WorldWideScience

Sample records for ray detector responses

  1. Flat-response x-ray-diode-detector development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tirsell, G.

    1982-10-01

    In this report we discuss the design of an improved sub-nanosecond flat response x-ray diode detector needed for ICF diagnostics. This device consists of a high Z cathode and a complex filter tailored to flatten the response so that the total x-ray energy below 1.5 keV can be measured using a single detector. Three major problems have become evident as a result of our work with the original LLNL design including deviation from flatness due to a peak in the response below 200 eV, saturation at relatively low x-ray fluences, and long term gold cathode instability. We are investigating grazing incidence reflection to reduce the response below 200 eV, new high Z cathode materials for long term stability, and a new complex filter for improved flatness. Better saturation performance will require a modified XRD detector under development with reduced anode to cathode spacing and increased anode bias voltage

  2. Matrix of response functions for xenon gamma-ray detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shustov, A.E.; Vlasik, K.F.; Grachev, V.M.; Dmitrenko, V.V.; Novikov, A.S.; P'ya, S.N.; Ulin, S.E.; Uteshev, Z.M.; Chernysheva, I.V.

    2014-01-01

    An approach of creation of response matrix using simulation GEANT4 gamma-ray Monte-Carlo method has been described for gamma-ray spectrometer based on high pressure xenon impulse ionization chamber with a shielding grid [ru

  3. Time response characteristics of X-ray detector system on Silex-Ⅰ laser facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yi Rongqing; He Xiao'an; Li Hang; Du Huabing; Zhang Haiying; Cao Zhurong

    2013-01-01

    On the Silex-Ⅰ laser facility, the time response characteristics of XRD detector were studied. A laser with a pulse of 32 fs and a wavelength of 800 nm was used to irradiate a plane Au target. X-ray calibrated method of time of exposure X-ray framing camera and time resolution of X-ray streak camera was explored. The time response characteristics of XRD detector and time process of X-ray emission were obtained from experiment. We obtained X-ray calibration method of time of exposure X-ray framing camera and time resolution of X-ray streak camera. (authors)

  4. Response of CZT drift-strip detector to X- and gamma rays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuvvetli, Irfan; Budtz-Jørgensen, Carl; Gerward, Leif

    2001-01-01

    The drift-strip method for improving the energy response of a CdZnTe (CZT) detector to hard X- and gamma rays is discussed. Results for a 10 x 10 x 3 mm(3) detector crystal demonstrate a remarkable improvement of the energy resolution. The full width at half maximum (FWHM) is 2.18 keV (3.6%), 2...

  5. CVD diamond based soft X-ray detector with fast response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Fang; Hou Lifei; Su Chunxiao; Yang Guohong; Liu Shenye

    2010-01-01

    A soft X-ray detector has been made with high quality chemical vapor deposited (CVD) diamond and the electrical structure of micro-strip. Through the measurement of response time on a laser with the pulse width of 10 ps, the full width at half maximum of the data got in the oscilloscope was 115 ps. The rise time of the CVD diamond detector was calculated to be 49 ps. In the experiment on the laser prototype facility, the signal got by the CVD diamond detector was compared with that got by a soft X-ray spectrometer. Both signals coincided well. The detector is proved to be a kind of reliable soft X-ray detector with fast response and high signal-to-noise ratio. (authors)

  6. A method for synthesizing response functions of NaI detectors to gamma rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sie, S.H.

    1978-08-01

    A simple method of parametrizing the response function of NaI detectors to gamma rays is described, based on decomposition of the pulse-height spectrum into components associated with the actual detection processes. Smooth dependence of the derived parameters on the gamma-ray energy made it possible to generate a lineshape for any gamma-ray energy by suitable interpolation techniques. The method is applied in analysis of spectra measured with a 7.6 x 7.6 cm NaI detector in continuum gamma-ray study following (HI,xn) reaction

  7. Dependence on incident angle of solid state detector response to gamma-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamanishi, Hirokuni; Yamaguchi, Satarou; Yamaguchi, Takayuki; Ueki, Kohtaro

    2002-01-01

    The shape and size of a NaI(Tl) scintillator that should maximize response variation with γ-ray incident angle was estimated by analytical model calculation. It proved that, even for gamma rays of energy exceeding 1 MeV, a slab detector measuring 50 cm x 50 cm x 5 cm thick should present a ratio of at least 4 between maximum and minimum responses against incidence at different angles. For a sample case of 60 keV gamma rays, estimation of the incident angle dependence by means of Monte Carlo simulation agreed well with experiment using a CZT detector. The counts from photo-electric peak varied with incident angle roughly along a sine curve. The foregoing finding served as basis for proposing a practical direction finder for γ-ray source operating on the principle of determining the source direction from variations in count with incident angle. (author)

  8. Measurements and simulations of the responses of the cluster Ge detectors to gamma rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hara, Kaoru Y.; Goko, Shinji; Harada, Hideo; Hirose, Kentaro; Kimura, Atsushi; Kin, Tadahiro; Kitatani, Fumito; Koizumi, Mitsuo; Nakamura, Shoji; Toh, Yosuke

    2013-01-01

    Responses of cluster Ge detectors have been measured with standard γ-ray sources and the 35 Cl(n,γ) 36 Cl reaction in ANNRI at J-PARC/MLF. Experimental results and simulations using the EGS5 code are compared. (author)

  9. Characterization of energy response for photon-counting detectors using x-ray fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, Huanjun; Cho, Hyo-Min; Molloi, Sabee; Barber, William C.; Iwanczyk, Jan S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of characterizing a Si strip photon-counting detector using x-ray fluorescence. Methods: X-ray fluorescence was generated by using a pencil beam from a tungsten anode x-ray tube with 2 mm Al filtration. Spectra were acquired at 90° from the primary beam direction with an energy-resolved photon-counting detector based on an edge illuminated Si strip detector. The distances from the source to target and the target to detector were approximately 19 and 11 cm, respectively. Four different materials, containing silver (Ag), iodine (I), barium (Ba), and gadolinium (Gd), were placed in small plastic containers with a diameter of approximately 0.7 cm for x-ray fluorescence measurements. Linear regression analysis was performed to derive the gain and offset values for the correlation between the measured fluorescence peak center and the known fluorescence energies. The energy resolutions and charge-sharing fractions were also obtained from analytical fittings of the recorded fluorescence spectra. An analytical model, which employed four parameters that can be determined from the fluorescence calibration, was used to estimate the detector response function. Results: Strong fluorescence signals of all four target materials were recorded with the investigated geometry for the Si strip detector. The average gain and offset of all pixels for detector energy calibration were determined to be 6.95 mV/keV and −66.33 mV, respectively. The detector’s energy resolution remained at approximately 2.7 keV for low energies, and increased slightly at 45 keV. The average charge-sharing fraction was estimated to be 36% within the investigated energy range of 20–45 keV. The simulated detector output based on the proposed response function agreed well with the experimental measurement. Conclusions: The performance of a spectral imaging system using energy-resolved photon-counting detectors is very dependent on the energy calibration of the

  10. Deconvolving the temporal response of photoelectric x-ray detectors for the diagnosis of pulsed radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zou, Shiyang; Song, Peng; Pei, Wenbing; Guo, Liang

    2013-01-01

    Based on the conjugate gradient method, a simple algorithm is presented for deconvolving the temporal response of photoelectric x-ray detectors (XRDs) to reconstruct the resolved time-dependent x-ray fluxes. With this algorithm, we have studied the impact of temporal response of XRD on the radiation diagnosis of hohlraum heated by a short intense laser pulse. It is found that the limiting temporal response of XRD not only postpones the rising edge and peak position of x-ray pulses but also smoothes the possible fluctuations of radiation fluxes. Without a proper consideration of the temporal response of XRD, the measured radiation flux can be largely misinterpreted for radiation pulses of a hohlraum heated by short or shaped laser pulses

  11. Evaluation of the Neutron Detector Response for Cosmic Ray Energy Spectrum by Monte Carlo Transport Simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pazianotto, Mauricio T.; Carlson, Brett V.; Federico, Claudio A.; Gonzalez, Odair L.

    2011-01-01

    Neutrons generated by the interaction of cosmic rays with the atmosphere make an important contribution to the dose accumulated in electronic circuits and aircraft crew members at flight altitude. High-energy neutrons are produced in spallation reactions and intranuclear cascade processes by primary cosmic-ray particle interactions with atoms in the atmosphere. These neutrons can produce secondary neutrons and also undergo a moderation process due to atmosphere interactions, resulting in a wider energy spectrum, ranging from thermal energies (0.025 eV) to energies of several hundreds of MeV. The Long-Counter (LC) detector is a widely used neutron detector designed to measure the directional flux of neutrons with about constant response over a wide energy range (thermal to 20 MeV). ). Its calibration process and the determination of its energy response for the wide-energy of cosmic ray induced neutron spectrum is a very difficult process due to the lack of installations with these capabilities. The goal of this study is to assess the behavior of the response of a Long Counter using the Monte Carlo (MC) computational code MCNPX (Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended). The dependence of the Long Counter response on the angle of incidence, as well as on the neutron energy, will be carefully investigated, compared with the experimental data previously obtained with 241 Am-Be and 252 Cf neutron sources and extended to the neutron spectrum produced by cosmic rays. (Author)

  12. Response function of NaI(Tl) detectors and multiple backscattering of gamma rays in aluminium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabharwal, Arvind D.; Singh, Manpreet; Singh, Bhajan; Sandhu, B.S.

    2008-01-01

    The response function, converting the observed pulse-height distribution of a NaI(Tl) detector to a true photon spectrum, is obtained experimentally with the help of an inverse matrix approach. The energy of gamma-ray photons continuously decreases as the number of scatterings increases in a sample having finite dimensions when one deals with the depth of the sample. The present experiments are undertaken to study the effect of target thickness on intensity distribution of gamma photons multiply backscattered from an aluminium target. A NaI(Tl) gamma-ray detector detects the photons backscattered from the aluminium target. The subtraction of analytically estimated singly scattered distribution from the observed intensity distribution (originating from interactions of primary gamma-ray photons with the target) results in multiply backscattered events. We observe that for each incident gamma photon energy, the number of multiply backscattered photons increases with increase in target thickness and then saturates at a particular target thickness called the saturation thickness (depth). Saturation thickness for multiply backscattering of gamma photons is found to decrease with increase in energy of incident gamma-ray photons

  13. Monte Carlo simulation of the response functions of Cd Te detectors to be applied in X-rays spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomal, A.; Lopez G, A. H.; Santos, J. C.; Costa, P. R.

    2014-08-01

    In this work, the energy response functions of a Cd Te detector were obtained by Monte Carlo simulation in the energy range from 5 to 150 keV, using the Penelope code. The response functions simulated included the finite detector resolution and the carrier transport. The simulated energy response matrix was validated through comparison with experimental results obtained for radioactive sources. In order to investigate the influence of the correction by the detector response at diagnostic energy range, x-ray spectra were measured using a Cd Te detector (model Xr-100-T, Amptek), and then corrected by the energy response of the detector using the stripping procedure. Results showed that the Cd Te exhibit good energy response at low energies (below 40 keV), showing only small distortions on the measured spectra. For energies below about 70 keV, the contribution of the escape of Cd- and Te-K x-rays produce significant distortions on the measured x-ray spectra. For higher energies, the most important correction is the detector efficiency and the carrier trapping effects. The results showed that, after correction by the energy response, the measured spectra are in good agreement with those provided by different models from the literature. Finally, our results showed that the detailed knowledge of the response function and a proper correction procedure are fundamental for achieve more accurate spectra from which several qualities parameters (i.e. half-value layer, effective energy and mean energy) can be determined. (Author)

  14. Monte Carlo simulation of the response functions of Cd Te detectors to be applied in X-rays spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomal, A. [Universidade Federale de Goias, Instituto de Fisica, Campus Samambaia, 74001-970, Goiania, (Brazil); Lopez G, A. H.; Santos, J. C.; Costa, P. R., E-mail: alessandra_tomal@yahoo.com.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo, Instituto de Fisica, Rua du Matao Travessa R. 187, Cidade Universitaria, 05508-090 Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    In this work, the energy response functions of a Cd Te detector were obtained by Monte Carlo simulation in the energy range from 5 to 150 keV, using the Penelope code. The response functions simulated included the finite detector resolution and the carrier transport. The simulated energy response matrix was validated through comparison with experimental results obtained for radioactive sources. In order to investigate the influence of the correction by the detector response at diagnostic energy range, x-ray spectra were measured using a Cd Te detector (model Xr-100-T, Amptek), and then corrected by the energy response of the detector using the stripping procedure. Results showed that the Cd Te exhibit good energy response at low energies (below 40 keV), showing only small distortions on the measured spectra. For energies below about 70 keV, the contribution of the escape of Cd- and Te-K x-rays produce significant distortions on the measured x-ray spectra. For higher energies, the most important correction is the detector efficiency and the carrier trapping effects. The results showed that, after correction by the energy response, the measured spectra are in good agreement with those provided by different models from the literature. Finally, our results showed that the detailed knowledge of the response function and a proper correction procedure are fundamental for achieve more accurate spectra from which several qualities parameters (i.e. half-value layer, effective energy and mean energy) can be determined. (Author)

  15. Time response of fast-gated microchannel plates used as x-ray detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, R.E.; Bell, P.; Hanks, R.; Kilkenny, J.D.; Landen, N.; Power, G.; Wiedwald, J.; Meier, M.

    1990-01-01

    We report measurements of the time response of fast-gated, micro- channel plate (MCP) detectors, using a <10 ps pulsewidth ultra-violet laser and an electronic sampling system to measure time resolutions to better than 25 ps. The results show that framing times of less than 100 ps are attainable with high gain. The data is compared to a Monte Carlo calculation, which shows good agreement. We also measured the relative sensitivity as a function of DC bias, and saturation effects for large signal inputs. In part B, we briefly describe an electrical ''time-of-flight'' technique, which we have used to measure the response time of a fast-gated microchannel plate (MCP). Thinner MCP's than previously used have been tested, and, as expected, show fast gating times and smaller electron multiplication. A preliminary design for an x-ray pinhole camera, using a thin MCP, is presented. 7 refs., 6 figs

  16. Correction method and software for image distortion and nonuniform response in charge-coupled device-based x-ray detectors utilizing x-ray image intensifier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Kazuki; Kamikubo, Hironari; Yagi, Naoto; Amemiya, Yoshiyuki

    2005-01-01

    An on-site method of correcting the image distortion and nonuniform response of a charge-coupled device (CCD)-based X-ray detector was developed using the response of the imaging plate as a reference. The CCD-based X-ray detector consists of a beryllium-windowed X-ray image intensifier (Be-XRII) and a CCD as the image sensor. An image distortion of 29% was improved to less than 1% after the correction. In the correction of nonuniform response due to image distortion, subpixel approximation was performed for the redistribution of pixel values. The optimal number of subpixels was also discussed. In an experiment with polystyrene (PS) latex, it was verified that the correction of both image distortion and nonuniform response worked properly. The correction for the 'contrast reduction' problem was also demonstrated for an isotropic X-ray scattering pattern from the PS latex. (author)

  17. Monte Carlo simulation of the X-ray response of a germanium microstrip detector with energy and position resolution

    CERN Document Server

    Rossi, G; Fajardo, P; Morse, J

    1999-01-01

    We present Monte Carlo computer simulations of the X-ray response of a micro-strip germanium detector over the energy range 30-100 keV. The detector consists of a linear array of lithographically defined 150 mu m wide strips on a high purity monolithic germanium crystal of 6 mm thickness. The simulation code is divided into two parts. We first consider a 10 mu m wide X-ray beam striking the detector surface at normal incidence and compute the interaction processes possible for each photon. Photon scattering and absorption inside the detector crystal are simulated using the EGS4 code with the LSCAT extension for low energies. A history of events is created of the deposited energies which is read by the second part of the code which computes the energy histogram for each detector strip. Appropriate algorithms are introduced to account for lateral charge spreading occurring during charge carrier drift to the detector surface, and Fano and preamplifier electronic noise contributions. Computed spectra for differen...

  18. Photopeak efficiency response function of an underwater gamma-ray NaI(Tl) detector using MCNP-X

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salgado, William L.; Silva, Ademir X.; Salgado, Cesar M.

    2015-01-01

    This work presents a study to calculate the response function of a 1.5″ x 1″ NaI(Tl) scintillation detector when it is used in the marine environment in the energy range from 20 keV to 662 keV. The method takes into account both the scattering of photons in the water and the detection mechanism of the detector. In addition, the calculation of the response function of the whole system is essential for suppressing the background of the measurement and for estimating the concentration of the involved radionuclides, especially given the greater probability of primary gamma photons undergoing multiple scattering events before they interact with the detector. The experimental photopeak efficiency measurements for point sources were compared with the simulated results under the same conditions of the experimental setup to validate the simulation of the detector. Monte Carlo simulations were performed using the MCNP-X code for the investigation of gamma-ray absorption in water in different brines. The energy resolution curve was used to improve the response of the mathematical simulation of the detector. The detector’s simulation was based on information obtained from the gammagraphy technique. Both dimensions and materials were used for the calculation with the MCNP-X code. The photopeak efficiency of a NaI(Tl) detector for different radionuclides in the aquatic environment with different salinities was calculated. (author)

  19. Evaluation of the x-ray response of a position-sensitive microstrip detector with an integrated readout chip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossington, C.; Jaklevic, J.; Haber, C.; Spieler, H.; Reid, J.

    1990-08-01

    The performance of an SVX silicon microstrip detector and its compatible integrated readout chip have been evaluated in response to Rh Kα x-rays (average energy 20.5 keV). The energy and spatial discrimination capabilities, efficient data management and fast readout rates make it an attractive alternative to the CCD and PDA detectors now being offered for x-ray position sensitive diffraction and EXAFS work. The SVX system was designed for high energy physics applications and thus further development of the existing system is required to optimize it for use in practical x-ray experiments. For optimum energy resolution the system noise must be decreased to its previously demonstrated low levels of 2 keV FWHM at 60 keV or less, and the data handling rate of the computer must be increased. New readout chips are now available that offer the potential of better performance. 15 refs., 7 figs

  20. The hard X-ray response of epitaxial GaAs detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Owens, A; Kraft, S; Peacock, A; Nenonen, S; Andersson, H

    2000-01-01

    We report on hard X-ray measurements with two epitaxial GaAs detectors of active areas 2.22 mm sup 2 and thicknesses 40 and 400 mu m at the ESRF and HASYLAB synchrotron research facilities. The detectors were fabricated using high-purity material and in spite of an order of magnitude difference in depletion depths, they were found to have comparable performances with energy resolutions at -45 deg. C of approx 1 keV fwhm at 7 keV rising to approx 2 keV fwhm at 200 keV and noise floors in the range 1-1.5 keV. At energies <30 keV, the energy resolution was dominated by leakage current and electromagnetic pick-up, while at the highest energies measured, the resolutions approach the expected Fano limit (e.g., approx 1 keV near 200 keV). Both detectors are remarkably linear, with average rms non-linearities of 0.2% over the energy range 10-60 keV, which, taken in conjunction with Monte-Carlo results indicate that charge collection efficiencies must be in excess of 98%. This is consistent with material science me...

  1. X-ray detector array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houston, J.M.

    1980-01-01

    The object of the invention (an ionization chamber X-ray detector array for use with high speed computerised tomographic imaging apparatus) is to reduce the time required to produce a tomographic image. The detector array described determines the distribution of X-ray intensities in one or more flat, coplanar X-ray beams. It comprises three flat anode sheets parallel to the X-ray beam, a plurality of rod-like cathodes between the anodes, a detector gas between the electrodes and a means for applying a potential between the electrodes. Each of the X-ray sources is collimated to give a narrow, planar section of X-ray photons. Sets of X-ray sources in the array are pulsed simultaneously to obtain X-ray transmission data for tomographic image reconstruction. (U.K.)

  2. Semiconductor X-ray detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Lowe, Barrie Glyn

    2014-01-01

    Identifying and measuring the elemental x-rays released when materials are examined with particles (electrons, protons, alpha particles, etc.) or photons (x-rays and gamma rays) is still considered to be the primary analytical technique for routine and non-destructive materials analysis. The Lithium Drifted Silicon (Si(Li)) X-Ray Detector, with its good resolution and peak to background, pioneered this type of analysis on electron microscopes, x-ray fluorescence instruments, and radioactive source- and accelerator-based excitation systems. Although rapid progress in Silicon Drift Detectors (SDDs), Charge Coupled Devices (CCDs), and Compound Semiconductor Detectors, including renewed interest in alternative materials such as CdZnTe and diamond, has made the Si(Li) X-Ray Detector nearly obsolete, the device serves as a useful benchmark and still is used in special instances where its large, sensitive depth is essential. Semiconductor X-Ray Detectors focuses on the history and development of Si(Li) X-Ray Detect...

  3. ALICE Cosmic Ray Detector

    CERN Multimedia

    Fernandez Tellez, A; Martinez Hernandez, M; Rodriguez Cahuantzi, M

    2013-01-01

    The ALICE underground cavern provides an ideal place for the detection of high energy atmospheric muons coming from cosmic ray showers. ACORDE detects cosmic ray showers by triggering the arrival of muons to the top of the ALICE magnet.

  4. X-ray detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whetten, N.R.; Houston, J.M.

    1977-01-01

    An ionization chamber for use in determining the spatial distribution of x-ray photons in tomography systems comprises a plurality of substantially parallel, planar anodes separated by parallel, planar cathodes and enclosed in a gas of high atomic weight at a pressure from approximately 10 atmospheres to approximately 50 atmospheres. The cathode and anode structures comprise metals which are substantially opaque to x-ray radiation and thereby tend to reduce the resolution limiting effects of x-ray fluoresence in the gas. In another embodiment of the invention the anodes comprise parallel conductive bars disposed between two planar cathodes. Guard rings eliminate surface leakage currents between adjacent electrodes. 8 figures

  5. X-ray detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houston, J.M.; Whetten, N.R.

    1981-01-01

    An ionization chamber for use in determining the spatial distribution of x-ray photons in tomography systems comprises a plurality of substantially parallel, planar anodes separated by parallel, planar cathodes and enclosed in a gas of high atomic weight at a pressure from approximately 10 atmospheres to approximately 50 atmospheres. The cathode and anode structures comprise metals which are substantially opaque to x-ray radiation and thereby tend to reduce the resolution limiting effects of xray fluoresence in the gas. In another embodiment of the invention the anodes comprise parallel conductive bars disposed between two planar cathodes. Guard rings eliminate surface leakage currents between adjacent electrodes

  6. (U) Second-Order Sensitivity Analysis of Uncollided Particle Contributions to Radiation Detector Responses Using Ray-Tracing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Favorite, Jeffrey A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-11-30

    The Second-Level Adjoint Sensitivity System (2nd-LASS) that yields the second-order sensitivities of a response of uncollided particles with respect to isotope densities, cross sections, and source emission rates is derived in Refs. 1 and 2. In Ref. 2, we solved problems for the uncollided leakage from a homogeneous sphere and a multiregion cylinder using the PARTISN multigroup discrete-ordinates code. In this memo, we derive solutions of the 2nd-LASS for the particular case when the response is a flux or partial current density computed at a single point on the boundary, and the inner products are computed using ray-tracing. Both the PARTISN approach and the ray-tracing approach are implemented in a computer code, SENSPG. The next section of this report presents the equations of the 1st- and 2nd-LASS for uncollided particles and the first- and second-order sensitivities that use the solutions of the 1st- and 2nd-LASS. Section III presents solutions of the 1st- and 2nd-LASS equations for the case of ray-tracing from a detector point. Section IV presents specific solutions of the 2nd-LASS and derives the ray-trace form of the inner products needed for second-order sensitivities. Numerical results for the total leakage from a homogeneous sphere are presented in Sec. V and for the leakage from one side of a two-region slab in Sec. VI. Section VII is a summary and conclusions.

  7. The technique of obtaining single-energy γ-rays in calibrating energy response of detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Rurong; Peng Taiping; Hu Mengchun; Li Zhongbao

    2004-01-01

    This paper introduces the principle of transforming γ-rays from 60 Co into a series of single-energy γ-rays and stresses the technique of shielding radiation-interfere and reducing energy-dispersion. The Single-energy γ-rays of any energy in the range of 0.36-1.02 MeV may be obtained by means of this technique. (authors)

  8. X-ray and gamma-ray response of a 2 '' x 2 '' LaBr3 : Ce scintillation detector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quarati, F.; Bos, A. J. J.; Brandenburg, S.; Dathy, C.; Dorenbos, P.; Kraft, S.; Ostendorf, R. W.; Ouspenski, V.; Owens, Alan

    2007-01-01

    Advances in material growth techniques have recently made large volume LaBr3:Ce crystals commercially available. These scintillators are currently being assessed by ESA for use as remote sensing gamma-ray spectrometers on future planetary missions. In addition to their superior scintillation

  9. CsI/PIN Diode Detector Manufacture and Gamma-ray Response Measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ha, Jang Ho; Park, Se Hwan; Kang, Sang Mook; Kim, Yong Kyun; Lee, Wo Kyu

    2007-01-01

    In the nuclear industry changes fast to expand from conventional industry to newly emerging market industry. Such industries are environment and security field. Conventional devices to field-orientation application are too heavy not enough to be hand held. Especially emerging environment and security markets need a device which should be handheld and available long term battery operation. Photomultiplier based detection system could not satisfied these requirements. One of the promising system is the scintillator/PIN diode device. Present investigation is motivated for the purpose of developing a gamma-ray monitoring system with nuclei identification and small and light enough to be transportable by worker

  10. Detector response artefacts in spectral reconstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Ulrik Lund; Christensen, Erik D.; Khalil, Mohamad

    2017-01-01

    Energy resolved detectors are gaining traction as a tool to achieve better material contrast. K-edge imaging and tomography is an example of a method with high potential that has evolved on the capabilities of photon counting energy dispersive detectors. Border security is also beginning to see...... instruments taking advantage of energy resolved detectors. The progress of the field is halted by the limitations of the detectors. The limitations include nonlinear response for both x-ray intensity and x-ray spectrum. In this work we investigate how the physical interactions in the energy dispersive...

  11. Si(Li) X-ray detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Xianglin; Li Zhiyong; Hong Xiuse

    1990-08-01

    The fabrication technology of the 10∼80 mm 2 Si(Li) X-ray detectors are described and some problems concerning technology and measurement are discussed. The specifications of the detectors are shown as well. The Si(Li) X-ray detector is a kind of low energy X-ray detectors. Owing to very high energy resolution, fine linearity and high detection efficiency in the range of low energy X-rays, it is widely used in the fields of nuclear physics, medicine, geology and environmental protection, etc,. It is also a kernel component for the scanning electron microscope and X-ray fluorescence analysis systems

  12. Soft x-ray detection with diamond photoconductive detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kania, D.R.; Pan, L.; Kornblum, H.; Bell, P.; Landen, O.N.; Pianetta, P.

    1990-01-01

    Photoconductive detectors fabricated from natural lla diamonds have been used to measure the x-ray power emitted from laser produced plasmas. The detector was operated without any absorbing filters to distort the x-ray power measurement. The 5.5 eV bandgap of the detector material practically eliminates its sensitivity to scattered laser radiation thus permitting filterless operation. The detector response time or carrier life time was 90 ps. Excellent agreement was achieved between a diamond PCD and a multichannel photoemissive diode array in the measurement of radiated x-ray power and energy. 4 figs

  13. Gas position sensitive x-ray detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbosa, A.F.

    1994-12-01

    The construction of gas x-ray detectors used to count and localize x-ray photons in one and two dimensions is reported. The principles of operation of the detectors are described, as well as the electronic modules comprised in the data acquisition system. Results obtained with detectors built at CBPF are shown, illustrating the performance of the Linear Position Sensitive Detectors. (author). 6 refs, 14 figs

  14. Cosmic-ray-veto detector system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, D.W.; Menlove, H.O.

    1992-12-01

    To reduce the cosmic-ray-induced neutron background, we are testing a cosmic-ray veto option with a neutron detector system that uses plastic scintillator slabs mounted on the outside of a 3 He-tube detector. The scintillator slabs eliminate unwanted cosmic-ray events, enabling the detector to assay low-level plutonium samples, for which a low-background coincident signature is critical. This report describes the design and testing of the prototype cosmic-ray-veto detector system

  15. Detector unit for X-ray diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svobodova, B.; Hamouz, J.; Pavlicek, Z.; Jursova, L.; Pohanka, J.

    1983-01-01

    The detector unit is applied in the medical and industrial X-ray diagnosis and analysis. It controls the X-ray dosing by exposure and brightness automation. The detector field is generated from a carrier, in which detector elements with light quides are situated, tapped on optical detectors with level converters outside the detector field. The detector field and the optical detectors with level converters are located in a light-resistent shell. This arrangement of the detector unit allows to use the impulse skiascopy instead of permanent X-ray examinations or the skiagraphy with multienergy levels which considerably improves the diagnostic value of the exposures and the working conditions. 1 cl., 1 fig

  16. Detectors of Cosmic Rays, Gamma Rays, and Neutrinos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altamirano, A.; Navarra, G.

    2009-01-01

    We summarize the main features, properties and performances of the typical detectors in use in Cosmic Ray Physics. A brief historical and general introduction will focus on the main classes and requirements of such detectors.

  17. Position-sensitive X-ray detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendrix, J.

    1982-01-01

    An overview is given of the different types of position-sensitive X-ray detectors used in kinetic studies of biological molecule state changes using X-ray diffraction with synchrotron radiation as a probe. The detector requirements and principles of operation of proportional counters are outlined. Multiwire proportional chamber systems and their readout techniques are described. Other detectors discussed include a drift chamber type detector, microchannel plates, charge-couple devices and, for high count rates, an integrating TV-detector. (U.K.)

  18. The Cosmic Ray Tracking (CRT) detector system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernloehr, K.; Gamp, S.; Hermann, G.; Hofmann, W.; Kihm, T.; Knoeppler, J.; Leffers, G.; Matheis, V.; Panter, M.; Trunk, U.; Ulrich, M.; Wolf, T.; Zink, R.; Heintze, J.

    1996-01-01

    The Cosmic Ray Tracking (CRT) project represents a study on the use of tracking detectors of the time projection chamber type to detect secondary cosmic ray particles in extensive air showers. In reconstructing the arrival direction of the primary cosmic ray particles, the CRT detectors take advantage of the angular correlation of secondary particles with the cosmic rays leading to these air showers. In this paper, the detector hardware including the custom-designed electronics system is described in detail. A CRT detector module provides an active area of 2.5 m 2 and allows to measure track directions with a precision of 0.4 circle . It consists of two circular drift chambers of 1.8 m diameter with six sense wires each, and a 10 cm thick iron plate between the two chambers. Each detector has a local electronics box with a readout, trigger, and monitoring system. The detectors can distinguish penetrating muons from other types of charged secondaries. A large detector array could be used to search for γ-ray point sources at energies above several TeV and for studies of the cosmic-ray composition. Ten detectors are in operation at the site of the HEGRA air shower array. (orig.)

  19. X-ray response of CdZnTe detectors grown by the vertical Bridgman technique: Energy, temperature and high flux effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbene, L., E-mail: leonardo.abbene@unipa.it [Dipartimento di Fisica e Chimica (DiFC), Università di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, Edificio 18, Palermo 90128 (Italy); Gerardi, G.; Turturici, A.A.; Raso, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Chimica (DiFC), Università di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, Edificio 18, Palermo 90128 (Italy); Benassi, G. [due2lab s.r.l., Via Paolo Borsellino 2, Scandiano, Reggio Emilia 42019 (Italy); Bettelli, M. [IMEM/CNR, Parco Area delle Scienze 37/A, Parma 43100 (Italy); Zambelli, N. [due2lab s.r.l., Via Paolo Borsellino 2, Scandiano, Reggio Emilia 42019 (Italy); Zappettini, A. [IMEM/CNR, Parco Area delle Scienze 37/A, Parma 43100 (Italy); Principato, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Chimica (DiFC), Università di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, Edificio 18, Palermo 90128 (Italy)

    2016-11-01

    Nowadays, CdZnTe (CZT) is one of the key materials for the development of room temperature X-ray and gamma ray detectors and great efforts have been made on both the device and the crystal growth technologies. In this work, we present the results of spectroscopic investigations on new boron oxide encapsulated vertical Bridgman (B-VB) grown CZT detectors, recently developed at IMEM-CNR Parma, Italy. Several detectors, with the same electrode layout (gold electroless contacts) and different thicknesses (1 and 2.5 mm), were realized: the cathode is a planar electrode covering the detector surface (4.1×4.1 mm{sup 2}), while the anode is a central electrode (2×2 mm{sup 2}) surrounded by a guard-ring electrode. The detectors are characterized by electron mobility-lifetime product (µ{sub e}τ{sub e}) values ranging between 0.6 and 1·10{sup −3} cm{sup 2}/V and by low leakage currents at room temperature and at high bias voltages (38 nA/cm{sup 2} at 10000 V/cm). The spectroscopic response of the detectors to monochromatic X-ray and gamma ray sources ({sup 109}Cd, {sup 241}Am and {sup 57}Co), at different temperatures and fluxes (up to 1 Mcps), was measured taking into account the mitigation of the effects of incomplete charge collection, pile-up and high flux radiation induced polarization phenomena. A custom-designed digital readout electronics, developed at DiFC of University of Palermo (Italy), able to perform a fine pulse shape and height analysis even at high fluxes, was used. At low rates (200 cps) and at room temperature (T=25 °C), the detectors exhibit an energy resolution FWHM around 4% at 59.5 keV, for comparison an energy resolution of 3% was measured with Al/CdTe/Pt detectors by using the same electronics (A250F/NF charge sensitive preamplifier, Amptek, USA; nominal ENC of 100 electrons RMS). At high rates (750 kcps), energy resolution values of 7% and 9% were measured, with throughputs of 2% and 60% respectively. No radiation polarization phenomena were

  20. Measurement of collision integral cross-sections of double-photon Compton effect using a single gamma ray detector: A response matrix approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saddi, M.B.; Singh, Bhajan; Sandhu, B.S.

    2008-01-01

    The collision integral cross-sections of double-photon Compton process are measured experimentally for 662 keV incident gamma photons. The measurements are successfully carried out using a single gamma ray detector, and do not require the complicated slow-fast coincidence technique used till now for observing this higher order quantum electrodynamics (QED) process. The energy spectra of one of the two final photons, originating in this process, in direction of the gamma ray detector are observed as a long tail to the single-photon Compton line on lower side of the full energy peak in the observed spectra. An inverse response matrix converts the observed pulse-height distribution of a NaI(Tl) scintillation detector to a true photon spectrum. This also results in extraction of events originating from double-photon Compton interactions. The present measured values of collision integral cross-section, although of same magnitude, deviate from the corresponding values obtained from the theory. In view of the magnitude of deviations, in addition to small value of probability of occurrence of this process, the agreement of measured values with theory is reasonably acceptable

  1. X-Ray and Gamma-Ray Radiation Detector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    Disclosed is a semiconductor radiation detector for detecting X-ray and / or gamma-ray radiation. The detector comprises a converter element for converting incident X-ray and gamma-ray photons into electron-hole pairs, at least one cathode, a plurality of detector electrodes arranged with a pitch...... (P) along a first axis, a plurality of drift electrodes, a readout circuitry being configured to read out signals from the plurality of detector electrodes and a processing unit connected to the readout circuitry and being configured to detect an event in the converter element. The readout circuitry...... is further configured to read out signals from the plurality of drift electrodes, and the processing unit is further configured to estimate a location of the event along the first axis by processing signals obtained from both the detector electrodes and the drift electrodes, the location of the event along...

  2. Ultrafast secondary emission x-ray imaging detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akkerman, A.; Gibrekhterman, A.; Majewski, S.

    1991-07-01

    Fast high accuracy, x-ray imaging at high photon flux can be achieved when coupling thin solid convertors to gaseous electron multipliers, operating at low gas pressures. Secondary electron emitted from the convertor foil are multiplied in several successive amplification elements. The obvious advantage of solid x-ray detectors, as compared to gaseous conversion, are the production of parallax-free images and the fast (subnanoseconds) response. These x-ray detectors have many potential applications in basic and applied research. Of particular interest is the possibility of an efficient and ultrafast high resolution imaging of transition radiation,with a reduced dE/dx background. We present experimental results on the operation of the secondary emission x-ray (SEX) detectors, their detection efficiency, localization and time resolution. The experimental work is accompanied by mathematical modelling and computer simulation of transition radiation detectors based on CsI transition radiation convertors. (author)

  3. Improvements in X-ray detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whetten, N.R.; Houston, J.M.

    1979-01-01

    Multicellular, spatially separate, gaseous ionization detectors for use in computerized tomography are described. They have high sensitivity, short recovery time, fine spatial resolution and are relatively insensitive to the adverse effects of k shell x-ray fluoresecence.(UK)

  4. Coakial gamma ray detector and method therefor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harchol, M.

    1977-01-01

    A coaxial gamma ray detector is fabricated using intrinsic Ge semiconductor material in a geometry whereby full depletion of electrical carriers is prevented within a small region proximate the point of electrical contact thereby allowing greater biasing potentials across the detector and, consequently, providing reduced electronic noise and increased energy resolution

  5. ACORDE a cosmic ray detector for ALICE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, A.; Gamez, E.; Herrera, G.; Lopez, R.; Leon-Monzon, I.; Martinez, M.I.; Pagliarone, C.; Paic, G.; Roman, S.; Tejeda, G.; Vargas, M.A.; Vergara, S.; Villasenor, L.; Zepeda, A.

    2007-01-01

    ACORDE is one of the ALICE detectors, presently under construction at CERN. It consists of an array of plastic scintillator counters placed on the three upper faces of the ALICE magnet. It will act as a cosmic ray trigger, and, together with other ALICE sub-detectors, will provide precise information on cosmic rays with primary energies around 10 15 -10 17 eV. Here we describe the design of ACORDE along with the present status and integration into ALICE

  6. Development of X-ray detector based on phototransistor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramacos Fardela; Kusminarto

    2014-01-01

    X-ray interaction with matter can produce phenomenon of fluorescence that emits visible light. This phenomenon has been exploited to design an X-ray detector based on photo transistor by attaching a screen ZnS(Ag) on the surface of the photo transistor which is arranged in a Darlington circuit. Response of detector was done by collimating of X-rays beam from the X-ray generator tube Philips 2000 watts, 60 kV type PW 2215/20 NR 780 026 and measure the detector output voltage (V out ). Varying the current by 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35 and 40 mA in the X-ray panel. The experimental results showed that the Darlington circuit can be applied to design the detector of X-ray based on phototransistor. The results show that there is a linear relationship between the change in the intensity of X-ray detectors with voltage output phototransistor when it was closed with fluorescence materials ZnS(Ag), the linearity coefficient was R 2 = 0.99. Sensitivity of detector was obtained to be 3.7 x 10 -2 mV per cpm. (author)

  7. Multicell x-ray detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stone, B.N.; Shelley, P.S.; Love, W.D.

    1981-01-01

    This invention is concerned with improving multicell detectors, particularly those used in computerized tomography. Existing ionization detectors have problems maintaining the precise dimensional spacing between electrodes required for accuracy. In addition, mechanical vibrations set up microphonic effects between the electrode plates. In this invention, pairs of electrode plates are separated by grooved insulating members. The upper and lower edges of an array of electrode plates are inserted in corresponding grooves in the insulating members, and, the whole electrode assembly is securely anchored in the detector chamber

  8. X-ray detector for a panoramic X-ray unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cowell, D; Ensslin, F H

    1976-01-15

    The discovery deals with an X-ray detector suitable for the controlling of panoramic X-ray systems. It consists of a fluorescent image screen and a semiconductor photo cell. The output signal of the detector is proportional to the intensity of the X-radiation and the response time is large enough to follow the change of amplitude of the contours of the modulated X radiation. The detector with band-pass filter regulates, via a control system, the moving rate of the X-ray source and of the film opposite it in dependence of the intensity, so that a uniform exposure is ensured.

  9. Neutron and X-ray Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carini, Gabriella [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Denes, Peter [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Gruener, Sol [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States); Lessner, Elianne [Dept. of Energy (DOE), Washington DC (United States). Office of Science Office of Basic Energy Sciences

    2012-08-01

    The Basic Energy Sciences (BES) X-ray and neutron user facilities attract more than 12,000 researchers each year to perform cutting-edge science at these state-of-the-art sources. While impressive breakthroughs in X-ray and neutron sources give us the powerful illumination needed to peer into the nano- to mesoscale world, a stumbling block continues to be the distinct lag in detector development, which is slowing progress toward data collection and analysis. Urgently needed detector improvements would reveal chemical composition and bonding in 3-D and in real time, allow researchers to watch “movies” of essential life processes as they happen, and make much more efficient use of every X-ray and neutron produced by the source The immense scientific potential that will come from better detectors has triggered worldwide activity in this area. Europe in particular has made impressive strides, outpacing the United States on several fronts. Maintaining a vital U.S. leadership in this key research endeavor will require targeted investments in detector R&D and infrastructure. To clarify the gap between detector development and source advances, and to identify opportunities to maximize the scientific impact of BES user facilities, a workshop on Neutron and X-ray Detectors was held August 1-3, 2012, in Gaithersburg, Maryland. Participants from universities, national laboratories, and commercial organizations from the United States and around the globe participated in plenary sessions, breakout groups, and joint open-discussion summary sessions. Sources have become immensely more powerful and are now brighter (more particles focused onto the sample per second) and more precise (higher spatial, spectral, and temporal resolution). To fully utilize these source advances, detectors must become faster, more efficient, and more discriminating. In supporting the mission of today’s cutting-edge neutron and X-ray sources, the workshop identified six detector research challenges

  10. A rod-like plastic scintillation detector for use in gamma-ray dosimetry and attempts to attain uniform response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, Mikio; Kawada, Yasushi; Avundukluoglu, M.A.

    1989-01-01

    The paper describes experiments made in an effort to develop scintillation dosimeters with emphasis on some attempts to attain a uniform response over the whole length of scintillators. A new method is proposed for measuring absorbed dose rate in plastic scintillators, using the photon-counting technique for measuring the total amount of luminescence from the scintillator exposed to gamma-rays. If a rod plastic scintillator and lucite light guides with well-polished and non-coated surfaces are surrounded by non-reflective material with a definite air gap between them, the scintillation light is transmitted to the PMTs only by the inner total reflection from the surface; a good uniformity of response could be expected if it were not for light attenuation in the transmission through the medium. With a diffusion reflector in non-optical contact with the scintillator surface, the scintillation light which otherwise would escape from the surface is partly reflected back into the scintillator. This effect is examined quantitatively. Measurements show that the presence of the diffusion reflector permits the uniformity of response to be improved considerably; a uniformity within 20 % is obtained. (N.K.)

  11. Radiation damage resistance in mercuric iodide X-ray detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patt, B E; Dolin, R C; Devore, T M; Markakis, J M [EG and G Energy Measurements, Inc., Goleta, CA (USA); Iwanczyk, J S; Dorri, N [Xsirius, Inc., Marina del Rey, CA (USA); Trombka, J [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Greenbelt, MD (USA). Goddard Space Flight Center

    1990-12-20

    Mercuric iodide (HgI{sub 2}) radiation detectors show great potential as ambient-temperature solid-state detectors for X-rays, gamma rays and visible light, with parameters that are competitive with existing technologies. In a previous experiment, HgI{sub 2} detectors irradiated with 10 MeV protons/cm{sup 2} exhibited no damage. The 10 MeV protons represent only the low range of the spectrum of energies that are important. An experiment has been conducted at the Saturne accelerator facility at Saclay, France, to determine the susceptibility of these detectors to radiation damage by high-energy (1.5 GeV) protons. The detectors were irradiated to a fluence of 10{sup 8} protons/cm{sup 2}. This fluence is equivalent to the cosmic radiation expected in a one-year period in space. The resolution of the detectors was measured as a function of the integral dose. No degradation in the response of any of the detectors or spectrometers was seen. It is clear from this data that HgI{sub 2} has extremely high radiation-damage resistance, exceeding that of most other semiconductor materials used for radiation detectors. Based on the results shown to date, HgI{sub 2} detectors are suitable for applications in which they may be exposed to high integral dose levels. (orig.).

  12. An analytical X-ray CdTe detector response matrix for incomplete charge collection correction for photon energies up to 300 keV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurková, Dana; Judas, Libor

    2018-05-01

    Gamma and X-ray energy spectra measured with semiconductor detectors suffer from various distortions, one of them being so-called "tailing" caused by an incomplete charge collection. Using the Hecht equation, a response matrix of size 321 × 321 was constructed which was used to correct the effect of incomplete charge collection. The correction matrix was constructed analytically for an arbitrary energy bin and the size of the energy bin thus defines the width of the spectral window. The correction matrix can be applied separately from other possible spectral corrections or it can be incorporated into an already existing response matrix of the detector. The correction was tested and its adjustable parameters were optimized on the line spectra of 57Co measured with a cadmium telluride (CdTe) detector in a spectral range from 0 up to 160 keV. The best results were obtained when the values of the free path of holes were spread over a range from 0.4 to 1.0 cm and weighted by a Gauss function. The model with the optimized parameter values was then used to correct the line spectra of 152Eu in a spectral range from 0 up to 530 keV. An improvement in the energy resolution at full width at half maximum from 2.40 % ± 0.28 % to 0.96 % ± 0.28 % was achieved at 344.27 keV. Spectra of "narrow spectrum series" beams, N120, N150, N200, N250 and N300, generated with tube voltages of 120 kV, 150 kV, 200 kV, 250 kV and 300 kV respectively, and measured with the CdTe detector, were corrected in the spectral range from 0 to 160 keV (N120 and N150) and from 0 to 530 keV (N200, N250, N300). All the measured spectra correspond both qualitatively and quantitatively to the available reference data after the correction. To obtain better correspondence between N150, N200, N250 and N300 spectra and the reference data, lower values of the free paths of holes (range from 0.16 to 0.65 cm) were used for X-ray spectra correction, which suggests energy dependence of the phenomenon.

  13. Gamma-ray standards for detector calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorenz, A.

    1985-10-01

    The proceeedings are reported of a Consultants' Meeting on Gamma-ray Standards for Detector Calibration, held at the CEN, Grenoble in France, from 30-31 May 1985. The meeting provided a forum to assess the requirements for a suitable file to be used internationally for the calibration of X- and gamma-ray detectors. A provisional list of nuclides was drawn up, and an initial assessment of the status of the required data was agreed to be performed by the participants before the end of 1985. (author)

  14. Cosmic ray spectroscopy using plastic scintillator detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudra, Sharmili; Nandan, Akhilesh P.; Neog, Himangshu; Biswas, S.; Mohanty, B.; Mahapatra, S.; Samal, P.K.

    2014-01-01

    A simple and new technique has been developed using plastic scintillator detectors for cosmic ray spectroscopy without single channel analyzer (SCA) or multichannel analyzer (MCA). In this technique only a leading edge discriminator (LED) and a NIM scaler have been used. Plastic scintillator detectors has been used to measure the velocity of cosmic ray muons. Here the time difference has been measured from the Tektronix DPO 5054 digital phosphor oscilloscope with 500 MHz and 5 GS/s. The details of experimental technique, analysis procedure and experimental results are presented

  15. Multichannel X-ray detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khabakhpashev, A

    1980-10-01

    A typical design is discussed of multiwire proportional counters and their characteristic feature is explained, ie., the possibility of showing one or two coordinates of the X-ray quantum absorption site. The advantages of such instruments are listed, such as increased sensitivity of determination, the possibility of recording radiations of a different intensity, the possibility of on-line data processing and of the digital display of results. The fields of application include X-ray structural analysis in solid state physics, crystallography, molecular biology, astronomy, materials testing, and medicine.

  16. Study of semiconductor detectors applied to diagnostic X-ray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salgado, Cesar Marques

    2003-08-01

    This work aims an evaluation of procedures for photons spectrum determination, produced by a X ray tube, normally used for medical diagnoses which operation voltage ranges from 20 to 150 kVp, to allow more precise characterization of the photon beam. The use of spectrum analysis will contribute to reduce the uncertainty in the ionization camera calibrations. For this purpose, two kind of detectors were selected, a Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) and a planar HPGe detector. The X ray interaction with the detector's crystal produces, by electronic processes, a pulse high distribution as an output, which is no the true photon spectrum, due to the presence of K shell escape peaks, Compton scattering and to the fact that the detectors efficiency diminish rapidly with the increase of the photon energy. A detailed analysis of the contributing factors to distortions in the spectrum is necessary and was performed by Monte Carlo calculation with the MCNP 4B computer code. In order to determine the actual photon spectrum for a X ray tube a spectra stripping procedure is described for the HPGe detector. The detector's response curves, determined by the Monte Carlo calculation, were compared to the experimental ones, for isotropic point sources. For the methodology validation, stripped spectra were compared to the theoretical ones, for the same X ray tube's settings, for a qualitative evaluation. The air kerma rate calculated with the photon spectra were compared to the direct measurement using an ionization chamber, for a quantitative evaluation. (author)

  17. X-ray imaging bilinear staggered GaAs detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Achmadullin, R.A.; Dvoryankin, V.F. E-mail: vfd217@ire216.msk.su; Dvoryankina, G.G.; Dikaev, Y.M.Yu.M.; Krikunov, A.I.; Kudryashov, A.A.; Panova, T.M.; Petrov, A.G.; Telegin, A.A

    2004-09-21

    The multichannel bilinear X-ray detector based on epitaxial GaAs structures is developed to obtain a digital X-ray image. Each detector operates in photovoltaic mode without reverse bias that enables almost complete elimination of detector noise arising due to leakage currents. The sensitivity range of the epitaxial GaAs photovoltaic X-ray detector covers the effective energies from 8 to 120 keV. A maximum response of the detector operating in the short-circuit mode was observed at an energy of 35 keV and amounted to 30 {mu}A min/(Gy cm{sup 2}). The multichannel detector was made of 1024 pixels with pitch of 0.8 mm. The spatial resolution of double staggered sensor row is twice as high as the resolution of that of single sensor row with the same pitch. Measured spatial resolution is 1.2 line-pairs/mm, contrast sensitivity not worse 1% and dynamic range defined as the ratio of maximum detectable X-ray signal to electronic noise level more than 2000 are received.

  18. X-ray imaging bilinear staggered GaAs detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Achmadullin, R.A.; Dvoryankin, V.F.; Dvoryankina, G.G.; Dikaev, Y.M.Yu.M.; Krikunov, A.I.; Kudryashov, A.A.; Panova, T.M.; Petrov, A.G.; Telegin, A.A.

    2004-01-01

    The multichannel bilinear X-ray detector based on epitaxial GaAs structures is developed to obtain a digital X-ray image. Each detector operates in photovoltaic mode without reverse bias that enables almost complete elimination of detector noise arising due to leakage currents. The sensitivity range of the epitaxial GaAs photovoltaic X-ray detector covers the effective energies from 8 to 120 keV. A maximum response of the detector operating in the short-circuit mode was observed at an energy of 35 keV and amounted to 30 μA min/(Gy cm 2 ). The multichannel detector was made of 1024 pixels with pitch of 0.8 mm. The spatial resolution of double staggered sensor row is twice as high as the resolution of that of single sensor row with the same pitch. Measured spatial resolution is 1.2 line-pairs/mm, contrast sensitivity not worse 1% and dynamic range defined as the ratio of maximum detectable X-ray signal to electronic noise level more than 2000 are received

  19. Tutorial on X-ray photon counting detector characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Liqiang; Zheng, Bin; Liu, Hong

    2018-01-01

    Recent advances in photon counting detection technology have led to significant research interest in X-ray imaging. As a tutorial level review, this paper covers a wide range of aspects related to X-ray photon counting detector characterization. The tutorial begins with a detailed description of the working principle and operating modes of a pixelated X-ray photon counting detector with basic architecture and detection mechanism. Currently available methods and techniques for charactering major aspects including energy response, noise floor, energy resolution, count rate performance (detector efficiency), and charge sharing effect of photon counting detectors are comprehensively reviewed. Other characterization aspects such as point spread function (PSF), line spread function (LSF), contrast transfer function (CTF), modulation transfer function (MTF), noise power spectrum (NPS), detective quantum efficiency (DQE), bias voltage, radiation damage, and polarization effect are also remarked. A cadmium telluride (CdTe) pixelated photon counting detector is employed for part of the characterization demonstration and the results are presented. This review can serve as a tutorial for X-ray imaging researchers and investigators to understand, operate, characterize, and optimize photon counting detectors for a variety of applications.

  20. Radiation detectors of PIN type for X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez-Jimenez, F.J.

    2003-01-01

    In this laboratory session, tree experiments are proposed: the measurement of X-ray energy spectra from radioactive sources with a high resolution cooled Si-Li detector, with a room temperature PIN diode and the measurement of the response of a PIN diode to the intensity of X-rays of radio-diagnostic units. The spectra obtained with the Si-Li detector help to understand the energy distribution of X-rays and are used as a reference to compare the results obtained with the PIN diode. Measurements in medical X-ray machines are proposed. Low cost, simple electronic instruments and systems are used as tools to make measurements in X-ray units used in radio-diagnostic

  1. Effect of gamma-ray and electron irradiation on the response of solid-state track detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuda, Kyue

    1980-01-01

    Specimens of muscovite mica were first exposed to fission fragments and then to various gamma-ray fields from a 60 Co source ranging from 1.9 x 10 3 to 1.6 x 10 4 Mrad dose. The results show that the average etched width of fission-fragment tracks decreases with increasing gamma-ray dose. Shallow pits were observed in etched specimens when the gamma-ray dose exceeded 5 x 10 3 Mrad. Numerous shallow etch pits caused by the gamma-ray irradiation interfered with the observation of fission tracks in the specimens. No shallow etch pits were observed in the specimen annealed for 100 min at 600 0 C before the gamma-ray irradiation. Pre-annealing extends the ''safety limits'' of gamma background below which muscovite mica can be used to observe fission tracks without any gamma-ray interference. Gamma-ray and electron irradiation caused significant increase of the resistance to thermal decomposition of muscovite mica. The resistance increased markedly in the dose range from 5 x 10 3 to 8 x 10 3 Mrad. These phenomena suggest the use of mica to assess radiation doses of gamma rays and electrons up to several thousand megarads. (author)

  2. X-ray detectors in medical imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spahn, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Healthcare systems are subject to continuous adaptation, following trends such as the change of demographic structures, the rise of life-style related and chronic diseases, and the need for efficient and outcome-oriented procedures. This also influences the design of new imaging systems as well as their components. The applications of X-ray imaging in the medical field are manifold and have led to dedicated modalities supporting specific imaging requirements, for example in computed tomography (CT), radiography, angiography, surgery or mammography, delivering projection or volumetric imaging data. Depending on the clinical needs, some X-ray systems enable diagnostic imaging while others support interventional procedures. X-ray detector design requirements for the different medical applications can vary strongly with respect to size and shape, spatial resolution, frame rates and X-ray flux, among others. Today, integrating X-ray detectors are in common use. They are predominantly based on scintillators (e.g. CsI or Gd 2 O 2 S) and arrays of photodiodes made from crystalline silicon (Si) or amorphous silicon (a-Si) or they employ semiconductors (e.g. Se) with active a-Si readout matrices. Ongoing and future developments of X-ray detectors will include optimization of current state-of-the-art integrating detectors in terms of performance and cost, will enable the usage of large size CMOS-based detectors, and may facilitate photon counting techniques with the potential to further enhance performance characteristics and foster the prospect of new clinical applications

  3. Gas Pixel Detectors for low energy X-ray polarimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spandre, Gloria

    2007-01-01

    Gas Pixel Detectors are position-sensitive proportional counters in which a complete integration between the gas amplification structure and the read-out electronics has been reached. Various generation of Application-Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) have been designed in deep submicron CMOS technology to realize a monolithic device which is at the same time the charge collecting electrode and the analog amplifying and charge measuring front-end electronics. The experimental response of a detector with 22060 pixels at 80 μm pitch to polarized and un-polarized X-ray radiation is shown and the application of this device for Astronomical X-ray Polarimetry discussed

  4. Thermally stimulated investigations on diamond X-Ray detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tromson, D.; Bergonzo, P.; Brambilla, A.; Mer, C.; Foulon, F.; Amosov, V.N.

    1999-01-01

    Intrinsic diamond material is increasingly used for the fabrication of radiation detectors. However, the presence of inherent defects has a strong impact on the detector characteristics such as the time dependent stability of the detection signal. In order to draw better insights into this effect, comparative investigations of the X-ray responses with thermally stimulated current (TSC) measurements were carried out on natural diamond detectors. TSC revealed the presence of four peaks or shoulders on natural samples in the 200 to 500 K domain. Three energy levels were identified at about 0.7, 0.71 and 0.95 eV. Time dependent X-ray detector sensitivity was investigated for various initial conditions. The results give evidence of the improvement of the detection properties after having filled traps in the material by X-ray irradiation. The comparison between the X-ray response and the TSC spectra indicate that trapping levels emptied at room temperature appear to significantly affect the performance of radiation detectors. (authors)

  5. Scintillating ribbon x-ray detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinchen, B.E.; Rogers, A.

    1995-01-01

    A patent in the early 1970's by Aerojet Corporation in Sacramento, CA put forth the idea of using an array of scintillating fibers for x-ray detection and imaging. In about 1975, Pratt and Whitney Aircraft in East Hartford, CT designed and manufactured an imaging system based on the patent. The device was 1.75 in thick in the direction of the x-ray beam and about 4 in. by 4 in. square. The device was used with a 8 MeV x-ray source to image and measure internal clearances within operating aircraft, gas turbines engines. There are significant advantages of fiber optic detectors in x-ray detection. However, the advantages are often outweighed by the disadvantages. Two of the advantages of scintillating fiber optic x-ray detectors are: (1) high limiting spatial frequency -- between 20 and 25 lp/mm; and (2) excellent x-ray stopping power -- they can be made thick and retain spatial resolution. In traditional fiber optic detectors the x-rays are oriented parallel to the long axis of the fiber. For the scintillating ribbon x-ray sensor, the x-rays are oriented normal to the fiber long axis. This ribbon sensor technique has a number of advantages over the two current radiographic techniques digital x-radiography and x-ray film: The main advantage the ribbon has is size and shape. It can be as thin as 0.05 in., virtually any width or length, and flexible. Once positioned in a given location, 20 to 100 square inches of the object being inspected can be imaged with a single x-ray beam sweep. It is clear that conventional digital cameras do not lend themselves to placement between walls of aircraft structures or similar items requiring x-ray inspections. A prototype scintillating ribbon x-ray sensor has been fabricated and tested by Synergistic Detector Designs. Images were acquired on corrosion test panels of aluminum fabricated by Iowa State University

  6. Assessing the efficiency position sensitive gaseous X-rays detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida, Gevaldo L. de; Souza, Maria Ines Silvani; Lopes, Ricardo T.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: The efficiency of gaseous X-ray detectors can be evaluated from tabulated data, but this approach assumes that the whole detector volume is permeated by the electrostatic field produced by the anode-cathode. Indeed, the usual detectors are comprised by a cylindrical hull acting as cathode containing a wire at its axis as anode, a configuration which foods the space between them with the electrostatic field. Some specially designed detectors, however, as Position Sensitive Detectors, contain regions which are not submitted to the electrostatic field, and hence, their efficiency could not be assessed from the tabulated data. Direct measurements of this efficiency would require a mono-chromator or set of pure mono-energetic X-rays sources. As only very few of them are really mono-energetic, the detector response to a given energy would be spoiled by to the concomitant contribution of other energies. Yet, the information would not be completely lost, but only concealed due to the convolution carried out by the detector. Therefore, a proper unfolding would be capable to recover the information, yielding the individual detector efficiency for each of the contributing energies. The degraded information is retrieved in this work through a proper mathematical unfolding of the detector response, when exposed to Bremsstrahlung spectra from an X-ray tube submitted to different voltages. For this purpose, Lorentzian functions have been fitted to these spectra - obtained with a NaI(Tl) spectrometer - in order to characterize them with proper parameters. The mathematical convolution of these functions with a theoretical detector efficiency curve yields, after integration, values which, confronted with those experimentally measured, allow the determination of the parameters of the efficiency curve. As some parameters of this curve are well known, it is possible to represent it by proper functions. For argon-filled detectors, for instance, this efficiency has a

  7. X-ray detectors based on image sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, A.P.R.

    1983-01-01

    X-ray detectors based on image sensors are described and a comparison is made between the advantages and the disadvantages of such a kind of detectors with the position sensitive detectors. (L.C.) [pt

  8. Small Angle X-Ray Scattering Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hessler, Jan P.

    2004-06-15

    A detector for time-resolved small-angle x-ray scattering includes a nearly constant diameter, evacuated linear tube having an end plate detector with a first fluorescent screen and concentric rings of first fiber optic bundles for low angle scattering detection and an annular detector having a second fluorescent screen and second fiber optic bundles concentrically disposed about the tube for higher angle scattering detection. With the scattering source, i.e., the specimen under investigation, located outside of the evacuated tube on the tube's longitudinal axis, scattered x-rays are detected by the fiber optic bundles, to each of which is coupled a respective photodetector, to provide a measurement resolution, i.e., dq/q, where q is the momentum transferred from an incident x-ray to an x-ray scattering specimen, of 2% over two (2) orders of magnitude in reciprocal space, i.e., qmax/qmin approx=lO0.

  9. Quality control measurements for digital x-ray detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marshall, N W [Department of Radiology, University Hospitals Leuven, 49 Herenstraat, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Mackenzie, A [National Co-ordinating Centre for the Physics of Mammography, Medical Physics, Level B, St Luke' s Wing, The Royal Surrey County Hospital NHS Trust, Egerton Road, Guildford, GU2 7XX (United Kingdom); Honey, I D, E-mail: nicholas.marshall@uz.kuleuven.ac.be [Department of Medical Physics, Floor 3, Henriette Raphael House, Guy' s and St Thomas' Hospital, London, SE1 9RT (United Kingdom)

    2011-02-21

    This paper describes a digital radiography (DR) quality control protocol for DR detectors from the forthcoming report from the Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine (IPEM). The protocol was applied to a group of six identical caesium iodide (CsI) digital x-ray detectors to assess reproducibility of methods, while four further detectors were assessed to examine the wider applicability. Twelve images with minimal spatial frequency processing are required, from which the detector response, lag, modulation transfer function (MTF), normalized noise power spectrum (NNPS) and threshold contrast-detail (c-d) detectability are calculated. The x-ray spectrum used was 70 kV and 1 mm added copper filtration, with a target detector air kerma of 2.5 {mu}Gy for the NNPS and c-d results. In order to compare detector performance with previous imaging technology, c-d data from four screen/film systems were also acquired, at a target optical density of 1.5 and an average detector air kerma of 2.56 {mu}Gy. The DR detector images were typically acquired in 20 min, with a further 45 min required for image transfer and analysis. The average spatial frequency for the 50% point of the MTF for six identical detectors was 1.29 mm{sup -1} {+-} 0.05 (3.9% coefficient of variation (cov)). The air kerma set for the six systems was 2.57 {mu}Gy {+-} 0.13 (5.0% cov) and the NNPS at this air kerma was 1.42 x 10{sup -5} mm{sup 2} (6.5% cov). The detective quantum efficiency (DQE) measured for the six identical detectors was 0.60 at 0.5 mm{sup -1}, with a maximum cov of 10% at 2.9 mm{sup -1}, while the average DQE was 0.56 at 0.5 mm{sup -1} for three CsI detectors from three different manufacturers. Comparable c-d performance was found for these detectors (5.9% cov) with an average threshold contrast of 0.46% for 11 mm circular discs. The average threshold contrast for the S/F systems was 0.70% at 11 mm, indicating superior imaging performance for the digital systems. The protocol was found

  10. CCD-based X-ray detectors for X-ray diffraction studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, K.; Amemiya, Y.

    1999-01-01

    CCD-based X-ray detectors are getting to be used for X-ray diffraction studies especially in the studies where real time (automated) measurements and time-resolved measurements are required. Principles and designs of two typical types of CCD-based detectors are described; one is ths system in which x-ray image intensifiers are coupled to maximize the detective quantum efficiency for time-resolved measurements, and the other is the system in which tapered optical fibers are coupled for the reduction of the image into the CCD, which is optimized for automated measurements for protein crystallography. These CCD-based X-ray detectors have an image distortion and non-uniformity of response to be corrected by software. Correction schemes which we have developed are also described. (author)

  11. Silicon lithium detector for x ray fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez Cabal, A. E.; Diaz Garcia, A.; Noriega Scull, C.; Martinez Munoz, O.; Diaz Cepeda, R.

    1997-01-01

    The Silicon Lithium detector is the system for the detection of nuclear radiation. It transforms the charge that was produced inside of Silicon material as a result of the incidence of particles and X rays, in voltage pulses at the output of the preamplifier. In this work was made the adjustment of the technological process of manufacture of the detector. Also was made the design and construction of the cryostat and preamplifier and then the validation of the system in a Cuban Dewar. The system, which was made for the first time in our country, has an energy resolution of 185 eV for the Fe-55 source (E=5.9 KeV), which has permitted its implementation in energy dispersive X ray fluorescence. (author) [es

  12. Ultra high resolution X-ray detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hess, U.; Buehler, M.; Hentig, R. von; Hertrich, T.; Phelan, K.; Wernicke, D.; Hoehne, J.

    2001-01-01

    CSP Cryogenic Spectrometers GmbH is developing cryogenic energy dispersive X-ray spectrometers based on superconducting detector technology. Superconducting sensors exhibit at least a 10-fold improvement in energy resolution due to their low energy gap compared to conventional Si(Li) or Ge detectors. These capabilities are extremely valuable for the analysis of light elements and in general for the analysis of the low energy range of the X-ray spectrum. The spectrometer is based on a mechanical cooler needing no liquid coolants and an adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) stage which supplies the operating temperature of below 100 mK for the superconducting sensor. Applications include surface analysis in semiconductor industry as well material analysis for material composition e.g. in ceramics or automobile industry

  13. Gamma-ray standards for detector calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christmas, P.; Nichols, A.L.; Lorenz, A.

    1987-09-01

    The first official meeting of the IAEA Coordinated Research Programme on the Measurement and Evaluation of X- and Gamma-ray Standards for Detector Calibration was held in Rome from 11 to 13 June 1987. Work undertaken by the CRP members was reviewed in detail: specific problems in the evaluations were identified and actions placed on the participants to resolve these issues. (author). 3 tabs

  14. Ground calibration of the spatial response and quantum efficiency of the CdZnTe hard x-ray detectors for NuSTAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grefenstette, Brian W.; Bhalerao, Varun; Cook, W. Rick; Harrison, Fiona A.; Kitaguchi, Takao; Madsen, Kristin K.; Mao, Peter H.; Miyasaka, Hiromasa; Rana, Vikram

    2017-08-01

    Pixelated Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CdZnTe) detectors are currently flying on the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope ARray (NuSTAR) NASA Astrophysics Small Explorer. While the pixel pitch of the detectors is ≍ 605 μm, we can leverage the detector readout architecture to determine the interaction location of an individual photon to much higher spatial accuracy. The sub-pixel spatial location allows us to finely oversample the point spread function of the optics and reduces imaging artifacts due to pixelation. In this paper we demonstrate how the sub-pixel information is obtained, how the detectors were calibrated, and provide ground verification of the quantum efficiency of our Monte Carlo model of the detector response.

  15. Diamond detectors for synchrotron radiation X-ray applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Sio, A. [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, INFN, 00044 Frascati, Roma (Italy); Department of Astronomy and Space Science, Universita di Firenze, L.go E. Fermi 2, 50125 Firenze (Italy)], E-mail: desio@arcetri.astro.it; Pace, E. [Department of Astronomy and Space Science, Universita di Firenze, L.go E. Fermi 2, 50125 Firenze (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Firenze, v. G. Sansone 1, Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze (Italy); Cinque, G.; Marcelli, A. [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, INFN, 00044 Frascati, Roma (Italy); Achard, J.; Tallaire, A. [LIMHP-CNRS, University of Paris XIII, 99 Avenue JB Clement, 93430 Villetaneuse (France)

    2007-07-15

    Due to its unique physical properties, diamond is a very appealing material for the development of electronic devices and sensors. Its wide band gap (5.5 eV) endows diamond based devices with low thermal noise, low dark current levels and, in the case of radiation detectors, high visible-to-X-ray signal discrimination (visible blindness) as well as high sensitivity to energies greater than the band gap. Furthermore, due to its radiation hardness diamond is very interesting for applications in extreme environments, or as monitor of high fluency radiation beams. In this work the use of diamond based detectors for X-ray sensing is discussed. On purpose, some photo-conductors based on different diamond types have been tested at the DAFNE-L synchrotron radiation laboratory at Frascati. X-ray sensitivity spectra, linearity and stability of the response of these diamond devices have been measured in order to evidence the promising performance of such devices.

  16. Diamond detectors for synchrotron radiation X-ray applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Sio, A.; Pace, E.; Cinque, G.; Marcelli, A.; Achard, J.; Tallaire, A.

    2007-01-01

    Due to its unique physical properties, diamond is a very appealing material for the development of electronic devices and sensors. Its wide band gap (5.5 eV) endows diamond based devices with low thermal noise, low dark current levels and, in the case of radiation detectors, high visible-to-X-ray signal discrimination (visible blindness) as well as high sensitivity to energies greater than the band gap. Furthermore, due to its radiation hardness diamond is very interesting for applications in extreme environments, or as monitor of high fluency radiation beams. In this work the use of diamond based detectors for X-ray sensing is discussed. On purpose, some photo-conductors based on different diamond types have been tested at the DAFNE-L synchrotron radiation laboratory at Frascati. X-ray sensitivity spectra, linearity and stability of the response of these diamond devices have been measured in order to evidence the promising performance of such devices

  17. Position sensitive x-ray detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macchione, E.L.A.

    1990-01-01

    A multi ware position sensitive gas counter for X-ray detection was developed in our laboratory, making use of commercial delay-lines for position sensing. Six delay-line chips (50 ns delay each, 40 Mhz cut-off frequency) cover a total sensitive length of 150 mm leading to a delay-risetime ratio that allows for a high-resolution position detection. Tests using the 5,9 keV X-ray line from a 55 Fe source and integral linearity better than 0,1% and a maximal differential linearity of ±4,0% were obtained operating the detector with an Ar-C H 4 (90%-10%) gas mixture at 700 torr. Similar tests were performed, using the 8,04 keV line from a Cu x-ray tube. A total resolution of 330 μm, and the same integral and differential linearities were obtained. (author)

  18. Gamma-ray detectors for breast imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Mark B.; Goode, Allen R.; Majewski, Stan; Steinbach, Daniela; Weisenberger, Andrew G.; Wojcik, Randolph F.; Farzanpay, Farzin

    1997-07-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer of American women and is the leading cause of cancer-related death among women aged 15 - 54; however recent years have shown that early detection using x-ray mammography can lead to a high probability of cure. However, because of mammography's low positive predictive value, surgical or core biopsy is typically required for diagnosis. In addition, the low radiographic contrast of many nonpalpable breast masses, particularly among women with radiographically dense breasts, results in an overall rate of 10% to 25% for missed tumors. Nuclear imaging of the breast using single gamma emitters (scintimammography) such as (superscript 99m)Tc, or positron emitters such as F-18- fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) for positron emission tomography (PET), can provide information on functional or metabolic tumor activity that is complementary to the structural information of x-ray mammography, thereby potentially reducing the number of unnecessary biopsies and missed cancers. This paper summarizes recent data on the efficacy of scintimammography using conventional gamma cameras, and describes the development of dedicated detectors for gamma emission breast imaging. The detectors use new, high density crystal scintillators and large area position sensitive photomultiplier tubes (PSPMTs). Detector design, imaging requirements, and preliminary measured imaging performance are discussed.

  19. Radiation response issues for infrared detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalma, Arne H.

    1990-01-01

    Researchers describe the most important radiation response issues for infrared detectors. In general, the two key degradation mechanisms in infrared detectors are the noise produced by exposure to a flux of ionizing particles (e.g.; trapped electronics and protons, debris gammas and electrons, radioactive decay of neutron-activated materials) and permanent damage produced by exposure to total dose. Total-dose-induced damage is most often the result of charge trapping in insulators or at interfaces. Exposure to short pulses of ionization (e.g.; prompt x rays or gammas, delayed gammas) will cause detector upset. However, this upset is not important to a sensor unless the recovery time is too long. A few detector technologies are vulnerable to neutron-induced displacement damage, but fortunately most are not. Researchers compare the responses of the new technologies with those of the mainstream technologies of PV HgCdTe and IBC Si:As. One important reason for this comparison is to note where some of the newer technologies have the potential to provide significantly improved radiation hardness compared with that of the mainstream technologies, and thus to provide greater motivation for the pursuit of these technologies.

  20. Mount makes liquid nitrogen-cooled gamma ray detector portable

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fessler, T. E.

    1966-01-01

    Liquid nitrogen-cooled gamma ray detector system is made portable by attaching the detector to a fixture which provides a good thermal conductive path between the detector and the liquid nitrogen in a dewar flask and a low heat leak path between the detector and the external environment.

  1. Comparison of natural and synthetic diamond X-ray detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lansley, S. P.; Betzel, G.T.; Meyer, J.; Metcalf, P.; Reinisch, L.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: Diamond detectors are particularly well suited for dosimetry applications in radiotherapy for reasons including near-tissue equivalence and high-spatial resolu tion resulting from small sensitive volumes. However, these detectors have not become commonplace due to high cost and poor availability arising from the need for high quality diamond. We have fabricated relatively cheap detectors from commercially-available synthetic diamond fabricated using chemical vapour deposition. Here, we present a comparison of one of these detectors with the only commercially-available diamond-based detector (which uses a natural diamond crystal). Parameters such as the energy dependence and linearity of charge with dose were investigated at orthovoltage energies (50-250 kY), and dose-rate dependence of charge at linear accelerator energy (6 MY). The energy dependence of a synthetic diamond detector was similar to that of the natural diamond detector, albeit with slightly less variation across the energy range. Both detectors displayed a linear response S. P. Lansley () . G. T. Betzel . J. Meyer Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand e-mail: stuart.lansley canterbury.ac.nz S. P. Lansley The Macdiarmid Institute for Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology, University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand P. Metcalfe Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, Australia L. Reinisch Department of Physical and Earth Sciences, Jacksonville State University, Jacksonville, AL, USA with dose (at 100 kY) over the limited dose range used. The sensitivity of the synthetic diamond detector was 302 nC/Gy, compared to 294 nC/Gy measured for the natural diamond detector; however, this was obtained with a bias of 246.50 Y compared to a bias of 61.75 Y used for the natural diamond detector. The natural diamond detector exhibited a greater dependency on dose-rate than the syn thetic diamond detector. Overall

  2. Charge diffusion in CCD X-ray detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavlov, George G.; Nousek, John A.

    1999-01-01

    Critical to the detection of X-rays by CCDs, is the detailed process of charge diffusion and drift within the device. We reexamine the prescriptions currently used in the modeling of X-ray CCD detectors to provide analytic expressions for the charge distribution over the CCD pixels which are suitable for use in numerical simulations of CCD response. Our treatment results in models which predict charge distributions which are more centrally peaked and have flatter wings than the Gaussian shapes predicted by previous work and adopted in current CCD modeling codes

  3. Silicon Drift Detector response function for PIXE spectra fitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calzolai, G.; Tapinassi, S.; Chiari, M.; Giannoni, M.; Nava, S.; Pazzi, G.; Lucarelli, F.

    2018-02-01

    The correct determination of the X-ray peak areas in PIXE spectra by fitting with a computer program depends crucially on accurate parameterization of the detector peak response function. In the Guelph PIXE software package, GUPIXWin, one of the most used PIXE spectra analysis code, the response of a semiconductor detector to monochromatic X-ray radiation is described by a linear combination of several analytical functions: a Gaussian profile for the X-ray line itself, and additional tail contributions (exponential tails and step functions) on the low-energy side of the X-ray line to describe incomplete charge collection effects. The literature on the spectral response of silicon X-ray detectors for PIXE applications is rather scarce, in particular data for Silicon Drift Detectors (SDD) and for a large range of X-ray energies are missing. Using a set of analytical functions, the SDD response functions were satisfactorily reproduced for the X-ray energy range 1-15 keV. The behaviour of the parameters involved in the SDD tailing functions with X-ray energy is described by simple polynomial functions, which permit an easy implementation in PIXE spectra fitting codes.

  4. A proposal for both plasma ion- and electron-temperature diagnostics under simultaneous incidence of particles and x-rays into a semiconductor on the basis of a proposed model for a semiconductor detector response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numakura, T; Cho, T; Kohagura, J; Hirata, M; Minami, R; Yoshida, M; Nakashima, Y; Tamano, T; Yatsu, K; Miyoshi, S

    2003-01-01

    A method is proposed for obtaining radial profiles of plasma temperatures of both plasma ion (T i ) and electron (T e ) simultaneously by the use of a semiconductor detector array. The method is based on our developed particle-response model for a semiconductor detector; in particular, the response theory is constructed for giving the applicability in particle energies ranging down to a kiloelectronvolt. Calculated results from our model are in fairly good agreement with experimental data on the detector response of incident particle beams with energies in the range 100 eV to a few kiloelectronvolts. On the basis of the verification of the proposed model, an idea of the use of a developed semiconductor detector array covered with 'reliably unbreakable' ultrathin SiO 2 'dead-layer filters' having various nanometre-order thicknesses is applied for simultaneous T i and T e analyses by using charge-exchange neutral particles and x-rays from plasmas. Radial profiles of T i and T e are obtained in a single plasma discharge alone, and the data reliability is independently cross-checked by a radial scan of a conventional charge-exchange neutral-particle analyser system as well as a 50-channel microchannel plate x-ray diagnostics system in the GAMMA 10 tandem mirror

  5. High-Resolution Detector For X-Ray Diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Daniel C.; Withrow, William K.; Pusey, Marc L.; Yost, Vaughn H.

    1988-01-01

    Proposed x-ray-sensitive imaging detector offers superior spatial resolution, counting-rate capacity, and dynamic range. Instrument based on laser-stimulated luminescence and reusable x-ray-sensitive film. Detector scans x-ray film line by line. Extracts latent image in film and simultaneously erases film for reuse. Used primarily for protein crystallography. Principle adapted to imaging detectors for electron microscopy and fluorescence spectroscopy and general use in astronomy, engineering, and medicine.

  6. Small area silicon diffused junction X-ray detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, J. T.; Pehl, R. H.; Larsh, A. E.

    1982-01-01

    The low-temperature performance of silicon diffused junction detectors in the measurement of low energy X-rays is reported. The detectors have an area of 0.04 sq cm and a thickness of 100 microns. The spectral resolutions of these detectors were found to be in close agreement with expected values, indicating that the defects introduced by the high-temperature processing required in the device fabrication were not deleteriously affecting the detection of low-energy X-rays. Device performance over a temperature range of 77 K to 150 K is given. These detectors were designed to detect low-energy X-rays in the presence of minimum ionizing electrons. The successful application of silicon-diffused junction technology to X-ray detector fabrication may facilitate the development of other novel silicon X-ray detector designs.

  7. Small area silicon diffused junction x-ray detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walton, J.T.; Pehl, R.H.; Larsh, A.E.

    1981-10-01

    The low temperature performance of silicon diffused junction detectors in the measurement of low energy x-rays is reported. The detectors have an area of 0.04 cm 2 and a thickness of 100 μm. The spectral resolutions of these detectors were found to be in close agreement with expected values indicating that the defects introduced by the high temperature processing required in the device fabrication were not deleteriously affecting the detection of low energy x-rays. Device performance over a temperature range of 77 to 150 0 K is given. These detectors were designed to detect low energy x-rays in the presence of minimum ionizing electrons. The successful application of silicon diffused junction technology to x-ray detector fabrication may facilitate the development of other novel silicon x-ray detector designs

  8. Spectral response of multi-element silicon detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludewigt, B.A.; Rossington, C.S.; Chapman, K. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1997-04-01

    Multi-element silicon strip detectors, in conjunction with integrated circuit pulse-processing electronics, offer an attractive alternative to conventional lithium-drifted silicon Si(Li) and high purity germanium detectors (HPGe) for high count rate, low noise synchrotron x-ray fluorescence applications. One of the major differences between the segmented Si detectors and the commercially available single-element Si(Li) or HPGe detectors is that hundreds of elements can be fabricated on a single Si substrate using standard silicon processing technologies. The segmentation of the detector substrate into many small elements results in very low noise performance at or near, room temperature, and the count rate of the detector is increased many-fold due to the multiplication in the total number of detectors. Traditionally, a single channel of detector with electronics can handle {approximately}100 kHz count rates while maintaining good energy resolution; the segmented detectors can operate at greater than MHz count rates merely due to the multiplication in the number of channels. One of the most critical aspects in the development of the segmented detectors is characterizing the charge sharing and charge loss that occur between the individual detector strips, and determining how these affect the spectral response of the detectors.

  9. Digital signal processors for cryogenic high-resolution x-ray detector readout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedrich, Stephan; Drury, Owen B.; Bechstein, Sylke; Hennig, Wolfgang; Momayezi, Michael

    2003-01-01

    We are developing fast digital signal processors (DSPs) to read out superconducting high-resolution X-ray detectors with on-line pulse processing. For superconducting tunnel junction (STJ) detector read-out, the DSPs offer online filtering, rise time discrimination and pile-up rejection. Compared to analog pulse processing, DSP readout somewhat degrades the detector resolution, but improves the spectral purity of the detector response. We discuss DSP performance with our 9-channel STJ array for synchrotron-based high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy. (author)

  10. Small Pixel Hybrid CMOS X-ray Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, Samuel; Bray, Evan; Burrows, David N.; Chattopadhyay, Tanmoy; Falcone, Abraham; Kern, Matthew; McQuaide, Maria; Wages, Mitchell

    2018-01-01

    Concepts for future space-based X-ray observatories call for a large effective area and high angular resolution instrument to enable precision X-ray astronomy at high redshift and low luminosity. Hybrid CMOS detectors are well suited for such high throughput instruments, and the Penn State X-ray detector lab, in collaboration with Teledyne Imaging Sensors, has recently developed new small pixel hybrid CMOS X-ray detectors. These prototype 128x128 pixel devices have 12.5 micron pixel pitch, 200 micron fully depleted depth, and include crosstalk eliminating CTIA amplifiers and in-pixel correlated double sampling (CDS) capability. We report on characteristics of these new detectors, including the best read noise ever measured for an X-ray hybrid CMOS detector, 5.67 e- (RMS).

  11. Study on response function of CdTe detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyunduk; Cho, Gyuseong [Department of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Bo-Sun [Department of Radiological Science, Catholic University of Daegu, Kyoungsan, Kyoungbuk 712-702 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: bskang@cu.ac.kr

    2009-10-21

    So far the origin of the mechanism of light emission in the sonoluminescence has not elucidated whether it is due to blackbody radiation or bremsstrahlung. The final goal of our study is measuring X-ray energy spectrum using high-sensitivity cadmium telluride (CdTe) detector in order to obtain information for understanding sonoluminescence phenomena. However, the scope of this report is the measurement of X-ray spectrum using a high-resolution CdTe detector and determination of CdTe detector response function to obtain the corrected spectrum from measured soft X-ray source spectrum. In general, the measured spectrum was distorted by the characteristics of CdTe detector. Monte Carlo simulation code, MCNP, was used to obtain the reference response function of the CdTe detector. The X-ray spectra of {sup 57}Co, {sup 133}Ba, and {sup 241}Am were obtained by a 4x4x1.0(t) mm{sup 3} CdTe detector at room temperature.

  12. TL detectors for gamma ray dose measurements in criticality accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miljanic, S.; Zorko, B.; Gregori, B.; Knezevic, Z.

    2007-01-01

    Determination of gamma ray dose in mixed neutron + gamma ray fields is still a demanding task. Dosemeters used for gamma ray dosimetry are usually in some extent sensitive to neutrons and their response variations depend on neutron energy i.e., on neutron spectra. Besides, it is necessary to take into account the energy dependence of dosemeter responses to gamma rays. In this work, several types of thermoluminescent detectors (TLD) placed in different holders used for gamma ray dose determination in the mixed fields were examined. Dosemeters were from three different institutions: Ruder Boskovic Inst. (RBI), Croatia, Jozef Stefan Inst. (JSI), Slovenia and Autoridad Regulatoria Nuclear (ARN), Argentina. All dosemeters were irradiated during the International Intercomparison of Criticality Accident Dosimetry Systems at the SILENE Reactor, Valduc, June 2002. Three accidental scenarios were reproduced and in each irradiation the dosemeters were exposed placed on the front of phantom and 'free in air'. Following types of TLDs were used: 7 LiF (TLD-700), CaF 2 :Mn and Al2 O3 :Mg,Y - all from RBI; CaF 2 :Mn from JSI and 7 LiF (TLD-700) from ARN. Reported doses were compared with the reference values as well as with the values obtained from the results of all participants. The results show satisfactory agreement with other dosimetry systems used in the Intercomparison. The influence of different types of holders and applied corrections of dosemeters' readings are discussed. (authors)

  13. TL detectors for gamma ray dose measurements in criticality accidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miljanić, Saveta; Zorko, Benjamin; Gregori, Beatriz; Knezević, Zeljka

    2007-01-01

    Determination of gamma ray dose in mixed neutron+gamma ray fields is still a demanding task. Dosemeters used for gamma ray dosimetry are usually in some extent sensitive to neutrons and their response variations depend on neutron energy i.e., on neutron spectra. Besides, it is necessary to take into account the energy dependence of dosemeter responses to gamma rays. In this work, several types of thermoluminescent detectors (TLD) placed in different holders used for gamma ray dose determination in the mixed fields were examined. Dosemeters were from three different institutions: Ruder Bosković Institute (RBI), Croatia, JoZef Stefan Institute (JSI), Slovenia and Autoridad Regulatoria Nuclear (ARN), Argentina. All dosemeters were irradiated during the International Intercomparison of Criticality Accident Dosimetry Systems at the SILENE Reactor, Valduc, June 2002. Three accidental scenarios were reproduced and in each irradiation the dosemeters were exposed placed on the front of phantom and 'free in air'. Following types of TLDs were used: 7LiF (TLD-700), CaF2:Mn and Al2O3:Mg,Y-all from RBI; CaF2:Mn from JSI and 7LiF (TLD-700) from ARN. Reported doses were compared with the reference values as well as with the values obtained from the results of all participants. The results show satisfactory agreement with other dosimetry systems used in the Intercomparison. The influence of different types of holders and applied corrections of dosemeters' readings are discussed.

  14. The color of X-rays Spectral X-ray computed tomography using energy sensitive pixel detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Schioppa, Enrico Junior

    Energy sensitive X-ray imaging detectors are produced by connecting a semiconductor sensor to a spectroscopic pixel readout chip. In this thesis, the applicability of such detectors to X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) is studied. A prototype Medipix based silicon detector is calibrated using X-ray fluorescence. The charge transport properties of the sensor are characterized using a high energy beam of charged particles at the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) at the European Center for Nuclear Research (CERN). Monochromatic X-rays at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) are used to determined the energy response function. These data are used to implement a physics-based CT projection operator that accounts for the transmission of the source spectrum through the sample and detector effects. Based on this projection operator, an iterative spectral CT reconstruction algorithm is developed by extending an Ordered Subset Expectation Maximization (OSEM) method. Subsequently, a maximum likelihood based algo...

  15. A new MBE CdTe photoconductor array detector for X-ray applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, S.S.; Sivananthan, S.; Faurie, J.P.; Rodricks, B.; Bai, J.; Montano, P.A.; Argonne National Lab., IL

    1994-10-01

    A CdTe photoconductor array x-ray detector was grown using Molecular Beam Epitaxially (MBE) on a Si (100) substrate. The temporal response of the photoconductor arrays is as fast as 21 psec risetime and 38 psec Full Width Half Maximum (FWHM). Spatial and energy responses were obtained using x-rays from a rotating anode and synchrotron radiation source. The spatial resolution of the photoconductor was good enough to provide 75 microm FWHM using a 50 microm synchrotron x-ray beam. A substantial number of x-ray photons are absorbed effectively within the MBE CdTe layer as observed from the linear response up to 15 keV. These results demonstrate that MBE grown CdTe is a suitable choice of the detector materials to meet the requirements for x-ray detectors in particular for the new high brightness synchrotron sources

  16. Sensitivity of Gamma-Ray Detectors to Polarization

    OpenAIRE

    Yadigaroglu, I. -A.

    1996-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the largest gamma-ray detector to date, EGRET, does not have useful polarization sensitivity. We have explored here some improved approaches to analyzing gamma-ray pair production events, leading to important gains in sensitivity to polarization. The performance of the next generation gamma-ray instrument GLAST is investigated using a detailed Monte Carlo simulation of the complete detector.

  17. The one- and two-coordinate x-ray detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aulchenko, V.M.; Baru, S.E.; Khabakhpashev, A.G.; Savinov, G.A.

    1992-01-01

    The Institute of Nuclear Physics has designed and fabricated one- and two-coordinate x-ray detectors since 1975. For photon detection multiwire proportional chambers that operate in direct pulse count mode are employed. The characteristics of the detectors allow successful use of them for a wide range of diffractive x-ray structure studies, including studies of dynamics of structure variation (x-ray diffractive movies) and measurements at synchrotron radiation channels

  18. Position-sensitive X-ray detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendrix, J.

    1982-01-01

    In this review of the application of different types of position sensitive detectors to synchrotron radiation, discussion of the proportional counters based on the gas amplification principle forms a major part. Other topics reviewed are detector requirements, multiwire proportional chamber system, drift chamber type detectors, TV detectors, and recent developments, such as that based on a micro-channel plate as the amplifying element, and charge-coupled devices. (U.K.)

  19. Hight resolution Si(Li) X ray detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Xianglin; Huang Naizhang; Lin Maocai; Li Zhiyong

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes the fabrication technology of GL1221 type Si(Li) X ray detector core and the pulse light feedback colded preamplifier fitted on the detector. The energy resolution of the detector system is 165 eV (At 5.89 KeV Mn-K α X ray); the counting rate is 1020 cps, and the electronics noise is 104 eV. The performace of the detector keeps up with the business level of a foreign product of the same kind

  20. Monte Carlo simulation of discrete γ-ray detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakkali, A.; Tamda, N.; Parmentier, M.; Chavanelle, J.; Pousse, A.; Kastler, B.

    2005-01-01

    Needs in medical diagnosis, especially for early and reliable breast cancer detection, lead us to consider developments in scintillation crystals and position sensitive photomultiplier tubes (PSPMT) in order to develop a high-resolution medium field γ-ray imaging device. However the ideal detector for γ-rays represents a compromise between many conflicting requirements. In order to optimize different parameters involved in the detection process, we have developed a Monte Carlo simulation software. Its aim was to study the light distribution produced by a gamma photon interacting with a pixellated scintillation crystal coupled to a PSPMT array. Several crystal properties were taken into account as well as the intrinsic response of PSPMTs. Images obtained by simulations are compared with experimental results. Agreement between simulation and experimental results validate our simulation model

  1. Calibration of the hard x-ray detectors for the FOXSI solar sounding rocket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athiray, P. S.; Buitrago-Casas, Juan Camilo; Bergstedt, Kendra; Vievering, Juliana; Musset, Sophie; Ishikawa, Shin-nosuke; Glesener, Lindsay; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Watanabe, Shin; Courtade, Sasha; Christe, Steven; Krucker, Säm.; Goetz, Keith; Monson, Steven

    2017-08-01

    The Focusing Optics X-ray Solar Imager (FOXSI) sounding rocket experiment conducts direct imaging and spectral observation of the Sun in hard X-rays, in the energy range 4 to 20 keV. These high-sensitivity observations are used to study particle acceleration and coronal heating. FOXSI is designed with seven grazing incidence optics modules that focus X-rays onto seven focal plane detectors kept at a 2m distance. FOXSI-1 was flown with seven Double-sided Si Strip Detectors (DSSD), and two of them were replaced with CdTe detectors for FOXSI-2. The upcoming FOXSI-3 flight will carry DSSD and CdTe detectors with upgraded optics for enhanced sensitivity. The detectors are calibrated using various radioactive sources. The detector's spectral response matrix was constructed with diagonal elements using a Gaussian approximation with a spread (sigma) that accounts for the energy resolution of the detector. Spectroscopic studies of past FOXSI flight data suggest that the inclusion of lower energy X-rays could better constrain the spectral modeling to yield a more precise temperature estimation of the hot plasma. This motivates us to carry out an improved calibration to better understand the finer-order effects on the spectral response, especially at lower energies. Here we report our improved calibration of FOXSI detectors using experiments and Monte-Carlo simulations.

  2. X-ray imaging with the PILATUS 100k detector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, Martin; Bunk, O.; David, C.

    2008-01-01

    We report on the application of the PILATUS 100K pixel detector for medical imaging. Experimental results are presented in the form of X-ray radiographs using standard X-ray absorption contrast and a recently developed phase contrast imaging method. The results obtained with the PILATUS detector...... are compared to results obtained with a conventional X-ray imaging system consisting of an X-ray scintillation screen, lens optics, and a charge coupled device. Finally, the results for both systems are discussed more quantitatively based on an image power spectrum analysis. Udgivelsesdato: April...

  3. A gas pixel detector for X-ray imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bateman, J.E.; Connolly, J.F.

    1991-11-01

    A simple, robust form of gas pixel detector is discussed which is based on the use of electronic connector pins as the gain elements. With a rate capability of >10 5 counts/s per pin, an X-ray imaging detector system capable of counting at global rates of the order of 10 10 counts/s is foreseen. (author)

  4. Transition-radiation detectors for cosmic-ray research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, D.; Chicago Univ., Ill.

    1975-01-01

    Transition-radiation detectors for cosmic-ray work are described which consist of plastic foam of multiple plastic foil radiators, followed by proportional chambers. A summary of the properties of such detectors is given, and the detection and discrimination efficiencies for energetic particles are discussed. Several possible applications of such devices for studies of cosmic-ray particles in the energy region γ=E/mc 2 >10 3 are advertised

  5. Neutron energy response measurement of scintillation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Hongqiong; Peng Taiping; Yang Jianlun; Tang Zhengyuan; Yang Gaozhao; Li Linbo; Hu Mengchun; Wang Zhentong; Zhang Jianhua; Li Zhongbao; Wang Lizong

    2004-01-01

    Neutron sensitivities of detectors composed of plastic scintillator ST401, ST1422, ST1423 and phyotomultiplier tube in primary energy range of fission neutron are calibrated by direct current. The energy response curve of the detectors is obtained in this experiment. The experimental result has been compared with the theoretical calculation and they are in agreement within measuring uncertainty. (authors)

  6. Advanced radiation detector development: Advanced semiconductor detector development: Development of a oom-temperature, gamma ray detector using gallium arsenide to develop an electrode detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knoll, G.F.

    1995-11-01

    The advanced detector development project at the University of Michigan has completed the first full year of its current funding. Our general goals are the development of radiation detectors and spectrometers that are capable of portable room temperature operation. Over the past 12 months, we have worked primarily in the development of semiconductor spectrometers with open-quotes single carrierclose quotes response that offer the promise of room temperature operation and good energy resolution in gamma ray spectroscopy. We have also begun a small scale effort at investigating the properties of a small non-spectroscopic detector system with directional characteristics that will allow identification of the approximate direction in which gamma rays are incident. These activities have made use of the extensive clean room facilities at the University of Michigan for semiconductor device fabrication, and also the radiation measurement capabilities provided in our laboratory in the Phoenix Building on the North Campus. In addition to our laboratory based activities, Professor Knoll has also been a participant in several Department of Energy review activities held in the Forrestal Building and at the Germantown site. The most recent of these has been service on a DOE review panel chaired by Dr. Hap Lamonds that is reviewing the detector development programs supported through the Office of Arms Control and International Security

  7. Fabrication of Sparse Readout Detectors for X-ray Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrows, David

    We propose to continue our detector development program in X-ray astronomy. Under our current APRA grant we have fabricated a new read out integrated circuit that is one half of a hybrid CMOS detector. Here we propose to build and test these innovative detectors, which could potentially be flown on future X-ray missions with focused optics and/or large effective area. This proposal supports NASA's goals of technical advancement of technologies suitable for future missions and training of graduate students.

  8. Modeling and design of X-rays bidimensional detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quisbert, Elmer Paz Alcon

    2000-03-01

    In this work has been developed the scintillating fiber optic and semiconductor devices based 2-D detector design, modeling and performance evaluation using Monte Carlo methods, for high X-ray energy range (10-140 kV) radiography and tomography applications. These processes allowed us, also, the imaging system parameters and components optimization and appropriate detector design. The model estimated the detectors performance parameters (DQE, MTF and SNR), and radiation risk (in terms of mean absorbed dose in the patient) and to show up how the sequence of physical processes in X-ray detection influence the performance of this imaging PFOC detectors. In this way, the modeling of the detector includes the statistics of the spatial distribution of absorbed X-rays and of X-ray to light conversion, its transmission, and the light quanta conversion into electrons. Also contributions to noise from the detection system chain is included, mainly the CCD detector ambient noise. Performance prediction, based on calculation taken from simulations, illustrates how such detectors meet the exacting requirements of some medical and industrial applications. Also, it is envisaged that our modeling procedure of the imaging system will be suitable not only for investigating how the system components should be best designed but for CT and RD system performance prediction. The powerful techniques would enable us to give advice for future development, in this field, in search of more dose-efficient imaging systems. (author)

  9. The pin pixel detector--X-ray imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Bateman, J E; Derbyshire, G E; Duxbury, D M; Marsh, A S; Simmons, J E; Stephenson, R

    2002-01-01

    The development and testing of a soft X-ray gas pixel detector, which uses connector pins for the anodes is reported. Based on a commercial 100 pin connector block, a prototype detector of aperture 25.4 mm centre dot 25.4 mm can be economically fabricated. The individual pin anodes all show the expected characteristics of small gas detectors capable of counting rates reaching 1 MHz per pin. A 2-dimensional resistive divide readout system has been developed to permit the imaging properties of the detector to be explored in advance of true pixel readout electronics.

  10. Medical imaging: Material change for X-ray detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowlands, John A.

    2017-10-01

    The X-ray sensitivity of radiology instruments is limited by the materials used in their detectors. A material from the perovskite family of semiconductors could allow lower doses of X-rays to be used for medical imaging. See Letter p.87

  11. Investigation about semiconductor gamma ray detector - Evaluation of Ge(Li) detectors life expectation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-06-01

    A list of germanium lithium gamma ray detectors has been drawn up by a working group after investigations in various laboratories. Authors analyse the historical account of each detector and try to give an answer about some questions as: - detectors life expectation, - deficiencies and death reasons, - influence of detector type and volume. Differents parameters are also collected by the working group for future works (standard geometry, low level measurements, etc.). In the list, the characteristics of 228 detectors, collected between january 1965 and december 1977 are put together. The principal conclusions of the authors are: - with a probability of 95%, half of the detectors is dead before 6.1 years, - the average age of dead population (33% of detectors) is 3.9 years, - resolution and efficiency evolution are good indicators of possible deficiency, - the fiability of vertical cryostat is better than the other systems [fr

  12. A method to unfold the efficiency of gaseous detectors exposed to broad X-ray spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida, Gevaldo L. de; Souza, Maria Ines S. de; Lopes, Ricardo T.

    2000-01-01

    A method to obtain the efficiency of a gaseous detector exposed to broad energy X-ray spectra was developed. It consists in the de-convolution of the integrated detector response using the shapes of those spectra as a tool to unfold the aimed detector efficiency curve. For this purpose, the spectra emitted by a X-ray tube under several anode voltages, were properly characterized through measurements with a NaI(Tl) spectrometer. A Lorentz function was then fitted to each of the spectra, and their parameters expressed as a function of the anode voltage, by using polynomial and gaussian fittings. The integral of the product of each Lorentz function, by another unknown Lorentz function, expressing the detector efficiency curve, represents the response of the detector for each anode tension, e.g., each X-ray spectrum. The symbolical integration of that product, produces a general function containing the unknown parameters of the unknown efficiency curve. A non-linear fitting of this general function, to the detector response points, as experimentally obtained, generates the aimed parameters for the efficiency curve. The final detector efficiency curve is obtained after normalization procedures. (author)

  13. X-ray micro-beam characterization of a small pixel spectroscopic CdTe detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veale, M. C.; Bell, S. J.; Seller, P.; Wilson, M. D.; Kachkanov, V.

    2012-07-01

    A small pixel, spectroscopic, CdTe detector has been developed at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL) for X-ray imaging applications. The detector consists of 80 × 80 pixels on a 250 μm pitch with 50 μm inter-pixel spacing. Measurements with an 241Am γ-source demonstrated that 96% of all pixels have a FWHM of better than 1 keV while the majority of the remaining pixels have FWHM of less than 4 keV. Using the Diamond Light Source synchrotron, a 10 μm collimated beam of monochromatic 20 keV X-rays has been used to map the spatial variation in the detector response and the effects of charge sharing corrections on detector efficiency and resolution. The mapping measurements revealed the presence of inclusions in the detector and quantified their effect on the spectroscopic resolution of pixels.

  14. Position sensitive detector for X-ray photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbosa, A.F.

    1988-01-01

    This work reports the theoretical basis and the details of the construction process, characterization and application of gas X-ray position sensitive detectors. The unidimensional detector consists of a gas camera (argon and CH 4 ), a metallic anode, a cathode and a delay line. Details of the construction process are given in order to allow the reproduction of the detector. It has been characterized by measuring its spatial resolution, homogeneity and linerity. The built linear detector has been used to obtain diffraction diagrams from polycrystalline silicon, C 23 H 48 paraffin and glassy carbon. These diagrams have been compared with those obtained under equivalent conditions with a conventional proportional detector by the step scanning method. It has been shown that the detector provides diffraction diagrams of equivalent quality to those obtained by the step scanning method, in appreciably lower time intervals. (author) [pt

  15. Precision scans of the Pixel cell response of double sided 3D Pixel detectors to pion and X-ray beams

    CERN Document Server

    Mac Raighne, A; Crossley, M; Alianelli, L; Lozano, M; Dumps, R; Fleta, C; Collins, P; Rodrigues, E; Sawhney, K J S; Tlustos, L; Pennicard, D; Buytaert, J; Stewart, G; Parkes, C; Eklund, L; Campbell, M; Marchal, J; Akiba, K; Pellegrini, G; Llopart, X; Plackett, R; Maneuski, D; Gligorov, V V; Tartoni, N; Nicol, M; Bates, R; Gallas, A; Gimenez, E N; van Beuzekom, M; John, M

    2011-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) silicon sensors offer potential advantages over standard planar sensors for radiation hardness in future high energy physics experiments and reduced charge-sharing for X-ray applications, but may introduce inefficiencies due to the columnar electrodes. These inefficiencies are probed by studying variations in response across a unit pixel cell in a 55 m m pitch double-sided 3D pixel sensor bump bonded to TimePix and Medipix2 readout ASICs. Two complementary characterisation techniques are discussed: the first uses a custom built telescope and a 120GeV pion beam from the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) at CERN; the second employs a novel technique to illuminate the sensor with a micro-focused synchrotron X-ray beam at the Diamond Light Source, UK. For a pion beam incident perpendicular to the sensor plane an overall pixel efficiency of 93.0 +/- 0.5\\% is measured. After a 10 degrees rotation of the device the effect of the columnar region becomes negligible and the overall efficiency rises ...

  16. Monte Carlo simulation of the HEGRA cosmic ray detector performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, S. [Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain). Dept. de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear; Arqueros, F. [Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain). Dept. de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear; Fonseca, V. [Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain). Dept. de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear; Karle, A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Foehringer Ring 6, D80805 Munich (Germany); Lorenz, E. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Foehringer Ring 6, D80805 Munich (Germany); Plaga, R. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Foehringer Ring 6, D80805 Munich (Germany); Rozanska, M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Foehringer Ring 6, D80805 Munich (Germany)]|[Institute of Nuclear Physics, ul.Kawiory 26a, PL30-055 Cracow (Poland)

    1995-04-21

    Models of the scintillator and wide-angle air Cherenkov (AIROBICC) arrays of the HEGRA experiment are described here. Their response to extensive air showers generated by cosmic rays in the 10 to 1000 TeV range has been assessed using a detailed Monte Carlo simulation of air shower development and associated Cherenkov emission. Protons, {gamma}-rays and oxygen and iron nuclei have been considered as primary particles. For both arrays, the angular resolution as determined from the Monte Carlo simulation is compared with experimental data. Shower size N{sub e} can be reconstructed from the scintillator signals with an error ranging from 10% (N{sub e}=2x10{sup 5}) to 35% (N{sub e}=3x10{sup 3}). The energy threshold of AIROBICC is 14 TeV for primary gammas and 27 TeV for protons and an angular resolution of 0.25 can be obtained. The measurement of the Cherenkov light at 90 m from the shower core provides an accurate determination of primary energy E{sub 0} as far as the nature of the primary particle is known. For gammas an error in the energy prediction ranging from 8% (E{sub 0}=5x10{sup 14} eV) to 15% (E{sub 0}=2x10{sup 13} eV) is achieved. This detector is therefore a powerful tool for {gamma}-ray astronomy. ((orig.)).

  17. Self-powered neutron and γ-ray flux detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allan, C.J.

    1983-01-01

    According to the invention there is provided a self-powered neutron and γ-ray flux detector, comprising: a) an emitter core wire; b) an emitter outer layer around the core wire and of different metal thereto; c) a metal collector around the emitter core wire and the emitter outer layer; and d) dielectric insulation electrically insulating the emitter core wire and the emitter outer layer from the metal collector. The improvement comprises: a) the overall diameter of the emitter core wire and the emitter outer layer is at least of the order of 0.4 mm in diameter; b) the emitter outer layer covers only of the order of l0 percent of the order of 90 percent of the emitter core wire surface area and comprises at least one band around the emitter core wire and is of a thickness in the range of the order 0.02 mm to of the order of 0.07 mm; and c) the metal of the emitter core wire, the metal of the emitter outer layer, the metal of the metal collector, the overall diameter of the emitter core wire and the emitter outer layer and the surface area of the emitter core wire that is covered by the emitter outer layer are selected so that the detector has a prompt fraction in the range of the order of 90 percent to of the order of 96 percent and has a dynamic response which substantially matches the dynamic response of the power in the fuel of the nuclear reactor in which the detector is to be used

  18. Development of multiwire gas detectors for X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sales, Eraldo de

    2015-01-01

    This work presents the prototype of a 2D position sensitive gas detector for application in X-ray scattering and diffraction experiments. Starting from a detector initially developed for other applications and will show the required changes on the original concept of this device. The strategy used to determine the necessary adaptations were based on searching in the literature for the overall characteristics of a multi-wire X-ray detector (choice of gas, pressure, window, etc.), the use of simulations, implementation of the changes and finally operational tests. Computational tools were used to calculate the mechanical strength and attenuation of the X-ray photons that helped to determine the most appropriate material for the construction of the entrance window. Detector simulations were built with Garfield software and were used to study the overall properties of the detector, and to determine the optimum parameters for the equipment operation. Typical parameters are the distance between the wires, wire diameter, high voltage to be used, among several other parameters. The results obtained showed that the multi-wire detector concept with the implemented adaptations allowed the detection of X-rays. However, depending on the application, it may be necessary improve the resolution of the equipment, in order to have a better description of the collected data. Several ideas are suggested for this improvement. It is also presented interesting results obtained with a microscopic pattern detector called triple GEM. This device belongs to the Gas Detectors Development group (GDD group) at CERN and was used in my training at this institution. The results showed the potential of the equipment for detection of X-rays. The results and simulations presented in this work, confirmed that the changes in the concept of the original detector permitted it use on X-ray detection applications. Also, it was possible to obtain several indications for further optimization, which may

  19. Flat-panel detectors in x-ray diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spahn, M.; Heer, V.; Freytag, R.

    2003-01-01

    For all application segments X-ray systems with flat-panel detectors increasingly enter the market. In digital radiography, mammography and cardiologic angiography flat-panel detectors are already well established while they are made ready for market introduction in general angiography and fluoroscopy. Two flat-panel detector technologies are available. One technology is based on an indirect conversion process of X-rays while the other one uses a direct conversion method.For radiography and dynamic applications the indirect method provides substantial advantages, while the direct method has some benefits for mammography. In radiography and mammography flat-panel detectors lead to clear improvements with respect to workflow, image quality and dose reduction potentials. These improvements are fostered by the immediate availability of the image, the large dynamic range and the high sensitivity to X-rays. New applications and the use of complex image processing algorithms have the potential to enlarge the present diagnostic range of applications.Up to now, image intensifiers are still the well-established technology for angiography and fluoroscopy. Nevertheless flat-panel detectors begin to enter this field, especially in cardiologic angiography.Characteristics of flat-panel detectors such as the availability of distortion-free images, the excellent contrast resolution, the large dynamic range, the high sensitivity to X-rays and the usability in magnetic fields provide the basis for improved and new diagnostic and interventional methods. (orig.) [de

  20. Depth of interaction and bias voltage depenence of the spectral response in a pixellated CdTe detector operating in time-over-threshold mode subjected to monochromatic X-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fröjdh, E.; Fröjdh, C.; Gimenez, E. N.; Maneuski, D.; Marchal, J.; Norlin, B.; O'Shea, V.; Stewart, G.; Wilhelm, H.; Modh Zain, R.; Thungström, G.

    2012-03-01

    High stopping power is one of the most important figures of merit for X-ray detectors. CdTe is a promising material but suffers from: material defects, non-ideal charge transport and long range X-ray fluorescence. Those factors reduce the image quality and deteriorate spectral information. In this project we used a monochromatic pencil beam collimated through a 20μm pinhole to measure the detector spectral response in dependance on the depth of interaction. The sensor was a 1mm thick CdTe detector with a pixel pitch of 110μm, bump bonded to a Timepix readout chip operating in Time-Over-Threshold mode. The measurements were carried out at the Extreme Conditions beamline I15 of the Diamond Light Source. The beam was entering the sensor at an angle of \\texttildelow20 degrees to the surface and then passed through \\texttildelow25 pixels before leaving through the bottom of the sensor. The photon energy was tuned to 77keV giving a variation in the beam intensity of about three orders of magnitude along the beam path. Spectra in Time-over-Threshold (ToT) mode were recorded showing each individual interaction. The bias voltage was varied between -30V and -300V to investigate how the electric field affected the spectral information. For this setup it is worth noticing the large impact of fluorescence. At -300V the photo peak and escape peak are of similar height. For high bias voltages the spectra remains clear throughout the whole depth but for lower voltages as -50V, only the bottom part of the sensor carries spectral information. This is an effect of the low hole mobility and the longer range the electrons have to travel in a low field.

  1. The digital flat-panel X-Ray detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Risticj, S. Goran

    2013-01-01

    In a digital imaging system, the incident x-ray image must be sampled both in the spatial and intensity dimensions. In the spatial dimensions, samples are obtained as averages of the intensity over picture elements or pixels. In the intensity dimension, the signal is digitalized into one of a finite number of levels or bits. Two main types of digital flat-panel detectors are based on the direct conversion, which contains the photoconductor, and on indirect conversion, which contains phosphor. The basics of these detectors are given. Coupling traditional x-ray detection material such as photoconductors and phosphors with a large-area active-matrix readout structure forms the basis of flat panel x-ray images. Active matrix technology provides a new, highly efficient, real time method for electronically storing and measuring the product of the x-ray interaction stage whether the product is visible wavelength photons or electrical charges. The direct and indirect detectors, made as the active-matrix flat-panel detectors containing sensing/storage elements, switching elements (diodes or thin film transistors (TFTS)) and image processing module, are described. Strengths and limitations of stimulable phosphors are discussed. The main advantages and disadvantages of mentioned x-ray detectors are also analyzed. (Author)

  2. Effect of energy deposited by cosmic-ray particles on interferometric gravitational wave detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Hayakawa, Hideaki; Okada, Atsushi; Uchiyama, Takashi; Miyoki, Shinji; Ohashi, Masatake; Kuroda, Kazuaki; Kanda, Nobuyuki; Tatsumi, Daisuke; Tsunesada, Yoshiki

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the noise of interferometric gravitational wave detectors due to heat energy deposited by cosmic-ray particles. We derived a general formula that describes the response of a mirror against a cosmic-ray passage. We found that there are differences in the comic-ray responses (the dependence of temperature and cosmic-ray track position) in cases of interferometric and resonant gravitational wave detectors. The power spectral density of vibrations caused by low-energy secondary muons is 100 times smaller than the goal sensitivity of future second-generation interferometer projects, such as LCGT and Advanced LIGO. The arrival frequency of high-energy cosmic-ray muons that generate enough large showers inside mirrors of LCGT and Advanced LIGO is one per a millennium. We also discuss the probability of exotic-particle detection with interferometers.

  3. Time response measurements of LASL diagnostic detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hocker, L.P.

    1970-07-01

    The measurement and data analysis techniques developed under the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory's detector improvement program were used to characterize the time and frequency response of selected LASL Compton, fluor-photodiode (NPD), and fluor-photomultiplier (NPM) diagnostic detectors. Data acquisition procedures and analysis methods presently in use are summarized, and detector time and frequency data obtained using the EG and G/AEC electron linear accelerator fast pulse (approximately 50 psec FWHM) as the incident radiation driving function are presented. (U.S.)

  4. Flexible X-ray detector based on sliced lead iodide crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Hui; Gao, Xiuying [College of Optoelectronic Technology, Chengdu University of Information Technology, Chengdu (China); Department of Materials Science, Sichuan University, Chengdu (China); Zhao, Beijun [Department of Materials Science, Sichuan University, Chengdu (China); Yang, Dingyu; Wangyang, Peihua; Zhu, Xinghua [College of Optoelectronic Technology, Chengdu University of Information Technology, Chengdu (China)

    2017-02-15

    A promising flexible X-ray detector based on inorganic semiconductor PbI{sub 2} crystal is reported. The sliced crystals mechanically cleaved from an as-grown PbI{sub 2} crystal act as the absorber directly converting the impinging X-ray photons to electron hole pairs. Due to the ductile feature of the PbI{sub 2} crystal, the detector can be operated under a highly curved state with the strain on the top surface up to 1.03% and still maintaining effective detection performance. The stable photocurrent and fast response were obtained with the detector repeated bending to a strain of 1.03% for 100 cycles. This work presents an approach for developing efficient and cost-effective PbI{sub 2}-based flexible X-ray detector. Photocurrent responses of the flexible PbI{sub 2} X-ray detector with the strain on the top surface up to 1.03% proposed in this work with the cross sectional structure and curved detector photograph as insets. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  5. A segmented detector for airbone gamma ray spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burgada, G.; Iovene, A.; Petrucci, S.; Tintori, C., E-mail: g.burgada@caen.it [Costruzioni Apparecchiature Elettroniche Nucleari S.p.A. (CAEN), Viareggio (Italy); Alvarez, M.A.G., E-mail: malvarez@if.usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (IF/USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Fisica; Baldoncini, M.; Xhixha, G.; Strati, V., E-mail: gerti.xhixha@unife.it [University of Ferrara, Department of Physics and Earth Sciences, Ferrara (Italy); Mantovani, F., E-mail: mantovani@fe.infn.it [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Ferrara (Italy); Garosi, P.; Mou, L., E-mail: li.mou@libero.it [University of Siena (Italy); Alvarez, C. Rossi, E-mail: rossialvarez@pd.infn.it [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Legnaro (Italy)

    2014-07-01

    The airborne gamma-ray spectrometry (AGRS) is widely acknowledged as a very efficient technique for large areas monitoring. The detector system mounted on a helicopter allows for an extensive survey in a single flight time, thus reducing the exposure risk for the operator. Results from AGRS techniques are exploited in many fields, from the geological research to the homeland security for the search of orphan radioactive sources, from the mining and hydrocarbon exploration to the construction industry. The new generation of compact digital data acquisition and online processing equipment allows for faster airborne survey campaigns, and enhances the flexibility of operations. In addition, the algorithm for the extrapolation of the nuclide concentrations from the acquired gamma spectra is a challenging step of the entire technique. We are going to present a new device for advanced AGRS measurements, with an innovative detector configuration and data processing algorithms for optimizing the source localization and the on-line response capabilities. The new compact structure makes the system easily portable by a single operator, and rapidly mountable on most common helicopters. Preliminary feasibility studies have been performed to test the mechanics and the hardware of the whole system, which is intended to work without any human attendance. The first flights are planned by the end of 2014, with the aim of detecting artificial point sources having intensities on the order of 10^8 Bq and natural enriched fields already monitored. (author)

  6. A segmented detector for airbone gamma ray spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burgada, G.; Iovene, A.; Petrucci, S.; Tintori, C.; Alvarez, M.A.G.; Mantovani, F.; Garosi, P.; Mou, L.; Alvarez, C. Rossi

    2014-01-01

    The airborne gamma-ray spectrometry (AGRS) is widely acknowledged as a very efficient technique for large areas monitoring. The detector system mounted on a helicopter allows for an extensive survey in a single flight time, thus reducing the exposure risk for the operator. Results from AGRS techniques are exploited in many fields, from the geological research to the homeland security for the search of orphan radioactive sources, from the mining and hydrocarbon exploration to the construction industry. The new generation of compact digital data acquisition and online processing equipment allows for faster airborne survey campaigns, and enhances the flexibility of operations. In addition, the algorithm for the extrapolation of the nuclide concentrations from the acquired gamma spectra is a challenging step of the entire technique. We are going to present a new device for advanced AGRS measurements, with an innovative detector configuration and data processing algorithms for optimizing the source localization and the on-line response capabilities. The new compact structure makes the system easily portable by a single operator, and rapidly mountable on most common helicopters. Preliminary feasibility studies have been performed to test the mechanics and the hardware of the whole system, which is intended to work without any human attendance. The first flights are planned by the end of 2014, with the aim of detecting artificial point sources having intensities on the order of 10^8 Bq and natural enriched fields already monitored. (author)

  7. Primary Cosmic Rays Composition: Simulations and Detector Design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Supanitsky, D.; Etchegoyen, A.; Medina, C.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Gomez Berisso, M.

    2007-01-01

    The Pierre Auger Observatory is a hybrid detector system for the detection of very high energy cosmic rays. A most difficult and important problem in these studies is the determination of the primary cosmic ray composition for which muon content in air showers appears to be one of the best parameters to discriminate between different composition types.Although the Pierre Auger surface detectors, which consist of water Cherenkov tanks, are sensitive to muon content they are not able to measure the number of muons directly. In this work we study using simulations the information that can be gained by adding muon detectors to the Auger surface detectors. We consider muon counters with two alternative areas

  8. Ground detectors for the study of cosmic ray showers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salazar, H; Villasenor, L

    2008-01-01

    We describe the work that we have done over the last decade to design and construct instruments to measure properties of cosmic rays in Mexico. We describe the detection of decaying and crossing muons in a water Cherenkov detector and discuss an application of these results to calibrate water Cherenkov detectors. We also describe a technique to separate isolated isolated muons and electrons in water Cherenkov detector. Next we describe the design and performance of a hybrid extensive air shower detector array built on the Campus of the University of Puebla (19 deg. N, 90 deg. W, 800 g/cm 2 ) to measure the energy, arrival direction and composition of primary cosmic rays with energies around 1 PeV

  9. The MU-RAY detector for muon radiography of volcanoes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anastasio, A. [INFN-Napoli (Italy); Ambrosino, F. [INFN-Napoli (Italy); Università Federico II, Napoli (Italy); Basta, D. [INFN-Napoli (Italy); Bonechi, L. [Università degli Studi di Firenze, Firenze (Italy); INFN-Firenze (Italy); Brianzi, M. [Università degli Studi di Firenze, Firenze (Italy); Bross, A. [Fermilab (United States); Callier, S. [LAL, Orsay (France); Caputo, A. [INGV Osservatorio Vesuviano, Napoli (Italy); Ciaranfi, R. [INFN-Firenze (Italy); Cimmino, L. [INFN-Napoli (Italy); Università Federico II, Napoli (Italy); D' Alessandro, R. [Università degli Studi di Firenze, Firenze (Italy); INFN-Firenze (Italy); D' Auria, L. [INGV Osservatorio Vesuviano, Napoli (Italy); La Taille, C. de [LAL, Orsay (France); Energico, S. [CNR- SPIN, Napoli (Italy); INFN-Napoli (Italy); Garufi, F. [INFN-Napoli (Italy); Università Federico II, Napoli (Italy); Giudicepietro, F. [INGV Osservatorio Vesuviano, Napoli (Italy); Lauria, A. [INFN-Napoli (Italy); Università Federico II, Napoli (Italy); Macedonio, G.; Martini, M. [INGV Osservatorio Vesuviano, Napoli (Italy); Masone, V. [Università Federico II, Napoli (Italy); and others

    2013-12-21

    The MU-RAY detector has been designed to perform muon radiography of volcanoes. The possible use on the field introduces several constraints. First the electric power consumption must be reduced to the minimum, so that the detector can be solar-powered. Moreover it must be robust and transportable, for what concerns the front-end electronics and data acquisition. A 1 m{sup 2} prototype has been constructed and is taking data at Mt. Vesuvius. The detector consists of modules of 32 scintillator bars with wave length shifting fibers and silicon photomultiplier read-out. A dedicated front-end electronics has been developed, based on the SPIROC ASIC. An introduction to muon radiography principles, the MU-RAY detector description and results obtained in laboratory will be presented.

  10. Comparison of natural and synthetic diamond X-ray detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lansley, S P; Betzel, G T; Metcalfe, P; Reinisch, L; Meyer, J

    2010-12-01

    Diamond detectors are particularly well suited for dosimetry applications in radiotherapy for reasons including near-tissue equivalence and high-spatial resolution resulting from small sensitive volumes. However, these detectors have not become commonplace due to high cost and poor availability arising from the need for high-quality diamond. We have fabricated relatively cheap detectors from commercially-available synthetic diamond fabricated using chemical vapour deposition. Here, we present a comparison of one of these detectors with the only commercially-available diamond-based detector (which uses a natural diamond crystal). Parameters such as the energy dependence and linearity of charge with dose were investigated at orthovoltage energies (50-250 kV), and dose-rate dependence of charge at linear accelerator energy (6 MV). The energy dependence of a synthetic diamond detector was similar to that of the natural diamond detector, albeit with slightly less variation across the energy range. Both detectors displayed a linear response with dose (at 100 kV) over the limited dose range used. The sensitivity of the synthetic diamond detector was 302 nC/Gy, compared to 294 nC/Gy measured for the natural diamond detector; however, this was obtained with a bias of 246.50 V compared to a bias of 61.75 V used for the natural diamond detector. The natural diamond detector exhibited a greater dependency on dose-rate than the synthetic diamond detector. Overall, the synthetic diamond detector performed well in comparison to the natural diamond detector.

  11. Performance of CdZnTe coplanar-grid gamma-ray detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luke, P.N.; Eissler, E.E.

    1995-11-01

    CdZnTe crystals grown using the high-pressure Bridgman method exhibit many properties that are desirable for radiation detector fabrication, such as high resistivity, stable operation, relative ease of processing, and the availability of large volume crystals. However, as is common with other compound semi-conductor materials, currently available CdZnTe crystals have poor charge transport characteristics. This seriously the spectral performance of detectors, especially in gamma-ray detection. The coplanar-grid detection technique was recently developed to address such charge collection problems. This technique was first demonstrated using a 5 mm cube CdZnTe detector, and a dramatic improvement in spectral response has been achieved. These early results verified the effectiveness of this technique and suggested that large-volume gamma-ray detectors with high energy resolution can be realized. To further the development of such detectors, it is important to understand the various factors that affect detector performance. The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of material properties on the spectral performance of CdZnTe coplanar-grid detectors. Theoretical spectral response is to show the level of performance that can be achieved given the typical carrier mobility-lifetime (μτ) properties of present-day materials. Nonuniformity in the charge transport properties of the material, which could limit the energy resolution of the detectors, has been studied experimentally and some of the results are presented here

  12. Simulation of scintillating fiber gamma ray detectors for medical imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaney, R.C.; Fenyves, E.J.; Antich, P.P.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on plastic scintillating fibers which have been shown to be effective for high spatial and time resolution of gamma rays. They may be expected to significantly improve the resolution of current medical imaging systems such as PET and SPECT. Monte Carlo simulation of imaging systems using these detectors, provides a means to optimize their performance in this application, as well as demonstrate their resolution and efficiency. Monte Carlo results are presented for PET and SPECT systems constructed using these detectors

  13. Pixel detectors for x-ray imaging spectroscopy in space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treis, J; Andritschke, R; Hartmann, R; Herrmann, S; Holl, P; Lauf, T; Lechner, P; Lutz, G; Meidinger, N; Porro, M; Richter, R H; Schopper, F; Soltau, H; Strueder, L

    2009-01-01

    Pixelated semiconductor detectors for X-ray imaging spectroscopy are foreseen as key components of the payload of various future space missions exploring the x-ray sky. Located on the platform of the new Spectrum-Roentgen-Gamma satellite, the eROSITA (extended Roentgen Survey with an Imaging Telescope Array) instrument will perform an imaging all-sky survey up to an X-ray energy of 10 keV with unprecedented spectral and angular resolution. The instrument will consist of seven parallel oriented mirror modules each having its own pnCCD camera in the focus. The satellite born X-ray observatory SIMBOL-X will be the first mission to use formation-flying techniques to implement an X-ray telescope with an unprecedented focal length of around 20 m. The detector instrumentation consists of separate high- and low energy detectors, a monolithic 128 x 128 DEPFET macropixel array and a pixellated CdZTe detector respectively, making energy band between 0.5 to 80 keV accessible. A similar concept is proposed for the next generation X-ray observatory IXO. Finally, the MIXS (Mercury Imaging X-ray Spectrometer) instrument on the European Mercury exploration mission BepiColombo will use DEPFET macropixel arrays together with a small X-ray telescope to perform a spatially resolved planetary XRF analysis of Mercury's crust. Here, the mission concepts and their scientific targets are briefly discussed, and the resulting requirements on the detector devices together with the implementation strategies are shown.

  14. Pixel detectors for x-ray imaging spectroscopy in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treis, J.; Andritschke, R.; Hartmann, R.; Herrmann, S.; Holl, P.; Lauf, T.; Lechner, P.; Lutz, G.; Meidinger, N.; Porro, M.; Richter, R. H.; Schopper, F.; Soltau, H.; Strüder, L.

    2009-03-01

    Pixelated semiconductor detectors for X-ray imaging spectroscopy are foreseen as key components of the payload of various future space missions exploring the x-ray sky. Located on the platform of the new Spectrum-Roentgen-Gamma satellite, the eROSITA (extended Roentgen Survey with an Imaging Telescope Array) instrument will perform an imaging all-sky survey up to an X-ray energy of 10 keV with unprecedented spectral and angular resolution. The instrument will consist of seven parallel oriented mirror modules each having its own pnCCD camera in the focus. The satellite born X-ray observatory SIMBOL-X will be the first mission to use formation-flying techniques to implement an X-ray telescope with an unprecedented focal length of around 20 m. The detector instrumentation consists of separate high- and low energy detectors, a monolithic 128 × 128 DEPFET macropixel array and a pixellated CdZTe detector respectively, making energy band between 0.5 to 80 keV accessible. A similar concept is proposed for the next generation X-ray observatory IXO. Finally, the MIXS (Mercury Imaging X-ray Spectrometer) instrument on the European Mercury exploration mission BepiColombo will use DEPFET macropixel arrays together with a small X-ray telescope to perform a spatially resolved planetary XRF analysis of Mercury's crust. Here, the mission concepts and their scientific targets are briefly discussed, and the resulting requirements on the detector devices together with the implementation strategies are shown.

  15. Pixel detectors for x-ray imaging spectroscopy in space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Treis, J; Andritschke, R; Hartmann, R; Herrmann, S; Holl, P; Lauf, T; Lechner, P; Lutz, G; Meidinger, N; Porro, M; Richter, R H; Schopper, F; Soltau, H; Strueder, L [MPI Semiconductor Laboratory, Otto-Hahn-Ring 6, D-81739 Munich (Germany)], E-mail: jft@hll.mpg.de

    2009-03-15

    Pixelated semiconductor detectors for X-ray imaging spectroscopy are foreseen as key components of the payload of various future space missions exploring the x-ray sky. Located on the platform of the new Spectrum-Roentgen-Gamma satellite, the eROSITA (extended Roentgen Survey with an Imaging Telescope Array) instrument will perform an imaging all-sky survey up to an X-ray energy of 10 keV with unprecedented spectral and angular resolution. The instrument will consist of seven parallel oriented mirror modules each having its own pnCCD camera in the focus. The satellite born X-ray observatory SIMBOL-X will be the first mission to use formation-flying techniques to implement an X-ray telescope with an unprecedented focal length of around 20 m. The detector instrumentation consists of separate high- and low energy detectors, a monolithic 128 x 128 DEPFET macropixel array and a pixellated CdZTe detector respectively, making energy band between 0.5 to 80 keV accessible. A similar concept is proposed for the next generation X-ray observatory IXO. Finally, the MIXS (Mercury Imaging X-ray Spectrometer) instrument on the European Mercury exploration mission BepiColombo will use DEPFET macropixel arrays together with a small X-ray telescope to perform a spatially resolved planetary XRF analysis of Mercury's crust. Here, the mission concepts and their scientific targets are briefly discussed, and the resulting requirements on the detector devices together with the implementation strategies are shown.

  16. Gamma ray polarimetry using a position sensitive germanium detector

    CERN Document Server

    Kroeger, R A; Kurfess, J D; Phlips, B F

    1999-01-01

    Imaging gamma-ray detectors make sensitive polarimeters in the Compton energy regime by measuring the scatter direction of gamma rays. The principle is to capitalize on the angular dependence of the Compton scattering cross section to polarized gamma rays and measure the distribution of scatter directions within the detector. This technique is effective in a double-sided germanium detector between roughly 50 keV and 1 MeV. This paper reviews device characteristics important to the optimization of a Compton polarimeter, and summarizes measurements we have made using a device with a 5x5 cm active area, 1 cm thickness, and strip-electrodes on a 2 mm pitch.

  17. Development of an X-ray detector using photodiodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez G, J.; Azorin V, J. C.; Sosa A, M. A.; Ceron, P.

    2016-10-01

    Currently the radiation detectors for medical applications are very high value in the market and are difficult to access as training material. In the Sciences and Engineering Division of the Guanajuato University (Mexico) investigations are carried out related to ionizing radiations, especially with X-rays. To overcome the lack of materials has had to resort to borrowing equipment from other institutions, so its use and availability are intermittent. For these reasons is proposed to design and implement an X-ray detector for the use of the work group and the University. This work aims to build an X-ray semiconductor detector using inexpensive and affordable materials, is also proposed the use of a photodiode sensor and an Arduino analog-digital card and a LCD display showing the data. (Author)

  18. Charge-coupled-device X-ray detector performance model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bautz, M. W.; Berman, G. E.; Doty, J. P.; Ricker, G. R.

    1987-01-01

    A model that predicts the performance characteristics of CCD detectors being developed for use in X-ray imaging is presented. The model accounts for the interactions of both X-rays and charged particles with the CCD and simulates the transport and loss of charge in the detector. Predicted performance parameters include detective and net quantum efficiencies, split-event probability, and a parameter characterizing the effective thickness presented by the detector to cosmic-ray protons. The predicted performance of two CCDs of different epitaxial layer thicknesses is compared. The model predicts that in each device incomplete recovery of the charge liberated by a photon of energy between 0.1 and 10 keV is very likely to be accompanied by charge splitting between adjacent pixels. The implications of the model predictions for CCD data processing algorithms are briefly discussed.

  19. Developments in gas detectors for synchrotron x-ray radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, J.; Radeka, V.; Smith, G.C.

    1985-09-01

    New results on the physical limitations to position resolution in gas detectors for x-rays (approx. =3 to 20 keV) due to the range of photoelectrons and Auger electrons are discussed. These results were obtained with a small gap detector in which position readout was accomplished by using a very low noise centroid finding technique. A description is given of position sensitive detectors for medium rates (a few x 10 5 photons per second), using delay line readout, and for very high rates (approx. =10 8 photons per second), using fast signal shaping on the output of each anode wire

  20. A gamma-ray tracking detector for molecular imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, C.J.; Lewis, R.A.; Helsby, W.I.; Nolan, P.; Boston, A.

    2003-01-01

    A design for a gamma-ray detector for molecular imaging is presented. The system is based on solid-state strip detector technology. The advantages of position sensitivity coupled with fine spectral resolution are exploited to produce a tracking detector for use with a variety of isotopes in nuclear medicine. Current design concepts employ both silicon and germanium layers to provide an energy range from 60 keV to >1 MeV. This allows a reference X-ray image to be collected simultaneously with the gamma-ray image providing accurate anatomical registration. The tracking ability of the gamma-ray detector allows ambiguities in the data set to be resolved which would otherwise cause events to be rejected in standard non-tracking system. Efficiency improvements that high solid angle coverage and the use of a higher proportion of events make time resolved imaging and multi-isotope work possible. A modular detector system, designed for viewing small animals has been accepted for funding

  1. Applications for X-ray detectors in astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remillard, R.A.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Position-sensitive X-Ray detectors continue to playa central role in high-energy astrophysics. The current science goals are reviewed with emphasis on requirements in terms of camera performance. Wide-field imaging techniques, including coded mask cameras, are an essential part of space programs because of the transient nature of high-priority targets, e.g. eruptions from black-hole binaries and cosmic explosions such as gamma ray bursts. Pointing X-ray telescopes are being planned with a wide range of photon energies and with collection designs that include both mirrors and coded masks. Requirements for high spectral resolution and high time resolution are driven by diverse types of X-ray sources such as msec pulsars, quasars with emission-line profiles shaped by general relativity, and X-ray binaries that exhibit quasi-periodic oscillations in the range of 40-1300 Hz. Many laboratories and universities are involved in space-qualification of new detector technologies, e.g. CZT cameras, X-ray calorimeters, new types of CCDs, and GEM detectors. Even X-ray interferometry is on the horizon of NASA's science roadmap. The difficulties in advancing new technologies for space science applications require careful coordinations between industry and science groups in order to solve science problems while minimizing risk

  2. Detector response theory and its applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keijzer, J.

    1992-11-01

    Some methods to describe the dynamics of fission reactors are investigated. First the reactivity of a reactor is regarded. The values of an exact calculation of the reactivity are compared with values obtained by first-order perturbation theory. Then a description of the point reactor kinetic theory and the detector response theory is given. A comparison of the two methods is made, using models of some well defined perturbations. Two of the perturbations are such that a physical movement of some absorber is regarded. A new way of modelling these moving objects is proposed. The result of the point reactor kinetic theory and the detecor response theory did not differ too much for perturbations which were far from the detector position. Locally however point reactor kinetic theory was not, in contrast with detector response theory, able to produce reliable results. The results of these calculations are to be compared with experiments, which will be performed later. (orig.)

  3. Detectors for X-ray diffraction and scattering: a user's overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruegemann, Lutz; Gerndt, E.K.E.

    2004-01-01

    An overview of the applications of X-ray detectors to material research is given. Four experimental techniques and their specific detector requirements are described. Detector types are classified and critical parameters described in the framework of X-ray diffraction and X-ray scattering experiments. The article aims at building a bridge between detector end-users and detector developers. It gives limits of critical detector parameters, like angular resolution, energy resolution, dynamic range, and active area

  4. Photoconductive Detectors with Fast Temporal Response for Laser Produced Plasma Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    M. J. May; C. Halvorson; T. Perry; F. Weber; P. Young; C. Silbernagel

    2008-01-01

    Processes during laser plasma experiments typically have time scales that are less than 100 ps. The measurement of these processes requires X-ray detectors with fast temporal resolution. We have measured the temporal responses and linearity of several different X-ray sensitive Photoconductive Detectors (PCDs). The active elements of the detectors investigated include both diamond (natural and synthetic) and GaAs crystals. The typical time responses of the GaAs PCDs are approximately 60 ps, respectively. Some characterizations using X-ray light from a synchrotron light source are presented

  5. Gamma detector for use with luggage X-ray systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McHugh, H.; Quam, W.

    1998-01-01

    A new gamma radiation sensor has been designed for installation on several types of luggage x-ray machines and mobile x-ray vans operated by the U.S. Customs Service and the U.S. Department of State. The use of gamma detectors on x-ray machines imposed difficulties not usually encountered in the design of gamma detectors because the spectrum of scattered x-rays, which varied from machine to machine, extended to energies significantly higher than those of the low-energy isotopic emissions. In the original design, the lower level discriminator was raised above the x-ray end point energy resulting in the loss of the americium line associated with plutonium. This reduced the overall sensitivity to unshielded plutonium by a factor of approximately 100. An improved method was subsequently developed wherein collimation was utilized in conjunction with a variable counting threshold to permit accommodation of differing conditions of x-ray scattering. This design has been shown to eliminate most of the problems due to x-ray scattering while still capturing the americium emissions. The overall sensitivity has remained quite high, though varying slightly from one model of x-ray machine to another, depending upon the x-ray scattering characteristics of each model. (author)

  6. A directional gamma-ray detector based on scintillator plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanna, D., E-mail: hanna@physics.mcgill.ca; Sagnières, L.; Boyle, P.J.; MacLeod, A.M.L.

    2015-10-11

    A simple device for determining the azimuthal location of a source of gamma radiation, using ideas from astrophysical gamma-ray burst detection, is described. A compact and robust detector built from eight identical modules, each comprising a plate of CsI(Tl) scintillator coupled to a photomultiplier tube, can locate a point source of gamma rays with degree-scale precision by comparing the count rates in the different modules. Sensitivity to uniform environmental background is minimal.

  7. Large area, low capacitance Si(Li) detectors for high rate x-ray applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossington, C.S.; Fine, P.M.; Madden, N.W.

    1992-10-01

    Large area, single-element Si(Li) detectors have been fabricated using a novel geometry which yields detectors with reduced capacitance and hence reduced noise at short amplifier pulse-processing times. A typical device employing the new geometry with a thickness of 6 mm and an active area of 175 mm 2 has a capacitance of only 0.5 pf, compared to 2.9 pf for a conventional planar device with equivalent dimensions. These new low capacitance detectors, used in conjunction with low capacitance field effect transistors, will result in x-ray spectrometers capable of operating at very high count rates while still maintaining excellent energy resolution. The spectral response of the low capacitance detectors to a wide range of x-ray energies at 80 K is comparable to typical state-of-the-art conventional Si(Li) devices. In addition to their low capacitance, the new devices offer other advantages over conventional detectors. Detector fabrication procedures, I-V and C-V characteristics, noise performance, and spectral response to 2-60 keV x-rays are described

  8. The color of X-rays: Spectral X-ray computed tomography using energy sensitive pixel detectors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schioppa, E.J.

    2014-01-01

    Energy sensitive X-ray imaging detectors are produced by connecting a semiconductor sensor to a spectroscopic pixel readout chip. In this thesis, the applicability of such detectors to X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) is studied. A prototype Medipix based silicon detector is calibrated using X-ray

  9. Recent X-ray hybrid CMOS detector developments and measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, Samuel V.; Falcone, Abraham D.; Burrows, David N.; Wages, Mitchell; Chattopadhyay, Tanmoy; McQuaide, Maria; Bray, Evan; Kern, Matthew

    2017-08-01

    The Penn State X-ray detector lab, in collaboration with Teledyne Imaging Sensors (TIS), have progressed their efforts to improve soft X-ray Hybrid CMOS detector (HCD) technology on multiple fronts. Having newly acquired a Teledyne cryogenic SIDECARTM ASIC for use with HxRG devices, measurements were performed with an H2RG HCD and the cooled SIDECARTM. We report new energy resolution and read noise measurements, which show a significant improvement over room temperature SIDECARTM operation. Further, in order to meet the demands of future high-throughput and high spatial resolution X-ray observatories, detectors with fast readout and small pixel sizes are being developed. We report on characteristics of new X-ray HCDs with 12.5 micron pitch that include in-pixel CDS circuitry and crosstalk-eliminating CTIA amplifiers. In addition, PSU and TIS are developing a new large-scale array Speedster-EXD device. The original 64 × 64 pixel Speedster-EXD prototype used comparators in each pixel to enable event driven readout with order of magnitude higher effective readout rates, which will now be implemented in a 550 × 550 pixel device. Finally, the detector lab is involved in a sounding rocket mission that is slated to fly in 2018 with an off-plane reflection grating array and an H2RG X-ray HCD. We report on the planned detector configuration for this mission, which will increase the NASA technology readiness level of X-ray HCDs to TRL 9.

  10. Self-powered neutron and gamma-ray flux detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allan, C.J.; Shields, R.B.; Lynch, G.F.; Cuttler, J.M.

    1980-01-01

    A new type of self-powered neutron detector was developed which is sensitive to both the neutron and gamma-ray fluxes. The emitter comprises two parts. The central emitter core is made of materials that generate high-energy electrons on exposure to neutrons. The outer layer acts as a gamma-ray/electron converter, and since it has a higher atomic number and higher back-scattering coefficient than the collector, increases the net outflow or emmission of electrons. The collector, which is around the emitter outer layer, is insulated from the outer layer electrically with dielectric insulation formed from compressed metal-oxide powder. The fraction of electrons given off by the emitter that is reflected back by the collector is less than the fraction of electrons emitted by the collector that is reflected back by the emitter. The thickness of the outer layer needed to achieve this result is very small. A detector of this design responds to external reactor gamma-rays as well as to neutron capture gamma-rays from the collector. The emitter core is either nickel, iron or titanium, or alloys based on these metals. The outer layer is made of platinum, tantalum, osmium, molybdenum or cerium. The detector is particularly useful for monitoring neutron and gamma ray flux intensities in nuclear reactor cores in which the neutron and gamma ray flux intensities are closely proportional, are unltimately related to the fission rate, and are used as measurements of nuclear reactor power. (DN)

  11. An x-ray detector for time-resolved studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodricks, B.; Brizard, C.; Clarke, R.; Lowe, W.

    1992-01-01

    The development of ultrahigh-brightness x-ray sources makes time-resolved x-ray studies more and more feasible. Improvements in x-ray optics components are also critical for obtaining the appropriate beam for a particular type of experiment. Moreover, fast parallel detectors will be essential in order to exploit the combination of high intensity x-ray sources and novel optics for time-resolved experiments. A CCD detector with a time resolution of microseconds has been developed at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). This detector is fully programmable using CAMAC electronics and a Micro Vax computer. The techniques of time-resolved x-ray studies, which include scattering, microradiography, microtomography, stroboscopy, etc., can be applied to a range of phenomena (including rapid thermal annealing, surface ordering, crystallization, and the kinetics of phase transition) in order to understand these time-dependent microscopic processes. Some of these applications will be illustrated by recent results performed at synchrotrons. New powerful x-ray sources now under construction offer the opportunity to apply innovative approaches in time-resolved work

  12. Gas detectors for x-ray lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiedtke, K.; Feldhaus, J.; Hahn, U.; Jastrow, U.; Nunez, T.; Tschentscher, T.; Bobashev, S. V.; Sorokin, A. A.; Hastings, J. B.; Moeller, S.; Cibik, L.; Gottwald, A.; Hoehl, A.; Kroth, U.; Krumrey, M.; Schoeppe, H.; Ulm, G.; Richter, M.

    2008-01-01

    We have developed different types of photodetectors that are based on the photoionization of a gas at a low target density. The almost transparent devices were optimized and tested for online photon diagnostics at current and future x-ray free-electron laser facilities on a shot-to-shot basis with a temporal resolution of better than 100 ns. Characterization and calibration measurements were performed in the laboratory of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt at the electron storage ring BESSY II in Berlin. As a result, measurement uncertainties of better than 10% for the photon-pulse energy and below 20 μm for the photon-beam position were achieved at the Free-electron LASer in Hamburg (FLASH). An upgrade for the detection of hard x-rays was tested at the Sub-Picosecond Photon Source in Stanford

  13. Gas detectors for x-ray lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiedtke, K.; Feldhaus, J.; Hahn, U.; Jastrow, U.; Nunez, T.; Tschentscher, T.; Bobashev, S. V.; Sorokin, A. A.; Hastings, J. B.; Möller, S.; Cibik, L.; Gottwald, A.; Hoehl, A.; Kroth, U.; Krumrey, M.; Schöppe, H.; Ulm, G.; Richter, M.

    2008-05-01

    We have developed different types of photodetectors that are based on the photoionization of a gas at a low target density. The almost transparent devices were optimized and tested for online photon diagnostics at current and future x-ray free-electron laser facilities on a shot-to-shot basis with a temporal resolution of better than 100 ns. Characterization and calibration measurements were performed in the laboratory of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt at the electron storage ring BESSY II in Berlin. As a result, measurement uncertainties of better than 10% for the photon-pulse energy and below 20 μm for the photon-beam position were achieved at the Free-electron LASer in Hamburg (FLASH). An upgrade for the detection of hard x-rays was tested at the Sub-Picosecond Photon Source in Stanford.

  14. A scintillation detector for measuring inert gas beta rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Hengchang; Yu Yunchang

    1989-10-01

    The inert gas beta ray scintillation detector, which is made of organic high polymers as the base and coated with compact fluorescence materials, is a lower energy scintillation detector. It can be used in the nuclear power plant and radioactive fields as a lower energy monitor to detect inert gas beta rays. Under the conditions of time constant 10 minutes, confidence level is 99.7% (3σ), the intensity of gamma rays 2.6 x 10 -7 C/kg ( 60 Co), and the minimum detectable concentration (MDC) of this detector for 133 Xe 1.2 Bq/L. The measuring range for 133 Xe is 11.1 ∼ 3.7 x 10 4 Bq/L. After a special measure is taken, the device is able to withstand 3 x 10 5 Pa gauge pressure. In the loss-of-cooolant-accident, it can prevent the radioactive gas of the detector from leaking. This detector is easier to be manufactured and decontaminated

  15. Photovoltaic x-ray detectors based on the GaAs epitaxial structures

    CERN Document Server

    Akhmadullin, R A; Dvoryankina, G G; Dikaev, Y M; Ermakov, M G; Ermakova, O N; Krikunov, A I; Kudryashov, A A; Petrov, A G; Telegin, A A

    2002-01-01

    The new photovoltaic detector of the X-ray radiation is proposed on the basis of the GaAs epitaxial structures, which operates with high efficiency of the charge carriers collection without shift voltage and at the room temperature. The structures are grown by the method of the gas-phase epitaxy on the n sup + -type highly-alloyed substrates. The range of sensitivity to the X-ray radiation is within the range of effective energies from 8 up to 120 keV. The detector maximum response in the current short circuit mode is determined

  16. The CCRT: An inexpensive cosmic ray muon detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harpell, E.; Langeveld, W.; McShurley, D.; Shapiro, S.; Venuti, J.

    1995-01-01

    In this article the authors describe an inexpensive cosmic ray counter useful for physics demonstrations and experiments. Although many university departments use cosmic ray detectors as part of their upper division laboratory courses, these are often large and expensive devices requiring specialized equipment not usually accessible in high school and college programs. This detector is very compact and can be constructed for about $350 using commercially available materials and small scintillator panels that may be available (in limited supply) from Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) and perhaps other accelerator laboratories. In the following, the authors provide detailed instructions for the construction of the detector as well as suggestions for its use in the classroom and laboratory

  17. Gaseous detectors for energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veloso, J. F. C. A.; Silva, A. L. M.

    2018-01-01

    The energy resolution capability of gaseous detectors is being used in the last years to perform studies on the detection of characteristic X-ray lines emitted by elements when excited by external radiation sources. One of the most successful techniques is the Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence (EDXRF) analysis. Recent developments in the new generation of micropatterned gaseous detectors (MPGDs), triggered the possibility not only of recording the photon energy, but also of providing position information, extending their application to EDXRF imaging. The relevant features and strategies to be applied in gaseous detectors in order to better fit the requirements for EDXRF imaging will be reviewed and discussed, and some application examples will be presented.

  18. Response function of a p type - HPGe detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez-Pino, Neivy; Cabral, Fatima Padilla; D'Alessandro, Katia; Maidana, Nora Lia; Vanin, Vito Roberto

    2011-01-01

    The response function of a HPGe detector depends on Ge crystal dimensions and dead layers thicknesses; most of them are not given by the manufacturers or change with detector damage from neutrons or contact with the atmosphere and therefore must be experimentally determined. The response function is obtained by a Monte-Carlo simulation procedure based on the Ge crystal characteristics. In this work, a p-type coaxial HPGe detector with 30% efficiency, manufactured in 1989, was investigated. The crystal radius and length and the inner hole dimensions were obtained scanning the capsule both in the radial and axial directions using 4 mm collimated beams from 137 Cs, 207 Bi point sources placed on a x-y table in steps of 2,00 mm. These dimensions were estimated comparing the experimental peak areas with those obtained by simulation using several hole configurations. In a similar procedure, the frontal dead layer thickness was determined using 2 mm collimated beams of the 59 keV gamma-rays from 241 Am and 81 keV from 133 Ba sources hitting the detector at 90 deg and 45 deg with respect to the capsule surface. The Monte Carlo detector model included, besides the crystal, hole and capsules sizes, the Ge dead-layers. The obtained spectra were folded with a gaussian resolution function to account for electronic noise. The comparison of simulated and experimental response functions for 4 mm collimated beams of 60 Co, 137 Cs, and 207 Bi points sources placed at distances of 7, 11 and 17 cm from the detector end cap showed relative deviations of about 10% in general and below 10% in the peak. The frontal dead layer thickness determined by our procedure was different from that specified by the detector manufacturer. (author)

  19. Four channel Cosmic Ray detector based on polymaq

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera-Guzman, K. N.; Gutierrez-Sanchez, R. A.; Felix, J.

    2017-01-01

    The Cherenkov radiation has been widely studied in transparent materials, and applied to detect and identify elementary particles. But it has not been widely studied in opaque materials. A four channels radiation detector has been designed, built, characterized, and operated; based on four polymaq (UHMW-PE) bars of 2.54 cm X 5.08 cm X 25.4 cm, which is an opaque material to visible radiation to the human eye. Silicon photo detectors, Hamamatsu, avalanche type (APD) are used to detect the radiation produced by the passage of particles in the detector blocks. The design, construction, characterization, operation, and preliminary results of this cosmic ray detector details are presented.

  20. A method of detector correction for cosmic ray muon radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yuanyuan; Zhao Ziran; Chen Zhiqiang; Zhang Li; Wang Zhentian

    2008-01-01

    Cosmic ray muon radiography which has good penetrability and sensitivity to high-Z materials is an effective way for detecting shielded nuclear materials. The problem of data correction is one of the key points of muon radiography technique. Because of the influence of environmental background, environmental yawp and error of detectors, the raw data can not be used directly. If we used the raw data as the usable data to reconstruct without any corrections, it would turn up terrible artifacts. Based on the characteristics of the muon radiography system, aimed at the error of detectors, this paper proposes a method of detector correction. The simulation experiments demonstrate that this method can effectively correct the error produced by detectors. Therefore, we can say that it does a further step to let the technique of cosmic muon radiography into out real life. (authors)

  1. Gated x-ray detector for the National Ignition Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oertel, John A.; Aragonez, Robert; Archuleta, Tom; Barnes, Cris; Casper, Larry; Fatherley, Valerie; Heinrichs, Todd; King, Robert; Landers, Doug; Lopez, Frank; Sanchez, Phillip; Sandoval, George; Schrank, Lou; Walsh, Peter; Bell, Perry; Brown, Matt; Costa, Robert; Holder, Joe; Montelongo, Sam; Pederson, Neal

    2006-01-01

    Two new gated x-ray imaging cameras have recently been designed, constructed, and delivered to the National Ignition Facility in Livermore, CA. These gated x-Ray detectors are each designed to fit within an aluminum airbox with a large capacity cooling plane and are fitted with an array of environmental housekeeping sensors. These instruments are significantly different from earlier generations of gated x-ray images due, in part, to an innovative impedance matching scheme, advanced phosphor screens, pulsed phosphor circuits, precision assembly fixturing, unique system monitoring, and complete remote computer control. Preliminary characterization has shown repeatable uniformity between imaging strips, improved spatial resolution, and no detectable impedance reflections

  2. Silicon drift detectors coupled to CsI(Tl) scintillators for spaceborne gamma-ray detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marisaldi, M.; Fiorini, C.; Labanti, C.; Longoni, A.; Perotti, F.; Rossi, E.; Soltau, H.

    2006-01-01

    Silicon Drift Detectors (SDDs), thanks to their peculiar low noise characteristics, have proven to be excellent photodetectors for CsI(Tl) scintillation light detection. Two basic detector configurations have been developed: either a single SDD or a monolithic array of SDDs coupled to a single CsI(Tl) crystal. A 16 independent detectors prototype is under construction, designed to work in conjunction with the MEGA Compton telescope prototype under development at MPE, Garching, Germany. A single SDD coupled to a CsI(Tl) crystal has also been tested as a monolithic detector with an extended energy range between 1.5 keV and 1 MeV. The SDD is used as a direct X-ray detector for low energy photons interacting in silicon and as a scintillation light photodetector for photons interacting in the crystal. The type of interaction is identified by means of pulse shape discrimination technique. Detectors based on an array of SDDs coupled to a single CsI(Tl) crystal have also been built. The readout of these detectors is based on the Anger camera technique, and submillimeter spatial resolution can be achieved. The two detectors' approaches and their applications will be described

  3. X-ray and gamma ray detector readout system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumer, Tumay O; Clajus, Martin; Visser, Gerard

    2010-10-19

    A readout electronics scheme is under development for high resolution, compact PET (positron emission tomography) imagers based on LSO (lutetium ortho-oxysilicate, Lu.sub.2SiO.sub.5) scintillator and avalanche photodiode (APD) arrays. The key is to obtain sufficient timing and energy resolution at a low power level, less than about 30 mW per channel, including all required functions. To this end, a simple leading edge level crossing discriminator is used, in combination with a transimpedance preamplifier. The APD used has a gain of order 1,000, and an output noise current of several pA/ Hz, allowing bipolar technology to be used instead of CMOS, for increased speed and power efficiency. A prototype of the preamplifier and discriminator has been constructed, achieving timing resolution of 1.5 ns FWHM, 2.7 ns full width at one tenth maximum, relative to an LSO/PMT detector, and an energy resolution of 13.6% FWHM at 511 keV, while operating at a power level of 22 mW per channel. Work is in progress towards integration of this preamplifier and discriminator with appropriate coincidence logic and amplitude measurement circuits in an ASIC suitable for a high resolution compact PET instrument. The detector system and/or ASIC can also be used for many other applications for medical to industrial imaging.

  4. Research on self-powered detectors for gamma-ray monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, S.W.; Lee, Y.J.

    1984-01-01

    Self-powered neutron detectors are used extensively in power reactors both for flux mapping and for power control and over-power protection, because of their small size, ruggedness and simplicity. But they have a few disadvantages such as high burn-up rate and background signal produced by the gamma-rays from the reactor itself. In order to overcome these disadvantages and to achieve a better understanding of gamma-ray effects of self-power detectors, a new type of self-powered detectors was designed and fabricated by the author,and experiments have carried out in the 10kCi sup(60)Co gamma irradiation facility in Korea Advanced Energy Research Institute. The configuration of the new type detectors is not of coaxial type but of paralled plate in order to obtain directional effects of gamma-ray incidence. Detector materials and dimensions are so chosen that the output current signal is large enough to be detected using some commercial measuring divice even at low dose rate and the contribution of the lead cable to the total signal is negligibly small. The results are 1)sensitivity is depended primarily on the materials of the insulator, 2)output signal has a good linearity to gamma dose rate, 3) response of detectors is prompt, but not perfect, 4) critical thickness for satusation of the output current is thinner than the range of photoelectron in the materials. (Author)

  5. Research on self-powered detectors for gamma-ray monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, S.W.

    1983-01-01

    Self-powered neutron detectors are used extensively in power reactors both for flux mapping and for power control and over-power protection, because of their small size, ruggedness and simplicity. But they have a few disadvantages such as high burn-up rate and background signal produced by the gamma-rays from the reactor itself. In order to overcome these disadvantages and to achieve a better understanding of gamma-ray effects of self-powered detectors, a new type of self-powered detectors was designed and fabricated by the author, and experiments have been carried out in the 10kCi sup(60)Co gamma irradiation facility in Korea Advanced Energy Research Institute. The configuration of the new type detectors is not of coaxial type but of paralled plate in order to obtain directional effects of gamma-ray incidence. Detector materials and dimensions are so chosen that the output current signal is large enough to be detected using some commercial measuring divice even at low dose rate and the contribution of the lead cable to the totel signal is negligibly small. The results are 1) sensitivity is depended primarily on the materials of the insulator, 2) output signal has a good linearity to gamma dose rate, 3) response of detectors is prompt, but not perfect, 4) critical thickness for satusation of the output current is thinner than the range of photoelectron in the materials. (Author) πT

  6. Characterizing X-ray detectors for prototype digital breast tomosynthesis systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Y.-S.; Park, H.-S.; Park, S.-J.; Choi, S.; Lee, H.; Kim, H.-J.; Lee, D.; Choi, Y.-W.

    2016-01-01

    The digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) system is a newly developed 3-D imaging technique that overcomes the tissue superposition problems of conventional mammography. Therefore, it produces fewer false positives. In DBT system, several parameters are involved in image acquisition, including geometric components. A series of projections should be acquired at low exposure. This makes the system strongly dependent on the detector's characteristic performance. This study compares two types of x-ray detectors developed by the Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute (KERI). The first prototype DBT system has a CsI (Tl) scintillator/CMOS based flat panel digital detector (2923 MAM, Dexela Ltd.), with a pixel size of 0.0748 mm. The second uses a-Se based direct conversion full field detector (AXS 2430, analogic) with a pixel size of 0.085 mm. The geometry of both systems is same, with a focal spot 665.8 mm from the detector, and a center of rotation 33 mm above the detector surface. The systems were compared with regard to modulation transfer function (MTF), normalized noise power spectrum (NNPS), detective quantum efficiency (DQE) and a new metric, the relative object detectability (ROD). The ROD quantifies the relative performance of each detector at detecting specified objects. The system response function demonstrated excellent linearity (R 2 >0.99). The CMOS-based detector had a high sensitivity, while the Anrad detector had a large dynamic range. The higher MTF and noise power spectrum (NPS) values were measured using an Anrad detector. The maximum DQE value of the Dexela detector was higher than that of the Anrad detector with a low exposure level, considering one projection exposure for tomosynthesis. Overall, the Dexela detector performed better than did the Anrad detector with regard to the simulated Al wires, spheres, test objects of ROD with low exposure level. In this study, we compared the newly developed prototype DBT system with two different types

  7. An X-ray gas position sensitive detector: construction and characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbosa, A.F.; Gabriel, A.; Gabriel, A.; Craievich, A.

    1988-01-01

    A linear x-ray gas position sensitive detector with delay line readout has been constructed. The detector is described, characterized and used for detecting x-ray diffraction patterns from polycrystals. (author) [pt

  8. Quantitative SPECT brain imaging: Effects of attenuation and detector response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilland, D.R.; Jaszczak, R.J.; Bowsher, J.E.; Turkington, T.G.; Liang, Z.; Greer, K.L.; Coleman, R.E.

    1993-01-01

    Two physical factors that substantially degrade quantitative accuracy in SPECT imaging of the brain are attenuation and detector response. In addition to the physical factors, random noise in the reconstructed image can greatly affect the quantitative measurement. The purpose of this work was to implement two reconstruction methods that compensate for attenuation and detector response, a 3D maximum likelihood-EM method (ML) and a filtered backprojection method (FB) with Metz filter and Chang attenuation compensation, and compare the methods in terms of quantitative accuracy and image noise. The methods were tested on simulated data of the 3D Hoffman brain phantom. The simulation incorporated attenuation and distance-dependent detector response. Bias and standard deviation of reconstructed voxel intensities were measured in the gray and white matter regions. The results with ML showed that in both the gray and white matter regions as the number of iterations increased, bias decreased and standard deviation increased. Similar results were observed with FB as the Metz filter power increased. In both regions, ML had smaller standard deviation than FB for a given bias. Reconstruction times for the ML method have been greatly reduced through efficient coding, limited source support, and by computing attenuation factors only along rays perpendicular to the detector

  9. Schottky x-ray detectors based on a bulk β-Ga2O3 substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xing; Zhou, Leidang; Chen, Liang; Ouyang, Xiaoping; Liu, Bo; Xu, Jun; Tang, Huili

    2018-03-01

    β-Ga2O3 Schottky barrier diodes (SBDs) have been fabricated on a bulk (100) β-Ga2O3 substrate and tested as X-ray detectors in this study. The devices exhibited good rectification properties, such as a high rectification ratio and a close-to-unity ideality factor. A high photo-to-dark current ratio exceeding 800 was achieved for X-ray detection, which was mainly attributed to the low reverse leakage current in the β-Ga2O3 SBDs. Furthermore, transient response of the β-Ga2O3 X-ray detectors was investigated, and two different detection mechanisms, photovoltaic and photoconductive, were identified. The results imply the great potential of β-Ga2O3 based devices for X-ray detection.

  10. Conference on physics from large γ-ray detector arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The conference on open-quotes Physics from Large γ-ray Detector Arraysclose quotes is a continuation of the series of conferences that have been organized every two years by the North American Heavy-ion Laboratories. The aim of the conference this year was to encourage discussion of the physics that can be studied with such large arrays. This volume is the collected proceedings from this conference. It discusses properties of nuclear states which can be created in heavy-ion reactions, and which can be observed via such detector systems

  11. Conference on physics from large {gamma}-ray detector arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    The conference on {open_quotes}Physics from Large {gamma}-ray Detector Arrays{close_quotes} is a continuation of the series of conferences that have been organized every two years by the North American Heavy-ion Laboratories. The aim of the conference this year was to encourage discussion of the physics that can be studied with such large arrays. This volume is the collected proceedings from this conference. It discusses properties of nuclear states which can be created in heavy-ion reactions, and which can be observed via such detector systems.

  12. Assembly Manual for the Berkeley Lab Cosmic Ray Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collier, Michael

    2002-01-01

    The Berkeley Lab Cosmic Ray Detector consists of 3 main components that must be prepared separately before they can be assembled. These components are the scintillator, circuit board, and casing. They are described in the main sections of this report, which may be completed in any order. Preparing the scintillator paddles involves several steps--cutting the scintillator material to the appropriate size and shape, preparing and attaching Lucite cookies (optional), polishing the edges, gluing the end to the photomultiplier tube (optional), and wrapping the scintillator. Since the detector has 2 paddles, each of the sections needs to be repeated for the other paddle

  13. Multielement X-ray row detector on GaAs with spatial resolution of 108 μm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dvoryankin, V.F.; Dikaev, Yu.M.; Krikunov, A.I.; Panova, T.M.; Telegin, A.A.

    2004-01-01

    The multielement X-ray row detector with pitch of 108 μm was made on epitaxial GaAs (p + -n-n'-n + ) structures by isotropic etching in solution HCl-KBrO 3 -H 2 O. Separation of signals from the near-by detectors is achieved by built-in guard ring on each pixel. The spatial response of the detectors was evaluated

  14. Multielement X-ray row detector on GaAs with spatial resolution of 108 {mu}m

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dvoryankin, V.F.; Dikaev, Yu.M. E-mail: ymd289@ire216.msk.ru; Krikunov, A.I.; Panova, T.M.; Telegin, A.A

    2004-09-21

    The multielement X-ray row detector with pitch of 108 {mu}m was made on epitaxial GaAs (p{sup +}-n-n'-n{sup +}) structures by isotropic etching in solution HCl-KBrO{sub 3}-H{sub 2}O. Separation of signals from the near-by detectors is achieved by built-in guard ring on each pixel. The spatial response of the detectors was evaluated.

  15. Measurement of Photomultipier Plateau Curves and Single MIP response in the AD detector at ALICE

    CERN Document Server

    Sanchez Falero, Sebastian De Jesus

    2015-01-01

    The Alice Diffractive (AD) detector is a forward detector in the ALICE experiment at CERN. It is aimed to the triggering on diffractive events and extends the pseudorapidity coverage to about 4.9 < /n/ < 6.3. In this work, a PMT's efficiency plateau and single MIP response are measured using a replica of the detector's scintillator modules, electronic and data acquisition system and cosmic rays as particle source.

  16. Calculation of Si(Li) x-ray detector efficiencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaluzec, N.; Holton, R.

    1984-01-01

    The calculation of detector efficiency functions is an important step in the quantitative analysis of x-ray spectra when approached by a standardless technique. In this regard, it becomes essential that the analyst not only model the physical aspects of the absorption and transmission of the various windows present, but also use the most accurate data available for the mass absorption coefficients required in these calculations. The topic of modeling the size and shape of the windows present is beyond the scope of this paper and the authors instead concentrate on the mass absorption coefficients used in the calculations and their implications to efficiency calculations. For the purposes of this paper, the authors consider that the relative detector efficiency function of a conventional Si(Li) detector can be modeled by a simple expression

  17. Commissioning of the ATLAS Inner Detector with cosmic rays

    CERN Document Server

    Klinkby, E

    2008-01-01

    The tracking of the ATLAS experiment is performed by the Inner Detector which has recently been installed in its final position. Various parts of the detector have been commissioned using cosmic rays both on the surface and in the ATLAS pit. The different calibration, alignment and monitoring methods have been tested as well as the handling of the conditions data. Both real and simulated cosmic events are reconstructed using the full ATLAS software chain, with only minor modifications to account for the lack of timing of cosmics events, the lack of magnetic field and to remove any vertex requirements in the track fitters. Results so far show that the Inner Detector performs within expectations with respect to noise, hit efficiency and track resolution.

  18. Research on influence of energy spectrum response of ICT detector arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Rifeng; Gao Fuqiang; Zhang Ping

    2008-01-01

    The energy spectrum response is important characteristic for X-ray ICT detector. But there exist many difficulties to measure these parameters by experiments. The energy spectrum response of CdWO 4 detector was simulated by using the EGSnrc code. Meanwhile the effect of detection efficiency was analyzed by the distribution of accelerator bremsstrahlung spectra and the X-ray spectrum hardening, and some theoretic parameters were offered for the consistent and no-linearity correction of detector arrays. It was applied to ICT image correction, and a satisfying result was obtained. (authors)

  19. Gas pixel detector for X-ray observation

    CERN Document Server

    Attié, D; Chefdeville, M; Colas, P; Delagnes, E; Giomataris, Y; van der Graaf, H; Llopart, X; Timmermans, J; Visschers, J

    2009-01-01

    We report on the status of the R&D for a digital Time Projection Chamber (TPC) based on Micromegas (MICRO MEsh GAseous Structure) detectors using the CMOS chip TimePix as a direct readout anode protected by highly resistive a-Si:H layer. A small chamber was built as a demonstrator of the 2-D and 3-D imaging capabilities of this technique. We illustrate the new capabilities of this detector for X-ray observation with data taken from radioactive sources. This small TPC is a very useful tool both for studying gas properties thanks to its good efficiency for single electrons, and for reconstructing photoelectron direction for use as a soft X-ray polarimeter.

  20. Detector calibration for in-situ gamma ray spectrometry

    CERN Document Server

    Balea, G

    2002-01-01

    The power in the technique of in-situ spectrometry lies in the fact that a detector placed on ground measures gamma radiation from sources situated over an area of several hundred square meters. The 'field of view' for the detector would be larger for high energy radiation sources and for sources closer to the soil surface. In contrast, a soil sample would represent an area of a few tens of hundreds of square centimeters. In practice, an effective characterization of a site would involve in-situ gamma ray spectrometry in conjunction with soil sampling. As part of an overall program, in-situ gamma ray spectrometry provides a means to assess the degree of contamination in areas during the course of operations in the field, thus guiding the investigator on where to collect samples. It can also substantially reduce the number of samples need to be collected and subsequently analyzed. (author)

  1. Feasibility study for use of a germanium detector in the LOFT gamma-ray densitometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swierkowski, S.P.

    1976-01-01

    The primary aim of this study is to predict the performance of a gamma-ray densitometer system using computer modeling techniques. The system consists of a collimated 137 Cs source, a pipe containing a variable amount of water absorber, and a shielded and collimated germanium detector system. The gamma-ray energy spectrum (number of photon counts as a function of energy) has been computed for several sources at the detector. The response for combined sourceconfigurations has been obtained by linear superposition. The signal essentially consists of the counts in an energy window centered on the 137 Cs source at 662 keV that originate from this source. The noise is the background counts in the signal energy window that originate from 16 N scatter radiation and direct and shield tank activation gammas. The detector signal has been computed for 0, 50, and 100 percent water in the pipe

  2. Analysis of self-powered gamma ray detector with directional discrimination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levert, F.E.; Beyerlein, R.A.; Cox, S.A.

    1979-01-01

    The results of a combined Monte Carlo simulation and experimental investigation of the directional and energy dependent response of a self-powered gamma detector with a flat plate Pb-C central electrode are presented. The electron yield of the central electrode in a three dimensional mockup of the detector was calculated for photons of several discrete energies, emanating from an infinitely thin planar source, incident on the outer surface of the detector. Separate computations were done with the source facing the lead side and carbon side of the central electrode. Experimental measurements with a detector that closely matched the design used in the simulation were conducted in a graphite column next to a neutron leakage face of a low flux reactor. A localized gamma ray source was created by positioning a 235 U strip between the leakage face of the reactor and the detector. A comparison of results obtained in both cases showed good agreement. Also experimental measurements to determine the effect of the thickness of lead shielding surrounding the outer wall of the detector and space charge in the vacuum insulator between the central electrode and the inner wall on the response of the detector were performed. (Auth.)

  3. Gas microstrip detectors for X-ray tomographic flow imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Key, M J; Luggar, R D; Kundu, A

    2003-01-01

    A investigation into the suitability of gas microstrip detector technology for a high-speed industrial X-ray tomography system is reported. X-ray energies in the region 20-30 keV are well suited to the application, which involves imaging two-dimensional slices through gas/liquid multiphase pipeline flows for quantitative component fraction measurement. Stable operation over a period representing several hundred individual tomographic scans at gas gains of 500 is demonstrated using a Penning gas mixture of krypton/propylene.

  4. Cosmic ray studies with the Soudan 2 detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruddick, Keith

    1994-01-01

    We will describe attempts to measure the elemental composition of the primary cosmic rays using muons observed deep underground in coincidence with detectors on the surface of the earth. A proportional tube array has been used to measure shower size at the surface and we have recently constructed a Cerenkov array which will give a more direct measurement of primary cosmic ray energy. We will also present results from an all-sky survey obtained from the trajectories of underground muons ohserved over a four year period. ((orig.))

  5. Effective and cheap X-ray television detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artem'ev, A.N.; Potlovskij, K.G.; Rezvov, V.A.; Yudin, L.I.

    2002-01-01

    The position sensitive detector (PSD) is designed for investigations with traditional X-ray tubes and synchrotron radiation from 3 to 30 keV. PSD consists of light-tight box, which transforms X-ray photons to light photons. Light photons are registered with the help of TV camera. Then an image is digitized and introduced into computer. Software provides registration of the dim beam images by means of accumulation of the information. Statistic processing of the image series allows to determine of the parameters of the image. Sensitivity is 41 phot/pixel. Spatial resolution is not worse then 400 μ [ru

  6. X-ray measurement with Pin type semiconductor detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez J, F.J.

    1999-01-01

    Here are presented the experimental results of the applications of Pin type radiation detectors developed in a National Institute of Nuclear Research (ININ) project, in the measurement of low energy gamma and X-rays. The applications were oriented mainly toward the Medical Physics area. It is planned other applications which are in process of implementation inside the National Institute of Nuclear Research in Mexico. (Author)

  7. Scintillator materials for x-ray detectors and beam monitors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Martin, T.; Koch, A.; Nikl, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 42, č. 6 (2017), s. 451-456 ISSN 0883-7694 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA16-15569S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : scintillator * X-ray detector * beam monitor * synchrotron * thin film Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.) Impact factor: 5.199, year: 2016

  8. Large area x-ray detectors for cargo radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno, C.; Albagli, D.; Bendahan, J.; Castleberry, D.; Gordon, C.; Hopkins, F.; Ross, W.

    2007-04-01

    Large area x-ray detectors based on phosphors coupled to flat panel amorphous silicon diode technology offer significant advances for cargo radiologic imaging. Flat panel area detectors provide large object coverage offering high throughput inspections to meet the high flow rate of container commerce. These detectors provide excellent spatial resolution when needed, and enhanced SNR through low noise electronics. If the resolution is reduced through pixel binning, further advances in SNR are achievable. Extended exposure imaging and frame averaging enables improved x-ray penetration of ultra-thick objects, or "select-your-own" contrast sensitivity at a rate many times faster than LDAs. The areal coverage of flat panel technology provides inherent volumetric imaging with the appropriate scanning methods. Flat panel area detectors have flexible designs in terms of electronic control, scintillator selection, pixel pitch, and frame rates. Their cost is becoming more competitive as production ramps up for the healthcare, nondestructive testing (NDT), and homeland protection industries. Typically used medical and industrial polycrystalline phosphor materials such as Gd2O2S:Tb (GOS) can be applied to megavolt applications if the phosphor layer is sufficiently thick to enhance x-ray absorption, and if a metal radiator is used to augment the quantum detection efficiency and reduce x-ray scatter. Phosphor layers ranging from 0.2-mm to 1-mm can be "sandwiched" between amorphous silicon flat panel diode arrays and metal radiators. Metal plates consisting of W, Pb or Cu, with thicknesses ranging from 0.25-mm to well over 1-mm can be used by covering the entire area of the phosphor plate. In some combinations of high density metal and phosphor layers, the metal plate provides an intensification of 25% in signal due to electron emission from the plate and subsequent excitation within the phosphor material. This further improves the SNR of the system.

  9. An x-ray detector using superconducting aluminum tunnel junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barber, W.C.; Bland, R.W.; Carpenter, J.W.; Johnson, R.T.; Laws, K.E.; Lockhart, J.; Lee, J.S.; Watson, R.M.

    1992-01-01

    We report on tests of a prototype detector for 6-keV X-rays, using series arrays of tunnel junction. Tests with higher-energy particles indicate an energy resolution of 4 keV, at 0.3K and with a warm pre-amp. At lower temperatures and with a cooled FET, the resolution should approach 100 eV

  10. Response of fire detectors to different smokes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjoerkman, J.; Keski-Rahkonen, O.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to characterize the behavior of fire alarm systems based on smoke detectors on smoldering fires especially cable fires in nuclear power plants (NPP). Full-scale fire experiments were carried out in a laboratory designed according to the standard EN54-9. The laboratory was instrumented with additional equipment such as thermocouples and flow meters which are not used in standard fire sensitivity tests. This allows the results to be used as experimental data for validation tasks of numerical fire simulation computerized fluid dynamics (CFD)-codes. The ultimate goal of the research is to model theoretically smoldering and flaming cable fires, their smoke production, transfer of smoke to detectors, as well as the response of detectors and fire alarm systems to potential fires. This would allow the use of numerical fire simulation to predict fire hazards in different fire scenarios found important in PSA (probability safety assessment) of NPPs. This report concentrates on explaining full-scale fire experiments in the smoke sensitivity laboratory and experimental results from fire tests of detectors. Validation tasks with CFD-codes will be first carried out 'blind' without any idea about corresponding experimental results. Accordingly, the experimental results cannot be published in this report. (orig.)

  11. Improvement of radiation response characteristic on CdTe detectors using fast neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyamaru, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Akito; Iida, Toshiyuki

    1999-01-01

    The treatment of fast neutron pre-irradiation was applied to a CdTe radiation detector in order to improve radiation response characteristic. Electron transport property of the detector was changed by the irradiation effect to suppress pulse amplitude fluctuation in risetime. Spectroscopic performance of the pre-irradiated detector was compared with the original. Additionally, the pre-irradiated detector was employed with a detection system using electrical signal processing of risetime discrimination (RTD). Pulse height spectra of 241 Am, 133 Ba, and 137 Cs gamma rays were measured to examine the change of the detector performance. The experimental results indicated that response characteristic for high-energy photons was improved by the pre-irradiation. The combination of the pre-irradiated detector and the RTD processing was found to provide further enhancement of the energy resolution. Application of fast neutron irradiation effect to the CdTe detector was demonstrated. (author)

  12. Charge collection and absorption-limited x-ray sensitivity of pixellated x-ray detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kabir, M. Zahangir; Kasap, S.O.

    2004-01-01

    The charge collection and absorption-limited x-ray sensitivity of a direct conversion pixellated x-ray detector operating in the presence of deep trapping of charge carriers is calculated using the Shockley-Ramo theorem and the weighting potential of the individual pixel. The sensitivity of a pixellated x-ray detector is analyzed in terms of normalized parameters; (a) the normalized x-ray absorption depth (absorption depth/photoconductor thickness), (b) normalized pixel width (pixel size/thickness), and (c) normalized carrier schubwegs (schubweg/thickness). The charge collection and absorption-limited sensitivity of pixellated x-ray detectors mainly depends on the transport properties (mobility and lifetime) of the charges that move towards the pixel electrodes and the extent of dependence increases with decreasing normalized pixel width. The x-ray sensitivity of smaller pixels may be higher or lower than that of larger pixels depending on the rate of electron and hole trapping and the bias polarity. The sensitivity of pixellated detectors can be improved by ensuring that the carrier with the higher mobility-lifetime product is drifted towards the pixel electrodes

  13. Gamma-Ray Background Variability in Mobile Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aucott, Timothy John

    Gamma-ray background radiation significantly reduces detection sensitivity when searching for radioactive sources in the field, such as in wide-area searches for homeland security applications. Mobile detector systems in particular must contend with a variable background that is not necessarily known or even measurable a priori. This work will present measurements of the spatial and temporal variability of the background, with the goal of merging gamma-ray detection, spectroscopy, and imaging with contextual information--a "nuclear street view" of the ubiquitous background radiation. The gamma-ray background originates from a variety of sources, both natural and anthropogenic. The dominant sources in the field are the primordial isotopes potassium-40, uranium-238, and thorium-232, as well as their decay daughters. In addition to the natural background, many artificially-created isotopes are used for industrial or medical purposes, and contamination from fission products can be found in many environments. Regardless of origin, these backgrounds will reduce detection sensitivity by adding both statistical as well as systematic uncertainty. In particular, large detector arrays will be limited by the systematic uncertainty in the background and will suffer from a high rate of false alarms. The goal of this work is to provide a comprehensive characterization of the gamma-ray background and its variability in order to improve detection sensitivity and evaluate the performance of mobile detectors in the field. Large quantities of data are measured in order to study their performance at very low false alarm rates. Two different approaches, spectroscopy and imaging, are compared in a controlled study in the presence of this measured background. Furthermore, there is additional information that can be gained by correlating the gamma-ray data with contextual data streams (such as cameras and global positioning systems) in order to reduce the variability in the background

  14. Synchrotron radiation calibration for soft X-ray detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ning, Jiamin; Guo, Cun; Xu, Rongkun; Jiang, Shilun; Xu, Zeping; Chen, Jinchuan; Xia, Guangxin; Xue, Feibiao; Qin, Yi

    2009-04-01

    The calibration experiments were carried out to X-ray film, scintillator and transmission grating by employing the soft X-ray station at 3W1B beam-line in Beijing synchrotron Radiation Facility. The experiments presented the black intensity curve and energy response curve of soft X-ray film. And the experimental results can be used in diagnosis of X-ray radiation characterization of Z-pinch, such as in the measurement of soft X-ray Power Meter, grating spectrometer, pinhole camera and one-dimension imaging system which can ensure precision of Z-pinch results. (authors)

  15. Advancing the technology of monolithic CMOS detectors for use as x-ray imaging spectrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenter, Almus; Kraft, Ralph; Gauron, Thomas; Amato, Stephen

    2017-08-01

    The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) in collaboration with SRI/Sarnoff has been engaged in a multi year effort to advance the technology of monolithic back-thinned CMOS detectors for use as X-ray imaging spectrometers. The long term goal of this campaign is to produce X-ray Active Pixel Sensor (APS) detectors with Fano limited performance over the 0.1-10keV band while incorporating the many benefits of CMOS technology. These benefits include: low power consumption, radiation "hardness", high levels of integration, and very high read rates. Such devices would be ideal for candidate post 2020 decadal missions such as LYNX and for smaller more immediate applications such as CubeX. Devices from a recent fabrication have been back-thinned, packaged and tested for soft X-ray response. These devices have 16μm pitch, 6 Transistor Pinned Photo Diode (6TPPD) pixels with ˜135μV/electron sensitivity and a highly parallel signal chain. These new detectors are fabricated on 10μm epitaxial silicon and have a 1k by 1k format. We present details of our camera design and device performance with particular emphasis on those aspects of interest to single photon counting X-ray astronomy. These features include read noise, X-ray spectral response and quantum efficiency.

  16. X-Ray Beam Studies of Charge Sharing in Small Pixel, Spectroscopic, CdZnTe Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allwork, Christopher; Kitou, Dimitris; Chaudhuri, Sandeep; Sellin, Paul J.; Seller, Paul; Veale, Matthew C.; Tartoni, Nicola; Veeramani, Perumal

    2012-08-01

    Recent advances in the growth of CdZnTe material have allowed the development of small pixel, spectroscopic, X-ray imaging detectors. These detectors have applications in a diverse range of fields such as medical, security and industrial sectors. As the size of the pixels decreases relative to the detector thickness, the probability that charge is shared between multiple pixels increases due to the non zero width of the charge clouds drifting through the detector. These charge sharing events will result in a degradation of the spectroscopic performance of detectors and must be considered when analyzing the detector response. In this paper charge sharing and charge loss in a 250 μm pitch CdZnTe pixel detector has been investigated using a mono-chromatic X-ray beam at the Diamond Light Source, U.K. Using a 20 μm beam diameter the detector response has been mapped for X-ray energies both above (40 keV) and below (26 keV) the material K-shell absorption energies to study charge sharing and the role of fluorescence X-rays in these events.

  17. Si(Li) detectors with thin dead layers for low energy x-ray detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossington, C.S.; Walton, J.T.; Jaklevic, J.M.

    1990-10-01

    Regions of incomplete charge collection, or ''dead layers'', are compared for Si(Li) detectors fabricated with Au and Pd entrance window electrodes. The dead layers were measured by characterizing the detector spectral response to x-ray energies above and below the Si Kα absorption edge. It was found that Si(Li) detectors with Pd electrodes exhibit consistently thinner effective Si dead layers than those with Au electrodes. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that the minimum thickness required for low resistivity Pd electrodes is thinner than that required for low resistivity Au electrodes, which further reduces the signal attenuation in Pd/Si(Li) detectors. A model, based on Pd compensation of oxygen vacancies in the SiO 2 at the entrance window Si(Li) surface, is proposed to explain the observed differences in detector dead layer thickness. Electrode structures for optimum Si(Li) detector performance at low x-ray energies are discussed. 18 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab

  18. Modelling of the small pixel effect in gallium arsenide X-ray imaging detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Sellin, P J

    1999-01-01

    A Monte Carlo simulation has been carried out to investigate the small pixel effect in highly pixellated X-ray imaging detectors fabricated from semi-insulating gallium arsenide. The presence of highly non-uniform weighting fields in detectors with a small pixel geometry causes the majority of the induced signal to be generated when the moving charges are close to the pixellated contacts. The response of GaAs X-ray imaging detectors is further complicated by the presence of charge trapping, particularly of electrons. In this work detectors are modelled with a pixel pitch of 40 and 150 mu m, and with thicknesses of 300 and 500 mu m. Pulses induced in devices with 40 mu m pixels are due almost totally to the movement of the lightly-trapped holes and can exhibit significantly higher charge collection efficiencies than detectors with large electrodes, in which electron trapping is significant. Details of the charge collection efficiencies as a function of interaction depth in the detector and of the incident phot...

  19. Oblique incidence effects in direct x-ray detectors: A first-order approximation using a physics-based analytical model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badano, Aldo; Freed, Melanie; Fang Yuan

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The authors describe the modifications to a previously developed analytical model of indirect CsI:Tl-based detector response required for studying oblique x-ray incidence effects in direct semiconductor-based detectors. This first-order approximation analysis allows the authors to describe the associated degradation in resolution in direct detectors and compare the predictions to the published data for indirect detectors. Methods: The proposed model is based on a physics-based analytical description developed by Freed et al. [''A fast, angle-dependent, analytical model of CsI detector response for optimization of 3D x-ray breast imaging systems,'' Med. Phys. 37(6), 2593-2605 (2010)] that describes detector response functions for indirect detectors and oblique incident x rays. The model, modified in this work to address direct detector response, describes the dependence of the response with x-ray energy, thickness of the transducer layer, and the depth-dependent blur and collection efficiency. Results: The authors report the detector response functions for indirect and direct detector models for typical thicknesses utilized in clinical systems for full-field digital mammography (150 μm for indirect CsI:Tl and 200 μm for a-Se direct detectors). The results suggest that the oblique incidence effect in a semiconductor detector differs from that in indirect detectors in two ways: The direct detector model produces a sharper overall PRF compared to the response corresponding to the indirect detector model for normal x-ray incidence and a larger relative increase in blur along the x-ray incidence direction compared to that found in indirect detectors with respect to the response at normal incidence angles. Conclusions: Compared to the effect seen in indirect detectors, the direct detector model exhibits a sharper response at normal x-ray incidence and a larger relative increase in blur along the x-ray incidence direction with respect to the blur in the

  20. Signs of cosmic rays in gravitational wave detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavares, Denis Borgarelli

    2010-01-01

    One of the phenomena predicted by Einstein in the derivation of general relativity is the existence of small perturbations of the metric that he named gravitational waves. As they travel through space oscillates the space-time according to its polarization. This is the only major prediction of general relativity not yet proven completely. The small signal generated by the passage of a gravitational wave compared to the noise in the system of detection makes their direct detection one challenge of modern science. In this paper we study the noise generated by cosmic rays in the gravitational antenna Mario Schenberg, located in the city of Sao Paulo. Single muons and hadrons flux measurements held in the northern hemisphere were used to calculate the expected flux of these particles in the city of Sao Paulo. The calculation of the energy deposited in the detector of gravitational waves from cosmic rays was performed by Monte Carlo simulations using Geant4. The transport of muons and protons, with several energy and some different angles of incidence, across the building and the resonant sphere was simulated. We developed a thermo-acoustic model, called multi-point, suitable for calculating the energy deposited in the normal modes from the energy deposited on the sphere by elementary particles. With these results we calculate the expected rate of cosmic ray signals in the main detection mode of gravitational waves, nl = 12, of the Mario Schenberg detector, for temperatures T noise between 10 -5 and 10 -7 K. The results showed for the designed for 4.2 K sensitivity of the Mario Schenberg detector that the rate of signals due to cosmic rays is very small, being around 5 events per day. However, when it will reach the quantum limit will be needed a more detailed analysis of the antenna signal output, since the expected number of cosmic ray noise increases considerably, reaching about 250 signals per day. (author)

  1. Dosimeter incorporating radiophotoluminescent detectors for thermal neutrons and γ-rays in n-γ fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salem, Y.O. [Groupe RaMsEs, Institut Pluridisciplinaire Hubert Curien (IPHC), UMR 7178 CNRS/IN2P3, 23 rue du Loess, BP 28, F-67037 Strasbourg Cedex 2 (France); Nachab, A., E-mail: a.nachab@uca.ma [Département de physique, Faculté Poly-disciplinaire, Université Cadi Ayyad, Route Sidi Bouzid BP 4162, 46000 Safi (Morocco); Roy, C.; Nourreddine, A. [Groupe RaMsEs, Institut Pluridisciplinaire Hubert Curien (IPHC), UMR 7178 CNRS/IN2P3, 23 rue du Loess, BP 28, F-67037 Strasbourg Cedex 2 (France)

    2016-10-15

    We have developed a dosimeter associating different neutron converters with two radiophotoluminescent detectors to measure thermal neutrons and γ-rays in a mixed n-γ field. Tests show that the H{sup ∗}(10) and H{sub p}(10) responses to thermal neutrons and γ-rays are linear with detection limits lower than 0.4 mSv. The angular dependence of the dosimeter response is satisfactory and the influence of a phantom on the results is examined.

  2. Fast photoconductor CdTe detectors for synchrotron x-ray studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Sung Shik; Faurie, J.P.; Huang Qiang; Rodricks, B.

    1993-09-01

    The Advanced Photon Source will be that brightest source of synchrotron x-rays when it becomes operational in 1996. During normal operation, the ring will be filled with 20 bunches of positrons with an interbunch spacing of 177 ns and a bunch width of 119 ps. To perform experiments with x-rays generated by positrons on these time scales one needs extremely high speed detectors. To achieve the necessary high speed, we are developing MBE-grown CdTe-base photoconductive position sensitive array detectors. The arrays fabricated have 64 pixels with a gap of 100 μm between pixels. The high speed response of the devices was tested using a short pulse laser. X-ray static measurements were performed using an x-ray tube and synchrotron radiation to study the device's response to flux and wavelength changes. This paper presents the response of the devices to some of these tests and discusses different physics aspects to be considered when designing high speed detectors

  3. Fine-scale spatial response of CdZnTe radiation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunett, B.A.; Van Scyoc, J.M.; Hilton, N.R.; Lund, J.C.; James, R.B.; Schlesinger, T.E.

    1998-01-01

    Several studies have suggested that the uniformity of Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) detectors play an important role in their performance when operated as gamma-ray spectrometers. However the detailed gamma response of simple planar detectors as a function of position over the device area is largely unknown. To address this issue the authors have built a system capable of measuring the detector response with a resolution of ∼250 (micro)m. The system consists of a highly collimated (∼200 (micro)m) photon source (<150 kev) scanned over the detector using a computer controlled two-axis translation stage. Fifteen samples configured as planar detectors were examined with the new apparatus. The material grade of the detectors examined varied from counter to select discriminator. Two classes of spatial response variation were observed and are presented here. Infrared (IR) transmission images were also acquired for each sample and correlation between features in the pulse height spectrum and crystalline defects were observed

  4. Recent developments in X-ray imaging detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Moy, J P

    2000-01-01

    The replacement of the radiographic film in medical imaging has been the driving force in X-ray imaging developments. It requires a approx 40 cm wide detector to cover all examinations, an equivalent noise level of 1-5 X-ray quanta per pixel, and spatial resolution in the range 100-150 mu m. The need for entirely electronic imaging equipments has fostered the development of many X-ray detectors, most of them based on an array of amorphous silicon pixels, which is the only technology capable to achieve such large areas. Essentially, two concepts have been implemented: - intermediate conversion of X-rays to light by a scintillator, detected by an array of light sensitive pixels, comprising a photodiode and a switching device, either a TFT or a diode. - conversion into electron-hole pairs in a photoconductor, collected by an array of electrodes and switches. In both cases, charge amplifiers read the generated charges line by line. Scintillator and photoconductor-based systems are now close to production. They ac...

  5. Photon response of silicon diode neutron detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCall, R.C.; Jenkins, T.M.; Oliver, G.D. Jr.

    1976-07-01

    The photon response of silicon diode neutron detectors was studied to solve the problem on detecting neutrons in the presence of high energy photons at accelerator neutron sources. For the experiment Si diodes, Si discs, and moderated activation foil detectors were used. The moderated activation foil detector consisted of a commercial moderator and indium foils 2'' in diameter and approximately 2.7 grams each. The moderator is a cylinder of low-density polyethylene 6 1 / 4 '' in diameter by 6 1 / 16 '' long covered with 0.020'' of cadmium. Neutrons are detected by the reaction 115 In (n,γ) 116 In(T/sub 1 / 2 / = 54 min). Photons cannot be detected directly but photoneutrons produced in the moderator assembly can cause a photon response. The Si discs were thin slices of single-crystal Si about 1.4 mils thick and 1'' in diameter which were used as activation detectors, subsequently being counted on a thin-window pancake G.M. counter. The Si diode fast neutron dosimeter 5422, manufactured by AB Atomenergi in Studsvik, Sweden, consists of a superdoped silicon wafer with a base width of 0.050 inches between two silver contacts coated with 2 mm of epoxy. For this experiment, the technique of measuring the percent change of voltage versus dose was used. Good precision was obtained using both unirradiated and preirradiated diodes. All diodes, calibrated against 252 CF in air,were read out 48 hours after irradiation to account for any room temperature annealing. Results are presented and discussed

  6. Do cosmic rays perturb the operation of a large resonant spherical detector of gravitational waves?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pizzella, G.

    1999-01-01

    The sensitivity of resonant gravitational wave detectors is reviewed. The effect of cosmic rays on a large spherical detector is considered. It is shown that the sensibility to short bursts, to monochromatic and to stochastic GW is not significantly degraded by cosmic rays. For a two-detector experiment, only one detector needs to be installed in an underground laboratory. This supports the idea to install a resonant detector at sea-level near a GW interferometer

  7. Do cosmic rays perturb the operation of a large resonant spherical detector of gravitational waves?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pizzella, G. [Rome Univ. Tor Vergata, Rome (Italy). Physics Dept.; Inst. for Nuclear Physics, Frascati, RM (Italy)

    1999-07-01

    The sensitivity of resonant gravitational wave detectors is reviewed. The effect of cosmic rays on a large spherical detector is considered. It is shown that the sensibility to short bursts, to monochromatic and to stochastic GW is not significantly degraded by cosmic rays. For a two-detector experiment, only one detector needs to be installed in an underground laboratory. This supports the idea to install a resonant detector at sea-level near a GW interferometer.

  8. Computer simulation of the CSPAD, ePix10k, and RayonixMX170HS X-ray detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tina, Adrienne

    2015-08-21

    The invention of free-electron lasers (FELs) has opened a door to an entirely new level of scientific research. The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory is an X-ray FEL that houses several instruments, each with its own unique X-ray applications. This light source is revolutionary in that while its properties allow for a whole new range of scientific opportunities, it also poses numerous challenges. For example, the intensity of a focused X-ray beam is enough to damage a sample in one mere pulse; however, the pulse speed and extreme brightness of the source together are enough to obtain enough information about that sample, so that no further measurements are necessary. An important device in the radiation detection process, particularly for X-ray imaging, is the detector. The power of the LCLS X-rays has instigated a need for better performing detectors. The research conducted for this project consisted of the study of X-ray detectors to imitate their behaviors in a computer program. The analysis of the Rayonix MX170-HS, CSPAD, and ePix10k in particular helped to understand their properties. This program simulated the interaction of X-ray photons with these detectors to discern the patterns of their responses. A scientist’s selection process of a detector for a specific experiment is simplified from the characterization of the detectors in the program.

  9. Portable X-Ray, K-Edge Heavy Metal Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fricke, V.

    1999-01-01

    The X-Ray, K-Edge Heavy Metal Detection System was designed and built by Ames Laboratory and the Center for Nondestructive Evaluation at Iowa State University. The system uses a C-frame inspection head with an X-ray tube mounted on one side of the frame and an imaging unit and a high purity germanium detector on the other side. the inspection head is portable and can be easily positioned around ventilation ducts and pipes up to 36 inches in diameter. Wide angle and narrow beam X-ray shots are used to identify the type of holdup material and the amount of the contaminant. Precise assay data can be obtained within minutes of the interrogation. A profile of the containerized holdup material and a permanent record of the measurement are immediately available

  10. Evaluation of K x-ray escape and crosstalk in CdTe detectors and multi-channel detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohtsuchi, Tetsuro; Ohmori, Koichi; Tsutsui, Hiroshi; Baba, Sueki

    1995-01-01

    The simple structure of CdTe semiconductor detectors facilitates their downsizing, and their possible application to radiographic sensors has been studied. The escape of K X-rays from these detectors increases with reduction of their dimensions and affects the measurements of X- and gamma-ray spectra. K X-rays also produce crosstalk in multi-channel detectors with adjacent channels. Therefore, K X-rays which escape from the detector elements degrade both the precision of energy spectra and spatial resolution. The ratios of escape peak integrated counts to total photon counts for various sizes of CdTe single detectors were calculated for gamma rays using the Monte Carlo method. Also, escape and crosstalk ratios were simulated for the CdTe multi-channel detectors. The theoretical results were tested experimentally for 59.54-keV gamma rays from a 241 Am radioactive source. Results showed that escape ratios for single detectors were strongly dependent on element size and thickness. The escape and crosstalk ratios increased with closer channel pitch. The calculated results showed a good agreement with the experimental data. The calculations made it clear that K X-rays which escaped to neighboring channels induced crosstalk more frequently at smaller channel pitch in multichannel detectors. A radiation shielding grid which blocked incident photons between the boundary channels was also tested by experiment and by calculation. It was effective in reducing the probability of escape and crosstalk

  11. Improvement of the detector resolution in X-ray spectrometry by using the maximum entropy method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernández, Jorge E.; Scot, Viviana; Giulio, Eugenio Di; Sabbatucci, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    In every X-ray spectroscopy measurement the influence of the detection system causes loss of information. Different mechanisms contribute to form the so-called detector response function (DRF): the detector efficiency, the escape of photons as a consequence of photoelectric or scattering interactions, the spectrum smearing due to the energy resolution, and, in solid states detectors (SSD), the charge collection artifacts. To recover the original spectrum, it is necessary to remove the detector influence by solving the so-called inverse problem. The maximum entropy unfolding technique solves this problem by imposing a set of constraints, taking advantage of the known a priori information and preserving the positive-defined character of the X-ray spectrum. This method has been included in the tool UMESTRAT (Unfolding Maximum Entropy STRATegy), which adopts a semi-automatic strategy to solve the unfolding problem based on a suitable combination of the codes MAXED and GRAVEL, developed at PTB. In the past UMESTRAT proved the capability to resolve characteristic peaks which were revealed as overlapped by a Si SSD, giving good qualitative results. In order to obtain quantitative results, UMESTRAT has been modified to include the additional constraint of the total number of photons of the spectrum, which can be easily determined by inverting the diagonal efficiency matrix. The features of the improved code are illustrated with some examples of unfolding from three commonly used SSD like Si, Ge, and CdTe. The quantitative unfolding can be considered as a software improvement of the detector resolution. - Highlights: • Radiation detection introduces distortions in X- and Gamma-ray spectrum measurements. • UMESTRAT is a graphical tool to unfold X- and Gamma-ray spectra. • UMESTRAT uses the maximum entropy method. • UMESTRAT’s new version produces unfolded spectra with quantitative meaning. • UMESTRAT is a software tool to improve the detector resolution.

  12. Photon Counting Energy Dispersive Detector Arrays for X-ray Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwanczyk, Jan S; Nygård, Einar; Meirav, Oded; Arenson, Jerry; Barber, William C; Hartsough, Neal E; Malakhov, Nail; Wessel, Jan C

    2009-01-01

    The development of an innovative detector technology for photon-counting in X-ray imaging is reported. This new generation of detectors, based on pixellated cadmium telluride (CdTe) and cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detector arrays electrically connected to application specific integrated circuits (ASICs) for readout, will produce fast and highly efficient photon-counting and energy-dispersive X-ray imaging. There are a number of applications that can greatly benefit from these novel imagers including mammography, planar radiography, and computed tomography (CT). Systems based on this new detector technology can provide compositional analysis of tissue through spectroscopic X-ray imaging, significantly improve overall image quality, and may significantly reduce X-ray dose to the patient. A very high X-ray flux is utilized in many of these applications. For example, CT scanners can produce ~100 Mphotons/mm(2)/s in the unattenuated beam. High flux is required in order to collect sufficient photon statistics in the measurement of the transmitted flux (attenuated beam) during the very short time frame of a CT scan. This high count rate combined with a need for high detection efficiency requires the development of detector structures that can provide a response signal much faster than the transit time of carriers over the whole detector thickness. We have developed CdTe and CZT detector array structures which are 3 mm thick with 16×16 pixels and a 1 mm pixel pitch. These structures, in the two different implementations presented here, utilize either a small pixel effect or a drift phenomenon. An energy resolution of 4.75% at 122 keV has been obtained with a 30 ns peaking time using discrete electronics and a (57)Co source. An output rate of 6×10(6) counts per second per individual pixel has been obtained with our ASIC readout electronics and a clinical CT X-ray tube. Additionally, the first clinical CT images, taken with several of our prototype photon-counting and

  13. In-line X-ray lensless imaging with lithium fluoride film detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonfigli, F.; Cecilia, A.; Bateni, S. Heidari; Nichelatti, E.; Pelliccia, D.; Somma, F.; Vagovic, P.; Vincenti, M.A.; Baumbach, T.; Montereali, R.M.

    2013-01-01

    In this work, we present preliminary in-line X-ray lensless projection imaging results at a synchrotron facility by using novel solid-state detectors based on non-destructive readout of photoluminescent colour centres in lithium fluoride thin films. The peculiarities of LiF radiation detectors are high spatial resolution on a large field of view, wide dynamic range, versatility and simplicity of use. These properties offered the opportunity to test a broadband X-ray synchrotron source for lensless projection imaging experiments at the TopoTomo beamline of the ANKA synchrotron facility by using a white beam spectrum (3–40 keV). Edge-enhancement effects were observed for the first time on a test object; they are discussed and compared with simulations, on the basis of the colour centre photoluminescence linear response found in the investigated irradiation conditions. -- Highlights: ► We performed broadband X-ray imaging at synchrotron by novel LiF imaging detectors. ► X-ray phase contrast experiments on LiF crystals and thin films were performed. ► Photoluminescent high-quality X-images on a LiF film only 1 μm thick were obtained. ► Edge-enhancement effects were detected and compared with simulations. ► A linearity of colour centre fluorescence response of LiF film was found

  14. Comparison of experimental and theoretical efficiency of HPGe X-ray detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohanty, B.P.; Balouria, P.; Garg, M.L.; Nandi, T.K.; Mittal, V.K.; Govil, I.M.

    2008-01-01

    The low energy high purity germanium (HPGe) detectors are being increasingly used for the quantitative estimation of elements using X-ray spectrometric techniques. The softwares used for quantitative estimation normally evaluate model based efficiency of detector using manufacturer supplied detector physical parameters. The present work shows that the manufacturer supplied detector parameters for low energy HPGe detectors need to be verified by comparing model based efficiency with the experimental ones. This is particularly crucial for detectors with ion implanted P type contacts

  15. Self-propelled x-ray flaw detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ershov, L.S.; Krasilnikov, S.B.; Lozovoi, L.N.; Losev, J.F.; Morgovsky, L.Y.; Pelix, E.A.; Khakimyanov, R.R.

    1988-01-01

    A self-propelled X-ray flaw detector for radiographic inspection of welded joints in pipelines comprises a carriage mounting a motor, a detector having two Geiger counters, a pulsed X-ray generator, and an exposure and carriage electronic control system. A memory unit in the control system has four storage elements containing information about the motion of the carriage. As the carriage moves in direction A, first one and then the other of the Geiger counters receives radiation from an isotope source positioned near a joint, and by means of logic circuitry in the control system, the information in the storage elements is modified to stop the carriage and to operate a timer to expose the weld. During exposure the X-rays may interfere with the information in the storage elements, but by means of a square-wave generator and the logic circuitry, the stored information is correctly reset in order to eliminate false operation of the memory unit. (author)

  16. Polarization phenomena in Al/p-CdTe/Pt X-ray detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Principato, F., E-mail: fabio.principato@unipa.it; Turturici, A.A.; Gallo, M.; Abbene, L.

    2013-12-01

    Over the last decades, CdTe detectors are widely used for the development of room temperature X-ray and gamma ray spectrometers. Typically, high resolution CdTe detectors are fabricated with blocking contacts (indium and aluminum) ensuring low leakage currents and high electric field for optimum charge collection. As well known, time instability under bias voltage (termed as polarization) is the major drawback of CdTe diode detectors. Polarization phenomena cause a progressive degradation of the spectroscopic performance with time, due to hole trapping and detrapping from deep acceptors levels. In this work, we studied the polarization phenomenon on new Al/p-CdTe/Pt detectors, manufactured by Acrorad (Japan), through electrical and spectroscopic approaches. In particular, we investigated on the time degradation of the spectroscopic response of the detectors at different temperatures, voltages and energies. Current transient measurements were also performed to better understand the properties of the deep acceptor levels and their correlation with the polarization effect.

  17. Improvement of an X-ray imaging detector based on a scintillating guides screen

    CERN Document Server

    Badel, X; Linnros, J; Kleimann, P; Froejdh, C; Petersson, C S

    2002-01-01

    An X-ray imaging detector has been developed for dental applications. The principle of this detector is based on application of a silicon charge coupled device covered by a scintillating wave-guide screen. Previous studies of such a detector showed promising results concerning the spatial resolution but low performance in terms of signal to noise ratio (SNR) and sensitivity. Recent results confirm the wave-guiding properties of the matrix and show improvement of the detector in terms of response uniformity, sensitivity and SNR. The present study is focussed on the fabrication of the scintillating screen where the principal idea is to fill a matrix of Si pores with a CsI scintillator. The photoluminescence technique was used to prove the wave-guiding property of the matrix and to inspect the filling uniformity of the pores. The final detector was characterized by X-ray evaluation in terms of spatial resolution, light output and SNR. A sensor with a spatial resolution of 9 LP/mm and a SNR over 50 has been achie...

  18. X-ray Peltier cooled detectors for X-ray fluorescence analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loupilov, A.; Sokolov, A.; Gostilo, V.

    2001-01-01

    The recent results on development of X-ray Si(Li), Si-planar and CdTe p-i-n detectors cooled by Peltier coolers for fabrication of laboratory and portable XRF analysers for different applications are discussed. Low detection limits of XRF analysers are provided by increasing of detectors sensitive surface; improvement of their spectrometrical characteristics; decreasing of front-end-electronics noise level; Peltier coolers and vacuum chambers cooling modes optimization. Solution of all mentioned tasks allowed to develop Peltier cooled detectors with the following performances: (1.) Si(Li) detectors: S=20 mm 2 , thickness=3.5 mm, 175 eV (5.9 keV), 430 eV (59.6 keV); S=100 mm 2 ; thickness=4.5 mm, 270 eV (5.9 keV), 485 eV (59.6 keV). (2.) Si-planar detector: S=10 mm 2 , thickness=0.4 mm, 230 eV (5.9 keV), 460 eV (59.6 keV). (3.) CdTe p-i-n detectors: S=16 mm 2 , thickness=0.5 mm, 350 eV (5.9 keV), 585 eV (59.6 keV). S=16 mm 2 , thickness=1.2 mm, 310 eV (5.9 keV), 600 eV (59.6 keV). Advantages and disadvantages of all types of detectors for X-ray fluorescence analysis are compared. Spectra are presented. Application of different XRF analysers based on developed detectors in medicine, environmental science, industry, cryminalistics and history of art are demonstrated

  19. X-ray Peltier cooled detectors for X-ray fluorescence analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loupilov, A.; Sokolov, A.; Gostilo, V.

    2000-01-01

    The recent results on development of X-ray Si(Li), Si-planar and CdTe p-i- n detectors cooled by Peltier coolers for fabrication of laboratory and portable XRF analysers for different applications are discussed. Low detection limits of XRF analysers are provided by increasing of detectors sensitive surface; improvement of their spectrometrical characteristics; decreasing of front-end-electronics noise level; Peltier coolers and vacuum chambers cooling modes optimization. Solution of all mentioned tasks allowed to develop Peltier cooled detectors with the following performances: (1) Si(Li) detectors: S = 20 mm 2 , thickness = 3.5 mm, 175 eV (5.9 keV), 430 eV (59.6 keV); S = 100 mm 2 ; thickness = 4.5 mm, 270 eV (5.9 keV), 485 eV (59,6 keV). (2) Si-planar detector: S = 10 mm 2 , thickness = 0.4 mm, 230 eV (5.9 keV), 460 eV (59.6 keV). (3) CdTe p-i-n detectors: S = 16 mm 2 , thickness 0.5 mm, 350 eV (5.9 keV), 585 eV (59.6 keV). S = 16 mm 2 , thickness = 1.2 mm, 310 eV (5.9 keV), 600 eV (59.6 keV). Advantages and disadvantages of all types of detectors for X-ray fluorescence analysis are compared. Spectra are presented. Application of different XRF analysers based on developed detectors in medicine, environmental science, industry, criminalistics and history of art are demonstrated. (author)

  20. Dosimetric properties of a radiochromic gel detector for diagnostic X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bero, M.A.

    2007-01-01

    The gel dosimetry method was found to be capable of addressing complicated issues related to dose measurements particularly in modern sophisticated radiotherapy applications. The Ferrous-sulphate Xylenol-orange and Gelatin (FXG) radiochromic gel dosemeter is one of the systems used for such applications. Some chemical dosemeters show different responses for low- and medium-energy X-rays in comparison with high-energy γ-photons. The energy and dose rate dependence of the FXG dose response was examined. In addition to the detector response, other important dosimetric properties of the system were investigated for different X-ray beam qualities with tube voltages in the range 100-300 kV. An orthovoltage X-ray therapy unit was used to irradiate standard sized samples of FXG from different batches for radiation doses in the range 0-20 Gy

  1. (Li) detector characteristics on the accuracy in X-ray analysis using the

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study has been carried out to show how variations in Si(Li) detector characteristics affect the accuracy of X-ray spectra evaluation. The detector characteristics investigated are Be window thickness, Au layer, Si dead layer and Si Detector Sensitive volume. For each of the detector parameters, different thickness values ...

  2. Wide Bandgap Semiconductor Detector Optimization for Flash X-Ray Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roecker, Caleb Daniel [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Schirato, Richard C. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-11-17

    Charge trapping, resulting in a decreased and spatially dependent electric field, has long been a concern for wide bandgap semiconductor detectors. While significant work has been performed to characterize this degradation at varying temperatures and radiation environments, this work concentrates upon examining the event-to-event response in a flash X-ray environment. The following work investigates if charge trapping is a problem for CZT detectors, with particular emphasis on flash X-ray radiation fields at cold temperatures. Results are compared to a non-flash radiation field, using an Am-241 alpha source and similar temperature transitions. Our ability to determine if a response change occurred was hampered by the repeatability of our flash X-ray systems; a small response change was observed with the Am-241 source. Due to contrast of these results, we are in the process of revisiting the Am-241 measurements in the presence of a high radiation environment. If the response change is more pronounced in the high radiation environment, a similar test will be performed in the flash X-ray environment.

  3. A CCD-based area detector for X-ray crystallography using synchrotron and laboratory sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, W.C.; Li Youli; Stanton, M.; Xie Yuanhui; O'Mara, D.; Kalata, K.

    1993-01-01

    The design and characteristics of a CCD-based area detector suitable for X-ray crystallographic studies using both synchrotron and laboratory sources are described. The active area is 75 mm in diameter, the FWHM of the point response function is 0.20 mm, and for Bragg peaks the dynamic range is 900 and the DQE ∼0.3. The 1320x1035-pixel Kodak CCD is read out into an 8 Mbyte memory system in 0.14 s and digitized to 12 bits. X-ray crystallographic data collected at the NSLS synchrotron from cubic insulin crystals are presented. (orig.)

  4. Filter-fluorescer x-ray spectrometer using solid state detectors for γ-ray background reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokoi, Takashi; Kitagawa, Yoneyoshi; Shiraga, Hiroyuki; Matsunaga, Hirohide; Kato, Yoshiaki; Yamanaka, Chiyoe.

    1986-01-01

    Filter-fluorescer x-ray spectrometer using solid state photo-detectors instead of the photomultiplier tubes in order to reduce the γ-ray background noise is reported. A significant reduction of the γ-ray background noise is expected, because solid state photo-detectors are very small in size compared with the photomultiplier tubes. It has been confirmed that the γ-ray background is reduced in the target irradiation experiments with the Gekko MII glass laser. (author)

  5. Gamma ray detector for solar maximum mission (SMM) of NASA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunner, W.; Brichzin, K.; Sach, E.

    1981-06-01

    For NASA's Project Solar Maximum Mission-SMM (launch 14.2.80) a Gamma Ray Detector was developed, manufactured and tested to measure solar high energetic Gamma rays and Neutron fluxes within the energy range 10-160 MeV, 4,43 MeV amd 2,23 MeV. The main components of the sensor are 7 NaI crystals 3 x 3 and a CsI crystal 30 cm diameter x 7,5 cm. The rejection of charged particles is done by two plasitc scintillators and 4 CsI-shields. From the beginning of the mission the experiment is working fully successfull. (orig.) [de

  6. P-type silicon surface barrier detector used for x-ray dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Hisao; Hatakeyama, Satoru; Norimura, Toshiyuki; Tsuchiya, Takehiko

    1983-01-01

    Responses to X-rays of a P-type surface barrier detector fabricated in our laboratory were studied, taking into consideration the dependence on the temperature in order to examine its applicability to dosimetry of short-range radiation. The study was also made in the case of N-type surface barrier detector. At room temperature, the short-circuit current increased linearly with exposure dose rate (15 - 50 R/min) for N- and P-type detectors. The open-circuit voltage showed a nonlinear dependence. With increasing temperature, the short-circuit current for the N-type detector was approximately constant up to 30 0 C and then decreased, though the open-circuit voltage decreased linearly. For the P- type detector, both open-circuit voltage and short-circuit current decreased almost linearly with increasing temperature. While a P-type detector is still open to some improvements, these results indicate that it can be used as a dosimeter. (author)

  7. Semiconductor detectors in current energy dispersive X-ray spectral analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Betin, J; Zhabin, E; Krampit, I; Smirnov, V

    1980-04-01

    A review is presented of the properties of semiconductor detectors and of the possibilities stemming therefrom of using the detectors in X-ray spectral analysis in industries, in logging, in ecology and environmental control, in medicine, etc.

  8. High-Resolution Gamma-Ray Imaging Measurements Using Externally Segmented Germanium Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callas, J.; Mahoney, W.; Skelton, R.; Varnell, L.; Wheaton, W.

    1994-01-01

    Fully two-dimensional gamma-ray imaging with simultaneous high-resolution spectroscopy has been demonstrated using an externally segmented germanium sensor. The system employs a single high-purity coaxial detector with its outer electrode segmented into 5 distinct charge collection regions and a lead coded aperture with a uniformly redundant array (URA) pattern. A series of one-dimensional responses was collected around 511 keV while the system was rotated in steps through 180 degrees. A non-negative, linear least-squares algorithm was then employed to reconstruct a 2-dimensional image. Corrections for multiple scattering in the detector, and the finite distance of source and detector are made in the reconstruction process.

  9. Modeling the frequency-dependent detective quantum efficiency of photon-counting x-ray detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stierstorfer, Karl

    2018-01-01

    To find a simple model for the frequency-dependent detective quantum efficiency (DQE) of photon-counting detectors in the low flux limit. Formula for the spatial cross-talk, the noise power spectrum and the DQE of a photon-counting detector working at a given threshold are derived. Parameters are probabilities for types of events like single counts in the central pixel, double counts in the central pixel and a neighboring pixel or single count in a neighboring pixel only. These probabilities can be derived in a simple model by extensive use of Monte Carlo techniques: The Monte Carlo x-ray propagation program MOCASSIM is used to simulate the energy deposition from the x-rays in the detector material. A simple charge cloud model using Gaussian clouds of fixed width is used for the propagation of the electric charge generated by the primary interactions. Both stages are combined in a Monte Carlo simulation randomizing the location of impact which finally produces the required probabilities. The parameters of the charge cloud model are fitted to the spectral response to a polychromatic spectrum measured with our prototype detector. Based on the Monte Carlo model, the DQE of photon-counting detectors as a function of spatial frequency is calculated for various pixel sizes, photon energies, and thresholds. The frequency-dependent DQE of a photon-counting detector in the low flux limit can be described with an equation containing only a small set of probabilities as input. Estimates for the probabilities can be derived from a simple model of the detector physics. © 2017 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  10. CONTINUING THE DEVELOPMENT OF A 100 FEMTOSECOND X-RAY DETECTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zenghu Chang

    2005-01-01

    The detector is an x-ray streak camera running in accumulation mode for time resolved x-ray studies at the existing third generation synchrotron facilities and will also be used for the development and applications of the fourth generation x-ray sources. We have made significant progress on both the detector development and its applications at Synchrotron facilities

  11. X-ray detectors at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blaj, Gabriel; Caragiulo, Pietro; Carini, Gabriella; Carron, Sebastian; Dragone, Angelo; Freytag, Dietrich; Haller, Gunther; Hart, Philip; Hasi, Jasmine; Herbst, Ryan; Herrmann, Sven; Kenney, Chris; Markovic, Bojan; Nishimura, Kurtis; Osier, Shawn; Pines, Jack; Reese, Benjamin; Segal, Julie; Tomada, Astrid; Weaver, Matt

    2015-01-01

    This paper offers an overview of area detectors developed for use at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) with particular emphasis on their impact on science. The experimental needs leading to the development of second-generation cameras for LCLS are discussed and the new detector prototypes are presented. Free-electron lasers (FELs) present new challenges for camera development compared with conventional light sources. At SLAC a variety of technologies are being used to match the demands of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) and to support a wide range of scientific applications. In this paper an overview of X-ray detector design requirements at FELs is presented and the various cameras in use at SLAC are described for the benefit of users planning experiments or analysts looking at data. Features and operation of the CSPAD camera, which is currently deployed at LCLS, are discussed, and the ePix family, a new generation of cameras under development at SLAC, is introduced

  12. Pixelated transmission-mode diamond X-ray detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Tianyi; Ding, Wenxiang; Gaowei, Mengjia; De Geronimo, Gianluigi; Bohon, Jen; Smedley, John; Muller, Erik

    2015-11-01

    Fabrication and testing of a prototype transmission-mode pixelated diamond X-ray detector (pitch size 60-100 µm), designed to simultaneously measure the flux, position and morphology of an X-ray beam in real time, are described. The pixel density is achieved by lithographically patterning vertical stripes on the front and horizontal stripes on the back of an electronic-grade chemical vapor deposition single-crystal diamond. The bias is rotated through the back horizontal stripes and the current is read out on the front vertical stripes at a rate of ∼ 1 kHz, which leads to an image sampling rate of ∼ 30 Hz. This novel signal readout scheme was tested at beamline X28C at the National Synchrotron Light Source (white beam, 5-15 keV) and at beamline G3 at the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (monochromatic beam, 11.3 keV) with incident beam flux ranges from 1.8 × 10(-2) to 90 W mm(-2). Test results show that the novel detector provides precise beam position (positional noise within 1%) and morphology information (error within 2%), with an additional software-controlled single channel mode providing accurate flux measurement (fluctuation within 1%).

  13. Energy Calibration of the Pixels of Spectral X-ray Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Panta, Raj Kumar; Bell, Stephen T; Anderson, Nigel G; Butler, Anthony P; Butler, Philip H

    2015-01-01

    The energy information acquired using spectral X-ray detectors allows noninvasive identification and characterization of chemical components of a material. To achieve this, it is important that the energy response of the detector is calibrated. The established techniques for energy calibration are not practical for routine use in pre-clinical or clinical research environment. This is due to the requirements of using monochromatic radiation sources such as synchrotron, radio-isotopes, and prohibitively long time needed to set up the equipment and make measurements. To address these limitations, we have developed an automated technique for calibrating the energy response of the pixels in a spectral X-ray detector that runs with minimal user intervention. This technique uses the X-ray tube voltage (kVp) as a reference energy, which is stepped through an energy range of interest. This technique locates the energy threshold where a pixel transitions from not-counting (off) to counting (on). Similarly, we have deve...

  14. Development of Ta-based Superconducting Tunnel Junction X-ray Detectors for Fluorescence XAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedrich, S.; Drury, O.; Hall, J.; Cantor, R.

    2009-01-01

    We are developing superconducting tunnel junction (STJ) soft X-ray detectors for chemical analysis of dilute samples by fluorescence-detected X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). Our 36-pixel Nb-based STJ spectrometer covers a solid angle (Omega)/4π ∼ 10 -3 , offers an energy resolution of ∼10-20 eV FWHM for energies up to ∼1 keV, and can be operated at total count rates of ∼10 6 counts/s. For increased quantum efficiency and cleaner response function, we have now started the development of Ta-based STJ detector arrays. Initial devices modeled after our Nb-based STJs have an energy resolution below 10 eV FWHM for X-ray energies below 1 keV, and pulse rise time discrimination can be used to improve their response function for energies up to several keV. We discuss the performance of the Ta-STJs and outline steps towards the next-generation of large STJ detector arrays with higher sensitivity.

  15. Numerical simulations on efficiency and measurement of capabilities of BGO detectors for high energy gamma ray

    CERN Document Server

    Wen Wan Xin

    2002-01-01

    The energy resolution and time resolution of two phi 75 x 100 BGO detectors for high energy gamma ray newly made were measured with sup 1 sup 3 sup 7 Cs and sup 6 sup 0 Co resources. The two characteristic gamma rays of high energy emitted from the thermal neutron capture of germanium in BGO crystal were used for the energy calibration of gamma spectra. The intrinsic photopeak efficiency, single escape probability and double escape probabilities of BGO detectors in photon energy range of 4-30 MeV are numerically calculated with GEANT code. The real count response and count ratio of the uniformly distributed incident photons in energy range of 0-30 MeV are also calculated. The distortion of gamma spectra caused by the photon energy loss extension to lower energy in detection medium is discussed

  16. A study of gamma-ray bursts and a new detector for gamma-ray astronomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, J.N.

    1979-09-01

    Three gamma-ray experiments flown on balloons between August 1975 and August 1976 are described in detail. The successful Transatlantic balloon flight enabled a rate of 3 bursts year -1 with energies > 7 x 10 -7 ergs cm -2 to be established. This result is discussed in the light of other work. The choice of γ-ray detector for optimum sensitivity is presented. In addition various techniques for determining the arrival direction of gamma-ray bursts are compared. A new balloon borne γ-ray burst telescope is proposed. The design, testing and results of the beam calibration of a new drift chamber detector system for high energy (> 50 MeV) γ-rays are presented. A projected angular resolution of 0.8 0 was obtained at 300 MeV. Techniques for the measurement of γ-ray energies are discussed in relation to this instrument. Finally the use of drift chambers in an integrated free flying satellite is illustrated, and the expected performance is presented. (author)

  17. X-ray and gamma-ray standards for detector calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-09-01

    The IAEA established a Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) on the Measurements and Evaluation of X- and Gamma-Ray Standards for Detector Efficiency Calibration in 1986 with the aim of alleviating the generation of such discrepancies. Within the framework of this CRP, representatives of nine research groups from six Member States and one international organization performed a number of precise measurements and systematic in-depth evaluations of the required decay data. They have also contributed to the development of evaluation methodology and measurement techniques, and stimulated a number of such studies at laboratories not directly involved in the IAEA project. The results of the work of the CRP, which was finished in 1990, are presented in this report. Recommended values of half-lives and photon emission probabilities are given for a carefully selected set of radionuclides that are suitable for detector efficiency calibration (X-rays from 5 to 90 keV and gamma-rays from 30 to about 3000 keV). Detector efficiency calibration for higher gamma-ray energies (up to 14 MeV) is also considered. The evaluation procedures used to obtain the recommended values and their estimated uncertainties are reported, and a summary of the remaining discrepancies is given. Refs and tabs

  18. Comparison of Response Characteristics of High-Purity Germanium Detectors using Analog Versus Digital Processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luke, S J; Raschke, K

    2004-01-01

    In this article we will discuss some of the results of the response characteristics of High Purity germanium detectors using analog versus digital processing of the signals that are outputted from the detector. The discussion will focus on whether or not there is a significant difference in the response of the detector with digital electronics that it limits the ability of the detection system to get reasonable gamma ray spectrometric results. Particularly, whether or not the performance of the analysis code Pu600 is compromised

  19. Scintillation Detector for the Measurement of Ultra-Heavy Cosmic Rays on the Super-TIGER Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Link, Jason

    2011-01-01

    We discuss the design and construction of the scintillation detectors for the Super-TIGER experiment. Super-TIGER is a large-area (5.4sq m) balloon-borne experiment designed to measure the abundances of cosmic-ray nuclei between Z= 10 and Z=56. It is based on the successful TIGER experiment that flew in Antarctica in 2001 and 2003. Super-TIGER has three layers of scintillation detectors, two Cherenkov detectors and a scintillating fiber hodoscope. The scintillation detector employs four wavelength shifter bars surrounding the edges of the scintillator to collect the light from particles traversing the detector. PMTs are optically coupled at both ends of the bars for light collection. We report on laboratory performance of the scintillation counters using muons. In addition we discuss the design challenges and detector response over this broad charge range including the effect of scintilator saturation.

  20. Timing of gamma rays in coaxial germanium detector systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Ibiary, M.Y.

    1979-01-01

    A study is reported on the timing uncertainty in gamma ray coaxial germanium detector systems. The work deals with the zero cross over method which is widely used to reduce the dependence of the instant of timing on the radiation energy absorbed and on the position within the detector at which absorption takes place. It is found that the amplitude risetime compensated (ARC) method gives, under normal conditions, the best resolution at a specific energy. For higher energies, the resolution improves and there is no shift of the mean instant of timing. The method is therefore well suited for wide energy coverage. The parameters involved in implementing an ARC system for optimum performance at a specific energy are identified in terms of the preamplifier noise level and risetime. A trade off can be made between the resolutions at high and at low energies. The time resolution attained is given by means of a series of charts which use normalized dimensionless variables for ready application to any given case. Lithium compensated Ge detectors which normally operate under conditions of velocity saturation of the charge carriers by applying sufficient bias voltage create an electric field in excess of 1 kV/cm throughout the depleted region. High purity Ge detectors where velocity saturation may not be reached within certain parts of the depleted region are studied. Special attention is given to the probability of pulses being incorrectly timed because of their slow rise or small magnitude. Such incorrect timing is energy-dependent and results in a noticeable distortion of the timing spectrum that relates to a wide energy range. Limitations on system parameters to keep the probability of incorrect timing below a specified fraction are given

  1. Calculating the Responses of Self-Powered Radiation Detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, D. A.

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. The aim of this research is to review and develop the theoretical understanding of the responses of Self -Powered Radiation Detectors (SPDs) in Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs). Two very different models are considered. A simple analytic model of the responses of SPDs to neutrons and gamma radiation is presented. It is a development of the work of several previous authors and has been incorporated into a computer program (called GENSPD), the predictions of which have been compared with experimental and theoretical results reported in the literature. Generally, the comparisons show reasonable consistency; where there is poor agreement explanations have been sought and presented. Two major limitations of analytic models have been identified; neglect of current generation in insulators and over-simplified electron transport treatments. Both of these are developed in the current work. A second model based on the Explicit Representation of Radiation Sources and Transport (ERRST) is presented and evaluated for several SPDs in a PWR at beginning of life. The model incorporates simulation of the production and subsequent transport of neutrons, gamma rays and electrons, both internal and external to the detector. Neutron fluxes and fuel power ratings have been evaluated with core physics calculations. Neutron interaction rates in assembly and detector materials have been evaluated in lattice calculations employing deterministic transport and diffusion methods. The transport of the reactor gamma radiation has been calculated with Monte Carlo, adjusted diffusion and point-kernel methods. The electron flux associated with the reactor gamma field as well as the internal charge deposition effects of the transport of photons and electrons have been calculated with coupled Monte Carlo calculations of photon and electron transport. The predicted response of a SPD is evaluated as the sum of contributions from individual

  2. Application of the self-powered detector concept in the design of a threshold gamma-ray detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LeVert, F.E.

    1979-01-01

    The self-powered detector concept has been utilized to develop an energy threshold gamma-ray detector. Gamma-ray energy discrimination is achieved by using a thick annular lead shield around the outer wall (emitter) of the detector in conjunction with a self-shielding central electrode (collector). Measurements conducted in the graphite pit of the Argonne Thermal Source Reactor have confirmed its ability to detect high-energy prompt fission gamma rays while discriminating against a significant flux of low-energy gamma rays from the decay of fission products. Also, auto-power spectral densities obtained with the detector were used to estimate the kinetic parameter, β/l, of the reactor

  3. Transient response of self-powered neutron detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boeck, H.; Gebureck, P.; Stegemann, D.

    The behaviour of self-powered neutron detectors with Co, Er, Hf and Pt emitters was investigated during reactor square wave and pulse operation. The detector's response was compared with the current of an excore ionization chamber. Characteristical deviations from linearity were observed with all detectors at fast reactor periods. The exact cause of these deviations is not yet fully understood but several possibilities for the nonlinear behaviour of self-powered neutron detectors are outlined. (author)

  4. X-ray detector for automatic exposure control using ionization chamber filled with xenon gas

    CERN Document Server

    Nakagawa, A; Yoshida, T

    2003-01-01

    This report refers to our newly developed X-ray detector for reliable automatic X-ray exposure control, which is to be widely used for X-ray diagnoses in various clinical fields. This new detector utilizes an ionization chamber filled with xenon gas, in contrast to conventional X-ray detectors which use ionization chambers filled with air. Use of xenon gas ensures higher sensitivity and thinner design of the detector. The xenon gas is completely sealed in the chamber, so that the influence of the changes in ambient environments is minimized. (author)

  5. Material inhomogeneities in Cd1-xZnxTe and their effects on large volume gamma-ray detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scyoc, J.M. Van; Lund, J.C.; Morse, D.H.

    1997-01-01

    Cadmium zinc telluride (Cd 1-x Zn x Te or CZT) has shown great promise as a material for room-temperature x-ray and gamma-ray detectors. In particular, polycrystalline material grown by the High Pressure Bridgman method with nominal Zn fraction (x) from 0.1 to 0.2 has been used to fabricate high resolution gamma-ray spectrometers with resolution approaching that of cooled high-purity Ge. For increased sensitivity, large areas (> 1 cm 2 ) are required, and for good sensitivity to high energy gamma photons, thick detectors (on the order of 1 cm) are required. Thus there has been a push for the development of CZT detectors with a volume greater than 1 cm 3 . However, nonuniformities in the material over this scale degrade the performance of the detectors. Variations in the zinc fraction, and thus the bandgap, and changes in the impurity distributions, both of which arise from the selective segregation of elements during crystal growth, result in spectral distortions. In this work several materials characterization techniques were combined with detector evaluations to determine the materials properties limiting detector performance. Materials measurements were performed on detectors found to have differing performance. Measurements conducted include infrared transmission (IR), particle induced x-ray emission (PIXE), photoluminescence (PL), and triaxial x-ray diffraction (TAXRD). To varying degrees, these measurements reveal that poor-performance detectors exhibit higher nonuniformities than spectrometer-grade detectors. This is reasonable, as regions of CZT material with different properties will give different localized spectral responses, which combine to result in a degraded spectrum for the total device

  6. A gas microstrip wide angle X-ray detector for application in synchrotron radiation experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Bateman, J E; Derbyshire, G E; Duxbury, D M; Lipp, J; Mir, J A; Simmons, J E; Spill, E J; Stephenson, R; Dobson, B R; Farrow, R C; Helsby, W I; Mutikainen, R; Suni, I

    2002-01-01

    The Gas Microstrip Detector has counting rate capabilities several orders of magnitude higher than conventional wire proportional counters while providing the same (or better) energy resolution for X-rays. In addition the geometric flexibility provided by the lithographic process combined with the self-supporting properties of the substrate offers many exciting possibilities for X-ray detectors, particularly for the demanding experiments carried out on Synchrotron Radiation Sources. Using experience obtained in designing detectors for Particle Physics we have developed a detector for Wide Angle X-ray Scattering studies. The detector has a fan geometry which makes possible a gas detector with high detection efficiency, sub-millimetre spatial resolution and good energy resolution over a wide range of X-ray energy. The detector is described together with results of experiments carried out at the Daresbury Laboratory Synchrotron Radiation Source.

  7. Development of a CZT drift ring detector for X and γ ray spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alruhaili, A.; Sellin, P. J.; Lohstroh, A.; Boothman, V.; Veeramani, P.; Veale, M. C.; Sawhney, K. J. S.; Kachkanov, V.

    2015-04-01

    CdTe and CZT detectors are considered better choices for high energy γ and X-ray spectroscopy in comparison to Si and HPGe detectors due to their good quantum efficiency and room temperature operation. The performance limitations in CdTe and CZT detectors are mainly associated with poor hole transport and trapping phenomena. Among many techniques that can be used to eliminate the effect of the poor charge transport properties of holes in CdTe and CZT material, the drift ring technique shows promising results. In this work, the performance of a 2.3 mm thick CZT drift ring detector is investigated. Spatially resolved measurements were carried out with an X-ray microbeam (25 and 75 keV) at the Diamond Light Source synchrotron to study the response uniformity and extent of the active area. Higher energy photon irradiation was also carried out at up to 662 keV using different radioisotopes to complement the microbeam data. Different biasing schemes were investigated in terms of biasing the cathode rear electrode (bulk field) and the ring electrodes (lateral fields). The results show that increasing the bulk field with fixed-ratio ring biases and lateral fields with fixed bulk fields increase the active area of the device significantly, which contrasts with previous studies in CdTe, where only an increasing lateral field resulted in an improvement of device performance. This difference is attributed to the larger thickness of the CZT device reported here.

  8. Calculation of ex-core detector responses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wouters, R. de; Haedens, M. [Tractebel Engineering, Brussels (Belgium); Baenst, H. de [Electrabel, Brussels (Belgium)

    2005-07-01

    The purpose of this work carried out by Tractebel Engineering, is to develop and validate a method for predicting the ex-core detector responses in the NPPs operated by Electrabel. Practical applications are: prediction of ex-core calibration coefficients for startup power ascension, replacement of xenon transients by theoretical predictions, and analysis of a Rod Drop Accident. The neutron diffusion program PANTHER calculates node-integrated fission sources which are combined with nodal importance representing the contribution of a neutron born in that node to the ex-core response. These importance are computed with the Monte Carlo program MCBEND in adjoint mode, with a model of the whole core at full power. Other core conditions are treated using sensitivities of the ex-core responses to water densities, computed with forward Monte Carlo. The Scaling Factors (SF), or ratios of the measured currents to the calculated response, have been established on a total of 550 in-core flux maps taken in four NPPs. The method has been applied to 15 startup transients, using the average SF obtained from previous cycles, and to 28 xenon transients, using the SF obtained from the in-core map immediately preceding the transient. The values of power (P) and axial offset (AOi) reconstructed with the theoretical calibration agree well with the measured values. The ex-core responses calculated during a rod drop transient have been successfully compared with available measurements, and with theoretical data obtained by alternative methods. In conclusion, the method is adequate for the practical applications previously listed. (authors)

  9. Novel Hybrid CMOS X-ray Detector Developments for Future Large Area and High Resolution X-ray Astronomy Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcone, Abe

    In the coming years, X-ray astronomy will require new soft X-ray detectors that can be read very quickly with low noise and can achieve small pixel sizes over a moderately large focal plane area. These requirements will be present for a variety of X-ray missions that will attempt to address science that was highly ranked by the 2010 Decadal Survey, including missions with science that overlaps with that of IXO and Athena, as well as other missions addressing science topics beyond those of IXO and Athena. An X-ray Surveyor mission was recently chosen by NASA for study by a Science & Technology Definition Team (STDT) so it can be considered as an option for an upcom-ing flagship mission. A mission such as this was endorsed by the NASA long term planning document entitled "Enduring Quests, Daring Visions," and a detailed description of one possible reali-zation of such a mission has been referred to as SMART-X, which was described in a recent NASA RFI response. This provides an example of a future mission concept with these requirements since it has high X-ray throughput and excellent spatial resolution. We propose to continue to modify current active pixel sensor designs, in particular the hybrid CMOS detectors that we have been working with for several years, and implement new in-pixel technologies that will allow us to achieve these ambitious and realistic requirements on a timeline that will make them available to upcoming X-ray missions. This proposal is a continuation of our program that has been work-ing on these developments for the past several years. The first 3 years of the program led to the development of a new circuit design for each pixel, which has now been shown to be suitable for a larger detector array. The proposed activity for the next four years will be to incorporate this pixel design into a new design of a full detector array (2k×2k pixels with digital output) and to fabricate this full-sized device so it can be thoroughly tested and

  10. Development of a simple detector response function generation program: The CEARDRFs code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Jiaxin, E-mail: jwang3@ncsu.edu [Center for Engineering Applications of Radioisotopes (CEAR), Department of Nuclear Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Wang Zhijian; Peeples, Johanna [Center for Engineering Applications of Radioisotopes (CEAR), Department of Nuclear Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Yu Huawei [Center for Engineering Applications of Radioisotopes (CEAR), Department of Nuclear Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); College of Geo-Resources and Information, China University of Petroleum, Qingdao, Shandong 266555 (China); Gardner, Robin P. [Center for Engineering Applications of Radioisotopes (CEAR), Department of Nuclear Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States)

    2012-07-15

    A simple Monte Carlo program named CEARDRFs has been developed to generate very accurate detector response functions (DRFs) for scintillation detectors. It utilizes relatively rigorous gamma-ray transport with simple electron transport, and accounts for two phenomena that have rarely been treated: scintillator non-linearity and the variable flat continuum part of the DRF. It has been proven that these physics and treatments work well for 3 Multiplication-Sign 3 Double-Prime and 6 Multiplication-Sign 6 Double-Prime cylindrical NaI detector in CEAR's previous work. Now this approach has been expanded to cover more scintillation detectors with various common shapes and sizes. Benchmark experiments of 2 Multiplication-Sign 2 Double-Prime cylindrical BGO detector and 2 Multiplication-Sign 4 Multiplication-Sign 16 Double-Prime rectangular NaI detector have been carried out at CEAR with various radiactive sources. The simulation results of CEARDRFs have also been compared with MCNP5 calculations. The benchmark and comparison show that CEARDRFs can generate very accurate DRFs (more accurate than MCNP5) at a very fast speed (hundred times faster than MCNP5). The use of this program can significantly increase the accuracy of applications relying on detector spectroscopy like prompt gamma-ray neutron activation analysis, X-ray fluorescence analysis, oil well logging and homeland security. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CEARDRF has been developed to generate detector response functions (DRFs) for scintillation detectors a. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Generated DRFs are very accurate. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Simulation speed is hundreds of times faster than MCNP5. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It utilizes rigorous gamma-ray transport with simple electron transport. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It also accounts for scintillator non-linearity and the variable flat continuum part.

  11. Development of a simple detector response function generation program: The CEARDRFs code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jiaxin; Wang Zhijian; Peeples, Johanna; Yu Huawei; Gardner, Robin P.

    2012-01-01

    A simple Monte Carlo program named CEARDRFs has been developed to generate very accurate detector response functions (DRFs) for scintillation detectors. It utilizes relatively rigorous gamma-ray transport with simple electron transport, and accounts for two phenomena that have rarely been treated: scintillator non-linearity and the variable flat continuum part of the DRF. It has been proven that these physics and treatments work well for 3×3″ and 6×6″ cylindrical NaI detector in CEAR's previous work. Now this approach has been expanded to cover more scintillation detectors with various common shapes and sizes. Benchmark experiments of 2×2″ cylindrical BGO detector and 2×4×16″ rectangular NaI detector have been carried out at CEAR with various radiactive sources. The simulation results of CEARDRFs have also been compared with MCNP5 calculations. The benchmark and comparison show that CEARDRFs can generate very accurate DRFs (more accurate than MCNP5) at a very fast speed (hundred times faster than MCNP5). The use of this program can significantly increase the accuracy of applications relying on detector spectroscopy like prompt gamma-ray neutron activation analysis, X-ray fluorescence analysis, oil well logging and homeland security. - Highlights: ► CEARDRF has been developed to generate detector response functions (DRFs) for scintillation detectors a. ► Generated DRFs are very accurate. ► Simulation speed is hundreds of times faster than MCNP5. ► It utilizes rigorous gamma-ray transport with simple electron transport. ► It also accounts for scintillator non-linearity and the variable flat continuum part.

  12. A multiple CCD X-ray detector and its first operation with synchrotron radiation X-ray beam

    CERN Document Server

    Suzuki, M; Kumasaka, T; Sato, K; Toyokawa, H; Aries, I F; Jerram, P A; Ueki, T

    1999-01-01

    A 4x4 array structure of 16 identical CCD X-ray detector modules, called the multiple CCD X-ray detector system (MCCDX), was submitted to its first synchrotron radiation experiment at the protein crystallography station of the RIKEN beamline (BL45XU) at the SPring-8 facility. An X-ray diffraction pattern of cholesterol powder was specifically taken in order to investigate the overall system performance.

  13. Characterization of the imaging performance of the simultaneously counting and integrating X-ray detector CIX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fink, Johannes

    2010-01-15

    The CIX detector is a direct converting hybrid pixel detector designed for medical X-ray imaging applications. Its de ning feature is the simultaneous operation of a photon counter as well as an integrator in every pixel cell. This novel approach o ers a dynamic range of more than five orders of magnitude, as well as the ability to directly obtain the average photon energy from the measured data. Several CIX 0.2 ASICs have been successfully connected to CdTe, CdZnTe and Si sensors. These detector modules were tested with respect to the imaging performance of the simultaneously counting and integrating concept under X-ray irradiation. Apart from a characterization of the intrinsic benefits of the CIX concept, the sensor performance was also investigated. Here, the two parallel signal processing concepts offer valuable insights into material related effects like polarization and temporal response. The impact of interpixel coupling effects like charge-sharing, Compton scattering and X-ray fluorescence was evaluated through simulations and measurements. (orig.)

  14. Characterization of the imaging performance of the simultaneously counting and integrating X-ray detector CIX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fink, Johannes

    2010-01-01

    The CIX detector is a direct converting hybrid pixel detector designed for medical X-ray imaging applications. Its de ning feature is the simultaneous operation of a photon counter as well as an integrator in every pixel cell. This novel approach o ers a dynamic range of more than five orders of magnitude, as well as the ability to directly obtain the average photon energy from the measured data. Several CIX 0.2 ASICs have been successfully connected to CdTe, CdZnTe and Si sensors. These detector modules were tested with respect to the imaging performance of the simultaneously counting and integrating concept under X-ray irradiation. Apart from a characterization of the intrinsic benefits of the CIX concept, the sensor performance was also investigated. Here, the two parallel signal processing concepts offer valuable insights into material related effects like polarization and temporal response. The impact of interpixel coupling effects like charge-sharing, Compton scattering and X-ray fluorescence was evaluated through simulations and measurements. (orig.)

  15. Fast "swarm of detectors" and their application in cosmic rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoziyoev, G. P.; Shoziyoev, Sh. P.

    2017-06-01

    New opportunities in science appeared with the latest technology of the 21st century. This paper points to creating a new architecture for detection systems of different characteristics in astrophysics and geophysics using the latest technologies related to multicopter cluster systems, alternative energy sources, cluster technologies, cloud computing and big data. The idea of a quick-deployable scaleable dynamic system of a controlled drone with a small set of different detectors for detecting various components of extensive air showers in cosmic rays and in geophysics is very attractive. Development of this type of new system also allows to give a multiplier effect for the development of various sciences and research methods to observe natural phenomena.

  16. Conversion factor and uncertainty estimation for quantification of towed gamma-ray detector measurements in Tohoku coastal waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnishi, S.; Thornton, B.; Kamada, S.; Hirao, Y.; Ura, T.; Odano, N.

    2016-01-01

    Factors to convert the count rate of a NaI(Tl) scintillation detector to the concentration of radioactive cesium in marine sediments are estimated for a towed gamma-ray detector system. The response of the detector against a unit concentration of radioactive cesium is calculated by Monte Carlo radiation transport simulation considering the vertical profile of radioactive material measured in core samples. The conversion factors are acquired by integrating the contribution of each layer and are normalized by the concentration in the surface sediment layer. At the same time, the uncertainty of the conversion factors are formulated and estimated. The combined standard uncertainty of the radioactive cesium concentration by the towed gamma-ray detector is around 25 percent. The values of uncertainty, often referred to as relative root mean squat errors in other works, between sediment core sampling measurements and towed detector measurements were 16 percent in the investigation made near the Abukuma River mouth and 5.2 percent in Sendai Bay, respectively. Most of the uncertainty is due to interpolation of the conversion factors between core samples and uncertainty of the detector's burial depth. The results of the towed measurements agree well with laboratory analysed sediment samples. Also, the concentrations of radioactive cesium at the intersection of each survey line are consistent. The consistency with sampling results and between different lines' transects demonstrate the availability and reproducibility of towed gamma-ray detector system.

  17. Conversion factor and uncertainty estimation for quantification of towed gamma-ray detector measurements in Tohoku coastal waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohnishi, S., E-mail: ohnishi@nmri.go.jp [National Maritime Research Institute, 6-38-1, Shinkawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-0004 (Japan); Thornton, B. [Institute of Industrial Science, The University of Tokyo, 4-6-1, Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan); Kamada, S.; Hirao, Y.; Ura, T.; Odano, N. [National Maritime Research Institute, 6-38-1, Shinkawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-0004 (Japan)

    2016-05-21

    Factors to convert the count rate of a NaI(Tl) scintillation detector to the concentration of radioactive cesium in marine sediments are estimated for a towed gamma-ray detector system. The response of the detector against a unit concentration of radioactive cesium is calculated by Monte Carlo radiation transport simulation considering the vertical profile of radioactive material measured in core samples. The conversion factors are acquired by integrating the contribution of each layer and are normalized by the concentration in the surface sediment layer. At the same time, the uncertainty of the conversion factors are formulated and estimated. The combined standard uncertainty of the radioactive cesium concentration by the towed gamma-ray detector is around 25 percent. The values of uncertainty, often referred to as relative root mean squat errors in other works, between sediment core sampling measurements and towed detector measurements were 16 percent in the investigation made near the Abukuma River mouth and 5.2 percent in Sendai Bay, respectively. Most of the uncertainty is due to interpolation of the conversion factors between core samples and uncertainty of the detector's burial depth. The results of the towed measurements agree well with laboratory analysed sediment samples. Also, the concentrations of radioactive cesium at the intersection of each survey line are consistent. The consistency with sampling results and between different lines' transects demonstrate the availability and reproducibility of towed gamma-ray detector system.

  18. GPS Time Synchronization in School-Network Cosmic Ray Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berns, H.-G.; Burnett, T. H.; Gran, R.; Wilkes, R. J.

    2004-06-01

    The QuarkNet DAQ card for school-network cosmic ray detectors provides a low-cost alternative to using standard particle and nuclear physics fast pulse electronics modules. The board, which can be produced at a cost of less than $500.00 (USD), produces trigger time and pulse edge time data for 2- to 4-fold coincidence levels via a universal RS232 serial port interface, usable with any PC. Individual detector stations, each consisting of four scintillation counter modules, front-end electronics, and a GPS receiver, produce a stream of data in form of ASCII text strings in identifiable set of formats for different functions. The card includes a low-cost GPS receiver module, which permits time-stamping event triggers to about 50 nanosecond accuracy in UTC between widely separated sites. The technique used for obtaining precise GPS time employs the 1PPS signal, which is not normally available to users of the commercial GPS module. We had the stock model slightly custom-modified to access this signal. The method for deriving time values was adapted from methods developed for the K2K long-baseline neutrino experiment. Performance of the low-cost GPS module used is compared to that of a more expensive unit with known quality.

  19. A large area detector for x-ray applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodricks, B.; Huang, Qiang; Hopf, R.; Wang, Kemei.

    1993-01-01

    A large area detector for x-ray synchrotron applications has been developed. The front end of this device consist of a scintillator coupled to a fiber-optic taper. The fiber-optic taper is comprised of 4 smaller (70 mm x 70 mm) tapers fused together in a square matrix giving an active area of 140 mm x 140 mm. Each taper has a demagnification of 5.5 resulting in four small ends that are 12 mm diagonally across. The small ends of each taper are coupled to four microchannel-plate-based image intensifiers. The output from each image intensifier is focused onto a Charge Coupled Device (CCD) detector. The four CCDs are read out in parallel and are independently controlled. The image intensifiers also act as fast (20 ns) electronic shutters. The system is capable of displaying images in real time. Additionally, with independent control on the readout of each row of data from the CCD, the system is capable of performing high speed imaging through novel readout manipulation

  20. Radioisotope decontamination of X-ray detector. Photostimulable phosphor plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onuma, Yoji; Hayashi, Michiko; Hayashi, Hiroaki; Nishihara, Sadamitsu

    2012-01-01

    We tried to remove contamination of radioisotope (RI) for an X-ray detector (photostimulable phosphor plate; IP) and verified that our procedure suggested by Nishihara et al. was effective for decontamination. The procedure was as follows. First, the IP was kept for approximately twelve hours, and then it was processed [image (A)] as well as a clinical processing mode. Second, using a wet-type chemical wiper, we scavenged the IP to remove the adhered RI on its surface. Then, once again, the IP was kept for approximately fifteen hours and processed [image (B)] in order to check an effect of decontamination. Finally, the two images of (A) and (B) were analyzed using ImageJ, which can be downloaded as a free software, and a percentage of removal was calculated. The procedure was applied to two IPs using the Fuji computed tomography (FCR) 5501 plus. In the present case, the percentage of removal was approximately 96%. The removed radioisotopes in the chemical wipers were analyzed by Ge detector. Then, 134 Cs and 137 Cs were found with activities of 2.9 4.3 Bq and 3.5 5.2 Bq, respectively. For three months after that, we cannot see black spots on the IPs owing to the contamination of the RI and there are no defects caused by decontamination using a wet-type chemical wiper. (author)

  1. Evaluation of the detector response function digital conventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arino Gil, A.; Hernandez Rodriguez, J.; Mateos Salvador, P.; Rodriguez Lopez, B.; Font Gelabert, J. C.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this work is to obtain the response function that relates the air kerma at the entrance of the detector and pixel value, for a series of digital detectors of conventional Radiology model Optimus DigitalDiagnost Philips () and 6000 Definium General Electric. From the set of measurements is obtained a response function for each reference type of detector, and compared with those published in the literature for these teams. (Author)

  2. PLATEAUING COSMIC RAY DETECTORS TO ACHIEVE OPTIMUM OPERATING VOLTAGE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knoff, E.N.; Peterson, R.S.

    2008-01-01

    Through QuarkNet, students across the country have access to cosmic ray detectors in their high school classrooms. These detectors operate using a scintillator material and a photomultiplier tube (PMT). A data acquisition (DAQ) board counts cosmic ray hits from the counters. Through an online e-Lab, students can analyze and share their data. In order to collect viable data, the PMTs should operate at their plateau voltages. In these plateau ranges, the number of counts per minute remains relatively constant with small changes in PMT voltage. We sought to plateau the counters in the test array and to clarify the plateauing procedure itself. In order to most effectively plateau the counters, the counters should be stacked and programmed to record the number of coincident hits as well as their singles rates. We also changed the threshold value that a signal must exceed in order to record a hit and replateaued the counters. For counter 1, counter 2, and counter 3, we found plateau voltages around 1V. The singles rate plateau was very small, while the coincidence plateau was very long. The plateau voltages corresponded to a singles rate of 700–850 counts per minute. We found very little effect of changing the threshold voltages. Our chosen plateau voltages produced good performance studies on the e-Lab. Keeping in mind the nature of the experiments conducted by the high school students, we recommend a streamlined plateauing process. Because changing the threshold did not drastically affect the plateau voltage or the performance study, students should choose a threshold value, construct plateau graphs, and analyze their data using a performance study. Even if the counters operate slightly off their plateau voltage, they should deliver good performance studies and return reliable results.

  3. Modeling and design of X-rays bidimensional detectors; Modelagem e projeto de detectores bidimensionais para radiacao-X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quisbert, Elmer Paz Alcon

    2000-03-01

    In this work has been developed the scintillating fiber optic and semiconductor devices based 2-D detector design, modeling and performance evaluation using Monte Carlo methods, for high X-ray energy range (10-140 kV) radiography and tomography applications. These processes allowed us, also, the imaging system parameters and components optimization and appropriate detector design. The model estimated the detectors performance parameters (DQE, MTF and SNR), and radiation risk (in terms of mean absorbed dose in the patient) and to show up how the sequence of physical processes in X-ray detection influence the performance of this imaging PFOC detectors. In this way, the modeling of the detector includes the statistics of the spatial distribution of absorbed X-rays and of X-ray to light conversion, its transmission, and the light quanta conversion into electrons. Also contributions to noise from the detection system chain is included, mainly the CCD detector ambient noise. Performance prediction, based on calculation taken from simulations, illustrates how such detectors meet the exacting requirements of some medical and industrial applications. Also, it is envisaged that our modeling procedure of the imaging system will be suitable not only for investigating how the system components should be best designed but for CT and RD system performance prediction. The powerful techniques would enable us to give advice for future development, in this field, in search of more dose-efficient imaging systems. (author)

  4. Sensitivity of self-powered detector probes to electron and gamma-ray fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lone, M A; Wong, P Y [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Chalk River, ON (Canada)

    1996-12-31

    A self-powered detector (SPD) is a simple, passive device that consists of a coaxial probe with a metallic outer sleeve, a mineral oxide insulating layer, and a metallic inner core. SPD`s are used in nuclear reactors to monitor neutron and gamma fields. Responses of SPD`s to electrons and {gamma}-rays of various energies were investigated with Monte Carlo simulations. Transmission filters were studied for the design of threshold SPD probes used for online monitoring of the energy spectrum of high-power industrial electron accelerator beams. Filters were also investigated for the enhancement of {gamma}-ray sensitivity of an SPD placed in a mixed electron and {gamma}-ray field. (author). 30 refs., 1 tab., 8 figs.

  5. Sensitivity of self-powered detector probes to electron and gamma-ray fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lone, M.A.; Wong, P.Y.

    1995-01-01

    A self-powered detector (SPD) is a simple, passive device that consists of a coaxial probe with a metallic outer sleeve, a mineral oxide insulating layer, and a metallic inner core. SPD's are used in nuclear reactors to monitor neutron and gamma fields. Responses of SPD's to electrons and γ-rays of various energies were investigated with Monte Carlo simulations. Transmission filters were studied for the design of threshold SPD probes used for online monitoring of the energy spectrum of high-power industrial electron accelerator beams. Filters were also investigated for the enhancement of γ-ray sensitivity of an SPD placed in a mixed electron and γ-ray field. (author). 30 refs., 1 tab., 8 figs

  6. Spectral correction algorithm for multispectral CdTe x-ray detectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Erik D.; Kehres, Jan; Gu, Yun

    2017-01-01

    Compared to the dual energy scintillator detectors widely used today, pixelated multispectral X-ray detectors show the potential to improve material identification in various radiography and tomography applications used for industrial and security purposes. However, detector effects, such as charge...

  7. On the possibilities of large-scale radio and fiber optics detectors in cosmic rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusev, G. A.; Markov, M. A.; Zheleznykh, I. M.

    1985-01-01

    Different variants of radio and fiber optics detectors for registration of super high energy cascades in the atmosphere and in dense media are discussed. Particularly the possibilities for investigation of quasi horizontal cosmic ray showers (CRS) and simulated muons from these CRS with the help of radio detectors and fiber optics detectors located on the ice surface are considered.

  8. Application of MSM InP detectors to the measurement of pulsed X-ray radiation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ryc, L.; Dobrzanski, L.; Dubecký, L.; Kaczmarczyk, J.; Pfeifer, Miroslav; Riesz, F.; Slysz, W.; Surma, B.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 163, 4-6 (2008), 559-567 ISSN 1042-0150 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC528 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100523 Keywords : InP detector * X-ray detector * picosecond detector * laser plasma Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 0.415, year: 2008

  9. Monte Carlo simulation of the response of a pixellated 3D photo-detector in silicon

    CERN Document Server

    Dubaric, E; Froejdh, C; Norlin, B

    2002-01-01

    The charge transport and X-ray photon absorption in three-dimensional (3D) X-ray pixel detectors have been studied using numerical simulations. The charge transport has been modelled using the drift-diffusion simulator MEDICI, while photon absorption has been studied using MCNP. The response of the entire pixel detector system in terms of charge sharing, line spread function and modulation transfer function, has been simulated using a system level Monte Carlo simulation approach. A major part of the study is devoted to the effect of charge sharing on the energy resolution in 3D-pixel detectors. The 3D configuration was found to suppress charge sharing much better than conventional planar detectors.

  10. Diagnostic X-ray spectrometry using a commercial CdZnTe detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, P.H.B.

    1998-01-01

    X ray spectrometry using Ge or Si detectors is an established tool to measure characterization parameters of X-ray beams. This work describes how a commercial CdZnTe was used to perform diagnostic X-ray spectrometry. Spectra were measured for two X-ray machines and compared with similar data found in the literature with an agreement of 2% rms

  11. Advantages of using 192Ir γ-ray flaw detector for some products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin Xiqi

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes the advantages of 192 Ir γ-ray flaw detector made in China in welding seam testings. The authors made a comparison between 192 Ir γ-ray and X-ray machine. 192 Ir γ-ray machine showed many advantages, such as shorter working hours and less labour intensity

  12. Development of multiwire gas detectors for X-rays; Desenvolvimento de detectores a gas multifilares para raios-X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sales, Eraldo de

    2015-06-01

    This work presents the prototype of a 2D position sensitive gas detector for application in X-ray scattering and diffraction experiments. Starting from a detector initially developed for other applications and will show the required changes on the original concept of this device. The strategy used to determine the necessary adaptations were based on searching in the literature for the overall characteristics of a multi-wire X-ray detector (choice of gas, pressure, window, etc.), the use of simulations, implementation of the changes and finally operational tests. Computational tools were used to calculate the mechanical strength and attenuation of the X-ray photons that helped to determine the most appropriate material for the construction of the entrance window. Detector simulations were built with Garfield software and were used to study the overall properties of the detector, and to determine the optimum parameters for the equipment operation. Typical parameters are the distance between the wires, wire diameter, high voltage to be used, among several other parameters. The results obtained showed that the multi-wire detector concept with the implemented adaptations allowed the detection of X-rays. However, depending on the application, it may be necessary improve the resolution of the equipment, in order to have a better description of the collected data. Several ideas are suggested for this improvement. It is also presented interesting results obtained with a microscopic pattern detector called triple GEM. This device belongs to the Gas Detectors Development group (GDD group) at CERN and was used in my training at this institution. The results showed the potential of the equipment for detection of X-rays. The results and simulations presented in this work, confirmed that the changes in the concept of the original detector permitted it use on X-ray detection applications. Also, it was possible to obtain several indications for further optimization, which may

  13. CdTe in photoconductive applications. Fast detector for metrology and X-ray imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuzin, M.

    1991-01-01

    Operating as a photoconductor, the sensitivity and the impulse response of semi-insulating materials greatly depend on the excitation duration compared to electron and hole lifetimes. The requirement of ohmic contact is shortly discussed. Before developing picosecond measurements with integrated autocorrelation system, this paper explains high energy industrial tomographic application with large CdTe detectors (25x15x0.9 mm 3 ). The excitation is typically μs range. X-ray flash radiography, with 10 ns burst, is in an intermediate time domain where excitation is similar to electron life-time. In laser fusion experiment excitation is in the range of 50 ps and we develop photoconductive devices able to study very high speed X-ray emission time behaviour. Thin polycristalline MOCVD CdTe films with picosecond response are suitable to perform optical correlation measurements of single shot pulses with a very large bandwidth (- 50 GHz)

  14. Development of a fast multi-line x-ray CT detector for NDT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmann, T.; Nachtrab, F.; Schlechter, T.; Mühlbauer, J.; Schröpfer, S.; Firsching, M.; Uhlmann, N.; Neubauer, H.; Ernst, J.; Schweiger, T.; Oberst, M.; Meyer, A.

    2015-01-01

    Typical X-ray detectors for non-destructive testing (NDT) are line detectors or area detectors, like e.g. flat panel detectors. Multi-line detectors are currently only available in medical Computed Tomography (CT) scanners. Compared to flat panel detectors, line and multi-line detectors can achieve much higher frame rates. This allows time-resolved 3D CT scans of an object under investigation. Also, an improved image quality can be achieved due to reduced scattered radiation from object and detector themselves. Another benefit of line and multi-line detectors is that very wide detectors can be assembled easily, while flat panel detectors are usually limited to an imaging field with a size of approx. 40 × 40 cm 2 at maximum. The big disadvantage of line detectors is the limited number of object slices that can be scanned simultaneously. This leads to long scan times for large objects. Volume scans with a multi-line detector are much faster, but with almost similar image quality. Due to the promising properties of multi-line detectors their application outside of medical CT would also be very interesting for NDT. However, medical CT multi-line detectors are optimized for the scanning of human bodies. Many non-medical applications require higher spatial resolutions and/or higher X-ray energies. For those non-medical applications we are developing a fast multi-line X-ray detector.In the scope of this work, we present the current state of the development of the novel detector, which includes several outstanding properties like an adjustable curved design for variable focus-detector-distances, conserving nearly uniform perpendicular irradiation over the entire detector width. Basis of the detector is a specifically designed, radiation hard CMOS imaging sensor with a pixel pitch of 200 μ m. Each pixel has an automatic in-pixel gain adjustment, which allows for both: a very high sensitivity and a wide dynamic range. The final detector is planned to have 256 lines of

  15. Response of resonant gravitational wave detectors to damped sinusoid signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pai, A; Celsi, C; Pallottino, G V; D'Antonio, S; Astone, P

    2007-01-01

    Till date, the search for burst signals with resonant gravitational wave (GW) detectors has been done using the δ-function approximation for the signal, which was reasonable due to the very small bandwidth of these detectors. However, now with increased bandwidth (of the order of 10 or more Hz) and with the possibility of comparing results with interferometric GW detectors (broad-band), it is very important to exploit the resonant detectors' capability to detect also signals with specific wave shapes. As a first step, we present a study of the response of resonant GW detectors to damped sinusoids with given frequency and decay time and report on the development of a filter matched to these signals. This study is a preliminary step towards the comprehension of the detector response and of the filtering for signals such as the excitation of stellar quasi-normal modes

  16. Investigation of photon counting pixel detectors for X-ray spectroscopy and imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talla, Patrick Takoukam

    2011-04-07

    The Medipix2 and Medipix3 detectors are hybrid pixelated photon counting detectors with a pixel pitch of 55 {mu}m. The sensor material used in this thesis was silicon. Because of their small pixel size they suffer from charge sharing i.e. an incoming photon can be registered by more than one pixel. In order to correct for charge sharing due to lateral diffusion of charge carriers, the Medipix3 detector was developed: with its Charge Summing Mode, the charge collected in a cluster of 2 x 2 pixel is added up and attributed to only one pixel whose counter is incremented. The adjustable threshold of the detectors allows to count the photons and to gain information on their energy. The main purposes of the thesis are to investigate spectral and imaging properties of pixelated photon counting detectors from the Medipix family such as Medipix2 and Medipix3. The investigations are based on simulations and measurements. In order to investigate the spectral properties of the detectors measurements were performed using fluorescence lines of materials such as molybdenum, silver but also some radioactive sources such as Am-241 or Cd-109. From the measured data, parameters like the threshold dispersion and the gain variation from pixel-to-pixel were extracted and used as input in the Monte Carlo code ROSI to model the responses of the detector to monoenergetic photons. The measured data are well described by the simulations for Medipix2 and for Medipix3 operating in Charge Summing Mode. Due to charge sharing and due to the energy dependence of attenuation processes in silicon and to Compton scattering the incoming and the measured spectrum differ substantially from each other. Since the responses to monoenergetic photons are known, a deconvolution was performed to determine the true incoming spectrum. Several direct and iterative methods were successfully applied on measured and simulated data of an X-ray tube and radioactive sources. The knowledge of the X-ray spectrum is

  17. Investigation of photon counting pixel detectors for X-ray spectroscopy and imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talla, Patrick Takoukam

    2011-01-01

    The Medipix2 and Medipix3 detectors are hybrid pixelated photon counting detectors with a pixel pitch of 55 μm. The sensor material used in this thesis was silicon. Because of their small pixel size they suffer from charge sharing i.e. an incoming photon can be registered by more than one pixel. In order to correct for charge sharing due to lateral diffusion of charge carriers, the Medipix3 detector was developed: with its Charge Summing Mode, the charge collected in a cluster of 2 x 2 pixel is added up and attributed to only one pixel whose counter is incremented. The adjustable threshold of the detectors allows to count the photons and to gain information on their energy. The main purposes of the thesis are to investigate spectral and imaging properties of pixelated photon counting detectors from the Medipix family such as Medipix2 and Medipix3. The investigations are based on simulations and measurements. In order to investigate the spectral properties of the detectors measurements were performed using fluorescence lines of materials such as molybdenum, silver but also some radioactive sources such as Am-241 or Cd-109. From the measured data, parameters like the threshold dispersion and the gain variation from pixel-to-pixel were extracted and used as input in the Monte Carlo code ROSI to model the responses of the detector to monoenergetic photons. The measured data are well described by the simulations for Medipix2 and for Medipix3 operating in Charge Summing Mode. Due to charge sharing and due to the energy dependence of attenuation processes in silicon and to Compton scattering the incoming and the measured spectrum differ substantially from each other. Since the responses to monoenergetic photons are known, a deconvolution was performed to determine the true incoming spectrum. Several direct and iterative methods were successfully applied on measured and simulated data of an X-ray tube and radioactive sources. The knowledge of the X-ray spectrum is

  18. Low Energy X-Ray and γ-Ray Detectors Fabricated on n-Type 4H-SiC Epitaxial Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Krishna C.; Muzykov, Peter G.; Chaudhuri, Sandeep K.; Terry, J. Russell

    2013-08-01

    Schottky barrier diode (SBD) radiation detectors have been fabricated on n-type 4H-SiC epitaxial layers and evaluated for low energy x- and γ-rays detection. The detectors were found to be highly sensitive to soft x-rays in the 50 eV to few keV range and showed 2.1 % energy resolution for 59.6 keV gamma rays. The response to soft x-rays for these detectors was significantly higher than that of commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) SiC UV photodiodes. The devices have been characterized by current-voltage (I-V) measurements in the 94-700 K range, thermally stimulated current (TSC) spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction (XRD) rocking curve measurements, and defect delineating chemical etching. I-V characteristics of the detectors at 500 K showed low leakage current ( nA at 200 V) revealing a possibility of high temperature operation. The XRD rocking curve measurements revealed high quality of the epitaxial layer exhibiting a full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the rocking curve 3.6 arc sec. TSC studies in a wide range of temperature (94-550 K) revealed presence of relatively shallow levels ( 0.25 eV) in the epi bulk with a density 7×1013 cm-3 related to Al and B impurities and deeper levels located near the metal-semiconductor interface.

  19. Application of the alanine detector to gamma-ray, X-ray and fast neutron dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waligorski, M.P.R.; Hansen, J.W.; Byrski, E.

    1987-01-01

    A dosimeter based on alanine has been developed at the INP in Krakow and at Risoe National Laboratory. Due to its near tissue-equivalence and stability of signal, measured using ESR spectrometry at room temperature, this free-radical amino-acid dosimetric system is particularly suitable for measuring X-ray, gamma-ray and fast neutron doses in the range 10-10 5 Gy. The relative effectiveness (with respect to 60 Co γ-rays) of the alanine dosimeter to 250 kVp X-rays and to cyclotron-produced fast neutrons (mean neutron energy 5.6 MeV) is measured to be 0.76± 0.06 and 0.60±0.05, respectively. The suitability of the alanine dosimeter for intercomparison gamma-ray dosimetry is also shown. The estimated absolute difference between 60 Co dosimetry at Risoe National Laboratory and at the Centre of Oncology in Krakow is about 5%, somewhat more than the experimental uncertainty. These results are based on ESR measurements performed in Krakow on about 25% of the exposed detectors. 28 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs. (author)

  20. Low energy response calibration of the BATSE large area detectors onboard the Compton Observatory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laird, C.E. [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Eastern Kentucky University, Moore 351, 521 Lancaster Avenue, Richmond, KY 40475-3124 (United States)]. E-mail: Chris.Laird@eku.edu; Harmon, B.A. [XD12 NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Wilson, Colleen A. [XD12 NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Hunter, David [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Eastern Kentucky University, Moore 351, 521 Lancaster Avenue, Richmond, KY 40475-3124 (United States); Isaacs, Jason [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Eastern Kentucky University, Moore 351, 521 Lancaster Avenue, Richmond, KY 40475-3124 (United States)

    2006-10-15

    The low-energy attenuation of the covering material of the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) large area detectors (LADs) on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory as well as the small-angle response of the LADs have been studied. These effects are shown to be more significant than previously assumed. The LAD entrance window included layers of an aluminum-epoxy composite (hexel) that acted as a collimator for the lowest energy photons entering the detector just above threshold (20-50 keV). Simplifying assumptions made concerning the entrance window materials and the angular response at incident angles near normal to the detector face in the original BATSE response matrix formalism had little effect on {gamma}-ray burst measurements; however, these assumptions created serious errors in measured fluxes of galactic sources, whose emission is strongest near the LAD energy threshold. Careful measurements of the angular and low-energy dependence of the attenuation due to the hexel plates only partially improved the response. A systematic study of Crab Nebula spectra showed the need for additional corrections: an angular-dependent correction for all detectors and an angular-independent correction for each detector. These corrections have been applied as part of an overall energy and angular-dependent correction to the BATSE response matrices.

  1. CZT detectors for a new generation of γ-ray telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quadrini, Egidio M.; Conti, Giancarlo; D'Angelo, Sergio; Fiorini, Mauro; Uslenghi, Michela; Natalucci, Lorenzo; Ubertini, Pietro

    2005-08-01

    The outstanding scientific performances of IBIS, Imager on Board INTEGRAL, has encouraged preliminary feasibility studies on new Gamma Ray instruments. We considered both a Wide Field Camera for transient event detection and fast automatic sky localisation and a high resolution imager. According to the basic scientific requirements, i.e. to operate with good sensitivity (1mCrab/day) and spatial resolution (from arcmin to arcsec) on a wide energy range (5 to 500 keV), these studies consider large detector area (from 1 to several m2) and a high number (~50000) of thick (≥ 5mm) pixels. Recent achievements already obtained by INTEGRAL, and initially showed by SWIFT, have validated the CdTe/CZT detector performances in terms of good spatial resolution, detection efficiency, energy resolution and low noise at room temperature. We have started a study to solve peculiar problems affecting this kind of detectors (e.g. response dependent on the interaction depth and multiple hit events) using a digital approach to photon reconstruction. This also facilitates operations like pixel to pixel equalisation and background rejection. The detector electronic chain thus includes a minimal analog stage for charge pre-amplification, coupled to a flash ADC for waveform digitalisation at a high time resolution sampling, and a powerful, FPGA based digital processing unit, devoted to waveform elaboration. Such a design should also help in optimising the telemetry flux and allow polarimetry evaluation on multiple events.

  2. Response of Moxon-Rae type gamma detectors for neutron capture cross section measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iyengar, K.V.K.; Lal, B.; Jhingan, M.L.

    1974-01-01

    A detector devised by Moxon and Rae for the absolute measurement of (n,γ) cross sections is briefly described. This detector is supposed to have an efficiency per MeV of γ-ray energy independent of the energy of the γ-rays. Such a detector consists of an electron converter placed before a thin plastic scintillator which detects the electron emitted by interaction of the γ-ray in the converter. The performance of this type of detector depends on the thickness and composition of the converter. Detailed Monte-Carlo calculations of the response for γ-ray energies from 0.2 to 12 MeV has been carried out for elements ranging from C to Bi and for a mixture of elements as well as for a mixture of an element plus compound, to find out the suitable material and thickness of the converter. Among the elements studied for the converter, Ni, Mo and Sn have a uniform response over the photon energy range 1-12 MeV. Out of these elements Mo has a low neutron capture cross section in the energy range 1-1000 keV and is thus to be preferred. A mixture of C + Bi 2 O 3 in the weight ratio 11.6 : 88.4 gives a uniform response over the photon energy range 1-12 MeV. (K.B.)

  3. Spectral and spatial resolution properties of photon counting X-ray detectors like the Medipix-Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korn, A.

    2007-01-01

    The Medipix detector is a hybrid photon counting X-ray detector, consisting of an ASIC and a semiconducting layer as the sensor. This makes the Medipix a direct converting detector. A special feature of the Medipix is a signal processing circuit in every single pixel. This circuit amplifies the input signal triggered by a photon and then transforms the pulse into a digital signal. This early stage digitalisation is one of the main advantages of the detector, since no dark currents are integrated into the signal. Furthermore, the energy information of each single photon is partly preserved. The high number of pixels lends the detector a wide dynamic range, starting from single counts up to a rate of 1010 photons per cm2 and second. Apart from the many advantages, there are still some problems with the detector. Some effects lead to a deterioration of the energy resolution as well as the spatial resolution. The main reasons for this are two effects occuring in the detector, charge sharing and backscattering inside the detector. This study investigates the influence of those two effects on both the energy and spatial resolution. The physical causes of these effects are delineated and their impact on the detector output is examined. In contrast to high energy photon detectors, the repulsion of the charge carriers drifting inside the sensor must not be neglected in a detailed model of X-ray detectors with an energy range of 5 keV-200 keV. For the simulation of the Medipix using Monte Carlo simulations, the software ROSI was augmented. The added features allow a detailed simulation of the charge distribution, using the relevant physical effects that alter the distribution width during the drift towards the sensor electrodes as well further influences on the detector output, including electronical noise, threshold noise or the geometry of the detector. The measured energy and spatial resolution of several different models of Medipix is compared to the simulated

  4. Development of criticality accident detector measuring neutrons and gamma-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsujimura, Norio; Yoshida, Tadayoshi; Ishii, Masato

    2005-01-01

    The authors developed a new criticality accident detector measuring neutrons and gamma-rays. The detector is a cylindrical plastic scintillator coupled to a current-mode operated photomultiplier, and is covered by an inner cadmium shell, acting as a neutron to gamma-ray converter, and a 5cm thick outer polyethylene moderator in order to respond to the same threshold triggering dose regardless of whether it was exposed to neutrons, gamma-rays or a mixture of the two radiations. (author)

  5. Artificial neural networks application for analysis of gamma ray spectrum obtained from the scintillation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stegowski, Z.

    2002-01-01

    Scintillation detectors are commonly used for the gamma ray detection. Actually the small peak resolution and the significant Compton effect fraction limit their utilization in the gamma ray spectrometry analysis. This article presents the artificial neural networks (ANN) application to the analysis of the gamma ray spectra acquired from scintillation detectors. The obtained results validate the effectiveness of the ANN method to spectrometry analysis. (author)

  6. Gamma ray and neutrino detector facility (GRANDE), Task C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sobel, H.W.; Yodh, G.B.

    1991-08-01

    GRANDE is an imaging, water Cerenkov detector, which combines in one facility an extensive air shower array and a high-energy neutrino detector. We proposed that the detector be constructed in phases, beginning with an active detector area of 31,000 m 2 (GRANDE-I) 2 and expanding to a final size of 100,000--150,00 m 2 . Some of the characteristics of GRANDE-I are discussed in this paper

  7. Development of an X-ray detector using photodiodes; Desarrollo de un detector de rayos X usando fotodiodos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez G, J.; Azorin V, J. C.; Sosa A, M. A.; Ceron, P., E-mail: gonzalezgj2012@licifug.ugto.mx [Universidad de Guanajuato, Division de Ciencias e Ingenierias, Loma del Bosque No. 103, Col. Lomas del Campestre, 37150 Leon, Guanajuato (Mexico)

    2016-10-15

    Currently the radiation detectors for medical applications are very high value in the market and are difficult to access as training material. In the Sciences and Engineering Division of the Guanajuato University (Mexico) investigations are carried out related to ionizing radiations, especially with X-rays. To overcome the lack of materials has had to resort to borrowing equipment from other institutions, so its use and availability are intermittent. For these reasons is proposed to design and implement an X-ray detector for the use of the work group and the University. This work aims to build an X-ray semiconductor detector using inexpensive and affordable materials, is also proposed the use of a photodiode sensor and an Arduino analog-digital card and a LCD display showing the data. (Author)

  8. Development of an X-ray detector using surface plasmon resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunieda, Y.; Nagashima, K.; Hasegawa, N.; Ochi, Y.

    2009-01-01

    A new X-ray detector using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) is proposed. The detector consists of a prism coated with a thin metal film and semiconductor film. Optical laser pulse induces SPR condition on the metal surface, and synchronized X-ray pulse which is absorbed into the semiconductor film can be detected by measuring the change of the resonance condition of the surface plasmon. The expected time and spatial resolution of this detector is better than that of conventional X-ray detectors by combining this SPR measurement with ultra-short laser pulse as the probe beam. Our preliminary investigation using Au and ZnSe coated prism implies this scheme works well as the detector for the ultra-short X-ray pulse.

  9. Cherenkov Water Detectors in Particle Physics and Cosmic Rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrukhin, A. A.; Yashin, I. I.

    2017-12-01

    Among various types of Cherenkov detectors (solid, liquid and gaseous) created for different studies, the most impressive development was gained by water detectors: from the first detector with a volume of several liters in which the Cherenkov radiation was discovered, to the IceCube detector with a volume of one cubic kilometer. The review of the development of Cherenkov water detectors for various purposes and having different locations - ground-based, underground and underwater-is presented in the paper. The prospects of their further development are also discussed.

  10. Microsecond-scale X-ray imaging with Controlled-Drift Detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castoldi, A.; Galimberti, A.; Guazzoni, C.; Rehak, P.; Strueder, L.

    2006-01-01

    The Controlled-Drift Detector is a fully-depleted silicon detector that allows 2-D position sensing and energy spectroscopy of X-rays in the range 0.5-20keV with excellent time resolution (few tens of μs) and limited readout channels. In this paper we review the Controlled-Drift Detector operating principle and we present the X-ray imaging and spectroscopic capabilities of Controlled Drift Detectors in microsecond-scale experiments and the more relevant applications fields

  11. Gamma ray energy loss spectra simulation in NaI detectors with the Monte Carlo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieira, W.J.

    1982-01-01

    With the aim of studying and applying the Monte Carlo method, a computer code was developed to calculate the pulse height spectra and detector efficiencies for gamma rays incident on NaI (Tl) crystals. The basic detector processes in NaI (Tl) detectors are given together with an outline of Monte Carlo methods and a general review of relevant published works. A detailed description of the application of Monte Carlo methods to ν-ray detection in NaI (Tl) detectors is given. Comparisons are made with published, calculated and experimental, data. (Author) [pt

  12. Directly-deposited blocking filters for high-performance silicon x-ray detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bautz, M.; Kissel, S.; Masterson, R.; Ryu, K.; Suntharalingam, V.

    2016-07-01

    Silicon X-ray detectors often require blocking filters to mitigate noise and out-of-band signal from UV and visible backgrounds. Such filters must be thin to minimize X-ray absorption, so direct deposition of filter material on the detector entrance surface is an attractive approach to fabrication of robust filters. On the other hand, the soft (E OD 6) care must be taken to prevent light from entering the sides and mounting surfaces of the detector. Our methods have been used to deposit filters on the detectors of the REXIS instrument scheduled to fly on OSIRIS-ReX later this year.

  13. Reconstruction of Spectra Using X-ray Flat Panel Detector; Reconstruccion de Espectros de Rayos X Utilizando un Detector Flat Panel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallardo, S.; Querol, A.; Pozuelo, F.; Juste, B.; Rodenas, J.; Verdu, G.

    2013-07-01

    In this work, we used a flat panel detector with a wedge of PMMA for absorbed dose curve for given working conditions of X-ray tube The relationship between absorbed dose curve recorded by the flat panel and primary X-ray spectrum is defined by a response function that can be obtained using the Monte Carlo method, namely the MCNP5 code. However there are some problems that affect the applicability of this method such as: flat panel characteristics and the characteristics of the physical process (ill-conditioned problem). Both aspects are discussed in this paper.

  14. Analysis of the direct x-ray absorption noise in phosphor-coupled CMOS detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Jong Chul; Yun, Seung Man; Kim, Ho Kyung; Cunningham, Ian; Achterkirchen, Thorsten

    2009-01-01

    It is known that the indirect conversion detectors have an NPS (noise power spectrum), which decreases with the spatial frequency, and the direct conversion detector have a nearly constant NPS with the spatial frequency (or white NPS). This explains that when a significant amount of x rays are not absorbed in the phosphor layer, then the additional absorption of x-rays in the semiconductor layers (or the photodiodes) with their white noise contributions degrades the total NPS performance. From the fact, we investigated how the direct x-ray affects CMOS detectors in terms of NPS and DQE (detective quantum efficiency)

  15. The γ rays sensitivity measurement of CeF3 scintillator detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Mengchun; Zhou Dianzhong; Li Rurong; Wang Zhentong; Yang Hongqiong; Zhang Jianhua; Hu Qingyuan; Peng Taiping

    2003-01-01

    The CeF 3 is an abio-scintillator developed in recent years, which are insensitive to neutron and sensitive to gamma rays and respond quickness. The relationship of CeF 3 scintillation detector gamma rays sensitivity with the change of crystal thickness was measured. The CeF 3 scintillation detector is composed by high liner current photomultiplier tube of CHφT3, CHφT5 and CeF 3 scintillator. The detector gamma rays sensitivity of purple photocell and common photocell with CeF 3 scintillator were measured too

  16. Study on data acquisition circuit used in SSPA linear array detector X-ray detection

    CERN Document Server

    Wei Biao; Che Zhen Ping

    2002-01-01

    After SSPA used as X-ray array detector is developed, the authors take a research on the data acquisition circuit applied to the detector. The experiment designed has verified the feasibility of application of this array detector and its data acquisition circuit to X-ray computed tomography (X-CT). The preliminary test results indicate that the method of the X-ray detection is feasible for industry X-CT nondestructive testing, which brings about advantage for detecting and measuring with high resolution, good efficiency and low cost

  17. Transmission properties of barite mortar using X-ray spectra measured with Cd Te detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, J. C.; Mariano, L.; Costa, P. R. [Universidade de Sao Paulo, Instituto de Fisica, Rua do Matao Travessa R. 187, Cidade Universitaria, 05508-090 Sao Paulo (Brazil); Tomal, A., E-mail: josilene@usp.br [Universidade Federal de Goias, Instituto de Fisica, Campus Samambaia, 74001-970 Goiania (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    Current methods for calculating X-ray shielding barriers do not take into account spectral distribution of the beam transmitted by the protective material. This consideration is important in dose estimations for radiation workers and general public in diagnostic radiology facilities. The aim of the present study was to estimate barite mortar attenuation curves using X-ray spectra weighted by a workload distribution. These curves were described in units of ambient dose equivalent (H (10)), since it is the radiation quantity adopted by IAEA for dose assessment in medical environment. Attenuation curves were determined using the optimized model for shielding evaluation presented by Costa and Caldas (2002). Workload distribution presented by Simpkin (1996), measured primary spectra and mass attenuation coefficients of barite mortar were used as input data in this model. X-ray beams in diagnostic energy range were generated by an industrial X-ray tube with 3 mm of aluminum additional filtration. Primary experimental spectra were measured by a Cd Te detector and corrected by the response function of detector by means of a stripping procedure. Air kerma measurements were performed using an ionization chamber for normalization purpose of the spectra. The corrected spectra presented good agreement with spectra generated by a semi-empirical model. The variation of the ambient dose equivalent as a function of barite mortar thickness was calculated. Using these data, it was estimated the optimized thickness of protective barrier needed for shielding a particular area in an X-ray imaging facility. The results obtained for primary protective barriers exhibit qualitative agreement with those presented in literature. (Author)

  18. Evaluation of a photon counting Medipix3RX CZT spectral x-ray detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgensen, Steven M.; Vercnocke, Andrew J.; Rundle, David S.; Butler, Philip H.; McCollough, Cynthia H.; Ritman, Erik L.

    2016-10-01

    We assessed the performance of a cadmium zinc telluride (CZT)-based Medipix3RX x-ray detector as a candidate for micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) imaging. This technology was developed at CERN for the Large Hadron Collider. It features an array of 128 by 128, 110 micrometer square pixels, each with eight simultaneous threshold counters, five of which utilize real-time charge summing, significantly reducing the charge sharing between contiguous pixels. Pixel response curves were created by imaging a range of x-ray intensities by varying x-ray tube current and by varying the exposure time with fixed x-ray current. Photon energy-related assessments were made by flooding the detector with the tin foil filtered emission of an I-125 radioisotope brachytherapy seed and sweeping the energy threshold of each of the four charge-summed counters of each pixel in 1 keV steps. Long term stability assessments were made by repeating exposures over the course of one hour. The high properly-functioning pixel yield (99%), long term stability (linear regression of whole-chip response over one hour of acquisitions: y = -0.0038x + 2284; standard deviation: 3.7 counts) and energy resolution (2.5 keV FWHM (single pixel), 3.7 keV FWHM across the full image) make this device suitable for spectral micro-CT. The charge summing performance effectively reduced the measurement corruption caused by charge sharing which, when unaccounted for, shifts the photon energy assignment to lower energies, degrading both count and energy accuracy. Effective charge summing greatly improves the potential for calibrated, energy-specific material decomposition and K edge difference imaging approaches.

  19. Gaining efficiency and resolution in soft X-ray emission spectrometers thanks to directly illuminated CCD detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dinardo, M.E.; Piazzalunga, A.; Braicovich, L.; Bisogni, V.; Dallera, C.; Giarda, K.; Marcon, M.; Tagliaferri, A.; Ghiringhelli, G.

    2007-01-01

    The back-illuminated charge coupled devices (CCD) are suitable for soft X-ray photon detection. Their nominal performances suggest that they can boost both efficiency and resolving power of X-ray spectrometers based on diffraction gratings and two-dimensional position sensitive detectors. We tested the performances of two commercially available CCDs, intended to replace a more traditional microchannel plate (MCP) detector. Our tests show that the devices have excellent performances in terms of dark current, response linearity, detection efficiency and spatial resolution. We observed that the CCDs have better efficiency (more than 10 times) and better resolution (∼3 times) than the MCP. Moreover we found an intrinsic limit for the spatial resolution, which is almost independent of the detector pixel size and is estimated around 25 μm

  20. Silicon detectors for x and gamma-ray with high radiation resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cimpoca, Valerica; Popescu, Ion V.; Ruscu, Radu

    2001-01-01

    Silicon detectors are widely used in X and gamma-ray spectroscopy for direct detection or coupled with scintillators in high energy nuclear physics (modern collider experiments are representative), medicine and industrial applications. In X and gamma dosimetry, a low detection limit (under 6 KeV) with silicon detectors becomes available. Work at the room temperature is now possible due to the silicon processing evolution, which assures low reverse current and high life time of carriers. For several years, modern semiconductor detectors have been the primary choice for the measurement of nuclear radiation in various scientific fields. Nowadays the recently developed high resolution silicon detectors found their way in medical applications. As a consequence many efforts have been devoted to the development of high sensitivity and radiation hardened X and gamma-ray detectors for the energy range of 5 - 150 keV. The paper presents some results concerning the technology and behaviour of X and Gamma ray silicon detectors used in physics research, industrial and medical radiography. The electrical characteristics of these detectors, their modification after exposure to radiation and the results of spectroscopic X and Gamma-ray measurements are discussed. The results indicated that the proposed detectors enables the development of reliable silicon detectors to be used in controlling the low and high radiation levels encountered in a lot of application

  1. Full energy peak efficiency of composite detectors for high energy gamma-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kshetri, Ritesh

    2015-01-01

    Experiments involving radioactive beams demand high detection efficiencies. One of the ways to obtain high detection efficiency without deteriorating the energy resolution or timing characteristics is the use of composite detectors which are composed of standard HPGe crystals arranged in a compact way. Two simplest composite detectors are the clover and cluster detectors. The TRIUMF-ISAC Gamma-Ray Escape-Suppressed Spectrometer (TIGRESS) comprises of 16 large volume, 32-fold segmented HPGe clover detectors, where each detector is shielded by a 20-fold segmented escape suppression shield (ESS)

  2. Room temperature X- and gamma-ray detectors using thallium bromide crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Hitomi, K; Shoji, T; Suehiro, T; Hiratate, Y

    1999-01-01

    Thallium bromide (TlBr) is a compound semiconductor with wide band gap (2.68 eV) and high X- and gamma-ray stopping power. The TlBr crystals were grown by the horizontal travelling molten zone (TMZ) method using purified material. Two types of room temperature X- and gamma-ray detectors were fabricated from the TlBr crystals: TlBr detectors with high detection efficiency for positron annihilation gamma-ray (511 keV) detection and TlBr detectors with high-energy resolution for low-energy X-ray detection. The detector of the former type demonstrated energy resolution of 56 keV FWHM (11%) for 511 keV gamma-rays. Energy resolution of 1.81 keV FWHM for 5.9 keV was obtained from the detector of the latter type. In order to analyze noise characteristics of the detector-preamplifier assembly, the equivalent noise charge (ENC) was measured as a function of the amplifier shaping time for the high-resolution detector. This analysis shows that parallel white noise and 1/f noise were dominant noise sources in the detector...

  3. Responses of conventional and extended-range neutron detectors in mixed radiation fields around a 150-MeV electron LINAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Yu-Chi; Sheu, Rong-Jiun; Chen, Ang-Yu

    2015-01-01

    This study analyzed the responses of two types of neutron detector in mixed gamma-ray and neutron radiation fields around a 150-MeV electron linear accelerator (LINAC). The detectors were self-assembled, high efficiency, and designed in two configurations: (1) a conventional moderated-type neutron detector based on a large cylindrical He-3 proportional counter; and (2) an extended-range version with an embedded layer of lead in the moderator to increase the detector’s sensitivity to high-energy neutrons. Two sets of the detectors were used to measure neutrons at the downstream and lateral locations simultaneously, where the radiation fields differed considerably in intensities and spectra of gamma rays and neutrons. Analyzing the detector responses through a comparison between calculations and measurements indicated that not only neutrons but also high-energy gamma rays (>5 MeV) triggered the detectors because of photoneutrons produced in the detector materials. In the lateral direction, the contribution of photoneutrons to both detectors was negligible. Downstream of the LINAC, where high-energy photons were abundant, photoneutrons contributed approximately 6% of the response of the conventional neutron detector; however, almost 50% of the registered counts of the extended-range neutron detector were from photoneutrons because of the presence of the detector rather than the effect of the neutron field. Dose readings delivered by extended-range neutron detectors should be interpreted cautiously when used in radiation fields containing a mixture of neutrons and high-energy gamma rays

  4. Simulation of medical irradiation and X-ray detector signals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kreisler, Bjoern

    2010-02-08

    This thesis aims for an improved understanding of medical irradiation. Two major parts are investigated: the beam shaping components of a medical linear accelerator, i.e. the source of the radiation, and the signal generation inside semiconductor sensors, i.e. the detection of the radiation. The direct measurement of the spatial and spectral particle distribution in the irradiation beam is not possible with state of the art detectors due to the high particle flux. The development of new advanced detectors is the goal of the first part of this thesis. The focus is set on the signal generation inside the sensor volume of a semiconductor detector. Incoming particles interact with the sensor material and generate clouds of electron hole pairs. These pairs get separated by an applied bias voltage. The motion of the charge clouds is simulated with a finite element programme taking into account the drift and diffusion. Mirror charges are induced on the electrodes which move due to the motion of the charge cloud. The motion of the induced mirror charges leads to the signal that is detected. The transient calculation of the signals is based on Ramo's theorem. The efficient adjoint formulation of the induction solution is adjusted to doped materials, as for example the electric bias field and hence the motion of the charge cloud is changing with the doping level. The effect of the doping of the material on the signal shape is shown together with influences of different voltages and pixel geometries. Smaller pixels and higher bias voltages can lead to shorter signals which is preferable for high flux measurements. Possible count rate improvements are limited by electric break through, high dark current across the sensor layer and charge sharing. Another option to shorten the signals is the use of steering grid electrodes which modify the electric and the weighting field. This results in shorter signals and thus in a higher possible rate. The detailed Monte

  5. Simulation of medical irradiation and X-ray detector signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kreisler, Bjoern

    2010-01-01

    This thesis aims for an improved understanding of medical irradiation. Two major parts are investigated: the beam shaping components of a medical linear accelerator, i.e. the source of the radiation, and the signal generation inside semiconductor sensors, i.e. the detection of the radiation. The direct measurement of the spatial and spectral particle distribution in the irradiation beam is not possible with state of the art detectors due to the high particle flux. The development of new advanced detectors is the goal of the first part of this thesis. The focus is set on the signal generation inside the sensor volume of a semiconductor detector. Incoming particles interact with the sensor material and generate clouds of electron hole pairs. These pairs get separated by an applied bias voltage. The motion of the charge clouds is simulated with a finite element programme taking into account the drift and diffusion. Mirror charges are induced on the electrodes which move due to the motion of the charge cloud. The motion of the induced mirror charges leads to the signal that is detected. The transient calculation of the signals is based on Ramo's theorem. The efficient adjoint formulation of the induction solution is adjusted to doped materials, as for example the electric bias field and hence the motion of the charge cloud is changing with the doping level. The effect of the doping of the material on the signal shape is shown together with influences of different voltages and pixel geometries. Smaller pixels and higher bias voltages can lead to shorter signals which is preferable for high flux measurements. Possible count rate improvements are limited by electric break through, high dark current across the sensor layer and charge sharing. Another option to shorten the signals is the use of steering grid electrodes which modify the electric and the weighting field. This results in shorter signals and thus in a higher possible rate. The detailed Monte-Carlo simulation of

  6. X-ray detectors for structure investigations constructed at JINR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chernenko, S P [LHE Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation); Cheremukhina, G A [LHE Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation); Fateev, O V [LHE Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation); Smykov, L P [LHE Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation); Vasiliev, S E [LHE Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation); Zanevsky, Yu V [LHE Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation); Kheiker, D M [Institute of Crystallography, Leninsky prosp. 59, 117333 Moscow (Russian Federation); Popov, A N [Institute of Crystallography, Leninsky prosp. 59, 117333 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1994-09-01

    The performance characteristics of a few high resolution position-sensitive detectors constructed at JINR are presented. The detectors supplied with original software operate with an IBM PC/AT. One of these devices has been succesfully applied for protein molecule structure investigations and the other for studies of the structure-forming process during combustion. The preliminary parameters of the high count rate MWPC with parallel electronics and the testing results of the microstrip detector are given. ((orig.))

  7. Imaging plate, a new type of x-ray area detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamiya, Nobuo; Amemiya, Yoshiyuki; Miyahara, Junji.

    1986-01-01

    In respective fields of X-ray crystallography, for the purpose of the efficient collection of reciprocal space information, two-dimensional X-ray detectors such as multiwire proportional chambers and X-ray television sets have been used together with conventional X-ray films. X-ray films are characterized by uniform sensitivity and high positional resolution over a wide area, but the sensitivity is low, and the range of action and the linearity of the sensitivity is problematic. They require the development process, accordingly lack promptitude. The MWPCs and X-ray television sets are superior in the sensitivity, its linearity, the range of action and promptitude, but interior in the uniformity and resolution to the films. Imaging plate is a new X-ray area detector developed by Fuji Photo Film Co., Ltd., for digital X-ray medical image diagnosis. This detector is superior in all the above mentioned performances, and it seems very useful also for X-ray crystallography. In this paper, the system composed of an imaging plate and its reader is described, and the basic performance as an X-ray area detector and the results of having recorded the diffraction images of protein crystals as the example of applying it to X-ray crystallography are reported. The imaging plate is that the crystalline fluorescent powder of BaFBr doped with Eu 2+ ions is applied on plastic films. (Kako, I.)

  8. Parametric curve evaluation of a phototransistor used as detector in stereotactic radiosurgery X-ray beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, Daniela Pontes A.; Santos, Luiz Antonio P.; Santos, Walter M.; Silva Junior, Eronides F. da

    2005-01-01

    Phototransistors have been widely used as detectors for low energy X-rays. However, when they are used in high energy X-rays fields like those generated from linear accelerators (linac), there is a certain loss of sensibility to the ionizing radiation. This damage is cumulative and irreversible. Thus, a correction factor must be applied to its response, which is proportional to the integrated dose. However, it is possible to estimate the correction factor by using the V x I parametric curve of the device. The aim of this work was to develop studies to evaluate and correlate the parametric response curve of a phototransistor with its loss of sensibility after irradiation. An Agilent 4155C semiconductor parameter analyzer was used to trace the parametric curve. X-rays were generated by a 14 MV Primus-Siemens linear accelerator. The results demonstrated that there is a correlation between the integrated dose applied to the phototransistor and the parametric response of the device. Studies are under way to determine how such behavior can provide information for the dosimetric planning in stereotactic radiosurgery. (author)

  9. Accelerated Aging Test for Plastic Scintillator Gamma Ray Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kouzes, Richard T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2017-05-12

    Polyvinyl toluene (PVT) and polystyrene (PS), collectively referred to as “plastic scintillator,” are synthetic polymer materials used to detect gamma radiation, and are commonly used in instrumentation. Recent studies have revealed that plastic scintillator undergoes an environmentally related material degradation that adversely affects performance under certain conditions and histories. A significant decrease in gamma ray sensitivity has been seen in some detectors in systems as they age. The degradation of sensitivity of plastic scintillator over time is due to a variety of factors, and the term “aging” is used to encompass all factors. Some plastic scintillator samples show no aging effects (no significant change in sensitivity over more than 10 years), while others show severe aging (significant change in sensitivity in less than 5 years). Aging effects arise from weather (variations in heat and humidity), chemical exposure, mechanical stress, light exposure, and loss of volatile components. The damage produced by these various causes can be cumulative, causing observable damage to increase over time. Damage may be reversible up to some point, but becomes permanent under some conditions. It has been demonstrated that exposure of plastic scintillator in an environmental chamber to 30 days of high temperature and humidity (90% relative humidity and 55°C) followed by a single cycle to cold temperature (-30°C) will produce severe fogging in all PVT samples. This thermal cycle will be referred to as the “Accelerated Aging Test.” This document describes the procedure for performing this Accelerated Aging Test.

  10. Applications of 'edge-on' illuminated porous plate detectors for diagnostic X-ray imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Shikhaliev, P M

    2002-01-01

    Scanning X-ray imaging systems for non-invasive diagnostics have several advantages over conventional imaging systems using area detectors. They significantly reduce the detected scatter radiation, cover large areas and potentially provide high spatial resolution. Applications of one-dimensional gaseous detectors and 'edge-on' illuminated silicon strip detectors for scanning imaging systems are currently under intensive investigation. The purpose of this work is to investigate 'edge-on' illuminated Porous Plate (PP) detectors for applications in diagnostic X-ray imaging. MicroChannel Plate (MCP), which is a common type of PP, has previously been investigated as a detector in surface-on illumination mode for medical X-ray imaging. However, its detection efficiency was too low for medical imaging applications. In the present study, the PP are used in the 'edge-on' illumination mode. Furthermore, the structural parameters of different PP types are optimized to improve the detection efficiency in the diagnostic X...

  11. Application of energy dispersive X-ray spectrometers with semiconductor detectors in radiometric analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jugelt, P.; Schieckel, M.

    1983-01-01

    Problems and possibilities of applying semiconductor detector spectrometers in radiometric analyses are described. A summary of the state of the art and tendencies of device engineering and spectra evaluation is given. Liquid-nitrogen cooled Li-drifted Si-detectors and high-purity Ge-detectors are compared. Semiconductor detectors working at room temperature are under development. In this connection CdTe and HgI 2 semiconductor detectors are compared. The use of small efficient computers in the spectrometer systems stimulates the development of algorithms for spectra analyses and for determining the concentration. Fields of application of energy dispersive X-ray spectrometers are X-ray diffraction and X-ray macroanalysis in investigating the structure of extensive surface regions

  12. On the calibration of a single channel cosmic ray particle detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maghrabi, A. H.; Alghamdi, A. S.; Alotaibi, R.; Almutari, M. M.; Garawi, M. S.

    2014-07-01

    Cosmic Ray (CR) variation measurements have been extensively conducted using different type of detectors sensing different components of CR and at different locations around the world. We have constructed and, operated a single channel muon detector in the central part of Saudi Arabia. The main goal of this detector is to record the intensity of cosmic rays on different time scales and investigate their correlations with environment parameters. This detector is expected to fill the gap between neutron monitors and muon telescopes that exist around the world. In this paper, the technical aspects of this detector will be briefly discussed. Calibration procedures conducted to characterize and improve its performance will be detailed. These include the effect of the detector geometry and the internal surface coating.

  13. Analysis of the TMI-2 source range detector response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carew, J.F.; Diamond, D.J.; Eridon, J.M.

    1980-01-01

    In the first few hours following the TMI-2 accident large variations (factors of 10-100) in the source range (SR) detector response were observed. The purpose of this analysis was to quantify the various effects which could contribute to these large variations. The effects evaluated included the transmission of neutrons and photons from the core to detector and the reduction in the multiplication of the Am-Be startup sources, and subsequent reduction in SR detector response, due to core voiding. A one-dimensional ANISN slab model of the TMI-2 core, core externals, pressure vessel and containment has been constructed for calculation of the SR detector response and is presented

  14. TL detectors for gamma-ray dose measurements in critically accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miljanic, S.; Knezevic, Z.; Zorko, B.; Gregori, B.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Determination of gamma-ray dose in mixed neutron + gamma-ray fields is still a challenging task. Dosemeters used for gamma-ray dosimetry are usually in some extent sensitive to neutrons and their response variations depend on neutron energy i.e. on neutron spectra. Besides, it is necessary to take into account the energy dependence of dosimeter responses to gamma-rays. To reduce all these influences, design of dosemeter holders is of special importance. In this work, several types of thermoluminescent detectors (TLD) placed in different holders used for gamma-ray dose determination in mixed fields were examined. Dosemeters were from three different institutions: Ruder Boscovic Institute (RBI), Croatia, Jozef Stefan Institute (JSI), Slovenia and Autoridad Regulatoria Nuclear (ARN), Argentina. All dosemeters were irradiated during the International Intercomparison of Criticality Accident Dosimetry Systems at the SILENE Reactor, Valduc, June 2002. At that exercise three accidental scenarios were reproduced: bare reactor, free evolution; lead shielded reactor, steady state; and lead shielded reactor, free evolution. In each irradiation dosemeters were exposed placed on the front of phantom and 'free-in-air'. Also, dosemeters were irradiated in a pure gamma ray field of 60 Co source. Following types of TLDs were used: 7 LiF (TLD-700), CaF 2 :Mn and AI 2 O 3 :Mg,Y - all from RBI; CaF 2 :Mn from JSI and 7 LiF (TLD-700) from ARN. Reported doses were compared with the reference values as well as with the mean participants' values. The results show satisfactory agreement with other dosimetry systems used in the Intercomparison. The influence of different types of holders and applied corrections of dosemeters' readings are discussed. (author)

  15. Responses of diode detectors to radiation beams from teletherapy machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malinda, Lora; Nasukha

    2003-01-01

    Responses of diode detectors to radiation beams from teletherapy machines. It has been carried out responses to two sets of diode detector by using the beams of teletherapy Co-60 and medical linear accelerator. Each set of consist of 8 diode detectors was irradiated by using gamma beams from teletherapy Co-60 machines and 6 MV and 10 MV foron beams from medical linear accelerator and 6.9.12.16. and 20 MeV electron beams from medical linear accelerator. The detectors were positioned on the phantom circularly and radially and electronic equilibrium condition for all type and energy beams. It was found that every detectors had own individual response and it is not to be uniformity, since the fluctuation in between 16.6 % to 30.9 %. All detectors responses are linear to gamma and foron beams, and also for energy above 6 MeV for electron beams. Nonlinearity response occurs for 6 MeV electron beam, it is probably from the assumption of electronic equilibrium

  16. Current responsivity of semiconductor superlattice THz-photon detectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ignatov, Anatoly A.; Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    1999-01-01

    The current responsivity of a semiconductor superlattice THz-photon detector is calculated using an equivalent circuit model which takes into account the finite matching efficiency between a detector antenna and the superlattice in the presence of parasitic losses. Calculations performed for curr......The current responsivity of a semiconductor superlattice THz-photon detector is calculated using an equivalent circuit model which takes into account the finite matching efficiency between a detector antenna and the superlattice in the presence of parasitic losses. Calculations performed...... for currently available superlattice diodes show that both the magnitudes and the roll-off frequencies of the responsivity are strongly influenced by an excitation of hybrid plasma-Bloch oscillations which are found to be eigenmodes of the system in the THz-frequency band. The expected room temperature values...... of the responsivity (2–3 A/W in the 1–3 THz-frequency band) range up to several percents of the quantum efficiency e/[h-bar] omega of an ideal superconductor tunnel junction detector. Properly designed semiconductor superlattice detectors may thus demonstrate better room temperature THz-photon responsivity than...

  17. Small angle X-ray scattering experiments with three-dimensional imaging gas detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    La Monaca, A.; Iannuzzi, M.; Messi, R.

    1985-01-01

    Measurements of small angle X-ray scattering of lupolen - R, dry collagen and dry cornea are presented. The experiments have been performed with synchrotron radiation and a new three-dimensional imaging drif-chamber gas detector

  18. Study on effects of gamma-ray irradiation on TlBr semiconductor detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumura, Motohiro; Watanabe, Kenichi; Yamazaki, Atsushi; Uritani, Akira; Kimura, Norihisa; Nagano, Nobumichi; Hitomi, Keitaro

    2016-01-01

    Radiation hardness of thallium bromide (TlBr) semiconductor detectors to 60 Co gamma-ray irradiation was evaluated. The energy spectra and μτ products of electrons were measured to evaluate the irradiation effects. No significant degradation of spectroscopic performance of the TlBr detector for 137 Cs gamma-rays was observed up to 45 kGy irradiation. Although the μτ products of electrons in the TlBr detector slightly decreased, position of the photo-peak was stable without significant degradation after the gamma-ray irradiation. We confirmed that the TlBr semiconductor detector has a high tolerance for gamma-ray irradiation at least up to 45 kGy. (author)

  19. Gamma-ray tracking: Characterisation of the AGATA symmetric prototype detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boston, A.J.; Boston, H.C.; Cresswell, J.R.; Dimmock, M.R.; Nelson, L.; Nolan, P.J.; Rigby, S.; Lazarus, I.; Simpson, J.; Medina, P.; Santos, C.; Parisel, C.

    2007-01-01

    Each major technical advance in gamma-ray detection devices has resulted in significant new insights into the structure of atomic nuclei. The next major step in gamma-ray spectroscopy involves achieving the goal of a 4pi ball of Germanium detectors by using the technique of gamma-ray energy tracking in electrically segmented Germanium crystals. The resulting spectrometer will have an unparalleled level of detection power for nuclear electromagnetic radiation. Collaborations have been established in Europe (AGATA) [J. Simpson, Acta Phys. Pol. B 36 (2005) 1383. ] and the USA (GRETA/GRETINA) to build gamma-ray tracking spectrometers. This paper discusses the performance of the AGATA (Advanced Gamma Tracking Array) symmetric prototype detectors that have been tested at University of Liverpool. The use of a fully digital data acquisition system has allowed detector charge pulse shapes from a selection of well defined photon interaction positions to be analysed, yielding important information on the position sensitivity of the detector

  20. Gamma-ray tracking: Characterisation of the AGATA symmetric prototype detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boston, A.J. [Oliver Lodge Laboratory, University of Liverpool, Oxford Street, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: ajboston@liv.ac.uk; Boston, H.C. [Oliver Lodge Laboratory, University of Liverpool, Oxford Street, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); Cresswell, J.R. [Oliver Lodge Laboratory, University of Liverpool, Oxford Street, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); Dimmock, M.R. [Oliver Lodge Laboratory, University of Liverpool, Oxford Street, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); Nelson, L. [Oliver Lodge Laboratory, University of Liverpool, Oxford Street, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); Nolan, P.J. [Oliver Lodge Laboratory, University of Liverpool, Oxford Street, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); Rigby, S. [Oliver Lodge Laboratory, University of Liverpool, Oxford Street, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); Lazarus, I. [STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Daresbury, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Simpson, J. [STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Daresbury, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Medina, P. [Institut de Recherches Subatomiques, Strasbourg BP28 67037 (France); Santos, C. [Institut de Recherches Subatomiques, Strasbourg BP28 67037 (France); Parisel, C. [Institut de Recherches Subatomiques, Strasbourg BP28 67037 (France)

    2007-08-15

    Each major technical advance in gamma-ray detection devices has resulted in significant new insights into the structure of atomic nuclei. The next major step in gamma-ray spectroscopy involves achieving the goal of a 4pi ball of Germanium detectors by using the technique of gamma-ray energy tracking in electrically segmented Germanium crystals. The resulting spectrometer will have an unparalleled level of detection power for nuclear electromagnetic radiation. Collaborations have been established in Europe (AGATA) [J. Simpson, Acta Phys. Pol. B 36 (2005) 1383. ] and the USA (GRETA/GRETINA) to build gamma-ray tracking spectrometers. This paper discusses the performance of the AGATA (Advanced Gamma Tracking Array) symmetric prototype detectors that have been tested at University of Liverpool. The use of a fully digital data acquisition system has allowed detector charge pulse shapes from a selection of well defined photon interaction positions to be analysed, yielding important information on the position sensitivity of the detector.

  1. Photovoltaic X-ray detectors based on epitaxial GaAs structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Achmadullin, R.A. [Institute of Radio Engineering and Electronics, Russian Academy of Sciences, 1 Ac. Vvedenski square, Fryazino 141190, Moscow region (Russian Federation); Artemov, V.V. [Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography, Russian Academy of Sciences, 59 Leninski pr., Moscow B-333, 117333 (Russian Federation); Dvoryankin, V.F. [Institute of Radio Engineering and Electronics, Russian Academy of Sciences, 1 Ac. Vvedenski square, Fryazino 141190, Moscow region (Russian Federation)]. E-mail: vfd217@ire216.msk.su; Dvoryankina, G.G. [Institute of Radio Engineering and Electronics, Russian Academy of Sciences, 1 Ac. Vvedenski square, Fryazino 141190, Moscow region (Russian Federation); Dikaev, Yu.M. [Institute of Radio Engineering and Electronics, Russian Academy of Sciences, 1 Ac. Vvedenski square, Fryazino 141190, Moscow region (Russian Federation); Ermakov, M.G. [Institute of Radio Engineering and Electronics, Russian Academy of Sciences, 1 Ac. Vvedenski square, Fryazino 141190, Moscow region (Russian Federation); Ermakova, O.N. [Institute of Radio Engineering and Electronics, Russian Academy of Sciences, 1 Ac. Vvedenski square, Fryazino 141190, Moscow region (Russian Federation); Chmil, V.B. [Scientific State Center, High Energy Physics Institute, Protvino, Moscow region (Russian Federation); Holodenko, A.G. [Scientific State Center, High Energy Physics Institute, Protvino, Moscow region (Russian Federation); Kudryashov, A.A.; Krikunov, A.I.; Petrov, A.G.; Telegin, A.A. [Institute of Radio Engineering and Electronics, Russian Academy of Sciences, 1 Ac. Vvedenski square, Fryazino 141190, Moscow region (Russian Federation); Vorobiev, A.P. [Scientific State Center, High Energy Physics Institute, Protvino, Moscow region (Russian Federation)

    2005-12-01

    A new type of the photovoltaic X-ray detector based on epitaxial p{sup +}-n-n'-n{sup +} GaAs structures which provides a high efficiency of charge collection in the non-bias operation mode at room temperature is proposed. The GaAs epitaxial structures were grown by vapor-phase epitaxy on heavily doped n{sup +}-GaAs(1 0 0) substrates. The absorption efficiency of GaAs X-ray detector is discussed. I-V and C-V characteristics of the photovoltaic X-ray detectors are analyzed. The built-in electric field profiles in the depletion region of epitaxial structures are measured by the EBIC method. Charge collection efficiency to {alpha}-particles and {gamma}-radiation are measured. The application of X-ray detectors is discussed.

  2. Evaluation of In-Vacuum Imaging Plate Detector for X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishino, Yoshinori; Takahashi, Yukio; Yamamoto, Masaki; Ishikawa, Tetsuya

    2007-01-01

    We performed evaluation tests of a newly developed in-vacuum imaging plate (IP) detector for x-ray diffraction microscopy. IP detectors have advantages over direct x-ray detection charge-coupled device (CCD) detectors, which have been commonly used in x-ray diffraction microscopy experiments, in the capabilities for a high photon count and for a wide area. The detector system contains two IPs to make measurement efficient by recording data with the one while reading or erasing the other. We compared speckled diffraction patterns of single particles taken with the IP and a direct x-ray detection CCD. The IP was inferior to the CCD in spatial resolution and in signal-to-noise ratio at a low photon count

  3. CsI(Tl)-photodiode detectors for gamma-ray spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Fioretto, E; Viesti, G; Cinausero, M; Zuin, L; Fabris, D; Lunardon, M; Nebbia, G; Prete, G

    2000-01-01

    We report on the performances of CsI(Tl)-photodiode detectors for gamma-ray spectroscopy applications. Light output yield and energy resolution have been measured for different crystals and read-out configurations.

  4. Energy dependence evaluation of a ZnO detector for diagnostic X-ray beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valença, C.P.V.; Silveira, M.A.L.; Macedo, M.A.; Santos, M.A.

    2015-01-01

    In the last decades the international organizations of human health and radiation protection have recommended certain care for using X-ray as a diagnosis tool. The current concern is to avoid any type of radiological accident or overdose to the patient. This can be done assessing the parameters of the X-ray equipment and there are various types of detectors available for that: ionizing chamber, semiconductor devices, etc. These detectors must be calibrated so that they can be used for any energy range and such a procedure is correlated with what is called the energy dependence of the detector. In accordance with the stated requirements of IEC 61267, the standard radiation quality beams and irradiation conditions (RQRs) are the tools and techniques for calibrating diagnostic X-Ray instruments and detectors. The purpose of this work is to evaluate the behavior of the energy dependence of a detector fabricated from a zinc oxide (ZnO) nanofilm. A Pantak industrial X-ray equipment was used to generate the RQR radiation quality beams and test three ZnO detector samples. A 6430 sub-femto-ammeter, Keithley, was used to bias the ZnO detector and simultaneously perform the output readings. The results showed that the ZnO device has some increase in its sensitivity to the ionizing radiation as the X-ray effective energy decreases unlike other types of semiconductor electronic devices typically used as an X-ray detector. We can be concluded that, after calibration, the ZnO device can be used as a diagnostic X-ray detector. (author)

  5. Evaluation of the energy dependence of a zinc oxide nanofilm X-ray detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valenca, C.P.V.; Silveira, M.A.L.; Macedo, M.A.; Santos, L.A.P

    2015-01-01

    International organizations of human health and radiation protection have recommended certain care for using of the X-ray as a diagnosis tool to avoid any type of radiological accident or overdose to the patient. This can be done assessing the parameters of the X-ray equipment and there are various types of detectors available for that: ionizing chamber, electronic semiconductor devices, etc. These detectors must be calibrated so that they can be used for any energy range and such a procedure is correlated with what is called the energy dependence of the detector. In accordance with the stated requirements of IEC 61267, the standard radiation quality beams and irradiation conditions (RQRs) are the tools and techniques for calibrating diagnostic X-Ray instruments and detectors. The purpose of this work is to evaluate the behavior of the energy dependence of a detector fabricated from a zinc oxide (ZnO) nanofilm. A Pantak industrial X-ray equipment was used to generate the RQR radiation quality beams and test three ZnO detector samples. A 6430 sub-femto-ammeter, Keithley, was used to bias the ZnO detector and simultaneously perform the output readings. The results showed that the ZnO device has some increase in its sensitivity to the ionizing radiation as the X-ray effective energy decreases unlike other types of semiconductor electronic devices typically used as an X-ray detector. We can conclude that the ZnO device can be used as a diagnostic X-ray detector with an appropriate calibration. (author)

  6. New portable 1200 W X-ray detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liebram, A.; Niemann, W.; Nielsen, J.

    2005-01-01

    The contribution presents new detectors of up to 1200 W. The new detectors by YXLON have several of the following advantages, depending on the application: a) Reduced exposure time; b) Higher contrast; c) deeper penetration. The high efficiency, the duty cycle achieved, and the low price make the instruments interesting also for stationary applications in radiography and radioscopy [de

  7. MOS solid-state detector arrays for x-ray imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koppel, L.N.

    1977-01-01

    Two types of MOS detector arrays were used to sense directly patterns of soft x-rays, in the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory experimental laser-fusion program. A linear self-scanning photodiode array (SSPA) is used in a wave-length-dispersive spectrometer. A frame transfer charge-coupled device (CCD) facilitates the use of an x-ray microscope. Measurements and calculations of the x-ray sensitivity of these devices are presented. Their linearity and dynamic range are discussed, as well as data recovery systems for each detector. Experiences in using these devices to detect pulses of x-rays in laser-fusion experiments are described

  8. Si(Li) detector system for application to x-ray astronomy rocket experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffiths, R.E.; Cheron, C.; Friant, A.; Jehanno, C.; Rocchia, R.; Rothenflug, R.; Testard, O.

    1975-01-01

    The problems associated with the use of Si(Li) detectors in x-ray astronomy rocket experiments are discussed. In particular a detector system is described that can be used at the focus of a grazing-incidence paraboloid telescope for the energy range 0.3 to 2 keV. (U.S.)

  9. Semiconductor detectors in current energy dispersive X-ray spectral analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Betin, J.; Zhabin, E.; Krampit, I.; Smirnov, V.

    1980-01-01

    A review is presented of the properties of semiconductor detectors and of the possibilities stemming therefrom of using the detectors in X-ray spectral analysis in industries, in logging, in ecology and environmental control, in medicine, etc. (M.S.)

  10. A BaF2-BGO detector for high-energy gamma rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bargholtz, C.; Ritzen, B.; Tegner, P.E.

    1989-01-01

    A scintillation detector has been developed for gamma rays with energy between a few hundred keV and approximately 100 MeV. The detector comprises a BaF 2 and a BGO crystal giving it good timing properties and a reasonably good energy resolution in combination with compact size. (orig.)

  11. Performance of a 6x6 segmented germanium detector for {gamma}-ray tracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valiente-Dobon, J.J. E-mail: j.valiente-dobon@surrey.ac.uk; Pearson, C.J.; Regan, P.H.; Sellin, P.J.; Gelletly, W.; Morton, E.; Boston, A.; Descovich, M.; Nolan, P.J.; Simpson, J.; Lazarus, I.; Warner, D

    2003-06-01

    A 36 fold segmented germanium coaxial detector has been supplied by EURISYS MESURES. The outer contact is segmented both radially and longitudinally. The signals from the fast preamplifiers have been digitised by 12 bit, 40 MHz ADCs. In this article we report preliminary results obtained using this detector and their relevance for future germanium {gamma}-ray tracking arrays.

  12. Some aspects of detectors and electronics for x-ray fluorescence analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goulding, F.S.

    1976-08-01

    Some of the less recognized and potentially important parameters of the electronics and detectors used in X-ray fluorescence spectrometers are discussed. Detector factors include window (dead-layer) effects, time-dependent background and excess background. Noise parameters of field-effect transistors and time-variant pulse shaping are also discussed

  13. Linearity discontinuities in Xe-filled X-ray microstrip detectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zavattini, G.; Feroci, M.; Budtz-Jørgensen, Carl

    1997-01-01

    A prototype Xe + 10% CH4 microstrip detector was used to study the K-edge discontinuity in the pulse-height distribution as a function of the energy of incident X-rays. The electronics used was such that a pulse-shape rejection could be made of K-fluorescence reabsorption in the detector. The mea...

  14. Basis material decomposition method for material discrimination with a new spectrometric X-ray imaging detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brambilla, A.; Gorecki, A.; Potop, A.; Paulus, C.; Verger, L.

    2017-08-01

    Energy sensitive photon counting X-ray detectors provide energy dependent information which can be exploited for material identification. The attenuation of an X-ray beam as a function of energy depends on the effective atomic number Zeff and the density. However, the measured attenuation is degraded by the imperfections of the detector response such as charge sharing or pile-up. These imperfections lead to non-linearities that limit the benefits of energy resolved imaging. This work aims to implement a basis material decomposition method which overcomes these problems. Basis material decomposition is based on the fact that the attenuation of any material or complex object can be accurately reproduced by a combination of equivalent thicknesses of basis materials. Our method is based on a calibration phase to learn the response of the detector for different combinations of thicknesses of the basis materials. The decomposition algorithm finds the thicknesses of basis material whose spectrum is closest to the measurement, using a maximum likelihood criterion assuming a Poisson law distribution of photon counts for each energy bin. The method was used with a ME100 linear array spectrometric X-ray imager to decompose different plastic materials on a Polyethylene and Polyvinyl Chloride base. The resulting equivalent thicknesses were used to estimate the effective atomic number Zeff. The results are in good agreement with the theoretical Zeff, regardless of the plastic sample thickness. The linear behaviour of the equivalent lengths makes it possible to process overlapped materials. Moreover, the method was tested with a 3 materials base by adding gadolinium, whose K-edge is not taken into account by the other two materials. The proposed method has the advantage that it can be used with any number of energy channels, taking full advantage of the high energy resolution of the ME100 detector. Although in principle two channels are sufficient, experimental measurements show

  15. Evaluation of bipolar phototransistors response used as detectors in megavoltage beams generated by a linear accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, J.O. da; Magalhaes, C.M.S. de; Santos, L.A.P. dos

    2007-01-01

    Commercial bipolar phototransistors have been used as detectors for low energy X-rays. However, when they are used in high energy X-ray beams, there is a certain loss of sensitivity to the ionizing radiation. This damage is cumulative and irreversible. There are several factors that yield variations in the phototransistor response when it is under high energy radiation, such as its fabrication technology and its electrical characteristics. The aim of this work is to present experimental results that are used to correlate the response curve of SMT (Surface-Mount Technology) bipolar phototransistors with their loss of sensitivity after irradiation from a Linac (linear accelerator) megavoltage beams. (author)

  16. Measurement of 15 MeV gamma-rays with the Ge cluster detectors of EUROBALL

    CERN Document Server

    Million, B; Camera, F; Brambilla, S; Gadea, A; Giugni, D; Herskind, B; Kmiecik, M; Isocrate, R; Leoni, S; Maj, A; Prelz, F; Wieland, O

    2000-01-01

    A measurement of the response to 15.1 MeV gamma-rays has been made for the Ge cluster detectors in the EUROBALL array. Each cluster detector consists of seven germanium capsules surrounded by a single anticompton shield of BGO. The reaction D( sup 1 sup 1 B,gamma) sup 1 sup 2 C+n at E sub b sub e sub a sub m =19.1 MeV has been employed. The 'adding-back' of signals simultaneously present in the capsules composing each cluster detector has been made on an event by event basis. The intensity in full-energy peak increases by a factor of three as compared to that of the spectrum obtained by summing the individual spectra of the 7 capsules. The pulse height to energy conversion is found to be very linear from few hundreds keV to 15 MeV. The efficiency is discussed relative to that of large volume BaF sub 2 scintillators.

  17. CdTe and CdZnTe detectors behavior in X-ray computed tomography conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Ricq, S; Garcin, M

    2000-01-01

    The application of CdTe and CdZnTe 2D array detectors for medical X-ray Computed Tomography (XCT) is investigated. Different metallic electrodes have been deposited on High-Pressure Bridgman Method CdZnTe and on Traveling Heater Method CdTe:Cl. These detectors are exposed to X-rays in the CT irradiation conditions and are characterized experimentally in current mode. Detectors performances such as sensitivity and response speed are studied. They are correlated with charge trapping and de-trapping. The trapped carrier space charges may influence the injection from the electrodes. This enables one to get information on the nature of the predominant levels involved. The performances achieved are encouraging: dynamic ranges higher than 4 decades and current decreases of 3 decades in 4 ms after X-ray beam cut-off are obtained. Nevertheless, these detectors are still limited by high trap densities responsible for the memory effect that makes them unsuitable for XCT.

  18. Versatile, reprogrammable area pixel array detector for time-resolved synchrotron x-ray applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruner, Sol [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)

    2010-05-01

    The final technical report for DOE grant DE-SC0004079 is presented. The goal of the grant was to perform research, development and application of novel imaging x-ray detectors so as to effectively utilize the high intensity and brightness of the national synchrotron radiation facilities to enable previously unfeasible time-resolved x-ray research. The report summarizes the development of the resultant imaging x-ray detectors. Two types of detector platforms were developed: The first is a detector platform (called a Mixed-Mode Pixel Array Detector, or MM-PAD) that can image continuously at over a thousand images per second while maintaining high efficiency for wide dynamic range signals ranging from 1 to hundreds of millions of x-rays per pixel per image. Research on an even higher dynamic range variant is also described. The second detector platform (called the Keck Pixel Array Detector) is capable of acquiring a burst of x-ray images at a rate of millions of images per second.

  19. Gamma-ray detector guidance of breast cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravi, Ananth

    2009-12-01

    . One method to provide intraoperative seed localization is through the use of a gamma-camera system. Monte Carlo simulations were conducted of a Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) gamma-camera system and a realistic model of a breast with 3 layers of seeds distributed according to the pre-implant treatment plan of a typical patient. The simulations showed that a gamma-camera was able to localize the seeds with a maximum error of 2.0 mm within 20 seconds. An experimental prototype was designed and constructed to validate these promising Monte Carlo results. Using a 64 pixel linear array CZT detector fitted with a custom built brass collimator, images were acquired of a physical phantom similar to the model used in the Monte Carlo simulations. The experimental prototype was able to reliably detect the seeds within 30 seconds with a median error in localization of 1 mm. The results from this thesis suggest that gamma-ray detecting technology may be able to provide significant improvements in guidance of breast cancer therapies and, thus, potentially improved therapeutic outcomes.

  20. High gain gas microstrip detectors for soft x-ray detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bateman, J.; Barlow, R.; Derbyshire, G.

    2001-01-01

    This report describes development work in which systematic changes in the pitch of the electrode pattern of a Gas Microstrip Detector are explored in the search for higher avalanche gains and enhanced stability. With the cathode width set to half of the pitch, gas gains of >50 000 are comfortably attainable with low detector noise so that x-rays can potentially be detected down to the limit of a single x-ray-produced photoelectron. (author)

  1. Cosmic-ray muons as a calibration source for high-energy gamma-ray detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thoerngren Engblom, P.

    1990-09-01

    In this paper a measurement of the directional distribution of cosmic-ray muons, at the latitude of Stockholm, is reported. In fitting the measured flux to a simple analytical expression, the distribution was found to be symmetric around a line approximately to the northwest at 4.2±0.7 degrees from zenith. The east-west asymmetry amounted to a difference in the total intensity of 20±4% at the zenith angle of 45 degrees. The spectra of energies deposited by the muons in a BGO-detector orientated at different angles, are obtained through a Monte Carlo-simulation, where the muon distribution is used as a weight function for sampling muons in different directions. (author)

  2. Time-resolved and position-resolved X-ray spectrometry with a pixelated detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sievers, Peter

    2012-12-07

    The aim of the work presented here was to measure X-ray spectra with a pixelated detector. Due to effects in the sensor the spectrum cannot be measured directly and has to be calculated by a deconvolution of the measured data. In the scope of this work the deconvolution of the measured spectra could be enhanced considerably by - amongst other things - the introduction of the Bayesian deconvolution method. Those improvements opened the possibilities for further measurements. For the measurements the detectors of the Medipix family have been used. They are nowadays used for a wide range of applications and scientific research. Their main advantage is the very high position resolution gained by a pixel pitch of 55 μm and a high number of 65536 pixels. The Timepix detector has, in particular, two special possibilities of measurement: the ToA mode and the ToT mode. In ToA mode the arrival time of an impinging photon is measured and in ToT mode the amount of deposited charge is measured. The most common method of operation is counting the number of impinging photons that release a charge higher than a preset threshold in each pixel. As this released charge is proportional to the energy deposition of the impinging photon, one can perform energy-sensitive measurements. To perform the deconvolution of the measured energy distribution there is a need of an energy response matrix describing the detector response on radiation. For some detectors it is possible to obtain an analytic model of the response functions. Due to the high discrepancy between the impinging spectrum and the measured spectrum in case of detectors of the Medipix family, there is so far no analytic model. Thus, the detector response has to be simulated. As I could improve the precision of the measurement quite extensively, I also intended to tune the simulation with more accurate and appropriate models to gain the same level of accuracy. The results of measurement and simulation have then been compared and

  3. Time-resolved and position-resolved X-ray spectrometry with a pixelated detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sievers, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the work presented here was to measure X-ray spectra with a pixelated detector. Due to effects in the sensor the spectrum cannot be measured directly and has to be calculated by a deconvolution of the measured data. In the scope of this work the deconvolution of the measured spectra could be enhanced considerably by - amongst other things - the introduction of the Bayesian deconvolution method. Those improvements opened the possibilities for further measurements. For the measurements the detectors of the Medipix family have been used. They are nowadays used for a wide range of applications and scientific research. Their main advantage is the very high position resolution gained by a pixel pitch of 55 μm and a high number of 65536 pixels. The Timepix detector has, in particular, two special possibilities of measurement: the ToA mode and the ToT mode. In ToA mode the arrival time of an impinging photon is measured and in ToT mode the amount of deposited charge is measured. The most common method of operation is counting the number of impinging photons that release a charge higher than a preset threshold in each pixel. As this released charge is proportional to the energy deposition of the impinging photon, one can perform energy-sensitive measurements. To perform the deconvolution of the measured energy distribution there is a need of an energy response matrix describing the detector response on radiation. For some detectors it is possible to obtain an analytic model of the response functions. Due to the high discrepancy between the impinging spectrum and the measured spectrum in case of detectors of the Medipix family, there is so far no analytic model. Thus, the detector response has to be simulated. As I could improve the precision of the measurement quite extensively, I also intended to tune the simulation with more accurate and appropriate models to gain the same level of accuracy. The results of measurement and simulation have then been compared and

  4. Nuclear Material Accountability Applications of a Continuous Energy and Direction Gamma Ray Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerts, David; Bean, Robert; Paff, Marc

    2010-01-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory has recently developed a detector system based on the principle of a Wilson cloud chamber that gives the original energy and direction to a gamma ray source. This detector has the properties that the energy resolution is continuous and the direction to the source can be resolved to desired fidelity. Furthermore, the detector has low power requirements, is durable, operates in widely varying environments, and is relatively cheap to produce. This detector is expected, however, to require significant time to perform measurements. To mitigate the significant time for measurements, the detector is expected to scale to very large sizes with a linear increase in cost. For example, the proof of principle detector is approximately 30,000 cm3. This work describes the technical results that lead to these assertions. Finally, the applications of this detector are described in the context of nuclear material accountability.

  5. Semi-empirical procedures for correcting detector size effect on clinical MV x-ray beam profiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahoo, Narayan; Kazi, Abdul M.; Hoffman, Mark

    2008-01-01

    The measured radiation beam profiles need to be corrected for the detector size effect to derive the real profiles. This paper describes two new semi-empirical procedures to determine the real profiles of high-energy x-ray beams by removing the detector size effect from the measured profiles. Measured profiles are corrected by shifting the position of each measurement point by a specific amount determined from available theoretical and experimental knowledge in the literature. The authors developed two procedures to determine the amount of shift. In the first procedure, which employs the published analytical deconvolution procedure of other investigators, the shift is determined from the comparison of the analytical fit of the measured profile and the corresponding analytical real profile derived from the deconvolution of the fitted measured profile and the Gaussian detector response function. In the second procedure, the amount of shift at any measurement point is considered to be proportional to the value of an analytical function related to the second derivative of the real profile at that point. The constant of proportionality and a parameter in the function are obtained from the values of the shifts at the 90%, 80%, 20%, and 10% dose levels, which are experimentally known from the published results of other investigators to be approximately equal to half of the radius of the detector. These procedures were tested by correcting the profiles of 6 and 18 MV x-ray beams measured by three different ionization chambers and a stereotactic field diode detector with 2.75, 2, 1, and 0.3 mm radii of their respective active cylindrical volumes. The corrected profiles measured by different detectors are found to be in close agreement. The detector size corrected penumbra widths also agree with the expected values based on the results of an earlier investigation. Thus, the authors concluded that the proposed procedures are accurate and can be used to derive the real

  6. Segmented Monolithic Germanium Detector Arrays for X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy. Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hull, Ethan L.

    2011-01-01

    The experimental results from the Phase I effort were extremely encouraging. During Phase I PHDs Co. made the first strides toward a new detector technology that could have great impact on synchrotron x-ray absorption (XAS) measurements, and x-ray detector technology in general. Detector hardware that allowed critical demonstration measurements of our technology was designed and fabricated. This new technology allows good charge collection from many pixels on a single side of a multi-element monolithic germanium planar detector. The detector technology provides 'dot-like' collection electrodes having very low capacitance. The detector technology appears to perform as anticipated in the Phase I proposal. In particular, the 7-pixel detector studied showed remarkable properties; making it an interesting example of detector physics. The technology is enabled by the use of amorphous germanium contact technology on germanium planar detectors. Because of the scalability associated with the fabrication of these technologies at PHDs Co., we anticipate being able to supply larger detector systems at significantly lower cost than systems made in the conventional manner.

  7. Characterization of a spectroscopic detector for application in x-ray computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dooraghi, Alex A.; Fix, Brian J.; Smith, Jerel A.; Brown, William D.; Azevedo, Stephen G.; Martz, Harry E.

    2017-09-01

    Recent advances in cadmium telluride (CdTe) energy-discriminating pixelated detectors have enabled the possibility of Multi-Spectral X-ray Computed Tomography (MSXCT) to incorporate spectroscopic information into CT. MultiX ME 100 V2 is a CdTe-based spectroscopic x-ray detector array capable of recording energies from 20 to 160 keV in 1.1 keV energy bin increments. Hardware and software have been designed to perform radiographic and computed tomography tasks with this spectroscopic detector. Energy calibration is examined using the end-point energy of a bremsstrahlung spectrum and radioisotope spectral lines. When measuring the spectrum from Am-241 across 500 detector elements, the standard deviation of the peak-location and FWHM measurements are +/- 0.4 and +/- 0.6 keV, respectively. As these values are within the energy bin size (1.1 keV), detector elements are consistent with each other. The count rate is characterized, using a nonparalyzable model with a dead time of 64 +/- 5 ns. This is consistent with the manufacturer's quoted per detector-element linear-deviation at 2 Mpps (million photons per sec) of 8.9 % (typical) and 12 % (max). When comparing measured and simulated spectra, a low-energy tail is visible in the measured data due to the spectral response of the detector. If no valid photon detections are expected in the low-energy tail, then a background subtraction may be applied to allow for a possible first-order correction. If photons are expected in the low-energy tail, a detailed model must be implemented. A radiograph of an aluminum step wedge with a maximum height of 20 mm shows an underestimation of attenuation by about 10 % at 60 keV. This error is due to partial energy deposition from higher energy (>60 keV) photons into a lower-energy ( 60 keV) bin, reducing the apparent attenuation. A radiograph of a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) cylinder taken using a bremsstrahlung spectrum from an x-ray voltage of 100 kV filtered by 1.3 mm Cu is

  8. Characterization of a spectroscopic detector for application in x-ray computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dooraghi, A. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Fix, B. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Smith, J. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Brown, W. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Azevedo, S. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Martz, H. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-04-21

    Recent advances in cadmium telluride (CdTe) energy-discriminating pixelated detectors have enabled the possibility of Multi-Spectral X-ray Computed Tomography (MSXCT) to incorporate spectroscopic information into CT. MultiX ME 100 V2 is a CdTe-based spectroscopic x-ray detector array capable of recording energies from 20 to 160 keV in 1.1 keV energy bin increments. Hardware and software have been designed to perform radiographic and computed tomography tasks with this spectroscopic detector. Energy calibration is examined using the end-point energy of a bremsstrahlung spectrum and radioisotope spectral lines. When measuring the spectrum from Am-241 across 500 detector elements, the standard deviation of the peak-location and FWHM measurements are ±0.4 and ±0.6 keV, respectively. As these values are within the energy bin size (1.1 keV), detector elements are consistent with each other. The count rate is characterized, using a nonparalyzable model with a dead time of 64 ± 5 ns. This is consistent with the manufacturer’s quoted per detector-element linear-deviation at 2 Mpps (million photons per sec) of 8.9% (typical) and 12% (max). When comparing measured and simulated spectra, a low-energy tail is visible in the measured data due to the spectral response of the detector. If no valid photon detections are expected in the low-energy tail, then a background subtraction may be applied to allow for a possible first-order correction. If photons are expected in the low-energy tail, a detailed model must be implemented. A radiograph of an aluminum step wedge with a maximum height of about 20 mm shows an underestimation of attenuation by about 10% at 60 keV. This error is due to partial energy deposition from higher-energy (> 60 keV) photons into a lower-energy (~60 keV) bin, reducing the apparent attenuation. A radiograph of a PTFE cylinder taken using a bremsstrahlung spectrum from an x-ray voltage of 100 kV filtered by 1.3 mm Cu is reconstructed using Abel inversion

  9. Organic Scintillator Detector Response Simulations with DRiFT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrews, Madison Theresa [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Bates, Cameron Russell [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Mckigney, Edward Allen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Rising, Michael Evan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Pinilla, Maria Isabel [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Solomon, Jr., Clell Jeffrey [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Sood, Avneet [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-12-19

    Accurate detector modeling is a requirement to design systems in many non-proliferation scenarios; by determining a Detector’s Response Function (DRF) to incident radiation, it is possible characterize measurements of unknown sources. DRiFT is intended to post-process MCNP® output and create realistic detector spectra. Capabilities currently under development include the simulation of semiconductor, gas, and (as is discussed in this work) scintillator detector physics. Energy spectra and pulse shape discrimination (PSD) trends for incident photon and neutron radiation have been reproduced by DRiFT.

  10. GEANT4 simulation study of a gamma-ray detector for neutron resonance densitometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuchiya, Harufumi; Harada, Hideo; Koizumi, Mitsuo; Kitatani, Fumito; Takamine, Jun; Kureta, Masatoshi; Iimura, Hideki

    2013-01-01

    A design study of a gamma-ray detector for neutron resonance densitometry was made with GEANT4. The neutron resonance densitometry, combining neutron resonance transmission analysis and neutron resonance capture analysis, is a non-destructive technique to measure amounts of nuclear materials in melted fuels of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plants. In order to effectively quantify impurities in the melted fuels via prompt gamma-ray measurements, a gamma-ray detector for the neutron resonance densitometry consists of cylindrical and well type LaBr 3 scintillators. The present simulation showed that the proposed gamma-ray detector suffices to clearly detect the gamma rays emitted by 10 B(n, αγ) reaction in a high environmental background due to 137 Cs radioactivity with its Compton edge suppressed at a considerably small level. (author)

  11. Coordinate detector for investigation of horizontal cosmic ray flux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barabashina, N.S.; Ezubchenko, A.A.; Kokoulin, R.P.; Kompaniets, K.G.; Konovalov, A.A.; Petrukhin, A.A.; Chernov, D.V.; Shutenko, V.V.; Yanson, Eh.E.

    2000-01-01

    DEKOR coordinate detector represents a multilayer system of polymer streamer chambers placed around NEVOD Cherenkov water calorimeter. The basic characteristics of the detector are as follows: area is about 100 m 2 , angular resolution of about 1 deg, spatial resolution is about 1 cm. Paper presents the detector design, structures of data acquisition system and of a trigger system, as well as, the results obtained in the course of a pilot mounting (8 layers of chambers, working area is 8.4 m 2 ). Measurements using a full-scale facility will ensure the possibility of qualitative investigation into the parameters of muon groups and into mechanisms of their formation [ru

  12. Response of Superheated Droplet Detector (SDD) and Bubble Detector (BD) to interrupted irradiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mondal, Prasanna Kumar, E-mail: prasanna_ind_82@yahoo.com; Sarkar, Rupa, E-mail: sarkar_rupa2003@yahoo.com; Chatterjee, Barun Kumar, E-mail: barun_k_chatterjee@yahoo.com

    2017-06-11

    Superheated droplet detectors (SDD) and bubble detectors (BD) are suspensions of micron-sized superheated liquid droplets in inert medium. The metastable droplets can vaporise upon interaction with ionising radiation generating visible bubbles. In this work, we investigated the response of SDD and BD to interrupted neutron irradiations. We observed that the droplet vaporisation rates for SDD and BD are different in nature. The unusual increase in droplet vaporisation rate observed when the SDD is exposed to neutrons after few minutes of radiation-off period is absent for BD. - Highlights: • Superheated droplet detectors (SDD) and bubble detectors (BD) are suspensions of superheated liquid droplets in inert medium. • The bubble nucleation in superheated droplets can be induced by ionising radiation. • The droplet vaporisation rate for SDD is non-monotonic when it is irradiated periodically to neutrons. • For BD the droplet vaporisation rate decrease monotonically when it is irradiated periodically to neutrons.

  13. The study of response of wide band gap semiconductor detectors using the Geant4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussain Riaz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The energy dependence on the intrinsic efficiency, absolute efficiency, full energy peak absolute efficiency and peak-to-total ratio have been studied for various wide band gap semiconductor detectors using the Geant4 based Monte Carlo simulations. The detector thickness of 1-4 mm and the area in 16-100 mm2 range were considered in this work. In excellent agreement with earlier work (Rybka et al., [20], the Geant4 simulated values of detector efficiencies have been found to decrease with incident g-ray energy. Both for the detector thickness and the detector area, the increasing trends have been observed for total efficiency as well as for full-energy peak efficiency in 0.1 MeV-50 MeV range. For Cd1-xZnxTe, the detector response remained insensitive to changes in relative proportions of Zn. For various wide band gap detectors studied in this work, the detection efficiency of TlBr was found highest over the entire range of energy, followed by the HgI2, CdTe, and then by CZT.

  14. Energy dependent features of X-ray signals in a GridPix detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieger, C.; Kaminski, J.; Vafeiadis, T.; Desch, K.

    2018-06-01

    We report on the calibration of an argon/isobutane (97.7%/2.3%)-filled GridPix detector with soft X-rays (277 eV to 8 keV) using the variable energy X-ray source of the CAST Detector Lab at CERN. We study the linearity and energy resolution of the detector using both the number of pixels hit and the total measured charge as energy measures. For the latter, the energy resolution σE / E is better than 10% (20%) for energies above 2 keV (0.5 keV). Several characteristics of the recorded events are studied.

  15. Optimising the design of gas microstrip detectors for soft x-ray detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bateman, J.; Barlow, R.; Derbyshire, G.

    2001-01-01

    This report describes development work in which systematic changes in the electrode pattern of a Gas Microstrip Detector are explored in the search for higher avalanche gains and enhanced stability. It is found that the width of the cathode structure is the main determinant of the detector stability. With the correct cathode width, gas gains of >50 000 are comfortably attainable with low detector noise so that x-rays can potentially be detected down to the limit of a single x-ray-produced photoelectron. (author)

  16. Prototype of a hybrid cosmic ray detector at the Pico de Orizaba: First stage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ponce, E.; Perez, E.; Villasenor, L.; Garipov, G.; Salazar, H.; Martinez, O.; Moreno, E.; Pedraza, I.; Cotzomi, J.; Khrenov, B.

    2003-01-01

    In this work we present a progress report of the project of a high energy cosmic ray observatory located at Pico de Orizaba mountain. One of the goals of this facility will be to contribute to the understanding of the origin of the cosmic rays at energies around the feature known as the knee. To achieve this goal we plan to use a hybrid detector composed of a surface detector array and a fluorescence telescope. The design and expected performance of the fluorescent detector is presented

  17. A high-resolution multiwire area detector for X-ray scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faruqi, A R; Andrews, H [Medical Research Council, Cambridge (UK). Lab. of Molecular Biology

    1989-11-10

    A high-resolution multiwire area detector has been developed for recording X-ray scattering from biological specimens. The detector is 100x100 mm{sup 2} and, under the present operating conditions, has a spatial resolution of about 250 {mu}m in both directions. The detector is set up on a double-mirror focusing camera on a rotating anode X-ray generator and has been used in a number of small-angle experiments, two of which are described in this paper. (orig.).

  18. Energy response of neutron area monitor with silicon semiconductor detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitaguchi, Hiroshi; Izumi, Sigeru; Kobayashi, Kaoru; Kaihara, Akihisa; Nakamura, Takashi.

    1993-01-01

    A prototype neutron area monitor with a silicon semiconductor detector has been developed which has the energy response of 1 cm dose equivalent recommended by the ICRP-26. Boron and proton radiators are coated on the surface of the silicon semiconductor detector. The detector is set at the center of a cylindrical polyethylene moderator. This moderator is covered by a porous cadmium board which serves as the thermal neutron absorber. Neutrons are detected as α-particles generated by the nuclear reaction 10 B(n,α) 7 Li and as recoil protons generated by the interaction of fast neutrons with hydrogen. The neutron energy response of the monitor was measured using thermal neutrons and monoenergetic fast neutrons generated by an accelerator. The response was consistent with the 1 cm dose equivalent response required for the monitor within ±34% in the range of 0.025 - 15 Mev. (author)

  19. Development of smart wireless detector system for gamma ray detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nolida Yussup; Nur Aira Abdul Rahman; Ismail Mustapha; Jaafar Abdullah; Mohd Ashhar Khalid; Hearie Hassan; Yoong, Chong Foh

    2012-01-01

    Data transmission in field works especially that is related to industry, gas and chemical is paramount importance to ensure data accuracy and delivery time. A development of wireless detector system for remote data acquisition to be applied in conducting fieldwork in industry is described in this paper. A wireless communication which is applied in the project development is a viable and cost-effective method of transmitting data from the detector to the laptop on the site to facilitate data storage and analysis automatically, which can be used in various applications such as column scanning. The project involves hardware design for the detector and electronics parts besides programming for control board and user interface. A prototype of a wireless gamma scintillation detector is developed with capabilities of transmitting data to computer via radio frequency (RF) and recording the data within the 433 MHz band at baud rate of 19200. (author)

  20. Development of smart wireless detector system for gamma ray detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nolida Yussup; Nur Aira Abd. Rahman; Chong, Foh Yoong; Mohd Ashhar Khalid; Ismail Mustapha; Jaafar Abdullah; Hearie Hassan

    2010-01-01

    Data transmission in field works especially that is related to industry, gas and chemical is paramount importance to ensure data accuracy and delivery time. A development of wireless detector system for remote data acquisition to be applied in conducting fieldwork in industry is described in this paper. A wireless communication which is applied in the project development is a viable and cost-effective method of transmitting data from the detector to the laptop on the site to facilitate data storage and analysis automatically, which can be used in various applications such as column scanning. The project involves hardware design for the detector and electronics parts besides programming for control board and user interface. A prototype of a wireless gamma scintillation detector is developed with capabilities of transmitting data to computer via radio frequency (RF) and recording the data within the 433 MHz band at baud rate of 19200. (author)

  1. Pixel array detector for X-ray free electron laser experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philipp, Hugh T., E-mail: htp2@cornell.edu [Department of Physics, Laboratory of Solid State Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Hromalik, Marianne [Electrical and Computer Engineering, SUNY Oswego, Oswego, NY 13126 (United States); Tate, Mark; Koerner, Lucas [Department of Physics, Laboratory of Solid State Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Gruner, Sol M. [Department of Physics, Laboratory of Solid State Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Wilson Laboratory, Cornell University, CHESS, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)

    2011-09-01

    X-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) promise to revolutionize X-ray science with extremely high peak brilliances and femtosecond X-ray pulses. This will require novel detectors to fully realize the potential of these new sources. There are many current detector development projects aimed at the many challenges of meeting the XFEL requirements . This paper describes a pixel array detector (PAD) that has been developed for the Coherent X-ray Imaging experiment at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at the SLAC National Laboratory . The detector features 14-bit in-pixel digitization; a 2-level in-pixel gain setting that can be used to make an arbitrary 2-D gain pattern that is adaptable to a particular experiment; the ability to handle instantaneous X-ray flux rates of 10{sup 17} photons per second; and continuous frames rates in excess of 120 Hz. The detector uses direct detection of X-rays in a silicon diode. The charge produced by the diode is integrated in a pixilated application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) which digitizes collected holes with single X-ray photon capability. Each ASIC is 194x185 pixels, each pixel is 110{mu}mx110{mu}m on a side. Each pixel can detect up to 2500 X-rays per frame in low-gain mode, yet easily detects single photons at high-gain. Cooled, single-chip detectors have been built and meet all the required specifications. SLAC National Laboratory is engaged in constructing a tiled, multi-chip 1516x1516 pixel detector.

  2. Dual-Energy Semiconductor Detector of X-rays and Gamma Radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brodyn, M.S.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of the major types of ionizing radiation detectors, their advantages and disadvantages are presented. Application of ZnSe-based semiconductor detector in high temperature environment is substantiated. Different forms of ZnSe-based detector samples and double-crystal scheme for registration of X- and gamma rays in a broad energy range were used . Based on the manufactured simulator device, the study sustains the feasibility of the gamma quanta recording by a high-resistance ZnSe-based detector operating in a perpulse mode.

  3. Performance of low-cost X-ray area detectors with consumer digital cameras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panna, A.; Gomella, A.A.; Harmon, K.J.; Chen, P.; Miao, H.; Bennett, E.E.; Wen, H.

    2015-01-01

    We constructed X-ray detectors using consumer-grade digital cameras coupled to commercial X-ray phosphors. Several detector configurations were tested against the Varian PaxScan 3024M (Varian 3024M) digital flat panel detector. These include consumer cameras (Nikon D800, Nikon D700, and Nikon D3X) coupled to a green emission phosphor in a back-lit, normal incidence geometry, and in a front-lit, oblique incidence geometry. We used the photon transfer method to evaluate detector sensitivity and dark noise, and the edge test method to evaluate their spatial resolution. The essential specifications provided by our evaluation include discrete charge events captured per mm 2 per unit exposure surface dose, dark noise in equivalents of charge events per pixel, and spatial resolution in terms of the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the detector's line spread function (LSF). Measurements were performed using a tungsten anode X-ray tube at 50 kVp. The results show that the home-built detectors provide better sensitivity and lower noise than the commercial flat panel detector, and some have better spatial resolution. The trade-off is substantially smaller imaging areas. Given their much lower costs, these home-built detectors are attractive options for prototype development of low-dose imaging applications

  4. First examination of CASCADE-X-ray-detector and measurement of neutron-mirrorneutron-oscillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boehm, B.

    2007-01-01

    The detection of X-radiation is of utmost importance for both fundamental physics and medical diagnostics. This work investigates whether or not the CASCADE detector working principle, first developed for the detection of neutrons, can be adapted for the detection of X-rays. This modular detector concept combines the use of a solid neutron or X-ray converter with the advantages of a counting gas detector. Thus, it gives the possibility to optimize efficiency, dynamics and spatial resolution independently. Firstly, it is necessary to find a suitable converter material that allows for the best possible detector efficiency. In order to do so, a mathematical model of the complete detector system was developed that yields the total efficiency for any given material. Respecting technical constraints, gold and gadolinium showed to be favorable choices. Based on these theoretical considerations a prototype of a CASCADE X-ray detector was built, and measurements for the determination of this detector's efficiency were conducted. In the second part of this work a CASCADE neutron detector was used to conduct the first measurement the neutron-mirrorneutron oscillation time. Mirrormatter was proposed in 1956 by Lee and Yang to allow for symmetry in the description of the universe despite the existence of parity violation. By using neutrons it was possible to determine a lower limit for the oscillation time in this work. (orig.)

  5. Gamma-ray detectors for intelligent, hand-held radiation monitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fehlau, P.E.

    1983-01-01

    Small radiation detectors based on HgI 2 , bismuth germanate (BGO), plastic, or NaI(Tl) detector materials were evaluated for use in small, lighweight radiation monitors. The two denser materials, HgI 2 and BGO, had poor resolution at low-energy and thus performed less well than NaI(Tl) in detecting low-energy gamma rays from bare, enriched uranium. The plastic scintillator, a Compton recoil detector, also performed less well at low gamma-ray energy. Two small NaI(Tl) detectors were suitable for detecting bare uranium and sheilded plutonium. One became part of a new lightweight hand-held monitor and the other found uses as a pole-mounted detector for monitoring hard-to-reach locations

  6. CDZNTE ROOM-TEMPERATURE SEMICONDUCTOR GAMMA-RAY DETECTOR FOR NATIONAL-SECURITY APPLICATIONS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CAMARDA,G.S.; BOLOTNIKOV, A.E.; CUI, Y.; HOSSAIN, A.; KOHMAN, K.T.; JAMES, R.B.

    2007-05-04

    One important mission of the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration is to develop reliable gamma-ray detectors to meet the widespread needs of users for effective techniques to detect and identify special nuclear- and radioactive-materials. Accordingly, the Nonproliferation and National Security Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory was tasked to evaluate existing technology and to develop improved room-temperature detectors based on semiconductors, such as CdZnTe (CZT). Our research covers two important areas: Improving the quality of CZT material, and exploring new CZT-based gamma-ray detectors. In this paper, we report on our recent findings from the material characterization and tests of actual CZT devices fabricated in our laboratory and from materials/detectors supplied by different commercial vendors. In particular, we emphasize the critical role of secondary phases in the current CZT material and issues in fabricating the CZT detectors, both of which affect their performance.

  7. An InGrid based Low Energy X-ray Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Krieger, Christoph; Kaminski, Jochen; Lupberger, Michael; Vafeiadis, Theodoros

    2014-01-01

    An X-ray detector based on the combination of an integrated Micromegas stage with a pixel chip has been built in order to be installed at the CERN Axion Solar Telescope. Due to its high granularity and spatial resolution this detector allows for a topological background suppression along with a detection threshold below $1\\,\\text{keV}$. Tests at the CAST Detector Lab show the detector's ability to detect X-ray photons down to an energy as low as $277\\,\\text{eV}$. The first background data taken after the installation at the CAST experiment underline the detector's performance with an average background rate of $5\\times10^{-5}\\,/\\text{keV}/\\text{cm}^2/\\text{s}$ between 2 and $10\\,\\text{keV}$ when using a lead shielding.

  8. Gamma-ray escape peak characteristics of radiation-damaged reverse-electrode germanium coaxial detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pehl, R.H.; Hull, E.L.; Madden, N.W.; Xing Jingshu; Friesel, D.L.

    1996-01-01

    A comparison of the characteristics of full-energy gamma-ray peaks and their corresponding escape peaks when high energy photons interact in radiation damaged reverse-electrode (n-type) germanium coaxial detectors is presented. Coaxial detector geometry is the dominant factor, causing charge collection to be dramatically better for interactions occurring near the outer periphery of the detector as well as increasing of the probability of escape events occurring in this region. It follows that the resolution of escape peaks is better than that of ordinary gamma-ray peaks. This is experimentally verified. A nearly identical but undamaged detector exhibited significant Doppler broadening of single escape peaks. Because double escape events preferentially occur at outer radii, energy shifts of double escape reflect extremely small amounts of charge trapping in undamaged detectors. (orig.)

  9. A balloon-borne solid state cosmic X-ray detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proctor, R.; Pietsch, W.; Reppin, C.

    1982-01-01

    On 9th May 1980 a MPI/AIT hard X-ray balloon payload successfully observed numerous cosmic X-ray sources. The payload consisted of a 2400 cm 2 Phoswich detector and a 114 cm 2 solid state detector. The solid state detector is described in this report. It consists of six intrinsic germanium planar crystals in a vacuum cryostat cooled by liquid nitrogen. The detector operates in the hard X-ray energy range of 20-150 keV and had in-flight a mean energy resolution of 2.75 keV at 60 keV. A hexagonal molybdenum collimator defined the field of view as approximately 4 0 fwhm. A CsI(Na) and plastic active shield and passive shielding provided background rejection. Mean background values of 1.3 X 10 -3 counts/(sec x cm 2 x keV) at 60 keV were obtained. (orig.)

  10. Development of a novel micro pattern gaseous detector for cosmic ray muon tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biglietti, M. [INFN Sezione di Roma Tre, Rome (Italy); Canale, V. [Università di Napoli Federico II, Naples (Italy); INFN Sezione di Napoli, Naples (Italy); Franchino, S. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Iengo, P. [INFN Sezione di Napoli, Naples (Italy); CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Iodice, M. [INFN Sezione di Roma Tre, Rome (Italy); Petrucci, F., E-mail: petrucci@roma3.infn.it [INFN Sezione di Roma Tre, Rome (Italy); Università Roma Tre, Rome (Italy)

    2016-07-11

    We propose a novel detector (Thick Groove Detector, TGD) designed for cosmic ray tomography with a spatial resolution of ~500 μm, trying to keep the construction procedure as simple as possible and to reduce the operating costs. The TGD belongs to the category of MPGDs with an amplification region less than 1 mm wide formed by alternate anode/cathode microstrips layers at different heights. A first 10×10 cm{sup 2} prototype has been built, divided in four sections with different test geometries. We present the construction procedure and the first results in terms of gain and stability. Preliminary studies with cosmic rays are also reported. - Highlights: • A new MPGD detector designed for cosmic ray tomography is presented. • With respect to existing detectors, the construction procedure is simpler and operating costs are lower. • Construction procedures and preliminary performance are shown.

  11. Spectrometry of X-ray beams using Cadmium and Zinc Teluride detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, Paulo Henriques Bastos

    1997-06-01

    Determination of X-ray spectra to be utilized for medical diagnostics is a complementary process to the development of procedures to be applied to the quality control of radiodiagnostics X-ray equipment. Until some years ago, that was only possible using Germanium or Silicon detectors. Both have an excellent resolution in this energy range, but present also some restrictions as there are high costs and the necessity of operating them at temperature of liquid Nitrogen, which is not always available at the measurement's place. Room temperature detectors like Cadmium Telluride and Mercury Iodine don't have these restrictions. They, however, have a lower resolution and incomplete collection of the charges produced by their interaction with radiation. With technological advance of crystal growth in general and new techniques like cooling the crystal with a Peltier cell and rise time discrimination circuits, today Cadmium Telluride detectors show a resolution very close to that from Germanium detectors. This work relates to the routine use of Cadmium and Zinc Telluride detectors for measuring X-ray spectra in loco of diagnostic X-ray units. It characterizes the properties of a commercially available detector and offers a model for stripping the measured pulse height distribution. It was also developed a collimator to allow the direct measurement of the beam. The model developed and the constructed set-up were applied to two X-ray tubes and the achieved spectra compared with some spectra available from the literature. (author)

  12. Diagnostic x-ray spectra measurements using a silicon surface barrier detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pani, R.; Laitano, R.F.

    1987-01-01

    A silicon surface barrier detector having a low efficiency for x-ray is used to analyse diagnostic x-ray spectra. This characteristic is advantageous in overcoming experimental problems caused by high fluence rates typical of diagnostic x-ray beams. The pulse height distribution obtained with silicon surface barrier detectors is very different from the true photon spectra because of the presence of escaped Compton photons and the fact that detection efficiency falls abruptly when photon energy increases. A detailed analysis of the spurious effects involved in detection is made by a Monte Carlo method. A stripping procedure is described for implementation on a personal computer. The validity of this method is tested by comparison with experimental results obtained with a Ge detector. The spectra obtained with the Si detector are in fairly good agreement with the analogous spectra measured with a Ge detector. The advantages of using Si as opposed to Ge detectors in x-ray spectrometry are: its simplicity of use, its greater economy for use in routine diagnostic x-ray spectroscopy and the possibility that the stripping procedure can be implemented on a personal computer. (author)

  13. Calibration comparative results for X - and gamma ray spectrometry with HPGe and BEGe detectors for a radon reference chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zoran, Maria; Paul, Annette; Arnold, Dirk

    2002-01-01

    Inhaled decay products of 222 Rn are the dominant components of the natural radiation exposure being responsible for about 30% of the whole human radioactive exposure. Field instruments for 222 Rn and his progeny monitoring are calibrated in 'radon climate rooms', where it is possible to vary and monitor 222 Rn and the indoor air parameters ( temperature, humidity, ventilation rate, aerosol concentration). German radon reference chamber used was developed and installed at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt in order to serve as a metrological standard for radon and his progeny calibration of active and passive, indoor and outdoor radon monitoring devices in air climate. The basic parts of experimental setup for this γ and X -ray spectrometry analysis consists of a γ-X ray source in a lead shield/collimator, the detectors, the electronics necessary for pulse-height analysis (PHA) to obtain energy spectra. For calibrating system with 226 Ra standard sources (multienergy X ray and gamma emitters), two germanium detectors HPGe (12.5 nominal efficiency) and BEGe (22.5 nominal efficiency) were used. Germanium detectors are semiconductor diodes having a P-I-N structure in which the Intrinsic (I) region is sensitive to ionizing radiation, particularly X-rays and gamma rays. The BEGe is designed with an electrode structure that enhances low energy resolution and is fabricated from selected germanium having an impurity profile that improves charge collection (thus resolution and peak shape) at high energies which is really important in analysis of the complex spectra for uranium and finally for 226 Ra. MAESTRO MCA software and GNUPLOT program were used for spectra acquisition and spectra analysis, respectively . The main aim of this paper was to do a comparatively analysis of the detector performances for this radon chamber spectrometric chain. The calibration data analysis includes energy calibrations for both detection systems as well as comparative X and gamma

  14. Photoemission measurements for low energy x-ray detector applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Day, R.H.

    1981-01-01

    Photoemission has been studied for nearly 100 years as both a means of investigating quantum physics, and as a practical technique for transducing optical/x-ray photons into electrical currents. Numerous x-ray detection schemes, such as streak cameras and x-ray sensitive diodes, exploit this process because of its simplicity, adaptability, and speed. Recent emphasis on diagnostics for low temperature, high density, and short-lived, plasmas for inertial confinement fusion has stimulated interest in x-ray photoemission in the sub-kilovolt regime. In this paper, a review of x-ray photoemission measurements in the 50 eV to 10 keV x-ray region is given and the experimental techniques are reviewed. A semiempirical model of x-ray photoemission is discussed and compared to experimental measurements. Finally, examples of absolutely calibrated instruments are shown

  15. In-situ X-ray diffraction system using sources and detectors at fixed angular positions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, David M [Voorheesville, NY; Gibson, Walter M [Voorheesville, NY; Huang, Huapeng [Latham, NY

    2007-06-26

    An x-ray diffraction technique for measuring a known characteristic of a sample of a material in an in-situ state. The technique includes using an x-ray source for emitting substantially divergent x-ray radiation--with a collimating optic disposed with respect to the fixed source for producing a substantially parallel beam of x-ray radiation by receiving and redirecting the divergent paths of the divergent x-ray radiation. A first x-ray detector collects radiation diffracted from the sample; wherein the source and detector are fixed, during operation thereof, in position relative to each other and in at least one dimension relative to the sample according to a-priori knowledge about the known characteristic of the sample. A second x-ray detector may be fixed relative to the first x-ray detector according to the a-priori knowledge about the known characteristic of the sample, especially in a phase monitoring embodiment of the present invention.

  16. Improvements in γ-ray reconstruction with positive sensitive Ge detectors using the backtracking method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milechina, L.; Cederwall, B.

    2003-01-01

    Gamma-ray tracking, a new detection technique for nuclear spectroscopy, requires efficient algorithms for reconstructing the interaction paths of multiple γ rays in a detector volume. In the present work, we discuss the effect of the atomic electron momentum distribution in Ge as well as employment of different types of figure-of-merit within the context of the so called backtracking method

  17. MCNP modelling of scintillation-detector gamma-ray spectra from natural radionuclides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, Peter; Maucec, M; de Meijer, RJ

    gamma-ray spectra of natural radionuclides are simulated for a BGO detector in a borehole geometry using the Monte Carlo code MCNP. All gamma-ray emissions of the decay of K-40 and the series of Th-232 and U-238 are used to describe the source. A procedure is proposed which excludes the

  18. Accurate and independent spectral response scale based on silicon trap detectors and spectrally invariant detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gran, Jarle

    2005-01-01

    The study aims to establish an independent high accuracy spectral response scale over a broad spectral range based on standard laboratory equipment at a moderate cost. This had to be done by a primary method, where the responsivity of the detector is linked to fundamental constants. Summary, conclusion and future directions: In this thesis it has been demonstrated that an independent spectral response scale from the visual to the IR based on simple relative measurements can be established. The accuracy obtained by the hybrid self-calibration method demonstrates that state of the art accuracy is obtained with self-calibration principles. A calculable silicon trap detector with low internal losses over a wide spectral range is needed to establish the scale, in addition to a linear, spectrally independent detector with a good signal to noise ratio. By fitting the parameters in the responsivity model to a purely relative measurement we express the spectral response in terms of fundamental constants with a known uncertainty This is therefore a primary method. By applying a digital filter on the relative measurements of the InGaAs detectors in the infrared reduces the standard deviation by 30 %. In addition, by optimising the necessary scaling constant converting the relative calibration to absolute values, we have managed to establish an accurate and cost efficient spectral response scale in the IR. The full covariance analysis, which takes into account the correlation in the absolute values of the silicon detector, the correlation caused by the filter and the scaling constant, shows that the spectral response scale established in the infrared with InGaAs detectors is done with high accuracy. A similar procedure can be used in the UV, though it has not been demonstrated here. In fig. 10 the responsitivities of the detectors (a) and their associated uncertainties (b) at the 1 sigma level of confidence is compared for the three publications. We see that the responsivity

  19. Plastic nuclear track detectors as high x-ray and gamma dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chong Chon Sing

    1995-01-01

    A brief review of recent studies on the effects of high doses of x-ray and gamma ray on the track registration properties of several plastic track detectors is presented. The bulk etching rates and the etched track sizes have been found to increase with the dose in the range up to 100 Mrad. These results suggest that the changes in track registration characteristics can be employed as an index of the radiation dose in the megarad region. In particular, recent results on the effect of X-ray irradiation on two types of cellulose nitrate track detectors obtained in our laboratory are reported in this paper. (author)

  20. X-ray television area detectors for macromolecular structural studies with synchrotron radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arndt, U.W.; Gilmore, D.J.

    1978-01-01

    Two-dimensional X-ray diffraction patterns may be recorded quantitatively by means of X-ray-to-electron converters which are scanned in a television-type raster scan. Detectors of this type are capable of operating over the whole range of counting rates from very low to higher than those with which other types of converters can deal. The component parts of an X-ray television detector are examined and the limits to the precision of the measurements are analysed. (Auth.)

  1. Compton scatter in germanium and its effect on imaging with gamma-ray position-sensitive detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherman, I.S.; Strauss, M.G.; Brenner, R.

    1978-01-01

    The spatial spread due to Compton scatter in Ge was measured to study the reduction in image contrast and signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) resulting from erroneous readout in Ge position-sensitive detectors. The step response revealing this spread was obtained by scanning with a 122 keV γ-ray beam across a boundary of two sectors of a slotted coaxial Ge(Li) detector that is 40 mm diameter by 22 mm long. The derived line-spread function at 140 keV (/sup 99m/Tc) exhibits much shorter but thicker tails than those due to scatter in tissue as observed with a NaI detector through 5.5 cm of scattering material. Convolutions of rectangular profiles of voids with the Ge(Li) line-spread function show marked deterioration in contrast for voids less than 10 mm across, which in turn results in even greater deterioration of the S/N. As a result, the contrast for voids in Ge images is only 20 to 30 percent higher than that in NaI and the S/N is only comparable for equal detector areas. The degradation in image contrast due to scatter in Ge detectors can be greatly reduced by either using thin detectors (approximately 5 mm), where scatter virtually does not exist, or by using thicker detectors and rejecting scatter electronically. To reduce the effects of scatter on the S/N as well as on contrast, the erroneous position readouts must actually be corrected. A more realizable approach to achieving the ultimate potential of Ge detectors may be a scanning array of discrete detectors (not position sensitive) in which readout is not affected by scatter

  2. Self-powered detector probes for electron and gamma-ray beam monitoring in high-power industrial accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lone, M.A.

    1992-08-01

    A self-powered detector (SPD) is a simple passive device that consists of a coaxial probe with a metallic outer sleeve, a mineral oxide insulating layer, and a metallic inner core. SPDs are used in nuclear reactors for monitoring neutron and gamma ray fields. Responses of various SPDs to electron and gamma ray beams from industrial accelerators were investigated with Monte Carlo simulations. By judicious choice of transmission filters, threshold SPD probes were investigated for on-line monitoring of the beam energy spectrum of the high-power IMPELA industrial electron accelerator. (Author) (14 figs, 16 refs.)

  3. Performance characteristics needed for protein crystal diffraction x-ray detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westbrook, E. M.

    1999-01-01

    During the 1990's, macromolecular crystallography became progressively more dependent on synchrotrons X-ray sources for diffraction data collection. Detectors of this diffraction data at synchrotrons beamlines have evolved over the decade, from film to image phosphor plates, and then to CCD systems. These changes have been driven by the data quality and quantity improvements each newer detector technology provided. The improvements have been significant. It is likely that newer detector technologies will be adopted at synchrotron beamlines for crystallographic diffraction data collection in the future, but these technologies will have to compete with existing CCD detector systems which are already excellent and are getting incrementally better in terms of size, speed, efficiency, and resolving power. Detector development for this application at synchrotrons must concentrate on making systems which are bigger and faster than CCDs and which can capture weak data more efficiently. And there is a need for excellent detectors which are less expensive than CCD systems

  4. Gas scintillation glass GEM detector for high-resolution X-ray imaging and CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujiwara, T., E-mail: fujiwara-t@aist.go.jp [Research Institute for Measurement and Analytical Instrumentation, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Mitsuya, Y. [Nuclear Professional School, The University of Tokyo, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan); Fushie, T. [Radiment Lab. Inc., Setagaya, Tokyo 156-0044 (Japan); Murata, K.; Kawamura, A.; Koishikawa, A. [XIT Co., Naruse, Machida, Tokyo 194-0045 (Japan); Toyokawa, H. [Research Institute for Measurement and Analytical Instrumentation, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Takahashi, H. [Institute of Engineering Innovation, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-8654 (Japan)

    2017-04-01

    A high-spatial-resolution X-ray-imaging gaseous detector has been developed with a single high-gas-gain glass gas electron multiplier (G-GEM), scintillation gas, and optical camera. High-resolution X-ray imaging of soft elements is performed with a spatial resolution of 281 µm rms and an effective area of 100×100 mm. In addition, high-resolution X-ray 3D computed tomography (CT) is successfully demonstrated with the gaseous detector. It shows high sensitivity to low-energy X-rays, which results in high-contrast radiographs of objects containing elements with low atomic numbers. In addition, the high yield of scintillation light enables fast X-ray imaging, which is an advantage for constructing CT images with low-energy X-rays.

  5. Superficial x-ray in-vivo dosimetry with MOSFET detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheung, T.; Yu, P.K.N.; Butson, M.J.; Cancer Services, Wollongong, NSW

    2004-01-01

    Full text: This note investigates in-vivo dosimetry using a Metal Oxide Semiconductor Field Effect Transistor (MOSFET) for radiotherapy treatment at superficial and orthovoltage x-ray energies. This was performed within one fraction of the patient's treatment. Standard measurements along with energy response of the detector are given. Results showed that the MOSFET measurements in-vivo agreed with calculated results on average within ± 5.6% over all superficial and orthovoltage energies. These variations were slightly larger than TLD results with variations between measured and calculated results being ± 5.0% for the same patient measurements. The MOSFET device provides adequate in-vivo dosimetry for superficial and orthovoltage energy treatments with the accuracy of the measurements seeming to be relatively on par with TLD in our case. The MOSFET does have the advantage of returning a relatively immediate dosimetric result after irradiation. Copyright (2004) Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine

  6. Compton polarimetry with position-resolving X-ray detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hess, Sebastian

    2010-02-01

    In the present thesis the prototype of a novel position-resolving and multi-hit able 2D Si(Li) strip detector is characterized, the planar detector crystal of which is simultaneously applied both as scatterer and as absorber. In the framework of this thesis the Si(Li) polarimeter could be applied in different experiments on the radiative electron capture and on the characteristic radiation at the experimental storage ring of the GSI. The characterization of the detector pursued by means of the highly polarized radiation of the electron capture into the K shell of naked xenon. In the following in two further experiments new values on the polarization of the electron capture into the K shell both of the naked and of the hydrogen-like uranium were performed.

  7. Shock-resistant gamma-ray detector tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    A simple durable scintillation detector is described which, it is claimed, offers a solution to the shock resistance problems encountered when gamma detectors are used for deep bore hole well logging or in space vehicles. The shock resistant detector consists of an elongate sodium iodide scintillation crystal and rigid metal container with a round glass optical window at one end of the container and a metal end closure cap at the opposite end. An elastic rubber compression pad is provided between the end cap and the scintillation crystal to bias the crystal axially toward the glass window. An extension transparent silicone rubber light pipe of substantial axial thickness permanently couples the optical window to the crystal while allowing substantial movement under high g forces. (U.K.)

  8. Determining dose rate with a semiconductor detector - Monte Carlo calculations of the detector response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nordenfors, C

    1999-02-01

    To determine dose rate in a gamma radiation field, based on measurements with a semiconductor detector, it is necessary to know how the detector effects the field. This work aims to describe this effect with Monte Carlo simulations and calculations, that is to identify the detector response function. This is done for a germanium gamma detector. The detector is normally used in the in-situ measurements that is carried out regularly at the department. After the response function is determined it is used to reconstruct a spectrum from an in-situ measurement, a so called unfolding. This is done to be able to calculate fluence rate and dose rate directly from a measured (and unfolded) spectrum. The Monte Carlo code used in this work is EGS4 developed mainly at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. It is a widely used code package to simulate particle transport. The results of this work indicates that the method could be used as-is since the accuracy of this method compares to other methods already in use to measure dose rate. Bearing in mind that this method provides the nuclide specific dose it is useful, in radiation protection, since knowing what the relations between different nuclides are and how they change is very important when estimating the risks

  9. Dose Response of Alanine Detectors Irradiated with Carbon Ion Beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herrmann, Rochus; Jäkel, Oliver; Palmans, Hugo

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The dose response of the alanine detector shows a dependence on particle energy and type, when irradiated with ion beams. The purpose of this study is to investigate the response behaviour of the alanine detector in clinical carbon ion beams and compare the results with model predictions......-dose curves deviate from predictions in the peak region, most pronounced at the distal edge of the peak. Conclusions: The used model and its implementation show a good overall agreement for quasi mono energetic measurements. Deviations in depth-dose measurements are mainly attributed to uncertainties...

  10. An efficient energy response model for liquid scintillator detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebanowski, Logan; Wan, Linyan; Ji, Xiangpan; Wang, Zhe; Chen, Shaomin

    2018-05-01

    Liquid scintillator detectors are playing an increasingly important role in low-energy neutrino experiments. In this article, we describe a generic energy response model of liquid scintillator detectors that provides energy estimations of sub-percent accuracy. This model fits a minimal set of physically-motivated parameters that capture the essential characteristics of scintillator response and that can naturally account for changes in scintillator over time, helping to avoid associated biases or systematic uncertainties. The model employs a one-step calculation and look-up tables, yielding an immediate estimation of energy and an efficient framework for quantifying systematic uncertainties and correlations.

  11. One dimensional detector for X-ray diffraction with superior energy resolution based on silicon strip detector technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dąbrowski, W; Fiutowski, T; Wiącek, P; Fink, J; Krane, H-G

    2012-01-01

    1-D position sensitive X-ray detectors based on silicon strip detector technology have become standard instruments in X-ray diffraction and are available from several vendors. As these devices have been proven to be very useful and efficient further improvement of their performance is investigated. The silicon strip detectors in X-ray diffraction are primarily used as counting devices and the requirements concerning the spatial resolution, dynamic range and count rate capability are of primary importance. However, there are several experimental issues in which a good energy resolution is important. The energy resolution of silicon strip detectors is limited by the charge sharing effects in the sensor as well as by noise of the front-end electronics. The charge sharing effects in the sensor and various aspects of the electronics, including the baseline fluctuations, which affect the energy resolution, have been analyzed in detail and a new readout concept has been developed. A front-end ASIC with a novel scheme of baseline restoration and novel interstrip logic circuitry has been designed. The interstrip logic is used to reject the events resulting in significant charge sharing between neighboring strips. At the expense of rejecting small fraction of photons entering the detector one can obtain single strip energy spectra almost free of charge sharing effects. In the paper we present the design considerations and measured performance of the detector being developed. The electronic noise of the system at room temperature is typically of the order of 70 el rms for 17 mm long silicon strips and a peaking time of about 1 μs. The energy resolution of 600 eV FWHM has been achieved including the non-reducible charge sharing effects and the electronic noise. This energy resolution is sufficient to address a common problem in X-ray diffraction, i.e. electronic suppression of the fluorescence radiation from samples containing iron or cobalt while irradiated with 8.04 ke

  12. Absorption of scintillation light in a 100l liquid xenon γ-ray detector and expected detector performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldini, A.; Bemporad, C.; Cei, F.; Doke, T.; Grassi, M.; Grebenuk, A.A.; Grigoriev, D.N.; Haruyama, T.; Kasami, K.; Kikuchi, J.; Maki, A.; Mashimo, T.; Mihara, S.; Mitsuhashi, T.; Mori, T.; Nicolo, D.; Nishiguchi, H.; Ootani, W.; Ozone, K.; Papa, A.; Pazzi, R.; Ritt, S.; Sawada, R.; Sergiampietri, F.; Signorelli, G.; Suzuki, S.; Terasawa, K.; Yamashita, M.; Yamashita, S.; Yoshimura, T.; Yuri, Yu.

    2005-01-01

    An 800l liquid xenon scintillation γ-ray detector is being developed for the MEG experiment which will search for μ + ->e + γdecay at the Paul Scherrer Institut. Absorption of scintillation light of xenon by impurities might possibly limit the performance of such a detector. We used a 100l prototype with an active volume of 372x372x496mm 3 to study the scintillation light absorption. We have developed a method to evaluate the light absorption, separately from elastic scattering of light, by measuring cosmic rays and α sources. By using a suitable purification technique, an absorption length longer than 100cm has been achieved. The effects of the light absorption on the energy resolution are estimated by Monte Carlo simulation

  13. A new X-ray detector for magnetic circular dichroism experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Bateman, J E; Dudzik, E; Laan, G V D; Lipp, J D; Smith, A D; Stephenson, R

    2001-01-01

    X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) studies of magnetic 3d transition metal samples require the recording of high quality absorption scans in high magnetic fields using circularly polarised soft X-rays of energies in the range 0.5-1 keV. A Gas Microstrip Detector is described which permits the option of using the X-ray fluorescence signal instead of the usual electron yield signal.

  14. MCNP modelling of scintillation-detector gamma-ray spectra from natural radionuclides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendriks, P H G M; Maucec, M; de Meijer, R J

    2002-09-01

    gamma-ray spectra of natural radionuclides are simulated for a BGO detector in a borehole geometry using the Monte Carlo code MCNP. All gamma-ray emissions of the decay of 40K and the series of 232Th and 238U are used to describe the source. A procedure is proposed which excludes the time-consuming electron tracking in less relevant areas of the geometry. The simulated gamma-ray spectra are benchmarked against laboratory data.

  15. Advancing the Technology of Monolithic CMOS detectors for their use as X-ray Imaging Spectrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenter, Almus

    The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) proposes a two year program to further advance the scientific capabilities of monolithic CMOS detectors for use as x-ray imaging spectrometers. This proposal will build upon the progress achieved with funding from a previous APRA proposal that ended in 2013. As part of that previous proposal, x- ray optimized, highly versatile, monolithic CMOS imaging detectors and technology were developed and tested. The performance and capabilities of these devices were then demonstrated, with an emphasis on the performance advantages these devices have over CCDs and other technologies. The developed SAO/SRI-Sarnoff CMOS devices incorporate: Low noise, high sensitivity ("gain") pixels; Highly parallel on-chip signal chains; Standard and very high resistivity (30,000Ohm-cm) Si; Back-Side thinning and passivation. SAO demonstrated the performance benefits of each of these features in these devices. This new proposal high-lights the performance of this previous generation of devices, and segues into new technology and capability. The high sensitivity ( 135uV/e) 6 Transistor (6T) Pinned Photo Diode (PPD) pixels provided a large charge to voltage conversion gain to the detect and resolve even small numbers of photo electrons produced by x-rays. The on-chip, parallel signal chain processed an entire row of pixels in the same time that a CCD requires to processes a single pixel. The resulting high speed operation ( 1000 times faster than CCD) provide temporal resolution while mitigating dark current and allowed room temperature operation. The high resistivity Si provided full (over) depletion for thicker devices which increased QE for higher energy x-rays. In this proposal, SAO will investigate existing NMOS and existing PMOS devices as xray imaging spectrometers. Conventional CMOS imagers are NMOS. NMOS devices collect and measure photo-electrons. In contrast, PMOS devices collect and measure photo-holes. PMOS devices have various

  16. X-ray measurement with Pin type semiconductor detectors; Medicion de rayos X con detectores de semiconductor tipo PIN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez J, F.J. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Departamento de Electronica, C.P. 52045 Salazar, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2000-07-01

    Here are presented the experimental results of the applications of Pin type radiation detectors developed in a National Institute of Nuclear Research (ININ) project, in the measurement of low energy gamma and X-rays. The applications were oriented mainly toward the Medical Physics area. It is planned other applications which are in process of implementation inside the National Institute of Nuclear Research in Mexico. (Author)

  17. A beta ray spectrometer based on a two-, or three-element silicon detector coincidence telescope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horowitz, Y.S.; Weizman, Y.; Hirning, C.R.

    1995-01-01

    The operation of a beta ray energy spectrometer based on a two-or three-element silicon detector telescope is described. The front detector (A) is a thin, totally depleted, silicon surface barrier detector either 40 μm, 72 μm or 98 μm thick. The back detector (C) is a Li compensated silicon detector, 5000 μm thick. An additional thin detector can be inserted between these two detectors when additional photon rejection capability is required in intense photon fields. The capability of the spectrometer to reject photons is based on the fact that incident photons will have a small probability of simultaneously losing detectable energy in two detectors and an even smaller probability of losing detectable energy in all three detectors. Electrons, however, above a low energy threshold, will always record simultaneous, events in all three detectors. The spectrometer is capable of measuring electron energies from a lower energy coincidence threshold of 70 keV with 60% efficiency increasing to 100% efficiency in the energy region between 150 keV and 2.5 MeV. (Author)

  18. A position sensitive gamma-ray detector which employs photodiode and CsI (T1) crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dean, A.J.; Graham, G.; Hopkins, C.J.; Ramsden, D.; Lei, M.

    1987-01-01

    A compact CsI(Tl)/photodiode gamma-ray detector is described which is capable of locating the point of interaction of incident gamma-ray photons in the spectral region around 1 MeV. Laboratory tests are used to quantify both the spectral and positional resolutions of the detectors. Their likely application in space gamma-ray astronomy is also discussed

  19. X-ray light valve (XLV): a novel detectors' technology for digital mammography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcovici, Sorin; Sukhovatkin, Vlad; Oakham, Peter

    2014-03-01

    A novel method, based on X-ray Light Valve (XLV) technology, is proposed for making good image quality yet inexpensive flat panel detectors for digital mammography. The digital mammography markets, particularly in the developing countries, demand quality machines at substantially lower prices than the ones available today. Continuous pressure is applied on x-ray detectors' manufacturers to reduce the flat panel detectors' prices. XLV presents a unique opportunity to achieve the needed price - performance characteristics for direct conversion, x-ray detectors. The XLV based detectors combine the proven, superior, spatial resolution of a-Se with the simplicity and low cost of liquid crystals and optical scanning. The x-ray quanta absorbed by a 200 μm a-Se produce electron - hole pairs that move under an electric field to the top and bottom of a-Se layer. This 2D charge distribution creates at the interface with the liquid crystals a continuous (analog) charge image corresponding to the impinging radiation's information. Under the influence of local electrical charges next to them, the liquid crystals twist proportionally to the charges and vary their light reflectivity. A scanning light source illuminates the liquid crystals while an associated, pixilated photo-detector, having a 42 μm pixel size, captures the light reflected by the liquid crystals and converts it in16 bit words that are transmitted to the machine for image processing and display. The paper will describe a novel XLV, 25 cm x 30 cm, flat panel detector structure and its underlying physics as well as its preliminary performance measured on several engineering prototypes. In particular, the paper will present the results of measuring XLV detectors' DQE, MTF, dynamic range, low contrast resolution and dynamic behavior. Finally, the paper will introduce the new, low cost, XLV detector based, digital mammography machine under development at XLV Diagnostics Inc.

  20. The effects of intense gamma-irradiation on the alpha-particle response of silicon carbide semiconductor radiation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruddy, Frank H.; Seidel, John G.

    2007-01-01

    Silicon Carbide (SiC) semiconductor radiation detectors are being developed for alpha-particle, X-ray and Gamma-ray, and fast-neutron energy spectrometry. SiC detectors have been operated at temperatures up to 306 deg. C and have also been found to be highly resistant to the radiation effects of fast-neutron and charged-particle bombardments. In the present work, the alpha-particle response of a SiC detector based on a Schottky diode design has been carefully monitored as a function of 137 Cs gamma-ray exposure. The changes in response have been found to be negligible for gamma exposures up to and including 5.4 MGy, and irradiations to higher doses are in progress

  1. On the response of electronic personal dosimeters in constant potential and pulsed X-ray beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guimaraes, Margarete C.; Silva, Teogenes; Silva, Claudete R.E., E-mail: margaretecristinag@gmail.com [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Oliveira, Paulo Marcio C. de [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Departamento de Anatomia e Imagem

    2015-07-01

    Electronic personal dosimeters (EPDs) based on solid state detectors have widely been used but some deficiencies in their response in pulsed radiation beams have been reported. Nowadays, there is not an international standard for pulsed X-ray beams for calibration or type testing of dosimeters. Irradiation conditions for testing the response of EPDs in both the constant potential and pulsed X-ray beams were established in CDTN. Three different types of EPDs were tested in different conditions in similar ISO and IEC X-ray qualities. Results stressed the need of performing additional checks before using EPDs in constant potential or pulsed X-rays. (author)

  2. Limits on neutrino emission from gamma-ray bursts with the 40 string IceCube detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, R; Abdou, Y; Abu-Zayyad, T; Adams, J; Aguilar, J A; Ahlers, M; Andeen, K; Auffenberg, J; Bai, X; Baker, M; Barwick, S W; Bay, R; Bazo Alba, J L; Beattie, K; Beatty, J J; Bechet, S; Becker, J K; Becker, K-H; Benabderrahmane, M L; BenZvi, S; Berdermann, J; Berghaus, P; Berley, D; Bernardini, E; Bertrand, D; Besson, D Z; Bindig, D; Bissok, M; Blaufuss, E; Blumenthal, J; Boersma, D J; Bohm, C; Bose, D; Böser, S; Botner, O; Braun, J; Brown, A M; Buitink, S; Carson, M; Chirkin, D; Christy, B; Clem, J; Clevermann, F; Cohen, S; Colnard, C; Cowen, D F; D'Agostino, M V; Danninger, M; Daughhetee, J; Davis, J C; De Clercq, C; Demirörs, L; Depaepe, O; Descamps, F; Desiati, P; de Vries-Uiterweerd, G; DeYoung, T; Díaz-Vélez, J C; Dierckxsens, M; Dreyer, J; Dumm, J P; Ehrlich, R; Eisch, J; Ellsworth, R W; Engdegård, O; Euler, S; Evenson, P A; Fadiran, O; Fazely, A R; Fedynitch, A; Feusels, T; Filimonov, K; Finley, C; Fischer-Wasels, T; Foerster, M M; Fox, B D; Franckowiak, A; Franke, R; Gaisser, T K; Gallagher, J; Geisler, M; Gerhardt, L; Gladstone, L; Glüsenkamp, T; Goldschmidt, A; Goodman, J A; Grant, D; Griesel, T; Gross, A; Grullon, S; Gurtner, M; Ha, C; Hallgren, A; Halzen, F; Han, K; Hanson, K; Heinen, D; Helbing, K; Herquet, P; Hickford, S; Hill, G C; Hoffman, K D; Homeier, A; Hoshina, K; Hubert, D; Huelsnitz, W; Hülss, J-P; Hulth, P O; Hultqvist, K; Hussain, S; Ishihara, A; Jacobsen, J; Japaridze, G S; Johansson, H; Joseph, J M; Kampert, K-H; Kappes, A; Karg, T; Karle, A; Kelley, J L; Kemming, N; Kenny, P; Kiryluk, J; Kislat, F; Klein, S R; Köhne, J-H; Kohnen, G; Kolanoski, H; Köpke, L; Kopper, S; Koskinen, D J; Kowalski, M; Kowarik, T; Krasberg, M; Krings, T; Kroll, G; Kuehn, K; Kuwabara, T; Labare, M; Lafebre, S; Laihem, K; Landsman, H; Larson, M J; Lauer, R; Lehmann, R; Lünemann, J; Madsen, J; Majumdar, P; Marotta, A; Maruyama, R; Mase, K; Matis, H S; Meagher, K; Merck, M; Mészáros, P; Meures, T; Middell, E; Milke, N; Miller, J; Montaruli, T; Morse, R; Movit, S M; Nahnhauer, R; Nam, J W; Naumann, U; Niessen, P; Nygren, D R; Odrowski, S; Olivas, A; Olivo, M; O'Murchadha, A; Ono, M; Panknin, S; Paul, L; Pérez de los Heros, C; Petrovic, J; Piegsa, A; Pieloth, D; Porrata, R; Posselt, J; Price, P B; Prikockis, M; Przybylski, G T; Rawlins, K; Redl, P; Resconi, E; Rhode, W; Ribordy, M; Rizzo, A; Rodrigues, J P; Roth, P; Rothmaier, F; Rott, C; Ruhe, T; Rutledge, D; Ruzybayev, B; Ryckbosch, D; Sander, H-G; Santander, M; Sarkar, S; Schatto, K; Schmidt, T; Schoenwald, A; Schukraft, A; Schultes, A; Schulz, O; Schunck, M; Seckel, D; Semburg, B; Seo, S H; Sestayo, Y; Seunarine, S; Silvestri, A; Slipak, A; Spiczak, G M; Spiering, C; Stamatikos, M; Stanev, T; Stephens, G; Stezelberger, T; Stokstad, R G; Stoyanov, S; Strahler, E A; Straszheim, T; Sullivan, G W; Swillens, Q; Taavola, H; Taboada, I; Tamburro, A; Tarasova, O; Tepe, A; Ter-Antonyan, S; Tilav, S; Toale, P A; Toscano, S; Tosi, D; Turčan, D; van Eijndhoven, N; Vandenbroucke, J; Van Overloop, A; van Santen, J; Vehring, M; Voge, M; Voigt, B; Walck, C; Waldenmaier, T; Wallraff, M; Walter, M; Weaver, C; Wendt, C; Westerhoff, S; Whitehorn, N; Wiebe, K; Wiebusch, C H; Williams, D R; Wischnewski, R; Wissing, H; Wolf, M; Woschnagg, K; Xu, C; Xu, X W; Yodh, G; Yoshida, S; Zarzhitsky, P

    2011-04-08

    IceCube has become the first neutrino telescope with a sensitivity below the TeV neutrino flux predicted from gamma-ray bursts if gamma-ray bursts are responsible for the observed cosmic-ray flux above 10(18)  eV. Two separate analyses using the half-complete IceCube detector, one a dedicated search for neutrinos from pγ interactions in the prompt phase of the gamma-ray burst fireball and the other a generic search for any neutrino emission from these sources over a wide range of energies and emission times, produced no evidence for neutrino emission, excluding prevailing models at 90% confidence.

  3. Quantitative microanalysis in the analytical electronmicroscope using an HPGe-x ray detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grogger, W.

    1994-01-01

    Energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry (EDX) is a routine method for determining the chemical composition of a sample in the analytical electronmicroscope. Since some years high purity germanium x-ray detectors (HPGe) are commercially available for use in EDX. This new type of detector offers some advantages over the commonly used Si (Li) detector: better energy resolution, better detector efficiency for high energy lines (> 30 keV) and better stability against exterior influences. For quantitative analysis one needs sensitivity factors (k-factors), which correlate the measured intensity to the concentration of a specific element. These k-factors can be calculated or determined experimentally. For a precise quantitative analysis of light elements measured k-factors are absolutely necessary. In this study k-factors were measured with an HPGe detector using standards. The accuracy of the k-factors was proved using some examples of practical relevance. Additionally some special features of the HPGe detector were examined, which lead to a better understanding of EDX spectrometry using an HPGe detector (escape lines, icing of the detector, artifacts). (author)

  4. Development of a lens-coupled CMOS detector for an X-ray inspection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ho Kyung; Ahn, Jung Keun; Cho, Gyuseong

    2005-01-01

    A digital X-ray imaging detector based on a complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) image sensor has been developed for X-ray non-destructive inspection applications. This is a cost-effective solution because of the availability of cheap commercial standard CMOS image sensors. The detector configuration adopts an indirect X-ray detection method by using scintillation material and lens assembly. As a feasibility test of the developed lens-coupled CMOS detector as an X-ray inspection system, we have acquired X-ray projection images under a variety of imaging conditions. The results show that the projected image is reasonably acceptable in typical non-destructive testing (NDT). However, the developed detector may not be appropriate for laminography due to a low light-collection efficiency of lens assembly. In this paper, construction of the lens-coupled CMOS detector and its specifications are described, and the experimental results are presented. Using the analysis of quantum accounting diagram, inefficiency of the lens-coupling method is discussed

  5. Observation of superheavy primary cosmic ray nuclei with solid state track detectors and x-ray films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doke, Tadayoshi; Hayashi, Takayoshi; Ito, Kensai; Yanagimachi, Tomoki; Kobayashi, Shigeru.

    1977-01-01

    The measurements of energy spectra and the nuclear charge distribution of superheavy nuclei heavier than iron in primary cosmic ray can provide information on the origin, propagation and life time of the cosmic ray. Since incident particles are in the region of relativistic velocity (the low energy cosmic ray below the cutoff energy is forbidden from entering), the charges of cosmic ray nuclei can be determined without knowing the energy of particles. The balloon-borne solid state track detector and plastic and X-ray films were employed for the detection of superheavy cosmic ray, and the five events were detected with the cellulose nitrate film. The flux of superheavy nuclei is predicted from the present analysis. (Yoshimori, M.)

  6. Position sensitive X-ray or X-ray detector and 3-D-tomography using same

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    A fan-shaped beam of penetrating radiation, such as X-ray or γ-ray radiation, is directed through a slice of the body to be analyzed into a position sensitive detector for deriving a shadowgraph of transmission or absorption of the penetrating radiation by the body. A number of such shadowgraphs are obtained for different angles of rotation of the fan-shaped beam relative to the center of the slice being analyzed. The detected fan beam shadowgraph data is reordered into shadowgraph data corresponding to sets of parallel paths of radiation through the body. The reordered parallel path shadowgraph data is then convoluted in accordance with a 3-D reconstruction method by convolution in a computer to derive a 3-D reconstructed tomograph of the body under analysis. In a preferred embodiment, the position sensitive detector comprises a multiwire detector wherein the wires are arrayed parallel to the direction of the divergent penetrating rays to be detected. A focussed grid collimator is interposed between the body and the position sensitive detector for collimating the penetrating rays to be detected. The source of penetrating radiation is preferably a monochromatic source

  7. Gamma-ray multiplicity measurement of the spontaneous fission decay of 252Cf in a segmented HPGe/BGO detector array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bleuel, D L; Bernstein, L A; Burke, J T; Gibelin, J; Heffner, M D; Mintz, J; Norman, E B; Phair, L; Scielzo, N D; Sheets, S A; Snyderman, N J; Stoyer, M A; Wiedeking, M

    2008-04-23

    Coincident {gamma} rays from a {sup 252}Cf source were measured using an array of six segmented high-purity germanium (HPGe) Clover detectors each enclosed by 16 bismuth-germanate (BGO) detectors. The detectors were arranged in a cubic pattern around a 1 {micro}Ci {sup 252}Cf source to cover a large solid angle for {gamma}-ray measurement with a reasonable reconstruction of the multiplicity. Neutron multiplicity was determined in certain cases by identifying the prompt {gamma} rays from individual fission fragment pairs. Multiplicity distributions from previous experiments and theoretical models were convolved with the response function of the array and compared to the present results. These results suggest a {gamma}-ray multiplicity spectrum broader than previous measurements and models, and provide no evidence of correlation with neutron multiplicity.

  8. Response of the D0 calorimeter to cosmic ray muons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotcher, J.

    1992-10-01

    The D0 Detector at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory is a large multipurpose detector facility designed for the study of proton-antiproton collision products at the center-of-mass energy of 2 TeV. It consists of an inner tracking volume, hermetic uranium/liquid argon sampling calorimetry, and an outer 47π muon detector. In preparation for our first collider run, the collaboration organized a Cosmic Ray Commissioning Run, which took place from February--May of 1991. This thesis is a detailed study of the response of the central calorimeter to cosmic ray muons as extracted from data collected during this run. We have compared the shapes of the experimentally-obtained pulse height spectra to the Landau prediction for the ionization loss in a continuous thin absorber in the four electromagnetic and four hadronic layers of the calorimeter, and find good agreement after experimental effects are folded in. We have also determined an absolute energy calibration using two independent methods: one which measures the response of the electronics to a known amount of charge injected at the preamplifiers, and one which uses a carry-over of the calibration from a beam test of central calorimeter modules. Both absolute energy conversion factors agree with one another, within their errors. The calibration determined from the test beam carryover, relevant for use with collider physics data, has an error of 2.3%. We believe that, with further study, a final error of ∼1% will be achieved. The theory-to-experiment comparison of the peaks (or most probable values) of the muon spectra was used to determine the layer-to-layer consistency of the muon signal. We find that the mean response in the 3 fine hadronic layers is (12 ± 2%) higher than that in the 4 electromagnetic layers. These same comparisons have been used to verify the absolute energy conversion factors. The conversion factors work well for the electromagnetic sections

  9. A high rate, low noise, x-ray silicon strip detector system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludewigt, B.; Jaklevic, J.; Kipnis, I.; Rossington, C.; Spieler, H.

    1993-11-01

    An x-ray detector system, based on a silicon strip detector wire-bonded to a low noise charge-senstive amplifier integrated circuit, has been developed for synchrotron radiation experiments which require very high count rates and good energy resolution. Noise measurements and x-ray spectra were taken using a 6 mm long, 55 μm pitch strip detector in conjunction with a prototype 16-channel charge-sensitive preamplifier, both fabricated using standard 1.2 μm CMOS technology. The detector system currently achieves an energy resolution of 350 eV FWHM at 5.9 key, 2 μs peaking time, when cooled to -5 degree C

  10. Automatic analysis of quality of images from X-ray digital flat detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Meur, Y.

    2009-04-01

    Since last decade, medical imaging has grown up with the development of new digital imaging techniques. In the field of X-ray radiography, new detectors replace progressively older techniques, based on film or x-ray intensifiers. These digital detectors offer a higher sensibility and reduced overall dimensions. This work has been prepared with Trixell, the world leading company in flat detectors for medical radiography. It deals with quality control on digital images stemming from these detectors. High quality standards of medical imaging impose a close analysis of the defects that can appear on the images. This work describes a complete process for quality analysis of such images. A particular focus is given on the detection task of the defects, thanks to methods well adapted to our context of spatially correlated defects in noise background. (author)

  11. Slow scan sit detector for x-ray diffraction studies using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milch, J.R.

    1978-01-01

    A TV-type x-ray detector using a SIT vidicon has been used for biological diffraction studies at the EMBL outstation at DESY, Hamburg, Germany. The detector converts the two-dimensional diffraction pattern to a charge pattern on the vidicon target, which is read out in the slow-scan mode. This detector has high DOE, no count-rate limit, and is simple and inexpensive to construct. Radiation from the storage ring DORIS was used to study the structure of live muscle at various phases of contraction. Typically the count-rate on the detector was 10 6 x-rays/sec and a total exposure of a few seconds was needed to record the weak diffraction from muscle. This compares with usual exposure times of several hours using a rotating anode generator and film

  12. High energy X-ray photon counting imaging using linear accelerator and silicon strip detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Y., E-mail: cycjty@sophie.q.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Bioengineering, the University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Shimazoe, K.; Yan, X. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Management, the University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Ueda, O.; Ishikura, T. [Fuji Electric Co., Ltd., Fuji, Hino, Tokyo 191-8502 (Japan); Fujiwara, T. [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Uesaka, M.; Ohno, M. [Nuclear Professional School, the University of Tokyo, 2-22 Shirakata-shirane, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan); Tomita, H. [Department of Quantum Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo, Chikusa, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Yoshihara, Y. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Management, the University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Takahashi, H. [Department of Bioengineering, the University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Department of Nuclear Engineering and Management, the University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)

    2016-09-11

    A photon counting imaging detector system for high energy X-rays is developed for on-site non-destructive testing of thick objects. One-dimensional silicon strip (1 mm pitch) detectors are stacked to form a two-dimensional edge-on module. Each detector is connected to a 48-channel application specific integrated circuit (ASIC). The threshold-triggered events are recorded by a field programmable gate array based counter in each channel. The detector prototype is tested using 950 kV linear accelerator X-rays. The fast CR shaper (300 ns pulse width) of the ASIC makes it possible to deal with the high instant count rate during the 2 μs beam pulse. The preliminary imaging results of several metal and concrete samples are demonstrated.

  13. High energy X-ray photon counting imaging using linear accelerator and silicon strip detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian, Y.; Shimazoe, K.; Yan, X.; Ueda, O.; Ishikura, T.; Fujiwara, T.; Uesaka, M.; Ohno, M.; Tomita, H.; Yoshihara, Y.; Takahashi, H.

    2016-01-01

    A photon counting imaging detector system for high energy X-rays is developed for on-site non-destructive testing of thick objects. One-dimensional silicon strip (1 mm pitch) detectors are stacked to form a two-dimensional edge-on module. Each detector is connected to a 48-channel application specific integrated circuit (ASIC). The threshold-triggered events are recorded by a field programmable gate array based counter in each channel. The detector prototype is tested using 950 kV linear accelerator X-rays. The fast CR shaper (300 ns pulse width) of the ASIC makes it possible to deal with the high instant count rate during the 2 μs beam pulse. The preliminary imaging results of several metal and concrete samples are demonstrated.

  14. Bio-medical X-ray imaging with spectroscopic pixel detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Butler, A P H; Tipples, R; Cook, N; Watts, R; Meyer, J; Bell, A J; Melzer, T R; Butler, P H

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study is to review the clinical potential of spectroscopic X-ray detectors and to undertake a feasibility study using a novel detector in a clinical hospital setting. Detectors currently in development, such as Medipix-3, will have multiple energy thresholds allowing for routine use of spectroscopic bio-medical imaging. We have coined the term MARS (Medipix All Resolution System) for bio-medical images that provide spatial, temporal, and energy information. The full clinical significance of spectroscopic X-ray imaging is difficult to predict but insights can be gained by examining both image reconstruction artifacts and the current uses of dual-energy techniques. This paper reviews the known uses of energy information in vascular imaging and mammography, clinically important fields. It then presents initial results from using Medipix-2, to image human tissues within a clinical radiology department. Detectors currently in development, such as Medipix-3, will have multiple energy thresholds allo...

  15. Investigation of gamma-ray sensitivity of neutron detectors based on thin converter films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khaplanov, A; Hall-Wilton, R [European Spallation Source, P.O Box 176, SE-22100 Lund (Sweden); Piscitelli, F; Buffet, J-C; Clergeau, J-F; Correa, J; Esch, P van; Ferraton, M; Guerard, B [Institute Laue Langevin, Rue Jules Horowitz, FR-38042 Grenoble (France)

    2013-10-15

    Currently, many detector technologies for thermal neutron detection are in development in order to lower the demand for the rare {sup 3}He gas. Gas detectors with solid thin film neutron converters readout by gas proportional counter method have been proposed as an appropriate choice for applications where large area coverage is necessary. In this paper, we investigate the probability for {gamma}-rays to generate a false count in a neutron measurement. Simulated results are compared to measurement with {sup 10}B thin film prototypes and a {sup 3}He detector. It is demonstrated that equal {gamma}-ray rejection to that of {sup 3}He tubes is achieved with the new technology. The arguments and results presented here are also applicable to gas detectors with converters other than solid {sup 10}B layers, such as {sup 6}Li layers and {sup 10}BF{sub 3} gas.

  16. Sound response of superheated drop bubble detectors to neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Size; Chen Zhe; Liu Chao; Ni Bangfa; Zhang Guiying; Zhao Changfa; Xiao Caijin; Liu Cunxiong; Nie Peng; Guan Yongjing

    2012-01-01

    The sound response of the bubble detectors to neutrons by using 252 Cf neutron source was described. Sound signals were filtered by sound card and PC. The short-time signal energy. FFT spectrum, power spectrum, and decay time constant were got to determine the authenticity of sound signal for bubbles. (authors)

  17. Energy response and compensation filters for pips detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Lin; Ye Zhiyao; Dong Binjiang

    2007-01-01

    This paper introduces the analysis of energy response and the choice of proper compensation filters for PIPS detector. With PRESTA-CG program, filters conformed to the national standard of PRC were picked out by calculation. Then the chosen filters were tested through experiments. Good agreement was obtained between measured results and calculated values by Monte Carlo method. (authors)

  18. Long-term and transient time variation of cosmic ray fluxes detected in Argentina by CARPET cosmic ray detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Mendonça, R. R. S.; Raulin, J.-P.; Bertoni, F. C. P.; Echer, E.; Makhmutov, V. S.; Fernandez, G.

    2011-07-01

    We present results obtained at El Leoncito (CASLEO, San Juan, Argentina) with the CARPET charged particles detector installed in April 2006. The observed modulation of the cosmic ray flux is discussed as a function of its time variability and it is related to longer solar activity variations and to shorter variations during solar and geomagnetic transient activity. Short period (few minutes, few hours) cosmic ray modulation events are observed during rain time (precipitation) and significant variations of the atmospheric electric field. Complementary observations of the atmospheric electric field indicate that its time variations play an important role in the detected cosmic ray event.

  19. Response function study of a scintillator detector of NaI(Tl)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villa, Marcelo Barros; Costa, Alessandro Martins da

    2014-01-01

    In measurements of gamma rays with Nai (Tl) scintillator, the detectors output data are pulse height spectra, that corresponding to distorted information about the radiation source due to various errors associated with the crystal scintillation process and electronics associated, instead of power spectra photons. Pulse height spectra are related to the real power spectra by means of scintillator detector response function NaI (Tl). In this work, the response function for a cylindrical crystal of Nal (Tl) of 7,62 x 7,62 cm (diameter x length) was studied, by Monte Carlo method, using the EGSnrc tool to model the transport of radiation, combined with experimental measurements. An inverse response matrix, even with the energy of the square root, which transforms the pulse height spectrum of photon energy spectrum was obtained. The results of this transformation of pulse height spectrum for photon energy spectrum is presented, showing that the methodology employed in this study is suitable

  20. High energy astrophysics with ground-based gamma ray detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aharonian, F; Buckley, J; Kifune, T; Sinnis, G

    2008-01-01

    Recent advances in ground-based gamma ray astronomy have led to the discovery of more than 70 sources of very high energy (E γ ≥ 100 GeV) gamma rays, falling into a number of source populations including pulsar wind nebulae, shell type supernova remnants, Wolf-Rayet stars, giant molecular clouds, binary systems, the Galactic Center, active galactic nuclei and 'dark' (yet unidentified) galactic objects. We summarize the history of TeV gamma ray astronomy up to the current status of the field including a description of experimental techniques and highlight recent astrophysical results. We also discuss the potential of ground-based gamma ray astronomy for future discoveries and describe possible directions for future instrumental developments

  1. Energy and angular responses of the criticality accident detector using a plastic scintillator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsujimura, Norio; Yoshida, Tadayoshi

    2006-01-01

    The Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Nuclear Fuel Cycle Engineering Laboratories, operates a spent fuel reprocessing plant and MOX (Plutonium-Uranium Mixed Oxide) fuel fabrication plants. Criticality accident detectors have been installed in these facilities. The detector, the Toshiba RD120, is composed of a plastic scintillator coupled to a photomultiplier tube, and an operational amplifier. The alarm triggering point is set to 1.0-3.6 mGy·h -1 in photon dose rate to detect the minimum accident of concern. However, a plastic scintillator is principally sensitive not only to primary photons but also to neutrons by secondary photons and heavy charged particles produced in the detector itself. The authors calculated energy and angular responses of the RD120 criticality accident detector to photons and neutrons using Monte Carlo computer codes. The response to primary photons was evaluated with the MCNP-4B and EGS4 calculations, and photon and X-ray irradiation experiments. The response to neutrons that produce secondary photons and heavy charged particles from neutron interactions was computed using the MCNP-4B and SCINFUL, respectively. As a result, reliable response functions were obtained. These results will be a great help in reassessing the coverage area and in determining the appropriate triggering dose rate level in criticality accidents. (author)

  2. A gas microstrip X-ray detector for soft energy fluorescence EXAFS

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, A D; Derbyshire, G E; Duxbury, D M; Lipp, J; Spill, E J; Stephenson, R

    2001-01-01

    Gas microstrip detectors have been previously developed by the particle physics community, where their robustness, compactness and high counting speed have been recognised. These features are particularly attractive to synchrotron radiation use. In this paper, we describe a gas microstrip detector employing multi-element readout and specifically developed for high count rate fluorescence EXAFS at soft X-ray energies below 4 keV.

  3. A novel detector assembly for detecting thermal neutrons, fast neutrons and gamma rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cester, D., E-mail: davide.cester@gmail.com [Dipartimento di Fisica ed Astronomia dell' Università di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Lunardon, M.; Moretto, S. [Dipartimento di Fisica ed Astronomia dell' Università di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); INFN Sezione di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Nebbia, G. [INFN Sezione di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Pino, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica ed Astronomia dell' Università di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Sajo-Bohus, L. [Dipartimento di Fisica ed Astronomia dell' Università di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Laboratorio de Fisica Nuclear, Universidad Simon Bolivar, Apartado 89000, 1080 A Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Stevanato, L.; Bonesso, I.; Turato, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica ed Astronomia dell' Università di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy)

    2016-09-11

    A new composite detector has been developed by combining two different commercial scintillators. The device has the capability to detect gamma rays as well as thermal and fast neutrons; the signal discrimination between the three types is performed on-line by means of waveform digitizers and PSD algorithms. This work describes the assembled detector and its discrimination performance to be employed in the applied field.

  4. A prototype silicon detector system for space cosmic-ray charge measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fei; Fan, Rui-Rui; Peng, Wen-Xi; Dong, Yi-Fa; Gong, Ke; Liang, Xiao-Hua; Liu, Ya-Qing; Wang, Huan-Yu

    2014-06-01

    A readout electronics system used for space cosmic-ray charge measurement for multi-channel silicon detectors is introduced in this paper, including performance measurements. A 64-channel charge sensitive ASIC (VA140) from the IDEAS company is used. With its features of low power consumption, low noise, large dynamic range, and high integration, it can be used in future particle detecting experiments based on silicon detectors.

  5. Proof of Principle for Electronic Collimation of a Gamma Ray Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. ERDC TN-EQT-16-1 January 2016 Proof of Principle for Electronic Collimation of a Gamma...in achieving the proof of principle of the technique, which is intended to be further developed. A gamma ray detector system utilizing electronic...waveforms from longitudinal (along the axis) waveforms yield proof of principle . TECHNOLOGY DESCRIPTION: The component detector technologies were

  6. A novel detector assembly for detecting thermal neutrons, fast neutrons and gamma rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cester, D.; Lunardon, M.; Moretto, S.; Nebbia, G.; Pino, F.; Sajo-Bohus, L.; Stevanato, L.; Bonesso, I.; Turato, F.

    2016-01-01

    A new composite detector has been developed by combining two different commercial scintillators. The device has the capability to detect gamma rays as well as thermal and fast neutrons; the signal discrimination between the three types is performed on-line by means of waveform digitizers and PSD algorithms. This work describes the assembled detector and its discrimination performance to be employed in the applied field.

  7. Multiple Gamma-Ray Detection Capability of a CeBr3 Detector for Gamma Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Naqvi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The newly developed cerium tribromide (CeBr3 detector has reduced intrinsic gamma-ray activity with gamma energy restricted to 1400–2200 keV energy range. This narrower region of background gamma rays allows the CeBr3 detector to detect more than one gamma ray to analyze the gamma-ray spectrum. Use of multiple gamma-ray intensities in elemental analysis instead of a single one improves the accuracy of the estimated results. Multigamma-ray detection capability of a cylindrical 75 mm × 75 mm (diameter × height CeBr3 detector has been tested by analyzing the chlorine concentration in water samples using eight chlorine prompt gamma rays over 517 to 8578 keV energies utilizing a D-D portable neutron generator-based PGNAA setup and measuring the corresponding minimum detection limit (MDC of chlorine. The measured MDC of chlorine for gamma rays with 517–8578 keV energies varies from 0.07 ± 0.02 wt% to 0.80 ± 0.24. The best value of MDC was measured to be 0.07 ± 0.02 wt% for 788 keV gamma rays. The experimental results are in good agreement with Monte Carlo calculations. The study has shown excellent detection capabilities of the CeBr3 detector for eight prompt gamma rays over 517–8578 keV energy range without significant background interference.

  8. Gamma-ray peak shapes from cadmium zinc telluride detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Namboodiri, M.N.; Lavietes, A.D.; McQuaid, J.H.

    1996-09-01

    We report the results of a study of the peak shapes in the gamma spectra measured using several 5 x 5 x 5 mm{sup 3} cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detectors. A simple parameterization involving a Gaussian and an exponential low energy tail describes the peak shapes sell. We present the variation of the parameters with gamma energy. This type of information is very useful in the analysis of complex gamma spectra consisting of many peaks.

  9. Large area self-powered gamma ray detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LeVert, F.E.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to develop a large area self-powered gamma detector (LASPGD) capable of detecting the movement of sealed radiation sources into and out of industrial radiographic units and to construct a prototype source position monitor (SPM) for these units utilizing the LASPGD. Prototype isotropic and directional LASPGDs, with solid and inert gas dielectrics, were developed and extensively tested using calibrated gamma sources (i.e., Cs-137, and Co-60). The sensitivities of the isotropic detectors, with inert gas dielectrics, were found to be approximately a factor of ten greater than those measured for the solid dielectric LASPGDs. Directionally sensitive self-powered detectors were found to exhibit a forward-to-back hemispherical sensitivity ratio of approximately 2 to 1. Industrial radiographic units containing Ir-192 sources with different activities were used to test the performance of the SPM. The SPM, which utilized a gas dielectric LASPGD, performed as designed. That is, the current generated in the LASPGD was converted to a voltage, amplified and used to control the on/off state of an incandescent lamp. The incandescent lamp, which functions as the source/out warning indicator, flashes at a rate of one flash per second when the source is in use (i.e. out of its shield)

  10. Earth formation pulsed neutron porosity logging system utilizing epithermal neutron and inelastic scattering gamma ray detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, H.D. Jr.; Smith, M.P.; Schultz, W.E.

    1978-01-01

    An improved pulsed neutron porosity logging system is provided in the present invention. A logging tool provided with a 14 MeV pulsed neutron source, an epithermal neutron detector and an inelastic scattering gamma ray detector is moved through a borehole. The detection of inelastic gamma rays provides a measure of the fast neutron population in the vicinity of the detector. repetitive bursts of neutrons irradiate the earth formation and, during the busts, inelastic gamma rays representative of the fast neutron population is sampled. During the interval between bursts the epithermal neutron population is sampled along with background gamma radiation due to lingering thermal neutrons. the fast and epithermal neutron population measurements are combined to provide a measurement of formation porosity

  11. PILATUS: a two-dimensional X-ray detector for macromolecular crystallography

    CERN Document Server

    Eikenberry, E F; Huelsen, G; Toyokawa, H; Horisberger, R P; Schmitt, B; Schulze-Briese, C; Tomizaki, T

    2003-01-01

    A large quantum-limited area X-ray detector for protein crystallography is under development at the Swiss Light Source. The final detector will be 2kx2k pixels covering 40x40 cm sup 2. A three-module prototype with 1120x157 pixels covering an active area of 24.3x3.4 cm sup 2 has been tested. X-rays above 6 keV with peak count rates exceeding 5x10 sup 5 X-ray/pixel/s could be detected in single photon counting mode. Statistics of module production and results of threshold trimming are presented. To demonstrate the potential of this new detector, protein crystal data were collected at beamline 6S of the SLS.

  12. X-ray imaging with photon counting hybrid semiconductor pixel detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Manolopoulos, S; Campbell, M; Snoeys, W; Heijne, Erik H M; Pernigotti, E; Raine, C; Smith, K; Watt, J; O'Shea, V; Ludwig, J; Schwarz, C

    1999-01-01

    Semiconductor pixel detectors, originally developed for particle physics experiments, have been studied as X-ray imaging devices. The performance of devices using the OMEGA 3 read-out chip bump-bonded to pixellated silicon semiconductor detectors is characterised in terms of their signal-to-noise ratio when exposed to 60 kVp X-rays. Although parts of the devices achieve values of this ratio compatible with the noise being photon statistics limited, this is not found to hold for the whole pixel matrix, resulting in the global signal-to-noise ratio being compromised. First results are presented of X-ray images taken with a gallium arsenide pixel detector bump-bonded to a new read-out chip, (MEDIPIX), which is a single photon counting read-out chip incorporating a 15-bit counter in every pixel. (author)

  13. Two-dimensional imaging detectors for structural biology with X-ray lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denes, Peter

    2014-07-17

    Our ability to harness the advances in microelectronics over the past decade(s) for X-ray detection has resulted in significant improvements in the state of the art. Biology with X-ray free-electron lasers present daunting detector challenges: all of the photons arrive at the same time, and individual high peak power pulses must be read out shot-by-shot. Direct X-ray detection in silicon pixel detectors--monolithic or hybrid--are the standard for XFELs today. For structural biology, improvements are needed for today's 10-100 Hz XFELs, and further improvements are required for tomorrow's 10+ kHz XFELs. This article will discuss detector challenges, why they arise and ways to overcome them, along with the current state of the art. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  14. Discriminating cosmic muons and X-rays based on rise time using a GEM detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hui-Yin; Zhao, Sheng-Ying; Wang, Xiao-Dong; Zhang, Xian-Ming; Qi, Hui-Rong; Zhang, Wei; Wu, Ke-Yan; Hu, Bi-Tao; Zhang, Yi

    2016-08-01

    Gas electron multiplier (GEM) detectors have been used in cosmic muon scattering tomography and neutron imaging over the last decade. In this work, a triple GEM device with an effective readout area of 10 cm × 10 cm is developed, and a method of discriminating between cosmic muons and X-rays based on rise time is tested. The energy resolution of the GEM detector is tested by 55Fe ray source to prove the GEM detector has a good performance. Analysis of the complete signal-cycles allows us to get the rise time and pulse heights. The experiment result indicates that cosmic muons and X-rays can be discriminated with an appropriate rise time threshold. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11135002, 11275235, 11405077, 11575073)

  15. Characterization of LiF-based soft X-ray imaging detectors by confocal fluorescence microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonfigli, F; Gaudio, P; Lupelli, I; Nichelatti, E; Richetta, M; Vincenti, M A; Montereali, R M

    2010-01-01

    X-ray microscopy represents a powerful tool to obtain images of samples with very high spatial resolution. The main limitation of this technique is represented by the poor spatial resolution of standard imaging detectors. We proposed an innovative high-performance X-ray imaging detector based on the visible photoluminescence of colour centres in lithium fluoride. In this work, a confocal microscope in fluorescence mode was used to characterize LiF-based imaging detectors measuring CC integrated visible fluorescence signals of LiF crystals and films (grown on several kinds of substrates) irradiated by soft X-rays produced by a laser plasma source in different exposure conditions. The results are compared with the CC photoluminescence spectra measured on the same samples and discussed.

  16. An empirical method for peak-to-total ratio computation of a gamma-ray detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cesana, A.; Terrani, M.

    1989-01-01

    A simple expression for peak-to-total ratio evaluation of gamma-ray detectors in the energy range 0.3-10 MeV is proposed. The quantities one needs to know for the computation are: Detector dimensions and chemical composition, photon corss sections and an empirical energy dependent function which is valid for all the detector materials considered. This procedure seems able to produce peak-to-total values with an accuracy comparable with the most sophisticated Monte Carlo calculations. It has been tested using experimental peak-to-total values of Ge, NaI, CsI and BGO detectors but it is reasonable to suppose that it is valid for any detector material. (orig.)

  17. Studies of the performance of the ATLAS detector using cosmic-ray muons

    CERN Document Server

    Aad, G.; Abdallah, J.; Abdelalim, A.A.; Abdesselam, A.; Abdinov, O.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, D.L.; Addy, T.N.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adragna, P.; Adye, T.; Aefsky, S.; Aharrouche, M.; Ahlen, S.P.; Ahles, F.; Ahmad, A.; Ahsan, M.; Aielli, G.; Akdogan, T.; Akesson, T.P.A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A.V.; Aktas, A.; Alam, M.S.; Alam, M.A.; Albrand, S.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I.N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Aliyev, M.; Allport, P.P.; Allwood-Spiers, S.E.; Almond, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alon, R.; Alonso, A.; Alviggi, M.G.; Amako, K.; Amelung, C.; Amoros, G.; Amram, N.; Anastopoulos, C.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C.F.; Anderson, K.J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Anduaga, X.S.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonaki, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonelli, S.; Antos, J.; Antunovic, B.; Anulli, F.; Aoun, S.; Arabidze, G.; Aracena, I.; Arai, Y.; Arce, A.T.H.; Archambault, J.P.; Arguin, J-F.; Argyropoulos, T.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A.J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnault, C.; Artamonov, A.; Arutinov, D.; Asai, M.; Asai, S.; Asfandiyarov, R.; Ask, S.; Asman, B.; Asner, D.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Atoian, G.; Auerbach, B.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Austin, N.; Avolio, G.; Avramidou, R.; Ay, C.; Azuma, Y.; Baak, M.A.; Bach, A.M.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Badescu, E.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bain, T.; Baines, J.T.; Baker, O.K.; Baker, M.D.; Baker, S.; Pedrosa, F.Baltasar Dos Santos; Banas, E.; Banerjee, P.; Banerjee, Sw.; Banfi, D.; Bangert, A.; Bansal, V.; Baranov, S.P.; Barashkou, A.; Barber, T.; Barberio, E.L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Bardin, D.Y.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnett, B.M.; Barnett, R.M.; Baroncelli, A.; Barr, A.J.; Barreiro, F.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.Barreiro; Barrillon, P.; Bartoldus, R.; Bartsch, D.; Bates, R.L.; Batkova, L.; Batley, J.R.; Battaglia, A.; Battistin, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H.S.; Beare, B.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P.H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, G.A.; Beck, H.P.; Beckingham, M.; Becks, K.H.; Beddall, A.J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V.A.; Bee, C.; Begel, M.; Harpaz, S.Behar; Behera, P.K.; Beimforde, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, P.J.; Bell, W.H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellina, F.; Bellomo, M.; Belloni, A.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Ami, S.Ben; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bendel, M.; Benedict, B.H.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benjamin, D.P.; Benoit, M.; Bensinger, J.R.; Benslama, K.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Kuutmann, E.Bergeaas; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Berglund, E.; Beringer, J.; Bernat, P.; Bernhard, R.; Bernius, C.; Berry, T.; Bertin, A.; Besana, M.I.; Besson, N.; Bethke, S.; Bianchi, R.M.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Biesiada, J.; Biglietti, M.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biscarat, C.; Bitenc, U.; Black, K.M.; Blair, R.E.; Blanchard, J-B.; Blanchot, G.; Blocker, C.; Blondel, A.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; 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Rousseau, D.; Royon, C.R.; Rozanov, A.; Rozen, Y.; Ruan, X.; Ruckert, B.; Ruckstuhl, N.; Rud, V.I.; Rudolph, G.; Ruhr, F.; Ruggieri, F.; Ruiz-Martinez, A.; Rumyantsev, L.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakovich, N.A.; Rutherfoord, J.P.; Ruwiedel, C.; Ryabov, Y.F.; Ryan, P.; Rybkin, G.; Rzaeva, S.; Saavedra, A.F.; Sadrozinski, H.F-W.; Sadykov, R.; Tehrani, F.Safai; Sakamoto, H.; Salamanna, G.; Salamon, A.; Saleem, M.; Salihagic, D.; Salnikov, A.; Salt, J.; Salvachua Ferrando, B.M.; Salvatore, D.; Salvatore, F.; Salvucci, A.; Salzburger, A.; Sampsonidis, D.; Samset, B.H.; Sandaker, H.; Sander, H.G.; Sanders, M.P.; Sandhoff, M.; Sandhu, P.; Sandstroem, R.; Sandvoss, S.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Sansoni, A.; Rios, C.Santamarina; Santoni, C.; Santonico, R.; Sarangi, T.; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E.; Sarri, F.; Sasaki, O.; Sasao, N.; Satsounkevitch, I.; Sauvage, G.; Savine, A.Y.; Savinov, V.; Saxon, D.H.; Says, L.P.; Sbarra, C.; Sbrizzi, A.; Scannicchio, D.A.; Schaarschmidt, J.; Schacht, P.; Schafer, U.; Schaetzel, S.; Schaffer, A.C.; Schaile, D.; Schamberger, R.D.; Schamov, A.G.; Scharf, V.; Schegelsky, V.A.; Scheirich, D.; Schernau, M.; Scherzer, M.I.; Schiavi, C.; Schieck, J.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenker, S.; Schmidt, E.; Schmieden, K.; Schmitt, C.; Schmitz, M.; Schoning, A.; Schott, M.; Schouten, D.; Schovancova, J.; Schram, M.; Schreiner, A.; Schroeder, C.; Schroer, N.; Schroers, M.; Schultes, J.; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Schumacher, J.W.; Schumacher, M.; Schumm, B.A.; Schune, Ph.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwemling, Ph.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwierz, R.; Schwindling, J.; Scott, W.G.; Searcy, J.; Sedykh, E.; Segura, E.; Seidel, S.C.; Seiden, A.; Seifert, F.; Seixas, J.M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Seliverstov, D.M.; Sellden, B.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sevior, M.E.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shamim, M.; Shan, L.Y.; Shank, J.T.; Shao, Q.T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P.B.; Shaw, K.; Sherman, D.; Sherwood, P.; Shibata, A.; Shimojima, M.; Shin, T.; Shmeleva, A.; Shochet, M.J.; Shupe, M.A.; Sicho, P.; Sidoti, A.; Siegert, F.; Siegrist, J.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silbert, O.; Silver, Y.; Silverstein, D.; Silverstein, S.B.; Simak, V.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simmons, B.; Simonyan, M.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N.B.; Sipica, V.; Siragusa, G.; Sisakyan, A.N.; Sivoklokov, S.Yu.; Sjolin, J.; Sjursen, T.B.; Skovpen, K.; Skubic, P.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Sliwa, K.; Sloper, J.; Smakhtin, V.; Smirnov, S.Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L.N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, B.C.; Smith, D.; Smith, K.M.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A.A.; Snow, S.W.; Snow, J.; Snuverink, J.; Snyder, S.; Soares, M.; Sodomka, J.; Soffer, A.; Solans, C.A.; Solar, M.; Solc, J.; Camillocci, E.Solfaroli; Solodkov, A.A.; Solovyanov, O.V.; Sondericker, J.; Sopko, V.; Sopko, B.; Sosebee, M.; Soukharev, A.; Spagnolo, S.; Spano, F.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spila, F.; Spiwoks, R.; Spousta, M.; Spurlock, B.; Denis, R.D.St.; Stahl, T.; Stahlman, J.; Stamen, R.; Stanecka, E.; Stanek, R.W.; Stanescu, C.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E.A.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Stavina, P.; Steele, G.; Steinbach, P.; Steinberg, P.; Stekl, I.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H.J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stevenson, K.; Stewart, G.A.; Stockton, M.C.; Stoerig, K.; Stoicea, G.; Stonjek, S.; Strachota, P.; Stradling, A.R.; Straessner, A.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strang, M.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Strohmer, R.; Strom, D.M.; Stroynowski, R.; Strube, J.; Stugu, B.; Sturm, P.; Su, D.; Sugaya, Y.; Sugimoto, T.; Suhr, C.; Suita, K.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V.V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J.E.; Suruliz, K.; Sushkov, S.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M.R.; Suzuki, Y.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Szymocha, T.; Sanchez, J.; Ta, D.; Tackmann, K.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taga, A.; Takahashi, Y.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A.; Tamsett, M.C.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tanaka, S.; Tani, K.; Tapprogge, S.; Tardif, D.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G.F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tassi, E.; Tatarkhanov, M.; Taylor, C.; Taylor, F.E.; Taylor, G.N.; Taylor, W.; Castanheira, M.Teixeira Dias; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Kate, H.Ten; Teng, P.K.; Tennenbaum-Katan, Y.D.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Testa, M.; Therhaag, J.; Thioye, M.; Thoma, S.; Thomas, J.P.; Thompson, E.N.; Thompson, P.D.; Thompson, P.D.; Thompson, R.J.; Thompson, A.S.; Thomson, E.; Thun, R.P.; Tic, T.; Tikhomirov, V.O.; Tikhonov, Y.A.; Tipton, P.; Aires Viegas, F.J.Tique; Tisserant, S.; Toczek, B.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Toggerson, B.; Tojo, J.; Tokar, S.; Tokunaga, K.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Tonoyan, A.; Topfel, C.; Topilin, N.D.; Torchiani, I.; Torrence, E.; Pastor, E.Torro; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D.R.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I.M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Trinh, T.N.; Tripiana, M.F.; Triplett, N.; Trischuk, W.; Trocme, B.; Troncon, C.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J.C-L.; Tsiakiris, M.; Tsiareshka, P.V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E.G.; Tsukerman, I.I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsung, J.W.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuggle, J.M.; Turecek, D.; Cakir, I.Turk; Turlay, E.; Tuts, P.M.; Twomey, M.S.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Uchida, K.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ugland, M.; Uhlenbrock, M.; Uhrmacher, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Unno, Y.; Urbaniec, D.; Urkovsky, E.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Uslenghi, M.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Vahsen, S.; Valente, P.; Valentinetti, S.; Valkar, S.; Gallego, E.Valladolid; Vallecorsa, S.; Ferrer, J.A.Valls; van der Graaf, H.; van der Kraaij, E.; van der Poel, E.; van der Ster, D.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; van Kesteren, Z.; van Vulpen, I.; Vandelli, W.; Vaniachine, A.; Vankov, P.; Vannucci, F.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E.W.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K.E.; Vassilakopoulos, V.I.; Vazeille, F.; Vellidis, C.; Veloso, F.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J.C.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Viehhauser, G.H.A.; Villa, M.; Villani, E.G.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M.G.; Vinek, E.; Vinogradov, V.B.; Viret, S.; Virzi, J.; Vitale, A.; Vitells, O.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vlasak, M.; Vlasov, N.; Vogel, A.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Loeben, J.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorwerk, V.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Voss, T.T.; Vossebeld, J.H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Anh, T.Vu; Vudragovic, D.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Wagner, P.; Walbersloh, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wall, R.; Wang, C.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, S.M.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C.P.; Warsinsky, M.; Wastie, R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, M.F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, A.T.; Waugh, B.M.; Weber, M.D.; Weber, M.; Weber, M.S.; Weber, P.; Weidberg, A.R.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Wellenstein, H.; Wells, P.S.; Wenaus, T.; Wendler, S.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Werth, M.; Werthenbach, U.; Wessels, M.; Whalen, K.; White, A.; White, M.J.; White, S.; Whitehead, S.R.; Whiteson, D.; Whittington, D.; Wicek, F.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, F.J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik, L.A.M.; Wildauer, A.; Wilkens, H.G.; Williams, E.; Williams, H.H.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, J.A.; Wilson, M.G.; Wilson, A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Wittgen, M.; Wolter, M.W.; Wosiek, B.K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M.J.; Wraight, K.; Wright, C.; Wright, D.; Wrona, B.; Wu, S.L.; Wu, X.; Wulf, E.; Wynne, B.M.; Xaplanteris, L.; Xella, S.; Xie, S.; Xu, D.; Yamada, M.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamamura, T.; Yamaoka, J.; Yamazaki, T.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, U.K.; Yang, Z.; Yao, W-M.; Yao, Y.; Yasu, Y.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yilmaz, M.; Yoosoofmiya, R.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Young, C.; Youssef, S.P.; Yu, D.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yurkewicz, A.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A.M.; Zajacova, Z.; Zambrano, V.; Zanello, L.; Zaytsev, A.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeller, M.; Zemla, A.; Zendler, C.; Zenin, O.; Zenis, T.; Zenonos, Z.; Zenz, S.; Zerwas, D.; della Porta, G.Zevi; Zhan, Z.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, Q.; Zhang, X.; Zhao, L.; Zhao, T.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, N.; Zhou, Y.; Zhu, C.G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhuravlov, V.; Zimmermann, R.; Zimmermann, S.; Zimmermann, S.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zivkovic, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.

    2011-01-01

    Muons from cosmic-ray interactions in the atmosphere provide a high-statistics source of particles that can be used to study the performance and calibration of the ATLAS detector. Cosmic-ray muons can penetrate to the cavern and deposit energy in all detector subsystems. Such events have played an important role in the commissioning of the detector since the start of the installation phase in 2005 and were particularly important for understanding the detector performance in the time prior to the arrival of the first LHC beams. Global cosmic-ray runs were undertaken in both 2008 and 2009 and these data have been used through to the early phases of collision data-taking as a tool for calibration, alignment and detector monitoring. These large datasets have also been used for detector performance studies, including investigations that rely on the combined performance of different subsystems. This paper presents the results of performance studies related to combined tracking, lepton identification and the reconst...

  18. High-resolution imaging gamma-ray spectroscopy with externally segmented germanium detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callas, J. L.; Mahoney, W. A.; Varnell, L. S.; Wheaton, W. A.

    1993-01-01

    Externally segmented germanium detectors promise a breakthrough in gamma-ray imaging capabilities while retaining the superb energy resolution of germanium spectrometers. An angular resolution of 0.2 deg becomes practical by combining position-sensitive germanium detectors having a segment thickness of a few millimeters with a one-dimensional coded aperture located about a meter from the detectors. Correspondingly higher angular resolutions are possible with larger separations between the detectors and the coded aperture. Two-dimensional images can be obtained by rotating the instrument. Although the basic concept is similar to optical or X-ray coded-aperture imaging techniques, several complicating effects arise because of the penetrating nature of gamma rays. The complications include partial transmission through the coded aperture elements, Compton scattering in the germanium detectors, and high background count rates. Extensive electron-photon Monte Carlo modeling of a realistic detector/coded-aperture/collimator system has been performed. Results show that these complicating effects can be characterized and accounted for with no significant loss in instrument sensitivity.

  19. Proportional counter response calculations for gallium solar neutrino detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kouzes, R.T.; Reynolds, D.

    1989-01-01

    Gallium bases solar neutrino detectors are sensitive to the primary pp reaction in the sun. Two experiments using gallium, SAGE in the Soviet Union and GALLEX in Europe, are under construction and will produce data by 1989. The radioactive /sup 71/Ge produced by neutrinos interacting with the gallium detector material, is chemically extracted and counted in miniature proportional counters. A number of calculations have been carried out to simulate the response of these counters to the decay of /sup 71/Ge and to background events

  20. Development and features of an X-ray detector with high spatial resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartmann, H.

    1979-09-01

    A laboratory model of an X-ray detector with high spatial resolution was developed and constructed. It has no spectral resolution, but a local resolution of 20 μm which is about ten times as high as that of position-sensitive proportional counters and satisfies the requirements of the very best Wolter telescopes with regard to spatial resolution. The detector will be used for laboratory tests of the 80 cm Wolter telescope which is being developed for Spacelab flights. The theory of the wire grid detector and the physics of the photoelectric effect has been developed, and model calculations and numerical calculations have been carried out. (orig./WB) [de

  1. Calibration of sodium iodide crystal (NaI) gamma ray detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azwah Jaafar; Juhari Yusof

    2005-01-01

    Sodium Iodide crystal gamma ray detector are widely used to detect leak in the pipeline linkage study, the complete mixing substances in of industrial processes, to measure the river and stream discharges and other usage in estuary and coastal sediment studies. These instruments are more sensitive as compared to other types of counters like Geiger Muller or plastic scintillation component. This calibration is to ensure the correct voltage for each detector. The characteristics of detector are different from each other. Once the operating voltage (HV) is determined it can be used effectively to measure the radiation in the application of nuclear techniques. (Author)

  2. High-speed X-ray imaging pixel array detector for synchrotron bunch isolation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philipp, Hugh T; Tate, Mark W; Purohit, Prafull; Shanks, Katherine S; Weiss, Joel T; Gruner, Sol M

    2016-03-01

    A wide-dynamic-range imaging X-ray detector designed for recording successive frames at rates up to 10 MHz is described. X-ray imaging with frame rates of up to 6.5 MHz have been experimentally verified. The pixel design allows for up to 8-12 frames to be stored internally at high speed before readout, which occurs at a 1 kHz frame rate. An additional mode of operation allows the integration capacitors to be re-addressed repeatedly before readout which can enhance the signal-to-noise ratio of cyclical processes. This detector, along with modern storage ring sources which provide short (10-100 ps) and intense X-ray pulses at megahertz rates, opens new avenues for the study of rapid structural changes in materials. The detector consists of hybridized modules, each of which is comprised of a 500 µm-thick silicon X-ray sensor solder bump-bonded, pixel by pixel, to an application-specific integrated circuit. The format of each module is 128 × 128 pixels with a pixel pitch of 150 µm. In the prototype detector described here, the three-side buttable modules are tiled in a 3 × 2 array with a full format of 256 × 384 pixels. The characteristics, operation, testing and application of the detector are detailed.

  3. Development of a Compact Gamma-ray Detector for a Neural-Network Radiation Monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, H. S.; Ha, J. H.; Lee, K. H. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, C. H. [Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    Radiation monitoring is very important to secure safety in nuclear-related facilities and against nuclear terrorism. For wide range of radiation monitoring, neutral network system of radiation detection is most efficient way. Thus, a compact radiation detector is useful to install in wide range to be concerned. A compact gamma-ray detector was fabricated by using a CsI(Tl) scintillator, which was matched with the formerly developed PIN photodiode, for a neural network radiation monitoring. At room temperature, the fabricated compact gamma-ray detector demonstrates an energy resolution of 13.3 % for 662 keV 6.9% for 1330 keV. The compactness, the low-voltage power consumption and the physical hardness are very useful features for a neural network radiation monitoring. In this study, characteristics of a fabricated compact gamma-ray detector were presented. An important aspect to consider in a neural-network radiation monitoring such as reaction probability of the fabricated compact detector for angle of incident gamma-ray was also addressed.

  4. The water Cherenkov detector array for studies of cosmic rays at the University of Puebla

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cotzomi, J.; Moreno, E.; Murrieta, T.; Palma, B.; Perez, E.; Salazar, H.; Villasenor, L.

    2005-01-01

    We describe the design and performance of a hybrid extensive air shower detector array built on the Campus of the University of Puebla (19 - bar N, 90 - bar W, 800g/cm 2 ) to measure the energy, arrival direction and composition of primary cosmic rays with energies around 1PeV, i.e., around the knee of the cosmic ray spectrum. The array consists of 3 water Cherenkov detectors of 1.86m 2 cross-section and 12 liquid scintillator detectors of 1m 2 distributed in a square grid with a detector spacing of 20m over an area of 4000m 2 . We discuss the calibration and stability of the array for both sets of detectors and report on preliminary measurements and reconstruction of the lateral distributions for the electromagnetic (EM) and muonic components of extensive air showers. We also discuss how the hybrid character of the array can be used to measure mass composition of the primary cosmic rays by estimating the relative contents of muons with respect to the EM component of extensive air showers. This facility is also used to train students interested in the field of cosmic rays

  5. Upgrade of the InGrid based X-ray detector for the CAST experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desch, Klaus; Kaminski, Jochen; Krieger, Christoph; Schmidt, Sebastian [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Bonn, Nussallee 12, 53115 Bonn (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    The CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST) is a magnetic helioscope searching for solar axions and chameleons using the inverse Primakoff effect. The produced photons are in the low X-ray regime. Chameleon search demands high sensitivity to photons with less than 1 keV and a very low background rate. Several improvements to the detector design used in 2014/15 are envisaged for 2016. The readout system is to be improved by including a flash ADC to read out the analog signal induced on the grid. The pulse shape contains information about the longitudinal shape of the event in addition to the transverse shape given by the pixel read out. Tracks passing through the chip orthogonally resemble photons in transverse shape. A scintillator behind the detector will also allow cross referencing chip and and scintillator signals to further reduce background rates. Finally, a new X-ray window separating detector and X-ray telescope volume from one another will be installed. Due to the low expected signal rate, a window with very low X-ray opacity is needed. Due to a pressure difference of ∝1 bar between detector and the vacuum of CAST this is demanding. The usage of silicon nitride windows is being explored. The current progress of the detector upgrade will be presented.

  6. Test results of a new detector system for gamma ray isotopic measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malcom, J.E.; Bonner, C.A.; Hurd, J.R.; Fleissner,

    1993-01-01

    A new type of gamma-ray detector system for isotopic measurements has been developed. This new system, a ''Duo detector'' array, consists of two intrinsic germanium detectors, a planar followed by a coaxial mounted on the same axis within a single cryostat assembly. This configuration allows the isotopic analysis system to take advantage of spectral data results that are collected simultaneously from different gamma-ray energy regimes. Princeton Gamma Tech (PGT) produced several prototypes of this Duo detector array which were then tested by Rocky Flats personnel until the design was optimized. An application for this detector design is in automated, roboticized NDA systems such as those being developed at the Los Alamos TA-55 Plutonium Facility. The Duo detector design reduces the space necessary for the isotopic instrument by a factor of two (only one liquid nitrogen dewar is needed), and also reduces the complexity of the mechanical systems and controlling software. Data will be presented on measurements of nuclear material with a Duo detector for a wide variety of matrices. Results indicate that the maximum count rate can be increased up to 100,000 counts per second yet maintaining excellent resolution and energy rate product

  7. Preliminary evaluation of a novel energy-resolved photon-counting gamma ray detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, L-J; Tan, J W; Spartiotis, K; Schulman, T

    2009-06-11

    In this paper, we present the design and preliminary performance evaluation of a novel energy-resolved photon-counting (ERPC) detector for gamma ray imaging applications. The prototype ERPC detector has an active area of 4.4 cm × 4.4 cm, which is pixelated into 128 × 128 square pixels with a pitch size of 350 µm × 350µm. The current detector consists of multiple detector hybrids, each with a CdTe crystal of 1.1 cm × 2.2 cm × 1 mm, bump-bonded onto a custom-designed application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC). The ERPC ASIC has 2048 readout channels arranged in a 32 × 64 array. Each channel is equipped with pre- and shaping-amplifiers, a discriminator, peak/hold circuitry and an analog-to-digital converter (ADC) for digitizing the signal amplitude. In order to compensate for the pixel-to-pixel variation, two 8-bit digital-to-analog converters (DACs) are implemented into each channel for tuning the gain and offset. The ERPC detector is designed to offer a high spatial resolution, a wide dynamic range of 12-200 keV and a good energy resolution of 3-4 keV. The hybrid detector configuration provides a flexible detection area that can be easily tailored for different imaging applications. The intrinsic performance of a prototype ERPC detector was evaluated with various gamma ray sources, and the results are presented.

  8. X-ray system with coupled source drive and detector drive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    An electronic coupling replacing the (more expensive) mechanical coupling which controls the speed of two sets of two electric motors, one driving an X-ray source and the other an X-ray detector, is described. Source and detector are kept rotating in parallel planes with a fairly constant velocity ratio. The drives are controlled by an electronic system comprising a comparator circuit comparing the position-indicative signals, a process control circuit and an inverter switch. The control system regulates the speed of the electric motors. The signal processing is described

  9. On a Three-Channel Cosmic Ray Detector based on Aluminum Blocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arceo, L.; Félix, J.

    2017-10-01

    There are many general purpose cosmic ray detectors based on plastic scintillators and electronic boards from the market. This is a new cosmic ray detector designed on three 2.54 cm × 5.08 cm × 20.32 cm Aluminum blocks in stack arrangement, and three Hamamatsu S12572-100P photodiodes. The photodiode board, the passive electronic board, and the discriminator board are own designed. The electronic signals are stored with a CompactRIO -cRIO- by National Instruments. It is presented the design, the construction, the data acquisition system algorithm, and the preliminary physical results.

  10. Early warning for VHE gamma-ray flares with the ARGO-YBJ detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartoli, B. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita di Napoli ' Federico II' , Complesso Universitario di Monte Sant' Angelo, via Cinthia, 80126 Napoli (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Napoli, Complesso Universitario di Monte Sant' Angelo, via Cinthia, 80126 Napoli (Italy); Bernardini, P. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita del Salento, via per Arnesano, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Lecce, via per Arnesano, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Bi, X.J. [Key Laboratory of Particle Astrophysics, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 918, 100049 Beijing (China); Bleve, C. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita del Salento, via per Arnesano, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Lecce, via per Arnesano, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Bolognino, I. [Dipartimento di Fisica Nucleare e Teorica dell' Universita di Pavia, via Bassi 6, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pavia, via Bassi 6, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Branchini, P.; Budano, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Roma Tre, via della Vasca Navale 84, 00146 Roma (Italy); Calabrese Melcarne, A.K. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - CNAF, Viale Berti-Pichat 6/2, 40127 Bologna (Italy); Camarri, P. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita di Roma ' Tor Vergata' , via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Roma (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Roma Tor Vergata, via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Roma (Italy); Cao, Z. [Key Laboratory of Particle Astrophysics, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 918, 100049 Beijing (China); and others

    2011-12-11

    Detecting and monitoring emissions from flaring gamma-ray sources in the very-high-energy (VHE, > 100 GeV) band is a very important topic in gamma-ray astronomy. The ARGO-YBJ detector is characterized by a high duty cycle and a wide field of view. Therefore, it is particularly capable of detecting flares from extragalactic objects. Based on fast reconstruction and analysis, real-time monitoring of 33 selected VHE extragalactic sources is implemented. Flares exceeding a specific threshold are reported timely, hence enabling the follow-up observation of these objects using more sensitive detectors, such as Cherenkov telescopes.

  11. Development of CdZnTe X-ray detectors at DSRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Pamelen, M.A.J.; Budtz-Jørgensen, Carl; Kuvvetli, Irfan

    2000-01-01

    An overview of the development of CdZnTe X-ray detectors at the Danish Space Research Institute is presented. Initiated in the beginning of 1996, the main motivation at that time was to develop focal plane detectors for the novel type of hard X-ray telescopes, which are currently under study...... developed a technique, which, with the use of microstrip electrodes, is able to compensate for the signal loss caused by trapping of positive charge carriers. This technique leads to a dramatic improvement of the achievable energy resolution, even for crystals of poor quality. With the technique, hole...

  12. Developments in microchannel plate detectors for imaging x-ray astronomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fraser, G.W.; Whiteley, M.J.; Pearson, J.F.

    1985-01-01

    The authors present new results in four areas of microchannel plate (MCP) X-ray detector operation. The performance in pulse counting mode of MCPs with 8 micron channel diameters is reported. The effects on MCP quantum detection efficiency and energy discrimination of multiple CsI coatings are described. A new mode of operation of two-stage multipliers is evaluated. Replacing the conventional electron-accelerating inter-plate potential difference by a retarding field is shown to result in definite advantages with regard to X-ray energy discrimination and detector lifetime. The source of the MCP internal background is discussed

  13. Development of a novel micro pattern gaseous detector for cosmic ray muon tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biglietti, M.; Canale, V.; Franchino, S.; Iengo, P.; Iodice, M.; Petrucci, F.

    2016-07-01

    We propose a novel detector (Thick Groove Detector, TGD) designed for cosmic ray tomography with a spatial resolution of 500 μm, trying to keep the construction procedure as simple as possible and to reduce the operating costs. The TGD belongs to the category of MPGDs with an amplification region less than 1 mm wide formed by alternate anode/cathode microstrips layers at different heights. A first 10×10 cm2 prototype has been built, divided in four sections with different test geometries. We present the construction procedure and the first results in terms of gain and stability. Preliminary studies with cosmic rays are also reported.

  14. Response of cellulose nitrate track detectors to electron doses

    CERN Document Server

    Segovia, N; Moreno, A; Vazquez-Polo, G; Santamaría, T; Aranda, P; Hernández, A

    1999-01-01

    In order to study alternative dose determination methods, the bulk etching velocity and the latent track annealing of LR 115 track detectors was studied during electron irradiation runs from a Pelletron accelerator. For this purpose alpha irradiated and blank detectors were exposed to increasing electron doses from 10.5 to 317.5 kGy. After the irradiation with electrons the detectors were etched under routine conditions, except for the etching time, that was varied for each electron dose in order to reach a fixed residual thickness. The variation of the bulk etching velocity as a function of each one of the electron doses supplied, was interpolated in order to obtain dosimetric response curves. The observed annealing effect on the latent tracks is discussed as a function of the total electron doses supplied and the temperature.

  15. Measurement of the Energy-Dependent Angular Response of the ARES Detector System and Application to Aerial Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Tenzing H. Y.; Quiter, Brian J.; Maltz, Jonathan S.; Bandstra, Mark S.; Haefner, Andrew; Eikmeier, Nicole; Wagner, Eric; Luke, Tanushree; Malchow, Russell; McCall, Karen

    2017-07-01

    The Airborne Radiological Enhanced-sensor System (ARES) includes a prototype helicopter-borne CsI(Na) detector array that has been developed as part of the DHS Domestic Nuclear Detection Office Advanced Technology Demonstration. The detector system geometry comprises two pairs of 23-detector arrays designed to function as active masks, providing additional angular resolution of measured gamma rays in the roll dimension. Experimental measurements, using five radioisotopes (137Cs, 60Co, 241Am, 131I, and 99mTc), were performed to map the detector response in both roll and pitch dimensions. This paper describes the acquisition and analysis of these characterization measurements, calculation of the angular response of the ARES system, and how this response function is used to improve aerial detection and localization of radiological and nuclear threat sources.

  16. A novel solution to the gated x-ray detector gain droop problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oertel, J. A.; Archuleta, T. N.

    2014-01-01

    Microchannel plate (MCP), microstrip transmission line based, gated x-ray detectors used at the premier ICF laser facilities have a drop in gain as a function of mircostrip length that can be greater than 50% over 40 mm. These losses are due to ohmic losses in a microstrip coating that is less than the optimum electrical skin depth. The electrical skin depth for a copper transmission line at 3 GHz is 1.2 μm while the standard microstrip coating thickness is roughly half a single skin depth. Simply increasing the copper coating thickness would begin filling the MCP pores and limit the number of secondary electrons created in the MCP. The current coating thickness represents a compromise between gain and ohmic loss. We suggest a novel solution to the loss problem by overcoating the copper transmission line with five electrical skin depths (∼6 μm) of Beryllium. Beryllium is reasonably transparent to x-rays above 800 eV and would improve the carrier current on the transmission line. The net result should be an optically flat photocathode response with almost no measurable loss in voltage along the transmission line

  17. Operation of an InGrid based X-ray detector at the CAST experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieger, Christoph; Desch, Klaus; Kaminski, Jochen; Lupberger, Michael

    2018-02-01

    The CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST) is searching for axions and other particles which could be candidates for DarkMatter and even Dark Energy. These particles could be produced in the Sun and detected by a conversion into soft X-ray photons inside a strong magnetic field. In order to increase the sensitivity for physics beyond the Standard Model, detectors with a threshold below 1 keV as well as efficient background rejection methods are required to compensate for low energies and weak couplings resulting in very low detection rates. Those criteria are fulfilled by a detector utilizing the combination of a pixelized readout chip with an integrated Micromegas stage. These InGrid (Integrated Grid) devices can be build by photolithographic postprocessing techniques, resulting in a close to perfect match of grid and pixels facilitating the detection of single electrons on the chip surface. The high spatial resolution allows for energy determination by simple electron counting as well as for an event-shape based analysis as background rejection method. Tests at an X-ray generator revealed the energy threshold of an InGrid based X-ray detector to be well below the carbon Kα line at 277 eV. After the successful demonstration of the detectors key features, the detector was mounted at one of CAST's four detector stations behind an X-ray telescope in 2014. After several months of successful operation without any detector related interruptions, the InGrid based X-ray detector continues data taking at CAST in 2015. During operation at the experiment, background rates in the order of 10-5 keV-1 cm-2 s-1 have been achieved by application of a likelihood based method discriminating the non-photon background originating mostly from cosmic rays. For continued operation in 2016, an upgraded InGrid based detector is to be installed among other improvements including decoupling and sampling of the signal induced on the grid as well as a veto scintillator to further lower the

  18. Simulated and experimental spectroscopic performance of GaAs X-ray pixel detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bisogni, M.G.; Cola, A.; Fantacci, M.E.

    2001-01-01

    In pixel detectors, the electrode geometry affects the signal shape and therefore the spectroscopic performance of the device. This effect is enhanced in semiconductors where carrier trapping is relevant. In particular, semi insulating (SI) GaAs crystals present an incomplete charge collection due to a high concentration of deep traps in the bulk. In the last few years, SI GaAs pixel detectors have been developed as soft X-ray detectors for medical imaging applications. In this paper, we present a numerical method to evaluate the local charge collection properties of pixel detectors. A bi-dimensional description has been used to represent the detector geometry. According to recent models, the active region of a reverse biased SI GaAs detector is almost neutral. Therefore, the electrostatic potential inside a full active detector has been evaluated using the Laplace equation. A finite difference method with a fixed step orthogonal mesh has been adopted. The photon interaction point has been generated with a Monte Carlo method according to the attenuation length of a monochromatic X-ray beam in GaAs. The number of photogenerated carriers for each interaction has been extracted using a gaussian distribution. The induced signal on the collecting electrode has been calculated according to the Ramo's theorem and the trapping effect has been modeled introducing electron and hole lifetimes. The noise of the charge preamplifier have been also taken into account. A comparison between simulated and experimental X-ray spectra from a 241 Am source acquired with different GaAs pixel detectors has been carried out

  19. Evaluation of Neutron Response of Criticality Accident Alarm System Detector to Quasi-Monoenergetic 24 keV Neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujimura, Norio; Yoshida, Tadayoshi; Yashima, Hiroshi

    The criticality accident alarm system (CAAS), which was recently developed and installed at the Japan Atomic Energy Agency's Tokai Reprocessing Plant, consists of a plastic scintillator combined with a cadmium-lined polyethylene moderator and thereby responds to both neutrons and gamma rays. To evaluate the neutron absorbed dose rate response of the CAAS detector, a 24 keV quasi-monoenergetic neutron irradiation experiment was performed at the B-1 facility of the Kyoto University Research Reactor. The detector's evaluated neutron response was confirmed to agree reasonably well with prior computer-predicted responses.

  20. Evaluation of neutron response of criticality accident alarm system detector to quasi-monoenergetic 24 keV neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsujimura, Norio; Yoshida, Tadayoshi; Yashima, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    The criticality accident alarm system (CAAS), which was recently developed and installed at the Japan Atomic Energy Agency's Tokai Reprocessing Plant, consists of a plastic scintillator combined with a cadmium-lined polyethylene moderator and thereby responds to both neutrons and gamma rays. To evaluate the neutron absorbed dose rate response of the CAAS detector, a 24 keV quasi-monoenergetic neutron irradiation experiment was performed at the B-1 facility of the Kyoto University Research Reactor. The detector's evaluated neutron response was confirmed to agree reasonably well with prior computer-predicted responses. (author)

  1. Picosecond time-resolved laser pump/X-ray probe experiments using a gated single-photon-counting area detector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejdrup, T.; Lemke, H.T.; Haldrup, Martin Kristoffer

    2009-01-01

    The recent developments in X-ray detectors have opened new possibilities in the area of time-resolved pump/probe X-ray experiments; this article presents the novel use of a PILATUS detector to achieve X-ray pulse duration limited time-resolution at the Advanced Photon Source (APS), USA...... limited time-resolution of 60 ps using the gated PILATUS detector. This is the first demonstration of X-ray pulse duration limited data recorded using an area detector without the use of a mechanical chopper array at the beamline........ The capability of the gated PILATUS detector to selectively detect the signal from a given X-ray pulse in 24 bunch mode at the APS storage ring is demonstrated. A test experiment performed on polycrystalline organic thin films of [alpha]-perylene illustrates the possibility of reaching an X-ray pulse duration...

  2. High temperature GaAs X-ray detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lioliou, G.; Whitaker, M. D. C.; Barnett, A. M.

    2017-12-01

    Two GaAs p+-i-n+ mesa X-ray photodiodes were characterized for their electrical and photon counting X-ray spectroscopic performance over the temperature range of 100 °C to -20 °C. The devices had 10 μm thick i layers with different diameters: 200 μm (D1) and 400 μm (D2). The electrical characterization included dark current and capacitance measurements at internal electric field strengths of up to 50 kV/cm. The determined properties of the two devices were compared with previously reported results that were made with a view to informing the future development of photon counting X-ray spectrometers for harsh environments, e.g., X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy of planetary surfaces in high temperature environments. The best energy resolution obtained (Full Width at Half Maximum at 5.9 keV) decreased from 2.00 keV at 100 °C to 0.66 keV at -20 °C for the spectrometer with D1, and from 2.71 keV at 100 °C to 0.71 keV at -20 °C for the spectrometer with D2. Dielectric noise was found to be the dominant source of noise in the spectra, apart from at high temperatures and long shaping times, where the main source of photopeak broadening was found to be the white parallel noise.

  3. Further delays hit troubled $2bn cosmic-ray detector

    CERN Multimedia

    Cartlidge, Edwin

    2010-01-01

    "A $2bn mission to study cosmic rays will have to wait another few months before being sent to the International Space Station (ISS) after NASA announced last month that it was pushing back the launch of the Space Shuttle Endeavour until 26 February 2011" (0.5 page)

  4. Generation of response functions of a NaI detector by using an interpolation technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tominaga, Shoji

    1983-01-01

    A computer method is developed for generating response functions of a NaI detector to monoenergetic γ-rays. The method is based on an interpolation between measured response curves by a detector. The computer programs are constructed for Heath's response spectral library. The principle of the basic mathematics used for interpolation, which was reported previously by the author, et al., is that response curves can be decomposed into a linear combination of intrinsic-component patterns, and thereby the interpolation of curves is reduced to a simple interpolation of weighting coefficients needed to combine the component patterns. This technique has some advantages of data compression, reduction in computation time, and stability of the solution, in comparison with the usual functional fitting method. The processing method of segmentation of a spectrum is devised to generate useful and precise response curves. A spectral curve, obtained for each γ-ray source, is divided into some regions defined by the physical processes, such as the photopeak area, the Compton continuum area, the backscatter peak area, and so on. Each segment curve then is processed separately for interpolation. Lastly the estimated curves to the respective areas are connected on one channel scale. The generation programs are explained briefly. It is shown that the generated curve represents the overall shape of a response spectrum including not only its photopeak but also the corresponding Compton area, with a sufficient accuracy. (author)

  5. Use of silicon microstrip detectors in medical diagnostic x-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabal Rodriguez, Ana Ester

    2004-11-01

    This work presents the development and characterization of a single photon counting system based on silicon microstrip detectors, used in High Energy Physics experiments, and on low noise multichannel readout electronics. The thesis evaluates the feasibility of dual energy X-ray imaging with silicon microstrip detectors to be applied on medical diagnosis. Dual energy mammographic and angiographic experimental tests have been performed using the developed counting systems proto types, properly phantoms and quasi-monochromatic X ray beams, obtained on a compact dichromatic source based on a conventional X-ray tube and a mosaic crystal. A Monte Carlo simulation of the performance of the experimental setup for dual X-ray imaging has also been carried out using MCNP-4C transport code. We obtained good agreement between MCNP results and the experimental data. (Author)

  6. Alpha-ray spectrometry at high temperature by using a compound semiconductor detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Jang Ho; Kim, Han Soo

    2013-11-01

    The use of conventional radiation detectors in harsh environments is limited by radiation damage to detector materials and by temperature constraints. We fabricated a wide-band gap semiconductor radiation detector based on silicon carbide. All the detector components were considered for an application in a high temperature environment like a nuclear reactor core. The radiation response, especially to alpha particles, was measured using an (241)Am source at variable operating voltages at room temperature in the air. The temperature on detector was controlled from 30°C to 250°C. The alpha-particle spectra were measured at zero bias operation. Even though the detector is operated at high temperature, the energy resolution as a function of temperature is almost constant within 3.5% deviation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. A semiempirical linear model of indirect, flat-panel x-ray detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Shih-Ying; Yang Kai; Abbey, Craig K.; Boone, John M. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of California, Davis, California, One Shields Avenue, Davis, California 95616 (United States) and Department of Radiology, University of California, Davis, Medical Center, 4860 Y Street, Ambulatory Care Center Suite 0505, Sacramento, California 95817 (United States); Department of Radiology, University of California, Davis, Medical Center, 4860 Y Street, Ambulatory Care Center Suite 0505, Sacramento, California 95817 (United States); Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 92106 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of California, Davis, California, One Shields Avenue, Davis, California 95616 (United States) and Department of Radiology, University of California, Davis, Medical Center, 4860 Y Street, Ambulatory Care Center Suite 3100, Sacramento, California 95817 (United States)

    2012-04-15

    Purpose: It is important to understand signal and noise transfer in the indirect, flat-panel x-ray detector when developing and optimizing imaging systems. For optimization where simulating images is necessary, this study introduces a semiempirical model to simulate projection images with user-defined x-ray fluence interaction. Methods: The signal and noise transfer in the indirect, flat-panel x-ray detectors is characterized by statistics consistent with energy-integration of x-ray photons. For an incident x-ray spectrum, x-ray photons are attenuated and absorbed in the x-ray scintillator to produce light photons, which are coupled to photodiodes for signal readout. The signal mean and variance are linearly related to the energy-integrated x-ray spectrum by empirically determined factors. With the known first- and second-order statistics, images can be simulated by incorporating multipixel signal statistics and the modulation transfer function of the imaging system. To estimate the semiempirical input to this model, 500 projection images (using an indirect, flat-panel x-ray detector in the breast CT system) were acquired with 50-100 kilovolt (kV) x-ray spectra filtered with 0.1-mm tin (Sn), 0.2-mm copper (Cu), 1.5-mm aluminum (Al), or 0.05-mm silver (Ag). The signal mean and variance of each detector element and the noise power spectra (NPS) were calculated and incorporated into this model for accuracy. Additionally, the modulation transfer function of the detector system was physically measured and incorporated in the image simulation steps. For validation purposes, simulated and measured projection images of air scans were compared using 40 kV/0.1-mm Sn, 65 kV/0.2-mm Cu, 85 kV/1.5-mm Al, and 95 kV/0.05-mm Ag. Results: The linear relationship between the measured signal statistics and the energy-integrated x-ray spectrum was confirmed and incorporated into the model. The signal mean and variance factors were linearly related to kV for each filter material (r

  8. A semiempirical linear model of indirect, flat-panel x-ray detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Shih-Ying; Yang Kai; Abbey, Craig K.; Boone, John M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: It is important to understand signal and noise transfer in the indirect, flat-panel x-ray detector when developing and optimizing imaging systems. For optimization where simulating images is necessary, this study introduces a semiempirical model to simulate projection images with user-defined x-ray fluence interaction. Methods: The signal and noise transfer in the indirect, flat-panel x-ray detectors is characterized by statistics consistent with energy-integration of x-ray photons. For an incident x-ray spectrum, x-ray photons are attenuated and absorbed in the x-ray scintillator to produce light photons, which are coupled to photodiodes for signal readout. The signal mean and variance are linearly related to the energy-integrated x-ray spectrum by empirically determined factors. With the known first- and second-order statistics, images can be simulated by incorporating multipixel signal statistics and the modulation transfer function of the imaging system. To estimate the semiempirical input to this model, 500 projection images (using an indirect, flat-panel x-ray detector in the breast CT system) were acquired with 50-100 kilovolt (kV) x-ray spectra filtered with 0.1-mm tin (Sn), 0.2-mm copper (Cu), 1.5-mm aluminum (Al), or 0.05-mm silver (Ag). The signal mean and variance of each detector element and the noise power spectra (NPS) were calculated and incorporated into this model for accuracy. Additionally, the modulation transfer function of the detector system was physically measured and incorporated in the image simulation steps. For validation purposes, simulated and measured projection images of air scans were compared using 40 kV/0.1-mm Sn, 65 kV/0.2-mm Cu, 85 kV/1.5-mm Al, and 95 kV/0.05-mm Ag. Results: The linear relationship between the measured signal statistics and the energy-integrated x-ray spectrum was confirmed and incorporated into the model. The signal mean and variance factors were linearly related to kV for each filter material (r 2 of

  9. A semiempirical linear model of indirect, flat-panel x-ray detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shih-Ying; Yang, Kai; Abbey, Craig K; Boone, John M

    2012-04-01

    It is important to understand signal and noise transfer in the indirect, flat-panel x-ray detector when developing and optimizing imaging systems. For optimization where simulating images is necessary, this study introduces a semiempirical model to simulate projection images with user-defined x-ray fluence interaction. The signal and noise transfer in the indirect, flat-panel x-ray detectors is characterized by statistics consistent with energy-integration of x-ray photons. For an incident x-ray spectrum, x-ray photons are attenuated and absorbed in the x-ray scintillator to produce light photons, which are coupled to photodiodes for signal readout. The signal mean and variance are linearly related to the energy-integrated x-ray spectrum by empirically determined factors. With the known first- and second-order statistics, images can be simulated by incorporating multipixel signal statistics and the modulation transfer function of the imaging system. To estimate the semiempirical input to this model, 500 projection images (using an indirect, flat-panel x-ray detector in the breast CT system) were acquired with 50-100 kilovolt (kV) x-ray spectra filtered with 0.1-mm tin (Sn), 0.2-mm copper (Cu), 1.5-mm aluminum (Al), or 0.05-mm silver (Ag). The signal mean and variance of each detector element and the noise power spectra (NPS) were calculated and incorporated into this model for accuracy. Additionally, the modulation transfer function of the detector system was physically measured and incorporated in the image simulation steps. For validation purposes, simulated and measured projection images of air scans were compared using 40 kV∕0.1-mm Sn, 65 kV∕0.2-mm Cu, 85 kV∕1.5-mm Al, and 95 kV∕0.05-mm Ag. The linear relationship between the measured signal statistics and the energy-integrated x-ray spectrum was confirmed and incorporated into the model. The signal mean and variance factors were linearly related to kV for each filter material (r(2) of signal mean to k

  10. The TUS Detector of Extreme Energy Cosmic Rays on Board the Lomonosov Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimov, P. A.; Panasyuk, M. I.; Khrenov, B. A.; Garipov, G. K.; Kalmykov, N. N.; Petrov, V. L.; Sharakin, S. A.; Shirokov, A. V.; Yashin, I. V.; Zotov, M. Y.; Biktemerova, S. V.; Grinyuk, A. A.; Grebenyuk, V. M.; Lavrova, M. V.; Tkachev, L. G.; Tkachenko, A. V.; Park, I. H.; Lee, J.; Jeong, S.; Martinez, O.; Salazar, H.; Ponce, E.; Saprykin, O. A.; Botvinko, A. A.; Senkovsky, A. N.; Puchkov, A. E.

    2017-11-01

    The origin and nature of extreme energy cosmic rays (EECRs), which have energies above the 5\\cdot10^{19} eV—the Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuzmin (GZK) energy limit, is one of the most interesting and complicated problems in modern cosmic-ray physics. Existing ground-based detectors have helped to obtain remarkable results in studying cosmic rays before and after the GZK limit, but have also produced some contradictions in our understanding of cosmic ray mass composition. Moreover, each of these detectors covers only a part of the celestial sphere, which poses problems for studying the arrival directions of EECRs and identifying their sources. As a new generation of EECR space detectors, TUS (Tracking Ultraviolet Set-up), KLYPVE and JEM-EUSO, are intended to study the most energetic cosmic-ray particles, providing larger, uniform exposures of the entire celestial sphere. The TUS detector, launched on board the Lomonosov satellite on April 28, 2016 from Vostochny Cosmodrome in Russia, is the first of these. It employs a single-mirror optical system and a photomultiplier tube matrix as a photo-detector and will test the fluorescent method of measuring EECRs from space. Utilizing the Earth's atmosphere as a huge calorimeter, it is expected to detect EECRs with energies above 10^{20} eV. It will also be able to register slower atmospheric transient events: atmospheric fluorescence in electrical discharges of various types including precipitating electrons escaping the magnetosphere and from the radiation of meteors passing through the atmosphere. We describe the design of the TUS detector and present results of different ground-based tests and simulations.

  11. Evaluation and development of X-ray detectors for dosimetry; Evaluierung und Entwicklung von Roentgendetektoren fuer die Dosimetrie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehnel, Michael

    2012-03-28

    This thesis presents the development and evaluation of a new personal dosemeter, based on the technology of energy-resolving pixelated photon-counting X-ray detectors. The basis of the development is a detailed study of the Timepix detector. The main focus is on the investigation of the energy resolving properties of the Timepix detector in counting mode and in the spectroscopic time-over-threshold mode. The approach for the production of fluorescence radiation for the detector calibration, necessary for the experiments, is presented. By using Monte Carlo simulations the spectral distribution of the resulting fluorescence spectra in dependence on the fluorescence material, the used primary X-ray radiation and the arrangement of the laboratory setup is discussed. Besides the actual fluorescence lines, the simulated calibration spectra also contain the background of scattered primary X-ray photons and fluorescence radiation contributions from parts of the experimental setup. Furthermore, the simulated spectra exhibit the corrected intensity conditions of the fluorescence emissions of the K- and L-shell. These calibration spectra permit a better match of measurements and simulations than the simplified fluorescence spectra used so far. For the detector calibration in counting mode, accelerated energy calibration methods are introduced. From measuring energy deposition spectra, the energy resolution of single pixels and the energy resolution of the complete detector could be determined by the application of a global energy calibration. It was shown that the influence of the threshold dispersion broadens the energy resolution of the single pixels, depending on the given energy deposition. The resulting energy resolution of the whole pixel matrix is thereby reduced. The negative effect of the threshold dispersion can be eliminated by the application of a single-pixel calibration. The relative energy resolution of the Timepix detector operated in the counting mode can

  12. Study of response of 3He detectors to monoenergetic neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abanades, A.; Andriamonje, S.; Arnould, H.; Barreau, G.; Bercion, M.; Casagrande, F.; Cennini, P.; Del Moral, R.; Gonzales, E.; Lacoste, V.; Pdemay, G.; Pravikoff, M.S.

    1997-01-01

    In the search of a hybrid system (the coupling of the particle accelerator to an under-critical reactor) for radioactive waste transmutation the TARC (Transmutation by Adiabatic Resonance Crossing) program has been developed. Due to experimental limitations, the time-energy relation at higher neutron energies, particularly, around 2 MeV, which is an important domain for TARC, cannot be applied. Consequently the responses of the 3 He ionization neutron detector developed for TARC experiment have been studied using a fast monoenergetic neutron source. The neutrons were produced by the interaction of the proton delivered by Van de Graaff accelerator of CENBG. The originality of the detector consists in its structure of three series of electric conductors which are mounted around the anode: a grid ensuring the detector proportionality, a cylindrical suit of alternating positive voltage and grounded wires aiming at eliminating the radial end effects, serving as veto and two cylinders serving as end plugs to eliminate the perpendicular end effects. Examples of anode spectra conditioned (in anticoincidence) by the mentioned vetoes are given. One can see the contribution of the elastic scattering from H and 3 He. By collimating the neutron beam through a borated polyethylene system it was possible to obtain a mapping of the detector allowing the study of its response as a function of the irradiated zones (anode and grid)

  13. Simulation of GRIS spectrometer response to the solar gamma-ray flare of 23 July 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trofimov, Yu A; Kotov, Yu D; Yurov, V N; Lupar, E E; Faradzhaev, R M; Glyanenko, A S

    2017-01-01

    GRIS is a prospective experiment designed to measure hard X-rays and γ-rays of solar flares in the energy range from 50 keV to 200 MeV as well as solar neutrons > 30 MeV. This study considers results of GEANT 4 simulation of GRIS detectors response to cosmic background radiation and to the solar flare SOL2002-07-23 (X4.8). It is shown that the GRIS spectrometers have enough sensitivity and energy resolution to measure redshifts of some narrow γ-rays in flare spectra, that the low energy thresholds of the detectors can be lowered considerably without a risk of counting rate saturation during high magnitude flares and that at a choice between LaBr 3 (Ce) and CeBr 3 the second one is a preferable scintillator for a hard X-ray and γ-ray spectrometer of solar flares. (paper)

  14. Measurement of the cosmic ray muon charge ratio with the OPERA detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mauri, N.; Sioli, M.

    2012-01-01

    The OPERA detector at the Gran Sasso underground laboratory (LNGS) was used to measure the cosmic ray muon charge ratio R μ =N μ + /N μ − in the TeV energy region. R μ is shown as a function of the “vertical surface energy” E μ cosθ. A fit to a simplified model of muon production in atmosphere allowed the determination of the pion and kaon charge ratios weighted by the cosmic ray energy spectrum.

  15. Design and construction of a uniform magnetic field generator for a 32 channel cosmic ray detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera-Guzman, K. N.; Gutierrez-Sanchez, R. A.; Felix, J.; Arceo, L. J.; Araujo, C.

    2017-10-01

    The trajectory of a particle can be measured if some points of its track are known. This is applied to any kind of particle, including cosmic rays. We have designed and built a device for this purpose. We present the design, construction and characterization of a uniform magnetic field generator system in a finite volume. An array of Cerenkov detectors will be placed inside of it for determining the cosmic rays charge and to reconstruct their trajectories.

  16. Instrumentations in x-ray plasma polarization spectroscopy. Crystal spectrometer, polarimeter and detectors for astronomical observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baronova, Elena O.; Stepanenko, Mikhail M. [RRC Kurchatov Institute, Nuclear Fusion Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Jakubowski, Lech [Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, Swierk-Otwock (Poland); Tsunemi, Hiroshi [Osaka Univ., Graduate School of Science, Osaka (Japan)

    2002-08-01

    This report discusses the various problems which are encountered when a crystal spectrometer is used for the purpose of observing polarized x-ray lines. A polarimeter is proposed based on the novel idea of using two series of equivalent atomic planes in a single crystal. The present status of the astronomical x-ray detection techniques are described with emphasis on two dimensional detectors which are polarization sensitive. (author)

  17. The analysis of the gamma-ray pulseheight spectra resulting from the NaI detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Zhengde; Zhang Guishan; Chen Qun; Cao Zhong

    1990-01-01

    The analysis of the Gamma-ray pulse-height spectra resulting from NaI detector is described by using weighted least square iteration. The computer program has the function of searching for Gamma-ray peak automatically. It can be used in the analysis of continuous, discrete or their superposition spectra. Besides, there are some function of the spectrum smooth,the correction of the shift in gain and zero energy channel intercept. Some results of the computer program are presented

  18. Development of a Gamma-Ray Detector for Z-Selective Radiographic Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandis, Michal

    2013-11-01

    Dual-Discrete Energy Gamma-Radiography (DDEGR) is a method for Special Nuclear Materials (SNM) detection. DDEGR utilizes 15.11 and 4.43 MeV gamma-rays produced in the 11B(d,n)12C reaction, in contrast to the conventional use of continuous Bremsstrahlung radiation. The clean and well separated gamma-rays result in high contrast sensitivity, enabling detection of small quantities of SNM. The most important aspects of a DDEGR system were discussed, simulated, measured and demonstrated. An experimental measurement of gamma-ray yields from the 11B(d,n)12C reaction showed that the yields from deuterons with 3{12 MeV energy are 2{201010 N/sr/mC 4.4 MeV gamma- rays and 2{5109 N/sr/mC 15.1 MeV gamma-rays. The measured neutron yields show that the neutron energies extend to 15-23 MeV for the same deuteron energy range. A simplied inspection system was simulated with GEANT4, showing that the ect of scattering on the signal measured in the detector is acceptable. Considering the reaction gamma yields, 1.8 mA deuteron current is required for separation of high-Z materials from medium- and low-Z materials and a 4.5 mA current is required for the additional capability of separating benign high-Z materials from SNM. The main part of the work was development of a detector suitable for a DDEGR system | Time Resolved Event Counting Optical Radiation (TRECOR) detector. TRECOR detector is a novel spectroscopic imaging detector for gamma-rays within the MeV energy range that uses an event counting image intensier with gamma-rays for the rst time. Neutrons that accompany the gamma radiation enable to implement, in parallel, Fast Neutron Resonance Radiography (FNRR), a method for explosives detection. A second generation detector, TRECOR-II, is capable of detecting gamma-rays and neutrons in parallel, separating them to create particle-specic images and energy-specic images for each particle, thus enabling simultaneous implementation of the two detection methods. A full DDEGR laboratory

  19. Highly sensitive x-ray detectors in the low-energy range on n-type 4H-SiC epitaxial layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandal, Krishna C.; Muzykov, Peter G. [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of South Carolina, Columbia, South Carolina 29208 (United States); Russell Terry, J. [Space Science and Applications Group (ISR-1), Intelligence and Space Research Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2012-07-30

    Schottky diodes on n-type 4H-SiC epitaxial layers have been fabricated for low-energy x-ray detection. The detectors were highly sensitive to soft x-rays and showed improved response compared to the commercial SiC UV photodiodes. Current-voltage characteristics at 475 K showed low leakage current revealing the possibility of high temperature operation. The high quality of the epi-layer was confirmed by x-ray diffraction and chemical etching. Thermally stimulated current measurements performed at 94-550 K revealed low density of deep levels which may cause charge trapping. No charge trapping on detectors' responsivity in the low x-ray energy was found.

  20. MoonBEAM: A Beyond Earth-Orbit Gamma-Ray Burst Detector for Gravitational-Wave Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, C. M.; Briggs, M. S.; Goldstein, A. M.; Jenke, P. A.; Kocevski, D.; Wilson-Hodge, C. A.

    2018-01-01

    Moon Burst Energetics All-sky Monitor (MoonBEAM) is a CubeSat concept of deploying gamma-ray detectors in cislunar space to improve localization precision for gamma-ray bursts by utilizing the light travel time difference between different orbits. We present here a gamma-ray SmallSat concept in Earth-Moon L3 halo orbit that is capable of rapid response and provide a timing baseline for localization improvement when partnered with an Earth-orbit instrument. Such an instrument would probe the extreme processes in cosmic collision of compact objects and facilitate multi-messenger time-domain astronomy to explore the end of stellar life cycles and black hole formations.

  1. Background in xenon filled X-ray detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feroci, M.; Costa, E.; Dwyer, J.; Ford, E.; Kaaret, P.; Rapisarda, M.; Soffitta, P.

    1995-01-01

    Xenon based gas mixtures have been often used in proportional counters for X-ray astronomy in order to achieve a good efficiency in the medium/high X-ray energy range. Proportional counters flown on past missions (i.e. HEAO1 and EXOSAT) filled with Xe-based mixtures have shown a higher residual background (after that all the rejection techniques have been applied) with respect to Ar-based ones, operating in the same energy band and in the same radiation environment. We show, by means of Monte Carlo simulations, analytical computations and laboratory measurements, that such difference can be mostly understood in terms of higher internal background production and lower pulse discrimination efficiency in Xe-based gas filling, with respect to Ar-based ones. (orig.)

  2. X-ray Imaging Using a Hybrid Photon Counting GaAs Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Schwarz, C; Göppert, R; Heijne, Erik H M; Ludwig, J; Meddeler, G; Mikulec, B; Pernigotti, E; Rogalla, M; Runge, K; Smith, K M; Snoeys, W; Söldner-Rembold, S; Watt, J

    1999-01-01

    The performance of hybrid GaAs pixel detectors as X-ray imaging sensors were investigated at room temperature. These hybrids consist of 300 mu-m thick GaAs pixel detectors, flip-chip bonded to a CMOS Single Photon Counting Chip (PCC). This chip consists of a matrix of 64 x 64 identical square pixels (170 mu-m x 170 mu-m) and covers a total area of 1.2 cm**2. The electronics in each cell comprises a preamplifier, a discriminator with a 3-bit threshold adjust and a 15-bit counter. The detector is realized by an array of Schottky diodes processed on semi-insulating LEC-GaAs bulk material. An IV-charcteristic and a detector bias voltage scan showed that the detector can be operated with voltages around 200 V. Images of various objects were taken by using a standard X-ray tube for dental diagnostics. The signal to noise ratio (SNR) was also determined. The applications of these imaging systems range from medical applications like digital mammography or dental X-ray diagnostics to non destructive material testing (...

  3. Design of a versatile detector for the detection of charged particles, neutrons and gamma rays. Neutron interaction with the matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez P, J.J.

    1991-01-01

    The Fostron detector detects charged particles, neutrons and gamma rays with a reasonable discrimination power. Because the typical detectors for neutrons present a great uncertainty in the detection, this work was focused mainly to the neutron detection in presence of gamma radiation. Also there are mentioned the advantages and disadvantages of the Fostron detector

  4. Investigation of Avalanche Photodiodes and Multipixel Photon Counters as Light Detectors for Cosmic Rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasquez, Jaime; Saavedra, Arthur; Ramos, Roxana; Tavares, Pablo; Wade, Marcus; Fan, Sewan; Haag, Brooke

    2013-04-01

    Through the Research Scholars Institute, students of Hartnell Community College experimented with the application of avalanche photodiodes (APDs) as cosmic ray detectors during the summer of 2012. An APD detector was coupled with a 10 meter long wavelength shifting fiber (WSF) wrapped around a cylindrical plastic scintillator to maximize signal detection. A photomultiplier tube (PMT) was used in conjunction to detect the same scintillation light caused by incoming cosmic rays. Two APD detectors were evaluated to confirm the viability of the setup. In addition, a similar setup was recently utilized to implement multi-pixel photon counters (MPPCs) as readout detectors. Under this configuration, a high gain preamplifier was used to amplify the signals for both the MPPC and APD detectors. We report on our results characterizing the MPPC and discuss its overall performance. Compared to the APD, our findings suggest that the MPPC detector has greater sensitivity in detecting weak light signals, and can be used in place of the PMT for certain counting applications.

  5. Characterization of spectrometric photon-counting X-ray detectors at different pitches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurdit, M.; Brambilla, A.; Moulin, V.; Ouvrier-Buffet, P.; Radisson, P.; Verger, L.

    2017-09-01

    There is growing interest in energy-sensitive photon-counting detectors based on high flux X-ray imaging. Their potential applications include medical imaging, non-destructive testing and security. Innovative detectors of this type will need to count individual photons and sort them into selected energy bins, at several million counts per second and per mm2. Cd(Zn)Te detector grade materials with a thickness of 1.5 to 3 mm and pitches from 800 μm down to 200 μm were assembled onto interposer boards. These devices were tested using in-house-developed full-digital fast readout electronics. The 16-channel demonstrators, with 256 energy bins, were experimentally characterized by determining spectral resolution, count rate, and charge sharing, which becomes challenging at low pitch. Charge sharing correction was found to efficiently correct X-ray spectra up to 40 × 106 incident photons.s-1.mm-2.

  6. Maximum likelihood positioning for gamma-ray imaging detectors with depth of interaction measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lerche, Ch.W.; Ros, A.; Monzo, J.M.; Aliaga, R.J.; Ferrando, N.; Martinez, J.D.; Herrero, V.; Esteve, R.; Gadea, R.; Colom, R.J.; Toledo, J.; Mateo, F.; Sebastia, A.; Sanchez, F.; Benlloch, J.M.

    2009-01-01

    The center of gravity algorithm leads to strong artifacts for gamma-ray imaging detectors that are based on monolithic scintillation crystals and position sensitive photo-detectors. This is a consequence of using the centroids as position estimates. The fact that charge division circuits can also be used to compute the standard deviation of the scintillation light distribution opens a way out of this drawback. We studied the feasibility of maximum likelihood estimation for computing the true gamma-ray photo-conversion position from the centroids and the standard deviation of the light distribution. The method was evaluated on a test detector that consists of the position sensitive photomultiplier tube H8500 and a monolithic LSO crystal (42mmx42mmx10mm). Spatial resolution was measured for the centroids and the maximum likelihood estimates. The results suggest that the maximum likelihood positioning is feasible and partially removes the strong artifacts of the center of gravity algorithm.

  7. Maximum likelihood positioning for gamma-ray imaging detectors with depth of interaction measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lerche, Ch.W. [Grupo de Sistemas Digitales, ITACA, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, 46022 Valencia (Spain)], E-mail: lerche@ific.uv.es; Ros, A. [Grupo de Fisica Medica Nuclear, IFIC, Universidad de Valencia-Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, 46980 Paterna (Spain); Monzo, J.M.; Aliaga, R.J.; Ferrando, N.; Martinez, J.D.; Herrero, V.; Esteve, R.; Gadea, R.; Colom, R.J.; Toledo, J.; Mateo, F.; Sebastia, A. [Grupo de Sistemas Digitales, ITACA, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, 46022 Valencia (Spain); Sanchez, F.; Benlloch, J.M. [Grupo de Fisica Medica Nuclear, IFIC, Universidad de Valencia-Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, 46980 Paterna (Spain)

    2009-06-01

    The center of gravity algorithm leads to strong artifacts for gamma-ray imaging detectors that are based on monolithic scintillation crystals and position sensitive photo-detectors. This is a consequence of using the centroids as position estimates. The fact that charge division circuits can also be used to compute the standard deviation of the scintillation light distribution opens a way out of this drawback. We studied the feasibility of maximum likelihood estimation for computing the true gamma-ray photo-conversion position from the centroids and the standard deviation of the light distribution. The method was evaluated on a test detector that consists of the position sensitive photomultiplier tube H8500 and a monolithic LSO crystal (42mmx42mmx10mm). Spatial resolution was measured for the centroids and the maximum likelihood estimates. The results suggest that the maximum likelihood positioning is feasible and partially removes the strong artifacts of the center of gravity algorithm.

  8. Gamma-ray tracking - A new detector concept for nuclear spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gast, W.

    2001-01-01

    In the framework of an European collaboration the nest generation of large efficiency, high resolution spectrometers for nuclear spectroscopy is under development. The new spectrometers are large volume, segmented Ge-detectors featuring 3D position sensitivity in order to allow Gamma-Ray Tracking. That is, knowing the interaction positions and the energies released at each interaction, the track each gamma-ray follows during its scattering process inside the detector volume can be reconstructed on basis of the Compton-scattering formula. The resulting high add-back efficiency an effective granularity significantly improves peak-to-total ratio, efficiency, and Doppler-broadening of the spectrometer. In this contribution the states of the project concerning detector design and development of digital signal processing techniques to achieve an optimal 3D position sensitivity is presented. (authors)

  9. The L3+C detector, a unique tool-set to study cosmic rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adriani, O.; Akker, M. van den; Banerjee, S.; Baehr, J.; Betev, B.; Bourilkov, D.; Bottai, S.; Bobbink, G.; Cartacci, A.; Chemarin, M.; Chen, G.; Chen, H.S.; Chiarusi, T.; Dai, C.J.; Ding, L.K.; Duran, I.; Faber, G.; Fay, J.; Grabosch, H.J.; Groenstege, H.; Guo, Y.N.; Gupta, S.; Haller, Ch.; Hayashi, Y.; He, Z.X.; Hebbeker, T.; Hofer, H.; Hoferjun, H.; Huo, A.X.; Ito, N.; Jing, C.L.; Jones, L.; Kantserov, V.; Kawakami, S.; Kittel, W.; Koenig, A.C.; Kok, E.; Korn, A.; Kuang, H.H.; Kuijpers, J.; Ladron de Guevara, P.; Le Coultre, P.; Lei, Y.; Leich, H.; Leiste, R.; Li, D.; Li, L.; Li, Z.C.; Liu, Z.A.; Liu, H.T.; Lohmann, W.; Lu, Y.S.; Ma, X.H.; Ma, Y.Q.; Mil, A. van; Monteleoni, B.; Nahnhauer, R.; Pauss, F.; Parriaud, J.-F.; Petersen, B.; Pohl, M.; Qing, C.R.; Ramelli, R.; Ravindran, K.C.; Rewiersma, P.; Rojkov, A.; Saidi, R.; Schmitt, V.; Schoeneich, B.; Schotanus, D.J.; Shen, C.Q.; Sulanke, H.; Tang, X.W.; Timmermans, C.; Tonwar, S.; Trowitzsch, G.; Unger, M.; Verkooijen, H.; Wang, X.L.; Wang, X.W.; Wang, Z.M.; Wijk, R. van; Wijnen, Th.A.M.; Wilkens, H.; Xu, Y.P.; Xu, Z.Z.; Yang, C.G.; Yang, X.F.; Yao, Z.G.; Yu, Z.Q.; Zhang, S.; Zhu, G.Y.; Zhu, Q.Q.; Zhuang, H.L.; Zwart, A.N.M.

    2002-01-01

    The L3 detector at the CERN electron-positron collider, LEP, has been employed for the study of cosmic ray muons. The muon spectrometer of L3 consists of a set of high-precision drift chambers installed inside a magnet with a volume of about 1000 m 3 and a field of 0.5 T. Muon momenta are measured with a resolution of a few percent at 50 GeV. The detector is located under 30 m of overburden. A scintillator air shower array of 54 m by 30 m is installed on the roof of the surface hall above L3 in order to estimate the energy and the core position of the shower associated with a sample of detected muons. Thanks to the unique properties of the L3+C detector, muon research topics relevant to various current problems in cosmic ray and particle astrophysics can be studied

  10. The L3+C detector, a unique tool-set to study cosmic rays

    CERN Document Server

    Adriani, O; Banerjee, S; Bähr, J; Betev, B L; Bourilkov, D; Bottai, S; Bobbink, Gerjan J; Cartacci, A M; Chemarin, M; Chen, G; Chen He Sheng; Chiarusi, T; Dai Chang Jiang; Ding, L K

    2002-01-01

    The L3 detector at the CERN electron-positron collider, LEP, has been employed for the study of cosmic ray muons. The muon spectrometer of L3 consists of a set of high-precision drift chambers installed inside a magnet with a volume of about 1000 m**3 and a field of 0.5 T. Muon momenta are measured with a resolution of a few percent at 50 GeV. The detector is located under 30 m of overburden. A scintillator air shower array of 54 m by 30 m is installed on the roof of the surface hall above L3 in order to estimate the energy and the core position of the shower associated with a sample of detected muons. Thanks to the unique properties of the L3+C detector, muon research topics relevant to various current problems in cosmic ray and particle astrophysics can be studied.

  11. Current applications of semiconductor x-ray detectors in chemical analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitehead, N.E.

    1975-07-01

    In the last few years, semiconductor detectors have been used as X-ray detectors with great success, and the routine rapid accumulation of X-ray spectra is now possible. This review surveys the historical development of the detectors, the utilisation, and relative merits of various means of exciting the X-radiation from the elements in the sample, and compares the technique with other methods claiming to offer the capability of simultaneous multi-element analysis. It is concluded that it is of average sensitivity, but offers some advantages from its non-destructive nature, and in some cases its ability to offer information about the spatial distribution of elements in a sample. Other types of analysis may also be possible simultaneously. Sample preparation techniques are reviewed, especially techniques of manufacturing thin samples. An appendix contains details of the very wide variety of samples which have been analysed. More than 350 references are included. (auth.)

  12. Detectors for X-ray diffraction and scattering: current technology and future challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahr, D.; Brugemann, L.; Gerndt, E.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Detectors are crucial devices determining the quality, the reliability and the throughput of x-ray diffraction (XRD) and scattering investigations. This is of utmost importance in an industrial environment where in many cases untrained personnel or even without human intervention the experiments and data evaluations are running. The currently used technology of 0-dimensional to 2-dim XRD detectors is presented using selected examples. The application specific requirements on e.g. energy range and resolution, count rate limit, background and dynamic range, and size versus price are discussed. Due to the fact that x-ray diffraction investigations are becoming increasingly attractive in science, research and industry the advance in detector technology is pushed beyond existing limits. The discussion of the resultant market opportunities versus the cost of ownership and market entrance barrier is the final section of the presentation

  13. A microprogrammable high-speed data collection system for position sensitive X-ray detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashizume, H.

    1984-01-01

    A high-speed data acquisition system has been designed which collects digital data from one- and two-dimensional position sensitive X-ray detectors at a maximum average data rate of 1 MHz. The system consists of two separate fast buffer memories, a 64 K word by 20-bit main storage, two timers, a display controller, a computer interface and a keyboard, controlled by a specially designed microprogrammable microprocessor. Data collection is performed by executing a microprogram stored in the control storage; data coming from a detector are first accumulated in a small but fast buffer memory by hardware and transferred to the main storage under control of the microprogram. This design not only permits time-resolved data collections but also provides maximum speed, flexibility and cost-effectiveness simultaneously. The system also accepts data from integrated detectors such as TV cameras. The system has been designed for use in experiments at conventional and synchrotron X-ray sources. (orig.)

  14. The MU-RAY project: detector technology and first data from Mt. Vesuvius

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambrosino, F; Cimmino, L; Garufi, F; Lauria, A; Masone, V; Anastasio, A; Basta, D; Energico, S; Bonechi, L; Brianzi, M; Ciaranfi, R; Bross, A; Callier, S; Taille, C de La; Caputo, A; D'Auria, L; Giudicepietro, F; Macedonio, G; Martini, M; D'Alessandro, R

    2014-01-01

    Muon Radiography allows to map the density of a volcanic cone. It is based on the measurement of the attenuation of the flux of muons present in the cosmic radiation on the ground. The MU-RAY project has developed an innovative detector designed for the muon radiography. The main features are the low electric power consumption, robustness and transportability, good spatial resolution and muon time of flight measurement. A 1 m 2 detector prototype has been constructed. and collected data at Mt. Vesuvius for approximately 1 month in spring 2013. A second campaign of measurement has been performed at the Puy de Dôme, France, in the last four months of 2013. In this article the principles of muon radiography, the MU-RAY detector and the first results from the collected data will be described

  15. A GEANT4 based simulation for pixelated X-ray hybrid detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marinho, F.; Akiba, K.

    2015-01-01

    In this letter we present a detailed Monte Carlo approach to simulate pixelated detectors for X-ray applications. It allows us to fully characterize quantities such as interaction probability and reconstructed energy deposits according to beam energy as to evaluate energy and position resolution for comparisons with experimental results. The implementation and use of Monte Carlo truth information is also discussed

  16. Stabilized transistor transformer for self-moving Sirena-1 X-ray flaw detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krasil'nikov, S.B.; Kristalinskij, A.L.; Lozovoj, L.N.; Markov, S.N.; Sindalovskij, E.I.

    1986-01-01

    Electric circuit of stabilized transistor transformer for self-moving ''Sirena'' type X-ray flaw detector is described. Specifications of the transformer and results of the experimental studies, which can be used when tuning and adjusting the transformer under industrial conditions

  17. The X-ray mirror telescope and the pn-CCD detector of CAST

    CERN Document Server

    Kuster, M; Englhauser, J; Franz, J; Friedrich, P; Hartmann, R; Kang, D; Kotthaus, R; Lutz, Gerhard; Moralez, J; Serber, W; Strüder, L

    2004-01-01

    The Cern Axion Solar Telescope - CAST - uses a prototype 9 Tesla LHC superconducting dipole magnet to search for a hypothetical pseudoscalar particle, the axion, which was proposed by theory in the 1980s to solve the strong CP problem and which could be a dark matter candidate. In CAST a strong magnetic field is used to convert the solar axions to detectable photons via inverse Primakoff effect. The resulting X-rays are thermally distributed in the energy range of 1-7 keV and can be observed with conventional X-ray detectors. The most sensitive detector system of CAST is a pn-CCD detector originally developed for XMM-Newton combined with a Wolter I type X-ray mirror system. The combination of a focusing X-ray optics and a state of the art pn-CCD detector which combines high quantum efficiency, good spacial and energy resolution, and low background improves the sensitivity of the CAST experiment such that for the first time the axion photon coupling constant can be probed beyond the best astrophysical constrai...

  18. First-principles study of γ-ray detector materials in perovskite halides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Jino; Jin, Hosub; Stoumpos, Constantinos; Chung, Duck; Liu, Zhifu; Peters, John; Wessels, Bruce; Kanatzidis, Mercouri; Freeman, Arthur

    2013-03-01

    In an effort to search for good γ-ray detector materials, perovskite halide compounds containing heavy elements were investigated. Despite the three-dimensional network of the corner shared octahedra and the extended nature of the outermost shell, its strong ionic character leads to a large band gap, which is one of the essential criteria for γ-ray detector materials. Thus, considering high density and high atomic number, these pervoskite halides are possible candidate for γ-ray detector materials. We performed first-principles calculations to investigate electronic structures and thermodynamic properties of intrinsic defects in the selected perovskite halide, CsPbBr3. The screened-exchange local density approximation scheme was employed to correct the underestimation of the band gap in the LDA method. As a result, the calculated band gap of CsPbBr3 is found to be suitable for γ-ray detection. Furthermore, defect formation energy calculations allow us to predict thermodynamic and electronic properties of possible intrinsic defects, which affect detector efficiency and energy resolution. Supported by the office of Nonproliferation and Verification R &D under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357

  19. MHz rate X-Ray imaging with GaAs:Cr sensors using the LPD detector system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veale, M. C.; Booker, P.; Cline, B.; Coughlan, J.; Hart, M.; Nicholls, T.; Schneider, A.; Seller, P.; Pape, I.; Sawhney, K.; Lozinskaya, A. D.; Novikov, V. A.; Tolbanov, O. P.; Tyazhev, A.; Zarubin, A. N.

    2017-02-01

    The STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (U.K.) and Tomsk State University (Russia) have been working together to develop and characterise detector systems based on chromium-compensated gallium arsenide (GaAs:Cr) semiconductor material for high frame rate X-ray imaging. Previous work has demonstrated the spectroscopic performance of the material and its resistance to damage induced by high fluxes of X-rays. In this paper, recent results from experiments at the Diamond Light Source Synchrotron have demonstrated X-ray imaging with GaAs:Cr sensors at a frame rate of 3.7 MHz using the Large Pixel Detector (LPD) ASIC, developed by STFC for the European XFEL. Measurements have been made using a monochromatic 20 keV X-ray beam delivered in a single hybrid pulse with an instantenous flux of up to ~ 1 × 1010 photons s-1 mm-2. The response of 500 μm GaAs:Cr sensors is compared to that of the standard 500 μm thick LPD Si sensors.

  20. Pulse shape analysis for the gamma-ray tracking detector Agata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olariu, A.

    2007-10-01

    Agata is the European project for a 4π gamma-ray tracking array of 180 Ge detectors and is expected to have a detection sensitivity higher by 3 orders of magnitude than that of the present generation of gamma spectrometers. The trajectories of the photons inside a Ge crystal are reconstituted, which allows the determination of the initial energy of the incident photons as the total energy deposited along the track. The sequence of a γ-ray scattering process is too fast compared with the time resolution of the detector to be measured electronically, so tracking algorithms are necessary. Gamma-ray tracking detectors are operating in position sensitive mode it means that Ge crystal are segmented in order to facilitate the localization of the gamma interactions. It is possible to improve the position resolution by using the information conveyed by the shape of the detector signal. The task of the PSA (Pulse Shape Analysis) algorithm is to analyze this signal and extract the number of interactions, the position and the energy of each interaction. PSA algorithms rely on a basis of reference signals given by single interactions and that are obtained through an experimental characterization of the detector with scanning systems. The matrix method is a new PSA algorithm that consists in fitting linearly the detector signal with a set of calculated signals. We have tested this method with both simulated and measured signals. In the case of simulated single interactions the position resolution is 1.4 mm which is within Agata's specifications. For measured signals we have obtained mean positional errors of 3.2 mm at the front end of the detector an 4.8 mm at the back end