WorldWideScience

Sample records for ray-tracing simulations based

  1. Numerical simulation and comparison of nonlinear self-focusing based on iteration and ray tracing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaotong; Chen, Hao; Wang, Weiwei; Ruan, Wangchao; Zhang, Luwei; Cen, Zhaofeng

    2017-05-01

    Self-focusing is observed in nonlinear materials owing to the interaction between laser and matter when laser beam propagates. Some of numerical simulation strategies such as the beam propagation method (BPM) based on nonlinear Schrödinger equation and ray tracing method based on Fermat's principle have applied to simulate the self-focusing process. In this paper we present an iteration nonlinear ray tracing method in that the nonlinear material is also cut into massive slices just like the existing approaches, but instead of paraxial approximation and split-step Fourier transform, a large quantity of sampled real rays are traced step by step through the system with changing refractive index and laser intensity by iteration. In this process a smooth treatment is employed to generate a laser density distribution at each slice to decrease the error caused by the under-sampling. The characteristics of this method is that the nonlinear refractive indices of the points on current slice are calculated by iteration so as to solve the problem of unknown parameters in the material caused by the causal relationship between laser intensity and nonlinear refractive index. Compared with the beam propagation method, this algorithm is more suitable for engineering application with lower time complexity, and has the calculation capacity for numerical simulation of self-focusing process in the systems including both of linear and nonlinear optical media. If the sampled rays are traced with their complex amplitudes and light paths or phases, it will be possible to simulate the superposition effects of different beam. At the end of the paper, the advantages and disadvantages of this algorithm are discussed.

  2. Rapid simulation of X-ray transmission imaging for baggage inspection via GPU-based ray-tracing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Qian; Stoian, Razvan-Ionut; Coccarelli, David S.; Greenberg, Joel A.; Vera, Esteban; Gehm, Michael E.

    2018-01-01

    We present a pipeline that rapidly simulates X-ray transmission imaging for arbitrary system architectures using GPU-based ray-tracing techniques. The purpose of the pipeline is to enable statistical analysis of threat detection in the context of airline baggage inspection. As a faster alternative to Monte Carlo methods, we adopt a deterministic approach for simulating photoelectric absorption-based imaging. The highly-optimized NVIDIA OptiX API is used to implement ray-tracing, greatly speeding code execution. In addition, we implement the first hierarchical representation structure to determine the interaction path length of rays traversing heterogeneous media described by layered polygons. The accuracy of the pipeline has been validated by comparing simulated data with experimental data collected using a heterogenous phantom and a laboratory X-ray imaging system. On a single computer, our approach allows us to generate over 400 2D transmission projections (125 × 125 pixels per frame) per hour for a bag packed with hundreds of everyday objects. By implementing our approach on cloud-based GPU computing platforms, we find that the same 2D projections of approximately 3.9 million bags can be obtained in a single day using 400 GPU instances, at a cost of only 0.001 per bag.

  3. Real time ray tracing based on shader

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gui, JiangHeng; Li, Min

    2017-07-01

    Ray tracing is a rendering algorithm for generating an image through tracing lights into an image plane, it can simulate complicate optical phenomenon like refraction, depth of field and motion blur. Compared with rasterization, ray tracing can achieve more realistic rendering result, however with greater computational cost, simple scene rendering can consume tons of time. With the GPU's performance improvement and the advent of programmable rendering pipeline, complicated algorithm can also be implemented directly on shader. So, this paper proposes a new method that implement ray tracing directly on fragment shader, mainly include: surface intersection, importance sampling and progressive rendering. With the help of GPU's powerful throughput capability, it can implement real time rendering of simple scene.

  4. Ray tracing the Wigner distribution function for optical simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mout, B.M.; Wick, Michael; Bociort, F.; Petschulat, Joerg; Urbach, Paul

    2018-01-01

    We study a simulation method that uses the Wigner distribution function to incorporate wave optical effects in an established framework based on geometrical optics, i.e., a ray tracing engine. We use the method to calculate point spread functions and show that it is accurate for paraxial systems

  5. Simulating polarized light scattering in terrestrial snow based on bicontinuous random medium and Monte Carlo ray tracing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiong, Chuan; Shi, Jiancheng

    2014-01-01

    To date, the light scattering models of snow consider very little about the real snow microstructures. The ideal spherical or other single shaped particle assumptions in previous snow light scattering models can cause error in light scattering modeling of snow and further cause errors in remote sensing inversion algorithms. This paper tries to build up a snow polarized reflectance model based on bicontinuous medium, with which the real snow microstructure is considered. The accurate specific surface area of bicontinuous medium can be analytically derived. The polarized Monte Carlo ray tracing technique is applied to the computer generated bicontinuous medium. With proper algorithms, the snow surface albedo, bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) and polarized BRDF can be simulated. The validation of model predicted spectral albedo and bidirectional reflectance factor (BRF) using experiment data shows good results. The relationship between snow surface albedo and snow specific surface area (SSA) were predicted, and this relationship can be used for future improvement of snow specific surface area (SSA) inversion algorithms. The model predicted polarized reflectance is validated and proved accurate, which can be further applied in polarized remote sensing. -- Highlights: • Bicontinuous random medium were used for real snow microstructure modeling. • Photon tracing technique with polarization status tracking ability was applied. • SSA–albedo relationship of snow is close to that of sphere based medium. • Validation of albedo and BRDF showed good results. • Validation of polarized reflectance showed good agreement with experiment data

  6. A Wigner-based ray-tracing method for imaging simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mout, B.M.; Wick, M.; Bociort, F.; Urbach, H.P.

    2015-01-01

    The Wigner Distribution Function (WDF) forms an alternative representation of the optical field. It can be a valuable tool for understanding and classifying optical systems. Furthermore, it possesses properties that make it suitable for optical simulations: both the intensity and the angular

  7. Ray tracing the Wigner distribution function for optical simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mout, Marco; Wick, Michael; Bociort, Florian; Petschulat, Joerg; Urbach, Paul

    2018-01-01

    We study a simulation method that uses the Wigner distribution function to incorporate wave optical effects in an established framework based on geometrical optics, i.e., a ray tracing engine. We use the method to calculate point spread functions and show that it is accurate for paraxial systems but produces unphysical results in the presence of aberrations. The cause of these anomalies is explained using an analytical model.

  8. Simulations Of Neutron Beam Optic For Neutron Radiography Collimator Using Ray Tracing Methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norfarizan Mohd Said; Muhammad Rawi Mohamed Zin

    2014-01-01

    Ray- tracing is a technique for simulating the performance of neutron instruments. McStas, the open-source software package based on a meta-language, is a tool for carrying out ray-tracing simulations. The program has been successfully applied in investigating neutron guide design, flux optimization and other related areas with high complexity and precision. The aim of this paper is to discuss the implementation of ray-tracing technique with McStas for simulating the performance of neutron collimation system developed for imaging system of TRIGA RTP reactor. The code for the simulation was developed and the results are presented. The analysis of the performance is reported and discussed. (author)

  9. Analysis of ionospheric structure influences on residual ionospheric errors in GNSS radio occultation bending angles based on ray tracing simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Congliang; Kirchengast, Gottfried; Sun, Yueqiang; Zhang, Kefei; Norman, Robert; Schwaerz, Marc; Bai, Weihua; Du, Qifei; Li, Ying

    2018-04-01

    The Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) radio occultation (RO) technique is widely used to observe the atmosphere for applications such as numerical weather prediction and global climate monitoring. The ionosphere is a major error source to RO at upper stratospheric altitudes, and a linear dual-frequency bending angle correction is commonly used to remove the first-order ionospheric effect. However, the higher-order residual ionospheric error (RIE) can still be significant, so it needs to be further mitigated for high-accuracy applications, especially from 35 km altitude upward, where the RIE is most relevant compared to the decreasing magnitude of the atmospheric bending angle. In a previous study we quantified RIEs using an ensemble of about 700 quasi-realistic end-to-end simulated RO events, finding typical RIEs at the 0.1 to 0.5 µrad noise level, but were left with 26 exceptional events with anomalous RIEs at the 1 to 10 µrad level that remained unexplained. In this study, we focused on investigating the causes of the high RIE of these exceptional events, employing detailed along-ray-path analyses of atmospheric and ionospheric refractivities, impact parameter changes, and bending angles and RIEs under asymmetric and symmetric ionospheric structures. We found that the main causes of the high RIEs are a combination of physics-based effects - where asymmetric ionospheric conditions play the primary role, more than the ionization level driven by solar activity - and technical ray tracer effects due to occasions of imperfect smoothness in ionospheric refractivity model derivatives. We also found that along-ray impact parameter variations of more than 10 to 20 m are possible due to ionospheric asymmetries and, depending on prevailing horizontal refractivity gradients, are positive or negative relative to the initial impact parameter at the GNSS transmitter. Furthermore, mesospheric RIEs are found generally higher than upper-stratospheric ones, likely due to

  10. MCViNE – An object oriented Monte Carlo neutron ray tracing simulation package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Jiao Y.Y., E-mail: linjiao@ornl.gov [Caltech Center for Advanced Computing Research, California Institute of Technology (United States); Department of Applied Physics and Materials Science, California Institute of Technology (United States); Neutron Data Analysis and Visualization Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (United States); Smith, Hillary L. [Department of Applied Physics and Materials Science, California Institute of Technology (United States); Granroth, Garrett E., E-mail: granrothge@ornl.gov [Neutron Data Analysis and Visualization Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (United States); Abernathy, Douglas L.; Lumsden, Mark D.; Winn, Barry; Aczel, Adam A. [Quantum Condensed Matter Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (United States); Aivazis, Michael [Caltech Center for Advanced Computing Research, California Institute of Technology (United States); Fultz, Brent, E-mail: btf@caltech.edu [Department of Applied Physics and Materials Science, California Institute of Technology (United States)

    2016-02-21

    MCViNE (Monte-Carlo VIrtual Neutron Experiment) is an open-source Monte Carlo (MC) neutron ray-tracing software for performing computer modeling and simulations that mirror real neutron scattering experiments. We exploited the close similarity between how instrument components are designed and operated and how such components can be modeled in software. For example we used object oriented programming concepts for representing neutron scatterers and detector systems, and recursive algorithms for implementing multiple scattering. Combining these features together in MCViNE allows one to handle sophisticated neutron scattering problems in modern instruments, including, for example, neutron detection by complex detector systems, and single and multiple scattering events in a variety of samples and sample environments. In addition, MCViNE can use simulation components from linear-chain-based MC ray tracing packages which facilitates porting instrument models from those codes. Furthermore it allows for components written solely in Python, which expedites prototyping of new components. These developments have enabled detailed simulations of neutron scattering experiments, with non-trivial samples, for time-of-flight inelastic instruments at the Spallation Neutron Source. Examples of such simulations for powder and single-crystal samples with various scattering kernels, including kernels for phonon and magnon scattering, are presented. With simulations that closely reproduce experimental results, scattering mechanisms can be turned on and off to determine how they contribute to the measured scattering intensities, improving our understanding of the underlying physics.

  11. New challenges in ray tracing simulations of X-ray optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Río, M Sánchez del

    2013-01-01

    The construction of new synchrotron sources and the refurbishment and upgrade of existing ones has boosted in the last years the interest in X-ray optics simulations for beamline design and optimization. In the last years we conducted a full renewal of the well established SHADOW ray tracing code, ending with a modular version SHADOW3 interfaced to multiple programming languages (C, C++, IDL, Python). Some of the new features of SHADOW3 are presented. From the physics point of view, SHADOW3 has been upgraded for dealing with lens systems. X-ray partial coherence applications demand an extension of traditional ray tracing methods into a hybrid ray-tracing wave-optics approach. The software development is essential for fulfilling the requests of the ESRF Upgrade Programme, and some examples of calculations are also presented.

  12. Multiscale optical simulation settings: challenging applications handled with an iterative ray-tracing FDTD interface method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiner, Claude; Nemitz, Wolfgang; Schweitzer, Susanne; Kuna, Ladislav; Wenzl, Franz P; Hartmann, Paul; Satzinger, Valentin; Sommer, Christian

    2016-03-20

    We show that with an appropriate combination of two optical simulation techniques-classical ray-tracing and the finite difference time domain method-an optical device containing multiple diffractive and refractive optical elements can be accurately simulated in an iterative simulation approach. We compare the simulation results with experimental measurements of the device to discuss the applicability and accuracy of our iterative simulation procedure.

  13. Investigation of propagation algorithms for ray-tracing simulation of polarized neutrons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergbäck Knudsen, Erik; Tranum-Rømer, A.; Willendrup, Peter Kjær

    2014-01-01

    Ray-tracing of polarized neutrons faces a challenge when the neutron propagates through an inhomogeneous magnetic field. This affects simulations of novel instruments using encoding of energy or angle into the neutron spin. We here present a new implementation of propagation of polarized neutrons...

  14. Ray tracing method for simulation of laser beam interaction with random packings of powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalev, O. B.; Kovaleva, I. O.; Belyaev, V. V.

    2018-03-01

    Selective laser sintering is a technology of rapid manufacturing of a free form that is created as a solid object by selectively fusing successive layers of powder using a laser. The motivation of this study is due to the currently insufficient understanding of the processes and phenomena of selective laser melting of powders whose time scales differ by orders of magnitude. To construct random packings from mono- and polydispersed solid spheres, the algorithm of their generation based on the discrete element method is used. A numerical method of ray tracing is proposed that is used to simulate the interaction of laser radiation with a random bulk packing of spherical particles and to predict the optical properties of the granular layer, the extinction and absorption coefficients, depending on the optical properties of a powder material.

  15. Ray Tracing for Real-time Games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bikker, J.

    2012-01-01

    This thesis describes efficient rendering algorithms based on ray tracing, and the application of these algorithms to real-time games. Compared to rasterizationbased approaches, rendering based on ray tracing allows elegant and correct simulation of important global effects, such as shadows,

  16. GRay: A MASSIVELY PARALLEL GPU-BASED CODE FOR RAY TRACING IN RELATIVISTIC SPACETIMES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, Chi-kwan; Psaltis, Dimitrios; Özel, Feryal [Department of Astronomy, University of Arizona, 933 N. Cherry Ave., Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

    2013-11-01

    We introduce GRay, a massively parallel integrator designed to trace the trajectories of billions of photons in a curved spacetime. This graphics-processing-unit (GPU)-based integrator employs the stream processing paradigm, is implemented in CUDA C/C++, and runs on nVidia graphics cards. The peak performance of GRay using single-precision floating-point arithmetic on a single GPU exceeds 300 GFLOP (or 1 ns per photon per time step). For a realistic problem, where the peak performance cannot be reached, GRay is two orders of magnitude faster than existing central-processing-unit-based ray-tracing codes. This performance enhancement allows more effective searches of large parameter spaces when comparing theoretical predictions of images, spectra, and light curves from the vicinities of compact objects to observations. GRay can also perform on-the-fly ray tracing within general relativistic magnetohydrodynamic algorithms that simulate accretion flows around compact objects. Making use of this algorithm, we calculate the properties of the shadows of Kerr black holes and the photon rings that surround them. We also provide accurate fitting formulae of their dependencies on black hole spin and observer inclination, which can be used to interpret upcoming observations of the black holes at the center of the Milky Way, as well as M87, with the Event Horizon Telescope.

  17. Neutron transport study based on assembly modular ray tracing MOC method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Chao; Zheng Youqi; Li Yunzhao; Li Shuo; Chai Xiaoming

    2015-01-01

    It is difficulty for the MOC method based on Cell Modular Ray Tracing to deal with the irregular geometry such as the water gap between the PWR lattices. Hence, the neutron transport code NECP-Medlar based on Assembly Modular Ray Tracing is developed. CMFD method is used to accelerate the transport calculation. The numerical results of the 2D C5G7 benchmark and typical PWR lattice prove that NECP-Medlar has an excellent performance in terms of accuracy and efficiency. Besides, NECP-Medlar can describe clearly the flux distribution of the lattice with water gap. (authors)

  18. Anisotropic ray trace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Wai Sze Tiffany

    anisotropic ray tracing. x. Chapter 4 presents the data reduction of the P matrix of a crystal waveplate. The diattenuation is embedded in the singular values of P. The retardance is divided into two parts: (A) The physical retardance induced by OPLs and surface interactions, and (B) the geometrical transformation induced by geometry of a ray path, which is calculated by the geometrical transform Q matrix. The Q matrix of an anisotropic intercept is derived from the generalization of s- and p-bases at the anisotropic intercept; the p basis is not confined to the plane of incidence due to the anisotropic refraction or reflection. Chapter 5 shows how the multiple P matrices associated with the eigenmodes resulting from propagation through multiple anisotropic surfaces can be combined into one P matrix when the multiple modes interfere in their overlapping regions. The resultant P matrix contains diattenuation induced at each surface interaction as well as the retardance due to ray propagation and total internal reflections. The polarization aberrations of crystal waveplates and crystal polarizers are studied in Chapter 6 and Chapter 7. A wavefront simulated by a grid of rays is traced through the anisotropic system and the resultant grid of rays is analyzed. The analysis is complicated by the ray doubling effects and the partially overlapping eigen-wavefronts propagating in various directions. The wavefront and polarization aberrations of each eigenmode can be evaluated from the electric field distributions. The overall polarization at the plane of interest or the image quality at the image plane are affected by each of these eigen-wavefronts. Isotropic materials become anisotropic due to stress, strain, or applied electric or magnetic fields. In Chapter 8, the P matrix for anisotropic materials is extended to ray tracing in stress birefringent materials which are treated as spatially varying anisotropic materials. Such simulations can predict the spatial retardance variation

  19. Computer ray tracing speeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robb, P; Pawlowski, B

    1990-05-01

    The results of measuring the ray trace speed and compilation speed of thirty-nine computers in fifty-seven configurations, ranging from personal computers to super computers, are described. A correlation of ray trace speed has been made with the LINPACK benchmark which allows the ray trace speed to be estimated using LINPACK performance data. The results indicate that the latest generation of workstations, using CPUs based on RISC (Reduced Instruction Set Computer) technology, are as fast or faster than mainframe computers in compute-bound situations.

  20. A Simplified Multipath Component Modeling Approach for High-Speed Train Channel Based on Ray Tracing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingya Yang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available High-speed train (HST communications at millimeter-wave (mmWave band have received a lot of attention due to their numerous high-data-rate applications enabling smart rail mobility. Accurate and effective channel models are always critical to the HST system design, assessment, and optimization. A distinctive feature of the mmWave HST channel is that it is rapidly time-varying. To depict this feature, a geometry-based multipath model is established for the dominant multipath behavior in delay and Doppler domains. Because of insufficient mmWave HST channel measurement with high mobility, the model is developed by a measurement-validated ray tracing (RT simulator. Different from conventional models, the temporal evolution of dominant multipath behavior is characterized by its geometry factor that represents the geometrical relationship of the dominant multipath component (MPC to HST environment. Actually, during each dominant multipath lifetime, its geometry factor is fixed. To statistically model the geometry factor and its lifetime, the dominant MPCs are extracted within each local wide-sense stationary (WSS region and are tracked over different WSS regions to identify its “birth” and “death” regions. Then, complex attenuation of dominant MPC is jointly modeled by its delay and Doppler shift both which are derived from its geometry factor. Finally, the model implementation is verified by comparison between RT simulated and modeled delay and Doppler spreads.

  1. High-efficiency photorealistic computer-generated holograms based on the backward ray-tracing technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuan; Chen, Zhidong; Sang, Xinzhu; Li, Hui; Zhao, Linmin

    2018-03-01

    Holographic displays can provide the complete optical wave field of a three-dimensional (3D) scene, including the depth perception. However, it often takes a long computation time to produce traditional computer-generated holograms (CGHs) without more complex and photorealistic rendering. The backward ray-tracing technique is able to render photorealistic high-quality images, which noticeably reduce the computation time achieved from the high-degree parallelism. Here, a high-efficiency photorealistic computer-generated hologram method is presented based on the ray-tracing technique. Rays are parallelly launched and traced under different illuminations and circumstances. Experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method. Compared with the traditional point cloud CGH, the computation time is decreased to 24 s to reconstruct a 3D object of 100 ×100 rays with continuous depth change.

  2. Patient-specific scatter correction in clinical cone beam computed tomography imaging made possible by the combination of Monte Carlo simulations and a ray tracing algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thing, Rune S.; Bernchou, Uffe; Brink, Carsten; Mainegra-Hing, Ernesto

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) image quality is limited by scattered photons. Monte Carlo (MC) simulations provide the ability of predicting the patient-specific scatter contamination in clinical CBCT imaging. Lengthy simulations prevent MC-based scatter correction from being fully implemented in a clinical setting. This study investigates the combination of using fast MC simulations to predict scatter distributions with a ray tracing algorithm to allow calibration between simulated and clinical CBCT images. Material and methods: An EGSnrc-based user code (egs c bct), was used to perform MC simulations of an Elekta XVI CBCT imaging system. A 60keV x-ray source was used, and air kerma scored at the detector plane. Several variance reduction techniques (VRTs) were used to increase the scatter calculation efficiency. Three patient phantoms based on CT scans were simulated, namely a brain, a thorax and a pelvis scan. A ray tracing algorithm was used to calculate the detector signal due to primary photons. A total of 288 projections were simulated, one for each thread on the computer cluster used for the investigation. Results: Scatter distributions for the brain, thorax and pelvis scan were simulated within 2 % statistical uncertainty in two hours per scan. Within the same time, the ray tracing algorithm provided the primary signal for each of the projections. Thus, all the data needed for MC-based scatter correction in clinical CBCT imaging was obtained within two hours per patient, using a full simulation of the clinical CBCT geometry. Conclusions: This study shows that use of MC-based scatter corrections in CBCT imaging has a great potential to improve CBCT image quality. By use of powerful VRTs to predict scatter distributions and a ray tracing algorithm to calculate the primary signal, it is possible to obtain the necessary data for patient specific MC scatter correction within two hours per patient

  3. Vertex shading of the three-dimensional model based on ray-tracing algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiaoming; Sang, Xinzhu; Xing, Shujun; Yan, Binbin; Wang, Kuiru; Dou, Wenhua; Xiao, Liquan

    2016-10-01

    Ray Tracing Algorithm is one of the research hotspots in Photorealistic Graphics. It is an important light and shadow technology in many industries with the three-dimensional (3D) structure, such as aerospace, game, video and so on. Unlike the traditional method of pixel shading based on ray tracing, a novel ray tracing algorithm is presented to color and render vertices of the 3D model directly. Rendering results are related to the degree of subdivision of the 3D model. A good light and shade effect is achieved by realizing the quad-tree data structure to get adaptive subdivision of a triangle according to the brightness difference of its vertices. The uniform grid algorithm is adopted to improve the rendering efficiency. Besides, the rendering time is independent of the screen resolution. In theory, as long as the subdivision of a model is adequate, cool effects as the same as the way of pixel shading will be obtained. Our practical application can be compromised between the efficiency and the effectiveness.

  4. Advanced 3D tools used in reverse engineering and ray tracing simulation of phased array inspection of turbine components with complex geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daks, W.; Kovacshazy, C.; Mair, D.; Ciorau, P.

    2002-01-01

    This paper outlines the practical aspects of reverse engineering and the integration of multiple pieces of software (Drafting, CNC Machining, Ray Tracing, Inspection Simulation Scenario and Phased Array UT Analysis), in order to inspect turbine components comprised of complex geometry. The CNC software, Mastercam, and design software, CADKEY/FastSURF, were used to validate the phased-array automated and manual inspection of blade root, rotor steeples and disk-blade rim attachment. The integration of a 3D part in the software engine, Imagine 3D and SimScan, as well as Tomoview analysis (specimen feature) is based on CADKEY Developer Kit - IGES/SAT file format. A generic Ray Tracing simulation for multi-probe beam was integrated into Imagine 3D. Representative examples of reference blocks and mock-ups, UT simulation and phased-array data comparison are presented. (author)

  5. Combined visualization for noise mapping of industrial facilities based on ray-tracing and thin plate splines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovsiannikov, Mikhail; Ovsiannikov, Sergei

    2017-01-01

    The paper presents the combined approach to noise mapping and visualizing of industrial facilities sound pollution using forward ray tracing method and thin-plate spline interpolation. It is suggested to cauterize industrial area in separate zones with similar sound levels. Equivalent local source is defined for range computation of sanitary zones based on ray tracing algorithm. Computation of sound pressure levels within clustered zones are based on two-dimension spline interpolation of measured data on perimeter and inside the zone.

  6. Study on method of characteristics based on cell modular ray tracing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Chuntao; Zhang Shaohong

    2009-01-01

    To address the issue of accurately solving neutron transport problem in complex geometry, method of characteristics (MOC) is studied in this paper, and a quite effective and memory saving cell modular ray tracing (CMRT) method is developed and related angle discretization and boundary condition handling issues are discussed. A CMRT based MOC code-PEACH is developed and tested against C5G7 MOX benchmark problem. Numerical results demonstrate that PEACH can give excellent accuracy for both k eff and pin power distribution for neutron transport problem. (authors)

  7. Study of Propagation Mechanisms in Dynamical Railway Environment to Reduce Computation Time of 3D Ray Tracing Simulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siham Hairoud

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to better assess the behaviours of the propagation channel in a confined environment such as a railway tunnel for subway application, we present an optimization method for a deterministic channel simulator based on 3D ray tracing associated to the geometrical optics laws and the uniform theory of diffraction. This tool requires a detailed description of the environment. Thus, the complexity of this model is directly bound to the complexity of the environment and specifically to the number of facets that compose it. In this paper, we propose an algorithm to identify facets that have no significant impact on the wave propagation. This allows us to simplify the description of the geometry of the modelled environment by removing them and by this way, to reduce the complexity of our model and therefore its computation time. A comparative study between full and simplified environment is led and shows the impact of this proposed method on the characteristic parameters of the propagation channel. Thus computation time obtained from the simplified environment is 6 times lower than the one of the full model without significant degradation of simulation accuracy.

  8. Simulation of Satellite, Airborne and Terrestrial LiDAR with DART (I):Waveform Simulation with Quasi-Monte Carlo Ray Tracing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gastellu-Etchegorry, Jean-Philippe; Yin, Tiangang; Lauret, Nicolas; Grau, Eloi; Rubio, Jeremy; Cook, Bruce D.; Morton, Douglas C.; Sun, Guoqing

    2016-01-01

    Light Detection And Ranging (LiDAR) provides unique data on the 3-D structure of atmosphere constituents and the Earth's surface. Simulating LiDAR returns for different laser technologies and Earth scenes is fundamental for evaluating and interpreting signal and noise in LiDAR data. Different types of models are capable of simulating LiDAR waveforms of Earth surfaces. Semi-empirical and geometric models can be imprecise because they rely on simplified simulations of Earth surfaces and light interaction mechanisms. On the other hand, Monte Carlo ray tracing (MCRT) models are potentially accurate but require long computational time. Here, we present a new LiDAR waveform simulation tool that is based on the introduction of a quasi-Monte Carlo ray tracing approach in the Discrete Anisotropic Radiative Transfer (DART) model. Two new approaches, the so-called "box method" and "Ray Carlo method", are implemented to provide robust and accurate simulations of LiDAR waveforms for any landscape, atmosphere and LiDAR sensor configuration (view direction, footprint size, pulse characteristics, etc.). The box method accelerates the selection of the scattering direction of a photon in the presence of scatterers with non-invertible phase function. The Ray Carlo method brings traditional ray-tracking into MCRT simulation, which makes computational time independent of LiDAR field of view (FOV) and reception solid angle. Both methods are fast enough for simulating multi-pulse acquisition. Sensitivity studies with various landscapes and atmosphere constituents are presented, and the simulated LiDAR signals compare favorably with their associated reflectance images and Laser Vegetation Imaging Sensor (LVIS) waveforms. The LiDAR module is fully integrated into DART, enabling more detailed simulations of LiDAR sensitivity to specific scene elements (e.g., atmospheric aerosols, leaf area, branches, or topography) and sensor configuration for airborne or satellite LiDAR sensors.

  9. Evaluation of simulation alternatives for the brute-force ray-tracing approach used in backlight design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desnijder, Karel; Hanselaer, Peter; Meuret, Youri

    2016-04-01

    A key requirement to obtain a uniform luminance for a side-lit LED backlight is the optimised spatial pattern of structures on the light guide that extract the light. The generation of such a scatter pattern is usually performed by applying an iterative approach. In each iteration, the luminance distribution of the backlight with a particular scatter pattern is analysed. This is typically performed with a brute-force ray-tracing algorithm, although this approach results in a time-consuming optimisation process. In this study, the Adding-Doubling method is explored as an alternative way for evaluating the luminance of a backlight. Due to the similarities between light propagating in a backlight with extraction structures and light scattering in a cloud of light scatterers, the Adding-Doubling method which is used to model the latter could also be used to model the light distribution in a backlight. The backlight problem is translated to a form upon which the Adding-Doubling method is directly applicable. The calculated luminance for a simple uniform extraction pattern with the Adding-Doubling method matches the luminance generated by a commercial raytracer very well. Although successful, no clear computational advantage over ray tracers is realised. However, the dynamics of light propagation in a light guide as used the Adding-Doubling method, also allow to enhance the efficiency of brute-force ray-tracing algorithms. The performance of this enhanced ray-tracing approach for the simulation of backlights is also evaluated against a typical brute-force ray-tracing approach.

  10. Global Calibration of Multi-Cameras Based on Refractive Projection and Ray Tracing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingchi Feng

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Multi-camera systems are widely applied in the three dimensional (3D computer vision, especially when multiple cameras are distributed on both sides of the measured object. The calibration methods of multi-camera systems are critical to the accuracy of vision measurement and the key is to find an appropriate calibration target. In this paper, a high-precision camera calibration method for multi-camera systems based on transparent glass checkerboards and ray tracing is described, and is used to calibrate multiple cameras distributed on both sides of the glass checkerboard. Firstly, the intrinsic parameters of each camera are obtained by Zhang’s calibration method. Then, multiple cameras capture several images from the front and back of the glass checkerboard with different orientations, and all images contain distinct grid corners. As the cameras on one side are not affected by the refraction of glass checkerboard, extrinsic parameters can be directly calculated. However, the cameras on the other side are influenced by the refraction of glass checkerboard, and the direct use of projection model will produce a calibration error. A multi-camera calibration method using refractive projection model and ray tracing is developed to eliminate this error. Furthermore, both synthetic and real data are employed to validate the proposed approach. The experimental results of refractive calibration show that the error of the 3D reconstruction is smaller than 0.2 mm, the relative errors of both rotation and translation are less than 0.014%, and the mean and standard deviation of reprojection error of the four-camera system are 0.00007 and 0.4543 pixels, respectively. The proposed method is flexible, highly accurate, and simple to carry out.

  11. Comparison and Extension of Existing 3D Propagation Models with Real-World Effects Based on Ray-tracing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kifle, Dereje W.; Gimenez, Lucas Chavarria; Wegmann, Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    antenna beam orientation like antenna tilting or when users are distributed in the third dimension (height) in multi-floor scenarios. Ray tracing based generated propagation maps that show the realistic propagation effect are used as 3D real world reference for investigation and model approval....

  12. Theoretical simulation and analysis of large size BMP-LSC by 3D Monte Carlo ray tracing model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Feng; Zhang Ning-Ning; Yan Sen; Song Sun; Jun Bao; Chen Gao; Zhang Yi

    2017-01-01

    Luminescent solar concentrators (LSC) can reduce the area of solar cells by collecting light from a large area and concentrating the captured light onto relatively small area photovoltaic (PV) cells, and thereby reducing the cost of PV electricity generation. LSCs with bottom-facing cells (BMP-LSC) can collect both direct light and indirect light, so further improving the efficiency of the PV cells. However, it is hard to analyze the effect of each parameter by experiment because there are too many parameters involved in the BMP-LSC. In this paper, all the physical processes of the light transmission and collection in the BMP-LSC were analyzed. A three-dimensional Monte Carlo ray tracing program was developed to study the transmission of photons in the LSC. A larger-size LSC was simulated, and the effects of dye concentration, the LSC thickness, the cell area, and the cell distance were systematically analyzed. (paper)

  13. A new 3-D ray tracing method based on LTI using successive partitioning of cell interfaces and traveltime gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dong; Zhang, Ting-Ting; Zhang, Xiao-Lei; Yang, Yan; Hu, Ying; Qin, Qian-Qing

    2013-05-01

    We present a new method of three-dimensional (3-D) seismic ray tracing, based on an improvement to the linear traveltime interpolation (LTI) ray tracing algorithm. This new technique involves two separate steps. The first involves a forward calculation based on the LTI method and the dynamic successive partitioning scheme, which is applied to calculate traveltimes on cell boundaries and assumes a wavefront that expands from the source to all grid nodes in the computational domain. We locate several dynamic successive partition points on a cell's surface, the traveltimes of which can be calculated by linear interpolation between the vertices of the cell's boundary. The second is a backward step that uses Fermat's principle and the fact that the ray path is always perpendicular to the wavefront and follows the negative traveltime gradient. In this process, the first-arriving ray path can be traced from the receiver to the source along the negative traveltime gradient, which can be calculated by reconstructing the continuous traveltime field with cubic B-spline interpolation. This new 3-D ray tracing method is compared with the LTI method and the shortest path method (SPM) through a number of numerical experiments. These comparisons show obvious improvements to computed traveltimes and ray paths, both in precision and computational efficiency.

  14. Simulating an extreme over-the-horizon optical propagation event over Lake Michigan using a coupled mesoscale modeling and ray tracing framework

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Basu, S.

    2017-01-01

    Accurate simulation and forecasting of over-the-horizon propagation events are essential for various civilian and defense applications. We demonstrate the prowess of a newly proposed coupled mesoscale modeling and ray tracing framework in reproducing such an event. Wherever possible, routinely

  15. Interactive Stable Ray Tracing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dal Corso, Alessandro; Salvi, Marco; Kolb, Craig

    2017-01-01

    Interactive ray tracing applications running on commodity hardware can suffer from objectionable temporal artifacts due to a low sample count. We introduce stable ray tracing, a technique that improves temporal stability without the over-blurring and ghosting artifacts typical of temporal post-pr...

  16. Non-imaging ray-tracing for sputtering simulation with apodization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Chung-Jen

    2018-04-01

    Although apodization patterns have been adopted for the analysis of sputtering sources, the analytical solutions for the film thickness equations are yet limited to only simple conditions. Empirical formulations for thin film sputtering lacking the flexibility in dealing with multi-substrate conditions, a suitable cost-effective procedure is required to estimate the film thickness distribution. This study reports a cross-discipline simulation program, which is based on discrete particle Monte-Carlo methods and has been successfully applied to a non-imaging design to solve problems associated with sputtering uniformity. Robustness of the present method is first proved by comparing it with a typical analytical solution. Further, this report also investigates the overall all effects cause by the sizes of the deposited substrate, such that the determination of the distance between the target surface and the apodization index can be complete. This verifies the capability of the proposed method for solving the sputtering film thickness problems. The benefit is that an optical thin film engineer can, using the same optical software, design a specific optical component and consider the possible coating qualities with thickness tolerance, during the design stage.

  17. Virtual experiments: the ultimate aim of neutron ray-tracing simulations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lefmann, K.; Willendrup, P.K.; Šaroun, Jan

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 16, 3 & 4 (2008), s. 97-111 ISSN 1023-8166 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : Monte Carlo simulations * neutron scattering * neutron instrumentation Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism

  18. R-LODs: fast LOD-based ray tracing of massive models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Sung-Eui; Lauterbach, Christian; Manocha, Dinesh

    2006-08-25

    We present a novel LOD (level-of-detail) algorithm to accelerate ray tracing of massive models. Our approach computes drastic simplifications of the model and the LODs are well integrated with the kd-tree data structure. We introduce a simple and efficient LOD metric to bound the error for primary and secondary rays. The LOD representation has small runtime overhead and our algorithm can be combined with ray coherence techniques and cache-coherent layouts to improve the performance. In practice, the use of LODs can alleviate aliasing artifacts and improve memory coherence. We implement our algorithm on both 32bit and 64bit machines and able to achieve up to 2.20 times improvement in frame rate of rendering models consisting of tens or hundreds of millions of triangles with little loss in image quality.

  19. Virtual experiments: the ultimate aim of neutron ray-tracing simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lefmann, Kim; Willendrup, Peter Kjær; Udby, Linda

    2008-01-01

    We define a virtual neutron experiment as a complete simulation of an experiment, from source over sample to detector. The virtual experiment (VE) will ideally interface with the instrument control software for the input and with standard data analysis packages for the virtual data output. Virtual...

  20. Theoretical simulation and analysis of large size BMP-LSC by 3D Monte Carlo ray tracing model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng Zhang; Ning-Ning Zhang; Yi Zhang; Sen Yan; Song Sun; Jun Bao; Chen Gao

    2017-01-01

    Luminescent solar concentrators (LSC) can reduce the area of solar cells by collecting light from a large area and concentrating the captured light onto relatively small area photovoltaic (PV) cells,and thereby reducing the cost of PV electricity generation.LSCs with bottom-facing cells (BMP-LSC) can collect both direct light and indirect light,so further improving the efficiency of the PV cells.However,it is hard to analyze the effect of each parameter by experiment because there are too many parameters involved in the BMP-LSC.In this paper,all the physical processes of the light transmission and collection in the BMP-LSC were analyzed.A three-dimensional Monte Carlo ray tracing program was developed to study the transmission of photons in the LSC.A larger-size LSC was simulated,and the effects of dye concentration,the LSC thickness,the cell area,and the cell distance were systematically analyzed.

  1. A Monte Carlo Ray Tracing Model to Improve Simulations of Solar-Induced Chlorophyll Fluorescence Radiative Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halubok, M.; Gu, L.; Yang, Z. L.

    2017-12-01

    A model of light transport in a three-dimensional vegetation canopy is being designed and evaluated. The model employs Monte Carlo ray tracing technique which offers simple yet rigorous approach of quantifying the photon transport in a plant canopy. This method involves simulation of a chain of scattering and absorption events incurred by a photon on its path from the light source. Implementation of weighting mechanism helps avoid `all-or-nothing' type of interaction between a photon packet and a canopy element, i.e. at each interaction a photon packet is split into three parts, namely, reflected, transmitted and absorbed, instead of assuming complete absorption, reflection or transmission. Canopy scenes in the model are represented by a number of polygons with specified set of reflectances and transmittances. The performance of the model is being evaluated through comparison against established plant canopy reflectance models, such as 3D Radiosity-Graphics combined model which calculates bidirectional reflectance distribution function of a 3D canopy scene. This photon transport model is to be coupled to a leaf level solar-induced chlorophyll fluorescence (SIF) model with the aim of further advancing of accuracy of the modeled SIF, which, in its turn, has a potential of improving our predictive capability of terrestrial carbon uptake.

  2. A fast and efficient adaptive parallel ray tracing based model for thermally coupled surface radiation in casting and heat treatment processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fainberg, J; Schaefer, W

    2015-01-01

    A new algorithm for heat exchange between thermally coupled diffusely radiating interfaces is presented, which can be applied for closed and half open transparent radiating cavities. Interfaces between opaque and transparent materials are automatically detected and subdivided into elementary radiation surfaces named tiles. Contrary to the classical view factor method, the fixed unit sphere area subdivision oriented along the normal tile direction is projected onto the surrounding radiation mesh and not vice versa. Then, the total incident radiating flux of the receiver is approximated as a direct sum of radiation intensities of representative “senders” with the same weight factor. A hierarchical scheme for the space angle subdivision is selected in order to minimize the total memory and the computational demands during thermal calculations. Direct visibility is tested by means of a voxel-based ray tracing method accelerated by means of the anisotropic Chebyshev distance method, which reuses the computational grid as a Chebyshev one. The ray tracing algorithm is fully parallelized using MPI and takes advantage of the balanced distribution of all available tiles among all CPU's. This approach allows tracing of each particular ray without any communication. The algorithm has been implemented in a commercial casting process simulation software. The accuracy and computational performance of the new radiation model for heat treatment, investment and ingot casting applications is illustrated using industrial examples. (paper)

  3. Capturing sunlight into a photobioreactor: Ray tracing simulations of the propagation of light from capture to distribution into the reactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijffers, J.F.; Janssen, M.G.J.; Tramper, J.; Wijffels, R.H.; Salim, S.

    2008-01-01

    The Green Solar Collector (GSC), a photobioreactor designed for area efficient outdoor cultivation of microalgae uses Fresnel lenses and light guides to focus, transport and distribute direct light into the algae suspension. Calculating the path of rays of light, so-called ray tracing, is used to

  4. SOLFAST, a Ray-Tracing Monte-Carlo software for solar concentrating facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roccia, J P; Piaud, B; Coustet, C; Caliot, C; Guillot, E; Flamant, G; Delatorre, J

    2012-01-01

    In this communication, the software SOLFAST is presented. It is a simulation tool based on the Monte-Carlo method and accelerated Ray-Tracing techniques to evaluate efficiently the energy flux in concentrated solar installations.

  5. Modelling of waves propagation on irregular surfaces using ray tracing and GTD approaches: Application to head waves simulation in TOFD inspections for NDT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrand, Adrien; Darmon, Michel; Chatillon, Sylvain; Deschamps, Marc

    2014-01-01

    The Time of Flight Diffraction (TOFD) technique is a classical ultrasonic method used in ultrasonic non-destructive evaluation, which allows a precise positioning and a quantitative size evaluation of cracks in the inspected material. Among the typical phenomena arising in the current TOFD inspection, the so-called 'head wave' is the first contribution reaching the receiver. The head wave propagation on a planar interface is well known and identified as a critical refraction taking place on the material surface. On irregular surfaces, it has been shown that the head wave results from the melting of surface and bulk waves mechanisms and that surface irregularities are responsible for numerous diffractions of the incident head wave. To simulate such behaviour, a model has been developed using a ray tracing technique based on time of flight minimization (generalized Fermat's principle). It enables the calculation of the ray path and the corresponding time of flight of all waves propagating in the material, including the head wave. To obtain a complete propagation model for these waves (both trajectory and amplitude), the integration of Geometrical Theory of Diffraction (GTD) models is currently performed by coupling them with the ray-based approach discussed above.

  6. Modelling of waves propagation on irregular surfaces using ray tracing and GTD approaches: Application to head waves simulation in TOFD inspections for NDT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrand, Adrien; Darmon, Michel; Chatillon, Sylvain; Deschamps, Marc

    2014-04-01

    The Time of Flight Diffraction (TOFD) technique is a classical ultrasonic method used in ultrasonic non-destructive evaluation, which allows a precise positioning and a quantitative size evaluation of cracks in the inspected material. Among the typical phenomena arising in the current TOFD inspection, the so-called "head wave" is the first contribution reaching the receiver. The head wave propagation on a planar interface is well known and identified as a critical refraction taking place on the material surface. On irregular surfaces, it has been shown that the head wave results from the melting of surface and bulk waves mechanisms and that surface irregularities are responsible for numerous diffractions of the incident head wave. To simulate such behaviour, a model has been developed using a ray tracing technique based on time of flight minimization (generalized Fermat's principle). It enables the calculation of the ray path and the corresponding time of flight of all waves propagating in the material, including the head wave. To obtain a complete propagation model for these waves (both trajectory and amplitude), the integration of Geometrical Theory of Diffraction (GTD) models is currently performed by coupling them with the ray-based approach discussed above.

  7. Reverse ray tracing for transformation optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chia-Yu; Lin, Chun-Hung

    2015-06-29

    Ray tracing is an important technique for predicting optical system performance. In the field of transformation optics, the Hamiltonian equations of motion for ray tracing are well known. The numerical solutions to the Hamiltonian equations of motion are affected by the complexities of the inhomogeneous and anisotropic indices of the optical device. Based on our knowledge, no previous work has been conducted on ray tracing for transformation optics with extreme inhomogeneity and anisotropicity. In this study, we present the use of 3D reverse ray tracing in transformation optics. The reverse ray tracing is derived from Fermat's principle based on a sweeping method instead of finding the full solution to ordinary differential equations. The sweeping method is employed to obtain the eikonal function. The wave vectors are then obtained from the gradient of that eikonal function map in the transformed space to acquire the illuminance. Because only the rays in the points of interest have to be traced, the reverse ray tracing provides an efficient approach to investigate the illuminance of a system. This approach is useful in any form of transformation optics where the material property tensor is a symmetric positive definite matrix. The performance and analysis of three transformation optics with inhomogeneous and anisotropic indices are explored. The ray trajectories and illuminances in these demonstration cases are successfully solved by the proposed reverse ray tracing method.

  8. Ray Tracing for Dispersive Tsunamis and Source Amplitude Estimation Based on Green's Law: Application to the 2015 Volcanic Tsunami Earthquake Near Torishima, South of Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandanbata, Osamu; Watada, Shingo; Satake, Kenji; Fukao, Yoshio; Sugioka, Hiroko; Ito, Aki; Shiobara, Hajime

    2018-04-01

    Ray tracing, which has been widely used for seismic waves, was also applied to tsunamis to examine the bathymetry effects during propagation, but it was limited to linear shallow-water waves. Green's law, which is based on the conservation of energy flux, has been used to estimate tsunami amplitude on ray paths. In this study, we first propose a new ray tracing method extended to dispersive tsunamis. By using an iterative algorithm to map two-dimensional tsunami velocity fields at different frequencies, ray paths at each frequency can be traced. We then show that Green's law is valid only outside the source region and that extension of Green's law is needed for source amplitude estimation. As an application example, we analyzed tsunami waves generated by an earthquake that occurred at a submarine volcano, Smith Caldera, near Torishima, Japan, in 2015. The ray-tracing results reveal that the ray paths are very dependent on its frequency, particularly at deep oceans. The validity of our frequency-dependent ray tracing is confirmed by the comparison of arrival angles and travel times with those of observed tsunami waveforms at an array of ocean bottom pressure gauges. The tsunami amplitude at the source is nearly twice or more of that just outside the source estimated from the array tsunami data by Green's law.

  9. Spin dynamics modeling in the AGS based on a stepwise ray-tracing method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutheil, Yann [Univ. of Grenoble (France)

    2006-08-07

    The AGS provides a polarized proton beam to RHIC. The beam is accelerated in the AGS from Gγ= 4.5 to Gγ = 45.5 and the polarization transmission is critical to the RHIC spin program. In the recent years, various systems were implemented to improve the AGS polarization transmission. These upgrades include the double partial snakes configuration and the tune jumps system. However, 100% polarization transmission through the AGS acceleration cycle is not yet reached. The current efficiency of the polarization transmission is estimated to be around 85% in typical running conditions. Understanding the sources of depolarization in the AGS is critical to improve the AGS polarized proton performances. The complexity of beam and spin dynamics, which is in part due to the specialized Siberian snake magnets, drove a strong interest for original methods of simulations. For that, the Zgoubi code, capable of direct particle and spin tracking through field maps, was here used to model the AGS. A model of the AGS using the Zgoubi code was developed and interfaced with the current system through a simple command: the AgsFromSnapRampCmd. Interfacing with the machine control system allows for fast modelization using actual machine parameters. Those developments allowed the model to realistically reproduce the optics of the AGS along the acceleration ramp. Additional developments on the Zgoubi code, as well as on post-processing and pre-processing tools, granted long term multiturn beam tracking capabilities: the tracking of realistic beams along the complete AGS acceleration cycle. Beam multiturn tracking simulations in the AGS, using realistic beam and machine parameters, provided a unique insight into the mechanisms behind the evolution of the beam emittance and polarization during the acceleration cycle. Post-processing softwares were developed to allow the representation of the relevant quantities from the Zgoubi simulations data. The Zgoubi simulations proved particularly

  10. Usage of ray tracing transfer matrix to mitigate the stray light for ITER spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kajita, S.; Veshchev, E.; Barnsley, R.; Walsh, M.

    2016-01-01

    Stray light formed by the reflection of photons on inner wall from a bright divertor region can be a serious issue in spectroscopic measurement systems in ITER. In this study, we propose a method to mitigate the influence of stray light using a ray tracing analysis. Usually, a ray tracing simulation requires a time consuming runs. We constructed transfer matrices based on the ray tracing simulation results and used them to demonstrate the influence of stray light. It is shown that the transfer matrix can be used to reconstruct the emission profile by considering the influence of the stray light without any additional ray tracing runs. Mitigation of the stray light in ITER divertor impurity monitor was demonstrated, and a method of prediction of the stray light level for the scrape off layer spectroscopy from divertor region was proposed. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  11. Ray-tracing techniques to assess the electromagnetic field radiated by radio base stations: Application and experimental validation in an urban environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adda, S.; Anglesio, L.; D'Amore, G.; Mantovan, M.; Menegolli, M.

    2004-01-01

    This paper aims to validate a ray-tracing model for electromagnetic field calculation, which is used in urban environments to predict irradiation from radio base stations for population exposure evaluation. Validation was carried out through a measurement campaign by choosing measurement points in order to test different propagation environments and analysing broadcast control channels through narrow band measurements. Comparison of the calculated and measured fields indicates that the ray-tracing model used calculates electric field with good accuracy, in spite of the fact that the propagation environment is not described in detail, because of difficulties in modelling the geometrical and electrical characteristics of urban areas. Differences between the calculated and measured results remain below 1.5 dB, with a mean value of 1 dB. (authors)

  12. The Alba ray tracing code: ART

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolas, Josep; Barla, Alessandro; Juanhuix, Jordi

    2013-09-01

    The Alba ray tracing code (ART) is a suite of Matlab functions and tools for the ray tracing simulation of x-ray beamlines. The code is structured in different layers, which allow its usage as part of optimization routines as well as an easy control from a graphical user interface. Additional tools for slope error handling and for grating efficiency calculations are also included. Generic characteristics of ART include the accumulation of rays to improve statistics without memory limitations, and still providing normalized values of flux and resolution in physically meaningful units.

  13. Full-sky Ray-tracing Simulation of Weak Lensing Using ELUCID Simulations: Exploring Galaxy Intrinsic Alignment and Cosmic Shear Correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Chengliang; Li, Guoliang; Kang, Xi; Luo, Yu; Xia, Qianli; Wang, Peng; Yang, Xiaohu; Wang, Huiyuan; Jing, Yipeng; Mo, Houjun; Lin, Weipeng; Wang, Yang; Li, Shijie; Lu, Yi; Zhang, Youcai; Lim, S. H.; Tweed, Dylan; Cui, Weiguang

    2018-01-01

    The intrinsic alignment of galaxies is an important systematic effect in weak-lensing surveys, which can affect the derived cosmological parameters. One direct way to distinguish different alignment models and quantify their effects on the measurement is to produce mock weak-lensing surveys. In this work, we use the full-sky ray-tracing technique to produce mock images of galaxies from the ELUCID N-body simulation run with WMAP9 cosmology. In our model, we assume that the shape of the central elliptical galaxy follows that of the dark matter halo, and that of the spiral galaxy follows the halo spin. Using the mock galaxy images, a combination of galaxy intrinsic shape and the gravitational shear, we compare the predicted tomographic shear correlations to the results of the Kilo-Degree Survey (KiDS) and Deep Lens Survey (DLS). We find that our predictions stay between the KiDS and DLS results. We rule out a model in which the satellite galaxies are radially aligned with the center galaxy; otherwise, the shear correlations on small scales are too high. Most importantly, we find that although the intrinsic alignment of spiral galaxies is very weak, they induce a positive correlation between the gravitational shear signal and the intrinsic galaxy orientation (GI). This is because the spiral galaxy is tangentially aligned with the nearby large-scale overdensity, contrary to the radial alignment of the elliptical galaxy. Our results explain the origin of the detected positive GI term in the weak-lensing surveys. We conclude that in future analyses, the GI model must include the dependence on galaxy types in more detail.

  14. Ray tracing reconstruction investigation for C-arm tomosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malalla, Nuhad A. Y.; Chen, Ying

    2016-04-01

    C-arm tomosynthesis is a three dimensional imaging technique. Both x-ray source and the detector are mounted on a C-arm wheeled structure to provide wide variety of movement around the object. In this paper, C-arm tomosynthesis was introduced to provide three dimensional information over a limited view angle (less than 180o) to reduce radiation exposure and examination time. Reconstruction algorithms based on ray tracing method such as ray tracing back projection (BP), simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique (SART) and maximum likelihood expectation maximization (MLEM) were developed for C-arm tomosynthesis. C-arm tomosynthesis projection images of simulated spherical object were simulated with a virtual geometric configuration with a total view angle of 40 degrees. This study demonstrated the sharpness of in-plane reconstructed structure and effectiveness of removing out-of-plane blur for each reconstruction algorithms. Results showed the ability of ray tracing based reconstruction algorithms to provide three dimensional information with limited angle C-arm tomosynthesis.

  15. Backward ray tracing for ultrasonic imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breeuwer, R.

    1990-01-01

    Focused ultrasonic beams frequently pass one or more media interfaces, strongly affecting the ultrasonic beamshape and focusing. A computer program, based on backward ray tracing was developed to compute the shape of a corrected focusing mirror. This shape is verified with another program; then the

  16. Towards modeling of random lasing in dye doped bio-organic based systems: ray-tracing and cellular automaton analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitus, A. C.; Stopa, P.; Zaklukiewicz, W.; Pawlik, G.; Mysliwiec, J.; Kajzar, F.; Rau, I.

    2015-08-01

    One of many photonic applications of biopolymers as functional materials is random lasing resulting from an incorporation of highly luminescent dyes into biopolymeric matrix, which leads to a random but coherent light scattering in amplifying medium. In spite of numerous theoretical and experimental studies the origin of the coherence is still not clear and various scenarios are discussed. In particular, inhomogeneity of biopolymeric layers can hypothetically promote the feedback in the scattering of the emitted light resulting in coherent and incoherent random lasing. In this paper we analyze the light scattering in a model system of scattering centers of circular shapes and various dimensions using ray-tracing techniques. In the second part, which has mostly a tutorial character, we present the approach to the study of random lasing using a cellular automaton model of Wiersma et al.

  17. McStas 1.1. A freeware package for neutron Monte Carlo ray-tracing simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lefmann, K.; Nielsen, K.

    1999-01-01

    Neutron simulation is becoming an indispensable tool for neutron instrument design. At Risoe National Laboratory, a user-friendly, versatile, and fast simulation package, McStas has been developed, which may be freely downloaded from our website. An instrument is described in the McStas meta-language and is composed of elements from the McStas component library, which is under constant development and debugging by both the users and us. The McStas front- and back-ends take care of performing the simulations and displaying their results, respectively. McStas 1.1 facilities detailed simulations of complicated triple-axis instruments like the Riso RITA spectrometer, and it is equally well equipped for time-of flight spectrometers. At ECNS'99, a brief tutorial of McStas including a few on-line demonstrations is presented. Further, results from the latest simulation work in the growing McStas user group are presented and the future of this project is discussed. (author)

  18. 3-D Ray-tracing and 2-D Fokker-Planck Simulations of Radiofrequency Application to Tokamak Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardinali, A.; Paoletti, F.; Bernabei, S.

    1999-01-01

    A state of the art numerical tool has been developed to simulate the propagation and the absorption of coexisting different types of waves in a tokamak geometry. The code includes a numerical solution of the three-dimensional (R, Z, Φ) toroidal wave equation for the electric field of the different waves in the WKBJ approximation. At each step of integration, the two-dimensional (v parallel, v perpendicular) Fokker-Planck equation is solved in the presence of quasilinear diffusion coefficients. The electron Landau damping of the waves is modeled taking into account the interaction of the wave electric fields with the quasilinearly modified distribution function. Consistently, the code calculates the radial profiles of non-inductively generated current densities, the transmitted power traces and the total power damping curves. Synergistic effects among the different type of waves (e.g., lower hybrid and ion Bernstein waves) are studied through the separation of the contributions of the single wave from the effects due to their coexistence

  19. Monte-Carlo RAY tracing simulation of a falling particle receiver in connection with a central receiver field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alxneit, I [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1999-08-01

    The program RAY was developed to perform Monte-Carlo simulations of the flux distribution in solar reactors in connection with an arbitrary heliostat field. The code accounts for the shading of the incoming rays from the sun due to the reactor supporting tower as well as for full blocking and shading of the heliostats among themselves. A simplified falling particle reactor (FPR) was evaluated. A central receiver field was used with a total area of 311 m{sup 2} composed of 176 round, focusing heliostats. No attempt was undertaken to optimise either the geometry of the heliostat field nor the aiming strategy of the heliostats. The FPR was evaluated at two different geographic latitudes (-8.23W/47.542N; PSI and -8.23W/20.0N) and during the course of a day (May 30{sup th}). The incident power passing through the reactor aperture and the flux density distribution within the FPR was calculated. (author) 3 figs., 1 tab., 3 refs.

  20. Three-dimensional ray-tracing model for the study of advanced refractive errors in keratoconus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schedin, Staffan; Hallberg, Per; Behndig, Anders

    2016-01-20

    We propose a numerical three-dimensional (3D) ray-tracing model for the analysis of advanced corneal refractive errors. The 3D modeling was based on measured corneal elevation data by means of Scheimpflug photography. A mathematical description of the measured corneal surfaces from a keratoconus (KC) patient was used for the 3D ray tracing, based on Snell's law of refraction. A model of a commercial intraocular lens (IOL) was included in the analysis. By modifying the posterior IOL surface, it was shown that the imaging quality could be significantly improved. The RMS values were reduced by approximately 50% close to the retina, both for on- and off-axis geometries. The 3D ray-tracing model can constitute a basis for simulation of customized IOLs that are able to correct the advanced, irregular refractive errors in KC.

  1. Geometry-invariant GRIN lens: finite ray tracing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrami, Mehdi; Goncharov, Alexander V

    2014-11-17

    The refractive index distribution of the geometry-invariant gradient refractive index lens (GIGL) model is derived as a function of Cartesian coordinates. The adjustable external geometry of the GIGL model aims to mimic the shape of the human and animal crystalline lens. The refractive index distribution is based on an adjustable power-law profile, which provides additional flexibility of the model. An analytical method for layer-by-layer finite ray tracing through the GIGL model is developed and used to calculate aberrations of the GIGL model. The result of the finite ray tracing aberrations of the GIGL model are compared to those obtained with paraxial ray tracing. The derived analytical expression for the refractive index distribution can be employed in the reconstruction processes of the eye using the conventional ray tracing methods. The layer-by-layer finite ray tracing approach would be an asset in ray tracing through a modified GIGL model, where the refractive index distribution cannot be described analytically. Using the layer-by-layer finite ray-tracing method, the potential of the GIGL model in representing continuous as well as shell-like layered structures is illustrated and the results for both cases are presented and analysed.

  2. Development of ray tracing visualization program by Monte Carlo method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higuchi, Kenji; Otani, Takayuki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokyo (Japan); Hasegawa, Yukihiro

    1997-09-01

    Ray tracing algorithm is a powerful method to synthesize three dimensional computer graphics. In conventional ray tracing algorithms, a view point is used as a starting point of ray tracing, from which the rays are tracked up to the light sources through center points of pixels on the view screen to calculate the intensities of the pixels. This manner, however, makes it difficult to define the configuration of light source as well as to strictly simulate the reflections of the rays. To resolve these problems, we have developed a new ray tracing means which traces rays from a light source, not from a view point, with use of Monte Carlo method which is widely applied in nuclear fields. Moreover, we adopt the variance reduction techniques to the program with use of the specialized machine (Monte-4) for particle transport Monte Carlo so that the computational time could be successfully reduced. (author)

  3. A Computer Library for Ray Tracing in Analytical Media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miqueles, Eduardo; Coimbra, Tiago A; Figueiredo, J J S de

    2013-01-01

    Ray tracing technique is an important tool not only for forward but also for inverse problems in Geophysics, which most of the seismic processing steps depends on. However, implementing ray tracing codes can be very time consuming. This article presents a computer library to trace rays in 2.5D media composed by stack of layers. The velocity profile inside each layer is such that the eikonal equation can be analitically solved. Therefore, the ray tracing within such profile is made fast and accurately. The great advantage of an analytical ray tracing library is the numerical precision of the quantities computed and the fast execution of the implemented codes. Although ray tracing programs already exist for a long time, for example the seis package by Cervený, with a numerical approach to compute the ray. Regardless of the fact that numerical methods can solve more general problems, the analytical ones could be part of a more sofisticated simulation process, where the ray tracing time is completely relevant. We demonstrate the feasibility of our codes using numerical examples.

  4. RAY TRACING IMPLEMENTATION IN JAVA PROGRAMMING LANGUAGE

    OpenAIRE

    Aybars UĞUR; Mustafa TÜRKSEVER

    2002-01-01

    In this paper realism in computer graphics and components providing realism are discussed at first. It is mentioned about illumination models, surface rendering methods and light sources for this aim. After that, ray tracing which is a technique for creating two dimensional image of a three-dimensional virtual environment is explained briefly. A simple ray tracing algorithm was given. "SahneIzle" which is a ray tracing program implemented in Java programming language which ...

  5. RAY TRACING IMPLEMENTATION IN JAVA PROGRAMMING LANGUAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aybars UĞUR

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper realism in computer graphics and components providing realism are discussed at first. It is mentioned about illumination models, surface rendering methods and light sources for this aim. After that, ray tracing which is a technique for creating two dimensional image of a three-dimensional virtual environment is explained briefly. A simple ray tracing algorithm was given. "SahneIzle" which is a ray tracing program implemented in Java programming language which can be used on the internet is introduced. As a result, importance of network-centric ray tracing software is discussed.

  6. Relationship of college student characteristics and inquiry-based geometrical optics instruction to knowledge of image formation with light-ray tracing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isik, Hakan

    This study is premised on the fact that student conceptions of optics appear to be unrelated to student characteristics of gender, age, years since high school graduation, or previous academic experiences. This study investigated the relationships between student characteristics and student performance on image formation test items and the changes in student conceptions of optics after an introductory inquiry-based physics course. Data was collected from 39 college students who were involved in an inquiry-based physics course teaching topics of geometrical optics. Student data concerning characteristics and previous experiences with optics and mathematics were collected. Assessment of student understanding of optics knowledge for pinholes, plane mirrors, refraction, and convex lenses was collected with, the Test of Image Formation with Light-Ray Tracing instrument. Total scale and subscale scores representing the optics instrument content were derived from student pretest and posttest responses. The types of knowledge, needed to answer each optics item correctly, were categorized as situational, conceptual, procedural, and strategic knowledge. These types of knowledge were associated with student correct and incorrect responses to each item to explain the existences and changes in student scientific and naive conceptions. Correlation and stepwise multiple regression analyses were conducted to identify the student characteristics and academic experiences that significantly predicted scores on the subscales of the test. The results showed that student experience with calculus was a significant predictor of student performance on the total scale as well as on the refraction subscale of the Test of Image Formation with Light-Ray Tracing. A combination of student age and previous academic experience with precalculus was a significant predictor of student performance on the pretest pinhole subscale. Student characteristic of years since high school graduation

  7. Patient-specific scatter correction in clinical cone beam computed tomography imaging made possible by the combination of Monte Carlo simulations and a ray tracing algorithm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Slot Thing, Rune; Bernchou, Uffe; Mainegra-Hing, Ernesto

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Purpose. Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) image quality is limited by scattered photons. Monte Carlo (MC) simulations provide the ability of predicting the patient-specific scatter contamination in clinical CBCT imaging. Lengthy simulations prevent MC-based scatter correction from...

  8. Comparison between ray-tracing and physical optics for the computation of light absorption in capillaries--the influence of diffraction and interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Yuan; Michalowski, Andreas; Weber, Rudolf; Yang, Sen; Graf, Thomas; Ni, Xiaowu

    2012-11-19

    Ray-tracing is the commonly used technique to calculate the absorption of light in laser deep-penetration welding or drilling. Since new lasers with high brilliance enable small capillaries with high aspect ratios, diffraction might become important. To examine the applicability of the ray-tracing method, we studied the total absorptance and the absorbed intensity of polarized beams in several capillary geometries. The ray-tracing results are compared with more sophisticated simulations based on physical optics. The comparison shows that the simple ray-tracing is applicable to calculate the total absorptance in triangular grooves and in conical capillaries but not in rectangular grooves. To calculate the distribution of the absorbed intensity ray-tracing fails due to the neglected interference, diffraction, and the effects of beam propagation in the capillaries with sub-wavelength diameter. If diffraction is avoided e.g. with beams smaller than the entrance pupil of the capillary or with very shallow capillaries, the distribution of the absorbed intensity calculated by ray-tracing corresponds to the local average of the interference pattern found by physical optics.

  9. Ray tracing study of rising tone EMIC-triggered emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanzelka, Miroslav; Santolík, Ondřej; Grison, Benjamin; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, Nicole

    2017-04-01

    ElectroMagnetic Ion Cyclotron (EMIC) triggered emissions have been subject of extensive theoretical and experimental research in last years. These emissions are characterized by high coherence values and a frequency range of 0.5 - 2.0 Hz, close to local helium gyrofrequency. We perform ray tracing case studies of rising tone EMIC-triggered emissions observed by the Cluster spacecraft in both nightside and dayside regions off the equatorial plane. By comparison of simulated and measured wave properties, namely wave vector orientation, group velocity, dispersion and ellipticity of polarization, we determine possible source locations. Diffusive equilibrium density model and other, semi-empirical models are used with ion composition inferred from cross-over frequencies. Ray tracing simulations are done in cold plasma approximation with inclusion of Landau and cyclotron damping. Various widths, locations and profiles of plasmapause are tested.

  10. Evaluation of light extraction efficiency for the light-emitting diodes based on the transfer matrix formalism and ray-tracing method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pingbo, An; Li, Wang; Hongxi, Lu; Zhiguo, Yu; Lei, Liu; Xin, Xi; Lixia, Zhao; Junxi, Wang; Jinmin, Li

    2016-06-01

    The internal quantum efficiency (IQE) of the light-emitting diodes can be calculated by the ratio of the external quantum efficiency (EQE) and the light extraction efficiency (LEE). The EQE can be measured experimentally, but the LEE is difficult to calculate due to the complicated LED structures. In this work, a model was established to calculate the LEE by combining the transfer matrix formalism and an in-plane ray tracing method. With the calculated LEE, the IQE was determined and made a good agreement with that obtained by the ABC model and temperature-dependent photoluminescence method. The proposed method makes the determination of the IQE more practical and conventional. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos.11574306, 61334009), the China International Science and Technology Cooperation Program (No. 2014DFG62280), and the National High Technology Program of China (No. 2015AA03A101).

  11. Ray-Tracing-Based Modeling of Clad-Removed Step-Index Plastic Optical Fiber in Smart Textiles: Effect of Curvature in Plain Weave Fabric

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Hee Moon

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Plastic optical fiber was chosen for information delivery media in smart textile. Cladding layer was peeled off by chemical and mechanical methods to find optimal peeling conditions. Both radial side illumination and longitudinal end-tip illumination were measured for visible light of 627 µm wavelength. A half-cone-shaped jig was manufactured using 3D printing to give various curvature conditions to fibers. Also POFs were embedded in plain weave textile structure to measure the light dissipation effect. The waveguide phenomenon was modeled using discrete ray tracing technique and ray-to-interface collision detection algorithm. Results from the proposed modeling technique showed linear relationship with those from experiment.

  12. A global solution of the ICRH problem based on the combined use of a planar coupling model and hot-plasma ray-tracing in tokamak geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, R.; Bhatnagar, V.P.; Messiaen, A.M.; Eester, D. van

    1986-01-01

    The global solution of the theoretical problem of Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating in tokamak plasmas is obtained by a subdivision of the problem into two simpler ones by virtue of the ''single pass absorption'' hypothesis. The coupling problem is solved in planar geometry, allowing computation of both the antenna electrical properties and the Radio-Frequency (RF) field distribution in the plasma facing the antenna. Starting from this field distribution, the initial conditions for ray-tracing are derived and the propagation and absorption of waves in the plasma bulk is solved in the geometric optics limit taking into account the full tokamak geometry and the kinetic wave description. In the minority heating, redistribution of the minority absorbed power to the other species is carred out using standard quasilinear theory. (orig.)

  13. Intra- and interobserver variability of MRI-based volume measurements of the hippocampus and amygdala using the manual ray-tracing method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Achten, E.; Deblaere, K.; Damme, F. van; Kunnen, M.; Wagter, C. de; Boon, P.; Reuck, J. de

    1998-01-01

    We studied the intra- and interobserver variability of volume measurments of the hippocampus (HC) and the amygdala as applied to the detection of HC atrophy in patients with complex partial seizures (CPE), measuring the volumes of the HC and amygdala of 11 normal volunteers and 12 patients with presumed CPE, using the manual ray-tracing method. Two independent observers performed these measurements twice each using home-made software. The intra- and interobserver variability of the absolute volumes and of the normalised left-to-right volume differences (δV) between the HC (δV HC ), the amygdala (δV A ) and the sum of both (δV HCA) were assessed. In our mainly right-handed normals, the right HC and amygdala were on average 0.05 and 0.03 ml larger respectively than on the left. The interobserver variability for volume measurements in normal subjects was 1.80 ml for the HC and 0.82 ml for the amygdala, the intraobserver variability roughly one third of these values. The interobserver variability coefficient in normals was 3.6 % for δV HCA , 4.7 % for δV HC and 7.3 % for δV A . The intraobserver variability coefficient was 3.4 % for δV HCA , 4.2 % for δV HC amd 5.6 % for δV A . The variability in patients was the same for volume differences less than 5 % either side of the interval for normality, but was higher when large volume differences were encountered, is probably due to the lack of thresholding and/or normalisation. Cutoff values for lateralisation with the δV were defined. No intra- or interobserver lateralisation differences were encountered with δV HCA and δV HC . From these observations we conclude that the manual ray-tracing method is a robust method for lateralisation in patients with TLE. Due to its higher variability, this method is less suited to measure absolute volumes. (orig.) (orig.)

  14. Intra- and interobserver variability of MRI-based volume measurements of the hippocampus and amygdala using the manual ray-tracing method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Achten, E.; Deblaere, K.; Damme, F. van; Kunnen, M. [MR Department 1K12, University Hospital Gent (Belgium); Wagter, C. de [Department of Radiotherapy and Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Gent (Belgium); Boon, P.; Reuck, J. de [Department of Neurology, University Hospital Gent (Belgium)

    1998-09-01

    We studied the intra- and interobserver variability of volume measurments of the hippocampus (HC) and the amygdala as applied to the detection of HC atrophy in patients with complex partial seizures (CPE), measuring the volumes of the HC and amygdala of 11 normal volunteers and 12 patients with presumed CPE, using the manual ray-tracing method. Two independent observers performed these measurements twice each using home-made software. The intra- and interobserver variability of the absolute volumes and of the normalised left-to-right volume differences ({delta}V) between the HC ({delta}V{sub HC}), the amygdala ({delta}V{sub A}) and the sum of both ({delta}V{sub HCA)} were assessed. In our mainly right-handed normals, the right HC and amygdala were on average 0.05 and 0.03 ml larger respectively than on the left. The interobserver variability for volume measurements in normal subjects was 1.80 ml for the HC and 0.82 ml for the amygdala, the intraobserver variability roughly one third of these values. The interobserver variability coefficient in normals was 3.6 % for {delta}V{sub HCA}, 4.7 % for {delta}V{sub HC} and 7.3 % for {delta}V{sub A}. The intraobserver variability coefficient was 3.4 % for {delta}V{sub HCA}, 4.2 % for {delta}V{sub HC} amd 5.6 % for {delta}V{sub A}. The variability in patients was the same for volume differences less than 5 % either side of the interval for normality, but was higher when large volume differences were encountered, is probably due to the lack of thresholding and/or normalisation. Cutoff values for lateralisation with the {delta}V were defined. No intra- or interobserver lateralisation differences were encountered with {delta}V{sub HCA} and {delta}V{sub HC}. From these observations we conclude that the manual ray-tracing method is a robust method for lateralisation in patients with TLE. Due to its higher variability, this method is less suited to measure absolute volumes. (orig.) (orig.) With 2 figs., 7 tabs., 23 refs.

  15. High performance dosimetry calculations using adapted ray-tracing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perrotte, Lancelot; Saupin, Guillaume

    2010-01-01

    When preparing interventions on nuclear sites, it is interesting to study different scenarios, to identify the most appropriate one for the operator(s). Using virtual reality tools is a good way to simulate the potential scenarios. Thus, taking advantage of very efficient computation times can help the user studying different complex scenarios, by immediately evaluating the impact of any changes. In the field of radiation protection, people often use computation codes based on the straight line attenuation method with build-up factors. As for other approaches, geometrical computations (finding all the interactions between radiation rays and the scene objects) remain the bottleneck of the simulation. We present in this paper several optimizations used to speed up these geometrical computations, using innovative GPU ray-tracing algorithms. For instance, we manage to compute every intersection between 600 000 rays and a huge 3D industrial scene in a fraction of second. Moreover, our algorithm works the same way for both static and dynamic scenes, allowing easier study of complex intervention scenarios (where everything moves: the operator(s), the shielding objects, the radiation sources).

  16. A generalized ray-tracing procedure for an atmospheric Cherenkov imaging telescope and optical characteristics of the TACTIC light collector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tickoo, A.K.; Suthar, R.L.; Koul, R.; Sapru, M.L.; Kumar, N.; Kaul, C.L.; Yadav, K.K.; Thoudam, S.; Kaul, S.K.; Venugopal, K.; Kothari, M.; Goyal, H.C.; Chandra, P.; Dhar, V.K.; Rannot, R.C.; Koul, M.K.; Kaul, S.R.

    2005-01-01

    A generalized ray-tracing procedure has been developed, which facilitates the design of a multimirror-based light collector used in atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes. This procedure has been employed to study the optical characteristics of the 3.5 m diameter light collector of the TACTIC Imaging telescope. Comparison of the measured point-spread function of the light collector with the simulated performance of ideal Davies-Cotton and paraboloid designs has been made to determine an optimum arrangement of the 34 spherical mirror facets used in the telescope to obtain the best possible point-spread function. A description of the ray-tracing subroutine used for processing CORSIKA-generated Cherenkov data, required for carrying out Monte-Carlo simulation studies, is also discussed in the paper

  17. AXAF FITS standard for ray trace interchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Paul F.

    1993-07-01

    A standard data format for the archival and transport of x-ray events generated by ray trace models is described. Upon review and acceptance by the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF) Software Systems Working Group (SSWG), this standard shall become the official AXAF data format for ray trace events. The Flexible Image Transport System (FITS) is well suited for the purposes of the standard and was selected to be the basis of the standard. FITS is both flexible and efficient and is also widely used within the astronomical community for storage and transfer of data. In addition, software to read and write FITS format files are widely available. In selecting quantities to be included within the ray trace standard, the AXAF Mission Support team, Science Instruments team, and the other contractor teams were surveyed. From the results of this survey, the following requirements were established: (1) for the scientific needs, each photon should have associated with it: position, direction, energy, and statistical weight; the standard must also accommodate path length (relative phase), and polarization. (2) a unique photon identifier is necessary for bookkeeping purposes; (3) a log of individuals, organizations, and software packages that have modified the data must be maintained in order to create an audit trail; (4) a mechanism for extensions to the basic kernel should be provided; and (5) the ray trace standard should integrate with future AXAF data product standards.

  18. Direct simulation Monte Carlo ray tracing model of light scattering by a class of real particles and comparison with PROGRA2 experimental results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikrenska, M.; Koulev, P.; Renard, J.-B.; Hadamcik, E.; Worms, J.-C.

    2006-01-01

    The Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) model is presented for three-dimensional single scattering of natural light by suspended, randomly oriented, optically homogeneous and isotropic, rounded and stochastically rough cubic particles. The modelled particles have large size parameter that allows geometric optics approximation to be used. The proposed computational model is simple and flexible. It is tested by comparison with known geometric optics solution for a perfect cube and Lorenz-Mie solution for a sphere, as extreme cases of the class of rounded cubes. Scattering and polarization properties of particles with various geometrical and optical characteristics are examined. The experimental study of real NaCl crystals with new Progra 2 instrument in microgravity conditions is conducted. The experimental and computed polarization and brightness phase curves are compared

  19. The importance of leaf BRDF in forest canopy bidirectional reflectance : a case study using simulated canopy architecture and PBRT ray tracing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biliourios, D.; Van der Zande, D.; Verstraeten, W.W.; Stuckens, J.; Muys, B.; Dutre, Ph.; Coppin, P.

    2013-01-01

    Two Fagus sylvatica L. stands with different Leaf Area Index and similar planophile Leaf Angle Distribution were created with L-systems based plant growth software and rendered using both Lambertian and Bousquet’s model leaf Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) assumption. During

  20. Electron ray tracing with high accuracy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, K.; Okubo, T.; Takamoto, K.; Uno, Y.; Kondo, M.

    1986-01-01

    An electron ray tracing program is developed to investigate the overall geometrical and chromatic aberrations in electron optical systems. The program also computes aberrations due to manufacturing errors in lenses and deflectors. Computation accuracy is improved by (1) calculating electrostatic and magnetic scalar potentials using the finite element method with third-order isoparametric elements, and (2) solving the modified ray equation which the aberrations satisfy. Computation accuracy of 4 nm is achieved for calculating optical properties of the system with an electrostatic lens

  1. Improved backward ray tracing with stochastic sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Seung Taek; Yoon, Kyung-Hyun

    1999-03-01

    This paper presents a new technique that enhances the diffuse interreflection with the concepts of backward ray tracing. In this research, we have modeled the diffuse rays with the following conditions. First, as the reflection from the diffuse surfaces occurs in all directions, it is impossible to trace all of the reflected rays. We confined the diffuse rays by sampling the spherical angle out of the reflected rays around the normal vector. Second, the traveled distance of reflected energy from the diffuse surface differs according to the object's property, and has a comparatively short reflection distance. Considering the fact that the rays created on the diffuse surfaces affect relatively small area, it is very inefficient to trace all of the sampled diffused rays. Therefore, we set a fixed distance as the critical distance and all the rays beyond this distance are ignored. The result of this research is that as the improved backward ray tracing can model the illumination effects such as the color bleeding effects, we can replace the radiosity algorithm under the limited environment.

  2. RayTrace: A Simplified Ray Tracing Software for use in AutoCad

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reimann, Gregers Peter; Tang, C.K.

    2005-01-01

    A design aid tool for testing and development of daylighting systems was developed. A simplified ray tracing software was programmed in Lisp for AutoCad. Only fully specularly reflective, fully transparent and fully absorbant surfaces can be defined in the software. The software is therefore best...

  3. RAY TRACING RENDER MENGGUNAKAN FRAGMENT ANTI ALIASING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Febriliyan Samopa

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false IN X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin-top:0cm; mso-para-margin-right:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:10.0pt; mso-para-margin-left:0cm; line-height:115%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Rendering is generating surface and three-dimensional effects on an object displayed on a monitor screen. Ray tracing as a rendering method that traces ray for each image pixel has a drawback, that is, aliasing (jaggies effect. There are some methods for executing anti aliasing. One of those methods is OGSS (Ordered Grid Super Sampling. OGSS is able to perform aliasing well. However, this method requires more computation time since sampling of all pixels in the image will be increased. Fragment Anti Aliasing (FAA is a new alternative method that can cope with the drawback. FAA will check the image when performing rendering to a scene. Jaggies effect is only happened at curve and gradient object. Therefore, only this part of object that will experience sampling magnification. After this sampling magnification and the pixel values are computed, then downsample is performed to retrieve the original pixel values. Experimental results show that the software can implement ray tracing well in order to form images, and it can implement FAA and OGSS technique to perform anti aliasing. In general, rendering using FAA is faster than using OGSS

  4. Combination of ray-tracing and the method of moments for electromagnetic radiation analysis using reduced meshes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, Carlos; Cátedra, Manuel Felipe

    2018-05-01

    This work presents a technique that allows a very noticeable relaxation of the computational requirements for full-wave electromagnetic simulations based on the Method of Moments. A ray-tracing analysis of the geometry is performed in order to extract the critical points with significant contributions. These points are then used to generate a reduced mesh, considering the regions of the geometry that surround each critical point and taking into account the electrical path followed from the source. The electromagnetic analysis of the reduced mesh produces very accurate results, requiring a fraction of the resources that the conventional analysis would utilize.

  5. Ray Tracing Results for Elevation Angle Spread of Departure and its Impact on System Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mondal, Bishwarup; Thomas, Timothy; Nguyen, Huan Cong

    2014-01-01

    Elevation spread of departure angles (ESD) is the key parameter characterizing a 3D fast-fading channel model. 3D channel mod-eling is currently being studied in 3GPP to enable the develop-ment of MIMO techniques exploiting both azimuth and elevation dimensions of the channel. In this paper we use...... ray-tracing techniques to estimate the ESD behavior in Manhattan and Copenhagen city environments and compare it with the 3GPP ESD model. We also investigate the ESD spread within a cluster of rays and show that the ESD within a cluster depends significantly on the distance of the mobile from the base......-station. This char-acterization addresses a gap in the existing literature. Simulation results show that the performance of MIMO techniques such as vertical sectorization depends significantly on the ESD of the underlying environment. This observation also underscores the importance of an accurate ESD model....

  6. Application of ray tracing towards a correction for refracting effects in computed tomography with diffracting sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, A.H.

    1983-01-01

    Ray tracing methods are investigated in forward and inverse processes and applied for image restoration and resolution enhancement in computed tomography with diffracting sources. Within the geometrical optics approximation for a given refractive field, a mathematical model for the forward propagation and inverse reconstruction process is presented. For a finite set of rays in a discrete image representation, an algebraic reconstruction technique is derived which is analogous to the inverse process for a continuum of rays. The geometrical theory of diffraction is invoked to describe ray patterns arising from the introduction of object discontinuity surfaces. We have compared the performance of existing recursive ray tracing techniques for the reconstruction of objects exhibiting discontinuity boundaries. A novel ray tracing and reconstruction technique is presented which enjoys significant computational savings over traditional implementations incorporating tedious ray linking procedures. Simulation studies illustrate the macro-structural distortion and loss of fine resolution when ray refraction is unaccounted for. Restoration and resolution enhancement is achieved with a recursive ray tracing approach. Successful experimental studies with tissue equivalent phantoms are presented. The comparison of simulation and experimental results demonstrated the reasonable assumption of the geometrical optics approximation. Simulation results for larger refractive deviations are encouraging

  7. Ray Tracing Study on Top ECCD Launch in KSTAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bae Young-soon

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The current drive efficiency of electron cyclotron (EC wave is typically low compared with other RF and neutral beam heating system in tokamak. It is known that EC current drive by outboard launch suffers from low current drive efficiency due to electron trapping. However, the heating and current drive by EC wave is being regarded as a strong candidate for DEMO reactor due to the simplicity of the launcher, none of its interaction with plasma, and no coupling issue at the plasma edge. Also, off-axis heating and current drive by EC wave plays an important role of steady state operation optimization. To enhance the current drive efficiency in DEMO-relevant operation condition having high density and high temperature, the top launch of EC wave is recently proposed in FNSF design [2]. In FNSF, a top launch makes use of a large toroidal component to the launch direction adjusting the vertical launch angle so that the rays propagate nearly parallel to the resonance layer increasing of Doppler shift with higher n||. The results shows a high dimensional efficiency for a broad ECCD profile peaked off axis. In KSTAR, the possibility of efficient off-axis ECCD using top launch is investigated using the ray tracing code, GENRAY [3] for the operating EC frequencies (105 GHz or 140 GHz, and 170 GHz. The high current drive efficiency is found by adjusting the toroidal magnetic field and the radial pivot position of the final launcher mirror for fundamental O-mode and second harmonic X-mode. A large Doppler shift is not quite sure in the typical plasma profile in KSTAR, but the simulation results show high current drive efficiency. This paper presents ray tracing results for many cases with the wave trajectories and damping of EC by scanning the launching angle for specific launcher pivot positions and toroidal magnetic field, and two equilibriums of the KSTAR.

  8. A FORMALISM FOR COVARIANT POLARIZED RADIATIVE TRANSPORT BY RAY TRACING

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gammie, Charles F.; Leung, Po Kin

    2012-01-01

    We write down a covariant formalism for polarized radiative transfer appropriate for ray tracing through a turbulent plasma. The polarized radiation field is represented by the polarization tensor (coherency matrix) N αβ ≡ (a α k a* β k ), where a k is a Fourier coefficient for the vector potential. Using Maxwell's equations, the Liouville-Vlasov equation, and the WKB approximation, we show that the transport equation in vacuo is k μ ∇ μ N αβ = 0. We show that this is equivalent to Broderick and Blandford's formalism based on invariant Stokes parameters and a rotation coefficient, and suggest a modification that may reduce truncation error in some situations. Finally, we write down several alternative approaches to integrating the transfer equation.

  9. RAY: a ray tracing program in cold magnetized plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montes, A.; Souza, L.H.

    1985-01-01

    This report deals with the development of a ray tracing program, that is, the plot of an electromagnetic wave path in a cold magnetized plasma medium. The program was developed based on the validity of the geometrical optics laws to calculate the electromagnetic wave trajectory. This approximation is valid when the wave length is much smaller than the characteristic length of the medium. No hypothesis was made about a particular geometric configuration for the magnetic field, what enables the use of the program in any magnetic confinment scheme. The numerically obtained results were compared with an analytic solution for a particular case (cylindrically symmetric medium, uniform magnetostatic, field along the symmetry axis and ordinary wave) and have shown a satisfactory precision. (Author) [pt

  10. Accounting for partiality in serial crystallography using ray-tracing principles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kroon-Batenburg, Loes M. J.; Schreurs, Antoine M. M.; Ravelli, Raimond B. G.; Gros, Piet

    2015-01-01

    Serial crystallography generates partial reflections from still diffraction images. Partialities are estimated with EVAL ray-tracing simulations, thereby improving merged reflection data to a similar quality as conventional rotation data. Serial crystallography generates ‘still’ diffraction data sets that are composed of single diffraction images obtained from a large number of crystals arbitrarily oriented in the X-ray beam. Estimation of the reflection partialities, which accounts for the expected observed fractions of diffraction intensities, has so far been problematic. In this paper, a method is derived for modelling the partialities by making use of the ray-tracing diffraction-integration method EVAL. The method estimates partialities based on crystal mosaicity, beam divergence, wavelength dispersion, crystal size and the interference function, accounting for crystallite size. It is shown that modelling of each reflection by a distribution of interference-function weighted rays yields a ‘still’ Lorentz factor. Still data are compared with a conventional rotation data set collected from a single lysozyme crystal. Overall, the presented still integration method improves the data quality markedly. The R factor of the still data compared with the rotation data decreases from 26% using a Monte Carlo approach to 12% after applying the Lorentz correction, to 5.3% when estimating partialities by EVAL and finally to 4.7% after post-refinement. The merging R int factor of the still data improves from 105 to 56% but remains high. This suggests that the accuracy of the model parameters could be further improved. However, with a multiplicity of around 40 and an R int of ∼50% the merged still data approximate the quality of the rotation data. The presented integration method suitably accounts for the partiality of the observed intensities in still diffraction data, which is a critical step to improve data quality in serial crystallography

  11. Accounting for partiality in serial crystallography using ray-tracing principles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kroon-Batenburg, Loes M. J., E-mail: l.m.j.kroon-batenburg@uu.nl; Schreurs, Antoine M. M. [Utrecht University, Padualaan 8, 3584 CH Utrecht (Netherlands); Ravelli, Raimond B. G. [Maastricht University, PO Box 616, 6200 MD Maastricht (Netherlands); Gros, Piet [Utrecht University, Padualaan 8, 3584 CH Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2015-08-25

    Serial crystallography generates partial reflections from still diffraction images. Partialities are estimated with EVAL ray-tracing simulations, thereby improving merged reflection data to a similar quality as conventional rotation data. Serial crystallography generates ‘still’ diffraction data sets that are composed of single diffraction images obtained from a large number of crystals arbitrarily oriented in the X-ray beam. Estimation of the reflection partialities, which accounts for the expected observed fractions of diffraction intensities, has so far been problematic. In this paper, a method is derived for modelling the partialities by making use of the ray-tracing diffraction-integration method EVAL. The method estimates partialities based on crystal mosaicity, beam divergence, wavelength dispersion, crystal size and the interference function, accounting for crystallite size. It is shown that modelling of each reflection by a distribution of interference-function weighted rays yields a ‘still’ Lorentz factor. Still data are compared with a conventional rotation data set collected from a single lysozyme crystal. Overall, the presented still integration method improves the data quality markedly. The R factor of the still data compared with the rotation data decreases from 26% using a Monte Carlo approach to 12% after applying the Lorentz correction, to 5.3% when estimating partialities by EVAL and finally to 4.7% after post-refinement. The merging R{sub int} factor of the still data improves from 105 to 56% but remains high. This suggests that the accuracy of the model parameters could be further improved. However, with a multiplicity of around 40 and an R{sub int} of ∼50% the merged still data approximate the quality of the rotation data. The presented integration method suitably accounts for the partiality of the observed intensities in still diffraction data, which is a critical step to improve data quality in serial crystallography.

  12. Mathematic models for a ray tracing method and its applications in wireless optical communications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Minglun; Zhang, Yangan; Yuan, Xueguang; Zhang, Jinnan

    2010-08-16

    This paper presents a new ray tracing method, which contains a whole set of mathematic models, and its validity is verified by simulations. In addition, both theoretical analysis and simulation results show that the computational complexity of the method is much lower than that of previous ones. Therefore, the method can be used to rapidly calculate the impulse response of wireless optical channels for complicated systems.

  13. High precision ray tracing in cylindrically symmetric electrostatics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards Jr, David, E-mail: dej122842@gmail.com

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • High precision ray tracing is formulated using power series techniques. • Ray tracing is possible for fields generated by solution to laplace's equation. • Spatial and temporal orders of 4–10 are included. • Precisions in test geometries of hemispherical deflector analyzer of ∼10{sup −20} have been obtained. • This solution offers a considerable extension to the ray tracing accuracy over the current state of art. - Abstract: With the recent availability of a high order FDM solution to the curved boundary value problem, it is now possible to determine potentials in such geometries with considerably greater accuracy than had been available with the FDM method. In order for the algorithms used in the accurate potential calculations to be useful in ray tracing, an integration of those algorithms needs to be placed into the ray trace process itself. The object of this paper is to incorporate these algorithms into a solution of the equations of motion of the ray and, having done this, to demonstrate its efficacy. The algorithm incorporation has been accomplished by using power series techniques and the solution constructed has been tested by tracing the medial ray through concentric sphere geometries. The testing has indicated that precisions of ray calculations of 10{sup −20} are now possible. This solution offers a considerable extension to the ray tracing accuracy over the current state of art.

  14. A comparison of ray-tracing software for the design of quadrupole microbeam systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Incerti, S.; Smith, R.W.; Merchant, M.; Grime, G.W.; Meot, F.; Serani, L.; Moretto, Ph.; Touzeau, C.; Barberet, Ph.; Habchi, C.; Nguyen, D.T.

    2005-01-01

    For many years the only ray-tracing software available with sufficient precision for the design of quadrupole microbeam focusing systems has been OXRAY and its successor TRAX, developed at Oxford in the 1980s. With the current interest in pushing the beam diameter into the nanometre region, this software has become dated and more importantly the precision at small displacements may not be sufficient and new simulation tools are required. Two candidates for this are Zgoubi, developed at CEA as a general beam line design tool and the CERN simulation program Geant in its latest version Geant4. In order to use Geant4 new quadrupole field modules have been developed and implemented. In this paper the capabilities of the three codes TRAX, Zgoubi and Geant4 are reviewed. Comparisons of ray-tracing calculations in a high demagnification quadrupole probe-forming system for the sub-micron region are presented

  15. Ray tracing for optimization of compound parabolic concentrators for solar collectors of enclosed design

    OpenAIRE

    YURCHENKO, VLADIMIR; YURCHENKO, EDUARD; ÇİYDEM, MEHMET; TOTUK, ONAT

    2015-01-01

    We present our developments in computer simulations and optimization of compound parabolic concentrators (CPCs) for solar heat collectors. Issues of both the optical and thermal optimization of CPC collectors of enclosed design are discussed. Ray tracing results for a CPC with a V-shaped absorber are presented. A range of optimal values for the apex angle of a V-shaped absorber is proposed for a CPC collector of typical design.

  16. The vectorization of a ray tracing program for image generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plunkett, D. J.; Cychosz, J. M.; Bailey, M. J.

    1984-01-01

    Ray tracing is a widely used method for producing realistic computer generated images. Ray tracing involves firing an imaginary ray from a view point, through a point on an image plane, into a three dimensional scene. The intersections of the ray with the objects in the scene determines what is visible at the point on the image plane. This process must be repeated many times, once for each point (commonly called a pixel) in the image plane. A typical image contains more than a million pixels making this process computationally expensive. A traditional ray tracing program processes one ray at a time. In such a serial approach, as much as ninety percent of the execution time is spent computing the intersection of a ray with the surface in the scene. With the CYBER 205, many rays can be intersected with all the bodies im the scene with a single series of vector operations. Vectorization of this intersection process results in large decreases in computation time. The CADLAB's interest in ray tracing stems from the need to produce realistic images of mechanical parts. A high quality image of a part during the design process can increase the productivity of the designer by helping him visualize the results of his work. To be useful in the design process, these images must be produced in a reasonable amount of time. This discussion will explain how the ray tracing process was vectorized and gives examples of the images obtained.

  17. Computation and analysis of backward ray-tracing in aero-optics flow fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Liang; Xue, Deting; Lv, Xiaoyi

    2018-01-08

    A backward ray-tracing method is proposed for aero-optics simulation. Different from forward tracing, the backward tracing direction is from the internal sensor to the distant target. Along this direction, the tracing in turn goes through the internal gas region, the aero-optics flow field, and the freestream. The coordinate value, the density, and the refractive index are calculated at each tracing step. A stopping criterion is developed to ensure the tracing stops at the outer edge of the aero-optics flow field. As a demonstration, the analysis is carried out for a typical blunt nosed vehicle. The backward tracing method and stopping criterion greatly simplify the ray-tracing computations in the aero-optics flow field, and they can be extended to our active laser illumination aero-optics study because of the reciprocity principle.

  18. Solar Proton Transport Within an ICRU Sphere Surrounded by a Complex Shield: Ray-trace Geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slaba, Tony C.; Wilson, John W.; Badavi, Francis F.; Reddell, Brandon D.; Bahadori, Amir A.

    2015-01-01

    A computationally efficient 3DHZETRN code with enhanced neutron and light ion (Z is less than or equal to 2) propagation was recently developed for complex, inhomogeneous shield geometry described by combinatorial objects. Comparisons were made between 3DHZETRN results and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations at locations within the combinatorial geometry, and it was shown that 3DHZETRN agrees with the MC codes to the extent they agree with each other. In the present report, the 3DHZETRN code is extended to enable analysis in ray-trace geometry. This latest extension enables the code to be used within current engineering design practices utilizing fully detailed vehicle and habitat geometries. Through convergence testing, it is shown that fidelity in an actual shield geometry can be maintained in the discrete ray-trace description by systematically increasing the number of discrete rays used. It is also shown that this fidelity is carried into transport procedures and resulting exposure quantities without sacrificing computational efficiency.

  19. Thermal radiation characteristics of nonisothermal cylindrical enclosures using a numerical ray tracing technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumeister, Joseph F.

    1990-01-01

    Analysis of energy emitted from simple or complex cavity designs can lead to intricate solutions due to nonuniform radiosity and irradiation within a cavity. A numerical ray tracing technique was applied to simulate radiation propagating within and from various cavity designs. To obtain the energy balance relationships between isothermal and nonisothermal cavity surfaces and space, the computer code NEVADA was utilized for its statistical technique applied to numerical ray tracing. The analysis method was validated by comparing results with known theoretical and limiting solutions, and the electrical resistance network method. In general, for nonisothermal cavities the performance (apparent emissivity) is a function of cylinder length-to-diameter ratio, surface emissivity, and cylinder surface temperatures. The extent of nonisothermal conditions in a cylindrical cavity significantly affects the overall cavity performance. Results are presented over a wide range of parametric variables for use as a possible design reference.

  20. Polarization ray tracing in anisotropic optically active media. I. Algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McClain, S.C.; Hillman, L.W.; Chipman, R.A.

    1993-01-01

    Procedures for performing polarization ray tracing through birefringent media are presented in a form compatible with the standard methods of geometrical ray tracing. The birefringent materials treated include the following: anisotropic optically active materials such as quartz, non-optically active uniaxial materials such as calcite, and isotropic optically active materials such as mercury sulfide and organic liquids. Refraction and reflection algorithms are presented that compute both ray directions and wave directions. Methods for computing polarization modes, refractive indices, optical path lengths, and Fresnel transmission and reflection coefficients are also specified. A numerical example of these algorithms is given for analyzing the field of view of a quartz rotator. 37 refs., 3 figs

  1. Three-dimensional ray tracing for refractive correction of human eye ametropies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez-Hernandez, J. A.; Diaz-Gonzalez, G.; Trujillo-Romero, F.; Iturbe-Castillo, M. D.; Juarez-Salazar, R.; Santiago-Alvarado, A.

    2016-09-01

    Ametropies of the human eye, are refractive defects hampering the correct imaging on the retina. The most common ways to correct them is by means of spectacles, contact lenses, and modern methods as laser surgery. However, in any case it is very important to identify the ametropia grade for designing the optimum correction action. In the case of laser surgery, it is necessary to define a new shape of the cornea in order to obtain the wanted refractive correction. Therefore, a computational tool to calculate the focal length of the optical system of the eye versus variations on its geometrical parameters is required. Additionally, a clear and understandable visualization of the evaluation process is desirable. In this work, a model of the human eye based on geometrical optics principles is presented. Simulations of light rays coming from a punctual source at six meter from the cornea are shown. We perform a ray-tracing in three dimensions in order to visualize the focusing regions and estimate the power of the optical system. The common parameters of ametropies can be easily modified and analyzed in the simulation by an intuitive graphic user interface.

  2. Quantitative evaluation of ultrasonic wave propagation in inhomogeneous anisotropic austenitic welds using 3D ray tracing method. Numerical and experimental validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolkoori, Sanjeevareddy

    2014-01-01

    material is modeled based on the Ogilvy's empirical relation. The weld parameters are optimized in the empirical relation such a way that to match with the macrograph of the real life austenitic weld specimen. The ultrasound beam propagation and field profiles are accurately computed using ray tracing model. The simulated ultrasound field profiles using ray tracing model along the back wall of an austenitic weld component and clad material are compared quantitatively with the experimental results. It turned out that the deviation between simulation and experiments was about 5.2% in the isotropic austenitic material, 16.5% in the austenitic weld material and 5.46% in the austenitic clad material. Finally, the reasons for differences between simulation and experimental results are explored.

  3. Quantitative evaluation of ultrasonic wave propagation in inhomogeneous anisotropic austenitic welds using 3D ray tracing method. Numerical and experimental validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolkoori, Sanjeevareddy

    2014-07-01

    material is modeled based on the Ogilvy's empirical relation. The weld parameters are optimized in the empirical relation such a way that to match with the macrograph of the real life austenitic weld specimen. The ultrasound beam propagation and field profiles are accurately computed using ray tracing model. The simulated ultrasound field profiles using ray tracing model along the back wall of an austenitic weld component and clad material are compared quantitatively with the experimental results. It turned out that the deviation between simulation and experiments was about 5.2% in the isotropic austenitic material, 16.5% in the austenitic weld material and 5.46% in the austenitic clad material. Finally, the reasons for differences between simulation and experimental results are explored.

  4. Fast solar radiation pressure modelling with ray tracing and multiple reflections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhen; Ziebart, Marek; Bhattarai, Santosh; Harrison, David; Grey, Stuart

    2018-05-01

    Physics based SRP (Solar Radiation Pressure) models using ray tracing methods are powerful tools when modelling the forces on complex real world space vehicles. Currently high resolution (1 mm) ray tracing with secondary intersections is done on high performance computers at UCL (University College London). This study introduces the BVH (Bounding Volume Hierarchy) into the ray tracing approach for physics based SRP modelling and makes it possible to run high resolution analysis on personal computers. The ray tracer is both general and efficient enough to cope with the complex shape of satellites and multiple reflections (three or more, with no upper limit). In this study, the traditional ray tracing technique is introduced in the first place and then the BVH is integrated into the ray tracing. Four aspects of the ray tracer were tested for investigating the performance including runtime, accuracy, the effects of multiple reflections and the effects of pixel array resolution.Test results in runtime on GPS IIR and Galileo IOV (In Orbit Validation) satellites show that the BVH can make the force model computation 30-50 times faster. The ray tracer has an absolute accuracy of several nanonewtons by comparing the test results for spheres and planes with the analytical computations. The multiple reflection effects are investigated both in the intersection number and acceleration on GPS IIR, Galileo IOV and Sentinel-1 spacecraft. Considering the number of intersections, the 3rd reflection can capture 99.12 %, 99.14 % , and 91.34 % of the total reflections for GPS IIR, Galileo IOV satellite bus and the Sentinel-1 spacecraft respectively. In terms of the multiple reflection effects on the acceleration, the secondary reflection effect for Galileo IOV satellite and Sentinel-1 can reach 0.2 nm /s2 and 0.4 nm /s2 respectively. The error percentage in the accelerations magnitude results show that the 3rd reflection should be considered in order to make it less than 0.035 % . The

  5. Approximate P-wave ray tracing and dynamic ray tracing in weakly orthorhombic media of varying symmetry orientation

    KAUST Repository

    Masmoudi, Nabil; Pšenčí k, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    We present an approximate, but efficient and sufficiently accurate P-wave ray tracing and dynamic ray tracing procedure for 3D inhomogeneous, weakly orthorhombic media with varying orientation of symmetry planes. In contrast to commonly used approaches, the orthorhombic symmetry is preserved at any point of the model. The model is described by six weak-anisotropy parameters and three Euler angles, which may vary arbitrarily, but smoothly, throughout the model. We use the procedure for the calculation of rays and corresponding two-point traveltimes in a VSP experiment in a part of the BP benchmark model generalized to orthorhombic symmetry.

  6. ARTEAM - Advanced ray tracing with earth atmospheric models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kunz, G.J.; Moerman, M.M.; Eijk, A.M.J. van

    2002-01-01

    The Advanced Ray Tracing with Earth Atmospheric Models (ARTEAM) aims at a description of the electro-optical propagation environment in the marine atmospheric surface layer. For given meteorological conditions, the model evaluates height- and range-resolved transmission losses, refraction and

  7. Real time ray tracing of skeletal implicit surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rouiller, Olivier; Bærentzen, Jakob Andreas

    Modeling and rendering in real time is usually done via rasterization of polygonal meshes. We present a method to model with skeletal implicit surfaces and an algorithm to ray trace these surfaces in real time in the GPU. Our skeletal representation of the surfaces allows to create smooth models...

  8. simEye: computer-based simulation of visual perception under various eye defects using Zernike polynomials

    OpenAIRE

    Fink, Wolfgang; Micol, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    We describe a computer eye model that allows for aspheric surfaces and a three-dimensional computer-based ray-tracing technique to simulate optical properties of the human eye and visual perception under various eye defects. Eye surfaces, such as the cornea, eye lens, and retina, are modeled or approximated by a set of Zernike polynomials that are fitted to input data for the respective surfaces. A ray-tracing procedure propagates light rays using Snell’s law of refraction from an input objec...

  9. GPU-accelerated ray-tracing for real-time treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinrich, H; Ziegenhein, P; Kamerling, C P; Oelfke, U; Froening, H

    2014-01-01

    Dose calculation methods in radiotherapy treatment planning require the radiological depth information of the voxels that represent the patient volume to correct for tissue inhomogeneities. This information is acquired by time consuming ray-tracing-based calculations. For treatment planning scenarios with changing geometries and real-time constraints this is a severe bottleneck. We implemented an algorithm for the graphics processing unit (GPU) which implements a ray-matrix approach to reduce the number of rays to trace. Furthermore, we investigated the impact of different strategies of accessing memory in kernel implementations as well as strategies for rapid data transfers between main memory and memory of the graphics device. Our study included the overlapping of computations and memory transfers to reduce the overall runtime using Hyper-Q. We tested our approach on a prostate case (9 beams, coplanar). The measured execution times for a complete ray-tracing range from 28 msec for the computations on the GPU to 99 msec when considering data transfers to and from the graphics device. Our GPU-based algorithm performed the ray-tracing in real-time. The strategies efficiently reduce the time consumption of memory accesses and data transfer overhead. The achieved runtimes demonstrate the viability of this approach and allow improved real-time performance for dose calculation methods in clinical routine.

  10. Developments in the ray-tracing code Zgoubi for 6-D multiturn tracking in FFAG rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemuet, F.; Meot, F.

    2005-01-01

    A geometrical method for 3-D modeling of the magnetic field in scaling and non-scaling FFAG magnets has been installed in the ray-tracing code Zgoubi. The method in particular allows a good simulation of transverse non-linearities, of field fall-offs and possible merging fields in configurations of neighboring magnets, while using realistic models of magnetic fields. That yields an efficient tool for FFAG lattice design and optimizations, and for 6-D tracking studies. It is applied for illustration to the simulation of an acceleration cycle in a 150 MeV radial sector proton FFAG

  11. Fast estimation of first-order scattering in a medical x-ray computed tomography scanner using a ray-tracing technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xin

    2014-01-01

    This study describes a deterministic method for simulating the first-order scattering in a medical computed tomography scanner. The method was developed based on a physics model of x-ray photon interactions with matter and a ray tracing technique. The results from simulated scattering were compared to the ones from an actual scattering measurement. Two phantoms with homogeneous and heterogeneous material distributions were used in the scattering simulation and measurement. It was found that the simulated scatter profile was in agreement with the measurement result, with an average difference of 25% or less. Finally, tomographic images with artifacts caused by scatter were corrected based on the simulated scatter profiles. The image quality improved significantly.

  12. Development and testing of a new ray-tracing approach to GNSS carrier-phase multipath modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Lawrence; Cross, Paul

    2007-11-01

    Multipath is one of the most important error sources in Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) carrier-phase-based precise relative positioning. Its theoretical maximum is a quarter of the carrier wavelength (about 4.8 cm for the Global Positioning System (GPS) L1 carrier) and, although it rarely reaches this size, it must clearly be mitigated if millimetre-accuracy positioning is to be achieved. In most static applications, this may be accomplished by averaging over a sufficiently long period of observation, but in kinematic applications, a modelling approach must be used. This paper is concerned with one such approach: the use of ray-tracing to reconstruct the error and therefore remove it. In order to apply such an approach, it is necessary to have a detailed understanding of the signal transmitted from the satellite, the reflection process, the antenna characteristics and the way that the reflected and direct signal are processed within the receiver. This paper reviews all of these and introduces a formal ray-tracing method for multipath estimation based on precise knowledge of the satellite reflector antenna geometry and of the reflector material and antenna characteristics. It is validated experimentally using GPS signals reflected from metal, water and a brick building, and is shown to be able to model most of the main multipath characteristics. The method will have important practical applications for correcting for multipath in well-constrained environments (such as at base stations for local area GPS networks, at International GNSS Service (IGS) reference stations, and on spacecraft), and it can be used to simulate realistic multipath errors for various performance analyses in high-precision positioning.

  13. Parallel ray tracing for one-dimensional discrete ordinate computations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarvis, R.D.; Nelson, P.

    1996-01-01

    The ray-tracing sweep in discrete-ordinates, spatially discrete numerical approximation methods applied to the linear, steady-state, plane-parallel, mono-energetic, azimuthally symmetric, neutral-particle transport equation can be reduced to a parallel prefix computation. In so doing, the often severe penalty in convergence rate of the source iteration, suffered by most current parallel algorithms using spatial domain decomposition, can be avoided while attaining parallelism in the spatial domain to whatever extent desired. In addition, the reduction implies parallel algorithm complexity limits for the ray-tracing sweep. The reduction applies to all closed, linear, one-cell functional (CLOF) spatial approximation methods, which encompasses most in current popular use. Scalability test results of an implementation of the algorithm on a 64-node nCube-2S hypercube-connected, message-passing, multi-computer are described. (author)

  14. Ray Tracing modelling of reflector for vertical bifacial panel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Michael Linde; Thorsteinsson, Sune; Poulsen, Peter Behrensdorff

    2016-01-01

    Bifacial solar panels have recently become a new attractive building block for PV systems. In this work we propose a reflector system for a vertical bifacial panel, and use ray tracing modelling to model the performance. Particularly, we investigate the impact of the reflector volume being filled...... with a refractive medium, and shows the refractive medium improves the reflector performance since it directs almost all the light incident on the incoming plane into the PV panel....

  15. Ray-tracing toroidal axisymmetric devices. 1. theoretical analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardinali, A.; Brambilla, M.

    1981-06-01

    Ray tracing technique for lower hybrid waves is used to obtain informations about accessibility, power deposition profiles and eventually electric field distribution. In the first part a critical discussion to establish the meaning and validity of this technique is presented, while in the second part of this work applications to small and to large, fat tokamaks are presented, which support and explain the theoretical arguments

  16. Virtual Ray Tracing as a Conceptual Tool for Image Formation in Mirrors and Lenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heikkinen, Lasse; Savinainen, Antti; Saarelainen, Markku

    2016-01-01

    The ray tracing method is widely used in teaching geometrical optics at the upper secondary and university levels. However, using simple and straightforward examples may lead to a situation in which students use the model of ray tracing too narrowly. Previous studies show that students seem to use the ray tracing method too concretely instead of…

  17. A new hybrid algorithm using thermodynamic and backward ray-tracing approaches for modeling luminescent solar concentrators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lo, Ch. K.; Lim, Y. S.; Tan, S. G.; Rahman, F. A. [Faculty of Engineering and Science, University Tunku Abdul Rahman, Jalan Genting Klang, 53300, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2010-12-15

    A Luminescent Solar Concentrator (LSC) is a transparent plate containing luminescent material with photovoltaic (PV) cells attached to its edges. Sunlight entering the plate is absorbed by the luminescent material, which in turn emits light. The emitted light propagates through the plate and arrives at the PV cells through total internal reflection. The ratio of the area of the relatively cheap polymer plate to that of the expensive PV cells is increased, and the cost per unit of solar electricity can be reduced by 75%. To improve the emission performance of LSCs, simulation modeling of LSCs becomes essential. Ray-tracing modeling is a popular approach for simulating LSCs due to its great ability of modeling various LSC structures under direct and diffuse sunlight. However, this approach requires substantial amount of measurement input data. Also, the simulation time is enormous because it is a forward-ray tracing method that traces all the rays propagating from the light source to the concentrator. On the other hand, the thermodynamic approach requires substantially less input parameters and simulation time, but it can only be used to model simple LSC designs with direct sunlight. Therefore, a new hybrid model was developed to perform various simulation studies effectively without facing the issues arisen from the existing ray-tracing and thermodynamic models. The simulation results show that at least 60% of the total output irradiance of a LSC is contributed by the light trapped and channeled by the LSC. The novelty of this hybrid model is the concept of integrating the thermodynamic model with a well-developed Radiance ray-tracing model, hence making this model as a fast, powerful and cost-effective tool for the design of LSCs. (authors)

  18. 3D Laser Imprint Using a Smoother Ray-Traced Power Deposition Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Andrew J.

    2017-10-01

    Imprinting of laser nonuniformities in directly-driven icf targets is a challenging problem to accurately simulate with large radiation-hydro codes. One of the most challenging aspects is the proper construction of the complex and rapidly changing laser interference structure driving the imprint using the reduced laser propagation models (usually ray-tracing) found in these codes. We have upgraded the modelling capability in our massively-parallel fastrad3d code by adding a more realistic EM-wave interference structure. This interference model adds an axial laser speckle to the previous transverse-only laser structure, and can be impressed on our improved smoothed 3D raytrace package. This latter package, which connects rays to form bundles and performs power deposition calculations on the bundles, is intended to decrease ray-trace noise (which can mask or add to imprint) while using fewer rays. We apply this improved model to 3D simulations of recent imprint experiments performed on the Omega-EP laser and the Nike laser that examined the reduction of imprinting due to very thin high-Z target coatings. We report on the conditions in which this new model makes a significant impact on the development of laser imprint. Supported by US DoE/NNSA.

  19. Ray tracing for inhomogeneous media applied to the human eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz-Gonzalez, G.; Iturbe-Castillo, M. D.; Juarez-Salazar, R.

    2017-08-01

    Inhomogeneous or gradient index media exhibit a refractive index varying with the position. This kind of media are very interesting because they can be found in both synthetic as well as real life optical devices such as the human lens. In this work we present the development of a computational tool for ray tracing in refractive optical systems. Particularly, the human eye is used as the optical system under study. An inhomogeneous medium with similar characteristics to the human lens is introduced and modeled by the so-called slices method. The useful of our proposal is illustrated by several graphical results.

  20. The elimination of ray tracing in Monte Carlo shielding programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bendall, D.E.

    1988-01-01

    The MONK6 code has clearly demonstrated the advantages of hole tracking, which was devised by Woodcock et at. for use in criticality codes from earlier work by Von Neumann. Hole tracking eliminates ray tracing by introducing, for all materials present in the problem, a pseudo scattering reaction that forward scatters without energy loss. The cross section for this reaction is chosen so that the total cross sections for all the materials are equal at a given energy. By this means, tracking takes place with a constant total cross section everywhere, so there is now no need to ray trace. The present work extends hole tracking to shielding codes, where it functions in tandem with Russian roulette and splitting. An algorithm has been evolved and its performance is compared with the ray-tracking code McBEND. A disadvantage with hole tracking occurs when there is a wide variation in total cross section for materials present. As the tracking uses the total cross section of the material that has the maximum cross section, there can be a large number of pseudo collisions in the materials with low total cross sections. In extreme cases, the advantages of hole tracking can be lost by the by the extra time taken in servicing these pseudo collisions; however, techniques for eliminating this problem are under consideration

  1. Optimization of Monte Carlo algorithms and ray tracing on GPUs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergmann, R.M.; Vujic, J.L.

    2013-01-01

    To take advantage of the computational power of GPUs (Graphical Processing Units), algorithms that work well on CPUs must be modified to conform to the GPU execution model. In this study, typical task-parallel Monte Carlo algorithms have been reformulated in a data-parallel way, and the benefits of doing so are examined. We were able to show that the data-parallel approach greatly improves thread coherency and keeps thread blocks busy, improving GPU utilization compared to the task-parallel approach. Data-parallel does not, however, outperform the task-parallel approach in regards to speedup over CPU. Regarding the ray-tracing acceleration, OptiX shows promise for providing enough ray tracing speed to be used in a full 3D Monte Carlo neutron transport code for reactor calculations. It is important to note that it is necessary to operate on large datasets of particle histories in order to have good performance in both OptiX and the data-parallel algorithm since this reduces the impact of latency. Our paper also shows the need to rewrite standard Monte Carlo algorithms in order to take full advantage of these new, powerful processor architectures

  2. Ray-tracing of shape metrology data of grazing incidence x-ray astronomy mirrors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zocchi, Fabio E.; Vernani, Dervis

    2008-07-01

    A number of future X-ray astronomy missions (e.g. Simbol-X, eROSITA) plan to utilize high throughput grazing incidence optics with very lightweight mirrors. The severe mass specifications require a further optimization of the existing technology with the consequent need of proper optical numerical modeling capabilities for both the masters and the mirrors. A ray tracing code has been developed for the simulation of the optical performance of type I Wolter masters and mirrors starting from 2D and 3D metrology data. In particular, in the case of 2D measurements, a 3D data set is reconstructed on the basis of dimensional references and used for the optical analysis by ray tracing. In this approach, the actual 3D shape is used for the optical analysis, thus avoiding the need of combining the separate contributions of different 2D measurements that require the knowledge of their interactions which is not normally available. The paper describes the proposed approach and presents examples of application on a prototype engineering master in the frame of ongoing activities carried out for present and future X-ray missions.

  3. Solar proton exposure of an ICRU sphere within a complex structure part II: Ray-trace geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slaba, Tony C; Wilson, John W; Badavi, Francis F; Reddell, Brandon D; Bahadori, Amir A

    2016-06-01

    A computationally efficient 3DHZETRN code with enhanced neutron and light ion (Z ≤ 2) propagation was recently developed for complex, inhomogeneous shield geometry described by combinatorial objects. Comparisons were made between 3DHZETRN results and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations at locations within the combinatorial geometry, and it was shown that 3DHZETRN agrees with the MC codes to the extent they agree with each other. In the present report, the 3DHZETRN code is extended to enable analysis in ray-trace geometry. This latest extension enables the code to be used within current engineering design practices utilizing fully detailed vehicle and habitat geometries. Through convergence testing, it is shown that fidelity in an actual shield geometry can be maintained in the discrete ray-trace description by systematically increasing the number of discrete rays used. It is also shown that this fidelity is carried into transport procedures and resulting exposure quantities without sacrificing computational efficiency. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Novel applications of the x-ray tracing software package McXtrace

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergbäck Knudsen, Erik; Nielsen, Martin Meedom; Haldrup, Kristoffer

    2014-01-01

    We will present examples of applying the X-ray tracing software package McXtrace to different kinds of X-ray scattering experiments. In particular we will be focusing on time-resolved type experiments. Simulations of full scale experiments are particularly useful for this kind, especially when...... some of the issues encountered. Generally more than one or all of these effects are present at once. Simulations can in these cases be used to identify distinct footprints of such distortions and thus give the experimenter a means of deconvoluting them from the signal. We will present a study...... of this kind along with the newest developments of the McXtrace software package....

  5. Development of Extended Ray-tracing method including diffraction, polarization and wave decay effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagihara, Kota; Kubo, Shin; Dodin, Ilya; Nakamura, Hiroaki; Tsujimura, Toru

    2017-10-01

    Geometrical Optics Ray-tracing is a reasonable numerical analytic approach for describing the Electron Cyclotron resonance Wave (ECW) in slowly varying spatially inhomogeneous plasma. It is well known that the result with this conventional method is adequate in most cases. However, in the case of Helical fusion plasma which has complicated magnetic structure, strong magnetic shear with a large scale length of density can cause a mode coupling of waves outside the last closed flux surface, and complicated absorption structure requires a strong focused wave for ECH. Since conventional Ray Equations to describe ECW do not have any terms to describe the diffraction, polarization and wave decay effects, we can not describe accurately a mode coupling of waves, strong focus waves, behavior of waves in inhomogeneous absorption region and so on. For fundamental solution of these problems, we consider the extension of the Ray-tracing method. Specific process is planned as follows. First, calculate the reference ray by conventional method, and define the local ray-base coordinate system along the reference ray. Then, calculate the evolution of the distributions of amplitude and phase on ray-base coordinate step by step. The progress of our extended method will be presented.

  6. Ray tracing package through a lens system and a spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zurro, B.; King, P.W.; Lazarus, E.A.

    1980-03-01

    To study the light collection optics of the ISX-B two-dimensional (2-D) Thomson scattering system, we have implemented in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Fusion Energy Division (FED) PDP-10 two computer programs, LENS and SPECT, that trace rays through a lens system and a spectrometer, respectively. The lens package follows the path of any kind of ray (meridional or skew) through a centered optical system formed by an arbitrary number of spherical surfaces. The spectrometer package performs geometrical ray tracing through a Czerney-Turner spectrometer and can be easily modified for studying any other configuration. Contained herein is a description of the procedures followed and a listing of the computer programs

  7. Implementation of Refined Ray Tracing inside a Space Module

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balamati Choudhury

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Modern space modules are susceptible to EM radiation from both external and internal sources within the space module. Since the EM waves for various operations are frequently in the high-frequency domain, asymptotic raytheoretic methods are often the most optimal choice for deterministic EM field analysis. In this work, surface modeling of a typical manned space module is done by hybridizing a finite segment of right circular cylinder and a general paraboloid of revolution (GPOR frustum. A transmitting source is placed inside the space module and test rays are launched from the transmitter. The rays are allowed to propagate inside the cavity. Unlike the available ray-tracing package, that use numerical search methods, a quasi-analytical ray-propagation model is developed to obtain the ray-path details inside the cavity which involves the ray-launching, ray-bunching, and an adaptive cube for ray-reception.

  8. An analysis of options available for developing a common laser ray tracing package for Ares and Kull code frameworks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weeratunga, S K

    2008-11-06

    Ares and Kull are mature code frameworks that support ALE hydrodynamics for a variety of HEDP applications at LLNL, using two widely different meshing approaches. While Ares is based on a 2-D/3-D block-structured mesh data base, Kull is designed to support unstructured, arbitrary polygonal/polyhedral meshes. In addition, both frameworks are capable of running applications on large, distributed-memory parallel machines. Currently, both these frameworks separately support assorted collections of physics packages related to HEDP, including one for the energy deposition by laser/ion-beam ray tracing. This study analyzes the options available for developing a common laser/ion-beam ray tracing package that can be easily shared between these two code frameworks and concludes with a set of recommendations for its development.

  9. An efficient ray tracing method for propagation prediction along a mobile route in urban environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, S.; Brennan, C.

    2017-07-01

    This paper presents an efficient ray tracing algorithm for propagation prediction in urban environments. The work presented in this paper builds upon previous work in which the maximum coverage area where rays can propagate after interaction with a wall or vertical edge is described by a lit polygon. The shadow regions formed by buildings within the lit polygon are described by shadow polygons. In this paper, the lit polygons of images are mapped to a coarse grid superimposed over the coverage area. This mapping reduces the active image tree significantly for a given receiver point to accelerate the ray finding process. The algorithm also presents an efficient method of quickly determining the valid ray segments for a mobile receiver moving along a linear trajectory. The validation results show considerable computation time reduction with good agreement between the simulated and measured data for propagation prediction in large urban environments.

  10. MC ray-tracing optimization of lobster-eye focusing devices with RESTRAX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saroun, Jan; Kulda, Jiri

    2006-01-01

    The enhanced functionalities of the latest version of the RESTRAX software, providing a high-speed Monte Carlo (MC) ray-tracing code to represent a virtual three-axis neutron spectrometer, include representation of parabolic and elliptic guide profiles and facilities for numerical optimization of parameter values, characterizing the instrument components. As examples, we present simulations of a doubly focusing monochromator in combination with cold neutron guides and lobster-eye supermirror devices, concentrating a monochromatic beam to small sample volumes. A Levenberg-Marquardt minimization algorithm is used to optimize simultaneously several parameters of the monochromator and lobster-eye guides. We compare the performance of optimized configurations in terms of monochromatic neutron flux and energy spread and demonstrate the effect of lobster-eye optics on beam transformations in real and momentum subspaces

  11. Introducing GAMER: A Fast and Accurate Method for Ray-tracing Galaxies Using Procedural Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groeneboom, N. E.; Dahle, H.

    2014-03-01

    We developed a novel approach for fast and accurate ray-tracing of galaxies using procedural noise fields. Our method allows for efficient and realistic rendering of synthetic galaxy morphologies, where individual components such as the bulge, disk, stars, and dust can be synthesized in different wavelengths. These components follow empirically motivated overall intensity profiles but contain an additional procedural noise component that gives rise to complex natural patterns that mimic interstellar dust and star-forming regions. These patterns produce more realistic-looking galaxy images than using analytical expressions alone. The method is fully parallelized and creates accurate high- and low- resolution images that can be used, for example, in codes simulating strong and weak gravitational lensing. In addition to having a user-friendly graphical user interface, the C++ software package GAMER is easy to implement into an existing code.

  12. Introducing GAMER: A fast and accurate method for ray-tracing galaxies using procedural noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groeneboom, N. E.; Dahle, H.

    2014-01-01

    We developed a novel approach for fast and accurate ray-tracing of galaxies using procedural noise fields. Our method allows for efficient and realistic rendering of synthetic galaxy morphologies, where individual components such as the bulge, disk, stars, and dust can be synthesized in different wavelengths. These components follow empirically motivated overall intensity profiles but contain an additional procedural noise component that gives rise to complex natural patterns that mimic interstellar dust and star-forming regions. These patterns produce more realistic-looking galaxy images than using analytical expressions alone. The method is fully parallelized and creates accurate high- and low- resolution images that can be used, for example, in codes simulating strong and weak gravitational lensing. In addition to having a user-friendly graphical user interface, the C++ software package GAMER is easy to implement into an existing code.

  13. Introducing GAMER: A fast and accurate method for ray-tracing galaxies using procedural noise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groeneboom, N. E.; Dahle, H., E-mail: nicolaag@astro.uio.no [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1029 Blindern, N-0315 Oslo (Norway)

    2014-03-10

    We developed a novel approach for fast and accurate ray-tracing of galaxies using procedural noise fields. Our method allows for efficient and realistic rendering of synthetic galaxy morphologies, where individual components such as the bulge, disk, stars, and dust can be synthesized in different wavelengths. These components follow empirically motivated overall intensity profiles but contain an additional procedural noise component that gives rise to complex natural patterns that mimic interstellar dust and star-forming regions. These patterns produce more realistic-looking galaxy images than using analytical expressions alone. The method is fully parallelized and creates accurate high- and low- resolution images that can be used, for example, in codes simulating strong and weak gravitational lensing. In addition to having a user-friendly graphical user interface, the C++ software package GAMER is easy to implement into an existing code.

  14. A manual to the MAXRAY program library for reflective and dispersive ray tracing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svensson, S.; Nyholm, R.

    1985-07-01

    A general ray tracing program package for reflective and dispersive X-ray optics is described. The package consists of a number of subroutines written in FORTRAN 77 code giving the necessary tools for ray tracing. The program package is available on request from the authors. (authors)

  15. Three-dimensional ray tracing in spherical and elliptical generalized Luneburg lenses for application in the human eye lens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Correa, J E; Coello, V; Garza-Rivera, A; Puente, N P; Chávez-Cerda, S

    2016-03-10

    Ray tracing in spherical Luneburg lenses has always been represented in 2D. All propagation planes in a 3D spherical Luneburg lens generate the same ray tracing, due to its radial symmetry. A geometry without radial symmetry generates a different ray tracing. For this reason, a new ray tracing method in 3D through spherical and elliptical Luneburg lenses using 2D methods is proposed. The physics of the propagation is shown here, which allows us to make a ray tracing associated with a vortex beam. A 3D ray tracing in a composite modified Luneburg lens that represents the human eye lens is also presented.

  16. Simulated BRDF based on measured surface topography of metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Haiyue; Haist, Tobias; Gronle, Marc; Osten, Wolfgang

    2017-06-01

    The radiative reflective properties of a calibration standard rough surface were simulated by ray tracing and the Finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. The simulation results have been used to compute the reflectance distribution functions (BRDF) of metal surfaces and have been compared with experimental measurements. The experimental and simulated results are in good agreement.

  17. Ray tracing and Hubble diagrams in post-Newtonian cosmology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanghai, Viraj A.A.; Clifton, Timothy [School of Physics and Astronomy, Queen Mary University of London, 327 Mile End Road, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom); Fleury, Pierre, E-mail: v.a.a.sanghai@qmul.ac.uk, E-mail: pierre.fleury@unige.ch, E-mail: t.clifton@qmul.ac.uk [Départment de Physique Théorique, Université de Genève, 24 quai Ernest-Ansermet, 1211 Genève 4 (Switzerland)

    2017-07-01

    On small scales the observable Universe is highly inhomogeneous, with galaxies and clusters forming a complex web of voids and filaments. The optical properties of such configurations can be quite different from the perfectly smooth Friedmann-Lemaȋtre-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) solutions that are frequently used in cosmology, and must be well understood if we are to make precise inferences about fundamental physics from cosmological observations. We investigate this problem by calculating redshifts and luminosity distances within a class of cosmological models that are constructed explicitly in order to allow for large density contrasts on small scales. Our study of optics is then achieved by propagating one hundred thousand null geodesics through such space-times, with matter arranged in either compact opaque objects or diffuse transparent haloes. We find that in the absence of opaque objects, the mean of our ray tracing results faithfully reproduces the expectations from FLRW cosmology. When opaque objects with sizes similar to those of galactic bulges are introduced, however, we find that the mean of distance measures can be shifted up from FLRW predictions by as much as 10%. This bias is due to the viable photon trajectories being restricted by the presence of the opaque objects, which means that they cannot probe the regions of space-time with the highest curvature. It corresponds to a positive bias of order 10% in the estimation of Ω{sub Λ} and highlights the important consequences that astronomical selection effects can have on cosmological observables.

  18. Multiplexed optical data storage and vectorial ray tracing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foreman M.R.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available With the motivation of creating a terabyte-sized optical disk, a novel imaging technique is implemented. This technique merges two existing technologies: confocal microscopy and Mueller matrix imaging. Mueller matrix images from a high numerical space are obtained. The acquisition of these images makes the exploration of polarisation properties in a sample possible. The particular case of optical data storage is used as an example in this presentation. Since we encode information into asymmetric datapits (see Figure 1, the study of the polarisation of the scattered light can then be used to recover the orientation of the pit. It is thus possible to multiplex information by changing the angle of the mark. The storage capacity in the system is hence limited by the number of distinct angles that the optical system can resolve. This presentation thus answers the question; what is the current storage capacity of a polarisation sensitive optical disk? After a brief introduction to polarisation, the decoding method and experimental results are presented so as to provide an answer to this question. With the aim of understanding high NA focusing, an introduction to vectorial ray tracing is then given.

  19. Ray tracing and Hubble diagrams in post-Newtonian cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanghai, Viraj A. A.; Fleury, Pierre; Clifton, Timothy

    2017-07-01

    On small scales the observable Universe is highly inhomogeneous, with galaxies and clusters forming a complex web of voids and filaments. The optical properties of such configurations can be quite different from the perfectly smooth Friedmann-Lemaȋtre-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) solutions that are frequently used in cosmology, and must be well understood if we are to make precise inferences about fundamental physics from cosmological observations. We investigate this problem by calculating redshifts and luminosity distances within a class of cosmological models that are constructed explicitly in order to allow for large density contrasts on small scales. Our study of optics is then achieved by propagating one hundred thousand null geodesics through such space-times, with matter arranged in either compact opaque objects or diffuse transparent haloes. We find that in the absence of opaque objects, the mean of our ray tracing results faithfully reproduces the expectations from FLRW cosmology. When opaque objects with sizes similar to those of galactic bulges are introduced, however, we find that the mean of distance measures can be shifted up from FLRW predictions by as much as 10%. This bias is due to the viable photon trajectories being restricted by the presence of the opaque objects, which means that they cannot probe the regions of space-time with the highest curvature. It corresponds to a positive bias of order 10% in the estimation of ΩΛ and highlights the important consequences that astronomical selection effects can have on cosmological observables.

  20. Application of ray-traced tropospheric slant delays to geodetic VLBI analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmeister, Armin; Böhm, Johannes

    2017-08-01

    The correction of tropospheric influences via so-called path delays is critical for the analysis of observations from space geodetic techniques like the very long baseline interferometry (VLBI). In standard VLBI analysis, the a priori slant path delays are determined using the concept of zenith delays, mapping functions and gradients. The a priori use of ray-traced delays, i.e., tropospheric slant path delays determined with the technique of ray-tracing through the meteorological data of numerical weather models (NWM), serves as an alternative way of correcting the influences of the troposphere on the VLBI observations within the analysis. In the presented research, the application of ray-traced delays to the VLBI analysis of sessions in a time span of 16.5 years is investigated. Ray-traced delays have been determined with program RADIATE (see Hofmeister in Ph.D. thesis, Department of Geodesy and Geophysics, Faculty of Mathematics and Geoinformation, Technische Universität Wien. http://resolver.obvsg.at/urn:nbn:at:at-ubtuw:1-3444, 2016) utilizing meteorological data provided by NWM of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF). In comparison with a standard VLBI analysis, which includes the tropospheric gradient estimation, the application of the ray-traced delays to an analysis, which uses the same parameterization except for the a priori slant path delay handling and the used wet mapping factors for the zenith wet delay (ZWD) estimation, improves the baseline length repeatability (BLR) at 55.9% of the baselines at sub-mm level. If no tropospheric gradients are estimated within the compared analyses, 90.6% of all baselines benefit from the application of the ray-traced delays, which leads to an average improvement of the BLR of 1 mm. The effects of the ray-traced delays on the terrestrial reference frame are also investigated. A separate assessment of the RADIATE ray-traced delays is carried out by comparison to the ray-traced delays from the

  1. Real-time generation of kd-trees for ray tracing using DirectX 11

    OpenAIRE

    Säll, Martin; Cronqvist, Fredrik

    2017-01-01

    Context. Ray tracing has always been a simple but effective way to create a photorealistic scene but at a greater cost when expanding the scene. Recent improvements in GPU and CPU hardware have made ray tracing faster, making more complex scenes possible with the same amount of time needed to process the scene. Despite the improvements in hardware ray tracing is still rarely run at a interactive speed. Objectives. The aim of this experiment was to implement a new kdtree generation algorithm us...

  2. Contribution of a 3D ray tracing model in a complex medium to the localization of infra-sound sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mialle, Pierrick

    2007-01-01

    Localisation of infra-sound sources is a difficult task due to large propagation distances at stake and because of the atmospheric complexity. In order to resolve this problem, one can seek as many necessary information as the comprehension of wave propagation, the role and influence of the atmosphere and its spatio-temporal variations, the knowledge of sources and detection parameters, but also the configuration of the stations and their global spreading. Two methods based on the construction of propagation tables depending on station, date and time are introduced. Those tables require a long range propagation tool to simulate the propagation through a complex medium, which are carried out by WASP-3D Sph a 3D paraxial ray tracing based-theory tool integrating both amplitude estimation and horizontal wind fields in space and time. Tables are centered on the receptor. They describe spatial variations of the main observation parameters and offer a snapshot of the atmospheric propagation depending on the range for every simulated phase. For each path, celerity, azimuth deviation, attenuation and return altitude are predicted and allow building the tables. The latter help to identify detected phases and are integrated in an accurate localization procedure. The procedure is tested on three case study, such as the explosion of gas-pipeline in Belgium 2004 near Ghislenghien, the explosion of a military facility in 2007 in Novaky, Slovakia and the explosion of the Buncefield oil depot in 2005 in the United Kingdom, where event specificities, propagation parameters and used configurations are introduced. The accuracy and optimization of the localization are discussed. A validation study is presented regarding International Monitoring System stations along a meridian - I18DK (Greenland, Denmark), I51UK (Bermuda, United Kingdom), I25FR (Guyane, France), I08BO (La Paz, Bolivia), I01AR (Paso Flores, Argentina), I02AR (Ushuaia, Argentina), I54US (Antarctica, U.S.A.) - to

  3. Ray-tracing analysis of electron-cyclotron-resonance heating in straight stellarators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, K.

    1983-05-01

    A ray-tracing computer code is developed and implemented to simulate electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) in stellarators. A straight stellarator model is developed to simulate the confinement geometry. Following a review of ECRH, a cold plasma model is used to define the dispersion relation. To calculate the wave power deposition, a finite temperature damping approximation is used. 3-D ray equations in cylindrical coordinates are derived and put into suitable forms for computation. The three computer codes, MAC, HERA, and GROUT, developed for this research, are described next. ECRH simulation is then carried out for three models including Heliotron E and Wendelstein VII A. Investigated aspects include launching position and mode scan, frequency detuning, helical effects, start-up, and toroidal effects. Results indicate: (1) an elliptical waveguide radiation pattern, with its long axis oriented half-way between the toroidal axis and the saddle point line, is more efficient than a circular one; and (2) mid-plane, high field side launch is favored for both O- and X-waves

  4. Fast voxel and polygon ray-tracing algorithms in intensity modulated radiation therapy treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fox, Christopher; Romeijn, H. Edwin; Dempsey, James F.

    2006-01-01

    We present work on combining three algorithms to improve ray-tracing efficiency in radiation therapy dose computation. The three algorithms include: An improved point-in-polygon algorithm, incremental voxel ray tracing algorithm, and stereographic projection of beamlets for voxel truncation. The point-in-polygon and incremental voxel ray-tracing algorithms have been used in computer graphics and nuclear medicine applications while the stereographic projection algorithm was developed by our group. These algorithms demonstrate significant improvements over the current standard algorithms in peer reviewed literature, i.e., the polygon and voxel ray-tracing algorithms of Siddon for voxel classification (point-in-polygon testing) and dose computation, respectively, and radius testing for voxel truncation. The presented polygon ray-tracing technique was tested on 10 intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment planning cases that required the classification of between 0.58 and 2.0 million voxels on a 2.5 mm isotropic dose grid into 1-4 targets and 5-14 structures represented as extruded polygons (a.k.a. Siddon prisms). Incremental voxel ray tracing and voxel truncation employing virtual stereographic projection was tested on the same IMRT treatment planning cases where voxel dose was required for 230-2400 beamlets using a finite-size pencil-beam algorithm. Between a 100 and 360 fold cpu time improvement over Siddon's method was observed for the polygon ray-tracing algorithm to perform classification of voxels for target and structure membership. Between a 2.6 and 3.1 fold reduction in cpu time over current algorithms was found for the implementation of incremental ray tracing. Additionally, voxel truncation via stereographic projection was observed to be 11-25 times faster than the radial-testing beamlet extent approach and was further improved 1.7-2.0 fold through point-classification using the method of translation over the cross product technique

  5. Technical Note: A direct ray-tracing method to compute integral depth dose in pencil beam proton radiography with a multilayer ionization chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farace, Paolo; Righetto, Roberto; Deffet, Sylvain; Meijers, Arturs; Vander Stappen, Francois

    2016-12-01

    To introduce a fast ray-tracing algorithm in pencil proton radiography (PR) with a multilayer ionization chamber (MLIC) for in vivo range error mapping. Pencil beam PR was obtained by delivering spots uniformly positioned in a square (45 × 45 mm 2 field-of-view) of 9 × 9 spots capable of crossing the phantoms (210 MeV). The exit beam was collected by a MLIC to sample the integral depth dose (IDD MLIC ). PRs of an electron-density and of a head phantom were acquired by moving the couch to obtain multiple 45 × 45 mm 2 frames. To map the corresponding range errors, the two-dimensional set of IDD MLIC was compared with (i) the integral depth dose computed by the treatment planning system (TPS) by both analytic (IDD TPS ) and Monte Carlo (IDD MC ) algorithms in a volume of water simulating the MLIC at the CT, and (ii) the integral depth dose directly computed by a simple ray-tracing algorithm (IDD direct ) through the same CT data. The exact spatial position of the spot pattern was numerically adjusted testing different in-plane positions and selecting the one that minimized the range differences between IDD direct and IDD MLIC . Range error mapping was feasible by both the TPS and the ray-tracing methods, but very sensitive to even small misalignments. In homogeneous regions, the range errors computed by the direct ray-tracing algorithm matched the results obtained by both the analytic and the Monte Carlo algorithms. In both phantoms, lateral heterogeneities were better modeled by the ray-tracing and the Monte Carlo algorithms than by the analytic TPS computation. Accordingly, when the pencil beam crossed lateral heterogeneities, the range errors mapped by the direct algorithm matched better the Monte Carlo maps than those obtained by the analytic algorithm. Finally, the simplicity of the ray-tracing algorithm allowed to implement a prototype procedure for automated spatial alignment. The ray-tracing algorithm can reliably replace the TPS method in MLIC PR for in

  6. Simulation and application of micro X-ray fluorescence based on an ellipsoidal capillary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jing; Li, Yude; Wang, Xingyi; Zhang, Xiaoyun; Lin, Xiaoyan

    2017-06-01

    A micro X-ray fluorescence setup was presented, based on an ellipsoidal capillary and a traditional laboratorial X-ray source. Using Ray-tracing principle, we have simulated the transmission path of X-ray beam in the ellipsoidal capillary and designed the optimal parameters of the ellipsoidal capillary for the micro X-ray fluorescence setup. We demonstrate that ellipsoidal capillary is well suited as condenser for the micro X-ray fluorescence based on traditional laboratorial X-ray source. Furthermore, we obtain the 2D mapping image of the leaf blade sample by using the ellipsoidal capillary we designed.

  7. SU-F-T-555: Accurate Stereotactic Cone TMRs Converted from PDDs Scanned with Ray Trace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, H; Zhong, H; Qin, Y; Snyder, K; Chetty, I; Wen, N

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether the accuracy of TMRs for stereotactic cones converted from PDDs scanned with Ray Trace can be improved, when compared against the TMRs converted from the traditional PDDs. Methods: Ray Trace measurement in Sun Nuclear 3D Scanner is for accurate scan of small field PDDs. The system detects the center of field at two depths, for example, at 3 and 20 cm in our study, and then performs scan along the line passing the two centers. With both Ray Trace and the traditional method, PDDs for conical cones of 4, 5, 7.5, 10, 12.5, 15, and 17.5 mm diameter (jaws set to 5×5 cm) were obtained for 6X FFF and 10X FFF energies on a Varian Edge linac, using Edge detectors. The formalism of converting PDD to TMR given in Khan’s book (4th Edition, p.161) was applied. Sp values at dmax were obtained by measuring cone Scp and Sc. Continuous direct measurement of TMR by filling/draining water to/from the tank and spot measurement by moving the tank and detector were also performed with the same equipment, using 100 cm SDD. Results: For 6XFFF energy and all the cones, TMRs converted from Ray Trace were very close to the continuous and spot measurement, while TMRs converted from traditional PDDs had larger deviation. Along the central axis beyond dmax, 1.7% of TMR data points calculated from Ray Trace had more 3% deviation from measurement, with maximal deviation of 5.2%. Whereas, 34% of TMR points calculated from traditional PDDs had more than 3% deviation, with maximum of 5.7%. In this initial study, Ray Trace scans for 10XFFF beam were noisy, further measurement is warranted. Conclusion: The Ray Trace could improve the accuracy of PDDs measurement and the calculated TMRs for stereotactic cones, which was within 3% of the measured TMRs.

  8. SU-F-T-555: Accurate Stereotactic Cone TMRs Converted from PDDs Scanned with Ray Trace

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, H; Zhong, H; Qin, Y; Snyder, K; Chetty, I; Wen, N [Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate whether the accuracy of TMRs for stereotactic cones converted from PDDs scanned with Ray Trace can be improved, when compared against the TMRs converted from the traditional PDDs. Methods: Ray Trace measurement in Sun Nuclear 3D Scanner is for accurate scan of small field PDDs. The system detects the center of field at two depths, for example, at 3 and 20 cm in our study, and then performs scan along the line passing the two centers. With both Ray Trace and the traditional method, PDDs for conical cones of 4, 5, 7.5, 10, 12.5, 15, and 17.5 mm diameter (jaws set to 5×5 cm) were obtained for 6X FFF and 10X FFF energies on a Varian Edge linac, using Edge detectors. The formalism of converting PDD to TMR given in Khan’s book (4th Edition, p.161) was applied. Sp values at dmax were obtained by measuring cone Scp and Sc. Continuous direct measurement of TMR by filling/draining water to/from the tank and spot measurement by moving the tank and detector were also performed with the same equipment, using 100 cm SDD. Results: For 6XFFF energy and all the cones, TMRs converted from Ray Trace were very close to the continuous and spot measurement, while TMRs converted from traditional PDDs had larger deviation. Along the central axis beyond dmax, 1.7% of TMR data points calculated from Ray Trace had more 3% deviation from measurement, with maximal deviation of 5.2%. Whereas, 34% of TMR points calculated from traditional PDDs had more than 3% deviation, with maximum of 5.7%. In this initial study, Ray Trace scans for 10XFFF beam were noisy, further measurement is warranted. Conclusion: The Ray Trace could improve the accuracy of PDDs measurement and the calculated TMRs for stereotactic cones, which was within 3% of the measured TMRs.

  9. Exploring Light’s Interactions with Bubbles and Light Absorbers in Photoelectrochemical Devices using Ray Tracing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevens, John Colby [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). The Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis; Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2012-12-01

    Ray tracing was used to perform optical optimization of arrays of photovoltaic microrods and explore the interaction between light and bubbles of oxygen gas on the surface of the microrods. The incident angle of light was varied over a wide range. The percent of incident light absorbed by the microrods and reflected by the bubbles was computed over this range. It was found that, for the 10 μm diameter, 100 μm tall SrTiO3 microrods simulated in the model, the optimal center-­to-­center spacing was 14 μm for a square grid. This geometry produced 75% average and 90% maximum absorbance. For a triangular grid using the same microrods, the optimal center-­to-­center spacing was 14 μm. This geometry produced 67% average and 85% maximum absorbance. For a randomly laid out grid of 5 μm diameter, 100 μm tall SrTiO3 microrods with an average center-­to-­center spacing of 20 μm, the average absorption was 23% and the maximum absorption was 43%. For a 50% areal coverage fraction of bubbles on the absorber surface, between 2%-­20% of the incident light energy was reflected away from the rods by the bubbles, depending upon incident angle and bubble morphology.

  10. Improving LED CCT uniformity using micropatterned films optimized by combining ray tracing and FDTD methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Xinrui; Li, Jiasheng; Chen, Qiu; Tang, Yong; Li, Zongtao; Yu, Binhai

    2015-02-09

    Although the light-emitting diode (LED) has revolutionized lighting, the non-uniformity of its correlated color temperature (CCT) still remains a major concern. In this context, to improve the light distribution performance of remote phosphor LED lamps, we employ a micropatterned array (MPA) optical film fabricated using a low-cost molding process. The parameters of the MPA, including different installation configurations, positioning, and diameters, are optimized by combining the finite-difference time-domain and ray-tracing methods. Results show that the sample with the upward-facing convex-cone MPA film that has a diameter of half of that of the remote phosphor glass, and is tightly affixed to the inward surface of the remote phosphor glass renders a superior light distribution performance. When compared with the case in which no MPA film is used, the deviation of the CCT distribution decreases from 1033 K to 223 K, and the corresponding output power of the sample is an acceptable level of 85.6%. We perform experiments to verify our simulation results, and the two sets of results exhibit a close agreement. We believe that our approach can be used to optimize MPA films for various lighting applications.

  11. Ray Tracing through the Edge Focusing of Rectangular Benders and an Improved Model for the Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolski, Jeffrey S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Barlow, David B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Macek, Robert J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; McCrady, Rodney C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-01

    Particle ray tracing through simulated 3D magnetic fields was executed to investigate the effective quadrupole strength of the edge focusing of the rectangular bending magnets in the Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring (PSR). The particle rays receive a kick in the edge field of the rectangular dipole. A focal length may be calculated from the particle tracking and related to the fringe field integral (FINT) model parameter. This tech note introduces the baseline lattice model of the PSR and motivates the need for an improvement in the baseline model's vertical tune prediction, which differs from measurement by .05. An improved model of the PSR is created by modifying the fringe field integral parameter to those suggested by the ray tracing investigation. This improved model is then verified against measurement at the nominal PSR operating set point and at set points far away from the nominal operating conditions. Lastly, Linear Optics from Closed Orbits (LOCO) is employed in an orbit response matrix method for model improvement to verify the quadrupole strengths of the improved model.

  12. Modeling UV Radiation Feedback from Massive Stars. I. Implementation of Adaptive Ray-tracing Method and Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeong-Gyu; Kim, Woong-Tae; Ostriker, Eve C.; Skinner, M. Aaron

    2017-12-01

    We present an implementation of an adaptive ray-tracing (ART) module in the Athena hydrodynamics code that accurately and efficiently handles the radiative transfer involving multiple point sources on a three-dimensional Cartesian grid. We adopt a recently proposed parallel algorithm that uses nonblocking, asynchronous MPI communications to accelerate transport of rays across the computational domain. We validate our implementation through several standard test problems, including the propagation of radiation in vacuum and the expansions of various types of H II regions. Additionally, scaling tests show that the cost of a full ray trace per source remains comparable to that of the hydrodynamics update on up to ∼ {10}3 processors. To demonstrate application of our ART implementation, we perform a simulation of star cluster formation in a marginally bound, turbulent cloud, finding that its star formation efficiency is 12% when both radiation pressure forces and photoionization by UV radiation are treated. We directly compare the radiation forces computed from the ART scheme with those from the M 1 closure relation. Although the ART and M 1 schemes yield similar results on large scales, the latter is unable to resolve the radiation field accurately near individual point sources.

  13. Magnetospherically reflected chorus waves revealed by ray tracing with CLUSTER data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Parrot

    Full Text Available This paper is related to the propagation characteristics of a chorus emission recorded simultaneously by the 4 satellites of the CLUSTER mission on 29 October 2001 between 01:00 and 05:00 UT. During this day, the spacecraft (SC 1, 2, and 4 are relatively close to each other but SC3 has been delayed by half an hour. We use the data recorded aboard CLUSTER by the STAFF spectrum analyser. This instrument provides the cross spectral matrix of three magnetic and two electric field components. Dedicated software processes this spectral matrix in order to determine the wave normal directions relative to the Earth’s magnetic field. This calculation is done for the 4 satellites at different times and different frequencies and allows us to check the directions of these waves. Measurements around the magnetic equator show that the parallel component of the Poynting vector changes its sign when the satellites cross the equator region. It indicates that the chorus waves propagate away from this region which is considered as the source area of these emissions. This is valid for the most intense waves observed on the magnetic and electric power spectrograms. But it is also observed on SC1, SC2, and SC4 that lower intensity waves propagate toward the equator simultaneously with the SC3 intense chorus waves propagating away from the equator. Both waves are at the same frequency. Using the wave normal directions of these waves, a ray tracing study shows that the waves observed by SC1, SC2, and SC4 cross the equatorial plane at the same location as the waves observed by SC3. SC3 which is 30 minutes late observes the waves that originate first from the equator; meanwhile, SC1, SC2, and SC4 observe the same waves that have suffered a Lower Hybrid Resonance (LHR reflection at low altitudes (based on the ray tracing analysis and now return to the equator at a different location with a lower intensity. Similar phenomenon is observed when all SC are on the other side

  14. Magnetospherically reflected chorus waves revealed by ray tracing with CLUSTER data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Parrot

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper is related to the propagation characteristics of a chorus emission recorded simultaneously by the 4 satellites of the CLUSTER mission on 29 October 2001 between 01:00 and 05:00 UT. During this day, the spacecraft (SC 1, 2, and 4 are relatively close to each other but SC3 has been delayed by half an hour. We use the data recorded aboard CLUSTER by the STAFF spectrum analyser. This instrument provides the cross spectral matrix of three magnetic and two electric field components. Dedicated software processes this spectral matrix in order to determine the wave normal directions relative to the Earth’s magnetic field. This calculation is done for the 4 satellites at different times and different frequencies and allows us to check the directions of these waves. Measurements around the magnetic equator show that the parallel component of the Poynting vector changes its sign when the satellites cross the equator region. It indicates that the chorus waves propagate away from this region which is considered as the source area of these emissions. This is valid for the most intense waves observed on the magnetic and electric power spectrograms. But it is also observed on SC1, SC2, and SC4 that lower intensity waves propagate toward the equator simultaneously with the SC3 intense chorus waves propagating away from the equator. Both waves are at the same frequency. Using the wave normal directions of these waves, a ray tracing study shows that the waves observed by SC1, SC2, and SC4 cross the equatorial plane at the same location as the waves observed by SC3. SC3 which is 30 minutes late observes the waves that originate first from the equator; meanwhile, SC1, SC2, and SC4 observe the same waves that have suffered a Lower Hybrid Resonance (LHR reflection at low altitudes (based on the ray tracing analysis and now return to the equator at a different location with a lower intensity. Similar phenomenon is observed when all SC are on the other side

  15. 2-Dimensional B-Spline Algorithms with Applications to Ray Tracing in Media of Spatially-Varying Refractive Index

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-08-01

    In the approach, photon trajectories are computed using a solution of the Eikonal equation (ray-tracing methods) rather than linear trajectories. The...coupling the radiative transport solution into heat transfer and damage models. 15. SUBJECT TERMS: B-Splines, Ray-Tracing, Eikonal Equation...multi-layer biological tissue model. In the approach, photon trajectories are computed using a solution of the Eikonal equation (ray-tracing methods

  16. Ray-tracing studies for a whole-viewing-angle retroreflector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, B.; Friedsam, H.

    2000-01-01

    The APS Survey and Alignment team uses LEICA laser trackers for the majority of their alignment tasks. These instruments utilize several different retroreflectors for tracking the path of the laser interferometer. Currently in use are open-air corner cubes with an acceptance angle of ±20 degree, corner cube prisms with an acceptance angle of ±50degree, and a Cat's eye with an acceptance angle of ±60degree. Best measurement results can be achieved by using an open-air corner cube that eliminates the need for the laser beam to travel through a different medium before it returns to the instrument detector. However, the trade off is a small acceptance angle. In order to overcome the limitations of the small acceptance angles, Takatsuji et al. has proposed the creation of a full-viewing-angle retroreflector. Based on the notion that the radius R 1 of a common Cat's eye is proportional to R 2 , one can write: R 1 = (n minus 1)R 2 . In the case that n, the refractive index of glass, equals 2, the radii R 1 and R 2 are identical, and one can create a solid sphere Cat's eye. This design has the advantages that no adhesives are used to bond the two hemispheres together, misalignments between the hemispheres are not an issue, and most importantly, larger acceptance angles are possible. This paper shows the results of their ray tracing calculations characterizing the geometrical optics

  17. A model of polarized-beam AGS in the ray-tracing code Zgoubi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meot, F. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Ahrens, L. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Brown, K. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Dutheil, Y. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Glenn, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Huang, H. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Roser, T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Shoefer, V. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Tsoupas, N. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-07-12

    A model of the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron, based on the AGS snapramps, has been developed in the stepwise ray-tracing code Zgoubi. It has been used over the past 5 years in a number of accelerator studies aimed at enhancing RHIC proton beam polarization. It is also used to study and optimize proton and Helion beam polarization in view of future RHIC and eRHIC programs. The AGS model in Zgoubi is operational on-line via three different applications, ’ZgoubiFromSnaprampCmd’, ’AgsZgoubiModel’ and ’AgsModelViewer’, with the latter two essentially interfaces to the former which is the actual model ’engine’. All three commands are available from the controls system application launcher in the AGS ’StartUp’ menu, or from eponymous commands on shell terminals. Main aspects of the model and of its operation are presented in this technical note, brief excerpts from various studies performed so far are given for illustration, means and methods entering in ZgoubiFromSnaprampCmd are developed further in appendix.

  18. The transesophageal echocardiography simulator based on computed tomography images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piórkowski, Adam; Kempny, Aleksander

    2013-02-01

    Simulators are a new tool in education in many fields, including medicine, where they greatly improve familiarity with medical procedures, reduce costs, and, importantly, cause no harm to patients. This is so in the case of transesophageal echocardiography (TEE), in which the use of a simulator facilitates spatial orientation and helps in case studies. The aim of the project described in this paper is to simulate an examination by TEE. This research makes use of available computed tomography data to simulate the corresponding echocardiographic view. This paper describes the essential characteristics that distinguish these two modalities and the key principles of the wave phenomena that should be considered in the simulation process, taking into account the conditions specific to the echocardiography. The construction of the CT2TEE (Web-based TEE simulator) is also presented. The considerations include ray-tracing and ray-casting techniques in the context of ultrasound beam and artifact simulation. An important aspect of the interaction with the user is raised.

  19. A Sub-band Divided Ray Tracing Algorithm Using the DPS Subspace in UWB Indoor Scenarios

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gan, Mingming; Xu, Zhinan; Hofer, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Sub-band divided ray tracing (SDRT) is one technique that has been extensively used to obtain the channel characteristics for ultra-wideband (UWB) radio wave propagation in realistic indoor environments. However, the computational complexity of SDRT scales directly with the number of sub-bands. A......Sub-band divided ray tracing (SDRT) is one technique that has been extensively used to obtain the channel characteristics for ultra-wideband (UWB) radio wave propagation in realistic indoor environments. However, the computational complexity of SDRT scales directly with the number of sub...

  20. Ray tracing of auroral Z mode radiation, AKR and auroral hiss

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horne, R.B.; Jones, D.; Kimura, I.; Sawada, A.

    1990-01-01

    While observed frequency bandwidths of auroral Z mode radiation cannot be directly accounted for in terms of direct cyclotron maser instability generation, ray tracing in a hot plasma indicates that if the radiation near a plasma frequency lower than the gyrofrequency, the observed bandwidths are explainable in terms of upward propagation away from the earth. An auroral Z-mode generation mechanism is proposed involving mode conversion from O-mode auroral kilometric radiation (AKR) at the plasma frequency, as well as mode conversion from upgoing auroral hiss. Ray tracings in the O mode identify a possible AKR source region along L = 8.55. 11 refs

  1. Pseudo forward ray-tracing: A new method for surface validation in cornea topography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sicam, V.; Snellenburg, J.J.; van der Heijde, R.G.; van Stokkum, I.H.M.

    2007-01-01

    PURPOSE. A pseudo forward ray-tracing (PFRT) algorithm is developed to evaluate surface reconstruction in corneal topography. The method can be applied to topographers where one-to-one correspondence between mire and image points can be established. METHODS. The PFRT algorithm was applied on a

  2. An Energy Conservative Ray-Tracing Method With a Time Interpolation of the Force Field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, Jin [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-02-10

    A new algorithm that constructs a continuous force field interpolated in time is proposed for resolving existing difficulties in numerical methods for ray-tracing. This new method has improved accuracy, but with the same degree of algebraic complexity compared to Kaisers method.

  3. Interior metric and ray-tracing map in the firework black-to-white hole transition

    OpenAIRE

    Rovelli, Carlo; Martin-Dussaud, Pierre

    2018-01-01

    The possibility that a black hole could tunnel into to white hole has recently received attention. Here we present a metric that improves the "firework" metric: it describes the entire process and solves the Einstein's equations everywhere except on a small transition surface that corresponds to the quantum tunneling. We compute the corresponding ray-tracing map from past infinity to future infinity explicitly.

  4. Electron ray tracing programs for gun design and beam transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.

    1988-05-01

    Computer simulation of electron and ion sources is made by using a class of computer codes known as gun design programs. In this paper, we shall first list most of the necessary and some optional capabilities of such programs. Then we will briefly note specific codes and/or authors of codes with attention to specialized applications if any. There may be many more such programs in use than are treated here; we are only trying to cover a range of examples, not perform a comprehensive survey

  5. Electromagnetic Computation and Visualization of Transmission Particle Model and Its Simulation Based on GPU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingnian Wu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Electromagnetic calculation plays an important role in both military and civic fields. Some methods and models proposed for calculation of electromagnetic wave propagation in a large range bring heavy burden in CPU computation and also require huge amount of memory. Using the GPU to accelerate computation and visualization can reduce the computational burden on the CPU. Based on forward ray-tracing method, a transmission particle model (TPM for calculating electromagnetic field is presented to combine the particle method. The movement of a particle obeys the principle of the propagation of electromagnetic wave, and then the particle distribution density in space reflects the electromagnetic distribution status. The algorithm with particle transmission, movement, reflection, and diffraction is described in detail. Since the particles in TPM are completely independent, it is very suitable for the parallel computing based on GPU. Deduction verification of TPM with the electric dipole antenna as the transmission source is conducted to prove that the particle movement itself represents the variation of electromagnetic field intensity caused by diffusion. Finally, the simulation comparisons are made against the forward and backward ray-tracing methods. The simulation results verified the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  6. Ray-tracing studies for a whole-viewing-angle retro-reflector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, B.; Friedsam, H.

    1999-01-01

    The APS Survey and Alignment team uses LEICA laser trackers for the majority of their alignment tasks. These instruments utilize several different retro-reflectors for tracking the path of the laser interferometer. Currently in use are open-air comer cubes with an acceptance angle of ±20 deg C, comer cube prisms with an acceptance angle of ±50 deg C, and a Cat's eye with an acceptance angle of ±60 deg C. Best measurement results can be achieved by using an open-air comer cube that eliminates the need for the laser beam to travel through a different medium before it returns to the instrument detector. However, the trade off is a small acceptance angle. In order to overcome the limitations of the small acceptance angles, Takatsuji et al. have proposed the creation of a full-viewing-angle retro-reflector. Based on the notion that the radius R 1 of a common Cat's eye is proportional to R 2 , one can write: R 1 = (n-1)R 2 In the case that n, the refractive index of glass, equals 2, the radii R 1 and R 2 are identical, and one can create a solid sphere Cat's eye. This design has the advantages that no adhesives are used to bond the two hemispheres together, misalignments between the hemispheres are not an issue, and most importantly, larger acceptance angles are possible. This paper shows the results of our ray tracing calculations characterizing the geometrical optics. In Section 2 we derived the analytical expressions for choosing the index of refraction n of a glass sphere based on the specifications of the reflected beam. We also provided an approximation for calculating the minimum radius of a reflector sphere based on efficiency considerations. Finally, in section 3, the analytically derived results were confirmed in a design study for a Cat's eye. (authors)

  7. Robust ray-tracing algorithms for interactive dose rate evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perrotte, L.

    2011-01-01

    More than ever, it is essential today to develop simulation tools to rapidly evaluate the dose rate received by operators working on nuclear sites. In order to easily study numerous different scenarios of intervention, computation times of available softwares have to be all lowered. This mainly implies to accelerate the geometrical computations needed for the dose rate evaluation. These computations consist in finding and sorting the whole list of intersections between a big 3D scene and multiple groups of 'radiative' rays meeting at the point where the dose has to be measured. In order to perform all these computations in less than a second, we first propose a GPU algorithm that enables the efficient management of one big group of coherent rays. Then we present a modification of this algorithm that guarantees the robustness of the ray-triangle intersection tests through the elimination of the precision issues due to floating-point arithmetic. This modification does not require the definition of scene-dependent coefficients ('epsilon' style) and only implies a small loss of performance (less than 10%). Finally we propose an efficient strategy to handle multiple ray groups (corresponding to multiple radiative objects) which use the previous results.Thanks to these improvements, we are able to perform an interactive and robust dose rate evaluation on big 3D scenes: all of the intersections (more than 13 million) between 700 000 triangles and 12 groups of 100 000 rays each are found, sorted along each ray and transferred to the CPU in 470 milliseconds. (author) [fr

  8. Accounting for partiality in serial crystallography using ray-tracing principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroon-Batenburg, Loes M J; Schreurs, Antoine M M; Ravelli, Raimond B G; Gros, Piet

    2015-09-01

    Serial crystallography generates `still' diffraction data sets that are composed of single diffraction images obtained from a large number of crystals arbitrarily oriented in the X-ray beam. Estimation of the reflection partialities, which accounts for the expected observed fractions of diffraction intensities, has so far been problematic. In this paper, a method is derived for modelling the partialities by making use of the ray-tracing diffraction-integration method EVAL. The method estimates partialities based on crystal mosaicity, beam divergence, wavelength dispersion, crystal size and the interference function, accounting for crystallite size. It is shown that modelling of each reflection by a distribution of interference-function weighted rays yields a `still' Lorentz factor. Still data are compared with a conventional rotation data set collected from a single lysozyme crystal. Overall, the presented still integration method improves the data quality markedly. The R factor of the still data compared with the rotation data decreases from 26% using a Monte Carlo approach to 12% after applying the Lorentz correction, to 5.3% when estimating partialities by EVAL and finally to 4.7% after post-refinement. The merging R(int) factor of the still data improves from 105 to 56% but remains high. This suggests that the accuracy of the model parameters could be further improved. However, with a multiplicity of around 40 and an R(int) of ∼50% the merged still data approximate the quality of the rotation data. The presented integration method suitably accounts for the partiality of the observed intensities in still diffraction data, which is a critical step to improve data quality in serial crystallography.

  9. Analysis of Simulated and Measured Indoor Channels for mm-Wave Beamforming Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karstensen, Anders; Fan, Wei; Zhang, Fengchun

    2018-01-01

    was investigated using both single beam and multiple beams, with two different power allocation schemes applied to multi-beamforming. Channel measurements were performed at 28-30 GHz using a vector network analyzer equipped with a Biconical antenna as the transmit antenna and a rotated horn antenna as the receive...... antenna. 3D ray tracing simulations were carried out in the same replicated propagation environments. Based on measurement and ray tracing simulation data, it is shown that RT-assisted beamforming performs well both for single and multi-beamforming in these two representative indoor propagation...

  10. CUDA-Accelerated Geodesic Ray-Tracing for Fiber Tracking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evert van Aart

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI allows to noninvasively measure the diffusion of water in fibrous tissue. By reconstructing the fibers from DTI data using a fiber-tracking algorithm, we can deduce the structure of the tissue. In this paper, we outline an approach to accelerating such a fiber-tracking algorithm using a Graphics Processing Unit (GPU. This algorithm, which is based on the calculation of geodesics, has shown promising results for both synthetic and real data, but is limited in its applicability by its high computational requirements. We present a solution which uses the parallelism offered by modern GPUs, in combination with the CUDA platform by NVIDIA, to significantly reduce the execution time of the fiber-tracking algorithm. Compared to a multithreaded CPU implementation of the same algorithm, our GPU mapping achieves a speedup factor of up to 40 times.

  11. X-ray trace element analysis with positive ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, R.H.

    1973-01-01

    A new trace element analysis having the advantage that many elements may be detected in a single measurement, based on positive charged particle induced X-ray florescence and on the production of X-rays by heavy ions, is described. Because of the large cross-sections for the production of discrete X-ray and the low yield of continuum radiation, positive charged particle X-ray florescence is a competitive, fast, analytic tool. In the experiment a beam of positive charged particles from an accelerator was directed toward a target. X-rays induced by the bombardment were detected by a Si(Li) detector the ouput from which was amplified and sorted in a multichannel analyzer. For rapid data handling and analysis, the multichannel analyzer or ADC unit was connected to an on-line computer. A large variety of targets prepared in collaboration with the oceanographers have been studied and spectra obtained for different particles having the same velocity are presented to show that the yield of discrete X-rays increases at least as rapidly as Z 2 . While protons of several MeV appear to be already competitive further advantage may be gained by heavy ions at lower energies since the continuum is reduced while the peak ''signals'' retain strength due to the Z 2 dependence. (S.B.)

  12. Random ray-tracing and graphic analysing of charged particle trajectories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Xiaomei; Mao Naifeng; Chen Jingxian

    1990-01-01

    In order to describe the optical properties of a charged particle beam realistically, the random sampling of initial conditions of particles in ray-tracing is discussed. The emission surface of particles may be a plane, a cylindrical surface or a spherical surface. The distribution functions may be expressed analytically or numerically. In order to analyse the properties of the charged particle beam systematically by use of the results from ray-tracing efficiently, the graphic processing and analysing of particle trajectories are also discussed, including the spline function fitting of trajectories, the graphic drafting of trajectories and beam envelopes, the determining of image dimensions and the correspinding positions, and also the graphic drafting of particle distributions on arbitrary cross sections

  13. Comparison of matrix method and ray tracing in the study of complex optical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anterrieu, Eric; Perez, Jose-Philippe

    2000-06-01

    In the context of the classical study of optical systems within the geometrical Gauss approximation, the cardinal elements are efficiently obtained with the aid of the transfer matrix between the input and output planes of the system. In order to take into account the geometrical aberrations, a ray tracing approach, using the Snell- Descartes laws, has been implemented in an interactive software. Both methods are applied for measuring the correction to be done to a human eye suffering from ametropia. This software may be used by optometrists and ophthalmologists for solving the problems encountered when considering this pathology. The ray tracing approach gives a significant improvement and could be very helpful for a better understanding of an eventual surgical act.

  14. Polarization ray tracing in anisotropic optically active media. II. Theory and physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McClain, S.C.; Hillman, L.W.; Chipman, R.A.

    1993-01-01

    Refraction, reflection, and amplitude relations are derived that apply to polarization ray tracing in anisotropic, optically active media such as quartz. The constitutive relations for quartz are discussed. The refractive indices and polarization states associated with the two modes of propagation are derived as a function of wave direction. A procedure for refracting at any uniaxial or optically active interface is derived that computes both the ray direction and the wave direction. A method for computing the optical path length is given, and Fresnel transmission and ref lection equations are derived from boundary conditions on the electromagnetic fields. These ray-tracing formulas apply to uniaxial, optically active media and therefore encompass uniaxial, non-optically active materials and isotropic, optically active materials

  15. Ray Trace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kowalski, S.

    1981-01-01

    During the past decade, a very general RAYTRACE code has been developed at MIT for following the trajectories of charged particles through ion-optical systems. The motion of a particle carrying charge Q is governed by the Lorentz equation, F = Q[E + V x B], where E is the electric field and B is the magnetic field. In a rectangular (x,y,z) coordinate system the equations of motion along each of the axes may be written as mx = Q(E/sub x/ + V/sub Y/B/sub z/ - v/sub z/B/sub Y/), my = Q(E/sub Y/ + v/sub z/B/sub x/ - v/sub x/B/sub z/, mz = Q(E/sub z/ + v/sub x/B/sub Y/ - v/sub Y/B/sub x/). These three particle differential equations of motion are solved by means of a step-by-step numerical integration with time as the independent variable. Accuracy is limited only by the uncertainties in our knowledge of the electric and magnetic fields. Current versions of the code may be used to calculate trajectories through an arbitrary arrangement of elements including dipoles, quadrupoles, general multipoles, solenoids, velocity selectors, drifts and thin lenses

  16. PEMBUATAN PERANGKAT LUNAK UNTUK MEMVISUALISASIKAN BENDA TEMBUS PANDANG DENGAN METODE RAY TRACING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Liliana

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Today computer graphics is used in many aspects, especially to make animation, advertisement and game. We hope this technology can produce realistic pictures which same quality with photo. Metode to get the realistic 3D image is ray tracing. In this journal, make a software which can produce realistic 3D image, especially for reflective and transparent object. Reflective object will modeled can reflect another object surrounding it. And transparent object will modeled can produce caustic effect, that's rays which refract in one area. So that area will appear brighter than area surround it. Abstract in Bahasa Indonesia : Dewasa ini grafika komputer semakin banyak digunakan di berbagai bidang terutama untuk pembuatan film animasi, iklan dan pembuatan game. Diharapkan teknologi grafika komputer mampu menghasilkan gambar-gambar realistik yang kualitasnya sama dengan kualitas foto. Salah satu metode yang digunakan untuk menghasilkan gambar 3D yang realistik tersebut adalah metode ray tracing. Dalam penelitian ini dibuat perangkat lunak yang mampu menghasilkan gambar-gambar 3D yang realistik terutama untuk benda-benda yang mengkilap dan benda-benda transparan. Benda mengkilap yang dimodelkan bisa memantulkan bayangan benda lain yang berada di sekitarnya. Benda transparan yang dimodelkan adalah benda transparan yang menghasilkan efek kaustik, yaitu pembiasan sinar dari sumber cahaya yang mengumpul di suatu daerah sehingga pada daerah tersebut akan tampak lebih terang daripada daerah sekitarnya. Kata kunci: efek kaustik, ray tracing.

  17. Simplifying numerical ray tracing for two-dimensional non circularly symmetric models of the human eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesus, Danilo A; Iskander, D Robert

    2015-12-01

    Ray tracing is a powerful technique to understand the light behavior through an intricate optical system such as that of a human eye. The prediction of visual acuity can be achieved through characteristics of an optical system such as the geometrical point spread function. In general, its precision depends on the number of discrete rays and the accurate surface representation of each eye's components. Recently, a method that simplifies calculation of the geometrical point spread function has been proposed for circularly symmetric systems [Appl. Opt.53, 4784 (2014)]. An extension of this method to 2D noncircularly symmetric systems is proposed. In this method, a two-dimensional ray tracing procedure for an arbitrary number of surfaces and arbitrary surface shapes has been developed where surfaces, rays, and refractive indices are all represented in functional forms being approximated by Chebyshev polynomials. The Liou and Brennan anatomically accurate eye model has been adapted and used for evaluating the method. Further, real measurements of the anterior corneal surface of normal, astigmatic, and keratoconic eyes were substituted for the first surface in the model. The results have shown that performing ray tracing, utilizing the two-dimensional Chebyshev function approximation, is possible for noncircularly symmetric models, and that such calculation can be performed with a newly created Chebfun toolbox.

  18. Ray trace visualization of negative refraction of light in two-dimensional air-bridged silicon photonic crystal slabs at 1.55 microm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Lin; Liu, Ya-Zhao; Li, Jiang-Yan; Zhang, Ze-Bo; Zhang, Dao-Zhong; Li, Zhi-Yuan

    2009-06-08

    We demonstrate design, fabrication, and ray trace observation of negative refraction of near-infrared light in a two-dimensional square lattice of air holes etched into an air-bridged silicon slab. Special surface morphologies are designed to reduce the impedance mismatch when light refracts from a homogeneous silicon slab into the photonic crystal slab. We clearly observed negative refraction of infrared light for TE-like modes in a broad wavelength range by using scanning near-field optical microscopy technology. The experimental results are in good agreement with finite-difference time-domain simulations. The results indicate the designed photonic crystal structure can serve as polarization beam splitter.

  19. Three-Dimensional Simulation of DRIE Process Based on the Narrow Band Level Set and Monte Carlo Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia-Cheng Yu

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available A three-dimensional topography simulation of deep reactive ion etching (DRIE is developed based on the narrow band level set method for surface evolution and Monte Carlo method for flux distribution. The advanced level set method is implemented to simulate the time-related movements of etched surface. In the meanwhile, accelerated by ray tracing algorithm, the Monte Carlo method incorporates all dominant physical and chemical mechanisms such as ion-enhanced etching, ballistic transport, ion scattering, and sidewall passivation. The modified models of charged particles and neutral particles are epitomized to determine the contributions of etching rate. The effects such as scalloping effect and lag effect are investigated in simulations and experiments. Besides, the quantitative analyses are conducted to measure the simulation error. Finally, this simulator will be served as an accurate prediction tool for some MEMS fabrications.

  20. Solar Ray Tracing Analysis to Determine Energy Availability in a CPC Designed for Use as a Residential Water Heater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Terrón-Hernández

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Compound parabolic concentrators are relevant systems used in solar thermal technology. With adequate tailoring, they can be used as an efficient and low-cost alternative in residential water heating applications. This work presents a simulation study using a ray tracing analysis. With this technique, we simulate the interaction between solar rays and solar concentrator to quantify the amount of energy that impinges on the receiver at a particular time. Energy availability is evaluated in a comparison of two configurations throughout the year: static setup at 21° and multi-position setup; tilted with respect to the horizontal, depending on three seasonal positions: 0° for summer, 16° for spring/autumn, and 32° for winter, with the aim to evaluate the amount of available energy in each season. The fact that a tracking system can be dispensed with also represents an economical option for the proposed application. The results showed that at 21°, the proposed solar Compound Parabolic Concentrator (CPC works satisfactorily; however, by carrying out the selected angular adjustments, the overall energy availability increased by 22%, resulting in a more efficient option. The most effective design was also built and analyzed outdoors. The obtained thermal efficiency was of ~43%. The optical design and its evaluation developed herein proved to be a valuable tool for prototype design and performance evaluation.

  1. Simulation and application of micro X-ray fluorescence based on an ellipsoidal capillary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Jing; Li, Yude; Wang, Xingyi; Zhang, Xiaoyun; Lin, Xiaoyan, E-mail: yangjing_928@126.com

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • A micro X-ray fluorescence setup based on an ellipsoidal capillary was presented. • The optimal parameters of ellipsoidal capillary were designed. • The 2D mapping image of biological sample was obtained. - Abstract: A micro X-ray fluorescence setup was presented, based on an ellipsoidal capillary and a traditional laboratorial X-ray source. Using Ray-tracing principle, we have simulated the transmission path of X-ray beam in the ellipsoidal capillary and designed the optimal parameters of the ellipsoidal capillary for the micro X-ray fluorescence setup. We demonstrate that ellipsoidal capillary is well suited as condenser for the micro X-ray fluorescence based on traditional laboratorial X-ray source. Furthermore, we obtain the 2D mapping image of the leaf blade sample by using the ellipsoidal capillary we designed.

  2. TIM, a ray-tracing program for METATOY research and its dissemination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Dean; Hamilton, Alasdair C.; Constable, George; Snehanshu, Harsh; Talati, Sharvil; Courtial, Johannes

    2012-03-01

    TIM (The Interactive METATOY) is a ray-tracing program specifically tailored towards our research in METATOYs, which are optical components that appear to be able to create wave-optically forbidden light-ray fields. For this reason, TIM possesses features not found in other ray-tracing programs. TIM can either be used interactively or by modifying the openly available source code; in both cases, it can easily be run as an applet embedded in a web page. Here we describe the basic structure of TIM's source code and how to extend it, and we give examples of how we have used TIM in our own research. Program summaryProgram title: TIM Catalogue identifier: AEKY_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEKY_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU General Public License No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 124 478 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 4 120 052 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Java Computer: Any computer capable of running the Java Virtual Machine (JVM) 1.6 Operating system: Any; developed under Mac OS X Version 10.6 RAM: Typically 145 MB (interactive version running under Mac OS X Version 10.6) Classification: 14, 18 External routines: JAMA [1] (source code included) Nature of problem: Visualisation of scenes that include scene objects that create wave-optically forbidden light-ray fields. Solution method: Ray tracing. Unusual features: Specifically designed to visualise wave-optically forbidden light-ray fields; can visualise ray trajectories; can visualise geometric optic transformations; can create anaglyphs (for viewing with coloured "3D glasses") and random-dot autostereograms of the scene; integrable into web pages. Running time: Problem-dependent; typically seconds for a simple scene.

  3. Modeling the reflectance of the lunar regolith by a new method combining Monte Carlo Ray tracing and Hapke's model with application to Chang'E-1 IIM data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Un-Hong; Wu, Yunzhao; Wong, Hon-Cheng; Liang, Yanyan; Tang, Zesheng

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we model the reflectance of the lunar regolith by a new method combining Monte Carlo ray tracing and Hapke's model. The existing modeling methods exploit either a radiative transfer model or a geometric optical model. However, the measured data from an Interference Imaging spectrometer (IIM) on an orbiter were affected not only by the composition of minerals but also by the environmental factors. These factors cannot be well addressed by a single model alone. Our method implemented Monte Carlo ray tracing for simulating the large-scale effects such as the reflection of topography of the lunar soil and Hapke's model for calculating the reflection intensity of the internal scattering effects of particles of the lunar soil. Therefore, both the large-scale and microscale effects are considered in our method, providing a more accurate modeling of the reflectance of the lunar regolith. Simulation results using the Lunar Soil Characterization Consortium (LSCC) data and Chang'E-1 elevation map show that our method is effective and useful. We have also applied our method to Chang'E-1 IIM data for removing the influence of lunar topography to the reflectance of the lunar soil and to generate more realistic visualizations of the lunar surface.

  4. Invisibility cloaking via non-smooth transformation optics and ray tracing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crosskey, Miles M.; Nixon, Andrew T.; Schick, Leland M.; Kovacic, Gregor

    2011-01-01

    We present examples of theoretically-predicted invisibility cloaks with shapes other than spheres and cylinders, including cones and ellipsoids, as well as shapes spliced from parts of these simpler shapes. In addition, we present an example explicitly displaying the non-uniqueness of invisibility cloaks of the same shape. We depict rays propagating through these example cloaks using ray tracing for geometric optics. - Highlights: → Theoretically-predicted conical and ellipsoidal invisibility cloaks. → Non-smooth cloaks spliced from parts of simpler shapes. → Example displaying non-uniqueness of invisibility cloaks of the same shape. → Rays propagating through example cloaks depicted using geometric optics.

  5. Infrasonic ray tracing applied to mesoscale atmospheric structures: refraction by hurricanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedard, Alfred J; Jones, R Michael

    2013-11-01

    A ray-tracing program is used to estimate the refraction of infrasound by the temperature structure of the atmosphere and by hurricanes represented by a Rankine-combined vortex wind plus a temperature perturbation. Refraction by the hurricane winds is significant, giving rise to regions of focusing, defocusing, and virtual sources. The refraction of infrasound by the temperature anomaly associated with a hurricane is small, probably no larger than that from uncertainties in the wind field. The results are pertinent to interpreting ocean wave generated infrasound in the vicinities of tropical cyclones.

  6. Microwave transport in EBT distribution manifolds using Monte Carlo ray-tracing techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lillie, R.A.; White, T.L.; Gabriel, T.A.; Alsmiller, R.G. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Ray tracing Monte Carlo calculations have been carried out using an existing Monte Carlo radiation transport code to obtain estimates of the microsave power exiting the torus coupling links in EPT microwave manifolds. The microwave power loss and polarization at surface reflections were accounted for by treating the microwaves as plane waves reflecting off plane surfaces. Agreement on the order of 10% was obtained between the measured and calculated output power distribution for an existing EBT-S toroidal manifold. A cost effective iterative procedure utilizing the Monte Carlo history data was implemented to predict design changes which could produce increased manifold efficiency and improved output power uniformity

  7. Line shape and ray trace calculations in saturated X-ray lasers: Application to Ni-like silver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benredjem, D.; Guilbaud, O.; Moeller, C.; Klisnick, A.; Ros, D.; Dubau, J.; Calisti, A.; Talin, B.

    2006-01-01

    Longitudinal coherence length in X-ray lasers depends strongly on the shape of the amplified line. We have modelled an experiment performed at the LULI facility of Ecole Polytechnique. The experiment was devoted to the study of the temporal (longitudinal) coherence of the transient Ni-like silver 4d-4p transition X-ray laser at 13.9 nm. Accurate line shape calculations using PPP, a spectral line shape code, confirm that the Voigt profile is a good approximation for this X-ray laser line. This allows us to extensively use the Voigt shape in conditions where the amplifier, i.e. the plasma produced by the interaction of a high intensity laser with a slab target, is neither stationary nor homogeneous. Our calculations involve a ray trace code which is a post-processor to the hydrodynamic simulation EHYBRID. As the effect of saturation is important for the level populations and gains we include the interaction between the amplified beam and the medium using the Maxwell-Bloch formalism. While the FWHM of the spontaneous emission profile is ∼10 mA, the amplified X-ray line exhibits gain narrowing leading to the smaller width ∼3 mA. Comparison with experiment is discussed

  8. Ray-tracing 3D dust radiative transfer with DART-Ray: code upgrade and public release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natale, Giovanni; Popescu, Cristina C.; Tuffs, Richard J.; Clarke, Adam J.; Debattista, Victor P.; Fischera, Jörg; Pasetto, Stefano; Rushton, Mark; Thirlwall, Jordan J.

    2017-11-01

    We present an extensively updated version of the purely ray-tracing 3D dust radiation transfer code DART-Ray. The new version includes five major upgrades: 1) a series of optimizations for the ray-angular density and the scattered radiation source function; 2) the implementation of several data and task parallelizations using hybrid MPI+OpenMP schemes; 3) the inclusion of dust self-heating; 4) the ability to produce surface brightness maps for observers within the models in HEALPix format; 5) the possibility to set the expected numerical accuracy already at the start of the calculation. We tested the updated code with benchmark models where the dust self-heating is not negligible. Furthermore, we performed a study of the extent of the source influence volumes, using galaxy models, which are critical in determining the efficiency of the DART-Ray algorithm. The new code is publicly available, documented for both users and developers, and accompanied by several programmes to create input grids for different model geometries and to import the results of N-body and SPH simulations. These programmes can be easily adapted to different input geometries, and for different dust models or stellar emission libraries.

  9. Every photon counts : understanding and optimizing photon paths in luminescent solar concentrator-based photomicroreactors (LSCPMs)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cambié, D.; Zhao, F.; Hessel, V.; Debije, M.G.; Noël, T.

    2017-01-01

    Luminescent solar concentrator-based photomicroreactors (LSC-PMs) have been recently proposed for sustainable and energy-efficient photochemical reactions. Herein, a Monte Carlo ray tracing algorithm to simulate photon paths within LSC-PMs was developed and experimentally validated. The simulation

  10. Development of Ray Tracing Algorithms for Scanning Plane and Transverse Plane Analysis for Satellite Multibeam Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. H. Abd Rahman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Reflector antennas have been widely used in many areas. In the implementation of parabolic reflector antenna for broadcasting satellite applications, it is essential for the spacecraft antenna to provide precise contoured beam to effectively serve the required region. For this purpose, combinations of more than one beam are required. Therefore, a tool utilizing ray tracing method is developed to calculate precise off-axis beams for multibeam antenna system. In the multibeam system, each beam will be fed from different feed positions to allow the main beam to be radiated at the exact direction on the coverage area. Thus, detailed study on caustics of a parabolic reflector antenna is performed and presented in this paper, which is to investigate the behaviour of the rays and its relation to various antenna parameters. In order to produce accurate data for the analysis, the caustic behaviours are investigated in two distinctive modes: scanning plane and transverse plane. This paper presents the detailed discussions on the derivation of the ray tracing algorithms, the establishment of the equations of caustic loci, and the verification of the method through calculation of radiation pattern.

  11. A versatile ray-tracing code for studying rf wave propagation in toroidal magnetized plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peysson, Y; Decker, J; Morini, L

    2012-01-01

    A new ray-tracing code named C3PO has been developed to study the propagation of arbitrary electromagnetic radio-frequency (rf) waves in magnetized toroidal plasmas. Its structure is designed for maximum flexibility regarding the choice of coordinate system and dielectric model. The versatility of this code makes it particularly suitable for integrated modeling systems. Using a coordinate system that reflects the nested structure of magnetic flux surfaces in tokamaks, fast and accurate calculations inside the plasma separatrix can be performed using analytical derivatives of a spline-Fourier interpolation of the axisymmetric toroidal MHD equilibrium. Applications to reverse field pinch magnetic configuration are also included. The effects of 3D perturbations of the axisymmetric toroidal MHD equilibrium, due to the discreteness of the magnetic coil system or plasma fluctuations in an original quasi-optical approach, are also studied. Using a Runge–Kutta–Fehlberg method for solving the set of ordinary differential equations, the ray-tracing code is extensively benchmarked against analytical models and other codes for lower hybrid and electron cyclotron waves. (paper)

  12. [Comparison of ocular modulation transfer function measurements by ray tracing wavefront technology and double-pass system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Liya; Cai, Xiaogu; Wan, Xiuhua; Guan, Zheng; Xiong, Ying; Lin, Zhong; Zhang, Ye; Tan, Jiaxuan; Wang, Ningli

    2015-01-01

    poor, while the limits of agreement improved in the 6.0 mm pupil. The iTrace-derived MTFs were negatively correlated with the subjects' LogMAR best corrected visual acuity (r = -0.139--0.165, P < 0.01) and positively with the log value of contrast sensitivity function at 6 c/d (P < 0.05) . OQAS-derived MTFs were negatively correlated with LogMAR best corrected visual acuity (r = 0.239-0.303, P < 0.01) and positively with contrast sensitivity at all spatial frequencies (r = 0.156-0.398, P < 0.01) . There exists a significant difference and poor agreement in MTF measurement based on the ray tracing wavefront aberrometer and the double-pass system, while the difference becomes smaller in a large pupil diameter. The double-pass system provides a useful tool in clinical optical quality evaluation.

  13. Assessment of the accuracy of the conventional ray-tracing technique: Implications in remote sensing and radiative transfer involving ice clouds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bi, Lei; Yang, Ping; Liu, Chao; Yi, Bingqi; Baum, Bryan A.; Diedenhoven, Bastiaan van; Iwabuchi, Hironobu

    2014-01-01

    A fundamental problem in remote sensing and radiative transfer simulations involving ice clouds is the ability to compute accurate optical properties for individual ice particles. While relatively simple and intuitively appealing, the conventional geometric-optics method (CGOM) is used frequently for the solution of light scattering by ice crystals. Due to the approximations in the ray-tracing technique, the CGOM accuracy is not well quantified. The result is that the uncertainties are introduced that can impact many applications. Improvements in the Invariant Imbedding T-matrix method (II-TM) and the Improved Geometric-Optics Method (IGOM) provide a mechanism to assess the aforementioned uncertainties. The results computed by the II-TM+IGOM are considered as a benchmark because the II-TM solves Maxwell's equations from first principles and is applicable to particle size parameters ranging into the domain at which the IGOM has reasonable accuracy. To assess the uncertainties with the CGOM in remote sensing and radiative transfer simulations, two independent optical property datasets of hexagonal columns are developed for sensitivity studies by using the CGOM and the II-TM+IGOM, respectively. Ice cloud bulk optical properties obtained from the two datasets are compared and subsequently applied to retrieve the optical thickness and effective diameter from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) measurements. Additionally, the bulk optical properties are tested in broadband radiative transfer (RT) simulations using the general circulation model (GCM) version of the Rapid Radiative Transfer Model (RRTMG) that is adopted in the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Atmosphere Model (CAM, version 5.1). For MODIS retrievals, the mean bias of uncertainties of applying the CGOM in shortwave bands (0.86 and 2.13 μm) can be up to 5% in the optical thickness and as high as 20% in the effective diameter, depending on cloud optical

  14. Fully automated laser ray tracing system to measure changes in the crystalline lens GRIN profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Chen; Maceo Heilman, Bianca; Kaipio, Jari; Donaldson, Paul; Vaghefi, Ehsan

    2017-11-01

    Measuring the lens gradient refractive index (GRIN) accurately and reliably has proven an extremely challenging technical problem. A fully automated laser ray tracing (LRT) system was built to address this issue. The LRT system captures images of multiple laser projections before and after traversing through an ex vivo lens. These LRT images, combined with accurate measurements of the lens geometry, are used to calculate the lens GRIN profile. Mathematically, this is an ill-conditioned problem; hence, it is essential to apply biologically relevant constraints to produce a feasible solution. The lens GRIN measurements were compared with previously published data. Our GRIN retrieval algorithm produces fast and accurate measurements of the lens GRIN profile. Experiments to study the optics of physiologically perturbed lenses are the future direction of this research.

  15. A comparison of partially specular radiosity and ray tracing for room acoustics modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beamer, C. Walter; Muehleisen, Ralph T.

    2005-04-01

    Partially specular (PS) radiosity is an extended form of the general radiosity method. Acoustic radiosity is a form of bulk transfer of radiant acoustic energy. This bulk transfer is accomplished through a system of energy balance equations that relate the bulk energy transfer of each surface in the system to all other surfaces in the system. Until now acoustic radiosity has been limited to modeling only diffuse surface reflection. The new PS acoustic radiosity method can model all real surface types, diffuse, specular and everything in between. PS acoustic radiosity also models all real source types and distributions, not just point sources. The results of the PS acoustic radiosity method are compared to those of well known ray tracing programs. [Work supported by NSF.

  16. ACCELERATION RENDERING METHOD ON RAY TRACING WITH ANGLE COMPARISON AND DISTANCE COMPARISON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana liliana

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In computer graphics applications, to produce realistic images, a method that is often used is ray tracing. Ray tracing does not only model local illumination but also global illumination. Local illumination count ambient, diffuse and specular effects only, but global illumination also count mirroring and transparency. Local illumination count effects from the lamp(s but global illumination count effects from other object(s too. Objects that are usually modeled are primitive objects and mesh objects. The advantage of mesh modeling is various, interesting and real-like shape. Mesh contains many primitive objects like triangle or square (rare. A problem in mesh object modeling is long rendering time. It is because every ray must be checked with a lot of triangle of the mesh. Added by ray from other objects checking, the number of ray that traced will increase. It causes the increasing of rendering time. To solve this problem, in this research, new methods are developed to make the rendering process of mesh object faster. The new methods are angle comparison and distance comparison. These methods are used to reduce the number of ray checking. The rays predicted will not intersect with the mesh, are not checked weather the ray intersects the mesh. With angle comparison, if using small angle to compare, the rendering process will be fast. This method has disadvantage, if the shape of each triangle is big, some triangles will be corrupted. If the angle to compare is bigger, mesh corruption can be avoided but the rendering time will be longer than without comparison. With distance comparison, the rendering time is less than without comparison, and no triangle will be corrupted.

  17. Simulation-Based Evaluation of Light Posts and Street Signs as 3-D Geolocation Targets in SAR Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auer, S.; Balss, U.

    2017-05-01

    The assignment of phase center positions (in 2D or 3D) derived from SAR data to physical object is challenging for many man-made structures such as buildings or bridges. In contrast, light poles and traffic signs are promising targets for tasks based on 3-D geolocation as they often show a prominent and spatially isolated appearance. For a detailed understanding of the nature of both targets, this paper presents results of a dedicated simulation case study, which is based on ray tracing methods (simulator RaySAR). For the first time, the appearance of the targets is analyzed in 2D (image plane) and 3D space (world coordinates of scene model) and reflecting surfaces are identified for related dominant image pixels. The case studies confirms the crucial impact of spatial resolution in the context of light poles and traffic signs and the appropriateness of light poles as target for 3-D geolocation in case of horizontal ground surfaces beneath.

  18. Ray-tracing traveltime tomography versus wave-equation traveltime inversion for near-surface seismic land data

    KAUST Repository

    Fu, Lei; Hanafy, Sherif M.

    2017-01-01

    . This initial starting model can be obtained by inverting traveltimes with ray-tracing traveltime tomography (RT) or wave-equation traveltime (WT) inversion. We have found that WT can provide a more accurate tomogram than RT by inverting the first

  19. Do Peripheral Refraction and Aberration Profiles Vary with the Type of Myopia? - An Illustration Using a Ray-Tracing Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi C. Bakaraju

    2009-01-01

    Conclusion: This study has indicated that myopic eyes with primarily an axial component may have a greater risk of progression than their refractive counterparts albeit with the same degree of refractive error. This prediction emerges from the presented theoretical ray tracing model and, therefore, requires clinical confirmation.

  20. The flux distribution from a 1.25m2 target aligned heliostat: comparison of ray tracing and experimental results

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Maliage, M

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to validate SolTrace for concentrating solar investigations at CSIR by means of a test case: the comparison of the flux distribution in the focal spot of a 1.25 m2 target aligned heliostat predicted by the ray tracing...

  1. Integration of Monte-Carlo ray tracing with a stochastic optimisation method: application to the design of solar receiver geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asselineau, Charles-Alexis; Zapata, Jose; Pye, John

    2015-06-01

    A stochastic optimisation method adapted to illumination and radiative heat transfer problems involving Monte-Carlo ray-tracing is presented. A solar receiver shape optimisation case study illustrates the advantages of the method and its potential: efficient receivers are identified using a moderate computational cost.

  2. GPU-Based Simulation of Ultrasound Imaging Artifacts for Cryosurgery Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keelan, Robert; Shimada, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    This study presents an efficient computational technique for the simulation of ultrasound imaging artifacts associated with cryosurgery based on nonlinear ray tracing. This study is part of an ongoing effort to develop computerized training tools for cryosurgery, with prostate cryosurgery as a development model. The capability of performing virtual cryosurgical procedures on a variety of test cases is essential for effective surgical training. Simulated ultrasound imaging artifacts include reverberation and reflection of the cryoprobes in the unfrozen tissue, reflections caused by the freezing front, shadowing caused by the frozen region, and tissue property changes in repeated freeze–thaw cycles procedures. The simulated artifacts appear to preserve the key features observed in a clinical setting. This study displays an example of how training may benefit from toggling between the undisturbed ultrasound image, the simulated temperature field, the simulated imaging artifacts, and an augmented hybrid presentation of the temperature field superimposed on the ultrasound image. The proposed method is demonstrated on a graphic processing unit at 100 frames per second, on a mid-range personal workstation, at two orders of magnitude faster than a typical cryoprocedure. This performance is based on computation with C++ accelerated massive parallelism and its interoperability with the DirectX-rendering application programming interface. PMID:26818026

  3. Spatial resolution recovery utilizing multi-ray tracing and graphic processing unit in PET image reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, Yicheng; Peng, Hao

    2015-01-01

    Depth-of-interaction (DOI) poses a major challenge for a PET system to achieve uniform spatial resolution across the field-of-view, particularly for small animal and organ-dedicated PET systems. In this work, we implemented an analytical method to model system matrix for resolution recovery, which was then incorporated in PET image reconstruction on a graphical processing unit platform, due to its parallel processing capacity. The method utilizes the concepts of virtual DOI layers and multi-ray tracing to calculate the coincidence detection response function for a given line-of-response. The accuracy of the proposed method was validated for a small-bore PET insert to be used for simultaneous PET/MR breast imaging. In addition, the performance comparisons were studied among the following three cases: 1) no physical DOI and no resolution modeling; 2) two physical DOI layers and no resolution modeling; and 3) no physical DOI design but with a different number of virtual DOI layers. The image quality was quantitatively evaluated in terms of spatial resolution (full-width-half-maximum and position offset), contrast recovery coefficient and noise. The results indicate that the proposed method has the potential to be used as an alternative to other physical DOI designs and achieve comparable imaging performances, while reducing detector/system design cost and complexity. (paper)

  4. Collision probability in two-dimensional lattice by ray-trace method and its applications to cell calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuchihashi, Keichiro

    1985-03-01

    A series of formulations to evaluate collision probability for multi-region cells expressed by either of three one-dimensional coordinate systems (plane, sphere and cylinder) or by the general two-dimensional cylindrical coordinate system is presented. They are expressed in a suitable form to have a common numerical process named ''Ray-Trace'' method. Applications of the collision probability method to two optional treatments for the resonance absorption are presented. One is a modified table-look-up method based on the intermediate resonance approximation, and the other is a rigorous method to calculate the resonance absorption in a multi-region cell in which nearly continuous energy spectra of the resonance neutron range can be solved and interaction effect between different resonance nuclides can be evaluated. Two works on resonance absorption in a doubly heterogeneous system with grain structure are presented. First, the effect of a random distribution of particles embedded in graphite diluent on the resonance integral is studied. Next, the ''Accretion'' method proposed by Leslie and Jonsson to define the collision probability in a doubly heterogeneous system is applied to evaluate the resonance absorption in coated particles dispersed in fuel pellet of the HTGR. Several optional models are proposed to define the collision rates in the medium with the microscopic heterogeneity. By making use of the collision probability method developed by the present study, the JAERI thermal reactor standard nuclear design code system SRAC has been developed. Results of several benchmark tests for the SRAC are presented. The analyses of critical experiments of the SHE, DCA, and FNR show good agreement of critical masses with their experimental values. (J.P.N.)

  5. The applicability of physical optics in the millimetre and sub-millimetre spectral region. Part I: The ray tracing with diffraction on facets method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baran, A.J.; Hesse, Evelyn; Sourdeval, Odran

    2017-01-01

    Future satellite missions, from 2022 onwards, will obtain near-global measurements of cirrus at microwave and sub-millimetre frequencies. To realise the potential of these observations, fast and accurate light-scattering methods are required to calculate scattered millimetre and sub-millimetre intensities from complex ice crystals. Here, the applicability of the ray tracing with diffraction on facets method (RTDF) in predicting the bulk scalar optical properties and phase functions of randomly oriented hexagonal ice columns and hexagonal ice aggregates at millimetre frequencies is investigated. The applicability of RTDF is shown to be acceptable down to size parameters of about 18, between the frequencies of 243 and 874 GHz. It is demonstrated that RTDF is generally well within about 10% of T-matrix solutions obtained for the scalar optical properties assuming hexagonal ice columns. Moreover, on replacing electromagnetic scalar optical property solutions obtained for the hexagonal ice aggregate with the RTDF counterparts at size parameter values of about 18 or greater, the bulk scalar optical properties can be calculated to generally well within ±5% of an electromagnetic-based database. The RTDF-derived bulk scalar optical properties result in brightness temperature errors to generally within about ±4 K at 874 GHz. Differing microphysics assumptions can easily exceed such errors. Similar findings are found for the bulk scattering phase functions. This finding is owing to the scattering solutions being dominated by the processes of diffraction and reflection, both being well described by RTDF. The impact of centimetre-sized complex ice crystals on interpreting cirrus polarisation measurements at sub-millimetre frequencies is discussed. - Highlights: • A method of physical optics is shown to apply to size parameters as low as 18 in the mm and sub-mm-wave spectral regions. • Including ray tracing with diffraction on facets and diffraction at the cross-section of

  6. Simulation of transmitted X-rays in a polycapillary X-ray lens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Shiqi [The Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Material Modification of the Ministry of Education, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Beijing Radiation Center, Beijing 100875 (China); Liu, Zhiguo, E-mail: liuzhiguo512@126.com [The Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Material Modification of the Ministry of Education, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Beijing Radiation Center, Beijing 100875 (China); Sun, Tianxi; Wang, Kai; Yi, Longtao; Yang, Kui; Chen, Man; Wang, Jinbang [The Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Material Modification of the Ministry of Education, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Beijing Radiation Center, Beijing 100875 (China)

    2015-09-21

    The geometrical description of capillary systems adjusted for the controlled guiding of X-rays and the basic theory of the transmission of X-rays are presented. A method of numerical calculation, based on Ray-Tracing theory, is developed to simulate the transmission efficiency of an X-ray parallel lens and the shape and size of the light spot gain from it. The simulation results for two half-lenses are in good agreement with the experimental results.

  7. Synthetic Diagnostic for Doppler Backscattering (DBS) Turbulence Measurements based on Full Wave Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, D. R.; Rhodes, T. L.; Kubota, S.; Crocker, N.

    2017-10-01

    Plasma full-wave simulations of the DIII-D DBS system including its lenses and mirrors are developed using the GPU-based FDTD2D code, verified against the GENRAY ray-tracing code and TORBEAM paraxial beam code. Our semi-analytic description of the effective spot size for a synthetic diagnostic reveals new focusing and defocusing effects arising from the combined effects of the curvature of the reflecting surface and that of the Gaussian beam wavefront. We compute the DBS transfer function from full-wave simulations to verify these effects. Using the synthetic diagnostic, nonlinear GYRO simulations closely match DBS fluctuation spectra with and without strong electron heating, without adjustment or change in normalization, while both GYRO and GENE also match fluxes in all transport channels. Density gradient driven TEMs that are observed by the DBS diagnostic on DIII-D are reproduced by simulations as a band of discrete toroidal mode numbers which intensify during strong electron heating. Work supported by US DOE under DE-FC02-04ER54698 and DE-FG02-08ER54984.

  8. A ray-tracing study of electron cyclotron resonance heating in Tokamak plasmas with a superthermal electron tail

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montes, A.; Dendy, R.O.

    1987-09-01

    We consider a Tokamak plasma in which the distribution of electron velocities in the direction parallel to the magnetic field has a monotonically decreasing superthermal tail. A fully three-dimensional ray-tracing code, which includes a realistic antenna pattern, toroidal effects, and refaction, is used to calculate the absorption of the extraordinary mode in the nonrelativistic limit away from perpendicular incidence. The ray-tracing approach extends results previously obtained in slab geometry (3-8) to a more realistic configuration; it is also essential in dealing with strong refraction in high-density plasmas. Our analytical model for the tail makes available a wide range of tail shapes and parameters. At low densities small tails (tail fraction [pt

  9. Three-dimensional ray tracing of electrostatic cyclotron harmonic waves and Z mode electromagnetic waves in the magnetosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashimoto, K.; Yamaashi, K.; Kimura, I.; Kyoto Univ., Japan)

    1987-01-01

    Three-dimensional ray tracing is performed for electrostatic electron cyclotron harmonic waves and Z mode electromagnetic waves in the earth's magnetosphere using the hot dispersion relation. Propagation characteristics of cyclotron harmonic waves under the electrostatic approximation are considered, and it is noted that waves starting near the equator can propagate over a long distance without damping. Ray tracing without the electrostatic approximation confirms mode conversion from cyclotron harmonic waves to Z mode electromagnetic waves, and the conditions for the conversion are clarified. It is suggested that further conversion to the L-O mode continuum radiation is possible under strict constraints. The present results are not inconsistent with the conversion mechanism for the generation of escaping continuum radiation in the magnetosphere. 20 references

  10. Simulation-based surgical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evgeniou, Evgenios; Loizou, Peter

    2013-09-01

    The reduction in time for training at the workplace has created a challenge for the traditional apprenticeship model of training. Simulation offers the opportunity for repeated practice in a safe and controlled environment, focusing on trainees and tailored to their needs. Recent technological advances have led to the development of various simulators, which have already been introduced in surgical training. The complexity and fidelity of the available simulators vary, therefore depending on our recourses we should select the appropriate simulator for the task or skill we want to teach. Educational theory informs us about the importance of context in professional learning. Simulation should therefore recreate the clinical environment and its complexity. Contemporary approaches to simulation have introduced novel ideas for teaching teamwork, communication skills and professionalism. In order for simulation-based training to be successful, simulators have to be validated appropriately and integrated in a training curriculum. Within a surgical curriculum, trainees should have protected time for simulation-based training, under appropriate supervision. Simulation-based surgical education should allow the appropriate practice of technical skills without ignoring the clinical context and must strike an adequate balance between the simulation environment and simulators. © 2012 The Authors. ANZ Journal of Surgery © 2012 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  11. Interactive Acoustic Simulation in Urban and Complex Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-21

    techniques based on ray tracing [83, 166, 88] or radiosity [159] have been developed for modeling diffuse reflections, but these energy- based formulations...method[7, 22], ray tracing[167, 149], frustum tracing[148], beam tracing[46, 32], sonal mapping[19, 38, 79], path tracing[136], and radiosity [160]. The...ray tracing[167, 149], frustum tracing[148], beam tracing[46, 32], sonal mapping[19, 38, 79], path tracing[136], and radiosity [160]. The ray models

  12. (U) Second-Order Sensitivity Analysis of Uncollided Particle Contributions to Radiation Detector Responses Using Ray-Tracing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Favorite, Jeffrey A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-11-30

    The Second-Level Adjoint Sensitivity System (2nd-LASS) that yields the second-order sensitivities of a response of uncollided particles with respect to isotope densities, cross sections, and source emission rates is derived in Refs. 1 and 2. In Ref. 2, we solved problems for the uncollided leakage from a homogeneous sphere and a multiregion cylinder using the PARTISN multigroup discrete-ordinates code. In this memo, we derive solutions of the 2nd-LASS for the particular case when the response is a flux or partial current density computed at a single point on the boundary, and the inner products are computed using ray-tracing. Both the PARTISN approach and the ray-tracing approach are implemented in a computer code, SENSPG. The next section of this report presents the equations of the 1st- and 2nd-LASS for uncollided particles and the first- and second-order sensitivities that use the solutions of the 1st- and 2nd-LASS. Section III presents solutions of the 1st- and 2nd-LASS equations for the case of ray-tracing from a detector point. Section IV presents specific solutions of the 2nd-LASS and derives the ray-trace form of the inner products needed for second-order sensitivities. Numerical results for the total leakage from a homogeneous sphere are presented in Sec. V and for the leakage from one side of a two-region slab in Sec. VI. Section VII is a summary and conclusions.

  13. A comparison of three different ray trace programs for x-ray and infrared synchrotron beamline designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irick, S.C.; Jung, C.R.

    1997-07-01

    There are a number of ray trace programs currently used for the design of synchrotron beamlines. While several of these programs have been written and used mostly within the programmer''s institution, many have also been available to the general public. This paper discusses three such programs. One is a commercial product oriented for the general optical designer (not specifically for synchrotron beamlines). One is designed for synchrotron beamlines and is free with restricted availability. Finally, one is designed for synchrotron beamlines and is used primarily in one institution. The wealth of information from general optical materials and components catalogs is readily available in the commercial program for general optical designs. This makes the design of an infrared beamline easier from the standpoint of component selection. However, this program is not easily configured for synchrotron beamline designs, particularly for a bending magnet source. The synchrotron ray trace programs offer a variety of sources, but generally are not as easy to use from the standpoint of the user interface. This paper shows ray traces of the same beamline Optikwerks, SHADOW, and RAY, and compares the results

  14. The Use of Pro/Engineer CAD Software and Fishbowl Tool Kit in Ray-tracing Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nounu, Hatem N.; Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Ponomarev, Artem L.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2009-01-01

    This document is designed as a manual for a user who wants to operate the Pro/ENGINEER (ProE) Wildfire 3.0 with the NASA Space Radiation Program's (SRP) custom-designed Toolkit, called 'Fishbowl', for the ray tracing of complex spacecraft geometries given by a ProE CAD model. The analysis of spacecraft geometry through ray tracing is a vital part in the calculation of health risks from space radiation. Space radiation poses severe risks of cancer, degenerative diseases and acute radiation sickness during long-term exploration missions, and shielding optimization is an important component in the application of radiation risk models. Ray tracing is a technique in which 3-dimensional (3D) vehicle geometry can be represented as the input for the space radiation transport code and subsequent risk calculations. In ray tracing a certain number of rays (on the order of 1000) are used to calculate the equivalent thickness, say of aluminum, of the spacecraft geometry seen at a point of interest called the dose point. The rays originate at the dose point and terminate at a homogenously distributed set of points lying on a sphere that circumscribes the spacecraft and that has its center at the dose point. The distance a ray traverses in each material is converted to aluminum or other user-selected equivalent thickness. Then all equivalent thicknesses are summed up for each ray. Since each ray points to a direction, the aluminum equivalent of each ray represents the shielding that the geometry provides to the dose point from that particular direction. This manual will first list for the user the contact information for help in installing ProE and Fishbowl in addition to notes on the platform support and system requirements information. Second, the document will show the user how to use the software to ray trace a Pro/E-designed 3-D assembly and will serve later as a reference for troubleshooting. The user is assumed to have previous knowledge of ProE and CAD modeling.

  15. FDTD-based optical simulations methodology for CMOS image sensors pixels architecture and process optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirigoyen, Flavien; Crocherie, Axel; Vaillant, Jérôme M.; Cazaux, Yvon

    2008-02-01

    This paper presents a new FDTD-based optical simulation model dedicated to describe the optical performances of CMOS image sensors taking into account diffraction effects. Following market trend and industrialization constraints, CMOS image sensors must be easily embedded into even smaller packages, which are now equipped with auto-focus and short-term coming zoom system. Due to miniaturization, the ray-tracing models used to evaluate pixels optical performances are not accurate anymore to describe the light propagation inside the sensor, because of diffraction effects. Thus we adopt a more fundamental description to take into account these diffraction effects: we chose to use Maxwell-Boltzmann based modeling to compute the propagation of light, and to use a software with an FDTD-based (Finite Difference Time Domain) engine to solve this propagation. We present in this article the complete methodology of this modeling: on one hand incoherent plane waves are propagated to approximate a product-use diffuse-like source, on the other hand we use periodic conditions to limit the size of the simulated model and both memory and computation time. After having presented the correlation of the model with measurements we will illustrate its use in the case of the optimization of a 1.75μm pixel.

  16. SolTrace: A Ray-Tracing Code for Complex Solar Optical Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wendelin, Tim [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Dobos, Aron [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Lewandowski, Allan [Allan Lewandowski Solar Consulting LLC, Evergreen, CO (United States)

    2013-10-01

    SolTrace is an optical simulation tool designed to model optical systems used in concentrating solar power (CSP) applications. The code was first written in early 2003, but has seen significant modifications and changes since its inception, including conversion from a Pascal-based software development platform to C++. SolTrace is unique in that it can model virtually any optical system utilizingthe sun as the source. It has been made available for free and as such is in use worldwide by industry, universities, and research laboratories. The fundamental design of the code is discussed, including enhancements and improvements over the earlier version. Comparisons are made with other optical modeling tools, both non-commercial and commercial in nature. Finally, modeled results are shownfor some typical CSP systems and, in one case, compared to measured optical data.

  17. Simulation Package based on Placet

    CERN Document Server

    D'Amico, T E; Leros, Nicolas; Schulte, Daniel

    2001-01-01

    The program PLACET is used to simulate transverse and longitudinal beam effects in the main linac, the drive-beam accelerator and the drive-beam decelerators of CLIC, as well as in the linac of CTF3. It provides different models of accelerating and decelerating structures, linear optics and thin multipoles. Several methods of beam-based alignment, including emittance tuning bumps and feedback, and different failure modes can be simulated. An interface to the beam-beam simulation code GUINEA-PIG exists. Currently, interfaces to MAD and TRANSPORT are under development and an extension to transfer lines and bunch compressors is also being made. In the future, the simulations will need to be performed by many users, which requires a simplified user interface. The paper describes the status of PLACET and plans for the futur

  18. Computer Based Modelling and Simulation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 6; Issue 3. Computer Based Modelling and Simulation - Modelling Deterministic Systems. N K Srinivasan. General Article Volume 6 Issue 3 March 2001 pp 46-54. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  19. Full 3-D OCT-based pseudophakic custom computer eye model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, M.; Pérez-Merino, P.; Martinez-Enriquez, E.; Velasco-Ocana, M.; Marcos, S.

    2016-01-01

    We compared measured wave aberrations in pseudophakic eyes implanted with aspheric intraocular lenses (IOLs) with simulated aberrations from numerical ray tracing on customized computer eye models, built using quantitative 3-D OCT-based patient-specific ocular geometry. Experimental and simulated aberrations show high correlation (R = 0.93; poptical geometrical and surgically-related factors to image quality, and are an excellent tool for characterizing and improving cataract surgery. PMID:27231608

  20. Inversion based on computational simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, K.M.; Cunningham, G.S.; Saquib, S.S.

    1998-01-01

    A standard approach to solving inversion problems that involve many parameters uses gradient-based optimization to find the parameters that best match the data. The authors discuss enabling techniques that facilitate application of this approach to large-scale computational simulations, which are the only way to investigate many complex physical phenomena. Such simulations may not seem to lend themselves to calculation of the gradient with respect to numerous parameters. However, adjoint differentiation allows one to efficiently compute the gradient of an objective function with respect to all the variables of a simulation. When combined with advanced gradient-based optimization algorithms, adjoint differentiation permits one to solve very large problems of optimization or parameter estimation. These techniques will be illustrated through the simulation of the time-dependent diffusion of infrared light through tissue, which has been used to perform optical tomography. The techniques discussed have a wide range of applicability to modeling including the optimization of models to achieve a desired design goal

  1. Seismic modeling of fluvial-estuarine deposits in the Athabasca oil sands using ray-tracing techniques, Steepbank River area, northeastern Alberta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langenberg, C. W.; Hein, F. J. [Alberta Energy and Utilities Board, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Lawton, D.; Cunningham, J. [Calgary Univ., Dept. of Geology and Geophysics, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2002-03-01

    Seismic reflection characteristics of contrasting channel geometries in a five-section portion of the Steepbank River are modeled using ray-tracing techniques. Outcrop lithofacies associations are used to create a seismic model that can be used as a subsurface analog of other similar oil-sands successions. At least four channel complexes based on stratal bounding surfaces, arrangement of lithofacies, and consistent paleoflow patterns have been identified. The lower part of each channel complex contains trough crossbedded sandstone, exhibiting high porosity and permeability. These sandstones were deposited in channel axes and are the highest grade bitumen deposits in the area. The upper parts of the channels contain significantly lower bitumen saturation values due to common interbedded mudstone. Nearby wells contain cored and logged intervals that are similar to exposed outcrops in the riverbank. Overall modeling results indicate that channel complexes can be imaged seismically, given data of sufficient quality and frequency. Bitumen grade may be predicted in these seismic lines, which has important consequences for bitumen exploration and extraction in the Steepbank River region. 64 refs., 26 figs.

  2. Radiation heat transfer model using Monte Carlo ray tracing method on hierarchical ortho-Cartesian meshes and non-uniform rational basis spline surfaces for description of boundaries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuczyński Paweł

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with a solution of radiation heat transfer problems in enclosures filled with nonparticipating medium using ray tracing on hierarchical ortho-Cartesian meshes. The idea behind the approach is that radiative heat transfer problems can be solved on much coarser grids than their counterparts from computational fluid dynamics (CFD. The resulting code is designed as an add-on to OpenFOAM, an open-source CFD program. Ortho-Cartesian mesh involving boundary elements is created based upon CFD mesh. Parametric non-uniform rational basis spline (NURBS surfaces are used to define boundaries of the enclosure, allowing for dealing with domains of complex shapes. Algorithm for determining random, uniformly distributed locations of rays leaving NURBS surfaces is described. The paper presents results of test cases assuming gray diffusive walls. In the current version of the model the radiation is not absorbed within gases. However, the ultimate aim of the work is to upgrade the functionality of the model, to problems in absorbing, emitting and scattering medium projecting iteratively the results of radiative analysis on CFD mesh and CFD solution on radiative mesh.

  3. A general ray-tracing algorithm for the solution of the neutron transport equation by the collision probability method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, G.

    1990-01-01

    The development and analysis of methods for generating first-flight collision probabilities in two-dimensional geometries consistent with Light Water Moderated (LWR) fuel assemblies are examined. A new ray-tracing algorithm is discussed. A number of numerical results are given demonstrating the feasibility of this algorithm and the effects of the moderator (and fuel) sectorizations on the resulting flux distributions. The collision probabilties have been introduced and their subsequent utilization in the flux calculation procedures illustrated. A brief description of the Coxy-1 and Coxy-2 programs (which were developed in the Reactor Theory Division of the Atomic Energy Agency of South Africa Ltd) has also been added. 41 figs., 9 tabs., 18 refs

  4. HARPA: A versatile three-dimensional Hamiltonian ray-tracing program for acoustic waves in the atmosphere above irregular terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, R. M.; Riley, J. P.; Georges, T. M.

    1986-08-01

    The modular FORTRAN 77 computer program traces the three-dimensional paths of acoustic rays through continuous model atmospheres by numerically integrating Hamilton's equations (a differential expression of Fermat's principle). The user specifies an atmospheric model by writing closed-form formulas for its three-dimensional wind and temperature (or sound speed) distribution, and by defining the height of the reflecting terrain vs. geographic latitude and longitude. Some general-purpose models are provided, or users can readily design their own. In addition to computing the geometry of each raypath, HARPA can calculate pulse travel time, phase time, Doppler shift (if the medium varies in time), absorption, and geometrical path length. The program prints a step-by-step account of a ray's progress. The 410-page documentation describes the ray-tracing equations and the structure of the program, and provides complete instructions, illustrated by a sample case.

  5. Fast ray-tracing of human eye optics on Graphics Processing Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Qi; Patkar, Saket; Pai, Dinesh K

    2014-05-01

    We present a new technique for simulating retinal image formation by tracing a large number of rays from objects in three dimensions as they pass through the optic apparatus of the eye to objects. Simulating human optics is useful for understanding basic questions of vision science and for studying vision defects and their corrections. Because of the complexity of computing such simulations accurately, most previous efforts used simplified analytical models of the normal eye. This makes them less effective in modeling vision disorders associated with abnormal shapes of the ocular structures which are hard to be precisely represented by analytical surfaces. We have developed a computer simulator that can simulate ocular structures of arbitrary shapes, for instance represented by polygon meshes. Topographic and geometric measurements of the cornea, lens, and retina from keratometer or medical imaging data can be integrated for individualized examination. We utilize parallel processing using modern Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) to efficiently compute retinal images by tracing millions of rays. A stable retinal image can be generated within minutes. We simulated depth-of-field, accommodation, chromatic aberrations, as well as astigmatism and correction. We also show application of the technique in patient specific vision correction by incorporating geometric models of the orbit reconstructed from clinical medical images. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Experiment vs simulation RT WFNDEC 2014 benchmark: CIVA results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tisseur, D.; Costin, M.; Rattoni, B.; Vienne, C.; Vabre, A.; Cattiaux, G.; Sollier, T.

    2015-01-01

    The French Atomic Energy Commission and Alternative Energies (CEA) has developed for years the CIVA software dedicated to simulation of NDE techniques such as Radiographic Testing (RT). RT modelling is achieved in CIVA using combination of a determinist approach based on ray tracing for transmission beam simulation and a Monte Carlo model for the scattered beam computation. Furthermore, CIVA includes various detectors models, in particular common x-ray films and a photostimulable phosphor plates. This communication presents the results obtained with the configurations proposed in the World Federation of NDEC 2014 RT modelling benchmark with the RT models implemented in the CIVA software

  7. Experiment vs simulation RT WFNDEC 2014 benchmark: CIVA results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tisseur, D., E-mail: david.tisseur@cea.fr; Costin, M., E-mail: david.tisseur@cea.fr; Rattoni, B., E-mail: david.tisseur@cea.fr; Vienne, C., E-mail: david.tisseur@cea.fr; Vabre, A., E-mail: david.tisseur@cea.fr; Cattiaux, G., E-mail: david.tisseur@cea.fr [CEA LIST, CEA Saclay 91191 Gif sur Yvette Cedex (France); Sollier, T. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire, B.P.17 92262 Fontenay-Aux-Roses (France)

    2015-03-31

    The French Atomic Energy Commission and Alternative Energies (CEA) has developed for years the CIVA software dedicated to simulation of NDE techniques such as Radiographic Testing (RT). RT modelling is achieved in CIVA using combination of a determinist approach based on ray tracing for transmission beam simulation and a Monte Carlo model for the scattered beam computation. Furthermore, CIVA includes various detectors models, in particular common x-ray films and a photostimulable phosphor plates. This communication presents the results obtained with the configurations proposed in the World Federation of NDEC 2014 RT modelling benchmark with the RT models implemented in the CIVA software.

  8. Technical Note : A direct ray-tracing method to compute integral depth dose in pencil beam proton radiography with a multilayer ionization chamber

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Farace, Paolo; Righetto, Roberto; Deffet, Sylvain; Meijers, Arturs; Vander Stappen, Francois

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To introduce a fast ray-tracing algorithm in pencil proton radiography (PR) with a multilayer ionization chamber (MLIC) for in vivo range error mapping. Methods: Pencil beam PR was obtained by delivering spots uniformly positioned in a square (45x45 mm(2) field-of-view) of 9x9 spots capable

  9. Estimation of viscoelastic attenuation of real seismic data by use of ray tracing software: Application to the detection of gas hydrates and free gas

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bouchaala, Fateh; Guennou, C.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 344, č. 2 (2012), s. 57-66 ISSN 1631-0713 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30120515 Keywords : viscoelastic attenuation * gas hydrates * free gas * ray tracing Subject RIV: DC - Siesmology, Volcanology, Earth Structure Impact factor: 1.401, year: 2012

  10. SIMULATION-BASED EVALUATION OF LIGHT POSTS AND STREET SIGNS AS 3-D GEOLOCATION TARGETS IN SAR IMAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Auer

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The assignment of phase center positions (in 2D or 3D derived from SAR data to physical object is challenging for many man-made structures such as buildings or bridges. In contrast, light poles and traffic signs are promising targets for tasks based on 3-D geolocation as they often show a prominent and spatially isolated appearance. For a detailed understanding of the nature of both targets, this paper presents results of a dedicated simulation case study, which is based on ray tracing methods (simulator RaySAR. For the first time, the appearance of the targets is analyzed in 2D (image plane and 3D space (world coordinates of scene model and reflecting surfaces are identified for related dominant image pixels. The case studies confirms the crucial impact of spatial resolution in the context of light poles and traffic signs and the appropriateness of light poles as target for 3-D geolocation in case of horizontal ground surfaces beneath.

  11. A Simulation Tool for Ultrasonic Inspection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishnamurthy, Adarsh; Mohan, K. V.; Karthikeyan, Soumya; Krishnamurthy, C. V.; Balasubramaniam, Krishnan [Indian Institute of Technology, Tamil Nadu (India)

    2006-06-15

    A simulation program SIMULTSONIC is under development at CNDE to help determine and/or help optimize ultrasonic probe locations for inspection of complex components. SIMULTSONIC provides a ray-trace based assessment for immersion and contact modes of inspection. The code written in Visual C++ operating in Microsoft Windows environment provides an interactive user interface. In this paper, a description of the various features of SIMULTSONIC is given followed by examples illustrating the capability of SIMULTSONIC to deal with inspection of canonical objects such as pipes. In particular, the use of SIMULTSONIC in the inspection of very thin-walled pipes (with 450 urn wall thickness) is described. Ray trace based assessment was done using SIMULTSONIC to determine the standoff distance and the angle of oblique incidence for an immersion mode focused transducer. A 3-cycle Hanning window pulse was chosen for simulations. Experiments were carried out to validate the simulations. The A-scans and the associated B-Scan images obtained through simulations show good correlation with experimental results, both with the arrival time of the signal as well as with the signal amplitudes

  12. Advanced simulations of x-ray beam propagation through CRL transfocators using ray-tracing and wavefront propagation methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baltser, Jana; Bergbäck Knudsen, Erik; Vickery, Anette

    2011-01-01

    Compound refractive lenses (CRL) are widely used to manipulate synchrotron radiation beams. Accurate modelling of X-ray beam propagation through individual lenses and through "transfocators" composed of a large number of CRLs is of high importance, since it allows for comprehensive optimization...

  13. Evaluation of Diversity Antenna Designs Using Ray Tracing, Measured Radiation Patterns, and MIMO Channel Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arindam Pal

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an evaluation of the MIMO performance of three candidate antenna array designs, each embedded within a PDA footprint, using indoor wideband channel measurements at 5.2 GHz alongside channel simulations. A channel model which employs the plane-wave approximation was used to combine the embedded antenna radiation patterns of the candidate devices obtained from far-field pattern measurements and multipath component parameters from an indoor ray-tracer. The 4-element candidate arrays were each constructed using a different type of antenna element, and despite the diverse element directivities, pattern characteristics, and polarization purities, all three devices were constructed to fully exploit diversity in polarization, space, and angle. Thus, low correlation and high information theoretic capacity was observed in each case. A good match between the model and the measurements is also demonstrated, especially for 2×2 MIMO subsets of identically or orthogonally polarized linear slot antennas. The interdependencies between the channel XPD, directional spread and pathloss, and the respective impact on channel capacity are also discussed in this paper.

  14. Evaluation of Diversity Antenna Designs Using Ray Tracing, Measured Radiation Patterns, and MIMO Channel Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pal Arindam

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an evaluation of the MIMO performance of three candidate antenna array designs, each embedded within a PDA footprint, using indoor wideband channel measurements at 5.2 GHz alongside channel simulations. A channel model which employs the plane-wave approximation was used to combine the embedded antenna radiation patterns of the candidate devices obtained from far-field pattern measurements and multipath component parameters from an indoor ray-tracer. The 4-element candidate arrays were each constructed using a different type of antenna element, and despite the diverse element directivities, pattern characteristics, and polarization purities, all three devices were constructed to fully exploit diversity in polarization, space, and angle. Thus, low correlation and high information theoretic capacity was observed in each case. A good match between the model and the measurements is also demonstrated, especially for MIMO subsets of identically or orthogonally polarized linear slot antennas. The interdependencies between the channel XPD, directional spread and pathloss, and the respective impact on channel capacity are also discussed in this paper.

  15. Photorealistic 3D omni-directional stereo simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiners, Dirk; Cruz-Neira, Carolina; Neumann, Carsten

    2015-03-01

    While a lot of areas in VR have made significant advances, visual rendering in VR is often not quite keeping up with the state of the art. There are many reasons for this, but one way to alleviate some of the issues is by using ray tracing instead of rasterization for image generation. Contrary to popular belief, ray tracing is a realistic, competitive technology nowadays. This paper looks at the pros and cons of using ray tracing and demonstrates the feasibility of employing it using the example of a helicopter flight simulator image generator.

  16. Effect of phantom voxelization in CT simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goertzen, Andrew L.; Beekman, Freek J.; Cherry, Simon R.

    2002-01-01

    In computer simulations of x-ray CT systems one can either use continuous geometrical descriptions for phantoms or a voxelized representation. The voxelized approach allows arbitrary phantoms to be defined without being confined to geometrical shapes. The disadvantage of the voxelized approach is that inherent errors are introduced due to the phantom voxelization. To study effects of phantom discretization, analytical CT simulations were run for a fan-beam geometry with phantom voxel sizes ranging from 0.0625 to 2 times the reconstructed pixel size and noise levels corresponding to 10 3 -10 7 photons per detector pixel prior to attenuation. The number of rays traced per detector element was varied from 1 to 16. Differences in the filtered backprojection images caused by changing the phantom matrix sizes and number of rays traced were assessed by calculating the difference between reconstructions based on the finest matrix and coarser matrix simulations. In noise free simulations, all phantom matrix sizes produced a measurable difference in comparison with the finest phantom matrix used. When even a small amount of noise was added to the projection data, the differences due to the phantom discretization were masked by the noise, and in all cases there was almost no improvement by using a phantom matrix that was more than twice as fine as the reconstruction matrix. No substantial improvement was achieved by tracing more than 4 rays per detector pixel

  17. Spectrophotometric study of Saturn's main rings by means of Monte Carlo ray-tracing and Hapke's theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciarniello, Mauro; Filacchione, Gianrico; D'Aversa, Emiliano; Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.; Capaccioni, Fabrizio; Hedman, Matthew M.; Dalle Ore, Cristina M.; Nicholson, Philip D.; Clark, Roger Nelson; Brown, Robert H.; Cerroni, Priscilla; Spilker, Linda

    2017-10-01

    This work is devoted to the investigation of the spectrophotometric properties of Saturn's rings from Cassini-VIMS (Visible and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer) observations. The dataset used for this analysis is represented by ten radial spectrograms of the rings which have been derived in Filacchione et al. (2014) by radial mosaics produced by VIMS. Spectrograms report the measured radiance factor of the main Saturn's rings as a function of both radial distance (from 73.500 to 141.375 km) and wavelength (0.35-5.1 µm) for different observation geometries (phase angle ranging in the 1.9°-132.2° interval). We take advantage of a Monte Carlo ray-tracing routine to characterize the photometric behavior of the rings at each wavelength and derive the spectral Bond albedo of rings particles. This quantity is used to infer the composition of the regolith covering rings particles by applying Hapke's theory. Four different regions, characterized by different optical depths, and respectively located in the C ring, inner B ring, mid B ring and A ring, have been investigated. Results from spectral modeling indicate that rings spectrum can be described by water ice with minimal inclusion of organic materials (tholin, exogenous material, which is more effective in the less dense regions of the rings because of their lower content of pure water ice.

  18. Ray-tracing traveltime tomography versus wave-equation traveltime inversion for near-surface seismic land data

    KAUST Repository

    Fu, Lei

    2017-05-11

    Full-waveform inversion of land seismic data tends to get stuck in a local minimum associated with the waveform misfit function. This problem can be partly mitigated by using an initial velocity model that is close to the true velocity model. This initial starting model can be obtained by inverting traveltimes with ray-tracing traveltime tomography (RT) or wave-equation traveltime (WT) inversion. We have found that WT can provide a more accurate tomogram than RT by inverting the first-arrival traveltimes, and empirical tests suggest that RT is more sensitive to the additive noise in the input data than WT. We present two examples of applying WT and RT to land seismic data acquired in western Saudi Arabia. One of the seismic experiments investigated the water-table depth, and the other one attempted to detect the location of a buried fault. The seismic land data were inverted by WT and RT to generate the P-velocity tomograms, from which we can clearly identify the water table depth along the seismic survey line in the first example and the fault location in the second example.

  19. Radiation characteristics of water droplets in a fire-inspired environment: A Monte Carlo ray tracing study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Bifen; Zhao, Xinyu

    2018-06-01

    The effects of radiation of water mists in a fire-inspired environment are numerically investigated for different complexities of radiative media in a three-dimensional cubic enclosure. A Monte Carlo ray tracing (MCRT) method is employed to solve the radiative transfer equation (RTE). The anisotropic scattering behaviors of water mists are modeled by a combination of the Mie theory and the Henyey-Greestein relation. A tabulation method considering the size and wavelength dependencies is established for water droplets, to reduce the computational cost associated with the evaluation of the nongray spectral properties of water mists. Validation and verification of the coupled MCRT solver are performed using a one-dimensional slab with gray gas in comparison with the analytical solutions. Parametric studies are then performed using a three-dimensional cubic box to examine radiation of two monodispersed and one polydispersed water mist systems. The tabulation method can reduce the computational cost by a factor of one hundred. Results obtained without any scattering model better conform with results obtained from the anisotropic model than the isotropic scattering model, when a highly directional emissive source is applied. For isotropic emissive sources, isotropic and anisotropic scattering models predict comparable results. The addition of different volume fractions of soot shows that soot may have a negative impact on the effectiveness of water mists in absorbing radiation when its volume fraction exceeds certain threshold.

  20. Dose distributions of a proton beam for eye tumor therapy: Hybrid pencil-beam ray-tracing calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rethfeldt, Ch.; Fuchs, H.; Gardey, K.-U.

    2006-01-01

    For the case of eye tumor therapy with protons, improvements are introduced compared to the standard dose calculation which implies straight-line optics and the constant-density assumption for the eye and its surrounding. The progress consists of (i) taking account of the lateral scattering of the protons in tissue by folding the entrance fluence distribution with the pencil beam distribution widening with growing depth in the tissue, (ii) rescaling the spread-out Bragg peak dose distribution in water with the radiological path length calculated voxel by voxel on ray traces through a realistic density matrix for the treatment geometry, yielding a trajectory dependence of the geometrical range. Distributions calculated for some specific situations are compared to measurements and/or standard calculations, and differences to the latter are discussed with respect to the requirements of therapy planning. The most pronounced changes appear for wedges placed in front of the eye, causing additional widening of the lateral falloff. The more accurate prediction of the dose dependence at the field borders is of interest with respect to side effects in the risk organs of the eye

  1. Implementation of diffraction in a ray-tracing model for the prediction of noise in open-plan offices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevret, P; Chatillon, J

    2012-11-01

    Sound prediction in open-plan offices is a real challenge because of the complexity of the layout of such offices, and therefore because of the multitude of acoustic phenomena involved. One such phenomenon, of primary importance, and not the least challenging of them, is the diffraction by screens and low dividers that usually partition the workspace. This paper describes implementing the equations of the Uniform Theory of Diffraction [McNamara et al. (1990). Introduction to the Uniform Theory of Diffraction (Artech House, Boston)] in an existing ray-tracing model initially dedicated to sound prediction in industrial premises. For the purposes of validation, a series of measurements was conducted in a semi-anechoic chamber in the same manner as Wang and Bradley [(2002). Appl. Acoust. 63, 849-866] but including real desktops instead of single screens. A first phase was dedicated to controlling the quality of the installation by making comparisons with McNamara's solution for a single screen on a rigid floor. Then, the validation itself was conducted with measurements on real desktops, first without a ceiling, and then with a rigid ceiling suspended above the double desk. The results of the comparisons between calculations and measurements in this configuration have demonstrated that the model is an effective tool for predicting sound levels in an open-plan office.

  2. The applicability of physical optics in the millimetre and sub-millimetre spectral region. Part I: The ray tracing with diffraction on facets method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baran, A. J.; Hesse, Evelyn; Sourdeval, Odran

    2017-03-01

    Future satellite missions, from 2022 onwards, will obtain near-global measurements of cirrus at microwave and sub-millimetre frequencies. To realise the potential of these observations, fast and accurate light-scattering methods are required to calculate scattered millimetre and sub-millimetre intensities from complex ice crystals. Here, the applicability of the ray tracing with diffraction on facets method (RTDF) in predicting the bulk scalar optical properties and phase functions of randomly oriented hexagonal ice columns and hexagonal ice aggregates at millimetre frequencies is investigated. The applicability of RTDF is shown to be acceptable down to size parameters of about 18, between the frequencies of 243 and 874 GHz. It is demonstrated that RTDF is generally well within about 10% of T-matrix solutions obtained for the scalar optical properties assuming hexagonal ice columns. Moreover, on replacing electromagnetic scalar optical property solutions obtained for the hexagonal ice aggregate with the RTDF counterparts at size parameter values of about 18 or greater, the bulk scalar optical properties can be calculated to generally well within ±5% of an electromagnetic-based database. The RTDF-derived bulk scalar optical properties result in brightness temperature errors to generally within about ±4 K at 874 GHz. Differing microphysics assumptions can easily exceed such errors. Similar findings are found for the bulk scattering phase functions. This finding is owing to the scattering solutions being dominated by the processes of diffraction and reflection, both being well described by RTDF. The impact of centimetre-sized complex ice crystals on interpreting cirrus polarisation measurements at sub-millimetre frequencies is discussed.

  3. Modeling a Miniaturized Scanning Electron Microscope Focusing Column - Lessons Learned in Electron Optics Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loyd, Jody; Gregory, Don; Gaskin, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    This presentation discusses work done to assess the design of a focusing column in a miniaturized Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) developed at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) for use in-situ on the Moon-in particular for mineralogical analysis. The MSFC beam column design uses purely electrostatic fields for focusing, because of the severe constraints on mass and electrical power consumption imposed by the goals of lunar exploration and of spaceflight in general. The resolution of an SEM ultimately depends on the size of the focused spot of the scanning beam probe, for which the stated goal here is a diameter of 10 nanometers. Optical aberrations are the main challenge to this performance goal, because they blur the ideal geometrical optical image of the electron source, effectively widening the ideal spot size of the beam probe. In the present work the optical aberrations of the mini SEM focusing column were assessed using direct tracing of non-paraxial rays, as opposed to mathematical estimates of aberrations based on paraxial ray-traces. The geometrical ray-tracing employed here is completely analogous to ray-tracing as conventionally understood in the realm of photon optics, with the major difference being that in electron optics the lens is simply a smoothly varying electric field in vacuum, formed by precisely machined electrodes. Ray-tracing in this context, therefore, relies upon a model of the electrostatic field inside the focusing column to provide the mathematical description of the "lens" being traced. This work relied fundamentally on the boundary element method (BEM) for this electric field model. In carrying out this research the authors discovered that higher accuracy in the field model was essential if aberrations were to be reliably assessed using direct ray-tracing. This led to some work in testing alternative techniques for modeling the electrostatic field. Ultimately, the necessary accuracy was attained using a BEM

  4. A New Approach to Bézier Surface Visualization by a Ray Tracing Method

    OpenAIRE

    Glazs, A; Sisojevs, A

    2008-01-01

    Problem of free – form surfaces visualization is actual in various areas of a science and engineering. One of mathematical models used for this purpose is the mathematical description of a Bézier surface. Classical methods of computer graphics based on polygonal models use only polygonal interpolation of a Bézier surface. Such approach inevitably leads to occurrence of an error and as a consequence – to discrepancy of an image.

  5. Numerical Approximations to the Solution of Ray Tracing through the Crystalline Lens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yildirim, A.; Gökdoğan, A.; Merdan, M.; Lakshminarayanan, V.

    2012-01-01

    An approximate analytical solution in the form of a rapidly convergent series for tracing light rays through an inhomogeneous graded index medium is developed, using the multi-step differential transform method based on the classical differential transformation method. Numerical results are compared to those obtained by the fourth-order Runge—Kutta method to illustrate the precision and effectiveness of the proposed method. Results are given in explicit and graphical forms. (fundamental areas of phenomenology(including applications))

  6. Laser ray tracing and power deposition on an unstructured three-dimensional grid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaiser, Thomas B.

    2000-01-01

    A scheme is presented for laser beam evolution and power deposition on three-dimensional unstructured grids composed of hexahedra, prisms, pyramids, and tetrahedra. The geometrical-optics approximation to the electromagnetic wave equation is used to follow propagation of a collection of discrete rays used to represent the beam(s). Ray trajectory equations are integrated using a method that is second order in time, exact for a constant electron-density gradient, and capable of dealing with density discontinuities that arise in certain hydrodynamics formulations. Power deposition by inverse-bremsstrahlung is modeled with a scheme based on Gaussian quadrature to accommodate a deposition rate whose spatial variation is highly nonuniform. Comparisons with analytic results are given for a density ramp in three dimensions, and a ''quadratic-well'' density trough in two dimensions. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society

  7. Alternative methods for ray tracing in uniaxial media. Application to negative refraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellver-Cebreros, Consuelo; Rodriguez-Danta, Marcelo

    2007-03-01

    In previous papers [C. Bellver-Cebreros, M. Rodriguez-Danta, Eikonal equation, alternative expression of Fresnel's equation and Mohr's construction in optical anisotropic media, Opt. Commun. 189 (2001) 193; C. Bellver-Cebreros, M. Rodriguez-Danta, Internal conical refraction in biaxial media and graphical plane constructions deduced from Mohr's method, Opt. Commun. 212 (2002) 199; C. Bellver-Cebreros, M. Rodriguez-Danta, Refraccion conica externa en medios biaxicos a partir de la construccion de Mohr, Opt. Pura AppliE 36 (2003) 33], the authors have developed a method based on the local properties of dielectric permittivity tensor and on Mohr's plane graphical construction in order to study the behaviour of locally plane light waves in anisotropic media. In this paper, this alternative methodology is compared with the traditional one, by emphasizing the simplicity of the former when studying ray propagation through uniaxial media (comparison is possible since, in this case, traditional construction becomes also plane). An original and simple graphical method is proposed in order to determine the direction of propagation given by the wave vector from the knowledge of the extraordinary ray direction (given by Poynting vector). Some properties of light rays in these media not described in the literature are obtained. Finally, two applications are considered: a description of optical birefringence under normal incidence and the study of negative refraction in uniaxial media.

  8. Intraocular Telescopic System Design: Optical and Visual Simulation in a Human Eye Model

    OpenAIRE

    Zoulinakis, Georgios; Ferrer-Blasco, Teresa

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. To design an intraocular telescopic system (ITS) for magnifying retinal image and to simulate its optical and visual performance after implantation in a human eye model. Methods. Design and simulation were carried out with a ray-tracing and optical design software. Two different ITS were designed, and their visual performance was simulated using the Liou-Brennan eye model. The difference between the ITS was their lenses’ placement in the eye model and their powers. Ray tracing in bot...

  9. RELAP5 based engineering simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charlton, T.R.; Laats, E.T.; Burtt, J.D.

    1990-01-01

    The INEL Engineering Simulation Center was established in 1988 to provide a modern, flexible, state-of-the-art simulation facility. This facility and two of the major projects which are part of the simulation center, the Advance Test Reactor (ATR) engineering simulator project and the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) advanced reactor control system, have been the subject of several papers in the past few years. Two components of the ATR engineering simulator project, RELAP5 and the Nuclear Plant Analyzer (NPA), have recently been improved significantly. This paper will present an overview of the INEL Engineering Simulation Center, and discuss the RELAP5/MOD3 and NPA/MOD1 codes, specifically how they are being used at the INEL Engineering Simulation Center. It will provide an update on the modifications to these two codes and their application to the ATR engineering simulator project, as well as, a discussion on the reactor system representation, control system modeling, two phase flow and heat transfer modeling. It will also discuss how these two codes are providing desktop, stand-alone reactor simulation. 12 refs., 2 figs

  10. RELAP5 based engineering simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charlton, T.R.; Laats, E.T.; Burtt, J.D.

    1990-01-01

    The INEL Engineering Simulation Center was established in 1988 to provide a modern, flexible, state-of-the-art simulation facility. This facility and two of the major projects which are part of the simulation center, the Advance Test Reactor (ATR) engineering simulator project and the Experimental Breeder Reactor (EBR-II) advanced reactor control system, have been the subject of several papers in the past few years. Two components of the ATR engineering simulator project, RELAP5 and the Nuclear Plant Analyzer (NPA), have recently been improved significantly. This paper presents an overview of the INEL Engineering Simulation Center, and discusses the RELAP5/MOD3 and NPA/MOD1 codes, specifically how they are being used at the INEL Engineering Simulation Center. It provides an update on the modifications to these two codes and their application to the ATR engineering simulator project, as well as, a discussion on the reactor system representation, control system modeling, two phase flow and heat transfer modeling. It will also discuss how these two codes are providing desktop, stand-alone reactor simulation

  11. Discrete curved ray-tracing method for radiative transfer in an absorbing-emitting semitransparent slab with variable spatial refractive index

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, L.H.

    2004-01-01

    A discrete curved ray-tracing method is developed to analyze the radiative transfer in one-dimensional absorbing-emitting semitransparent slab with variable spatial refractive index. The curved ray trajectory is locally treated as straight line and the complicated and time-consuming computation of ray trajectory is cut down. A problem of radiative equilibrium with linear variable spatial refractive index is taken as an example to examine the accuracy of the proposed method. The temperature distributions are determined by the proposed method and compared with the data in references, which are obtained by other different methods. The results show that the discrete curved ray-tracing method has a good accuracy in solving the radiative transfer in one-dimensional semitransparent slab with variable spatial refractive index

  12. SU-F-J-204: Carbon Digitally Reconstructed Radiography (CDRR): A GPU Based Tool for Fast and Versatile Carbonimaging Simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dias, M F; Seco, J; Baroni, G; Riboldi, M

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Research in carbon imaging has been growing over the past years, as a way to increase treatment accuracy and patient positioning in carbon therapy. The purpose of this tool is to allow a fast and flexible way to generate CDRR data without the need to use Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. It can also be used to predict future clinically measured data. Methods: A python interface has been developed, which uses information from CT or 4DCT and thetreatment calibration curve to compute the Water Equivalent Path Length (WEPL) of carbon ions. A GPU based ray tracing algorithm computes the WEPL of each individual carbon traveling through the CT voxels. A multiple peak detection method to estimate high contrast margin positioning has been implemented (described elsewhere). MC simulations have been used to simulate carbons depth dose curves in order to simulate the response of a range detector. Results: The tool allows the upload of CT or 4DCT images. The user has the possibility to selectphase/slice of interested as well as position, angle…). The WEPL is represented as a range detector which can be used to assess range dilution and multiple peak detection effects. The tool also provides knowledge of the minimum energy that should be considered for imaging purposes. The multiple peak detection method has been used in a lung tumor case, showing an accuracy of 1mm in determine the exact interface position. Conclusion: The tool offers an easy and fast way to simulate carbon imaging data. It can be used for educational and for clinical purposes, allowing the user to test beam energies and angles before real acquisition. An analysis add-on is being developed, where the used will have the opportunity to select different reconstruction methods and detector types (range or energy). Fundacao para a Ciencia e a Tecnologia (FCT), PhD Grant number SFRH/BD/85749/2012

  13. SU-F-J-204: Carbon Digitally Reconstructed Radiography (CDRR): A GPU Based Tool for Fast and Versatile Carbonimaging Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dias, M F [Dipartamento di Elettronica, Informazione e Bioingegneria - DEIB, Politecnico di Milano (Italy); Department of Radiation Oncology, Francis H. Burr Proton Therapy Center Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Seco, J [Department of Radiation Oncology, Francis H. Burr Proton Therapy Center Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Baroni, G; Riboldi, M [Dipartamento di Elettronica, Informazione e Bioingegneria - DEIB, Politecnico di Milano (Italy); Bioengineering Unit, Centro Nazionale di Adroterapia Oncologica, Pavia (Italy)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Research in carbon imaging has been growing over the past years, as a way to increase treatment accuracy and patient positioning in carbon therapy. The purpose of this tool is to allow a fast and flexible way to generate CDRR data without the need to use Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. It can also be used to predict future clinically measured data. Methods: A python interface has been developed, which uses information from CT or 4DCT and thetreatment calibration curve to compute the Water Equivalent Path Length (WEPL) of carbon ions. A GPU based ray tracing algorithm computes the WEPL of each individual carbon traveling through the CT voxels. A multiple peak detection method to estimate high contrast margin positioning has been implemented (described elsewhere). MC simulations have been used to simulate carbons depth dose curves in order to simulate the response of a range detector. Results: The tool allows the upload of CT or 4DCT images. The user has the possibility to selectphase/slice of interested as well as position, angle…). The WEPL is represented as a range detector which can be used to assess range dilution and multiple peak detection effects. The tool also provides knowledge of the minimum energy that should be considered for imaging purposes. The multiple peak detection method has been used in a lung tumor case, showing an accuracy of 1mm in determine the exact interface position. Conclusion: The tool offers an easy and fast way to simulate carbon imaging data. It can be used for educational and for clinical purposes, allowing the user to test beam energies and angles before real acquisition. An analysis add-on is being developed, where the used will have the opportunity to select different reconstruction methods and detector types (range or energy). Fundacao para a Ciencia e a Tecnologia (FCT), PhD Grant number SFRH/BD/85749/2012.

  14. Ocular aberrations with ray tracing and Shack-Hartmann wave-front sensors: Does polarization play a role?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcos, Susana; Diaz-Santana, Luis; Llorente, Lourdes; Dainty, Chris

    2002-06-01

    Ocular aberrations were measured in 71 eyes by using two reflectometric aberrometers, employing laser ray tracing (LRT) (60 eyes) and a Shack-Hartmann wave-front sensor (S-H) (11 eyes). In both techniques a point source is imaged on the retina (through different pupil positions in the LRT or a single position in the S-H). The aberrations are estimated by measuring the deviations of the retinal spot from the reference as the pupil is sampled (in LRT) or the deviations of a wave front as it emerges from the eye by means of a lenslet array (in the S-H). In this paper we studied the effect of different polarization configurations in the aberration measurements, including linearly polarized light and circularly polarized light in the illuminating channel and sampling light in the crossed or parallel orientations. In addition, completely depolarized light in the imaging channel was obtained from retinal lipofuscin autofluorescence. The intensity distribution of the retinal spots as a function of entry (for LRT) or exit pupil (for S-H) depends on the polarization configuration. These intensity patterns show bright corners and a dark area at the pupil center for crossed polarization, an approximately Gaussian distribution for parallel polarization and a homogeneous distribution for the autofluorescence case. However, the measured aberrations are independent of the polarization states. These results indicate that the differences in retardation across the pupil imposed by corneal birefringence do not produce significant phase delays compared with those produced by aberrations, at least within the accuracy of these techniques. In addition, differences in the recorded aerial images due to changes in polarization do not affect the aberration measurements in these reflectometric aberrometers.

  15. Application of the nudged elastic band method to the point-to-point radio wave ray tracing in IRI modeled ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosikov, I. A.; Klimenko, M. V.; Bessarab, P. F.; Zhbankov, G. A.

    2017-07-01

    Point-to-point ray tracing is an important problem in many fields of science. While direct variational methods where some trajectory is transformed to an optimal one are routinely used in calculations of pathways of seismic waves, chemical reactions, diffusion processes, etc., this approach is not widely known in ionospheric point-to-point ray tracing. We apply the Nudged Elastic Band (NEB) method to a radio wave propagation problem. In the NEB method, a chain of points which gives a discrete representation of the radio wave ray is adjusted iteratively to an optimal configuration satisfying the Fermat's principle, while the endpoints of the trajectory are kept fixed according to the boundary conditions. Transverse displacements define the radio ray trajectory, while springs between the points control their distribution along the ray. The method is applied to a study of point-to-point ionospheric ray tracing, where the propagation medium is obtained with the International Reference Ionosphere model taking into account traveling ionospheric disturbances. A 2-dimensional representation of the optical path functional is developed and used to gain insight into the fundamental difference between high and low rays. We conclude that high and low rays are minima and saddle points of the optical path functional, respectively.

  16. Simulation-based medical teaching and learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulmohsen H Al-Elq

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most important steps in curriculum development is the introduction of simulation- based medical teaching and learning. Simulation is a generic term that refers to an artificial representation of a real world process to achieve educational goals through experiential learning. Simulation based medical education is defined as any educational activity that utilizes simulation aides to replicate clinical scenarios. Although medical simulation is relatively new, simulation has been used for a long time in other high risk professions such as aviation. Medical simulation allows the acquisition of clinical skills through deliberate practice rather than an apprentice style of learning. Simulation tools serve as an alternative to real patients. A trainee can make mistakes and learn from them without the fear of harming the patient. There are different types and classification of simulators and their cost vary according to the degree of their resemblance to the reality, or ′fidelity′. Simulation- based learning is expensive. However, it is cost-effective if utilized properly. Medical simulation has been found to enhance clinical competence at the undergraduate and postgraduate levels. It has also been found to have many advantages that can improve patient safety and reduce health care costs through the improvement of the medical provider′s competencies. The objective of this narrative review article is to highlight the importance of simulation as a new teaching method in undergraduate and postgraduate education.

  17. Illuminance: Computerized simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barlow, A

    1991-03-01

    One of the main objectives of a graphics work-station is to create images that are as realistic as possible. This paper reviews and assesses the state-of-the-art in the field of illuminance simulation. The techniques examined are: ray tracing, in which illuminance in a given ambient is calculated in an approximate way by tracing individual rays of light; the 'radiosity' (a term combining surface radiancy and reflectivity) method, based on the calculation of the ambient's thermodynamics and which considers the effects of different surface colours; progressive improvement, in which 'radiosity' is calculated step by step with increasing levels of detail. The Gouraud and Phong methods of representing the effects of shade are also compared.

  18. Component-based framework for subsurface simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, B J; Fang, Yilin; Hammond, Glenn; Gurumoorthi, Vidhya

    2007-01-01

    Simulations in the subsurface environment represent a broad range of phenomena covering an equally broad range of scales. Developing modelling capabilities that can integrate models representing different phenomena acting at different scales present formidable challenges both from the algorithmic and computer science perspective. This paper will describe the development of an integrated framework that will be used to combine different models into a single simulation. Initial work has focused on creating two frameworks, one for performing smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations of fluid systems, the other for performing grid-based continuum simulations of reactive subsurface flow. The SPH framework is based on a parallel code developed for doing pore scale simulations, the continuum grid-based framework is based on the STOMP (Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases) code developed at PNNL Future work will focus on combining the frameworks together to perform multiscale, multiphysics simulations of reactive subsurface flow

  19. A heterogeneous graph-based recommendation simulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeonchan, Ahn [Seoul National University; Sungchan, Park [Seoul National University; Lee, Matt Sangkeun [ORNL; Sang-goo, Lee [Seoul National University

    2013-01-01

    Heterogeneous graph-based recommendation frameworks have flexibility in that they can incorporate various recommendation algorithms and various kinds of information to produce better results. In this demonstration, we present a heterogeneous graph-based recommendation simulator which enables participants to experience the flexibility of a heterogeneous graph-based recommendation method. With our system, participants can simulate various recommendation semantics by expressing the semantics via meaningful paths like User Movie User Movie. The simulator then returns the recommendation results on the fly based on the user-customized semantics using a fast Monte Carlo algorithm.

  20. Simulation and Non-Simulation Based Human Reliability Analysis Approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boring, Ronald Laurids [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Shirley, Rachel Elizabeth [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Joe, Jeffrey Clark [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Mandelli, Diego [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Part of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program, the Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) Pathway develops approaches to estimating and managing safety margins. RISMC simulations pair deterministic plant physics models with probabilistic risk models. As human interactions are an essential element of plant risk, it is necessary to integrate human actions into the RISMC risk model. In this report, we review simulation-based and non-simulation-based human reliability assessment (HRA) methods. Chapter 2 surveys non-simulation-based HRA methods. Conventional HRA methods target static Probabilistic Risk Assessments for Level 1 events. These methods would require significant modification for use in dynamic simulation of Level 2 and Level 3 events. Chapter 3 is a review of human performance models. A variety of methods and models simulate dynamic human performance; however, most of these human performance models were developed outside the risk domain and have not been used for HRA. The exception is the ADS-IDAC model, which can be thought of as a virtual operator program. This model is resource-intensive but provides a detailed model of every operator action in a given scenario, along with models of numerous factors that can influence operator performance. Finally, Chapter 4 reviews the treatment of timing of operator actions in HRA methods. This chapter is an example of one of the critical gaps between existing HRA methods and the needs of dynamic HRA. This report summarizes the foundational information needed to develop a feasible approach to modeling human interactions in the RISMC simulations.

  1. Scenario-based table top simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broberg, Ole; Edwards, Kasper; Nielsen, J.

    2012-01-01

    This study developed and tested a scenario-based table top simulation method in a user-driven innovation setting. A team of researchers worked together with a user group of five medical staff members from the existing clinic. Table top simulations of a new clinic were carried out in a simple model...

  2. Simulation-based certification for cataract surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Ann Sofia Skou; Kiilgaard, Jens Folke; Kjaerbo, Hadi

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate the EyeSi(™) simulator in regard to assessing competence in cataract surgery. The primary objective was to explore all simulator metrics to establish a proficiency-based test with solid evidence. The secondary objective was to evaluate whether the skill assessment was specific...

  3. On self-consistent ray-tracing and Fokker-Planck modeling of the hard X-ray emission during lower-hybrid current driven in Tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bizarro, J.P.; Peysson, Y.; Bonoli, P.T.; Carrasco, J.; Dudok de Wit, T.; Fuchs, V.; Hoang, G.T.; Litaudon, X.; Moreau, D.; Pocheau, C.; Shkarofsky, I.P.

    1993-04-01

    A detailed investigation is presented on the ability of combined ray-tracing and Fokker-Planck calculations to predict the hard x-ray (HXR) emission during lower-hybrid (LH) current drive in tokamaks when toroidally induced-ray-stochasticity is important. A large number of rays is used and the electron distribution function is obtained by self-consistently iterating the appropriate LH power deposition and Fokker-Planck calculations. Most of the experimentally observed features of the HXR emission are correctly predicted. It is found that corrections due to radial diffusion of suprathermal electrons and to radiation scattering by the inner wall can be significant

  4. Efficient Time-Domain Ray-Tracing Technique for the Analysis of Ultra-Wideband Indoor Environments including Lossy Materials and Multiple Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Saez de Adana

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an efficient application of the Time-Domain Uniform Theory of Diffraction (TD-UTD for the analysis of Ultra-Wideband (UWB mobile communications for indoor environments. The classical TD-UTD formulation is modified to include the contribution of lossy materials and multiple-ray interactions with the environment. The electromagnetic analysis is combined with a ray-tracing acceleration technique to treat realistic and complex environments. The validity of this method is tested with measurements performed inside the Polytechnic building of the University of Alcala and shows good performance of the model for the analysis of UWB propagation.

  5. Water simulation for cell based sandbox games

    OpenAIRE

    Lundell, Christian

    2014-01-01

    This thesis work presents a new algorithm for simulating fluid based on the Navier-Stokes equations. The algorithm is designed for cell based sandbox games where interactivity and performance are the main priorities. The algorithm enforces mass conservation conservatively instead of enforcing a divergence free velocity field. A global scale pressure model that simulates hydrostatic pressure is used where the pressure propagates between neighboring cells. A prefix sum algorithm is used to only...

  6. Micro-Fluidic Dye Ring Laser - Experimental Tuning of the Wavelength and Numerical Simulation of the Cavity Modes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gersborg-Hansen, Morten; Balslev, Søren; Mortensen, Niels Asger

    2006-01-01

    We demonstrate wavelength tuning of a micro-fluidic dye ring laser. Wavelength tunability is obtained by controlling the liquid dye concentration. The device performance is modelled by FEM simulations supporting a ray-tracing view.......We demonstrate wavelength tuning of a micro-fluidic dye ring laser. Wavelength tunability is obtained by controlling the liquid dye concentration. The device performance is modelled by FEM simulations supporting a ray-tracing view....

  7. Computer Based Modelling and Simulation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    GENERAL I ARTICLE. Computer Based ... universities, and later did system analysis, ... sonal computers (PC) and low cost software packages and tools. They can serve as useful learning experience through student projects. Models are .... Let us consider a numerical example: to calculate the velocity of a trainer aircraft ...

  8. Simulation of the Simbol-X telescope: imaging performance of a deformable x-ray telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauvin, Maxime; Roques, Jean-Pierre

    2009-08-01

    We have developed a simulation tool for a Wolter I telescope subject to deformations. The aim is to understand and predict the behavior of Simbol-X and other future missions (NuSTAR, Astro-H, IXO, ...). Our code, based on Monte-Carlo ray-tracing, computes the full photon trajectories up to the detector plane, along with the deformations. The degradation of the imaging system is corrected using metrology. This tool allows to perform many analyzes in order to optimize the configuration of any of these telescopes.

  9. Simulation of photons from plasmas for the applications to display devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hae June; Yoon, Hyun Jin; Lee, Jae Koo

    2007-07-01

    Numerical modeling of the photon transport of the ultraviolet (UV) and the visible lights are presented for plasma based display devices. The transport of UV lights which undergo resonance trapping by ground state atoms is solved by using the Holstein equation. After the UV lights are transformed to visible lights at the phosphor surfaces, the visible lights experience complicated traces inside the cell and finally are emitted toward the viewing window after having some power loss within the cell. A three-dimensional ray trace of the visible lights is calculated with a radiosity model. These simulations for the photons strengthen plasma discharge modeling for the application to display devices.

  10. Simulation-based medical education in pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopreiato, Joseph O; Sawyer, Taylor

    2015-01-01

    The use of simulation-based medical education (SBME) in pediatrics has grown rapidly over the past 2 decades and is expected to continue to grow. Similar to other instructional formats used in medical education, SBME is an instructional methodology that facilitates learning. Successful use of SBME in pediatrics requires attention to basic educational principles, including the incorporation of clear learning objectives. To facilitate learning during simulation the psychological safety of the participants must be ensured, and when done correctly, SBME is a powerful tool to enhance patient safety in pediatrics. Here we provide an overview of SBME in pediatrics and review key topics in the field. We first review the tools of the trade and examine various types of simulators used in pediatric SBME, including human patient simulators, task trainers, standardized patients, and virtual reality simulation. Then we explore several uses of simulation that have been shown to lead to effective learning, including curriculum integration, feedback and debriefing, deliberate practice, mastery learning, and range of difficulty and clinical variation. Examples of how these practices have been successfully used in pediatrics are provided. Finally, we discuss the future of pediatric SBME. As a community, pediatric simulation educators and researchers have been a leading force in the advancement of simulation in medicine. As the use of SBME in pediatrics expands, we hope this perspective will serve as a guide for those interested in improving the state of pediatric SBME. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Computational steering of GEM based detector simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheharyar, Ali; Bouhali, Othmane

    2017-10-01

    Gas based detector R&D relies heavily on full simulation of detectors and their optimization before final prototypes can be built and tested. These simulations in particular those with complex scenarios such as those involving high detector voltages or gas with larger gains are computationally intensive may take several days or weeks to complete. These long-running simulations usually run on the high-performance computers in batch mode. If the results lead to unexpected behavior, then the simulation might be rerun with different parameters. However, the simulations (or jobs) may have to wait in a queue until they get a chance to run again because the supercomputer is a shared resource that maintains a queue of other user programs as well and executes them as time and priorities permit. It may result in inefficient resource utilization and increase in the turnaround time for the scientific experiment. To overcome this issue, the monitoring of the behavior of a simulation, while it is running (or live), is essential. In this work, we employ the computational steering technique by coupling the detector simulations with a visualization package named VisIt to enable the exploration of the live data as it is produced by the simulation.

  12. Simulation-Based Training for Thoracoscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjurström, Johanna Margareta; Konge, Lars; Lehnert, Per

    2013-01-01

    An increasing proportion of thoracic procedures are performed using video-assisted thoracic surgery. This minimally invasive technique places special demands on the surgeons. Using simulation-based training on artificial models or animals has been proposed to overcome the initial part of the lear......An increasing proportion of thoracic procedures are performed using video-assisted thoracic surgery. This minimally invasive technique places special demands on the surgeons. Using simulation-based training on artificial models or animals has been proposed to overcome the initial part...... of the learning curve. This study aimed to investigate the effect of simulation-based training and to compare self-guided and educator-guided training....

  13. Hockey lines for simulation-based learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topps, David; Ellaway, Rachel; Kupsh, Christine

    2015-06-01

    Simulation-based health professional education is often limited in accommodating large numbers of students. Most organisations do not have enough simulation suites or staff to support growing demands. We needed to find ways to make simulation sessions more accommodating for larger groups of learners, so that more than a few individuals could be active in a simulation scenario at any one time. Moreover, we needed to make the experience meaningful for all participating learners. We used the metaphor of (ice) hockey lines and substitution 'on the fly' to effectively double the numbers of learners that can be actively engaged at once. Team players must communicate clearly, and observe keenly, so that currently playing members understand what is happening from moment to moment and incoming substitutes can take over their roles seamlessly. Most organisations do not have enough simulation suites or staff to support growing demands We found that this hockey lines approach to simulation-based team scenarios will raise learners' levels of engagement, reinforce good crew resource management (CRM) practices, enhance closed-loop communication, and help learners to understand their cognitive biases and limitations when working in high-pressure situations. During our continuing refinement of the hockey-lines approach, we developed a number of variations on the basic activity model, with various benefits and applications. Both students and teachers have been enthusiastically positive about this approach when it was introduced at our various courses and participating institutions. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Image based SAR product simulation for analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domik, G.; Leberl, F.

    1987-01-01

    SAR product simulation serves to predict SAR image gray values for various flight paths. Input typically consists of a digital elevation model and backscatter curves. A new method is described of product simulation that employs also a real SAR input image for image simulation. This can be denoted as 'image-based simulation'. Different methods to perform this SAR prediction are presented and advantages and disadvantages discussed. Ascending and descending orbit images from NASA's SIR-B experiment were used for verification of the concept: input images from ascending orbits were converted into images from a descending orbit; the results are compared to the available real imagery to verify that the prediction technique produces meaningful image data.

  15. Single-step reinitialization and extending algorithms for level-set based multi-phase flow simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Lin; Hu, Xiangyu Y.; Adams, Nikolaus A.

    2017-12-01

    We propose efficient single-step formulations for reinitialization and extending algorithms, which are critical components of level-set based interface-tracking methods. The level-set field is reinitialized with a single-step (non iterative) "forward tracing" algorithm. A minimum set of cells is defined that describes the interface, and reinitialization employs only data from these cells. Fluid states are extrapolated or extended across the interface by a single-step "backward tracing" algorithm. Both algorithms, which are motivated by analogy to ray-tracing, avoid multiple block-boundary data exchanges that are inevitable for iterative reinitialization and extending approaches within a parallel-computing environment. The single-step algorithms are combined with a multi-resolution conservative sharp-interface method and validated by a wide range of benchmark test cases. We demonstrate that the proposed reinitialization method achieves second-order accuracy in conserving the volume of each phase. The interface location is invariant to reapplication of the single-step reinitialization. Generally, we observe smaller absolute errors than for standard iterative reinitialization on the same grid. The computational efficiency is higher than for the standard and typical high-order iterative reinitialization methods. We observe a 2- to 6-times efficiency improvement over the standard method for serial execution. The proposed single-step extending algorithm, which is commonly employed for assigning data to ghost cells with ghost-fluid or conservative interface interaction methods, shows about 10-times efficiency improvement over the standard method while maintaining same accuracy. Despite their simplicity, the proposed algorithms offer an efficient and robust alternative to iterative reinitialization and extending methods for level-set based multi-phase simulations.

  16. Simulation of the Simbol-X Telescope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chauvin, M.; Roques, J. P.

    2009-01-01

    We have developed a simulation tool for a Wolter I telescope operating in formation flight. The aim is to understand and predict the behavior of the Simbol-X instrument. As the geometry is variable, formation flight introduces new challenges and complex implications. Our code, based on Monte Carlo ray tracing, computes the full photon trajectories up to the detector plane, along with the relative drifts of the two spacecrafts. It takes into account angle and energy dependent interactions of the photons with the mirrors and applies to any grazing incidence telescope. The resulting images of simulated sources from 0.1 keV to 100 keV allow us to optimize the configuration of the instrument and to assess the performance of the Simbol-X telescope.

  17. Simulation of the Simbol-X Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauvin, M.; Roques, J. P.

    2009-05-01

    We have developed a simulation tool for a Wolter I telescope operating in formation flight. The aim is to understand and predict the behavior of the Simbol-X instrument. As the geometry is variable, formation flight introduces new challenges and complex implications. Our code, based on Monte Carlo ray tracing, computes the full photon trajectories up to the detector plane, along with the relative drifts of the two spacecrafts. It takes into account angle and energy dependent interactions of the photons with the mirrors and applies to any grazing incidence telescope. The resulting images of simulated sources from 0.1 keV to 100 keV allow us to optimize the configuration of the instrument and to assess the performance of the Simbol-X telescope.

  18. Simulating Complex Window Systems using BSDF Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konstantoglou, Maria; Jonsson, Jacob; Lee, Eleanor

    2009-06-22

    Nowadays, virtual models are commonly used to evaluate the performance of conventional window systems. Complex fenestration systems can be difficult to simulate accurately not only because of their geometry but also because of their optical properties that scatter light in an unpredictable manner. Bi-directional Scattering Distribution Functions (BSDF) have recently been developed based on a mixture of measurements and modelling to characterize the optics of such systems. This paper describes the workflow needed to create then use these BSDF datasets in the Radiance lighting simulation software. Limited comparisons are made between visualizations produced using the standard ray-tracing method, the BSDF method, and that taken in a full-scale outdoor mockup.

  19. Simulation-based Testing of Control Software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozmen, Ozgur [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Nutaro, James J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Sanyal, Jibonananda [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Olama, Mohammed M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-02-10

    It is impossible to adequately test complex software by examining its operation in a physical prototype of the system monitored. Adequate test coverage can require millions of test cases, and the cost of equipment prototypes combined with the real-time constraints of testing with them makes it infeasible to sample more than a small number of these tests. Model based testing seeks to avoid this problem by allowing for large numbers of relatively inexpensive virtual prototypes that operate in simulation time at a speed limited only by the available computing resources. In this report, we describe how a computer system emulator can be used as part of a model based testing environment; specifically, we show that a complete software stack including operating system and application software - can be deployed within a simulated environment, and that these simulations can proceed as fast as possible. To illustrate this approach to model based testing, we describe how it is being used to test several building control systems that act to coordinate air conditioning loads for the purpose of reducing peak demand. These tests involve the use of ADEVS (A Discrete Event System Simulator) and QEMU (Quick Emulator) to host the operational software within the simulation, and a building model developed with the MODELICA programming language using Buildings Library and packaged as an FMU (Functional Mock-up Unit) that serves as the virtual test environment.

  20. Bridging the gap: simulations meet knowledge bases

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Gary W.; Morrison, Clayton T.; Westbrook, David L.; Cohen, Paul R.

    2003-09-01

    Tapir and Krill are declarative languages for specifying actions and agents, respectively, that can be executed in simulation. As such, they bridge the gap between strictly declarative knowledge bases and strictly executable code. Tapir and Krill components can be combined to produce models of activity which can answer questions about mechanisms and processes using conventional inference methods and simulation. Tapir was used in DARPA's Rapid Knowledge Formation (RKF) project to construct models of military tactics from the Army Field Manual FM3-90. These were then used to build Courses of Actions (COAs) which could be critiqued by declarative reasoning or via Monte Carlo simulation. Tapir and Krill can be read and written by non-knowledge engineers making it an excellent vehicle for Subject Matter Experts to build and critique knowledge bases.

  1. User and programmers guide to the neutron ray-tracing package McStas, version 1.2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, K.; Lefmann, K.

    2000-01-01

    to handle more unusual needs. This report constitutes the reference manual for McStas, and contains full documentation for all ascpects of the program. Itcovers the various ways to compile and run simulations; a description of the metalanguage used to define simulations; a full description of all algorithms...

  2. Agent-based simulation of animal behaviour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.M. Jonker (Catholijn); J. Treur

    1998-01-01

    textabstract In this paper it is shown how animal behaviour can be simulated in an agent-based manner. Different models are shown for different types of behaviour, varying from purely reactive behaviour to pro-active, social and adaptive behaviour. The compositional development method for

  3. Simulation-based summative assessments in surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szasz, Peter; Grantcharov, Teodor P; Sweet, Robert M; Korndorffer, James R; Pedowitz, Robert A; Roberts, Patricia L; Sachdeva, Ajit K

    2016-09-01

    The American College of Surgeons-Accredited Education Institutes (ACS-AEI) Consortium aims to enhance patient safety and advance surgical education through the use of cutting-edge simulation-based training and assessment methods. The annual ACS-AEI Consortium meeting provides a forum to discuss the latest simulation-based training and assessment methods and includes special panel presentations on key topics. During the 8th annual Consortium, there was a panel presentation on simulation-based summative assessments, during which experiences from across surgical disciplines were presented. The formal presentations were followed by a robust discussion between the conference attendees and the panelists. This report summarizes the panelists' presentations and their ensuing discussion with attendees. The focus of this report is on the basis for and advances in simulation-based summative assessments, the current practices employed across various surgical disciplines, and future directions that may be pursued by the ACS-AEI Consortium. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Agent Based Modelling for Social Simulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, S.K.; Ubink, E.M.; Vecht, B. van der; Langley, D.J.

    2013-01-01

    This document is the result of an exploratory project looking into the status of, and opportunities for Agent Based Modelling (ABM) at TNO. The project focussed on ABM applications containing social interactions and human factors, which we termed ABM for social simulation (ABM4SS). During the course

  5. 2D PIM Simulation Based on COMSOL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Xinbo; Cui, Wanzhao; Wang, Jingyu

    2011-01-01

    Passive intermodulation (PIM) is a problematic type of nonlinear distortion en- countered in many communication systems. To analyze the PIM distortion resulting from ma- terial nonlinearity, a 2D PIM simulation method based on COMSOL is proposed in this paper. As an example, a rectangular wavegui...

  6. The extended Beer-Lambert theory for ray tracing modeling of LED chip-scaled packaging application with multiple luminescence materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Cadmus C. A.

    2015-12-01

    Optical ray tracing modeling applied Beer-Lambert method in the single luminescence material system to model the white light pattern from blue LED light source. This paper extends such algorithm to a mixed multiple luminescence material system by introducing the equivalent excitation and emission spectrum of individual luminescence materials. The quantum efficiency numbers of individual material and self-absorption of the multiple luminescence material system are considered as well. By this combination, researchers are able to model the luminescence characteristics of LED chip-scaled packaging (CSP), which provides simple process steps and the freedom of the luminescence material geometrical dimension. The method will be first validated by the experimental results. Afterward, a further parametric investigation has been then conducted.

  7. Design of simulation-based medical education and advantages and disadvantages of in situ simulation versus off-site simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jette Led; Østergaard, Doris; LeBlanc, Vicki

    2017-01-01

    that choice of setting for simulations does not seem to influence individual and team learning. Department-based local simulation, such as simulation in-house and especially in situ simulation, leads to gains in organisational learning. The overall objectives of simulation-based education and factors......BACKGROUND: Simulation-based medical education (SBME) has traditionally been conducted as off-site simulation in simulation centres. Some hospital departments also provide off-site simulation using in-house training room(s) set up for simulation away from the clinical setting, and these activities...... simulations. DISCUSSION: Non-randomised studies argue that in situ simulation is more effective for educational purposes than other types of simulation settings. Conversely, the few comparison studies that exist, either randomised or retrospective, show that choice of setting does not seem to influence...

  8. Virtual X-ray imaging techniques in an immersive casting simulation environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Ning; Kim, Sung-Hee; Suh, Ji-Hyun; Cho, Sang-Hyun; Choi, Jung-Gil; Kim, Myoung-Hee

    2007-01-01

    A computer code was developed to simulate radiograph of complex casting products in a CAVE TM -like environment. The simulation is based on the deterministic algorithms and ray tracing techniques. The aim of this study is to examine CAD/CAE/CAM models at the design stage, to optimize the design and inspect predicted defective regions with fast speed, good accuracy and small numerical expense. The present work discusses the algorithms for the radiography simulation of CAD/CAM model and proposes algorithmic solutions adapted from ray-box intersection algorithm and octree data structure specifically for radiographic simulation of CAE model. The stereoscopic visualization of full-size of product in the immersive casting simulation environment as well as the virtual X-ray images of castings provides an effective tool for design and evaluation of foundry processes by engineers and metallurgists

  9. A web-based virtual lighting simulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papamichael, Konstantinos; Lai, Judy; Fuller, Daniel; Tariq, Tara

    2002-05-06

    This paper is about a web-based ''virtual lighting simulator,'' which is intended to allow architects and lighting designers to quickly assess the effect of key parameters on the daylighting and lighting performance in various space types. The virtual lighting simulator consists of a web-based interface that allows navigation through a large database of images and data, which were generated through parametric lighting simulations. At its current form, the virtual lighting simulator has two main modules, one for daylighting and one for electric lighting. The daylighting module includes images and data for a small office space, varying most key daylighting parameters, such as window size and orientation, glazing type, surface reflectance, sky conditions, time of the year, etc. The electric lighting module includes images and data for five space types (classroom, small office, large open office, warehouse and small retail), varying key lighting parameters, such as the electric lighting system, surface reflectance, dimming/switching, etc. The computed images include perspectives and plans and are displayed in various formats to support qualitative as well as quantitative assessment. The quantitative information is in the form of iso-contour lines superimposed on the images, as well as false color images and statistical information on work plane illuminance. The qualitative information includes images that are adjusted to account for the sensitivity and adaptation of the human eye. The paper also includes a section on the major technical issues and their resolution.

  10. Physics-Based Simulations of Natural Hazards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Kasey William

    Earthquakes and tsunamis are some of the most damaging natural disasters that we face. Just two recent events, the 2004 Indian Ocean earthquake and tsunami and the 2011 Haiti earthquake, claimed more than 400,000 lives. Despite their catastrophic impacts on society, our ability to predict these natural disasters is still very limited. The main challenge in studying the earthquake cycle is the non-linear and multi-scale properties of fault networks. Earthquakes are governed by physics across many orders of magnitude of spatial and temporal scales; from the scale of tectonic plates and their evolution over millions of years, down to the scale of rock fracturing over milliseconds to minutes at the sub-centimeter scale during an earthquake. Despite these challenges, there are useful patterns in earthquake occurrence. One such pattern, the frequency-magnitude relation, relates the number of large earthquakes to small earthquakes and forms the basis for assessing earthquake hazard. However the utility of these relations is proportional to the length of our earthquake records, and typical records span at most a few hundred years. Utilizing physics based interactions and techniques from statistical physics, earthquake simulations provide rich earthquake catalogs allowing us to measure otherwise unobservable statistics. In this dissertation I will discuss five applications of physics-based simulations of natural hazards, utilizing an earthquake simulator called Virtual Quake. The first is an overview of computing earthquake probabilities from simulations, focusing on the California fault system. The second uses simulations to help guide satellite-based earthquake monitoring methods. The third presents a new friction model for Virtual Quake and describes how we tune simulations to match reality. The fourth describes the process of turning Virtual Quake into an open source research tool. This section then focuses on a resulting collaboration using Virtual Quake for a detailed

  11. Simulation and case-based learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørngreen, Rikke; Guralnick, David

    2008-01-01

    Abstract- This paper has its origin in the authors' reflection on years of practical experiences combined with literature readings in our preparation for a workshop on learn-by-doing simulation and case-based learning to be held at the ICELW 2008 conference (the International Conference on E-Learning...... in the Workplace). The purpose of this paper is to describe the two online learning methodologies and to raise questions for future discussion. In the workshop, the organizers and participants work with and discuss differences and similarities within the two pedagogical methodologies, focusing on how...... they are applied in workplace related and e-learning contexts. In addition to the organizers, a small number of invited presenters will attend, giving demonstrations of their work within learn-by-doing simulation and cases-based learning, but still leaving ample of time for discussion among all participants....

  12. Design of simulation-based medical education and advantages and disadvantages of in situ simulation versus off-site simulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sorensen, J.L.; Ostergaard, D.; Leblanc, V.; Ottesen, B.; Konge, L.; Dieckmann, P.; Vleuten, C. van der

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Simulation-based medical education (SBME) has traditionally been conducted as off-site simulation in simulation centres. Some hospital departments also provide off-site simulation using in-house training room(s) set up for simulation away from the clinical setting, and these activities

  13. Agent Based Modelling for Social Simulation

    OpenAIRE

    Smit, S.K.; Ubink, E.M.; Vecht, B. van der; Langley, D.J.

    2013-01-01

    This document is the result of an exploratory project looking into the status of, and opportunities for Agent Based Modelling (ABM) at TNO. The project focussed on ABM applications containing social interactions and human factors, which we termed ABM for social simulation (ABM4SS). During the course of this project two workshops were organized. At these workshops, a wide range of experts, both ABM experts and domain experts, worked on several potential applications of ABM. The results and ins...

  14. Interactive physically-based sound simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghuvanshi, Nikunj

    The realization of interactive, immersive virtual worlds requires the ability to present a realistic audio experience that convincingly compliments their visual rendering. Physical simulation is a natural way to achieve such realism, enabling deeply immersive virtual worlds. However, physically-based sound simulation is very computationally expensive owing to the high-frequency, transient oscillations underlying audible sounds. The increasing computational power of desktop computers has served to reduce the gap between required and available computation, and it has become possible to bridge this gap further by using a combination of algorithmic improvements that exploit the physical, as well as perceptual properties of audible sounds. My thesis is a step in this direction. My dissertation concentrates on developing real-time techniques for both sub-problems of sound simulation: synthesis and propagation. Sound synthesis is concerned with generating the sounds produced by objects due to elastic surface vibrations upon interaction with the environment, such as collisions. I present novel techniques that exploit human auditory perception to simulate scenes with hundreds of sounding objects undergoing impact and rolling in real time. Sound propagation is the complementary problem of modeling the high-order scattering and diffraction of sound in an environment as it travels from source to listener. I discuss my work on a novel numerical acoustic simulator (ARD) that is hundred times faster and consumes ten times less memory than a high-accuracy finite-difference technique, allowing acoustic simulations on previously-intractable spaces, such as a cathedral, on a desktop computer. Lastly, I present my work on interactive sound propagation that leverages my ARD simulator to render the acoustics of arbitrary static scenes for multiple moving sources and listener in real time, while accounting for scene-dependent effects such as low-pass filtering and smooth attenuation

  15. Physiological Based Simulator Fidelity Design Guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnell, Thomas; Hamel, Nancy; Postnikov, Alex; Hoke, Jaclyn; McLean, Angus L. M. Thom, III

    2012-01-01

    The evolution of the role of flight simulation has reinforced assumptions in aviation that the degree of realism in a simulation system directly correlates to the training benefit, i.e., more fidelity is always better. The construct of fidelity has several dimensions, including physical fidelity, functional fidelity, and cognitive fidelity. Interaction of different fidelity dimensions has an impact on trainee immersion, presence, and transfer of training. This paper discusses research results of a recent study that investigated if physiological-based methods could be used to determine the required level of simulator fidelity. Pilots performed a relatively complex flight task consisting of mission task elements of various levels of difficulty in a fixed base flight simulator and a real fighter jet trainer aircraft. Flight runs were performed using one forward visual channel of 40 deg. field of view for the lowest level of fidelity, 120 deg. field of view for the middle level of fidelity, and unrestricted field of view and full dynamic acceleration in the real airplane. Neuro-cognitive and physiological measures were collected under these conditions using the Cognitive Avionics Tool Set (CATS) and nonlinear closed form models for workload prediction were generated based on these data for the various mission task elements. One finding of the work described herein is that simple heart rate is a relatively good predictor of cognitive workload, even for short tasks with dynamic changes in cognitive loading. Additionally, we found that models that used a wide range of physiological and neuro-cognitive measures can further boost the accuracy of the workload prediction.

  16. Simulation-based instruction of technical skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towne, Douglas M.; Munro, Allen

    1991-01-01

    A rapid intelligent tutoring development system (RAPIDS) was developed to facilitate the production of interactive, real-time graphical device models for use in instructing the operation and maintenance of complex systems. The tools allowed subject matter experts to produce device models by creating instances of previously defined objects and positioning them in the emerging device model. These simulation authoring functions, as well as those associated with demonstrating procedures and functional effects on the completed model, required no previous programming experience or use of frame-based instructional languages. Three large simulations were developed in RAPIDS, each involving more than a dozen screen-sized sections. Seven small, single-view applications were developed to explore the range of applicability. Three workshops were conducted to train others in the use of the authoring tools. Participants learned to employ the authoring tools in three to four days and were able to produce small working device models on the fifth day.

  17. Optimizing a Water Simulation based on Wavefront Parameter Optimization

    OpenAIRE

    Lundgren, Martin

    2017-01-01

    DICE, a Swedish game company, wanted a more realistic water simulation. Currently, most large scale water simulations used in games are based upon ocean simulation technology. These techniques falter when used in other scenarios, such as coastlines. In order to produce a more realistic simulation, a new one was created based upon the water simulation technique "Wavefront Parameter Interpolation". This technique involves a rather extensive preprocess that enables ocean simulations to have inte...

  18. Simulation of high-resolution X-ray microscopic images for improved alignment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Xiangxia; Zhang Xiaobo; Liu Gang; Cheng Xianchao; Li Wenjie; Guan Yong; Liu Ying; Xiong Ying; Tian Yangchao

    2011-01-01

    The introduction of precision optical elements to X-ray microscopes necessitates fine realignment to achieve optimal high-resolution imaging. In this paper, we demonstrate a numerical method for simulating image formation that facilitates alignment of the source, condenser, objective lens, and CCD camera. This algorithm, based on ray-tracing and Rayleigh-Sommerfeld diffraction theory, is applied to simulate the X-ray microscope beamline U7A of National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (NSRL). The simulations and imaging experiments show that the algorithm is useful for guiding experimental adjustments. Our alignment simulation method is an essential tool for the transmission X-ray microscope (TXM) with optical elements and may also be useful for the alignment of optical components in other modes of microscopy.

  19. An analytical simulation technique for cone-beam CT and pinhole SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Xuezhu; Qi Yujin

    2011-01-01

    This study was aimed at developing an efficient simulation technique with an ordinary PC. The work involved derivation of mathematical operators, analytic phantom generations, and effective analytical projectors developing for cone-beam CT and pinhole SPECT imaging. The computer simulations based on the analytical projectors were developed by ray-tracing method for cone-beam CT and voxel-driven method for pinhole SPECT of degrading blurring. The 3D Shepp-Logan, Jaszczak and Defrise phantoms were used for simulation evaluations and image reconstructions. The reconstructed phantom images were of good accuracy with the phantoms. The results showed that the analytical simulation technique is an efficient tool for studying cone-beam CT and pinhole SPECT imaging. (authors)

  20. Simulation and Analysis of Spectral Response Function and Bandwidth of Spectrometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenyu Gao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A simulation method for acquiring spectrometer’s Spectral Response Function (SRF based on Huygens Point Spread Function (PSF is suggested. Taking into account the effects of optical aberrations and diffraction, the method can obtain the fine SRF curve and corresponding spectral bandwidth at any nominal wavelength as early as in the design phase. A prism monochromator is proposed for illustrating the simulation procedure. For comparison, a geometrical ray-tracing method is also provided, with bandwidth deviations varying from 5% at 250 nm to 25% at 2400 nm. Further comparison with reported experiments shows that the areas of the SRF profiles agree to about 1%. However, the weak scattered background light on the level of 10−4 to 10−5 observed by experiment could not be covered by this simulation. This simulation method is a useful tool for forecasting the performance of an underdesigned spectrometer.

  1. Nuclear Power Reactor simulator - based training program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdelwahab, S.A.S.

    2009-01-01

    nuclear power stations will continue playing a major role as an energy source for electric generation and heat production in the world. in this paper, a nuclear power reactor simulator- based training program will be presented . this program is designed to aid in training of the reactor operators about the principles of operation of the plant. also it could help the researchers and the designers to analyze and to estimate the performance of the nuclear reactors and facilitate further studies for selection of the proper controller and its optimization process as it is difficult and time consuming to do all experiments in the real nuclear environment.this program is written in MATLAB code as MATLAB software provides sophisticated tools comparable to those in other software such as visual basic for the creation of graphical user interface (GUI). moreover MATLAB is available for all major operating systems. the used SIMULINK reactor model for the nuclear reactor can be used to model different types by adopting appropriate parameters. the model of each component of the reactor is based on physical laws rather than the use of look up tables or curve fitting.this simulation based training program will improve acquisition and retention knowledge also trainee will learn faster and will have better attitude

  2. Simulation-based disassembly systems design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohlendorf, Martin; Herrmann, Christoph; Hesselbach, Juergen

    2004-02-01

    Recycling of Waste of Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE) is a matter of actual concern, driven by economic, ecological and legislative reasons. Here, disassembly as the first step of the treatment process plays a key role. To achieve sustainable progress in WEEE disassembly, the key is not to limit analysis and planning to merely disassembly processes in a narrow sense, but to consider entire disassembly plants including additional aspects such as internal logistics, storage, sorting etc. as well. In this regard, the paper presents ways of designing, dimensioning, structuring and modeling different disassembly systems. Goal is to achieve efficient and economic disassembly systems that allow recycling processes complying with legal requirements. Moreover, advantages of applying simulation software tools that are widespread and successfully utilized in conventional industry sectors are addressed. They support systematic disassembly planning by means of simulation experiments including consecutive efficiency evaluation. Consequently, anticipatory recycling planning considering various scenarios is enabled and decisions about which types of disassembly systems evidence appropriateness for specific circumstances such as product spectrum, throughput, disassembly depth etc. is supported. Furthermore, integration of simulation based disassembly planning in a holistic concept with configuration of interfaces and data utilization including cost aspects is described.

  3. Simulation-based optimization of thermal systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaluria, Yogesh

    2009-01-01

    This paper considers the design and optimization of thermal systems on the basis of the mathematical and numerical modeling of the system. Many complexities are often encountered in practical thermal processes and systems, making the modeling challenging and involved. These include property variations, complicated regions, combined transport mechanisms, chemical reactions, and intricate boundary conditions. The paper briefly presents approaches that may be used to accurately simulate these systems. Validation of the numerical model is a particularly critical aspect and is discussed. It is important to couple the modeling with the system performance, design, control and optimization. This aspect, which has often been ignored in the literature, is considered in this paper. Design of thermal systems based on concurrent simulation and experimentation is also discussed in terms of dynamic data-driven optimization methods. Optimization of the system and of the operating conditions is needed to minimize costs and improve product quality and system performance. Different optimization strategies that are currently used for thermal systems are outlined, focusing on new and emerging strategies. Of particular interest is multi-objective optimization, since most thermal systems involve several important objective functions, such as heat transfer rate and pressure in electronic cooling systems. A few practical thermal systems are considered in greater detail to illustrate these approaches and to present typical simulation, design and optimization results

  4. SIMULATION OF SUBGRADE EMBANKMENT ON WEAK BASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. D. Petrenko

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. This article provides: the question of the sustainability of the subgrade on a weak base is considered in the paper. It is proposed to use the method of jet grouting. Investigation of the possibility of a weak base has an effect on the overall deformation of the subgrade; the identification and optimization of the parameters of subgrade based on studies using numerical simulation. Methodology. The theoretical studies of the stress-strain state of the base and subgrade embankment by modeling in the software package LIRA have been conducted to achieve this goal. Findings. After making the necessary calculations perform building fields of a subsidence, borders cramped thickness, bed’s coefficients of Pasternak and Winkler. The diagrams construction of vertical stress performs at any point of load application. Also, using the software system may perform peer review subsidence, rolls railroad tracks in natural and consolidated basis. Originality. For weak soils is the most appropriate nonlinear model of the base with the existing areas of both elastic and limit equilibrium, mixed problem of the theory of elasticity and plasticity. Practical value. By increasing the load on the weak base as a result of the second track construction, adds embankment or increasing axial load when changing the rolling stock process of sedimentation and consolidation may continue again. Therefore, one of the feasible and promising options for the design and reconstruction of embankments on weak bases is to strengthen the bases with the help of jet grouting. With the expansion of the railway infrastructure, increasing speed and weight of the rolling stock is necessary to ensure the stability of the subgrade on weak bases. LIRA software package allows you to perform all the necessary calculations for the selection of a proper way of strengthening weak bases.

  5. Agglomeration processes in carbonaceous dusty plasmas, experiments and numerical simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dap, S; Hugon, R; De Poucques, L; Bougdira, J; Lacroix, D; Patisson, F

    2010-01-01

    This paper deals with carbon dust agglomeration in radio frequency acetylene/argon plasma. Two studies, an experimental and a numerical one, were carried out to model dust formation mechanisms. Firstly, in situ transmission spectroscopy of dust clouds in the visible range was performed in order to observe the main features of the agglomeration process of the produced carbonaceous dust. Secondly, numerical simulation tools dedicated to understanding the achieved experiments were developed. A first model was used for the discretization of the continuous population balance equations that characterize the dust agglomeration process. The second model is based on a Monte Carlo ray-tracing code coupled to a Mie theory calculation of dust absorption and scattering parameters. These two simulation tools were used together in order to numerically predict the light transmissivity through a dusty plasma and make comparisons with experiments.

  6. Simulation of thermal radiation, illustrated by the Bridgman casting process for directional solidification of turbine blades; Simulation von Waermestrahlung am Beispiel des Bridgman-Verfahrens zur gerichteten Erstarrung von Turbinenschaufeln

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofmann, N

    1996-12-31

    Directionally solidified turbine blades for high-temperature applications today are commonly produced by the Bridgman casting process. The production of a newly constructed turbine blade requires a number of costly and time-consuming casting experiments. The author develops a numerical simulation model based on the finite element method and net radiation method for low-cost and short-term simulation and optimisation of the casting experiments. Several different numerical methods for calculating thermal radiation are compared (radiosity, ray tracing and the finite difference method), and the simulation results are presented for several exemplry turbine blades. Further, an optimisation strategy for improving the quality of the turbine blade casting process is presented. (orig.). 65 figs., 8 tabs. [Deutsch] Gerichtet erstarrte Turbinenschaufeln mit hoher Einsatztemperatur werden nach dem heutigen Stand der Technik nach dem Bridgman-Verfahren gegossen. Die Herstellung einer neu konstruierten Turbinenschaufel verlangt eine Reihe von kosten- und zeitaufwendigen Giessexperimenten. In der vorliegenden Arbeit wird ein numerisches Simulationsmodell auf Basis der Finiten Elemente Methode und Net Radiation Methode entwickelt, mit dem sich kostenguenstig und in kurzen Zeitraeumen die Giessversuche simulieren und optimieren lassen. Die Arbeit vergleicht verschiedene numerische Loesungsverfahren fuer die Waermestrahlung (Radiosity, Ray Tracing und Finite Differenzen Verfahren) und stellt am Beispiel einiger Turbinenschaufeln die Simulationsergebnisse dar. Weiterhin wird eine Optimierungsstrategie fuer Verbesserung der Gussqualitaet von Turbinenschaufeln vorgestellt. (orig.)

  7. Agent-Based Simulations for Project Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, J. Chris; Sholtes, Robert M.

    2011-01-01

    Currently, the most common approach used in project planning tools is the Critical Path Method (CPM). While this method was a great improvement over the basic Gantt chart technique being used at the time, it now suffers from three primary flaws: (1) task duration is an input, (2) productivity impacts are not considered , and (3) management corrective actions are not included. Today, computers have exceptional computational power to handle complex simulations of task e)(eculion and project management activities (e.g ., dynamically changing the number of resources assigned to a task when it is behind schedule). Through research under a Department of Defense contract, the author and the ViaSim team have developed a project simulation tool that enables more realistic cost and schedule estimates by using a resource-based model that literally turns the current duration-based CPM approach "on its head." The approach represents a fundamental paradigm shift in estimating projects, managing schedules, and reducing risk through innovative predictive techniques.

  8. Design of simulation-based medical education and advantages and disadvantages of in situ simulation versus off-site simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørensen, Jette Led; Østergaard, Doris; LeBlanc, Vicki; Ottesen, Bent; Konge, Lars; Dieckmann, Peter; Van der Vleuten, Cees

    2017-01-21

    Simulation-based medical education (SBME) has traditionally been conducted as off-site simulation in simulation centres. Some hospital departments also provide off-site simulation using in-house training room(s) set up for simulation away from the clinical setting, and these activities are called in-house training. In-house training facilities can be part of hospital departments and resemble to some extent simulation centres but often have less technical equipment. In situ simulation, introduced over the past decade, mainly comprises of team-based activities and occurs in patient care units with healthcare professionals in their own working environment. Thus, this intentional blend of simulation and real working environments means that in situ simulation brings simulation to the real working environment and provides training where people work. In situ simulation can be either announced or unannounced, the latter also known as a drill. This article presents and discusses the design of SBME and the advantage and disadvantage of the different simulation settings, such as training in simulation-centres, in-house simulations in hospital departments, announced or unannounced in situ simulations. Non-randomised studies argue that in situ simulation is more effective for educational purposes than other types of simulation settings. Conversely, the few comparison studies that exist, either randomised or retrospective, show that choice of setting does not seem to influence individual or team learning. However, hospital department-based simulations, such as in-house simulation and in situ simulation, lead to a gain in organisational learning. To our knowledge no studies have compared announced and unannounced in situ simulation. The literature suggests some improved organisational learning from unannounced in situ simulation; however, unannounced in situ simulation was also found to be challenging to plan and conduct, and more stressful among participants. The importance of

  9. A computer simulation model to compute the radiation transfer of mountainous regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuguang; Zhao, Feng; Song, Rui

    2011-11-01

    In mountainous regions, the radiometric signal recorded at the sensor depends on a number of factors such as sun angle, atmospheric conditions, surface cover type, and topography. In this paper, a computer simulation model of radiation transfer is designed and evaluated. This model implements the Monte Carlo ray-tracing techniques and is specifically dedicated to the study of light propagation in mountainous regions. The radiative processes between sun light and the objects within the mountainous region are realized by using forward Monte Carlo ray-tracing methods. The performance of the model is evaluated through detailed comparisons with the well-established 3D computer simulation model: RGM (Radiosity-Graphics combined Model) based on the same scenes and identical spectral parameters, which shows good agreements between these two models' results. By using the newly developed computer model, series of typical mountainous scenes are generated to analyze the physical mechanism of mountainous radiation transfer. The results show that the effects of the adjacent slopes are important for deep valleys and they particularly affect shadowed pixels, and the topographic effect needs to be considered in mountainous terrain before accurate inferences from remotely sensed data can be made.

  10. An Agent-Based Monetary Production Simulation Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Charlotte

    2006-01-01

    An Agent-Based Simulation Model Programmed in Objective Borland Pascal. Program and source code is downloadable......An Agent-Based Simulation Model Programmed in Objective Borland Pascal. Program and source code is downloadable...

  11. The influence of leaf anatomy on the internal light environment and photosynthetic electron transport rate: exploration with a new leaf ray tracing model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yi; Tholen, Danny; Zhu, Xin-Guang

    2016-11-01

    Leaf photosynthesis is determined by biochemical properties and anatomical features. Here we developed a three-dimensional leaf model that can be used to evaluate the internal light environment of a leaf and its implications for whole-leaf electron transport rates (J). This model includes (i) the basic components of a leaf, such as the epidermis, palisade and spongy tissues, as well as the physical dimensions and arrangements of cell walls, vacuoles and chloroplasts; and (ii) an efficient forward ray-tracing algorithm, predicting the internal light environment for light of wavelengths between 400 and 2500nm. We studied the influence of leaf anatomy and ambient light on internal light conditions and J The results show that (i) different chloroplasts can experience drastically different light conditions, even when they are located at the same distance from the leaf surface; (ii) bundle sheath extensions, which are strips of parenchyma, collenchyma or sclerenchyma cells connecting the vascular bundles with the epidermis, can influence photosynthetic light-use efficiency of leaves; and (iii) chloroplast positioning can also influence the light-use efficiency of leaves. Mechanisms underlying leaf internal light heterogeneity and implications of the heterogeneity for photoprotection and for the convexity of the light response curves are discussed. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  12. Designing solar thermal experiments based on simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huleihil, Mahmoud; Mazor, Gedalya

    2013-01-01

    In this study three different models to describe the temperature distribution inside a cylindrical solid body subjected to high solar irradiation were examined, beginning with the simpler approach, which is the single dimension lump system (time), progressing through the two-dimensional distributed system approach (time and vertical direction), and ending with the three-dimensional distributed system approach with azimuthally symmetry (time, vertical direction, and radial direction). The three models were introduced and solved analytically and numerically. The importance of the models and their solution was addressed. The simulations based on them might be considered as a powerful tool in designing experiments, as they make it possible to estimate the different effects of the parameters involved in these models

  13. Simulation based engineering in solid mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Rao, J S

    2017-01-01

    This book begins with a brief historical perspective of the advent of rotating machinery in 20th century Solid Mechanics and the development of the discipline of the Strength of Materials. High Performance Computing (HPC) and Simulation Based Engineering Science (SBES) have gradually replaced the conventional approach in Design bringing science directly into engineering without approximations. A recap of the required mathematical principles is given. The science of deformation, strain and stress at a point under the application of external traction loads is next presented. Only one-dimensional structures classified as Bars (axial loads), Rods (twisting loads) and Beams (bending loads) are considered in this book. The principal stresses and strains and von Mises stress and strain that used in design of structures are next presented. Lagrangian solution was used to derive the governing differential equations consistent with assumed deformation field and solution for deformations, strains and stresses were obtai...

  14. Simulation-based education for transfusion medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Shanna; Rioux-Masse, Benjamin; Oancea, Cristina; Cohn, Claudia; Harmon, James; Konia, Mojca

    2015-04-01

    The administration of blood products is frequently determined by physicians without subspecialty training in transfusion medicine (TM). Education in TM is necessary for appropriate utilization of resources and maintaining patient safety. Our institution developed an efficient simulation-based TM course with the goal of identifying key topics that could be individualized to learners of all levels in various environments while also allowing for practice in an environment where the patient is not placed at risk. A 2.5-hour simulation-based educational activity was designed and taught to undergraduate medical students rotating through anesthesiology and TM elective rotations and to all Clinical Anesthesia Year 1 (CA-1) residents. Content and process evaluation of the activity consisted of multiple-choice tests and course evaluations. Seventy medical students and seven CA-1 residents were enrolled in the course. There was no significant difference on pretest results between medical students and CA-1 residents. The posttest results for both medical students and CA-1 residents were significantly higher than pretest results. The results of the posttest between medical students and CA-1 residents were not significantly different. The TM knowledge gap is not a trivial problem as transfusion of blood products is associated with significant risks. Innovative educational techniques are needed to address the ongoing challenges with knowledge acquisition and retention in already full curricula. Our institution developed a feasible and effective way to integrate TM into the curriculum. Educational activities, such as this, might be a way to improve the safety of transfusions. © 2014 AABB.

  15. Modeling and simulation of complex systems a framework for efficient agent-based modeling and simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Siegfried, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Robert Siegfried presents a framework for efficient agent-based modeling and simulation of complex systems. He compares different approaches for describing structure and dynamics of agent-based models in detail. Based on this evaluation the author introduces the "General Reference Model for Agent-based Modeling and Simulation" (GRAMS). Furthermore he presents parallel and distributed simulation approaches for execution of agent-based models -from small scale to very large scale. The author shows how agent-based models may be executed by different simulation engines that utilize underlying hard

  16. Multibus-based parallel processor for simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogrady, E. P.; Wang, C.-H.

    1983-01-01

    A Multibus-based parallel processor simulation system is described. The system is intended to serve as a vehicle for gaining hands-on experience, testing system and application software, and evaluating parallel processor performance during development of a larger system based on the horizontal/vertical-bus interprocessor communication mechanism. The prototype system consists of up to seven Intel iSBC 86/12A single-board computers which serve as processing elements, a multiple transmission controller (MTC) designed to support system operation, and an Intel Model 225 Microcomputer Development System which serves as the user interface and input/output processor. All components are interconnected by a Multibus/IEEE 796 bus. An important characteristic of the system is that it provides a mechanism for a processing element to broadcast data to other selected processing elements. This parallel transfer capability is provided through the design of the MTC and a minor modification to the iSBC 86/12A board. The operation of the MTC, the basic hardware-level operation of the system, and pertinent details about the iSBC 86/12A and the Multibus are described.

  17. Agent Programming Languages and Logics in Agent-Based Simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John

    2018-01-01

    and social behavior, and work on verification. Agent-based simulation is an approach for simulation that also uses the notion of agents. Although agent programming languages and logics are much less used in agent-based simulation, there are successful examples with agents designed according to the BDI...

  18. Computer-Based Simulation Games in Public Administration Education

    OpenAIRE

    Kutergina Evgeniia

    2017-01-01

    Computer simulation, an active learning technique, is now one of the advanced pedagogical technologies. Th e use of simulation games in the educational process allows students to gain a firsthand understanding of the processes of real life. Public- administration, public-policy and political-science courses increasingly adopt simulation games in universities worldwide. Besides person-to-person simulation games, there are computer-based simulations in public-administration education. Currently...

  19. FluorWPS: A Monte Carlo ray-tracing model to compute sun-induced chlorophyll fluorescence of three-dimensional canopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    A model to simulate radiative transfer (RT) of sun-induced chlorophyll fluorescence (SIF) of three-dimensional (3-D) canopy, FluorWPS, was proposed and evaluated. The inclusion of fluorescence excitation was implemented with the ‘weight reduction’ and ‘photon spread’ concepts based on Monte Carlo ra...

  20. Exploration of parameters influencing the self-absorption losses in luminescent solar concentrators with an experimentally validated combined ray-tracing/Monte-Carlo model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumer, Zachar; van Sark, Wilfried G. J. H. M.; de Mello Donegá, Celso; Schropp, Ruud E. I.

    2013-09-01

    Luminescent solar concentrators (LSCs) are low cost photovoltaic devices, which reduce the amount of necessary semiconductor material per unit area of a photovoltaic solar energy converter by means of concentration. The device is comprised of a thin plastic plate in which luminescent species (fluorophores) have been incorporated.The fluorophores absorb the solar light and radiatively re-emit a part of the energy. Total internal reflection traps most of the emitted light inside the plate and wave-guides it to a narrow side facet with a solar cell attached, where conversion into electricity occurs. The eciency of such devices is as yet rather low, due to several loss mechanisms, of which self-absorption is of high importance. Combined ray-tracing and Monte-Carlosimulations is a widely used tool for efficiency estimations of LSC-devices prior to manufacturing. We have applied this method to a model experiment, in which we analysed the impact of self-absorption onto LSC-efficiency of fluorophores with different absorption/emission-spectral overlap (Stokes-shift): several organic dyes and semiconductor quantum dots (single compound and core/shell of type-II). These results are compared with the ones obtained experimentally demonstrating a good agreement. The validated model is used to investigate systematically the influence of spectral separation and luminescence quantum efficiency on the intensity loss inconsequence of increased self-absorption. The results are used to adopt a quantity called the self-absorption cross-section and establish it as reliable criterion for self-absorption properties of materials that can be obtained from fundamental data and has a more universal scope of application, than the currently used Stokes-shift.

  1. Simulation-Based System Design Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The research objective is to develop, test, and implement effective and efficient simulation techniques for modeling, evaluating, and optimizing systems in order to...

  2. Simulation-Based Testing of Distributed Systems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rutherford, Matthew J; Carzaniga, Antonio; Wolf, Alexander L

    2006-01-01

    .... Typically written using an imperative programming language, these simulations capture basic algorithmic functionality at the same time as they focus attention on properties critical to distribution...

  3. Simulation-based training for colonoscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Preisler, Louise; Svendsen, Morten Bo Søndergaard; Nerup, Nikolaj

    2015-01-01

    in colonoscopy before practicing on patients. Twenty-five physicians (10 consultants with endoscopic experience and 15 fellows with very little endoscopic experience) were tested on 2 different simulator models: a virtual-reality simulator and a physical model. Tests were repeated twice on each simulator model...... on both the models (P virtual-reality and the physical model, respectively. The established pass/fail standards failed one of the consultants (virtual-reality simulator) and allowed one fellow to pass (physical model). The 2 tested...

  4. The simulation of CAMAC system based on Windows API

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Lei; Song Yushou; Xi Yinyin; Yan Qiang; Liu Huilan; Li Taosheng

    2012-01-01

    Based on Windows API, a kind of design method to simulate the CAMAC System, which is commonly used in nuclear physics experiments, is developed. Using C++ object-oriented programming, the simulation is carried out in the environment of Visual Studio 2010 and the interfaces, the data-way, the control commands and the modules are simulated with the functions either user-defined or from Windows API. Applying this method, the amplifier plug AMP575A produced by ORTEC is simulated and performance experiments are studied for this simulation module. The results indicate that the simulation module can fulfill the function of pole-zero adjustment, which means this method is competent for the simulation of CAMAC System. Compared with the simulation based on LabVIEW, this way is more flexible and closer to the bottom of the system. All the works above have found a path to making the virtual instrument platform based on CAMAC system. (authors)

  5. Competency-Based Training and Simulation: Making a "Valid" Argument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noureldin, Yasser A; Lee, Jason Y; McDougall, Elspeth M; Sweet, Robert M

    2018-02-01

    The use of simulation as an assessment tool is much more controversial than is its utility as an educational tool. However, without valid simulation-based assessment tools, the ability to objectively assess technical skill competencies in a competency-based medical education framework will remain challenging. The current literature in urologic simulation-based training and assessment uses a definition and framework of validity that is now outdated. This is probably due to the absence of awareness rather than an absence of comprehension. The following review article provides the urologic community an updated taxonomy on validity theory as it relates to simulation-based training and assessments and translates our simulation literature to date into this framework. While the old taxonomy considered validity as distinct subcategories and focused on the simulator itself, the modern taxonomy, for which we translate the literature evidence, considers validity as a unitary construct with a focus on interpretation of simulator data/scores.

  6. Physical optics simulations with PHASE for SwissFEL beamlines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flechsig, U.; Follath, R.; Reiche, S. [Paul Scherrer Institut, Swiss Light Source, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Bahrdt, J. [Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin (Germany)

    2016-07-27

    PHASE is a software tool for physical optics simulation based on the stationary phase approximation method. The code is under continuous development since about 20 years and has been used for instance for fundamental studies and ray tracing of various beamlines at the Swiss Light Source. Along with the planning for SwissFEL a new hard X-ray free electron laser under construction, new features have been added to permit practical performance predictions including diffraction effects which emerge with the fully coherent source. We present the application of the package on the example of the ARAMIS 1 beamline at SwissFEL. The X-ray pulse calculated with GENESIS and given as an electrical field distribution has been propagated through the beamline to the sample position. We demonstrate the new features of PHASE like the treatment of measured figure errors, apertures and coatings of the mirrors and the application of Fourier optics propagators for free space propagation.

  7. Simulation-based assessment for construction helmets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, James; Yang, James; Lei, Zhipeng; Liang, Daan

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a concerted effort for greater job safety in all industries. Personnel protective equipment (PPE) has been developed to help mitigate the risk of injury to humans that might be exposed to hazardous situations. The human head is the most vulnerable to impact as a moderate magnitude can cause serious injury or death. That is why industries have required the use of an industrial hard hat or helmet. There have only been a few articles published to date that are focused on the risk of head injury when wearing an industrial helmet. A full understanding of the effectiveness of construction helmets on reducing injury is lacking. This paper presents a simulation-based method to determine the threshold at which a human will sustain injury when wearing a construction helmet and assesses the risk of injury for wearers of construction helmets or hard hats. Advanced finite element, or FE, models were developed to study the impact on construction helmets. The FE model consists of two parts: the helmet and the human models. The human model consists of a brain, enclosed by a skull and an outer layer of skin. The level and probability of injury to the head was determined using both the head injury criterion (HIC) and tolerance limits set by Deck and Willinger. The HIC has been widely used to assess the likelihood of head injury in vehicles. The tolerance levels proposed by Deck and Willinger are more suited for finite element models but lack wide-scale validation. Different cases of impact were studied using LSTC's LS-DYNA.

  8. Numerical simulation methods for electron and ion optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munro, Eric

    2011-01-01

    This paper summarizes currently used techniques for simulation and computer-aided design in electron and ion beam optics. Topics covered include: field computation, methods for computing optical properties (including Paraxial Rays and Aberration Integrals, Differential Algebra and Direct Ray Tracing), simulation of Coulomb interactions, space charge effects in electron and ion sources, tolerancing, wave optical simulations and optimization. Simulation examples are presented for multipole aberration correctors, Wien filter monochromators, imaging energy filters, magnetic prisms, general curved axis systems and electron mirrors.

  9. An Agent-Based Simulation Model for Organizational Analysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ruan, Sui; Gokhale, Swapna S; Pattipati, Krishna R

    2006-01-01

    In many fields, including engineering, management, and organizational science, simulation-based computational organization theory has been used to gain insight into the degree of match ("congruence...

  10. An Example-Based Brain MRI Simulation Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Qing; Roy, Snehashis; Jog, Amod; Pham, Dzung L

    2015-02-21

    The simulation of magnetic resonance (MR) images plays an important role in the validation of image analysis algorithms such as image segmentation, due to lack of sufficient ground truth in real MR images. Previous work on MRI simulation has focused on explicitly modeling the MR image formation process. However, because of the overwhelming complexity of MR acquisition these simulations must involve simplifications and approximations that can result in visually unrealistic simulated images. In this work, we describe an example-based simulation framework, which uses an "atlas" consisting of an MR image and its anatomical models derived from the hard segmentation. The relationships between the MR image intensities and its anatomical models are learned using a patch-based regression that implicitly models the physics of the MR image formation. Given the anatomical models of a new brain, a new MR image can be simulated using the learned regression. This approach has been extended to also simulate intensity inhomogeneity artifacts based on the statistical model of training data. Results show that the example based MRI simulation method is capable of simulating different image contrasts and is robust to different choices of atlas. The simulated images resemble real MR images more than simulations produced by a physics-based model.

  11. Simulation-based training for thoracoscopic lobectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Katrine; Ringsted, Charlotte; Hansen, Henrik Jessen

    2014-01-01

    overcome the first part of the learning curve, but no virtual-reality simulators for thoracoscopy are commercially available. This study aimed to investigate whether training on a laparoscopic simulator enables trainees to perform a thoracoscopic lobectomy. METHODS: Twenty-eight surgical residents were...... randomized to either virtual-reality training on a nephrectomy module or traditional black-box simulator training. After a retention period they performed a thoracoscopic lobectomy on a porcine model and their performance was scored using a previously validated assessment tool. RESULTS: The groups did...... not differ in age or gender. All participants were able to complete the lobectomy. The performance of the black-box group was significantly faster during the test scenario than the virtual-reality group: 26.6 min (SD 6.7 min) versus 32.7 min (SD 7.5 min). No difference existed between the two groups when...

  12. A Simbol-X Event Simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puccetti, S.; Giommi, P.; Fiore, F.

    2009-01-01

    The ASI Science Data Center (ASDC) has developed an X-ray event simulator to support users (and team members) in simulation of data taken with the two cameras on board the Simbol-X X-Ray Telescope. The Simbol-X simulator is very fast and flexible, compared to ray-tracing simulator. These properties make our simulator advantageous to support the user in planning proposals and comparing real data with the theoretical expectations and for a quick detection of unexpected features. We present here the simulator outline and a few examples of simulated data.

  13. A Simbol-X Event Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puccetti, S.; Fiore, F.; Giommi, P.

    2009-05-01

    The ASI Science Data Center (ASDC) has developed an X-ray event simulator to support users (and team members) in simulation of data taken with the two cameras on board the Simbol-X X-Ray Telescope. The Simbol-X simulator is very fast and flexible, compared to ray-tracing simulator. These properties make our simulator advantageous to support the user in planning proposals and comparing real data with the theoretical expectations and for a quick detection of unexpected features. We present here the simulator outline and a few examples of simulated data.

  14. Agent-based simulation of animal behaviour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonker, C.M.; Treur, J

    In the biological literature on animal behaviour, in addition to real experiments and field studies, also simulation experiments are a useful source of progress. Often specific mathematical modelling techniques are adopted and directly implemented in a programming language. Modelling more complex

  15. Simulation based analysis of laser beam brazing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobler, Michael; Wiethop, Philipp; Schmid, Daniel; Schmidt, Michael

    2016-03-01

    Laser beam brazing is a well-established joining technology in car body manufacturing with main applications in the joining of divided tailgates and the joining of roof and side panels. A key advantage of laser brazed joints is the seam's visual quality which satisfies highest requirements. However, the laser beam brazing process is very complex and process dynamics are only partially understood. In order to gain deeper knowledge of the laser beam brazing process, to determine optimal process parameters and to test process variants, a transient three-dimensional simulation model of laser beam brazing is developed. This model takes into account energy input, heat transfer as well as fluid and wetting dynamics that lead to the formation of the brazing seam. A validation of the simulation model is performed by metallographic analysis and thermocouple measurements for different parameter sets of the brazing process. These results show that the multi-physical simulation model not only can be used to gain insight into the laser brazing process but also offers the possibility of process optimization in industrial applications. The model's capabilities in determining optimal process parameters are exemplarily shown for the laser power. Small deviations in the energy input can affect the brazing results significantly. Therefore, the simulation model is used to analyze the effect of the lateral laser beam position on the energy input and the resulting brazing seam.

  16. Agent-based Simulation of the Maritime Domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Vaněk

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a multi-agent based simulation platform is introduced that focuses on legitimate and illegitimate aspects of maritime traffic, mainly on intercontinental transport through piracy afflicted areas. The extensible architecture presented here comprises several modules controlling the simulation and the life-cycle of the agents, analyzing the simulation output and visualizing the entire simulated domain. The simulation control module is initialized by various configuration scenarios to simulate various real-world situations, such as a pirate ambush, coordinated transit through a transport corridor, or coastal fishing and local traffic. The environmental model provides a rich set of inputs for agents that use the geo-spatial data and the vessel operational characteristics for their reasoning. The agent behavior model based on finite state machines together with planning algorithms allows complex expression of agent behavior, so the resulting simulation output can serve as a substitution for real world data from the maritime domain.

  17. Budget Time: A Gender-Based Negotiation Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkacs, Linda L.; Barkacs, Craig B.

    2017-01-01

    This article presents a gender-based negotiation simulation designed to make participants aware of gender-based stereotypes and their effect on negotiation outcomes. In this simulation, the current research on gender issues is animated via three role sheets: (a) Vice president (VP), (b) advantaged department head, and (c) disadvantaged department…

  18. PCISIM - A Simulation Tool for PCI Bus Based Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sharp, Robin

    1999-01-01

    This document describes a PCI bus simulator for use in evaluating the feasibility of system designs based on this bus.......This document describes a PCI bus simulator for use in evaluating the feasibility of system designs based on this bus....

  19. Preview-based sampling for controlling gaseous simulations

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Ruoguan

    2011-01-01

    In this work, we describe an automated method for directing the control of a high resolution gaseous fluid simulation based on the results of a lower resolution preview simulation. Small variations in accuracy between low and high resolution grids can lead to divergent simulations, which is problematic for those wanting to achieve a desired behavior. Our goal is to provide a simple method for ensuring that the high resolution simulation matches key properties from the lower resolution simulation. We first let a user specify a fast, coarse simulation that will be used for guidance. Our automated method samples the data to be matched at various positions and scales in the simulation, or allows the user to identify key portions of the simulation to maintain. During the high resolution simulation, a matching process ensures that the properties sampled from the low resolution simulation are maintained. This matching process keeps the different resolution simulations aligned even for complex systems, and can ensure consistency of not only the velocity field, but also advected scalar values. Because the final simulation is naturally similar to the preview simulation, only minor controlling adjustments are needed, allowing a simpler control method than that used in prior keyframing approaches. Copyright © 2011 by the Association for Computing Machinery, Inc.

  20. Determining procedures for simulation-based training in radiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nayahangan, Leizl Joy; Nielsen, Kristina Rue; Albrecht-Beste, Elisabeth

    2018-01-01

    , and basic abdominal ultrasound. CONCLUSION: A needs assessment identified and prioritized 13 technical procedures to include in a simulation-based curriculum. The list may be used as guide for development of training programs. KEY POINTS: • Simulation-based training can supplement training on patients......OBJECTIVES: New training modalities such as simulation are widely accepted in radiology; however, development of effective simulation-based training programs is challenging. They are often unstructured and based on convenience or coincidence. The study objective was to perform a nationwide needs...... assessment to identify and prioritize technical procedures that should be included in a simulation-based curriculum. METHODS: A needs assessment using the Delphi method was completed among 91 key leaders in radiology. Round 1 identified technical procedures that radiologists should learn. Round 2 explored...

  1. Simulation Based Optimization for World Line Card Production System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinan APAK

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Simulation based decision support system is one of the commonly used tool to examine complex production systems. The simulation approach provides process modules which can be adjusted with certain parameters by using data relatively easily obtainable in production process. World Line Card production system simulation is developed to evaluate the optimality of existing production line via using discrete event simulation model with variaty of alternative proposals. The current production system is analysed by a simulation model emphasizing the bottlenecks and the poorly utilized production line. Our analysis identified some improvements and efficient solutions for the existing system.

  2. Developing a Theory-Based Simulation Educator Resource.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Christine M; Sievers, Lisa D; Kellgren, Molly; Manning, Sara J; Rojas, Deborah E; Gamblian, Vivian C

    2015-01-01

    The NLN Leadership Development Program for Simulation Educators 2014 faculty development group identified a lack of a common language/terminology to outline the progression of expertise of simulation educators. The group analyzed Benner's novice-to-expert model and applied its levels of experience to simulation educator growth. It established common operational categories of faculty development and used them to organize resources that support progression toward expertise. The resulting theory-based Simulator Educator Toolkit outlines levels of ability and provides quality resources to meet the diverse needs of simulation educators and team members.

  3. Simulation-based training in echocardiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Monodeep; Patel, Rajendrakumar; German, Charles; Kharod, Anant; Mohamed, Ahmed; Dod, Harvinder S; Kapoor, Poonam Malhotra; Nanda, Navin C

    2016-10-01

    The knowledge gained from echocardiography is paramount for the clinician in diagnosing, interpreting, and treating various forms of disease. While cardiologists traditionally have undergone training in this imaging modality during their fellowship, many other specialties are beginning to show interest as well, including intensive care, anesthesia, and primary care trainees, in both transesophageal and transthoracic echocardiography. Advances in technology have led to the development of simulation programs accessible to trainees to help gain proficiency in the nuances of obtaining quality images, in a low stress, pressure free environment, often with a functioning ultrasound probe and mannequin that can mimic many of the pathologies seen in living patients. Although there are various training simulation programs each with their own benefits and drawbacks, it is clear that these programs are a powerful tool in educating the trainee and likely will lead to improved patient outcomes. © 2016, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Ocean Wave Simulation Based on Wind Field.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongyi Li

    Full Text Available Ocean wave simulation has a wide range of applications in movies, video games and training systems. Wind force is the main energy resource for generating ocean waves, which are the result of the interaction between wind and the ocean surface. While numerous methods to handle simulating oceans and other fluid phenomena have undergone rapid development during the past years in the field of computer graphic, few of them consider to construct ocean surface height field from the perspective of wind force driving ocean waves. We introduce wind force to the construction of the ocean surface height field through applying wind field data and wind-driven wave particles. Continual and realistic ocean waves result from the overlap of wind-driven wave particles, and a strategy was proposed to control these discrete wave particles and simulate an endless ocean surface. The results showed that the new method is capable of obtaining a realistic ocean scene under the influence of wind fields at real time rates.

  5. Traffic simulation based ship collision probability modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goerlandt, Floris, E-mail: floris.goerlandt@tkk.f [Aalto University, School of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Mechanics, Marine Technology, P.O. Box 15300, FI-00076 AALTO, Espoo (Finland); Kujala, Pentti [Aalto University, School of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Mechanics, Marine Technology, P.O. Box 15300, FI-00076 AALTO, Espoo (Finland)

    2011-01-15

    Maritime traffic poses various risks in terms of human, environmental and economic loss. In a risk analysis of ship collisions, it is important to get a reasonable estimate for the probability of such accidents and the consequences they lead to. In this paper, a method is proposed to assess the probability of vessels colliding with each other. The method is capable of determining the expected number of accidents, the locations where and the time when they are most likely to occur, while providing input for models concerned with the expected consequences. At the basis of the collision detection algorithm lays an extensive time domain micro-simulation of vessel traffic in the given area. The Monte Carlo simulation technique is applied to obtain a meaningful prediction of the relevant factors of the collision events. Data obtained through the Automatic Identification System is analyzed in detail to obtain realistic input data for the traffic simulation: traffic routes, the number of vessels on each route, the ship departure times, main dimensions and sailing speed. The results obtained by the proposed method for the studied case of the Gulf of Finland are presented, showing reasonable agreement with registered accident and near-miss data.

  6. A Computer-Based Simulation of an Acid-Base Titration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boblick, John M.

    1971-01-01

    Reviews the advantages of computer simulated environments for experiments, referring in particular to acid-base titrations. Includes pre-lab instructions and a sample computer printout of a student's use of an acid-base simulation. Ten references. (PR)

  7. UAV Flight Control Based on RTX System Simulation Platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaojun Duan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes RTX and Matlab UAV flight control system simulation platform based on the advantages and disadvantages of Windows and real-time system RTX. In the simulation platform, we set the RTW toolbox configuration and modify grt_main.c in order to make simulation platform endowed with online parameter adjustment, fault injection. Meanwhile, we develop the interface of the system simulation platform by CVI, thus it makes effective and has good prospects in application. In order to improve the real-time performance of simulation system, the current computer of real-time simulation mostly use real-time operating system to solve simulation model, as well as dual- framework containing in Host and target machine. The system is complex, high cost, and generally used for the control and half of practical system simulation. For the control system designers, they expect to design control law at a computer with Windows-based environment and conduct real-time simulation. This paper proposes simulation platform for UAV flight control system based on RTX and Matlab for this demand.

  8. Wave-optics simulation of the double-pass beam propagation in modulating retro-reflector FSO systems using a corner cube reflector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guowei; You, Shengzui; Bi, Meihua; Fan, Bing; Lu, Yang; Zhou, Xuefang; Li, Jing; Geng, Hujun; Wang, Tianshu

    2017-09-10

    Free-space optical (FSO) communication utilizing a modulating retro-reflector (MRR) is an innovative way to convey information between the traditional optical transceiver and the semi-passive MRR unit that reflects optical signals. The reflected signals experience turbulence-induced fading in the double-pass channel, which is very different from that in the traditional single-pass FSO channel. In this paper, we consider the corner cube reflector (CCR) as the retro-reflective device in the MRR. A general geometrical model of the CCR is established based on the ray tracing method to describe the ray trajectory inside the CCR. This ray tracing model could treat the general case that the optical beam is obliquely incident on the hypotenuse surface of the CCR with the dihedral angle error and surface nonflatness. Then, we integrate this general CCR model into the wave-optics (WO) simulation to construct the double-pass beam propagation simulation. This double-pass simulation contains the forward propagation from the transceiver to the MRR through the atmosphere, the retro-reflection of the CCR, and the backward propagation from the MRR to the transceiver, which can be realized by a single-pass WO simulation, the ray tracing CCR model, and another single-pass WO simulation, respectively. To verify the proposed CCR model and double-pass WO simulation, the effective reflection area, the incremental phase, and the reflected beam spot on the transceiver plane of the CCR are analyzed, and the numerical results are in agreement with the previously published results. Finally, we use the double-pass WO simulation to investigate the double-pass channel in the MRR FSO systems. The histograms of the turbulence-induced fading in the forward and backward channels are obtained from the simulation data and are fitted by gamma-gamma (ΓΓ) distributions. As the two opposite channels are highly correlated, we model the double-pass channel fading by the product of two correlated

  9. Simulation-Based Internal Models for Safer Robots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Blum

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we explore the potential of mobile robots with simulation-based internal models for safety in highly dynamic environments. We propose a robot with a simulation of itself, other dynamic actors and its environment, inside itself. Operating in real time, this simulation-based internal model is able to look ahead and predict the consequences of both the robot’s own actions and those of the other dynamic actors in its vicinity. Hence, the robot continuously modifies its own actions in order to actively maintain its own safety while also achieving its goal. Inspired by the problem of how mobile robots could move quickly and safely through crowds of moving humans, we present experimental results which compare the performance of our internal simulation-based controller with a purely reactive approach as a proof-of-concept study for the practical use of simulation-based internal models.

  10. Sub-basalt Imaging of Hydrocarbon-Bearing Mesozoic Sediments Using Ray-Trace Inversion of First-Arrival Seismic Data and Elastic Finite-Difference Full-Wave Modeling Along Sinor-Valod Profile of Deccan Syneclise, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talukdar, Karabi; Behera, Laxmidhar

    2018-03-01

    Imaging below the basalt for hydrocarbon exploration is a global problem because of poor penetration and significant loss of seismic energy due to scattering, attenuation, absorption and mode-conversion when the seismic waves encounter a highly heterogeneous and rugose basalt layer. The conventional (short offset) seismic data acquisition, processing and modeling techniques adopted by the oil industry generally fails to image hydrocarbon-bearing sub-trappean Mesozoic sediments hidden below the basalt and is considered as a serious problem for hydrocarbon exploration in the world. To overcome this difficulty of sub-basalt imaging, we have generated dense synthetic seismic data with the help of elastic finite-difference full-wave modeling using staggered-grid scheme for the model derived from ray-trace inversion using sparse wide-angle seismic data acquired along Sinor-Valod profile in the Deccan Volcanic Province of India. The full-wave synthetic seismic data generated have been processed and imaged using conventional seismic data processing technique with Kirchhoff pre-stack time and depth migrations. The seismic image obtained correlates with all the structural features of the model obtained through ray-trace inversion of wide-angle seismic data, validating the effectiveness of robust elastic finite-difference full-wave modeling approach for imaging below thick basalts. Using the full-wave modeling also allows us to decipher small-scale heterogeneities imposed in the model as a measure of the rugose basalt interfaces, which could not be dealt with ray-trace inversion. Furthermore, we were able to accurately image thin low-velocity hydrocarbon-bearing Mesozoic sediments sandwiched between and hidden below two thick sequences of high-velocity basalt layers lying above the basement.

  11. Automated numerical simulation of biological pattern formation based on visual feedback simulation framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Mingzhu; Xu, Hui; Zeng, Xingjuan; Zhao, Xin

    2017-01-01

    There are various fantastic biological phenomena in biological pattern formation. Mathematical modeling using reaction-diffusion partial differential equation systems is employed to study the mechanism of pattern formation. However, model parameter selection is both difficult and time consuming. In this paper, a visual feedback simulation framework is proposed to calculate the parameters of a mathematical model automatically based on the basic principle of feedback control. In the simulation framework, the simulation results are visualized, and the image features are extracted as the system feedback. Then, the unknown model parameters are obtained by comparing the image features of the simulation image and the target biological pattern. Considering two typical applications, the visual feedback simulation framework is applied to fulfill pattern formation simulations for vascular mesenchymal cells and lung development. In the simulation framework, the spot, stripe, labyrinthine patterns of vascular mesenchymal cells, the normal branching pattern and the branching pattern lacking side branching for lung branching are obtained in a finite number of iterations. The simulation results indicate that it is easy to achieve the simulation targets, especially when the simulation patterns are sensitive to the model parameters. Moreover, this simulation framework can expand to other types of biological pattern formation.

  12. CUDA-based real time surgery simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Youquan; De, Suvranu

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we present a general software platform that enables real time surgery simulation on the newly available compute unified device architecture (CUDA)from NVIDIA. CUDA-enabled GPUs harness the power of 128 processors which allow data parallel computations. Compared to the previous GPGPU, it is significantly more flexible with a C language interface. We report implementation of both collision detection and consequent deformation computation algorithms. Our test results indicate that the CUDA enables a twenty times speedup for collision detection and about fifteen times speedup for deformation computation on an Intel Core 2 Quad 2.66 GHz machine with GeForce 8800 GTX.

  13. Haptic Feedback for the GPU-based Surgical Simulator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Thomas Sangild; Mosegaard, Jesper

    2006-01-01

    The GPU has proven to be a powerful processor to compute spring-mass based surgical simulations. It has not previously been shown however, how to effectively implement haptic interaction with a simulation running entirely on the GPU. This paper describes a method to calculate haptic feedback...... with limited performance cost. It allows easy balancing of the GPU workload between calculations of simulation, visualisation, and the haptic feedback....

  14. Cognitive Modeling for Agent-Based Simulation of Child Maltreatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiaolin; Puddy, Richard

    This paper extends previous work to develop cognitive modeling for agent-based simulation of child maltreatment (CM). The developed model is inspired from parental efficacy, parenting stress, and the theory of planned behavior. It provides an explanatory, process-oriented model of CM and incorporates causality relationship and feedback loops from different factors in the social ecology in order for simulating the dynamics of CM. We describe the model and present simulation results to demonstrate the features of this model.

  15. Cavitation-based hydro-fracturing simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jy-An John; Wang, Hong; Ren, Fei; Cox, Thomas S.

    2016-11-22

    An apparatus 300 for simulating a pulsed pressure induced cavitation technique (PPCT) from a pressurized working fluid (F) provides laboratory research and development for enhanced geothermal systems (EGS), oil, and gas wells. A pump 304 is configured to deliver a pressurized working fluid (F) to a control valve 306, which produces a pulsed pressure wave in a test chamber 308. The pulsed pressure wave parameters are defined by the pump 304 pressure and control valve 306 cycle rate. When a working fluid (F) and a rock specimen 312 are included in the apparatus, the pulsed pressure wave causes cavitation to occur at the surface of the specimen 312, thus initiating an extensive network of fracturing surfaces and micro fissures, which are examined by researchers.

  16. Immersive Simulation in Constructivist-Based Classroom E-Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHaney, Roger; Reiter, Lauren; Reychav, Iris

    2018-01-01

    This article describes the development of a simulation-based online course combining sound pedagogy, educational technology, and real world expertise to provide university students with an immersive experience in storage management systems. The course developed in this example does more than use a simulation, the entire course is delivered using a…

  17. Simulating individual-based models of epidemics in hierarchical networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quax, R.; Bader, D.A.; Sloot, P.M.A.

    2009-01-01

    Current mathematical modeling methods for the spreading of infectious diseases are too simplified and do not scale well. We present the Simulator of Epidemic Evolution in Complex Networks (SEECN), an efficient simulator of detailed individual-based models by parameterizing separate dynamics

  18. Simulation-based modeling of building complexes construction management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepelev, Aleksandr; Severova, Galina; Potashova, Irina

    2018-03-01

    The study reported here examines the experience in the development and implementation of business simulation games based on network planning and management of high-rise construction. Appropriate network models of different types and levels of detail have been developed; a simulation model including 51 blocks (11 stages combined in 4 units) is proposed.

  19. Modeling ground-based timber harvesting systems using computer simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jingxin Wang; Chris B. LeDoux

    2001-01-01

    Modeling ground-based timber harvesting systems with an object-oriented methodology was investigated. Object-oriented modeling and design promote a better understanding of requirements, cleaner designs, and better maintainability of the harvesting simulation system. The model developed simulates chainsaw felling, drive-to-tree feller-buncher, swing-to-tree single-grip...

  20. Simulation of quantum computation : A deterministic event-based approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michielsen, K; De Raedt, K; De Raedt, H

    We demonstrate that locally connected networks of machines that have primitive learning capabilities can be used to perform a deterministic, event-based simulation of quantum computation. We present simulation results for basic quantum operations such as the Hadamard and the controlled-NOT gate, and

  1. Simulation of Quantum Computation : A Deterministic Event-Based Approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michielsen, K.; Raedt, K. De; Raedt, H. De

    2005-01-01

    We demonstrate that locally connected networks of machines that have primitive learning capabilities can be used to perform a deterministic, event-based simulation of quantum computation. We present simulation results for basic quantum operations such as the Hadamard and the controlled-NOT gate, and

  2. Web-based Interactive Simulator for Rotating Machinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirohi, Vijayalaxmi

    1999-01-01

    Baroma (Balance of Rotating Machinery), the Web-based educational engineering interactive software for teaching/learning combines didactical and software ergonomical approaches. The software in tutorial form simulates a problem using Visual Interactive Simulation in graphic display, and animation is brought about through graphical user interface…

  3. Conceptual modeling for simulation-based serious gaming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Zee, D.J.; Holkenborg, Bart; Robinson, Stewart

    2012-01-01

    In recent years many simulation-based serious games have been developed for supporting (future) managers in operations management decision making. They illustrate the high potential of using discrete event simulation for pedagogical purposes. Unfortunately, this potential does not seem to go

  4. Airway management in a bronchoscopic simulator based setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graeser, Karin; Konge, Lars; Kristensen, Michael S

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Several simulation-based possibilities for training flexible optical intubation have been developed, ranging from non-anatomical phantoms to high-fidelity virtual reality simulators. These teaching devices might also be used to assess the competence of trainees before allowing them...

  5. Simulation-Based Medical Education: An Ethical Imperative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziv, Amitai; Wolpe, Paul Root; Small, Stephen D.; Glick, Shimon

    2003-01-01

    Describes simulation-based learning in medical education and presents four these that make a framework for simulations: (1) best standards of care and training; (2) error management and patient safety; (3) patient autonomy; and (4) social justice and resource allocation. (SLD)

  6. Design-Based Comparison of Spine Surgery Simulators: Optimizing Educational Features of Surgical Simulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Won Hyung A; Mostafa, Ahmed E; Dharampal, Navjit; Sharlin, Ehud; Kopp, Gail; Jacobs, W Bradley; Hurlbert, R John; Chan, Sonny; Sutherland, Garnette R

    2017-10-01

    Simulation-based education has made its entry into surgical residency training, particularly as an adjunct to hands-on clinical experience. However, one of the ongoing challenges to wide adoption is the capacity of simulators to incorporate educational features required for effective learning. The aim of this study was to identify strengths and limitations of spine simulators to characterize design elements that are essential in enhancing resident education. We performed a mixed qualitative and quantitative cohort study with a focused survey and interviews of stakeholders in spine surgery pertaining to their experiences on 3 spine simulators. Ten participants were recruited spanning all levels of training and expertise until qualitative analysis reached saturation of themes. Participants were asked to perform lumbar pedicle screw insertion on 3 simulators. Afterward, a 10-item survey was administrated and a focused interview was conducted to explore topics pertaining to the design features of the simulators. Overall impressions of the simulators were positive with regards to their educational benefit, but our qualitative analysis revealed differing strengths and limitations. Main design strengths of the computer-based simulators were incorporation of procedural guidance and provision of performance feedback. The synthetic model excelled in achieving more realistic haptic feedback and incorporating use of actual surgical tools. Stakeholders from trainees to experts acknowledge the growing role of simulation-based education in spine surgery. However, different simulation modalities have varying design elements that augment learning in distinct ways. Characterization of these design characteristics will allow for standardization of simulation curricula in spinal surgery, optimizing educational benefit. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Computer-Based Simulation Games in Public Administration Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kutergina Evgeniia

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Computer simulation, an active learning technique, is now one of the advanced pedagogical technologies. Th e use of simulation games in the educational process allows students to gain a firsthand understanding of the processes of real life. Public- administration, public-policy and political-science courses increasingly adopt simulation games in universities worldwide. Besides person-to-person simulation games, there are computer-based simulations in public-administration education. Currently in Russia the use of computer-based simulation games in Master of Public Administration (MPA curricula is quite limited. Th is paper focuses on computer- based simulation games for students of MPA programmes. Our aim was to analyze outcomes of implementing such games in MPA curricula. We have done so by (1 developing three computer-based simulation games about allocating public finances, (2 testing the games in the learning process, and (3 conducting a posttest examination to evaluate the effect of simulation games on students’ knowledge of municipal finances. Th is study was conducted in the National Research University Higher School of Economics (HSE and in the Russian Presidential Academy of National Economy and Public Administration (RANEPA during the period of September to December 2015, in Saint Petersburg, Russia. Two groups of students were randomly selected in each university and then randomly allocated either to the experimental or the control group. In control groups (n=12 in HSE, n=13 in RANEPA students had traditional lectures. In experimental groups (n=12 in HSE, n=13 in RANEPA students played three simulation games apart from traditional lectures. Th is exploratory research shows that the use of computer-based simulation games in MPA curricula can improve students’ outcomes by 38 %. In general, the experimental groups had better performances on the post-test examination (Figure 2. Students in the HSE experimental group had 27.5 % better

  8. a Simulation-As Framework Facilitating Webgis Based Installation Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Z.; Chang, Z. Y.; Fei, Y. F.

    2017-09-01

    Installation Planning is constrained by both natural and social conditions, especially for spatially sparse but functionally connected facilities. Simulation is important for proper deploy in space and configuration in function of facilities to make them a cohesive and supportive system to meet users' operation needs. Based on requirement analysis, we propose a framework to combine GIS and Agent simulation to overcome the shortness in temporal analysis and task simulation of traditional GIS. In this framework, Agent based simulation runs as a service on the server, exposes basic simulation functions, such as scenario configuration, simulation control, and simulation data retrieval to installation planners. At the same time, the simulation service is able to utilize various kinds of geoprocessing services in Agents' process logic to make sophisticated spatial inferences and analysis. This simulation-as-a-service framework has many potential benefits, such as easy-to-use, on-demand, shared understanding, and boosted performances. At the end, we present a preliminary implement of this concept using ArcGIS javascript api 4.0 and ArcGIS for server, showing how trip planning and driving can be carried out by agents.

  9. Knowledge-based simulation using object-oriented programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidoran, Karen M.

    1993-01-01

    Simulations have become a powerful mechanism for understanding and modeling complex phenomena. Their results have had substantial impact on a broad range of decisions in the military, government, and industry. Because of this, new techniques are continually being explored and developed to make them even more useful, understandable, extendable, and efficient. One such area of research is the application of the knowledge-based methods of artificial intelligence (AI) to the computer simulation field. The goal of knowledge-based simulation is to facilitate building simulations of greatly increased power and comprehensibility by making use of deeper knowledge about the behavior of the simulated world. One technique for representing and manipulating knowledge that has been enhanced by the AI community is object-oriented programming. Using this technique, the entities of a discrete-event simulation can be viewed as objects in an object-oriented formulation. Knowledge can be factual (i.e., attributes of an entity) or behavioral (i.e., how the entity is to behave in certain circumstances). Rome Laboratory's Advanced Simulation Environment (RASE) was developed as a research vehicle to provide an enhanced simulation development environment for building more intelligent, interactive, flexible, and realistic simulations. This capability will support current and future battle management research and provide a test of the object-oriented paradigm for use in large scale military applications.

  10. Implementing effective simulation-based education to improve ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Implementing effective simulation-based education to improve maternal ... by IDRC, including the contributions IDRC is making towards Canada's maternal child ... OECD's Development Co-Operation Report highlights critical role of data to ...

  11. Simulation-based optimization parametric optimization techniques and reinforcement learning

    CERN Document Server

    Gosavi, Abhijit

    2003-01-01

    Simulation-Based Optimization: Parametric Optimization Techniques and Reinforcement Learning introduces the evolving area of simulation-based optimization. The book's objective is two-fold: (1) It examines the mathematical governing principles of simulation-based optimization, thereby providing the reader with the ability to model relevant real-life problems using these techniques. (2) It outlines the computational technology underlying these methods. Taken together these two aspects demonstrate that the mathematical and computational methods discussed in this book do work. Broadly speaking, the book has two parts: (1) parametric (static) optimization and (2) control (dynamic) optimization. Some of the book's special features are: *An accessible introduction to reinforcement learning and parametric-optimization techniques. *A step-by-step description of several algorithms of simulation-based optimization. *A clear and simple introduction to the methodology of neural networks. *A gentle introduction to converg...

  12. Use of agent based simulation for traffic safety assessment

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Conradie, Dirk CU

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the development of an agent based Computational Building Simulation (CBS) tool, termed KRONOS that is being used to work on advanced research questions such as traffic safety assessment and user behaviour in buildings...

  13. Rapid Development of Scenario-Based Simulations and Tutoring Systems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mohammed, John L; Sorensen, Barbara; Ong, James C; Li, Jian

    2005-01-01

    .... Scenario-based training, in which trainees practice handling specific situations using faithful simulations of the equipment they will use on the job has proven to be an extremely effective method...

  14. CFOA-Based Lossless and Lossy Inductance Simulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Kaçar

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Inductance simulator is a useful component in the circuit synthesis theory especially for analog signal processing applications such as filter, chaotic oscillator design, analog phase shifters and cancellation of parasitic element. In this study, new four inductance simulator topologies employing a single current feedback operational amplifier are presented. The presented topologies require few passive components. The first topology is intended for negative inductance simulation, the second topology is for lossy series inductance, the third one is for lossy parallel inductance and the fourth topology is for negative parallel (-R (-L (-C simulation. The performance of the proposed CFOA based inductance simulators is demonstrated on both a second-order low-pass filter and inductance cancellation circuit. PSPICE simulations are given to verify the theoretical analysis.

  15. Development of training simulator based on critical assemblies test bench

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narozhnyi, A.T.; Vorontsov, S.V.; Golubeva, O.A.; Dyudyaev, A.M.; Il'in, V.I.; Kuvshinov, M.I.; Panin, A.V.; Peshekhonov, D.P.

    2007-01-01

    When preparing critical mass experiment, multiplying system (MS) parts are assembled manually. This work is connected with maximum professional risk to personnel. Personnel training and keeping the skill of working experts is the important factor of nuclear safety maintenance. For this purpose authors develop a training simulator based on functioning critical assemblies test bench (CATB), allowing simulation of the MS assemblage using training mockups made of inert materials. The control program traces the current status of MS under simulation. A change in the assembly neutron physical parameters is mapped in readings of the regular devices. The simulator information support is provided by the computer database on physical characteristics of typical MS components The work in the training mode ensures complete simulation of real MS assemblage on the critical test bench. It makes it possible to elaborate the procedures related to CATB operation in a standard mode safely and effectively and simulate possible abnormal situations. (author)

  16. Virtual rounds: simulation-based education in procedural medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, David W.; Meglan, Dwight A.; Ferrell, Margaret; Dawson, Steven L.

    1999-07-01

    Computer-based simulation is a goal for training physicians in specialties where traditional training puts patients at risk. Intuitively, interactive simulation of anatomy, pathology, and therapeutic actions should lead to shortening of the learning curve for novice or inexperienced physicians. Effective transfer of knowledge acquired in simulators must be shown for such devices to be widely accepted in the medical community. We have developed an Interventional Cardiology Training Simulator which incorporates real-time graphic interactivity coupled with haptic response, and an embedded curriculum permitting rehearsal, hypertext links, personal archiving and instructor review and testing capabilities. This linking of purely technical simulation with educational content creates a more robust educational purpose for procedural simulators.

  17. Simulator for beam-based LHC collimator alignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentino, Gianluca; Aßmann, Ralph; Redaelli, Stefano; Sammut, Nicholas

    2014-02-01

    In the CERN Large Hadron Collider, collimators need to be set up to form a multistage hierarchy to ensure efficient multiturn cleaning of halo particles. Automatic algorithms were introduced during the first run to reduce the beam time required for beam-based setup, improve the alignment accuracy, and reduce the risk of human errors. Simulating the alignment procedure would allow for off-line tests of alignment policies and algorithms. A simulator was developed based on a diffusion beam model to generate the characteristic beam loss signal spike and decay produced when a collimator jaw touches the beam, which is observed in a beam loss monitor (BLM). Empirical models derived from the available measurement data are used to simulate the steady-state beam loss and crosstalk between multiple BLMs. The simulator design is presented, together with simulation results and comparison to measurement data.

  18. A MARTe based simulator for the JET Vertical Stabilization system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellizio, Teresa, E-mail: teresa.bellizio@unina.it [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA-CREATE, University di Napoli Federico II, Via Claudio 21, 80125 Napoli (Italy); De Tommasi, Gianmaria; Risoli, Nicola; Albanese, Raffaele [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA-CREATE, University di Napoli Federico II, Via Claudio 21, 80125 Napoli (Italy); Neto, Andre [Associacao EURATOM/IST, Inst. de Plasmas e Fusao Nuclear - Laboratorio Associado, Instituto Superior, Tecnico, P-1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2011-10-15

    Validation by means of simulation is a crucial step when developing real-time control systems. Modeling and simulation are an essential tool since the early design phase, when the control algorithms are designed and tested. This phase is commonly carried out in off-line environments such as Matlab and Simulink. A MARTe-based simulator has been recently developed to validate the new JET Vertical Stabilization (VS) system. MARTe is the multi-thread framework used at JET to deploy hard real-time control systems. This paper presents the software architecture of the MARTe-based simulator and it shows how this tool has been effectively used to evaluate the effects of Edge Localized Modes (ELMs) on the VS system. By using the simulator it is possible to analyze different plasma configurations, extrapolating the limit of the new vertical amplifier in terms of the energy of the largest rejectable ELM.

  19. Improving the performance of a filling line based on simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasiulewicz-Kaczmarek, M.; Bartkowiak, T.

    2016-08-01

    The paper describes the method of improving performance of a filling line based on simulation. This study concerns a production line that is located in a manufacturing centre of a FMCG company. A discrete event simulation model was built using data provided by maintenance data acquisition system. Two types of failures were identified in the system and were approximated using continuous statistical distributions. The model was validated taking into consideration line performance measures. A brief Pareto analysis of line failures was conducted to identify potential areas of improvement. Two improvements scenarios were proposed and tested via simulation. The outcome of the simulations were the bases of financial analysis. NPV and ROI values were calculated taking into account depreciation, profits, losses, current CIT rate and inflation. A validated simulation model can be a useful tool in maintenance decision-making process.

  20. Agent-based simulation in entrepreneurship research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, S.-J.S.; Chandra, Y.

    2009-01-01

    Agent-based modeling (ABM) has wide applications in natural and social sciences yet it has not been widely applied in entrepreneurship research. We discuss the nature of ABM, its position among conventional methodologies and then offer a roadmap for developing, testing and extending theories of

  1. Synthetic Observations of the HI Line in SPH-Simulated Spiral Galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Douglas, Kevin A.; Acreman, David; Dobbs, Clare; Brunt, Chris

    2009-01-01

    Using the radiative transfer code Torus, we produce spectral-line cubes of the predicted HI profile from global SPH simulations of spiral galaxies. Torus grids the SPH galaxy using Adaptive Mesh Refinement, then applies a ray-tracing method to infer the HI profile along the line(s) of sight. The

  2. Simulation-based learning: Just like the real thing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lateef Fatimah

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Simulation is a technique for practice and learning that can be applied to many different disciplines and trainees. It is a technique (not a technology to replace and amplify real experiences with guided ones, often "immersive" in nature, that evoke or replicate substantial aspects of the real world in a fully interactive fashion. Simulation-based learning can be the way to develop health professionals′ knowledge, skills, and attitudes, whilst protecting patients from unnecessary risks. Simulation-based medical education can be a platform which provides a valuable tool in learning to mitigate ethical tensions and resolve practical dilemmas. Simulation-based training techniques, tools, and strategies can be applied in designing structured learning experiences, as well as be used as a measurement tool linked to targeted teamwork competencies and learning objectives. It has been widely applied in fields such aviation and the military. In medicine, simulation offers good scope for training of interdisciplinary medical teams. The realistic scenarios and equipment allows for retraining and practice till one can master the procedure or skill. An increasing number of health care institutions and medical schools are now turning to simulation-based learning. Teamwork training conducted in the simulated environment may offer an additive benefit to the traditional didactic instruction, enhance performance, and possibly also help reduce errors.

  3. Simulation-based learning: Just like the real thing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lateef, Fatimah

    2010-10-01

    Simulation is a technique for practice and learning that can be applied to many different disciplines and trainees. It is a technique (not a technology) to replace and amplify real experiences with guided ones, often "immersive" in nature, that evoke or replicate substantial aspects of the real world in a fully interactive fashion. Simulation-based learning can be the way to develop health professionals' knowledge, skills, and attitudes, whilst protecting patients from unnecessary risks. Simulation-based medical education can be a platform which provides a valuable tool in learning to mitigate ethical tensions and resolve practical dilemmas. Simulation-based training techniques, tools, and strategies can be applied in designing structured learning experiences, as well as be used as a measurement tool linked to targeted teamwork competencies and learning objectives. It has been widely applied in fields such aviation and the military. In medicine, simulation offers good scope for training of interdisciplinary medical teams. The realistic scenarios and equipment allows for retraining and practice till one can master the procedure or skill. An increasing number of health care institutions and medical schools are now turning to simulation-based learning. Teamwork training conducted in the simulated environment may offer an additive benefit to the traditional didactic instruction, enhance performance, and possibly also help reduce errors.

  4. New developments in simulating X-ray phase contrast imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterzol, A.; Berthier, J.; Duvauchelle, P.; Babot, D.; Ferrero, C.

    2007-01-01

    A deterministic algorithm simulating phase contrast (PC) x-ray images for complex 3- dimensional (3D) objects is presented. This algorithm has been implemented in a simulation code named VXI (Virtual X-ray Imaging). The physical model chosen to account for PC technique is based on the Fresnel-Kirchhoff diffraction theory. The algorithm consists mainly of two parts. The first one exploits the VXI ray-tracing approach to compute the object transmission function. The second part simulates the PC image due to the wave front distortion introduced by the sample. In the first part, the use of computer-aided drawing (CAD) models enables simulations to be carried out with complex 3D objects. Differently from the VXI original version, which makes use of an object description via triangular facets, the new code requires a more 'sophisticated' object representation based on Non-Uniform Rational B-Splines (NURBS). As a first step we produce a spatial high resolution image by using a point and monochromatic source and an ideal detector. To simulate the polychromatic case, the intensity image is integrated over the considered x-ray energy spectrum. Then, in order to account for the system spatial resolution properties, the high spatial resolution image (mono or polychromatic) is convolved with the total point spread function of the imaging system under consideration. The results supplied by the presented algorithm are examined with the help of some relevant examples. (authors)

  5. Cyber-Based Turbulent Combustion Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-28

    in flow-field structures between the laminar and turbulent counter-flowing fuel injection is clearly illustrated in figure 1. As a consequence , it...flame thickness by comparing with benchmark of AFRL/RZ ( UNICORN ) suppressing the oscillatory numerical behavior. These improvements in numerical...fraction with the benchmark results of AFRL/RZ. This validating base is generated by the UNICORN program on the finest mesh available and the local

  6. Colour based sorting station with Matlab simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantin Victor

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the design process and manufacturing elements of a colour-based sorting station. The system is comprised of a gravitational storage, which also contains the colour sensor. Parts are extracted using a linear pneumatic motor and are fed onto an electrically driven conveyor belt. Extraction of the parts is done at 4 points, using two pneumatic motors and a geared DC motor, while the 4th position is at the end of the belt. The mechanical parts of the system are manufactured using 3D printer technology, allowing for easy modification and adaption to the geometry of different parts. The paper shows all of the stages needed to design, optimize, test and implement the proposed solution. System optimization was performed using a graphical Matlab interface which also allows for sorting algorithm optimization.

  7. Module-based Simulation System for efficient development of nuclear simulation programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshikawa, Hidekazu; Wakabayashi, Jiro

    1990-01-01

    Module-based Simulation System (MSS) has been developed to realize a new software environment enabling versatile dynamic simulation of a complex nuclear power plant system flexibly. Described in the paper are (i) fundamental methods utilized in MMS and its software systemization, (ii) development of human interface system to help users in generating integrated simulation programs automatically, and (iii) development of an intelligent user support system for helping users in the two phases of automatical semantic diagnosis and consultation to automatic input data setup for the MSS-generated programs. (author)

  8. Tsunami Early Warning via a Physics-Based Simulation Pipeline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, J. M.; Rundle, J. B.; Donnellan, A.; Ward, S. N.; Komjathy, A.

    2017-12-01

    Through independent efforts, physics-based simulations of earthquakes, tsunamis, and atmospheric signatures of these phenomenon have been developed. With the goal of producing tsunami forecasts and early warning tools for at-risk regions, we join these three spheres to create a simulation pipeline. The Virtual Quake simulator can produce thousands of years of synthetic seismicity on large, complex fault geometries, as well as the expected surface displacement in tsunamigenic regions. These displacements are used as initial conditions for tsunami simulators, such as Tsunami Squares, to produce catalogs of potential tsunami scenarios with probabilities. Finally, these tsunami scenarios can act as input for simulations of associated ionospheric total electron content, signals which can be detected by GNSS satellites for purposes of early warning in the event of a real tsunami. We present the most recent developments in this project.

  9. Laguna Verde simulator: A new TRAC-RT based application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munoz Cases, J.J.; Tanarro Onrubia, A.

    2006-01-01

    In a partnership with GSE Systems, TECNATOM is developing a full scope training simulator for Laguna Verde Unit 2 (LV2). The simulator design is based upon the current 'state-of-the art technology' regarding the simulation platform, instructor station, visualization tools, advanced thermalhydraulics and neutronics models, I/O systems and automated model building technology. When completed, LV2 simulator will achieve a remarkable level of modeling fidelity by using TECNATOM's TRAC-RT advanced thermalhydraulic code for the reactor coolant and main steam systems, and NEMO neutronic model for the reactor core calculations. These models have been utilized up to date for the development or upgrading of nine NPP simulators in Spain and abroad, with more than 8000 hours of training sessions, and have developed an excellent reputation for its robustness and high fidelity. (author)

  10. SIDH: A Game-Based Architecture for a Training Simulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Backlund

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Game-based simulators, sometimes referred to as “lightweight” simulators, have benefits such as flexible technology and economic feasibility. In this article, we extend the notion of a game-based simulator by introducing multiple screen view and physical interaction. These features are expected to enhance immersion and fidelity. By utilizing these concepts we have constructed a training simulator for breathing apparatus entry. Game hardware and software have been used to produce the application. More important, the application itself is deliberately designed to be a game. Indeed, one important design goal is to create an entertaining and motivating experience combined with learning goals in order to create a serious game. The system has been evaluated in cooperation with the Swedish Rescue Services Agency to see which architectural features contribute to perceived fidelity. The modes of visualization and interaction as well as level design contribute to the usefulness of the system.

  11. A simulated regolith medium for multi-wavelength studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkman, O.; Muinonen, K.; Parviainen, H.; Näränen, J.

    2012-04-01

    Effects arising from the small-scale surface structure are significant in remote studies of regolith surfaces on atmosphereless solar system bodies, such as the Moon, Mercury and the asteroids. The important properties determining these effects are the porosity of the regolith and the roughness of the interface between the bulk material and empty space. We concentrate on the regolith effects in visible light photometry and X-ray spectrometry. The fluorescent X-ray spectrum induced by solar X-rays contains information about the elemental abundances of the surface material, while the photometry can be used to constrain surface properties such as porosity. We have developed a computer model simulating a regolith medium consisting of spherical particles with variable size distribution and properties. The bulk properties of the medium, such as porosity and surface roughness, can be varied. The model can then be used in ray-tracing simulations of the regolith effects in both visible light scattering and X-ray fluorescence. In photometric studies the scattering law of the constituent particles can be chosen to take into account scattering phenomena such as coherent backscattering. In the X-ray simulations, we can choose the elemental abundances of the material and the spectrum of the incident X-ray radiation. The ray-tracing simulations then allow us to determine the characteristics of the emitted radiation in different observational geometries. We present results from various studies which have been based on our regolith model. The model has been used to simulate the regolith effects on X-ray fluorescence spectra under specific situations. These can be compared to laboratory measurements. The visible light simulations have been applied in a study of the shadowing effects in photometry. The model was also used in a study of lunar photometry from SMART-1/AMIE data. Applications in the analysis of X-ray spectrometry from the BepiColombo MIXS/SIXS instruments are planned. An

  12. Optimization and performance evaluation of a conical mirror based fluorescence molecular tomography imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yue; Zhang, Wei; Zhu, Dianwen; Li, Changqing

    2016-03-01

    We performed numerical simulations and phantom experiments with a conical mirror based fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) imaging system to optimize its performance. With phantom experiments, we have compared three measurement modes in FMT: the whole surface measurement mode, the transmission mode, and the reflection mode. Our results indicated that the whole surface measurement mode performed the best. Then, we applied two different neutral density (ND) filters to improve the measurement's dynamic range. The benefits from ND filters are not as much as predicted. Finally, with numerical simulations, we have compared two laser excitation patterns: line and point. With the same excitation position number, we found that the line laser excitation had slightly better FMT reconstruction results than the point laser excitation. In the future, we will implement Monte Carlo ray tracing simulations to calculate multiple reflection photons, and create a look-up table accordingly for calibration.

  13. A Table-Based Random Sampling Simulation for Bioluminescence Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaomeng Zhang

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available As a popular simulation of photon propagation in turbid media, the main problem of Monte Carlo (MC method is its cumbersome computation. In this work a table-based random sampling simulation (TBRS is proposed. The key idea of TBRS is to simplify multisteps of scattering to a single-step process, through randomly table querying, thus greatly reducing the computing complexity of the conventional MC algorithm and expediting the computation. The TBRS simulation is a fast algorithm of the conventional MC simulation of photon propagation. It retained the merits of flexibility and accuracy of conventional MC method and adapted well to complex geometric media and various source shapes. Both MC simulations were conducted in a homogeneous medium in our work. Also, we present a reconstructing approach to estimate the position of the fluorescent source based on the trial-and-error theory as a validation of the TBRS algorithm. Good agreement is found between the conventional MC simulation and the TBRS simulation.

  14. An FPGA-Based Massively Parallel Neuromorphic Cortex Simulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Runchun M; Thakur, Chetan S; van Schaik, André

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents a massively parallel and scalable neuromorphic cortex simulator designed for simulating large and structurally connected spiking neural networks, such as complex models of various areas of the cortex. The main novelty of this work is the abstraction of a neuromorphic architecture into clusters represented by minicolumns and hypercolumns, analogously to the fundamental structural units observed in neurobiology. Without this approach, simulating large-scale fully connected networks needs prohibitively large memory to store look-up tables for point-to-point connections. Instead, we use a novel architecture, based on the structural connectivity in the neocortex, such that all the required parameters and connections can be stored in on-chip memory. The cortex simulator can be easily reconfigured for simulating different neural networks without any change in hardware structure by programming the memory. A hierarchical communication scheme allows one neuron to have a fan-out of up to 200 k neurons. As a proof-of-concept, an implementation on one Altera Stratix V FPGA was able to simulate 20 million to 2.6 billion leaky-integrate-and-fire (LIF) neurons in real time. We verified the system by emulating a simplified auditory cortex (with 100 million neurons). This cortex simulator achieved a low power dissipation of 1.62 μW per neuron. With the advent of commercially available FPGA boards, our system offers an accessible and scalable tool for the design, real-time simulation, and analysis of large-scale spiking neural networks.

  15. A review of computer-based simulators for ultrasound training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Tobias; Rieger, Andreas; Navab, Nassir; Friess, Helmut; Martignoni, Marc

    2013-04-01

    Computer-based simulators for ultrasound training are a topic of recent interest. During the last 15 years, many different systems and methods have been proposed. This article provides an overview and classification of systems in this domain and a discussion of their advantages. Systems are classified and discussed according to the image simulation method, user interactions and medical applications. Computer simulation of ultrasound has one key advantage over traditional training. It enables novel training concepts, for example, through advanced visualization, case databases, and automatically generated feedback. Qualitative evaluations have mainly shown positive learning effects. However, few quantitative evaluations have been performed and long-term effects have to be examined.

  16. Modeling and simulation for micro DC motor based on simulink

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Hanxin; Lei, Qiao; Chen, Wenxiang

    2017-09-01

    The micro DC motor has a large market demand but there is a lack of theoretical research for it. Through detailed analysis of the commutation process of micro DC motor commutator, based on micro DC motor electromagnetic torque equation and mechanical torque equation, with the help of Simulink toolkit, a triangle connection micro DC motor simulation model is established. By using the model, a sample micro DC motor are simulated, and an experimental measurements has been carried on the sample micro DC motor. It is found that the simulation results are consistent with theoretical analysis and experimental results.

  17. Discrete simulation system based on artificial intelligence methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Futo, I; Szeredi, J

    1982-01-01

    A discrete event simulation system based on the AI language Prolog is presented. The system called t-Prolog extends the traditional possibilities of simulation languages toward automatic problem solving by using backtrack in time and automatic model modification depending on logical deductions. As t-Prolog is an interactive tool, the user has the possibility to interrupt the simulation run to modify the model or to force it to return to a previous state for trying possible alternatives. It admits the construction of goal-oriented or goal-seeking models with variable structure. Models are defined in a restricted version of the first order predicate calculus using Horn clauses. 21 references.

  18. Wind flow simulation over flat terrain using CFD based software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrov, Peter; Terziev, Angel; Genovski, Ivan

    2009-01-01

    Velocity distribution recognition over definite place (terrain) is very important because due to that the zones with high energy potential could be defined (the fields with high velocities). This is a precondition for optimal wind turbine generators micro-sitting. In current work a simulation of the open flow over the flat terrain using the CFD based software is reviewed. The simulations are made of a real fluid flow in order to be defined the velocity fields over the terrain

  19. Quadcopter Attitude and Thrust Simulation Based on Simulink Platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Endrowednes Kuantama

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Orientation of quadcopter axes relative to reference line direction of motion will result in attitude and every movement is controlled regulated by each rotor’s thrust. Mathematical equation based on Euler formula and 3D simulation using Matlab/Simulink software platform are used to model quadcopter movement. Change of attitude, position and thrust of each rotor can be seen through this simulation movement.

  20. Microprocessor-based simulator of surface ECG signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MartInez, A E; Rossi, E; Siri, L Nicola

    2007-01-01

    In this work, a simulator of surface electrocardiogram recorded signals (ECG) is presented. The device, based on a microcontroller and commanded by a personal computer, produces an analog signal resembling actual ECGs, not only in time course and voltage levels, but also in source impedance. The simulator is a useful tool for electrocardiograph calibration and monitoring, to incorporate as well in educational tasks and in clinical environments for early detection of faulty behaviour

  1. Enriching Triangle Mesh Animations with Physically Based Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yijing; Xu, Hongyi; Barbic, Jernej

    2017-10-01

    We present a system to combine arbitrary triangle mesh animations with physically based Finite Element Method (FEM) simulation, enabling control over the combination both in space and time. The input is a triangle mesh animation obtained using any method, such as keyframed animation, character rigging, 3D scanning, or geometric shape modeling. The input may be non-physical, crude or even incomplete. The user provides weights, specified using a minimal user interface, for how much physically based simulation should be allowed to modify the animation in any region of the model, and in time. Our system then computes a physically-based animation that is constrained to the input animation to the amount prescribed by these weights. This permits smoothly turning physics on and off over space and time, making it possible for the output to strictly follow the input, to evolve purely based on physically based simulation, and anything in between. Achieving such results requires a careful combination of several system components. We propose and analyze these components, including proper automatic creation of simulation meshes (even for non-manifold and self-colliding undeformed triangle meshes), converting triangle mesh animations into animations of the simulation mesh, and resolving collisions and self-collisions while following the input.

  2. Simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gould, Derek A; Chalmers, Nicholas; Johnson, Sheena J

    2012-01-01

    Recognition of the many limitations of traditional apprenticeship training is driving new approaches to learning medical procedural skills. Among simulation technologies and methods available today, computer-based systems are topical and bring the benefits of automated, repeatable, and reliable p...... performance assessments. Human factors research is central to simulator model development that is relevant to real-world imaging-guided interventional tasks and to the credentialing programs in which it would be used....

  3. A java based simulator with user interface to simulate ventilated patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stehle P.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical ventilation is a life-saving intervention, which despite its use on a routine basis, poses the risk of inflicting further damage to the lung tissue if ventilator settings are chosen inappropriately. Medical decision support systems may help to prevent such injuries while providing the optimal settings to reach a defined clinical goal. In order to develop and verify decision support algorithms, a test bench simulating a patient’s behaviour is needed. We propose a Java based system that allows simulation of respiratory mechanics, gas exchange and cardiovascular dynamics of a mechanically ventilated patient. The implemented models are allowed to interact and are interchangeable enabling the simulation of various clinical scenarios. Model simulations are running in real-time and show physiologically plausible results.

  4. Virtual reality based surgery simulation for endoscopic gynaecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Székely, G; Bajka, M; Brechbühler, C; Dual, J; Enzler, R; Haller, U; Hug, J; Hutter, R; Ironmonger, N; Kauer, M; Meier, V; Niederer, P; Rhomberg, A; Schmid, P; Schweitzer, G; Thaler, M; Vuskovic, V; Tröster, G

    1999-01-01

    Virtual reality (VR) based surgical simulator systems offer very elegant possibilities to both enrich and enhance traditional education in endoscopic surgery. However, while a wide range of VR simulator systems have been proposed and realized in the past few years, most of these systems are far from able to provide a reasonably realistic surgical environment. We explore the basic approaches to the current limits of realism and ultimately seek to extend these based on our description and analysis of the most important components of a VR-based endoscopic simulator. The feasibility of the proposed techniques is demonstrated on a first modular prototype system implementing the basic algorithms for VR-training in gynaecologic laparoscopy.

  5. Performance simulation of a MRPC-based PET imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, A.; Banerjee, A.; Biswas, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Das, G.; Saha, S.

    2014-10-01

    The less expensive and high resolution Multi-gap Resistive Plate Chamber (MRPC) opens up a new possibility to find an efficient alternative detector for the Time of Flight (TOF) based Positron Emission Tomography, where the sensitivity of the system depends largely on the time resolution of the detector. In a layered structure, suitable converters can be used to increase the photon detection efficiency. In this work, we perform a detailed GEANT4 simulation to optimize the converter thickness towards improving the efficiency of photon conversion. A Monte Carlo based procedure has been developed to simulate the time resolution of the MRPC-based system, making it possible to simulate its response for PET imaging application. The results of the test of a six-gap MRPC, operating in avalanche mode, with 22Na source have been discussed.

  6. Development of intelligent interface for simulation execution by module-based simulation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshikawa, Hidekazu; Mizutani, Naoki; Shimoda, Hiroshi; Wakabayashi, Jiro

    1988-01-01

    An intelligent user support for the two phases of simulation execution was newly developed for Module-based Simulation System (MSS). The MSS has been in development as a flexible simulation environment to improve software productivity in complex, large-scale dynamic simulation of nuclear power plant. The AI programing by Smalltalk-80 was applied to materialize the two user-interface programs for (i) semantic diagnosis of the simulation program generated automatically by MSS, and (ii) consultation system by which user can set up consistent numerical input data files necessary for executing a MSS-generated program. Frame theory was utilized in those interface programs to represent the four knowledge bases, which are (i) usage information on module library in MSS and MSS-generated program, and (ii) expertise knowledge on nuclear power plant analysis such as material properties and reactor system configuration. Capabilities of those interface programs were confirmed by some example practice on LMFBR reactor dynamic calculation, and it was demonstrated that the knowledge-based systemization was effective to improve software work environment. (author)

  7. Cost analysis of simulated base-catalyzed biodiesel production processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tasić, Marija B.; Stamenković, Olivera S.; Veljković, Vlada B.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Two semi-continuous biodiesel production processes from sunflower oil are simulated. • Simulations were based on the kinetics of base-catalyzed methanolysis reactions. • The total energy consumption was influenced by the kinetic model. • Heterogeneous base-catalyzed process is a preferable industrial technology. - Abstract: The simulation and economic feasibility evaluation of semi-continuous biodiesel production from sunflower oil were based on the kinetics of homogeneously (Process I) and heterogeneously (Process II) base-catalyzed methanolysis reactions. The annual plant’s capacity was determined to be 8356 tonnes of biodiesel. The total energy consumption was influenced by the unit model describing the methanolysis reaction kinetics. The energy consumption of the Process II was more than 2.5 times lower than that of the Process I. Also, the simulation showed the Process I had more and larger process equipment units, compared with the Process II. Based on lower total capital investment costs and biodiesel selling price, the Process II was economically more feasible than the Process I. Sensitivity analysis was conducted using variable sunflower oil and biodiesel prices. Using a biodiesel selling price of 0.990 $/kg, Processes I and II were shown to be economically profitable if the sunflower oil price was 0.525 $/kg and 0.696 $/kg, respectively

  8. Research of Simulation in Character Animation Based on Physics Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Yu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Computer 3D character animation essentially is a product, which is combined with computer graphics and robotics, physics, mathematics, and the arts. It is based on computer hardware and graphics algorithms and related sciences rapidly developed new technologies. At present, the mainstream character animation technology is based on the artificial production of key technologies and capture frames based on the motion capture device technology. 3D character animation is widely used not only in the production of film, animation, and other commercial areas but also in virtual reality, computer-aided education, flight simulation, engineering simulation, military simulation, and other fields. In this paper, we try to study physics based character animation to solve these problems such as poor real-time interaction that appears in the character, low utilization rate, and complex production. The paper deeply studied the kinematics, dynamics technology, and production technology based on the motion data. At the same time, it analyzed ODE, PhysX, Bullet, and other variety of mainstream physics engines and studied OBB hierarchy bounding box tree, AABB hierarchical tree, and other collision detection algorithms. Finally, character animation based on ODE is implemented, which is simulation of the motion and collision process of a tricycle.

  9. Optimization Model for Web Based Multimodal Interactive Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halic, Tansel; Ahn, Woojin; De, Suvranu

    2015-07-15

    This paper presents a technique for optimizing the performance of web based multimodal interactive simulations. For such applications where visual quality and the performance of simulations directly influence user experience, overloading of hardware resources may result in unsatisfactory reduction in the quality of the simulation and user satisfaction. However, optimization of simulation performance on individual hardware platforms is not practical. Hence, we present a mixed integer programming model to optimize the performance of graphical rendering and simulation performance while satisfying application specific constraints. Our approach includes three distinct phases: identification, optimization and update . In the identification phase, the computing and rendering capabilities of the client device are evaluated using an exploratory proxy code. This data is utilized in conjunction with user specified design requirements in the optimization phase to ensure best possible computational resource allocation. The optimum solution is used for rendering (e.g. texture size, canvas resolution) and simulation parameters (e.g. simulation domain) in the update phase. Test results are presented on multiple hardware platforms with diverse computing and graphics capabilities to demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach.

  10. Knowledge Based Cloud FE Simulation of Sheet Metal Forming Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Du; Yuan, Xi; Gao, Haoxiang; Wang, Ailing; Liu, Jun; El Fakir, Omer; Politis, Denis J; Wang, Liliang; Lin, Jianguo

    2016-12-13

    The use of Finite Element (FE) simulation software to adequately predict the outcome of sheet metal forming processes is crucial to enhancing the efficiency and lowering the development time of such processes, whilst reducing costs involved in trial-and-error prototyping. Recent focus on the substitution of steel components with aluminum alloy alternatives in the automotive and aerospace sectors has increased the need to simulate the forming behavior of such alloys for ever more complex component geometries. However these alloys, and in particular their high strength variants, exhibit limited formability at room temperature, and high temperature manufacturing technologies have been developed to form them. Consequently, advanced constitutive models are required to reflect the associated temperature and strain rate effects. Simulating such behavior is computationally very expensive using conventional FE simulation techniques. This paper presents a novel Knowledge Based Cloud FE (KBC-FE) simulation technique that combines advanced material and friction models with conventional FE simulations in an efficient manner thus enhancing the capability of commercial simulation software packages. The application of these methods is demonstrated through two example case studies, namely: the prediction of a material's forming limit under hot stamping conditions, and the tool life prediction under multi-cycle loading conditions.

  11. [Simulation-based robot-assisted surgical training].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolontarev, K B; Govorov, A V; Rasner, P I; Sheptunov, S A; Prilepskaya, E A; Maltsev, E G; Pushkar, D Yu

    2015-12-01

    Since the first use of robotic surgical system in 2000, the robot-assisted technology has gained wide popularity throughout the world. Robot-assisted surgical training is a complex issue that requires significant efforts from students and teacher. During the last two decades, simulation-based training had received active development due to wide-spread occurrence and popularization of laparoscopic and robot-assisted surgical techniques. We performed a systematic review to identify the currently available simulators for robot-assisted surgery. We searched the Medline and Pubmed, English sources of literature data, using the following key words and phrases: "robotics", "robotic surgery", "computer assisted surgery", "simulation", "computer simulation", "virtual reality", "surgical training", and "surgical education". There were identified 565 publications, which meet the key words and phrases; 19 publications were selected for the final analysis. It was established that simulation-based training is the most promising teaching tool that can be used in the training of the next generation robotic surgeons. Today the use of simulators to train surgeons is validated. Price of devices is an obvious barrier for inclusion in the program for training of robotic surgeons, but the lack of this tool will result in a sharp increase in the duration of specialists training.

  12. Modelling and simulation-based acquisition decision support: present & future

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Naidoo, S

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available stream_source_info Naidoo1_2009.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 24551 Content-Encoding UTF-8 stream_name Naidoo1_2009.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8 1 Modelling & Simulation...-Based Acquisition Decision Support: Present & Future Shahen Naidoo Abstract The Ground Based Air Defence System (GBADS) Programme, of the South African Army has been applying modelling and simulation (M&S) to provide acquisition decision and doctrine...

  13. Medical simulation-based education improves medicos' clinical skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhaoming; Liu, Qiaoyu; Wang, Hai

    2013-03-01

    Clinical skill is an essential part of clinical medicine and plays quite an important role in bridging medicos and physicians. Due to the realities in China, traditional medical education is facing many challenges. There are few opportunities for students to practice their clinical skills and their dexterities are generally at a low level. Medical simulation-based education is a new teaching modality and helps to improve medicos' clinical skills to a large degree. Medical simulation-based education has many significant advantages and will be further developed and applied.

  14. A particle-based method for granular flow simulation

    KAUST Repository

    Chang, Yuanzhang; Bao, Kai; Zhu, Jian; Wu, Enhua

    2012-01-01

    We present a new particle-based method for granular flow simulation. In the method, a new elastic stress term, which is derived from a modified form of the Hooke's law, is included in the momentum governing equation to handle the friction of granular materials. Viscosity force is also added to simulate the dynamic friction for the purpose of smoothing the velocity field and further maintaining the simulation stability. Benefiting from the Lagrangian nature of the SPH method, large flow deformation can be well handled easily and naturally. In addition, a signed distance field is also employed to enforce the solid boundary condition. The experimental results show that the proposed method is effective and efficient for handling the flow of granular materials, and different kinds of granular behaviors can be well simulated by adjusting just one parameter. © 2012 Science China Press and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  15. Engineering uses of physics-based ground motion simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Jack W.; Luco, Nicolas; Abrahamson, Norman A.; Graves, Robert W.; Maechling, Phillip J.; Olsen, Kim B.

    2014-01-01

    This paper summarizes validation methodologies focused on enabling ground motion simulations to be used with confidence in engineering applications such as seismic hazard analysis and dynmaic analysis of structural and geotechnical systems. Numberical simullation of ground motion from large erthquakes, utilizing physics-based models of earthquake rupture and wave propagation, is an area of active research in the earth science community. Refinement and validatoin of these models require collaboration between earthquake scientists and engineering users, and testing/rating methodolgies for simulated ground motions to be used with confidence in engineering applications. This paper provides an introduction to this field and an overview of current research activities being coordinated by the Souther California Earthquake Center (SCEC). These activities are related both to advancing the science and computational infrastructure needed to produce ground motion simulations, as well as to engineering validation procedures. Current research areas and anticipated future achievements are also discussed.

  16. A particle-based method for granular flow simulation

    KAUST Repository

    Chang, Yuanzhang

    2012-03-16

    We present a new particle-based method for granular flow simulation. In the method, a new elastic stress term, which is derived from a modified form of the Hooke\\'s law, is included in the momentum governing equation to handle the friction of granular materials. Viscosity force is also added to simulate the dynamic friction for the purpose of smoothing the velocity field and further maintaining the simulation stability. Benefiting from the Lagrangian nature of the SPH method, large flow deformation can be well handled easily and naturally. In addition, a signed distance field is also employed to enforce the solid boundary condition. The experimental results show that the proposed method is effective and efficient for handling the flow of granular materials, and different kinds of granular behaviors can be well simulated by adjusting just one parameter. © 2012 Science China Press and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  17. Simulation-based MDP verification for leading-edge masks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Bo; Syrel, Oleg; Pomerantsev, Michael; Hagiwara, Kazuyuki; Pearman, Ryan; Pang, Leo; Fujimara, Aki

    2017-07-01

    For IC design starts below the 20nm technology node, the assist features on photomasks shrink well below 60nm and the printed patterns of those features on masks written by VSB eBeam writers start to show a large deviation from the mask designs. Traditional geometry-based fracturing starts to show large errors for those small features. As a result, other mask data preparation (MDP) methods have become available and adopted, such as rule-based Mask Process Correction (MPC), model-based MPC and eventually model-based MDP. The new MDP methods may place shot edges slightly differently from target to compensate for mask process effects, so that the final patterns on a mask are much closer to the design (which can be viewed as the ideal mask), especially for those assist features. Such an alteration generally produces better masks that are closer to the intended mask design. Traditional XOR-based MDP verification cannot detect problems caused by eBeam effects. Much like model-based OPC verification which became a necessity for OPC a decade ago, we see the same trend in MDP today. Simulation-based MDP verification solution requires a GPU-accelerated computational geometry engine with simulation capabilities. To have a meaningful simulation-based mask check, a good mask process model is needed. The TrueModel® system is a field tested physical mask model developed by D2S. The GPU-accelerated D2S Computational Design Platform (CDP) is used to run simulation-based mask check, as well as model-based MDP. In addition to simulation-based checks such as mask EPE or dose margin, geometry-based rules are also available to detect quality issues such as slivers or CD splits. Dose margin related hotspots can also be detected by setting a correct detection threshold. In this paper, we will demonstrate GPU-acceleration for geometry processing, and give examples of mask check results and performance data. GPU-acceleration is necessary to make simulation-based mask MDP verification

  18. Remote collaboration system based on large scale simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishimoto, Yasuaki; Sugahara, Akihiro; Li, J.Q.

    2008-01-01

    Large scale simulation using super-computer, which generally requires long CPU time and produces large amount of data, has been extensively studied as a third pillar in various advanced science fields in parallel to theory and experiment. Such a simulation is expected to lead new scientific discoveries through elucidation of various complex phenomena, which are hardly identified only by conventional theoretical and experimental approaches. In order to assist such large simulation studies for which many collaborators working at geographically different places participate and contribute, we have developed a unique remote collaboration system, referred to as SIMON (simulation monitoring system), which is based on client-server system control introducing an idea of up-date processing, contrary to that of widely used post-processing. As a key ingredient, we have developed a trigger method, which transmits various requests for the up-date processing from the simulation (client) running on a super-computer to a workstation (server). Namely, the simulation running on a super-computer actively controls the timing of up-date processing. The server that has received the requests from the ongoing simulation such as data transfer, data analyses, and visualizations, etc. starts operations according to the requests during the simulation. The server makes the latest results available to web browsers, so that the collaborators can monitor the results at any place and time in the world. By applying the system to a specific simulation project of laser-matter interaction, we have confirmed that the system works well and plays an important role as a collaboration platform on which many collaborators work with one another

  19. Transmitted wavefront testing with large dynamic range based on computer-aided deflectometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Daodang; Xu, Ping; Gong, Zhidong; Xie, Zhongmin; Liang, Rongguang; Xu, Xinke; Kong, Ming; Zhao, Jun

    2018-06-01

    The transmitted wavefront testing technique is demanded for the performance evaluation of transmission optics and transparent glass, in which the achievable dynamic range is a key issue. A computer-aided deflectometric testing method with fringe projection is proposed for the accurate testing of transmitted wavefronts with a large dynamic range. Ray tracing of the modeled testing system is carried out to achieve the virtual ‘null’ testing of transmitted wavefront aberrations. The ray aberration is obtained from the ray tracing result and measured slope, with which the test wavefront aberration can be reconstructed. To eliminate testing system modeling errors, a system geometry calibration based on computer-aided reverse optimization is applied to realize accurate testing. Both numerical simulation and experiments have been carried out to demonstrate the feasibility and high accuracy of the proposed testing method. The proposed testing method can achieve a large dynamic range compared with the interferometric method, providing a simple, low-cost and accurate way for the testing of transmitted wavefronts from various kinds of optics and a large amount of industrial transmission elements.

  20. Simulation based virtual learning environment in medical genetics counseling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Makransky, Guido; Bonde, Mads T.; Wulff, Julie S. G.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Simulation based learning environments are designed to improve the quality of medical education by allowing students to interact with patients, diagnostic laboratory procedures, and patient data in a virtual environment. However, few studies have evaluated whether simulation based...... the perceived relevance of medical educational activities. The results suggest that simulations can help future generations of doctors transfer new understanding of disease mechanisms gained in virtual laboratory settings into everyday clinical practice....... learning environments increase students' knowledge, intrinsic motivation, and self-efficacy, and help them generalize from laboratory analyses to clinical practice and health decision-making. METHODS: An entire class of 300 University of Copenhagen first-year undergraduate students, most with a major...

  1. Simulation-based medical education: time for a pedagogical shift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalaniti, Kaarthigeyan; Campbell, Douglas M

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of medical education at all levels is to prepare physicians with the knowledge and comprehensive skills, required to deliver safe and effective patient care. The traditional 'apprentice' learning model in medical education is undergoing a pedagogical shift to a 'simulation-based' learning model. Experiential learning, deliberate practice and the ability to provide immediate feedback are the primary advantages of simulation-based medical education. It is an effective way to develop new skills, identify knowledge gaps, reduce medical errors, and maintain infrequently used clinical skills even among experienced clinical teams, with the overall goal of improving patient care. Although simulation cannot replace clinical exposure as a form of experiential learning, it promotes learning without compromising patient safety. This new paradigm shift is revolutionizing medical education in the Western world. It is time that the developing countries embrace this new pedagogical shift.

  2. Comparison of GPU-Based Numerous Particles Simulation and Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Sang Wook; Jun, Chul Woong; Sohn, Jeong Hyun; Lee, Jae Wook

    2014-01-01

    The dynamic behavior of numerous grains interacting with each other can be easily observed. In this study, this dynamic behavior was analyzed based on the contact between numerous grains. The discrete element method was used for analyzing the dynamic behavior of each particle and the neighboring-cell algorithm was employed for detecting their contact. The Hertzian and tangential sliding friction contact models were used for calculating the contact force acting between the particles. A GPU-based parallel program was developed for conducting the computer simulation and calculating the numerous contacts. The dam break experiment was performed to verify the simulation results. The reliability of the program was verified by comparing the results of the simulation with those of the experiment

  3. Simulation Based Data Reconciliation for Monitoring Power Plant Efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Sang Jun; Heo, Gyun Young

    2010-01-01

    Power plant efficiency is analyzed by using measured values, mass/energy balance principles, and several correlations. Since the measured values can have uncertainty depending on the accuracy of instrumentation, the results of plant efficiency should definitely have uncertainty. The certainty may occur due to either the randomness or the malfunctions of a process. In order to improve the accuracy of efficiency analysis, the data reconciliation (DR) is expected as a good candidate because the mathematical algorithm of the DR is based on the first principles such as mass and energy balance considering the uncertainty of instrumentation. It should be noted that the mass and energy balance model for analyzing power plant efficiency is equivalent to a steady-state simulation of a plant system. Therefore the DR for efficiency analysis necessitates the simulation which can deal with the uncertainty of instrumentation. This study will propose the algorithm of the simulation based DR which is applicable to power plant efficiency monitoring

  4. Engineering-Based Thermal CFD Simulations on Massive Parallel Systems

    KAUST Repository

    Frisch, Jérôme

    2015-05-22

    The development of parallel Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes is a challenging task that entails efficient parallelization concepts and strategies in order to achieve good scalability values when running those codes on modern supercomputers with several thousands to millions of cores. In this paper, we present a hierarchical data structure for massive parallel computations that supports the coupling of a Navier–Stokes-based fluid flow code with the Boussinesq approximation in order to address complex thermal scenarios for energy-related assessments. The newly designed data structure is specifically designed with the idea of interactive data exploration and visualization during runtime of the simulation code; a major shortcoming of traditional high-performance computing (HPC) simulation codes. We further show and discuss speed-up values obtained on one of Germany’s top-ranked supercomputers with up to 140,000 processes and present simulation results for different engineering-based thermal problems.

  5. Design and numerical simulation of a 3-D electron plasma analyzer that resolves both energy and elevation angle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, L.A.; Sablik, M.J.; Winningham, J.D.; Frahm, R.A.; Reiff, P.H.

    1989-01-01

    The Comet Rendezvous and Asteroid Flyby Mission (CRAF) will include, as one of its complement of thirteen scientific instruments, a plasma electron analyzer capable of providing 3-dimensional measurements of the energy and angular distribution of electrons in the solar wind, asteroidal and cometary environments. After initial instrument selection, mission planners at JPL suggested that an instrument capable of performing angular scanning electronically rather than mechanically be investigated. This paper describes the computer design of the new CRAF plasma electron detector, consisting of an electronic scanning component, called the 'elevation analyzer', and an energy analyzing component based on the Soft Particle Spectrometer (SPS) and its successor, the Spectrographic Particle Imager (SPI). Numerical simulation of each component's operation - consisting of ray-tracing particles through the electrostatic field of each analyzer and collecting statistics on those particles successfully transmitted - is used to determine the energy and angular response functions of each component and the design dimensions that optimize these responses. (orig.)

  6. Digital Simulation-Based Training: A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gegenfurtner, Andreas; Quesada-Pallarès, Carla; Knogler, Maximilian

    2014-01-01

    This study examines how design characteristics in digital simulation-based learning environments moderate self-efficacy and transfer of learning. Drawing on social cognitive theory and the cognitive theory of multimedia learning, the meta-analysis psychometrically cumulated k?=?15 studies of 25 years of research with a total sample size of…

  7. Event-based Simulation Model for Quantum Optics Experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Raedt, H.; Michielsen, K.; Jaeger, G; Khrennikov, A; Schlosshauer, M; Weihs, G

    2011-01-01

    We present a corpuscular simulation model of optical phenomena that does not require the knowledge of the solution of a wave equation of the whole system and reproduces the results of Maxwell's theory by generating detection events one-by-one. The event-based corpuscular model gives a unified

  8. Porting a Java-based Brain Simulation Software to C++

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    A currently available software solution to simulate neural development is Cx3D. However, this software is Java-based, and not ideal for high performance computing. This talk presents our step-by-step porting approach, that uses SWIG as a tool to interface C++ code from Java.

  9. gemcWeb: A Cloud Based Nuclear Physics Simulation Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markelon, Sam

    2017-09-01

    gemcWeb allows users to run nuclear physics simulations from the web. Being completely device agnostic, scientists can run simulations from anywhere with an Internet connection. Having a full user system, gemcWeb allows users to revisit and revise their projects, and share configurations and results with collaborators. gemcWeb is based on simulation software gemc, which is based on standard GEant4. gemcWeb requires no C++, gemc, or GEant4 knowledge. Using a simple but powerful GUI allows users to configure their project from geometries and configurations stored on the deployment server. Simulations are then run on the server, with results being posted to the user, and then securely stored. Python based and open-source, the main version of gemcWeb is hosted internally at Jefferson National Labratory and used by the CLAS12 and Electron-Ion Collider Project groups. However, as the software is open-source, and hosted as a GitHub repository, an instance can be deployed on the open web, or any institution's intra-net. An instance can be configured to host experiments specific to an institution, and the code base can be modified by any individual or group. Special thanks to: Maurizio Ungaro, PhD., creator of gemc; Markus Diefenthaler, PhD., advisor; and Kyungseon Joo, PhD., advisor.

  10. Simulating an elastic bipedal robot based on musculoskeletal modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bortoletto, Roberto; Sartori, Massimo; He, Fuben; Pagello, Enrico

    2012-01-01

    Many of the processes involved into the synthesis of human motion have much in common with problems found in robotics research. This paper describes the modeling and the simulation of a novel bipedal robot based on series elastic actuators [1]. The robot model takes in- spiration from the human

  11. Cost Effective Community Based Dementia Screening: A Markov Model Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin Saito

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Given the dementia epidemic and the increasing cost of healthcare, there is a need to assess the economic benefit of community based dementia screening programs. Materials and Methods. Markov model simulations were generated using data obtained from a community based dementia screening program over a one-year period. The models simulated yearly costs of caring for patients based on clinical transitions beginning in pre dementia and extending for 10 years. Results. A total of 93 individuals (74 female, 19 male were screened for dementia and 12 meeting clinical criteria for either mild cognitive impairment (n=7 or dementia (n=5 were identified. Assuming early therapeutic intervention beginning during the year of dementia detection, Markov model simulations demonstrated 9.8% reduction in cost of dementia care over a ten-year simulation period, primarily through increased duration in mild stages and reduced time in more costly moderate and severe stages. Discussion. Community based dementia screening can reduce healthcare costs associated with caring for demented individuals through earlier detection and treatment, resulting in proportionately reduced time in more costly advanced stages.

  12. Design Heuristics for Authentic Simulation-Based Learning Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ney, Muriel; Gonçalves, Celso; Balacheff, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    Simulation games are games for learning based on a reference in the real world. We propose a model for authenticity in this context as a result of a compromise among learning, playing and realism. In the health game used to apply this model, students interact with characters in the game through phone messages, mail messages, SMS and video.…

  13. Identifying content for simulation-based curricula in urology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nayahangan, Leizl Joy; Hansen, Rikke Bolling; Lindorff-Larsen, Karen Gilboe

    2017-01-01

    to identify technical procedures in urology that should be included in a simulation-based curriculum for residency training. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A national needs assessment was performed using the Delphi method involving 56 experts with significant roles in the education of urologists. Round 1 identified...

  14. The afforestation problem: a heuristic method based on simulated annealing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vidal, Rene Victor Valqui

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents the afforestation problem, that is the location and design of new forest compartments to be planted in a given area. This optimization problem is solved by a two-step heuristic method based on simulated annealing. Tests and experiences with this method are also presented....

  15. Solution of partial differential equations by agent-based simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szilagyi, Miklos N

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this short note is to demonstrate that partial differential equations can be quickly solved by agent-based simulation with high accuracy. There is no need for the solution of large systems of algebraic equations. This method is especially useful for quick determination of potential distributions and demonstration purposes in teaching electromagnetism. (letters and comments)

  16. Toward Developing Authentic Leadership: Team-Based Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapira-Lishchinsky, Orly

    2014-01-01

    Although there is a consensus that authentic leadership should be an essential component in educational leadership, no study to date has ever tried to find whether team-based simulations may promote authentic leadership. The purpose of this study was to identify whether principal trainees can develop authentic leadership through ethical decision…

  17. Students' Emotions in Simulation-Based Medical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keskitalo, Tuulikki; Ruokamo, Heli

    2017-01-01

    Medical education is emotionally charged for many reasons, especially the fact that simulation-based learning is designed to generate emotional experiences. However, there are very few studies that concentrate on learning and emotions, despite widespread interest in the topic, especially within healthcare education. The aim of this research is to…

  18. Fast spot-based multiscale simulations of granular drainage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rycroft, Chris H.; Wong, Yee Lok; Bazant, Martin Z.

    2009-05-22

    We develop a multiscale simulation method for dense granular drainage, based on the recently proposed spot model, where the particle packing flows by local collective displacements in response to diffusing"spots'" of interstitial free volume. By comparing with discrete-element method (DEM) simulations of 55,000 spheres in a rectangular silo, we show that the spot simulation is able to approximately capture many features of drainage, such as packing statistics, particle mixing, and flow profiles. The spot simulation runs two to three orders of magnitude faster than DEM, making it an appropriate method for real-time control or optimization. We demonstrateextensions for modeling particle heaping and avalanching at the free surface, and for simulating the boundary layers of slower flow near walls. We show that the spot simulations are robust and flexible, by demonstrating that they can be used in both event-driven and fixed timestep approaches, and showing that the elastic relaxation step used in the model can be applied much less frequently and still create good results.

  19. An electromechanical based deformable model for soft tissue simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Yongmin; Shirinzadeh, Bijan; Smith, Julian; Gu, Chengfan

    2009-11-01

    Soft tissue deformation is of great importance to surgery simulation. Although a significant amount of research efforts have been dedicated to simulating the behaviours of soft tissues, modelling of soft tissue deformation is still a challenging problem. This paper presents a new deformable model for simulation of soft tissue deformation from the electromechanical viewpoint of soft tissues. Soft tissue deformation is formulated as a reaction-diffusion process coupled with a mechanical load. The mechanical load applied to a soft tissue to cause a deformation is incorporated into the reaction-diffusion system, and consequently distributed among mass points of the soft tissue. Reaction-diffusion of mechanical load and non-rigid mechanics of motion are combined to govern the simulation dynamics of soft tissue deformation. An improved reaction-diffusion model is developed to describe the distribution of the mechanical load in soft tissues. A three-layer artificial cellular neural network is constructed to solve the reaction-diffusion model for real-time simulation of soft tissue deformation. A gradient based method is established to derive internal forces from the distribution of the mechanical load. Integration with a haptic device has also been achieved to simulate soft tissue deformation with haptic feedback. The proposed methodology does not only predict the typical behaviours of living tissues, but it also accepts both local and large-range deformations. It also accommodates isotropic, anisotropic and inhomogeneous deformations by simple modification of diffusion coefficients.

  20. Simulation-based medical education in clinical skills laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akaike, Masashi; Fukutomi, Miki; Nagamune, Masami; Fujimoto, Akiko; Tsuji, Akiko; Ishida, Kazuko; Iwata, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    Clinical skills laboratories have been established in medical institutions as facilities for simulation-based medical education (SBME). SBME is believed to be superior to the traditional style of medical education from the viewpoint of the active and adult learning theories. SBME can provide a learning cycle of debriefing and feedback for learners as well as evaluation of procedures and competency. SBME offers both learners and patients a safe environment for practice and error. In a full-environment simulation, learners can obtain not only technical skills but also non-technical skills, such as leadership, team work, communication, situation awareness, decision-making, and awareness of personal limitations. SBME is also effective for integration of clinical medicine and basic medicine. In addition, technology-enhanced simulation training is associated with beneficial effects for outcomes of knowledge, skills, behaviors, and patient-related outcomes. To perform SBME, effectively, not only simulators including high-fidelity mannequin-type simulators or virtual-reality simulators but also full-time faculties and instructors as professionals of SBME are essential in a clinical skills laboratory for SBME. Clinical skills laboratory is expected to become an integrated medical education center to achieve continuing professional development, integrated learning of basic and clinical medicine, and citizens' participation and cooperation in medical education.

  1. Dynamic Garment Simulation based on Hybrid Bounding Volume Hierarchy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Dongyong

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to solve the computing speed and efficiency problem of existing dynamic clothing simulation, this paper presents a dynamic garment simulation based on a hybrid bounding volume hierarchy. It firstly uses MCASG graph theory to do the primary segmentation for a given three-dimensional human body model. And then it applies K-means cluster to do the secondary segmentation to collect the human body’s upper arms, lower arms, upper legs, lower legs, trunk, hip and woman’s chest as the elementary units of dynamic clothing simulation. According to different shapes of these elementary units, it chooses the closest and most efficient hybrid bounding box to specify these units, such as cylinder bounding box and elliptic cylinder bounding box. During the process of constructing these bounding boxes, it uses the least squares method and slices of the human body to get the related parameters. This approach makes it possible to use the least amount of bounding boxes to create close collision detection regions for the appearance of the human body. A spring-mass model based on a triangular mesh of the clothing model is finally constructed for dynamic simulation. The simulation result shows the feasibility and superiority of the method described.

  2. Team play in surgical education: a simulation-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marr, Mollie; Hemmert, Keith; Nguyen, Andrew H; Combs, Ronnie; Annamalai, Alagappan; Miller, George; Pachter, H Leon; Turner, James; Rifkind, Kenneth; Cohen, Steven M

    2012-01-01

    Simulation-based training provides a low-stress learning environment where real-life emergencies can be practiced. Simulation can improve surgical education and patient care in crisis situations through a team approach emphasizing interpersonal and communication skills. This study assessed the effects of simulation-based training in the context of trauma resuscitation in teams of trainees. In a New York State-certified level I trauma center, trauma alerts were assessed by a standardized video review process. Simulation training was provided in various trauma situations followed by a debriefing period. The outcomes measured included the number of healthcare workers involved in the resuscitation, the percentage of healthcare workers in role position, time to intubation, time to intubation from paralysis, time to obtain first imaging study, time to leave trauma bay for computed tomography scan or the operating room, presence of team leader, and presence of spinal stabilization. Thirty cases were video analyzed presimulation and postsimulation training. The two data sets were compared via a 1-sided t test for significance (p role positions increased from 57.8% to 83.6% (p = 0.46). The time to intubation from paralysis decreased from 3.9 to 2.8 minutes (p team leader increased from 64% to 90% (p team interaction and educational competencies. Providing simulation training as a tool for surgical education may enhance patient care. Copyright © 2012 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Current concepts in simulation-based trauma education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, Robert A; Ali, Jameel

    2008-11-01

    The use of simulation-based technology in trauma education has focused on providing a safe and effective alternative to the more traditional methods that are used to teach technical skills and critical concepts in trauma resuscitation. Trauma team training using simulation-based technology is also being used to develop skills in leadership, team-information sharing, communication, and decision-making. The integration of simulators into medical student curriculum, residency training, and continuing medical education has been strongly recommended by the American College of Surgeons as an innovative means of enhancing patient safety, reducing medical errors, and performing a systematic evaluation of various competencies. Advanced human patient simulators are increasingly being used in trauma as an evaluation tool to assess clinical performance and to teach and reinforce essential knowledge, skills, and abilities. A number of specialty simulators in trauma and critical care have also been designed to meet these educational objectives. Ongoing educational research is still needed to validate long-term retention of knowledge and skills, provide reliable methods to evaluate teaching effectiveness and performance, and to demonstrate improvement in patient safety and overall quality of care.

  4. An FPGA-Based Massively Parallel Neuromorphic Cortex Simulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Runchun M. Wang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a massively parallel and scalable neuromorphic cortex simulator designed for simulating large and structurally connected spiking neural networks, such as complex models of various areas of the cortex. The main novelty of this work is the abstraction of a neuromorphic architecture into clusters represented by minicolumns and hypercolumns, analogously to the fundamental structural units observed in neurobiology. Without this approach, simulating large-scale fully connected networks needs prohibitively large memory to store look-up tables for point-to-point connections. Instead, we use a novel architecture, based on the structural connectivity in the neocortex, such that all the required parameters and connections can be stored in on-chip memory. The cortex simulator can be easily reconfigured for simulating different neural networks without any change in hardware structure by programming the memory. A hierarchical communication scheme allows one neuron to have a fan-out of up to 200 k neurons. As a proof-of-concept, an implementation on one Altera Stratix V FPGA was able to simulate 20 million to 2.6 billion leaky-integrate-and-fire (LIF neurons in real time. We verified the system by emulating a simplified auditory cortex (with 100 million neurons. This cortex simulator achieved a low power dissipation of 1.62 μW per neuron. With the advent of commercially available FPGA boards, our system offers an accessible and scalable tool for the design, real-time simulation, and analysis of large-scale spiking neural networks.

  5. Nucleonica. Web-based software tools for simulation and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magill, J.; Dreher, R.; Soti, Z.

    2014-01-01

    The authors present a description of the Nucleonica web-based portal for simulation and analysis for a wide range of commonly encountered nuclear science applications. Advantages of a web-based approach include availability wherever there is internet access, intuitive user-friendly interface, remote access to high-power computing resources, and continual maintenance, improvement, and addition of tools and techniques common to the nuclear science industry. A description of the nuclear data resources, and some applications is given.

  6. Towards an entropy-based detached-eddy simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Rui; Yan, Chao; Li, XinLiang; Kong, WeiXuan

    2013-10-01

    A concept of entropy increment ratio ( s¯) is introduced for compressible turbulence simulation through a series of direct numerical simulations (DNS). s¯ represents the dissipation rate per unit mechanical energy with the benefit of independence of freestream Mach numbers. Based on this feature, we construct the shielding function f s to describe the boundary layer region and propose an entropy-based detached-eddy simulation method (SDES). This approach follows the spirit of delayed detached-eddy simulation (DDES) proposed by Spalart et al. in 2005, but it exhibits much better behavior after their performances are compared in the following flows, namely, pure attached flow with thick boundary layer (a supersonic flat-plate flow with high Reynolds number), fully separated flow (the supersonic base flow), and separated-reattached flow (the supersonic cavity-ramp flow). The Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) resolved region is reliably preserved and the modeled stress depletion (MSD) phenomenon which is inherent in DES and DDES is partly alleviated. Moreover, this new hybrid strategy is simple and general, making it applicable to other models related to the boundary layer predictions.

  7. [Does simulator-based team training improve patient safety?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trentzsch, H; Urban, B; Sandmeyer, B; Hammer, T; Strohm, P C; Lazarovici, M

    2013-10-01

    Patient safety became paramount in medicine as well as in emergency medicine after it was recognized that preventable, adverse events significantly contributed to morbidity and mortality during hospital stay. The underlying errors cannot usually be explained by medical technical inadequacies only but are more due to difficulties in the transition of theoretical knowledge into tasks under the conditions of clinical reality. Crew Resource Management and Human Factors which determine safety and efficiency of humans in complex situations are suitable to control such sources of error. Simulation significantly improved safety in high reliability organizations, such as the aerospace industry.Thus, simulator-based team training has also been proposed for medical areas. As such training is consuming in cost, time and human resources, the question of the cost-benefit ratio obviously arises. This review outlines the effects of simulator-based team training on patient safety. Such course formats are not only capable of creating awareness and improvements in safety culture but also improve technical team performance and emphasize team performance as a clinical competence. A few studies even indicated improvement of patient-centered outcome, such as a reduced rate of adverse events but further studies are required in this respect. In summary, simulator-based team training should be accepted as a suitable strategy to improve patient safety.

  8. Hyperspectral imaging simulation of object under sea-sky background

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Biao; Lin, Jia-xuan; Gao, Wei; Yue, Hui

    2016-10-01

    Remote sensing image simulation plays an important role in spaceborne/airborne load demonstration and algorithm development. Hyperspectral imaging is valuable in marine monitoring, search and rescue. On the demand of spectral imaging of objects under the complex sea scene, physics based simulation method of spectral image of object under sea scene is proposed. On the development of an imaging simulation model considering object, background, atmosphere conditions, sensor, it is able to examine the influence of wind speed, atmosphere conditions and other environment factors change on spectral image quality under complex sea scene. Firstly, the sea scattering model is established based on the Philips sea spectral model, the rough surface scattering theory and the water volume scattering characteristics. The measured bi directional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) data of objects is fit to the statistical model. MODTRAN software is used to obtain solar illumination on the sea, sky brightness, the atmosphere transmittance from sea to sensor and atmosphere backscattered radiance, and Monte Carlo ray tracing method is used to calculate the sea surface object composite scattering and spectral image. Finally, the object spectrum is acquired by the space transformation, radiation degradation and adding the noise. The model connects the spectrum image with the environmental parameters, the object parameters, and the sensor parameters, which provide a tool for the load demonstration and algorithm development.

  9. Simulation-based interpersonal communication skills training for neurosurgical residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harnof, Sagi; Hadani, Moshe; Ziv, Amitai; Berkenstadt, Haim

    2013-09-01

    Communication skills are an important component of the neurosurgery residency training program. We developed a simulation-based training module for neurosurgery residents in which medical, communication and ethical dilemmas are presented by role-playing actors. To assess the first national simulation-based communication skills training for neurosurgical residents. Eight scenarios covering different aspects of neurosurgery were developed by our team: (1) obtaining informed consent for an elective surgery, (2) discharge of a patient following elective surgery, (3) dealing with an unsatisfied patient, (4) delivering news of intraoperative complications, (5) delivering news of a brain tumor to parents of a 5 year old boy, (6) delivering news of brain death to a family member, (7) obtaining informed consent for urgent surgery from the grandfather of a 7 year old boy with an epidural hematoma, and (8) dealing with a case of child abuse. Fifteen neurosurgery residents from all major medical centers in Israel participated in the training. The session was recorded on video and was followed by videotaped debriefing by a senior neurosurgeon and communication expert and by feedback questionnaires. All trainees participated in two scenarios and observed another two. Participants largely agreed that the actors simulating patients represented real patients and family members and that the videotaped debriefing contributed to the teaching of professional skills. Simulation-based communication skill training is effective, and together with thorough debriefing is an excellent learning and practical method for imparting communication skills to neurosurgery residents. Such simulation-based training will ultimately be part of the national residency program.

  10. Simulation-based training in brain death determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDougall, Benjamin J; Robinson, Jennifer D; Kappus, Liana; Sudikoff, Stephanie N; Greer, David M

    2014-12-01

    Despite straightforward guidelines on brain death determination by the American Academy of Neurology (AAN), substantial practice variability exists internationally, between states, and among institutions. We created a simulation-based training course on proper determination based on the AAN practice parameters to address and assess knowledge and practice gaps at our institution. Our intervention consisted of a didactic course and a simulation exercise, and was bookended by before and after multiple-choice tests. The 40-min didactic course, including a video demonstration, covered all aspects of the brain death examination. Simulation sessions utilized a SimMan 3G manikin and involved a complete examination, including an apnea test. Possible confounders and signs incompatible with brain death were embedded throughout. Facilitators evaluated performance with a 26-point checklist based on the most recent AAN guidelines. A senior neurologist conducted all aspects of the course, including the didactic session, simulation, and debriefing session. Ninety physicians from multiple specialties have participated in the didactic session, 38 of whom have completed the simulation. Pre-test scores were poor (41.4 %), with attendings scoring higher than residents (46.6 vs. 40.4 %, p = 0.07), and neurologists and neurosurgeons significantly outperforming other specialists (53.9 vs. 38.9 %, p = 0.003). Post-test scores (73.3 %) were notably higher than pre-test scores (45.4 %). Participant feedback has been uniformly positive. Baseline knowledge of brain death determination among providers was low but improved greatly after the course. Our intervention represents an effective model that can be replicated at other institutions to train clinicians in the determination of brain death according to evidence-based guidelines.

  11. AUV-Based Plume Tracking: A Simulation Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Awantha Jayasiri

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a simulation study of an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV navigation system operating in a GPS-denied environment. The AUV navigation method makes use of underwater transponder positioning and requires only one transponder. A multirate unscented Kalman filter is used to determine the AUV orientation and position by fusing high-rate sensor data and low-rate information. The paper also proposes a gradient-based, efficient, and adaptive novel algorithm for plume boundary tracking missions. The algorithm follows a centralized approach and it includes path optimization features based on gradient information. The proposed algorithm is implemented in simulation on the AUV-based navigation system and successful boundary tracking results are obtained.

  12. A Geometrical-based Vertical Gain Correction for Signal Strength Prediction of Downtilted Base Station Antennas in Urban Areas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodriguez, Ignacio; Nguyen, Huan Cong; Sørensen, Troels Bundgaard

    2012-01-01

    -based extension to standard empirical path loss prediction models can give quite reasonable accuracy in predicting the signal strength from tilted base station antennas in small urban macro-cells. Our evaluation is based on measurements on several sectors in a 2.6 GHz Long Term Evolution (LTE) cellular network......, with electrical antenna downtilt in the range from 0 to 10 degrees, as well as predictions based on ray-tracing and 3D building databases covering the measurement area. Although the calibrated ray-tracing predictions are highly accurate compared with the measured data, the combined LOS/NLOS COST-WI model...

  13. Simulation-based Strategies for Smart Demand Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ines Leobner

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Demand Response can be seen as one effective way to harmonize demand and supply in order to achieve high self-coverage of energy consumption by means of renewable energy sources. This paper presents two different simulation-based concepts to integrate demand-response strategies into energy management systems in the customer domain of the Smart Grid. The first approach is a Model Predictive Control of the heating and cooling system of a low-energy office building. The second concept aims at industrial Demand Side Management by integrating energy use optimization into industrial automation systems. Both approaches are targeted at day-ahead planning. Furthermore, insights gained into the implications of the concepts onto the design of the model, simulation and optimization will be discussed. While both approaches share a similar architecture, different modelling and simulation approaches were required by the use cases.

  14. Man-machine interfaces analysis system based on computer simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Xiaoming; Gao Zuying; Zhou Zhiwei; Zhao Bingquan

    2004-01-01

    The paper depicts a software assessment system, Dynamic Interaction Analysis Support (DIAS), based on computer simulation technology for man-machine interfaces (MMI) of a control room. It employs a computer to simulate the operation procedures of operations on man-machine interfaces in a control room, provides quantified assessment, and at the same time carries out analysis on operational error rate of operators by means of techniques for human error rate prediction. The problems of placing man-machine interfaces in a control room and of arranging instruments can be detected from simulation results. DIAS system can provide good technical supports to the design and improvement of man-machine interfaces of the main control room of a nuclear power plant

  15. Formalizing Knowledge in Multi-Scale Agent-Based Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somogyi, Endre; Sluka, James P; Glazier, James A

    2016-10-01

    Multi-scale, agent-based simulations of cellular and tissue biology are increasingly common. These simulations combine and integrate a range of components from different domains. Simulations continuously create, destroy and reorganize constituent elements causing their interactions to dynamically change. For example, the multi-cellular tissue development process coordinates molecular, cellular and tissue scale objects with biochemical, biomechanical, spatial and behavioral processes to form a dynamic network. Different domain specific languages can describe these components in isolation, but cannot describe their interactions. No current programming language is designed to represent in human readable and reusable form the domain specific knowledge contained in these components and interactions. We present a new hybrid programming language paradigm that naturally expresses the complex multi-scale objects and dynamic interactions in a unified way and allows domain knowledge to be captured, searched, formalized, extracted and reused.

  16. A Simulation Base Investigation of High Latency Space Systems Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zu Qun; Crues, Edwin Z.; Bielski, Paul; Moore, Michael

    2017-01-01

    NASA's human space program has developed considerable experience with near Earth space operations. Although NASA has experience with deep space robotic missions, NASA has little substantive experience with human deep space operations. Even in the Apollo program, the missions lasted only a few weeks and the communication latencies were on the order of seconds. Human missions beyond the relatively close confines of the Earth-Moon system will involve missions with durations measured in months and communications latencies measured in minutes. To minimize crew risk and to maximize mission success, NASA needs to develop a better understanding of the implications of these types of mission durations and communication latencies on vehicle design, mission design and flight controller interaction with the crew. To begin to address these needs, NASA performed a study using a physics-based subsystem simulation to investigate the interactions between spacecraft crew and a ground-based mission control center for vehicle subsystem operations across long communication delays. The simulation, built with a subsystem modeling tool developed at NASA's Johnson Space Center, models the life support system of a Mars transit vehicle. The simulation contains models of the cabin atmosphere and pressure control system, electrical power system, drinking and waste water systems, internal and external thermal control systems, and crew metabolic functions. The simulation has three interfaces: 1) a real-time crew interface that can be use to monitor and control the vehicle subsystems; 2) a mission control center interface with data transport delays up to 15 minutes each way; 3) a real-time simulation test conductor interface that can be use to insert subsystem malfunctions and observe the interactions between the crew, ground, and simulated vehicle. The study was conducted at the 21st NASA Extreme Environment Mission Operations (NEEMO) mission between July 18th and Aug 3rd of year 2016. The NEEMO

  17. Simulation-based ureteroscopy training: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunckhorst, Oliver; Aydin, Abdullatif; Abboudi, Hamid; Sahai, Arun; Khan, Muhammad Shamim; Dasgupta, Prokar; Ahmed, Kamran

    2015-01-01

    Simulation is a common adjunct to operative training and various modalities exist for ureteroscopy. This systematic review aims the following: (1) to identify available ureteroscopy simulators, (2) to explore evidence for their effectiveness using characteristic criterion, and (3) to provide recommendations for simulation-based ureteroscopy training. The preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analysis statement guidelines were used. A literature search was performed using the PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library databases. In total, 20 articles concerning ureteroscopy simulators were included. Overall, 3 high-fidelity bench models are available. The Uro-Scopic Trainer has demonstrated face, construct, and concurrent validity, whereas the Scope Trainer has undergone content, construct, and predictive validation. The adult ureteroscopy trainer has demonstrated face, content, and construct validity. The URO Mentor is the only available ureteroscopy virtual-reality system; 10 studies were identified demonstrating its face, content, construct, concurrent, and predictive validity. The Uro-Scopic Trainer, the Scope Trainer, and the URO Mentor have demonstrated high educational impact. A noncommercially available, low-fidelity model has demonstrated effectiveness comparable to its high-fidelity counterpart at 185 times lesser than the price of the Uro-Scopic Trainer. The use of porcine models has also been described in 3 studies but require further study. Valid models are available for simulation-based ureteroscopy training. However, there is a lack of many high-level studies conducted, and further investigation is required in this area. Furthermore, current research focuses on the technical skills acquisition with little research conducted on nontechnical skills acquisition within ureteroscopy. The next step for ureteroscopy training is a formalized and validated curriculum, incorporating simulation, training models, development of nontechnical skills

  18. GPU based numerical simulation of core shooting process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-zhong Zhang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Core shooting process is the most widely used technique to make sand cores and it plays an important role in the quality of sand cores. Although numerical simulation can hopefully optimize the core shooting process, research on numerical simulation of the core shooting process is very limited. Based on a two-fluid model (TFM and a kinetic-friction constitutive correlation, a program for 3D numerical simulation of the core shooting process has been developed and achieved good agreements with in-situ experiments. To match the needs of engineering applications, a graphics processing unit (GPU has also been used to improve the calculation efficiency. The parallel algorithm based on the Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA platform can significantly decrease computing time by multi-threaded GPU. In this work, the program accelerated by CUDA parallelization method was developed and the accuracy of the calculations was ensured by comparing with in-situ experimental results photographed by a high-speed camera. The design and optimization of the parallel algorithm were discussed. The simulation result of a sand core test-piece indicated the improvement of the calculation efficiency by GPU. The developed program has also been validated by in-situ experiments with a transparent core-box, a high-speed camera, and a pressure measuring system. The computing time of the parallel program was reduced by nearly 95% while the simulation result was still quite consistent with experimental data. The GPU parallelization method can successfully solve the problem of low computational efficiency of the 3D sand shooting simulation program, and thus the developed GPU program is appropriate for engineering applications.

  19. A virtual reality based simulator for learning nasogastric tube placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Kup-Sze; He, Xuejian; Chiang, Vico Chung-Lim; Deng, Zhaohong

    2015-02-01

    Nasogastric tube (NGT) placement is a common clinical procedure where a plastic tube is inserted into the stomach through the nostril for feeding or drainage. However, the placement is a blind process in which the tube may be mistakenly inserted into other locations, leading to unexpected complications or fatal incidents. The placement techniques are conventionally acquired by practising on unrealistic rubber mannequins or on humans. In this paper, a virtual reality based training simulation system is proposed to facilitate the training of NGT placement. It focuses on the simulation of tube insertion and the rendering of the feedback forces with a haptic device. A hybrid force model is developed to compute the forces analytically or numerically under different conditions, including the situations when the patient is swallowing or when the tube is buckled at the nostril. To ensure real-time interactive simulations, an offline simulation approach is adopted to obtain the relationship between the insertion depth and insertion force using a non-linear finite element method. The offline dataset is then used to generate real-time feedback forces by interpolation. The virtual training process is logged quantitatively with metrics that can be used for assessing objective performance and tracking progress. The system has been evaluated by nursing professionals. They found that the haptic feeling produced by the simulated forces is similar to their experience during real NGT insertion. The proposed system provides a new educational tool to enhance conventional training in NGT placement. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. An introduction to statistical computing a simulation-based approach

    CERN Document Server

    Voss, Jochen

    2014-01-01

    A comprehensive introduction to sampling-based methods in statistical computing The use of computers in mathematics and statistics has opened up a wide range of techniques for studying otherwise intractable problems.  Sampling-based simulation techniques are now an invaluable tool for exploring statistical models.  This book gives a comprehensive introduction to the exciting area of sampling-based methods. An Introduction to Statistical Computing introduces the classical topics of random number generation and Monte Carlo methods.  It also includes some advanced met

  1. Simulation-Based Abdominal Ultrasound Training – A Systematic Review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mia L.; Ewertsen, Caroline; Konge, Lars

    2016-01-01

    of Science, and the Cochrane Library was searched. Articles were divided into three categories based on study design (randomized controlled trials, before-and-after studies and descriptive studies) and assessed for level of evidence using the Oxford Centre for Evidence Based Medicine (OCEBM) system......PURPOSE: The aim is to provide a complete overview of the different simulation-based training options for abdominal ultrasound and to explore the evidence of their effect. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This systematic review was performed according to the PRISMA guidelines and Medline, Embase, Web...

  2. Two new methods used to simulate the circumferential solar flux density concentrated on the absorber of a parabolic trough solar collector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Minghuan; Wang, Zhifeng; Sun, Feihu

    2016-05-01

    The optical efficiencies of a solar trough concentrator are important to the whole thermal performance of the solar collector, and the outer surface of the tube absorber is a key interface of energy flux. So it is necessary to simulate and analyze the concentrated solar flux density distributions on the tube absorber of a parabolic trough solar collector for various sun beam incident angles, with main optical errors considered. Since the solar trough concentrators are linear focusing, it is much of interest to investigate the solar flux density distribution on the cross-section profile of the tube absorber, rather than the flux density distribution along the focal line direction. Although a few integral approaches based on the "solar cone" concept were developed to compute the concentrated flux density for some simple trough concentrator geometries, all those integral approaches needed special integration routines, meanwhile, the optical parameters and geometrical properties of collectors also couldn't be changed conveniently. Flexible Monte Carlo ray trace (MCRT) methods are widely used to simulate the more accurate concentrated flux density distribution for compound parabolic solar trough concentrators, while generally they are quite time consuming. In this paper, we first mainly introduce a new backward ray tracing (BRT) method combined with the lumped effective solar cone, to simulate the cross-section flux density on the region of interest of the tube absorber. For BRT, bundles of rays are launched at absorber-surface points of interest, directly go through the glass cover of the absorber, strike on the uniformly sampled mirror segment centers in the close-related surface region of the parabolic reflector, and then direct to the effective solar cone around the incident sun beam direction after the virtual backward reflection. All the optical errors are convoluted into the effective solar cone. The brightness distribution of the effective solar cone is supposed

  3. An Individual-based Probabilistic Model for Fish Stock Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Buti

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available We define an individual-based probabilistic model of a sole (Solea solea behaviour. The individual model is given in terms of an Extended Probabilistic Discrete Timed Automaton (EPDTA, a new formalism that is introduced in the paper and that is shown to be interpretable as a Markov decision process. A given EPDTA model can be probabilistically model-checked by giving a suitable translation into syntax accepted by existing model-checkers. In order to simulate the dynamics of a given population of soles in different environmental scenarios, an agent-based simulation environment is defined in which each agent implements the behaviour of the given EPDTA model. By varying the probabilities and the characteristic functions embedded in the EPDTA model it is possible to represent different scenarios and to tune the model itself by comparing the results of the simulations with real data about the sole stock in the North Adriatic sea, available from the recent project SoleMon. The simulator is presented and made available for its adaptation to other species.

  4. Simulating classroom lessons : an agent-based attempt

    OpenAIRE

    Ingram, Fred; Brooks, Roger John

    2018-01-01

    This is an interim report on a project to construct an agent-based simulation that reproduces some of the interactions between students and their teacher in classroom lessons. In a pilot study, the activities of 67 students and 7 teachers during 40 lessons were recorded using a data collection instrument that currently captures 17 student states and 15 teacher states. These data enabled various conceptual models to be explored, providing empirical values and distributions for the model parame...

  5. Invariance and universality in social agent-based simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cioffi-Revilla, Claudio

    2002-01-01

    Agent-based simulation models have a promising future in the social sciences, from political science to anthropology, economics, and sociology. To realize their full scientific potential, however, these models must address a set of key problems, such as the number of interacting agents and their geometry, network topology, time calibration, phenomenological calibration, structural stability, power laws, and other substantive and methodological issues. This paper discusses and highlights these problems and outlines some solutions. PMID:12011412

  6. Designing and simulating a nitinol-based micro ejector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yesid Mora Sierra

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes pico-droplet ejector design and simulation. The actuation system was based on two interconnected nitinol membranes’ shape memory effect. Ejected volume was 12pL and it operated at 30°C to 64°C. Ejecting excitation voltage was 12V and the ejecting energy required by actuator operation was 26µJ per drop. These pico-liter ejectors could have applications in making, lubricating and cooling integrated circuits.

  7. Enhancing food engineering education with interactive web-based simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Alexandros Koulouris; Georgios Aroutidis; Dimitrios Vardalis; Petros Giannoulis; Paraskevi Karakosta

    2015-01-01

    In the traditional deductive approach in teaching any engineering topic, teachers would first expose students to the derivation of the equations that govern the behavior of a physical system and then demonstrate the use of equations through a limited number of textbook examples. This methodology, however, is rarely adequate to unmask the cause-effect and quantitative relationships between the system variables that the equations embody. Web-based simulation, which is the integration of simulat...

  8. Beam-based Feedback Simulations for the NLC Linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendrickson, Linda

    2000-01-01

    Extensive beam-based feedback systems are planned as an integral part of the Next Linear Collider (NLC) control system. Wakefield effects are a significant influence on the feedback design, imposing both architectural and algorithmic constraints. Studies are in progress to assure the optimal selection of devices and to refine and confirm the algorithms for the system design. The authors show the results of initial simulations, along with evaluations of system response for various conditions of ground motion and other operational disturbances

  9. A Bacterial-Based Algorithm to Simulate Complex Adaptative Systems

    OpenAIRE

    González Rodríguez, Diego; Hernández Carrión, José Rodolfo

    2014-01-01

    Paper presented at the 13th International Conference on Simulation of Adaptive Behavior which took place at Castellón, Spain in 2014, July 22-25. Bacteria have demonstrated an amazing capacity to overcome envi-ronmental changes by collective adaptation through genetic exchanges. Using a distributed communication system and sharing individual strategies, bacteria propagate mutations as innovations that allow them to survive in different envi-ronments. In this paper we present an agent-based...

  10. Simulation based optimization on automated fibre placement process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Shi

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, a software simulation (Autodesk TruPlan & TruFiber) based method is proposed to optimize the automate fibre placement (AFP) process. Different types of manufacturability analysis are introduced to predict potential defects. Advanced fibre path generation algorithms are compared with respect to geometrically different parts. Major manufacturing data have been taken into consideration prior to the tool paths generation to achieve high success rate of manufacturing.

  11. Concept of operator support system based on cognitive simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasou, Kunihide; Takano, Kenichi

    1999-01-01

    Hazardous technologies such chemical plants, nuclear power plants, etc. have introduced multi-layered defenses to prevent accidents. One of those defenses is experienced operators in control rooms. Once an abnormal condition occurs, they are the front line people to cope with it. Therefore, operators' quick recognition of the plant conditions and fast decision making on responses are quite important for trouble shooting. In order to help operators to deal with abnormalities in process plants, lots of efforts had been done to develop operator support systems since early 1980s (IAEA, 1993). However, the boom in developing operator support systems has slumped due to the limitations of knowledge engineering, artificial knowledge, etc (Yamamoto, 1998). The limitations had also biased the focus of the system development to abnormality detection, root cause diagnosis, etc (Hajek, Hashemi, Sharma and Chandrasekaran, 1986). Information or guidance about future plant behavior and strategies/tactics to deal with abnormal events are important and helpful for operators but researches and development of those systems made a belated start. Before developing these kinds of system, it is essential to understand how operators deal with abnormalities. CRIEPI has been conducting a project to develop a computer system that simulates behavior of operators dealing with abnormal operating conditions in a nuclear power plant. This project had two stages. In the first stage, the authors developed a prototype system that simulates behavior of a team facing abnormal events in a very simplified power plant (Sasou, Takano and Yoshimura, 1995). In the second stage, the authors applied the simulation technique developed in the first stage to construct a system to simulate a team's behavior in a nuclear power plant. This paper briefly summarizes the simulation system developed in the second stage, main mechanism for the simulation and the concept of an operator support system based on this

  12. Simulation-based artifact correction (SBAC) for metrological computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Joscha; Leinweber, Carsten; Sawall, Stefan; Stoschus, Henning; Ballach, Frederic; Müller, Tobias; Hammer, Michael; Christoph, Ralf; Kachelrieß, Marc

    2017-06-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is a valuable tool for the metrolocical assessment of industrial components. However, the application of CT to the investigation of highly attenuating objects or multi-material components is often restricted by the presence of CT artifacts caused by beam hardening, x-ray scatter, off-focal radiation, partial volume effects or the cone-beam reconstruction itself. In order to overcome this limitation, this paper proposes an approach to calculate a correction term that compensates for the contribution of artifacts and thus enables an appropriate assessment of these components using CT. Therefore, we make use of computer simulations of the CT measurement process. Based on an appropriate model of the object, e.g. an initial reconstruction or a CAD model, two simulations are carried out. One simulation considers all physical effects that cause artifacts using dedicated analytic methods as well as Monte Carlo-based models. The other one represents an ideal CT measurement i.e. a measurement in parallel beam geometry with a monochromatic, point-like x-ray source and no x-ray scattering. Thus, the difference between these simulations is an estimate for the present artifacts and can be used to correct the acquired projection data or the corresponding CT reconstruction, respectively. The performance of the proposed approach is evaluated using simulated as well as measured data of single and multi-material components. Our approach yields CT reconstructions that are nearly free of artifacts and thereby clearly outperforms commonly used artifact reduction algorithms in terms of image quality. A comparison against tactile reference measurements demonstrates the ability of the proposed approach to increase the accuracy of the metrological assessment significantly.

  13. Parallel PDE-Based Simulations Using the Common Component Architecture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McInnes, Lois C.; Allan, Benjamin A.; Armstrong, Robert; Benson, Steven J.; Bernholdt, David E.; Dahlgren, Tamara L.; Diachin, Lori; Krishnan, Manoj Kumar; Kohl, James A.; Larson, J. Walter; Lefantzi, Sophia; Nieplocha, Jarek; Norris, Boyana; Parker, Steven G.; Ray, Jaideep; Zhou, Shujia

    2006-01-01

    The complexity of parallel PDE-based simulations continues to increase as multimodel, multiphysics, and multi-institutional projects become widespread. A goal of component based software engineering in such large-scale simulations is to help manage this complexity by enabling better interoperability among various codes that have been independently developed by different groups. The Common Component Architecture (CCA) Forum is defining a component architecture specification to address the challenges of high-performance scientific computing. In addition, several execution frameworks, supporting infrastructure, and general purpose components are being developed. Furthermore, this group is collaborating with others in the high-performance computing community to design suites of domain-specific component interface specifications and underlying implementations. This chapter discusses recent work on leveraging these CCA efforts in parallel PDE-based simulations involving accelerator design, climate modeling, combustion, and accidental fires and explosions. We explain how component technology helps to address the different challenges posed by each of these applications, and we highlight how component interfaces built on existing parallel toolkits facilitate the reuse of software for parallel mesh manipulation, discretization, linear algebra, integration, optimization, and parallel data redistribution. We also present performance data to demonstrate the suitability of this approach, and we discuss strategies for applying component technologies to both new and existing applications

  14. COEL: A Cloud-based Reaction Network Simulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter eBanda

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Chemical Reaction Networks (CRNs are a formalism to describe the macroscopic behavior of chemical systems. We introduce COEL, a web- and cloud-based CRN simulation framework that does not require a local installation, runs simulations on a large computational grid, provides reliable database storage, and offers a visually pleasing and intuitive user interface. We present an overview of the underlying software, the technologies, and the main architectural approaches employed. Some of COEL's key features include ODE-based simulations of CRNs and multicompartment reaction networks with rich interaction options, a built-in plotting engine, automatic DNA-strand displacement transformation and visualization, SBML/Octave/Matlab export, and a built-in genetic-algorithm-based optimization toolbox for rate constants.COEL is an open-source project hosted on GitHub (http://dx.doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.46544, which allows interested research groups to deploy it on their own sever. Regular users can simply use the web instance at no cost at http://coel-sim.org. The framework is ideally suited for a collaborative use in both research and education.

  15. Projection model for flame chemiluminescence tomography based on lens imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Minggang; Zhuang, Jihui

    2018-04-01

    For flame chemiluminescence tomography (FCT) based on lens imaging, the projection model is essential because it formulates the mathematical relation between the flame projections captured by cameras and the chemiluminescence field, and, through this relation, the field is reconstructed. This work proposed the blurry-spot (BS) model, which takes more universal assumptions and has higher accuracy than the widely applied line-of-sight model. By combining the geometrical camera model and the thin-lens equation, the BS model takes into account perspective effect of the camera lens; by combining ray-tracing technique and Monte Carlo simulation, it also considers inhomogeneous distribution of captured radiance on the image plane. Performance of these two models in FCT was numerically compared, and results showed that using the BS model could lead to better reconstruction quality in wider application ranges.

  16. A computer code to simulate X-ray imaging techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duvauchelle, Philippe; Freud, Nicolas; Kaftandjian, Valerie; Babot, Daniel

    2000-01-01

    A computer code was developed to simulate the operation of radiographic, radioscopic or tomographic devices. The simulation is based on ray-tracing techniques and on the X-ray attenuation law. The use of computer-aided drawing (CAD) models enables simulations to be carried out with complex three-dimensional (3D) objects and the geometry of every component of the imaging chain, from the source to the detector, can be defined. Geometric unsharpness, for example, can be easily taken into account, even in complex configurations. Automatic translations or rotations of the object can be performed to simulate radioscopic or tomographic image acquisition. Simulations can be carried out with monochromatic or polychromatic beam spectra. This feature enables, for example, the beam hardening phenomenon to be dealt with or dual energy imaging techniques to be studied. The simulation principle is completely deterministic and consequently the computed images present no photon noise. Nevertheless, the variance of the signal associated with each pixel of the detector can be determined, which enables contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) maps to be computed, in order to predict quantitatively the detectability of defects in the inspected object. The CNR is a relevant indicator for optimizing the experimental parameters. This paper provides several examples of simulated images that illustrate some of the rich possibilities offered by our software. Depending on the simulation type, the computation time order of magnitude can vary from 0.1 s (simple radiographic projection) up to several hours (3D tomography) on a PC, with a 400 MHz microprocessor. Our simulation tool proves to be useful in developing new specific applications, in choosing the most suitable components when designing a new testing chain, and in saving time by reducing the number of experimental tests

  17. A computer code to simulate X-ray imaging techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duvauchelle, Philippe E-mail: philippe.duvauchelle@insa-lyon.fr; Freud, Nicolas; Kaftandjian, Valerie; Babot, Daniel

    2000-09-01

    A computer code was developed to simulate the operation of radiographic, radioscopic or tomographic devices. The simulation is based on ray-tracing techniques and on the X-ray attenuation law. The use of computer-aided drawing (CAD) models enables simulations to be carried out with complex three-dimensional (3D) objects and the geometry of every component of the imaging chain, from the source to the detector, can be defined. Geometric unsharpness, for example, can be easily taken into account, even in complex configurations. Automatic translations or rotations of the object can be performed to simulate radioscopic or tomographic image acquisition. Simulations can be carried out with monochromatic or polychromatic beam spectra. This feature enables, for example, the beam hardening phenomenon to be dealt with or dual energy imaging techniques to be studied. The simulation principle is completely deterministic and consequently the computed images present no photon noise. Nevertheless, the variance of the signal associated with each pixel of the detector can be determined, which enables contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) maps to be computed, in order to predict quantitatively the detectability of defects in the inspected object. The CNR is a relevant indicator for optimizing the experimental parameters. This paper provides several examples of simulated images that illustrate some of the rich possibilities offered by our software. Depending on the simulation type, the computation time order of magnitude can vary from 0.1 s (simple radiographic projection) up to several hours (3D tomography) on a PC, with a 400 MHz microprocessor. Our simulation tool proves to be useful in developing new specific applications, in choosing the most suitable components when designing a new testing chain, and in saving time by reducing the number of experimental tests.

  18. A Rules-Based Simulation of Bacterial Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikel-Stites, Maxwell; Staples, Anne

    2015-11-01

    In sufficiently dense bacterial populations (>40% bacteria by volume), unusual collective swimming behaviors have been consistently observed, resembling von Karman vortex streets. The source of these collective swimming behavior has yet to be fully determined, and as of yet, no research has been conducted that would define whether or not this behavior is derived predominantly from the properties of the surrounding media, or if it is an emergent behavior as a result of the ``rules'' governing the behavior of individual bacteria. The goal of this research is to ascertain whether or not it is possible to design a simulation that can replicate the qualitative behavior of the densely packed bacterial populations using only behavioral rules to govern the actions of each bacteria, with the physical properties of the media being neglected. The results of the simulation will address whether or not it is possible for the system's overall behavior to be driven exclusively by these rule-based dynamics. In order to examine this, the behavioral simulation was written in MATLAB on a fixed grid, and updated sequentially with the bacterial behavior, including randomized tumbling, gathering and perceptual sub-functions. If the simulation is successful, it will serve as confirmation that it is possible to generate these qualitatively vortex-like behaviors without specific physical media (that the phenomena arises in emergent fashion from behavioral rules), or as evidence that the observed behavior requires some specific set of physical parameters.

  19. Simulation-based seismic loss estimation of seaport transportation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ung Jin Na; Shinozuka, Masanobu

    2009-01-01

    Seaport transportation system is one of the major lifeline systems in modern society and its reliable operation is crucial for the well-being of the public. However, past experiences showed that earthquake damage to port components can severely disrupt terminal operation, and thus negatively impact on the regional economy. The main purpose of this study is to provide a methodology for estimating the effects of the earthquake on the performance of the operation system of a container terminal in seaports. To evaluate the economic loss of damaged system, an analytical framework is developed by integrating simulation models for terminal operation and fragility curves of port components in the context of seismic risk analysis. For this purpose, computerized simulation model is developed and verified with actual terminal operation records. Based on the analytical procedure to assess the seismic performance of the terminal, system fragility curves are also developed. This simulation-based loss estimation methodology can be used not only for estimating the seismically induced revenue loss but also serve as a decision-making tool to select specific seismic retrofit technique on the basis of benefit-cost analysis

  20. Flat Knitting Loop Deformation Simulation Based on Interlacing Point Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Gaoming

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to create realistic loop primitives suitable for the faster CAD of the flat-knitted fabric, we have performed research on the model of the loop as well as the variation of the loop surface. This paper proposes an interlacing point-based model for the loop center curve, and uses the cubic Bezier curve to fit the central curve of the regular loop, elongated loop, transfer loop, and irregular deformed loop. In this way, a general model for the central curve of the deformed loop is obtained. The obtained model is then utilized to perform texture mapping, texture interpolation, and brightness processing, simulating a clearly structured and lifelike deformed loop. The computer program LOOP is developed by using the algorithm. The deformed loop is simulated with different yarns, and the deformed loop is applied to design of a cable stitch, demonstrating feasibility of the proposed algorithm. This paper provides a loop primitive simulation method characterized by lifelikeness, yarn material variability, and deformation flexibility, and facilitates the loop-based fast computer-aided design (CAD of the knitted fabric.

  1. Some computer simulations based on the linear relative risk model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilbert, E.S.

    1991-10-01

    This report presents the results of computer simulations designed to evaluate and compare the performance of the likelihood ratio statistic and the score statistic for making inferences about the linear relative risk mode. The work was motivated by data on workers exposed to low doses of radiation, and the report includes illustration of several procedures for obtaining confidence limits for the excess relative risk coefficient based on data from three studies of nuclear workers. The computer simulations indicate that with small sample sizes and highly skewed dose distributions, asymptotic approximations to the score statistic or to the likelihood ratio statistic may not be adequate. For testing the null hypothesis that the excess relative risk is equal to zero, the asymptotic approximation to the likelihood ratio statistic was adequate, but use of the asymptotic approximation to the score statistic rejected the null hypothesis too often. Frequently the likelihood was maximized at the lower constraint, and when this occurred, the asymptotic approximations for the likelihood ratio and score statistics did not perform well in obtaining upper confidence limits. The score statistic and likelihood ratio statistics were found to perform comparably in terms of power and width of the confidence limits. It is recommended that with modest sample sizes, confidence limits be obtained using computer simulations based on the score statistic. Although nuclear worker studies are emphasized in this report, its results are relevant for any study investigating linear dose-response functions with highly skewed exposure distributions. 22 refs., 14 tabs

  2. A sEMG model with experimentally based simulation parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Katherine A; Shimada, Hiroshima; Kumar, Dinesh K; Arjunan, Sridhar P

    2010-01-01

    A differential, time-invariant, surface electromyogram (sEMG) model has been implemented. While it is based on existing EMG models, the novelty of this implementation is that it assigns more accurate distributions of variables to create realistic motor unit (MU) characteristics. Variables such as muscle fibre conduction velocity, jitter (the change in the interpulse interval between subsequent action potential firings) and motor unit size have been considered to follow normal distributions about an experimentally obtained mean. In addition, motor unit firing frequencies have been considered to have non-linear and type based distributions that are in accordance with experimental results. Motor unit recruitment thresholds have been considered to be related to the MU type. The model has been used to simulate single channel differential sEMG signals from voluntary, isometric contractions of the biceps brachii muscle. The model has been experimentally verified by conducting experiments on three subjects. Comparison between simulated signals and experimental recordings shows that the Root Mean Square (RMS) increases linearly with force in both cases. The simulated signals also show similar values and rates of change of RMS to the experimental signals.

  3. Research on facial expression simulation based on depth image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Sha-sha; Duan, Jin; Zhao, Yi-wu; Xiao, Bo; Wang, Hao

    2017-11-01

    Nowadays, face expression simulation is widely used in film and television special effects, human-computer interaction and many other fields. Facial expression is captured by the device of Kinect camera .The method of AAM algorithm based on statistical information is employed to detect and track faces. The 2D regression algorithm is applied to align the feature points. Among them, facial feature points are detected automatically and 3D cartoon model feature points are signed artificially. The aligned feature points are mapped by keyframe techniques. In order to improve the animation effect, Non-feature points are interpolated based on empirical models. Under the constraint of Bézier curves we finish the mapping and interpolation. Thus the feature points on the cartoon face model can be driven if the facial expression varies. In this way the purpose of cartoon face expression simulation in real-time is came ture. The experiment result shows that the method proposed in this text can accurately simulate the facial expression. Finally, our method is compared with the previous method. Actual data prove that the implementation efficiency is greatly improved by our method.

  4. Airway management education: simulation based training versus non-simulation based training-A systematic review and meta-analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yanxia; Pan, Chuxiong; Li, Tianzuo; Gan, Tong J

    2017-02-01

    Simulation-based training (SBT) has become a standard for medical education. However, the efficacy of simulation based training in airway management education remains unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate all published evidence comparing the effectiveness of SBT for airway management versus non-simulation based training (NSBT) on learner and patient outcomes. Systematic review with meta-analyses were used. Data were derived from PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, Scopus, the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews from inception to May 2016. Published comparative trials that evaluated the effect of SBT on airway management training in compared with NSBT were considered. The effect sizes with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated for outcomes measures. Seventeen eligible studies were included. SBT was associated with improved behavior performance [standardized mean difference (SMD):0.30, 95% CI: 0.06 to 0.54] in comparison with NSBT. However, the benefits of SBT were not seen in time-skill (SMD:-0.13, 95% CI: -0.82 to 0.52), written examination score (SMD: 0.39, 95% CI: -0.09 to 0.86) and success rate of procedure completion on patients [relative risk (RR): 1.26, 95% CI: 0.96 to 1.66]. SBT may be not superior to NSBT on airway management training.

  5. Simulating the Performance of Ground-Based Optical Asteroid Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Eric J.; Shelly, Frank C.; Gibbs, Alex R.; Grauer, Albert D.; Hill, Richard E.; Johnson, Jess A.; Kowalski, Richard A.; Larson, Stephen M.

    2014-11-01

    We are developing a set of asteroid survey simulation tools in order to estimate the capability of existing and planned ground-based optical surveys, and to test a variety of possible survey cadences and strategies. The survey simulator is composed of several layers, including a model population of solar system objects and an orbital integrator, a site-specific atmospheric model (including inputs for seeing, haze and seasonal cloud cover), a model telescope (with a complete optical path to estimate throughput), a model camera (including FOV, pixel scale, and focal plane fill factor) and model source extraction and moving object detection layers with tunable detection requirements. We have also developed a flexible survey cadence planning tool to automatically generate nightly survey plans. Inputs to the cadence planner include camera properties (FOV, readout time), telescope limits (horizon, declination, hour angle, lunar and zenithal avoidance), preferred and restricted survey regions in RA/Dec, ecliptic, and Galactic coordinate systems, and recent coverage by other asteroid surveys. Simulated surveys are created for a subset of current and previous NEO surveys (LINEAR, Pan-STARRS and the three Catalina Sky Survey telescopes), and compared against the actual performance of these surveys in order to validate the model’s performance. The simulator tracks objects within the FOV of any pointing that were not discovered (e.g. too few observations, too trailed, focal plane array gaps, too fast or slow), thus dividing the population into “discoverable” and “discovered” subsets, to inform possible survey design changes. Ongoing and future work includes generating a realistic “known” subset of the model NEO population, running multiple independent simulated surveys in coordinated and uncoordinated modes, and testing various cadences to find optimal strategies for detecting NEO sub-populations. These tools can also assist in quantifying the efficiency of novel

  6. Simulation based virtual learning environment in medical genetics counseling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Makransky, Guido; Bonde, Mads T; Wulff, Julie S G

    2016-01-01

    learning environments increase students' knowledge, intrinsic motivation, and self-efficacy, and help them generalize from laboratory analyses to clinical practice and health decision-making. METHODS: An entire class of 300 University of Copenhagen first-year undergraduate students, most with a major...... in medicine, received a 2-h training session in a simulation based learning environment. The main outcomes were pre- to post- changes in knowledge, intrinsic motivation, and self-efficacy, together with post-intervention evaluation of the effect of the simulation on student understanding of everyday clinical...... practice were demonstrated. RESULTS: Knowledge (Cohen's d = 0.73), intrinsic motivation (d = 0.24), and self-efficacy (d = 0.46) significantly increased from the pre- to post-test. Low knowledge students showed the greatest increases in knowledge (d = 3.35) and self-efficacy (d = 0.61), but a non...

  7. Ergonomics and simulation-based approach in improving facility layout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abad, Jocelyn D.

    2018-02-01

    The use of the simulation-based technique in facility layout has been a choice in the industry due to its convenience and efficient generation of results. Nevertheless, the solutions generated are not capable of addressing delays due to worker's health and safety which significantly impact overall operational efficiency. It is, therefore, critical to incorporate ergonomics in facility design. In this study, workstation analysis was incorporated into Promodel simulation to improve the facility layout of a garment manufacturing. To test the effectiveness of the method, existing and improved facility designs were measured using comprehensive risk level, efficiency, and productivity. Results indicated that the improved facility layout generated a decrease in comprehensive risk level and rapid upper limb assessment score; an increase of 78% in efficiency and 194% increase in productivity compared to existing design and thus proved that the approach is effective in attaining overall facility design improvement.

  8. A web-based repository of surgical simulator projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leskovský, Peter; Harders, Matthias; Székely, Gábor

    2006-01-01

    The use of computer-based surgical simulators for training of prospective surgeons has been a topic of research for more than a decade. As a result, a large number of academic projects have been carried out, and a growing number of commercial products are available on the market. Keeping track of all these endeavors for established groups as well as for newly started projects can be quite arduous. Gathering information on existing methods, already traveled research paths, and problems encountered is a time consuming task. To alleviate this situation, we have established a modifiable online repository of existing projects. It contains detailed information about a large number of simulator projects gathered from web pages, papers and personal communication. The database is modifiable (with password protected sections) and also allows for a simple statistical analysis of the collected data. For further information, the surgical repository web page can be found at www.virtualsurgery.vision.ee.ethz.ch.

  9. Model-based microwave image reconstruction: simulations and experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciocan, Razvan; Jiang Huabei

    2004-01-01

    We describe an integrated microwave imaging system that can provide spatial maps of dielectric properties of heterogeneous media with tomographically collected data. The hardware system (800-1200 MHz) was built based on a lock-in amplifier with 16 fixed antennas. The reconstruction algorithm was implemented using a Newton iterative method with combined Marquardt-Tikhonov regularizations. System performance was evaluated using heterogeneous media mimicking human breast tissue. Finite element method coupled with the Bayliss and Turkel radiation boundary conditions were applied to compute the electric field distribution in the heterogeneous media of interest. The results show that inclusions embedded in a 76-diameter background medium can be quantitatively reconstructed from both simulated and experimental data. Quantitative analysis of the microwave images obtained suggests that an inclusion of 14 mm in diameter is the smallest object that can be fully characterized presently using experimental data, while objects as small as 10 mm in diameter can be quantitatively resolved with simulated data

  10. Internet Based Simulations of Debris Dispersion of Shuttle Launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardina, Jorge; Thirumalainambi, Rajkumar

    2004-01-01

    The debris dispersion model (which dispersion model?) is so heterogeneous and interrelated with various factors, 3D graphics combined with physical models are useful in understanding the complexity of launch and range operations. Modeling and simulation in this area mainly focuses on orbital dynamics and range safety concepts, including destruct limits, telemetry and tracking, and population risk. Particle explosion modeling is the process of simulating an explosion by breaking the rocket into many pieces. The particles are scattered throughout their motion using the laws of physics eventually coming to rest. The size of the foot print explains the type of explosion and distribution of the particles. The shuttle launch and range operations in this paper are discussed based on the operations of the Kennedy Space Center, Florida, USA. Java 3D graphics provides geometric and visual content with suitable modeling behaviors of Shuttle launches.

  11. A pedagogical model for simulation-based learning in healthcare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuulikki Keskitalo

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to design a pedagogical model for a simulation-based learning environment (SBLE in healthcare. Currently, simulation and virtual reality are a major focus in healthcare education. However, when and how these learning environments should be applied is not well-known. The present study tries to fill that gap. We pose the following research question: What kind of pedagogical model supports and facilitates students’ meaningful learning in SBLEs? The study used design-based research (DBR and case study approaches. We report the results from our second case study and how the pedagogical model was developed based on the lessons learned. The study involved nine facilitators and 25 students. Data were collected and analysed using mixed methods. The main result of this study is the refined pedagogical model. The model is based on the socio-cultural theory of learning and characteristics of meaningful learning as well as previous pedagogical models. The model will provide a more holistic and meaningful approach to teaching and learning in SBLEs. However, the model requires evidence and further development.

  12. Simulating the operation of photosensor-based lighting controls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehrlich, Charles; Papamichael, Konstantinos; Lai, Judy; Revzan, Kenneth

    2001-01-01

    Energy savings from the use of daylighting in commercial buildings are realized through implementation of photoelectric lighting controls that dim electric lights when sufficient daylight is available to provide adequate workplane illumination. The dimming level of electric lighting is based on the signal of a photosensor. Current simulation approaches for such systems are based on the questionable assumption that the signal of the photosensor is proportional to the task illuminance. This paper presents a method that simulates the performance of photosensor controls considering the acceptance angle, angular sensitivity, placement of the photosensor within a space, and color correction filter. The method is based on the multiplication of two fisheye images: one generated from the angular sensitivity of the photosensor and the other from a 180- or 360-degree fisheye image of the space as ''seen'' by the photosensor. The paper includes a detailed description of the method and its implementation, example applications, and validation results based on comparison with measurements in an actual office space

  13. Analysis of manufacturing based on object oriented discrete event simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eirik Borgen

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes SIMMEK, a computer-based tool for performing analysis of manufacturing systems, developed at the Production Engineering Laboratory, NTH-SINTEF. Its main use will be in analysis of job shop type of manufacturing. But certain facilities make it suitable for FMS as well as a production line manufacturing. This type of simulation is very useful in analysis of any types of changes that occur in a manufacturing system. These changes may be investments in new machines or equipment, a change in layout, a change in product mix, use of late shifts, etc. The effects these changes have on for instance the throughput, the amount of VIP, the costs or the net profit, can be analysed. And this can be done before the changes are made, and without disturbing the real system. Simulation takes into consideration, unlike other tools for analysis of manufacturing systems, uncertainty in arrival rates, process and operation times, and machine availability. It also shows the interaction effects a job which is late in one machine, has on the remaining machines in its route through the layout. It is these effects that cause every production plan not to be fulfilled completely. SIMMEK is based on discrete event simulation, and the modeling environment is object oriented. The object oriented models are transformed by an object linker into data structures executable by the simulation kernel. The processes of the entity objects, i.e. the products, are broken down to events and put into an event list. The user friendly graphical modeling environment makes it possible for end users to build models in a quick and reliable way, using terms from manufacturing. Various tests and a check of model logic are helpful functions when testing validity of the models. Integration with software packages, with business graphics and statistical functions, is convenient in the result presentation phase.

  14. Pump-stopping water hammer simulation based on RELAP5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yi, W S; Jiang, J; Li, D D; Lan, G; Zhao, Z

    2013-01-01

    RELAP5 was originally designed to analyze complex thermal-hydraulic interactions that occur during either postulated large or small loss-of-coolant accidents in PWRs. However, as development continued, the code was expanded to include many of the transient scenarios that might occur in thermal-hydraulic systems. The fast deceleration of the liquid results in high pressure surges, thus the kinetic energy is transformed into the potential energy, which leads to the temporary pressure increase. This phenomenon is called water hammer. Generally water hammer can occur in any thermal-hydraulic systems and it is extremely dangerous for the system when the pressure surges become considerably high. If this happens and when the pressure exceeds the critical pressure that the pipe or the fittings along the pipeline can burden, it will result in the failure of the whole pipeline integrity. The purpose of this article is to introduce the RELAP5 to the simulation and analysis of water hammer situations. Based on the knowledge of the RELAP5 code manuals and some relative documents, the authors utilize RELAP5 to set up an example of water-supply system via an impeller pump to simulate the phenomena of the pump-stopping water hammer. By the simulation of the sample case and the subsequent analysis of the results that the code has provided, we can have a better understand of the knowledge of water hammer as well as the quality of the RELAP5 code when it's used in the water-hammer fields. In the meantime, By comparing the results of the RELAP5 based model with that of other fluid-transient analysis software say, PIPENET. The authors make some conclusions about the peculiarity of RELAP5 when transplanted into water-hammer research and offer several modelling tips when use the code to simulate a water-hammer related case

  15. Pump-stopping water hammer simulation based on RELAP5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, W. S.; Jiang, J.; Li, D. D.; Lan, G.; Zhao, Z.

    2013-12-01

    RELAP5 was originally designed to analyze complex thermal-hydraulic interactions that occur during either postulated large or small loss-of-coolant accidents in PWRs. However, as development continued, the code was expanded to include many of the transient scenarios that might occur in thermal-hydraulic systems. The fast deceleration of the liquid results in high pressure surges, thus the kinetic energy is transformed into the potential energy, which leads to the temporary pressure increase. This phenomenon is called water hammer. Generally water hammer can occur in any thermal-hydraulic systems and it is extremely dangerous for the system when the pressure surges become considerably high. If this happens and when the pressure exceeds the critical pressure that the pipe or the fittings along the pipeline can burden, it will result in the failure of the whole pipeline integrity. The purpose of this article is to introduce the RELAP5 to the simulation and analysis of water hammer situations. Based on the knowledge of the RELAP5 code manuals and some relative documents, the authors utilize RELAP5 to set up an example of water-supply system via an impeller pump to simulate the phenomena of the pump-stopping water hammer. By the simulation of the sample case and the subsequent analysis of the results that the code has provided, we can have a better understand of the knowledge of water hammer as well as the quality of the RELAP5 code when it's used in the water-hammer fields. In the meantime, By comparing the results of the RELAP5 based model with that of other fluid-transient analysis software say, PIPENET. The authors make some conclusions about the peculiarity of RELAP5 when transplanted into water-hammer research and offer several modelling tips when use the code to simulate a water-hammer related case.

  16. Application potential of Agent Based Simulation and Discrete Event Simulation in Enterprise integration modelling concepts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul-Eric DOSSOU

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 21 false false false EN-US JA X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Tabla normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Cambria; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-ansi-language:EN-US;} This paper aims to present the dilemma of simulation tool selection. Authors discuss the examples of methodologies of enterprises architectures (CIMOSA and GRAI where agent approach is used to solve planning and managing problems. Actually simulation is widely used and practically only one tool which can enable verification of complex systems. Many companies face the problem, which simulation tool is appropriate to use for verification. Selected tools based on ABS and DES are presented. Some tools combining DES and ABS approaches are described. Authors give some recommendation on selection process.

  17. Application potential of Agent Based Simulation and Discrete Event Simulation in Enterprise integration modelling concepts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawel PAWLEWSKI

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 21 false false false EN-US JA X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Tabla normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Cambria; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-ansi-language:EN-US;} This paper aims to present the dilemma of simulation tool selection. Authors discuss the examples of methodologies of enterprises architectures (CIMOSA and GRAI where agent approach is used to solve planning and managing problems. Actually simulation is widely used and practically only one tool which can enable verification of complex systems. Many companies face the problem, which simulation tool is appropriate to use for verification. Selected tools based on ABS and DES are presented. Some tools combining DES and ABS approaches are described. Authors give some recommendation on selection process.

  18. Simulation based medical education; teaching normal delivery on intermediate fidelity simulator to medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Nighat; Baig, Lubna; Shah, Nusrat; Hussain, Riffat; Aly, Syed Moyn

    2017-10-01

    To assess the effectiveness of medium fidelity simulator in teaching normal vaginal delivery to medical students. The quasi-experimental study was conducted at the professional development centre of the Jinnah Sindh Medical University, Karachi, from June to December 2015, and comprised medical students. Third-year medical students were included. They were divided into two groups. Group A was taught normal delivery through traditional PowerPoint and group B through simulator. The instruments used for assessing knowledge were pre-test and post-test, for skills of labour/delivery checklist of performance was used, and perception forms were filled to evaluate workshops/learning environment by students. Of the 76 participants, there were 36(47.4%) in group A and 40(52.6%) in group B. The overall mean age of the participants was 20.86±0.76 years in group B and 20.60±0.95 years in group A (p=0.19). The mean grade point average of the participants was 2.89±0.47 in group A and 2.87±0.48 in group B (p=0.81).Group B performed much better in skill of delivery having a mean score of 8.91±3.20compared to group A which had mean of 5.67±1.84 (pSimulation-based skill learning showed significantly better results.

  19. Simulating non-holonomic constraints within the LCP-based simulation framework

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellekilde, Lars-Peter; Petersen, Henrik Gordon

    2006-01-01

    be incorporated directly, and derive formalism for how the non-holonomic contact constraints can be modelled as a combination of non-holonomic equality constraints and ordinary contacts constraints. For each of these three we are able to guarantee solvability, when using Lemke's algorithm. A number of examples......In this paper, we will extend the linear complementarity problem-based rigid-body simulation framework with non-holonomic constraints. We consider three different types of such, namely equality, inequality and contact constraints. We show how non-holonomic equality and inequality constraints can...... are included to demonstrate the non-holonomic constraints. Udgivelsesdato: Marts...

  20. Simulation Learning: PC-Screen Based (PCSB) versus High Fidelity Simulation (HFS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    1.00 (0.00) Score Change (mean change and sd) Assemble Equipment (Yes/No) 1. Water soluble lubricant 2. Suction equipment 3. Selecting correct...0.92 (0.25) 0.64 (0.31) 0.86 (0.22) 0.98 (0.07) Mean score change and sd Procedural Steps (Yes/No) 1. Lubricate tube with water -soluble...w., Johnson, C., Hsu, E. and  Wasser , T. (2006). Using innovative  simulation modalities for civilian based, chemical, biological, radiological