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Sample records for reaction centers isolated

  1. Isolated photosystem I reaction centers on a functionalized gated high electron mobility transistor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliza, Sazia A; Lee, Ida; Tulip, Fahmida S; Mostafa, Salwa; Greenbaum, Elias; Ericson, M Nance; Islam, Syed K

    2011-09-01

    In oxygenic plants, photons are captured with high quantum efficiency by two specialized reaction centers (RC) called Photosystem I (PS I) and Photosystem II (PS II). The captured photon triggers rapid charge separation and the photon energy is converted into an electrostatic potential across the nanometer-scale (~6 nm) reaction centers. The exogenous photovoltages from a single PS I RC have been previously measured using the technique of Kelvin force probe microscopy (KFM). However, biomolecular photovoltaic applications require two-terminal devices. This paper presents for the first time, a micro-device for detection and characterization of isolated PS I RCs. The device is based on an AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) structure. AlGaN/GaN HEMTs show high current throughputs and greater sensitivity to surface charges compared to other field-effect devices. PS I complexes immobilized on the floating gate of AlGaN/GaN HEMTs resulted in significant changes in the device characteristics under illumination. An analytical model has been developed to estimate the RCs of a major orientation on the functionalized gate surface of the HEMTs. © 2011 IEEE

  2. Isolated Photosystem I Reaction Centers on a Functionalized Gated High Electron Mobility Transistor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eliza, Sazia A. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Lee, Ida [ORNL; Tulip, Fahmida S [ORNL; Islam, Syed K [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Mostafa, Salwa [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Greenbaum, Elias [ORNL; Ericson, Milton Nance [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    In oxygenic plants, photons are captured with high quantum efficiency by two specialized reaction centers (RC) called Photosystem I (PS I) and Photosystem II (PS II). The captured photon triggers rapid charge separation and the photon energy is converted into an electrostatic potential across the nanometer-scale nm reaction centers. The exogenous photovoltages from a single PS I RC have been previously measured using the technique of Kelvin force probe microscopy (KFM). However, biomolecular photovoltaic applications require two-terminal devices. This paper presents for the first time, a micro-device for detection and characterization of isolated PS I RCs. The device is based on an AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) structure. AlGaN/GaN HEMTs show high current throughputs and greater sensitivity to surface charges compared to other field-effect devices. PS I complexes immobilized on the floating gate of AlGaN/GaN HEMTs resulted in significant changes in the device characteristics under illumination. An analytical model has been developed to estimate the RCs of a major orientation on the functionalized gate surface of the HEMTs.

  3. Purification and spectroscopic characterization of photosystem II reaction center complexes isolated with or without Triton X-100.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijckelhoff, C.; van Roon, H.; Groot, M.L.; van Grondelle, R.; Dekker, J.P.

    1996-01-01

    The pigment composition of the isolated photosystem II reaction center complex in its most stable and pure form currently is a matter of considerable debate. In this contribution, we present a new method based on a combination of gel filtration chromatography and diode array detection to analyze the

  4. Nuclear Reaction Data Centers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLane, V.; Nordborg, C.; Lemmel, H.D.; Manokhin, V.N.

    1988-01-01

    The cooperating Nuclear Reaction Data Centers are involved in the compilation and exchange of nuclear reaction data for incident neutrons, charged particles and photons. Individual centers may also have services in other areas, e.g., evaluated data, nuclear structure and decay data, reactor physics, nuclear safety; some of this information may also be exchanged between interested centers. 20 refs., 1 tab

  5. Equilibration kinetics in isolated and membrane-bound photosynthetic reaction centers upon illumination: a method to determine the photoexcitation rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzo, Anthony J; Goushcha, Alexander O; Barabash, Yuri M; Kharkyanen, Valery N; Scott, Gary W

    2009-07-01

    Kinetics of electron transfer, following variation of actinic light intensity, for photosynthetic reaction centers (RCs) of purple bacteria (isolated and membrane-bound) were analyzed by measuring absorbance changes in the primary photoelectron donor absorption band at 865 nm. The bleaching of the primary photoelectron donor absorption band in RCs, following a sudden increase of illumination from the dark to an actinic light intensity of I(exp), obeys a simple exponential law with the rate constant alphaI(exp) + k(rec), in which alpha is a parameter relating the light intensity, measured in mW/cm(2), to a corresponding theoretical rate in units of reciprocal seconds, and k(rec) is the effective rate constant of the charge recombination in the photosynthetic RCs. In this work, a method for determining the alpha parameter value is developed and experimentally verified for isolated and membrane-bound RCs, allowing for rigorous modeling of RC macromolecule dynamics under varied photoexcitation conditions. Such modeling is necessary for RCs due to alterations of the forward photoexcitation rates and relaxation rates caused by illumination history and intramolecular structural dynamics effects. It is demonstrated that the classical Bouguer-Lambert-Beer formalism can be applied for the samples with relatively low scattering, which is not necessarily the case with strongly scattering media or high light intensity excitation.

  6. Model photo reaction centers via genetic engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhiyu Wang; DiMagno, T.J.; Popov, M.; Norris, J.R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)]|[Chicago Univ., IL (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Chikin Chan; Fleming, G. [Chicago Univ., IL (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Jau Tang; Hanson, D.; Schiffer, M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1992-12-31

    A series of reaction centers of Rhodococcus capsulatus isolated from a set of mutated organisms modified by site-directed mutagenesis at residues M208 and L181 are described. Changes in the amino acid at these sites affect both the energetics of the systems as well as the chemical kinetics for the initial ET event. Two empirical relations among the different mutants for the reduction potential and the ET rate are presented.

  7. Model photo reaction centers via genetic engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhiyu Wang; DiMagno, T.J.; Popov, M.; Norris, J.R. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States) Chicago Univ., IL (United States). Dept. of Chemistry); Chikin Chan; Fleming, G. (Chicago Univ., IL (United States). Dept. of Chemistry); Jau Tang; Hanson, D.; Schiffer, M. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States))

    1992-01-01

    A series of reaction centers of Rhodococcus capsulatus isolated from a set of mutated organisms modified by site-directed mutagenesis at residues M208 and L181 are described. Changes in the amino acid at these sites affect both the energetics of the systems as well as the chemical kinetics for the initial ET event. Two empirical relations among the different mutants for the reduction potential and the ET rate are presented.

  8. Langmuir-Blodgett and X-ray diffraction studies of isolated photosystem II reaction centers in monolayers and multilayers: physical dimensions of the complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uphaus, R A; Fang, J Y; Picorel, R; Chumanov, G; Wang, J Y; Cotton, T M; Seibert, M

    1997-04-01

    The photosystem II (PSII) reaction center (RC) is a hydrophobic intrinsic protein complex that drives the water-oxidation process of photosynthesis. Unlike the bacterial RC complex, an X-ray crystal structure of the PSII RC is not available. In order to determine the physical dimensions of the isolated PSII RC complex, we applied Langmuir techniques to determine the cross-sectional area of an isolated RC in a condensed monolayer film. Low-angle X-ray diffraction results obtained by examining Langmuir-Blodgett multilayer films of alternating PSII RC/Cd stearate monolayers were used to determine the length (or height; z-direction, perpendicular to the plane of the original membrane) of the complex. The values obtained for a PSII RC monomer were 26 nm2 and 4.8 nm, respectively, and the structural integrity of the RC in the multilayer film was confirmed by several approaches. Assuming a cylindrical-type RC structure, the above dimensions lead to a predicted volume of about 125 nm3. This value is very close to the expected volume of 118 nm3, calculated from the known molecular weight and partial specific volume of the PSII RC proteins. This same type of comparison was also made with the Rhodobacter sphaeroides RC based on published data, and we conclude that the PSII RC is much shorter in length and has a more regular solid geometric structure than the bacterial RC. Furthermore, the above dimensions of the PSII RC and those of PSII core (RC plus proximal antenna) proteins protruding outside the plane of the PSII membrane into the lumenal space as imaged by scanning tunneling microscopy (Seibert, Aust. J. Pl. Physiol. 22, 161-166, 1995) fit easily into the known dimensions of the PSII core complex visualized by others as electron-density projection maps. From this we conclude that the in situ PSII core complex is a dimeric structure containing two copies of the PSII RC.

  9. The three-dimensional structures of bacterial reaction centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, T L; Williams, J C; Allen, J P

    2014-05-01

    This review presents a broad overview of the research that enabled the structure determination of the bacterial reaction centers from Blastochloris viridis and Rhodobacter sphaeroides, with a focus on the contributions from Duysens, Clayton, and Feher. Early experiments performed in the laboratory of Duysens and others demonstrated the utility of spectroscopic techniques and the presence of photosynthetic complexes in both oxygenic and anoxygenic photosynthesis. The laboratories of Clayton and Feher led efforts to isolate and characterize the bacterial reaction centers. The availability of well-characterized preparations of pure and stable reaction centers allowed the crystallization and subsequent determination of the structures using X-ray diffraction. The three-dimensional structures of reaction centers revealed an overall arrangement of two symmetrical branches of cofactors surrounded by transmembrane helices from the L and M subunits, which also are related by the same twofold symmetry axis. The structure has served as a framework to address several issues concerning bacterial photosynthesis, including the directionality of electron transfer, the properties of the reaction center-cytochrome c 2 complex, and the coupling of proton and electron transfer. Together, these research efforts laid the foundation for ongoing efforts to address an outstanding question in oxygenic photosynthesis, namely the molecular mechanism of water oxidation.

  10. Bio-Photoelectrochemical Solar Cells Incorporating Reaction Center and Reaction Center Plus Light Harvesting Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaghoubi, Houman

    Harvesting solar energy can potentially be a promising solution to the energy crisis now and in the future. However, material and processing costs continue to be the most important limitations for the commercial devices. A key solution to these problems might lie within the development of bio-hybrid solar cells that seeks to mimic photosynthesis to harvest solar energy and to take advantage of the low material costs, negative carbon footprint, and material abundance. The bio-photoelectrochemical cell technologies exploit biomimetic means of energy conversion by utilizing plant-derived photosystems which can be inexpensive and ultimately the most sustainable alternative. Plants and photosynthetic bacteria harvest light, through special proteins called reaction centers (RCs), with high efficiency and convert it into electrochemical energy. In theory, photosynthetic RCs can be used in a device to harvest solar energy and generate 1.1 V open circuit voltage and ~1 mA cm-2 short circuit photocurrent. Considering the nearly perfect quantum yield of photo-induced charge separation, efficiency of a protein-based solar cell might exceed 20%. In practice, the efficiency of fabricated devices has been limited mainly due to the challenges in the electron transfer between the protein complex and the device electrodes as well as limited light absorption. The overarching goal of this work is to increase the power conversion efficiency in protein-based solar cells by addressing those issues (i.e. electron transfer and light absorption). This work presents several approaches to increase the charge transfer rate between the photosynthetic RC and underlying electrode as well as increasing the light absorption to eventually enhance the external quantum efficiency (EQE) of bio-hybrid solar cells. The first approach is to decrease the electron transfer distance between one of the redox active sites in the RC and the underlying electrode by direct attachment of the of protein complex

  11. Enriched reaction center preparation from green photosynthetic bacteria. [Chlorobium limicola

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olson, J M; Giddings, Jr, T H; Shaw, E K

    1976-01-01

    Bacteriochlorophyll a reaction-center complex I from Chlorobium limicola f. thiosulfatophilum 6230 (Tassajara) was incubated in 2 M guanidine . HCl and then chromatographed on cross-linked dextran or agarose gel. Two principal components were separated: a larger component with photochemical activity (bacteriochlorophyll a reaction-center complex II) and a smaller component without activity (bacteriochlorophyll a protein). Complex II contains carotenoid, bacteriochlorophyll a, reaction center(s), and cytochromes b and c, but lacks the well characterized bacteriochlorophyll a protein contained in Complex I. Complex II carries out a light-induced reduction of cytochrome b along with an oxidation of cytochrome c.

  12. Matrix isolation as a tool for studying interstellar chemical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, David W.; Ortman, Bryan J.; Hauge, Robert H.; Margrave, John L.

    1989-01-01

    Since the identification of the OH radical as an interstellar species, over 50 molecular species were identified as interstellar denizens. While identification of new species appears straightforward, an explanation for their mechanisms of formation is not. Most astronomers concede that large bodies like interstellar dust grains are necessary for adsorption of molecules and their energies of reactions, but many of the mechanistic steps are unknown and speculative. It is proposed that data from matrix isolation experiments involving the reactions of refractory materials (especially C, Si, and Fe atoms and clusters) with small molecules (mainly H2, H2O, CO, CO2) are particularly applicable to explaining mechanistic details of likely interstellar chemical reactions. In many cases, matrix isolation techniques are the sole method of studying such reactions; also in many cases, complexations and bond rearrangements yield molecules never before observed. The study of these reactions thus provides a logical basis for the mechanisms of interstellar reactions. A list of reactions is presented that would simulate interstellar chemical reactions. These reactions were studied using FTIR-matrix isolation techniques.

  13. Mathematical Model of Synthesis Catalyst with Local Reaction Centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Derevich

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article considers a catalyst granule with a porous ceramic passive substrate and point active centers on which an exothermic synthesis reaction occurs. A rate of the chemical reaction depends on the temperature according to the Arrhenius law. Heat is removed from the pellet surface in products of synthesis due to heat transfer. In our work we first proposed a model for calculating the steady-state temperature of a catalyst pellet with local reaction centers. Calculation of active centers temperature is based on the idea of self-consistent field (mean-field theory. At first, it is considered that powers of the reaction heat release at the centers are known. On the basis of the found analytical solution, which describes temperature distribution inside the granule, the average temperature of the reaction centers is calculated, which then is inserted in the formula for heat release. The resulting system of transcendental algebraic equations is transformed into a system of ordinary differential equations of relaxation type and solved numerically to achieve a steady-state value. As a practical application, the article considers a Fischer-Tropsch synthesis catalyst granule with active cobalt metallic micro-particles. Cobalt micro-particles are the centers of the exothermic reaction of hydrocarbons macromolecular synthesis. Synthesis occurs as a result of absorption of the components of the synthesis gas on metallic cobalt. The temperature distribution inside the granule for a single local center and reaction centers located on the same granule diameter is found. It was found that there is a critical temperature of reactor exceeding of which leads to significant local overheating of the centers - thermal explosion. The temperature distribution with the local reaction centers is qualitatively different from the granule temperature, calculated in the homogeneous approximation. It is shown that, in contrast to the homogeneous approximation, the

  14. Molecular electronics of a single photosystem I reaction center: Studies with scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, I.; Lee, J.W.; Warmack, R.J.; Allison, D.P.; Greenbaum, E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-03-14

    Thylakoids and photosystem I (PSI) reaction centers were imaged by scanning tunneling microscopy. The thylakoids were isolated from spinach chloroplasts, and PSI reaction centers were extracted from thylakoid membranes. Because thylakoids are relatively thick nonconductors, they were sputter-coated with Pd/Au before imaging. PSI photosynthetic centers and chemically platinized PSI were investigated without sputter-coating. They were mounted on flat gold substrates that had been treated with mercaptoacetic acid to help bind the proteins. With tunneling spectroscopy, the PSI centers displayed a semiconductor-like response with a band gap of 1.8 eV. Lightly platinized (platinized for 1 hr) centers displayed diode-like conduction that resulted in dramatic contrast changes between images taken with opposite bias voltages. The electronic properties of this system were stable under long-term storage. 42 refs., 7 figs.

  15. Moessbauer spectroscopy on the reaction center of Rhodopseudomonas viridis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frolov, E.; Goldanskii, V.I.; Birk, A.; Parak, F.; Fritzsch, G.; Sinning, I.; Michel, H.

    1992-01-01

    Proteins called 'reaction centers' (RC) can be isolated from many photosynthetic bacteria. They have one non-heme iron in a quinone acceptor region. The RC of Rhodopseudomonas viridis contains an additional tightly bound tetra-heme cytochrome c subunit. The electronic configuration of both cytochrome and the non-heme iron has been studied in the crystallized protein by Moessbauer spectroscopy at different redox potentials, pH-values, and with an addition of o-phenanthroline. At high potentials (E h =+500 mV) all heme irons are in the low spin Fe 3+ -state, and at low potential (E h = 1 50 mV) they are low spin Fe 2+ with the same Moessbauer parameters for all hemes independent of pH. Redox titrations change the relative area of the reduced and oxidized states in agreement with other methods. The non-heme iron shows a high spin Fe 2+ configuration independent of E h and pH with parameters comparable to those of Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides. Surprisingly, there is strong evidence for another non-heme iron species in part of the molecules with a Fe 2+ low spin configuration. Incubation with o-phenanthroline decreases the relative Fe 2+ hs-area and increases the contribution of Fe 2+ ls-area. Above 210 K the mean square displacement, 2 >, of the RC-crystals increases more than linearly with temperature. This may be correlated with the increase of the electron transfer rate and indicates that intramolecular mobility influences the functional activity of a protein. (orig.)

  16. Functional type 2 photosynthetic reaction centers found in the rare bacterial phylum Gemmatimonadetes

    OpenAIRE

    Zeng, Yonghui; Feng, Fuying; Medová, Hana; Dean, Jason; Koblížek, Michal

    2014-01-01

    Photosynthesis is one of the most fundamental biological processes on Earth. To date, species capable of performing (bacterio)chlorophyll-based phototrophy have been reported in six bacterial phyla. Here we report a phototrophic bacterium belonging to the rare and understudied phylum Gemmatimonadetes. This strain, isolated from a freshwater lake in the Gobi Desert, contains fully functional photosynthetic reaction centers. Its photosynthesis genes appear to originate from an ancient horizonta...

  17. Quantum measurement corrections to CIDNP in photosynthetic reaction centers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kominis, Iannis K

    2013-01-01

    Chemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization is a signature of spin order appearing in many photosynthetic reaction centers. Such polarization, significantly enhanced above thermal equilibrium, is known to result from the nuclear spin sorting inherent in the radical pair mechanism underlying long-lived charge-separated states in photosynthetic reaction centers. We will show here that the recently understood fundamental quantum dynamics of radical-ion-pair reactions open up a new and completely unexpected pathway toward obtaining chemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization signals. The fundamental decoherence mechanism inherent in the recombination process of radical pairs is shown to produce nuclear spin polarizations of the order of 10 4 times (or more) higher than the thermal equilibrium value at the Earth's magnetic field relevant to natural photosynthesis. This opens up the possibility of a fundamentally new exploration of the biological significance of high nuclear polarizations in photosynthesis. (paper)

  18. Marshak Lectureship: Vibrational properties of isolated color centers in diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkauskas, Audrius

    In this talk we review our recent work on first-principles calculations of vibrational properties of isolated defect spin qubits and single photon emitters in diamond. These properties include local vibrational spectra, luminescence lineshapes, and electron-phonon coupling. They are key in understanding physical mechanisms behind spin-selective optical initialization and read-out, quantum efficiency of single-photon emitters, as well as in the experimental identification of as yet unknown centers. We first present the methodology to calculate and analyze vibrational properties of effectively isolated defect centers. We then apply the methodology to the nitrogen-vacancy and the silicon-vacancy centers in diamond. First-principles calculations yield important new insights about these important defects. Work performed in collaboration with M. W. Doherty, A. Gali, E. Londero, L. Razinkovas, and C. G. Van de Walle. Supported by the Research Council of Lithuania (Grant M-ERA.NET-1/2015).

  19. Conformational regulation of charge recombination reactions in a photosynthetic bacterial reaction center

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katona, Gergely; Snijder, Arjan; Gourdon, Pontus Emanuel

    2005-01-01

    In bright light the photosynthetic reaction center (RC) of Rhodobacter sphaeroides stabilizes the P(+)(870).Q(-)(A) charge-separated state and thereby minimizes the potentially harmful effects of light saturation. Using X-ray diffraction we report a conformational change that occurs within the cy...... the cytoplasmic domain of this RC in response to prolonged illumination with bright light. Our observations suggest a novel structural mechanism for the regulation of electron transfer reactions in photosynthesis....

  20. The Type 1 Homodimeric Reaction Center in Heliobacterium modesticaldum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golbeck, John [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    2018-01-15

    In this funding period, we (i) found that strong illumination of Heliobacterium modesticaldum cells results in saturation of the electron acceptor pool, leading to reduction of the acceptor side and the creation of a back-reacting state that gives rise to delayed fluorescence; (ii) noted that when the FX cluster is reduced in purified reaction centers, no electron transfer occurs beyond A0, even though a quinone is present; (iii) observed by photochemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization (photo-CIDNP) studies of whole cells of Heliobacterium mobilis that primary charge separation is retained even after conversion of the majority of BChl g to Chl aF. ; and (iv) purified a homogeneous preparation of reaction center cores, which led to promising crystallization trials to obtain a three-dimensional structure.

  1. A multi-pathway model for photosynthetic reaction center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin, M.; Shen, H. Z.; Yi, X. X.

    2016-01-01

    Charge separation occurs in a pair of tightly coupled chlorophylls at the heart of photosynthetic reaction centers of both plants and bacteria. Recently it has been shown that quantum coherence can, in principle, enhance the efficiency of a solar cell, working like a quantum heat engine. Here, we propose a biological quantum heat engine (BQHE) motivated by Photosystem II reaction center (PSII RC) to describe the charge separation. Our model mainly considers two charge-separation pathways which is more than that typically considered in the published literature. We explore how these cross-couplings increase the current and power of the charge separation and discuss the effects of multiple pathways in terms of current and power. The robustness of the BQHE against the charge recombination in natural PSII RC and dephasing induced by environments is also explored, and extension from two pathways to multiple pathways is made. These results suggest that noise-induced quantum coherence helps to suppress the influence of acceptor-to-donor charge recombination, and besides, nature-mimicking architectures with engineered multiple pathways for charge separations might be better for artificial solar energy devices considering the influence of environments.

  2. Electrostatic dominoes: long distance propagation of mutational effects in photosynthetic reaction centers of Rhodobacter capsulatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebban, P; Maróti, P; Schiffer, M; Hanson, D K

    1995-07-04

    Two point mutants from the purple bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus, both modified in the M protein of the photosynthetic reaction center, have been studied by flash-induced absorbance spectroscopy. These strains carry either the M231Arg --> Leu or M43ASN --> Asp mutations, which are located 9 and 15 A, respectively, from the terminal electron acceptor QB. In the wild-type Rb. sphaeroides structure, M231Arg is involved in a conserved salt bridge with H125Glu and H232Glu and M43Asn is located among several polar residues that form or surround the QB binding site. These substitutions were originally uncovered in phenotypic revertants isolated from the photosynthetically incompetent L212Glu-L213Asp --> Ala-Ala site-specific double mutant. As second-site suppressor mutations, they have been shown to restore the proton transfer function that is interrupted in the L212Ala-L213Ala double mutant. The electrostatic effects that are induced in reaction centers by the M231Arg --> Leu and M43Asn --> Asp substitutions are roughly the same in either the double-mutant or wild-type backgrounds. In a reaction center that is otherwise wild type in sequence, they decrease the free energy gap between the QA- and QB- states by 24 +/- 5 and 45 +/- 5 meV, respectively. The pH dependences of K2, the QA-QB QAQB- equilibrium constant, are altered in reaction centers that carry either of these substitutions, revealing differences in the pKas of titratable groups compared to the wild type.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Regulation of Germinal Center Reactions by B and T Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeonseok Chung

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Break of B cell tolerance to self-antigens results in the development of autoantibodies and, thus, leads to autoimmunity. How B cell tolerance is maintained during active germinal center (GC reactions is yet to be fully understood. Recent advances revealed several subsets of T cells and B cells that can positively or negatively regulate GC B cell responses in vivo. IL-21-producing CXCR5+ CD4+ T cells comprise a distinct lineage of helper T cells—termed follicular helper T cells (TFH—that can provide help for the development of GC reactions where somatic hypermutation and affinity maturation take place. Although the function of TFH cells is beneficial in generating high affinity antibodies against infectious agents, aberrant activation of TFH cell or B cell to self-antigens results in autoimmunity. At least three subsets of immune cells have been proposed as regulatory cells that can limit such antibody-mediated autoimmunity, including follicular regulatory T cells (TFR, Qa-1 restricted CD8+ regulatory T cells (CD8+TREG, and regulatory B cells (BREG. In this review, we will discuss our current understanding of GC B cell regulation with specific emphasis on the newly identified immune cell subsets involved in this process.

  4. Protein sequences and redox titrations indicate that the electron acceptors in reaction centers from heliobacteria are similar to Photosystem I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trost, J. T.; Brune, D. C.; Blankenship, R. E.

    1992-01-01

    Photosynthetic reaction centers isolated from Heliobacillus mobilis exhibit a single major protein on SDS-PAGE of 47 000 Mr. Attempts to sequence the reaction center polypeptide indicated that the N-terminus is blocked. After enzymatic and chemical cleavage, four peptide fragments were sequenced from the Heliobacillus mobilis apoprotein. Only one of these sequences showed significant specific similarity to any of the protein and deduced protein sequences in the GenBank data base. This fragment is identical with 56% of the residues, including both cysteines, found in highly conserved region that is proposed to bind iron-sulfur center Fx in the Photosystem I reaction center peptide that is the psaB gene product. The similarity to the psaA gene product in this region is 48%. Redox titrations of laser-flash-induced photobleaching with millisecond decay kinetics on isolated reaction centers from Heliobacterium gestii indicate a midpoint potential of -414 mV with n = 2 titration behavior. In membranes, the behavior is intermediate between n = 1 and n = 2, and the apparent midpoint potential is -444 mV. This is compared to the behavior in Photosystem I, where the intermediate electron acceptor A1, thought to be a phylloquinone molecule, has been proposed to undergo a double reduction at low redox potentials in the presence of viologen redox mediators. These results strongly suggest that the acceptor side electron transfer system in reaction centers from heliobacteria is indeed analogous to that found in Photosystem I. The sequence similarities indicate that the divergence of the heliobacteria from the Photosystem I line occurred before the gene duplication and subsequent divergence that lead to the heterodimeric protein core of the Photosystem I reaction center.

  5. Spectroscopic properties of reaction center pigments in photosystem II core complexes: revision of the multimer model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raszewski, Grzegorz; Diner, Bruce A; Schlodder, Eberhard; Renger, Thomas

    2008-07-01

    Absorbance difference spectra associated with the light-induced formation of functional states in photosystem II core complexes from Thermosynechococcus elongatus and Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 (e.g., P(+)Pheo(-),P(+)Q(A)(-),(3)P) are described quantitatively in the framework of exciton theory. In addition, effects are analyzed of site-directed mutations of D1-His(198), the axial ligand of the special-pair chlorophyll P(D1), and D1-Thr(179), an amino-acid residue nearest to the accessory chlorophyll Chl(D1), on the spectral properties of the reaction center pigments. Using pigment transition energies (site energies) determined previously from independent experiments on D1-D2-cytb559 complexes, good agreement between calculated and experimental spectra is obtained. The only difference in site energies of the reaction center pigments in D1-D2-cytb559 and photosystem II core complexes concerns Chl(D1). Compared to isolated reaction centers, the site energy of Chl(D1) is red-shifted by 4 nm and less inhomogeneously distributed in core complexes. The site energies cause primary electron transfer at cryogenic temperatures to be initiated by an excited state that is strongly localized on Chl(D1) rather than from a delocalized state as assumed in the previously described multimer model. This result is consistent with earlier experimental data on special-pair mutants and with our previous calculations on D1-D2-cytb559 complexes. The calculations show that at 5 K the lowest excited state of the reaction center is lower by approximately 10 nm than the low-energy exciton state of the two special-pair chlorophylls P(D1) and P(D2) which form an excitonic dimer. The experimental temperature dependence of the wild-type difference spectra can only be understood in this model if temperature-dependent site energies are assumed for Chl(D1) and P(D1), reducing the above energy gap from 10 to 6 nm upon increasing the temperature from 5 to 300 K. At physiological temperature, there are

  6. Bacteriological profile of burn wound isolates in a burns center of a tertiary hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amankwa Richcane

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the bacteriological profile and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of burn wound isolates.Methods: Swabs were taken from burn wound of patients admitted to Ward D2C and Burns Intensive Care Unit (BICU from December 2014 to November 2015. Samples were processed at the Microbiology Laboratory for identification and sensitivity. Bacteria isolated were identified using their morphological characteristics, Gram staining reaction and biochemical tests. The antimicrobial susceptibility testing was done using Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method. Questionnaires were also administered to study participants to obtain information on demography, kind of first aid received, antibiotics received prior to culture and sensitivity.Results: A total of 86 patients comprising 45 patients from Ward D2C and 41 from BICU participated in the study. Males were 51(59.3% and females 35 (40.7%. Age of participants ranged from 0–56+ years. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was the commonest pathogen isolated 26(30.2%, followed by Pseudomonas spp. 21(24.4%, Escherichia coli 17(19.8%, Klebsiella spp. 12(14.0%. Coagulase negative Staphylococcus accounted for 2(2.3%. Overall prevalence of infection in the study was 90.7%.Conclusions: Burn wound infection continues to be a major challenge in burn centers. Regular surveillance of commonly identified pathogens in the ward and their antimicrobial susceptibility will guide proper empiric selection of antibiotics for management of burn wounds.

  7. Nuclear Reaction Data File for Astrophysics (NRDF/A) in Hokkaido University Nuclear Reaction Data Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Kiyoshi; Kimura, Masaaki; Furutachi, Naoya; Makinaga, Ayano; Togashi, Tomoaki; Otuka, Naohiko

    2010-01-01

    The activities of the Japan Nuclear Reaction Data Centre is explained. The main task of the centre is data compilation of Japanese nuclear reaction data in collaboration of the International Network of Nuclear Reaction Data Centres. As one of recent activities, preparation of a new database (NRDF/A) and evaluation of astronuclear reaction data are reported. Collaboration in the nuclear data activities among Asian countries is proposed.

  8. Pathways and timescales of primary charge separation in the photosystem II reaction center as revealed by a simultaneous fit of time-resolved fluorescence and transient absorption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Novoderezhkin, V.I.; Andrizhiyevskaya, E.G.; Dekker, J.P.; van Grondelle, R.

    2005-01-01

    We model the dynamics of energy transfer and primary charge separation in isolated photosystem II (PSII) reaction centers. Different exciton models with specific site energies of the six core pigments and two peripheral chlorophylls (Chls) in combination with different charge transfer schemes have

  9. Chalcogenide metal centers for oxygen reduction reaction: Activity and tolerance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Yongjun; Gago, Aldo; Timperman, Laure; Alonso-Vante, Nicolas

    2011-01-01

    This mini-review summarizes materials design methods, oxygen reduction kinetics, tolerance to small organic molecules and fuel cell performance of chalcogenide metal catalysts, particularly, ruthenium (Ru x Se y ) and non-precious transition metals (M x X y : M = Co, Fe and Ni; X = Se and S). These non-platinum catalysts are potential alternatives to Pt-based catalysts because of their comparable catalytic activity (Ru x Se y ), low cost, high abundance and, in particular, a high tolerance to small organic molecules. Developing trends of synthesis methods, mechanism of oxygen reduction reaction and applications in direct alcohol fuel cells as well as the substrate effect are highlighted.

  10. SUSCEPTIBILITY OF RESPIRATORY ISOLATES OF STREPTOCOCCUS PNEUMONIAE ISOLATED FROM CHILDREN HOSPITALIZED IN THE CLINICAL CENTER NIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinić, Marina M; Mladenović Antić, Snezana; Kocić, Branislava; Stanković Dordević, Dobrila; Vrbić, Miodrag; Bogdanović, Milena

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is one of the most common causes of respiratory infections. The aim was to study the susceptibility to antimicrobial agents of respiratory isolates ofStreptococcus pneumoniae obtained from hospitalized children. A total of 190 respiratory pneumococcal isolates obtained from children aged from 0 to 14 years were isolated and identified by using standard microbiological methods. Susceptibility to oxacillin, erythromycin, clindamycin, tetracycline, cotrimoxazole, ofloxacin and rifampicin was tested by disc diffusion method. Minimal inhibitory concentrations for amoxicillin and ceftriaxone were determined by means of E test. The macrolide-resistant phenotype was detected by double disc diffusion test. All tested isolates were susceptible to amoxicillin and ceftriaxone. The minimal amoxicillin concentration inhibiting the growth of 50% of isolates and of 90% of isolates was 0.50 microg/ml and 1.0 microg/ml, respectively and the minimal ceftriaxone concentration inhibiting the growth of 50% of isolates and of 90% of isolates was 0.25 microg/ml and 0.50 microg/ml, respectively. Susceptibility to erythromycin and clindamycin was observed in 21.6% and 29.47% of isolates, respectively. The resistence to macrolides-M phenotype was detected in 10.07% of isolates and constitutive macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin phenotype (constitutive MLS phenotype) was found in 89.93% of isolates. All tested isolates were susceptible to ofloxacin and rifampicin. Amoxicillin could be the therapy of choice in pediatric practice. The macrolides should not be recommended for the empirical therapy of pneumococcal respiratory tract infection in our local area.

  11. 11. IAEA consultants' meeting of the nuclear reaction data centers. Obninsk, 7-11 October 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemmel, H.D.

    1992-03-01

    This report summarizes the 1991 co-ordination meeting in Obninsk, Russia, of the national and regional nuclear reaction data centers, convened by the IAEA at regular intervals. The main topics are: the international exchange of nuclear reaction data by means of the ''EXFOR'' system, and the further development of this system; the ''CINDA'' system as an international index and bibliography to neutron reaction data; the sharing of the workload for speedy and reliable nuclear data compilation; the exchanged and documentation of evaluated data libraries in ENDF format, with the goal of rendering data center services to data users in IAEA Member States by means of computer retrievals, online services and printed materials

  12. Photosynthetic antennas and reaction centers: Current understanding and prospects for improvement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blankenship, R.E. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States)

    1996-09-01

    A brief introduction to the principles, structures and kinetic processes that take place in natural photosynthetic reaction center complexes is presented. Energy is first collected by an antenna system, and is transferred to a reaction center complex where primary electron transfer takes place. Secondary reactions lead to oxidation of water and reduction of CO{sub 2} in some classes of organisms. Antenna systems are highly regulated to maximize energy collection efficiency while avoiding photodamage. Some areas that are presently not well understood are listed.

  13. Co-ordination of the nuclear reaction data centers. Report on an IAEA advisory group meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwerer, O.; Lemmel, H.D.

    1996-11-01

    This report summarizes the 1996 co-ordination meeting in Brookhaven, U.S.A., of the national and regional nuclear reaction data center, convened by the IAEA at regular intervals. The main topics are: the international exchange of nuclear reaction data by means of the ''EXFOR'' system, and the further development of this system; the ''CINDA'' system as an international index and bibliography to neutron reaction data; the sharing of the workload for speedy and reliable nuclear data compilation and data center services; the exchange and documentation of evaluated data libraries in ''ENDF'' format; the rapid advances of online electronic information technologies, with the goal of rendering data center services to data users in IAEA Member States by means of computer retrievals, online services and printed materials. The scope of data covers microscopic cross-sections and related parameters of nuclear reactions induced by neutrons, charged-particles and photons. (author). Refs, figs, tabs

  14. Co-ordination of the nuclear reactions data centers. Report on an IAEA advisory group meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pronyaev, V.G.; Schwerer, O.

    1998-07-01

    This report summarizes the 1998 co-ordination meeting at the IAEA Headquarters in Vienna of the regional, national and specialized nuclear reaction data centers, concerned by the IAEA at two-year intervals. The main topics are: the international exchange of nuclear reaction data by means of the ''EXFOR'' system, and the further development of this system; the ''CINDA'' system as an international index and bibliography to neutron reaction data; the sharing of the workload for speedy and reliable nuclear data compilation and data center services; the exchange and documentation of evaluated data libraries in ''ENDF'' format; the rapid advances of online electronic information technologies, with goal of rendering data center services to data users in IAEA Member States by means of computer retrievals, online services and printed materials. The scope of data covers microscopic cross-sections and related parameters of nuclear reactions induced by neutrons, charged-particles and photons. (author)

  15. Co-ordination of the nuclear reaction data centers. Report on an IAEA advisory group meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwerer, O; Lemmel, H D [eds.

    1996-11-01

    This report summarizes the 1996 co-ordination meeting in Brookhaven, U.S.A., of the national and regional nuclear reaction data center, convened by the IAEA at regular intervals. The main topics are: the international exchange of nuclear reaction data by means of the ``EXFOR`` system, and the further development of this system; the ``CINDA`` system as an international index and bibliography to neutron reaction data; the sharing of the workload for speedy and reliable nuclear data compilation and data center services; the exchange and documentation of evaluated data libraries in ``ENDF`` format; the rapid advances of online electronic information technologies, with the goal of rendering data center services to data users in IAEA Member States by means of computer retrievals, online services and printed materials. The scope of data covers microscopic cross-sections and related parameters of nuclear reactions induced by neutrons, charged-particles and photons. (author). Refs, figs, tabs.

  16. Co-ordination of the nuclear reactions data centers. Report on an IAEA advisory group meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pronyaev, V G; Schwerer, O [eds.

    1998-07-01

    This report summarizes the 1998 co-ordination meeting at the IAEA Headquarters in Vienna of the regional, national and specialized nuclear reaction data centers, concerned by the IAEA at two-year intervals. The main topics are: the international exchange of nuclear reaction data by means of the ``EXFOR`` system, and the further development of this system; the ``CINDA`` system as an international index and bibliography to neutron reaction data; the sharing of the workload for speedy and reliable nuclear data compilation and data center services; the exchange and documentation of evaluated data libraries in ``ENDF`` format; the rapid advances of online electronic information technologies, with goal of rendering data center services to data users in IAEA Member States by means of computer retrievals, online services and printed materials. The scope of data covers microscopic cross-sections and related parameters of nuclear reactions induced by neutrons, charged-particles and photons. (author) Refs, figs, tabs

  17. The breakdown of vinyl ethers as a two-center synchronous reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokidova, T. S.; Shestakov, A. F.

    2009-11-01

    The experimental data on the molecular decomposition of vinyl ethers of various structures to alkanes and the corresponding aldehydes or ketones in the gas phase were analyzed using the method of intersecting parabolas. The enthalpies and kinetic parameters of decomposition were calculated for 17 reactions. The breakdown of ethers is a two-center concerted reaction characterized by a very high classical potential barrier to the thermally neutral reaction (180-190 kJ/mol). The kinetic parameters (activation energies and rate constants) of back reactions of the formation of vinyl ethers in the addition of aldehydes or ketones to alkanes were calculated using the method of intersecting parabolas. The factors that influenced the activation energy of the decomposition and formation of ethers were discussed. Quantum-chemical calculations of several vinyl ether decomposition reactions were performed. Ether formation reactions were compared with the formation of unsaturated alcohols as competitive reactions, which can occur in the interaction of carbonyl compounds with alkenes.

  18. Reaction of common bean lines and aggressiveness of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, P H; Santos, J B; Lima, I A; Lara, L A C; Alves, F C

    2014-11-07

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the reaction of common bean lines to white mold, the aggressiveness of different Sclerotinia sclerotiorum isolates from various common bean production areas in Brazil, and comparison of the diallel and GGE (genotype main effect plus genotype-by-environment interaction) biplot analysis procedures via study of the line-by-isolate interaction. Eleven common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) lines derived from 3 backcross populations were used. Field experiments were performed in the experimental area of the Departamento de Biologia of the Universidade Federal de Lavras, Lavras, MG, Brazil, in the 2011 and 2012 dry crop season and 2011 winter crop season through a randomized block design with 3 replications. This study was also set up in a greenhouse. Inoculations were performed 28 days after sowing by means of the straw test method. The reaction of the bean lines to white mold was assessed according to a diagrammatic scale from 1 (plant without symptoms) to 9 (dead plant). Estimations of general reaction capacity (lines) and general aggressiveness capacity (isolates) indicated different horizontal levels of resistance in the lines and levels of aggressiveness in the isolates. Therefore, it was possible to select more resistant lines and foresee those crosses that are the most promising for increasing the level of resistance. It was also possible to identify the most aggressive isolates that were more efficient in distinguishing the lines. Both diallel and GGE biplot analyses were useful in identifying the genotypic values of lines and isolates.

  19. Energy transfer and reaction dynamics of matrix-isolated 1,2-difluoroethane-d4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raff, Lionel M.

    1990-09-01

    The molecular dynamics of vibrationally excited 1,2-difluoroethane-d4 isolated in Ar, Kr, and Xe matrices at 12 K are investigated using trajectory methods. The matrix model is an fcc crystal containing 125 unit cells with 666 atoms in a cubic (5×5×5) arrangement. It is assumed that 1,2-difluoroethane-d4 is held interstitially within the volume bounded by the innermost unit cell of the crystal. The transport effects of the bulk are simulated using the velocity reset method introduced by Riley, Coltrin, and Diestler [J. Chem. Phys. 88, 5934 (1988)]. The system potential is written as the separable sum of a lattice potential, a lattice-molecule interaction and a gas-phase potential for 1,2-difluoroethane. The first two of these are assumed to have pairwise form while the molecular potential is a modified form of the global potential previously developed for 1,2-difluoroethane [J. Phys. Chem. 91, 3266 (1987)]. Calculated sublimation energies for the pure crystals are in good accord with the experimental data. The distribution of metastable-state energies for matrix-isolated 1,2-difluoroethane-d4 is Gaussian in form. In krypton, the full width at half maximum for the distribution is 0.37 eV. For a total excitation energy of 6.314 eV, the observed dynamic processes are vibrational relaxation, orientational exchange, and four-center DF elimination reactions. The first of these processes is characterized by a near linear, first-order decay curve with rate coefficients in the range 1.30-1.48×1011 s-1. The average rates in krypton and xenon are nearly equal. The process is slightly slower in argon. The decay curves exhibit characteristic high-frequency oscillations that are generally seen in energy transfer studies. It is demonstrated that these oscillations are associated with the frequencies for intramolecular energy transfer so that the entire frequency spectrum for such transfer processes can be obtained from the Fourier transform of the decay curve. Orientational

  20. Resident Reactions to Person-Centered Communication by Long-Term Care Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savundranayagam, Marie Y; Sibalija, Jovana; Scotchmer, Emma

    2016-09-01

    Long-term care staff caregivers who are person centered incorporate the life history, preferences, and feelings of residents with dementia during care interactions. Communication is essential for person-centered care. However, little is known about residents' verbal reactions when staff use person-centered communication. Accordingly, this study investigated the impact of person-centered communication and missed opportunities for such communication by staff on resident reactions. Conversations (N = 46) between staff-resident dyads were audio-recorded during routine care tasks over 12 weeks. Staff utterances were coded for person-centered communication and missed opportunities. Resident utterances were coded for positive reactions, such as cooperation, and negative reactions, such as distress. Linear regression analyses revealed that the more staff used person-centered communication, the more likely that residents reacted positively. Additionally, the more missed opportunities in a conversation, the more likely that the residents reacted negatively. Conversation illustrations elaborate on the quantitative findings and implications for staff training are discussed. © The Author(s) 2016.

  1. Neurocysticercosis presenting as isolated wall-eyed monocular internuclear ophthalmoplegia with contraversive ocular tilt reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandran, Suresh R; Balakrishnan, Rojith K; Umakanthan, K; Govindarajan, K

    2012-01-01

    Neurocysticercosis is a common tropical infection presenting with neurological signs. It commonly presents as seizures but various other focal neurological presentations have been reported. Though neurocysticercosis have been reported to present as isolated internuclear ophthalmoplegia, we report the first case of neurocysticercosis presenting as wall-eyed monoocular internuclear ophthalmoplegia syndrome with contraversive ocular tilt reaction.

  2. Neurocysticercosis presenting as isolated wall-eyed monocular internuclear ophthalmoplegia with contraversive ocular tilt reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh R Chandran

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurocysticercosis is a common tropical infection presenting with neurological signs. It commonly presents as seizures but various other focal neurological presentations have been reported. Though neurocysticercosis have been reported to present as isolated internuclear ophthalmoplegia, we report the first case of neurocysticercosis presenting as wall-eyed monoocular internuclear ophthalmoplegia syndrome with contraversive ocular tilt reaction.

  3. Vasovagal reactions in whole blood donors at three REDS-II blood centers in Brazil.

    OpenAIRE

    Gonçalez, TT; Sabino, EC; Schlumpf, KS; Wright, DJ; Leao, S; Sampaio, D; Takecian, PL; Proietti, AB; Murphy, E; Busch, M; Custer, B; NHLBI Retrovirus Epidemiology Donor Study-II REDS-II, International Component,

    2012-01-01

    In Brazil little is known about adverse reactions during donation and the donor characteristics that may be associated with such events. Donors are offered snacks and fluids before donating and are required to consume a light meal after donation. For these reasons the frequency of reactions may be different than those observed in other countries.A cross-sectional study was conducted of eligible whole blood donors at three large blood centers located in Brazil between July 2007 and December 20...

  4. Vasovagal reactions in whole blood donors at 3 REDS-II blood centers in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncalez, T. T.; Sabino, E. C.; Schlumpf, K.S.; Wright, D.J.; Leao, S.; Sampaio, D.; Takecian, P. L.; Carneiro-Proietti, AB; Murphy, E.; Busch, M.; Custer, B.

    2013-01-01

    Background In Brazil little is known about adverse reactions during donation and the donor characteristics that may be associated with such events. Donors are offered snacks and fluids prior to donating and are required to consume a light meal after donation. For these reasons the frequency of reactions may be different than those observed in other countries. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted of eligible whole blood donors at three large blood centers located in Brazil between July 2007 and December 2009. Vasovagal reactions (VVRs) along with donor demographic and biometric data were collected. Reactions were defined as any presyncopal or syncopal event during the donation process. Multivariable logistic regression was performed to identify predictors of VVRs. Results Of 724,861 donor presentations, 16,129 (2.2%) VVRs were recorded. Rates varied substantially between the three centers: 53, 290 and 381 per 10,000 donations in Recife, São Paulo and Belo Horizonte, respectively. Although the reaction rates varied, the donor characteristics associated with VVRs were similar [younger age (18–29), replacement donors, first time donors, low estimated blood volume (EBV)]. In multivariable analysis controlling for differences between the donor populations in each city younger age, first-time donor status and lower EBV were the factors most associated with reactions. Conclusion Factors associated with VVRs in other locations are also evident in Brazil. The difference in VVR rates between the three centers might be due to different procedures for identifying and reporting the reactions. Potential interventions to reduce the risk of reactions in Brazil should be considered. PMID:22073941

  5. Biological diversity of photosynthetic reaction centers and the solid-state photo-CIDNP effect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roy, Esha

    2007-01-01

    Photosynthetic reaction centers (RCs) from plants, heliobacteria and green sulphur bacteria has been investigated with photochemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization (photo-CIDNP) MAS NMR. In photosystem (PS) I of spinach, all signals appear negative which is proposed by a predominance of the

  6. The effects of light-induced reduction of the photosystem II reaction center

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kutý, Michal

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 15 (2009), s. 923-933 ISSN 1610-2940 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06010 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60870520 Keywords : Photosystem II * Reaction center * Pheophytin Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 2.336, year: 2009

  7. Functional LH1 antenna complexes influence electron transfer in bacterial photosynthetic reaction centers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visschers, R.W.; Vulto, S.I.E.; Jones, M.R.; van Grondelle, R.; Kraayenhof, R.

    1999-01-01

    The effect of the light harvesting 1 (LH1) antenna complex on the driving force for light-driven electron transfer in the Rhodobacter sphaeroides reaction center has been examined. Equilibrium redox titrations show that the presence of the LH1 antenna complex influences the free energy change for

  8. Functional LH1 antenna complexes influence electron transfer in bacterial photosynthetic reaction centers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visschers, R.W.; Vulto, S.I.E.; Jones, M.R.; van Grondelle, R.; Kraayenhof, R.

    1999-01-01

    The effect of the light harvesting 1 (LH1) antenna complex on the driving force for light-driven electron transfer in the Rhodobacter sphaeroides reaction center has been examined. Equilibrium redox titrations show that the presence of the LH1 antenna complex influences the free energy change for

  9. Reactions of carbon radicals generated by 1,5-transposition of reactive centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZIVORAD CEKOVIC

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Radical intermediates can undergo specific reactions, such as intramolecular rearrangements, i.e., the transpositions of radical centers, which are not known in classical ionic organic reactions. 1,5-Transposition of a radical center to a non-activated carbon atom are of great synthetic importance. It can be successfully applied for the introduction of different functional groups (oxygen, nitrogen, sulfur, halogens onto a carbon atom remote from the present functional group. In addition to functionalization of a remote non-activated carbon atom, the formation of new C-C bonds on the d-carbon atom have also been achieved. 1,5-Transposition of the radical centers takes place from alkoxyl, aminyl and carbon radicals to a remote carbon atom. Relocation of the radical centers preferentially involves 1,5-transfer of a hydrogen atom, although migrations of some other groups are known. The reactions of the carbon radical generated by 1,5-relocation of the radical center are presented and their synthetic applications are reviewed.

  10. Molar extinction coefficients and other properties of an improved reaction center preparation from Rhodopseudomonas viridis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clayton, R.K.; Clayton, B.J.

    1978-01-01

    Reaction centers have been purified from chromatophores of Rhodopseudomonas viridis by treatment with lauryl dimethyl amine oxide followed by hydroxyapatite chromatography and precipitation with ammonium sulfate. The absorption spectrum at low temperature shows bands at 531 and 543 nm, assigned to two molecules of bacteriopheophytin b. The 600 nm band of bacteriochlorophyll b is resolved at low temperature into components at 601 and 606.5 nm. At room temperature the light-induced difference spectrum shows a negative band centered at 615 nm, where the absorption spectrum shows only a week shoulder adjacent to the 600 nm band. The fluorescence spectrum shows a band at 1000 nm and no fluorescence corresponding to the 830 nm absorption band. Two molecules of cytochrome 558 and three of cytochrome 552 accompany each reaction center. The differential extinction coefficient (reduced minus oxidized) of cytochrome 558 nm was estimated as 20 +- 2 mM/sup -1/.cm/sup -1/ through a coupled reaction with equine cytochrome c. The extinction coefficient of reaction centers at 960 nm was determined to be 123 +- 25 mM/sup -1/.cm/sup -1/ by measuring the light-induced bleaching of P-960 and the coupled oxidation of cytochrome 558. The corresponding extinction coefficient at 830 nm is 300 +- 65 mM/sup -1/.cm/sup -1/. The absorbance ratio ..cap alpha../sub 280nm/..cap alpha../sub 830nm/ in our preparations was 2.1, and there was 190 kg protein per mol of reaction centers. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed three major components of apparent molecular weights 31,000, 37,000, and 41,000.

  11. Isolation and polymerase chain reaction-based identification of Riemerella anatipestifer from ducks in Kerala, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manju Soman

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim was to isolate and characterize Riemerella anatipestifer organisms from disease outbreaks in ducks in Kerala. Materials and Methods: Ducklings, suspected of Riemerella infection, were sacrificed and subjected to post-mortem examination. Heart blood smears and impression smears from liver and spleen were examined for the presence of pathogenic organisms. Heart blood, lung, liver, and spleen collected aseptically from the birds were subjected to isolation trials in brain heart infusion agar and 10% bovine blood agar. The isolates were characterized based on morphology, cultural characteristics and biochemical tests, and their identity were confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR and the PCR amplified DNA was sequenced. The antibiotic sensitivity testing of the isolates were carried out using six antibiotics viz ciprofloxacin, chloramphenicol, enrofloxacin, amoxycillin, cotrimoxazole, and gentamicin. Results: Colonies suggestive of Riemerella organisms could be isolated on blood agar. Biochemical characterization and PCR confirmed the identity of isolates as R. anatipestifer. The nucleotide sequence of the PCR product showed 99% homology to the R. anatipestifer sequences in the NCBI. The antibiogram revealed that the organisms were sensitive to ciprofloxacin, enrofloxacin, and gentamicin. Conclusion: The present study suggests that the PCR assay can facilitate fast and proper identification of R. anatipestifer infection in ducks. The assay can also differentiate between R. anatipestifer and Pasteurella multocida and can replace the traditional methods of differentiation which are cumbersome and time-consuming.

  12. Shortening Isolation of Patients With Suspected Tuberculosis by Using Polymerase Chain Reaction Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fløe, Andreas; Hilberg, Ole; Thomsen, Vibeke Østergaard

    2015-01-01

    Background. Isolation of patients suspected for pulmonary tuberculosis is guided by serial sputum smears. This can result in isolation for days for patients with noncontagious tuberculosis. To determine whether a single sample negative for Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex at polymerase chain...... reaction (PCR) can guide isolation. Methods. We retrospectively evaluated sputum samples analyzed for M. tuberculosis complex at the International Reference Laboratory of Mycobacteriology, Copenhagen, Denmark in 2002–2011. We selected culture-confirmed tuberculosis cases with ≥3 samples within 14 days...... before or after the initial culture-positive sample. We repeated the process for those with ≥2 samples within 28 days. The primary outcome was PCR-negative, smear-positive patients. Results. We included 53 533 sputum samples from 20 928 individuals; 1636 had culture-confirmed tuberculosis. Of these, 856...

  13. Photoinduced ethane formation from reaction of ethene with matrix-isolated Ti, V, or Nb atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Matthew G K; Parnis, J Mark

    2005-10-27

    The reactions of matrix-isolated Ti, V, or Nb atoms with ethene (C(2)H(4)) have been studied by FTIR absorption spectroscopy. Under conditions where the ethene dimer forms, metal atoms react with the ethene dimer to yield matrix-isolated ethane (C(2)H(6)) and methane. Under lower ethene concentration conditions ( approximately 1:70 ethene/Ar), hydridic intermediates of the types HMC(2)H(3) and H(2)MC(2)H(2) are also observed, and the relative yield of hydrocarbons is diminished. Reactions of these metals with perdeuterioethene, and equimolar mixtures of C(2)H(4) and C(2)D(4), yield products that are consistent with the production of ethane via a metal atom reaction involving at least two C(2)H(4) molecules. The absence of any other observed products suggests the mechanism also involves production of small, highly symmetric species such as molecular hydrogen and metal carbides. Evidence is presented suggesting that ethane production from the ethene dimer is a general photochemical process for the reaction of excited-state transition-metal atoms with ethene at high concentrations of ethene.

  14. Isolated Renal Hydatid Disease: Experience at the Queen Rania Urology Center, The King Hussein Medical Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abu-Qamar, Adnan A.; Aljader, Khalaf M.; Habboub, Hazem

    2004-01-01

    In this retrospective study, we present our experience on the diagnosis and management of isolated Hydatid disease of kidneys. Between January 1999 and January 2003, eight patients were diagnosed to have Hydatid disease of kidney and constituted the subjects of this study. Their age ranged between 20 and 63 years age (mean 40); there were five males and three females. Loin pain was the commonest mode of presentation in these patients. Investigations performed included urine analysis, serological tests, eosinophil count and relevant radiological studies. Urine analysis showed hydatiduria in one patient, the Casoni's test was positive in two, Ghedini skin test was positive in three and esinophilia was noted in two other patients. All patients were treated surgically using loin supracoastal extra-peritoneal approach. Total nephrectomy was performed in five patients, partial nephrectomy in one while excision of the cyst was performed in two patients. Our report suggests that a combination of various investigative modalities with a high index of suspicion is necessary in establishing the correct diagnosis. Surgery remains the main option of treatment for renal hydatid disease. (author)

  15. Isolated renal hydatid disease: experience at the queen rania urology center, the king hussein medical center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Qamar, Adnan A; Aljader, Khalaf M; Habboub, Hazem

    2004-01-01

    In this retrospective study, we present our experience on the diagnosis and management of isolated Hydatid disease of the kidneys. Between January 1999 and January 2003, eight patients were diagnosed to have Hydatid disease of the kidney and constituted the subjects of this study. Their age ranged between 20 and 63 years age (mean 40); there were five males and three females. Loin pain was the commonest mode of presentation in these patients. Investigations performed included urine analysis, serological tests, eosinophil count and relevant radiological studies. Urine analysis showed hydatiduria in one patient, the Casoni's test was positive in two, Ghedini skin test was positive in three and eosinophilia was noted in two other patients. All patients were treated surgically using loin supracostal extra-peritoneal approach. Total nephrectomy was performed in five patients, partial nephrectomy in one while excision of the cyst was performed in two patients. Our report suggests that a combination of various investigative modalities with a high index of suspicion is necessary in establishing the correct diagnosis. Surgery remains the main option of treatment for renal hydatid disease.

  16. Geometric phase and quantum interference in photosynthetic reaction center: Regulation of electron transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Yuming, E-mail: ymsun@ytu.edu.cn; Su, Yuehua; Dai, Zhenhong; Wang, WeiTian

    2016-10-20

    Photosynthesis is driven by electron transfer in reaction centers in which the functional unit is composed of several simple molecules C{sub 2}-symmetrically arranged into two branches. In view of quantum mechanism, both branches are possible pathways traversed by the transferred electron. Due to different evolution of spin state along two pathways in transmembrane electric potential (TEP), quantum state of the transferred electron at the bridged site acquires a geometric phase difference dependent on TEP, the most efficient electron transport takes place in a specific range of TEP beyond which electron transfer is dramatically suppressed. What’s more, reaction center acts like elaborately designed quantum device preparing polarized spin dependent on TEP for the transferred electron to regulate the reduction potential at bridged site. In brief, electron transfer generates the TEP, reversely, TEP modulates the efficiency of electron transfer. This may be an important approach to maintaining an appreciable pH environment in photosynthesis.

  17. Molecular typing of Lactobacillus brevis isolates from Korean food using repetitive element-polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Jasmine; Sharma, Anshul; Lee, Sulhee; Park, Young-Seo

    2018-06-01

    Lactobacillus brevis is a part of a large family of lactic acid bacteria that are present in cheese, sauerkraut, sourdough, silage, cow manure, feces, and the intestinal tract of humans and rats. It finds its use in food fermentation, and so is considered a "generally regarded as safe" organism. L. brevis strains are extensively used as probiotics and hence, there is a need for identifying and characterizing these strains. For identification and discrimination of the bacterial species at the subspecific level, repetitive element-polymerase chain reaction method is a reliable genomic fingerprinting tool. The objective of the present study was to characterize 13 strains of L. brevis isolated from various fermented foods using repetitive element-polymerase chain reaction. Repetitive element-polymerase chain reaction was performed using three primer sets, REP, Enterobacterial Repetitive Intergenic Consensus (ERIC), and (GTG) 5 , which produced different fingerprinting patterns that enable us to distinguish between the closely related strains. Fingerprinting patterns generated band range in between 150 and 5000 bp with REP, 200-7500 bp with ERIC, and 250-2000 bp with (GTG) 5 primers, respectively. The Jaccard's dissimilarity matrices were used to obtain dendrograms by the unweighted neighbor-joining method using genetic dissimilarities based on repetitive element-polymerase chain reaction fingerprinting data. Repetitive element-polymerase chain reaction proved to be a rapid and easy method that can produce reliable results in L. brevis species.

  18. Isolation and Spectroscopic Characterization of Reactive Species in Atmospheric and Interstellar Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Relph, Rachael A.

    2011-12-01

    A critical element to the study of chemical reactions is the characterization of reaction intermediates. Methods have been developed to isolate these transient species in the gas phase and when combined with infrared spectroscopy have proven to be excellent tools for determining the structure and reactivity of key intermediates. The studies presented here exploit these technologies to better understand the chemistry of species involved in atmospheric and interstellar reactions. An excellent example of their utility is in the study of the formation of proton hydrates and HONO in the upper atmosphere by sequential addition of water molecules onto the nitrosonium ion. This reaction only proceeds to products after addition of the fourth water molecule, and isolation and characterization of the intermediate trihydrate, NO+(H 2O)3, shows that this species is formed in three isomeric forms, each with a different water network that controls the degree of bond formation between the nitrosonium ion and an activated water molecule. Many isomeric structures are also seen in the clustering reactions of acetylene which may be a mechanism for the formation of benzene cation in interstellar space. The spectroscopy of the trimer, (C2H2)3 + indicates that this species exists in two major isomer classes; covalent forms, one of which may be benzene, and an ion-molecule complex, comprised of a loosely bound acetylene on a dimer core. Interestingly, this dimer core is different from the cyclobutadiene-like structure observed in dimerized acetylene, and proves to be a robust species on the potential energy surface as it survives further clustering events. Two structural isomers of CO3 -and NO3 - are also investigated, and found to have drastically different infrared spectra which are analyzed in the context of their electronic structure. Isomers in these systems are prepared under different expansion conditions which accounts for their unique spectral signatures.

  19. Nuclear Reaction and Structure Databases of the National Nuclear Data Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pritychenko, B.; Arcilla, R.; Herman, M. W.; Oblozinsky, P.; Rochman, D.; Sonzogni, A. A.; Tuli, J. K.; Winchell, D. F.

    2006-01-01

    The National Nuclear Data Center (NNDC) collects, evaluates, and disseminates nuclear physics data for basic research and applied nuclear technologies. In 2004, the NNDC migrated all databases into modern relational database software, installed new generation of Linux servers and developed new Java-based Web service. This nuclear database development means much faster, more flexible and more convenient service to all users in the United States. These nuclear reaction and structure database developments as well as related Web services are briefly described

  20. A single residue controls electron transfer gating in photosynthetic reaction centers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Shlyk, O.; Samish, I.; Matěnová, M.; Dulebo, A.; Poláková, H.; Kaftan, David; Scherz, A.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 7, MAR 16 (2017), s. 1-13, č. článku 44580. ISSN 2045-2322 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-00703S; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1416 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : BACTERIAL REACTION CENTERS * INDUCED STRUCTURAL-CHANGES * ATOMIC-FORCE MICROSCOPE Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology OBOR OECD: Microbiology Impact factor: 4.259, year: 2016

  1. Methods for Confirming the Gram Reaction of Gram-variable Bacillus Species Isolated from Tobacco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morin A

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Bacillus is a predominant genus of bacteria isolated from tobacco. The Gram stain is the most commonly used and most important of all diagnostic staining techniques in microbiology. In order to help confirm the Gram positivity of Bacillus isolates from tobacco, three methods using the chemical differences of the cell wall and membrane of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria were investigated: the KOH (potassium hydroxide, the LANA (L-alanine-4-nitroanilide, and the vancomycin susceptibility tests. When colonies of Gram-negative bacteria are treated with 3% KOH solution, a slimy suspension is produced, probably due to destruction of the cell wall and liberation of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA. Gram-positive cell walls resist KOH treatment. The LANA test reveals the presence of a cell wall aminopeptidase that hydrolyzes the L-alanine-4-nitroanilide in Gram-negative bacteria. This enzyme is absent in Gram-positive bacteria. Vancomycin is a glycopeptide antibiotic inhibiting the cell wall peptido-glycan synthesis of Gram-positive microorganisms. Absence of lysis with KOH, absence of hydrolysis of LANA, and susceptibility to vancomycin were used with the Gram reaction to confirm the Gram positivity of various Bacillus species isolated from tobacco. B. laevolacticus excepted, all Bacillus species tested showed negative reactions to KOH and LANA tests, and all species were susceptible to vancomycin (5 and 30 µg.

  2. Model of deep centers formation and reactions in electron irradiated InP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sibille, A.; Suski, J.; Gilleron, M.

    1986-01-01

    We present a model of the production of deep centers and their reactions following electron irradiations in InP. We propose that the dominant hole traps in p-InP and electron traps in p + n InP junctions are complexes between shallow acceptors and a common intrinsic entity, the phosphorus interstitial or vacancy. The reactions observed below and above room temperature are then due to a local mobility of this entity, which can be obtained as well by thermal as by electronic stimulation of the reactions. This model implies the long-range migration (at least down to 16 K) of this entity, and explains the strongly different behavior of n-InP compared to p-InP samples

  3. Incidence of transfusion reactions: a multi-center study utilizing systematic active surveillance and expert adjudication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrickson, Jeanne E.; Roubinian, Nareg H.; Chowdhury, Dhuly; Brambilla, Don; Murphy, Edward L.; Wu, Yanyun; Ness, Paul M.; Gehrie, Eric A.; Snyder, Edward L.; Hauser, R. George; Gottschall, Jerome L.; Kleinman, Steve; Kakaiya, Ram; Strauss, Ronald G.

    2017-01-01

    Background Prevalence estimates of serious hazards of transfusion vary widely. We hypothesized that the current reporting infrastructure in the United States fails to capture many transfusion reactions, and undertook a multi-center study utilizing active surveillance, data review, and adjudication to test this hypothesis. Study Design and Methods A retrospective record review was completed for a random sample of 17% of all inpatient transfusion episodes over 6 months at 4 academic tertiary care hospitals, with an episode defined as all blood products released to a patient in 6 hours. Data were recorded by trained clinical research nurses, and serious reactions were adjudicated by a panel of transfusion medicine experts. Results Of 4857 transfusion episodes investigated, 1.1% were associated with a serious reaction. Transfusion associated circulatory overload (TACO) was the most frequent serious reaction noted, being identified in 1% of transfusion episodes. Despite clinical notes describing a potential transfusion association in 59% of these cases, only 5.1% were reported to the transfusion service. Suspected transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI/possible TRALI), anaphylactic, and hypotensive reactions were noted in 0.08%, 0.02%, and 0.02% of transfusion episodes. Minor reactions, including febrile non-hemolytic and allergic, were noted in 0.62% and 0.29% of transfusion episodes, with 30–50% reported to the transfusion service. Conclusion Underreporting of cardiopulmonary transfusion reactions is striking among academic, tertiary care hospitals. Complete and accurate reporting is essential to identify, define, establish pathogenesis, and mitigate/treat transfusion reactions. A better understanding of the failure to report may improve the accuracy of passive reporting systems. PMID:27460200

  4. Theoretical studies of the reaction dynamics of the matrix-isolated F2+cis-d2 -ethylene system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raff, Lionel M.

    1991-12-01

    The molecular dynamics of the F2+cis-d2 -ethylene addition reaction and the subsequent decomposition dynamics of the vibrationally excited 1,2-difluoroethane-d2 product isolated in Ar or Xe matrices at 12 K are investigated using trajectory methods that incorporate nonstatistical sampling to enhance the reaction probabilities. The matrix is represented by a face-centered-cubic crystal containing 125 unit cells with 666 lattice atoms in a cubic (5×5×5) arrangement. Both interstitial and substitutional sites for the F2/cis-d2 -ethylene pair are examined. Transport effects of the bulk are simulated using the velocity reset method introduced by Riley, Coltrin, and Diestler [J. Chem. Phys. 88, 5934 (1988)]. The potential-energy hypersurface for the system is written as the separable sum of a lattice potential, a lattice-substrate interaction, and a gas-phase potential for 1,2-difluoroethane-d2. The first two of these have pairwise form, while the 1,2-difluoroethane-d2 potential is identical to that employed previously to study the unimolecular reaction dynamics of matrix-isolated 1,2-difluoroethane-d4 [J. Chem. Phys. 93, 3160 (1990)]. The major F2+cis-d2 -ethylene reaction mechanism involves a four-center, concerted αβ addition across the C=C double bond. A small contribution from an atomic addition mechanism that initially forms fluoroethyl and fluorine radicals is observed in a xenon matrix, but not in argon. Subsequent to the formation of 1,2-difluoroethane-d2, the observed dynamic processes are vibrational relaxation to the lattice phonon modes, orientational exchange, and HF or DF elimination reactions. Vibrational relaxation is found to be very similar to that observed previously for 1,2-difluoroethane-d4. The process is well described by a first-order rate law with rate coefficients in the range 0.046-0.069 ps-1. The distribution of rate coefficients, as well as the averages, are nearly identical for Ar and Xe lattices. Very little difference is found between

  5. Photochemical Ring-Opening Reaction in 2(1H)-Pyrimidinones: A Matrix Isolation Study

    OpenAIRE

    Lapinski, Leszek; Rostkowska, Hanna; Khvorostov, Artem; Fausto, Rui; Nowak, Maciej J.

    2003-01-01

    Photoreactions induced by UV-B (290−320 nm) irradiation were studied for 1-methyl-2(1H)-pyrimidinone and 1-methylcytosine monomers isolated in low-temperature inert gas matrixes. A Norrish type I α-cleavage reaction leading to open-ring conjugated isocyanate was observed for 1-methyl-2(1H)-pyrimidinone. The structure of the photoproduct was identified by comparison of its experimental IR spectrum with the spectrum theoretically calculated at the DFT(B3LYP)/6-31++G(d,p) level. The main indicat...

  6. Fe Isolated Single Atoms on S, N Codoped Carbon by Copolymer Pyrolysis Strategy for Highly Efficient Oxygen Reduction Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiheng; Chen, Wenxing; Xiao, Hai; Gong, Yue; Li, Zhi; Zheng, Lirong; Zheng, Xusheng; Yan, Wensheng; Cheong, Weng-Chon; Shen, Rongan; Fu, Ninghua; Gu, Lin; Zhuang, Zhongbin; Chen, Chen; Wang, Dingsheng; Peng, Qing; Li, Jun; Li, Yadong

    2018-06-01

    Heteroatom-doped Fe-NC catalyst has emerged as one of the most promising candidates to replace noble metal-based catalysts for highly efficient oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). However, delicate controls over their structure parameters to optimize the catalytic efficiency and molecular-level understandings of the catalytic mechanism are still challenging. Herein, a novel pyrrole-thiophene copolymer pyrolysis strategy to synthesize Fe-isolated single atoms on sulfur and nitrogen-codoped carbon (Fe-ISA/SNC) with controllable S, N doping is rationally designed. The catalytic efficiency of Fe-ISA/SNC shows a volcano-type curve with the increase of sulfur doping. The optimized Fe-ISA/SNC exhibits a half-wave potential of 0.896 V (vs reversible hydrogen electrode (RHE)), which is more positive than those of Fe-isolated single atoms on nitrogen codoped carbon (Fe-ISA/NC, 0.839 V), commercial Pt/C (0.841 V), and most reported nonprecious metal catalysts. Fe-ISA/SNC is methanol tolerable and shows negligible activity decay in alkaline condition during 15 000 voltage cycles. X-ray absorption fine structure analysis and density functional theory calculations reveal that the incorporated sulfur engineers the charges on N atoms surrounding the Fe reactive center. The enriched charge facilitates the rate-limiting reductive release of OH* and therefore improved the overall ORR efficiency. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Matrix isolation infrared spectra of O2 and N2 insertion reactions with atomic uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunt, R.D.; Toth, L.M.; Yustein, J.T.; Andrews, L.

    1993-01-01

    Laser ablation of refractory metals can be an effective source of vapor for matrix isolation IR studies. This combination of techniques was used for the first time to study the mechanisms of U vapor reactions with atmospheric components. U atoms and O 2 were codeposited with excess Ar at 12 K. The dominant codeposition products were UO 2 and UO 3 . In contrast, the UO yield was always small because UO 2 is formed by an insertion mechanism. This mechanism was verified in the 16 O 2 / 18 O 2 experiments which failed to produce 16 OU 18 O. The effects of UV photolysis and matrix annealings were also examined. The U atoms and O 2 reaction requires little or no activation energy since UO 2 was formed from cold reagents. New charge-transfer species, (UO 2+ 2 )(O 2- 2 ) and (UO + 2 )(O - 2 ), and a weak complex, UO 3 --O 2 , were primarily produced under conditions which favored further O 2 reactions. Similar U atom and N 2 experiments produced only linear NUN which is also produced by an insertion mechanism. This U reaction represents the first time that atom was observed breaking and inserting into the triple bond of N 2 . Photolysis dramatically increased the NUN yield by 3-fold. Matrix annealings produced weak UN 2 --N 2 and UN 2 --2N 2 complexes

  8. Matrix isolation infrared spectra of O2 and N2 insertion reactions with atomic uranium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Rodney D.; Toth, L. Mac; Yustein, Jason T.; Andrews, Lester

    1993-10-01

    Laser ablation of refractory metals can be an effective source of vapor for matrix isolation IR studies. This combination of techniques was used for the first time to study the mechanisms of U vapor reactions with atmospheric components. U atoms and O2 were codeposited with excess Ar at 12 K. The dominant codeposition products were UO2 and UO3. In contrast, the UO yield was always small because UO2 is formed by an insertion mechanism. This mechanism was verified in the 16O2/18O2 experiments which failed to produce 16OU18O. The effects of UV photolysis and matrix annealings were also examined. The U atoms and O2 reaction requires little or no activation energy since UO2 was formed from cold reagents. New charge-transfer species, (UO2+2)(O2-2) and (UO+2)(O-2), and a weak complex, UO3-O2, were primarily produced under conditions which favored further O2 reactions. Similar U atom and N2 experiments produced only linear NUN which is also produced by an insertion mechanism. This U reaction represents the first time that atom was observed breaking and inserting into the triple bond of N2. Photolysis dramatically increased the NUN yield by 3-fold. Matrix annealings produced weak UN2-N2 and UN2-2N2 complexes.

  9. Japan Nuclear Reaction Data Center (JCPRG), Faculty of Science, Hokkaido University, Steering Committee progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-11-15

    The Japan Nuclear Reaction Data Center (JCPRG) was approved as an organisation of Faculty of Science, Hokkaido University and established on April 1, 2007. In addition to nuclear data activities carried out by JCPRG (Japan-Charged Particle Nuclear Reaction Data Group), the centre is concerned with the evaluation of nuclear reaction data in nucleosynthesis in the universe. In order efficiently to compile reaction data obtained by using radioactive ion beam, the centre signed a research contract with RIKEN Nishina Center. We are scanning 16 journals for Japanese charged-particle and photo-nuclear nuclear reaction data compilation. From April 2006 to March 2007, CPND and PhND in 45 references (453 records, 1.83 MB) have been newly compiled for NRDF. Usually new data are released at the JCPRG web site several months prior to EXFOR. Since the 2006 NRDC meeting, we have made 104 new entries and have revised or deleted 142 old entries. Intensive numerical data compilations have been done. These data were shown in tabular form in dissertations which are (partially) published in Journals. About 30 new entries were compiled from these data. We have prepared CINDA batches for CPND published in Japan every half year. Each batch covers 6 issues of each of 4 Japanese journals JPJ, PTP, NST and JNRS. Bibliographies for neutron induced reaction data have been compiled by JAEA Nuclear Data Center as before. A new web-based NRDF search and plot system on MySQL was released in July, 2007. New compilation, which has been finalized for NRDF, but not for EXFOR, can be obtained from this site. DARPE (another NRDF search and plot system written in Perl) is also available at http://www.jcprg.org/darpe/. EXFOR/ENDF (http://www.jcprg.org/exfor/) search and plot system is available. We have also developed following utilities: PENDL (http://www.jcprg.org/endf/) and RENORM (http://www.jcprg.org/renorm). We are developing a new search system of CINDA. This is an extension of EXFOR/ENDF search

  10. High-pressure modulation of the structure of the bacterial photochemical reaction center at physiological and cryogenic temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timpmann, Kõu; Kangur, Liina; Lõhmus, Ants; Freiberg, Arvi

    2017-07-01

    The optical absorption and fluorescence response to external high pressure of the reaction center membrane chromoprotein complex from the wild-type non-sulfur photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides was investigated using the native pigment cofactors as local molecular probes of the reaction center structure at physiological (ambient) and cryogenic (79 K) temperatures. In detergent-purified complexes at ambient temperature, abrupt blue shift and accompanied broadening of the special pair band was observed at about 265 MPa. These reversible in pressure features were assigned to a pressure-induced rupture of a lone hydrogen bond that binds the photo-chemically active L-branch primary electron donor bacteriochlorophyll cofactor to the surrounding protein scaffold. In native membrane-protected complexes the hydrogen bond rupture appeared significantly restricted and occurred close to about 500 MPa. The free energy change associated with the rupture of the special pair hydrogen bond in isolate complexes was estimated to be equal to about 12 kJ mol-1. In frozen samples at cryogenic temperatures the hydrogen bond remained apparently intact up to the maximum utilized pressure of 600 MPa. In this case, however, heterogeneous spectral response of the cofactors from the L-and M-branches was observed due to anisotropic build-up of the protein structure. While in solid phase, the special pair fluorescence as a function of pressure exactly followed the respective absorption spectrum at a constant Stokes shift, at ambient temperature, the two paths began to deviate strongly from one other at the hydrogen bond rupture pressure. This effect was tentatively interpreted by different emission properties of hydrogen-bound and hydrogen-unbound special pair exciton states.

  11. Proton conduction within the reaction centers of Rhodobacter capsulatus: the electrostatic role of the protein.

    OpenAIRE

    Maróti, P; Hanson, D K; Baciou, L; Schiffer, M; Sebban, P

    1994-01-01

    Light-induced charge separation in the photosynthetic reaction center results in delivery of two electrons and two protons to the terminal quinone acceptor QB. In this paper, we have used flash-induced absorbance spectroscopy to study three strains that share identical amino acid sequences in the QB binding site, all of which lack the protonatable amino acids Glu-L212 and Asp-L213. These strains are the photosynthetically incompetent site-specific mutant Glu-L212/Asp-L213-->Ala-L212/Ala-L213 ...

  12. An efficient synthesis of α-amino-δ-valerolactones by the ugi five-center three-component reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young Bae; Lee, Duck Hyung; Park, Soo Jung; Keum, Gyo Chang; Jang, Min Seok; Kang, Soon Bang; Kim, You Seung

    2002-01-01

    A novel approach to α-amino-δ-valerolactones derivatives 8 by the intramolecular Ugi five-center three-component reaction (U-5C-3CR) using the multifunctional starting material, L-pentahomoserine 5 is described

  13. Engineered Photosystem II reaction centers optimize photochemistry versus photoprotection at different solar intensities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinyard, David J; Gimpel, Javier; Ananyev, Gennady M; Mayfield, Stephen P; Dismukes, G Charles

    2014-03-12

    The D1 protein of Photosystem II (PSII) provides most of the ligating amino acid residues for the Mn4CaO5 water-oxidizing complex (WOC) and half of the reaction center cofactors, and it is present as two isoforms in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942. These isoforms, D1:1 and D1:2, confer functional advantages for photosynthetic growth at low and high light intensities, respectively. D1:1, D1:2, and seven point mutations in the D1:2 background that are native to D1:1 were expressed in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. We used these nine strains to show that those strains that confer a higher yield of PSII charge separation under light-limiting conditions (where charge recombination is significant) have less efficient photochemical turnover, measured in terms of both a lower WOC turnover probability and a longer WOC cycle period. Conversely, these same strains under light saturation (where charge recombination does not compete) confer a correspondingly faster O2 evolution rate and greater protection against photoinhibition. Taken together, the data clearly establish that PSII primary charge separation is a trade-off between photochemical productivity (water oxidation and plastoquinone reduction) and charge recombination (photoprotection). These trade-offs add up to a significant growth advantage for the two natural isoforms. These insights provide fundamental design principles for engineering of PSII reaction centers with optimal photochemical efficiencies for growth at low versus high light intensities.

  14. Pigment organization and their interactions in reaction centers of photosystem II: optical spectroscopy at 6 K of reaction centers with modified pheophytin composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germano, M; Shkuropatov, A Y; Permentier, H; de Wijn, R; Hoff, A J; Shuvalov, V A; van Gorkom, H J

    2001-09-25

    Photosystem II reaction centers (RC) with selectively exchanged pheophytin (Pheo) molecules as described in [Germano, M., Shkuropatov, A. Ya., Permentier, H., Khatypov, R. A., Shuvalov, V. A., Hoff, A. J., and van Gorkom, H. J. (2000) Photosynth. Res. 64, 189-198] were studied by low-temperature absorption, linear and circular dichroism, and triplet-minus-singlet absorption-difference spectroscopy. The ratio of extinction coefficients epsilon(Pheo)/epsilon(Chl) for Q(Y) absorption in the RC is approximately 0.40 at 6 K and approximately 0.45 at room temperature. The presence of 2 beta-carotenes, one parallel and one perpendicular to the membrane plane, is confirmed. Absorption at 670 nm is due to the perpendicular Q(Y) transitions of the two peripheral chlorophylls (Chl) and not to either Pheo. The "core" pigments, two Pheo and four Chl absorb in the 676-685 nm range. Delocalized excited states as predicted by the "multimer model" are seen in the active branch. The inactive Pheo and the nearby Chl, however, mainly contribute localized transitions at 676 and 680 nm, respectively, although large CD changes indicate that exciton interactions are present on both branches. Replacement of the active Pheo prevents triplet formation, causes an LD increase at 676 and 681 nm, a blue-shift of 680 nm absorbance, and a bleach of the 685 nm exciton band. The triplet state is mainly localized on the Chl corresponding to B(A) in purple bacteria. Both Pheo Q(Y) transitions are oriented out of the membrane plane. Their Q(X) transitions are parallel to that plane, so that the Pheos in PSII are structurally similar to their homologues in purple bacteria.

  15. The isolation of 139Ce after production by a proton-induced nuclear reaction on praseodymium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van der Walt, T.N.; Vermeulen, C.

    2004-01-01

    A method, based on anion exchange chromatography, is presented for the isolation of 139 Ce after production by a proton-induced nuclear reaction on a thick praseodymium target. After bombardment the target is dissolved in nitric acid and 139 Ce oxidised to the Ce(IV) oxidation state with bromic acid. 139 Ce is then separated form the praseodymium by anion exchange chromatography on a Ag MP-1 resin column in a nitric acid - bromic acid mixture. 139 Ce is sorbed onto the resin column and praseodymium eluted with the acid mixture. The bromic acid is washed out of the column with nitric acid and 139 Ce finally eluted with dilute nitric acid containing sulphur dioxide

  16. DNA-based identification of spices: DNA isolation, whole genome amplification, and polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Focke, Felix; Haase, Ilka; Fischer, Markus

    2011-01-26

    Usually spices are identified morphologically using simple methods like magnifying glasses or microscopic instruments. On the other hand, molecular biological methods like the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) enable an accurate and specific detection also in complex matrices. Generally, the origins of spices are plants with diverse genetic backgrounds and relationships. The processing methods used for the production of spices are complex and individual. Consequently, the development of a reliable DNA-based method for spice analysis is a challenging intention. However, once established, this method will be easily adapted to less difficult food matrices. In the current study, several alternative methods for the isolation of DNA from spices have been developed and evaluated in detail with regard to (i) its purity (photometric), (ii) yield (fluorimetric methods), and (iii) its amplifiability (PCR). Whole genome amplification methods were used to preamplify isolates to improve the ratio between amplifiable DNA and inhibiting substances. Specific primer sets were designed, and the PCR conditions were optimized to detect 18 spices selectively. Assays of self-made spice mixtures were performed to proof the applicability of the developed methods.

  17. How exciton-vibrational coherences control charge separation in the photosystem II reaction center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novoderezhkin, Vladimir I; Romero, Elisabet; van Grondelle, Rienk

    2015-12-14

    In photosynthesis absorbed sun light produces collective excitations (excitons) that form a coherent superposition of electronic and vibrational states of the individual pigments. Two-dimensional (2D) electronic spectroscopy allows a visualization of how these coherences are involved in the primary processes of energy and charge transfer. Based on quantitative modeling we identify the exciton-vibrational coherences observed in 2D photon echo of the photosystem II reaction center (PSII-RC). We find that the vibrations resonant with the exciton splittings can modify the delocalization of the exciton states and produce additional states, thus promoting directed energy transfer and allowing a switch between the two charge separation pathways. We conclude that the coincidence of the frequencies of the most intense vibrations with the splittings within the manifold of exciton and charge-transfer states in the PSII-RC is not occurring by chance, but reflects a fundamental principle of how energy conversion in photosynthesis was optimized.

  18. Chemical proprieties of the iron-quinone complex in mutated reaction centers of Rb. sphaeroides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hałas, Agnieszka; Derrien, Valerie; Sebban, Pierre; Matlak, Krzysztof; Korecki, Józef; Kruk, Jerzy; Burda, Kvĕtoslava

    2012-01-01

    We investigated type II bacterial photosynthetic reaction centers, which contain a quinone - iron complex (Q A -Fe-Q B ) on their acceptor side. Under physiological conditions it was observed mainly in a reduced high spin state but its low spin ferrous states were also observed. Therefore, it was suggested that it might regulate the dynamical properties of the iron–quinone complex and the protonation and deprotonation events in its neighbourhood. In order to get insight into the molecular mechanism of the NHFe low spin state formation, we preformed Mössbauer studies of a wild type of Rb. sphaeroides and its two mutated forms. Our Mössbauer measurements show that the hydrophobicity of the Q A binding site can be crucial for stabilization of the high spin ferrous state of NHFe.

  19. Alumina plate containing photosystem I reaction center complex oriented inside plate-penetrating silica nanopores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamidaki, Chihiro; Kondo, Toru; Noji, Tomoyasu; Itoh, Tetsuji; Yamaguchi, Akira; Itoh, Shigeru

    2013-08-22

    The photosynthetic photosystem I reaction center complex (PSI-RC), which has a molecular diameter of 21 nm with 100 pigments, was incorporated into silica nanopores with a 100-nm diameter that penetrates an alumina plate of 60-μm thickness to make up an inorganic-biological hybrid photocell. PSI-RCs, purified from a thermophilic cyanobacterium, were stable inside the nanopores and rapidly photoreduced a mediator dye methyl viologen. The reduced dye was more stable inside nanopores suggesting the decrease of dissolved oxygen. The analysis by a cryogenic electron spin paramagnetic resonance indicated the oriented arrangement of RCs inside the 100-nm nanopores, with their surface parallel to the silica wall and perpendicular to the plane of the alumina plate. PSI RC complex in the semicrystalline orientation inside silica nanopores can be a new type of light energy conversion unit to supply strong reducing power selectively to other molecules inside or outside nanopores.

  20. Kinetics of several oxygenated carbon-centered free radical reactions with NO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rissanen, Matti P; Arppe, Suula L; Timonen, Raimo S

    2013-05-16

    Five oxygenated carbon-centered free radical reactions with nitrogen dioxide (NO2) have been studied in direct time-resolved measurements. Experiments were conducted in a temperature-controlled flow tube reactor coupled to a 193 nm exciplex laser photolysis and a resonance gas lamp photoionization mass spectrometer. Reactions were investigated under pseudofirst-order conditions, with the NO2 concentrations of the experiments in great excess over the initial radical concentrations ([R]0 CH3CO radical reactions with NO2 and, hence, includes the three smallest hydroxyalkyl radical species (CH2OH, CH2CH2OH, and CH3CHOH). The obtained rate coefficients are high with the temperature-dependent rate coefficients given by a formula k(T) = k300K × (T/300 K)(-n) as (in units of cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1)): k(CH2OH + NO2) = (8.95 ± 2.70) × 10(-11) × (T/300 K)(-0.54±0.27) (T = 298-363 K), k(CH2CH2OH + NO2) = (5.99 ± 1.80) × 10(-11) × (T/300 K)(-1.49±0.45)(T = 241-363 K), k(CH3CHOH + NO2) = (7.48 ± 2.24) × 10(-11) × (T/300 K)(-1.36±0.41) (T = 266-363 K), k(CH3OCH2 + NO2) = (7.85 ± 2.36) × 10(-11) × (T/300 K)(-0.93±0.28) (T = 243-363 K), and k(CH3CO + NO2) = (2.87 ± 0.57) × 10(-11) × (T/300 K)(-2.45±0.49) (T = 241-363 K), where the uncertainties refer to the estimated overall uncertainties of the values obtained. The determined rate coefficients show negative temperature dependence with no apparent bath gas pressure dependence under the current experimental conditions (241-363 K and about 1-3 Torr helium). This behavior is typical for a radical-radical addition mechanism with no potential energy barrier above the energy of the separated reactants in the entrance channel of the reaction. Unfortunately the absence of detected product signals prevented gaining deeper insight into the reaction mechanism.

  1. Interplay between excitation kinetics and reaction-center dynamics in purple bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caycedo-Soler, Felipe; RodrIguez, Ferney J; Quiroga, Luis; Johnson, Neil F

    2010-01-01

    Photosynthesis is arguably the fundamental process of life, since it enables energy from the Sun to enter the food chain on the Earth. It is a remarkable non-equilibrium process in which photons are converted to many-body excitations, which traverse a complex biomolecular membrane, where they are captured and fuel chemical reactions within a reaction center (RC) in order to produce nutrients. The precise nature of these dynamical processes-which lie at the interface between quantum and classical behavior and involve both noise and coordination-is still being explored. Here, we focus on a striking recent empirical finding concerning an illumination-driven transition in the biomolecular membrane architecture of the purple bacteria Rsp. photometricum. Using stochastic realizations to describe a hopping rate model for excitation transfer, we show numerically and analytically that this surprising shift in preferred architectures can be traced to the interplay between the excitation kinetics and the RC dynamics. The net effect is that the bacteria profit from efficient metabolism at low illumination intensities while using dissipation to avoid an oversupply of energy at high illumination intensities.

  2. Center of gravity estimation using a reaction board instrumented with fiber Bragg gratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Rui; Roriz, Paulo; Marques, Manuel B.; Frazão, Orlando

    2018-03-01

    The purpose of the present work is to construct a reaction board based on fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) that could be used for estimation of the 2D coordinates of the projection of center of gravity (CG) of an object. The apparatus is consisted of a rigid equilateral triangular board mounted on three supports at the vertices, two of which have cantilevers instrumented with FBGs. When an object of known weight is placed on the board, the bending strain of the cantilevers is measured by a proportional wavelength shift of the FBGs. Applying the equilibrium conditions of a rigid body and proper calibration procedures, the wavelength shift is used to estimate the vertical reaction forces and moments of force at the supports and the coordinates of the object's CG projection on the board. This method can be used on a regular basis to estimate the CG of the human body or objects with complex geometry and density distribution. An example is provided for the estimation of the CG projection coordinates of two orthopaedic femur bone models, one intact, and the other with a hip stem implant encased. The clinical implications of changing the normal CG location by means of a prosthesis have been discussed.

  3. Rapid differentiation of closely related isolates of two plant viruses by polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbara, D J; Morton, A; Spence, N J; Miller, A

    1995-09-01

    Immunocapture reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) followed by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of the product has been shown to be an effective procedure for discriminating serologically indistinguishable isolates of two plant viruses, raspberry bushy dwarf (RBDV) and zucchini yellow mosaic (ZYMV). For both viruses, only limited sequence information was available at the time of primer design, but most of the isolates which were tested could be amplified (the one exception being a serologically quite distinct isolate of ZYMV). Restriction endonucleases revealing diagnostic RFLPs were readily identified. Each of two isolates of ZYMV could be detected in the presence of the other and the relative proportions approximately quantified by visual estimation of the relative intensity of the appropriate bands. A range of isolates of different RBDV pathotypes were compared; isolates were grouped in ways that accorded with their known history. Computer analysis of the published sequence from which the primers had been derived showed the sequenced isolate to be identical with an isolate imported from the USSR. The PCR/RFLP procedure is rapid (it can be completed in less than 2 days), effective and will probably be generally applicable to distinguishing closely related virus isolates, even where little sequence information is available.

  4. Catalytic center of lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase: isolation and sequence of diisopropyl fluorophosphate-labeled peptides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Y.B.; Yueksel, U.G.; Gracy, R.W.; Lacko, A.G.

    1987-02-27

    Lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) was purified from hog plasma and subsequently reacted with (/sup 3/H)-Diisopropyl fluorophosphate (DFP). The labeled enzyme was digested with pepsin and the peptides separated by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Two radioactive peptides were isolated, subjected to automated amino acid sequencing and yielded the following data: A) Ile-Ser-Leu-Gly-Ala-Pro-Trp-Gly-Gly-Ser, and B) Tyr-Ile-Phe-Asp-x-Gly-Phe-Pro-Tyr-x-Asp-Pro-Val. Both of these sequences represent very highly conserved regions of the enzyme when compared to the sequence of human LCAT. Peptide (A) is considered to represent the catalytic center of LCAT based on comparisons with data reported in the literature.

  5. MoS2 monolayer catalyst doped with isolated Co atoms for the hydrodeoxygenation reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guoliang; Robertson, Alex W.; Li, Molly Meng-Jung; Kuo, Winson C. H.; Darby, Matthew T.; Muhieddine, Mohamad H.; Lin, Yung-Chang; Suenaga, Kazu; Stamatakis, Michail; Warner, Jamie H.; Tsang, Shik Chi Edman

    2017-08-01

    The conversion of oxygen-rich biomass into hydrocarbon fuels requires efficient hydrodeoxygenation catalysts during the upgrading process. However, traditionally prepared CoMoS2 catalysts, although efficient for hydrodesulfurization, are not appropriate due to their poor activity, sulfur loss and rapid deactivation at elevated temperature. Here, we report the synthesis of MoS2 monolayer sheets decorated with isolated Co atoms that bond covalently to sulfur vacancies on the basal planes that, when compared with conventionally prepared samples, exhibit superior activity, selectivity and stability for the hydrodeoxygenation of 4-methylphenol to toluene. This higher activity allows the reaction temperature to be reduced from the typically used 300 °C to 180 °C and thus allows the catalysis to proceed without sulfur loss and deactivation. Experimental analysis and density functional theory calculations reveal a large number of sites at the interface between the Co and Mo atoms on the MoS2 basal surface and we ascribe the higher activity to the presence of sulfur vacancies that are created local to the observed Co-S-Mo interfacial sites.

  6. Optimal DNA Isolation Method for Detection of Nontuberculous Mycobacteria by Polymerase Chain Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Samira; Esfahani, Bahram Nasr; Moghim, Sharareh; Mirhendi, Hossein; Zaniani, Fatemeh Riyahi; Safaei, Hajieh Ghasemian; Fazeli, Hossein; Salehi, Mahshid

    2017-01-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are a group of opportunistic pathogens and these are widely dispersed in water and soil resources. Identification of mycobacteria isolates by conventional methods including biochemical tests, growth rates, colony pigmentation, and presence of acid-fast bacilli is widely used, but these methods are time-consuming, labor-intensive, and may sometimes remain inconclusive. The DNA was extracted from NTM cultures using CTAB, Chelex, Chelex + Nonidet P-40, FTA ® Elute card, and boiling The quantity and quality of the DNA extracted via these methods were determined using UV-photometer at 260 and 280 nm, and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of the heat-shock protein 65 gene with serially diluted DNA samples. The CTAB method showed more positive results at 1:10-1:100,000 at which the DNA amount was substantial. With the Chelex method of DNA extraction, PCR amplification was detected at 1:10 and 1:1000 dilutions. According to the electrophoresis results, the CTAB and Chelex DNA extraction methods were more successful in comparison with the others as regard producing suitable concentrations of DNA with the minimum use of PCR inhibitor.

  7. Optimal DNA Isolation Method for Detection of Nontuberculous Mycobacteria by Polymerase Chain Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samira Mohammadi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM are a group of opportunistic pathogens and these are widely dispersed in water and soil resources. Identification of mycobacteria isolates by conventional methods including biochemical tests, growth rates, colony pigmentation, and presence of acid-fast bacilli is widely used, but these methods are time-consuming, labor-intensive, and may sometimes remain inconclusive. Materials and Methods: The DNA was extracted from NTM cultures using CTAB, Chelex, Chelex + Nonidet P-40, FTA® Elute card, and boiling The quantity and quality of the DNA extracted via these methods were determined using UV-photometer at 260 and 280 nm, and polymerase chain reaction (PCR amplification of the heat-shock protein 65 gene with serially diluted DNA samples. Results: The CTAB method showed more positive results at 1:10–1:100,000 at which the DNA amount was substantial. With the Chelex method of DNA extraction, PCR amplification was detected at 1:10 and 1:1000 dilutions. Conclusions: According to the electrophoresis results, the CTAB and Chelex DNA extraction methods were more successful in comparison with the others as regard producing suitable concentrations of DNA with the minimum use of PCR inhibitor.

  8. Bacterial Reaction Centers Purified with Styrene Maleic Acid Copolymer Retain Native Membrane Functional Properties and Display Enhanced Stability**

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swainsbury, David J K; Scheidelaar, Stefan; van Grondelle, Rienk; Killian, J Antoinette; Jones, Michael R

    2014-01-01

    Integral membrane proteins often present daunting challenges for biophysical characterization, a fundamental issue being how to select a surfactant that will optimally preserve the individual structure and functional properties of a given membrane protein. Bacterial reaction centers offer a rare opportunity to compare the properties of an integral membrane protein in different artificial lipid/surfactant environments with those in the native bilayer. Here, we demonstrate that reaction centers purified using a styrene maleic acid copolymer remain associated with a complement of native lipids and do not display the modified functional properties that typically result from detergent solubilization. Direct comparisons show that reaction centers are more stable in this copolymer/lipid environment than in a detergent micelle or even in the native membrane, suggesting a promising new route to exploitation of such photovoltaic integral membrane proteins in device applications. PMID:25212490

  9. FUNGI ISOLATED FROM THE EXCRETA OF WILD BIRDS IN SCREENING CENTERS IN PELOTAS, RS, BRAZIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josiara Furtado Mendes

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The identification of the fungal species belonging to the healthy microflora in animals is a precondition for the recognition of pathological processes causing them. The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of potentially pathogenic fungi in the feces of wild birds collected in Screening Centers. Samples were collected from the feces of 50 cages with different species of birds. The samples were processed according to the modified method STAIB and the plates incubated at 32 °C for up to ten days with daily observation for detection of fungal growth. The isolation of the following species was observed: Malassezia pachydermatis, Candida albicans, C. famata, C. guilliermondii, C. sphaerica, C. globosa, C. catenulata, C. ciferri, C. intermedia, Cryptococcus laurentii, Trichosporon asahii, Geotrichum klebahnii, Aspergillus spp., A. niger and Penicillium spp. Knowing the character of some opportunistic fungi is important in identifying them, facilitating the adoption of preventive measures, such as proper cleaning of cages, since the accumulation of excreta may indicate a risk for both health professionals and centers for screening public health.

  10. Guiding-center models for edge plasmas and numerical simulations of isolated plasma filaments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madsen, Jens

    2010-09-01

    The work presented in this thesis falls into two categories: development of reduced dynamical models applicable to edge turbulence in magnetically confined fusion plasmas and numerical simulations of isolated plasma filaments in the scrape-off layer region investigating the influence of finite Larmor radius effects on the radial plasma transport. The coexistence of low-frequency fluctuations, having length scales comparable to the ion gyroradius, steep pressure gradients and strong E x B flows in the edge region of fusion plasmas violates the standard gyrokinetic ordering. In this thesis two models are presented that overcome some of the difficulties associated with the development of reduced dynamical models applicable to the edge. Second order guiding-center coordinates are derived using the phasespace Lie transform method. Using a variational principle the corresponding Vlasov-Maxwell equations expressed in guiding-center coordinates are derived including a local energy theorem. The second order terms describe lowest order finite Larmor radius effects. This set of equations might be relevant for edge plasmas due to the capability of capturing strong E x B flows and lowest order finite Larmor radius effects self-consistently. Next, an extension of the existing gyrokinetic formalism with strong flows is presented. In this work the background electric fields is dynamical, whereas earlier contributions did only incorporate a stationary electric field. In an ordering relevant for edge plasma turbulence, fully electromagnetic second order gyrokinetic coordinates and the corresponding gyrokinetic Vlasov-Maxwell equations are derived, including a local energy theorem. By taking the polarization and magnetization densities in the drift kinetic limit, we present the gyrokinetic Vlasov-Maxwell equations in a more tractable form, which could be relevant for direct numerical simulations of edge plasma turbulence. Finally, an investigation of the influence of finite Larmor

  11. Guiding-center models for edge plasmas and numerical simulations of isolated plasma filaments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madsen, Jens

    2010-09-15

    The work presented in this thesis falls into two categories: development of reduced dynamical models applicable to edge turbulence in magnetically confined fusion plasmas and numerical simulations of isolated plasma filaments in the scrape-off layer region investigating the influence of finite Larmor radius effects on the radial plasma transport. The coexistence of low-frequency fluctuations, having length scales comparable to the ion gyroradius, steep pressure gradients and strong E x B flows in the edge region of fusion plasmas violates the standard gyrokinetic ordering. In this thesis two models are presented that overcome some of the difficulties associated with the development of reduced dynamical models applicable to the edge. Second order guiding-center coordinates are derived using the phasespace Lie transform method. Using a variational principle the corresponding Vlasov-Maxwell equations expressed in guiding-center coordinates are derived including a local energy theorem. The second order terms describe lowest order finite Larmor radius effects. This set of equations might be relevant for edge plasmas due to the capability of capturing strong E x B flows and lowest order finite Larmor radius effects self-consistently. Next, an extension of the existing gyrokinetic formalism with strong flows is presented. In this work the background electric fields is dynamical, whereas earlier contributions did only incorporate a stationary electric field. In an ordering relevant for edge plasma turbulence, fully electromagnetic second order gyrokinetic coordinates and the corresponding gyrokinetic Vlasov-Maxwell equations are derived, including a local energy theorem. By taking the polarization and magnetization densities in the drift kinetic limit, we present the gyrokinetic Vlasov-Maxwell equations in a more tractable form, which could be relevant for direct numerical simulations of edge plasma turbulence. Finally, an investigation of the influence of finite Larmor

  12. [High activity antiretroviral therapy change associated to adverse drug reactions in a specialized center in Venezuela].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subiela, José D; Dapena, Elida

    2016-03-01

    Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) represent the first cause of change of the first-line highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) regimen, therefore, they constitute the main limiting factor in the long-term follow up of HIV patients in treatment. A retrospective study was carried out in a specialized center in Lara State, Venezuela, including 99 patients over 18 years of age who had change of first-line HAART regimen due to ADRs, between 2010 and 2013. The aims of this research were to describe the sociodemographic and clinical variables, frequency of ADRs related to change of HAART, duration of the first-line HAART regimen, to determine the drugs associated with ARVs and to identify the risk factors. The ADRs constituted 47.5% of all causes of change of first-line HAART regimen, the median duration was 1.08±0.28 years. The most frequent ADRs were anemia (34.3%), hypersensitivity reactions (20.2%) and gastrointestinal intolerance (13.1%). The most frequent ARV regimen type was the protease inhibitors-based regimen (59.6%), but zidovudine was the ARV most linked to ADRs (41.4%). The regression analysis showed increased risk of ADRs in singles and students in the univariate analysis and heterosexuals and homosexuals in multivariate analysis; and decreased risk in active workers. The present work shows the high prevalence of ADRs in the studied population and represents the first case-based study that describes the pharmacoepidemiology of a cohort of HIV-positive patients treated in Venezuela.

  13. Proton conduction within the reaction centers of Rhodobacter capsulatus: the electrostatic role of the protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maróti, P; Hanson, D K; Baciou, L; Schiffer, M; Sebban, P

    1994-06-07

    Light-induced charge separation in the photosynthetic reaction center results in delivery of two electrons and two protons to the terminal quinone acceptor QB. In this paper, we have used flash-induced absorbance spectroscopy to study three strains that share identical amino acid sequences in the QB binding site, all of which lack the protonatable amino acids Glu-L212 and Asp-L213. These strains are the photosynthetically incompetent site-specific mutant Glu-L212/Asp-L213-->Ala-L212/Ala-L213 and two different photocompetent derivatives that carry both alanine substitutions and an intergenic suppressor mutation located far from QB (class 3 strain, Ala-Ala + Arg-M231-->Leu; class 4 strain, Ala-Ala + Asn-M43-->Asp). At pH 8 in the double mutant, we observe a concomitant decrease of nearly 4 orders of magnitude in the rate constants of second electron and proton transfer to QB compared to the wild type. Surprisingly, these rates are increased to about the same extent in both types of suppressor strains but remain > 2 orders of magnitude smaller than those of the wild type. In the double mutant, at pH 8, the loss of Asp-L213 and Glu-L212 leads to a substantial stabilization (> or = 60 meV) of the semiquinone energy level. Both types of compensatory mutations partially restore, to nearly the same level, the original free energy difference for electron transfer from primary quinone QA to QB. The pH dependence of the electron and proton transfer processes in the double-mutant and the suppressor strains suggests that when reaction centers of the double mutant are shifted to lower pH (1.5-2 units), they function like those of the suppressor strains at physiological pH. Our data suggest that the main effect of the compensatory mutations is to partially restore the negative electrostatic environment of QB and to increase an apparent "functional" pK of the system for efficient proton transfer to the active site. This emphasizes the role of the protein in tuning the

  14. [On the influence of local molecular environment on the redox potential of electron transfer cofactors in bacterial photosynthetic reaction centers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasil'nikov, P M; Noks, P P; Rubin, A B

    2011-01-01

    The addition of cryosolvents (glycerol, dimethylsulfoxide) to a water solution containing bacterial photosynthetic reaction centers changes the redox potential of the bacteriochlorophyll dimer, but does not affect the redox potential of the quinone primary acceptor. It has been shown that the change in redox potential can be produced by changes of the electrostatic interactions between cofactors and the local molecular environment modified by additives entered into the solution. The degree of influence of a solvent on the redox potential of various cofactors is determined by degree of availability of these cofactors for molecules of solvent, which depends on the arrangement of cofactors in the structure of reaction centers.

  15. Kinetics of Several Oxygen-Containing Carbon-Centered Free Radical Reactions with Nitric Oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rissanen, Matti P; Ihlenborg, Marvin; Pekkanen, Timo T; Timonen, Raimo S

    2015-07-16

    Kinetics of four carbon-centered, oxygen-containing free radical reactions with nitric oxide (NO) were investigated as a function of temperature at a few Torr pressure of helium, employing flow tube reactors coupled to a laser-photolysis/resonance-gas-discharge-lamp photoionization mass spectrometer (LP-RPIMS). Rate coefficients were directly determined from radical (R) decay signals under pseudo-first-order conditions ([R]0 ≪ [NO]). The obtained rate coefficients showed negative temperature dependences, typical for a radical-radical association process, and can be represented by the following parametrizations (all in units of cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1)): k(CH2OH + NO) = (4.76 × 10(-21)) × (T/300 K)(15.92) × exp[50700/(RT)] (T = 266-363 K, p = 0.79-3.44 Torr); k(CH3CHOH + NO) = (1.27 × 10(-16)) × (T/300 K)(6.81) × exp[28700/(RT)] (T = 241-363 K, p = 0.52-3.43 Torr); k(CH3OCH2 + NO) = (3.58 ± 0.12) × 10(-12) × (T/300 K)(-3.17±0.14) (T = 221-363 K, p = 0.50-0.80 Torr); k(T)3 = 9.62 × 10(-11) × (T/300 K)(-5.99) × exp[-7100/(RT)] (T = 221-473 K, p = 1.41-2.95 Torr), with the uncertainties given as standard errors of the fits and the overall uncertainties estimated as ±20%. The rate of CH3OCH2 + NO reaction was measured in two density ranges due to its observed considerable pressure dependence, which was not found in the studied hydroxyalkyl reactions. In addition, the CH3CO + NO rate coefficient was determined at two temperatures resulting in k298K(CH3CO + NO) = (5.6 ± 2.8) × 10(-13) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1). No products were found during these experiments, reasons for which are briefly discussed.

  16. Assembly of photosynthetic reaction center with ABA tri-block polymersomes: highlights on the protein localization.

    KAUST Repository

    Tangorra, Roberto Rocco

    2015-07-07

    The reconstitution of the integral membrane protein photosynthetic reaction center (RC) in polymersomes, i. e. artificial closed vesicles, was achieved by the micelle-to-vesicle transition technique, a very mild protocol based on size exclusion chromatography often used to drive the incorporation of proteins contemporarily to liposomes formation. An optimized protocol was used to successfully reconstitute the protein in a fully active state in polymersomes formed by the tri-block copolymers PMOXA22-PDMS61-PMOXA22. The RC is very sensitive to its solubilizing environment and was used to probe the positioning of the protein in the vesicles. According to charge-recombination experiments and to the enzymatic activity assay, the RC is found to accommodate in the PMOXA22 region of the polymersome, facing the water bulk solution, rather than in the PDMS61 transmembrane-like region. Furthermore, polymersomes were found to preserve protein integrity efficiently as the biomimetic lipid bilayers but show a much longer temporal stability than lipid based vesicles.

  17. Early bacteriopheophytin reduction in charge separation in reaction centers of Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jingyi; van Stokkum, Ivo H M; Paparelli, Laura; Jones, Michael R; Groot, Marie Louise

    2013-06-04

    A question at the forefront of biophysical sciences is, to what extent do quantum effects and protein conformational changes play a role in processes such as biological sensing and energy conversion? At the heart of photosynthetic energy transduction lie processes involving ultrafast energy and electron transfers among a small number of tetrapyrrole pigments embedded in the interior of a protein. In the purple bacterial reaction center (RC), a highly efficient ultrafast charge separation takes place between a pair of bacteriochlorophylls: an accessory bacteriochlorophyll (B) and bacteriopheophytin (H). In this work, we applied ultrafast spectroscopy in the visible and near-infrared spectral region to Rhodobacter sphaeroides RCs to accurately track the timing of the electron on BA and HA via the appearance of the BA and HA anion bands. We observed an unexpectedly early rise of the HA⁻ band that challenges the accepted simple picture of stepwise electron transfer with 3 ps and 1 ps time constants. The implications for the mechanism of initial charge separation in bacterial RCs are discussed in terms of a possible adiabatic electron transfer step between BA and HA, and the effect of protein conformation on the electron transfer rate. Copyright © 2013 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Fragment molecular orbital study on electron tunneling mechanisms in bacterial photosynthetic reaction center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitoh-Nishioka, Hirotaka; Ando, Koji

    2012-11-01

    The tunneling mechanisms of electron transfers (ETs) in photosynthetic reaction center of Blastochloris viridis are studied by the ab initio fragment molecular orbital (FMO) method combined with the generalized Mulliken-Hush (GMH) and the bridge Green function (GF) calculations of the electronic coupling T(DA) and the tunneling current method for the ET pathway analysis at the fragment-based resolution. For the ET from batctriopheophytin (H(L)) to menaquinone (MQ), a major tunneling current through Trp M250 and a minor back flow via Ala M215, Ala M216, and His M217 are quantified. For the ET from MQ to ubiquinone, the major tunneling pathway via the nonheme Fe(2+) and His L190 is identified as well as minor pathway via His M217 and small back flows involving His L230, Glu M232, and His M264. At the given molecular structure from X-ray experiment, the spin state of the Fe(2+) ion, its replacement by Zn(2+), or its removal are found to affect the T(DA) value by factors within 2.2. The calculated T(DA) values, together with experimentally estimated values of the driving force and the reorganization energy, give the ET rates in reasonable agreement with experiments.

  19. Assembly of photosynthetic reaction center with ABA tri-block polymersomes: highlights on the protein localization.

    KAUST Repository

    Tangorra, Roberto Rocco; Operamolla, Alessandra; Milano, Francesco; Hassan Omar, Omar; Henrard, John; Comparelli, Roberto; Italiano, Francesca; Agostiano, Angela; De Leo, Vincenzo; Marotta, Roberto; Falqui, Andrea; Farinola, Gianluca; Trotta, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    The reconstitution of the integral membrane protein photosynthetic reaction center (RC) in polymersomes, i. e. artificial closed vesicles, was achieved by the micelle-to-vesicle transition technique, a very mild protocol based on size exclusion chromatography often used to drive the incorporation of proteins contemporarily to liposomes formation. An optimized protocol was used to successfully reconstitute the protein in a fully active state in polymersomes formed by the tri-block copolymers PMOXA22-PDMS61-PMOXA22. The RC is very sensitive to its solubilizing environment and was used to probe the positioning of the protein in the vesicles. According to charge-recombination experiments and to the enzymatic activity assay, the RC is found to accommodate in the PMOXA22 region of the polymersome, facing the water bulk solution, rather than in the PDMS61 transmembrane-like region. Furthermore, polymersomes were found to preserve protein integrity efficiently as the biomimetic lipid bilayers but show a much longer temporal stability than lipid based vesicles.

  20. Redox potential tuning through differential quinone binding in the photosynthetic reaction center of Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermaas, Josh V; Taguchi, Alexander T; Dikanov, Sergei A; Wraight, Colin A; Tajkhorshid, Emad

    2015-03-31

    Ubiquinone forms an integral part of the electron transport chain in cellular respiration and photosynthesis across a vast number of organisms. Prior experimental results have shown that the photosynthetic reaction center (RC) from Rhodobacter sphaeroides is only fully functional with a limited set of methoxy-bearing quinones, suggesting that specific interactions with this substituent are required to drive electron transport and the formation of quinol. The nature of these interactions has yet to be determined. Through parameterization of a CHARMM-compatible quinone force field and subsequent molecular dynamics simulations of the quinone-bound RC, we have investigated and characterized the interactions of the protein with the quinones in the Q(A) and Q(B) sites using both equilibrium simulation and thermodynamic integration. In particular, we identify a specific interaction between the 2-methoxy group of ubiquinone in the Q(B) site and the amide nitrogen of GlyL225 that we implicate in locking the orientation of the 2-methoxy group, thereby tuning the redox potential difference between the quinones occupying the Q(A) and Q(B) sites. Disruption of this interaction leads to weaker binding in a ubiquinone analogue that lacks a 2-methoxy group, a finding supported by reverse electron transfer electron paramagnetic resonance experiments of the Q(A)⁻Q(B)⁻ biradical and competitive binding assays.

  1. Site Energies of Active and Inactive Pheophytins in the Reaction Center of Photosystem II from Chlamydomonas Reinhardtii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acharya, K.; Neupane, B.; Zazubovich, V.; Sayre, R. T.; Picorel, R.; Seibert, M.; Jankowiak, R.

    2012-03-29

    It is widely accepted that the primary electron acceptor in various Photosystem II (PSII) reaction center (RC) preparations is pheophytin {alpha} (Pheo {alpha}) within the D1 protein (Pheo{sub D1}), while Pheo{sub D2} (within the D2 protein) is photochemically inactive. The Pheo site energies, however, have remained elusive, due to inherent spectral congestion. While most researchers over the past two decades placed the Q{sub y}-states of Pheo{sub D1} and Pheo{sub D2} bands near 678-684 and 668-672 nm, respectively, recent modeling [Raszewski et al. Biophys. J. 2005, 88, 986-998; Cox et al. J. Phys. Chem. B 2009, 113, 12364-12374] of the electronic structure of the PSII RC reversed the assignment of the active and inactive Pheos, suggesting that the mean site energy of Pheo{sub D1} is near 672 nm, whereas Pheo{sub D2} ({approx}677.5 nm) and Chl{sub D1} ({approx}680 nm) have the lowest energies (i.e., the Pheo{sub D2}-dominated exciton is the lowest excited state). In contrast, chemical pigment exchange experiments on isolated RCs suggested that both pheophytins have their Q{sub y} absorption maxima at 676-680 nm [Germano et al. Biochemistry 2001, 40, 11472-11482; Germano et al. Biophys. J. 2004, 86, 1664-1672]. To provide more insight into the site energies of both Pheo{sub D1} and Pheo{sub D2} (including the corresponding Q{sub x} transitions, which are often claimed to be degenerate at 543 nm) and to attest that the above two assignments are most likely incorrect, we studied a large number of isolated RC preparations from spinach and wild-type Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (at different levels of intactness) as well as the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutant (D2-L209H), in which the active branch Pheo{sub D1} is genetically replaced with chlorophyll {alpha} (Chl {alpha}). We show that the Q{sub x}-/Q{sub y}-region site energies of Pheo{sub D1} and Pheo{sub D2} are {approx}545/680 nm and {approx}541.5/670 nm, respectively, in good agreement with our previous assignment

  2. Polymerase chain reaction fingerprints of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus clinical isolates in Greece are related to certain antibiotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartzavali-Louki, Christina; Dimitracopoulos, George; Spiliopoulou, Iris

    2003-06-01

    Characterization of clinical isolates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and representatives of three MRSA clones from other hospitals was performed by arbitrarily primed polymerase chain reaction (AP-PCR) and antibiotic susceptibility patterns. All isolates were mecA-positive and two main antibiotypes have been characterized. Two major clones were identified with AP-PCR related to the aforementioned antibiotypes. The combination of antibiotypes with AP-PCR patterns successfully identified the two major clones in our hospital, which are identical with the MRSA clones previously characterized in Athens and in Central and North Greece.

  3. TREHALOSE-BASED ADDITIVE IMPROVED INTER-PRIMER BINDING SITE REACTIONS FOR DNA ISOLATED FROM RECALCITRANT PLANTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronika Lancíková

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Trehalose-based (TBT-PAR additive was tested in order to optimize PCR amplification for DNA isolated from recalcitrant plants. Retrotransposon-based inter-primer binding site reactions were significantly improved with TBT-PAR solution using genomic DNA isolated from flax (Linum usitatissimum L., genotypes Kyivskyi, Bethune grown in radio-contaminated and non-radioactive remediated Chernobyl experimental fields. Additionally, similar improvements were observed using 19 recalcitrant genotypes of maize (Zea mays L. and three genotypes of yacon (Smallanthus sonchifolius, Poepp. et Endl., genotypes PER05, ECU45, BOL22 grown in standard field conditions.

  4. Automated methods for single-stranded DNA isolation and dideoxynucleotide DNA sequencing reactions on a robotic workstation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mardis, E.R.; Roe, B.A.

    1989-01-01

    Automated procedures have been developed for both the simultaneous isolation of 96 single-stranded M13 chimeric template DNAs in less than two hours, and for simultaneously pipetting 24 dideoxynucleotide sequencing reactions on a commercially available laboratory workstation. The DNA sequencing results obtained by either radiolabeled or fluorescent methods are consistent with the premise that automation of these portions of DNA sequencing projects will improve the reproducibility of the DNA isolation and the procedures for these normally labor-intensive steps provides an approach for rapid acquisition of large amounts of high quality, reproducible DNA sequence data

  5. Report on the consultants` meeting on technical aspects of the co-operation of nuclear reaction data centers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemmel, H D; Schwerer, O; Wienke, H [eds.

    1995-10-01

    The IAEA Nuclear Data Section convenes in annual intervals coordination meetings of the Network of the Nuclear Reaction Data Center. The present meeting dealt with technical matters of the nuclear data compilation and exchange by means of the jointly operated computerized systems CINDA, EXFOR, ENDF and others. Refs, figs and tabs.

  6. A new pathway for transmembrane electron transfer in photosynthetic reaction centers of Rhodobacter sphaeroides not involving the excited special pair.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Brederode, M.E.; Jones, M.R.; van Mourik, F.; van Stokkum, I.H.M.; van Grondelle, R.

    1997-01-01

    It is generally accepted that electron transfer in bacterial photosynthesis is driven by the first singlet excited state of a special pair of bacteriochlorophylls (P*). We have examined the first steps of electron transfer in a mutant of the Rhodobacter sphaeroides reaction center in which charge

  7. A new pathway for transmembrane electron transfer in photosyntetic reaction centers of Rhodobacter sphaeroides not involving the excited special pair.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Brederode, M.E.; Jones, M.R.; van Mourik, F.; van Stokkum, I.H.M.; van Grondelle, R.

    1997-01-01

    It is generally accepted that electron transfer in bacterial photosynthesis is driven by the first singlet excited state of a special pair of bacteriochlorophylls (P*). We have examined the first steps of electron transfer in a mutant of the Rhodobacter sphaeroides reaction center in which charge

  8. Report on the consultants' meeting on technical aspects of the co-operation of nuclear reaction data centers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemmel, H.D.; Schwerer, O.; Wienke, H.

    1995-10-01

    The IAEA Nuclear Data Section convenes in annual intervals coordination meetings of the Network of the Nuclear Reaction Data Center. The present meeting dealt with technical matters of the nuclear data compilation and exchange by means of the jointly operated computerized systems CINDA, EXFOR, ENDF and others. Refs, figs and tabs

  9. Utilizing the dynamic stark shift as a probe for dielectric relaxation in photosynthetic reaction centers during charge separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhi; Lin, Su; Woodbury, Neal W

    2013-09-26

    In photosynthetic reaction centers, the electric field generated by light-induced charge separation produces electrochromic shifts in the transitions of reaction center pigments. The extent of this Stark shift indirectly reflects the effective field strength at a particular cofactor in the complex. The dynamics of the effective field strength near the two monomeric bacteriochlorophylls (BA and BB) in purple photosynthetic bacterial reaction centers has been explored near physiological temperature by monitoring the time-dependent Stark shift during charge separation (dynamic Stark shift). This dynamic Stark shift was determined through analysis of femtosecond time-resolved absorbance change spectra recorded in wild type reaction centers and in four mutants at position M210. In both wild type and the mutants, the kinetics of the dynamic Stark shift differ from those of electron transfer, though not in the same way. In wild type, the initial electron transfer and the increase in the effective field strength near the active-side monomer bacteriochlorophyll (BA) occur in synchrony, but the two signals diverge on the time scale of electron transfer to the quinone. In contrast, when tyrosine is replaced by aspartic acid at M210, the kinetics of the BA Stark shift and the initial electron transfer differ, but transfer to the quinone coincides with the decay of the Stark shift. This is interpreted in terms of differences in the dynamics of the local dielectric environment between the mutants and the wild type. In wild type, comparison of the Stark shifts associated with BA and BB on the two quasi-symmetric halves of the reaction center structure confirm that the effective dielectric constants near these cofactors are quite different when the reaction center is in the state P(+)QA(-), as previously determined by Steffen et al. at 1.5 K (Steffen, M. A.; et al. Science 1994, 264, 810-816). However, it is not possible to determine from static, low-temperature measurments if the

  10. Conformational differences between the methoxy groups of QA and QB site ubisemiquinones in bacterial reaction centers: a key role for methoxy group orientation in modulating ubiquinone redox potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taguchi, Alexander T; O'Malley, Patrick J; Wraight, Colin A; Dikanov, Sergei A

    2013-07-09

    Ubiquinone is an almost universal, membrane-associated redox mediator. Its ability to accept either one or two electrons allows it to function in critical roles in biological electron transport. The redox properties of ubiquinone in vivo are determined by its environment in the binding sites of proteins and by the dihedral angle of each methoxy group relative to the ring plane. This is an attribute unique to ubiquinone among natural quinones and could account for its widespread function with many different redox complexes. In this work, we use the photosynthetic reaction center as a model system for understanding the role of methoxy conformations in determining the redox potential of the ubiquinone/semiquinone couple. Despite the abundance of X-ray crystal structures for the reaction center, quinone site resolution has thus far been too low to provide a reliable measure of the methoxy dihedral angles of the primary and secondary quinones, QA and QB. We performed 2D ESEEM (HYSCORE) on isolated reaction centers with ubiquinones (13)C-labeled at the headgroup methyl and methoxy substituents, and have measured the (13)C isotropic and anisotropic components of the hyperfine tensors. Hyperfine couplings were compared to those derived by DFT calculations as a function of methoxy torsional angle allowing estimation of the methoxy dihedral angles for the semiquinones in the QA and QB sites. Based on this analysis, the orientation of the 2-methoxy groups are distinct in the two sites, with QB more out of plane by 20-25°. This corresponds to an ≈50 meV larger electron affinity for the QB quinone, indicating a substantial contribution to the experimental difference in redox potentials (60-75 mV) of the two quinones. The methods developed here can be readily extended to ubiquinone-binding sites in other protein complexes.

  11. Comparison of Ground Reaction Forces, Center of Pressure and Body Center of Mass Changes in the Voluntary, Semi-Voluntary and Involuntary Gait Termination in Healthy Young Men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    behrooz teymourian

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was comparing the ground reaction forces, center of pressure and body center of mass changes in voluntary, semi-voluntary and involuntary gait termination in healthy young men. Methods: In this study, 12 young men performed termination of gait in three different patterns. The variable of peak antero-posterior and vertical forces in two directions at both limbs, the time to reach peak and average forces in every limb in both directions, the center of pressure displacement of medio-lateral and antero-posterior direction for each limb and the net center of pressure and the displacement of the center of mass motion in all three motion plates were recorded using motion analysis system and force plate.The repeated measurements test was used to compare three patterns of gait termination at significance level of p&le0.5. Results: The results showed a significant difference in variables of peak antero-posterior force, the time to reach peak antero-posterior force and mean antero-posterior forces of the leading limb, the peak antero-posterior force of the trialing limbs, the depth force of leading limbs, medio-lateral cop of leading limbs displacement and vertical displacement of the center of mass, among different patterns of gait termination. Conclusion: While walking, the probability of a fall or collision damage, when a sudden or unexpected stop is required, increases. Therefore, more coordination between neuromuscular systems is required.

  12. The general theory of multistage geminate reactions of isolated pairs of reactants. III. Two-stage reversible dissociation in geminate reaction A + A↔C↔B + B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kipriyanov, Alexey A.; Kipriyanov, Alexander A.; Doktorov, Alexander B. [Voevodsky Institute of Chemical Kinetics and Combustion, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk 630090, Russia and Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation)

    2016-04-14

    Specific two-stage reversible reaction A + A↔C↔B + B of the decay of species C reactants by two independent transition channels is considered on the basis of the general theory of multistage reactions of isolated pairs of reactants. It is assumed that at the initial instant of time, the reacting system contains only reactants C. The employed general approach has made it possible to consider, in the general case, the inhomogeneous initial distribution of reactants, and avoid application of model concepts of a reaction system structure (i.e., of the structure of reactants and their molecular mobility). Slowing of multistage reaction kinetics as compared to the kinetics of elementary stages is established and physically interpreted. To test approximations (point approximation) used to develop a universal kinetic law, a widely employed specific model of spherical particles with isotropic reactivity diffusing in solution is applied. With this particular model as an example, ultimate kinetics of chemical conversion of reactants is investigated. The question concerning the depths of chemical transformation at which long-term asymptotes are reached is studied.

  13. The general theory of multistage geminate reactions of isolated pairs of reactants. III. Two-stage reversible dissociation in geminate reaction A + A ↔ C ↔ B + B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kipriyanov, Alexey A; Kipriyanov, Alexander A; Doktorov, Alexander B

    2016-04-14

    Specific two-stage reversible reaction A + A ↔ C ↔ B + B of the decay of species C reactants by two independent transition channels is considered on the basis of the general theory of multistage reactions of isolated pairs of reactants. It is assumed that at the initial instant of time, the reacting system contains only reactants C. The employed general approach has made it possible to consider, in the general case, the inhomogeneous initial distribution of reactants, and avoid application of model concepts of a reaction system structure (i.e., of the structure of reactants and their molecular mobility). Slowing of multistage reaction kinetics as compared to the kinetics of elementary stages is established and physically interpreted. To test approximations (point approximation) used to develop a universal kinetic law, a widely employed specific model of spherical particles with isotropic reactivity diffusing in solution is applied. With this particular model as an example, ultimate kinetics of chemical conversion of reactants is investigated. The question concerning the depths of chemical transformation at which long-term asymptotes are reached is studied.

  14. Detection of Maillard reaction products by a coupled HPLC-Fraction collector technique and FTIR characterization of Cu(II)-complexation with the isolated species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioannou, Aristos; Daskalakis, Vangelis; Varotsis, Constantinos

    2017-08-01

    The isolation of reaction products of asparagine with reducing sugars at alkaline pH and high temperature has been probed by a combination of high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled with a Fraction Collector. The UV-vis and FTIR spectra of the isolated Maillard reaction products showed structure-sensitive changes as depicted by deamination events and formation of asparagine-saccharide conjugates. The initial reaction species of the Asn-Gluc reaction were also characterized by Density Functional Theory (DFT) methods. Evidence for Cu (II) metal ion complexation with the Maillard reaction products is supported by UV-vis and FTIR spectroscopy.

  15. Detection of Chloramphenicol Resistance Genes (cat in Clinical Isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa with Polymerase Chain Reaction Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiana Milanda

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic Gram negative bacteria, which may cause infection in eyes, ears, skin, bones, central nervous system, gastrointestinal tract, circulatory system, heart, respiratory system, and urinary tract. Recently, chloramphenicol is no longer used as the main option of the therapy due of its resistance case. The aim of this research was to detect the presence of gene which is responsible to chloramphenicol resistance in clinical isolates of P.aeruginosa. These bacteria isolated from pus of external otitis patients in Hasan Sadikin Hospital in Bandung City. Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR method (colony-PCR and DNA-PCR were performed to detect this resistance gene. Electropherogram from PCR products showed that the chloramphenicol resistance in clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa was caused by cat gene (317 bp. Based on this research, cat gene may be used to detect the chloramphenicol resistance in patients with external ostitis.

  16. Reactions of laser ablated uranium with nitrogen studied using matrix isolation spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sankaran, K.; Sundararajan, K.; Viswanathan, K.S.

    1999-01-01

    Unusual reactions were found to occur when uranium was laser ablated in the presence of nitrogen. The reaction products were trapped in a rigid inert gas matrix and studied using infrared spectroscopy. The species formed were strongly dependent on the partial pressure of nitrogen in the matrix gas used during the ablation process; at low nitrogen partial pressures uranium dinitride (NUN) was the major reaction product, while at high partial pressures of nitrogen the mononitride, UN, was the predominant product. (author)

  17. Quinone reduction via secondary B-branch electron transfer in mutant bacterial reaction centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laible, Philip D; Kirmaier, Christine; Udawatte, Chandani S M; Hofman, Samuel J; Holten, Dewey; Hanson, Deborah K

    2003-02-18

    Symmetry-related branches of electron-transfer cofactors-initiating with a primary electron donor (P) and terminating in quinone acceptors (Q)-are common features of photosynthetic reaction centers (RC). Experimental observations show activity of only one of them-the A branch-in wild-type bacterial RCs. In a mutant RC, we now demonstrate that electron transfer can occur along the entire, normally inactive B-branch pathway to reduce the terminal acceptor Q(B) on the time scale of nanoseconds. The transmembrane charge-separated state P(+)Q(B)(-) is created in this manner in a Rhodobacter capsulatus RC containing the F(L181)Y-Y(M208)F-L(M212)H-W(M250)V mutations (YFHV). The W(M250)V mutation quantitatively blocks binding of Q(A), thereby eliminating Q(B) reduction via the normal A-branch pathway. Full occupancy of the Q(B) site by the native UQ(10) is ensured (without the necessity of reconstitution by exogenous quinone) by purification of RCs with the mild detergent, Deriphat 160-C. The lifetime of P(+)Q(B)(-) in the YFHV mutant RC is >6 s (at pH 8.0, 298 K). This charge-separated state is not formed upon addition of competitive inhibitors of Q(B) binding (terbutryn or stigmatellin). Furthermore, this lifetime is much longer than the value of approximately 1-1.5 s found when P(+)Q(B)(-) is produced in the wild-type RC by A-side activity alone. Collectively, these results demonstrate that P(+)Q(B)(-) is formed solely by activity of the B-branch carriers in the YFHV RC. In comparison, P(+)Q(B)(-) can form by either the A or B branches in the YFH RC, as indicated by the biexponential lifetimes of approximately 1 and approximately 6-10 s. These findings suggest that P(+)Q(B)(-) states formed via the two branches are distinct and that P(+)Q(B)(-) formed by the B side does not decay via the normal (indirect) pathway that utilizes the A-side cofactors when present. These differences may report on structural and energetic factors that further distinguish the functional

  18. Report compiled by Research Center for Carbonaceous Resources, Institute for Chemical Reaction Science, Tohoku University; Tohoku Daigaku Hanno Kagaku Kenkyusho tanso shigen hanno kenkyu center hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-04-01

    The Research Center for Carbonaceous Resources was established in April 1991 for the purpose of developing a comprehensive process for converting carbonaceous resources into clean fuels or into materials equipped with advanced functions. In this report, the track records etc. of the center are introduced. Under study in the conversion process research department is the organization of a comprehensive coal conversion process which will be a combination of solvent extraction, catalytic decomposition, and catalytic gasification, whose goal is to convert coal in a clean way at high efficiency. Under study in the conversion catalyst research department are the development of a coal denitrogenation method, development of a low-temperature gasification method by use of inexpensive catalysts, synthesis of C{sub 2} hydrocarbons in a methane/carbon dioxide reaction, etc. Other endeavors under way involve the designing and development of new organic materials such as new carbon materials and a study of the foundation on which such efforts stand, that is, the study of the control of reactions between solids. Furthermore, in the study of interfacial reaction control, the contact gasification of coal, brown coal ion exchange capacity and surface conditions, carbonization of cation exchanged brown coal, etc., are being developed. (NEDO)

  19. Clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) reduce costs in the management of isolated splenic injuries at pediatric trauma centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, Ivan M; Zurakowski, David; Chen, Qiaoli; Mooney, David P

    2013-02-01

    The American Pediatric Surgical Association Trauma Committee proposed the use of a clinical practice guideline (CPG) for the non-operative management of isolated splenic injuries in 1998. An analysis was conducted to determine the financial impact of CPGs on the management of these injuries. The Pediatric Health Information System database, which contains data from 44 children's hospitals, was used to identify children who sustained a graded isolated splenic injury between June 2005 and June 2010. Demographics, length of stay (LOS), readmission rates, and laboratory, imaging, procedural, and total cost data were determined for all hospitals verified as a pediatric trauma center by the American College of Surgeons and/or designated by their local authority. Comparisons were made between facilities self-identifying as having a splenic injury management CPG and those without a CPG. Children (1,154) with isolated splenic injuries (grades 1-4) were cared for in 26 pediatric trauma centers: 20 with a CPG and 6 without (non-CPG). Median costs were significantly lower at CPG than non-CPG centers for imaging (US $163 vs. US $641, P splenic injuries at a pediatric trauma center results in significantly reduced imaging, laboratory, and total hospital costs independent of patient age, gender, grade, and LOS.

  20. Discrimination of Arcobacter butzleri isolates by polymerase chain reaction-mediated DNA fingerprinting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Atabay, H. I.; Bang, Dang Duong; Aydin, F.

    2002-01-01

    Aims: The objective of this study was to subtype Arcobacter butzleri isolates using RAPD-PCR. Methods and Results: Thirty-five A. butzleri isolates obtained from chicken carcasses were examined. PCR-mediated DNA fingerprinting technique with primers of the variable sequence motifs was used...... to detect polymorphism within the isolates. Eleven distinct DNA profiles were obtained as follows: Of the 35 strains, 10 as profile 4; seven as profile 1; five as profile 3; three as profiles 2 and 9; two as profile 10; one as profiles 5, 6, 7, 8 and 11. Conclusions: Chicken carcasses sold in markets were...... found to be contaminated with several different strains of A. butzleri . RAPD-PCR technique was found to be a useful technique for distinguishing A. butzleri isolates. Significance and Impact of the Study: The presence of several different A. butzleri strains on chicken carcasses may indicate multiple...

  1. Photochemistry and reactions of OH- defects and F centers in alkali halides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morato, S.P.; Luety, F.

    1978-01-01

    Aditively colored KCl:OH - crystals showed under a combined UV and VIS irradiation, a nearly complete and irreversible destruction of all F centers and visible absorption in the crystal. Only upon heating the crystal above 650 0 C the F center coloration becomes partially restored. The photodissociation of the OH - (under UV light) together with the photoionization of the F center (under VIS light) produces a not effects where all the F centers are converted into U centers. These photoreactions produces high contrast visible images that are completely stable under light at RT. Besides the optical information storage aspect of this effect these photoreaction s can also be used for controlled production of Usub(A) centers if the crystal also contains a foreign metallic impurity such a Na + ion [pt

  2. Seismic Response and Performance Evaluation of Self-Centering LRB Isolators Installed on the CBF Building under NF Ground Motions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junwon Seo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper mainly treats the seismic behavior of lead-rubber bearing (LRB isolation systems with superealstic shape memory alloy (SMA bending bars functioning as damper and self-centering devices. The conventional LRB isolators that are usually installed at the column bases supply extra flexibility to the centrically braced frame (CBF building with a view to elongate its vibration period, and thus make a contribution to mitigating seismic acceleration transferred from ground to structure. However, these base isolation systems are somehow susceptible to shear failure due to the lack of lateral resistance. In the construction site, they have been used to be integrated with displacement control dampers additionally withstanding lateral seismic forces. For this motivation, LRB isolation systems equipped with superelastic SMA bending bars, which possess not only excellent energy dissipation but also outstanding recentering capability, are proposed in this study. These reinforced and recentering LRB base isolators are modeled as nonlinear component springs, and then assigned into the bases of 2D frame models used for numerical simulation. Their seismic performance and capacity in the base-isolated frame building can be evaluated through nonlinear dynamic analyses conducted with historic ground motion data. After comparative study with analyses results, it is clearly shown that 2D frame models with proposed LRB isolators generally have smaller maximum displacements than those with conventional LRB isolators. Furthermore, the LRB isolation systems with superelastic SMA bending bars effectively reduce residual displacement as compared to those with steel bending bars because they provide more flexibility and recentering force to the entire building structure.

  3. On the nature of organic and inorganic centers that bifurcate electrons, coupling exergonic and endergonic oxidation-reduction reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, John W; Beratan, David N; Schut, Gerrit J; Adams, Michael W W

    2018-04-19

    Bifurcating electrons to couple endergonic and exergonic electron-transfer reactions has been shown to have a key role in energy conserving redox enzymes. Bifurcating enzymes require a redox center that is capable of directing electron transport along two spatially separate pathways. Research into the nature of electron bifurcating sites indicates that one of the keys is the formation of a low potential oxidation state to satisfy the energetics required of the endergonic half reaction, indicating that any redox center (organic or inorganic) that can exist in multiple oxidation states with sufficiently separated redox potentials should be capable of electron bifurcation. In this Feature Article, we explore a paradigm for bifurcating electrons down independent high and low potential pathways, and describe redox cofactors that have been demonstrated or implicated in driving this unique biochemistry.

  4. Reaction

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    19 oct. 2017 ... Reaction to Mohamed Said Nakhli et al. concerning the article: "When the axillary block remains the only alternative in a 5 year old child". .... Bertini L1, Savoia G, De Nicola A, Ivani G, Gravino E, Albani A et al ... 2010;7(2):101-.

  5. Glial reaction in visual centers upon whole-body combined irradiation with microwaves and x-radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Logvinov, S.V.

    1989-01-01

    A single whole-body preirradiation with thermogenous microwaves modifies the dynamics of the glial reactions of visual centers of ginea pigs induced by median lethal X-radiation doses. A combination of the two factors products the synergistic effect, estimated by the degree of alteration of astrocytes and oligodendroglyocytes at early times after exposure, leads to early activation of microglia, and reduces radiation-induced alterations in glia at later times (25-60 days)

  6. Serological cross-reaction between O-antigens of Shigella dysenteriae type 4 and an environmental Escherichia albertii isolate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Mohammed Ziaur; Akter, Selina; Azmuda, Nafisa; Sultana, Munawar; Weill, François-Xavier; Khan, Sirajul Islam; Grimont, Patrick A D; Birkeland, Nils-Kåre

    2013-11-01

    An environmental freshwater bacterial isolate, DM104, appearing as Shigella-like colonies on selective agar plates was found to show strong and specific serological cross-reactivity with Shigella dysenteriae type 4. Biochemical identification according to the analytical profile index, molecular serotyping by restriction of the amplified O-antigen gene cluster (rfb-RFLP), together with phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene and multi-locus sequence analysis, identified the isolate as Escherichia albertii. rfb-RFLP of DM104, revealed a profile different from that of S. dysenteriae type 4. However, western blot analysis of extracted lipopolysaccharides demonstrated strong cross-reactivity with S. dysenteriae type 4 using specific monovalent antisera and a lipopolysaccharide gel banding profile similar to that of S. dysenteriae type 4. The observed O-antigen cross-reaction between an E. albertii isolate and S. dysenteriae extends our knowledge of the extent of O-antigen cross-reaction within the Escherichia/Shigella group of organisms, and offers the possibility of using DM104 and similar cross-reacting strains as shigellosis vaccine candidates.

  7. PCR (Polymerase Chain Reaction) Assay On Antibiotics Resistant Clinical Isolates Of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    R, Maria Lina; S, Dadang; Suhadi, F.

    2000-01-01

    To detect to DNA of 9 drug-resistant isolates of m. tuberculosis such as isoniazid, streptomycin, isoniazid + streptomycin and isoniazid + rifampisin- resistant isolates, the DNA amplification by using PCR assay was carried out after lysing the bacterial cells. Two primer pairs for amplification used were Pt8 and Pt9 and Pt3 and Pt6. The amplified DNA taeget of 8 drug-resistant isolates and 1 drug-resistant isolate by means Pt8 8 Pt9 primer, gave the positive and negative result, respectively. Presence of amplified DNA target fragmens/bands on agarose gel, showed the positive result and vice verse. PCR process by using Pt3 and Pt6 primer revealed the positive results on 2 drug-resistant islates, whereas there was no amplified DNA bands from the other 7 isolates. DNA amplification by using either Pt8 and Pt9 or Pt3 and Pt6 primers occurred on H sub.37Rv strain DNA. Size of the amplified DNA products with Pt8 and Pt9 and Pt3 and Pt6 primers were 541 bp and 188 bp, respectively

  8. Polymerase Chain Reaction, Bacteriologic Detection and Antibiogram of Bacteria Isolated from Otitis Media with Effusion in Children, Shiraz, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmood Shishegar

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Otitis media with effusion is one of the leading causes of hearing loss in children. Effective treatment of effusion in the middle ear requires appropriate empirical treatment and characterization of responsible pathogens. Objective of the present study was to detect pathogens in clinical samples from patients with otitis media with effusion in our area and to determine the sensitivity profile of isolated organisms to commonly used antibiotics. Methods: Sixty three samples of middle ear effusion were aseptically obtained from 36 children, who had been treated up to at least two weeks before sampling. They were analyzed using standard bacteriological and multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR assays. Antibiotic susceptibility tests were also performed. Results: PCR analysis showed that DNA of Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae and Moraxella catarrhalis were present in 60 (95.2% of the samples. The culture-positive effusion for Streptococcus Pneumoniae, HaemophilusInfluenzae and Moraxella catarrhalis was 34.9%. Almost all isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniaee were sensitive to ciprofloxacin and erythromycin, and none of them was sensitive to co-trimoxazole. None of H. Influenzae isolates was sensitive to erythromycin, cefixim, co-trimoxazole, ampicillin and amoxicillin. None of M. Catarrhalis isolates was sensitive to ceftriaxone, co-trimoxazole, ampicillin and amoxicillin. Conclusion: Compared with other studies using PCR method, the number of H. influenza isolates was in higher in the present study (95.2%. Antibiotic sensitivity profiles of pathogens isolated in this study were different from others. Thus, we can determine empirical antibiotic therapy based on sensi-tivity profile in our geographic area.

  9. Isolation and Characterization of Mobile Genetic Elements from Microbial Assemblages Obtained from the Field Research Center Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patricia Sobecky; Cassie Hodges; Kerri Lafferty; Mike Humphreys; Melanie Raimondo; Kristin Tuttle; Tamar Barkay

    2004-03-17

    Considerable knowledge has been gained from the intensive study of a relatively limited group of bacterial plasmids. Recent efforts have begun to focus on the characterization of, at the molecular level, plasmid populations and associated mobile genetic elements (e.g., transposons, integrons) occurring in a wider range of aquatic and terrestrial habitats. Surprisingly, however, little information is available regarding the incidence and distribution of mobile genetic elements extant in contaminated subsurface environments. Such studies will provide greater knowledge on the ecology of plasmids and their contributions to the genetic plasticity (and adaptation) of naturally occurring subsurface microbial communities. We requested soil cores from the DOE NABIR Field Research Center (FRC) located on the Oak Ridge Reservation. The cores, received in February 2003, were sampled from four areas on the Oak Ridge Site: Area 1, Area 2, Area 3 (representing contaminated subsurface locales) and the background reference sites. The average core length (24 in) was subdivided into three profiles and soil pH and moisture content were determined. Uranium concentration was also determined in bulk samples. Replicate aliquots were fixed for total cell counts and for bacterial isolation. Four different isolation media were used to culture aerobic and facultative microbes from these four study areas. Colony forming units ranged from a minimum of 100 per gram soil to a maximum of 10,000 irrespective of media composition used. The vast majority of cultured subsurface isolates were gram-positive isolates and plasmid characterization was conducted per methods routinely used in the Sobecky laboratory. The percentage of plasmid incidence ranged from 10% to 60% of all isolates tested. This frequency appears to be somewhat higher than the incidence of plasmids we have observed in other habitats and we are increasing the number of isolates screened to confirm this observation. We are also

  10. The binding of quinone to the photosynthetic reaction centers: kinetics and thermodynamics of reactions occurring at the QB-site in zwitterionic and anionic liposomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavelli, Fabio; Trotta, Massimo; Ciriaco, Fulvio; Agostiano, Angela; Giotta, Livia; Italiano, Francesca; Milano, Francesco

    2014-07-01

    Liposomes represent a versatile biomimetic environment for studying the interaction between integral membrane proteins and hydrophobic ligands. In this paper, the quinone binding to the QB-site of the photosynthetic reaction centers (RC) from Rhodobacter sphaeroides has been investigated in liposomes prepared with either the zwitterionic phosphatidylcholine (PC) or the negatively charged phosphatidylglycerol (PG) to highlight the role of the different phospholipid polar heads. Quinone binding (K Q) and interquinone electron transfer (L AB) equilibrium constants in the two type of liposomes were obtained by charge recombination reaction of QB-depleted RC in the presence of increasing amounts of ubiquinone-10 over the temperature interval 6-35 °C. The kinetic of the charge recombination reactions has been fitted by numerically solving the ordinary differential equations set associated with a detailed kinetic scheme involving electron transfer reactions coupled with quinone release and uptake. The entire set of traces at each temperature was accurately fitted using the sole quinone release constants (both in a neutral and a charge separated state) as adjustable parameters. The temperature dependence of the quinone exchange rate at the QB-site was, hence, obtained. It was found that the quinone exchange regime was always fast for PC while it switched from slow to fast in PG as the temperature rose above 20 °C. A new method was introduced in this paper for the evaluation of constant K Q using the area underneath the charge recombination traces as the indicator of the amount of quinone bound to the QB-site.

  11. Photosynthesis by isolated chloroplasts. IV. General concept and comparison of three photochemical reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnon, D I; Allen, M B; Whatley, F R

    1956-01-01

    Procedures are described for the preparation of chloroplasts capable of carrying out three photochemical reactions, each representing an increasingly complex phase of photosynthesis: photolysis of water (Hill reaction), esterification of inorganic phosphate into adenosine triphosphate (photosynthetic phosphorylation) and the reduction of carbon dioxide to the level of carbohydrates with a simultaneous evolution of oxygen. The three photochemical reactions were separable by variations in the technique for preparation of chloroplasts and by differential inhibition by several reagents. Inhibition of a more complex phase of photosynthesis does not affect the simpler one which precedes it and, conversely, the inhibition of a simpler phase of photosynthesis is paralleled by an inhibition of the more complex phase which follows. Reversible inhibition of CO/sub 2/ fixation and photosynthetic phosphorylation, but not of photolysis, by sulfhydryl group inhibitors suggests that sulfhydryl compounds (enzymes, cofactors, or both) are involved in phosphorylation and CO/sub 2/ fixation, but not in the primary conversion of light into chemical energy as measured by the Hill reaction. Evidence is presented in support of the conclusion that the synthesis of ATP by green cells occurs at two distinct sites: anaerobically in chloroplasts by photosynthetic phosphorylation, and acrobically in smaller cytoplasmic particles, presumably mitochondria, by oxidative phosphorylation independent of light. A general scheme of photosynthesis by chloroplasts, consistent with these findings, is presented. 44 references, 8 figures, 4 tables.

  12. Optimisation of high-quality total ribonucleic acid isolation from cartilaginous tissues for real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeters, M; Huang, C L; Vonk, L A; Lu, Z F; Bank, R A; Helder, M N; Doulabi, B Zandieh

    2016-11-01

    Studies which consider the molecular mechanisms of degeneration and regeneration of cartilaginous tissues are seriously hampered by problematic ribonucleic acid (RNA) isolations due to low cell density and the dense, proteoglycan-rich extracellular matrix of cartilage. Proteoglycans tend to co-purify with RNA, they can absorb the full spectrum of UV light and they are potent inhibitors of polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Therefore, the objective of the present study is to compare and optimise different homogenisation methods and RNA isolation kits for an array of cartilaginous tissues. Tissue samples such as the nucleus pulposus (NP), annulus fibrosus (AF), articular cartilage (AC) and meniscus, were collected from goats and homogenised by either the MagNA Lyser or Freezer Mill. RNA of duplicate samples was subsequently isolated by either TRIzol (benchmark), or the RNeasy Lipid Tissue, RNeasy Fibrous Tissue, or Aurum Total RNA Fatty and Fibrous Tissue kits. RNA yield, purity, and integrity were determined and gene expression levels of type II collagen and aggrecan were measured by real-time PCR. No differences between the two homogenisation methods were found. RNA isolation using the RNeasy Fibrous and Lipid kits resulted in the purest RNA (A260/A280 ratio), whereas TRIzol isolations resulted in RNA that is not as pure, and show a larger difference in gene expression of duplicate samples compared with both RNeasy kits. The Aurum kit showed low reproducibility. For the extraction of high-quality RNA from cartilaginous structures, we suggest homogenisation of the samples by the MagNA Lyser. For AC, NP and AF we recommend the RNeasy Fibrous kit, whereas for the meniscus the RNeasy Lipid kit is advised.Cite this article: M. Peeters, C. L. Huang, L. A. Vonk, Z. F. Lu, R. A. Bank, M. N. Helder, B. Zandieh Doulabi. Optimisation of high-quality total ribonucleic acid isolation from cartilaginous tissues for real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis. Bone Joint Res 2016

  13. From Isolation to Insulation: The Impact of Campus Culture on the Existence of Two Cultural Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinchback-Hines, Cynthia Juanesta

    2013-01-01

    This case study examined how the campus culture influences the existence of a Black cultural center and a multicultural center at a predominantly White university. A qualitative ethnography was conducted using focus group interviews, personal interviews, archival research, and anecdotal observation. The results of the study identified five themes:…

  14. Detection of giardine gene in local isolates of Giardia duodenalis by polymerase chain reaction (PCR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latifah, I; Teoh, K Y; Wan, K L; Rahmah, M; Normaznah, Y; Rohani, A

    2005-12-01

    Giardia duodenalis is an intestinal parasite that causes diarrhoea and malabsorption in children. The parasite also infects AIDS patients with a weak immune system. A study was carried out on six local isolates of Giardia duodenalis (110, 7304, 6304, M007, 2002 and 6307) from faeces of Orang Asli patients admitted to the Gombak Hospital. WB, a reference pathogenic strain from human and G. muris from a wild mouse, were commercially obtained from the American Type Culture Collection (ATCC). All the isolates were cultured axenically in TYI-S-33 medium. Two sets of primers were used for the techniques: primers LP1 and RP1 and primers LP2 and RP2. The sets of primers amplified giardine gene of 171 bp and 218 bp in sizes respectively. The study showed that the two sets of primers could detect G. duodenalis to the genus and species level specifically.

  15. Detection by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and molecular characterization of subtype B avian metapneumovirus isolated in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacón, Jorge Luis; Brandão, Paulo E; Buim, Marcos; Villarreal, Laura; Ferreira, Antonio J Piantino

    2007-10-01

    Subtype B avian metapneumovirus (aMPV) was isolated and detected by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in Brazilian commercial laying chicken flocks with no history of vaccination against aMPV and presenting respiratory signs and decreased egg production. RT-PCR results from samples from three affected flocks revealed that the three isolates were subtype B. Partial sequence analysis of the G glycoprotein gene confirmed that the samples belonged to subtype B and were not of the vaccine type. Comparison of nucleotide and amino acid sequences of the G gene of the three Brazilian aMPV samples with subtype B isolates from other countries revealed 95.1% to 96.1% identity. Nucleotide sequences showed 100% identity among the Brazilian subtype B samples and 95.6% identity with the subtype B vaccine strain used in Brazil. This work describes the circulation of subtype B aMPV in Brazil and discusses its importance in terms of disease epidemiology.

  16. Modification of quinone electrochemistry by the proteins in the biological electron transfer chains: examples from photosynthetic reaction centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunner, M. R.; Madeo, Jennifer; Zhu, Zhenyu

    2009-01-01

    Quinones such as ubiquinone are the lipid soluble electron and proton carriers in the membranes of mitochondria, chloroplasts and oxygenic bacteria. Quinones undergo controlled redox reactions bound to specific sites in integral membrane proteins such as the cytochrome bc1 oxidoreductase. The quinone reactions in bacterial photosynthesis are amongst the best characterized, presenting a model to understand how proteins modulate cofactor chemistry. The free energy of ubiquinone redox reactions in aqueous solution and in the QA and QB sites of the bacterial photosynthetic reaction centers (RCs) are compared. In the primary QA site ubiquinone is reduced only to the anionic semiquinone (Q•−) while in the secondary QB site the product is the doubly reduced, doubly protonated quinol (QH2). The ways in which the protein modifies the relative energy of each reduced and protonated intermediate are described. For example, the protein stabilizes Q•− while destabilizing Q= relative to aqueous solution through electrostatic interactions. In addition, kinetic and thermodynamic mechanisms for stabilizing the intermediate semiquinones are compared. Evidence for the protein sequestering anionic compounds by slowing both on and off rates as well as by binding the anion more tightly is reviewed. PMID:18979192

  17. Tight-binding model of the photosystem II reaction center: application to two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelzinis, Andrius; Valkunas, Leonas; Abramavicius, Darius; Fuller, Franklin D; Ogilvie, Jennifer P; Mukamel, Shaul

    2013-01-01

    We propose an optimized tight-binding electron–hole model of the photosystem II (PSII) reaction center (RC). Our model incorporates two charge separation pathways and spatial correlations of both static disorder and fast fluctuations of energy levels. It captures the main experimental features observed in time-resolved two-dimensional (2D) optical spectra at 77 K: peak pattern, lineshapes and time traces. Analysis of 2D spectra kinetics reveals that specific regions of the 2D spectra of the PSII RC are sensitive to the charge transfer states. We find that the energy disorder of two peripheral chlorophylls is four times larger than the other RC pigments. (paper)

  18. Tight-binding model of the photosystem II reaction center: application to two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelzinis, Andrius; Valkunas, Leonas; Fuller, Franklin D.; Ogilvie, Jennifer P.; Mukamel, Shaul; Abramavicius, Darius

    2013-07-01

    We propose an optimized tight-binding electron-hole model of the photosystem II (PSII) reaction center (RC). Our model incorporates two charge separation pathways and spatial correlations of both static disorder and fast fluctuations of energy levels. It captures the main experimental features observed in time-resolved two-dimensional (2D) optical spectra at 77 K: peak pattern, lineshapes and time traces. Analysis of 2D spectra kinetics reveals that specific regions of the 2D spectra of the PSII RC are sensitive to the charge transfer states. We find that the energy disorder of two peripheral chlorophylls is four times larger than the other RC pigments.

  19. In vitro antifungal activity of isavuconazole against 345 mucorales isolates collected at study centers in eight countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verweij, P E; González, G M; Wiedrhold, N P; Lass-Flörl, C; Warn, P; Heep, M; Ghannoum, M A; Guinea, J

    2009-06-01

    Although mucormycoses (formerly zygomycoses) are relatively uncommon, they are associated with high mortality and treatment options are limited. Isavuconazole is a novel, water soluble, broad-spectrum azole in clinical development for the treatment of invasive aspergillosis and candidiasis. The objective of this report was to collate data on the in vitro activity of isavuconazole against a collection of 345 diverse mucorales isolates, collected and tested at eight study centers in europe, mexico and North America. Each study center undertook minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) susceptibility testing of their isolates, according to EUCAST or CLSI guidelines. Across all study centers, isavuconazole exhibited MIC(50 )values of 1-4 mg/l and MIC(90 )values of 4-16 mg/l against the five genera. There were also marked differences in MIC distributions, which could be ascribed to differences in inoculum and/or endpoint. EUCAST guidelines appeared to generate modal MICs 2-fold higher than CLSI. These results confirm that isavuconazole possesses at least partial antifungal activity against mucorales.

  20. Sustainability of High-Level Isolation Capabilities among US Ebola Treatment Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herstein, Jocelyn J; Biddinger, Paul D; Gibbs, Shawn G; Le, Aurora B; Jelden, Katelyn C; Hewlett, Angela L; Lowe, John J

    2017-06-01

    To identify barriers to maintaining and applying capabilities of US high-level isolation units (HLIUs) used during the Ebola virus disease outbreak, during 2016 we surveyed HLIUs. HLIUs identified sustainability challenges and reported the highly infectious diseases they would treat. HLIUs expended substantial resources in development but must strategize models of sustainability to maintain readiness.

  1. Front and Center: Contradicting Isolation by Supporting Leadership and Service by Students with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Robin M.

    2009-01-01

    When students with disabilities are isolated socially and physically, their self-confidence and engagement may be low. Encouraging leadership and service in students who are often overlooked for these roles enhances peer relations, engagement, and self-confidence. Principles and strategies for fostering leadership and service are described.…

  2. Cancer Inhibitors Isolated from an African Plant | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute's Molecular Targets Development Program is seeking parties interested in collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize cancer inhibitors isolated from the African plant Phyllanthus englerii. The technology is also available for exclusive or non-exclusive licensing.

  3. Isolation and crystal structure determination of piperazine dicarbamate obtained from a direct reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sim, Jae Ung; Jo, Eun Hee; Jhon, Young Ho; Paek, Kyung Soo; Kim, Ja Heon [Dept. of Chemistry, Soongsil University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jang Se Gyu; Shim, Jae Goo; Jang, Kyung Ryong [Korea Future Technology Research Laboratory, Korea Electric Power Research Institute (KEPRI), Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    Separation of CO{sub 2} in the flue gas emitted from coal-fired power plants is the first technological step toward reducing the CO{sub 2} concentration in atmosphere, and eventually for mitigating the global climate change. We could isolate the PZ-dicarbamate, where two CO{sub 2} molecules are bonded to each secondary amine group, through CO{sub 2} absorption by PZ in methanol, and determined its crystal structure by X-ray crystallography. The PZ-dicarbamate as a salt with piperazinium allowed further analyses such as TGA and NMR measurements, which gave information on the fate of the salt. In particular, the salt can be used as a standard sample exhibiting 100% CO{sub 2} loading in a PZ molecule.

  4. Reduction reactions of water soluble cyano-cobalt(III)-porphyrins: Metal versus ligand centered processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosseri, S.; Neta, P.; Harriman, A.; Hambright, P.

    1990-01-01

    Reduction reactions of dicyano-cobalt(III)-porphyrins [potential in vivo cyanide scavenger drugs] were studied by radiolytic and electrochemical methods using the water soluble tetrakis(4-sulfonatophenyl)porphyrin (TPPS) and tetrakis(N-methyl-4-pyridyl)porphyrin (TMPyP). For [(CN)2CoIIITPPS]-, reduction occurs stepwise to the CoII, CoI, and finally to the phlorin anion. This behavior is similar to that of the cobalt porphyrins in the absence of cyanide, except that the cyanide ligand shifts the reduction potentials to much more negative values. On the other hand, under radiolytic conditions, [(CN)2CoIIITMPyP]- is reduced on the porphyrin macrocycle by one electron to give the CoIII pi-radical anion, which disproportionates into the initial complex and the two-electron ring reduced CoIII phlorin. The radical anion is also formed by intramolecular electron transfer subsequent to the reaction of CoIITMPyP and cyanide. The results are compared with the chemistry of Vitamin B-12

  5. HTP kinetics studies on isolated elementary combustion reactions over wide temperature ranges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fontijn, A.; Adusei, G.Y.; Hranisavlevic, J.; Bajaj, P.N. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The goals of this project are to provide accurate data on the temperature dependence of the kinetics of elementary combustion reactions, (i) for use by combustion modelers, and (ii) to gain a better fundamental understanding of, and hence predictive ability for, the chemistry involved. Experimental measurements are made mainly by using the pseudo-static HTP (high-temperature photochemistry) technique. While continuing rate coefficient measurements, further aspects of kinetics research are being explored. Thus, starting from the data obtained, a method for predicting the temperature dependence of rate coefficients of oxygen-atom olefin experiment and confirms the underlying mechanistic assumptions. Mechanistic information of another sort, i.e. by product analysis, has recently become accessible with the inauguration of our heated flow tube mass spectrometer facility; early results are reported here. HTP experiments designed to lead to measurements of product channels by resonance fluorescence have started.

  6. Density functional theoretical study on the C-F and C-O oxidative addition reaction at an AI center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yong Seong [Dept. of Science Education, Kyungnam University, Masan (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Hyun; Hwang, Sungu [Dept. of Nanomechatronics Engineering, Pusan National University, Miryang (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    In this study, B3LYP/LACVP** level calculations were chosen because the level of theory was applied successfully to calculations of the thermodynamic and kinetic features of the oxidative addition reactions of alkyl and aryl halides to pincer-type complexes. This study examined the effects of the substituents on the phenyl rings of the Al(I) center. Isopropyl side chains in the phenyl rings attached to N atoms of the pincer ligand were replaced with a methyl (Me) (2) or tertiary butyl ( t Bu) group. The oxidative addition of C[BOND]F and C[BOND]O bonds to an Al (I) center was investigated computationally by DFT calculations. The geometries, thermodynamic, and kinetic features were in good agreement with the experimental data, as in previous studies on the transition metal complexes. The computational results showed that the DFT calculations could provide qualitative insight into the reactivity and thermodynamics of the oxidative addition reactions of C[BOND]F bonds.

  7. Alu polymerase chain reaction: A method for rapid isolation of human-specific sequences from complex DNA sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, D.L.; Ledbetter, S.A.; Corbo, L.; Victoria, M.F.; Ramirez-Solis, R.; Webster, T.D.; Ledbetter, D.H.; Caskey, C.T.

    1989-01-01

    Current efforts to map the human genome are focused on individual chromosomes or smaller regions and frequently rely on the use of somatic cell hybrids. The authors report the application of the polymerase chain reaction to direct amplification of human DNA from hybrid cells containing regions of the human genome in rodent cell backgrounds using primers directed to the human Alu repeat element. They demonstrate Alu-directed amplification of a fragment of the human HPRT gene from both hybrid cell and cloned DNA and identify through sequence analysis the Alu repeats involved in this amplification. They also demonstrate the application of this technique to identify the chromosomal locations of large fragments of the human X chromosome cloned in a yeast artificial chromosome and the general applicability of the method to the preparation of DNA probes from cloned human sequences. The technique allows rapid gene mapping and provides a simple method for the isolation and analysis of specific chromosomal regions

  8. Stereoselective synthesis of organosulfur compounds incorporating N-aromatic heterocyclic motifs and quaternary carbon centers via a sulfa-Michael triggered tandem reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Tianyou; Cheng, Lu; Zhang, Sean Xiao-An; Liao, Weiwei

    2015-06-14

    A novel sulfa-Michael addition (SMA)-triggered tandem reaction was developed by combining a SMA reaction with a simultaneous rearomatization process utilizing a less reactive carbonyl group as an intramolecular electrophile partner, which provided a unique synthetic route to access various organosulfur compounds incorporating an N-aromatic heterocyclic motif and quaternary carbon centers.

  9. Molecular modeling and computational simulation of the photosystem-II reaction center to address isoproturon resistance in Phalaris minor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Durg Vijay; Agarwal, Shikha; Kesharwani, Rajesh Kumar; Misra, Krishna

    2012-08-01

    Isoproturon is the only herbicide that can control Phalaris minor, a competitive weed of wheat that developed resistance in 1992. Resistance against isoproturon was reported to be due to a mutation in the psbA gene that encodes the isoproturon-binding D1 protein. Previously in our laboratory, a triazole derivative of isoproturon (TDI) was synthesized and found to be active against both susceptible and resistant biotypes at 0.5 kg/ha but has shown poor specificity. In the present study, both susceptible D1((S)), resistant D1((R)) and D2 proteins of the PS-II reaction center of P. minor have been modeled and simulated, selecting the crystal structure of PS-II from Thermosynechococcus elongatus (2AXT.pdb) as template. Loop regions were refined, and the complete reaction center D1/D2 was simulated with GROMACS in lipid (1-palmitoyl-2-oleoylglycero-3-phosphoglycerol, POPG) environment along with ligands and cofactor. Both S and R models were energy minimized using steepest decent equilibrated with isotropic pressure coupling and temperature coupling using a Berendsen protocol, and subjected to 1,000 ps of MD simulation. As a result of MD simulation, the best model obtained in lipid environment had five chlorophylls, two plastoquinones, two phenophytins and a bicarbonate ion along with cofactor Fe and oxygen evolving center (OEC). The triazole derivative of isoproturon was used as lead molecule for docking. The best worked out conformation of TDI was chosen for receptor-based de novo ligand design. In silico designed molecules were screened and, as a result, only those molecules that show higher docking and binding energies in comparison to isoproturon and its triazole derivative were proposed for synthesis in order to get more potent, non-resistant and more selective TDI analogs.

  10. Isolation of salt stress gene(s) from some haloterant streptomyces strains using polymerase chain reaction (abstract)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammad, S.H.

    2005-01-01

    We studied salt tolerance range in sixteen halotolerant streptomyces strains to isolate salt regulated genes using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technology. A group of these strains was isolated from Sedi-creer (S. niveus Sc-2 and S. sendenensis Sc-II); El-Malahat (Alexndria) (S. graminofaciens Ma-13): Qaroon's lake (S. albovinaceus QA-44, S. luteofluorescens Qa-51, S. albidoflavous Qa-53 and S. erthaeus QA-84). The other group represents the strains isolated from different soils from Damaaita (S. violans Da-3). Ismailia (S. alboflavus-Is-10). Port said (S. bobili Ps-12) and Sinai sandy soil (streptomyces species Si-1, S. truirus Si-4, S. lateritius Si-6, S. hawaiiensis Si-8, S. muavecolor Si-9 and S. melanogenes Si-11). These strains were varied in their salt tolerance range in particular, with increasing NaCl concentration in the growth medium up to 14%. It was also noted that all the applied Streptomyces strains appeared abundant growth at NaCl concentrations of 0.05, 3.5 and 7.0%. When NaCl was added at concentration of 10.5%, all of them except S. melanogenes Si-II strain gave moderate growth. On the contrary, NaCl at concentration of 14% inhibited the growth of 50% of strains under investigation. But the other 50% of these strains gave moderate growth at the same NaCl concentration. At the molecular level, the PCR was successfully used for isolating the mtlD and P5CS genes from 3 (S. alboinaceus Qa-44, S. albidoflavus Qa-53, S. erthraeus QA-84) and 4 (S. albovunaecaus Qa-44, Streptomyces species Si-I, S. luteofluorescens Qa-51, S. latritius Si-6) strains, respectively. As PCR fragments with a size of about 1095 and 2100 bp were amplified from the DNA genome of these strains using the primer pairs (P1 and P2) and (P3 and P4), respectively. These results confirmed the ability to use PCR for isolation or detection of any gene based on its nucleotide sequencing in any microorganism. Furthermore, one can recommended the use of the applied halotolerant

  11. Differentiation of closely related but biologically distinct cherry isolates of Prunus necrotic ringspot virus by polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, R W; Crosslin, J M; Pasini, R; Howell, W E; Mink, G I

    1999-07-01

    Prunus necrotic ringspot ilarvirus (PNRSV) exists as a number of biologically distinct variants which differ in host specificity, serology, and pathology. Previous nucleotide sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis of cloned reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) products of several biologically distinct sweet cherry isolates revealed correlations between symptom type and the nucleotide and amino acid sequences of the 3a (putative movement protein) and 3b (coat protein) open reading frames. Based upon this analysis, RT-PCR assays have been developed that can identify isolates displaying different symptoms and serotypes. The incorporation of primers in a multiplex PCR protocol permits rapid detection and discrimination among the strains. The results of PCR amplification using type-specific primers that amplify a portion of the coat protein gene demonstrate that the primer-selection procedure developed for PNRSV constitutes a reliable method of viral strain discrimination in cherry for disease control and will also be useful for examining biological diversity within the PNRSV virus group.

  12. A Polymerase Chain Reaction-Based Method for Isolating Clones from a Complimentary DNA Library in Sheep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friis, Thor Einar; Stephenson, Sally; Xiao, Yin; Whitehead, Jon

    2014-01-01

    The sheep (Ovis aries) is favored by many musculoskeletal tissue engineering groups as a large animal model because of its docile temperament and ease of husbandry. The size and weight of sheep are comparable to humans, which allows for the use of implants and fixation devices used in human clinical practice. The construction of a complimentary DNA (cDNA) library can capture the expression of genes in both a tissue- and time-specific manner. cDNA libraries have been a consistent source of gene discovery ever since the technology became commonplace more than three decades ago. Here, we describe the construction of a cDNA library using cells derived from sheep bones based on the pBluescript cDNA kit. Thirty clones were picked at random and sequenced. This led to the identification of a novel gene, C12orf29, which our initial experiments indicate is involved in skeletal biology. We also describe a polymerase chain reaction-based cDNA clone isolation method that allows the isolation of genes of interest from a cDNA library pool. The techniques outlined here can be applied in-house by smaller tissue engineering groups to generate tools for biomolecular research for large preclinical animal studies and highlights the power of standard cDNA library protocols to uncover novel genes. PMID:24447069

  13. Structure and function of the tetraheme cytochrome associated to the reaction center of Roseobacter denitrificans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, D; Richaud, P; Breton, J; Verméglio, A

    1994-01-01

    We have characterized the tetrahemic RC bound cytochrome isolated from the quasi-photosynthetic bacterium Roseobacter denitrificans in terms of absorption spectrum, redox property and orientation with respect to the membrane plane. The heme, designated H1, which possesses the highest redox midpoint potential (+290 mV), absorbs at 555 nm. Its plane makes an angle of 40 degrees with the membrane plane. The second high potential heme, H2 (+240 mV), peaks at 554 nm and makes a tilt of 55 degrees with the membrane. The two low potential hemes, L1 and L2, present a similar and rather high redox midpoint potential (+90 mV). They absorb at 553 nm and 550 nm. One of these hemes is oriented at 40 degrees while the other makes an angle of 90 degrees with the membrane plane. The soluble cytochrome c551 completes the cyclic electron transfer between the RC and the bc1 complex. Both the oxidation and the re-reduction of cytochrome c551 are diffusible processes. Under semi-aerobic conditions, one of the low potential hemes is photo-oxidized under illumination but only extremely slowly re-reduced. This explains the requirement of high aerobic conditions for growth of Roseobacter denitrificans cells in the light.

  14. The Issue of Loneliness and Isolation of Youths, Youth Detention Center Charges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Szafrańska

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Alienation in the initial phase of adolescence is common and understandable, given a stage of development. It can be regarded as a phenomenon that is to forge a young man’s identity and to make them gain autonomy. Fromm shows that overcoming alienation is an element that makes the subject more efficient and can enable them to get answers to important existential questions (E. Fromm, 1996. A certain level of loneliness fosters personal maturity and integration. It is important for young people to contact with their friends and peers when they look for answers to their questions. However, they also need some time to think everything over and to have intellectual reflection in solitude. While charting their own pathway, they learn to satisfy two seemingly conflicting needs: autonomy and intimacy with others. On the one hand, they need to be together and on the other hand, they need to move away from social relations. Erikson states that the period of adolescence requires overcoming the so-called intimacy versus isolation crisis (E. H. Erikson, 2000. Adolescents who have already found their own identity, start looking for opportunities to join it with the identity of others. Communal behaviour of young people characterised by cordiality, closeness and openness is connected with a positive solution to the intimacy versus isolation crisis, and thus with a willingness to engage in certain relationships and communities. A sense of alienation among adolescents can be explained by development and a normative crisis. However, the natural alienation tendency of adolescents, when they feel detached and have a sense of strangeness to some external or internal reality, should be temporary. The negative consequences of not solving the developmental crisis, together with a deep sense of isolation and lack of adequate social support, are connected with the cognitive and emotional spheres of an adolescent and may lead to psychosocial consequences. If they are

  15. Measurement of weak magnetic field of corrosion current of isolated corrosion center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Bardin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A very small magnetic field of corrosion current, of the order of 10−4 Oe, generated by isolated zinc inclusion in a copper platelet placed in electrolyte has been measured for the first time with a highly sensitive giant magneto-impedance magnetometer. The total corrosion current of the inclusion is estimated comparing the measured magnetic field distribution with corresponding theoretical calculation. The estimated value of the total corrosion current turns out to be in reasonable agreement with that one obtained in the standard gravimetric measurement.

  16. Isolation and identification of Mycoplasma agalactiae by culture and polymerase chain reaction (PCR from sheep of Qom province, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abtin, A.R.

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Contagious agalactia (C.A is an infectious syndrome of sheep that is characterized by mastitis andsubsequent failure of milk production, arthritis, abortion and keratoconjunctivitis. Mycoplasma agalactiae(M. agalactiae is the main cause of the disease in sheep. The aim of this study was isolation andidentification of M. agalactiae with culture and polymerase chain reaction (PCR assay from sheep of Qomprovince in Iran. A total of 102 samples were collected from milk secretion, eye, ear and joint exudates ofsheep. All samples were cultured in PPLO broth supplemented for M. agalaciae isolation. The bacteriaDNAs were extracted by phenol/chloroform method and the PCR assay was applied for detecting ofMycoplasma genus in 163bp fragment of 16S rRNA gene and M. agalactiae in 375bp fragment oflipoprotein gene from culture as same as in clinical samples. Out of the 102 samples, 19(18.63% cultureswere shown positive and typical Mycoplasma colonies in PPLO agar culture diagnostic method and59(57.8% were scored positive by Mycoplasma genus PCR, 19(18.62% of the samples were scoredpositive by using M. agalactiae PCR as diagnostic method. Out of the 102 samples, 19 samples wereshown both positive in the culture and PCR, 42 samples were shown both negative in the culture and PCR.40 samples were negative in the culture and positive in PCR whereas only one sample was positive inculture and negative in PCR. The results showed that the more isolations of M. agalactiae were taken from milk and less in joint samples. M. agalactiae was one of the main factors of contagious agalactia that was detected for the first time from sheep in Qom province.

  17. Unifying principles in homodimeric type I photosynthetic reaction centers: properties of PscB and the FA, FB and FX iron-sulfur clusters in green sulfur bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagannathan, Bharat; Golbeck, John H

    2008-12-01

    The photosynthetic reaction center from the green sulfur bacterium Chlorobium tepidum (CbRC) was solubilized from membranes using Triton X-100 and isolated by sucrose density ultra-centrifugation. The CbRC complexes were subsequently treated with 0.5 M NaCl and ultrafiltered over a 100 kDa cutoff membrane. The resulting CbRC cores did not exhibit the low-temperature EPR resonances from FA- and FB- and were unable to reduce NADP+. SDS-PAGE and mass spectrometric analysis showed that the PscB subunit, which harbors the FA and FB clusters, had become dissociated, and was now present in the filtrate. Attempts to rebind PscB onto CbRC cores were unsuccessful. Mössbauer spectroscopy showed that recombinant PscB contains a heterogeneous mixture of [4Fe-4S]2+,1+ and other types of Fe/S clusters tentatively identified as [2Fe-2S]2+,1+ clusters and rubredoxin-like Fe3+,2+ centers, and that the [4Fe-4S]2+,1+ clusters which were present were degraded at high ionic strength. Quantitative analysis confirmed that the amount of iron and sulfide in the recombinant protein was sub-stoichiometric. A heme-staining assay indicated that cytochrome c551 remained firmly attached to the CbRC cores. Low-temperature EPR spectroscopy of photoaccumulated CbRC complexes and CbRC cores showed resonances between g=5.4 and 4.4 assigned to a S=3/2 ground spin state [4Fe-4S]1+ cluster and at g=1.77 assigned to a S=1/2 ground spin state [4Fe-4S]1+ cluster, both from FX-. These results unify the properties of the acceptor side of the Type I homodimeric reaction centers found in green sulfur bacteria and heliobacteria: in both, the FA and FB iron-sulfur clusters are present on a salt-dissociable subunit, and FX is present as an interpolypeptide [4Fe-4S]2+,1+ cluster with a significant population in a S=3/2 ground spin state.

  18. Antimicrobial resistance and virulence genes profiling of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates in a burn center: A 5-year study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Bei; Yin, Supeng; You, Bo; Gong, Yali; Huang, Guangtao; Yang, Zichen; Zhang, Yulong; Chen, Yu; Chen, Jing; Yuan, Zhiqiang; Hu, Xiaomei; Peng, Yizhi

    2018-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) has attracted more and more attention in recent years, especially in burn medical centers. Here we conducted a 5-year period study to evaluate the MRSA infection in our burn center. The staphylococcal chromosomal cassette mec (SCCmec) typing, antimicrobials susceptibility and virulence profiles were also performed among the MRSA isolates. Of the 259 S. aureus isolates, 239 (92.28%) isolates were identified as MRSA. A decreased trend of MRSA isolation rate over time was found (P = 0.0063). Majority of MRSA isolates in our center belonged to SCCmec type III (230/239, 96.23%). Antimicrobials susceptibility tests of the MRSA isolates revealed significantly decreased resistance to clindamycin (P = 0.0183), and increased resistance to chloramphenicol (P = 0.0020) and minocycline (P Virulence factors profiling showed that most of MRSA isolates in our center carried the virulence factor pattern of cna-clfA-clfB-eno-fib-icaA-icaD-sea-psmα-lukED-hlg-hlgv-hla-hld (214/239, 89.54%). In conclusion, our study suggests that MRSA infection is serious in our burn center, but presented decreased trend over time. Most of MRSA isolates in our center presented the same virulence factor profile. More attention should be attached to nosocomial infection in burn medical center. Antimicrobials susceptibility changing over time was observed. Antimicrobials susceptibility monitoring is necessary and helps to select appropriate drugs against MRSA infections. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Identifikasi Brucella abortus Isolat Lokal dengan Brucella abortus Strain Specific-Polymerase Chain Reaction (IDENTIFICATION OF LOCAL ISOLATES OF BRUCELLA ABORTUS USING BRUCELLA ABORTUS STRAIN SPECIFIC-POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION ASSAY)

    OpenAIRE

    Susan Maphilindawati Noor; Pratiwi Pujilestari Sudarmono; Asmarani Kusumawati; Anis Karuniawati

    2014-01-01

    Brucella abortus Strain Specific-Polymerase Chain Reaction (BaSS-PCR) is a single multiplex PCRtechnique which able to identify and differentiate between Brucella abortus field strains (biovar 1, 2, and4), B. abortus vaccine strains, Brucella species, and non-Brucella species. In this study, BaSS-PCR wasapplied to identify local isolates of B. abortus in order to investigate the B. abortus strains that infectedcattle in Indonesia. Fifty local strains of B.abortus isolated from infected cattle...

  20. General theory of the multistage geminate reactions of the isolated pairs of reactants. II. Detailed balance and universal asymptotes of kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kipriyanov, Alexey A; Doktorov, Alexander B

    2014-10-14

    The analysis of general (matrix) kinetic equations for the mean survival probabilities of any of the species in a sample (or mean concentrations) has been made for a wide class of the multistage geminate reactions of the isolated pairs. These kinetic equations (obtained in the frame of the kinetic approach based on the concept of "effective" particles in Paper I) take into account various possible elementary reactions (stages of a multistage reaction) excluding monomolecular, but including physical and chemical processes of the change in internal quantum states carried out with the isolated pairs of reactants (or isolated reactants). The general basic principles of total and detailed balance have been established. The behavior of the reacting system has been considered on macroscopic time scales, and the universal long-term kinetics has been determined.

  1. Derivatives of a vancomycin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strain isolated at Hershey Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozdogan, Bülent; Ednie, Lois; Credito, Kim; Kosowska, Klaudia; Appelbaum, Peter C

    2004-12-01

    Antimicrobial susceptibilities and genetic relatedness of the vancomycin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strain (VRSA) isolated at Hershey, Pa. (VRSA Hershey), and its vancomycin-susceptible and high-level-resistant derivatives were studied and compared to 32 methicillin-resistant S. aureus strains (MRSA) isolated from patients and medical staff in contact with the VRSA patient. Derivatives of VRSA were obtained by subculturing six VRSA colonies from the original culture with or without vancomycin. Ten days of drug-free subculture caused the loss of vanA in two vancomycin-susceptible derivatives for which vancomycin MICs were 1 to 4 microg/ml. Multistep selection of three VRSA clones with vancomycin for 10 days increased vancomycin MICs from 32 to 1,024 to 2,048 microg/ml. MICs of teicoplanin, dalbavancin, and oritavancin were also increased from 4, 0.5, and 0.12 to 64, 1, and 32 microg/ml, respectively. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multilocus sequence typing analysis indicated that VRSA Hershey was the vanA-acquired variety of a common MRSA clone in our hospital with sequence type 5 (ST5). Three of five vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus strains tested from geographically different areas were also ST5, and the Michigan VRSA was ST371, a one-allele variant of ST5. Derivatives of VRSA Hershey had differences in PFGE profiles and the size of SmaI fragment that carries the vanA gene cluster, indicating instability of this cluster in VRSA Hershey. However induction with vancomycin increased glycopeptide MICs and stabilized the resistance.

  2. Comments on the optical lineshape function: Application to transient hole-burned spectra of bacterial reaction centers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reppert, Mike; Kell, Adam; Pruitt, Thomas; Jankowiak, Ryszard

    2015-01-01

    The vibrational spectral density is an important physical parameter needed to describe both linear and non-linear spectra of multi-chromophore systems such as photosynthetic complexes. Low-temperature techniques such as hole burning (HB) and fluorescence line narrowing are commonly used to extract the spectral density for a given electronic transition from experimental data. We report here that the lineshape function formula reported by Hayes et al. [J. Phys. Chem. 98, 7337 (1994)] in the mean-phonon approximation and frequently applied to analyzing HB data contains inconsistencies in notation, leading to essentially incorrect expressions in cases of moderate and strong electron-phonon (el-ph) coupling strengths. A corrected lineshape function L(ω) is given that retains the computational and intuitive advantages of the expression of Hayes et al. [J. Phys. Chem. 98, 7337 (1994)]. Although the corrected lineshape function could be used in modeling studies of various optical spectra, we suggest that it is better to calculate the lineshape function numerically, without introducing the mean-phonon approximation. New theoretical fits of the P870 and P960 absorption bands and frequency-dependent resonant HB spectra of Rb. sphaeroides and Rps. viridis reaction centers are provided as examples to demonstrate the importance of correct lineshape expressions. Comparison with the previously determined el-ph coupling parameters [Johnson et al., J. Phys. Chem. 94, 5849 (1990); Lyle et al., ibid. 97, 6924 (1993); Reddy et al., ibid. 97, 6934 (1993)] is also provided. The new fits lead to modified el-ph coupling strengths and different frequencies of the special pair marker mode, ω sp , for Rb. sphaeroides that could be used in the future for more advanced calculations of absorption and HB spectra obtained for various bacterial reaction centers

  3. Comments on the optical lineshape function: Application to transient hole-burned spectra of bacterial reaction centers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reppert, Mike; Kell, Adam; Pruitt, Thomas [Department of Chemistry, Kansas State University, Manhattan, Kansas 66506 (United States); Jankowiak, Ryszard, E-mail: ryszard@ksu.edu [Department of Chemistry, Kansas State University, Manhattan, Kansas 66506 (United States); Department of Physics, Kansas State University, Manhattan, Kansas 66506 (United States)

    2015-03-07

    The vibrational spectral density is an important physical parameter needed to describe both linear and non-linear spectra of multi-chromophore systems such as photosynthetic complexes. Low-temperature techniques such as hole burning (HB) and fluorescence line narrowing are commonly used to extract the spectral density for a given electronic transition from experimental data. We report here that the lineshape function formula reported by Hayes et al. [J. Phys. Chem. 98, 7337 (1994)] in the mean-phonon approximation and frequently applied to analyzing HB data contains inconsistencies in notation, leading to essentially incorrect expressions in cases of moderate and strong electron-phonon (el-ph) coupling strengths. A corrected lineshape function L(ω) is given that retains the computational and intuitive advantages of the expression of Hayes et al. [J. Phys. Chem. 98, 7337 (1994)]. Although the corrected lineshape function could be used in modeling studies of various optical spectra, we suggest that it is better to calculate the lineshape function numerically, without introducing the mean-phonon approximation. New theoretical fits of the P870 and P960 absorption bands and frequency-dependent resonant HB spectra of Rb. sphaeroides and Rps. viridis reaction centers are provided as examples to demonstrate the importance of correct lineshape expressions. Comparison with the previously determined el-ph coupling parameters [Johnson et al., J. Phys. Chem. 94, 5849 (1990); Lyle et al., ibid. 97, 6924 (1993); Reddy et al., ibid. 97, 6934 (1993)] is also provided. The new fits lead to modified el-ph coupling strengths and different frequencies of the special pair marker mode, ω{sub sp}, for Rb. sphaeroides that could be used in the future for more advanced calculations of absorption and HB spectra obtained for various bacterial reaction centers.

  4. Prevalence, and virulence determination of Listeria monocytogenes strains isolated from clinical and non-clinical samples by multiplex polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pournajaf, Abazar; Rajabnia, Ramazan; Sedighi, Mansour; Kassani, Aziz; Moqarabzadeh, Vahid; Lotfollahi, Lida; Ardebilli, Abdollah; Emadi, Behzad; Irajian, Gholamreza

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the prevalence, and virulence factors of Listeria monocytogenes isolated from various samples by multiplex polymerase chain reaction (MPCR). A total of 617 isolates were obtained and MPCR was employed for detection of the inlA, inlC, and inlJ genes. L. monocytogenes was detected in 46 (7.45%) of the 617 specimens. inlA, inlC, and inlJ were detected in 100%, 76.26%, and 71% isolates, respectively. This study validated MPCR in the analysis and rapid detection of L. monocytogenes. The role of the genes in pathogenesis of the strains can also be affirmed.

  5. [In vitro activity of ertapenem against clinical bacterial isolates in 69 Spanish medical centers (E-test study)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobernado, M; Sanz-Rodríguez, C; Villanueva, R; Torroba, L; Redondo, E; González-Esteban, J

    2007-12-01

    This study was conducted to assess the in vitro activity of ertapenem against clinical bacterial isolates from patients with community-acquired intra-abdominal and lower tract respiratory infections in Spain in 2003. As the study was conducted before the marketing of ertapenem, it was also useful to define a baseline susceptibility pattern for ertapenem in each of the participating hospitals for later surveillance studies. Each partipating site identified a variable number of aerobic and facultative bacteria isolated from patients with community-acquired intra-abdominal infection or pneumonia using standard procedures. E-test strips were used for determining the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of ertapenem, while for other antimicrobials either quantitative dilution techniques or qualitative diffusion procedures were used according to each microbiology laboratory's routine practice. MIC breakpoints for categorization of susceptibility provided by the CLSI were used for interpreting MIC values. A total of 2,901 recent clinical isolates from patients with community-acquired intra-abdominal infection or pneumonia hospitalized in 69 Spanish medical centers were tested. These isolates included 2,039 Gram-negative bacteria (1,646 Enterobacteriaceae, 216 Haemophilus, 123 non-fermenting Gram-negative bacteria [NFGNB] and 54 others) and 862 Gram-positive bacteria (556 pneumococci, 159 staphylococci, 96 streptococci other than S. pneumoniae, 44 enterococci and 7 others). Ertapenem was very active in vitro against Enterobacteriaceae (99.8% susceptible), Haemophilus (96.3% susceptible), pneumococci (99.6% susceptible, of which 31% were penicillin non-susceptible strains), streptococci other than S. pneumoniae (99.0% susceptible) and methicillin-susceptible staphylococci (94.8% susceptible). For other Gram-positive and Gram-negative pathogens for which ertapenem susceptible breakpoints have not been defined, MIC(90) values were 0.38 and 0.064 mg/l, respectively. As

  6. Magnetic bistability of isolated giant-spin centers in a diamagnetic crystalline matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergnani, Luca; Barra, Anne-Laure; Neugebauer, Petr; Rodriguez-Douton, Maria Jesus; Sessoli, Roberta; Sorace, Lorenzo; Wernsdorfer, Wolfgang; Cornia, Andrea

    2012-03-12

    Polynuclear single-molecule magnets (SMMs) were diluted in a diamagnetic crystal lattice to afford arrays of independent and iso-oriented magnetic units. Crystalline solid solutions of an Fe(4) SMM and its Ga(4) analogue were prepared with no metal scrambling for Fe(4) molar fractions x down to 0.01. According to high-frequency EPR and magnetic measurements, the guest SMM species have the same total spin (S=5), anisotropy, and high-temperature spin dynamics found in the pure Fe(4) phase. However, suppression of intermolecular magnetic interactions affects magnetic relaxation at low temperature (40 mK), where quantum tunneling (QT) of the magnetization dominates. When a magnetic field is applied along the easy magnetic axis, both pure and diluted (x=0.01) phases display pronounced steps at evenly spaced field values in their hysteresis loops due to resonant QT. The pure Fe(4) phase exhibits additional steps which are firmly ascribed to two-molecule QT transitions. Studies on the field-dependent relaxation rate showed that the zero-field resonance sharpens by a factor of five and shifts from about 8 mT to exactly zero field on dilution, in agreement with the calculated variation of dipolar interactions. The tunneling efficiency also changes significantly as a function of Fe(4) concentration: the zero-field resonance is significantly enhanced on dilution, while tunneling at ±0.45 T becomes less efficient. These changes were rationalized on the basis of a dipolar shuffling mechanism and transverse dipolar fields, whose effect was analyzed by using a multispin model. Our findings directly prove the impact of intermolecular magnetic couplings on SMM behavior and disclose the magnetic response of truly isolated giant spins in a diamagnetic crystalline environment. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Relationships among North American and Japanese Laetiporus isolates inferred from molecular phylogenetics and single-spore incompatibility reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark T. Banik; Daniel L. Lindner; Yuko Ota; Tsutomu Hattori

    2010-01-01

    Relationships were investigated among North American and Japanese isolates of Laetiporus using phylogenetic analysis of ITS sequences and single-spore isolate incompatibility. Single-spore isolate pairings revealed no significant compatibility between North American and Japanese isolates. ITS analysis revealed 12 clades within the core ...

  8. Characterisation of Toxoplasma gondii isolates using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) of the non-coding Toxoplasma gondii (TGR)-gene sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgdall, Estrid; Vuust, Jens; Lind, Peter

    2000-01-01

    of using TGR gene variants as markers to distinguish among T. gondii isolates from different animals and different geographical sources. Based on the band patterns obtained by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplified TGR sequences, the T...

  9. Detection of Ampicillin Resistance Genes (bla in Clinical Isolates of Escherichia coli with Polymerase Chain Reaction Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiana Milanda

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli is a rod negative Gram which could be pathogenic, if its value increases or located in outer gastrointestinal tract. Pathogenic E. coli will produce enterotoxin which will cause diarrhoea or infection in urine tract. Ampicilin was one of particular antibiotics to overcome infection. Ampicilin nowadays is no longer used as primary medicine, because of its resistance case. The aim of this research is to detect the presence of gene which is responsible to ampicilin resistant E. coli. We used isolated midstream urine from cystitis object in Hasan Sadikin Hospital (RSHS as samples. Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR method (colony-PCR and DNA-PCR were done to invenstigate the antibiotic resistency. Based on the result of antibiotic susceptibility testing to ampicillin, E. coli samples were resistant to ampicilin. Elektroforegram products of colony-PCR and DNA-PCR showed that the resistance case of ampicilin caused by bla gene (199 bp. Selective and rational antibiotic treatment is required to prevent ampicillin resistance in patients with symptoms

  10. The evolutionary pathway from anoxygenic to oxygenic photosynthesis examined by comparison of the properties of photosystem II and bacterial reaction centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, J P; Williams, J C

    2011-01-01

    In photosynthetic organisms, such as purple bacteria, cyanobacteria, and plants, light is captured and converted into energy to create energy-rich compounds. The primary process of energy conversion involves the transfer of electrons from an excited donor molecule to a series of electron acceptors in pigment-protein complexes. Two of these complexes, the bacterial reaction center and photosystem II, are evolutionarily related and structurally similar. However, only photosystem II is capable of performing the unique reaction of water oxidation. An understanding of the evolutionary process that lead to the development of oxygenic photosynthesis can be found by comparison of these two complexes. In this review, we summarize how insight is being gained by examination of the differences in critical functional properties of these complexes and by experimental efforts to alter pigment-protein interactions of the bacterial reaction center in order to enable it to perform reactions, such as amino acid and metal oxidation, observable in photosystem II.

  11. Detection of tet(M) and tet(O) using the polymerase chain reaction in bacteria isolated from patients with periodontal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsvik, B; Olsen, I; Tenover, F C

    1995-04-01

    The polymerase chain reaction was used to examine 114 tetracycline-resistant anaerobic and facultative anaerobic bacterial isolates from patients with periodontal disease for the tet(M) and tet(O) genes. A 740-base-pair fragment of the tet(M) gene was amplified from 84 of 114 isolates, and a 519-base-pair fragment of the tet(O) gene was amplified from 13 streptococcal isolates. Six of 7 tetracycline-resistant isolates of Veillonella spp. and tetracycline-resistant isolates of Eubacterium spp. (n = 3), Eubacterium saburreum (n = 1), Streptococcus intermedius (n = 5) and Gemella morbillorum (n = 2) all harbored the tet(M) gene. The tet(M) and tet(O) negative as well as selected positive isolates were tested for the tet(K) and tet(L) genes using DNA probes. All isolates of Staphylococcus spp. (n = 11) hybridized with the tet(K) probe. None of the isolates tested hybridized with the probe for tet(L). This is the first report of the tet(M) gene in the facultative bacterium G. morbillorum and in E. saburreum.

  12. Electron transfer. 93. Further reactions of transition-metal-center oxidants with vitamin B12s (Cob(I)alamin)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pillai, G.C.; Ghosh, S.K.; Gould, E.S.

    1988-01-01

    Vitamin B 12s (cob(I)alamin) reduces europium(III), titanium(IV) (TiO(C 2 O 4 ) 2 2- ), and uranium(VI) in aqueous solution. These oxidants undergo one-electron changes, leading in each case to the cobalt product cob(II)alamin (B 12r ). The reduction of Eu 3+ , which is inhibited by TES buffer, but not by glycine, is outer sphere. Its limiting specific rate (1 x 10 2 M -1 s -1 ), incorporated in the Marcus treatment, yields a B 12s ,B 12r self-exchange rate of 10 4.8±0.5 M -1 s -1 . Reductions of TiO(C 2 O 4 ) 2 2- are accelerated by H + and by acetic acid. Kinetic patterns suggest three competing reaction paths involving varying degrees of protonation of the Ti(IV) center or its association with acetic acid. The very rapid reduction of U(VI) (k = 4 x 10 6 M -1 s -1 ) yields U(V) in several buffering media, even when B 12s is taken in excess. The much slower conversion of U(V) to U(IV), although thermodynamically favored, appears to be retarded by the extensive reorganization of the coordination sphere of oxo-bound U(V) that must accompany its acceptance of an additional electron. The observed specific rate for the B 12s -U(VI) reaction is in reasonable agreement, in the framework of the Marcus formalism, with reported values of the formal potential and the self-exchange rate for U(V,VI). 37 references, 4 tables

  13. B-side charge separation in bacterial photosynthetic reaction centers: nanosecond time scale electron transfer from HB- to QB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirmaier, Christine; Laible, Philip D; Hanson, Deborah K; Holten, Dewey

    2003-02-25

    We report time-resolved optical measurements of the primary electron transfer reactions in Rhodobacter capsulatus reaction centers (RCs) having four mutations: Phe(L181) --> Tyr, Tyr(M208) --> Phe, Leu(M212) --> His, and Trp(M250) --> Val (denoted YFHV). Following direct excitation of the bacteriochlorophyll dimer (P) to its lowest excited singlet state P, electron transfer to the B-side bacteriopheophytin (H(B)) gives P(+)H(B)(-) in approximately 30% yield. When the secondary quinone (Q(B)) site is fully occupied, P(+)H(B)(-) decays with a time constant estimated to be in the range of 1.5-3 ns. In the presence of excess terbutryn, a competitive inhibitor of Q(B) binding, the observed lifetime of P(+)H(B)(-) is noticeably longer and is estimated to be in the range of 4-8 ns. On the basis of these values, the rate constant for P(+)H(B)(-) --> P(+)Q(B)(-) electron transfer is calculated to be between approximately (2 ns)(-)(1) and approximately (12 ns)(-)(1), making it at least an order of magnitude smaller than the rate constant of approximately (200 ps)(-)(1) for electron transfer between the corresponding A-side cofactors (P(+)H(A)(-) --> P(+)Q(A)(-)). Structural and energetic factors associated with electron transfer to Q(B) compared to Q(A) are discussed. Comparison of the P(+)H(B)(-) lifetimes in the presence and absence of terbutryn indicates that the ultimate (i.e., quantum) yield of P(+)Q(B)(-) formation relative to P is 10-25% in the YFHV RC.

  14. Spectral properties of chlorines and electron transfer with their participation in the photosynthetic reaction center of photosystem II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shchupak, E. E.; Ivashin, N. V.

    2014-02-01

    Structural factors that provide localization of excited states and determine the properties of primary donor and acceptor of electron in the reaction center of photosystem II (PSII RC) are studied. The results of calculations using stationary and time-dependent density functional theory indicate an important role of protein environments of chlorophylls PA, PB, BA, and BB and pheophytins HA and HB in the area with a radius of no greater than ≤10 Å in the formation of excitonic states of PSII RC. When the neighboring elements are taken into account, the wavelength of long-wavelength Q y transition of chlorophyll molecules is varied by about 10 nm. The effect is less developed for pheophytin molecules (Δλ ≅ 2 nm). The following elements strongly affect energy of the transition: HisA198 and HisD197 amino-acid residues that serve as ligands of magnesium atoms affect PA and PB, respectively; MetA183 affects PA; MetA172 and MetD198 affect BA; water molecules that are located above the planes of the BA and BB macrocycles form H bonds with carbonyl groups; and phytol chains of PA and PB affect BA, BB, HA, and HB. The analysis of excitonic states, mutual positions of molecular orbitals of electron donors and acceptors, and matrix elements of electron transfer reaction shows that (i) charge separation between BA and HA and PB and BA is possible in the active A branch of cofactors of PSII RC and (ii) electron transfer is blocked at the BB - HB fragment in inactive B branch of PSII RC.

  15. Electronically stimulated deep-center reactions in electron-irradiated InP: Comparison between experiment and recombination-enhancement theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sibille, A.

    1987-01-01

    We present a detailed study of the recombination enhancement of several defect reactions involving the main deep centers in low-temperature electron-irradiated InP. A fairly good agreement is obtained with the Weeks-Tully-Kimerling theory for the activation energies of the enhanced process. On the other hand, a thorough investigation of a thermally and electronically stimulated defect transformation shows evidence that one major approximation (local vibrational equilibrium) fails, and that the recently proposed [H. Sumi, Phys. Rev. B 29, 4616 (1984)] mechanism of coherent recombination on deep centers is responsible for altered reaction rates at high injection levels

  16. Menaquinone-7 in the reaction center complex of the green sulfur bacterium Chlorobium vibrioforme functions as the electron acceptor A1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, B; Frigaard, N-U; Yang, F

    1998-01-01

    Photosynthetically active reaction center complexes were prepared from the green sulfur bacterium Chlorobium vibrioforme NCIMB 8327, and the content of quinones was determined by extraction and high-performance liquid chromatography. The analysis showed a stoichiometry of 1.7 molecules of menaqui......Photosynthetically active reaction center complexes were prepared from the green sulfur bacterium Chlorobium vibrioforme NCIMB 8327, and the content of quinones was determined by extraction and high-performance liquid chromatography. The analysis showed a stoichiometry of 1.7 molecules...

  17. Reaction Control System Thruster Cracking Consultation: NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) Materials Super Problem Resolution Team (SPRT) Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKay, Rebecca A.; Smith, Stephen W.; Shah, Sandeep R.; Piascik, Robert S.

    2005-01-01

    The shuttle orbiter s reaction control system (RCS) primary thruster serial number 120 was found to contain cracks in the counter bores and relief radius after a chamber repair and rejuvenation was performed in April 2004. Relief radius cracking had been observed in the 1970s and 1980s in seven thrusters prior to flight; however, counter bore cracking had never been seen previously in RCS thrusters. Members of the Materials Super Problem Resolution Team (SPRT) of the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) conducted a detailed review of the relevant literature and of the documentation from the previous RCS thruster failure analyses. It was concluded that the previous failure analyses lacked sufficient documentation to support the conclusions that stress corrosion cracking or hot-salt cracking was the root cause of the thruster cracking and lacked reliable inspection controls to prevent cracked thrusters from entering the fleet. The NESC team identified and performed new materials characterization and mechanical tests. It was determined that the thruster intergranular cracking was due to hydrogen embrittlement and that the cracking was produced during manufacturing as a result of processing the thrusters with fluoride-containing acids. Testing and characterization demonstrated that appreciable environmental crack propagation does not occur after manufacturing.

  18. Establishment of a community care center for isolation and management of Ebola patients - Bomi County, Liberia, October 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Gorbee; Vora, Neil M; Nyensuah, Tolbert G; Gasasira, Alex; Mott, Joshua; Walke, Henry; Mahoney, Frank; Luce, Richard; Flannery, Brendan

    2014-11-07

    As of October 29, 2014, a total of 6,454 Ebola virus disease (Ebola) cases had been reported in Liberia by the Liberian Ministry of Health and Social Welfare, with 2,609 deaths. Although the national strategy for combating the ongoing Ebola epidemic calls for construction of Ebola treatment units (ETUs) in all 15 counties of Liberia, only a limited number are operational, and most of these are within Montserrado County. ETUs are intended to improve medical care delivery to persons whose illnesses meet Ebola case definitions, while also allowing for the safe isolation of patients to break chains of transmission in the community. Until additional ETUs are constructed, the Ministry of Health and Social Welfare is supporting development of community care centers (CCCs) for isolation of patients who are awaiting Ebola diagnostic test results and for provision of basic care (e.g., oral rehydration salts solutions) to patients confirmed to have Ebola who are awaiting transfer to ETUs. CCCs often have less bed capacity than ETUs and are frequently placed in areas not served by ETUs; if built rapidly enough and in sufficient quantity, CCCs will allow Ebola-related health measures to reach a larger proportion of the population. Staffing requirements for CCCs are frequently lower than for ETUs because CCCs are often designed such that basic patient needs such as food are provided for by friends and family of patients rather than by CCC staff. (It is customary in Liberia for friends and family to provide food for hospitalized patients.) Creation of CCCs in Liberia has been led by county health officials and nongovernmental organizations, and this local, community-based approach is intended to destigmatize Ebola, to encourage persons with illness to seek care rather than remain at home, and to facilitate contact tracing of exposed family members. This report describes one Liberian county's approach to establishing a CCC.

  19. Comparison of different methods of RNA isolation for plum pox virus detection by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faggioli, F; Pasquini, G; Barba, M

    1998-09-01

    The diagnosis of plum pox virus (PPV) is still considered one of the most important aspects of the "sharka" problem. In fact, different studies demonstrated an uneven distribution of the virus in infected trees due to a high variability in virus concentration. These aspects complicate the PPV diagnosis. To date, biological, serological and molecular assays have been successively developed in order to obtain sensitive and efficient PPV detection techniques. In particular, the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique seems to be promising and can be considered the most sensitive and reliable one. Preparation of viral RNA is still a fundamental step in reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) technique, especially when applied to large scale testing, i.e., for certification purposes. In order to find the most rapid and efficient procedure, we have compared three different procedures of extraction of viral RNA to be processed RT-PCR. Their common characteristics is their capacity to extract the RNA from a small amount of plant tissue without organic solvents in the extraction fluid. The procedures were as follows: an immuno-capture (IC) method using a specific antiserum, a silica-capture (SC) method using a non-specific matrix, and a simple and rapid RNA extraction (RE) method. They all were followed by one-tube RT-PCR. The obtained results show that all the three techniques allowed a successful amplification and detection of PPV in tested samples except the SC-PCR method which proved less effective. In fact, the IC-PCR and RE-PCR methods amplified and detected PPV in all isolates tested, while the SC-PCR method was able to reveal the presence of the virus in apricot and infected control samples only.

  20. Energetic change of the primary quinone in photosynthetic reaction center. Mutation, delayed fluorescence and model calculations (Theses of the Ph.D. dissertation)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rinyu, L.

    2007-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Photosynthesis is one of the basic metabolic processes of living organisms. Photosynthesizing species (bacteria, algae and higher class plants) convert the energy of light into other forms of free energy (redox potential, electro- chemical potential of ions and protons and phosphate-potential) which are directly suit- able either to cover the energy need of the vital processes of the cell or to storage. In reaction center (RC) protein of photo- synthetic bacteria, electron transfer is initiated upon light excitation from the excited bacteriochlorophyll dimer (P) to the secondary quinone (Q B ) via bacteriopheophytine (Bph) and the primary quinone (Q A ). In Rhodobacter sphaeroides purple bacteria, both quinones are ubiquinone-10, but due to the different protein environment, their electrochemical properties is highly different. Whereas Q A makes one-electron chemistry, Q B can be doubly reduced to form hydroquinone, Q B H 2 by uptake of two protons. Q B H 2 subsequently leaves the RC and is replaced by an oxidized quinone from to membrane pool. The semiquinones are important intermediates in the quinone reduction cycle of the RC. The redox midpoint potentials of the Q/Q - redox pairs (E m ) are also different: the Q A /Q A - has 60 mV more negative potential than the Q B /Q B - couple (pH 8) to make the (interquinone) electron transfer favorable. For fine tuning of the midpoint redox potentials of the quinones, the protein assures appropriate steric and electrostatic environment. The most important aim of this study was the design and production of reaction center mutants in the binding pocket of the primary quinone to investigate the effect of the amino acids of the protein and lipids of the membrane on the thermodynamics of the primary quinone. The first priority was the determination of the absolute free energy gap between the P* and the P + Q A - states in wild type and mutant reaction centers by comparison of the

  1. Hydrogen bonds in the vicinity of the special pair of the bacterial reaction center probed by hydrostatic high-pressure absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kangur, Liina; Jones, Michael R; Freiberg, Arvi

    2017-12-01

    Using the native bacteriochlorophyll a pigment cofactors as local probes, we investigated the response to external hydrostatic high pressure of reaction center membrane protein complexes from the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides. Wild-type and engineered complexes were used with a varied number (0, 1 or 2) of hydrogen bonds that bind the reaction center primary donor bacteriochlorophyll cofactors to the surrounding protein scaffold. A pressure-induced breakage of hydrogen bonds was established for both detergent-purified and membrane-embedded reaction centers, but at rather different pressures: between 0.2 and 0.3GPa and at about 0.55GPa, respectively. The free energy change associated with the rupture of the single hydrogen bond present in wild-type reaction centers was estimated to be equal to 13-14kJ/mol. In the mutant with two symmetrical hydrogen bonds (FM197H) a single cooperative rupture of the two bonds was observed corresponding to an about twice stronger bond, rather than a sequential rupture of two individual bonds. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Notable light-free catalytic activity for pollutant destruction over flower-like BiOI microspheres by a dual-reaction-center Fenton-like process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liang; Yan, Dengbiao; Lyu, Lai; Hu, Chun; Jiang, Ning; Zhang, Lili

    2018-10-01

    BiOI is widely used as photocatalysts for pollutant removal, water splitting, CO 2 reduction and organic transformation due to its excellent photoelectric properties. Here, we report for the first time that a light-free catalyst consisting of the flower-like BiOI microspheres (f-BiOI MSs) exposing (1 0 1) and (1 1 0) crystal planes prepared by a hydrothermal method in ethylene glycol environment can rapidly eliminate the refractory BPA within only ∼3 min through a Fenton-like process. The reaction activity is ∼190 times higher than that of the conventional Fenton catalyst Fe 2 O 3 . A series of characterizations and experiments reveal the formation of the dual reaction centers on f-BiOI MSs. The electron-rich O centers efficiently reduce H 2 O 2 to OH, while the electron-poor oxygen vacancies capture electrons from the adsorbed pollutants and divert them to the electron-rich area during the Fenton-like reactions. By these processes, pollutants are degraded and mineralized quickly in a wide pH range. Our findings address the problems of the classical Fenton reaction and are useful for the development of efficient Fenton-like catalysts through constructing dual reaction centers. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Reactive scattering from oriented molecules: The three-center reaction K+ICl --> KI+Cl, KCl+I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loesch, H. J.; Möller, J.

    1992-12-01

    In a crossed molecular beam experiment, we have measured the angular and time-of-flight (TOF) distributions of the products KCl and KI formed in the reaction K+ICl→KI+Cl, KCl+I at an elevated collision energy of Etr=1.64 eV. Employing the brute force method, we have prepared an oriented ICl beam and studied in addition also the orientation dependence of these distributions. The results are (i) KCl is the dominant product, but also KI is substantially formed with a branching ratio of 4:1; (ii) the double differential reaction cross section in the center-of-mass frame (contour maps) indicates that all products are preferentially forward scattered and constrained to the forward hemisphere; (iii) the KCl flux consists of two distinct components which differ markedly in kinetic energy and dependence on the ICl orientation; there are also indications of the existence of two components of KI; (iv) 65%, 84%, and 64% of the available energy is vested into the internal degrees of freedom for the fast, slow component of KCl and KI, respectively; (v) the existence of two components can be rationalized on the basis of the harpooning mechanism where the jumping electron accesses the ground state or one of the low excited states of the ICl- ion and triggers the subsequent explosion of the ion with more or less kinetic energy of the fragments depending on the initially populated state; (vi) the energies released during dissociation of ICl- in the 2Σ ground state and the first 2Π state are ≤0.19 and ≤1.2 eV, respectively; (vii) the fast KCl component features a negative steric effect suggesting favorable product formation for attacks of K to the I end of ICl, the steric effect of the slow KI component is positive, i.e., attacks to the Cl end form products favorably; the other components exhibit no significant steric effect; (viii) the steric effects can be quantitatively rationalized using the same model as mentioned above; (ix) the magnitude of the steric effect suggests a

  4. Genotypic and Phenotypic Correlations of Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii-A. calcoaceticus Complex Strains Isolated from Patients at the National Naval Medical Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acinetobacter baumannii-calcoaceticus complex (ABC) infections have complicated the care of U.S. combat casualties. In this study, 102 ABC isolates from wounded soldiers treated at National Naval Medical Center (NNMC) were characterized by phenotype and genotype to identify clones in this population...

  5. Ventilator-associated pneumonia at a tertiary-care center in a developing country: incidence, microbiology, and susceptibility patterns of isolated microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanafani, Zeina A; Kara, Layla; Hayek, Shady; Kanj, Souha S

    2003-11-01

    Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) complicates the course of up to 24% of intubated patients. Data from the Middle East are scarce. The objective of this study was to evaluate the incidence, microbiology, and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of isolated microorganisms in VAP in a developing country. Prospective observational cohort study. The American University of Beirut Medical Center, a tertiary-care center that serves as a major referral center for Lebanon and neighboring countries. All patients admitted to the intensive care and respiratory care units from March to September 2001, and who had been receiving mechanical ventilation for at least 48 hours, were included in the study. Results of samples submitted for culture were recorded and antimicrobial susceptibility testing of isolated pathogens was performed. Seventy patients were entered into the study. The incidence of VAP was 47%. Gram-negative bacilli accounted for 83% of all isolates. The most commonly identified organism was Acinetobacter anitratus, followed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Fifty percent of all gram-negative bacterial isolates were classified as antibiotic resistant. Compared with patients without VAP, patients with VAP remained intubated for a longer period and stayed in the intensive care unit longer. VAP was not associated with an increased mortality rate. Compared with other studies, the results from this referral center in Lebanon indicate a higher incidence of VAP and a high prevalence of resistant organisms. These data are relevant because they direct the choice of empiric antibiotic therapy for VAP.

  6. Mono-, di- and trimeric PS I reaction center complexes isolated from the thermophilic cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. Size, shape and activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rögner, M.; Mühlenhoff, U.; Boekema, E.J.; Witt, H.T.

    1990-01-01

    Photosystem I preparations from the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. were treated with high concentrations of Tris and octyl glucoside at alkaline pH and elevated temperature. A sucrose density gradient yielded three pigment-protein complexes; these were further purified on a HPLC anion-exchange

  7. Purple-bacterial photosynthetic reaction centers and quantum-dot hybrid-assemblies in lecithin liposomes and thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukashev, Eugeny P; Knox, Petr P; Gorokhov, Vladimir V; Grishanova, Nadezda P; Seifullina, Nuranija Kh; Krikunova, Maria; Lokstein, Heiko; Paschenko, Vladimir Z

    2016-11-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) absorb ultraviolet and long-wavelength visible light energy much more efficiently than natural bacterial light-harvesting proteins and can transfer the excitation energy to photosynthetic reaction centers (RCs). Inclusion of RCs combined with QDs as antennae into liposomes opens new opportunities for using such hybrid systems as a basis for artificial energy-transforming devices that potentially can operate with greater efficiency and stability than devices based only on biological components or inorganic components alone. RCs from Rhodobacter sphaeroides and QDs (CdSe/ZnS with hydrophilic covering) were embedded in lecithin liposomes by extrusion of a solution of multilayer lipid vesicles through a polycarbonate membrane or by dialysis of lipids and proteins dispersed with excess detergent. The efficiency of RC and QD interaction within the liposomes was estimated using fluorescence excitation spectra of the photoactive bacteriochlorophyll of the RCs and by measuring the fluorescence decay kinetics of the QDs. The functional activity of the RCs in hybrid complexes was fully maintained, and their stability was even increased. The efficiency of energy transfer between QDs and RCs and conditions of long-term stability of function of such hybrid complexes in film preparations were investigated as well. It was found that dry films containing RCs and QDs, maintained at atmospheric humidity, are capable of maintaining their functional activity for at least some months as judged by measurements of their spectral characteristics, efficiency of energy transfer from QDs to RCs and RC electron transport activity. Addition of trehalose to the films increases the stability further, especially for films maintained at low humidity. These stable hybrid film structures are promising for further studies towards developing new phototransformation devices for biotechnological applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Photosynthesis Is Widely Distributed among Proteobacteria as Demonstrated by the Phylogeny of PufLM Reaction Center Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes F. Imhoff

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Two different photosystems for performing bacteriochlorophyll-mediated photosynthetic energy conversion are employed in different bacterial phyla. Those bacteria employing a photosystem II type of photosynthetic apparatus include the phototrophic purple bacteria (Proteobacteria, Gemmatimonas and Chloroflexus with their photosynthetic relatives. The proteins of the photosynthetic reaction center PufL and PufM are essential components and are common to all bacteria with a type-II photosynthetic apparatus, including the anaerobic as well as the aerobic phototrophic Proteobacteria. Therefore, PufL and PufM proteins and their genes are perfect tools to evaluate the phylogeny of the photosynthetic apparatus and to study the diversity of the bacteria employing this photosystem in nature. Almost complete pufLM gene sequences and the derived protein sequences from 152 type strains and 45 additional strains of phototrophic Proteobacteria employing photosystem II were compared. The results give interesting and comprehensive insights into the phylogeny of the photosynthetic apparatus and clearly define Chromatiales, Rhodobacterales, Sphingomonadales as major groups distinct from other Alphaproteobacteria, from Betaproteobacteria and from Caulobacterales (Brevundimonas subvibrioides. A special relationship exists between the PufLM sequences of those bacteria employing bacteriochlorophyll b instead of bacteriochlorophyll a. A clear phylogenetic association of aerobic phototrophic purple bacteria to anaerobic purple bacteria according to their PufLM sequences is demonstrated indicating multiple evolutionary lines from anaerobic to aerobic phototrophic purple bacteria. The impact of pufLM gene sequences for studies on the environmental diversity of phototrophic bacteria is discussed and the possibility of their identification on the species level in environmental samples is pointed out.

  9. Identification of protein W, the elusive sixth subunit of the Rhodopseudomonas palustris reaction center-light harvesting 1 core complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Philip J; Hitchcock, Andrew; Swainsbury, David J K; Qian, Pu; Martin, Elizabeth C; Farmer, David A; Dickman, Mark J; Canniffe, Daniel P; Hunter, C Neil

    2018-02-01

    The X-ray crystal structure of the Rhodopseudomonas (Rps.) palustris reaction center-light harvesting 1 (RC-LH1) core complex revealed the presence of a sixth protein component, variably referred to in the literature as helix W, subunit W or protein W. The position of this protein prevents closure of the LH1 ring, possibly to allow diffusion of ubiquinone/ubiquinol between the RC and the cytochrome bc 1 complex in analogous fashion to the well-studied PufX protein from Rhodobacter sphaeroides. The identity and function of helix W have remained unknown for over 13years; here we use a combination of biochemistry, mass spectrometry, molecular genetics and electron microscopy to identify this protein as RPA4402 in Rps. palustris CGA009. Protein W shares key conserved sequence features with PufX homologs, and although a deletion mutant was able to grow under photosynthetic conditions with no discernible phenotype, we show that a tagged version of protein W pulls down the RC-LH1 complex. Protein W is not encoded in the photosynthesis gene cluster and our data indicate that only approximately 10% of wild-type Rps. palustris core complexes contain this non-essential subunit; functional and evolutionary consequences of this observation are discussed. The ability to purify uniform RC-LH1 and RC-LH1-protein W preparations will also be beneficial for future structural studies of these bacterial core complexes. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Prevalence, and virulence determination of Listeria monocytogenes strains isolated from clinical and non-clinical samples by multiplex polymerase chain reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abazar Pournajaf

    Full Text Available Abstract INTRODUCTION: This study aimed to determine the prevalence, and virulence factors of Listeria monocytogenes isolated from various samples by multiplex polymerase chain reaction (MPCR. METHODS: A total of 617 isolates were obtained and MPCR was employed for detection of the inlA, inlC, and inlJ genes. RESULTS: L. monocytogenes was detected in 46 (7.45% of the 617 specimens. inlA, inlC, and inlJ were detected in 100%, 76.26%, and 71% isolates, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: This study validated MPCR in the analysis and rapid detection of L. monocytogenes. The role of the genes in pathogenesis of the strains can also be affirmed.

  11. Detection and identification of cutaneous leishmaniasis isolates by culture, Polymerase chain reaction and sequence analyses in Syrian and Central Anatolia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyhan, Yunus E; Karakus, Mehmet; Karagoz, Alper; Mungan, Mesut; Ozkan, Aysegul T; Hokelek, Murat

    2017-09-01

    To characterize the cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) isolates of Syrian and Central Anatolia patients at species levels. Methods: Skin scrapings of 3 patients (2 Syrian, 1 Turkish) were taken and examined by direct examination, culture in Novy-MacNeal-Nicole (NNN) medium, internal transcribed spacer polymerase chain reaction and sequence analysis (PCR). Results:According to microscopic examination, culture and PCR methods, 3 samples were detected positive. The sequencing results of all isolates in the study were identified as Leishmania tropica. The same genotypes were detected in the 3 isolates and nucleotide sequence submitted into GenBank with the accession number: KP689599. Conclusion: This finding could give information about the transmission of CL between Turkey and Syria. Because of the Syrian civil war, most of the Syrian citizens circulating in Turkey and different part of Europe, this can be increase the risk of spreading the disease. So, prevention measurements must be taken urgently.

  12. Detection and identification of cutaneous leishmaniasis isolates by culture, Polymerase chain reaction and sequence analyses in Syrian and Central Anatolia patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunus E. Beyhan

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To characterize the cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL isolates of Syrian and Central Anatolia patients at species levels. Methods: Skin scrapings of 3 patients (2 Syrian, 1 Turkish were taken and examined by direct examination, culture in Novy-MacNeal-Nicole (NNN medium, internal transcribed spacer polymerase chain reaction and sequence analysis (PCR. Results:According to microscopic examination, culture and PCR methods, 3 samples were detected positive. The sequencing results of all isolates in the study were identified as Leishmania tropica. The same genotypes were detected in the 3 isolates and nucleotide sequence submitted into GenBank with the accession number: KP689599. Conclusion: This finding could give information about the transmission of CL between Turkey and Syria. Because of the Syrian civil war, most of the Syrian citizens circulating in Turkey and different part of Europe, this can be increase the risk of spreading the disease. So, prevention measurements must be taken urgently.

  13. Using an enzymatic galactose assay to detect lactose glycation extents of two proteins caseinate and soybean protein isolate via the Maillard reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Peng; Zhao, Xin-Huai

    2017-06-01

    Glycation of food proteins via the Maillard reaction has been widely studied in the recent years; however, the amount of saccharide connected to proteins is usually not determined. An enzymatic galactose assay was proposed firstly in this study to detect lactose glycation extents of caseinate and soybean protein isolate (SPI) during the Maillard reaction at two temperatures and different times. The separated glycated proteins were hydrolysed to release galactose necessary for the enzymatic assay and glycation calculation. Caseinate and SPI both obtained the highest lactose glycation extents at 100 °C or 121 °C by a reaction time of 180 or 20 min. Short- and long-time reaction resulted in lower glycation extents. During the reaction, three chemical indices (absorbences at 294/490 nm and fluorescence intensities) of reaction mixtures increased continually, but another index reactable NH 2 of glycated proteins showed the opposite trend. In general, changing profiles of the four indices were inconsistent with those profiles of lactose glycation extents of glycated proteins, implying practical limitation of the four indices in studies. This proposed enzymatic assay could directly detect lactose glycation of the two proteins, and thus was more useful than the four chemical indices to monitor glycation of the two proteins. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  14. [Prevalence of reactions secundary to mosquito bites Aedes aegypti at en el Regional Center of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, University Hospital, de Monterrey, Nuevo Leon].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Diaz, Sandra Nora; Cruz, Alfredo Arias; Sedó Mejía, Giovanni A; Rojas Lozano, Antonio A; Valenzuela, Enrique Avitia; Vidaurri Ojeda, Alma C

    2010-01-01

    although systemic reactions resulting from hymenoptera stings have been studied extensively, the prevalence of allergic reactions to mosquitoes is unknown. to investigate the prevalence of allergic reactions to Aedes aegypti bites in patients seeking treatment at the Allergy and Clinical Immunology Regional Center of Jose E Gonzalez University Hospital in Monterrey, Mexico. we carried out a cross-sectional, descriptive study that included patients receiving skin tests for aeroallergens; skin sensitivity to mosquito bites was also tested. A questionnaire was used to obtain information about previous allergic reactions to mosquito bites. a total of 482 patients between 2 and 60 years of age were included; 53% were female, 407 (84.4%) had a history of local reactions to mosquito bites. Twelve patients (2.4%) stated a history of large local reaction; three (0.6%) of them with a positive skin prick test, one (0.2%) of those had systemic reaction history to mosquito. Eighty five (17.6%) patients had a positive mosquito skin test and 307 (63.6%) had a positive skin test for at least one aeroallergen. Seventy-eight (91.7%) of the 85 patients with a positive mosquito skin test had a history of local skin reactions to mosquito bite (odds ratio: 2.303 [confidence interval (CI) 1.037-5.10]. There was no statistically significance association between allergic diseases and mosquito allergy. adverse reactions and allergic reactions to mosquito bites occur frequently. However mosquito allergy is low. Further studies are required to determine the prevalence of mosquito allergy in the general population.

  15. First Survey of Metallo-β-Lactamase Producers in Clinical Isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa From a Referral Burn Center in Kurdistan Province.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalantar, Enayatollah; Torabi, Vahideh; Salimizand, Heiman; Soheili, Fariborz; Beiranvand, Soheila; Soltan Dallal, Mohammad Mehdi

    2012-01-01

    Treatment of infectious diseases is becoming more challenging with each passing year. This is especially true for infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an opportunistic pathogen with the ability to rapidly develop resistance to multiple classes of antibiotics. This study was conducted to determine the prevalence of metallo-β-lactamase (MBL)-producing strains among multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa strains isolated from burn patients. The isolates were identified, tested for susceptibility to various antimicrobial agents, and screened for the presence of MβLs by using the double-disk synergy test. The minimal inhibitory concentration of imipenem was determined by microplate broth dilution method on Mueller-Hinton agar. To detect VIM, SIM, and GIM MBLs, the isolates were subjected to polymerase chain reaction. In this study, we identified 100 P. aeruginosa isolates from 176 clinical specimens obtained from burn patients. The isolates showed maximum resistance to ampicillin (100%), ceftazidime (94%), and ceftriaxone (89%). The CLSI-MBL phenotypic test showed that of the 100 P. aeruginosa isolates, 22 (22%) were positive for MBL production in the double-disk synergy test. Of the 22 MBL-positive P. aeruginosa isolates, 8 were resistant to imipenem. PCR analysis showed that 8 isolates were positive for blaVIM1. The other genes blaSIM1 and blaGIM1 were not detected. The study results demonstrate the serious therapeutic threat of the spread of MBL producers among P. aeruginosa populations. Metallo-β-lactamases were detected in 22% of imipenem-resistant P. aeruginosa isolates. Early detection and infection-control practices are the best antimicrobial strategies for this organism; therefore, systematic surveillance to detect MBL producers is necessary.

  16. Identification and Characterization of Linezolid-Resistant cfr-Positive Staphylococcus aureus USA300 Isolates from a New York City Medical Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuill, Douglas E.; Scharn, Caitlyn R.; Deane, Jennifer; Sahm, Daniel F.; Goering, Richard V.; Jenkins, Stephen G.; Shaw, Karen J.

    2014-01-01

    The cfr gene was identified in three linezolid-resistant USA300 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates collected over a 3-day period at a New York City medical center in 2011 as part of a routine surveillance program. Each isolate possessed a plasmid containing a pSCFS3-like cfr gene environment. Transformation of the cfr-bearing plasmids into the S. aureus ATCC 29213 background recapitulated the expected Cfr antibiogram, including resistance to linezolid, tiamulin, clindamycin, and florfenicol and susceptibility to tedizolid. PMID:25136008

  17. Optimisation of high-quality total ribonucleic acid isolation from cartilaginous tissues for real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peeters, M.; Huang, C. L.; Vonk, L. A.; Lu, Z. F.; Bank, R. A.; Helder, M. N.; Doulabi, B. Zandieh

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Studies which consider the molecular mechanisms of degeneration and regeneration of cartilaginous tissues are seriously hampered by problematic ribonucleic acid (RNA) isolations due to low cell density and the dense, proteoglycan-rich extracellular matrix of cartilage. Proteoglycans tend

  18. Optimisation of high-quality total ribonucleic acid isolation from cartilaginous tissues for real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peeters, M; Huang, C L; Vonk, L A; Lu, Z F; Bank, R A; Helder, M N; Doulabi, B Zandieh

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Studies which consider the molecular mechanisms of degeneration and regeneration of cartilaginous tissues are seriously hampered by problematic ribonucleic acid (RNA) isolations due to low cell density and the dense, proteoglycan-rich extracellular matrix of cartilage. Proteoglycans tend

  19. Comparison of calculated and experimental isotope edited FTIR difference spectra for purple bacterial photosynthetic reaction centers with different quinones incorporated into the QA binding site.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan eZhao

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Previously we have shown that ONIOM type (QM/MM calculations can be used to simulate isotope edited FTIR difference spectra for neutral ubiquinone in the QA binding site in Rhodobacter sphaeroides photosynthetic reaction centers. Here we considerably extend upon this previous work by calculating isotope edited FTIR difference spectra for reaction centers with a variety of unlabeled and 18O labeled foreign quinones incorporated into the QA binding site. Isotope edited spectra were calculated for reaction centers with 2,3-dimethoxy-5,6-dimethyl-1,4-benzoquinone (MQ0, 2,3,5,6-tetramethyl-1,4-benzoquinone (duroquinone, DQ, and 2,3-dimethyl-l,4-naphthoquinone (DMNQ incorporated, and compared to corresponding experimental spectra. The calculated and experimental spectra agree well, further demonstrating the utility and applicability of our ONIOM approach for calculating the vibrational properties of pigments in protein binding sites.The normal modes that contribute to the bands in the calculated spectra, their composition, frequency and intensity, and how these quantities are modified upon 18O labeling, are presented. This computed information leads to a new and more detailed understanding/interpretation of the experimental FTIR difference spectra. Hydrogen bonding to the carbonyl groups of the incorporated quinones is shown to be relatively weak. It is also shown that there is some asymmetry in hydrogen bonding, accounting for 10-13 cm-1 separation in the frequencies of the carbonyl vibrational modes of the incorporated quinones. The extent of asymmetry H-bonding could only be established by considering the spectra for various types of quinones incorporated into the QA binding site. The quinones listed above are tail-less. Spectra were also calculated for reaction centers with corresponding tail containing quinones incorporated, and it is found that replacement of the quinone methyl group by a phytyl or prenyl chain does not alter ONIOM calculated s

  20. Identification of ochratoxin A producing Aspergillus carbonarius and A. niger clade isolated from grapes using the loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storari, M; von Rohr, R; Pertot, I; Gessler, C; Broggini, G A L

    2013-04-01

    To develop two assays based on the loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) of DNA for the quick and specific identification of Aspergillus carbonarius and ochratoxigenic strains of the Aspergillus niger clade isolated from grapes. Two sets of primers were designed based on the polyketide synthase genes involved or putatively involved in ochratoxin A (OTA) biosynthesis in A. carbonarius and A. niger clade. Hydroxynaphthol blue was used as indirect method to indicate DNA amplification. The limit of detection of both assays was comparable to that of a PCR reaction. Specificities of the reactions were tested using DNA from different black aspergilli isolated from grapes. The two LAMP assays were then used to identify A. carbonarius and ochratoxigenic A. niger and A. awamori grown in pure cultures without a prior DNA extraction. The two LAMP assays permitted to quickly and specifically identify DNA from OTA-producing black aspergilli, as well as isolates grown in pure culture. Monitoring vineyards for the presence of OTA-producing strains is part of the measures to minimize the occurrence of OTA in grape products. The two LAMP assays developed here could be potentially used to speed the screening process of vineyards for the presence of OTA-producing black aspergilli. © 2013 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  1. Identifikasi Brucella abortus Isolat Lokal dengan Brucella abortus Strain Specific-Polymerase Chain Reaction (IDENTIFICATION OF LOCAL ISOLATES OF BRUCELLA ABORTUS USING BRUCELLA ABORTUS STRAIN SPECIFIC-POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION ASSAY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Maphilindawati Noor

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Brucella abortus Strain Specific-Polymerase Chain Reaction (BaSS-PCR is a single multiplex PCRtechnique which able to identify and differentiate between Brucella abortus field strains (biovar 1, 2, and4, B. abortus vaccine strains, Brucella species, and non-Brucella species. In this study, BaSS-PCR wasapplied to identify local isolates of B. abortus in order to investigate the B. abortus strains that infectedcattle in Indonesia. Fifty local strains of B.abortus isolated from infected cattle in Java (Jakarta andBandung, South Sulawesi (Maros, East Nusa Tenggara (Kupang and Belu were used in this study. TheDNA bands were observed by agarose gel in the presence of ethidium bromide. Identification was performedbased on the size and number of DNA products amplified by PCR from each isolates. The results showedthat the 50 isolates were of B. abortus field strains. This finding showed that the cause of bovine brucellosisin Indonesia is B. abortus field strains.

  2. White spot syndrome virus isolates of tiger shrimp Penaeus monodon (Fabricious) in India are similar to exotic isolates as revealed by polymerase chain reaction and electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, S S; Shekhar, M S

    2005-07-01

    Microbiological analysis of samples collected from cases of white spot disease outbreaks in cultured shrimp in different farms located in three regions along East Coast of India viz. Chidambram (Tamil Nadu), Nellore (Andhra Pradesh) and Balasore (Orissa), revealed presence of Vibrio alginolyticus, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, and Aeromonas spp. but experimental infection trials in Penaeus monodon with these isolates did not induce any acute mortality or formation of white spots on carapace. Infection trials using filtered tissue extracts by oral and injection method induced mortality in healthy P. monodon with all samples and 100% mortality was noted by the end of 7 day post-inoculation. Histopathological analysis demonstrated degenerated cells characterized by hypertrophied nuclei in gills, hepatopancreas and lymphoid organ with presence of intranuclear basophilic or eosino-basophilic bodies in tubular cells and intercellular spaces. Analysis of samples using 3 different primer sets as used by other for detection of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) generated 643, 1447 and 520bp amplified DNA products in all samples except in one instance. Variable size virions with mean size in the range of 110 x 320 +/- 20 nm were observed under electron microscope. It could be concluded that the viral isolates in India involved with white spot syndrome in cultured shrimp are similar to RV-PJ and SEMBV in Japan, WSBV in Taiwan and WSSV in Malaysia, Indonesia, Thailand, China and Japan.

  3. Evolution of direct mechanisms with incident energy from the Coulomb-barrier to relativistic energies. - Two-center effects in nucleon transfer between nuclei. - Signatures of nucleon promotion in heavy ion reactions at barrier energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oertzen, W. von; Voit, H.; Imanishi, B.

    1988-10-01

    This report contains a review article considering the evolution of direct mechanisms with incident energy in heavy ion reactions and two theoretical articles concerning two-center effects in transfer reactions between heavy ions and the nucleon promotion in heavy ion reactions. See hints under the relevant topics. (HSI)

  4. Investigation of Antibiotic Susceptibility Pattern of Staphylococcus aureus Strains Isolated from Patients Referring to Some Treatment Centers of Qom City, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Mosaei

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Staphylococcus aureus is one of the important causes of nosocomial infections. Resistance to various antibiotics, such as beta-lactams, aminoglycosides, and macrolides is one of the major problems in treatment and prevention of infections caused by this bacterium. Therefore, accurate determination of antibiotic susceptibility pattern of organisms isolated from patients can be beneficial in treatment and prevention of dangerous infections. The objective of this study was to isolate S. aureus bacterium and to determine the antibiotic susceptibility pattern of the isolated strains in patients referred to some treatment centers of Qom city. Methods: In this descriptive cross-sectional study, 340 clinical samples, were collected from September 2016 to July 2017. After isolation and primary identification of S. aureus isolates (using standard bacteriology methods, the isolated strains were confirmed by PCR technique and amplification of femA gene as a molecular diagnostic marker of S. aureus. Finally, antibiotic susceptibility pattern of the strains, was determined by disk diffusion method according to CLSI guideline. Results: Out of 340 clinical samples, 86 S. aureus strains were isolated and identified based on phenotypic characteristics. The femA gene was observed only in 45 strains (52.32% based on molecular analysis. The results of the antibiotic susceptibility test showed that the highest resistance was to penicillin (86.04% and the lowest resistance was to chloramphenicol (0%. Conclusion: The results of this study indicated that femA gene cannot by itself identify all the S. aureus strains. Also, with regard to the results of antibiogram test, it seems that antibiotic susceptibility test is necessary for S. aureus strains isolated from patients.

  5. Emergence of serine carbapenemases (KPC and SME) among clinical strains of Enterobacteriaceae isolated in the United States Medical Centers: report from the MYSTIC Program (1999-2005).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, Lalitagauri M; Rhomberg, Paul R; Sader, Helio S; Jones, Ronald N

    2006-12-01

    Among 8885 Enterobacteriaceae tested in the 1999 to 2005 period as part of the USA Meropenem Yearly Susceptibility Test Information Collection (MYSTIC) Program, 51 strains with increased imipenem and meropenem MIC values (> or =2 microg/mL) were detected. bla(KPC) was identified from 28 Klebsiella pneumoniae from 3 medical centers in the New York City area (8 ribotypes), 2 Klebsiella oxytoca from Arkansas (same ribotype), 7 Citrobacter freundii (6 from New York [5 ribotypes] and 1 from Delaware), 4 Enterobacter spp. from New York (2 species, different ribotypes), 3 Escherichia coli (2 from New York and 1 from Ohio, same ribotype), and 1 Serratia marcescens (New York). Sequencing confirmed KPC-2 or -3 in all of the strains. S. marcescens strains harboring SME-1 (2 isolates, same ribotype) and SME-2 (1 isolate) were identified from medical centers in Illinois and Washington state, respectively. Our results indicate that bla(KPC-2/3) has emerged widely (New York City area, Arkansas, Delaware, and Ohio) among Enterobacteriaceae isolated in the MYSTIC Program participant sites (2000-2005) and continues to be isolated from multiple species, as a result of clonal expansion and horizontal gene transfer. The escalating occurrence (0.35%) of serine carbapenemases could compromise the role of carbapenems and other beta-lactams in USA clinical practice although observed in only a few locations to date.

  6. Isolation and Characterization of a Novel Rebaudioside M Isomer from a Bioconversion Reaction of Rebaudioside A and NMR Comparison Studies of Rebaudioside M Isolated from Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni and Stevia rebaudiana Morita

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indra Prakash

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A minor product, rebaudioside M2 (2, from the bioconversion reaction of rebaudioside A (4 to rebaudioside D (3, was isolated and the complete structure of the novel steviol glycoside was determined. Rebaudioside M2 (2 is considered an isomer of rebaudioside M (1 and contains a relatively rare 1→6 sugar linkage. It was isolated and characterized with NMR (1H, 13C, COSY, HSQC-DEPT, HMBC, 1D-TOCSY, and NOESY and mass spectral data. Additionally, we emphasize the importance of 1D and 2D NMR techniques when identifying complex steviol glycosides. Numerous NMR spectroscopy studies of rebaudioside M (1, rebaudioside D (3, and mixture of 1 and 3 led to the discovery that SG17 which was previously reported in literature, is a mixture of rebaudioside D (3, rebaudioside M (1, and possibly other related steviol glycosides.

  7. Isolation and Characterization of a Novel Rebaudioside M Isomer from a Bioconversion Reaction of Rebaudioside A and NMR Comparison Studies of Rebaudioside M Isolated from Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni and Stevia rebaudiana Morita

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Indra; Bunders, Cynthia; Devkota, Krishna P.; Charan, Romila D.; Ramirez, Catherine; Priedemann, Christopher; Markosyan, Avetik

    2014-01-01

    A minor product, rebaudioside M2 (2), from the bioconversion reaction of rebaudioside A (4) to rebaudioside D (3), was isolated and the complete structure of the novel steviol glycoside was determined. Rebaudioside M2 (2) is considered an isomer of rebaudioside M (1) and contains a relatively rare 1→6 sugar linkage. It was isolated and characterized with NMR (1H, 13C, COSY, HSQC-DEPT, HMBC, 1D-TOCSY, and NOESY) and mass spectral data. Additionally, we emphasize the importance of 1D and 2D NMR techniques when identifying complex steviol glycosides. Numerous NMR spectroscopy studies of rebaudioside M (1), rebaudioside D (3), and mixture of 1 and 3 led to the discovery that SG17 which was previously reported in literature, is a mixture of rebaudioside D (3), rebaudioside M (1), and possibly other related steviol glycosides. PMID:24970220

  8. Relationship Between Ebola Virus Real-Time Quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction-Based Threshold Cycle Value and Virus Isolation From Human Plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spengler, Jessica R; McElroy, Anita K; Harmon, Jessica R; Ströher, Ute; Nichol, Stuart T; Spiropoulou, Christina F

    2015-10-01

    We performed a longitudinal analysis of plasma samples obtained from 4 patients with Ebola virus (EBOV) disease (EVD) to determine the relationship between the real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR)-based threshold cycle (Ct) value and the presence of infectious EBOV. EBOV was not isolated from plasma samples with a Ct value of >35.5 or >12 days after onset of symptoms. EBOV was not isolated from plasma samples in which anti-EBOV nucleoprotein immunoglobulin G was detected. These data demonstrate the utility of interpreting qRT-PCR results in the context of the course of EBOV infection and associated serological responses for patient-management decisions. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America 2015. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  9. Determination of haemolytic and non haemolytic genes profiles of Bacillus cereus strains isolated from food samples by polymerase chain reaction (pcr) technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jawad, Nisreen; Ahemd, Asmat; Abdullah, Aminah

    2018-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of Bacillus cereus and detection of enterotoxigenic genes in food samples by utilizing a Polymerase Chain Reaction technique (PCR). In this study the providence of B. cereus was carried out to food samples. The B. cereus isolates were investigated for enterotoxigenic gene. The cooked seafood, and raw milk samples were purchased from several restaurants and market in the area of (Bangi, Kajang, Serdang and UKM) Selangor, Malaysia. A total of 60 samples have been analyzed. B. cereus contamination has been formed between 1.4×105 - 3×105 cfu/mL of cooked seafood and raw milk samples. Five colonies have been detected as B. cereus using biochemical test. All B. cereus isolates named BC1 to BC27, were characterized for haemolytic enterotoxin (HBL) complex encoding genes (hblA), non-haemolytic enterotoxin encoding gene (NheA). 10 isolates have been reported to be positive towards hblA and 12 isolates were positive towards NheA. The presence of B. cereus and their enterotoxigenic genes in cooked seafood and raw milk from to food samples obtained may pose a potential risk for public health.

  10. Molecular identification of Candida species isolated from cases of neonatal candidemia using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism in a tertiary care hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akeela Fatima

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Candida spp. is an emerging cause of bloodstream infections worldwide. Delay in speciation of Candida isolates by conventional methods and resistance to antifungal drugs in various Candida species are responsible for the increase in morbidity and mortality due to candidemia. Hence, the rapid identification of Candida isolates is very important for the proper management of patients with candidemia. Aims: The aim was to re-evaluate the identification of various Candida spp. by polymerase chain reaction (PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP and to evaluate the accuracy, speed, and cost of phenotypic methodology versus PCR-RFLP. Settings and Design: Hospital-based cross-sectional study. Materials and Methods: Ninety consecutive clinical isolates of seven Candida species, isolated from blood of neonates and identified by routine phenotypic methods, were re-evaluated using universal primers internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1 and ITS4 for PCR amplification and Msp I restriction enzyme for RFLP. Statistical Analysis Used: Kappa test for agreement. Results: The results of PCR-RFLP were 100% in agreement with those obtained using conventional phenotypic methods. Identification could be achieved within 3 work days by both the methods. Our routine methods proved to be cost effective than PCR-RFLP. Conclusions: We can continue with our routine phenotypic methods and PCR-RFLP can be used for periodic quality control or when conventional methods fail to identify a species.

  11. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based typing analysis of atypical isolates of the fish pathogen Aeromonas salmonicida

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høie, S.; Dalsgaard, Inger; Aase, I.L.

    1999-01-01

    . salmonicida subsp. salmonicida isolates tested, belonged to group 1. The PCR primer-sets separated A. salmonicida from other reference strains of Aeromonas species and related bacteria with the exception of Aeromonas hydrophila. The results indicated that PCR typing is a useful framework for characterization...

  12. Nuclear Data Center (NDC) of Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI). Progress Report to the IAEA Technical Meeting of Nuclear Reaction Data Centers (NRDC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Young-Ouk

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear Data Center (NDC, former Nuclear Data Evaluation Lab.) of Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) has a director, 10 permanent staffs (2 in evaluation, 1 in measurement, 2 in atomic and molecular data, 2 in processing and validation, 3 in applications), one PhD student and one secretary. KAERI/NDC recently expanded its scope of work into the atomic and molecular data where two permanent staffs are involved. Mission of KAERI/NDC is disseminating outcomes of international network as well as promoting domestic nuclear data activities and related applications.

  13. A study of the atmospherically important reactions of dimethylsulfide (DMS) with I2 and ICl using infrared matrix isolation spectroscopy and electronic structure calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beccaceci, Sonya; Armata, Nerina; Ogden, J Steven; Dyke, John M; Rhyman, Lydia; Ramasami, Ponnadurai

    2012-02-21

    The reactions of dimethylsulfide (DMS) with molecular iodine (I(2)) and iodine monochloride (ICl) have been studied by infrared matrix isolation spectroscopy by co-condensation of the reagents in an inert gas matrix. Molecular adducts of DMS + I(2) and DMS + ICl have also been prepared using standard synthetic methods. The vapour above each of these adducts trapped in an inert gas matrix gave the same infrared spectrum as that recorded for the corresponding co-condensation reaction. In each case, the infrared spectrum has been interpreted in terms of a van der Waals adduct, DMS : I(2) and DMS : ICl, with the aid of infrared spectra computed for their minimum energy structures at the MP2 level. Computed relative energies of minima and transition states on the potential energy surfaces of these reactions were used to understand why they do not proceed further than the reactant complexes DMS : I(2) and DMS : ICl. The main findings of this research are compared with results obtained earlier for the DMS + Cl(2) and DMS + Br(2) reactions, and the atmospheric implications of the conclusions are also considered.

  14. Characterization of hypersensitivity reactions reported among Andrographis paniculata users in Thailand using Health Product Vigilance Center (HPVC) database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwankesawong, Wimon; Saokaew, Surasak; Permsuwan, Unchalee; Chaiyakunapruk, Nathorn

    2014-12-24

    Andrographis paniculata (andrographis) is one of the herbal products that are widely used for various indications. Hypersensitivity reactions have been reported among subjects receiving Andrographis paniculata in Thailand. Understanding of characteristics of patients, adverse events, and clinical outcomes is essential for ensuring population safety.This study aimed to describe the characteristics of hypersensitivity reactions reported in patients receiving andrographis containing products in Thailand using national pharmacovigilance database. Thai Vigibase data from February 2001 to December 2012 involving andrographis products were used. This database includes the reports submitted through the spontaneous reporting system and intensive monitoring programmes. The database contained patient characteristic, adverse events associated with andrographis products, and details on seriousness, causality, and clinical outcomes. Case reports were included for final analysis if they met the inclusion criteria; 1) reports with andrographis being the only suspected cause, 2) reports with terms consistent with the constellation of hypersensitivity reactions, and 3) reports with terms considered critical terms according to WHO criteria. Descriptive statistics were used. A total of 248 case reports of andrographis-associated adverse events were identified. Only 106 case reports specified andrographis herbal product as the only suspected drug and reported at least one term consistent with constellation of hypersensitivity reactions. Most case reports (89%) came from spontaneous reporting system with no previously documented history of drug allergy (88%). Of these, 18 case reports were classified as serious with 16 cases requiring hospitalization. For final assessment, the case reports with terms consistent with constellation of hypersensitivity reactions and critical terms were included. Thirteen case reports met such criteria including anaphylactic shock (n = 5), anaphylactic

  15. A Fluorogenic Aromatic Nucleophilic Substitution Reaction for Demonstrating Normal-Phase Chromatography and Isolation of Nitrobenzoxadiazole Chromophores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Key, Jessie A.; Li, Matthew D.; Cairo, Christopher W.

    2011-01-01

    Normal-phase chromatography is an essential technique for monitoring chemical reactions, identifying the presence of specific components, as well as the purification of organic compounds. An experiment to facilitate the instruction and understanding of the concepts behind normal-phase chromatography at the introductory and intermediate…

  16. Redox reactions of cytochrome c in isolated mitochondria exposed to blue or red lasers using resonance Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denton, Michael L.; Gonzalez, Cherry C.; Noojin, Gary D.; Yakovlev, Vladislav V.

    2018-02-01

    Resonance Raman spectroscopy of cytochrome c was used to follow reduction/oxidation (redox) states of isolated mitochondria in response to blue or red laser exposure. Mitochondria were isolated from hTERT-RPE1 cells and were kept in a buffer formulation known to be conducive to electron transport chain (ETC) activity. Using either pyruvate or succinate as substrates for ETC, we found differences in the redox responses of cytochrome c for different exposure laser irradiance and excitation wavelength. We anticipate that the proposed new method will be valuable in the study of metabolic processes in mitochondria in response to low level laser exposure, and thus aid in elucidating the mechanism(s) of photobiomodulation.

  17. Adverse reactions of Methylphenidate in children with attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder: Report from a referral center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khajehpiri, Zahra; Mahmoudi-Gharaei, Javad; Faghihi, Toktam; Karimzadeh, Iman; Khalili, Hossein; Mohammadi, Mostafa

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the current study was to determine various aspects of methylphenidate adverse reactions in children with attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in Iran. Methods: During the 6 months period, all children under methylphenidate treatment alone or along with other agents attending a university-affiliated psychology clinic were screened regarding all subjective and objective adverse drug reactions (ADRs) of methylphenidate. Causality and seriousness of detected ADRs were assessed by relevant World Health Organization definitions. The Schumock and Thornton questionnaire was used to determine preventability of ADRs. Findings: Seventy-one patients including 25 girls and 46 boys with ADHD under methylphenidate treatment were enrolled within the study period. All (100%) ADHD children under methylphenidate treatment developed at least one ADR. Anorexia (74.3%), irritability (57.1%), and insomnia (47.2%) were the most frequent methylphenidate-related adverse reactions. Except for one, all other detected ADRs were determined to be mild. In addition, no ADR was considered to be preventable and serious. Conclusion: Our data suggested that although methylphenidate related adverse reactions were common in children with ADHD, but they were mainly mild and nonserious. PMID:25535621

  18. Probing the Energy Transfer Dynamics of Photosynthetic Reaction Center Complexes Through Hole-Burning and Single-Complex Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, Kerry Joseph [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Photosynthesis is the process by which light energy is used to drive reactions that generate sugars to supply energy for cellular processes. It is one of the most important fundamental biological reactions and occurs in both prokaryotic (e.g. bacteria) and eukaryotic (e.g. plants and algae) organisms. Photosynthesis is also remarkably intricate, requiring the coordination of many different steps and reactions in order to successfully transform absorbed solar energy into a biochemical usable form of energy. However, the net reaction for all photosynthetic organisms can be reduced to the following, deceptively general, equation developed by Van Niel[1] H2 - D + Aimplieshv A - H2 + D where H2-D is the electron donor, e.g. H2O, H2S. A is the electron acceptor, e.g. CO2, and A-H2 is the synthesized sugar. Amazingly, this simple net equation is responsible for creating the oxidizing atmosphere of Earth and the recycling of CO2, both of which are necessary for the sustainment of the global ecosystem.

  19. Reactions of dihydridotetrakis(triphenylphosphine)ruthenium(II) with olefins and isolation of new ruthenium-olefin complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komiya, Sanshiro; Yamamoto, Akio

    1976-01-01

    Dihydridotetrakis(triphenylphosphine)ruthenium (II), RuH 2 (PPh 3 ) 4 , reacts with olefins (ethylene, propylene, stylene and butadiene) to give olefin-coordinated complexes of the type, Ru(olefin)(PPh 3 ) 3 and equimolar amounts of their hydrogenation products per mol of the dihydride complex. The olefin coordinated with ruthenium can be exchanged with other olefins. Olefin-coordinated complexes easily react with molecular hydrogen to afford tetrahydridotris(triphenylphosphine)ruthenium, RuH 4 (PPh 3 ) 3 , releasing alkane at room temperature, Under hydrogen atmosphere catalytic hydrogenation of the olefins smoothly takes place with RuH 2 (PPh 3 ) 4 . (Ethylene)tris(triphenylphosphine)ruthenium(0) reacts with methyl iodide to give propylene and a trace of butadiene along with methane, ethylene, and small amounts of ethane and butenes. The formation of propylene suggests that oxidative addition involving cleavage of the C-H bond of ethylene to ruthenium giving a hydridovinyl complex may be taking place. Reactions of Ru(C 2 H 4 )(PPh 3 ) 3 with methyl-d 3 iodide and ethyl iodide, and of Ru(C 3 H 6 )(PPh 3 ) 3 with methyl iodide were examined to test the generality of this type of reaction. The reaction of Ru(C 2 H 4 )(PPh 3 ) 3 with CD 3 I released CD 4 and CD 2 H 2 together with CD 3 H suggesting the involvement of α-hydrogen abstraction. (auth.)

  20. Physicochemical properties of soy protein isolate/carboxymethyl cellulose blend films crosslinked by Maillard reactions: Color, transparency and heat-sealing ability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su Junfeng; Yuan Xiaoyan; Huang Zhen; Wang Xinyu; Lu Xuzhen; Zhang Lidan; Wang Shengbao

    2012-01-01

    Soy protein isolate (SPI) films have many potential applications in the biomaterial field as surgical dressings for burns, films for reduction of wound inflammation, and facial masks. The appearance and the sealing ability are important physicochemical properties that greatly influence consumer acceptance of such protein-based films. The aim of the present work was to investigate the chemical structure and the physical properties associated with color, transparency and heat-sealing ability for SPI/carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) blend films prepared by solution casting, with weight proportions 90/10, 80/20, 70/30 and 60/40. Fourier transform infra-red (FTIR) and solid-state 13 C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra confirmed that Maillard reactions occurred between SPI and CMC. The Hunter color value (L, a, b) and transparency of films were affected by varying the proportions of SPI and CMC. With increasing degree of crosslinking of SPI and CMC, the yellow color of the films was diluted and transparency was improved. Peel strength and tensile strength measurements showed that the Maillard reactions had the main effect of enhancing the heat-sealing ability above the melting temperature. These results indicated that the structure and properties of SPI-based films could be modified and improved by blending with CMC. - Highlights: ► Maillard reactions occurred in SPI/CMC films. ► The color and transparency of SPI/CMC films were affected by Maillard reactions. ► Maillard reactions enhanced the heat-sealing ability of SPI/CMC films.

  1. Dalbavancin Activity When Tested against Streptococcus pneumoniae Isolated in Medical Centers on Six Continents (2011 to 2014).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Ronald N; Schuchert, Jason E; Mendes, Rodrigo E

    2016-06-01

    Dalbavancin, a novel lipoglycopeptide, was approved for use in 2014 by regulatory agencies in the United States and Europe for the treatment of skin and skin structure infections. The activity of dalbavancin was also widely assessed by determination of its activity against Streptococcus pneumoniae clinical isolates collected from patients on six continents monitored during two time intervals (2011 to 2013 and 2014). A total of 18,186 pneumococcal isolates were obtained from 49 nations and submitted to a monitoring laboratory as part of the SENTRY Antimicrobial Surveillance Program for reference susceptibility testing. The potency of dalbavancin against S. pneumoniae was consistent across the years that it was monitored, with the MIC50 and MIC90 being 0.015 and 0.03 μg/ml, respectively, and all isolates were inhibited by ≤0.12 μg/ml. The activity of dalbavancin was not adversely influenced by nonsusceptibility to β-lactams (ceftriaxone or penicillin), macrolides, clindamycin, fluoroquinolones, or tetracyclines or multidrug resistance (MDR). Regional variations in dalbavancin activity were not detected, but S. pneumoniae strains isolated in the Asia-Pacific region were more likely to be nonsusceptible to penicillin and ceftriaxone as well as to be MDR than strains isolated in North or South America and Europe. Direct comparisons of potency illustrated that dalbavancin (MIC50 and MIC90, 0.015 and 0.03 μg/ml, respectively) was 16-fold or more active than vancomycin (MIC50, 0.25 μg/ml), linezolid (MIC50, 1 μg/ml), levofloxacin (MIC50, 1 μg/ml), ceftriaxone (MIC90, 1 μg/ml), and penicillin (MIC90, 2 μg/ml). In conclusion, dalbavancin had potent and consistent activity against this contemporary (2011 to 2014) collection of S. pneumoniae isolates. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  2. Fluorescent antibody test, quantitative polymerase chain reaction pattern and clinical aspects of rabies virus strains isolated from main reservoirs in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Appolinário

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Rabies virus (RABV isolated from different mammals seems to have unique characteristics that influence the outcome of infection. RABV circulates in nature and is maintained by reservoirs that are responsible for the persistence of the disease for almost 4000 years. Considering the different pattern of pathogenicity of RABV strains in naturally and experimentally infected animals, the aim of this study was to analyze the characteristics of RABV variants isolated from the main Brazilian reservoirs, being related to a dog (variant 2, Desmodus rotundus (variant 3, crab eating fox, marmoset, and Myotis spp. Viral replication in brain tissue of experimentally infected mouse was evaluated by two laboratory techniques and the results were compared to clinical evolution from five RABV variants. The presence of the RABV was investigated in brain samples by fluorescent antibody test (FAT and real time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR for quantification of rabies virus nucleoprotein gene (N gene. Virus replication is not correlated with clinical signs and evolution. The pattern of FAT is associated with RABV replication levels. Virus isolates from crab eating fox and marmoset had a longer evolution period and higher survival rate suggesting that the evolution period may contribute to the outcome. RABV virus variants had independent characteristics that determine the clinical evolution and survival of the infected mice.

  3. The prevalence of cryptosporidiosis in Turkish children, and geno typing of isolates by nested polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamer, Gulden S.; Turk, M.; Dagci, H.; Pektas, B.; Guruz, Adnan Y.; Uner, A.; Guy, E.C.

    2007-01-01

    Objective was to verify the incidence of cryptosporidiosis among Turkish elementary school students. The study was conducted in the Dept. of Parasitology, Faculty of Medicine, Ege University, Turkey during a 3-month period in 2006. We assessed the fecal samples of 707 children using modified acid-fast and phenol-auramine staining followed by modified Ritchie concentration method. All cryptosporidium species isolates were analysed by nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) to differentiate genotypes of the isolates. After the coprological examination, 4 samples were found to be positive for cryptosporidium species oocysts. In the present study, all 4 oocysts were of zoonotic origin and belonged to cryptoporodium parvum genotype 2 indicating that in Turkey the potential sources of human cryptosporidiosis is from animals. The application of genotyping to clinical isolates of cryptosporidium has significantly increased our knowledge and understanding of the distribution and epidemiology of this parasite. The PCR and RFLP techniques represent a more rapid and simple method of genotyping to support epidemiological and clinical investigations than conventional analytical DNA techniques. (author)

  4. Magnitude and direction of the change in dipole moment associated with excitation of the primary electron donor in Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides reaction centers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lockhart, D.J.; Boxer, S.G.

    1987-02-10

    The magnitude and direction of the change in dipole moment, ..delta mu.., associated with the Q/sub y/ transition of the dimeric primary electron donor (special pair or P870) in Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides reaction centers have been measured by Stark spectroscopy at 20 /sup 0/C. The magnitude of ..delta mu.. is found to be f/sup -1/ (10.3 +/- 0.7) D, where f is a correction factor for the local dielectric properties of the protein matrix. With the spherical cavity approximation and an effective local dielectric constant of 2, f = 1.2, and absolute value of ..delta mu.. is 8.6 +/- 0.6 D. Absolute value of ..delta mu.. for the Q/sub y/ transition of the special pair is approximately a factor of 3.4 and 2 greater than for the monomeric bacteriochlorophylls and bacteriopheophytins, respectively, in the reaction center. The angle between ..delta mu.. and the transition dipole moment for excitation of the first singlet electron state of the special pair was found to be 24 +/- 2/sup 0/. The measured values are combined to suggest a physical model in which the lowest excited singlet state of the special pair has substantial charge-transfer character and where charge is separated between the two monomers comprising the dimeric special pair. This leads to the hypothesis that the first charge-separated state in bacterial photosynthesis is formed directly upon photoexcitation. These data provide stringent values for comparison with theoretical calculations of the electronic structure of the chromophores in the reaction center.

  5. Investigation of Biofield Treatment on Antimicrobial Susceptibility, Biochemical Reaction Pattern and Biotyping of Enteropathogenic Multidrug-Resistant Escherichia coli Isolates

    OpenAIRE

    Trivedi, Dahryn; Trivedi, Mahendra Kumar; Branton, Alice; Nayak, Gopal; Shettigar, Harish; Gangwar, Mayank; Jana, Snehasis

    2015-01-01

    Study background: Multidrug resistant Escherichia coli (MDR E. coli) has become a major health concern, and failure of treatment leads to huge health burden. Aim of the present study was to determine the impact of Mr. Trivedi’s biofield treatment on E. coli. Methods: Four MDR clinical lab isolates (LSs) of E. coli (LS 8, LS 9, LS 10, and LS 11) were taken and divided into two groups i.e. control and biofield treated. Control and treated samples were identified with respect to its antimicr...

  6. Prevalence and identification by multiplex polymerase chain reaction patterns of Cronobacter spp. isolated from plant-based foods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filiz AKSU

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cronobacter spp. involves a group of opportunistic pathogens that cause meningitis in newborns, immunosuppressed individuals with a mortality rate of 50-80%. Seven species like C. sakazakii, C. malonaticus, C. muytjensii, C. turicensis, C. dublinensis, C. universalis, C. condimenti are included in this genus which has been a subject of research especially in the bacteriologic analysis of baby foods. However, since these species were detected also in prepared foodstuffs. The objective of this study was to assert the presence of Cronobacter spp. in foodstuff offered for sale in Turkey. A total of 151 prepared foodstuffs including a variety of spice, flour, instant soup were purchased from different sales points. The presence of Cronobacter spp. were investigated in these samples. Cronobacter suspected isolates which were obtained by microbiological analyses were confirmed by PCR targeted to gyrB gene and were then identified by multiplex PCR. Prevalence of Cronobacter spp was estimated to be 17.88%. Out of 27 Cronobacter spp. isolates obtained, 13(48.1%, 6(22.2%, 5(18.5%, 3(11.1% belonged to C. sakazakii, C. muytjensii, C. turicensis, C. malonaticus species, respectively. Consequently, the presence of the bacteria in widely consumed foodstuff revealed that Cronobacter spp. is subject to monitoring due to its opportunistic nature in terms of public health concern.

  7. Evidence that the periaqueductal gray matter mediates the facilitation of panic-like reactions in neonatally-isolated adult rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeyce Willig Quintino-dos-Santos

    Full Text Available Plenty of evidence suggests that childhood separation anxiety (CSA predisposes the subject to adult-onset panic disorder (PD. As well, panic is frequently comorbid with both anxiety and depression. The brain mechanisms whereby CSA predisposes to PD are but completely unknown in spite of the increasing evidence that panic attacks are mediated at midbrain's dorsal periaqueductal gray matter (DPAG. Accordingly, here we examined whether the neonatal social isolation (NSI, a model of CSA, facilitates panic-like behaviors produced by electrical stimulations of DPAG of rats as adults. Eventual changes in anxiety and depression were also assessed in the elevated plus-maze (EPM and forced-swimming test (FST respectively. Male pups were subjected to 3-h daily isolations from post-natal day 2 (PN2 until weaning (PN21 allotting half of litters in individual boxes inside a sound-attenuated chamber (NSI, n = 26 whilst siblings (sham-isolated rats, SHAM, n = 27 and dam were moved to another box in a separate room. Non-handled controls (CTRL, n = 18 remained undisturbed with dams until weaning. As adults, rats were implanted with electrodes into the DPAG (PN60 and subjected to sessions of intracranial stimulation (PN65, EPM (PN66 and FST (PN67-PN68. Groups were compared by Fisher's exact test (stimulation sites, likelihood ratio chi-square tests (stimulus-response threshold curves and Bonferroni's post hoc t-tests (EPM and FST, for P<0.05. Notably, DPAG-evoked panic-like responses of immobility, exophthalmus, trotting, galloping and jumping were markedly facilitated in NSI rats relative to both SHAM and CTRL groups. Conversely, anxiety and depression scores either did not change or were even reduced in neonatally-handled groups relative to CTRL, respectively. Data are the first behavioral evidence in animals that early-life separation stress produces the selective facilitation of panic-like behaviors in adulthood. Most importantly, results implicate

  8. Report on the consultants` meeting on co-ordination of the nuclear reaction data centers (technical aspects)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwerer, O; Wienke, H [eds.

    1997-10-01

    The report summarizes the co-ordination meeting of the network of Nuclear Reaction Data Centres organized by the IAEA in 1997. The meeting was attended by technical staff from ten member centres of the network (representing USA, Russia, China, Japan, Hungary, OECD-NEA and IAEA) to discuss technical matters of the nuclear data compilation and exchange by means of the jointly operated computerized systems CINDA, EXFOR, ENDF and others. Observers from Belgium and Ukraine also attended the meeting. The document includes status reports of all centres and selected working papers. Refs, figs, tabs.

  9. Report on the consultants' meeting on co-ordination of the nuclear reaction data centers (technical aspects)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwerer, O.; Wienke, H.

    1997-10-01

    The report summarizes the co-ordination meeting of the network of Nuclear Reaction Data Centres organized by the IAEA in 1997. The meeting was attended by technical staff from ten member centres of the network (representing USA, Russia, China, Japan, Hungary, OECD-NEA and IAEA) to discuss technical matters of the nuclear data compilation and exchange by means of the jointly operated computerized systems CINDA, EXFOR, ENDF and others. Observers from Belgium and Ukraine also attended the meeting. The document includes status reports of all centres and selected working papers

  10. Isolation and Characterization of Well-Defined Silica-Supported Azametallacyclopentane: A Key Intermediate in Catalytic Hydroaminoalkylation Reactions

    KAUST Repository

    Hamzaoui, Bilel

    2015-09-25

    Intermolecular catalytic hydroaminoalkylation of unactivated alkene occurs with silica-supported azazirconacyclopropane [[TRIPLE BOND]Si[BOND]O[BOND]Zr(HNMe2)(η2-NMeCH2)(NMe2)]. Mechanistic studies were conducted using surface organometallic chemistry (SOMC) concepts to identify the key surface intermediates. The azametallacyclopentene intermediate {[TRIPLE BOND]Si[BOND]O[BOND]Zr(HNMe2)[η2-NMeCH2CH(Me)CH2](NMe2)} was isolated after treating with 1-propylene and characterized by FT-IR spectroscopy, elemental analysis, 1H 13C HETCOR, DARR SS-NMR and DQ TQ SS-NMR. The regeneration of the catalyst was conducted by dimethylamine protonolysis to yield the pure amine.

  11. Molecular detection of field isolates of Turkey Eimeria by polymerase chain reaction amplification of the cytochrome c oxidase I gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathinam, T; Gadde, U; Chapman, H D

    2015-07-01

    Oocysts of Eimeria spp. were isolated from litter samples obtained from 30 commercial turkey farms. Genomic DNA was extracted from clean oocysts, and polymerase chain amplification of the species-specific cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) gene was performed for five species of turkey Eimeria. The species tested were Eimeria adenoeides, Eimeria meleagrimitis, Eimeria meleagridis, Eimeria dispersa, and Eimeria gallopavonis. All DNA samples were positive for E. meleagrimitis, nine were positive for E. adenoeides, two were positive for E. dispersa, and none for E. meleagridis and E. gallopavonis. E. meleagrimitis occurred as a single species in 21 (70 %) of the farms while 9 (30 %) farms had a mixed species with E. meleagrimitis and E. adenoeides and 2 (7 %) were triple positive with E. meleagrimitis, E. adenoeides, and E. dispersa. This is the first account of the field prevalence of turkey Eimeria species using molecular methods.

  12. Isolation and Characterization of Well-Defined Silica-Supported Azametallacyclopentane: A Key Intermediate in Catalytic Hydroaminoalkylation Reactions

    KAUST Repository

    Hamzaoui, Bilel; Pelletier, Jé ré mie D. A.; El Eter, Mohamad; Chen, Yin; Abou-Hamad, Edy; Basset, Jean-Marie

    2015-01-01

    Intermolecular catalytic hydroaminoalkylation of unactivated alkene occurs with silica-supported azazirconacyclopropane [[TRIPLE BOND]Si[BOND]O[BOND]Zr(HNMe2)(η2-NMeCH2)(NMe2)]. Mechanistic studies were conducted using surface organometallic chemistry (SOMC) concepts to identify the key surface intermediates. The azametallacyclopentene intermediate {[TRIPLE BOND]Si[BOND]O[BOND]Zr(HNMe2)[η2-NMeCH2CH(Me)CH2](NMe2)} was isolated after treating with 1-propylene and characterized by FT-IR spectroscopy, elemental analysis, 1H 13C HETCOR, DARR SS-NMR and DQ TQ SS-NMR. The regeneration of the catalyst was conducted by dimethylamine protonolysis to yield the pure amine.

  13. Vancomycin, linezolid and daptomycin susceptibility pattern among clinical isolates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA from Sub- Himalyan Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afzal Husain

    2018-01-01

    CONCLUSION: MIC creep was observed with vancomycin. Although linezolid MIC was within the susceptible zone, more than 40% strains showing MIC 3 μg/ml may herald the future development of either resistant or heteroresistant. Daptomycin showed good sensitivity against MRSA isolates. Therefore, it could be considered as an alternative agent for the treatment of infections caused by MRSA. However, it should be reserved where this class has a clear therapeutic advantage over other anti-MRSA drugs.

  14. Twenty-Five Year Epidemiology of Invasive Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Isolates Recovered at a Burn Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Aggressive infection control practices included contact isolation and strictly enforced hand hygiene practices especially after the move to the new...strains replacing traditional nosocomial MRSA strains? Clin Infect Dis 2008;46. 787.794. [11] Naimi TS, LeDell KH, Como-Sabetti K, Borchardt SM, Boxrud...a c t Over the past two decades, an epidemiologic emergence of methicillin-resistant Staphylo- coccus aureus (MRSA) infections has occurred from that

  15. The importance of a hot-sequential mechanism in triplet-state formation by charge recombination in reaction centers of bacterial photosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, K.; Mukai, K.; Sumi, H.

    2006-01-01

    In photosynthesis, pigment-excitation energies in the antenna system produced by light harvesting are transferred among antenna pigments toward the core antenna, where they are captured by the reaction center and initially fixed in the form of a charge separation. Primary charge separation between an oxidized special pair (P + ) and a reduced bacteriopheohytin (H - ) is occasionally intervened by recombination, and a spin-triplet state ( 3 P*) is formed on P in the bacterial reaction center. The 3 P* state is harmful to bio-organisms, inducing the formation of the highly damaging singlet oxygen species. Therefore, understanding the 3 P*-formation mechanism is important. The 3 P* formation is mediated by a state |m> of intermediate charge separation between P and the accessory chlorophyll, which is located between P and H. It will be shown theoretically in the present work that at room temperature, not only the mechanism of superexchange by quantum-mechanical virtual mediation at |m>, but also a hot-sequential mechanism contributes to the mediation. In the latter, although |m> is produced as a real state, the final state 3 P* is quickly formed during thermalization of phonons in the protein matrix in |m>. In the former, the final state is formed more quickly before dephasing-thermalization of phonons in |m>. 3 P* is unistep formed from the charge-separated state in the both mechanisms

  16. Study of the Mn-binding sites in photosystem II using antibodies raised against lumenal regions of the D1 and D2 reaction center proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalmasso, Enrique Agustin [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1992-04-01

    The experiments discussed in this thesis focus on identifying the protein segments or specific amino acids which provide ligands to the Mn cluster of photosystem II (PS II). This Mn cluster plays a central role in the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) of PS II. The Mn cluster is thought to be bound by lumenal regions of the PS II reaction center proteins known as D1 and D2. First, several peptides were synthesized which correspond to specific lumenal segments of the D1 and D2 proteins. Next, polyclonal antibodies were successfully elicited using three of these peptides. The peptides recognized by these antibodies correspond to protein segments of the spinach reaction center proteins: Ile-321 to Ala-344 of D1 (D1-a), Asp-319 to Arg-334 of D1 (D1-b), and Val-300 to Asn-319 of D2 (D2-a). These antibodies were then used in assays which were developed to structurally or functionally probe the potential Mn-binding regions of the D1 and D2 proteins.

  17. Isolation and stereochemical assignment of phthalides resulting from the Diels-Alder reaction between 5-isopropoxyfuran-2(5H)-one and cyclopentadiene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resende, G. C.; Alvarenga, E. S.; Willoughby, P. H.

    2015-12-01

    Naturally occurring phthalides and their synthetic analogs, feature a wide range of bioactivities. In our work, the Diels-Alder reaction between 5-isopropoxyfuran-2(5H)-one and cyclopentadiene was chosen as the key step to obtain tetrahydroisobenzofuran-1(3H)-one derivatives. The anti-endo (major), anti-exo and syn-endo adducts were isolated and structurally elucidated by nmr experiments. In order to rationalize the experimental finding, chemical shifts were predicted by theoretical calculations using density functional theory at B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) and B3LYP/6-311 + G(2d,p) levels. The goodness-of-fit between calculated and experimental data was evaluated by comparing mean absolute errors and applying DP4 probability methodology. Results demonstrated that DP4 probability of combined data (13C and 1H) is the most efficient method for assignment of the correct diastereoisomers.

  18. Detection and analysis of hemolysin genes in Aeromonas hydrophila isolated from Gouramy (Osphronemus gouramy) by polymerase chain reaction (PCR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozi; Rahayu, K.; Daruti, D. N.

    2018-04-01

    The goal of this study was to detect of Aeromonas hydrophila carrying the hlyA gene in guramy by PCR assay. A total of 5 A. hydrophila strains were isolated from gouramy with different location and furthermore genotypic of all A. hydrophila strains havedetected by PCR assay for 16S rRNA gene. The primers used in the PCR targeted a 592-bp fragment of the hlyA gene coding for the hemolysin gene. Particularly hlyA genes are responsible for haemolysin toxins production in this genus. After gel electrophoresis, the amplicons from representative strains of the A. hydrophila were purified using extraction kit and were subjected to the DNA sequencing analysis. The results showed that: (i) the 592bp amplicon of the hlyA gene was detected in 5/6 of the A. hydrophila; (ii) the nucleotide blast results of hemolysin gene sequences of the strains of A. hydrophila revealed a high homology of 90-97 % with published sequences, and;(iii) the protein blast showed 95-98 % homology when compared to the published sequences. The PCR clearly identified the haemolysin-producing strains of A. hydrophila by detection in hlyA genes and may have application as a rapid species-specific virulence test.

  19. Prevalence and species spectrum of both pulmonary and extrapulmonary nontuberculous mycobacteria isolates at a tertiary care center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyoti Umrao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective/background: Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM infection associated with pulmonary and extrapulmonary disease has been increasing globally. Despite an increase in incidence rate of NTM infection, its prevalence, species diversity, and circulation pattern in India is largely unknown. This study sought to investigate the overall burden and diversity of NTM among both pulmonary and extrapulmonary clinical isolates from a Northern Indian population. Methods: The study was conducted in the Department of Microbiology, from January 2013 to December 2015. A total of 4620 clinical samples were collected from patients suspected to have pulmonary and extrapulmonary tuberculosis. Preliminary diagnosis was performed using Ziehl–Neelsen staining followed by liquid culture in BacT/ALERT three-dimensional system. A total of 906 positive cultures obtained were differentiated as either NTM or Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex using a biochemical and MPT64 antigen test. Further identification of NTM species was confirmed with a line probe assay. Results: Out of 906 cultures isolates, 263 (29.0% were confirmed as NTM and 643 (71.0% were identified as Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex. A total of 79.4% of the NTM were recovered from pulmonary and 18.2% from extrapulmonary specimens. The diversity of NTM species was high (13 species and predominated by Mycobacterium abscessus (31.3% followed by Mycobacterium fortuitum (22%, Mycobacterium intracellulare (13.6%, Mycobacterium chelonae (9.1%, however, M. abscessus and M. fortuitum were the predominant species in both types of clinical isolates. Men (60.4% and older patients aged greater than 55 years were the predominated risk group for NTM infection. Conclusion: The high prevalence and species diversity of NTM suggests the need for immediate and accurate characterization of NTM for proper treatment and management of patients.

  20. Comparative analysis of human cytomegalovirus a-sequence in multiple clinical isolates by using polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaia, J A; Gallez-Hawkins, G; Churchill, M A; Morton-Blackshere, A; Pande, H; Adler, S P; Schmidt, G M; Forman, S J

    1990-01-01

    The human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) a-sequence (a-seq) is located in the joining region between the long (L) and short (S) unique sequences of the virus (L-S junction), and this hypervariable junction has been used to differentiate HCMV strains. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether there are differences among strains of human cytomegalovirus which could be characterized by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of the a-seq of HCMV DNA and to compare a PCR method of strain differentiation with conventional restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) methodology by using HCMV junction probes. Laboratory strains of HCMV and viral isolates from individuals with HCMV infection were characterized by using both RFLPs and PCR. The PCR assay amplified regions in the major immediate-early gene (IE-1), the 64/65-kDa matrix phosphoprotein (pp65), and the a-seq of the L-S junction region. HCMV laboratory strains Towne, AD169, and Davis were distinguishable, in terms of size of the amplified product, when analyzed by PCR with primers specific for the a-seq but were indistinguishable by using PCR targeted to IE-1 and pp65 sequences. When this technique was applied to a characterization of isolates from individuals with HCMV infection, selected isolates could be readily distinguished. In addition, when the a-seq PCR product was analyzed with restriction enzyme digestion for the presence of specific sequences, these DNA differences were confirmed. PCR analysis across the variable a-seq of HCMV demonstrated differences among strains which were confirmed by RFLP in 38 of 40 isolates analyzed. The most informative restriction enzyme sites in the a-seq for distinguishing HCMV isolates were those of MnlI and BssHII. This indicates that the a-seq of HCMV is heterogeneous among wild strains, and PCR of the a-seq of HCMV is a practical way to characterize differences in strains of HCMV. Images PMID:1980680

  1. Implications of Partial Conjugation of Whey Protein Isolate to Durian Seed Gum through Maillard Reactions: Foaming Properties, Water Holding Capacity and Interfacial Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahareh Tabatabaee Amid

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the conjugation of durian seed gum (DSG with whey protein isolate (WPI through Maillard reactions. Subsequently, the functional properties of durian seed gum in the non-conjugated (control sample and conjugated forms were compared with several commercial gums (i.e., Arabic gum, sodium alginate, kappa carrageenan, guar gum, and pectin. The current study revealed that the conjugation of durian seed gum with whey protein isolate significantly (p < 0.05 improved its foaming properties. In this study, the conjugated durian seed gum produced the most stable foam among all samples. On the other hand, the emulsion stabilized with the conjugated durian seed gum also showed more uniform particles with a larger specific surface area than the emulsion containing the non-conjugated durian seed gum. The conjugated durian seed gum showed significant different foaming properties, specific surface area, particle uniformity and water holding capacity (WHC as compared to the target polysaccharide gums. The conjugated durian seed gum showed more similar functional properties to Arabic gum rather than other studied gums.

  2. Susceptibility Testing by Polymerase Chain Reaction DNA Quantitation: A Method to Measure Drug Resistance of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Isolates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eron, Joseph J.; Gorczyca, Paul; Kaplan, Joan C.; D'Aquila, Richard T.

    1992-04-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) DNA quantitation (PDQ) susceptibility testing rapidly and directly measures nucleoside sensitivity of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) isolates. PCR is used to quantitate the amount of HIV-1 DNA synthesized after in vitro infection of peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The relative amounts of HIV-1 DNA in cell lysates from cultures maintained at different drug concentrations reflect drug inhibition of virus replication. The results of PDQ susceptibility testing of 2- or 3-day cultures are supported by assays measuring HIV-1 p24 antigen production in supernatants of 7- or 10-day cultures. DNA sequence analyses to identify mutations in the reverse transcriptase gene that cause resistance to 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine also support the PDQ results. With the PDQ method, both infectivity titration and susceptibility testing can be performed on supernatants from primary cultures of peripheral blood mononuclear cells. PDQ susceptibility testing should facilitate epidemiologic studies of the clinical significance of drug-resistant HIV-1 isolates.

  3. Cultural competency and patient-centered communication: a study of an isolated outbreak of urinary tract infections in afghanistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culbertson, Nicholas T; Scholl, Brian J

    2013-01-01

    Personal hygiene is strongly associated with disease prevention and is especially important during prolonged patrol or combat operations. Understanding cultural variances associated with personal hygiene is critical for Special Operation Forces (SOF) medics to prevent, monitor, and treat acquired and transmitted infections while working with host nation personnel. During a multiday, long-range patrol, approximately 40 male Afghan National Army troops between the ages of 22 and 49 presented for treatment of burning or pain while urinating. All patients were empirically diagnosed with urinary tract infections. Methods and Discussion: The high attack rate and isolated nature of the outbreak suggested that personal hygiene or sexual intercourse was the most likely cause of the isolated outbreak. However, the cultural sensitivity of both topics made social history gathering a difficult task. After participating in a detailed medical interview, one patient revealed that he and his comrades were blocking their urethras with clay plugs after voiding to prevent residual urine from dripping onto their clothes. This case study presents what might be an undocumented practice carried throughout many ethnic cultures endogenous to Afghanistan and discusses how cultural barriers can impact effective health care delivery. 2013.

  4. Detection of rifampin resistance patterns in Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains isolated in Iran by polymerase chain reaction-single-strand conformation polymorphism and direct sequencing methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahram Nasr Isfahani

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in the rpoB locus confer conformational changes leading to defective binding of rifampin (RIF to rpoB and consequently resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Polymerase chain reaction-single-strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP was established as a rapid screening test for the detection of mutations in the rpoB gene, and direct sequencing has been unambiguously applied to characterize mutations. A total of 37 of Iranian isolates of M. tuberculosis, 16 sensitive and 21 resistant to RIF, were used in this study. A 193-bp region of the rpoB gene was amplified and PCR-SSCP patterns were determined by electrophoresis in 10% acrylamide gel and silver staining. Also, 21 samples of 193-bp rpoB amplicons with different PCR-SSCP patterns from RIFr and 10 from RIFs were sequenced. Seven distinguishable PCR-SSCP patterns were recognized in the 21 Iranian RIFr strains, while 15 out of 16 RIFs isolates demonstrated PCR-SSCP banding patterns similar to that of sensitive standard strain H37Rv. However one of the sensitive isolates demonstrated a different pattern. There were seen six different mutations in the amplified region of rpoB gene: codon 516(GAC/GTC, 523(GGG/GGT, 526(CAC/TAC, 531(TCG/TTG, 511(CTG/TTG, and 512(AGC/TCG. This study demonstrated the high specificity (93.8% and sensitivity (95.2% of PCR-SSCP method for detection of mutation in rpoB gene; 85.7% of RIFr strains showed a single mutation and 14.3% had no mutations. Three strains showed mutations caused polymorphism. Our data support the common notion that rifampin resistance genotypes are generally present mutations in codons 531 and 526, most frequently found in M. tuberculosis populations regardless of geographic origin.

  5. Detection and identification of dengue virus isolates from Brazil by a simplified reverse transcription - polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FIGUEIREDO Luiz Tadeu Moraes

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available We show here a simplified RT-PCR for identification of dengue virus types 1 and 2. Five dengue virus strains, isolated from Brazilian patients, and yellow fever vaccine 17DD as a negative control, were used in this study. C6/36 cells were infected and supernatants were collected after 7 days. The RT-PCR, done in a single reaction vessel, was carried out following a 1/10 dilution of virus in distilled water or in a detergent mixture containing Nonidet P40. The 50 µl assay reaction mixture included 50 pmol of specific primers amplifying a 482 base pair sequence for dengue type 1 and 210 base pair sequence for dengue type 2. In other assays, we used dengue virus consensus primers having maximum sequence similarity to the four serotypes, amplifying a 511 base pair sequence. The reaction mixture also contained 0.1 mM of the four deoxynucleoside triphosphates, 7.5 U of reverse transcriptase, 1U of thermostable Taq DNA polymerase. The mixture was incubated for 5 minutes at 37ºC for reverse transcription followed by 30 cycles of two-step PCR amplification (92ºC for 60 seconds, 53ºC for 60 seconds with slow temperature increment. The PCR products were subjected to 1.7% agarose gel electrophoresis and visualized by UV light after staining with ethidium bromide solution. Low virus titer around 10 3, 6 TCID50/ml was detected by RT-PCR for dengue type 1. Specific DNA amplification was observed with all the Brazilian dengue strains by using dengue virus consensus primers. As compared to other RT-PCRs, this assay is less laborious, done in a shorter time, and has reduced risk of contamination

  6. Non-tuberculous mycobacteria I: one year clinical isolates identification in Tertiary Hospital Aids Reference Center, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, in pre highly active antiretroviral therapy era

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferreira Rosa Maria Carvalho

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM isolates at University Hospital, Reference Center for Aids in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, during one year. We used standard biochemical tests for species identification and IS1245 PCR amplification was applied as a Mycobacterium avium specific identification marker. Four hundred and four specimens from 233 patients yielded acid-fast bacilli growth. M. tuberculosis was identified in 85% of the patients and NTM in 15%. NTM disseminated infection was a common event correlated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infected patients and only in HIV negative patients the source of NTM was non sterile site. M. avium complex (MAC was biochemically identified in 57.8% (49/83 of NTM isolates, most of them from sterile sites (75.5%, and in 94% (46/49 the IS 1245 marker specific for M. avium was present. Twenty NTM strains showed a MAC biochemical pattern with the exception of a urease-positive (99% of MAC are urease-negative, however IS1245 was detected in 96% of the strains leading to their identification as M. avium. In this group differences in NTM source was not significant. The second most frequently isolated NTM was identified as M. scrofulaceum (7.2%, followed by M. terrae (3.6%, M. gordonae (2.4%, M. chelonae (1.2%, M. fortuitum (1.2% and one strain which could not be identified. All were IS1245 negative except for one strain identified as M. scrofulaceum. It is interesting to note that non-sterile sites were the major source of these isolates (92.8%. Our finding indicated that M. avium is still the major atypical species among in the MAC isolates recovered from Brazilian Aids patients without highty active antiretroviral therapy schema. Some discrepancies were seen between the identification methods and further investigations must be done to better characterize NTM isolates using other phenotypic and genotypic methods.

  7. Separate photosensitizers mediate degradation of the 32-kDa photosystem II reaction center protein in the visible and UV spectral regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenberg, B.M.; Gaba, V.; Canaani, O.; Malkin, S.; Mattoo, A.K.; Edelman, M.

    1989-01-01

    A component of the photosystem II reaction center, the 32-kDa protein, is rapidly turned over in the light. The mechanism of its light-dependent metabolism is largely unknown. We quantified the rate of 32-kDa protein degradation over a broad spectral range (UV, visible, and far red). The quantum yield for degradation was highest in the UVB (280-320 nm) region. Spectral evidence demonstrates two distinctly different photosensitizers for 32-kDa protein degradation. The data implicate the bulk photosynthetic pigments (primarily chlorophyll) in the visible and far red regions, and plastoquinone (in one or more of its redox states) in the UV region. A significant portion of 32-kDa protein degradation in sunlight is attributed to UVB irradiance

  8. Correlation of paramagnetic states and molecular structure in bacterial photosynthetic reaction centers: The symmetry of the primary electron donor in Rhodopseudomonas viridis and Rhodobacter sphaeroides R-26

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norris, J.R.; Budil, D.E.; Gast, P.; Chang, C.H.; El-Kabbani, O.; Schiffer, M.

    1989-01-01

    The orientation of the principal axes of the primary electron donor triplet state measured in single crystals of photosynthetic reaction centers is compared to the x-ray structures of the bacteria Rhodobacter (Rb.) sphaeroides R-26 and Rhodopseudomonas (Rps.) viridis. The primary donor of Rps. viridis is significantly different from that of Rb. sphaeroides. The measured directions of the axes indicate that triplet excitation is almost completely localized on the L-subunit half of the dimer in Rps. viridis but is more symmetrically distributed on the dimeric donor in Rb. sphaeroides R-26. The large reduction of the zero field splitting parameters relative to monomeric bacteriochlorophyll triplet in vitro suggests significant participation of asymmetrical charge transfer electronic configurations in the special pair triplet state of both organisms

  9. Aborted germinal center reactions and B cell memory by follicular T cells specific for a B cell receptor V region peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiser, Ryan A; Snyder, Christopher M; St Clair, James; Wysocki, Lawrence J

    2011-07-01

    A fundamental problem in immunoregulation is how CD4(+) T cells react to immunogenic peptides derived from the V region of the BCR that are created by somatic mechanisms, presented in MHC II, and amplified to abundance by B cell clonal expansion during immunity. BCR neo Ags open a potentially dangerous avenue of T cell help in violation of the principle of linked Ag recognition. To analyze this issue, we developed a murine adoptive transfer model using paired donor B cells and CD4 T cells specific for a BCR-derived peptide. BCR peptide-specific T cells aborted ongoing germinal center reactions and impeded the secondary immune response. Instead, they induced the B cells to differentiate into short-lived extrafollicular plasmablasts that secreted modest quantities of Ig. These results uncover an immunoregulatory process that restricts the memory pathway to B cells that communicate with CD4 T cells via exogenous foreign Ag.

  10. ISOLATED WOLF-RAYET STARS AND O SUPERGIANTS IN THE GALACTIC CENTER REGION IDENTIFIED VIA PASCHEN-α EXCESS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mauerhan, J. C.; Stolovy, S. R.; Cotera, A.; Dong, H.; Wang, Q. D.; Morris, M. R.; Lang, C.

    2010-01-01

    We report the discovery of 19 hot, evolved, massive stars near the Galactic center region (GCR). These objects were selected for spectroscopy owing to their detection as strong sources of Paschen-α (Pα) emission-line excess, following a narrowband imaging survey of the central 0. 0 65 x 0. 0 25 (l, b) around Sgr A* with the Hubble Space Telescope. Discoveries include six carbon-type (WC) and five nitrogen-type (WN) Wolf-Rayet stars, six O supergiants, and two B supergiants. Two of the O supergiants have X-ray counterparts having properties consistent with solitary O stars and colliding-wind binaries. The infrared photometry of 17 stars is consistent with the Galactic center distance, but 2 of them are located in the foreground. Several WC stars exhibit a relatively large infrared excess, which is possibly thermal emission from hot dust. Most of the stars appear scattered throughout the GCR, with no relation to the three known massive young clusters; several others lie near the Arches and Quintuplet clusters and may have originated within one of these systems. The results of this work bring the total sample of Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars in the GCR to 88. All sources of strong Pα excess have been identified in the area surveyed with HST, which implies that the sample of WN stars in this region is near completion, and is dominated by late (WNL) types. The current WC sample, although probably not complete, is almost exclusively dominated by late (WCL) types. The observed WR subtype distribution in the GCR is a reflection of the intrinsic rarity of early subtypes (WNE and WCE) in the inner Galaxy, an effect that is driven by metallicity.

  11. Orientations of Iron-Sulfur Clusters FA and FB in the Homodimeric Type-I Photosynthetic Reaction Center of Heliobacterium modesticaldum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Toru; Matsuoka, Masahiro; Azai, Chihiro; Itoh, Shigeru; Oh-Oka, Hirozo

    2016-05-12

    Orientations of the FA and FB iron-sulfur (FeS) clusters in a structure-unknown type-I homodimeric heriobacterial reaction center (hRC) were studied in oriented membranes of the thermophilic anaerobic photosynthetic bacterium Heliobacterium modesticaldum by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), and compared with those in heterodimeric photosystem I (PS I). The Rieske-type FeS center in the cytochrome b/c complex showed a well-oriented EPR signal. Illumination at 14 K induced an FB(-) signal with g-axes of gz = 2.066, gy = 1.937, and gx = 1.890, tilted at angles of 60°, 60°, and 45°, respectively, with respect to the membrane normal. Chemical reduction with dithionite produced an additional signal of FA(-), which magnetically interacted with FB(-), with gz = 2.046, gy = 1.942, and gx = 1.911 at 30°, 60°, and 90°, respectively. The angles and redox properties of FA(-) and FB(-) in hRC resemble those of FB(-) and FA(-), respectively, in PS I. Therefore, FA and FB in hRC, named after their g-value similarities, seem to be located like FB and FA, not like FA and FB, respectively, in PS I. The reducing side of hRC could resemble those in PS I, if the names of FA and FB are interchanged with each other.

  12. Sequence typing of human adenoviruses isolated from Polish patients subjected to allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation - a single center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przybylski, Maciej; Rynans, Sylwia; Waszczuk-Gajda, Anna; Bilinski, Jarosław; Basak, Grzegorz W; Jędrzejczak, Wiesław W; Wróblewska, Marta; Młynarczyk, Grażyna; Dzieciątkowski, Tomasz

    2018-03-28

    Human adenoviruses (HAdV) from species A, B and C are commonly recognized as pathogens causing severe morbidity and mortality in hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) recipients. The purpose of the present study was to determine HAdV types responsible for viremia in HSCT recipients at a large tertiary hospital in Poland. Analysis of partial nucleotide sequences of HAdV hexon gene was used to type 40 clinical isolates of HAdV obtained from 40 HSCT recipients. We identified six different HAdV serotypes belonging to species B, C and E. We demonstrated high variability in sequences of detected HAdV types, and patients infected with the same HAdV types were not hospitalized at the same time, which suggests the low possibility of cross-infection. In almost all patients, anti-HAdV antibodies in IgG class were detected, which indicates a history of HAdV infection in the past. Clinical symptoms accompanying HAdV viremia were in 89%, and in 61.5% of individuals, HAdV was a sole pathogen detected. There were no cases with high-level HAdV viremia and severe systemic or organ infections. Graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) was present in patients infected with species B and C, but grade II of GvHD was observed only in patients infected with HAdV-B. The predominance of HAdV-C and common presence of anti-HAdV antibodies in IgG class may strongly suggest that most infections in the present study were reactivations of HAdV persisting into the patient's mucosa-associated lymphoid tissues. Variability of HAdV sequences suggests that cross-infections between patients were very rare. GvHD: graft-versus-host disease; HAdV: human adenoviruses; HSCT: hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

  13. Matrix-isolation studies on the radiation-induced chemistry in H₂O/CO₂ systems: reactions of oxygen atoms and formation of HOCO radical.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryazantsev, Sergey V; Feldman, Vladimir I

    2015-03-19

    The radiation-induced transformations occurring upon X-ray irradiation of solid CO2/H2O/Ng systems (Ng = Ar, Kr, Xe) at 8-10 K and subsequent annealing up to 45 K were studied by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The infrared (IR) spectra of deposited matrices revealed the presence of isolated monomers, dimers, and intermolecular H2O···CO2 complexes. Irradiation resulted in effective decomposition of matrix-isolated carbon dioxide and water yielding CO molecules and OH radicals, respectively. Annealing of the irradiated samples led to formation of O3, HO2, and a number of xenon hydrides of HXeY type (in the case of xenon matrices). The formation of these species was used for monitoring of the postirradiation thermally induced chemical reactions involving O and H atoms generated by radiolysis. It was shown that the radiolysis of CO2 in noble-gas matrices produced high yields of stabilized oxygen atoms. In all cases, the temperatures at which O atoms become mobile and react are lower than those of H atoms. Dynamics and reactivity of oxygen atoms was found to be independent of the precursor nature. In addition, the formation of HOCO radicals was observed in all the noble-gas matrices at remarkably low temperatures. The IR spectra of HOCO and DOCO were first characterized in krypton and xenon matrices. It was concluded that the formation of HOCO was mainly due to the radiation-induced evolution of the weakly bound H2O···CO2 complexes. This result indicates the significance of weak intermolecular interactions in the radiation-induced chemical processes in inert low-temperature media.

  14. Antioxidant activity and inhibitory effects of 2-hydroxy-3-methylcyclopent-2-enone isolated from ribose-histidine Maillard reaction products on aldose reductase and tyrosinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Seung Hwan; Wang, Zhiqiang; Suh, Hong-Won; Lim, Soon Sung

    2018-03-01

    This study aimed to better understand the functional properties of ribose and 20 amino acid Maillard reaction products (MRPs). The ABTS + radical scavenging ability of the ribose-20 amino acid MRPs was evaluated. Among the MRPs, ribose-histidine MRPs (RH-MRPs) showed the highest inhibitory activities on the ABTS + radical scavenging ability, aldose reductase (AR), and tyrosinase compared to other MRPs. Functional compounds with antioxidant and AR inhibitory activities have been recognized as an important strategy in the prevention and treatment of diabetic complications, and the search for tyrosinase inhibitors is important for the treatment of hyperpigmentation, development of skin-whitening agents, and use as preservatives in the food industry. On this basis, we sought to isolate and identify compounds with inhibitory activities against AR and tyrosinase. RH-MRPs were heated at 120 °C for 2 h and fractionated using four solvents: methylene chloride (MC), ethyl acetate, n-butanol, and water. The highest inhibitions were found in the MC fraction. The two compounds from this fraction were purified by silica gel column and preparative thin layer chromatography, and identified as 2-hydroxy-3-methylcyclopent-2-enone and furan-3-carboxylic acid. AR inhibition, tyrosinase inhibition, and ABTS + scavenging (IC 50 ) of 2-hydroxy-3-methylcyclopent-2-enone were 4.47, 721.91 and 9.81 μg mL -1 , respectively. In this study, inhibitory effects of 2-hydroxy-3-methylcyclopent-2-enone isolated from RH-MRP were demonstrated on AR, tyrosinase, and its antioxidant activity for the first time. RH-MRP and its constituents can be developed as beneficial functional food sources and cosmetic materials and should be investigated further as potential functional food sources.

  15. NEAR-IR TWO PHOTON MICROSCOPY IMAGING OF SILICA NANOPARTICLES FUNCTIONALIZED WITH ISOLATED SENSITIZED Yb(III) CENTERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapadula, Giuseppe; Bourdolle, Adrien; Allouche, Florian; Conley, Matthew P.; Maron, Laurent; Lukens, Wayne W.; Guyot, Yannick; Andraud, Chantal; Brasselet, Sophie; Copé; ret, Christophe; Maury, Olivier; Andersen, Richard A.

    2013-01-12

    Bright nano objects emitting in the near infrared with a maximal cross section of 41.4 x 103 GM (Goppert Mayer), were prepared by implanting ca. 180 4,4 diethylaminostyryl 2,2 bipyridine (DEAS) Yb(III) complexes on the surface of 12 nm silica nanoparticles. The surface complexes ([DEAS Ln SiO2], Ln =Y,Yb) were characterized using IR, solid state NMR, UV Vis, EXAFS spectroscopies in combination with the preparation and characterization of similar molecular analogues by analytical techniques (IR, solution NMR, UV Vis, X ray crystallography) as well as DFT calculations. Starting from the partial dehydroxylation of the silica at 700 C on high vacuum having 0.8 OH.nm 2, the grafting of Ln(N(SiMe3)2)3 generate ≤SiO Ln(N(SiMe3)2)2, which upon thermal step and coordination of the DEAS chromophore yields (≤SiO)3Ln(DEAS). Surface and molecular analogues display similar properties, in terms of DEAS binding constants absorption maxima and luminescence properties (intense emission band assigned to a ligand centered CT fluorescence and life time) in the solid state, consistent with the molecular nature of the surface species. The densely functionalized nanoparticles can be dispersed via ultra-sonication in small ca. 15-20 nm aggregates (1 to 6 elementary particles) that were detected using two photon microscopy imaging at 720 nm excitation, making them promising nano objects for bio imaging.

  16. Correlation between carbapenem consumption and resistance to carbapenems among Enterobacteriaceae isolates collected from patients with intra-abdominal infections at five medical centers in Taiwan, 2006-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Cheng-Mao; Ho, Mao-Wang; Liu, Yung-Ching; Toh, Han-Siong; Lee, Yu-Lin; Liu, Yuag-Meng; Huang, Chi-Chang; Lu, Po-Liang; Liu, Chun-Eng; Chen, Yen-Hsu; Ko, Wen-Chien; Tang, Hung-Jen; Yu, Kwok-Woon; Chen, Yao-Shen; Chuang, Yin-Ching; Wang, Jen-Hsien; Hsueh, Po-Ren

    2012-06-01

    We investigated the trend in resistance to carbapenems among isolates of Enterobacteriaceae that had been collected from patients with intra-abdominal infections at five medical centers in Taiwan from 2006 to 2010 and evaluated the correlation between resistance to carbapenems and consumption of said agents as part of the Study for Monitoring Antimicrobial Resistance Trends (SMART). During the study period, the usage of ertapenem and that of total carbapenems (ertapenem, imipenem, and meropenem) increased significantly from 6.13 to 13.38 defined daily doses per 1000 patient-days for ertapenem and from 20.43 to 34.25 defined daily doses per 1000 patient-days for total carbapenems. The most common species were Escherichia coli (n = 1095), Klebsiella spp. (n = 663), and Enterobacter spp. (n = 202). The susceptibility of all isolates to ertapenem and to imipenem varied during the study period. For ertapenem, the rates of nonsusceptibility ranged from 3.5% to 10.3% and those for imipenem ranged from 3.5% to 10.7%. Although the use of carbapenems increased during the study period, there was no marked increase in resistance to carbapenems. Continuous monitoring of resistance trends is necessary so that antimicrobial prescription policies can be adjusted and infection control intervention programs can be implemented. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Pollen-Mediated Gene Flow in Maize: Implications for Isolation Requirements and Coexistence in Mexico, the Center of Origin of Maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltazar, Baltazar M; Castro Espinoza, Luciano; Espinoza Banda, Armando; de la Fuente Martínez, Juan Manuel; Garzón Tiznado, José Antonio; González García, Juvencio; Gutiérrez, Marco Antonio; Guzmán Rodríguez, José Luis; Heredia Díaz, Oscar; Horak, Michael J; Madueño Martínez, Jesús Ignacio; Schapaugh, Adam W; Stojšin, Duška; Uribe Montes, Hugo Raúl; Zavala García, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Mexico, the center of origin of maize (Zea mays L.), has taken actions to preserve the identity and diversity of maize landraces and wild relatives. Historically, spatial isolation has been used in seed production to maintain seed purity. Spatial isolation can also be a key component for a strategy to minimize pollen-mediated gene flow in Mexico between transgenic maize and sexually compatible plants of maize conventional hybrids, landraces, and wild relatives. The objective of this research was to generate field maize-to-maize outcrossing data to help guide coexistence discussions in Mexico. In this study, outcrossing rates were determined and modeled from eight locations in six northern states, which represent the most economically important areas for the cultivation of hybrid maize in Mexico. At each site, pollen source plots were planted with a yellow-kernel maize hybrid and surrounded by plots with a white-kernel conventional maize hybrid (pollen recipient) of the same maturity. Outcrossing rates were then quantified by assessing the number of yellow kernels harvested from white-kernel hybrid plots. The highest outcrossing values were observed near the pollen source (12.9% at 1 m distance). The outcrossing levels declined sharply to 4.6, 2.7, 1.4, 1.0, 0.9, 0.5, and 0.5% as the distance from the pollen source increased to 2, 4, 8, 12, 16, 20, and 25 m, respectively. At distances beyond 20 m outcrossing values at all locations were below 1%. These trends are consistent with studies conducted in other world regions. The results suggest that coexistence measures that have been implemented in other geographies, such as spatial isolation, would be successful in Mexico to minimize transgenic maize pollen flow to conventional maize hybrids, landraces and wild relatives.

  18. Aromatic residues located close to the active center are essential for the catalytic reaction of flap endonuclease-1 from hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus horikoshii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Eriko; Abe, Junko; Yokoyama, Hideshi; Matsui, Ikuo

    2004-04-16

    Flap endonuclease-1 (FEN-1) possessing 5'-flap endonuclease and 5'-->3' exonuclease activity plays important roles in DNA replication and repair. In this study, the kinetic parameters of mutants at highly conserved aromatic residues, Tyr33, Phe35, Phe79, and Phe278-Phe279, in the vicinity of the catalytic centers of FEN-1 were examined. The substitution of these aromatic residues with alanine led to a large reduction in kcat values, although these mutants retained Km values similar to that of the wild-type enzyme. Notably, the kcat of Y33A and F79A decreased 333-fold and 71-fold, respectively, compared with that of the wild-type enzyme. The aromatic residues Tyr33 and Phe79, and the aromatic cluster Phe278-Phe279 mainly contributed to the recognition of the substrates without the 3' projection of the upstream strand (the nick, 5'-recess-end, single-flap, and pseudo-Y substrates) for the both exo- and endo-activities, but played minor roles in recognizing the substrates with the 3' projection (the double flap substrate and the nick substrate with the 3' projection). The replacement of Tyr33, Phe79, and Phe278-Phe279, with non-charged aromatic residues, but not with aliphatic hydrophobic residues, recovered the kcat values almost fully for the substrates without the 3' projection of the upstream strand, suggesting that the aromatic groups of Tyr33, Phe79, and Phe278-Phe279 might be involved in the catalytic reaction, probably via multiple stacking interactions with nucleotide bases. The stacking interactions of Tyr33 and Phe79 might play important roles in fixing the template strand and the downstream strand, respectively, in close proximity to the active center to achieve the productive transient state leading to the hydrolysis.

  19. Role of Rhodobacter sphaeroides photosynthetic reaction center residue M214 in the composition, absorbance properties, and conformations of H(A) and B(A) cofactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saer, Rafael G; Hardjasa, Amelia; Rosell, Federico I; Mauk, A Grant; Murphy, Michael E P; Beatty, J Thomas

    2013-04-02

    In the native reaction center (RC) of Rhodobacter sphaeroides, the side chain of (M)L214 projects orthogonally toward the plane and into the center of the A branch bacteriopheophytin (BPhe) macrocycle. The possibility that this side chain is responsible for the dechelation of the central Mg(2+) of bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) was investigated by replacement of (M)214 with residues possessing small, nonpolar side chains that can neither coordinate nor block access to the central metal ion. The (M)L214 side chain was also replaced with Cys, Gln, and Asn to evaluate further the requirements for assembly of the RC with BChl in the HA pocket. Photoheterotrophic growth studies showed no difference in growth rates of the (M)214 nonpolar mutants at a low light intensity, but the growth of the amide-containing mutants was impaired. The absorbance spectra of purified RCs indicated that although absorbance changes are associated with the nonpolar mutations, the nonpolar mutant RC pigment compositions are the same as in the wild-type protein. Crystal structures of the (M)L214G, (M)L214A, and (M)L214N mutants were determined (determined to 2.2-2.85 Å resolution), confirming the presence of BPhe in the HA pocket and revealing alternative conformations of the phytyl tail of the accessory BChl in the BA site of these nonpolar mutants. Our results demonstrate that (i) BChl is converted to BPhe in a manner independent of the aliphatic side chain length of nonpolar residues replacing (M)214, (ii) BChl replaces BPhe if residue (M)214 has an amide-bearing side chain, (iii) (M)214 side chains containing sulfur are not sufficient to bind BChl in the HA pocket, and (iv) the (M)214 side chain influences the conformation of the phytyl tail of the BA BChl.

  20. Pattern of Adverse Drug Reactions in Children Attending the Department of Pediatrics in a Tertiary Care Center: A Prospective Observational Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kishour Kumar Digra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available AIM To study the pattern of various adverse drug reactions (ADRs occurring in children attending the Department of Pediatrics, SMGS Hospital, Jammu over 1 year. Subjects and Methods This was a prospective study, with study population of patients attending Department of Pediatrics over a period of 1 year. A structured format was used to enroll the participants. A pilot study was conducted to test the suitability of the format and feasibility of the study. The study was carried out to review various pattern of ADRs by using the Naranjo probability scale, and severity was assessed by using the Hartwig severity scale. ADRs were classified according to the classification used by the Adverse Drug Reaction Monitoring Center, Central Drugs Standard Control Organization, New Delhi, India. Results In the present study, 104 patients were found to have developed acute drug reactions. Among these, 83.6% were type B, 14.42% type A, and 1.92% were type U. Furthermore, 25.96% ADRs were due to anticonvulsants, followed by antibiotics (22.11%, antipyretics (11.53%, vaccination (8.65%, steroids (6.73%, decongestants (5.67%, snake antivenom and antiemetics (3.84%, and fluids, insulin, and antacids (1.92%. The patients’ dermatological system was involved in 67.30%, followed by the central nervous system (CNS in 11.53% patients. Renal system was involved in 6.73% patients. Cardiac, musculoskeletal, metabolic, and other systems were involved in 4.80%, 3.84%, 2.88%, and 0.96%, respectively. According to the Hartwig severity scale of ADRs, 64.4% patients had moderate ADRs, 29.8% patients had severe ADRs, and 5.76% had mild ADRs. In the present study, 64.4% patients expressed moderate severity, whereas 29.8% expressed high severity and 5.76% expressed mild ADRs. Conclusion ADRs were seen in 71% of the patients between 1 and 5 years of age, 26% in the age group of 5–10 years, and 3% were more than 10 years old. Anticonvulsants (25.96% and antibiotics (22.11% were

  1. Antimicrobial susceptibility of Neisseria gonorrhoeae isolates from patients attending a public referral center for sexually transmitted diseases in Belo Horizonte, State of Minas Gerais, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ligia Maria Bedeschi Costa

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The aim of this study was to determine the antimicrobial susceptibility of Neisseria gonorrhoeae isolates obtained from patients attending a public referral center for sexually transmitted diseases and specialized care services (STD/SCS in Belo Horizonte, Brazil. Methods Between March 2011 and February 2012, 201 specimens of Neisseria gonorrhoeae were consecutively obtained from men with symptoms of urethritis and women with symptons of cervicitis or were obtained during their initial consultation. The strains were tested using the disk diffusion method, and the minimum inhibitory concentrations of azithromycin, cefixime, ceftriaxone, ciprofloxacin, chloramphenicol, penicillin, tetracycline and spectinomycin were determined using the E-test. Results The specimens were 100% sensitive to cefixime, ceftriaxone and spectinomycin and exhibited resistances of 4.5% (9/201, 21.4% (43/201, 11.9% (24/201, 22.4% (45/201 and 32.3% (65/201 to azithromycin, ciprofloxacin, chloramphenicol, penicillin and tetracycline, respectively. Intermediate sensitivities of 17.9% (36/201, 4% (8/201, 16.9% (34/201, 71.1% (143/201 and 22.9% (46/201 were observed for azithromycin, ciprofloxacin, chloramphenicol, penicillin and tetracycline, respectively. The specimens had plasmid-mediated resistance to penicillin PPNG 14.5% (29/201 and tetracycline TRNG 11.5% (23/201. Conclusions The high percentage of detected resistance to penicillin, tetracycline, chloramphenicol and ciprofloxacin indicates that these antibiotics are not appropriate for gonorrhea treatment at the Health Clinic and possibly in Belo Horizonte. The resistance and intermediate sensitivity of these isolates indicates that caution is recommended in the use of azithromycin and emphasizes the need to establish mechanisms for the surveillance of antimicrobial resistance for the effective control of gonorrhea.

  2. Charge stabilization by reaction center protein immobilized to carbon nanotubes functionalized by amine groups and poly(3-thiophene acetic acid) conducting polymer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szabo, T.; Magyar, M.; Nagy, L. [Department of Medical Physics and Informatics, University of Szeged, H-6720 Szeged (Hungary); Nemeth, Z.; Hernadi, K. [Department of Applied and Environmental Chemistry, University of Szeged, H-6720 Szeged (Hungary); Endrodi, B.; Bencsik, G.; Visy, Cs. [Department of Physical Chemistry and Materials Science, University of Szeged, H-6720 Szeged (Hungary); Horvath, E.; Magrez, A.; Forro, L. [Institute of Physics of Complex Matter, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2012-12-15

    A large number of studies have indicated recently that photosynthetic reaction center proteins (RC) bind successfully to nanostructures and their functional activity is largely retained. The major goal of current research is to find the most efficient systems and conditions for the photoelectric energy conversion and for the stability of this bio-nanocomposite. In our studies, we immobilized the RC protein on multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNT) through specific chemical binding to amine functional groups and through conducting polymer (poly(3-thiophene acetic acid), PTAA). Both structural (TEM, AFM) and functional (absorption change and conductivity) measurements has shown that RCs could be bound effectively to functionalized CNTs. The kinetics of the light induced absorption change indicated that RCs were still active in the composite and there was an interaction between the protein cofactors and the CNTs. The light generated photocurrent was measured in an electrochemical cell with transparent CNT electrode designed specially for this experiment. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  3. Electrostatics of the photosynthetic bacterial reaction center. Protonation of Glu L 212 and Asp L 213 - A new method of calculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ptushenko, Vasily V; Cherepanov, Dmitry A; Krishtalik, Lev I

    2015-12-01

    Continuum electrostatic calculation of the transfer energies of anions from water into aprotic solvents gives the figures erroneous by order of magnitude. This is due to the hydrogen bond disruption that suggests the necessity to reconsider the traditional approach of the purely electrostatic calculation of the transfer energy from water into protein. In this paper, the method combining the experimental estimates of the transfer energies from water into aprotic solvent and the electrostatic calculation of the transfer energies from aprotic solvent into protein is proposed. Hydrogen bonds between aprotic solvent and solute are taken into account by introducing an imaginary aprotic medium incapable to form hydrogen bonds with the solute. Besides, a new treatment of the heterogeneous intraprotein dielectric permittivity based on the microscopic protein structure and electrometric measurements is elaborated. The method accounts semi-quantitatively for the electrostatic effect of diverse charged amino acid substitutions in the donor and acceptor parts of the photosynthetic bacterial reaction center from Rhodobacter sphaeroides. Analysis of the volatile secondary acceptor site QB revealed that in the conformation with a minimal distance between quinone QB and Glu L 212 the proton uptake upon the reduction of QB is prompted by Glu L 212 in alkaline and by Asp L 213 in slightly acidic regions. This agrees with the pH dependences of protonation degrees and the proton uptake. The method of pK calculation was applied successfully also for dissociation of Asp 26 in bacterial thioredoxin. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Selective binding of carotenoids with a shorter conjugated chain to the LH2 antenna complex and those with a longer conjugated chain to the reaction center from Rubrivivax gelatinosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakitani, Yoshinori; Fujii, Ritsuko; Hayakawa, Yoshihiro; Kurahashi, Masahiro; Koyama, Yasushi; Harada, Jiro; Shimada, Keizo

    2007-06-19

    Rubrivivax gelatinosus having both the spheroidene and spirilloxanthin biosynthetic pathways produces carotenoids (Cars) with a variety of conjugated chains, which consist of different numbers of conjugated double bonds (n), including the C=C (m) and C=O (o) bonds. When grown under anaerobic conditions, the wild type produces Cars for which n = m = 9-13, whereas under semiaerobic conditions, it additionally produces Cars for which n = m + o = 10 + 1, 13 + 1, and 13 + 2. On the other hand, a mutant, in which the latter pathway is genetically blocked, produces only Cars for which n = 9 and 10 under anaerobic conditions and n = 9, 10, and 10 + 1 under semianaerobic conditions. Those Cars that were extracted from the LH2 complex (LH2) and the reaction center (RC), isolated from the wild-type and the mutant Rvi. gelatinosus, were analyzed by HPLC, and their structures were determined by mass spectrometry and 1H NMR spectroscopy. The selective binding of Cars to those pigment-protein complexes has been characterized as follows. (1) Cars with a shorter conjugated chain are selectively bound to LH2 whereas Cars with a longer conjugated chain to the RC. (2) Shorter chain Cars with a hydroxyl group are bound to LH2 almost exclusively. This rule holds either in the absence or in the presence of the keto group. The natural selection of shorter chain Cars by LH2 and longer chain Cars by the RC is discussed, on the basis of the results now available, in relation to the light-harvesting and photoprotective functions of Cars.

  5. Modeling the bacterial photosynthetic reaction center. VII. Full simulation of the intervalence hole-transfer absorption spectrum of the special-pair radical cation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reimers, Jeffrey R.; Hush, Noel S.

    2003-01-01

    reaction centers from photosystems I, II, etc., facilitating a deeper understanding of the role of the special pair in initiating primary charge separation during photosynthesis

  6. Manipulating the Energetics and Rates of Electron Transfer in Rhodobacter capsulatus Reaction Centers with Asymmetric Pigment Content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faries, Kaitlyn M. [Department; Dylla, Nicholas P. [Biosciences Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont, Illinois 60439, United States; Hanson, Deborah K. [Biosciences Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont, Illinois 60439, United States; Holten, Dewey [Department; Laible, Philip D. [Biosciences Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont, Illinois 60439, United States; Kirmaier, Christine [Department

    2017-07-17

    Seemingly redundant parallel pathways for electron transfer (ET), composed of identical sets of cofactors, are a cornerstone feature of photosynthetic reaction centers (RCs) involved in light-energy conversion. In native bacterial RCs, both A and B branches house one bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) and one bacteriopheophytin (BPh), but the A branch is used exclusively. Described herein are the results-obtained for two Rhodobacter capsulatus RCs with an unnaturally high degree of cofactor asymmetry, two BPh on the RC's B side and two BChl on the A side. These pigment changes derive, respectively, from the His(M180)Leu mutation [a BPh ((Phi(B)) replaces the B-side BChl (BB)], and the Leu(M212)His mutation [a BChl (beta(A))) replaces the A-side BPh (H-A)]. Additionally, Tyr(M208)Phe was employed to disfavor ET to the A branch; in one mutant, Val(M131)Glu creates a hydrogen bond to H-B to enhance ET to H-B. In both Phi(B) mutants, the decay kinetics of the excited primary ET donor (P*) resolve three populations with lifetimes of similar to 9 ps (50-60%), similar to 40 ps (10-20%), and similar to 200 ps (20-30%), with P+Phi(-)(B) formed predominantly from the 9 ps fraction. The 50-60% yield of P+Phi(B)- is the highest yet observed for a Phi(B)-containing RC. The results provide insight into factors needed for efficient multistep ET.

  7. The rate of second electron transfer to QB(-) in bacterial reaction center of impaired proton delivery shows hydrogen-isotope effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maróti, Ágnes; Wraight, Colin A; Maróti, Péter

    2015-02-01

    The 2nd electron transfer in reaction center of photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides is a two step process in which protonation of QB(-) precedes interquinone electron transfer. The thermal activation and pH dependence of the overall rate constants of different RC variants were measured and compared in solvents of water (H2O) and heavy water (D2O). The electron transfer variants where the electron transfer is rate limiting (wild type and M17DN, L210DN and H173EQ mutants) do not show solvent isotope effect and the significant decrease of the rate constant of the second electron transfer in these mutants is due to lowering the operational pKa of QB(-)/QBH: 4.5 (native), 3.9 (L210DN), 3.7 (M17DN) and 3.1 (H173EQ) at pH7. On the other hand, the proton transfer variants where the proton transfer is rate limiting demonstrate solvent isotope effect of pH-independent moderate magnitude (2.11±0.26 (WT+Ni(2+)), 2.16±0.35 (WT+Cd(2+)) and 2.34±0.44 (L210DN/M17DN)) or pH-dependent large magnitude (5.7 at pH4 (L213DN)). Upon deuteration, the free energy and the enthalpy of activation increase in all proton transfer variants by about 1 kcal/mol and the entropy of activation becomes negligible in L210DN/M17DN mutant. The results are interpreted as manifestation of equilibrium and kinetic solvent isotope effects and the structural, energetic and kinetic possibility of alternate proton delivery pathways are discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Calculation of Transactinide Homolog Isotope Production Reactions Possible with the Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (CAMS) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moody, K.J.; Shaughnessy, D.A.; Gostic, J.M.

    2011-01-01

    The LLNL heavy element group has been investigating the chemical properties of the heaviest elements over the past several years. The properties of the transactinides (elements with Z > 103) are often unknown due to their low production rates and short half-lives, which require lengthy cyclotron irradiations in order to make enough atoms for statistically significant evaluations of their chemistry. In addition, automated chemical methods are often required to perform consistent and rapid chemical separations on the order of minutes for the duration of the experiment, which can last from weeks to months. Separation methods can include extraction chromatography, liquid-liquid extraction, or gas-phase chromatography. Before a lengthy transactinide experiment can be performed at an accelerator, a large amount of preparatory work must be done both to ensure the successful application of the chosen chemical system to the transactinide chemistry problem being addressed, and to evaluate the behavior of the lighter elemental homologs in the same chemical system. Since transactinide chemistry is literally performed on one single atom, its chemical properties cannot be determined from bulk chemical matrices, but instead must be inferred from the behavior of the lighter elements that occur in its chemical group and in those of its neighboring elements. By first studying the lighter group homologs in a particular chemical system, when the same system is applied to the transactinide element under investigation, its decay properties can be directly compared to those of the homologues, thereby allowing an inference of its own chemistry. The Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (CAMS) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) includes a 1 MV Tandem accelerator, capable of accelerating light ions such as protons to energies of roughly 15 MeV. By using the CAMS beamline, tracers of transactinide homolog elements can be produced both for development of chemical systems and

  9. Calculation of Transactinide Homolog Isotope Production Reactions Possible with the Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (CAMS) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moody, K J; Shaughnessy, D A; Gostic, J M

    2011-11-29

    The LLNL heavy element group has been investigating the chemical properties of the heaviest elements over the past several years. The properties of the transactinides (elements with Z > 103) are often unknown due to their low production rates and short half-lives, which require lengthy cyclotron irradiations in order to make enough atoms for statistically significant evaluations of their chemistry. In addition, automated chemical methods are often required to perform consistent and rapid chemical separations on the order of minutes for the duration of the experiment, which can last from weeks to months. Separation methods can include extraction chromatography, liquid-liquid extraction, or gas-phase chromatography. Before a lengthy transactinide experiment can be performed at an accelerator, a large amount of preparatory work must be done both to ensure the successful application of the chosen chemical system to the transactinide chemistry problem being addressed, and to evaluate the behavior of the lighter elemental homologs in the same chemical system. Since transactinide chemistry is literally performed on one single atom, its chemical properties cannot be determined from bulk chemical matrices, but instead must be inferred from the behavior of the lighter elements that occur in its chemical group and in those of its neighboring elements. By first studying the lighter group homologs in a particular chemical system, when the same system is applied to the transactinide element under investigation, its decay properties can be directly compared to those of the homologues, thereby allowing an inference of its own chemistry. The Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (CAMS) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) includes a 1 MV Tandem accelerator, capable of accelerating light ions such as protons to energies of roughly 15 MeV. By using the CAMS beamline, tracers of transactinide homolog elements can be produced both for development of chemical systems and

  10. Isolation and Characterization of the 2,2'-Azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) Radical Cation-Scavenging Reaction Products of Arbutin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Akihiro; Ohno, Asako; Ito, Hideyuki

    2016-09-28

    Arbutin, a glucoside of hydroquinone, has shown strong 2,2'-azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) radical cation-scavenging activity, especially in reaction stoichiometry. This study investigated the reaction mechanism of arbutin against ABTS radical cation that caused high stoichiometry of arbutin in an ABTS radical cation-scavenging assay. HPLC analysis of the reaction mixture of arbutin and ABTS radical cation indicated the existence of two reaction products. The two reaction products were purified and identified to be a covalent adduct of arbutin with an ABTS degradation fragment and 3-ethyl-6-sulfonate benzothiazolone. A time-course study of the radical-scavenging reactions of arbutin and the two reaction products suggested that one molecule of arbutin scavenges three ABTS radical cation molecules to generate an arbutin-ABTS fragment adduct as a final reaction product. The results suggest that one molecule of arbutin reduced two ABTS radical cation molecules to ABTS and then cleaved the third ABTS radical cation molecule to generate two products, an arbutin-ABTS fragment adduct and 3-ethyl-6-sulfonate benzothiazolone.

  11. Structure and function of cytochrome c2 in electron transfer complexes with the photosynthetic reaction center of Rhodobacter sphaeroides: optical linear dichroism and EPR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drepper, F; Mathis, P

    1997-02-11

    The photosynthetic reaction center (RC) and its secondary electron donor the water-soluble cytochrome (cyt) c2 from the purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides have been used in cross-linked and non-cross-linked complexes, oriented in compressed gels or partially dried multilayers, to study the respective orientation of the primary donor P (BChl dimer) and of cyt c2. Three methods were used: (i) Polarized optical absorption spectra at 295 and 10 K were measured and the linear dichroism of the two individual transitions (Qx, Qy), which are nearly degenerate within the alpha-band of reduced cyt c2, was determined. Attribution of the polarization directions to the molecular axes within the heme plane yielded the average cyt orientation in the complexes. (ii) Time-resolved flash absorption measurements using polarized light allowed determination of the orientation of cyt c2 in complexes which differ in their kinetics of electron transfer. (iii) EPR spectroscopy of ferricyt c2 in cross-linked RC-cyt c2 complexes was used to determine the angle between the heme and the membrane plane. The results suggest the following structural properties for the docking of cyt c2 to the RC: (i) In cross-linked complexes, the two cytochromes displaying half-lives of 0.7 and 60 micros for electron transfer to P+ are similarly oriented (difference plane is parallel to the symmetry axis of the RC (0 degrees +/- 10 degrees). Moreover, the Qy transition, which is assumed to be polarized within the ring III-ring I direction of the heme plane, makes an angle of 56 degrees +/- 1 degree with the symmetry axis. (iii) The dichroism spectrum for the fast phase (0.7 micros) for the non-cross-linked cyt c2-RC complex suggests an orientation similar to that of cross-linked cyt c2, but the heme plane is tilted about 20 degrees closer to the membrane. An alternative model is that two or more bound states of cyt c2 with heme plane tilt angles between 0 degrees and 30 degrees allow the fast electron

  12. Comparative Evaluation of Three-Phase Isolated Matrix-Type PFC Rectifier Concepts for High Efficiency 380VDC Supplies of Future Telco and Data Centers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cortes, Patricio; Bortis, Dominik; Pittini, Riccardo

    2014-01-01

    rectifier and in many cases a mains transformer is used to provide galvanic isolation. In order to achieve a high efficiency in the DC voltage generation and to implement the required isolation, a single-stage concept, such as a matrix-type rectifier that enables PFC functionality and galvanic isolation...... in a single conversion, can be beneficial. In addition, due to the fact that with the matrix-type rectifier the galvanic isolation is performed with a high-frequency transformer, this results in a more compact rectifier system compared to conventional systems where the mains-frequency isolation transformer...... is located at the input of the PFC rectifier. In this paper, an overview of isolated matrix-type PFC rectifier topologies is given and a new converter circuit is proposed, analyzed and comparatively evaluated against another promising PFC rectifier concept, the phase-modular IMY-rectifier....

  13. Conformational heterogeneity of the bacteriopheophytin electron acceptor HA in reaction centers from Rhodopseudomonas viridis revealed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and site-directed mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breton, J; Bibikova, M; Oesterhelt, D; Nabedryk, E

    1999-08-31

    The light-induced Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) difference spectra corresponding to the photoreduction of either the HA bacteriopheophytin electron acceptor (HA-/HA spectrum) or the QA primary quinone (QA-/QA spectrum) in photosynthetic reaction centers (RCs) of Rhodopseudomonas viridis are reported. These spectra have been compared for wild-type (WT) RCs and for two site-directed mutants in which the proposed interactions between the carbonyls on ring V of HA and the RC protein have been altered. In the mutant EQ(L104), the putative hydrogen bond between the protein and the 9-keto C=O of HA should be affected by changing Glu L104 to a Gln. In the mutant WF(M250), the van der Waals interactions between Trp M250 and the 10a-ester C=O of HA should be modified. The characteristic effects of both mutations on the FTIR spectra support the proposed interactions and allow the IR modes of the 9-keto and 10a-ester C=O of HA and HA- to be assigned. Comparison of the HA-/HA and QA-/QA spectra leads us to conclude that the QA-/QA IR signals in the spectral range above 1700 cm-1 are largely dominated by contributions from the electrostatic response of the 10a-ester C=O mode of HA upon QA photoreduction. A heterogeneity in the conformation of the 10a-ester C=O mode of HA in WT RCs, leading to three distinct populations of HA, appears to be related to differences in the hydrogen-bonding interactions between the carbonyls of ring V of HA and the RC protein. The possibility that this structural heterogeneity is related to the observed multiexponential kinetics of electron transfer and the implications for primary processes are discussed. The effect of 1H/2H exchange on the QA-/QA spectra of the WT and mutant RCs shows that neither Glu L104 nor any other exchangeable carboxylic residue changes appreciably its protonation state upon QA reduction.

  14. Report on the second consultants' meeting of nuclear reaction data centers Kiev, USSR, 11-16 April 1977. Including the thirteenth four-center meeting and the third meeting on charged particle nuclear data compilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemmel, H.D.

    1977-10-01

    This second ''NRDC meeting'' combined the 13th ''four centers meeting'' (consultants' meeting of the four neutron nuclear data centers) with the third ''CPND meeting'' (consultants' meeting on charged particle nuclear data compilation). In Part I of the meeting, the neutron data centers held a special session on neutron data matters, in particular on the jointly operated neutron data index CINDA, whereas all items of more general interest, in particular the data exchange system EXFOR, were treated in Part II of the meeting

  15. Tuning cofactor redox potentials: the 2-methoxy dihedral angle generates a redox potential difference of >160 mV between the primary (Q(A)) and secondary (Q(B)) quinones of the bacterial photosynthetic reaction center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taguchi, Alexander T; Mattis, Aidas J; O'Malley, Patrick J; Dikanov, Sergei A; Wraight, Colin A

    2013-10-15

    Only quinones with a 2-methoxy group can act simultaneously as the primary (QA) and secondary (QB) electron acceptors in photosynthetic reaction centers from Rhodobacter sphaeroides. (13)C hyperfine sublevel correlation measurements of the 2-methoxy in the semiquinone states, SQA and SQB, were compared with quantum mechanics calculations of the (13)C couplings as a function of the dihedral angle. X-ray structures support dihedral angle assignments corresponding to a redox potential gap (ΔEm) between QA and QB of ~180 mV. This is consistent with the failure of a ubiquinone analogue lacking the 2-methoxy to function as QB in mutant reaction centers with a ΔEm of ≈160-195 mV.

  16. The unusually strong hydrogen bond between the carbonyl of Q(A) and His M219 in the Rhodobacter sphaeroides reaction center is not essential for efficient electron transfer from Q(A)(-) to Q(B).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breton, Jacques; Lavergne, Jérôme; Wakeham, Marion C; Nabedryk, Eliane; Jones, Michael R

    2007-06-05

    In native reaction centers (RCs) from photosynthetic purple bacteria the primary quinone (QA) and the secondary quinone (QB) are interconnected via a specific His-Fe-His bridge. In Rhodobacter sphaeroides RCs the C4=O carbonyl of QA forms a very strong hydrogen bond with the protonated Npi of His M219, and the Ntau of this residue is in turn coordinated to the non-heme iron atom. The second carbonyl of QA is engaged in a much weaker hydrogen bond with the backbone N-H of Ala M260. In previous work, a Trp side chain was introduced by site-directed mutagenesis at the M260 position in the RC of Rb. sphaeroides, resulting in a complex that is completely devoid of QA and therefore nonfunctional. A photochemically competent derivative of the AM260W mutant was isolated that contains a Cys side chain at the M260 position (denoted AM260(W-->C)). In the present work, the interactions between the carbonyl groups of QA and the protein in the AM260(W-->C) suppressor mutant have been characterized by light-induced FTIR difference spectroscopy of the photoreduction of QA. The QA-/QA difference spectrum demonstrates that the strong interaction between the C4=O carbonyl of QA and His M219 is lost in the mutant, and the coupled CO and CC modes of the QA- semiquinone are also strongly perturbed. In parallel, a band assigned to the perturbation of the C5-Ntau mode of His M219 upon QA- formation in the native RC is lacking in the spectrum of the mutant. Furthermore, a positive band between 2900 and 2400 cm-1 that is related to protons fluctuating within a network of highly polarizable hydrogen bonds in the native RC is reduced in amplitude in the mutant. On the other hand, the QB-/QB FTIR difference spectrum is essentially the same as for the native RC. The kinetics of electron transfer from QA- to QB were measured by the flash-induced absorption changes at 780 nm. Compared to native RCs the absorption transients are slowed by a factor of about 2 for both the slow phase (in the

  17. Factors associated with acute oral mucosal reaction induced by radiotherapy in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma: A retrospective single-center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Zhenchao; Gao, Jin; Qian, Liting; Huang, Yifan; Zhou, Yan; Yang, Liping; He, Jian; Yang, Jing; Wang, Ru; Zhang, Yangyang

    2017-12-01

    To investigate risk factors for acute oral mucosal reaction during head and neck squamous cell carcinoma radiotherapy.A retrospective study of patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma who underwent radiotherapy from November 2013 to May 2016 in Anhui Provincial Cancer Hospital was conducted. Data on the occurrence and severity of acute oral mucositis were extracted from clinical records. Based on the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) grading of acute radiation mucosal injury, the patients were assigned into acute reaction (grades 2-4) and minimum reaction (grades 0-1) groups. Preradiotherapy characteristics and treatment factors were compared between the 2 groups. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to detect the independent factors associated with acute oral mucosal reactions.Eighty patients completed radiotherapy during the study period. Oral mucosal reactions were recorded as 25, 31, and 24 cases of grades 1, 2, and 3 injuries, respectively. Significant differences between acute reaction and minimum reaction groups were detected in cancer lymph node (N) staging, smoking and diabetes history, pretreatment platelet count and T-Helper/T-Suppressor lymphocyte (Th/Ts) ratio, concurrent chemotherapy, and total and single irradiation doses.Multivariate analysis showed that N stage, smoking history, single dose parapharyngeal irradiation, and pretreatment platelet count were independent risk factors for acute radiation induced oral mucosal reaction. Smoking history, higher grading of N stage, higher single dose irradiation, and lower preirradiation platelet count may increase the risk and severity of acute radiation oral mucosal reaction in radiotherapy of head and neck cancer patients. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Quick-Reaction Report on the Audit of Defense Base Realignment and Closure Budget Data for Naval Training Center Great Lakes, Illinois

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Granetto, Paul

    1994-01-01

    .... The Hull Technician School will share building 520 with the Advanced Hull Technician School, which is being realigned from the Naval Training Center San Diego, California, under project P-608T...

  19. Isolation and identification of Mycoplasma agalactiae by culture and Polymerase Chain Reaction in Sheep and Goat Milk Samples in Kordestan province, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaki, P.

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Contagious agalactiae (C.A. is one of the most common disease affecting small ruminants which is caused by Mycoplasma agalactiae. This disease is particularly widespread around the world and Iran is one of the countries that C.A. is present. The aim of this study was isolation and identification of M. agalactiae (MG with culture and PCR technique in milk samples in Kordestan province, Iran. A total of 367 milk samples were collected from sheep and goat. Specific published primers amplify a 375 bp gene of MG were used for PCR. Twenty (5.5% out of 367 were positive in PPLO agar and 5 (25% out of these isolates were positive with Mycoplasma agalactiae primers. Four (75% out of 5 isolates was from sheep and 1(25% from goat. Result of PCR with 367 milk samples showed that 11(3% of them were positive with these primers. The isolation of M. agalactiae showed that C.A is present in Kordestan province and our results suggested that PCR method because of reduces the time consuming could be an alternative method beside culture.

  20. Detection of a Bacteriophage Gene Encoding a Mu-like Portal Protein in Haemophilus parasuis Reference Strains and Field Isolates by Nested Polymerase Chain Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    A nested PCR assay was developed to determine the presence of a gene encoding a bacteriophage Mu-like portal protein, gp29, in 15 reference strains and 31 field isolates of Haemophilus parasuis. Specific primers, based on the gene’s sequence, were utilized. A majority of the virulent reference strai...

  1. [Epidemiological profile and antibiotic resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates in burn and traumatology center in Tunisia over a three-year period].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoghlami, Ayoub; Kanzari, Lamia; Boukadida, Jalel; Messadi, Amen Allah; Ghanem, Abdelraouef

    2012-11-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a known opportunistic pathogen frequently causing serious infections in burned patients. To analyze the epidemiological profile of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated in a Tunisian burn unit. During a 3-year period (from 01 July 2008 to 30 June 2011), 544 non repetitive strains of P. aeruginosa were isolated from burn patients. Susceptibility to antibiotics was assessed according to CA-SFM guidelines. Serotypes were identified by slide agglutination test using P.aeruginosa O antisera (Biorad). Producing carbapenemase was analyzed for 202 imipenem resistant isolates by EDTA test. Susceptibility testing data were stored in a laboratory data base using whonet 5.3 software. The most frequent sites of isolation were cutaneous infections and blood cultures (83.4%). The percentages of resistant isolates were as follows: ceftazidime: 34%; imipenem: 37.1%, ciprofloxacin: 27.1% and amikacin: 29.6%. The most prevalent serotypes were: 011(51%), 06(17%), 03 (8%), 04(12%), 012(5%). Among the 202 imipenem resistant strains, 58% expressed a metallocarbapenemase. All theses strains were resistant to all tested antibiotics except colistin and belonged to the serotype O11. The dissemination of carbapenemases strains must be contained by implementation of timely identification, strict isolation methods and better hygienic procedures.

  2. Genomic DNA fingerprinting of clinical Haemophilus influenzae isolates by polymerase chain reaction amplification: comparison with major outer-membrane protein and restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Belkum, A.; Duim, B.; Regelink, A.; Möller, L.; Quint, W.; van Alphen, L.

    1994-01-01

    Non-capsulate strains of Haemophilus influenzae were genotyped by analysis of variable DNA segments obtained by amplification of genomic DNA with the polymerase chain reaction (PCR fingerprinting). Discrete fragments of 100-2000 bp were obtained. The reproducibility of the procedure was assessed by

  3. Secular trends of blood isolates in patients from a rural area population hospitalized in a tertiary center in a small city in Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holevas Pierros V

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most of the studies evaluating the secular trends of blood isolates come from tertiary hospitals in urban areas. We sought to study the trends of the antimicrobial resistance of blood isolates in patients from a rural population hospitalized in a tertiary hospital in a small city in Greece. Methods We retrospectively collected and analysed data for the first positive blood culture obtained for each admission for each patient hospitalized in General Hospital of Tripolis, Tripolis, Peloponnesus, Greece during a 5 year period (16/05/2000 – 15/05/2005. Results Sixty-seven thousand and seventy patients were hospitalized during the study period from whom 3,206 blood cultures were obtained. A higher increase of the number of obtained blood cultures than the number of admissions was noted during the study period (p Escherichia coli (29%, and Staphylococcus aureus (18.2% were the most commonly isolated pathogens. Among the Staphylococcus aureus isolates, the proportion of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA was 17.2% (5/29. The proportion of Escherichia coli resistant to trimethoprim and sulfamethoxazole, ampicillin and cefuroxime was 29.6% (32/108, 25.0% (27/108, and 8.3% (9/108 respectively. Imipenem-resistance was noted in 3.4% (1/29 of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates. There were only 6 (1.6% Acinetobacter baummanii blood isolates during the study period. Conclusion The antimicrobial resistance of isolates from patients receiving care at the studied tertiary hospital in a small city in Greece is considerably less compared to that noted in tertiary hospitals in larger cities of the country.

  4. Petasis/Diels-Alder/Cyclization Cascade Reactions for the Generation of Scaffolds with Multiple Stereogenic Centers and Orthogonal Handles for Library Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flagstad, Thomas; Azevedo, Carlos M. G.; Min, Geanna

    2018-01-01

    A new effective strategy for the synthesis of sp3‐rich small molecules for library production is presented. The key steps to generate complexity highlight Petasis 3‐component reaction followed by an intramolecular Diels‐Alder and cyclization to generate a densely enriched tricyclic or tetracyclic...

  5. Kinetic studies on the reaction of cob(II)alamin with hypochlorous acid: Evidence for one electron oxidation of the metal center and corrin ring destruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dassanayake, Rohan S; Farhath, Mohamed M; Shelley, Jacob T; Basu, Soumitra; Brasch, Nicola E

    2016-10-01

    Kinetic and mechanistic studies on the reaction of a major intracellular vitamin B 12 form, cob(II)alamin (Cbl(II)), with hypochlorous acid/hypochlorite (HOCl/OCl - ) have been carried out. Cbl(II) (Co(II)) is rapidly oxidized by HOCl to predominately aquacobalamin/hydroxycobalamin (Cbl(III), Co(III)) with a second-order rate constant of 2.4×10 7 M -1 s -1 (25.0°C). The stoichiometry of the reaction is 1:1. UHPLC/HRMS analysis of the product mixture of the reaction of Cbl(II) with 0.9mol equiv. HOCl provides support for HOCl being initially reduced to Cl and subsequent H atom abstraction from the corrin macrocycle occurring, resulting in small amounts of corrinoid species with two or four H atoms fewer than the parent cobalamin. Upon the addition of excess (H)OCl further slower reactions are observed. Finally, SDS-PAGE experiments show that HOCl-induced damage to bovine serum albumin does not occur in the presence of Cbl(II), providing support for Cbl(II) being an efficient HOCl trapping agent. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Quick-Reaction Report on the Audit of Defense Base Realignment and Closure Budget Data for Naval Training Center Great Lakes, Illinois

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-05-19

    the audit of project P-608T, Building Modifications, as they relate to project P-557S. Because...project P-608T was addressed in Report No. 94-108, Quick-Reaction Report on the Audit of Defense Base Realignment and Closure Budget Data for Naval Station Treasure Island, California, May 19,

  7. Volume changes and electrostriction in the primary photoreactions of various photosynthetic systems: estimation of dielectric coefficient in bacterial reaction centers and of the observed volume changes with the Drude-Nernst equation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauzerall, David; Hou, Jian-Min; Boichenko, Vladimir A

    2002-01-01

    Photoacoustics (PA) allows the determination of enthalpy and volume changes of photoreactions in photosynthetic reaction centers on the 0.1-10 mus time scale. These include the bacterial centers from Rb. sphaeroides, PS I and PS II centers from Synechocystis and in whole cells. In vitro and in vivo PA data on PS I and PS II revealed that both the volume change (-26 A(3)) and reaction enthalpy (-0.4 eV) in PS I are the same as those in the bacterial centers. However the volume change in PS II is small and the enthalpy far larger, -1 eV. Assigning the volume changes to electrostriction allows a coherent explanation of these observations. One can explain the large volume decrease in the bacterial centers with an effective dielectric coefficient of approximately 4. This is a unique approach to this parameter so important in estimation of protein energetics. The value of the volume contraction for PS I can only be explained if the acceptor is the super- cluster (Fe(4)S(4))(Cys(4)) with charge change from -1 to -2. The small volume change in PS II is explained by sub-mus electron transfer from Y(Z) anion to P(680) cation, in which charge is only moved from the Y(Z) anion to the Q(A) with no charge separation or with rapid proton transfer from oxidized Y(Z) to a polar region and thus very little change in electrostriction. At more acid pH equally rapid proton transfer from a neighboring histidine to a polar region may be caused by the electric field of the P(680) cation.

  8. Isolation of an oxomanganese(V) porphyrin intermediate in the reaction of a manganese(III) porphyrin complex and H2O2 in aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Wonwoo; Kim, Inwoo; Lim, Mi Hee; Choi, Hye Jin; Lee, Je Seung; Jang, Ho G

    2002-05-03

    The reaction of [Mn(TF(4)TMAP)](CF(3)SO(3))(5) (TF(4)TMAP=meso-tetrakis(2,3,5,6-tetrafluoro-N,N,N-trimethyl-4-aniliniumyl)porphinato dianion) with H(2)O(2) (2 equiv) at pH 10.5 and 0 degrees C yielded an oxomanganese(V) porphyrin complex 1 in aqueous solution, whereas an oxomanganese(IV) porphyrin complex 2 was generated in the reactions of tert-alkyl hydroperoxides such as tert-butyl hydroperoxide and 2-methyl-1-phenyl-2-propyl hydroperoxide. Complex 1 was capable of epoxidizing olefins and exchanging its oxygen with H(2) (18)O, whereas 2 did not epoxidize olefins. From the reactions of [Mn(TF(4)TMAP)](5+) with various oxidants in the pH range 3-11, the O-O bond cleavage of hydroperoxides was found to be sensitive to the hydroperoxide substituent and the pH of the reaction solution. Whereas the O-O bond of hydroperoxides containing an electron-donating tert-alkyl group is cleaved homolytically, an electron-withdrawing substituent such as an acyl group in m-chloroperoxybenzoic acid (m-CPBA) facilitates O-O bond heterolysis. The mechanism of the O-O bond cleavage of H(2)O(2) depends on the pH of the reaction solution: O-O bond homolysis prevails at low pH and O-O bond heterolysis becomes a predominant pathway at high pH. The effect of pH on (18)O incorporation from H(2) (18)O into oxygenated products was examined over a wide pH range, by carrying out the epoxidation of carbamazepine (CBZ) with [Mn(TF(4)TMAP)](5+) and KHSO(5) in buffered H(2) (18)O solutions. A high proportion of (18)O was incorporated into the CBZ-10,11-oxide product at all pH values but this proportion was not affected significantly by the pH of the reaction solution.

  9. Selected ion flow tube (SIFT) studies of the reactions of H3O+, NO+ and O-2(+center dot) with six volatile phytogenic esters

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sovová, K.; Dryahina, Kseniya; Španěl, Patrik

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 300, č. 1 (2011), s. 31-38 ISSN 1387-3806 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/09/0800; GA ČR GA203/09/0256 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : SIFT-MS * ion-molecule reactions * plant esters Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.549, year: 2011

  10. Efficient Destruction of Pollutants in Water by a Dual-Reaction-Center Fenton-like Process over Carbon Nitride Compounds-Complexed Cu(II)-CuAlO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyu, Lai; Yan, Dengbiao; Yu, Guangfei; Cao, Wenrui; Hu, Chun

    2018-04-03

    Carbon nitride compounds (CN) complexed with the in-situ-produced Cu(II) on the surface of CuAlO 2 substrate (CN-Cu(II)-CuAlO 2 ) is prepared via a surface growth process for the first time and exhibits exceptionally high activity and efficiency for the degradation of the refractory pollutants in water through a Fenton-like process in a wide pH range. The reaction rate for bisphenol A removal is ∼25 times higher than that of the CuAlO 2 . According to the characterization, Cu(II) generation on the surface of CuAlO 2 during the surface growth process results in the marked decrease of the surface oxygen vacancies and the formation of the C-O-Cu bridges between CN and Cu(II)-CuAlO 2 in the catalyst. The electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) analysis and density functional theory (DFT) calculations demonstrate that the dual reaction centers are produced around the Cu and C sites due to the cation-π interactions through the C-O-Cu bridges in CN-Cu(II)-CuAlO 2 . During the Fenton-like reactions, the electron-rich center around Cu is responsible for the efficient reduction of H 2 O 2 to • OH, and the electron-poor center around C captures electrons from H 2 O 2 or pollutants and diverts them to the electron-rich area via the C-O-Cu bridge. Thus, the catalyst exhibits excellent catalytic performance for the refractory pollutant degradation. This study can deepen our understanding on the enhanced Fenton reactivity for water purification through functionalizing with organic solid-phase ligands on the catalyst surface.

  11. 2-Acetylthiamin pyrophosphate (acetyl-TPP) pH-rate profile for hydrolysis of acetyl-TPP and isolation of acetyl-TPP as a transient species in pyruvate dehydrogenase catalyzed reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruys, K.J.; Datta, A.; Frey, P.A.

    1989-01-01

    Rate constants for the hydrolysis of acetyl-TPP were measured pH values of 2.5 and 7.5 and plotted as log k obs versus pH. The pH-rate profile defined two legs, each with a slope of +1 but separated by a region of decreased slope between pH 4 and pH 6. The rates were insensitive to buffer concentrations. Each leg of the profile reflected specific-base-catalyzed hydrolysis of acetyl-TPP, analogous to the hydrolysis of 2-acetyl-3,4-dimethylthiazolium ion. The separation of the two legs of this profile has been shown to be caused by the ionization of a group exhibiting a pK a of 4.73 within acetyl-TPP that is remote from the acetyl group, the aminopyrimidine ring, which is promoted below pH 4.73. The protonation level of this ring has been shown to control the equilibrium partitioning of acetyl-TPP among its carbinolamine, keto, and hydrate forms. The differential partitioning of these species is a major factor causing the separation between the two legs of the pH-rate profile. The characteristic pH-rate profile and the availability of synthetic acetyl-TPP have facilitated the isolation and identification of [1- 14 C]acetyl-TPP from acid-quenched enymatic reaction mixtures at steady states. [1- 14 C]Acetyl-TPP was identified as a transient species in reactions catalyzed by the PDH complex or the pyruvate dehydrogenase component of the complex (E 1 ). The pH-rate profile for hydrolysis of [1- 14 C]-acetyl-TPP, isolated from enzymatic reactions was found to be indistinguishable from that for authentic acetyl-TPP, which constituted positive identification of the 14 C-labeled enzymic species

  12. Detection of methicillin-resistance gene in Staphylococcus epidermidis strains isolated from patients in Al-Zahra Hospital using polymerase chain reaction and minimum inhibitory concentration methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebtehaj Pishva

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: The frequency of mecA gene in S. epidermidis isolates was 75.34%. Among the various applied tests used for determining methicillin resistance, sensitivity and specificity of PCR were the highest and reached 100%. Sensitivity and specificity were found to be 95.3% and 94.7%, respectively, for phenotypic test (E-test and 86.5% and 80.9%, respectively, for disk diffusion method. Based on the above results, it seems that resistance of S. epidermidis to methicillin is on the rise, and therefore more research is warranted.

  13. Typing of Ochrobactrum anthropi clinical isolates using automated repetitive extragenic palindromic-polymerase chain reaction DNA fingerprinting and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quirino, Angela; Pulcrano, Giovanna; Rametti, Linda; Puccio, Rossana; Marascio, Nadia; Catania, Maria Rosaria; Matera, Giovanni; Liberto, Maria Carla; Focà, Alfredo

    2014-03-22

    Ochrobactrum anthropi (O. anthropi), is a non-fermenting gram-negative bacillus usually found in the environment. Nevertheless, during the past decade it has been identified as pathogenic to immunocompromised patients. In this study, we assessed the usefulness of the automated repetitive extragenic palindromic-polymerase chain reaction (rep-PCR-based DiversiLab™ system, bioMèrieux, France) and of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF MS) for typing of twentythree O. anthropi clinical isolates that we found over a four-months period (from April 2011 to August 2011) in bacteriemic patients admitted in the same operative unit of our hospital. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), commonly accepted as the gold standard technique for typing, was also used. Analysis was carried out using the Pearson correlation coefficient to determine the distance matrice and the unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean (UPGMA) to generate dendogram. Rep-PCR analysis identified four different patterns: three that clustered together with 97% or more pattern similarity, and one whose members showed < 95% pattern similarity. Interestingly, strains isolated later (from 11/06/2011 to 24/08/2011) displayed a pattern with 99% similarity. MALDI-TOF MS evaluation clustered the twentythree strains of O. anthropi into a single group containing four distinct subgroups, each comprising the majority of strains clustering below 5 distance levels, indicating a high similarity between the isolates. Our results indicate that these isolates are clonally-related and the methods used afforded a valuable contribution to the epidemiology, prevention and control of the infections caused by this pathogen.

  14. Workgroup Report by the Joint Task Force Involving American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology (AAAAI); Food Allergy, Anaphylaxis, Dermatology and Drug Allergy (FADDA) (Adverse Reactions to Foods Committee and Adverse Reactions to Drugs, Biologicals, and Latex Committee); and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Botulism Clinical Treatment Guidelines Workgroup-Allergic Reactions to Botulinum Antitoxin: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schussler, Edith; Sobel, Jeremy; Hsu, Joy; Yu, Patricia; Meaney-Delman, Dana; Grammer, Leslie C; Nowak-Wegrzyn, Anna

    2017-12-27

    Naturally occurring botulism is rare, but a large number of cases could result from unintentional or intentional contamination of a commercial food. Despeciated, equine-derived, heptavalent botulinum antitoxin (HBAT) is licensed in the United States. Timely treatment reduces morbidity and mortality, but concerns that botulinum antitoxin can induce anaphylaxis exist. We sought to quantify the allergy risk of botulinum antitoxin treatment and the usefulness of skin testing to assess this risk. We conducted a systematic review of (1) allergic reactions to botulinum antitoxin and (2) the predictive value of skin testing (ST) before botulinum antitoxin administration. We searched 5 scientific literature databases, reviewed articles' references, and obtained data from the HBAT manufacturer and from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Anaphylaxis incidence was determined for HBAT and previously employed botulinum antitoxins. We calculated the positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) of ST for anaphylaxis related to HBAT and other botulinum antitoxins. Seven articles were included. Anaphylaxis incidence was 1.64% (5/305 patients) for HBAT and 1.16% (8/687 patients) for all other botulinum antitoxins (relative risk, 1.41 [95% confidence interval, .47-4.27]; P = .5). Observed values for both PPV and NPV for HBAT-ST (33 patients) were 100%. Observed PPVs and NPVs of ST for other botulinum antitoxins (302 patients) were 0-56% and 50%-100%, respectively. There were no reports of fatal anaphylaxis. Considering the <2 % rate of anaphylaxis, fatal outcomes, modest predictive value of ST, resource requirements for ST, and the benefits of early treatment, data do not support delaying HBAT administration to perform ST in a mass botulinum toxin exposure. Anaphylactic reactions may occur among 1%-2% of botulinum antitoxin recipients and will require epinephrine and antihistamine treatment and, possibly, intensive care. Published by Oxford

  15. Patrones de resistencia bacteriana en urocultivos en un hospital oncológico Antimicrobial resistance patterns of isolates from urine cultures at an oncological center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Cornejo-Juárez

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Describir los patrones de resistencia bacteriana en cultivos de orina en un hospital oncológico. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: Se incluyeron las cepas obtenidas de cultivos de orina de 1998 a 2005. Se obtuvo el porcentaje de sensibilidad para diferentes antibióticos, tras analizar por separado cepas nosocomiales y compararlas con las de la comunidad. RESULTADOS: Se detectaron 9 232 cultivos positivos (20.7% de 44 447 muestras: gramnegativos, 78.8%; grampositivos, 13.8%; y levaduras, 7.4 por ciento. Escherichia coli fue el principal microorganismo identificado (41.3%; la resistencia en aislados nosocomiales fue mayor que en la comunidad para amikacina (92.4 y 97%, ceftazidima (83.1 y 95.1% y ciprofloxacina (46.2 y 58.6%. De igual manera, Pseudomonas aeruginosa presentó mayor resistencia para amikacina y ceftazidima en las cepas nosocomiales (55.7 y 66.6%; y 65.5 y 84.8%, respectivamente. Enterococcus resistente a vancomicina se encontró sólo en 2.5% (3/119 aislados de E. faecium. CONCLUSIONES: Existe una mayor resistencia bacteriana en las cepas de origen nosocomial en comparación con las cepas comunitarias. Se encontró un incremento progresivo de la resistencia para E. coli, el patógeno aislado con más frecuencia de infecciones nosocomiales y comunitarias. Es prioritario intensificar una campaña educativa para el control y uso racional de los antibióticos.OBJECTIVE: To describe the patterns of antimicrobial resistance of organisms isolated from urine cultures at a teaching oncological hospital for adult patients. MATERIAL AND METHODS: All strains obtained from urine cultures from 1998 to 2005 were included. Mean susceptibilities were obtained for each antimicrobial tested; nosocomial and community-acquired isolates were analyzed separately. RESULTS: A total of 9 232 positive urine cultures were obtained (20.7% from 44 447 samples taken. Gram negative bacteria were reported in 78.8%, Gram-positive in 13.8% and yeasts in 7

  16. Prevalence of Antimicrobial Resistance Among Gram-Negative Isolates in and Adult Intensive care unit at a Tertiary care Center in Saudi Arabia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al Johani, Sameera

    2010-01-01

    Patients in the ICU have encountered an increasing emergence and spread of antibiotic-resistant pathogens. We examined patterns of antimicrobial susceptibility in gram-negative isolates to commonly used drugs in an adult ICU at a tertiary care hospital in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.A retrospective study was carried out of gram-negative isolates from the adult ICU of King Fahad National Guard Hospital (KFNGH) between 2004 and 2009. Organisms were identified and tested by an automated identification and susceptibility system, and the antibiotic susceptibility testing was confirmed by the disk diffusion. The most frequently isolated organism was Acinetobacter baumannii, followed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pnemoniae, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, and Enterobacter. Antibiotic susceptibility patterns significantly declined in many organisms, especially A baumannii, E coli, S marcescens, and Enterobacter. A baumannii susceptibility was significantly decreased to imipenem (55% to 10%), meropenem (33% to 10%), ciprofloxacin (22% to 10%), and amikacin (12% to 6%). E coli susceptibility was markedly decreased (from 75% to 50% or less) to cefuroxime, ceftazidime, cefotaxime, and cefepime. S marcescens susceptibility was markedly decreased to cefotaxime (100% to 32%), ceftazidime (100% to 35%), and cefepime (100% to 66%). Enterobacter susceptibility was markedly decreased to ceftazidime (34% to 5%), cefotaxime (34% to 6%), and pipracillin-tazobactam (51% to 35%). Respiratory samples were the most frequently indicative of multidrug-resistant pathogens (63%), followed by urinary samples (57%).Antimicrobial resistance is an emerging problem in the KFNGH ICU, justifying new more stringent antibiotic prescription guidelines. Continuous monitoring of antimicrobial susceptibility and strict adherence to infection prevention guidelines are essential to eliminate major outbreaks in the future (Author).

  17. Genetic Characterization of Fungi Isolated from the Environmental Swabs collected from a Compounding Center Known to Cause Multistate Meningitis Outbreak in United States Using ITS Sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irshad M. Sulaiman

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A multistate fungal meningitis outbreak started in September of 2012 which spread in 20 states of the United States. The outbreak has been fatal so far, and has affected 751 individuals with 64 deaths among those who received contaminated spinal injections manufactured by a Compounding Center located in Massachusetts. In a preliminary study, Food and Drug Administration (FDA investigated the outbreak in collaboration with Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC, state and local health departments, and identified four fungal and several bacterial contaminations in the recalled unopened injection vials. This follow-up study was carried out to assess DNA sequencing of the ITS1 region of rRNA gene for rapid identification of fungal pathogens during public health outbreak investigations. A total of 26 environmental swabs were collected from several locations at the manufacturing premises of the Compounding Center known to have caused the outbreak. The swab samples were initially examined by conventional microbiologic protocols and a wide range of fungal species were recovered. Species-identification of these microorganisms was accomplished by nucleotide sequencing of ITS1 region of rRNA gene. Analysis of data confirmed 14 additional fungal species in the swabs analyzed.

  18. Identifying the public's concerns and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's reactions during a health crisis: An analysis of a Zika live Twitter chat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glowacki, Elizabeth M; Lazard, Allison J; Wilcox, Gary B; Mackert, Michael; Bernhardt, Jay M

    2016-12-01

    The arrival of the Zika virus in the United States caused much concern among the public because of its ease of transmission and serious consequences for pregnant women and their newborns. We conducted a text analysis to examine original tweets from the public and responses from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) during a live Twitter chat hosted by the CDC. Both the public and the CDC expressed concern about the spread of Zika virus, but the public showed more concern about the consequences it had for women and babies, whereas the CDC focused more on symptoms and education. Copyright © 2016 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Effect of expertise in shooting and Taekwondo on bipedal and unipedal postural control isolated or concurrent with a reaction-time task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negahban, Hossein; Aryan, Najmolhoda; Mazaheri, Masood; Norasteh, Ali Asghar; Sanjari, Mohammad Ali

    2013-06-01

    It was hypothesized that training in 'static balance' or 'dynamic balance' sports has differential effects on postural control and its attention demands during quiet standing. In order to test this hypothesis, two groups of female athletes practicing shooting, as a 'static balance' sport, and Taekwondo, as a 'dynamic balance' sport, and a control group of non-physically active females voluntarily participated in this study. Postural control was assessed during bipedal and unipedal stance with and without performing a Go/No-go reaction time task. Visual and/or support surface conditions were manipulated in bipedal and unipedal stances in order to modify postural difficulty. Mixed model analysis of variance was used to determine the effects of dual tasking on postural and cognitive performance. Similar pattern of results were found in bipedal and unipedal stances, with Taekwondo practitioners displaying larger sway, shooters displaying lower sway and non-athletes displaying sway characteristics intermediate to Taekwondo and shooting athletes. Larger effect was found in bipedal stance. Single to dual-task comparison of postural control showed no significant effect of mental task on sway velocity in shooters, indicating less cognitive effort invested in balance control during bipedal stance. We suggest that expertise in shooting has a more pronounced effect on decreased sway in static balance conditions. Furthermore, shooters invest less attention in postures that are more specific to their training, i.e. bipedal stance. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Retrospective analysis of non-laboratory-based adverse drug reactions induced by intravenous radiocontrast agents in a Joint Commission International-accredited academic medical center hospital in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen QL

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Qin-lan Chen,1 Xiao-ying Zhao,2 Xiao-mi Wang,1 Na Lv,2 Ling-ling Zhu,3 Hui-min Xu,4 Quan Zhou4 1Radiology Nursing Unit, Division of Nursing, 2Department of Quality Management, 3Geriatric VIP Care Ward, Division of Nursing, 4Department of Pharmacy, The Second Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, People’s Republic of China Abstract: The authors retrospectively analyzed the pattern and characteristics of non-laboratory-based adverse drug reactions (ADRs induced by intravenous radiocontrast agents in a large-scale hospital in China during 2014–2015. There were 314 ADR cases among 118,208 patients receiving enhanced CT or MRI examinations. The frequency of moderate/severe ADRs defined by Chinese Society of Radiology (ie, severe vomiting, systematic urticaria, facial swelling, dyspnea, vasovagal reaction, laryngeal edema, seizure, trembling, convulsions, unconsciousness, shock, death, and other unexpected adverse reactions was rare (0.0431%, whereas the mild ADRs were uncommon (0.2225% and accounted for 83.76% of ADRs. Frequency of ADRs induced by iodinated contrast agents was related with examination site, sex, and type of patient settings (P<0.01 and was higher compared with gadolinium contrast agents (0.3676% vs 0.0504%, P<0.01. From 2014 to 2015, frequencies of total and moderate/severe ADRs induced by iodinated contrast agents decreased significantly (0.4410% vs 0.2947%, P<0.01; 0.0960% vs 0.0282%, P<0.01, respectively. Frequency of ADRs differed among different iodinated contrast and gadolinium contrast (P<0.05 agents. Iopromide’s ADR frequency in 2014 was significantly higher compared with iopamidol, ioversol, or iohexol (P<0.01. Frequency of moderate/severe ADRs induced by iodixanol was 4.1–5.4 times that of iohexol, iopromide, or iopamidol. Rash was the predominant ADR subtype (84.39% and occurred more frequently with iodixanol compared with iohexol, iopamidol, or ioversol (P<0

  1. Differentiation of canine distemper virus isolates in fur animals from various vaccine strains by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism according to phylogenetic relations in china

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Jianjun

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In order to effectively identify the vaccine and field strains of Canine distemper virus (CDV, a new differential diagnostic test has been developed based on reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP. We selected an 829 bp fragment of the nucleoprotein (N gene of CDV. By RFLP analysis using BamHI, field isolates were distinguishable from the vaccine strains. Two fragments were obtained from the vaccine strains by RT-PCR-RFLP analysis while three were observed in the field strains. An 829 nucleotide region of the CDV N gene was analyzed in 19 CDV field strains isolated from minks, raccoon dogs and foxes in China between 2005 and 2007. The results suggest this method is precise, accurate and efficient. It was also determined that three different genotypes exist in CDV field strains in fur animal herds of the north of China, most of which belong to Asian type. Mutated field strains, JSY06-R1, JSY06-R2 and JDH07-F1 also exist in Northern China, but are most closely related to the standard virulent strain A75/17, designated in Arctic and America-2 genetype in the present study, respectively.

  2. Reaction dynamics of the four-centered elimination CH2OH + --> CHO + +H2: Measurement of kinetic energy release distribution and classical trajectory calculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tae Geol; Park, Seung C.; Kim, Myung Soo

    1996-03-01

    Mass-analyzed ion kinetic energy (MIKE) spectrum of CHO+ generated in the unimolecular dissociation of CH2OH+ was measured. Kinetic energy release distribution (KERD) was evaluated by analyzing the spectrum according to the algorithm developed previously. The average kinetic energy release evaluated from the distribution was extraordinarily large, 1.63 eV, corresponding to 75% of the reverse barrier of the reaction. A global analytical potential energy surface was constructed such that the experimental energetics was represented and that various features in the ab initio potential energy surface were closely reproduced. Classical trajectory calculation was carried out with the global analytical potential energy surface to investigate the causes for the extraordinarily large kinetic energy release. Based on the detailed dynamical calculations, it was found that the strained bending forces at the transition state and strengthening of the CO bond from double to triple bond character were mainly responsible for such a significant kinetic energy release. In addition, the dissociation products H2 and CHO+ ion were found to be rotationally excited in the trajectory calculations. This was attributed to the asymmetry of the transition state and the release of asymmetric bending forces. Also, the bending vibrational modes of CHO+ and the H2 stretching mode, which are coupled with the bending coordinates, were found to be moderately excited.

  3. Reaction-Based Reactive Transport Modeling of Iron Reduction and Uranium Immobilization at Area 2 of the NABIR Field Research Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burgos, W.D.

    2009-09-02

    This report summarizes research conducted in conjunction with a project entitled “Reaction-Based Reactive Transport Modeling of Iron Reduction and Uranium Immobilization at Area 2 of the NABIR Field Research Center”, which was funded through the Integrative Studies Element of the former NABIR Program (now the Environmental Remediation Sciences Program) within the Office of Biological and Environmental Research. Dr. William Burgos (The Pennsylvania State University) was the overall PI/PD for the project, which included Brian Dempsey (Penn State), Gour-Tsyh (George) Yeh (Central Florida University), and Eric Roden (formerly at The University of Alabama, now at the University of Wisconsin) as separately-funded co-PIs. The project focused on development of a mechanistic understanding and quantitative models of coupled Fe(III)/U(VI) reduction in FRC Area 2 sediments. The work builds on our previous studies of microbial Fe(III) and U(VI) reduction, and was directly aligned with the Scheibe et al. ORNL FRC Field Project at Area 2.

  4. Effect of ultrasound treatment on the wet heating Maillard reaction between mung bean [Vigna radiate (L.)] protein isolates and glucose and on structural and physico-chemical properties of conjugates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhongjiang; Han, Feifei; Sui, Xiaonan; Qi, Baokun; Yang, Yong; Zhang, Hui; Wang, Rui; Li, Yang; Jiang, Lianzhou

    2016-03-30

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of ultrasound treatment on the wet heating Maillard reaction between mung bean protein isolates (MBPIs) and glucose, and on structural and physico-chemical properties of the conjugates. The degree of glycosylation of MBPI-glucose conjugates treated by ultrasound treatment and wet heating (MBPI-GUH) was higher than that of MBPI-glucose conjugates only treated by wet heating (MBPI-GH). Solubility, emulsification activity, emulsification stability and surface hydrophobicity of MBPI-GUH were higher than that of MBPI-GH. Grafted MBPIs had a lower content of α-helix and unordered coil, but a higher content of β-sheet and β-turn structure than MBPIs. No significant structural changes were observed in β-turn and random coil structure of MBPI-GUH, while α-helix content increased with ultrasonic time, and decreased at 300 W ultrasonic power with the increase of β-sheet. MBPI-GUH had a less compact tertiary structure compared to MBPI-GH and MBPI. Grafting MBPIs with glucose formed conjugates of higher molecular weight, while no significant changes were observed in electrophoresis profiles of MBPI-GUH. Ultrasound-assisted wet heating Maillard reaction between MBPIs and glucose could be a promising way to improve functional properties of MBPIs. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  5. Structural studies on reaction centers from thermophilic photosynthetic bacteria and its functional utilizations. Tainetsusei kogosei saikin ni yuraisuru kogosei hanno chushin no kozo kaimei to kino kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nozawa, T; Morishita, Y; Kobayashi, M; Kanno, S [Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1992-10-31

    This paper describes the results of the experiment in which crystallization of protein of reactive center purified from the photosynthetic film of thermophilic purple sulfur photosynthetic bacterium Chromatium tepidum whose hyrogen donor in photosynthesis is H2S instead of H2O was attempted. Crystallization was carried out by the vapor diffusion method and particularly by using ethylene glycol as precipitator at 4[degree]C after various investigations on the conditions of crystallization. By X-ray diffraction, this crystal was found to belong to the rhombic system, and it was estimated that the lattice constants, a, b, c equal to 140[angstrom], 190[angstrom] and 80[angstrom] respectively. This bacterium is a thermophilic bacterium having the optimum growth temperature of 48-50 [degree]C and utilizes CO2 or H2CO3 as corbon source, ammonium, urea etc. as nitrogen source and thiosulfate as sulfur source. Moreover, another purpose of this investigation was to determine the thermophilic location by elucidating its configuration (although, as a result, the analysis of configuration had no sufficient resolution). It was confirmed that the enzyme system of photosynthetic film and its cytoplasm obtained by ultrasonic spallation of this cell have CO2 fixing activity utilizing light energy. 23 refs., 14 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Concurrent validity and reliability of using ground reaction force and center of pressure parameters in the determination of leg movement initiation during single leg lift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldabe, Daniela; de Castro, Marcelo Peduzzi; Milosavljevic, Stephan; Bussey, Melanie Dawn

    2016-09-01

    Postural adjustment evaluations during single leg lift requires the initiation of heel lift (T1) identification. T1 measured by means of motion analyses system is the most reliable approach. However, this method involves considerable workspace, expensive cameras, and time processing data and setting up laboratory. The use of ground reaction forces (GRF) and centre of pressure (COP) data is an alternative method as its data processing and setting up is less time consuming. Further, kinetic data is normally collected using frequency samples higher than 1000Hz whereas kinematic data are commonly captured using 50-200Hz. This study describes the concurrent-validity and reliability of GRF and COP measurements in determining T1, using a motion analysis system as reference standard. Kinematic and kinetic data during single leg lift were collected from ten participants. GRF and COP data were collected using one and two force plates. Displacement of a single heel marker was captured by means of ten Vicon(©) cameras. Kinetic and kinematic data were collected using a sample frequency of 1000Hz. Data were analysed in two stages: identification of key events in the kinetic data, and assessing concurrent validity of T1 based on the chosen key events with T1 provided by the kinematic data. The key event presenting the least systematic bias, along with a narrow 95% CI and limits of agreement against the reference standard T1, was the Baseline COPy event. Baseline COPy event was obtained using one force plate and presented excellent between-tester reliability. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Retrospective analysis of multiplex polymerase chain reaction-based molecular diagnostics (SES in 70 patients with suspected central nervous system infections: A single-center study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rama Krishnan Tiruppur Chinnappan Ramalingam

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Central nervous system (CNS infections present a grave health care challenge due to high morbidity and mortality. Clinical findings and conventional laboratory assessments are not sufficiently distinct for specific etiologic diagnosis. Identification of pathogens is a key to appropriate therapy. Aim: In this retrospective observational study, we evaluated the efficacy and clinical utility of syndrome evaluation system (SES for diagnosing clinically suspected CNS infections. Materials and Methods: This retrospective analysis included inpatients in our tertiary level neurointensive care unit (NICU and ward from February 2010 to December 2013. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF samples of 70 patients, clinically suspected of having CNS infections, were subjected to routine laboratory tests, culture, imaging, and SES. We analyzed the efficacy of SES in the diagnosis of CNS infections and its utility in therapeutic decision-making. Results: SES had a clinical sensitivity of 57.4% and clinical specificity of 95.6%. Streptococcus pneumoniae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were the top two bacterial pathogens, whereas Herpes simplex virus (HSV was the most common viral pathogen. Polymicrobial infections were detected in 32.14% of SES-positive cases. SES elicited a change in the management in 30% of the patients from initial empiric therapy. At discharge, 51 patients recovered fully while 11 patients had partial recovery. Three-month follow-up showed only six patients to have neurological deficits. Conclusion: In a tertiary care center, etiological microbial diagnosis is central to appropriate therapy and outcomes. Sensitive and accurate multiplex molecular diagnostics play a critical role in not only identifying the causative pathogen but also in helping clinicians to institute appropriate therapy, reduce overuse of antimicrobials, and ensure superior clinical outcomes.

  8. Retrospective analysis of multiplex polymerase chain reaction-based molecular diagnostics (SES) in 70 patients with suspected central nervous system infections: A single-center study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramalingam, Rama Krishnan Tiruppur Chinnappan; Chakraborty, Dipanjan

    2016-01-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) infections present a grave health care challenge due to high morbidity and mortality. Clinical findings and conventional laboratory assessments are not sufficiently distinct for specific etiologic diagnosis. Identification of pathogens is a key to appropriate therapy. In this retrospective observational study, we evaluated the efficacy and clinical utility of syndrome evaluation system (SES) for diagnosing clinically suspected CNS infections. This retrospective analysis included inpatients in our tertiary level neurointensive care unit (NICU) and ward from February 2010 to December 2013. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples of 70 patients, clinically suspected of having CNS infections, were subjected to routine laboratory tests, culture, imaging, and SES. We analyzed the efficacy of SES in the diagnosis of CNS infections and its utility in therapeutic decision-making. SES had a clinical sensitivity of 57.4% and clinical specificity of 95.6%. Streptococcus pneumoniae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were the top two bacterial pathogens, whereas Herpes simplex virus (HSV) was the most common viral pathogen. Polymicrobial infections were detected in 32.14% of SES-positive cases. SES elicited a change in the management in 30% of the patients from initial empiric therapy. At discharge, 51 patients recovered fully while 11 patients had partial recovery. Three-month follow-up showed only six patients to have neurological deficits. In a tertiary care center, etiological microbial diagnosis is central to appropriate therapy and outcomes. Sensitive and accurate multiplex molecular diagnostics play a critical role in not only identifying the causative pathogen but also in helping clinicians to institute appropriate therapy, reduce overuse of antimicrobials, and ensure superior clinical outcomes.

  9. Final Scientific Report: Bacterial Nanowires and Extracellular Electron Transfer to Heavy Metals and Radionuclides by Bacterial Isolates from DOE Field Research Centers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nealson, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    This proposal involved the study of bacteria capable of transferring electrons from the bacterial cells to electron acceptors located outside the cell. These could be either insoluble minerals that were transformed into soluble products upon the addition of electrons, or they could be soluble salts like uranium or chromium, that become insoluble upon the addition of electrons. This process is called extracellular electron transport or EET, and can be done directly by cellular contact, or via conductive appendages called bacterial nanowires. In this work we examined a number of different bacteria for their ability to perform EET, and also looked at their ability to produce conductive nanowires that can be used for EET at a distance away from the EET-capable cells. In the work, new bacteria were isolated, new abilities of EET were examined, and many new methods were developed, and carefully described in the literature. These studies set the stage for future work dealing with the bioremediation of toxic metals like uranium and chromium. They also point out that EET (and conductive nanowires) are far more common that had been appreciated, and may be involved with energy transfer not only in sediments, but in symbioses between different bacteria, and in symbiosis/pathogenesis between bacteria and higher organisms.

  10. Final Scientific Report: Bacterial Nanowires and Extracellular Electron Transfer to Heavy Metals and Radionuclides by Bacterial Isolates from DOE Field Research Centers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nealson, Kenneth [Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2016-12-20

    This proposal involved the study of bacteria capable of transferring electrons from the bacterial cells to electron acceptors located outside the cell. These could be either insoluble minerals that were transformed into soluble products upon the addition of electrons, or they could be soluble salts like uranium or chromium, that become insoluble upon the addition of electrons. This process is called extracellular electron transport or EET, and can be done directly by cellular contact, or via conductive appendages called bacterial nanowires. In this work we examined a number of different bacteria for their ability to perform EET, and also looked at their ability to produce conductive nanowires that can be used for EET at a distance away from the EET-capable cells. In the work, new bacteria were isolated, new abilities of EET were examined, and many new methods were developed, and carefully described in the literature. These studies set the stage for future work dealing with the bioremediation of toxic metals like uranium and chromium. They also point out that EET (and conductive nanowires) are far more common that had been appreciated, and may be involved with energy transfer not only in sediments, but in symbioses between different bacteria, and in symbiosis/pathogenesis between bacteria and higher organisms.

  11. Two-center three-electron bonding in ClNH{sub 3} revealed via helium droplet infrared laser Stark spectroscopy: Entrance channel complex along the Cl + NH{sub 3} → ClNH{sub 2} + H reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moradi, Christopher P.; Douberly, Gary E., E-mail: douberly@uga.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30602-2556 (United States); Xie, Changjian; Guo, Hua [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 (United States); Kaufmann, Matin [Department of Physical Chemistry II, Ruhr-University Bochum, D-44801 Bochum (Germany)

    2016-04-28

    Pyrolytic dissociation of Cl{sub 2} is employed to dope helium droplets with single Cl atoms. Sequential addition of NH{sub 3} to Cl-doped droplets leads to the formation of a complex residing in the entry valley to the substitution reaction Cl + NH{sub 3} → ClNH{sub 2} + H. Infrared Stark spectroscopy in the NH stretching region reveals symmetric and antisymmetric vibrations of a C{sub 3v} symmetric top. Frequency shifts from NH{sub 3} and dipole moment measurements are consistent with a ClNH{sub 3} complex containing a relatively strong two-center three-electron (2c–3e) bond. The nature of the 2c–3e bonding in ClNH{sub 3} is explored computationally and found to be consistent with the complexation-induced blue shifts observed experimentally. Computations of interconversion pathways reveal nearly barrierless routes to the formation of this complex, consistent with the absence in experimental spectra of two other complexes, NH{sub 3}Cl and Cl–HNH{sub 2}, which are predicted in the entry valley to the hydrogen abstraction reaction Cl + NH{sub 3} → HCl + NH{sub 2}.

  12. (MIRC) reaction w

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sudesh Kumari

    eco-friendly solvents, high yields and easy work-up procedure. Keywords. Ethylene glycol; 4-hydroxycoumarin; ... ability and also compatibility with most organic and inorganic compounds. Because of these properties it is ..... phenyl amino)-2H-chromen-2-one (8a) was isolated from the reaction mixture to confirm the ...

  13. Organic chemistry - Fast reactions 'on water'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klijn, JE; Engberts, JBFN

    2005-01-01

    Efficient reactions in aqueous organic chemistry do not require soluble reactants, as had been thought. A newly developed ‘on-water’ protocol is characterized by short reaction times, and the products are easy to isolate.

  14. Isolation, characterization and identification of actinomycetes from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A total of 62 isolates of actinomycetes were isolated from 7 soil samples collected from Agriculture Research Center Semongok, Sarawak. All 62 isolates exhibited a range of colony colours (dark grey, grey, dark brown, brownish, whitish and yellowish white). All the isolates were later purified and subjected to a few ...

  15. Reaction-Based Reactive Transport Modeling of Iron Reduction and Uranium Immobilization at Area 2 of the NABIR Field Research Center, Subproject to Co-PI Eric E. Roden. Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roden, Eric E.

    2011-01-01

    This report summarizes research conducted in conjunction with a project entitled 'Reaction-Based Reactive Transport Modeling of Iron Reduction and Uranium Immobilization at Area 2 of the NABIR Field Research Center', which was funded through the Integrative Studies Element of the former NABIR Program (now the Environmental Remediation Sciences Program) within the Office of Biological and Environmental Research. Dr. William Burgos (The Pennsylvania State University) was the overall PI/PD for the project, which included Brian Dempsey (Penn State), Gour-Tsyh (George) Yeh (Central Florida University), and Eric Roden (formerly at The University of Alabama, now at the University of Wisconsin) as separately-funded co-PIs. The project focused on development of a mechanistic understanding and quantitative models of coupled Fe(III)/U(VI) reduction in FRC Area 2 sediments. The work builds on our previous studies of microbial Fe(III) and U(VI) reduction, and was directly aligned with the Scheibe et al. ORNL FRC Field Project at Area 2.

  16. Impact differences in ground reaction force and center of mass between the first and second landing phases of a drop vertical jump and their implications for injury risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Nathaniel A; Ford, Kevin R; Myer, Gregory D; Hewett, Timothy E

    2013-04-26

    The drop vertical jump (DVJ) task is commonly used to assess biomechanical performance measures that are associated with ACL injury risk in athletes. Previous investigations have solely assessed the first landing phase. We examined the first and second landings of a DVJ for differences in the magnitude of vertical ground reaction force (vGRF) and position of center of mass (CoM). A cohort of 239 adolescent female basketball athletes completed a series of DVJ tasks from an initial box height of 31 cm. Dual force platforms and a three dimensional motion capture system recorded force and positional data for each trial. There was no difference in peak vGRF between landings (p=0.445), but side-to-side differences increased from the first to second landing (p=0.007). Participants demonstrated a lower minimum CoM during stance in the first landing than the second landing (p<0.001). The results have important implications for the future assessment of ACL injury risk behaviors in adolescent female athletes. Greater side-to-side asymmetry in vGRF and higher CoM during impact indicate the second landing of a DVJ may exhibit greater perturbation and better represent in-game mechanics associated with ACL injury risk. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Scandium(III) catalysis of transimination reactions. Independent and constitutionally coupled reversible processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuseppone, Nicolas; Schmitt, Jean-Louis; Schwartz, Evan; Lehn, Jean-Marie

    2005-04-20

    Sc(OTf)(3) efficiently catalyzes the self-sufficient transimination reaction between various types of C=N bonds in organic solvents, with turnover frequencies up to 3600 h(-)(1) and rate accelerations up to 6 x 10(5). The mechanism of the crossover reaction in mixtures of amines and imines is studied, comparing parallel individual reactions with coupled equilibria. The intrinsic kinetic parameters for isolated reactions cannot simply be added up when several components are mixed, and the behavior of the system agrees with the presence of a unique mediator that constitutes the core of a network of competing reactions. In mixed systems, every single amine or imine competes for the same central hub, in accordance with their binding affinity for the catalyst metal ion center. More generally, the study extends the basic principles of constitutional dynamic chemistry to interconnected chemical transformations and provides a step toward dynamic systems of increasing complexity.

  18. Nuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lane, A.M.

    1980-01-01

    In reviewing work at Harwell over the past 25 years on nuclear reactions it is stated that a balance has to be struck in both experiment and theory between work on cross-sections of direct practical relevance to reactors and on those relevant to an overall understanding of reaction processes. The compound nucleus and direct process reactions are described. Having listed the contributions from AERE, Harwell to developments in nuclear reaction research in the period, work on the optical model, neutron capture theory, reactions at doorway states with fine structure, and sum-rules for spectroscopic factors are considered in more detail. (UK)

  19. STUDY OF UROGENITAL TRACT MICROFLORA OF DNEPROPETROVSK FEMALES BY POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Honcharova S.Y.

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available We isolated and identified the pathogens from the urogenital tract in 100 women of 26-55 years in Diagnostic Center of Dnepropetrovsk Medical Academy by polymerase chain reaction. It was found that all investigated microflora was represented by HPV of high and low cancer risk - HSV type 1+2, Ureaplasma urealyticum, Chlamydia trachomatis, Trichomonas vaginalis, Mycoplasma hominis, and Candida yeast species. The most abundant pathogens from the urogenital tract were HPV, Ureaplasma urealyticum, and Chlamydia trachomatis.

  20. Organolanthanide reagents and the Mukaiyama reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong, L.

    1989-01-01

    The bis(pentamethylcyclopentadienyl) lutetium halide complex [(C 5 Me 5 ) 2 LuCl/center dot/THF] was synthesized and characterized. The crystal structure of this complex shows that the Lu is at the center of a distorted tetrahedron consisting of the centroids of two cyclopentadienyl rings, the oxygen atom of a tetrahydrofuran molecule and a chlorine atom. 1 H NMR studies of toluene-d 8 solutions of (C 5 Me 5 LuCl(THF) + THF, (TMS 2 CP) 2 LuCl(THF) + THF, and (MeCp) 2 LuCl(THF) + THF at various temperatures showed exchange processes between co- ordinated THF and free THF with average values of ΔG/sup ne/ of 13.0 /+-/ 0.3 kcal/mol, 11.1 /+-/ 0.1 kcal/mol and 2 Cp) 2 YbCl dimer, silyl enol ethers (R 1 R 2 C = C(OR 3 )OSiMe 3 )) react with benzaldehyde smoothly in dichloromethane at room temperature, giving >99% of the aldol silyl ether (isolated yield: 90%) within 3 h. At /minus/78/degrees/C, the reaction gives kinetically controlled diastereoselectivity, which was not observed in the TiCl 4 -mediated aldol reaction. The use of organoytterbium enolates shows promise result with respect to increased stereoselectivity, and indicates the importance of the bulky ligands on the metal center. In addition, Yb(III) species can retard retroaldol reaction owing to its mild Lewis acidity. 118 refs., 14 figs., 30 tabs

  1. Isolated galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Einasto, Maret

    1990-01-01

    To test for the possible presence of really isolated galaxies, which form a randomly distributed population in voids, we compare the distribution of most isolated galaxies in an observed sample with distributions of the same number of random points using the nearest neighbour test. The results show that the random population of really isolated galaxies does not exist - even the most isolated galaxies are connected with systems of galaxies, forming their outlying parts. (author)

  2. The effects of protein crowding in bacterial photosynthetic membranes on the flow of quinone redox species between the photochemical reaction center and the ubiquinol-cytochrome c2 oxidoreductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woronowicz, Kamil; Sha, Daniel; Frese, Raoul N; Sturgis, James N; Nanda, Vikas; Niederman, Robert A

    2011-08-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) of the native architecture of the intracytoplasmic membrane (ICM) of a variety of species of purple photosynthetic bacteria, obtained at submolecular resolution, shows a tightly packed arrangement of light harvesting (LH) and reaction center (RC) complexes. Since there are no unattributed structures or gaps with space sufficient for the cytochrome bc(1) or ATPase complexes, they are localized in membrane domains distinct from the flat regions imaged by AFM. This has generated a renewed interest in possible long-range pathways for lateral diffusion of UQ redox species that functionally link the RC and the bc(1) complexes. Recent proposals to account for UQ flow in the membrane bilayer are reviewed, along with new experimental evidence provided from an analysis of intrinsic near-IR fluorescence emission that has served to test these hypotheses. The results suggest that different mechanism of UQ flow exist between species such as Rhodobacter sphaeroides, with a highly organized arrangement of LH and RC complexes and fast RC electron transfer turnover, and Phaeospirillum molischianum with a more random organization and slower RC turnover. It is concluded that packing density of the peripheral LH2 antenna in the Rba. sphaeroides ICM imposes constraints that significantly slow the diffusion of UQ redox species between the RC and cytochrome bc(1) complex, while in Phs. molischianum, the crowding of the ICM with LH3 has little effect upon UQ diffusion. This supports the proposal that in this type of ICM, a network of RC-LH1 core complexes observed in AFM provides a pathway for long-range quinone diffusion that is unaffected by differences in LH complex composition or organization.

  3. Comparison of Path Length and Ranges of Movement of the Center of Pressure and Reaction Time and Between Paired-Play and Solo-Play of a Virtual Reality Game.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portnoy, Sigal; Hersch, Ayelet; Sofer, Tal; Tresser, Sarit

    2017-06-01

    To test whether paired-play will induce longer path length and ranges of movement of the center of pressure (COP), which reflects on balance performance and stability, compared to solo-play and to test the difference in the path length and ranges of movement of the COP while playing the virtual reality (VR) game with the dominant hand compared to playing it with the nondominant hand. In this cross-sectional study 20 children (age 6.1 ± 0.7 years old) played an arm movement controlled VR game alone and with a peer while each of them stood on a pressure measuring pad to track the path length and ranges of movement of the COP. The total COP path was significantly higher during the paired-play (median 295.8 cm) compared to the COP path during the solo-play (median 189.2 cm). No significant differences were found in the reaction time and the mediolateral and anterior-posterior COP ranges between solo-play and paired-play. No significant differences were found between the parameters extracted during paired-play with the dominant or nondominant hand. Our findings imply that the paired-play is advantageous compared to solo-play since it induces a greater movement for the child, during which, higher COP velocities are reached that may contribute to improving the balance control of the child. Apart from the positive social benefits of paired-play, this positive effect on the COP path length is a noteworthy added value in the clinical setting when treating children with balance disorder.

  4. Yeast Isolation for Bioethanol Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EKA RURIANI

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available We have isolated 12 yeast isolates from five different rotten fruits by using a yeast glucose chloramphenicol agar (YGCA medium supplemented with tetracycline. From pre-screening assay, four isolates exhibited higher substrate (glucose-xylose consumption efficiency in the reaction tube fermentation compared to Saccharomyces cerevisiae dan Saccharomyces ellipsoids as the reference strains. Based on the fermentation process in gooseneck flasks, we observed that two isolates (K and SB showed high fermentation efficiency both in sole glucose and mixed glucose-xylose substrate. Moreover, isolates K and SB produced relatively identical level of ethanol concentration compared to the reference strains. Isolates H and MP could only produce high levels of ethanol in glucose fermentation, while only half of that amount of ethanol was detected in glucose-xylose fermentation. Isolate K and SB were identified as Pichia kudriavzeevii (100% based on large sub unit (LSU ribosomal DNA D1/D2 region.

  5. Riscos isolados e agregados de anemia em crianças frequentadoras de berçários de creches Isolated and combined risks for anemia in children attending the nurseries of daycare centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tulio Konstantyner

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Identificar e quantificar os fatores de risco isolados e agregados de anemia, proporcionando visão ampliada quanto à probabilidade da sua ocorrência. MÉTODOS: Estudo transversal com 482 crianças, entre 4 e 29 meses de idade, frequentadoras de berçários de creches públicas e filantrópicas do município de São Paulo (SP, que participaram de dois inquéritos (2004 e 2007. Foram realizadas entrevistas com as mães, coleta de sangue por punção digital e antropometria. Considerou-se anemia, hemoglobina inferior a 11 g/dL. Foi ajustado modelo de regressão logística não-condicional para fatores de risco de anemia, considerando-se estatisticamente significantes associações com p OBJECTIVE: To identify and quantify isolated and combined risk factors for anemia, providing a comprehensive view of the likelihood of its occurrence. METHODS: Cross-sectional study with 482 children aged 4 to 29 months attending the nurseries of philanthropic and public daycare centers in the city of São Paulo, Brazil, who participated in two surveys (2004 and 2007. Mothers were interviewed, blood was collected using digital puncture, and anthropometry was performed. Anemia was characterized by hemoglobin levels below 11 g/dL. Unconditional logistic regression was adjusted for anemia risk factors. A value of p < 0.05 indicated statistically significant associations. Post-test odds and likelihood ratios were calculated to define post-test probabilities. Epi-InfoTM 2000 and Stata 10.0 software packages were used for statistical analysis. RESULTS: Prevalence of anemia was 43.6% (95%CI 39.1-48.1. The final logistic model included five categorical variables: mother's age less than 28 years (OR = 1.50; p = 0.041, per capita income below half a minimum wage (OR = 1.56; p = 0.029, exclusive breastfeeding less than 2 months (OR = 1.71; p = 0.009, decrease in weight/age z score from birth to survey (OR = 1.47; p = 0.050, and age less than 17 months (OR = 2

  6. Accelerator Center for Energy Research (ACER)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Accelerator Center for Energy Research (ACER) exploits radiation chemistry techniques to study chemical reactions (and other phenomena) by subjecting samples to...

  7. Quasielastic reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henning, W.

    1979-01-01

    Quasielastic reaction studies, because of their capability to microscopically probe nuclear structure, are still of considerable interest in heavy-ion reactions. The recent progress in understanding various aspects of the reaction mechanism make this aim appear closer. The relation between microscopic and macroscopic behavior, as suggested, for example, by the single proton transfer data to individual final states or averaged excitation energy intervals, needs to be explored. It seems particularly useful to extend measurements to higher incident energies, to explore and understand nuclear structure aspects up to the limit of the energy range where they are important

  8. The Paterno-Buchi reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brogaard, Rasmus Yding; Schalk, Oliver; Boguslavskiy, Andrey E.

    2012-01-01

    The Paternò-Büchi (PB) reaction between an excited carbonyl compound and an alkene has been widely studied, but so far little is known about the excited-state dynamics of the reaction. In this investigation, we used a compound in which a formyl and a vinyl group are attached to a [2.......2]paracyclophane in order to obtain a model system in pre-reactive conformation for the PB reaction. We studied the excited-state dynamics of the isolated molecule in a molecular beam using femtosecond time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy and ab initio calculations. The results show that inter-system crossing...... within two picoseconds competes efficiently with the reaction in the singlet manifold. Thus, the PB reaction in this model system takes place in the triplet state on a time scale of nanoseconds. This result stresses the importance of triplet states in the excited-state pathway of the PB reaction...

  9. cycloaddition reactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Molecular Modeling Group, Organic Chemical Sciences, Indian Institute of Chemical Technology,. Hyderabad ... thus obtained are helpful to model the regioselectivity ... compromise to model Diels–Alder reactions involving ...... acceptance.

  10. Role of the PufX protein in photosynthetic growth of Rhodobacter sphaeroides. 2. PufX is required for efficient ubiquinone/ubiquinol exchange between the reaction center QB site and the cytochrome bc1 complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barz, W P; Verméglio, A; Francia, F; Venturoli, G; Melandri, B A; Oesterhelt, D

    1995-11-21

    The PufX membrane protein is essential for photosynthetic growth of Rhodobacter sphaeroides because it is required for multiple-turnover electron transfer under anaerobic conditions [see accompanying article; Barz, W. P., Francia, F., Venturoli, G., Melandri, B. A., Verméglio, A., & Oesterhelt, D. (1995) Biochemistry 34, 15235-15247]. In order to understand the molecular role of PufX, light-induced absorption spectroscopy was performed using a pufX- mutant, a pufX+ strain, and two suppressor mutants. We show that the reaction center (RC) requires PufX for its functionality under different redox conditions than the cytochrome bc1 complex: When the kinetics of flash-induced reduction of cytochrome b561 were monitored in chromatophores, we observed a requirement of PufX for turnover of the cytochrome bc1 complex only at high redox potential (Eh > 140 mV), suggesting a function of PufX in lateral ubiquinol transfer from the RC. In contrast, PufX is required for multiple turnover of the RC only under reducing conditions: When the Q pool was partially oxidized in vivo using oxygen or electron acceptors like dimethyl sulfoxide or trimethylamine N-oxide, the deletion of PufX had no effect on light-driven electron flow through the RC. Flash train experiments under anaerobic in vivo conditions revealed that RC photochemistry does not depend on PufX for the first two flash excitations. Following the third and subsequent flashes, however, efficient charge separation requires PufX, indicating an important role of PufX for fast Q/QH2 exchange at the QB site of the RC. We show that the Q/QH2 exchange rate is reduced approximately 500-fold by the deletion of PufX when the Q pool is nearly completely reduced, demonstrating an essential role of PufX for the access of ubiquinone to the QB site. The fast ubiquinone/ubiquinol exchange is partially restored by suppressor mutations altering the macromolecular antenna structure. These results suggest an indirect role of PufX in

  11. Direct Reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Austern, N. [University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1963-01-15

    In order to give a unified presentation of one point of view, these lectures are devoted only to a detailed development of the standard theories of direct reactions, starting from basic principles. Discussion is given of the present status of the theories, of the techniques used for practical calculation, and of possible future developments. The direct interaction (DI) aspects of a reaction are those which involve only a few of the many degrees of freedom of a nucleus. In fact the minimum number of degrees of freedom which must be involved in a reaction are those required to describe the initial and final channels, and DI studies typically consider these degrees of freedom and no others. Because of this simplicity DI theories may be worked out in painstaking detail. DI processes concern only part of the wave function for a problem. The other part involves complicated excitations of many degrees of freedom, and gives the compound nucleus (CN) effects. While it is extremely interesting to learn how to separate DI and CN effects in an orderly manner, if they are both present in a reaction, no suitable method has yet been found. Instead, current work stresses the kinds of reactions and the kinds of final states in which DI effects dominate and in which CN effects may almost be forgotten. The DI cross-sections which are studied are often extremely large, comparable to elastic scattering cross-sections. (author)

  12. Reaction mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Trong Anh

    1988-01-01

    The 1988 progress report of the Reaction Mechanisms laboratory (Polytechnic School, France), is presented. The research topics are: the valence bond methods, the radical chemistry, the modelling of the transition states by applying geometric constraints, the long range interactions (ion - molecule) in gaseous phase, the reaction sites in gaseous phase and the mass spectroscopy applications. The points of convergence between the investigations of the mass spectroscopy and the theoretical chemistry teams, as well as the purposes guiding the research programs, are discussed. The published papers, the conferences, the congress communications and the thesis, are also reported [fr

  13. Extent of reaction in open systems with multiple heterogeneous reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedly, John C.

    1991-01-01

    The familiar batch concept of extent of reaction is reexamined for systems of reactions occurring in open systems. Because species concentrations change as a result of transport processes as well as reactions in open systems, the extent of reaction has been less useful in practice in these applications. It is shown that by defining the extent of the equivalent batch reaction and a second contribution to the extent of reaction due to the transport processes, it is possible to treat the description of the dynamics of flow through porous media accompanied by many chemical reactions in a uniform, concise manner. This approach tends to isolate the reaction terms among themselves and away from the model partial differential equations, thereby enabling treatment of large problems involving both equilibrium and kinetically controlled reactions. Implications on the number of coupled partial differential equations necessary to be solved and on numerical algorithms for solving such problems are discussed. Examples provided illustrate the theory applied to solute transport in groundwater flow.

  14. Isolation and Identification of Active Compound Cause Light Emmitting of Bacterial Photobacterium phosphoreum Isolated from the Indonesia Jepara Marine Squid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Idam Arif

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available This research carried out to study the bioluminescence process of bacterial Photobacterium phosphoreum isolated from Indonesia marine squid. The method used in the present study involved isolation, purification, electrophoresis, and the absorbance and light intensity measurement. This result show that the luciferace enzyme of bacterial Photobacterium phosphoreum or called LBPP catalyzes the emission of visible light from the reaction of reduced flavin mononucleotide (FMNH2, molecular oxygen (O2, and an aldehyde (RCOH. The electrophoresis data show that LBPP comprised of two different subunits α and βwith 41kD and 38 kD molecular weights. The absorb pattern showed that the bioluminescence process centered around 516 nm and are consistent with the fluorescence data. This result concluded that the excitation state formed after LBPP bind subtracts and the ground state formed after LBPP releases product and visible light.

  15. Allergic reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that don't bother most people (such as venom from bee stings and certain foods, medicines, and pollens) can ... person. If the allergic reaction is from a bee sting, scrape the ... more venom. If the person has emergency allergy medicine on ...

  16. A polysaccharide isolated from the liquid culture of Lentinus edodes (shiitake) mushroom mycelia containing black rice bran protects mice against Salmonellosis through up-regulation of the Th1 immune reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    The present study investigated the antibacterial effect of a bioprocessed polysaccharide (BPP) isolated from Lentinus edodes liquid mycelial culture supplemented with black rice bran against murine salmonellosis. BPP was not bactericidal in vitro, but did, however stimulate uptake of the bacteria i...

  17. Usage Center

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kleinaltenkamp, Michael; Plewa, Carolin; Gudergan, Siegfried

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to advance extant theorizing around resourceintegration by conceptualizing and delineating the notion of a usage center. Ausage center consists of a combination of interdependent actors that draw onresources across their individual usage processes to create v...

  18. Statistical theory of neutron nuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moldauer, P.A.

    1980-01-01

    The statistical theory of average neutron nucleus reaction cross sections is reviewed with emphasis on the justification of the Hauser Feshbach formula and its modifications for situations including isolated compound nucleus resonances, overlapping and interfering resonances, the competition of compound and direct reactions, and continuous treatment of residual nuclear states. (author)

  19. Statistical theory of neutron nuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moldauer, P.A.

    1978-02-01

    The statistical theory of average neutron nucleus reaction cross sections is reviewed with emphasis on the justification of the Hauser Feshbach formula and its modifications for situations including isolated compound nucleus resonances, overlapping and interfering resonances, the competition of compound and direct reactions, and continuous treatment of residual nuclear states

  20. Statistical theory of neutron nuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moldauer, P.A.

    1975-01-01

    The statistical theory of average neutron nucleus reaction cross sections is reviewed with emphasis on the justification of the Hauser Feshbach formula and its modifications for situations including isolated compound nucleus resonances, overlapping and interfering resonances, the competition of compound and direct reactions, and continuous treatment of residual nuclear states. 3 figures

  1. GENOMIC DNA-FINGERPRINTING OF CLINICAL HAEMOPHILUS-INFLUENZAE ISOLATES BY POLYMERASE CHAIN-REACTION AMPLIFICATION - COMPARISON WITH MAJOR OUTER-MEMBRANE PROTEIN AND RESTRICTION-FRAGMENT-LENGTH-POLYMORPHISM ANALYSIS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANBELKUM, A; DUIM, B; REGELINK, A; MOLLER, L; QUINT, W; VANALPHEN, L

    Non-capsulate strains of Haemophilus influenzae were genotyped by analysis of variable DNA segments obtained by amplification of genomic DNA with the polymerase chain reaction (PCR fingerprinting). Discrete fragments of 100-2000 bp were obtained. The reproducibility of the procedure was assessed by

  2. Patients experience of source isolation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Kamilla; Pedersen, Didde; Kragbak, Nina

    2014-01-01

    , Nursing education in Århus, Hedeager 2, 8200 Aarhus N, Denmark. Background: Medical treatment and care of patients with infections may include source isolation of the patient, to avoid spreading of the infection. However, isolation is a potential physiological and psychological stress factor...... of the patients perspectives of being isolated to identify areas of potential interest for developing new caring strategies to minimize the negative side effects of isolation. Methods: Literature was systematically searched in CINAHL, Nursing Reference Center, Social Care Online, SveMed+, The Cochrane Library...... of Care: The patients felt abandoned and forgotten by the nurses, because of fewer visits and time limited communication. This led to emotions such as frustrations, insecurity and neglect. While isolated the patients felt it difficult to achieve contact and have an optimal relation with the nurses...

  3. A selected ion flow tube study of the reactions of H3O+, NO+ and O-2(+center dot) with seven isomers of hexanol in support of SIFT-MS

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Smith, D.; Sovová, Kristýna; Španěl, Patrik

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 319, MAY 1 2012 (2012), s. 25-30 ISSN 1387-3806 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/09/0256 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry * proton transfer * ion molecule reaction Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.142, year: 2012

  4. Quasielastic reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, O.

    1983-01-01

    A brief review is presented of the experimental and theoretical situation regarding transfer reactions and inelastic scattering. In the first category there is little (very little) precision data for heavy projectiles and consequently almost no experience with quantitative theoretical analysis. For the inelastic scattering the rather extensive data strongly supports the coupled channels models with collective formfactors. At the most back angles, at intensities about 10 -5 of Rutherford scattering, a second, compound-like mechanism becomes dominant. The description of the interplay of these two opposite mechanisms provides a new challenge for our understanding

  5. Nuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corner, J.; Richardson, K.; Fenton, N.

    1990-01-01

    Nuclear reactions' marks a new development in the study of television as an agency of public policy debate. During the Eighties, nuclear energy became a major international issue. The disasters at Three-mile Island and Chernobyl created a global anxiety about its risks and a new sensitivity to it among politicians and journalists. This book is a case-study into documentary depictions of nuclear energy in television and video programmes and into the interpretations and responses of viewers drawn from many different occupational groupings. How are the complex and specialist arguments about benefit, risk and proof conveyed through the different conventions of commentary, interview and film sequence? What symbolic associations does the visual language of television bring to portrayals of the issue? And how do viewers make sense of various and conflicting accounts, connecting what they see and hear on the screen with their pre-existing knowledge, experience and 'civic' expectations. The authors examine some of the contrasting forms and themes which have been used by programme makers to explain and persuade, and then give a sustained analysis of the nature and sources of viewers' own accounts. 'Nuclear Reactions' inquires into the public meanings surrounding energy and the environment, spelling out in its conclusion some of the implications for future media treatments of this issue. It is also a key contribution to the international literature on 'television knowledge' and the processes of active viewing. (author)

  6. Rapid detection of cytomegalovirus in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and serum samples by polymerase chain reaction: correlation of virus isolation and clinical outcome for patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, K K; Vestbo, Jørgen; Benfield, T

    1997-01-01

    Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluids and serum samples from 153 patients with pulmonary symptoms who were infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and underwent BAL were examined for the presence of cytomegalovirus (CMV) by conventional culture and by polymerase chain reaction (PCR...... technique than conventional culture. Detection of CMV DNA in BAL fluid or serum predicted subsequent development of extrapulmonary CMV disease but not death for HIV-infected patients with pulmonary symptoms....

  7. Spallation reactions; Reactions de spallation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cugon, J.

    1996-12-31

    Spallation reactions dominate the interactions of hadrons with nuclei in the GeV range (from {approx} 0.1 to {approx} 10 GeV). They correspond to a sometimes important ejection of light particles leaving most of the time a residue of mass commensurate with the target mass. The main features of the experimental data are briefly reviewed. The most successful theoretical model, namely the intranuclear cascade + evaporation model, is presented. Its physical content, results and possible improvements are critically discussed. Alternative approaches are shortly reviewed. (author). 84 refs.

  8. Isolation World

    OpenAIRE

    Núñez Martín, Eugeni

    2012-01-01

    El trabajo de fin de grado tiene como nombre “Isolation World”, que en su traducción literal significa “Aislamiento del mundo”, un videojuego diseñado y creado desde cero en su totalidad, utilizando herramientas y conocimiento de lógica en programación que se han ido aprendiendo y desarrollando a lo largo de la carrera.

  9. Kinematical coincidence method in transfer reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acosta, L.; Amorini, F. [INFN—Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia, Catania (Italy); Auditore, L. [INFN Gruppo Collegato di Messina and Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Messina (Italy); Berceanu, I. [Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Bucharest (Romania); Cardella, G., E-mail: cardella@ct.infn.it [INFN—Sezione di Catania, Via S. Sofia, 95123 Catania (Italy); Chatterjiee, M.B. [Saha Institute for Nuclear Physics, Kolkata (India); De Filippo, E. [INFN—Sezione di Catania, Via S. Sofia, 95123 Catania (Italy); Francalanza, L.; Gianì, R. [INFN—Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia, Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Catania, Via S. Sofia, Catania (Italy); Grassi, L. [INFN—Sezione di Catania, Via S. Sofia, 95123 Catania (Italy); Rudjer Boskovic Institute, Zagreb (Croatia); Grzeszczuk, A. [Institut of Physics, University of Silesia, Katowice (Poland); La Guidara, E. [INFN—Sezione di Catania, Via S. Sofia, 95123 Catania (Italy); Centro Siciliano di Fisica Nucleare e Struttura della Materia, Catania (Italy); Lanzalone, G. [INFN—Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia, Catania (Italy); Facoltà di Ingegneria e Architettura, Università Kore, Enna (Italy); Lombardo, I. [INFN—Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia, Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Università Federico II and INFN Sezione di Napoli (Italy); Loria, D.; Minniti, T. [INFN Gruppo Collegato di Messina and Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Messina (Italy); Pagano, E.V. [INFN—Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia, Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Catania, Via S. Sofia, Catania (Italy); and others

    2013-07-01

    A new method to extract high resolution angular distributions from kinematical coincidence measurements in binary reactions is presented. Kinematics is used to extract the center of mass angular distribution from the measured energy spectrum of light particles. Results obtained in the case of {sup 10}Be+p→{sup 9}Be+d reaction measured with the CHIMERA detector are shown. An angular resolution of few degrees in the center of mass is obtained. The range of applicability of the method is discussed.

  10. Impact of patient-prosthesis mismatch following aortic valve replacement on short-term survival: a retrospective single center analysis of 632 consecutive patients with isolated stented biological aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Grischa; Ogbamicael, Selam Abraham; Jochens, Arne; Frank, Derk; Lutter, Georg; Cremer, Jochen; Petzina, Rainer

    2014-09-01

    The impact of patient-prosthesis mismatch (PPM) after aortic valve replacement (AVR) on short-term and long-term mortality remains controversial. The objective of this study was to evaluate the incidence and severity of PPM and its impact on short-term survival in a large cohort of patients treated with isolated stented biological AVR in a single institution. We analyzed retrospectively data of 632 consecutive patients with aortic stenosis undergoing isolated stented biological AVR between January 2007 and February 2012 at our institution. PPM was defined as an indexed effective orifice area ≤ 0.85 cm(2)/m(2). Statistical analyses were performed to identify influencing variables on valve size implanted. Of the 632 patients investigated, 46% were females and mean age was 71.9 ± 10.4 years. PPM was observed in 93.8% (593 of 632 patients). In 71% of the patients, moderate (0.65-0.85 cm(2)/m(2)) PPM was present and in 22.8% severe (body mass index, and body surface area as simultaneous predictors of the valve size implanted (R(2)= 0.39). PPM had no discernable impact on short-term survival, although it was present in 93.8% of our patients following isolated stented biological AVR. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  11. Chain reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balogh, Brian.

    1991-01-01

    Chain Reaction is a work of recent American political history. It seeks to explain how and why America came to depend so heavily on its experts after World War II, how those experts translated that authority into political clout, and why that authority and political discretion declined in the 1970s. The author's research into the internal memoranda of the Atomic Energy Commission substantiates his argument in historical detail. It was not the ravages of American anti-intellectualism, as so many scholars have argued, that brought the experts back down to earth. Rather, their decline can be traced to the very roots of their success after World War II. The need to over-state anticipated results in order to garner public support, incessant professional and bureaucratic specialization, and the sheer proliferation of expertise pushed arcane and insulated debates between experts into public forums at the same time that a broad cross section of political participants found it easier to gain access to their own expertise. These tendencies ultimately undermined the political influence of all experts. (author)

  12. Re-evaluation of lung to thorax transverse area ratio immediately before birth in predicting postnatal short-term outcomes of fetuses with isolated left-sided congenital diaphragmatic hernia: A single center analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kido, Saki; Hidaka, Nobuhiro; Sato, Yuka; Fujita, Yasuyuki; Miyoshi, Kina; Nagata, Kouji; Taguchi, Tomoaki; Kato, Kiyoko

    2018-05-01

    We aimed to investigate whether the lung-to-thorax transverse area ratio (LTR) immediately before birth is of diagnostic value for the prediction of postnatal short-term outcomes in cases of isolated left-sided congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH). We retrospectively reviewed the cases of fetal isolated left-sided CDH managed at our institution between April 2008 and July 2016. We divided the patients into two groups based on LTR immediately before birth, using a cut-off value of 0.08. We compared the proportions of subjects within the two groups who survived until discharge using Fisher's exact test. Further, using Spearman's rank correlation, we assessed whether LTR was correlated with length of stay, duration of mechanical ventilation, and supplemental oxygen. Twenty-nine subjects were included (five with LTR < 0.08, and 24 with LTR ≥ 0.08). The proportion of subjects surviving until discharge was 40% (2/5) for patients with LTR < 0.08, as compared with 96% (23/24) for those with LTR ≥ 0.08. LTR measured immediately before birth was negatively correlated with the postnatal length of stay (Spearman's rank correlation coefficient, rs = -0.486), and the duration of supplemental oxygen (rs = -0.537). Further, the duration of mechanical ventilation was longer in patients with a lower LTR value. LTR immediately before birth is useful for the prediction of postnatal short-term outcomes in fetuses with isolated left-sided CDH. In particular, patients with prenatal LTR value less than 0.08 are at increased risk of postnatal death. © 2017 Japanese Teratology Society.

  13. Presence of Essential Hypertension or Diabetes Mellitus Is a Predictor of Intracranial Bleeding in Elderly Patients: A Study of 108 Patients with Isolated Thrombocytopenia from a Single Reference Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajan Kapoor

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Thrombocytopenia poses a significant problem in the elderly. Not only are there varied causes, but it is also associated with significant morbidity and mortality. We carried out a study to learn the causes of isolated thrombocytopenia in elderly patients and to correlate the severity of thrombocytopenia and bleeding manifestations with various etiologic factors and comorbidities. METHODS: A total of 108 patients above 50 years of age presenting with isolated thrombocytopenia (platelet counts of <100x109/L with normal hemoglobin and total leukocyte counts were enrolled in the study. Detailed history and clinical examinations were carried out for each patient. Complete blood counts were analyzed by automated cell counter. Peripheral smears were examined in all cases. HbsAg, anti-HCV, and anti-HIV testing by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was done in all patients. Wherever clinically indicated, bone marrow aspiration biopsy and cytogenetic studies were done. RESULTS: Out of 108 patients, 102 (94.4% presented with bleeding tendencies. Twenty-nine (26.8% presented with serious (World Health Organization grade 3/4 bleedings. Major findings were immune thrombocytopenic purpura in 79 (73.1%, myelodysplastic syndrome in 7 (6.5%, drug-induced thrombocytopenia in 7 (6.5%, and connective tissue disorder in 4 (3.7% cases. Ten patients presented with intracranial bleedings. Upon logistic regression analysis, comorbidities in the form of essential hypertension and diabetes mellitus were significantly associated with occurrence of intracranial bleeding. There was no correlation of serious bleedings with platelet counts. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION: Isolated thrombocytopenia in the elderly is associated with significant morbidity. Diligent clinical and laboratory evaluation is required to elucidate the cause of thrombocytopenia in the elderly. Comorbidities in this population are associated with serious bleedings and not low platelet counts as is

  14. Center for Adaptive Optics | Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astronomy, UCSC's CfAO and ISEE, and Maui Community College, runs education and internship programs in / Jacobs Retina Center Department of Psychology University of California, San Francisco Department of University School of Optometry Maui Community College Maui Community College Space Grant Program Montana

  15. Mycoplasma contamination of Chlamydia pneumoniae isolates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huniche, BS; Jensen, Lise Torp; Birkelund, Svend

    1998-01-01

    media, immunoblotting, polymerase chain reaction and pulsed field gel electrophoresis. Two of the 6 ATCC isolates [ATCC VR1355 (TWAR strain 2043) and ATCC VR1356 (TWAR strain 2023)] were infected with Mycoplasma hominis and 1 isolate [ATCC VR2282 (TWAR strain TW183)] was contaminated with both...... Mycoplasma hominis and Mycoplasma orale, whereas 3 of the ATCC isolates [ATCC VR1310, ATCC VR1360 (TWAR strain CM-1) and ATCC 53592 (TWAR strain AR39)] were not contaminated. The Finnish C. pneumoniae isolates Kajaani 6 and Parola were found to be contaminated with M. hominis and M. orale, respectively...

  16. TRIMOLECULAR REACTIONS OF URANIUM HEXAFLUORIDE WITH WATER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westbrook, M.; Becnel, J.; Garrison, S.

    2010-02-25

    The hydrolysis reaction of uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) is a key step in the synthesis of uranium dioxide (UO{sub 2}) powder for nuclear fuels. Mechanisms for the hydrolysis reactions are studied here with density functional theory and the Stuttgart small-core scalar relativistic pseudopotential and associated basis set for uranium. The reaction of a single UF{sub 6} molecule with a water molecule in the gas phase has been previously predicted to proceed over a relatively sizeable barrier of 78.2 kJ {center_dot} mol{sup -1}, indicating this reaction is only feasible at elevated temperatures. Given the observed formation of a second morphology for the UO{sub 2} product coupled with the observations of rapid, spontaneous hydrolysis at ambient conditions, an alternate reaction pathway must exist. In the present work, two trimolecular hydrolysis mechanisms are studied with density functional theory: (1) the reaction between two UF{sub 6} molecules and one water molecule, and (2) the reaction of two water molecules with a single UF{sub 6} molecule. The predicted reaction of two UF{sub 6} molecules with one water molecule displays an interesting 'fluorine-shuttle' mechanism, a significant energy barrier of 69.0 kJ {center_dot} mol{sup -1} to the formation of UF{sub 5}OH, and an enthalpy of reaction ({Delta}H{sub 298}) of +17.9 kJ {center_dot} mol{sup -1}. The reaction of a single UF{sub 6} molecule with two water molecules displays a 'proton-shuttle' mechanism, and is more favorable, having a slightly lower computed energy barrier of 58.9 kJ {center_dot} mol{sup -1} and an exothermic enthalpy of reaction ({Delta}H{sub 298}) of -13.9 kJ {center_dot} mol{sup -1}. The exothermic nature of the overall UF{sub 6} + 2 {center_dot} H{sub 2}O trimolecular reaction and the lowering of the barrier height with respect to the bimolecular reaction are encouraging; however, the sizable energy barrier indicates further study of the UF{sub 6} hydrolysis reaction

  17. Chemical potential and reaction electronic flux in symmetry controlled reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt-Geisse, Stefan; Toro-Labbé, Alejandro

    2016-07-15

    In symmetry controlled reactions, orbital degeneracies among orbitals of different symmetries can occur along a reaction coordinate. In such case Koopmans' theorem and the finite difference approximation provide a chemical potential profile with nondifferentiable points. This results in an ill-defined reaction electronic flux (REF) profile, since it is defined as the derivative of the chemical potential with respect to the reaction coordinate. To overcome this deficiency, we propose a new way for the calculation of the chemical potential based on a many orbital approach, suitable for reactions in which symmetry is preserved. This new approach gives rise to a new descriptor: symmetry adapted chemical potential (SA-CP), which is the chemical potential corresponding to a given irreducible representation of a symmetry group. A corresponding symmetry adapted reaction electronic flux (SA-REF) is also obtained. Using this approach smooth chemical potential profiles and well defined REFs are achieved. An application of SA-CP and SA-REF is presented by studying the Cs enol-keto tautomerization of thioformic acid. Two SA-REFs are obtained, JA'(ξ) and JA'' (ξ). It is found that the tautomerization proceeds via an in-plane delocalized 3-center 4-electron O-H-S hypervalent bond which is predicted to exist only in the transition state (TS) region. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. A Polysaccharide isolated from the liquid culture of Lentinus edodes (Shiitake) mushroom mycelia containing black rice bran protects mice against salmonellosis through upregulation of the Th1 immune reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung Phil; Park, Sun Ok; Lee, Sang Jong; Nam, Seok Hyun; Friedman, Mendel

    2014-03-19

    The present study investigated the antibacterial effect of a bioprocessed polysaccharide (BPP) isolated from Lentinus edodes liquid mycelial culture supplemented with black rice bran against murine salmonellosis. BPP was not bactericidal in vitro, it did, however, stimulate uptake of the bacteria into RAW 264.7 murine macrophage cells, as indicated by increased colony-forming unit (CFU) counts of the contents of the lysed macrophages incubated with Salmonella Typhimurium for 30 and 60 min. Two hours postinfection, the bacterial counts drastically increased in the macrophages, but 4 and 8 h postinfection BPP extract-treated cells showed lower bacterial counts than the vehicle (saline phosphate pH 7.4 buffer, PBS)-treated control. BPP elicited altered morphology and markedly elevated inducible nitric oxide (NO) synthase (iNOS) mRNA and protein expression in the infected macrophage cells. BPP also activated leukocytes in S. Typhimurium-infected mice, as determined by spleen lymphocyte proliferation and IFN-γ levels in mice sera. ELISA analysis on cytokine production by Th1 and Th2 immune cells from splenocytes of infected mice showed significant increases in the levels of the following Th1 cytokines: IL-1β, IL-2, IL-6, and IL-12. Histology assays of the livers of mice infected with a sublethal dose (1 × 10(4) CFU) of S. Typhimurium showed that BPP, administered daily through an intraperitoneal (ip) or oral route, protected against necrosis of the liver, a biomarker of in vivo salmonellosis. The lifespan of mice similarly infected with a lethal dose of S. Typhimurium (1 × 10(5) CFU) was significantly extended by ip injection or oral administration of the BPP without side effects. These results suggest that the activity of BPP against bacterial infection in mice occurs mainly through the activation of macrophage-mediated immune response resulting from augmented Th1 immunity. The significance of the results for microbial food safety and human health and further

  19. Tendencia del perfil de sensibilidad antimicrobiana de los aislamientos de sangre en un hospital oncológico (1998-2003 Trend of antimicrobial drug-susceptibility of blood isolates at an oncological center (1998-2003

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Cornejo-Juárez

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Describir la frecuencia de la resistencia en microrganismos aislados en cultivos de sangre en pacientes de un hospital oncológico de tercer nivel. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: De enero de 1998 a diciembre de 2003, en el Instituto Nacional de Cancerología se desarrolló un estudio retrospectivo en el cual se obtuvieron cepas de cultivos de sangre que fueron incluidas y procesadas por sistema Bactec y Microscan, para determinar identificación y sensibilidad antimicrobiana. Se determinó la tendencia anual de la resistencia de cada organismo especificado a los diferentes antibióticos. Se obtuvo la diferencia porcentual (incremento o decremento comparando la frecuencia de resistencia al inicio y al final del estudio. RESULTADOS: Se detectaron 2 071 cultivos positivos. Se recuperaron Gram negativos en 59.7% de las muestras, Gram positivos en 35.7% y levaduras en 4.6%. Escherichia coli fue el principal germen identificado (18.6%, seguido de S. epidermidis (12.7% y Klebsiella spp (9%. Durante el periodo de estudio la sensibilidad se mantuvo estable y por arriba de 88% (excepto para Pseudomonas aeruginosa. La sensibilidad de ciprofloxacina para E. coli se encontró alrededor de 50%. Amikacina presentó mayor sensibilidad que gentamicina. Staphylococcus aureus presentó una sensibilidad a oxacilina de 96% y a vancomicina de 100%. S.epidermidis de 14% a oxacilina y de 98.6% a vancomicina. No se encontraron cepas de enterococo resistente a vancomicina. Todas las cepas de S. pneumoniae fueron sensibles a penicilina. CONCLUSIONES: Se considera que los patrones de resistencia encontrados en este hospital son el resultado del control en el uso de antimicrobianos, del programa de vigilancia de infecciones nosocomiales y de la utilización de terapia combinada en todos los pacientes con bacteremia.OBJECTIVE: To describe the patterns of antimicrobial resistance organisms isolated in blood cultures from patients detected in a tertiary level of care, teaching

  20. Probing the influence of the center atom coordination structure in iron phthalocyanine multi-walled carbon nanotube-based oxygen reduction reaction catalysts by X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yingxiang; Li, Zhipan; Xia, Dingguo; Zheng, Lirong; Liao, Yi; Li, Kai; Zuo, Xia

    2015-09-01

    Three different pentacoordinate iron phthalocyanine (FePc) electrocatalysts with an axial ligand (pyridyl group, Py) anchored to multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are prepared by a microwave method as high performance composite electrocatalysts (FePc-Py/MWCNTs) for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). For comparison, tetracoordinate FePc electrocatalysts without an axial ligand anchored to MWCNTs (FePc/MWCNTs) are assembled in the same way. Ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometry (UV-Vis), Raman spectroscopy (RS), and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) are used to characterize the obtained electrocatalysts. The electrocatalytic activity of the samples is measured by linear sweep voltammetry (LSV), and the onset potential of all of the FePc-Py/MWCNTs electrocatalysts is found to be more positive than that of their FePc/MWCNTs counterparts. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy are employed to elucidate the relationship between molecular structure and electrocatalytic activity. XPS indicates that higher concentrations of Fe3+ and pyridine-type nitrogen play critical roles in determining the electrocatalytic ORR activity of the samples. XAFS spectroscopy reveals that the FePc-Py/MWCNTs electrocatalysts have a coordination geometry around Fe that is closer to the square pyramidal structure, a higher concentration of Fe3+, and a smaller phthalocyanine ring radius compared with those of FePc/MWCNTs.

  1. Chemical kinetics and reaction mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Ou Sik; Park, Youn Yeol

    1996-12-01

    This book is about chemical kinetics and reaction mechanism. It consists of eleven chapters, which deal with reaction and reaction speed on reaction mechanism, simple reaction by rate expression, reversible reaction and simultaneous reaction, successive reaction, complicated reaction mechanism, assumption for reaction mechanism, transition state theory, successive reaction and oscillating reaction, reaction by solution, research method high except kinetics on reaction mechanism, high reaction of kinetics like pulsed radiolysis.

  2. Synthesis and structures of six closely related N-[3-(2-chlorobenzoyl)-5-ethylthiophen-2-yl]arylamides, together with an isolated reaction intermediate: order versus disorder, molecular conformations and hydrogen bonding in zero, one and two dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagar, Belakavadi K; Yathirajan, Hemmige S; Rathore, Ravindranath S; Glidewell, Christopher

    2018-02-01

    Six closely related N-[3-(2-chlorobenzoyl)-5-ethylthiophen-2-yl]arylamides have been synthesized and structurally characterized, together with a representative reaction intermediate. In each of N-[3-(2-chlorobenzoyl)-5-ethylthiophen-2-yl]benzamide, C 20 H 16 ClNO 2 S, (I), N-[3-(2-chlorobenzoyl)-5-ethylthiophen-2-yl]-4-phenylbenzamide, C 26 H 20 ClNO 2 S, (II), and 2-bromo-N-[3-(2-chlorobenzoyl)-5-ethylthiophen-2-yl]benzamide, C 20 H 15 BrClNO 2 S, (III), the molecules are disordered over two sets of atomic sites, with occupancies of 0.894 (8) and 0.106 (8) in (I), 0.832 (5) and 0.168 (5) in (II), and 0.7006 (12) and 0.2994 (12) in (III). In each of N-[3-(2-chlorobenzoyl)-5-ethylthiophen-2-yl]-2-iodobenzamide, C 20 H 15 ClINO 2 S, (IV), and N-[3-(2-chlorobenzoyl)-5-ethylthiophen-2-yl]-2-methoxybenzamide, C 21 H 18 ClNO 3 S, (V), the molecules are fully ordered, but in N-[3-(2-chlorobenzoyl)-5-ethylthiophen-2-yl]-2,6-difluorobenzamide, C 20 H 14 ClF 2 NO 2 S, (VI), which crystallizes with Z' = 2 in the space group C2/c, one of the two independent molecules is fully ordered, while the other is disordered over two sets of atomic sites having occupancies of 0.916 (3) and 0.084 (3). All of the molecules in compounds (I)-(VI) exhibit an intramolecular N-H...O hydrogen bond. The molecules of (I) and (VI) are linked by C-H...O hydrogen bonds to form finite zero-dimensional dimers, which are cyclic in (I) and acyclic in (VI), those of (III) are linked by C-H...π(arene) hydrogen bonds to form simple chains, and those of (IV) and (V) are linked into different types of chains of rings, built in each case from a combination of C-H...O and C-H...π(arene) hydrogen bonds. Two C-H...O hydrogen bonds link the molecules of (II) into sheets containing three types of ring. In benzotriazol-1-yl 3,4-dimethoxybenzoate, C 15 H 13 N 3 O 4 , (VII), the benzoate component is planar and makes a dihedral angle of 84.51 (6)° with the benzotriazole unit. Comparisons are made

  3. A half mode inkjet printed tunable ferrite isolator

    KAUST Repository

    Ghaffar, Farhan A.; Vaseem, Mohammed; Bray, Joey. R.; Shamim, Atif

    2017-01-01

    . The isolation band can be controlled by changing the applied magnetostatic bias. As the bias is varied from 1500 Oe to 3500 Oe the center frequency of the isolation band varies from 4.45 GHz to 9 GHz. The measured response of the isolator shows that it can

  4. Molecular mechanisms of fluoroquinolone resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from cystic fibrosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jalal, S; Ciofu, O; Høiby, Niels

    2000-01-01

    Twenty P. aeruginosa isolates were collected from six cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, aged 27 to 33, in 1994 (9 isolates) and 1997 (11 isolates) at the CF Center, Copenhagen, Denmark, and were typed by pulse-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) or ribotyping. Five of the patients had isolates with the......Twenty P. aeruginosa isolates were collected from six cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, aged 27 to 33, in 1994 (9 isolates) and 1997 (11 isolates) at the CF Center, Copenhagen, Denmark, and were typed by pulse-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) or ribotyping. Five of the patients had isolates...

  5. A crystallographically isolated dimeric hydrolyzed chlorophosphazene dianion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J. Panzner

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Single crystals of the title compound bis[bis(1-ethyl-3-methyl-imidazol-2-ylidenesilver(I] 1,5,5,7,11,11-hexachloro-2,8-dioxa-4,6,10,12,13,14-hexaaza-1λ5,3,5λ5,7λ5,9,11λ5-hexaphosphatricyclo[7.3.1.13,7]tetradeca-1(13,4,7(14,10-tetraene-6,12-diide 3,9-dioxide, [Ag(C6H10N22](Cl6N6O4P60.5, were isolated from the reaction of the silver N-heteocyclic carbene complex [Ag(C6H10N22]Cl and hexachlorocyclotriphosphazene [NPCl2]3 in the presence of water. The asymmetric unit contains one silver carbene cation with the carbene ligands bound to the Ag(I in an almost linear arrangement and one half of a hydrolyzed phosphazene dianion. The second cation and additional half of the anion are generated by an inversion center.

  6. Nuclear data services of the Nuclear Data Centers Network available at the National Nuclear Data Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLane, V.

    1997-01-01

    The Nuclear Data Centers Network provides low and medium energy nuclear reaction data to users around the world. Online retrievals are available through the U.S. National Nuclear Data Center, the Nuclear Energy Agency Data Bank, and the IAEA Nuclear Data Section from these extensive bibliographic, experimental data, and evaluated data files. In addition to nuclear reaction data, the various databases also provide nuclear structure and decay data, and other information of interest to users. The WorldWideWeb sites at the National Nuclear Data Center and the NEA Data Bank provide access to some of the Centers' files. (orig.)

  7. A one-year prospective study on the antibiotic resistance of E. coli strains isolated in urinary specimens of children hospitalized at the University Pediatric Medical Center in Novi Sad, Serbia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakovljević, E; Ilić, K; Jelesić, Z; Konstantinidis, G

    2013-12-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs), the most common serious bacterial infections in children, are frequently caused by Escherichia coli. The purpose of this study was to investigate E. coli resistance/multidrug resistance to antibiotics most frequently used for UTIs. Children 0-18 years of age, hospitalized at the University Pediatric Hospital in Novi Sad, Serbia, were included in a 1-year observational prospective study. The microbiological analysis was performed using the standard Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method. The results were analyzed using WHONET 5.4 software. E. coli was isolated from 61.7 % of positive urine specimens. In general, higher average E. coli antibiotic resistance was found in infants and toddlers compared to children and adolescents (33.4 vs. 25.0 %) (p resistance to all the tested antibiotics was higher in boys than in girls (37.0 vs. 25.1 %) (p 93.1 %), amikacin (86.3 %), quinolones (>75.0 %), and penems (>96.6 %). The prevalence of multiresistant E. coli strains was significantly higher in infants and toddlers (72.3 vs. 36.8 %) (p pediatric hospitals, is highly resistant/multidrug-resistant to commonly used antibiotics. Higher average resistance is found in infants and toddlers than in children and adolescents, as well as in boys compared to girls. These findings are important for the regional empiric therapy of UTIs and call for actions to decrease E. coli antibiotic resistance.

  8. Molecular epidemiology of carbapenem non-susceptible Acinetobacter nosocomialis in a medical center in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ya-Sung; Lee, Yi-Tzu; Wang, Yung-Chih; Chiu, Chun-Hsiang; Kuo, Shu-Chen; Sun, Jun-Ren; Yin, Ti; Chen, Te-Li; Lin, Jung-Chung; Fung, Chang-Phone; Chang, Feng-Yee

    2015-04-01

    The mechanism by which carbapenem non-susceptible Acinetobacter nosocomialis (CNSAN) is disseminated is rarely described in the literature. In this study, we delineated the molecular epidemiology of CNSAN isolated from patients in a medical center in Taiwan. Fifty-four non-duplicate bloodstream isolates of CNSAN were collected at the Taipei Veterans General Hospital between 2001 and 2007. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) was performed to determine their clonal relationship. Carbapenem-resistance genes and associated genetic structures were detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) mapping. Southern hybridization was performed to determine the plasmid location of carbapenem-resistance genes. Transmissibility of these genes to Acinetobacterbaumannii was demonstrated by conjugation tests. The overall carbapenem non-susceptibility rate among A. nosocomialis isolates during the study period was 21.6% (54/250). PFGE revealed three major pulsotypes: H (n=23), I (n=10), and K (n=8). The most common carbapenem-resistance gene was blaOXA-58 (43/54, 79.6%), containing an upstream insertion sequence IS1006 and a truncated ISAba3 (IS1006-ΔISAba3-like-blaOXA-58). All isolates belonging to the pulsotypes H, I, and K carried plasmid located IS1006-ΔISAba3-like-blaOXA-58. A common plasmid carrying ISAba1-blaOXA-82 was found in six isolates, which belonged to five pulsotypes. A type 1 integron that carried blaIMP-1 was detected in different plasmids of seven isolates, which belonged to five pulsotypes. Plasmids carrying these carbapenem-resistant determinants were transmissible from A. nosocomialis to A. baumannii via conjugation. In this medical center, CNSAN mainly emerged through clonal dissemination; propagation of plasmids and integrons carrying carbapenem-resistant determinants played a minor role. This study showed that plasmids carrying carbapenem-resistant determinants are transmissible from A. nosocomialis to A. baumannii. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All

  9. PIXE analysis of proteins from a photochemical center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solís, C.; Oliver, A.; Andrade, E.

    1998-03-01

    In oxygen evolving photosynthetic organisms, light is absorbed and its energy used for the conversion of chemical products in two photosystems: PSI and PSII. Each photosystem is composed of a protein core which binds a pigment antenna and a Reaction Center (RC). RC of PSI is considered an "Iron-Sulfur" type. There are six components that participate in the charge separation after light absorption occurs in PSI: the center chlorophyll P700, two acceptors A 0 and A 1 and three FeS centers F X, F A and F B. However, the exact number of polypeptides, their exact molecular weight, their relative abundances and the active components associated to those polypeptides remain still to be completely characterized. In particular the FeS centers have been difficult to detect in a direct way in a gel band, because the amount of centers involved is under the detection limits of the conventional techniques. This study has been under-taken to explore the capability of particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) to detect in a qualitative way the presence of Fe in some of the protein bands obtained by Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate Polyacrylamide Gel Electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) from the PSI complex. The complex was isolated from membranes of thermophilic cyanobacteria: Synechochoccus sp. The polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the complex shows eight subunits of 66, 60-65, 14, 13, 9, 8 and 7 KDa. In-air PIXE was performed at 2 MeV and proved to be an adequate tool for direct identification of the iron present in the gel bands.

  10. Enantioselective syntheses and biological studies of aeruginosin 298-A and its analogs: application of catalytic asymmetric phase-transfer reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuta, Yuhei; Ohshima, Takashi; Gnanadesikan, Vijay; Shibuguchi, Tomoyuki; Nemoto, Tetsuhiro; Kisugi, Takaya; Okino, Tatsufumi; Shibasaki, Masakatsu

    2004-04-13

    Aeruginosin 298-A was isolated from the freshwater cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa (NIES-298) and is an equipotent thrombin and trypsin inhibitor. A variety of analogs were synthesized to gain insight into the structure-activity relations. We developed a versatile synthetic process for aeruginosin 298-A as well as several attractive analogs, in which all stereocenters were controlled by catalytic asymmetric phase-transfer reaction promoted by two-center asymmetric catalysts and catalytic asymmetric epoxidation promoted by a lanthanide-BINOL complex. Furthermore, serine protease inhibitory activities of aeruginosin 298-A and its analogs were examined.

  11. Method for predicting enzyme-catalyzed reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlavacek, William S.; Unkefer, Clifford J.; Mu, Fangping; Unkefer, Pat J.

    2013-03-19

    The reactivity of given metabolites is assessed using selected empirical atomic properties in the potential reaction center. Metabolic reactions are represented as biotransformation rules. These rules are generalized from the patterns in reactions. These patterns are not unique to reactants but are widely distributed among metabolites. Using a metabolite database, potential substructures are identified in the metabolites for a given biotransformation. These substructures are divided into reactants or non-reactants, depending on whether they participate in the biotransformation or not. Each potential substructure is then modeled using descriptors of the topological and electronic properties of atoms in the potential reaction center; molecular properties can also be used. A Support Vector Machine (SVM) or classifier is trained to classify a potential reactant as a true or false reactant using these properties.

  12. Apple phenolics and their contribution to enzymatic browning reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiesław Oleszek

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chlorogenic acid, epicatechin, procyanidin B2 and C1 were isolated from apple skin. These compounds as well as quercetine and phloretine glycosides isolated from apples were studied individually and as mixtures for their participation in the enzymatic browning reactions. The importance of quercetine glycosides and the synergistic effect of phloridzin and phloretine xyloglucoside with chlorogenic acid and flavans in the browning reaction are reported.

  13. Respiratory hypersensitivity reactions to NSAIDs in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Makowska, J S; Burney, P; Jarvis, D

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are among the most prevalent drugs inducing hypersensitivity reactions. The aim of this analysis was to estimate the prevalence of NSAID-induced respiratory symptoms in population across Europe and to assess its association with upper...... and lower respiratory tract disorders. METHODS: The GA(2) LEN survey was conducted in 22 centers in 15 European countries. Each of 19 centers selected random samples of 5000 adults aged 15-74 from their general population, and in three centers (Athens, Munich, Oslo), a younger population was sampled...... prevalence of NSAID-induced dyspnea was 1.9% and was highest in the three Polish centers [Katowice (4.9%), Krakow (4.8%), and Lodz (4.4%)] and lowest in Skopje, (0.9%), Amsterdam (1.1%), and Umea (1.2%). In multivariate analysis, the prevalence of respiratory reactions to NSAIDs was higher in participants...

  14. Laser Spot Detection Based on Reaction Diffusion

    OpenAIRE

    Alejandro Vázquez-Otero; Danila Khikhlukha; J. M. Solano-Altamirano; Raquel Dormido; Natividad Duro

    2016-01-01

    Center-location of a laser spot is a problem of interest when the laser is used for processing and performing measurements. Measurement quality depends on correctly determining the location of the laser spot. Hence, improving and proposing algorithms for the correct location of the spots are fundamental issues in laser-based measurements. In this paper we introduce a Reaction Diffusion (RD) system as the main computational framework for robustly finding laser spot centers. The method presente...

  15. Characterization of Gibberella xylarioides Isolates and the Reaction ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Admin

    2013-08-14

    Aug 14, 2013 ... growth was rated visually as appressed (flat), slightly raised and raised from the agar ... through cheese clothes into sterile beaker, while thoroughly stirring, ... technique described in detail by Girma et al. (2009b) and ... Design (CRD) replicated three times, and the pathological analysis ... pattern (Figure 1).

  16. DNA isolation from rat tail or ear

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cuppen, E.

    2010-01-01

    This protocol describes a rapid procedure for isolating DNA from rat tail or ear punches. The simplest version of the protocol can be scaled for use in 96-well (deep-well) plates. The quality of the DNA is sufficient for any polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based genotyping approach.

  17. Reaction rates for neutrino processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shalitin, D.

    1978-01-01

    Some integrals involved in neutrino processes are evaluated by transformation to a special system of reference - usually to the center of mass system (CM). Rather simple analytic expressions are obtained for reaction rates and, though less simple, for moments. An interesting result thus obtained is for an isotropic interaction (in CM) of a neutrino with a monoenergetic isotropic gas of extreme relativistic electrons: it is found that the probability of the scattered neutrino to have energy in a certain range is independent of this energy. (Auth.)

  18. Fungal contamination assessment in Portuguese elderly care centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viegas, C; Almeida-Silva, M; Gomes, A Quintal; Wolterbeek, H T; Almeida, S M

    2014-01-01

    Individuals spend 80-90% of their day indoors and elderly subjects are likely to spend even a greater amount of time indoors. Thus, indoor air pollutants such as bioaerosols may exert a significant impact on this age group. The aim of this study was to characterize fungal contamination within Portuguese elderly care centers. Fungi were measured using conventional as well as molecular methods in bedrooms, living rooms, canteens, storage areas, and outdoors. Bioaerosols were evaluated before and after the microenvironments' occupancy in order to understand the role played by occupancy in fungal contamination. Fungal load results varied from 32 colony-forming units CFU m(-3) in bedrooms to 228 CFU m(-3) in storage areas. Penicillium sp. was the most frequently isolated (38.1%), followed by Aspergillus sp. (16.3%) and Chrysonilia sp. (4.2%). With respect to Aspergillus genus, three different fungal species in indoor air were detected, with A. candidus (62.5%) the most prevalent. On surfaces, 40 different fungal species were isolated and the most frequent was Penicillium sp. (22.2%), followed by Aspergillus sp. (17.3%). Real-time polymerase chain reaction did not detect the presence of A. fumigatus complex. Species from Penicillium and Aspergillus genera were the most abundant in air and surfaces. The species A. fumigatus was present in 12.5% of all indoor microenvironments assessed. The living room was the indoor microenvironment with lowest fungal concentration and the storage area was highest.

  19. Reaction between drug substances and pharmaceutical excipients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jesper; Cornett, Claus; Jaroszewski, Jerzy Witold

    2009-01-01

    The reactivity of citric acid towards drug substances in the solid state was examined using the beta-blocker carvedilol as a model compound. The reaction mixtures were analysed by LC-MS, the reaction products were isolated by preparative HPLC, and the structures were elucidated by microprobe NMR...... spectroscopy. Heating a mixture of solid carvedilol and solid citric acid monohydrate for 96h at 50 degrees C resulted in the formation of about 3% of a symmetrical ester as well as of a number of other reaction products in smaller amounts. Formation of the symmetrical ester was also observed at room...... temperature. At 70 degrees C, the amounts of three isomeric esters formed reached 6-8%. The minor reaction products were citric acid amides, O-acetylcarvedilol, and esters of itaconic acid....

  20. Treatment and Managing Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of reactions. Learn more here. Milk Egg Peanut Tree Nuts Soy Wheat Fish Shellfish Sesame Other Food ... a severe reaction. Consider wearing an emergency medical identification (e.g., bracelet, other jewelry). What to Read ...

  1. Microfluidic chemical reaction circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chung-cheng [Irvine, CA; Sui, Guodong [Los Angeles, CA; Elizarov, Arkadij [Valley Village, CA; Kolb, Hartmuth C [Playa del Rey, CA; Huang, Jiang [San Jose, CA; Heath, James R [South Pasadena, CA; Phelps, Michael E [Los Angeles, CA; Quake, Stephen R [Stanford, CA; Tseng, Hsian-rong [Los Angeles, CA; Wyatt, Paul [Tipperary, IE; Daridon, Antoine [Mont-Sur-Rolle, CH

    2012-06-26

    New microfluidic devices, useful for carrying out chemical reactions, are provided. The devices are adapted for on-chip solvent exchange, chemical processes requiring multiple chemical reactions, and rapid concentration of reagents.

  2. Preequilibrium Nuclear Reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strohmaier, B.

    1988-01-01

    After a survey on existing experimental data on precompound reactions and a description of preequilibrium reactions, theoretical models and quantum mechanical theories of preequilibrium emission are presented. The 25 papers of this meeting are analyzed separately

  3. Managing Your Emotional Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Videos for Educators Search English Español Managing Your Emotional Reactions KidsHealth / For Teens / Managing Your Emotional Reactions ... Think about what you might do next time. Emotions 101 The skills we use to manage our ...

  4. Heavy ion transfer reactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    array (CLARA), extensive investigations of nuclear structure and reaction dynamics have been carried out. In the present paper aspects of these studies will be presented, focussing more closely on the reaction mechanism, in particular on the ...

  5. DNA fingerprinting of spore-forming bacterial isolates, using Bacillus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bc-repetitive extragenic palindromic polymerase chain reaction (Bc-Rep PCR) analysis was conducted on seven Bacillus thuringiensis isolates accessed from the Deutsche Sammlung von Mikroorganismen und Zellkulturen (DSMZ) culture collection and on five local isolates of entomopathogenic spore-forming bacteria.

  6. Chemical transport reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Schäfer, Harald

    2013-01-01

    Chemical Transport Reactions focuses on the processes and reactions involved in the transport of solid or liquid substances to form vapor phase reaction products. The publication first offers information on experimental and theoretical principles and the transport of solid substances and its special applications. Discussions focus on calculation of the transport effect of heterogeneous equilibria for a gas motion between equilibrium spaces; transport effect and the thermodynamic quantities of the transport reaction; separation and purification of substances by means of material transport; and

  7. Thermonuclear reaction rates. III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, M.J.; Fowler, W.A.; Caughlan, G.R.; Zimmerman, B.A.

    1983-01-01

    Stellar thermonuclear reaction rates are revised and updated, adding a number of new important reaction rates. Several reactions with large negative Q-values are included, and examples of them are discussed. The importance of the decay rates for Mg-26(p,n) exp 26 Al and Al-26(n,p) exp 26 Mg for stellar studies is emphasized. 19 references

  8. Maillard Reaction: review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Júlia d'Almeida Francisquini

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Maillard reaction is an important subject of study in food science and technology and different areas of knowledge are involved such as chemistry, food engineering, nutrition and food technology. The objective of this paper is to present the basic concepts of the Maillard reaction, such as the reaction stages, the main compounds producced and some technological consequences for dairy products.

  9. Resonant thermonuclear reaction rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haubold, H.J.; Mathai, A.M.

    1986-01-01

    Basic physical principles for the resonant and nonresonant thermonuclear reaction rates are applied to find their standard representations for nuclear astrophysics. Closed-form representations for the resonant reaction rate are derived in terms of Meijer's G-function. Analytic representations of the resonant and nonresonant nuclear reaction rates are compared and the appearance of Meijer's G-function is discussed in physical terms

  10. Iowa Water Center | Iowa Water Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Home Iowa State University Extension Iowa Water Center Submitted by mollyd on April 24, 2012 - 09 :42 Advancing the state of water knowledge and management The Iowa Water Center is a part of a nationwide network of university-based water centers created to encourage interdisciplinary water research

  11. Spreading of genes encoding enterotoxins, haemolysins, adhesin and biofilm among methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains with staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec type IIIA isolated from burn patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motallebi, Mitra; Jabalameli, Fereshteh; Asadollahi, Kheirollah; Taherikalani, Morovat; Emaneini, Mohammad

    2016-08-01

    The emergence of antibiotic-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in particular methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) is an important concern in burn medical centers either in Iran or worldwide. A total of 128 S. aureus isolates were collected from wound infection of burn patients during June 2013 to June 2014. Multiplex-polymerase chain reaction (MPCR) assay was performed for the characterization of the staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec). Genes encoding virulence factors and biofilm were targeted by PCR. Of 128 S. aureus isolates, 77 (60.1%) isolates were MRSA. Fifty four (70.1%) isolates were identified as SCCmec type IIIA. The most frequently detected toxin genes among MRSA isolates with SCCmec type IIIA were sea (64.1%) and hla (51.8%). The rate of coexistence of sea with hla and sea with hla and hlb was 37% and12.9%, respectively. The sec, eta, tst, pvl, hla and hlb genes were not detected in any of the MRSA isolates. The most prevalent genes encoding biofilm was eno, found in 61.1% of isolates, followed by fib and icaA found in 48.1% and 38.8% of the isolates, respectively. The rate of coexistence of fib + eno + icaA + icaD and fib + eno was 20.3% and 9.2%, respectively. The ebps gene was not detected in any of the isolates. In conclusion, our study indicated that the sea, hla, fib and icaA were most frequent genes encoding virulence factors among MRSA with SCCmec type IIIA isolated from burn wound infection. Moreover, the results of this study shows that the rate of coexistence of genes encoding different virulence factor were high. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Matrix isolation and theoretical study of the photochemical reactions of C{sub 2}H{sub 3}Br and 1,2-C{sub 2}H{sub 2}Br{sub 2} with CrO{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemon, Christine E. [Department of Chemistry, University of Cincinnati, P.O. Box 210172, Cincinnati, OH 45221 (United States); Goldberg, Nicola [Department of Chemistry, University of Cincinnati, P.O. Box 210172, Cincinnati, OH 45221 (United States); Klein-Riffle, Evan T. [Department of Chemistry, University of Cincinnati, P.O. Box 210172, Cincinnati, OH 45221 (United States); Kronberg, Jon K. [Department of Chemistry, University of Cincinnati, P.O. Box 210172, Cincinnati, OH 45221 (United States); Ault, Bruce S. [Department of Chemistry, University of Cincinnati, P.O. Box 210172, Cincinnati, OH 45221 (United States)], E-mail: bruce.ault@uc.edu

    2006-08-01

    The matrix-isolation technique has been combined with infrared spectroscopy and theoretical calculations to characterize the products of the photochemical reactions of C{sub 2}H{sub 3}Br and 1,2-C{sub 2}H{sub 2}Br{sub 2} with CrO{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}. For these systems, oxygen-atom transfer occurred upon visible-near ultraviolet irradiation, yielding bromoacetaldehyde and CrOCl{sub 2} in the former case and bromoacetyl bromide and CrCl{sub 2}O in the latter. For each system, the products were formed in the same matrix cage and strongly interacted to form a distinct molecular complex. No evidence was obtained for the acetyl bromide derivative in the C{sub 2}H{sub 3}Br system, indicating the occurrence of oxygen-atom attack at the less substituted carbon of vinyl bromide, nor was any evidence obtained for the formation of a possible five-membered metallocycle. Two different modes of interaction were explored computationally: {eta}{sup 1} (end-on) to the oxygen atom and {eta}{sup 2} (side-on) to the C=O bond. Theoretical calculations indicated that the {eta}{sup 1} complex of CH{sub 2}BrCHO-CrCl{sub 2}O was 13 kcal mol{sup -1} more stable than the {eta}{sup 2} complex at the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,2p) level of theory. The binding energy of the {eta}{sup 1} complex was found to be 21 kcal mol{sup -1}, compared to 8 kcal mol{sup -1} for the {eta}{sup 2} complex at this level of theory.

  13. Experiments on seismic isolation in Italy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonacina, G.; Bettinali, F.; Martelli, A.; Olivieri, M.

    1992-01-01

    Static and dynamic tests have been performed in Italy on high damping steel-laminated elastomer bearings in various scales, rubber specimens and structures isolated by means of such bearings, in the framework of studies in progress to support seismic isolation development. Tests on rubber specimens and bearings have already provided important data (vertical and horizontal stiffness, damping, creep, temperature, aging and scale effects, etc.), necessary for the development and validation of numerical models, comparison with the test results of isolated structure mockups and actual buildings, and improvement of design guidelines. Dynamic experiments of structures concerned both full-scale and scaled isolated structure mock-ups and actual isolated buildings (one of those forming the SIP Administration Center at Ancona, an isolated house at Squillace, Calabria). Both snap-back tests and forced excitation experiments were performed, to rather large displacements. The latter were both sinusoidal and (on a 1/4 scale mock-up) seismic, with one- and multidirectional simultaneous excitations. Test results have already demonstrated the adequacy of seismic isolation and have provided data useful for the comparison with single bearing test results and validation of numerical models for the analysis of isolated structures. This paper reports the main features and results of tests performed or in progress. Further tests planned have been mentioned in the Status Report. Numerical analysis of measured data and guidelines development have been discussed in separate technical papers. (author)

  14. Insights into the mechanisms on chemical reactions: reaction paths for chemical reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunning, T.H. Jr.; Rosen, E.; Eades, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    We report reaction paths for two prototypical chemical reactions: Li + HF, an electron transfer reaction, and OH + H 2 , an abstraction reaction. In the first reaction we consider the connection between the energetic terms in the reaction path Hamiltonian and the electronic changes which occur upon reaction. In the second reaction we consider the treatment of vibrational effects in chemical reactions in the reaction path formalism. 30 refs., 9 figs

  15. Identifikasi Cendawan Endofit Menggunakan Teknik Polymerase Chain Reaction (Detection of Endophytic Fungi Using Polymerase Chain Reaction Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuti Susanti Legiastuti

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Yellow leaf curl disease, caused by a member of Begomovirus (Geminiviridae, is one of important diseases of chilli pepper in Indonesia. Exploration of endophytic fungi was initiated in order to find biological control agents for an alternative control strategies of this disease. Isolates of endophytic fungi were collected from chilli pepper growing area in Sleman, Yogyakarta and further identification using molecular technique involving polymerase chain reaction (PCR and DNA sequencing was performed. DNA fragments of ±500 bp were successfully amplified from 10 fungal isolates by PCR using primer pair ITS1/ITS4, but only 8 DNA sequences was obtained for further genetic analysis. Based on BLASTN analysis the endophytic fungi were identified as having the highest similarity with Pleosporaceae sp. (98% for H1 isolate, Cercospora nicotianae (100% for H5 isolate, ercospora piaropi (98% for H11 isolate, Guignardia mangiferae (99% for H16 isolate, Geomyces pannorum 95% for H17 isolate, Diaporthe phaseoloru (99% for H18 isolate, Dothideomycete sp. (100% for K3 isolate, and Alternaria longissima (99% for K10 isolate. Key words: Begomovirus, chillipepper, DNA sequencing, polymerase chain reaction

  16. Stephenson Cancer Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson Cancer Center at the University of Oklahoma in Oklahoma City is an NCI-designated cancer center at the forefront of NCI-supported cancer research. Learn more about the Stephenson Cancer Center's mission.

  17. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Education Centers Carbon Monoxide Information Center Carbon Monoxide Information Center En Español The Invisible Killer Carbon monoxide, ... Install one and check its batteries regularly. View Information About CO Alarms Other CO Topics Safety Tips ...

  18. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Education Safety Education Centers Carbon Monoxide Information Center Carbon Monoxide Information Center En Español The Invisible Killer Carbon monoxide, also known as CO, is called the " ...

  19. Optimum Shock Isolation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bolotnik, Nikolai

    2001-01-01

    .... Several types of performance criteria for isolation are considered, the most important of which are the peak force transmitted to the body to be isolated and the maximum displacement of the body relative to the base...

  20. Isolated patellofemoral osteoarthritis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonbergen, J.P.W. van; Poolman, R.W.; Kampen, A. van

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The optimal treatment for isolated patellofemoral osteoarthritis is unclear at present. We systematically reviewed the highest level of available evidence on the nonoperative and operative treatment of isolated patellofemoral osteoarthritis to develop an evidenced-based

  1. On the ultrafast kinetics of the energy and electron transfer reactions in photosystem I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slavov, Chavdar Lyubomirov

    2009-07-09

    The subject of the current work is one of the main participants in the light-dependent phase of oxygenic photosynthesis, Photosystem I (PS I). This complex carries an immense number of cofactors: chlorophylls (Chl), carotenoids, quinones, etc, which together with the protein entity exhibit several exceptional properties. First, PS I has an ultrafast light energy trapping kinetics with a nearly 100% quantum efficiency. Secondly, both of the electron transfer branches in the reaction center are suggested to be active. Thirdly, there are some so called 'red' Chls in the antenna system of PS I, absorbing light with longer wavelengths than the reaction center. These 'red' Chls significantly modify the trapping kinetics of PS I. The purpose of this thesis is to obtain better understanding of the above-mentioned, specific features of PS I. This will not merely cast more light on the mechanisms of energy and electron transfer in the complex, but also will contribute to the future developments of optimized artificial light-harvesting systems. In the current work, a number of PS I complexes isolated from different organisms (Thermosynechococcus elongatus, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, Arabidopsis thaliana) and possessing distinctive features (different macroorganisation, monomers, trimers, monomers with a semibelt of peripheral antenna attached; presence of 'red' Chls) is investigated. The studies are primarily focused on the electron transfer kinetics in each of the cofactor branches in the PS I reaction center, as well as on the effect of the antenna size and the presence of 'red' Chls on the trapping kinetics of PS I. These aspects are explored with the help of several ultrafast optical spectroscopy methods: (i) time-resolved fluorescence ? single photon counting and synchroscan streak camera; and (ii) ultrafast transient absorption. Physically meaningful information about the molecular mechanisms of the energy trapping in PS I is

  2. Womens Business Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Small Business Administration — Women's Business Centers (WBCs) represent a national network of nearly 100 educational centers throughout the United States and its territories, which are designed...

  3. Iminium ion chemistry of mitosene DNA alkylating agents. Enriched 13C NMR and isolation studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, A; Skibo, E B

    2000-05-16

    Described herein is a study of the reductive alkylation chemistry of mitosene antitumor agents. We employed a 13C-enriched electrophilic center to probe the fate of the iminium ion resulting from reductive activation. The 13C-labeled center permitted the identification of complex products resulting from alkylation reactions. In the case of DNA reductive alkylation, the type and number of alkylation sites were readily assessed by 13C NMR. Although there has been much excellent work done in the area of mitosene chemistry and biochemistry, the present study provides a number of new findings: (1) The major fate of the iminium ion is head-to-tail polymerization, even in dilute solutions. (2) Dithionite reductive activation results in the formation of mitosene sulfite esters as well as the previously observed sulfonate adducts. (3) The mitosene iminium ion alkylates the adenosine 6-amino group as well as the guanosine 2-amino group. The identification of the latter adduct was greatly facilitated by the 13C-label at the electrophilic center. (4) The mitosene iminium ion alkylates DNA at both nitrogen and oxygen centers without any apparent base selectivity. The complexity of mitosene reductive alkylation of DNA will require continued adduct isolation studies.

  4. Nuclear reaction studies using inverse kinematics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shapira, D.

    1985-01-01

    Reaction studies with reversed kinematics refer to studies of nuclear reactions induced by a heavy projectile colliding with lighter target nuclei. The technique of using reversed kinematics is costly in terms of the available center-of-mass energy. Most of the projectile's energy goes into forward motion of the reaction products in the laboratory system. Examples are presented where the use of reversed kinematics techniques has provided new information on certain reaction processes. A list of kinematic properties and advantages they may afford is shown. Clearly the possible studies listed can be done without using reversed kinematics but because of the difficulty associated with some of these studies they were never performed until more energetic heavier beams have become available and the reversed kinematics technique was utilized

  5. Photochemical reaction products in air pollution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephens, E R; Darley, E F; Taylor, O C; Scott, W E

    1961-01-01

    Isolation and purification of peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) from artificial photochemical reaction of olefins and NO/sub x/ in air are analyzed. Olefin splits at the double bond, one end forming carbonyl compound and the other yielding PAN, among others. At concentrations below 1 ppM, PAN causes plant damage. At a concentration of about 1 ppM, PAN is a strong eye irritant.

  6. Noncanonical Reactions of Flavoenzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Sobrado

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Enzymes containing flavin cofactors are predominantly involved in redox reactions in numerous cellular processes where the protein environment modulates the chemical reactivity of the flavin to either transfer one or two electrons. Some flavoenzymes catalyze reactions with no net redox change. In these reactions, the protein environment modulates the reactivity of the flavin to perform novel chemistries. Recent mechanistic and structural data supporting novel flavin functionalities in reactions catalyzed by chorismate synthase, type II isopentenyl diphosphate isomerase, UDP-galactopyranose mutase, and alkyl-dihydroxyacetonephosphate synthase are presented in this review. In these enzymes, the flavin plays either a direct role in acid/base reactions or as a nucleophile or electrophile. In addition, the flavin cofactor is proposed to function as a “molecular scaffold” in the formation of UDP-galactofuranose and alkyl-dihydroxyacetonephosphate by forming a covalent adduct with reaction intermediates.

  7. Modeling and analysis of liquid deuterium-water reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taleyarkhan, R.P.

    1995-01-01

    This Presentation highlights the following: Overview of LD 2 -water reactions their connections to research reactors with cold sources; some key features and ingredients of vapor explosions in general; Examination of results of 1970 experiment at Grenoble Nuclear Research Center; Thermodynamic evaluations of energetics of explosive LD 2 -D 2 O reactions. This presentation concentrates only on the technical aspects of LD 2 /LH 2 - water reactions; it is not intended to draw/imply safety-related conclusions for research reactors

  8. Static and dynamic stability of pneumatic vibration isolators and systems of isolators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryaboy, Vyacheslav M.

    2014-01-01

    Pneumatic vibration isolation is the most widespread effective method for creating vibration-free environments that are vital for precise experiments and manufacturing operations in optoelectronics, life sciences, microelectronics, nanotechnology and other areas. The modeling and design principles of a dual-chamber pneumatic vibration isolator, basically established a few decades ago, continue to attract attention of researchers. On the other hand, behavior of systems of such isolators was never explained in the literature in sufficient detail. This paper covers a range of questions essential for understanding the mechanics of pneumatic isolation systems from both design and application perspectives. The theory and a model of a single standalone isolator are presented in concise form necessary for subsequent analysis. Then the dynamics of a system of isolators supporting a payload is considered with main attention directed to two aspects of their behavior: first, the static stability of payloads with high positions of the center of gravity; second, dynamic stability of the feedback system formed by mechanical leveling valves. The direct method of calculating the maximum stable position of the center of gravity is presented and illustrated by three-dimensional stability domains; analytic formulas are given that delineate these domains. A numerical method for feedback stability analysis of self-leveling valve systems is given, and the results are compared with the analytical estimates for a single isolator. The relation between the static and dynamic phenomena is discussed.

  9. Nuclear reaction studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, J.M.; Lacey, R.A.

    1994-01-01

    Research focused on the statistical and dynamical properties of ''hot'' nuclei formed in symmetric heavy-ion reactions. Theses included ''flow'' measurements and the mechanism for multifragment disassembly. Model calculations are being performed for the reactions C+C, Ne+Al, Ar+Sc, Kr+Nb, and Xe+La. It is planned to study 40 Ar reactions from 27 to 115 MeV/nucleon. 2 figs., 41 refs

  10. Knock-out reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    de Forest, T. Jr.

    1977-01-01

    It is pointed out that the primary motivation for performing high energy single nucleon knock-out reactions is based on the concept of quasi-elastic scattering. The validity of and corrections to the partial wave impulse approximation and kinematical invariance of knock-out reactions and tests of the reaction mechanism are treated. The effect of distortions on the momentum distribution in the effective momentum approximation for given parameters are plotted. 12 references

  11. Reaction kinetics of polybutylene terephthalate polycondensation reaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Darda, P. J.; Hogendoorn, J. A.; Versteeg, G. F.; Souren, F.

    2005-01-01

    The kinetics of the forward polycondensation reaction of polybutylene terephthalate (PBT) has been investigated using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). PBT - prepolymer with an initial degree of polymerization of 5.5 was used as starting material. The PBT prepolymer was prepared from dimethyl

  12. Thermonuclear reaction listing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukai, Yuzo

    1993-01-01

    The following 10 elements, including T, are well known as nuclear fusion fuels: p, D, T, 3 He, 4 He, 6 Li, 7 Li, 9 Be, 10 B, 11 B, ( 12 C, 13 C), where 12 C and 13 C are considered only in the calculation of Q value. Accordingly the number of the thermonuclear reactions is 55, and 78, if including carbon elements. The reactions have some branches. For the branches having two and three reaction products, the reaction products, Q value and threshold energy are calculated by using a computer. We have investigated those of the branches having more than three products from the papers of Ajzenberg-Selove and so on. And also, by the same papers, we check whether the above mentioned branch has been observed or not. The results are as follows: (I) the number of reactions which have Q 0 branches only with γ ray production, and Q 0 and neutron production is 36(17), and (IV) that of reactions whose branch with Q > 0 does not produce neutrons is 9(3). The value in the parentheses shows the number of the case of the carbon elements. For 55 thermonuclear reactions induced by lighter nuclides than 11 B, the reaction products, the values of Q and threshold energy, and the papers with reaction cross section data are presented in the tables. (author)

  13. Sleeve reaction chamber system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northrup, M Allen [Berkeley, CA; Beeman, Barton V [San Mateo, CA; Benett, William J [Livermore, CA; Hadley, Dean R [Manteca, CA; Landre, Phoebe [Livermore, CA; Lehew, Stacy L [Livermore, CA; Krulevitch, Peter A [Pleasanton, CA

    2009-08-25

    A chemical reaction chamber system that combines devices such as doped polysilicon for heating, bulk silicon for convective cooling, and thermoelectric (TE) coolers to augment the heating and cooling rates of the reaction chamber or chambers. In addition the system includes non-silicon-based reaction chambers such as any high thermal conductivity material used in combination with a thermoelectric cooling mechanism (i.e., Peltier device). The heat contained in the thermally conductive part of the system can be used/reused to heat the device, thereby conserving energy and expediting the heating/cooling rates. The system combines a micromachined silicon reaction chamber, for example, with an additional module/device for augmented heating/cooling using the Peltier effect. This additional module is particularly useful in extreme environments (very hot or extremely cold) where augmented heating/cooling would be useful to speed up the thermal cycling rates. The chemical reaction chamber system has various applications for synthesis or processing of organic, inorganic, or biochemical reactions, including the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and/or other DNA reactions, such as the ligase chain reaction.

  14. Tattoo reaction: Case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muneer Mohamed

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Tattoo is going to be a very common practice especially among young people and we are witnessing a gradual increase of numerous potential complications to tattoo placement which are often seen by physicians, but generally unknown to the public. The most common skin reactions to tattoo include a transient acute inflammatory reaction due to trauma of the skin with needles and medical complications such as superficial and deep local infections, systemic infections, allergic contact dermatitis, photodermatitis, granulomatous and lichenoid reactions, and skin diseases localized on tattooed area (eczema, psoriasis, lichen, and morphea. In this series we present three cases of tattoo reaction.

  15. EMPLACEMENT DRIFT ISOLATION DOOR CONTROL SYSTEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    N.T. Raczka

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this analysis is to review and refine key design concepts related to the control system presently under consideration for remotely operating the emplacement drift isolation doors at the potential subsurface nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. This analysis will discuss the key design concepts of the control system that may be utilized for remotely monitoring, opening, and closing the emplacement drift isolation doors. The scope and primary objectives of this analysis are to: (1) Discuss the purpose and function of the isolation doors (Presented in Section 7.1). (2) Review the construction of the isolation door and other physical characteristics of the doors that the control system will interface with (Presented in Section 7.2). (3) Discuss monitoring and controlling the operation of the isolation doors with a digital control system (either a Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) system or a Distributed Control System (DCS)) (Presented in Section 7.3). (4) Discuss how all isolation doors can be monitored and controlled from a subsurface central control center (Presented in Section 7.4). This analysis will focus on the development of input/output (I/O) counts including the types of I/O, redundancy and fault tolerance considerations, and processor requirements for the isolation door control system. Attention will be placed on operability, maintainability, and reliability issues for the system operating in the subsurface environment with exposure to high temperatures and radiation

  16. Freqüência e atividade enzimática de Candida albicans isoladas da mucosa bucal de crianças de uma creche da prefeitura de Fortaleza Frequency and enzymatic activity of Candida albicans isolated from the buccal mucosa of children of a day-care center of the city hall of Fortaleza, Ceará, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Everardo Albuquerque Menezes

    2005-02-01

    %-45% followed by C. tropicalis (31%, C. guilliermondi (17%, C. glabrata (4.5% and C. stellatoidea (1,5%. Considering enzymatic activitie of Candida albicans strains, 20% produced proteinasis and 33% produced phospholipasis. Candida albicans isolated from children mouth mucous from a public day care center in Fortaleza presented a weak enzymatic activity. This finding leads to the conclusion that those strains seem to be of low virulence.

  17. Nuclear information services at the National Nuclear Data Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burrows, T.W.; Tuli, J.K.

    1996-01-01

    The numeric and bibliographic nuclear data bases maintained by the National Nuclear Data Center and access to these data bases will be described. The U.S. Nuclear Data and Reaction Data Networks will also be briefly described

  18. Reactions of psychiatric patients to telepsychiatry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbie Campbell

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Telepsychiatry could offer a viable medical service to remote or isolated social communities if it does not generate adverse reactions such as delusional ideation, particularly in patients in settlements without adequate exposure to mainstream culture and internet. We examined subjective reactions to telepsychiatry of randomly selected 84 psychiatric patients from remote locations in Ontario, Canada. They rated the quality of their teleconferencing sessions via 10 item questionnaire and were asked about advantages and disadvantages of telepsychiatry. The majority of patients indicated that they were able to communicate as if physically present (92.9% and were comfortable with telepsychiatric service (95.2%. They found the sessions as beneficial as direct meetings with their psychiatrist (84.5% and would use this service again (98.8%. There were no instances of telepsychiatry being associated with adverse reactions in patients from remote communities with inadequate exposure to modern mainstream culture and internet.

  19. Comparação entre método bioquímico e reação em cadeia de polimerase para identificação de Lactobacillus spp., isolados de aves Comparison between biochemical and polymerase chain reaction methods for the identification of Lactobacillus spp. isolated from chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.R. Barros

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Lactobacilos foram isolados do inglúvio e cecos de reprodutoras pesadas e caracterizados como Gram-positivo, catalase negativo, produtores de gás em glicose e não produtores de H2S em triple sugar iron e pela fermentação de carboidratos. Utilizaram-se os iniciadores: Lac 1/23-10C para detecção de Lactobacillus acidophilus, L. crispatus, L. amylovorus, L. gasseri, L. helveticus e L. jensenii; Lac 2/LU-1' para L. acidophilus; Fer 3/Fer 4 para L. fermentum; Reu 1/Reu 2 para L. reuteri e Sal 1 e Sal 2 para L. salivarius. L. reuteri e L. salivarius foram identificados pela reação em cadeia de polimerase (PCR e pelo teste bioquímico, enquanto L. acidophilus, L. fermentum e Lactobacillus sp. somente pelo teste bioquímico. Os resultados obtidos na PCR foram mais precisos quando comparados aos obtidos com o método bioquímico, que demonstrou ser subjetivo devido às variações na fermentação de carboidratos, principalmente na diferenciação entre L. fermentum e L. reuteri.Lactobacilli were isolated from crops and ceca of broiler breeders and characterized by positive Gram staining, negative catalase test, production of gas from glucose, and negative for H2S production from triple sugar iron, and carbohydrates fermentation. Primers: Lac1/23-10C for detecting Lactobacillus acidophilus, L. crispatus, L. amylovorus, L. gasseri, L. helveticus, and L. jensenii; Lac2/LU-1' for L. acidophilus; Fer3/Fer4 for L. fermentum; Reu1/Reu2 for L. reuteri, and Sal1/Sal2 for L. salivarius were used. L. reuteri and L. salivarius were identified by both polymerase chain reaction (PCR and biochemical tests. However, L. acidophilus, L. fermentum, and Lactobacillus sp. were only identified by biochemical tests. PCR results were more precise, considering the variability of carbohydrate fermentation among the strains, especially for identifying L. fermentum and L. reuteri.

  20. Alpha resonant scattering for astrophysical reaction studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaguchi, H.; Kahl, D.; Nakao, T. [Center for Nuclear Study (CNS), University of Tokyo, RIKEN campus, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Wakabayashi, Y.; Kubano, S. [The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research (RIKEN), 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Hashimoto, T. [Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP), Osaka University, 10-1 Mihogaoka, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Hayakawa, S. [Istituto Nazionale Fisica Nucleare - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud (INFN-LNS), Via S. Sofia 62, 95125 Catania (Italy); Kawabata, T. [Department of Physics, Kyoto University, Kita-Shirakawa, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Iwasa, N. [Department of Physics, Tohoku University, Aoba, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8578 (Japan); Teranishi, T. [Department of Physics, Kyushu University, 6-10-1 Hakozaki, Fukuoka 812-8581 (Japan); Kwon, Y. K. [Institute for Basic Science, 70, Yuseong-daero 1689-gil, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-811 (Korea, Republic of); Binh, D. N. [30 MeV Cyclotron Center, Tran Hung Dao Hospital, Hoan Kiem District, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Khiem, L. H.; Duy, N. G. [Institute of Physics, Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology, 18 Hong Quoc Viet, Nghia do, Hanoi (Viet Nam)

    2014-05-02

    Several alpha-induced astrophysical reactions have been studied at CRIB (CNS Radioactive Ion Beam separator), which is a low-energy RI beam separator at Center for Nuclear Study (CNS) of the University of Tokyo. One of the methods to study them is the α resonant scattering using the thick-target method in inverse kinematics. Among the recent studies at CRIB, the measurement of {sup 7}Be+α resonant scattering is discussed. Based on the result of the experiment, we evaluated the contributions of high-lying resonances for the {sup 7}Be(α,γ) reaction, and proposed a new cluster band in {sup 11}C.

  1. Alpha resonant scattering for astrophysical reaction studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, H.; Kahl, D.; Nakao, T.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Kubano, S.; Hashimoto, T.; Hayakawa, S.; Kawabata, T.; Iwasa, N.; Teranishi, T.; Kwon, Y. K.; Binh, D. N.; Khiem, L. H.; Duy, N. G.

    2014-01-01

    Several alpha-induced astrophysical reactions have been studied at CRIB (CNS Radioactive Ion Beam separator), which is a low-energy RI beam separator at Center for Nuclear Study (CNS) of the University of Tokyo. One of the methods to study them is the α resonant scattering using the thick-target method in inverse kinematics. Among the recent studies at CRIB, the measurement of 7 Be+α resonant scattering is discussed. Based on the result of the experiment, we evaluated the contributions of high-lying resonances for the 7 Be(α,γ) reaction, and proposed a new cluster band in 11 C

  2. Hydrogen evolution reaction catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subbaraman, Ram; Stamenkovic, Vojislav; Markovic, Nenad; Tripkovic, Dusan

    2016-02-09

    Systems and methods for a hydrogen evolution reaction catalyst are provided. Electrode material includes a plurality of clusters. The electrode exhibits bifunctionality with respect to the hydrogen evolution reaction. The electrode with clusters exhibits improved performance with respect to the intrinsic material of the electrode absent the clusters.

  3. Precompound Reactions: Basic Concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weidenmueller, H. A.

    2008-01-01

    Because of the non-zero nuclear equilibration time, the compound-nucleus scattering model fails when the incident energy exceeds 10 or 20 MeV, and precompound reactions become important. Basic ideas used in the quantum-statistical approaches to these reactions are described

  4. Fluorogenic organocatalytic reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raeisolsadati Oskouei, M.

    2017-01-01

    In this thesis, we introduce fluorescence spectroscopy as a new tool to gain insight into the interactions between the substrates and catalyst during organocatalytic reactions. The ultimate goal is to resolve the kinetics of the binding and reaction steps and obtain detailed understanding of the

  5. Applications of Reaction Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Kevin

    2007-01-01

    This article presents an assignment in which students are to research and report on a chemical reaction whose increased or decreased rate is of practical importance. Specifically, students are asked to represent the reaction they have chosen with an acceptable chemical equation, identify a factor that influences its rate and explain how and why it…

  6. Chemical burn or reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemicals that touch skin can lead to a reaction on the skin, throughout the body, or both. ... leave the person alone and watch carefully for reactions affecting the entire body. Note: If a chemical gets into the eyes, the eyes should be ...

  7. Degradations and Rearrangement Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianbo

    This section deals with recent reports concerning degradation and rearrangement reactions of free sugars as well as some glycosides. The transformations are classified in chemical and enzymatic ways. In addition, the Maillard reaction will be discussed as an example of degradation and rearrangement transformation and its application in current research in the fields of chemistry and biology.

  8. EXFOR Manual. Center-to-Center Exchange Format. Version 89-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLane, V.

    1989-09-01

    EXFOR is the agreed exchange format for the transmission of nuclear reaction data between national and international nuclear data centers for the benefit of nuclear data users in all countries. EXFOR is a database with several million data records containing the world's experimental nuclear reaction data induced by neutrons, photons or charged particles. Data retrievals can be obtained from the IAEA Nuclear Data Section (NDS) or from one of the co-operating data centers whose names and addresses can be found inside the manual. Their contributions and co-operative efforts are gratefully acknowledged. (author). Refs

  9. From isolated light-harvesting complexes to the thylakoid membrane: a single-molecule perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, J. Michael; Malý, Pavel; Krüger, Tjaart P. J.; Grondelle, Rienk van

    2018-01-01

    The conversion of solar radiation to chemical energy in plants and green algae takes place in the thylakoid membrane. This amphiphilic environment hosts a complex arrangement of light-harvesting pigment-protein complexes that absorb light and transfer the excitation energy to photochemically active reaction centers. This efficient light-harvesting capacity is moreover tightly regulated by a photoprotective mechanism called non-photochemical quenching to avoid the stress-induced destruction of the catalytic reaction center. In this review we provide an overview of single-molecule fluorescence measurements on plant light-harvesting complexes (LHCs) of varying sizes with the aim of bridging the gap between the smallest isolated complexes, which have been well-characterized, and the native photosystem. The smallest complexes contain only a small number (10-20) of interacting chlorophylls, while the native photosystem contains dozens of protein subunits and many hundreds of connected pigments. We discuss the functional significance of conformational dynamics, the lipid environment, and the structural arrangement of this fascinating nano-machinery. The described experimental results can be utilized to build mathematical-physical models in a bottom-up approach, which can then be tested on larger in vivo systems. The results also clearly showcase the general property of biological systems to utilize the same system properties for different purposes. In this case it is the regulated conformational flexibility that allows LHCs to switch between efficient light-harvesting and a photoprotective function.

  10. Mutation and premating isolation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodruff, R. C.; Thompson, J. N. Jr

    2002-01-01

    While premating isolation might be traceable to different genetic mechanisms in different species, evidence supports the idea that as few as one or two genes may often be sufficient to initiate isolation. Thus, new mutation can theoretically play a key role in the process. But it has long been thought that a new isolation mutation would fail, because there would be no other individuals for the isolation-mutation-carrier to mate with. We now realize that premeiotic mutations are very common and will yield a cluster of progeny carrying the same new mutant allele. In this paper, we discuss the evidence for genetically simple premating isolation barriers and the role that clusters of an isolation mutation may play in initiating allopatric, and even sympatric, species divisions.

  11. Social Isolation, Depression, and Psychological Distress Among Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Harry Owen; Taylor, Robert Joseph; Nguyen, Ann W; Chatters, Linda

    2018-02-01

    To investigate the impact of objective and subjective social isolation from extended family members and friends on depressive symptoms and psychological distress among a national sample of older adults. Data for older adults (55 years and above) from the National Survey of American Life ( N = 1,439) were used to assess level of objective social isolation and subjective social isolation and to test regression models examining their impact on depressive symptoms (Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression [CES-D] Scale) and psychological distress (Kessler 6 [K6] Scale). The majority of respondents were not socially isolated from family or friends; 5% were objectively isolated from family and friends, and less than 1% were subjectively isolated from family and friends. Regression analyses using both social isolation measures indicated that objective social isolation was unrelated to depressive symptoms and psychological distress. However, subjective social isolation from both family and friends and from friends only was associated with more depressive symptoms, and subjective social isolation from friends only was associated with higher levels of psychological distress. Assessments of social isolation among older populations should account for both subjective and objective dimensions, as well as both family and friend social networks. Social isolation from friends is an important, but understudied, issue that has significant consequences for older adult mental health.

  12. Physics in isolation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1986-01-01

    In late May, about 330 physicists made their way up to isolated and beautiful Lake Louise high in the Canadian Rockies about 100 miles west of Calgary in a second effort to increase interactions between particle and nuclear physicists. The conference series aims to foster exciting and diverse physics by bringing the different physicists together somewhere which is so isolated that they must interact with each other. The formula worked very well and isolated Lake Louise was a huge success

  13. Physics in isolation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1986-09-15

    In late May, about 330 physicists made their way up to isolated and beautiful Lake Louise high in the Canadian Rockies about 100 miles west of Calgary in a second effort to increase interactions between particle and nuclear physicists. The conference series aims to foster exciting and diverse physics by bringing the different physicists together somewhere which is so isolated that they must interact with each other. The formula worked very well and isolated Lake Louise was a huge success.

  14. Heavy ion transfer reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weisser, D.C.

    1977-06-01

    To complement discussions on the role of γ rays in heavy ion induced reactions, the author discusses the role played by particle detection. Transfer reactions are part of this subject and are among those in which one infers the properties of the residual nucleus in a reaction by observing the emerging light nucleus. Inelastic scattering ought not be excluded from this subject, although no particles are transferred, because of the role it plays in multistep reactions and in fixing O.M. parameters describing the entrance channel of the reaction. Heavy ion transfer reaction studies have been under study for some years and yet this research is still in its infancy. The experimental techniques are difficult and the demands on theory rigorous. One of the main products of heavy ion research has been the thrust to re-examine the assumptions of reaction theory and now include many effects neglected for light ion analysis. This research has spurred the addition of multistep processes to simple direct processes and coupled channel calculations. (J.R.)

  15. Enhancing chemical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrey, John R.

    1978-01-01

    Methods of enhancing selected chemical reactions. The population of a selected high vibrational energy state of a reactant molecule is increased substantially above its population at thermal equilibrium by directing onto the molecule a beam of radiant energy from a laser having a combination of frequency and intensity selected to pump the selected energy state, and the reaction is carried out with the temperature, pressure, and concentrations of reactants maintained at a combination of values selected to optimize the reaction in preference to thermal degradation by transforming the absorbed energy into translational motion. The reaction temperature is selected to optimize the reaction. Typically a laser and a frequency doubler emit radiant energy at frequencies of .nu. and 2.nu. into an optical dye within an optical cavity capable of being tuned to a wanted frequency .delta. or a parametric oscillator comprising a non-centrosymmetric crystal having two indices of refraction, to emit radiant energy at the frequencies of .nu., 2.nu., and .delta. (and, with a parametric oscillator, also at 2.nu.-.delta.). Each unwanted frequency is filtered out, and each desired frequency is focused to the desired radiation flux within a reaction chamber and is reflected repeatedly through the chamber while reactants are fed into the chamber and reaction products are removed therefrom.

  16. Isolation of nucleoli from Ehrlich ascites tumor cells and dynamics of nascent RNA within isolated nucleoli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiry, Marc; Ploton, Dominique

    2008-01-01

    Here we describe a new, rapid method for isolating nucleoli from Ehrlich tumor cells that preserves their morphological integrity and high transcriptional activity. Until now, methods for isolation of nucleoli were generally assumed to empty one of their three main compartments, the fibrillar center, of its contents. This new method consists of sonicating cells in an isotonic medium containing MgSO(4), spermidine, and spermine, followed by separation of nucleoli through a Percoll density gradient. Using the nonisotopic approach of labelling with BrUTP, we have further investigated the dynamics of nascent ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) within morphologically intact isolated nucleoli at the electron microscope level. We show that ribosomal transcripts are elongated in the cortex of the fibrillar center and then enter the surrounding dense fibrillar component.

  17. Studies in the reaction dynamics of beam-gas chemiluminescent reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prisant, M.G.

    1984-01-01

    This thesis develops techniques for the analysis and interpretation of data obtained from beam-gas chemiluminescence experiments. These techniques are applied to experimental studies of atom transfer reactions of the type A + BC → AB + C. A procedure is developed for determining the product rotational alignment in the center-of-mass frame from polarization measurements of chemiluminescent atom-diatom exchange reactions under beam-gas conditions. Knowledge of a vector property of a reaction, such as product alignment, provides information on the disposition of angular momentum by a chemical reaction. Fluorescence polarization and hence product alignment are measured for two prototype reactions. The reaction of metastable calcium atoms with hydrogen-chloride gas yields highly aligned calcium-chloride product which exhibits little variation of alignment with vibrational state. The reaction of ground-state calcium with fluorine gas yields moderately aligned product which shows strong variation of alignment with vibration. A multi-surface direct-interaction model is developed to interpret product alignment and population data. The predictions of this model for the reaction of calcium with fluorine show reasonable agreement with experiment

  18. The Reaction Wheel Pendulum

    CERN Document Server

    Block, Daniel J; Spong, Mark W

    2007-01-01

    This monograph describes the Reaction Wheel Pendulum, the newest inverted-pendulum-like device for control education and research. We discuss the history and background of the reaction wheel pendulum and other similar experimental devices. We develop mathematical models of the reaction wheel pendulum in depth, including linear and nonlinear models, and models of the sensors and actuators that are used for feedback control. We treat various aspects of the control problem, from linear control of themotor, to stabilization of the pendulum about an equilibrium configuration using linear control, t

  19. Electron transfer reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Cannon, R D

    2013-01-01

    Electron Transfer Reactions deals with the mechanisms of electron transfer reactions between metal ions in solution, as well as the electron exchange between atoms or molecules in either the gaseous or solid state. The book is divided into three parts. Part 1 covers the electron transfer between atoms and molecules in the gas state. Part 2 tackles the reaction paths of oxidation states and binuclear intermediates, as well as the mechanisms of electron transfer. Part 3 discusses the theories and models of the electron transfer process; theories and experiments involving bridged electron transfe

  20. Firefighter Nozzle Reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chin, Selena K.; Sunderland, Peter B.; Jomaas, Grunde

    2017-01-01

    to anchor forces, the hose becomes straight. The nozzle reaction is found to equal the jet momentum flow rate, and it does not change when an elbow connects the hose to the nozzle. A forward force must be exerted by a firefighter or another anchor that matches the forward force that the jet would exert...... on a perpendicular wall. Three reaction expressions are derived, allowing it to be determined in terms of hose diameter, jet diameter, flow rate, and static pressure upstream of the nozzle. The nozzle reaction predictions used by the fire service are 56% to 90% of those obtained here for typical firefighting hand...

  1. Tornadoes: A Center Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christman-Rothlein, Liz; Meinbach, Anita M.

    1981-01-01

    Information is given on how to put together a learning center. Discusses information and activity packets for a complete learning center on tornadoes including objectives, directions, materials, photographs of physical arrangements, and posttest. (DC)

  2. Tehran Nuclear Research Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taherzadeh, M.

    1977-01-01

    The Tehran Nuclear Research Center was formerly managed by the University of Tehran. This Center, after its transformation to the AEOI, has now become a focal point for basic research in the area of Nuclear Energy in Iran

  3. Day Care Centers

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This database contains locations of day care centers for 50 states and Washington D.C. and Puerto Rico. The dataset only includes center based day care locations...

  4. Center for Functional Nanomaterials

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN) explores the unique properties of materials and processes at the nanoscale. The CFN is a user-oriented research center...

  5. Hydrologic Engineering Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Hydrologic Engineering Center (HEC), an organization within the Institute for Water Resources, is the designated Center of Expertise for the U.S. Army Corps of...

  6. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... OnSafety Blog Safety Education Centers Neighborhood Safety Network Community Outreach Resource Center Toy Recall Statistics CO Poster ... Sitemap RSS E-mail Inside CPSC Accessibility Privacy Policy Budget, Performances & Finance Open Government Freedom of Information ( ...

  7. MARYLAND ROBOTICS CENTER

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Maryland Robotics Center is an interdisciplinary research center housed in the Institute for Systems Research (link is external)within the A. James Clark School...

  8. Find a Health Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — HRSA Health Centers care for you, even if you have no health insurance – you pay what you can afford based on your income. Health centers provide services that...

  9. NIH Clinical Centers

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The NIH Clinical Center consists of two main facilities: The Mark O. Hatfield Clinical Research Center, which opened in 2005, houses inpatient units, day hospitals,...

  10. Genetic Science Learning Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genetic Science Learning Center Making science and health easy for everyone to understand Home News Our Team What We Do ... Collaboration Conferences Current Projects Publications Contact The Genetic Science Learning Center at The University of Utah is a ...

  11. Poison Control Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 1222 immediately. Name State American Association of Poison Control Centers Address AAPCC Central Office NOT A POISON ... not for emergency use. Arkansas ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center Address 1717 S. Philo Road, Suite 36 Urbana, ...

  12. BNL325 - Nuclear reaction data display program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunford, C.L.

    1994-01-01

    A computer code for the graphical display of nuclear reaction data is described. The code, which works on a computer with VMS operating system, can overlay experimental data from an EXFOR/CSISRS table-computation format with evaluated data from ENDF formatted data libraries. Originally, this code has been used at the U.S. National Nuclear Data Center to produce the well-known neutron cross-section atlas published as report BNL-325. (author). 3 tabs

  13. BNL325 - Nuclear reaction data display program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunford, C L

    1994-11-27

    A computer code for the graphical display of nuclear reaction data is described. The code, which works on a computer with VMS operating system, can overlay experimental data from an EXFOR/CSISRS table-computation format with evaluated data from ENDF formatted data libraries. Originally, this code has been used at the U.S. National Nuclear Data Center to produce the well-known neutron cross-section atlas published as report BNL-325. (author). 3 tabs.

  14. Reaction paths based on mean first-passage times

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Sanghyun; Sener, Melih K.; Lu Deyu; Schulten, Klaus

    2003-01-01

    Finding representative reaction pathways is important for understanding the mechanism of molecular processes. We propose a new approach for constructing reaction paths based on mean first-passage times. This approach incorporates information about all possible reaction events as well as the effect of temperature. As an application of this method, we study representative pathways of excitation migration in a photosynthetic light-harvesting complex, photosystem I. The paths thus computed provide a complete, yet distilled, representation of the kinetic flow of excitation toward the reaction center, thereby succinctly characterizing the function of the system

  15. Nucleon induced reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gmuca, S.; Antalik, R.; Kristiak, J.

    1988-01-01

    The collection contains full texts of 37 contributions; all fall within the INIS Subject Scope. The topics treated include some unsolved problems of nuclear reactions and relevant problems of nuclear structure at low and intermediate energies. (Z.S.)

  16. Reactor for exothermic reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, L.A. Jr.; Hearn, D.; Jones, E.M. Jr.

    1993-03-02

    A liquid phase process is described for oligomerization of C[sub 4] and C[sub 5] isoolefins or the etherification thereof with C[sub 1] to C[sub 6] alcohols wherein the reactants are contacted in a reactor with a fixed bed acid cation exchange resin catalyst at an LHSV of 5 to 20, pressure of 0 to 400 psig and temperature of 120 to 300 F. Wherein the improvement is the operation of the reactor at a pressure to maintain the reaction mixture at its boiling point whereby at least a portion but less than all of the reaction mixture is vaporized. By operating at the boiling point and allowing a portion of the reaction mixture to vaporize, the exothermic heat of reaction is dissipated by the formation of more boil up and the temperature in the reactor is controlled.

  17. Statistical nuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilaire, S.

    2001-01-01

    A review of the statistical model of nuclear reactions is presented. The main relations are described, together with the ingredients necessary to perform practical calculations. In addition, a substantial overview of the width fluctuation correction factor is given. (author)

  18. Photon induced reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mecking, B.A.

    1982-04-01

    Various aspects of medium energy nuclear reactions induced by real photons are reviewed. Special emphasis is put on high accuracy experiments that will become possible with the next generation of electron accelerators. (orig.)

  19. Transfusion reaction - hemolytic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Names Blood transfusion reaction Images Surface proteins causing rejection References Choate JD, Maitta RW, Tormey CA, Wu ... PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 177. Hall JE. Blood types; transfusion; tissue and organ transplantation. In: Hall JE, ...

  20. Sequential charged particle reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hori, Jun-ichi; Ochiai, Kentaro; Sato, Satoshi; Yamauchi, Michinori; Nishitani, Takeo

    2004-01-01

    The effective cross sections for producing the sequential reaction products in F82H, pure vanadium and LiF with respect to the 14.9-MeV neutron were obtained and compared with the estimation ones. Since the sequential reactions depend on the secondary charged particles behavior, the effective cross sections are corresponding to the target nuclei and the material composition. The effective cross sections were also estimated by using the EAF-libraries and compared with the experimental ones. There were large discrepancies between estimated and experimental values. Additionally, we showed the contribution of the sequential reaction on the induced activity and dose rate in the boundary region with water. From the present study, it has been clarified that the sequential reactions are of great importance to evaluate the dose rates around the surface of cooling pipe and the activated corrosion products. (author)

  1. Reaction Qualifications Revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lippert-Rasmussen, Kasper

    2009-01-01

    to a person's effectiveness by causing a favourable reaction in customers, co-workers etc. (for short: recipients) - are involved, this assumption is false. Building on work by Wertheimer, Mason, and Miller, this paper proposes an account of the reaction qualifications that count, from the point of view...... preferences, recipients should not respond to the applicant actually hired on the basis of their (the recipients') racial preferences. My account decomposes the meritocratic ideal into four separate norms, one of which applies to recipients rather than to selectors. Finally, it defends the view that reaction...... qualifications based on antimeritocratic reactions, while not unproblematic, are not entirely irrelevant from the point of view of merit. Notably, selectors need not discount them when no one - including the targets of the objectionable preferences - is unfairly disadvantaged. Because not all problematic...

  2. Cutaneous adverse drug reactions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    CADRs).1 ... patient's management is thought to be responsible for the reaction. Some clinical ... In SJS/TEN hypotension, diarrhoea, hypothermia and confusion suggest ... and a pain management team, centred around a good core of experienced ...

  3. Reaction Qualifications Revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lippert-Rasmussen, Kasper

    2009-01-01

      When, in a competitive sphere, people are selected on the basis of qualifications only, their chances of acquiring positions of advantage may seem to depend entirely upon their abilities, not discriminatory bias. However, if reaction qualifications - i.e. characteristics which contribute...... to a person's effectiveness by causing a favourable reaction in customers, co-workers etc. (for short: recipients) - are involved, this assumption is false. Building on work by Wertheimer, Mason, and Miller, this paper proposes an account of the reaction qualifications that count, from the point of view...... of merit. Specifically, it preserves symmetry between negative evaluations of antimeritocratic bases of selection and negative evaluations of qualifications rooted in comparable antimeritocratic reactions. So if employers should not select among applicants on the basis of their (the employers') racial...

  4. Firefighter Nozzle Reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chin, Selena K.; Sunderland, Peter B.; Jomaas, Grunde

    2017-01-01

    Nozzle reaction and hose tension are analyzed using conservation of fluid momentum and assuming steady, inviscid flow and a flexible hose in frictionless contact with the ground. An expression that is independent of the bend angle is derived for the hose tension. If this tension is exceeded owing...... to anchor forces, the hose becomes straight. The nozzle reaction is found to equal the jet momentum flow rate, and it does not change when an elbow connects the hose to the nozzle. A forward force must be exerted by a firefighter or another anchor that matches the forward force that the jet would exert...... on a perpendicular wall. Three reaction expressions are derived, allowing it to be determined in terms of hose diameter, jet diameter, flow rate, and static pressure upstream of the nozzle. The nozzle reaction predictions used by the fire service are 56% to 90% of those obtained here for typical firefighting hand...

  5. Isolated optic nerve pseudotumour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patankar, T.; Prasad, S.; Krishnan, A.; Laxminarayan, R.

    2000-01-01

    Isolated optic nerve involvement by the idiopathic inflammatory process is a rare finding and very few reports are available. Here a case of an isolated optic nerve inflammatory pseudotumour presenting with gradually progressive unilateral loss of vision is described. It showed dramatic response to a trial of steroids and its differential diagnoses are discussed. Copyright (1999) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  6. Data Center Tasking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temares, M. Lewis; Lutheran, Joseph A.

    Operations tasking for data center management is discussed. The original and revised organizational structures of the data center at the University of Miami are also described. The organizational strategy addresses the functions that should be performed by the data center, anticipates the specialized skills required, and addresses personnel…

  7. Center of buoyancy definition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandberg, V.

    1988-12-01

    The center of buoyancy of an arbitrary shaped body is defined in analogy to the center of gravity. The definitions of the buoyant force and center of buoyancy in terms of integrals over the area of the body are converted to volume integrals and shown to have simple intuitive interpretations

  8. Wound care centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pressure ulcer - wound care center; Decubitus ulcer - wound care center; Diabetic ulcer - wound care center; Surgical wound - wound ... Common types of non-healing wounds include: Pressure sores Surgical ... flow, or swollen legs Certain wounds may not heal well due to: ...

  9. Oxygen evolution reaction catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haber, Joel A.; Jin, Jian; Xiang, Chengxiang; Gregoire, John M.; Jones, Ryan J.; Guevarra, Dan W.; Shinde, Aniketa A.

    2016-09-06

    An Oxygen Evolution Reaction (OER) catalyst includes a metal oxide that includes oxygen, cerium, and one or more second metals. In some instances, the cerium is 10 to 80 molar % of the metals in the metal oxide and/or the catalyst includes two or more second metals. The OER catalyst can be included in or on an electrode. The electrode can be arranged in an oxygen evolution system such that the Oxygen Evolution Reaction occurs at the electrode.

  10. Spallation reactions: calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertini, H.W.

    1975-01-01

    Current methods for calculating spallation reactions over various energy ranges are described and evaluated. Recent semiempirical fits to existing data will probably yield the most accurate predictions for these reactions in general. However, if the products in question have binding energies appreciably different from their isotropic neighbors and if the cross section is approximately 30 mb or larger, then the intranuclear-cascade-evaporation approach is probably better suited. (6 tables, 12 figures, 34 references) (U.S.)

  11. Space Flight Operations Center local area network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Ross V.

    1988-01-01

    The existing Mission Control and Computer Center at JPL will be replaced by the Space Flight Operations Center (SFOC). One part of the SFOC is the LAN-based distribution system. The purpose of the LAN is to distribute the processed data among the various elements of the SFOC. The SFOC LAN will provide a robust subsystem that will support the Magellan launch configuration and future project adaptation. Its capabilities include (1) a proven cable medium as the backbone for the entire network; (2) hardware components that are reliable, varied, and follow OSI standards; (3) accurate and detailed documentation for fault isolation and future expansion; and (4) proven monitoring and maintenance tools.

  12. Enantio- and Stereoselective Construction of Atisane Scaffold via Organocatalytic Intramolecular Michael Reaction and Diels-Alder Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekita, Hiroko; Adachi, Kyohei; Kobayashi, Ippei; Sato, Yusuke; Nakada, Masahisa

    2017-05-05

    An enantio- and stereoselective construction of the atisane scaffold via organocatalytic intramolecular Michael reaction and Diels-Alder reaction is described. The organocatalytic intramolecular Michael reaction has been found to stereoselectively generate a trans-stereodiad comprising an all-carbon quaternary and a tertiary stereogenic centers. Use of the chiral secondary amine bearing thiourea with benzoic acid as additive is the key to obtaining the desired product with excellent ee in synthetically acceptable yield. The prepared chiral building block has been successfully converted to the compound including the atisane scaffold via the highly stereoselective intramolecular Diels-Alder reaction.

  13. Isolation of Ganjam virus from ticks collected off domestic animals around Pune, Maharashtra, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, M V; Geevarghese, G; Joshi, G D; Ghodke, Y S; Mourya, D T; Mishra, A C

    2005-03-01

    Studies on viruses of zoonotic importance in certain villages around Pune were undertaken between December 2000 and January 2002. A total of 1,138 adult ticks belonging to six different species were collected off domestic animals and processed for virus isolation. Six virus isolates were obtained. All six isolates were identified as Ganjam virus by Quick Complement Fixation test and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction using RNA nucleocapsid gene amplification. Five isolates were from the pools of adult Hemaphysalis intermedia ticks, and one isolate was from a pool of adult Rhipecephalus hemaphysaloides. This is the first report of isolation of Ganjam virus from Maharashtra state of India.

  14. MOX Fabrication Isolation Considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eric L. Shaber; Bradley J Schrader

    2005-08-01

    This document provides a technical position on the preferred level of isolation to fabricate demonstration quantities of mixed oxide transmutation fuels. The Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative should design and construct automated glovebox fabrication lines for this purpose. This level of isolation adequately protects the health and safety of workers and the general public for all mixed oxide (and other transmutation fuel) manufacturing efforts while retaining flexibility, allowing parallel development and setup, and minimizing capital expense. The basis regulations, issues, and advantages/disadvantages of five potential forms of isolation are summarized here as justification for selection of the preferred technical position.

  15. Bibliographic index to photonuclear reaction data (1955--1992)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asami, Tetsuo [Data Engineering, Inc., Yokohama (Japan); Nakagawa, Tsuneo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Dept. of Reactor Engineering

    1993-10-01

    Japanese Nuclear Data Committee (JNDC) has a plan to compile the evaluated data library for photon-induced nuclear reaction cross sections, and the work on the data evaluation is in progress at the present. In the evaluations for these data a bibliographic index for neutron nuclear data is required. As the bibliographic index to photonuclear reactions, several excellent compilations have been done at some research institutes in the world, and have contributed to various basic and applied researches on the photonuclear reactions. For example, there are the abstract sheets published by US National Bureau of Standards and the data index published regularly in Russia. On the other hand, the four-center network on nuclear data (US National Nuclear Data Center at Brookhaven, Russian Nuclear Data Center at Obninsk, NEA Data Bank at Paris and IAEA Nuclear Data Section at Vienna) compiles and exchanges the numerical data on photonuclear reactions as well as on neutron-induced ones, in the EXFOR format. Those numerical data are available for users. There is, however, no bibliographic index to photonuclear reactions, available for general users. Therefore, the present work to make a photonuclear reaction data index has been done urgently to contribute to the above-mentioned data evaluation. Although these data might be still incomplete and have some defects, we have decided to serve this as the first edition of our photonuclear reaction index.

  16. National Nuclear Data Center status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    This paper is the status report of the US National Nuclear Data Center, Brookhaven. It describes the new NDS approach to customer services, which is based on users initiating wish lists on topics of interest with the possibility to receive reports in hardcopy or electronically forms. After completion within the next two years of the multi platform software for management and data retrievals from shared databases, users will have the opportunity to install directly their own local nuclear data center for desktop applications. The paper describes the computer facilities, the nuclear reaction data structure, the database migration and the customer services. (a.n.)

  17. Global Controllability of Chemical Reactions

    OpenAIRE

    Drexler, Dániel András; Tóth, János

    2015-01-01

    Controllability of chemical reactions is an important problem in chemical engineering science. In control theory, analysis of the controllability of linear systems is well-founded, however the dynamics of chemical reactions is usually nonlinear. Global controllability properties of chemical reactions are analyzed here based on the Lie-algebra of the vector fields associated to elementary reactions. A chemical reaction is controllable almost everywhere if all the reaction rate coefficients can...

  18. Introduction to chemical reaction engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yeong Geol

    1990-10-01

    This deals with chemical reaction engineering with thirteen chapters. The contents of this book are introduction on reaction engineering, chemical kinetics, thermodynamics and chemical reaction, abnormal reactor, non-isothermal reactor, nonideal reactor, catalysis in nonuniform system, diffusion and reaction in porosity catalyst, design catalyst heterogeneous reactor in solid bed, a high molecule polymerization, bio reaction engineering, reaction engineering in material process, control multi-variable reactor process using digital computer.

  19. Chemical kinetics of gas reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Kondrat'Ev, V N

    2013-01-01

    Chemical Kinetics of Gas Reactions explores the advances in gas kinetics and thermal, photochemical, electrical discharge, and radiation chemical reactions. This book is composed of 10 chapters, and begins with the presentation of general kinetic rules for simple and complex chemical reactions. The next chapters deal with the experimental methods for evaluating chemical reaction mechanisms and some theories of elementary chemical processes. These topics are followed by discussions on certain class of chemical reactions, including unimolecular, bimolecular, and termolecular reactions. The rema

  20. Photochemical reactions in dehydrated photosynthetic organisms, leaves, chloroplasts and photosystem II particles: reversible reduction of pheophytin and chlorophyll and oxidation of {beta}-carotene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shuvalov, Vladimir A.; Heber, Ulrich

    2003-11-01

    Photoreactions of dehydrated leaves, isolated broken chloroplasts and PSII membrane fragments of spinach (Spinacia oleracea) were studied at different air humidities and compared with photoreactions of dry fronds of a fern, Polypodium vulgare, and a dry lichen, Parmelia sulcata, which in contrast to spinach are insensitive to photoinactivation in the dry state. Even in very dry air, P700 in the reaction center of photosystem I of dry leaves was oxidized, and the primary quinone acceptor Q{sub A} in the reaction center of photosystem II was photoreduced by low light. These reactions were only very slowly reversed in the dark and saturated under low light intensity. Light-minus-dark difference absorption spectra of the dry leaves, isolated chloroplasts and PSII membrane fragments measured at higher light intensities revealed absorbance changes of {beta}-carotene at 500 nm (light-dependent bleaching) and 980 nm (light-dependent band formation) and bleaching of chlorophyll at 436 and 680 nm with appearance of bands at 450 and 800 nm. Decrease of chlorophyll fluorescence upon strong illumination indicated photoaccumulation of a quencher. All these changes were kinetically related and readily reversible. They are interpreted to show light-induced oxidation of {beta}-carotene (Car) and reduction of chlorophyll-680 (Chl-680) in the reaction center of photosystem II of the dried leaves, chloroplasts and photosystem II particles. The fluorescence quencher was suggested to be Chl-680{sup -} or Car{sup +} in close proximity to P680, the primary electron donor. Appreciable photoaccumulation of reduced pheophytin was only observed in dry leaves after Q{sub A} reduction had been lost during heat treatment of hydrated leaves prior to dehydration. The observations are interpreted to show light-dependent cyclic electron flow within the reaction center of photosystem II in which Chl-680 (or Pheo) is reduced by P680* and Car is oxidized by P680{sup +} with consequent recombination of

  1. Photochemical reactions in dehydrated photosynthetic organisms, leaves, chloroplasts and photosystem II particles: reversible reduction of pheophytin and chlorophyll and oxidation of β-carotene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shuvalov, Vladimir A.; Heber, Ulrich

    2003-01-01

    Photoreactions of dehydrated leaves, isolated broken chloroplasts and PSII membrane fragments of spinach (Spinacia oleracea) were studied at different air humidities and compared with photoreactions of dry fronds of a fern, Polypodium vulgare, and a dry lichen, Parmelia sulcata, which in contrast to spinach are insensitive to photoinactivation in the dry state. Even in very dry air, P700 in the reaction center of photosystem I of dry leaves was oxidized, and the primary quinone acceptor Q A in the reaction center of photosystem II was photoreduced by low light. These reactions were only very slowly reversed in the dark and saturated under low light intensity. Light-minus-dark difference absorption spectra of the dry leaves, isolated chloroplasts and PSII membrane fragments measured at higher light intensities revealed absorbance changes of β-carotene at 500 nm (light-dependent bleaching) and 980 nm (light-dependent band formation) and bleaching of chlorophyll at 436 and 680 nm with appearance of bands at 450 and 800 nm. Decrease of chlorophyll fluorescence upon strong illumination indicated photoaccumulation of a quencher. All these changes were kinetically related and readily reversible. They are interpreted to show light-induced oxidation of β-carotene (Car) and reduction of chlorophyll-680 (Chl-680) in the reaction center of photosystem II of the dried leaves, chloroplasts and photosystem II particles. The fluorescence quencher was suggested to be Chl-680 - or Car + in close proximity to P680, the primary electron donor. Appreciable photoaccumulation of reduced pheophytin was only observed in dry leaves after Q A reduction had been lost during heat treatment of hydrated leaves prior to dehydration. The observations are interpreted to show light-dependent cyclic electron flow within the reaction center of photosystem II in which Chl-680 (or Pheo) is reduced by P680* and Car is oxidized by P680 + with consequent recombination of Car + and Chl-680 - (or Pheo

  2. Inflammatory reaction in chondroblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamura, Sigeki; Sato, Keiji; Sugiura, Hideshi; Iwata, Hisashi

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the inflammatory reaction accompanying chondroblastoma and to define the value of the finding in clinical practice. We reviewed the clinical, radiographic, and magnetic resonance (MR) findings in six patients with histologically proven chondroblastoma. In all cases, MR imaging showered marrow and soft tissue edema. In four of six cases, periosteal reaction related to intra-osseous edema was more clearly demonstrated on MR imaging than on radiographs. Follow-up MR studies after surgery were available in three patients and all showed disappearance of inflammatory responses such as marrow and soft tissue edema, and reactive synovitis. We propose that these inflammatory reactions of chondroblastomas are inportant signs for detecting residual tumor in recurrences after surgery, as well as for making a precise diagnosis. The MR changes may also be valuable in demonstrating eradication of the tumor. (orig./MG)

  3. Inflammatory reaction in chondroblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamura, Sigeki [Dept. of Orthopedic Surgery, Nagoya Univ. School of Medicine (Japan); Sato, Keiji [Dept. of Orthopedic Surgery, Nagoya Univ. School of Medicine (Japan); Sugiura, Hideshi [Dept. of Orthopedic Surgery, Nagoya Univ. School of Medicine (Japan); Iwata, Hisashi [Dept. of Orthopedic Surgery, Nagoya Univ. School of Medicine (Japan)

    1996-05-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the inflammatory reaction accompanying chondroblastoma and to define the value of the finding in clinical practice. We reviewed the clinical, radiographic, and magnetic resonance (MR) findings in six patients with histologically proven chondroblastoma. In all cases, MR imaging showered marrow and soft tissue edema. In four of six cases, periosteal reaction related to intra-osseous edema was more clearly demonstrated on MR imaging than on radiographs. Follow-up MR studies after surgery were available in three patients and all showed disappearance of inflammatory responses such as marrow and soft tissue edema, and reactive synovitis. We propose that these inflammatory reactions of chondroblastomas are inportant signs for detecting residual tumor in recurrences after surgery, as well as for making a precise diagnosis. The MR changes may also be valuable in demonstrating eradication of the tumor. (orig./MG)

  4. Diagnosing ignition with DT reaction history

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, D. C.; Bradley, P. A.; Herrmann, H. W.; Cerjan, C. J.; Salmonson, J. D.; Spears, B. K.; Hatchet, S. P. II; Glebov, V. Yu.

    2008-01-01

    A full range DT reaction history of an ignition capsule, from 10 9 to 10 20 neutrons/ns, offers the opportunity to diagnose fuel conditions hundreds of picoseconds before and during burn. The burn history begins with a sharp rise when the first shock reaches the center of the capsule. The level of this jump reflects the combined shock strength and the adiabat of DT fuel. Changes to the four laser pulses driving the capsule implosion which are large enough to degrade the yield make measurable changes to the reaction history. Low mode asymmetries grow during convergence but change the reaction history during the final ∼100 ps. High mode asymmetry or turbulence mixing affects only the reaction history within ∼50 ps of peak burn rate. A capsule with a tritium fuel layer containing a small amount of deuterium (∼1%) creates a reaction history similar to the ignition capsule, but without the final ignition burn. A combination of gas Cerenkov detectors and the neutron temporal diagnostic could be capable of diagnosing the full history of ignition and tritium rich capsules.

  5. Isolation & characterization of Brucella melitensis isolated from patients suspected for human brucellosis in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barua, Anita; Kumar, Ashu; Thavaselvam, Duraipandian; Mangalgi, Smita; Prakash, Archana; Tiwari, Sapana; Arora, Sonia; Sathyaseelan, Kannusamy

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: Brucellosis is endemic in the southern part of India. A combination of biochemical, serological and molecular methods is required for identification and biotyping of Brucella. The present study describes the isolation and biochemical, molecular characterization of Brucella melitensis from patients suspected for human brucellosis. Methods: The blood samples were collected from febrile patients suspected to have brucellosis. A total of 18 isolates were obtained from 102 blood samples subjected to culture. The characterization of these 18 isolates was done by growth on Brucella specific medium, biochemical reactions, CO2 requirement, H2S production, agglutination with A and M mono-specific antiserum, dye sensitivity to basic fuchsin and thionin. Further, molecular characterization of the isolates was done by amplification of B. melitensis species specific IS711 repetitive DNA fragment and 16S (rRNA) sequence analysis. PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of omp2 locus and IS711 gene was also done for molecular characterization. Results: All 102 suspected samples were subjected to bacteria isolation and of these, 18 isolates could be recovered on blood culture. The biochemical, PCR and PCR-RFLP and 16s rRNA sequencing revealed that all isolates were of B. melitensis and matched exactly with reference strain B. melitensis 16M. Interpretation & conclusions: The present study showed an overall isolation rate of 17.64 per cent for B. melitensis. There is a need to establish facilities for isolation and characterization of Brucella species for effective clinical management of the disease among patients as well as surveillance and control of infection in domestic animals. Further studies are needed from different geographical areas of the country with different level of endemicity to plan and execute control strategies against human brucellosis. PMID:27488010

  6. isolated from Trichoderma harzianum

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAM

    2014-05-21

    May 21, 2014 ... Chitinase gene from Trichoderma harzianum was cloned and hetrologously over expressed in ... used by Trichoderma to inhibit the growth of other fungi. ..... actinomycete isolates from niche habitats in Manipur for antibiotic.

  7. Handbook on data centers

    CERN Document Server

    Khan, Samee Ullah

    2015-01-01

    This handbook offers a comprehensive review of the state-of-the-art research achievements in the field of data centers. Contributions from international, leading researchers and scholars offer topics in cloud computing, virtualization in data centers, energy efficient data centers, and next generation data center architecture.  It also comprises current research trends in emerging areas, such as data security, data protection management, and network resource management in data centers. Specific attention is devoted to industry needs associated with the challenges faced by data centers, such as various power, cooling, floor space, and associated environmental health and safety issues, while still working to support growth without disrupting quality of service. The contributions cut across various IT data technology domains as a single source to discuss the interdependencies that need to be supported to enable a virtualized, next-generation, energy efficient, economical, and environmentally friendly data cente...

  8. Call Center Capacity Planning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Thomas Bang

    in order to relate the results to the service levels used in call centers. Furthermore, the generic nature of the approximation is demonstrated by applying it to a system incorporating a dynamic priority scheme. In the last paper Optimization of overflow policies in call centers, overflows between agent......The main topics of the thesis are theoretical and applied queueing theory within a call center setting. Call centers have in recent years become the main means of communication between customers and companies, and between citizens and public institutions. The extensively computerized infrastructure...... in modern call centers allows for a high level of customization, but also induces complicated operational processes. The size of the industry together with the complex and labor intensive nature of large call centers motivates the research carried out to understand the underlying processes. The customizable...

  9. Knockout reactions: experimental aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cortina Gil, D. [Santiago de Compostela Univ. (Spain)

    2007-07-01

    The availability of radioactive beams has given rise to intense activity in the field of direct reactions. The removal of one(two)-nucleon (referred to as nucleon knockout in this text) from a fast exotic projectile has been extensively investigated. This lecture provides a general overview of the experimental results achieved using this technique. The sensitivity of the method to different experimental aspects is illustrated with a few examples. Special attention is given to the application of nucleon-knockout reactions as a general purpose spectroscopic tool. (author)

  10. Reactions to dietary tartrazine.

    OpenAIRE

    David, T J

    1987-01-01

    Double blind challenges with tartrazine and benzoic acid were performed in hospital in 24 children whose parents gave a definite history of a purely behavioural immediate adverse reaction to one of these substances. The patients, whose ages ranged from 1.6 to 12.4 years, were on a diet that avoided these items, and in all there was a clear history that any lapse of the diet caused an obvious adverse behavioural reaction within two hours. In no patient was any change in behaviour noted either ...

  11. Nuclear fission and reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1975-01-01

    The nuclear fission research programs are designed to elucidate basic features of the fission process. Specifically, (1) factors determining how nucleons of a fissioning nucleus are distributed between two fission fragments, (2) factors determining kinetic energy and excitation energies of fragments, and (3) factors controlling fission lifetimes. To these ends, fission studies are reported for several heavy elements and include investigations of spontaneous and neutron-induced fission, heavy ion reactions, and high energy proton reactions. The status of theoretical research is also discussed. (U.S.)

  12. Modeling of Reaction Calorimeter

    OpenAIRE

    Farzad, Reza

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to model the reaction calorimeter in order to calculate the heat of absorption which is the most important parameter in this work. Reaction calorimeter is an apparatus which is used in measuring the heat of absorption of CO2 as well as the total pressure in vapor phase based on vapor-liquid equilibrium state. Mixture of monoethanolamine (MEA) and water was used as a solvent to absorb the CO2.Project was divided in to three parts in order to make the programming...

  13. Introduction to nuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satchler, G.R.

    1980-01-01

    This introduction to nuclear reaction phenomena is aimed primarily but not exclusively at readers at the undergraduate student level. An overview of the subject is presented in the first two chapters entitled - Some background information and Introduction to nuclear reactions. The third chapter reviews scattering theory with emphasis on the underlying physical ideas and also provides schematic entrees to the more advanced topics. The physical models which have been developed to account for the various aspects of nuclear phenomena are described in more detail in chapter 4. References and exercises are appended to each chapter. (U.K.)

  14. Knockout reactions: experimental aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cortina Gil, D.

    2007-01-01

    The availability of radioactive beams has given rise to intense activity in the field of direct reactions. The removal of one(two)-nucleon (referred to as nucleon knockout in this text) from a fast exotic projectile has been extensively investigated. This lecture provides a general overview of the experimental results achieved using this technique. The sensitivity of the method to different experimental aspects is illustrated with a few examples. Special attention is given to the application of nucleon-knockout reactions as a general purpose spectroscopic tool. (author)

  15. The guiding center Lagrangian

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsson, J.

    1986-01-01

    Recursion relations determining the guiding center Langrangian Λ and the associated guiding center variables to all orders are derived. We consider some particularly simple forms of Λ obtainable by specific choices of certain arbitrary functions appearing as free parameters in the theory. It is, for example, possible to locally define the guiding center variables so that the expression for the corresponding Langrangian is unchanged by all higher order terms. (orig.)

  16. The Reaction Microscope: Imaging and Pulse Shaping Control in Photodynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vredenborg, A.; Lehmann, C.S.; Irimia, D.; Roeterdink, W.; Janssen, M.H.M.

    2011-01-01

    Herein, we review the current capabilities and potential of advanced single-particle imaging techniques to study photodynamics in isolated molecules. These reaction microscopes are able to measure the full three-dimensional energy and angular distribution of (correlated) particles such as electrons

  17. Epoxidation and oxidation reactions using 1,4-butanediol ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    and aryl halides to hydroxy compounds through a .... Epoxidation of olefins using 1,4-BDDMA-crosslinked polystyrene supported t- butyl hydroperoxide. Reaction. Isolated. Olefina timeb (h). Productc yield (%). Cinnamic acid. 39 ... aCinnamic acid; bcyclohexene; csubstrate to resin 1 : 2; solvent, dioxan, temperature, 70°C.

  18. Role of Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) in the detection of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Staphylococcus aureus is mainly acquired from hospital infections and demonstrated the ability of developing resistance to many antibiotics. Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) was used to identify antibiotic-resistant isolates. This study was conducted in Al-Mujtahed, Al-Mouwasat and the Children Hospitals in ...

  19. Formation of phosphonates and pyrophosphates in the reactions of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Bu-4-Me-C6H2O)2P(O)]2O (8) could be isolated, although the reaction mixture showed several other compounds in the phosphorus NMR. A possible pathway for the formation of phosphonate salts is proposed. The X-ray crystal structures of 4, ...

  20. Environmental Modeling Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Environmental Modeling Center provides the computational tools to perform geostatistical analysis, to model ground water and atmospheric releases for comparison...