WorldWideScience

Sample records for reaction control engine

  1. Reaction Control Engine for Space Launch Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Engineers at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) have begun a series of engine tests on a new breed of space propulsion: a Reaction Control Engine developed for the Space Launch Initiative (SLI). The engine, developed by TRW Space and Electronics of Redondo Beach, California, is an auxiliary propulsion engine designed to maneuver vehicles in orbit. It is used for docking, reentry, attitude control, and fine-pointing while the vehicle is in orbit. The engine uses nontoxic chemicals as propellants, a feature that creates a safer environment for ground operators, lowers cost, and increases efficiency with less maintenance and quicker turnaround time between missions. Testing includes 30 hot-firings. This photograph shows the first engine test performed at MSFC that includes SLI technology. Another unique feature of the Reaction Control Engine is that it operates at dual thrust modes, combining two engine functions into one engine. The engine operates at both 25 and 1,000 pounds of force, reducing overall propulsion weight and allowing vehicles to easily maneuver in space. The low-level thrust of 25 pounds of force allows the vehicle to fine-point maneuver and dock while the high-level thrust of 1,000 pounds of force is used for reentry, orbit transfer, and coarse positioning. SLI is a NASA-wide research and development program, managed by the MSFC, designed to improve safety, reliability, and cost effectiveness of space travel for second generation reusable launch vehicles.

  2. Demonstration of a Non-Toxic Reaction Control Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Philip J.; Turpin, Alicia A.; Veith, Eric M.

    2007-01-01

    T:hree non-toxic demonstration reaction control engines (RCE) were successfully tested at the Aerojet Sacramento facility under a technology contract sponsored by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The goals of the NASA MSFC contract (NAS8-01109) were to develop and expand the technical maturity of a non-toxic, on-orbit auxiliary propulsion system (APS) thruster under the auspices of the Exploration Systems Mission Directorate. The demonstration engine utilized Liquid Oxygen (LOX) and Ethanol as propellants to produce 870 lbf thrust. The Aerojet RCE's were successfully acceptance tested over a broad range of operating conditions. Steady state tests evaluated engine response to varying chamber pressures and mixture ratios. In addition to the steady state tests, a variety of pulsing tests were conducted over a wide range of electrical pulse widths (EPW). Each EPW condition was also tested over a range of percent duty cycles (DC), and bit impulse and pulsing specific impulse were determined for each of these conditions. Subsequent to acceptance testing at Aerojet, these three engines were delivered to the NASA White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) in April 2005 for incorporation into a cryogenic Auxiliary Propulsion System Test Bed (APSTB). The APSTB is a test article that will be utilized in an altitude test cell to simulate anticipated mission applications. The objectives of this APSTB testing included evaluation of engine performance over an extended duty cycle map of propellant pressure and temperature, as well as engine and system performance at typical mission duty cycles over extended periods of time. This paper provides acceptance test results and a status of the engine performance as part of the system level testing.

  3. Introduction to chemical reaction engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yeong Geol

    1990-10-01

    This deals with chemical reaction engineering with thirteen chapters. The contents of this book are introduction on reaction engineering, chemical kinetics, thermodynamics and chemical reaction, abnormal reactor, non-isothermal reactor, nonideal reactor, catalysis in nonuniform system, diffusion and reaction in porosity catalyst, design catalyst heterogeneous reactor in solid bed, a high molecule polymerization, bio reaction engineering, reaction engineering in material process, control multi-variable reactor process using digital computer.

  4. Summary of Altitude Pulse Testing of a 100-lbf L02/LCH4 Reaction Control Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, William M.; Kleinhenz, Julie E.

    2011-01-01

    Recently, liquid oxygen-liquid methane (LO2/LCH4) has been considered as a potential "green" propellant alternative for future exploration missions. The Propulsion and Cryogenic Advanced Development (PCAD) project has been tasked by NASA to develop this propulsion combination to enable safe and cost effective exploration missions. To date, limited experience with such combinations exist, and as a result a comprehensive test program is critical to demonstrating the viability of implementing such a system. The NASA Glenn Research Center has conducted a test program of a 100-lbf (445-N) reaction control engine (RCE) at the center s Altitude Combustion Stand (ACS), focusing on altitude testing over a wide variety of operational conditions. The ACS facility includes a unique propellant conditioning feed system (PCFS) which allows precise control of propellant inlet conditions to the engine. Engine performance as a result of these inlet conditions was examined extensively during the test program. This paper is a companion to the previous specific impulse testing paper, and discusses the pulsed mode operation portion of testing, with a focus on minimum impulse bit (I-bit) and repeatable pulse performance. The engine successfully demonstrated target minimum impulse bit performance at all conditions, as well as successful demonstration of repeatable pulse widths. Some anomalous conditions experienced during testing are also discussed, including a double pulse phenomenon which was not noted in previous test programs for this engine.

  5. Non-Toxic Dual Thrust Reaction Control Engine Development for On-Orbit APS Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Philip J.; Veith, Eric M.

    2003-01-01

    A non-toxic dual thrust proof-of-concept demonstration engine was successfully tested at the Aerojet Sacramento facility under a technology contract sponsored by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The goals of the NASA MSFC contract (NAS8-01109) were to develop and expand the technical maturity of a non-toxic, on-orbit auxiliary propulsion system (APS) thruster under the Next Generation Launch Technology (NGLT) program. The demonstration engine utilized the existing Kistler K-1 870 lbf LOX/Ethanol orbital maneuvering engine ( O m ) coupled with some special test equipment (STE) that enabled engine operation at 870 lbf in the primary mode and 25 lbf in the vernier mode. Ambient testing in primary mode varied mixture ratio (MR) from 1.28 to 1.71 and chamber pressure (P(c) from 110 to 181 psia, and evaluated electrical pulse widths (EPW) of 0.080, 0.100 and 0.250 seconds. Altitude testing in vernier mode explored igniter and thruster pulsing characteristics, long duration steady state operation (greater than 420 sec) and the impact of varying the percent fuel film cooling on vernier performance and chamber thermal response at low PC (4 psia). Data produced from the testing provided calibration of the performance and thermal models used in the design of the next version of the dual thrust Reaction Control Engine (RCE).

  6. Thermodynamic Vent System for an On-Orbit Cryogenic Reaction Control Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurlbert, Eric A.; Romig, Kris A.; Jimenez, Rafael; Flores, Sam

    2012-01-01

    A report discusses a cryogenic reaction control system (RCS) that integrates a Joule-Thompson (JT) device (expansion valve) and thermodynamic vent system (TVS) with a cryogenic distribution system to allow fine control of the propellant quality (subcooled liquid) during operation of the device. It enables zero-venting when coupled with an RCS engine. The proper attachment locations and sizing of the orifice are required with the propellant distribution line to facilitate line conditioning. During operations, system instrumentation was strategically installed along the distribution/TVS line assembly, and temperature control bands were identified. A sub-scale run tank, full-scale distribution line, open-loop TVS, and a combination of procured and custom-fabricated cryogenic components were used in the cryogenic RCS build-up. Simulated on-orbit activation and thruster firing profiles were performed to quantify system heat gain and evaluate the TVS s capability to maintain the required propellant conditions at the inlet to the engine valves. Test data determined that a small control valve, such as a piezoelectric, is optimal to provide continuously the required thermal control. The data obtained from testing has also assisted with the development of fluid and thermal models of an RCS to refine integrated cryogenic propulsion system designs. This system allows a liquid oxygenbased main propulsion and reaction control system for a spacecraft, which improves performance, safety, and cost over conventional hypergolic systems due to higher performance, use of nontoxic propellants, potential for integration with life support and power subsystems, and compatibility with in-situ produced propellants.

  7. Test Results for a Non-toxic, Dual Thrust Reaction Control Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Philip J.; Veith, Eric M.; Turpin, Alicia A.

    2005-01-01

    A non-toxic, dual thrust reaction control engine (RCE) was successfully tested over a broad range of operating conditions at the Aerojet Sacramento facility. The RCE utilized LOX/Ethanol propellants; and was tested in steady state and pulsing modes at 25-lbf thrust (vernier) and at 870-lbf thrust (primary). Steady state vernier tests vaned chamber pressure (Pc) from 0.78 to 5.96 psia, and mixture ratio (MR) from 0.73 to 1.82, while primary steady state tests vaned Pc from 103 to 179 psia and MR from 1.33 to 1.76. Pulsing tests explored EPW from 0.080 to 10 seconds and DC from 5 to 50 percent at both thrust levels. Vernier testing accumulated a total of 6,670 seconds of firing time, and 7,215 pulses, and primary testing accumulated a total of 2,060 seconds of firing time and 3,646 pulses.

  8. Global Controllability of Chemical Reactions

    OpenAIRE

    Drexler, Dániel András; Tóth, János

    2015-01-01

    Controllability of chemical reactions is an important problem in chemical engineering science. In control theory, analysis of the controllability of linear systems is well-founded, however the dynamics of chemical reactions is usually nonlinear. Global controllability properties of chemical reactions are analyzed here based on the Lie-algebra of the vector fields associated to elementary reactions. A chemical reaction is controllable almost everywhere if all the reaction rate coefficients can...

  9. Polymer reaction engineering, an integrated approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meyer, T.; Keurentjes, J.T.F.; Meyer, T.; Keurentjes, J.T.F.

    2005-01-01

    Summary This chapter contains sections titled: Polymer Materials A Short History of Polymer Reaction Engineering The Position of Polymer Reaction Engineering Toward Integrated Polymer Reaction Engineering The Disciplines in Polymer Reaction Engineering The Future: Product-inspired Polymer Reaction

  10. Engineering reactors for catalytic reactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Extensive studies have been conducted to establish sound basis for design and engineering of reactors for practising such catalytic reactions and for realizing improvements in reactor performance. In this article, application of recent (and not so recent) developments in engineering reactors for catalytic reactions is ...

  11. Hot-Fire Testing of 100 LB(sub F) LOX/LCH4 Reaction Control Engine at Altitude Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, William M.; Kleinhenz, Julie E.

    2010-01-01

    Liquid oxygen/liquid methane (LO2/LCH4 ) has recently been viewed as a potential green propulsion system for both the Altair ascent main engine (AME) and reaction control system (RCS). The Propulsion and Cryogenic Advanced Development Project (PCAD) has been tasked by NASA to develop these green propellant systems to enable safe and cost effective exploration missions. However, experience with LO2/LCH4 as a propellant combination is limited, so testing of these systems is critical to demonstrating reliable ignition and performance. A test program of a 100 lb f reaction control engine (RCE) is underway at the Altitude Combustion Stand (ACS) of the NASA Glenn Research Center, with a focus on conducting tests at altitude conditions. These tests include a unique propellant conditioning feed system (PCFS) which allows for the inlet conditions of the propellant to be varied to test warm to subcooled liquid propellant temperatures. Engine performance, including thrust, c* and vacuum specific impulse (I(sub sp,vac)) will be presented as a function of propellant temperature conditions. In general, the engine performed as expected, with higher performance at warmer propellant temperatures but better efficiency at lower propellant temperatures. Mixture ratio effects were inconclusive within the uncertainty bands of data, but qualitatively showed higher performance at lower ratios.

  12. Analysis of 100-lb(sub f) (445-N) LO2-LCH4 Reaction Control Engine Impulse Bit Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, William M.; Klenhenz, Julie E.

    2012-01-01

    Recently, liquid oxygen-liquid methane (LO2-LCH4) has been considered as a potential green propellant alternative for future exploration missions. The Propulsion and Cryogenic Advanced Development (PCAD) project was tasked by NASA to develop this propulsion combination to enable safe and cost-effective exploration missions. To date, limited experience with such combinations exist, and as a result a comprehensive test program is critical to demonstrating with the viability of implementing such a system. The NASA Glenn Research Center conducted a test program of a 100-lbf (445-N) reaction control engine (RCE) at the Center s Altitude Combustion Stand (ACS), focusing on altitude testing over a wide variety of operational conditions. The ACS facility includes unique propellant conditioning feed systems (PCFS), which allow precise control of propellant inlet conditions to the engine. Engine performance as a result of these inlet conditions was examined extensively during the test program. This paper is a companion to the previous specific impulse testing paper, and discusses the pulsed-mode operation portion of testing, with a focus on minimum impulse bit (MIB) and repeatable pulse performance. The engine successfully demonstrated target MIB performance at all conditions, as well as successful demonstration of repeatable pulse widths. Some anomalous conditions experienced during testing are also discussed, including a double pulse phenomenon, which was not noted in previous test programs for this engine.

  13. Vision 2020. Reaction Engineering Roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klipstein, David H. [Reaction Design, San Diego, CA (United States); Robinson, Sharon [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2001-01-01

    The Reaction Engineering Roadmap is a part of an industry- wide effort to create a blueprint of the research and technology milestones that are necessary to achieve longterm industry goals. This report documents the results of a workshop focused on the research needs, technology barriers, and priorities of the chemical industry as they relate to reaction engineering viewed first by industrial use (basic chemicals; specialty chemicals; pharmaceuticals; and polymers) and then by technology segment (reactor system selection, design, and scale-up; chemical mechanism development and property estimation; dealing with catalysis; and new, nonstandard reactor types).

  14. Reaction and catalyst engineering to exploit kinetically controlled whole-cell multistep biocatalysis for terminal FAME oxyfunctionalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrewe, Manfred; Julsing, Mattijs K; Lange, Kerstin; Czarnotta, Eik; Schmid, Andreas; Bühler, Bruno

    2014-09-01

    The oxyfunctionalization of unactivated C−H bonds can selectively and efficiently be catalyzed by oxygenase-containing whole-cell biocatalysts. Recombinant Escherichia coli W3110 containing the alkane monooxygenase AlkBGT and the outer membrane protein AlkL from Pseudomonas putida GPo1 have been shown to efficiently catalyze the terminal oxyfunctionalization of renewable fatty acid methyl esters yielding bifunctional products of interest for polymer synthesis. In this study, AlkBGTL-containing E. coli W3110 is shown to catalyze the multistep conversion of dodecanoic acid methyl ester (DAME) via terminal alcohol and aldehyde to the acid, exhibiting Michaelis-Menten-type kinetics for each reaction step. In two-liquid phase biotransformations, the product formation pattern was found to be controlled by DAME availability. Supplying DAME as bulk organic phase led to accumulation of the terminal alcohol as the predominant product. Limiting DAME availability via application of bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (BEHP) as organic carrier solvent enabled almost exclusive acid accumulation. Furthermore, utilization of BEHP enhanced catalyst stability by reducing toxic effects of substrate and products. A further shift towards the overoxidized products was achieved by co-expression of the gene encoding the alcohol dehydrogenase AlkJ, which was shown to catalyze efficient and irreversible alcohol to aldehyde oxidation in vivo. With DAME as organic phase, the aldehyde accumulated as main product using resting cells containing AlkBGT, AlkL, as well as AlkJ. This study highlights the versatility of whole-cell biocatalysis for synthesis of industrially relevant bifunctional building blocks and demonstrates how integrated reaction and catalyst engineering can be implemented to control product formation patterns in biocatalytic multistep reactions. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Reaction Control System Thruster Cracking Consultation: NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) Materials Super Problem Resolution Team (SPRT) Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKay, Rebecca A.; Smith, Stephen W.; Shah, Sandeep R.; Piascik, Robert S.

    2005-01-01

    The shuttle orbiter s reaction control system (RCS) primary thruster serial number 120 was found to contain cracks in the counter bores and relief radius after a chamber repair and rejuvenation was performed in April 2004. Relief radius cracking had been observed in the 1970s and 1980s in seven thrusters prior to flight; however, counter bore cracking had never been seen previously in RCS thrusters. Members of the Materials Super Problem Resolution Team (SPRT) of the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) conducted a detailed review of the relevant literature and of the documentation from the previous RCS thruster failure analyses. It was concluded that the previous failure analyses lacked sufficient documentation to support the conclusions that stress corrosion cracking or hot-salt cracking was the root cause of the thruster cracking and lacked reliable inspection controls to prevent cracked thrusters from entering the fleet. The NESC team identified and performed new materials characterization and mechanical tests. It was determined that the thruster intergranular cracking was due to hydrogen embrittlement and that the cracking was produced during manufacturing as a result of processing the thrusters with fluoride-containing acids. Testing and characterization demonstrated that appreciable environmental crack propagation does not occur after manufacturing.

  16. Discussion of the Investigation Method on the Reaction Kinetics of Metallurgical Reaction Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Ruiling; Wu, Keng; Zhang, Jiazhi; Zhao, Yong

    Reaction kinetics of metallurgical physical chemistry which was successfully applied in metallurgy (as ferrous metallurgy, non-ferrous metallurgy) became an important theoretical foundation for subject system of traditional metallurgy. Not only the research methods were very perfect, but also the independent structures and systems of it had been formed. One of the important tasks of metallurgical reaction engineering was the simulation of metallurgical process. And then, the mechanism of reaction process and the conversion time points of different control links should be obtained accurately. Therefore, the research methods and results of reaction kinetics in metallurgical physical chemistry were not very suitable for metallurgical reaction engineering. In order to provide the definite conditions of transmission, reaction kinetics parameters and the conversion time points of different control links for solving the transmission and reaction equations in metallurgical reaction engineering, a new method for researching kinetics mechanisms in metallurgical reaction engineering was proposed, which was named stepwise attempt method. Then the comparison of results between the two methods and the further development of stepwise attempt method were discussed in this paper. As a new research method for reaction kinetics in metallurgical reaction engineering, stepwise attempt method could not only satisfy the development of metallurgical reaction engineering, but also provide necessary guarantees for establishing its independent subject system.

  17. Factors controlling the redox potential of ZnCe6 in an engineered bacterioferritin photochemical 'reaction centre'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahboob, Abdullah; Vassiliev, Serguei; Poddutoori, Prashanth K; van der Est, Art; Bruce, Doug

    2013-01-01

    Photosystem II (PSII) of photosynthesis has the unique ability to photochemically oxidize water. Recently an engineered bacterioferritin photochemical 'reaction centre' (BFR-RC) using a zinc chlorin pigment (ZnCe6) in place of its native heme has been shown to photo-oxidize bound manganese ions through a tyrosine residue, thus mimicking two of the key reactions on the electron donor side of PSII. To understand the mechanism of tyrosine oxidation in BFR-RCs, and explore the possibility of water oxidation in such a system we have built an atomic-level model of the BFR-RC using ONIOM methodology. We studied the influence of axial ligands and carboxyl groups on the oxidation potential of ZnCe6 using DFT theory, and finally calculated the shift of the redox potential of ZnCe6 in the BFR-RC protein using the multi-conformational molecular mechanics-Poisson-Boltzmann approach. According to our calculations, the redox potential for the first oxidation of ZnCe6 in the BRF-RC protein is only 0.57 V, too low to oxidize tyrosine. We suggest that the observed tyrosine oxidation in BRF-RC could be driven by the ZnCe6 di-cation. In order to increase the efficiency of tyrosine oxidation, and ultimately oxidize water, the first potential of ZnCe6 would have to attain a value in excess of 0.8 V. We discuss the possibilities for modifying the BFR-RC to achieve this goal.

  18. Primary reaction control system/remote manipulator system interaction with loaded arm. Space shuttle engineering and operations support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, E. C.; Davis, J. D.

    1978-01-01

    A study of the interaction between the orbiter primary reaction control system (PRCS) and the remote manipulator system (RMS) with a loaded arm is documented. This analysis was performed with the Payload Deployment and Retrieval Systems Simulation (PDRSS) program with the passive arm bending option. The passive-arm model simulates the arm as massless elastic links with locked joints. The study was divided into two parts. The first part was the evaluation of the response of the arm to step inputs (i.e. constant jet torques) about each of the orbiter body axes. The second part of the study was the evaluation of the response of the arm to minimum impulse primary RCS jet firings with both single pulse and pulse train inputs.

  19. The application of reaction engineering to biocatalysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ringborg, Rolf Hoffmeyer; Woodley, John

    2016-01-01

    outline the benefits of reaction engineering in this development process, with particular emphasis of reaction kinetics. Future research needs to focus on rapid methods to collect such data at sufficient accuracy that it can be used forthe effective design of new biocatalytic processes....

  20. Cell Control Engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynggaard, Hans Jørgen Birk; Alting, Leo

    1996-01-01

    The engineering process of creating cell control systems is described, and a Cell Control Engineering (CCE) concept is defined. The purpose is to assist people, representing different disciplines in the organisation, to implement cell controllers by addressing the complexity of having many systems...... in physically and logically different and changing manufacturing environments. The defined CCE concept combines state-of-the-art of commercially available enabling technologies for automation system software development, generic cell control models and guidelines for the complete engineering process...

  1. Testing of a Liquid Oxygen/Liquid Methane Reaction Control Thruster in a New Altitude Rocket Engine Test Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Michael L.; Arrington, Lynn A.; Kleinhenz, Julie E.; Marshall, William M.

    2012-01-01

    A relocated rocket engine test facility, the Altitude Combustion Stand (ACS), was activated in 2009 at the NASA Glenn Research Center. This facility has the capability to test with a variety of propellants and up to a thrust level of 2000 lbf (8.9 kN) with precise measurement of propellant conditions, propellant flow rates, thrust and altitude conditions. These measurements enable accurate determination of a thruster and/or nozzle s altitude performance for both technology development and flight qualification purposes. In addition the facility was designed to enable efficient test operations to control costs for technology and advanced development projects. A liquid oxygen-liquid methane technology development test program was conducted in the ACS from the fall of 2009 to the fall of 2010. Three test phases were conducted investigating different operational modes and in addition, the project required the complexity of controlling propellant inlet temperatures over an extremely wide range. Despite the challenges of a unique propellant (liquid methane) and wide operating conditions, the facility performed well and delivered up to 24 hot fire tests in a single test day. The resulting data validated the feasibility of utilizing this propellant combination for future deep space applications.

  2. Advanced Control Engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Jianjun

    1999-01-01

    This book is developed as a textbook for the course Advanced Control Engineering. The book is intended for students in mechanical engineering and its aim is to provide an understanding of modern control theory as well as methodologies and applications for state space modeling and design...

  3. Emerging Engine Control Technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendricks, Elbert; Chevalier, Alain

    1996-01-01

    In earlier work published by the author and co-authors, a dynamic model called a Mean Value Engine Model (MVEM) was developed. This model is physically based and is intended mainly for control applications. It is especially well suited to embedded model applications in engine controllers, susch...

  4. Systems and Control Engineering

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    design of civil engineering structures has been noted. Protecting ci vil ... R despite disturbing forces such as wind gusts, changes in ambient temperature, etc .. Brief History of ... frequency regulation, boiler control for steam generation, electric.

  5. Experimental Investigation of Augmented Spark Ignition of a LO2/LCH4 Reaction Control Engine at Altitude Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinhenz, Julie; Sarmiento, Charles; Marshall, William

    2012-01-01

    The use of nontoxic propellants in future exploration vehicles would enable safer, more cost-effective mission scenarios. One promising green alternative to existing hypergols is liquid methane (LCH4) with liquid oxygen (LO2). A 100 lbf LO2/LCH4 engine was developed under the NASA Propulsion and Cryogenic Advanced Development project and tested at the NASA Glenn Research Center Altitude Combustion Stand in a low pressure environment. High ignition energy is a perceived drawback of this propellant combination; so this ignition margin test program examined ignition performance versus delivered spark energy. Sensitivity of ignition to spark timing and repetition rate was also explored. Three different exciter units were used with the engine s augmented (torch) igniter. Captured waveforms indicated spark behavior in hot fire conditions was inconsistent compared to the well-behaved dry sparks. This suggests that rising pressure and flow rate increase spark impedance and may at some point compromise an exciter s ability to complete each spark. The reduced spark energies of such quenched deliveries resulted in more erratic ignitions, decreasing ignition probability. The timing of the sparks relative to the pressure/flow conditions also impacted the probability of ignition. Sparks occurring early in the flow could trigger ignition with energies as low as 1 to 6 mJ, though multiple, similarly timed sparks of 55 to 75 mJ were required for reliable ignition. Delayed spark application and reduced spark repetition rate both correlated with late and occasional failed ignitions. An optimum time interval for spark application and ignition therefore coincides with propellant introduction to the igniter.

  6. Systems and Control Engineering

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 4; Issue 5. Systems and Control Engineering - Control Systems-Analysis and Design. A Rama Kalyan J R Vengateswaran. General Article Volume 4 Issue 5 May 1999 pp 88-94 ...

  7. Systems and Control Engineering

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 4; Issue 1. Systems and Control Engineering - Notions of Control. A Rama Kalyan J R Vengateswaran. General Article Volume 4 Issue 1 January 1999 pp 45-52. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  8. Stirling engine power control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, James P.

    1983-01-01

    A power control method and apparatus for a Stirling engine including a valved duct connected to the junction of the regenerator and the cooler and running to a bypass chamber connected between the heater and the cylinder. An oscillating zone of demarcation between the hot and cold portions of the working gas is established in the bypass chamber, and the engine pistons and cylinders can run cold.

  9. Computer aided control engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szymkat, Maciej; Ravn, Ole

    1997-01-01

    Current developments in the field of Computer Aided Control Engineering (CACE) have a visible impact on the design methodologies and the structure of the software tools supporting them. Today control engineers has at their disposal libraries, packages or programming environments that may...... in CACE enhancing efficient flow of information between the tools supporting the following phases of the design process. In principle, this flow has to be two-way, and more or less automated, in order to enable the engineer to observe the propagation of the particular design decisions taken at various...... levels.The major conclusions of the paper are related with identifying the factors affecting the software tool integration in a way needed to facilitate design "inter-phase" communication. These are: standard application interfaces, dynamic data exchange mechanisms, code generation techniques and general...

  10. JPL Contamination Control Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakkolb, Brian

    2013-01-01

    JPL has extensive expertise fielding contamination sensitive missions-in house and with our NASA/industry/academic partners.t Development and implementation of performance-driven cleanliness requirements for a wide range missions and payloads - UV-Vis-IR: GALEX, Dawn, Juno, WFPC-II, AIRS, TES, et al - Propulsion, thermal control, robotic sample acquisition systems. Contamination control engineering across the mission life cycle: - System and payload requirements derivation, analysis, and contamination control implementation plans - Hardware Design, Risk trades, Requirements V-V - Assembly, Integration & Test planning and implementation - Launch site operations and launch vehicle/payload integration - Flight ops center dot Personnel on staff have expertise with space materials development and flight experiments. JPL has capabilities and expertise to successfully address contamination issues presented by space and habitable environments. JPL has extensive experience fielding and managing contamination sensitive missions. Excellent working relationship with the aerospace contamination control engineering community/.

  11. Control systems engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Nise, Norman S

    1995-01-01

    This completely updated new edition shows how to use MATLAB to perform control-system calculations. Designed for the professional or engineering student who needs a quick and readable update on designing control systems, the text features a series of tightly focused examples that clearly illustrate each concept of designing control systems. Most chapters conclude with a detailed application from the two case studies that run throughout the book: an antenna asimuth control system and a submarine. The author also refers to many examples of design methods.

  12. CONTROL ENGINEERING ON BOARD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serghei RADU

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Control engineering embraces instrumentation, alarm systems, control of machinery and plant previously known under the misnomer of automation. Control engineering can be applied not only to propelling and auxiliary machinery but also to electrical installations, refrigeration, cargo handling (especially in tankers and deck machinery, e.g. Windlass control. Opinion still vary on such matters as the relative merits of pneumatic versus electronic system and whether the control center should be in the engine room or adjacent to the navigating bridge. Arguments against the exclusion of the engineer officer from close contact with the machinery are countered by the fact that electronic systems are based on changes other than those of human response. Automated ships (UMS operate closer to prescribed standards and therefore operate with greater efficiency. The closer control of machinery operating conditions, e.g. cooling water temperatures and pressures, permits machinery to be run at its optimum design conditions, making for fuel economy and reduced maintenance. Automation can carry out some tasks far more effectively than men. In other areas it is less effective. For example, the monitoring of machinery operating conditions such as the temperatures and pressures can be carried out by a solid state alarm scanning system at the rate of 400 channels/sec., giving a degree of surveillance which would be impossible by human observation. Conversely, the detection of noisy bearing, a leaky gland or cracked pipe is scarcely possible by automatic means. The balance between the possible and the necessary would be achieved in this case by combining automatic monitoring of all the likely fault conditions, with routine machinery space inspection say twice a day.

  13. Stirling Engine Controller

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaze, Gina M.

    2004-01-01

    and also safely shutdown the engines. The test will last for a period of 8000 to 9000 hours. Other types of tests that have been performed are: performance mapping, controller development, launch environment, and vibration emissions testing. Currently, the thermo-mechanical system branch is housing a RG-350, a stirling convertor. The convertor was used in previous tests such as a Hall Thruster test, world s first integrated test of a dynamic power system with electric propulsion. Another test performed was to conclude if free piston stirling convertors can be synchronized for vibration balancing, with no thermodynamic or electrical connections and not cause both to shutdown if one failed. The ability to reduce vibration by synchronizing convertor operation but still be able to operate when one partner fails is pertinent in space and terrestrial applications. The convertor is now being brought back into operation and a controller is in the process of being developed. This convertor will be used as a testbed for new controllers. I worked with Mary Ellen Roth on the electric engineering aspects of the RG-350. My main goal was to enhance the data collection process. I worked on different aspects of the RG-350, with a main focus on the engine controller. I drew a schematic of the wire connections in the engine controller, using PCB Express, so that a plan could be devised to connect the power meter properly between the output of the engine and the engine controller. I measured the power using two different instruments: Valhalla Scientific power meter and Ohio Semitronics power measurement device. The convertor is connected to an Agilent 34970A Data Acquisition/Switch Unit, which allows the user to measure, record, and monitor voltage, current, frequency, and temperature. I assisted in preparing the Data Acquisition for general operation. I also helped test a panel of transducers, which will be placed in the rack that powers and monitors the convertor.

  14. Statistical Engine Knock Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stotsky, Alexander A.

    2008-01-01

    A new statistical concept of the knock control of a spark ignition automotive engine is proposed . The control aim is associated with the statistical hy pothesis test which compares the threshold value to the average value of the max imal amplitud e of the knock sensor signal at a given freq uency....... C ontrol algorithm which is used for minimization of the regulation error realizes a simple count-up-count-d own logic. A new ad aptation algorithm for the knock d etection threshold is also d eveloped . C onfi d ence interval method is used as the b asis for ad aptation. A simple statistical mod el...... which includ es generation of the amplitud e signals, a threshold value d etermination and a knock sound mod el is d eveloped for evaluation of the control concept....

  15. Engine Cylinder Temperature Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilkenny, Jonathan Patrick; Duffy, Kevin Patrick

    2005-09-27

    A method and apparatus for controlling a temperature in a combustion cylinder in an internal combustion engine. The cylinder is fluidly connected to an intake manifold and an exhaust manifold. The method and apparatus includes increasing a back pressure associated with the exhaust manifold to a level sufficient to maintain a desired quantity of residual exhaust gas in the cylinder, and varying operation of an intake valve located between the intake manifold and the cylinder to an open duration sufficient to maintain a desired quantity of fresh air from the intake manifold to the cylinder, wherein controlling the quantities of residual exhaust gas and fresh air are performed to maintain the temperature in the cylinder at a desired level.

  16. Feedforward mapping for engine control

    OpenAIRE

    Aran, Volkan; Ünel, Mustafa; Unel, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    Feedforward control is widely used in electronic control units of internal combustion engines besides feedback controls. However, almost all feedforward control values are used in table form, also called maps, having engine speed and engine torque in their axes. Table approach limits all inte ractions in two input dimensions. This paper focuses on application of Gaussian process modelling of errors of inverse parametric model of the valve position. Validation results based on ...

  17. Engine Modelling for Control Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendricks, Elbert

    1997-01-01

    In earlier work published by the author and co-authors, a dynamic engine model called a Mean Value Engine Model (MVEM) was developed. This model is physically based and is intended mainly for control applications. In its newer form, it is easy to fit to many different engines and requires little...... engine data for this purpose. It is especially well suited to embedded model applications in engine controllers, such as nonlinear observer based air/fuel ratio and advanced idle speed control. After a brief review of this model, it will be compared with other similar models which can be found...

  18. HCCI engine control and optimization

    OpenAIRE

    Killingsworth, Nicholas J.

    2007-01-01

    Homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engines have the benefit of high efficiency with low emissions of nitrogen oxides and particulates. These benefits are due to the autoignition process of the dilute mixture of fuel and air during compression. However, because there is no direct ignition trigger, control of ignition is inherently more difficult than in standard internal combustion engines. This difficulty necessitates that a feedback controller be used to keep the engine at a desi...

  19. Advanced Control of Turbofan Engines

    CERN Document Server

    Richter, Hanz

    2012-01-01

    Advanced Control of Turbofan Engines describes the operational performance requirements of turbofan (commercial)engines from a controls systems perspective, covering industry-standard methods and research-edge advances. This book allows the reader to design controllers and produce realistic simulations using public-domain software like CMAPSS: Commercial Modular Aero-Propulsion System Simulation, whose versions are released to the public by NASA. The scope of the book is centered on the design of thrust controllers for both steady flight and transient maneuvers. Classical control theory is not dwelled on, but instead an introduction to general undergraduate control techniques is provided. This book also: Develops a thorough understanding of the challenges associated with engine operability from a control systems perspective, describing performance demands and operational constraints into the framework and language of modern control theory Presents solid theoretical support for classical and advanced engine co...

  20. Optimal control in thermal engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Badescu, Viorel

    2017-01-01

    This book is the first major work covering applications in thermal engineering and offering a comprehensive introduction to optimal control theory, which has applications in mechanical engineering, particularly aircraft and missile trajectory optimization. The book is organized in three parts: The first part includes a brief presentation of function optimization and variational calculus, while the second part presents a summary of the optimal control theory. Lastly, the third part describes several applications of optimal control theory in solving various thermal engineering problems. These applications are grouped in four sections: heat transfer and thermal energy storage, solar thermal engineering, heat engines and lubrication.Clearly presented and easy-to-use, it is a valuable resource for thermal engineers and thermal-system designers as well as postgraduate students.

  1. Plasma and controlled thermonuclear reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapitsa, P.

    1980-01-01

    The principle and prospects are given of three methods of achieving controlled thermonuclear reaction. The original and so far most promising TOKAMAK method is presented invented in the USSR. Another method is the heating of a sphere about 1 mm in diameter from a mixture of deuterium and tritium by focused laser light from all sides. The third method consists in continuous plasma heating. A rope-like plasma discharge at a temperature of more than a million K results in the gas from microwave oscillations. The discharge is placed in a magnetic field and the ion temperature is increased by magneto-acoustic waves. A reactor is proposed operating on this principle and problems are pointed out which will have to be resolved. (M.S.)

  2. Plasma and controlled thermonuclear reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kapitsa, P

    1980-06-01

    The principle and prospects are given of three methods of achieving controlled thermonuclear reaction. The original and so far most promising TOKAMAK method is presented invented in the USSR. Another method is the heating of a sphere about 1 mm in diameter from a mixture of deuterium and tritium by focused laser light from all sides. The third method consists in continuous plasma heating. A rope-like plasma discharge at a temperature of more than a million K results in the gas from microwave oscillations. The discharge is placed in a magnetic field and the ion temperature is increased by magneto-acoustic waves. A reactor is proposed operating on this principle and problems are pointed out which will have to be resolved.

  3. Dynamic Systems and Control Engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong Seok

    1994-02-01

    This book deals with introduction of dynamic system and control engineering, frequency domain modeling of dynamic system, temporal modeling of dynamic system, typical dynamic system and automatic control device, performance and stability of control system, root locus analysis, analysis of frequency domain dynamic system, design of frequency domain dynamic system, design and analysis of space, space of control system and digital control system such as control system design of direct digital and digitalization of consecutive control system.

  4. Dynamic Systems and Control Engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jong Seok

    1994-02-15

    This book deals with introduction of dynamic system and control engineering, frequency domain modeling of dynamic system, temporal modeling of dynamic system, typical dynamic system and automatic control device, performance and stability of control system, root locus analysis, analysis of frequency domain dynamic system, design of frequency domain dynamic system, design and analysis of space, space of control system and digital control system such as control system design of direct digital and digitalization of consecutive control system.

  5. Results of the 2010 Survey on Teaching Chemical Reaction Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverstein, David L.; Vigeant, Margot A. S.

    2012-01-01

    A survey of faculty teaching the chemical reaction engineering course or sequence during the 2009-2010 academic year at chemical engineering programs in the United States and Canada reveals change in terms of content, timing, and approaches to teaching. The report consists of two parts: first, a statistical and demographic characterization of the…

  6. Automatic control systems engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Yun Gi

    2004-01-01

    This book gives descriptions of automatic control for electrical electronics, which indicates history of automatic control, Laplace transform, block diagram and signal flow diagram, electrometer, linearization of system, space of situation, state space analysis of electric system, sensor, hydro controlling system, stability, time response of linear dynamic system, conception of root locus, procedure to draw root locus, frequency response, and design of control system.

  7. Teaching Reaction Engineering Using the Attainable Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, Matthew J.; Glasser, Benjamin J.; Glasser, David; Hausberger, Brendon; Hildebrandt, Diane

    2007-01-01

    Ask a graduating chemical engineering student the following question: What makes one reactor different from the next? The answers received will often be unsatisfactory and will vary widely in scope. Some may cite the difference between the basic design equations, others may point out a PFR is "longer," and still others may state that it…

  8. Fuzzy control in environmental engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Chmielowski, Wojciech Z

    2016-01-01

    This book is intended for engineers, technicians and people who plan to use fuzzy control in more or less developed and advanced control systems for manufacturing processes, or directly for executive equipment. Assuming that the reader possesses elementary knowledge regarding fuzzy sets and fuzzy control, by way of a reminder, the first parts of the book contain a reminder of the theoretical foundations as well as a description of the tools to be found in the Matlab/Simulink environment in the form of a toolbox. The major part of the book presents applications for fuzzy controllers in control systems for various manufacturing and engineering processes. It presents seven processes and problems which have been programmed using fuzzy controllers. The issues discussed concern the field of Environmental Engineering. Examples are the control of a flood wave passing through a hypothetical, and then the real Dobczyce reservoir in the Raba River, which is located in the upper Vistula River basin in Southern Poland, th...

  9. Systems and Control Engineering

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    activities directed towards the students and the general public. Designed .... attention has been directed towards the use of control and automation to mitigate the effects of those ... The history of automatic control can be divided into four main.

  10. HCCI Engine Optimization and Control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rolf D. Reitz

    2005-09-30

    The goal of this project was to develop methods to optimize and control Homogeneous-Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) engines, with emphasis on diesel-fueled engines. HCCI offers the potential of nearly eliminating IC engine NOx and particulate emissions at reduced cost over Compression Ignition Direct Injection engines (CIDI) by controlling pollutant emissions in-cylinder. The project was initiated in January, 2002, and the present report is the final report for work conducted on the project through December 31, 2004. Periodic progress has also been reported at bi-annual working group meetings held at USCAR, Detroit, MI, and at the Sandia National Laboratories. Copies of these presentation materials are available on CD-ROM, as distributed by the Sandia National Labs. In addition, progress has been documented in DOE Advanced Combustion Engine R&D Annual Progress Reports for FY 2002, 2003 and 2004. These reports are included as the Appendices in this Final report.

  11. Perturbing engine performance measurements to determine optimal engine control settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Li; Lee, Donghoon; Yilmaz, Hakan; Stefanopoulou, Anna

    2014-12-30

    Methods and systems for optimizing a performance of a vehicle engine are provided. The method includes determining an initial value for a first engine control parameter based on one or more detected operating conditions of the vehicle engine, determining a value of an engine performance variable, and artificially perturbing the determined value of the engine performance variable. The initial value for the first engine control parameter is then adjusted based on the perturbed engine performance variable causing the engine performance variable to approach a target engine performance variable. Operation of the vehicle engine is controlled based on the adjusted initial value for the first engine control parameter. These acts are repeated until the engine performance variable approaches the target engine performance variable.

  12. Model photo reaction centers via genetic engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhiyu Wang; DiMagno, T.J.; Popov, M.; Norris, J.R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)]|[Chicago Univ., IL (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Chikin Chan; Fleming, G. [Chicago Univ., IL (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Jau Tang; Hanson, D.; Schiffer, M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1992-12-31

    A series of reaction centers of Rhodococcus capsulatus isolated from a set of mutated organisms modified by site-directed mutagenesis at residues M208 and L181 are described. Changes in the amino acid at these sites affect both the energetics of the systems as well as the chemical kinetics for the initial ET event. Two empirical relations among the different mutants for the reduction potential and the ET rate are presented.

  13. Model photo reaction centers via genetic engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhiyu Wang; DiMagno, T.J.; Popov, M.; Norris, J.R. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States) Chicago Univ., IL (United States). Dept. of Chemistry); Chikin Chan; Fleming, G. (Chicago Univ., IL (United States). Dept. of Chemistry); Jau Tang; Hanson, D.; Schiffer, M. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States))

    1992-01-01

    A series of reaction centers of Rhodococcus capsulatus isolated from a set of mutated organisms modified by site-directed mutagenesis at residues M208 and L181 are described. Changes in the amino acid at these sites affect both the energetics of the systems as well as the chemical kinetics for the initial ET event. Two empirical relations among the different mutants for the reduction potential and the ET rate are presented.

  14. Biomedical applications of control engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Hacısalihzade, Selim S

    2013-01-01

    Biomedical Applications of Control Engineering is a lucidly written textbook for graduate control engin­eering and biomedical engineering students as well as for medical prac­ti­tioners who want to get acquainted with quantitative methods. It is based on decades of experience both in control engineering and clinical practice.   The book begins by reviewing basic concepts of system theory and the modeling process. It then goes on to discuss control engineering application areas like ·         Different models for the human operator, ·         Dosage and timing optimization in oral drug administration, ·         Measuring symptoms of and optimal dopaminergic therapy in Parkinson’s disease, ·         Measure­ment and control of blood glucose le­vels both naturally and by means of external controllers in diabetes, and ·         Control of depth of anaesthesia using inhalational anaesthetic agents like sevoflurane using both fuzzy and state feedback controllers....

  15. Engineering of metabolic control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, James C.

    2004-03-16

    The invention features a method of producing heterologous molecules in cells under the regulatory control of a metabolite and metabolic flux. The method can enhance the synthesis of heterologous polypeptides and metabolites.

  16. Handbook of smoke control engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Klote, John H; Turnbull, Paul G; Kashef, Ahmed; Ferreira, Michael J

    2012-01-01

    The Handbook of Smoke Control Engineering extends the tradition of the comprehensive treatment of smoke control technology, including fundamental concepts, smoke control systems, and methods of analysis. The handbook provides information needed for the analysis of design fires, including considerations of sprinklers, shielded fires, and transient fuels. It is also extremely useful for practicing engineers, architects, code officials, researchers, and students. Following the success of Principles of Smoke Management in 2002, this new book incorporates the latest research and advances in smoke control practice. New topics in the handbook are: controls, fire and smoke control in transport tunnels, and full-scale fire testing. For those getting started with the computer models CONTAM and CFAST, there are simplified instructions with examples. This is the first smoke control book with climatic data so that users will have easy-to-use weather data specifically for smoke control design for locations in the U.S., Can...

  17. Preventing Corrosion by Controlling Cathodic Reaction Kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-25

    3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 09/23/15 - 04/22/16 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Sa. CONTRACT NUMBER Preventing Corrosion by Controlling Cathodic Reaction...Preventing corrosion by controlling cathodic reaction kinetics Progress Report for Period: 1 SEP 2015-31 MAR 2016 John Keith Department of...25 March 2016 Preventing corrosion by controlling cathodic reaction kinetics Annual Summary Report: FY16 PI: John Keith, 412-624-7016,jakeith

  18. Femtosecond laser control of chemical reactions

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Du Plessis, A

    2010-08-31

    Full Text Available Femtosecond laser control of chemical reactions is made possible through the use of pulse-shaping techniques coupled to a learning algorithm feedback loop – teaching the laser pulse to control the chemical reaction. This can result in controllable...

  19. Concepts for Distributed Engine Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culley, Dennis E.; Thomas, Randy; Saus, Joseph

    2007-01-01

    Gas turbine engines for aero-propulsion systems are found to be highly optimized machines after over 70 years of development. Still, additional performance improvements are sought while reduction in the overall cost is increasingly a driving factor. Control systems play a vitally important part in these metrics but are severely constrained by the operating environment and the consequences of system failure. The considerable challenges facing future engine control system design have been investigated. A preliminary analysis has been conducted of the potential benefits of distributed control architecture when applied to aero-engines. In particular, reductions in size, weight, and cost of the control system are possible. NASA is conducting research to further explore these benefits, with emphasis on the particular benefits enabled by high temperature electronics and an open-systems approach to standardized communications interfaces.

  20. Wideband SI Engine Lambda Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Per Buchbjerg; Olsen, Mads Bruun; Poulsen, Jannik

    1998-01-01

    Long term control of the AFR (Air/Fuel Ratio) of spark ignition engines is currently accomplished with a self-oscialling PI control loop. Because of the intake/exhaust time delay, the oscillation frequency and hence bandwidth of this loop is small. This paper describes a new approach to the desig...

  1. 14 CFR 23.1143 - Engine controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Engine controls. 23.1143 Section 23.1143... Accessories § 23.1143 Engine controls. (a) There must be a separate power or thrust control for each engine... supercharger controls must be arranged to allow— (1) Separate control of each engine and each supercharger; and...

  2. Launch Control Network Engineer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medeiros, Samantha

    2017-01-01

    The Spaceport Command and Control System (SCCS) is being built at the Kennedy Space Center in order to successfully launch NASA’s revolutionary vehicle that allows humans to explore further into space than ever before. During my internship, I worked with the Network, Firewall, and Hardware teams that are all contributing to the huge SCCS network project effort. I learned the SCCS network design and the several concepts that are running in the background. I also updated and designed documentation for physical networks that are part of SCCS. This includes being able to assist and build physical installations as well as configurations. I worked with the network design for vehicle telemetry interfaces to the Launch Control System (LCS); this allows the interface to interact with other systems at other NASA locations. This network design includes the Space Launch System (SLS), Interim Cryogenic Propulsion Stage (ICPS), and the Orion Multipurpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV). I worked on the network design and implementation in the Customer Avionics Interface Development and Analysis (CAIDA) lab.

  3. Contamination Control for Thermal Engineers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Rachel B.

    2015-01-01

    The presentation will be given at the 26th Annual Thermal Fluids Analysis Workshop (TFAWS 2015) hosted by the Goddard Spaceflight Center (GSFC) Thermal Engineering Branch (Code 545). This course will cover the basics of Contamination Control, including contamination control related failures, the effects of contamination on Flight Hardware, what contamination requirements translate to, design methodology, and implementing contamination control into Integration, Testing and Launch.

  4. Advanced Development of a Compact 5-15 lbf Lox/Methane Thruster for an Integrated Reaction Control and Main Engine Propulsion System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurlbert, Eric A.; McManamen, John Patrick; Sooknanen, Josh; Studak, Joseph W.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the advanced development and testing of a compact 5 to 15 lbf LOX/LCH4 thruster for a pressure-fed integrated main engine and RCS propulsion system to be used on a spacecraft "vertical" test bed (VTB). The ability of the RCS thruster and the main engine to operate off the same propellant supply in zero-g reduces mass and improves mission flexibility. This compact RCS engine incorporates several features to dramatically reduce mass and parts count, to ease manufacturing, and to maintain acceptable performance given that specific impulse (Isp) is not the driver. For example, radial injection holes placed on the chamber body for easier drilling, and high temperature Haynes 230 were selected for the chamber over other more expensive options. The valve inlets are rotatable before welding allowing different orientations for vehicle integration. In addition, the engine design effort selected a coil-on-plug ignition system which integrates a relay and coil with the plug electrode, and moves some exciter electronics to avionics driver board. The engine injector design has small dribble volumes to target minimum pulse widths of 20 msec. and an efficient minimum impulse bit of less than 0.05 lbf-sec. The propellants, oxygen and methane, were chosen because together they are a non-toxic, Mars-forward, high density, space storable, and high performance propellant combination that is capable of pressure-fed and pump-fed configurations and integration with life support and power subsystems. This paper will present the results of the advanced development testing to date of the RCS thruster and the integration with a vehicle propulsion system.

  5. Optimal control for chemical engineers

    CERN Document Server

    Upreti, Simant Ranjan

    2013-01-01

    Optimal Control for Chemical Engineers gives a detailed treatment of optimal control theory that enables readers to formulate and solve optimal control problems. With a strong emphasis on problem solving, the book provides all the necessary mathematical analyses and derivations of important results, including multiplier theorems and Pontryagin's principle.The text begins by introducing various examples of optimal control, such as batch distillation and chemotherapy, and the basic concepts of optimal control, including functionals and differentials. It then analyzes the notion of optimality, de

  6. Chemical potential and reaction electronic flux in symmetry controlled reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt-Geisse, Stefan; Toro-Labbé, Alejandro

    2016-07-15

    In symmetry controlled reactions, orbital degeneracies among orbitals of different symmetries can occur along a reaction coordinate. In such case Koopmans' theorem and the finite difference approximation provide a chemical potential profile with nondifferentiable points. This results in an ill-defined reaction electronic flux (REF) profile, since it is defined as the derivative of the chemical potential with respect to the reaction coordinate. To overcome this deficiency, we propose a new way for the calculation of the chemical potential based on a many orbital approach, suitable for reactions in which symmetry is preserved. This new approach gives rise to a new descriptor: symmetry adapted chemical potential (SA-CP), which is the chemical potential corresponding to a given irreducible representation of a symmetry group. A corresponding symmetry adapted reaction electronic flux (SA-REF) is also obtained. Using this approach smooth chemical potential profiles and well defined REFs are achieved. An application of SA-CP and SA-REF is presented by studying the Cs enol-keto tautomerization of thioformic acid. Two SA-REFs are obtained, JA'(ξ) and JA'' (ξ). It is found that the tautomerization proceeds via an in-plane delocalized 3-center 4-electron O-H-S hypervalent bond which is predicted to exist only in the transition state (TS) region. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Chemical Reaction Engineering: Current Status and Future Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudukovic, M. P.

    1987-01-01

    Describes Chemical Reaction Engineering (CRE) as the discipline that quantifies the interplay of transport phenomena and kinetics in relating reactor performance to operating conditions and input variables. Addresses the current status of CRE in both academic and industrial settings and outlines future trends. (TW)

  8. Researches on Preliminary Chemical Reactions in Spark-Ignition Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    1943-06-01

    compression type, without ignition, the resulting preliminary reactions being detectable and meas- urable thermometrically . Contents I. Influence of Preliminary...thoroughly insulated be- tween the carburettor and the engine, by aluminium foil and asbestos. -I -I " I" I ’I il i~ " !, I I 1𔃻I I’ ) To enable the

  9. Problems in event based engine control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendricks, Elbert; Jensen, Michael; Chevalier, Alain Marie Roger

    1994-01-01

    Physically a four cycle spark ignition engine operates on the basis of four engine processes or events: intake, compression, ignition (or expansion) and exhaust. These events each occupy approximately 180° of crank angle. In conventional engine controllers, it is an accepted practice to sample...... the engine variables synchronously with these events (or submultiples of them). Such engine controllers are often called event-based systems. Unfortunately the main system noise (or disturbance) is also synchronous with the engine events: the engine pumping fluctuations. Since many electronic engine...... problems on accurate air/fuel ratio control of a spark ignition (SI) engine....

  10. Expanding P450 catalytic reaction space through evolution and engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, John A.; Farwell, Christopher C.; Arnold, Frances H.

    2014-01-01

    Advances in protein and metabolic engineering have led to wider use of enzymes to synthesize important molecules. However, many desirable transformations are not catalyzed by any known enzyme, driving interest in understanding how new enzymes can be created. The cytochrome P450 enzyme family, whose members participate in xenobiotic metabolism and natural products biosynthesis, catalyzes an impressive range of difficult chemical reactions that continues to grow as new enzymes are characterized. Recent work has revealed that P450-derived enzymes can also catalyze useful reactions previously accessible only to synthetic chemistry. The evolution and engineering of these enzymes provides an excellent case study for how to genetically encode new chemistry and expand biology’s reaction space. PMID:24658056

  11. Engineering Documentation and Data Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matteson, Michael J.; Bramley, Craig; Ciaruffoli, Veronica

    2001-01-01

    Mississippi Space Services (MSS) the facility services contractor for NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center (SSC), is utilizing technology to improve engineering documentation and data control. Two identified improvement areas, labor intensive documentation research and outdated drafting standards, were targeted as top priority. MSS selected AutoManager(R) WorkFlow from Cyco software to manage engineering documentation. The software is currently installed on over 150 desctops. The outdated SSC drafting standard was written for pre-CADD drafting methods, in other words, board drafting. Implementation of COTS software solutions to manage engineering documentation and update the drafting standard resulted in significant increases in productivity by reducing the time spent searching for documents.

  12. 14 CFR 29.1143 - Engine controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Engine controls. 29.1143 Section 29.1143... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Powerplant Controls and Accessories § 29.1143 Engine controls. (a) There must be a separate power control for each engine. (b) Power controls must be arranged...

  13. 14 CFR 27.1143 - Engine controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Engine controls. 27.1143 Section 27.1143... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Powerplant Controls and Accessories § 27.1143 Engine controls. (a) There must be a separate power control for each engine. (b) Power controls must be grouped...

  14. Moisture monitoring and control system engineering study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, K.E.; Fadeff, J.G.

    1995-01-01

    During the past 50 years, a wide variety of chemical compounds have been placed in the 149 single-shell tanks (SSTS) on the Hanford Site. A concern relating to chemical stability, chemical control, and safe storage of the waste is the potential for propagating reactions as a result of ferrocyanide-oxidizer and organic-oxidizer concentrations in the SSTS. Propagating reactions in fuel-nitrate mixtures are precluded if the amounts of fuel and moisture present in the waste are within specified limits. Because most credible ignition sources occur near the waste surface, the main emphasis of this study is toward monitoring and controlling moisture in the top 14 cm (5.5 in.) of waste. The purpose of this engineering study is to recommend a moisture monitoring and control system for use in SSTs containing sludge and saltcake. This study includes recommendations for: (1) monitoring and controlling moisture in SSTs; (2) the fundamental design criteria for a moisture monitoring and control system; and (3) criteria for the deployment of a moisture monitoring and control system in hanford Site SSTs. To support system recommendations, technical bases for selecting and using a moisture monitoring and control system are presented. Key functional requirements and a conceptual design are included to enhance system development and establish design criteria

  15. 14 CFR 25.1143 - Engine controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Engine controls. 25.1143 Section 25.1143... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Powerplant Controls and Accessories § 25.1143 Engine controls. (a) There must be a separate power or thrust control for each engine. (b) Power and thrust...

  16. Nonlinear control of the Salnikov model reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Recke, Bodil; Jørgensen, Sten Bay

    1999-01-01

    This paper explores different nonlinear control schemes, applied to a simple model reaction. The model is the Salnikov model, consisting of two ordinary differential equations. The control strategies investigated are I/O-linearisation, Exact linearisation, exact linearisation combined with LQR...

  17. Strata control in mineral engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bieniawski, Z.T.

    1986-01-01

    This book covers the state-of-the-art of strata control practice both in the United States and abroad with respect to strata reinforcement by rock bolting, long wall mining technology and innovations in energy development, such as mining for oil and tunneling for storage of high-level nuclear waste in deep underground repositories. It features coverage of design concepts in rock engineering and rockbolt systems, stability of rock pillars, rockbursts, shaft design and construction and a detailed consideration of mineral and energy needs in the United States

  18. Advanced nonlinear engine speed control systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vesterholm, Thomas; Hendricks, Elbert

    1994-01-01

    Several subsidiary control problems have turned out to be important for improving driveability and fuel consumption in modern spark ignition (SI) engine cars. Among these are idle speed control and cruise control. In this paper the idle speed and cruise control problems will be treated as one......: accurately tracking of a desired engine speed in the presence of model uncertainties and severe load disturbances. This is accomplished by using advanced nonlinear control techniques such as input/output-linearization and sliding mode control. These techniques take advantage of a nonlinear model...... of the engine dynamics, a mean value engine model....

  19. Internal combustion engine and method for control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Daniel G

    2013-05-21

    In one exemplary embodiment of the invention an internal combustion engine includes a piston disposed in a cylinder, a valve configured to control flow of air into the cylinder and an actuator coupled to the valve to control a position of the valve. The internal combustion engine also includes a controller coupled to the actuator, wherein the controller is configured to close the valve when an uncontrolled condition for the internal engine is determined.

  20. Model based development of engine control algorithms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, H.J.; Sturm, W.L.

    1996-01-01

    Model based development of engine control systems has several advantages. The development time and costs are strongly reduced because much of the development and optimization work is carried out by simulating both engine and control system. After optimizing the control algorithm it can be executed

  1. Recent Technology Advances in Distributed Engine Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culley, Dennis

    2017-01-01

    This presentation provides an overview of the work performed at NASA Glenn Research Center in distributed engine control technology. This is control system hardware technology that overcomes engine system constraints by modularizing control hardware and integrating the components over communication networks.

  2. Long life reaction control system design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanciullo, Thomas J.; Judd, Craig

    1993-02-01

    Future single stage to orbit systems will utilize oxygen/hydrogen propellants in their main propulsion means due to the propellant's high energy content and environmental acceptability. Operational effectiveness studies and life cycle cost studies have indicated that minimizing the number of different commodities on a given vehicle not only reduces cost, but reduces the ground span times in both the pre- and postflight operations. Therefore, oxygen and hydrogen should be used for the reaction controls systems, eliminating the need to deal with toxic or corrosive fluids. When the hydrogen scramjet powered NASP design development began in 1985, new system design studies considered overall integration of subsystems; in the context of that approach, O2/H2 reaction controls system were more than competitive with storable propellant systems and had the additional benefits of lower life cycle cost, rapid turnaround times, and O2 and H2 commodities for use throughout the vehicle. Similar benefits were derived in rocket-powered SSTO vehicles.

  3. Design of an embedded inverse-feedforward biomolecular tracking controller for enzymatic reaction processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foo, Mathias; Kim, Jongrae; Sawlekar, Rucha; Bates, Declan G

    2017-04-06

    Feedback control is widely used in chemical engineering to improve the performance and robustness of chemical processes. Feedback controllers require a 'subtractor' that is able to compute the error between the process output and the reference signal. In the case of embedded biomolecular control circuits, subtractors designed using standard chemical reaction network theory can only realise one-sided subtraction, rendering standard controller design approaches inadequate. Here, we show how a biomolecular controller that allows tracking of required changes in the outputs of enzymatic reaction processes can be designed and implemented within the framework of chemical reaction network theory. The controller architecture employs an inversion-based feedforward controller that compensates for the limitations of the one-sided subtractor that generates the error signals for a feedback controller. The proposed approach requires significantly fewer chemical reactions to implement than alternative designs, and should have wide applicability throughout the fields of synthetic biology and biological engineering.

  4. Remote Experiments in Control Engineering Education Laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milica B Naumović

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents Automatic Control Engineering Laboratory (ACEL - WebLab, an under-developed, internet-based remote laboratory for control engineering education at the Faculty of Electronic Engineering in Niš. Up to now, the remote laboratory integrates two physical systems (velocity servo system and magnetic levitation system and enables some levels of measurement and control. To perform experiments in ACEL-WebLab, the "LabVIEW Run Time Engine"and a standard web browser are needed.

  5. Dedicated EGR engine with dynamic load control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayman, Alan W.; McAlpine, Robert S.; Keating, Edward J.

    2016-09-06

    An internal combustion engine comprises a first engine bank and a second engine bank. A first intake valve is disposed in an intake port of a cylinder of the first engine bank, and is configured for metering the first flow of combustion air by periodically opening and closing according to a first intake valve lift and duration characteristic. A variable valve train control mechanism is configured for affecting the first intake valve lift and duration characteristic. Either a lift or duration of the first intake valve is modulated so as to satisfy an EGR control criterion.

  6. Advanced Control Considerations for Turbofan Engine Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, Joseph W.; Csank, Jeffrey T.; Chicatelli, Amy

    2016-01-01

    This paper covers the application of a model-based engine control (MBEC) methodology featuring a self tuning on-board model for an aircraft turbofan engine simulation. The nonlinear engine model is capable of modeling realistic engine performance, allowing for a verification of the advanced control methodology over a wide range of operating points and life cycle conditions. The on-board model is a piece-wise linear model derived from the nonlinear engine model and updated using an optimal tuner Kalman Filter estimation routine, which enables the on-board model to self-tune to account for engine performance variations. MBEC is used here to show how advanced control architectures can improve efficiency during the design phase of a turbofan engine by reducing conservative operability margins. The operability margins that can be reduced, such as stall margin, can expand the engine design space and offer potential for efficiency improvements. Application of MBEC architecture to a nonlinear engine simulation is shown to reduce the thrust specific fuel consumption by approximately 1% over the baseline design, while maintaining safe operation of the engine across the flight envelope.

  7. Experimental Investigation of Embedded Controlled Diesel Engine

    OpenAIRE

    R.Govindaraju; M.Bharathiraja; Dr. K.Ramani; Dr.K.R.Govindan

    2012-01-01

    Diesel engines are widely used in Automobiles, Agriculture and Power generation sectors in a large scale. The modern techniques have contributed a lot in the saving of fuel in these diesel engines. However, from 1970 onwards the fuel consumption becomes a serious concern because of a manifold increase of automobiles and fast depletion of non renewable sources of energy. Since the fuel injection system plays a major role in the consumption of fuel in diesel engines, various control measures we...

  8. Controlling LPG temperature for SI engine applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceviz, Mehmet Akif; Kaleli, Alirıza; Güner, Erdoğan

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the effects of the LPG temperature on the engine performance and the exhaust emission characteristics have been investigated experimentally on an SI engine. In conventional injection systems, the LPG temperature increases excessively during the phase change in pressure regulator, and reduces the engine volumetric efficiency. According to the test results, engine performance and NO emission characteristics can be improved by controlling the LPG temperature before injecting to the engine intake manifold. A new control system taking into account the results of the study has been developed and tested. In order to control the LPG temperature, the coolant flow rate in pressure regulator circuit was arranged by using a control valve activated by a PID controller unit. Results of the study showed that the engine brake power loss can be increased by about 1.85% and NO emissions can be decreased by about 2% as compared to the operation with the original LPG injection system. - Highlights: • Effects of the LPG temperature have been examined. • Engine performance characteristics and exhaust emissions have been studied. • Results reveal that the LPG temperature should be kept in a range. • A prototype LPG temperature control system has been successfully developed

  9. Tracing And Control Of Engineering Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Philip R.; Stoller, Richard L.; Neville, Ted; Boyle, Karen A.

    1991-01-01

    TRACER (Tracing and Control of Engineering Requirements) is data-base/word-processing software system created to document and maintain order of both requirements and descriptions associated with engineering project. Implemented on IBM PC under PC-DOS. Written with CLIPPER.

  10. The Phase Behavior Effect on the Reaction Engineering of Transesterification Reactions and Reactor Design for Continuous Biodiesel Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csernica, Stephen N.

    The demand for renewable forms of energy has increased tremendously over the past two decades. Of all the different forms of renewable energy, biodiesel, a liquid fuel, has emerged as one of the more viable possibilities. This is in large part due to the fact that biodiesel can readily be used in modern day diesel engines with nearly no engine modifications. It is commonly blended with conventional petroleum-derived diesel but it can also be used neat. As a result of the continued growth of the industry, there has been a correspondingly large increase in the scientific and technical research conducted on the subject. Much of the research has been conducted on the feasibility of using different types of feedstocks, which generally vary with respect to geographic locale, as well as different types of catalysts. Much of the work of the present study was involved with the investigation of the binary liquid-liquid nature of the system and its effects on the reaction kinetics. Initially, the development of an analytical method for the analysis of the compounds present in transesterification reaction mixtures using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was developed. The use of UV(205 nm) as well as refractive index detection (RID) were shown capable to detect the various different types of components associated with transesterification reactions. Reversed-phase chromatography with isocratic elution was primarily used. Using a unique experimental apparatus enabling the simultaneous analysis of both liquid phases throughout the reaction, an experimental method was developed for measuring the reaction rate under both mass transfer control and reaction control. The transesterification reaction rate under each controlling mechanism was subsequently evaluated and compared. It was determined that the reaction rate is directly proportional to the concentration of triglycerides in the methanol phase. Furthermore, the reaction rate accelerates rapidly as the system

  11. Johnson Controls | College of Engineering & Applied Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Electrical Engineering Instructional Laboratories Student Resources Industrial & Manufacturing Engineering Industrial & Manufacturing Engineering Academic Programs Industrial & Manufacturing Engineering Major Industrial & Manufacturing Engineering Minor Industrial & Manufacturing Engineering

  12. Value-Engineering Review for Numerical Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, J. L.

    1984-01-01

    Selecting parts for conversion from conventional machining to numerical control, value-engineering review performed for every part to identify potential changes to part design that result in increased production efficiency.

  13. Method of operating a thermal engine powered by a chemical reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, J.; Escher, C.

    1988-06-07

    The invention involves a novel method of increasing the efficiency of a thermal engine. Heat is generated by a non-linear chemical reaction of reactants, said heat being transferred to a thermal engine such as Rankine cycle power plant. The novel method includes externally perturbing one or more of the thermodynamic variables of said non-linear chemical reaction. 7 figs.

  14. Oxidative coupling of methane. Still a challenge for catalyst development and reaction engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schomaecker, R.; Arnd, S.; Beck, B. [Technical Univ. of Berlin (Germany). Dept. of Chemistry] [and others

    2013-11-01

    The oxidative coupling of methane to ethylene offers great industrial potential, because it would broaden the feedstock basis for chemical industry. Because methane is the most stable hydrocarbon, its activation requires high temperatures and it is a great scientific challenge to overcome the apparent yield limit of about 25%. This barrier has never been exceeded since the beginning of OCM research more than 20 years ago. Results and Discussion: This challenge is one of the key projects of the Cluster of Excellence UNICAT and requires joined efforts and contributions from many disciplines, because this reaction shows a combined surface/gas phase reaction mechanism which results in very unusual and complex dependencies on the reaction conditions. Although dozens of materials are known to catalyze the reaction, the selection of a catalyst suitable for an industrial process is difficult, due to severe stability problems of many materials. Li/MgO was chosen by the UNICAT-team as model catalyst, because of the extended literature about it. But it shows uncontrollable deactivation, no matter what precursor and method were used for its preparation. Nevertheless, it is a suitable catalyst for fundamental studies, due to its formal chemical simplicity. A key result of the joined research activities was the disproval of the Lunsford mechanism and the elucidation of the real function of lithium as a surface modifier creating a rough and defect-rich surface. For the development of an OCM process another catalyst, Na{sub 2}WO{sub 4}/Mn/SiO{sub 2}, was chosen from the rich literature on OCM. Although less is known about its structure and the reaction mechanism at this catalyst, its stability was the most important reason to select it for further engineering studies. Kinetic isotope measurements and studies in a TAP reactor demonstrate the similarity of the reaction mechanisms at both catalysts, despite the completely different materials. The selectivity is largely controlled by

  15. Engineering Process Monitoring for Control Room Operation

    OpenAIRE

    Bätz, M

    2001-01-01

    A major challenge in process operation is to reduce costs and increase system efficiency whereas the complexity of automated process engineering, control and monitoring systems increases continuously. To cope with this challenge the design, implementation and operation of process monitoring systems for control room operation have to be treated as an ensemble. This is only possible if the engineering of the monitoring information is focused on the production objective and is lead in close coll...

  16. Engineering Metallic Nanoparticles for Enhancing and Probing Catalytic Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Gillian; Holmes, Justin D

    2016-07-01

    Recent developments in tailoring the structural and chemical properties of colloidal metal nanoparticles (NPs) have led to significant enhancements in catalyst performance. Controllable colloidal synthesis has also allowed tailor-made NPs to serve as mechanistic probes for catalytic processes. The innovative use of colloidal NPs to gain fundamental insights into catalytic function will be highlighted across a variety of catalytic and electrocatalytic applications. The engineering of future heterogenous catalysts is also moving beyond size, shape and composition considerations. Advancements in understanding structure-property relationships have enabled incorporation of complex features such as tuning surface strain to influence the behavior of catalytic NPs. Exploiting plasmonic properties and altering colloidal surface chemistry through functionalization are also emerging as important areas for rational design of catalytic NPs. This news article will highlight the key developments and challenges to the future design of catalytic NPs. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Control apparatus for hot gas engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stotts, Robert E.

    1986-01-01

    A mean pressure power control system for a hot gas (Stirling) engine utilizing a plurality of supply tanks for storing a working gas at different pressures. During pump down operations gas is bled from the engine by a compressor having a plurality of independent pumping volumes. In one embodiment of the invention, a bypass control valve system allows one or more of the compressor volumes to be connected to the storage tanks. By selectively sequencing the bypass valves, a capacity range can be developed over the compressor that allows for lower engine idle pressures and more rapid pump down rates.

  18. Nuclear thermal rocket engine operation and control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunn, S.V.; Savoie, M.T.; Hundal, R.

    1993-06-01

    The operation of a typical Rover/Nerva-derived nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) engine is characterized and the control requirements of the NTR are defined. A rationale for the selection of a candidate diverse redundant NTR engine control system is presented and the projected component operating requirements are related to the state of the art of candidate components and subsystems. The projected operational capabilities of the candidate system are delineated for the startup, full-thrust, shutdown, and decay heat removal phases of the engine operation. 9 refs

  19. Software engineering practices for control system reliability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    S. K. Schaffner; K. S White

    1999-01-01

    This paper will discuss software engineering practices used to improve Control System reliability. The authors begin with a brief discussion of the Software Engineering Institute's Capability Maturity Model (CMM) which is a framework for evaluating and improving key practices used to enhance software development and maintenance capabilities. The software engineering processes developed and used by the Controls Group at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab), using the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS) for accelerator control, are described. Examples are given of how their procedures have been used to minimized control system downtime and improve reliability. While their examples are primarily drawn from their experience with EPICS, these practices are equally applicable to any control system. Specific issues addressed include resource allocation, developing reliable software lifecycle processes and risk management

  20. Nonlinear control of a spark ignition engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bidan, P [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), 31 - Toulouse (France); Boverie, S; Chaumerliac, V [Siemens AutomotiveSA, MIRGAS Laboratory, 31 - Toulouse (France)

    1994-12-31

    This paper describes the improvements which can be made to spark ignition engine by extensive use of automatic control. Particular emphasis is placed on fast transient phases produced by simultaneous action on the throttle and the electronic fuel injection device. The aim is to achieve better performance for the fuel/air ratio regulation system, thereby improving engine efficiency and exhaust emission during these transient phases. The authors begin by presenting an average dynamic model of the intake manifold validated on an engine test bench and goes on to develop a closed-loop system controlling average pressure in the intake manifold using the reference tracking model method. The air supply control system is combined with a predictor to compensate for delays in the injection procedure. The paper concludes with a comparison between the results obtained using simulation and those obtained experimentally from the engine. (author) 10 refs.

  1. 46 CFR 121.620 - Propulsion engine control systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Propulsion engine control systems. 121.620 Section 121... Propulsion engine control systems. (a) A vessel must have two independent means of controlling each propulsion engine. Control must be provided for the engine speed, direction of shaft rotation, and engine...

  2. Biological Systems Thinking for Control Engineering Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. J. Murray-Smith

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Artificial neural networks and genetic algorithms are often quoted in discussions about the contribution of biological systems thinking to engineering design. This paper reviews work on the neuromuscular system, a field in which biological systems thinking could make specific contributions to the development and design of automatic control systems for mechatronics and robotics applications. The paper suggests some specific areas in which a better understanding of this biological control system could be expected to contribute to control engineering design methods in the future. Particular emphasis is given to the nonlinear nature of elements within the neuromuscular system and to processes of neural signal processing, sensing and system adaptivity. Aspects of the biological system that are of particular significance for engineering control systems include sensor fusion, sensor redundancy and parallelism, together with advanced forms of signal processing for adaptive and learning control

  3. Concurrently adjusting interrelated control parameters to achieve optimal engine performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Li; Lee, Donghoon; Yilmaz, Hakan; Stefanopoulou, Anna

    2015-12-01

    Methods and systems for real-time engine control optimization are provided. A value of an engine performance variable is determined, a value of a first operating condition and a value of a second operating condition of a vehicle engine are detected, and initial values for a first engine control parameter and a second engine control parameter are determined based on the detected first operating condition and the detected second operating condition. The initial values for the first engine control parameter and the second engine control parameter are adjusted based on the determined value of the engine performance variable to cause the engine performance variable to approach a target engine performance variable. In order to cause the engine performance variable to approach the target engine performance variable, adjusting the initial value for the first engine control parameter necessitates a corresponding adjustment of the initial value for the second engine control parameter.

  4. Engineering Process Monitoring for Control Room Operation

    CERN Document Server

    Bätz, M

    2001-01-01

    A major challenge in process operation is to reduce costs and increase system efficiency whereas the complexity of automated process engineering, control and monitoring systems increases continuously. To cope with this challenge the design, implementation and operation of process monitoring systems for control room operation have to be treated as an ensemble. This is only possible if the engineering of the monitoring information is focused on the production objective and is lead in close collaboration of control room teams, exploitation personnel and process specialists. In this paper some principles for the engineering of monitoring information for control room operation are developed at the example of the exploitation of a particle accelerator at the European Laboratory for Nuclear Research (CERN).

  5. RxnFinder: biochemical reaction search engines using molecular structures, molecular fragments and reaction similarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Qian-Nan; Deng, Zhe; Hu, Huanan; Cao, Dong-Sheng; Liang, Yi-Zeng

    2011-09-01

    Biochemical reactions play a key role to help sustain life and allow cells to grow. RxnFinder was developed to search biochemical reactions from KEGG reaction database using three search criteria: molecular structures, molecular fragments and reaction similarity. RxnFinder is helpful to get reference reactions for biosynthesis and xenobiotics metabolism. RxnFinder is freely available via: http://sdd.whu.edu.cn/rxnfinder. qnhu@whu.edu.cn.

  6. Mechanical engineers' handbook, design, instrumentation, and controls

    CERN Document Server

    Kutz, Myer

    2015-01-01

    Full coverage of electronics, MEMS, and instrumentation andcontrol in mechanical engineering This second volume of Mechanical Engineers' Handbookcovers electronics, MEMS, and instrumentation and control, givingyou accessible and in-depth access to the topics you'll encounterin the discipline: computer-aided design, product design formanufacturing and assembly, design optimization, total qualitymanagement in mechanical system design, reliability in themechanical design process for sustainability, life-cycle design,design for remanufacturing processes, signal processing, dataacquisition and dis

  7. Engineered Alloy Structures by Friction Stir Reaction Processing, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR Phase I effort examines the feasibility of an innovative surface modification technology incorporating friction stir reaction processing for producing...

  8. Integrated Control System Engineering Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-12-01

    Advanced Medium Range Air to Air Missile ASTEC Advanced Speech Technology Experimental Configuration BA Body Axis BCIU Bus Control Interface Unit BMU Bus...support nreeded to tie an ASTEC speech recognition system into the DIGISYN fJcility and support an FIGR experiment designed to investigate the voice...information passed to the PDP computer consisted of integers which represented words or phrases recognized by the ASTEC recognition system. An interface

  9. Design of an embedded inverse-feedforward biomolecular tracking controller for enzymatic reaction processes

    OpenAIRE

    Foo, Mathias; Kim, Jongrae; Sawlekar, Rucha; Bates, Declan G.

    2017-01-01

    Feedback control is widely used in chemical engineering to improve the performance and robustness of chemical processes. Feedback controllers require a ‘subtractor’ that is able to compute the error between the process output and the reference signal. In the case of embedded biomolecular control circuits, subtractors designed using standard chemical reaction network theory can only realise one-sided subtraction, rendering standard controller design approaches inadequate. Here, we show how a b...

  10. Tickover speed controller for car engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawk, R L

    1980-05-22

    In general, the tickover speed of a car engine is made sufficiently high, in order to permit an assumed maximum load to be taken from the engine at tickover. This setting of the tickover speed is usually done by stops in the fuel supply. Matching the actual load would lead to lower fuel consumption, without any danger of the engine stalling. The purpose of the invention is to provide a tickover speed controller, so that the tickover speed is adjusted by electronic control equipment, independently of the machine load. The fuel consumption on tickover is reduced and the emission of noxious substances is decreased. The electro-magnetic control of the throttle valve tickover setting is explained by extensive section drawings of the system. This process dispenses with the special tickover cams for a cold start.

  11. Controlled drug release for tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rambhia, Kunal J; Ma, Peter X

    2015-12-10

    Tissue engineering is often referred to as a three-pronged discipline, with each prong corresponding to 1) a 3D material matrix (scaffold), 2) drugs that act on molecular signaling, and 3) regenerative living cells. Herein we focus on reviewing advances in controlled release of drugs from tissue engineering platforms. This review addresses advances in hydrogels and porous scaffolds that are synthesized from natural materials and synthetic polymers for the purposes of controlled release in tissue engineering. We pay special attention to efforts to reduce the burst release effect and to provide sustained and long-term release. Finally, novel approaches to controlled release are described, including devices that allow for pulsatile and sequential delivery. In addition to recent advances, limitations of current approaches and areas of further research are discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Development of a robust and compact kerosene–diesel reaction mechanism for diesel engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tay, Kun Lin; Yang, Wenming; Mohan, Balaji; An, Hui; Zhou, Dezhi; Yu, Wenbin

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • An approach is used to develop a robust kerosene–diesel reaction mechanism. • Ignition delay of the kerosene sub-mechanism is well validated with experiments. • The kerosene sub-mechanism reproduces the flame lift-off lengths of Jet-A reasonably well. • The kerosene sub-mechanism performs reasonably well under engine conditions. - Abstract: The use of kerosene fuels in internal combustion engines is getting more widespread. The North Atlantic Treaty Organization military is pushing for the use of a single fuel on the battlefield in order to reduce logistical issues. Moreover, in some countries, fuel adulteration is a serious matter where kerosene is blended with diesel and used in diesel engines. So far, most investigations done regarding the use of kerosene fuels in diesel engines are experimental and there is negligible simulation work done in this area possibly because of the lack of a robust and compact kerosene reaction mechanism. This work focuses on the development of a small but reliable kerosene–diesel reaction mechanism, suitable to be used for diesel engine simulations. The new kerosene–diesel reaction mechanism consists only of 48 species and 152 reactions. Furthermore, the kerosene sub-mechanism in this new mechanism is well validated for its ignition delay times and has proven to replicate kerosene combustion well in a constant volume combustion chamber and an optical engine. Overall, this new kerosene–diesel reaction mechanism is proven to be robust and practical for diesel engine simulations.

  13. Enhanced Engine Control for Emergency Operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litt, Jonathan S.

    2012-01-01

    C-MAPSS40k engine simulation has been developed and is available to the public. The authenticity of the engine performance and controller enabled the development of realistic enhanced control modes through controller modification alone. Use of enhanced control modes improved stability and control of an impaired aircraft. - Fast Response is useful for manual manipulation of the throttles - Use of Fast Response improved stability as part of a yaw rate feedback system. - Use of Overthrust shortened takeoff distance, but was generally useful in flight, too. Initial lack of pilot familiarity resulted in discomfort, especially with yaw rate feedback, but that was the only drawback, overall the pilot found the enhanced modes very helpful.

  14. 46 CFR 184.620 - Propulsion engine control systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Propulsion engine control systems. 184.620 Section 184... Communications Systems § 184.620 Propulsion engine control systems. (a) A vessel must have two independent means of controlling each propulsion engine. Control must be provided for the engine speed, direction of...

  15. An autonomous organic reaction search engine for chemical reactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragone, Vincenza; Sans, Victor; Henson, Alon B.; Granda, Jaroslaw M.; Cronin, Leroy

    2017-06-01

    The exploration of chemical space for new reactivity, reactions and molecules is limited by the need for separate work-up-separation steps searching for molecules rather than reactivity. Herein we present a system that can autonomously evaluate chemical reactivity within a network of 64 possible reaction combinations and aims for new reactivity, rather than a predefined set of targets. The robotic system combines chemical handling, in-line spectroscopy and real-time feedback and analysis with an algorithm that is able to distinguish and select the most reactive pathways, generating a reaction selection index (RSI) without need for separate work-up or purification steps. This allows the automatic navigation of a chemical network, leading to previously unreported molecules while needing only to do a fraction of the total possible reactions without any prior knowledge of the chemistry. We show the RSI correlates with reactivity and is able to search chemical space using the most reactive pathways.

  16. Engine control techniques to account for fuel effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Shankar; Frazier, Timothy R.; Stanton, Donald W.; Xu, Yi; Bunting, Bruce G.; Wolf, Leslie R.

    2014-08-26

    A technique for engine control to account for fuel effects including providing an internal combustion engine and a controller to regulate operation thereof, the engine being operable to combust a fuel to produce an exhaust gas; establishing a plurality of fuel property inputs; establishing a plurality of engine performance inputs; generating engine control information as a function of the fuel property inputs and the engine performance inputs; and accessing the engine control information with the controller to regulate at least one engine operating parameter.

  17. Progress in biocatalysis with immobilized viable whole cells: systems development, reaction engineering and applications

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Polakovič, M.; Švitel, J.; Bučko, M.; Filip, J.; Neděla, Vilém; Ansorge-Schumacher, M.B.; Gemeiner, P.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 39, č. 5 (2017), s. 667-683 ISSN 0141-5492 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : biocatalysis * immobilization methods * immobilized whole-cell biocatalyst * multienzyme cascade reactions * process economics * reaction engineering Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering OBOR OECD: Bioprocessing technologies (industrial processes relying on biological agents to drive the process) biocatalysis, fermentation Impact factor: 1.730, year: 2016

  18. Engineering to Control Noise, Loading, and Optimal Operating Points

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell R. Swartz

    2000-01-01

    Successful engineering of low-energy nuclear systems requires control of noise, loading, and optimum operating point (OOP) manifolds. The latter result from the biphasic system response of low-energy nuclear reaction (LENR)/cold fusion systems, and their ash production rate, to input electrical power. Knowledge of the optimal operating point manifold can improve the reproducibility and efficacy of these systems in several ways. Improved control of noise, loading, and peak production rates is available through the study, and use, of OOP manifolds. Engineering of systems toward the OOP-manifold drive-point peak may, with inclusion of geometric factors, permit more accurate uniform determinations of the calibrated activity of these materials/systems

  19. Wind energy systems control engineering design

    CERN Document Server

    Garcia-Sanz, Mario

    2012-01-01

    IntroductionBroad Context and MotivationConcurrent Engineering: A Road Map for EnergyQuantitative Robust ControlNovel CAD Toolbox for QFT Controller DesignOutline Part I: Advanced Robust Control Techniques: QFT and Nonlinear SwitchingIntroduction to QFTQuantitative Feedback TheoryWhy Feedback? QFT OverviewInsight into the QFT TechniqueBenefits of QFTMISO Analog QFT Control SystemIntroductionQFT Method (Single-Loop MISO System)Design Procedure OutlineMinimum-Phase System Performance SpecificationsJ LTI Plant ModelsPlant Templates of P?(s), P( j_i )Nominal PlantU-Contour (Stability Bound)Trackin

  20. Engine control system having speed-based timing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willi, Martin L [Dunlap, IL; Fiveland, Scott B [Metamora, IL; Montgomery, David T [Edelstein, IL; Gong, Weidong [Dunlap, IL

    2012-02-14

    A control system for an engine having a cylinder is disclosed having an engine valve movable to regulate a fluid flow of the cylinder and an actuator associated with the engine valve. The control system also has a controller in communication with the actuator. The controller is configured to receive a signal indicative of engine speed and compare the engine speed signal with a desired engine speed. The controller is also configured to selectively regulate the actuator to adjust a timing of the engine valve to control an amount of air/fuel mixture delivered to the cylinder based on the comparison.

  1. Chemical Reaction Engineering Applications in Non-traditional Technologies. A Textbook Supplement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Phillip E.; Blaine, Steven

    1991-01-01

    A set of educational materials that have been developed which deal with chemical engineering applications in emerging technologies is described. The organization and the content of the supplemental textbook materials and how they can be integrated into an undergraduate reaction engineering course are discussed. (KR)

  2. Learning the Fundamentals of Kinetics and Reaction Engineering with the Catalytic Oxidation of Methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cybulskis, Viktor J.; Smeltz, Andrew D.; Zvinevich, Yury; Gounder, Rajamani; Delgass, W. Nicholas; Ribeiro, Fabio H.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding catalytic chemistry, collecting and interpreting kinetic data, and operating chemical reactors are critical skills for chemical engineers. This laboratory experiment provides students with a hands-on supplement to a course in chemical kinetics and reaction engineering. The oxidation of methane with a palladium catalyst supported on…

  3. Double acting stirling engine phase control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berchowitz, David M.

    1983-01-01

    A mechanical device for effecting a phase change between the expansion and compression volumes of a double-acting Stirling engine uses helical elements which produce opposite rotation of a pair of crankpins when a control rod is moved, so the phase between two pairs of pistons is changed by +.psi. and the phase between the other two pairs of pistons is changed by -.psi.. The phase can change beyond .psi.=90.degree. at which regenerative braking and then reversal of engine rotation occurs.

  4. Methanator fueled engines for pollution control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cagliostro, D. E.; Winkler, E. L.

    1973-01-01

    A methanator fueled Otto-cycle engine is compared with other methods proposed to control pollution due to automobile exhaust emissions. The comparison is made with respect to state of development, emission factors, capital cost, operational and maintenance costs, performance, operational limitations, and impact on the automotive industries. The methanator fueled Otto-cycle engine is projected to meet 1975 emission standards and operate at a lower relative total cost compared to the catalytic muffler system and to have low impact. Additional study is required for system development.

  5. Jet Engine Control Using Ethernet with a BRAIN (Postprint)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hall, Brendan; Paulitsch, Michael; Benson, Dewey; Behbahani, Alireza

    2008-01-01

    .... However, achieving a distributed architecture that supports the increasing computational demands of engine control and prognostics strategies whilst surviving in the harsh on-engine environment...

  6. Structural Control Systems Implemented in Civil Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian Pastia

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the past three decades, a great interest has been generated by the use of protection systems to mitigate the effects of dynamic environmental hazards on civil engineering structures, such as earthquakes and strong wind. These control systems develop controllable forces to add or dissipate energy in a structure, or both, due to specific devices integrated with sensors, controllers and real – time process to operate. The paper includes the advantages of these technologies consisting of the following sections: 1 represents an introduction, 2 deals with passive control system, 3 regards some control techniques, 4 concerns hybrid control techniques, 5 contains semi – active control techniques, and 6 is dedicated to general conclusions.

  7. Communication: Control of chemical reactions using electric field gradients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deshmukh, Shivaraj D.; Tsori, Yoav, E-mail: tsori@bgu.ac.il [Department of Chemical Engineering, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva 84105 (Israel)

    2016-05-21

    We examine theoretically a new idea for spatial and temporal control of chemical reactions. When chemical reactions take place in a mixture of solvents, an external electric field can alter the local mixture composition, thereby accelerating or decelerating the rate of reaction. The spatial distribution of electric field strength can be non-trivial and depends on the arrangement of the electrodes producing it. In the absence of electric field, the mixture is homogeneous and the reaction takes place uniformly in the reactor volume. When an electric field is applied, the solvents separate and the reactants are concentrated in the same phase or separate to different phases, depending on their relative miscibility in the solvents, and this can have a large effect on the kinetics of the reaction. This method could provide an alternative way to control runaway reactions and to increase the reaction rate without using catalysts.

  8. Communication: Control of chemical reactions using electric field gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshmukh, Shivaraj D; Tsori, Yoav

    2016-05-21

    We examine theoretically a new idea for spatial and temporal control of chemical reactions. When chemical reactions take place in a mixture of solvents, an external electric field can alter the local mixture composition, thereby accelerating or decelerating the rate of reaction. The spatial distribution of electric field strength can be non-trivial and depends on the arrangement of the electrodes producing it. In the absence of electric field, the mixture is homogeneous and the reaction takes place uniformly in the reactor volume. When an electric field is applied, the solvents separate and the reactants are concentrated in the same phase or separate to different phases, depending on their relative miscibility in the solvents, and this can have a large effect on the kinetics of the reaction. This method could provide an alternative way to control runaway reactions and to increase the reaction rate without using catalysts.

  9. Study on the Attitude Control of Spacecraft Using Reaction Wheels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ju-Young Du

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available Attitude determination and control of satellite is important component which determines the accomplish satellite missions. In this study, attitude control using reaction wheels and momentum dumping of wheels are considered. Attitude control law is designed by Sliding control and LQR. Attitude maneuver control law is obtained by Shooting method. Wheels momentum dumping control law is designed by Bang-Bang control. Four reaction wheels are configurated for minimized the electric power consumption. Wheels control torque and magnetic moment of magnetic torquer are limited.

  10. Control of Maillard Reactions in Foods: Strategies and Chemical Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Marianne N; Ray, Colin A

    2017-06-14

    Maillard reactions lead to changes in food color, organoleptic properties, protein functionality, and protein digestibility. Numerous different strategies for controlling Maillard reactions in foods have been attempted during the past decades. In this paper, recent advances in strategies for controlling the Maillard reaction and subsequent downstream reaction products in food systems are critically reviewed. The underlying mechanisms at play are presented, strengths and weaknesses of each strategy are discussed, and reasonable reaction mechanisms are proposed to reinforce the evaluations. The review includes strategies involving addition of functional ingredients, such as plant polyphenols and vitamins, as well as enzymes. The resulting trapping or modification of Maillard targets, reactive intermediates, and advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) are presented with their potential unwanted side effects. Finally, recent advances in processing for control of Maillard reactions are discussed.

  11. Automatic Tuning of Control Parameters for Single Speed Engines

    OpenAIRE

    Olsson, Johan

    2004-01-01

    In Scania’s single speed engines for industrial and marine use, the engine speed is controlled by a PI-controller. This controller is tuned independent of engine type and application. This brings certain disadvantages since the engines are used in a wide range of applications where the dynamics may differ. In this thesis, the possibility to tune the controller automatically for a specific engine installation has been investigated. The work shows that automatic tuning is possible. By performin...

  12. The Use of Executive Control Processes in Engineering Design by Engineering Students and Professional Engineers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Raymond A.; Johnson, Scott D.

    2012-01-01

    A cognitive construct that is important when solving engineering design problems is executive control process, or metacognition. It is a central feature of human consciousness that enables one "to be aware of, monitor, and control mental processes." The framework for this study was conceptualized by integrating the model for creative design, which…

  13. Engineering-scale dust control experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winberg, M.R.; Pawelko, R.J.; Jacobs, N.C.; Thompson, D.N.

    1990-12-01

    This report presents the results of engineering scale dust-control experiments relating to contamination control during handling of transuranic waste. These experiments focused on controlling dust during retrieval operations of buried waste where waste and soil are intimately mixed. Sources of dust generation during retrieval operations include digging, dumping, and vehicle traffic. Because contaminants are expected to attach to soil particles and move with the generated dust, control of the dust spread may be the key to contamination control. Dust control techniques examined in these experiments include the use of misting systems, soil fixatives, and dust suppression agents. The Dryfog Ultrasonic Misting Head, manufactured by Sonics, Incorporated, and ENTAC, an organic resin derived from tree sap manufactured by ENTAC Corporation, were tested. The results of the experiments include product performance and recommended application methods. 19 figs., 7 refs., 6 tabs

  14. A cellular automata approach to chemical reactions : 1 reaction controlled systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korte, de A.C.J.; Brouwers, H.J.H.

    2013-01-01

    A direct link between the chemical reaction controlled (shrinking core) model and cellular automata, to study the dissolution of particles, is derived in this paper. Previous research on first and second order reactions is based on the concentration of the reactant. The present paper describes the

  15. Receptor control in mesenchymal stem cell engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalby, Matthew J.; García, Andrés J.; Salmeron-Sanchez, Manuel

    2018-03-01

    Materials science offers a powerful tool to control mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) growth and differentiation into functional phenotypes. A complex interplay between the extracellular matrix and growth factors guides MSC phenotypes in vivo. In this Review, we discuss materials-based bioengineering approaches to direct MSC fate in vitro and in vivo, mimicking cell-matrix-growth factor crosstalk. We first scrutinize MSC-matrix interactions and how the properties of a material can be tailored to support MSC growth and differentiation in vitro, with an emphasis on MSC self-renewal mechanisms. We then highlight important growth factor signalling pathways and investigate various materials-based strategies for growth factor presentation and delivery. Integrin-growth factor crosstalk in the context of MSC engineering is introduced, and bioinspired material designs with the potential to control the MSC niche phenotype are considered. Finally, we summarize important milestones on the road to MSC engineering for regenerative medicine.

  16. Aspects of parallel processing and control engineering

    OpenAIRE

    McKittrick, Brendan J

    1991-01-01

    The concept of parallel processing is not a new one, but the application of it to control engineering tasks is a relatively recent development, made possible by contemporary hardware and software innovation. It has long been accepted that, if properly orchestrated several processors/CPUs when combined can form a powerful processing entity. What prevented this from being implemented in commercial systems was the adequacy of the microprocessor for most tasks and hence the expense of a multi-pro...

  17. Engine combustion control via fuel reactivity stratification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitz, Rolf Deneys; Hanson, Reed M; Splitter, Derek A; Kokjohn, Sage L

    2013-12-31

    A compression ignition engine uses two or more fuel charges having two or more reactivities to control the timing and duration of combustion. In a preferred implementation, a lower-reactivity fuel charge is injected or otherwise introduced into the combustion chamber, preferably sufficiently early that it becomes at least substantially homogeneously dispersed within the chamber before a subsequent injection is made. One or more subsequent injections of higher-reactivity fuel charges are then made, and these preferably distribute the higher-reactivity matter within the lower-reactivity chamber space such that combustion begins in the higher-reactivity regions, and with the lower-reactivity regions following thereafter. By appropriately choose the reactivities of the charges, their relative amounts, and their timing, combustion can be tailored to achieve optimal power output (and thus fuel efficiency), at controlled temperatures (and thus controlled NOx), and with controlled equivalence ratios (and thus controlled soot).

  18. Versatile Dual Photoresponsive System for Precise Control of Chemical Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Can; Bing, Wei; Wang, Faming; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2017-08-22

    A versatile method for photoregulation of chemical reactions was developed through a combination of near-infrared (NIR) and ultraviolet (UV) light sensitive materials. This regulatory effect was achieved through photoresponsive modulation of reaction temperature and pH values, two prominent factors influencing reaction kinetics. Photothermal nanomaterial graphene oxide (GO) and photobase reagent malachite green carbinol base (MGCB) were selected for temperature and pH regulation, respectively. Using nanocatalyst- and enzyme-mediated chemical reactions as model systems, we demonstrated the feasibility and high efficiency of this method. In addition, a photoresponsive, multifunctional "Band-aid"-like hydrogel platform was presented for programmable wound healing. Overall, this simple, efficient, and reversible system was found to be effective for controlling a wide variety of chemical reactions. Our work may provide a method for remote and sustainable control over chemical reactions for industrial and biomedical applications.

  19. Automotive Control Systems: For Engine, Driveline, and Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiencke, Uwe; Nielsen, Lars

    Advances in automotive control systems continue to enhance safety and comfort and to reduce fuel consumption and emissions. Reflecting the trend to optimization through integrative approaches for engine, driveline, and vehicle control, this valuable book enables control engineers to understand engine and vehicle models necessary for controller design, and also introduces mechanical engineers to vehicle-specific signal processing and automatic control. The emphasis on measurement, comparisons between performance and modeling, and realistic examples derive from the authors' unique industrial experience

  20. Novel reaction engineering concepts for catalyst immobilisation in hydroformylation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole-Hamilton, D.J.; Desset, S.L.; Muldoon, M.J. [St. Andrews Univ. (United Kingdom). EaStChem, School of Chemistry; Hintermair, U. [St. Andrews Univ. (United Kingdom). EaStChem, School of Chemistry]|[CNRS, Lyon (France). Laboratoire de Chimie Organometallique de Surface; Santini, C.C. [CNRS, Lyon (France). Laboratoire de Chimie Organometallique de Surface

    2006-07-01

    Various methods for the separation of the aldehyde products from the catalyst and any solvent during or after hydroformylation reactions of long chain alkenes are reviewed. The catalyst can be immobilized on a soluble or insoluble support or in a phase that does not mix with the product phase under the separation conditions. Aqueous, fluorous, and ionic liquid biphasic systems as well as systems involving scCO{sub 2} sometimes in conjunction with one or other of the types of solvents listed above. Hybrid systems in which a liquid phase containing the catalyst is supported on a microporous solid support are also discussed. The advantages and disadvantages of the various systems are considered and new results concerning the addition of [1-octyl-3-methylimidazolium]Br to aqueous biphasic systems and the use of supercritical fluids to transport substrates over supported ionic liquid phases are presented. Both of these new approaches give high reaction rates, which for the supported ionic liquid phase catalysts can be maintained for at least 40 h of continuous flow operation. For the aqueous biphasic systems, leaching is low and phase separation is fast. (orig.)

  1. Controlled thermonuclear reactions and Tora Supra program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The research programs for the nuclear energy production by means of thermonuclear fusion are shown. TORA SUPRA, Joint European Torus, Next European Torus and those developed at the Atomic Energy Center are described. The controlled fusion necessary conditions, the energy and confinement balance, and the research of a better tokamak configuration are discussed. A description of TORA SUPRA, the ways of achieving the project and the expected delays are shown. The Controlled Fusion Research Department functions, concerning these programs, are described. The importance of international cooperation and the perspectives about the use of controlled fusion are underlined [fr

  2. Modeling of Reaction Processes Controlled by Diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Revelli, Jorge

    2003-01-01

    Stochastic modeling is quite powerful in science and technology.The technics derived from this process have been used with great success in laser theory, biological systems and chemical reactions.Besides, they provide a theoretical framework for the analysis of experimental results on the field of particle's diffusion in ordered and disordered materials.In this work we analyze transport processes in one-dimensional fluctuating media, which are media that change their state in time.This fact induces changes in the movements of the particles giving rise to different phenomena and dynamics that will be described and analyzed in this work.We present some random walk models to describe these fluctuating media.These models include state transitions governed by different dynamical processes.We also analyze the trapping problem in a lattice by means of a simple model which predicts a resonance-like phenomenon.Also we study effective diffusion processes over surfaces due to random walks in the bulk.We consider different boundary conditions and transitions movements.We derive expressions that describe diffusion behaviors constrained to bulk restrictions and the dynamic of the particles.Finally it is important to mention that the theoretical results obtained from the models proposed in this work are compared with Monte Carlo simulations.We find, in general, excellent agreements between the theory and the simulations

  3. Discovery of gigantic molecular nanostructures using a flow reaction array as a search engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, Hong-Ying; de la Oliva, Andreu Ruiz; Miras, Haralampos N; Long, De-Liang; McBurney, Roy T; Cronin, Leroy

    2014-04-28

    The discovery of gigantic molecular nanostructures like coordination and polyoxometalate clusters is extremely time-consuming since a vast combinatorial space needs to be searched, and even a systematic and exhaustive exploration of the available synthetic parameters relies on a great deal of serendipity. Here we present a synthetic methodology that combines a flow reaction array and algorithmic control to give a chemical 'real-space' search engine leading to the discovery and isolation of a range of new molecular nanoclusters based on [Mo(2)O(2)S(2)](2+)-based building blocks with either fourfold (C4) or fivefold (C5) symmetry templates and linkers. This engine leads us to isolate six new nanoscale cluster compounds: 1, {Mo(10)(C5)}; 2, {Mo(14)(C4)4(C5)2}; 3, {Mo(60)(C4)10}; 4, {Mo(48)(C4)6}; 5, {Mo(34)(C4)4}; 6, {Mo(18)(C4)9}; in only 200 automated experiments from a parameter space spanning ~5 million possible combinations.

  4. Cascade fuzzy control for gas engine driven heat pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Shuze; Zhang Wugao; Zhang Rongrong; Lv Dexu; Huang Zhen

    2005-01-01

    In addition to absorption chillers, today's gas cooling technology includes gas engine driven heat pump systems (GEHP) in a range of capacities and temperature capacities suitable for most commercial air conditioning and refrigeration applications. Much is expected from GEHPs as a product that would help satisfy the air conditioning system demand from medium and small sized buildings, restrict electric power demand peaks in summer and save energy in general. This article describes a kind of control strategy for a GEHP, a cascade fuzzy control. GEHPs have large and varying time constants and their dynamic modeling cannot be easily achieved. A cascade control strategy is effective for systems that have large time constants and disturbances, and a fuzzy control strategy is fit for a system that lacks an accurate model. This cascade fuzzy control structure brings together the best merits of fuzzy control and cascade control structures. The performance of the cascade fuzzy control is compared to that of a cascade PI (proportional and integral) control strategy, and it is shown by example that the cascade fuzzy control strategy gives a better performance, reduced reaction time and smaller overshoot temperature

  5. Acoustic Resonance Reaction Control Thruster (ARCTIC), Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ORBITEC proposes to develop and demonstrate the innovative Acoustic Resonance Reaction Control Thruster (ARCTIC) to provide rapid and reliable in-space impulse...

  6. Mars Ascent Vehicle Reaction Control System, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — During this Phase I NASA program, Valley Tech Systems (VTS) will develop an innovative solid Reaction Control System (RCS) architecture concept design that can...

  7. Modeling Reaction Control System Effects on Mars Odyssey

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hanna, Jill

    2002-01-01

    ...) simulations to determine rotational motion of the spacecraft. The main objective of this study was to assess the reaction control system models and their effects on the atmospheric flight of Odyssey...

  8. Controllable molecular motors engineered from myosin and RNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omabegho, Tosan; Gurel, Pinar S.; Cheng, Clarence Y.; Kim, Laura Y.; Ruijgrok, Paul V.; Das, Rhiju; Alushin, Gregory M.; Bryant, Zev

    2018-01-01

    Engineering biomolecular motors can provide direct tests of structure-function relationships and customized components for controlling molecular transport in artificial systems1 or in living cells2. Previously, synthetic nucleic acid motors3-5 and modified natural protein motors6-10 have been developed in separate complementary strategies to achieve tunable and controllable motor function. Integrating protein and nucleic-acid components to form engineered nucleoprotein motors may enable additional sophisticated functionalities. However, this potential has only begun to be explored in pioneering work harnessing DNA scaffolds to dictate the spacing, number and composition of tethered protein motors11-15. Here, we describe myosin motors that incorporate RNA lever arms, forming hybrid assemblies in which conformational changes in the protein motor domain are amplified and redirected by nucleic acid structures. The RNA lever arm geometry determines the speed and direction of motor transport and can be dynamically controlled using programmed transitions in the lever arm structure7,9. We have characterized the hybrid motors using in vitro motility assays, single-molecule tracking, cryo-electron microscopy and structural probing16. Our designs include nucleoprotein motors that reversibly change direction in response to oligonucleotides that drive strand-displacement17 reactions. In multimeric assemblies, the controllable motors walk processively along actin filaments at speeds of 10-20 nm s-1. Finally, to illustrate the potential for multiplexed addressable control, we demonstrate sequence-specific responses of RNA variants to oligonucleotide signals.

  9. Fuel Saving Strategy in Spark Ignition Engine Using Fuzzy Logic Engine Torque Control

    OpenAIRE

    Aris Triwiyatno; Sumardi

    2012-01-01

    In the case of injection gasoline engine, or better known as spark ignition engines, an effort to improve engine performance as well as to reduce fuel consumption is a fairly complex problem. Generally, engine performance improvement efforts will lead to increase in fuel consumption. However, this problem can be solved by implementing engine torque control based on intelligent regulation such as the fuzzy logic inference system. In this study, fuzzy logic engine torque regulation is used to c...

  10. Introduction to Advanced Engine Control Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanjay, Garg

    2007-01-01

    With the increased emphasis on aircraft safety, enhanced performance and affordability, and the need to reduce the environmental impact of aircraft, there are many new challenges being faced by the designers of aircraft propulsion systems. The Controls and Dynamics Branch at NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) Glenn Research Center (GRC) in Cleveland, Ohio, is leading and participating in various projects in partnership with other organizations within GRC and across NASA, the U.S. aerospace industry, and academia to develop advanced controls and health management technologies that will help meet these challenges through the concept of Intelligent Propulsion Systems. The key enabling technologies for an Intelligent Propulsion System are the increased efficiencies of components through active control, advanced diagnostics and prognostics integrated with intelligent engine control to enhance operational reliability and component life, and distributed control with smart sensors and actuators in an adaptive fault tolerant architecture. This presentation describes the current activities of the Controls and Dynamics Branch in the areas of active component control and propulsion system intelligent control, and presents some recent analytical and experimental results in these areas.

  11. The Need and Challenges for Distributed Engine Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culley, Dennis E.

    2013-01-01

    The presentation describes the challenges facing the turbine engine control system. These challenges are primarily driven by a dependence on commercial electronics and an increasingly severe environment on board the turbine engine. The need for distributed control is driven by the need to overcome these system constraints and develop a new growth path for control technology and, as a result, improved turbine engine performance.

  12. Engineering microbial consortia for controllable outputs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindemann, Stephen R.; Bernstein, Hans C.; Song, Hyun-Seob; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Fields, Matthew W.; Shou, Wenying; Johnson, David R.; Beliaev, Alexander S.

    2016-03-11

    Much research has been invested into engineering microorganisms to perform desired biotransformations; nonetheless, these efforts frequently fall short of expected results due to the unforeseen effects of biofeedback regulation and functional incompatibility. In nature, metabolic function is compartmentalized into diverse organisms assembled into resilient consortia, in which the division of labor is thought to lead to increased community efficiency and productivity. Here, we consider whether and how consortia can be designed to perform bioprocesses of interest beyond the metabolic flexibility limitations of a single organism. Advances in post-genomic analysis of microbial consortia and application of high-resolution global measurements now offer the promise of systems-level understanding of how microbial consortia adapt to changes in environmental variables and inputs of carbon and energy. We argue that when combined with appropriate modeling framework that predictive knowledge generates testable hypotheses and orthogonal synthetic biology tools, such understanding can dramatically improve our ability to control the fate and functioning of consortia. In this article, we articulate our collective perspective on the current and future state of microbial community engineering and control while placing specific emphasis on ecological principles that promote control over community function and emergent properties.

  13. NASA Ares I Launch Vehicle Roll and Reaction Control Systems Design Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butt, Adam; Popp, Chris G.; Pitts, Hank M.; Sharp, David J.

    2009-01-01

    This paper provides an update of design status following the preliminary design review of NASA s Ares I first stage roll and upper stage reaction control systems. The Ares I launch vehicle has been chosen to return humans to the moon, mars, and beyond. It consists of a first stage five segment solid rocket booster and an upper stage liquid bi-propellant J-2X engine. Similar to many launch vehicles, the Ares I has reaction control systems used to provide the vehicle with three degrees of freedom stabilization during the mission. During launch, the first stage roll control system will provide the Ares I with the ability to counteract induced roll torque. After first stage booster separation, the upper stage reaction control system will provide the upper stage element with three degrees of freedom control as needed. Trade studies and design assessments conducted on the roll and reaction control systems include: propellant selection, thruster arrangement, pressurization system configuration, and system component trades. Since successful completion of the preliminary design review, work has progressed towards the critical design review with accomplishments made in the following areas: pressurant / propellant tank, thruster assembly, and other component configurations, as well as thruster module design, and waterhammer mitigation approach. Also, results from early development testing are discussed along with plans for upcoming system testing. This paper concludes by summarizing the process of down selecting to the current baseline configuration for the Ares I roll and reaction control systems.

  14. TRACER - TRACING AND CONTROL OF ENGINEERING REQUIREMENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, P. R.

    1994-01-01

    TRACER (Tracing and Control of Engineering Requirements) is a database/word processing system created to document and maintain the order of both requirements and descriptive material associated with an engineering project. A set of hierarchical documents are normally generated for a project whereby the requirements of the higher level documents levy requirements on the same level or lower level documents. Traditionally, the requirements are handled almost entirely by manual paper methods. The problem with a typical paper system, however, is that requirements written and changed continuously in different areas lead to misunderstandings and noncompliance. The purpose of TRACER is to automate the capture, tracing, reviewing, and managing of requirements for an engineering project. The engineering project still requires communications, negotiations, interactions, and iterations among people and organizations, but TRACER promotes succinct and precise identification and treatment of real requirements separate from the descriptive prose in a document. TRACER permits the documentation of an engineering project's requirements and progress in a logical, controllable, traceable manner. TRACER's attributes include the presentation of current requirements and status from any linked computer terminal and the ability to differentiate headers and descriptive material from the requirements. Related requirements can be linked and traced. The program also enables portions of documents to be printed, individual approval and release of requirements, and the tracing of requirements down into the equipment specification. Requirement "links" can be made "pending" and invisible to others until the pending link is made "binding". Individuals affected by linked requirements can be notified of significant changes with acknowledgement of the changes required. An unlimited number of documents can be created for a project and an ASCII import feature permits existing documents to be incorporated

  15. Dual-fuel engine with cylinder pressure based control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritscher, Bert [Caterpillar Motoren GmbH und Co. KG, Kiel (Germany). Large Power Systems Div.

    2013-10-15

    Cylinder pressure sensors were initially used to detect knocking and misfiring on spark ignited gas engines. On its latest MaK brand dual-fuel engine, Caterpillar Motoren is harnessing the deep insights into combustion and engine condition that can be derived direct from the origin of engine power in sophisticated control, monitoring and diagnostic systems. (orig.)

  16. Molecular controls of the oxygenation and redox reactions of hemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonaventura, Celia; Henkens, Robert; Alayash, Abdu I; Banerjee, Sambuddha; Crumbliss, Alvin L

    2013-06-10

    The broad classes of O(2)-binding proteins known as hemoglobins (Hbs) carry out oxygenation and redox functions that allow organisms with significantly different physiological demands to exist in a wide range of environments. This is aided by allosteric controls that modulate the protein's redox reactions as well as its O(2)-binding functions. The controls of Hb's redox reactions can differ appreciably from the molecular controls for Hb oxygenation and come into play in elegant mechanisms for dealing with nitrosative stress, in the malarial resistance conferred by sickle cell Hb, and in the as-yet unsuccessful designs for safe and effective blood substitutes. An important basic principle in consideration of Hb's redox reactions is the distinction between kinetic and thermodynamic reaction control. Clarification of these modes of control is critical to gaining an increased understanding of Hb-mediated oxidative processes and oxidative toxicity in vivo. This review addresses emerging concepts and some unresolved questions regarding the interplay between the oxygenation and oxidation reactions of structurally diverse Hbs, both within red blood cells and under acellular conditions. Developing methods that control Hb-mediated oxidative toxicity will be critical to the future development of Hb-based blood substitutes.

  17. Molecular Controls of the Oxygenation and Redox Reactions of Hemoglobin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henkens, Robert; Alayash, Abdu I.; Banerjee, Sambuddha; Crumbliss, Alvin L.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Significance: The broad classes of O2-binding proteins known as hemoglobins (Hbs) carry out oxygenation and redox functions that allow organisms with significantly different physiological demands to exist in a wide range of environments. This is aided by allosteric controls that modulate the protein's redox reactions as well as its O2-binding functions. Recent Advances: The controls of Hb's redox reactions can differ appreciably from the molecular controls for Hb oxygenation and come into play in elegant mechanisms for dealing with nitrosative stress, in the malarial resistance conferred by sickle cell Hb, and in the as-yet unsuccessful designs for safe and effective blood substitutes. Critical Issues: An important basic principle in consideration of Hb's redox reactions is the distinction between kinetic and thermodynamic reaction control. Clarification of these modes of control is critical to gaining an increased understanding of Hb-mediated oxidative processes and oxidative toxicity in vivo. Future Directions: This review addresses emerging concepts and some unresolved questions regarding the interplay between the oxygenation and oxidation reactions of structurally diverse Hbs, both within red blood cells and under acellular conditions. Developing methods that control Hb-mediated oxidative toxicity will be critical to the future development of Hb-based blood substitutes. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 18, 2298–2313. PMID:23198874

  18. Solvent engineering and other reaction design methods for favouring enzyme-catalysed synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeuner, Birgitte

    . However, both FAEs catalysed the feruloylation and/or sinapoylation of solvent cation C2OHMIm+, thus underlining the broad acceptor specificity of FAEs and their potential for future solvent reactions. An engineered sialidase from Trypanosoma rangeli, Tr6, catalyses trans-sialylation but the yield......This thesis investigates different methods for improving reaction yields of enzyme-catalysed synthesis reactions. These methods include the use of non-conventional media such as ionic liquids (ILs) and organic solvents as main solvents or as co-solvents as well as the use of more classical reaction...... design methods, i.e. enzyme immobilization and the use of an enzymatic membrane reactor. Two different enzyme classes, namely feruloyl esterases (FAEs) and sialidases are employed. Using sinapoylation of glycerol as a model reaction it was shown that both the IL anion nature and the FAE structure were...

  19. A Simple Experiment for Teaching Process Intensification by Static Mixing in Chemical Reaction Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baz-Rodríguez, Sergio; Herrera-Soberanis, Natali; Rodríguez-Novelo, Miguel; Guillén-Francisc, Juana; Rocha-Uribe, José

    2016-01-01

    An experiment for teaching mixing intensification in reaction engineering is described. For this, a simple tubular reactor was constructed; helical static mixer elements were fabricated from stainless steel strips and inserted into the reactor. With and without the internals, the equipment operates as a static mixer reactor or a laminar flow…

  20. Molecular Modeling as a Self-Taught Component of a Conventional Undergraduate Chemical Reaction Engineering Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothe, Erhard W.; Zygmunt, William E.

    2016-01-01

    We inserted a self-taught molecular modeling project into an otherwise conventional undergraduate chemical-reaction-engineering course. Our objectives were that students should (a) learn with minimal instructor intervention, (b) gain an appreciation for the relationship between molecular structure and, first, macroscopic state functions in…

  1. Evaluating control displays with the Engineering Control Analysis Tool (ECAT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plott, B.

    2006-01-01

    In the Nuclear Power Industry increased use of automated sensors and advanced control systems is expected to reduce and/or change manning requirements. However, critical questions remain regarding the extent to which safety will be compromised if the cognitive workload associated with monitoring multiple automated systems is increased. Can operators/engineers maintain an acceptable level of performance if they are required to supervise multiple automated systems and respond appropriately to off-normal conditions? The interface to/from the automated systems must provide the information necessary for making appropriate decisions regarding intervention in the automated process, but be designed so that the cognitive load is neither too high nor too low for the operator who is responsible for the monitoring and decision making. This paper will describe a new tool that was developed to enhance the ability of human systems integration (HSI) professionals and systems engineers to identify operational tasks in which a high potential for human overload and error can be expected. The tool is entitled the Engineering Control Analysis Tool (ECAT). ECAT was designed and developed to assist in the analysis of: Reliability Centered Maintenance (RCM), operator task requirements, human error probabilities, workload prediction, potential control and display problems, and potential panel layout problems. (authors)

  2. Evaluating control displays with the Engineering Control Analysis Tool (ECAT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plott, B. [Alion Science and Technology, MA and D Operation, 4949 Pearl E. Circle, 300, Boulder, CO 80301 (United States)

    2006-07-01

    In the Nuclear Power Industry increased use of automated sensors and advanced control systems is expected to reduce and/or change manning requirements. However, critical questions remain regarding the extent to which safety will be compromised if the cognitive workload associated with monitoring multiple automated systems is increased. Can operators/engineers maintain an acceptable level of performance if they are required to supervise multiple automated systems and respond appropriately to off-normal conditions? The interface to/from the automated systems must provide the information necessary for making appropriate decisions regarding intervention in the automated process, but be designed so that the cognitive load is neither too high nor too low for the operator who is responsible for the monitoring and decision making. This paper will describe a new tool that was developed to enhance the ability of human systems integration (HSI) professionals and systems engineers to identify operational tasks in which a high potential for human overload and error can be expected. The tool is entitled the Engineering Control Analysis Tool (ECAT). ECAT was designed and developed to assist in the analysis of: Reliability Centered Maintenance (RCM), operator task requirements, human error probabilities, workload prediction, potential control and display problems, and potential panel layout problems. (authors)

  3. Determining two-step control in heterogeneous catalytic reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakrabarty, T; Silveston, P L; Hudgins, R R

    1979-10-01

    The data by Thaller and Thodos on the sec.-butanol dehydrogenation to methyl ethyl ketone on brass catalyst indicated that a dual site surface reaction was rate-controlling below 575/sup 0/K and hydrogen desorption was rate-controlling above 616/sup 0/K (Vertical BarAIChE J.

  4. Applications of sliding mode control in science and engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Lien, Chang-Hua

    2017-01-01

    Gathering 20 chapters contributed by respected experts, this book reports on the latest advances in and applications of sliding mode control in science and engineering. The respective chapters address applications of sliding mode control in the broad areas of chaos theory, robotics, electrical engineering, physics, chemical engineering, memristors, mechanical engineering, environmental engineering, finance, and biology. Special emphasis has been given to papers that offer practical solutions, and which examine design and modeling involving new types of sliding mode control such as higher order sliding mode control, terminal sliding mode control, super-twisting sliding mode control, and integral sliding mode control. This book serves as a unique reference guide to sliding mode control and its recent applications for graduate students and researchers with a basic knowledge of electrical and control systems engineering.

  5. 14 CFR 125.177 - Control of engine rotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Control of engine rotation. 125.177 Section... Requirements § 125.177 Control of engine rotation. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, each airplane must have a means of individually stopping and restarting the rotation of any engine in...

  6. Synthesis of porous gold nanoshells by controlled transmetallation reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pattabi, Manjunatha, E-mail: manjupattabi@yahoo.com; M, Krishnaprabha [Department of Materials Science, Mangalore University, Mangalagangothri-574199 (India)

    2015-06-24

    Aqueous synthesis of porous gold nanoshells in one step is carried out through controlled transmetallation (TM) reaction using a naturally available egg shell membrane (ESM) as a barrier between the sacrificial silver particles (AgNPs) and the gold precursor solution (HAuCl{sub 4}). The formation of porous gold nanoshells via TM reaction is inferred from UV-Vis spectroscopy and the scanning electron microscopic (SEM) studies.

  7. Method and apparatus for controlling gas evolution from chemical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skorpik, James R.; Dodson, Michael G.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention is directed toward monitoring a thermally driven gas evolving chemical reaction with an acoustic apparatus. Signals from the acoustic apparatus are used to control a heater to prevent a run-away condition. A digestion module in combination with a robotic arm further automate physical handling of sample material reaction vessels. The invention is especially useful for carrying out sample procedures defined in EPA Methods SW-846.

  8. Programming chemical kinetics: engineering dynamic reaction networks with DNA strand displacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivas, Niranjan

    Over the last century, the silicon revolution has enabled us to build faster, smaller and more sophisticated computers. Today, these computers control phones, cars, satellites, assembly lines, and other electromechanical devices. Just as electrical wiring controls electromechanical devices, living organisms employ "chemical wiring" to make decisions about their environment and control physical processes. Currently, the big difference between these two substrates is that while we have the abstractions, design principles, verification and fabrication techniques in place for programming with silicon, we have no comparable understanding or expertise for programming chemistry. In this thesis we take a small step towards the goal of learning how to systematically engineer prescribed non-equilibrium dynamical behaviors in chemical systems. We use the formalism of chemical reaction networks (CRNs), combined with mass-action kinetics, as our programming language for specifying dynamical behaviors. Leveraging the tools of nucleic acid nanotechnology (introduced in Chapter 1), we employ synthetic DNA molecules as our molecular architecture and toehold-mediated DNA strand displacement as our reaction primitive. Abstraction, modular design and systematic fabrication can work only with well-understood and quantitatively characterized tools. Therefore, we embark on a detailed study of the "device physics" of DNA strand displacement (Chapter 2). We present a unified view of strand displacement biophysics and kinetics by studying the process at multiple levels of detail, using an intuitive model of a random walk on a 1-dimensional energy landscape, a secondary structure kinetics model with single base-pair steps, and a coarse-grained molecular model that incorporates three-dimensional geometric and steric effects. Further, we experimentally investigate the thermodynamics of three-way branch migration. Our findings are consistent with previously measured or inferred rates for

  9. Engine Torque Control of Spark Ignition Engine using Fuzzy Gain Scheduling

    OpenAIRE

    Aris Triwiyatno

    2012-01-01

    In the spark ignition engine system, driver convenience is very dependent on satisfying engine torque appropriate with the throttle position given by the driver. Unfortunately, sometimes the fulfillment of engine torque is not in line with fuel saving efforts. This requires the development of high performance and robust power train controllers. One way to potentially meet these performance requirements is to introduce a method of controlling engine torque using fuzzy gain scheduling. By using...

  10. Stirling engine control mechanism and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dineen, John J.

    1983-01-01

    A reciprocating-to-rotating motion conversion and power control device for a Stirling engine includes a hub mounted on an offset portion of the output shaft for rotation relative to the shaft and for sliding motion therealong which causes the hub to tilt relative to the axis of rotation of the shaft. This changes the angle of inclination of the hub relative to the shaft axis and changes the axial stroke of a set of arms connected to the hub and nutating therewith. A hydraulic actuating mechanism is connected to the hub for moving its axial position along the shaft. A balancing wheel is linked to the hub and changes its angle of inclination as the angle of inclination of the hub changes to maintain the mechanism in perfect balance throughout its range of motion.

  11. Failure is an option: Reactions to failure in elementary engineering design projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Matthew M.

    Recent reform documents in science education have called for teachers to use epistemic practices of science and engineering researchers to teach disciplinary content (NRC, 2007; NRC, 2012; NGSS Lead States, 2013). Although this creates challenges for classroom teachers unfamiliar with engineering, it has created a need for high quality research about how students and teachers engage in engineering activities to improve curriculum development and teaching pedagogy. While framers of the Next Generation Science Standards (NRC, 2012; NGSS Lead States 2013) focused on the similarities of the practices of science researchers and engineering designers, some have proposed that engineering has a unique set of epistemic practices, including improving from failure (Cunningham & Carlsen, 2014; Cunningham & Kelly, in review). While no one will deny failures occur in science, failure in engineering is thought of in fundamentally different ways. In the study presented here, video data from eight classes of elementary students engaged in one of two civil engineering units were analyzed using methods borrowed from psychology, anthropology, and sociolinguistics to investigate: 1) the nature of failure in elementary engineering design; 2) the ways in which teachers react to failure; and 3) how the collective actions of students and teachers support or constrain improvement in engineering design. I propose new ways of considering the types and causes of failure, and note three teacher reactions to failure: the manager, the cheerleader, and the strategic partner. Because the goal of iteration in engineering is improvement, I also studied improvement. Students only systematically improve when they have the opportunity, productive strategies, and fair comparisons between prototypes. I then investigate the use of student engineering journals to assess learning from the process of improvement after failure. After discussion, I consider implications from this work as well as future research

  12. Alternatives for Jet Engine Control. Volume 1: Modelling and Control Design with Jet Engine Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sain, M. K.

    1985-01-01

    This document compiles a comprehensive list of publications supported by, or related to, National Aeronautics and Space Administration Grant NSG-3048, entitled "Alternatives for Jet Engine Control". Dr. Kurt Seldner was the original Technical Officer for the grant, at Lewis Research Center. Dr. Bruce Lehtinen was the final Technical Officer. At the University of Notre Dame, Drs. Michael K. Sain and R. Jeffrey Leake were the original Project Directors, with Dr. Sain becoming the final Project Director. Publications cover work over a ten-year period. The Final Report is divided into two parts. Volume i, "Modelling and Control Design with Jet Engine Data", follows in this report. Volume 2, "Modelling and Control Design with Tensors", has been bound separately.

  13. On spacecraft maneuvers control subject to propellant engine modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazinan, A H

    2015-09-01

    The paper attempts to address a new control approach to spacecraft maneuvers based upon the modes of propellant engine. A realization of control strategy is now presented in engine on mode (high thrusts as well as further low thrusts), which is related to small angle maneuvers and engine off mode (specified low thrusts), which is also related to large angle maneuvers. There is currently a coarse-fine tuning in engine on mode. It is shown that the process of handling the angular velocities are finalized via rate feedback system in engine modes, where the angular rotations are controlled through quaternion based control (QBCL)strategy in engine off mode and these ones are also controlled through an optimum PID (OPIDH) strategy in engine on mode. Copyright © 2015 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Recent advances in electrical engineering and control applications

    CERN Document Server

    Bououden, Sofiane; Zelinka, Ivan

    2017-01-01

    This book of proceedings includes papers presenting the state of art in electrical engineering and control theory as well as their applications. The topics focus on classical as well as modern methods for modeling, control, identification and simulation of complex systems with applications in science and engineering. The papers were selected from the hottest topic areas, such as control and systems engineering, renewable energy, faults diagnosis—faults tolerant control, large-scale systems, fractional order systems, unconventional algorithms in control engineering, signals and communications. The control and design of complex systems dynamics, analysis and modeling of its behavior and structure is vitally important in engineering, economics and in science generally science today. Examples of such systems can be seen in the world around us and are a part of our everyday life. Application of modern methods for control, electronics, signal processing and more can be found in our mobile phones, car engines, hom...

  15. Bond-selective control of a gas-surface reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killelea, Daniel R.

    The prospect of using light to selectively control chemical reactions has tantalized chemists since the development of the laser. Unfortunately, the realization of laser-directed chemistry is frequently thwarted by the randomization of energy within the molecule through intramolecular vibrational energy distribution (IVR). However, recent results showing vibrational mode-specific reactivity on metal surfaces suggest that IVR may not always be complete for gas-surface reactions. Here, we combine molecular beam techniques and direct laser excitation to characterize the bond-specific reactivity of trideuteromethane on a Ni(111) surface. Our results reveal important details about how vibrational energy is distributed in the reactive molecule. We use a molecular beam to direct state-selected trideuteromethane (CHD 3) molecules onto a nickel single crystal sample and use the results we obtain to describe the flow of vibrational energy in the methane-surface reaction complex. We show that CHD3 molecules initially excited to v=1, J=2, K=0 of the v 1 symmetric C-H stretching mode will dissociate exclusively via C-H cleavage on Ni(111). This result highlights the localization of vibrational energy in the reaction complex, despite the presence of many energy exchange channels with the high state-density surface. We demonstrate, for the first time, highly parallel bond-selective control of a heterogeneously catalyzed reaction. We place our results in the context of recent experiments investigating IVR for molecules in both the gas phase and liquid solutions. If IVR is fast on the reaction timescale, vibrational energy would be randomly distributed throughout the nascent methane-surface reaction complex and vibrational mode-specific behavior would not occur. The short timescale of a direct gas-surface collision may explain how the exchange of energy via IVR is limited to only a small subset of the energetic configurations available to the reaction complex. This framework

  16. Enhanced Engine Performance During Emergency Operation Using a Model-Based Engine Control Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csank, Jeffrey T.; Connolly, Joseph W.

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses the design and application of model-based engine control (MBEC) for use during emergency operation of the aircraft. The MBEC methodology is applied to the Commercial Modular Aero-Propulsion System Simulation 40k (CMAPSS40k) and features an optimal tuner Kalman Filter (OTKF) to estimate unmeasured engine parameters, which can then be used for control. During an emergency scenario, normally-conservative engine operating limits may be relaxed to increase the performance of the engine and overall survivability of the aircraft; this comes at the cost of additional risk of an engine failure. The MBEC architecture offers the advantage of estimating key engine parameters that are not directly measureable. Estimating the unknown parameters allows for tighter control over these parameters, and on the level of risk the engine will operate at. This will allow the engine to achieve better performance than possible when operating to more conservative limits on a related, measurable parameter.

  17. Active Engine Mounting Control Algorithm Using Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fadly Jashi Darsivan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes the application of neural network as a controller to isolate engine vibration in an active engine mounting system. It has been shown that the NARMA-L2 neurocontroller has the ability to reject disturbances from a plant. The disturbance is assumed to be both impulse and sinusoidal disturbances that are induced by the engine. The performance of the neural network controller is compared with conventional PD and PID controllers tuned using Ziegler-Nichols. From the result simulated the neural network controller has shown better ability to isolate the engine vibration than the conventional controllers.

  18. Preliminary delineation of natural geochemical reactions, Snake River Plain aquifer system, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and vicinity, Idaho

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knobel, L.L.; Bartholomay, R.C.; Orr, B.R.

    1997-05-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy, is conducting a study to determine the natural geochemistry of the Snake River Plain aquifer system at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), Idaho. As part of this study, a group of geochemical reactions that partially control the natural chemistry of ground water at the INEL were identified. Mineralogy of the aquifer matrix was determined using X-ray diffraction and thin-section analysis and theoretical stabilities of the minerals were used to identify potential solid-phase reactants and products of the reactions. The reactants and products that have an important contribution to the natural geochemistry include labradorite, olivine, pyroxene, smectite, calcite, ferric oxyhydroxide, and several silica phases. To further identify the reactions, analyses of 22 representative water samples from sites tapping the Snake River Plain aquifer system were used to determine the thermodynamic condition of the ground water relative to the minerals in the framework of the aquifer system. Principal reactions modifying the natural geochemical system include congruent dissolution of olivine, diopside, amorphous silica, and anhydrite; incongruent dissolution of labradorite with calcium montmorillonite as a residual product; precipitation of calcite and ferric oxyhydroxide; and oxidation of ferrous iron to ferric iron. Cation exchange reactions retard the downward movement of heavy, multivalent waste constituents where infiltration ponds are used for waste disposal

  19. Engine modeling and control modeling and electronic management of internal combustion engines

    CERN Document Server

    Isermann, Rolf

    2014-01-01

    The increasing demands for internal combustion engines with regard to fuel consumption, emissions and driveability lead to more actuators, sensors and complex control functions. A systematic implementation of the electronic control systems requires mathematical models from basic design through simulation to calibration. The book treats physically-based as well as models based experimentally on test benches for gasoline (spark ignition) and diesel (compression ignition) engines and uses them for the design of the different control functions. The main topics are: - Development steps for engine control - Stationary and dynamic experimental modeling - Physical models of intake, combustion, mechanical system, turbocharger, exhaust, cooling, lubrication, drive train - Engine control structures, hardware, software, actuators, sensors, fuel supply, injection system, camshaft - Engine control methods, static and dynamic feedforward and feedback control, calibration and optimization, HiL, RCP, control software developm...

  20. Backup control airstart performance on a digital electronic engine control-equipped F100-engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, J. B.

    1984-01-01

    The air start capability of a backup control (BUC) was tested for a digital electronic engine control (DEEC) equipped F100 engine, which was installed in an F-15 aircraft. Two air start schedules were tested. Using the group 1 start schedule, based on a 40 sec timer, an air speed of 300 knots was required to ensure successful 40 and 25% BUC mode spooldown airstarts. If core rotor speed (N2) was less than 40% a stall would occur when the start bleed closed, 40 sec after initiation of the air start. All jet fuel starter (JFS) assisted air starts were successful with the group 1 start schedule. For the group 2 schedule, the time between pressurization and start bleed closure ranged between 50 sec and 72 sec. Idle rps was lower than the desired 65% for air starts at higher altitudes and lower air speeds.

  1. ADVANCED COMPRESSOR ENGINE CONTROLS TO ENHANCE OPERATION, RELIABILITY AND INTEGRITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gary D. Bourn; Jess W. Gingrich; Jack A. Smith

    2004-03-01

    This document is the final report for the ''Advanced Compressor Engine Controls to Enhance Operation, Reliability, and Integrity'' project. SwRI conducted this project for DOE in conjunction with Cooper Compression, under DOE contract number DE-FC26-03NT41859. This report addresses an investigation of engine controls for integral compressor engines and the development of control strategies that implement closed-loop NOX emissions feedback.

  2. Towards constrained optimal control of spark-ignition engines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feru, E.; Luo, X.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the torque control problem for spark-ignition engines is considered. The objective is to provide good output torque tracking with minimum fuel consumption, while avoiding engine knock and misre. To this end, three control strategies are proposed: a feed-forward controller with

  3. Reaction parameters for controlled sonosynthesis of gold nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez M, A. L. [Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Facultad de Quimica, Paseo Colon esq. Paseo Tollocan s/n, 50120 Toluca, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Cabrera L, L. I. [UNAM-UAEM, Centro Conjunto de Investigacion en Quimica Sustentable, Km 14.5 Carretera Toluca-Atlacomulco, 50200 San Cayetano-Toluca, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2015-07-01

    The synthesis of gold nanoparticles by sonochemical technique has been previously performed with excellent results. The synthesis has been carried out in the presence of citric acid, a strong reducing agent, which allows the nucleation and growth of gold nanoparticles, at the same time that controls particle size. In this work we report the use of sodium tartrate as a mild reducing agent that allows a better understanding of the effect of the reaction parameters during gold nanoparticle synthesis. A conventional sonication bath (37 k Hz) was used for the sonochemical synthesis. This work focuses on the reaction temperature effect and the effect of sodium tartrate concentration. It was confirmed that particle size, and particle morphology is dependent of these two reaction parameters. Equally, colloidal stabilization was related to reaction temperature and sodium tartrate concentration. It was also determined that Ostwald ripening takes place during sonochemical reaction under our conditions, allowing to understand the mechanism that takes place during synthesis. Gold nanoparticles with main particle size of 17 nm were achieved by this method. Characterization techniques used: Fourier transform infrared spectra (Ftir), X-ray diffraction and Atomic Force Microscope was used in order to determine particle size of the synthetic product of reaction M10c by tapping mode. (Author)

  4. Reaction parameters for controlled sonosynthesis of gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez M, A. L.; Cabrera L, L. I.

    2015-01-01

    The synthesis of gold nanoparticles by sonochemical technique has been previously performed with excellent results. The synthesis has been carried out in the presence of citric acid, a strong reducing agent, which allows the nucleation and growth of gold nanoparticles, at the same time that controls particle size. In this work we report the use of sodium tartrate as a mild reducing agent that allows a better understanding of the effect of the reaction parameters during gold nanoparticle synthesis. A conventional sonication bath (37 k Hz) was used for the sonochemical synthesis. This work focuses on the reaction temperature effect and the effect of sodium tartrate concentration. It was confirmed that particle size, and particle morphology is dependent of these two reaction parameters. Equally, colloidal stabilization was related to reaction temperature and sodium tartrate concentration. It was also determined that Ostwald ripening takes place during sonochemical reaction under our conditions, allowing to understand the mechanism that takes place during synthesis. Gold nanoparticles with main particle size of 17 nm were achieved by this method. Characterization techniques used: Fourier transform infrared spectra (Ftir), X-ray diffraction and Atomic Force Microscope was used in order to determine particle size of the synthetic product of reaction M10c by tapping mode. (Author)

  5. 14 CFR 121.279 - Control of engine rotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Control of engine rotation. 121.279 Section... of engine rotation. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, each airplane must have a means of individually stopping and restarting the rotation of any engine in flight. (b) In the...

  6. Engine control system having fuel-based adjustment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willi, Martin L [Dunlap, IL; Fiveland, Scott B [Metamora, IL; Montgomery, David T [Edelstein, IL; Gong, Weidong [Dunlap, IL

    2011-03-15

    A control system for an engine having a cylinder is disclosed having an engine valve configured to affect a fluid flow of the cylinder, an actuator configured to move the engine valve, and an in-cylinder sensor configured to generate a signal indicative of a characteristic of fuel entering the cylinder. The control system also has a controller in communication with the actuator and the sensor. The controller is configured to determine the characteristic of the fuel based on the signal and selectively regulate the actuator to adjust a timing of the engine valve based on the characteristic of the fuel.

  7. Engine control system having fuel-based timing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willi, Martin L [Dunlap, IL; Fiveland, Scott B [Metamora, IL; Montgomery, David T [Edelstein, IL; Gong, Weidong [Dunlap, IL

    2012-04-03

    A control system for an engine having a cylinder is disclosed having an engine valve movable to regulate a fluid flow of the cylinder and an actuator associated with the engine valve. The control system also has a sensor configured to generate a signal indicative of an amount of an air/fuel mixture remaining within the cylinder after completion of a first combustion event and a controller in communication with the actuator and the sensor. The controller may be configured to compare the amount with a desired amount, and to selectively regulate the actuator to adjust a timing of the engine valve associated with a subsequent combustion event based on the comparison.

  8. Engine control system having pressure-based timing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willi, Martin L [Dunlap, IL; Fiveland, Scott B [Metamora, IL; Montgomery, David T [Edelstein, IL; Gong, Weidong [Dunlap, IL

    2011-10-04

    A control system for an engine having a first cylinder and a second cylinder is disclosed having a first engine valve movable to regulate a fluid flow of the first cylinder and a first actuator associated with the first engine valve. The control system also has a second engine valve movable to regulate a fluid flow of the second cylinder and a sensor configured to generate a signal indicative of a pressure within the first cylinder. The control system also has a controller that is in communication with the first actuator and the sensor. The controller is configured to compare the pressure within the first cylinder with a desired pressure and selectively regulate the first actuator to adjust a timing of the first engine valve independently of the timing of the second engine valve based on the comparison.

  9. Modelling for Fuel Optimal Control of a Variable Compression Engine

    OpenAIRE

    Nilsson, Ylva

    2007-01-01

    Variable compression engines are a mean to meet the demand on lower fuel consumption. A high compression ratio results in high engine efficiency, but also increases the knock tendency. On conventional engines with fixed compression ratio, knock is avoided by retarding the ignition angle. The variable compression engine offers an extra dimension in knock control, since both ignition angle and compression ratio can be adjusted. The central question is thus for what combination of compression ra...

  10. Distributed Engine Control Empirical/Analytical Verification Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCastro, Jonathan; Hettler, Eric; Yedavalli, Rama; Mitra, Sayan

    2013-01-01

    NASA's vision for an intelligent engine will be realized with the development of a truly distributed control system featuring highly reliable, modular, and dependable components capable of both surviving the harsh engine operating environment and decentralized functionality. A set of control system verification tools was developed and applied to a C-MAPSS40K engine model, and metrics were established to assess the stability and performance of these control systems on the same platform. A software tool was developed that allows designers to assemble easily a distributed control system in software and immediately assess the overall impacts of the system on the target (simulated) platform, allowing control system designers to converge rapidly on acceptable architectures with consideration to all required hardware elements. The software developed in this program will be installed on a distributed hardware-in-the-loop (DHIL) simulation tool to assist NASA and the Distributed Engine Control Working Group (DECWG) in integrating DCS (distributed engine control systems) components onto existing and next-generation engines.The distributed engine control simulator blockset for MATLAB/Simulink and hardware simulator provides the capability to simulate virtual subcomponents, as well as swap actual subcomponents for hardware-in-the-loop (HIL) analysis. Subcomponents can be the communication network, smart sensor or actuator nodes, or a centralized control system. The distributed engine control blockset for MATLAB/Simulink is a software development tool. The software includes an engine simulation, a communication network simulation, control algorithms, and analysis algorithms set up in a modular environment for rapid simulation of different network architectures; the hardware consists of an embedded device running parts of the CMAPSS engine simulator and controlled through Simulink. The distributed engine control simulation, evaluation, and analysis technology provides unique

  11. Reaction-diffusion controlled growth of complex structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noorduin, Willem; Mahadevan, L.; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2013-03-01

    Understanding how the emergence of complex forms and shapes in biominerals came about is both of fundamental and practical interest. Although biomineralization processes and organization strategies to give higher order architectures have been studied extensively, synthetic approaches to mimic these self-assembled structures are highly complex and have been difficult to emulate, let alone replicate. The emergence of solution patterns has been found in reaction-diffusion systems such as Turing patterns and the BZ reaction. Intrigued by this spontaneous formation of complexity we explored if similar processes can lead to patterns in the solid state. We here identify a reaction-diffusion system in which the shape of the solidified products is a direct readout of the environmental conditions. Based on insights in the underlying mechanism, we developed a toolbox of engineering strategies to deterministically sculpt patterns and shapes, and combine different morphologies to create a landscape of hierarchical multi scale-complex tectonic architectures with unprecedented levels of complexity. These findings may hold profound implications for understanding, mimicking and ultimately expanding upon nature's morphogenesis strategies, allowing the synthesis of advanced highly complex microscale materials and devices. WLN acknowledges the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research for financial support

  12. Kinetics of diffusion-controlled and ballistically-controlled reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Redner, S.

    1995-01-01

    The kinetics of diffusion-controlled two-species annihilation, A+B → O and single-species ballistically-controlled annihilation, A+A → O are investigated. For two-species annihilation, we describe the basic mechanism that leads to the formation of a coarsening mosaic of A- and B-domains. The implications of this picture on the distribution of reactants is discussed. For ballistic annihilation, dimensional analysis shows that the concentration and rms velocity decay as c∼t -α and v∼t -β , respectively, with α+β = 1 in any spatial dimension. Analysis of the Boltzmann equation for the evolution of the velocity distribution yields accurate predictions for the kinetics. New phenomena associated with discrete initial velocity distributions and with mixed ballistic and diffusive reactant motion are also discussed. (author)

  13. Reaction-diffusion systems in intracellular molecular transport and control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soh, Siowling; Byrska, Marta; Kandere-Grzybowska, Kristiana; Grzybowski, Bartosz A

    2010-06-07

    Chemical reactions make cells work only if the participating chemicals are delivered to desired locations in a timely and precise fashion. Most research to date has focused on active-transport mechanisms, although passive diffusion is often equally rapid and energetically less costly. Capitalizing on these advantages, cells have developed sophisticated reaction-diffusion (RD) systems that control a wide range of cellular functions-from chemotaxis and cell division, through signaling cascades and oscillations, to cell motility. These apparently diverse systems share many common features and are "wired" according to "generic" motifs such as nonlinear kinetics, autocatalysis, and feedback loops. Understanding the operation of these complex (bio)chemical systems requires the analysis of pertinent transport-kinetic equations or, at least on a qualitative level, of the characteristic times of the constituent subprocesses. Therefore, in reviewing the manifestations of cellular RD, we also describe basic theory of reaction-diffusion phenomena.

  14. SN2 fluorination reactions in ionic liquids: a mechanistic study towards solvent engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Young-Ho; Jang, Hyeong Bin; Im, Suk; Song, Myoung Jong; Kim, So-Yeon; Park, Sung-Woo; Chi, Dae Yoon; Song, Choong Eui; Lee, Sungyul

    2011-01-21

    In the catalysis of S(N)2 fluorination reactions, the ionic liquid anion plays a key role as a Lewis base by binding to the counterion Cs(+) and thereby reducing the retarding Coulombic influence of Cs(+) on the nucleophile F(-). The reaction rates also depend critically on the structures of ionic liquid cation, for example, n-butyl imidazolium gives no S(N)2 products, whereas n-butylmethyl imidazolium works well. The origin of the observed phenomenal synergetic effects by the ionic liquid [mim-(t)OH][OMs], in which t-butanol is bonded covalently to the cation [mim], is that the t-butanol moiety binds to the leaving group of the substrate, moderating the retarding interactions between the acidic hydrogen and F(-). This work is a significant step toward designing and engineering solvents for promoting specific chemical reactions.

  15. Use of Soft Computing Technologies For Rocket Engine Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevino, Luis C.; Olcmen, Semih; Polites, Michael

    2003-01-01

    The problem to be addressed in this paper is to explore how the use of Soft Computing Technologies (SCT) could be employed to further improve overall engine system reliability and performance. Specifically, this will be presented by enhancing rocket engine control and engine health management (EHM) using SCT coupled with conventional control technologies, and sound software engineering practices used in Marshall s Flight Software Group. The principle goals are to improve software management, software development time and maintenance, processor execution, fault tolerance and mitigation, and nonlinear control in power level transitions. The intent is not to discuss any shortcomings of existing engine control and EHM methodologies, but to provide alternative design choices for control, EHM, implementation, performance, and sustaining engineering. The approaches outlined in this paper will require knowledge in the fields of rocket engine propulsion, software engineering for embedded systems, and soft computing technologies (i.e., neural networks, fuzzy logic, and Bayesian belief networks), much of which is presented in this paper. The first targeted demonstration rocket engine platform is the MC-1 (formerly FASTRAC Engine) which is simulated with hardware and software in the Marshall Avionics & Software Testbed laboratory that

  16. The application of human engineering in control room of HFETR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Shuchun; Shan Songlin

    2003-01-01

    The human-machine system for improving the working environment in the control room of HFETR is described. The reliability of the equipment, instruments and operation by human engineering is increased. The relations between human engineering and lowering human failure in HFETR are also discussed. It is concluded that the further application of human engineering can increase interaction of the human and machine in the control room and provide assurances for the safe and reliable operation of reactor. (authors)

  17. Engineering and material aspects of impurity control systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koski, J.A.

    1985-01-01

    The design of impurity control devices for fusion energy devices is discussed from the engineering and materials viewpoint. First, examples of impurity control devices are presented, and the plasma edge environment for which they are designed is briefly described. Materials concerns related to the design of the components are discussed and some currently proposed designs presented. Engineering tools available to the designer are listed, and some commonly encountered engineering analysis problems described

  18. The application of human engineering in control room of HFETR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shuchun, Yang; Songlin, Shan [Nuclear Power Inst. of China, Chengdu (China)

    2003-07-01

    The human-machine system for improving the working environment in the control room of HFETR is described. The reliability of the equipment, instruments and operation by human engineering is increased. The relations between human engineering and lowering human failure in HFETR are also discussed. It is concluded that the further application of human engineering can increase interaction of the human and machine in the control room and provide assurances for the safe and reliable operation of reactor. (authors)

  19. The control of a free-piston engine generator. Part 2: Engine dynamics and piston motion control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikalsen, R.; Roskilly, A.P. [Sir Joseph Swan Institute for Energy Research, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 7RU England (United Kingdom)

    2010-04-15

    Free-piston engines are under investigation by a number of research groups due to potential fuel efficiency and exhaust emissions advantages over conventional technology. The main challenge with such engines is the control of the piston motion, and this has not yet been fully resolved for all types of free-piston engines. This paper builds on the fundamental investigations presented in the accompanying paper and investigates the dynamics of the engine and the feasibility of classical control approaches. The response of the engine to rapid load changes are investigated using decentralised PID, PDF and disturbance feedforward. It is found that the engine is sensitive to rapid load changes but that in constant power applications standard control techniques provide satisfactory performance. The influence of cycle-to-cycle variations in the combustion process are investigated, but not found to be critical for engine operation. (author)

  20. Adverse Reactions Associated With Cannabis Consumption as Evident From Search Engine Queries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yom-Tov, Elad; Lev-Ran, Shaul

    2017-10-26

    Cannabis is one of the most widely used psychoactive substances worldwide, but adverse drug reactions (ADRs) associated with its use are difficult to study because of its prohibited status in many countries. Internet search engine queries have been used to investigate ADRs in pharmaceutical drugs. In this proof-of-concept study, we tested whether these queries can be used to detect the adverse reactions of cannabis use. We analyzed anonymized queries from US-based users of Bing, a widely used search engine, made over a period of 6 months and compared the results with the prevalence of cannabis use as reported in the US National Survey on Drug Use in the Household (NSDUH) and with ADRs reported in the Food and Drug Administration's Adverse Drug Reporting System. Predicted prevalence of cannabis use was estimated from the fraction of people making queries about cannabis, marijuana, and 121 additional synonyms. Predicted ADRs were estimated from queries containing layperson descriptions to 195 ICD-10 symptoms list. Our results indicated that the predicted prevalence of cannabis use at the US census regional level reaches an R 2 of .71 NSDUH data. Queries for ADRs made by people who also searched for cannabis reveal many of the known adverse effects of cannabis (eg, cough and psychotic symptoms), as well as plausible unknown reactions (eg, pyrexia). These results indicate that search engine queries can serve as an important tool for the study of adverse reactions of illicit drugs, which are difficult to study in other settings. ©Elad Yom-Tov, Shaul Lev-Ran. Originally published in JMIR Public Health and Surveillance (http://publichealth.jmir.org), 26.10.2017.

  1. Comparison of Engine Simulation Software for Development of Control System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KinYip Chan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Most commonly used commercial engine simulation packages generate detailed estimation of the combustion and gas flow parameters. These parameters are required for advanced research on fluid flow and heat transfer and development of geometries of engine components. However, engine control involves different operating parameters. Various sensors are installed into the engine, the combustion performance is recorded, and data is sent to engine control unit (ECU. ECU computes the new set of parameters to make fine adjustments to actuators providing better engine performance. Such techniques include variable valve timing, variable ignition timing, variable air to fuel ratio, and variable compression ratio. In the present study, two of the commercial packages, Ricardo Wave and Lotus Engine Simulation, have been tested on the capabilities for engine control purposes. These packages are compared with an in-house developed package and with reference results available from the literature. Different numerical experiments have been carried out from which it can be concluded that all packages predict similar profiles of pressure and temperature in the engine cylinder. Moreover, those are in reasonable agreement with the reference results while in-house developed package is possible to run simulations with changing speed for engine control purpose.

  2. Control of transversal instabilities in reaction-diffusion systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Totz, Sonja; Löber, Jakob; Totz, Jan Frederik; Engel, Harald

    2018-05-01

    In two-dimensional reaction-diffusion systems, local curvature perturbations on traveling waves are typically damped out and vanish. However, if the inhibitor diffuses much faster than the activator, transversal instabilities can arise, leading from flat to folded, spatio-temporally modulated waves and to spreading spiral turbulence. Here, we propose a scheme to induce or inhibit these instabilities via a spatio-temporal feedback loop. In a piecewise-linear version of the FitzHugh–Nagumo model, transversal instabilities and spiral turbulence in the uncontrolled system are shown to be suppressed in the presence of control, thereby stabilizing plane wave propagation. Conversely, in numerical simulations with the modified Oregonator model for the photosensitive Belousov–Zhabotinsky reaction, which does not exhibit transversal instabilities on its own, we demonstrate the feasibility of inducing transversal instabilities and study the emerging wave patterns in a well-controlled manner.

  3. Control of Stirling engine. Simplified, compressible model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotnikov, P. I.; Sokołowski, J.; Żochowski, A.

    2016-06-01

    A one-dimensional free boundary problem on a motion of a heavy piston in a tube filled with viscous gas is considered. The system of governing equations and boundary conditions is derived. The obtained system of differential equations can be regarded as a mathematical model of an exterior combustion engine. The existence of a weak solution to this model is proved. The problem of maximization of the total work of the engine is considered.

  4. Combustion engine. [for air pollution control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houseman, J. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    An arrangement for an internal combustion engine is provided in which one or more of the cylinders of the engine are used for generating hydrogen rich gases from hydrocarbon fuels, which gases are then mixed with air and injected into the remaining cylinders to be used as fuel. When heavy load conditions are encountered, hydrocarbon fuel may be mixed with the hydrogen rich gases and air and the mixture is then injected into the remaining cylinders as fuel.

  5. Modeling and fuzzy control of the engine coolant conditioning system in an IC engine test bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohtasebi, Seyed Saeid; Shirazi, Farzad A.; Javaheri, Ahmad; Nava, Ghodrat Hamze

    2010-01-01

    Mechanical and thermodynamical performance of internal combustion engines is significantly affected by the engine working temperature. In an engine test bed, the internal combustion engines are tested in different operating conditions using a dynamometer. It is required that the engine temperature be controlled precisely, particularly in transient states. This precise control can be achieved by an engine coolant conditioning system mainly consisting of a heat exchanger, a control valve, and a controller. In this study, constitutive equations of the system are derived first. These differential equations show the second- order nonlinear time-varying dynamics of the system. The model is validated with the experimental data providing satisfactory results. After presenting the dynamic equations of the system, a fuzzy controller is designed based on our prior knowledge of the system. The fuzzy rules and the membership functions are derived by a trial and error and heuristic method. Because of the nonlinear nature of the system the fuzzy rules are set to satisfy the requirements of the temperature control for different operating conditions of the engine. The performance of the fuzzy controller is compared with a PI one for different transient conditions. The results of the simulation show the better performance of the fuzzy controller. The main advantages of the fuzzy controller are the shorter settling time, smaller overshoot, and improved performance especially in the transient states of the system

  6. Aircraft Turbine Engine Control Research at NASA Glenn Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Sanjay

    2014-01-01

    This lecture will provide an overview of the aircraft turbine engine control research at NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) Glenn Research Center (GRC). A brief introduction to the engine control problem is first provided with a description of the current state-of-the-art control law structure. A historical aspect of engine control development since the 1940s is then provided with a special emphasis on the contributions of GRC. The traditional engine control problem has been to provide a means to safely transition the engine from one steady-state operating point to another based on the pilot throttle inputs. With the increased emphasis on aircraft safety, enhanced performance and affordability, and the need to reduce the environmental impact of aircraft, there are many new challenges being faced by the designers of aircraft propulsion systems. The Controls and Dynamics Branch (CDB) at GRC is leading and participating in various projects in partnership with other organizations within GRC and across NASA, other government agencies, the U.S. aerospace industry, and academia to develop advanced propulsion controls and diagnostics technologies that will help meet the challenging goals of NASA programs under the Aeronautics Research Mission. The second part of the lecture provides an overview of the various CDB technology development activities in aircraft engine control and diagnostics, both current and some accomplished in the recent past. The motivation for each of the research efforts, the research approach, technical challenges and the key progress to date are summarized. The technologies to be discussed include system level engine control concepts, gas path diagnostics, active component control, and distributed engine control architecture. The lecture will end with a futuristic perspective of how the various current technology developments will lead to an Intelligent and Autonomous Propulsion System requiring none to very minimum pilot interface

  7. Control of internal combustion engines and hybrid engines; Regelung von Verbrennungsmotoren und Hybridantrieben

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isermann, R. [TU Darmstadt (Germany). Forschungsgruppe Regelungstechnik und Prozessautomatisierung

    2007-07-15

    In the development of internal combustion engines, there are increasingly rigid specifications for further reduction of consumption, exhaust and noise emissions, better specific performance, lower weight, and good driving characteristics. The contributions in this special issue provide an insight into the many aspects of internal combustion engine and hybrid engine control. The editors of at journal took care to select interesting papers presented at the 3. VDI/VDE-GMA conference AUTOREG 2006. They show how control and mechatronics support the high demands on functionality in motor car engineering. (orig.)

  8. Near wall combustion modeling in spark ignition engines. Part B: Post-flame reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demesoukas, Sokratis; Caillol, Christian; Higelin, Pascal; Boiarciuc, Andrei; Floch, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Models for the post flame reactions (CO and hydrocarbons) and heat release rate are proposed. • ‘Freezing’ effect of CO kinetics is captured but equilibrium CO concentrations are low. • Reactive–diffusive processes are modeled for hydrocarbons and the last stage of combustion is captured. - Abstract: Reduced fuel consumption, low pollutant emissions and adequate output performance are key features in the contemporary design of spark ignition engines. Zero-dimensional numerical simulation is an attractive alternative to engine experiments for the evaluation of various engine configurations. Both flame front reaction and post-flame processes contribute to the heat release rate. The contribution of this work is to highlight and model the role of post-flame reactions (CO and hydrocarbons) in the heat release rate. The modeling approach to CO kinetics used two reactions considered to be dominant and thus more suitable for the description of CO chemical mechanism. Equilibrium concentrations of all the species involved were calculated by a two-zone thermodynamic model. The computed characteristic time of CO kinetics was found to be of a similar order to the results of complex chemistry simulations. The proposed model captured the ‘freezing’ effect (reaction rate is almost zero) for temperatures lower than 1800 K and followed the trends of the measured values at exhaust. However, a consistent underestimation of CO levels at the exhaust was observed. The impact of the remaining CO on the combustion efficiency is considerable especially for rich mixtures. For a remaining 0.4% CO mass fraction, the impact on combustion inefficiency is 0.1%. Unburnt hydrocarbon, which have not reacted within the flame front before quenching, diffuse in the burnt gas and react. In this work, a global reaction rate models the kinetic behavior of hydrocarbon. The diffusion process was modeled by a relaxation equation applied on the calculated kinetic concentration

  9. Propulsion Controls Modeling for a Small Turbofan Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, Joseph W.; Csank, Jeffrey T.; Chicatelli, Amy; Franco, Kevin

    2017-01-01

    A nonlinear dynamic model and propulsion controller are developed for a small-scale turbofan engine. The small-scale turbofan engine is based on the Price Induction company's DGEN 380, one of the few turbofan engines targeted for the personal light jet category. Comparisons of the nonlinear dynamic turbofan engine model to actual DGEN 380 engine test data and a Price Induction simulation are provided. During engine transients, the nonlinear model typically agrees within 10 percent error, even though the nonlinear model was developed from limited available engine data. A gain scheduled proportional integral low speed shaft controller with limiter safety logic is created to replicate the baseline DGEN 380 controller. The new controller provides desired gain and phase margins and is verified to meet Federal Aviation Administration transient propulsion system requirements. In understanding benefits, there is a need to move beyond simulation for the demonstration of advanced control architectures and technologies by using real-time systems and hardware. The small-scale DGEN 380 provides a cost effective means to accomplish advanced controls testing on a relevant turbofan engine platform.

  10. Neural control of vascular reactions: impact of emotion and attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okon-Singer, Hadas; Mehnert, Jan; Hoyer, Jana; Hellrung, Lydia; Schaare, Herma Lina; Dukart, Juergen; Villringer, Arno

    2014-03-19

    This study investigated the neural regions involved in blood pressure reactions to negative stimuli and their possible modulation by attention. Twenty-four healthy human subjects (11 females; age = 24.75 ± 2.49 years) participated in an affective perceptual load task that manipulated attention to negative/neutral distractor pictures. fMRI data were collected simultaneously with continuous recording of peripheral arterial blood pressure. A parametric modulation analysis examined the impact of attention and emotion on the relation between neural activation and blood pressure reactivity during the task. When attention was available for processing the distractor pictures, negative pictures resulted in behavioral interference, neural activation in brain regions previously related to emotion, a transient decrease of blood pressure, and a positive correlation between blood pressure response and activation in a network including prefrontal and parietal regions, the amygdala, caudate, and mid-brain. These effects were modulated by attention; behavioral and neural responses to highly negative distractor pictures (compared with neutral pictures) were smaller or diminished, as was the negative blood pressure response when the central task involved high perceptual load. Furthermore, comparing high and low load revealed enhanced activation in frontoparietal regions implicated in attention control. Our results fit theories emphasizing the role of attention in the control of behavioral and neural reactions to irrelevant emotional distracting information. Our findings furthermore extend the function of attention to the control of autonomous reactions associated with negative emotions by showing altered blood pressure reactions to emotional stimuli, the latter being of potential clinical relevance.

  11. 76 FR 55293 - Special Conditions: Diamond Aircraft Industries, Model DA-40NG; Electronic Engine Control (EEC...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-07

    ... with an electronic engine control (EEC), also known as a Full Authority Digital Engine Control (FADEC... engine design certification, and the certification requirements for engine control systems are driven by... aircraft supplied power and data failures on the engine control system, and the resulting effects on engine...

  12. Control Design for a Generic Commercial Aircraft Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csank, Jeffrey; May, Ryan D.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the control algorithms and control design process for a generic commercial aircraft engine simulation of a 40,000 lb thrust class, two spool, high bypass ratio turbofan engine. The aircraft engine is a complex nonlinear system designed to operate over an extreme range of environmental conditions, at temperatures from approximately -60 to 120+ F, and at altitudes from below sea level to 40,000 ft, posing multiple control design constraints. The objective of this paper is to provide the reader an overview of the control design process, design considerations, and justifications as to why the particular architecture and limits have been chosen. The controller architecture contains a gain-scheduled Proportional Integral controller along with logic to protect the aircraft engine from exceeding any limits. Simulation results illustrate that the closed loop system meets the Federal Aviation Administration s thrust response requirements

  13. Distributed Control Architecture for Gas Turbine Engine. Chapter 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culley, Dennis; Garg, Sanjay

    2009-01-01

    The transformation of engine control systems from centralized to distributed architecture is both necessary and enabling for future aeropropulsion applications. The continued growth of adaptive control applications and the trend to smaller, light weight cores is a counter influence on the weight and volume of control system hardware. A distributed engine control system using high temperature electronics and open systems communications will reverse the growing trend of control system weight ratio to total engine weight and also be a major factor in decreasing overall cost of ownership for aeropropulsion systems. The implementation of distributed engine control is not without significant challenges. There are the needs for high temperature electronics, development of simple, robust communications, and power supply for the on-board electronics.

  14. Optimal Vibration Control of Civil Engineering Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thesbjerg, Leo

    In designing large civil engineering structures, an important consideration is prospective dynamic loadings which may include earthquake ground motion, wind gusts, severe sea states and moving vehicles, rotating and reciprocating machinery and others. successful design of such structures requires...... providing for the safety and integrity of the structure, and in some cases also providing for a measure of comfort for the occupants during such loading which the structure and its occupants must endure. Due to these uncertainties, the civil engineering community has traditionally adopted a very...

  15. Alternative Observers for SI Engine Air/Fuel Ratio Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendricks, Elbert; Poulsen, Jannik; Olsen, Mads Bruun

    1996-01-01

    In earlier work it has been shown that a nonlinear observer based on the use of the manifold pressure state equation and a nonlinear fuel film compensator can maintain accurate A/F ratio control during both steady state and transient operation. This observer may be called a manifold absolute pres...... engine control system designer with a variety of robust control systems which can easily be made redundant in order to satisfy newer engine emissions and diagnosis requirements and legislation...

  16. Integrated Tools for Future Distributed Engine Control Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culley, Dennis; Thomas, Randy; Saus, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Turbine engines are highly complex mechanical systems that are becoming increasingly dependent on control technologies to achieve system performance and safety metrics. However, the contribution of controls to these measurable system objectives is difficult to quantify due to a lack of tools capable of informing the decision makers. This shortcoming hinders technology insertion in the engine design process. NASA Glenn Research Center is developing a Hardware-inthe- Loop (HIL) platform and analysis tool set that will serve as a focal point for new control technologies, especially those related to the hardware development and integration of distributed engine control. The HIL platform is intended to enable rapid and detailed evaluation of new engine control applications, from conceptual design through hardware development, in order to quantify their impact on engine systems. This paper discusses the complex interactions of the control system, within the context of the larger engine system, and how new control technologies are changing that paradigm. The conceptual design of the new HIL platform is then described as a primary tool to address those interactions and how it will help feed the insertion of new technologies into future engine systems.

  17. Study of reaction between water and exhaust gases from diesel engines used in underground mining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazukhina, S.I.; Kalabin, G.V.; Romanov, V.S.

    1988-05-01

    A method of mathematical simulation, based on the principle of local equilibrium of the kinetic components, was proposed for formulating and solving problems related to the combustion of fuel and the treatment of exhaust gases from a diesel engine in underground workings. Results of a study of the effects of exhaust gas quantity and composition on the reaction between the gases and water are presented. It is shown that the kinetic model correlates well with the equilibrium model, adequately describes the process, and gives a reliable picture of the changes over a period of time. The proposed method can be used to study the gas emission with different fuel mixtures and liquid neutralizing agents with a view to reducing the toxicity of diesel-engine exhaust gases.

  18. Experiment-Based Teaching in Advanced Control Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Precup, R.-E.; Preitl, S.; Radac, M.-B.; Petriu, E. M.; Dragos, C.-A.; Tar, J. K.

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses an experiment-based approach to teaching an advanced control engineering syllabus involving controlled plant analysis and modeling, control structures and algorithms, real-time laboratory experiments, and their assessment. These experiments are structured around the representative case of the longitudinal slip control of an…

  19. Characterisation, control, and energy management of electrified turbocharged diesel engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Dezong; Winward, Edward; Yang, Zhijia; Stobart, Richard; Steffen, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A real-time energy management framework for electrified engines is proposed. • A multi-variable robust controller is designed. • Characterisation on the air system of electrified diesel engines is given. • Reliable for engine downsizing because of the promising transient performance. - Abstract: The electrification of engine components offers significant opportunities for fuel efficiency improvements. The electrified turbocharger is one of the most attractive options since it recovers part of the engine exhaust gas mechanical energy to assist boosting. Therefore, the engine can be downsized through improved transient responsiveness. In the electrified turbocharger, an electric machine is mounted on the turbine shaft and changes the air system dynamics, so characterisation of the new layout is essential. A systematic control solution is required to manage energy flows in the hybrid system. In this paper, a framework for characterisation, control, and energy management for an electrified turbocharged diesel engine is proposed. The impacts of the electric machine on fuel economy and air system variables are analysed. Based on the characterisation, a two-level control structure is proposed. A real-time energy management strategy is employed as the supervisory level controller to generate the optimal values of critical variables, while a model-based multi-variable controller is designed as the low level controller to track the values. The two controllers work together in a cascade to address both fuel economy optimisation and battery state-of-charge maintenance. The proposed control strategy is validated on a high fidelity physical engine model. The tracking performance shows the proposed framework is a promising solution in regulating the behavior of electrified engines.

  20. Human factors evaluation of the engineering test reactor control room

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banks, W.W.; Boone, M.P.

    1981-03-01

    The Reactor and Process Control Rooms at the Engineering Test Reactor were evaluated by a team of human factors engineers using available human factors design criteria. During the evaluation, ETR, equipment and facilities were compared with MIL-STD-1472-B, Human Engineering design Criteria for Military Systems. The focus of recommendations centered on: (a) displays and controls; placing displays and controls in functional groups; (b) establishing a consistent color coding (in compliance with a standard if possible); (c) systematizing annunciator alarms and reducing their number; (d) organizing equipment in functional groups; and (e) modifying labeling and lines of demarcation

  1. Common Rail System for GDI Engines Modelling, Identification, and Control

    CERN Document Server

    Fiengo, Giovanni; Palladino, Angelo; Giglio, Veniero

    2013-01-01

    Progressive reductions in vehicle emission requirements have forced the automotive industry to invest in research and development of alternative control strategies. Continual control action exerted by a dedicated electronic control unit ensures that best performance in terms of pollutant emissions and power density is married with driveability and diagnostics. Gasoline direct injection (GDI) engine technology is a way to attain these goals. This brief describes the functioning of a GDI engine equipped with a common rail (CR) system, and the devices necessary to run test-bench experiments in detail. The text should prove instructive to researchers in engine control and students are recommended to this brief as their first approach to this technology. Later chapters of the brief relate an innovative strategy designed to assist with the engine management system; injection pressure regulation for fuel pressure stabilization in the CR fuel line is proposed and validated by experiment. The resulting control scheme ...

  2. Role of measurement in feedback-controlled quantum engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Juyeon; Kim, Yong Woon

    2018-01-01

    In feedback controls, measurement is an essential step in designing protocols according to outcomes. For quantum mechanical systems, measurement has another effect; to supply energy to the measured system. We verify that in feedback-controlled quantum engines, measurement plays a dual role; not only as an auxiliary to perform feedback control but also as an energy supply to drive the engines. We consider a specific engine cycle exploiting feedback control followed by projective measurement and show that the maximum bound of the extractable work is set by both the efficacy of the feedback control and the energy change caused by projective measurement. We take a concrete example of an engine using an immobile spin-1/2 particle as a working substance and suggest two possible scenarios for work extraction.

  3. Control Engineering as a Part of Undergraduate Curriculum for Mechanical Engineering in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtar, Shagil; Iqbal, Syed Muneeb; Bajpai, Shrish

    2016-01-01

    In this present study we have traced the genesis of control engineering in the scope of mechanical engineering and then some analysis on its recent developments, their increasing need and how this particular subject has evolved machines functioning nowadays specifically its standard of education in India. We have probed this field right from its…

  4. Self-Control and Academic Performance in Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honken, Nora; Ralston, Patricia A.; Tretter, Thomas R.

    2016-01-01

    Self-control has been related to positive student outcomes including academic performance of college students. Because of the critical nature of the first semester academic performance for engineering students in terms of retention and persistence in pursuing an engineering degree, this study investigated the relationship between freshmen…

  5. Dynamic control of a homogeneous charge compression ignition engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Kevin P [Metamora, IL; Mehresh, Parag [Peoria, IL; Schuh, David [Peoria, IL; Kieser, Andrew J [Morton, IL; Hergart, Carl-Anders [Peoria, IL; Hardy, William L [Peoria, IL; Rodman, Anthony [Chillicothe, IL; Liechty, Michael P [Chillicothe, IL

    2008-06-03

    A homogenous charge compression ignition engine is operated by compressing a charge mixture of air, exhaust and fuel in a combustion chamber to an autoignition condition of the fuel. The engine may facilitate a transition from a first combination of speed and load to a second combination of speed and load by changing the charge mixture and compression ratio. This may be accomplished in a consecutive engine cycle by adjusting both a fuel injector control signal and a variable valve control signal away from a nominal variable valve control signal. Thereafter in one or more subsequent engine cycles, more sluggish adjustments are made to at least one of a geometric compression ratio control signal and an exhaust gas recirculation control signal to allow the variable valve control signal to be readjusted back toward its nominal variable valve control signal setting. By readjusting the variable valve control signal back toward its nominal setting, the engine will be ready for another transition to a new combination of engine speed and load.

  6. Real time control engineering systems and automation

    CERN Document Server

    Ng, Tian Seng

    2016-01-01

    This book covers the two broad areas of the electronics and electrical aspects of control applications, highlighting the many different types of control systems of relevance to real-life control system design. The control techniques presented are state-of-the-art. In the electronics section, readers will find essential information on microprocessor, microcontroller, mechatronics and electronics control. The low-level assembly programming language performs basic input/output control techniques as well as controlling the stepper motor and PWM dc motor. In the electrical section, the book addresses the complete elevator PLC system design, neural network plant control, load flow analysis, and process control, as well as machine vision topics. Illustrative diagrams, circuits and programming examples and algorithms help to explain the details of the system function design. Readers will find a wealth of computer control and industrial automation practices and applications for modern industries, as well as the educat...

  7. Artificial intelligence in engineering planning and control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boardman, J.T.; Brown, N.; Kuzora, P.W.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents a methodology to formalise the expertise of the engineering planner and describes a suite of user-friendly computer-based tools. An original modelling scheme is proposed based on an information system represented by a type of associative network. The means of representing knowledge is unique in that the inferencing, instead of operating from a central database containing evidence and hypotheses, works in conjunction with the information system which maintains both. (author)

  8. Liquid metals fire control engineering handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballif, J.L.

    1979-02-01

    This handbook reviews the basic requirements of the use of liquid metals with emphasis on sodium which has the greatest current usage. It delineates the concepts necessary to design facilities both radioactive and nonradioactive for use with liquid metals. It further reviews the state-of-the-art in fire extinguishers and leak detection equipment and comments on their application and sensitivity. It also provides details on some engineering features of value to the designer of liquid metal facilities

  9. The Case for Distributed Engine Control in Turbo-Shaft Engine Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culley, Dennis E.; Paluszewski, Paul J.; Storey, William; Smith, Bert J.

    2009-01-01

    The turbo-shaft engine is an important propulsion system used to power vehicles on land, sea, and in the air. As the power plant for many high performance helicopters, the characteristics of the engine and control are critical to proper vehicle operation as well as being the main determinant to overall vehicle performance. When applied to vertical flight, important distinctions exist in the turbo-shaft engine control system due to the high degree of dynamic coupling between the engine and airframe and the affect on vehicle handling characteristics. In this study, the impact of engine control system architecture is explored relative to engine performance, weight, reliability, safety, and overall cost. Comparison of the impact of architecture on these metrics is investigated as the control system is modified from a legacy centralized structure to a more distributed configuration. A composite strawman system which is typical of turbo-shaft engines in the 1000 to 2000 hp class is described and used for comparison. The overall benefits of these changes to control system architecture are assessed. The availability of supporting technologies to achieve this evolution is also discussed.

  10. Diffusion-controlled reactions modeling in Geant4-DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karamitros, M., E-mail: matkara@gmail.com [CNRS, IN2P3, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); CNRS, INCIA, UMR 5287, F-33400 Talence (France); Luan, S. [University of New Mexico, Department of Computer Science, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bernal, M.A. [Instituto de Física Gleb Wataghin, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil); Allison, J. [Geant4 Associates International Ltd (United Kingdom); Baldacchino, G. [CEA Saclay, IRAMIS, LIDYL, Radiation Physical Chemistry Group, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette Cedex (France); CNRS, UMR3299, SIS2M, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette Cedex (France); Davidkova, M. [Nuclear Physics Institute of the ASCR, Prague (Czech Republic); Francis, Z. [Saint Joseph University, Faculty of Sciences, Department of Physics, Mkalles, Beirut (Lebanon); Friedland, W. [Helmholtz Zentrum München, German Research Center for Environmental Health, Institute of Radiation Protection, Ingolstädter Landstr. 1, 85764 Neuherberg (Germany); Ivantchenko, V. [Ecoanalytica, 119899 Moscow (Russian Federation); Geant4 Associates International Ltd (United Kingdom); Ivantchenko, A. [Geant4 Associates International Ltd (United Kingdom); Mantero, A. [SwHaRD s.r.l., via Buccari 9, 16153 Genova (Italy); Nieminem, P.; Santin, G. [ESA-ESTEC, 2200 AG Noordwijk (Netherlands); Tran, H.N. [Division of Nuclear Physics and Faculty of Applied Sciences, Ton Duc Thang University, Tan Phong Ward, District 7, Ho Chi Minh City (Viet Nam); Stepan, V. [CNRS, IN2P3, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); Nuclear Physics Institute of the ASCR, Prague (Czech Republic); Incerti, S., E-mail: incerti@cenbg.in2p3.fr [CNRS, IN2P3, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France)

    2014-10-01

    Context Under irradiation, a biological system undergoes a cascade of chemical reactions that can lead to an alteration of its normal operation. There are different types of radiation and many competing reactions. As a result the kinetics of chemical species is extremely complex. The simulation becomes then a powerful tool which, by describing the basic principles of chemical reactions, can reveal the dynamics of the macroscopic system. To understand the dynamics of biological systems under radiation, since the 80s there have been on-going efforts carried out by several research groups to establish a mechanistic model that consists in describing all the physical, chemical and biological phenomena following the irradiation of single cells. This approach is generally divided into a succession of stages that follow each other in time: (1) the physical stage, where the ionizing particles interact directly with the biological material; (2) the physico-chemical stage, where the targeted molecules release their energy by dissociating, creating new chemical species; (3) the chemical stage, where the new chemical species interact with each other or with the biomolecules; (4) the biological stage, where the repairing mechanisms of the cell come into play. This article focuses on the modeling of the chemical stage. Method This article presents a general method of speeding-up chemical reaction simulations in fluids based on the Smoluchowski equation and Monte-Carlo methods, where all molecules are explicitly simulated and the solvent is treated as a continuum. The model describes diffusion-controlled reactions. This method has been implemented in Geant4-DNA. The keys to the new algorithm include: (1) the combination of a method to compute time steps dynamically with a Brownian bridge process to account for chemical reactions, which avoids costly fixed time step simulations; (2) a k–d tree data structure for quickly locating, for a given molecule, its closest reactants. The

  11. Optimization and control methods in industrial engineering and construction

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Xiangyu

    2014-01-01

    This book presents recent advances in optimization and control methods with applications to industrial engineering and construction management. It consists of 15 chapters authored by recognized experts in a variety of fields including control and operation research, industrial engineering, and project management. Topics include numerical methods in unconstrained optimization, robust optimal control problems, set splitting problems, optimum confidence interval analysis, a monitoring networks optimization survey, distributed fault detection, nonferrous industrial optimization approaches, neural networks in traffic flows, economic scheduling of CCHP systems, a project scheduling optimization survey, lean and agile construction project management, practical construction projects in Hong Kong, dynamic project management, production control in PC4P, and target contracts optimization.   The book offers a valuable reference work for scientists, engineers, researchers and practitioners in industrial engineering and c...

  12. Control Design for an Advanced Geared Turbofan Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Jeffryes W.; Litt, Jonathan S.

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes the design process for the control system of an advanced geared turbofan engine. This process is applied to a simulation that is representative of a 30,000 lbf thrust class concept engine with two main spools, ultra-high bypass ratio, and a variable area fan nozzle. Control system requirements constrain the non-linear engine model as it operates throughout its flight envelope of sea level to 40,000 ft and from 0 to 0.8 Mach. The control architecture selected for this project was developed from literature and reflects a configuration that utilizes a proportional integral controller integrated with sets of limiters that enable the engine to operate safely throughout its flight envelope. Simulation results show the overall system meets performance requirements without exceeding system operational limits.

  13. Hydrothermal analysis in engineering using control volume finite element method

    CERN Document Server

    Sheikholeslami, Mohsen

    2015-01-01

    Control volume finite element methods (CVFEM) bridge the gap between finite difference and finite element methods, using the advantages of both methods for simulation of multi-physics problems in complex geometries. In Hydrothermal Analysis in Engineering Using Control Volume Finite Element Method, CVFEM is covered in detail and applied to key areas of thermal engineering. Examples, exercises, and extensive references are used to show the use of the technique to model key engineering problems such as heat transfer in nanofluids (to enhance performance and compactness of energy systems),

  14. Inflight performance of the Ulysses reaction control system

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGarry, Andrew; Berry, William; Parker, David

    1997-01-01

    The Ulysses spacecraft has been exploring the heliosphere since October 1990 in a six-year polar orbit. Despite varying operational demands, the pressure-fed monopropellant hydrazine reaction control system (RCS) has experienced few problems. The observed anomalies, having minimal operational impact, include plume impingement effects, electrical power overload effects and hydrazine gas generation effects. These anomalies are presented and discussed, with emphasis on the first observation of gas in the hydrazine propellant. The relatively low gas generation rate is attributed to: the use of high purity hydrazine; the configuration of the spin-stabilized spacecraft; the extensive use of titanium alloys; and the efficiency of the thermal control of the propellant tank which maintains a temperature of 21 C.

  15. Design of Distributed Engine Control Systems with Uncertain Delay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaofeng Liu

    Full Text Available Future gas turbine engine control systems will be based on distributed architecture, in which, the sensors and actuators will be connected to the controllers via a communication network. The performance of the distributed engine control (DEC is dependent on the network performance. This study introduces a distributed control system architecture based on a networked cascade control system (NCCS. Typical turboshaft engine-distributed controllers are designed based on the NCCS framework with a H∞ output feedback under network-induced time delays and uncertain disturbances. The sufficient conditions for robust stability are derived via the Lyapunov stability theory and linear matrix inequality approach. Both numerical and hardware-in-loop simulations illustrate the effectiveness of the presented method.

  16. Design of Distributed Engine Control Systems with Uncertain Delay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaofeng; Li, Yanxi; Sun, Xu

    Future gas turbine engine control systems will be based on distributed architecture, in which, the sensors and actuators will be connected to the controllers via a communication network. The performance of the distributed engine control (DEC) is dependent on the network performance. This study introduces a distributed control system architecture based on a networked cascade control system (NCCS). Typical turboshaft engine-distributed controllers are designed based on the NCCS framework with a H∞ output feedback under network-induced time delays and uncertain disturbances. The sufficient conditions for robust stability are derived via the Lyapunov stability theory and linear matrix inequality approach. Both numerical and hardware-in-loop simulations illustrate the effectiveness of the presented method.

  17. Should we attempt global (inlet engine airframe) control design?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlin, C. M.

    1980-01-01

    The feasibility of multivariable design of the entire airplane control system is briefly addressed. An intermediate step in that direction is to design a control for an inlet engine augmentor system by using multivariable techniques. The supersonic cruise large scale inlet research program is described which will provide an opportunity to develop, integrate, and wind tunnel test a control for a mixed compression inlet and variable cycle engine. The integrated propulsion airframe control program is also discussed which will introduce the problem of implementing MVC within a distributed processing avionics architecture, requiring real time decomposition of the global design into independent modules in response to hardware communication failures.

  18. State-of-the-art in control engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Štefan Kozák

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with new trends in research, development and applications of advanced control methods and structures based on the principles of optimality, robustness and intelligence. Present trends in the complex process control design demand an increasing degree of integration of numerical mathematics, control engineering methods, new control structures based of distribution, embedded network control structure and new information and communication technologies. Furthermore, increasing problems with interactions, process non-linearities, operating constraints, time delays, uncertainties, and significant dead-times consequently lead to the necessity to develop more sophisticated control strategies. Advanced control methods and new distributed embedded control structures represent the most effective tools for realizing high performance of many technological processes. Main ideas covered in this paper are motivated namely by the development of new advanced control engineering methods (predictive, hybrid predictive, optimal, adaptive, robust, fuzzy logic, and neural network and new possibilities of their SW and HW realizations and successful implementation in industry.

  19. A Mathematical Model of Marine Diesel Engine Speed Control System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Rajendra Prasad; Balaji, Rajoo

    2018-02-01

    Diesel engine is inherently an unstable machine and requires a reliable control system to regulate its speed for safe and efficient operation. Also, the diesel engine may operate at fixed or variable speeds depending upon user's needs and accordingly the speed control system should have essential features to fulfil these requirements. This paper proposes a mathematical model of a marine diesel engine speed control system with droop governing function. The mathematical model includes static and dynamic characteristics of the control loop components. Model of static characteristic of the rotating fly weights speed sensing element provides an insight into the speed droop features of the speed controller. Because of big size and large time delay, the turbo charged diesel engine is represented as a first order system or sometimes even simplified to a pure integrator with constant gain which is considered acceptable in control literature. The proposed model is mathematically less complex and quick to use for preliminary analysis of the diesel engine speed controller performance.

  20. Engineering models and methods for industrial cell control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynggaard, Hans Jørgen Birk; Alting, Leo

    1997-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the engineering, i.e. the designing and making, of industrial cell control systems. The focus is on automated robot welding cells in the shipbuilding industry. The industrial research project defines models and methods for design and implemen-tation of computer based...... SHIPYARD.It is concluded that cell control technology provides for increased performance in production systems, and that the Cell Control Engineering concept reduces the effort for providing and operating high quality and high functionality cell control solutions for the industry....... control and monitor-ing systems for production cells. The project participants are The Danish Academy of Technical Sciences, the Institute of Manufacturing Engineering at the Technical University of Denmark and ODENSE STEEL SHIPYARD Ltd.The manufacturing environment and the current practice...

  1. Real-time nonlinear feedback control of pattern formation in (bio)chemical reaction-diffusion processes: a model study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt-Pollmann, U; Lebiedz, D; Diehl, M; Sager, S; Schlöder, J

    2005-09-01

    Theoretical and experimental studies related to manipulation of pattern formation in self-organizing reaction-diffusion processes by appropriate control stimuli become increasingly important both in chemical engineering and cellular biochemistry. In a model study, we demonstrate here exemplarily the application of an efficient nonlinear model predictive control (NMPC) algorithm to real-time optimal feedback control of pattern formation in a bacterial chemotaxis system modeled by nonlinear partial differential equations. The corresponding drift-diffusion model type is representative for many (bio)chemical systems involving nonlinear reaction dynamics and nonlinear diffusion. We show how the computed optimal feedback control strategy exploits the system inherent physical property of wave propagation to achieve desired control aims. We discuss various applications of our approach to optimal control of spatiotemporal dynamics.

  2. Control and automation, and energy system engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tai-hoon [Hannam Univ., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Adeli, Hojjat [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); Stoica, Adrian [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA (United States); Kang, Byeong-Ho (eds.) [Tasmania Univ., Hobart, TAS (Australia)

    2011-07-01

    This book comprises selected papers of the International Conferences, CA and CES3 2011, held as Part of the Future Generation Information Technology Conference, FGIT 2011, in Conjunction with GDC 2011, Jeju Island, Korea, in December 2011. The papers presented were carefully reviewed and selected from numerous submissions and focused on the various aspects of control and automation, and circuits, control, communication, electricity, electronics, energy, system, signal and simulation. (orig.)

  3. [Comparison Analysis of Economic and Engineering Control of Industrial VOCs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu-fei; Liu, Chang-xin; Cheng, Jie; Hao, Zheng-ping; Wang, Zheng

    2015-04-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) pollutant has become China's major air pollutant in key urban areas like sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides and particulate matter. It is mainly produced from industry sectors, and engineering control is one of the most important reduction measures. During the 12th Five-Year Plan, China decides to invest 40 billion RMB to build pollution control projects in key industry sectors with annual emission reduction of 605 000 t x a(-1). It shows that China attaches a great importance to emission reduction by engineering projects and highlights the awareness of engineering reduction technologies. In this paper, a macroeconomic model, namely computable general equilibrium model, (CGE model) was employed to simulate engineering control and economic control (imposing environmental tax). We aim to compare the pros and cons of the two reduction policies. Considering the economic loss of the whole country, the environmental tax has more impacts on the economy system than engineering reduction measures. We suggest that the central government provides 7 500 RMB x t(-1) as subsidy for enterprises in industry sectors to encourage engineering reduction.

  4. Internal combustion engines - Modelling, estimation and control issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vigild, C.W.

    2001-12-01

    Alternative power-trains have become buzz words in the automotive industry in the recent past. New technologies like Lithium-Ion batteries or fuel cells combined with high efficient electrical motors show promising results. However both technologies are extremely expensive and important questions like 'How are we going to supply fuel-cells with hydrogen in an environmentally friendly way?', 'How are we going to improve the range - and recharging speed - of electrical vehicles?' and 'How will our existing infrastructure cope with such changes?' are still left unanswered. Hence, the internal combustion engine with all its shortcomings is to stay with us for the next many years. What the future will really bring in this area is uncertain, but one thing can be said for sure; the time of the pipe in - pipe out engine concept is over. Modem engines, Diesel or gasoline, have in the recent past been provided with many new technologies to improve both performance and handling and to cope with the tightening emission legislations. However, as new devices are included, the number of control inputs is also gradually increased. Hence, the control matrix dimension has grown to a considerably size, and the typical table and regression based engine calibration procedures currently in use today contain both challenging and time-consuming tasks. One way to improve understanding of engines and provide a more comprehensive picture of the control problem is by use of simplified physical modelling - one of the main thrusts of this dissertation. The application of simplified physical modelling as a foundation for engine estimation and control design is first motivated by two control applications. The control problem concerns Air/Fuel ratio control of Spark Ignition engines. Two different ways of control are presented; one based on. a model based Extended Kalman Filter updated predictor, and one based on robust H {infinity} techniques. Both controllers are

  5. The Case for Intelligent Propulsion Control for Fast Engine Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litt, Jonathan S.; Frederick, Dean K.; Guo, Ten-Huei

    2009-01-01

    Damaged aircraft have occasionally had to rely solely on thrust to maneuver as a consequence of losing hydraulic power needed to operate flight control surfaces. The lack of successful landings in these cases inspired research into more effective methods of utilizing propulsion-only control. That research demonstrated that one of the major contributors to the difficulty in landing is the slow response of the engines as compared to using traditional flight control. To address this, research is being conducted into ways of making the engine more responsive under emergency conditions. This can be achieved by relaxing controller limits, adjusting schedules, and/or redesigning the regulators to increase bandwidth. Any of these methods can enable faster response at the potential expense of engine life and increased likelihood of stall. However, an example sensitivity analysis revealed a complex interaction of the limits and the difficulty in predicting the way to achieve the fastest response. The sensitivity analysis was performed on a realistic engine model, and demonstrated that significantly faster engine response can be achieved compared to standard Bill of Material control. However, the example indicates the need for an intelligent approach to controller limit adjustment in order for the potential to be fulfilled.

  6. The international symposium on 'chemical engineering of gas-liquid-solid catalyst reactions'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammer, H

    1978-06-01

    A report on the International Symposium on ''Chemical Engineering of Gas-Liquid-Solid Catalyst Reactions'', sponsored by the University of Liege (3/2-3/78), covers papers on the hydrodynamics, modeling and simulation, operating behavior, and chemical kinetics of trickle-bed reactors; scale-up of a trickle-bed reactor for hydrotreating Kuwait vacuum distillate; experimental results obtained in trickle-bed reactors for hydroprocessing atmospheric residua, hydrogenation of methylstyrene, hydrogenation of butanone, and hydrodemetallization of petroleum residua; advantages and disadvantages of various three-phase reactor types (e.g., for the liquid-phase hydrogenation of carbon monoxide to benzene, SNG, or methanol) and hydrodynamics, mass and heat transfer, and modeling of bubble columns with suspended catalysts (slurry reactors), and their applications (e.g., in SNG and fermentation processes).

  7. Fuzzy logic applications to control engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langari, Reza

    1993-12-01

    This paper presents the results of a project presently under way at Texas A&M which focuses on the use of fuzzy logic in integrated control of manufacturing systems. The specific problems investigated here include diagnosis of critical tool wear in machining of metals via a neuro-fuzzy algorithm, as well as compensation of friction in mechanical positioning systems via an adaptive fuzzy logic algorithm. The results indicate that fuzzy logic in conjunction with conventional algorithmic based approaches or neural nets can prove useful in dealing with the intricacies of control/monitoring of manufacturing systems and can potentially play an active role in multi-modal integrated control systems of the future.

  8. Life extending control: An interdisciplinary engineering thrust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzo, Carl F.; Merrill, Walter C.

    1991-01-01

    The concept of Life Extending Control (LEC) is introduced. Possible extensions to the cyclic damage prediction approach are presented based on the identification of a model from elementary forms. Several candidate elementary forms are presented. These extensions will result in a continuous or differential form of the damage prediction model. Two possible approaches to the LEC based on the existing cyclic damage prediction method, the measured variables LEC and the estimated variables LEC, are defined. Here, damage estimates or measurements would be used directly in the LEC. A simple hydraulic actuator driven position control system example is used to illustrate the main ideas behind LEC. Results from a simple hydraulic actuator example demonstrate that overall system performance (dynamic plus life) can be maximized by accounting for component damage in the control design.

  9. Power control system for a hot gas engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berntell, John O.

    1986-01-01

    A power control system for a hot gas engine of the type in which the power output is controlled by varying the mean pressure of the working gas charge in the engine has according to the present invention been provided with two working gas reservoirs at substantially different pressure levels. At working gas pressures below the lower of said levels the high pressure gas reservoir is cut out from the control system, and at higher pressures the low pressure gas reservoir is cut out from the system, thereby enabling a single one-stage compressor to handle gas within a wide pressure range at a low compression ratio.

  10. Engineering Documentation Control Handbook Configuration Management and Product Lifecycle Management

    CERN Document Server

    Watts, Frank B

    2011-01-01

    In this new edition of his widely-used Handbook, Frank Watts, widely recognized for his significant contributions to engineering change control processes, provides a thoroughly practical guide to the implementation and improvement of Engineering Documentation Control (EDC), Product Lifecycle Management and Product Configuration Management (CM). Successful and error-free implementation of EDC/CM is critical to world-class manufacturing. Huge amounts of time are wasted in most product manufacturing environments over EDC/CM issues such as interchangeability, document release and change control -

  11. Use of university research reactors to teach control engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernard, J.A.

    1991-01-01

    University research reactors (URRs) have provided generations of students with the opportunity to receive instruction and do hands-on work in reactor dynamics, neutron scattering, health physics, and neutron activation analysis. Given that many URRs are currently converting to programmable control systems, the opportunity now exists to provide a similar learning experience to those studying systems control engineering. That possibility is examined here with emphasis on the need for the inclusion of experiment in control engineering curricula, the type of activities that could be performed, and safety considerations

  12. Adaptive feedforward control of exhaust recirculation in large diesel engines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kræn Vodder; Blanke, Mogens; Eriksson, Lars

    2017-01-01

    is generalized to a class of first order Hammerstein systems with sensor delay and exponentially converging bounds of the control error are proven analytically. It is then shown how to apply the method to the EGR system of a two-stroke crosshead diesel engine. The controller is validated by closed loop......Environmental concern has led the International Maritime Organization to restrict NO푥 emissions from marine diesel engines. Exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) systems have been introduced in order to comply to the new standards. Traditional fixed-gain feedback methods are not able to control the EGR...

  13. Engineering applications of discrete-time optimal control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vidal, Rene Victor Valqui; Ravn, Hans V.

    1990-01-01

    Many problems of design and operation of engineering systems can be formulated as optimal control problems where time has been discretisized. This is also true even if 'time' is not involved in the formulation of the problem, but rather another one-dimensional parameter. This paper gives a review...... of some well-known and new results in discrete time optimal control methods applicable to practical problem solving within engineering. Emphasis is placed on dynamic programming, the classical maximum principle and generalized versions of the maximum principle for optimal control of discrete time systems...

  14. Control Engineering Embraces Instrumentation and Alarm Systems Of Navy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gheorghe Samoilescu

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Control engineering can be applied not only to propelling and auxiliary machinery but also to electrical installations, refrigeration, cargo handling (especially in tankers and deck machinery, e.g. Windlass control. Opinion still vary on such matters as the relative merits of pneumatic versus electronic system and whether the control center should be in the engine room or adjacent to the navigating bridge. Arguments against the exclusion of the engineer officer from close contact with the machinery are countered by the fact that electronic systems are based on changes other than those of human response. Automated ships (UMS operate closer to prescribed standards and therefore operate with greater efficiency. The closer control of machinery operating conditions (cooling water temperatures and pressures, permits machinery to be run at its optimum design conditions, making for fuel economy and reduced maintenance.

  15. Hydraulic engine valve actuation system including independent feedback control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marriott, Craig D

    2013-06-04

    A hydraulic valve actuation assembly may include a housing, a piston, a supply control valve, a closing control valve, and an opening control valve. The housing may define a first fluid chamber, a second fluid chamber, and a third fluid chamber. The piston may be axially secured to an engine valve and located within the first, second and third fluid chambers. The supply control valve may control a hydraulic fluid supply to the piston. The closing control valve may be located between the supply control valve and the second fluid chamber and may control fluid flow from the second fluid chamber to the supply control valve. The opening control valve may be located between the supply control valve and the second fluid chamber and may control fluid flow from the supply control valve to the second fluid chamber.

  16. Fuel accountability and control at Combustion Engineering, Inc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kersteen, G.C.

    1978-01-01

    Combustion Engineering, Inc. has recently developed and installed an automated data collection, data processing system for the accounting and control of special nuclear material. The system uses a variety of data collection techniques and some relatively new data processing ideas. The next few pages describe the Fuel Accountability and Control System

  17. Model-Based Engineering of Supervisory Controllers using CIF

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schiffelers, R.R.H.; Theunissen, R.J.M.; Beek, van D.A.; Rooda, J.E.; Levendovsky, T.; Lengyel, L.

    2009-01-01

    In the Model-Based Engineering (MBE) paradigm, models are the core elements in the design process of a system from its requirements to the actual implementation of the system. By means of Supervisory Control Theory (SCT), supervisory controllers (supervisors) can be synthesized instead of

  18. Local control stations: Human engineering issues and insights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, W.S.; Higgins, J.C.; O'Hara, J.M.

    1994-09-01

    The objective of this research project was to evaluate current human engineering at local control stations (LCSs) in nuclear power plants, and to identify good human engineering practices relevant to the design of these operator interfaces. General literature and reports of operating experience were reviewed to determine the extent and type of human engineering deficiencies at LCSs in nuclear power plants. In-plant assessments were made of human engineering at single-function as well as multifunction LCSs. Besides confirming the existence of human engineering deficiencies at LCSs, the in-plant assessments provided information about the human engineering upgrades that have been made at nuclear power plants. Upgrades were typically the result of any of three influences regulatory activity, broad industry initiatives such as INPO, and specific in-plant programs (e.g. activities related to training). It is concluded that the quality of LCSs is quite variable and might be improved if there were greater awareness of good practices and existing human engineering guidance relevant to these operator interfaces, which is available from a variety of sources. To make such human engineering guidance more readily accessible, guidelines were compiled from such sources and included in the report as an appendix

  19. Single-temperature quantum engine without feedback control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Juyeon; Talkner, Peter; Kim, Yong Woon

    2017-08-01

    A cyclically working quantum-mechanical engine that operates at a single temperature is proposed. Its energy input is delivered by a quantum measurement. The functioning of the engine does not require any feedback control. We analyze work, heat, and the efficiency of the engine for the case of a working substance that is governed by the laws of quantum mechanics and that can be adiabatically compressed and expanded. The obtained general expressions are exemplified for a spin in an adiabatically changing magnetic field and a particle moving in a potential with slowly changing shape.

  20. Torque Modeling and Control of a Variable Compression Engine

    OpenAIRE

    Bergström, Andreas

    2003-01-01

    The SAAB variable compression engine is a new engine concept that enables the fuel consumption to be radically cut by varying the compression ratio. A challenge with this new engine concept is that the compression ratio has a direct influence on the output torque, which means that a change in compression ratio also leads to a change in the torque. A torque change may be felt as a jerk in the movement of the car, and this is an undesirable effect since the driver has no control over the compre...

  1. Quantitative Robust Control Engineering: Theory and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-09-01

    30]. Gutman, PO., Baril , C. Neuman, L. (1994), An algorithm for computing value sets of uncertain transfer functions in factored real form...linear compensation design for saturating unstable uncertain plants. Int. J. Control, Vol. 44, pp. 1137-1146. [90]. Oldak S., Baril C. and Gutman

  2. Engineered Photosystem II reaction centers optimize photochemistry versus photoprotection at different solar intensities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinyard, David J; Gimpel, Javier; Ananyev, Gennady M; Mayfield, Stephen P; Dismukes, G Charles

    2014-03-12

    The D1 protein of Photosystem II (PSII) provides most of the ligating amino acid residues for the Mn4CaO5 water-oxidizing complex (WOC) and half of the reaction center cofactors, and it is present as two isoforms in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942. These isoforms, D1:1 and D1:2, confer functional advantages for photosynthetic growth at low and high light intensities, respectively. D1:1, D1:2, and seven point mutations in the D1:2 background that are native to D1:1 were expressed in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. We used these nine strains to show that those strains that confer a higher yield of PSII charge separation under light-limiting conditions (where charge recombination is significant) have less efficient photochemical turnover, measured in terms of both a lower WOC turnover probability and a longer WOC cycle period. Conversely, these same strains under light saturation (where charge recombination does not compete) confer a correspondingly faster O2 evolution rate and greater protection against photoinhibition. Taken together, the data clearly establish that PSII primary charge separation is a trade-off between photochemical productivity (water oxidation and plastoquinone reduction) and charge recombination (photoprotection). These trade-offs add up to a significant growth advantage for the two natural isoforms. These insights provide fundamental design principles for engineering of PSII reaction centers with optimal photochemical efficiencies for growth at low versus high light intensities.

  3. Communication Needs Assessment for Distributed Turbine Engine Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culley, Dennis E.; Behbahani, Alireza R.

    2008-01-01

    Control system architecture is a major contributor to future propulsion engine performance enhancement and life cycle cost reduction. The control system architecture can be a means to effect net weight reduction in future engine systems, provide a streamlined approach to system design and implementation, and enable new opportunities for performance optimization and increased awareness about system health. The transition from a centralized, point-to-point analog control topology to a modular, networked, distributed system is paramount to extracting these system improvements. However, distributed engine control systems are only possible through the successful design and implementation of a suitable communication system. In a networked system, understanding the data flow between control elements is a fundamental requirement for specifying the communication architecture which, itself, is dependent on the functional capability of electronics in the engine environment. This paper presents an assessment of the communication needs for distributed control using strawman designs and relates how system design decisions relate to overall goals as we progress from the baseline centralized architecture, through partially distributed and fully distributed control systems.

  4. Energy Efficient Engine: Control system preliminary definition report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, David C.

    1986-01-01

    The object of the Control Preliminary Definition Program was to define a preliminary control system concept as a part of the Energy Efficient Engine program. The program was limited to a conceptual definition of a full authority digital electronic control system. System requirements were determined and a control system was conceptually defined to these requirements. Areas requiring technological development were identified and a plan was established for implementing the identified technological features, including a control technology demonstration. A significant element of this program was a study of the potential benefits of closed-loop active clearance control, along with laboratory tests of candidate clearance sensor elements for a closed loop system.

  5. Speed Control of General Purpose Engine with Electronic Governor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawut, Umerujan; Tohti, Gheyret; Takigawa, Buso; Tsuji, Teruo

    This paper presents a general purpose engine speed control system with an electronic governor in order to improve the current system with a mechanical governor which shows unstable characteristics by change of mecanical friction or A/F ratio (Air/Fuel ratio). For the control system above, there are problems that the feedback signal is only a crank angle because of cost and the controlled object is a general purpose engine which is strongly nonlinear. In order to overcome these problems, the system model is shown for the dynamic estimation of the amount of air flow and the robust controller is designed. That is, the proposed system includes the robust sliding-mode controller by the feedback signal of only a crank angle where Genetic Algorithm is applied for the controller design. The simulation and the experiments by MATLAB/Simulink are performed to show the effectiveness of our proposal.

  6. HPT Clearance Control: Intelligent Engine Systems-Phase 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    The following work has been completed to satisfy the Phase I Deliverables for the "HPT Clearance Control" project under NASA GRC's "Intelligent Engine Systems" program: (1) Need for the development of an advanced HPT ACC system has been very clearly laid out, (2) Several existing and potential clearance control systems have been reviewed, (3) A scorecard has been developed to document the system, performance (fuel burn, range, payload, etc.), thermal, and mechanical characteristics of the existing clearance control systems, (4) Engine size and flight cycle selection for the advanced HPT ACC system has been reviewed with "large engine"/"long range mission" combination showing the most benefit, (5) A scoring criteria has been developed to tie together performance parameters for an objective, data driven comparison of competing systems, and (6) The existing HPT ACC systems have been scored based on this scoring system.

  7. Palm Power Free-Piston Stirling Engine Control Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiter, Douglas E.; Holliday, Ezekiel

    2007-01-01

    A prototype 35We, JP-8 fueled, soldier-wearable power system for the DARPA Palm Power program has been developed and tested by Sunpower. A hermetically-sealed 42We Sunpower Free-Piston Stirling Engine (FPSE) with integral linear alternator is the prime mover for this system. To maximize system efficiency over a broad range of output power, a non-dissipative, highly efficient electronic control system which modulates engine output power by varying piston stroke and converts the AC output voltage of the FPSE into 28Vdc for the Palm Power end user, has been designed and demonstrated as an integral component of the Palm Power system. This paper reviews the current status and progress made in developing the control electronics for the Palm Power system, in addition to describing the operation and demonstrated performance of the engine controller in the context of the current JP-8 fueled Palm Power system.

  8. Transcription control engineering and applications in synthetic biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D. Engstrom

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In synthetic biology, researchers assemble biological components in new ways to produce systems with practical applications. One of these practical applications is control of the flow of genetic information (from nucleic acid to protein, a.k.a. gene regulation. Regulation is critical for optimizing protein (and therefore activity levels and the subsequent levels of metabolites and other cellular properties. The central dogma of molecular biology posits that information flow commences with transcription, and accordingly, regulatory tools targeting transcription have received the most attention in synthetic biology. In this mini-review, we highlight many past successes and summarize the lessons learned in developing tools for controlling transcription. In particular, we focus on engineering studies where promoters and transcription terminators (cis-factors were directly engineered and/or isolated from DNA libraries. We also review several well-characterized transcription regulators (trans-factors, giving examples of how cis- and trans-acting factors have been combined to create digital and analogue switches for regulating transcription in response to various signals. Last, we provide examples of how engineered transcription control systems have been used in metabolic engineering and more complicated genetic circuits. While most of our mini-review focuses on the well-characterized bacterium Escherichia coli, we also provide several examples of the use of transcription control engineering in non-model organisms. Similar approaches have been applied outside the bacterial kingdom indicating that the lessons learned from bacterial studies may be generalized for other organisms.

  9. Transcription control engineering and applications in synthetic biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engstrom, Michael D; Pfleger, Brian F

    2017-09-01

    In synthetic biology, researchers assemble biological components in new ways to produce systems with practical applications. One of these practical applications is control of the flow of genetic information (from nucleic acid to protein), a.k.a. gene regulation. Regulation is critical for optimizing protein (and therefore activity) levels and the subsequent levels of metabolites and other cellular properties. The central dogma of molecular biology posits that information flow commences with transcription, and accordingly, regulatory tools targeting transcription have received the most attention in synthetic biology. In this mini-review, we highlight many past successes and summarize the lessons learned in developing tools for controlling transcription. In particular, we focus on engineering studies where promoters and transcription terminators ( cis -factors) were directly engineered and/or isolated from DNA libraries. We also review several well-characterized transcription regulators ( trans- factors), giving examples of how cis- and trans -acting factors have been combined to create digital and analogue switches for regulating transcription in response to various signals. Last, we provide examples of how engineered transcription control systems have been used in metabolic engineering and more complicated genetic circuits. While most of our mini-review focuses on the well-characterized bacterium Escherichia coli , we also provide several examples of the use of transcription control engineering in non-model organisms. Similar approaches have been applied outside the bacterial kingdom indicating that the lessons learned from bacterial studies may be generalized for other organisms.

  10. Controller for computer control of brushless dc motors. [automobile engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hieda, L. S. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A motor speed and torque controller for brushless d.c. motors provides an unusually smooth torque control arrangement. The controller provides a means for controlling a current waveform in each winding of a brushless dc motor by synchronization of an excitation pulse train from a programmable oscillator. Sensing of torque for synchronization is provided by a light beam chopper mounted on the motor rotor shaft. Speed and duty cycle are independently controlled by controlling the frequency and pulse width output of the programmable oscillator. A means is also provided so that current transitions from one motor winding to another is effected without abrupt changes in output torque.

  11. Introduction to modeling and control of internal combustion engine systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guzzella, Lino; Onder, Christopher H. [ETH Zuerich (Switzerland). Institute for Dynamic Systems and Control

    2010-07-01

    Internal combustion engines (ICE) still have potential for substantial improvements, particularly with regard to fuel efficiency and environmental compatibility. In order to fully exploit the remaining margins, increasingly sophisticated control systems have to be applied. This book offers an introduction to cost-effective model-based control-system design for ICE. The primary emphasis is put on the ICE and its auxiliary devices. Mathematical models for these processes are developed and solutions for selected feedforward and feedback control-problems are presented. The discussions concerning pollutant emissions and fuel economy of ICE in automotive applications constantly intensified since the first edition of this book was published. Concerns about the air quality, the limited resources of fossil fuels and the detrimental effects of greenhouse gases exceedingly spurred the interest of both the industry and academia in further improvements. The most important changes and additions included in this second edition are: - restructured and slightly extended section on superchargers; - short subsection on rotational oscillations and their treatment on engine test-benches; - complete section on modeling, detection, and control of engine knock; - improved physical and chemical model for the three-way catalytic converter; - new methodology for the design of an air-to-fuel ratio controller; - short introduction to thermodynamic engine-cycle calculation and corresponding control-oriented aspects. (orig.)

  12. Buried waste integrated demonstration human engineered control station. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-09-01

    This document describes the Human Engineered Control Station (HECS) project activities including the conceptual designs. The purpose of the HECS is to enhance the effectiveness and efficiency of remote retrieval by providing an integrated remote control station. The HECS integrates human capabilities, limitations, and expectations into the design to reduce the potential for human error, provides an easy system to learn and operate, provides an increased productivity, and reduces the ultimate investment in training. The overall HECS consists of the technology interface stations, supporting engineering aids, platform (trailer), communications network (broadband system), and collision avoidance system.

  13. Buried waste integrated demonstration human engineered control station. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    This document describes the Human Engineered Control Station (HECS) project activities including the conceptual designs. The purpose of the HECS is to enhance the effectiveness and efficiency of remote retrieval by providing an integrated remote control station. The HECS integrates human capabilities, limitations, and expectations into the design to reduce the potential for human error, provides an easy system to learn and operate, provides an increased productivity, and reduces the ultimate investment in training. The overall HECS consists of the technology interface stations, supporting engineering aids, platform (trailer), communications network (broadband system), and collision avoidance system

  14. Reaction

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    19 oct. 2017 ... Reaction to Mohamed Said Nakhli et al. concerning the article: "When the axillary block remains the only alternative in a 5 year old child". .... Bertini L1, Savoia G, De Nicola A, Ivani G, Gravino E, Albani A et al ... 2010;7(2):101-.

  15. Combustion control for diesel engines with direct injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeschke, J.; Henn, M.; Lang, T.; Wendt, J.; Nitzke, H.G.; Mannigel, D. [Volkswagen AG (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    This article looks at a new cylinder pressure-based combustion control for DI diesel engines that has been developed by Volkswagen. This cylinder pressure-based control uses cylinder pressure sensors that are integrated in the glow plugs. The description and the evaluation of these sensors form a main part of this article as they are a central element in the new diesel management system. The test and development phase in connection with a rapid prototyping system and the realisation of the combustion control algorithms in a diesel control unit are also described. Finally, results from use of the closed-loop combustion control with different applications on a diesel engine are presented. (orig.)

  16. Linear parameter-varying control for engineering applications

    CERN Document Server

    White, Andrew P; Choi, Jongeun

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this brief is to carefully illustrate a procedure of applying linear parameter-varying (LPV) control to a class of dynamic systems via a systematic synthesis of gain-scheduling controllers with guaranteed stability and performance. The existing LPV control theories rely on the use of either H-infinity or H2 norm to specify the performance of the LPV system.  The challenge that arises with LPV control for engineers is twofold. First, there is no systematic procedure for applying existing LPV control system theory to solve practical engineering problems from modeling to control design. Second, there exists no LPV control synthesis theory to design LPV controllers with hard constraints. For example, physical systems usually have hard constraints on their required performance outputs along with their sensors and actuators. Furthermore, the H-infinity and H2 performance criteria cannot provide hard constraints on system outputs. As a result, engineers in industry could find it difficult to utiliz...

  17. Optimal control of bond selectivity in unimolecular reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Shenghua; Rabitz, H.

    1991-01-01

    The optimal control theory approach to designing optimal fields for bond-selective unimolecular reactions is presented. A set of equations for determining the optimal fields, which will lead to the achievement of the objective of bond-selective dissociation is developed. The numerical procedure given for solving these equations requires the repeated calculation of the time propagator for the system with the time-dependent Hamiltonian. The splitting approximation combined with the fast Fourier transform algorithm is used for computing the short time propagator. As an illustrative example, a model linear triatomic molecule is treated. The model system consists of two Morse oscillators coupled via kinetic coupling. The magnitude of the dipoles of the two Morse oscillators are the same, the fundamental frequencies are almost the same, but the dissociation energies are different. The rather demanding objective under these conditions is to break the stronger bond while leaving the weaker one intact. It is encouraging that the present computational method efficiently gives rise to the optimal field, which leads to the excellent achievement of the objective of bond selective dissociation. (orig.)

  18. Human Factors Engineering Aspects of Modifications in Control Room Modernization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hugo, Jacques [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Clefton, Gordon [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Joe, Jeffrey [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2017-06-01

    This report describes the basic aspects of control room modernization projects in the U.S. nuclear industry and the need for supplementary guidance on the integration of human factors considerations into the licensing and regulatory aspects of digital upgrades. The report pays specific attention to the integration of principles described in NUREG-0711 (Human Factors Engineering Program Review Model) and how supplementary guidance can help to raise general awareness in the industry regarding the complexities of control room modernization projects created by many interdependent regulations, standards and guidelines. The report also describes how human factors engineering principles and methods provided by various resources and international standards can help in navigating through the process of licensing digital upgrades. In particular, the integration of human factors engineering guidance and requirements into the process of licensing digital upgrades can help reduce uncertainty related to development of technical bases for digital upgrades that will avoid the introduction of new failure modes.

  19. Towards a controlled vocabulary on software engineering education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizard, Sebastián; Vallespir, Diego

    2017-11-01

    Software engineering is the discipline that develops all the aspects of the production of software. Although there are guidelines about what topics to include in a software engineering curricula, it is usually unclear which are the best methods to teach them. In any science discipline the construction of a classification schema is a common approach to understand a thematic area. This study examines previous publications in software engineering education to obtain a first controlled vocabulary (a more formal definition of a classification schema) in the field. Publications from 1988 to 2014 were collected and processed using automatic clustering techniques and the outcomes were analysed manually. The result is an initial controlled vocabulary with a taxonomy form with 43 concepts that were identified as the most used in the research publications. We present the classification of the concepts in three facets: 'what to teach', 'how to teach' and 'where to teach' and the evolution of concepts over time.

  20. Research on LQR optimal control method of active engine mount

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huan, Xie; Yu, Duan

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, the LQR control method is applied to the active mount of the engine, and a six-cylinder engine excitation model is established. Through the joint simulation of AMESim and MATLAB, the vibration isolation performance of the active mount system and the passive mount system is analyzed. Excited by the multi-engine operation, the simulation results of the vertical displacement, acceleration and dynamic deflection of the vehicle body show that the vibration isolation capability of the active mount system is superior to that of the passive mount system. It shows that compared with the passive mount, LQR active mount can greatly improve the vibration isolation performance, which proves the feasibility and effectiveness of the LQR control method.

  1. Apollo experience report: Guidance and control systems. Engineering simulation program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, D. W.

    1973-01-01

    The Apollo Program experience from early 1962 to July 1969 with respect to the engineering-simulation support and the problems encountered is summarized in this report. Engineering simulation in support of the Apollo guidance and control system is discussed in terms of design analysis and verification, certification of hardware in closed-loop operation, verification of hardware/software compatibility, and verification of both software and procedures for each mission. The magnitude, time, and cost of the engineering simulations are described with respect to hardware availability, NASA and contractor facilities (for verification of the command module, the lunar module, and the primary guidance, navigation, and control system), and scheduling and planning considerations. Recommendations are made regarding implementation of similar, large-scale simulations for future programs.

  2. Urea-SCR Temperature Investigation for NOx Control of Diesel Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asif Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available SCR (selective catalytic reduction system is continuously being analyzed by many researchers worldwide on various concerns due to the stringent nitrogen oxides (NOx emissions legislation for heavy-duty diesel engines. Urea-SCR includes AdBlue as urea source, which subsequently decomposes to NH3 (ammonia being the reducing agent. Reaction temperature is a key factor for the performance of urea-SCR system, as urea decomposition rate is sensitive to a specific temperature range. This particular study was directed to investigate the temperature of the SCR system in diesel engine with the objective to confirm that whether the appropriate temperature is attained for occurrence of urea based catalytic reduction or otherwise and how the system performs on the prescribed temperature range. Diesel engine fitted with urea-SCR exhaust system has been operated on European standard cycle for emission testing to monitor the temperature and corresponding nitrogen oxides (NOx values on specified points. Moreover, mathematical expressions for approximation of reaction temperature are also proposed which are derived by applying energy conservation principal and gas laws. Results of the investigation have shown that during the whole testing cycle system temperature has remained in the range where urea-SCR can take place with best optimum rate and the system performance on account of NOx reduction was exemplary as excellent NOx conversion rate is achieved. It has also been confirmed that selective catalytic reduction (SCR is the best suitable technology for automotive engine-out NOx control.

  3. Control room human engineering influences on operator performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finlayson, F.C.

    1977-01-01

    Three general groups of factors influence operator performance in fulfilling their responsibilities in the control room: (1) control room and control system design, informational data displays (operator inputs) as well as control board design (for operator output); (2) operator characteristics, including those skills, mental, physical, and emotional qualities which are functions of operator selection, training, and motivation; (3) job performance guides, the prescribed operating procedures for normal and emergency operations. This paper presents some of the major results of an evaluation of the effect of human engineering on operator performance in the control room. Primary attention is given to discussion of control room and control system design influence on the operator. Brief observations on the influences of operator characteristics and job performance guides (operating procedures) on performance in the control room are also given. Under the objectives of the study, special emphasis was placed on the evaluation of the control room-operator relationships for severe emergency conditions in the power plant. Consequently, this presentation is restricted largely to material related to emergency conditions in the control room, though it is recognized that human engineering of control systems is of equal (or greater) importance for many other aspects of plant operation

  4. Studies of some phenomena in control engineering projects - With application to precipitation processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoele-Hansen, Kjell

    1998-12-31

    This thesis deals with the life-cycle of a control engineering project and some phenomena encountered in such projects. Different types of control strategies are discussed and an attempt is made to classify them into categories. Some case projects are presented and forms the basis for discussing the individual`s role in a change project. Further conditions for successful implementation of new control strategies are discussed in general, but also conditions for successful implementation of new control strategies at a process section of a nickel work. Procedures for implementing new control strategies are treated and some remarks are made about operation of control strategies. An introduction is given to the modelling of precipitation in pH systems and different model formulations are discused. The modelling of pH controlled precipitations is discussed in general. A variety of dynamic models, ranging from complex to simple, are proposed and discussed. A rigorous dynamic nonlinear mechanistic model of a precipitation reactor is developed. It is based on the theory of reaction invariants and variants. The model is verified against real process data. The dynamics and characteristics of the precipitation reactor are analysed and some remarks are made with respect to controllability. A new strategy for pH control is proposed. A new model based strategy for controlling the precipitation reactions is also proposed. 93 refs., 63 figs., 10 tabs.

  5. Automated Model Fit Method for Diesel Engine Control Development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seykens, X.; Willems, F.P.T.; Kuijpers, B.; Rietjens, C.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an automated fit for a control-oriented physics-based diesel engine combustion model. This method is based on the combination of a dedicated measurement procedure and structured approach to fit the required combustion model parameters. Only a data set is required that is

  6. Modeling for Control of a Wobble–Yoke Stirling Engine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    García–Canseco, Eloísa; Scherpen, Jacquelien M.A.; Kuindersma, Marnix

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we derive the dynamic model of a four–cylinder double–acting wobble–yoke Stirling engine. In contrast with the classical thermodynamics methods that dominate the literature of Stirling mechanisms, we present a control system perspective to obtain a useful model for the analysis and

  7. Modeling for Control of a Wobble-Yoke Stirling Engine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garcia Canseco, E.; Scherpen, J.M.A.; Kuindersma, M.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we derive the dynamical model of a four–cylinder double–acting wobble–yoke Stirling engine introduced originally by [1, 2]. In contrast with the classical thermodynamics methods that dominate the literature of Stirling mechanisms, we present a control systems perspective to obtain a

  8. Engineered Surfaces to Control Secondary Electron Yield for Multipactor Suppression

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-14

    Air Force Institute of Technology AFIT Scholar Theses and Dissertations 9-14-2017 Engineered Surfaces to Control Secondary Electron Yield for...Multipactor Suppression James M. Sattler Follow this and additional works at: https://scholar.afit.edu/etd Part of the Electrical and Electronics Commons... TECHNOLOGY Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE; DISTRIBUTION UNLIMITED

  9. Optimal control for integrated emission management in diesel engines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donkers, M.C.F.; van Schijndel, J.; Heemels, W.P.M.H.; Willems, F.

    2017-01-01

    Integrated Emission Management (IEM) is a supervisory control strategy that minimises operational costs (consisting of fuel and AdBlue) for diesel engines with an aftertreatment system, while satisfying emission constraints imposed by legislation. In most work on IEM, a suboptimal heuristic

  10. Optimal Control of Diesel Engines with Waste Heat Recovery System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willems, F.P.T.; Donkers, M.C.F.; Kupper, F.

    2014-01-01

    This study presents an integrated energy and emission management strategy for a Euro-VI diesel engine with Waste Heat Recovery (WHR) system. This Integrated Powertrain Control (IPC) strategy optimizes the CO2-NOx trade-off by minimizing the operational costs associated with fuel and AdBlue

  11. Optimal control for integrated emission management in diesel engines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donkers, M.C.F.; Schijndel, J. van; Heemels, W.P.M.H.; Willems, F.P.T.

    2016-01-01

    Integrated Emission Management (IEM) is a supervisory control strategy that minimises operational costs (consisting of fuel and AdBlue) for diesel engines with an aftertreatment system, while satisfying emission constraints imposed by legislation. In most work on IEM, a suboptimal heuristic

  12. Optimal control of diesel engines with waste heat recovery systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willems, F.P.T.; Donkers, M.C.F.; Kupper, F.; Waschl, H.; Kolmanovsky, I.; Steinbuch, M.; Del Re, L.

    2014-01-01

    This study presents an integrated energy and emission management strategy for a Euro-VI diesel engine with Waste Heat Recovery (WHR) system. This Integrated Powertrain Control (IPC) strategy optimizes the CO 2 - NO x trade-off by minimizing the operational costs associated with fuel and AdBlue

  13. Hybrid systems: a real-time interface to control engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Thomas Juul; Heilmann, Søren; Holdgaard, Michael

    1996-01-01

    are usually investigated by control engineers that base their work on the theory of dynamic systems. The mathematical tool for this work is thus mathematical analysis, in particular the theory of differential equations. The paper gives an introduction to a general hybrid systems model for definition of system...

  14. Automated model fit method for diesel engine control development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seykens, X.L.J.; Willems, F.P.T.; Kuijpers, B.; Rietjens, C.J.H.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an automated fit for a control-oriented physics-based diesel engine combustion model. This method is based on the combination of a dedicated measurement procedure and structured approach to fit the required combustion model parameters. Only a data set is required that is

  15. Nanoscale tissue engineering: spatial control over cell-materials interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wheeldon, Ian; Farhadi, Arash; Bick, Alexander G; Khademhosseini, Ali; Jabbari, Esmaiel

    2011-01-01

    Cells interact with the surrounding environment by making tens to hundreds of thousands of nanoscale interactions with extracellular signals and features. The goal of nanoscale tissue engineering is to harness these interactions through nanoscale biomaterials engineering in order to study and direct cellular behavior. Here, we review two- and three-dimensional (2- and 3D) nanoscale tissue engineering technologies, and provide a holistic overview of the field. Techniques that can control the average spacing and clustering of cell adhesion ligands are well established and have been highly successful in describing cell adhesion and migration in 2D. Extension of these engineering tools to 3D biomaterials has created many new hydrogel and nanofiber scaffold technologies that are being used to design in vitro experiments with more physiologically relevant conditions. Researchers are beginning to study complex cell functions in 3D. However, there is a need for biomaterials systems that provide fine control over the nanoscale presentation of bioactive ligands in 3D. Additionally, there is a need for 2- and 3D techniques that can control the nanoscale presentation of multiple bioactive ligands and that can control the temporal changes in the cellular microenvironment. (topical review)

  16. Engineered barrier experiment. Power control and data acquisition systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alberdi, J.; Barcala, J.M.; Gamero, E.; Martin, P.L.; Molinero, A.; Navarrete, J.J.; Yuste, C.

    1997-01-01

    The engineered barrier concept for the storage of radioactive wastes is being tested at almost full scale at CIEMAT facilities. A data acquisition and control is an element of this experiment. This system would be operating for next three years. (Author)

  17. Control Engineering, System Theory and Mathematics: The Teacher's Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenger, K.

    2007-01-01

    The principles, difficulties and challenges in control education are discussed and compared to the similar problems in the teaching of mathematics and systems science in general. The difficulties of today's students to appreciate the classical teaching of engineering disciplines, which are based on rigorous and scientifically sound grounds, are…

  18. State Analysis: A Control Architecture View of Systems Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Robert D.

    2005-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on the state analysis process is shown. The topics include: 1) Issues with growing complexity; 2) Limits of common practice; 3) Exploiting a control point of view; 4) A glimpse at the State Analysis process; 5) Synergy with model-based systems engineering; and 6) Bridging the systems to software gap.

  19. Need for Robust Sensors for Inherently Fail-Safe Gas Turbine Engine Controls, Monitoring, and Prognostics (Postprint)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Behbahani, Alireza R

    2006-01-01

    Sensor reliability is critical to turbine engine control. Today's aircraft engines demand more sophisticated sensors in the control systems, requiring advanced engine testing for component performance demonstration...

  20. Control room design and human engineering in power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herbst, L.; Hinz, W.

    1982-01-01

    The concept for modern plant control rooms is primary influenced by: The automation of protection, binary control and closed loop control functions; organization employing functional areas; computer based information processing; human engineered design. Automation reduces the human work load. Employment of functional areas permits optimization of operational sequences. Computer based information processing makes it possible to output information in accordance with operating requirements. Design based on human engineering principles assures the quality of the interaction between the operator and the equipment. The degree to which these conceptional features play a role in design of power plant control rooms depends on the unit rating, the mode of operation and on the requirements respecting safety and availability of the plant. (orig.)

  1. Hybrid Engine Powered City Car: Fuzzy Controlled Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Ataur; Mohiuddin, AKM; Hawlader, MNA; Ihsan, Sany

    2017-03-01

    This study describes a fuzzy controlled hybrid engine powered car. The car is powered by the lithium ion battery capacity of 1000 Wh is charged by the 50 cc hybrid engine and power regenerative mode. The engine is operated with lean mixture at 3000 rpm to charge the battery. The regenerative mode that connects with the engine generates electrical power of 500-600 W for the deceleration of car from 90 km/h to 20 km/h. The regenerated electrical power has been used to power the air-conditioning system and to meet the other electrical power. The battery power only used to propel the car. The regenerative power also found charging the battery for longer operation about 40 minutes and more. The design flexibility of this vehicle starts with whole-vehicle integration based on radical light weighting, drag reduction, and accessory efficiency. The energy efficient hybrid engine cut carbon dioxide (CO2) and nitrogen oxides (N2O) emission about 70-80% as the loads on the crankshaft such as cam-follower and its associated rotating components are replaced by electromagnetic systems, and the flywheel, alternator and starter motor are replaced by a motor generator. The vehicle was tested and found that it was able to travel 70 km/litre with the power of hybrid engine.

  2. Turbine Engine Clearance Control Systems: Current Practices and Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lattime, Scott B.; Steinetz, Bruce M.

    2002-01-01

    Improved blade tip sealing in the high pressure compressor (HPC) and high pressure turbine (HPT) can provide dramatic reductions in specific fuel consumption (SFC), time-on-wing, compressor stall margin, and engine efficiency as well as increased payload and mission range capabilities. Maintenance costs to overhaul large commercial gas turbine engines can easily exceed $1M. Engine removal from service is primarily due to spent exhaust gas temperature (EGT) margin caused mainly by the deterioration of HPT components. Increased blade tip clearance is a major factor in hot section component degradation. As engine designs continue to push the performance envelope with fewer parts and the market drives manufacturers to increase service life, the need for advanced sealing continues to grow. A review of aero gas turbine engine HPT performance degradation and the mechanisms that promote these losses are discussed. Benefits to the HPT due to improved clearance management are identified. Past and present sealing technologies are presented along with specifications for next generation engine clearance control systems.

  3. Control of 12-Cylinder Camless Engine with Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashhab Moh’d Sami

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The 12-cyliner camless engine breathing process is modeled with artificial neural networks (ANN’s. The inputs to the net are the intake valve lift (IVL and intake valve closing timing (IVC whereas the output of the net is the cylinder air charge (CAC. The ANN is trained with data collected from an engine simulation model which is based on thermodynamics principles and calibrated against real engine data. A method for adapting single-output feed-forward neural networks is proposed and applied to the camless engine ANN model. As a consequence the overall 12-cyliner camless engine feedback controller is upgraded and the necessary changes are implemented in order to contain the adaptive neural network with the objective of tracking the cylinder air charge (driver’s torque demand while minimizing the pumping losses (increasing engine efficiency. All the needed measurements are extracted only from the two conventional and inexpensive sensors, namely, the mass air flow through the throttle body (MAF and the intake manifold absolute pressure (MAP sensors. The feedback controller’s capability is demonstrated through computer simulation.

  4. Developing an Integration Infrastructure for Distributed Engine Control Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culley, Dennis; Zinnecker, Alicia; Aretskin-Hariton, Eliot; Kratz, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Turbine engine control technology is poised to make the first revolutionary leap forward since the advent of full authority digital engine control in the mid-1980s. This change aims squarely at overcoming the physical constraints that have historically limited control system hardware on aero-engines to a federated architecture. Distributed control architecture allows complex analog interfaces existing between system elements and the control unit to be replaced by standardized digital interfaces. Embedded processing, enabled by high temperature electronics, provides for digitization of signals at the source and network communications resulting in a modular system at the hardware level. While this scheme simplifies the physical integration of the system, its complexity appears in other ways. In fact, integration now becomes a shared responsibility among suppliers and system integrators. While these are the most obvious changes, there are additional concerns about performance, reliability, and failure modes due to distributed architecture that warrant detailed study. This paper describes the development of a new facility intended to address the many challenges of the underlying technologies of distributed control. The facility is capable of performing both simulation and hardware studies ranging from component to system level complexity. Its modular and hierarchical structure allows the user to focus their interaction on specific areas of interest.

  5. Synergistic Interlayer and Defect Engineering in VS2 Nanosheets toward Efficient Electrocatalytic Hydrogen Evolution Reaction

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Junjun; Zhang, Chenhui; Wang, Zhenyu; Zhu, Jian; Wen, Zhiwei; Zhao, Xingzhong; Zhang, Xixiang; Xu, Jun; Lu, Zhouguang

    2017-01-01

    A simple one-pot solvothermal method is reported to synthesize VS2 nanosheets featuring rich defects and an expanded (001) interlayer spacing as large as 1.00 nm, which is a ≈74% expansion as relative to that (0.575 nm) of the pristine counterpart. The interlayer-expanded VS2 nanosheets show extraordinary kinetic metrics for electrocatalytic hydrogen evolution reaction (HER), exhibiting a low overpotential of 43 mV at a geometric current density of 10 mA cm-2 , a small Tafel slope of 36 mV dec-1 , and long-term stability of 60 h without any current fading. The performance is much better than that of the pristine VS2 with a normal interlayer spacing, and even comparable to that of the commercial Pt/C electrocatalyst. The outstanding electrocatalytic activity is attributed to the expanded interlayer distance and the generated rich defects. Increased numbers of exposed active sites and modified electronic structures are achieved, resulting in an optimal free energy of hydrogen adsorption (∆GH ) from density functional theory calculations. This work opens up a new door for developing transition-metal dichalcogenide nanosheets as high active HER electrocatalysts by interlayer and defect engineering.

  6. Synergistic Interlayer and Defect Engineering in VS2 Nanosheets toward Efficient Electrocatalytic Hydrogen Evolution Reaction

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Junjun

    2017-12-27

    A simple one-pot solvothermal method is reported to synthesize VS2 nanosheets featuring rich defects and an expanded (001) interlayer spacing as large as 1.00 nm, which is a ≈74% expansion as relative to that (0.575 nm) of the pristine counterpart. The interlayer-expanded VS2 nanosheets show extraordinary kinetic metrics for electrocatalytic hydrogen evolution reaction (HER), exhibiting a low overpotential of 43 mV at a geometric current density of 10 mA cm-2 , a small Tafel slope of 36 mV dec-1 , and long-term stability of 60 h without any current fading. The performance is much better than that of the pristine VS2 with a normal interlayer spacing, and even comparable to that of the commercial Pt/C electrocatalyst. The outstanding electrocatalytic activity is attributed to the expanded interlayer distance and the generated rich defects. Increased numbers of exposed active sites and modified electronic structures are achieved, resulting in an optimal free energy of hydrogen adsorption (∆GH ) from density functional theory calculations. This work opens up a new door for developing transition-metal dichalcogenide nanosheets as high active HER electrocatalysts by interlayer and defect engineering.

  7. Simple control law structure for the control of airplanes by means of their engines

    OpenAIRE

    Fezans, Nicolas

    2011-01-01

    In this paper a simple control law structure is presented for the control of airplanes using only the engines' thrust. For the design of such a propulsion controlled aircraft control law, the approach followed in this work is to look for the right level of performance in order to avoid both excessive engines activity and reduction of robustness properties. Another goal is to keep the control law and its tuning as simple as possible: for this a control law structure whose terms can easily be i...

  8. Controllable gaussian-qubit interface for extremal quantum state engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adesso, Gerardo; Campbell, Steve; Illuminati, Fabrizio; Paternostro, Mauro

    2010-06-18

    We study state engineering through bilinear interactions between two remote qubits and two-mode gaussian light fields. The attainable two-qubit states span the entire physically allowed region in the entanglement-versus-global-purity plane. Two-mode gaussian states with maximal entanglement at fixed global and marginal entropies produce maximally entangled two-qubit states in the corresponding entropic diagram. We show that a small set of parameters characterizing extremally entangled two-mode gaussian states is sufficient to control the engineering of extremally entangled two-qubit states, which can be realized in realistic matter-light scenarios.

  9. The electric power engineering handbook power system stability and control

    CERN Document Server

    Grisby, Leonard L

    2012-01-01

    With contributions from worldwide leaders in the field, Power System Stability and Control, Third Edition (part of the five-volume set, The Electric Power Engineering Handbook) updates coverage of recent developments and rapid technological growth in essential aspects of power systems. Edited by L.L. Grigsby, a respected and accomplished authority in power engineering, and section editors Miroslav Begovic, Prabha Kundur, and Bruce Wollenberg, this reference presents substantially new and revised content. Topics covered include: * Power System Protection * Power System Dynamics and Stability *

  10. Executive control systems in the engineering design environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, P. W.; Pratt, T. W.

    1985-01-01

    Executive Control Systems (ECSs) are software structures for the unification of various engineering design application programs into comprehensive systems with a central user interface (uniform access) method and a data management facility. Attention is presently given to the most significant determinations of a research program conducted for 24 ECSs, used in government and industry engineering design environments to integrate CAD/CAE applications programs. Characterizations are given for the systems' major architectural components and the alternative design approaches considered in their development. Attention is given to ECS development prospects in the areas of interdisciplinary usage, standardization, knowledge utilization, and computer science technology transfer.

  11. Nanoscale tissue engineering: spatial control over cell-materials interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeldon, Ian; Farhadi, Arash; Bick, Alexander G.; Jabbari, Esmaiel; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2011-01-01

    Cells interact with the surrounding environment by making tens to hundreds of thousands of nanoscale interactions with extracellular signals and features. The goal of nanoscale tissue engineering is to harness the interactions through nanoscale biomaterials engineering in order to study and direct cellular behaviors. Here, we review the nanoscale tissue engineering technologies for both two- and three-dimensional studies (2- and 3D), and provide a holistic overview of the field. Techniques that can control the average spacing and clustering of cell adhesion ligands are well established and have been highly successful in describing cell adhesion and migration in 2D. Extension of these engineering tools to 3D biomaterials has created many new hydrogel and nanofiber scaffolds technologies that are being used to design in vitro experiments with more physiologically relevant conditions. Researchers are beginning to study complex cell functions in 3D, however, there is a need for biomaterials systems that provide fine control over the nanoscale presentation of bioactive ligands in 3D. Additionally, there is a need for 2- and 3D techniques that can control the nanoscale presentation of multiple bioactive ligands and the temporal changes in cellular microenvironment. PMID:21451238

  12. Automotive engine air intake system with variable noise control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moenssen, David J.; Hellie, Mark D.; Koston, John D.; Shaw, Christopher E.

    2005-09-01

    Engine air intake systems are routinely tasked with delivering a specific target sound which involves meeting an overall noise level and, in many cases, desired frequency content over the entire engine speed range. In order to meet these targets, it is generally necessary to incorporate one or more reactive tuning devices, such as Helmholtz resonators, into the intake system. Traditional devices provide deep attenuation at their designed frequency, but they also introduce undesirable sideband resonances at a higher and a lower frequency. Even after the addition of several devices, it may still not be possible to match the desired intake noise targets due to their deep attenuation and sideband amplification. The subject of this work is to introduce an electronically controlled variable noise control (VNC) device for engine air intake systems which is capable of adjusting the air intake system's frequency response as commanded by the engine operating conditions. The VNC device permits the desired amount of attenuation of peaks in the air intake noise without introducing undesirable sideband resonances. In addition, because the tuning is controlled electronically, the VNC device can deliver a target-specific response using the same hardware across multiple vehicle programs.

  13. 78 FR 50412 - California State Nonroad Engine Pollution Control Standards; Amendments to Spark Ignition Marine...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-19

    ... Engine Pollution Control Standards; Amendments to Spark Ignition Marine Engine and Boat Regulations... emission standards; enhanced evaporative emission controls for high performance sterndrive/inboard engines... requirement relating to the control of emissions from new nonroad engines which are used in construction...

  14. 78 FR 37958 - Special Conditions: Cessna Aircraft Company, Model J182T; Electronic Engine Control System...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-25

    ...; Electronic Engine Control System Installation AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION... feature(s) associated with the installation of an electronic engine control. The applicable airworthiness...) fuel. The J182T incorporates an engine controlled by an electronic engine [[Page 37959

  15. 14 CFR 23.865 - Fire protection of flight controls, engine mounts, and other flight structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fire protection of flight controls, engine... controls, engine mounts, and other flight structure. Flight controls, engine mounts, and other flight... they are capable of withstanding the effects of a fire. Engine vibration isolators must incorporate...

  16. Miniature Reaction Wheel for Small Satellite Control, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The overall goal of this project is to design, develop, demonstrate, and deliver a miniature, high torque, low-vibration reaction wheel for use on small satellites....

  17. 5th International Conference on Electrical Engineering and Automatic Control

    CERN Document Server

    Yao, Yufeng

    2016-01-01

    On the basis of instrument electrical and automatic control system, the 5th International Conference on Electrical Engineering and Automatic Control (CEEAC) was established at the crossroads of information technology and control technology, and seeks to effectively apply information technology to a sweeping trend that views control as the core of intelligent manufacturing and life. This book takes a look forward into advanced manufacturing development, an area shaped by intelligent manufacturing. It highlights the application and promotion of process control represented by traditional industries, such as the steel industry and petrochemical industry; the technical equipment and system cooperative control represented by robot technology and multi-axis CNC; and the control and support of emerging process technologies represented by laser melting and stacking, as well as the emerging industry represented by sustainable and intelligent life. The book places particular emphasis on the micro-segments field, such as...

  18. Manual Manipulation of Engine Throttles for Emergency Flight Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burcham, Frank W., Jr.; Fullerton, C. Gordon; Maine, Trindel A.

    2004-01-01

    If normal aircraft flight controls are lost, emergency flight control may be attempted using only engines thrust. Collective thrust is used to control flightpath, and differential thrust is used to control bank angle. Flight test and simulation results on many airplanes have shown that pilot manipulation of throttles is usually adequate to maintain up-and-away flight, but is most often not capable of providing safe landings. There are techniques that will improve control and increase the chances of a survivable landing. This paper reviews the principles of throttles-only control (TOC), a history of accidents or incidents in which some or all flight controls were lost, manual TOC results for a wide range of airplanes from simulation and flight, and suggested techniques for flying with throttles only and making a survivable landing.

  19. Femtosecond laser control of chemical reaction of carbon monoxide and hydrogen

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Du Plessis, A

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Femtosecond laser control of chemical reactions is made possible through the use of pulse-shaping techniques coupled to a learning algorithm feedback loop – teaching the laser pulse to control the chemical reaction. This can result in controllable...

  20. Design and Stability of an On-Orbit Attitude Control System Using Reaction Control Thrusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Robert A.; Hough, Steven; Orphee, Carolina; Clements, Keith

    2016-01-01

    Basic principles for the design and stability of a spacecraft on-orbit attitude control system employing on-off Reaction Control System (RCS) thrusters are presented. Both vehicle dynamics and the control system actuators are inherently nonlinear, hence traditional linear control system design approaches are not directly applicable. This paper has two main aspects: It summarizes key RCS design principles from earlier NASA vehicles, notably the Space Shuttle and Space Station programs, and introduces advances in the linear modelling and analyses of a phase plane control system derived in the initial development of the NASA's next upper stage vehicle, the Exploration Upper Stage (EUS). Topics include thruster hardware specifications, phase plane design and stability, jet selection approaches, filter design metrics, and RCS rotational maneuver logic.

  1. Mean Value SI Engine Model for Control Studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendricks, Elbert; Sorenson, Spencer C

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents a mathematically simple nonlinear three state (three differential equation) dynamic model of an SI engine which has the same steady state accuracy as a typical dynamometer measurement of the engine over its entire speed/load operating range (± 2.0%). The model's accuracy...... for large, fast transients is of the same order in the same operating region. Because the model is mathematically compact, it has few adjustable parameters and is thus simple to fit to a given engine either on the basis of measurements or given the steady state results of a larger cycle simulation package....... The model can easily be run on a Personal Computer (PC) using a ordinary differential equation (ODE) integrating routine or package. This makes the model is useful for control system design and evaluation....

  2. Engineering Design of ITER Prototype Fast Plant System Controller

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncalves, B.; Sousa, J.; Carvalho, B.; Rodrigues, A. P.; Correia, M.; Batista, A.; Vega, J.; Ruiz, M.; Lopez, J. M.; Rojo, R. Castro; Wallander, A.; Utzel, N.; Neto, A.; Alves, D.; Valcarcel, D.

    2011-08-01

    The ITER control, data access and communication (CODAC) design team identified the need for two types of plant systems. A slow control plant system is based on industrial automation technology with maximum sampling rates below 100 Hz, and a fast control plant system is based on embedded technology with higher sampling rates and more stringent real-time requirements than that required for slow controllers. The latter is applicable to diagnostics and plant systems in closed-control loops whose cycle times are below 1 ms. Fast controllers will be dedicated industrial controllers with the ability to supervise other fast and/or slow controllers, interface to actuators and sensors and, if necessary, high performance networks. Two prototypes of a fast plant system controller specialized for data acquisition and constrained by ITER technological choices are being built using two different form factors. This prototyping activity contributes to the Plant Control Design Handbook effort of standardization, specifically regarding fast controller characteristics. Envisaging a general purpose fast controller design, diagnostic use cases with specific requirements were analyzed and will be presented along with the interface with CODAC and sensors. The requirements and constraints that real-time plasma control imposes on the design were also taken into consideration. Functional specifications and technology neutral architecture, together with its implications on the engineering design, were considered. The detailed engineering design compliant with ITER standards was performed and will be discussed in detail. Emphasis will be given to the integration of the controller in the standard CODAC environment. Requirements for the EPICS IOC providing the interface to the outside world, the prototype decisions on form factor, real-time operating system, and high-performance networks will also be discussed, as well as the requirements for data streaming to CODAC for visualization and

  3. Reducing Diesel Engine Emission Using Reactivity Controlled Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osama Hasib Ghazal

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Several automobile manufacturers are interested in investigating of dual fuel internal combustion engines, due to high efficiencand low emissions. Many alternative fuels have been used in dual fuel mode for IC engine, such as methane, hydrogen, and natural gas. In the present study, a reactivity controlled compression ignition (RCCI engine using gasoline/diesel (G/D dual fuel has been investigated. The effectof mixing gasoline with diesel fuel on combustion characteristic, engine performance and emissions has been studied. The gasoline was injected in the engine intake port, to produce a homogeneous mixture with air. The diesel fuel was injected directly to the combustion chamber during compression stroke to initiate the combustion process. A direct injection compression ignition engine has been built and simulated using ANSYS Forte professional code. The gasoline amount in the simulation varied from (50%-80% by volume. The diesel fuel was injected to the cylinder in two stages. The model has been validated and calibrated for neat diesel fuel using available data from the literature. The results show that the heat release rate and the cylinder pressure increased when the amount of added gasoline is between 50%-60% volume of the total injected fuels, compared to the neat diesel fuel. Further addition of gasoline will have a contrary effect. In addition, the combustion duration is extended drastically when the gasoline ratio is higher than 60% which results in an incomplete combustion. The NO emission decreased drastically as the gasoline ratio increased. Moreover, addition of gasoline to the mixture increased the engine power, thermal efficienc and combustion efficienc compared to neat diesel fuel.

  4. β Style Free-Piston Stirling Engine Control System Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Jian

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available For the Free-Piston Stirling Engines (FPSE control system, a three -phase bridge circuit is reused as the system output about rectifier and start inverter. When FPSE system is in the power stage, the double closed loop control strategy and optimization algorithm of PI control parameters is adopted to ensure the highest system transmission efficiency under the requirements of the system output power and guarantee the stability of the running system. The simulation results prove the effectiveness of the above research content.

  5. Towards a modern concept for teaching control engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemann, Hans Henrik; Andersen, Jens Christian; Ravn, Ole

    2009-01-01

    A new concept for teaching an introduction course in control engineering is described. The main issue is that the concept is based directly on the students’ knowledge from previous courses in math, physics and electronics. This will provid the students with a more direct and clear link between...... these previous courses and athe introduction course in control theory. As a direct consequence, it is now possible to introduce and use feedback control from the first lecture. The new teaching concept has had a major effect on the exam results. In the two semesters before the changes, only 53% of the students...

  6. Human-Machine Systems concepts applied to Control Engineering Education

    OpenAIRE

    Marangé , Pascale; Gellot , François; Riera , Bernard

    2008-01-01

    International audience; In this paper, we interest us to Human-Machine Systems (HMS) concepts applied to Education. It is shown how the HMS framework enables to propose original solution in matter of education in the field of control engineering. We focus on practical courses on control of manufacturing systems. The proposed solution is based on an original use of real and large-scale systems instead of simulation. The main idea is to enable the student, whatever his/her level to control the ...

  7. [Eutrophication control in local area by physic-ecological engineering].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiu-Hua; Xia, Pin-Hua; Wu, Hong; Lin, Tao; Zhang, You-Chun; Li, Cun-Xiong; Chen, Li-Li; Yang, Fan

    2012-07-01

    An integrated physical and ecological engineering experiment for ecological remediation was performed at the Maixi River bay in Baihua Reservoir Guizhou Province, China. The results show that eutrophic parameters, such as total nitrogen, total phosphorus, chlorophyll a and chemical oxygen demand from the experimental site (enclosed water) were significantly lower than those of the reference site. The largest differences between the sites were 0.61 mg x L(-1), 0.041 mg x L(-1), 23.06 microg x L(-1), 8.4 mg x L(-1) respectively; experimental site transparency was > 1.50 m which was significantly higher than that of the reference site. The eutrophic index of the experimental site was oligo-trophic and mid-trophic, while the control site was mid-trophic state and eutrophic state. Phytoplankton abundance was 2 125.5 x 10(4) cells x L(-1) in June, 2011 at the control site,but phytoplankton abundance was lower at the experimental site with 33 x 10(4) cells x L(-1). Cyanobacteria dominated phytoplankton biomass at both sites, however the experimental site consisted of a higher proportion of diatoms and dinoflagellates. After more than one year of operation, the ecological engineering technology effectively controlled the occurrence of algae blooms, changed phytoplankton community structure, and controlled the negative impacts of eutrophication. Integrating physical and ecological engineering technology could improve water quality for reservoirs on the Guizhou plateau.

  8. Reactivity control system of the high temperature engineering test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tachibana, Yukio; Sawahata, Hiroaki; Iyoku, Tatsuo; Nakazawa, Toshio

    2004-01-01

    The reactivity control system of the high temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR) consists of a control rod system and a reserve shutdown system. During normal operation, reactivity is controlled by the control rod system, which consists of 32 control rods (16 pairs) and 16 control rod drive mechanisms except for the case when the center control rods are removed to perform an irradiation test. In an unlikely event that the control rods fail to be inserted, reserve shutdown system is provided to insert pellets of neutron-absorbing material into the core. Alloy 800H is chosen for the metallic parts of the control rods. Because the maximum temperature of the control rods reaches about 900 deg. C at reactor scrams, structural design guideline and design material data on Alloy 800H are needed for the high temperature design. The design guideline for the HTTR control rod is based on ASME Code Case N-47-21. Design material data is also determined and shown in this paper. Observing the guideline, temperature and stress analysis were conducted; it can be confirmed that the target life of the control rods of 5 years can be achieved. Various tests conducted for the control rod system and the reserve shutdown system are also described

  9. Study of In-Cylinder Reactions of High Power-Density Direct Injection Diesel Engines

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jansons, M

    2004-01-01

    Direct-injection (DI) Diesel or compression-ignition (CI) engine combustion process is investigated when new design and operational strategies are employed in order to achieve a high power-density (HPD) engine...

  10. Deformation compatibility control for engineering structures methods and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Hanhua; Chen, Mengchong; Deng, Jianliang

    2017-01-01

    This book presents essential methods of deformation compatibility control, and explicitly addresses the implied conditions on the methods’ deformation compatibility. Consequently, these conditions can be considered in engineering structure design, while the conditions on stable equilibrium can be taken into account in the design method. Thus, the designed deformation and the actual deformation of the respective structure are approximately identical, guaranteeing both the flexibility of the construction material in force transmission and the equilibrium of force in the structure. Though equilibrium theory in engineering structures has been extensively studied, there has been comparatively little research on compatibility. In the limited researches available, the topics are primarily the theories and assumptions on the deformation compatibility, while few systematic works focus on the mechanical theoretical principles and methods of deformation compatibility control. As such, the flexibility of the constructi...

  11. Reduced-graphene-oxide supported tantalum-based electrocatalysts: Controlled nitrogen doping and oxygen reduction reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaoyun; Mo, Qijie; Guo, Yulin; Chen, Nana; Gao, Qingsheng

    2018-03-01

    Controlled N-doping is feasible to engineer the surface stoichiometry and the electronic configuration of metal-oxide electrocatalysts toward efficient oxygen reduction reactions (ORR). Taking reduced graphene oxide supported tantalum-oxides (TaOx/RGO) for example, this work illustrated the controlled N-doping in both metal-oxides and carbon supports, and the contribution to the improved ORR activity. The active N-doped TaOx/RGO electrocatalysts were fabricated via SiO2-assisted pyrolysis, in which the amount and kind of N-doping were tailored toward efficient electrocatalysis. The optimal nanocomposites showed a quite positive half-wave potential (0.80 V vs. RHE), the excellent long-term stability, and the outstanding tolerance to methanol crossing. The improvement in ORR was reasonably attributed to the synergy between N-doped TaOx and N-doped RGO. Elucidating the importance of controlled N-doping for electrocatalysis, this work will open up new opportunities to explore noble-metal-free materials for renewable energy applications.

  12. Jet Engines - The New Masters of Advanced Flight Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal-Or, Benjamin

    2018-05-01

    ANTICIPATED UNITED STATES CONGRESS ACT should lead to reversing a neglected duty to the people by supporting FAA induced bill to civilize classified military air combat technology to maximize flight safety of airliners and cargo jet transports, in addition to FAA certifying pilots to master Jet-Engine Steering ("JES") as automatic or pilot recovery when Traditional Aerodynamic-only Flight Control ("TAFC") fails to prevent a crash and other related damages

  13. ETV TEST REPORT OF MOBILE SOURCE EMISSIONS CONTROL DEVICES: LUBRIZOL ENGINE CONTROL SYSTEMS PURIFILTER SC17L

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Environmental Technology Verification report discusses the technology and performance of the Lubrizol Engine Control Systems Purifilter SC17L manufactured by Lubrizol Engine Control Systems. The technology is a precious and base metal, passively regenerated particulate filter...

  14. Mechanics and model-based control of advanced engineering systems

    CERN Document Server

    Irschik, Hans; Krommer, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Mechanics and Model-Based Control of Advanced Engineering Systems collects 32 contributions presented at the International Workshop on Advanced Dynamics and Model Based Control of Structures and Machines, which took place in St. Petersburg, Russia in July 2012. The workshop continued a series of international workshops, which started with a Japan-Austria Joint Workshop on Mechanics and Model Based Control of Smart Materials and Structures and a Russia-Austria Joint Workshop on Advanced Dynamics and Model Based Control of Structures and Machines. In the present volume, 10 full-length papers based on presentations from Russia, 9 from Austria, 8 from Japan, 3 from Italy, one from Germany and one from Taiwan are included, which represent the state of the art in the field of mechanics and model based control, with particular emphasis on the application of advanced structures and machines.

  15. Engine combustion control at low loads via fuel reactivity stratification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitz, Rolf Deneys; Hanson, Reed M; Splitter, Derek A; Kokjohn, Sage L

    2014-10-07

    A compression ignition (diesel) engine uses two or more fuel charges during a combustion cycle, with the fuel charges having two or more reactivities (e.g., different cetane numbers), in order to control the timing and duration of combustion. By appropriately choosing the reactivities of the charges, their relative amounts, and their timing, combustion can be tailored to achieve optimal power output (and thus fuel efficiency), at controlled temperatures (and thus controlled NOx), and with controlled equivalence ratios (and thus controlled soot). At low load and no load (idling) conditions, the aforementioned results are attained by restricting airflow to the combustion chamber during the intake stroke (as by throttling the incoming air at or prior to the combustion chamber's intake port) so that the cylinder air pressure is below ambient pressure at the start of the compression stroke.

  16. Automatic Reverse Engineering of Private Flight Control Protocols of UAVs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ran Ji

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The increasing use of civil unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs has the potential to threaten public safety and privacy. Therefore, airspace administrators urgently need an effective method to regulate UAVs. Understanding the meaning and format of UAV flight control commands by automatic protocol reverse-engineering techniques is highly beneficial to UAV regulation. To improve our understanding of the meaning and format of UAV flight control commands, this paper proposes a method to automatically analyze the private flight control protocols of UAVs. First, we classify flight control commands collected from a binary network trace into clusters; then, we analyze the meaning of flight control commands by the accumulated error of each cluster; next, we extract the binary format of commands and infer field semantics in these commands; and finally, we infer the location of the check field in command and the generator polynomial matrix. The proposed approach is validated via experiments on a widely used consumer UAV.

  17. Engine combustion control at low loads via fuel reactivity stratification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reitz, Rolf Deneys; Hanson, Reed M.; Splitter, Derek A.; Kokjohn, Sage

    2017-12-26

    A compression ignition (diesel) engine uses two or more fuel charges during a combustion cycle, with the fuel charges having two or more reactivities (e.g., different cetane numbers), in order to control the timing and duration of combustion. By appropriately choosing the reactivities of the charges, their relative amounts, and their timing, combustion can be tailored to achieve optimal power output (and thus fuel efficiency), at controlled temperatures (and thus controlled NOx), and with controlled equivalence ratios (and thus controlled soot). At low load and no load (idling) conditions, the aforementioned results are attained by restricting airflow to the combustion chamber during the intake stroke (as by throttling the incoming air at or prior to the combustion chamber's intake port) so that the cylinder air pressure is below ambient pressure at the start of the compression stroke.

  18. Polyol synthesis of silver nanocubes via moderate control of the reaction atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Seog-Jin; Lee, Jae-Hwang; Thomas, Edwin L

    2014-12-01

    Silver nanocubes were successfully synthesized at high yield in variously controlled reaction atmospheres by balancing etching of O2/Cl(-) and reduction of glycolaldehyde. There have been efforts to control the O2 content in reaction atmospheres by purging of O2 or Ar gas for the balancing, but we found that moderate control of reaction atmosphere, just by careful timing of the opening and the capping of the reaction vial, greatly enhanced reproducibility. Enhanced reproducibility is attributed to alleviation of evaporation and condensation of glycolaldehyde (b.p.=131°C) by using capping at reaction temperatures higher than the b.p. of glycolaldehyde rather than purging with gas. The most important finding is that seeding is initiated by HNO3 induced deoxygenation reaction in the gas phase. O2 is consumed by oxidation of NO generated from the silver etching reaction by HNO3, which effectively controls the reaction atmosphere without introduction of gas. Our simple method to control reaction atmosphere reduces the overall reaction time to one fifth of the previous result and provides excellent size and distribution selectivity of the Ag nanocube product. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The Reaction Microscope: Imaging and Pulse Shaping Control in Photodynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vredenborg, A.; Lehmann, C.S.; Irimia, D.; Roeterdink, W.; Janssen, M.H.M.

    2011-01-01

    Herein, we review the current capabilities and potential of advanced single-particle imaging techniques to study photodynamics in isolated molecules. These reaction microscopes are able to measure the full three-dimensional energy and angular distribution of (correlated) particles such as electrons

  20. A General Strategy for Nanohybrids Synthesis via Coupled Competitive Reactions Controlled in a Hybrid Process

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Rongming; Yang, Wantai; Song, Yuanjun; Shen, Xiaomiao; Wang, Junmei; Zhong, Xiaodi; Li, Shuai; Song, Yujun

    2015-01-01

    A new methodology based on core alloying and shell gradient-doping are developed for the synthesis of nanohybrids, realized by coupled competitive reactions, or sequenced reducing-nucleation and co-precipitation reaction of mixed metal salts in a microfluidic and batch-cooling process. The latent time of nucleation and the growth of nanohybrids can be well controlled due to the formation of controllable intermediates in the coupled competitive reactions. Thus, spatiotemporal-resolved synthesi...

  1. 10 CFR 20.1701 - Use of process or other engineering controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Use of process or other engineering controls. 20.1701... or other engineering controls. The licensee shall use, to the extent practical, process or other engineering controls (e.g., containment, decontamination, or ventilation) to control the concentration of...

  2. Global differential geometry: An introduction for control engineers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doolin, B. F.; Martin, C. F.

    1982-01-01

    The basic concepts and terminology of modern global differential geometry are discussed as an introduction to the Lie theory of differential equations and to the role of Grassmannians in control systems analysis. To reach these topics, the fundamental notions of manifolds, tangent spaces, vector fields, and Lie algebras are discussed and exemplified. An appendix reviews such concepts needed for vector calculus as open and closed sets, compactness, continuity, and derivative. Although the content is mathematical, this is not a mathematical treatise but rather a text for engineers to understand geometric and nonlinear control.

  3. Internal Diffusion-Controlled Enzyme Reaction: The Acetylcholinesterase Kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sangyun; Kim, Ji-Hyun; Lee, Sangyoub

    2012-02-14

    Acetylcholinesterase is an enzyme with a very high turnover rate; it quenches the neurotransmitter, acetylcholine, at the synapse. We have investigated the kinetics of the enzyme reaction by calculating the diffusion rate of the substrate molecule along an active site channel inside the enzyme from atomic-level molecular dynamics simulations. In contrast to the previous works, we have found that the internal substrate diffusion is the determinant of the acetylcholinesterase kinetics in the low substrate concentration limit. Our estimate of the overall bimolecular reaction rate constant for the enzyme is in good agreement with the experimental data. In addition, the present calculation provides a reasonable explanation for the effects of the ionic strength of solution and the mutation of surface residues of the enzyme. The study suggests that internal diffusion of the substrate could be a key factor in understanding the kinetics of enzymes of similar characteristics.

  4. Metabolic control analysis of biochemical pathways based on a thermokinetic description of reaction rates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Bredal

    1997-01-01

    Metabolic control analysis is a powerful technique for the evaluation of flux control within biochemical pathways. Its foundation is the elasticity coefficients and the flux control coefficients (FCCs). On the basis of a thermokinetic description of reaction rates it is here shown...... that the elasticity coefficients can be calculated directly from the pool levels of metabolites at steady state. The only requirement is that one thermodynamic parameter be known, namely the reaction affinity at the intercept of the tangent in the inflection point of the curve of reaction rate against reaction...... of the thermokinetic description of reaction rates to include the influence of effecters. Here the reaction rate is written as a linear function of the logarithm of the metabolite concentrations. With this type of rate function it is shown that the approach of Delgado and Liao [Biochem. J. (1992) 282, 919-927] can...

  5. Control and robotics remote laboratory for engineering education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregor Pačnik

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The new tools for education of engineering emerged and one of the most promising is a remote rapid control prototyping (RRCP, which is very useful also for control and robotics development in industry and in education. Examples of introductory remote control and simple robotics courses with integrated hands on experiments are presented in the paper. The aim of integration of remote hands on experiments into control and/or robotics course is to minimize the gap between the theory and practice to teach students the use of RRCP and to decrease the education costs. Developed RRCP experiments are based on MATLAB/Simulink, xPC target, custom developed embedded target

  6. Engineering controllable bidirectional molecular motors based on myosin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lu; Nakamura, Muneaki; Schindler, Tony D.; Parker, David; Bryant, Zev

    2012-04-01

    Cytoskeletal motors drive the transport of organelles and molecular cargoes within cells and have potential applications in molecular detection and diagnostic devices. Engineering molecular motors with controllable properties will allow selective perturbation of mechanical processes in living cells and provide optimized device components for tasks such as molecular sorting and directed assembly. Biological motors have previously been modified by introducing activation/deactivation switches that respond to metal ions and other signals. Here, we show that myosin motors can be engineered to reversibly change their direction of motion in response to a calcium signal. Building on previous protein engineering studies and guided by a structural model for the redirected power stroke of myosin VI, we have constructed bidirectional myosins through the rigid recombination of structural modules. The performance of the motors was confirmed using gliding filament assays and single fluorophore tracking. Our strategy, in which external signals trigger changes in the geometry and mechanics of myosin lever arms, should make it possible to achieve spatiotemporal control over a range of motor properties including processivity, stride size and branchpoint turning.

  7. Engineering controllable bidirectional molecular motors based on myosin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lu; Nakamura, Muneaki; Schindler, Tony D.; Parker, David; Bryant, Zev

    2012-01-01

    Cytoskeletal motors drive the transport of organelles and molecular cargoes within cells1, and have potential applications in molecular detection and diagnostic devices2,3. Engineering molecular motors with dynamically controllable properties will allow selective perturbation of mechanical processes in living cells, and yield optimized device components for complex tasks such as molecular sorting and directed assembly3. Biological motors have previously been modified by introducing activation/deactivation switches that respond to metal ions4,5 and other signals6. Here we show that myosin motors can be engineered to reversibly change their direction of motion in response to a calcium signal. Building on previous protein engineering studies7–11 and guided by a structural model12 for the redirected power stroke of myosin VI, we constructed bidirectional myosins through the rigid recombination of structural modules. The performance of the motors was confirmed using gliding filament assays and single fluorophore tracking. Our general strategy, in which external signals trigger changes in the geometry and mechanics of myosin lever arms, should enable spatiotemporal control over a range of motor properties including processivity, stride size13, and branchpoint turning14. PMID:22343382

  8. Expanding the scope of cyclopropene reporters for the detection of metabolically engineered glycoproteins by Diels–Alder reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Katrin Späte

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring glycoconjugates has been tremendously facilitated by the development of metabolic oligosaccharide engineering. Recently, the inverse-electron-demand Diels–Alder reaction between methylcyclopropene tags and tetrazines has become a popular ligation reaction due to the small size and high reactivity of cyclopropene tags. Attaching the cyclopropene tag to mannosamine via a carbamate linkage has made the reaction even more efficient. Here, we expand the application of cyclopropene tags to N-acylgalactosamine and N-acylglucosamine derivatives enabling the visualization of mucin-type O-glycoproteins and O-GlcNAcylated proteins through Diels–Alder chemistry. Whereas the previously reported cyclopropene-labeled N-acylmannosamine derivative leads to significantly higher fluorescence staining of cell-surface glycoconjugates, the glucosamine derivative gave higher labeling efficiency with protein preparations containing also intracellular proteins.

  9. A New Family of Nonlinear Observers for SI Engine Air/Fuel Ratio Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, P. B.; Olsen, M. B.; Poulsen, J.

    1997-01-01

    The paper treats a newly developed set of nonlinear observers for advanced spark ignition engine control.......The paper treats a newly developed set of nonlinear observers for advanced spark ignition engine control....

  10. Method and apparatus for controlling hybrid powertrain system in response to engine temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, Ryan D; Spohn, Brian L; Lehmen, Allen J; Cerbolles, Teresa L

    2014-10-07

    A method for controlling a hybrid powertrain system including an internal combustion engine includes controlling operation of the hybrid powertrain system in response to a preferred minimum coolant temperature trajectory for the internal combustion engine.

  11. Handbook of engineering control methods for occupational radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orn, M.K.

    1992-01-01

    Sources of ionizing and non-ionizing radiation are widely used in industrial, medical, military, and other applications. In the workplace, the task of assuring the safety of workers exposed to radiation sources is generally assigned to the safety professional, industrial hygienist, or an engineer in some other discipline. Rarely do employers outside the nuclear industry have the luxury of a staff health physicist in the workplace. Consultants may be called in to provide initial assessments of the hazards and to assist with complex problems, but the day-to-day problem solving is usually a function of the safety professional or other professional with the responsibility for safety. The primary purpose of this book is to provide a practical reference for safety professionals that addresses the application of ionizing and non-ionizing radiation protection standards and the quantitative methods for evaluating and designing engineering controls to meet those standards. Although the emphasis of this book is on control methods, it is necessary to understand the physical nature of the radiation exposure, its units of measure, and its biological effects in order to apply the appropriate control methods. Consequently, a brief treatment of these topics precedes the discussion of control methods for each type of radiation exposure

  12. Engineering and malaria control: learning from the past 100 years

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Konradsen, Flemming; van der Hoek, Wim; Amerasinghe, Felix P

    2004-01-01

    Traditionally, engineering and environment-based interventions have contributed to the prevention of malaria in Asia. However, with the introduction of DDT and other potent insecticides, chemical control became the dominating strategy. The renewed interest in environmental-management-based approa......Traditionally, engineering and environment-based interventions have contributed to the prevention of malaria in Asia. However, with the introduction of DDT and other potent insecticides, chemical control became the dominating strategy. The renewed interest in environmental......-management-based approaches for the control of malaria vectors follows the rapid development of resistance by mosquitoes to the widely used insecticides, the increasing cost of developing new chemicals, logistical constraints involved in the implementation of residual-spraying programs and the environmental concerns linked...... cases are discussed in the wider context of environment-based approaches for the control of malaria vectors, including current relevance. Clearly, some of the interventions piloted and implemented early in the last century still have relevance today but generally in a very site-specific manner...

  13. Diffusion-controlled reaction. V. Effect of concentration-dependent diffusion coefficient on reaction rate in graft polymerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imre, K.; Odian, G.

    1979-01-01

    The effect of diffusion on radiation-initiated graft polymerization has been studied with emphasis on the single- and two-penetrant cases. When the physical properties of the penetrants are similar, the two-penetrant problems can be reduced to the single-penetrant problem by redefining the characteristic parameters of the system. The diffusion-free graft polymerization rate is assumed to be proportional to the upsilon power of the monomer concentration respectively, and, in which the proportionality constant a = k/sub p/R/sub i//sup w//k/sub t//sup z/, where k/sub p/ and k/sub t/ are the propagation and termination rate constants, respectively, and R/sub i/ is the initiation rate. The values of upsilon, w, and z depend on the particular reaction system. The results of earlier work were generalized by allowing a non-Fickian diffusion rate which predicts an essentially exponential dependence on the monomer concentration of the diffusion coefficient, D = D 0 [exp(deltaC/M)], where M is the saturation concentration. A reaction system is characterized by the three dimensionless parameters, upsilon, delta, and A = (L/2)[aM/sup (upsilon--1)//D 0 ]/sup 1/2/, where L is the polymer film thickness. Graft polymerization tends to become diffusion controlled as A increases. Larger values of delta and ν cause a reaction system to behave closer to the diffusion-free regime. Transition from diffusion-free to diffusion-controlled reaction involves changes in the dependence of the reaction rate on film thickness, initiation rate, and monomer concentration. Although the diffusion-free rate is w order in initiation rate, upsilon order in monomer, and independent of film thickness, the diffusion-controlled rate is w/2 order in initiator rate and inverse first-order in film thickness. Dependence of the diffusion-controlled rate on monomer is dependent in a complex manner on the diffusional characteristics of the reaction system. 11 figures, 4 tables

  14. Can we (control) Engineer the degree learning process?

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, A. S.; Censlive, M.; Neilsen, D.

    2014-07-01

    This paper investigates how control theory could be applied to learning processes in engineering education. The initial point for the analysis is White's Double Loop learning model of human automation control modified for the education process where a set of governing principals is chosen, probably by the course designer. After initial training the student decides unknowingly on a mental map or model. After observing how the real world is behaving, a strategy to achieve the governing variables is chosen and a set of actions chosen. This may not be a conscious operation, it maybe completely instinctive. These actions will cause some consequences but not until a certain time delay. The current model is compared with the work of Hollenbeck on goal setting, Nelson's model of self-regulation and that of Abdulwahed, Nagy and Blanchard at Loughborough who investigated control methods applied to the learning process.

  15. Active control of a plasmonic metamaterial for quantum state engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uriri, S. A.; Tashima, T.; Zhang, X.; Asano, M.; Bechu, M.; Güney, D. Ö.; Yamamoto, T.; Özdemir, Ş. K.; Wegener, M.; Tame, M. S.

    2018-05-01

    We experimentally demonstrate the active control of a plasmonic metamaterial operating in the quantum regime. A two-dimensional metamaterial consisting of unit cells made from gold nanorods is investigated. Using an external laser, we control the temperature of the metamaterial and carry out quantum process tomography on single-photon polarization-encoded qubits sent through, characterizing the metamaterial as a variable quantum channel. The overall polarization response can be tuned by up to 33% for particular nanorod dimensions. To explain the results, we develop a theoretical model and find that the experimental results match the predicted behavior well. This work goes beyond the use of simple passive quantum plasmonic systems and shows that external control of plasmonic elements enables a flexible device that can be used for quantum state engineering.

  16. Can we (control) Engineer the degree learning process?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, A S; Censlive, M; Neilsen, D

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates how control theory could be applied to learning processes in engineering education. The initial point for the analysis is White's Double Loop learning model of human automation control modified for the education process where a set of governing principals is chosen, probably by the course designer. After initial training the student decides unknowingly on a mental map or model. After observing how the real world is behaving, a strategy to achieve the governing variables is chosen and a set of actions chosen. This may not be a conscious operation, it maybe completely instinctive. These actions will cause some consequences but not until a certain time delay. The current model is compared with the work of Hollenbeck on goal setting, Nelson's model of self-regulation and that of Abdulwahed, Nagy and Blanchard at Loughborough who investigated control methods applied to the learning process

  17. A Statistical Project Control Tool for Engineering Managers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauch, Garland T.

    2001-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the use of a Statistical Project Control Tool (SPCT) for managing engineering projects. A literature review pointed to a definition of project success, (i.e., A project is successful when the cost, schedule, technical performance, and quality satisfy the customer.) The literature review also pointed to project success factors, and traditional project control tools, and performance measures that are detailed in the report. The essential problem is that with resources becoming more limited, and an increasing number or projects, project failure is increasing, there is a limitation of existing methods and systematic methods are required. The objective of the work is to provide a new statistical project control tool for project managers. Graphs using the SPCT method plotting results of 3 successful projects and 3 failed projects are reviewed, with success and failure being defined by the owner.

  18. Geochemical controls on shale groundwaters: Results of reaction path modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Von Damm, K.L.; VandenBrook, A.J.

    1989-03-01

    The EQ3NR/EQ6 geochemical modeling code was used to simulate the reaction of several shale mineralogies with different groundwater compositions in order to elucidate changes that may occur in both the groundwater compositions, and rock mineralogies and compositions under conditions which may be encountered in a high-level radioactive waste repository. Shales with primarily illitic or smectitic compositions were the focus of this study. The reactions were run at the ambient temperatures of the groundwaters and to temperatures as high as 250/degree/C, the approximate temperature maximum expected in a repository. All modeling assumed that equilibrium was achieved and treated the rock and water assemblage as a closed system. Graphite was used as a proxy mineral for organic matter in the shales. The results show that the presence of even a very small amount of reducing mineral has a large influence on the redox state of the groundwaters, and that either pyrite or graphite provides essentially the same results, with slight differences in dissolved C, Fe and S concentrations. The thermodynamic data base is inadequate at the present time to fully evaluate the speciation of dissolved carbon, due to the paucity of thermodynamic data for organic compounds. In the illitic cases the groundwaters resulting from interaction at elevated temperatures are acid, while the smectitic cases remain alkaline, although the final equilibrium mineral assemblages are quite similar. 10 refs., 8 figs., 15 tabs

  19. 76 FR 7196 - California State Nonroad Engine Pollution Control Standards; Request for Authorization of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-09

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY [FRL-9264-4] California State Nonroad Engine Pollution Control Standards; Request for Authorization of Airborne Toxic Control Measure for In-Use Portable Diesel Engines 50... for In-Use Strategies to Control Emissions from Diesel Engines,'' 13 California Code of Regulations...

  20. 76 FR 24872 - California State Nonroad Engine and Vehicle Pollution Control Standards; Authorization of Tier II...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-03

    ... Pollution Control Standards; Authorization of Tier II Marine Inboard/Sterndrive Spark Ignition Engine... requirement relating to the control of emissions for certain new nonroad engines or vehicles.\\1\\ Section 209(e... control of emissions from either of the following new nonroad engines or nonroad vehicles subject to...

  1. 78 FR 721 - California State Nonroad Engine Pollution Control Standards; Transport Refrigeration Units...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-04

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY California State Nonroad Engine Pollution Control Standards... requirements related to the control of emissions from non-new nonroad engines or vehicles. Section 209(e)(2... requirements relating to the control of emissions from new nonroad spark-ignition engines smaller than 50...

  2. 78 FR 724 - California State Nonroad Engine Pollution Control Standards; Off-Highway Recreational Vehicles...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-04

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY [FRL-9766-2] California State Nonroad Engine Pollution Control...\\ California State Nonroad Engine and Vehicle Pollution Control Standards; Authorization of State Standards... standards and other requirements relating to the control of emissions from such vehicles or engines if...

  3. 75 FR 43975 - California State Motor Vehicle and Nonroad Engine Pollution Control Standards; Truck Idling...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-27

    ... standards) for the control of emissions from new motor vehicles or new motor vehicle engines prior to March... approval relating to the control of emissions from any new motor vehicle or new motor vehicle engine as... relating to the control of emissions from new nonroad spark-ignition engines smaller than 50 horsepower...

  4. 76 FR 7194 - California State Nonroad Engine Pollution Control Standards; Request for Authorization of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-09

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY [FRL-9264-3] California State Nonroad Engine Pollution Control... Toxic Control Measure (ATCM) for in-use portable diesel-fueled engines 50 brake-horsepower (hp) and... within-the-scope confirmation. \\2\\ This includes: California State Nonroad Engine Pollution Control...

  5. 75 FR 11880 - California State Nonroad Engine Pollution Control Standards; California Nonroad Compression...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-12

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY [AMS-FRL-9126-4] California State Nonroad Engine Pollution Control... to the control of emissions from either of the following new nonroad engines or nonroad vehicles... other requirements relating to emissions control of new engines not listed under section 209(e)(1). The...

  6. 14 CFR 25.865 - Fire protection of flight controls, engine mounts, and other flight structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fire protection of flight controls, engine... Design and Construction Fire Protection § 25.865 Fire protection of flight controls, engine mounts, and other flight structure. Essential flight controls, engine mounts, and other flight structures located in...

  7. Design description of a microprocessor based Engine Monitoring and Control unit (EMAC) for small turboshaft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baez, A. N.

    1985-01-01

    Research programs have demonstrated that digital electronic controls are more suitable for advanced aircraft/rotorcraft turbine engine systems than hydromechanical controls. Commercially available microprocessors are believed to have the speed and computational capability required for implementing advanced digital control algorithms. Thus, it is desirable to demonstrate that off-the-shelf microprocessors are indeed capable of performing real time control of advanced gas turbine engines. The engine monitoring and control (EMAC) unit was designed and fabricated specifically to meet the requirements of an advanced gas turbine engine control system. The EMAC unit is fully operational in the Army/NASA small turboshaft engine digital research program.

  8. Cabin fuselage structural design with engine installation and control system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakrishnan, Tanapaal; Bishop, Mike; Gumus, Ilker; Gussy, Joel; Triggs, Mike

    1994-01-01

    Design requirements for the cabin, cabin system, flight controls, engine installation, and wing-fuselage interface that provide adequate interior volume for occupant seating, cabin ingress and egress, and safety are presented. The fuselage structure must be sufficient to meet the loadings specified in the appropriate sections of Federal Aviation Regulation Part 23. The critical structure must provide a safe life of 10(exp 6) load cycles and 10,000 operational mission cycles. The cabin seating and controls must provide adjustment to account for various pilot physiques and to aid in maintenance and operation of the aircraft. Seats and doors shall not bind or lockup under normal operation. Cabin systems such as heating and ventilation, electrical, lighting, intercom, and avionics must be included in the design. The control system will consist of ailerons, elevator, and rudders. The system must provide required deflections with a combination of push rods, bell cranks, pulleys, and linkages. The system will be free from slack and provide smooth operation without binding. Environmental considerations include variations in temperature and atmospheric pressure, protection against sand, dust, rain, humidity, ice, snow, salt/fog atmosphere, wind and gusts, and shock and vibration. The following design goals were set to meet the requirements of the statement of work: safety, performance, manufacturing and cost. To prevent the engine from penetrating the passenger area in the event of a crash was the primary safety concern. Weight and the fuselage aerodynamics were the primary performance concerns. Commonality and ease of manufacturing were major considerations to reduce cost.

  9. Invariant-Based Inverse Engineering of Crane Control Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Resines, S.; Guéry-Odelin, D.; Tobalina, A.; Lizuain, I.; Torrontegui, E.; Muga, J. G.

    2017-11-01

    By applying invariant-based inverse engineering in the small-oscillation regime, we design the time dependence of the control parameters of an overhead crane (trolley displacement and rope length) to transport a load between two positions at different heights with minimal final-energy excitation for a microcanonical ensemble of initial conditions. The analogy between ion transport in multisegmented traps or neutral-atom transport in moving optical lattices and load manipulation by cranes opens a route for a useful transfer of techniques among very different fields.

  10. Comparison of PBL Curricua within Control Engineering Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandez-Samaca, Liliana; Nielsen, Kirsten M.; Ramirez, Jose Miguel

    2011-01-01

    During the last twenty years, various forms of PBL have been implemented in diverse educational programs and national policy regulations, and to different extents, ranging from a single course level to an integrated PBL curriculum. This has resulted in a variety of PBL curriculum practices....... In this article, a comparison of two PBL cases will be described in order to study the advantages and disadvantages of the two systems. One case presents a single level comprised of two courses and the other one is an integrated PBL curriculum, and both are focused on control engineering courses. The PBL...

  11. Space Station Environmental Control/Life Support System engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, C. W.; Heppner, D. B.

    1985-01-01

    The present paper is concerned with a systems engineering study which has provided an understanding of the overall Space Station ECLSS (Environmental Control and Life Support System). ECLSS/functional partitioning is considered along with function criticality, technology alternatives, a technology description, single thread systems, Space Station architectures, ECLSS distribution, mechanical schematics per space station, and Space Station ECLSS characteristics. Attention is given to trade studies and system synergism. The Space Station functional description had been defined by NASA. The ECLSS will utilize technologies which embody regenerative concepts to minimize the use of expendables.

  12. Control room design and human engineering in power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herbst, L.; Hinz, W.

    1981-01-01

    Automation reduces the human work load. Employment of functional areas permits optimization of operational sequences. Computer based information processing makes it possible to output information in accordance with operating requirements. Design based on human engineering principles assures the quality of the interaction between the operator and the equipment. The degree to which these conceptional features play a role in design of power plant control rooms depends on the unit rating, the mode of operation and on the requirements respecting safety and availability of the plant. (orig./RW)

  13. Optimizing the human engineering design of control panels in nuclear power plant control rooms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behrendt, V.; Krehbiehl, T.; Hartfiel, H.D.; Mannhaupt, H.R.

    1986-12-01

    The study contains two parts. In the first part an analytical procedure is developed to logically and reproducibly subdivide the control room personnel tasks resulting in a list of the elements (operations) and the structure (operations scheme) of a task. The second part lists together all knowledge of and influences on human engineering which are known at this time and which should be taken into account in designing control rooms. The content of this catalogue can best be used and presented by using a personal computer. Two fundamental different ways are possible to use the catalogue. Designing new control rooms or new parts of control rooms the results of the task analysis which should be done first, should guide the search in the catalogue to find the right human engineering factors. For assessing existing control room panels the performance shaping factors which are establishing the table of content, permit a quick access to the catalogue. Both the specific procedure of the task analysis and the different ways of access to the catalogue of human engineering knowledge for designing nuclear power plant control rooms have been proven by experienced system engineers and safety experts. The results are presented. They have been considered in this version of the study. (orig.) [de

  14. High Temperature "Smart" P3 Sensors and Electronics for Distributed Engine Control, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Current engine control architectures impose limitations on the insertion of new control capabilities due to weight penalties and reliability issues related to...

  15. High Temperature "Smart" P3 Sensors and Electronics for Distributed Engine Control, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Current engine control architectures impose limitations on the insertion of new control capabilities due to weight penalties and reliability issues related to...

  16. Aspects of computer control from the human engineering standpoint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, T.V.

    1979-03-01

    A Computer Control System includes data acquisition, information display and output control signals. In order to design such a system effectively we must first determine the required operational mode: automatic control (closed loop), computer assisted (open loop), or hybrid control. The choice of operating mode will depend on the nature of the plant, the complexity of the operation, the funds available, and the technical expertise of the operating staff, among many other factors. Once the mode has been selected, consideration must be given to the method (man/machine interface) by which the operator interacts with this system. The human engineering factors are of prime importance to achieving high operating efficiency and very careful attention must be given to this aspect of the work, if full operator acceptance is to be achieved. This paper will discuss these topics and will draw on experience gained in setting up the computer control system in Main Control Center for Stanford University's Accelerator Center (a high energy physics research facility)

  17. A Nonlinear Fuel Optimal Reaction Jet Control Law

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Breitfeller, Eric

    2002-01-01

    We derive a nonlinear fuel optimal attitude control system (ACS) that drives the final state to the desired state according to a cost function that weights the final state angular error relative to the angular rate error...

  18. Mems Reaction Control and Maneuvering for Picosat beyond LEO

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This project further develops a multi-functional SmallSat technology for low-power attitude control of picosatellites beyond low Earth orbit. The film-evaporation...

  19. Twin defects engineered Pd cocatalyst on C3N4 nanosheets for enhanced photocatalytic performance in CO2 reduction reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Qingqing; Hu, Wenli; Zhou, Penghui; Huang, Tianlong; Zhong, Shuxian; Yang, Lining; Chen, Jianrong; Bai, Song

    2017-12-01

    Photocatalytic conversion of CO2 to value-added chemicals, a potential route to addressing the depletion of fossil fuels and anthropogenic climate change, is greatly limited by the low-efficient semiconductor photocatalyst. The integration of cocatalyst with light-harvesting semiconductor is a promising approach to enhancing the photocatalytic performance in CO2 reduction reaction. The enhancement is greatly determined by the catalytic active sites on the surface of cocatalyst. Herein, we demonstrate that the photocatalytic performance in the CO2 reduction reaction is greatly promoted by twin defects engineered Pd cocatalyst. In this work, Pd nanoicosahedrons with twin defects were in situ grown on C3N4 nanosheets, which effectively improve the photocatalytic performance in reduction of CO2 to CO and CH4 in comparison with Pd nanotetrahedrons without twin defects. It is proposed that the twin boundary (TB) terminations on the surface of Pd cocatalysts are highly catalytic active sites for CO2 reduction reaction. Based on the proposed mechanism, the photocatalytic activity and selectivity in CO2 reduction were further advanced through reducing the size of Pd icosahedral cocatalyst resulted from the increased surface density of TB terminations. The defect engineering on the surface of cocatalyst represents a novel route in realizing high-performance photocatalytic applications.

  20. Femtosecond laser induced and controlled chemical reaction of carbon monoxide and hydrogen

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Du Plessis, A

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Results from experiments aimed at bimolecular chemical reaction control of CO and H2 at room temperature and pressure, without any catalyst, using shaped femtosecond laser pulses are presented. A stable reaction product (CO2) was measured after...

  1. Automatic testing devices for diesel engines for the quality control in engine production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Homann, R; Homilius, K

    1979-01-01

    A device which generates the torque for the brakes is the most important functional group in engine test stands. Hydraulic dynamometric brakes are serially produced for power ranges from 210 up to 70000 kw and maximum revolutions up to 10000 rpm. Eddy current brakes can be supplied for the power range of 40 to 3600 kW. Compared to the hydraulic dynamometric brake they have a larger rev-range for control while both have the same torque. Electric machines used as dynamometric brakes make it possible to recuperate electric energy. The properties of the individual braking devices are compared. Torque and number of revolutions are calculated digitally. Test methods are automatised as far as possible. There are four control methods: time plan, perforated strip, magnetic tape or computer.

  2. A Study on Catalysis and Electrolyte Engineering for H2/O2 Electrochemical Reactions

    KAUST Repository

    Shinagawa, Tatsuya

    2016-01-01

    placed on milder conditions, to rationalize and improve its performance. Microkinetic analysis was performed for the cathodic half-reaction in conjugation with mass transport evaluation using various electrode materials. The analysis revealed a

  3. Human factors in remote control engineering development activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarke, M.M.; Hamel, W.R.; Draper, J.V.

    1983-01-01

    Human factors engineering, which is an integral part of the advanced remote control development activities at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, is described. First, work at the Remote Systems Development Facility (RSDF) has shown that operators can perform a wide variety of tasks, some of which were not specifically designed for remote systems, with a dextrous electronic force-reflecting servomanipulator and good television remote viewing capabilities. Second, the data collected during mock-up remote maintenance experiments at the RSDF have been analyzed to provide guidelines for the design of human interfaces with an integrated advanced remote maintenance system currently under development. Guidelines have been provided for task allocation between operators, remote viewing systems, and operator controls. 6 references, 5 figures, 2 tables

  4. Human Engineering of Space Vehicle Displays and Controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitmore, Mihriban; Holden, Kritina L.; Boyer, Jennifer; Stephens, John-Paul; Ezer, Neta; Sandor, Aniko

    2010-01-01

    Proper attention to the integration of the human needs in the vehicle displays and controls design process creates a safe and productive environment for crew. Although this integration is critical for all phases of flight, for crew interfaces that are used during dynamic phases (e.g., ascent and entry), the integration is particularly important because of demanding environmental conditions. This panel addresses the process of how human engineering involvement ensures that human-system integration occurs early in the design and development process and continues throughout the lifecycle of a vehicle. This process includes the development of requirements and quantitative metrics to measure design success, research on fundamental design questions, human-in-the-loop evaluations, and iterative design. Processes and results from research on displays and controls; the creation and validation of usability, workload, and consistency metrics; and the design and evaluation of crew interfaces for NASA's Crew Exploration Vehicle are used as case studies.

  5. Design of a microprocessor-based Control, Interface and Monitoring (CIM unit for turbine engine controls research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaat, J. C.; Soeder, J. F.

    1983-01-01

    High speed minicomputers were used in the past to implement advanced digital control algorithms for turbine engines. These minicomputers are typically large and expensive. It is desirable for a number of reasons to use microprocessor-based systems for future controls research. They are relatively compact, inexpensive, and are representative of the hardware that would be used for actual engine-mounted controls. The Control, Interface, and Monitoring Unit (CIM) contains a microprocessor-based controls computer, necessary interface hardware and a system to monitor while it is running an engine. It is presently being used to evaluate an advanced turbofan engine control algorithm.

  6. Multiphoton control of the 1,3-cyclohexadiene ring-opening reaction in the presence of competing solvent reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Elizabeth C; White, James L; Florean, Andrei C; Bucksbaum, Philip H; Sension, Roseanne J

    2008-07-31

    Although physical chemistry has often concentrated on the observation and understanding of chemical systems, the defining characteristic of chemistry remains the direction and control of chemical reactivity. Optical control of molecular dynamics, and thus of chemical reactivity provides a path to use photon energy as a smart reagent in a chemical system. In this paper, we discuss recent research in this field in the context of our studies of the multiphoton optical control of the photo-initiated ring-opening reaction of 1,3-cyclohexadiene (CHD) to form 1,3,5- cis-hexatriene (Z-HT). Closed-loop feedback and learning algorithms are able to identify pulses that increase the desired target state by as much as a factor of two. Mechanisms for control are discussed through the influence of the intensity dependence, the nonlinear power spectrum, and the projection of the pulses onto low orders of polynomial phase. Control measurements in neat solvents demonstrate that competing solvent fragmentation reactions must also be considered. In particular, multiphoton excitation of cyclohexane alone is capable of producing hexatriene. Statistical analyses of data sets obtained in learning algorithm searches in neat cyclohexane and for CHD in hexane and cyclohexane highlight the importance of linear and quadratic chirp, while demonstrating that the control features are not so easily defined. Higher order phase components are also important. On the basis of these results the involvement of low-frequency ground-state vibrational modes is proposed. When the population is transferred to the excited state, momentum along the torsional coordinate may keep the wave packet localized as it moves toward the conical intersections controlling the yield of Z-HT.

  7. PENERAPAN ENGINEERING CONTROL DAN ADMINISTRATIVE CONTROL SEBAGAI BENTUK INTERVENSI ERGONOMI DI PT GANDING TOOLSINDO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataya Charoonsri Rizani

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available PT. Ganding Toolsindo,sebuah perusahaan  manufaktur yang bergerak di bidang industri otomotif, mengalami permasalahan ergonomi berdasarkan tanda-tanda umum terjadinya permasalahan ergonomi yaitu apparent trend in accidents and injuries, incidence of CTD (cumulative trauma disorder, absenteeism & high turnover rates, employee complaints, poor quality,dan  manual material handling. Permasalahan  yang menjadi focus untuk diselesaikan oleh perusahaan adalah CTD. Penelitian  pada dua stasiun kerja utama  yang bermasalah  yaitu mesin chinfong dan ada yang menggunakan tiga tools yaitu Rapid Upper Limb Assessment (RULA, Nordic Body Map dan pengukuran momen tubuh dengan software Mannequin Pro 7. Hasil dari ketiga tools ini menunjukkan perlu dilakukan intervensi ergonomi dengan pendekatan engineering control maupun administrative control. Intervensi dengan pendekatan engineering control dilakukan dengan meninggikan area kerja dan modifikasi bangku kerja, sedangkan pendekatan administrative control dilakukan dengan menerapkan rotasi kerja dan pemanasan tubuh sebelum bekerja. Hasil implementasi intervensi ergonomic menunjukkan adalanya penurunan pada skor RULA, persentasi keluhan tubuh dan penggunaan momen tubuh. Kata Kunci: CTD, intervensi ergonomi, engineering control, administrative control     PT. Ganding Toolsindo, a manufacturing company engaged in the automotive industry, ergonomics problems experienced by general signs of ergonomics problems are apparent trend in accidents and injuries, incidence of CTD (cumulative trauma disorder, high absenteeism & turnover rates, employee complaints, poor quality, and manual material handling. The problems to be resolved by the company's focus for the CTD. Research on the two main work stations that are problematic and aida chinfong machine uses three tools namely Rapid Upper Limb Assessment (Rula, Nordic Body Map and measurement of body moments with Mannequin Pro 7 software. The results of all three

  8. The control of a free-piston engine generator. Part 1: Fundamental analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikalsen, R.; Roskilly, A.P. [Sir Joseph Swan Institute for Energy Research, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 7RU, England (United Kingdom)

    2010-04-15

    Free-piston engines are under investigation by a number of research groups due to potential fuel efficiency and exhaust emissions advantages over conventional technology. The main challenge with such engines is the control of the piston motion, and this has not yet been fully resolved for all types of free-piston engines. This paper discusses the basic features of a single piston free-piston engine generator under development at Newcastle University and investigates engine control issues using a full-cycle simulation model. Control variables and disturbances are identified, and a control strategy is proposed. It is found that the control of the free-piston engine is a challenge, but that the proposed control strategy is feasible. Engine speed control does, however, represent a challenge in the current design. (author)

  9. Detection of combustion start in the controlled auto ignition engine by wavelet transform of the engine block vibration signal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seonguk; Min, Kyoungdoug

    2008-01-01

    The CAI (controlled auto ignition) engine ignites fuel and air mixture by trapping high temperature burnt gas using a negative valve overlap. Due to auto ignition in CAI combustion, efficiency improvements and low level NO x emission can be obtained. Meanwhile, the CAI combustion regime is restricted and control parameters are limited. The start of combustion data in the compressed ignition engine are most critical for controlling the overall combustion. In this research, the engine block vibration signal is transformed by the Meyer wavelet to analyze CAI combustion more easily and accurately. Signal acquisition of the engine block vibration is a more suitable method for practical use than measurement of in-cylinder pressure. A new method for detecting combustion start in CAI engines through wavelet transformation of the engine block vibration signal was developed and results indicate that it is accurate enough to analyze the start of combustion. Experimental results show that wavelet transformation of engine block vibration can track the start of combustion in each cycle. From this newly developed method, the start of combustion data in CAI engines can be detected more easily and used as input data for controlling CAI combustion

  10. Detection of combustion start in the controlled auto ignition engine by wavelet transform of the engine block vibration signal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seonguk; Min, Kyoungdoug

    2008-08-01

    The CAI (controlled auto ignition) engine ignites fuel and air mixture by trapping high temperature burnt gas using a negative valve overlap. Due to auto ignition in CAI combustion, efficiency improvements and low level NOx emission can be obtained. Meanwhile, the CAI combustion regime is restricted and control parameters are limited. The start of combustion data in the compressed ignition engine are most critical for controlling the overall combustion. In this research, the engine block vibration signal is transformed by the Meyer wavelet to analyze CAI combustion more easily and accurately. Signal acquisition of the engine block vibration is a more suitable method for practical use than measurement of in-cylinder pressure. A new method for detecting combustion start in CAI engines through wavelet transformation of the engine block vibration signal was developed and results indicate that it is accurate enough to analyze the start of combustion. Experimental results show that wavelet transformation of engine block vibration can track the start of combustion in each cycle. From this newly developed method, the start of combustion data in CAI engines can be detected more easily and used as input data for controlling CAI combustion.

  11. Blockage-induced condensation controlled by a local reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirillo, Emilio N. M.; Colangeli, Matteo; Muntean, Adrian

    2016-10-01

    We consider the setup of stationary zero range models and discuss the onset of condensation induced by a local blockage on the lattice. We show that the introduction of a local feedback on the hopping rates allows us to control the particle fraction in the condensed phase. This phenomenon results in a current versus blockage parameter curve characterized by two nonanalyticity points.

  12. Dogs' reaction to inequity is affected by inhibitory control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brucks, Désirée; Range, Friederike; Marshall-Pescini, Sarah

    2017-11-17

    Inequity aversion is thought to act as a mechanism to ensure cooperation and has been studied in many different species, consistently revealing inter-individual variation. Inhibitory control has been proposed to act as one factor responsible for this variation since individuals need to inhibit performing the required action and/or refuse rewards in order to exhibit inequity aversion. Here, we investigated if dogs' sensitivity to inequity is affected by their capacity for inhibitory control, assessed in a test battery and questionnaire. Overall, dogs showing high compulsivity scores (i.e. repetitive behaviours independent of feedback) were more motivated to participate in the inequity task independent of the rewarding scheme. Dogs were more sensitive to inequity and individual contrast if they exhibited a slower decision speed in the inhibition tasks. Furthermore, less persistent and more impulsive dogs were more sensitive to reward inequity, potentially due to having a lower tolerance level for frustration. Results indicate that aspects of inhibitory control can explain the variation in dogs' inequity response, highlighting one of the mechanisms underlying responses to inequity. Emphasising the importance to design paradigms, which allow us to disentangle capacities to recognise inequity from the inability to react to it due to poor inhibitory control abilities.

  13. Aircraft dual-shaft jet engine with indirect action fuel flow controller

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tudosie, Alexandru-Nicolae

    2017-06-01

    The paper deals with an aircraft single-jet engine's control system, based on a fuel flow controller. Considering the engine as controlled object and its thrust the most important operation effect, from the multitude of engine's parameters only its rotational speed n is measurable and proportional to its thrust, so engine's speed has become the most important controlled parameter. Engine's control system is based on fuel injection Qi dosage, while the output is engine's speed n. Based on embedded system's main parts' mathematical models, the author has described the system by its block diagram with transfer functions; furthermore, some Simulink-Matlab simulations are performed, concerning embedded system quality (its output parameters time behavior) and, meanwhile, some conclusions concerning engine's parameters mutual influences are revealed. Quantitative determinations are based on author's previous research results and contributions, as well as on existing models (taken from technical literature). The method can be extended for any multi-spool engine, single- or twin-jet.

  14. Controlling wave propagation through nonlinear engineered granular systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Andrea

    We study the fundamental dynamic behavior of a special class of ordered granular systems in order to design new, structured materials with unique physical properties. The dynamic properties of granular systems are dictated by the nonlinear, Hertzian, potential in compression and zero tensile strength resulting from the discrete material structure. Engineering the underlying particle arrangement of granular systems allows for unique dynamic properties, not observed in natural, disordered granular media. While extensive studies on 1D granular crystals have suggested their usefulness for a variety of engineering applications, considerably less attention has been given to higher-dimensional systems. The extension of these studies in higher dimensions could enable the discovery of richer physical phenomena not possible in 1D, such as spatial redirection and anisotropic energy trapping. We present experiments, numerical simulation (based on a discrete particle model), and in some cases theoretical predictions for several engineered granular systems, studying the effects of particle arrangement on the highly nonlinear transient wave propagation to develop means for controlling the wave propagation pathways. The first component of this thesis studies the stress wave propagation resulting from a localized impulsive loading for three different 2D particle lattice structures: square, centered square, and hexagonal granular crystals. By varying the lattice structure, we observe a wide range of properties for the propagating stress waves: quasi-1D solitary wave propagation, fully 2D wave propagation with tunable wave front shapes, and 2D pulsed wave propagation. Additionally the effects of weak disorder, inevitably present in real granular systems, are investigated. The second half of this thesis studies the solitary wave propagation through 2D and 3D ordered networks of granular chains, reducing the effective density compared to granular crystals by selectively placing wave

  15. Host-Guest Engineering of Layered Double Hydroxides towards Efficient Oxygen Evolution Reaction: Recent Advances and Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianming Li

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Electrochemical water splitting has great potential in the storage of intermittent energy from the sun, wind, or other renewable sources for sustainable clean energy applications. However, the anodic oxygen evolution reaction (OER usually determines the efficiency of practical water electrolysis due to its sluggish four-electron process. Layered double hydroxides (LDHs have attracted increasing attention as one of the ideal and promising electrocatalysts for water oxidation due to their excellent activity, high stability in basic conditions, as well as their earth-abundant compositions. In this review, we discuss the recent progress on LDH-based OER electrocatalysts in terms of active sites, host-guest engineering, and catalytic performances. Moreover, further developments and challenges in developing promising electrocatalysts based on LDHs are discussed from the viewpoint of molecular design and engineering.

  16. Simulation of biodiesel combustion in a light-duty diesel engine using integrated compact biodiesel–diesel reaction mechanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ng, Hoon Kiat; Gan, Suyin; Ng, Jo-Han

    2013-01-01

    This computational fluid dynamics (CFD) study is performed to investigate the combustion characteristics and emissions formation processes of biodiesel fuels in a light-duty diesel engine. A compact reaction mechanism with 80 species and 303 reactions is used to account for the effects of chemical...... kinetics. Here, the mechanism is capable of emulating biodiesel–diesel mixture of different blending levels and biodiesel produced from different feedstock. The integrated CFD-kinetic model was validated against a test matrix which covers the entire saturated–unsaturated methyl ester range typical...... of biodiesel fuels, as well as the biodiesel–diesel blending levels. The simulated cases were then validated for in-cylinder pressure profiles and peak pressure values/timings. Errors in the peak pressure values did not exceed 1%, while the variations in peak pressure timings were kept within 1.5 crank angle...

  17. Numerical Analysis of the Interaction between Thermo-Fluid Dynamics and Auto-Ignition Reaction in Spark Ignition Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saijyo, Katsuya; Nishiwaki, Kazuie; Yoshihara, Yoshinobu

    The CFD simulations were performed integrating the low-temperature oxidation reaction. Analyses were made with respect to the first auto-ignition location in the case of a premixed-charge compression auto-ignition in a laminar flow field and in the case of the auto-ignition in an end gas during an S. I. Engine combustion process. In the latter simulation, the spatially-filtered transport equations were solved to express fluctuating temperatures in a turbulent flow in consideration of strong non-linearity to temperature in the reaction equations. It is suggested that the first auto-ignition location does not always occur at higher-temperature locations and that the difference in the locations of the first auto-ignition depends on the time period during which the local end gas temperature passes through the region of shorter ignition delay, including the NTC region.

  18. Linear Dynamics and Control of a Kinematic Wobble–Yoke Stirling Engine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alvarez–Aguirre, Alejandro; García–Canseco, Eloísa; Scherpen, Jacquelien M.A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a control systems approach for the modeling and control of a kinematic wobble–yoke Stirling engine. The linear dynamics of the Stirling engine are analyzed based on the dynamical model of the system, developed by these authors. We show that the Stirling engine can be viewed as a

  19. Linear dynamics and control of a kinematic wobble-yoke Stirling engine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alvarez Aguirre, A.; Garcia Canseco, E.; Scherpen, J.M.A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a control systems approachfor the modeling and control of a kinematic wobbleyokeStirling engine. The linear dynamics of the Stirling engine are analyzed based on the dynamical model of the system, developed by the authors in [1]. We show that the Stirling engine can be viewed as

  20. 77 FR 50500 - California State Nonroad Engine Pollution Control Standards; California Nonroad Compression...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-21

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY [AMS-FRL 9716-8] California State Nonroad Engine Pollution Control Standards; California Nonroad Compression Ignition Engines--In-Use Fleets; Authorization Request... emissions control of new engines not listed under section 209(e)(1). The section 209(e) rule and its...

  1. Reaction of Sulfuric Acid in Lube Oil: Implications for Large Two-Stroke Diesel Engines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lejre, Kasper Hartvig; Kiil, Søren; Glarborg, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Slow-steaming operation and an increased pressure in the combustion chamber have contributed to increased sulfuric acid (H2SO4) condensation on the cylinder liners in large two-stroke marine diesel engines, thus causing increased corrosion wear. To cope with this, lube oils are formulated...... of CaCO3 compared to the condensed H2SO4. The observed corrosion wear in large two-stroke marine diesel engines could consequently be attributed to local molar excess of H2SO4 compared to CaCO3 reverse micelles on the cylinder liners....

  2. Optimal Control of Engine Warmup in Hybrid Vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Reeven Vital

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available An Internal Combustion Engine (ICE under cold conditions experiences increased friction losses due to a high viscosity of the lubricant. With the additional control freedom present in hybrid electric vehicles, the losses during warmup can be minimized and fuel can be saved. In this paper, firstly, a control-oriented model of the ICE, describing the warmup behavior, is developed and validated on measured vehicle data. Secondly, the two-state, non-autonomous fuel optimization, for a parallel hybrid electric vehicle with stop-start functionality, is solved using optimal control theory. The principal behavior of the Lagrange multipliers is explicitly derived, including the discontinuities (jumps that are caused by the constraints on the lubricant temperature and the energy in the battery system. The minimization of the Hamiltonian for this two-state problem is also explicitly solved, resulting in a computationally efficient algorithm. The optimal controller shows the fuel benefit, as a function of the initial temperature, for a long-haul truck simulated on the FTP-75.

  3. Dynamics and control of mechanical systems in offshore engineering

    CERN Document Server

    He, Wei; How, Bernard Voon Ee; Choo, Yoo Sang

    2014-01-01

    Dynamics and Control of Mechanical Systems in Offshore Engineering is a comprehensive treatment of marine mechanical systems (MMS) involved in processes of great importance such as oil drilling and mineral recovery. Ranging from nonlinear dynamic modeling and stability analysis of flexible riser systems, through advanced control design for an installation system with a single rigid payload attached by thrusters, to robust adaptive control for mooring systems, it is an authoritative reference on the dynamics and control of MMS. Readers will gain not only a complete picture of MMS at the system level, but also a better understanding of the technical considerations involved and solutions to problems that commonly arise from dealing with them. The text provides:                                                                                                                                 ...

  4. Contamination control engineering design guidelines for the aerospace community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tribble, A. C. (Principal Investigator); Boyadjian, B.; Davis, J.; Haffner, J.; McCullough, E.

    1996-01-01

    Thermal control surfaces, solar arrays, and optical devices may be adversely affected by a small quantity of molecular and/or particulate contamination. What is rarely discussed is how one: (1) quantifies the level of contamination that must be maintained in order for the system to function properly, and (2) enforces contamination control to ensure compliance with requirements. This document is designed to address these specific issues and is intended to serve as a handbook on contamination control for the reader, illustrating process and methodology while providing direction to more detailed references when needed. The effects of molecular contamination on reflecting and transmitting surfaces are examined and quantified in accordance with MIL STD 1246C. The generation, transportation, and deposition of molecular contamination is reviewed and specific examples are worked to illustrate the process a design engineer can use to estimate end of life cleanliness levels required by solar arrays, thermal control surfaces, and optical surfaces. A similar process is used to describe the effect of particulate contamination as related to percent area coverage (PAC) and bi-directional reflectance distribution function (BRDF). Relationships between PAC and surface cleanliness, which include the effects of submicron sized particles, are developed and BRDF is related to specific sensor design parameters such as Point Source Transmittance (PST). The pros and cons of various methods of preventing, monitoring, and cleaning surfaces are examined and discussed.

  5. Knowledge-based engineering of a PLC controlled telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pessemier, Wim; Raskin, Gert; Saey, Philippe; Van Winckel, Hans; Deconinck, Geert

    2016-08-01

    As the new control system of the Mercator Telescope is being finalized, we can review some technologies and design methodologies that are advantageous, despite their relative uncommonness in astronomical instrumentation. Particular for the Mercator Telescope is that it is controlled by a single high-end soft-PLC (Programmable Logic Controller). Using off-the-shelf components only, our distributed embedded system controls all subsystems of the telescope such as the pneumatic primary mirror support, the hydrostatic bearing, the telescope axes, the dome, the safety system, and so on. We show how real-time application logic can be written conveniently in typical PLC languages (IEC 61131-3) and in C++ (to implement the pointing kernel) using the commercial TwinCAT 3 programming environment. This software processes the inputs and outputs of the distributed system in real-time via an observatory-wide EtherCAT network, which is synchronized with high precision to an IEEE 1588 (PTP, Precision Time Protocol) time reference clock. Taking full advantage of the ability of soft-PLCs to run both real-time and non real-time software, the same device also hosts the most important user interfaces (HMIs or Human Machine Interfaces) and communication servers (OPC UA for process data, FTP for XML configuration data, and VNC for remote control). To manage the complexity of the system and to streamline the development process, we show how most of the software, electronics and systems engineering aspects of the control system have been modeled as a set of scripts written in a Domain Specific Language (DSL). When executed, these scripts populate a Knowledge Base (KB) which can be queried to retrieve specific information. By feeding the results of those queries to a template system, we were able to generate very detailed "browsable" web-based documentation about the system, but also PLC software code, Python client code, model verification reports, etc. The aim of this paper is to

  6. Cost-Effective Reciprocating Engine Emissions Control and Monitoring for E&P Field and Gathering Engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirby S. Chapman; Sarah R. Nuss-Warren

    2007-02-01

    The objective of this project is to identify, develop, test, and commercialize emissions control and monitoring technologies that can be implemented by exploration and production (E&P) operators to significantly lower the cost of environmental compliance and expedite project permitting. The project team takes considerable advantage of the emissions control research and development efforts and practices that have been underway in the gas pipeline industry for the last 12 years. These efforts and practices are expected to closely interface with the E&P industry to develop cost-effective options that apply to widely-used field and gathering engines, and which can be readily commercialized. The project is separated into two phases. Phase 1 work establishes an E&P industry liaison group, develops a frequency distribution of installed E&P field engines, and identifies and assesses commercially available and emerging engine emissions control and monitoring technologies. Current and expected E&P engine emissions and monitoring requirements are reviewed, and priority technologies are identified for further development. The identified promising technologies are tested on a laboratory engine to confirm their generic viability. In addition, a full-scale field test of prototype emissions controls will be conducted on at least ten representative field engine models with challenging emissions profiles. Emissions monitoring systems that are integrated with existing controls packages will be developed. Technology transfer/commercialization is expected to be implemented through compressor fleet leasing operators, engine component suppliers, the industry liaison group, and the Petroleum Technology Transfer Council. This topical report discusses work completed during Phase 1 of the project Cost Effective Reciprocating Engine Emissions Control and Monitoring for E&P Field and Gathering Engines. In this report information, data, and results are compiled and summarized from quarterly

  7. Methods of Si based ceramic components volatilization control in a gas turbine engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Crespo, Andres Jose; Delvaux, John; Dion Ouellet, Noemie

    2016-09-06

    A method of controlling volatilization of silicon based components in a gas turbine engine includes measuring, estimating and/or predicting a variable related to operation of the gas turbine engine; correlating the variable to determine an amount of silicon to control volatilization of the silicon based components in the gas turbine engine; and injecting silicon into the gas turbine engine to control volatilization of the silicon based components. A gas turbine with a compressor, combustion system, turbine section and silicon injection system may be controlled by a controller that implements the control method.

  8. Characterization of Aerodynamic Interactions with the Mars Science Laboratory Reaction Control System Using Computation and Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenenberger, Mark; VanNorman, John; Rhode, Matthew; Paulson, John

    2013-01-01

    On August 5 , 2012, the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) entry capsule successfully entered Mars' atmosphere and landed the Curiosity rover in Gale Crater. The capsule used a reaction control system (RCS) consisting of four pairs of hydrazine thrusters to fly a guided entry. The RCS provided bank control to fly along a flight path commanded by an onboard computer and also damped unwanted rates due to atmospheric disturbances and any dynamic instabilities of the capsule. A preliminary assessment of the MSL's flight data from entry showed that the capsule flew much as predicted. This paper will describe how the MSL aerodynamics team used engineering analyses, computational codes and wind tunnel testing in concert to develop the RCS system and certify it for flight. Over the course of MSL's development, the RCS configuration underwent a number of design iterations to accommodate mechanical constraints, aeroheating concerns and excessive aero/RCS interactions. A brief overview of the MSL RCS configuration design evolution is provided. Then, a brief description is presented of how the computational predictions of RCS jet interactions were validated. The primary work to certify that the RCS interactions were acceptable for flight was centered on validating computational predictions at hypersonic speeds. A comparison of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) predictions to wind tunnel force and moment data gathered in the NASA Langley 31-Inch Mach 10 Tunnel was the lynch pin to validating the CFD codes used to predict aero/RCS interactions. Using the CFD predictions and experimental data, an interaction model was developed for Monte Carlo analyses using 6-degree-of-freedom trajectory simulation. The interaction model used in the flight simulation is presented.

  9. Metabolic engineering of free-energy (ATP) conserving reactions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Kok, S.

    2012-01-01

    Metabolic engineering – the improvement of cellular activities by manipulation of enzymatic, transport and regulatory functions of the cell – has enabled the industrial production of a wide variety of biological molecules from renewable resources. Microbial production of fuels and chemicals thereby

  10. Engineering E. coli for triglyceride accumulation through native and heterologous metabolic reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rucker, Joanna; Paul, Julie; Pfeifer, Blaine A; Lee, Kyongbum

    2013-03-01

    Triglycerides, traditionally sourced from plant oils, are heavily used in both industrial and healthcare applications. Commercially significant products produced from triglycerides include biodiesel, lubricants, moisturizers, and oils for cooking and dietary supplements. The need to rely upon plant-based production, however, raises concerns of increasing demand and sustainability. The reliance on crop yields and a strong demand for triglycerides provides motivation to engineer production from a robust microbial platform. In this study, Escherichia coli was engineered to synthesize and accumulate triglycerides. Triglycerides were produced from cell wall phospholipid precursors through engineered expression of two enzymes, phosphatidic acid phosphatase (PAP) and diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT). A liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) method was developed to analyze the production of triglycerides by the engineered E. coli strains. This proof-of-concept study demonstrated a yield of 1.1 mg/L triglycerides (2 g/L dry cell weight) in lysogeny broth medium containing 5 g/L glucose at 8 h following induction of PAP and DGAT expression. LC-MS results also demonstrated that the intracellular triglyceride composition of E. coli was highly conserved. Triglycerides containing the fatty acid distributions 16:0/16:0/16:1, 16:0/16:0/18:1, and 18:1/16:0/16:1 were found in highest concentrations and represent ∼70 % of triglycerides observed.

  11. General Attitude Control Algorithm for Spacecraft Equipped with Star Camera and Reaction Wheels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wisniewski, Rafal; Kulczycki, P.

    A configuration consisting of a star camera, four reaction wheels and magnetorquers for momentum unloading has become standard for many spacecraft missions. This popularity has motivated numerous agencies and private companies to initiate work on the design of an imbedded attitude control system...... realized on an integrated circuit. This paper considers two issues: slew maneuver with a feature of avoiding direct exposure of the camera's CCD chip to the Sun %, three-axis attitude control and optimal control torque distribution in a reaction wheel assembly. The attitude controller is synthesized...

  12. Parameter Sensitivity Study of the Unreacted-Core Shrinking Model: A Computer Activity for Chemical Reaction Engineering Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tudela, Ignacio; Bonete, Pedro; Fullana, Andres; Conesa, Juan Antonio

    2011-01-01

    The unreacted-core shrinking (UCS) model is employed to characterize fluid-particle reactions that are important in industry and research. An approach to understand the UCS model by numerical methods is presented, which helps the visualization of the influence of the variables that control the overall heterogeneous process. Use of this approach in…

  13. A Reactive Blended Learning Proposal for an Introductory Control Engineering Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez, Juan A.; Gonzalez, Evelio J.

    2010-01-01

    As it happens in other fields of engineering, blended learning is widely used to teach process control topics. In this paper, the inclusion of a reactive element--a Fuzzy Logic based controller--is proposed for a blended learning approach in an introductory control engineering course. This controller has been designed in order to regulate the…

  14. Vicher: A Virtual Reality Based Educational Module for Chemical Reaction Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, John T.; Fogler, H. Scott

    1996-01-01

    A virtual reality application for undergraduate chemical kinetics and reactor design education, Vicher (Virtual Chemical Reaction Model) was originally designed to simulate a portion of a modern chemical plant. Vicher now consists of two programs: Vicher I that models catalyst deactivation and Vicher II that models nonisothermal effects in…

  15. Engineering of RuMb: Toward a Green Catalyst for Carbene Insertion Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Matthew W; Vargas, David A; Lehnert, Nicolai

    2017-05-15

    The small, stable heme protein myoglobin (Mb) was modified through cofactor substitution and mutagenesis to develop a new catalyst for carbene transfer reactions. The native heme was removed from wild-type Mb and several Mb His64 mutants (H64D, H64A, H64V), and the resulting apoproteins were reconstituted with ruthenium mesoporphyrin IX (RuMpIX). The reconstituted proteins (RuMb) were characterized by UV-vis and circular dichroism spectroscopy and were used as catalysts for the N-H insertion of aniline derivatives and the cyclopropanation of styrene derivatives. The best catalysts for each reaction were able to achieve turnover numbers (TON) up to 520 for the N-H insertion of aniline, and 350 TON for the cyclopropanation of vinyl anisole. Our results show that RuMb is an effective catalyst for N-H insertion, with the potential to further increase the activity and stereoselectivity of the catalyst in future studies. Compared to native Mb ("FeMb"), RuMb is a more active catalyst for carbene transfer reactions, which leads to both heme and protein modification and degradation and, hence, to an overall much-reduced lifetime of the catalyst. This leads to lower TONs for RuMb compared to the iron-containing analogues. Strategies to overcome this limitation are discussed. Finally, comparison is also made to FeH64DMb and FeH64AMb, which have not been previously investigated for carbene transfer reactions.

  16. A Study on Catalysis and Electrolyte Engineering for H2/O2 Electrochemical Reactions

    KAUST Repository

    Shinagawa, Tatsuya

    2016-09-27

    Water electrolysis conjugated with renewable energy sources potentially realizes a sustainable society. Although the current electrolyzers operate at extreme pH to maximize the electrolysis efficiency, near-neutral pH conditions may optimize the overall system operation when conjugated with renewable energy sources. In this context, a study on the electrolysis in the mild conditions is essential. The dissertation investigates the water electrolysis in various conditions, with a particular focus placed on milder conditions, to rationalize and improve its performance. Microkinetic analysis was performed for the cathodic half-reaction in conjugation with mass transport evaluation using various electrode materials. The analysis revealed a significant universal influence of electrolyte properties on the reaction performances at near-neutral pH. Investigation of the associated electrolyte properties (ion size, viscosity and activity/fugacity) rationally optimized the reaction conditions. Together with the separately performed studies on the anodic half-reaction and system configurations, the finding was successfully transferred to electrocatalytic and solar-driven water splitting systems. The presented herein is a fundamental yet crucial aspect of water electrolysis, which can advance the water electrolysis for the future.

  17. Biodegradation at Dynamic Plume Fringes: Mixing Versus Reaction Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirpka, O. A.; Eckert, D.; Griebler, C.; Haberer, C.; Kürzinger, P.; Bauer, R.; Mellage, A.

    2014-12-01

    Biodegradation of continuously emitted plumes is known to be most pronounced at the plume fringe, where mixing of contaminated water and ambient groundwater, containing dissolved electron acceptors, stimulates microbial activity. Under steady-state conditions, physical mixing of contaminant and electron acceptor by transverse dispersion was shown to be the major bottleneck for biodegradation, with plume lengths scaling inversely with the bulk transverse dispersivity in quasi two-dimensional settings. Under these conditions, the presence of suitable microbes is essential but the biokinetic parameters do not play an important role. When the location of the plume shifts (caused, e.g., by a fluctuating groundwater table), however, the bacteria are no more situated at the plume fringe and biomass growth, decay, activation and deactivation determine the time lag until the fringe-controlled steady state is approached again. During this time lag, degradation is incomplete. The objective of the presented study was to analyze to which extent flow and transport dynamics diminish effectiveness of fringe-controlled biodegradation and which microbial processes and related biokinetic parameters determine the system response in overall degradation to hydraulic fluctuations. We performed experiments in quasi-two-dimensional flow through microcosms on aerobic toluene degradation by Pseudomonas putida F1. Plume dynamics were simulated by vertical alteration of the toluene plume position and experimental results were analyzed by reactive-transport modeling. We found that, even after disappearance of the toluene plume for two weeks, the majority of microorganisms stayed attached to the sediment and regained their full biodegradation potential within two days after reappearance of the toluene plume. Our results underline that besides microbial growth and maintenance (often subsumed as "biomass decay") microbial dormancy (that is, change into a metabolically inactive state) and

  18. Heterogeneous reactions of dioctahedral smectites in illite-smectite and kaolinite-smectite mixed-layers: applications to clay materials for engineered barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meunier, A.; Proust, D.; Beaufort, D.; Lajudie, A.; Petit, J.-C.

    1992-01-01

    The clay materials selected for use in the engineered barriers of the French nuclear waste isolation programme are mainly composed of dioctahedral smectite, either bentonite of Wyoming type or kaolinite-smectites most often consist of randomly stacked layers with low and high charges. In the case of the Wyoming-type bentonite, these two differently charged layers do not react in the same way when subjected to hydrothermal alteration. Overall, the low-charge smectite layers react to form high-charge smectite layers + quartz + kaolinite. Then, fixing K ions, the high-charge smectite layers are transformed into illite-smectite mixed-layers (I/S) when the temperature conditions increase. A symmetrical process is observed in natural or experimental hydrothermal conditions when the high-charge smectite layers of I/S minerals react with quartz and/or kaolinite to produce low-charge smectite layers. The chemical properties of the bentonite-engineered barriers clearly depend on the low charge/high charge smectite layer proportion, which is in turn controlled by the temperature-dependent reactions in the vicinity of the waste disposal. Although there are fewer published data on the kaolinite-smectite mixed-layered minerals (K/S), a similar low charge-high charge reaction appears to affect their smectite component. The experimental alteration of K/S leads to the formation of a low-charge beidellite with an increase in the cation-exchange capacity and in the expandability of the clay material. Thus, the properties of the engineered barrier seems to be improved after hydrothermal alteration. (Author)

  19. Engineering Sensorial Delay to Control Phototaxis and Emergent Collective Behaviors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mite Mijalkov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Collective motions emerging from the interaction of autonomous mobile individuals play a key role in many phenomena, from the growth of bacterial colonies to the coordination of robotic swarms. For these collective behaviors to take hold, the individuals must be able to emit, sense, and react to signals. When dealing with simple organisms and robots, these signals are necessarily very elementary; e.g., a cell might signal its presence by releasing chemicals and a robot by shining light. An additional challenge arises because the motion of the individuals is often noisy; e.g., the orientation of cells can be altered by Brownian motion and that of robots by an uneven terrain. Therefore, the emphasis is on achieving complex and tunable behaviors from simple autonomous agents communicating with each other in robust ways. Here, we show that the delay between sensing and reacting to a signal can determine the individual and collective long-term behavior of autonomous agents whose motion is intrinsically noisy. We experimentally demonstrate that the collective behavior of a group of phototactic robots capable of emitting a radially decaying light field can be tuned from segregation to aggregation and clustering by controlling the delay with which they change their propulsion speed in response to the light intensity they measure. We track this transition to the underlying dynamics of this system, in particular, to the ratio between the robots’ sensorial delay time and the characteristic time of the robots’ random reorientation. Supported by numerics, we discuss how the same mechanism can be applied to control active agents, e.g., airborne drones, moving in a three-dimensional space. Given the simplicity of this mechanism, the engineering of sensorial delay provides a potentially powerful tool to engineer and dynamically tune the behavior of large ensembles of autonomous mobile agents; furthermore, this mechanism might already be at work within

  20. Adjusting the specificity of an engine map based on the sensitivity of an engine control parameter relative to a performance variable

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Li; Lee, Donghoon; Yilmaz, Hakan; Stefanopoulou, Anna

    2014-10-28

    Methods and systems for engine control optimization are provided. A first and a second operating condition of a vehicle engine are detected. An initial value is identified for a first and a second engine control parameter corresponding to a combination of the detected operating conditions according to a first and a second engine map look-up table. The initial values for the engine control parameters are adjusted based on a detected engine performance variable to cause the engine performance variable to approach a target value. A first and a second sensitivity of the engine performance variable are determined in response to changes in the engine control parameters. The first engine map look-up table is adjusted when the first sensitivity is greater than a threshold, and the second engine map look-up table is adjusted when the second sensitivity is greater than a threshold.

  1. Tracking and Control of Gas Turbine Engine Component Damage/Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaw, Link C.; Wu, Dong N.; Bryg, David J.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes damage mechanisms and the methods of controlling damages to extend the on-wing life of critical gas turbine engine components. Particularly, two types of damage mechanisms are discussed: creep/rupture and thermo-mechanical fatigue. To control these damages and extend the life of engine hot-section components, we have investigated two methodologies to be implemented as additional control logic for the on-board electronic control unit. This new logic, the life-extending control (LEC), interacts with the engine control and monitoring unit and modifies the fuel flow to reduce component damages in a flight mission. The LEC methodologies were demonstrated in a real-time, hardware-in-the-loop simulation. The results show that LEC is not only a new paradigm for engine control design, but also a promising technology for extending the service life of engine components, hence reducing the life cycle cost of the engine.

  2. Compact and Accurate Turbocharger Modelling for Engine Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorenson, Spencer C; Hendricks, Elbert; Magnússon, Sigurjón

    2005-01-01

    With the current trend towards engine downsizing, the use of turbochargers to obtain extra engine power has become common. A great díffuculty in the use of turbochargers is in the modelling of the compressor map. In general this is done by inserting the compressor map directly into the engine ECU...... turbocharges with radial compressors for either Spark Ignition (SI) or diesel engines...

  3. Nitric oxide and nitrous oxide turnover in natural and engineered microbial communities: biological pathways, chemical reactions, and novel technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, Frank; Wunderlin, Pascal; Udert, Kai M.; Wells, George F.

    2012-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is an environmentally important atmospheric trace gas because it is an effective greenhouse gas and it leads to ozone depletion through photo-chemical nitric oxide (NO) production in the stratosphere. Mitigating its steady increase in atmospheric concentration requires an understanding of the mechanisms that lead to its formation in natural and engineered microbial communities. N2O is formed biologically from the oxidation of hydroxylamine (NH2OH) or the reduction of nitrite (NO−2) to NO and further to N2O. Our review of the biological pathways for N2O production shows that apparently all organisms and pathways known to be involved in the catabolic branch of microbial N-cycle have the potential to catalyze the reduction of NO−2 to NO and the further reduction of NO to N2O, while N2O formation from NH2OH is only performed by ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB). In addition to biological pathways, we review important chemical reactions that can lead to NO and N2O formation due to the reactivity of NO−2, NH2OH, and nitroxyl (HNO). Moreover, biological N2O formation is highly dynamic in response to N-imbalance imposed on a system. Thus, understanding NO formation and capturing the dynamics of NO and N2O build-up are key to understand mechanisms of N2O release. Here, we discuss novel technologies that allow experiments on NO and N2O formation at high temporal resolution, namely NO and N2O microelectrodes and the dynamic analysis of the isotopic signature of N2O with quantum cascade laser absorption spectroscopy (QCLAS). In addition, we introduce other techniques that use the isotopic composition of N2O to distinguish production pathways and findings that were made with emerging molecular techniques in complex environments. Finally, we discuss how a combination of the presented tools might help to address important open questions on pathways and controls of nitrogen flow through complex microbial communities that eventually lead to N2O build

  4. Nitric oxide and nitrous oxide turnover in natural and engineered microbial communities: biological pathways, chemical reactions and novel technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank eSchreiber

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Nitrous oxide (N2O is an environmentally important atmospheric trace gas because it is an effective greenhouse gas and it leads to ozone depletion through photo-chemical nitric oxide (NO production in the stratosphere. Mitigating its steady increase in atmospheric concentration requires an understanding of the mechanisms that lead to its formation in natural and engineered microbial communities. N2O is formed biologically from the oxidation of hydroxylamine (NH2OH or the reduction of nitrite (NO2- to NO and further to N2O. Our review of the biological pathways for N2O production shows that apparently all organisms and pathways known to be involved in the catabolic branch of microbial N-cycle have the potential to catalyze the reduction of NO2- to NO and the further reduction of NO to N2O, while N2O formation from NH2OH is only performed by ammonia oxidizing bacteria. In addition to biological pathways, we review important chemical reactions that can lead to NO and N2O formation due to the reactivity of NO2-, NH2OH and nitroxyl (HNO. Moreover, biological N2O formation is highly dynamic in response to N-imbalance imposed on a system. Thus, understanding NO formation and capturing the dynamics of NO and N2O build-up are key to understand mechanisms of N2O release. Here, we discuss novel technologies that allow experiments on NO and N2O formation at high temporal resolution, namely NO and N2O microelectrodes and the dynamic analysis of the isotopic signature of N2O with quantum cascade laser based absorption spectroscopy. In addition, we introduce other techniques that use the isotopic composition of N2O to distinguish production pathways and findings that were made with emerging molecular techniques in complex environments. Finally, we discuss how a combination of the presented tools might help to address important open questions on pathways and controls of nitrogen flow through complex microbial communities that eventually lead to N2O build-up.

  5. A new robust adaptive controller for vibration control of active engine mount subjected to large uncertainties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fakhari, Vahid; Choi, Seung-Bok; Cho, Chang-Hyun

    2015-01-01

    This work presents a new robust model reference adaptive control (MRAC) for vibration control caused from vehicle engine using an electromagnetic type of active engine mount. Vibration isolation performances of the active mount associated with the robust controller are evaluated in the presence of large uncertainties. As a first step, an active mount with linear solenoid actuator is prepared and its dynamic model is identified via experimental test. Subsequently, a new robust MRAC based on the gradient method with σ-modification is designed by selecting a proper reference model. In designing the robust adaptive control, structured (parametric) uncertainties in the stiffness of the passive part of the mount and in damping ratio of the active part of the mount are considered to investigate the robustness of the proposed controller. Experimental and simulation results are presented to evaluate performance focusing on the robustness behavior of the controller in the face of large uncertainties. The obtained results show that the proposed controller can sufficiently provide the robust vibration control performance even in the presence of large uncertainties showing an effective vibration isolation. (paper)

  6. Role of glycolytic intermediate in regulation: Improving lycopene production in Escherichia coli by engineering metabolic control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmer, W.R.; Liao, J.C.

    2001-06-01

    Metabolic engineering in the postgenomic era is expected to benefit from a full understanding of the biosynthetic capability of microorganisms as a result of the progress being made in bioinformatics and functional genomics. The immediate advantage of such information is to allow the rational design of novel pathways and the elimination of native reactions that are detrimental or unnecessary for the desired purpose. However, with the ability to manipulate metabolic pathways becoming more effective, metabolic engineering will need to face a new challenge: the reengineering of the regulatory hierarchy that controls gene expression in those pathways. In addition to constructing the genetic composition of a metabolic pathway, they propose that it will become just as important to consider the dynamics of pathways gene expression. It has been widely observed that high-level induction of a recombinant protein or pathway leads to growth retardation and reduced metabolic activity. These phenotypic characteristics result from the fact that the constant demands of production placed upon the cell interfere with its changing requirements for growth. They believe that this common situation in metabolic engineering can be alleviated by designing a dynamic controller that is able to sense the metabolic state of the cell and regulate the expression of the recombinant pathway accordingly. This approach, which is termed metabolic control engineering, involves redesigning the native regulatory circuits and applying them to the recombinant pathway. The general goal of such an effort will be to control the flux to the recombinant pathway adaptively according to the cell's metabolic state. The dynamically controlled recombinant pathway can potentially lead to enhanced production, minimized growth retardation, and reduced toxic by-product formation. The regulation of gene expression in response to the physiological state is also essential to the success of gene therapy. Here they

  7. Nanoscale control of reversible chemical reaction between fullerene C60 molecules using scanning tunneling microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakaya, Masato; Kuwahara, Yuji; Aono, Masakazu; Nakayama, Tomonobu

    2011-04-01

    The nanoscale control of reversible chemical reactions, the polymerization and depolymerization between C60 molecules, has been investigated. Using a scanning tunneling microscope (STM), the polymerization and depolymerization can be controlled at designated positions in ultrathin films of C60 molecules. One of the two chemical reactions can be selectively induced by controlling the sample bias voltage (V(s)); the application of negative and positive values of V(s) results in polymerization and depolymerization, respectively. The selectivity between the two chemical reactions becomes extremely high when the thickness of the C60 film increases to more than three molecular layers. We conclude that STM-induced negative and positive electrostatic ionization are responsible for the control of the polymerization and depolymerization, respectively.

  8. Synchronization criteria for generalized reaction-diffusion neural networks via periodically intermittent control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Qintao; Lv, Tianshi; Fu, Zhenhua

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, the synchronization problem for a class of generalized neural networks with time-varying delays and reaction-diffusion terms is investigated concerning Neumann boundary conditions in terms of p-norm. The proposed generalized neural networks model includes reaction-diffusion local field neural networks and reaction-diffusion static neural networks as its special cases. By establishing a new inequality, some simple and useful conditions are obtained analytically to guarantee the global exponential synchronization of the addressed neural networks under the periodically intermittent control. According to the theoretical results, the influences of diffusion coefficients, diffusion space, and control rate on synchronization are analyzed. Finally, the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed methods are shown by simulation examples, and by choosing different diffusion coefficients, diffusion spaces, and control rates, different controlled synchronization states can be obtained.

  9. Computer-Aided Design Methods for Model-Based Nonlinear Engine Control Systems, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Traditional design methods for aircraft turbine engine control systems have relied on the use of linearized models and linear control theory. While these controllers...

  10. Controlling Behaviors in Middle School Youth's Dating Relationships: Reactions and Help-Seeking Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias-Lambert, Nada; Black, Beverly M.; Chigbu, Kingsley U.

    2014-01-01

    This exploratory study examined middle school students' (N = 380) help-seeking behaviors and other reactions to controlling behaviors in their dating relationships. Over three-fourths of the participants perpetrated and were victimized by controlling behaviors in their dating relationships. Youth used emotional/verbal and dominance/isolation forms…

  11. Employee reactions to the use of management control systems in hospitals: motivation vs. threat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernesto Lopez-Valeiras

    2018-03-01

    Conclusions: The results obtained contribute to creating specific knowledge on the reactions of employees to the use of management control systems in hospitals. This information may be important in adapting management control systems to the characteristics of the hospital and its employees, which may in turn contribute to reducing dysfunctional worker behavior.

  12. Engine-start Control Strategy of P2 Parallel Hybrid Electric Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiangyang, Xu; Siqi, Zhao; Peng, Dong

    2017-12-01

    A smooth and fast engine-start process is important to parallel hybrid electric vehicles with an electric motor mounted in front of the transmission. However, there are some challenges during the engine-start control. Firstly, the electric motor must simultaneously provide a stable driving torque to ensure the drivability and a compensative torque to drag the engine before ignition. Secondly, engine-start time is a trade-off control objective because both fast start and smooth start have to be considered. To solve these problems, this paper first analyzed the resistance of the engine start process, and established a physic model in MATLAB/Simulink. Then a model-based coordinated control strategy among engine, motor and clutch was developed. Two basic control strategy during fast start and smooth start process were studied. Simulation results showed that the control objectives were realized by applying given control strategies, which can meet different requirement from the driver.

  13. Crystallization engineering as a route to epitaxial strain control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew R. Akbashev

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The controlled synthesis of epitaxial thin films offers opportunities for tuning their functional properties via enabling or suppressing strain relaxation. Examining differences in the epitaxial crystallization of amorphous oxide films, we report on an alternate, low-temperature route for strain engineering. Thin films of amorphous Bi–Fe–O were grown on (001SrTiO3 and (001LaAlO3 substrates via atomic layer deposition. In situ X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies of the crystallization of the amorphous films into the epitaxial (001BiFeO3 phase reveal distinct evolution profiles of crystallinity with temperature. While growth on (001SrTiO3 results in a coherently strained film, the same films obtained on (001LaAlO3 showed an unstrained, dislocation-rich interface, with an even lower temperature onset of the perovskite phase crystallization than in the case of (001SrTiO3. Our results demonstrate how the strain control in an epitaxial film can be accomplished via its crystallization from the amorphous state.

  14. Trajectory control sensor engineering model detailed test objective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekome, Kent; Barr, Joseph Martin

    1991-01-01

    The concept employed in an existing Trajectory Control Sensor (TCS) breadboard is being developed into an engineering model to be considered for flight on the Shuttle as a Detailed Test Objective (DTO). The sensor design addresses the needs of Shuttle/SSF docking/berthing by providing relative range and range rate to 1500 meters as well as the perceived needs of AR&C by relative attitude measurement over the last 100 meters. Range measurement is determined using a four-tone ranging technique. The Doppler shift on the highest frequency tone will be used to provide direct measurement of range rate. Bearing rate and attitude rates will be determined through back differencing of bearing and attitude, respectively. The target consists of an isosceles triangle configuration of three optical retroreflectors, roughly one meter and one-half meter in size. After target acquisition, the sensor continually updates the positions of the three retros at a rate of about one hertz. The engineering model is expected to weigh about 25 pounds, consume 25-30 watts, and have an envelope of about 1.25 cubic feet. The following concerns were addressed during the presentation: are there any concerns with differentiating attitude and bearing to get attitude and bearing rates? Since the docking scenario has low data bandwidth, back differencing is a sufficient approximation of a perfect differentiator for this application. Could range data be obtained if there were no retroreflectors on the target vehicle? Possibly, but only at close range. It would be dependent on target characteristics.

  15. Chemical-Reaction-Controlled Phase Separated Drops: Formation, Size Selection, and Coarsening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurtz, Jean David; Lee, Chiu Fan

    2018-02-01

    Phase separation under nonequilibrium conditions is exploited by biological cells to organize their cytoplasm but remains poorly understood as a physical phenomenon. Here, we study a ternary fluid model in which phase-separating molecules can be converted into soluble molecules, and vice versa, via chemical reactions. We elucidate using analytical and simulation methods how drop size, formation, and coarsening can be controlled by the chemical reaction rates, and categorize the qualitative behavior of the system into distinct regimes. Ostwald ripening arrest occurs above critical reaction rates, demonstrating that this transition belongs entirely to the nonequilibrium regime. Our model is a minimal representation of the cell cytoplasm.

  16. Flexible structure control experiments using a real-time workstation for computer-aided control engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stieber, Michael E.

    1989-01-01

    A Real-Time Workstation for Computer-Aided Control Engineering has been developed jointly by the Communications Research Centre (CRC) and Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum (RUB), West Germany. The system is presently used for the development and experimental verification of control techniques for large space systems with significant structural flexibility. The Real-Time Workstation essentially is an implementation of RUB's extensive Computer-Aided Control Engineering package KEDDC on an INTEL micro-computer running under the RMS real-time operating system. The portable system supports system identification, analysis, control design and simulation, as well as the immediate implementation and test of control systems. The Real-Time Workstation is currently being used by CRC to study control/structure interaction on a ground-based structure called DAISY, whose design was inspired by a reflector antenna. DAISY emulates the dynamics of a large flexible spacecraft with the following characteristics: rigid body modes, many clustered vibration modes with low frequencies and extremely low damping. The Real-Time Workstation was found to be a very powerful tool for experimental studies, supporting control design and simulation, and conducting and evaluating tests withn one integrated environment.

  17. Fabrication of self-written waveguide in photosensitive polyimide resin by controlling photochemical reaction of photosensitizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, K.; Kuro, T.; Oe, K.; Mune, K.; Tagawa, K.; Naitou, R.; Mochizuki, A.

    2004-01-01

    We have investigated optical properties of photosensitive polyimide appropriating for long self-written waveguide fabrication. From systematic measurements of absorption properties, it was found that photochemical reaction of photosensitizer dissolved in the photosensitive polyimide resins relates to transparency after the exposure, which limits the length of the fabricated self-written waveguide. By controlling the photochemical reaction, in which the photosensitive polyimide resin has sufficient transparency during exposure, four times longer self-written waveguide core was fabricated

  18. System and method for controlling engine knock using electro-hydraulic valve actuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Daniel G

    2013-12-10

    A control system for an engine includes a knock control module and a valve control module. The knock control module adjusts a period that one or more of an intake valve and an exhaust valve of a cylinder are open based on engine knock corresponding to the cylinder. The valve control module, based on the adjusted period, controls the one or more of the intake valve and the exhaust valve using one or more hydraulic actuators.

  19. Experiential learning in control systems laboratories and engineering project management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reck, Rebecca Marie

    2015, a panel of 40 control systems faculty members, from a variety of institutions, completed a multi-round Delphi survey in order to bring them toward consensus on the common aspects of their laboratories. The following winter, 45 additional faculty members and practitioners from the control systems community completed a follow-up survey to gather feedback on the results of the Delphi survey. During the Delphi study, the panelists identified 15 laboratory objectives, 26 concepts, and 15 components that were common in their laboratories. Then in both the Delphi survey and follow-up survey each participant rated the importance of each of these items. While the average ratings differed slightly between the two groups, the order of each set of items was compared with two different tests and the order was found to be similar. Some of the common and important learning objectives include connecting theory to what is implemented and observed in the laboratory, designing controllers, and modeling and simulating systems. The most common component in both groups was Math-Works software. Some of the common concepts include block diagrams, stability, and PID control. Defining common aspects of undergraduate control systems laboratories enables common development, detailed comparisons, and simplified adaptation of equipment and experiments between campuses and programs. Throughout an undergraduate program in engineering, there are multiple opportunities for hands-on laboratory experiences that are related to course content. However, a similarly immersive experience for project management graduate students is harder to incorporate for all students in a course at once. This study explores an experiential learning opportunity for graduate students in engineering management or project management programs. The project management students enroll in a project management course. Undergraduate students interested in working on a project with a real customer enroll in a different projects

  20. 76 FR 78 - Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard; Engine Control Module Speed Limiter Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-03

    ... [Docket No. NHTSA-2007-26851] Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard; Engine Control Module Speed Limiter... occupants. IIHS stated that on-board electronic engine control modules (ECM) will maintain the desired speed... be equipped with an electronic control module (ECM) that is capable of limiting the maximum speed of...

  1. A Study on Application of Fuzzy Adaptive Unscented Kalman Filter to Nonlinear Turbojet Engine Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Dongju

    2018-05-01

    Safe and efficient flight powered by an aircraft turbojet engine relies on the performance of the engine controller preventing compressor surge with robustness from noises or disturbances. This paper proposes the effective nonlinear controller associated with the nonlinear filter for the real turbojet engine with highly nonlinear dynamics. For the feasible controller study the nonlinearity of the engine dynamics was investigated by comparing the step responses from the linearized model with the original nonlinear dynamics. The fuzzy-based PID control logic is introduced to control the engine efficiently and FAUKF is applied for robustness from noises. The simulation results prove the effectiveness of FAUKF applied to the proposed controller such that the control performances are superior over the conventional controller and the filer performance using FAUKF indicates the satisfactory results such as clearing the defects by reducing the distortions without compressor surge, whereas the conventional UKF is not fully effective as occurring some distortions with compressor surge due to a process noise.

  2. Towards model-based control of RCCI-CDF mode-switching in dual fuel engines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Indrajuana, Armando; Bekdemir, C.; Feru, E.; Willems, F.P.T.

    2018-01-01

    The operation of a dual fuel combustion engine using combustion mode-switching offers the benefit of higher thermal efficiency compared to single-mode operation. For various fuel combinations, the engine research community has shown that running dual fuel engines in Reactivity Controlled Compression

  3. The Effect of Faster Engine Response on the Lateral Directional Control of a Damaged Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Ryan D.; Lemon, Kimberly A.; Csank, Jeffrey T.; Litt, Jonathan S.; Guo, Ten-Huei

    2012-01-01

    The integration of flight control and propulsion control has been a much discussed topic, especially for emergencies where the engines may be able to help stabilize and safely land a damaged aircraft. Previous research has shown that for the engines to be effective as flight control actuators, the response time to throttle commands must be improved. Other work has developed control modes that accept a higher risk of engine failure in exchange for improved engine response during an emergency. In this effort, a nonlinear engine model (the Commercial Modular Aero-Propulsion System Simulation 40k) has been integrated with a nonlinear airframe model (the Generic Transport Model) in order to evaluate the use of enhanced-response engines as alternative yaw rate control effectors. Tests of disturbance rejection and command tracking were used to determine the impact of the engines on the aircraft's dynamical behavior. Three engine control enhancements that improve the response time of the engine were implemented and tested in the integrated simulation. The enhancements were shown to increase the engine s effectiveness as a yaw rate control effector when used in an automatic feedback loop. The improvement is highly dependent upon flight condition; the airframe behavior is markedly improved at low altitude, low speed conditions, and relatively unchanged at high altitude, high speed.

  4. Pengaruh Prosentase Etanol terhadap Torsi dan Emisi Motor Indirect Injection dengan Memodifikasi Engine Control Module

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadi Rahmad

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This research present the torque and exhaust emission level from four stroke indirect injection fuel system engine. An engine fueled by ethanol gasoline blend. The original Engine Controle Module injected lean mixture into Combustion Chamber. Lean Mixture decreased Torque drastically. Therefore, the Engine Controle Module was modified to produce stoichiometric mixture. Injector was controlled by digital pulse of Fuel Controller. Ethanol was added into gasoline 0% - 100% at 1500 rpm-5000 rpm. The result demonstrate that increasing ethanol concentration into gasoline fuel system, decreasing Torque, and CO, HC, CO2 emission. By increasing ethanol concentration also increase CO2 emission to 34.6%.

  5. Status, Vision, and Challenges of an Intelligent Distributed Engine Control Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behbahani, Alireza; Culley, Dennis; Garg, Sanjay; Millar, Richard; Smith, Bert; Wood, Jim; Mahoney, Tim; Quinn, Ronald; Carpenter, Sheldon; Mailander, Bill; hide

    2007-01-01

    A Distributed Engine Control Working Group (DECWG) consisting of the Department of Defense (DoD), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Glenn Research Center (GRC) and industry has been formed to examine the current and future requirements of propulsion engine systems. The scope of this study will include an assessment of the paradigm shift from centralized engine control architecture to an architecture based on distributed control utilizing open system standards. Included will be a description of the work begun in the 1990's, which continues today, followed by the identification of the remaining technical challenges which present barriers to on-engine distributed control.

  6. Handbook of air pollution from internal combustion engines: pollutant formation and control

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sher, Eran

    1998-01-01

    ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xix PART I OVERViEW . 1. Motor Vehicle Emissions Control: Achievements, Future Prospects Past 3 John B. Heywood Sun Jae Professor of Mechanical Engineering...

  7. Using Engine Thrust for Emergency Flight Control: MD-11 and B-747 Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burcham, Frank W., Jr.; Maine, Trindel A.; Burken, John J.; Bull, John

    1998-01-01

    With modern digital control systems, using engine thrust for emergency flight control to supplement or replace failed aircraft normal flight controls has become a practical consideration. The NASA Dryden Flight Research Center has developed a propulsion-controlled aircraft (PCA) system in which computer-controlled engine thrust provides emergency flight control. An F-15 and an MD-11 airplane have been landed without using any flight control surfaces. Preliminary studies have also been conducted that show that engines on only one wing can provide some flight control capability if the lateral center of gravity can be shifted toward the side of the airplane that has the operating engine(s). Simulator tests of several airplanes with no flight control surfaces operating and all engines out on the left wing have all shown positive control capability within the available range of lateral center-of-gravity offset. Propulsion-controlled aircraft systems that can operate without modifications to engine control systems, thus allowing PCA technology to be installed on less capable airplanes or at low cost, are also desirable. Further studies have examined simplified 'PCA Lite' and 'PCA Ultralite' concepts in which thrust control is provided by existing systems such as auto-throttles or a combination of existing systems and manual pilot control.

  8. Slew Maneuver Control for Spacecraft Equipped with Star Camera and Reaction Wheels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wisniewski, Rafal; Kulczycki, P.

    2005-01-01

    A configuration consisting of a star camera, four reaction wheels and magnetorquers for momentum unloading has become standard for many spacecraft missions. This popularity has motivated numerous agencies and private companies to initiate work on the design of an imbedded attitude control system...... realized on an integrated circuit. This paper provides an easily implementable control algorithm for this type of configuration. The paper considers two issues: slew maneuver with a feature of avoiding direct exposure of the camera's CCD chip to the Sun %, three-axis attitude control and optimal control...... torque distribution in a reaction wheel assembly. The attitude controller is synthesized applying the energy shaping technique, where the desired potential function is carefully designed using a physical insight into the nature of the problem. The system stability is thoroughly analyzed and the control...

  9. Diesel engine exhaust particulate filter with intake throttling incineration control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludecke, O.; Rosebrock, T.

    1980-07-08

    A description is given of a diesel engine exhaust filter and particulate incineration system in combination with a diesel engine having a normally unthrottled air induction system for admitting combustion air to the engine and an exhaust system for carrying off spent combustion products exhausted from the engine, said filter and incineration system comprising: a combustion resistant filter disposed in the exhaust system and operative to collect and retain portions of the largely carbonaceous particulate matter contained in the engine exhaust products, said fiber being capable of withstanding without substantial damage internal temperatures sufficient to burn the collected particulate matter, a throttle in the indication system and operable to restrict air flow into the engine to reduce the admittance of excess combustion air and thereby increase engine exhaust gas temperature, and means to actuate said throttle periodically during engine operation to an air flow restricting burn mode capable of raising the particulates in said filter to their combustion temperature under certain engine operating conditions and to maintain said throttle mode for an interval adequate to burn retained particulates in the filter.

  10. Exploring Bridge-Engine Control Room Collaborative Team Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aditi Kataria

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The EC funded CyClaDes research project is designed to promote the increased impact of the human element in shipping across the design and operational lifecycle. It addresses the design and operation of ships and ship systems. One of the CyClaDes’ tasks is to create a crew-centered design case-study examination of the information that is shared between the Bridge and Engine Control Room that helps the crew co-ordinate to ensure understanding and complete interconnected tasks. This information can be provided in various ways, including communication devices or obtained from a common database, display, or even the ship environment (e.g., the roll of the ship. A series of semi-structured interviews were conducted with seafarers of diverse ranks to get a better idea of what communication does, or should, take place and any problems or challenges existing in current operations, as seen from both the bridge and ECR operators’ perspectives. Included in the interview were both the standard communications and information shared during planning and executing a voyage, as well as special situations such as safety/casualty tasks or heavy weather. The results were analyzed in terms of the goals of the communication, the primary situations of interest for communication and collaboration, the communication media used, the information that is shared, and the problems experienced. The results of seafarer interviews are presented in the paper to explore on-board inter-departmental communication.

  11. Controlled trifluoromethylation reactions of alkynes through visible-light photoredox catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Naeem; Jung, Jaehun; Park, Sehyun; Cho, Eun Jin

    2014-01-07

    The control of a reaction that can form multiple products is a highly attractive and challenging concept in synthetic chemistry. A set of valuable CF3 -containing molecules, namely trifluoromethylated alkenyl iodides, alkenes, and alkynes, were selectively generated from alkynes and CF3 I by environmentally benign and efficient visible-light photoredox catalysis. Subtle differences in the combination of catalyst, base, and solvent enabled the control of reactivity and selectivity for the reaction between an alkyne and CF3 I. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. THE HYDROVINYLATION AND RELATED REACTIONS: NEW PROTOCOLS AND CONTROL ELEMENTS IN SEARCH OF GREATER SYNTHETIC EFFICIENCY AND SELECTIVITY. (R826120)

    Science.gov (United States)

    New reaction conditions and stereochemical control elements for heterodimerization between ethylene (or propylene) and functionalized vinyl arenes are highlighted (see equation). For example, an enantioselective version of the hydrovinylation reaction uses [{(allyl)NiBr}...

  13. Study of Efficiency Control by Hybrid Jet Engine Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. F. Maksimov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyzes main control aspects of thrust jet engines, which use fuel components in different states of aggregation (solid fuels - liquid oxidant, a solid oxidizer - liquid fuel. Following the analytical review of literature a conclusion has been drawn that it is technically and functionally complicated to provide a process of thrust control by changing the mass flow and the combustion rate of a solid fuel charge.The objective of this work is to give a theoretical prediction of how the thermal knife impacts on the local combustion rate.The paper presents a diagram of interaction between thermal knife and solid fuel. There are three modes, namely: pyrolysis, transition (from pyrolysis to cutting charge, and fuel cut. In the computational model generation it is assumed that the solid fuel combustion rate is not dependent on the combustion direction, and the temperature distribution along the length of the charge (in the direction perpendicular to the face obeys the Michelson dependence without considering a resistance of the heated layer at the surface of the combustion charge. The paper considers mechanical interaction of the thermal knife with the surface of charge. The Hertz formula describes the relationship between the pressing force, the penetration depth and the radius of thermal knife mark in the fuel.Numerical modeling methods and direct calculations allow us to obtain relationships to describe the changing local combustion rate under the action of the thermal knife on a solid fuel charge in its mechanical penetration, depending on the blade geometry, mechanical properties of charge and pressing force.

  14. Nano-metal oxides: Exposure and engineering control assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Alberto; Eastlake, Adrienne; Topmiller, Jennifer L; Sparks, Christopher; Martinez, Kenneth; Geraci, Charles L

    2017-09-01

    In January 2007, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) conducted a field study to evaluate process specific emissions during the production of ENMs. This study was performed using the nanoparticle emission assessment technique (NEAT). During this study, it was determined that ENMs were released during production and cleaning of the process reactor. Airborne concentrations of silver, nickel, and iron were found both in the employee's personal breathing zone and area samples during reactor cleaning. At the completion of this initial survey, it was suggested that a flanged attachment be added to the local exhaust ventilation system.  NIOSH re-evaluated the facility in December 2011 to assess worker exposures following an increase in production rates. This study included a fully comprehensive emissions, exposure, and engineering control evaluation of the entire process. This study made use of the nanoparticle exposure assessment technique (NEAT 2.0). Data obtained from filter-based samples and direct reading instruments indicate that reactor cleanout increased the overall particle concentration in the immediate area. However, it does not appear that these concentrations affect areas outside of the production floor. As the distance between the reactor and the sample location increased, the observed particle number concentration decreased, creating a concentration gradient with respect to the reactor. The results of this study confirm that the flanged attachment on the local exhaust ventilation system served to decrease exposure potential.  Given the available toxicological data of the metals evaluated, caution is warranted. One should always keep in mind that occupational exposure levels were not developed specifically for nanoscale particles. With data suggesting that certain nanoparticles may be more toxic than the larger counterparts of the same material; employers should attempt to control emissions of these particles at the source

  15. Thermally activated reaction–diffusion-controlled chemical bulk reactions of gases and solids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Möller

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The chemical kinetics of the reaction of thin films with reactive gases is investigated. The removal of thin films using thermally activated solid–gas to gas reactions is a method to in-situ control deposition inventory in vacuum and plasma vessels. Significant scatter of experimental deposit removal rates at apparently similar conditions was observed in the past, highlighting the need for understanding the underlying processes. A model based on the presence of reactive gas in the films bulk and chemical kinetics is presented. The model describes the diffusion of reactive gas into the film and its chemical interaction with film constituents in the bulk using a stationary reaction–diffusion equation. This yields the reactive gas concentration and reaction rates. Diffusion and reaction rate limitations are depicted in parameter studies. Comparison with literature data on tokamak co-deposit removal results in good agreement of removal rates as a function of pressure, film thickness and temperature.

  16. Development of a Dynamic Engine Brake Model for Control Purposes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seykens, X.L.J.; Baert, R.S.G.; Willems, F.P.T.; Vink, W.; van den Heuvel, I.T.M.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents the extension of an existing mean value dynamic engine model with new models for the combination of a compression release brake and an exhaust valve brake. The focus is on the prediction of engine brake torque, exhaust gas temperatures and mass flow rates. The implemented models

  17. Development of a dynamic engine brake model for control purposes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seykens, X.L.J.; Baert, R.S.G.; Willems, F.P.T.; Vink, W.; van den Heuvel, I.T.M.; Corde, G.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the extension of an existing mean value dynamic engine model with new models for the combination of a compression release brake and an exhaust valve brake. The focus is on the prediction of engine brake torque, exhaust gas temperatures and mass flow rates. The implemented models

  18. Towards a Controlled Vocabulary on Software Engineering Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizard, Sebastián; Vallespir, Diego

    2017-01-01

    Software engineering is the discipline that develops all the aspects of the production of software. Although there are guidelines about what topics to include in a software engineering curricula, it is usually unclear which are the best methods to teach them. In any science discipline the construction of a classification schema is a common…

  19. Design of an Adaptive-Neural Network Attitude Controller of a Satellite using Reaction Wheels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Ajorkar

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, an adaptive attitude control algorithm is developed based on neural network for a satellite using four reaction wheels in a tetrahedron configuration. Then, an attitude control based on feedback linearization control has been designed and uncertainties in the moment of inertia matrix and disturbances torque have been considered. In order to eliminate the effect of these uncertainties, a multilayer neural network with back-propagation law is designed. In this structure, the parameters of the moment of inertia matrix and external disturbances are estimated and used in feedback linearization control law. Finally, the performance of the designed attitude controller is investigated by several simulations.

  20. Resetting the Growth Engines of the BRICS Countries as a Reaction to the Global Crisis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iulia Monica Oehler-Șincai

    2013-01-01

    up exports and FDI as engines of economic growth, the administrative bodies at macro and microeconomic levels understood that the internal demand represents a complementary source of growth. In contrast with the most developed countries, which intensely resorted to austerity measures, the BRICS were able to adopt stimulus measures. Such Keynesian moves were possible, as the emerging countries entered the global crisis with strong macroeconomic and financial positions. As a matter of fact, the world financial and economic crisis erupted in a moment considered by the international experts as the “most prosperous” for these countries. The general measures adopted in order to stimulate the economy in the field of fiscal policy and monetary policy were combined with specific, sectoral ones. Such measures managed even to attenuate the negative effects of the global crisis at social level. Infrastructure development though public investment projects is used by the BRICS governments as one of the principal means to stimulate economic growth and jobs creation. Our paper concludes that, for the BRICS countries, the classical engines for economic growth like exports and inward FDI are complemented by additional growth engines: internal demand (spurred by the high level of remittances from abroad, the outward FDI, innovation and infrastructure development.

  1. Design and Demonstration of Emergency Control Modes for Enhanced Engine Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuan; Litt, Jonathan S.; Guo, Ten-Huei

    2013-01-01

    A design concept is presented for developing control modes that enhance aircraft engine performance during emergency flight scenarios. The benefits of increased engine performance to overall vehicle survivability during these situations may outweigh the accompanied elevated risk of engine failure. The objective involves building control logic that can consistently increase engine performance beyond designed maximum levels based on an allowable heightened probability of failure. This concept is applied to two previously developed control modes: an overthrust mode that increases maximum engine thrust output and a faster response mode that improves thrust response to dynamic throttle commands. This paper describes the redesign of these control modes and presents simulation results demonstrating both enhanced engine performance and robust maintenance of the desired elevated risk level.

  2. Genetic control of the angular leaf spot reaction in common bean leaves and pods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerônimo Constantino Borel

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Information about genetic control of plant reaction to pathogens is essential in plant breeding programs focusing resistance. This study aimed to obtain information about genetic control of the angular leaf spot reaction in leaves and pods from common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. line ESAL 686. This line was crossed with cultivars Jalo EEP 558 (resistant, Cornell 49-242 (resistant and Carioca MG (susceptible. Generations F1, F2 and backcrosses (BC11 and BC21 were obtained. In the dry season (2009, parents and respective populations were evaluated for angular leaf spot reaction under field conditions. Disease severity was evaluated on leaves and pods using diagrammatic scales. Severity scores were obtained and mean and variance genetic components were estimated for both. Segregation of F2 generation was analyzed for some crosses. Different genes control angular leaf spot reaction in leaves and pods. Mean and variance components showed predominance of additive effects. Heritability was high, however, was greater on pods than on leaves which indicated that leaf reaction is more influenced by the environment.

  3. The Maillard reaction and its control during food processing. The potential of emerging technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeger, H; Janositz, A; Knorr, D

    2010-06-01

    The Maillard reaction between reducing sugars and amino acids is a common reaction in foods which undergo thermal processing. Desired consequences like the formation of flavor and brown color of some cooked foods but also the destruction of essential amino acids and the production of anti-nutritive compounds require the consideration of the Maillard reaction and relevant mechanisms for its control. This paper aims to exemplify the recent advances in food processing with regard to the controllability of heat-induced changes in the food quality. Firstly, improved thermal technologies, such as ohmic heating, which allows direct heating of the product and overcoming the heat transfer limitations of conventional thermal processing are presented in terms of their applicability to reduce the thermal exposure during food preservation. Secondly, non-thermal technologies such as high hydrostatic pressure and pulsed electric fields and their ability to extend the shelf life of food products without the application of heat, thus also preserving the quality attributes of the food, will be discussed. Finally, an innovative method for the removal of Maillard reaction substrates in food raw materials by the application of pulsed electric field cell disintegration and extraction as well as enzymatic conversion is presented in order to demonstrate the potential of the combination of processes to control the occurrence of the Maillard reaction in food processing. (c) 2009 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Controlling Chemical Reactions in Confined Environments: Water Dissociation in MOF-74

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika M. A. Fuentes-Fernandez

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The confined porous environment of metal organic frameworks (MOFs is an attractive system for studying reaction mechanisms. Compared to flat oxide surfaces, MOFs have the key advantage that they exhibit a well-defined structure and present significantly fewer challenges in experimental characterization. As an example of an important reaction, we study here the dissociation of water—which plays a critical role in biology, chemistry, and materials science—in MOFs and show how the knowledge of the structure in this confined environment allows for an unprecedented level of understanding and control. In particular, combining in-situ infrared spectroscopy and first-principles calculations, we show that the water dissociation reaction can be selectively controlled inside Zn-MOF-74 by alcohol, through both chemical and physical interactions. Methanol is observed to speed up water dissociation by 25% to 100%, depending on the alcohol partial pressure. On the other hand, co-adsorption of isopropanol reduces the speed of the water reaction, due mostly to steric interactions. In addition, we also investigate the stability of the product state after the water dissociation has occurred and find that the presence of additional water significantly stabilizes the dissociated state. Our results show that precise control of reactions within nano-porous materials is possible, opening the way for advances in fields ranging from catalysis to electrochemistry and sensors.

  5. Optimization of Aero Engine Acceleration Control in Combat State Based on Genetic Algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jie; Fan, Ding; Sreeram, Victor

    2012-03-01

    In order to drastically exploit the potential of the aero engine and improve acceleration performance in the combat state, an on-line optimized controller based on genetic algorithms is designed for an aero engine. For testing the validity of the presented control method, detailed joint simulation tests of the designed controller and the aero engine model are performed in the whole flight envelope. Simulation test results show that the presented control algorithm has characteristics of rapid convergence speed, high efficiency and can fully exploit the acceleration performance potential of the aero engine. Compared with the former controller, the designed on-line optimized controller (DOOC) can improve the security of the acceleration process and greatly enhance the aero engine thrust in the whole range of the flight envelope, the thrust increases an average of 8.1% in the randomly selected working states. The plane which adopts DOOC can acquire better fighting advantage in the combat state.

  6. Stimulation of a turbofan engine for evaluation of multivariable optimal control concepts. [(computerized simulation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seldner, K.

    1976-01-01

    The development of control systems for jet engines requires a real-time computer simulation. The simulation provides an effective tool for evaluating control concepts and problem areas prior to actual engine testing. The development and use of a real-time simulation of the Pratt and Whitney F100-PW100 turbofan engine is described. The simulation was used in a multi-variable optimal controls research program using linear quadratic regulator theory. The simulation is used to generate linear engine models at selected operating points and evaluate the control algorithm. To reduce the complexity of the design, it is desirable to reduce the order of the linear model. A technique to reduce the order of the model; is discussed. Selected results between high and low order models are compared. The LQR control algorithms can be programmed on digital computer. This computer will control the engine simulation over the desired flight envelope.

  7. A Comparison of Flood Control Standards for Reservoir Engineering for Different Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minglei Ren

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Across the globe, flood control standards for reservoir engineering appear different due to various deciding factors such as flood features, society, economy, culture, morality, politics, and technology resources, etc. This study introduces an in-depth comparison of flood control standards for reservoir engineering for different countries. After the comparison and analysis, it is concluded that the determination of flood control standards is related to engineering grade, dam type, dam height, and the hazard to downstream after dam-breaking, etc. Each country should adopt practical flood control standards according to the characteristics of local reservoir engineering. The constitutive flood control standards should retain certain flexibility in the basis of constraint force. This review could offer a reference for developing countries in the enactment of flood control standards for reservoir engineering.

  8. Self-assembled monolayer exchange reactions as a tool for channel interface engineering in low-voltage organic thin-film transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenz, Thomas; Schmaltz, Thomas; Novak, Michael; Halik, Marcus

    2012-10-02

    In this work, we compared the kinetics of monolayer self-assembly long-chained carboxylic acids and phosphonic acids on thin aluminum oxide surfaces and investigated their dielectric properties in capacitors and low-voltage organic thin-film transistors. Phosphonic acid anchor groups tend to substitute carboxylic acid molecules on aluminum oxide surfaces and thus allow the formation of mixed or fully exchanged monolayers. With different alkyl chain substituents (n-alkyl or fluorinated alkyl chains), the exchange reaction can be monitored as a function of time by static contact angle measurements. The threshold voltage in α,α'-dihexyl-sexithiophene thin-film transistors composed of such mixed layer dielectrics correlates with the exchange progress and can be tuned from negative to positive values or vice versa depending on the dipole moment of the alkyl chain substituents. The change in the dipole moment with increasing exchange time also shifts the capacitance of these devices. The rate constants for exchange reactions determined by the time-dependent shift of static contact angle, threshold voltage, and capacitance exhibit virtually the same value thus proving the exchange kinetics to be highly controllable. In general, the exchange approach is a powerful tool in interface engineering, displaying a great potential for tailoring of device characteristics.

  9. Non-Toxic Orbiter Maneuvering System (OMS) and Reaction Control System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurlbert, Eric A.; Nicholson, Leonard S. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    NASA is pursuing the technology and advanced development of a non-toxic (NT) orbital maneuvering system (OMS) and reaction control system (RCS) for shuttle upgrades, RLV, and reusable first stages. The primary objectives of the shuttle upgrades program are improved safety, improved reliability, reduced operations time and cost, improved performance or capabilities, and commonality with future space exploration needs. Non-Toxic OMS/RCS offers advantages in each of these categories. A non-toxic OMS/RCS eliminates the ground hazards and the flight safety hazards of the toxic and corrosive propellants. The cost savings for ground operations are over $24M per year for 7 flights, and the savings increase with increasing flight rate up to $44M per year. The OMS/RCS serial processing time is reduced from 65 days to 13 days. The payload capability can be increased up to 5100 Ibms. The non-toxic OMS/RCS also provides improved space station reboost capability up to 20 nautical miles over the current toxic system of 14 nautical miles. A NT OMS/RCS represents a clear advancement in the SOA over MMH/NTO. Liquid oxygen and ethanol are clean burning, high-density propellants that provide a high degree of commonality with other spacecraft subsystems including life support, power, and thermal control, and with future human exploration and development of space missions. The simple and reliable pressure-fed design uses sub-cooled liquid oxygen at 250 to 350 psia, which allows a propellant to remain cryogenic for longer periods of time. The key technologies are thermal insulation and conditioning techniques are used to maintain the sub-cooling. Phase I successfully defined the system architecture, designed an integrated OMS/RCS propellant tank, analyzed the feed system, built and tested the 870 lbf RCS thrusters, and tested the 6000 lbf OMS engine. Phase 11 is currently being planned for the development and test of full-scale prototype of the system in 1999 and 2000

  10. Reaction engineering analysis of Scenedesmus ovalternus in a flat-plate gas-lift photobioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koller, Anja Pia; Wolf, Lara; Weuster-Botz, Dirk

    2017-02-01

    Microalgal strains of the genus Scenedesmus are a promising resource for commercial biotechnological applications. The temperature-, pH- and light-dependent growth of Scenedesmus ovalternus has been investigated on a laboratory scale. Best batch process performance was obtained at 30°C, pH 8.0 and an incident photon flux density of 1300μmolphotonsm -2 s -1 using a flat-plate gas-lift photobioreactor. Highest growth rate (0.11h -1 ) and space-time yield (1.7±0.1g CDW L -1 d -1 ) were observed when applying these reaction conditions. Biomass concentrations of up to 7.5±0.1g CDW L -1 were achieved within six days (25.0±0.5g CDW m -2 d -1 ). The light-dependent growth kinetics of S. ovalternus was identified using Schuster's light transfer model and Andrews' light inhibition model (K S =545μmolphotonsm -2 s -1 ; K I =2744μmolphotonsm -2 s -1 ; μ max =0.21h -1 ). The optimal mean integral photon flux density for growth of S. ovalternus was estimated to be 1223μmolphotonsm -2 s -1 . Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Directing Reaction Pathways through Controlled Reactant Binding at Pd-TiO2 Interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Wang, Bingwen; Nikolla, Eranda; Medlin, J Will

    2017-06-01

    Recent efforts to design selective catalysts for multi-step reactions, such as hydrodeoxygenation (HDO), have emphasized the preparation of active sites at the interface between two materials having different properties. However, achieving precise control over interfacial properties, and thus reaction selectivity, has remained a challenge. Here, we encapsulated Pd nanoparticles (NPs) with TiO 2 films of regulated porosity to gain a new level of control over catalyst performance, resulting in essentially 100 % HDO selectivity for two biomass-derived alcohols. This catalyst also showed exceptional reaction specificity in HDO of furfural and m-cresol. In addition to improving HDO activity by maximizing the interfacial contact between the metal and metal oxide sites, encapsulation by the nanoporous oxide film provided a significant selectivity boost by restricting the accessible conformations of aromatics on the surface. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Engineering the Flow of Liquid Two-Phase Systems by Passive Noise Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zeyi; Kong, Tiantian; Zhou, Chunmei; Wang, Liqiu

    2018-02-01

    We investigate a passive noise-control approach to engineering the two-phase flow in a microfluidic coflow system. The presence or absence of the jet breakup is studied for two immiscible oil phases, in a straight microchannel (referred to as the J device in the main text), an expansion microchannel (the W device) and a microchannel with the expansion-contraction geometry (the S device), respectively. We show that the jet breaks into droplets, in the jetting regime and the dripping regime (also referred to as the widening-jetting regime) for the straight channel and expansion channel, respectively, while a stable long jet does not break for the expansion-contraction geometry. As the inner phase passes the expansion-contraction functional unit, the random noise on the interface is significantly reduced and the hydrodynamic instability is suppressed, for a range of experimental parameters including flow rates, device geometry, liquid viscosity, and interfacial tension. We further present scale-up devices with multiple noise-control units and achieve decimeter-long yet stable jets. Our simple, effective, and robust noise-control approach can benefit microfluidic applications such as microfiber fabrication, interface chemical reaction, and on-chip distance transportation.

  13. Cost-Effective Reciprocating Engine Emissions Control and Monitoring for E&P Field and Gathering Engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirby S. Chapman

    2004-01-01

    During the fourth reporting period, the project team investigated the Non-Selective Catalytic Reduction technologies that are in use on rich-burn four-stroke cycle engines. Several engines were instrumented and data collected to obtain a rich set of engine emissions and performance data. During the data collection, the performance of the catalyst under a variety of operating conditions was measured. This information will be necessary to specify a set of sensors that can then be used to reliably implement NSCRs as plausible technologies to reduce NOx emissions for four-stroke cycle engines used in the E&P industry. A complete summary all the technologies investigated to data is included in the report. For each technology, the summary includes a description of the process, the emission reduction that is to be expected, information on the cost of the technology, development status, practical considerations, compatibility with other air pollutant control technologies, and any references used to obtain the information.

  14. Technology Requirements and Development for Affordable High-Temperature Distributed Engine Controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-04

    long lasting, high temperature modules is to use high temperature electronics on ceramic modules. The electronic components are “ brazed ” onto the...Copyright © 2012 by ISA Technology Requirements and Development for Affordable High - Temperature Distributed Engine Controls Alireza Behbahani 1...with regards to high temperature capability. The Government and Industry Distributed Engine Controls Working Group (DECWG) [5] has been established

  15. Comparison of EGR-VTG control schemes for an EPA2010 heavy-duty diesel engine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Criens, C.H.A.; Willems, F.P.T.; Steinbuch, M.

    2011-01-01

    Next generation heavy-duty diesel engines require tight air path control to meet upcoming emission legislation with minimal fuel consumption. This study concentrates on the emission control of a 13l, 360 kW EGR diesel engine, which is compliant with EPA2010 emission targets. Currently, an

  16. Control of 12-Cylinder Camless Engine with Neural Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Ashhab Moh’d Sami

    2017-01-01

    The 12-cyliner camless engine breathing process is modeled with artificial neural networks (ANN’s). The inputs to the net are the intake valve lift (IVL) and intake valve closing timing (IVC) whereas the output of the net is the cylinder air charge (CAC). The ANN is trained with data collected from an engine simulation model which is based on thermodynamics principles and calibrated against real engine data. A method for adapting single-output feed-forward neural networks is proposed and appl...

  17. Local Government Planning Tool to Calculate Institutional and Engineering Control Costs for Brownfield Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    This cost calculator is designed as a guide for municipal or local governments to assist in calculating their expected costs of implementing and conducting long-term stewardship of institutional controls and engineering controls at brownfield properties.

  18. Optically Controlled Electron-Transfer Reaction Kinetics and Solvation Dynamics : Effect of Franck-Condon States

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gupta, Kriti; Patra, Aniket; Dhole, Kajal; Samanta, Alok Kumar; Ghosh, Swapan K.

    2017-01-01

    Experimental results for optically controlled electron-transfer reaction kinetics (ETRK) and nonequilibrium solvation dynamics (NESD) of Coumarin 480 in DMPC vesicle show their dependence on excitation wavelength λex. However, the celebrated Marcus theory and linear-response-theory-based approaches

  19. Use of Soft Computing Technologies for a Qualitative and Reliable Engine Control System for Propulsion Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevino, Luis; Brown, Terry; Crumbley, R. T. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The problem to be addressed in this paper is to explore how the use of Soft Computing Technologies (SCT) could be employed to improve overall vehicle system safety, reliability, and rocket engine performance by development of a qualitative and reliable engine control system (QRECS). Specifically, this will be addressed by enhancing rocket engine control using SCT, innovative data mining tools, and sound software engineering practices used in Marshall's Flight Software Group (FSG). The principle goals for addressing the issue of quality are to improve software management, software development time, software maintenance, processor execution, fault tolerance and mitigation, and nonlinear control in power level transitions. The intent is not to discuss any shortcomings of existing engine control methodologies, but to provide alternative design choices for control, implementation, performance, and sustaining engineering, all relative to addressing the issue of reliability. The approaches outlined in this paper will require knowledge in the fields of rocket engine propulsion (system level), software engineering for embedded flight software systems, and soft computing technologies (i.e., neural networks, fuzzy logic, data mining, and Bayesian belief networks); some of which are briefed in this paper. For this effort, the targeted demonstration rocket engine testbed is the MC-1 engine (formerly FASTRAC) which is simulated with hardware and software in the Marshall Avionics & Software Testbed (MAST) laboratory that currently resides at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, building 4476, and is managed by the Avionics Department. A brief plan of action for design, development, implementation, and testing a Phase One effort for QRECS is given, along with expected results. Phase One will focus on development of a Smart Start Engine Module and a Mainstage Engine Module for proper engine start and mainstage engine operations. The overall intent is to demonstrate that by

  20. 76 FR 67184 - California State Nonroad Engine Pollution Control Standards; Large Spark-Ignition (LSI) Engines...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-31

    ... are applicable to fleets comprised of four or more pieces of equipment powered by LSI engines... comment. If you send an email comment directly to EPA without going through http://www.regulations.gov...

  1. Transient performance simulation of aircraft engine integrated with fuel and control systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, C.; Li, Y.G.; Yang, B.Y.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A new performance simulation method for engine hydraulic fuel systems is introduced. • Time delay of engine performance due to fuel system model is noticeable but small. • The method provides details of fuel system behavior in engine transient processes. • The method could be used to support engine and fuel system designs. - Abstract: A new method for the simulation of gas turbine fuel systems based on an inter-component volume method has been developed. It is able to simulate the performance of each of the hydraulic components of a fuel system using physics-based models, which potentially offers more accurate results compared with those using transfer functions. A transient performance simulation system has been set up for gas turbine engines based on an inter-component volume (ICV) method. A proportional-integral (PI) control strategy is used for the simulation of engine controller. An integrated engine and its control and hydraulic fuel systems has been set up to investigate their coupling effect during engine transient processes. The developed simulation system has been applied to a model aero engine. The results show that the delay of the engine transient response due to the inclusion of the fuel system model is noticeable although relatively small. The developed method is generic and can be applied to any other gas turbines and their control and fuel systems.

  2. Reaming process improvement and control: An application of statistical engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Pavel; Genta, G.; Barbato, G.

    2012-01-01

    A reaming operation had to be performed within given technological and economical constraints. Process improvement under realistic conditions was the goal of a statistical engineering project, supported by a comprehensive experimental investigation providing detailed information on single...

  3. 14 CFR 33.28 - Engine control systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...) Applicability. These requirements are applicable to any system or device that is part of engine type design...) Aircraft-supplied data. Single failures leading to loss, interruption or corruption of aircraft-supplied...

  4. Design and Control of Chemical Grouting : Volume 3 - Engineering Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-04-01

    Recent improvements in the engineering practice of chemical grouting have provided increased confidence in this method of ground modification. Designers can significantly improve the success of chemical grouting by defining their grouting program obj...

  5. Combustion Property Analysis and Control System for the Dynamics of a Single Cylinder Diesel Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bambang Wahono

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Corresponding to global environment problems in recent year, the technology for reducing fuel consumption and exhaust gas emission of engine was needed. Simulation of transient engine response is needed to predict engine performance that frequently experience rapid changes of speed. The aim of this research is to develop a non-linear dynamic control model for direct injection single cylinder diesel engine which can simulate engine performance under transient conditions. In this paper, the combustion model with multistage injection and conducted experiments in the transient conditions to clarify the combustion characteristics was proposed. In order to perform the analysis of acceleration operation characteristics, it was built a Model Predictive Control (MPC to reproduce the characteristic values of the exhaust gas and fuel consumption from the control parameters in particular. Finally, MPC is an effective method to perform the analysis of characteristic in diesel engine under transient conditions.

  6. Model-Based Control of an Aircraft Engine using an Optimal Tuner Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, Joseph W.; Chicatelli, Amy; Garg, Sanjay

    2012-01-01

    This paper covers the development of a model-based engine control (MBEC) method- ology applied to an aircraft turbofan engine. Here, a linear model extracted from the Commercial Modular Aero-Propulsion System Simulation 40,000 (CMAPSS40k) at a cruise operating point serves as the engine and the on-board model. The on-board model is up- dated using an optimal tuner Kalman Filter (OTKF) estimation routine, which enables the on-board model to self-tune to account for engine performance variations. The focus here is on developing a methodology for MBEC with direct control of estimated parameters of interest such as thrust and stall margins. MBEC provides the ability for a tighter control bound of thrust over the entire life cycle of the engine that is not achievable using traditional control feedback, which uses engine pressure ratio or fan speed. CMAPSS40k is capable of modeling realistic engine performance, allowing for a verification of the MBEC tighter thrust control. In addition, investigations of using the MBEC to provide a surge limit for the controller limit logic are presented that could provide benefits over a simple acceleration schedule that is currently used in engine control architectures.

  7. A novel approach to sports concussion assessment: Computerized multilimb reaction times and balance control testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vartiainen, Matti V; Holm, Anu; Lukander, Jani; Lukander, Kristian; Koskinen, Sanna; Bornstein, Robert; Hokkanen, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Mild traumatic brain injuries (MTBI) or concussions often result in problems with attention, executive functions, and motor control. For better identification of these diverse problems, novel approaches integrating tests of cognitive and motor functioning are needed. The aim was to characterize minor changes in motor and cognitive performance after sports-related concussions with a novel test battery, including balance tests and a computerized multilimb reaction time test. The cognitive demands of the battery gradually increase from a simple stimulus response to a complex task requiring executive attention. A total of 113 male ice hockey players (mean age = 24.6 years, SD = 5.7) were assessed before a season. During the season, nine concussed players were retested within 36 hours, four to six days after the concussion, and after the season. A control group of seven nonconcussed players from the same pool of players with comparable demographics were retested after the season. Performance was measured using a balance test and the Motor Cognitive Test battery (MotCoTe) with multilimb responses in simple reaction, choice reaction, inhibition, and conflict resolution conditions. The performance of the concussed group declined at the postconcussion assessment compared to both the baseline measurement and the nonconcussed controls. Significant changes were observed in the concussed group for the multilimb choice reaction and inhibition tests. Tapping and balance showed a similar trend, but no statistically significant difference in performance. In sports-related concussions, complex motor tests can be valuable additions in assessing the outcome and recovery. In the current study, using subtasks with varying cognitive demands, it was shown that while simple motor performance was largely unaffected, the more complex tasks induced impaired reaction times for the concussed subjects. The increased reaction times may reflect the disruption of complex and integrative cognitive

  8. Localized temperature and chemical reaction control in nanoscale space by nanowire array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, C Yan; Li, Zhiyong; Williams, R Stanley; Lee, K-Cheol; Park, Inkyu

    2011-11-09

    We introduce a novel method for chemical reaction control with nanoscale spatial resolution based on localized heating by using a well-aligned nanowire array. Numerical and experimental analysis shows that each individual nanowire could be selectively and rapidly Joule heated for local and ultrafast temperature modulation in nanoscale space (e.g., maximum temperature gradient 2.2 K/nm at the nanowire edge; heating/cooling time chemical reactions such as polymer decomposition/cross-linking and direct and localized hydrothermal synthesis of metal oxide nanowires were demonstrated.

  9. Intelligent energy management control of vehicle air conditioning system coupled with engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khayyam, Hamid; Abawajy, Jemal; Jazar, Reza N.

    2012-01-01

    Vehicle Air Conditioning (AC) systems consist of an engine powered compressor activated by an electrical clutch. The AC system imposes an extra load to the vehicle's engine increasing the vehicle fuel consumption and emissions. Energy management control of the vehicle air conditioning is a nonlinear dynamic system, influenced by uncertain disturbances. In addition, the vehicle energy management control system interacts with different complex systems, such as engine, air conditioning system, environment, and driver, to deliver fuel consumption improvements. In this paper, we describe the energy management control of vehicle AC system coupled with vehicle engine through an intelligent control design. The Intelligent Energy Management Control (IEMC) system presented in this paper includes an intelligent algorithm which uses five exterior units and three integrated fuzzy controllers to produce desirable internal temperature and air quality, improved fuel consumption, low emission, and smooth driving. The three fuzzy controllers include: (i) a fuzzy cruise controller to adapt vehicle cruise speed via prediction of the road ahead using a Look-Ahead system, (ii) a fuzzy air conditioning controller to produce desirable temperature and air quality inside vehicle cabin room via a road information system, and (iii) a fuzzy engine controller to generate the required engine torque to move the vehicle smoothly on the road. We optimised the integrated operation of the air conditioning and the engine under various driving patterns and performed three simulations. Results show that the proposed IEMC system developed based on Fuzzy Air Conditioning Controller with Look-Ahead (FAC-LA) method is a more efficient controller for vehicle air conditioning system than the previously developed Coordinated Energy Management Systems (CEMS). - Highlights: ► AC interacts: vehicle, environment, driver components, and the interrelationships between them. ► Intelligent AC algorithm which uses

  10. The Effect of Modified Control Limits on the Performance of a Generic Commercial Aircraft Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csank, Jeffrey T.; May, Ryan D.; Gou, Ten-Huei; Litt, Jonathan S.

    2012-01-01

    This paper studies the effect of modifying the control limits of an aircraft engine to obtain additional performance. In an emergency situation, the ability to operate an engine above its normal operating limits and thereby gain additional performance may aid in the recovery of a distressed aircraft. However, the modification of an engine s limits is complex due to the risk of an engine failure. This paper focuses on the tradeoff between enhanced performance and risk of either incurring a mechanical engine failure or compromising engine operability. The ultimate goal is to increase the engine performance, without a large increase in risk of an engine failure, in order to increase the probability of recovering the distressed aircraft. The control limit modifications proposed are to extend the rotor speeds, temperatures, and pressures to allow more thrust to be produced by the engine, or to increase the rotor accelerations and allow the engine to follow a fast transient. These modifications do result in increased performance; however this study indicates that these modifications also lead to an increased risk of engine failure.

  11. Adaptive critic learning techniques for engine torque and air-fuel ratio control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Derong; Javaherian, Hossein; Kovalenko, Olesia; Huang, Ting

    2008-08-01

    A new approach for engine calibration and control is proposed. In this paper, we present our research results on the implementation of adaptive critic designs for self-learning control of automotive engines. A class of adaptive critic designs that can be classified as (model-free) action-dependent heuristic dynamic programming is used in this research project. The goals of the present learning control design for automotive engines include improved performance, reduced emissions, and maintained optimum performance under various operating conditions. Using the data from a test vehicle with a V8 engine, we developed a neural network model of the engine and neural network controllers based on the idea of approximate dynamic programming to achieve optimal control. We have developed and simulated self-learning neural network controllers for both engine torque (TRQ) and exhaust air-fuel ratio (AFR) control. The goal of TRQ control and AFR control is to track the commanded values. For both control problems, excellent neural network controller transient performance has been achieved.

  12. Pressure-Fed LOX/LCH4 Reaction Control System for Spacecraft: Transient Modeling and Thermal Vacuum Hotfire Test Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwell, Matthew J.; Hurlbert, Eric A.; Melcher, J. C.; Morehead, Robert L.

    2017-01-01

    An integrated cryogenic liquid oxygen, liquid methane (LOX/LCH4) reaction control system (RCS) was tested at NASA Glenn Research Center's Plum Brook Station in the Spacecraft Propulsion Research Facility (B-2) under vacuum and thermal vacuum conditions. The RCS is a subsystem of the Integrated Cryogenic Propulsion Test Article (ICPTA), a pressure-fed LOX/LCH4 propulsion system composed of a single 2,800 lbf main engine, two 28 lbf RCS engines, and two 7 lbf RCS engines. Propellants are stored in four 48 inch diameter 5083 aluminum tanks that feed both the main engine and RCS engines in parallel. Helium stored cryogenically in a composite overwrapped pressure vessel (COPV) flows through a heat exchanger on the main engine before being used to pressurize the propellant tanks to a design operating pressure of 325 psi. The ICPTA is capable of simultaneous main engine and RCS operation. The RCS engines utilize a coil-on-plug (COP) ignition system designed for operation in a vacuum environment, eliminating corona discharge issues associated with a high voltage lead. There are two RCS pods on the ICPTA, with two engines on each pod. One of these two engines is a heritage flight engine from Project Morpheus. Its sea level nozzle was removed and replaced by an 85:1 nozzle machined using Inconel 718, resulting in a maximum thrust of 28 lbf under altitude conditions. The other engine is a scaled down version of the 28 lbf engine, designed to match the core and overall mixture ratios as well as other injector characteristics. This engine can produce a maximum thrust of 7 lbf with an 85:1 nozzle that was additively manufactured using Inconel 718. Both engines are film-cooled and capable of limited duration gas-gas and gas-liquid operation, as well as steady-state liquid-liquid operation. Each pod contains one of each version, such that two engines of the same thrust level can be fired as a couple on opposite pods. The RCS feed system is composed of symmetrical 3/8 inch lines

  13. Neural Network Control of CSTR for Reversible Reaction Using Reverence Model Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duncan ALOKO

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, non-linear control of CSTR for reversible reaction is carried out using Neural Network as design tool. The Model Reverence approach in used to design ANN controller. The idea is to have a control system that will be able to achieve improvement in the level of conversion and to be able to track set point change and reject load disturbance. We use PID control scheme as benchmark to study the performance of the controller. The comparison shows that ANN controller out perform PID in the extreme range of non-linearity.This paper represents a preliminary effort to design a simplified neutral network control scheme for a class of non-linear process. Future works will involve further investigation of the effectiveness of thin approach for the real industrial chemical process

  14. Waterhammer modeling for the Ares I Upper Stage Reaction Control System cold flow development test article

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Jonathan Hunter

    The Upper Stage Reaction Control System provides in-flight three-axis attitude control for the Ares I Upper Stage. The system design must accommodate rapid thruster firing to maintain proper launch trajectory and thus allow for the possibility to pulse multiple thrusters simultaneously. Rapid thruster valve closure creates an increase in static pressure, known as waterhammer, which propagates throughout the propellant system at pressures exceeding nominal design values. A series of development tests conducted at Marshall Space Flight Center in 2009 were performed using a water-flow test article to better understand fluid characteristics of the Upper Stage Reaction Control System. A subset of the tests examined the waterhammer pressure and frequency response in the flight-representative system and provided data to anchor numerical models. This thesis presents a comparison of waterhammer test results with numerical model and analytical results. An overview of the flight system, test article, modeling and analysis are also provided.

  15. Combustion Model and Control Parameter Optimization Methods for Single Cylinder Diesel Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bambang Wahono

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This research presents a method to construct a combustion model and a method to optimize some control parameters of diesel engine in order to develop a model-based control system. The construction purpose of the model is to appropriately manage some control parameters to obtain the values of fuel consumption and emission as the engine output objectives. Stepwise method considering multicollinearity was applied to construct combustion model with the polynomial model. Using the experimental data of a single cylinder diesel engine, the model of power, BSFC, NOx, and soot on multiple injection diesel engines was built. The proposed method succesfully developed the model that describes control parameters in relation to the engine outputs. Although many control devices can be mounted to diesel engine, optimization technique is required to utilize this method in finding optimal engine operating conditions efficiently beside the existing development of individual emission control methods. Particle swarm optimization (PSO was used to calculate control parameters to optimize fuel consumption and emission based on the model. The proposed method is able to calculate control parameters efficiently to optimize evaluation item based on the model. Finally, the model which added PSO then was compiled in a microcontroller.

  16. Adaptive Gas Turbine Engine Control for Deterioration Compensation Due to Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litt, Jonathan S.; Parker, Khary I.; Chatterjee, Santanu

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents an ad hoc adaptive, multivariable controller tuning rule that compensates for a thrust response variation in an engine whose performance has been degraded though use and wear. The upset appears when a large throttle transient is performed such that the engine controller switches from low-speed to high-speed mode. A relationship was observed between the level of engine degradation and the overshoot in engine temperature ratio, which was determined to cause the thrust response variation. This relationship was used to adapt the controller. The method is shown to work very well up to the operability limits of the engine. Additionally, since the level of degradation can be estimated from sensor data, it would be feasible to implement the adaptive control algorithm on-line.

  17. The Application of Hardware in the Loop Testing for Distributed Engine Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, George L.; Culley, Dennis E.; Brand, Alex

    2016-01-01

    The essence of a distributed control system is the modular partitioning of control function across a hardware implementation. This type of control architecture requires embedding electronics in a multitude of control element nodes for the execution of those functions, and their integration as a unified system. As the field of distributed aeropropulsion control moves toward reality, questions about building and validating these systems remain. This paper focuses on the development of hardware-in-the-loop (HIL) test techniques for distributed aero engine control, and the application of HIL testing as it pertains to potential advanced engine control applications that may now be possible due to the intelligent capability embedded in the nodes.

  18. Mass transfer rate through liquid membranes: interfacial chemical reactions and diffusion as simultaneous permeability controlling factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danesi, P.R.; Horwitz, E.P.; Vandegrift, G.F.; Chiarizia, R.

    1981-01-01

    Equations describing the permeability of a liquid membrane to metal cations have been derived taking into account aqueous diffusion, membrane diffusion, and interfacial chemical reactions as simultaneous permeability controlling factors. Diffusion and chemical reactions have been coupled by a simple model analogous to the one previously described by us to represent liquid-liquid extraction kinetics. The derived equations, which make use of experimentally determined interfacial reaction mechanisms, qualitatively fit unexplained literature data regarding Cu 2+ transfer through liquid membranes. Their use to predict and optimize membrane permeability in practical separation processes by setting the appropriate concentration of the membrane carrier [LIX 64 (General Mills), a commercial β-hydroxy-oxime] and the pH of the aqueous copper feed solution is briefly discussed. 4 figures

  19. Reaction engineering analysis of the autotrophic energy metabolism of Clostridium aceticum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Alexander; Weuster-Botz, Dirk

    2017-12-01

    Acetogenesis with CO2:H2 or CO via the reductive acetyl-CoA pathway does not provide any net ATP formation in homoacetogenic bacteria. Autotrophic energy conservation is coupled to the generation of chemiosmotic H+ or Na+ gradients across the cytoplasm membrane using either a ferredoxin:NAD+ oxidoreductase (Rnf), a ferredoxin:H+ oxidoreductase (Ech) or substrate-level phosphorylation via cytochromes. The first isolated acetogenic bacterium Clostridium aceticum shows both cytochromes and Rnf complex, putting it into an outstanding position. Autotrophic batch processes with continuous gas supply were performed in fully controlled stirred-tank bioreactors to elucidate energy metabolism of C. aceticum. Varying the initial Na+ concentration in the medium showed sodium-dependent growth of C. aceticum with a growth optimum between 60 and 90 mM Na+. The addition of the Na+-selective ionophore ETH2120 or the protonophore CCCP or the H+/cation-antiporter monensin revealed that an H+ gradient is used as primary energy conservation mechanism, which strengthens the exceptional position of C. aceticum as acetogenic bacterium showing an H+-dependent energy conservation mechanism as well as Na+-dependent growth. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. A new model to predict diffusive self-heating during composting incorporating the reaction engineering approach (REA) framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putranto, Aditya; Chen, Xiao Dong

    2017-05-01

    During composting, self-heating may occur due to the exothermicities of the chemical and biological reactions. An accurate model for predicting maximum temperature is useful in predicting whether the phenomena would occur and to what extent it would have undergone. Elevated temperatures would lead to undesirable situations such as the release of large amount of toxic gases or sometimes would even lead to spontaneous combustion. In this paper, we report a new model for predicting the profiles of temperature, concentration of oxygen, moisture content and concentration of water vapor during composting. The model, which consists of a set of equations of conservation of heat and mass transfer as well as biological heating term, employs the reaction engineering approach (REA) framework to describe the local evaporation/condensation rate quantitatively. A good agreement between the predicted and experimental data of temperature during composting of sewage sludge is observed. The modeling indicates that the maximum temperature is achieved after some 46weeks of composting. Following this period, the temperature decreases in line with a significant decrease in moisture content and a tremendous increase in concentration of water vapor, indicating the massive cooling effect due to water evaporation. The spatial profiles indicate that the maximum temperature is approximately located at the middle-bottom of the compost piles. Towards the upper surface of the piles, the moisture content and concentration of water vapor decreases due to the moisture transfer to the surrounding. The newly proposed model can be used as reliable simulation tool to explore several geometry configurations and operating conditions for avoiding elevated temperature build-up and self-heating during industrial composting. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.