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Sample records for rdx anfo petn

  1. Frictional properties of single crystals HMX, RDX and PETN explosives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Y.Q.; Huang, F.L.

    2010-01-01

    The frictional properties of single crystals of cyclotetramethylene tetranitramine (HMX), cyclotrimethylene trinitramine (RDX) and pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) secondary explosives are examined using a sensitive friction machine. The explosive crystals used for the measurements are at least 3.5 mm wide. The friction coefficients between crystals of the same explosive (i.e., HMX on HMX, etc.), crystals of different explosives (i.e., HMX on RDX, etc.), and each explosive and a well-polished gauge steel surface are determined. The frictional surfaces are also studied under an environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) to analyze surface microstructural changes under increasing loading forces. The friction coefficients vary considerably with increasing normal loading forces and are particularly sensitive to slider shapes, crystal roughness and the mechanical properties of both the slider and the sample. With increasing loading forces, most friction experiments show surface damage, consisting of grooves, debris, and nano-particles, on both the slider and sample. In some cases, a strong evidence of a localized molten state is found in the central region of the friction track. Possible mechanisms that affect the friction coefficient are discussed based on microscopic observations.

  2. ANFO truck burn trials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosen von, B.; Contestabile, E. [Natural Resources Canada, CANMET Canadian Explosives Research Laboratory, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2003-10-01

    This report describes the investigation of a tractor-trailer explosion. A truck loaded with 18,000 kg of commercial explosives, of which 13,000 kg was ammonium nitrate with fuel oil (ANFO), caught fire when it struck a rockcut near Walden, Ontario on August 5, 1998. The fire resulted in the detonation of the load. The Canadian Explosives Research Laboratory (CERL) conducted a test program to examine the suitability of existing explosive transportation regulations. Unconfined burns of ANFO were performed. The accident was recreated in two burn trials in an attempt to identify the mechanism that led from fire to detonation. Two full-scale tests were conducted using complete tractor-trailers, each in a jack-knifed position with most of the explosives placed on the ground in front of the trailer. ANFO was used in the first test to determine its response to thermal stimulus and the likelihood of detonation or explosion. The second test involved ANFO, a slurry and an emulsion. Thermocouples and video cameras were used to observe the burning characteristics of the explosives, the truck and its components. The explosives burned steadily for 80 minutes in each test. Many truck components, such as tires, spring brake chambers and the fuel tank ruptured violently due to the heat. Although no detonation occurred in the test trials, it was concluded that under favourable conditions, many truck components, might produce fragments with enough energy to initiate heat-sensitized explosives. It was suggested that a fragment impact caused the detonation at Walden. 4 refs., 7 tabs., 8 figs.

  3. Exploring the High-Pressure Behavior of PETN: A Combined Quantum Mechanical and Experimental Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-11-01

    calculations to explore the hypothesized compression-induced polymorphic phase transition [Gruzdkov 2004]. The initial crystal in these Figure 4...Scuseria, G.E., and Chabalowski, C.F. 2004: An ab Initio Study of Solid Nitromethane, HMX , RDX , and CL20: Successes and Failures of DFT. J. Phys. Chem... RDX , HMX , HNIW, and PETN Crystals. J. Phys. Chem. B, 103, 6783. Trotter, J., 1963: Bond lengths and angles in Pentaerythritol Tetranitrate. Acta

  4. Aging of Pentaerythritol Tetranitrate (PETN)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foltz, M F

    2009-04-22

    Pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) is a relatively sensitive explosive used in many electroexplosive devices as well as in medicine. Of primary interest to LLNL is its use in items such as exploding bridgewire (EBW) detonators and exploding bridge foil initiators (EFI). In these devices the crystalline powder is pressed into a granular, low-density compact that can be initiated by an exploding wire or foil. The long-term stability of this pressed compact is of interest to weapon stockpile lifetime prediction studies. Key points about potential aging mechanisms can be summarized as follows: (1) There are a number of factors that can contribute to PETN instability. These include particle size, polymorphic phase transitions, crystal structure, impurities, moisture, occlusions, chemical incompatibility and biological (microorganism) action. of these factors the most important for long-term aging of high surface area powders used in detonators appears to be that of particle size growth. (2) There is a great deal of literature on the thermal degradation kinetics of PETN, unfortunately much of it with little bearing on ambient temperature aging during long-term storage. PETN is very stable with respect to thermal decomposition. Low-temperature thermal studies have not revealed evidence of chemical degradation products in archived PETN. Data extrapolated to 30 C predicts a half-life of 12 million years. (3) Moisture seems to lower the activation energy for and accelerate the decomposition of PETN. (4) External drivers affecting stability include temperature, moisture, radiation fields, and stress, while internal drivers include residual solvents, and impurities. Temperature affects kinetic processes of crystal growth such as adsorption, desorption, and diffusion rates of molecules on the surface of PETN crystals. A low-level radiation field may induce unexpected changes in the chemical makeup of PETN and its homologue impurities. Stress at high pressure points caused by

  5. Reduced sensitivity RDX obtained from bachmann RDX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spyckerelle, Christian; Eck, Genevieve [EURENCO France, Sorgues Plant 1928 route d' Avignon, BP 311, 84706 Sorgues Cedex (France); Sjoeberg, Per; Amneus, Anna-Maria [EURENCO Sweden, SE-69186 Karlskoga (Sweden)

    2008-02-15

    In recent years much interest has been generated in a quality of reduced sensitivity RDX (RS-RDX), like I-RDX {sup registered} which, when incorporated in cast cure and even pressable plastic bonded explosives (PBX compositions), can confer reduced shock sensitivity as measured through gap test. At crystal level, lot of work has been done to try to determine which property or properties may explain the behaviour of the corresponding cast PBX composition. But up to now, and despite an international inter-laboratory comparison (Round Robin) of seven lots of RDX from five different manufacturers conducted from 2003 to 2005, even if some techniques lead to interesting results, there is no dedicated specification to apply to RS-RDX. This quality (I-RDX {sup registered}) has proved to retain its low sensitivity even after ageing, which does not seem to be the case for standard RDX produced by the Bachmann process (when re-crystallized under I-RDX conditions in order to obtain RS-RDX). It has been shown that the higher sensitivity of RDX produced by the Bachmann process, or the evolution of sensitivity after ageing of RS-RDX produced from Bachmann RDX may be linked to the presence of octogen (HMX) during the crystallization process. In order to check such hypothesis, low HMX content RDX produced by the Bachmann process has been prepared and evaluated in cast PBX composition (PBX N 109). Results of the characterization of such quality of RDX and its evaluation in cast PBX composition as well as ageing behaviour are presented and discussed; there are indications that removal of HMX from Bachmann RDX may lead to RS-RDX, which retains its RS character even after ageing. (Abstract Copyright [2008], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  6. ANFO bulk loading in coal mines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gajjar, A.

    1987-08-01

    With India's total coal production projected to increase from 152 to 237 million tons by 1990, net additional production from new mines must be more because of substantial depletion in existing mines. This article discusses the best possible application of explosive techniques in open-cast coal mines to economize production cost. The most energy-efficient and safest explosive is ANFO (ammonium nitrate, fuel oil); however, manual charging by INFO is not possible. Therefore, the solution is the application of bulk-loading systems of ANFO for giant mining operations. Cost of blasting per ton of coal production in India is in the range of Rs 25. Thus, the author suggests it will be the responsibility of mining engineers to see that the ANFO based bulk-loading system is implemented and the cost of production per ton reduced to Rs 19.50.

  7. Simulation of explosive welding with ANFO mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mousavi, A.A. Akbari; Burley, Stephen J.; Al-Hassani, S.T.S. [Department of Mechanical, Aerospace and Manufacturing Engineering, UMIST, PO Box 88, Manchester M60 1QD (United Kingdom); Byers Brown, W. [Mass Action Research Consultancy, Devonshire House, 14 Corbar Road, Buxton, SK17 6RQ (United Kingdom)

    2004-06-01

    The work described here arose from a study into explosive welding. As part of that study, the impact velocity of stainless steel and titanium plates to grazing detonation of ANFO/perlite, the velocity of detonation were measured. Computer simulation required a new model which copes with an equation of state of low explosives. (Abstract Copyright [2004], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  8. P-ANFO: new era in surface coal mining; P-ANFO: acik ocak komur isletmeciliginde yeni bir cag

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tek, A. [Atlas Ltd., Istanbul (Turkey)

    1999-07-01

    ANFO, an effective and inexpensive explosive, is widely used in rock blasting operations. However, for weak strata, ANFO often produces too much shock energy and leads to inefficiencies in the mining operation. Especially in Turkish surface coal mines where ANFO is used with the decking system, it is desirable to develop a low shock energy but a high heave energy ammonium nitrate based explosive. 3 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Performance calculations on the ANFO explosive RX-HD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souers, P.C.; Larson, D.B.; Tarver, C.M.

    1994-12-31

    This report presents the calculation methods utilized in asessing the detonation performance of the ammonium nitrate-fuel oil (ANFO) utilized in the non-proliferation experiment (NPE) underground explosion at te Nevada Test Site. The composition of the ANFO is discussed.

  10. PETN Coarsening - Predictions from Accelerated Aging Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maiti, Amitesh [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Gee, Richard H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2011-03-30

    Ensuring good ignition properties over long periods of time necessitates maintaining a good level of porosity in powders of initiator materials and preventing particle coarsening. To simulate porosity changes of such powder materials over long periods of time a common strategy is to perform accelerated aging experiments over shorter time spans at elevated temperatures. In this paper we examine historical accelerated-aging data on powders of Pentaerythritol Tetranitrate (PETN), an important energetic material, and make predictions for long-term aging under ambient conditions. Lastly, we develop an evaporation-condensation- based model to provide some mechanistic understanding of the coarsening process.

  11. Charging method of water hole with ANFO explosive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimizu, Susumu

    1988-02-28

    It has been investigated how to charge a water hole with an inexpensive explosive for blasting. An experiment was made using the combination of a plasticized resin hose and the ANFO charger as the method for making the most of the ANFO explosive aiming at charging a hole with the explosive at a low cost without damaging the hole wall. The experimental result indicates that any water hole with spring water can be charged with the explosive using the ANFO charger combined with the plasticized resin hose. The method is superior to conventional methods in cost and workability because the working atmosphere is not aggravated and the hole wall is not damaged without using an expensive vacuum collector. Charging a blasting hole 165 mm or less in diameter with the explosive will be investigated for commercialization in future. (4 figs)

  12. Density Distributions of Cyclotrimethylenetrinitramines (RDX)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, D M

    2002-01-01

    As part of the US Army Foreign Comparative Testing (FCT) program the density distributions of six samples of class 1 RDX were measured using the density gradient technique. This technique was used in an attempt to distinguish between RDX crystallized by a French manufacturer (designated insensitive or IRDX) from RDX manufactured at Holston Army Ammunition Plant (HAAP), the current source of RDX for Department of Defense (DoD). Two samples from different lots of French IRDX had an average density of 1.7958 ± 0.0008 g/cc. The theoretical density of a perfect RDX crystal is 1.806 g/cc. This yields 99.43% of the theoretical maximum density (TMD). For two HAAP RDX lots the average density was 1.786 ± 0.002 g/cc, only 98.89% TMD. Several other techniques were used for preliminary characterization of one lot of French IRDX and two lot of HAAP RDX. Light scattering, SEM and polarized optical microscopy (POM) showed that SNPE and Holston RDX had the appropriate particle size distribution for Class 1 RDX. High performance liquid chromatography showed quantities of HMX in HAAP RDX. French IRDX also showed a 1.1 C higher melting point compared to HAAP RDX in the differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) consistent with no melting point depression due to the HMX contaminant. A second part of the program involved characterization of Holston RDX recrystallized using the French process. After reprocessing the average density of the Holston RDX was increased to 1.7907 g/cc. Apparently HMX in RDX can act as a nucleating agent in the French RDX recrystallization process. The French IRDX contained no HMX, which is assumed to account for its higher density and narrower density distribution. Reprocessing of RDX from Holston improved the average density compared to the original Holston RDX, but the resulting HIRDX was not as dense as the original French IRDX. Recrystallized Holston IRDX crystals were much larger (3-500 (micro)m or more) then either the original class 1 HAAP RDX or French

  13. Pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) profiling in post-explosion residues to constitute evidence of crime-scene presence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brust, H.; van Asten, A.; Koeberg, M.; van der Heijden, A.; Kuijpers, C.J.; Schoenmakers, P.

    2013-01-01

    Pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) and its degradation products are analyzed to discriminate between residues originating from PETN explosions and residues obtained under other circumstances, such as natural degradation on textile, or after handling intact PETN. The degradation products observed in

  14. Recent developments in the field of ANFO blasting agents in India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatterjee, T.K. [Deepak Fertilisers and Petrochemicals Corp. Ltd., Pune (India)

    1995-08-01

    ANFO is known to be truly cost-effective and the safest blasting agent worldover, which has made its usage very extensive in countries like USA, Australia, Canada etc. Yet in India ANFO consumption is limited to hardly 10-13% of the total explosive market. An attempt has been made here for a techno-commercial analysis of the possible reasons for the neglect so far towards ANFO usage in India in spite of its high potential and the paper goes on to review the recent developments which can revolutionise the usage of ANFO systems in future.

  15. Verification of RDX Photolysis Mechanism

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Peyton, Gary

    1999-01-01

    ... such as formaldehyde and formic acid, as well as the inorganic ions nitrate and nitrite. This implies that UV photolysis might provide a satisfactory and economical treatment system for RDX in water...

  16. Photochemistry of the α-Al2O3-PETN Interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman V. Tsyshevsky

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Optical absorption measurements are combined with electronic structure calculations to explore photochemistry of an α-Al2O3-PETN interface formed by a nitroester (pentaerythritol tetranitrate, PETN, C5H8N4O12 and a wide band gap aluminum oxide (α-Al2O3 substrate. The first principles modeling is used to deconstruct and interpret the α-Al2O3-PETN absorption spectrum that has distinct peaks attributed to surface F0-centers and surface—PETN transitions. We predict the low energy α-Al2O3 F0-center—PETN transition, producing the excited triplet state, and α-Al2O3 F0-center—PETN charge transfer, generating the PETN anion radical. This implies that irradiation by commonly used lasers can easily initiate photodecomposition of both excited and charged PETN at the interface. The feasible mechanism of the photodecomposition is proposed.

  17. Separation and determination of PETN and TNT by HPTLC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaloosi, Marzieh; Nejad-Darzi, Seyed Karim Hassani; Ghoulipour, Vanik [Faculty of Chemistry, University of Tarbiat Moallem, Tehran (Iran)

    2009-02-15

    High-performance thin layer chromatography (HPTLC) has been used for the separation and quantification of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) and pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN). The compounds were separated on silica gel 60 F{sub 254} with a double development system of trichloroethylene-acetone 4:1 and petroleum ether-acetone 5.7:1. For obtaining chromatograms of these materials, UV detection was performed at 215 and 250 nm for PETN and TNT, respectively. The linear dynamic range was 0.835-83.50 {mu}g per spot for PETN and 0.045-1.44 {mu}g per spot for TNT. (Abstract Copyright [2009], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  18. Development of Biomarkers for Assessing In Situ RDX Biodegradation Potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-10

    the RDX degrading communities in four different soil slurries. The third task examined the microorganisms involved in RDX biodegradation from...RDX biodegradation at two Navy sites. Several key microorganisms were associated with RDX removal in these mixed communities. These phylogenetic and...manuscripts. 1 ABSTRACT Objective The objective was to identify the microorganisms and genes responsible for the biodegradation of RDX (hexahydro

  19. Integrated Data Analysis (IDCA) Program - PETN Class 4 Standard

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandstrom, Mary M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Brown, Geoffrey W. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Preston, Daniel N. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Pollard, Colin J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Warner, Kirstin F. [Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC), Indian Head, MD (United States). Indian Head Division; Sorensen, Daniel N. [Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC), Indian Head, MD (United States). Indian Head Division; Remmers, Daniel L. [Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC), Indian Head, MD (United States). Indian Head Division; Shelley, Timothy J. [Air Force Research Lab. (AFRL), Tyndall AFB, FL (United States); Reyes, Jose A. [Applied Research Associates, Tyndall AFB, FL (United States); Phillips, Jason J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hsu, Peter C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Reynolds, John G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2012-08-01

    The Integrated Data Collection Analysis (IDCA) program is conducting a proficiency study for Small- Scale Safety and Thermal (SSST) testing of homemade explosives (HMEs). Described here are the results for impact, friction, electrostatic discharge, and differential scanning calorimetry analysis of PETN Class 4. The PETN was found to have: 1) an impact sensitivity (DH50) range of 6 to 12 cm, 2) a BAM friction sensitivity (F50) range 7 to 11 kg, TIL (0/10) of 3.7 to 7.2 kg, 3) a ABL friction sensitivity threshold of 5 or less psig at 8 fps, 4) an ABL ESD sensitivity threshold of 0.031 to 0.326 j/g, and 5) a thermal sensitivity of an endothermic feature with Tmin = ~ 141 °C, and a exothermic feature with a Tmax = ~205°C.

  20. Temperature evolution in silver nanoparticle doped PETN composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kameswari, D. P. S. L.; Kiran, P. Prem

    2018-04-01

    Optical absorption and the associated spatio-temporal evolution of temperature silver nanoparticles doped energetic material composite is presented. Silver nanoparticles of radii 10 - 150 nm are doped in Penta Erythrtol Tetra Nitrate (PETN), a secondary energetic material to form the composite materials. Of all the composites the ones doped with 35 nm sized nanoparticles have shown maximum absorption at excitation wavelength of 532 nm. The spatio-temporal evolution of temperature within these composites up on excitation with ns laser pulses of energy density 0.5 J/cm2 is studied. The role of particle sizes on the temperature of composites is studied and a maximum temperature of 2200 K at the nanoparticle interface is observed for 35 nm doped PETN composite.

  1. RDX Detection with THz Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalopoulou, Zoi-Heleni; Mukherjee, Suman; Hor, Yew Li; Su, Ke; Liu, Zhiwei; Barat, Robert B.; Gary, Dale E.; Federici, John F.

    2010-10-01

    Spectroscopic analysis in the Terahertz frequency range, providing characteristic “signatures” for explosive and non-explosive materials, is proposed as an efficient and powerful tool for explosive identification. It is demonstrated that spectral responses of materials can be used as fingerprints that distinguish cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine (RDX) from other materials even with simple detectors and a limited number of available frequencies. Detection is performed using a modified least squares approach and multilayer perceptrons that operate on smoothed reflectance spectra. The performance of the detectors is evaluated through application to spectra of RDX and several common materials. A Receiver Operating Characteristic curve analysis demonstrates that our detectors exhibit the desirable properties of high probability of detection and low probability of false alarm.

  2. Anfo and prill ammonium nitrate. Technological view of their origin and development; ANFO oyobi prill shoan ni tsuite. Tanjo to hatten no gijutsuteki kosatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, T. [Okamoto Machine Tool Works, Ltd., Yokohama (Japan)

    1997-06-30

    Anfo (Ammonium Nitrate and Fuel Oil)is an explosive consisting of prill ammonium nitrate and light oil that immediately spread across the world upon its debut in the U.S. around 1956, but the details of its birth, for example the name of its inventor, are not known. Granular ammonium nitrate is in production, with its porosity enhanced to elevate oil absorption efficiency to the level for the nitrate to be proper as the material for the anfo by adjusting the water content at approximately 4% in the ammonium nitrate mother liquid before corning. Efforts are being exerted by manufacturers to improve the drying process to remove excess water efficiently from granular ammonium nitrate. In Japan, industrial production of prill ammonium nitrate for the anfo began in 1964. Since then, the problem of anfo sensitivity to detonation has been solved by adjusting the oil absorption rate of prill ammonium nitrate to be in the range of 10-12%, and the problem of ammonium nitrate solidification has been solved by the development of a solidification preventing technology that utilizes solidification preventing agents based on organic surface active agents (while inorganic anti-bonding agents are in popular use in the U.S. and Europe)

  3. Spectral Characterization of RDX, ETN, PETN, TATP, HMTD, HMX, and C-4 in the Mid-Infrared Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    Germany, 1996. 12. Bertie, J.E. and Keefe , C.D. “Infrared intensities of liquids XXIV: Optical constants of liquid benzene-h6 at 25°C extended to...Bertie, J.E.; Apelblat, Y.; Keefe , C.D. “Infrared intensities of liquids XXV: Optical constants of liquid toluene at 25°C between 4800 and 400 cm−1

  4. Analysis of RDX and RDX Breakdown Products in Environmental Samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felt, Deborah R.; Larson, Steven L.; Wani, Altaf; Davis, Jeffrey L.

    2003-03-26

    The identification and quantification of explosives and their degradation products in soil and natural waters is helpful in the design of remediation technologies, mobility investigations and performing risk assessments. The objective of this study was to develop a method for the determination of the degradation of nitramine compounds, specifically hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX). The analytical methods developed in this study were based on reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) using both C-18 and CN bonded silica columns to eliminate common interferences. Contaminant identification was further confirmed by performing spectral analysis of the compounds upon elution. The proposed method yields good separation of RDX from its degradation products and from other common energetic compounds. Method detection limits for the proposed method ranged from 0.01 to 0.03 mg/L. This method satisfies the need for analytical techniques to monitor the formation and subsequent degradation products of toxic and carcinogenic nitrosyl substituted nitramines.

  5. Treatment of HMX and RDX contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Card, R.E. Jr.; Autenrieth, R.

    1998-03-01

    HMX and RDX are often found in the soil, groundwater, and surface waters at facilities where they are manufactured as the result of negligent disposal methods. The toxicity of these compounds and their degradation products has led to concern about their fate in the environment and the potential for human exposure. HMX and RDX are recalcitrant in the environment with low rates of biodegradation and photolysis. Several methods of treating contaminated soils and waters have been developed and studied. Many of these technologies (i.e., carbon adsorption, oxidation, and chemical treatment) have been developed to treat munition plant wastewaters that are contaminated with explosives. These methods need to be adapted to remediate contaminated water. Other technologies such as bioremediation and composting are being developed as methods of remediating HMX and RDX contamination in a solid matrix. This report describes and evaluates each of these technologies. This report also describes the processes which affect HMX and RDX in the environment. The major transformation processes of RDX and HMX in the environment are biodegradation and photolysis. A major factor affecting the transport and treatment of RDX and HMX in soil-water environments is their sorption and desorption to soil particles. Finally, this report draws conclusions as to which treatment methods are currently most suitable for the remediation of contaminated soils and waters

  6. Preparation and characterization of GA/RDX nanostructured ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Thenhexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) was added and trapped in the nano-porous three-dimensional networks of GA to obtain a novel GA/RDX nanostructured energetic composite. The composition, morphology andstructure of the obtained GA/RDX nanostructured energetic composite were characterized by ...

  7. Relationship between RDX properties and sensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doherty, Ruth M. [Research, Development, Test and Evaluation Directorate, Naval Surface Warfare Center Indian Head Division, Indian Head, MD 20640-5102 (United States); Watt, Duncan S. [Novare, Level 6 80 Petrie Terrace, Brisbane 4000 (Australia)

    2008-02-15

    An interlaboratory comparison of seven lots of commercially available RDX was conducted to determine what properties of the nitramine particles can be used to assess whether the RDX has relatively high or relatively low sensitivity. The materials chosen for the study were selected to give a range of HMX content, manufacturing process and reported shock sensitivity. The results of two different shock sensitivity tests conducted on a PBX made with the RDX lots in the study showed that there are measurable differences in the shock sensitivity of the PBXs, but the impact sensitivity for all of the lots is essentially the same. Impact sensitivity is not a good predictor of shock sensitivity for these types of RDX. Although most RDX that exhibits RS has low HMX content, that characteristic alone is not sufficient to guarantee low sensitivity. A range of additional analytical chemistry tests were conducted on the material; two of these (HPLC and DSC) are discussed within. (Abstract Copyright [2008], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  8. Method development and validation for measuring the particle size distribution of pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) powders.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, Sharissa Gay

    2005-09-01

    Currently, the critical particle properties of pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) that influence deflagration-to-detonation time in exploding bridge wire detonators (EBW) are not known in sufficient detail to allow development of a predictive failure model. The specific surface area (SSA) of many PETN powders has been measured using both permeametry and gas absorption methods and has been found to have a critical effect on EBW detonator performance. The permeametry measure of SSA is a function of particle shape, packed bed pore geometry, and particle size distribution (PSD). Yet there is a general lack of agreement in PSD measurements between laboratories, raising concerns regarding collaboration and complicating efforts to understand changes in EBW performance related to powder properties. Benchmarking of data between laboratories that routinely perform detailed PSD characterization of powder samples and the determination of the most appropriate method to measure each PETN powder are necessary to discern correlations between performance and powder properties and to collaborate with partnering laboratories. To this end, a comparison was made of the PSD measured by three laboratories using their own standard procedures for light scattering instruments. Three PETN powder samples with different surface areas and particle morphologies were characterized. Differences in bulk PSD data generated by each laboratory were found to result from variations in sonication of the samples during preparation. The effect of this sonication was found to depend on particle morphology of the PETN samples, being deleterious to some PETN samples and advantageous for others in moderation. Discrepancies in the submicron-sized particle characterization data were related to an instrument-specific artifact particular to one laboratory. The type of carrier fluid used by each laboratory to suspend the PETN particles for the light scattering measurement had no consistent effect on the resulting

  9. Forensic methodology for the thermochemical characterization of ANNM and ANFO homemade explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nazarian, Ashot; Presser, Cary, E-mail: cpresser@nist.gov

    2015-05-20

    Highlights: • The LDTR is a useful diagnostic for characterizing HME thermochemical behavior. • ANNM thermograms indicated sensitivity to varying HME composition. • ANFO measurements demonstrated sensitivity to fuel hydrocarbon volatility. • Mixture preparation time can be defined by studying vaporization effects on mass. - Abstract: Measurements were carried out to obtain thermal signatures of the most commonly used homemade explosive (HME) materials, i.e., ammonium nitrate/nitromethane and ammonium nitrate/No. 2 diesel fuel oil, using a novel laser-heating technique referred to as the laser-driven thermal reactor (LDTR). Experiments were performed for different compositions, initial masses, and steady-state temperatures, along with the effects associated with HME aging. For ammonium nitrate/nitromethane (ANNM), the NM/ANNM mass fractions investigated were 29% (stoichiometric value) and 14%; these experiments were with fresh mixtures. The 29% NM/ANNM mass fraction mixture was also aged to 3%. For ammonium nitrate/fuel oil (ANFO), a fresh stoichiometric FO/ANFO mass fraction of 6% was used initially, and aged mixtures were then investigated for mass fractions of 5.4%, 4.7%, 4.4%, and 3.7%. The results indicated that the LDTR thermograms (i.e., sample temperature change with time) for the mixed ANNM were different than the individual isolated components, and that the technique was sensitive to varying HME composition. In addition, changes in the thermograms as ANFO aged were attributed to the varying volatility of the fuel hydrocarbon fractions, and thus provide important information for forensics analysis as to the HME reactivity.

  10. Forensic methodology for the thermochemical characterization of ANNM and ANFO homemade explosives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazarian, Ashot; Presser, Cary

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The LDTR is a useful diagnostic for characterizing HME thermochemical behavior. • ANNM thermograms indicated sensitivity to varying HME composition. • ANFO measurements demonstrated sensitivity to fuel hydrocarbon volatility. • Mixture preparation time can be defined by studying vaporization effects on mass. - Abstract: Measurements were carried out to obtain thermal signatures of the most commonly used homemade explosive (HME) materials, i.e., ammonium nitrate/nitromethane and ammonium nitrate/No. 2 diesel fuel oil, using a novel laser-heating technique referred to as the laser-driven thermal reactor (LDTR). Experiments were performed for different compositions, initial masses, and steady-state temperatures, along with the effects associated with HME aging. For ammonium nitrate/nitromethane (ANNM), the NM/ANNM mass fractions investigated were 29% (stoichiometric value) and 14%; these experiments were with fresh mixtures. The 29% NM/ANNM mass fraction mixture was also aged to 3%. For ammonium nitrate/fuel oil (ANFO), a fresh stoichiometric FO/ANFO mass fraction of 6% was used initially, and aged mixtures were then investigated for mass fractions of 5.4%, 4.7%, 4.4%, and 3.7%. The results indicated that the LDTR thermograms (i.e., sample temperature change with time) for the mixed ANNM were different than the individual isolated components, and that the technique was sensitive to varying HME composition. In addition, changes in the thermograms as ANFO aged were attributed to the varying volatility of the fuel hydrocarbon fractions, and thus provide important information for forensics analysis as to the HME reactivity

  11. Biodegradación del explosivo tetranitrato de pentaeritritol (PETN por bacterias aisladas de ambientes mineros

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yerson Durán

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available El tetranitrato de pentaeritritol (PETN es el detonante más energético y recalcitrante empleado en la actividad minera ya que posee cuatro grupos nitro unidos mediante enlaces éster; además es un contaminante orgánico persistente según el Convenio de Estocolmo. En el presente trabajo es evaluada la eficiencia de degradación del PETN por bacterias aisladas de ambientes mineros. En primer lugar se seleccionó las cepas con mayor crecimiento durante tres subcultivos en medio mínimo con PETN como única fuente de nitrógeno. Luego, se identificó mediante análisis del gen RNAr 16S las cepas Bacillus sp. J8A2 y Enterobacter sp. M1B. Las velocidades específicas de crecimiento fueron de 0.057 h -1 para J8A2 y 0.042 h -1 para M1B, y las velocidades específicas de degradación de 0.72 y 1.16 mmol de PETN/g de proteína.h, respectivamente. Además, el extracto crudo de la cepa J8A2 mostró una actividad específica (U de 1.03 mmol de PETN/h y una actividad específica por proteína (U/g de 138.6 mmol de PETN/g.h.

  12. Implementation of a PETN failure model using ARIA's general chemistry framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hobbs, Michael L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-01-01

    We previously developed a PETN thermal decomposition model that accurately predicts thermal ignition and detonator failure [1]. This model was originally developed for CALORE [2] and required several complex user subroutines. Recently, a simplified version of the PETN decomposition model was implemented into ARIA [3] using a general chemistry framework without need for user subroutines. Detonator failure was also predicted with this new model using ENCORE. The model was simplified by 1) basing the model on moles rather than mass, 2) simplifying the thermal conductivity model, and 3) implementing ARIA’s new phase change model. This memo briefly describes the model, implementation, and validation.

  13. Characterization of ANFO explosive by high accuracy ESI(±)-FTMS with forensic identification on real samples by EASI(-)-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandes, Vinicius Veri; Franco, Marcos Fernado; Santos, Jandyson Machado; Melendez-Perez, Jose J; de Morais, Damila Rodrigues; Rocha, Werickson Fortunato de Carvalho; Borges, Rodrigo; de Souza, Wanderley; Zacca, Jorge Jardim; Logrado, Lucio Paulo Lima; Eberlin, Marcos Nogueira; Correa, Deleon Nascimento

    2015-04-01

    Ammonium nitrate fuel oil (ANFO) is an explosive used in many civil applications. In Brazil, ANFO has unfortunately also been used in criminal attacks, mainly in automated teller machine (ATM) explosions. In this paper, we describe a detailed characterization of the ANFO composition and its two main constituents (diesel and a nitrate explosive) using high resolution and accuracy mass spectrometry performed on an FT-ICR-mass spectrometer with electrospray ionization (ESI(±)-FTMS) in both the positive and negative ion modes. Via ESI(-)-MS, an ion marker for ANFO was characterized. Using a direct and simple ambient desorption/ionization technique, i.e., easy ambient sonic-spray ionization mass spectrometry (EASI-MS), in a simpler, lower accuracy but robust single quadrupole mass spectrometer, the ANFO ion marker was directly detected from the surface of banknotes collected from ATM explosion theft. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Application of 13C-stable isotope probing to identify RDX-degrading microorganisms in groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Kun-Ching; Lee, Do Gyun; Roh, HyungKeun; Fuller, Mark E.; Hatzinger, Paul B.; Chu, Kung-Hui

    2013-01-01

    We employed stable isotope probing (SIP) with 13 C-labeled hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) to identify active microorganisms responsible for RDX biodegradation in groundwater microcosms. Sixteen different 16S rRNA gene sequences were derived from microcosms receiving 13 C-labeled RDX, suggesting the presence of microorganisms able to incorporate carbon from RDX or its breakdown products. The clones, residing in Bacteroidia, Clostridia, α-, β- and δ-Proteobacteria, and Spirochaetes, were different from previously described RDX degraders. A parallel set of microcosms was amended with cheese whey and RDX to evaluate the influence of this co-substrate on the RDX-degrading microbial community. Cheese whey stimulated RDX biotransformation, altered the types of RDX-degrading bacteria, and decreased microbial community diversity. Results of this study suggest that RDX-degrading microorganisms in groundwater are more phylogenetically diverse than what has been inferred from studies with RDX-degrading isolates. Highlights: •SIP identified sixteen groundwater bacteria capable of using RDX and/or its metabolites as a carbon source. •The RDX degraders in groundwater are phylogenetically diverse and different from known RDX degraders. •Cheese whey induced community shift and altered diversity of the RDX-degrading microorganisms over time. -- RDX-degrading bacteria in contaminated groundwater, identified by SIP with 13 C-labeled RDX, are phylogenetically diverse and different from known RDX degraders

  15. Shock-induced hotspot formation and chemical reaction initiation in PETN containing a spherical void

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shan, Tzu-Ray; Thompson, Aidan P

    2014-01-01

    We present results of reactive molecular dynamics simulations of hotspot formation and chemical reaction initiation in shock-induced compression of pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) with the ReaxFF reactive force field. A supported shockwave is driven through a PETN crystal containing a 20 nm spherical void at a sub-threshold impact velocity of 2 km/s. Formation of a hotspot due to shock-induced void collapse is observed. During void collapse, NO 2 is the dominant species ejected from the upstream void surface. Once the ejecta collide with the downstream void surface and the hotspot develops, formation of final products such as N 2 and H 2 O is observed. The simulation provides a detailed picture of how void collapse and hotspot formation leads to initiation at sub-threshold impact velocities.

  16. New ANFO explosives made of ammonium nitrate of increased porosity and naphtha

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kutsarov, B.; Mavrodieva, R.; Ivanov, I.; Stoyanov, V.; Georgiev, N.; Krumov, I.; Katsarski, I.; Vakliev, I.

    1990-01-01

    Discusses results achieved by the KNIIPPI Niproruda Research Institute and the Osogovo enterprise in improving the quality of ANFO explosives. Ammonium nitrate with increased porosity was treated by water steam and wetting agents and then thermally treated. Naphtha in a quantity of up to 8% was then added to the ammonium nitrate to produce a powerful and stable explosive. The quality of explosive cartridges was tested first in the laboratory using the Schaffler apparatus. Test results were very satisfactory (better porosity, higher detonation velocity (2200-3600 m/s), better stability). Industrial experiments carried out in several underground mines also produced satisfactory results (better output in roadway drivage at lower operating cost and better safety). 8 refs.

  17. Effects of expiring reimbursability of pentaerythrityl tetranitrate (PETN, pentalong®) on anti-anginal therapy: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimmsmann, Thomas; Chenot, Jean-François; Angelow, Aniela

    2015-08-01

    Pentaerythrityl tetranitrate (PETN) was the most commonly prescribed long-acting nitrate in Germany. We aimed to assess whether the discontinuation of PETN reimbursability in 2011 resulted in alternative prescriptions of anti-anginal medications or in a discontinuation of anti-anginal therapy. This is an observational study using health claims data from one German federal state analysing all patients discontinuing a PETN treatment. Patients starting a new alternative anti-anginal treatment (long-acting nitrates, molsidome, ivabradine and ranolazine) were compared with patients without a new anti-anginal treatment with respect to use of short-acting nitrates, beta blockers (BBs) and calcium channel blockers (CCBs). Out of 12,909 patients, 12,763 (99%) discontinued PETN until 12/2012. Of these, 52% started an alternative anti-anginal treatment, 43% did not receive any alternative treatment and 5% were excluded from analysis. Before termination of PETN reimbursability, 65% of patients received BBs, 29% CCBs and 10% short-acting nitrates. In patients started on alternative anti-anginal treatment, prescription rates for short-acting nitrates, BBs and CCBs remained constant after discontinuing PETN. In patients without any alternative anti-anginal treatment, prescription rates for BBs and CCBs did not change meaningfully (<3%), and prescription rates for short-acting nitrates decreased from 9% to 6%. Half of the patients discontinued PETN without alternative. This did not lead to increased prescription rates of standard IHD medications or total medication number indicating that there might still be a high percentage of ischaemic heart disease patients treated unnecessarily with long-acting nitrates. The undertreatment with prognostically relevant first-line medications indicates a need for better guideline implementation activities. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Bioconcentration of TNT and RDX in coastal marine biota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballentine, Mark; Tobias, Craig; Vlahos, Penny; Smith, Richard; Cooper, Christopher

    2015-05-01

    The bioconcentration factor (BCF) was measured for 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) and hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) in seven different marine species of varying trophic levels. Time series and concentration gradient treatments were used for water column and tissue concentrations of TNT, RDX, and their environmentally important derivatives 2-amino-4,6-dintrotoluene (2-ADNT) and 4-amino-2,6-dinitrotoluene (4-ADNT). BCF values ranged from 0.0031 to 484.5 mL g(-1) for TNT and 0.023 to 54.83 mL g(-1) for RDX. The use of log K ow value as an indicator was evaluated by adding marine data from this study to previously published data. For the munitions in this study, log K ow value was a good indicator in the marine environment. The initial uptake and elimination rates of TNT and RDX for Fucus vesiculosus were 1.79 and 0.24 h(-1) for TNT and 0.50 and 0.0035 h(-1) for RDX respectively. Biotransformation was observed in all biota for both TNT and RDX. Biotransformation of TNT favored 4-ADNT over 2-ADNT at ratios of 2:1 for F. vesiculosus and 3:1 for Mytilus edulis. Although RDX derivatives were measureable, the ratios of RDX derivatives were variable with no detectable trend. Previous approaches for measuring BCF in freshwater systems compare favorably with these experiments with marine biota, yet significant gaps on the ultimate fate of munitions within the biota exist that may be overcome with the use stable isotope-labeled munitions substrates.

  19. Electrostaticspray preparation and properties of RDX/DOS composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Yao

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available A composite explosive based on 1, 3, 5-trinitro-1, 3, 5-triazinane (RDX was prepared by electrostaticspray method with dioctyl sebacate (DOS as desensitizer. After preparation, the particle size and crystal structure were characterized and chemical features, such as chemical bonds, functional groups, thermal decomposition parameters and mechanical sensitivity were investigated as well. In terms of the morphologies of the composites, the particle sizes were in the range of 1–3 μm. Compared with RDX, the crystal types, chemical bonds and functional groups of the RDX/DOS composites were unchanged. The activation energy of the composites was lower than that of raw RDX, and the 3wt % DOS composites had the lowest activation energy. The impact sensitivity and friction sensitivity of the RDX/DOS composites were lower than those of raw RDX, and the 10wt% DOS composites had the highest H50 (125.9 cm and the lowest friction sensitivity (8%.

  20. Аpplying of Explosives of the Type an-fo and Slurry in the Open Pit Mine "Bucim"

    OpenAIRE

    Dambov, Risto; Nikolic, Miroslav; Dambov, Ilija

    2012-01-01

    In this paper shows the way of application of ANFO and SLURRY bulk explosives and blasting methods that are characteristic for this open pit mine. According to the physical - mechanical characteristics of the working environment and condition of the blast hole are defining some parameters for each series separately. In this open pit are defined 5(five) different working environments - rocks with copper mineralization (0,25%Cu) or rocks waste. According to the effects of blasting are make cert...

  1. Time-of-flight mass spectrometry of laser exploding foil initiated PETN samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajardo, Mario E.; Molek, Christopher D.; Fossum, Emily C.

    2017-01-01

    We report the results of time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOFMS) measurements of the gaseous products of thin-film pentaerythritol tetranitrate [PETN, C(CH2NO3)4] samples reacting in vacuo. The PETN sample spots are produced by masked physical vapor deposition [A.S. Tappan, et al., AIP Conf. Proc. 1426, 677 (2012)] onto a first-surface aluminum mirror. A pulsed laser beam imaged through the soda lime glass mirror substrate converts the aluminum layer into a high-temperature high-pressure plasma which initiates chemical reactions in the overlying PETN sample. We had previously proposed [E.C. Fossum, et al., AIP Conf. Proc. 1426, 235 (2012)] to exploit differences in gaseous product chemical identities and molecular velocities to provide a chemically-based diagnostic for distinguishing between "detonation-like" and deflagration responses. Briefly: we expect in-vacuum detonations to produce hyperthermal (v˜10 km/s) thermodynamically-stable products such as N2, CO2, and H2O, and for deflagrations to produce mostly reaction intermediates, such as NO and NO2, with much slower molecular velocities - consistent with the expansion-quenched thermal decomposition of PETN. We observe primarily slow reaction intermediates (NO2, CH2NO3) at low laser pulse energies, the appearance of NO at intermediate laser pulse energies, and the appearance of hyperthemal CO/N2 at mass 28 amu at the highest laser pulse energies. However, these results are somewhat ambiguous, as the NO, NO2, and CH2NO3 intermediates persist and all species become hyperthermal at the higher laser pulse energies. Also, the purported CO/N2 signal at 28 amu may be contaminated by silicon ablated from the glass mirror substrate. We plan to mitigate these problems in future experiments by adopting the "Buelow" sample configuration which employs an intermediate foil barrier to shield the energetic material from the laser and the laser driven plasma [S.J. Buelow, et al., AIP Conf. Proc. 706, 1377 (2003)].

  2. Reactive Burn Model Calibration for PETN Using Ultra-High-Speed Phase Contrast Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Carl; Ramos, Kyle; Bolme, Cindy; Sanchez, Nathaniel; Barber, John; Montgomery, David

    2017-06-01

    A 1D reactive burn model (RBM) calibration for a plastic bonded high explosive (HE) requires run-to-detonation data. In PETN (pentaerythritol tetranitrate, 1.65 g/cc) the shock to detonation transition (SDT) is on the order of a few millimeters. This rapid SDT imposes experimental length scales that preclude application of traditional calibration methods such as embedded electromagnetic gauge methods (EEGM) which are very effective when used to study 10 - 20 mm thick HE specimens. In recent work at Argonne National Laboratory's Advanced Photon Source we have obtained run-to-detonation data in PETN using ultra-high-speed dynamic phase contrast imaging (PCI). A reactive burn model calibration valid for 1D shock waves is obtained using density profiles spanning the transition to detonation as opposed to particle velocity profiles from EEGM. Particle swarm optimization (PSO) methods were used to operate the LANL hydrocode FLAG iteratively to refine SURF RBM parameters until a suitable parameter set attained. These methods will be presented along with model validation simulations. The novel method described is generally applicable to `sensitive' energetic materials particularly those with areal densities amenable to radiography.

  3. Characterization of the Morphology of RDX Particles Formed by Laser Ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-01

    military-grade RDX can contain significant amounts of HMX (up to 5% for type-I RDX produced by direct nitration with the Woolwich process and up to...potentially produce RDX particles with specific morphologies in support of microstructural experiments for the Multiscale Response of Energetic

  4. Mechanism of RDX-Induced Seizures in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    benchmark for RDX. d. The main acute effect of RDX after ingestion of high doses is the induction of seizures accompanied by excessive salivation ...most animals that seize demonstrate excessive salivation (Schneider et al., 1977; Burdette et al., 1988; Crouse et al., 2006). These clinical signs...Padilla et al., 1998). A 2% (wet wt./vol.) homogenate was made in 0.1 M Na phosphate buffer ( pH 8.0) + 1% Triton, using a 20 sec burst (on ice) of

  5. First-principles studies of PETN molecular crystal vibrational frequencies under high pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perger, Warren; Zhao, Jijun

    2005-07-01

    The vibrational frequencies of the PETN molecular crystal were calculated using the first-principles CRYSTAL03 program which employs an all-electron LCAO approach and calculates analytic first derivatives of the total energy with respect to atomic displacements. Numerical second derivatives were used to enable calculation of the vibrational frequencies at ambient pressure and under various states of compression. Three different density functionals, B3LYP, PW91, and X3LYP were used to examine the effect of the exchange-correlation functional on the vibrational frequencies. The pressure-induced shift of the vibrational frequencies will be presented and compared with experiment. The average deviation with experimental results is shown to be on the order of 2-3%, depending on the functional used.

  6. Treatment of RDX & HMX Plumes Using Mulch Biowalls

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-08-01

    BAK Benzalkonium chloride BGS Below Ground Surface BRAC Base Realignment and Closure CHAAP Cornhusker Army Ammunition Plant CDPHE Colorado...Metabolism, and Reductive Transformation of RDX .............................................................. 9  Figure 4. Plan View Schematic of...43  Figure 17. Oxidation- reduction Potential (ORP) Measurement Averaged Over Different Well- rows

  7. Identification of groundwater microorganisms capable of assimilating RDX-derived nitrogen during in-situ bioremediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Kun-Ching; Fuller, Mark E.; Hatzinger, Paul B.; Chu, Kung-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX), a nitroamine explosive, is commonly detected in groundwater at military testing and training sites. The objective of this study was to characterize the microbial community capable of using nitrogen derived from the RDX or RDX intermediates during in situ bioremediation. Active groundwater microorganisms capable of utilizing nitro-, ring- or fully-labeled "1"5N-RDX as a nitrogen source were identified using stable isotope probing (SIP) in groundwater microcosms prepared from two wells in an aquifer previously amended with cheese whey to promote RDX biodegradation. A total of fifteen 16S rRNA gene sequences, clustered in Clostridia, β-Proteobacteria, and Spirochaetes, were derived from the "1"5N-labeled DNA fractions, suggesting the presence of metabolically active bacteria capable of using RDX and/or RDX intermediates as a nitrogen source. None of the derived sequences matched RDX-degrading cultures commonly studied in the laboratory, but some of these genera have previously been linked to RDX degradation in site groundwater via "1"3C-SIP. When additional cheese whey was added to the groundwater samples, 28 sequences grouped into Bacteroidia, Bacilli, and α-, β-, and γ-Proteobacteria were identified. The data suggest that numerous bacteria are capable of incorporating N from ring- and nitro-groups in RDX during anaerobic bioremediation, and that some genera may be involved in both C and N incorporation from RDX. - Highlights: • Cheese whey addition resulted in 28 different clones associated with RDX degradation. • The 28 clones belong to Bacteroidia, Bacilli, and α-, β-, and γ-Proteobacteria. • SIP identified 15 clones using RDX and/or its metabolites as a nitrogen source. • The clones clustered in Clostridia, β-Proteobacteria, and Spirochaetes

  8. Identification of groundwater microorganisms capable of assimilating RDX-derived nitrogen during in-situ bioremediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Kun-Ching [Zachry Department of Civil Engineering, Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77843-3136 (United States); Fuller, Mark E.; Hatzinger, Paul B. [CB& I Federal Services, Lawrenceville, NJ 08648 (United States); Chu, Kung-Hui, E-mail: kchu@civil.tamu.edu [Zachry Department of Civil Engineering, Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77843-3136 (United States)

    2016-11-01

    Hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX), a nitroamine explosive, is commonly detected in groundwater at military testing and training sites. The objective of this study was to characterize the microbial community capable of using nitrogen derived from the RDX or RDX intermediates during in situ bioremediation. Active groundwater microorganisms capable of utilizing nitro-, ring- or fully-labeled {sup 15}N-RDX as a nitrogen source were identified using stable isotope probing (SIP) in groundwater microcosms prepared from two wells in an aquifer previously amended with cheese whey to promote RDX biodegradation. A total of fifteen 16S rRNA gene sequences, clustered in Clostridia, β-Proteobacteria, and Spirochaetes, were derived from the {sup 15}N-labeled DNA fractions, suggesting the presence of metabolically active bacteria capable of using RDX and/or RDX intermediates as a nitrogen source. None of the derived sequences matched RDX-degrading cultures commonly studied in the laboratory, but some of these genera have previously been linked to RDX degradation in site groundwater via {sup 13}C-SIP. When additional cheese whey was added to the groundwater samples, 28 sequences grouped into Bacteroidia, Bacilli, and α-, β-, and γ-Proteobacteria were identified. The data suggest that numerous bacteria are capable of incorporating N from ring- and nitro-groups in RDX during anaerobic bioremediation, and that some genera may be involved in both C and N incorporation from RDX. - Highlights: • Cheese whey addition resulted in 28 different clones associated with RDX degradation. • The 28 clones belong to Bacteroidia, Bacilli, and α-, β-, and γ-Proteobacteria. • SIP identified 15 clones using RDX and/or its metabolites as a nitrogen source. • The clones clustered in Clostridia, β-Proteobacteria, and Spirochaetes.

  9. Forensic analysis of explosives using isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS)--preliminary study on TATP and PETN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Sarah J; Lennard, Christopher J; Maynard, Philip; Hill, David M; Andrew, Anita S; Roux, Claude

    2009-06-01

    The application of isotopic techniques to investigations requiring the provision of evidence to a Court is limited. The objective of this research was to investigate the application of light stable isotopes and isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) to solve complex forensic cases by providing a level of discrimination not achievable utilising traditional forensic techniques. Due to the current threat of organic peroxide explosives, such as triacetone triperoxide (TATP), research was undertaken to determine the potential of IRMS to differentiate samples of TATP that had been manufactured utilising different starting materials and/or manufacturing processes. In addition, due to the prevalence of pentaerythritoltetranitrate (PETN) in detonators, detonating cord, and boosters, the potential of the IRMS technique to differentiate PETN samples from different sources was also investigated. Carbon isotope values were measured in fourteen TATP samples, with three definite groups appearing in the initial sample set based on the carbon data alone. Four additional TATP samples (in a second set of samples) were distinguishable utilising the carbon and hydrogen isotopic compositions individually, and also in combination with the oxygen isotope values. The 3D plot of the carbon, oxygen and hydrogen data demonstrated the clear discrimination of the four samples of TATP. The carbon and nitrogen isotope values measured from fifteen PETN samples, allowed samples from different sources to be readily discriminated. This paper demonstrates the successful application of IRMS to the analysis of explosives of forensic interest to assist in discriminating samples from different sources. This research represents a preliminary evaluation of the IRMS technique for the measurement of stable isotope values in TATP and PETN samples, and supports the dedication of resources for a full evaluation of this application in order to achieve Court reportable IRMS results.

  10. Surface characterization of an energetic material, pentaerythritoltetranitrate (PETN), having a thin coating achieved through a starved addition microencapsulation technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Worley, C.M.

    1986-05-07

    The objective of this research was to: (1) determine the nature of a thin coating on an explosive material which was applied using a starved addition microencapsulation technique, (2) understand the coating/crystal bond, and (3) investigate the wettability/adhesion of plastic/solvent combinations using the coating process. The coating used in this work was a Firestone Plastic Company copolymer (FPC-461) of vinylchloride/trifluorochloroethylene in a 1.5/1.0 weight ratio. The energetic explosive examined was pentaerythritoltetranitrate (PETN). The coating process used was starved addition followed by a solvent evaporation technique. Surface analytical studies, completed for characterization of the coating process, show (1) evidence that the polymer coating is present, but not continuous, over the surface of PETN; (2) the average thickness of the polymer coating is between 16-32 A and greater than 44 A, respectively, for 0.5 and 20 wt % coated PETN; (3) no changes in surface chemistry of the polymer or the explosive material following microencapsulation; and (4) the presence of explosive material on the surface of 0.5 wt % FPC-461 coated explosives. 5 refs., 15 figs., 6 tabs.

  11. Modeling Nonlinear Elastic-plastic Behavior of RDX Single Crystals During Indentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    single crystals has also been probed using shock experiments (6, 12) and molecular dynamics simulations (12–14). RDX undergoes a polymorphic phase...Patterson, J.; Dreger, Z.; Gupta, Y. Shock-wave Induced Phase Transition in RDX Single Crystals. J. Phys. Chem. B 2007, 111, 10897–10904. 17. Bedrov, D...and Volume Compression of β - HMX and RDX . In Proc. Int. Symp. High Dynamic Pressures; Commissariat a l’Energie Atomique: Paris, 1978; pp 3–8. 24

  12. Shock-induced fast reactions of zinc nanoparticles and RDX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xue Mian; Wu Jinghe; Ye Song; Yang Xiangdong [Institute of Atomic and Molecular Physics, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Hu Dong; Wang Yanping; Zhu Wenjun; Li Chengbing [National Key Laboratory for Shock Wave and Detonation Physics Research, Institute of Fluid Physics, CAEP, Mianyang 621900 (China)], E-mail: mi-anxue@163.com

    2008-02-21

    Fast reactions of zinc nanoparticles and RDX were investigated in normal incident shock waves. The emergence time and emission spectra intensity of partial products such as NO{sub 2}, H, C{sub 2}, O, CO, CH{sub 2}O, CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O and ZnO were observed by a TDS5054 oscilloscope. The results indicate that NO{sub 2} appears first in each experiment, which is in agreement with the theoretical results. The addition of zinc nanoparticles to RDX can not only shorten the ignition delay time by 20% but also double the shockwave diffusion velocity to 2180 {+-} 50 m s{sup -1} and triple the temperature to 2020 {+-} 60 K. The emergence time of products shortens by around 10-40% and the emission spectra intensity of H{sub 2}O and CH{sub 2}O rises by about three times and one times, respectively. CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O and O{sub 2} in various concentrations were introduced into the zinc-RDX reaction, respectively, which indicate that O{sub 2} made the ignition delay time shorten by over 30%, the effect of H{sub 2}O was not prominent while CO{sub 2} made the ignition delay time lag by around 30%. The results indicate that the Zn-O{sub 2} reaction mainly occurs in O{sub 2}, CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O.

  13. Shock-induced fast reactions of zinc nanoparticles and RDX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xue Mian; Wu Jinghe; Ye Song; Yang Xiangdong; Hu Dong; Wang Yanping; Zhu Wenjun; Li Chengbing

    2008-01-01

    Fast reactions of zinc nanoparticles and RDX were investigated in normal incident shock waves. The emergence time and emission spectra intensity of partial products such as NO 2 , H, C 2 , O, CO, CH 2 O, CO 2 , H 2 O and ZnO were observed by a TDS5054 oscilloscope. The results indicate that NO 2 appears first in each experiment, which is in agreement with the theoretical results. The addition of zinc nanoparticles to RDX can not only shorten the ignition delay time by 20% but also double the shockwave diffusion velocity to 2180 ± 50 m s -1 and triple the temperature to 2020 ± 60 K. The emergence time of products shortens by around 10-40% and the emission spectra intensity of H 2 O and CH 2 O rises by about three times and one times, respectively. CO 2 , H 2 O and O 2 in various concentrations were introduced into the zinc-RDX reaction, respectively, which indicate that O 2 made the ignition delay time shorten by over 30%, the effect of H 2 O was not prominent while CO 2 made the ignition delay time lag by around 30%. The results indicate that the Zn-O 2 reaction mainly occurs in O 2 , CO 2 and H 2 O

  14. New Approaches to Evaluate the Biological Degradation of RDX in Groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-27

    again indicate the diversity of active microorganisms associated with RDX biodegradation in the environmental samples. When cheese whey was absent...34  2.2 Task 2 – Geochemical and Environmental Conditions Affecting RDX Biodegradation ............ 36  2.2.1 Objective...Degrading Microorganisms . 49  2.3.1 Objective

  15. Feasibility of In Situ Redox Manipulation of Subsurface Sediments for RDX Remediation at Pantex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szecsody, James E.; Fruchter, Jonathan S.; Mckinley, Mark A.; Resch, Charles T.; Gilmore, Tyler J.

    2001-12-31

    This laboratory study was conducted to assess RDX (hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5 triazine) abiotic degradation by chemically reduced sediments and other geochemical aspects of the application of this technology to remediation of RDX contamination in groundwater at the U.S. DOE Pantex facility...

  16. Passive Biobarrier for Treating Co-mingled Perchlorate and RDX in Groundwater at an Active Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-12

    16S rRNA sequences were derived. These sequences resided in four major clusters: Actinobacteria (Eggerthella), -Proteobacteria (unclassified...Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria , -Proteobacteria and Clostridia) have been previously reported to biodegrade RDX directly, or to contribute to RDX...detected primarily under manganese-reducing conditions (with one under sulfate- reducing conditions) in our study, remain unclear. Actinobacteria are

  17. Effect of Nano-Magnesium Hydride on the Thermal Decomposition Behaviors of RDX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, M.; Chen, L.; Rao, G.; Peng, J.; Zou, J.; Zeng, X.

    2013-01-01

    In order to improve the detonation performance of hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) explosive, addictive with high heat values were used, and magnesium hydride (MgH 2 ) is one of the candidates. However, it is important to see whether MgH 2 is a safe addictive. In this paper, the thermal and kinetic properties of RDX and mixture of RDX/MgH 2 were investigated by differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) and accelerating rate calorimeter (ARC), respectively. The apparent activation energy (E) and frequency factor (A) of thermal explosion were calculated based on the data of DSC experiments using the Kissinger and Ozawa approaches. The results show that the addition of MgH 2 decreases both E and A of RDX, which means that the mixture of RDX/MgH 2 has a lower thermal stability than RDX, and the calculation results obtained from the ARC experiments data support this too. Besides, the most probable mechanism functions about the decomposition of RDX and RDX/MgH 2 were given in this paper which confirmed the change of the decomposition mechanism.

  18. Tracking the Fate of Explosive-Trinitrotriazine (RDX) in Coastal Marine Ecosystems Using Stable Isotopic Tracer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariyarathna, T. S.; Ballentine, M.; Vlahos, P.; Smith, R. W.; Bohlke, J. K.; Tobias, C. R.; Fallis, S.; Groshens, T.; Cooper, C.

    2017-12-01

    It has been estimated that there are hundreds of explosive-contaminated sites all over the world and managing these contaminated sites is an international challenge. As coastal zones and estuaries are commonly impacted zones, it is vital to understand the fate and transport of munition compounds in these environments. The demand for data on sorption, biodegradation and mineralization of trinitrotriazine (RDX) in coastal ecosystems is the impetus for this study using stable nitrogen isotopes to track its metabolic pathways. Mesocosm experiments representing subtidal vegetated, subtidal unvegetated and intertidal marsh ecocosms were conducted. Steady state concentrations of RDX were maintained in the systems throughout two-week time duration of experiments. Sediment, pore-water and overlying water samples were analyzed for RDX and degradation products. Isotope analysis of the bulk sediments revealed an initial rising inventory of 15N followed by a decay illustrating the role of sediments on sorption and degradation of RDX in anaerobic sediments respectively. Both pore-water and overlying water samples were analyzed for 15N inventories of different inorganic nitrogen pools including ammonium, nitrate, nitrite, nitrous oxide and nitrogen gases. RDX is mineralized to nitrogen gas through a series of intermediates leaving nitrous oxide as the prominent metabolite of RDX. Significant differences in RDX metabolism were observed in the three different ecosystems based on sediment characteristics and redox conditions in the systems. Fine grained organic carbon rich sediments show notably higher mineralization rates of RDX in terms of production of its metabolites. Quantification of degradation and transformation rates leads to mass balances of RDX in the systems. Further analysis of results provides insights for mineralization pathways of RDX into both organic and inorganic nitrogen pools entering the marine nitrogen cycle.

  19. Spectrophotometric determination of cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine (RDX) in explosive mixtures and residues with the Berthelot reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzer, A; Erçağ, E; Apak, R

    2008-03-31

    On-site colorimetric methods are a valuable, cost-effective tool to assess the nature and extent of contamination in remediated sites and to enable on-site screening for police criminology laboratories. The existing colorimetric method for cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine (RDX) based on a Griess reaction suffers from the non-quantitative reduction to nitrite and from the unstable character of HNO2 in acidic medium. Thus we propose a novel spectrophotometric RDX assay in explosive mixtures and residues, based on (Zn+HCl) reduction of RDX in a microwave oven, followed by neutralization of the reduction products to ammonia and low molecular-weight amines, and Berthelot reaction of these amine-compounds with phenol and hypochlorite in alkaline medium to give an intensely blue indophenol dye absorbing at 631nm. The molar absorptivity and limit of detection (LOD) for RDX were (1.08+/-0.04)x10(4) L mol(-1) cm(-1) and 0.18 mg L(-1), respectively. Application of the method to synthetic mixture solutions of RDX and trinitrotoluene (TNT) at varying proportions showed that there was minimal interference from TNT (which could be compensated for by dicyclohexylamine colorimetry), since the Berthelot reaction was essentially non-responsive to m-substituted anilines derived from TNT upon (Zn+HCl) reduction. The proposed method was successfully applied to military-purpose explosive mixtures of (RDX+inert matter) such as Comp A5, Comp C4, and Hexal P30, and to (RDX+TNT) mixtures such as Comp B. The molar absorptivity of RDX was much higher than that of either ammonium or nitrate; RDX could be effectively separated from ammonium and nitrate in soil mixtures, based on solubility differences. The Berthelot method for RDX was statistically validated using Comp B mixtures against standard HPLC equipped with a Hypersil C-18 column with (40% MeOH-60% H2O) mobile phase, and against gas chromatography-thermal energy analysis (GC-TEA) system.

  20. Theoretical studies on the thermodynamic properties and detonation properties of cyclotrimethylene trinitramine (RDX with aluminum and boron metals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilgün Şen

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The B3LYP/6-311++G(2df,2p density functional theory (DFT method was used to investigate molecular geometry and thermodynamic properties of RDX and RDX derivatives containing Al and B metals. The detonation velocity (D and detonation pressure (P, estimated by using Kamlet–Jacobs and in literature equations, respectively. Total energies (Et, frontier orbital energy (EHOMO, ELOMO, energy gap (ΔELUMO–HOMO and theoretical molecular density (ρ were calculated with Spartan 14 software package program. It was shown that the presence of aluminum and boron atoms affects the good thermal stabilities. The results show that the composite RDX-Al, RDX-B derivatives have higher detonation performance and higher density than RDX. RDX-Al derivatives appeared to be superior to RDX-B mixtures in terms of these parameters. These results provide information on the moleculer design of new energetic materials.

  1. ONE-DIMENSIONAL TIME TO EXPLOSION (THERMAL SENSITIVITY) TESTS ON PETN, PBX-9407, LX-10, AND LX-17

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, Peter C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Strout, Steve [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); McClelland, Matthew [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ellsworth, Fred Ellsworth [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-01-28

    Incidents caused by fire and combat operations can heat energetic materials that may lead to thermal explosion and result in structural damage and casualty. Some explosives may thermally explode at fairly low temperatures (< 100 C) and the violence from thermal explosion may cause a significant damage. Thus it is important to understand the response of energetic materials to thermal insults. The One Dimensional Time to Explosion (ODTX) system at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has been used for decades to measure times to thermal explosion, threshold thermal explosion temperature, and determine the kinetic parameters of thermal decomposition of energetic materials. Samples of different configurations (pressed part, powder, paste, and liquid) can be tested in the system. The ODTX testing can also provide useful data for assessing the thermal explosion violence of energetic materials. This report summarizes the results of our recent ODTX experiments on PETN powder, PBX-9407 pressed part, LX-10 pressed part, LX-17 pressed part and compares the test data that were obtained decades ago with the older version of ODTX system. Test results show the thermal sensitivity of various materials tested in the following order: PETN> PBX-9407 > LX-10 > LX-17.

  2. Environmental Toxicity of the Explosives RDX and TNT in Soil to the Soil Invertebrate Folsomia candida

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Phillips, Carlton T; Checkai, Ronald T; Kuperman, Roman G; Simini, Michael; Kolakowski, Jan E; Kurnas, Carl W

    2004-01-01

    ...; medium for RCL and KCL; and relatively low or WCL soil. We investigated whether soil type affects the toxicity of RDX or TNT in soil to Collembola by adapting a standardized Folsomia reproduction test (ISO 11267:1998...

  3. Computational Study of the Structure and Mechanical Properties of the Molecular Crystal RDX

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-01

    basic equilibrium properties of and transitions to and from the α and γ polymorphs in crystalline RDX based on the SB potential (17). Atomic-level...elastic constants, polymorph transitions , cleavage properties, and energy barriers to slip. The energy barriers to slip are determined through the... RDX molecule containing three R2N-NO2 groups, where each R=CH2; and (c) HMX molecule containing four R2N-NO2 groups with R=CH2

  4. First-Principles Studies of Pentaerythritol Tetranitrate (PETN) Single Crystal Unit Cell Volumes and Vibrational Frequencies under Hydrostatic Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perger, Warren F.; Zhao, Jijun; Winey, J. M.; Gupta, Y. M.

    2006-07-01

    The vibrational frequencies of the PETN molecular crystal were calculated using the first-principles CRYSTAL03 program which employs an all-electron LCAO approach and calculates analytic first derivatives of the total energy with respect to atomic displacements. Numerical second derivatives were used to enable calculation of the vibrational frequencies at ambient pressure and under various states of compression. Three different density functionals, B3LYP, PW91, and X3LYP were used to examine the effect of the exchange-correlation functional on the vibrational frequencies. The average deviation with experimental results is shown to be on the order of 2-3%, depending on the functional used. The pressure-induced shift of the vibrational frequencies is presented.

  5. Biodegradation of RDX within soil-water slurries using a combination of differing redox incubation conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waisner, S.; Hansen, L.; Fredrickson, H.; Nestler, C.; Zappi, M.; Banerji, S.; Bajpai, R.

    2002-01-01

    Biodegradation of 14 C-tagged hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) was studied in aerobic, anaerobic, and anaerobic/aerobic slurries to identify the conditions maximizing RDX-mineralization in Cornhusker Army Ammunition Plant (CAAP, NE) groundwater. Supplementation with phosphate and adequate quantities of acetate caused 25% mineralization of RDX in 3 weeks by microorganisms native to CAAP. Under anaerobic conditions, the same supplementation resulted in 20% mineralization in 3 weeks and 30% mineralization in 6 weeks. The highest degree of mineralization (50%) was obtained under aerobic conditions when the contaminated groundwater was augmented with a consortium of three microbes isolated from another RDX contaminated soil (Hastings, NE) in addition to supplemented with phosphate and acetic acid. Use of complex organic sources (potato or corn starch) slowed down the rates of mineralization under anaerobic conditions, but rapid mineralization ensued as soon as the aerobic conditions were created. Final RDX concentrations in aqueous phase were below detection limit under most conditions. Assimilation of RDX by the cells was negligible

  6. Stable isotope probing reveals the importance of Comamonas and Pseudomonadaceae in RDX degradation in samples from a Navy detonation site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayamani, Indumathy; Cupples, Alison M

    2015-07-01

    This study investigated the microorganisms involved in hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) degradation from a detonation area at a Navy base. Using Illumina sequencing, microbial communities were compared between the initial sample, samples following RDX degradation, and controls not amended with RDX to determine which phylotypes increased in abundance following RDX degradation. The effect of glucose on these communities was also examined. In addition, stable isotope probing (SIP) using labeled ((13)C3, (15)N3-ring) RDX was performed. Illumina sequencing revealed that several phylotypes were more abundant following RDX degradation compared to the initial soil and the no-RDX controls. For the glucose-amended samples, this trend was strong for an unclassified Pseudomonadaceae phylotype and for Comamonas. Without glucose, Acinetobacter exhibited the greatest increase following RDX degradation compared to the initial soil and no-RDX controls. Rhodococcus, a known RDX degrader, also increased in abundance following RDX degradation. For the SIP study, unclassified Pseudomonadaceae was the most abundant phylotype in the heavy fractions in both the presence and absence of glucose. In the glucose-amended heavy fractions, the 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes of Comamonas and Anaeromxyobacter were also present. Without glucose, the heavy fractions also contained the 16S rRNA genes of Azohydromonas and Rhodococcus. However, all four phylotypes were present at a much lower level compared to unclassified Pseudomonadaceae. Overall, these data indicate that unclassified Pseudomonadaceae was primarily responsible for label uptake in both treatments. This study indicates, for the first time, the importance of Comamonas for RDX removal.

  7. Hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) degradation by Acetobacterium paludosum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherburne, Leslie A; Shrout, Joshua D; Alvarez, Pedro J J

    2005-12-01

    Substrates and nutrients are often added to contaminated soil or groundwater to enhance bioremediation. Nevertheless, this practice may be counterproductive in some cases where nutrient addition might relieve selective pressure for pollutant biodegradation. Batch experiments with a homoacetogenic pure culture of Acetobacterium paludosum showed that anaerobic RDX degradation is the fastest when auxiliary growth substrates (yeast extract plus fructose) and nitrogen sources (ammonium) are not added. This bacterium degraded RDX faster under autotrophic (H2-fed) than under heterotrophic conditions, even though heterotrophic growth was faster. The inhibitory effect of ammonium is postulated to be due to the repression of enzymes that initiate RDX degradation by reducing its nitro groups, based on the known fact that ammonia represses nitrate and nitrite reductases. This observation suggests that the absence of easily assimilated nitrogen sources, such as ammonium, enhances RDX degradation. Although specific end products of RDX degradation were not determined, the production of nitrous oxide (N2O) suggests that A. paludosum cleaved the triazine ring.

  8. Reactive simulation of the chemistry behind the condensed-phase ignition of RDX from hot spots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Kaushik L; Chaudhuri, Santanu

    2015-07-28

    Chemical events that lead to thermal initiation and spontaneous ignition of the high-pressure phase of RDX are presented using reactive molecular dynamics simulations. In order to initiate the chemistry behind thermal ignition, approximately 5% of RDX crystal is subjected to a constant temperature thermal pulse for various time durations to create a hot spot. After application of the thermal pulse, the ensuing chemical evolution of the system is monitored using reactive molecular dynamics under adiabatic conditions. Thermal pulses lasting longer than certain time durations lead to the spontaneous ignition of RDX after an incubation period. For cases where the ignition is observed, the incubation period is dominated by intermolecular and intramolecular hydrogen transfer reactions. Contrary to the widely accepted unimolecular models of initiation chemistry, N-N bond dissociations that produce NO2 species are suppressed in the condensed phase. The gradual temperature and pressure increase in the incubation period is accompanied by the accumulation of short-lived, heavier polyradicals. The polyradicals contain intact triazine rings from the RDX molecules. At certain temperatures and pressures, the polyradicals undergo ring-opening reactions, which fuel a series of rapid exothermic chemical reactions leading to a thermal runaway regime with stable gas-products such as N2, H2O and CO2. The evolution of the RDX crystal throughout the thermal initiation, incubation and thermal runaway phases observed in the reactive simulations contains a rich diversity of condensed-phase chemistry of nitramines under high-temperature/pressure conditions.

  9. Water quality criteria for hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Etnier, E.L.

    1989-04-01

    The occurrence of the munitions compound hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) in groundwater surrounding Army ammunition plants may result in contamination of local drinking water supplies. RDX exerts its primary toxic effect in humans on the central nervous system, but also involves gastrointestinal and renal effects. Symptomatic effects following acute exposure include hyperirritability, nausea, vomiting, generalized epileptiform seizures, and prolonged postictal confusion and amnesia. Health effects data were analyzed for RDX, and although no controlled human studies exist concerning the acute or chronic toxic effects of exposure to RDX, sufficient animal toxicity data are available to derive an ambient water quality criterion for the protection of human health. This paper summarizes the available literature on metabolism of RDX and human and animal toxicity. Based on noncarcinogenic mammalian toxicity data, and following the methodologies of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, an ambient water quality criterion for the protection of human health of 103 micrograms/liter is proposed for ingestion of drinking water and aquatic foodstuffs. A criterion of 105 micrograms/liter is proposed for ingestion of drinking water alone.54 references.

  10. Effects of Aluminum Powder on Ignition Performance of RDX, HMX, and CL-20 Explosives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoxiang Mao

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available As a kind of high explosives, aluminized explosive cannot release the energy maximumly, which is a key problem. Using DTA-TG equipment, the ignition performance of three kinds of aluminized explosives (RDX, HMX, and CL-20 with different mass percentages of aluminum powder (0%, 10 wt.%, 20 wt.%, and 30 wt.% was investigated. The results showed that the energy release of the HMX/Al composite explosive with 10 wt.%, 20 wt.%, and 30 wt.% aluminum powder was only equivalent to 80%, 65%, and 36% of pure HMX, respectively. It was similar to RDX/Al and CL-20/Al composite explosives, except the CL-20/Al mixture with 10% aluminum powder. Rather than participating in the ignition and combustion, the aluminum powder does effect the complete reaction of RDX, HMX, and CL-20 in the initial stage of ignition or in the lower temperature area of the boundary.

  11. Effects of hydrogen bonds on solid state TATB, RDX, and DATB under high pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Feng; Hu Hai-Quan; Zhang Hong; Cheng Xin-Lu

    2014-01-01

    To probe the behavior of hydrogen bonds in solid energetic materials, we conduct ReaxFF and SCC–DFTB molecular dynamics simulations of crystalline TATB, RDX, and DATB. By comparing the intra- and inter-molecular hydrogen bonding rates, we find that the crystal structures are stabilized by inter-molecular hydrogen bond networks. Under high-pressure, the inter- and intra-molecular hydrogen bonds in solid TATB and DATB are nearly equivalent. The hydrogen bonds in solid TATB and DATB are much shorter than in solid RDX, which suggests strong hydrogen bond interactions existing in these energetic materials. Stretching of the C–H bond is observed in solid RDX, which may lead to further decomposition and even detonation. (condensed matter: structural, mechanical, and thermal properties)

  12. Effects of hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) in zebrafish: General and reproductive toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhi, S.; Patino, R.

    2008-01-01

    Mixed-sex populations of young adult zebrafish (???2-month-old) were exposed to measured RDX concentrations of 0, 1 or 9.6 ppm for up to 12 weeks followed by a 15-day rearing period in untreated water. RDX caused high mortality at 9.6 ppm, with most deaths occurring within the first 8 weeks of exposure. RDX at 9.6 ppm caused lower body weights at 4 and 8 weeks of exposure; and at 1 ppm, lower body weight was observed only at 4 weeks. Fish length was not affected by treatment at any time during the exposure period. The bioconcentration factor for RDX seemed to be influenced by time of exposure but not by water RDX concentration; its overall values were 1.01 ?? 0.13, 0.91 ?? 0.06 and 2.23 ?? 0.04 at 4, 8 weeks and 12 weeks, respectively. RDX was not detected in fish collected after the 15-day recovery period. In a separate experiment, adult females and males were separately exposed to RDX at measured concentrations of 0, 0.5 and 3.2 ppm for a period of 6 weeks. Reproductive performance was evaluated by biweekly breeding of the fish and measuring packed-egg volume (PEV) as index of fecundity. At 0.5 ppm, RDX caused elevated PEV levels relative to the control value at 2 weeks but not at 4 or 6 weeks, whereas no significant effects were noted at 3.2 ppm. Egg fertilization and embryo hatching rates were not affected by RDX at any of the concentrations tested. In conclusion, RDX at sublethal concentrations causes short-term negative effects on growth and, at 0.5 ppm, positive effects on fecundity. ?? 2008 Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Bioremediation of RDX in the vadose zone beneath the Pantex Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shull, T.L.; Speitel, G.E. Jr.; McKinney, D.C. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering

    1999-01-01

    The presence of dissolved high explosives (HE), in particular RDX and HMX, is well documented in the perched aquifer beneath the Pantex Plant, but the distribution of HE in the vadose zone has not yet been well defined. Although current remediation activities focus on the contamination in the perched aquifer, eventually regulatory concern is likely to turn to the residual contamination in the vadose zone. Sources of HE include the infiltration of past wastewater discharges from several HE-processing facilities through the ditch drainage system and leachate from former Landfill 3. With limited existing data on the HE distribution in the vadose zone and without preventive action, it must be assumed that residual HE could be leached into infiltrating water, providing a continuing supply of contamination to the perched aquifer. The purpose of this project was to more closely examine the fate and transport of HE in the vadose zone through mathematical modeling and laboratory experimentation. In particular, this report focuses on biodegradation as one possible fate of HE. Biodegradation of RDX in the vadose zone was studied because it is both present in highest concentration and is likely to be of the greatest regulatory concern. This study had several objectives: determine if indigenous soil organisms are capable of RDX biodegradation; determine the impact of electron acceptor availability and nutrient addition on RDX biodegradation; determine the extent of RDX mineralization (i.e., conversion to inorganic carbon) during biodegradation; and estimate the kinetics of RDX biodegradation to provide information for mathematical modeling of fate and transport.

  14. Understanding metastable phase transformation during crystallization of RDX, HMX and CL-20: experimental and DFT studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Mrinal; Banerjee, Shaibal; Shafeeuulla Khan, Md Abdul; Sikder, Nirmala; Sikder, Arun Kanti

    2016-09-14

    Multiphase growth during crystallization severely affects deliverable output of explosive materials. Appearance and incomplete transformation of metastable phases are a major source of polymorphic impurities. This article presents a methodical and molecular level understanding of the metastable phase transformation mechanism during crystallization of cyclic nitramine explosives, viz. RDX, HMX and CL-20. Instantaneous reverse precipitation yielded metastable γ-HMX and β-CL-20 which undergo solution mediated transformation to the respective thermodynamic forms, β-HMX and ε-CL-20, following 'Ostwald's rule of stages'. However, no metastable phase, anticipated as β-RDX, was evidenced during precipitation of RDX, which rather directly yielded the thermodynamically stable α-phase. The γ→β-HMX and β→ε-CL-20 transformations took 20 and 60 minutes respectively, whereas formation of α-RDX was instantaneous. Density functional calculations were employed to identify the possible transition state conformations and to obtain activation barriers for transformations at wB97XD/6-311++G(d,p)(IEFPCM)//B3LYP/6-311G(d,p) level of theory. The computed activation barriers and lattice energies responsible for transformation of RDX, HMX and CL-20 metastable phases to thermodynamic ones conspicuously supported the experimentally observed order of phase stability. This precise result facilitated an understanding of the occurrence of a relatively more sensitive and less dense β-CL-20 phase in TNT based melt-cast explosive compositions, a persistent and critical problem unanswered in the literature. The crystalline material recovered from such compositions revealed a mixture of β- and ε-CL-20. However, similar compositions of RDX and HMX never showed any metastable phase. The relatively long stability with the highest activation barrier is believed to restrict complete β→ε-CL-20 transformation during processing. Therefore a method is suggested to overcome this issue.

  15. Integrated Data Collection Analysis (IDCA) Program - RDX Standard Data Set 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandstrom, Mary M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Brown, Geoffrey W. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Preston, Daniel N. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Pollard, Colin J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Warner, Kirstin F. [Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC), Indian Head, MD (United States). Indian Head Division; Sorensen, Daniel N. [Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC), Indian Head, MD (United States). Indian Head Division; Remmers, Daniel L. [Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC), Indian Head, MD (United States). Indian Head Division; Phillips, Jason J. [Air Force Research Lab. (AFRL), Tyndall Air Force Base, FL (United States); Shelley, Timothy J. [Applied Research Associates, Tyndall Air Force Base, FL (United States); Reyes, Jose A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hsu, Peter C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Reynolds, John G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2013-02-20

    The Integrated Data Collection Analysis (IDCA) program is conducting a proficiency study for Small- Scale Safety and Thermal (SSST) testing of homemade explosives (HMEs). Described here are the results for impact, friction, electrostatic discharge, and differential scanning calorimetry analysis of the RDX Type II Class 5 standard, from testing the second time in the Proficiency Test. This RDX testing (Set 2) compared to the first (Set 1) was found to have about the same impact sensitivity, have more BAM friction sensitivity, less ABL friction sensitivity, similar ESD sensitivity, and same DSC sensitivity.

  16. An Evaluation of the Environmental Fate and Behavior of Munitions Material (TNT, RDX) in Soil and Plant Systems. Environmental Fate and Behavior of RDX

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-08-01

    2.2 2.2 SOIL CHARACTERIZATION AND SAMPLING ............................................. 2.7 2.3 PLANT CULTIVATION ...cycle. 2.3 Plant Cultivation and Samoling The chemical fate of RDX in plants was evaluated using bush beans K (Phaseolus vulgaris), wheat (Triticum...particularly in light of the high tissue concentrations observed, may be important from the standpoint of food-chain transfer and ecotoxicology

  17. Studies of the laser-induced fluorescence of explosives and explosive compositions.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hargis, Philip Joseph, Jr. (,; .); Thorne, Lawrence R.; Phifer, Carol Celeste; Parmeter, John Ethan; Schmitt, Randal L.

    2006-10-01

    Continuing use of explosives by terrorists throughout the world has led to great interest in explosives detection technology, especially in technologies that have potential for standoff detection. This LDRD was undertaken in order to investigate the possible detection of explosive particulates at safe standoff distances in an attempt to identify vehicles that might contain large vehicle bombs (LVBs). The explosives investigated have included the common homogeneous or molecular explosives, 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN), cyclonite or hexogen (RDX), octogen (HMX), and the heterogeneous explosive, ammonium nitrate/fuel oil (ANFO), and its components. We have investigated standard excited/dispersed fluorescence, laser-excited prompt and delayed dispersed fluorescence using excitation wavelengths of 266 and 355 nm, the effects of polarization of the laser excitation light, and fluorescence imaging microscopy using 365- and 470-nm excitation. The four nitro-based, homogeneous explosives (TNT, PETN, RDX, and HMX) exhibit virtually no native fluorescence, but do exhibit quenching effects of varying magnitude when adsorbed on fluorescing surfaces. Ammonium nitrate and fuel oil mixtures fluoresce primarily due to the fuel oil, and, in some cases, due to the presence of hydrophobic coatings on ammonium nitrate prill or impurities in the ammonium nitrate itself. Pure ammonium nitrate shows no detectable fluorescence. These results are of scientific interest, but they provide little hope for the use of UV-excited fluorescence as a technique to perform safe standoff detection of adsorbed explosive particulates under real-world conditions with a useful degree of reliability.

  18. The Effect of Light Casings on the Blast Parameters from a Spherical Charge of RDX/TNT 60/40

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bishop, Valerie J; James, D. J

    1968-01-01

    .... High speed cine films were taken of the fireball growth. Peak overpressure and impulse enhancement over the values from an uncased RDX/TNT charge were obtained only from the thickest lead casing...

  19. The environmental behavior and chemical fate of energetic compounds (TNT, RDX, tetryl) in soil and plant systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cataldo, D.A.; Harvey, S.D.; Fellows, R.J.

    1993-06-01

    Munitions materials can accumulate or cycle in terrestrial environs at production and manufacturing facilities and thus pose potential heath and environmental concerns. To address questions related to food chain accumulation, the environmental behavior of energetic compounds (2,4,6-trinitrotoluene,TNT; hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine, RDX; 2,4,6-trinitrophenylmethylnitramine, tetryl) was evaluated. Emphasis was placed on determining the potential for soil/plant transfer of munitions residues, translocation and distribution within the plant, the extent to which compounds were metabolized following accumulation, and the chemical nature and form of accumulated residues. Both TNT and tetryl undergo extensive chemical transformation in soil, forming aminodinitrotoluene isomers and N-methyl-2,4,6-trinitroaniline residues, respectively, along with a series of unknowns. After 60 days, only 30% of the amended TNT and 8% of the amended tetryl remained unchanged in the soil. In contrast, 78% of the soil-amended RDX remained unchanged after 60 days. After 60 days, plants grown in soils containing 10 ppm residues contained from 5 μg TNT/g to 600 μg RDX/G fresh wt. tissue. TNT and tetryl residues were primarily accumulated in roots (75%), while RDX was concentrated in leaves and seed. The principal transport form for TNT (root to shoot) was an acid labile conjugate of aminodinitrotoluene; RDX was transported unchanged. On accumulation in roots and leaves, highly polar and non-extractable TNT metabolites dominated, with the aminodinitrotoluene isomers accounting for less than 20% of the residues present. Only a few percent were present as the parent TNT. RDX was partitioned similarly to TNT, with 8 to 30% of the RDX appearing as polar metabolites, 20--50% as parent RDX, and the balance as non-extractable residues. Tetryl was metabolized to N-methyl-2,4,6-trinitroaniline and a variety of polar metabolites

  20. Phytoremediation of Composition-B Derived TNT and RDX in Herbaceous Plant-vegetated and Bare Lysimeters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-01

    ER D C TR -0 9- 10 Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program Phytoremediation of Composition-B Derived TNT and RDX in...Program ERDC TR-09-10 December 2009 Phytoremediation of Composition-B Derived TNT and RDX in Herbaceous Plant-vegetated and Bare Lysimeters Elly P. H...for U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Washington, DC 20314-1000 ERDC TR-09-10 ii Abstract: This report describes a study in which phytoremediation of

  1. Effect of Long Term Low-Level Gamma Radiation on Thermal Sensitivity of RDX/HMX Mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-11-01

    1.1x10 R. It was concluded that the slight exothermic reaction before the 3^6 HMX polymorphic transition could be caused by a radiation-induced...Radiation on Thermal Sensitivity of RDX / HMX Mixtures 5. TYPE OF REPORT 4 PERIOD COVERED Final Report 6. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER 7...and Identity by block number) Gamma radiation Weight loss HMX Impact sensitivity test RDX Vacuum stability test DTA Infrared spectrometry TGA

  2. Fizičko-hemijske i detonacione karakteristike nitraminskih eksploziva - RDX, HMX i CL-20

    OpenAIRE

    Anđelković-Lukić Mirjana

    2002-01-01

    U radu su prikazane fizičko-hemijske i detonacione karakteristike nitraminskih brizantnih eksploziva, heksogena i oktogena, uporedene sa osobinama novog cikličnog nitraminskog eksploziva CL-20. Novi visokobrizantni eksploziv CL-20 postoji u četiri kristalne forme, stabilne na različitim temepraturama. Ima bolje detonacione karakteristike od heksogena i oktogena veću gustinu i brzinu detonacije, all mnogo veću osetljivost na udar i trenje, reda PETN. Zbog toga se ovaj eksploziv flegmatizuje sa...

  3. Integrated Data Collection Analysis (IDCA) Program — RDX Standard Data Sets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandstrom, Mary M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Brown, Geoffrey W. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Preston, Daniel N. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Pollard, Colin J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Warner, Kirstin F. [Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC), Indian Head, MD (United States). Indian Head Division; Sorensen, Daniel N. [Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC), Indian Head, MD (United States). Indian Head Division; Remmers, Daniel L. [Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC), Indian Head, MD (United States). Indian Head Division; Phillips, Jason J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Shelley, Timothy J. [Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms, Huntsville, AL (United States); Reyes, Jose A. [Applied Research Associates, Tyndall AFB, FL (United States); Hsu, Peter C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Reynolds, John G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2013-03-04

    The Integrated Data Collection Analysis (IDCA) program is conducting a proficiency study for Small- Scale Safety and Thermal (SSST) testing of homemade explosives (HMEs). Described here are the results for impact, friction, electrostatic discharge, and differential scanning calorimetry analysis of the RDX Type II Class 5 standard, for a third and fourth time in the Proficiency Test and averaged with the analysis results from the first and second time. The results, from averaging all four sets (1, 2, 3 and 4) of data suggest a material to have slightly more impact sensitivity, more BAM friction sensitivity, less ABL friction sensitivity, similar ESD sensitivity, and same DSC sensitivity, compared to the results from Set 1, which was used previously as the values for the RDX standard in IDCA Analysis Reports.

  4. Polarizability of acetanilide and RDX in the crystal: effect of molecular geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsiaousis, D.; Munn, R. W.; Smith, P. J.; Popelier, P. L. A.

    2004-10-01

    Density-functional theory with the B3LYP functional at the 6-311++G** level is used to calculate the dipole moment and the static polarizability for acetanilide and 1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazacyclohexane (RDX) in their in-crystal structures. For acetanilide the dipole moment is 2{1}/{2}% larger than for the gas-phase structure and for RDX (where there is a gross geometry change) it is 15% larger. The polarizability for the in-crystal structure is smaller than for the gas-phase structure by 3% for both species, whereas the in-crystal effective optical polarizability is larger than the gas-phase static polarizability for both crystals. Hence, effects in addition to the molecular geometry change in the crystal must be considered in order to interpret the effective polarizability completely.

  5. Aminoxyl (nitroxyl) radicals in the early decomposition of the nitramine RDX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irikura, Karl K

    2013-03-14

    The explosive nitramine RDX (1,3,5-trinitrohexahydro-s-triazine) is thought to decompose largely by homolytic N-N bond cleavage, among other possible initiation reactions. Density-functional theory (DFT) calculations indicate that the resulting secondary aminyl (R2N·) radical can abstract an oxygen atom from NO2 or from a neighboring nitramine molecule, producing an aminoxyl (R2NO·) radical. Persistent aminoxyl radicals have been detected in electron-spin resonance (ESR) experiments and are consistent with autocatalytic "red oils" reported in the experimental literature. When the O-atom donor is a nitramine, a nitrosamine is formed along with the aminoxyl radical. Reactions of aminoxyl radicals can lead readily to the "oxy-s-triazine" product (as the s-triazine N-oxide) observed mass-spectrometrically by Behrens and co-workers. In addition to forming aminoxyl radicals, the initial aminyl radical can catalyze loss of HONO from RDX.

  6. Evaluation of the metabolic fate of munitions material (TNT & RDX) in plant systems and initial assessment of material interaction with plant genetic material. Validation of the metabolic fate of munitions materials (TNT, RDX) in mature crops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fellows, R.J.; Harvey, S.D.; Cataldo, D.A.

    1995-09-01

    The goals of this effort were to confirm and expand data related to the behavior and impacts of munitions residues upon human food chain components. Plant species employed included corn (Zea mays), alfalfa (Medicago sativa). spinach (Spinacea oleraceae), and carrot (Daucus carota). Plants were grown from seed to maturity (70 to 120 days) in a low-fertility soil (Burbank) amended with either {sup 14}C-TNT or {sup 14}C-RDX at which time they were harvested and analyzed for munitions uptake, partitioning, and chemical form of the munition or munition-metabolite. All four of the plant species used in this study accumulated the {sup 14}C-TNT- and RDX-derived label. The carrot, alfalfa, and corn demonstrated a higher percentage of label retained in the roots (62, 73, and 83% respectively). The spinach contained less activity in its root (36%) but also contained the highest TNT specific activity observed (>4600 jig TNT equivalents/g dry wt.). The specific uptake values of RDX for the spinach and alfalfa were comparable to those previously reported for wheat and bean (314 to 590 {mu}g RDX-equivalents/g dry wt. respectively). An exception to this may be the carrot where the specific activity was found to exceed 4200 {mu}g RDX-equivalents/g dry wt. in the shoot. The total accumulation of TNT by the plants ranged from 1.24% for the spinach to 2.34% for the carrot. The RDX plants ranging from 15% for the spinach to 37% for the carrot. There was no identifiable TNT or amino dinitrotoluene (ADNT) isomers present in the plants however, the parent RDX compound was found at significant levels in the shoot of alfalfa (> 1 80 {mu}g/g) and corn (>18 {mu}g/g).

  7. Lon protease affects the RdxA nitroreductase activity and metronidazole susceptibility in Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, I-Fan; Liao, Jiahn-Haur; Yang, Feng-Ling; Lin, Nien-Tsung; Chan, Hong-Lin; Wu, Shih-Hsiung

    2014-10-01

    The lon gene of Helicobacter pylori strains is constitutively expressed during growth. However, virtually nothing is understood concerning the role of Lon in H. pylori. This study examined the function and physiological role of Lon in H. pylori (HpLon) using a trapping approach to identify putative Lon binding partners in the bacterium. Protease-deficient Lon was expressed and served as the bait in trapping approach to capture the interacting partners in H. pylori. The antibiotic susceptibility of wild-type and lon derivative mutants was determined by the E test trips and the disc diffusion assay. The effect of HpLon on RdxA activity was detected the change in NADPH oxidation and metronidazole reduction by spectrophotometer. Lon in Helicobacter pylori (HpLon) interacting partners are mostly associated with metronidazole activation. lon mutant presents more susceptible to metronidazole than that of the wild type, and this phenotype is recovered by complementation of the wild-type Lon. We found that the ATPases associated with a variety of cellular activities (AAA(+) ) module of HpLon causes a decrease in both NADPH oxidase and Mtz reductase activity in RdxA, a major Mtz-activating enzyme in H. pylori. Metronidazole resistance of H. pylori causes the serious medical problem worldwide. In this study, HpLon is involved in metronidazole susceptibility among H. pylori strains. We provide the evidence that HpLon alters RdxA activity in vitro. The decrease in metronidazole activation caused by HpLon is possibly prior to accumulate mutation in rdxA gene before the metronidazole-resistant strains to be occurred. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Laboratory Demonstration of Abiotic Technologies for Removal of RDX from a Process Waste Stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    calcium carbonate CSTR continuous stirred tank reactor d day DoD Department of Defense gal gallons gpd gallons per day RDX hexahydro-1,3,5... CSTR ), and (c) Plug flow reactor. a batch reactor may be used if the desired reaction occurs while the reactor volume is inconstant (i.e., during the...products from the reactor system. Con- tinuous flow reactors may be further divided into continuous stirred tank reactors ( CSTRs ) and plug or pipe flow

  9. Cost and Performance Report: Bioaugmentation for Aerobic Bioremediation of RDX-Contaminated Groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    costs were also included. The addition of two extraction wells would not require an upgrade of the current granular activated carbon (GAC) treatment...transport properties, and RDX-degrading activity in UMCD aquifer material and groundwater. Phase II included a field-scale cell transport test conducted ...Accordingly, users may plan to conduct a field tracer test to confirm hydraulic connectivity between the injection and downgradient monitoring

  10. Sustainable Range Management of RDX and TNT by Phytoremediation with Engineered Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    pH 6.5. Change in absorbance at 340 nm was measured over 1 min. Significant difference from wild-type (WT) is shown by an asterisk and determined by...FINAL REPORT Sustainable Range Management of RDX and TNT by Phytoremediation with Engineered Plants SERDP Project ER-1498 APRIL 2016...by Phyoremediation with Engineered Plants 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER ER-1498 Neil C

  11. CFD SIMULATION FOR DEMILITARIZATION OF RDX IN A ROTARY KILN BY THERMAL DECOMPOSITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SI H. LEE

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Demilitarization requires the recovery and disposal of obsolete ammunition and explosives. Since open burning/detonation of hazardous waste has caused serious environmental and safety problems, thermal decomposition has emerged as one of the most feasible methods. RDX is widely used as a military explosive due to its high melting temperature and detonation power. In this work, the feasible conditions under which explosives can be safely incinerated have been investigated via a rotary kiln simulation. To solve this problem, phase change along with the reactions of RDX has been incisively analyzed. A global reaction mechanism consisting of condensed phase and gas phase reactions are used in Computational Fluid Dynamics simulation. User Defined Functions in FLUENT is utilized in this study to inculcate the reactions and phase change into the simulation. The results divulge the effect of temperature and the varying amounts of gas produced in the rotary kiln during the thermal decomposition of RDX. The result leads to the prospect of demilitarizing waste explosives to avoid the possibility of detonation.

  12. Application of 13C and 15N stable isotope probing to characterize RDX degrading microbial communities under different electron-accepting conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Kun-Ching; Lee, Do Gyun; Fuller, Mark E.; Hatzinger, Paul B.; Condee, Charles W.; Chu, Kung-Hui

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • SIP characterized RDX-degrading communities under different e-accepting conditions. • Dominant RDX degradation pathways differed under different e-accepting conditions. • More complete detoxification of RDX occurred under methanogenic and sulfate-reducing conditions than under manganese(IV) and iron(III)-reducing conditions. - Abstract: This study identified microorganisms capable of using the explosive hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) or its metabolites as carbon and/or nitrogen sources under different electron-accepting conditions using 13 C and 15 N stable isotope probing (SIP). Mesocosms were constructed using groundwater and aquifer solids from an RDX-contaminated aquifer. The mesocosms received succinate as a carbon source and one of four electron acceptors (nitrate, manganese(IV), iron(III), or sulfate) or no additional electron acceptor (to stimulate methanogenesis). When RDX degradation was observed, subsamples from each mesocosm were removed and amended with 13 C 3 - or ring- 15 N 3 -, nitro- 15 N 3 -, or fully-labeled 15 N 6 -RDX, followed by additional incubation and isolation of labeled nucleic acids. A total of fifteen 16S rRNA sequences, clustering in α- and γ-Proteobacteria, Clostridia, and Actinobacteria, were detected in the 13 C-DNA fractions. A total of twenty seven sequences were derived from different 15 N-DNA fractions, with the sequences clustered in α- and γ-Proteobacteria, and Clostridia. Interestingly, sequences identified as Desulfosporosinus sp. (in the Clostridia) were not only observed to incorporate the labeled 13 C or 15 N from labeled RDX, but also were detected under each of the different electron-accepting conditions. The data suggest that 13 C- and 15 N-SIP can be used to characterize microbial communities involved in RDX biodegradation, and that the dominant pathway of RDX biodegradation may differ under different electron-accepting conditions

  13. Shock-to-detonation transition of RDX, HMX and NTO based composite high explosives: experiments and modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baudin, G; Roudot, M; Genetier, M; Mateille, P; Lefrançois, A

    2014-01-01

    HMX, RDX and NTO based cast-cured plastic bounded explosive (PBX) are widely used in insensitive ammunitions. Designing modern warheads needs robust and reliable models to compute shock ignition and detonation propagation inside PBX. Comparing to a pressed PBX, a cast-cured PBX is not porous and the hot-spots are mainly located at the grain-binder interface leading to a different burning behavior during shock-to-detonation transition. Here, we review the shock-to-detonation transition (SDT) and its modeling for cast-cured PBX containing HMX, RDX and NTO. Future direction is given in conclusion.

  14. Shock-to-detonation transition of RDX, HMX and NTO based composite high explosives: experiments and modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baudin, G.; Roudot, M.; Genetier, M.; Mateille, P.; Lefrançois, A.

    2014-05-01

    HMX, RDX and NTO based cast-cured plastic bounded explosive (PBX) are widely used in insensitive ammunitions. Designing modern warheads needs robust and reliable models to compute shock ignition and detonation propagation inside PBX. Comparing to a pressed PBX, a cast-cured PBX is not porous and the hot-spots are mainly located at the grain-binder interface leading to a different burning behavior during shock-to-detonation transition. Here, we review the shock-to-detonation transition (SDT) and its modeling for cast-cured PBX containing HMX, RDX and NTO. Future direction is given in conclusion.

  15. Sorption kinetics of TNT and RDX in anaerobic freshwater and marine sediments: Batch studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariyarathna, Thivanka; Vlahos, Penny; Tobias, Craig; Smith, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Examination of the partitioning of explosives onto sediment in marine environments is critical to predict the toxicological impacts of worldwide explosive-contaminated sites adjacent to estuaries, wetlands, and the coastal ocean. Marine sediments have been identified as sites of enhanced munitions removal, yet most studies addressing these interactions focus on soils and freshwater sediments. The present study measured the kinetics of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) and hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) sorption onto 2 marine sediments of varying grain sizes (silt vs sand) and organic carbon (OC) content. Abiotic sediment sorption tests were performed at 23 °C, 15 °C, and 4 °C by spiking TNT and RDX solutions directly into anaerobic sediment slurries. Marine sediments showed significantly higher compound uptake rates (0.30-0.80 h(-1) ) than freshwater silt (0.0046-0.0065 h(-1) ) for both compounds, probably because of lower compound solubilities and a higher pH in marine systems. Equilibrium partition constants are on the same order of magnitude for marine silt (1.1-2.0 L kg(-1) sediment) and freshwater silt (1.4-3.1 L kg(-1) sediment) but lower for marine sand (0.72-0.92 L kg(-1) sediment). Total organic carbon content in marine sediments varied linearly with equilibrium partition constants for TNT and was moderately linear for RDX. Uptake rates and equilibrium constants of explosives are inversely correlated to temperature regardless of sediment type because of kinetic barriers associated with low temperatures. © 2015 SETAC.

  16. (Bio)degradation of RDX and HMX in Marine/Estuarine Water and Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-09-01

    four fungal strains Rhodotorula sp . HAW-OCF1, Bullera sp . HAW-OCF2, Acremonium sp . HAW-OCF3 and Penicillium sp . HAW-OCF5, were isolated as RDX...represent four novel species of Shewanella described as follows: Shewanella sediminis sp . nov.: Strain HAW-EB3T contains lysine decarboxylase that is...We proposed Shewanella sediminis sp . nov. with HAW-EB3T (= NCIMB 14036T = DSM 17055T) as the type strain (Zhao et al. 2005). Shewanella halifaxensis

  17. Energetic materials under high pressures and temperatures: stability, polymorphism and decomposition of RDX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dreger, Z A

    2012-01-01

    A recent progress in understanding the response of energetic crystal of cyclotrimethylene trinitramine (RDX) to high pressures and temperatures is summarized. The optical spectroscopy and imaging studies under static compression and high temperatures provided new insight into phase diagram, polymorphism and decomposition mechanisms at pressures and temperatures relevant to those under shock compression. These results have been used to aid the understanding of processes under shock compression, including the shock-induced phase transition and identification of the crystal phase at decomposition. This work demonstrates that studies under static compression and high temperatures provide important complementary route for elucidating the physical and chemical processes in shocked energetic crystals.

  18. Non-equilibrium dynamics due to moving deflagration front at RDX/HTPB interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhuri, Santanu; Joshi, Kaushik; Lacevic, Naida

    Reactive dissipative particle dynamics (DPD-RX), a promising tool in characterizing the sensitivity and performance of heterogeneous solid propellants like polymer bonded explosives (PSXs), requires further testing for non-equilibrium dynamics. It is important to understand detailed atomistic chemistry for developing coarse grain reactive models needed for the DPD-RX. In order to obtain insights into combustion chemistry of RDX/HTPB binder, we used reactive molecular dynamics (RMD) to obtain energy up-pumping and reaction mechanisms at RDX/HTPB interface when exposed to a self-sustaining deflagration front. Hot spots are ignited near and away from the heterogeneous interface using the thermal pulse. The results show that the hot spot near interface significantly delays the transition from ignition to deflagration. We will present the mechanical response and the combustion chemistry of HTPB when the propagating deflagration front hits the polymer binder. We will discuss our efforts to incorporate this RMD based chemistry into the DPD-RX which will enable us to perform such non-equilibrium dynamics simulations on large-length scale with microstructural heterogeneities. Funding from DTRA Grant Number HDTRA1-15-1-0034 is acknowledged.

  19. Mechanical and chemical responses of low-velocity impacted RDX and HMX explosive powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yanqing; Guo, Hongfu; Huang, Fenglei; Bao, Xiaowei; Explosion; damage Team

    2017-06-01

    The experimental analyses of mechanical and chemical responses of RDX and HMX particles were performed based on the optimized drop-weight experimental system equipped with the High-Speed Camera (HSC). It has been found that Jetting phenomenon observed by HSC is the result of the energy released by gaseous products, which push the pulverized or melted explosives to splash radially. Jetting is the only and the most obvious difference between reactive and inert particles prior to combustion so that jetting can be regarded as the sign of ignition. Area expansion velocity, jetting velocity, and flame propagation velocity have been estimated via image processing, making it possible to characterize mechanical deformation and violence of reaction of each stage. Hot-spots coalescence promotes flame propagation whose velocity reflects the violence of deflagration reaction. Jetting appearance time can be used to determine time-to-ignition more accurately than other ways. For RDX, molten phase plays an important role to the formation of the hot-spots. Multiple particles experienced more severe burning reactions than an individual particle. China National Nature Science Foundation (11572045), ``Science Challenging Program'' (JCKY2016212A501),opening fund from Safety ammunition research and Development Center (RMC2015B03).

  20. IRIS Toxicological Review of Hexahydro-1,3,5-Trinitro-1,3,5-Triazine (RDX) (Preliminary Assessment Materials)

    Science.gov (United States)

    In August 2013, EPA released the draft literature searches and associated search strategies, evidence tables, and exposure response arrays for RDX to obtain input from stakeholders and the public prior to developing the draft IRIS assessment. Specifically, EPA was interested in c...

  1. IRIS Toxicological Review of Hexahydro-1,3,5-Trinitro-1,3,5-Triazine (RDX) (Public Comment Draft)

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA is developing an Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) assessment of hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) and has released the draft assessment for public comment. When final, the assessment will appear on the IRIS database.

  2. IRIS Toxicological Review of Hexahydro-1,3,5-Trinitro-1,3,5-Triazine (RDX) (External Review Draft)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The IRIS Toxicological Review of Hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) was released for external peer review in September 2016. The EPA’s Science Advisory Board’s (SAB) Chemical Assessment Advisory Committee (CAAC) will conduct a peer review of the scientific basis suppor...

  3. RDX binds to the convulsant site of the GABAA receptor and increases spontaneous firing rates of cortical neurons in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    RDX (hexahydro-1 ,3,5-trinitro-1 ,3,5-triazine, hexogen, Royal Demolition eXplosive) is an explosive widely used by the military and has been found in soil and ground water in and surrounding training ranges, creating potential hazards to the environment and human health. Oral RD...

  4. Thermal safety characterization on PETN, PBX-9407, LX-10-2, LX-17-1 and detonator in the LLNL's P-ODTX system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, P. C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Strout, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Reynolds, J. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kahl, E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ellsworth, F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Healy, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-09-21

    Incidents caused by fire and other thermal events can heat energetic materials that may lead to thermal explosion and result in structural damage and casualty. Thus, it is important to understand the response of energetic materials to thermal insults. The One-Dimensional-Time to Explosion (ODTX) system at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has been used for decades to characterize thermal safety of energetic materials. In this study, an integration of a pressure monitoring element has been added into the ODTX system (P-ODTX) to perform thermal explosion (cook-off) experiments (thermal runaway) on PETN powder, PBX-9407, LX-10-2, LX-17-1, and detonator samples (cup tests). The P-ODTX testing generates useful data (thermal explosion temperature, thermal explosion time, and gas pressures) to assist with the thermal safety assessment of relevant energetic materials and components. This report summarizes the results of P-ODTX experiments that were performed from May 2015 to July 2017. Recent upgrades to the data acquisition system allows for rapid pressure monitoring in microsecond intervals during thermal explosion. These pressure data are also included in the report.

  5. Environmental Behavior and Fate of Explosives in Groundwater from the Milan Army Ammunition Plant in Aquatic and Wetland Plants. Fate of TNT and RDX

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Best, Elly

    1998-01-01

    The present study was performed to elucidate the environmental behavior and fate of TNT and RDX in aquatic and wetland plants collected from a field-scale wetland demonstration deployed at Milan Army...

  6. Mirrored continuum and molecular scale simulations of the ignition of gamma phase RDX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, D. Scott; Chaudhuri, Santanu; Joshi, Kaushik; Lee, Kibaek

    2017-01-01

    We describe the ignition of an explosive crystal of gamma-phase RDX due to a thermal hot spot with reactive molecular dynamics (RMD), with first-principles trained, reactive force field based molecular potentials that represents an extremely complex reaction network. The RMD simulation is analyzed by sorting molecular product fragments into high and low molecular weight groups, to represent identifiable components that can be interpreted by a continuum model. A continuum model based on a Gibbs formulation has a single temperature and stress state for the mixture. The continuum simulation that mirrors the atomistic simulation allows us to study the atomistic simulation in the familiar physical chemistry framework and provides an essential, continuum/atomistic link.

  7. Studies of free field and confined explosions of aluminium enriched RDX compositions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trzcinski, Waldemar A.; Cudzilo, Stanislaw; Paszula, Jozef [Military University of Technology, Kaliskiego 2, 00-908 Warsaw (Poland)

    2007-12-15

    Research on the effect of aluminium contents and its particle size on free field and confined explosions characteristics of RDX-based compositions containing 15-60% aluminium was carried out. Parameters of blast waves produced by charges of the investigated explosives detonating in an open space were measured by the use of piezoelectric gauges. Simultaneously, photodiode set-ups were used to measure light output of the detonating charges. Quasi-static pressure measurements were conducted in steel chambers of 0.15 and 7 m{sup 3} volume filled with air. Moreover, the heat of detonation was measured with a calorimetric set in a 5.6 dm{sup 3} bomb filled with argon. The results of QSP and detonation heat measurements were compared with those obtained from thermochemical calculations. (Abstract Copyright [2007], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  8. Biotransformation of hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) by a prospective consortium and its most effective isolate Serratia marcescens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, D.M.; Ogden, K.L. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Environmental Engineering; Unkefer, P.J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Chemical Science and Technology Div.

    1997-03-05

    The biotransformation of hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5 triazine (RDX) has been observed in liquid culture by a consortium of bacteria found in horse manure. Five types of bacteria were found to predominate in the consortium and were isolated. The most effective of these isolates at transforming RDX was Serratia marcescens. The biotransformation of RDX by all of these bacteria was found to occur only in the anoxic stationary phase. The process of bacterial growth and RDX biotransformation was quantified for the purpose of developing a predictive type model. Cell growth was assumed to follow Monod kinetics. All of the aerobic and anoxid growth parameters were determined: {mu}{sub max}, K{sub s}, and Y{sub x/s}. RDX was found to competitively inhibit cell growth in both atmospheres. Degradation of RDX by Serratia marcescens was found to proceed through the stepwise reduction of the three nitro groups to nitroso groups. Each of these reductions was found to be first order in both component and cell concentrations. The degradation rate constant for the first step in this reduction process by the consortium was 0.022 L/g cells {center_dot} h compared to 0.033 L/g cells {center_dot} h for the most efficient isolate.

  9. Integrated Data Collection Analysis (IDCA) Program - RDX Type II Class 5 Standard, Data Set 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandstrom, Mary M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Brown, Geoffrey W. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Preston, Daniel N. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Pollard, Colin J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Warner, Kirstin F. [Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC), Indian Head, MD (United States). Indian Head Division; Sorenson, Daniel N. [Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC), Indian Head, MD (United States). Indian Head Division; Remmers, Daniel L. [Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC), Indian Head, MD (United States). Indian Head Division; Moran, Jesse S. [Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC), Indian Head, MD (United States). Indian Head Division; Shelley, Timothy J. [Air Force Research Lab. (AFRL), Tyndall AFB, FL (United States); Reyes, Jose A. [Applied Research Associates, Inc., Tyndall AFB, FL (United States); Hsu, Peter C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Whipple, Richard E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Reynolds, John G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2011-04-11

    This document describes the results of the first reference sample material—RDX Type II Class 5—examined in the proficiency study for small-scale safety and thermal (SSST) testing of explosive materials for the Integrated Data Collection Analysis (IDCA) Program. The IDCA program is conducting proficiency testing on homemade explosives (HMEs). The reference sample materials are being studied to establish the accuracy of traditional explosives safety testing for each performing laboratory. These results will be used for comparison to results from testing HMEs. This effort, funded by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), ultimately will put the issues of safe handling of these materials in perspective with standard military explosives. The results of the study will add SSST testing results for a broad suite of different HMEs to the literature, potentially suggest new guidelines and methods for HME testing, and possibly establish what are the needed accuracies in SSST testing to develop safe handling practices. Described here are the results for impact, friction, electrostatic discharge, and scanning calorimetry analysis of a reference sample of RDX Type II Class 5. The results from each participating testing laboratory are compared using identical test material and preparation methods wherever possible. Note, however, the test procedures differ among the laboratories. These results are then compared to historical data from various sources. The performers involved are Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Air Force Research Laboratory/ RXQL (AFRL), Indian Head Division, Naval Surface Warfare Center, (IHD-NSWC), and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). These tests are conducted as a proficiency study in order to establish some consistency in test protocols, procedures, and experiments and to understand how to compare results when test protocols are not identical.

  10. Shock-to-detonation transition of RDX and NTO based composite high explosives: experiments and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baudin, Gerard; Roudot, Marie; Genetier, Marc

    2013-06-01

    Composite HMX and NTO based high explosives (HE) are widely used in ammunitions. Designing modern warheads needs robust and reliable models to compute shock ignition and detonation propagation inside HE. Comparing to a pressed HE, a composite HE is not porous and the hot-spots are mainly located at the grain - binder interface leading to a different behavior during shock-to-detonation transition. An investigation of how shock-to-detonation transition occurs inside composite HE containing RDX and NTO is proposed in this lecture. Two composite HE have been studied. The first one is HMX - HTPB 82:18. The second one is HMX - NTO - HTPB 12:72:16. These HE have been submitted to plane sustained shock waves at different pressure levels using a laboratory powder gun. Pressure signals are measured using manganin gauges inserted at several distances inside HE. The corresponding run-distances to detonation are determined using wedge test experiments where the plate impact is performed using a powder gun. Both HE exhibit a single detonation buildup curve in the distance - time diagram of shock-to-detonation transition. This feature seems a common shock-to-detonation behavior for composite HE without porosity. This behavior is also confirmed for a RDX - HTPB 85:15 based composite HE. Such a behavior is exploited to determine the heterogeneous reaction rate versus the shock pressure using a method based on the Cauchy-Riemann problem inversion. The reaction rate laws obtained allow to compute both run-distance to detonation and pressure signals.

  11. Fizičko-hemijske i detonacione karakteristike nitraminskih eksploziva - RDX, HMX i CL-20 / Physico-chemical and detonation properties of nitramine explosives: RDX, HMX and CL-20

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirjana Anđelković-Lukić

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available U radu su prikazane fizičko-hemijske i detonacione karakteristike nitraminskih brizantnih eksploziva, heksogena i oktogena, uporedene sa osobinama novog cikličnog nitraminskog eksploziva CL-20. Novi visokobrizantni eksploziv CL-20 postoji u četiri kristalne forme, stabilne na različitim temepraturama. Ima bolje detonacione karakteristike od heksogena i oktogena veću gustinu i brzinu detonacije, all mnogo veću osetljivost na udar i trenje, reda PETN. Zbog toga se ovaj eksploziv flegmatizuje sa polimerima etilenvinilacetatom (EVA i estanom. Da bi se povećale energetske performanse eksploziva i smanjila osetljivost na mehanička dejstva eksplozivu CL-20 dodaju se visokoenergetski materijali, fluoronitrojedinjenja (FEFO. / In this paper the physico-chemical and detonation properties of nitramine high explosives, hexogen and octogen, are presented and compared with a polycyclic nitramine high explosive CL-20. This new high explosive CL-20 exists in four crystalline forms, stable at different temperatures. CL-20 has better detonation properties than hexogen and octogen, higher density and detonation rate, but greater impact and friction sensitivity (of PETN class. So it is necessary to bond this explosive with polymers-ethylenvinil acetat (EVA and estane to reduce sensitivity to mechanical effects. CL-20 can be prepared by adding high energy materials-fluoro-nitro compounds (FEFO as regulators of energy performances.

  12. Mineralization of TNT, RDX, and By-Products in an Anaerobic Granular Activated Carbon-Fluidized Bed Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-04-01

    pipe fitters and safety personnel who constructed and installed the system. CERL personnel include Don Cropek, Pat Kemme, Neil Adrian and Clint Arnett...al. (2000), demonstrated the sequential conversion of the nitro-groups to amino-groups in TNT degradation, and Adrian and Sutherland , 1998...dinitrotoluene extended the research to TNT, RDX and pinkwater (Adrian and Sutherland , 1998, VanderLoop et al., 1998 and Hwang et al., 2000). Initial pilot

  13. Integrated Data Collection Analysis (IDCA) Program - Statistical Analysis of RDX Standard Data Sets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandstrom, Mary M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Brown, Geoffrey W. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Preston, Daniel N. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Pollard, Colin J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Warner, Kirstin F. [Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC), Indian Head, MD (United States). Indian Head Division; Sorensen, Daniel N. [Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC), Indian Head, MD (United States). Indian Head Division; Remmers, Daniel L. [Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC), Indian Head, MD (United States). Indian Head Division; Phillips, Jason J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Shelley, Timothy J. [Air Force Research Lab. (AFRL), Tyndall AFB, FL (United States); Reyes, Jose A. [Applied Research Associates, Tyndall AFB, FL (United States); Hsu, Peter C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Reynolds, John G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-10-30

    The Integrated Data Collection Analysis (IDCA) program is conducting a Proficiency Test for Small- Scale Safety and Thermal (SSST) testing of homemade explosives (HMEs). Described here are statistical analyses of the results for impact, friction, electrostatic discharge, and differential scanning calorimetry analysis of the RDX Type II Class 5 standard. The material was tested as a well-characterized standard several times during the proficiency study to assess differences among participants and the range of results that may arise for well-behaved explosive materials. The analyses show that there are detectable differences among the results from IDCA participants. While these differences are statistically significant, most of them can be disregarded for comparison purposes to assess potential variability when laboratories attempt to measure identical samples using methods assumed to be nominally the same. The results presented in this report include the average sensitivity results for the IDCA participants and the ranges of values obtained. The ranges represent variation about the mean values of the tests of between 26% and 42%. The magnitude of this variation is attributed to differences in operator, method, and environment as well as the use of different instruments that are also of varying age. The results appear to be a good representation of the broader safety testing community based on the range of methods, instruments, and environments included in the IDCA Proficiency Test.

  14. Transport in aluminized RDX under shock compression explored using molecular dynamics simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Losada, M; Chaudhuri, S

    2014-01-01

    Shock response of energetic materials is controlled by a combination of mechanical response, thermal, transport, and chemical properties. How these properties interplay in condensed-phase energetic materials is of fundamental interest for improving predictive capabilities. Due to unknown nature of chemistry during the evolution and growth of high-temperature regions within the energetic material (so called hot spots), the connection between reactive and unreactive equations of state contain a high degree of empiricism. In particular, chemistry in materials with high degree of heterogeneity such as aluminized HE is of interest. In order to identify shock compression states and transport properties in high-pressure/temperature (HP-HT) conditions, we use molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in conjunction with the multi-scale shock technique (MSST). Mean square displacement calculations enabled us to track the diffusivity of stable gas products. Among decomposition products, H 2 O and CO 2 are found to be the dominant diffusing species under compression conditions. Heat transport and diffusion rates in decomposed RDX are compared and the comparison shows that around 2000 K, transport can be a major contribution during propagation of the reaction front.

  15. High Density, Insensitive Oxidizer With RDX Performance Final Report CRADA No. TC02178.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pagoria, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Preda, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-08-25

    This was a collaborative effort between Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC as manager and operator of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Physical Sciences, Inc. (PSI), to develop a synthesis and evaluate a novel high density, insensitive oxidizer with RDX performance. This CRADA resulted from the award of a Phase I STTR ("STTR") from DOD. In recent years, the synthesis of new energetic heterocyclic compounds to replace the energetic materials currently in the stockpile has received a great amount of attention. The Office of the Secretary of Defense has identified that there is a need to incorporate new energetic materials in current and future weapon systems in an effort to increase performance and decrease sensitivity. For many of the future weapon systems, incorporation of energetic compounds currently in the stockpile will not provide the desired performance and sensitivity goals. The success of this CRADA may lead to a Phase I option STTR from DOD and to a Phase II STTR from DOD. The goal of this CRADA was to produce and test a novel oxidizer, 2,5,8-trinitroheptazine (TNH).

  16. A level set approach for shock-induced α-γ phase transition of RDX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josyula, Kartik; Rahul; De, Suvranu

    2018-02-01

    We present a thermodynamically consistent level sets approach based on regularization energy functional which can be directly incorporated into a Galerkin finite element framework to model interface motion. The regularization energy leads to a diffusive form of flux that is embedded within the level sets evolution equation which maintains the signed distance property of the level set function. The scheme is shown to compare well with the velocity extension method in capturing the interface position. The proposed level sets approach is employed to study the α-γphase transformation in RDX single crystal shocked along the (100) plane. Example problems in one and three dimensions are presented. We observe smooth evolution of the phase interface along the shock direction in both models. There is no diffusion of the interface during the zero level set evolution in the three dimensional model. The level sets approach is shown to capture the characteristics of the shock-induced α-γ phase transformation such as stress relaxation behind the phase interface and the finite time required for the phase transformation to complete. The regularization energy based level sets approach is efficient, robust, and easy to implement.

  17. Thermal Decomposition Behaviors and Burning Characteristics of AN/RDX-Based Composite Propellants Supplemented with MnO2 and Fe2O3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohga, Makoto; Naya, Tomoki

    2015-10-01

    Ammonium nitrate (AN)-based composite propellants have gained popularity because of the clean burning nature of AN as an oxidizer. However, such propellants have several disadvantages such as poor ignition and low burning rate. The burning characteristics of the AN propellant were improved when a portion of this propellant was replaced by an energetic material and the addition of a catalyst. In this study, RDX (1,3,5-trinitroperhydro-1,3,5-triazine) was used as the energetic material, and Fe2O3 and MnO2 were used as catalysts. The burning characteristics of the AN/RDX propellants supplemented with catalysts were investigated, and the effects of the replacement of AN by RDX and the catalyst addition were evaluated.

  18. A theoretical study of the relaxation of a phenyl group chemisorbed to an RDX freestanding thin film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereverzev, Andrey, E-mail: pereverzeva@missouri.edu; Sewell, Thomas D., E-mail: sewellt@missouri.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Missouri-Columbia, Columbia, Missouri 65211-7600 (United States)

    2016-08-07

    Energy relaxation from an excited phenyl group chemisorbed to the surface of a crystalline thin film of α-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazacyclohexane (α-RDX) at 298 K and 1 atm is simulated using molecular dynamics. Two schemes are used to excite the phenyl group. In the first scheme, the excitation energy is added instantaneously as kinetic energy by rescaling momenta of the 11 atoms in the phenyl group. In the second scheme, the phenyl group is equilibrated at a higher temperature in the presence of static RDX geometries representative of the 298 K thin film. An analytical model based on ballistic phonon transport that requires only the harmonic part of the total Hamiltonian and includes no adjustable parameters is shown to predict, essentially quantitatively, the short-time dynamics of the kinetic energy relaxation (∼200 fs). The dynamics of the phenyl group for times longer than about 6 ps follows exponential decay and agrees qualitatively with the dynamics described by a master equation. Long-time heat propagation within the bulk of the crystal film is consistent with the heat equation.

  19. Human health risks from TNT, RDX, and HMX in environmental media and consideration of the US Regulatory Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daniels, J.I.; Knezovich, J.P.

    1994-12-01

    Although the most economical method for disposing of unwanted energetic high explosives [HEs; e.g., 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-triazine (RDX, also known as Cyclonite), and octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX, also known as Octogen)] involves open burning and open or underground detonation [OB/O(U)D]; federal, state, and even local government agencies in the United States (U.S.) are implementing stricter environmental regulations that eventually may prevent such activities. These stricter regulations will promote alternative technologies that are designed to be environmentally benign. However, past HE-waste disposal practices at manufacturing and fabrication facilities in the U.S. have included uncontrolled OB/O(U)D, as well as direct surface discharge of HE-contaminated waste water, resulting in contaminated environmental media (e.g., ground water, soil, and perhaps even edible vegetation) near residential areas. Using TNT, RDX, and HMX as examples, this paper describes how risk-based standards for HEs can be derived that account for potential multimedia exposures (associated with contaminated air, water, food, and soil) by individuals near a contaminated site, and used to (1) protect public health and safety; (2)prevent limited resources from being dedicated to unnecessary cleanup activities; and (3) identify the most cost-effective, practical, and environmentally benign technologies suitable for integrating with the handling of the large quantity of high explosives scheduled for demilitarization

  20. USE OF SERIAL ANALYSIS OF GENE EXPRESSION (SAGE) TO STUDY GENETIC RESPONSES TO THE PRESENCE OF THE TNT OR RDX BY ARABIDOPSIS THALIANA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phytoremediation is currently being explored for its potential to clean-up of the large number of military sites that have been contaminated by explosives such as 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) and hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX). Although some of the enzymes responsi...

  1. Explosive Contamination from Substrate Surfaces: Differences and Similarities in Contamination Techniques Using RDX and C-4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, C. J.; Yoder, T. S.

    2010-06-01

    Explosive trace detection equipment has been deployed to airports for more than a decade. During this time, the need for standardized procedures and calibrated trace amounts for ensuring that the systems are operating properly and detecting the correct explosive has been apparent but a standard representative of a fingerprint has been elusive. Standards are also necessary to evaluate instrumentation in the laboratories during development and prior to deployment to determine sample throughput, probability of detection, false positive/negative rates, ease of use by operator, mechanical and/or software problems that may be encountered, and other pertinent parameters that would result in the equipment being unusable during field operations. Since many laboratories do not have access to nor are allowed to handle explosives, the equipment is tested using techniques aimed at simulating the actual explosives fingerprint. This laboratory study focused on examining the similarities and differences in three different surface contamination techniques that are used to performance test explosive trace detection equipment in an attempt to determine how effective the techniques are at replicating actual field samples and to offer scenarios where each contamination technique is applicable. The three techniques used were dry transfer deposition of standard solutions using the Transportation Security Laboratory’s (TSL) patented dry transfer techniques (US patent 6470730), direct deposition of explosive standards onto substrates, and fingerprinting of actual explosives onto substrates. RDX was deposited on the surface of one of five substrates using one of the three different deposition techniques. The process was repeated for each substrate type using each contamination technique. The substrate types used were: 50% cotton/50% polyester as found in T-shirts, 100% cotton with a smooth surface such as that found in a cotton dress shirt, 100% cotton on a rough surface such as that

  2. Fabrication of Graded Porous and Skin-Core Structure RDX-Based Propellants via Supercritical CO2 Concentration Profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Weitao; Li, Yuxiang; Ying, Sanjiu

    2015-04-01

    A fabrication process to produce graded porous and skin-core structure propellants via supercritical CO2 concentration profile is reported in this article. It utilizes a partial gas saturation technique to obtain nonequilibrium gas concentration profiles in propellants. Once foamed, the propellant obtains a graded porous or skin-pore structure. This fabrication method was studied with RDX(Hexogen)-based propellant under an SC-CO2 saturation condition. The principle was analyzed and the one-dimensional diffusion model was employed to estimate the gas diffusion coefficient and to predict the gas concentration profiles inside the propellant. Scanning electron microscopy images were used to analyze the effects of partial saturation on the inner structure. The results also suggested that the sorption time and desorption time played an important role in gas profile generation and controlled the inner structure of propellants.

  3. Delayed myelosuppression with acute exposure to hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) and environmental degradation product hexahydro-1-nitroso-3,5-dinitro-1,3,5-triazine (MNX) in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaligama, Sridhar; Kale, Vijay M.; Wilbanks, Mitchell S. [Department of Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, University of Louisiana at Monroe, Monroe, LA 71209 (United States); Perkins, Edward J. [US Army Engineer Research and Development Center, Vicksburg, MS 39180 (United States); Meyer, Sharon A., E-mail: meyer@ulm.edu [Department of Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, University of Louisiana at Monroe, Monroe, LA 71209 (United States)

    2013-02-01

    Hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX), a widely used munitions compound, and hexahydro-1-nitroso-3,5-dinitro-1,3,5-triazine (MNX), its N-nitroso product of anaerobic microbial nitroreduction, are contaminants of military sites. Previous studies have shown MNX to be the most acutely toxic among the nitroreduced degradation products of RDX and to cause mild anemia at high dose. The present study compares hematotoxicity with acute oral exposure to MNX with parent RDX. Both RDX and MNX caused a modest decrease in blood hemoglobin and ∼ 50% loss of granulocytes (NOAELs = 47 mg/kg) in female Sprague–Dawley rats observed 14 days post-exposure. We explored the possibility that blood cell loss observed after 14 days was delayed in onset because of toxicity to bone marrow (BM) progenitors. RDX and MNX decreased granulocyte/macrophage-colony forming cells (GM-CFCs) at 14, but not 7, days (NOAELs = 24 mg/kg). The earliest observed time at which MNX decreased GM-CFCs was 10 days post-exposure. RDX and MNX likewise decreased BM burst-forming units-erythroid (BFU-Es) at 14, but not 7, days. Granulocyte–erythrocyte–monocyte–megakaryocyte (GEMM)-CFCs were unaffected by RDX and MNX at 7 days suggesting precursor depletion did not account for GM-CFC and BFU-E loss. MNX added to the culture media was without effect on GM-CFC formation indicating no direct inhibition. Flow cytometry showed no differential loss of BM multilineage progenitors (Thy1.1{sup +}) or erythroid (CD71{sup +}) precursors with MNX suggesting myeloid and erythroid lineages were comparably affected. Collectively, these data indicate that acute exposure to both RDX and MNX caused delayed suppression of myelo- and erythropoiesis with subsequent decrease of peripheral granulocytes and erythrocytes. Highlights: ► Acute oral exposure to munitions RDX causes myelosuppression. ► Environmental degradation product MNX is comparable in effect. ► RDX and MNX are cytotoxic to both myeloid and erythroid

  4. Using of multi-walled carbon nanotubes electrode for adsorptive stripping voltammetric determination of ultratrace levels of RDX explosive in the environmental samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaei, Behzad; Damiri, Sajjad

    2010-11-15

    A study of the electrochemical behavior and determination of RDX, a high explosive, is described on a multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE) using adsorptive stripping voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) techniques. The results indicated that MWCNTs electrode remarkably enhances the sensitivity of the voltammetric method and provides measurements of this explosive down to the sub-mg/l level in a wide pH range. The operational parameters were optimized and a sensitive, simple and time-saving cyclic voltammetric procedure was developed for the analysis of RDX in ground and tap water samples. Under optimized conditions, the reduction peak have two linear dynamic ranges of 0.6-20.0 and 8.0-200.0 mM with a detection limit of 25.0 nM and a precision of <4% (RSD for 8 analysis). Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Characterization of polymorphic states in energetic samples of 1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) fabricated using drop-on-demand inkjet technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmons, Erik D; Farrell, Mikella E; Holthoff, Ellen L; Tripathi, Ashish; Green, Norman; Moon, Raphael P; Guicheteau, Jason A; Christesen, Steven D; Pellegrino, Paul M; Fountain, Augustus W

    2012-06-01

    The United States Army and the first responder community are evaluating optical detection systems for the trace detection of hazardous energetic materials. Fielded detection systems must be evaluated with the appropriate material concentrations to accurately identify the residue in theater. Trace levels of energetic materials have been observed in mutable polymorphic phases and, therefore, the systems being evaluated must be able to detect and accurately identify variant sample phases observed in spectral data. In this work, we report on the novel application of drop-on-demand technology for the fabrication of standardized trace 1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) samples. The drop-on-demand sample fabrication technique is compared both visually and spectrally to the more commonly used drop-and-dry technique. As the drop-on-demand technique allows for the fabrication of trace level hazard materials, concerted efforts focused on characterization of the polymorphic phase changes observed with low concentrations of RDX commonly used in drop-on-demand processing. This information is important when evaluating optical detection technologies using samples prepared with a drop-on-demand inkjet system, as the technology may be "trained" to detect the common bulk α phase of the explosive based on its spectral features but fall short in positively detecting a trace quantity of RDX (β-phase). We report the polymorphic shifts observed between α- and β-phases of this energetic material and discuss the conditions leading to the favoring of one phase over the other.

  6. Effects of hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) metabolites on cricket (Acheta domesticus) survival and reproductive success

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Baohong [Institute of Environmental and Human Health (TIEHH), and Department of Environmental Toxicology, Texas Tech University, Box 41163, Lubbock, TX 79409-1163 (United States); Freitag, Christina M. [Institute of Environmental and Human Health (TIEHH), and Department of Environmental Toxicology, Texas Tech University, Box 41163, Lubbock, TX 79409-1163 (United States); Canas, Jaclyn E. [Institute of Environmental and Human Health (TIEHH), and Department of Environmental Toxicology, Texas Tech University, Box 41163, Lubbock, TX 79409-1163 (United States); Cheng Qiuqiong [Institute of Environmental and Human Health (TIEHH), and Department of Environmental Toxicology, Texas Tech University, Box 41163, Lubbock, TX 79409-1163 (United States); Anderson, Todd A. [Institute of Environmental and Human Health (TIEHH), and Department of Environmental Toxicology, Texas Tech University, Box 41163, Lubbock, TX 79409-1163 (United States)]. E-mail: todd.anderson@tiehh.ttu.edu

    2006-11-15

    The effect of two major hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) metabolites, hexahydro-1-nitroso-3,5-dinitro-1,3,5-triazine (MNX) and hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitroso-1,3,5-triazine (TNX), on cricket (Acheta domesticus) survival and reproduction was studied. RDX metabolites did not have adverse effects on cricket survival, growth, and egg production. However, MNX and TNX did affect egg hatching. MNX and TNX were more toxic in spiked-sand than in topical tests. TNX was more toxic to egg than MNX. Developmental stage and exposure time affected hatching. After 30 days exposure to MNX or TNX, the EC{sub 2}, EC{sub 5}, and EC{sub 95} were 47, 128, and 247 {mu}g/g for TNX, and 65, 140, and 253 {mu}g/g for MNX in topical tests. The ECs for 20, 50, and 95 were 21, 52, and 99 {mu}g/g for MNX, and 12, 48, and 97 {mu}g/g for TNX in sand. No gross abnormalities in cricket nypmhs were observed in all experiments indicating that neither TNX or MNX is teratogenic in this assay. - RDX metabolites did not have adverse effects on cricket survival, growth, and egg production, but adversely affected egg hatching.

  7. Effects of hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) metabolites on cricket (Acheta domesticus) survival and reproductive success

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Baohong; Freitag, Christina M.; Canas, Jaclyn E.; Cheng Qiuqiong; Anderson, Todd A.

    2006-01-01

    The effect of two major hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) metabolites, hexahydro-1-nitroso-3,5-dinitro-1,3,5-triazine (MNX) and hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitroso-1,3,5-triazine (TNX), on cricket (Acheta domesticus) survival and reproduction was studied. RDX metabolites did not have adverse effects on cricket survival, growth, and egg production. However, MNX and TNX did affect egg hatching. MNX and TNX were more toxic in spiked-sand than in topical tests. TNX was more toxic to egg than MNX. Developmental stage and exposure time affected hatching. After 30 days exposure to MNX or TNX, the EC 2 , EC 5 , and EC 95 were 47, 128, and 247 μg/g for TNX, and 65, 140, and 253 μg/g for MNX in topical tests. The ECs for 20, 50, and 95 were 21, 52, and 99 μg/g for MNX, and 12, 48, and 97 μg/g for TNX in sand. No gross abnormalities in cricket nypmhs were observed in all experiments indicating that neither TNX or MNX is teratogenic in this assay. - RDX metabolites did not have adverse effects on cricket survival, growth, and egg production, but adversely affected egg hatching

  8. Integrated Data Collection Analysis (IDCA) Program — Bullseye® Smokeless Powder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandstrom, Mary M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Brown, Geoffrey W. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Preston, Daniel N. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Pollard, Colin J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Warner, Kirstin F. [Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC), Indian Head, MD (United States). Indian Head Division; Sorensen, Daniel N. [Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC), Indian Head, MD (United States). Indian Head Division; Remmers, Daniel L. [Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC), Indian Head, MD (United States). Indian Head Division; Phillips, Jason J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Shelley, Timothy J. [Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms, Redstone Arsenal, AL (United States); Reyes, Jose A. [Applied Research Associates, Tyndall AFB, FL (United States); Hsu, Peter C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Reynolds, John G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2013-05-30

    The Integrated Data Collection Analysis (IDCA) program is conducting a proficiency study for Small- Scale Safety and Thermal (SSST) testing of homemade explosives (HMEs). Described here are the results for impact, friction, electrostatic discharge, and differential scanning calorimetry analysis of Bullseye® smokeless powder (Gunpowder). The participants found the Gunpowder: 1) to have a range of sensitivity to impact, from less than RDX to almost as sensitive as PETN, 2) to be moderately sensitive to BAM and ABL friction, 3) have a range for ESD, from insensitive to more sensitive than PETN, and 4) to have thermal sensitivity about the same as PETN and RDX.

  9. Investigating a Drop-on-Demand Microdispenser for Standardized Sample Preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    potassium chlorate were obtained from Sigma-Aldrich. 1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX), octahydro-1,3,5,7- tetranitro-tetrazocine (HMX), 2,4,6... potassium chlorate , HMX, TNT, RDX, PETN, urea, and sugar. The analyte of interest was dissolved in the appropriate solvent and then diluted to various

  10. Integrated Data Collection Analysis (IDCA) Program - NaClO3/Icing Sugar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandstrom, Mary M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Brown, Geoffrey W. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Preston, Daniel N. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Pollard, Colin J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Warner, Kirstin F. [Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC), Indian Head, MD (United States). Indian Head Division; Sorensen, Daniel N. [Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC), Indian Head, MD (United States). Indian Head Division; Remmers, Daniel L. [Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC), Indian Head, MD (United States). Indian Head Division; Shelley, Timothy J. [Air Force Research Lab. (AFRL), Tyndall Air Force Base, FL (United States); Reyes, Jose A. [Applied Research Associates, Tyndall Air Force Base, FL (United States); Hsu, Peter C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Reynolds, John G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2013-02-11

    The Integrated Data Collection Analysis (IDCA) program is conducting a proficiency study for Small- Scale Safety and Thermal (SSST) testing of homemade explosives (HMEs). Described here are the results for impact, friction, electrostatic discharge, and differential scanning calorimetry analysis of a mixture of NaClO3 and icing sugar—NaClO3/icing sugar mixture. The mixture was found to: be more sensitive than RDX but less sensitive than PETN in impact testing (180-grit sandpaper); be more sensitive than RDX and about the same sensitivity as PETN in BAM fiction testing; be less sensitive than RDX and PETN except for one participant found the mixture more sensitive than PETN in ABL ESD testing; and to have one to three exothermic features with the lowest temperature event occurring at ~ 160°C always observed in thermal testing. Variations in testing parameters also affected the sensitivity.

  11. Shock-induced transformations in crystalline RDX: a uniaxial constant-stress Hugoniostat molecular dynamics simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedrov, Dmitry; Hooper, Justin B; Smith, Grant D; Sewell, Thomas D

    2009-07-21

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of uniaxial shock compression along the [100] and [001] directions in the alpha polymorph of hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (alpha-RDX) have been conducted over a wide range of shock pressures using the uniaxial constant stress Hugoniostat method [Ravelo et al., Phys. Rev. B 70, 014103 (2004)]. We demonstrate that the Hugoniostat method is suitable for studying shock compression in atomic-scale models of energetic materials without the necessity to consider the extremely large simulation cells required for an explicit shock wave simulation. Specifically, direct comparison of results obtained using the Hugoniostat approach to those reported by Thompson and co-workers [Phys. Rev. B 78, 014107 (2008)] based on large-scale MD simulations of shocks using the shock front absorbing boundary condition (SFABC) approach indicates that Hugoniostat simulations of systems containing several thousand molecules reproduced the salient features observed in the SFABC simulations involving roughly a quarter-million molecules, namely, nucleation and growth of nanoscale shear bands for shocks propagating along the [100] direction and the polymorphic alpha-gamma phase transition for shocks directed along the [001] direction. The Hugoniostat simulations yielded predictions of the Hugoniot elastic limit for the [100] shock direction consistent with SFABC simulation results.

  12. Assessment of ANFO on the Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    there is an increasing risk of algal blobs and eutrophication in surface waters according to the Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment...Section 36(3) of the Fisheries Act (1985), which prohibits the deposit of deleterious substances into waters frequented by fish , unless otherwise...nitrate in the environment, which could have either short or long-term toxic effects on fish and wildlife resources if they were released in sufficient

  13. Effect of two major N-nitroso hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) metabolites on earthworm reproductive success

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Baohong; Cox, Stephen B.; McMurry, Scott T.; Jackson, W. Andrew; Cobb, George P.; Anderson, Todd A.

    2008-01-01

    Soil and topical tests were employed to investigate the effect of two N-nitroso metabolites of RDX (hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine) on earthworm reproduction. The lowest observed effect concentration (LOEC) for cocoon production and hatching was 50 mg/kg for both hexahydro-1-nitroso-3,5-dinitro-1,3,5-triazine (MNX) and hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitroso-1,3,5-triazine (TNX) in soil. MNX and TNX also significantly affected cocoon hatching in soil (p 20 values for MNX were 8.7 and 8.8 mg/kg for cocoon and juvenile production, respectively, compared to 9.2 and 9.1 mg/kg for TNX, respectively. The EC 20 values for the total number of cocoon hatchlings were 3.1 and 4.7 mg/kg for MNX and TNX, respectively, in soil and 4.5 and 3.1 mg/L in the topical test. Both MNX and TNX inhibited cocoon production and hatching, suggesting that they may have a negative affect on soil ecosystems at contaminated sites. - RDX metabolites affect earthworm cocoon production and hatching

  14. Multivariate soil fertility relationships for predicting the environmental persistence of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) and 1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-tricyclohexane (RDX) among taxonomically distinct soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katseanes, Chelsea K; Chappell, Mark A; Hopkins, Bryan G; Durham, Brian D; Price, Cynthia L; Porter, Beth E; Miller, Lesley F

    2017-12-01

    After nearly a century of use in numerous munition platforms, TNT and RDX contamination has turned up largely in the environment due to ammunition manufacturing or as part of releases from low-order detonations during training activities. Although the basic knowledge governing the environmental fate of TNT and RDX are known, accurate predictions of TNT and RDX persistence in soil remain elusive, particularly given the universal heterogeneity of pedomorphic soil types. In this work, we proposed overcoming this problem by considering the environmental persistence of these munition constituents (MC) as multivariate mathematical functions over a variety of taxonomically distinct soil types, instead of a single constant or parameter of a specific absolute value. To test this idea, we conducted experiments where the disappearance kinetics of TNT and RDX were measured over a >300 h period in taxonomically distinct soils. Classical fertility-based soil measurements were log-transformed, statistically decomposed, and correlated to TNT and RDX disappearance rates (k -TNT and k -RDX ) using multivariate dimension-reduction and correlation techniques. From these efforts, we generated multivariate linear functions for k parameters across different soil types based on a statistically reduced set of their chemical and physical properties: Calculations showed that the soil properties exhibited strong covariance, with a prominent latent structure emerging as the basis for relative comparisons of the samples in reduced space. Loadings describing TNT degradation were largely driven by properties associated with alkaline/calcareous soil characteristics, while the degradation of RDX was attributed to the soil organic matter content - reflective of an important soil fertility characteristic. In spite of the differing responses to the munitions, batch data suggested that the overall nutrient dynamics were consistent for each soil type, as well as readily distinguishable from the other

  15. Synthesis of 14C-Labelled Octahydor-1,3,5,7-Tetranitro-1,3,5,7-Tetrazocine (HMx0 and 15N-Isotopic Hexahyrro-1,3,5-Trinitro-1,3,5-Triazine (RDX) for use in Microcosm Experiments

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ampleman, G

    2000-01-01

    Within the framework of an R & D project on bioremediation of soils contaminated with energetic compounds, the biodegradation of energetic nitramine products such as octogen (HMX) and hexogen (RDX) is under study...

  16. Surface effects on the crystallization of cyclo-1,3,5-trimethylene-2,4,6-trinitramine (RDX) and the consequences for its N K X-ray emission spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Ilana G; Vila, Fernando D; Jach, Terrence

    2012-10-11

    Recent studies of the crystallization of cyclotrimethylene-trinitramine (RDX) have shown that the presence of the α- and β-phases of the compound is sensitive to the substrate when using drop cast crystallization methods. The specific phase has potential consequences for measurements of the nitrogen K X-ray emission spectrum (XES) that were recently reported for this compound using samples crystallized on In metal substrates. We have determined that the crystallization of RDX on a clean In metal substrate starts out completely as the β-phase but progressively incorporates the α-phase as the film thickens. In addition, we have carried out additional molecular orbital calculations of the N 1s X-ray fluorescence from the valence band, comparing the results expected from the α-and β- phases. The differences due to the presence of the β-phase instead of, or in addition to, the α-phase appear to be minimal.

  17. Reevaluation of a twenty-four-month chronic toxicity/carcinogenicity study of hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) in the B6C3F1 hybrid mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, George A; Reddy, Gunda; Major, Michael A

    2006-01-01

    Hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) has been widely used as an explosive in U.S. army munitions formulations since World War II. Two-year carcinogenicity studies revealed RDX to be noncarcinogenic in two strains of rats, but a 2-year carcinogenicity study in B6C3F1 mice revealed an increased incidence of hepatocellular neoplasms in females. Based on results of the study in B6C3F1 mice, RDX has been classified as a possible carcinogen. The authors reevaluated the archived histological sections from the B6C3F1 mouse study, using current histopathologic diagnostic criteria and interpretations. The earlier evaluation showed a statistically significant increase in the incidence of hepatocellular adenoma/carcinoma in female mice from the three highest dose groups (7, 35, and 175/100 mg/kg/day). The revaluation yielded a slightly lower incidence at each of the dose levels in female mice. The reduced number of hepatocellular neoplasms was largely due to reclassification of hepatocellular adenomas as foci of cytoplasmic alteration, in compliance with current diagnostic criteria. The reevaluation was reviewed by a pathology working group (PWG), which arrived at a consensus classification of each lesion. Based on the consensus diagnoses of the PWG, only one female group (35 mg/kg/day) showed a significant increase when compared to controls. The incidence of hepatocellular neoplasms for all groups, including the 35 mg/kg/day group, was within the reported incidence range for spontaneous hepatocellular neoplasms in female B6C3F1 mice. The increased incidence of hepatocellular neoplasms in female mice given RDX at 35 mg/kg/day was interpreted as equivocal evidence of a carcinogenic effect.

  18. Clostridium geopurificans strain MJ1 sp. nov., a strictly anaerobic bacterium that grows via fermentation and reduces the cyclic nitramine explosive hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Man Jae; Wei, Na; Millerick, Kayleigh; Popovic, Jovan; Finneran, Kevin

    2014-06-01

    A fermentative, non-spore forming, motile, rod-shaped bacterium, designated strain MJ1(T), was isolated from an RDX contaminated aquifer at a live-fire training site in Northwest NJ, United States. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequencing and DNA base composition, strain MJ1(T) was assigned to the Firmicutes. The DNA G+C content was 42.8 mol%. Fermentative growth was supported by glucose and citrate in a defined basal medium. The bacterium is a strict anaerobe that grows between at pH 6.0 and pH 8.0 and 18 and 37 °C. The culture did not grow with hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) as the electron acceptor or mineralize RDX under these conditions. However, MJ1(T) transformed RDX into MNX, methylenedinitramine, formaldehyde, formate, ammonium, nitrous oxide, and nitrate. The nearest phylogenetic relative with a validly published name was Desulfotomaculum guttoideum (95 % similarity). However, MJ1(T) was also related to Clostridium celerecrescens DSM 5628 (95 %), Clostridium indolis DSM 755 (94 %), and Clostridium sphenoides DSM 632 (94 %). DNA:DNA hybridization with these strains was between 6.7 and 58.7 percent. The dominant cellular fatty acids (greater than 5 % of the total, which was 99.0 % recovery) were 16:0 fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) (32.12 %), 18:1cis 11 dimethyl acetal (DMA) (16.47 %), 16:1cis 9 DMA (10.28 %), 16:1cis 9 FAME (8.10 %), and 18:1cis 9 DMA (5.36 %). On the basis of morphological, physiological, and phylogenetic data, Clostridium geopurificans is proposed as a new species in genus Clostridium, with strain MJ1(T) as the type strain.

  19. Differential thermal analysis microsystem for explosive detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Jesper Kenneth; Greve, Anders; Senesac, L.

    2011-01-01

    as a small silicon nitride membrane incorporating heater elements and a temperature measurement resistor. In this manuscript the DTA system is described and tested by measuring calorimetric response of 3 different kinds of explosives (TNT, RDX and PETN). This project is carried out under the framework...

  20. Integrated Data Collection Analysis (IDCA) Program — KClO3/Icing Sugar (-100 mesh) Mixture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandstrom, Mary M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Brown, Geoffrey W. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Preston, Daniel N. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Pollard, Colin J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Warner, Kirstin F. [Naval Surface Warfare Center (IHD-NSWC), Indian Head, MD (United States). Indian Head Division; Sorenson, Daniel N. [Naval Surface Warfare Center (IHD-NSWC), Indian Head, MD (United States). Indian Head Division; Remmers, Daniel L. [Naval Surface Warfare Center (IHD-NSWC), Indian Head, MD (United States). Indian Head Division; Moran, Jesse S. [Naval Surface Warfare Center (IHD-NSWC), Indian Head, MD (United States). Indian Head Division; Shelley, Timothy J. [Air Force Research Lab. (AFRL/RXQF), Tyndall AFB, FL (United States); Hsu, Peter C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Whipple, Richard E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Reynolds, John G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2011-05-02

    The Integrated Data Collection Analysis (IDCA) program is conducting a proficiency study for Small-Scale Safety and Thermal (SSST) testing of homemade explosives (HMEs). Described here are the results for impact, friction, electrostatic discharge, and scanning calorimetry analysis of a mixture of KClO3 sized through a 100-mesh sieve mixed with icing sugar, also sized through a 100-mesh sieve—KClO3/icing sugar (-100) mixture. This material was selected because of the challenge of performing SSST testing of a mixture of two solid materials. The mixture was found to be: 1) more sensitive to impact than RDX, with sensitivity similar to PETN, 2) the same or more sensitive to friction than PETN, and 3) less sensitive to spark than RDX. The analysis showed that the mixture has thermally stability similar to RDX and is perhaps more energetic upon decomposition but variable results indicate sampling issues.

  1. Optimizing cast blasting efficiency using ANFO with liners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madsen, A.

    2007-01-15

    As part of a five research project funded by the National Science Foundation, Peabody Energy studied three experimental cast blasts conducted at the North Antelope Rochelle mine site on July 24,28 and 31 2005. The initial purpose of this research project was to determine the influence that blast initiation sequence have on: NOx production; Face Displacement; Highwall damage; Explosive performance; Vibration emissions; Displacement; Surface swell; and Cast benefit. Two new discoveries on velocity of detonation (VoD) and pressure of detonation (PoD) were made as a result of this research project. Furthermore, a relationship between surface swell velocity and face velocity was also noted. 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Farco Mining makes productivity gains using emulsion-Anfo blends

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, N. [Nelson Brothers, Inc., Parrish, AL (United States)

    1995-02-01

    Describes the use of a 40:60 emulsion: Auto blend for overburden removal at Farco Minings surface coal mine near Laredo, Texas. The use of this explosives mixture maximized the explosive per foot of blasthole, increasing overburden removal to 925,000 buy per month and improving mine productivity. Increases in powder factors produced further increases in cast yardage and mine production. 2 figs.

  3. Forensic Analysis of High Explosive Residues from Selected Cloth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamad Afiq Mohamed Huri; Umi Kalthom Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    Increased terrorist activities around the Asian region have resulted in the need for improved analytical techniques in forensic analysis. High explosive residues from post-blast clothing are often encountered as physical evidence submitted to a forensic laboratory. Therefore, this study was initiated to detect high explosives residues of cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine (RDX) and pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) on selected cloth in this study. Cotton swabbing technique was employed as a simple and rapid method in recovering analytes from the sample matrix. Analytes were analyzed using Griess spot test, TLC and HPLC. TLC separation employed toluene-ethyl acetate (9:1) as a good solvent system. Reversed phase HPLC separation employed acetonitrile-water (65:35) as the mobile phase and analytes detected using a programmed wavelength. RDX was detected at 235 nm for the first 3.5 min and then switched to 215 nm for PETN. Limits of detection (LODs) of analytes were in the low ppm range (0.05 ppm for RDX and 0.25 ppm for PETN). Analyte recovery studies revealed that the type of cloth has a profound effect on the extraction efficiency. Analytes were recovered better for nylon as compared to cotton cloth. However, no analytes could be recovered from denim cloth. For post-blast samples, only RDX was detected in low concentration for both nylon and cotton cloth. (author)

  4. Integrated Data Collection Analysis (IDCA) Program - KClO4/Aluminum Mixture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandstrom, Mary M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Brown, Geoffrey W. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Preston, Daniel N. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Pollard, Colin J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Warner, Kirstin F. [Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC IHD), Indian Head, MD (United States). Indian Head Division; Sorensen, Daniel N. [Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC IHD), Indian Head, MD (United States). Indian Head Division; Remmers, Daniel L. [Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC IHD), Indian Head, MD (United States). Indian Head Division; Whinnery, LeRoy L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Shelley, Timothy J. [Air Force Research Lab. (AFRL), Tyndall AFB, FL (United States); Reyes, Jose A. [Applied Research Associates (ARA), Tyndall AFB, FL (United States); Hsu, Peter C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Reynolds, John G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2012-01-17

    The Integrated Data Collection Analysis (IDCA) program is conducting a Proficiency Test for Small-Scale Safety and Thermal (SSST) testing of homemade explosives (HMEs). Described here are the results for impact, friction, electrostatic discharge, and differential scanning calorimetry analysis of a mixture of KClO4 and aluminum—KClO4/Al mixture. This material was selected because of the challenge of performing SSST testing of a mixture of two solids. The mixture was found to be: 1) much less sensitive to impact than RDX, (LLNL being the exception) and PETN, 2) more sensitive to friction than RDX and PETN, and 3) extremely sensitive to spark. The thermal analysis showed little or no exothermic character. One prominent endothermic feature was observed in the temperature range studied and identified as a phase transition of KClO4.

  5. Mass Spectrometric Analysis of Eight Common Chemical Explosives Using Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sehwan; Lee, Jihyeon; KIm, Jeongkwon [Chungnam National Univ., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Soo Gyeong; Goh, Eun Mee [Agency for Defense Development, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sungman; Koh, Sungsuk [Sensor Tech Inc., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-15

    Eight representative explosives (ammonium perchlorate (AP), ammonium nitrate (AN), trinitrotoluene (TNT), 2,4-dinitrotoluene (DNT), cyclonite (RDX), cyclotetramethylenetetranitramine (HMX), pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN), and hexanitrostilbene (HNS)) were comprehensively analyzed with an ion trap mass spectrometer in negative ion mode using direct infusion electrospray ionization. MS/MS experiments were performed to generate fragment ions from the major parent ion of each explosive. Explosives in salt forms such as AP or AN provided cluster parent ions with their own anions. Explosives with an aromatic ring were observed as either [M.H]{sup -} for TNT and DNT or [M]{sup ·-}. for HNS, while explosives without an aromatic ring such as RDX, HMX, and PETN were detected as an adduct ion with a formate anion, i. e., [M+HCOO]{sup -}. These findings provide a guideline for the rapid and accurate detection of explosives once portable MS instruments become more readily available.

  6. Mass Spectrometric Analysis of Eight Common Chemical Explosives Using Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Sehwan; Lee, Jihyeon; KIm, Jeongkwon; Cho, Soo Gyeong; Goh, Eun Mee; Lee, Sungman; Koh, Sungsuk

    2013-01-01

    Eight representative explosives (ammonium perchlorate (AP), ammonium nitrate (AN), trinitrotoluene (TNT), 2,4-dinitrotoluene (DNT), cyclonite (RDX), cyclotetramethylenetetranitramine (HMX), pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN), and hexanitrostilbene (HNS)) were comprehensively analyzed with an ion trap mass spectrometer in negative ion mode using direct infusion electrospray ionization. MS/MS experiments were performed to generate fragment ions from the major parent ion of each explosive. Explosives in salt forms such as AP or AN provided cluster parent ions with their own anions. Explosives with an aromatic ring were observed as either [M.H] - for TNT and DNT or [M] ·- . for HNS, while explosives without an aromatic ring such as RDX, HMX, and PETN were detected as an adduct ion with a formate anion, i. e., [M+HCOO] - . These findings provide a guideline for the rapid and accurate detection of explosives once portable MS instruments become more readily available

  7. Standardized Sample Preparation Using a Drop-on-Demand Printing Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-07

    and Materials Ammonium nitrate (AN), methanol (MeOH), distilled water (H2O), acetonitrile, sugar, urea, and potassium chlorate (KClO3) were...various pre-determined energetic and interferent compounds. The evaluated analytes were: AN, potassium chlorate , HMX, TNT, RDX, PETN, urea, and...KClO3 molecules dissolving and then breaking into potassium and chlorate ions in H2O. An additional concern was the interaction of adjacent

  8. A review of Explosives Used in Explosive Excavation Research Laboratory Projects Since 1969

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-12-01

    Boron compounds Potassium dichramat« Antimony compounds Bismuth compounds P«riodat«s Litharge Guar gum (polysaccSarid«) Storch Acrylomid... gum , and gelled with a cross- linking agent. The i-arliest slurries used Government surplus TNT as a fuel-sensitizer, but the majority o...Nonexplosive TNT PETN RDX Rentalite Composition B Guanidine nitrate Smokeless powder Nitres*: ch Alky’amine nitrates Nit.omannite Aluminum Sugar

  9. Integrated Data Collection Analysis (IDCA) Program — Ammonium Nitrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandstrom, Mary M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Brown, Geoffrey W. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Preston, Daniel N. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Pollard, Colin J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Warner, Kirstin F. [Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC), Indian Head, MD (United States). Indian Head Division; Sorensen, Daniel N. [Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC), Indian Head, MD (United States). Indian Head Division; Remmers, Daniel L. [Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC), Indian Head, MD (United States). Indian Head Division; Phillips, Jason J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Shelley, Timothy J. [Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms, Redstone Arsenal, AL (United States); Reyes, Jose A. [Applied Research Associates, Tyndall AFB, FL (United States); Hsu, Peter C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Reynolds, John G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2013-05-17

    The Integrated Data Collection Analysis (IDCA) program is conducting a proficiency study for Small- Scale Safety and Thermal (SSST) testing of homemade explosives (HMEs). Described here are the results for impact, friction, electrostatic discharge, and differential scanning calorimetry analysis of ammonium nitrate (AN). AN was tested, in most cases, as both received from manufacturer and dried/sieved. The participants found the AN to be: 1) insensitive in Type 12A impact testing (although with a wide range of values), 2) completely insensitive in BAM friction testing, 3) less sensitive than the RDX standard in ABL friction testing, 4) less sensitive than RDX in ABL ESD testing, and 5) less sensitive than RDX and PETN in DSC thermal analyses.

  10. Microbial Degradation of RDX and HMX

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-02-01

    cultivated in the M-succinate medium as previously described (Coleman et al., 1998). P. chrysosporium ATCC 24725 was provided by Ian Reid (Paprican...Sunahara. 1999. Ecotoxicological Evaluation of a Bench–Scale Bioslurry Treating Explosives – Spiked Soil. Bioremediation J. 3(3), 233-245. 217...1999. Ecotoxicological characterization of energetic substances using a soil extraction procedure. Ecotoxicol. Environ. Safety 43, 138-148

  11. Integrated Data Collection Analysis (IDCA) Program — KClO3 (as received)/Icing Sugar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandstrom, Mary M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Brown, Geoffrey W. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Preston, Daniel N. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Pollard, Colin J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Warner, Kirstin F. [Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC IHD), Indian Head, MD (United States). Indian Head Division; Sorenson, Daniel N. [Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC IHD), Indian Head, MD (United States). Indian Head Division; Remmers, Daniel L. [Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC IHD), Indian Head, MD (United States). Indian Head Division; Shelley, Timothy J. [Air Force Research Lab. (AFRL/RXQL), Tyndall AFB, FL (United States); Reyes, Jose A. [Applied Research Associates, Inc., Tyndall AFB, FL (United States); Hsu, Peter C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Whipple, Richard E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Reynolds, John G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2011-05-23

    The Integrated Data Collection Analysis (IDCA) program is conducting a proficiency study for Small-Scale Safety and Thermal (SSST) testing of homemade explosives (HMEs). Described here are the results for impact, friction, electrostatic discharge, and differential scanning calorimetry analysis of a mixture of KClO3 as received from the manufacturer mixed with icing sugar, sized through a 100-mesh sieve—KClO3/icing sugar (AR) mixture. This material was selected because of the challenge of performing SSST testing of a mixture of two solid materials. The mixture was found to: 1) be more sensitive to impact than RDX, similar to PETN, 2) be the same or less sensitive to friction than PETN, and 3) to be less sensitive to spark than RDX. The thermal analysis showed that the mixture has thermally stability similar to RDX and is perhaps more energetic upon decomposition but variable results indicate sampling issues. Compared to the 100-mesh sieved counter part, the KClO3/icing sugar (-100) mixture, the AR mixture was found to be about the same sensitivity towards impact, friction and ESD.

  12. After-blast fumes from ANFO mixtures - the effect of prill type and mixing techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farnfield, R.; Wetherelt, A.

    2003-06-01

    Over the last couple of years the Technical Services Department of exchem explosives has received a number of enquiries regarding the nature of after-blast fumes. These enquiries have been driven by two concerns: site-related health and safety and public comment from people living close to blasting operations. The paper examines how these choices can impact the quality and quantity of after-blast fume. 3 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. ANFO and TNT anti-vehicle mine blast: Experimental and numerical observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tyler-Street, M.; Leerdam, P.J.; Verhoeven, T.

    2014-01-01

    Anti-vehicle (AV) mines and Improvised Explosive Devices (IEDs) pose a major threat in recent and current missions. In the latest operational theatres of Iraq and Afghanistan they have been responsible for a significant proportion of all casualties. Understanding both the characteristics and

  14. Imaging indicator for ESD safety testing.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whinnery, LeRoy L.,; Nissen, April; Keifer, Patrick N.; Tyson, Alexander

    2013-05-01

    This report describes the development of a new detection method for electrostatic discharge (ESD) testing of explosives, using a single-lens reflex (SLR) digital camera and a 200-mm macro lens. This method has demonstrated several distinct advantages to other current ESD detection methods, including the creation of a permanent record, an enlarged image for real-time viewing as well as extended periods of review, and ability to combine with most other Go/No-Go sensors. This report includes details of the method, including camera settings and position, and results with wellcharacterized explosives PETN and RDX, and two ESD-sensitive aluminum powders.

  15. Recent Developments in the Field of Energetic Ionic Liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-07

    tetranitroaniline RDX 14,18,19,21 1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5- triazacyclohexane PETN 14,15,21 [3-nitrooxy-2,2-bis(nitro oxymethyl) propyl ] nitrate CL20 21-25...was then proved to play a vital role since the chloride precursor (2a) was also found to be hypergolic. Therefore, the 45 anion is not solely... Synthesis , 1977, 1, 1. 91 C. D. Hurd, L. F. Audrieth and L. A. Nalefski, Inorganic Syntheses, ed. H. S. Booth, McGraw-Hill Book Company Inc., New York

  16. Experimental Studies on Improved Plastic Bonded Explosives Materials (PBXs for Controlled Fragmentation Warheads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsharkawy Karim

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes formulations of plastic bonded explosives (PBXs based on three highly brisant explosives, namely 1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazinane (RDX, 1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocane (HMX and pentaerythritoltetranitrate (PETN with polyurethane (PU based on Glycidyl azide polymer (GAP as an energetic binder in comparison with composition-B, which used in the fragmentation warheads. The sensitivity and performance properties of different types of PBXs were evaluated by experimental results of prepared selected PBX compositions. Casting technique was used to prepare the selected compositions containing 14% PU based on GAP. It has been observed that the brisance of the PBX based on HMX was higher than that of comp-B by 21.3 %, the detonation velocity showed a remarkable increase of the order of 8480 (m/s while that of comp-B was 7638 (m/s. A controlled fragmentation warhead with an outer grooving warhead case of dimensions 100x35x4 mm was used and arena test was carried out to determine the lethal zone of the fragmentation warhead. The lethal zone obtained from arena test for PBX composition based on HMX named PBXHG4 was higher than that based on RDX or PETN, and than that of comp-B by 40%.

  17. New Mix Explosives for Explosive Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreevskikh, Leonid

    2011-06-01

    Suggested and tested were some mix explosives--powder mixtures of a brisant high explosive (HE = RDX, PETN) and an inert diluent (baking soda)--for use in explosive welding. RDX and PETN were selected in view of their high throwing ability and low critical diameter. Since the decomposition of baking soda yields a huge amount of gaseous products, its presence ensures (even at a low HE percentage) a throwing speed that is sufficient for realization of explosive welding, at a reduced brisant action of charge. Mix chargers containing 30-70 wt % HE (the rest baking soda) have been tested experimentally and optimized. For study of possibility to reduce critical diameter of HE mixture, the mixture was prepared where HE crystal sizes did not exceed 10 μm. The tests, which were performed with this HE, revealed that the mixture detonated stably with the velocity D ~ 2 km/s, if the layer thickness was d = 2 mm. The above explosives afford to markedly diminish deformations within the oblique impact zone and thus to carry out explosive welding of hollow items and thin metallic foils.

  18. Integrated Data Collection Analysis (IDCA) Program - AN and Bullseye Smokeless Powder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandstrom, Mary M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Brown, Geoffrey W. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Preston, Daniel N. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Pollard, Colin J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Warner, Kirstin F. [Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC), Indian Head, MD (United States); Sorensen, Daniel N. [Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC), Indian Head, MD (United States); Remmers, Daniel L. [Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC), Indian Head, MD (United States); Phillips, Jason J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Shelley, Timothy J. [Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms, Redstone Arsenal, AL (United States); Reyes, Jose A. [Applied Research Associates, Tyndall Air Force Base, FL (United States); Hsu, Peter C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Reynolds, John G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2013-07-17

    The Integrated Data Collection Analysis (IDCA) program is conducting a proficiency study for Small- Scale Safety and Thermal (SSST) testing of homemade explosives (HMEs). Described here are the results for impact, friction, electrostatic discharge, and differential scanning calorimetry analysis of ammonium nitrate (AN) mixed with Bullseye® smokeless powder (Gunpowder). The participants found the AN/Gunpowder to: 1) have a range of sensitivity to impact, comparable to or less than RDX, 2) be fairly insensitive to friction as measured by BAM and ABL, 3) have a range for ESD, from insensitive to more sensitive than PETN, and 4) have thermal sensitivity about the same as PETN and Gunpowder. This effort, funded by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), is putting the issues of safe handling of these materials in perspective with standard military explosives. The study is adding SSST testing results for a broad suite of different HMEs to the literature. Ultimately the study has the potential to suggest new guidelines and methods and possibly establish the SSST testing accuracies needed when developing safe handling practices for HMEs. Each participating testing laboratory uses identical test materials and preparation methods. Note, however, the test procedures differ among the laboratories. The testing performers involved are Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Indian Head Division, Naval Surface Warfare Center, (NSWC IHD), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), and Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL/RXQL). These tests are conducted as a proficiency study in order to establish some consistency in test protocols, procedures, and experiments and to compare results when these testing variables cannot be made consistent. Keywords: Small-scale safety testing, proficiency test, impact-, friction-, spark discharge-, thermal testing, round-robin test, safety testing protocols, HME, RDX, potassium perchlorate, potassium

  19. Large-Scale Reactive Atomistic Simulation of Shock-induced Initiation Processes in Energetic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Aidan

    2013-06-01

    Initiation in energetic materials is fundamentally dependent on the interaction between a host of complex chemical and mechanical processes, occurring on scales ranging from intramolecular vibrations through molecular crystal plasticity up to hydrodynamic phenomena at the mesoscale. A variety of methods (e.g. quantum electronic structure methods (QM), non-reactive classical molecular dynamics (MD), mesoscopic continuum mechanics) exist to study processes occurring on each of these scales in isolation, but cannot describe how these processes interact with each other. In contrast, the ReaxFF reactive force field, implemented in the LAMMPS parallel MD code, allows us to routinely perform multimillion-atom reactive MD simulations of shock-induced initiation in a variety of energetic materials. This is done either by explicitly driving a shock-wave through the structure (NEMD) or by imposing thermodynamic constraints on the collective dynamics of the simulation cell e.g. using the Multiscale Shock Technique (MSST). These MD simulations allow us to directly observe how energy is transferred from the shockwave into other processes, including intramolecular vibrational modes, plastic deformation of the crystal, and hydrodynamic jetting at interfaces. These processes in turn cause thermal excitation of chemical bonds leading to initial chemical reactions, and ultimately to exothermic formation of product species. Results will be presented on the application of this approach to several important energetic materials, including pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) and ammonium nitrate/fuel oil (ANFO). In both cases, we validate the ReaxFF parameterizations against QM and experimental data. For PETN, we observe initiation occurring via different chemical pathways, depending on the shock direction. For PETN containing spherical voids, we observe enhanced sensitivity due to jetting, void collapse, and hotspot formation, with sensitivity increasing with void size. For ANFO, we

  20. Preparation and characterization of GA/RDX nanostructured ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2Department of Fire Protection Engineering, The Armed Police Forces Academy, Langfang 065000, China .... 2.2 Preparation of graphene oxide and graphene hydrogels ... coating with gold, were observed with a HITACHI S-4800.

  1. Rhizosphere Bacterial Degradation of RDX, Understanding and Enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-01

    conditions tested for detection in non-eukaryotic RNA. We hesitate to interpret this data until heavier labeling, longer time course , and larger...searches, SignalP predictions and AutoAnnotate. All of this information was stored in a MySQL database and associated files which were downloaded for...predictions and AutoAnnotate. All of this information was stored in a MySQL database and associated files which were downloaded for review and manual

  2. Control of a pulse height analyzer using an RDX workstation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montelongo, S.; Hunt, D.N.

    1984-12-01

    The Nuclear Chemistry Division of Lawrence Livermore National laboratory is in the midst of upgrading its radiation counting facilities to automate data acquisition and quality control. This upgrade requires control of a pulse height analyzer (PHA) from an interactive LSI-11/23 workstation running RSX-11M. The PHA is a micro-computer based multichannel analyzer system providing data acquisition, storage, display, manipulation and input/output from up to four independent acquisition interfaces. Control of the analyzer includes reading and writing energy spectra, issuing commands, and servicing device interrupts. The analyzer communicates to the host system over a 9600-baud serial line using the Digital Data Communications link level Protocol (DDCMP). We relieved the RSX workstation CPU from the DDCMP overhead by implementing a DEC compatible in-house designed DMA serial line board (the ISL-11) to communicate with the analyzer. An RSX I/O device driver was written to complete the path between the analyzer and the RSX system by providing the link between the communication board and an application task. The I/O driver is written to handle several ISL-11 cards all operating in parallel thus providing support for control of multiple analyzers from a single workstation. The RSX device driver, its design and use by application code controlling the analyzer, and its operating environment will be discussed

  3. Identification of Microbial Gene Biomarkers for in situ RDX Biodegradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    synthetase activity. The expected product, glutamate, could not be detected by thin layer chromatography in the reaction mixture (solvent: butanol: acetic... urease ) gamma subunit 5.344 KTR9_0529 Urea amidohydrolase ( urease ) alpha subunit 4.671 KTR9_34231 Aspartyl aminopeptidase 4.028 KTR9_0611

  4. RDX in Plant Tissue: Leading to Humification in Surface Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    distribution, and transfor- mation of TNT in higher plants. Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety 64(2): 136–145. Amann, R. I., W. Ludwig, and K.-H...Schleifer. 1995. Phyolgenetic identification and in situ detection of individual microbial cells without cultivation . Microbiol. Rev. 59: 143–169

  5. Bioaugmentation for Aerobic Bioremediation of RDX Contaminated Groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-06

    concentrations of antibiotics : 1 μg/ml Amp, 2 μg/ml Gen, 15 μg/ml Strep, 2μg/ml Kan. Total cellular fatty acids were analyzed by MIDI Laboratories using the...are thought to have originated as a self-defense mechanism used by microorganisms that produce the antibiotics (Blast search result). This site is...affect immunocompromised patients (16,17,19). The complete genome sequence of Gordonia bronchialis type strain, an isolate associated with human

  6. Bioaugmentation for Aerobic Bioremediation of RDX-Contaminated Groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    sampling. The surface soil is characterized as a sandy loam soil (78% sand, 6% silt, 16% clay ) with a pH of 8.4, an organic carbon content of < 0.1...biomass is disposed of according to local ordinances (e.g., sterilized and directed into a municipal sanitary sewer). E.3. Use Information and...sterilized and directed into a municipal sanitary sewer). E.3. Use Information and Consumer Exposure Cultures are being used solely for field

  7. Treatment of RDX and/or HMX Using Mulch Biowalls

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-04-01

    Cornhusker Army Ammunition Plant (CHAAP), Holston Army Ammunition Plant (HSAAP), Iowa Army Ammunition Plant (IAAP), Fort Meade, PCD, Raritan Arsenal ...0.01% 1 ɘ.001% 0.1% * i. Presence of other remediation technologies in the immediate vicinity No 4 No Yes, active phytoremediation in Pink Water...Concentrations of geochemical parameters such as inorganic anions (i.e., sulfate and nitrate) and cations (i.e., ferrous iron and arsenic ) were

  8. Development of Ultrafast Indirect Flash Heating Methods for RDX

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-01

    8 1 1. Introduction The mission of the Multiscale Response of Energetic Materials program is to establish...vinyl nitrate ) Films. J. Phys. Chem. A 2004, 108 (43), 9342–9347. 11 12. Gottfried, J. L.; de Lucia, F. C., Jr.; Piraino, S. M. Ultrafast Laser

  9. Integrated Data Collection Analysis (IDCA) program--KClO4/Dodecane Mixture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandstrom, Mary M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Brown, Geoffrey W. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Preston, Daniel N. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Pollard, Colin J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Warner, Kirstin F. [Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC), Indian Head, MD (United States). Indian Head Division; Sorensen, Daniel N. [Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC), Indian Head, MD (United States). Indian Head Division; Remmers, Daniel L. [Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC), Indian Head, MD (United States). Indian Head Division; Shelley, Timothy J. [Air Force Research Lab. (AFRL), Tyndall AFB, FL (United States); Reyes, Jose A. [Applied Research Associates, Tyndall AFB, FL (United States); Hsu, Peter C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Reynolds, John G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2012-05-11

    The Integrated Data Collection Analysis (IDCA) program is conducting a proficiency study for Small- Scale Safety and Thermal (SSST) testing of homemade explosives (HMEs). Described here are the results for impact, friction, electrostatic discharge, and differential scanning calorimetry analysis of a mixture of KClO4 and dodecane—KClO4/dodecane mixture. This material was selected because of the challenge of performing SSST testing of a mixture of solid and liquid materials. The mixture was found to: 1) be less sensitive to impact than RDX, and PETN, 2) less sensitive to friction than RDX and PETN, and 3) less sensitive to spark than RDX and PETN. The thermal analysis showed little or no exothermic features suggesting that the dodecane volatilized at low temperatures. A prominent endothermic feature was observed and assigned to a phase transition of KClO4. This effort, funded by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), ultimately will put the issues of safe handling of these materials in perspective with standard military explosives. The study is adding SSST testing results for a broad suite of different HMEs to the literature. Ultimately the study has the potential to suggest new guidelines and methods and possibly establish the SSST testing accuracies needed to develop safe handling practices for HMEs. Each participating testing laboratory uses identical test materials and preparation methods wherever possible. Note, however, the test procedures differ among the laboratories. The results are compared among the laboratories and then compared to historical data from various sources. The testing performers involved for the KClO4/dodecane mixture are Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Indian Head Division, Naval Surface Warfare Center, (NSWC IHD), and Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL/RXQL). These tests are conducted as a proficiency study in order to establish some

  10. Unreacted equation of states of typical energetic materials under static compression: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Zhaoyang; Zhao Jijun

    2016-01-01

    The unreacted equation of state (EOS) of energetic materials is an important thermodynamic relationship to characterize their high pressure behaviors and has practical importance. The previous experimental and theoretical works on the equation of state of several energetic materials including nitromethane, 1,3,5-trinitrohexahydro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX), 1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazacyclooctane (HMX), hexanitrostilbene (HNS), hexanitrohexaazaisowurtzitane (HNIW or CL-20), pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN), 2,6-diamino-3,5-dinitropyrazine-1-oxide (LLM-105), triamino-trinitrobenzene (TATB), 1,1-diamino-2,2-dinitroethene (DADNE or FOX-7), and trinitrotoluene (TNT) are reviewed in this paper. The EOS determined from hydrostatic and non-hydrostatic compressions are discussed and compared. The theoretical results based on ab initio calculations are summarized and compared with the experimental data. (topical review)

  11. Computations on Internal Blast from Titanium-Cased Charges in Air

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-07-01

    formation and considerable temperature- dependent polymorphic transition . Oxygen is soluble in titanium metal to the extent of about 25 atom-percent, yielding...15 CSH8N4O1 2 NC Nitrocellulose, 13.3% N; -812.9 +3 C6H7N2.5010 HMX symn-Cyclotetramnethylene- + 77.4 0 tetranitramine, C4HSNBO8 Pentolite 50% PETN, 50...TNT; -97.9 -5 C6.1 6H6 .2 5N3.41085. Comp 8 65% RDX , 35% TNT; + 11.47 -9 C1 .96H2. 53N2.2202.68 TNT 2,4,6-Trinitrotoluene, +30.7 -25 p C7R 5N306 N2

  12. Integrated Data Collection Analysis (IDCA) Program - KClO3/Dodecane Mixture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandstrom, Mary M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Brown, Geoffrey W. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Preston, Daniel N. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Pollard, Colin J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Warner, Kirstin F. [Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC), Indian Head, MD (United States). Indian Head Division; Sorenson, Daniel N. [Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC), Indian Head, MD (United States). Indian Head Division; Remmers, Daniel L. [Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC), Indian Head, MD (United States). Indian Head Division; Shelley, Timothy J. [Air Force Research Lab. (AFRL), Tyndall AFB, FL (United States); Whinnery, LeRoy L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Hsu, Peter C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Reynolds, John G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2011-05-23

    The Integrated Data Collection Analysis (IDCA) program is conducting a proficiency study for Small-Scale Safety and Thermal (SSST) testing of homemade explosives (HMEs). Described here are the results for impact, friction, electrostatic discharge, and differential scanning calorimetry analysis of a mixture of KClO3 and dodecane—KClO3/dodecane mixture. This material was selected because of the challenge of performing SSST testing of a mixture of solid and liquid materials. The mixture was found to: 1) be more sensitive to impact than RDX, and PETN, 2) less sensitive to friction than PETN, and 3) less sensitive to spark than RDX. The thermal analysis showed little or no exothermic features suggesting that the dodecane volatilized at low temperatures. A prominent endothermic feature was observed assigned to melting of KClO3. This effort, funded by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), ultimately will put the issues of safe handling of these materials in perspective with standard military explosives. The study is adding SSST testing results for a broad suite of different HMEs to the literature. Ultimately the study has the potential to suggest new guidelines and methods and possibly establish the SSST testing accuracies needed to develop safe handling practices for HMEs. Each participating testing laboratory uses identical test materials and preparation methods wherever possible. Note, however, the test procedures differ among the laboratories. The results are compared among the laboratories and then compared to historical data from various sources. The testing performers involved for the KClO3/dodecane mixture are Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), and Indian Head Division, Naval Surface Warfare Center, (NSWC IHD). These tests are conducted as a proficiency study in order to establish some consistency in test protocols, procedures, and experiments and to understand

  13. Standoff laser-induced thermal emission of explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galán-Freyle, Nataly Y.; Pacheco-Londoño, Leonardo C.; Figueroa-Navedo, Amanda; Hernandez-Rivera, Samuel P.

    2013-05-01

    A laser mediated methodology for remote thermal excitation of analytes followed by standoff IR detection is proposed. The goal of this study was to determine the feasibility of using laser induced thermal emission (LITE) from vibrationally excited explosives residues deposited on surfaces to detect explosives remotely. Telescope based FT-IR spectral measurements were carried out to examine substrates containing trace amounts of threat compounds used in explosive devices. The highly energetic materials (HEM) used were PETN, TATP, RDX, TNT, DNT and ammonium nitrate with concentrations from 5 to 200 μg/cm2. Target substrates of various thicknesses were remotely heated using a high power CO2 laser, and their mid-infrared (MIR) thermally stimulated emission spectra were recorded. The telescope was configured from reflective optical elements in order to minimize emission losses in the MIR frequencies and to provide optimum overall performance. Spectral replicas were acquired at a distance of 4 m with an FT-IR interferometer at 4 cm- 1 resolution and 10 scans. Laser power was varied from 4-36 W at radiation exposure times of 10, 20, 30 and 60 s. CO2 laser powers were adjusted to improve the detection and identification of the HEM samples. The advantages of increasing the thermal emission were easily observed in the results. Signal intensities were proportional to the thickness of the coated surface (a function of the surface concentration), as well as the laser power and laser exposure time. For samples of RDX and PETN, varying the power and time of induction of the laser, the calculated low limit of detections were 2 and 1 μg/cm2, respectively.

  14. Forensic analysis of high explosives residues in post-blast water samples employing solid phase extraction for analyte pro-concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umi Kalsom Ahmad; Rajendran, Sumathy; Ling, Lee Woan

    2008-01-01

    Nitro aromatic, nitramine and nitrate ester compounds are a major group of high order explosive or better known as military explosives. Octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX), 1,3,5-hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro triazine (RDX), 2,4,6-trinitro-toluene (TNT), pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) and 2,4-dinitrotoluene (2,4-DNT) are secondary high explosives classified as most commonly used explosives components. There is an increasing demand for pre-concentration of these compounds in water samples as the sensitivity achieved by instrumental analytical methods for these high explosives residues are the main drawback in the application at trace levels for forensic analysis. Hence, a simple cartridge solid phase extraction (SPE) procedure was optimized as the off-line extraction and pre-concentration method to enhance the detection limit of high explosive residues using micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC) and gas chromatography with electron-capture detection (GC-ECD) methods. The SPE cartridges utilized LiChrolut EN as the SPE adsorbent. By emplying pre-concentration using SPE, the detection limits of the target analytes in water sample were lowered by more than 1000 times with good percentage recovery (>87%) for MEKC method and lowered by 120 times with more than 2 % percentage recovery for GC-ECD methods. In order to test the feasibility of the developed method to real cases, post-blast water samples were analyzed. The post-blast water samples which were collected from Baling Bom training range, Ulu Kinta, Perak contained RDX and PETN in the range of 0.05 - 0.17 ppm and 0.0124 - 0.0390 ppm respectively. (author)

  15. Molten salt destruction as an alternative to open burning of energetic material wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Upadhye, R.S.; Watkins, B.E.; Pruneda, C.O.; Brummond, W.A.

    1994-01-01

    LLNL has built a small-scale (about 1 kg/hr throughput unit to test the destruction of energetic materials using the Molten Salt Destruction (MSD) process. We have modified the unit described in the earlier references to inject energetic waste material continuously into the unit. In addition to the HMX, other explosives we have destroyed include RDX, PETN, ammonium picrate, TNT, nitroguanadine, and TATB. We have also destroyed a liquid gun propellant comprising hydroxyl ammonium nitrate, triethanolammonium nitrate and water. In addition to these pure components, we have destroyed a number of commonly used formulations, such as LX-10 (HMX/Viton), LX-16 (PETN/FPC461, LX-17 (TATB/Kel F), and PBX-9404 (HMX)/CEF/Nitro cellulose). Our experiments have demonstrated that energetic materials can be safely and effectively treated by MSD.We have also investigated the issue of steam explosions in molten salt units, both experimentally and theoretically, and concluded that steam explosions can be avoided under proper design and operating conditions. We are currently building a larger unit (nominal capacity 5 kg/hr,) to investigate the relationship between residence time, temperature, feed concentration and throughputs, avoidance of back-burn, a;nd determination of the products of combustion under different operating conditions

  16. Coefficients of sliding friction of single crystals of high explosives under different rubbing conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Y Q; Chaudhri, M Munawar

    2013-01-01

    The coefficients of sliding friction of single crystals of commonly used high explosives pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN), cyclotrimethylene trinitramine (RDX) and beta-cyclotetramethylene tetranitramine (β-HMX) under several rubbing configurations and at a relative sliding speed of 0.22 mm s -1 were measured. The sliding configurations were (1) crystal-polished steel pairs, (2) like-crystal pairs and (3) unlike-crystal pairs. For every rubbing configuration the friction force showed oscillations, which are thought to be caused by the formation and shearing of the adhesive junctions formed at the surface of the rubbing crystals. This shearing of the adhesive junctions led to the formation of microscopic and sub-microscopic particles, which were confirmed by an environmental scanning electron microscope study. For every rubbing configuration and for relatively high normal loads pressing the rubbing crystals together, the coefficient of friction was generally in the range 0.2-0.25 and it has been concluded that the coefficient of friction is controlled by the adhesion with almost negligible contribution from the ploughing component. From a knowledge of the coefficient of friction and the uniaxial yield stress values of single crystals of RDX and β-HMX, the shear strength of these crystals were determined to be ∼13.4 MPa and ∼16.8 MPa, respectively.

  17. Design Considerations for a Portable Raman Probe Spectrometer for Field Forensics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James F. Kelly

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Raman spectroscopy has been shown to be a viable method for explosives detection. Currently most forensic Raman systems are either large, powerful instruments for laboratory experiments or handheld instruments for in situ point detection. We have chosen to examine the performance of certain benchtop Raman probe systems with the goal of developing an inexpensive, portable system that could be used to operate in a field forensics laboratory to examine explosives-related residues or samples. To this end, a rugged, low distortion line imaging dispersive Raman spectrograph was configured to work at 830 nm laser excitation and was used to determine whether the composition of thin films of plastic explosives or small (e.g., ≤10 μm particles of RDX or other explosives or oxidizers can be detected, identified, and quantified in the field. With 300 mW excitation energy, concentrations of RDX and PETN can be detected and reconstructed in the case of thin Semtex smears, but further work is needed to push detection limits of areal dosages to the ~1 μg/cm2 level. We describe the performance of several probe/spectrograph combinations and show preliminary data for particle detection, calibration and detection linearity for mixed compounds, and so forth.

  18. Long-Wave Infrared (LWIR) Molecular Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) Emissions of Thin Solid Explosive Powder Films Deposited on Aluminum Substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Clayton S-C; Jin, Feng; Trivedi, Sudhir B; Brown, Ei E; Hommerich, Uwe; Tripathi, Ashish; Samuels, Alan C

    2017-04-01

    Thin solid films made of high nitro (NO 2 )/nitrate (NO 3 ) content explosives were deposited on sand-blasted aluminum substrates and then studied using a mercury-cadmium-telluride (MCT) linear array detection system that is capable of rapidly capturing a broad spectrum of atomic and molecular laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) emissions in the long-wave infrared region (LWIR; ∼5.6-10 µm). Despite the similarities of their chemical compositions and structures, thin films of three commonly used explosives (RDX, HMX, and PETN) studied in this work can be rapidly identified in the ambient air by their molecular LIBS emission signatures in the LWIR region. A preliminary assessment of the detection limit for a thin film of RDX on aluminum appears to be much lower than 60 µg/cm 2 . This LWIR LIBS setup is capable of rapidly probing and charactering samples without the need for elaborate sample preparation and also offers the possibility of a simultaneous ultraviolet visible and LWIR LIBS measurement.

  19. Effectiveness of laser sources for contactless sampling of explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akmalov, Artem E.; Chistyakov, Alexander A.; Kotkovskii, Gennadii E.

    2016-05-01

    A mass-spectrometric study of photo processes initiated by ultraviolet (UV) laser radiation in explosives adsorbed on metal and dielectric substrates has been performed. A calibrated quadrupole mass spectrometer was used to determine a value of activation energy of desorption and a quantity of explosives desorbed by laser radiation. A special vacuumoptical module was elaborated and integrated into a vacuum mass-spectrometric system to focus the laser beam on a sample. It has been shown that the action of nanosecond laser radiation set at q= 107 - 108 W/cm2, λ=266 nm on adsorbed layers of molecules of trinitrotoluene (TNT ) and pentaerytritoltetranitrate (PETN) leads not only to an effective desorption, but also to the non-equilibrium dissociation of molecules with the formation of nitrogen oxide NO. The cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine (RDX) dissociation products are observed only at high laser intensities (q> 109 W/cm2) thus indicating the thermal nature of dissociation, whereas desorption of RDX is observed even at q> 107 W/cm2 from all substrates. Desorption is not observed for cyclotetramethylenetetranitramine (HMX) under single pulse action: the dissociation products NO and NO2 are registered only, whereas irradiation at 10Hz is quite effective for HMX desorption. The results clearly demonstrate a high efficiency of nanosecond laser radiation with λ = 266 nm, q ~ 107 - 108 W/cm2, Epulse= 1mJ for desorption of molecules of explosives from various surfaces.

  20. Sustainable Range Management of RDX and TNT by Phytoremediation with Engineered Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    crop has recently led to the development and publication of efficient transformation techniques. Switchgrass is climatically adapted to grow...the medium, for the first round of selection. Petri dishes were incubated in the culture room under white fluorescent lamps (1900 lux) with 16 hr...with shaking overnight. The GFP signal was observed under UV light. 78 Primers for promoter amplification PL Z1 Ppsbaf2

  1. Toxicities of TNT and RDX to Terrestrial Plants in Five Soils with Contrasting Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    lettuce ( Lactuca sativa (L.)) and barley (Hordeum vulgare (L.)), respectively, at analytically determined soil concentrations up to and including 3320... sativa L.), Japanese millet (J. millet; Echinochloa crus-galli L. [Beauv.]), and perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) in five natural soils that...of the test. The test species in these studies were Medicago sativa (L.) var. Canada no. 1 (alfalfa), Echinochloa crus-galli (L.) P. Beauv. var

  2. Capacities of Candidate Herbaceous Plants for Phytoremediation of Soil-based TNT and RDX on Ranges

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Best, Elly P; Smith, Thomas; Hagen, Frank L; Dawson, Jeffrey O; Torrey, Alan J

    2008-01-01

    .... In these experiments, plants were exposed for periods ranging from 55 to 83 days in the greenhouse, biomass and evapotranspiration characteristics were determined, and residues of explosives' parent...

  3. Capacities of Candidate Herbaceous Plants for Phytoremediation of Soil-based TNT and RDX on Ranges

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    installations and distribution of Sida spinosa...Lehi, UT • Forb seeds from three vendors as follows: redroot pigweed (Amaran- thus retroflexus), morning glory (Ipomoea lacunosa), and prickly sida ... Sida spinosa) from Azlin Seed Service, Leland, MS; common milk- weed (Asclepias syriaca) from Prairiemoon Nursery, Winona, WI; common purslane

  4. Passive Biobarrier for Treating Co-Mingled Perchlorate and RDX in Groundwater at an Active Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-31

    monitoring K hydraulic conductivity; sorption coefficient MCL Maximum Contaminant Level mg/kg milligram(s) per kilogram mg/L milligram(s) per liter...low concentrations. The effectiveness of the barrier for reducing migration of perchlorate and explosives in groundwater at the EEA of NSWCDD was...at NSWCDD suggests that an emulsified oil biobarrier is a viable alternative to reduce the migration of co-mingled perchlorate and explosives in

  5. A Coarse-grain Force Field for RDX: Density Dependent and Eergy Conserving.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Moore, J.D.; Barnes, B.C.; Izvekov, S.; Lísal, Martin; Sellers, M.S.; Taylor, D.E.; Brennan, J.K.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 144, č. 10 (2016), s. 104501 ISSN 0021-9606 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA13-02938S Grant - others:ARL(US) W911NF-10-2-0039 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : dissipative particle dynamics * cyclotrimethylele-trinitramine * biomolecular systems Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.965, year: 2016

  6. Critical Analysis of Nitramine Decomposition Data: Product Distributions from HMX and RDX Decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-06-01

    12. It was stated that analysis of the gaseous products showed that they consisted of N2O, NO, N2, CO, CO2, F^CO and traces of N,* The products of...IR, UV and mass spectrometry. These were (yields summarized in Table 1) as follows: No 1 N2O, NO, CO2, CO, HCN, CH2O, and I^O. NO2 and a trace ...Ramirez, "Reaction of Gem-Nitronitroso Compounds with Triethyl Phosphite ," Tetrahedron, Vol. 29, p. 4195, 1973. J. Jappy and P.N. Preston

  7. Genetic and Biochemical Basis for the Transformation of Energetic Materials (RDX, TNT, DNTs) by Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-04-01

    cultivating them from seeds as described in the previous section. Seedlings were grown at 25ºC under light at 100 rpm for seven days, following which three...detector. The ratio of the mobile phase of HPLC to Ultima Flo M cocktail was 1: 2. 2.3. Cultivation of plants Wild-type Arabidopsis thaliana...Organic toxicants and plants. Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety 47:1-26 Larson SL, Jones RP, Escalon L, Parker D (1999) Classification of explosives

  8. Influence of Ubiquitous Electron Acceptors on In Situ Anaerobic Biotransformation of RDX in Groundwater

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wani, Altaf

    2003-01-01

    A series of column studies, with aquifer material from the former Nebraska Ordnance Plant, were performed to explore the phenomenon of electron competition from ubiquitous inorganic electron acceptors (nitrate and sulfate...

  9. Analysis of Wastewater for Organic Compounds Unique to RDX/HMX manufacturing and Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-12-01

    manufacture of acetic anhydride and the concentration of weak acetic acid, recovered at Area B, to yield * Holston Defense Corporation 2 Kingsport...washing nor Soxhlet extraction techniques proved to be effective in recovering the organic compounds from the type of activated carbon available at the...ice ?nd acetone mixture.J Approximately one liter of dewater yielded approximately 200 mg (0.2 grams) of freeze-dried solids: These solids were

  10. Toxicities of TNT and RDX to the Earthworm Eisenia fetida in Five Soils with Contrasting Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    to prevent photolysis of the EM. Each soil treatment sample was then transferred into a fluorocarbon-coated, high-density polyethylene container and...and abiotic processes under anaerobic and aerobic conditions (Sunahara et al., 2001). A number of soil-borne bacteria and fungi are known to transform

  11. Biodegradation of RDX by Stimulating Humic Substance- and Fe(III) - Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-06-19

    30. Lovley, D. R. 1995. Microbial Reduction of Iron, Manganese, and Other Metals. Adv. Agronomy 54:175-231. 31. Lovley, D. R., and E. L. Blunt...167. 57. Stevenson, F. J. 1982. Humus chemistry genesis, composition, reactions. Wiley Interscience, New York. 58. Stolz, J. F., D. R. Lovley, and

  12. Anisotropic Dislocation Line Energy and Crack Tip Dislocation Nucleation in (alpha)RDX

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-01

    Mitchell, R.L.; Knap, J.; Chung, P.W., Role of molecule flexibility on the nucleation of dislocations in molecular crystals. App. Phys. Lett. 2013...uniform stres , under-estimate of stressses (Get from S) Br=0; for i=1:3 Br=Br+sum(S(i,1:3)); end Br=1/Br; % Shear Modulus Gr=4/15*(S(1,1

  13. Water Quality Criteria for Hexahydro-1,3,5-Trinitro-1,3,5-Triazine (RDX)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-06-01

    might have produced an inter- mediate degree of absorption between the two others described above. 4.2.2 Aimal Studies As in man, CNS excitation is...real-world situation, and almost h1s Lo be measured in a field situation in which predators accumulate the material directly from A-15 water and by

  14. Biologically Active Zone Enhancement (BAZE) for In Situ RDX Degradation in Ground Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    x 3 m) stainless steel tubing equipped with an in-line flow-through cell (Figures 21 and 22). Sampling equipment was decontaminated prior to...demonstration. Jeff Breckenridge from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineer-Center of Expertise (Hazardous Toxic and Radioactive Waste) assisted in the collection...injection/recirculation system. The pump was suspended 60-LF (18.3 m) below ground surface (bgs) by a stainless steel cable attached to the well

  15. Composting of soils/sediments and sludges containing toxic organics including high energy explosives. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doyle, R.C.; Kitchens, J.F.

    1993-07-01

    Laboratory and pilot-scale experimentation were conducted to evaluate composting as an on-site treatment technology to remediate soils contaminated with hazardous waste at DOE`s PANTEX Plant. Suspected contaminated sites within the PANTEX Plant were sampled and analyzed for explosives, other organics, and inorganic wastes. Soils in drainage ditches and playas at PANTEX Plant were found to be contaminated with low levels of explosives (including RDX, HMX, PETN and TATB). Additional sites previously used for solvent disposal were heavily contaminated with solvents and transformation products of the solvent, as well as explosives and by-products of explosives. Laboratory studies were conducted using {sup 14}C-labeled explosives and {sup 14}C-labeled diacetone alcohol contaminated soil loaded into horse manure/hay composts at three rates: 20, 30, and 40%(W/W). The composts were incubated for six weeks at approximately 60{degree}C with continuous aeration. All explosives degraded rapidly and were reduced to below detection limits within 3 weeks in the laboratory studies. {sup 14}C-degradates from {sup 14}C-RDX, {sup 14}C-HMX and {sup 14}C-TATB were largely limited to {sup 14}CO{sub 2} and unextracted residue in the compost. Volatile and non-volatile {sup 14}C-degradates were found to result from {sup 14}C-PETN breakdown, but these compounds were not identified. {sup 14}C-diacetone alcohol concentrations were significantly reduced during composting. However, most of the radioactivity was volatilized from the compost as non-{sup 14}CO{sub 2} degradates or as {sup 14}C-diacetone alcohol. Pilot scale composts loaded with explosives contaminated soil at 30% (W/W) with intermittent aeration were monitored over six weeks. Data from the pilot-scale study generally was in agreement with the laboratory studies. However, the {sup 14}C-labeled TATB degraded much faster than the unlabeled TATB. Some formulations of TATB may be more resistant to composting activity than others.

  16. Optimization of biological and instrumental detection of explosives and ignitable liquid residues including canines, SPME/ITMS and GC/MSn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furton, Kenneth G.; Harper, Ross J.; Perr, Jeannette M.; Almirall, Jose R.

    2003-09-01

    A comprehensive study and comparison is underway using biological detectors and instrumental methods for the rapid detection of ignitable liquid residues (ILR) and high explosives. Headspace solid phase microextraction (SPME) has been demonstrated to be an effective sampling method helping to identify active odor signature chemicals used by detector dogs to locate forensic specimens as well as a rapid pre-concentration technique prior to instrumental detection. Common ignitable liquids and common military and industrial explosives have been studied including trinitrotoluene, tetryl, RDX, HMX, EGDN, PETN and nitroglycerine. This study focuses on identifying volatile odor signature chemicals present, which can be used to enhance the level and reliability of detection of ILR and explosives by canines and instrumental methods. While most instrumental methods currently in use focus on particles and on parent organic compounds, which are often involatile, characteristic volatile organics are generally also present and can be exploited to enhance detection particularly for well-concealed devices. Specific examples include the volatile odor chemicals 2-ethyl-1-hexanol and cyclohexanone, which are readily available in the headspace of the high explosive composition C-4; whereas, the active chemical cyclo-1,3,5-trimethylene-2,4,6-trinitramine (RDX) is not. The analysis and identification of these headspace 'fingerprint' organics is followed by double-blind dog trials of the individual components using certified teams in an attempt to isolate and understand the target compounds to which dogs are sensitive. Studies to compare commonly used training aids with the actual target explosive have also been undertaken to determine their suitability and effectiveness. The optimization of solid phase microextraction (SPME) combined with ion trap mobility spectrometry (ITMS) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (GC/MSn) is detailed including interface development

  17. Recognition of explosives fingerprints on objects for courier services using machine learning methods and laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moros, J; Serrano, J; Gallego, F J; Macías, J; Laserna, J J

    2013-06-15

    During recent years laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been considered one of the techniques with larger ability for trace detection of explosives. However, despite of the high sensitivity exhibited for this application, LIBS suffers from a limited selectivity due to difficulties in assigning the molecular origin of the spectral emissions observed. This circumstance makes the recognition of fingerprints a latent challenging problem. In the present manuscript the sorting of six explosives (chloratite, ammonal, DNT, TNT, RDX and PETN) against a broad list of potential harmless interferents (butter, fuel oil, hand cream, olive oil, …), all of them in the form of fingerprints deposited on the surfaces of objects for courier services, has been carried out. When LIBS information is processed through a multi-stage architecture algorithm built from a suitable combination of 3 learning classifiers, an unknown fingerprint may be labeled into a particular class. Neural network classifiers trained by the Levenberg-Marquardt rule were decided within 3D scatter plots projected onto the subspace of the most useful features extracted from the LIBS spectra. Experimental results demonstrate that the presented algorithm sorts fingerprints according to their hazardous character, although its spectral information is virtually identical in appearance, with rates of false negatives and false positives not beyond of 10%. These reported achievements mean a step forward in the technology readiness level of LIBS for this complex application related to defense, homeland security and force protection. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Advanced recognition of explosives in traces on polymer surfaces using LIBS and supervised learning classifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, Jorge; Moros, Javier; Sánchez, Carlos; Macías, Jorge; Laserna, J Javier

    2014-01-02

    The large similarity existing in the spectral emissions collected from organic compounds by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is a limiting factor for the use of this technology in the real world. Specifically, among the most ambitious challenges of today's LIBS involves the recognition of an organic residue when neglected on the surface of an object of identical nature. Under these circumstances, the development of an efficient algorithm to disclose the minute differences within this highly complex spectral information is crucial for a realistic application of LIBS in countering explosive threats. An approach cemented on scatter plots of characteristic emission features has been developed to identify organic explosives when located on polymeric surfaces (teflon, nylon and polyethylene). By using selected spectral variables, the approach allows to design a concise classifier for alerting when one of four explosives (DNT, TNT, RDX and PETN) is present on the surface of the polymer. Ordinary products (butter, fuel oil, hand cream, olive oil and motor oil) cause no confusion in the decisions taken by the classifier. With rates of false negatives and false positives below 5%, results demonstrate that the classification algorithm enables to label residues according to their harmful nature in the most demanding scenario for a LIBS sensor. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. New directions in the science and technology of advanced sheet explosive formulations and the key energetic materials used in the processing of sheet explosives: Emerging trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talawar, M B; Jangid, S K; Nath, T; Sinha, R K; Asthana, S N

    2015-12-30

    This review presents the work carried out by the international community in the area of sheet explosive formulations and its applications in various systems. The sheet explosive is also named as PBXs and is a composite material in which solid explosive particles like RDX, HMX or PETN are dispersed in a polymeric matrix, forms a flexible material that can be rolled/cut into sheet form which can be applied to any complex contour. The designed sheet explosive must possess characteristic properties such as flexible, cuttable, water proof, easily initiable, and safe handling. The sheet explosives are being used for protecting tanks (ERA), light combat vehicle and futuristic infantry carrier vehicle from different attacking war heads etc. Besides, sheet explosives find wide applications in demolition of bridges, ships, cutting and metal cladding. This review also covers the aspects such as risks and hazard analysis during the processing of sheet explosive formulations, effect of ageing on sheet explosives, detection and analysis of sheet explosive ingredients and the R&D efforts of Indian researchers in the development of sheet explosive formulations. To the best of our knowledge, there has been no review article published in the literature in the area of sheet explosives. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Negative Ion Formation of Pentaerythritol Tetranitrate in Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization-Mass Spectrometry and in Corona Discharge Ionization-Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Sung Seen; Kim, Ok Bae; Kim, Yun Ki; An, Seung Geon; Shin, Myung Won; Maeng, Seug Jin; Choi, Gyu Seop

    2011-01-01

    Most organic explosives contain nitro groups and are subdivided into nitro-aromatic compounds, nitrate esters, and nitroamines. 1,3,5-Trinitrobenzene (TNB), 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), and 2,4-dinitrotoluene (DNT) belong to the nitroaromatic compounds, pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) is one of the nitrate esters, and the nitroamines include 1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazacyclohexane (RDX) and octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX). Explosives are unstable compounds and their polarities vary from moderate to high due to their nitro groups. These properties impose certain limitations on techniques used for their analysis, since explosives may decompose during analysis or result in poor chromatographic retention. Gas chromatography (GC) is suitable for the analysis of nitroaromatic compounds, but not for nitrate esters and nitroamines, which undergo thermal decomposition under the high temperature conditions of injector and oven. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) would be a better alternative for the more unstable and polar explosives Common analytical

  1. Computer simulation for prediction of performance and thermodynamic parameters of high energy materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muthurajan, H.; Sivabalan, R.; Talawar, M.B.; Asthana, S.N.

    2004-01-01

    A new code viz., Linear Output Thermodynamic User-friendly Software for Energetic Systems (LOTUSES) developed during this work predicts the theoretical performance parameters such as density, detonation factor, velocity of detonation, detonation pressure and thermodynamic properties such as heat of detonation, heat of explosion, volume of explosion gaseous products. The same code also assists in the prediction of possible explosive decomposition products after explosion and power index. The developed code has been validated by calculating the parameters of standard explosives such as TNT, PETN, RDX, and HMX. Theoretically predicated parameters are accurate to the order of ±5% deviation. To the best of our knowledge, no such code is reported in literature which can predict a wide range of characteristics of known/unknown explosives with minimum input parameters. The code can be used to obtain thermochemical and performance parameters of high energy materials (HEMs) with reasonable accuracy. The code has been developed in Visual Basic having enhanced windows environment, and thereby advantages over the conventional codes, written in Fortran. The theoretically predicted HEMs performance can be directly printed as well as stored in text (.txt) or HTML (.htm) or Microsoft Word (.doc) or Adobe Acrobat (.pdf) format in the hard disk. The output can also be copied into the Random Access Memory as clipboard text which can be imported/pasted in other software as in the case of other codes

  2. Explosives and chemical warfare agents - detection and analysis with PTR-MS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sulzer, Philipp; Juerschik, Simone; Jaksch, Stefan; Jordan, Alfons; Hanel, Gernot; Hartungen, Eugen; Seehauser, Hans; Maerk, Lukas; Haidacher, Stefan; Schottkowsky, Ralf [IONICON Analytik GmbH, Innsbruck (Austria); Petersson, Fredrik [Institut fuer Ionenphysik und Angewandte Physik, Leopold-Franzens Universitaet Innsbruck (Austria); Maerk, Tilmann [IONICON Analytik GmbH, Innsbruck (Austria); Institut fuer Ionenphysik und Angewandte Physik, Leopold-Franzens Universitaet Innsbruck (Austria)

    2010-07-01

    We utilized a recently developed high sensitivity PTR-MS instrument equipped with a high resolution time-of-flight mass analyzer for detailed investigations on explosives and chemical warfare agents (CWAs). We show that with this so called PTR-TOF 8000 it is possible to identify solid explosives (RDX, TNT, HMX, PETN and Semtex A) by analyzing the headspace above small quantities of samples at room temperature and from trace quantities not visible to the naked eye placed on surfaces. As the mentioned solid explosives possess very low vapor pressures, the main challenge for detecting them in the gas phase is to provide an instrument with a sufficient sensitivity. CWAs on the other side have very high vapor pressures but are difficult to identify unambiguously as their nominal molecular masses are usually comparably small and therefore hard to distinguish from harmless everyday-compounds (e.g. mustard gas: 159 g/mol). In the present work we demonstrate that we can detect a broad range of dangerous substances, ranging from the CWA mustard gas to the explosive HMX.

  3. Reverse Phase HPLC Method for Analysis of TNT, RDX, HMX and 2,4-DNT in Munitions Wastewater,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-12-01

    Materials Agency (USATHAMA), Capt. P. Rissell (USATHAMA) and Dr. R. Westerdahl (LCWSL). project monitors. The authors ac- knowledge the support given by...Capt. Rissell and Dr. Westerdahl throughout this effort, and their technical review of the report. The contents of this report are not to be used for

  4. Laser interaction effects of electromagnetic absorption and microstructural defects on hot-spot formation in RDX-PCTFE energetic aggregates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, Judith A; LaBarbera, Darrell A; Zikry, Mohammed A

    2014-01-01

    Hot-spot formation in energetic aggregates subjected to dynamic pressure loading and laser irradiation has been investigated. Specialized finite-element techniques with a dislocation-density-based crystalline plasticity constitutive formulation and thermo-mechanical coupling of heat conduction, adiabatic heating, laser heating and thermal decomposition were used to predict hot-spot formation in RDX–polymer aggregates subjected to dynamic pressures and laser energies. The effects of the electromagnetic absorption coefficient coupled with void distribution and spacing, grain morphology, crystal–binder interactions and dislocation densities were analyzed to determine their influence on the time, location and mechanisms of hot-spot formation. Four different mechanisms for hot-spot initiation under dynamic laser and pressure loads were identified, which depend on the localization of plastic shear strain and laser heat absorption within the aggregate. The predictions indicate that hot-spot formation is accelerated by higher absorption coefficients and by localized plastic deformations that occur in areas of significant laser heating. (paper)

  5. Development of a Relative Source Contribution Factor for Hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    Japanese millet , perennial ryegrass, carrot shoot, spinach seeds, etc.) (Cataldo et al., 1990; Checkai and Simini, 1996; Price et al., 1997; Fellows et al...environmental effects and screening values. Rev Environ Contam Toxicol 161:1-156. Todd, Q., Finger , F., Tuner, R., Morley, D. 1989. Delivery

  6. Acute and Chronic Toxicities of TNT and RDX to the Enchytraeid Worm, Enchytraeus crypticus, in Natural Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-01

    Checkai, R. Comparison of Malathion Toxicity Using Enchytraeid Reproduction Test and Earthworm Toxicity Test in Different Soil Types. Pedobiologia...Russow, R.; Richnow, H.H.; Kastner, M. Fate and Metabolism of [ 15 N]2,4,6-Trinitrotoluene in Soil . Environ. Toxicol. Chem. 2004, 23, pp 1852–1860...ENCHYTRAEUS CRYPTICUS, IN NATURAL SOILS ECBC-TR-981 Roman G. Kuperman Ronald T. Checkai Michael Simini Carlton T. Phillips Jan E. Kolakowski Carl

  7. Role of the rdxA and frxA genes in oxygen-dependent metronidazole resistance of Helicobacter pylori

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.M. Gerrits (Monique); E.J. van der Wouden; D.A. Bax (Dorine); A.A. van Zwet (Anton); A.H.M. van Vliet (Arnoud); J.G. Kusters (Johannes); J.C. Thijs; E.J. Kuipers (Ernst); A. de Jong (Albertine)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractAlmost 50 % of all Helicobacter pylori isolates are resistant to metronidazole, which reduces the efficacy of metronidazole-containing regimens, but does not make them completely ineffective. This discrepancy between in vitro metronidazole resistance and treatment

  8. IRIS Toxicological Review of Hexahydro-1,3,5-Trinitro-1,3,5-Triazine (RDX) (Interagency Science Consultation Draft)

    Science.gov (United States)

    On March 10, 2016, the public comment draft Toxicological Review of Hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine and the draft charge to external peer reviewers were released for public review and comment. The Toxicological Review and charge were reviewed internally by EPA and by othe...

  9. Nano-RDX Electrostatic Stabilization Mechanism Investigation Using Derjaguin-Landau and Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-20

    maintain electro- neutrality , an equal number of counter ions with the opposite charge will surround the colloidal particles and give rise to overall...charge- neutral double layers. A diagram of a particle in solution with an electric double layer can be seen in figure 2. -200.00 -180.00...Salts can be added to the solution, and their ions can be adsorbed onto the particle surface to change the particle’s net surface charge by modifying

  10. Identification of Metabolic Routes and Catabolic Enzymes Involved in Phytoremediation of the Nitro-Substituted Explosives TNT, RDX, and HMX

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-07-31

    from various well-studied spermatophyte plants species (e.g., A. thaliana, Zea mays, Oryza sativa). The two P. trichocarpa housekeeping genes used as...Nitrate oxidoreductase from Aspergillus niger. Environ. Sci. Technol. 36, 3104-3108. Bhushan, B., Trott, S., Spain, J. C., Halasz, A., Pacquet, L

  11. Water in the blast hole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pilshaw, S.R. [Pilshaw Associates, KS (United States)

    1995-10-01

    Water in the blast area is a considerable problem in US opencast coal mining. While gelatin dynamite was reasonably water resistant, Anfo is not. All potential solutions to this problem: the use of Anfo and emulsion (Heavy Anfo), pumping, draining, and the use of water bags, involve considerable extra cost. With small amounts of water an alternative solution has been formulated: the use of a self inflating gas bag to exclude water, and loading the Anfo from the water line up to the stemming level of the blasthole. Quite substantial water columns may be sealed off in this manner, with little or no deleterious effect on blast effects.

  12. Destruction of energetic materials by supercritical water oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beulow, S.J.; Dyer, R.B.; Harradine, D.M.; Robinson, J.M.; Oldenborg, R.C.; Funk, K.A.; McInroy, R.E.; Sanchez, J.A.; Spontarelli, T.

    1993-01-01

    Supercritical water oxidation is a relatively low-temperature process that can give high destruction efficiencies for a variety of hazardous chemical wastes. Results are presented examining the destruction of high explosives and propellants in supercritical water and the use of low temperature, low pressure hydrolysis as a pretreatment process. Reactions of cyclotrimethylene trinitramine (RDX), cyclotetramethylene tetranitramine (HMX), nitroguanidine (NQ), pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN), and 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) are examined in a flow reactor operated at temperatures between 400 degrees C and 650 degrees C. Explosives are introduced into the reactor at concentrations below the solubility limits. For each of the compounds, over 99.9% is destroyed in less than 30 seconds at temperatures above 600 degrees C. The reactions produce primarily N 2 , N 2 O,CO 2 , and some nitrate and nitrite ions. The distribution of reaction products depends on reactor pressure, temperature, and oxidizer concentration. Kinetics studies of the reactions of nitrate and nitrite ions with various reducing reagents in supercritical water show that they can be rapidly and completely destroyed at temperatures above 525 degrees C. The use of slurries and hydrolysis to introduce high concentrations of explosives into a supercritical water reactor is examined. For some compounds the rate of reaction depends on particle size. The hydrolysis of explosives at low temperatures (<100 degrees C) and low pressures (<1 atm) under basic conditions produces water soluble, non-explosive products which are easily destroyed by supercritical water oxidation. Large pieces of explosives (13 cm diameter) have been successfully hydrolyzed. The rate, extent, and products of the hydrolysis depend on the type and concentration of base. Results from the base hydrolysis of triple base propellant M31A1E1 and the subsequent supercritical water oxidation of the hydrolysis products are presented

  13. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for the remote detection of explosives at level of fingerprints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almaviva, S.; Palucci, A.; Lazic, V.; Menicucci, I.; Nuvoli, M.; Pistilli, M.; De Dominicis, L.

    2016-04-01

    We report the results of the application of Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) for the detection of some common military explosives and theirs precursors deposited on white varnished car's external and black car's internal or external plastic. The residues were deposited by an artificial silicon finger, to simulate material manipulation by terrorists when preparing a car bomb, leaving traces of explosives on the parts of a car. LIBS spectra were acquired by using a first prototype laboratory stand-off device, developed in the framework of the EU FP7 313077 project EDEN (End-user driven DEmo for CBRNe). The system operates at working distances 8-30 m and collects the LIBS in the spectral range 240-840 nm. In this configuration, the target was moved precisely in X-Y direction to simulate the scanning system, to be implemented successively. The system is equipped with two colour cameras, one for wide scene view and another for imaging with a very high magnification, capable to discern fingerprints on a target. The spectral features of each examined substance were identified and compared to those belonging to the substrate and the surrounding air, and those belonging to possible common interferents. These spectral differences are discussed and interpreted. The obtained results show that the detection and discrimination of nitro-based compounds like RDX, PETN, ammonium nitrate (AN), and urea nitrate (UN) from organic interfering substances like diesel, greasy lubricants, greasy adhesives or oils in fingerprint concentration, at stand-off distance of some meters or tenths of meters is feasible.

  14. Gaseous byproducts from high-temperature thermal conversion elemental analysis of nitrogen- and sulfur-bearing compounds with considerations for δ2H and δ18O analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunsinger, Glendon B; Tipple, Christopher A; Stern, Libby A

    2013-07-30

    High-temperature, conversion-reduction (HTC) systems convert hydrogen and oxygen in materials into H2 and CO for δ(2)H and δ(18)O measurements by isotope ratio mass spectrometry. HTC of nitrogen- and sulfur-bearing materials produces unintended byproduct gases that could affect isotope analyses by: (1) allowing isotope exchange reactions downstream of the HTC reactor, (2) creating isobaric or co-elution interferences, and (3) causing deterioration of the chromatography. This study characterizes these HTC byproducts. A HTC system (ThermoFinnigan TC/EA) was directly connected to a gas chromatograph/quadrupole mass spectrometer in scan mode (m/z 8 to 88) to identify the volatile products generated by HTC at conversion temperatures of 1350 °C and 1450 °C for a range of nitrogen- and sulfur-bearing solids [keratin powder, horse hair, caffeine, ammonium nitrate, potassium nitrate, ammonium sulfate, urea, and three nitrated organic explosives (PETN, RDX, and TNT)]. The prominent HTC byproduct gases include carbon dioxide, hydrogen cyanide, methane, acetylene, and water for all nitrogen-bearing compounds, as well as carbon disulfide, carbonyl sulfide, and hydrogen sulfide for sulfur-bearing compounds. The 1450 °C reactor temperature reduced the abundance of most byproduct gases, but increased the significant byproduct, hydrogen cyanide. Inclusion of a post-reactor chemical trap containing Ascarite II and Sicapent, in series, eliminated the majority of byproducts. This study identified numerous gaseous HTC byproducts. The potential adverse effects of these gases on isotope ratio analyses are unknown but may be mitigated by higher HTC reactor temperatures and purifying the products with a purge-and-trap system or with chemical traps. Published in 2013. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  15. Recent advances in the molten salt technology for the destruction of energetic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Upadhye, R.S.; Watkins, B.E.; Pruneda, C.O.

    1995-11-01

    The DOE has thousands of pounds of energetic materials which result from dismantlement operations at the Pantex Plant. The authors have demonstrated the Molten Salt Destruction (MSD) Process for the treatment of explosives and explosive-containing wastes on a 1.5 kilogram of explosive per hour scale and are currently building a 5 kilogram per hour unit. MSD converts the organic constituents of the waste into non-hazardous substances such as carbon dioxide, nitrogen and water. Any inorganic constituents of the waste, such as binders and metallic particles, are retained in the molten salt. The destruction of energetic material waste is accomplished by introducing it, together with air, into a crucible containing a molten salt, in this case a eutectic mixture of Na, K, and Li carbonates. The following pure component DOE and DoD explosives have been destroyed in LLNL's experimental unit at their High Explosives Applications Facility (HEAF): ammonium picrate, HMX, K-6, NQ, NTO, PETN, RDX, TATB, and TNT. In addition, the following formulations were also destroyed: Comp B, LX-10, LX-16, LX-17, PBX-9404, and XM46, a US Army liquid gun propellant. In this 1.5 kg/hr unit, the fractions of carbon converted to CO and of chemically bound nitrogen converted to NOx were found to be well below 1T. In addition to destroying explosive powders and molding powders the authors have also destroyed materials that are typical of real world wastes. These include shavings from machined pressed parts of plastic bonded explosives and sump waste containing both explosives and non-explosive debris. Based on the information obtained on the smaller unit, the authors have constructed a 5 kg/hr MSD unit, incorporating LLNL's advanced chimney design. This unit is currently under shakedown tests and evaluation

  16. An innovative approach to dealing with water in the blasthole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pilshaw, S.R. [Pilshaw Associates, Inc., Kansas City, KS (United States)

    1994-11-01

    Anfo is much cheaper than the dynamite it has replaced for explosive fracturing, however it will only work in dry conditions. Where water conditions are present in the blasthole some alternative product or method will need to be found. One solution is to use Heavy Anfo, a blend of Anfo and emulsion. However much emulsion is added, the cost will still be much higher than pure Anfo, and the blast effects may well be damped down by the water. Wet bag cartridges may be dropped into the hole to displace the water, adding Anfo to the top of the column. This is cheaper than using Heavy Anfo, but still much more expensive than dry blasting. Pumping the water and using plastic liners is perceived as being labour-intensive, but may easily involve no more work than placing wet bags in the hole, thus making the overall cost much lower. Small amounts of water can be negated by using a self-inflating gas bag, sealing the hole at water level. The explosive column then remains dry. Upon explosion the water is driven into the rock, amplifying the effect of the blast rather than damping them. This may cost less than an all Anfo shot. 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  17. Emulsions: the cutting edge of development in blasting agent technology - a method for economic comparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayat, M.G.; Allen, S.G.

    1988-03-01

    This work examines the history and development of blasting agents beginning with ANFO in the 1950's and concluding with a specific look at the 1980's blasting technology: the emulsion. Properties of emulsions and Emulsion Blend Explosive Systems are compared with ANFO and a method of comparing their costs, useful for comparing any two explosives, is developed. Based on this comparison, the Emulsion Blend Explosive System is determined superior to ANFO on the basis of cost per unit of overburden broken. 4 refs.

  18. It's sensible to mix your own slurries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chironis, N.P.

    1990-05-01

    Slurry explosives have not made the gains in the market expected of them, possibly due to the extra handling required at the mine site. One Peabody Coal Co. mine has built its own inexpensive setup that blends emulsions with Anfo to the desired ratio before loading the blend into Anfo trucks. Another mine is using a salvaged cement mixer to mix up its own batches of water gels, which are then mixed with Anfo. Both approaches result in blends that can be specialized for different areas of a mine to expand drill patterns, increase fragmentation and gain additional movements for blast casting. 2 figs.

  19. Evaluation of the metabolic fate of munitions material (TNT & RDX) in plant systems. Initial assessment of plant DNA mutation spectra as a biomarker

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leung, F.; Cataldo, D.A.; Fellows, R.J.; Jarrell, A.E.; Harvey, S.D.

    1995-09-01

    Munitions material can enter the environment as a result of manufacturing activities and field usage. Predictor methodologies, or biomarkers would enhance evaluation of environmental impacts. The goal of this exploratory study deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) mutation frequency as a biomarker for munitions exposure. The approach e resolution of an effective repetitive sequence probe for the identification of characteristic mutations, and (2) the development of a testing media [a clonal cell line of carrot (Daucus carota) spension cells]. Commercially available probes demonstrated marginal resolution therefore a low-C{sub o}t library was then constructed. Three colonies from the low-C{sub o}t DNA library were screened and the DNA isolates sequenced. A suspension culture of carrot (Daucus carota) was developed. A mutation spectra experiment was initiated at a 10-mg TNT/L exposure concentration with the attempt to clone over 1500 single TNT-exposed cells. Over the following six months greater than 98% of the initially isolated cells were unable to survive and produce micro calluses. The remaining calli were too few to be statistically significant and the experiment was terminated. The biomarker concept itself remains to be disproved, but the need for large numbers of uniform clones to differentiate true mutations suggest that more direct techniques using whole tissues need to be developed.

  20. An Evaluation of the Environmental Fate and behavior of Munitions Materiel (TNT, RDX) in Soil and Plant Systems. Environmental Fate and behavior of TNT

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-08-01

    for 48 I. The soil extracts were filtered through a 0.22-lim Nylon 66 filter ( Alltech Associates, Deerfield, Illinois), and the volume was then... advantages over the analysis of stem tissue. Paramount among these is that stem exudate contains only xylem transport products, or those metabolites being...transported 3 from root to shoot tissues, whereas stem tissue contains both transport products and storage forms of xenobiotics. Additional advantages

  1. Polarization Orientation Dependence of the Far Infrared Spectra of Oriented Single Crystals of 1,3,5-trinitro-S-triazine (RDX) using Terahertz Time-Domain Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    BE, Hogbin MR, Kemp MC (2007) Proc IEEE 95:1559 14. Laman N, Sree Harsha S, Grischkowsky D, Melinger JS (2008) Opt Express 16:4094 15. Melinger JS... Laman N, Grischkowsky D (2008) Appl Phy Lett 93:011102 16. Tribe WR, Newnham DA, Taday PF, Kemp MC (2004) Proc SPIE 5354:168 17. Watters DG, Falconer DG

  2. Reactions of thiocarbamate, triazine and urea herbicides, RDX and benzenes on EPA Contaminant Candidate List with ozone and with hydroxyl radicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Second-order rate constants of the direct ozone reactions (kO3,M) and the indirect OH radical reactions (kOH,M) for nine chemicals on the US EPA’s Drinking Water Contaminant Candidate List (CCL) were studied during the ozonation and ozone/hydrogen peroxide a...

  3. Toxicity of RDX, HMX, TNB, 2,4-DNT, and 2,6-DNT to the Earthworm, Eisenia Fetida, in a Sandy Loam Soil

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Simini, Michael; Checkai, Ronald T; Kuperman, Roman G; Phillips, Carlton T; Kolakowski, Jan E; Kurnas, Carl W; Sunahara, Geoffrey I

    2006-01-01

    ...), and 1,3,5-trinitrobenzene (TNB) to fill the data gaps. Tests were conducted in freshly amended and in amended soils subjected to a weathering/aging process to better reflect exposure conditions in field soils...

  4. CARS (Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering) Spectroscopy of the Reaction Zone of Methane-Nitrous Oxide and RDX Propellant Flames.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    IB, L. Watermier A. Barrows G. Adams R. Fifer M. Miller T. Coffee J. Heimeryl C. Nelson J. Vanderhoff J. Anderson Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21005...Electronics Research and Development Command ATTN: ANSEL -ED DELSD-L 0 Fort Monmouth, NJ 07703-5301 Commander U.S. Army Missile Command ATTN: AMSMI-R

  5. Toxicity of RDX, HMX, TNB, 2,4-DNT, and 2,6-DNT to the Earthworm, Eisenia Fetida, in a Sandy Loam Soil

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Simini, Michael; Checkai, Ronald T; Kuperman, Roman G; Phillips, Carlton T; Kolakowski, Jan E; Kurnas, Carl W; Sunahara, Geoffrey I

    2006-01-01

    ...) for ecological risk assessment of soil contaminants at Superfund sites. Insufficient information existed to generate Eco-SSLs for explosives and related materials in soil. The earthworm (Eisenia fetida...

  6. An Investigation of the Sub-Microsecond Features of Dynamic Crack Propagation in PMMA and the Rdx-Based Explosive PBX 9205

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washabaugh, P. D.; Hill, L. G.

    2007-12-01

    A dynamic crack propagating in a brittle material releases enough thermal energy to produce visible light. The dynamic fracture of even macroscopically amorphous materials becomes unsteady as the crack propagation velocity approaches the material wave-speeds. The heat generated at a crack-tip, especially as it jumps, may be a mechanism to initiate a self-sustaining reaction in an energetic material. Experiments were conducted in specimens to simulate an infinite plate for ˜10 μs. The initial specimens were 152 mm square by 6 mm thick acrylic sheets, and were fabricated to study non-steady near-wave-speed crack propagation. A variant of this specimen embedded a 25 mm×3 mm PBX 9205 pellet to explore the influence of dynamic Mode-I cracks in these materials. The crack was initiated by up to 0.24 g of Detasheet placed along a precursor 50 mm long notch, with a shield to contain the reaction products and prevent propagation along the fractured surfaces. The crack was studied by means of a streak camera and a Fourier-filter of the light reflecting off the newly minted surfaces. The sub-microsecond behavior of holes initiating, preceding and coalescing with the main crack were observed in the PMMA samples. The embedding and mechanical loading of explosives by this technique did not initiate a self-sustaining reaction in preliminary testing.

  7. An initial investigation of the sub-microsecond features of dynamic crack propagation in PMMA and the RDX-based explosive PBX 9205

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washabaugh, Peter; Hill, Larry

    2007-06-01

    A dynamic crack propagating in a brittle material releases enough thermal energy to produce visible light. The dynamic fracture of even macroscopically amorphous materials becomes unsteady as the crack propagation velocity approaches the material wave-speeds. The heat generated at a crack-tip, especially as it jumps, may be a mechanism to initiate a self-sustaining reaction in an energetic material. Experiments were conducted in specimens to simulate an infinite plate for 20 μs. The initial specimens were 152 mm square by 6 mm thick acrylic sheets, and were fabricated to study non-steady near-wave-speed crack propagation. A variant of this specimen embedded a 25 mm x 3 mm PBX 9205 pellet to explore the influence of dynamic Mode-I cracks in these materials. The crack was initiated by up to 0.2 g of Detasheet placed along a precursor 50 mm long notch, with a shield to contain the reaction products and prevent propagation along the fractured surfaces. The crack was studied by means of a streak camera and a Fourier-filter of the light reflecting off the newly minted surfaces. The sub-microsecond behavior of holes initiating, preceding and coalescing with the main crack were observed in the PMMA samples. The embedding and mechanical loading of explosives by this technique did not initiate a self-sustaining reaction in preliminary testing.

  8. Free-energy Calculations Using Classical Molecular Simulation: Application to the Determination of the Melting Point and Chemical Potential of a Flexible RDX Model.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sellers, M.S.; Lísal, Martin; Brennan, J.K.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 11 (2016), s. 7841-7850 ISSN 1463-9076 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA13-02938S Grant - others:ARL(US) W911NF-10-2-0039 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : solid-liquid coexistence * atomistic simulation * dynamics simulations Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 4.123, year: 2016

  9. Toxicities of RDX or TNT Freshly Amended or Weathered-and-Aged in Five Natural Soils to the Collembolan Folsomia candida

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    Explosive 2,4,6-Trinitrotoluene. Ecotoxicol. Environ. Saf. 2002, 51, 133–144. 65 Gorontzy, T.; Drzyga, O.; Kahl, M.W.; Bruns- Nigel , D.; Breitung, J... Taylor and Francis Group: Boca Raton, FL, 2009; pp 5–33. Monteil-Rivera, F.; Paquet, L.; Deschamps, S.; Balakrishnan, V.K.; Beaulieu, C.; Hawari, J

  10. Possibilities and limitations in the use of bulk explosives for undergound blasting work

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thum, W.

    1982-06-01

    Conditions for the use of bulk explosives - Characterization of the explosives - ANFO - Water gel blasting agents - Underground application of bulk explosives - Comparison of application criteria - Dead-pressing effects - Modifications of application technology - Loading systems.

  11. Dewatering blastholes cuts explosives costs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pilshaw, S.R.

    1987-11-01

    Large mining operations often require a combination of presplitting and dewatering with blasthole pumps. Increasing the percentage of bulk ANFO in any blast will reduce cost and should increase profitability.

  12. The Characterization of a Slurry Explosive--Teledet

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-02-01

    weight PETN* 38.0 + .5 Ammonium nitrate** 27 T .5 Diethyleneglycol 9 T .5 Guar Gum .5 Water 25 + .5 *This is ultra-fine particle size, sensitive PETN. r...Diamond Laboratories ATTN: Technical Library I Branch 420, Mr. R.K. Warner 2800 Powder Mill Road Adelphi, MD 20783 P Commander US Army Engineers

  13. Bulk-loaded emulsion explosives technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borg, D.G. [Blasting Analysis International, Inc., Allentown, PA (United States)

    1995-01-01

    The largest use of emulsion explosives and emulsion-Anfo blends is in surface mining operations. An emulsion explosive is a two-phase system: the inner phase is madeup of an oxidizer solution; the outer phase is made up of oils or an oil/wax blend. Emulsion Anfo blends have been used to expand drill patterns, increase fragmentation, and provide extra energy for blast casting. 3 tabs.

  14. Sublimation Properties of Pentaerythritol Tetranitrate Single Crystals Doped with Its Homologs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharia, Sanjoy K.; Maiti, Amitesh; Gee, Richard H.; Weeks, Brandon L.

    2012-07-20

    Pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) is a secondary explosive used extensively in military and commercial applications. Coarsening of PETN during long-term storage changes the physical properties such as surface area and particle morphology which are important factors in initiation and performance. Doping of impurities was proposed to slow the coarsening process since impurities were shown to modify both the kinetic and thermodynamic properties. In this paper, we discuss how doping of PETN with its homologs of dipentaerythritol hexanitrate (diPEHN) and tripentaerytritol octanitrate (triPEON) affect kinetic and thermodynamic parameters. Pure and homolog doped PETN single crystals were prepared by solvent evaporation in acetone at room temperature. Doping concentrations for this study were 1000 ppm, 5000 ppm, and 10000 ppm. Activation energy and vapor pressure of pure and doped PETN single crystals were obtained from thermogravimetric analysis data.

  15. Modification of the Campylobacter jejuni N-linked glycan by EptC protein-mediated addition of phosphoethanolamine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scott, Nichollas E; Nothaft, Harald; Edwards, Alistair V G

    2012-01-01

    . Interrogation of these data allowed the identification of a phosphoethanolamine (pEtN)-modified variant of the N-glycan that was attached to multiple proteins. The pEtN moiety was attached to the terminal GalNAc of the canonical N-glycan. Deletion of the pEtN transferase eptC removed all evidence of the p......, yet above background levels of pEtN-glycan were also observed in E. coli not expressing eptC, suggesting that endogenous E. coli pEtN transferases can mediate the addition of pEtN to N-glycans. The addition of pEtN must be considered in the context of glycoengineering and may alter C. jejuni glycan...

  16. Molecular Dynamics in Nitramines and Modified Nitramines

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-11-01

    34melts"? Uhat is the structure of RDX and HMX molecules in the "melt", solution, and ,gas phases? What is the structure of the O- RDX polymorph ? These... RDX molecule has 4sentially 3v oeulrsrutr L~j -in all environments except the stable solid"V- RDX ph&*e. The RDX and HMX --~J meslts were found to be...otion and phase transition characteristics of HMX . These studies involve approaches not previously used in this field such as 14 N nuclear quadrupole

  17. Electron shuttle-mediated biotransformation of hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine adsorbed to granular activated carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millerick, Kayleigh; Drew, Scott R; Finneran, Kevin T

    2013-08-06

    Granular activated carbon (GAC) effectively removes hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) from groundwater but generates RDX-laden GAC that must be disposed of or regenerated. Batch reactors containing GAC to which RDX was preadsorbed were used in experiments to test the potential for adsorbed RDX reduction and daughter product formation using (i) chemically reduced anthrahydroquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AH2QDS), (ii) resting Geobacter metallireducens strain GS-15, and (iii) a combined system containing AQDS and GS-15. Approximately 97.0% of the adsorbed RDX was transformed in each of these experimental systems by 90 h. Chemically reduced AQDS (AH2QDS) transformed 99.2% of adsorbed RDX; formaldehyde was produced rapidly and was stoichiometric (3 mol HCHO per mol RDX). Geobacter metallireducens also reduced RDX with and without AQDS present. This is the first study to demonstrate biological transformation of RDX adsorbed to GAC. Formaldehyde increased and then decreased in biological systems, suggesting a previously unreported capacity for G. metallireducens to oxidize formaldehyde, which was confirmed with resting cell suspensions. These data suggest the masses of GAC waste currently produced by activated carbon at RDX remediation sites can be minimized, decreasing the carbon footprint of the treatment technology. Alternatively, this strategy may be used to develop a Bio-GAC system for ex situ RDX treatment.

  18. The effect of phosphoethanolamine intake on mortality and macrophage activity in mice with solid ehrlich tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Sueli Parreira de Arruda

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of a diet rich in synthetic PEtn on the metabolism macrophages of tumor-bearing mice. The results demonstrated that PEtn increased the animals' survival time. In addition, the treated animals released smaller amounts of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 and nitric oxide (NO than the non-treated animals, particularly after day 14. From the results it could be concluded that H2O2 and NO were important in the modulation of neoplastic growth, and pointed to a promising role of PEtn in the control of human neoplasms.

  19. Patterning high explosives at the nanoscale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nafday, Omkar A.; Pitchimani, Rajasekar; Weeks, Brandon L. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX 79409 (United States); Haaheim, Jason [NanoInk Inc., 8025 Lamon Ave., Skokie, IL 60077 (United States)

    2006-10-15

    For the first time, we have shown that spin coating and Dip pen nanolithography (DPN trademark) are simple methods of preparing energetic materials such as PETN and HMX on the nanoscale, requiring no heating of the energetic material. Nanoscale patterning has been demonstrated by the DPN method while continuous thin films were produced using the spin coating method. Results are presented for preparing continuous PETN thin films of nanometer thickness by the spin coating method and for controlling the architecture of arbitrary nanoscale patterns of PETN and HMX by the DPN method. These methods are simple for patterning energetic materials and can be extended beyond PETN and HMX, opening the door for fundamental studies at the nanoscale. (Abstract Copyright [2006], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  20. Mechanization of drill-and-blast operations in surface mines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogan, B.

    1985-07-01

    Comments on recent developments in blasting techniques in modern surface mines and quarries. The tendency to use large boreholes (up to 320 mm diameter) and on site manufactured ANFO and slurry explosives is stressed. Soviet experience with ANFO and slurry explosives and with 9 types of explosive-mixing/charging vehicles is presented. One type of vehicle is used as a stable explosive mixing unit, the others (SUZN-1B, SUZN-2, SUZN-5A, SUZN-5AM, ZS-1B, MZS-1M, MAZ-509P) are used as mobile explosive mixing and loading units. Some also incorporate a borehole stemming device. Mixtures of ANFO and slurry (aquatol) explosives, explosive charging capacities (outputs 9-30 t/h) and other characteristics of mechanized explosive charging vehicles are described. Obligatory safety measures during usage are quoted. 4 refs.

  1. Effect of Energetic Materials on Thermal Decomposition of Phase-Stabilised Ammonium Nitrate - An Eco-Friendly Oxidiser

    OpenAIRE

    Suresh Mathew; K. Krishnan; K. N. Ninan

    1999-01-01

    Phase-stabilised ammonium nitrate (PSAN) was prepared by incorporating copper (II) diamine nitrate in the ammonium nitrate (AN) crystal lattice, thereby avoiding the abrupt volume change within the useful temperature range. The effect of RDX on the thermal decomposition of PSAN has been investigated. Decomposition temperatures of PSAN and RDX are almost in the same temperature range. The synergetic effect of the interaction between PSAN and RDX resulted in a net exothermic reaction of PSAN. T...

  2. Evaluation of the metabolic fate of munitions material (TNT & RDX) in plant systems and initial assessment of material interaction with plant genetic material (DNA). Initial assessment of plant DNA adducts as biomarkers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harvey, S.D.; Clauss, T.W.; Fellows, R.J.; Cataldo, D.A.

    1995-08-01

    Genetic damage to deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) has long been suspected of being a fundamental event leading to cancer. A variety of causal factors can result in DNA damage including photodimerization of base pairs, ionizing radiation, specific reaction of DNA with environmental pollutants, and nonspecific oxidative damage caused by the action of highly reactive oxidizing agents produced by metabolism. Because organisms depend on an unadulterated DNA template for reproduction, DNA repair mechanisms are an important defense for maintaining genomic integrity. The objective of this exploratory project was to evaluate the potential for TNT to form DNA adducts in plants. These adducts, if they exist in sufficient quantities, could be potential biomarkers of munitions exposure. The ultimate goal is to develop a simple analytical assay for the determination of blomarkers that is indicative of munitions contamination. DNA repair exists in dynamic equilibrium with DNA damage. Repair mechanisms are capable of keeping DNA damage at remarkably low concentrations provided that the repair capacity is not overwhelmed.

  3. IRIS Toxicological Review of Hexahydro-1,3,5-Trinitro-1,3,5 ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    The IRIS Toxicological Review of Hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) was released for external peer review in September 2016. The EPA’s Science Advisory Board’s (SAB) Chemical Assessment Advisory Committee (CAAC) will conduct a peer review of the scientific basis supporting the RDX assessment and release a final report of their review. Information regarding the peer review can be found on the SAB website. EPA is undertaking an update of the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) health assessment for RDX. The outcome of this project is an updated Toxicological Review and IRIS Summary for RDX that will be entered into the IRIS database.

  4. Water containing explosive for big diameter use. [Slurry of ammonium nitrate and monomethyl lamine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sunakawa, Tomoji; Fujita, Koichi; Kodama, Taro; Suzuki, Masahiro; Ono, Naoki

    1988-05-11

    This is a report concerning the design and experiment of water containing explosive which can be used as a substitute of ANFO. As the water containing explosive, slurry type was taken which consists of ammonium nitrate and monomethyl amine as main components and density of which was more than 1.2, explosion speed 4880 m/s, F value 7790 atm*L/Kg. Experiments were conducted for variuous loading length. From the result, it was recognized that at least 4.5 m of loading length was neccessary for achieving better result than the case whlen only ANFO was used. (1 fig, 1 tab)

  5. Trouble shooting problem blasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konya, K.D. [Society of Explosive Engineers, Montville, OH (United States)

    1996-02-01

    There have been many occurrences of water-gel or emulsion explosives or heavy Anfo`s (ammonium nitrate and fuel oil) either not detonating in some blast holes in surface coal mining operations, or producing yellow or reddish-brown fumes upon reaction. The explosives rely on entrapped gas to detonate properly. It is important to control the size of the bubble and the dispersion of gas bubbles throughout the explosive. The article discusses and compares the use of microspheres and of gassing agents for detonation control.

  6. High explosive characterization for the dice throw event

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helm, F.; Finger, M.; Hayes, B.; Lee, E.; Cheung, H.; Walton, J.

    1976-06-16

    An equation of state for detonation products was developed to describe the detonation of large charges of ammonium nitrate/fuel oil (ANFO). The equation of state will be used to predict air-blast and ground-motion effects in the Dice Throw Event. The explosive performance of ANFO is highly dependent on charge size. The equation developed from this work is applicable to heavily confined detonations 101.6 mm in diameter or larger. The equation of state is based on results from experiments in cylinders and hemispheres, and a large field test. The report contains a detailed discussion of the diagnostic and initiation techniques used in these experiments.

  7. Raman hyperspectral imaging in conjunction with independent component analysis as a forensic tool for explosive analysis: The case of an ATM explosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Mariana Ramos; Logrado, Lucio Paulo Lima; Zacca, Jorge Jardim; Correa, Deleon Nascimento; Poppi, Ronei Jesus

    2017-11-01

    In this work, Raman hyperspectral imaging, in conjunction with independent component analysis, was employed as an analytical methodology to detect an ammonium nitrate fuel oil (ANFO) explosive in banknotes after an ATM explosion experiment. The proposed methodology allows for the identification of the ANFO explosive without sample preparation or destroying the sample, at quantities as small as 70μgcm -2 . The explosive was identified following ICA data decomposition by the characteristic nitrate band at 1044cm -1 . The use of Raman hyperspectral imaging and independent component analysis shows great potential for identifying forensic samples by providing chemical and spatial information. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. GENE EXPRESSION CHANGES IN ARABIDOPSIS THALIANA SEEDLING ROOTS EXPOSED TO THE MUNITION HEXAHYDRO-1,3,5-TRINITRO-1,3,5-TRIAZINE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arabidopsis thaliana root transcriptome responses to the munition, hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX), were assessed using serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE). Comparison of the transcriptional profile for the RDX response to a profile previously described for Ar...

  9. Self-Remediating Energetic Fills Based on Cyclic Dinitroureas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    al., 2006). The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has issued a drinking water guideline limit ( lifetime ) for RDX of 2 µg/L. RDX has high to...The lid was inverted , placed above the sample, and crimped into place using a hermetic press. The samples were heated from 25 °C to 300 °C at a

  10. Thermal Decomposition Behaviors and Burning Characteristics of AN/Nitramine-Based Composite Propellant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naya, Tomoki; Kohga, Makoto

    2015-04-01

    Ammonium nitrate (AN) has attracted much attention due to its clean burning nature as an oxidizer. However, an AN-based composite propellant has the disadvantages of low burning rate and poor ignitability. In this study, we added nitramine of cyclotrimethylene trinitramine (RDX) or cyclotetramethylene tetranitramine (HMX) as a high-energy material to AN propellants to overcome these disadvantages. The thermal decomposition and burning rate characteristics of the prepared propellants were examined as the ratio of AN and nitramine was varied. In the thermal decomposition process, AN/RDX propellants showed unique mass loss peaks in the lower temperature range that were not observed for AN or RDX propellants alone. AN and RDX decomposed continuously as an almost single oxidizer in the AN/RDX propellant. In contrast, AN/HMX propellants exhibited thermal decomposition characteristics similar to those of AN and HMX, which decomposed almost separately in the thermal decomposition of the AN/HMX propellant. The ignitability was improved and the burning rate increased by the addition of nitramine for both AN/RDX and AN/HMX propellants. The increased burning rates of AN/RDX propellants were greater than those of AN/HMX. The difference in the thermal decomposition and burning characteristics was caused by the interaction between AN and RDX.

  11. The Indian Jihadist Movement: Evolution and Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    and friendship ties.78 In some instances, a person is exposed to the proper “mood music ,” decides he wants to “do” jihad, and looks for assistance...Brigade RDX smuggled from Bangladesh Diwali Festival , Delhi October 29, 2005 IM–Northern Brigade RDX smuggled from Bangladesh; Lashkar-e-Taiba

  12. Groundwater Chemistry and Microbial Ecology Effects on Explosives Biodegradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine catalyzed by a 17 NAD(P)H: nitrate oxidoreductase from Aspergillus niger. Environ Sci Technol 18 36:3104-3108. 19...Azospirillum sp. B518 [AB049112] RDX clone 8 [EU907872] RDX clone 2 [EU907866] Azospirillum sp. 2436 [EF422176] Pleomorphomonas oryzae F-4

  13. New slurry explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kale, D.C.

    1982-12-01

    Mining engineers will soon have an additional 2 or 3 types of explosives which increase rock yield without increasing cost. A new variety of Ammonium Nitrate and Fuel Oil (ANFO), which is much heavier and more powerful, is being introduced in the US. New types of NCN (nitrocarbonitrate) blasting agents have also been developed.

  14. Blasting forward in underground work; Voladuras de camara de la mina de Aguas Tenidas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia Maneiro, C. H.; Maqueda Jimenez, S.; Pazos Perez, L.; Carnero Ortiz, F.

    2012-11-01

    This paper explains the drilling and blasting techniques of stopes in Aguas Tenidas Mine (Huelva, Spain), including slot raises and slots. Highights are: application of electronic detonators and a 30'' hole in slot raise blasts, ANFO uphole chrging of 89 mm holes and high productive fan drillin, in order to maintain stoping production of 150.000 t/month. (Author)

  15. Proceedings of the twenty-seventh annual conference on explosives and blasting techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    Various aspects of explosives and blasting techniques are covered. Those of particular interest to the coal industry buffer blasting versus cast blasting, post-blast cast profile shape prediction, fragmentation model to estimate ROM size distribution of soft rocks, blasting accidents, blast vibrations, ANFO explosives and carbon monoxide poisoning.

  16. Application of isothermal calorimetry and uv spectroscopy for stability monitoring of pentaerythritol tetranitrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dosser, L.R.; Pickard, J.M.

    1992-01-01

    Thermal stabilities for a series of pentaerythritol-tetranitrate (PETN) samples with variable surf ace areas were monitored by isothermal calorimetry and UV spectroscopy over the temperature range of 363 to 408 K. Isothermal induction times measured with constant volume calorimetry under an air atmosphere and No evolution rates monitored by UV absorbance at 213 nm under vacuum correlated with the PETN surface area at temperatures equal to or exceeding 383 K. Rate data measured at 383 K are in accord with predictions based on detailed kinetic modeling. Below 383 K, NO evolution data suggested that additional geometric factors may be significant in controlling PETN stability. Mechanisms for influencing surface area upon the rate-determining step are addressed

  17. Toxicity of hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine to larval zebrafish (Danio rerio)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhi, S.; Pan, X.; Cobb, G.P.; Patino, R.

    2005-01-01

    Hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine, a cyclonitramine commonly known as RDX, is used in the production of military munitions. Contamination of soil, sediment, and ground and surface waters with RDX has been reported in different places around the world. Acute and subacute toxicities of RDX have been relatively well documented in terrestrial vertebrates, but among aquatic vertebrates the information available is limited. The objective of this study was to characterize the acute toxicity of RDX to larval zebrafish. Mortality (LC50) and incidence of vertebral column deformities (EC50) were two of the end points measured in this study. The 96-h LC50 was estimated at 22.98 and 25.64 mg l-1 in two different tests. The estimated no-observed-effective- concentration (NOEC) values of RDX on lethality were 13.27 ?? 0.05 and 15.32 ?? 0.30 mg l-1; and the lowest-observed-effective- concentration (LOEC) values were 16.52 ?? 0.05 and 19.09 ?? 0.23 mg l-1 in these two tests, respectively. The 96-h EC50 for vertebral deformities on survivors from one of the acute lethality tests was estimated at 20.84 mg l-1, with NOEC and LOEC of 9.75 ?? 0.34 and 12.84 ?? 0.34 mg l-1, respectively. Behavioral aberrations were also noted in this acute toxicity study, including the occurrence of whirling movement and lethargic behavior. The acute effects of RDX on survival, incidence of deformities, and behavior of larval zebrafish occurred at the high end of the most frequently reported concentrations of RDX in aquatic environments. The chronic effects of RDX in aquatic vertebrates need to be determined for an adequate assessment of the ecological risk of environmental RDX. ?? 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Comparison of Post-detonation Combustion in Explosives Incorporating Aluminum Nanoparticles: Influence of the Passivation Layer (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-31

    meters away from the explosive charge. The collection optic were aligned to view the center of each charge through a BK7 glass view- port. The...Basler Sprint ) with a data collection rate of 1–70 kHz. The resolution and usable spectral range of the spectrograph were 1.2 nm and 380–720 nm...RDX 20 wt. % AlOA in RDX 20 wt. % AlFA in RDX 0 … … … 15 … 4000 ( 400 ) … 30 3900 (200) 4500 (500) 3200 (300) 45 3600 (300) 򓇨 3400 (500) 044907-3

  19. 1983 AFOSR/AFRPL Chemical Rocket Research Meeting, Abstracts and Agenda. Includes: Abstracts on Advanced Diagnostics of Reacting Flow, 28 February - 3 March 1983, Lancaster, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-02-01

    0w 5680 RDX as they do in HMX . 5600 - 98 198 298 398 Temp. (K) A SECOND POLYMORPH OF RDX • I’ s . II !Th,"’rieI Spectral evidence of the second...Bernecker, R. R., and D. Price, Combustion and Flame, 22:111 (1974). 3. Campbell, A. W., "Deflagration-to-Detonation Transition in Granular HMX ," 1980...thermophysical properties of HMX , RDX , and AP are being made. Shown in Figure I is the general approach for making the thermophysical property determinations

  20. Novel approach to the preparation of organic energetic film for microelectromechanical systems and microactuator applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Zhang, Wenchao; Wang, Lianwei; Shen, Ruiqi; Xu, Xing; Ye, Jiahai; Chao, Yimin

    2014-07-23

    An activated RDX-Fe2O3 xerogel in a Si-microchannel plate (MCP) has been successfully prepared by a novel propylene epoxide-mediated sol-gel method. A decrease of nearly 40 °C in decomposition temperature has been observed compared with the original cyclotrimethylene trinitramine (RDX). The RDX-Fe2O3 xerogel can release gas and solid matter simultaneously, and the ratio of gas to solid can be tailored easily by changing the initial proportions of RDX and FeCl3·6H2O, which significantly enhances the explosive and propulsion effects and is of great benefit to the applications. The approach, which is simple, safe, and fully compatible with MEMS technology, opens a new route to the introduction of organic energetic materials to a silicon substrate.

  1. Remediation Using Plants and Plant Enzymes: A Progress Report

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1995-01-01

    .... In every case, the sources are plants growing near the sediment. The use of plants for remediation of hazardous materials such as TNT or other munitions like RDX and HMX has led to a new approach to remediation-- phytoremediation...

  2. Nitramine Drying & Fine Grinding Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Nitramine Drying and Fine Grinding Facility provides TACOM-ARDEC with a state-of-the-art facility capable of drying and grinding high explosives (e.g., RDX and...

  3. Blasting agents and initiation systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiscor, S.

    2000-01-01

    Although blasting differs between and within each industry, as a whole, the mines and quarries are making a shift from a purely ammonium nitrate/fuel oil (ANFO) mixture to a blend of emulsion and ANFO on a straight emulsion. Non-electric (shock tube) initiation systems have provided a viable alternative to the electric detonator (blasting cap). Explosives manufacturers are seeing their roles changes to being blasting contractors or consultants rather than just suppliers. The article discusses these trends and gives examples of typical blasting techniques and amounts of blasting agent used at large USA surface coal mines. Electric caps are still used in blasting underground coal. The Ensign Bickford Co. (EBCo) is developing electronic detonators and has been field testing an electronic initiator, the DIGIDET detonator, for the last four years. When commercially available, electronic detonators will be accurate but will come with a hefty price tag. 2 photos.

  4. Current trends in development of explosives in world mining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobnikar, S.

    1987-01-01

    Surveys development of manufacturing industrial explosives in the 19th and 20th centuries, from first use of black powder, ammonium nitrate and TNT to the use of ANFO, slurries and water gel type explosives. Achievements of explosive producers with worldwide reputation (Ireco Chemicals, Du Pont, Atlas Powder Chemical, Nitro Nobel, Nippon Oil and Fats Co., Thermex Energy Co.) for manufacturing safe, reliable explosives used in surface and underground coal and ore mining (including gassy coal mines) and for quarrying are mentioned. Main characteristics of IREMITE, IREGEL, TOVEX, POURVEX, DRIVEX, Detagel, ANFO (both gel- and emulsion-type), Emulgite and Emulite are presented. A critical opinion about future trends in industrial explosive development is given. 10 refs., 7 tabs.

  5. Grenade Range Management Using Lime for Dual Role of Metals Immobilization and Explosives Transformation. Field Demonstration at Fort Jackson, SC

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    and reported the results under the sample delivery groups ( SDG ) L128026 and L128720. The following analytical methods were requested on the chains -of... supplies . The application of hydrated lime to an HGR to provide a mechanism for both metals immobilization and explosives transformation was...Offsites 1 and 2 were supplied by RDX from the control bay, Bay 2. Offsite 3 was supplied by the RDX from lime- treated Bay 4. A period of 6 months had

  6. Nitramine Monopropellant Deflagration and General Nonsteady Reacting Rocket Chamber Flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    structure of RDX was also investigated by Harris,2 using X-ray diffraction. 2. The Crystalline Polymorphs of RMX HMX in the solid state exhibits four distinct...deflagration were shown to occur after transition . The critical transition pressure was found to correlate with the mean particle size of HMX and RDX ...Structure ....... ............ 4 2. The Crystalline Polymorphs of HMX ... ....... 5 3. Sublimation, Vaporization and Melting...... 6 C. The Chemical

  7. Development of a short-term (<12 days), plant-based screening method to assess the bioavailability, bioconcentration, and phytotoxicity of Hexahydro-1,3,5- Trinitro-1,3,5-Tiazine (RDZ) to terrestrial plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linda Winfield; Steven D' Surney; John Rodgers

    2000-01-01

    Limited amounts of information have been published on the environmental impacts of hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) to terrestrial plant communities. RDX is one of the two high-explosive compounds used by the U.S. military (Davis 1998) and classified as a priority pollutant by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA). Millions of acres of land on...

  8. Halogenated Explosives to Defeat Biological Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    for example. However, in testing this nitrating reagent, it was decided to use a purer and less valuable substrate as a model reactant: the...secondary nitramine but possibly containing both N-nitro derivatives. Figure 9. “Nonacidic” nitration of a model reactant, 2-(trifluoromethyl... economics of possible alternative technical approaches that might produce it—led to its abandonment, in this project, in favor of TFM-RDX. TFM-RDX was a

  9. Acute hexogen poisoning after occupational exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testud, F; Glanclaude, J M; Descotes, J

    1996-01-01

    Hexogen (cyclonite, RDX) nitrate explosive is an infrequent cause of poisoning. A 42-year-old man with no prior history of epilepsy experienced grand mal seizures after sieving fine hexogen (RDX) powder for four hours in an ammunition plant. Physical examination was normal on arrival at the emergency room but recurrent seizures occurred six hour after admission. EEG, CT scan and MRI were normal and the patient recovered uneventfully. The available toxicological data on this rare occupational poisoning are reviewed.

  10. Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy for Detection of Explosives Residues: A Review of Recent Advances, Challenges, and Future Prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    PETN), and nitrate and chlorate simulants mixed with sand (8%) at a distance of 50 m [104]. Early results for LIBS/Raman data originated in the art and...of black powder and its principle components (charcoal, sulfur, calcium sulfate, potassium nitrate, and ammonium nitrate) [22]. Although this ap

  11. Technology Challenges in Solid Energetic Materials for Micro Propulsion Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-11-01

    pressure and low temperature. NAB is used with/without lead rhodanide/ potassium chlorate /nitrocellulose (RK) to aid in the ignition. The impulse thrust...NAB boron/ potassium nitrate PETN Pentaerythritol tetranitrate RK lead rhodanide/ potassium chlorate /nitrocellulose Zr zirconium ZPP zirconium... potassium nitrate (NAB) propellant was selected over HTPB/AP and glycidyle azide polymer (GAP), because of its ignition capability at atmospheric

  12. Some analytical methods for explosives: Part 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selig, W.

    1965-12-08

    This report is the second compilation of methods for analyzing explosives. All the methods were developed for routine performance by techniques, and an attempt has therefore been made to keep them as simple as possible. Methods are presented for analyzing plastic-bonded explosives based on sym-cyclomethylenetetra-nitramine (HMX), based on viton in addition to HMX, and based on pentraerythritol tetranitrate (PETN).

  13. Forensic analysis of explosive residues from hand swabs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umi Khairul Ahmad; Sumathy Rajendran; Syahidah Abu Hassan

    2008-01-01

    In the forensic examination of physical evidence for organic explosives, cotton swabs are often used to collect residue from surfaces, such as skin and post-blast debris. A preliminary study has been conducted to develop extraction method of a common energetic compound, pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) from hand swabs followed by direct analysis of the resulting extract solution using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with ultraviolet (UV) detector. Analysis was performed on an octadecylsilane-based (C 18 ) column using acetonitrile-water mixture (55:45) as mobile phase. The mobile phase was pumped at 1.0 mL/ min and separation affected using an isocratic mode with the detection wavelength of 230 nm. The explosive residue was extracted from cotton swabs using acetone in an ultrasonic cold bath. The developed method was later applied to the real hand swabs samples, which were taken from three army personnel who handled PETN during a munition disposal operation at Asahan Camp Military Firing range. The acetone extract obtained using sonication method was found to be effective in recovering PETN from cotton swabs with relatively high recovery (89.5 %) and good sensitivity with detection limit as low as 2 ng. The content of PETN in the real hand swab samples were found to be in the range of 4.7-130 mg. (author)

  14. Atomistic simulation of orientation dependence in shock-induced initiation of pentaerythritol tetranitrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Tzu-Ray; Wixom, Ryan R; Mattsson, Ann E; Thompson, Aidan P

    2013-01-24

    The dependence of the reaction initiation mechanism of pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) on shock orientation and shock strength is investigated with molecular dynamics simulations using a reactive force field and the multiscale shock technique. In the simulations, a single crystal of PETN is shocked along the [110], [001], and [100] orientations with shock velocities in the range 3-10 km/s. Reactions occur with shock velocities of 6 km/s or stronger, and reactions initiate through the dissociation of nitro and nitrate groups from the PETN molecules. The most sensitive orientation is [110], while [100] is the most insensitive. For the [001] orientation, PETN decomposition via nitro group dissociation is the dominant reaction initiation mechanism, while for the [110] and [100] orientations the decomposition is via mixed nitro and nitrate group dissociation. For shock along the [001] orientation, we find that CO-NO(2) bonds initially acquire more kinetic energy, facilitating nitro dissociation. For the other two orientations, C-ONO(2) bonds acquire more kinetic energy, facilitating nitrate group dissociation.

  15. 77 FR 75243 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Options Clearing Corporation; Order Approving Proposed Rule Change...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-19

    ... modeling and risk management procedures (``Risk Management Proposal'') \\9\\ is approved by the Commission... risk modeling enhancements with respect to longer-tenor options, including OTC S&P 500 Index Options... http://www.sec.gov/rules/petitions/2012/petn4-644.pdf . This Order does not address the relief...

  16. Tunnel blasting - recent developments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, T.E.

    1999-05-01

    While tunnelling machines are more efficient than previously, there are still areas where blasting is a more efficient method of advance. Drilling and design methods are increasingly sophisticated, as is choice of explosive. Explosive deployment must be carefully calculated so as to avoid desensitisation. Nitroglycerine may be used as slurries; bulk mixing on site of ANFO is also practised in mining in the UK. Electric detonators, Nonel tubes, and electronic detonators are also increasingly employed.

  17. Blast vibration monitoring, July to December, 1983

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-01-01

    The complexity of the vibration waveforms produced appears at this stage to preclude simple comparison of different blasts. A modelling approach is indicated from the preliminary experiments. The required elemental charge length and the steady state column length of ANFO in 381 mm holes must be determined for further development of a model. This information may be acquired by firing a number of charges of varying lengths with all other variables held constant.

  18. Blasting technology advances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-04-01

    Nitroglycerine explosives are increasingly giving way to emulsions and low cost Anfo compositions, the latter sometimes incorporating emulsion in order to improve water resistance and performance. The aim is to produce an explosive which is extremely efficient, relatively safe and can be tailored to meet user requirements. Discussion is presented of emulsion delivery systems, initiation systems, electronic detonators, computer blast modelling, directional explosives, underground automation, and the development of Soviet explosives. 3 refs., 4 figs.

  19. Proceedings of the fourteenth annual symposium on explosives and blasting research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-31

    Subjects covered include: ground vibration effects on structures; open-pit blast vibration prediction; effects of velocity of detonation and gas pressurization on fragmentation in layered rock; thermal ignition for emulsion powder explosives and emulsion matrix; effect of cut-off pressure on energy partition and blast design; new burden and spacing formulae for optimum blasting; calculated risk of experiencing lightning caused unplanned detonation; predicting explosive toxic fumes; and stemming techniques for loading angled holes charged with Anfo.

  20. Preparation of explosive nanoparticles in a porous chromium(III) oxide matrix: a first attempt to control the reactivity of explosives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comet, M; Siegert, B; Pichot, V; Gibot, P; Spitzer, D

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports the first attempt to control the combustion and the detonation properties of a high explosive through its structure. A porous chromium(III) oxide matrix produced by the combustion of ammonium dichromate was infiltrated by hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX). The structure of the Cr 2 O 3 matrix was studied by both scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM, TEM); the Cr 2 O 3 /RDX nanocomposites were characterized by nitrogen adsorption. A mathematical model based on these techniques was used to demonstrate that the Cr 2 O 3 matrix encloses and stabilizes RDX particles at the nanoscale. The decomposition process of the nanocomposites was investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The reactivity and sensitivity of the nanocomposites were studied by impact and friction tests, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), time-resolved cinematography and detonation experiments, and were correlated with their structure. The size of RDX nanoparticles and their distribution in the Cr 2 O 3 matrix have an important influence on their reactivity. The reactive properties of nanostructured RDX differ significantly from those of classical micron-sized RDX. For instance, the melting point disappears and the decomposition temperature is significantly lowered. The quantization of the explosive particles in the Cr 2 O 3 matrix decreases the sensitivity to mechanical stress and allows controlling the decomposition mode-i.e. combustion versus detonation

  1. Preparation of explosive nanoparticles in a porous chromium(III) oxide matrix: a first attempt to control the reactivity of explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Comet, M; Siegert, B; Pichot, V; Gibot, P; Spitzer, D [Laboratoire ISL/CNRS ' Nanomateriaux pour les Systemes Sous Sollicitations Extremes' (NS3E), FRE 3026, French-German Research Institute of Saint-Louis (ISL), 5 rue du General Cassagnou, 68301 Saint-Louis (France)], E-mail: comet@isl.tm.fr

    2008-07-16

    This paper reports the first attempt to control the combustion and the detonation properties of a high explosive through its structure. A porous chromium(III) oxide matrix produced by the combustion of ammonium dichromate was infiltrated by hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX). The structure of the Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} matrix was studied by both scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM, TEM); the Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}/RDX nanocomposites were characterized by nitrogen adsorption. A mathematical model based on these techniques was used to demonstrate that the Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} matrix encloses and stabilizes RDX particles at the nanoscale. The decomposition process of the nanocomposites was investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The reactivity and sensitivity of the nanocomposites were studied by impact and friction tests, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), time-resolved cinematography and detonation experiments, and were correlated with their structure. The size of RDX nanoparticles and their distribution in the Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} matrix have an important influence on their reactivity. The reactive properties of nanostructured RDX differ significantly from those of classical micron-sized RDX. For instance, the melting point disappears and the decomposition temperature is significantly lowered. The quantization of the explosive particles in the Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} matrix decreases the sensitivity to mechanical stress and allows controlling the decomposition mode-i.e. combustion versus detonation.

  2. Open cast blasting of coal in Australia; Goshu rotenbori tanko kengakuki

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashizume, K. [Nippon Kayaku Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-06-30

    Introduced in this report are blastings performed for surface coal mining in the southeastern part of Australia. The Liddell coal mine began mining in 1990. This mine enjoys an annual raw coal yield of 2-million ton, removing approximately 11-million m{sup 3} of rocks consuming 5000 ton of anfo and emulsion explosives. The explosives are carried by a pump truck to the site where mixing is carried out, and non-electrical primers are used for detonation. The other mine described here is the Camberwell mine that yields 3.5-million ton of raw coal annually. For each blasting, 100-200 ton of explosive is consumed. A pump truck reciprocates between the material plant near the mine and the location of blasting, and charges the explosive directly. One of the anfo, emulsion, and heavy-anfo explosives is chosen, dependent upon conditions such as rock hardness. Also mentioned in this report are general blasting specifications relating to blasting at these two mines

  3. Performance properties of commercial explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, J.N.; Mader, C.L.; Goldstein, S.

    1983-01-01

    The aquarium test is a proven means of obtaining nonidial performance property data for commercial blasting agents. Optical data on the detonation velocity, shock wave in water, and expansion rate of the pipe enclosing the detonation products (in combination with the equilibrium thermodynamic chemistry code BKW) give the C-J state and degree of chemical reaction at the detonation front, as well as information on additional chemical reaction that occurs as the detonation products expand. Specific explosive systems that are studied are ammonium nitrate-fuel oil mixture (ANFO), aluminized ANFO, flaked trinitrotoluene (TNT), and several other commercial products in 10-cm diam and 20-cm-diam pipes of Plexiglas and clay. Experimental shock-pressure data are obtained with lithium niobate transducers placed in the water surrounding the explosive charge. These data show that the addition of approx.100-..mu..m aluminum particles to ANFO significantly increases the initial peak shock pressure delivered to the surrounding medium. Peak shock pressures in the water, calculated from the shock-wave orientation, are also useful in comparing performance properties of various commercial explosives. 20 references, 17 figures, 2 tables.

  4. Calling the shots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Potts, A.

    2000-04-01

    Sophisticated technologies and tools have come to the aid of the blasting technology industry. These include computer-based blast design, GPS technology and use of electronic detonating. Either emulsion or blends of emulsion and ANFO are being increasingly used as explosives. Contract blasting packages are becoming popular. Electric detonators have been largely replaced by simpler non-electric 'shock tube' initiation systems. These in turn are being replaced by electronic initiation systems which have precise time control. Recent developments or electron detonators from Dynbamit Nobel, African Explosives Ltd. (AEL), Dyno Nobel and Ensigh Bickford are mentioned in the article. Many manufacturers are offering their own charging vehicles with their explosive systems for surface and underground blasting. Dyno Nobel's site sensitised emulsion (SSE) system has a loading ruck, two storage tank containers and two pumps for the emulsion matrix and chemical sensitiser. The ANFO P1-AN/FO trick from Dax Machinery is mounted on an articulated carrier with an on-board compressor. Normet's Charmet machines have a superboom lift and extendable platform and a 1000 t capacity emulsion charging unit. 6 photos

  5. Treatment of groundwater contaminated with low levels of military munitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bricka, R.M.; Sharp, W.

    1993-01-01

    The site of interest is a military base that was established in the late 1800s. In its early history this facility was used as a powder depot to fill projectiles with miximite (a propellant). Since World War I, this facility was used to produce artillery ammunition, bombs, high explosives, pyrotechnics and other ordinances. Weapons production at this facility has ceased, but as a result of the past activities at this facility, contaminants are migrating into the groundwater. One source of drinking water for this installation is a screened well in a stratified-drift aquifer system at a depth of 75-85 feet below land surface. In the 1980s sampling of this well revealed low level contamination of trichloroethylene (TCE), RDX and HMX. TCE levels exceeded drinking water standards and an air stripping column was installed to remove the TCE. RDX and HMX, concentrations were below drinking water standards. Health Advisory (HA) levels for RDX and HMX were published by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) in November 1988. The lifetime HA levels are 2 ppb and 400 ppb for RDX and HMX, respectively (McLellan et al. 1988a, and McLellan et al. 1988b). It is expected that continuous withdrawals from this well will increase RDX and HMX concentrations. In addition, it is believed that future USEPA regulations will adapt the HA as a drinking water standard. This study was initiated in an effort to have an appropriate cost effective technology ready to meet any such standard. RDX and HMX RDX and HMX are military explosives. RDX (Hexahydro-l,3,5-trinitro-l,3,5-triazine) is a code name for Research Department Explosive. This explosive is described as a white crystalline solid with about 1.3 times the explosive power of trinitrotoluene (TNT). RDX is classified as a EPA Group C compound: Possible Human Carcinogen (McLellan et. al. 1988a). HMX (Octahydro-1, 3, 5, 7- tetranitro-l, 3, 5, 7-tetrazocine) is a code name for High Melting Explosive. This explosive is described as a

  6. Synthesis, crystal structure and catalytic effect on thermal decomposition of RDX and AP: An energetic coordination polymer [Pb{sub 2}(C{sub 5}H{sub 3}N{sub 5}O{sub 5}){sub 2}(NMP)·NMP]{sub n}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jin-jian [School of Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China); Yancheng Teachers College, Yancheng 224002 (China); Liu, Zu-Liang, E-mail: liuzl@mail.njust.edu.cn [School of Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China); Cheng, Jian [School of Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China); Yancheng Teachers College, Yancheng 224002 (China); Fang, Dong, E-mail: fangdong106@163.com [Yancheng Teachers College, Yancheng 224002 (China)

    2013-04-15

    An energetic lead(II) coordination polymer based on the ligand ANPyO has been synthesized and its crystal structure has been got. The polymer was characterized by FT-IR spectroscopy, elemental analysis, DSC and TG-DTG technologies. Thermal analysis shows that there are one endothermic process and two exothermic decomposition stages in the temperature range of 50–600 °C with final residues 57.09%. The non-isothermal kinetic has also been studied on the main exothermic decomposition using the Kissinger's and Ozawa–Doyle's methods, the apparent activation energy is calculated as 195.2 KJ/mol. Furthermore, DSC measurements show that the polymer has significant catalytic effect on the thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate. - Graphical abstract: An energetic lead(II) coordination polymer of ANPyO has been synthesized, structurally characterized and properties tested. Highlights: ► We have synthesized and characterized an energetic lead(II) coordination polymer. ► We have measured its molecular structure and thermal decomposition. ► It has significant catalytic effect on thermal decomposition of AP.

  7. Investigations of Chemical and Biological Treatment Options for the Attenuation of Hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine Contamination in Groundwater at Los Alamos, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heerspink, B. P.; Wang, D.; Ware, D.; Marina, O.; Perkins, G.; WoldeGabriel, G. W.; Goering, T.; Boukhalfa, H.

    2017-12-01

    High-explosive compounds including hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) were used extensively in weapons research and testing at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in Los Alamos, NM. Liquid effluents containing RDX released at LANL's Technical Area 16 (TA-16) resulted in the contamination of alluvial, perched-intermediate, and regional groundwater bodies. Past investigations have shown persistent RDX contamination in the perched-intermediate zone located between 225 to 311 m below ground surface, where transport studies have shown that RDX and its degradation products transport conservatively. In this study, we compared RDX degradation by chemical treatments using reduction by sodium dithionite, oxidation by potassium permanganate, and alkaline hydrolysis by carbonate/bicarbonate buffering, with microbial degradation under biostimulated conditions. The experiments were conducted using groundwater and sediments representative of the contaminated aquifer beneath TA-16. Batch testing showed that all chemical treatments degraded RDX very rapidly, with half-lives ranging from 50 minutes to 22 hours. Comparatively, RDX degradation in biostimulated reactors under strict anaerobic conditions was significantly slower, with half-lives of about 3 weeks. Results from column experiments with chemically treated sediments deviated from the results of the batch testing. Dithionite treated sediments reduced RDX with no breakthrough observed before clogging occurred at 50 pour volumes. Treatments by oxidation using potassium permanganate, and hydrolysis under buffered alkaline conditions, were less effective with complete RDX breakthrough after 2 pore volumes. No known degradation products were observed in the column effluents. RDX degradation in biostimulated columns was very effective initially for both treatments. However, the column biostimulated with safflower oil clogged very rapidly. The column biostimulated with molasses was very effective when molasses was

  8. Coral-zooxanthellae meta-transcriptomics reveals integrated response to pollutant stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gust, Kurt A; Najar, Fares Z; Habib, Tanwir; Lotufo, Guilherme R; Piggot, Alan M; Fouke, Bruce W; Laird, Jennifer G; Wilbanks, Mitchell S; Rawat, Arun; Indest, Karl J; Roe, Bruce A; Perkins, Edward J

    2014-07-12

    Corals represent symbiotic meta-organisms that require harmonization among the coral animal, photosynthetic zooxanthellae and associated microbes to survive environmental stresses. We investigated integrated-responses among coral and zooxanthellae in the scleractinian coral Acropora formosa in response to an emerging marine pollutant, the munitions constituent, 1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5 triazine (RDX; 5 day exposures to 0 (control), 0.5, 0.9, 1.8, 3.7, and 7.2 mg/L, measured in seawater). RDX accumulated readily in coral soft tissues with bioconcentration factors ranging from 1.1 to 1.5. Next-generation sequencing of a normalized meta-transcriptomic library developed for the eukaryotic components of the A. formosa coral holobiont was leveraged to conduct microarray-based global transcript expression analysis of integrated coral/zooxanthellae responses to the RDX exposure. Total differentially expressed transcripts (DET) increased with increasing RDX exposure concentrations as did the proportion of zooxanthellae DET relative to the coral animal. Transcriptional responses in the coral demonstrated higher sensitivity to RDX compared to zooxanthellae where increased expression of gene transcripts coding xenobiotic detoxification mechanisms (i.e. cytochrome P450 and UDP glucuronosyltransferase 2 family) were initiated at the lowest exposure concentration. Increased expression of these detoxification mechanisms was sustained at higher RDX concentrations as well as production of a physical barrier to exposure through a 40% increase in mucocyte density at the maximum RDX exposure. At and above the 1.8 mg/L exposure concentration, DET coding for genes involved in central energy metabolism, including photosynthesis, glycolysis and electron-transport functions, were decreased in zooxanthellae although preliminary data indicated that zooxanthellae densities were not affected. In contrast, significantly increased transcript expression for genes involved in cellular energy production

  9. Multianalyte detection using a capillary-based flow immunosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narang, U; Gauger, P R; Kusterbeck, A W; Ligler, F S

    1998-01-01

    A highly sensitive, dual-analyte detection system using capillary-based immunosensors has been designed for explosive detection. This model system consists of two capillaries, one coated with antibodies specific for 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) and the other specific for hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) combined into a single device. The fused silica capillaries are prepared by coating anti-TNT and anti-RDX antibodies onto the silanized inner walls using a hetero-bifunctional crosslinker. After immobilization, the antibodies are saturated with a suitable fluorophorelabeled antigen. A "T" connector is used to continuously flow the buffer solution through the individual capillaries. To perform the assay, an aliquot of TNT or RDX or a mixture of the two analytes is injected into the continuous flow stream. In each capillary, the target analyte displaces the fluorophore-labeled antigen from the binding pocket of the antibody. The labeled antigen displaced from either capillary is detected downstream using two portable spectrofluorometers. The limits of detection for TNT and RDX in the multi-analyte formate are 44 fmol (100 microliters of 0.1 ng/ml TNT solution) and 224 fmol (100 microliters of 0.5 ng/ml RDX solution), respectively. The entire assay for both analytes can be performed in less than 3 min.

  10. In situ pilot test for bioremediation of energetic compound-contaminated soil at a former military demolition range site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jugnia, Louis B; Manno, Dominic; Drouin, Karine; Hendry, Meghan

    2018-05-04

    Bioremediation was performed in situ at a former military range site to assess the performance of native bacteria in degrading hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) and 2,4-dinitrotoluene (2,4-DNT). The fate of these pollutants in soil and soil pore water was investigated as influenced by waste glycerol amendment to the soil. Following waste glycerol application, there was an accumulation of organic carbon that promoted microbial activity, converting organic carbon into acetate and propionate, which are intermediate compounds in anaerobic processes. This augmentation of anaerobic activity strongly correlated to a noticeable reduction in RDX concentrations in the amended soil. Changes in concentrations of RDX in pore water were similar to those observed in the soil suggesting that RDX leaching from the soil matrix, and treatment with waste glycerol, contributed to the enhanced removal of RDX from the water and soil. This was not the case with 2,4-DNT, which was neither found in pore water nor affected by the waste glycerol treatment. Results from saturated conditions and Synthetic Precipitation Leaching Procedure testing, to investigate the environmental fate of 2,4-DNT, indicated that 2,4-DNT found on site was relatively inert and was likely to remain in its current state on the site.

  11. Precursors in detonations in porous explosives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spaulding, R.L. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Photographs of detonation waves in low-density HMX and PETN, made with an image-intensifier camera, show a brilliant band of light in front of the pressure jump. The radiation temperature is estimated to be 12,000 to 14,000 0 K. The spectrum of this light is continuous. A quartz gauge shows a gradual buildup of pressure from the material producing the light. The material has little effect on the propagation of detonation. Further observations, using pellets of plastic-bonded HMX and single crystals of PETN, show that the material thrown off the free surface is transparent, with a leading edge moving at approximately 20 mm/μs. Collision of this material with polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) produces a brilliant light with a spectrum that is initially a narrow H/sub α/ line. Quartz gauges measure the rate of pessure buildup of this material

  12. Possible hazard reduction by using distributed phased nuclear explosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chilton, Frank [Theoretical Physics Program, Stanford Research Institute, Menio Park, CA (United States); [Department of Applied Science, University of California, Davis, CA (United States); Cheney, James A [Department of Civil Engineering, University of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    1970-05-15

    The use of two or more nuclear devices, phased together in order to constructively add their respective particle velocities, is proposed herein. By directing the seismic waves of the nuclear explosions to make them more efficient in accomplishing the intended construction, we hope to be able to reduce the radioactivity, seismic, and airblast hazards substantially. Experiments are being performed with one gram charges of PETN. (author)

  13. Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy: A Review of Applied Explosive Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    ammonium nitrate (AN)), and explosive primers and propellants ( potassium chlorate and ammonium perchlorate...trinitrotoulene, DNT = 2,4-dinitrotoluene, PETN = pentaerythritol tetranitrate, TATP = triacetone triperoxide, AN = ammonium nitrate, KClO3 = potassium chlorate ...Sucrose C12H22O11 Precursor Material Chlorate KClO3, NH4ClO4 Primer, Propellant Note: EGDM = ethylene glycol dinitrate, TNT = 2,4,6

  14. The construction and evaluation of a high pressure manifold and vessels for a Calvet type microcalorimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, D.E.G.; Turcotte, A.-M.; Fouchard, R.C.

    2003-01-01

    A Setaram C-80 calorimeter has been modified in order to measure the heat flow of energetic materials at pressures up to 69 MPa. A manifold and sample cells capable of operating at high pressure were designed, constructed and evaluated. This paper will describe, in detail, the high pressure manifold construction, safety assessment and calibration. As well, the results for initial trials with ammonium nitrate (AN), and pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) at various pressures and heating rates will be discussed

  15. Unique Structural Modifications Are Present in the Lipopolysaccharide from Colistin-Resistant Strains of Acinetobacter baumannii

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Selected reaction monitoring (SRM) studies were performed on a Thermo TSQ Quantum Ultra Triple Stage quadrupole mass spectrometer. The scans of the...well as a PmrC-dependent pEtN addition to the lipid A of E. coli O157:H7 (39). Surprisingly, the canine pathogen Capnocytophaga canimorsus and plant...variety of novel lipid A structures obtained from Francisella tula- rensis live vaccine strain. Innate Immun. 18:268 –278. 44. Balaji V, Jeremiah SS

  16. Direct Analysis in Real Time Mass Spectrometry of Potential By-Products from Homemade Nitrate Ester Explosive Synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Sisco, Edward; Forbes, Thomas P.

    2015-01-01

    This work demonstrates the coupling of direct analysis in real time (DART) ionization with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MS) in an off-axis configuration for the trace detection and analysis of potential partially nitrated and dimerized by-products of homemade nitrate ester explosive synthesis. Five compounds relating to the synthesis of nitroglycerin (NG) and pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) were examined. Deprotonated ions and adducts with molecular oxygen, nitrite, and nitrate were ...

  17. Mitochondrial oxidative stress and nitrate tolerance – comparison of nitroglycerin and pentaerithrityl tetranitrate in Mn-SOD+/- mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stalleicken Dirk

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic therapy with nitroglycerin (GTN results in a rapid development of nitrate tolerance which is associated with an increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS. According to recent studies, mitochondrial ROS formation and oxidative inactivation of the organic nitrate bioactivating enzyme mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH-2 play an important role for the development of nitrate and cross-tolerance. Methods Tolerance was induced by infusion of wild type (WT and heterozygous manganese superoxide dismutase mice (Mn-SOD+/- with ethanolic solution of GTN (12.5 μg/min/kg for 4 d. For comparison, the tolerance-free pentaerithrityl tetranitrate (PETN, 17.5 μg/min/kg for 4 d was infused in DMSO. Vascular reactivity was measured by isometric tension studies of isolated aortic rings. ROS formation and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH-2 activity was measured in isolated heart mitochondria. Results Chronic GTN infusion lead to impaired vascular responses to GTN and acetylcholine (ACh, increased the ROS formation in mitochondria and decreased ALDH-2 activity in Mn-SOD+/- mice. In contrast, PETN infusion did not increase mitochondrial ROS formation, did not decrease ALDH-2 activity and accordingly did not lead to tolerance and cross-tolerance in Mn-SOD+/- mice. PETN but not GTN increased heme oxygenase-1 mRNA in EA.hy 926 cells and bilirubin efficiently scavenged GTN-derived ROS. Conclusion Chronic GTN infusion stimulates mitochondrial ROS production which is an important mechanism leading to tolerance and cross-tolerance. The tetranitrate PETN is devoid of mitochondrial oxidative stress induction and according to the present animal study as well as numerous previous clinical studies can be used without limitations due to tolerance and cross-tolerance.

  18. Formulation, Casting, and Evaluation of Paraffin-Based Solid Fuels Containing Energetic and Novel Additives for Hybrid Rockets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Daniel B.; Desain, John D.; Boyer, Eric; Wachs, Trevor; Kuo, Kenneth K.; Borduin, Russell; Koo, Joseph H.; Brady, Brian B.; Curtiss, Thomas J.; Story, George

    2012-01-01

    This investigation studied the inclusion of various additives to paraffin wax for use in a hybrid rocket motor. Some of the paraffin-based fuels were doped with various percentages of LiAlH4 (up to 10%). Addition of LiAlH4 at 10% was found to increase regression rates between 7 - 10% over baseline paraffin through tests in a gaseous oxygen hybrid rocket motor. Mass burn rates for paraffin grains with 10% LiAlH4 were also higher than those of the baseline paraffin. RDX was also cast into a paraffin sample via a novel casting process which involved dissolving RDX into dimethylformamide (DMF) solvent and then drawing a vacuum on the mixture of paraffin and RDX/DMF in order to evaporate out the DMF. It was found that although all DMF was removed, the process was not conducive to generating small RDX particles. The slow boiling generated an inhomogeneous mixture of paraffin and RDX. It is likely that superheating the DMF to cause rapid boiling would likely reduce RDX particle sizes. In addition to paraffin/LiAlH4 grains, multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNT) were cast in paraffin for testing in a hybrid rocket motor, and assorted samples containing a range of MWNT percentages in paraffin were imaged using SEM. The fuel samples showed good distribution of MWNT in the paraffin matrix, but the MWNT were often agglomerated, indicating that a change to the sonication and mixing processes were required to achieve better uniformity and debundled MWNT. Fuel grains with MWNT fuel grains had slightly lower regression rate, likely due to the increased thermal conductivity to the fuel subsurface, reducing the burning surface temperature.

  19. Biodegradation of Nitro-Substituted Explosives 2,4,6-Trinitrotoluene, Hexahydro-1,3,5-Trinitro-1,3,5-Triazine, and Octahydro-1,3,5,7-Tetranitro-1,3,5-Tetrazocine by a Phytosymbiotic Methylobacterium sp. Associated with Poplar Tissues (Populus deltoides × nigra DN34)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Aken, Benoit; Yoon, Jong Moon; Schnoor, Jerald L.

    2004-01-01

    A pink-pigmented symbiotic bacterium was isolated from hybrid poplar tissues (Populus deltoides × nigra DN34). The bacterium was identified by 16S and 16S-23S intergenic spacer ribosomal DNA analysis as a Methylobacterium sp. (strain BJ001). The isolated bacterium was able to use methanol as the sole source of carbon and energy, which is a specific attribute of the genus Methylobacterium. The bacterium in pure culture was shown to degrade the toxic explosives 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazene (RDX), and octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5-tetrazocine (HMX). [U-ring-14C]TNT (25 mg liter−1) was fully transformed in less than 10 days. Metabolites included the reduction derivatives amino-dinitrotoluenes and diamino-nitrotoluenes. No significant release of 14CO2 was recorded from [14C]TNT. In addition, the isolated methylotroph was shown to transform [U-14C]RDX (20 mg liter−1) and [U-14C]HMX (2.5 mg liter−1) in less than 40 days. After 55 days of incubation, 58.0% of initial [14C]RDX and 61.4% of initial [14C]HMX were mineralized into 14CO2. The radioactivity remaining in solution accounted for 12.8 and 12.7% of initial [14C]RDX and [14C]HMX, respectively. Metabolites detected from RDX transformation included a mononitroso RDX derivative and a polar compound tentatively identified as methylenedinitramine. Since members of the genus Methylobacterium are distributed in a wide diversity of natural environments and are very often associated with plants, Methylobacterium sp. strain BJ001 may be involved in natural attenuation or in situ biodegradation (including phytoremediation) of explosive-contaminated sites. PMID:14711682

  20. Long-term use of short- and long-acting nitrates in stable angina pectoris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosmicki, Marek Antoni

    2009-05-01

    Long-acting nitrates are effective antianginal drugs during initial treatment. However, their therapeutic value is compromised by the rapid development of tolerance during sustained therapy, which means that their clinical efficacy is decreased during long-term use. Sublingual nitroglycerin (NTG), a short-acting nitrate, is suitable for the immediate relief of angina. In patients with stable angina treated with oral long-acting nitrates, NTG maintains its full anti-ischemic effect both after initial oral ingestion and after intermittent long-term oral administration. However, NTG attenuates this effect during continuous treatment, when tolerance to oral nitrates occurs, and this is called cross-tolerance. In stable angina long-acting nitrates are considered third-line therapy because a nitrate-free interval is required to avoid the development of tolerance. Nitrates vary in their potential to induce the development of tolerance. During long-lasting nitrate therapy, except pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN), one can observe the development of reactive oxygen species (ROS) inside the muscular cell of a vessel wall, and these bind with nitric oxide (NO). This leads to decreased NO activity, thus, nitrate tolerance. PETN has no tendency to form ROS, and therefore during long-term PETN therapy, there is probably no tolerance or cross-tolerance, as during treatment with other nitrates.

  1. Novel uses of detonator diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibson, John R. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Wilde, Zakary Robert [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Tasker, Douglas George [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Francois, Elizabeth Green [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Nakamoto, Teagan Kanakanui Junichi [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Smith, Dalton Kay [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Trujillo, Christopher J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-09-15

    A novel combination of diagnostics is being used to research the physics of detonator initiation. The explosive PETN (Pentaerythritol tetranitrate) commonly used in detonators, is also a piezo-electric material that, when sufficiently shocked, emits an electromagnetic field in the radio frequency (RF) range, along crystal fracture planes. In an effort to capture this RF signal, a new diagnostic was created. A copper foil, used as an RF antenna, was wrapped around a foam fixture encompassing a PETN pellet. Rogowski coils were used to obtain the change in current with respect to time (di/dt) the detonator circuit, in and polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) stress sensors were used to capture shockwave arrival time. The goal of these experiments is to use these diagnostics to study the reaction response of a PETN pellet of known particle size to shock loading with various diagnostics including an antenna to capture RF emissions. Our hypothesis is that RF feedback may signify the rate of deflagration to detonation transition (DDT) or lack thereof. The new diagnostics and methods will be used to determine the timing of start of current, bridge burst, detonator breakout timing and RF generated from detonation. These data will be compared to those of currently used diagnostics in order to validate the accuracy of these new methods. Future experiments will incorporate other methods of validation including dynamic radiography, optical initiation and use of magnetic field sensors.

  2. High explosive spot test analyses of samples from Operable Unit (OU) 1111

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McRae, D.; Haywood, W.; Powell, J.; Harris, B.

    1995-01-01

    A preliminary evaluation has been completed of environmental contaminants at selected sites within the Group DX-10 (formally Group M-7) area. Soil samples taken from specific locations at this detonator facility were analyzed for harmful metals and screened for explosives. A sanitary outflow, a burn pit, a pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) production outflow field, an active firing chamber, an inactive firing chamber, and a leach field were sampled. Energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) was used to obtain semi-quantitative concentrations of metals in the soil. Two field spot-test kits for explosives were used to assess the presence of energetic materials in the soil and in items found at the areas tested. PETN is the major explosive in detonators manufactured and destroyed at Los Alamos. No measurable amounts of PETN or other explosives were detected in the soil, but items taken from the burn area and a high-energy explosive (HE)/chemical sump were contaminated. The concentrations of lead, mercury, and uranium are given.

  3. Candidate Herbaceous Plants for Phytoremediation of Energetics on Ranges. Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-09-01

    fescue P medium medium N-W NE, NH G.c. CCREL 10 Hordeum sativum Barley TNT A medium medium N&S AK, HW 4 Lolium multiflorum Ryegrass TNT AP... Allium schoenopra- sum Wild chives TNT P small small N AK 4 Brassica rapa Canola RDX,HMX AB medium medium N&S AK, HW, IL, PR, VI 4, 20 Bupleurum...TNT, HMX A medium medium N&S IL, PR, VI JAAP 4, 12.,13 Pisum sativum Pea TNT A small large N&S 4 Raphanus sativus Radish RDX A tap small N

  4. Development of Toxicity Benchmarks and Bioaccumulation Data for N-based Organic Explosives for Terrestrial Plants and Soil Invertebrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-01

    mL pre-weighed glass vessel. The sample was then completely evaporated using a nitrogen stream and the vessel was placed in an oven at 150°C for 1 h...14]. Central nervous system and respiratory distresses also were observed in the RDX-exposed birds . In humans, RDX is a possible carcinogen, and...failing to comply with a collection of information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO

  5. Formulation and Testing of Paraffin-Based Solid Fuels Containing Energetic Additives for Hybrid Rockets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Daniel B.; Boyer, Eric; Wachs,Trevor; Kuo, Kenneth K.; Story, George

    2012-01-01

    Many approaches have been considered in an effort to improve the regression rate of solid fuels for hybrid rocket applications. One promising method is to use a fuel with a fast burning rate such as paraffin wax; however, additional performance increases to the fuel regression rate are necessary to make the fuel a viable candidate to replace current launch propulsion systems. The addition of energetic and/or nano-sized particles is one way to increase mass-burning rates of the solid fuels and increase the overall performance of the hybrid rocket motor.1,2 Several paraffin-based fuel grains with various energetic additives (e.g., lithium aluminum hydride (LiAlH4) have been cast in an attempt to improve regression rates. There are two major advantages to introducing LiAlH4 additive into the solid fuel matrix: 1) the increased characteristic velocity, 2) decreased dependency of Isp on oxidizer-to-fuel ratio. The testing and characterization of these solid-fuel grains have shown that continued work is necessary to eliminate unburned/unreacted fuel in downstream sections of the test apparatus.3 Changes to the fuel matrix include higher melting point wax and smaller energetic additive particles. The reduction in particle size through various methods can result in more homogeneous grain structure. The higher melting point wax can serve to reduce the melt-layer thickness, allowing the LiAlH4 particles to react closer to the burning surface, thus increasing the heat feedback rate and fuel regression rate. In addition to the formulation of LiAlH4 and paraffin wax solid-fuel grains, liquid additives of triethylaluminum and diisobutylaluminum hydride will be included in this study. Another promising fuel formulation consideration is to incorporate a small percentage of RDX as an additive to paraffin. A novel casting technique will be used by dissolving RDX in a solvent to crystallize the energetic additive. After dissolving the RDX in a solvent chosen for its compatibility

  6. Explosive underground: vehicles and concepts for transport and charging; Sprengstoff Untertage: Fahrzeuge und Konzepte fuer den Transport und das Laden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plagemann, D.; Schroeder, W. [Hermann Paus Maschinenfabrik GmbH, Emsbueren (Germany)

    2005-01-27

    For about 30 years Hermann Paus Maschinenfabrik GmbH has been in continuous and direct contact with mines throughout the world and during this period has developed a number of specific solutions, which offer mines a potential for performance of the respective tasks. The essential feature of each development is high individualisation of the equipment or high universality of the machine platforms used for this purpose to ensure that the costs are clear also in the case of special equipment. In particular for transport and the handling of Anfo concepts were already developed and tested jointly with the users at an early stage. (orig.)

  7. Explosive and accessories in rock blasting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pingua, B.M.P.; Nabiullah, M.; Jagdish, S.; Mishra, G.D.; Singh, T.N. [Central Mining Research Institute, Dhanbad (India)

    1999-02-01

    Chemical explosives are commonly used in the mining industry. Those used in India include nitroglycerine (NG) base, ammonium nitrate fuel oil mixture (ANFO), slurry emulsion and liquid oxygen (LOX). Examples of each type and their general properties are lighted. The electric and non-electric detonating systems used are described. Two Indian companies are producing non-electric in-hole delay system. Raydet (IDL-make) and Excel (ICI-make). Their firing characteristics are listed. Tables are given for burden for different density of rock and explosive strength. Causes of bad blast are itemised. 7 refs., 4 figs., 7 tabs.

  8. Explosives 92. Conference proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farnfield, R.A. (ed.)

    1992-01-01

    17 papers are presented. Topics covered include: the POG system - a new concept in the use of ANFO; demolition of a motorway bridge; presplit and smooth blasting; VIBReX - a predictive code for assessing the effect of blast design on ground vibration; ground vibrations from blasting; digital seismographs; human response to blasting and the effects on planning conditions; landform construction by restoration blasting; use of small diameter explosives; efficient priming; safety management in the explosives industry; and the law on packaging of explosives. Two papers have been abstracted separately.

  9. Blast casting requires fresh assessment of methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pilshaw, S.R.

    1987-08-01

    The article discusses the reasons why conventional blasting operations, mainly that of explosive products, drilling and initiation methods are inefficient, and suggests new methods and materials to overcome the problems of the conventional operations. The author suggests that the use of bulk ANFO for casting, instead of high energy and density explosives with high velocity detonation is more effective in producing heave action results. Similarly the drilling of smaller blast holes than is conventional allows better loading distribution of explosives in the rock mass. The author also suggests that casting would be more efficient if the shot rows were loaded differently to produce a variable burden blasting pattern.

  10. Water in blast holes can improve blasting efficiency and cut costs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Regan, G.

    1983-08-01

    Water in blast holes has been a traditional problem faced by blasting engineers and foremen in surface mining. Presently accepted techniques for blasting in water-filled holes include the use of more expensive water-gel explosives which are denser than water, dewatering of holes by pumping, and blowing out the water with a small charge before loading the main ANFO charge column. These methods involve considerable expense and delay to the normal charge-loading procedure. The author describes a method of using the water in blast holes to improve blasting efficiency and reduce the consumption of explosive.

  11. New techniques for improved performance in surface blasting operation and optimisation of blast design parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, P.P. [Central Mining Research Institute, Dhanbad (India). Blasting Dept.

    1999-02-01

    Experimental blasts were conducted for optimisation of blasting parameters using separate technologies involving non-electric initiation systems, air decking accessories in conjunction with different explosive products like emulsion (cartridge and site-mixed), slurries (cartridge and site-mixed) and ANFO. The cost associated with each such technology was then compared with the conventional methods of drilling and blasting operations. The results of cost analyses are given. Theoretical and practical aspects of such technologies and their best possible usage in order to establish the desired fragmentation, muck profile, wall control and ultimately the accepted level of costs are mentioned in subsequent sections. 16 refs., 17 figs., 8 plates, 11 tabs.

  12. Effect of blasting on output increase of bucket wheel excavators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Musil, P.

    1987-12-01

    In brown coal surface mines, consolidated sediments become a problem as mining operations advance into greater depth below the original terrain. Owing to higher digging resistance, the output of bucket wheel excavators drops. This problem may be solved by blasting technology and using drilling machines with higher digging force. This paper describes the blasting operations at the Nastup Mines in Tusmice, Czechoslovakia. About 60% of blasting explosives used is a simple mixture of ammonium nitrate and fuel (ANFO), the rest falls on classic blasting gelatines and blasting explosives plasticized by slurry. It is found that blasting improves output by 30% while electric energy consumption is reduced.

  13. Rietspruit - a pattern for progress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holz, P.

    1991-02-01

    Operations at the Rietspruit coal export mine, opened in November 1976 as a joint venture between Rand Mines and Shell South Africa, are described. The mines initial two pits are to be joined by the end of 1991 and a new pit was opened in 1988. Removal of overburden using the throw blasting technique is described. Use of explosives such as emulsions, Anfo and packaged explosives have reduced costs. A small underground mining operation began in 1990. Present reserves should give the mine a lifetime of 10-12 years and a rehabilitation programme is in progress to restore mined land to its original state. 11 photos.

  14. Utility equipment systems: promising more for less

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-10-01

    This paper discusses current developments in utility equipment systems, a term applied to carrier vehicles, mostly evolved from well-known forms of construction or mining equipment modified to work with a variety of different front or back end attachments. One of the equipment ranges discussed is the Normet cassette system produced by the Orion corporation of Finland, which allows a basic chassis to be converted from a personnel carrier to an ANFO carrier within minutes. LHD vehicles which are being adapted to fulfil multipurpose roles, such as carrying roof supports, chocks and other heavy mining equipment underground are also discussed. 5 figs.

  15. Influence of external-detonation-generated plasmas on the performance of semi-confined explosive charges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Udy, L.L.

    1979-02-01

    External-detonation-generated plasmas, highly ionized zones of reacting material ejected from the surface of detonating explosive charges, are shown to be the cause of channel desensitization, i.e., the self-quenching of a detonating explosive column loaded in a borehole with an air annulus between the explosive and the borehole wall. The effects of this phenomenon on several explosive compositions and types are demonstrated and discussed. The explosives tested include aluminum-sensitized and explosive-sensitized slurries, ANFO, liquid explosives and dynamites. Various techniques are described that can be used to reduce or eliminate the plasma effect.

  16. Research Area 3 - Mathematical Sciences: Multiscale Modeling of the Mechanics of Advanced Energetic Materials Relevant to Detonation Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-24

    for initiation. We have used first principle calculations (plane wave Density Functional Theory with projector augmented-wave (PAW) pseudopotentials...RDX -what are conformers?- • Estimation of energy barriers using the Nudged Elastic Band method. • Various conformations stabilized by the Grant

  17. METHOD 529, DETERMINATION OF EXPLOSIVES AND RELATED COMPOUNDS IN DRINKING WATER BY SOLID PHASE EXTRACTION AND CAPILLARY COLUMN GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY/MASS SPECTROMETRY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) is a military explosive which is known to have contaminated groundwater on and near military installations where it has been used and stored. Historical disposal practices such as open burning and detonation have contributed to envir...

  18. Crystal morphology variation in inkjet-printed organic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihnen, Andrew C.; Petrock, Anne M.; Chou, Tsengming; Samuels, Phillip J.; Fuchs, Brian E.; Lee, Woo Y.

    2011-11-01

    The recent commercialization of piezoelectric-based drop-on-demand inkjet printers provides an additive processing platform for producing and micropatterning organic crystal structures. We report an inkjet printing approach where macro- and nano-scale energetic composites composed of cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine (RDX) crystals dispersed in a cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB) matrix are produced by direct phase transformation from organic solvent-based all-liquid inks. The characterization of printed composites illustrates distinct morphological changes dependent on ink deposition parameters. When 10 pL ink droplets rapidly formed a liquid pool, a coffee ring structure containing dendritic RDX crystals was produced. By increasing the substrate temperature, and consequently the evaporation rate of the pooled ink, the coffee ring structure was mitigated and shorter dendrites from up to ∼1 to 0.2 mm with closer arm spacing from ∼15 to 1 μm were produced. When the nucleation and growth of RDX and CAB were confined within the evaporating droplets, a granular structure containing nanoscale RDX crystals was produced. The results suggest that evaporation rate and microfluidic droplet confinement can effectively be used to tailor the morphology of inkjet-printed energetic composites.

  19. HMX based enhanced energy LOVA gun propellant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanghavi, R.R. [High Energy Materials Research Laboratory, Pune 411021 (India)]. E-mail: sanghavirr@yahoo.co.uk; Kamale, P.J. [High Energy Materials Research Laboratory, Pune 411021 (India); Shaikh, M.A.R. [High Energy Materials Research Laboratory, Pune 411021 (India); Shelar, S.D. [High Energy Materials Research Laboratory, Pune 411021 (India); Kumar, K. Sunil [High Energy Materials Research Laboratory, Pune 411021 (India); Singh, Amarjit [High Energy Materials Research Laboratory, Pune 411021 (India)

    2007-05-08

    Efforts to develop gun propellants with low vulnerability have recently been focused on enhancing the energy with a further improvement in its sensitivity characteristics. These propellants not only prevent catastrophic disasters due to unplanned initiation of currently used gun propellants (based on nitrate esters) but also realize enhanced energy levels to increase the muzzle velocity of the projectiles. Now, in order to replace nitroglycerine, which is highly sensitive to friction and impact, nitramines meet the requirements as they offer superior energy due to positive heat of formation, typical stoichiometry with higher decomposition temperatures and also owing to negative oxygen balance are less sensitive than stoichiometrically balanced NG. RDX has been widely reported for use in LOVA propellant. In this paper we have made an effort to present the work on scantily reported nitramine HMX based LOVA gun propellant while incorporating energetic plasticizer glycidyl azide polymer to enhance the energy level. HMX is known to be thermally stable at higher temperature than RDX and also proved to be less vulnerable to small scale shaped charge jet attack as its decomposition temperature is 270 deg. C. HMX also offers improved impulse due to its superior heat of formation (+17 kcal/mol) as compared to RDX (+14 kcal/mol). It has also been reported that a break point will not appear until 35,000 psi for propellant comprising of 5 {mu}m HMX. Since no work has been reported in open literature regarding replacement of RDX by HMX, the present studies were carried out.

  20. Toxicity and uptake of cyclic nitramine explosives in ryegrass Lolium perenne

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rocheleau, Sylvie; Lachance, Bernard; Kuperman, Roman G.; Hawari, Jalal; Thiboutot, Sonia; Ampleman, Guy; Sunahara, Geoffrey I.

    2008-01-01

    Hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX), octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX), and 2,4,6,8,10,12-hexanitro-2,4,6,8,10,12-hexaazaisowurtzitane (CL-20) are cyclic nitramines used as explosives. Their ecotoxicities have been characterized incompletely and little is known about their accumulation potential in soil organisms. We assessed the toxicity and uptake of these explosives in perennial ryegrass Lolium perenne L. exposed in a Sassafras sandy loam (SSL) or in a sandy soil (DRDC, CL-20 only) containing contrasting clay contents (11% and 0.3%, respectively). A 21-d exposure to RDX, HMX or CL-20 in either soil had no adverse effects on ryegrass growth. RDX and HMX were translocated to ryegrass shoots, with bioconcentration factors (BCF) of up to 15 and 11, respectively. In contrast, CL-20 was taken up by the roots (BCF up to 19) with no translocation to the shoots. These studies showed that RDX, HMX, and CL-20 can accumulate in plants and may potentially pose a risk of biomagnification across the food chain. - Cyclic nitramine explosives accumulate in perennial ryegrass and exhibit distinct uptake patterns

  1. Study of nano-nitramine explosives: preparation, sensitivity and application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Liu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Nano-nitramine explosives (RDX, HMX, CL-20 are produced on a bi-directional grinding mill. The scanning electron microscope (SEM observations show that the prepared particles are semi-spherical, and the narrow size distributions are characterized using the laser particle size analyzer. Compared with the micron-sized samples, the nano-products show obvious decrease in friction and impact sensitivities. In the case of shock sensitivities, nano-products have lower values by 59.9% (RDX, 56.4% (HMX, and 58.1% (CL-20, respectively. When nano-RDX and nano-HMX are used in plastic bonded explosives (PBX as alternative materials of micron-sized particles, their shock sensitivities are significantly decreased by 24.5% (RDX and 22.9% (HMX, and their detonation velocities are increased by about 1.7%. Therefore, it is expected to promote the application of nano-nitramine explosives in PBXs and composite modified double-based propellants (CMDBs so that some of their properties would be improved.

  2. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U15502-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 1 9e-26 EU080357_1( EU080357 |pid:none) Phytophthora cuyabensis isolate PD... 121 9e-26 EU080370_1( EU080370...- T... 121 9e-26 EU080331_1( EU080331 |pid:none) Phytophthora cuyabensis isolate PD... 121 9e-26 (Q8RDX7) Re

  3. Toxicity and uptake of cyclic nitramine explosives in ryegrass Lolium perenne

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocheleau, Sylvie; Lachance, Bernard [Biotechnology Research Institute, National Research Council of Canada, 6100 Royalmount Avenue, Montreal, Quebec H4P 2R2 (Canada); Kuperman, Roman G. [Edgewood Chemical Biological Center, 5183 Blackhawk Road, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21010-5424 (United States); Hawari, Jalal [Biotechnology Research Institute, National Research Council of Canada, 6100 Royalmount Avenue, Montreal, Quebec H4P 2R2 (Canada); Thiboutot, Sonia; Ampleman, Guy [Defense Research and Development Canada, 2459 Pie IX Boulevard, Val Belair, Quebec G3J 1X5 (Canada); Sunahara, Geoffrey I. [Biotechnology Research Institute, National Research Council of Canada, 6100 Royalmount Avenue, Montreal, Quebec H4P 2R2 (Canada)], E-mail: geoffrey.sunahara@cnrc-nrc.gc.ca

    2008-11-15

    Hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX), octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX), and 2,4,6,8,10,12-hexanitro-2,4,6,8,10,12-hexaazaisowurtzitane (CL-20) are cyclic nitramines used as explosives. Their ecotoxicities have been characterized incompletely and little is known about their accumulation potential in soil organisms. We assessed the toxicity and uptake of these explosives in perennial ryegrass Lolium perenne L. exposed in a Sassafras sandy loam (SSL) or in a sandy soil (DRDC, CL-20 only) containing contrasting clay contents (11% and 0.3%, respectively). A 21-d exposure to RDX, HMX or CL-20 in either soil had no adverse effects on ryegrass growth. RDX and HMX were translocated to ryegrass shoots, with bioconcentration factors (BCF) of up to 15 and 11, respectively. In contrast, CL-20 was taken up by the roots (BCF up to 19) with no translocation to the shoots. These studies showed that RDX, HMX, and CL-20 can accumulate in plants and may potentially pose a risk of biomagnification across the food chain. - Cyclic nitramine explosives accumulate in perennial ryegrass and exhibit distinct uptake patterns.

  4. Bishydrazinium and Diammonium Salts of 4,4’,5,5’-Tetranitro-2,2’-biimidazolate (TNBI): Synthesis and Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    detonation were all calculated with CHEETAH 6.0 using the exp 6.3 library. The per- formance values as reported for NTO and RDX are provided for comparison...purposes and were generated using the CHEETAH 6.0 reactant library values for heat of formation and density for these materials. 3.2 Synthetic

  5. Burning characteristics of microcellular combustible objects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-tao Yang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Microcellular combustible objects for application of combustible case, caseless ammunition or combustible detonator-holding tubes are fabricated through one-step foaming process, in which supercritical CO2 is used as foaming agent. The formulations consist of inert polymer binder and ultra fine RDX. For the inner porous structures of microcellular combustible objects, the cell sizes present a unimodal or bimodal distribution by adjusting the foaming conditions. Closed bomb test is to investigate the influence of both porous structure style and RDX content on burning behavior. The sample with bimodal distribution of cell sizes burns faster than that with unimodal distribution, and the concentration of RDX can influence the burning characteristics in a positive manner. In addition, the translation of laminar burning to convective burning is determined by burning rate versus pressure curves of samples at two different loading densities, and the resulting transition pressure is 30 MPa. Moreover, the samples with bigger sample size present higher burning rate, resulting in providing deeper convective depth. Dynamic vivacity of samples is also studied. The results show that the vivacity increases with RDX content and varies with inner structure.

  6. Impacts of explosive compounds on vegetation: A need for community scale investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Via, Stephen M.; Zinnert, Julie C.

    2016-01-01

    Explosive compounds are distributed heterogeneously across the globe as a result of over a century of human industrial and military activity. RDX (hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine) and TNT (2-methyl-1,3,5-trinitrobenzene) are the most common and most abundant explosives in the environment. Vegetation exhibits numerous physiological and morphological stress responses in the presence of RDX and TNT. Varied stress responses act as physiological filters that facilitate the proliferation of tolerant species and the extirpation of intolerant species. Contaminants alter community composition as they differentially impact plants at each life stage (i.e. germination, juvenile, adult), subsequently modifying larger scale ecosystem processes. This review summarizes the current explosives-vegetation literature, focusing on RDX and TNT as these are well documented in the literature, linking our current understanding to ecological theory. A conceptual framework is provided that will aid future efforts in predicting plant community response to residual explosive compounds. - Highlights: • There is a strong need for community scale explosives research. • Contaminants alter community composition as they impact plants at each life stage. • These small scale changes modify larger scale ecosystem processes. • This review summarizes the current explosives-vegetation literature. • We focus on RDX and TNT as these are well documented in the literature. - Explosives act as physiological filters that alter community composition as they differentially affect plants at each life stage (i.e. germination, juvenile, adult).

  7. Design and validation of inert homemade explosive simulants for ground penetrating radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanderGaast, Brian W.; McFee, John E.; Russell, Kevin L.; Faust, Anthony A.

    2015-05-01

    The Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) identified a requirement for inert simulants to act as improvised, or homemade, explosives (IEs) when training on, or evaluating, ground penetrating radar (GPR) systems commonly used in the detection of buried landmines and improvised explosive devices (IEDs). In response, Defence R and D Canada (DRDC) initiated a project to develop IE simulant formulations using commonly available inert materials. These simulants are intended to approximate the expected GPR response of common ammonium nitrate-based IEs, in particular ammonium nitrate/fuel oil (ANFO) and ammonium nitrate/aluminum (ANAl). The complex permittivity over the range of electromagnetic frequencies relevant to standard GPR systems was measured for bulk quantities of these three IEs that had been fabricated at DRDC Suffield Research Centre. Following these measurements, published literature was examined to find benign materials with both a similar complex permittivity, as well as other physical properties deemed desirable - such as low-toxicity, thermal stability, and commercial availability - in order to select candidates for subsequent simulant formulation. Suitable simulant formulations were identified for ANFO, with resulting complex permittivities measured to be within acceptable limits of target values. These IE formulations will now undergo end-user trials with CAF operators in order to confirm their utility. Investigations into ANAl simulants continues. This progress report outlines the development program, simulant design, and current validation results.

  8. Bulk delivery of explosives offers positive advantages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-09-01

    The bulk delivery of precisely-formulated explosives directly to the shothole is a safe, secure and cost effective way of bringing rock to the quarry floor. This article describes several of the latest generation of Anfo trucks. The typical Anfo truck carries ammonium nitrate and fuel oil in bulk, together with several other mix constituents, including an emulsifying agent. These are designed to form the basis of a range of emulsion-type explosives. In effect, these are water in oil emulsions where the water phase consists of droplets of a saturated solution of the oxidizing material suspended in oil. The formulations may be further tailored to the shothole requirements by the addition of oils or waxes, which can alter the viscosity of the explosive. The precise and programmable controls which determine the exact quantities of materials delivered to the mixer mean that the explosive mixtures can be tailored exactly to the requirements of the blasting operation, be it the amount of rock to be dislodged, the geological conditions, or the state of the shothole - either wet or dry. 4 systems are described in detail. 3 figs.

  9. Measurement for commercial exposives with SC-DSC test. Sangyoyo bakuhayaku no SC-DSC sokutei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yabashi, H.; Wada, Y.; Hwang, D.; Akutsu, Y.; Tamura, M.; Yoshida, T. (The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan). Faculty of Engineering); Matsuzawa, T. (Nippon Kayaku Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan))

    1991-08-30

    The sealed cell differential scanning calorimetry (SC-DSC) was sintroduced of commercial blasting explosives. As a series of testing the commercial blasting explosives in performance, an SC-DSC test was made to compare the critical detonability line with that resulting therefrom. From the result of SC-DSC measurement, the critical dilution rate was estimated of commercial blasting explosives to become without detonating propagation. As a result, all the explosives with exception of ANFO one were assumed to have a possibility of detonating propagation so that the ANFO explosive was known to be material, unable to exactly evaluate the detonability by the SC-DSC test. The explosion heat, then calculated by the REITP2 in order to assume how the reaction proceeded in the DSC cell, was compared with the reaction heat measured by the SC-DSC test. As a result, the calculated value was known to be almost equal to or slightly larger than the measured one. 15 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Reactive flow modeling of small scale detonation failure experiments for a baseline non-ideal explosive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kittell, David E.; Cummock, Nick R.; Son, Steven F. [School of Mechanical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)

    2016-08-14

    Small scale characterization experiments using only 1–5 g of a baseline ammonium nitrate plus fuel oil (ANFO) explosive are discussed and simulated using an ignition and growth reactive flow model. There exists a strong need for the small scale characterization of non-ideal explosives in order to adequately survey the wide parameter space in sample composition, density, and microstructure of these materials. However, it is largely unknown in the scientific community whether any useful or meaningful result may be obtained from detonation failure, and whether a minimum sample size or level of confinement exists for the experiments. In this work, it is shown that the parameters of an ignition and growth rate law may be calibrated using the small scale data, which is obtained from a 35 GHz microwave interferometer. Calibration is feasible when the samples are heavily confined and overdriven; this conclusion is supported with detailed simulation output, including pressure and reaction contours inside the ANFO samples. The resulting shock wave velocity is most likely a combined chemical-mechanical response, and simulations of these experiments require an accurate unreacted equation of state (EOS) in addition to the calibrated reaction rate. Other experiments are proposed to gain further insight into the detonation failure data, as well as to help discriminate between the role of the EOS and reaction rate in predicting the measured outcome.

  11. Work-principle model for predicting toxic fumes of nonideal explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wieland, Michael S. [National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health, Pittsburgh Research Center, P.O. Box 18070, Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0070 (United States)

    2004-08-01

    The work-principle from thermodynamics was used to formulate a model for predicting toxic fumes from mining explosives in underground chamber tests, where rapid turbulent combustion within the surrounding air noticeably changes the resulting concentrations. Two model constants were required to help characterize the reaction zone undergoing rapid chemical transformations in conjunction with heat transfer and work output: a stoichiometry mixing fraction and a reaction-quenching temperature. Rudimentary theory with an unsteady uniform concentration gradient was taken to characterize the combustion zone, yielding 75% for the mixing fraction. Four quenching temperature trends were resolved and compared to test results of ammonium nitrate compositions with different fuel-oil percentages (ANFO). The quenching temperature 2345 K was the optimum choice for fitting the two major components of fume toxicity: carbon monoxide (CO) and total nitrogen oxides (NO{sub X}). The resulting two-constant model was used to generate comparisons for test results of ANFO compositions with additives. Though respectable fits were usually found, charge formulations which reacted weakly could not be resolved numerically. The work-principle model yields toxic concentrations for a range of charge formulations, making it a useful tool for investigating the potential hazard of released fumes and reducing the risk of unwanted incidents. (Abstract Copyright [2004], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  12. Sandia National Laboratories Small-Scale Sensitivity Testing (SSST) Report: Calcium Nitrate Mixtures with Various Fuels.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, Jason Joe [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Based upon the presented sensitivity data for the examined calcium nitrate mixtures using sugar and sawdust, contact handling/mixing of these materials does not present hazards greater than those occurring during handling of dry PETN powder. The aluminized calcium nitrate mixtures present a known ESD fire hazard due to the fine aluminum powder fuel. These mixtures may yet present an ESD explosion hazard, though this has not been investigated at this time. The detonability of these mixtures will be investigated during Phase III testing.

  13. Explosion-induced combustion of hydrocarbon clouds in a chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neuwald, P; Reichenbach, H; Kuhl, A L

    2001-01-01

    The interaction of the detonation of a solid HE-charge with a non-premixed cloud of hydro-carbon fuel in a chamber was studied in laboratory experiments. Soap bubbles filled with a flammable gas were subjected to the blast wave created by the detonation of PETN-charges (0.2 g < mass < 0.5 g). The dynamics of the combustion system were investigated by means of high-speed photography and measurement of the quasi-static chamber pressure

  14. Dynamics of the formation of the condensed phase particles at detonation of high explosives

    CERN Document Server

    Evdokov, O V; Kulipanov, G N; Luckjanchikov, L A; Lyakhov, N Z; Mishnev, S I; Sharafutdinov, M R; Sheromov, M A; Ten, K A; Titov, V M; Tolochko, B P; Zubkov, P I

    2001-01-01

    The article presents the results of the experimental study SAXS on condensed carbon particles that appear at the detonation of a high explosive. It was shown that the SAXS signal rises for 1.5-4 mu s after the detonation front passing. The SAXS signal in trotyl and its alloys with hexogen starts just after the compression of the material in the detonation wave. In octogen, hexogen and PETN, the SAXS signal appears in 0.5 mu s and is much smaller than the signal at the detonation of trotyl and its alloys with hexogen.

  15. Comparing CTH simulations and experiments on explosively loaded rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braithwaite, C. H.; Aydelotte, Brady; Collins, Adam; Thadhani, Naresh; Williamson, David Martin

    2012-03-01

    A series of experiments were conducted on explosively loaded metallic rings for the purpose of studying fragmentation. In addition to the collection of fragments for analysis, the radial velocity of the expanding ring was measured with photon Doppler velocimetry (PDV) and the arrangement was imaged using high speed photography. Both the ring material and the material used as the explosive container were altered and the results compared with simulations performed in CTH. Good agreement was found between the simulations and the experiments. The maximum radial velocity attained was approximately 380 m/s, which was achieved through loading with a 5g PETN based charge.

  16. Comparative Assessment of Copper-Coated Kapton: Analysis of Microclad from Several Manufacturing Lots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martz, Joseph Christopher [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Spearing, Dane Robert [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Labouriau, Andrea [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Judge, Elizabeth [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Kelly, Daniel [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Dirmyer, Matthew R. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Milenski, Helen Marie [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Patterson, Brian M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Sandoval, Cynthia Wathen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Usov, Igor Olegovich [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Beaux, Miles Frank II [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Henderson, Kevin C. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Torres, Joseph Angelo [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Edwards, Stephanie Lynn [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Vodnik, Douglas R. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Keller, Jennie [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Mccabe, Rodney James [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Livescu, Veronica [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Cowan, Joseph Sarno [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Aragonez, Robert J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Tokash, Justin Charles [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Lawrence, Samantha Kay [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Leon Brito, Neliza [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-04-03

    Microclad is a composite material consisting of a thin copper coating applied on a single side over a Kapton substrate. Kapton is the commercial designator for polyimide supplied by DuPont. Microclad is a key material in detonator manufacture and function. Detonators which utilize Microclad function when a large current applied through a thin bridge etched into the copper produces a plasma, accelerating a Kapton flyer into an explosive (PETN) pellet. The geometry and properties of the Microclad are a critical element of this process.

  17. Experiments on cylindrically converging blast waves in atmospheric air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Hideo; Nakamura, Yuichi

    1980-06-01

    Cylindrically converging blast waves have been produced in normal atmospheric conditions by the detonation of the explosives, pentaerythritoltetranitrate, (PETN), over cylindrical surfaces. The shocks generated in this way are so strong that the fronts propagating through the air become luminous of themselves. The production and the propagation of the shocks have been monitored with a framing camera and a streak camera, and the time-space relations of the shock propagations have been determined using an electrical ionization probing system. The results have shown that the trajectory of the shock fronts near the axis of the cylinder can be approximately represented by the Guderley's formula.

  18. Full scale numerical analysis of high performance concrete columns designed to withstand severe blast impact

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riisgaard, Benjamin; Georgakis, Christos; Stang, Henrik

    2007-01-01

    Polymer reinforced Compact Reinforced Composite, PCRC, is a Fiber reinforced Densified Small Particle system, FDSP, combined with a high strength longitudinal flexural rebar arrangement laced together with polymer lacing to avoid shock initiated disintegration of the structural element under blast...... of PETN (85/15) High Explosives at stand off 1600 mm. Additionally, a LS-DYNA material model suitable for predicting the response of Polymer reinforced Compact Reinforced Concrete improved for close-in detonation and a description of the LS-DYNA multi-material Eulerian method for modeling the blast event...

  19. SERDP ER-1376 Enhancement of In Situ Bioremediation of Energetic Compounds by Coupled Abiotic/Biotic Processes:Final Report for 2004 - 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szecsody, James E.; Comfort, Steve; Fredrickson, Herbert L.; Boparai, Hardiljeet K.; Devary, Brooks J.; Thompson, Karen T.; Phillips, Jerry L.; Crocker, Fiona H.; Girvin, Donald C.; Resch, Charles T.; Shea, Patrick; Fischer, Ashley E.; Durkin, Lisa M.

    2007-08-07

    This project was initiated by SERDP to quantify processes and determine the effectiveness of abiotic/biotic mineralization of energetics (RDX, HMX, TNT) in aquifer sediments by combinations of biostimulation (carbon, trace nutrient additions) and chemical reduction of sediment to create a reducing environment. Initially it was hypothesized that a balance of chemical reduction of sediment and biostimulation would increase the RDX, HMX, and TNT mineralization rate significantly (by a combination of abiotic and biotic processes) so that this abiotic/biotic treatment may be a more efficient for remediation than biotic treatment alone in some cases. Because both abiotic and biotic processes are involved in energetic mineralization in sediments, it was further hypothesized that consideration for both abiotic reduction and microbial growth was need to optimize the sediment system for the most rapid mineralization rate. Results show that there are separate optimal abiotic/biostimulation aquifer sediment treatments for RDX/HMX and for TNT. Optimal sediment treatment for RDX and HMX (which have chemical similarities and similar degradation pathways) is mainly chemical reduction of sediment, which increased the RDX/HMX mineralization rate 100 to150 times (relative to untreated sediment), with additional carbon or trace nutrient addition, which increased the RDX/HMX mineralization rate an additional 3 to 4 times. In contrast, the optimal aquifer sediment treatment for TNT involves mainly biostimulation (glucose addition), which stimulates a TNT/glucose cometabolic degradation pathway (6.8 times more rapid than untreated sediment), degrading TNT to amino-intermediates that irreversibly sorb (i.e., end product is not CO2). The TNT mass migration risk is minimized by these transformation reactions, as the triaminotoluene and 2,4- and 2,6-diaminonitrotoluene products that irreversibly sorb are no longer mobile in the subsurface environment. These transformation rates are increased

  20. Energetic materials: crystallization, characterization and insensitive plastic bonded explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heijden, Antoine E.D.M. van der; Creyghton, Yves L.M.; Marino, Emanuela; Bouma, Richard H.B.; Scholtes, Gert J.H.G.; Duvalois, Willem [TNO Defence, Security and Safety, P. O. Box 45, 2280 AA Rijswijk (Netherlands); Roelands, Marc C.P.M. [TNO Science and Industry, P. O. Box 342, 7300 AH Apeldoorn (Netherlands)

    2008-02-15

    The product quality of energetic materials is predominantly determined by the crystallization process applied to produce these materials. It has been demonstrated in the past that the higher the product quality of the solid energetic ingredients, the less sensitive a plastic bonded explosive containing these energetic materials becomes. The application of submicron or nanometric energetic materials is generally considered to further decrease the sensitiveness of explosives. In order to assess the product quality of energetic materials, a range of analytical techniques is available. Recent attempts within the Reduced-sensitivity RDX Round Robin (R4) have provided the EM community a better insight into these analytical techniques and in some cases a correlation between product quality and shock initiation of plastic bonded explosives containing (RS-)RDX was identified, which would provide a possibility to discriminate between conventional and reduced sensitivity grades. (Abstract Copyright [2008], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  1. The use of triangle diagram in the detection of explosive and illicit drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudac, Davorin; Baricevic, Martina; Obhodas, Jasmina; Franulovic, Andrej; Valkovic, Vladivoj

    2010-04-01

    A tagged neutron inspection system has been used for the detection of explosive and illicite drugs. Simulant of the RDX explosive was measured in different environments and its gamma ray spectra were compared with the gamma ray spectra of benign materials like paper, sugar and rise. "Fingerprint" of the RDX simulant was found by detecting the nitrogen as well as by making the triangle plot which coordinates show the carbon and oxygen content and density. Density was obtained by measuring the intensity of the transmited tagged neutrons. Hence, the presence of the simulant can be confirmed by using two different methods. The possibility of using the triangle plot for detection of illicit drugs like heroin, cocain and marihuana is also discused.

  2. Energetic Di- and Trinitromethylpyridines: Synthesis and Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiying Zhang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Pyridine derivatives based on the addition of trinitromethyl functional groups were synthesized by the reaction of N2O4 with the corresponding pyridinecarboxaldoximes, then they were converted into dinitromethylide hydrazinium salts. These energetic compounds were fully characterized by IR and NMR spectroscopy, elemental analysis, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, and X-ray crystallography. These pyridine derivatives have good densities, positive enthalpies of formation, and acceptable sensitivity values. Theoretical calculations carried out using Gaussian 03 and EXPLO5 programs demonstrated good to excellent detonation velocities and pressures. Each of these compounds is superior in performance to TNT, while 2,6-bis(trinitromethylpyridine (D = 8700 m·s−1, P = 33.2 GPa shows comparable detonation performance to that of RDX, but its thermal stability is too low, making it inferior to RDX.

  3. Multi-colorimetric sensor array for detection of explosives in gas and liquid phase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kostesha, Natalie; Alstrøm, Tommy Sonne; Johnsen, C.

    2011-01-01

    In the framework of the research project "Xsense" at the Technical University of Denmark (DTU) we are developing a simple colorimetric sensor array which can be useful in detection of explosives like DNT, TATP, HMX, RDX and identification of reagents needed for making homemade explosives. The tec......In the framework of the research project "Xsense" at the Technical University of Denmark (DTU) we are developing a simple colorimetric sensor array which can be useful in detection of explosives like DNT, TATP, HMX, RDX and identification of reagents needed for making homemade explosives...... to the analytes creates a color difference map which gives a unique fingerprint for each explosive and VOCs. Such sensing technology can be used for screening relevant explosives in a complex background as well as to distinguish mixtures of volatile organic compounds distributed in gas and liquid phases....... This sensor array is inexpensive, and can potentially be produced as single use disposable....

  4. A phenomenological model for improving understanding of the ammonium nitrate agglomeration process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Videla Leiva Alvaro

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ammonium nitrate is intensively used as explosive in the mining industry as the main component of ANFO. The ammonium nitrate is known to be a strong hygroscopic crystal matter which generates problems due to the creation of water bridges between crystals leading later to nucleation and crystallization forming an agglomerated solid cake. The agglomeration process damages the ammonium nitrate performance and is undesirable. Usually either organic or inorganic coatings are used to control agglomeration. In the present work a characterization method of humidity adsorption of the ammonium nitrate crystal was performed under laboratory conditions. Several samples were exposed into a defined humidity in a controlled chamber during 5 hours after which the samples were tested to measure agglomeration as the resistance force to compression. A clear relation was found between coating protection level, humidity and agglomeration. Agglomeration can be then predicted by a phenomenological model based of combination of the mono-layer BET adsorption and CNT nucleation models.

  5. Phase diagram of ammonium nitrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunuwille, Mihindra; Yoo, Choong-Shik

    2013-01-01

    Ammonium Nitrate (AN) is a fertilizer, yet becomes an explosive upon a small addition of chemical impurities. The origin of enhanced chemical sensitivity in impure AN (or AN mixtures) is not well understood, posing significant safety issues in using AN even today. To remedy the situation, we have carried out an extensive study to investigate the phase stability of AN and its mixtures with hexane (ANFO–AN mixed with fuel oil) and Aluminum (Ammonal) at high pressures and temperatures, using diamond anvil cells (DAC) and micro-Raman spectroscopy. The results indicate that pure AN decomposes to N 2 , N 2 O, and H 2 O at the onset of the melt, whereas the mixtures, ANFO and Ammonal, decompose at substantially lower temperatures. The present results also confirm the recently proposed phase IV-IV ′ transition above 17 GPa and provide new constraints for the melting and phase diagram of AN to 40 GPa and 400°C

  6. Reaction path of energetic materials using THOR code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durães, L.; Campos, J.; Portugal, A.

    1998-07-01

    The method of predicting reaction path, using THOR code, allows for isobar and isochor adiabatic combustion and CJ detonation regimes, the calculation of the composition and thermodynamic properties of reaction products of energetic materials. THOR code assumes the thermodynamic equilibria of all possible products, for the minimum Gibbs free energy, using HL EoS. The code allows the possibility of estimating various sets of reaction products, obtained successively by the decomposition of the original reacting compound, as a function of the released energy. Two case studies of thermal decomposition procedure were selected, calculated and discussed—pure Ammonium Nitrate and its based explosive ANFO, and Nitromethane—because their equivalence ratio is respectively lower, near and greater than the stoicheiometry. Predictions of reaction path are in good correlation with experimental values, proving the validity of proposed method.

  7. Analysis of effect of aluminized canfo on fragmentation and economics of quarry blast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoukat, M.R.; Akram, M.

    2016-01-01

    Reducing the explosive cost for drilling and blasting operations conducted at limestone quarries is a major concern for every mine operator. In Pakistan, to reduce explosive cost, Calcium Ammonium Nitrate with Fuel Oil (CANFO) is commonly used in explosive column charge in place of Ammonium nitrate fuel oil (ANFO). However, fragmentation of the blast has to be compromised over cost reduction. Hence it is desired to enhance the performance of CANFO. In this study, Aluminum (AL) is added into Calcium Ammonium Nitrate (CAN) to analyze its effect on fragmentation and economics of blast at a limestone quarry. Experimental shots were held using rectangular drilling pattern (current practice), using CANFO and ALCANFO in separate shots, while all other blast design factors were kept constant. Post blast analysis for all shots was done in terms of fragmentation and cost. The shots using ALCANFO proved to be better fragmentation wise, and also assured a saving of 1.6% in drilling and blasting costs. (author)

  8. Study on explosives and their quality performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nabiullah, M.; Pingua, B.M.P.; Jagdish Khan, M.; Emranuzzaman [Central Mining Research Institute, Dhanbad (India)

    2005-07-01

    There are about forty suppliers of explosive and blasting accessories in India manufacturing site mixed emulsion, site mixed slurry, ANFO, HANFO, packed products, and blasting accessories of use in surface and underground mines. A field laboratory was set up to measure explosive properties of explosive samples, cast booster, detonating fuse, detonators, cord relay, MS connector, and shock tubes. Density, velocity of detonation, water percentage, water resistance, and energy output were considered as the important properties of explosives. A rating system was designed for selection of good explosive products. The delay interval and delay scattering in cord relay and shock tube was studied to improve blast performance. This paper describes in detail the method of measurement and vender rating system for explosive products as per marking system accepted by Coal India. 12 refs., 4 figs., 22 tabs.

  9. Physico-chemical principles of slurries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leiber, C.O.

    1984-12-01

    Spectacular accidents have occurred in mining with products considered non-explosive. In view of the disastrous consequences of these accidents, the old 'Anfo' idea has been revived (= ammonium nitrate and fuel oil). Experiments in wet wells have led to the development of a new type of non-explosive blasting agents, i.e. the so-called slurries. Detonation of these slurries is divided into an energy release process and an energy conversion process. The basic mechanisms are described with a view to practical problems, e.g. detonation control, temperature dependence of the blasting characteristics, pressure dependence of the ignition process, critical diameter, slurry state problems, and sensitivity.

  10. Ammonium nitrate explosion hazards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Negovanović Milanka

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ammonium nitrate (AN primarily is used as a fertilizer but it is also very important compound in the production of industrial explosives. The application of ammonium nitrate in the production of industrial explosives was related with the early era of Nobel dynamite and widely increased with the appearance of blasting agents such as ANFO and Slurry, in the middle of the last Century. Throughout the world millions of tons of ammonium nitrate are produced annually and handled without incident. Although ammonium nitrate generally is used safely, accidental explosions involving AN have high impact resulting in loss of lives and destruction of property. The paper presents the basic properties of ammonium nitrate as well as hazards in handling of ammonium nitrate in order to prevent accidents. Several accidents with explosions of ammonium nitrate resulted in catastrophic consequences are listed in the paper as examples of non-compliance with prescribed procedures.

  11. Possibilities for using emulsion explosives in the Pljevlja coal surface mine. Mogucnost primjene emulzionih eksploziva na povrsinskim kopovima rudnika uglja Pljevlja

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Memic, M.; Pejatovic, Z.; Rocen, V. (Rudnik Uglja, Pljevlja (Yugoslavija))

    1990-01-01

    Conducts experimental blasting experiments with ANFO and slurry explosives in the Potrlica surface mine (Yugoslavia). The study aimed at assessing the possibility of reducing overburden removal cost by replacing conventional solid explosives. Effects of experimental fragmentation blasting of marlstone layers in the overburden of this mine in the Pljevlja coal basin are described. Multi-row delayed blasting (4 rows, 85 boreholes with 115 mm diameter) was carried out on a 10 m high working bench. A total of 7,855 kg of slurry DETOLIT PEM explosive, mixed on the spot and strengthened with aluminium powder, were pumped into boreholes and activated by boosters. The effects of experimental blasting are regarded as promising in respect to fragmentation of blasted material, lower seismic effects and cost (30% less than that of conventional explosives).

  12. Double airdecks cushion presplitting of highwalls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chironis, N.P.

    1991-04-01

    Airdecking is a blasting technique for presplitting highwalls. The article describes the airdeck technique used at a Wyoming mine. Trapped air columns in the blastholes are used to enhance and effectively distribute the shock-wave power of the explosive force. A rugged, inflatable plug near the top of the hole supports stemming that bottles up the blast. When the explosion is triggered the shock wave travels up the air column and also rebounds from the bottom of the hole to produce stresses in the surrounding rock. Although this method resulted in a 41% reduction in rockfall, costs were high. A second method involved spacing four bags of Anfo along the borehole and in a third method a second borehole plug was inserted. Although labour and materials costs were still high, rockfall was reduced by between 27% and a very significant 88%. 5 figs., 9 photos.

  13. Controlled blasting experiments in a small drift at the CANMET experimental mine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lizotte, Y.C.

    1994-03-01

    Experiments on controlled blasting conducted at the CANMET Experimental Mine to develop suitable controlled blasting techniques for small development headings are described. The methods selected for study must maintain the drill-blast-muck cycle achieved each work shift. The experiments also examine blast damage mechanisms to formulate criteria for dilution minimization with blast designs in stopes. The drift faces are 2.4 m square, with 34 to 43 holes drilled 2.4 m deep. Cartridged water gels, emulsions, and semi-gelatin dynamite were used in the cuts and as primers, ANFO as the main explosive, and semi- gelatin dynamite in 19 mm diameter cartridges was used in perimeter holes. The results of the first set of experiments show the efficiency of controlled blasting techniques to reduce blast damage. 60 refs., 71 figs., 9 tabs.

  14. Thermal hazard assessment of AN and AN-based explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turcotte, T.; Lightfoot, P. D.; Fouchard, R.; Jones, D. E. G. [Natural Resources Canada, CANMET Canadian Explosives Research Laboratory, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2002-12-01

    Ammonium-based aqeous solutions of various concentrations are processed in both the fertilizer and explosives industry, and ammonium nitrate emulsions form the basis of bulk ammonium nitrate emulsion explosives. Major accidents involving overheating of large quantities of these products are not uncommon. To provide guidance to handling large bulk quantities of these materials laboratory experiments must be carried out in such a way as to minimize heat losses from the samples. In this study experiments were performed on pure ammonium, the popular commercial explosive ANFO, various aqueous ammonium solutions and typical bulk and packaged ammonium nitrate emulsions, using two laboratory-scale calorimeters (accelerating rate calorimeter and adiabatic Dewar calorimeter). The objective of the experiments was to study the effects of sample mass, atmosphere, and formulation on the resulting onset temperatures. Result from the two techniques were compared and a method for extrapolating these results to large-scale inventories was proposed. 22 refs., 4 tabs., 14 figs.

  15. Background on the commercial explosive chosen for the non-proliferation experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mammele, M.E.

    1994-12-31

    The requirements of the Chemical Kiloton Experiment as outlined in the original explosives bid package provided DYNO NOBEL/Alpha-Ireco, Inc. with a unique challenge. The size of the chamber, the total volume of explosives required, the chemical energy equivalent of one kiloton, the time-frame of loading the chamber, transportation, safety, were all necessary considerations in choosing this particular explosive. The rationale for choosing this particular emulsion/ANFO blend of blasting agent explosive will be presented. DYNO NOBEL INC in-house theoretical predictions as to the explosive performance potential of the blasting agent will be compared to some of the actual data acquired upon detonation. The results of this type of experiment may provide new insight as to the efficiency of the energy release of typical commercial explosives.

  16. Multipurpose Sediment Passive Sampler with Improved Tissue Mimicry to Measure the Bioavailable Fraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-01

    run by HPLC- DAD . There was a linear relationship between the RDX found in the extract and the amount in the solution (Figures 11 and 12, Raw data can...TNT had occurred in the reaction solution. Moreover, the anion is reactive and can form Meisenheimer complexes with electron rich compounds...The poor recovery was determined to be due to the desorption step since it was found that the samplers efficiently extracted the metals from solution

  17. Research@ARL. Volume 4, Issue 1, November 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    devices has not met expectations. This is due primarily to an incomplete understanding of their electronic processes, for example, their complex band...fact, able to distinguish RDX from non-explosive materials. For example, ARL found that the molecular formation and subsequent decay of cyanide (a...and robustness to challenging tactical communication environments that may include complex (e.g., urban or mountainous) terrain or RF congestion or

  18. Validation of Passive Sampling Devices for Monitoring of Munitions Constituents in Underwater Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    and sampling handling was met. All calibration criteria and instrument maintenance was met for all final reported data. 23 3.2 QUALITATIVE ...the relatively large size of each sampling box within the grid, there were no issues associated with locating appropriate anchoring locations, based...quantiative, as only estimated sampling rates were available, or spiked recoveries were lower suggesting the results are qualitative . TNT RDX ADNTs

  19. Pacific Operational Science and Technology Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-07-17

    fluxgate magnetometer for use in multiple COCOMs. To continue T&E with joint services and apply lessons learned to provide wide range of surveillance...Foreign Partners Advanced Dynamic Magnetometer for Static and Moving Applications (US Navy (SPAWAR)) To develop a compact and inexpensive micro...loy VTOL UAV - Identifies Targets - VIS/LWIR Imager - 3D Ladar - Magnetometer - MMW Designator - Tasks Lethal UAVs Loitering Lethal UAVs - RDX

  20. Spontaneous Energy Concentration in Energetic Molecules, Interfaces and Composites: Response to Ultrasound and THz Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-21

    crystals or crystalline composites. One crystal had a slippery surface coating and the other did not. The coated ammonium nitrate , RDX and PBX...vibrational spectroscopies and time-resolved thermal imaging microscopy. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Ultrasound, THz radiation, energetic materials, hot spots, energy...studying fast processes at interfaces. 3. At the level of bulk materials, we developed a high-speed thermal imaging microscope apparatus.15󈧔

  1. Validation of Passive Sampling Devices for Monitoring of Munitions Constituents in Underwater Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    TNT TOC TSS Low Order Detonation Munitions constituents Munitions Debris Method Detection Limit Munitions and explosives of concern Mean low...Total organic carbon ( TOC ) and grain size distribution from stations A1, T10, T11, and T12 at BSS...16 syringes/stn) TNT, ADNTs, DNTs, RDX 4 locations in BSS based on positive POCIS results Sediment 5 TOC , grain size 4, co-located with sediment

  2. Managing Chemical & Material Risks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    Certification Program Acquisition, Technology and Logistics 9 DoD Hexavalent Chromium Risk Reduction Non- Chrome Primer II EXAVAJ ENT CHROM lrUMI...Royal Demolition eXplosive (RDX) • Cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine  Hexavalent Chromium (Cr6+) Naphthalene …pending downgrade to watch list Beryllium...T1me (secondo) 700 Acquisition, Technology and Logistics 10 Hexavalent Chromium Risk Management Actions • DoD minimization policy signed April

  3. Emission Spectroscopy of the Interior of Optically Dense Post-Detonation Fireballs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    sample. Light from the fiber optics was sent to spectrograph located in a shielded observation room several meters away from the explosive charge. The...spectrograph was constructed from a 1/8 m spectrometer (Oriel) interfaced to a 4096 pixel line-scan camera (Basler Sprint ) with a data collection rate... 400 ) 45 4000 (200) … FIG. 3. Time-resolved emission spectra obtained from detonation of 20 g charges of RDX containing 20 wt. % aluminum nanoparticles

  4. Development Of An In Situ Passive Sampler For The Detection And Remediation of Explosive Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-07

    including high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCMS) and isotope ratio mass spectrometry ( IRMS ) as...GCMS) and isotope ratio mass spectrometry ( IRMS ) as summarized in St. George et al., 2010 and Smith et al., 2013, 2014. Depuration rates will be...TNT and RDX for the depuration compounds and unlabeled compounds in the ambient environment. These will be quantified as above by GCMS and IRMS . 2015

  5. Role of NADPH-insensitive nitroreductase gene to metronidazole resistance of Helicobacter pylori strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Kargar

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and the purpose of the study: Current anti-H. pylori therapies are based on the use of two antibiotics with a proton pump inhibitor and/or a bismuth component. Metronidazole is a key component of such combination therapies in Iran. The aim of this study was to determine the role of rdxA gene in resistant strains of H. pylori isolated from Shahrekord Hajar hospital to metronidazole. Methods: This study was a cross-sectional method, which was carried out on 263 patients who referred to endoscopy department of Hajar hospital, in 2007. Biopsy samples were cultured on selective Brucella agar containing 10% blood and incubated under microerophilic condition at 370C for 3 - 7 days. Suspected colonies were tested by Gram staining, urease, oxidase and catalase activities. Organisms were confirmed to be H. pylori on the basis of the presence of ureC(glmM gene by PCR .Specific primers were used for detection of rdxA gene mutation . Results: Eighty and four strains of H. pylori determined by PCR method. Of the isolated strains, 49 (58.33% were resistant, 7 (8.33% were semi-sensitive to metronidazole and 200bp deletion in rdxA gene was observed in 2 strains. Conclusion: Because of the high metronidazole resistance in patients under study it was necessary to replace it by other antibiotics in therapeutic regimens. On the basis of low frequency of resistance mutation in rdxA gene, sequence analysis for identification of other mechanisms is suggested.

  6. Development of a remediation strategy for surface soils contaminated with energetic materials by thermal processes: Phases 1, 2 and 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-11-01

    aerobic and thermophilic (55 to 60°C) conditions, which foster the growth of microorganisms. Bulking agents, such as cow manure and vegetable waste and...streams. In bench-scale testing, the EPA National Exposure Research Laboratory in Athens, GA, has identified a plant nitroreductase enzyme shown to...degrade TNT, RDX and HMX in concert with other plant enzymes . An immunoassay test has been developed that identifies nitroreductase activity in a

  7. Workshop Report: Fundamental Reactions in Solid Propellant Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-05-01

    combustion conditions. 6. What effect might a pressure-induced phase transition to a polymorph other than 6- HMX have on the pressure slope break during...pure HMX as well. Nevertheless, it is recommended that the high pressure polymorphs of HMX and RDX be determined. It was also felt that there...plateau burning phenomena E. Solid phase, surface, gas phase reactions F. Phase transitions : melting, vaporization, polymorphs G. Flame

  8. Aluminum Agglomeration and Trajectory in Solid Rocket Motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-08-30

    34the stepwise oxidation of aluminum (that) is caused by the sequence of polymorphic phase transitions occurring in the growing oxide film",2 5 . 25...C. and Yang, V., "Analysis of RDX Monopropellant Combustion with Two-Phase Subsurface Reactions", Journal of Propulsion and Power, Vol. 11, No. 4...temperature. Generalized mechanisms have been developed and applied to many ingredients such as HMX , GAP, NG, BTTN, ADN and AP.10 The burning rates of

  9. Identification and optimization of classifier genes from multi-class earthworm microarray dataset.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Li

    Full Text Available Monitoring, assessment and prediction of environmental risks that chemicals pose demand rapid and accurate diagnostic assays. A variety of toxicological effects have been associated with explosive compounds TNT and RDX. One important goal of microarray experiments is to discover novel biomarkers for toxicity evaluation. We have developed an earthworm microarray containing 15,208 unique oligo probes and have used it to profile gene expression in 248 earthworms exposed to TNT, RDX or neither. We assembled a new machine learning pipeline consisting of several well-established feature filtering/selection and classification techniques to analyze the 248-array dataset in order to construct classifier models that can separate earthworm samples into three groups: control, TNT-treated, and RDX-treated. First, a total of 869 genes differentially expressed in response to TNT or RDX exposure were identified using a univariate statistical algorithm of class comparison. Then, decision tree-based algorithms were applied to select a subset of 354 classifier genes, which were ranked by their overall weight of significance. A multiclass support vector machine (MC-SVM method and an unsupervised K-mean clustering method were applied to independently refine the classifier, producing a smaller subset of 39 and 30 classifier genes, separately, with 11 common genes being potential biomarkers. The combined 58 genes were considered the refined subset and used to build MC-SVM and clustering models with classification accuracy of 83.5% and 56.9%, respectively. This study demonstrates that the machine learning approach can be used to identify and optimize a small subset of classifier/biomarker genes from high dimensional datasets and generate classification models of acceptable precision for multiple classes.

  10. Engineering of an Extremely Thermostable Alpha/Beta Barrel Scaffold to Serve as a High Affinity Molecular Recognition Element for Use in Sensor Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-23

    Molecular Recognition Element For Use in Sensor Applications Report Title The overall goal of the project was to evolve a highly thermostable enzyme ( alcohol ...SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: The overall goal of the project was to evolve a highly thermostable enzyme ( alcohol dehydrogenase D (AdhD) from Pyrococcus...furiosus) to bind an explosive molecule, RDX. The enzyme naturally catalyzes the nicotinamide cofactor-dependent oxidation or reduction of alcohols

  11. Utilizing the Power of Nanostructures to Their Fullest Capability in Energetic Formulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-01

    Fujihisa H, Honda K, Obata S, Yamawaki H, Takeya S, Gotoh Y, Matsunaga T. Crystal structure of anhydrous 5-aminotetrazole and its high-pressure behavior...multiple objective evolutionary strategies (MOES). Part 1: ReaxFF models for cyclotrimethylene trinitramine (RDX) and 1,1-diamino-2,2-dinitroethene...complex reactive force fields using multiple objective evolutionary strategies (MOES): Part 2: transferability of ReaxFF models to C-H-N-O

  12. Field Demonstration and Validation of TREECS and CTS for the Risk Assessment of Contaminants on Department of Defense Ranges

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-01

    inputs USGS United States Geological Survey USLE Universal Soil Loss Equation USMA United States Military Academy UXO unexploded ordnance...Firing Ranges, rainfall factor in the USLE 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF a. REPORT b.ABSTRACT c. THlSPAGE ABSTRACT u u u u 18...NGVD). ................................... 25 Figure 10. Computed and Observed RDX Soil Concentrations at MMR Demo Area 2. ............. 27 Figure 11

  13. Ecological Risk Assessment of Perchlorate in Avian Species, Rodents, Amphibians and Fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-08-01

    nutritional physiology. Vet. Res. Commun. 8:77–91. Lee S-Y, Brodman BW. 2004. Biodegradation of 1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX). Journal of...laevis (African clawed frog) Strain: Outbred Age: embryo/Larvae/Adults Source: All of Xenopus used in this proposal were bred from captive stocks...Laboratory studies have shown that PAHs may stimulate the induction of hepatic monooxygenase activity in birds , although PAHs are rapidly metabolized, and

  14. Characterization and remediation of Soil Contaminated with Explosives: Development of Practical Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-07-06

    typically used as a surfactant allowing an increased pollutant bioavailability in various bioremediation treatment processes. In the particular case... Bioremediation f. 2000, 4, 27-39. (25) Hawari, J.In Biodegradation ofNitroaromatic Compounds and Explosives; Spain, J. C., Hughes, J. B., Knackmuss, H.-J...terrestrial plants such as sunflower and sanfroin. Significant sublethal effects of RDX were observed on the reproduction of earthworm Eisenia

  15. FY90 R&D Project Descriptions ESL (Engineering & Services Laboratory) Environics Division

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-07-01

    nutrient demand and potential adverse reactions. Alternatives to ammonlum chloride and sodium phosphate nutrient formulas may reduce adverse side...RDX1, 2,4,6-trinltrotoluene [TNT], and l,l-dimethylhydrazine [ UDMH ]) will be dissolved or slurried in water or dissolved in an organic solvent. The...which will include measurement of NOx in the feed to the reactor and in the exhaust. Variables will include the temperature and particulate density of

  16. Non-hemodynamic effects of organic nitrates and the distinctive characteristics of pentaerithrityl tetranitrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gori, Tommaso; Daiber, Andreas

    2009-01-01

    Organic nitrates are among the oldest and yet most commonly employed drugs in the long-term therapy of coronary artery disease and congestive heart failure. While they have long been used in clinical practice, our understanding of their mechanism of action and side effects remains incomplete. For instance, recent findings provide evidence of previously unanticipated, non-hemodynamic properties that include potentially beneficial mechanisms (such as the induction of a protective phenotype that mimics ischemic preconditioning), but also toxic effects (such as endothelial and autonomic dysfunction, rebound angina, tolerance). To date, the most commonly employed organic nitrates are isosorbide mononitrate, isosorbide dinitrate, and nitroglycerin (glyceryl trinitrate). Another organic nitrate, pentaerithrityl tetranitrate (PETN), has long been employed in eastern European countries and is currently being reintroduced in Western countries. In light of their wide use, and of the (re)introduction of PETN in Western markets, the present review focuses on the novel effects of organic nitrates, describing their potential clinical implications and discussing differences among different compounds. We believe that these recent findings have important clinical implications. Since the side effects of organic nitrates such as nitroglycerin and isosorbides appear to be mediated by reactive oxygen species, care should be taken that drugs with antioxidant properties are co-administered. On the other hand, efforts should be made to clinically exploit the preconditioning effects of these drugs.

  17. Characteristics of a New Plastic Explosive Named EPX-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Elbeih

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available EPX-1 is a new plastic explosive (in the research stage which has been prepared for military and civilian applications. EPX-1 explosive contains pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN with different particle size as explosive filler bonded by nonenergetic thermoplastic binder plasticized by dibutyl phthalate (DBP. In this paper, the production method of EPX-1 was described. The crystal morphology was studied by scanning electron microscope (SEM. Heat of combustion was determined experimentally. The compatibility of PETN with the polymeric matrix was studied by vacuum stability test. Sensitivities to impact and friction were measured. The detonation velocity was measured experimentally and the detonation characteristics were calculated by EXPLO5 thermodynamic code. For comparison, Semtex 1A, Semtex 10, Formex P1, and Sprängdeg m/46 were studied. It was concluded that PEX-1 has compatible ingredients, it has the highest detonation velocity of all the studied plastic explosives, and its sensitivity is in the same level of the studied plastic explosives except Semtex 1A.

  18. A novel plasmid-encoded serotype conversion mechanism through addition of phosphoethanolamine to the O-antigen of Shigella flexneri.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiangzheng Sun

    Full Text Available Shigella flexneri is the major pathogen causing bacillary dysentery in developing countries. S. flexneri is divided into at least 16 serotypes based on the combination of antigenic determinants present in the O-antigen. All the serotypes (except for serotype 6 share a basic O-unit containing one N-acetyl-d-glucosamine and three l-rhamnose residues, whereas differences between the serotypes are conferred by phage-encoded glucosylation and/or O-acetylation. Serotype Xv is a newly emerged and the most prevalent serotype in China, which can agglutinate with both MASF IV-1 and 7,8 monoclonal antibodies. The factor responsible for the presence of MASF IV-1 (E1037 epitope has not yet been identified. In this study, we analyzed the LPS structure of serotype Xv strains and found that the MASF IV-1 positive phenotype depends on an O-antigen modification with a phosphoethanolamine (PEtN group attached at position 3 of one of the rhamnose residues. A plasmid carried gene, lpt-O (LPS phosphoethanolamine transferase for O-antigen, mediates the addition of PEtN for serotype Xv and other MASF IV-1 positive strains. These findings reveal a novel serotype conversion mechanism in S. flexneri and show the necessity of further extension of the serotype classification scheme recognizing the MASF IV-1 positive strains as distinctive subtypes.

  19. Thermal hazard assessment of AN and AN-based explosives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turcotte, R; Lightfoot, P D; Fouchard, R; Jones, D E G

    2003-07-04

    Ammonium nitrate (AN) is an essential ingredient in most fertilizers. It is also widely used in the commercial explosives industry. In this latter application, it is mostly mixed with fuel oil to form the most popular commercial explosive: ANFO. In both the fertilizer and the explosive industry, aqueous AN solutions (ANS) of various concentrations are processed. These solutions also form the basis of ammonium nitrate emulsion explosives (also called ammonium nitrate emulsions or ANE), which are produced either in bulk or in packaged form. For all these AN-based products, quantities of the order of 20,000kg are being manufactured, transported, stored, and processed at elevated temperatures and/or elevated pressures. Correspondingly, major accidents involving overheating of large quantities of these products have happened in several of these operations. In comparison, convenient laboratory quantities to investigate thermal decomposition properties are generally less than 1kg. As a result, in order to provide information applicable to real-life situations, any laboratory study must use techniques that minimize heat losses from the samples to their environment. In the present study, two laboratory-scale calorimeters providing an adiabatic environment were used: an accelerating rate calorimeter (ARC) and an adiabatic Dewar calorimeter (ADC). Experiments were performed on pure AN, ANFO, various ANS systems, and typical bulk and packaged ANE systems. The effects of sample mass, atmosphere, and formulation on the resulting onset temperatures were studied. A comparison of the results from the two techniques is provided and a proposed method to extrapolate these results to large-scale inventories is examined.

  20. Logistics and preparations for the NPE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, P.J.; Miller, J.W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The purpose of this experiment was to simulate a one kiloton nuclear explosion using chemical explosives and try to differentiate the seismic signatures generated from that of previous nuclear detonations. In order to duplicate the geology of nuclear detonations this experiment was carried out in the {open_quotes}N{close_quotes} Tunnel complex at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). This location was particularly appropriate since data is available from previous nearby nuclear events for comparison with data to be collected from the Chemical Kiloton (CKT) Experiment. We operated on a non-interference basis with test program activities. A total of 2.9 million pounds of blasting agent was detonated using five 5 pound Pentolite booster charges, each initiated by a high energy Exploding Bridge Wire (EBW) detonator. The blasting agent consisting of a 50/50 emulsion ANFO mixture; the emulsion being an ammonium nitrate water mixture, and ANFO being an ammonium nitrate fuel oil mixture. The explosive was emplaced at the end of a newly mined drift, designated U12n.25, which branched off an existing drift in {open_quotes}N{close_quotes} Tunnel, U12n.23. A cavity was mined at the end of U12n.25 and instrumented with arrays of Continuous Reflectometry for Radius Versus Time (CORRTEX) cables, thermocouples, and pressure measuring instrumentation for both scientific and safety monitoring purposes. Additional instrumentation, external to the cavity, was installed in several tunnel locations, as well as locations external to the tunnel, and on Ranier Mesa above the point of detonation. More distant measurements were made at various permanently installed seismic stations across the country, as well as at some international locations. In particular, an attempt was made to coordinate this detonation with the National Science Foundation fielding of a seismic array emplaced by Duke University in the southern Sierra-Nevada mountain range (Nevada & California) during mid-September of 1993.

  1. Shock initiation sensitivity and Hugoniot-based equation of state of Composition B obtained using in situ electromagnetic gauging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibson, L L; Bartram, B D; Sheffield, S A; Gustavsen, R L; Brown, G W; Sandstrom, M M; Giambra, A M; Dattelbaum, D M; Handley, C A

    2014-01-01

    A series of gas gun-driven plate impact experiments were performed on vacuum melt-cast Composition B to obtain new Hugoniot states and shock sensitivity (run-distance-to-detonation) information. The Comp B (ρ 0 = 1.713 g/cm 3 ) consisted of 59.5% RDX, 39.5% TNT, and 1% wax, with ∼ 6.5% HMX in the RDX. The measured Hugoniot states were found to be consistent with earlier reports, with the compressibility on the shock adiabat softer than that of a 63% RDX material reported by Marsh.[4] The shock sensitivity was found to be more sensitive (shorter run distance to detonation at a given shock input condition) than earlier reports for Comp B-3 and a lower density (1.68-1.69 g/cm 3 ) Comp B formulation. The reactive flow during the shock-to-detonation transition was marked by heterogeneous, hot spot-driven growth both in and behind the leading shock front.

  2. CLIC5 stabilizes membrane-actin filament linkages at the base of hair cell stereocilia in a molecular complex with radixin, taperin, and myosin VI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salles, Felipe T; Andrade, Leonardo R; Tanda, Soichi; Grati, M'hamed; Plona, Kathleen L; Gagnon, Leona H; Johnson, Kenneth R; Kachar, Bechara; Berryman, Mark A

    2014-01-01

    Chloride intracellular channel 5 protein (CLIC5) was originally isolated from microvilli in complex with actin binding proteins including ezrin, a member of the Ezrin-Radixin-Moesin (ERM) family of membrane-cytoskeletal linkers. CLIC5 concentrates at the base of hair cell stereocilia and is required for normal hearing and balance in mice, but its functional significance is poorly understood. This study investigated the role of CLIC5 in postnatal development and maintenance of hair bundles. Confocal and scanning electron microscopy of CLIC5-deficient jitterbug (jbg) mice revealed progressive fusion of stereocilia as early as postnatal day 10. Radixin (RDX), protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor Q (PTPRQ), and taperin (TPRN), deafness-associated proteins that also concentrate at the base of stereocilia, were mislocalized in fused stereocilia of jbg mice. TPRQ and RDX were dispersed even prior to stereocilia fusion. Biochemical assays showed interaction of CLIC5 with ERM proteins, TPRN, and possibly myosin VI (MYO6). In addition, CLIC5 and RDX failed to localize normally in fused stereocilia of MYO6 mutant mice. Based on these findings, we propose a model in which these proteins work together as a complex to stabilize linkages between the plasma membrane and subjacent actin cytoskeleton at the base of stereocilia. © Published 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. This article is a US government work and, as such, is in the public domain in the United States of America.

  3. Yield Stress Model for Molten Composition B-3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Stephen; Zerkle, David

    2017-06-01

    Composition B-3 (Comp B-3) is a melt-castable explosive composed of 60/40 wt% RDX/TNT (hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine/2,4,6-trinitrotoluene). During casting operations thermal conditions are controlled which along with the low melting point of TNT and the insensitivity of the mixture to external stimuli leading to safe use. Outside these standard operating conditions a more rigorous model of Comp B-3 rheological properties is necessary to model thermal transport as Comp B-3 evolves from quiescent solid through vaporization/decomposition upon heating. One particular rheological phenomena of interest is Bingham plasticity, where a material behaves as a quiescent solid unless a sufficient load is applied, resulting in fluid flow. In this study falling ball viscometer data is used to model the change in Bingham plastic yield stresses as a function of RDX particle volume fraction; a function of temperature. Results show the yield stress of Comp B-3 (τy) follows the expression τy = B ϕ -ϕc N , where Φ and Φc are the volume fraction of RDX and a critical volume fraction, respectively and B and N are experimentally evaluated constants.

  4. Isotopic measurements (C,N,O) of detonation soot produced from labeled and unlabeled Composition B-3 indicate source of solid carbon residues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podlesak, David; Manner, Virginia; Amato, Ronald; Dattelbaum, Dana; Gusavsen, Richard; Huber, Rachel

    2017-06-01

    Detonation of HE is an exothermic process whereby metastable complex molecules are converted to simple stable molecules such as H2 O, N2, CO, CO2, and solid carbon. The solid carbon contains various allotropes such as detonation nanodiamonds, graphite, and amorphous carbon. It is well known that certain HE formulations such as Composition B (60% RDX, 40% TNT) produce greater amounts of solid carbon than other more oxygen-balanced formulations. To develop a greater understanding of how formulation and environment influence solid carbon formation, we synthesized TNT and RDX with 13 C and 15 N at levels slightly above natural abundance levels. Synthesized RDX and TNT were mixed at a ratio of 60:40 to form Composition B and solid carbon residues were collected from detonations of isotopically-labeled as well as un-labelled Composition B. The raw HE and detonation residues were analyzed isotopically for C, N, O isotopic compositions. We will discuss differences between treatments groups as a function of formulation and environment. LA-UR - 17-21266.

  5. Photoactive energetic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavez, David E.; Hanson, Susan Kloek; Scharff, Robert Jason; Veauthier, Jacqueline Marie; Myers, Thomas Winfield

    2018-02-27

    Energetic materials that are photoactive or believed to be photoactive may include a conventional explosive (e.g. PETN, nitroglycerine) derivatized with an energetic UV-absorbing and/or VIS-absorbing chromophore such as 1,2,4,5-tetrazine or 1,3,5-triazine. Absorption of laser light having a suitably chosen wavelength may result in photodissociation, decomposition, and explosive release of energy. These materials may be used as ligands to form complexes. Coordination compounds include such complexes with counterions. Some having the formula M(L).sub.n.sup.2+ were synthesized, wherein M is a transition metal and L is a ligand and n is 2 or 3. These may be photoactive upon exposure to a laser light beam having an appropriate wavelength of UV light, near-IR and/or visible light. Photoactive materials also include coordination compounds bearing non-energetic ligands; in this case, the counterion may be an oxidant such as perchlorate.

  6. Dynamic response of single hexagonal LMFBR core subassembly wrappers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ash, J. E.; Marciniak, T. J.; (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States))

    1977-07-01

    To analyze the dynamic structural response of the LMFBR core subassembly hexagonal wrappers to postulated local energy releases and the sensitivity of the response to variations in both the pressure loading and the material properties of the stainless steel, a finite-element computer code STRAW has been developed. A series of experiments was performed to study the effects of variations in material properties. The amount of coldworking to which the Type 316 stainless steel is subjected has a strong influence upon the ductility and the elastic yield point. The usual fabrication process produced a nominally 20% coldworking with a yield point of about 680 MPa. By designing a special set of dies for the drawing process, a very low ductility hexcan was produced for which the yield point was raised to 820 MPa. Conversely, the yield point was lowered to 170 MPa by a solution annealing process producing a highly ductile test hexcan. A metallurgical study was conducted to find a representative brittle simulant material for the irradiated end-of-life steel properties. An aging treatment for Type 446 stainless steel was developed which reproduced the expected tensile-flow behavior of the in-pile subassembly. Further study is underway to investigate the fracture properties of the simulant material. The pressure pulses were generated by the controlled expansion of high-pressure detonation poducts from low-density explosives detonated inside a vented steel cannister. The orifice configuration of the cannister and the charge mixture ratio were designed to produce two specified pulse shapes. A charge containing 37,7 g PETN mixed with 35 wt % inert, hollow-glass microballoons developed a pressure pulse peak of 9.5 MPa at 1.0 ms. Increasing the PETN to 41 g resulted in a 14.6 MPa peak pressure, and increasing the explosive concentration to 90 wt % in the mixture increased the burning rate and the pulse risetime, so that the peak occurred at 0.6 ms.

  7. Organic Nitrate Therapy, Nitrate Tolerance, and Nitrate-Induced Endothelial Dysfunction: Emphasis on Redox Biology and Oxidative Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Organic nitrates, such as nitroglycerin (GTN), isosorbide-5-mononitrate and isosorbide dinitrate, and pentaerithrityl tetranitrate (PETN), when given acutely, have potent vasodilator effects improving symptoms in patients with acute and chronic congestive heart failure, stable coronary artery disease, acute coronary syndromes, or arterial hypertension. The mechanisms underlying vasodilation include the release of •NO or a related compound in response to intracellular bioactivation (for GTN, the mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase [ALDH-2]) and activation of the enzyme, soluble guanylyl cyclase. Increasing cyclic guanosine-3′,-5′-monophosphate (cGMP) levels lead to an activation of the cGMP-dependent kinase I, thereby causing the relaxation of the vascular smooth muscle by decreasing intracellular calcium concentrations. The hemodynamic and anti-ischemic effects of organic nitrates are rapidly lost upon long-term (low-dose) administration due to the rapid development of tolerance and endothelial dysfunction, which is in most cases linked to increased intracellular oxidative stress. Enzymatic sources of reactive oxygen species under nitrate therapy include mitochondria, NADPH oxidases, and an uncoupled •NO synthase. Acute high-dose challenges with organic nitrates cause a similar loss of potency (tachyphylaxis), but with distinct pathomechanism. The differences among organic nitrates are highlighted regarding their potency to induce oxidative stress and subsequent tolerance and endothelial dysfunction. We also address pleiotropic effects of organic nitrates, for example, their capacity to stimulate antioxidant pathways like those demonstrated for PETN, all of which may prevent adverse effects in response to long-term therapy. Based on these considerations, we will discuss and present some preclinical data on how the nitrate of the future should be designed. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 23, 899–942. PMID:26261901

  8. Synthesis of a new energetic nitrate ester

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chavez, David E [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    Nitrate esters have been known as useful energetic materials since the discovery of nitroglycerin by Ascanio Sobrero in 1846. The development of methods to increase the safety and utility of nitroglycerin by Alfred Nobel led to the revolutionary improvement in the utility of nitroglycerin in explosive applications in the form of dynamite. Since then, many nitrate esters have been prepared and incorporated into military applications such as double-based propellants, detonators and as energetic plasticizers. Nitrate esters have also been shown to have vasodilatory effects in humans and thus have been studied and used for treatments of ailments such as angina. The mechanism of the biological response towards nitrate esters has been elucidated recently. Interestingly, many of the nitrate esters used for military purposes are liquids (ethylene glycol dinitrate, propylene glycol dinitrate, etc). Pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) is one of the only solid nitrate esters, besides nitrocellulose, that is used in any application. Unfortunately, PETN melting point is above 100 {sup o}C, and thus must be pressed as a solid for detonator applications. A more practical material would be a melt-castable explosive, for potential simplification of manufacturing processes. Herein we describe the synthesis of a new energetic nitrate ester (1) that is a solid at ambient temperatures, has a melting point of 85-86 {sup o}C and has the highest density of any known nitrate ester composed only of carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen and oxygen. We also describe the chemical, thermal and sensitivity properties of 1 as well as some preliminary explosive performance data.

  9. Organic Nitrate Therapy, Nitrate Tolerance, and Nitrate-Induced Endothelial Dysfunction: Emphasis on Redox Biology and Oxidative Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daiber, Andreas; Münzel, Thomas

    2015-10-10

    Organic nitrates, such as nitroglycerin (GTN), isosorbide-5-mononitrate and isosorbide dinitrate, and pentaerithrityl tetranitrate (PETN), when given acutely, have potent vasodilator effects improving symptoms in patients with acute and chronic congestive heart failure, stable coronary artery disease, acute coronary syndromes, or arterial hypertension. The mechanisms underlying vasodilation include the release of •NO or a related compound in response to intracellular bioactivation (for GTN, the mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase [ALDH-2]) and activation of the enzyme, soluble guanylyl cyclase. Increasing cyclic guanosine-3',-5'-monophosphate (cGMP) levels lead to an activation of the cGMP-dependent kinase I, thereby causing the relaxation of the vascular smooth muscle by decreasing intracellular calcium concentrations. The hemodynamic and anti-ischemic effects of organic nitrates are rapidly lost upon long-term (low-dose) administration due to the rapid development of tolerance and endothelial dysfunction, which is in most cases linked to increased intracellular oxidative stress. Enzymatic sources of reactive oxygen species under nitrate therapy include mitochondria, NADPH oxidases, and an uncoupled •NO synthase. Acute high-dose challenges with organic nitrates cause a similar loss of potency (tachyphylaxis), but with distinct pathomechanism. The differences among organic nitrates are highlighted regarding their potency to induce oxidative stress and subsequent tolerance and endothelial dysfunction. We also address pleiotropic effects of organic nitrates, for example, their capacity to stimulate antioxidant pathways like those demonstrated for PETN, all of which may prevent adverse effects in response to long-term therapy. Based on these considerations, we will discuss and present some preclinical data on how the nitrate of the future should be designed.

  10. Characterization of nitrated sugar alcohols by atmospheric-pressure chemical-ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrinskaya, Alla; Kelley, Jude A; Kunz, Roderick R

    2017-02-28

    The nitrated sugar alcohols mannitol hexanitrate (MHN), sorbitol hexanitrate (SHN) and xylitol pentanitrate (XPN) are in the same class of compounds as the powerful military-grade explosive pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) and the homemade explosive erythritol tetranitrate (ETN) but, unlike for PETN and ETN, ways to detect MHN, SHN and XPN by mass spectrometry (MS) have not been fully investigated. Atmospheric-pressure chemical-ionization mass spectrometry (APCI-MS) was used to detect ions characteristic of nitrated sugar alcohols. APCI time-of-flight mass spectrometry (APCI-TOF MS) and collision-induced dissociation tandem mass spectrometry (CID MS/MS) were used for confirmation of each ion assignment. In addition, the use of the chemical ionization reagent dichloromethane was investigated to improve sensitivity and selectivity for detection of MHN, SHN and XPN. All the nitrated sugar alcohols studied followed similar fragmentation pathways in the APCI source. MHN, SHN and XPN were detectable as fragment ions formed by the loss of NO 2 , HNO 2 , NO 3 , and CH 2 NO 2 groups, and in the presence of dichloromethane chlorinated adduct ions were observed. It was determined that in MS/MS mode, chlorinated adducts of MHN and SHN had the lowest limits of detection (LODs), while for XPN the lowest LOD was for the [XPN-NO 2 ] - fragment ion. Partially nitrated analogs of each of the three compounds were also present in the starting materials, and ions attributable to these compounds versus those formed from in-source fragmentation of MHN, SHN, and XPN were distinguished and assigned using liquid chromatography APCI-MS and ESI-MS. The APCI-MS technique provides a selective and sensitive method for the detection of nitrated sugar alcohols. The methods disclosed here will benefit the area of explosives trace detection for counterterrorism and forensics. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Ultraviolet Resonant Raman Enhancements in the Detection of Explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Short Jr., Billy Joe [Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, CA (United States)

    2009-06-01

    Raman-based spectroscopy is potentially militarily useful for standoff detection of high explosives. Normal (non-resonance) and resonance Raman spectroscopies are both light scattering techniques that use a laser to measure the vibrational spectrum of a sample. In resonance Raman, the laser is tuned to match the wavelength of a strong electronic absorbance in the molecule of interest, whereas, in normal Raman the laser is not tuned to any strong electronic absorbance bands. The selection of appropriate excitation wavelengths in resonance Raman can result in a dramatic increase in the Raman scattering efficiency of select band(s) associated with the electronic transition. Other than the excitation wavelength, however, resonance Raman is performed experimentally the same as normal Raman. In these studies, normal and resonance Raman spectral signatures of select solid high explosive (HE) samples and explosive precursors were collected at 785 nm, 244 nm and 229 nm. Solutions of PETN, TNT, and explosive precursors (DNT & PNT) in acetonitrile solvent as an internal Raman standard were quantitatively evaluated using ultraviolet resonance Raman (UVRR) microscopy and normal Raman spectroscopy as a function of power and select excitation wavelengths. Use of an internal standard allowed resonance enhancements to be estimated at 229 nm and 244 nm. Investigations demonstrated that UVRR provided ~2000-fold enhancement at 244 nm and ~800-fold improvement at 229 nm while PETN showed a maximum of ~25-fold at 244 nm and ~190-fold enhancement at 229 nm solely from resonance effects when compared to normal Raman measurements. In addition to the observed resonance enhancements, additional Raman signal enhancements are obtained with ultraviolet excitation (i.e., Raman scattering scales as !4 for measurements based on scattered photons). A model, based partly on the resonance Raman enhancement results for HE solutions, is presented for estimating Raman enhancements for solid HE samples.

  12. Simulation Study of Near-Surface Coupling of Nuclear Devices vs. Equivalent High-Explosive Charges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fournier, Kevin B [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Walton, Otis R [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Benjamin, Russ [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Dunlop, William H [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-09-29

    A computational study was performed to examine the differences in near-surface ground-waves and air-blast waves generated by high-explosive energy sources and those generated by much higher energy - density low - yield nuclear sources. The study examined the effect of explosive-source emplacement (i.e., height-of-burst, HOB, or depth-of-burial, DOB) over a range from depths of -35m to heights of 20m, for explosions with an explosive yield of 1-kt . The chemical explosive was modeled by a JWL equation-of-state model for a ~14m diameter sphere of ANFO (~1,200,000kg – 1 k t equivalent yield ), and the high-energy-density source was modeled as a one tonne (1000 kg) plasma of ‘Iron-gas’ (utilizing LLNL’s tabular equation-of-state database, LEOS) in a 2m diameter sphere, with a total internal-energy content equivalent to 1 k t . A consistent equivalent-yield coupling-factor approach was developed to compare the behavior of the two sources. The results indicate that the equivalent-yield coupling-factor for air-blasts from 1 k t ANFO explosions varies monotonically and continuously from a nearly perfec t reflected wave off of the ground surface for a HOB ≈ 20m, to a coupling factor of nearly zero at DOB ≈ -25m. The nuclear air - blast coupling curve, on the other hand, remained nearly equal to a perfectly reflected wave all the way down to HOB’s very near zero, and then quickly dropped to a value near zero for explosions with a DOB ≈ -10m. The near - surface ground - wave traveling horizontally out from the explosive source region to distances of 100’s of meters exhibited equivalent - yield coupling - factors t hat varied nearly linearly with HOB/DOB for the simulated ANFO explosive source, going from a value near zero at HOB ≈ 5m to nearly one at DOB ≈ -25m. The nuclear-source generated near-surface ground wave coupling-factor remained near zero for almost all HOB’s greater than zero, and then appeared to vary nearly - linearly with depth

  13. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and paramagnetic resonance evidence for shock-induced intramolecular bond breaking in some energetic solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, F. J.; Sharma, J.

    1980-03-01

    Solid samples of 1,3,5, trinitro 1,3,5, triazacyclohexane (RDX), trinitrotoluene (TNT), and ammonium nitrate were subjected to shock pulses of strength and duration less than the threshold to cause detonation. The recovered shocked samples were studied by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). The results of these measurements indicate that the shock pulse either broke or altered the internal bonds of the molecules of the solid. The results of the shock decomposition are compared with measurements of the uv and slow thermal decomposition of these materials using the same experimental techniques.

  14. Combustion Mechanisms of Very High Burn Rate (VHBR) Propellant. Phase II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-09-01

    potassium salt of B10H1 2-. The Kraton slate and the Hycar slate both contain RDX as the oxidizer, while the PEG slate contains HMX and TAGN in the... polyacrylate (Hycar), hydroxy-terminated polybutadiene, and a mixture of styrene and ethylene-butylene (Kraton). As might be expected, when all else is equal...proprietary formulations of Teledyne-McCormick-Selph (TMS), designated H498 and H466. In H498, a potassium cation is utilized, while in H466, an

  15. Feature extraction using distribution representation for colorimetric sensor arrays used as explosives detectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alstrøm, Tommy Sonne; Raich, Raviv; Kostesha, Natalie

    2012-01-01

    is required. We present a new approach of extracting features from a colorimetric sensor array based on a color distribution representation. For each sensor in the array, we construct a K-nearest neighbor classifier based on the Hellinger distances between color distribution of a test compound and the color......We present a colorimetric sensor array which is able to detect explosives such as DNT, TNT, HMX, RDX and TATP and identifying volatile organic compounds in the presence of water vapor in air. To analyze colorimetric sensors with statistical methods, a suitable representation of sensory readings...

  16. Specific Heat of Octahydro - 1,3,5,7 - Tetranitro - 1,3,5,7 - Tetrazocine (HMX).

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    impurities probably consist of molecules of similar atomic weights as those present in the HMX molecule. Usually the major impurity in HMX is RDX (5...crystal and powdered blend HMX . Data beyond the normal transformation temperature (i.e. 0*6 transition ) were obtained from 472 to 486*K. Also, due to the...Cady, H.H.; Smith, L.C., "Studies on the Polymorphs of HMX ," Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory, Los Alamos, N.M., LAMS-2652, May 1962. (6) Brill, T.B

  17. Double-pulse standoff laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for versatile hazardous materials detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gottfried, Jennifer L. [U.S. Army Research Laboratory, AMSRD-ARL-WM-BD, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD, 21005-5069 (United States)], E-mail: jennifer.gottfried@arl.army.mil; De Lucia, Frank C.; Munson, Chase A.; Miziolek, Andrzej W. [U.S. Army Research Laboratory, AMSRD-ARL-WM-BD, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD, 21005-5069 (United States)

    2007-12-15

    We have developed a double-pulse standoff laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (ST-LIBS) system capable of detecting a variety of hazardous materials at tens of meters. The use of a double-pulse laser improves the sensitivity and selectivity of ST-LIBS, especially for the detection of energetic materials. In addition to various metallic and plastic materials, the system has been used to detect bulk explosives RDX and Composition-B, explosive residues, biological species such as the anthrax surrogate Bacillus subtilis, and chemical warfare simulants at 20 m. We have also demonstrated the discrimination of explosive residues from various interferents on an aluminum substrate.

  18. Compatibility study of trans-1,4,5,8-tetranitro-1,4,5,8-tetraazadecalin (TNAD) with some energetic components and inert materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Qilong; Li Xiaojiang; Zhang Laying; Li Jizhen; Li Hongli; Liu Ziru

    2008-01-01

    The compatibility of trans-1,4,5,8-tetranitro-1,4,5,8-tetraazadecalin (TNAD) with some energetic components and inert materials of solid propellants was studied by using the pressure DSC method where, cyclotetramethylenetetranitroamine (HMX), cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine (RDX), 1,4-dinitropiperazine (DNP), 1.25/1-NC/NG mixture, lead 3-nitro-1,2,4-triazol-5-onate (NTO-Pb), aluminum powder (Al, particle size = 13.6 μm) and N-nitrodihydroxyethylaminedinitrate (DINA) were used as energetic components and polyethylene glycol (PEG), polyoxytetramethylene-co-oxyethylene (PET), addition product of hexamethylene diisocyanate and water (N-100), 2-nitrodianiline (2-NDPA), 1,3-dimethyl-1,3-diphenyl urea (C 2 ), carbon black (C.B.), aluminum oxide (Al 2 O 3 ), cupric 2,4-dihydroxy-benzoate (β-Cu), cupric adipate (AD-Cu) and lead phthalate (φ-Pb) were used as inert materials. It was concluded that the binary systems of TNAD with NTO-Pb, RDX, PET and Al powder are compatible, and systems of TNAD with DINA and HMX are slightly sensitive, and with 2-NDPA, φ-Pb, β-Cu, AD-Cu and Al 2 O 3 are sensitive, and with PEG, N-100, C 2 and C.B. are incompatible. The impact and friction sensitivity data of the TNAD and TNAD in combination with the other energetic materials under present study was also obtained, and there was no consequential affiliation between sensitivity and compatibility

  19. Extending atomistic scale chemistry to mesoscale model of condensed-phase deflagration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Kaushik; Chaudhuri, Santanu

    2017-01-01

    Predictive simulations connecting chemistry that follow the shock or thermal initiation of energetic materials to subsequent deflagration or detonation events is currently outside the realm of possibilities. Molecular dynamics and first-principles based dynamics have made progress in understanding reactions in picosecond to nanosecond time scale. Results from thermal ignition of different phases of RDX show a complex reaction network and emergence of a deterministic behavior for critical temperature before ignition and hot spot growth rates. The kinetics observed is dependent on the hot spot temperature, system size and thermal conductivity. For cases where ignition is observed, the incubation period is dominated by intermolecular and intramolecular hydrogen transfer reactions. The gradual temperature and pressure increase in the incubation period is accompanied by accumulation of heavier polyradicals. The challenge of connecting such chemistry in mesoscale simulations remain in reducing the complexity of chemistry. The hot spot growth kinetics in RDX grains and interfaces is an important challenge for reactive simulations aiming to fill in the gaps in our knowledge in the nanoseconds to microseconds time scale. The results discussed indicate that the mesoscale chemistry may include large polyradical molecules in dense reactive mix reaching an instability point at certain temperatures and pressures.

  20. Monte Carlo calculations of the elastic moduli and pressure-volume-temperature equation of state for hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sewell, Thomas D.; Bennett, Carl M.

    2000-01-01

    Isothermal-isobaric Monte Carlo calculations were used to obtain predictions of the elastic coefficients and derived engineering moduli and Poisson ratios for crystalline hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX). The elastic coefficients were computed using the strain fluctuation formula due to Rahman and Parrinello [J. Chem. Phys. 76, 2662 (1982)]. Calculations were performed as a function of temperature (218 K≤T≤333 K) and hydrostatic pressure (0 GPa≤p≤4 GPa). The predicted values of the moduli and Poisson ratios under ambient conditions are in accord with general expectations for molecular crystals and with a very recent, unpublished determination for RDX. The moduli exhibit a sensitive pressure dependence whereas the Poisson ratios are relatively independent of pressure. The temperature dependence of the moduli is comparable to the precision of the results. However, the crystal does exhibit thermal softening for most pressures. An additional product of the calculations is information about the pressure-volume-temperature (pVT) equation of state. We obtain near-quantitative agreement with experiment for the case of hydrostatic compression and reasonable, but not quantitative, correspondence for thermal expansion. The results indicate a significant dependence of the thermal expansion coefficients on hydrostatic pressure. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics

  1. Chemical Selectivity and Sensitivity of a 16-Channel Electronic Nose for Trace Vapour Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drago Strle

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Good chemical selectivity of sensors for detecting vapour traces of targeted molecules is vital to reliable detection systems for explosives and other harmful materials. We present the design, construction and measurements of the electronic response of a 16 channel electronic nose based on 16 differential microcapacitors, which were surface-functionalized by different silanes. The e-nose detects less than 1 molecule of TNT out of 10+12 N2 molecules in a carrier gas in 1 s. Differently silanized sensors give different responses to different molecules. Electronic responses are presented for TNT, RDX, DNT, H2S, HCN, FeS, NH3, propane, methanol, acetone, ethanol, methane, toluene and water. We consider the number density of these molecules and find that silane surfaces show extreme affinity for attracting molecules of TNT, DNT and RDX. The probability to bind these molecules and form a surface-adsorbate is typically 10+7 times larger than the probability to bind water molecules, for example. We present a matrix of responses of differently functionalized microcapacitors and we propose that chemical selectivity of multichannel e-nose could be enhanced by using artificial intelligence deep learning methods.

  2. Studies on compatibility of energetic materials by thermal methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Alice Carvalho Mazzeu

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The chemical compatibility of explosives, pyrotechnics and propellants with those materials is studied to evaluate potential hazards when in contact with other materials during production, storage and handling. Compatibility can be studied by several thermal methods as DSC (differential scanning calorimetry, TG (Thermogravimetry, VST (Vacuum stability test and others. The test methods and well defined criteria are the most important elements when a compatibility study is being accomplished. In this paper, the compatibility of two very important high explosives used in ammunition, RDX (Cyclo-1,3,5-trimethylene-2,4,6-trinitramine and HMX (Cyclotetramethylene tetranitramine was studied with the materials: fluoroelastomer (Viton and powdered aluminum (Al, using DSC and VST methods. The criteria to judge the compatibility between materials is based on a standardization agreement (STANAG 4147, 2001, and the final conclusion is that explosives and this materials are compatible, but in DSC it was observed that the peak of decomposition temperature of the admixture of RDX with Al decreased in 3º C and another peak appeared after the decomposition peak.

  3. Adsorption of TNT, DNAN, NTO, FOX7, and NQ onto cellulose, chitin, and cellulose triacetate. Insights from Density Functional Theory calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todde, Guido; Jha, Sanjiv K.; Subramanian, Gopinath; Shukla, Manoj K.

    2018-02-01

    Insensitive munitions (IM) compounds such as DNAN (2,4-dinitroanisole), NTO (3-nitro-1,2,4-triazol-5-one), NQ (nitroguanidine), and FOX7 (1,1-diamino-2,2-dinitroethene) reduce the risk of accidental explosions due to shock and high temperature exposure. These compounds are being used as replacements for sensitive munition compounds such as TNT (2,4,6-trinitromethylbenzene) and RDX (1,3,5-hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine). NTO and NQ in IM compounds are more soluble than TNT or RDX, hence they can easily spread in the environment and get dissolved if exposed to precipitation. DNAN solubility is comparable to TNT solubility. Cellulosic biomass, due to its abundance in the environment and its chemical structure, has a high probability of adsorbing these IM compounds, and thus, it is important to investigate the interactions between cellulose and cellulose like biopolymers (e.g. cellulose triacetate and chitin) with IM compounds. Using Density Functional Theory methods, we have studied the adsorption of TNT, DNAN, NTO, NQ, and FOX7 onto cellulose Iα and Iβ, chitin, and cellulose triacetate I (CTA I). Solvent effects on the adsorption were also investigated. Our results show that all contaminants are more strongly adsorbed onto chitin and cellulose Iα than onto CTA I and cellulose Iβ. Dispersion forces were found to be the predominant contribution to the adsorption energies of all contaminants.

  4. Standardized Method for Measuring Collection Efficiency from Wipe-sampling of Trace Explosives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verkouteren, Jennifer R; Lawrence, Jeffrey A; Staymates, Matthew E; Sisco, Edward

    2017-04-10

    One of the limiting steps to detecting traces of explosives at screening venues is effective collection of the sample. Wipe-sampling is the most common procedure for collecting traces of explosives, and standardized measurements of collection efficiency are needed to evaluate and optimize sampling protocols. The approach described here is designed to provide this measurement infrastructure, and controls most of the factors known to be relevant to wipe-sampling. Three critical factors (the applied force, travel distance, and travel speed) are controlled using an automated device. Test surfaces are chosen based on similarity to the screening environment, and the wipes can be made from any material considered for use in wipe-sampling. Particle samples of the explosive 1,3,5-trinitroperhydro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) are applied in a fixed location on the surface using a dry-transfer technique. The particle samples, recently developed to simulate residues made after handling explosives, are produced by inkjet printing of RDX solutions onto polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) substrates. Collection efficiency is measured by extracting collected explosive from the wipe, and then related to critical sampling factors and the selection of wipe material and test surface. These measurements are meant to guide the development of sampling protocols at screening venues, where speed and throughput are primary considerations.

  5. A laser-based FAIMS detector for detection of ultra-low concentrations of explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akmalov, Artem E.; Chistyakov, Alexander A.; Kotkovskii, Gennadii E.; Sychev, Alexey V.; Tugaenko, Anton V.; Bogdanov, Artem S.; Perederiy, Anatoly N.; Spitsyn, Eugene M.

    2014-06-01

    A non-contact method for analyzing of explosives traces from surfaces was developed. The method is based on the laser desorption of analyzed molecules from the surveyed surfaces followed by the laser ionization of air sample combined with the field asymmetric ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS). The pulsed radiation of the fourth harmonic of a portable GSGG: Cr3+ :Nd3+ laser (λ = 266 nm) is used. The laser desorption FAIMS analyzer have been developed. The detection limit of the analyzer equals 40 pg for TNT. The results of detection of trinitrotoluene (TNT), cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine (RDX) and cyclotetramethylenetetranitramine (HMX) are presented. It is shown that laser desorption of nitro-compounds from metals is accompanied by their surface decomposition. A method for detecting and analyzing of small concentrations of explosives in air based on the laser ionization and the FAIMS was developed. The method includes a highly efficient multipass optical scheme of the intracavity fourthharmonic generation of pulsed laser radiation (λ = 266 nm) and the field asymmetric ion mobility (FAIM) spectrometer disposed within a resonator. The ions formation and detection proceed inside a resonant cavity. The laser ion source based on the multi-passage of radiation at λ = 266 nm through the ionization region was elaborated. On the basis of the method the laser FAIMS analyzer has been created. The analyzer provides efficient detection of low concentrations of nitro-compounds in air and shows a detection limit of 10-14 - 10-15 g/cm3 both for RDX and TNT.

  6. High-resolution Raman Spectroscopy for the Nanostructural Characterization of Explosive Nanodiamond Precursors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deckert-Gaudig, Tanja; Pichot, Vincent; Spitzer, Denis; Deckert, Volker

    2017-01-18

    The specific attributes of nanodiamonds have attracted increasing interest for electronics or biomedical applications. An efficient synthetic route towards nanodiamonds is via detonation of hexolite (i.e. a mixture of TNT [2,4,6-trinitrotoluene] and RDX [1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine]). In particular, detonation of hexolite crystallized by spray flash evaporation (SFE) yields extremely small diamonds (<4 nm). To unravel the detonation mechanism, a structural characterization of the explosives is required but is challenging due to their thermal instability. We demonstrate a combination of conventional Raman spectroscopy and tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS) for resolving morphological and structural differences of differently prepared hexolite nanocomposites. The experiments allow for the first time a structural differentiation of individual TNT and RDX crystals and 15-20 nm sized core-shell structures, consequently providing a general approach to investigate the actual composition of mixtures on the nanometer scale. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Halide salts accelerate degradation of high explosives by zerovalent iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong Sung; Shea, Patrick J.; Yang, Jae E.; Kim, Jang-Eok

    2007-01-01

    Zerovalent iron (Fe 0 , ZVI) has drawn great interest as an inexpensive and effective material to promote the degradation of environmental contaminants. A focus of ZVI research is to increase degradation kinetics and overcome passivation for long-term remediation. Halide ions promote corrosion, which can increase and sustain ZVI reactivity. Adding chloride or bromide salts with Fe 0 (1% w/v) greatly enhanced TNT, RDX, and HMX degradation rates in aqueous solution. Adding Cl or Br salts after 24 h also restored ZVI reactivity, resulting in complete degradation within 8 h. These observations may be attributed to removal of the passivating oxide layer and pitting corrosion of the iron. While the relative increase in degradation rate by Cl - and Br - was similar, TNT degraded faster than RDX and HMX. HMX was most difficult to remove using ZVI alone but ZVI remained effective after five HMX reseeding cycles when Br - was present in solution. - The addition of halide ions promotes the degradation of high explosives by zerovalent iron

  8. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for detection of ammonium nitrate in soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz, Daniel; Hahn, David W.; Molina, Alejandro

    2009-05-01

    The extensive use of improvised explosive devices (IED) by irregular armed groups in Colombia has posed a threat, not only to the Colombian regular army but to the civilian population. It is expected that in future years, after an eventual cease fire, humanitarian missions for IED clearance will be fundamental to secure safe transit of people and goods, particularly in Colombian rural areas. The clandestine nature of IEDs preparation in Colombia yielded a rather diverse nature of these irregular weapons. Although, some have metal parts such as nails and shrapnel, others are metal-free devices in which detonation is obtained by chemical means. Despite this variability in IEDs design, one thing that is common in IEDs preparation is the use of significant amounts of ANFO (ammonium nitrate (AN), fuel oil (FO)) in their construction. The goal of this work was to identify AN and FO in soils using LIBS. Experiments showed the ability of LIBS to identify the presence of AN based on Hα (656.3 nm) and Hβ (486.1 nm) emission lines. It was not possible to identify FO mixed with soils in the spectral windows studied. FO caused a reduction on spark intensity on the samples. This would represent a challenge for identification of chemical compounds in wet soils. Potential interferences with fertilizers are discussed as well.

  9. Vulnerability of industrial facilities to attacks with improvised explosive devices aimed at triggering domino scenarios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landucci, Gabriele; Reniers, Genserik; Cozzani, Valerio; Salzano, Ernesto

    2015-01-01

    Process- and chemical plants may constitute a critical target for a terrorist attack. In the present study, the analysis of industrial accidents induced by intentional acts of interference is carried out focusing on accident chains triggered by attacks with home-made (improvised) explosives. The effects of blast waves caused by improvised explosive devices are compared with those expected from a net equivalent charge of TNT by using a specific methodology for the assessment of stand-off distances. It is demonstrated that a home-made explosive device has a TNT efficiency comprised between 0.2 and 0.5. The model was applied to a case study, demonstrating the potentiality of improvised explosives in causing accident escalation sequences and severe effects on population and assets. The analysis of the case-study also allowed obtaining suggestions for an adequate security management. - Highlights: • Improvised explosives possibly used for terrorist attacks were described. • The TNT efficiency of ANFO and TATP was characterized. • Domino effects caused by an attack with improvised explosive were analyzed. • Domino scenarios induced by an attack were compared to conventional scenarios

  10. Calculation of the energy of explosives with a partial reaction model. Comparison with cylinder test data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchidrian, Jose A.; Lopez, Lina M. [Universidad Politecnica de Madrid - E.T.S.I. Minas, Rios Rosas 21, E-28003 Madrid (Spain)

    2006-02-15

    The energy delivered by explosives is described by means of the useful expansion work along the isentrope of the detonation products. A thermodynamic code (W-DETCOM) is used, in which a partial reaction model has been implemented. In this model, the reacted fraction of the explosive in the detonation state is used as a fitting factor so that the calculated detonation velocity meets the experimental value. Calculations based on such a model have been carried out for a number of commercial explosives of ANFO and emulsion types. The BKW (Becker-Kistiakowsky-Wilson) equation of state is used for the detonation gases with the Sandia parameter set (BKWS). The energy delivered in the expansion (useful work) is calculated, and the values obtained are compared with the Gurney energies from cylinder test data at various expansion ratios. The expansion work values obtained are much more realistic than those from an ideal detonation calculation and, in most cases, the values predicted by the calculation are in good agreement with the experimental ones. (Abstract Copyright [2006], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  11. Desenvolvimento de surfatantes para aplicação na indústria de explosivos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Rodrigues Barreto Lopes

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A comercialização dos explosivos emulsionáveis, aí incluída a dinamite de ANFO, acarretou um aumento significativo no consumo mundial de explosivos entre 1960 e 1980, conseqüência da maior segurança no transporte e no preparo dos explosivos na forma de uma emulsão. Os surfatantes utilizados nestas emulsões são ésteres, amidas ou imidas derivadas do poliisobutileno com terminações de anidrido succínico (PIBSA. Neste trabalho, surfatantes derivados da reação do PIBSA com polioxietilenodiaminas foram sintetizados e caracterizados pelas técnicas de espectrometria no infravermelho e de cromatografia de exclusão de tamanho. Os surfatantes sintetizados foram avaliados quanto ao efeito das suas estruturas na redução da tensão interfacial do sistema água em óleo e todos foram capazes de reduzir a tensão interfacial deste sistema.

  12. Investigation of the wettability of ammonium nitrate prills

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwok, Q.S.M.; Jones, D.E.G.; Kruus, P.

    2003-03-01

    The wetting characteristics of a variety of powders or porous materials can be determined through capillary penetration methods. Wettability of ammonium nitrate (AN) prills determines, in large part, the physical stability and detonation behaviour of ANFO (admixtures of AN prills with fuel oil). This study compared the wettabilities of a variety of AN prills with alkanes and fuel oil. Complementary characterization studies using scanning electron microscopy and thermogravimetry were also performed to justify the differences in wettability. Several factors affected wettability, including surface tension, viscosity, density, purity, polarity and polarizability of the liquid used. Surface composition, porosity, bulk density, particle size and moisture content of the AN samples were also contributing factors to wettability. The explosive-grade (porous) AN prill demonstrated a better wettability due the combined effects of these factors. Thermodesorption of octane from various AN prills was examined using high-resolution thermogravimetry. The adsorption capacity, porosity and specific surface area of 3 different AN prills were evaluated from the mass-loss curves to reflect the evaporation of the excess liquid and the thermodesorption of octane from the pores and the surface of the AN prills. The amount of octane desorbed in these steps was correlated with the volume in the pores and the quantity adsorbed on the surface. The porosity and surface area adsorption capacity of an AN prill was then estimated. 15 refs., 5 tabs., 10 figs.

  13. Blasting in hot zone - a case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nabiullah, B.M.P.; Pingua, J.; Dhar, B.B. [Central Mining Research Institute, Dhanbad (India)

    1997-12-31

    A significant quantity of coking coal reserves in the country are under fire particularly in Jharia coalfield. To control the fire and prevent loss of coal, an opencast mining method is adopted. The main problem with these opencast mines is drilling in hot strata and selection of suitable explosives and blasting in the fire zone. Trial blasts were conducted at two open cast mines. The problem was tackled by quenching the hot blast holes with water. Temperature of blast holes were recorded soon after drilling, after quenching with water and just before charging with explosives. The rise in temperature of charged explosives with time was also recorded until blasting. The thermal behaviour of commercially available explosives (including slurry, emulsion, ANFO and detonating cord) was investigated in laboratory and field simulated conditions. Emulsion, slurry compositions and detonating cord were found safe to use in hot holes up to 120{degree}C for duration of two hours. This paper describes the blasting practices adopted in the fire zones. 4 refs., 6 figs., 8 tabs.

  14. Lower blasthole pressures: a means of reducing costs when blasting rocks of low to moderate strength

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagan, T.N.; Gibson, I.M.

    1988-03-01

    From a purely mechanical viewpoint, each explosive charge should produce a peak blasthole pressure (P/sub b/) that just fails to crush (i.e. pulverise or plastically deform) the rock which surrounds it. Where P/sub b/ exceeds a critical value, some explosion energy is wasted in crushing an annular section of rock immediately around each charge. As a rock's dynamic compressive breaking strain decreases, so should P/sub b/ (Hagan, 1977b). This paper reviews information on, and anticipates the blasting performance of, bulk charges having effective densities which are as low as about 40% of that for ammonium nitrate fuel oil (ANFO). It also outlines the potential advantages of extending the reaction periods of charges, even to the extent that explosive reactions continue after the blasthole wall and stemming have started to move. The paper then proceeds to define situations in which the use of such lower-pressure charges is likely to result in greatest reductions in mining costs. Some methods of applying bulk charges having effective densities in the 0.3-0.8 g cm/sup -3/ range and/or lower reaction rates are suggested. 15 refs., 3 figs.

  15. Excavation of the Surikamigawa dam diversion tunnel. Surikamigawa dam karihaisui tunnel kantsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikeda, T.; Konno, T. (Ministry of Construction, Tokyo (Japan))

    1994-04-01

    A bypass tunnel construction has been completed at the Surikamigawa dam (Japan). This paper describes the summary of the construction. The full-swing dam construction work is scheduled to begin in 1995. The soils distributed near the dam site consist of lapillus tuff containing andesite-based light stones and tuff-based conglomerates containing large gravels. Excavation of the dam diversion tunnel has used a blasting method, and the tunnel construction has adopted an automatic tunnel cross section marking system and a non-electric explosion method. This marking system is a system to irradiate a laser beam onto the facing to depict excavation lines that realizes labor saving and high-accuracy excavation. The error at the tunnel completion was found 20 mm. The non-electric explosion method ignites a coated explosive layer with an impact wave, which is electrostatically safe, and reduces blasting vibration. Electric detonators have also been used because of using ANFO explosives. The result obtained from measurements of inner space displacement necessary for the blasting process has indicated that the area near the dam site consists of stable mountains. 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  16. Thermodesorption studies of ammonium nitrate prills by high-resolution thermogravimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwok, Q.S.M.; Jones, D.E.G. [Natural Resources Canada, CANMET Canadian Explosives Research Laboratory, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2003-07-01

    Ammonium nitrate prills with fuel oil (ANFO) are commonly used in commercial explosives. The wettability of AN is influenced by porosity and surface area. To date, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), mercury porosimetry, and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) microscopy have been used to characterize prill porosities. This study used high-resolution thermogravimetry (TG) to investigate the thermodesorption of octane from ammonium nitrate (AN) prills of different porosities. Samples were immersed in octane. Samples of AN prills were monitored over a temperature range between 25 to 120 degrees C. Mass-loss curves were measured to determine the evaporation of excess liquids as well as the rate of octane thermodesorption from the pores and surfaces of the AN prills. An analysis of the curves suggested that the initial mass loss was caused by evaporation of the bulk liquid. The following step represented the thermodesorption of adsorbed octane on the surface of the AN remote from the monolayer. Properties of the surface liquid differed significantly from the bulk liquid as the adsorbate materials interacted with the solid surface. The study demonstrated that the quantity of octane desorbed in the steps correlated with the volume observed in the pores and the amount adsorbed on the surface. Results of the study were then compared with data obtained using SEM. It was concluded that high resolution TG can be used to characterize AN porosity and adsorption capacity. 16 refs., 1 tab., 5 figs.

  17. Phase diagram of ammonium nitrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunuwille, Mihindra; Yoo, Choong-Shik, E-mail: csyoo@wsu.edu [Department of Chemistry and Institute for Shock Physics, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington 99164 (United States)

    2013-12-07

    Ammonium Nitrate (AN) is a fertilizer, yet becomes an explosive upon a small addition of chemical impurities. The origin of enhanced chemical sensitivity in impure AN (or AN mixtures) is not well understood, posing significant safety issues in using AN even today. To remedy the situation, we have carried out an extensive study to investigate the phase stability of AN and its mixtures with hexane (ANFO–AN mixed with fuel oil) and Aluminum (Ammonal) at high pressures and temperatures, using diamond anvil cells (DAC) and micro-Raman spectroscopy. The results indicate that pure AN decomposes to N{sub 2}, N{sub 2}O, and H{sub 2}O at the onset of the melt, whereas the mixtures, ANFO and Ammonal, decompose at substantially lower temperatures. The present results also confirm the recently proposed phase IV-IV{sup ′} transition above 17 GPa and provide new constraints for the melting and phase diagram of AN to 40 GPa and 400°C.

  18. Toru to Nukui dam construction carried out by Chugoku district construction department of Ministry of construction. Kensetsusho chugoku chiho kensetsukyoku Nukui dam koji kengakuki

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitajima, E. (Chugoku Kayaku Co. Ltd. Hiroshima (Japan))

    1993-08-31

    This paper reports the summary of a tour to the Nukui dam being constructed on the Ota river system in Hiroshima Prefecture, as a study activity of the blasting expert working group. The Nukui dam has the second highest embankment in Japan (155 m). It adjusts flood at 1800 m[sup 3]/s from the planned high water discharge of 2900 m[sup 3]/s supplies water of 200,000 m[sup 3] daily at maximum, and generates electric power of 2300 kW as the maximum output. The blasting adopted a presplit system not to damage base rock beds, and was used with a bench height of 5 m, a hole diameter of 75 mm, a minimum shaft line of 2.5 m, and a hole distance of 2.8m. The main explosive used was the ANFO, No. 3 Kiri, Akatsuki dynamite. Slurry explosives were used for the presplit. Drilling machines with three-dimensional computers were used. The 'Nukui Dam Work Station' is the country's first site office/lodgings integrated facility offering as comfortable working environment as a city hotel. The facility is expected to wipe out the dirty, dangerous and hard image of construction work. 1 ref., 3 figs.

  19. Safety engineering experiments of explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishikawa, Noboru

    1987-07-24

    The outline of large scale experiments carried out every year since 1969 to obtain fundamental data and then establish the safety engineering standards concerning the manufacturing, storage and transportation, etc. of all explosives was described. Because it becomes recently difficult to ensure the safety distance in powder magazines and powder plants, the sandwich structure with sand is thought to be suitable as the neighboring barrier walls. The special vertical structure for embankments to provide against a emergency explosion is effective to absorb the blast. Explosion behaviors such as initiating sensitivity, detonation, sympathetic detonation, and shock occurence of the ANFO explosives in place of dynamite and the slurry explosives were studied. The safety engineering standards for the manufacturing and application of explosives were studied to establish because accidents by tabacco fire are not still distinguished. Much data concerning early stage fire fighting, a large quantity of flooding and shock occurence from a assumption of ignition during machining in the propellants manufacturing plant, could be obtained. Basic studies were made to prevent pollution in blasting sites. Collected data are utilized for the safety administration after sufficient discussion. (4 figs, 2 tabs, 3 photos, 17 refs)

  20. The Effects of Fracture Anisotropy on the Damage Pattern and Seismic Radiation from a Chemical Explosion in a Granite Quarry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers-Martinez, M. A.; Sammis, C. G.; Ezzedine, S. M.

    2017-12-01

    As part of the New England Damage Experiment (NEDE) a 122.7 kg Heavy ANFO charge was detonated at a depth of 13 m in a granite quarry in Barre Vt. Subsequent drill cores from the source region revealed that most of the resultant fracturing was concentrated in the rift plane of the highly anisotropic Barre granite. We simulated this explosion using a dynamic damage mechanics model embedded in the ABAQUS 3D finite element code. The damage mechanics was made anisotropic by taking the critical stress intensity factor to be a function of azimuth in concert with the physics of interacting parallel fractures and laboratory studies of anisotropic granite. In order to identify the effects of anisotropy, the explosion was also simulated assuming 1) no initial damage (pure elasticity) and 2) isotropic initial damage. For the anisotropic case, the calculated fracture pattern simulated that observed in NEDE. The simulated seismic radiation looked very much like that from a tensile fracture oriented in the rift plane, and similar to the crack-like moment tensor observed in the far field of many nuclear explosions.

  1. Some properties of explosive mixtures containing peroxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeman, Svatopluk; Trzcinski, Waldemar A.; Matyas, Robert

    2008-01-01

    This study concerns mixtures of triacetone triperoxide (3,3,6,6,9,9-hexamethyl-1,2,4,5,7,8-hexoxonane, TATP) and ammonium nitrate (AN) with added water (W), as the case may be, and dry mixtures of TATP with urea nitrate (UN). Relative performances (RP) of the mixtures and their individual components, relative to TNT, were determined by means of ballistic mortar. The detonation energies, E 0 , and detonation velocities, D, were calculated for the mixtures studied by means of the thermodynamic code CHEETAH. Relationships have been found and are discussed between the RP and the E 0 values related to unit volume of gaseous products of detonation of these mixtures. These relationships together with those between RP and oxygen balance values of the mixtures studied indicate different types of participation of AN and UN in the explosive decomposition of the respective mixtures. Dry TATP/UN mixtures exhibit lower RP than analogous mixtures TATP/AN containing up to 25% of water. Depending on the water content, the TATP/AN mixtures possess higher detonability values than the ANFO explosives. A semi-logarithmic relationship between the D values and oxygen coefficients has been derived for all the mixtures studied at the charge density of 1000 kg m -3 . Among the mixtures studied, this relationship distinguishes several samples of the type of 'tertiary explosives' as well as samples that approach 'high explosives' in their performances and detonation velocities

  2. Detoxification of PAX-21 ammunitions wastewater by zero-valent iron for microbial reduction of perchlorate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Se Chang; Cha, Daniel K. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Kim, Byung J. [U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center, Champaign, IL 61826-9005 (United States); Oh, Seok-Young, E-mail: quartzoh@ulsan.ac.kr [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Ulsan, Ulsan 680-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-08-30

    Highlights: {yields} Ammonium perchlorate, hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) and 2,4-dinitroanisole (DNAN) are the major constituents of PAX-21. {yields} DNAN is identified as the primary toxicant responsible for inhibiting the activity of perchlorate reducing bacteria. {yields} Iron treatment not only removes energetic compounds but also eliminates the toxic constituents that inhibit the subsequent microbial process. - Abstract: US Army and the Department of Defense (DoD) facilities generate perchlorate (ClO{sub 4}{sup -}) from munitions manufacturing and demilitarization processes. Ammonium perchlorate is one of the main constituents in Army's new main charge melt-pour energetic, PAX-21. In addition to ammonium perchlorate, hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) and 2,4-dinitroanisole (DNAN) are the major constituents of PAX-21. In order to evaluate microbial perchlorate reduction as a practical option for the treatment of perchlorate in PAX-21 wastewater, we conducted biodegradation experiments using glucose as the primary sources of electrons and carbon. Batch experiments showed that negligible perchlorate was removed in microbial reactors containing PAX-21 wastewater while control bottles containing seed bacteria and glucose rapidly and completely removed perchlorate. These results suggested that the constituents in PAX-21 wastewater may be toxic to perchlorate reducing bacteria. A series of batch toxicity test was conducted to identify the toxic constituents in PAX-21 and DNAN was identified as the primary toxicant responsible for inhibiting the activity of perchlorate reducing bacteria. It was hypothesized that pretreatment of PAX-21 by zero-valent iron granules will transform toxic constituents in PAX-21 wastewater to non-toxic products. We observed complete reduction of DNAN to 2,4-diaminoanisole (DAAN) and RDX to formaldehyde in abiotic iron reduction study. After a 3-day acclimation period, perchlorate in iron-treated PAX-21

  3. Explosives detection through fast-neutron time-of-flight attenuation measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Overley, J.C.; Chmelik, M.S.; Rasmussen, R.J.; Schofield, R.M.S.; Lefevre, H.W.

    1995-01-01

    Computer simulations have been used to devise an algorithm for detection of explosives in luggage which is based upon measured projected number densities of H, C, N, and O. Other elements are lumped together as projection X. Dependence on luggage-thickness is reduced by normalizing the projection for each element by the total. Normalization constrains projections to a 4-dimensional space. Distributions of nonexplosive (N) and explosive (E) situations are generated by sorting results of simulations into bins in that 4-space. A detection matrix element, given by the ratio E/(N+E) for each bin, is addressed by a measurement. For a realistic distribution of the numbers and types of luggage materials, the plastic explosive RDX, at 10% of suitcase thickness, can be detected in a single pixel with 85% reliability and a false alarm rate of 3%. (orig.)

  4. Treatment of Explosives Residues From Range Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    total of 1200 lbs of crude soybean oil was purchased from Grain States Soya , Inc. (West Point, NE, USA) and shipped to the site in three 55 gal plastic...1.0E-08 1.0E-07 1.0E-06 1.0E-05 1.0E-04 1.0E-03 1.0E-02 1.0E-01 1.0E+00 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Elapsed Time (years) Re la tiv e M as s Fl ux TNT RDX HMX...www.waupacasoilblenders.com Crude soybean oil suppliers Grain States Soya Inc. 400 Johnson Road West Point, NE 68788 Phone: 402-372-2429 Fax: 402-372-3305

  5. Dynamic transition in the structure of an energetic crystal during chemical reactions at shock front prior to detonation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Ken-Ichi; Kalia, Rajiv K; Nakano, Aiichiro; Vashishta, Priya; van Duin, Adri C T; Goddard, William A

    2007-10-05

    Mechanical stimuli in energetic materials initiate chemical reactions at shock fronts prior to detonation. Shock sensitivity measurements provide widely varying results, and quantum-mechanical calculations are unable to handle systems large enough to describe shock structure. Recent developments in reactive force-field molecular dynamics (ReaxFF-MD) combined with advances in parallel computing have paved the way to accurately simulate reaction pathways along with the structure of shock fronts. Our multimillion-atom ReaxFF-MD simulations of l,3,5-trinitro-l,3,5-triazine (RDX) reveal that detonation is preceded by a transition from a diffuse shock front with well-ordered molecular dipoles behind it to a disordered dipole distribution behind a sharp front.

  6. Hierarchical Petascale Simulation Framework for Stress Corrosion Cracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vashishta, Priya

    2014-12-01

    Reaction Dynamics in Energetic Materials: Detonation is a prototype of mechanochemistry, in which mechanically and thermally induced chemical reactions far from equilibrium exhibit vastly different behaviors. It is also one of the hardest multiscale physics problems, in which diverse length and time scales play important roles. The CACS group has performed multimillion-atom reactive MD simulations to reveal a novel two-stage reaction mechanism during the detonation of cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine (RDX) crystal. Rapid production of N2 and H2O within ~10 ps is followed by delayed production of CO molecules within ~ 1 ns. They found that further decomposition towards the final products is inhibited by the formation of large metastable C- and O-rich clusters with fractal geometry. The CACS group has also simulated the oxidation dynamics of close-packed aggregates of aluminum nanoparticles passivated by oxide shells. Their simulation results suggest an unexpectedly active role of the oxide shell as a nanoreactor.

  7. 2007 TOXICOLOGY AND RISK ASSESSMENT ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA has announced The 2007 Toxicology and Risk Assessment Conference Cincinnati Marriott North, West Chester (Cincinnati), OHApril 23- 26, 2007 - Click to register!The Annual Toxicology and Risk Assessment Conference is a unique meeting where several Government Agencies come together to discuss toxicology and risk assessment issues that are not only of concern to the government, but also to a broader audience including academia and industry. The theme of this year's conference is Emerging Issues and Challenges in Risk Assessment and the preliminary agenda includes: Plenary Sessions and prominent speakers (tentative) include: Issues of Emerging Chemical ContaminantsUncertainty and Variability in Risk Assessment Use of Mechanistic data in IARC evaluationsParallel Sessions:Uncertainty and Variability in Dose-Response Assessment Recent Advances in Toxicity and Risk Assessment of RDX The Use of Epidemiologic Data for Risk Assessment Applications Cumulative Health Risk Assessment:

  8. Simulating sympathetic detonation using the hydrodynamic models and constitutive equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Bo Hoon; Kim, Min Sung; Yoh, Jack J. [Dept. of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Sun, Tae Boo [Hanwha Corporation Defense Rand D Center, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    A Sympathetic detonation (SD) is a detonation of an explosive charge by a nearby explosion. Most of times it is unintended while the impact of blast fragments or strong shock waves from the initiating donor explosive is the cause of SD. We investigate the SD of a cylindrical explosive charge (64 % RDX, 20 % Al, 16 % HTPB) contained in a steel casing. The constitutive relations for high explosive are obtained from a thermo-chemical code that provides the size effect data without the rate stick data typically used for building the rate law and equation of state. A full size SD test of eight pallet-packaged artillery shells is performed that provides the pressure data while the hydrodynamic model with proper constitutive relations for reactive materials and the fragmentation model for steel casing is conducted to replicate the experimental findings. The work presents a novel effort to accurately model and reproduce the sympathetic detonation event with a reduced experimental effort.

  9. Terahertz and Mid Infrared

    CERN Document Server

    Shulika, Oleksiy; Detection of Explosives and CBRN (Using Terahertz)

    2014-01-01

    The reader will find here a timely update on new THz sources and detection schemes as well as concrete applications to the detection of Explosives and CBRN. Included is a method to identify hidden RDX-based explosives (pure and plastic ones) in the frequency domain study by Fourier Transformation, which has been complemented by the demonstration of improvement of the quality of the images captured commercially available THz passive cameras. The presented examples show large potential for the detection of small hidden objects at long distances (6-10 m).  Complementing the results in the short-wavelength range, laser spectroscopy with a mid-infrared, room temperature, continuous wave, DFB laser diode and high performance DFB QCL have been demonstrated to offer excellent enabling sensor technologies for environmental monitoring, medical diagnostics, industrial and security applications.  From the new source point of view a number of systems have been presented - From superconductors to semiconductors, e.g. Det...

  10. Numerical and experimental investigation of the melt casting of explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Dawei; Garimella, Suresh V. [School of Mechanical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2088 (United States); Singh, Sanjeev; Naik, Neelam [US Army Armaments Research, Development and Engineering Center, Picatinny Arsenal, NJ 07806 (United States)

    2005-10-01

    Melt casting of energetic materials is investigated, and a numerical model is formulated for the analysis of the coupled fluid flow, heat transfer, and stress fields involved in this phase-change process. The numerical model is based on a conservative multi block control volume method. The SIMPLE algorithm is employed along with an enthalpy method approach to model the solidification process. Results from the model are verified against analytical solutions, experimental results, and published numerical results for simplified cases. In the melt casting of RDX-binder mixtures, the very high viscosity of the melt limits the influence of melt convection. The impacts of different cooling conditions on the velocity, temperature and stress distributions, as well as on the solidification time, are discussed. The present model can be used to improve the quality of cast explosives, by optimizing and controlling the processing conditions. (Abstract Copyright [2005], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  11. Evaluation of few-view reconstruction parameters for illicit substance detection using fast-neutron transmission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fink, C.L.; Humm, P.G.; Martin, M.M.; Micklich, B.J.

    1996-01-01

    The authors have evaluated the performance of an illicit substance detection system that performs image reconstruction using the Maximum Likelihood algebraic reconstruction algorithm, a fe number of projections, and relatively coarse projection and pixel resolution. This evaluation was done using receiver operator curves and simulated data from the fast-neutron transmission spectroscopy system operated in a mode to detect explosives in luggage. The results show that increasing the number of projection angles is more important than increasing the projection resolution, the reconstructed pixel resolution, of the number of iterations in the Maximum Likelihood algorithm. A 100% detection efficiency with essentially no false positives is possible for a square block of RDX explosive, a projection resolution of 2 cm, a reconstructed pixel size of 2x2 cm, and five projection angles. For rectangular shaped explosives more angles are required to obtain the same system performance

  12. Parameters of explosives detection through tagged neutron method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagdasaryan, Kh.E.; Batyaev, V.F.; Belichenko, S.G., E-mail: consul757@mail.ru; Bestaev, R.R.; Gavryuchenkov, A.V.; Karetnikov, M.D.

    2015-06-01

    The potentialities of tagged neutron method (TNM) for explosives detection are examined on the basis of an idealized geometrical model. The model includes ING-27 14 MeV neutron generator with a built-in α-detector, a LYSO γ-detector and samples of material to be identified of approximately 0.3 kg each: explosives imitators (trinitrotoluene - TNT, tetryl, RDX and ammonium nitrate), legal materials (sugar, water, silk and polyethylene). The samples were unshielded or shielded by a paper layer of various thicknesses. The experimental data were interpreted by numerical simulation using a Poisson distribution of signals with the statistical parameters defined experimentally. The detection parameters were obtained by a pattern classification theory and a Bayes classifier.

  13. TiO{sub 2} synthesized by the method of polymeric precursor (Pechini): structure of the intermediate resine; TiO{sub 2} sintetizado por el metodo de precursor polimerico (Pechini): estructura de la resina intermedia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vargas, M. A.; Granco, Y.; Ochoa, Y.; Ortegon, Y.; Rodriguez Paez, J. E.

    2011-07-01

    In this work, the polymeric precursor method (Pechini method) was used to synthesize titanium dioxide. This process allowed a bigger control on the purity of the oxide and the crystalline phase present in the material. In this case, the principal phase was anatase. The resine obtained in this process was characterized using NMR and IR spectroscopy to determine their structure. With this information we proposed a resine structure model. To finish the process, the resin was thermally treated to obtain TiO{sub 2}. This oxide was characterized using different techniques: ray-X diffraction (RDX) and electron microscopy (TEM and SEM). The results indicated that the TiO{sub 2} anatase phase can be obtained at 450 degree centigrade with a particle size <100nm. (Author) 10 refs.

  14. Method development for the analysis of nitrotoluenes, nitramines and other organic compounds in ammunition waste water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mussmann, P.; Preiss, A.; Levsen, K.; Wuensch, G.

    1994-01-01

    Gas chromatography and high performance liquid chromatography were used to determine explosives, their by- and degradation products near the former ammunition plant Elsnig in Saxony. Enrichment procedures using liquid/liquid-and solid-phase extraction, which have already been developed, were used to investigate ground and surface water samples. Mono-, di- and trinitrotoluenes as well as aminonitro- and chlorinated nitroaromatics were identified and quantified using GC/MS, the electron capture detector (ECD) and the nitrogen-phosphorus detector (NPD). Besides, some nitrophenols were identified in ground water. Additionally, RDX, which is hardly to be determined by GC, was quantified using high performance liquid chromatography. Identification was performed by the UV-spectra using a photodiode array detector. (orig.) [de

  15. 1-Amine-1,2,3-triazolium salts with oxidizing anions: A new family of energetic materials with good performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhi-Bin; Zhang, Jian-Guo

    2018-04-01

    A series of 1-amino-1,2,3-triazole (ATZ) based energetic nitrogen-rich salts are prepared by using acid-base neutralization reaction (1:1 M ratio), and fully characterized. Structures of the salts are recrystallized and determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, which dominated by a strong hydrogen-bond influence with the densities ranging from 1.692 to 1.868 g cm-3. Thermal behaviors have characterized by using the DSC and TG-DTG technologies. The enthalpies of formation have calculated by using Gaussian 03. The detonation parameters of the salts are determined by using the K-J method, and most salts show promising detonation performances (D: 6699-8231 m s-1, P: 19.2-30.7 GPa), among which the salt of 1-amino-1,2,3-triazolium trinitrophloroglucinate has a detonation properties comparable to RDX. The sensitivities results provided the salts as insensitive energetic materials.

  16. LAMMPS Project Report for the Trinity KNL Open Science Period.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, Stan Gerald [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Thompson, Aidan P. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Wood, Mitchell [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-08-01

    LAMMPS is a classical molecular dynamics code (lammps.sandia.gov) used to model materials science problems at Sandia National Laboratories and around the world. LAMMPS was one of three Sandia codes selected to participate in the Trinity KNL (TR2) Open Science period. During this period, three different problems of interest were investigated using LAMMPS. The first was benchmarking KNL performance using different force field models. The second was simulating void collapse in shocked HNS energetic material using an all-atom model. The third was simulating shock propagation through poly-crystalline RDX energetic material using a coarse-grain model, the results of which were used in an ACM Gordon Bell Prize submission. This report describes the results of these simulations, lessons learned, and some hardware issues found on Trinity KNL as part of this work.

  17. New perspectives in the PAW/GIPAW approach: J(P-O-Si) coupling constants, antisymmetric parts of shift tensors and NQR predictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonhomme, Christian; Gervais, Christel; Coelho, Cristina; Pourpoint, Frédérique; Azaïs, Thierry; Bonhomme-Coury, Laure; Babonneau, Florence; Jacob, Guy; Ferrari, Maude; Canet, Daniel; Yates, Jonathan R; Pickard, Chris J; Joyce, Siân A; Mauri, Francesco; Massiot, Dominique

    2010-12-01

    In 2001, Pickard and Mauri implemented the gauge including projected augmented wave (GIPAW) protocol for first-principles calculations of NMR parameters using periodic boundary conditions (chemical shift anisotropy and electric field gradient tensors). In this paper, three potentially interesting perspectives in connection with PAW/GIPAW in solid-state NMR and pure nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) are presented: (i) the calculation of J coupling tensors in inorganic solids; (ii) the calculation of the antisymmetric part of chemical shift tensors and (iii) the prediction of (14)N and (35)Cl pure NQR resonances including dynamics. We believe that these topics should open new insights in the combination of GIPAW, NMR/NQR crystallography, temperature effects and dynamics. Points (i), (ii) and (iii) will be illustrated by selected examples: (i) chemical shift tensors and heteronuclear (2)J(P-O-Si) coupling constants in the case of silicophosphates and calcium phosphates [Si(5)O(PO(4))(6), SiP(2)O(7) polymorphs and α-Ca(PO(3))(2)]; (ii) antisymmetric chemical shift tensors in cyclopropene derivatives, C(3)X(4) (X = H, Cl, F) and (iii) (14)N and (35)Cl NQR predictions in the case of RDX (C(3)H(6)N(6)O(6)), β-HMX (C(4)H(8)N(8)O(8)), α-NTO (C(2)H(2)N(4)O(3)) and AlOPCl(6). RDX, β-HMX and α-NTO are explosive compounds. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Ultra-violet and visible absorption characterization of explosives by differential reflectometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubroca, Thierry; Moyant, Kyle; Hummel, Rolf E

    2013-03-15

    This study presents some optical properties of TNT (2,4,6-trinitrotoluene), RDX, HMX and tetryl, specifically their absorption spectra as a function of concentration in various solvents in the ultraviolet and visible portion of the electromagnetic spectrum. We utilize a standoff explosives detection method, called differential reflectometry (DR). TNT was diluted in six different solvents (acetone, acetonitrile, ethanol, ethyl acetate, methanol, and toluene), which allowed for a direct comparison of absorption features over a wide range of concentrations. A line-shape analysis was adopted with great accuracy (R(2)>0.99) to model the absorption features of TNT in differential reflectivity spectra. We observed a blue shift in the pertinent absorption band with decreasing TNT concentration for all solvents. Moreover, using this technique, it was found that for all utilized solvents the concentration of TNT as well as of RDX, HMX, and tetryl, measured as a function of the transition wavelength of the ultra-violet absorption edge in differential reflectivity spectra shows three distinct regions. A model is presented to explain this behavior which is based on intermolecular hydrogen bonding of explosives molecules with themselves (or lack thereof) at different concentrations. Other intermolecular forces such as dipole-dipole interactions, London dispersion forces and π-stacking contribute to slight variations in the resulting spectra, which were determined to be rather insignificant in comparison to hydrogen bonding. The results are aimed towards a better understanding of the DR spectra of explosives energetic materials. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Preparation of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles for superthermites by the detonation of an explosive nanocomposite material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Comet, Marc, E-mail: marc.comet@isl.eu; Pichot, Vincent; Siegert, Benny; Fousson, Eric [NS3E, UMR 3208 ISL/CNRS, French-German Research Institute of Saint-Louis (ISL) (France); Mory, Julien; Moitrier, Florence [French-German Research Institute of Saint-Louis (ISL) (France); Spitzer, Denis [NS3E, UMR 3208 ISL/CNRS, French-German Research Institute of Saint-Louis (ISL) (France)

    2011-05-15

    This article reports on the preparation of chromium(III) oxide nanoparticles by detonation. For this purpose, a high explosive-hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX)-has been solidified from a solution infiltrated into the macro- and mesoporosity of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} powder obtained by the combustion of ammonium dichromate. The resulting Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}/RDX nanocomposite material was embedded in a cylindrical charge of pure explosive and detonated in order to fragment the metallic oxide into nanoparticles. The resulting soot contains Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles, nanodiamonds, amorphous carbon species and inorganic particles resulting from the erosion by the blast of the detonation tank wall. The purification process consists in (i) removing the carbonaceous species by an oxidative treatment at 500 Degree-Sign C and (ii) dissolving the mineral particles by a chemical treatment with hydrofluoric acid. Contrary to what could be expected, the Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles formed during the detonation are twice larger than those of initial Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The detonation causes the fragmentation of the porous oxide and the melting of resulting particles. Nanometric droplets of molten Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} are ejected and quenched by the water in which the charge is fired. Despite their larger size, the Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles prepared by detonation were found to be less aggregated than those of the initial oxide used as precursor. Finally, the Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} synthesized by detonation was used to prepare a superthermite with aluminium nanoparticles. This material possesses a lower sensitivity and a more regular combustion compared to the one made of initial Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}.

  20. Thermochemistry of mixed explosives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janney, J.L.; Rogers, R.N.

    1982-01-01

    In order to predict thermal hazards of high-energy materials, accurate kinetics constants must be determined. Predictions of thermal hazards for mixtures of high-energy materials require measurements on the mixtures, because interactions among components are common. A differential-scanning calorimeter (DSC) can be used to observe rate processes directly, and isothermal methods enable detection of mechanism changes. Rate-controlling processes will change as components of a mixture are depleted, and the correct depletion function must be identified for each specific stage of a complex process. A method for kinetics measurements on mixed explosives can be demonstrated with Composition B is an approximately 60/40 mixture of RDX and TNT, and is an important military explosive. Kinetics results indicate that the mator process is the decomposition of RDX in solution in TNT with a perturbation caused by interaction between the two components. It is concluded that a combination of chemical kinetics and experimental self-heating procedures provides a good approach to the production of predictive models for thermal hazards of high-energy materials. Systems involving more than one energy-contributing component can be studied. Invalid and dangerous predictive models can be detected by a failure of agreement between prediction and experiment at a specific size, shape, and density. Rates of thermal decomposition for Composition B appear to be modeled adequately for critical-temperature predictions with the following kinetics constants: E = 180.2 kJ mole -1 and Z = 4.62 X 10 16 s -1

  1. Organic nitrates: update on mechanisms underlying vasodilation, tolerance and endothelial dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Münzel, Thomas; Steven, Sebastian; Daiber, Andreas

    2014-12-01

    Given acutely, organic nitrates, such as nitroglycerin (GTN), isosorbide mono- and dinitrates (ISMN, ISDN), and pentaerythrityl tetranitrate (PETN), have potent vasodilator and anti-ischemic effects in patients with acute coronary syndromes, acute and chronic congestive heart failure and arterial hypertension. During long-term treatment, however, side effects such as nitrate tolerance and endothelial dysfunction occur, and therapeutic efficacy of these drugs rapidly vanishes. Recent experimental and clinical studies have revealed that organic nitrates per se are not just nitric oxide (NO) donors, but rather a quite heterogeneous group of drugs considerably differing for mechanisms underlying vasodilation and the development of endothelial dysfunction and tolerance. Based on this, we propose that the term nitrate tolerance should be avoided and more specifically the terms of GTN, ISMN and ISDN tolerance should be used. The present review summarizes preclinical and clinical data concerning organic nitrates. Here we also emphasize the consequences of chronic nitrate therapy on the supersensitivity of the vasculature to vasoconstriction and on the increased autocrine expression of endothelin. We believe that these so far rather neglected and underestimated side effects of chronic therapy with at least GTN and ISMN are clinically important. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Ambient Pressure Laser Desorption—Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry for Fast and Reliable Detection of Explosives, Drugs, and Their Precursors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    René Reiss

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Fast and reliable information is crucial for first responders to draw correct conclusions at crime scenes. An ambient pressure laser desorption (APLD mass spectrometer is introduced for this scenario, which enables detecting substances on surfaces without sample pretreatment. It is especially useful for substances with low vapor pressure and thermolabile ones. The APLD allows for the separation of desorption and ionization into two steps and, therefore, both can be optimized separately. Within this work, an improved version of the developed system is shown that achieves limits of detection (LOD down to 500 pg while remaining fast and flexible. Furthermore, realistic scenarios are applied to prove the usability of this system in real-world issues. For this purpose, post-blast residues of a bomb from the Second World War were analyzed, and the presence of PETN was proven without sample pretreatment. In addition, the analyzable substance range could be expanded by various drugs and drug precursors. Thus, the presented instrumentation can be utilized for an increased number of forensically important compound classes without changing the setup. Drug precursors revealed a LOD ranging from 6 to 100 ng. Drugs such as cocaine hydrochloride, heroin, (3,4-methylendioxy-methamphetamine hydrochloride (MDMA hydrochloride, and others exhibit a LOD between 10 to 200 ng.

  3. Development of ab initio techniques critical for future science-based explosives R&D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wixom, Ryan R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Mattsson, Ann Elisabet [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Density Functional Theory (DFT) has emerged as an indispensable tool in materials research, since it can accurately predict properties of a wide variety of materials at both equilibrium and extreme conditions. However, for organic molecular crystal explosives, successful application of DFT has largely failed due to the inability of current exchange-correlation functionals to correctly describe intermolecular van der Waals (vdWs) forces. Despite this, we have discovered that even with no treatment of vdWs bonding, the AM05 functional and DFT based molecular dynamics (MD) could be used to study the properties of molecular crystals under compression. We have used DFT-MD to predict the unreacted Hugoniots for PETN and HNS and validated the results by comparison with crystalline and porous experimental data. Since we are also interested in applying DFT methods to study the equilibrium volume properties of explosives, we studied the nature of the vdWs bonding in pursuit of creating a new DFT functional capable of accurately describing equilibrium bonding of molecular crystals. In this report we discuss our results for computing shock Hugoniots of molecular crystals and also what was learned about the nature of bonding in these materials.

  4. Fessibility Study on Nitrogen in Explosives using X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy: Chemical Fertilizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dararutana, P.

    2014-01-01

    It was known that an explosive is defined as a material which contains a large amount of energy stored in chemical bonds. The energetic stability of gaseous products, and hence, their generation come from the strong bond formation of carbon (mono/di)oxide and (di)nitrogen. Consequently, most commercial explosives are contained -NO 2 , -ONO 2 and/or -NHNO 2 groups which when detonated release gases like the aforementioned ones, e.g., nitroglycerin, TNT, HMX, PETN, nitrocellulose, etc. It was revealed that the elemental compositions, especially N was found in most of the explosive and fertilizer. Chemical fertilizers that used as explosive stimulants were analyzed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning electron microscope coupled with energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (SEM-EDS). XPS spectra showed relatively high amount of nitrogen (N) in the various samples, especially sample #6 and #7. In addition, the elemental analysis revealed the presence of trace elements. Explosives and fertilizers have differences in specific compositions. It can be concluded that these methods seem to be used as a fingerprint examination to identify various kinds of explosives and fertilizers.

  5. Direct analysis in real time mass spectrometry of potential by-products from homemade nitrate ester explosive synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisco, Edward; Forbes, Thomas P

    2016-04-01

    This work demonstrates the coupling of direct analysis in real time (DART) ionization with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MS) in an off-axis configuration for the trace detection and analysis of potential partially nitrated and dimerized by-products of homemade nitrate ester explosive synthesis. Five compounds relating to the synthesis of nitroglycerin (NG) and pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) were examined. Deprotonated ions and adducts with molecular oxygen, nitrite, and nitrate were observed in the mass spectral responses of these compounds. A global optimum temperature of 350 °C for the by-products investigated here enabled single nanogram to sub nanogram trace detection. Matrix effects were examined through a series of mixtures containing one or more compounds (sugar alcohol precursors, by-products, and/or explosives) across a range of mass loadings. The explosives MS responses experienced competitive ionization in the presence of all by-products. The magnitude of this influence corresponded to both the degree of by-product nitration and the relative mass loading of the by-product to the explosive. This work provides a characterization of potential by-products from homemade nitrate ester synthesis, including matrix effects and potential challenges that might arise from the trace detection of homemade explosives (HMEs) containing impurities. Detection and understanding of HME impurities and complex mixtures may provide valuable information for the screening and sourcing of homemade nitrate ester explosives. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. The dynamic pressure measurements of the nuclear reactor coolant for condition-based maintenance of the reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Es-Saheb, M.H.H.

    1990-01-01

    The condition-based maintenance of the nuclear reactor, by monitoring and measuring the instantaneous dynamic pressure distribution of the coolant (water) impact on the solid surfaces of the reactor during operation is presented. The behaviour of water domes (jets) produced by underwater explosions of small changes of P.E.T.N. at various depths in two different size cylindrical containers, which simulate the nuclear reactor, is investigated. Water surface domes (jets) from the underwater explosions are photographed. Depending on the depth of the charge, curved and flat top jets of up to 455 mm diameter and impact speeds of up to 70 m/sec. are observed. The instabilities in the dome surfaces are observed and the instantaneous profiles are analysed. It is found that, in all cases tested, the maximum pressure takes place at the center of the jet and could reach up to 3.0 times the on-dimensional impact pressure value. The use of their measurements, as online monitoring for condition-based maintenance and design-out maintenance is discussed. 18 refs

  7. Combustion of Shock-Dispersed Flake Aluminum - High-Speed Visualization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neuwald, P; Reichenbach, H; Kuhl, A

    2006-06-19

    Charges of 0.5 g PETN were used to disperse 1 g of flake aluminum in a rectangular test chamber of 4 liter inner volume and inner dimensions of approximately 10 cm x 10 cm x 40 cm. The subsequent combustion of the flake aluminum with the ambient air in the chamber gave rise to a highly luminous flame. The evolution of the luminous region was studied by means of high-speed cinematography. The high-speed camera is responsive to a broad spectral range in the visible and near infra-red. For a number of tests this response range was narrowed down by means of a band-pass filter with a center wavelength of 488 nm and a half-width of 23 nm. The corresponding images were expected to have a stronger temperature dependence than images obtained without the filter, thus providing better capability to highlight hot-spots. Emission in the range of the pass-band of the filter can be due to continuous thermal radiation from hot Al and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles or to molecular band emission from gaseous AlO. A time-resolving spectrometer was improvised to inspect this topic. The results suggest that AlO emission occurs, but that the continuous spectrum is the dominating effect in our experiments.

  8. Rapid expansion and fracture of metallic cylinders driven by explosive loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiroe, T.; Fujiwara, K.; Abe, T.; Yoshida, M.

    2004-01-01

    Smooth walled tubular specimens of stainless steel and low-carbon steels were explosively expanded to fragmentation. The driver was a column of the high explosive PETN inserted into the central bore and initiated by exploding a fine copper wire using a discharge current from a high-voltage capacitor bank. The variation of wall thickness and the effect of different explosive driver diameters are reported. A fully charged casing model was also exploded with initiation at the end surface for comparison. Streak and framing photos show both radially and axially symmetric expansion of cylinders at average strain rates of above 104 s-1 and a wall velocity of 417-1550 m/s. Some framing photos indicate the initiation and spacing of fractures during the bursting of the cylinders. Hydro codes have been applied to simulate the experimental behavior of the cylinders, examining numerical stresses, deformation and fracture criteria. Most of the fragments were successfully recovered inside a cushion-filled chamber, and the circumferential fracture spacing of measured fragments is investigated using a fragmentation model

  9. Polymyxin susceptibility testing, interpretative breakpoints and resistance mechanisms: An update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakthavatchalam, Yamuna Devi; Pragasam, Agila Kumari; Biswas, Indranil; Veeraraghavan, Balaji

    2018-03-01

    Emerging multidrug-resistant (MDR) nosocomial pathogens are a great threat. Polymyxins, an old class of cationic polypeptide antibiotic, are considered as last-resort drugs in treating infections caused by MDR Gram-negative bacteria. Increased use of polymyxins in treating critically ill patients necessitates routine polymyxin susceptibility testing. However, susceptibility testing both of colistin and polymyxin B (PMB) is challenging. In this review, currently available susceptibility testing methods are briefly discussed. The multicomponent composition of colistin and PMB significantly influences susceptibility testing. In addition, poor diffusion in the agar medium, adsorption to microtitre plates and the synergistic effect of the surfactant polysorbate 80 with polymyxins have a great impact on the performance of susceptibility testing methods This review also describes recently identified chromosomal resistance mechanisms, including modification of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) with 4-amino-4-deoxy-l-arabinose (L-Ara4-N) and phosphoethanolamine (pEtN) resulting in alteration of the negative charge, as well as the plasmid-mediated colistin resistance determinants mcr-1, mcr-1.2, mcr-2 and mcr-3. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Chemotherapy of Infection and Cancer. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Explosions of ammonium nitrate fertilizer in storage or transportation are preventable accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babrauskas, Vytenis

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • First comprehensive review of a century of ammonium nitrate explosions in transport or storage. • Uncontrolled fires are found to be the cause of all such explosions. • Importance of studying common factors, not unique factors, in accidents presented. • Fire and explosion safety measures identified that would prevent recurrence of such disasters. • Shortcomings of existing regulations and guidelines are demonstrated. - Abstract: Ammonium nitrate (AN) is a detonable substance which has led to numerous disasters throughout the 20th century and until the present day, with the latest disaster occurring on 17 April 2013. Needed safety lesson have not been learned, since typically each accident was viewed as a great surprise and investigations focused on finding some unique reason for the accident, rather than examining what is common among the accidents. A review is made of accidents which involved AN for fertilizer purposes, and excluding incidents involving ANFO or additional explosives apart from AN. It is found that, for explosions in storage or transportation, 100% of these disasters had a single causative factor—an uncontrollable fire. Thus, such disasters can be eliminated by eliminating the potential for uncontrolled fire. Two actions are required to achieve this: (1) adoption of fertilizer formulations which reduce the potential for uncontrolled fire and for detonation; and (2) adoption of building safety measures which provide assurance against uncontrolled fires. Technical means are available for achieving both these required measures. These measures have been known for a long time and the only reason that disasters continue to occur is that these safety measures are not implemented. The problem can be solved unilaterally by product manufacturers or by government authorities, but preferably both should take necessary steps.

  11. Aspergilose invasiva do seio esfenoidal e paralisia do sexto nervo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Inês de Vilhena Lana-Peixoto

    1992-03-01

    Full Text Available A aspergilose do seio esfenoidal é doença rara e pode se apresentar sob diferentes formas clínicas devido a envolvimento de. diversas estruturas anatomicamente adjacentes ao seio esfenoidal. Relatamos o caso de uma paciente com 74 anos de idade, diabética, com paralisia do sexto nervo esquerdo secundária a aspergilose do seio esfenoidal. Não havia história de cefaléia ou de queixas sugestivas de alergia respiratória. A tomografia computadorizada revelou lesão etmoídeo-esfenoidal à esquerda, com presença de imagem cálcica em seu interior e destruição óssea. A paciente foi submetida a cirurgia com retirada de material necrótico e debridamento da lesão, seguida de tratamento com anfote-ricina B e 5-fluorocitosina. Exame histológico revelou a presença de hifas sugestivas de Aspergilius sp. Após três meses de tratamento a paciente apresentou recuperação total da paresia do nervo abducente. O diagnóstico clínico pré-operatório de aspergilose do seio esfenoidal é difícil. No entanto, a presença de imagem cálcica ou de densidade metálica à radiografia simples de crânio ou à tomografia computadorizada sugere fortemente o diagnóstico. O exame hihstológico revela a presença de hifas dicotomatosas em 45,0 típicas do Aspergilius. O tratamento inclui excisão e debridamento da lesão seguida do uso de anfo-tericina B associada a 5-fluorocitosina ou rifampicina.

  12. Gas pollutants from detonation and combustion of industrial explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campos, J.; Pines, A.; Gois, J.C.; Portugal, A. (University of Coimbra, Coimbra (Portugal). Mechanical Engineering Dept.)

    1993-01-01

    The potential hazards of fumes, from blasting operations in underground mines, have long been recognised. Beyond this normal use of explosives, there are also large amounts of energy substances which cannot be used because their life time is outdated or they are not within the minimal quality requirements. There is a lack of information concerning tests, procedures and theoretical predictions of pollutant concentrations in fumes from detonation and combustion operations with industrial explosives. The most common industrial explosives in Portugal are ammonium nitrate-fuel oil compositions (anfo), and dynamite. Recently, ammonium nitrate based emulsion explosives are more and more used in industrial applications. This paper presents the structure and fundamental thermodynamic equations of THOR computer code to calculate the combustion and detonation products (CO[sub 2], CO, H[sub 2]O, N[sub 2], O[sub 2], H[sub 2], OH, NO, H, N, O, HCN, NH[sub 3], NO[sub 2], N[sub 2]O, CH[sub 4] gases and two kinds of solid carbon - graphite and diamond) for the minimum value of Gibbs free energy, using three well known equations of state - BKW, H9 and H12. Detonation experiments are described and gas analysis discussed. Measured pollutants concentrations (CO, CO[sub 2], NO and NO[sub 2]), as a function of volume of explosion chamber, prove the dependence of expansion mechanisms on CO and NO formation and recombination and validate theoretical predictions. Incineration of explosives in a fluidised bed is described. Products composition from isobare adiabatic combustion of selected explosives has been calculated and correlated with previous calculations for a detonation regime. The obtained results demonstrate the possibility of predicting gas composition of detonation and combustion products of industrial explosives. 22 refs., 14 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Explosions of ammonium nitrate fertilizer in storage or transportation are preventable accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babrauskas, Vytenis, E-mail: vytob@doctorfire.com

    2016-03-05

    Highlights: • First comprehensive review of a century of ammonium nitrate explosions in transport or storage. • Uncontrolled fires are found to be the cause of all such explosions. • Importance of studying common factors, not unique factors, in accidents presented. • Fire and explosion safety measures identified that would prevent recurrence of such disasters. • Shortcomings of existing regulations and guidelines are demonstrated. - Abstract: Ammonium nitrate (AN) is a detonable substance which has led to numerous disasters throughout the 20th century and until the present day, with the latest disaster occurring on 17 April 2013. Needed safety lesson have not been learned, since typically each accident was viewed as a great surprise and investigations focused on finding some unique reason for the accident, rather than examining what is common among the accidents. A review is made of accidents which involved AN for fertilizer purposes, and excluding incidents involving ANFO or additional explosives apart from AN. It is found that, for explosions in storage or transportation, 100% of these disasters had a single causative factor—an uncontrollable fire. Thus, such disasters can be eliminated by eliminating the potential for uncontrolled fire. Two actions are required to achieve this: (1) adoption of fertilizer formulations which reduce the potential for uncontrolled fire and for detonation; and (2) adoption of building safety measures which provide assurance against uncontrolled fires. Technical means are available for achieving both these required measures. These measures have been known for a long time and the only reason that disasters continue to occur is that these safety measures are not implemented. The problem can be solved unilaterally by product manufacturers or by government authorities, but preferably both should take necessary steps.

  14. Atmospheric emission of NOx from mining explosives: A critical review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oluwoye, Ibukun; Dlugogorski, Bogdan Z.; Gore, Jeff; Oskierski, Hans C.; Altarawneh, Mohammednoor

    2017-10-01

    High-energy materials such as emulsions, slurries and ammonium-nitrate fuel-oil (ANFO) explosives play crucial roles in mining, quarrying, tunnelling and many other infrastructure activities, because of their excellent transport and blasting properties. These explosives engender environmental concerns, due to atmospheric pollution caused by emission of dust and nitrogen oxides (NOx) from blasts, the latter characterised by the average emission factor of 5 kg (t AN explosive)-1. This first-of-its-kind review provides a concise literature account of the formation of NOx during blasting of AN-based explosives, employed in surface operations. We estimate the total NOx emission rate from AN-based explosives as 0.05 Tg (i.e., 5 × 104 t) N per annum, compared to the total global annual anthropogenic NOx emissions of 41.3 × 106 t N y-1. Although minor in the global sense, the large localised plumes from blasting exhibit high NOx concentration (500 ppm) exceeding up to 3000 times the international standards. This emission has profound consequences at mining sites and for adjacent atmospheric environment, necessitating expensive management of exclusion zones. The review describes different types of AN energetic materials for civilian applications, and summarises the essential properties and terminologies pertaining to their use. Furthermore, we recapitulate the mechanisms that lead to the formation of the reactive nitrogen species in blasting of AN-based explosives, review their implications to atmospheric air pollution, and compare the mechanisms with those experienced in other thermal and combustion operations. We also examine the mitigation approaches, including guidelines and operational-control measures. The review discusses the abatement technologies such as the formulation of new explosive mixtures, comprising secondary fuels, spin traps and other additives, in light of their effectiveness and efficiency. We conclude the review with a summary of unresolved problems

  15. Some properties of explosive mixtures containing peroxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeman, Svatopluk [Institute of Energetic Materials, Faculty of Chemical Technology, University of Pardubice, CZ-532 10 Pardubice (Czech Republic)], E-mail: svatopluk.zeman@upce.cz; Trzcinski, Waldemar A. [Institute of Chemistry, Military University of Technology, PL-00-908 Warsaw 49 (Poland); Matyas, Robert [Institute of Energetic Materials, Faculty of Chemical Technology, University of Pardubice, CZ-532 10 Pardubice (Czech Republic)

    2008-06-15

    This study concerns mixtures of triacetone triperoxide (3,3,6,6,9,9-hexamethyl-1,2,4,5,7,8-hexoxonane, TATP) and ammonium nitrate (AN) with added water (W), as the case may be, and dry mixtures of TATP with urea nitrate (UN). Relative performances (RP) of the mixtures and their individual components, relative to TNT, were determined by means of ballistic mortar. The detonation energies, E{sub 0}, and detonation velocities, D, were calculated for the mixtures studied by means of the thermodynamic code CHEETAH. Relationships have been found and are discussed between the RP and the E{sub 0} values related to unit volume of gaseous products of detonation of these mixtures. These relationships together with those between RP and oxygen balance values of the mixtures studied indicate different types of participation of AN and UN in the explosive decomposition of the respective mixtures. Dry TATP/UN mixtures exhibit lower RP than analogous mixtures TATP/AN containing up to 25% of water. Depending on the water content, the TATP/AN mixtures possess higher detonability values than the ANFO explosives. A semi-logarithmic relationship between the D values and oxygen coefficients has been derived for all the mixtures studied at the charge density of 1000 kg m{sup -3}. Among the mixtures studied, this relationship distinguishes several samples of the type of 'tertiary explosives' as well as samples that approach 'high explosives' in their performances and detonation velocities.

  16. Results, meta-analysis and a first evaluation of UNOxR, the urinary nitrate-to-nitrite molar ratio, as a measure of nitrite reabsorption in experimental and clinical settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsikas, Dimitrios; Hanff, Erik; Bollenbach, Alexander; Kruger, Ruan; Pham, Vu Vi; Chobanyan-Jürgens, Kristine; Wedekind, Dirk; Arndt, Tanja; Jörns, Anne; Berbée, Jimmy F P; Princen, Hans M G; Lücke, Thomas; Mariotti, François; Huneau, Jean-François; Ückert, Stefan; Frölich, Jürgen C; Lenzen, Sigurd

    2018-05-04

    We recently found that renal carbonic anhydrase (CA) is involved in the reabsorption of inorganic nitrite (NO 2 - ), an abundant reservoir of nitric oxide (NO) in tissues and cells. Impaired NO synthesis in the endothelium and decreased NO bioavailability in the circulation are considered major contributors to the development and progression of renal and cardiovascular diseases in different conditions including diabetes. Isolated human and bovine erythrocytic CAII and CAIV can convert nitrite to nitrous acid (HONO) and its anhydride N 2 O 3 which, in the presence of thiols (RSH), are further converted to S-nitrosothiols (RSNO) and NO. Thus, CA may be responsible both for the homeostasis of nitrite and for its bioactivation to RSNO/NO. We hypothesized that enhanced excretion of nitrite in the urine may contribute to NO-related dysfunctions in the renal and cardiovascular systems, and proposed the urinary nitrate-to-nitrite molar ratio, i.e., U NOx R, as a measure of renal CA-dependent excretion of nitrite. Based on results from clinical and experimental animal studies, here, we report on a first evaluation of U NOx R. We determined U NOx R values in preterm neonates, healthy children, and adults, in children suffering from type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) or Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), in elderly subjects suffering from chronic rheumatic diseases, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), coronary artery disease (CAD), or peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD). We also determined U NOx R values in healthy young men who ingested isosorbide dinitrate (ISDN), pentaerythrityl tetranitrate (PETN), or inorganic nitrate. In addition, we tested the utility of U NOx R in two animal models, i.e., the LEW.1AR1-iddm rat, an animal model of human T1DM, and the APOE*3-Leiden.CETP mice, a model of human dyslipidemia. Mean U NOx R values were lower in adult patients with rheumatic diseases (187) and in T2DM patients of the DALI study (74) as compared to healthy elderly adults

  17. Geochemical evidence of groundwater flow paths and the fate and transport of constituents of concern in the alluvial aquifer at Fort Wingate Depot Activity, New Mexico, 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Andrew J.; Henry, David W.; Langman, Jeffery B.

    2013-01-01

    accidental spill of perchlorate was spatially limited, and that dilution is the primary attenuation process for these constituents. The explosive concentrations of the nitramine 1,3,5-trinitroperhydro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) and the oxidizer perchlorate both support that determination. Unlike RDX and perchlorate, there were no detectable concentrations of trinitrotoluene (TNT) in the aquifer. Based on the chemical nature of TNT and the redox conditions found in the aquifer, it is interpreted that TNT is lost to irreversible sorption and aerobic degradation. Nitrate was ubiquitous in the alluvial groundwater in October 2009. The nitrate concentrations in wells associated with the explosives’ groundwater flow path indicate attenuation primarily through dilution, similar to that of RDX. The origin of nitrate concentrations in the wells located in the Administration Area is uncertain but may have resulted from the leakage of aging clay sewage pipes that service most of the structures within that area or as a relic of a former hydrologic regime in which water from the washout operation migrated across a broader area. Sufficient data do not exist to definitively identify the location(s) of water discharge in this area, but transpiration from near the Administration Area is supported by the geochemical concentrations.

  18. A novel rat model of blast-induced traumatic brain injury simulating different damage degree: implications for morphological, neurological, and biomarker changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengdong eLiu

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In current military conflicts and civilian terrorism, blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI is the primary cause of neurotrauma. However, the effects and mechanisms of bTBI are poorly understood. Although previous researchers have made significant contributions to establishing animal models for the simulation of bTBI, the precision and controllability of blast-induced injury in animal models must be improved. Therefore, we established a novel rat model to simulate blast-wave injury to the brain. To simulate different extents of bTBI injury, the animals were divided into moderate and severe injury groups. The miniature spherical explosives (PETN used in each group were of different sizes (2.5 mm diameter in the moderate injury group and 3.0 mm diameter in the severe injury group. A specially designed apparatus was able to precisely adjust the positions of the miniature explosives and create eight rats with bTBI simultaneously, using a single electric detonator. Neurological functions, gross pathologies, histopathological changes and the expression levels of various biomarkers were examined after the explosion. Compared with the moderate injury group, there were significantly more neurological dysfunctions, cortical contusions, intraparenchymal hemorrhages, cortical expression of S-100β, MBP, NSE, IL-8, IL-10, iNOS and HIF-1α in the severe injury group. These results demonstrate that we have created a reliable and reproducible bTBI model in rats. This model will be helpful for studying the mechanisms of bTBI and developing strategies for clinical bTBI treatment.

  19. Effect of cetuximab combined with paclitaxel + cisplatin neoadjuvant chemotherapy on esophageal cancer cell proliferation and invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Lin Zhao

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the effect of cetuximab combined with paclitaxel + cisplatin neoadjuvant chemotherapy on esophageal cancer cell proliferation and invasion. Methods: A total of 62 patients with esophageal cancer who were treated in the hospital between January 2015 and December 2016 were collected and divided into control group and observation group according to random number table, with 31 cases in each group. Control group of patients received paclitaxel + cisplatin neoadjuvant chemotherapy + surgery, and observation group of patients accepted cetuximab combined with paclitaxel + cisplatin neoadjuvant chemotherapy + surgery. The differences in proliferation and invasion gene expression in the tumor tissue were compared between two groups of patients before and after chemotherapy. Results: Before chemotherapy, differences in proliferation and invasion gene expression in tumor tissue were not statistically significant between two groups of patients. After chemotherapy, proproliferation genes FOXA1, ABCE1, USP39 and Nestin mRNA expression in tumor tissue of observation group were significantly lower than those of control group; anti-proliferation genes PETN, KLF4, TSLC1 and AnnexinA2 mRNA expression were significantly higher than those of control group; pro-invasion genes γ-synuclein, CXCR4 and Snail mRNA expression were significantly lower than those of control group; anti-invasion genes CIAPIN1, Fez and Lrig1 mRNA expression were significantly higher than that of control group. Conclusions: Cetuximab combined with paclitaxel + cisplatin neoadjuvant chemotherapy can effectively inhibit the malignant degree of esophageal cancer cells and inhibit its proliferation and invasion.

  20. Reduced amino acids in the bovine uterine lumen of cloned versus in vitro fertilized pregnancies prior to implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groebner, Anna E; Zakhartchenko, Valeri; Bauersachs, Stefan; Rubio-Aliaga, Isabel; Daniel, Hannelore; Büttner, Mathias; Reichenbach, Horst D; Meyer, Heinrich H D; Wolf, Eckhard; Ulbrich, Susanne E

    2011-10-01

    Fetal overgrowth and placental abnormalities frequently occur in pregnancies following somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). An optimal intrauterine supply of amino acids (AA) is of specific importance for the development of the bovine preimplantation embryo, and a defective regulation of AA supply might contribute to pregnancy failures. Thus, we analyzed 41 AA and derivatives by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry in uterine flushings of day 18 pregnant heifers carrying in vitro fertilized (IVF) or SCNT embryos, which were cultured under identical conditions until transfer to recipients. The concentrations of several AA were reduced in samples from SCNT pregnancies: L-leucine (1.8-fold), L-valine (1.6-fold), L-isoleucine (1.9-fold), L-phenylalanine (1.5-fold), L-glutamic acid (3.9-fold), L-aspartic acid (4.0-fold), L-proline (2.6-fold), L-alanine (2.0-fold), L-arginine (2.5-fold), and L-lysine (1.9-fold). The endometrial transcript abundance for the AA transporter solute carrier family 7 (amino acid transporter, L-type), member 8 (SLC7A8) was also 2.4-fold lower in SCNT pregnancies. O-phosphoethanolamine (PetN) was 11-fold (p=0.0001) reduced in the uterine fluid of animals carrying an SCNT conceptus, pointing toward changes of the phospholipid metabolism. We provide evidence for disturbed embryo-maternal interactions in the preimplantation period after transfer of SCNT embryos, which may contribute to developmental abnormalities. These are unlikely related to the major embryonic pregnancy recognition signal interferon-tau, because similar activities were detected in uterine flushings of the SCNT and IVF groups.

  1. Gasdynamic Model of Turbulent Combustion in TNT Explosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhl, A L; Bell, J B; Beckner, V E

    2010-01-08

    A model is proposed to simulate turbulent combustion in confined TNT explosions. It is based on: (i) the multi-component gasdynamic conservation laws, (ii) a fast-chemistry model for TNT-air combustion, (iii) a thermodynamic model for frozen reactants and equilibrium products, (iv) a high-order Godunov scheme providing a non-diffusive solution of the governing equations, and (v) an ILES approach whereby adaptive mesh refinement is used to capture the energy bearing scales of the turbulence on the grid. Three-dimensional numerical simulations of explosion fields from 1.5-g PETN/TNT charges were performed. Explosions in six different chambers were studied: three calorimeters (volumes of 6.6-l, 21.2-l and 40.5-l with L/D = 1), and three tunnels (L/D = 3.8, 4.65 and 12.5 with volumes of 6.3-l) - to investigate the influence of chamber volume and geometry on the combustion process. Predicted pressures histories were quite similar to measured pressure histories for all cases studied. Experimentally, mass fraction of products, Y{sub p}{sup exp}, reached a peak value of 88% at an excess air ratio of twice stoichiometric, and then decayed with increasing air dilution; mass fractions Y{sub p}{sup calc} computed from the numerical simulations followed similar trends. Based on this agreement, we conclude that the dominant effect that controls the rate of TNT combustion with air is the turbulent mixing rate; the ILES approach along with the fast-chemistry model used here adequately captures this effect.

  2. Initial characterization of a highly contaminated high explosives outfall in preparation for in situ bioremediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Betty A. Strietelmeier; Patrick J. Coyne; Patricia A. Leonard; W. Lamar Miller; Jerry R. Brian

    1999-12-01

    In situ bioremediation is a viable, cost-effective treatment for environmental contamination of many kinds. The feasibility of using biological techniques to remediate soils contaminated with high explosives (HE) requires laboratory evaluation before proceeding to a larger scale field operation. Laboratory investigations have been conducted at pilot scale which indicate that an anaerobic process could be successful at reducing levels of HE, primarily HMX, RDX and TNT, in contaminated soils. A field demonstration project has been designed to create an anaerobic environment for the degradation of HE materials. The first step in this project, initial characterization of the test area, was conducted and is the subject of this report. The levels of HE compounds found in the samples from the test area were higher than the EPA Method 8330 was able to extract without subsequent re-precipitation; therefore, a new method was developed using a superior extractant system. The test area sampling design was relatively simple as one might expect in an initial characterization. A total of 60 samples were each removed to a depth of 4 inches using a 1 inch diameter corer. The samples were spaced at relatively even intervals across a 20 foot cross-section through the middle of four 7-foot-long adjacent plots which are designed to be a part of an in situ bioremediation experiment. Duplicate cores were taken from each location for HE extraction and analysis in order to demonstrate and measure the heterogeneity of the contamination. Each soil sample was air dried and ball-milled to provide a homogeneous solid for extraction and analysis. Several samples had large consolidated pieces of what appeared to be solid HE. These were not ball-milled due to safety concerns, but were dissolved and the solutions were analyzed. The new extraction method was superior in that results obtained for several of the contaminants were up to 20 times those obtained with the EPA extraction method. The

  3. Factors Effecting the Fate and Transport of CL-20 in the Vadose Zone and Groundwater: Final Report 2002 - 2004 SERDP Project CP-1255

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szecsody, James E.; Riley, Robert G.; Devary, Brooks J.; Girvin, Donald C.; Resch, Charles T.; Campbell, James A.; Fredrickson, Herbert L.; Thompson, Karen T.; Crocker, Fiona H.; Qasim, Mohammad M.; Gamerdinger, Amy P.; Lemond, Luke A.

    2005-06-01

    This SERDP-funded project was initiated to investigate the fate of CL-20 in the subsurface environment, with a focus on identification and quantification of geochemical and microbial reactions of CL-20. CL-20 can be released to the surface and subsurface terrestrial environment by: a) manufacturing processes, b) munition storage, and c) use with low order detonation or unexploded ordnance. The risk of far-field subsurface migration was assessed through labora-tory experiments with a variety of sediments and subsurface materials to quantify processes that control CL-20 sorption-limited migration and degradation. Results of this study show that CL-20 will exhibit differing behavior in the subsurface terrestrial environment: 1. CL-20 on the sediment surface will photodegrade and interact with plants/animals (described in other SERDP projects CU 1254, 1256). CL-20 will exhibit greater sorption in humid sediments to organic matter. Transport will be solubility limited (i.e., low CL-20 aqueous solubility). 2. CL-20 infiltration into soils (<2 m) from spills will be subject to sorption to soil organic matter (if present), and low to high biodegradation rates (weeks to years) depending on the microbial population (greater in humid environment). 3. CL-20 in the vadose zone (>2 m) will be, in most cases, subject to low sorption and low degradation rates, so would persist in the subsurface environment and be at risk for deep migration. Low water content in arid regions will result in a decrease in both sorption and the degradation rate. Measured degradation rates in unsaturated sediments of years would result in significant subsurface migration distances. 4. CL-20 in groundwater will be subject to some sorption but likely very slow degradation rates. CL-20 sorption will be greater than RDX. Most CL-20 degradation will be abiotic (ferrous iron and other transition metals), because most deep subsurface systems have extremely low natural microbial populations. Degradation rates

  4. Effects of Temperature and Humidity on the Characterization of C-4 Explosive Threats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, C. J.; Yoder, T. S.

    2012-06-01

    Both the quantity and the amount of time that an explosive is present on the surface of a material is dependent upon the amount of explosive originally deposited on the surface, the adhesive forces, temperature and humidity, as well as other environmental factors. This laboratory study focused on evaluating RDX crystal morphology changes resulting from variations in temperature and humidity conditions of the sample. The temperature and humidity conditions were controlled using a Tenney THRJ environmental chamber and a Tenney T11RC-1.5 environmental chamber. These chambers allow the temperature and humidity to be held within ±3 °C and ±5 % RH. The temperature and humidity conditions used for this test series were: 4 °C/40 %RH, 21 °C/20 %RH (samples left on benchtop), 21 °C/70 %RH, 21 °C/95 %RH, 35 °C/40 %RH, 35 °C/70 %RH, and 35 °C/95 %RH. These temperature and humidity set points were chosen to represent a wide range of conditions that may be found in real world scenarios. C-4 (RDX crystals and binder material) was deposited on the surface of one of six substrates by placing a fingerprint from the explosive block onto the matrix surface. The substrates were chosen to provide a range of items that are commonly used. Six substrate types were used during these tests: 50 % cotton/50 % polyester as found in T-shirts, 100 % cotton with a smooth surface such as that found in a cotton dress shirt, 100 % cotton on a rough surface such as that found on canvas or denim, suede leather such as might be found on jackets, purses, or shoes, painted metal obtained from a car hood, and a computer diskette. The samples were not pre-cleaned prior to testing and contained sizing agents, and in the case of the metal: oil, dirt, scratches, and rust spots. The substrates were photographed at various stages of testing, using a Zeiss Discover V12 stereoscope with Axiocam ICc1 3 megapixel digital camera, to determine any changes in the crystalline morphology. Some of the samples

  5. Iron-Dependent Enzyme Catalyzes the Initial Step in Biodegradation of N-Nitroglycine by Variovorax sp. Strain JS1663.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahan, Kristina M; Zheng, Hangping; Fida, Tekle T; Parry, Ronald J; Graham, David E; Spain, Jim C

    2017-08-01

    Nitramines are key constituents of most of the explosives currently in use and consequently contaminate soil and groundwater at many military facilities around the world. Toxicity from nitramine contamination poses a health risk to plants and animals. Thus, understanding how nitramines are biodegraded is critical to environmental remediation. The biodegradation of synthetic nitramine compounds such as hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) has been studied for decades, but little is known about the catabolism of naturally produced nitramine compounds. In this study, we report the isolation of a soil bacterium, Variovorax sp. strain JS1663, that degrades N -nitroglycine (NNG), a naturally produced nitramine, and the key enzyme involved in its catabolism. Variovorax sp. JS1663 is a Gram-negative, non-spore-forming motile bacterium isolated from activated sludge based on its ability to use NNG as a sole growth substrate under aerobic conditions. A single gene ( nnlA ) encodes an iron-dependent enzyme that releases nitrite from NNG through a proposed β-elimination reaction. Bioinformatics analysis of the amino acid sequence of NNG lyase identified a PAS (Per-Arnt-Sim) domain. PAS domains can be associated with heme cofactors and function as signal sensors in signaling proteins. This is the first instance of a PAS domain present in a denitration enzyme. The NNG biodegradation pathway should provide the basis for the identification of other enzymes that cleave the N-N bond and facilitate the development of enzymes to cleave similar bonds in RDX, nitroguanidine, and other nitramine explosives. IMPORTANCE The production of antibiotics and other allelopathic chemicals is a major aspect of chemical ecology. The biodegradation of such chemicals can play an important ecological role in mitigating or eliminating the effects of such compounds. N -Nitroglycine (NNG) is produced by the Gram-positive filamentous soil bacterium Streptomyces noursei This study reports the

  6. Single and multi degree of freedom analysis of steel beams under blast loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nassr, Amr A., E-mail: nassraa@mcmaster.ca [Dept. of Civil Engineering, McMaster Univ., Hamilton, ON, L8S 4L7 (Canada); Razaqpur, A. Ghani, E-mail: razaqpu@mcmaster.ca [Dept. of Civil Engineering, McMaster Univ., Hamilton, ON, L8S 4L7 (Canada); Tait, Michael J., E-mail: taitm@mcmaster.ca [Dept. of Civil Engineering, McMaster Univ., Hamilton, ON, L8S 4L7 (Canada); Campidelli, Manuel, E-mail: campide@mcmaster.ca [Dept. of Civil Engineering, McMaster Univ., Hamilton, ON, L8S 4L7 (Canada); Foo, Simon, E-mail: simon.foo@pwgsc.gc.ca [Public Works and Government Services, Gatineau, Quebec (Canada)

    2012-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Experimentally tested beams under blast are analyzed using SDOF and MDOF models. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SDOF model adequately captures the time dependant deformations and internal forces. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Constant DIF based on a low strain rate leads to conservative estimate of the DIF. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The responses of the test beams are governed by the first mode of vibration. - Abstract: This paper presents detailed analysis of the results of field tests on 13 full scale wide flange steel beams subjected to blast loads generated by the detonation of up to 250 kg of ANFO explosive. The experimental results are analyzed using an equivalent Single-Degree-of-Freedom (SDOF) model of a beam, which includes material nonlinearity and strain rate effects. To account for strain rate effect on beam stiffness and strength, its full moment-curvature response is determined by dividing its cross-section into a number of layers and a strain rate-dependent stress-strain relationship, based on the Cowper-Symonds strain rate model, is used to capture the nonlinear stress distribution over the section. To determine the effects of higher modes of vibration and the variation of beam mechanical properties along its length on its dynamic response, the test beams are also analyzed using a Multi-Degree-of-Freedom (MDOF) model involving beam finite elements. Each element has two nodes and three degrees of freedom and is again divided into a number of layers to capture the strain rate effect and nonlinear stress distribution over its depth. The predicted displacements and strains by the two models are compared with the corresponding experimental data and the results show that for the given beams, the time-dependant deformations, internal forces, and moments can be adequately predicted by either model because the first mode of vibration is found to dominate their response; however, the use of a constant strain rate

  7. Single and multi degree of freedom analysis of steel beams under blast loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nassr, Amr A.; Razaqpur, A. Ghani; Tait, Michael J.; Campidelli, Manuel; Foo, Simon

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Experimentally tested beams under blast are analyzed using SDOF and MDOF models. ► SDOF model adequately captures the time dependant deformations and internal forces. ► Constant DIF based on a low strain rate leads to conservative estimate of the DIF. ► The responses of the test beams are governed by the first mode of vibration. - Abstract: This paper presents detailed analysis of the results of field tests on 13 full scale wide flange steel beams subjected to blast loads generated by the detonation of up to 250 kg of ANFO explosive. The experimental results are analyzed using an equivalent Single-Degree-of-Freedom (SDOF) model of a beam, which includes material nonlinearity and strain rate effects. To account for strain rate effect on beam stiffness and strength, its full moment-curvature response is determined by dividing its cross-section into a number of layers and a strain rate-dependent stress-strain relationship, based on the Cowper–Symonds strain rate model, is used to capture the nonlinear stress distribution over the section. To determine the effects of higher modes of vibration and the variation of beam mechanical properties along its length on its dynamic response, the test beams are also analyzed using a Multi-Degree-of-Freedom (MDOF) model involving beam finite elements. Each element has two nodes and three degrees of freedom and is again divided into a number of layers to capture the strain rate effect and nonlinear stress distribution over its depth. The predicted displacements and strains by the two models are compared with the corresponding experimental data and the results show that for the given beams, the time-dependant deformations, internal forces, and moments can be adequately predicted by either model because the first mode of vibration is found to dominate their response; however, the use of a constant strain rate through the so-called Dynamic Increase Factor (DIF) can lead to highly conservative estimate of the

  8. Study by Monte Carlo methods of an explosive detection system using a D-D generator and Nal (Tl) detectors; Estudio mediante metodos Monte Carlo de un sistema de deteccion de explosivos utilizando un generador D-D y detectores de NaI (Tl)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cevallos R, L. E.; Guzman G, K. A.; Gallego, E.; Garcia F, G. [Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Escuela Tecnica Superior de Ingenieros Industriales, Departamento de Ingenieria Energetica, C. Jose Gutierrez Abascal 2, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Vega C, H. R., E-mail: lenin_cevallos@hotmail.com [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas, Zac. (Mexico)

    2017-10-15

    The detection of hidden explosive material is very important for national security. Using Monte Carlo methods, with the code MCNP6, several proposed configurations of a detection system with a Deuterium-Deuterium (D-D) generator, in conjunction with NaI (Tl) scintillation detectors, have been evaluated to intercept hidden explosives. The response of the system to various explosive samples such as Rdx and ammonium nitrate are analyzed as the main components of home-military explosives. The D-D generator produces fast neutrons of 2.5 MeV in a maximum field of 10{sup 10} n/s (Dd-110) which is surrounded with high density polyethylene in order to thermalized the fast neutrons making them interact with the sample inspected, giving rise to the emission of gamma rays that generates a characteristic spectrum of the elements that constitute it, being able in this way to determine its chemical composition and identify the type of substance. The necessary shielding is evaluated to estimate the admissible operation dose, with thicknesses of lead and borated polyethylene, in order to place it at some point of the Laboratory of Neutron Measurements of the Polytechnic University of Madrid where the shielding is optimal. The results show that its functionality is promising in the field of national security for the explosives inspection. (Author)

  9. Infrared photothermal imaging of trace explosives on relevant substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendziora, Christopher A.; Furstenberg, Robert; Papantonakis, Michael; Nguyen, Viet; Borchert, James; Byers, Jeff; McGill, R. Andrew

    2013-06-01

    We are developing a technique for the stand-off detection of trace explosives on relevant substrate surfaces using photo-thermal infrared (IR) imaging spectroscopy (PT-IRIS). This approach leverages one or more compact IR quantum cascade lasers, tuned to strong absorption bands in the analytes and directed to illuminate an area on a surface of interest. An IR focal plane array is used to image the surface and detect small increases in thermal emission upon laser illumination. The PT-IRIS signal is processed as a hyperspectral image cube comprised of spatial, spectral and temporal dimensions as vectors within a detection algorithm. The ability to detect trace analytes on relevant substrates is critical for stand-off applications, but is complicated by the optical and thermal analyte/substrate interactions. This manuscript describes recent PT-IRIS experimental results and analysis for traces of RDX, TNT, ammonium nitrate (AN) and sucrose on relevant substrates (steel, polyethylene, glass and painted steel panels). We demonstrate that these analytes can be detected on these substrates at relevant surface mass loadings (10 μg/cm2 to 100 μg/cm2) even at the single pixel level.

  10. Detection of trace explosives on relevant substrates using a mobile platform for photothermal infrared imaging spectroscopy (PT-IRIS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendziora, Christopher A.; Furstenberg, Robert; Papantonakis, Michael; Nguyen, Viet; Byers, Jeff; McGill, R. Andrew

    2015-05-01

    This manuscript describes the results of recent tests regarding standoff detection of trace explosives on relevant substrates using a mobile platform. We are developing a technology for detection based on photo-thermal infrared (IR) imaging spectroscopy (PT-IRIS). This approach leverages one or more microfabricated IR quantum cascade lasers, tuned to strong absorption bands in the analytes and directed to illuminate an area on a surface of interest. An IR focal plane array is used to image the surface thermal emission upon laser illumination. The PT-IRIS signal is processed as a hyperspectral image cube comprised of spatial, spectral and temporal dimensions as vectors within a detection algorithm. Increased sensitivity to explosives and selectivity between different analyte types is achieved by narrow bandpass IR filters in the collection path. We have previously demonstrated the technique at several meters of stand-off distance indoors and in field tests, while operating the lasers below the infrared eye-safe intensity limit (100 mW/cm2). Sensitivity to explosive traces as small as a single 10 μm diameter particle (~1 ng) has been demonstrated. Analytes tested here include RDX, TNT, ammonium nitrate and sucrose. The substrates tested in this current work include metal, plastics, glass and painted car panels.

  11. Infrared photothermal imaging spectroscopy for detection of trace explosives on surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendziora, Christopher A; Furstenberg, Robert; Papantonakis, Michael; Nguyen, Viet; Byers, Jeff; Andrew McGill, R

    2015-11-01

    We are developing a technique for the standoff detection of trace explosives on relevant substrate surfaces using photothermal infrared (IR) imaging spectroscopy (PT-IRIS). This approach leverages one or more compact IR quantum cascade lasers, which are tuned to strong absorption bands in the analytes and directed to illuminate an area on a surface of interest. An IR focal plane array is used to image the surface and detect increases in thermal emission upon laser illumination. The PT-IRIS signal is processed as a hyperspectral image cube comprised of spatial, spectral, and temporal dimensions as vectors within a detection algorithm. The ability to detect trace analytes at standoff on relevant substrates is critical for security applications but is complicated by the optical and thermal analyte/substrate interactions. This manuscript describes a series of PT-IRIS experimental results and analysis for traces of RDX, TNT, ammonium nitrate, and sucrose on steel, polyethylene, glass, and painted steel panels. We demonstrate detection at surface mass loadings comparable with fingerprint depositions ( 10μg/cm2 to 100μg/cm2) from an area corresponding to a single pixel within the thermal image.

  12. Carbon-coated copper nanoparticles prepared by detonation method and their thermocatalysis on ammonium perchlorate

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Chongwei; Ding, Penghui; Ye, Baoyun; Geng, Xiaoheng; Wang, Jingyu

    2017-03-01

    Carbon-coated copper nanoparticles (CCNPs) were prepared by initiating a high-density charge pressed with a mixture of microcrystalline wax, hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX), and copper nitrate hydrate (Cu(NO3)2.3H2O) in an explosion vessel filled with nitrogen gas. The detonation products were characterized by transmission electron microcopy (TEM), high resolution transmission electron microcopy (HRTEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and Raman spectroscopy. The effects of CCNPs on thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate (AP) were also investigated by differential scanning calorimeter (DSC). Results indicated that the detonation products were spherical, 25-40 nm in size, and had an apparent core-shell structure. In this structure, the carbon shell was 3-5 nm thick and mainly composed of graphite, C8 (a kind of carbyne), and amorphous carbon. When 5 wt.% CCNPs was mixed with 95 wt.% AP, the high-temperature decomposition peak of AP decreased by 95.97, 96.99, and 96.69 °Cat heating rates of 5, 10, and 20 °C/min, respectively. Moreover, CCNPs decreased the activation energy of AP as calculated through Kissinger's method by 25%, which indicated outstanding catalysis for the thermal decomposition of AP.

  13. Carbon-coated copper nanoparticles prepared by detonation method and their thermocatalysis on ammonium perchlorate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chongwei An

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Carbon-coated copper nanoparticles (CCNPs were prepared by initiating a high-density charge pressed with a mixture of microcrystalline wax, hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX, and copper nitrate hydrate (Cu(NO32·3H2O in an explosion vessel filled with nitrogen gas. The detonation products were characterized by transmission electron microcopy (TEM, high resolution transmission electron microcopy (HRTEM, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX, X-ray diffraction (XRD, and Raman spectroscopy. The effects of CCNPs on thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate (AP were also investigated by differential scanning calorimeter (DSC. Results indicated that the detonation products were spherical, 25-40 nm in size, and had an apparent core-shell structure. In this structure, the carbon shell was 3-5 nm thick and mainly composed of graphite, C8 (a kind of carbyne, and amorphous carbon. When 5 wt.% CCNPs was mixed with 95 wt.% AP, the high-temperature decomposition peak of AP decreased by 95.97, 96.99, and 96.69 °Cat heating rates of 5, 10, and 20 °C/min, respectively. Moreover, CCNPs decreased the activation energy of AP as calculated through Kissinger’s method by 25%, which indicated outstanding catalysis for the thermal decomposition of AP.

  14. Synthesis and theoretical studies on nitrogen-rich salts of bis[4-nitraminofurazanyl-3-azoxy]azofurazan (ADNAAF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Chunmei; Chu, Yuting; Xu, Liwen; Lei, Wu; Wang, Fengyun; Xia, Mingzhu

    2017-01-01

    Multi-furazan compounds bis[4-nitramino- furazanyl-3-azoxy]azofurazan (ADNAAF) and its derivatives were first synthesized by our research group, and their structures were characterized by IR, 1 H-NMR, 13 C-NMR spectrums, and element analysis. ADNAAF was synthesized by nitration reaction of bis[4-aminofurazanyl-3-azoxy]azofurazan (ADAAF), and then reacted with ammonium hydroxide, hydrazine hydrate, and guanidine nitrate to obtain three salts marked as salt 1, 2, and 3, respectively. The thermal stabilities of the three salts were supported by the results of DSC analysis, which shows the decomposition temperatures are all above 190 °C. Their densities, enthalpies of formation, and detonation properties were studied by density functional theory (DFT) method. Salt 1 has the best detonation pressure (P), 37.42 GPa, and detonation velocity (D), 8.88 km/s, while salt 2 has the best nitrogen content and heat of detonation (Q), 1.27 kcal mol -1 . The detonation properties of salt 1 is similar to that of 1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazineane (RDX). It means that the ammonium cation can provide the better D and P than the cation of hydrazine and guanidine. The three cations offer the enthalpies of formations in the order of hydrazinium > guanidinium > ammonium. Graphical Abstract Nitrogen-rich salts of bis[4-nitraminofurazanyl-3-azoxy]azofurazan(ADNAAF).

  15. Emerging contaminants: Presentations at the 2009 Toxicology and Risk Assessment Conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murnyak, George; Vandenberg, John; Yaroschak, Paul J.; Williams, Larry; Prabhakaran, Krishnan; Hinz, John

    2011-01-01

    A session entitled 'Emerging Contaminants' was held in April 2009 in Cincinnati, OH at the 2009 Toxicology and Risk Assessment Conference. The purpose of the session was to share information on both programmatic and technical aspects associated with emerging contaminants. Emerging contaminants are chemicals or materials that are characterized by a perceived or real threat to human health or environment, a lack of published health standards or an evolving standard. A contaminant may also be 'emerging' because of the discovery of a new source, a new pathway to humans, or a new detection method or technology. The session included five speakers representing the Department of Defense (DoD), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and each of the military services. The DoD created the Emerging Contaminant Directorate to proactively address environmental, health, and safety concerns associated with emerging contaminants. This session described the scan-watch-action list process, impact assessment methodology, and integrated risk management concept that DoD has implemented to manage emerging contaminants. EPA presented emerging trends in health risk assessment. Researchers made technical presentations on the status of some emerging contaminates in the assessment process (i.e. manganese, RDX, and naphthalene).

  16. One-electron standard reduction potentials of nitroaromatic and cyclic nitramine explosives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchimiya, Minori; Gorb, Leonid; Isayev, Olexandr; Qasim, Mohammad M.; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2010-01-01

    Extensive studies have been conducted in the past decades to predict the environmental abiotic and biotic redox fate of nitroaromatic and nitramine explosives. However, surprisingly little information is available on one-electron standard reduction potentials (E o (R-NO 2 /R-NO 2 - )). The E o (R-NO 2 /R-NO 2 - ) is an essential thermodynamic parameter for predicting the rate and extent of reductive transformation for energetic residues. In this study, experimental (linear free energy relationships) and theoretical (ab initio calculation) approaches were employed to determine E o (R-NO 2 /R-NO 2 - ) for nitroaromatic, (caged) cyclic nitramine, and nitroimino explosives that are found in military installations or are emerging contaminants. The results indicate a close agreement between experimental and theoretical E o (R-NO 2 /R-NO 2 - ) and suggest a key trend: E o (R-NO 2 /R-NO 2 - ) value decreases from di- and tri-nitroaromatic (e.g., 2,4-dinitroanisole) to nitramine (e.g., RDX) to nitroimino compound (e.g., nitroguanidine). The observed trend in E o (R-NO 2 /R-NO 2 - ) agrees with reported rate trends for reductive degradation, suggesting a thermodynamic control on the reduction rate under anoxic/suboxic conditions. - Reduction of explosives becomes less thermodynamically favorable as the one-electron standard reduction potential decreases from di- and tri-nitroaromatic, nitramine, to nitroimino compounds.

  17. Effective gasoline site assessment using the D TECH trademark BTEX immunoassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hudak, R.T.; Melby, J.M.; Stave, J.W.

    1994-01-01

    The application of immunoassay to environmental testing can greatly aid in assessing sites for various contaminants including PCB, TNT, RDX, PAH and BTEX. Immunoassay offers several benefits to site assessment: it is accurate, reproducible and relatively inexpensive compared to instrumental analysis. In addition, because of its ease-of-use, this technique is ideal for the field and requires minimal user training. To demonstrate not only the effectiveness of the BTEX immunoassay, but also the reliability of the field results, a gasoline contaminated site was assessed comparing the BTEX immunoassay to gas chromatography. All sampling and site related activities were executed in accordance to the USEPA SW-846 guidelines. Three (3) analyses were performed on each sample. One immunoassay analysis was performed in the field by an individual who received two (2) hours of training prior to the start of the study. A technician familiar with the immunoassay ran the second analysis in a laboratory. Finally, an independent GC laboratory certified for BTEX method 8020 and 602 performed the GC analyses. One hundred one (101) samples were analyzed: thirty-nine (39) samples were water, the other sixty-two (62) were soils ranging from clay to silt. The results and costs of the methods are compared

  18. Novel methods for detecting buried explosive devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kercel, S.W.; Burlage, R.S.; Patek, D.R.; Smith, C.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Hibbs, A.D.; Rayner, T.J. [Quantum Magnetics, Inc., San Diego, CA (United States)

    1997-04-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Quantum Magnetics, Inc. (QM) are exploring novel landmine detection technologies. Technologies considered here include bioreporter bacteria, swept acoustic resonance, nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR), and semiotic data fusion. Bioreporter bacteria look promising for third-world humanitarian applications; they are inexpensive, and deployment does not require high-tech methods. Swept acoustic resonance may be a useful adjunct to magnetometers in humanitarian demining. For military demining, NQR is a promising method for detecting explosive substances; of 50,000 substances that have been tested, none has an NQR signature that can be mistaken for RDX or TNT. For both military and commercial demining, sensor fusion entails two daunting tasks, identifying fusible features in both present-day and emerging technologies, and devising a fusion algorithm that runs in real-time on cheap hardware. Preliminary research in these areas is encouraging. A bioreporter bacterium for TNT detection is under development. Investigation has just started in swept acoustic resonance as an approach to a cheap mine detector for humanitarian use. Real-time wavelet processing appears to be a key to extending NQR bomb detection into mine detection, including TNT-based mines. Recent discoveries in semiotics may be the breakthrough that will lead to a robust fused detection scheme.

  19. Evolution of Shock Waves in Silicon Carbide Rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balagansky, I. A.; Balagansky, A. I.; Razorenov, S. V.; Utkin, A. V.

    2006-01-01

    Evolution of shock waves in self-bonded silicon carbide bars in the shape of 20 mm x 20 mm square prisms of varying lengths (20 mm, 40 mm, and 77.5 mm) is investigated. The density and porosity of the test specimens were 3.08 g/cm3 and 2%, respectively. Shock waves were generated by detonating a cylindrical shaped (d=40 mm and 1=40 mm) stabilized RDX high explosive charge of density 1.60 g/cm3. Embedded manganin gauges at various distances from the impact face were used to monitor the amplitude of shock pressure profiles. Propagation velocity of the stress pulse was observed to be equal to the elastic bar wave velocity of 11 km/s and was independent of the amplitude of the impact pulse. Strong fuzziness of the stress wave front is observed. This observation conforms to the theory on the instability of the shock formation in a finite size elastic body. This phenomenon of wave front fuzziness may be useful for desensitization of heterogeneous high explosives

  20. Modeling the tagged-neutron UXO identification technique using the Geant4 toolkit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Y.; Zhu, X.; Wang, Y.; Mitra, S.

    2012-01-01

    It is proposed to use 14 MeV neutrons tagged by the associated particle neutron time-of-flight technique (APnTOF) to identify the fillers of unexploded ordnances (UXO) by characterizing their carbon, nitrogen and oxygen contents. To facilitate the design and construction of a prototype system, a preliminary simulation model was developed, using the Geant4 toolkit. This work established the toolkit environment for (a) generating tagged neutrons, (b) their transport and interactions within a sample to induce emission and detection of characteristic gamma-rays, and (c) 2D and 3D-image reconstruction of the interrogated object using the neutron and gamma-ray time-of-flight information. Using the modeling, this article demonstrates the novelty of the tagged-neutron approach for extracting useful signals with high signal-to-background discrimination of an object-of-interest from that of its environment. Simulations indicated that an UXO filled with the RDX explosive, hexogen (C 3 H 6 O 6 N 6 ), can be identified to a depth of 20 cm when buried in soil. (author)

  1. Performance evaluation of granular activated carbon system at Pantex: Rapid small-scale column tests to simulate removal of high explosives from contaminated groundwater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henke, J.L.; Speitel, G.E. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering

    1998-08-01

    A granular activated carbon (GAC) system is now in operation at Pantex to treat groundwater from the perched aquifer that is contaminated with high explosives. The main chemicals of concern are RDX and HMX. The system consists of two GAC columns in series. Each column is charged with 10,000 pounds of Northwestern LB-830 GAC. At the design flow rate of 325 gpm, the hydraulic loading is 6.47 gpm/ft{sup 2}, and the empty bed contact time is 8.2 minutes per column. Currently, the system is operating at less than 10% of its design flow rate, although flow rate increases are expected in the relatively near future. This study had several objectives: Estimate the service life of the GAC now in use at Pantex; Screen several GACs to provide a recommendation on the best GAC for use at Pantex when the current GAC is exhausted and is replaced; Determine the extent to which natural organic matter in the Pantex groundwater fouls GAC adsorption sites, thereby decreasing the adsorption capacity for high explosives; and Determine if computer simulation models could match the experimental results, thereby providing another tool to follow system performance.

  2. Research on the combustion properties of propellants with low content of nano metal powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhi, Jiang; Shu-Fen, Li [Department of Chemical Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Feng-Qi, Zhao; Zi-Ru, Liu; Cui-Mei, Yin; Yang, Luo; Shang-Wen, Li [Xi' an Modern Chemistry Research Inst., Xi' an 710065 (China)

    2006-04-15

    A comparison of various experimental results for combustionrelated properties evaluation, including burning rates, deflagration heat, flame structures and thermal decomposition properties, of AP/RDX/Al/HTPB composite propellants containing nano metal powders is presented. The thermal behavior of n-Al (nano grain size aluminum) and g-Al (general grain size aluminum i.e., 10 {mu}m) heated in air was also investigated by thermogravimetry. The burning rates results indicate that the usage of bimodal aluminum distribution with the ratio around 4: 1 of n-Al to g-Al or the addition of 2% nano nickel powders (n-Ni) will improve the burning behavior of the propellant, while the usage of grading aluminum powders with the ratio 1: 1 of n-Al to g-Al will impair the combustion of the propellant. Results show that n-Al and n-Ni both have a lower heating capacity, lower ignition threshold and shorter combustion time than g-Al. In addition n-Al is inclined to burn in single particle form. And the thermal analysis results show that n-Ni can catalyze the thermal decomposition of AP in the propellant. The results also confirm the high reactivity of n-Al, which will lead to a lower reaction temperature and rather higher degree of reaction ratio as compared with g-Al in air. All these factors will influence the combustion of propellants. (Abstract Copyright [2006], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  3. PuReMD-GPU: A reactive molecular dynamics simulation package for GPUs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kylasa, S.B.; Aktulga, H.M.; Grama, A.Y.

    2014-01-01

    We present an efficient and highly accurate GP-GPU implementation of our community code, PuReMD, for reactive molecular dynamics simulations using the ReaxFF force field. PuReMD and its incorporation into LAMMPS (Reax/C) is used by a large number of research groups worldwide for simulating diverse systems ranging from biomembranes to explosives (RDX) at atomistic level of detail. The sub-femtosecond time-steps associated with ReaxFF strongly motivate significant improvements to per-timestep simulation time through effective use of GPUs. This paper presents, in detail, the design and implementation of PuReMD-GPU, which enables ReaxFF simulations on GPUs, as well as various performance optimization techniques we developed to obtain high performance on state-of-the-art hardware. Comprehensive experiments on model systems (bulk water and amorphous silica) are presented to quantify the performance improvements achieved by PuReMD-GPU and to verify its accuracy. In particular, our experiments show up to 16× improvement in runtime compared to our highly optimized CPU-only single-core ReaxFF implementation. PuReMD-GPU is a unique production code, and is currently available on request from the authors

  4. PuReMD-GPU: A reactive molecular dynamics simulation package for GPUs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kylasa, S.B., E-mail: skylasa@purdue.edu [Department of Elec. and Comp. Eng., Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Aktulga, H.M., E-mail: hmaktulga@lbl.gov [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Rd, MS 50F-1650, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Grama, A.Y., E-mail: ayg@cs.purdue.edu [Department of Computer Science, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States)

    2014-09-01

    We present an efficient and highly accurate GP-GPU implementation of our community code, PuReMD, for reactive molecular dynamics simulations using the ReaxFF force field. PuReMD and its incorporation into LAMMPS (Reax/C) is used by a large number of research groups worldwide for simulating diverse systems ranging from biomembranes to explosives (RDX) at atomistic level of detail. The sub-femtosecond time-steps associated with ReaxFF strongly motivate significant improvements to per-timestep simulation time through effective use of GPUs. This paper presents, in detail, the design and implementation of PuReMD-GPU, which enables ReaxFF simulations on GPUs, as well as various performance optimization techniques we developed to obtain high performance on state-of-the-art hardware. Comprehensive experiments on model systems (bulk water and amorphous silica) are presented to quantify the performance improvements achieved by PuReMD-GPU and to verify its accuracy. In particular, our experiments show up to 16× improvement in runtime compared to our highly optimized CPU-only single-core ReaxFF implementation. PuReMD-GPU is a unique production code, and is currently available on request from the authors.

  5. Identification of explosives and drugs and inspection of material defects with THz radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Cunlin; Mu, Kaijun; Jiang, Xue; Jiao, Yueying; Zhang, Liangliang; Zhou, Qingli; Zhang, Yan; Shen, Jingling; Zhao, Guoshong; Zhang, X.-C.

    2008-03-01

    We report the sensing of explosive materials and illicit drugs by using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) and imaging. Several explosive materials, such as γ-HNIW, RDX, 2,4-DNT, TNT, Nitro-aniline, and illicit drugs, such as methamphetamine (MA) etc were researched here. Non-destructive testing, as one of the major applications of THz imaging, can be applied to an area of critical need: the testing of aerospace materials. Composite materials such as carbon fiber are widely used in this industry. The nature of their use requires technologies that are able to differentiate between safe and unsafe materials, due to either manufacturing tolerance or damage acquired while in use. In this paper, we discuss the applicability of terahertz (THz) imaging systems to this purpose, focusing on graphite fiber composite materials, carbon silicon composite materials and so on. We applied THz imaging technology to evaluate the fire damage to a variety of carbon fiber composite samples. Major carbon fiber materials have polarization-dependent reflectivity in THz frequency range, and we show how the polarization dependence changes versus the burned damage level. Additionally, time domain information acquired through a THz time-domain spectroscopy (TDS) system provides further information with which to characterize the damage. We also detect fuel tank insulation foam panel defects with pulse and continuous-wave (CW) terahertz system.

  6. The state of permanganate with relation to in situ chemical oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veronda, Brenda; Dingens, Matthew

    2007-01-01

    In Situ Chemical Oxidation (ISCO) with permanganate had its beginnings over 10 years ago. Since that time, many sites have been successfully treated for organic compounds including chlorinated ethenes (perchloroethylene, trichloroethylene, etc.) phenols, explosives such as RDX, and many other organics. The successful application of ISCO with permanganate requires the integration of many site-specific factors into the remedial design. ISCO with permanganate is an effective technology, not only for its oxidative properties and persistence, but also for its application flexibility to remediate soil and groundwater. The merits of any type of treatment technology can be assessed in terms of effectiveness, ease of use, reaction rate, and cost. The use of permanganate for in situ chemical oxidation results in the complete mineralization of TCE and PCE and can result in treatment levels below detection limits. Permanganate is a single component oxidizer, which is easily handled, mixed and distributed to the subsurface. Permanganate is also inexpensive to design and implement as compared to other technologies. This presentation will provide a general overview of the application and safety aspects of ISCO with permanganate. This paper will discuss the advantages and limitations of this technology, typical cost ranges, site evaluation and application technologies. (authors)

  7. Fate of CL-20 in sandy soils: Degradation products as potential markers of natural attenuation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monteil-Rivera, Fanny; Halasz, Annamaria; Manno, Dominic; Kuperman, Roman G.; Thiboutot, Sonia; Ampleman, Guy; Hawari, Jalal

    2009-01-01

    Hexanitrohexaazaisowurtzitane (CL-20) is an emerging explosive that may replace the currently used explosives such as RDX and HMX, but little is known about its fate in soil. The present study was conducted to determine degradation products of CL-20 in two sandy soils under abiotic and biotic anaerobic conditions. Biotic degradation was prevalent in the slightly acidic VT soil, which contained a greater organic C content, while the slightly alkaline SAC soil favored hydrolysis. CL-20 degradation was accompanied by the formation of formate, glyoxal, nitrite, ammonium, and nitrous oxide. Biotic degradation of CL-20 occurred through the formation of its denitrohydrogenated derivative (m/z 393 Da) while hydrolysis occurred through the formation of a ring cleavage product (m/z 156 Da) that was tentatively identified as CH 2 =N-C(=N-NO 2 )-CH=N-CHO or its isomer N(NO 2 )=CH-CH=N-CO-CH=NH. Due to their chemical specificity, these two intermediates may be considered as markers of in situ attenuation of CL-20 in soil. - Two key intermediates of CL-20 degradation are potential markers of its natural attenuation in soil

  8. DHS small-scale safety and thermal testing of improvised explosives-comparison of testing performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reynolds, J G; Hsu, P C; Sandstrom, M M; Brown, G W; Warner, K F; Phillips, J J; Shelley, T J; Reyes, J A

    2014-01-01

    One of the first steps in establishing safe handling procedures for explosives is small-scale safety and thermal (SSST) testing. To better understand the response of improvised materials or homemade explosives (HMEs) to SSST testing, 16 HME materials were compared to three standard military explosives in a proficiency-type round robin study among five laboratories-two DoD and three DOE-sponsored by DHS. The testing matrix has been designed to address problems encountered with improvised materials-powder mixtures, liquid suspensions, partially wetted solids, immiscible liquids, and reactive materials. More than 30 issues have been identified that indicate standard test methods may require modification when applied to HMEs to derive accurate sensitivity assessments needed for developing safe handling and storage practices. This paper presents a generalized comparison of the results among the testing participants, comparison of friction results from BAM (German Bundesanstalt für Materi-alprüfung) and ABL (Allegany Ballistics Laboratory) designed testing equipment, and an overview of the statistical results from the RDX (1,3,5-Trinitroperhydro-1,3,5-triazine) standard tested throughout the proficiency test.

  9. Monte Carlo design of a system for the detection of explosive materials and analysis of the dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez A, P. L.; Medina C, D.; Rodriguez I, J. L.; Salas L, M. A.; Vega C, H. R.

    2015-10-01

    The problems associated with insecurity and terrorism have forced to designing systems for detecting nuclear materials, drugs and explosives that are installed on roads, ports and airports. Organic materials are composed of C, H, O and N; similarly the explosive materials are manufactured which can be distinguished by the concentration of these elements. Its elemental composition, particularly the concentration of hydrogen and oxygen, allow distinguish them from other organic substances. When these materials are irradiated with neutrons nuclear reactions (n, γ) are produced, where the emitted photons are ready gamma rays whose energy is characteristic of each element and its abundance allows estimating their concentration. The aim of this study was designed using Monte Carlo methods a system with neutron source, gamma rays detector and moderator able to distinguish the presence of Rdx and urea. In design were used as moderators: paraffin, light water, polyethylene and graphite; as detectors were used HPGe and the NaI(Tl). The design that showed the best performance was the moderator of light water and HPGe, with a source of 241 AmBe. For this design, the values of ambient dose equivalent around the system were calculated. (Author)

  10. Pathways Regulating Spheroid Formation of Human Follicular Thyroid Cancer Cells under Simulated Microgravity Conditions: A Genetic Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Riwaldt

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Microgravity induces three-dimensional (3D growth in numerous cell types. Despite substantial efforts to clarify the underlying mechanisms for spheroid formation, the precise molecular pathways are still not known. The principal aim of this paper is to compare static 1g-control cells with spheroid forming (MCS and spheroid non-forming (AD thyroid cancer cells cultured in the same flask under simulated microgravity conditions. We investigated the morphology and gene expression patterns in human follicular thyroid cancer cells (UCLA RO82-W-1 cell line after a 24 h-exposure on the Random Positioning Machine (RPM and focused on 3D growth signaling processes. After 24 h, spheroid formation was observed in RPM-cultures together with alterations in the F-actin cytoskeleton. qPCR indicated more changes in gene expression in MCS than in AD cells. Of the 24 genes analyzed VEGFA, VEGFD, MSN, and MMP3 were upregulated in MCS compared to 1g-controls, whereas ACTB, ACTA2, KRT8, TUBB, EZR, RDX, PRKCA, CAV1, MMP9, PAI1, CTGF, MCP1 were downregulated. A pathway analysis revealed that the upregulated genes code for proteins, which promote 3D growth (angiogenesis and prevent excessive accumulation of extracellular proteins, while genes coding for structural proteins are downregulated. Pathways regulating the strength/rigidity of cytoskeletal proteins, the amount of extracellular proteins, and 3D growth may be involved in MCS formation.

  11. Short pulse duration shock initiation experiments plus ignition and growth modeling on Composition B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    May, Chadd M; Tarver, Craig M

    2014-01-01

    Composition B (63% RDX, 36% TNT, 1% wax) is still a widely used energetic material whose shock initiation characteristics are necessary to understand. It is now possible to shock initiate Composition B and other secondary explosives at diameters well below their characteristic failure diameters for unconfined self-sustaining detonation. This is done using very high velocity, very thin, small diameter flyer plates accelerated by electric or laser power sources. Recently experimental detonation versus failure to detonate threshold flyer velocity curves for Composition B using several Kapton TM flyer thicknesses and diameters were measured. Flyer plates with diameters of 2 mm successfully detonated Composition B, which has a nominal failure diameter of 4.3 mm. The shock pressures required for these initiations are greater than the Chapman-Jouguet (C-J) pressure in self-sustaining Composition B detonation waves. The initiation process is two-dimensional, because both rear and side rarefactions can affect the shocked Composition B reaction rates. The Ignition and Growth reactive flow model for Composition B is extended to yield accurate simulations of this new threshold velocity data for various flyer thicknesses.

  12. Quantitative analysis for the determination of aluminum percentage and detonation performance of aluminized plastic bonded explosives by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaei, A. H.; Keshavarz, M. H.; Kavosh Tehrani, M.; Darbani, S. M. R.

    2018-06-01

    The aluminized plastic-bonded explosive (PBX) is a composite material in which solid explosive particles are dispersed in a polymer matrix, which includes three major components, i.e. polymeric binder, metal fuel (aluminum) and nitramine explosive. This work introduces a new method on the basis of the laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technique in air and argon atmospheres to investigate the determination of aluminum content and detonation performance of aluminized PBXs. Plasma emissions of aluminized PBXs are recorded where atomic lines of Al, C and H as well as molecular bands of AlO and CN are identified. The experimental results demonstrate that a good discrimination and separation between the aluminized PBXs is possible using LIBS and principle component analysis, although they have similar atomic composition. Relative intensity of the AlO/Al is used to determine aluminum percentage of the aluminized PBXs. The obtained quantitative calibration curve using the relative intensity of the AlO/Al is better than the resulting calibration curve using only the intensity of Al. By using the LIBS method and the measured intensity ratio of CN/C, an Al content of 15% is found to be the optimum value in terms of velocity of detonation of the RDX/Al/HTPB standard samples.

  13. Performance evaluation of granular activated carbon system at Pantex: Rapid small-scale column tests to simulate removal of high explosives from contaminated groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henke, J.L.; Speitel, G.E.

    1998-08-01

    A granular activated carbon (GAC) system is now in operation at Pantex to treat groundwater from the perched aquifer that is contaminated with high explosives. The main chemicals of concern are RDX and HMX. The system consists of two GAC columns in series. Each column is charged with 10,000 pounds of Northwestern LB-830 GAC. At the design flow rate of 325 gpm, the hydraulic loading is 6.47 gpm/ft 2 , and the empty bed contact time is 8.2 minutes per column. Currently, the system is operating at less than 10% of its design flow rate, although flow rate increases are expected in the relatively near future. This study had several objectives: Estimate the service life of the GAC now in use at Pantex; Screen several GACs to provide a recommendation on the best GAC for use at Pantex when the current GAC is exhausted and is replaced; Determine the extent to which natural organic matter in the Pantex groundwater fouls GAC adsorption sites, thereby decreasing the adsorption capacity for high explosives; and Determine if computer simulation models could match the experimental results, thereby providing another tool to follow system performance

  14. Quasi-dynamic pressure and temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaug, J M.; Farber, D L; Blosch, L L; Craig, I M; Hansen, D W; Aracne-Ruddle, C M; Shuh, D K

    1998-01-01

    The phase transformation of(beta)-HMX ( and lt; 0.5% RDX) to the(delta) phase has been studied for over twenty years and more recently with an optically sensitive second harmonic generation technique. Shock studies of the plastic binder composites of HMX have indicated that the transition is perhaps irreversible, a result that concurs with the static pressure results published by F. Goetz et al.[l] in 1978. However the stability field favors the(beta) polymorph over(delta) as pressure is increased (up to 5.4 GPa) along any sensible isotherm. In this experiment strict control of pressure and temperature is maintained while x-ray and optical diagnostics are applied to monitor the conformational dynamics of HMX. Unlike the temperature induced(beta) - and gt;(delta) transition, the pressure induced is heterogeneous in nature. The room pressure and temperature(delta) - and gt;(beta) transition is not immediate although it seems to occur over tens of hours. Transition points and kinetics are path dependent and so this paper describes our work in progress

  15. High Pressure-Temperature Phase Diagram of 1,1-diamino-2,2-dinitroethylene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Matthew; Chellappa, Raja; Liu, Zhenxian; Preston, Daniel; Sandstrom, Mary; Dattelbaum, Dana; Vohra, Yogesh; Velisavljevic, Nenad

    2013-06-01

    1,1-diamino-2,2-dinitroethelyne (FOX-7) is a less sensitive energetic material with performance comparable to commonly used secondary explosives such as RDX and HMX. At ambient pressure, FOX-7 exhibits complex polymorphism with at least three structurally distinct phases (α, β, and γ) . In this study, we have investigated the high P-T stability of FOX-7 polymorphs using synchrotron mid-infrared (MIR) spectroscopy. At ambient pressure, our MIR spectra confirmed the known α --> β (110 °C) and β --> γ (160 °C) phase transitions; as well as, indicated an additional phase transition, γ --> δ (210°C), with the δ phase being stable up to 250 °C prior to melt/decomposition. In situ MIR spectra obtained during isobaric heating at 0.9 GPa revealed that the α --> β transition occurs at 180 °C, while β --> β + δ phase transition shifted to 300 °C with suppression of γ phase. Decomposition was observed above 325 °C. Based on multiple high P-T measurements, we have established the first high P-T phase diagram of FOX-7. This work was, in part, supported by the US DOE under contract No. DE-AC52-06NA25396 and Science Campaign 2 Program. MB acknowledges additional support from the NSF BD program. Use of NSLS (DE-AC02-98CH10886) beamline U2A (COMPRES, No.EAR01-35554, CDAC).

  16. High pressure-temperature polymorphism of 1,1-diamino-2,2-dinitroethylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bishop, M M; Dattelbaum, D M; Velisavljevic, N; Chellappa, R S; Liu, Z; Preston, D N; Sandstrom, M M; Vohra, Y K

    2014-01-01

    1,1-diamino-2,2-dinitroethylene (FOX-7) is a low sensitivity energetic material with performance comparable to commonly used secondary explosives such as RDX and HMX. At ambient pressure, FOX-7 exhibits complex polymorphism with at least three structurally distinct phases (α, β, and γ). In this study, we have investigated the high pressure-temperature stability of FOX-7 polymorphs using synchrotron mid-infrared (MIR) spectroscopy. At ambient pressure, our MIR spectra and corresponding differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) measurements confirmed the known α → β (∼110 °C) and α → β (∼160 °C) structural phase transitions; as well as, indicated an additional transition γ → (∼210 °C), with the δ phase being stable up to ∼251 °C prior to decomposition. In situ MIR spectra obtained during isobaric heating at 0.9 GPa, revealed a potential α → β transition that could occur as early as 180 °C, while β → β+δ phase transition shifted to ∼300 °C with suppression of γ phase. Decomposition was observed slightly above 325 °C at 0.9 GPa.

  17. Quasi-dynamic pressure and temperature initiated βδ solid phase transitions in HMX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaug, Joseph M.; Farber, Daniel L.; Craig, Ian M.; Blosch, Laura L.; Shuh, David K.; Hansen, Donald W.; Aracne-Ruddle, Chantel M.

    2000-04-01

    The phase transformation of β-HMX (>0.5% RDX) to δ phase has been studied for over twenty years and more recently with an high-contrast optical second harmonic generation technique. Shock studies of the plastic binder composites of HMX have indicated that the transition is perhaps irreversible, a result that concurs with the static pressure results published by F. Goetz et al. [1] in 1978. However, the stability field favors the β polymorph over δ as pressure is increased (up to 5.4 GPa) along any thermodynamically reasonable isotherm. In this experiment, strict control of pressure and temperature is maintained while x-ray and optical diagnostics are applied to monitor the conformational dynamics of HMX. Unlike the temperature induced β→δ transition, the pressure induced is heterogeneous in nature. The 1 bar 25 °C δ→β transition is not immediate, occuring over tens of hours. Transition points and kinetics are path dependent and consequently this paper describes our work in progress.

  18. High pressure-temperature polymorphism of 1,1-diamino-2,2-dinitroethylene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, M. M.; Chellappa, R. S.; Liu, Z.; Preston, D. N.; Sandstrom, M. M.; Dattelbaum, D. M.; Vohra, Y. K.; Velisavljevic, N.

    2014-05-01

    1,1-diamino-2,2-dinitroethylene (FOX-7) is a low sensitivity energetic material with performance comparable to commonly used secondary explosives such as RDX and HMX. At ambient pressure, FOX-7 exhibits complex polymorphism with at least three structurally distinct phases (α, β, and γ). In this study, we have investigated the high pressure-temperature stability of FOX-7 polymorphs using synchrotron mid-infrared (MIR) spectroscopy. At ambient pressure, our MIR spectra and corresponding differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) measurements confirmed the known α → β (~110 °C) and α → β (~160 °C) structural phase transitions; as well as, indicated an additional transition γ → (~210 °C), with the δ phase being stable up to ~251 °C prior to decomposition. In situ MIR spectra obtained during isobaric heating at 0.9 GPa, revealed a potential α → β transition that could occur as early as 180 °C, while β → β+δ phase transition shifted to ~300 °C with suppression of γ phase. Decomposition was observed slightly above 325 °C at 0.9 GPa.

  19. Study by Monte Carlo methods of an explosives detection system made up with a D-D neutron generator and NaI(Tl) gamma detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cevallos Robalino, Lenin E; García Fernández, Gonzalo Felipe; Gallego, Eduardo; Guzmán-García, Karen A; Vega-Carrillo, Hector Rene

    2018-02-17

    Detection of hidden explosives is of utmost importance for homeland security. Several configurations of an Explosives Detection System (EDS) to intercept hidden threats, made up with a Deuterium-Deuterium (D-D) compact neutron generator and NaI (Tl) scintillation detectors, have been evaluated using MCNP6 code. The system's response to various samples of explosives, such as RDX and Ammonium Nitrate, is analysed. The D-D generator is able to produce fast neutrons with 2.5 MeV energy in a maximum yield of 10 10 n/s. It is surrounded by high-density polyethylene to thermalize the fast neutrons and to optimize interactions with the sample inspected, whose emission of gamma rays gives a characteristic spectrum of the elements that constitute it. This procedure allows to determine its chemical composition and to identify the type of substance. The necessary shielding is evaluated to estimate its thicknesses depending on the admissible dose of operation, using lead and polyethylene. The results show that its functionality is promising in the field of national security for explosives inspection. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Study by Monte Carlo methods of an explosive detection system using a D-D generator and Nal (Tl) detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cevallos R, L. E.; Guzman G, K. A.; Gallego, E.; Garcia F, G.; Vega C, H. R.

    2017-10-01

    The detection of hidden explosive material is very important for national security. Using Monte Carlo methods, with the code MCNP6, several proposed configurations of a detection system with a Deuterium-Deuterium (D-D) generator, in conjunction with NaI (Tl) scintillation detectors, have been evaluated to intercept hidden explosives. The response of the system to various explosive samples such as Rdx and ammonium nitrate are analyzed as the main components of home-military explosives. The D-D generator produces fast neutrons of 2.5 MeV in a maximum field of 10 10 n/s (Dd-110) which is surrounded with high density polyethylene in order to thermalized the fast neutrons making them interact with the sample inspected, giving rise to the emission of gamma rays that generates a characteristic spectrum of the elements that constitute it, being able in this way to determine its chemical composition and identify the type of substance. The necessary shielding is evaluated to estimate the admissible operation dose, with thicknesses of lead and borated polyethylene, in order to place it at some point of the Laboratory of Neutron Measurements of the Polytechnic University of Madrid where the shielding is optimal. The results show that its functionality is promising in the field of national security for the explosives inspection. (Author)