WorldWideScience

Sample records for reaction mechanisms resonance

  1. Resonant thermonuclear reaction rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haubold, H.J.; Mathai, A.M.

    1986-01-01

    Basic physical principles for the resonant and nonresonant thermonuclear reaction rates are applied to find their standard representations for nuclear astrophysics. Closed-form representations for the resonant reaction rate are derived in terms of Meijer's G-function. Analytic representations of the resonant and nonresonant nuclear reaction rates are compared and the appearance of Meijer's G-function is discussed in physical terms

  2. Reaction mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Trong Anh

    1988-01-01

    The 1988 progress report of the Reaction Mechanisms laboratory (Polytechnic School, France), is presented. The research topics are: the valence bond methods, the radical chemistry, the modelling of the transition states by applying geometric constraints, the long range interactions (ion - molecule) in gaseous phase, the reaction sites in gaseous phase and the mass spectroscopy applications. The points of convergence between the investigations of the mass spectroscopy and the theoretical chemistry teams, as well as the purposes guiding the research programs, are discussed. The published papers, the conferences, the congress communications and the thesis, are also reported [fr

  3. An investigation of the reaction mechanism for resonance neutron capture in 54Fe and 62Ni

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mason, J.P.

    1986-01-01

    The gamma-ray spectra produced following neutron capture in the low energy resonances of 54 Fe and 62 Ni have been observed, using the Harwell 136 MeV electron linear accelerator facility, HELIOS, as a source of pulsed neutrons. The work indicated that, for s-wave capture in the mass region A approx. 55, single particle effects may only be apparent if the size of the valence component is about an order of magnitude larger than the compound nuclear component, and that this may limit the importance of such effects to a few nuclides. In addition, some information was obtained on the radiative decay of p-wave resonances of 54 Fe and 62 Ni. (author)

  4. Quantum mechanical resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cisneros S, A.; McIntosh, H.V.

    1982-01-01

    A discussion of the nature of quantum mechanical resonances is presented from the point of view of the spectral theory of operators. In the case of Bohr-Feshbach resonances, graphs are presented to illustrate the theory showing the decay of a doubly excited metastable state and the excitation of the resonance by an incident particle with proper energy. A characterization of resonances is given as well as a procedure to determine widths using the spectral density function. A sufficient condition is given for the validity of the Breit-Wigner formula for Bohr-Feshbach resonances. (author)

  5. Chemical kinetics and reaction mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Ou Sik; Park, Youn Yeol

    1996-12-01

    This book is about chemical kinetics and reaction mechanism. It consists of eleven chapters, which deal with reaction and reaction speed on reaction mechanism, simple reaction by rate expression, reversible reaction and simultaneous reaction, successive reaction, complicated reaction mechanism, assumption for reaction mechanism, transition state theory, successive reaction and oscillating reaction, reaction by solution, research method high except kinetics on reaction mechanism, high reaction of kinetics like pulsed radiolysis.

  6. Giant resonances: reaction theory approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toledo Piza, A.F.R. de; Foglia, G.A.

    1989-09-01

    The study of giant resonances through the use of reaction theory approach is presented and discussed. Measurements of cross-sections to the many available decay channels following excitation of giant multipole resonances (GMR) led one to view these phenomena as complicated dynamical syndromes so that theoretical requirements for their study must be extended beyond the traditional bounds of nuclear structure models. The spectra of decay products following GMR excitation in heavy nuclei are well described by statistical model (Hauser-Feshback, HF) predictions indicated that spreading of the collective modes plays a major role in shaping exclusive cross-sections. (A.C.A.S.) [pt

  7. Nanoantenna using mechanical resonance

    KAUST Repository

    Chang Hwa Lee,

    2010-11-01

    Nanoantenna using mechanical resonance vibration is made from an indium tin oxide (ITO) coated vertically aligned nanorod array. Only this structure works as a radio with demodulator without any electrical circuit using field emission phenomenon. A top-down fabrication method of an ITO coated nanorod array is proposed using a modified UV lithography. The received radio frequency and the resonance frequency of nanoantenna can be controlled by the fabrication condition through the height of a nanorod array. The modulated signals are received successfully with the transmission carrier wave frequency (248MHz) and the proposed nanoantenna is expected to be used in communication system for ultra small scale sensor. ©2010 IEEE.

  8. Dibaryon resonances in photon induced reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwille, W.J.

    1981-11-01

    The author gives a review about the production of dibaryon resonances in photon reactions on deuterium targets. Especially he considers the reactions γ + d → p + n, γ + d → p + X, and γ + d → p + N + π. (HSI)

  9. Hadron reaction mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, P.D.B.; Martin, A.D.

    1982-01-01

    The mechanism of hadron scattering at high energies are reviewed in such a way as to combine the ideas of the parton model and quantum chromodynamics (QCD) with Regge theory and phenomenology. After a brief introduction to QCD and the basic features of hadron scattering data, scaling and the dimensional counting rules, the parton structure of hadrons, and the parton model for large momentum transfer processes, including scaling violations are discussed. Hadronic jets and the use of parton ideas in soft scattering processes are examined, attention being paid to Regge theory and its applications in exclusive and inclusive reactions, the relationship to parton exchange being stressed. The mechanisms of hadron production which build up cross sections, and hence the underlying Regge singularities, and the possible overlap of Regge and scaling regions are discussed. It is concluded that the key to understanding hadron reaction mechanisms seems to lie in the marriage of Regge theory with QCD. (author)

  10. Giant resonances in heavy-ion reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussein, M.S.

    1982-11-01

    The several roles of multipole giant resonances in heavy-ion reactions are discussed. In particular, the modifications in the effective ion-ion potencial due to the virtual excitation of giant resonances at low energies, are considered and estimated for several systems. Real excitation of giant resonances in heavy-ion reactions at intermediate energies are then discussed and their importance in the approach phase of deeply inelastic processes in emphasized. Several demonstrative examples are given. (Author) [pt

  11. Structure and reactivity of thiazolium azo dyes: UV-visible, resonance Raman, NMR, and computational studies of the reaction mechanism in alkaline solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Laurence C; Batchelor, Stephen N; Moore, John N

    2013-03-07

    UV-visible absorption, resonance Raman, and (1)H NMR spectroscopy, allied with density functional theory (DFT) calculations, have been used to study the structure, bonding, and alkaline hydrolysis mechanism of the cationic thiazloium azo dye, 2-[2-[4-(diethylamino)phenyl]diazenyl]-3-methyl-thiazolium (1a), along with a series of six related dyes with different 4-dialkylamino groups and/or other phenyl ring substituents (2a-c, 3a-c) and the related isothiazolium azo dye, 5-[2-[4-(dimethylamino)phenyl]diazenyl]-2-methyl-isothiazolium (4). These diazahemicyanine dyes are calculated to have a similar low-energy structure that is cis, trans at the (iso)thiazolium-azo group, and for which the calculated Raman spectra provide a good match with the experimental data; the calculations on these structures are used to assign and discuss the transitions giving rise to the experimental spectra, and to consider the bonding and its variation between the dyes. UV-visible, Raman, and NMR spectra recorded from minutes to several weeks after raising the pH of an aqueous solution of 1a to ca. 11.5 show that the dominant initial step in the reaction is loss of diethylamine to produce a quinonimine (ca. hours), with subsequent reactions occurring on longer time scales (ca. days to weeks); kinetic analyses give a rate constant of 2.6 × 10(-2) dm(3) mol(-1) s(-1) for reaction of 1a with OH(-). UV-visible spectra recorded on raising the pH of the other dyes in solution show similar changes that are attributed to the same general reaction mechanism, but with different rate constants for which the dependence on structure is discussed.

  12. On nuclear reaction duration at the range of overlapping resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olkhovsky, V.S.

    1981-01-01

    Nuclear reaction duration above the threshold of overlapping resonances is investigated and its importance to obtain a new information on a collision mechanism is evidenced. It is shown also that the duration of resonant nuclear reactions is asymptotically decreasing according to the law[E 2 n(E)] -1 when the energy E and the number of open channels n(E) are increasing [ru

  13. Enhancement Mechanisms of Low Energy Nuclear Reactions

    OpenAIRE

    Gareev, F. A.; Zhidkova, I. E.

    2005-01-01

    The review of possible stimulation mechanisms of LENR (low energy nuclear reaction) is represented. We have concluded that transmutation of nuclei at low energies and excess heat are possible in the framework of the modern physical theory - the universal resonance synchronization principle [1] and based on its different enhancement mechanisms of reaction rates are responsible for these processes [2]. The excitation and ionization of atoms may play role as a trigger for LENR. Superlow energy o...

  14. Alpha resonant scattering for astrophysical reaction studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaguchi, H.; Kahl, D.; Nakao, T. [Center for Nuclear Study (CNS), University of Tokyo, RIKEN campus, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Wakabayashi, Y.; Kubano, S. [The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research (RIKEN), 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Hashimoto, T. [Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP), Osaka University, 10-1 Mihogaoka, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Hayakawa, S. [Istituto Nazionale Fisica Nucleare - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud (INFN-LNS), Via S. Sofia 62, 95125 Catania (Italy); Kawabata, T. [Department of Physics, Kyoto University, Kita-Shirakawa, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Iwasa, N. [Department of Physics, Tohoku University, Aoba, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8578 (Japan); Teranishi, T. [Department of Physics, Kyushu University, 6-10-1 Hakozaki, Fukuoka 812-8581 (Japan); Kwon, Y. K. [Institute for Basic Science, 70, Yuseong-daero 1689-gil, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-811 (Korea, Republic of); Binh, D. N. [30 MeV Cyclotron Center, Tran Hung Dao Hospital, Hoan Kiem District, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Khiem, L. H.; Duy, N. G. [Institute of Physics, Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology, 18 Hong Quoc Viet, Nghia do, Hanoi (Viet Nam)

    2014-05-02

    Several alpha-induced astrophysical reactions have been studied at CRIB (CNS Radioactive Ion Beam separator), which is a low-energy RI beam separator at Center for Nuclear Study (CNS) of the University of Tokyo. One of the methods to study them is the α resonant scattering using the thick-target method in inverse kinematics. Among the recent studies at CRIB, the measurement of {sup 7}Be+α resonant scattering is discussed. Based on the result of the experiment, we evaluated the contributions of high-lying resonances for the {sup 7}Be(α,γ) reaction, and proposed a new cluster band in {sup 11}C.

  15. Alpha resonant scattering for astrophysical reaction studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, H.; Kahl, D.; Nakao, T.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Kubano, S.; Hashimoto, T.; Hayakawa, S.; Kawabata, T.; Iwasa, N.; Teranishi, T.; Kwon, Y. K.; Binh, D. N.; Khiem, L. H.; Duy, N. G.

    2014-01-01

    Several alpha-induced astrophysical reactions have been studied at CRIB (CNS Radioactive Ion Beam separator), which is a low-energy RI beam separator at Center for Nuclear Study (CNS) of the University of Tokyo. One of the methods to study them is the α resonant scattering using the thick-target method in inverse kinematics. Among the recent studies at CRIB, the measurement of 7 Be+α resonant scattering is discussed. Based on the result of the experiment, we evaluated the contributions of high-lying resonances for the 7 Be(α,γ) reaction, and proposed a new cluster band in 11 C

  16. Online quench-flow electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry for elucidating kinetic and chemical enzymatic reaction mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, David J; Stokes, Adam A; Langridge-Smith, Pat; Mackay, C Logan

    2010-03-01

    We have developed an automated quench-flow microreactor which interfaces directly to an electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometer. We have used this device in conjunction with ESI Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR MS) to demonstrate the potential of this approach for studying the mechanistic details of enzyme reactions. For the model system chosen to test this device, namely, the pre-steady-state hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl acetate by the enzyme chymotrypsin, the kinetic parameters obtained are in good agreement with those in the literature. To our knowledge, this is the first reported use of online quench-flow coupled with FTICR MS. Furthermore, we have exploited the power of FTICR MS to interrogate the quenched covalently bound enzyme intermediate using top-down fragmentation. The accurate mass capabilities of FTICR MS permitted the nature of the intermediate to be assigned with high confidence. Electron capture dissociation (ECD) fragmentation allowed us to locate the intermediate to a five amino acid section of the protein--which includes the known catalytic residue, Ser(195). This experimental approach, which uniquely can provide both kinetic and chemical details of enzyme mechanisms, is a potentially powerful tool for studies of enzyme catalysis.

  17. Reaction mechanisms of metal complexes

    CERN Document Server

    Hay, R W

    2000-01-01

    This text provides a general background as a course module in the area of inorganic reaction mechanisms, suitable for advanced undergraduate and postgraduate study and/or research. The topic has important research applications in the metallurgical industry and is of interest in the science of biochemistry, biology, organic, inorganic and bioinorganic chemistry. In addition to coverage of substitution reactions in four-, five- and six-coordinate complexes, the book contains further chapters devoted to isomerization and racemization reactions, to the general field of redox reactions, and to the reactions of coordinated ligands. It is relevant in other fields such as organic, bioinorganic and biological chemistry, providing a bridge to organic reaction mechanisms. The book also contains a chapter on the kinetic background to the subject with many illustrative examples which should prove useful to those beginning research. Provides a general background as a course module in the area of inorganic reaction mechanis...

  18. Resonance search on πN reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugahara, Ryuhei

    1974-01-01

    Present status of the study on resonance state is reviewed. Among various problems on the resonance state, the inelastic decay of baryon resonance and boson resonance are described in this paper. Experimental data on N → N eta with bubble chambers are few. An experimental results by using a counter shows enhancement around 1.8 GeV in the relation between cross section and energy. Some bubble chamber experiment also shows enhancement around 1.6 GeV. The spin and parity analyses for 1000 events are required. Data on N → Nω show enhancement at 1.76 GeV. The effective mass distribution on N → delta ++ (1236)π + π - shows enhancement around 2.0 GeV. Study on the boson resonance has been made, but still ambiguity remains. Effective mass distribution on the reaction π + d → pspπ + π - π 0 shows a peak of ω 1664 . The assignment of spin and parity by Matthews et al. is not in agreement with that by Kenyon et al. therefore confirmation by other experiment is necessary. A few experiment show peaks at 1.4 and 1.7 GeV in the effective mass distribution of (rho 0 rho 0 ) in the reaction anti pp → 3π + π - . Confirmation is also required. Deviation was found in the effective mass distribution of (ωπ + π - ) in anti pp → 3π + π - π 0 reaction, and ωπ + π - decay was seen in π + d → psp2π + 2π - π 0 reaction. (Kato, T.)

  19. Analysis of kinetic reaction mechanisms

    CERN Document Server

    Turányi, Tamás

    2014-01-01

    Chemical processes in many fields of science and technology, including combustion, atmospheric chemistry, environmental modelling, process engineering, and systems biology, can be described by detailed reaction mechanisms consisting of numerous reaction steps. This book describes methods for the analysis of reaction mechanisms that are applicable in all these fields. Topics addressed include: how sensitivity and uncertainty analyses allow the calculation of the overall uncertainty of simulation results and the identification of the most important input parameters, the ways in which mechanisms can be reduced without losing important kinetic and dynamic detail, and the application of reduced models for more accurate engineering optimizations. This monograph is invaluable for researchers and engineers dealing with detailed reaction mechanisms, but is also useful for graduate students of related courses in chemistry, mechanical engineering, energy and environmental science and biology.

  20. Excitation of giant resonances via charge exchange reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodman, C.D.

    1979-01-01

    Charge-exchange reactions can be useful for identifying isovector resonances. At present the most promising use of charge-exchange reactions with respect to giant resonances is to locate and study Gamow-Teller (GT) resonances. Detailed comparisons between GT and M1 strengths can yield further structure information. 7 figures

  1. Advances in mechanical detection of magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuehn, Seppe; Hickman, Steven A.; Marohn, John A.

    2008-01-01

    The invention and initial demonstration of magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM) in the early 1990s launched a renaissance of mechanical approaches to detecting magnetic resonance. This article reviews progress made in MRFM in the last decade, including the demonstration of scanned probe detection of magnetic resonance (electron spin resonance, ferromagnetic resonance, and nuclear magnetic resonance) and the mechanical detection of electron spin resonance from a single spin. Force and force-gradient approaches to mechanical detection are reviewed and recent related work using attonewton sensitivity cantilevers to probe minute fluctuating electric fields near surfaces is discussed. Given recent progress, pushing MRFM to single proton sensitivity remains an exciting possibility. We will survey some practical and fundamental issues that must be resolved to meet this challenge.

  2. Electro-Mechanical Resonance Curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    2018-01-01

    Recently I have been investigating the frequency response of galvanometers. These are direct-current devices used to measure small currents. By using a low-frequency function generator to supply the alternating-current signal and a stopwatch smartphone app to measure the period, I was able to take data to allow a resonance curve to be drawn. This…

  3. Acoustic Resonance Reaction Control Thruster (ARCTIC), Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ORBITEC proposes to develop and demonstrate the innovative Acoustic Resonance Reaction Control Thruster (ARCTIC) to provide rapid and reliable in-space impulse...

  4. Electrothermal Frequency Modulated Resonator for Mechanical Memory

    KAUST Repository

    Hafiz, Md Abdullah Al; Kosuru, Lakshmoji; Younis, Mohammad I.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we experimentally demonstrate a mechanical memory device based on the nonlinear dynamics of an electrostatically actuated microelectromechanical resonator utilizing an electrothermal frequency modulation scheme. The microstructure

  5. Reaction mechanisms in zeolite catalysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rozanska, X.; Santen, van R.A.; Auerbach, S.C.; Carrado, K.A.; Dutta, P.D.

    2003-01-01

    A review; described are the most basic mechanistic reaction steps that are induced by zeolite catalysts. Details on the zeolitic properties that are relevant to mol. reactivity are also provided. The theor. methods and models at hand to allow the investigation of these reaction steps and that have

  6. Spin isovector giant resonances in (n,p) reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spicer, B.M.

    1997-01-01

    The present status of the study of spin-flip isovector giant resonances, using the (n,p) charge exchange reaction, is reviewed. After a brief history of the discovery of these giant resonances, a critical appraisal of the interpretation of the data in terms of giant resonances is given, along with some of the theoretical advances that impact on the interpretation of these data. A sampling of the results obtained for typical targets is given, followed by the interpretation of these results. A brief statement is made concerning the way forward in experimental technique for nuclear structure research using charge exchange reactions

  7. Fusion, resonances and scattering in C reaction

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    respectively. In each of these regions, we find some important features in the results ofσfus. ... draws attention in the astrophysical studies [2,7]. Here, Ecm and η .... We outline the concept of selective resonance tunneling for fusion in Ü3. In Ü4 ...

  8. Dynamical resonances in the fluorine atom reaction with the hydrogen molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xueming; Zhang, Dong H

    2008-08-01

    picture of the F + HD reaction observed in the experiment. It is clear that the dynamics of the F + HD reaction below the threshold was dominated by the ground resonance state. Furthermore, the forward scattering HF (nu' = 3) channel from the F + H 2 ( j = 0) reaction was investigated and was attributed mainly to a slow-down mechanism over the centrifugal exit barrier, with small contributions from a shape resonance mechanism in a narrow collision energy range. A striking effect of the reagent rotational excitation on resonance was also observed in F + H 2 ( j = 1), in comparison with F + H 2 ( j = 0). From these concerted experimental and theoretical studies, a clear physical picture of the reaction resonances in this benchmark reaction has emerged, providing a textbook example of dynamical resonances in elementary chemical reactions.

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of periosteal reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nogueira-Barbosa, Marcello Henrique; Trad, Clovis Simao; Muglia, Valdair Francisco; Elias Junior, Jorge; Simao, Marcelo Novelino, E-mail: marcello@fmrp.usp.b [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Centro de Ciencias das Imagens e Fisica Medica; Sa, Jose Luiz de [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Hospital das Clinicas; Oliveira, Rodrigo Cecilio Vieira de [Clinica de Diagnostico por Imagem Tomoson, Aracatuba, SP (Brazil); Engel, Edgard Eduard [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Dept. de Biomecanica, Medicina e Reabilitacao do Aparelho Locomotor

    2010-07-15

    The objective of the present essay was to encourage a careful evaluation of periosteal reactions on magnetic resonance images. The initial approach to bone lesions is made by conventional radiography and, based on the imaging findings, periosteal reactions are classified into classical subtypes. Although magnetic resonance imaging is considered as the gold standard for local staging of bone tumors, the utilization of such method in the study of periosteal reactions related to focal bone lesions has been poorly emphasized, with relatively few studies approaching this subject. The literature review revealed a study describing an experimental animal model of osteomyelitis suggesting that magnetic resonance imaging is superior to other imaging methods in the early identification of periosteal reactions. Another study has suggested a good correlation between conventional radiography and magnetic resonance imaging in the identification and classification of periosteal reactions in cases of osteosarcoma. The present essay illustrates cases of periosteal reactions observed at magnetic resonance imaging in correlation with findings of conventional radiography or other imaging methods. (author)

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of periosteal reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nogueira-Barbosa, Marcello Henrique; Trad, Clovis Simao; Muglia, Valdair Francisco; Elias Junior, Jorge; Simao, Marcelo Novelino; Engel, Edgard Eduard

    2010-01-01

    The objective of the present essay was to encourage a careful evaluation of periosteal reactions on magnetic resonance images. The initial approach to bone lesions is made by conventional radiography and, based on the imaging findings, periosteal reactions are classified into classical subtypes. Although magnetic resonance imaging is considered as the gold standard for local staging of bone tumors, the utilization of such method in the study of periosteal reactions related to focal bone lesions has been poorly emphasized, with relatively few studies approaching this subject. The literature review revealed a study describing an experimental animal model of osteomyelitis suggesting that magnetic resonance imaging is superior to other imaging methods in the early identification of periosteal reactions. Another study has suggested a good correlation between conventional radiography and magnetic resonance imaging in the identification and classification of periosteal reactions in cases of osteosarcoma. The present essay illustrates cases of periosteal reactions observed at magnetic resonance imaging in correlation with findings of conventional radiography or other imaging methods. (author)

  11. Non-resonant triple alpha reaction rate at low temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoh, T.; Tamii, A.; Aoi, N.; Fujita, H.; Hashimoto, T.; Miki, K.; Ogata, K. [Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka University, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Carter, J.; Donaldson, L.; Sideras-Haddad, E. [Schools of Physics, University of Witwatersrand, Johannesburg 2050 (South Africa); Furuno, T.; Kawabata, T. [Departments of Physics, Kyoto University, Sakyo, Kyoto, 606-8502 (Japan); Kamimura, M. [RIKEN Nishina Center, Wako, Saitama, 351-0198 (Japan); Nemulodi, F.; Neveling, R.; Smit, F. D.; Swarts, C. [iThemba Laboratory for Accelerator Based Sciences Somerset, West, 7129 (South Africa)

    2014-05-02

    Our experimental goal is to study the non-resonant triple alpha reaction rate at low temperture (T < 10{sup 8} K). The {sup 13}C(p,d) reaction at 66 MeV has been used to probe the alpha-unbound continuum state in {sup 12}C just below the 2{sup nd} 0{sup +} state at 7.65 MeV. The transition strength to the continuum state is predicted to be sensitive to the non-resonant triple alpha reaction rate. The experiment has been performed at iThemba LABS. We report the present status of the experiment.

  12. Use of Isotopes for Studying Reaction Mechanisms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    of atoms during a chemical transformation. This strategy of determining reaction mechanisms is illustrated in the article with several examples. Introduction. When a reaction is carried out, the primary effort goes towards the identification of the product(s) of the reaction. A more time consuming endeavour, however, is the ...

  13. The combined resonance tunneling and semi-resonance level in low energy D-D reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xingzhong; Jin Dezhe; Chang Lee

    1993-01-01

    When nuclear potential wells are connected by an atomic potential well, a new kind of tunneling may happen even if there is no virtual energy level in nuclear potential wells. The necessary condition for this combined resonance tunneling is the resonance in the atomic potential well. Thus, the nuclear reaction may be affected by the action in atomic scale in terms of combined resonance tunneling. The nuclear spectrum data support this idea. (author)

  14. Morphing of the Dissipative Reaction Mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroeder, W.U.; Toke, J.; Gawlikowicz, W.; Houck, M.A.; Lu, J.; Pienkowski, L.

    2003-01-01

    Important trends in the evolution of heavy-ion reaction mechanisms with bombarding energy and impact parameter are reviewed. Essential features of dissipative reactions appear preserved at E/A = 50-62 MeV, such as dissipative orbiting and multi-nucleon exchange. The relaxation of the A/Z asymmetry with impact parameter is slow. Non-equilibrium emission of light particles and clusters is an important process accompanying the evolution of the mechanism. Evidence is presented for a new mechanism of statistical cluster emission from hot, metastable primary reaction products, driven by surface entropy. These results suggest a plausible reinterpretation of multi-fragmentation. (authors)

  15. Morphing of the Dissipative Reaction Mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, W.U.; Toke, J.; Gawlikowicz, W.; Houck, M.A.; Lu, J.; Pienkowski, L. [Rochester Univ., Dept. of Chemistry, Rochester, NY (United States)

    2003-07-01

    Important trends in the evolution of heavy-ion reaction mechanisms with bombarding energy and impact parameter are reviewed. Essential features of dissipative reactions appear preserved at E/A = 50-62 MeV, such as dissipative orbiting and multi-nucleon exchange. The relaxation of the A/Z asymmetry with impact parameter is slow. Non-equilibrium emission of light particles and clusters is an important process accompanying the evolution of the mechanism. Evidence is presented for a new mechanism of statistical cluster emission from hot, metastable primary reaction products, driven by surface entropy. These results suggest a plausible reinterpretation of multi-fragmentation. (authors)

  16. Bimolecular reactions of carbenes: Proton transfer mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Saleh, Abd Al-Aziz A.; Almatarneh, Mansour H.; Poirier, Raymond A.

    2018-04-01

    Here we report the bimolecular reaction of trifluoromethylhydroxycarbene conformers and the water-mediated mechanism of the 1,2-proton shift for the unimolecular trans-conformer by using quantum chemical calculations. The CCSD(T)/cc-pVTZ//MP2/cc-pVDZ potential-energy profile of the bimolecular reaction of cis- and trans-trifluoromethylhydroxycarbene, shows the lowest gas-phase barrier height of 13 kJ mol-1 compared to the recently reported value of 128 kJ mol-1 for the unimolecular reaction. We expect bimolecular reactions of carbene's stereoisomers will open a valuable field for new and useful synthetic strategies.

  17. Resonant elastic scattering, inelastic scattering and astrophysical reactions; Diffusion elastique resonante, diffusion inelastique et reactions astrophysiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Oliveira Santos, F. [Grand Accelerateur National d' Ions Lourds, UMR 6415, 14 - Caen (France)

    2007-07-01

    Nuclear reactions can occur at low kinetic energy. Low-energy reactions are characterized by a strong dependence on the structure of the compound nucleus. It turns out that it is possible to study the nuclear structure by measuring these reactions. In this course, three types of reactions are treated: Resonant Elastic Scattering (such as N{sup 14}(p,p)N{sup 14}), Inelastic Scattering (such as N{sup 14}(p,p')N{sup 14*}) and Astrophysical reactions (such as N{sup 14}(p,{gamma})O{sup 15}). (author)

  18. Molecular resonances, fusion reactions and surface transparency of interaction between heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Yasuhisa.

    1980-01-01

    A review of the Band Crossing Model is given, including recent results on the 16 O + 16 O system. Surface Transparency is discussed in the light of the recent development in our understanding of the fusion reaction mechanisms and by calculating the number of open channels available to direct reactions. The existence of the Molecular Resonance Region is suggested in several systems by the fact that Band Crossing Region overlaps with the Transparent Region. A systematic study predicts molecular resonances in the 14 C + 14 C and 12 C + 14 C systems as prominent as those observed in the 16 O + 16 O and 12 C + 16 O systems

  19. Review of heavy ion reaction mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ngo, C.

    1986-04-01

    We review some of the many aspects of heavy-ion reaction mechanisms observed at bombarding energies smaller than approximately 50 MeV/u that is to say in what is called the low bombarding energy domain and the intermediate bombarding energy domain. We emphasize the results concerning the use of very heavy projectiles which has led to the observation of new mechanisms

  20. Mechanisms of inorganic and organometallic reactions

    CERN Document Server

    The purpose of this series is to provide a continuing critical review of the literature concerned with mechanistic aspects of inorganic and organo­ metallic reactions in solution, with coverage being complete in each volume. The papers discussed are selected on the basis of relevance to the elucidation of reaction mechanisms and many include results of a nonkinetic nature when useful mechanistic information can be deduced. The period of literature covered by this volume is July 1982 through December 1983, and in some instances papers not available for inclusion in the previous volume are also included. Numerical results are usually reported in the units used by the original authors, except where data from different papers are com­ pared and conversion to common units is necessary. As in previous volumes material included covers the major areas of redox processes, reactions of the nonmetallic elements, reaction of inert and labile metal complexes and the reactions of organometallic compounds. While m...

  1. Ion cyclotron resonance study of reactions of ions with hydrogen atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karpas, Z.; Anicich, V.; Huntress, W.T. Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Reactions of H 2 + , HeH + , and CO 2 + ions with hydrogen atoms, and the reactions of D 2 + , CO 2 + , CO + , N 2 + and HCN + with deuterium atoms, were studied using ion cyclotron resonance techniques. These reactions proceed predominantly via a charge transfer mechanism. The rate constants measured are: 6.4, 9.1, 1.1, 5.0, 0.84, 0.90, 1.2, and 0.37 x 10 -10 cm 3 /sec, respectively. Hydrocarbon ions of the types CH/sub n/ + and C 2 H/sub n/ + , where n=2--4, do not react with H or D atoms

  2. Two-Dimensional Resonance Raman Signatures of Vibronic Coherence Transfer in Chemical Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhenkun; Molesky, Brian P; Cheshire, Thomas P; Moran, Andrew M

    2017-11-02

    Two-dimensional resonance Raman (2DRR) spectroscopy has been developed for studies of photochemical reaction mechanisms and structural heterogeneity in condensed phase systems. 2DRR spectroscopy is motivated by knowledge of non-equilibrium effects that cannot be detected with traditional resonance Raman spectroscopy. For example, 2DRR spectra may reveal correlated distributions of reactant and product geometries in systems that undergo chemical reactions on the femtosecond time scale. Structural heterogeneity in an ensemble may also be reflected in the 2D spectroscopic line shapes of both reactive and non-reactive systems. In this chapter, these capabilities of 2DRR spectroscopy are discussed in the context of recent applications to the photodissociation reactions of triiodide. We show that signatures of "vibronic coherence transfer" in the photodissociation process can be targeted with particular 2DRR pulse sequences. Key differences between the signal generation mechanisms for 2DRR and off-resonant 2D Raman spectroscopy techniques are also addressed. Overall, recent experimental developments and applications of the 2DRR method suggest that it will be a valuable tool for elucidating ultrafast chemical reaction mechanisms.

  3. Electrothermal Frequency Modulated Resonator for Mechanical Memory

    KAUST Repository

    Hafiz, Md Abdullah Al

    2016-08-18

    In this paper, we experimentally demonstrate a mechanical memory device based on the nonlinear dynamics of an electrostatically actuated microelectromechanical resonator utilizing an electrothermal frequency modulation scheme. The microstructure is deliberately fabricated as an in-plane shallow arch to achieve geometric quadratic nonlinearity. We exploit this inherent nonlinearity of the arch and drive it at resonance with minimal actuation voltage into the nonlinear regime, thereby creating softening behavior, hysteresis, and coexistence of states. The hysteretic frequency band is controlled by the electrothermal actuation voltage. Binary values are assigned to the two allowed dynamical states on the hysteretic response curve of the arch resonator with respect to the electrothermal actuation voltage. Set-and-reset operations of the memory states are performed by applying controlled dc pulses provided through the electrothermal actuation scheme, while the read-out operation is performed simultaneously by measuring the motional current through a capacitive detection technique. This novel memory device has the advantages of operating at low voltages and under room temperature. [2016-0043

  4. Reaction Mechanism Generator: Automatic construction of chemical kinetic mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Connie W.; Allen, Joshua W.; Green, William H.; West, Richard H.

    2016-06-01

    Reaction Mechanism Generator (RMG) constructs kinetic models composed of elementary chemical reaction steps using a general understanding of how molecules react. Species thermochemistry is estimated through Benson group additivity and reaction rate coefficients are estimated using a database of known rate rules and reaction templates. At its core, RMG relies on two fundamental data structures: graphs and trees. Graphs are used to represent chemical structures, and trees are used to represent thermodynamic and kinetic data. Models are generated using a rate-based algorithm which excludes species from the model based on reaction fluxes. RMG can generate reaction mechanisms for species involving carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, sulfur, and nitrogen. It also has capabilities for estimating transport and solvation properties, and it automatically computes pressure-dependent rate coefficients and identifies chemically-activated reaction paths. RMG is an object-oriented program written in Python, which provides a stable, robust programming architecture for developing an extensible and modular code base with a large suite of unit tests. Computationally intensive functions are cythonized for speed improvements.

  5. Simultaneous electrical and mechanical resonance drive for large signal amplification of micro resonators

    KAUST Repository

    Hasan, M. H.

    2018-01-12

    Achieving large signal-noise ratio using low levels of excitation signal is key requirement for practical applications of micro and nano electromechanical resonators. In this work, we introduce the double electromechanical resonance drive concept to achieve an order-of-magnitude dynamic signal amplification in micro resonators. The concept relies on simultaneously activating the micro-resonator mechanical and electrical resonance frequencies. We report an input voltage amplification up to 15 times for a micro-resonator when its electrical resonance is tuned to match the mechanical resonance that leads to dynamic signal amplification in air (Quality factor enhancement). Furthermore, using a multi-frequency excitation technique, input voltage and vibrational amplification of up to 30 times were shown for the same micro-resonator while relaxing the need to match its mechanical and electrical resonances.

  6. Simultaneous electrical and mechanical resonance drive for large signal amplification of micro resonators

    KAUST Repository

    Hasan, M. H.; Alsaleem, F. M.; Jaber, Nizar; Hafiz, Md Abdullah Al; Younis, Mohammad I.

    2018-01-01

    Achieving large signal-noise ratio using low levels of excitation signal is key requirement for practical applications of micro and nano electromechanical resonators. In this work, we introduce the double electromechanical resonance drive concept to achieve an order-of-magnitude dynamic signal amplification in micro resonators. The concept relies on simultaneously activating the micro-resonator mechanical and electrical resonance frequencies. We report an input voltage amplification up to 15 times for a micro-resonator when its electrical resonance is tuned to match the mechanical resonance that leads to dynamic signal amplification in air (Quality factor enhancement). Furthermore, using a multi-frequency excitation technique, input voltage and vibrational amplification of up to 30 times were shown for the same micro-resonator while relaxing the need to match its mechanical and electrical resonances.

  7. Production and decay of baryonic resonances in pion induced reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Przygoda Witold

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pion induced reactions give unique opportunities for an unambiguous description of baryonic resonances and their coupling channels. A systematic energy scan and high precision data, in conjunction with a partial wave analysis, allow for the study of the excitation function of the various contributions. A review of available world data unravels strong need for modern facilities delivering measurements with a pion beam. Recently, HADES collaboration collected data in pion-induced reactions on light (12C and heavy (74W nuclei at a beam momentum of 1.7 GeV/c dedicated to strangeness production. It was followed by a systematic scan at four different pion beam momenta (0.656, 0.69, 0.748 and 0.8 GeV/c in π− − p reaction in order to tackle the role of N(1520 resonance in conjunction with the intermediate ρ production. First results on exclusive channels with one pion (π− p and two pions (nπ+π−, pπ−π0 in the final state are discussed.

  8. Elucidating reaction mechanisms on quantum computers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiher, Markus; Wiebe, Nathan; Svore, Krysta M.; Wecker, Dave; Troyer, Matthias

    2017-07-01

    With rapid recent advances in quantum technology, we are close to the threshold of quantum devices whose computational powers can exceed those of classical supercomputers. Here, we show that a quantum computer can be used to elucidate reaction mechanisms in complex chemical systems, using the open problem of biological nitrogen fixation in nitrogenase as an example. We discuss how quantum computers can augment classical computer simulations used to probe these reaction mechanisms, to significantly increase their accuracy and enable hitherto intractable simulations. Our resource estimates show that, even when taking into account the substantial overhead of quantum error correction, and the need to compile into discrete gate sets, the necessary computations can be performed in reasonable time on small quantum computers. Our results demonstrate that quantum computers will be able to tackle important problems in chemistry without requiring exorbitant resources.

  9. Elucidating reaction mechanisms on quantum computers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiher, Markus; Wiebe, Nathan; Svore, Krysta M.; Wecker, Dave; Troyer, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    With rapid recent advances in quantum technology, we are close to the threshold of quantum devices whose computational powers can exceed those of classical supercomputers. Here, we show that a quantum computer can be used to elucidate reaction mechanisms in complex chemical systems, using the open problem of biological nitrogen fixation in nitrogenase as an example. We discuss how quantum computers can augment classical computer simulations used to probe these reaction mechanisms, to significantly increase their accuracy and enable hitherto intractable simulations. Our resource estimates show that, even when taking into account the substantial overhead of quantum error correction, and the need to compile into discrete gate sets, the necessary computations can be performed in reasonable time on small quantum computers. Our results demonstrate that quantum computers will be able to tackle important problems in chemistry without requiring exorbitant resources. PMID:28674011

  10. Elucidating reaction mechanisms on quantum computers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiher, Markus; Wiebe, Nathan; Svore, Krysta M; Wecker, Dave; Troyer, Matthias

    2017-07-18

    With rapid recent advances in quantum technology, we are close to the threshold of quantum devices whose computational powers can exceed those of classical supercomputers. Here, we show that a quantum computer can be used to elucidate reaction mechanisms in complex chemical systems, using the open problem of biological nitrogen fixation in nitrogenase as an example. We discuss how quantum computers can augment classical computer simulations used to probe these reaction mechanisms, to significantly increase their accuracy and enable hitherto intractable simulations. Our resource estimates show that, even when taking into account the substantial overhead of quantum error correction, and the need to compile into discrete gate sets, the necessary computations can be performed in reasonable time on small quantum computers. Our results demonstrate that quantum computers will be able to tackle important problems in chemistry without requiring exorbitant resources.

  11. Resonant Electromagnetic Interaction in Low Energy Nuclear Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chubb, Scott

    2008-03-01

    Basic ideas about how resonant electromagnetic interaction (EMI) can take place in finite solids are reviewed. These ideas not only provide a basis for conventional, electron energy band theory (which explains charge and heat transport in solids), but they also explain how through finite size effects, it is possible to create many of the kinds of effects envisioned by Giuliano Preparata. The underlying formalism predicts that the orientation of the external fields in the SPAWAR protocolootnotetextKrivit, Steven B., New Energy Times, 2007, issue 21, item 10. http://newenergytimes.com/news/2007/NET21.htm^,ootnotetextSzpak, S.; Mosier-Boss, P.A.; Gordon, F.E. Further evidence of nuclear reactions in the Pd lattice: emission of charged particles. Naturwissenschaften 94,511(2007)..has direct bearing on the emission of high-energy particles. Resonant EMI also implies that nano-scale solids, of a particular size, provide an optimal environment for initiating Low Energy Nuclear Reactions (LENR) in the PdD system.

  12. Reaction mechanisms in heavy ion fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lubian J.

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the reaction mechanisms involved in heavy ion fusion. We begin with collisions of tightly bound systems, considering three energy regimes: energies above the Coulomb barrier, energies just below the barrier and deep sub-barrier energies. We show that channel coupling effects may influence the fusion process at above-barrier energies, increasing or reducing the cross section predicted by single barrier penetration model. Below the Coulomb barrier, it enhances the cross section, and this effect increases with the system’s size. It is argued that this behavior can be traced back to the increasing importance of Coulomb coupling with the charge of the collision partners. The sharp drop of the fusion cross section observed at deep sub-barrier energies is addressed and the theoretical approaches to this phenomenon are discussed. We then consider the reaction mechanisms involved in fusion reactions of weakly bound systems, paying particular attention to the calculations of complete and incomplete fusion available in the literature.

  13. Light ion reaction mechanisms and nuclear structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robson, B.A.

    1986-01-01

    Of the many contributions to the subject 'Light ion reaction mechanism and nuclear structure', a few are selected and reviewed which highlight the present state of the field. Some contributions to the conference dealing with nuclear interactions are briefly outlined in the second section following an introductory section. Lane model calculations are compared with data for 9 Be and results are given showing angular distributions of the cross sections, the analyzing powers and the spin-rotation parameters for p - 40 Ca. Real central potential for d + 32 s resulting from the FB-analysis are compared with frozen density folding and delta-function folding. The third section deals with reaction mechanism. Data are cited which show near-side and far-side contributions to the calculated analyzing powers in the 116 Sn(d,p) 117 Sn (11.2 - ) transition. Calculations are compared with experimental A y and -(A yy + 2)/3. Also given are measurements of the cross sections and analyzing powers of the continuum energy spectra for the 58 Ni(p,p'x), along with relations between the analyzing powers and momentum transfer. The fourth section addresses nuclear structure. Cross sections and analyzing powers measured at 22 MeV for the reaction 208 Pb(p,t) 206 Pb(3 2 + ) are cited and considered. (Nogami, K.)

  14. QUANTUM MECHANICS. Quantum squeezing of motion in a mechanical resonator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollman, E E; Lei, C U; Weinstein, A J; Suh, J; Kronwald, A; Marquardt, F; Clerk, A A; Schwab, K C

    2015-08-28

    According to quantum mechanics, a harmonic oscillator can never be completely at rest. Even in the ground state, its position will always have fluctuations, called the zero-point motion. Although the zero-point fluctuations are unavoidable, they can be manipulated. Using microwave frequency radiation pressure, we have manipulated the thermal fluctuations of a micrometer-scale mechanical resonator to produce a stationary quadrature-squeezed state with a minimum variance of 0.80 times that of the ground state. We also performed phase-sensitive, back-action evading measurements of a thermal state squeezed to 1.09 times the zero-point level. Our results are relevant to the quantum engineering of states of matter at large length scales, the study of decoherence of large quantum systems, and for the realization of ultrasensitive sensing of force and motion. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  15. Time-resolved resonance fluorescence spectroscopy for study of chemical reactions in laser-induced plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lei; Deng, Leimin; Fan, Lisha; Huang, Xi; Lu, Yao; Shen, Xiaokang; Jiang, Lan; Silvain, Jean-François; Lu, Yongfeng

    2017-10-30

    Identification of chemical intermediates and study of chemical reaction pathways and mechanisms in laser-induced plasmas are important for laser-ablated applications. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), as a promising spectroscopic technique, is efficient for elemental analyses but can only provide limited information about chemical products in laser-induced plasmas. In this work, time-resolved resonance fluorescence spectroscopy was studied as a promising tool for the study of chemical reactions in laser-induced plasmas. Resonance fluorescence excitation of diatomic aluminum monoxide (AlO) and triatomic dialuminum monoxide (Al 2 O) was used to identify these chemical intermediates. Time-resolved fluorescence spectra of AlO and Al 2 O were used to observe the temporal evolution in laser-induced Al plasmas and to study their formation in the Al-O 2 chemistry in air.

  16. Baryon resonances in pion- and photon-induced hadronic reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roenchen, Deborah

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present work is the analysis of the baryon spectrum in the medium-energy regime. At those energies, a perturbative treatment of Quantum Chromodynamics, that is feasible in the high-energy regime, is not possible. Chiral perturbation theory, the low-energy effective theory of the strong interaction, is limited to the lowest excited states and does not allow to analyze the complete resonance region. For the latter purpose, dynamical coupled-channel approaches provide an especially suited framework. In the present study, we apply the Juelich model, a dynamical coupled-channel model developed over the years, to analyze pion- and photon-induced hadronic reactions in a combined approach. In the Juelich model, the interaction of the mesons and baryons is built of t- and u-channel exchange diagrams based on an effective Lagrangian. Genuine resonances are included as s-channel states. The scattering potential is unitarized in a Lippmann-Schwinger-type equation. Analyticity is preserved, which is a prerequisite for a reliable extraction of resonance parameters in terms of pole positions and residues in the complex energy plane. Upon giving an introduction to the subject in Chap. 1 and showing selected results in Chap. 2, we will describe the simultaneous analysis of elastic πN scattering and the reactions π - p → ηn, K 0 Λ, K + Σ - , K 0 Σ 0 and π + p→K + Σ + within the Juelich framework in Chap. 3. The free parameters of the model are adjusted to the GWU/SAID analysis of elastic πN scattering and, in case of the inelastic reactions, to experimental data. Partial waves up to J=9/2 are included and we consider the world data set from threshold up to E∝2.3 GeV. We show our fit results compared to differential and total cross sections, to polarizations and to measurements of the spin-rotation parameter. Finally, we present the results of a pole search in the complex energy plane of the scattering amplitude and discuss the extracted resonance

  17. Two-body molecular model for resonances in heavy ion reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Y.

    1978-01-01

    It is necessary to develop qualitative arguments on resonance mechanisms, which will give an overview on occurrences of resonances in heavy ion reactions, and further to identify typical examples of nuclear molecules among existing experimental data. In section 2, qualitative arguments on resonance mechanisms are given by exemplifying the 12 C + 16 O system with the 3 - excitation of the 16 O nucleus. In section 3 a simple formulation in the coupled channel framework is given. Resonances in the 12 C - 16 O system, which has been observed well above the Coulomb barrier, are investigated in section 4. In section 5 an old, but not yet solved problem on resonances in the 12 C + 12 C system which have been observed at sub-Coulomb energies, is taken up along the nuclear molecular picture. Further discussions are given on a role of the 20 Ne-α channel along the present simple qualitative picture given in section 2, which can be extended to rearrangement channels. (Auth.)

  18. NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE THE GELLED PRODUCT OF CANNIZZARO REACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilia Fernández-Sánchez

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR of proton 1H, carbon 13C and two dimensional spectrums, product of a green organic synthesis of redox on the Cannizzaro reaction. The product was reported as a tribochemical gel (heterogeneous mixture and confirmed by Infrared Spectroscopy IR, X-ray and scanning electron microscope (SEM. The results in this paper confirm its structure through various techniques of NMR and evaluate the content of sodium benzoate and benzyl alcohol in the spectroscopy sample, examining the values of the integrals on 1H NMR signals. The result of analysis indicates that benzyl alcohol (dispersed phase is in 33.44% mol in comparison with sodium benzoate content (continuous phase. These results confirm that the gel structure over time loses the dispersed phase of the benzyl alcohol producing a xerogel.

  19. Kinetics and mechanisms of reactions involving small aromatic reactive intermediates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, M.C. [Emory Univ., Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Small aromatic radicals such as C{sub 6}H{sub 5}, C{sub 6}H{sub 5}O and C{sub 6}H{sub 4} are key prototype species of their homologs. C{sub 6}H{sub 5} and its oxidation product, C{sub 6}H{sub 5}O are believed to be important intermediates which play a pivotal role in hydrocarbon combustion, particularly with regard to soot formation. Despite their fundamental importance, experimental data on the reaction mechanisms and reactivities of these species are very limited. For C{sub 6}H{sub 5}, most kinetic data except its reactions with NO and NO{sub 2}, were obtained by relative rate measurements. For C{sub 6}H{sub 5}O, the authors have earlier measured its fragmentation reaction producing C{sub 5}H{sub 5} + CO in shock waves. For C{sub 6}H{sub 4}, the only rate constant measured in the gas phase is its recombination rate at room temperature. The authors have proposed to investigate systematically the kinetics and mechanisms of this important class of molecules using two parallel laser diagnostic techniques--laser resonance absorption (LRA) and resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization mass spectrometry (REMPI/MS). In the past two years, study has been focused on the development of a new multipass adsorption technique--the {open_quotes}cavity-ring-down{close_quotes} technique for kinetic applications. The preliminary results of this study appear to be quite good and the sensitivity of the technique is at least comparable to that of the laser-induced fluorescence method.

  20. A resonant absorption measurement in the reaction 26Mg(p, γ)27Al

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leun, C. van der; Burhoven Jaspers, N.C.

    1966-01-01

    A resonant absorption measurement at the 1966 keV proton resonance in the reaction 26Mg(p, γ)27Al leads to an absolute determination of the resonance strength, (2J+1)ΓpΓγ/Γ, of 5.6±1.8 eV. Normalization of previously published strengths of 120 resonances in the reaction 26Mg(p, γ)27Al, reduces these

  1. New Mechanism of Low Energy Nuclear Reactions Using Superlow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gareev, F. A.; Zhidkova, I. E.

    2006-03-01

    We proposed a new mechanism of LENR (low energy nuclear reactions) cooperative processes in the whole system - nuclei+atoms+condensed matter can occur at smaller threshold than the corresponding ones assoiciated with free constituents. The cooperative processes can be induced and enhanced by (``superlow energy'') external fields. The excess heat is the emission of internal energy, and transmutations from LENR are the result of redistribution of the internal energy of the whole system. A review of possible stimulation mechanisms of LENR is presented. We have concluded that transmutation of nuclei at low energies and excess heat are possible in the framework of the known fundamental physical laws: The universal resonance synchronization principle, and based on it, different enhancement mechanisms of reaction rates are responsible for these processes. The excitation and ionization of atoms may play the role of a trigger for LENR. F.A. Gareev, I.E. Zhidkova, E-print arXiv Nucl-th/0511092 v1 30 Nov 2005. F.A. Gareev, In: FPB-98, Novosibirsk, June 1998, p.92; F.A.Gareev, G.F. Gareeva, in: Novosibirsk, July 2000, p.161. F.A. Gareev, I.E. Zhidkova and Yu.L. Ratis, Preprint JINR P4-2004-68, Dubna, 2004. F.A. Gareev, I.E. Zhidkova, E-print arXiv Nucl-th/0505021 9 May 2005.

  2. Resonating group method as applied to the spectroscopy of α-transfer reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subbotin, V. B.; Semjonov, V. M.; Gridnev, K. A.; Hefter, E. F.

    1983-10-01

    In the conventional approach to α-transfer reactions the finite- and/or zero-range distorted-wave Born approximation is used in liaison with a macroscopic description of the captured α particle in the residual nucleus. Here the specific example of 16O(6Li,d)20Ne reactions at different projectile energies is taken to present a microscopic resonating group method analysis of the α particle in the final nucleus (for the reaction part the simple zero-range distorted-wave Born approximation is employed). In the discussion of suitable nucleon-nucleon interactions, force number one of the effective interactions presented by Volkov is shown to be most appropriate for the system considered. Application of the continuous analog of Newton's method to the evaluation of the resonating group method equations yields an increased accuracy with respect to traditional methods. The resonating group method description induces only minor changes in the structures of the angular distributions, but it does serve its purpose in yielding reliable and consistent spectroscopic information. NUCLEAR STRUCTURE 16O(6Li,d)20Ne; E=20 to 32 MeV; calculated B(E2); reduced widths, dσdΩ extracted α-spectroscopic factors. ZRDWBA with microscope RGM description of residual α particle in 20Ne; application of continuous analog of Newton's method; tested and applied Volkov force No. 1; direct mechanism.

  3. The mechanism of the modified Ullmann reaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sperotto, Elena; Klink, Gerard P.M. van; Koten, Gerard van; Vries, Johannes G. de

    2010-01-01

    The copper-mediated aromatic nucleophilic substitution reactions developed by Fritz Ullmann and Irma Goldberg required stoichiometric amounts of copper and very high reaction temperatures. Recently, it was found that addition of relatively cheap ligands (diamines, aminoalcohols, diketones, diols)

  4. Resonant laser ablation: mechanisms and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, J.E.; Bodla, R.; Eiden, G.C.; Nogar, N.S.; Smith, C.H.

    1996-01-01

    Resonant laser ablation (RLA) typically relies on irradiation of a sample in a mass spectrometer with modest intensity laser pulses tuned to a one or two photon resonant transition in the analyte of interest. This paper shows that RLA is well suited for highly sensitive analyses of complex samples. The examples actually studied are trace components in rhenium and technetium in nickel. The authors also studied the 2+1 multiphoton ionization spectrum of iron-56 detected by RLA of Re containing 70 ppm iron. Two-photon transition rates for Fe transitions were calculated perturbatively and found to agree semi-quantitatively with experimentally observed intensities. 17 refs., 3 figs

  5. Insights into the mechanisms on chemical reactions: reaction paths for chemical reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunning, T.H. Jr.; Rosen, E.; Eades, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    We report reaction paths for two prototypical chemical reactions: Li + HF, an electron transfer reaction, and OH + H 2 , an abstraction reaction. In the first reaction we consider the connection between the energetic terms in the reaction path Hamiltonian and the electronic changes which occur upon reaction. In the second reaction we consider the treatment of vibrational effects in chemical reactions in the reaction path formalism. 30 refs., 9 figs

  6. Reaction mechanism of dicofol removal by cellulase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ziyuan; Yang, Ting; Zhai, Zihan; Zhang, Boya; Zhang, Jianbo

    2015-10-01

    It remains unclear whether dicofol should be defined as a persistent organic pollutant. Its environmental persistence has gained attention. This study focused on its degradation by cellulase. Cellulase was separated using a gel chromatogram, and its degradation activity towards dicofol involved its endoglucanase activity. By analyzing the kinetic parameters of cellulase reacting with mixed substrates, it was shown that cellulase reacted on dicofol and carboxyl methyl cellulose through two different active centers. Thus, the degradation of dicofol was shown to be an oxidative process by cellulase. Next, by comparing the impacts of tert-butyl alcohol (a typical OH free-radical inhibitor) on the removal efficiencies of dicofol under both cellulase and Fenton reagent systems, it was shown that the removal of dicofol was initiated by OH free radicals produced by cellulase. Finally, 4,4'-dichloro-dibenzophenone and chloride were detected using gas chromatography mass spectrometry and ion chromatography analysis, which supported our hypothesis. The reaction mechanism was analyzed and involved an attack by OH free radicals at the orthocarbon of dicofol, resulting in the degradation product 4,4'-dichloro-dibenzophenone. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Report on research in progress in the reaction mechanism area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toledo, A.S. de; Canto, L.F.

    1982-01-01

    Research on reaction mechanisms which are being done by several groups in Brazil are reported. They are grouped in four types, namely, reactions induced by heavy and light ions, induced by electrons and finally by photons. (L.C.) [pt

  8. Report on research in progress in the reaction mechanism area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toledo, A.S. de; Canto, L F [Sao Paulo Univ. (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica

    1982-09-01

    Research on reaction mechanisms which are being done by several groups in Brazil are reported. They are grouped in four types, namely, reactions induced by heavy and light ions, induced by electrons and finally by photons.

  9. 3C-SiC microdisk mechanical resonators with multimode resonances at radio frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jaesung; Zamani, Hamidrera; Rajgopal, Srihari; Zorman, Christian A.; X-L Feng, Philip

    2017-07-01

    We report on the design, modeling, fabrication and measurement of single-crystal 3C-silicon carbide (SiC) microdisk mechanical resonators with multimode resonances operating at radio frequencies (RF). These microdisk resonators (center-clamped on a vertical stem pedestal) offer multiple flexural-mode resonances with frequencies dependent on both disk and anchor dimensions. The resonators are made using a novel fabrication method comprised of focused ion beam nanomachining and hydroflouic : nitric : acetic (HNA) acid etching. Resonance peaks (in the frequency spectrum) are detected through laser-interferometry measurements. Resonators with different dimensions are tested, and multimode resonances, mode splitting, energy dissipation (in the form of quality factor measurement) are investigated. Further, we demonstrate a feedback oscillator based on a passive 3C-SiC resonator. This investigation provides important guidelines for microdisk resonator development, ranging from an analytical prediction of frequency scaling law to fabrication, suggesting RF microdisk resonators can be good candidates for future sensing applications in harsh environments.

  10. (p,n) and (n,p) reactions as probes of isovector giant monopole resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auerbach, N.; Bowman, J.D.; Franey, M.A.; Love, W.G.

    1983-01-01

    Nucleon charge exchange reactions are explored as prospective probes of isovector giant monopole resonances. Using charge exchange transition densities based on random-phase approximation sum rules, distorted wave impulse approximation calculations are made for the (p,n) and (n,p) reactions exciting the isovector giant monopole resonances in several nuclei at bombarding energies of 120 and 800 MeV. Based on our calculations, the charge exchange reactions at 800 MeV appear more promising

  11. Use of Isotopes for Studying Reaction Mechanisms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In the first part of this series, we discussed how isotopes can be used as markers to determine the nature of intermediates in chemical reactions. The second part covered the effect of isotopes on equilibria and reactions, in processes where the bond to the isotopic a tom is broken. We showed with specific examples how.

  12. Reaction mechanism of reductive decomposition of FGD gypsum with anthracite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Da; Lu, Hailin; Sun, Xiuyun; Liu, Xiaodong; Han, Weiqing; Wang, Lianjun

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • The reaction mechanism was different if the molar ratio of C/CaSO 4 was different. • The yield of CaO rises with an increase in temperature. • The optimal ratio of C/CaSO 4 = 1.2:1. • The decomposition process is mainly apparent solid–solid reaction with liquid-phase involved. - Abstract: The process of decomposition reaction between flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum and anthracite is complex, which depends on the reaction conditions and atmosphere. In this study, thermogravimetric analysis with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (TGA-FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and the experiment in a tubular reactor were used to characterize the decomposition reaction in a nitrogen atmosphere under different conditions. The reaction mechanism analysis showed that the decomposition reaction process and mechanism were different when the molar proportion of C/CaSO 4 was changed. The experiment results showed that appropriate increase in the C/CaSO 4 proportion and higher temperatures were suitable for the formation of the main production of CaO, which can help us to understand the solid state reaction mechanism better. Via kinetic analysis of the reaction between anthracite and FGD gypsum under the optimal molar ratio of C/CaSO 4 , the mechanism model of the reaction was confirmed and the decomposition process was a two-step reaction which was in accordance with apparent solid–solid reaction

  13. Chromomagnetic mechanism for the X(3872) resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoegaasen, H.; Richard, J.-M.; Sorba, P.

    2006-01-01

    The chromomagnetic interaction, with proper account for flavor-symmetry breaking, is shown to explain the mass and coupling properties of the X(3872) resonance as a J PC =1 ++ state consisting of a heavy quark-antiquark pair and a light one. It is crucial to introduce all the spin-color configurations compatible with these quantum numbers and diagonalize the chromomagnetic interaction in this basis. This approach thus differs from the molecular picture DD* and from the diquark-anti-diquark picture

  14. Qubit Coupled Mechanical Resonator in an Electromechanical System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Yu

    This thesis describes the development of a hybrid quantum electromechanical system. In this system the mechanical resonator is capacitively coupled to a superconducting transmon which is embedded in a superconducting coplanar waveguide (CPW) cavity. The difficulty of achieving high quality of superconducting qubit in a high-quality voltage-biased cavity is overcome by integrating a superconducting reflective T-filter to the cavity. Further spectroscopic and pulsed measurements of the hybrid system demonstrate interactions between the ultra-high frequency mechanical resonator and transmon qubit. The noise of mechanical resonator close to ground state is measured by looking at the spectroscopy of the transmon. At last, fabrication and tests of membrane resonators are discussed.

  15. The 130Te (p,p') reaction on analog resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez Ruiz, M. del C.H.; Cescato, M.L.; Foster Junior, J.L.; Krmpotic, F.

    1983-07-01

    Angular distributions for elastic and inelastic scattering have been measured on six analog resonances in the 130 Te + p system and at two off resonance energies. Partial widths are deduced from the angular distributions. Formulae for the spectroscopic amplitudes within the framework of quasiparticle random phase approximation are presented. The experimental results are compared with the theoretical predictions. (Author) [pt

  16. The wave attenuation mechanism of the periodic local resonant metamaterial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, I.-Ling; Liang, Zhen-Xian; Kao, Hao-Wei; Chang, Shih-Hsiang; Yang, Chih-Ying

    2018-01-01

    This research discusses the wave propagation behavior and attenuation mechanism of the elastic metamaterial with locally resonant sub-structure. The dispersion relation of the single resonance system, i.e., periodic spring mass system with sub-structure, could be derived based on lattice dynamics and the band gap could be easily identified. The dynamically equivalent properties, i.e., mass and elastic property, of the single resonance system are derived and found to be frequency dependent. Negative effective properties are found in the vicinity of the local resonance. It is examined whether the band gap always coincides with the frequency range of negative effective properties. The wave attenuation mechanism and the characteristic dynamic behavior of the elastic metamaterial are also studied from the energy point of view. From the analysis, it is clarified that the coupled Bragg-resonance band gap is much wider than the narrow-banded local resonance and the corresponding effective material properties at band gap could be either positive or negative. However, the band gap is totally overlapping with the frequency range of negative effective properties for the metamaterial with band gap purely caused by local resonance. The presented analysis can be extended to other forms of elastic metamaterials involving periodic resonator structures.

  17. Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics Study of the Sialyltransferase Reaction Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamada, Yojiro; Kanematsu, Yusuke; Tachikawa, Masanori

    2016-10-11

    The sialyltransferase is an enzyme that transfers the sialic acid moiety from cytidine 5'-monophospho-N-acetyl-neuraminic acid (CMP-NeuAc) to the terminal position of glycans. To elucidate the catalytic mechanism of sialyltransferase, we explored the potential energy surface along the sialic acid transfer reaction coordinates by the hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics method on the basis of the crystal structure of sialyltransferase CstII. Our calculation demonstrated that CstII employed an S N 1-like reaction mechanism via the formation of a short-lived oxocarbenium ion intermediate. The computational barrier height was 19.5 kcal/mol, which reasonably corresponded with the experimental reaction rate. We also found that two tyrosine residues (Tyr156 and Tyr162) played a vital role in stabilizing the intermediate and the transition states by quantum mechanical interaction with CMP.

  18. Intrinsic resonance representation of quantum mechanics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carioli, M.; Heller, E.J.; Møller, Klaus Braagaard

    1997-01-01

    an optimal representation, based purely on classical mechanics. ''Hidden'' constants of the motion and good actions already known to the classical mechanics are thus incorporated into the basis, leaving the quantum effects to be isolated and included by small matrix diagonalizations. This simplifies...

  19. Time delayed K sup + N reactions and exotic baryon resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Kelkar, N G; Khemchandani, K P

    2003-01-01

    Evidence and hints, from both the theoretical and experimental sides, of exotic baryon resonances with B = S, have been with us for the last 30 years. The poor status of the general acceptance of these Z* resonances is partly due to the prejudice against penta-quark baryons and partly due to the opinion that a proof of the existence of exotic states must be rigorous. This can refer to the quality and amount of data gathered, and also to the analytical methods applied in the study of these resonances. It then seems mandatory that all possibilities and aspects be exploited. We do that by analysing the time delay in K sup + N scattering, encountering clear signals of the exotic Z* resonances close to the pole values found in partial wave analyses.

  20. Measurement of resonance integral of the 90Sr(n,γ)91Sr reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Shoji; Furutaka, Kazuyoshi; Wada, Hiroaki; Katoh, Toshio; Harada, Hideo; Fujii, Toshiyuki; Yamana, Hajimu

    2001-01-01

    To obtain fundamental data for research on nuclear transmutation method of radioactive wastes, the resonance integral (I 0 ) of the 90 Sr(n,γ) 91 Sr reaction was measured with an activation method. (author)

  1. Reaction theory for analysis of nuclear giant resonances production and decay processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foglia, G.A.

    1991-01-01

    The existence of mixing parameters connected to the different decay forms of the giant resonances was theoretically justified, and their energy dependence determined as well using a reaction theory which treats in a consistent manner the giant multipolar resonances formation and their different decay modes. (L.C.J.A.)

  2. [Reaction mechanism studies of heavy ion induced nuclear reactions]: Annual progress report, October 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mignerey, A.C.

    1987-10-01

    The experiments which this group has been working on seek to define the reaction mechanisms responsible for complex fragment emission in heavy ion reactions. The reactions studied are La + La, La + Al, and La + Cu at 46.8 MeV/u; and Ne + Ag and Ne + Au reactions at 250 MeV/u. Another experimental program at the Oak Ridge Hollifield Heavy Ion Research Facility (HHIRF) is designed to measure the excitation energy division between reaction products in asymmetric deep inelastic reactions. A brief description is given of progress to date, the scientific goals of this experiment and the plastic phoswich detectors developed for this experiment

  3. Mechanical Resonators for Quantum Optomechanics Experiments at Room Temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norte, R A; Moura, J P; Gröblacher, S

    2016-04-08

    All quantum optomechanics experiments to date operate at cryogenic temperatures, imposing severe technical challenges and fundamental constraints. Here, we present a novel design of on-chip mechanical resonators which exhibit fundamental modes with frequencies f and mechanical quality factors Q_{m} sufficient to enter the optomechanical quantum regime at room temperature. We overcome previous limitations by designing ultrathin, high-stress silicon nitride (Si_{3}N_{4}) membranes, with tensile stress in the resonators' clamps close to the ultimate yield strength of the material. By patterning a photonic crystal on the SiN membranes, we observe reflectivities greater than 99%. These on-chip resonators have remarkably low mechanical dissipation, with Q_{m}∼10^{8}, while at the same time exhibiting large reflectivities. This makes them a unique platform for experiments towards the observation of massive quantum behavior at room temperature.

  4. Enhancement mechanisms of low energy nuclear reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gareev, F. A.; Zhidkova, I.E.; Ratis, Yu.L. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, JINR, 6 Joliot Curie Street, Dubna, Moscow Region 141980 (Russian Federation)

    2006-07-01

    The full review of Russian low energy nuclear reactors is represented. We have concluded that transmutation of nuclei at low energies, LENR, is possible in the framework of the modern physical theory - excitation and ionization of atoms and universal resonance synchronization principle are responsible for it. Investigation of this phenomenon requires knowledge of different branches of science: nuclear and atomic physics, chemistry and electrochemistry, condensed matter and solid state physics. The results of this research field can provide a new source of energy, substances and technologies. The puzzle of poor reproducibility of experimental data is due to the fact that LENR occurs in open systems and it is extremely sensitive to parameters of external fields and systems. Classical reproducibility principle should be reconsidered for LENR experiments. Poor reproducibility and unexplained results do not means that the experiment is wrong.

  5. Enhancement mechanisms of low energy nuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gareev, F. A.; Zhidkova, I.E.; Ratis, Yu.L.

    2006-01-01

    The full review of Russian low energy nuclear reactors is represented. We have concluded that transmutation of nuclei at low energies, LENR, is possible in the framework of the modern physical theory - excitation and ionization of atoms and universal resonance synchronization principle are responsible for it. Investigation of this phenomenon requires knowledge of different branches of science: nuclear and atomic physics, chemistry and electrochemistry, condensed matter and solid state physics. The results of this research field can provide a new source of energy, substances and technologies. The puzzle of poor reproducibility of experimental data is due to the fact that LENR occurs in open systems and it is extremely sensitive to parameters of external fields and systems. Classical reproducibility principle should be reconsidered for LENR experiments. Poor reproducibility and unexplained results do not means that the experiment is wrong

  6. On the nature of resonances in photonuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filippov, G.F.; Vasilevsky, V.S.; Kruchinin, S.P.; Chopovsky, L.L.

    1985-01-01

    An investigation of continuous spectrum states of the 6 He, 6 Li, 7 Li and 7 Be light atomic nuclei is carried out within the microscopic approach taking into account the dynamics of cluster and quadrupole collective degrees of freedom. The interaction of these nuclei with electromagnetic radiation is shown to lead to the excitation of collective resonances with energy exceeding 20 MeV and width GITA<1 MeV, and also giant quadrupole resonances with parameters: E=12-15 MeV and GITA approximately 5 MeV

  7. Quantum mechanical coherence, resonance, and mind

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stapp, H.P.

    1995-01-01

    Norbert Wiener and J.B.S. Haldane suggested during the early thirties that the profound changes in our conception of matter entailed by quantum theory opens the way for our thoughts, and other experiential or mind-like qualities, to play a role in nature that is causally interactive and effective, rather than purely epiphenomenal, as required by classical mechanics. The mathematical basis of this suggestion is described here, and it is then shown how, by giving mind this efficacious role in natural process, the classical character of our perceptions of the quantum universe can be seen to be a consequence of evolutionary pressures for the survival of the species

  8. Quantum mechanical coherence, resonance, and mind

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stapp, H.P.

    1995-03-26

    Norbert Wiener and J.B.S. Haldane suggested during the early thirties that the profound changes in our conception of matter entailed by quantum theory opens the way for our thoughts, and other experiential or mind-like qualities, to play a role in nature that is causally interactive and effective, rather than purely epiphenomenal, as required by classical mechanics. The mathematical basis of this suggestion is described here, and it is then shown how, by giving mind this efficacious role in natural process, the classical character of our perceptions of the quantum universe can be seen to be a consequence of evolutionary pressures for the survival of the species.

  9. Investigating resonances above and below the threshold in nuclear reactions of astrophysical interest and beyond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    La Cognata, M., E-mail: lacognata@lns.infn.it [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud - INFN, Catania (Italy); Kiss, G. G. [ATOMKI, Debrecen (Hungary); Mukhamedzhanov, A. M. [Cyclotron Institute, Texas A& M University, College Station, Texas (United States); Spitaleri, C. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud - INFN, Catania (Italy); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Catania, Catania (Italy); Trippella, O. [Sezione di Perugia - INFN, Perugia (Italy)

    2015-10-15

    Resonances in nuclear cross sections dramatically change their trends. Therefore, the presence of unexpected resonances might lead to unpredicted consequences on astrophysics and nuclear physics. In nuclear physics, resonances allow one to study states in the intermediate compound systems, to evaluate their cluster structure, for instance, especially in the energy regions approaching particle decay thresholds. In astrophysics, resonances might lead to changes in the nucleosynthesis flow, determining different isotopic compositions of the nuclear burning ashes. For these reasons, the Trojan Horse method has been modified to investigate resonant reactions. Thanks to this novel approach, for the first time normalization to direct data might be avoided. Moreover, in the case of sub threshold resonances, the Trojan Horse method modified to investigate resonances allows one to deduce the asymptotic normalization coefficient, showing the close connection between the two indirect approaches.

  10. High Q diamond hemispherical resonators: fabrication and energy loss mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernstein, Jonathan J; Bancu, Mirela G; Bauer, Joseph M; Cook, Eugene H; Kumar, Parshant; Nyinjee, Tenzin; Perlin, Gayatri E; Ricker, Joseph A; Teynor, William A; Weinberg, Marc S; Newton, Eric

    2015-01-01

    We have fabricated polycrystalline diamond hemispheres by hot-filament CVD (HFCVD) in spherical cavities wet-etched into a high temperature glass substrate CTE matched to silicon. Hemispherical resonators 1.4 mm in diameter have a Q of up to 143 000 in the fundamental wineglass mode, for a ringdown time of 2.4 s. Without trimming, resonators have the two degenerate wineglass modes frequency matched as close as 2 Hz, or 0.013% of the resonant frequency (∼16 kHz). Laser trimming was used to match resonant modes on hemispheres to 0.3 Hz. Experimental and FEA energy loss studies on cantilevers and hemispheres examine various energy loss mechanisms, showing that surface related losses are dominant. Diamond cantilevers with a Q of 400 000 and a ringdown time of 15.4 s were measured, showing the potential of polycrystalline diamond films for high Q resonators. These resonators show great promise for use as hemispherical resonant gyroscopes (HRGs) on a chip. (paper)

  11. Search for a resonant enhancement of the 7Be + d reaction and primordial 7Li abundances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Malley, Patrick; Adekola, A.S.; Cizewski, J.A.; Howard, M.E.; Strauss, S.; Bardayan, Daniel W.; Chae, Kyung Yuk; Nesaraja, Caroline D.; Pain, Steven D.; Smith, Michael Scott; Ahn, S.H.; Jones, K.L.; Pittman, S.T.; Schmitt, Kyle; Graves, S.; Kozub, R.L.; Shriner, J.F. Jr.; Wheeler, J.L.; Linhardt, Laura; Matos, M.; Moazen, B.M.; Peters, W.A.; Spassova, I.

    2011-01-01

    Big Bang nucleosynthesis calculations, constrained by the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe results, produce 7 Li abundances almost a factor of four larger than those extrapolated from observations. Since primordial 7 Li is believed to be mostly produced by the beta decay of 7 Be, one proposed solution to this discrepancy is a resonant enhancement of the 7 Be(d,p)2α reaction rate through the 5/2 + 16.7-MeV state in 9 B. The 2 H( 7 Be,d) 7 Be reaction was used to search for such a resonance; none was observed. An upper limit on the width of the proposed resonance was deduced.

  12. A dual resonance model for high energy electroweak reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Picard, Jean-Francois

    1995-01-01

    The aim of this work is to propose an original model for the weak interaction at high energy (about 1 TeV) that is inspired from resonance dual models established for hadron physics. The first chapter details the basis and assumptions of the standard model. The second chapter deals with various scenarios that go beyond the standard model and that involve a strong interaction and a perturbative approach to assess coupling. The third chapter is dedicated to the main teachings of hadron physics concerning resonances, the model of Regge poles and the concept of duality. We present our new model in the fourth chapter, we build a scenario in which standard fermions and the 3 massive gauge bosons would have a sub-structure alike that of hadrons. In order to give non-null values to the width of resonances we use the K matrix method, we describe this method in the last chapter and we apply it for the computation of the width of the Z 0 boson. Our model predicts a large spectra of states particularly with the 143-up-lets of ff-bar states. The K matrix method has allowed us to compute amplitudes for helicity, then to collapse them in amplitudes invariant with SU(2) and to project these amplitudes in partial waves of helicity. For most resonances partial widths are very low compared to their mass

  13. A cascade mechanism of three-particle resonance production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badalyan, A.M.; Polikarpov, M.I.; Simonov, Yu.A.

    1976-01-01

    We study the mechanism of the three-particle resonance production in a system consisting of a two-particle resonance and of one particle, the resonance and the particle permanently exchanging the decay product particle. The N/D method is used to show that the solution of the unitarity for the resonance-particle amplitude reduces to solving a one-dimensional nonsingular integral equation for the denominator of the amplitude D(y). The contribution from the right-hand cut of the exchange decay diagram is considered explicitly and the final equation contains only the integral over an arbitrary left-hand cut as in the case of the interaction amplitude of stable particles. It is as well shown that if only the right-hand cut is present, than the denominator D(y) for L=0 has no singularities, whereas the amplitude may have virtual or real poles at L=1

  14. Resonances in A=6 nuclei: use of supersymmetric quantum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutta, S.K.; Das, T.K.; Khan, M.A.; Chakrabarti, B.

    2004-01-01

    We propose a novel theoretical technique for the calculation of resonances at low excitation energies in weakly bound systems. Starting from an effective potential, supersymmetric quantum mechanics can be successfully used to generate families of isospectral potentials having desirable and adjustable properties. For resonance states, for which there is no bound ground state of the same spin-parity, one can construct an isospectral potential with a bound state in the continuum (BIC). The potential looks quite different but is strictly isospectral with the original one. The quasi-bound state in the original shallow potential will be effectively trapped in the deep well of the isospectral family facilitating an easier and more accurate calculation of the resonance energy. Application to 6 He, 6 Be, and 6 Li systems yields quite accurate results. The beauty of our technique: We get both the bound ground state and the resonances by a single technique and using the same potential. (author)

  15. KINETICS AND MECHANISM OF REACTION OF ACIDIC ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The kinetics and mechanism of the oxidation of two phenoxazine dyes namely Nile blue (7-amino-3-diethylamino-8,9-benzo phenoxazine chloride, NB+) and Meldola\\'s blue (3- dimethylamino-8,9-benzo phenoxazine chloride, MB+) with acidic chlorite and hypochlorous acid have been investigated using a UV-visible and a ...

  16. Nuclear excitations and reaction mechanisms. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fallieros, S.; Levin, F.S.

    1986-01-01

    Theoretical research is being conducted on the following topics: photon scattering, gauge invariance and the extension of Siefert's Theorem; retardation effects in photonuclear absorption and the Cabibbo Radicati Sum Rule; isovector transition densities, currents and response functions; the electric polarizability, the magnetic susceptibility and the distribution of oscillator strengths in some elementary systems; relativistic models and processes; properties of skyrmions; multiquark compound bags and the charge form factor of the A = 3 nuclei; nuclear reaction theory; three-particle scattering theory; deuteron-nucleus model calculations; asymptotia in three-particle scattering systems; and time-dependent approach to few-nucleon collisions. Progress in each of these areas is reviewed briefly. A list of invited talks and of publications for the fiscal year 1986 is included. 27 refs

  17. Decay of a Jπ=36+ Resonance in the 24Mg+24Mg Reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salsac, M.-D.; Haas, F.; Courtin, S.

    2005-01-01

    For the 24 Mg+ 24 Mg reaction, striking narrow and correlated resonance structures have been observed previously in the excitation functions of the elastic and low-lying channels. In our study we have decided to focus on the resonance at E C M =45.7 MeV, which is known to have J π =36 + . Despite the very high excitation energy(∼60 MeV) in the 48 Cr composite system, this resonance has a narrow total width of 170 keV. To determine precisely which states in the inelastic 24 Mg channels carry away the resonance flux, an experiment, on the 24 Mg + 24 Mg reaction at energies On and OFF resonance, has been performed at the Legnaro Tandem accelerator using the Prisma fragment spectrometer associated with the CLARA γ array

  18. Control of Maillard Reactions in Foods: Strategies and Chemical Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Marianne N; Ray, Colin A

    2017-06-14

    Maillard reactions lead to changes in food color, organoleptic properties, protein functionality, and protein digestibility. Numerous different strategies for controlling Maillard reactions in foods have been attempted during the past decades. In this paper, recent advances in strategies for controlling the Maillard reaction and subsequent downstream reaction products in food systems are critically reviewed. The underlying mechanisms at play are presented, strengths and weaknesses of each strategy are discussed, and reasonable reaction mechanisms are proposed to reinforce the evaluations. The review includes strategies involving addition of functional ingredients, such as plant polyphenols and vitamins, as well as enzymes. The resulting trapping or modification of Maillard targets, reactive intermediates, and advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) are presented with their potential unwanted side effects. Finally, recent advances in processing for control of Maillard reactions are discussed.

  19. Resonant elastic scattering of 15O and a new reaction path in the CNO cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefan, Gheorghe Iulian

    2006-12-01

    This work presents a very accurate experimental method based on radioactive beams for the study of the spectroscopical properties of unbound states. It makes use of inverse kinematical elastic scattering of the ions of an radioactive beam from a target of stable nuclei. An application of the method for the study of radioactive nuclei of astrophysical interests is given, namely of 19 Ne and 16 F nuclei. It is shown that on the basis of the properties of proton-emitting unbound levels of 19 Ne one can develop a method of experimental study of nova explosions. It is based on observation of gamma emissions following the gamma decays of the radionuclides generated in the explosion. The most interesting radioactive nucleus involved in this process is 18 F the yield of which depends strongly on the rate of 18 F(p,α) 15 O reaction. This yield depends in turn of the properties of the states of the ( 18 F + p) compound nucleus, i.e. the 19 Ne nucleus. In addition it was studied the unbound 16 F nucleus also of astrophysical significance in 15 O rich environment. Since 16 F is an unbound nucleus the reaction of 15 O with protons, although abundant in most astrophysical media, appears to be negligible. Thus the question that was posed was whether the exotic 15 O(p,β + ) 16 O resonant reaction acquires some importance in various astrophysical media. In this work one describes a novel approach to study the reaction mechanisms which could change drastically the role of non-bound nuclei in stellar processes. One implies this mechanism to the processes (p,γ)(β) + and (p,γ) (p,γ) within 15 O rich media. The experimental studies of the 19 Ne and 16 F were carried out with a radioactive beam of 15 O ions of very low energy produced by SPIRAL at GANIL. To improve the energy resolution thin targets were used with a 0 angle of observation relative to the beam direction. There are stressed the advantages of this approach and one gives details concerning the method of separation of

  20. Kinetic mechanism for modeling of electrochemical reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervenka, Petr; Hrdlička, Jiří; Přibyl, Michal; Snita, Dalimil

    2012-04-01

    We propose a kinetic mechanism of electrochemical interactions. We assume fast formation and recombination of electron donors D- and acceptors A+ on electrode surfaces. These mediators are continuously formed in the electrode matter by thermal fluctuations. The mediators D- and A+, chemically equivalent to the electrode metal, enter electrochemical interactions on the electrode surfaces. Electrochemical dynamics and current-voltage characteristics of a selected electrochemical system are studied. Our results are in good qualitative agreement with those given by the classical Butler-Volmer kinetics. The proposed model can be used to study fast electrochemical processes in microsystems and nanosystems that are often out of the thermal equilibrium. Moreover, the kinetic mechanism operates only with the surface concentrations of chemical reactants and local electric potentials, which facilitates the study of electrochemical systems with indefinable bulk.

  1. Sugarcane bagasse gasification: Global reaction mechanism of syngas evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, I.I.; Gupta, A.K.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Gasification of sugarcane bagasse has been investigated using a semi batch reactor. ► Global reaction mechanism combining pyrolysis and gasification reactions is presented. ► High flow rates of syngas supported fragmentation and secondary reactions. ► CO flow rate increased at higher heating rates at the expense of CO 2 production. ► At high temperatures merger between pyrolysis and char gasification occurs. -- Abstract: Steam gasification of sugarcane bagasse has been investigated. A semi batch reactor with a fixed amount of sugarcane bagasse sample placed in steady flow of high temperature steam at atmospheric pressure has been used. The gasification of bagasse was examined at reactor and steam temperatures of 800, 900 and 1000 °C. The evolution of syngas flow rate and chemical composition has been monitored. The evolution of chemical composition and total flow rate of the syngas has been used to formulate a global reaction mechanism. The mechanism combines pyrolysis reaction mechanisms from the literature and steam gasification/reforming reactions. Steam gasification steps include steam–hydrocarbons reforming, char gasification and water gas shift reactions. Evidence of fragmentation, secondary ring opening reactions and tertiary reactions resulting in formation of gaseous hydrocarbons is supported by higher flow rates of syngas and hydrogen at high heating rates and high reactor temperatures. Increase in carbon monoxide flow rate at the expense of carbon dioxide flow rate with the increase in reactor temperature has been observed. This increase in the ratio of CO/CO 2 flow rate confirms the production of CO and CO 2 from the competing reaction routes. At 1000 °C gasification a total merging between the pyrolysis step and the char gasification step has been observed. This is attributed to acceleration of char gasification reactions and acceleration of steam–hydrocarbons reforming reactions. These hydrocarbons are the precursors to

  2. Electric reaction arising in bone subjected to mechanical loadings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murasawa, Go; Cho, Hideo; Ogawa, Kazuma

    2006-03-01

    The aim of present study is the investigation of the electric reaction arising in bone subjected to mechanical loadings. Firstly, specimen was fabricated from femur of cow, and ultrasonic propagation in bone was measured by ultrasonic technique. Secondary, 4-point bending test was conducted up to fracture, and electric reaction arising in bone was measured during loading. Thirdly, cyclic 4-point bending test was conducted to investigate the effect of applied displacement speed on electric reaction.

  3. Reaction Mechanism of Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Glutamine Synthetase Using Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics Calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Cátia; Ramos, Maria J; Fernandes, Pedro Alexandrino

    2016-06-27

    This paper is devoted to the understanding of the reaction mechanism of mycobacterium tuberculosis glutamine synthetase (mtGS) with atomic detail, using computational quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) methods at the ONIOM M06-D3/6-311++G(2d,2p):ff99SB//B3LYP/6-31G(d):ff99SB level of theory. The complete reaction undergoes a three-step mechanism: the spontaneous transfer of phosphate from ATP to glutamate upon ammonium binding (ammonium quickly loses a proton to Asp54), the attack of ammonia on phosphorylated glutamate (yielding protonated glutamine), and the deprotonation of glutamine by the leaving phosphate. This exothermic reaction has an activation free energy of 21.5 kcal mol(-1) , which is consistent with that described for Escherichia coli glutamine synthetase (15-17 kcal mol(-1) ). The participating active site residues have been identified and their role and energy contributions clarified. This study provides an insightful atomic description of the biosynthetic reaction that takes place in this enzyme, opening doors for more accurate studies for developing new anti-tuberculosis therapies. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Explore the reaction mechanism of the Maillard reaction: a density functional theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Ge-Rui; Zhao, Li-Jiang; Sun, Qiang; Xie, Hu-Jun; Lei, Qun-Fang; Fang, Wen-Jun

    2015-05-01

    The mechanism of Maillard reaction has been investigated by means of density functional theory calculations in the gaseous phase and aqueous solution. The Maillard reaction is a cascade of consecutive and parallel reaction. In the present model system study, glucose and glycine were taken as the initial reactants. On the basis of previous experimental results, the mechanisms of Maillard reaction have been proposed, and the possibility for the formation of different compounds have been evaluated through calculating the relative energy changes for different steps of reaction under different pH conditions. Our calculations reveal that the TS3 in Amadori rearrangement reaction is the rate-determining step of Maillard reaction with the activation barriers of about 66.7 and 68.8 kcal mol(-1) in the gaseous phase and aqueous solution, respectively. The calculation results are in good agreement with previous studies and could provide insights into the reaction mechanism of Maillard reaction, since experimental evaluation of the role of intermediates in the Maillard reaction is quite complicated.

  5. Reactions of a stable dialkylsilylene and their mechanisms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Stable silylene; mechanisms; photoreaction; addition; insertion; DFT. 1. ... Some of these reactions provide useful ... Although much attention has been ... sis, structure, and spectroscopic properties of 1 that .... Because silylenes are usually in the singlet ground state ..... selective 1,2-/1,4-addition reactions of dialkylsilylenes.

  6. Excitation functions of pion reactions on 14N, 16O, and 19F through the (3,3) resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacob, N.P. Jr.; Markowitz, S.S.

    1976-01-01

    Cross sections for pion-induced reactions of the form (π,πN) and more complex spallation reactions of the form (π,X) have been measured from 50--550 MeV on the target nuclei 14 N, 16 O, and 19 F using the secondary pion beams at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory 184-inch synchrocyclotron and the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility. The dominance of the (3,3) free-particle resonance is seen in all excitation functions determined in this work. Relative to the 12 C(π/sup plus-or-minus/,πN) 11 C reactions, the (π/sup plus-or-minus/,πN) reactions on 14 N, 16 O, and 19 F have magnitudes of 0.2, 1, and 0.7, respectively. The cross section ratio R=sigma (π - ,π - n)/sigma (π + ,π N) =1.68+-0.18 for 14 N at 188+-15 MeV, 1.68+-0.05 for 16 O at 188+-9 MeV, and 1.68+-0.03 for 19 F at 178+-2 MeV incident pion energy. The results from this work are compared to previous pion work, analogous proton-induced reactions, Monte Carlo intranuclear cascade-evaporation calculations, and to a semiclassical nucleon charge-exchange model which convincingly explains the (π,πN) reaction mechanism in the (3,3) resonance region

  7. Quasi-bound alpha resonant states populated by the 12C(6Li, d) reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, M.R.D.; Borello-Lewin, T.; Miyake, H.; Horodynski-Matsushigue, L.B.; Duarte, J.L.M.; Rodrigues, C.L.; Souza, M.A.; Cunsolo, A.; Cappuzzello, F.; Foti, A.; Agodi, C.; Cavallaro, M.; Ukita, G.M.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: The alpha cluster phenomenon in the light nuclei structure has been the subject of a long time investigation since the proposal of the Ikeda diagrams [1]. The main purpose of the research program in progress is the investigation of this phenomenon in (xα) and (xα+n) nuclei through the ( 6 Li, d) alpha transfer reaction [2-4]. Alpha resonant states around the (4α) threshold in the nucleus 16 O are the focus of the present contribution. In fact, the importance of these resonances at the elements production in stars is recognized, as primarily pointed out by Hoyle in 12 C [6]. The existence of a rotational band with the α + 12 C (Hoyle) cluster state structure was recently demonstrated by Ohkubo and Hirabayashi [6]. In order to explore this region of interest, measurements of the 12 C( 6 Li, d) 16 O reaction up to 17 MeV of excitation at an incident energy of 25.5 MeV, have been performed employing the Sao Paulo Pelletron-Enge Split-Pole facility and the nuclear emulsion detection technique (plates Fuji G6B, 50 μm thick). Spectra associated with six scattering angles, from 5 deg to 29 deg in the laboratory frame, each one 50 cm along the focal surface, were measured. Several narrow resonances with a quasi-bound behavior embedded in the continuum were detected and the resolution of 25 keV allowed for the separation of doublets not resolved before [7,8]. The absolute cross sections and the respective deuteron angular distributions were determined and the analysis is in progress. [1] K. Ikeda et al., Prog. Theor. Phys. Suppl. E 68, 464 (1968); H. Horiuchi, K. Ikeda, and Y. Suzuki, ibid. 44, 225 (1978). [2] M.R.D.Rodrigues et al., in12th International Conference on Nuclear Reaction Mechanism, Varenna, Italy, edited by F. Cerutti and A. Ferrari , CERN Proceedings, 2010-2, pp. 331- 335. [3] T. Borello-Lewin et al., Proceedings of SOTANCP2, Brussels, Belgium 2010, edited by P. Descouvemount et al., Int. J. Mod. Mod. Phys E 20, 1018-1021 (2011). [4] T. Borello

  8. Resonance reactions and enhancement of weak interactions in collisions of cold molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flambaum, V. V.; Ginges, J. S. M.

    2006-01-01

    With the creation of ultracold atoms and molecules, a new type of chemistry - 'resonance' chemistry - emerges: chemical reactions can occur when the energy of colliding atoms and molecules matches a bound state of the combined molecule (Feshbach resonance). This chemistry is rather similar to reactions that take place in nuclei at low energies. In this paper we suggest some problems for future experimental and theoretical work related to the resonance chemistry of ultracold molecules. Molecular Bose-Einstein condensates are particularly interesting because in this system collisions and chemical reactions are extremely sensitive to weak fields; also, a preferred reaction channel may be enhanced due to a finite number of final states. The sensitivity to weak fields arises due to the high density of narrow compound resonances and the macroscopic number of molecules with kinetic energy E=0 (in the ground state of a mean-field potential). The high sensitivity to the magnetic field may be used to measure the distribution of energy intervals, widths, and magnetic moments of compound resonances and study the onset of quantum chaos. A difference in the production rate of right-handed and left-handed chiral molecules may be produced by external electric E and magnetic B fields and the finite width Γ of the resonance (correlation ΓE·B). The same effect may be produced by the parity-violating energy difference in chiral molecules

  9. Resonances and fusion in heavy ion reactions: new models and developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cindro, N.

    1982-01-01

    Several aspects of the problem of the resonant behaviour of heavy-ion induced reactions are discussed. First, the problem is set in its relation to fundamental nuclear physics and our understanding of nuclear structure. It is suggested that, if the resonant behaviour of heavy-ion reactions is indeed due to the presence of particular configurations in the composite systems, these configurations must have a very specific nature which prevents their mixing with the adjacent states or else other conditons (e.g. low level density) should be met. Further on, the problem of resonant behaviour observed in back-angle elastic scattering and in forward-angle reaction data is discussed. Collisions between heavy ions leading to the composite systems 36 Ar and 40 Ca are used to discuss the apparent lack of correlation between these two sets of data. A way to understand it, based on the fragmentation of broad resonances, is suggested. In the third part the relation between structure in the fusion cross section excitation functions and that in reaction channel cross sections is discussed. Finally, in the fourth part, the orbiting-cluster model of heavy-ion resonances is briefly described and its predictions discussed. Based on this model a list is given of colliding heavy-ion systems where resonances are expected. (author)

  10. Intermediate resonance excitation in the {gamma}p->p{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0} reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahrens, J. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Universitaet Mainz, D-55099 Mainz (Germany); Altieri, S. [INFN, Sezione di Pavia, I-27100 Pavia (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica Nucleare e Teorica, Universita di Pavia, I-27100 Pavia (Italy); Annand, J.R.M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow (United Kingdom)] (and others)

    2005-09-29

    The helicity dependence of the total cross section for the {gamma}->p->->p{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0} reaction has been measured for the first time at incident photon energies from 400 to 800 MeV. The measurement, performed at the tagged photon beam facility of the MAMI accelerator in Mainz, used the large acceptance detector DAPHNE and a longitudinally polarized frozen-spin target. This channel is found to be excited predominantly when the photon and proton have a parallel spin orientation, most likely due to the intermediate production of the D{sub 13}(1520) resonance. However, the contribution of the antiparallel spin configuration, arising from other reaction mechanisms, is also not negligible. This result gives important new information to resolve the existing model discrepancies in the identification of the nucleon resonances contributing to this channel.

  11. Resonances and reactions from mean-field dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stevenson P. D.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The time-dependent version of nuclear density functional theory, using functionals derived from Skyrme interactions, is able to approximately describe nuclear dynamics. We present time-dependent results of calculations of dipole resonances, concentrating on excitations of valence neutrons against a proton plus neutron core in the neutron-rich doubly-magic 132Sn nucleus, and results of collision dynamics, highlighting potential routes to ternary fusion, with the example of a collision of 48Ca+48Ca+208Pb resulting in a compound nucleus of element 120 stable against immediate fission.

  12. Resonance charge exchange mechanism at high and moderate energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogdanov, A.V.; Gevorkyan, A.S.

    1984-01-01

    Charge exchange mechanisms at high and medium energies are investigated, ta king the resonance charge exchange of a proton by an hydrogen atom as an example . It is established that there are two classical charge exchange mechanisms rel ated to direct proton knockout from the bound state and one quantum-mechanical mechanism corresponding to the electron tunnelling from one bound state to anoth er. The classical cross-section diverges for two of these mechanisms, and the quasiclassical scattering amplitude must be calculated on the base of a complex classical trajectory. Physical grounds for the choice of such trajectories are discussed and calculations of the Van Vleck determinant for these mechanisms a re presented. Contributions from different mechanisms to the total charge excha nge cross-section are analyzed. A comparison with experimental data and results of other authors is made

  13. Low Energy Electrons as Probing Tool for Astrochemical Reaction Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrik Bredehöft, Jan; Swiderek, Petra; Hamann, Thorben

    The complexity of molecules found in space varies widely. On one end of the scale of molecular complexity is the hydrogen molecule H2 . Its formation from H atoms is if not understood than at least thoroughly investigated[1]. On the other side of said spectrum the precursors to biopolymers can be found, such as amino acids[2,3], sugars[4], lipids, cofactors[5], etc, and the kerogen-like organic polymer material in carbonaceous meteorites called "black stuff" [6]. These have also received broad attention in the last decades. Sitting in the middle between these two extremes are simple molecules that are observed by radio astronomy throughout the Universe. These are molecules like methane (CH4 ), methanol (CH3 OH), formaldehyde (CH2 O), hydrogen cyanide (HCN), and many many others. So far more than 40 such species have been identified.[7] They are often used in laboratory experiments to create larger complex molecules on the surface of simulated interstellar dust grains.[2,8] The mechanisms of formation of these observed starting materials for prebiotic chemistry is however not always clear. Also the exact mechanisms of formation of larger molecules in photochemical experiments are largely unclear. This is mostly due to the very complex chemistry going on which involves many different radicals and ions. The creation of radicals and ions can be studied in detail in laboratory simulations. They can be created in a setup mimicking interstellar grain chemistry using slow electrons. There is no free electron radiation in space. What can be found though is a lot of radiation of different sorts. There is electromagnetic radiation (UV light, X-Rays, rays, etc.) and there is particulate radiation as well in the form of high energy ions. This radiation can provide energy that drives chemical reactions in the ice mantles of interstellar dust grains. And while the multitude of different kinds of radiation might be a little confusing, they all have one thing in common: Upon

  14. Studies of gas phase ion/molecule reactions by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleingeld, J.C.

    1984-01-01

    An important field in which Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance has useful applications is that of gas phase ion chemistry, the subject of this thesis. First, the general picture of ion-molecule reactions in the gas phase is discussed. Next, some positive ion-molecule reactions are described, whereas the remaining chapters deal with negative ion-molecule reactions. Most of these studies have been performed using the FT-ICR method. Reactions involving H 3 O - and NH 4 - ions are described whereas the other chapters deal with larger organic complexes. (Auth.)

  15. Resonance capture reactions with a total energy detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macklin, R.L.

    1978-01-01

    The determination of nuclear reaction rates is considered; the Moxon--Rae detector and pulse height weighting are reviewed. This method has been especially useful in measuring (n,γ) cross sections. Strength functions and level spacing can be derived from (n,γ) yields. The relevance of neutron capture data to astrophysical nucleosynthesis is pointed out. The total gamma energy detection method has been applied successfully to radiative neutron capture cross section measurements. A bibliography of most of the published papers reporting neutron capture cross sections measured by the pulse height weighting technique is included. 55 references

  16. Photonuclear reactions in the Δ-resonance region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arends, J.

    1988-02-01

    The following review is intended to give an overview of the experimental information on photon-induced reactions in comparison with theoretical calculations. Most of the experimental data presented here, were measured at the Bonn 500 MeV synchrotron. In section II the experimental techniques used for the measurements are briefly described. Section III deals with the most inclusive information, the total hadronic photoabsorption cross section. In sections IV and V, pion production and proton emission channels are discussed. A brief outlook to prospects for future photonuclear experiments at the new electron stretcher ELSA is given in section VI. (orig./HSI)

  17. Digital system to monitor the natural frequency of mechanical resonators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brengartner, Tobias; Siegel, Michael; Urban, Martin; Monse, Benjamin; Frühauf, Dietmar

    2013-01-01

    Mechanical resonators are often used in process or condition monitoring. They are used for liquid-level limit detection or for viscosity and density sensing. Therefore, the resonator is preferably actuated at its natural frequency. In industrial applications, this is achieved by analogue closed resonant circuits. These circuits have been established because of the low energy consumption and low component costs. Due to the future trend of microprocessors, digital systems are now an interesting alternative and can achieve better results compared to analogue realizations. In this context, this paper presents a novel digital system for monitoring the natural frequency of mechanical resonators. The system is realized with newly developed algorithms and is based on a simple signal processing procedure with minimum computational cost. This allows the use of a low-power microcontroller, thus making the system interesting for industrial use. It is shown that the natural frequency can be measured in respect of high industrial requirements on reliability, fastness and accuracy, combined with the possibility of reducing energy consumption. (paper)

  18. Mechanism of the CO2-Ca(OH)2 reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chew, V.S.; Cheh, C.H.; Glass, R.W.

    1983-01-01

    Recent studies clearly showed the importance of moisture in achieving high Ca(OH) 2 absorbent utilization for removing CO 2 from gas streams at ambient temperatures. However, the role of moisture and the mechanism of the reaction was not well understood. This paper summarizes the results of a study of the mechanism of the CO 2 -Ca(OH) 2 reaction with emphasis on the role of moisture. The reaction between Ca(OH) 2 and CO 2 in moist N 2 was found to be first order with respect to the reactants with a rate constant of about 100 min -1 . At high humidities, the rate of reaction was chemically controlled, but at low humidities, the reaction rate was limited by the diffusion through the carbonate layer formed by the reaction. Calculations showed that capillary condensation could have occurred only in about 2% of the pore volume and was unlikely to have affected the reaction rate significantly by allowing the reaction to occur in the liquid phase. It was, therefore, concluded that the main role of moisture was to improve the Ca(OH) 2 utilization by lowering the resistance to diffusion through the carbonate layer

  19. Exploring chemical reaction mechanisms through harmonic Fourier beads path optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khavrutskii, Ilja V; Smith, Jason B; Wallqvist, Anders

    2013-10-28

    Here, we apply the harmonic Fourier beads (HFB) path optimization method to study chemical reactions involving covalent bond breaking and forming on quantum mechanical (QM) and hybrid QM∕molecular mechanical (QM∕MM) potential energy surfaces. To improve efficiency of the path optimization on such computationally demanding potentials, we combined HFB with conjugate gradient (CG) optimization. The combined CG-HFB method was used to study two biologically relevant reactions, namely, L- to D-alanine amino acid inversion and alcohol acylation by amides. The optimized paths revealed several unexpected reaction steps in the gas phase. For example, on the B3LYP∕6-31G(d,p) potential, we found that alanine inversion proceeded via previously unknown intermediates, 2-iminopropane-1,1-diol and 3-amino-3-methyloxiran-2-ol. The CG-HFB method accurately located transition states, aiding in the interpretation of complex reaction mechanisms. Thus, on the B3LYP∕6-31G(d,p) potential, the gas phase activation barriers for the inversion and acylation reactions were 50.5 and 39.9 kcal∕mol, respectively. These barriers determine the spontaneous loss of amino acid chirality and cleavage of peptide bonds in proteins. We conclude that the combined CG-HFB method further advances QM and QM∕MM studies of reaction mechanisms.

  20. The Electronic Flux in Chemical Reactions. Insights on the Mechanism of the Maillard Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Patricio; Gutiérrez-Oliva, Soledad; Herrera, Bárbara; Silva, Eduardo; Toro-Labbé, Alejandro

    2007-11-01

    The electronic transfer that occurs during a chemical process is analysed in term of a new concept, the electronic flux, that allows characterizing the regions along the reaction coordinate where electron transfer is actually taking place. The electron flux is quantified through the variation of the electronic chemical potential with respect to the reaction coordinate and is used, together with the reaction force, to shed light on reaction mechanism of the Schiff base formation in the Maillard reaction. By partitioning the reaction coordinate in regions in which different process might be taking place, electronic reordering associated to polarization and transfer has been identified and found to be localized at specific transition state regions where most bond forming and breaking occur.

  1. The measurements of parity violation in resonant neutron-capture reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharapov, E.I.; Popov, Y.P.; Wender, S.A.; Seestrom, S.J.; Bowman, C.D.; Postma, H.; Gould, C.R.; Wasson, A.

    1990-01-01

    The study of parity violation in total (n,γ) cross sections on 139 La and 117 Sn targets was performed at the LANSCE pulsed neutron source using longitudinally polarized neutrons and a BaF 2 detector. The effect of parity nonconservation in the 139 La(n,γ) reaction for the resonance at E n =0.73 eV was confirmed. New results for p-wave resonances in the 117 Sn(n, γ) reaction were obtained. A comparison between the capture and transmission techniques is presented. 12 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  2. 16O resonances near 4α threshold through 12C(6Li,d) reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, M. R. D.; Borello-Lewin, T.; Miyake, H.; Horodynski-Matsushigue, L. B.; Duarte, J. L. M.; Rodrigues, C. L.; Faria, P. Neto de; Cunsolo, A.; Cappuzzello, F.; Foti, A.; Agodi, C.; Cavallaro, M.; Napoli, M. di; Ukita, G. M.

    2014-01-01

    Several narrow alpha resonant 16 O states were detected through the 12 C( 6 Li,d) reaction, in the range of 13.5 to 17.5 MeV of excitation energy. The reaction was measured at a bombarding energy of 25.5 MeV employing the São Paulo Pelletron-Enge-Spectrograph facility and the nuclear emulsion technique. Experimental angular distributions associated with natural parity quasi-bound states around the 4α threshold are presented and compared to DWBA predictions. The upper limit for the resonance widths obtained is near the energy resolution (15 keV)

  3. 16O resonances near 4α threshold through 12C (6Li,d ) reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, M. R. D.; Borello-Lewin, T.; Miyake, H.; Horodynski-Matsushigue, L. B.; Duarte, J. L. M.; Rodrigues, C. L.; de Faria, P. Neto; Cunsolo, A.; Cappuzzello, F.; Foti, A.; Agodi, C.; Cavallaro, M.; di Napoli, M.; Ukita, G. M.

    2014-11-01

    Several narrow alpha resonant 16O states were detected through the 12C (6Li,d ) reaction, in the range of 13.5 to 17.5 MeV of excitation energy. The reaction was measured at a bombarding energy of 25.5 MeV employing the São Paulo Pelletron-Enge-Spectrograph facility and the nuclear emulsion technique. Experimental angular distributions associated with natural parity quasi-bound states around the 4α threshold are presented and compared to DWBA predictions. The upper limit for the resonance widths obtained is near the energy resolution (15 keV).

  4. Isobaric analogue resonances in the 56Fe(rho,γ)57Co reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elkateb, M.S.

    1974-01-01

    The excitation function for the reaction 56 Fe(rho,γ) 57 Co has been measured from 1200-3000 KeV proton energy using enriched 56 Fe targets. The resonance strength, ωsub(γ), has been determined for the studied resonances. The absence of the isobaric analogue resonance corresponding to the ground state in 57 Fe is discussed as a result of the present study. A coulomb displacement energy for 57 Co- 57 Fe of 8876 +- 6 KeV is deduced from these measurements. (author)

  5. Reaction mechanisms of ruthenium tetroxide mediated oxidations of organic compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Froehaug, Astrid Elisabeth

    1995-12-31

    This thesis reports a study of the mechanism of ruthenium tetroxide mediated oxidations of saturated hydrocarbons, ethers, alkenes and alcohols. Several methods were used. The RuO{sub 4}-mediated oxidations of adamantane and cis-decalin were studied in CCl{sub 4}-CH{sub 3}CN-H{sub 2}O and in acetone-water. The rate of reaction was found to be moderately influenced by the polarity of the solvent. Solvent properties other than the polarity were also found to influence the reaction rates. From the oxidations of adamantane and adamantane-1,3,5,7-d{sub 4} two primary kinetic deuterium isotope effects were found. These were comparable with the deuterium isotope effects found for the analogous oxidations of cis-decalin and cis-decalin-d{sub 18}. The results seem to exclude both a one step hydride abstraction reaction mechanism and a one step concerted mechanism, as well as a scheme where two such mechanisms compete. The observations may be explained by a two step reaction mechanism consisting of a pre-equilibrium with formation of a substrate-RuO{sub 4} complex followed by a concerted rate determining reaction. The RuO{sub 4}-mediated oxidation of ethers was of kinetic second order with a small enthalpy of activation and a large negative entropy of activation. Oxidation of cyclopropylmethyl methyl ether gave methyl cyclopropanecarboxylate, no rearranged products were observed. On RuO{sub 4} oxidations in CCl{sub 4} with NaIO{sub 4} as stoichiometric oxidant, no chlorinated products were observed. Several observations not in agreement with a hydride or a hydrogen abstraction mechanism may be explained by assuming that the reaction proceeds by either a concerted reaction or by a reversible oxidative addition of the ether to RuO{sub 4} followed by a slow concerted step. 228 refs., 9 figs., 27 tabs.

  6. Reaction mechanisms in cellulose pyrolysis: a literature review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molton, P.M.; Demmitt, T.F.

    1977-08-01

    A bibliographic review of 195 references is presented outlining the history of the research into the mechanisms of cellulose pyrolysis. Topics discussed are: initial product identification, mechanism of initial formation of levoglucosan, from cellulose and from related compounds, decomposition of cellulose to other compounds, formation of aromatics, pyrolysis of levoglucosan, crosslinking of cellulose, pyrolytic reactions of cellulose derivatives, and the effects of inorganic salts on the pyrolysis mechanism. (JSR)

  7. Reaction mechanisms in the radiolysis of peptides, polypeptides and proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garrison, W.M.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to bring together and to correlate the wide variety of experimental studies that provide information on the reaction products and reaction mechanisms involved in the radiolysis of peptides, polypeptides and proteins (including chromosomal proteins) in both aqueous and solid-state systems. The comparative radiation chemistry of these systems is developed in terms of specific reactions of the peptide main-chain and the aliphatic, aromatic-unsaturated and sulfur-containing side-chains. Information obtained with the various experimental techniques of product analysis, competition kinetics, spin-trapping, pulse radiolysis and ESR spectroscopy is included. 147 refs.

  8. Reaction mechanisms in the radiolysis of peptides, polypeptides and proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garrison, W.M.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to bring together and to correlate the wide variety of experimental studies that provide information on the reaction products and reaction mechanisms involved in the radiolysis of peptides, polypeptides and proteins (including chromosomal proteins) in both aqueous and solid-state systems. The comparative radiation chemistry of these systems is developed in terms of specific reactions of the peptide main-chain and the aliphatic, aromatic-unsaturated and sulfur-containing side-chains. Information obtained with the various experimental techniques of product analysis, competition kinetics, spin-trapping, pulse radiolysis and ESR spectroscopy is included. 147 refs

  9. Reaction mechanisms for on-surface synthesis of covalent nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Björk, J

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, on-surface synthesis has become an increasingly popular strategy to form covalent nanostructures. The approach has great prospects for facilitating the manufacture of a range of fascinating materials with atomic precision. However, the on-surface reactions are enigmatic to control, currently restricting its bright perspectives and there is a great need to explore how the reactions are governed. The objective of this topical review is to summarize theoretical work that has focused on comprehending on-surface synthesis protocols through studies of reaction mechanisms. (topical review)

  10. Cyclodextrin-Catalyzed Organic Synthesis: Reactions, Mechanisms, and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Cai Bai

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Cyclodextrins are well-known macrocyclic oligosaccharides that consist of α-(1,4 linked glucose units and have been widely used as artificial enzymes, chiral separators, chemical sensors, and drug excipients, owing to their hydrophobic and chiral interiors. Due to their remarkable inclusion capabilities with small organic molecules, more recent interests focus on organic reactions catalyzed by cyclodextrins. This contribution outlines the current progress in cyclodextrin-catalyzed organic reactions. Particular emphases are given to the organic reaction mechanisms and their applications. In the end, the future directions of research in this field are proposed.

  11. Gas phase ion/molecule reactions as studied by Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joergensen, S.I.

    1985-01-01

    The subject of this thesis is gas phase ion/molecule reactions as studied by Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry (chapter 2 contains a short description of this method). Three chapters are mainly concerned with mechanistic aspects of gas phase ion/molecule reactions. An equally important aspect of the thesis is the stability and reactivity of α-thio carbanions, dipole stabilized carbanions and homoenolate anions, dealt with in the other four chapters. (Auth.)

  12. Reaction 12C(16O,α)24Mg leading to nuclear molecular resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagatani, K.; Shimoda, T.; Tanner, D.; Tribble, R.; Yamaya, T.

    1979-01-01

    The reactions 12 C( 16 O,α) 24 Mg and 13 C( 16 O,α) 25 Mg were investigated at an incident energy of 145 MeV. In the reaction with the 12 C target, broad peaks are observed at forward angles which correspond to the molecular resonance states of the 12 C+ 12 C system, while the spectra with 13 C target show only a smooth continuum

  13. Resonances in the nuclear reactions 15N + 12C and 15N + 16O

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monnehan, G.A.

    1987-06-01

    The reaction 12 C + 15 N have been studied at 15 N beam energies between 30 and 70 MeV. For each reaction, about twelve residual nuclei have been identified through the γ-ray detection method. Excitation functions were obtained for the fusion and peripheral channels. Resonances are seen in the channels containing at least one α particle at energies below 50 MeV. At higher energies, strong structures are observed in the direct reaction channels. The evolution of the fusion cross section is well reproduced by a model based on the statistical desexcitation of the compound nucleus if the discrete states of the residual nuclei are taken into account. The favourable observation of resonant phenomena in 15 N induced reactions can be understood in terms of a small number of channels open to the grazing wave. In the range 50 to 60 MeV, there is a strong coupling between the fusion and the direct reaction channels. The occurrence of resonances above E lab = 50 MeV in the peripheral channels is explained with the band crossing and effective barrier models. In the 15 N induced reactions, the absorption of the surface waves is weak [fr

  14. The dynamics of the Hg + Br2 reaction: elucidation of the reaction mechanism for the Br exchange reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jambrina, P G; Menéndez, M; Aoiz, F J

    2017-06-28

    In spite of its importance in the Hg atmospheric chemistry, the dynamics of the Hg + Br 2 → HgBr + Br reaction is poorly understood. In this article, we have carried out a comprehensive study of the reaction mechanism of this reaction by means of quasiclassical trajectories (QCTs) on an existing ab initio potential energy surface (PES). The reaction has a non trivial dynamics, as a consequence of its large endothermicity, the presence of a deep potential well, and the competition between the Br exchange and the collision induced dissociation processes. Our calculations demonstrate that insertion is only relevant at energies just above the reaction threshold and that, at energies above 2.3 eV, HgBr formation typically takes place via a sort of frustrated dissociation. In order to compare directly with the results obtained in extensive cross molecular beam experiments for the homologous reaction with I 2 , angular distributions in the laboratory frame for Hg + Br 2 have been simulated under similar experimental conditions. The lack of agreement at the highest energies considered suggests that either the two reactions have substantially different mechanisms or that calculations on a single PES cannot account for the dynamics at those energies.

  15. Helicity dependence of the {gamma}d{yields} {pi}NN reactions in the {delta}-resonance region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahrens, J.; Arends, H.J.; Beck, R.; Heid, E.; Jahn, O.; Lang, M.; Martinez-Fabregate, M.; Schwamb, M.; Tamas, G.; Thomas, A. [Universitaet Mainz, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Mainz (Germany); Altieri, S.; Panzeri, A.; Pinelli, T. [INFN, Pavia (Italy); Universita di Pavia, Dipartimento di Fisica Nucleare e Teorica, Pavia (Italy); Annand, J.R.M.; McGeorge, J.C.; Protopopescu, D.; Rosner, G. [University of Glasgow, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Blackston, M.A.; Weller, H.R. [Duke University, Department of Physics, Durham, NC (United States); Bradtke, C.; Dutz, H.; Klein, F.; Rohlof, C. [Universitaet Bonn, Physikalisches Institut, Bonn (Germany); Braghieri, A.; Pedroni, P. [INFN, Sezione di Pavia, Pavia (Italy); Hose, N. d' [DSM/DAPNIA/SPhN, CEA Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Fix, A. [Tomsk Polytechnic University, Laboratory of Mathematical Physics, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Kondratiev, R.; Lisin, V. [Academy of Science, INR, Moscow (Russian Federation); Meyer, W.; Reicherz, G. [Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, Insitut fuer Experimentalphysik, Bochum (Germany); Rostomyan, T. [Universiteit Gent, Subatomaire en Stralingsfysica, Gent (Belgium); INFN, Pavia (Italy); Ryckbosch, D. [Universiteit Gent, Subatomaire en Stralingsfysica, Gent (Belgium)

    2010-05-15

    The helicity dependence of the differential cross-section for the {gamma}d{yields}{pi}NN reactions has been measured for the first time in the {delta} -resonance region. The measurement was performed with the large-acceptance detector DAPHNE at the tagged photon beam facility of the MAMI accelerator in Mainz. The data show that the main reaction mechanisms for the {pi}{sup {+-}} NN channels are the quasi-free N {pi} processes on one bound nucleon with nuclear dynamics playing a minor role. On the contrary, for the {pi}{sup 0}np channel nuclear mechanisms involving the reabsorption of the photoproduced {pi}{sup 0} by the np pair have to be taken into account to reproduce the experimental data. (orig.)

  16. Helicity dependence of the γd→ πNN reactions in the Δ-resonance region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahrens, J.; Arends, H.J.; Beck, R.; Heid, E.; Jahn, O.; Lang, M.; Martinez-Fabregate, M.; Schwamb, M.; Tamas, G.; Thomas, A.; Altieri, S.; Panzeri, A.; Pinelli, T.; Annand, J.R.M.; McGeorge, J.C.; Protopopescu, D.; Rosner, G.; Blackston, M.A.; Weller, H.R.; Bradtke, C.; Dutz, H.; Klein, F.; Rohlof, C.; Braghieri, A.; Pedroni, P.; Hose, N. d'; Fix, A.; Kondratiev, R.; Lisin, V.; Meyer, W.; Reicherz, G.; Rostomyan, T.; Ryckbosch, D.

    2010-01-01

    The helicity dependence of the differential cross-section for the γd→πNN reactions has been measured for the first time in the Δ -resonance region. The measurement was performed with the large-acceptance detector DAPHNE at the tagged photon beam facility of the MAMI accelerator in Mainz. The data show that the main reaction mechanisms for the π ± NN channels are the quasi-free N π processes on one bound nucleon with nuclear dynamics playing a minor role. On the contrary, for the π 0 np channel nuclear mechanisms involving the reabsorption of the photoproduced π 0 by the np pair have to be taken into account to reproduce the experimental data. (orig.)

  17. Radiation reaction effect on laser driven auto-resonant particle acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagar, Vikram; Sengupta, Sudip; Kaw, P. K.

    2015-01-01

    The effects of radiation reaction force on laser driven auto-resonant particle acceleration scheme are studied using Landau-Lifshitz equation of motion. These studies are carried out for both linear and circularly polarized laser fields in the presence of static axial magnetic field. From the parametric study, a radiation reaction dominated region has been identified in which the particle dynamics is greatly effected by this force. In the radiation reaction dominated region, the two significant effects on particle dynamics are seen, viz., (1) saturation in energy gain by the initially resonant particle and (2) net energy gain by an initially non-resonant particle which is caused due to resonance broadening. It has been further shown that with the relaxation of resonance condition and with optimum choice of parameters, this scheme may become competitive with the other present-day laser driven particle acceleration schemes. The quantum corrections to the Landau-Lifshitz equation of motion have also been taken into account. The difference in the energy gain estimates of the particle by the quantum corrected and classical Landau-Lifshitz equation is found to be insignificant for the present day as well as upcoming laser facilities

  18. Subthreshold resonances and resonances in the R -matrix method for binary reactions and in the Trojan horse method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhamedzhanov, A. M.; Shubhchintak, Bertulani, C. A.

    2017-08-01

    In this paper we discuss the R -matrix approach to treat the subthreshold resonances for the single-level and one-channel and for the single-level and two-channel cases. In particular, the expression relating the asymptotic normalization coefficient (ANC) with the observable reduced width, when the subthreshold bound state is the only channel or coupled with an open channel, which is a resonance, is formulated. Since the ANC plays a very important role in nuclear astrophysics, these relations significantly enhance the power of the derived equations. We present the relationship between the resonance width and the ANC for the general case and consider two limiting cases: wide and narrow resonances. Different equations for the astrophysical S factors in the R -matrix approach are presented. After that we discuss the Trojan horse method (THM) formalism. The developed equations are obtained using the surface-integral formalism and the generalized R -matrix approach for the three-body resonant reactions. It is shown how the Trojan horse (TH) double-differential cross section can be expressed in terms of the on-the-energy-shell astrophysical S factor for the binary subreaction. Finally, we demonstrate how the THM can be used to calculate the astrophysical S factor for the neutron generator 13C(α ,n )16O in low-mass AGB stars. At astrophysically relevant energies this astrophysical S factor is controlled by the threshold level 1 /2+,Ex=6356 keV. Here, we reanalyzed recent TH data taking into account more accurately the three-body effects and using both assumptions that the threshold level is a subthreshold bound state or it is a resonance state.

  19. Efficient Computation of Transition State Resonances and Reaction Rates from a Quantum Normal Form

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schubert, Roman; Waalkens, Holger; Wiggins, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    A quantum version of a recent formulation of transition state theory in phase space is presented. The theory developed provides an algorithm to compute quantum reaction rates and the associated Gamov-Siegert resonances with very high accuracy. The algorithm is especially efficient for

  20. Magnetic Resonance Determinations of Structure and Reaction Kinetics of Epoxy/Amine Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-12-31

    AD- AISA 542 MCDONNELL DOUGLAS RESEARCH LABS ST LOUIS MO FIG 7/4 MAGNETIC RESONANCE DETERMINATIONS OF STRUCTURE AND REACTION KIN--ETC (U) DEC Al I M...solvent content (methylene chloride). DD I JAN73 1473 EDITION OF I NOV 65 IS OBSOLETE UNCLASSIFIED SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGE (When Doe Fntered

  1. The Trojan Horse method for nuclear astrophysics: Recent results on resonance reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cognata, M. La; Pizzone, R. G. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Catania (Italy); Spitaleri, C.; Cherubini, S.; Romano, S. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Catania, Catania, Italy and Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Catania (Italy); Gulino, M.; Tumino, A. [Kore University, Enna, Italy and Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Catania (Italy); Lamia, L. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Catania, Catania (Italy)

    2014-05-09

    Nuclear astrophysics aims to measure nuclear-reaction cross sections of astrophysical interest to be included into models to study stellar evolution and nucleosynthesis. Low energies, < 1 MeV or even < 10 keV, are requested for this is the window where these processes are more effective. Two effects have prevented to achieve a satisfactory knowledge of the relevant nuclear processes, namely, the Coulomb barrier exponentially suppressing the cross section and the presence of atomic electrons. These difficulties have triggered theoretical and experimental investigations to extend our knowledge down to astrophysical energies. For instance, indirect techniques such as the Trojan Horse Method have been devised yielding new cutting-edge results. In particular, I will focus on the application of this indirect method to resonance reactions. Resonances might dramatically enhance the astrophysical S(E)-factor so, when they occur right at astrophysical energies, their measurement is crucial to pin down the astrophysical scenario. Unknown or unpredicted resonances might introduce large systematic errors in nucleosynthesis models. These considerations apply to low-energy resonances and to sub-threshold resonances as well, as they may produce sizable modifications of the S-factor due to, for instance, destructive interference with another resonance.

  2. The Trojan Horse method for nuclear astrophysics: Recent results on resonance reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cognata, M. La; Pizzone, R. G.; Spitaleri, C.; Cherubini, S.; Romano, S.; Gulino, M.; Tumino, A.; Lamia, L.

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear astrophysics aims to measure nuclear-reaction cross sections of astrophysical interest to be included into models to study stellar evolution and nucleosynthesis. Low energies, < 1 MeV or even < 10 keV, are requested for this is the window where these processes are more effective. Two effects have prevented to achieve a satisfactory knowledge of the relevant nuclear processes, namely, the Coulomb barrier exponentially suppressing the cross section and the presence of atomic electrons. These difficulties have triggered theoretical and experimental investigations to extend our knowledge down to astrophysical energies. For instance, indirect techniques such as the Trojan Horse Method have been devised yielding new cutting-edge results. In particular, I will focus on the application of this indirect method to resonance reactions. Resonances might dramatically enhance the astrophysical S(E)-factor so, when they occur right at astrophysical energies, their measurement is crucial to pin down the astrophysical scenario. Unknown or unpredicted resonances might introduce large systematic errors in nucleosynthesis models. These considerations apply to low-energy resonances and to sub-threshold resonances as well, as they may produce sizable modifications of the S-factor due to, for instance, destructive interference with another resonance

  3. Reaction mechanism and reaction coordinates from the viewpoint of energy flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Wenjin; Ma, Ao, E-mail: aoma@uic.edu [Department of Bioengineering, The University of Illinois at Chicago, 851 South Morgan Street, Chicago, Illinois 60607 (United States)

    2016-03-21

    Reaction coordinates are of central importance for correct understanding of reaction dynamics in complex systems, but their counter-intuitive nature made it a daunting challenge to identify them. Starting from an energetic view of a reaction process as stochastic energy flows biased towards preferred channels, which we deemed the reaction coordinates, we developed a rigorous scheme for decomposing energy changes of a system, both potential and kinetic, into pairwise components. The pairwise energy flows between different coordinates provide a concrete statistical mechanical language for depicting reaction mechanisms. Application of this scheme to the C{sub 7eq} → C{sub 7ax} transition of the alanine dipeptide in vacuum revealed novel and intriguing mechanisms that eluded previous investigations of this well studied prototype system for biomolecular conformational dynamics. Using a cost function developed from the energy decomposition components by proper averaging over the transition path ensemble, we were able to identify signatures of the reaction coordinates of this system without requiring any input from human intuition.

  4. Reaction mechanism and reaction coordinates from the viewpoint of energy flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Wenjin; Ma, Ao

    2016-01-01

    Reaction coordinates are of central importance for correct understanding of reaction dynamics in complex systems, but their counter-intuitive nature made it a daunting challenge to identify them. Starting from an energetic view of a reaction process as stochastic energy flows biased towards preferred channels, which we deemed the reaction coordinates, we developed a rigorous scheme for decomposing energy changes of a system, both potential and kinetic, into pairwise components. The pairwise energy flows between different coordinates provide a concrete statistical mechanical language for depicting reaction mechanisms. Application of this scheme to the C 7eq → C 7ax transition of the alanine dipeptide in vacuum revealed novel and intriguing mechanisms that eluded previous investigations of this well studied prototype system for biomolecular conformational dynamics. Using a cost function developed from the energy decomposition components by proper averaging over the transition path ensemble, we were able to identify signatures of the reaction coordinates of this system without requiring any input from human intuition.

  5. Atlas of giant dipole resonances. Parameters and graphs of photonuclear reaction cross sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varlamov, A.V.; Varlamov, V.V.; Rudenko, D.S.; Stepanov, M.E.

    1999-01-01

    Parameters of giant dipole resonances (GDR) observed in photonuclear reaction cross sections using various beams of incident photons are presented. Data, given for 200 stable isotopes from 2 H to 243 Am including their natural compositions, were collected from papers published over the years 1951-1996. GDR parameters, such as energy positions, amplitudes and widths, are included into the table and organized by element, isotope and reaction. Graphs of the majority of the photonuclear reaction cross sections, included in the international nuclear data library EXFOR by the end of 1998, are presented. The graphs are provided for 182 stable isotopes and natural compositions. (author)

  6. Kinetics and Mechanisms of Calcite Reactions with Saline Waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorman, Brian P [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-09-02

    Project Description: The general objective of the proposed research is to determine the kinetics and mechanisms of calcite reactions with saline waters over a wide range of saline water composition, pCO2, and modest ranges in T and P. This will be accomplished by studying both reaction rates and solubility from changes in solution chemistry, and making nanoscale observations of calcite precipitate surface morphology and composition at the micro-to-nano-scale to provide an understanding of controlling reaction mechanisms and pathways. The specific objectives necessary to reach the general objective are: a) determination of how pCO2, Ca2+, ionic strength and “foreign” ions influence reaction rates; and b) investigate the influence of these parameters on apparent kinetic solubility from dissolution and precipitation reactions. This information will clearly be central to the construction of reliable reaction-transport models to predict reservoir and formation response to increased CO2 in saline waters. This program was initially collaborative with John Morse at Texas A&M, however his passing shortly after the beginning of this program resulted in abbreviated research time and effort. Summary of Results: Early studies using electron microscopy and spectroscopy indicated that carbonate precipitation from natural seawater (NSW) conditions onto aragonite substrates was mediated by a surface amorphous calcium carbonate layer. It was hypothesized that this ACC layer (observed after < 5days reaction time) was responsible for the abnormal reaction kinetics and also served as a metastable seed layer for growth of epitaxial aragonite. Further studies of the ACC formation mechanism indicated a strong dependence on the Mg concentration in solution. Subsequent studies at shorter times (10 hrs) on calcite substrates and in a wide range of supersaturation conditions did not indicate any ACC layer. Instead, an epitaxial layer by layer

  7. Mechanism of nuclear dissipation in fission and heavy-ion reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nix, J.R.; Sierk, A.J.

    1986-01-01

    Recent advances in the theoretical understanding of nuclear dissipation at intermediate excitation energies are reviewed, with particular emphasis on a new surface-plus-window mechanism that involves interactions of either one or two nucleons with the moving nuclear surface and also, for dumbbell-like shapes encountered in fission and heavy-ion reactions, the transfer of nucleons through the window separating the two portions of the system. This novel dissipation mechanism provides a unified macroscopic description of such diverse phenomena as widths of isoscalar giant quadrupole and giant octupole resonances, mean fission-fragment kinetic energies and excitation energies, dynamical thresholds for compound-nucleus formation, enhancement in neutron emission prior to fission, and widths of mass and charge distributions in deep-inelastic heavy-ion reactions. 41 refs., 8 figs

  8. Alcali-silica reactions: Mechanisms for crack formations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goltermann, Per

    2006-01-01

    Alkali-silica reactions (ASR) are found all over the world and cause a large number of damage, which have lead to different sets of requirements in the different countries for the aggregates, the cements and the admixtures. One of the reasons for the damage and the different requirements is that ......Alkali-silica reactions (ASR) are found all over the world and cause a large number of damage, which have lead to different sets of requirements in the different countries for the aggregates, the cements and the admixtures. One of the reasons for the damage and the different requirements...... is that the mechanical behavior of the ASR has not been fully investigated, although the chemical aspects of ASR have been dealt with in depth. This paper presents a unified, mechanical explanation of the ASR damage mechanism, covering the relevant aspects of the diffusion model; the stress-variations in the aggregate...

  9. Driving a mechanical resonator into coherent states via random measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, Ll; Wu, L-A; Chhajlany, R W; Li, Y

    2013-01-01

    We propose dynamical schemes to engineer coherent states of a mechanical resonator (MR) coupled to an ancillary, superconducting flux qubit. The flux qubit, when repeatedly projected on to its ground state, drives the MR into a coherent state in probabilistic, albeit heralded fashion. Assuming no operations on the state of the MR during the protocol, coherent states are successfully generated only up to a certain value of the displacement parameter. This restriction can be overcome at the cost of a one-time operation on the initial state of the MR. We discuss the possibility of experimental realization of the presented schemes. (paper)

  10. Defect-related internal dissipation in mechanical resonators and the study of coupled mechanical systems.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedmann, Thomas Aquinas; Czaplewski, David A.; Sullivan, John Patrick; Modine, Normand Arthur; Wendt, Joel Robert; Aslam, Dean (Michigan State University, Lansing, MI); Sepulveda-Alancastro, Nelson (University of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez, PR)

    2007-01-01

    Understanding internal dissipation in resonant mechanical systems at the micro- and nanoscale is of great technological and fundamental interest. Resonant mechanical systems are central to many sensor technologies, and microscale resonators form the basis of a variety of scanning probe microscopies. Furthermore, coupled resonant mechanical systems are of great utility for the study of complex dynamics in systems ranging from biology to electronics to photonics. In this work, we report the detailed experimental study of internal dissipation in micro- and nanomechanical oscillators fabricated from amorphous and crystalline diamond materials, atomistic modeling of dissipation in amorphous, defect-free, and defect-containing crystalline silicon, and experimental work on the properties of one-dimensional and two-dimensional coupled mechanical oscillator arrays. We have identified that internal dissipation in most micro- and nanoscale oscillators is limited by defect relaxation processes, with large differences in the nature of the defects as the local order of the material ranges from amorphous to crystalline. Atomistic simulations also showed a dominant role of defect relaxation processes in controlling internal dissipation. Our studies of one-dimensional and two-dimensional coupled oscillator arrays revealed that it is possible to create mechanical systems that should be ideal for the study of non-linear dynamics and localization.

  11. Inelastic collisions of heavy ions and their reaction mechanisms; Collisions inelastiques d'ions lourds et mecanismes de reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scarpaci, J.A

    2004-06-01

    This work is dedicated to the study of inelastic collisions of heavy ions. Most experiments took place in Ganil facility. The 2 first chapters introduce the notion of inelastic scattering of heavy ions. The third chapter deals with target excitation, giant monopolar or dipolar or quadrupolar resonances ant the multi-phonon concept and presents relevant experimental results from the Ca{sup 40} + Ca{sup 40} nuclear reaction at 50 MeV/A. The fourth chapter is dedicated to nuclear processes involved in inelastic collisions: pick-up break-up mechanisms, the angular distribution of emitted protons and the towing mode. These notions are applied to the reaction Zr{sup 90}(Ar{sup 40}, Ar{sup 40}'). The fifth chapter presents the solving of the time dependent Schroedinger equation (TDSE) applied to the wave function of a particle plunged in a variable potential. TDSE solving is applied to the break-up of Be{sup 11}. These calculations have been validated by comparing them with experimental results from the nuclear reaction Ti{sup 48}(Be{sup 11}, Be{sup 10} + n + {gamma}) that is described in the chapter 6. The last chapter presents the advantages of inelastic scattering considered as a tool to study exotic nuclei.

  12. Simulation mechanisms of low energy nuclear reaction using super flow energy external fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gareev, F.A.; Zhidkova, I.E.; ); Ratis, Yu.I.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: The review of possible stimulation mechanisms of the LENR (low energy nuclear reactions) is represented. We have concluded that transamination of nuclei at low energies and excess heat are possible in the framework of the modern physical theory - the universal resonance synchronization principle and based on its different enhancement mechanisms of reaction rates are responsible for these processes. The excitation nd ionization of atom may play role as trigger for LERN. Investigation of this phenomenon requires knowledge of different branches if science: nuclear and atomic physics, chemistry and electrochemistry, condensed matter and solid state physics. The results of this research field can provide a new source of energy, substances and technologies. The puzzle of poor re-productivity of experimental data in due ti the fact LENR occurs in open systems and it is extremely sensitive to parameters of external fields and systems. Classical re-productivity principle should be reconsidered for LENR experiments. Poor re-productivity and unexpected results do not means that the experiment is wrong. Our main conclusion: LENR may be understand in terms of the modern theory without any violation of the basic physics. 2) Weak and electromagnetic interactions may show the strong influence of the surrounding conditions on the nuclear processes. 3) Universal resonance synchronization principle is a key issue to make a bridge between various scales of interactions and it is responsible for self-organization of hierarchical systems independent of substances, fields and interactions. We bring some arguments in favor of the mechanism - order based on order - declared by Schroedinger in fundamental problem of contemporary science. 4) The universal resonance synchronization principle became a fruitful interdisciplinary science of general laws of self-organized processes in different branches of physics because it is consequence of the energy conservation law and resonance

  13. Structure and Reaction Mechanism of Pyrrolysine Synthase (PylD)

    KAUST Repository

    Quitterer, Felix; Beck, Philipp; Bacher, Adelbert; Groll, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The final step in the biosynthesis of the 22nd genetically encoded amino acid, pyrrolysine, is catalyzed by PylD, a structurally and mechanistically unique dehydrogenase. This catalyzed reaction includes an induced-fit mechanism achieved by major structural rearrangements of the N-terminal helix upon substrate binding. Different steps of the reaction trajectory are visualized by complex structures of PylD with substrate and product. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Structure and Reaction Mechanism of Pyrrolysine Synthase (PylD)

    KAUST Repository

    Quitterer, Felix

    2013-05-29

    The final step in the biosynthesis of the 22nd genetically encoded amino acid, pyrrolysine, is catalyzed by PylD, a structurally and mechanistically unique dehydrogenase. This catalyzed reaction includes an induced-fit mechanism achieved by major structural rearrangements of the N-terminal helix upon substrate binding. Different steps of the reaction trajectory are visualized by complex structures of PylD with substrate and product. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Reaction mechanisms of CO2 activation and catalytic reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolff, Niklas von

    2016-01-01

    The use of CO 2 as a C1 chemical feedstock for the fine chemical industry is interesting both economically and ecologically, as CO 2 is non-toxic, abundant and cheap. Nevertheless, transformations of CO 2 into value-added products is hampered by its high thermodynamic stability and its inertness toward reduction. In order to design new catalysts able to overcome this kinetic challenge, a profound understanding of the reaction mechanisms at play in CO 2 reduction is needed. Using novel N/Si+ frustrated Lewis pairs (FLPs), the influence of CO 2 adducts and different hydro-borane reducing agents on the reaction mechanism in the catalytic hydroboration of CO 2 were investigated, both by DFT calculations and experiments. In a second step, the reaction mechanism of a novel reaction for the creation of C-C bonds from CO 2 and pyridyl-silanes (C 5 H 4 N-SiMe 3 ) was analyzed by DFT calculations. It was shown that CO 2 plays a double role in this transformation, acting both as a catalyst and a C1-building block. The fine understanding of this transformation then led to the development of a novel approach for the synthesis of sulfones and sulfonamides. Starting from SO 2 and aromatic silanes/amine silanes, these products were obtained in a single step under metal-free conditions. Noteworthy, sulfones and sulfonamides are common motifs in organic chemistry and found in a variety of highly important drugs. Finally, this concept was extended to aromatic halides as coupling partners, and it was thus shown for the first time that a sulfonylative Hiyama reaction is a possible approach to the synthesis of sulfones. (author) [fr

  16. High resolution studies of pion-nucleus reaction mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, C.L.

    1983-01-01

    Pion inelastic scattering is generally well described as a first order process using the DWIA. This is especially true for a large body of inelastic scattering data to low-lying collective states which is well-described by form factors obtained in (e,e') and the DWIA. Some data for which this model does not work are presented. Higher order reaction mechanisms have been invoked to explain some of these data. However, no model of these second order processes gives a satisfactory explanation of the entire data set. Experimentally, more data for pion-induced transitions to low-spin unnatural-parity states which have been studied by other probes would be useful in sorting out the reaction mechanisms responsible for the anomalous cross sections observed for the 1 + states in 12 C. Theoretically, a consistent evaluation of possible second-order diagrams in inelastic scattering, such as is being attempted for DCX 22 , would be useful

  17. Reaction mechanism in high energy heavy-ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanihata, Isao.

    1982-04-01

    The reaction mechanism in high energy heavy-ion collision is discussed. The discussion is mainly based on the experimental data. Empirical equations have been given for the total cross-sections of nucleus-nucleus reactions and the reaction cross-sections. These cross-sections are well described by the geometrical size of the colliding nuclei. The cross-sections are also understood by microscopic calculation. The charged particle multiplicity gives additional information about the geometrical aspect of heavy ion collision. The data suggested that the total energy, independent of projectile size, is most important for determining the multiplicity. The inclusive proton spectrum in a heavy ion collision showed two distinct regions. The one is the fragment region, and the other the participant region. The spectral shapes of inclusive pion spectra are reasonably well explained by the Coulomb interaction of pions with nuclear fragments. The high energy heavy ion reaction occurs in the overlap region of the projectile and target. This has been tested by measuring the number of participants for various reactions. The space and the time structure of the collision are also discussed in this paper as well as the dynamical aspects of the collision. (Kato, T.)

  18. Sunflower oil ozonation. Following of the reaction by proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz Gomez, Maritza F.

    2005-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the technique of Proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance can be used for the pursuit of the reaction between the ozone and the unsaturated fatty acids. It's carried out the sunflower oil ozonization to different applied dose of ozone and the index of peroxides and the concentration of aldehydes are determined. The main reaction products were identified by Proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (NMR 1 H). The intensities of the signs were used to follow the advance of the reaction between the ozone and the sunflower oil. It is was carried out until obtaining an index of peroxides of 1 202 mmol-equiv/kg. The intensities of the signs of the olefinic protons diminish with a gradual increment in the dose of applied ozone, but without ending up disappearing completely. The ozonides of Criegee obtained to applied dose of ozone of 107,1 mg/g were approximately bigger 7,4 times that those obtained at the beginning from the reaction to applied dose of ozone of 15,3 mg/g. The aldehydes protons were observed as a sign of weak intensity in all the spectra. The signs belonging to the olenifics protons of the hydroperoxides in d = 5,55 ppm increases with the increment of the applied dose of ozone. You concludes that to higher applied dose of ozone, haggler is the advance of the ozonization reaction, what belongs together with a bigger formation of oxygenated compounds

  19. Measure of hydrogen concentration profile in materials by resonant nuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Livi, R.P.; Zawislak, F.C.; Acquadro, J.C.

    1986-01-01

    The technique for determining the profile of hydrogen concentration in proximities of the surface of materials, is presented. The preliminary measurements were done, using the Pelletron accelerator at Sao Paulo University (USP), in Brazil, for the resonant-nuclear reaction 1 H( 19 F, α γ) 16 O. By using this reaction the technique is sensitive for concentrations above 500 ppm, which could be reduced to 100 ppm through special shieldings and other techniques to reduce the background radiation. (M.C.K.) [pt

  20. A Practical Quantum Mechanics Molecular Mechanics Method for the Dynamical Study of Reactions in Biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendieta-Moreno, Jesús I; Marcos-Alcalde, Iñigo; Trabada, Daniel G; Gómez-Puertas, Paulino; Ortega, José; Mendieta, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    Quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) methods are excellent tools for the modeling of biomolecular reactions. Recently, we have implemented a new QM/MM method (Fireball/Amber), which combines an efficient density functional theory method (Fireball) and a well-recognized molecular dynamics package (Amber), offering an excellent balance between accuracy and sampling capabilities. Here, we present a detailed explanation of the Fireball method and Fireball/Amber implementation. We also discuss how this tool can be used to analyze reactions in biomolecules using steered molecular dynamics simulations. The potential of this approach is shown by the analysis of a reaction catalyzed by the enzyme triose-phosphate isomerase (TIM). The conformational space and energetic landscape for this reaction are analyzed without a priori assumptions about the protonation states of the different residues during the reaction. The results offer a detailed description of the reaction and reveal some new features of the catalytic mechanism. In particular, we find a new reaction mechanism that is characterized by the intramolecular proton transfer from O1 to O2 and the simultaneous proton transfer from Glu 165 to C2. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Search for multibaryonic resonances in the p vector+d→π-+X reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aslanides, E.; Benabdelouahed, D.; Bergdolt, A.M.; Bergdolt, G.; Bing, O.; Fassnacht, P.; Hibou, F.; Combes-Comets, M.P.; Courtat, P.; Frascaria, R.; Le Bornec, Y.; Reide, F.; Tatischeff, B.; Willis, N.; Boivin, M.; Kerboul, C.

    1991-01-01

    The reaction p vector+d→π - +X has been studied at Saturne at 1.45, 2.10 and 2.70 GeV, using the spectrometer SPES III. The analysing power and the differential cross sections show no evidence for narrow structures which could be interpreted as a resonance in the three baryon system. At the lowest incident energy, the shapes of the experimental cross sections are well reproduced by phase-space distributions. (orig.)

  2. Transglycosylation reactions, a main mechanism of phenolics incorporation in coffee melanoidins: Inhibition by Maillard reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Ana S P; Nunes, Fernando M; Simões, Cristiana; Maciel, Elisabete; Domingues, Pedro; Domingues, M Rosário M; Coimbra, Manuel A

    2017-07-15

    Under roasting conditions, polysaccharides depolymerize and also are able to polymerize, forming new polymers through non-enzymatic transglycosylation reactions (TGRs). TGRs can also occur between carbohydrates and aglycones, such as the phenolic compounds present in daily consumed foods like coffee. In this study, glycosidically-linked phenolic compounds were quantified in coffee melanoidins, the polymeric nitrogenous brown-colored compounds formed during roasting, defined as end-products of Maillard reaction. One third of the phenolics present were in glycosidically-linked form. In addition, the roasting of solid-state mixtures mimicking coffee beans composition allowed the conclusion that proteins play a regulatory role in TGRs extension and, consequently, modulate melanoidins composition. Overall, the results obtained showed that TGRs are a main mechanism of phenolics incorporation in melanoidins and are inhibited by amino groups through Maillard reaction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. (π±, π±' N) reactions on 12C and 208Pb near the giant resonance region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Sung Hoon.

    1990-05-01

    Angular distributions for the 12 C(π ± , π ± ' p) and 208 Pb(π ± , π ± ' p or n) reactions near the giant resonance region have been measured at T π = 180 MeV, and found different between π + and π - data. This observation is interpreted as evidence for different excitation mechanisms dominating the π - -nucleus and π + -nucleus interactions in the giant resonance region of these targets. A comparison with the single-nucleon knock-out distorted-wave impulse approximation calculations shows, even though these calculations underestimate (π ± , π ± ' N) data for both targets, the dominance of direct process for (π + , π + ' p) or (π - , π - ' n) in contrast to (π - , π - ' p) or (π + , π + ' n). In the (π + , π + ' p) reaction proton-proton hole states are excited directly and appear to have a large probability for direct decay with escape width, whereas in (π - , π - ' p) the preferentially excited neutron-neutron hole doorway states couple to resonance states and decay with spreading width. This interpretation led us to suggest that the ratio of cross-sections for inelastic scattering to the giant resonance region should be written in terms of an incoherent sum of cross-sections to neutron and proton doorway states. In a heavy nucleus such as 208 Pb, neutron and proton doorway states. In a heavy nucleus such as 208 Pb, neutron and proton doorway states contribute incoherently because the different decay processes do not populate the same final states of the residual nucleus

  4. Reaction Mechanisms of Magnesium Potassium Phosphate Cement and its Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Fei

    Magnesium potassium phosphate cement (MKPC) is a kind of cementitious binder in which the chemical bond is formed via a heterogeneous acid-base reaction between dead burned magnesia powder and potassium phosphate solution at room temperature. Small amount of boron compounds can be incorporated in the cement as a setting retarder. The final reaction product of MgO-KH2PO4-H 2O ternary system is identified as magnesium potassium phosphate hexahydrate, MgKPO4·6H2O. However, the mechanisms and procedures through which this crystalline product is formed and the conditions under which the crystallization process would be influenced are not yet clear. Understanding of the reaction mechanism of the system is helpful for developing new methodologies to control the rapid reaction process and furthermore, to adjust the phase assemblage of the binder, and to enhance the macroscopic properties. This study is mainly focused on the examination of the reaction mechanism of MKPC. In addition, the formulation optimization, microstructure characterization and field application in rapid repair are also systematically studied. The chemical reactions between magnesia and potassium dihydrogen phosphate are essentially an acid-base reaction with strong heat release, the pH and temperature variation throughout the reaction process could provide useful information to disclose the different stages in the reaction. However, it would be very difficult to conduct such tests on the cement paste due to the limited water content and fast setting. In the current research, the reaction mechanism of MKPC is investigated on the diluted MKPC system through monitoring the pH and temperature development, identification of the solid phase formed, and measurement of the ionic concentration of the solution. The reaction process can be explained as follows: when magnesia and potassium phosphate powder are mixed with water, phosphate is readily dissolved, which is instantly followed by the dissociation of

  5. Metabolites as Biomarkers of Adverse Reactions Following Vaccination: A Pilot Study using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Metabolomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClenathan, Bruce M.; Stewart, Delisha A.; Spooner, Christina E.; Pathmasiri, Wimal W.; Burgess, Jason P.; McRitchie, Susan L.; Choi, Y. Sammy; Sumner, Susan C.J.

    2017-01-01

    An Adverse Event Following Immunization (AEFI) is an adverse reaction to a vaccination that goes above and beyond the usual side effects associated with vaccinations. One serious AEFI related to the smallpox vaccine is myopericarditis. Metabolomics involves the study of the low molecular weight metabolite profile of cells, tissues, and biological fluids, and provides a functional readout of the phenotype. Metabolomics may help identify a particular metabolic signature in serum of subjects who are predisposed to developing AEFIs. The goal of this study was to identify metabolic markers that may predict the development of adverse events following smallpox vaccination. Serum samples were collected from military personnel prior to and following receipt of smallpox vaccine. The study population included five subjects who were clinically diagnosed with myopericarditis, 30 subjects with asymptomatic elevation of troponins, and 31 subjects with systemic symptoms following immunization, and 34 subjects with no AEFI, serving as controls. Two-hundred pre- and post-smallpox vaccination sera were analyzed by untargeted metabolomics using 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Baseline (pre-) and post-vaccination samples from individuals who experienced clinically verified myocarditis or asymptomatic elevation of troponins were more metabolically distinguishable pre- and post-vaccination compared to individuals who only experienced systemic symptoms, or controls. Metabolomics profiles pre- and post-receipt of vaccine differed substantially when an AEFI resulted. This study is the first to describe pre- and post-vaccination metabolic profiles of subjects who developed an adverse event following immunization. The study demonstrates the promise of metabolites for determining mechanisms associated with subjects who develop AEFI and the potential to develop predictive biomarkers. PMID:28169076

  6. Photocatalytic degradation of paracetamol: intermediates and total reaction mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moctezuma, Edgar; Leyva, Elisa; Aguilar, Claudia A; Luna, Raúl A; Montalvo, Carlos

    2012-12-01

    The advanced oxidation of paracetamol (PAM) promoted by TiO(2)/UV system in aqueous medium was investigated. Monitoring this reaction by HPLC and TOC, it was demonstrated that while oxidation of paracetamol is quite efficient under these conditions, its mineralization is not complete. HPLC indicated the formation of hydroquinone, benzoquinone, p-aminophenol and p-nitrophenol in the reaction mixtures. Further evidence of p-nitrophenol formation was obtained following the reaction by UV-vis spectroscopy. Continuous monitoring by IR spectroscopy demonstrated the breaking of the aromatic amide present in PAM and subsequent formation of several aromatic intermediate compounds such as p-aminophenol and p-nitrophenol. These aromatic compounds were eventually converted into trans-unsaturated carboxylic acids. Based on these experimental results, an alternative deacylation mechanism for the photocatalytic oxidation of paracetamol is proposed. Our studies also demonstrated IR spectroscopy to be a useful technique to investigate oxidative mechanisms of pharmaceutical compounds. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Investigation of (n, p) and (n, alpha) reactions with thermal and resonance energy neutrons

    CERN Document Server

    Gledenov, Yu M

    2002-01-01

    Influence of results of (n, alpha) and (n, p) reactions cross section and asymmetry measurements on certain branches of fundamental and applied science is considered. For instance, some of the cross sections are critical for comprehension of many scenarios of nuclear synthesis in the Universe. They are also used for studying some aspects of nuclear structure and fundamental symmetries, such as mixing of isospin and non-retaining of spatial parity. And, finally, cross sections of the reactions are of applied interest, for reactor materials technologies specifically. Types of sources and methods of (n, p) and (n, alpha) reactions measurements in energy range of thermal and resonance neutrons are described in the review. Special attention is paid to measurements in radioactive relatively short-lived samples and very small stable samples. Several examples of the measurements are provided, which are of scientific interest, as they permit demonstrating the method used. Possible future measurements are discussed in ...

  8. High-energy nuclear reaction mechanisms - fission, fragmentation and spallation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaufman, S.B.

    1987-01-01

    Measurements of the correlations in kinetic energy, mass, charge, and angle of coincident fragments formed in high-energy nuclear reactions have helped to characterize the processes of fission, fragmentation and spallation. For example, fission or fission-like two-body breakup mechanisms result in a strong angular correlation between two heavy fragments; in addition, the momentum transfer in the reaction can be deduced from the correlation. Another example is the multiplicity of light charged particles associated with a given heavy fragment, which is a measure of the violence of the collision, thus distinguishing between central and peripheral collisions. A summary of what has been learned about these processes from such studies will be given, along with some suggestions for further experiments

  9. Application of the resonant 52(p,γ)53Mn reaction to the measurement of chromium depth distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Switkowski, Z.E.; Petty, R.J.; Clark, G.J.

    1979-01-01

    A resonance in the 52 Cr(p,γ) 53 Mn reaction has been investigated as a probe for the quantitative determination of chromium depth distributions. The relevant nuclear parameters of this resonance were measured to be: resonance energy, Esub(p)1005.2 +- 0.2 keV, total width GAMMA < 100 eV, and resonance strength, (2J+1)GAMMAsub(p)GAMMAsub(γ)/GAMMA = 0.89 +-0.11 eV. As an example of the use of the nuclear resonance technique, the chromium profile of an electroplated chrome black solar absorber surface has been studied and the results are presented

  10. Resonant Interaction, Approximate Symmetry, and Electromagnetic Interaction (EMI) in Low Energy Nuclear Reactions (LENR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chubb, Scott

    2007-03-01

    Only recently (talk by P.A. Mosier-Boss et al, in this session) has it become possible to trigger high energy particle emission and Excess Heat, on demand, in LENR involving PdD. Also, most nuclear physicists are bothered by the fact that the dominant reaction appears to be related to the least common deuteron(d) fusion reaction,d+d ->α+γ. A clear consensus about the underlying effect has also been illusive. One reason for this involves confusion about the approximate (SU2) symmetry: The fact that all d-d fusion reactions conserve isospin has been widely assumed to mean the dynamics is driven by the strong force interaction (SFI), NOT EMI. Thus, most nuclear physicists assume: 1. EMI is static; 2. Dominant reactions have smallest changes in incident kinetic energy (T); and (because of 2), d+d ->α+γ is suppressed. But this assumes a stronger form of SU2 symmetry than is present; d+d ->α+γ reactions are suppressed not because of large changes in T but because the interaction potential involves EMI, is dynamic (not static), the SFI is static, and because the two incident deuterons must have approximate Bose Exchange symmetry and vanishing spin. A generalization of this idea involves a resonant form of reaction, similar to the de-excitation of an atom. These and related (broken gauge) symmetry EMI effects on LENR are discussed.

  11. Study of the Pygmy Dipole Resonance in 124Sn by means of the (α,α'γ) reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endres, J.; Zilges, A.; Pietralla, N.; Savran, D.; Sonnabend, K.; Harakeh, M. N.; Stoica, V.; Woertche, H.; Butler, P.; Herzberg, R. D.; Scheck, M.; Kruecken, R.; Popescu, L.; Harissopulos, S.; Lagoyannis, A.

    2009-01-01

    In recent years α-γ coincidence experiments at 136 MeV incident energy on 48 Ca, 140 Ce, 138 Ba and 124 Sn were performed at the KVI in Groningen to study the isospin character of electric dipole excitations below the particle threshold, frequently called Pygmy Dipole Resonance (PDR). An array of HPGe γ-detectors has been used in coincidence with the Big-Bite Spectrometer (BBS) and a resolution of about 10 keV in the γ-ray energy has been achieved. The results show that the excitation patterns of the PDR in the (α,α') reaction seem to differ significantly from results obtained in Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence (NRF)(γ,γ') measurements. The PDR, which until now has been assigned to one excitation mode, splits up into two parts: One that is excited in (α,α'γ) and (γ,γ') reactions (denoting a dominant isoscalar character), and one that is only excited in (γ,γ')(denoting a dominant isovector character). This indicates that two different excitation mechanisms produce these low-lying E1 excitations [1], The preliminary results of the latest measurements on the N = 82 nucleus 138 Ba and the Z = 50 nucleus 124 Sn show that this break up into two parts is a common feature of the PDR in semi-magic nuclei.

  12. Reaction mechanisms for enhancing carbon dioxide mineral sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvis, Karalee Ann

    Increasing global temperature resulting from the increased release of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere is one of the greatest problems facing society. Nevertheless, coal plants remain the largest source of electrical energy and carbon dioxide gas. For this reason, researchers are searching for methods to reduce carbon dioxide emissions into the atmosphere from the combustion of coal. Mineral sequestration of carbon dioxide reacted in electrolyte solutions at 185°C and 2200 psi with olivine (magnesium silicate) has been shown to produce environmentally benign carbonates. However, to make this method feasible for industrial applications, the reaction rate needs to be increased. Two methods were employed to increase the rate of mineral sequestration: reactant composition and concentration were altered independently in various runs. The products were analyzed with complete combustion for total carbon content. Crystalline phases in the product were analyzed with Debye-Scherrer X-ray powder diffraction. To understand the reaction mechanism, single crystals of San Carlos Olivine were reacted in two solutions: (0.64 M NaHCO3/1 M NaCl) and (5.5 M KHCO3) and analyzed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS), and fluctuation electron microscopy (FEM) to study the surface morphology, atomic crystalline structure, composition and amorphous structure. From solution chemistry studies, it was found that increasing the activity of the bicarbonate ion increased the conversion rate of carbon dioxide to magnesite. The fastest conversion, 60% conversion in one hour, occurred in a solution of 5.5 M KHCO3. The reaction product particles, magnesium carbonate, significantly increased in both number density and size on the coupon when the bicarbonate ion activity was increased. During some experiments reaction vessel corrosion also altered the mineral sequestration mechanism. Nickel ions from vessel

  13. A discrete model to study reaction-diffusion-mechanics systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weise, Louis D; Nash, Martyn P; Panfilov, Alexander V

    2011-01-01

    This article introduces a discrete reaction-diffusion-mechanics (dRDM) model to study the effects of deformation on reaction-diffusion (RD) processes. The dRDM framework employs a FitzHugh-Nagumo type RD model coupled to a mass-lattice model, that undergoes finite deformations. The dRDM model describes a material whose elastic properties are described by a generalized Hooke's law for finite deformations (Seth material). Numerically, the dRDM approach combines a finite difference approach for the RD equations with a Verlet integration scheme for the equations of the mass-lattice system. Using this framework results were reproduced on self-organized pacemaking activity that have been previously found with a continuous RD mechanics model. Mechanisms that determine the period of pacemakers and its dependency on the medium size are identified. Finally it is shown how the drift direction of pacemakers in RDM systems is related to the spatial distribution of deformation and curvature effects.

  14. A discrete model to study reaction-diffusion-mechanics systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louis D Weise

    Full Text Available This article introduces a discrete reaction-diffusion-mechanics (dRDM model to study the effects of deformation on reaction-diffusion (RD processes. The dRDM framework employs a FitzHugh-Nagumo type RD model coupled to a mass-lattice model, that undergoes finite deformations. The dRDM model describes a material whose elastic properties are described by a generalized Hooke's law for finite deformations (Seth material. Numerically, the dRDM approach combines a finite difference approach for the RD equations with a Verlet integration scheme for the equations of the mass-lattice system. Using this framework results were reproduced on self-organized pacemaking activity that have been previously found with a continuous RD mechanics model. Mechanisms that determine the period of pacemakers and its dependency on the medium size are identified. Finally it is shown how the drift direction of pacemakers in RDM systems is related to the spatial distribution of deformation and curvature effects.

  15. Mechanical detection of electron spin resonance beyond 1 THz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Hideyuki; Ohmichi, Eiji; Ohta, Hitoshi

    2015-01-01

    We report the cantilever detection of electron spin resonance (ESR) in the terahertz (THz) region. This technique mechanically detects ESR as a change in magnetic torque that acts on the cantilever. The ESR absorption of a tiny single crystal of Co Tutton salt, Co(NH 4 ) 2 (SO 4 ) 2 ⋅6H 2 O, was observed in frequencies of up to 1.1 THz using a backward travelling wave oscillator as a THz-wave source. This is the highest frequency of mechanical detection of ESR till date. The spectral resolution was evaluated with the ratio of the peak separation to the sum of the half-width at half maximum of two absorption peaks. The highest resolution value of 8.59 ± 0.53 was achieved at 685 GHz, while 2.47 ± 0.01 at 80 GHz. This technique will not only broaden the scope of ESR spectroscopy application but also lead to high-spectral-resolution ESR imaging

  16. Reaction mechanism and spectroscopy of transfer reactions induced by heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemaire, M.-C.

    1977-01-01

    The specific features displayed by data on heavy ion elastic and inelastic angular distributions are discussed, and their physical origin is pointed out from semi-classical calculations in counterpart ambiguities in the phenomenological description of the optical potential appear. Two nucleon transfer reactions induced by heavy ions successfully point out important contributions of a two-step process where the transfer is proceeding via target and residual nucleus inelastic excitation. At incident energies not too high above the Coulomb barrier, such process produces clear shape changes between different final state angular distributions. At higher incident energy, the angular distributions are forward peaked and display oscillations for both mechanisms. As for four-nucleon transfer reactions, the existing data suggest that the nucleons are well transferred into a Os relative

  17. Semiclassical wave packet treatment of scattering resonances: application to the delta zero-point energy effect in recombination reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetoshkin, Evgeny; Babikov, Dmitri

    2007-09-28

    For the first time Feshbach-type resonances important in recombination reactions are characterized using the semiclassical wave packet method. This approximation allows us to determine the energies, lifetimes, and wave functions of the resonances and also to observe a very interesting correlation between them. Most important is that this approach permits description of a quantum delta-zero-point energy effect in recombination reactions and reproduces the anomalous rates of ozone formation.

  18. Radiation-protective drugs and their reaction mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Livesey, J.C.; Reed, D.J.; Adamson, L.F.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of this book is to provide the reader with a concise review of radioprotective drugs and their reaction mechanisms. The first chapter reviews the effect of radiation on biological systems at the atomic, molecular, and subcellular levels. The second chapter discusses endogenous factors that influence radioresistance. Chapter 3 presents the main theme of the book, chemical radioprotection and its mechanisms, and examines the basis of natural radioprotection and how it may be affected by exogenous chemicals. Chapter 4, the Therapy of Radiation Damage, is a very brief general discussion that only touches on some of the experimental approaches to therapy. Chapter 5 contains recommendations for future research. The two appendices list research in progress in the United States and some radioprotective compounds of possible investigational interest. Also included is a brief discussion of structure-activity relationships

  19. Suppression of mechanical resonance in digital servo system considering oscillation frequency deviation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Yangyang; Yang, Ming; Hu, Kun

    2017-01-01

    High-stiffness servo system is easy to cause mechanical resonance in elastic coupling servo system. Although on-line adaptive notch filter is effective in most cases, it will lead to a severer resonance when resonance frequency deviated from the natural torsional frequency. To explain...

  20. Mechanisms of polyphosphate glucokinase and polyphosphate kinase reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pepin, C.A.; Robinson, N.A.; Wood, H.G.

    1986-01-01

    Polyphosphate glucokinase [poly(P)GK] catalyzes the following reaction: poly(P)/sub n/ + glucose → poly(P)/sub n-1/ + G-6-P. With long chain poly(P) [n=750 to 400] the mechanism appeared to be processive, in which there is phosphorylation of glucose without release of intermediate sizes of the poly(P) until the chain is about 100, thereafter there were intermediate sizes formed apparently by a non-processive process. Poly(P) kinase catalyzes the following reaction: ATP + poly(P)/sub n/ ↔ ADP + poly(P)/sub n + 1/. Using short chain 32 [P] poly(P) as a primer and non-radioactive ATP, long chain poly(P) is formed processively. The resulting chain has a short length labeled with 32 [P] contributed by the primer on one end and the remainder is made up of unlabeled (P) from the ATP. The authors have used this 32 [P] poly(P) as a substrate with poly(P)GK. If the mechanism of the poly(P)GK were initially processive, there would be a 50% chance the phosphate would be utilized from the unlabeled end and 50% of the 32 [P] would remain in the shortened chain. However, all the 32 [P] was lost when 20% of the poly(P) was converted to G-6-P. In contrast, with poly(P) kinase, the % of poly(P) utilized was equivalent to the % of 32 [P] converted to ATP, which is consistent with a strictly processive mechanism. Even though the mechanism of poly(P)GK appeared to be processive with long chains, the on and off rate of poly(P) from the enzyme is such that there is random removal of (P) from both ends of the poly(P) chain

  1. On the resonant behavior of the 16O + 15N reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aissaoui, N.; Haas, F.; Freeman, R.M.; Beck, C.; Morsad, A.; Djerroud, B.; Caplar, R.; Monnehan, G.A.; Hachem, A.; Youlal, M.

    1994-01-01

    The 16 O+ 15 N reaction products have been studied by the γ-ray detection method in the CM energy range 15.5 to 36.1 MeV and by the kinematical coincidence method at energies ranging from E CM =20.6 to 33.5 MeV. The γ-ray yield excitation function of the 16 O 3 - inelastic channel shows the existence of resonant structures. Two structures with ∼1.6 MeV width are observed in the large angle elastic, scattering excitation function, they are correlated with the resonances seen in the inelastic channel. Angular momentum assignments were made from the elastic backward angular distributions. (orig.)

  2. The chemistry of the carbothermal synthesis of β-SiC : reaction mechanism, reaction rate and grain growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijen, F.K.; Metselaar, R.

    1991-01-01

    Evidence is given that in the present case the reaction mechanism of ß-SiC formation from silica and carbon is a direct solid-state reaction in which silica migrates over the silicon carbide surface to the carbon. A high value (440 kJ/mol) of activation energy is obtained for this reaction. This

  3. Mechanism of chimera formation during the Multiple Displacement Amplification reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stockwell Timothy B

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multiple Displacement Amplification (MDA is a method used for amplifying limiting DNA sources. The high molecular weight amplified DNA is ideal for DNA library construction. While this has enabled genomic sequencing from one or a few cells of unculturable microorganisms, the process is complicated by the tendency of MDA to generate chimeric DNA rearrangements in the amplified DNA. Determining the source of the DNA rearrangements would be an important step towards reducing or eliminating them. Results Here, we characterize the major types of chimeras formed by carrying out an MDA whole genome amplification from a single E. coli cell and sequencing by the 454 Life Sciences method. Analysis of 475 chimeras revealed the predominant reaction mechanisms that create the DNA rearrangements. The highly branched DNA synthesized in MDA can assume many alternative secondary structures. DNA strands extended on an initial template can be displaced becoming available to prime on a second template creating the chimeras. Evidence supports a model in which branch migration can displace 3'-ends freeing them to prime on the new templates. More than 85% of the resulting DNA rearrangements were inverted sequences with intervening deletions that the model predicts. Intramolecular rearrangements were favored, with displaced 3'-ends reannealing to single stranded 5'-strands contained within the same branched DNA molecule. In over 70% of the chimeric junctions, the 3' termini had initiated priming at complimentary sequences of 2–21 nucleotides (nts in the new templates. Conclusion Formation of chimeras is an important limitation to the MDA method, particularly for whole genome sequencing. Identification of the mechanism for chimera formation provides new insight into the MDA reaction and suggests methods to reduce chimeras. The 454 sequencing approach used here will provide a rapid method to assess the utility of reaction modifications.

  4. Studies of photonuclear reactions and photon activation analysis in the giant dipole resonance region using microtrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tran Duc Thiep; Nguyen Van Do; Nguyen Khac Thi; Truong Thi An; Nguyen Ngoc Son

    2004-01-01

    Microtrons are accelerators of electrons and are simultaneous source of Bremsstrahlung photon flux and fission neutrons. In 1982, a microtron of seventeen trajectories Microtron MT - 17 was put into operation at the National Institute of Physics of Vietnam. Though very modest, microtrons are very useful for developing countries such as Vietnam in both fundamental and applied physics research. During the recent years by using the above mentioned MT - 17 and microtrons from other institutes we have carried out different investigation. In this report we present some results obtained in the studies of photonuclear reactions and photon activation analysis in the giant dipole resonance region. (author)

  5. On the knock-out mechanism for the 12C(P,α)9B reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, M.Y.M.; Ismail, E.H.; Rabie, A.

    1978-01-01

    The mechanism of the reaction 12 C(P,α) 9 B is studied using zero range distorted wave Born approximation. The knock out mechanism is assumed to represent this reaction both in the forward and backward angles. (orig.) [de

  6. Quantum and classical control of single photon states via a mechanical resonator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basiri-Esfahani, Sahar; Myers, Casey R; Combes, Joshua; Milburn, G J

    2016-01-01

    Optomechanical systems typically use light to control the quantum state of a mechanical resonator. In this paper, we propose a scheme for controlling the quantum state of light using the mechanical degree of freedom as a controlled beam splitter. Preparing the mechanical resonator in non-classical states enables an optomechanical Stern–Gerlach interferometer. When the mechanical resonator has a small coherent amplitude it acts as a quantum control, entangling the optical and mechanical degrees of freedom. As the coherent amplitude of the resonator increases, we recover single photon and two-photon interference via a classically controlled beam splitter. The visibility of the two-photon interference is particularly sensitive to coherent excitations in the mechanical resonator and this could form the basis of an optically transduced weak-force sensor. (paper)

  7. Optimized reaction mechanism rate rules for ignition of normal alkanes

    KAUST Repository

    Cai, Liming

    2016-08-11

    The increasing demand for cleaner combustion and reduced greenhouse gas emissions motivates research on the combustion of hydrocarbon fuels and their surrogates. Accurate detailed chemical kinetic models are an important prerequisite for high fidelity reacting flow simulations capable of improving combustor design and operation. The development of such models for many new fuel components and/or surrogate molecules is greatly facilitated by the application of reaction classes and rate rules. Accurate and versatile rate rules are desirable to improve the predictive accuracy of kinetic models. A major contribution in the literature is the recent work by Bugler et al. (2015), which has significantly improved rate rules and thermochemical parameters used in kinetic modeling of alkanes. In the present study, it is demonstrated that rate rules can be used and consistently optimized for a set of normal alkanes including n-heptane, n-octane, n-nonane, n-decane, and n-undecane, thereby improving the predictive accuracy for all the considered fuels. A Bayesian framework is applied in the calibration of the rate rules. The optimized rate rules are subsequently applied to generate a mechanism for n-dodecane, which was not part of the training set for the optimized rate rules. The developed mechanism shows accurate predictions compared with published well-validated mechanisms for a wide range of conditions.

  8. Tc1-mediated contact sensitivity reaction, its mechanism and regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Zemelka-Wiącek

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The contact hypersensitivity reaction (CHS to haptens is a classic example of cell-mediated immune response. In the effector phase, two stages can be distinguished: an early component, that appears only 2 hours after subsequent contact with the hapten, and the late component that develops approximately 24 hours later which is mediated by TCRαβ+ cells. The effector lymphocytes may be CD4+ T helper 1 (Th1 cells or CD8+ T cytotoxic 1 (Tc1 cells, which depends on the employed hapten and/or mice strain. NKT lymphocytes play the crucial role in the CHS initiation, by supporting B1 cells in the antigen-specific IgM antibodies production. The development of an early component is essential for the recruitment of T effector (Teff cells to the side of hapten deposition and for the complete expansion of inflammatory reaction. The CHS reaction is under T regulatory (Treg cells control, both in the induction phase as well as in the effector phase. A new view of a negative regulation of the Tc1 mediated CHS response is based on the suppression induced by epicutaneous (EC application of protein antigen. The DNP-BSA skin application, on a gauze patch, leads to a state of immunosuppression. This maneuver results in rising the population of Treg cells with TCRαβ+CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ phenotype. The mechanism of suppression requires direct contact between Treg cells and Teff cells and the participation of CTLA-4 molecule is also necessary. The described method of evoking immune tolerance via EC immunization may contribute to elaborate a new method of allergic contact dermatitis therapy. This is because of its effectiveness, ease of induction and non-invasive protein antigen application.

  9. Resonance analysis of the {sup 12}C,{sup 13}C({alpha},n) reactions and evaluation of neutron yield data of the reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murata, Toru [AITEL Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1998-03-01

    The {sup 12}C({alpha},n){sup 15}O reaction and the {sup 13}C({alpha},n){sup 16}O reaction were analyzed with a resonance formula in the incident {alpha}-particle energy range of 1.0 to 16.0 MeV. With the obtained resonance parameters, branching ratios of the emitted neutrons to the several levels of the residual nucleus and their angular distributions were calculated to obtain the energy spectrum of emitted neutrons. Thick target neutron yield of carbon were also calculated and compared with the experimental data. (author)

  10. Search for a resonance in the 14N(p,γ)15O reaction at Ep=127 keV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Runkle, R.C.; Champagne, A.E.; Fox, C.; Iliadis, C.; Pollanen, J.; Stephan, A.; Westerfeldt, C.

    2002-01-01

    The 14 N(p,γ) 15 O reaction regulates the energy produced by the CN cycle in main-sequence stars and in red giants. Recently, preliminary evidence was presented for a new resonance in this reaction, which would significantly increase the reaction rate for temperatures near 10 8 K. We have attempted to confirm this result and find no indication of a resonance near E p lab =127 keV. Our upper limit on its strength is ωγ≤32 neV (95% C.L.), which is more than 2 orders of magnitude below the previously reported value

  11. Revisiting the Kinetics and Mechanism of Bromate-Bromide Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Côrtes Carlos Eduardo S.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The bromate-bromide reaction was investigated in an acidity range not studied yet. The reaction was followed at the Br2/Br3- isosbestic point (lambda = 446 nm. It was observed a first-order behavior for bromate and bromide ions and a second-order behavior for H+ ion that results in the rate law nu = k[BrO3-][Br- ][H+]². This rate law suggests a mechanism involving two successive protonation of bromate followed by the interaction of the intermediate species H2BrO3+ with bromide. These results disagree with the obtained by other authors who observed a second-order behavior for the bromide and first-order for H+, and have proposed intermediate species like H2Br2O3 and HBr2O3-. The second-order for [H+] observed in the range 0.005 <= [H+] <= 2.77 mol L-1 sets down that the pKa of bromic acid, HBrO3, must be lower than -0.5 (T = 25 °C, different from all other values for this pKa proposed in the literature.

  12. BlenX-based compositional modeling of complex reaction mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judit Zámborszky

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Molecular interactions are wired in a fascinating way resulting in complex behavior of biological systems. Theoretical modeling provides a useful framework for understanding the dynamics and the function of such networks. The complexity of the biological networks calls for conceptual tools that manage the combinatorial explosion of the set of possible interactions. A suitable conceptual tool to attack complexity is compositionality, already successfully used in the process algebra field to model computer systems. We rely on the BlenX programming language, originated by the beta-binders process calculus, to specify and simulate high-level descriptions of biological circuits. The Gillespie's stochastic framework of BlenX requires the decomposition of phenomenological functions into basic elementary reactions. Systematic unpacking of complex reaction mechanisms into BlenX templates is shown in this study. The estimation/derivation of missing parameters and the challenges emerging from compositional model building in stochastic process algebras are discussed. A biological example on circadian clock is presented as a case study of BlenX compositionality.

  13. Reaction mechanisms and staggering in S+Ni collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Agostino, M.; Bruno, M.; Gulminelli, F.; Morelli, L.; Baiocco, G.; Bardelli, L.; Barlini, S.; Cannata, F.; Casini, G.; Geraci, E.; Gramegna, F.; Kravchuk, V.L.; Marchi, T.; Moroni, A.; Ordine, A.; Raduta, Ad.R.

    2011-01-01

    The reactions 32 S+ 58 Ni and 32 S+ 64 Ni are studied at 14.5 A MeV. After a selection of the collision mechanism, we show that important even-odd effects are present in the isotopic fragment distributions when the excitation energy is small. Close to the multifragmentation threshold this staggering appears hidden by the rapid variation of the production yields with the fragment size. Once this effect is accounted for, the staggering appears to be a universal feature of fragment production, slightly enhanced when the emission source is neutron poor. A closer look at the behavior of the production yields as a function of the neutron excess N-Z, reveals that odd-even effects cannot be explained by pairing effects in the nuclear masses alone, but depend in a more complex way on the de-excitation chain.

  14. On the mechanism of effective chemical reactions with turbulent mixing of reactants and finite rate of molecular reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vorotilin, V. P., E-mail: VPVorotilin@yandex.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Applied Mechanics (Russian Federation)

    2017-01-15

    A generalization of the theory of chemical transformation processes under turbulent mixing of reactants and arbitrary values of the rate of molecular reactions is presented that was previously developed for the variant of an instantaneous reaction [13]. The use of the features of instantaneous reactions when considering the general case, namely, the introduction of the concept of effective reaction for the reactant volumes and writing a closing conservation equation for these volumes, became possible due to the partition of the whole amount of reactants into “active” and “passive” classes; the reactants of the first class are not mixed and react by the mechanism of instantaneous reactions, while the reactants of the second class approach each other only through molecular diffusion, and therefore their contribution to the reaction process can be neglected. The physical mechanism of reaction for the limit regime of an ideal mixing reactor (IMR) is revealed and described. Although formally the reaction rate in this regime depends on the concentration of passive fractions of the reactants, according to the theory presented, the true (hidden) mechanism of the reaction is associated only with the reaction of the active fractions of the reactants with vanishingly small concentration in the volume of the reactor. It is shown that the rate constant of fast chemical reactions can be evaluated when the mixing intensity of reactants is much less than that needed to reach the mixing conditions in an IMR.

  15. Design optimization and fatigue testing of an electronically-driven mechanically-resonant cantilever spring mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kheng, Lim Boon; Kean, Koay Loke; Gitano-Briggs, Horizon

    2010-01-01

    A light scanning device consisting of an electronically-driven mechanically-resonant cantilever spring-mirror system has been developed for innovative lighting applications. The repeated flexing of the cantilever spring during operation can lead to premature fatigue failure. A model was created to optimize the spring design. The optimized spring design can reduce stress by approximately one-third from the initial design. Fatigue testing showed that the optimized spring design can operate continuously for over 1 month without failure. Analysis of failures indicates surface cracks near the root of the spring are responsible for the failures.

  16. An efficient quantum mechanical method for radical pair recombination reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Alan M; Fay, Thomas P; Manolopoulos, David E

    2016-12-28

    The standard quantum mechanical expressions for the singlet and triplet survival probabilities and product yields of a radical pair recombination reaction involve a trace over the states in a combined electronic and nuclear spin Hilbert space. If this trace is evaluated deterministically, by performing a separate time-dependent wavepacket calculation for each initial state in the Hilbert space, the computational effort scales as O(Z 2 log⁡Z), where Z is the total number of nuclear spin states. Here we show that the trace can also be evaluated stochastically, by exploiting the properties of spin coherent states. This results in a computational effort of O(MZlog⁡Z), where M is the number of Monte Carlo samples needed for convergence. Example calculations on a strongly coupled radical pair with Z>10 6 show that the singlet yield can be converged to graphical accuracy using just M=200 samples, resulting in a speed up by a factor of >5000 over a standard deterministic calculation. We expect that this factor will greatly facilitate future quantum mechanical simulations of a wide variety of radical pairs of interest in chemistry and biology.

  17. Quasi-bound alpha resonant states populated by the {sup 12}C({sup 6}Li, d) reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, M.R.D.; Borello-Lewin, T.; Miyake, H.; Horodynski-Matsushigue, L.B.; Duarte, J.L.M.; Rodrigues, C.L.; Souza, M.A. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (IF/USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica; Cunsolo, A.; Cappuzzello, F.; Foti, A.; Agodi, C.; Cavallaro, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (LNS/INFN), Catania (Italy). Lab. Nazionali del Sud; Ukita, G.M. [Universidade de Santo Amaro (UNISA), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Psicologia

    2012-07-01

    Full text: The alpha cluster phenomenon in the light nuclei structure has been the subject of a long time investigation since the proposal of the Ikeda diagrams [1]. The main purpose of the research program in progress is the investigation of this phenomenon in (x{alpha}) and (x{alpha}+n) nuclei through the ({sup 6}Li, d) alpha transfer reaction [2-4]. Alpha resonant states around the (4{alpha}) threshold in the nucleus {sup 16}O are the focus of the present contribution. In fact, the importance of these resonances at the elements production in stars is recognized, as primarily pointed out by Hoyle in {sup 12}C [6]. The existence of a rotational band with the {alpha} +{sup 12} C (Hoyle) cluster state structure was recently demonstrated by Ohkubo and Hirabayashi [6]. In order to explore this region of interest, measurements of the {sup 12}C({sup 6}Li, d){sup 16}O reaction up to 17 MeV of excitation at an incident energy of 25.5 MeV, have been performed employing the Sao Paulo Pelletron-Enge Split-Pole facility and the nuclear emulsion detection technique (plates Fuji G6B, 50 {mu}m thick). Spectra associated with six scattering angles, from 5 deg to 29 deg in the laboratory frame, each one 50 cm along the focal surface, were measured. Several narrow resonances with a quasi-bound behavior embedded in the continuum were detected and the resolution of 25 keV allowed for the separation of doublets not resolved before [7,8]. The absolute cross sections and the respective deuteron angular distributions were determined and the analysis is in progress. [1] K. Ikeda et al., Prog. Theor. Phys. Suppl. E 68, 464 (1968); H. Horiuchi, K. Ikeda, and Y. Suzuki, ibid. 44, 225 (1978). [2] M.R.D.Rodrigues et al., in12th International Conference on Nuclear Reaction Mechanism, Varenna, Italy, edited by F. Cerutti and A. Ferrari , CERN Proceedings, 2010-2, pp. 331- 335. [3] T. Borello-Lewin et al., Proceedings of SOTANCP2, Brussels, Belgium 2010, edited by P. Descouvemount et al., Int. J

  18. Induced Double-Beta Processes in Electron Fluxes as Resonance Reactions in Weak Interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaponov, Yu.V.

    2004-01-01

    A theory of induced double-beta processes in electron beams is developed. It is shown that a resonance mechanism of the excitation of the ground state of an intermediate nucleus is realized in them, this mechanism being described in the single-state-dominance approximation, where the process in question is broken down into two stages, the excitation of a dominant state and its decay. This approximation is valid irrespective of the features of this state, both for allowed (for a 1 + state of the intermediate nucleus) and for forbidden transitions. An analysis of the resonance mechanism reveals that its inclusion in double-beta-decay processes requires introducing additional diagrams that describe the gamma decay of virtual intermediate states. The inclusion of such corrections may lead to a decrease in the expected half-life and to a change in the beta spectrum. Effects associated with the interference between the two stages of a double-beta process are estimated, and it is shown that their influence can be significant if the time interval between these stages is less than or on the order of the lifetime of the dominant state

  19. Helicity dependence of the γ {sup 3}He → πX reactions in the Δ(1232) resonance region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costanza, S.; Rigamonti, F. [INFN, Sezione di Pavia, Pavia (Italy); Universita di Pavia, Dipartimento di Fisica, Pavia (Italy); Mushkarenkov, A.; Braghieri, A.; Pedroni, P. [INFN, Sezione di Pavia, Pavia (Italy); Romaniuk, M.; Mandaglio, G. [INFN, Sezione di Catania, Catania (Italy); Universita di Messina, Dipartimento di Fisica e Scienze della Terra, Messina (Italy); Aguar Bartolome, P.; Ahrens, J.; Arends, H.J.; Heid, E.; Jahn, O.; Kashevarov, V.L.; Ostrick, M.; Ortega, H.; Otte, P.B.; Oussena, B.; Schumann, S.; Thomas, A.; Unverzagt, M. [Universitaet Mainz, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Mainz (Germany); Annand, J.R.M.; Hamilton, D.; Howdle, D.; Livingston, K.; MacGregor, I.J.D.; Mancell, J.; McGeorge, J.C.; Rosner, G. [University of Glasgow, SUPA School of Physics and Astronomy, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Beck, R. [University of Bonn, Helmholtz-Institut fuer Strahlen und Kernphysik, Bonn (Germany); Bekrenev, V.; Kruglov, S.; Kulbardis, A. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina (Russian Federation); Berghaeuser, H.; Drexler, P.; Metag, V.; Thiel, M. [University of Giessen, II Physikalisches Institut, Giessen (Germany); Briscoe, W.J.; Downie, E.J. [The George Washington University, Washington, DC (United States); Cherepnya, S.N.; Fil' kov, L.V.; Lisin, V.; Polonski, A. [Institute for Nuclear Research, Moscow (Russian Federation); Collicott, C. [Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS (Canada); Saint Mary' s University, Halifax, NS (Canada); Fix, A. [Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Glazier, D.I. [University of Glasgow, SUPA School of Physics and Astronomy, Glasgow (United Kingdom); University of Edinburgh, SUPA School of Physics and Astronomy, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Heil, W.; Krimmer, J. [Universitaet Mainz, Institut fuer Physik, Mainz (Germany); Hornidge, D.; Middleton, D.G. [Mount Allison University, Sackville, NB (Canada); Jaegle, I.; Keshelashvili, I.; Krusche, B.; Oberle, M.; Pheron, F.; Rostomyan, T.; Werthmueller, D. [University of Basel, Institut fuer Physik, Basel (Switzerland); Huber, G.M. [University of Regina, Regina, SK (Canada); Jude, T.; Watts, D.P. [University of Edinburgh, SUPA School of Physics and Astronomy, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Kondratiev, R. [Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Korolija, M.; Supek, I. [Rudjer Boskovic Institute, Zagreb (Croatia); Manley, D.M. [Kent State University, Kent, Ohio (United States); Nefkens, B.M.K.; Starostin, A. [University of California, Los Angeles, California (United States); Nikolaev, A. [Universita di Pavia, Dipartimento di Fisica, Pavia (Italy); Prakhov, S. [Universitaet Mainz, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Mainz (Germany); The George Washington University, Washington, DC (United States); University of California, Los Angeles, California (United States); Sarty, A.J. [Saint Mary' s University, Halifax, NS (Canada); Collaboration: A2 Collaboration

    2014-11-15

    The helicity dependences of the differential cross sections for the semi-inclusive γ {sup 3}He → π{sup 0} X and γ {sup 3}He → π{sup ±} X reactions have been measured for the first time in the energy region 200 < E{sub γ} 450 MeV. The experiment was performed at the tagged photon beam facility of the MAMI accelerator in Mainz using a longitudinally polarised high-pressure {sup 3}He gas target. Hadronic products were measured with the large-acceptance Crystal Ball detector complemented with additional devices for charged-particle tracking and identification. Unpolarised differential cross sections and their helicity dependence are compared with theoretical calculations using the Fix-Arenhoevel model. The effect of the intermediate excitation of the Δ(1232) resonance can be clearly seen from this comparison, especially for the polarised case, where nuclear effects are relatively small. The model provides a better theoretical description of the unpolarised charged pion photoproduction data than the neutral pion channel. It does significantly better in describing the helicity-dependent data in both channels. These comparisons provide new information on the mechanisms involved in pion photoproduction on {sup 3}He and suggest that a polarised {sup 3}He target can provide valuable information on the corresponding polarised quasi-free neutron reactions. (orig.)

  20. Helicity dependence of the γ 3He → πX reactions in the Δ(1232) resonance region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costanza, S.; Rigamonti, F.; Mushkarenkov, A.; Braghieri, A.; Pedroni, P.; Romaniuk, M.; Mandaglio, G.; Aguar Bartolome, P.; Ahrens, J.; Arends, H.J.; Heid, E.; Jahn, O.; Kashevarov, V.L.; Ostrick, M.; Ortega, H.; Otte, P.B.; Oussena, B.; Schumann, S.; Thomas, A.; Unverzagt, M.; Annand, J.R.M.; Hamilton, D.; Howdle, D.; Livingston, K.; MacGregor, I.J.D.; Mancell, J.; McGeorge, J.C.; Rosner, G.; Beck, R.; Bekrenev, V.; Kruglov, S.; Kulbardis, A.; Berghaeuser, H.; Drexler, P.; Metag, V.; Thiel, M.; Briscoe, W.J.; Downie, E.J.; Cherepnya, S.N.; Fil'kov, L.V.; Lisin, V.; Polonski, A.; Collicott, C.; Fix, A.; Glazier, D.I.; Heil, W.; Krimmer, J.; Hornidge, D.; Middleton, D.G.; Jaegle, I.; Keshelashvili, I.; Krusche, B.; Oberle, M.; Pheron, F.; Rostomyan, T.; Werthmueller, D.; Huber, G.M.; Jude, T.; Watts, D.P.; Kondratiev, R.; Korolija, M.; Supek, I.; Manley, D.M.; Nefkens, B.M.K.; Starostin, A.; Nikolaev, A.; Prakhov, S.; Sarty, A.J.

    2014-01-01

    The helicity dependences of the differential cross sections for the semi-inclusive γ 3 He → π 0 X and γ 3 He → π ± X reactions have been measured for the first time in the energy region 200 γ 450 MeV. The experiment was performed at the tagged photon beam facility of the MAMI accelerator in Mainz using a longitudinally polarised high-pressure 3 He gas target. Hadronic products were measured with the large-acceptance Crystal Ball detector complemented with additional devices for charged-particle tracking and identification. Unpolarised differential cross sections and their helicity dependence are compared with theoretical calculations using the Fix-Arenhoevel model. The effect of the intermediate excitation of the Δ(1232) resonance can be clearly seen from this comparison, especially for the polarised case, where nuclear effects are relatively small. The model provides a better theoretical description of the unpolarised charged pion photoproduction data than the neutral pion channel. It does significantly better in describing the helicity-dependent data in both channels. These comparisons provide new information on the mechanisms involved in pion photoproduction on 3 He and suggest that a polarised 3 He target can provide valuable information on the corresponding polarised quasi-free neutron reactions. (orig.)

  1. Opto-mechanical design of vacuum laser resonator for the OSQAR experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hošek, Jan; Macúchová, Karolina; Nemcová, Šárka; Kunc, Štěpán.; Šulc, Miroslav

    2015-01-01

    This paper gives short overview of laser-based experiment OSQAR at CERN which is focused on search of axions and axion-like particles. The OSQAR experiment uses two experimental methods for axion search - measurement of the ultra-fine vacuum magnetic birefringence and a method based on the "Light shining through the wall" experiment. Because both experimental methods have reached its attainable limits of sensitivity we have focused on designing a vacuum laser resonator. The resonator will increase the number of convertible photons and their endurance time within the magnetic field. This paper presents an opto-mechanical design of a two component transportable vacuum laser resonator. Developed optical resonator mechanical design allows to be used as a 0.8 meter long prototype laser resonator for laboratory testing and after transportation and replacement of the mirrors it can be mounted on the LHC magnet in CERN to form a 20 meter long vacuum laser resonator.

  2. Rate constants for the slow Mu + propane abstraction reaction at 300 K by diamagnetic RF resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Donald G; Cottrell, Stephen P; McKenzie, Iain; Ghandi, Khashayar

    2015-08-14

    The study of kinetic isotope effects for H-atom abstraction rates by incident H-atoms from the homologous series of lower mass alkanes (CH4, C2H6 and, here, C3H8) provides important tests of reaction rate theory on polyatomic systems. With a mass of only 0.114 amu, the most sensitive test is provided by the rates of the Mu atom. Abstraction of H by Mu can be highly endoergic, due to the large zero-point energy shift in the MuH bond formed, which also gives rise to high activation energies from similar zero-point energy corrections at the transition state. Rates are then far too slow near 300 K to be measured by conventional TF-μSR techniques that follow the disappearance of the spin-polarised Mu atom with time. Reported here is the first measurement of a slow Mu reaction rate in the gas phase by the technique of diamagnetic radio frequency (RF) resonance, where the amplitude of the MuH product formed in the Mu + C3H8 reaction is followed with time. The measured rate constant, kMu = (6.8 ± 0.5) × 10(-16) cm(3) s(-1) at 300 K, is surprisingly only about a factor of three slower than that expected for H + C3H8, indicating a dominant contribution from quantum tunneling in the Mu reaction, consistent with elementary transition state theory calculations of the kMu/kH kinetic isotope effect.

  3. Loss mechanisms in superconducting thin film microwave resonators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goetz, Jan, E-mail: jan.goetz@wmi.badw.de; Haeberlein, Max; Wulschner, Friedrich; Zollitsch, Christoph W.; Meier, Sebastian; Fischer, Michael; Fedorov, Kirill G.; Menzel, Edwin P. [Walther-Meißner-Institut, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, 85748 Garching (Germany); Physik-Department, Technische Universität München, 85748 Garching (Germany); Deppe, Frank; Eder, Peter; Xie, Edwar; Gross, Rudolf, E-mail: rudolf.gross@wmi.badw.de [Walther-Meißner-Institut, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, 85748 Garching (Germany); Physik-Department, Technische Universität München, 85748 Garching (Germany); Nanosystems Initiative Munich (NIM), Schellingstraße 4, 80799 München (Germany); Marx, Achim [Walther-Meißner-Institut, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2016-01-07

    We present a systematic analysis of the internal losses of superconducting coplanar waveguide microwave resonators based on niobium thin films on silicon substrates. In particular, we investigate losses introduced by Nb/Al interfaces in the center conductor, which is important for experiments where Al based Josephson junctions are integrated into Nb based circuits. We find that these interfaces can be a strong source for two-level state (TLS) losses, when the interfaces are not positioned at current nodes of the resonator. In addition to TLS losses, for resonators including Al, quasiparticle losses become relevant above 200 mK. Finally, we investigate how losses generated by eddy currents in conductive material on the backside of the substrate can be minimized by using thick enough substrates or metals with high conductivity on the substrate backside.

  4. Dynamic strain-mediated coupling of a single diamond spin to a mechanical resonator

    OpenAIRE

    Ovartchaiyapong, Preeti; Lee, Kenneth W.; Myers, Bryan A.; Jayich, Ania C. Bleszynski

    2014-01-01

    The development of hybrid quantum systems is central to the advancement of emerging quantum technologies, including quantum information science and quantum-assisted sensing. The recent demonstration of high quality single-crystal diamond resonators has led to significant interest in a hybrid system consisting of nitrogen-vacancy center spins that interact with the resonant phonon modes of a macroscopic mechanical resonator through crystal strain. However, the nitrogen-vacancy spin-strain inte...

  5. Mechano-chemical synthesis of strontium britholites: Reaction mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gmati, N.; Boughzala, K.; Bouzouita, K.; Abdellaoui, M.

    2011-01-01

    The britholites have gained a great interest thanks to their potential applications as matrices for the confinement of the byproducts in the nuclear industry such as minor actinides and long-lived fission products. However, the preparation of britholites requires high temperatures, above 1200 C. In this work, we strive to prepare these kinds of compounds by a mechano-chemical synthesis at room temperature from the starting materials SrF 2 , SrCO 3 , Sr 2 P 2 O 7 , La 2 O 3 and SiO 2 using a planetary ball mill. The obtained results showed that the prepared products were carbonated apatites and the corresponding powders contained some unreacted silica and lanthana. To obtain pure britholites, a heat-treatment at 1100 C was required. The mechanism involved in the different steps of the reaction is discussed in this paper. The obtained results suggest that the use of raw materials containing no carbonate is expected to directly lead to pure britholites by appropriate milling at room temperature. (authors)

  6. Experimental study of the reaction p vector d → π -X. Research of multibaryonic resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benabdelouahed, D.

    1987-11-01

    The polarized proton beam is produced by the synchrotron of the National Laboratory Saturne (LNS), at incident energies of 1.45 GeV, 2.1 GeV and 2.7 GeV. The pions were detected at an angle 13 0 , with the magnetic spectrometer SPES-III. The limits of the cross section for the formation of tribaryon resonances are given as functions of missing mass, in the range between 3 GeV et 3,8 GeV. At the 1,45 GeV incident energy two structures located near the acceptance limit of the spectrometer are interpreted in term of conventional physics. The first structure near a mass of 2855 MeV should be from the nucleon-nucleon interactions in the final state whereas the second one at about 2950 MeV is attributed to the upper thresholds of different pion production reactions. The analysing power variations are attributed to two baryons interactions in the final state rather than to a manifestation of possible tribaryon resonances. A qualitative agreement has been obtained between the values of the cross sections measured at the incident energy of 1.45 GeV and the theoretical values obtained with a model based on meson exchange. This model does not reproduce the variations of the analysing power [fr

  7. Reaction pathway and oxidation mechanisms of dibutyl phthalate by persulfate activated with zero-valent iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Huanxuan [School of Environment and Energy, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006 (China); The Key Lab of Pollution Control and Ecosystem Restoration in Industry Clusters, Ministry of Education, China, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Wan, Jinquan, E-mail: ppjqwan@scut.edu.cn [School of Environment and Energy, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006 (China); The Key Lab of Pollution Control and Ecosystem Restoration in Industry Clusters, Ministry of Education, China, Guangzhou 510640 (China); State Key Lab Pulp and Paper Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Ma, Yongwen [School of Environment and Energy, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006 (China); The Key Lab of Pollution Control and Ecosystem Restoration in Industry Clusters, Ministry of Education, China, Guangzhou 510640 (China); State Key Lab Pulp and Paper Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Wang, Yan [School of Environment and Energy, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006 (China); The Key Lab of Pollution Control and Ecosystem Restoration in Industry Clusters, Ministry of Education, China, Guangzhou 510640 (China)

    2016-08-15

    This study investigated reaction pathway and oxidation mechanisms of dibutyl phthalate (DBP) by persulfate (PS) activated with zero-valent iron (ZVI). The DBP degradation was studied at three pH values (acidic, neutral and basic) in the presence of different organic scavengers. Using a chemical probe method, both sulfate radical (SO{sub 4}·{sup −}) and hydroxyl radical (·OH) were found to be primary oxidants at pH 3.0 and pH 7.0, respectively while ·OH was the major specie to oxidize DBP at pH 11.0. A similar result was found in an experiment of Electron Spin Resonance spin-trapping where in addition to ·OH, superoxide radical (O{sub 2}·{sup −}) was detected at pH 11.0. The transformation of degradation products including dimethyl phthalate (DMP), diethyl phthalate (DEP), phthalic anhydride, and acetophenone exhibited diverse variation during the reaction processes. The phthalic anhydride concentration appeared to be maximum at all pHs. Another eleven intermediate products were also found at pH 3.0 by GC–MS and HPLC analysis, and their degradation mechanisms and pathways were proposed. It was suggested that dealkylation, hydroxylation, decarboxylation and hydrogen extraction were the dominant degradation mechanisms of DBP at pH 3.0. - Highlights: • Both SO{sub 4}{sup −}· and ·OH were found to be the major active species at pH 3.0 and pH 7.0. • ·OH and ·O2– were the primary oxidants pH 11.0. • The intermediate products were investigated as well as the degradation pathway. • Dealkylation, hydroxylation, decarboxylation, H-extraction were the major mechanisms.

  8. Orbital State Manipulation of a Diamond Nitrogen-Vacancy Center Using a Mechanical Resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, H. Y.; MacQuarrie, E. R.; Fuchs, G. D.

    2018-04-01

    We study the resonant optical transitions of a single nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center that is coherently dressed by a strong mechanical drive. Using a gigahertz-frequency diamond mechanical resonator that is strain coupled to a NV center's orbital states, we demonstrate coherent Raman sidebands out to the ninth order and orbital-phonon interactions that mix the two excited-state orbital branches. These interactions are spectroscopically revealed through a multiphonon Rabi splitting of the orbital branches which scales as a function of resonator driving amplitude and is successfully reproduced in a quantum model. Finally, we discuss the application of mechanical driving to engineering NV-center orbital states.

  9. Stamp transferred suspended graphene mechanical resonators for radio frequency electrical readout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xuefeng; Oksanen, Mika; Sillanpää, Mika A; Craighead, H G; Parpia, J M; Hakonen, Pertti J

    2012-01-11

    We present a simple micromanipulation technique to transfer suspended graphene flakes onto any substrate and to assemble them with small localized gates into mechanical resonators. The mechanical motion of the graphene is detected using an electrical, radio frequency (RF) reflection readout scheme where the time-varying graphene capacitor reflects a RF carrier at f = 5-6 GHz producing modulation sidebands at f ± f(m). A mechanical resonance frequency up to f(m) = 178 MHz is demonstrated. We find both hardening/softening Duffing effects on different samples and obtain a critical amplitude of ~40 pm for the onset of nonlinearity in graphene mechanical resonators. Measurements of the quality factor of the mechanical resonance as a function of dc bias voltage V(dc) indicates that dissipation due to motion-induced displacement currents in graphene electrode is important at high frequencies and large V(dc). © 2011 American Chemical Society

  10. Survey of the (3He,t) reaction: Excitation of the isobaric analog of the giant dipole resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabor, S.L.; Chang, C.C.; Collins, M.T.; Wagner, G.J.; Wu, J.R.; Halderson, D.W.; Petrovich, F.

    1982-01-01

    The ( 3 He,t) reaction at 130 and 170 MeV has been investigated on targets of 12 C, 16 O, 27 Al, 28 Si, 40 Ca, 46 Ti, and 90 Zr. Data for the ( 3 He, 3 He') reaction were measured simultaneously for reference purposes. Structure is observed in the spectra from the ( 3 He, 3 He') and ( 3 He,t) reaction at the expected positions of the giant quadrupole resonance and the isobaric analog of the giant dipole resonance, respectively. An angular distribution was measured for the suspected giant dipole resonance structure in the 40 Ca( 3 He,t) 40 Sc reaction at 130 MeV. The data are reasonably described by a collective model calculation based on the Goldhaber-Teller model for the giant dipole resonance. Several other strong peaks at excitation energies below the giant dipole resonance are observed in the ( 3 He,t) spectra. Most notable of these are the ones at the expected positions for analogs of well known 1 + states and 1hω stretched states in the targets

  11. The reaction mechanism of the (3HE,T) reaction and applications to nuclear structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    1986-01-01

    In this thesis we present a study on the reaction meachanism of the (3He,t) reaction at 70-80 MeV bombarding energy and on structures of the residual nuclei excited in this reaction: 24-Al, 26-Al, 28-P, 32-Cl, 40-Sc, 42-Sc and 58-Cu... Zie: Summary

  12. Oxygen 18 concentration profile measurements near the surface by 18O(p,α)15N resonance reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amsel, G.; David, D.

    1975-01-01

    The method of spectrum reduction in nuclear reaction microanalysis does not allow to obtain depth resolutions better than the order of 2000A. Resolutions of the order of 200A may be obtained by using the narrow resonance technique, when applied to thin films. The latter technique was extended to thick targets, with deep concentration profiles presenting a sharp gradient near the surface. This method is presented and illustrated by the study of 18 O profiles in oxygen diffusion measurements in growing ZrO 2 , using the 629keV resonance of the reaction 18 O(p,α) 15 N [fr

  13. {sup 16}O resonances near 4α threshold through {sup 12}C({sup 6}Li,d) reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, M. R. D.; Borello-Lewin, T.; Miyake, H.; Horodynski-Matsushigue, L. B.; Duarte, J. L. M.; Rodrigues, C. L.; Faria, P. Neto de [Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo, Caixa Postal 66318, CEP 05314-970, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Cunsolo, A.; Cappuzzello, F.; Foti, A.; Agodi, C.; Cavallaro, M. [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia 62, 95125 Catania (Italy); Napoli, M. di; Ukita, G. M. [Faculdade de Psicologia, Universidade de Santo Amaro, R. Prof. Eneas da Siqueira Neto, 340, CEP 04829-300, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2014-11-11

    Several narrow alpha resonant {sup 16}O states were detected through the {sup 12}C({sup 6}Li,d) reaction, in the range of 13.5 to 17.5 MeV of excitation energy. The reaction was measured at a bombarding energy of 25.5 MeV employing the São Paulo Pelletron-Enge-Spectrograph facility and the nuclear emulsion technique. Experimental angular distributions associated with natural parity quasi-bound states around the 4α threshold are presented and compared to DWBA predictions. The upper limit for the resonance widths obtained is near the energy resolution (15 keV)

  14. Resonance Strength Measurement at Astrophysical Energies: The 17O(p,α14N Reaction Studied via THM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergi M.L.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the Trojan Horse Method (THM has been used to investigate the low-energy cross sections of proton-induced reactions on 17O nuclei, overcoming extrapolation procedures and enhancement effects due to electron screening. We will report on the indirect study of the 17O(p,α14N reaction via the Trojan Horse Method by applying the approach developed for extracting the resonance strength of narrow resonance in the ultralow energy region. The mean value of the strengths obtained in the two measurements was calculated and compared with the direct data available in literature.

  15. The effect of weak resonances on the sup 25 Mg(p,gamma) sup 26 Al reaction rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Champagne, A E [Princeton Univ., NJ (USA). Dept. of Physics; Howard, A J [Trinity Coll., Hartford, CT (USA). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; Smith, M S; Magnus, P V; Parker, P D [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (USA). Wright Nuclear Structure Lab.

    1989-12-11

    The {sup 25}Mg({sup 3}He,d){sup 26}Al reaction has been used to estimate proton spectroscopic factors for states which could be weak {sup 25}Mg+p resonances located near the proton-capture threshold. One of these states (corresponding to a resonance energy E{sub c.m.}=92.2 keV) is found to have a significant effect on the {sup 25}Mg(p,gamma){sup 26}Al reaction rate for temperatures characteristic of Wolf-Rayet stars or late-stage red giants. (orig.).

  16. The yields of 1P and 1D resonances in the He(e,2e)He+ reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lhagva, O.; Badamdamdin, R.; Strakhova, S.I.; Hehnmedeh, L.

    1991-01-01

    In the first Born approximation the dependence of the yields of the 1 P and 1 D resonances in the He(e,2e)He + reaction on the momentum transfer in the recoil peak region at incident energies E 0 =1000 eV is studied. It is shown that in a certain range of the ejection angle and for the large momentum transfer the yield of the 1 D resonance dominates over the 1 P resonance one. 12 refs.; 4 figs

  17. Reaction Mechanism for m- Xylene Oxidation in the Claus Process by Sulfur Dioxide

    KAUST Repository

    Sinha, Sourab

    2015-09-24

    In the Claus process, the presence of aromatic contaminants such benzene, toluene, and xylenes (BTX), in the H2S feed stream has a detrimental effect on catalytic reactors, where BTX form soot particles and clog and deactivate the catalysts. Among BTX, xylenes are proven to be most damaging contaminant for catalysts. BTX oxidation in the Claus furnace, before they enter catalyst beds, provides a solution to this problem. A reaction kinetics study on m-xylene oxidation by SO2, an oxidant present in Claus furnace, is presented. The density functional theory is used to study the formation of m-xylene radicals (3-methylbenzyl, 2,6-dimethylphenyl, 2,4-dimethylphenyl, and 3,5-dimethylphenyl) through H-abstraction and their oxidation by SO2. The mechanism begins with SO2 addition on the radicals through an O-atom rather than the S-atom with the release of 180.0-183.1 kJ/mol of reaction energies. This exothermic reaction involves energy barriers in the range 3.9-5.2 kJ/mol for several m-xylene radicals. Thereafter, O-S bond scission takes place to release SO, and the O-atom remaining on aromatics leads to CO formation. Among four m-xylene radicals, the resonantly stabilized 3-methylbenzyl exhibited the lowest SO2 addition and SO elimination rates. The reaction rate constants are provided to facilitate Claus process simulations to find conditions suitable for BTX oxidation. © 2015 American Chemical Society.

  18. Reaction Mechanism for m- Xylene Oxidation in the Claus Process by Sulfur Dioxide

    KAUST Repository

    Sinha, Sourab; Raj, Abhijeet; Al Shoaibi, Ahmed S.; Chung, Suk-Ho

    2015-01-01

    In the Claus process, the presence of aromatic contaminants such benzene, toluene, and xylenes (BTX), in the H2S feed stream has a detrimental effect on catalytic reactors, where BTX form soot particles and clog and deactivate the catalysts. Among BTX, xylenes are proven to be most damaging contaminant for catalysts. BTX oxidation in the Claus furnace, before they enter catalyst beds, provides a solution to this problem. A reaction kinetics study on m-xylene oxidation by SO2, an oxidant present in Claus furnace, is presented. The density functional theory is used to study the formation of m-xylene radicals (3-methylbenzyl, 2,6-dimethylphenyl, 2,4-dimethylphenyl, and 3,5-dimethylphenyl) through H-abstraction and their oxidation by SO2. The mechanism begins with SO2 addition on the radicals through an O-atom rather than the S-atom with the release of 180.0-183.1 kJ/mol of reaction energies. This exothermic reaction involves energy barriers in the range 3.9-5.2 kJ/mol for several m-xylene radicals. Thereafter, O-S bond scission takes place to release SO, and the O-atom remaining on aromatics leads to CO formation. Among four m-xylene radicals, the resonantly stabilized 3-methylbenzyl exhibited the lowest SO2 addition and SO elimination rates. The reaction rate constants are provided to facilitate Claus process simulations to find conditions suitable for BTX oxidation. © 2015 American Chemical Society.

  19. (Electro-) mechanical characteristics of electrostatically driven vacuum encapsulated polysilicon resonators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tilmans, H.A.C.; Tilmans, H.A.C.; Legtenberg, Rob; Legtenberg, R.; Schurer, H.; Schurer, H.; IJntema, D.J.; Ijntema, D.J.; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt; Fluitman, J.H.J.

    The design, fabrication and performance of vacuum-encapsulated electrostatically driven polysilicon resonating beams, 210-510 μm long, 100 μm wide, and 1.5 μm thick, are described. The shortest beams have a fundamental frequency of 324 kHz, a gauge factor of 2400 and a quality factor of 600 at

  20. Modulation Spectroscopy and Opto Mechanics of Micro Toroidal Resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-01

    collaboration between UTRGV and Rice University. We planned 1) to acquire research instrumentation for experimental studies of micro-ring resonators on...reflected   from   the   ring   ( black   trace)   and   the   corresponding   I   and   Q   demodulation   outputs.  The

  1. Calculation of astrophysical S-factor in reaction ^{13}C(p,γ )^{14}N for first resonance levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghadasi, A.; Sadeghi, H.; Pourimani, R.

    2018-01-01

    The ^{13}C(p,γ )^{14}N reaction is one of the important reactions in the CNO cycle, which is a key process in nucleosynthesis. We first calculated wave functions for the bound state of ^{14}N with Faddeev's method. In this method, the considered reaction components are ^{12}C+n+p. Then, by using direct capture cross section and Breit-Wigner formulae, the non-resonant and resonant cross sections were calculated, respectively. In the next step, we calculated the total S-factor and compared it with experimental data, which showed good agreement between them. Next, we extrapolated the S-factor for the transition to the ground state at zero energy and obtained S(0)=5.8 ± 0.7 (keV b) and then calculate reaction rate. These ones are in agreement with previous reported results.

  2. ¹⁹F magnetic resonance probes for live-cell detection of peroxynitrite using an oxidative decarbonylation reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruemmer, Kevin J; Merrikhihaghi, Sara; Lollar, Christina T; Morris, Siti Nur Sarah; Bauer, Johannes H; Lippert, Alexander R

    2014-10-21

    We report a newly discovered oxidative decarbonylation reaction of isatins that is selectively mediated by peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)) to provide anthranilic acid derivatives. We have harnessed this rapid and selective transformation to develop two reaction-based probes, 5-fluoroisatin and 6-fluoroisatin, for the low-background readout of ONOO(-) using (19)F magnetic resonance spectroscopy. 5-fluoroisatin was used to non-invasively detect ONOO(-) formation in living lung epithelial cells stimulated with interferon-γ (IFN-γ).

  3. Theoretical Study of Sodium-Water Surface Reaction Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Shin; Kurihara, Akikazu; Ohshima, Hiroyuki; Hashimoto, Kenro

    Computational study of the sodium-water reaction at the gas (water) - liquid (sodium) interface has been carried out using the ab initio (first-principle) method. A possible reaction channel has been identified for the stepwise OH bond dissociations of a single water molecule. The energetics including the binding energy of a water molecule on the sodium surface, the activation energies of the bond cleavages, and the reaction energies, have been evaluated, and the rate constants of the first and second OH bond-breakings have been compared. It was found that the estimated rate constant of the former was much larger than the latter. The results are the basis for constructing the chemical reaction model used in a multi-dimensional sodium-water reaction code, SERAPHIM, being developed by Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) toward the safety assessment of the steam generator (SG) in a sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR).

  4. Theoretical study of sodium-water surface reaction mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Shin; Kurihara, Akikazu; Ohshima, Hiroyuki; Hashimoto, Kenro

    2012-01-01

    Computational study of the sodium-water reaction at the gas (water) - liquid (sodium) interface has been carried out using the ab initio (first-principle) method. A possible reaction channel has been identified for the stepwise OH bond dissociations of a single water molecule. The energetics including the binding energy of a water molecule on the sodium surface, the activation energies of the bond cleavages, and the reaction energies, have been evaluated, and the rate constants of the first and second OH bond-breakings have been compared. It was found that the estimated rate constant of the former was much larger than the latter. The results are the basis for constructing the chemical reaction model used in a multi-dimensional sodium-water reaction code, SERAPHIM, being developed by Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) toward the safety assessment of the steam generator (SG) in a sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR). (author)

  5. Magnetically coupled resonance wireless charging technology principles and transfer mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jiehua; Wan, Jian; Ma, Yinping

    2017-05-01

    With the tenure of Electric-Vehicle rising around the world, the charging methods have been paid more and more attention, the current charging mode mainly has the charging posts and battery swapping station. The construction of the charging pile or battery swapping station not only require lots of manpower, material costs but the bare conductor is also easy to generate electric spark hidden safety problems, still occupies large space. Compared with the wired charging, wireless charging mode is flexible, unlimited space and location factors and charging for vehicle safety and quickly. It complements the traditional charging methods in adaptability and the independent charge deficiencies. So the researching the wireless charging system have an important practical significance and application value. In this paper, wireless charging system designed is divided into three parts: the primary side, secondary side and resonant coupling. The main function of the primary side is to generate high-frequency alternating current, so selecting CLASS-E amplifier inverter structure through the research on full bridge, half-bridge and power amplification circuit. Addition, the wireless charging system is susceptible to outside interference, frequency drift phenomenon. Combined with the wireless energy transmission characteristics, resonant parts adopt resonant coupling energy transmission scheme and the Series-Series coupling compensation structure. For the electric vehicle charging power and voltage requirements, the main circuit is a full bridge inverter and Boost circuit used as the secondary side.

  6. New mechanism of spiral wave initiation in a reaction-diffusion-mechanics system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louis D Weise

    Full Text Available Spiral wave initiation in the heart muscle is a mechanism for the onset of dangerous cardiac arrhythmias. A standard protocol for spiral wave initiation is the application of a stimulus in the refractory tail of a propagating excitation wave, a region that we call the "classical vulnerable zone." Previous studies of vulnerability to spiral wave initiation did not take the influence of deformation into account, which has been shown to have a substantial effect on the excitation process of cardiomyocytes via the mechano-electrical feedback phenomenon. In this work we study the effect of deformation on the vulnerability of excitable media in a discrete reaction-diffusion-mechanics (dRDM model. The dRDM model combines FitzHugh-Nagumo type equations for cardiac excitation with a discrete mechanical description of a finite-elastic isotropic material (Seth material to model cardiac excitation-contraction coupling and stretch activated depolarizing current. We show that deformation alters the "classical," and forms a new vulnerable zone at longer coupling intervals. This mechanically caused vulnerable zone results in a new mechanism of spiral wave initiation, where unidirectional conduction block and rotation directions of the consequently initiated spiral waves are opposite compared to the mechanism of spiral wave initiation due to the "classical vulnerable zone." We show that this new mechanism of spiral wave initiation can naturally occur in situations that involve wave fronts with curvature, and discuss its relation to supernormal excitability of cardiac tissue. The concept of mechanically induced vulnerability may lead to a better understanding about the onset of dangerous heart arrhythmias via mechano-electrical feedback.

  7. New mechanism of spiral wave initiation in a reaction-diffusion-mechanics system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weise, Louis D; Panfilov, Alexander V

    2011-01-01

    Spiral wave initiation in the heart muscle is a mechanism for the onset of dangerous cardiac arrhythmias. A standard protocol for spiral wave initiation is the application of a stimulus in the refractory tail of a propagating excitation wave, a region that we call the "classical vulnerable zone." Previous studies of vulnerability to spiral wave initiation did not take the influence of deformation into account, which has been shown to have a substantial effect on the excitation process of cardiomyocytes via the mechano-electrical feedback phenomenon. In this work we study the effect of deformation on the vulnerability of excitable media in a discrete reaction-diffusion-mechanics (dRDM) model. The dRDM model combines FitzHugh-Nagumo type equations for cardiac excitation with a discrete mechanical description of a finite-elastic isotropic material (Seth material) to model cardiac excitation-contraction coupling and stretch activated depolarizing current. We show that deformation alters the "classical," and forms a new vulnerable zone at longer coupling intervals. This mechanically caused vulnerable zone results in a new mechanism of spiral wave initiation, where unidirectional conduction block and rotation directions of the consequently initiated spiral waves are opposite compared to the mechanism of spiral wave initiation due to the "classical vulnerable zone." We show that this new mechanism of spiral wave initiation can naturally occur in situations that involve wave fronts with curvature, and discuss its relation to supernormal excitability of cardiac tissue. The concept of mechanically induced vulnerability may lead to a better understanding about the onset of dangerous heart arrhythmias via mechano-electrical feedback.

  8. Pre-equilibrium nuclear reactions: An introduction to classical and quantum-mechanical models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koning, A.J.; Akkermans, J.M.

    1999-01-01

    In studies of light-ion induced nuclear reactions one distinguishes three different mechanisms: direct, compound and pre-equilibrium nuclear reactions. These reaction processes can be subdivided according to time scales or, equivalently, the number of intranuclear collisions taking place before emission. Furthermore, each mechanism preferably excites certain parts of the nuclear level spectrum and is characterized by different types of angular distributions. This presentation includes description of the classical, exciton model, semi-classical models, with some selected results, and quantum mechanical models. A survey of classical versus quantum-mechanical pre-equilibrium reaction theory is presented including practical applications

  9. Resonance phase and sings of P-odd and P-even effects, observable in the reactions with neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smotritskij, L.M.

    2002-01-01

    It is shown that introduction of the resonance phase for two quasistationary states with a similar spin and counter parity makes it possible to correlate the sing dependence of both the P-odd and P-even effects, experimentally observed in the reactions with neutrons. The common description of such effects enables determination of the theory unknown (free) parameters from the experiment [ru

  10. Information about the properties of highly-excited states of nuclei, obtained in the reaction (n, α) with resonance neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balabanov, N.P.

    1980-01-01

    The results measurements of total α-widths in the reaction (n, α) using resonance neutrons have been analysed. The data obtained have been compared with the predictions of the statistical theory and the cluster model. Attention has been paid to some possible deviations from the statistical relationships in the behaviour of total α-widths

  11. Reaction mechanisms for the synthesis of the heaviest elements from heavy ion reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaeggeler, H.W.

    1988-10-01

    This review paper concerns fusion reactions with light heavy-ions, cold fusion, transfer reactions using light heavy-ions or heavy ions. In two appendices, methods for the separation and detection of nuclides in the domain of heaviest elements are described and a comment on the discovery of the element 104 is given. 51 figs., 10 tabs., 335 refs

  12. Optimized reaction mechanism rate rules for ignition of normal alkanes

    KAUST Repository

    Cai, Liming; Pitsch, Heinz; Mohamed, Samah; Raman, Venkat; Bugler, John; Curran, Henry; Sarathy, Mani

    2016-01-01

    fidelity reacting flow simulations capable of improving combustor design and operation. The development of such models for many new fuel components and/or surrogate molecules is greatly facilitated by the application of reaction classes and rate rules

  13. Mechanisms in adverse reactions to food. The sinuses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høst, A

    1995-01-01

    Food allergy is an extremely rare cause of chronic sinusitis. Mucosal inflammation in chronic sinusitis is rarely caused by allergic reactions to foods but rather viral infections in the upper respiratory tract.......Food allergy is an extremely rare cause of chronic sinusitis. Mucosal inflammation in chronic sinusitis is rarely caused by allergic reactions to foods but rather viral infections in the upper respiratory tract....

  14. Mechanism of tellurium isomers excitation in (γ, n) reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazur, V.M.; Symochko, D.M.; Bigan, Z.M.; Poltorzhytska, T.V.; Derechkey, P.S.

    2012-01-01

    Isomeric yield ratios for the 119 Te, 121 Te, 123 Te, 127 Te, 129 Te nuclei were obtained in (γ, n) reactions with bremsstrahlung end point energies ranging 10 - 22 MeV with δE = 0.5 MeV step. Experimental isomeric ratios were used to calculate the cross-sections of (γ, n) m reactions, that were further compared with TALYS-1.4 calculations

  15. Mechanisms of generation of membrane potential resonance in a neuron with multiple resonant ionic currents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M Fox

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal membrane potential resonance (MPR is associated with subthreshold and network oscillations. A number of voltage-gated ionic currents can contribute to the generation or amplification of MPR, but how the interaction of these currents with linear currents contributes to MPR is not well understood. We explored this in the pacemaker PD neurons of the crab pyloric network. The PD neuron MPR is sensitive to blockers of H- (IH and calcium-currents (ICa. We used the impedance profile of the biological PD neuron, measured in voltage clamp, to constrain parameter values of a conductance-based model using a genetic algorithm and obtained many optimal parameter combinations. Unlike most cases of MPR, in these optimal models, the values of resonant- (fres and phasonant- (fϕ = 0 frequencies were almost identical. Taking advantage of this fact, we linked the peak phase of ionic currents to their amplitude, in order to provide a mechanistic explanation the dependence of MPR on the ICa gating variable time constants. Additionally, we found that distinct pairwise correlations between ICa parameters contributed to the maintenance of fres and resonance power (QZ. Measurements of the PD neuron MPR at more hyperpolarized voltages resulted in a reduction of fres but no change in QZ. Constraining the optimal models using these data unmasked a positive correlation between the maximal conductances of IH and ICa. Thus, although IH is not necessary for MPR in this neuron type, it contributes indirectly by constraining the parameters of ICa.

  16. Numerical analysis of the resonance mechanism of the lumped parameter system model for acoustic mine detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Chi; Zhou Yu-Qiu; Shen Gao-Wei; Wu Wen-Wen; Ding Wei

    2013-01-01

    The method of numerical analysis is employed to study the resonance mechanism of the lumped parameter system model for acoustic mine detection. Based on the basic principle of the acoustic resonance technique for mine detection and the characteristics of low-frequency acoustics, the ''soil-mine'' system could be equivalent to a damping ''mass-spring'' resonance model with a lumped parameter analysis method. The dynamic simulation software, Adams, is adopted to analyze the lumped parameter system model numerically. The simulated resonance frequency and anti-resonance frequency are 151 Hz and 512 Hz respectively, basically in agreement with the published resonance frequency of 155 Hz and anti-resonance frequency of 513 Hz, which were measured in the experiment. Therefore, the technique of numerical simulation is validated to have the potential for analyzing the acoustic mine detection model quantitatively. The influences of the soil and mine parameters on the resonance characteristics of the soil—mine system could be investigated by changing the parameter setup in a flexible manner. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  17. Resonance amplification of the nuclear reaction X(a,b)Y near the a+X channel threshold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melezhik, V.S.

    1991-01-01

    Deviation of the cross section for the nuclear reaction X(a,b)Y from the Gamow formula due to an interaction additional to the Coulomb one in the entrance channel has been analyzed. It is shown that the reaction cross section has an oscillating structure at low energies. If the maximum of the first oscillation is close to the threshold of the channel a+X, it has a resonance behaviour. The peculiarity of the cross sections leads to the resonance amplification of the rate for a muon-catalyzed fusion reaction ('in flight' fusion) tμ+d→ 4 He+n+μ at the energy =76 eV and may influence the μ-capture rate in a dense mixture of hydrogen isotopes. 26 refs.; 4 figs

  18. The Suzuki-Miyaura Cross-Coupling Reaction of Halogenated Aminopyrazoles: Method Development, Scope, and Mechanism of Dehalogenation Side Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jedinák, Lukáš; Zátopková, Renáta; Zemánková, Hana; Šustková, Alena; Cankař, Petr

    2017-01-06

    The efficient Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling reaction of halogenated aminopyrazoles and their amides or ureas with a range of aryl, heteroaryl, and styryl boronic acids or esters has been developed. The method allowed incorporation of problematic substrates: aminopyrazoles bearing protected or unprotected pyrazole NH, as well as the free amino or N-amide group. Direct comparison of the chloro, bromo, and iodopyrazoles in the Suzuki-Miyaura reaction revealed that Br and Cl derivatives were superior to iodopyrazoles, as a result of reduced propensity to dehalogenation. Moreover, the mechanism and factors affecting the undesired dehalogenation side reaction were revealed.

  19. Dynamical barrier and isotope effects in the simplest substitution reaction via Walden inversion mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Zhaojun; Liu, Shu; Zhang, Dong H.

    2017-02-01

    Reactions occurring at a carbon atom through the Walden inversion mechanism are one of the most important and useful classes of reactions in chemistry. Here we report an accurate theoretical study of the simplest reaction of that type: the H+CH4 substitution reaction and its isotope analogues. It is found that the reaction threshold versus collision energy is considerably higher than the barrier height. The reaction exhibits a strong normal secondary isotope effect on the cross-sections measured above the reaction threshold, and a small but reverse secondary kinetic isotope effect at room temperature. Detailed analysis reveals that the reaction proceeds along a path with a higher barrier height instead of the minimum-energy path because the umbrella angle of the non-reacting methyl group cannot change synchronously with the other reaction coordinates during the reaction due to insufficient energy transfer from the translational motion to the umbrella mode.

  20. A reaction mechanism for gasoline surrogate fuels for large polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    KAUST Repository

    Raj, Abhijeet; Charry Prada, Iran David; Amer, Ahmad Amer; Chung, Suk-Ho

    2012-01-01

    This work aims to develop a reaction mechanism for gasoline surrogate fuels (n-heptane, iso-octane and toluene) with an emphasis on the formation of large polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Starting from an existing base mechanism for gasoline

  1. Tuning Acoustic Wave Properties by Mechanical Resonators on a Surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dühring, Maria Bayard; Laude, Vincent; Khelif, Abdelkrim

    Vibrations generated by high aspects ratio electrodes are studied by the finite element method. It is found that the modes are combined of a surface wave and vibration in the electrodes. For increasing aspect ratio most of the mechanical energy is confined to the electrodes which act as mechanical...

  2. On the mechanism of bandgap formation in locally resonant finite elastic metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugino, Christopher; Leadenham, Stephen; Ruzzene, Massimo; Erturk, Alper

    2016-10-01

    Elastic/acoustic metamaterials made from locally resonant arrays can exhibit bandgaps at wavelengths much longer than the lattice size for various applications spanning from low-frequency vibration/sound attenuation to wave guiding and filtering in mechanical and electromechanical devices. For an effective use of such locally resonant metamaterial concepts in finite structures, it is required to bridge the gap between the lattice dispersion characteristics and modal behavior of the host structure with its resonators. To this end, we develop a novel argument for bandgap formation in finite-length elastic metamaterial beams, relying on the modal analysis and the assumption of infinitely many resonators. We show that the dual problem to wave propagation through an infinite periodic beam is the modal analysis of a finite beam with an infinite number of resonators. A simple formula that depends only on the resonator natural frequency and total mass ratio is derived for placing the bandgap in a desired frequency range, yielding an analytical insight and a rule of thumb for design purposes. A method for understanding the importance of a resonator location and mass is discussed in the context of a Riemann sum approximation of an integral, and a method for determining the optimal number of resonators for a given set of boundary conditions and target frequency is introduced. The simulations of the theoretical framework are validated by experiments for bending vibrations of a locally resonant cantilever beam.

  3. Attention: Reaction Time and Accuracy Reveal Different Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prinzmetal, William; McCool, Christin; Park, Samuel

    2005-01-01

    The authors propose that there are 2 different mechanisms whereby spatial cues capture attention. The voluntary mechanism is the strategic allocation of perceptual resources to the location most likely to contain the target. The involuntary mechanism is a reflexive orienting response that occurs even when the spatial cue does not indicate the…

  4. Recent developments in semiclassical mechanics: eigenvalues and reaction rate constants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, W.H.

    1976-04-01

    A semiclassical treatment of eigenvalues for a multidimensional non-separable potential function and of the rate constant for a chemical reaction with an activation barrier is presented. Both phenomena are seen to be described by essentially the same semiclassical formalism, which is based on a construction of the total Hamiltonian in terms of the complete set of ''good'' action variables (or adiabatic invariants) associated with the minimum in the potential energy surface for the eigenvalue case, or the saddle point in the potential energy surface for the case of chemical reaction

  5. On the mechanism of photocatalytic reactions with eosin Y

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Majek

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available A combined spectroscopic, synthetic, and apparative study has allowed a more detailed mechanistic rationalization of several recently reported eosin Y-catalyzed aromatic substitutions at arenediazonium salts. The operation of rapid acid–base equilibria, direct photolysis pathways, and radical chain reactions has been discussed on the basis of pH, solvent polarity, lamp type, absorption properties, and quantum yields. Determination of the latter proved to be an especially valuable tool for the distinction between radical chain and photocatalytic reactions.

  6. Visualization of reaction mechanism by CG based on quantum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this work, the change in the molecular configuration in fundamental chemical reactions such as, F + HCl ¨ HF + Cl, I + H2¨ HI + H, OH- + CH3Cl ¨ CH3OH + Cl-, and esterification of acetic acid and ethyl alcohol were visualized by the quantum chemical calculation MOPAC with PM5 Hamiltonian. The CG teaching material ...

  7. Tris(Cyclopentadienyl)Uranium-t-Butyl: Synthesis, reactions, and mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weydert, M.

    1993-04-01

    Compounds (RC[sub 5]H[sub 4])[sub 3]U(t-Bu) were prepared for R = H, Me, Et. Their decomposition products in aromatic solvents are consistent with a radical decomposition pathway induced by solvent-assisted U-C bond homolysis. NMR was used to study the reactions of (RC[sub 5]H[sub 4])[sub 3]UCl with t-BuLi (R = t-Bu, Me[sub 3]Si). Reactions of (MeC[sub 5]H[sub 4])[sub 3]U(t-Bu) with Lewis bases and fluorocarbons were studied. Analogous reaction chemistry between (RC[sub 5]H[sub 4])[sub 3]ThX systems and t-BuLi was also studied, and reactivity differences between U and Th are discussed. Synthesis of sterically crowded (RC[sub 5]H[sub 4])[sub 4]U compounds is next considered. Reaction of the trivalent (RC[sub 5]H[sub 4])[sub 3]U with (RC[sub 5]H[sub 4])[sub 2]Hg results in formation of (RC[sub 5]H[sub 4])[sub 4]U. Steric congestion, cyclopentadienyl ligand exchange, and electron transfer are discussed. (DLC)

  8. Tris(Cyclopentadienyl)Uranium-t-Butyl: Synthesis, reactions, and mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weydert, Marc [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1993-04-01

    Compounds (RC5H4)3U(t-Bu) were prepared for R = H, Me, Et. Their decomposition products in aromatic solvents are consistent with a radical decomposition pathway induced by solvent-assisted U-C bond homolysis. NMR was used to study the reactions of (RC5H4)3UCl with t-BuLi (R = t-Bu, Me3Si). Reactions of (MeC5H4)3U(t-Bu) with Lewis bases and fluorocarbons were studied. Analogous reaction chemistry between (RC5H4)3ThX systems and t-BuLi was also studied, and reactivity differences between U and Th are discussed. Synthesis of sterically crowded (RC5H4)4U compounds is next considered. Reaction of the trivalent (RC5H4)3U with (RC5H4)2Hg results in formation of (RC5H4)4U. Steric congestion, cyclopentadienyl ligand exchange, and electron transfer are discussed. (DLC)

  9. Reaction mechanism of O-acylhydroxamate with cysteine proteases

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    WINTEC

    more stable than the reactant and hence the reaction enthalpy is found to be exothermic. ... healing, fertilization, cell differentiation and growth, ... to lower the side effects of drug administration. Since ... tozoa and plants. ... give turnover products or could produce a stable ad- ...... be due to the hydrolysis with water molecule.

  10. Iron Contamination Mechanism and Reaction Performance Research on FCC Catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaoyong Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available FCC (Fluid Catalytic Cracking catalyst iron poisoning would not only influence units’ product slate; when the poisoning is serious, it could also jeopardize FCC catalysts’ fluidization in reaction-regeneration system and further cause bad influences on units’ stable operation. Under catalytic cracking reaction conditions, large amount of iron nanonodules is formed on the seriously iron contaminated catalyst due to exothermic reaction. These nodules intensify the attrition between catalyst particles and generate plenty of fines which severely influence units’ smooth running. A dense layer could be formed on the catalysts’ surface after iron contamination and the dense layer stops reactants to diffuse to inner structures of catalyst. This causes extremely negative effects on catalyst’s heavy oil conversion ability and could greatly cut down gasoline yield while increasing yields of dry gas, coke, and slurry largely. Research shows that catalyst’s reaction performance would be severely deteriorated when iron content in E-cat (equilibrium catalyst exceeds 8000 μg/g.

  11. Mechanisms in adverse reactions to food. The ear

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høst, A

    1995-01-01

    Otitis media with effusion is rarely caused by allergy to food. Allergic inflammation in the nasal mucosa, mainly due to IgE-mediated reactions to foods, may cause eustachian tube dysfunction and subsequent otitis media with effusion. Inflammatory mediators from the nasal mucosa transported via...

  12. Coupling Effect between Mechanical Loading and Chemical Reactions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klika, Václav; Maršík, František

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 113, č. 44 (2009), s. 14689-14697 ISSN 1520-6106 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA106/08/0557 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : coupling * dynamic loading * reaction kinetics Subject RIV: FI - Traumatology, Orthopedics Impact factor: 3.471, year: 2009

  13. Amplitude calibration of 2D mechanical resonators by nonlinear optical transduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dolleman, R.J.; Davidovikj, D.; van der Zant, H.S.J.; Steeneken, P.G.

    2017-01-01

    Contactless characterization of mechanical resonances using Fabry-Perot interferometry is a powerful tool to study the mechanical and dynamical properties of atomically thin membranes. However, amplitude calibration is often not performed or only possible by making assumptions on the device

  14. Quantum ground state and single-phonon control of a mechanical resonator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, A D; Hofheinz, M; Ansmann, M; Bialczak, Radoslaw C; Lenander, M; Lucero, Erik; Neeley, M; Sank, D; Wang, H; Weides, M; Wenner, J; Martinis, John M; Cleland, A N

    2010-04-01

    Quantum mechanics provides a highly accurate description of a wide variety of physical systems. However, a demonstration that quantum mechanics applies equally to macroscopic mechanical systems has been a long-standing challenge, hindered by the difficulty of cooling a mechanical mode to its quantum ground state. The temperatures required are typically far below those attainable with standard cryogenic methods, so significant effort has been devoted to developing alternative cooling techniques. Once in the ground state, quantum-limited measurements must then be demonstrated. Here, using conventional cryogenic refrigeration, we show that we can cool a mechanical mode to its quantum ground state by using a microwave-frequency mechanical oscillator-a 'quantum drum'-coupled to a quantum bit, which is used to measure the quantum state of the resonator. We further show that we can controllably create single quantum excitations (phonons) in the resonator, thus taking the first steps to complete quantum control of a mechanical system.

  15. Unified connected theory of few-body reaction mechanisms in N-body scattering theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polyzou, W. N.; Redish, E. F.

    1978-01-01

    A unified treatment of different reaction mechanisms in nonrelativistic N-body scattering is presented. The theory is based on connected kernel integral equations that are expected to become compact for reasonable constraints on the potentials. The operators T/sub +-//sup ab/(A) are approximate transition operators that describe the scattering proceeding through an arbitrary reaction mechanism A. These operators are uniquely determined by a connected kernel equation and satisfy an optical theorem consistent with the choice of reaction mechanism. Connected kernel equations relating T/sub +-//sup ab/(A) to the full T/sub +-//sup ab/ allow correction of the approximate solutions for any ignored process to any order. This theory gives a unified treatment of all few-body reaction mechanisms with the same dynamic simplicity of a model calculation, but can include complicated reaction mechanisms involving overlapping configurations where it is difficult to formulate models.

  16. Flow-excited acoustic resonance excitation mechanism, design guidelines, and counter measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziada, Samir; Lafon, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    The excitation mechanism of acoustic resonances has long been recognized, but the industry continues to be plagued by its undesirable consequences, manifested in severe vibration and noise problems in a wide range of industrial applications. This paper focuses on the nature of the excitation mechanism of acoustic resonances in piping systems containing impinging shear flows, such as flow over shallow and deep cavities. Since this feedback mechanism is caused by the coupling between acoustic resonators and shear flow instabilities, attention is focused first on the nature of various types of acoustic resonance modes and then on the aero-acoustic sound sources, which result from the interaction of the inherently unstable shear flow with the sound field generated by the resonant acoustic modes. Various flow-sound interaction patterns are discussed, in which the resonant sound field can be predominantly parallel or normal to the mean flow direction and the acoustic wavelength can be an order of magnitude longer than the length scale of the separated shear flow or as short as the cavity length scale. Since the state of knowledge in this field has been recently reviewed by Tonon et al. (2011, 'Aero-acoustics of Pipe Systems With Closed Branches', Int. J. Aeroacoust., 10(2), pp. 201-276), this article focuses on the more practical aspects of the phenomenon, including various flow sound interaction patterns and the resulting aero-acoustic sources, which are relevant to industrial applications. A general design guide proposal and practical means to alleviate the excitation mechanism are also presented. These are demonstrated by two examples of recent industrial case histories dealing with acoustic fatigue failure of the steam dryer in a boiling water reactor (BWR) due to acoustic resonance in the main steam piping and acoustic resonances in the roll posts of the Short Take-Off and Vertical Lift Joint Strike Fighter (JSF). (authors)

  17. Multilevel Quantum Mechanics Theories and Molecular Mechanics Calculations of the Cl- + CH3I Reaction in Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Peng; Li, Chen; Wang, Dunyou

    2017-10-19

    The Cl - + CH 3 I → CH 3 Cl + I - reaction in water was studied using combined multilevel quantum mechanism theories and molecular mechanics with an explicit water solvent model. The study shows a significant influence of aqueous solution on the structures of the stationary points along the reaction pathway. A detailed, atomic-level evolution of the reaction mechanism shows a concerted one-bond-broken and one-bond-formed mechanism, as well as a synchronized charge-transfer process. The potentials of mean force calculated with the CCSD(T) and DFT treatments of the solute produce a free activation barrier at 24.5 and 19.0 kcal/mol, respectively, which agrees with the experimental one at 22.0 kcal/mol. The solvent effects have also been quantitatively analyzed: in total, the solvent effects raise the activation energy by 20.2 kcal/mol, which shows a significant impact on this reaction in water.

  18. Nuclear reaction mechanisms. Progress report, June 1976--July 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blann, M.

    1977-01-01

    Research under the subject contract is on heavy ion induced reactions, both on experimental measurement and theoretical interpretation. Measurements have included determination of elastic scattering, evaporation residue, fission, quasi elastic and deep inelastic scattering cross sections. From these data we have extracted information on fusion barrier heights and radii, nucleus-nucleus potentials and fission parameterizations at high angular momenta. We have started investigating influence of excitation energies on inverse cross sections and of precompound decay in heavy ion reactions, and have investigated multidimensional potential energy surfaces for heavy ion collisions. Work which has been published is listed in the Publications Section; work not yet published and/or in progress is discussed herein.

  19. Nuclear reaction mechanisms. Progress report, June 1976--July 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blann, M.

    1977-01-01

    Research under the subject contract is on heavy ion induced reactions, both on experimental measurement and theoretical interpretation. Measurements have included determination of elastic scattering, evaporation residue, fission, quasi elastic and deep inelastic scattering cross sections. From these data we have extracted information on fusion barrier heights and radii, nucleus-nucleus potentials and fission parameterizations at high angular momenta. We have started investigating influence of excitation energies on inverse cross sections and of precompound decay in heavy ion reactions, and have investigated multidimensional potential energy surfaces for heavy ion collisions. Work which has been published is listed in the Publications Section; work not yet published and/or in progress is discussed herein

  20. Illustration of reaction mechanism in polyatomic systems via computer movies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raff, L.M.

    1974-01-01

    The CD 4 + T* systems is suited for classroom illustration of reaction dynamics. Questions about the system can be illustrated by reducing selected many-body trajectories to a 16 mm color movie that represents the six-body motion in projected coordinates. Such a movie has been produced for this system. The production procedure used is reported, and a detailed description of the contents of the movie is given. (U.S.)

  1. On the mechanism of photocatalytic reactions with eosin Y

    OpenAIRE

    Majek, Michal; Filace, Fabiana; von Wangelin, Axel Jacobi

    2014-01-01

    Summary A combined spectroscopic, synthetic, and apparative study has allowed a more detailed mechanistic rationalization of several recently reported eosin Y-catalyzed aromatic substitutions at arenediazonium salts. The operation of rapid acid–base equilibria, direct photolysis pathways, and radical chain reactions has been discussed on the basis of pH, solvent polarity, lamp type, absorption properties, and quantum yields. Determination of the latter proved to be an especially valuable tool...

  2. Chlorination of tramadol: Reaction kinetics, mechanism and genotoxicity evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hanyang; Song, Dean; Chang, Yangyang; Liu, Huijuan; Qu, Jiuhui

    2015-12-01

    Tramadol (TRA) is one of the most detected analgesics in environmental matrices, and it is of high significance to study the reactivity of TRA during chlorination considering its potential toxicity to the environment. The chlorine/TRA reaction is first order with respect to the TRA concentration, and a combination of first-order and second-order with respect to chlorine concentration. The pH dependence of the observed rate constants (kobs) showed that the TRA oxidation reactivity increased with increasing pH. kobs can be quantitatively described by considering all active species including Cl2, Cl2O and HOCl, and the individual rate constants of HOCl/TRA(0), HOCl/TRAH(+), Cl2/TRA and Cl2O/TRA reactions were calculated to be (2.61±0.29)×10(3)M(-1)s(-1), 14.73±4.17M(-1)s(-1), (3.93±0.34)×10(5)M(-1)s(-1) and (5.66±1.83)×10(6)M(-1)s(-1), respectively. Eleven degradation products were detected with UPLC-Q-TOF-MS, and the corresponding structures of eight products found under various pH conditions were proposed. The amine group was proposed to be the initial attack site under alkaline pH conditions, where reaction of the deprotonated amine group with HOCl is favorable. Under acidic and neutral pH conditions, however, two possible reaction pathways were proposed. One is an electrophilic substitution on the aromatic ring, and another is an electrophilic substitution on the nitrogen, leading to an N-chlorinated intermediate, which can be further oxidized. Finally, the SOS/umu test showed that the genotoxicity of TRA chlorination products increased with increasing dosage of chlorine, which was mostly attributed to the formation of some chlorine substitution products. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Novel error propagation approach for reducing H2S/O2 reaction mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selim, H.; Gupta, A.K.; Sassi, M.

    2012-01-01

    A reduction strategy of hydrogen sulfide/oxygen reaction mechanism is conducted to simplify the detailed mechanism. Direct relation graph and error propagation methodology (DRGEP) has been used. A novel approach of direct elementary reaction error (DERE) has been developed in this study. The developed approach allowed for further reduction of the reaction mechanism. The reduced mechanism has been compared with the detailed mechanism under different conditions to emphasize its validity. The results obtained from the resulting reduced mechanism showed good agreement with that from the detailed mechanism. However, some discrepancies have been found for some species. Hydrogen and oxygen mole fractions showed the largest discrepancy of all combustion products. The reduced mechanism was also found to be capable of tracking the changes that occur in chemical kinetics through the change in reaction conditions. A comparison on the ignition delay time obtained from the reduced mechanism and previous experimental data showed good agreement. The reduced mechanism was used to track changes in mechanistic pathways of Claus reactions with the reaction progress.

  4. Development of a robust and compact kerosene–diesel reaction mechanism for diesel engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tay, Kun Lin; Yang, Wenming; Mohan, Balaji; An, Hui; Zhou, Dezhi; Yu, Wenbin

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • An approach is used to develop a robust kerosene–diesel reaction mechanism. • Ignition delay of the kerosene sub-mechanism is well validated with experiments. • The kerosene sub-mechanism reproduces the flame lift-off lengths of Jet-A reasonably well. • The kerosene sub-mechanism performs reasonably well under engine conditions. - Abstract: The use of kerosene fuels in internal combustion engines is getting more widespread. The North Atlantic Treaty Organization military is pushing for the use of a single fuel on the battlefield in order to reduce logistical issues. Moreover, in some countries, fuel adulteration is a serious matter where kerosene is blended with diesel and used in diesel engines. So far, most investigations done regarding the use of kerosene fuels in diesel engines are experimental and there is negligible simulation work done in this area possibly because of the lack of a robust and compact kerosene reaction mechanism. This work focuses on the development of a small but reliable kerosene–diesel reaction mechanism, suitable to be used for diesel engine simulations. The new kerosene–diesel reaction mechanism consists only of 48 species and 152 reactions. Furthermore, the kerosene sub-mechanism in this new mechanism is well validated for its ignition delay times and has proven to replicate kerosene combustion well in a constant volume combustion chamber and an optical engine. Overall, this new kerosene–diesel reaction mechanism is proven to be robust and practical for diesel engine simulations.

  5. On the reaction of the nitroso group with olefins. Mechanisms of ene reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seymour, C.A.; Greene, F.D.

    1982-01-01

    Intra- and intermolecular isotope effects point to a two-step process for the reaction of pentafluoronitrosobenzene with tetramethylethylene to afford the ene product, rate-determining formation of an intermediate (for which the arizidine N-oxide is suggested) followed by C-H (or C-D) cleavage to the ene product

  6. Complex Reaction Environments and Competing Reaction Mechanisms in Zeolite Catalysis: Insights from Advanced Molecular Dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Wispelaere, K.; Ensing, B.; Ghysels, A.; Meijer, E.J.; van Van Speybroeck, V.

    2015-01-01

    The methanol-to-olefin process is a showcase example of complex zeolite-catalyzed chemistry. At real operating conditions, many factors affect the reactivity, such as framework flexibility, adsorption of various guest molecules, and competitive reaction pathways. In this study, the strength of first

  7. Kinetics and mechanisms of reactions of CF, CHF, and CF2 radicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, D.S.Y.; Umstead, M.E.; Lin, M.C.

    1978-01-01

    This chapter reviews briefly methods for the production of CF, CHF and CF 2 , and inmore detail, the reactions of these interesting and important radicals. Although a considerable, but not extensive, amount of work has been done on the reactions of CF 2 , little of the chemistry of CF and CHF is known. This chapter also includes the preliminary results of some experiments carried out in this Laboratory on the dynamics of some of the reactions involving these radicals. These results were largely arrived at through investigations of the degree of vibrational excitation of the HF and CO reaction products, determined by HF and CO laser emission and CO laser resonance absorption measurements. The coverage of this review is restricted to the gas phase chemistry of these radicals, and does not include their addition reactions to olefins

  8. Resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Nils Holger

    2014-01-01

    A chapter in a book about terminology within the field of medievalism: the chapter discusses the resonance of medieval music and ritual in modern (classical) music culture and liturgical practice.......A chapter in a book about terminology within the field of medievalism: the chapter discusses the resonance of medieval music and ritual in modern (classical) music culture and liturgical practice....

  9. Thermodynamic chemical energy transfer mechanisms of non-equilibrium, quasi-equilibrium, and equilibrium chemical reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roh, Heui-Seol

    2015-01-01

    Chemical energy transfer mechanisms at finite temperature are explored by a chemical energy transfer theory which is capable of investigating various chemical mechanisms of non-equilibrium, quasi-equilibrium, and equilibrium. Gibbs energy fluxes are obtained as a function of chemical potential, time, and displacement. Diffusion, convection, internal convection, and internal equilibrium chemical energy fluxes are demonstrated. The theory reveals that there are chemical energy flux gaps and broken discrete symmetries at the activation chemical potential, time, and displacement. The statistical, thermodynamic theory is the unification of diffusion and internal convection chemical reactions which reduces to the non-equilibrium generalization beyond the quasi-equilibrium theories of migration and diffusion processes. The relationship between kinetic theories of chemical and electrochemical reactions is also explored. The theory is applied to explore non-equilibrium chemical reactions as an illustration. Three variable separation constants indicate particle number constants and play key roles in describing the distinct chemical reaction mechanisms. The kinetics of chemical energy transfer accounts for the four control mechanisms of chemical reactions such as activation, concentration, transition, and film chemical reactions. - Highlights: • Chemical energy transfer theory is proposed for non-, quasi-, and equilibrium. • Gibbs energy fluxes are expressed by chemical potential, time, and displacement. • Relationship between chemical and electrochemical reactions is discussed. • Theory is applied to explore nonequilibrium energy transfer in chemical reactions. • Kinetics of non-equilibrium chemical reactions shows the four control mechanisms

  10. Mass effect of redox reactions: A novel mode for surface plasmon resonance-based bioanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Pei-Xin; Deng, Sheng-Yuan; Xin, Peng; Ji, Xu-Bo; Shan, Dan; Cosnier, Serge

    2015-12-15

    The pursuit of more specific and sensitive response is a perpetual goal for modern bioassays. This work proposed a novel label-free strategy about redox-related mass effect based on the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technique for ultrasensitive determination of DNA. The protocol starts with the modification of SPR gilded disk with the capture DNA (cDNA). After the conjugation of immobilized cDNA with the target DNA (tDNA), the hybridization chain reaction was triggered by the introduction of mutual partial complementary primers to elongate the terminal into a nanoscale duplex. As it is reported that porphyrin could intercalate into the grooves of the double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) scaffold, multiple positive-charged Fe(III)meso-tetra(N-methyl-4-pyridyl) porphine (FeTMPyP) with symmetric structure were uptaken for in situ formation of porphyrin-dsDNA complex. Given FeTMPyP a highly efficient catalysis for the peroxide reduction, its presence as a biomimetic cofactor was validated via circular dichroism and UV-vis spectroscopy, demonstrating a tight binding as well as high catalytic activity and stability. Using 4-chloro-1-naphthol as a proton donor, the catalytic reduction of H2O2 would oxidize it into insoluble benzo-4-chloro-hexadienone, which simultaneously deposited on the heterogeneous interface, leading to a significant amplification in both SPR response and topological height profile. The signal increment was proportional to the concentration of tDNA, thus an ultrasensitive SPR-based DNA assay was developed with a linear range over four orders of magnitudes and a sub-femtomolar detection limit of 0.73 fM. The developed methodology exemplifies a different way of thinking about mass-sensing modes, extending conventional SPR-based DNA analysis to relevant biomedical applications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Eletromagnetic radiation and the mechanical reactions arising from it

    CERN Document Server

    Schott, G A

    1912-01-01

    Fundamental equations of the electron theory ; transformation of the potentials ; other types of solution ; physical interpretation of the solutions obtained ; illustrative examples ; remarks on the solutions obtained and on the methods of calculating the potentials in general ; periodic motions ; on the distant field due to a moving charge ; pseudo-periodic and aperiodic motions ; on the field near the orbit of a moving charge or group ; the mechanical forces acting on electric charges in motion ; the motion of groups of electric charges ; on the Doppler effect ; on the disturbed motion of a ring of electrons ; on the field close to a point charge in motion ; the mechanical force exterted by an electron on itself ; the mechanical explanation of the electron ; the mechanics of the Lorentz electron ; problems illustrative of the motion of the Lorentz electron.

  12. Multi-nucleon transfer: a probe to investigate the reaction mechanism around the barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandal, Samit K.

    2014-01-01

    The investigation of multi-nucleon transfer mechanism offers valuable information on the pairing interactions that enhance the transfer of nucleon pairs across heavy ions involved in the reaction. These reactions are also a useful tool to study exotic nuclei far from the stability line, which can be explored with the new generation radioactive beam facility. In this talk, multi-nucleon transfer reaction mechanisms between heavy ions and their effect on the reaction dynamics around the coulomb barrier energies have been discussed. Experimental results will be presented with a semi classical description of multi nucleon transfer reaction calculation. One and two nucleon transfer cross sections reproduced using a quantum mechanical coupled channel calculations will also be discussed. A feasibility of investigation of multi-nucleon transfer mechanism to explore the pairing correlation at moderate spin states with radioactive beams will be discussed. (author)

  13. Investigation of meson resonances in the reaction pp→ppπ+π+π-π- at 19 GeV/c

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allan, J.; Blomqvist, G.

    1975-07-01

    In the reaction pp→ppπ + π + π - π - at 19 GeV/c, enchancements around 1100 and 1300 MeV/c in the (π + π + π - ) and (π + π - π - ) systems are analysed. The peak at A 2 - is mainly visible in association with the Δ ++ (1236) resonance, a phenomenon analogous to the previous observed reaction type pp → ΔrhoN. In contrast, a weak enchancement at A 1 + is not visible together with the Δ 0 (1236) resonance. The peak at A 1 + is predominantly seen in a subsample of single diffraction like events, whereas the peak at A 2 - is only visible in the corresponding nondiffractive subsample. Further, there is an indication of the process pp → prho 0 rho 0 p and finally, an observed enchancement around 1680 MeV/c 2 in the (π + π + π - π - ) system can be explained as a reflection of the peak at A 2 - . (Auth.)

  14. First measurement of 30S+α resonant elastic scattering for the 30S(α ,p ) reaction rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahl, D.; Yamaguchi, H.; Kubono, S.; Chen, A. A.; Parikh, A.; Binh, D. N.; Chen, J.; Cherubini, S.; Duy, N. N.; Hashimoto, T.; Hayakawa, S.; Iwasa, N.; Jung, H. S.; Kato, S.; Kwon, Y. K.; Nishimura, S.; Ota, S.; Setoodehnia, K.; Teranishi, T.; Tokieda, H.; Yamada, T.; Yun, C. C.; Zhang, L. Y.

    2018-01-01

    Background: Type I x-ray bursts are the most frequently observed thermonuclear explosions in the galaxy, resulting from thermonuclear runaway on the surface of an accreting neutron star. The 30S(α ,p ) reaction plays a critical role in burst models, yet insufficient experimental information is available to calculate a reliable, precise rate for this reaction. Purpose: Our measurement was conducted to search for states in 34Ar and determine their quantum properties. In particular, natural-parity states with large α -decay partial widths should dominate the stellar reaction rate. Method: We performed the first measurement of 30S+α resonant elastic scattering up to a center-of-mass energy of 5.5 MeV using a radioactive ion beam. The experiment utilized a thick gaseous active target system and silicon detector array in inverse kinematics. Results: We obtained an excitation function for 30S(α ,α ) near 150∘ in the center-of-mass frame. The experimental data were analyzed with R -matrix calculations, and we observed three new resonant patterns between 11.1 and 12.1 MeV, extracting their properties of resonance energy, widths, spin, and parity. Conclusions: We calculated the resonant thermonuclear reaction rate of 30S(α ,p ) based on all available experimental data of 34Ar and found an upper limit about one order of magnitude larger than a rate determined using a statistical model. The astrophysical impact of these two rates has been investigated through one-zone postprocessing type I x-ray burst calculations. We find that our new upper limit for the 30S(α ,p )33Cl rate significantly affects the predicted nuclear energy generation rate during the burst.

  15. Implementation of TTIK method and time of flight for resonance reaction studies at heavy ion accelerator DC-60

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nurmukhanbetova, A.K. [National Laboratory Astana, Nazarbayev University, Astana 010000 (Kazakhstan); Goldberg, V.Z. [Cyclotron Institute, Texas A& M University, College Station, TX (United States); Nauruzbayev, D.K. [National Laboratory Astana, Nazarbayev University, Astana 010000 (Kazakhstan); Saint Petersburg State University, Saint Petersburg (Russian Federation); Rogachev, G.V. [Cyclotron Institute, Texas A& M University, College Station, TX (United States); Golovkov, M.S. [Joint Institute of Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Dubna State University, Dubna (Russian Federation); Mynbayev, N.A. [National Laboratory Astana, Nazarbayev University, Astana 010000 (Kazakhstan); Artemov, S.; Karakhodjaev, A. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Tashkent (Uzbekistan); Kuterbekov, K. [L.N. Gumilov Eurasian National University, Astana (Kazakhstan); Rakhymzhanov, A. [National Laboratory Astana, Nazarbayev University, Astana 010000 (Kazakhstan); Berdibek, Zh. [School of Science and Technology, Nazarbayev University, Astana (Kazakhstan); Ivanov, I. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Astana (Kazakhstan); Tikhonov, A. [School of Science and Technology, Nazarbayev University, Astana (Kazakhstan); Zherebchevsky, V.I.; Torilov, S. Yu. [Saint Petersburg State University, Saint Petersburg (Russian Federation); Tribble, R.E. [Cyclotron Institute, Texas A& M University, College Station, TX (United States)

    2017-03-01

    To study resonance reactions of heavy ions at low energy we have combined the Thick Target Inverse Kinematics Method (TTIK) with Time of Flight method (TF). We used extended target and TF to resolve the identification problems of various possible nuclear processes inherent to the simplest popular version of TTIK. Investigations of the {sup 15}N interaction with hydrogen and helium gas targets by using this new approach are presented.

  16. Multipolarity analysis for 14C high-energy resonance populated by (18O,16O) two-neutron transfer reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbone, D.; Cavallaro, M.; Bondì, M.; Agodi, C.; Cunsolo, A.; Cappuzzello, F.; Azaiez, F.; Franchoo, S.; Khan, E.; Bonaccorso, A.; Fortunato, L.; Foti, A.; Linares, R.; Lubian, J.; Scarpaci, J. A.; Vitturi, A.

    2015-01-01

    The 12 C( 18 O, 16 O) 14 C reaction at 84 MeV incident energy has been explored up to high excitation energy of the residual nucleus thanks to the use of the MAGNEX spectrometer to detect the ejectiles. In the region above the two-neutron separation energy, a resonance has been observed at 16.9 MeV. A multipolarity analysis of the cross section angular distribution indicates an L = 0 character for such a transition

  17. Quantum Measurement Backaction and Upconverting Microwave Signals with Mechanical Resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, R. W.

    The limits of optical measurement and control of mechanical motion are set by the quantum nature of light. The familiar shot noise limit can be avoided by increasing the optical power, but at high enough powers, the backaction of the randomly-arriving photons' radiation pressure can grow to become the dominant force on the system. This thesis will describe an experiment showing how backaction limits the laser cooling of macroscopic drumhead membranes, as well as work on how these membranes can be used to upconvert microwave signals to optical frequencies, potentially preserving the fragile quantum state of the upconverted signal.

  18. Mechanism to preserve phrenic nerve function during photosensitization reaction: drug uptake and photosensitization reaction effect on electric propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Haruka; Hamada, Risa; Ogawa, Emiyu; Arai, Tsunenori

    2018-02-01

    To study a mechanism of phrenic nerve preservation phenomena during a photosensitization reaction, we investigated an uptake of talaporfin sodium and photosensitization reaction effect on an electric propagation. Right phrenic nerve was completely preserved after superior vena cava isolations using the photosensitization reaction in canine animal experiments, in spite of adjacent myocardium was electrically blocked. We predicted that low drug uptake and/or low photosensitization reaction effect on the nerve might be a mechanism of that phenomena. To investigate uptake to various nerve tissue, a healthy extracted crayfish ventral nerve cord and an extracted porcine phrenic nerve were immersed in 20 μg/ml talaporfin sodium solution for 0-240 min. The mean talaporfin sodium fluorescence brightness increased depending on the immersion time. This brightness saturated around the immersion time of 120 min. We found that talaporfin sodium uptake inside the perineurium which directly related to the electric propagation function was lower than that of outside in the porcine phrenic nerve. To investigate photosensitization reaction effect on electric propagation, the crayfish nerve was immersed into the same solution for 15 min and irradiated by a 663 nm laser light with 120 mW/cm2. Since we found the action potential disappeared when the irradiation time was 25-65 s, we consider that the crayfish nerve does not tolerant to the photosensitization reaction on electric propagation function at atmospheric pressure. From these results, we think that the low uptake of talaporfin sodium inside the perineurium and low oxygen partial pressure of nerve might be the possible mechanism to preserve phrenic nerve in vivo.

  19. NNΔ resonance and pd → 3He πo reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, T.

    1988-01-01

    On the basis of the I = 1, JP = 2+ resonant NΔ interaction (the pp 1D2 dibaryon), one argues that in NNΔ system a three-body resonance is generated. With a clustering binding energy of a few 10 MeV between the N and the Δ making the dibaryon and another binding energy of about 10 MeV between the NΔ cluster and the spectator N due to the attractive interaction of the Δ exchange between the cluster and spectator, the NNΔ system is bound about 40 - 60 MeV below the NNΔ threshold. Because of the Δ decay width the NNΔ bound state is actually a resonant state. The case where the spins of all the particles align in the same direction is most favorable to be bound, since the driving term is largest here. Assigning the zero orbital angular momenta, the spin-parity of the NNΔ resonance is JP = (5/2)+ . The resonance couples with NNN system through NN(1D2)-NΔ(5S2). Thus the total spin of the NNN system which couples easily with the NNΔ resonance is 1/2. Namely the spin doublet pd channel creates the NNΔ resonance. Similar argument applies to NΔΔ system. Then one summarize: NNΔ resonance : M = 3.07 GeV, JP = (5/2)+. NΔΔ resonance : M = 3.36 GeV, JP = (7/2)+. Both are easy to couple with the spin-doublet pd channel. Assuming the NNΔ and NΔΔ resonance terms, combined with the background ones which are mild in the energy dependence, one analyses the differential cross section and the deuteron tensor polarization of pd → 3 He π o at deuteron incident energy 410 ∼ 2200 MeV at θ = 0 and π. The remarkable energy-dependent structure of the tensor polarization is fairly explained by the existence of the NNΔ and NΔΔ resonances. (author)

  20. Strain coupling between nitrogen vacancy centers and the mechanical motion of a diamond optomechanical crystal resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cady, J. V.; Lee, K. W.; Ovartchaiyapong, P.; Bleszynski Jayich, A. C.

    Several experiments have recently demonstrated coupling between nitrogen vacancy (NV) centers in diamond and mechanical resonators via crystal strain. In the strong coupling regime, such devices could realize applications critical to emerging quantum technologies, including phonon-mediated spin-spin interactions and mechanical cooling with the NV center1. An outstanding challenge for these devices is generating higher strain coupling in high frequency devices while maintaining the excellent coherence properties of the NV center and high mechanical quality factors. As a step toward these objectives, we demonstrate single-crystal diamond optomechanical crystal resonators with embedded NV centers. These devices host highly-confined GHz-scale mechanical modes that are isolated from mechanical clamping losses and generate strain profiles that allow for large strain coupling to NV centers far from noise-inducing surfaces.

  1. Nuclear and hadronic reaction mechanisms producing spin asymmetry

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We briefly review concept of the quark recombination (QRC) model and a general success of the model. To solve the existing problem, so called anomalous spin observables, in the high energy hyperon spin phenomena, we propose a mechanism; the primarily produced quarks, which are predominantly and quarks, ...

  2. Reaction kinetics and mechanism of magnetic field effects in cryptochrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solov'yov, Ilia; Schulten, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    Creatures as varied as mammals, fish, insects, reptiles, and birds have an intriguing sixth sense that allows them to orient themselves in the Earth's magnetic field. Despite decades of study, the physical basis of this magnetic sense remains elusive. A likely mechanism is furnished by magnetically...

  3. Nuclear and hadronic reaction mechanisms producing spin asymmetry

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    naka

    are predominantly u and d quarks, act as the leading partons to form the hyperons. Extension of the quark recombination concept with this mechanism is successful in providing a good account of the anomalous spin observables. Another kind of anomaly, the non-zero analysing power and spin depolarization in the A ...

  4. Mechanical Resonators for Material Characterization: Sensor Development and Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Casci Ceccacci, Andrea; Bosco, Filippo Giacomo

    The goals of this PhD project were to provide new approaches and developing new systems for material characterization, based on micro and nanomechanical sensors. Common issues that have shown to hinder large-scale integration of sensing techniques based on a micromechanical sensor are the readout......-co-Glycolic Acid (PLGA), which is of high relevance in the biomedical research field. A second version of the system is currently under development, and it aims to increase the throughput of the system allowing to read out multiple microbridge arrays. For material characterization, spectroscopy analysis is often...... considered a benchmark technology. Conventional infrared spectroscopy approaches commonly require milligram amount of sample. Considering the frame of reference given by the overall aim of the project, mechanical sensors can be exploited to provide a unique tool for performing spectroscopy on a limited...

  5. Ambiguities in the reaction mechanism for (e,e'N)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forest, T. de Jr.

    1984-01-01

    The primary motivation for performing quasi-elastic (e,e'N) experiments revolves around the plane wave impulse approximation (PWIA) description of this reaction. Since the PWIA is an approximation, corrections are necessary in practice in order to extract the desired nuclear structure. Unless one understands the physics behind these corrections this introduces ambiguities. In fact the PWIA itself is an ambiguous prescription since a 'free' off-shell cross section is not a well-defined concept. It is these ambiguities which are discussed in this talk. Most of the paper is devoted to the ambiguities associated with the electromagnetic interaction. The author concentrates on four topics: (1) the interaction of the electron with the nucleus in general; (2) ambiguities in the application of the impulse approximation; (3) the sigma-omega model; and (4) the Coulomb sum rule. (Auth.)

  6. Analysis of reaction products formed in the gas phase reaction of E,E-2,4-hexadienal with atmospheric oxidants: Reaction mechanisms and atmospheric implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colmenar, I.; Martin, P.; Cabañas, B.; Salgado, S.; Martinez, E.

    2018-03-01

    An analysis of reaction products for the reaction of E,E-2,4-hexadienal with chlorine atoms (Cl) and OH and NO3 radicals has been carried out at the first time with the aim of obtaining a better understanding of the tropospheric reactivity of α,β-unsaturated carbonyl compounds. Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry with a Time of Flight detector (GC-TOFMS) were used to carry out the qualitative and/or quantitative analyses. Reaction products in gas and particulate phase were observed from the reactions of E,E-2,4- hexadienal with all oxidants. E/Z-Butenedial and maleic anhydride were the main products identified in gas phase. E-butenedial calculated molar yield ranging from 4 to 10%. A significant amount of multifunctional compounds (chloro and hydroxy carbonyls) was identified. These compounds could be formed in particulate phase explaining the ∼90% of unaccounted carbon in gas phase. The reaction with Cl atoms in the presence of NOx with a long reaction time gave Peroxy Acetyl Nitrate (PAN) as an additional product, which is known for being an important specie in the generation of the photochemical smog. Nitrated compounds were the major organic products from the reaction with the NO3 radical. Based on the identified products, the reaction mechanisms have been proposed. In these mechanisms a double bond addition of the atmospheric oxidant at C4/C5 of E,E-2,4-hexadienal is the first step for tropospheric degradation.

  7. Insights into the Reaction Mechanism of Aromatic Ring Cleavage by Homogentisate Dioxygenase: A Quantum Mechanical/Molecular Mechanical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Yue; Lu, Jiarui; Lai, Wenzhen

    2016-05-26

    To elucidate the reaction mechanism of the ring cleavage of homogentisate by homogentisate dioxygenase, quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) calculations were carried out by using two systems in different protonation states of the substrate C2 hydroxyl group. When the substrate C2 hydroxyl group is ionized (the ionized pathway), the superoxo attack on the substrate is the rate-limiting step in the catalytic cycle, with a barrier of 15.9 kcal/mol. Glu396 was found to play an important role in stabilizing the bridge species and its O-O cleavage product by donating a proton via a hydrogen-bonded water molecule. When the substrate C2 hydroxyl group is not ionized (the nonionized pathway), the O-O bond cleavage of the bridge species is the rate-limiting step, with a barrier of 15.3 kcal/mol. The QM/MM-optimized geometries for the dioxygen and alkylperoxo complexes using the nonionized model (for the C2 hydroxyl group) are in agreement with the experimental crystal structures, suggesting that the C2 hydroxyl group is more likely to be nonionized.

  8. 16O resonances near the 4α threshold through the 12C(6Li,d) reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, M. R. D.; Borello-Lewin, T.; Miyake, H.; Duarte, J. L. M.; Rodrigues, C. L.; Souza, M. A.; Horodynski-Matsushigue, L. B.; Ukita, G. M.; Cappuzzello, F.; Cunsolo, A.; Cavallaro, M.; Agodi, C.; Foti, A.

    2014-02-01

    Background: Resonances around xα thresholds in light nuclei are recognized to be important in basic aspects of nuclear structure. However, there is scarce experimental information associated with them. Purpose: We study the α-clustering phenomenon in resonant states around the 4α threshold (14.44 MeV) in the 16O nucleus. Method: The 12C(6Li,d )16O reaction was investigated with an unprecedented resolution at a bombarding energy of 25.5 MeV by employing the São Paulo Pelletron-Enge-Spectrograph facility and the nuclear emulsion technique. Results: Several narrow resonances were populated and the energy resolution of 15 keV allows for the separation of doublet states that were not resolved previously. The upper limits for the resonance widths in this region were extracted. The angular distributions of the absolute differential cross section associated with four natural parity quasibound states are presented and compared to distorted wave Born approximation predictions. Conclusions: Narrow resonances not previously reported in the literature were observed. This indicates that the α-cluster structure information in this region should be revised.

  9. Combined quantum mechanical and molecular mechanical reaction pathway calculation for aromatic hydroxylation by p-hydroxybenzoate-3-hydroxylase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ridder, L.; Mulholland, A.; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.; Vervoort, J.

    1999-01-01

    The reaction pathway for the aromatic 3-hydroxylation of p-hydroxybenzoate by the reactive C4a-hydroperoxyflavin cofactor intermediate in p-hydroxybenzoate hydroxylase (PHBH) has been investigated by a combined quantum mechanical and molecular mechanical (QM/MM) method. A structural model for the

  10. Heterogeneous reaction mechanisms and kinetics relevant to the CVD of semiconductor materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Creighton, J.R.; Coltrin, M.E.

    1994-03-01

    This report documents the state of the art in experimental and theoretical techniques for determining reaction mechanisms and chemical kinetics of heterogeneous reactions relevant to the chemical vapor deposition of semiconductor materials. It summarizes the most common ultra-high vacuum experimental techniques that are used and the types of rate information available from each. Several case studies of specific chemical systems relevant to the microelectronics industry are described. Theoretical methods for calculating heterogeneous reaction rate constants are also summarized.

  11. Effect of mechanical tactile noise on amplitude of visual evoked potentials: multisensory stochastic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méndez-Balbuena, Ignacio; Huidobro, Nayeli; Silva, Mayte; Flores, Amira; Trenado, Carlos; Quintanar, Luis; Arias-Carrión, Oscar; Kristeva, Rumyana; Manjarrez, Elias

    2015-10-01

    The present investigation documents the electrophysiological occurrence of multisensory stochastic resonance in the human visual pathway elicited by tactile noise. We define multisensory stochastic resonance of brain evoked potentials as the phenomenon in which an intermediate level of input noise of one sensory modality enhances the brain evoked response of another sensory modality. Here we examined this phenomenon in visual evoked potentials (VEPs) modulated by the addition of tactile noise. Specifically, we examined whether a particular level of mechanical Gaussian noise applied to the index finger can improve the amplitude of the VEP. We compared the amplitude of the positive P100 VEP component between zero noise (ZN), optimal noise (ON), and high mechanical noise (HN). The data disclosed an inverted U-like graph for all the subjects, thus demonstrating the occurrence of a multisensory stochastic resonance in the P100 VEP. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  12. Interfacial mechanisms of heterogeneous Fenton reactions catalyzed by iron-based materials: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jie; Yang, Xiaofang; Men, Bin; Wang, Dongsheng

    2016-01-01

    The heterogeneous Fenton reaction can generate highly reactive hydroxyl radicals (OH) from reactions between recyclable solid catalysts and H2O2 at acidic or even circumneutral pH. Hence, it can effectively oxidize refractory organics in water or soils and has become a promising environmentally friendly treatment technology. Due to the complex reaction system, the mechanism behind heterogeneous Fenton reactions remains unresolved but fascinating, and is crucial for understanding Fenton chemistry and the development and application of efficient heterogeneous Fenton technologies. Iron-based materials usually possess high catalytic activity, low cost, negligible toxicity and easy recovery, and are a superior type of heterogeneous Fenton catalysts. Therefore, this article reviews the fundamental but important interfacial mechanisms of heterogeneous Fenton reactions catalyzed by iron-based materials. OH, hydroperoxyl radicals/superoxide anions (HO2/O2(-)) and high-valent iron are the three main types of reactive oxygen species (ROS), with different oxidation reactivity and selectivity. Based on the mechanisms of ROS generation, the interfacial mechanisms of heterogeneous Fenton systems can be classified as the homogeneous Fenton mechanism induced by surface-leached iron, the heterogeneous catalysis mechanism, and the heterogeneous reaction-induced homogeneous mechanism. Different heterogeneous Fenton systems catalyzed by characteristic iron-based materials are comprehensively reviewed. Finally, related future research directions are also suggested. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Investigation of the reaction mechanism by means of polarized proton scattering at 30 Si in the range of Ericson fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wangler, M.

    1978-01-01

    By measuring cross section fluctuations in the area of heavily overlapping resonances (Ericson-fluctuations) one is able to extract nuclear properties like level width and level distance. For the elastic scattering case of polarized spin 1/2-particles at nuclei with zero spin one is able to determine the direct reaction part independently from the model by evaluating the polarized and unpolarized cross sections. For this reason the reaction 30 Si(p,p 0 ) and 30 Si(p,p 1 ) was measured with polarized protons in the angular range 50 0 0 , ΔTHETA = 10 0 . The bombarding energy was varied between 8.500 MeV and 10.680 MeV with 20 keV steps. A mean value of (18.5 +- 2.9) keV resulted for the coherence width that was in agreement for the measurements with polarized and unpolarized particles. To define a final value of the reaction mechanism in elastic scattering the direct part of reaction was determined for all angles. (orig.) [de

  14. Development of a skeletal multi-component fuel reaction mechanism based on decoupling methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohan, Balaji; Tay, Kun Lin; Yang, Wenming; Chua, Kian Jon

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A compact multi-component skeletal reaction mechanism was developed. • Combined bio-diesel and PRF mechanism was proposed. • The mechanism consists of 68 species and 183 reactions. • Well validated against ignition delay times, flame speed and engine results. - Abstract: A new coupled bio-diesel surrogate and primary reference fuel (PRF) oxidation skeletal mechanism has been developed. The bio-diesel surrogate sub-mechanism consists of oxidation sub-mechanisms of Methyl decanoate (MD), Methyl 9-decenoate (MD9D) and n-Heptane fuel components. The MD and MD9D are chosen to represent the saturated and unsaturated methyl esters respectively in bio-diesel fuels. Then, a reduced iso-Octane oxidation sub-mechanism is added to the bio-diesel surrogate sub-mechanism. Then, all the sub-mechanisms are integrated to a reduced C_2–C_3 mechanism, detailed H_2/CO/C_1 mechanism and reduced NO_x mechanism based on decoupling methodology. The final mechanism consisted of 68 species and 183 reactions. The mechanism was well validated with shock-tube ignition delay times, laminar flame speed and 3D engine simulations.

  15. Effect of compound nuclear reaction mechanism in 12C(6Li,d) reaction at sub-Coulomb energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Ashok; Adhikari, S.; Basu, C.

    2017-09-01

    The angular distribution of the 12C(6Li,d) reaction populating the 6.92 and 7.12 MeV states of 16O at sub-Coulomb energy (Ecm=3 MeV) are analysed in the framework of the Distorted Wave Born Approximation (DWBA). Recent results on excitation function measurements and backward angle angular distributions derive ANC for both the states on the basis of an alpha transfer mechanism. In the present work, we show that considering both forward and backward angle data in the analysis, the 7.12 MeV state at sub-Coulomb energy is populated from Compound nuclear process rather than transfer process. The 6.92 MeV state is however produced from direct reaction mechanism.

  16. Reaction mechanisms in 24.3 MeV/nucleon 238U induced reactions through a comprehensive study of fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chbihi, A.; Galin; Guerreau, D.; Lewitowicz, M.; Morjean, M.; Pouthas, J.; Piasecki, E.; Kordyasz, A.; Iwanicki, J.; Jastrzebski, J.; Pienkowski, L.; Crema, E.; Gatty, B.; Jacquet, D.; Muchorowska, M.

    1994-01-01

    Nuclear reaction mechanisms for system characterized by very different asymmetries (U+C, Si, Ni, Au) have been investigated at 24.3 MeV/nucleon, using as observables both the fission products and the neutron multiplicity. It is clearly observed that the fusion process-whatever its completeness- can only occur with rather light target nuclei, indicating the persistence of potential energy effects much above the interaction barrier. (authors). 22 refs., 1 fig

  17. Mechanical properties of cellulose nanomaterials studied by contact resonance atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan Wagner; Robert J. Moon; Arvind Raman

    2016-01-01

    Quantification of the mechanical properties of cellulose nanomaterials is key to the development of new cellulose nanomaterial based products. Using contact resonance atomic force microscopy we measured and mapped the transverse elastic modulus of three types of cellulosic nanoparticles: tunicate cellulose nanocrystals, wood cellulose nanocrystals, and wood cellulose...

  18. Broadening of Plasmonic Resonance Due to Electron Collisions with Nanoparticle Boundary: а Quantum Mechanical Consideration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uskov, Alexander; Protsenko, Igor E.; Mortensen, N. Asger

    2014-01-01

    We present a quantum mechanical approach to calculate broadening of plasmonic resonances in metallic nanostructures due to collisions of electrons with the surface of the structure. The approach is applicable if the characteristic size of the structure is much larger than the de Broglie electron...

  19. Quantum Entanglement of a Tunneling Spin with Mechanical Modes of a Torsional Resonator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Garanin

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available We solve the Schrödinger equation for various quantum regimes describing a tunneling macrospin coupled to a torsional oscillator. The energy spectrum and freezing of spin tunneling are studied. Magnetic susceptibility, noise spectrum, and decoherence due to entanglement of spin and mechanical modes are computed. We show that the presence of a tunneling spin can be detected via splitting of the mechanical mode at the resonance. Our results apply to experiments with magnetic molecules coupled to nanoresonators.

  20. Development and validation of a reduced combined biodiesel–diesel reaction mechanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ng, Hoon Kiat; Gan, Suyin; Ng, Jo-Han

    2013-01-01

    In this study, a compact combined biodiesel–diesel (CBD) reaction mechanism for diesel engine simulations is proposed through the combination of three component mechanisms using a chemical class-based approach. The proposed mechanism comprises the reaction mechanisms of methyl crotonate (MC...... to characterise the combustion of fossil diesel. Here, the MC and MB mechanisms are reduced before integrating with a compact n-heptane mechanism. CHEMKIN-PRO is used as the solver for the zero-dimensional, closed homogenous reactor with a constant volume in this study. In the first phase, the mechanisms of MC...... ranging from initial temperatures of 750–1350 K, pressures of 40–60 bar and equivalence ratios of 0.4–1.5. The mechanism is generally found to accurately predict the timing and duration of ID for the combustion of each surrogate fuel. This model is also shown to be feasible for use with multidimensional...

  1. Reaction mechanism of the acidic hydrolysis of highly twisted amides: Rate acceleration caused by the twist of the amide bond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mujika, Jon I; Formoso, Elena; Mercero, Jose M; Lopez, Xabier

    2006-08-03

    We present an ab initio study of the acid hydrolysis of a highly twisted amide and a planar amide analogue. The aim of these studies is to investigate the effect that the twist of the amide bond has on the reaction barriers and mechanism of acid hydrolysis. Concerted and stepwise mechanisms were investigated using density functional theory and polarizable continuum model calculations. Remarkable differences were observed between the mechanism of twisted and planar amide, due mainly to the preference for N-protonation of the former and O-protonation of the latter. In addition, we were also able to determine that the hydrolytic mechanism of the twisted amide will be pH dependent. Thus, there is a preference for a stepwise mechanism with formation of an intermediate in the acid hydrolysis, whereas the neutral hydrolysis undergoes a concerted-type mechanism. There is a nice agreement between the characterized intermediate and available X-ray data and a good agreement with the kinetically estimated rate acceleration of hydrolysis with respect to analogous undistorted amide compounds. This work, along with previous ab initio calculations, describes a complex and rich chemistry for the hydrolysis of highly twisted amides as a function of pH. The theoretical data provided will allow for a better understanding of the available kinetic data of the rate acceleration of amides upon twisting and the relation of the observed rate acceleration with intrinsic differential reactivity upon loss of amide bond resonance.

  2. A solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance study of post-plasma reactions in organosilicone microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Colin J; Ponnusamy, Thirunavukkarasu; Murphy, Peter J; Lindberg, Mats; Antzutkin, Oleg N; Griesser, Hans J

    2014-06-11

    Plasma-polymerized organosilicone coatings can be used to impart abrasion resistance and barrier properties to plastic substrates such as polycarbonate. Coating rates suitable for industrial-scale deposition, up to 100 nm/s, can be achieved through the use of microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD), with optimal process vapors such as tetramethyldisiloxane (TMDSO) and oxygen. However, it has been found that under certain deposition conditions, such coatings are subject to post-plasma changes; crazing or cracking can occur anytime from days to months after deposition. To understand the cause of the crazing and its dependence on processing plasma parameters, the effects of post-plasma reactions on the chemical bonding structure of coatings deposited with varying TMDSO-to-O2 ratios was studied with (29)Si and (13)C solid-state magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR) using both single-pulse and cross-polarization techniques. The coatings showed complex chemical compositions significantly altered from the parent monomer. (29)Si MAS NMR spectra revealed four main groups of resonance lines, which correspond to four siloxane moieties (i.e., mono (M), di (D), tri (T), and quaternary (Q)) and how they are bound to oxygen. Quantitative measurements showed that the ratio of TMDSO to oxygen could shift the chemical structure of the coating from 39% to 55% in Q-type bonds and from 28% to 16% for D-type bonds. Post-plasma reactions were found to produce changes in relative intensities of (29)Si resonance lines. The NMR data were complemented by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Together, these techniques have shown that the bonding environment of Si is drastically altered by varying the TMDSO-to-O2 ratio during PECVD, and that post-plasma reactions increase the cross-link density of the silicon-oxygen network. It appears that Si-H and Si-OH chemical groups are the most susceptible to post-plasma reactions. Coatings produced at a

  3. On the existence of and mechanism for microwave-specific reaction rate enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudley, Gregory B; Richert, Ranko; Stiegman, A E

    2015-04-01

    The use of microwave radiation to drive chemical reactions has become ubiquitous in almost all fields of chemistry. In all of these areas it is principally due to rapid and convenient heating resulting in significantly higher rates of reaction, with other advantages including enhanced product selectivity and control of materials properties. Although microwave heating continues to grow as an enabling technology, fundamental research into the nature of microwave heating has not grown at the same rate. In the case of chemical reactions run in homogeneous solution, particularly synthetic organic reactions, there is considerable controversy over the origins of rate enhancement, with a fundamental question being whether there exist microwave-specific effects, distinct from what can be attained under conventional convective heating, that can accelerate a reaction rate. In this Perspective, we discuss unique aspects of microwave heating of molecules in solution and discuss the origin and nature of microwave-specific effects arising from the process of "selective heating" of reactants in solution. Integral to this discussion is work from the field of dielectric relaxation spectroscopy, which provides a model for selective heating by Debye relaxation processes. The Perspective also includes a critical discussion of hypotheses of non-thermal effects (alternatively classified here as resonant processes) and an outline of specific reaction parameters for chemical systems in which microwave-specific Debye relaxation processes can result in observable reaction rate enhancement.

  4. Mechanism and kinetics of LiX(X=H, D, T) + H2O reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lei Hongjie; Duan Hao; Xing Pifeng; Tang Yongjian

    2011-01-01

    The reaction mechanism of LiX(X=H, D, T) with H 2 O was investigated at MP2/6-311G (d) level using ab initio quantum chemistry in Gaussian 03 software. The equilibrium geometries, harmonic frequencies and energy of various stationary points on the potential energy surfaces were calculated in the lowest singlet states. Considering the quantum correction, the reaction rate constants were calculated using classical transition state theory. The results show the reaction of LiH (LiD, LiT) with H 2 O was considerably dependent on temperature that it is lower, the reaction rate constants are smaller. (authors)

  5. Reaction mechanism of oxygen atoms with unsaturated hydrocarbons by the crossed molecular beams method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buss, R.J.; Baseman, R.J.; Guozhong, H.; Lee, Y.T.

    1982-04-01

    From a series of studies of the reaction of oxygen atoms with unsaturated hydrocarbons using the crossed molecular beam method, the dominant reaction mechanisms were found to be the simple substitution reactions with oxygen atoms replacing H, Cl, Br atom or alkyl groups. Complication due to secondary reaction was avoided by carrying out experiments under single collisions and observing primary products directly. Primary products were identified by measuring the angular and velocity distributions of products at all the mass numbers which could be detected by the mass spectrometer, and from comparison of these distributions, applying the requirement of energy and momentum conservation.

  6. Reaction Mechanism of Oxygen Atoms with Unsaturated Hydrocarbons by the Crossed-Molecular-Beams Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buss, R. J.; Baseman, R. J.; Guozhong, H.; Lee, Y. T.

    1982-04-01

    From a series of studies of the reaction of oxygen atoms with unsaturated hydrocarbons using the crossed molecular beam method, the dominant reaction mechanisms were found to be the simple substitution reactions with oxygen atoms replacing H, Cl, Br atom or alkyl groups. Complication due to secondary reaction was avoided by carrying out experiments under single collisions and observing primary products directly. Primary products were identified by measuring the angular and velocity distributions of products at all the mass numbers which could be detected by the mass spectrometer, and from comparison of these distributions, applying the requirement of energy and momentum conservation.

  7. Determining the reaction in kinematic pairs of certain mechanisms using a digital computer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chifchieva, V N

    1980-01-01

    In Dorr classifiers, walking excavators, conveyors, sieves and other mechanisms, one finds a triad with a sliding pair. An algorithm is proposed for determining reactions in the kinematic connections of a triad with one, two or three sliding pairs. The algorithm is suitable for use in digital computers. It is based on the transfer function method, and has several advantages over the technnique of determining reactions in kinematic pairs of V. Zinovyev. A concrete example is given of calculating reactions in the connections of a crank and lever mechanism of a walking excavator.

  8. 2013 Gordon Research Conference, Inorganic reaction mechanisms, Galveston, TX, March 3-8 2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abu-Omar, Mahdi M. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States)

    2012-12-08

    The 2013 Gordon Conference on Inorganic Reaction Mechanisms will present cutting-edge research on the molecular aspects of inorganic reactions involving elements from throughout the periodic table and state-of-the art techniques that are used in the elucidation of reaction mechanisms. The Conference will feature a wide range of topics, such as homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis, metallobiochemistry, electron-transfer in energy reactions, polymerization, nitrogen fixation, green chemistry, oxidation, solar conversion, alkane functionalization, organotransition metal chemistry, and computational chemistry. The talks will cover themes of current interest including energy, materials, and bioinorganic chemistry. Sections cover: Electron-Transfer in Energy Reactions; Catalytic Polymerization and Oxidation Chemistry; Kinetics and Spectroscopy of Heterogeneous Catalysts; Metal-Organic Chemistry and its Application in Synthesis; Green Energy Conversion;Organometallic Chemistry and Activation of Small Molecules; Advances in Kinetics Modeling and Green Chemistry; Metals in Biology and Disease; Frontiers in Catalytic Bond Activation and Cleavage.

  9. Resonance-enhanced laser-induced plasma spectroscopy for sensitive elemental analysis: Elucidation of enhancement mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lui, S.L.; Cheung, N.H.

    2002-01-01

    When performing laser-induced plasma spectroscopy for elemental analysis, the analyte signal-to-noise ratio increased from four to over fifty if the plume was reheated by a dye laser pulse tuned to resonant absorption. Time-resolved studies showed that the enhancement was not due to resonance photoionization. Rather, efficient and controlled rekindling of a larger plume volume was the key mechanism. The signal-to-noise ratio further increased to over a hundred if the atmosphere was replaced by a low-pressure heavy inert gas. The ambient gas helped confine and thermally insulate the expanding vapor

  10. Mechanically Reconfigurable Microstrip Lines Loaded with Stepped Impedance Resonators and Potential Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Naqui

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is focused on exploring the possibilities and potential applications of microstrip transmission lines loaded with stepped impedance resonators (SIRs etched on top of the signal strip, in a separated substrate. It is shown that if the symmetry plane of the line (a magnetic wall is perfectly aligned with the electric wall of the SIR at the fundamental resonance, the line is transparent. However, if symmetry is somehow ruptured, a notch in the transmission coefficient appears. The notch frequency and depth can thus be mechanically controlled, and this property can be of interest for the implementation of sensors and barcodes, as it is discussed.

  11. Extremely high Q-factor mechanical modes in quartz bulk acoustic wave resonators at millikelvin temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goryachev, M.; Creedon, D. L.; Ivanov, E. N.; Tobar, M. E. [ARC Centre of Excellence for Engineered Quantum Systems, University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley WA 6009 (Australia); Galliou, S.; Bourquin, R. [Department of Time and Frequency, FEMTO-ST Institute, ENSMM, 26 Chemin de l' Épitaphe, 25000, Besançon (France)

    2014-12-04

    We demonstrate that Bulk Acoustic Wave (BAW) quartz resonator cooled down to millikelvin temperatures are excellent building blocks for hybrid quantum systems with extremely long coherence times. Two overtones of the longitudinal mode at frequencies of 15.6 and 65.4 MHz demonstrate a maximum f.Q product of 7.8×10{sup 16} Hz. With this result, the Q-factor in such devices near the quantum ground state can be four orders of magnitude better than previously attained in other mechanical systems. Tested quartz resonators possess the ultra low acoustic losses crucial for electromagnetic cooling to the phonon ground state.

  12. Vacuum fluctuations and radiation reaction contributions to the resonance dipole-dipole interaction between two atoms near a reflecting boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wenting; Rizzuto, Lucia; Passante, Roberto

    2018-04-01

    We investigate the resonance dipole-dipole interaction energy between two identical atoms, one in the ground state and the other in the excited state, interacting with the electromagnetic field in the presence of a perfectly reflecting plane boundary. The atoms are prepared in a correlated (symmetric or antisymmetric) Bell-type state. Following a procedure due to Dalibard et al. [J. Dalibard et al., J. Phys. (Paris) 43, 1617 (1982);, 10.1051/jphys:0198200430110161700 J. Phys. (Paris) 45, 637 (1984), 10.1051/jphys:01984004504063700], we separate the contributions of vacuum fluctuations and radiation reaction (source) field to the resonance interaction energy between the two atoms and show that only the source field contributes to the interatomic interaction, while vacuum field fluctuations do not. By considering specific geometric configurations of the two-atom system with respect to the mirror and specific choices of dipole orientations, we show that the presence of the mirror significantly affects the resonance interaction energy and that different features appear with respect to the case of atoms in free space, for example, a change in the spatial dependence of the interaction. Our findings also suggest that the presence of a boundary can be exploited to tailor and control the resonance interaction between two atoms, as well as the related energy transfer process. The possibility of observing these phenomena is also discussed.

  13. gamma-decay of resonance-like structure observed in sup 3 sup 0 Si(p,gamma) sup 3 sup 1 P reaction

    CERN Document Server

    Kachan, A S; Korda, L P; Mishchenko, V M; Korda, V Y

    2002-01-01

    gamma-Decay of a resonance-like structure observed in the reaction sup 3 sup 0 Si (p, gamma) sup 3 sup 1 P in the energy region E sub p = 1.4 - 2.7 MeV of accelerated protons is studied. The M1 resonance built on the ground state of sup 3 sup 1 P is identified. The position of the M1 resonance is explained taking into account pairing forces.

  14. Resonances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    an impetus or drive to that account: change, innovation, rupture, or discontinuity. Resonances: Historical Essays on Continuity and Change explores the historiographical question of the modes of interrelation between these motifs in historical narratives. The essays in the collection attempt to realize...

  15. Plasmonic resonances of nanoparticles from large-scale quantum mechanical simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xu; Xiang, Hongping; Zhang, Mingliang; Lu, Gang

    2017-09-01

    Plasmonic resonance of metallic nanoparticles results from coherent motion of its conduction electrons, driven by incident light. For the nanoparticles less than 10 nm in diameter, localized surface plasmonic resonances become sensitive to the quantum nature of the conduction electrons. Unfortunately, quantum mechanical simulations based on time-dependent Kohn-Sham density functional theory are computationally too expensive to tackle metal particles larger than 2 nm. Herein, we introduce the recently developed time-dependent orbital-free density functional theory (TD-OFDFT) approach which enables large-scale quantum mechanical simulations of plasmonic responses of metallic nanostructures. Using TD-OFDFT, we have performed quantum mechanical simulations to understand size-dependent plasmonic response of Na nanoparticles and plasmonic responses in Na nanoparticle dimers and trimers. An outlook of future development of the TD-OFDFT method is also presented.

  16. Strange baryonic resonances below the anti KN threshold. Results from p+p reactions at the HADES experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siebenson, Johannes Stephan

    2013-04-18

    The present work investigates the vacuum properties of the hyperon resonances {Sigma}(1385){sup +} and {Lambda}(1405). For this purpose, p+p reactions at 3.5 GeV kinetic beam energy were analyzed. By using simulations and a special background method, the Breit-Wigner mass and width of the {Sigma}(1385){sup +} could be determined. Furthermore, its production dynamics were studied in different angular distributions. In this context indications were found that the {Sigma}(1385){sup +} partially stems from the decay of a heavy {Delta}-resonance. The investigation of the {Lambda}(1405) was based on similar analysis methods. After acceptance and efficiency corrections, the spectral shape of the {Lambda}(1405) could be extracted. Here a mass shift of this particle to masses below 1400 MeV/c{sup 2} was found. This might reveal important information about the two pole structure of the {Lambda}(1405) and its influence on the low energy anti KN interaction.

  17. Giant resonance spectroscopy of 40Ca with the (e,e'x) reaction (I): Experiments and overview of results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diesener, H.; Helm, U.; Neumann-Cosel, P. von; Richter, A.; Schrieder, G.; Stascheck, A.; Stiller, A.; Carter, J.

    2001-01-01

    The 40 Ca(e,e'x; x=p,α) reaction has been measured in the giant resonance excitation region for E x ≅8-26 MeV. The present article is the first out of three describing the experiments and giving an overview of the results. Data were taken at four momentum transfers in the range q=0.26-0.66 fm -1 . Angular correlations for decay to the ground state and low-lying states of 39 K and 36 Ar could be extracted as a function of excitation energy in 40 Ca. Excitation energy spectra integrated over the particle emission angle were generated for the various resolved decay channels. Comparisons of the giant resonance cross-section distributions with results using other electromagnetic or hadronic probes have been made and good agreement is found in most cases

  18. Exchange reaction between hydrogen and deuterium. II - Proposal for an heterogeneous initiation mechanism of gaseous phase reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marteau, Chantal; Gaillard-Cusin, Francoise; James, Henri [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, 45 - Orleans-la-Source (France). Centre de Recherches sur la Chimie de Combustion et des Hautes Temperatures

    1978-05-01

    Investigation of experimental data related to evolution period exhibited by H/sub 2/-D/sub 2/ exchange process requires to take into account the variation against time of every atomic species -adsorbed or not- implied in the reaction mechanism. The formation of first chain carriers involves: - chemisorption of either gaseous reactant on the surface active centres (..sigma..), e.g.: ..sigma.. + 1/2 H/sub 2/ reversible ..sigma..H; - consecutive generation of atomic species through hetero-homogeneous transfer between chemisorbed species (..sigma..H) and gaseous molecules: ..sigma..H+H/sub 2/..--> sigma..+H/sub 2/+H/sup 0/, ..sigma..H+D/sub 2/..--> sigma..+HD+D/sup 0/. Therefore, it can be shown that the heterogeneous initiation process of a gas phase reaction identifies to a chain linear mechanism. Such an heterogeneous sequence conditions the further proceeding of the homogeneous chain reaction; both evolutions being kinematically connected. Rate constant of hydrogen adsorption on silica glass: ksub(a1) approximately 10/sup 14/ exp(-47/RT)Isup(0,5).molesup(-0,5).S/sup -1/ has been evaluated.

  19. Optical fiber tip interferometer gas pressure sensor based on anti-resonant reflecting guidance mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Y. B.; Wang, D. N.; Xu, Ben; Wang, Z. K.

    2018-05-01

    We propose and demonstrate a gas pressure sensor based on an anti-resonant reflecting guidance (ARRG) mechanism in quartz capillary tube with an open cavity. The device is simple in fabrication by only fusion splicing a segment of capillary tube with single mode fiber. It has compact size, robust structure, convenient mode of operation, and high sensitivity of 4.278 nm/MPa. Moreover, as two Faby-Perot cavities exist in the device, which create the interference spectrum with several distinct resonance dips, a simultaneous gas pressure and temperature detection can be readily achieved by tracing two dip wavelengths. The error in the measurement due to the choice of different resonant dips can be effectively reduced by using the Fourier band pass filtering method.

  20. Size modulated transition in the fluid–structure interaction losses in nano mechanical beam resonators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vishwakarma, S. D.; Pratap, R., E-mail: pratap@mecheng.iisc.ernet.in [Center for Nano Science and Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bengaluru 560012 (India); Pandey, A. K., E-mail: ashok@iith.ac.in [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Hyderabad, Kandi, Sangareddy - 502285 (India); Parpia, J. M.; Craighead, H. G. [Center for Materials Research, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Verbridge, S. S. [Biomedical Engineering and Mechanics, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States)

    2016-05-21

    An understanding of the dominant dissipative mechanisms is crucial for the design of a high-Q doubly clamped nanobeam resonator to be operated in air. We focus on quantifying analytically the viscous losses—the squeeze film damping and drag force damping—that limit the net quality factor of a beam resonator, vibrating in its flexural fundamental mode with the surrounding fluid as air at atmospheric pressure. Specifically, drag force damping dominates at smaller beam widths and squeeze film losses dominate at larger beam widths, with no significant contribution from structural losses and acoustic radiation losses. The combined viscous losses agree well with the experimentally measured Q of the resonator over a large range of beam widths, within the limits of thin beam theory. We propose an empirical relation between the maximum quality factor and the ratio of maximum beam width to the squeeze film air gap thickness.

  1. Mechanical nonlinearity elimination with a micromechanical clamped-free semicircular beams resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dongyang; Chen, Xuying; Wang, Yong; Liu, Xinxin; Guan, Yangyang; Xie, Jin

    2018-04-01

    This paper reports a micro-machined clamped-free semicircular beam resonator aiming to eliminate the nonlinearity that widely exists in traditional mechanical resonators. Cubic coefficients over vibration displacement due to axial extension of the beams are analyzed through theoretical modelling, and the corresponding frequency effect is demonstrated. With the device working in the elastic vibration mode, the cubic coefficients are eliminated by using a free end to release the nonlinear extension of beams and thus the inside axial stress. The amplitude-frequency (A-f) effect is overcome in a large region of source power, and the coefficient of frequency softening is linearized in a large region of polarization voltage. As a result, the resonator can be driven at larger vibration amplitude to achieve a high signal to noise ratio and power handling performance.

  2. A general procedure for thermomechanical calibration of nano/micro-mechanical resonators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hauer, B.D.; Doolin, C.; Beach, K.S.D.; Davis, J.P.

    2013-01-01

    We describe a general procedure to calibrate the detection of a nano/micro-mechanical resonator’s displacement as it undergoes thermal Brownian motion. A brief introduction to the equations of motion for such a resonator is presented, followed by a detailed derivation of the corresponding power spectral density (PSD) function, which is identical in all situations aside from a system-dependent effective mass value. The effective masses for a number of different resonator geometries are determined using both finite element method (FEM) modeling and analytical calculations. -- Highlights: •Model micro- and nanomechanical resonators displaced by their own thermal motion. •Review the theoretical framework for describing thermomechanical systems. •Present a recipe for measurement calibration on devices of arbitrary shape. •Point out and correct inconsistencies in the existing literature. •Provide an authoritative guide and reference for practitioners in this area

  3. A general procedure for thermomechanical calibration of nano/micro-mechanical resonators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hauer, B.D., E-mail: bhauer@ualberta.ca; Doolin, C.; Beach, K.S.D., E-mail: kbeach@ualberta.ca; Davis, J.P., E-mail: jdavis@ualberta.ca

    2013-12-15

    We describe a general procedure to calibrate the detection of a nano/micro-mechanical resonator’s displacement as it undergoes thermal Brownian motion. A brief introduction to the equations of motion for such a resonator is presented, followed by a detailed derivation of the corresponding power spectral density (PSD) function, which is identical in all situations aside from a system-dependent effective mass value. The effective masses for a number of different resonator geometries are determined using both finite element method (FEM) modeling and analytical calculations. -- Highlights: •Model micro- and nanomechanical resonators displaced by their own thermal motion. •Review the theoretical framework for describing thermomechanical systems. •Present a recipe for measurement calibration on devices of arbitrary shape. •Point out and correct inconsistencies in the existing literature. •Provide an authoritative guide and reference for practitioners in this area.

  4. Nanoscale studies of cement chemistry with 15N resonance reaction analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schweitzer, Jeffrey S.; Livingston, Richard A.; Rolfs, Claus; Becker, Hans-Werner; Kubsky, Stefan; Spillane, Timothy; Castellote, Marta; Viedma, Paloma G. de

    2005-01-01

    Analyses of materials with ion beams have proven to be a valuable technique for describing the spatial distributions of specific elements in host materials. We have applied this technique using the 15 N(p, αγ) 12 C reaction to study the time dependence of the chemical reactions involved in the curing of cement. By using the Dynamitron Tandem accelerator at the Ruhr Universitaet, Bochum, Germany, we have been able to achieve a few nanometer spatial resolution at the surface of cement grains and to study the hydrogen distributions to a depth of about 2 μm. By applying a technique for stopping the chemical reactions at arbitrary times, the time dependence of the chemical reactions involving specific components of cement can be investigated. In addition, the effects of additives on the chemical reactions have been studied, as have materials that are components of concrete

  5. Nanoscale studies of cement chemistry with {sup 15}N resonance reaction analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schweitzer, Jeffrey S. [University of Connecticut, Department of Physics, Unit 3046, Storrs, CT 06269-3046 (United States)]. E-mail: schweitz@phys.uconn.edu; Livingston, Richard A. [Federal Highway Administration, HRDI-05, 6300 Georgetown Pike McLean, VA 22101 (United States); Rolfs, Claus [Institut fuer Physik mit Ionenstrahlen, Ruhr-Universitaet, Bochum Universitaetsstr. 150, Gebaeude NB 3, 44780 Bochum (Germany); Becker, Hans-Werner [Institut fuer Physik mit Ionenstrahlen, Ruhr-Universitaet, Bochum Universitaetsstr. 150, Gebaeude NB 3, 44780 Bochum (Germany); Kubsky, Stefan [Institut fuer Physik mit Ionenstrahlen, Ruhr-Universitaet, Bochum Universitaetsstr. 150, Gebaeude NB 3, 44780 Bochum (Germany); Spillane, Timothy [University of Connecticut, Department of Physics, Unit 3046, Storrs, CT 06269-3046 (United States); Castellote, Marta [Institute of Construction Science ' Eduardo Torroja' (CSIC), Serrano Galvache no. 4, 28033 Madrid (Spain); Viedma, Paloma G. de [Institute of Construction Science ' Eduardo Torroja' (CSIC), Serrano Galvache no. 4, 28033 Madrid (Spain)

    2005-12-15

    Analyses of materials with ion beams have proven to be a valuable technique for describing the spatial distributions of specific elements in host materials. We have applied this technique using the {sup 15}N(p, {alpha}{gamma}){sup 12}C reaction to study the time dependence of the chemical reactions involved in the curing of cement. By using the Dynamitron Tandem accelerator at the Ruhr Universitaet, Bochum, Germany, we have been able to achieve a few nanometer spatial resolution at the surface of cement grains and to study the hydrogen distributions to a depth of about 2 {mu}m. By applying a technique for stopping the chemical reactions at arbitrary times, the time dependence of the chemical reactions involving specific components of cement can be investigated. In addition, the effects of additives on the chemical reactions have been studied, as have materials that are components of concrete.

  6. Insights into the π-p → ηn reaction mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durand, J.; Julia-Diaz, B.; Julia-Diaz, B.; Julia-Diaz, B.; Lee, T.S.H.; Sato, T.; Lee, T.S.H.; Sato, T.

    2009-01-01

    A dynamical coupled-channels formalism is used to investigate the eta-meson production mechanism on the proton induced by pions, in the total center-of-mass energy region from threshold up to 2 GeV. We show how and why studying exclusively total cross section data might turn out to be misleading in pinning down the reaction mechanism. (authors)

  7. Formation of amorphous Ti-50at.%Pt by solid state reactions during mechanical alloying

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mahlatji, ML

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical alloying of an equiatomic mixture of crystalline elemental powders of Ti and Pt in a high-energy ball mill results in formation of an amorphous alloy by solid-state reactions. Mechanical alloying was carried out in an argon atmosphere...

  8. The 65 keV resonance in the {sup 17}O(p,alpha){sup 14}N thermonuclear reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sergi, M.L. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Metodologie Fisiche e Chimiche per l' Ingegneria, Universita di Catania, Catania (Italy); Centro Siciliano di Fisica Nucleare e Struttura della Materia, Catania (Italy); Spitaleri, C. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Metodologie Fisiche e Chimiche per l' Ingegneria, Universita di Catania, Catania (Italy); Coc, A. [CSNSM, UMR 8609, CNRS/IN2P3and Universite Paris Sud 11, Batiment 104, 91405 Orsay Campus (France); Mukhamedzhanov, A. [Cyclotron Institute, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Burjan, S.V. [Nuclear Physics Institute of ASCR Rez near Prague (Czech Republic); Gulino, M. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Metodologie Fisiche e Chimiche per l' Ingegneria, Universita di Catania, Catania (Italy); Hammache, F. [IPN, IN2P3-CNRS et Universite de Paris-Sud 11, 91406 Orsay Cedex (France); Hons, Z. [Nuclear Physics Institute of ASCR Rez near Prague (Czech Republic); Irgaziev, B. [GIK Institute of Engineering Sciences and Technology Topi District Swabi NWFP (Pakistan); Kiss, G.G. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Metodologie Fisiche e Chimiche per l' Ingegneria, Universita di Catania, Catania (Italy); Kroha, V. [Nuclear Physics Institute of ASCR Rez near Prague (Czech Republic); La Cognata, M. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Metodologie Fisiche e Chimiche per l' Ingegneria, Universita di Catania, Catania (Italy); Centro Siciliano di Fisica Nucleare e Struttura della Materia, Catania (Italy); Lamia, L.; Pizzone, R.G. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Metodologie Fisiche e Chimiche per l' Ingegneria, Universita di Catania, Catania (Italy); Sereville, N. de [IPN, IN2P3-CNRS et Universite de Paris-Sud 11, 91406 Orsay Cedex (France); Somorjai, E. [ATOMKI, Debrecen (Hungary)

    2010-03-01

    The indirect measurement of {sup 17}O(p,alpha){sup 14}N cross section was performed by means of the Trojan Horse Method. This approach allowed to investigate the ultra-low energy range (E{sub c.m.}=0-300 keV) relevant for several astrophysics environments, where two resonant levels of {sup 18}F at E{sub c.m.}{sup R}=65 keV and E{sub c.m.}{sup R}=183 keV play a significant role in the reaction rate determination.

  9. Gross resonance-like structure of the complete fusion excitation function for the 16O + 28Si reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Jiwen; Zheng Pingzi; Liu Guoxing

    1993-01-01

    The complete fusion excitation function for the 16 O + 28 Si reaction is measured in the incident energy range from 50 to 90 MeV with step of 1.0 MeV using a position sensitive ΔE-E telescope system. The striking gross resonance-like structure is observed when E c.m. c.m. 34.5, 38.5 and 43.0 MeV respectively. The structure vanishes gradually when E c.m. > 46.0 MeV

  10. Observation of low-lying resonances in the quasicontinuum of 195,196Pt and enhanced astrophysical reaction rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giacoppo F.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An excess of strength on the low-energy tail of the giant dipole resonance recently has been observed in the γ-decay from the quasicontinuum of 195,196Pt. The nature of this phenomenon is not yet fully investigated. If this feature is present also in the γ-ray strength of the neutron-rich isotopes, it can affect the neutron-capture reactions involved in the formation of heavy-elements in stellar nucleosynthesis. The experimental level density and γ-ray strength function of 195,196Pt are presented together with preliminary calculations of the corresponding neutron-capture cross sections.

  11. Interest of uranium complexes for the mechanism study of the McMurry reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maury, O.

    1997-01-01

    The reducing coupling reactions of ketones in diols and olefins are generally carried out with titanium or samarium compounds. In this work uranium complexes have been used. They have allowed to study the chemical reaction mechanism. This thesis is divided into three parts: 1) the reduction mechanism of uranium tetrachloride by cyclic voltametry has been studied at first. It has been shown that this reduction is followed by a transfer reaction of chlorides between the reduced specie of the higher electronic density and UCl . 2) In the second part is described: the synthesis, the crystal structure, the reactivity of the chemical agents, the stereochemistry of diols and alkenes formation and the pinacolisation reaction catalysis. 3) In the last part, the limits of the McMurry reaction are given by the study of the aromatic ketones pinacolisation reaction by-products. The obtained results show that the complexes of the metals which present a high reducing and oxo-philic (Ti, Sm, U..) character react in a similar way with the carbonyl compounds. If the uranium compounds are less used than those of the titanium in the field of the organic synthesis applications, they are precious auxiliaries and excellent models for reactions mechanisms study and for the synthesis methods optimization. (O.M.)

  12. Synergetic mechanism of methanol–steam reforming reaction in a catalytic reactor with electric discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Taegyu; Jo, Sungkwon; Song, Young-Hoon; Lee, Dae Hoon

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Methanol–steam reforming was performed on Cu catalysts under an electric discharge. • Discharge had a synergetic effect on the catalytic reaction for methanol conversion. • Discharge lowered the temperature for catalyst activation or light off. • Discharge controlled the yield and selectivity of species in a reforming process. • Adsorption triggered by a discharge was a possible mechanism for a synergetic effect. - Abstract: Methanol–steam reforming was performed on Cu/ZnO/Al 2 O 3 catalysts under an electric discharge. The discharge occurred between the electrodes where the catalysts were packed. The electric discharge was characterized by the discharge voltage and electric power to generate the discharge. The existence of a discharge had a synergetic effect on the catalytic reaction for methanol conversion. The electric discharge provided modified reaction paths resulting in a lower temperature for catalyst activation or light off. The discharge partially controlled the yield and selectivity of species in a reforming process. The aspect of control was examined in view of the reaction kinetics. The possible mechanisms for the synergetic effect between the catalytic reaction and electric discharge on methanol–steam reforming were addressed. A discrete reaction path, particularly adsorption triggered by an electric discharge, was suggested to be the most likely mechanism for the synergetic effect. These results are expected to provide a guide for understanding the plasma–catalyst hybrid reaction

  13. Mechanism of degradation and discoloration reaction of L-ascorbic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurata, Tadao

    1976-01-01

    The mechanisms of decomposition and coloration reaction of L-ascorbic acid are reviewed. At the initial stage of the decomposition, it can be classified roughly into oxidative and non-oxidative processes of decomposition. ASA forms furfural by being heated and decomposed in strong acid. The mechanism of the production of furfural at varying pH in acidic region was discussed. Furfural was produced through the enol form of 3-deoxy-L-pentosulose(3DP). 3DP seemed to be produced by two different routes: the one route consists of successive reactions from ASA through lactone ring-opening, dehydration, decarboxylation, to 3DP, and the other consists of reactions from the 3-keto form of ASA, through lactone ring-opening, decarboxylation, and dehydration, to the enol form of 3DP. ASA is easily reduced and decomposed through dehydro-ASA(DHA) by the presence of an oxidizing agent. The decomposition of DHA is discussed in cases of the systems of DHA alone, DHA and α-aminoacid, and DHA and amine. DHA was decomposed by the same reaction scheme as the decomposition of ASA and yielded 2-furoic acid. In the presence of an amino acid, DHA was decomposed by the Strecker decomposition, and yielded a red compound and a radical. In the presence of an amine, the discoloration reaction seemed to take place through radical reaction mechanism. The coloration reaction of ASA occurs in an acidic medium, and is accelerated by the oxidative process of decomposition. (Nishino, S.)

  14. Advances in Computational High-Resolution Mechanical Spectroscopy HRMS Part II: Resonant Frequency – Young's Modulus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majewski, M; Magalas, L B

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we compare the values of the resonant frequency f 0 of free decaying oscillations computed according to the parametric OMI method (Optimization in Multiple Intervals) and nonparametric DFT-based (discrete Fourier transform) methods as a function of the sampling frequency. The analysis is carried out for free decaying signals embedded in an experimental noise recorded for metallic samples in a low-frequency resonant mechanical spectrometer. The Yoshida method (Y), the Agrez' method (A), and new interpolated discrete Fourier transform (IpDFT) methods, that is, the Yoshida-Magalas (YM) and (YM C ) methods developed by the authors are carefully compared for the resonant frequency f 0 = 1.12345 Hz and the logarithmic decrement, δ = 0.0005. Precise estimation of the resonant frequency (Youngs' modulus ∼ f 0 2 ) for real experimental conditions, i.e., for exponentially damped harmonic signals embedded in an experimental noise, is a complex task. In this work, various computing methods are analyzed as a function of the sampling frequency used to digitize free decaying oscillations. The importance of computing techniques to obtain reliable and precise values of the resonant frequency (i.e. Young's modulus) in materials science is emphasized.

  15. Mechanical design parameters for detection of nuclear signals by magnetic resonance force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, G.J.; Hanlon, J.A.; Lamartine, B.; Hawley, M.; Solem, J.C.; Signer, S.; Jarmer, J.J.; Penttila, S.; Sillerud, L.O.; Pryputniewicz, R.J.

    1993-01-01

    Recent theoretical work has shown that mechanical detection of magnetic resonance from a single nuclear spin is in principle possible. This theory has recently been experimentally validated by the mechanical detection of electron spin resonance signals using microscale cantilevers. Currently we are extending this technology in an attempt to detect nuclear signals which are extending this technology in an attempt to detect nuclear signals which are three orders of magnitude lower in intensity than electron signals. In order to achieve the needed thousand-fold improvement in sensitivity we have undertaken the development of optimized mechanical cantilevers and highly polarized samples. Finite element modeling is used as a tool to simulate cantilever beam dynamics and to optimize the mechanical properties including Q, resonant frequency, amplitude of vibration and spring constant. Simulations are compared to experiments using heterodyne hologram interferometry. Nanofabrication of optimized cantilevers via ion milling will be directed by the outcome of these simulations and experiments. Highly polarized samples are developed using a three-fold approach: (1) high magnetic field strength (2.5T), (2) low temperature (1K), and (3) use of samples polarized by dynamic nuclear polarization. Our recent experiments have demonstrated nuclear polarizations in excess of 50% in molecules of toulene

  16. A novel flow sensor based on resonant sensing with two-stage microleverage mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, B.; Guo, X.; Wang, Q. H.; Lu, C. F.; Hu, D.

    2018-04-01

    The design, simulation, fabrication, and experiments of a novel flow sensor based on resonant sensing with a two-stage microleverage mechanism are presented in this paper. Different from the conventional detection methods for flow sensors, two differential resonators are adopted to implement air flow rate transformation through two-stage leverage magnification. The proposed flow sensor has a high sensitivity since the adopted two-stage microleverage mechanism possesses a higher amplification factor than a single-stage microleverage mechanism. The modal distribution and geometric dimension of the two-stage leverage mechanism and hair are analyzed and optimized by Ansys simulation. A digital closed-loop driving technique with a phase frequency detector-based coordinate rotation digital computer algorithm is implemented for the detection and locking of resonance frequency. The sensor fabricated by the standard deep dry silicon on a glass process has a device dimension of 5100 μm (length) × 5100 μm (width) × 100 μm (height) with a hair diameter of 1000 μm. The preliminary experimental results demonstrate that the maximal mechanical sensitivity of the flow sensor is approximately 7.41 Hz/(m/s)2 at a resonant frequency of 22 kHz for the hair height of 9 mm and increases by 2.42 times as hair height extends from 3 mm to 9 mm. Simultaneously, a detection-limit of 3.23 mm/s air flow amplitude at 60 Hz is confirmed. The proposed flow sensor has great application prospects in the micro-autonomous system and technology, self-stabilizing micro-air vehicles, and environmental monitoring.

  17. Fluctuation effects on average cross sections in compound, direct and doorway state resonance reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moldauer, P.A.

    1979-01-01

    The main features of the effects of S-matrix flucturations on average cross sections are reviewed with emphasis on recent developments on the enhancement of small cross sections and cross sections between directly coupled channels. Examples are given in which the effect can distort the shape of a doorway state resonance so as to reduce its observed width. 4 figures

  18. Electrospray Ionization Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Analysis of Large Polymerases Chain Reaction Products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wunschel, David S.; Pasa Tolic, Ljiljana; Feng, Bingbing; Smith, Richard D.

    2000-01-01

    We have attempted to expand the size range of PCR products that can be analyzed by electroscopy ionization (ESI) Fourier transformion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometry. The mass measurement accuracy obtained illustrates that a signel base substitution could be identified at the size of PCR product with a 7 tesla ESI-FTICR

  19. Reduction of very large reaction mechanisms using methods based on simulation error minimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagy, Tibor; Turanyi, Tamas [Institute of Chemistry, Eoetvoes University (ELTE), P.O. Box 32, H-1518 Budapest (Hungary)

    2009-02-15

    A new species reduction method called the Simulation Error Minimization Connectivity Method (SEM-CM) was developed. According to the SEM-CM algorithm, a mechanism building procedure is started from the important species. Strongly connected sets of species, identified on the basis of the normalized Jacobian, are added and several consistent mechanisms are produced. The combustion model is simulated with each of these mechanisms and the mechanism causing the smallest error (i.e. deviation from the model that uses the full mechanism), considering the important species only, is selected. Then, in several steps other strongly connected sets of species are added, the size of the mechanism is gradually increased and the procedure is terminated when the error becomes smaller than the required threshold. A new method for the elimination of redundant reactions is also presented, which is called the Principal Component Analysis of Matrix F with Simulation Error Minimization (SEM-PCAF). According to this method, several reduced mechanisms are produced by using various PCAF thresholds. The reduced mechanism having the least CPU time requirement among the ones having almost the smallest error is selected. Application of SEM-CM and SEM-PCAF together provides a very efficient way to eliminate redundant species and reactions from large mechanisms. The suggested approach was tested on a mechanism containing 6874 irreversible reactions of 345 species that describes methane partial oxidation to high conversion. The aim is to accurately reproduce the concentration-time profiles of 12 major species with less than 5% error at the conditions of an industrial application. The reduced mechanism consists of 246 reactions of 47 species and its simulation is 116 times faster than using the full mechanism. The SEM-CM was found to be more effective than the classic Connectivity Method, and also than the DRG, two-stage DRG, DRGASA, basic DRGEP and extended DRGEP methods. (author)

  20. Revealing the reaction mechanisms of Li–O2 batteries using environmental transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Langli; Liu, Bin; Song, Shidong; Xu, Wu; Zhang, Ji-Guang; Wang, Chongmin

    2017-03-27

    The capacity, Coulombic efficiency, rate, and cyclability of a Li-O2 battery critically depend on the electrode reaction mechanism and the structure/morphology of the reaction product as well as their spatial and temporal evolution1-8, which are all further complicated by the choice of different electrolyte. For the case of aprotic cell, the discharge product, Li2O2, is formed through solution and surface mechanisms9,10, but little is known on the formation mechanism of the perplexing morphology of the reaction product11-15. For the case of Li-O2 battery using solid electrolyte, neither electrode reaction mechanism nor the nature of the reaction production is known. Herein, we reveal the full cycle reaction pathway for Li-O2 batteries and its correlation with the nature of the reaction product. Using an aberration-corrected environmental TEM under oxygen environment, we captured, for the first time, the morphology and phase evolution on the carbon nanotube (CNT) cathode of a working solid-state Li-O2 nano-battery16 and directly correlated these features with electrochemical reaction. We found that the oxygen reduction reaction on CNTs initially produces LiO2, which subsequently evolves to Li2O2 and O2 through disproportionation reaction. Surprisingly it is just the releasing of O2 that inflates the particles to a hollow structure with a Li2O outer surface layer and Li2O2 inner-shell, demonstrating that, in general, accommodation of the released O2 coupled with the Li+ ion diffusion and electron transport paths across both spatial and temporal scales critically governs the morphology of the discharging/charging product in Li-O2 system. We anticipate that the direct observation of Li-O2 reaction mechanisms and their correlation with the morphology of the reaction product set foundation for quantitative understanding/modeling of the electrochemical processes in the Li-O2 system, enabling rational design of both solid-state and aprotic Li-O2 batteries.

  1. Contactless, probeless and non-titrimetric determination of acid-base reactions using broadband acoustic resonance dissolution spectroscopy (BARDS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, M Rizwan; McSweeney, Sean; Krüse, Jacob; Vos, Bastiaan; Fitzpatrick, Dara

    2018-02-12

    pH determination is a routine measurement in scientific laboratories worldwide. Most major advances in pH measurement were made in the 19th and early 20th century. pH measurements are critical for the determination of acid base reactions. This study demonstrates how an acid-base reaction can be monitored without the use of a pH probe, indicator and titres of reagent. The stoichiometric reaction between carbonate and HCl acid yields specific quantities of CO 2 , which causes reproducible changes to the compressibility of the solvent. This in turn slows down the speed of sound in solution which is induced by a magnetic follower gently tapping the inner wall of the vessel. As a consequence the frequencies of the acoustic resonances in the vessel are reduced. This approach is called Broadband Acoustic Resonance Dissolution Spectroscopy (BARDS) which harnesses this phenomenon for many applications. The acid-carbonate experiments have also been validated using H 2 SO 4 acid and using both potassium and sodium counterions for the carbonate. This method can be used to interrogate strong acid-base reactions in a rapid and non-invasive manner using carbonate as the base. The data demonstrate the first example of a reactant also acting as an indicator. The applicability of the method to weak acids has yet to be determined. A novel conclusion from the study is that a person with a well-trained ear is capable of determining the concentration and pH of a strong acid just by listening. This brings pH measurement into the realm of human perception.

  2. Carbon Nanofiber-Based, High-Frequency, High-Q, Miniaturized Mechanical Resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaul, Anupama B.; Epp, Larry W.; Bagge, Leif

    2011-01-01

    High Q resonators are a critical component of stable, low-noise communication systems, radar, and precise timing applications such as atomic clocks. In electronic resonators based on Si integrated circuits, resistive losses increase as a result of the continued reduction in device dimensions, which decreases their Q values. On the other hand, due to the mechanical construct of bulk acoustic wave (BAW) and surface acoustic wave (SAW) resonators, such loss mechanisms are absent, enabling higher Q-values for both BAW and SAW resonators compared to their electronic counterparts. The other advantages of mechanical resonators are their inherently higher radiation tolerance, a factor that makes them attractive for NASA s extreme environment planetary missions, for example to the Jovian environments where the radiation doses are at hostile levels. Despite these advantages, both BAW and SAW resonators suffer from low resonant frequencies and they are also physically large, which precludes their integration into miniaturized electronic systems. Because there is a need to move the resonant frequency of oscillators to the order of gigahertz, new technologies and materials are being investigated that will make performance at those frequencies attainable. By moving to nanoscale structures, in this case vertically oriented, cantilevered carbon nanotubes (CNTs), that have larger aspect ratios (length/thickness) and extremely high elastic moduli, it is possible to overcome the two disadvantages of both bulk acoustic wave (BAW) and surface acoustic wave (SAW) resonators. Nano-electro-mechanical systems (NEMS) that utilize high aspect ratio nanomaterials exhibiting high elastic moduli (e.g., carbon-based nanomaterials) benefit from high Qs, operate at high frequency, and have small force constants that translate to high responsivity that results in improved sensitivity, lower power consumption, and im - proved tunablity. NEMS resonators have recently been demonstrated using topdown

  3. Modeling the mechanism of glycosylation reactions between ethanol, 1,2-ethanediol and methoxymethanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azofra, Luis Miguel; Alkorta, Ibon; Toro-Labbé, Alejandro; Elguero, José

    2013-09-07

    The mechanism of the S(N)2 model glycosylation reaction between ethanol, 1,2-ethanediol and methoxymethanol has been studied theoretically at the B3LYP/6-311+G(d,p) computational level. Three different types of reactions have been explored: (i) the exchange of hydroxyl groups between these model systems; (ii) the basic catalysis reactions by combination of the substrates as glycosyl donors (neutral species) and acceptors (enolate species); and (iii) the effect on the reaction profile of an explicit H2O molecule in the reactions considered in (ii). The reaction force, the electronic chemical potential and the reaction electronic flux have been characterized for the reaction path in each case. Energy calculations show that methoxymethanol is the worst glycosyl donor model among the ones studied here, while 1,2-ethanediol is the best, having the lowest activation barrier of 74.7 kJ mol(-1) for the reaction between this one and the ethanolate as the glycosyl acceptor model. In general, the presence of direct interactions between the atoms involved in the penta-coordinated TS increases the activation energies of the processes.

  4. An ICR study of ion-molecule reactions of PH(n)+ ions. [of importance to interstellar chemistry, using ion cyclotron resonance techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorne, L. R.; Anicich, V. G.; Huntress, W. T.

    1983-01-01

    The reactions of PH(n)+ ions (n = 0-3) were examined with a number of neutrals using ion-cyclotron-resonance techniques. The reactions examined have significance for the distribution of phosphorus in interstellar molecules. The results indicate that interstellar molecules containing the P-O bond are likely to be more abundant than those containing the P-H bond.

  5. Computational organic chemistry: bridging theory and experiment in establishing the mechanisms of chemical reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Gui-Juan; Zhang, Xinhao; Chung, Lung Wa; Xu, Liping; Wu, Yun-Dong

    2015-02-11

    Understanding the mechanisms of chemical reactions, especially catalysis, has been an important and active area of computational organic chemistry, and close collaborations between experimentalists and theorists represent a growing trend. This Perspective provides examples of such productive collaborations. The understanding of various reaction mechanisms and the insight gained from these studies are emphasized. The applications of various experimental techniques in elucidation of reaction details as well as the development of various computational techniques to meet the demand of emerging synthetic methods, e.g., C-H activation, organocatalysis, and single electron transfer, are presented along with some conventional developments of mechanistic aspects. Examples of applications are selected to demonstrate the advantages and limitations of these techniques. Some challenges in the mechanistic studies and predictions of reactions are also analyzed.

  6. Reaction mechanisms and rate constants of waste degradation in landfill bioreactor systems with enzymatic-enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayasinghe, P A; Hettiaratchi, J P A; Mehrotra, A K; Kumar, S

    2014-06-01

    Augmenting leachate before recirculation with peroxidase enzymes is a novel method to increase the available carbon, and therefore the food supply to microorganisms at the declining phase of the anaerobic landfill bioreactor operation. In order to optimize the enzyme-catalyzed leachate recirculation process, it is necessary to identify the reaction mechanisms and determine rate constants. This paper presents a kinetic model developed to ascertain the reaction mechanisms and determine the rate constants for enzyme catalyzed anaerobic waste degradation. The maximum rate of reaction (Vmax) for MnP enzyme-catalyzed reactors was 0.076 g(TOC)/g(DS).day. The catalytic turnover number (k(cat)) of the MnP enzyme-catalyzed was 506.7 per day while the rate constant (k) of the un-catalyzed reaction was 0.012 per day. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Resonant elastic scattering of {sup 15}O and a new reaction path in the CNO cycle; Spectroscopie par diffusion elastique resonante d' {sup 15}O et nouveau chemin de reaction dans le cycle CNO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stefan, Gheorghe Iulian [Ecole doctorale SIMEM, U.F.R. Sciences, Universite de Caen Basse-Normandie, 14032 Caen Cedex (France)

    2006-12-15

    This work presents a very accurate experimental method based on radioactive beams for the study of the spectroscopical properties of unbound states. It makes use of inverse kinematical elastic scattering of the ions of an radioactive beam from a target of stable nuclei. An application of the method for the study of radioactive nuclei of astrophysical interests is given, namely of {sup 19}Ne and {sup 16}F nuclei. It is shown that on the basis of the properties of proton-emitting unbound levels of {sup 19}Ne one can develop a method of experimental study of nova explosions. It is based on observation of gamma emissions following the gamma decays of the radionuclides generated in the explosion. The most interesting radioactive nucleus involved in this process is {sup 18}F the yield of which depends strongly on the rate of {sup 18}F(p,{alpha}){sup 15}O reaction. This yield depends in turn of the properties of the states of the ({sup 18}F + p) compound nucleus, i.e. the {sup 19}Ne nucleus. In addition it was studied the unbound {sup 16}F nucleus also of astrophysical significance in {sup 15}O rich environment. Since {sup 16}F is an unbound nucleus the reaction of {sup 15}O with protons, although abundant in most astrophysical media, appears to be negligible. Thus the question that was posed was whether the exotic {sup 15}O(p,{beta}{sup +}){sup 16}O resonant reaction acquires some importance in various astrophysical media. In this work one describes a novel approach to study the reaction mechanisms which could change drastically the role of non-bound nuclei in stellar processes. One implies this mechanism to the processes (p,{gamma})({beta}){sup +} and (p,{gamma}) (p,{gamma}) within {sup 15}O rich media. The experimental studies of the {sup 19}Ne and {sup 16}F were carried out with a radioactive beam of {sup 15}O ions of very low energy produced by SPIRAL at GANIL. To improve the energy resolution thin targets were used with a 0 angle of observation relative to the beam

  8. THM determination of the 65 keV resonance strength intervening in the {sup 17}O(p,α){sup 14}N reaction rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sergi, M. L.; La Cognata, M.; Pizzone, R. G. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Spitaleri, C.; Cherubini, S.; Puglia, S. M. R.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Romano, S. [Università di Catania, Catania, Italy and INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Burjan, S. V.; Hons, Z.; Kroha, V. [Nuclear Physics Institute of ASCR Rez near Prague (Czech Republic); Coc, A. [CSNSM, UMR 8609, CNRS/IN2P3 and Universitè Paris Sud 11, Bâtiment 104, 91405 Orsay Campus (France); Gulino, M.; Tumino, A. [Università di Catania, Catania, Italy and INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania, Italy and Universitá Kore di Enna, Enna (Italy); Hammache, F. [IPN, IN2P3-CNRS et Université de Paris-Sud 91406 Orsay Cedex (France); Irgaziev, B. [GIK Institute of Engineering Sciences and Technology Topi District Swabi NWFP (Pakistan); Kiss, G. G.; Somorjai, E. [ATOMKI, Debrecen (Hungary); Lamia, L. [Università di Catania, Catania (Italy); Mukhamedzhanov, A. [Cyclotron Institute,Texas A and M University College Station (United States); and others

    2015-02-24

    The {sup 17}O(p,α){sup 14}N reaction is of paramount importance for the nucleosynthesis in a number of stellar sites, including red giants (RG), asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, massive stars and classical novae. We report on the indirect study of the {sup 17}O(p,α){sup 14}N reaction via the Trojan Horse Method by applying the approach recently developed for extracting the resonance strength of the narrow resonance at E{sub c.m.}{sup R} = 65 keV (E{sub X} =5.673 MeV). The strength of the 65 keV resonance in the {sup 17}O(p,α){sup 14}N reaction, measured by means of the THM, has been used to renormalize the corresponding resonance strength in the {sup 17}O+p radiative capture channel.

  9. Back-action evasion and squeezing of a mechanical resonator using a cavity detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clerk, A A [Department of Physics, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, H3A 2T8 (Canada); Marquardt, F [Department of Physics, Arnold-Sommerfeld-Center for Theoretical Physics and Center for NanoScience, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Theresienstrasse 37, 80333 Munich (Germany); Jacobs, K [Department of Physics, University of Massachussets at Boston, Boston, MA 02125 (United States)], E-mail: aashish.clerk@mcgill.ca, E-mail: florian.marquardt@physik.uni-muenchen.de, E-mail: kjacobs@cs.umb.edu

    2008-09-15

    We study the quantum measurement of a cantilever using a parametrically coupled electromagnetic cavity which is driven at the two sidebands corresponding to the mechanical motion. This scheme, originally due to Braginsky et al (Braginsky V, Vorontsov Y I and Thorne K P 1980 Science 209 547), allows a back-action free measurement of one quadrature of the cantilever's motion, and hence the possibility of generating a squeezed state. We present a complete quantum theory of this system, and derive simple conditions on when the quantum limit on the added noise can be surpassed. We also study the conditional dynamics of the measurement, and discuss how such a scheme (when coupled with feedback) can be used to generate and detect squeezed states of the oscillator. Our results are relevant to experiments in optomechanics, and to experiments in quantum electromechanics employing stripline resonators coupled to mechanical resonators.

  10. A nanoradio utilizing the mechanical resonance of a vertically aligned nanopillar array

    KAUST Repository

    Lee, Chang Hwa; Lee, Seok Woo; Lee, Seung S.

    2014-01-01

    A nanoradio based on the mechanical resonance of a nanomaterial has promising applications in terms of size reduction of an antenna and integrity of all components of a radio except a speaker. In this letter, a nanopillar array radio utilizing the mechanical resonance of a vertically aligned nanopillar array is realized by a reliable top-down method. By exploiting the field emission phenomenon, it was found that the nanopillar array functions as a radio with a demodulator without any electrical circuitry. The array of vertically aligned nanopillars increases the demodulated current and signal to noise ratio, and this fabrication method makes manipulation and positioning of nanostructures possible intrinsically for industrial applications. © 2014 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  11. Development of 400- to 450-MHz RFQ resonator-cavity mechanical designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansborough, L.D.

    1982-01-01

    In the development of the radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) linac, the resonator cavity's mechanical design may be a challenge similar in magnitude to that of the development of the accelerator structure itself. Experience with the all-copper 425-MHz RFQ proof-of-principle linac has demonstrated that the resonator cavity must be structurally stiff and easily tunable. This experience has led to development of copper-plated steel structures having vanes that may be moved within a cylinder for tuning. Design of a flexible vane-to-cylinder radio-frequency (rf) joint, the vane, and the cylinder has many constraints dictated by the small-diameter cavities in the 400-MHz-frequency region. Two types of flexible, mechanical vane-to-cylinder rf joints are being developed at Los Alamos: the C-seal and the rf clamp-joint

  12. Prediction of Tetraoxygen Reaction Mechanism with Sulfur Atom on the Singlet Potential Energy Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf Khademzadeh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The mechanism of S+O4 (D2h reaction has been investigated at the B3LYP/6-311+G(3df and CCSD levels on the singlet potential energy surface. One stable complex has been found for the S+O4 (D2h reaction, IN1, on the singlet potential energy surface. For the title reaction, we obtained four kinds of products at the B3LYP level, which have enough thermodynamic stability. The results reveal that the product P3 is spontaneous and exothermic with −188.042 and −179.147 kcal/mol in Gibbs free energy and enthalpy of reaction, respectively. Because P1 adduct is produced after passing two low energy level transition states, kinetically, it is the most favorable adduct in the 1S+1O4 (D2h atmospheric reactions.

  13. Kinetics and mechanism of the gas phase reaction of Cl atoms with iodobenzene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mads Peter Sulbæk; Ponomarev, DA; Nielsen, OJ

    2001-01-01

    Smog chamber/FTIR techniques were used to study the kinetics and mechanism of the reaction of Cl atoms with iodobenzene (C6H5I) in 20-700 Torr of N-2, air, or O-2 diluent at 296 K. The reaction proceeds with a rate constant k(Cl + QH(5)I) = (3.3 +/- 0.7) x 10(-11) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) to give...

  14. Modelling the dynamic mechanisms associated with the principal resonance of the seated human body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Y; Griffin, M J

    2001-01-01

    Simple mathematical models have been developed to obtain insights into resonance phenomena observed at about 5 Hz in the dynamic responses of the seated human body exposed to vertical whole-body vibration. Alternative lumped parameter models with a few degrees-of-freedom have been investigated. Rotational degrees-of-freedom, with eccentricity of the centre of gravity of the mass elements, represented responses in the fore-and-aft and pitch axes caused by vertical vibration. The causes of body resonance are not fully understood, but this information is required to develop cause-effect relationships between vibration exposures and effects on human health, comfort and performance.Method. The inertial and geometric parameters for models were based on published anatomical data. Other mechanical parameters were determined by comparing model responses to experimental data. Two models, with four and five degrees-of-freedom, gave more reasonable representations than other models. Mechanical parameters obtained with median and individual experimental data were consistent for vertical degrees-of-freedom but varied for rotational degrees-of-freedom. The resonance of the apparent mass at about 5 Hz may be attributed to a vibration mode consisting of vertical motion of the pelvis and legs and a pitch motion of the pelvis, both of which cause vertical motion of the upper-body above the pelvis, a bending motion of the spine, and vertical motion of the viscera. The mathematical models developed in this study may assist understanding of the dynamic mechanisms responsible for resonances in the seated human body. The information is required to represent mechanical responses of the body and assist the development of models for specific effects of vibration.

  15. Understanding organometallic reaction mechanisms and catalysis experimental and computational tools computational and experimental tools

    CERN Document Server

    Ananikov, Valentin P

    2014-01-01

    Exploring and highlighting the new horizons in the studies of reaction mechanisms that open joint application of experimental studies and theoretical calculations is the goal of this book. The latest insights and developments in the mechanistic studies of organometallic reactions and catalytic processes are presented and reviewed. The book adopts a unique approach, exemplifying how to use experiments, spectroscopy measurements, and computational methods to reveal reaction pathways and molecular structures of catalysts, rather than concentrating solely on one discipline. The result is a deeper

  16. Resonance Raman spectroscopy of 2H-labelled spheroidenes in petroleum ether and in the Rhodobacter sphaeroides reaction centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kok, P; Köhler, J; Groenen, E J; Gebhard, R; van der Hoef, I; Lugtenburg, J; Farhoosh, R; Frank, H A

    1997-03-01

    As a step towards the structural analysis of the carotenoid spheroidene in the Rhodobacter sphaeroides reaction centre, we present the resonance Raman spectra of 14-2H, 15-2H, 15'-2H, 14'-2H, 14,15'-2H2 and 15-15'-2H2 spheroidenes in petroleum ether and, except for 14,15'-2H2 spheroidene, in the Rb. sphaeroides R26 reaction center (RC). Analysis of the spectral changes upon isotopic substitution allows a qualitative assignment of most of the vibrational bands to be made. For the all-trans spheroidenes in solution the resonance enhancement of the Raman bands is determined by the participation of carbon carbon stretching modes in the centre of the conjugated chain, the C9 to C15' region. For the RC-bound 15,15'-cis spheroidenes, enhancement is determined by the participation of carbon-carbon stretching modes in the centre of the molecule, the C13 to C13' region. Comparison of the spectra in solution and in the RC reveals evidence for an out-of-plane distortion of the RC-bound spheroidene in the central C14 to C14' region of the carotenoid. The characteristic 1240 cm-1 band in the spectrum of the RC-bound spheroidene has been assigned to a normal mode that contains the coupled C12-C13 and C13'-C12' stretch vibrations.

  17. Complex Reaction Kinetics in Chemistry: A Unified Picture Suggested by Mechanics in Physics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Agliari

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Complex biochemical pathways can be reduced to chains of elementary reactions, which can be described in terms of chemical kinetics. Among the elementary reactions so far extensively investigated, we recall the Michaelis-Menten and the Hill positive-cooperative kinetics, which apply to molecular binding and are characterized by the absence and the presence, respectively, of cooperative interactions between binding sites. However, there is evidence of reactions displaying a more complex pattern: these follow the positive-cooperative scenario at small substrate concentration, yet negative-cooperative effects emerge as the substrate concentration is increased. Here, we analyze the formal analogy between the mathematical backbone of (classical reaction kinetics in Chemistry and that of (classical mechanics in Physics. We first show that standard cooperative kinetics can be framed in terms of classical mechanics, where the emerging phenomenology can be obtained by applying the principle of least action of classical mechanics. Further, since the saturation function plays in Chemistry the same role played by velocity in Physics, we show that a relativistic scaffold naturally accounts for the kinetics of the above-mentioned complex reactions. The proposed formalism yields to a unique, consistent picture for cooperative-like reactions and to a stronger mathematical control.

  18. Clustering mechanism of oxocarboxylic acids involving hydration reaction: Implications for the atmospheric models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ling; Kupiainen-Määttä, Oona; Zhang, Haijie; Li, Hao; Zhong, Jie; Kurtén, Theo; Vehkamäki, Hanna; Zhang, Shaowen; Zhang, Yunhong; Ge, Maofa; Zhang, Xiuhui; Li, Zesheng

    2018-06-01

    The formation of atmospheric aerosol particles from condensable gases is a dominant source of particulate matter in the boundary layer, but the mechanism is still ambiguous. During the clustering process, precursors with different reactivities can induce various chemical reactions in addition to the formation of hydrogen bonds. However, the clustering mechanism involving chemical reactions is rarely considered in most of the nucleation process models. Oxocarboxylic acids are common compositions of secondary organic aerosol, but the role of oxocarboxylic acids in secondary organic aerosol formation is still not fully understood. In this paper, glyoxylic acid, the simplest and the most abundant atmospheric oxocarboxylic acid, has been selected as a representative example of oxocarboxylic acids in order to study the clustering mechanism involving hydration reactions using density functional theory combined with the Atmospheric Clusters Dynamic Code. The hydration reaction of glyoxylic acid can occur either in the gas phase or during the clustering process. Under atmospheric conditions, the total conversion ratio of glyoxylic acid to its hydration reaction product (2,2-dihydroxyacetic acid) in both gas phase and clusters can be up to 85%, and the product can further participate in the clustering process. The differences in cluster structures and properties induced by the hydration reaction lead to significant differences in cluster formation rates and pathways at relatively low temperatures.

  19. Ontology aided modeling of organic reaction mechanisms with flexible and fragment based XML markup procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankar, Punnaivanam; Aghila, Gnanasekaran

    2007-01-01

    The mechanism models for primary organic reactions encoding the structural fragments undergoing substitution, addition, elimination, and rearrangements are developed. In the proposed models, each and every structural component of mechanistic pathways is represented with flexible and fragment based markup technique in XML syntax. A significant feature of the system is the encoding of the electron movements along with the other components like charges, partial charges, half bonded species, lone pair electrons, free radicals, reaction arrows, etc. needed for a complete representation of reaction mechanism. The rendering of reaction schemes described with the proposed methodology is achieved with a concise XML extension language interoperating with the structure markup. The reaction scheme is visualized as 2D graphics in a browser by converting them into SVG documents enabling the desired layouts normally perceived by the chemists conventionally. An automatic representation of the complex patterns of the reaction mechanism is achieved by reusing the knowledge in chemical ontologies and developing artificial intelligence components in terms of axioms.

  20. Ultra-fast magnetic resonance encephalography of physiological brain activity - Glymphatic pulsation mechanisms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiviniemi, Vesa; Wang, Xindi; Korhonen, Vesa; Keinänen, Tuija; Tuovinen, Timo; Autio, Joonas; LeVan, Pierre; Keilholz, Shella; Zang, Yu-Feng; Hennig, Jürgen; Nedergaard, Maiken

    2016-06-01

    The theory on the glymphatic convection mechanism of cerebrospinal fluid holds that cardiac pulsations in part pump cerebrospinal fluid from the peri-arterial spaces through the extracellular tissue into the peri-venous spaces facilitated by aquaporin water channels. Since cardiac pulses cannot be the sole mechanism of glymphatic propulsion, we searched for additional cerebrospinal fluid pulsations in the human brain with ultra-fast magnetic resonance encephalography. We detected three types of physiological mechanisms affecting cerebral cerebrospinal fluid pulsations: cardiac, respiratory, and very low frequency pulsations. The cardiac pulsations induce a negative magnetic resonance encephalography signal change in peri-arterial regions that extends centrifugally and covers the brain in ≈1 Hz cycles. The respiratory ≈0.3 Hz pulsations are centripetal periodical pulses that occur dominantly in peri-venous areas. The third type of pulsation was very low frequency (VLF 0.001-0.023 Hz) and low frequency (LF 0.023-0.73 Hz) waves that both propagate with unique spatiotemporal patterns. Our findings using critically sampled magnetic resonance encephalography open a new view into cerebral fluid dynamics. Since glymphatic system failure may precede protein accumulations in diseases such as Alzheimer's dementia, this methodological advance offers a novel approach to image brain fluid dynamics that potentially can enable early detection and intervention in neurodegenerative diseases. © The Author(s) 2015.

  1. Chemical reaction of hexagonal boron nitride and graphite nanoclusters in mechanical milling systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muramatsu, Y.; Grush, M.; Callcott, T.A. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Synthesis of boron-carbon-nitride (BCN) hybrid alloys has been attempted extensively by many researchers because the BCN alloys are considered an extremely hard material called {open_quotes}super diamond,{close_quotes} and the industrial application for wear-resistant materials is promising. A mechanical alloying (MA) method of hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) with graphite has recently been studied to explore the industrial synthesis of the BCN alloys. To develop the MA method for the BCN alloy synthesis, it is necessary to confirm the chemical reaction processes in the mechanical milling systems and to identify the reaction products. Therefore, the authors have attempted to confirm the chemical reaction process of the h-BN and graphite in mechanical milling systems using x-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) methods.

  2. Chemical reaction of hexagonal boron nitride and graphite nanoclusters in mechanical milling systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muramatsu, Y.; Grush, M.; Callcott, T.A.

    1997-01-01

    Synthesis of boron-carbon-nitride (BCN) hybrid alloys has been attempted extensively by many researchers because the BCN alloys are considered an extremely hard material called open-quotes super diamond,close quotes and the industrial application for wear-resistant materials is promising. A mechanical alloying (MA) method of hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) with graphite has recently been studied to explore the industrial synthesis of the BCN alloys. To develop the MA method for the BCN alloy synthesis, it is necessary to confirm the chemical reaction processes in the mechanical milling systems and to identify the reaction products. Therefore, the authors have attempted to confirm the chemical reaction process of the h-BN and graphite in mechanical milling systems using x-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) methods

  3. Dielectric micro-resonator-based opto-mechanical systems for sensing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Amir Roushdy

    In recent years, whispering gallery mode (WGM), or morphology dependent optical resonances (MDR) of dielectric micro-resonators have attracted interest with proposed applications in a wide range of areas due to the high optical quality factors, Q, they can exhibit (reaching ~ 10. 9 for silica spheres). Micro-resonator WGMs have been used in applications that include those in spectroscopy, micro-cavity laser technology, optical communications (switching, filtering and multiplexing), sensors technologies and even chemical and biological sensing. The WGM of these dielectric micro-resonators are highly sensitive to morphological changes (such as the size, shape, or refractive index) of the resonance cavity and hence, can be tuned by causing a minute change in the physical condition of the surrounding. In this dissertation, we have been creating opto-mechanical systems, which at their most basic, are extraordinarily sensitive sensors. One of the ultimate goals of this dissertation is to develop sensors capable of detecting the extremely small electric field changes. To improve the performance of the sensors, we couple a polymer cantilever beam to a dielectric micro-resonator. The eventual use of such ultra sensitive electric filed sensors could include neural-machine interfaces for advanced prosthetics devices. The work presented here includes a basic analysis and experimental investigations of the electric field sensitivity and range of micro-resonators of several different materials and geometries followed by the electric field sensor design, testing, and characterization. Also, the effects of angular velocity on the WGM shifts of spherical micro-resonators are also investigated. The elastic deformation that is induced on a spinning resonator due to the centrifugal force may lead to a sufficient shift in the optical resonances and therefore interfering with its desirable operational sensor design. Furthermore, this principle could be used for the development of

  4. Investigation of the CH3Cl + CN(-) reaction in water: Multilevel quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yulong; Zhang, Jingxue; Wang, Dunyou

    2015-06-28

    The CH3Cl + CN(-) reaction in water was studied using a multilevel quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (MM) method with the multilevels, electrostatic potential, density functional theory (DFT) and coupled-cluster single double triple (CCSD(T)), for the solute region. The detailed, back-side attack SN2 reaction mechanism was mapped along the reaction pathway. The potentials of mean force were calculated under both the DFT and CCSD(T) levels for the reaction region. The CCSD(T)/MM level of theory presents a free energy activation barrier height at 20.3 kcal/mol, which agrees very well with the experiment value at 21.6 kcal/mol. The results show that the aqueous solution has a dominant role in shaping the potential of mean force. The solvation effect and the polarization effect together increase the activation barrier height by ∼11.4 kcal/mol: the solvation effect plays a major role by providing about 75% of the contribution, while polarization effect only contributes 25% to the activation barrier height. Our calculated potential of mean force under the CCSD(T)/MM also has a good agreement with the one estimated using data from previous gas-phase studies.

  5. Mechanical design and analysis of a low beta squeezed half-wave resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Shou-Bo; Zhang, Cong; Yue, Wei-Ming; Wang, Ruo-Xu; Xu, Meng-Xin; Wang, Zhi-Jun; Huang, Shi-Chun; Huang, Yu-Lu; Jiang, Tian-Cai; Wang, Feng-Feng; Zhang, Sheng-Xue; He, Yuan; Zhang, Sheng-Hu; Zhao, Hong-Wei

    2014-08-01

    A superconducting squeezed type half-wave resonator (HWR) of β=0.09 has been developed at the Institute of Modern Physics, Lanzhou. In this paper, a basic design is presented for the stiffening structure for the detuning effect caused by helium pressure and Lorentz force. The mechanical modal analysis has been investigated the with finite element method (FEM). Based on these considerations, a new stiffening structure is proposed for the HWR cavity. The computation results concerning the frequency shift show that the low beta HWR cavity with new stiffening structure has low frequency sensitivity coefficient df/dp and Lorentz force detuning coefficient KL, and stable mechanical properties.

  6. WNT and DKK Determine Hair Follicle Spacing Through a Reaction-Diffusion Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sick, Stefanie; Reinker, Stefan; Timmer, Jens; Schlake, Thomas

    2006-12-01

    Mathematical reaction-diffusion models have been suggested to describe formation of animal pigmentation patterns and distribution of epidermal appendages. However, the crucial signals and in vivo mechanisms are still elusive. Here we identify WNT and its inhibitor DKK as primary determinants of murine hair follicle spacing, using a combined experimental and computational modeling approach. Transgenic DKK overexpression reduces overall appendage density. Moderate suppression of endogenous WNT signaling forces follicles to form clusters during an otherwise normal morphogenetic program. These results confirm predictions of a WNT/DKK-specific mathematical model and provide in vivo corroboration of the reaction-diffusion mechanism for epidermal appendage formation.

  7. Identification of mechanisms in heavy ion reactions by measurement of angular correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlin Filho, N.

    1987-01-01

    The identification of reaction mechanisms in light heavy-ion collisions has been performed within the framework of the three body kinematics, by means of angular correlation measurements. The 16 O+ 27 Al, 16 +O+ 28 Si and 10 B+ 27 Al reactions were investigated at Laboratory bombarding energies of 64 MeV, 64 and 48 MeV, respectively. Contributions of transfer-reemission and projectile sequential decay mechanisms were identified by the analysis of the relative kinetic energy of the final state components, excitation energies of the system at the intermediate stages, and also by means of fits to theoretical predictions for the angular correlations. (author) [pt

  8. Kinetic and mechanism formation reaction of complex compound Cu with di-n-buthildithiocarbamate (dbdtc) ligand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haryani, S.; Kurniawan, C.; Kasmui

    2018-04-01

    Synthesis of complex compound is one field of research which intensively studied. Metal-dithiocarbamate complexes find wide-ranging applications in nanomaterial and metal separation science, and have potential use as chemotherapeutic, pesticides, and as additives to lubricants. However, the information about is reaction kinetic and mechanism are very much lacking. The research and analyzes results show that reaction synthesis ligand DBDTC and complex compounds Cu-DBDTC. Optimum reaction condition of formation of complex compounds Cu with DBDTC at pH=3, [DBDTC] = 4.10-3 M, and the time of reaction 5 minutes. Based the analysis varian reaction of complex compounds at pH 3 and 4, diffrence significance at the other pH: 5; 5,5; 6; 6,5 ; 7; and 8. The various of mole with reactants comosition difference sigbificance, those the time reaction for 5 and 6 minutes diffrence by significance with the other time, it is 3,4,8, and 10 minutes. The great product to at condition pH 6, the time optimum at 5 minutes and molar ratio of logam: ligand = 1:2. The reaction kinetic equation of complex compound Cu with chelathing ligand DBDTC is V=0.917106 [Cu2+]0.87921 [DBDTC]2.03021. Based on the kinetic data, and formed complex compounds estimation, the mechanism explaining by 2 stages. In the first stage formation of [Cu(DBDTC)], and then [Cu(DBDTC)2] with the last structure geomethry planar rectangle. The result of this research will be more useful if an effort is being done in reaction mechanism by chemical computation method for obtain intermediate, and for constant “k” in same stage, k1.k2. and compound complex constanta (β).

  9. Complementary theta resonance filtering by two spatially segregated mechanisms in CA1 hippocampal pyramidal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hua; Vervaeke, Koen; Graham, Lyle J; Storm, Johan F

    2009-11-18

    Synaptic input to a neuron may undergo various filtering steps, both locally and during transmission to the soma. Using simultaneous whole-cell recordings from soma and apical dendrites from rat CA1 hippocampal pyramidal cells, and biophysically detailed modeling, we found two complementary resonance (bandpass) filters of subthreshold voltage signals. Both filters favor signals in the theta (3-12 Hz) frequency range, but have opposite location, direction, and voltage dependencies: (1) dendritic H-resonance, caused by h/HCN-channels, filters signals propagating from soma to dendrite when the membrane potential is close to rest; and (2) somatic M-resonance, caused by M/Kv7/KCNQ and persistent Na(+) (NaP) channels, filters signals propagating from dendrite to soma when the membrane potential approaches spike threshold. Hippocampal pyramidal cells participate in theta network oscillations during behavior, and we suggest that that these dual, polarized theta resonance mechanisms may convey voltage-dependent tuning of theta-mediated neural coding in the entorhinal/hippocampal system during locomotion, spatial navigation, memory, and sleep.

  10. Soft tissue deformation modelling through neural dynamics-based reaction-diffusion mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jinao; Zhong, Yongmin; Gu, Chengfan

    2018-05-30

    Soft tissue deformation modelling forms the basis of development of surgical simulation, surgical planning and robotic-assisted minimally invasive surgery. This paper presents a new methodology for modelling of soft tissue deformation based on reaction-diffusion mechanics via neural dynamics. The potential energy stored in soft tissues due to a mechanical load to deform tissues away from their rest state is treated as the equivalent transmembrane potential energy, and it is distributed in the tissue masses in the manner of reaction-diffusion propagation of nonlinear electrical waves. The reaction-diffusion propagation of mechanical potential energy and nonrigid mechanics of motion are combined to model soft tissue deformation and its dynamics, both of which are further formulated as the dynamics of cellular neural networks to achieve real-time computational performance. The proposed methodology is implemented with a haptic device for interactive soft tissue deformation with force feedback. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed methodology exhibits nonlinear force-displacement relationship for nonlinear soft tissue deformation. Homogeneous, anisotropic and heterogeneous soft tissue material properties can be modelled through the inherent physical properties of mass points. Graphical abstract Soft tissue deformation modelling with haptic feedback via neural dynamics-based reaction-diffusion mechanics.

  11. Hydroxylamine derivative in Purex process. Part 8. The kinetics and mechanism of the redox reaction of N-methylhydroxylamine and vanadium(V)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anyun Zhang; Shaanxi Normal Univ., Xi'an; Kai Li; Jingxin Hu

    2004-01-01

    The kinetic properties of the oxidation-reduction reaction between N-methylhydroxylamine (NMHAN) and vanadium(V) in nitric acid medium has been studied by spectrophotometry at 23.1 deg C. The rate equation of the redox reaction was determined as -d[V(V)]/dt = k[V(V)] [NMHAN] by investigating the influence of concentration of NMHAN, acidity, ionic strength and the ratio of initial concentration of V(V) to NMHAN on the reaction. The rate constant of the reaction k = 0.818 ± 0.051 (mol/l) -1 x s -1 at the ionic strength of 1.00 mol/l. The activation energy of the redox reaction was calculated to be 39.6 kJ/mol. A possibly radical mechanism of the redox reaction between NMHAN and V(V) has been suggested on the basis of electron spin resonance (ESR) spectra of nitroxyl radical, i.e., CH 3 NHO. It is helpful to understand and make the redox mechanism of NMHAN and Np(VI) clear in the reprocessing process of nuclear spent fuel. (author)

  12. High resolution resonance studies with the (p,p) and (p,α) reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilpuch, E.G.; Mitchell, G.E.; Brooks, W.

    1985-01-01

    Recently the authors have extended their high resolution studies to targets with spin. A series of measurements on non-zero spin targets in the 2s-1d shell is now in progress. In section b the analysis of resonance data for targets with spin is described, with emphasis on s and l mixing. In sections c and d the authors briefly summarize the published data on 27 Al and 25 Mg, while in sections e, f, and g preliminary results for 33 S, 39 K, and 23 Na are described. The relevance of the entrance channel relative phase to a class of parity mixing experiments is discussed in section h

  13. Insights into reaction mechanisms in heterogeneous catalysis revealed by in situ NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasco, Teresa

    2010-12-01

    This tutorial review intends to show the possibilities of in situ solid state NMR spectroscopy in the elucidation of reaction mechanisms and the nature of the active sites in heterogeneous catalysis. After a brief overview of the more usual experimental devices used for in situ solid state NMR spectroscopy measurements, some examples of applications taken from the recent literature will be presented. It will be shown that in situ NMR spectroscopy allows: (i) the identification of stable intermediates and transient species using indirect methods, (ii) to prove shape selectivity in zeolites, (iii) the study of reaction kinetics, and (iv) the determination of the nature and the role played by the active sites in a catalytic reaction. The approaches and methodology used to get this information will be illustrated here summarizing the most relevant contributions on the investigation of the mechanisms of a series of reactions of industrial interest: aromatization of alkanes on bifunctional catalysts, carbonylation reaction of methanol with carbon monoxide, ethylbenzene disproportionation, and the Beckmann rearrangement reaction. Special attention is paid to the research carried out on the role played by carbenium ions and alkoxy as intermediate species in the transformation of hydrocarbon molecules on solid acid catalysts.

  14. Study of astrophysically important resonant states in 30 S using the 32S(p,t30 S reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wrede C.

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available A small fraction (< 1% of presolar SiC grains is suggested to have been formed in the ejecta of classical novae. The 29P(p,γ30S reaction plays an important role in understanding the Si isotopic abundances in such grains, which in turn provide us with information on the nature of the probable white dwarf progenitor’s core, as well as the peak temperatures achieved during nova outbursts, and thus the nova nucleosynthetic path. The 29P(p,γ30S reaction rate at nova temperatures is determined by two low-lying 3+ and 2+ resonances above the proton threshold at 4399 keV in 30S. Despite several experimental studies in the past, however, only one of these two states has only been observed very recently. We have studied the 30S nuclear structure via the 32S(p,t 30S reaction at 5 laboratory angles between 9° to 62°. We have observed 14 states, eleven of which are above the proton threshold, including two levels at 4692.7 ± 4.5 keV and 4813.8 ± 3.4 keV that are candidates for the 3+ and the previously “issing” 2+ state, respectively.

  15. The three transglycosylation reactions catalyzed by cyclodextrin glycosyltransferase from Bacillus circulans (strain 251) proceed via different kinetic mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veen, Bart A. van der; Alebeek, Gert-Jan W.M. van; Uitdehaag, Joost C.M.; Dijkstra, Bauke W.; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert

    Cyclodextrin glycosyltransferase (CGTase) catalyzes three transglycosylation reactions via a double displacement mechanism involving a covalent enzyme-intermediate complex (substituted-enzyme intermediate). Characterization of the three transglycosylation reactions, however, revealed that they

  16. Hybrid Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics Solvation Scheme for Computing Free Energies of Reactions at Metal-Water Interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faheem, Muhammad; Heyden, Andreas

    2014-08-12

    We report the development of a quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics free energy perturbation (QM/MM-FEP) method for modeling chemical reactions at metal-water interfaces. This novel solvation scheme combines planewave density function theory (DFT), periodic electrostatic embedded cluster method (PEECM) calculations using Gaussian-type orbitals, and classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to obtain a free energy description of a complex metal-water system. We derive a potential of mean force (PMF) of the reaction system within the QM/MM framework. A fixed-size, finite ensemble of MM conformations is used to permit precise evaluation of the PMF of QM coordinates and its gradient defined within this ensemble. Local conformations of adsorbed reaction moieties are optimized using sequential MD-sampling and QM-optimization steps. An approximate reaction coordinate is constructed using a number of interpolated states and the free energy difference between adjacent states is calculated using the QM/MM-FEP method. By avoiding on-the-fly QM calculations and by circumventing the challenges associated with statistical averaging during MD sampling, a computational speedup of multiple orders of magnitude is realized. The method is systematically validated against the results of ab initio QM calculations and demonstrated for C-C cleavage in double-dehydrogenated ethylene glycol on a Pt (111) model surface.

  17. Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics Free Energy Maps and Nonadiabatic Simulations for a Photochemical Reaction in DNA: Cyclobutane Thymine Dimer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendieta-Moreno, Jesús I; Trabada, Daniel G; Mendieta, Jesús; Lewis, James P; Gómez-Puertas, Paulino; Ortega, José

    2016-11-03

    The absorption of ultraviolet radiation by DNA may result in harmful genetic lesions that affect DNA replication and transcription, ultimately causing mutations, cancer, and/or cell death. We analyze the most abundant photochemical reaction in DNA, the cyclobutane thymine dimer, using hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) techniques and QM/MM nonadiabatic molecular dynamics. We find that, due to its double helix structure, DNA presents a free energy barrier between nonreactive and reactive conformations leading to the photolesion. Moreover, our nonadiabatic simulations show that most of the photoexcited reactive conformations return to standard B-DNA conformations after an ultrafast nonradiative decay to the ground state. This work highlights the importance of dynamical effects (free energy, excited-state dynamics) for the study of photochemical reactions in biological systems.

  18. Modified reaction mechanism of aerated n-dodecane liquid flowing over heated metal tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, K. T.; Cernansky, N. P.; Cohen, R. S.

    1988-01-01

    The degradation mechanism of the n-dodecane was studied using a modified jet fuel thermal oxidation tester containing a sample withdrawal system as a reaction vessel. The reaction products were identified using gas chromatography and mass spectorometry. The soluble products were found to consist mainly of C5-C10 n-alkanes and 1-alkenes, C7-C10 aldehydes, tetrahydrofuran derivatives, dodecanol and dodecanone isomers, dodecyl hydroperoxide (ROOH) decomposition products, and C24 alkane isomers. The data from the experiments agreed with those of Hazlett et al. (1977). It was found that alkyl peroxide radical reactions dominate in the autooxidation temperature regime (at T not above 300 C); the dominant path is for the alkyl peroxyl radical to react bimolecularly with fuel to yield primarily alkyl hydroperoxides. The alkyl peroxide radical also undergoes self-termination and unimolecular isomerization and decomposition reactions, to yield smaller amounts of C12 alcohol plus ketone products and tetrahydrofuran derivatives, respectively.

  19. Reaction Mechanisms on Multiwell Potential Energy Surfaces in Combustion (and Atmospheric) Chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osborn, David L.

    2017-01-01

    Chemical reactions occurring on a potential energy surface with multiple wells are ubiquitous in low temperature combustion and the oxidation of volatile organic compounds in earth’s atmosphere. The rich variety of structural isomerizations that compete with collisional stabilization make characterizing such complex-forming reactions challenging. This review describes recent experimental and theoretical advances that deliver increasingly complete views of their reaction mechanisms. New methods for creating reactive intermediates coupled with multiplexed measurements provide many experimental observables simultaneously. Automated methods to explore potential energy surfaces can uncover hidden reactive pathways, while master equation methods enable a holistic treatment of both sequential and well-skipping pathways. Our ability to probe and understand nonequilibrium effects and reaction sequences is increasing. These advances provide the fundamental science base for predictive models of combustion and the atmosphere that are crucial to address global challenges.

  20. Reaction Mechanisms on Multiwell Potential Energy Surfaces in Combustion (and Atmospheric) Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborn, David L.

    2017-05-01

    Chemical reactions occurring on a potential energy surface with multiple wells are ubiquitous in low-temperature combustion and in the oxidation of volatile organic compounds in Earth's atmosphere. The rich variety of structural isomerizations that compete with collisional stabilization makes characterizing such complex-forming reactions challenging. This review describes recent experimental and theoretical advances that deliver increasingly complete views of their reaction mechanisms. New methods for creating reactive intermediates coupled with multiplexed measurements provide many experimental observables simultaneously. Automated methods to explore potential energy surfaces can uncover hidden reactive pathways, and master equation methods enable a holistic treatment of both sequential and well-skipping pathways. Our ability to probe and understand nonequilibrium effects and reaction sequences is increasing. These advances provide the fundamental science base for predictive models of combustion and the atmosphere that are crucial to address global challenges.

  1. Initial deposition and electron paramagnetic resonance defects characterization of TiO{sub 2} films prepared using successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Yiyong, E-mail: wuyiyong2001@yahoo.com.cn [National Key Laboratory of Materials Behaviors and Evaluation Technology in Space Environments, Harbin Institute of Technology, P.O. 432, Nan gang District, Harbin, 150080 (China); Shi Yaping [National Key Laboratory of Materials Behaviors and Evaluation Technology in Space Environments, Harbin Institute of Technology, P.O. 432, Nan gang District, Harbin, 150080 (China); Harbin University of Commerce, P.O. 493, Song bei District, Harbin, 150028 (China); Xu Xianbin; Sun Chengyue [National Key Laboratory of Materials Behaviors and Evaluation Technology in Space Environments, Harbin Institute of Technology, P.O. 432, Nan gang District, Harbin, 150080 (China)

    2012-06-01

    Successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) technique was considered promisingly to deposit ultra thin titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) films under ambient condition. In this paper, the growth process, structures and paramagnetic defects of the films were characterized by complementary techniques of atomic force microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. The results indicate that on glass substrate the SILAR TiO{sub 2} film nucleates in an island mode within the initial five deposition cycles but grows in a layer-by-layer mode afterwards. The growth rate was measured as 4.6 A/cycle. In the as-deposited films, a kind of paramagnetic defects is detected at g (2.0029) and it can be attributed to oxygen vacancies. These as-received oxygen vacancies could be annealed out at 473 K. Ultraviolet irradiation on the as-deposited films can also decrease the density of the defects. The relative mechanisms on the phenomenon were discussed in this paper. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TiO{sub 2} films are deposited on glass at 25 Degree-Sign C by successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction method with a rate of 4.6 A/cycle. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The films nucleate in an island mode initially but grow in a layer mode afterwards. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The SILAR TiO{sub 2} films nucleation period is five cycles. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy shows that TiO{sub 2} films paramagnetic defects are attributed to oxygen vacancies. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer They will decrease by anneal or ultraviolet radiation and form hydroxyl or superoxide radicals.

  2. Initial deposition and electron paramagnetic resonance defects characterization of TiO2 films prepared using successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Yiyong; Shi Yaping; Xu Xianbin; Sun Chengyue

    2012-01-01

    Successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) technique was considered promisingly to deposit ultra thin titanium dioxide (TiO 2 ) films under ambient condition. In this paper, the growth process, structures and paramagnetic defects of the films were characterized by complementary techniques of atomic force microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. The results indicate that on glass substrate the SILAR TiO 2 film nucleates in an island mode within the initial five deposition cycles but grows in a layer-by-layer mode afterwards. The growth rate was measured as 4.6 Å/cycle. In the as-deposited films, a kind of paramagnetic defects is detected at g (2.0029) and it can be attributed to oxygen vacancies. These as-received oxygen vacancies could be annealed out at 473 K. Ultraviolet irradiation on the as-deposited films can also decrease the density of the defects. The relative mechanisms on the phenomenon were discussed in this paper. - Highlights: ► TiO 2 films are deposited on glass at 25 °C by successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction method with a rate of 4.6 Å/cycle. ► The films nucleate in an island mode initially but grow in a layer mode afterwards. ► The SILAR TiO 2 films nucleation period is five cycles. ► Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy shows that TiO 2 films paramagnetic defects are attributed to oxygen vacancies. ► They will decrease by anneal or ultraviolet radiation and form hydroxyl or superoxide radicals.

  3. Formation of degradation compounds from lignocellulosic biomass in the biorefinery: sugar reaction mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Helena; Sørensen, Hanne R.; Meyer, Anne S.

    2014-01-01

    , several aldehydes and ketones and many different organic acids and aromatic compounds may be generated during hydrothermal treatment of lignocellulosic biomass. The reaction mechanisms are of interest because the very same compounds that are possible inhibitors for biomass processing enzymes......The degradation compounds formed during pretreatment when lignocellulosic biomass is processed to ethanol or other biorefinery products include furans, phenolics, organic acids, as well as mono- and oligomeric pentoses and hexoses. Depending on the reaction conditions glucose can be converted to 5......-(hydroxymethyl)-2-furaldehyde (HMF) and/or levulinic acid, formic acid and different phenolics at elevated temperatures. Correspondingly, xylose can follow different reaction mechanisms resulting in the formation of furan-2-carbaldehyde (furfural) and/or various C-1 and C-4 compounds. At least four routes...

  4. Chemical dynamics in the gas phase: Time-dependent quantum mechanics of chemical reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, S.K. [Argonne National Laboratory, IL (United States)

    1993-12-01

    A major goal of this research is to obtain an understanding of the molecular reaction dynamics of three and four atom chemical reactions using numerically accurate quantum dynamics. This work involves: (i) the development and/or improvement of accurate quantum mechanical methods for the calculation and analysis of the properties of chemical reactions (e.g., rate constants and product distributions), and (ii) the determination of accurate dynamical results for selected chemical systems, which allow one to compare directly with experiment, determine the reliability of the underlying potential energy surfaces, and test the validity of approximate theories. This research emphasizes the use of recently developed time-dependent quantum mechanical methods, i.e. wave packet methods.

  5. Expanding the Enzyme Universe: Accessing Non-Natural Reactions by Mechanism-Guided Directed Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renata, Hans; Wang, Z. Jane

    2015-01-01

    High selectivities and exquisite control over reaction outcomes entice chemists to use biocatalysts in organic synthesis. However, many useful reactions are not accessible because they are not in nature’s known repertoire. We will use this review to outline an evolutionary approach to engineering enzymes to catalyze reactions not found in nature. We begin with examples of how nature has discovered new catalytic functions and how such evolutionary progressions have been recapitulated in the laboratory starting from extant enzymes. We then examine non-native enzyme activities that have been discovered and exploited for chemical synthesis, emphasizing reactions that do not have natural counterparts. The new functions have mechanistic parallels to the native reaction mechanisms that often manifest as catalytic promiscuity and the ability to convert from one function to the other with minimal mutation. We present examples of how non-natural activities have been improved by directed evolution, mimicking the process used by nature to create new catalysts. Examples of new enzyme functions include epoxide opening reactions with non-natural nucleophiles catalyzed by a laboratory-evolved halohydrin dehalogenase, cyclopropanation and other carbene transfer reactions catalyzed by cytochrome P450 variants, and non-natural modes of cyclization by a modified terpene synthase. Lastly, we describe discoveries of non-native catalytic functions that may provide future opportunities for expanding the enzyme universe. PMID:25649694

  6. Resonance-Based Sparse Signal Decomposition and its Application in Mechanical Fault Diagnosis: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wentao; Sun, Hongjian; Wang, Weijie

    2017-06-03

    Mechanical equipment is the heart of industry. For this reason, mechanical fault diagnosis has drawn considerable attention. In terms of the rich information hidden in fault vibration signals, the processing and analysis techniques of vibration signals have become a crucial research issue in the field of mechanical fault diagnosis. Based on the theory of sparse decomposition, Selesnick proposed a novel nonlinear signal processing method: resonance-based sparse signal decomposition (RSSD). Since being put forward, RSSD has become widely recognized, and many RSSD-based methods have been developed to guide mechanical fault diagnosis. This paper attempts to summarize and review the theoretical developments and application advances of RSSD in mechanical fault diagnosis, and to provide a more comprehensive reference for those interested in RSSD and mechanical fault diagnosis. Followed by a brief introduction of RSSD's theoretical foundation, based on different optimization directions, applications of RSSD in mechanical fault diagnosis are categorized into five aspects: original RSSD, parameter optimized RSSD, subband optimized RSSD, integrated optimized RSSD, and RSSD combined with other methods. On this basis, outstanding issues in current RSSD study are also pointed out, as well as corresponding instructional solutions. We hope this review will provide an insightful reference for researchers and readers who are interested in RSSD and mechanical fault diagnosis.

  7. A full understanding of oxygen reduction reaction mechanism on Au(1 1 1) surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Dai, Changqing; Fisher, Adrian; Shen, Yanchun; Cheng, Daojian

    2017-09-01

    Oxygen reduction and hydrogen peroxide reduction are technologically important reactions in energy-conversion devices. In this work, a full understanding of oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) mechanism on Au(1 1 1) surface is investigated by density functional theory (DFT) calculations, including the reaction mechanisms of O2 dissociation, OOH dissociation, and H2O2 dissociation. Among these ORR mechanisms on Au(1 1 1), the activation energy of \\text{O}2* hydrogenation reaction is much lower than that of \\text{O}2* dissociation, indicating that \\text{O}2* hydrogenation reaction is more appropriate at the first step than \\text{O}2* dissociation. In the following, H2O2 can be formed with the lower activation energy compared with the OOH dissociation reaction, and finally H2O2 could be generated as a detectable product due to the high activation energy of H2O2 dissociation reaction. Furthermore, the potential dependent free energy study suggests that the H2O2 formation is thermodynamically favorable up to 0.4 V on Au(1 1 1), reducing the overpotential for 2e - ORR process. And the elementary step of first H2O formation becomes non-spontaneous at 0.4 V, indicating the difficulty of 4e - reduction pathway. Our DFT calculations show that H2O2 can be generated on Au(1 1 1) and the first electron transfer is the rate determining step. Our results show that gold surface could be used as a good catalyst for small-scale manufacture and on-site production of H2O2.

  8. Characterization of 22Ne implanted target by 22Ne(p,γ)23Na resonance reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bisoi, Abhijit; Saha Sarkar, M.; Desai, C.A.; Tribedi, L.C.; Jung, H.S.; Setoodehnia, K.; Lyons, S.; Görres, J.; Stech, Ed; Robertson, D.; Wiescher, M.

    2013-01-01

    Studies of nuclear reactions relevant to astrophysical scenario, often require measurement of cross section in picobarn to nano-barn range (1 barn = 10 −24 cm 2 ). So we need targets which are isotopically pure and can withstand high beam load over a long time. Even the backings used should contain no or very low concentration of impurities. Implantation technique has been found to be one of the most effective methods to produce such targets

  9. The oxygen reduction reaction mechanism on Pt(111) from density functional theory calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tripkovic, Vladimir; Skulason, Egill; Siahrostami, Samira

    2010-01-01

    We study the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) mechanism on a Pt(1 1 1) surface using density functional theory calculations We find that at low overpotentials the surface is covered with a half dissociated water layer We estimate the barrier for proton transfer to this surface and the barrier...

  10. Inheritance of the bark reaction resistance mechanism in Pinus monticola infected by Cronartium ribicola

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray J. Hoff

    1986-01-01

    Necrotic reactions in branch or main stems of western white pine (Pinus monticola Dougl.) caused by infection by the blister rust fungus (Cronartium ribicola J. C. Fisch. ex Rabenh.) are a major mechanism of resistance. Overall, 26 percent of the seedlings eliminated the fungus via this defense system. Heritability based upon crossing family groups averaged 33 percent...

  11. Hydrodeoxygenation by deuterium gas--a powerful way to provide insight into the reaction mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben, Haoxi; Ferguson, Glen A; Mu, Wei; Pu, Yunqiao; Huang, Fang; Jarvis, Mark; Biddy, Mary; Deng, Yulin; Ragauskas, Arthur J

    2013-11-28

    This study demonstrates the use of isotopic labelling and NMR to study the HDO process. As far as we know, this is the first reported effort to trace the incorporation of hydrogen in the HDO process of lignin pyrolysis oil thereby providing key fundamental insight into its reaction mechanism.

  12. Mechanism and kinetics of the electrocatalytic reaction responsible for the high cost of hydrogen fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Tao; Goddard, William A; An, Qi; Xiao, Hai; Merinov, Boris; Morozov, Sergey

    2017-01-25

    The sluggish oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is a major impediment to the economic use of hydrogen fuel cells in transportation. In this work, we report the full ORR reaction mechanism for Pt(111) based on Quantum Mechanics (QM) based Reactive metadynamics (RμD) simulations including explicit water to obtain free energy reaction barriers at 298 K. The lowest energy pathway for 4 e - water formation is: first, *OOH formation; second, *OOH reduction to H 2 O and O*; third, O* hydrolysis using surface water to produce two *OH and finally *OH hydration to water. Water formation is the rate-determining step (RDS) for potentials above 0.87 Volt, the normal operating range. Considering the Eley-Rideal (ER) mechanism involving protons from the solvent, we predict the free energy reaction barrier at 298 K for water formation to be 0.25 eV for an external potential below U = 0.87 V and 0.41 eV at U = 1.23 V, in good agreement with experimental values of 0.22 eV and 0.44 eV, respectively. With the mechanism now fully understood, we can use this now validated methodology to examine the changes upon alloying and surface modifications to increase the rate by reducing the barrier for water formation.

  13. The relationship of microstructure and temperature to fracture mechanics parameters in reaction bonded silicon nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jennings, H.M.; Dalgleish, B.J.; Pratt, P.L.

    1978-01-01

    The development of physical properties in reaction bonded silicon nitride has been investigated over a range of temperatures and correlated with microstructure. Fracture mechanics parameters, elastic moduli, strength and critical defect size have been determined. The nitrided microstructure is shown to be directly related to these observed properties and these basic relationships can be used to produce material with improved properties. (orig.) [de

  14. Ion-cyclotron-resonance- and Fourier-transform-ion-cyclotron-resonance spectroscopy: technology and application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luederwald, I.

    1977-01-01

    Instrumentation and technology of Ion-Cyclotron-Resonance and Fourier-Transform-Ion-Cyclotron-Resonance Spectroscopy are described. The method can be applied to studies of ion/molecule reactions in gas phase, to obtain thermodynamic data as gas phase acidity or basicity, proton and electron affinity, and to establish reaction mechanisms and ion structures. (orig.) [de

  15. Nuclear magnetic resonance study of reaction of p-(1,1', 3,3'-tetramethylbutyl)phenol with phosphoric pentoxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Didi, Mohamed Amine; Elias Abdelhamid

    1998-12-01

    Some aspects dealing with the mechanisms and the kinetics of the reaction between phosphorus pentoxide and p-(1,1',3,3'-tetramethylbutyl)phenol were investigated, by means of the 31P nmr technique . The kinetic model considered showed that only the time and, to a lesser extent, the temperature of the reaction seem to the yield. The reactant mode ratio does not exhibit any effect upon the MOPPA DOPPA ratio. A series of adequate experiments based on the 2 factorial 3 plane method allowed to confirm these results. The tripyroesters were identified as being the longest intermediates detected by nmr. In the reaction mixture no traces of phosphoric triester (t- TOPPA) were detected

  16. Comparison of a two-body threshold (π,2π) reaction mechanism with the usual one-body mechanism in the deuteron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rockmore, R.

    1984-01-01

    A two-body threshold (π +- ,π +- π -+ ) reaction mechanism is suggested in direct analogy with pion absorption. The mechanism involves boson rescattering via Δ excitation. The relative importance of this mechanism and the ordinary one-body mechanism in nuclei is studied in the particular case of S-wave deuteron targets. The contribution of the two-body mechanism to the threshold reaction cross section is found to be less than 1% of the simple one-body estimate

  17. Coincidence measurements of the (π+,π0p) reaction in the /triangle/-resonance region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoeibraten, S.

    1989-05-01

    This thesis describes an experimental study of the (π + , π 0 p) reaction at incident energy T/sub π/sup +// = 165 MeV. This work is part of the first experiment to detect neutral pions and protons in coincidence in kinematically complete measurements. The reaction was studied on 16 O (using water targets) at several pion angles: θ/sub π/sup 0// = 70/degree/, 80/degree/, 110/degree/, and 130/degree/. At θ/sub π/sup 0// = 110/degree/ measurements were also made on 56 Fe, 120 Sn, and 208 Pb. The neutral pions were detected with the LAMPF π 0 spectrometer, while the protons were detected in a vertical array of plastic-scintillator ΔE-E telescopes, each spanning 8.5 msr. Energy spectra of the differential cross sections d 4 σ/dE/sub π/sup 0// dE/sub p/dΩ/sub π/sup 0//dΩ/sub p/ were obtained for each proton telescope and subsequently integrated over proton and pion energy and proton angle. The characteristics of these spectra are consistent with a quasi-free description of the (π + ,π 0 p) reaction. The angular dependence of dσ/dΩ/sub π/sup 0//(θ/sub π/sup 0//) for 16 O(π + ,π 0 p) was found to be in accordance with that of the cross section for the corresponding free reaction at backward π 0 angles. For the 16 O(π + ,π 0 p) reaction, events in which a p-shell nucleon had been removed were identified. The p-shell events were found to constitute only 40--50% of the total cross section for quasi-free one-nucleon removal. The (π + ,π 0 p) cross section at θ/sub π/sup 0// = 110/degree/ proved to be almost the same for all target nuclei, possibly slightly decreasing as a function of A. 102 refs., 108 figs., 24 tabs

  18. Quadrupole corrections to matrix elements of transitions in resonant reactions of muonic molecule formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faifman, M.P.; Strizh, T.A.; Armour, E.A.G.; Harston, M.R.

    1996-01-01

    The calculated resonant formation rates of the muonic molecules DDμ and DTμ are presented. The approach developed earlier for calculating the transition matrix elements in the dipole approximation has been extended to include the quadrupole terms in the multipole expansion of the interaction operator. The calculated dependence of the DTμ formation rates on the energies of the incident Tμ muonic atoms shows that the effect of including the quadrupole correction is to reduce the magnitude of the peak rates by about 20-30% at the different temperatures, compared to those calculated in the dipole approximation. The dependence on temperature for the DDμ formation rates is obtained with the differences between the presented and previous calculations being less than 5%. (orig.)

  19. Reaction

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    19 oct. 2017 ... Reaction to Mohamed Said Nakhli et al. concerning the article: "When the axillary block remains the only alternative in a 5 year old child". .... Bertini L1, Savoia G, De Nicola A, Ivani G, Gravino E, Albani A et al ... 2010;7(2):101-.

  20. Automated Prediction of Catalytic Mechanism and Rate Law Using Graph-Based Reaction Path Sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habershon, Scott

    2016-04-12

    In a recent article [ J. Chem. Phys. 2015 , 143 , 094106 ], we introduced a novel graph-based sampling scheme which can be used to generate chemical reaction paths in many-atom systems in an efficient and highly automated manner. The main goal of this work is to demonstrate how this approach, when combined with direct kinetic modeling, can be used to determine the mechanism and phenomenological rate law of a complex catalytic cycle, namely cobalt-catalyzed hydroformylation of ethene. Our graph-based sampling scheme generates 31 unique chemical products and 32 unique chemical reaction pathways; these sampled structures and reaction paths enable automated construction of a kinetic network model of the catalytic system when combined with density functional theory (DFT) calculations of free energies and resultant transition-state theory rate constants. Direct simulations of this kinetic network across a range of initial reactant concentrations enables determination of both the reaction mechanism and the associated rate law in an automated fashion, without the need for either presupposing a mechanism or making steady-state approximations in kinetic analysis. Most importantly, we find that the reaction mechanism which emerges from these simulations is exactly that originally proposed by Heck and Breslow; furthermore, the simulated rate law is also consistent with previous experimental and computational studies, exhibiting a complex dependence on carbon monoxide pressure. While the inherent errors of using DFT simulations to model chemical reactivity limit the quantitative accuracy of our calculated rates, this work confirms that our automated simulation strategy enables direct analysis of catalytic mechanisms from first principles.

  1. Optimization of metabolite detection by quantum mechanics simulations in magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambarota, Giulio

    2017-07-15

    Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) is a well established modality for investigating tissue metabolism in vivo. In recent years, many efforts by the scientific community have been directed towards the improvement of metabolite detection and quantitation. Quantum mechanics simulations allow for investigations of the MR signal behaviour of metabolites; thus, they provide an essential tool in the optimization of metabolite detection. In this review, we will examine quantum mechanics simulations based on the density matrix formalism. The density matrix was introduced by von Neumann in 1927 to take into account statistical effects within the theory of quantum mechanics. We will discuss the main steps of the density matrix simulation of an arbitrary spin system and show some examples for the strongly coupled two spin system. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. [Research progress of functional magnetic resonance imaging in mechanism studies of tinnitus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, B B; Li, M; Zhang, J N

    2018-02-07

    Tinnitus is a subjective symptom of phantom sound in the ear or brain without sound or electrical stimulation in the environment. The mechanism of tinnitus is complicated and mostly unclear. Recent studies suggested that the abnormal peripheral auditory input lead to neuroplasticity changes in central nervous system followed by tinnitus. More research concerned on the tinnitus central mechanism. A rapid development of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) technique made it more widely used in tinnitus central mechanism research. fMRI brought new findings but also presented some shortages in technology and cognition in tinnitus study. This article summarized the outcomes of fMRI research on tinnitus in recent years, exploring its existing problems and application prospects.

  3. The differential cross section of the 12C(p,p)12C reaction near the resonance at energy 1.726 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duvanov, S.M.; Kobzev, A.P.

    1996-01-01

    New experimental results on the differential cross section of the 12 C(p,p) 12 C reaction near the separate resonance at 1726 keV were obtained for the 170 deg scattering angle. The cross section measured with a thin target has been used for computer simulation of the spectra measured for a defined initial proton energy for two thick targets. The precision measurements of the proton energies have been carried out using the resonance of 27 Al(p,γ) 28 Si reaction at 1726.0 keV. The energy scale of the excitation function of the 12 C(p,p) 12 C reaction near the resonance at 1726 keV has been defined more exactly. It will improve the precision of depth profiling of carbon in solids. 11 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  4. Reactions of metal ions and their clusters in the gas phase using laser ionization: ion cyclotron resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freiser, B.S.

    1981-04-01

    Two subjects are discussed in this report: advances in proposed studies on metal ion chemistry and expansion of laboratory facilities. The development of a combined pulsed laser source-ion cyclotron resonance spectrometer has proven to be a convenient and powerful method for generating metal ions and for studying their subsequent chemistry in the gas phase. The main emphasis of this research has been on the application of metal ions as a selective chemical ionization reagents and progress in this area are discussed. The goal is to identify trends in reactivity i.e. mechanisms useful in interpreting the chemical ionization spectra of unknown compounds and to test for the functional group selectivity of the various metal ions. The feasibility of these goals have been demonstrated in extensive studies on Cu + with esters and ketones, on Fe + with ethers, ketones, and hydrocarbons, and on Ti + with hydrocarbons. In addition, preliminary results on sulfur containing compounds and on a variety of other metallic ions have been obtained. Laboratory facilities were expanded from one ion cyclotron resonance (ICR) spectrometer to two, plus a third instrument the Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance (FTICR) spectrometer

  5. Role of high-spin hyperon resonances in the reaction of $\\gamma p \\to K^+ K^+ \\Xi^-$

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Ka Shing Man, Yongseok Oh, K. Nakayama

    2011-05-01

    The recent data taken by the CLAS Collaboration at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility for the reaction of $\\gamma p \\to K^+ K^+ \\Xi^-$ are reanalyzed within a relativistic meson-exchange model of hadronic interactions. The present model is an extension of the one developed in an earlier work by Nakayama, Oh, and Haberzettl [Phys. Rev. C 74, 035205 (2006)]. In particular, the role of the spin-5/2 and -7/2 hyperon resonances, which were not included in the previous model, is investigated in the present study. It is shown that the contribution of the $\\Sigma(2030)$ hyperon having spin-7/2 and positive parity has a key role to bring the model predictions into a fair agreement with the measured data for the $K^+\\Xi^-$ invariant mass distribution.

  6. On experimental determination of characteristics of nuclear fusion reactions from mu-molecular resonance states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bystritskij, V.M.; Pen'kov, F.M.

    1997-01-01

    Charge-nonsymmetrical deuterium-helium muon complexes (dμHe) are studied. A method is proposed for experimentally determining the rates of nuclear fusion reactions in dμHe molecules in the J=1 and J=0 states (J is the orbital moment of the system) and the partial rates for radiative decay of these complexes in these states. Experiments are supposed to be carried out at meson factories with gaseous and cryogenic targets filled with a mixture of deuterium and helium

  7. Dynamical response of multi-walled carbon nanotube resonators based on continuum mechanics modeling for mass sensing applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Myungseok; Olshevskiy, Alexander; Kim, Chang-Wan [Konkuk University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Eom, Kilho [Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Gwak, Kwanwoong [Sejong University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Dai, Mai Duc [Ho Chi Minh City University of Technology and Education, Ho Chi Minh (Viet Nam)

    2017-05-15

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) has recently received much attention due to its excellent electromechanical properties, indicating that CNT can be employed for development of Nanoelectromechanical system (NEMS) such as nanomechanical resonators. For effective design of CNT-based resonators, it is required to accurately predict the vibration behavior of CNT resonators as well as their frequency response to mass adsorption. In this work, we have studied the vibrational behavior of Multi-walled CNT (MWCNT) resonators by using a continuum mechanics modeling that was implemented in Finite element method (FEM). In particular, we consider a transversely isotropic hollow cylinder solid model with Finite element (FE) implementation for modeling the vibration behavior of Multi-walled CNT (MWCNT) resonators. It is shown that our continuum mechanics model provides the resonant frequencies of various MWCNTs being comparable to those obtained from experiments. Moreover, we have investigated the frequency response of MWCNT resonators to mass adsorption by using our continuum model with FE implementation. Our study sheds light on our continuum mechanics model that is useful in predicting not only the vibration behavior of MWCNT resonators but also their sensing performance for further effective design of MWCNT- based NEMS devices.

  8. The Reaction Mechanism and Rate Constants in the Radiolysis of Fe2+-Cu2+ Solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjergbakke, Erling; Sehested, Knud; Rasmussen, O. Lang

    1976-01-01

    Pulse radiolysis and gamma radiolysis have been used to study the reaction mechanism in the radiolysis of aqueous solutions of Fe2+ and Cu2+. A reaction scheme has been developed and confirmed by computation of the corresponding complete set of differential equations. The rate constants for some ...... 10^{8}$ and $1.3\\times 10^{8}\\ {\\rm mol}^{-1}\\ {\\rm sec}^{-1}$ in pH 2.1 H2 SO4 and HClO4, respectively.......Pulse radiolysis and gamma radiolysis have been used to study the reaction mechanism in the radiolysis of aqueous solutions of Fe2+ and Cu2+. A reaction scheme has been developed and confirmed by computation of the corresponding complete set of differential equations. The rate constants for some...... of the reactions have been determined at different pH's. $k_{{\\rm Cu}^{+}+{\\rm O}_{2}}=4.6\\times 10^{5}$ and $1.0\\times 10^{6}\\ {\\rm mol}^{-1}\\ {\\rm sec}^{-1}$, $k_{{\\rm Cu}^{+}+{\\rm Fe}^{3+}}=5.5\\times 10^{6}$ and $1.3\\times 10^{7}\\ {\\rm mol}^{-1}\\ {\\rm sec}^{-1}$, $k_{{\\rm Cu}({\\rm III)}+{\\rm Fe}^{2+}}=3.3\\times...

  9. A Microfluidic Chip Based on Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance for Real-Time Monitoring of Antigen-Antibody Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiep, Ha Minh; Nakayama, Tsuyoshi; Saito, Masato; Yamamura, Shohei; Takamura, Yuzuru; Tamiya, Eiichi

    2008-02-01

    Localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) connecting to noble metal nanoparticles is an important issue for many analytical and biological applications. Therefore, the development of microfluidic LSPR chip that allows studying biomolecular interactions becomes an essential requirement for micro total analysis systems (µTAS) integration. However, miniaturized process of the conventional surface plasmon resonance system has been faced with some limitations, especially with the usage of Kretschmann configuration in total internal reflection mode. In this study, we have tried to solve this problem by proposing a novel microfluidic LSPR chip operated with a simple collinear optical system. The poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) based microfluidic chip was fabricated by soft-lithography technique and enables to interrogate specific insulin and anti-insulin antibody reaction in real-time after immobilizing antibody on its surface. Moreover, the sensing ability of microfluidic LSPR chip was also evaluated with various glucose concentrations. The kinetic constant of insulin and anti-insulin antibody was determined and the detection limit of 100 ng/mL insulin was archived.

  10. Hydrogen depth resolution in multilayer metal structures, comparison of elastic recoil detection and resonant nuclear reaction method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wielunski, L.S. E-mail: leszekw@optushome.com.au; Grambole, D.; Kreissig, U.; Groetzschel, R.; Harding, G.; Szilagyi, E

    2002-05-01

    Four different metals: Al, Cu, Ag and Au have been used to produce four special multilayer samples to study the depth resolution of hydrogen. The layer structure of each sample was analysed using 2 MeV He Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, 4.5 MeV He elastic recoil detection (ERD) and 30 MeV F{sup 6+} HIERD. Moreover the hydrogen distribution was analysed in all samples using H({sup 15}N, {alpha}{gamma}){sup 12}C nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) with resonance at 6.385 MeV. The results show that the best depth resolution and sensitivity for hydrogen detection are offered by resonance NRA. The He ERD shows good depth resolution only for the near surface hydrogen. In this technique the depth resolution is rapidly reduced with depth due to multiple scattering effects. The 30 MeV F{sup 6+} HIERD demonstrated similar hydrogen depth resolution to He ERD for low mass metals and HIERD resolution is substantially better for heavy metals and deep layers.

  11. Fabrication and characterization of non-resonant magneto-mechanical low-frequency vibration energy harvester

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nammari, Abdullah; Caskey, Logan; Negrete, Johnny; Bardaweel, Hamzeh

    2018-03-01

    This article presents a non-resonant magneto-mechanical vibration energy harvester. When externally excited, the energy harvester converts vibrations into electric charge using a guided levitated magnet oscillating inside a multi-turn coil that is fixed around the exterior of the energy harvester. The levitated magnet is guided using four oblique mechanical springs. A prototype of the energy harvester is fabricated using additive manufacturing. Both experiment and model are used to characterize the static and dynamic behavior of the energy harvester. Measured restoring forces show that the fabricated energy harvester retains a mono-stable potential energy well with desired stiffness nonlinearities. Results show that magnetic spring results in hardening effect which increases the resonant frequency of the energy harvester. Additionally, oblique mechanical springs introduce geometric, negative, nonlinear stiffness which improves the harvester's response towards lower frequency spectrum. The unique design can produce a tunable energy harvester with multi-well potential energy characteristics. A finite element model is developed to estimate the average radial flux density experienced by the multi-turn coil. Also, a lumped parameter model of the energy harvester is developed and validated against measured data. Both upward and downward frequency sweeps are performed to determine the frequency response of the harvester. Results show that at higher excitation levels hardening effects become more apparent, and the system dynamic response turns into non-resonant. Frequency response curves exhibit frequency jump phenomena as a result of coexistence of multiple energy states at the frequency branch. The fabricated energy harvester is hand-held and measures approximately 100.5 [cm3] total volume. For a base excitation of 1.0 g [m/s2], the prototype generates a peak voltage and normalized power density of approximately 3.5 [V] and 0.133 [mW/cm3 g2], respectively, at 15.5 [Hz].

  12. Mechanical detection and mode shape imaging of vibrational modes of micro and nanomechanical resonators by dynamic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paulo, A S; GarcIa-Sanchez, D; Perez-Murano, F; Bachtold, A; Black, J; Bokor, J; Esplandiu, M J; Aguasca, A

    2008-01-01

    We describe a method based on the use of higher order bending modes of the cantilever of a dynamic force microscope to characterize vibrations of micro and nanomechanical resonators at arbitrarily large resonance frequencies. Our method consists on using a particular cantilever eigenmode for standard feedback control in amplitude modulation operation while another mode is used for detecting and imaging the resonator vibration. In addition, the resonating sample device is driven at or near its resonance frequency with a signal modulated in amplitude at a frequency that matches the resonance of the cantilever eigenmode used for vibration detection. In consequence, this cantilever mode is excited with an amplitude proportional to the resonator vibration, which is detected with an external lock-in amplifier. We show two different application examples of this method. In the first one, acoustic wave vibrations of a film bulk acoustic resonator around 1.6 GHz are imaged. In the second example, bending modes of carbon nanotube resonators up to 3.1 GHz are characterized. In both cases, the method provides subnanometer-scale sensitivity and the capability of providing otherwise inaccessible information about mechanical resonance frequencies, vibration amplitude values and mode shapes

  13. Numerical comparison of hydrogen-air reaction mechanisms for unsteady shockinduced combustion applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, P. Pradeep; Kim, Kui Soon; Oh, Se Jong; Choi, Jeong Yeol [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-03-15

    An unsteady shock-induced combustion (SIC) is characterized by the regularly oscillating combustion phenomenon behind the shock wave supported by the blunt projectile flying around the speed of Chapman-Jouguet detonation wave. The SIC is the coupling phenomenon between the hypersonic flow and the chemical kinetics, but the effects of chemical kinetics have been rarely reported. We compared hydrogen-air reaction mechanisms for the shock-induced combustion to demonstrate the importance of considering the reaction mechanisms for such complex flows. Seven hydrogen-air reaction mechanisms were considered, those available publically and used in other researches. As a first step in the comparison of the hydrogen combustion, ignition delay time of hydrogen-oxygen mixtures was compared at various initial conditions. Laminar premixed flame speed was also compared with available experimental data and at high pressure conditions. In addition, half-reaction length of ZND (Zeldovich-Neumann-Doering) detonation structure accounts for the length scale in SIC phenomena. Oscillation frequency of the SIC is compared by running the time-accurate 3rd-order Navier-Stokes CFD code fully coupled with the detailed chemistry by using four levels of grid resolutions.

  14. Numerical comparison of hydrogen-air reaction mechanisms for unsteady shockinduced combustion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, P. Pradeep; Kim, Kui Soon; Oh, Se Jong; Choi, Jeong Yeol

    2015-01-01

    An unsteady shock-induced combustion (SIC) is characterized by the regularly oscillating combustion phenomenon behind the shock wave supported by the blunt projectile flying around the speed of Chapman-Jouguet detonation wave. The SIC is the coupling phenomenon between the hypersonic flow and the chemical kinetics, but the effects of chemical kinetics have been rarely reported. We compared hydrogen-air reaction mechanisms for the shock-induced combustion to demonstrate the importance of considering the reaction mechanisms for such complex flows. Seven hydrogen-air reaction mechanisms were considered, those available publically and used in other researches. As a first step in the comparison of the hydrogen combustion, ignition delay time of hydrogen-oxygen mixtures was compared at various initial conditions. Laminar premixed flame speed was also compared with available experimental data and at high pressure conditions. In addition, half-reaction length of ZND (Zeldovich-Neumann-Doering) detonation structure accounts for the length scale in SIC phenomena. Oscillation frequency of the SIC is compared by running the time-accurate 3rd-order Navier-Stokes CFD code fully coupled with the detailed chemistry by using four levels of grid resolutions.

  15. Micro-mechanical resonators for dynamically reconfigurable reduced voltage logic gates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappanda, K. N.; Ilyas, S.; Younis, M. I.

    2018-05-01

    Due to the limitations of transistor-based logic devices such as their poor performance at elevated temperature, alternative computing methods are being actively investigated. In this work, we present electromechanical logic gates using electrostatically coupled in-plane micro-cantilever resonators operated at modest vacuum conditions of 5 Torr. Operating in the first resonant mode, we demonstrate 2-bit XOR, 2- and 3-bit AND, 2- and 3-bit NOR, and 1-bit NOT gates; all condensed in the same device. Through the designed electrostatic coupling, the required voltage for the logic gates is reduced by 80%, along with the reduction in the number of electrical interconnects and devices per logic operation (contrary to transistors). The device is dynamically reconfigurable between any logic gates in real time without the need for any change in the electrical interconnects and the drive circuit. By operating in the first two resonant vibration modes, we demonstrate mechanical logic gates consisting of two 2-bit AND and two 2-bit XOR gates. The device is tested at elevated temperatures and is shown to be functional as a logic gate up to 150 °C. Also, the device has high reliability with demonstrated lifetime greater than 5  ×  1012 oscillations.

  16. Micro-mechanical resonators for dynamically reconfigurable reduced voltage logic gates

    KAUST Repository

    Chappanda , K. N.; Ilyas, Saad; Younis, Mohammad I.

    2018-01-01

    Due to the limitations of transistor-based logic devices such as their poor performance at elevated temperature, alternative computing methods are being actively investigated. In this work, we present electromechanical logic gates using electrostatically coupled in-plane micro-cantilever resonators operated at modest vacuum conditions of 5 Torr. Operating in the first resonant mode, we demonstrate 2-bit XOR, 2- and 3-bit AND, 2- and 3-bit NOR, and 1-bit NOT gates; all condensed in the same device. Through the designed electrostatic coupling, the required voltage for the logic gates is reduced by 80%, along with the reduction in the number of electrical interconnects and devices per logic operation (contrary to transistors). The device is dynamically reconfigurable between any logic gates in real time without the need for any change in the electrical interconnects and the drive circuit. By operating in the first two resonant vibration modes, we demonstrate mechanical logic gates consisting of two 2-bit AND and two 2-bit XOR gates. The device is tested at elevated temperatures and is shown to be functional as a logic gate up to 150 °C. Also, the device has high reliability with demonstrated lifetime greater than 5 × 10 oscillations.

  17. Micro-mechanical resonators for dynamically reconfigurable reduced voltage logic gates

    KAUST Repository

    Chappanda, K N

    2018-02-16

    Due to the limitations of transistor-based logic devices such as their poor performance at elevated temperature, alternative computing methods are being actively investigated. In this work, we present electromechanical logic gates using electrostatically coupled in-plane micro-cantilever resonators operated at modest vacuum conditions of 5 Torr. Operating in the first resonant mode, we demonstrate 2-bit XOR, 2- and 3-bit AND, 2- and 3-bit NOR, and 1-bit NOT gates; all condensed in the same device. Through the designed electrostatic coupling, the required voltage for the logic gates is reduced by 80%, along with the reduction in the number of electrical interconnects and devices per logic operation (contrary to transistors). The device is dynamically reconfigurable between any logic gates in real time without the need for any change in the electrical interconnects and the drive circuit. By operating in the first two resonant vibration modes, we demonstrate mechanical logic gates consisting of two 2-bit AND and two 2-bit XOR gates. The device is tested at elevated temperatures and is shown to be functional as a logic gate up to 150 °C. Also, the device has high reliability with demonstrated lifetime greater than 5 × 10 oscillations.

  18. Resonance strength measurement at astrophysical energies: The {sup 17}O(p,α){sup 14}N reaction studied via Trojan Horse Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sergi, M. L., E-mail: sergi@lns.infn.it; La Cognata, M.; Pizzone, R. G. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Spitaleri, C. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università degli studi di Catania, Catania (Italy); Lamia, L.; Rapisarda, G. G. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università degli studi di Catania, Catania (Italy); Mukhamedzhanov, A. [Cyclotron Institute, Texas A& M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Irgaziev, B. [GIK Institute of Engineering Sciences and Technology, Topi, Districti Swabi, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa (Pakistan); Tang, X. D.; Wiescher, M. [Department of Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame 46556, Indiana (United States); Mrazek, J.; Kroha, V. [Nuclear Physics Institute of ASCR, Rez (Czech Republic)

    2015-10-15

    In recent years, the Trojan Horse Method (THM) has been used to investigate the low-energy cross sections of proton-induced reactions on {sup 17}O nuclei, overcoming extrapolation procedures and enhancement effects due to electron screening. We will report on the indirect study of the {sup 17}O(p,α){sup 14}N reaction via the THM by applying the approach developed for extracting the resonance strength of narrow resonance in the ultralow energy region. Two measurements will be described and the experimental THM cross sections will be shown for both experiments.

  19. Analysis of the /sup 28/Si(p,. gamma. )/sup 29/P reaction data in the region of the sub-barrier single particle resonances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matulewicz, T; Decowski, P; Kicinska-Habior, M; Sikora, B; Toke, J

    1983-01-01

    The /sup 28/Si(p, ..gamma..)/sup 29/P reaction data have been analyzed in terms of a modified direct-semidirect capture model which accounts for the presence of broad shape (single-particle) resonances in the entrance channel. Values of the spectroscopic factors for the ground state and 1,65 MeV and 2,88 MeV resonances in /sup 29/P nuclei were extracted and found to be consistent with those obtained in other experiments. The modified theoretical analysis scheme was found to provide a convenient tool for analyzing the radiative capture reaction data.

  20. Measurement of the vector np → dπ{sup 0}π{sup 0} reaction with polarized beam in the region of the d*(2380) resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adlarson, P.; Calen, H.; Fransson, K.; Gullstroem, C.O.; Heijkenskjoeld, L.; Johansson, T.; Marciniewski, P.; Wolke, M.; Zlomanczuk, J. [Uppsala University, Division of Nuclear Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Box 516, Uppsala (Sweden); Augustyniak, W.; Marianski, B.; Morsch, H.P.; Trzcinski, A.; Zupranski, P. [National Centre for Nuclear Research, Department of Nuclear Physics, Warsaw (Poland); Bardan, W.; Ciepal, I.; Czerwinski, E.; Jarczyk, L.; Kamys, B.; Khatri, G.; Kistryn, S.; Krzemien, W.; Magiera, A.; Moskal, P.; Rudy, Z.; Rundel, O.; Schaetti-Ozerianska, I.; Skurzok, M.; Smyrski, J.; Wronska, A.; Zielinski, M.J. [Jagiellonian University, Institute of Physics, Krakow (Poland); Bashkanov, M. [University of Edinburgh, James Clerk Maxwell Building, School of Physics and Astronomy, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Eberhard-Karls-Universitaet Tuebingen, Physikalisches Institut, Tuebingen (Germany); Bergmann, F.S.; Demmich, K.; Huesken, N.; Khoukaz, A.; Sitterberg, K.; Taeschner, A. [Westfaelische Wilhelms-Universitaet Muenster, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Muenster (Germany); Berlowski, M.; Stepaniak, J. [National Centre for Nuclear Research, High Energy Physics Department, Warsaw (Poland); Bhatt, H.; Varma, R. [Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Department of Physics, Powai, Maharashtra (India); Bondar, A.; Kuzmin, A.; Shwartz, B. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics of SB RAS, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Buescher, M.; Engels, R.; Goldenbaum, F.; Hejny, V.; Khan, F.A.; Lersch, D.; Lorentz, B.; Ohm, H.; Prasuhn, D.; Schadmand, S.; Sefzick, T.; Serdyuk, V.; Stassen, R.; Sterzenbach, G.; Stockhorst, H.; Zurek, M. [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Juelich (Germany); Clement, H. [Eberhard-Karls-Universitaet Tuebingen, Physikalisches Institut, Tuebingen (Germany); University of Tuebingen, Kepler Center for Astro- and Particle Physics, Tuebingen (Germany); Erven, A.; Erven, W.; Kemmerling, G.; Kleines, H.; Wuestner, P. [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Zentralinstitut fuer Engineering, Elektronik und Analytik, Juelich (Germany); Eyrich, W.; Zink, A. [Friedrich-Alexander-Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Physikalisches Institut, Erlangen (Germany); Fedorets, P. [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Juelich (Germany); State Scientific Center of the Russian Federation, Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Foehl, K. [Justus-Liebig-Universitaet Giessen, II. Physikalisches Institut, Giessen (Germany); Goswami, A.; Roy, A. [Indian Institute of Technology Indore, Department of Physics, Indore, Madhya Pradesh (India); Grigoryev, K. [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Juelich (Germany); Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, High Energy Physics Division, Gatchina, Leningrad district (Russian Federation); Kirillov, D.A.; Piskunov, N.M. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Physics, Veksler and Baldin Laboratory of High Energiy Physics, Dubna, Moscow region (Russian Federation); Klos, B.; Stephan, E. [University of Silesia, August Chelkowski Institute of Physics, Katowice (Poland); Kulessa, P.; Pysz, K.; Siudak, R.; Szczurek, A. [Polish Academy of Sciences, The Henryk Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, Krakow (Poland); Kupsc, A.; Pszczel, D. [Uppsala University, Division of Nuclear Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Box 516, Uppsala (Sweden); National Centre for Nuclear Research, High Energy Physics Department, Warsaw (Poland); Lalwani, K. [Malaviya National Institute of Technology Jaipur, JLN Marg, Department of Physics, Jaipur, Rajasthan (India); Maier, R.; Stroeher, H. [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Juelich (Germany); Forschungszentrum Juelich, JARA-FAME, Juelich Aachen Research Alliance, Juelich (Germany); RWTH Aachen, Aachen (Germany); Perez del Rio, E. [Eberhard-Karls-Universitaet Tuebingen, Physikalisches Institut, Tuebingen (Germany); Pyszniak, A. [Uppsala University, Division of Nuclear Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Box 516, Uppsala (Sweden); Jagiellonian University, Institute of Physics, Krakow (PL); Ritman, J. [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Juelich (DE); Forschungszentrum Juelich, JARA-FAME, Juelich Aachen Research Alliance, Juelich (DE); RWTH Aachen, Aachen (DE); Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, Institut fuer Experimentalphysik I, Bochum (DE); Sawant, S. [Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Department of Physics, Powai, Maharashtra (IN); Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Juelich (DE); Skorodko, T. [Eberhard-Karls-Universitaet Tuebingen, Physikalisches Institut, Tuebingen (DE); University of Tuebingen, Kepler Center for Astro- and Particle Physics, Tuebingen (DE); Tomsk State University, Department of Physics, Tomsk (RU); Sopov, V. [State Scientific Center of the Russian Federation, Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (RU); Yamamoto, A. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organisation KEK, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (JP); Zabierowski, J. [National Centre for Nuclear Research, Department of Astrophysics, Lodz (PL); Collaboration: WASA-at-COSY Collaboration

    2016-05-15

    We report on a high-statistics measurement of the most basic double-pionic fusion reaction vector np→dπ{sup 0}π{sup 0} over the energy region of the d*(2380) resonance by use of a polarized deuteron beam and observing the double fusion reaction in the quasifree scattering mode. The measurements were performed with the WASA detector setup at COSY. The data reveal substantial analyzing powers and confirm conclusions about the d* resonance obtained from unpolarized measurements. We also confirm the previous unpolarized data obtained under complementary kinematic conditions. (orig.)

  1. Mechanism of the electrochemical hydrogen reaction on smooth tungsten carbide and tungsten electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiesener, K.; Winkler, E.; Schneider, W.

    1985-01-01

    The course of the electrochemical hydrogen reaction on smooth tungsten-carbide electrodes in hydrogen saturated 2.25 M H 2 SO 4 follows a electrochemical sorption-desorption mechanism in the potential range of -0.4 to +0.1 V. At potentials greater than +0.1 V the hydrogen oxidation is controlled by a preliminary chemical sorption step. Concluding from the similar behaviour of tungsten-carbide and tungsten electrodes after cathodic pretreatment, different tungsten oxides should be involved in the course of the hydrogen reaction on tungsten carbide electrodes. (author)

  2. Mechanisms of reactions of organoaluminium compounds with alkenes and alkynes catalyzed by Zr complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parfenova, L V; Khalilov, Leonard M; Dzhemilev, Usein M

    2012-01-01

    The results of studies dealing with mechanisms of hydro-, carbo- and cycloalumination of alkenes and alkynes catalyzed by zirconium complexes are generalized and systematized for the first time. Data about the structures of intermediates responsible for the formation of the target compounds are presented and the available data on the effect of the structure of organoaluminium compounds and the electronic and steric factors determining the catalytic activity of metal complexes in these reactions are considered in detail. Much attention is paid to studies of the influence of reaction conditions on the chemo-, regio- and stereoselectivity of the Zr-containing complex catalysts. The bibliography includes 217 references.

  3. Biogenesis of Triterpene Dimers from Orthoquinones Related to Quinonemethides: Theoretical Study on the Reaction Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Quesadas-Rojas

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The biogenetic origin of triterpene dimers from the Celastraceae family has been proposed as assisted hetero-Diels-Alder reaction (HDA. In this work, computational calculation of HDA between natural quinonemethides (tingenone and isopristimerol and hypothetical orthoquinones has been performed at the M06-2X/6-31G(d level of theory. We have located all the HDA transition states supporting the biogenetic route via HDA cycloadditions. We found that all reactions take place through a concerted inverse electron demand and asynchronous mechanism. The enzymatic assistance for dimer formation was analyzed in terms of the calculated transition state energy barrier.

  4. Mechanism and kinetics in reactions of caffeic acid with radicals by pulse radiolysis and calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Xifeng; Cai, Zhongli; Katsumura, Yosuke

    2000-01-01

    The interaction of caffeic acid with e aq - , (CH 3 ) 2 (OH) CCH 2 · , CO 2 ·- , H · , ·OH and N 3 · radicals were studied by γ-, pulse radiolysis and molecular orbital calculation. UV-visible spectra of electron/·OH adducts, semi-quinone radicals of caffeic ions, and the stable products from the reactions were derived. The rate constants were determined. The attacked sites and the most favorable structures of the transient radicals were predicted. Reaction mechanisms were proposed. (author)

  5. Study of reaction mechanism for 12C(14N, 6Li) by angular correlation measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldberg, V.Z.; Golovkov, M.S.; Rogatchev, G.V.; Barrov, S.P.; Zurmuhle, R.W.; Liu, Z.; Benton, D.R.; Miao, Y.; Lee, C.; Wimer, N.G.; Murgatroyd, J.T.; Li, X.

    1999-01-01

    An angular correlation for the reaction 12 C ( 14 N, 6 Li) 20 Ne* (α) populating the 8.78 MeV (6 + ) level in 20 Ne is measured at 48 MeV incident 14 N energy. 6 Li is registered for 0-degree geometry in coincidence with α particles from the 20 Ne excited state decay. The results shows that 20% was the upper limit for the contribution of compound nucleus formation. Possible main direct mechanisms of the reaction are discussed [ru

  6. Contribution of 194.1 keV Resonance to 17O(p, alpha) 14N Reaction Rate using R Matrix Code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chafa, A.; Messili, F.Z.; Barhoumi, S.

    2009-01-01

    Knowledge of the 17 O(p, alpha ) 14 N reaction rates is required for evaluating elemental abundances in a number of hydrogen - burning stellar sites. This reaction is specifically very important for nucleosynthesis of the rare oxygen isotope 17 O. Classical novae are thought to be a major source of 17 O in the Galaxy and produce the short-live radioisotope 18 F whose + decay is followed by a gamma ray emission which could be observed with satellites such as the Integral observatory. As the 17 O(p, alpha) 14 N and 17 O(p, alpha ) 18 F reactions govern the destruction of 17 O and the formation of 1 '8F, their rates are decisive in determining the final abundances of these isotopes. Stellar temperatures of primary importance for nucleosynthesis are typically in the ranges T = 0.01-0.1 GK for red giant, AGB, and massive stars, and T 0.01-0.4 GK for classical nova explosions In recent work, we observed, for the first time, a resonance a 183.3 keV corresponding to level in 18 F at Ex 5789.8 ± 0.3 keV. A new astrophysical parameters of this resonance are found. In this work we study this reaction using numerical code based on R matrix method including the new values of level energy and parameters of 183.3 keV resonance in order to show his contribution to 17 O(p, alpha) 14 N reaction rates. We also use old parameters values of this resonance given in Keiser work for comparison. We show that this resonance predominate the reaction rates in all range of stellar temperature for classical nova explosions. This is in good agreement with our work with experimental method. We also study cross section and differential cross section 17 O(p, alpha ) 14 N reaction with R matrix method

  7. Redox reactions of cytochrome c in isolated mitochondria exposed to blue or red lasers using resonance Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denton, Michael L.; Gonzalez, Cherry C.; Noojin, Gary D.; Yakovlev, Vladislav V.

    2018-02-01

    Resonance Raman spectroscopy of cytochrome c was used to follow reduction/oxidation (redox) states of isolated mitochondria in response to blue or red laser exposure. Mitochondria were isolated from hTERT-RPE1 cells and were kept in a buffer formulation known to be conducive to electron transport chain (ETC) activity. Using either pyruvate or succinate as substrates for ETC, we found differences in the redox responses of cytochrome c for different exposure laser irradiance and excitation wavelength. We anticipate that the proposed new method will be valuable in the study of metabolic processes in mitochondria in response to low level laser exposure, and thus aid in elucidating the mechanism(s) of photobiomodulation.

  8. Separation of reaction mechanisms at low energy. Study of the reactions: 27Al(d,p) 28Al, 24Mg(d,p) 25Mg, and 24Mg(d, α) 22Na

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mermaz, M.

    1966-06-01

    The two sets of angular distributions of (d,p) reactions on Al and Mg, measured between 2 and 6 MeV, have given the possibility to test, in analysing the statistical fluctuations of cross-section, the validity of the separation of their mean values in two parts, one 'direct', another given by the statistical mechanism. With the same method of analysis we have studied excitation functions for several alpha groups of the reaction 24 Mg(d, α) 22 Na and given an evidence for an intermediate structure for the alpha channel leading to the 3. excited state of 22 Na. The angular distribution of the wide resonance at 15.9 MeV in 26 Al has been obtained. (author) [fr

  9. On final-state interaction in d - NN reaction in the (1236) - resonance region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aznauryan, I.G.; Nagorskaya, I.A.

    1975-01-01

    The spectator model is corrected due to scattering of particles in the final state. It is shown that the discrepancies between the data for γd→u 0 π + uu and γd→u 0 pn and the predictions from the spectator model are mainly due to the nucleon-nucleon scattering in the final state. By means of a generally used evaluation procedure for the experimental data it is shown that the reaction cross sections of γu→π 0 u and γu→ - p, which are obtained from the experiments with deuterons, are not very sensitive to these corrections will have no influence on conclusions concerning the exotic properties of the electromagnetic current

  10. Compositional analysis of silicon nitride films on Si and GaAs by backscattering spectrometry and nuclear resonance reaction analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Sanjiv; Raju, V.S.

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the application of proton and α-backscattering spectrometry for the determination of atomic ratio of Si to N in 1100-5000 A silicon nitride films on Si and GaAs. The conventional α-Rutherford backscattering spectrometry is suitable for the analysis of films on Si; it is rather inadequate for films on GaAs due to higher background from the substrate. It is shown that these films can be analysed by 14 N(α,α) 14 N scattering with 3.5 MeV α-particles. Proton elastic scattering with enhanced cross sections for 28 Si(p,p) 28 Si and 14 N(p,p) 14 N scatterings, is also suitable for analysing films on GaAs. However, the analysis of films on Si by this technique is difficult due to interferences between the signals of Si from the film and the substrate. In addition, the hydrogen content in films is determined by 1 H( 19 F,αγ) 16 O nuclear reaction analysis using the resonance at 6.4 MeV. The combination of backscattering spectrometry with nuclear reaction analysis provides compositional analysis of ternary Si 1-(x+y) N x H y films

  11. Isomeric ratios in photonuclear reactions of molybdenum isotopes induced by bremsstrahlung in the giant dipole resonance region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tran Duc Thiep; Truong Thi An; Phan Viet Cuong; Nguyen The Vinh; Bui Minh Hue; Belov, A.G.; Maslov, O.D.; Mishinsky, G.V.; Zhemenik, V.I.

    2017-01-01

    We have determined the isomeric ratios of isomeric pairs "9"7"m","gNb, "9"5"m","gNb and "9"1"m","gMo produced in "9"8Mo(γ, p)"9"7"m","gNb, "9"6Mo(γ, p)"9"5"m","gNb and "9"2Mo(γ, n)"9"1"m","gMo photonuclear reactions in the giant dipole resonance (GDR) region by the activation method. The results were analyzed, discussed and compared with the similar data from literature to examine the role of excitation energy, neutron configuration, channel effect, and direct and pre-equilibrium processes in (γ, p) photonuclear reactions. In this work the isomeric ratios for "9"7"m","gNb from 14 to 19 MeV, for "1"9"5"m","gNb from 14 to 24 MeV except 20 and 23.5 MeV and for "9"1"m","gMo at 14 and 15 MeV were first measured.

  12. A reaction mechanism for gasoline surrogate fuels for large polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    KAUST Repository

    Raj, Abhijeet

    2012-02-01

    This work aims to develop a reaction mechanism for gasoline surrogate fuels (n-heptane, iso-octane and toluene) with an emphasis on the formation of large polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Starting from an existing base mechanism for gasoline surrogate fuels with the largest chemical species being pyrene (C 16H 10), this new mechanism is generated by adding PAH sub-mechanisms to account for the formation and growth of PAHs up to coronene (C 24H 12). The density functional theory (DFT) and the transition state theory (TST) have been adopted to evaluate the rate constants for several PAH reactions. The mechanism is validated in the premixed laminar flames of n-heptane, iso-octane, benzene and ethylene. The characteristics of PAH formation in the counterflow diffusion flames of iso-octane/toluene and n-heptane/toluene mixtures have also been tested for both the soot formation and soot formation/oxidation flame conditions. The predictions of the concentrations of large PAHs in the premixed flames having available experimental data are significantly improved with the new mechanism as compared to the base mechanism. The major pathways for the formation of large PAHs are identified. The test of the counterflow diffusion flames successfully predicts the PAH behavior exhibiting a synergistic effect observed experimentally for the mixture fuels, irrespective of the type of flame (soot formation flame or soot formation/oxidation flame). The reactions that lead to this synergistic effect in PAH formation are identified through the rate-of-production analysis. © 2011 The Combustion Institute.

  13. Development of the Automatic Modeling System for Reaction Mechanisms Using REX+JGG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Takahiro; Kawai, Kohei; Nakai, Hiroyuki; Ema, Yoshinori

    The identification of appropriate reaction models is very helpful for developing chemical vapor deposition (CVD) processes. In this study, we developed an automatic modeling system that analyzes experimental data on the cross- sectional shapes of films deposited on substrates with nanometer- or micrometer-sized trenches. The system then identifies a suitable reaction model to describe the film deposition. The inference engine used by the system to model the reaction mechanism was designed using real-coded genetic algorithms (RCGAs): a generation alternation model named "just generation gap" (JGG) and a real-coded crossover named "real-coded ensemble crossover" (REX). We studied the effect of REX+JGG on the system's performance, and found that the system with REX+JGG was the most accurate and reliable at model identification among the algorithms that we studied.

  14. [Mechanism of reaction catalyzed by RNA-ligase from bacteriophage T4].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagrebel'nyĭ, S N; Zernov, Iu P

    1987-01-01

    The dissociation constants of the complexes of RNA-ligase with acceptors, donors and the adenylylated donor A(5')ppAp have been determined on the basis of the inhibition of ATP-pyrophosphate exchange reaction. The dissociation constants of the complexes of the enzyme with "poor" acceptors (oligouridilates) have been shown to be slightly different from those with "good" acceptors (oligoadenylates). The dependence of the reaction velocity of the formation of ligation products on the concentration of acceptors (pA)4, (pU)4 and the adenylylated donor A(5)ppAp has been studied. On the basis of the data obtained the conclusion about the random addition mechanism has been drawn. The reaction takes place in the steady-state conditions in the case of (pA)4 and in the equilibrium conditions--in the case of (pU)4.

  15. A Density Functional Theory Study on the Reaction Mechanism of Terpinolene with O{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hahkjoon [Duksung Women' s University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    The energies of chemical species involved in the early stage of the reaction of terpinolene with ozone were calculated to understand the oxidation mechanism of terpinolene with atmospheric O{sub 2} and NO determined experimentally. All the quantum calculations for geometry optimization and frequency calculations in this study were carried out using B3LYP with the 6-31G(d,p) basis (Gaussian 03 software package). In conclusion, quantum chemical calculations were performed to obtain the relative energies and energy barriers for the early stage of the reaction pathways of terpinolene with ozone. The branching ratio for pathways 3 and 4 determined experimentally is in qualitative agreement with the current calculations. The results of these calculations are important for assessing the relative stabilities of the intermediates in the reaction of terpinolene with ozone although detailed RRKM calculations are still needed to fully understand the branching ratios of the final products.

  16. Trampoline Resonator Fabrication for Tests of Quantum Mechanics at High Mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Matthew; Pepper, Brian; Sonin, Petro; Eerkens, Hedwig; Buters, Frank; de Man, Sven; Bouwmeester, Dirk

    2014-03-01

    There has been much interest recently in optomechanical devices that can reach the ground state. Two requirements for achieving ground state cooling are high optical finesse in the cavity and high mechanical quality factor. We present a set of trampoline resonator devices using high stress silicon nitride and superpolishing of mirrors with sufficient finesse (as high as 60,000) and quality factor (as high as 480,000) for ground state cooling in a dilution refrigerator. These devices have a higher mass, between 80 and 100 ng, and lower frequency, between 200 and 500 kHz, than other devices that have been cooled to the ground state, enabling tests of quantum mechanics at a larger mass scale.

  17. Release mechanisms of acetaminophen from polyethylene oxide/polyethylene glycol matrix tablets utilizing magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajiri, Tomokazu; Morita, Shigeaki; Sakamoto, Ryosaku; Suzuki, Masazumi; Yamanashi, Shigeyuki; Ozaki, Yukihiro; Kitamura, Satoshi

    2010-08-16

    Release mechanism of acetaminophen (AAP) from extended-release tablets of hydrogel polymer matrices containing polyethylene oxide (PEO) and polyethylene glycol (PEG) were achieved using flow-through cell with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The hydrogel forming abilities are observed characteristically and the layer thickness which is corresponding to the diffusion length of AAP has a good correlation with the drug release profiles. In addition, polymeric erosion contribution to AAP releasing from hydrogel matrix tablets was directly quantified using size-exclusion chromatography (SEC). The matrix erosion profile indicates that the PEG erosion kinetic depends primarily on the composition ratio of PEG to PEO. The present study has confirmed that the combination of in situ MRI and SEC should be well suited to investigate the drug release mechanisms of hydrogel matrix such as PEO/PEG. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Partly Duffing Oscillator Stochastic Resonance Method and Its Application on Mechanical Fault Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Dang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the fact that the slight fault signals in early failure of mechanical system are usually submerged in heavy background noise, it is unfeasible to extract the weak fault feature via the traditional vibration analysis. Stochastic resonance (SR, as a method of utilizing noise to amplify weak signals in nonlinear dynamical systems, can detect weak signals overwhelmed in the noise. However, based on the analysis of the impact of noise intensity on SR effect, it is concluded that the detection results are dramatically limited by the noise intensity of measured signals, especially for incipient fault feature of mechanical system with poor working environment. Therefore, this paper proposes a partly Duffing oscillator SR method to extract the fault feature of mechanical system. In this method, to locate the appearance of weak fault feature and decrease noise intensity, the permutation entropy index is constructed to select the measured signals for the input of Duffing oscillator system. Then, according to the regulation of system parameters, a reasonable match between the selected signals and Duffing oscillator model is achieved to produce a SR phenomenon and realize the fault diagnosis of mechanical system. Experiment results demonstrate that the proposed method achieves a better effect on the fault diagnosis of mechanical system.

  19. Prediction of Mechanism and Thermochemical Properties of O3 + H2S Atmospheric Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morteza Vahedpour

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ozone and hydrogen sulfide reaction mechanism including a complex was studied at the B3LYP/6-311++G(3df,3pd and CCSD/6-311++G(3df,3pd//B3LYP/6-311++G(3df,3pd levels of computation. The interaction between sulfur atom of hydrogen sulfide and terminal oxygen atom of ozone produces a stable H2S-O3 complex with no barrier. With the decomposition of this complex, four possible product channels have been found. Intrinsic reaction coordinate, topological analyses of atom in molecule, and vibrational frequency calculation have been used to confirm the suggested mechanism. Thermodynamic data at T = 298.15 K and the atmospheric pressure have been calculated. The results show that the production of H2O + SO2 is the main reaction channel with ΔG° = −645.84 kJ/mol. Rate constants of H2S + O3 reaction show two product channels, SO2 + H2O and HSO + HOO, which compete with each other based on the temperature.

  20. An experimental and theoretical study of reaction mechanisms between nitriles and hydroxylamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vörös, Attila; Mucsi, Zoltán; Baán, Zoltán; Timári, Géza; Hermecz, István; Mizsey, Péter; Finta, Zoltán

    2014-10-28

    The industrially relevant reaction between nitriles and hydroxylamine yielding amidoximes was studied in different molecular solvents and in ionic liquids. In industry, this procedure is carried out on the ton scale in alcohol solutions and the above transformation produces a significant amount of unexpected amide by-product, depending on the nature of the nitrile, which can cause further analytical and purification issues. Although there were earlier attempts to propose mechanisms for this transformation, the real reaction pathway is still under discussion. A new detailed reaction mechanistic explanation, based on theoretical and experimental proof, is given to augment the former mechanisms, which allowed us to find a more efficient, side-product free procedure. Interpreting the theoretical results obtained, it was shown that the application of specific imidazolium, phosphonium and quaternary ammonium based ionic liquids could decrease simultaneously the reaction time while eliminating the amide side-product, leading to the targeted product selectively. This robust and economic procedure now affords a fast, selective amide free synthesis of amidoximes.

  1. Elucidation of reaction mechanism for m -cresol hydrodeoxygenation over Fe based catalysts: A kinetic study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Yongchun; Wang, Yong

    2017-09-01

    Fe based catalysts are promising for hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) of lignin derived phenolics due to their high selectivity for aromatics. In this work, the reaction mechanism of m-cresol HDO on Fe catalysts and the kinetic consequence with Pd addition were elucidated by examining the effect of H2, H2O and m-cresol pressures on toluene formation rate on Fe and PdFe catalysts. A direct CO bond cleavage mechanism is proposed for HDO catalysis on both Fe and PdFe catalysts, while Pd provides a facilitated reaction pathway at the PdFe interface and therefore promotes the catalysis on Fe without changing the high selectivity towards aromatics.

  2. Light particle emission as a probe of reaction mechanism and nuclear excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerreau, D.

    1989-01-01

    The central part of these lectures will be dealing with the problem of energy dissipation. A good understanding of the mechanisms for the dissipation requires to study both peripheral and central collisions or, in other words, to look at the impact paramenter dependence. This should also provide valuable information on the time scale. In order to probe the reaction mechanism and nuclear excitation, one of the most powerful tool is unquestionably the observation of light particle emission, including neutrons and charged particles. Several examples will be discussed related to peripheral collisions (the fate of transfer reactions, the excitation energy generation, the production of projectile-like fragments) as well as inner collisions for which extensive studies have demonstrated the strength of intermediate energy heavy ions for the production of very hot nuclei and detailed study of their decay properties

  3. Quantum mechanical reactive scattering theory for simple chemical reactions: Recent developments in methodology and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, W.H.

    1989-08-01

    It has recently been discovered that the S-matrix version of the Kohn variational principle is free of the ''Kohn anomalies'' that have plagued other versions and prevented its general use. This has made a major contribution to heavy particle reactive (and also to electron-atom/molecule) scattering which involve non-local (i.e., exchange) interactions that prevent solution of the coupled channel equations by propagation methods. This paper reviews the methodology briefly and presents a sample of integral and differential cross sections that have been obtained for the H + H 2 → H 2 +H and D + H 2 → HD + H reactions in the high energy region (up to 1.2 eV translational energy) relevant to resonance structures reported in recent experiments. 35 refs., 11 figs

  4. Theoretical studies of mechanisms of cycloaddition reaction between difluoromethylene carbene and acetone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiu Hui; Yu, Hai Bin; Wu, Wei Rong; Xu, Yue Hua

    Mechanisms of the cycloaddition reaction between singlet difluoromethylene carbene and acetone have been investigated with the second-order Møller-Plesset (MP2)/6-31G* method, including geometry optimization and vibrational analysis. Energies for the involved stationary points on the potential energy surface (PES) are corrected by zero-point energy (ZPE) and CCSD(T)/6-31G* single-point calculations. From the PES obtained with the CCSD(T)//MP2/6-31G* method for the cycloaddition reaction between singlet difluoromethylene carbene and acetone, it can be predicted that path B of reactions 2 and 3 should be two competitive leading channels of the cycloaddition reaction between difluoromethylene carbene and acetone. The former consists of two steps: (i) the two reactants first form a four-membered ring intermediate, INT2, which is a barrier-free exothermic reaction of 97.8 kJ/mol; (ii) the intermediate INT2 isomerizes to a four-membered product P2b via a transition state TS2b with an energy barrier of 24.9 kJ/mol, which results from the methyl group transfer. The latter proceeds in three steps: (i) the two reactants first form an intermediate, INT1c, through a barrier-free exothermic reaction of 199.4 kJ/mol; (ii) the intermediate INT1c further reacts with acetone to form a polycyclic intermediate, INT3, which is also a barrier-free exothermic reaction of 27.4 kJ/mol; and (iii) INT3 isomerizes to a polycyclic product P3 via a transition state TS3 with an energy barrier of 25.8 kJ/mol.

  5. Drift mechanism of mass transfer on heterogeneous reaction in crystalline silicon substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kukushkin, S.A. [Institute of Problems of Mechanical Engineering, Russian Academy of Science, St Petersburg, 199178 (Russian Federation); St. Petersburg National Research University of Information Technologies, Mechanics and Optics, 197101 (Russian Federation); Osipov, A.V., E-mail: Andrey.V.Osipov@gmail.com [Institute of Problems of Mechanical Engineering, Russian Academy of Science, St Petersburg, 199178 (Russian Federation); St. Petersburg National Research University of Information Technologies, Mechanics and Optics, 197101 (Russian Federation)

    2017-05-01

    This work aims to study the pressure dependence of the thickness of the epitaxial silicon carbide film growing from crystalline silicon due to the heterogeneous reaction with gaseous carbon monoxide. It turned out that this dependence exhibits the clear maximum. On further pressure increasing the film thickness decreases. The theoretical model has been developed which explains such a character of the dependence by the fact that the gaseous silicon monoxide reaction product inhibits the drift of the gaseous reagent through the channels of a crystal lattice, thus decreasing their hydraulic diameter. In the proposed hydraulic model, the dependences of the film thickness both on the gas pressure and time have been calculated. It was shown that not only the qualitative but also quantitative correspondence between theoretical and experimental results takes place. As one would expect, due to the Einstein relation, at short growth times the drift model coincides with the diffusion one. Consequences of this drift mechanism of epitaxial film growing are discussed. - Graphical abstract: This work aims to study the pressure dependence of the thickness of the epitaxial silicon carbide film growing from crystalline silicon due to the heterogeneous reaction with gaseous carbon monoxide. It turned out that this dependence exhibits the clear maximum. On further pressure increasing the film thickness decreases. The theoretical model has been developed which explains such a character of the dependence by the fact that the gaseous silicon monoxide reaction product inhibits the drift of the gaseous reagent through the channels of a crystal lattice, thus decreasing their hydraulic diameter. - Highlights: • It is established that the greater pressure, the smaller is the reaction rate. • The reaction product prevents penetration of the reagent into a reaction zone. • For description the hydraulic model of crystal lattice channels is developed. • Theoretical results for polytropic

  6. Reaction mechanism of hydroxymaleimide induced by γ-irradiation in alcohol solvents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, Seiko

    2010-01-01

    Methanol and 2-propanol solutions of hydroxymaleimide were irradiated with γ-ray and mechanism of its γ-irradiation-induced reactions was investigated through final-product analyses using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled with mass spectroscopy. An addition reaction of a solvent radical toward hydroxymaleimide was dominant among its oxygen-free γ-irradiation-induced reactions in its alcohol solutions while it is known that electron attachment toward hydroxyphthalimide or hydroxysuccinimide is dominant among their γ-irradiation-induced reactions. The radical adduct abstracts hydrogen from solvent molecule to re-produce a solvent radical. Therefore, the degradation efficiency of hydroxymaleimide was more than ten times larger than that of hydroxyphthalimide and hydroxysuccinimide. Dimer was also produced through electron attachment process in the solutions of hydroxymaleimide. In addition, it was found that the degradation efficiency increased with decrease in dose rate. An additional reaction of a solvent radical toward hydroxymaleimide competes with a radical-radical recombination. The latter was reduced, with the former leading to efficient degradation of hydroxymaleimide increased by irradiation at lower dose rate. On the contrary, the production yield of the adduct radical as well as the degradation efficiency of hydroxymaleimide was inhibited in the presence of oxygen.

  7. Reaction mechanism of hydroxymaleimide induced by γ-irradiation in alcohol solvents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, Seiko

    2010-01-01

    Methanol and 2-propanol solutions of hydroxymaleimide were irradiated with γ-ray and mechanism of its γ-irradiation-induced reactions was investigated through final-product analyses using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled with mass spectroscopy. An addition reaction of a solvent radical toward hydroxymaleimide was dominant among its oxygen-free γ-irradiation-induced reactions in its alcohol solutions while it is known that electron attachment toward hydroxyphthalimide or hydroxysuccinimide is dominant among their γ-irradiation-induced reactions. The radical adduct abstracts hydrogen from solvent molecule to re-produce a solvent radical. Therefore, the degradation efficiency of hydroxymaleimide was more than 10 times larger than that of hydroxyphthalimide and hydroxysuccinimide. Dimer was also produced through electron attachment process in the solutions of hydroxymaleimide. In addition, it was found that the degradation efficiency increased with decreasing the dose rate. An addition reaction of a solvent radical toward hydroxymaleimide competes with a radical-radical recombination. The latter was reduced and the former leading to efficient degradation of hydroxymaleimide increased by irradiation at lower dose rate. On the contrary, the production yield of the adduct radical as well as the degradation efficiency of hydroxymaleimide was inhibited in the presence of oxygen.

  8. Investigation of organometallic reaction mechanisms with one and two dimensional vibrational spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cahoon, James Francis [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2008-12-01

    One and two dimensional time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy has been used to investigate the elementary reactions of several prototypical organometallic complexes in room temperature solution. The electron transfer and ligand substitution reactions of photogenerated 17-electron organometallic radicals CpW(CO)3 and CpFe(CO)2 have been examined with one dimensional spectroscopy on the picosecond through microsecond time-scales, revealing the importance of caging effects and odd-electron intermediates in these reactions. Similarly, an investigation of the photophysics of the simple Fischer carbene complex Cr(CO)5[CMe(OMe)] showed that this class of molecule undergoes an unusual molecular rearrangement on the picosecond time-scale, briefly forming a metal-ketene complex. Although time-resolved spectroscopy has long been used for these types of photoinitiated reactions, the advent of two dimensional vibrational spectroscopy (2D-IR) opens the possibility to examine the ultrafast dynamics of molecules under thermal equilibrium conditions. Using this method, the picosecond fluxional rearrangements of the model metal carbonyl Fe(CO)5 have been examined, revealing the mechanism, time-scale, and transition state of the fluxional reaction. The success of this experiment demonstrates that 2D-IR is a powerful technique to examine the thermally-driven, ultrafast rearrangements of organometallic molecules in solution.

  9. Reaction mechanism for the free-edge oxidation of soot by O 2

    KAUST Repository

    Raj, Abhijeet; da Silva, Gabriel; Chung, Suk-Ho

    2012-01-01

    The reaction pathways for the oxidation by O 2 of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons present in soot particles are investigated using density functional theory at B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory. For this, pyrene radical (4-pyrenyl) is chosen as the model molecule, as most soot models present in the literature employ the reactions involving the conversion of 4-pyrenyl to 4-phenanthryl by O 2 and OH to account for soot oxidation. Several routes for the formation of CO and CO 2 are proposed. The addition of O 2 on a radical site to form a peroxyl radical is found to be barrierless and exothermic with reaction energy of 188kJ/mol. For the oxidation reaction to proceed further, three pathways are suggested, each of which involve the activation energies of 104, 167 and 115kJ/mol relative to the peroxyl radical. The effect of the presence of H atom on a carbon atom neighboring the radical site on the energetics of carbon oxidation is assessed. Those intermediate species formed during oxidation with seven-membered rings or with a phenolic group are found to be highly stable. The rate constants evaluated using transition state theory in the temperature range of 300-3000K for the reactions involved in the mechanism are provided. © 2012 The Combustion Institute.

  10. A Density Functional Theory Study on the Reaction Mechanism of α-Phellandrene with NO_3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hahk Joon; Park, Ji Ho

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the relative energies of the chemical species involved in the reaction of α-phellandrene with NO_3 under ambient nighttime conditions to understand the reaction pathway and identify the final products using quantum chemical calculations. The expected main oxidation products are nitrosocabonyl compounds. Although the formation of an oxirane compound is plausible, the reaction might proceed further to produce an aromatic compound. To fully understand α-phellandrene oxidation by NO_3, further study of the detailed reaction mechanism of the formation of an aromatic compound detected by the experiment is needed. Oxidations by OH radical and O_3 are major loss processes for tropospheric monoterpenes during the day. NO_3 radical, which is rapidly photolyzed by sunlight, is a dominant trophospheric oxidant at night because they react rapidly with monoterpens. Some volatile organic compounds produced by the reaction with atmospheric constituents are responsible for the formation of secondary organic aerosols that serve as cloud condensation nuclei inducing a cloud climate effect in the troposphere

  11. Reaction mechanism for the free-edge oxidation of soot by O 2

    KAUST Repository

    Raj, Abhijeet

    2012-11-01

    The reaction pathways for the oxidation by O 2 of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons present in soot particles are investigated using density functional theory at B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory. For this, pyrene radical (4-pyrenyl) is chosen as the model molecule, as most soot models present in the literature employ the reactions involving the conversion of 4-pyrenyl to 4-phenanthryl by O 2 and OH to account for soot oxidation. Several routes for the formation of CO and CO 2 are proposed. The addition of O 2 on a radical site to form a peroxyl radical is found to be barrierless and exothermic with reaction energy of 188kJ/mol. For the oxidation reaction to proceed further, three pathways are suggested, each of which involve the activation energies of 104, 167 and 115kJ/mol relative to the peroxyl radical. The effect of the presence of H atom on a carbon atom neighboring the radical site on the energetics of carbon oxidation is assessed. Those intermediate species formed during oxidation with seven-membered rings or with a phenolic group are found to be highly stable. The rate constants evaluated using transition state theory in the temperature range of 300-3000K for the reactions involved in the mechanism are provided. © 2012 The Combustion Institute.

  12. Reaction kinetics and mechanisms of organosilicon fungicide flusilazole with sulfate and hydroxyl radicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercado, D Fabio; Bracco, Larisa L B; Arques, Antonio; Gonzalez, Mónica C; Caregnato, Paula

    2018-01-01

    Flusilazole is an organosilane fungicide used for treatments in agriculture and horticulture for control of diseases. The reaction kinetics and mechanism of flusilazole with sulfate and hydroxyl radicals were studied. The rate constant of the radicals with the fungicide were determined by laser flash photolysis of peroxodisulfate and hydrogen peroxide. The results were 2.0 × 10 9 s -1 M -1 for the reaction of the fungicide with HO and 4.6 × 10 8  s -1  M -1 for the same reaction with SO 4 - radicals. The absorption spectra of organic intermediates detected by laser flash photolysis of S 2 O 8 2- with flusilazole, were identified as α-aminoalkyl and siloxyl radicals and agree very well with those estimated employing the time-dependent density functional theory with explicit account for bulk solvent effects. In the continuous photolysis experiments, performed by photo-Fenton reaction of the fungicide, the main degradation products were: (bis(4-fluorophenyl)-hydroxy-methylsilane) and the non-toxic silicic acid, diethyl bis(trimethylsilyl) ester, in ten and twenty minutes of reaction, respectively. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Modeling of the Reaction Mechanism of Enzymatic Radical C–C Coupling by Benzylsuccinate Synthase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maciej Szaleniec

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Molecular modeling techniques and density functional theory calculations were performed to study the mechanism of enzymatic radical C–C coupling catalyzed by benzylsuccinate synthase (BSS. BSS has been identified as a glycyl radical enzyme that catalyzes the enantiospecific fumarate addition to toluene initiating its anaerobic metabolism in the denitrifying bacterium Thauera aromatica, and this reaction represents the general mechanism of toluene degradation in all known anaerobic degraders. In this work docking calculations, classical molecular dynamics (MD simulations, and DFT+D2 cluster modeling was employed to address the following questions: (i What mechanistic details of the BSS reaction yield the most probable molecular model? (ii What is the molecular basis of enantiospecificity of BSS? (iii Is the proposed mechanism consistent with experimental observations, such as an inversion of the stereochemistry of the benzylic protons, syn addition of toluene to fumarate, exclusive production of (R-benzylsuccinate as a product and a kinetic isotope effect (KIE ranging between 2 and 4? The quantum mechanics (QM modeling confirms that the previously proposed hypothetical mechanism is the most probable among several variants considered, although C–H activation and not C–C coupling turns out to be the rate limiting step. The enantiospecificity of the enzyme seems to be enforced by a thermodynamic preference for binding of fumarate in the pro(R orientation and reverse preference of benzyl radical attack on fumarate in pro(S pathway which results with prohibitively high energy barrier of the radical quenching. Finally, the proposed mechanism agrees with most of the experimental observations, although the calculated intrinsic KIE from the model (6.5 is still higher than the experimentally observed values (4.0 which suggests that both C–H activation and radical quenching may jointly be involved in the kinetic control of the reaction.

  14. A coupled mechanical and chemical damage model for concrete affected by alkali–silica reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pignatelli, Rossella, E-mail: rossellapignatelli@gmail.com [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza L. da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Lombardi Ingegneria S.r.l., Via Giotto 36, 20145 Milano (Italy); Comi, Claudia, E-mail: comi@stru.polimi.it [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza L. da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Monteiro, Paulo J.M., E-mail: monteiro@ce.berkeley.edu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2013-11-15

    To model the complex degradation phenomena occurring in concrete affected by alkali–silica reaction (ASR), we formulate a poro-mechanical model with two isotropic internal variables: the chemical and the mechanical damage. The chemical damage, related to the evolution of the reaction, is caused by the pressure generated by the expanding ASR gel on the solid concrete skeleton. The mechanical damage describes the strength and stiffness degradation induced by the external loads. As suggested by experimental results, degradation due to ASR is considered to be localized around reactive sites. The effect of the degree of saturation and of the temperature on the reaction development is also modeled. The chemical damage evolution is calibrated using the value of the gel pressure estimated by applying the electrical diffuse double-layer theory to experimental values of the surface charge density in ASR gel specimens reported in the literature. The chemo-damage model is first validated by simulating expansion tests on reactive specimens and beams; the coupled chemo-mechanical damage model is then employed to simulate compression and flexure tests results also taken from the literature. -- Highlights: •Concrete degradation due to ASR in variable environmental conditions is modeled. •Two isotropic internal variables – chemical and mechanical damage – are introduced. •The value of the swelling pressure is estimated by the diffuse double layer theory. •A simplified scheme is proposed to relate macro- and microscopic properties. •The chemo-mechanical damage model is validated by simulating tests in literature.

  15. Gas-phase thermolysis reaction of formaldehyde diperoxide. Kinetic study and theoretical mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jorge, Nelly Lidia [Instituto Andaluz de Ciencias de la Tierra, CSIC-Universidad de Granada, Av. Las Palmeras 4, 18100 Armilla, Granada (Spain); Area de Quimica Fisica Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales y Agrimensura, UNNE, Avda. Libertad 5460, 3400 Corrientes (Argentina); Romero, Jorge Marcelo [Area de Quimica Fisica Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales y Agrimensura, UNNE, Avda. Libertad 5460, 3400 Corrientes (Argentina); Grand, Andre [INAC, SCIB, Laboratoire ' Lesions des Acides Nucleiques' , UMR CEA-UJF E3, CEA-Grenoble, 17 Rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble cedex 9 (France); Hernandez-Laguna, Alfonso, E-mail: ahlaguna@ugr.es [Instituto Andaluz de Ciencias de la Tierra, CSIC-Universidad de Granada, Av. Las Palmeras 4, 18100 Armilla, Granada (Spain)

    2012-01-17

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Kinetic and mechanism of the gas-phase thermolysis of tetroxane were determined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Gas chromatography and computational potential energy surfaces were performed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A mechanism in steps looked like the most probable mechanism. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A spin-orbit coupling appeared at the singlet and triple diradical open structures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A non-adiabatic crossing from the singlet to the triplet state occurred. - Abstract: Gas-phase thermolysis reaction of formaldehyde diperoxide (1,2,4,5-tetroxane) was performed in an injection chamber of a gas chromatograph at a range of 463-503 K. The average Arrhenius activation energy and pre-exponential factor were 29.3 {+-} 0.8 kcal/mol and 5.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} s{sup -1}, respectively. Critical points and reaction paths of the ground singlet and first triplet potential energy surfaces (PES) were calculated, using DFT method at BHANDHLYP/6-311+G{sup Asterisk-Operator Asterisk-Operator} level of the theory. Also, G3 calculations were performed on the reactant and products. Reaction by the ground-singlet and first-triplet states turned out to be endothermic and exothermic, respectively. The mechanism in three steps seemed to be the most probable one. An electronically non-adiabatic process appeared, in which a crossing, at an open diradical structure, from the singlet to the triplet state PES occurred, due to a spin-orbit coupling, yielding an exothermic reaction. Theoretical kinetic constant coming from the non- adiabatic transition from the singlet to the triplet state agrees with the experimental values.

  16. Concerted and stepwise mechanisms in cycloaddition reactions: potential surfaces and isotope effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houk, K.N.; Yi Li; Storer, Joey; Raimondi, Laura; Beno, Brett

    1994-01-01

    CASSCF/6-31G * calculations have been performed on concerted and stepwise Diels-Alder reactions of butadiene with ethene, the dimerization of butadiene, and the dimerization of cyclobutadiene. The relative energies of concerted and stepwise mechanisms are compared, and the factors influencing these ''energies of concert'' are discussed. The comparison of calculated isotope effects to experimental data provides support for theoretical results. (Author)

  17. Gas-phase thermolysis reaction of formaldehyde diperoxide. Kinetic study and theoretical mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jorge, Nelly Lidia; Romero, Jorge Marcelo; Grand, André; Hernández-Laguna, Alfonso

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Kinetic and mechanism of the gas-phase thermolysis of tetroxane were determined. ► Gas chromatography and computational potential energy surfaces were performed. ► A mechanism in steps looked like the most probable mechanism. ► A spin–orbit coupling appeared at the singlet and triple diradical open structures. ► A non-adiabatic crossing from the singlet to the triplet state occurred. - Abstract: Gas-phase thermolysis reaction of formaldehyde diperoxide (1,2,4,5-tetroxane) was performed in an injection chamber of a gas chromatograph at a range of 463–503 K. The average Arrhenius activation energy and pre-exponential factor were 29.3 ± 0.8 kcal/mol and 5.2 × 10 13 s −1 , respectively. Critical points and reaction paths of the ground singlet and first triplet potential energy surfaces (PES) were calculated, using DFT method at BHANDHLYP/6-311+G ∗∗ level of the theory. Also, G3 calculations were performed on the reactant and products. Reaction by the ground-singlet and first-triplet states turned out to be endothermic and exothermic, respectively. The mechanism in three steps seemed to be the most probable one. An electronically non-adiabatic process appeared, in which a crossing, at an open diradical structure, from the singlet to the triplet state PES occurred, due to a spin–orbit coupling, yielding an exothermic reaction. Theoretical kinetic constant coming from the non- adiabatic transition from the singlet to the triplet state agrees with the experimental values.

  18. Doorway states in nuclear reactions as a manifestation of the 'super-radiant' mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auerbach, N.; Zelevinsky, V.

    2007-01-01

    A mechanism is considered for generating doorway states and intermediate structure in low-energy nuclear reactions as a result of collectivization of widths of unstable intrinsic states coupled to common decay channels. At the limit of strong continuum coupling, the segregation of broad ('super-radiating') and narrow ('trapped') states occurs revealing the separation of direct and compound processes. We discuss the conditions for the appearance of intermediate structure in this process and doorways related to certain decay channels

  19. Mechanism of catalytic action of oxide systems in reactions of aldehyde oxidation to carboxylic acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrushkevich, T.V.

    1997-01-01

    Mechanism of selective action of oxide catalysts (on the base of V 2 O 4 , MoO 3 ) of aldehyde oxidation to acids is considered, reaction acrolein oxidation to acrylic acid is taken as an example. Multistage mechanism of the process is established; it involves consequent transformation of coordination-bonded aldehyde into carbonyl-bonded aldehyde and symmetric carboxylate. Principles of active surface construction are formulated, they take into account the activity of stabilization center of concrete intermediate compound and bond energy of oxygen with surface. (author)

  20. Thermal runaway reaction hazards and mechanisms of hydroxylamine with acid/base contaminants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Chunyang; Saraf, Sanjeev R.; Rogers, William J.; Sam Mannan, M.

    2004-01-01

    Hydroxylamine (HA) has been involved in two incidents since 1999 because of its thermal instability and incompatibility. In this study, thermal runaway reactions of hydroxylamine with various concentrations of KOH and HCl were studied using the reactive system screening tool (RSST) and automatic pressure tracking adiabatic calorimeter (APTAC). The thermokinetic data, such as onset temperature, heat of reaction, maximum self-heat rate, maximum pressure rate, and non-condensable gas pressure, were compared with those of hydroxylamine solution without added impurity. Our study shows that the thermal decomposition behavior of hydroxylamine is affected by the presence of acid/base, and mixing of hydroxylamine with acid/base may cause thermal decomposition at lower temperatures. Different decomposition pathways can be initiated by hydrogen ion and hydroxide ion. The decomposition mechanisms of hydroxylamine in alkaline and acidic solutions are proposed based on the products, information from the literature, and quantum mechanical calculations. The experimental results are discussed in terms of the proposed reaction mechanisms

  1. The oxidative response and viable reaction mechanism of the textile dyes by fenton reagent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masooda, Q.; Hijira, T.; Sitara, M.; Sehar, M.; Sundus, A.; Mohsin, A.

    2017-01-01

    The mechanism of the degradation of the Reactive Red 239 and Reactive Blue 19 by Fenton reagent was studied by advanced oxidation process in aqueous medium. The spectroscopic technique was adopted for the measurements of dye concentration. Moreover they were determined at 540 nm and 590 nm, respectively. Kinetics of the reaction was studied under the effect of concentration of reactive dyes, concentration of oxidant were followed under pseudo first order condition and found to influence the catalytic mechanism. The pH of the medium, vibrant response of several cations and anions and influence of ionic strength on the reaction kinetics were also monitored. Physical evidences for the degradation and mineralization of the dyes were evaluated by Lime water test, Ring Test and TLC test also confirmed the degradation of dye. Inhibitory effects of dyes were observed by CO3-, HCO3-, HPO42-, Cl-, I- Al3+ and Na+. Thermodynamic activation parameters in the oxidation reaction were studied and mode of mechanism was suggested on the basic of these parameters. This study explored the safe and eco friendly degradation of the textile dyes under Pseudo first order rate constant. It was observed that Fenton assisted degradation of the dyes under controlled conditions was found to be favorable for the treatment of textile wastewater. Moreover compared to other chemical methods it is effective and harmless to the environment. (author)

  2. Close correlation between the reaction mechanism and inner structure of loosely halo-nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jianye; Tianshui Normal Univ., Tianshui; National Laboratory of Heavy Ion Accelerator of Lanzhou, Lanzhou; Guo Wenjun; Ren Zhongzhou; National Laboratory of Heavy Ion Accelerator of Lanzhou, Lanzhou; Xing Yongzhong; National Laboratory of Heavy Ion Accelerator of Lanzhou, Lanzhou

    2006-01-01

    It was based on the comparisons of the variance properties of fragment multiplicities FM's and nuclear stoppings R's for the neutron-halo colliding system with those of FZ's and R's for the proton-halo colliding system with the increases of beam energy in more detail, the closely correlations between the reaction mechanism and the inner structures of halo-nuclei is found. From above comparisons it is found that the variance properties of fragment multiplicities and nuclear stopping with the increases of beam energy are quite different for the neutron-halo and proton halo colliding systems, such as the effects of loosely bound neutron-halo structure on the fragment multiplicities and nuclear stopping are obviously larger than those for the proton-halo colliding system. This is due to that the structures of halo-neutron nucleus 11 Li is more loosely than that of the proton-halo nucleus 23 Al. In this case, the fragment multiplicity and nuclear stopping of halo nuclei may be used as a possible probe for studying the reaction mechanism and the correlation between the reaction mechanism and the inner structure of halo-nuclei. (authors)

  3. 31 P magnetic resonance fingerprinting for rapid quantification of creatine kinase reaction rate in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Charlie Y; Liu, Yuchi; Huang, Shuying; Griswold, Mark A; Seiberlich, Nicole; Yu, Xin

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of this work was to develop a 31 P spectroscopic magnetic resonance fingerprinting (MRF) method for fast quantification of the chemical exchange rate between phosphocreatine (PCr) and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) via creatine kinase (CK). A 31 P MRF sequence (CK-MRF) was developed to quantify the forward rate constant of ATP synthesis via CK ( kfCK), the T 1 relaxation time of PCr ( T1PCr), and the PCr-to-ATP concentration ratio ( MRPCr). The CK-MRF sequence used a balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP)-type excitation with ramped flip angles and a unique saturation scheme sensitive to the exchange between PCr and γATP. Parameter estimation was accomplished by matching the acquired signals to a dictionary generated using the Bloch-McConnell equation. Simulation studies were performed to examine the susceptibility of the CK-MRF method to several potential error sources. The accuracy of nonlocalized CK-MRF measurements before and after an ischemia-reperfusion (IR) protocol was compared with the magnetization transfer (MT-MRS) method in rat hindlimb at 9.4 T (n = 14). The reproducibility of CK-MRF was also assessed by comparing CK-MRF measurements with both MT-MRS (n = 17) and four angle saturation transfer (FAST) (n = 7). Simulation results showed that CK-MRF quantification of kfCK was robust, with less than 5% error in the presence of model inaccuracies including dictionary resolution, metabolite T 2 values, inorganic phosphate metabolism, and B 1 miscalibration. Estimation of kfCK by CK-MRF (0.38 ± 0.02 s -1 at baseline and 0.42 ± 0.03 s -1 post-IR) showed strong agreement with MT-MRS (0.39 ± 0.03 s -1 at baseline and 0.44 ± 0.04 s -1 post-IR). kfCK estimation was also similar between CK-MRF and FAST (0.38 ± 0.02 s -1 for CK-MRF and 0.38 ± 0.11 s -1 for FAST). The coefficient of variation from 20 s CK-MRF quantification of kfCK was 42% of that by 150 s MT-MRS acquisition and was 12% of that by 20 s FAST

  4. Kinetics and mechanism of oxygen reduction reaction at CoPd system synthesized on XC72

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarasevich, M.R.; Chalykh, A.E.; Bogdanovskaya, V.A.; Kuznetsova, L.N.; Kapustina, N.A.; Efremov, B.N.; Ehrenburg, M.R.; Reznikova, L.A.

    2006-01-01

    Studies are presented of the kinetics and mechanism of oxygen electroreduction reaction on CoPd catalysts synthesized on carbon black XC72. As shown both in model conditions and in the tests within the cathodes of hydrogen-oxygen fuel cells with proton conducting electrolyte, CoPd/C system features a higher activity, as compared to Co/C. The highest activity in the oxygen reduction reaction is demonstrated by the catalysts with the Pd:Co atomic ratio being 7:3 and 4:1. The structural studies (XPS and XRD, and also the data of CO desorption measurements) evidence the CoPd alloy formation, which is reflected in the negative shift of the bonding energy maximum as compared to Pd/C and in the appearance of the additional CO desorption maximums on the voltammograms. It is found by means of structural research that CoPd alloy is formed in the course of the catalyst synthesis which features a higher catalytic activity of the binary systems. Besides, CoPd/C catalyst is more stable in respect to corrosion than Pd supported on carbon black. The measurements on the rotating disc electrode and rotating ring-disc electrode evidence that CoPd/C system provides the predominant oxygen reduction to water in the practically important range of potentials (E > 0.7 V). The proximity of kinetic parameters of the oxygen reduction reaction on CoPd/C and Pt/C catalysts points to the similar reaction mechanism. The slow step of the reaction is the addition of the first electron to the adsorbed and previously protonated O 2 molecule. The assumptions are offered about the reasons causing the higher activity and selectivity of the binary catalyst towards oxygen reduction to water, as compared to Co/C. The studies of the most active catalysts within the fuel cell cathodes are performed

  5. Excitation of large-amplitude parametric resonance by the mechanical stiffness modulation of a microstructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krylov, Slava; Gerson, Yuval; Nachmias, Tali; Keren, Uri

    2010-01-01

    In this work we report on an approach allowing efficient parametric excitation of large-amplitude stable oscillations of a microstructure operated by a parallel-plate electrode, and present results of a theoretical and experimental investigation of the device. The frame-type structure, fabricated from a silicon on insulator (SOI) substrate using deep reactive ion etching (DRIE), consists a pair of cantilever-type suspensions connected at their ends by a link. The time-varying electrostatic force applied to the link by a parallel-plate electrode is transformed into a periodic tension of the beams, resulting in the modulation of their flexural stiffness and consequently the mechanical parametric excitation of the structure. The lateral compliance of the beams allows for large-amplitude in-plane oscillations in the direction parallel to the electrode while high axial stiffness prevents undesirable instabilities. The lumped model of the device, considered as an assembly of geometrically nonlinear massless flexures and a rigid massive link and built using the Rayleigh–Ritz method, predicted the feasibility of the excitation approach. The fabricated devices were operated in ambient air conditions by a combination of a steady (dc) and time-dependent (ac) components of voltage and the large-amplitude responses, up to 75 µm, in the vicinity of the principal parametric and primary resonances were registered by means of video acquisition and image processing. The shapes of the experimental resonant curves were consistent with those predicted by the model. The location and size of the instability regions on the frequency–voltage plane (parametric tongues) were quantitatively in good agrement with the model results. Theoretical and experimental results indicate that the suggested approach can be efficiently used for excitation of various types of microdevices where stable resonant operation combined with robustness and large vibrational amplitudes are desirable

  6. General classical and quantum-mechanical description of magnetic resonance: an application to electric-dipole-moment experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silenko, Alexander J. [Belarusian State University, Research Institute for Nuclear Problems, Minsk (Belarus); Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Bogoliubov Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Dubna (Russian Federation)

    2017-05-15

    A general theoretical description of a magnetic resonance is presented. This description is necessary for a detailed analysis of spin dynamics in electric-dipole-moment experiments in storage rings. General formulas describing a behavior of all components of the polarization vector at the magnetic resonance are obtained for an arbitrary initial polarization. These formulas are exact on condition that the nonresonance rotating field is neglected. The spin dynamics is also calculated at frequencies far from resonance with allowance for both rotating fields. A general quantum-mechanical analysis of the spin evolution at the magnetic resonance is fulfilled and the full agreement between the classical and quantum-mechanical approaches is shown. Quasimagnetic resonances for particles and nuclei moving in noncontinuous perturbing fields of accelerators and storage rings are considered. Distinguishing features of quasimagnetic resonances in storage ring electric-dipole-moment experiments are investigated in detail. The exact formulas for the effect caused by the electric dipole moment are derived. The difference between the resonance effects conditioned by the rf electric-field flipper and the rf Wien filter is found and is calculated for the first time. The existence of this difference is crucial for the establishment of a consent between analytical derivations and computer simulations and for checking spin tracking programs. The main systematical errors are considered. (orig.)

  7. (3He,α) reaction mechanism at high energy and neutron inner shell structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiele, J. van de.

    1980-01-01

    The ( 3 He,α) reaction on 12 C, 16 O, 28 Si, 58 Ni, 90 Zr, 118 Sn, 124 Sn and 208 Pb targets has been studied at Esub( 3 He) = 217 MeV (or 205 MeV) in order to investigate the reaction mechanism at high energy and large momentum transfer. The reaction yields large cross sections at very forward angles and strongly enhances the largest orbital momentum transfer. The angular distribution shapes are well reproduced in the frame-work of the Z-R- D.W.B.A. analysis if we use a unique empirical α-potential: Vsub(α)(Esub(α)) = Vsub( 3 He)(3/4 Esub(α)) + Vsub(n)(1/4 Esub(α)). The excitation energy spectra have been measured up to 100 MeV in the residual light and medium nuclei and up to about 16 MeV in heavy nuclei. In addition to the well-known low-lying levels, peaks or broad structures are observed for each nucleus at higher excitation energies. They are attributed to pick up from inner shells: 1s( 11 C and 15 O), 1p( 27 Si), 1d5/2 + 1p( 57 Ni), 1f7/2( 89 Zr) 1g9/2 117 Sn, 123 Sn and 1h11/2( 207 Pb). Selectivity and localization of direct and indirect pick up ( 3 He,α) reactions were studied. Finite range calculations show that this reaction is not very sensitive to the details of the range from function but only to D 0 coefficient and range R. A microscopic α-nucleus optical potential calculated with n-n dependent and independent density forces is able to reproduce both elastic scattering and pick up reaction angular distributions [fr

  8. Elimination Reactions of (E)-2,4,6-Trinitrobenzaldehyde O-benzoyloximes Promoted by R2NH in MeCN. Change of Reaction Mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Bong Rae; Pyun, Sang Yong

    2010-01-01

    We have studied the nitrile-forming elimination reactions from 1 promoted by R 2 NH in MeCN. The reaction proceeded by (E1cb) irr mechanism. Change of the β-aryl group from 2,4-dinitrophenyl to a more strongly electron-withdrawing 2,4,6-trinitrophenyl increased the reaction rate by 470-fold, shifted the transition state toward more reactant-like, and changed the reaction mechanism from E2 to (E1cb) irr . To the best of our knowledge, this is the first example of nitrile-forming elimination reaction that proceeds by the (E1cb) irr mechanism in MeCN. Noteworthy is the carbanion stabilizing ability of the 2,4,6-trinitrophenyl group in aprotic solvent. Nitrile-forming elimination reactions of (E)-benzaldoxime derivatives have been extensively investigated under various conditions. The reactions proceeded by the E2 mechanism in MeCN despite the fact that the reactants have syn stereochemistry, poor leaving, and sp 2 hybridized β-carbon atom, all of which favor E1cb- or E1cb-like transition state. Moreover, the transition state structures were relatively insensitive to the variation of the reactant structures. The results have been attributed to the poor anion solvating ability of MeCN, which favors E2 transition state with maximum charge dispersal. For eliminations from strongly activated (E)-2,4-(NO 2 ) 2 C 6 H 3 CH=NOC(O)C 6 H 4 X, a change in the reaction mechanism from E2 to (E1cb) irr was observed as the base-solvent was changed from R 2 NH in MeCN to R 2 NH/R 2 NH 2 + in 70 mol % MeCN(aq). A combination of a strong electron-withdrawing β-aryl group and anion-solvating protic solvent was required for the mechanistic change

  9. Kinetics and Mechanism of the Reaction of Hydoxyl Radicals with Acetonitrile under Atmospheric Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hynes, A. J.; Wine, P. H.

    1997-01-01

    scheme to extract kinetic information about the adduct reations with O2 and branching ratios for OH regeneration. A plausible mechanism for OH regeneration in (2) involves OH addition to the nitrogen atom followed by O2 addition to the cyano carbon atom, isomeriazation and decomposition to D2CO + DOCN + OH. Our results suggest that the OH + CH3CN reaction occurs via a complex mechanism involving both bimolecular and termolecular pathways, analogous to the mechanisms for the the important atmospheric reactions of OH with CO and HNO3.

  10. Quadrature squeezing of a mechanical resonator generated by the electromechanical coupling with two coupled quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Yan [Department of Physics, Huazhong Normal University, Wuhan (China); School of Physics and Optoelectronic Engineering, Yangtze University, Jingzhou (China); Zhu, Jia-pei [Department of Physics, Honghe University, Mengzi (China); Zhao, Shao-ming; Li, Gao-xiang [Department of Physics, Huazhong Normal University, Wuhan (China)

    2015-01-01

    The quadrature squeezing of a mechanical resonator (MR) coupled with two quantum dots (QDs) through the electromechanical coupling, where the QDs are driven by a strong and two weak laser fields is investigated. By tuning the gate voltage, the electron can be trapped in a quantum pure state. Under certain conditions, the discrepancies between the transition frequency and that of two weak fields are compensated by the phonons induced by the electromechanical coupling of the MR with QDs. In this case, some dissipative processes occur resonantly. The phonons created and (or) annihilated in these dissipative processes are correlated thus leading to the quadrature squeezing of the MR. A squeezed vacuum reservoir for the MR is built up. By tuning the gate voltage to control the energy structure of the QDs, the present squeezing scheme has strong resistance against the dephasing processes of the QDs in low temperature limit. The role of the temperature of the phonon reservoir is to damage squeezing of the MR. (copyright 2014 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  11. High-resolution mechanical imaging of glioblastoma by multifrequency magnetic resonance elastography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaspar-Josche Streitberger

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To generate high-resolution maps of the viscoelastic properties of human brain parenchyma for presurgical quantitative assessment in glioblastoma (GB. METHODS: Twenty-two GB patients underwent routine presurgical work-up supplemented by additional multifrequency magnetic resonance elastography. Two three-dimensional viscoelastic parameter maps, magnitude |G*|, and phase angle φ of the complex shear modulus were reconstructed by inversion of full wave field data in 2-mm isotropic resolution at seven harmonic drive frequencies ranging from 30 to 60 Hz. RESULTS: Mechanical brain maps confirmed that GB are composed of stiff and soft compartments, resulting in high intratumor heterogeneity. GB could be easily differentiated from healthy reference tissue by their reduced viscous behavior quantified by φ (0.37±0.08 vs. 0.58±0.07. |G*|, which in solids more relates to the material's stiffness, was significantly reduced in GB with a mean value of 1.32±0.26 kPa compared to 1.54±0.27 kPa in healthy tissue (P = 0.001. However, some GB (5 of 22 showed increased stiffness. CONCLUSION: GB are generally less viscous and softer than healthy brain parenchyma. Unrelated to the morphology-based contrast of standard magnetic resonance imaging, elastography provides an entirely new neuroradiological marker and contrast related to the biomechanical properties of tumors.

  12. Advances in quantum and molecular mechanical (QM/MM) simulations for organic and enzymatic reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo, Orlando; Jorgensen, William L

    2010-01-19

    Application of combined quantum and molecular mechanical (QM/MM) methods focuses on predicting activation barriers and the structures of stationary points for organic and enzymatic reactions. Characterization of the factors that stabilize transition structures in solution and in enzyme active sites provides a basis for design and optimization of catalysts. Continued technological advances allowed for expansion from prototypical cases to mechanistic studies featuring detailed enzyme and condensed-phase environments with full integration of the QM calculations and configurational sampling. This required improved algorithms featuring fast QM methods, advances in computing changes in free energies including free-energy perturbation (FEP) calculations, and enhanced configurational sampling. In particular, the present Account highlights development of the PDDG/PM3 semi-empirical QM method, computation of multi-dimensional potentials of mean force (PMF), incorporation of on-the-fly QM in Monte Carlo (MC) simulations, and a polynomial quadrature method for efficient modeling of proton-transfer reactions. The utility of this QM/MM/MC/FEP methodology is illustrated for a variety of organic reactions including substitution, decarboxylation, elimination, and pericyclic reactions. A comparison to experimental kinetic results on medium effects has verified the accuracy of the QM/MM approach in the full range of solvents from hydrocarbons to water to ionic liquids. Corresponding results from ab initio and density functional theory (DFT) methods with continuum-based treatments of solvation reveal deficiencies, particularly for protic solvents. Also summarized in this Account are three specific QM/MM applications to biomolecular systems: (1) a recent study that clarified the mechanism for the reaction of 2-pyrone derivatives catalyzed by macrophomate synthase as a tandem Michael-aldol sequence rather than a Diels-Alder reaction, (2) elucidation of the mechanism of action of fatty

  13. Diagnostic performance of magnetic resonance imaging in the assessment of periosteal reactions in bone sarcomas using conventional radiography as the reference

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sá Neto, José Luiz; Simão, Marcelo Novelino; Crema, Michel Daoud; Engel, Edgard Eduard; Nogueira-Barbosa, Marcello Henrique

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the performance of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in detecting periosteal reactions and to compare MRI and conventional radiography (CR) in terms of the classification of periosteal reactions. Materials and Methods: Retrospective study of 42 consecutive patients (mean age, 22 years; 20 men) with a confirmed diagnosis of osteosarcoma or Ewing's sarcoma, MRI and CR images having been acquired pretreatment. Three blinded radiologists detected periosteal reactions and evaluated each periosteal reaction subtype in CR and MRI images: Codman's triangle; laminated; and spiculated. The CR was used as a benchmark to calculate the diagnostic performance. We used the kappa coefficient to assess interobserver reproducibility. A two-tailed Fisher's exact test was used in order to assess contingency between CR and MRI classifications. Results: In the detection of periosteal reactions, MRI showed high specificity, a high negative predictive value, and low-to-moderate sensitivity. For CR and for MRI, the interobserver agreement for periosteal reaction was almost perfect, whereas, for the classification of different subtypes of periosteal reaction, it was higher for the Codman's triangle subtype and lower for the spiculated subtype. There was no significant difference between MRI and CR in terms of the classifications (p < 0.05). Conclusion: We found no difference between MRI and CR in terms of their ability to classify periosteal reactions. MRI showed high specificity and almost perfect interobserver agreement for the detection of periosteal reactions. The interobserver agreement was variable for the different subtypes of periosteal reaction. PMID:28670029

  14. Diagnostic performance of magnetic resonance imaging in the assessment of periosteal reactions in bone sarcomas using conventional radiography as the reference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luiz de Sá Neto

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To evaluate the performance of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI in detecting periosteal reactions and to compare MRI and conventional radiography (CR in terms of the classification of periosteal reactions. Materials and Methods: Retrospective study of 42 consecutive patients (mean age, 22 years; 20 men with a confirmed diagnosis of osteosarcoma or Ewing's sarcoma, MRI and CR images having been acquired pretreatment. Three blinded radiologists detected periosteal reactions and evaluated each periosteal reaction subtype in CR and MRI images: Codman's triangle; laminated; and spiculated. The CR was used as a benchmark to calculate the diagnostic performance. We used the kappa coefficient to assess interobserver reproducibility. A two-tailed Fisher's exact test was used in order to assess contingency between CR and MRI classifications. Results: In the detection of periosteal reactions, MRI showed high specificity, a high negative predictive value, and low-to-moderate sensitivity. For CR and for MRI, the interobserver agreement for periosteal reaction was almost perfect, whereas, for the classification of different subtypes of periosteal reaction, it was higher for the Codman's triangle subtype and lower for the spiculated subtype. There was no significant difference between MRI and CR in terms of the classifications (p < 0.05. Conclusion: We found no difference between MRI and CR in terms of their ability to classify periosteal reactions. MRI showed high specificity and almost perfect interobserver agreement for the detection of periosteal reactions. The interobserver agreement was variable for the different subtypes of periosteal reaction.

  15. Reaction mechanisms in the radiolysis of peptides, polypeptides and proteins II reactions at side-chain loci in model systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garrison, W.M.

    1983-11-01

    The major emphasis in radiation biology at the molecular level has been on the nucleic acid component of the nucleic acid-protein complex because of its primary genetic importance. But there is increasing evidence that radiation damage to the protein component also has important biological implications. Damage to capsid protein now appears to be a major factor in the radiation inactivation of phage and other viruses. And, there is increasing evidence that radiation-chemical change in the protein component of chromation leads to changes in the stability of the repressor-operator complexes involved in gene expression. Knowledge of the radiation chemistry of protein is also of importance in other fields such as the application of radiation sterilization to foods and drugs. Recent findings that a class of compounds, the α,α'-diaminodicarboxylic acids, not normally present in food proteins, are formed in protein radiolysis is of particular significance since certain of their peptide derivatives have been showing to exhibit immunological activity. The purpose of this review is to bring together and to correlate our present knowledge of products and mechanisms in the radiolysis of peptides, polypeptides and proteins both aqueous and solid-state. In part 1 we presented a discussion of the radiation-induced reactions of the peptide main-chain in model peptide and polypeptide systems. Here in part 2 the emphasis is on the competing radiation chemistry at side-chain loci of peptide derivatives of aliphatic, aromatic-unsaturated and sulfur-containing amino acids in similar systems. Information obtained with the various experimental techniques of product analysis, competition kinetics, spin-trapping, pulse radiolysis, and ESR spectroscopy are included

  16. Theoretical Research on the Mechanism of the Dimerization Reactions of Alkyl Ketene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiguo Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A quantum chemical method was employed to investigate the mechanism of dimerization reactions of alkyl ketene. All the geometric configurations of the stationary points on the reactions path were optimized with Gaussian03 employing density functional theory at the B3LYP/6-311G++(d, p level by energy gradient technique. The transition states were also investigated through synchronous transit method, and its reasonability was confirmed by using frequency analysis and intrinsic reaction coordinate analysis. The results can be summed up as follows: according to the frontier orbital theory, the dimerization reaction (3 to generate four-membered carbon cyclic product P3 is forbidden. Two different dimerization processes of alkyl ketene are all concerted but nonsynchronous, taking place through twisted four-membered cyclic transition states. The activation energies were calculated to be 34.54 and 61.73 kJ/mol, respectively for the two ketene dimerization processes. Calculation results satisfactorily explained the experimental facts.

  17. Calcium-Magnesium-Aluminosilicate (CMAS) Reactions and Degradation Mechanisms of Advanced Environmental Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlborg, Nadia L.; Zhu, Dongming

    2013-01-01

    The thermochemical reactions between calcium-magnesium-aluminosilicate- (CMAS-) based road sand and several advanced turbine engine environmental barrier coating (EBC) materials were studied. The phase stability, reaction kinetics and degradation mechanisms of rare earth (RE)-silicates Yb2SiO5, Y2Si2O7, and RE-oxide doped HfO2 and ZrO2 under the CMAS infiltration condition at 1500 C were investigated, and the microstructure and phase characteristics of CMAS-EBC specimens were examined using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and X-ray Diffraction (XRD). Experimental results showed that the CMAS dissolved RE-silicates to form crystalline, highly non-stoichiometric apatite phases, and in particular attacking the silicate grain boundaries. Cross-section images show that the CMAS reacted with specimens and deeply penetrated into the EBC grain boundaries and formed extensive low-melting eutectic phases, causing grain boundary recession with increasing testing time in the silicate materials. The preliminary results also showed that CMAS reactions also formed low melting grain boundary phases in the higher concentration RE-oxide doped HfO2 systems. The effect of the test temperature on CMAS reactions of the EBC materials will also be discussed. The faster diffusion exhibited by apatite and RE-doped oxide phases and the formation of extensive grain boundary low-melting phases may limit the CMAS resistance of some of the environmental barrier coatings at high temperatures.

  18. Characteristics and mechanism of explosive reactions of Purex solvents with Nitric Acid at elevated temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyata, Teijiro [Radiation Application Development Association, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan); Takada, Junichi; Koike, Tadao; Tsukamoto, Michio; Watanabe, Koji [Department of Fuel Cycle Safety Research, Nuclear Safety Research Center, Tokai Research Establishment, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan); Ida, Masaaki [JGC PLANTECH CO., LTD (Japan); Nakagiri, Naotaka [JGC Corp., Tokyo (Japan); Nishio, Gunji [Research Organization for Information Science and Technology, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2000-03-01

    This investigation was undertaken to make clear the energetic properties and mechanism of explosive decomposition of Purex solvent systems (TBP/n-Dodecane/HNO{sub 3}) by Nitric Acid at elevated temperatures using a calorimetric technique (DSC, ARC) and a chromatographic technique (GC, GC/MS). The measurement of exothermic events of solvent-HNO{sub 3} reactions using DSC with a stainless steel sealed cell showed distinct two peaks with maxima at around 170 and 320degC, respectively. The peak at around 170degC was mainly attributed to the reactions of dealkylation products (n-butyl nitrate) of TBP and the solvent with nitric acid, and the peak at around 320degC was attributed to the exothermic decomposition of nitrated dodecanes formed in the foregoing exothermic reaction of dodecane with nitric acid. By using the data obtained in ARC experiments, activation energies of 123.2 and 152.5 kJ/mol were determined for the exothermic reaction of TBP with nitric acid and for the exothermic pyrolysis of n-butyl nitrate, respectively. Some possible pathways were considered for the explosive decomposition of TBP by nitric acid at elevated temperatures. (author)

  19. Memorable Experiences with Sad Music—Reasons, Reactions and Mechanisms of Three Types of Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltola, Henna-Riikka

    2016-01-01

    Reactions to memorable experiences of sad music were studied by means of a survey administered to a convenience (N = 1577), representative (N = 445), and quota sample (N = 414). The survey explored the reasons, mechanisms, and emotions of such experiences. Memorable experiences linked with sad music typically occurred in relation to extremely familiar music, caused intense and pleasurable experiences, which were accompanied by physiological reactions and positive mood changes in about a third of the participants. A consistent structure of reasons and emotions for these experiences was identified through exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses across the samples. Three types of sadness experiences were established, one that was genuinely negative (Grief-Stricken Sorrow) and two that were positive (Comforting Sorrow and Sweet Sorrow). Each type of emotion exhibited certain individual differences and had distinct profiles in terms of the underlying reasons, mechanisms, and elicited reactions. The prevalence of these broad types of emotional experiences suggested that positive experiences are the most frequent, but negative experiences were not uncommon in any of the samples. The findings have implications for measuring emotions induced by music and fiction in general, and call attention to the non-pleasurable aspects of these experiences. PMID:27300268

  20. Reaction between peroxynitrite and boronates: EPR spin-trapping, HPLC analyses, and quantum mechanical study of the free radical pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikora, Adam; Zielonka, Jacek; Lopez, Marcos; Dybala-Defratyka, Agnieszka; Joseph, Joy; Marcinek, Andrzej; Kalyanaraman, Balaraman

    2013-01-01

    Recently we showed that peroxynitrite (ONOO−) reacts directly and rapidly with aromatic and aliphatic boronic acids (k ≈ 106 M−1s−1). Product analyses and substrate consumption data indicated that ONOO− reacts stoichiometrically with boronates, yielding the corresponding phenols as the major product (~85–90%), and the remaining products (10–15%) were proposed to originate from free radical intermediates (phenyl and phenoxyl radicals). Here we investigated in detail the minor, free radical pathway of boronate reaction with ONOO−. The electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spin-trapping technique was used to characterize the free radical intermediates formed from the reaction between boronates and ONOO−. Using 2-methyl-2-nitrosopropane (MNP) and 5-diethoxyphosphoryl-5-methyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide (DEPMPO) spin traps, phenyl radicals were trapped and detected. Although phenoxyl radicals were not detected, the positive effects of molecular oxygen, and inhibitory effects of hydrogen atom donors (acetonitrile, and 2-propanol) and general radical scavengers (GSH, NADH, ascorbic acid and tyrosine) on the formation of phenoxyl radical-derived nitrated product, suggest that phenoxyl radical was formed as the secondary species. We propose that the initial step of the reaction involves the addition of ONOO− to the boron atom in boronates. The anionic intermediate undergoes both heterolytic (major pathway) and homolytic (minor pathway) cleavage of the peroxy (O-O) bond to form phenol and nitrite as a major product (via a non-radical mechanism), or a radical pair PhB(OH)2O•−…•NO2 as a minor product. It is conceivable that phenyl radicals are formed by the fragmentation of PhB(OH)2O•− radical anion. According to the DFT quantum mechanical calculations, the energy barrier for the dissociation of PhB(OH)2O•− radical anion to form phenyl radicals is only a few kcal/mol, suggesting rapid and spontaneous fragmentation of PhB(OH)2O•− radical anion

  1. Reaction mechanism for the symmetric breakup of 24Mg following an interaction with 12C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gyapong, G.J.; Watson, D.L.; Catford, W.N.; Clarke, N.M.; Bennett, S.J.; Freer, M.; Fulton, B.R.; Jones, C.D.; Leddy, M.; Murgatroyd, J.T.; Rae, W.D.M.; Simmons, P.

    1994-01-01

    Data on the yield of the symmetric breakup of 24 Mg as a function of beam energy are presented and compared with detailed calculations of the energy dependence. The 24 Mg states seen in symmetric breakup agree with previously observed breakup states having spin and parities J π =4 + ,(6 + ),8 + . The data allow the variations of yield for indivual states to be judged, as the beam energy is varied. The variation in the yield of the 4 + states is compared in detail with calculations assuming several possible compound nuclear or direct reaction mechanisms. It is concluded that a massive ( 12 C) transfer or a simple statistical compound process are unlikely mechanisms, but that each of several other mechanisms is consistent with the data. ((orig.))

  2. Investigation on Mechanisms of Polymer Enhanced Oil Recovery by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Microscopic Theoretical Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji-Cheng, Zhang; Kao-Ping, Song; Er-Long, Yang; Li, Liu

    2008-01-01

    Polymer flooding is an efficient technique to enhance oil recovery over water flooding. There are lots of discussions regarding the mechanisms for polymer flooding enhancing oil recovery. The main focus is whether polymer flooding can increase sweep efficiency alone, or can increase both of sweep efficiency and displacement efficiency. We present a study on this problem. Oil displacement experiments on 4 natural cores show that polymer flooding can increase oil recovery efficiency by more than 12% over water. Moreover, photos are taken by the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) method both after water flooding and after polymer flooding, which show remaining oil saturation distribution at the middle cross section and the central longitudinal section. Analyses of these photos demonstrate that polymer flooding can increase both sweep efficiency and displacement efficiency. (fundamental areas of phenomenology (including applications))

  3. Giant resonance spectroscopy of 40Ca with the (e,e'x) reaction (III): Direct versus statistical decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, J.; Diesener, H.; Helm, U.; Herbert, G.; Neumann-Cosel, P. von; Richter, A.; Schrieder, G.; Strauch, S.

    2001-01-01

    The present article is the third out of three on a study of the 40 Ca(e,e'x) reaction discussing the role of direct and statistical contributions to the decay of the observed giant resonance strengths. The proton and α decay modes leading to low-lying final states in 36 Ar and 39 K were investigated. The branching ratios for the p 0 , p 123 , α 0 and α 1 channels are compared to statistical model calculations. In the excitation region of dominant isoscalar E2 strength (E x =12-18 MeV) good agreement is observed. Model predictions of direct E2 decay for the (α 0 +α 1 )/(p 0 +p 1 ) ratio describe the data poorly. In the isovector E1 excitation region large excess strength is found in the population of low-lying states in 39 K. A fluctuation analysis shows the direct contributions to the p 0 , p 1 channels to be ≥85%. The presence of preequilibrium components is indicated by the significant nonstatistical decay to the p 3 level which has a dominant 'phonon·hole' structure. Cross correlations reveal no significant branching between the different channels. The correlations between different electron scattering angles in the p 0 , p 1 and p 3 decay result in an interaction radius compatible with the whole nucleus acting as an emitting source

  4. Reaction Mechanisms and HCCI Combustion Processes of Mixtures of n-Heptane and the Butanols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu eWang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A reduced primary reference fuel (PRF-Alcohol-Di-tert-butyl Peroxide (DTBP mechanism with 108 species and 435 reactions, including sub-mechanisms of PRF, methanol, ethanol, DTBP and the four butanol isomers, is proposed for homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI engine combustion simulations of butanol isomers/n-heptane mixtures. HCCI experiments fuelled with butanol isomer/n-heptane mixtures on two different engines are conducted for the validation of proposed mechanism. The mechanism has been validated against shock tube ignition delays, laminar flame speeds, species profiles in premixed flames and engine HCCI combustion data, and good agreements with experimental results are demonstrated under various validation conditions. It is found that although the reactivity of neat tert-butanol is the lowest, mixtures of tert-butanol/n-heptane exhibit the highest reactivity among the butanol isomer/n-heptane mixtures if the n-heptane blending ratio exceeds 20% (mole. Kinetic analysis shows that the highest C-H bond energy in the tert-butanol molecule is partially responsible for this phenomenon. It is also found that the reaction tC4H9OH+CH3O2 =tC4H9O+CH3O2H plays important role and eventually produces the OH radical to promote the ignition and combustion. The proposed mechanism is able to capture HCCI combustion processes of the butanol/n-heptane mixtures under different operating conditions. In addition, the trend that tert-butanol /n-heptane has the highest reactivity is also captured in HCCI combustion simulations. The results indicate that the current mechanism can be used for HCCI engine predictions of PRF and alcohol fuels.

  5. Analyzing power T20 measurement of backscattering d.p. vector in the Δ resonance excitation range and theoretical analysis of this reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boudard, A.

    1983-12-01

    We have measured the analysing power T 20 in the backward elastic scattering d.p. for 16 energies of the deuteron from 300 MeV to 2300 MeV. This is the region of the observed bump in the backward excitation function of the cross section. This bump is usually thought to be a signature of a Δ(3/2,3/2 + ) dynamically excited in the intermediate state. We have also measured Ay and Ayy from 70 0 to 180 0 for Tsub(d)=1200 MeV. we have compared both T 20 and the backward cross section with a coherent sum between direct neutron exchange and Δ excitation by intermediate exchanges of π and rho mesons. The overall shape of the cross section is reproduced. Unlike the earlier measurements from Argonne, there is a deep minimum in T 20 at Tsub(d)=600 MeV, in agreement with the predictions of direct exchange models. However, an additional structure producing a second minimum at Tsub(d)=1400 MeV (√S=3240 MeV) is never reproduced by our calculations. This suggests either that refinements in the Δ treatment are needed or that a new reaction mechanism (resonance) takes place in that region [fr

  6. Paralinguistic mechanisms of production in human "beatboxing": a real-time magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor, Michael; Bresch, Erik; Byrd, Dani; Nayak, Krishna; Narayanan, Shrikanth

    2013-02-01

    Real-time magnetic resonance imaging (rtMRI) was used to examine mechanisms of sound production by an American male beatbox artist. rtMRI was found to be a useful modality with which to study this form of sound production, providing a global dynamic view of the midsagittal vocal tract at frame rates sufficient to observe the movement and coordination of critical articulators. The subject's repertoire included percussion elements generated using a wide range of articulatory and airstream mechanisms. Many of the same mechanisms observed in human speech production were exploited for musical effect, including patterns of articulation that do not occur in the phonologies of the artist's native languages: ejectives and clicks. The data offer insights into the paralinguistic use of phonetic primitives and the ways in which they are coordinated in this style of musical performance. A unified formalism for describing both musical and phonetic dimensions of human vocal percussion performance is proposed. Audio and video data illustrating production and orchestration of beatboxing sound effects are provided in a companion annotated corpus.

  7. Flexural resonance mechanism of thermal transport across graphene-SiO2 interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Zhun-Yong; Qiu, Bo; Xu, Shanglong; Ruan, Xiulin; Pop, Eric

    2018-03-01

    Understanding the microscopic mechanism of heat dissipation at the dimensionally mismatched interface between a two-dimensional (2D) crystal and its substrate is crucial for the thermal management of devices based on 2D materials. Here, we study the lattice contribution to thermal (Kapitza) transport at graphene-SiO2 interfaces using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and non-equilibrium Green's functions (NEGF). We find that 78 percent of the Kapitza conductance is due to sub-20 THz flexural acoustic modes, and that a resonance mechanism dominates the interfacial phonon transport. MD and NEGF estimate the classical Kapitza conductance to be hK ≈ 10 to 16 MW K-1 m-2 at 300 K, respectively, consistent with existing experimental observations. Taking into account quantum mechanical corrections, this value is approximately 28% lower at 300 K. Our calculations also suggest that hK scales as T2 at low temperatures (T < 100 K) due to the linear frequency dependence of phonon transmission across the graphene-SiO2 interface at low frequencies. Our study sheds light on the role of flexural acoustic phonons in heat dissipation from graphene to its substrate.

  8. Multi-level quantum mechanics theories and molecular mechanics study of the double-inversion mechanism of the F- + CH3I reaction in aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Peng; Zhang, Jingxue; Wang, Dunyou

    2017-06-07

    A double-inversion mechanism of the F - + CH 3 I reaction was discovered in aqueous solution using combined multi-level quantum mechanics theories and molecular mechanics. The stationary points along the reaction path show very different structures to the ones in the gas phase due to the interactions between the solvent and solute, especially strong hydrogen bonds. An intermediate complex, a minimum on the potential of mean force, was found to serve as a connecting-link between the abstraction-induced inversion transition state and the Walden-inversion transition state. The potentials of mean force were calculated with both the DFT/MM and CCSD(T)/MM levels of theory. Our calculated free energy barrier of the abstraction-induced inversion is 69.5 kcal mol -1 at the CCSD(T)/MM level of theory, which agrees with the one at 72.9 kcal mol -1 calculated using the Born solvation model and gas-phase data; and our calculated free energy barrier of the Walden inversion is 24.2 kcal mol -1 , which agrees very well with the experimental value at 25.2 kcal mol -1 in aqueous solution. The calculations show that the aqueous solution makes significant contributions to the potentials of mean force and exerts a big impact on the molecular-level evolution along the reaction pathway.

  9. Evolution of reaction mechanisms for the reaction 36Ar + 58Ni studied from 32 to 95 A*MeV with the INDRA multidetector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Filippo, E.

    1995-03-01

    In the context of the multifragmentation study program with the 4π INDRA detector at GANIL, the reaction 36 Ar + 58 Ni has been studied at seven different energies ranging from 32 to 95 A*MeV. After a brief description of the detector characteristics and of the data treatment, results on the evolution of intermediate mass fragments (IMF) distributions with incident energy and a first outlook about reaction mechanisms are presented. (author). 15 refs., 10 figs

  10. Mechanism and kinetics in reactions of caffeic acid with radicals by pulse radiolysis and calculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xifeng; Cai, Zhongli; Katsumura, Yosuke [Tokyo Univ., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Nuclear Engineering Research Lab

    2000-03-01

    The interaction of caffeic acid with e{sub aq}{sup -}, (CH{sub 3}){sub 2}(OH) CCH{sub 2}{sup {center_dot}}, CO{sub 2}{sup {center_dot}}{sup -}, H{sup {center_dot}}, {center_dot}OH and N{sub 3}{sup {center_dot}} radicals were studied by {gamma}-, pulse radiolysis and molecular orbital calculation. UV-visible spectra of electron/{center_dot}OH adducts, semi-quinone radicals of caffeic ions, and the stable products from the reactions were derived. The rate constants were determined. The attacked sites and the most favorable structures of the transient radicals were predicted. Reaction mechanisms were proposed. (author)

  11. Reaction Mechanism of Tar Evolution in Biomass Steam Gasification for Hydrogen Production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shingo Katayama; Masahiro Suzuki; Atsushi Tsutsumi

    2006-01-01

    Reaction mechanism of tar evolution in steam gasification of biomass was investigated with a continuous cross-flow moving bed type differential reactor, in which tar and gases can be fractionated according to reaction time. We estimated that time profile of tar and gas evolution in the gasification of cellulose, xylan, and lignin, and compared it with experimental product time profile of real biomass gasification. The experimental tar evolution rate is different from estimated tar evolution rate. The estimated tar evolution rate has a peak at 20 s. On the other hand, the experimental tar evolution rate at 20 s is little, and tar at initial stage includes more water-soluble and water-insoluble compounds. It can be concluded that in the real biomass steam gasification the evolution of tar from cellulose and lignin component was found to be precipitated by that from hemi-cellulose component. (authors)

  12. Heterogeneous kinetics, products, and mechanisms of ferulic acid particles in the reaction with NO3 radicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Changgeng; Zhang, Peng; Wen, Xiaoying; Wu, Bin

    2017-03-01

    Methoxyphenols, as an important component of wood burning, are produced by lignin pyrolysis and considered to be the potential tracers for wood smoke emissions. In this work, the heterogeneous reaction between ferulic acid particles and NO3 radicals was investigated. Six products including oxalic acid, 4-vinylguaiacol, vanillin, 5-nitrovanillin, 5-nitroferulic acid, and caffeic acid were confirmed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). In addition, the reaction mechanisms were proposed and the main pathways were NO3 electrophilic addition to olefin and the meta-position to the hydroxyl group. The uptake coefficient of NO3 radicals on ferulic acid particles was 0.17 ± 0.02 and the effective rate constant under experimental conditions was (1.71 ± 0.08) × 10-12 cm3 molecule-1 s-1. The results indicate that ferulic acid degradation by NO3 can be an important sink at night.

  13. A general reaction mechanism for carbapenem hydrolysis by mononuclear and binuclear metallo-β-lactamases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisa, María-Natalia; Palacios, Antonela R; Aitha, Mahesh; González, Mariano M; Moreno, Diego M; Crowder, Michael W; Bonomo, Robert A; Spencer, James; Tierney, David L; Llarrull, Leticia I; Vila, Alejandro J

    2017-09-14

    Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae threaten human health, since carbapenems are last resort drugs for infections by such organisms. Metallo-β-lactamases (MβLs) are the main mechanism of resistance against carbapenems. Clinically approved inhibitors of MBLs are currently unavailable as design has been limited by the incomplete knowledge of their mechanism. Here, we report a biochemical and biophysical study of carbapenem hydrolysis by the B1 enzymes NDM-1 and BcII in the bi-Zn(II) form, the mono-Zn(II) B2 Sfh-I and the mono-Zn(II) B3 GOB-18. These MβLs hydrolyse carbapenems via a similar mechanism, with accumulation of the same anionic intermediates. We characterize the Michaelis complex formed by mono-Zn(II) enzymes, and we identify all intermediate species, enabling us to propose a chemical mechanism for mono and binuclear MβLs. This common mechanism open avenues for rationally designed inhibitors of all MβLs, notwithstanding the profound differences between these enzymes' active site structure, β-lactam specificity and metal content.Carbapenem-resistant bacteria pose a major health threat by expressing metallo-β-lactamases (MβLs), enzymes able to hydrolyse these life-saving drugs. Here the authors use biophysical and computational methods and show that different MβLs share the same reaction mechanism, suggesting new strategies for drug design.

  14. From Sound to Significance: Exploring the Mechanisms Underlying Emotional Reactions to Music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juslin, Patrik N; Barradas, Gonçalo; Eerola, Tuomas

    2015-01-01

    A common approach to studying emotional reactions to music is to attempt to obtain direct links between musical surface features such as tempo and a listener's responses. However, such an analysis ultimately fails to explain why emotions are aroused in the listener. In this article we explore an alternative approach, which aims to account for musical emotions in terms of a set of psychological mechanisms that are activated by different types of information in a musical event. This approach was tested in 4 experiments that manipulated 4 mechanisms (brain stem reflex, contagion, episodic memory, musical expectancy) by selecting existing musical pieces that featured information relevant for each mechanism. The excerpts were played to 60 listeners, who were asked to rate their felt emotions on 15 scales. Skin conductance levels and facial expressions were measured, and listeners reported subjective impressions of relevance to specific mechanisms. Results indicated that the target mechanism conditions evoked emotions largely as predicted by a multimechanism framework and that mostly similar effects occurred across the experiments that included different pieces of music. We conclude that a satisfactory account of musical emotions requires consideration of how musical features and responses are mediated by a range of underlying mechanisms.

  15. Mechanisms of emission of particles charged in 6Li + 6Li and 6Li + 10B reactions at low energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quebert, Jean

    1964-01-01

    The lithium 6 nucleus is a projectile of interest to study nuclear reactions at low energy due to the possibility to obtain high heats of reaction, and to its structure which can play an important role in the projectile-target interaction. This research thesis focused on the study of two low-energy reactions provoked by lithium projectiles. These reactions are studied within the framework of the theoretical model of aggregates. The first part presents the experimental conditions of both reactions, reports the development and analysis of nuclear plates, and the transformation of a given type of particle histogram into a spectrum in the mass centre system. The next parts report the study of the 6 Li + 6 Li reaction (previous results, kinematic analysis, spectrum of secondary particles, theoretical analysis of results) and of the 6 Li + 10 B reaction (previous results, experimental results, study of the continuous spectrum of alpha particle, reaction mechanisms)

  16. Exchange reaction between hydrogen and deuterium. I. Importance of surface reactions in the steady-state mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marteau, C; Gaillard-Cusin, F; James, H [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, 45 - Orleans-la-Source (France). Centre de Recherches sur la Chimie de Combustion et des Hautes Temperatures

    1978-05-01

    Investigation of heterogeneous initiation process of gas phase linear chain reactions is carried out through the study of H/sub 2/-D/sub 2/ exchange reaction. Experimental data under study concern mainly the stationary rate of HD formation and the prestationary proceeding. Steady-state method accounts for the first one of these data; it allows to clearly compare the wall process part to the part played by the homogeneous chain reaction towards HD formation. Activation energy of exchange elementary step between chemisorbed hydrogen (on silica) and gaseous deuterium has been evaluated: Esub(e1)=52+-1 Kcal/mole.

  17. Kinetics modeling and reaction mechanism of ferrate(VI) oxidation of benzotriazoles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bin; Ying, Guang-Guo; Zhang, Li-Juan; Zhou, Li-Jun; Liu, Shan; Fang, Yi-Xiang

    2011-03-01

    Benzotriazoles (BTs) are high production volume chemicals with broad application in various industrial processes and in households, and have been found to be omnipresent in aquatic environments. We investigated oxidation of five benzotriazoles (BT: 1H-benzotriazole; 5MBT: 5-methyl-1H-benzotriazole; DMBT: 5,6-dimethyl-1H-benzotriazole hydrate; 5CBT: 5-chloro-1H-benzotriazole; HBT: 1-hydroxybenzotriazole) by aqueous ferrate (Fe(VI)) to determine reaction kinetics as a function of pH (6.0-10.0), and interpreted the reaction mechanism of Fe(VI) with BTs by using a linear free-energy relationship. The pK(a) values of BT and DMBT were also determined using UV-Visible spectroscopic method in order to calculate the species-specific rate constants, and they were 8.37 ± 0.0 and 8.98 ± 0.08 respectively. Each of BTs reacted moderately with Fe(VI) with the k(app) ranged from 7.2 to 103.8 M(-1)s(-1) at pH 7.0 and 24 ± 1 °C. When the molar ratio of Fe(VI) and BTs increased up to 30:1, the removal rate of BTs reached about >95% in buffered milli-Q water or secondary wastewater effluent. The electrophilic oxidation mechanism of the above reaction was illustrated by using a linear free-energy relationship between pH-dependence of species-specific rate constants and substituent effects (σ(p)). Fe(VI) reacts initially with BTs by electrophilic attack at the 1,2,3-triazole moiety of BT, 5MBT, DMBT and 5CBT, and at the N-OH bond of HBT. Moreover, for BT, 5MBT, DMBT and 5CBT, the reactions with the species HFeO(4)(-) predominantly controled the reaction rates. For HBT, the species H(2)FeO(4) with dissociated HBT played a major role in the reaction. The results showed that Fe(VI) has the ability to degrade benzotriazoles in water. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Studying mechanism of radical reactions: From radiation to nitroxides as research tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maimon, Eric; Samuni, Uri; Goldstein, Sara

    2018-02-01

    Radicals are part of the chemistry of life, and ionizing radiation chemistry serves as an indispensable research tool for elucidation of the mechanism(s) underlying their reactions. The ever-increasing understanding of their involvement in diverse physiological and pathological processes has expanded the search for compounds that can diminish radical-induced damage. This review surveys the areas of research focusing on radical reactions and particularly with stable cyclic nitroxide radicals, which demonstrate unique antioxidative activities. Unlike common antioxidants that are progressively depleted under oxidative stress and yield secondary radicals, nitroxides are efficient radical scavengers yielding in most cases their respective oxoammonium cations, which are readily reduced back in the tissue to the nitroxide thus continuously being recycled. Nitroxides, which not only protect enzymes, cells, and laboratory animals from diverse kinds of biological injury, but also modify the catalytic activity of heme enzymes, could be utilized in chemical and biological systems serving as a research tool for elucidating mechanisms underlying complex chemical and biochemical processes.

  19. Asymmetric effect of mechanical stress on the forward and reverse reaction catalyzed by an enzyme.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Collin Joseph

    Full Text Available The concept of modulating enzymatic activity by exerting a mechanical stress on the enzyme has been established in previous work. Mechanical perturbation is also a tool for probing conformational motion accompanying the enzymatic cycle. Here we report measurements of the forward and reverse kinetics of the enzyme Guanylate Kinase from yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The enzyme is held in a state of stress using the DNA spring method. The observation that mechanical stress has different effects on the forward and reverse reaction kinetics suggests that forward and reverse reactions follow different paths, on average, in the enzyme's conformational space. Comparing the kinetics of the stressed and unstressed enzyme we also show that the maximum speed of the enzyme is comparable to the predictions of the relaxation model of enzyme action, where we use the independently determined dissipation coefficient [Formula: see text] for the enzyme's conformational motion. The present experiments provide a mean to explore enzyme kinetics beyond the static energy landscape picture of transition state theory.

  20. Improved removal performance and mechanism investigation of papermaking wastewater treatment using manganese enhanced Fenton reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yingcai; Wang, Can; Shi, Shuai; Fang, Shuai

    2018-06-01

    The effects of Mn(II) on Fenton system to treat papermaking wastewater and the mechanism of Mn(II) enhanced Fenton reaction were investigated in this study. The chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiency was enhanced in the presence of Mn(II), which increased by 19% compared with that of the Fenton system alone. The pseudo-first order reaction kinetic rate constant of Mn(II)/Fenton system was 2.11 times higher than that of Fenton system. 67%-81% COD were removed with the increasing Mn(II) concentration from 0 to 0.8 g/L. COD removal efficiency was also enhanced in a wider pH range (3-7), which indicated the operation parameters of Fenton technology could be broadened to a milder condition. The study of the mechanism showed that Mn(II) participated in the oxidation and coagulation stages in Fenton system. In the oxidation stage, Mn(II) promotes the production of HO 2 •/ O 2 • - , then HO 2 •/ O 2 • - reacts with Fe(III) to accelerate the formation of Fe(II), and finally accelerates the production of HO•. Meantime MnMnO 3 and Fe(OH) 3 forms in the coagulation stage, facilitating the removal of suspended substances and a large amount of COD, which enhances the overall COD removal of papermaking wastewater. This study provided a detailed mechanism to improve practical applications of Fenton technology.