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Sample records for rational therapeutic approach

  1. Complement Involvement in Periodontitis: Molecular Mechanisms and Rational Therapeutic Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajishengallis, George; Maekawa, Tomoki; Abe, Toshiharu; Hajishengallis, Evlambia; Lambris, John D

    2015-01-01

    The complement system is a network of interacting fluid-phase and cell surface-associated molecules that trigger, amplify, and regulate immune and inflammatory signaling pathways. Dysregulation of this finely balanced network can destabilize host-microbe homeostasis and cause inflammatory tissue damage. Evidence from clinical and animal model-based studies suggests that complement is implicated in the pathogenesis of periodontitis, a polymicrobial community-induced chronic inflammatory disease that destroys the tooth-supporting tissues. This review discusses molecular mechanisms of complement involvement in the dysbiotic transformation of the periodontal microbiome and the resulting destructive inflammation, culminating in loss of periodontal bone support. These mechanistic studies have additionally identified potential therapeutic targets. In this regard, interventional studies in preclinical models have provided proof-of-concept for using complement inhibitors for the treatment of human periodontitis.

  2. Guidelines for Rational Cancer Therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byunghee Yoo

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally, cancer therapy has relied on surgery, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy. In recent years, these interventions have become increasingly replaced or complemented by more targeted approaches that are informed by a deeper understanding of the underlying biology. Still, the implementation of fully rational patient-specific drug design appears to be years away. Here, we present a vision of rational drug design for cancer that is defined by two major components: modularity and image guidance. We suggest that modularity can be achieved by combining a nanocarrier and an oligonucleotide component into the therapeutic. Image guidance can be incorporated into the nanocarrier component by labeling with a specific imaging reporter, such as a radionuclide or contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging. While limited by the need for additional technological advancement in the areas of cancer biology, nanotechnology, and imaging, this vision for the future of cancer therapy can be used as a guide to future research endeavors.

  3. A rational quantitative approach to determine the best dosing regimen for a target therapeutic effect: a unified formalism for antibiotic evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Nekka, Fahima

    2013-02-21

    The determination of an optimal dosing regimen is a critical step to enhance the drug efficacy and avoid toxicity. Rational dosing recommendations based on mathematical considerations are increasingly being adopted in the process of drug development and use. In this paper, we propose a quantitative approach to evaluate the efficacy of antibiotic agents. By integrating both pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) information, this approach gives rise to a unified formalism able to measure the cause-effect of dosing regimens. This new pharmaco-metric allows to cover a whole range of antibiotics, including the two well known concentration and time dependent classes, through the introduction of the Hill-dependency concept. As a direct fallout, our formalism opens a new path toward the bioequivalence evaluation in terms of PK and PD, which associates the in vivo drug concentration and the in vitro drug effect. Using this new approach, we succeeded to reveal unexpected, but relevant behaviors of drug performance when different drug regimens and drug classes are considered. Of particular notice, we found that the doses required to reach the same therapeutic effect, when scheduled differently, exhibit completely different tendencies for concentration and time dependent drugs. Moreover, we theoretically confirmed the previous experimental results of the superiority of the once daily regimen of aminoglycosides. The proposed methodology is appealing for its computational features and can easily be applicable to design fair clinical protocols or rationalize prescription decisions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. A Rational Approach to Rational Suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richman, Joseph

    1992-01-01

    Describes suicide as reaction to internal and external sources of stress and the impact of life events. Notes that, in the elderly, these situations are prevalent in many who are not suicidal. Contends that much more is written about rational suicide than its alternative (rational nonsuicide). Reviews reasons for this and suggests rational…

  5. Neuroinflammation in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. A rational framework for the search of novel therapeutic approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Inelia; Guzmán-Martínez, Leonardo; Cerda-Troncoso, Cristóbal; Farías, Gonzalo A; Maccioni, Ricardo B

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia in people over 60 years old. The molecular and cellular alterations that trigger this disease are still diffuse, one of the reasons for the delay in finding an effective treatment. In the search for new targets to search for novel therapeutic avenues, clinical studies in patients who used anti-inflammatory drugs indicating a lower incidence of AD have been of value to support the neuroinflammatory hypothesis of the neurodegenerative processes and the role of innate immunity in this disease. Neuroinflammation appears to occur as a consequence of a series of damage signals, including trauma, infection, oxidative agents, redox iron, oligomers of τ and β-amyloid, etc. In this context, our theory of Neuroimmunomodulation focus on the link between neuronal damage and brain inflammatory process, mediated by the progressive activation of astrocytes and microglial cells with the consequent overproduction of proinflammatory agents. Here, we discuss about the role of microglial and astrocytic cells, the principal agents in neuroinflammation process, in the development of neurodegenerative diseases such as AD. In this context, we also evaluated the potential relevance of natural anti-inflammatory components, which include curcumin and the novel Andean Compound, as agents for AD prevention and as a coadjuvant for AD treatments.

  6. Neuroinflammation in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer´s disease. A rational framework for the search of novel therapeutic approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Benjamin Maccioni

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer disease (AD is the most common cause of dementia in people over 60 years old. The molecular and cellular alterations that trigger this disease are still diffuse, one of the reasons for the delay in finding an effective treatment. In the search for new targets to search for novel therapeutic avenues, clinical studies in patients who used anti-inflammatory drugs indicating a lower incidence of AD have been of value to support the neuroinflammatory hypothesis of the neurodegenerative processes and the role of innate immunity in this disease. Neuroinflammation appears to occur as a consequence of a series of damage signals, including trauma, infection, oxidative agents, redox iron, oligomers of tau and beta amyloid, etc. In this context, our theory of Neuroimmunomodulation focus on the link between neuronal damage and brain inflammatory process, mediated by the progressive activation of astrocytes and microglial cells with the consequent overproduction of proinflammatory agents. Here, we discuss about the role of microglial and astrocytic cells, the principal agents in neuroinflammation process, in the development of neurodegenerative diseases such as AD. In this context, we also evaluated the potential relevance of natural anti-inflammatory components, which include curcumin and the novel Andean Compound, as agents for AD prevention and as a coadjuvant for AD treatments.

  7. The Rational-Emotive Approach: A Critique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, G. Barry

    1976-01-01

    The critique of Rational-Emotive Therapy aims criticism at Ellis' concept of irrationality, analysis of human behavior and therapeutic techniques. Ellis suggests that his critic's claims lack the support of experimental evidence. He further suggests that an "existential" bias pervades which differs from his own brand of…

  8. Pharmacogenetics approach to therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Seok Hwee; Lee, Edmund Jon Deoon

    2006-01-01

    1. Pharmacogenetics refers to the study of genetically controlled variations in drug response. Functional variants caused by single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes encoding drug-metabolising enzymes, transporters, ion channels and drug receptors have been known to be associated with interindividual and interethnic variation in drug response. Genetic variations in these genes play a role in influencing the efficacy and toxicity of medications. 2. Rapid, precise and cost-effective high-throughput technological platforms are essential for performing large-scale mutational analysis of genetic markers involved in the aetiology of variable responses to drug therapy. 3. The application of a pharmacogenetics approach to therapeutics in general clinical practice is still far from being achieved today owing to various constraints, such as limited accessibility of technology, inadequate knowledge, ambiguity of the role of variants and ethical concerns. 4. Drug actions are determined by the interplay of several genes encoding different proteins involved in various biochemical pathways. With rapidly emerging SNP discovery technological platforms and widespread knowledge on the role of SNPs in disease susceptibility and variability in drug response, the pharmacogenetics approach to therapeutics is anticipated to take off in the not-too-distant future. This will present profound clinical, economic and social implications for health care.

  9. Stress Management: A Rational Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Cecil

    This workbook was designed for use as the primary resource tool during a l-day participatory stress management seminar in which participants identify stressful situations, conduct analyses, and develop approaches to manage the stressful situations more effectively. Small group warm-up activities designed to introduce participants, encourage…

  10. Were Neanderthals Rational? A Stoic Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Whiting

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper adopts the philosophical approach of Stoicism as the basis for re-examining the cognitive and ethical relationship between Homo sapiens and Neanderthals. Stoicism sets out a clear criterion for the special moral status of human beings, namely rationality. We explore to what extent Neanderthals were sufficiently rational to be considered “human”. Recent findings in the fields of palaeoanthropology and palaeogenetics show that Neanderthals possessed high-level cognitive abilities and produced viable offspring with anatomically modern humans. Our discussion offers insights for reflecting on the relationship between humans and other forms of natural life and any moral obligations that result.

  11. PYTHIOSIS: A THERAPEUTIC APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. M. C. Falcão

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Pythiosis, a disease caused by the oomycete Pythium insidiosum, often presents inefficient response to chemotherapy. It is a consensus that, in spite the several therapeutic protocols, a combination of surgery, chemotherapy and immunotherapy should be used. Surgical excision requires the removal of the entire affected area, with a wide margin of safety. The use of antifungal drugs has resulted in variable results, both in vitro and in vivo, and presents low therapeutic efficiency due to differences in the agent characteristics, which differ from true fungi. Immunotherapy is a non-invasive alternative for the treatment of pythiosis, which aims at modifying the immune response of the host, thereby producing an effective response to the agent. Photodynamic therapy has emerged as a promising technique, with good activity against P. insidiosum in vitro and in vivo. However, more studies are necessary to increase the efficiency of the current treatment protocols and consequently improve the cure rates. This paper aims to conduct a review covering the conventional and recent therapeutic methods against P. insidiosum infections

  12. Melanoma genetics and the development of rational therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudnovsky, Yakov; Khavari, Paul A; Adams, Amy E

    2005-04-01

    Melanoma is a cancer of the neural crest-derived cells that provide pigmentation to skin and other tissues. Over the past 4 decades, the incidence of melanoma has increased more rapidly than that of any other malignancy in the United States. No current treatments substantially enhance patient survival once metastasis has occurred. This review focuses on recent insights into melanoma genetics and new therapeutic approaches being developed based on these advances.

  13. MBO: A Rational Approach and a Comparative Frameworks Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harries, T. W.

    1974-01-01

    Considering an organizational phenomenon from more than one theoretical perspective may be more fruitful than using a single rational approach. There is a danger that the restriction of information generation caused by the single approach may produce a false certainty engendered in part through the methodology itself. (Author/WM)

  14. Therapeutic approaches to genetic disorders

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    salah

    Although prevention is the ideal goal for genetic disorders, various types of therapeutic ... The patient being ... pirical or aimed at controlling or mediating signs and symptoms without care. ... plications and gene therapy approaches .... genes family, have opened a wide and .... cancer where nanoparticles are used to.

  15. Therapeutic approaches for celiac disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plugis, Nicholas M.; Khosla, Chaitan

    2015-01-01

    Celiac disease is a common, lifelong autoimmune disorder for which dietary control is the only accepted form of therapy. A strict gluten-free diet is burdensome to patients and can be limited in efficacy, indicating there is an unmet need for novel therapeutic approaches to supplement or supplant dietary therapy. Many molecular events required for disease pathogenesis have been recently characterized and inspire most current and emerging drug-discovery efforts. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) confirm the importance of human leukocyte antigen genes in our pathogenic model and identify a number of new risk loci in this complex disease. Here, we review the status of both emerging and potential therapeutic strategies in the context of disease pathophysiology. We conclude with a discussion of how genes identified during GWAS and follow-up studies that enhance susceptibility may offer insight into developing novel therapies. PMID:26060114

  16. Rationality and drug use: an experimental approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blondel, Serge; Lohéac, Youenn; Rinaudo, Stéphane

    2007-05-01

    In rational addiction theory, higher discount rates encourage drug use. We test this hypothesis in the general framework of rationality and behaviour under risk. We do so using an experimental design with real monetary incentives. The decisions of 34 drug addicts are compared with those of a control group. The decisions of drug users (DU) are not any less consistent with standard theories of behaviour over time and under risk. Further, there is no difference in the estimated discount rate between drug users and the control group, but the former do appear to be more risk-seeking.

  17. Rational design of peptide affinity ligands for the purification of therapeutic enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trasatti, John P; Woo, James; Ladiwala, Asif; Cramer, Steven; Karande, Pankaj

    2018-04-25

    Non-mAb biologics represent a growing class of therapeutics under clinical development. Although affinity chromatography is a potentially attractive approach for purification, the development of platform technologies, such as Protein A for mAbs, has been challenging due to the inherent chemical and structural diversity of these molecules. Here, we present our studies on the rapid development of peptide affinity ligands for the purification of biologics using a prototypical enzyme therapeutic in clinical use. Employing a suite of de novo rational and combinatorial design strategies we designed and screened a library of peptides on microarray platforms for their ability to bind to the target with high affinity and selectivity in cell culture fluid. Lead peptides were evaluated on resin in batch conditions and compared with a commercially available resin to evaluate their efficacy. Two lead candidates identified from microarray studies provided high binding capacity to the target while demonstrating high selectivity against culture contaminants and product variants compared to a commercial resin system. These findings provide a proof-of-concept for developing affinity peptide-based bioseparations processes for a target biologic. Peptide affinity ligand design and screening approaches presented in this work can also be easily translated to other biologics of interest. © 2018 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 2018. © 2018 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  18. Novel therapeutic approaches in chondrosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polychronidou, Genovefa; Karavasilis, Vasilios; Pollack, Seth M; Huang, Paul H; Lee, Alex; Jones, Robin L

    2017-03-01

    Chondrosarcoma is a malignant tumor of bones, characterized by the production of cartilage matrix. Due to lack of effective treatment for advanced disease, the clinical management of chondrosarcomas is exceptionally challenging. Current research focuses on elucidating the molecular events underlying the pathogenesis of this rare bone malignancy, with the goal of developing new molecularly targeted therapies. Signaling pathways suggested to have a role in chondrosarcoma include Hedgehog, Src, PI3k-Akt-mTOR and angiogenesis. Mutations in IDH1/2, present in more than 50% of primary conventional chondrosarcomas, make the development of IDH inhibitors a promising treatment option. The present review discusses the preclinical and early clinical data on novel targeted therapeutic approaches in chondrosarcoma.

  19. The Rational Approach to Budget Cuts: One University's Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Cynthia

    1988-01-01

    The University of Montreal's choice of the rational model of decision-making in managing budget cutbacks is explored and compared with other approaches, including the bureaucratic, garbage can, political, and collegial models. (MSE)

  20. Probabilistic approach to rationalization of plants maintenance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasai, Masao; Notoya, Junichi; Uchimoto, Tetsuya; Miya, Kenzo

    2001-01-01

    Since there are a lot of equipments in large plants, their safety and reliability cannot be kept as high level as designed without maintenance activities. Then preventive maintenance is intensively executed in some large plants. However, it will be inefficient to perform the preventive maintenance blindly. To make maintenance activities effective, it is essential to identify the critical equipments influencing plant safety and/or reliability and carry out the maintenance by focusing attentions on these equipments. It needs quantitative analyses to identify the critical equipments based on the data of failure rates. However, complete data set of failure rates cannot necessarily be available for some plants such as nuclear power plants. In this study, we carry out the reliability analysis for generic LNG plant and calculate various quantitative risk importance measures for each equipment. We propose rather qualitative representations for some quantitative measures, considering the situation without complete data set and conclude that it is possible to rationalize maintenance procedure by using these rather qualitative measures, though the level of rationalization is of course limited. (author)

  1. Computational and Game-Theoretic Approaches for Modeling Bounded Rationality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Waltman (Ludo)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractThis thesis studies various computational and game-theoretic approaches to economic modeling. Unlike traditional approaches to economic modeling, the approaches studied in this thesis do not rely on the assumption that economic agents behave in a fully rational way. Instead, economic

  2. Rational therapeutic choice for older patients with lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bron, Dominique; Soubeyran, Pierre

    2017-09-01

    The choice for an optimal treatment in older lymphoma patients is a real challenge for hemato-oncologists. They have to treat a potentially curative lymphoma, and concomitantly protect their patients from unacceptable toxicities. Some recommendations are provided for the major subtypes of lymphomas including the antitumoral treatment and primarily the optimal supportive care. All the recent literature data converge to say that the approach of an older patient with a malignant hemopathy is a multistep procedure. This process comprises the appraisal of life expectancy of the patient with or without the disease, the prognostic factors of the tumor, the functional, physiological and cognitive functions evaluation, the socio-economical environment and the patient's expectancy in terms of quality of life. Major progresses have been achieved in the management of diffuse large B cell lymphoma and mantle cell lymphoma in patients up to 80 and above 80 years old. With all these information in hands, the hematologist will decide if the treatment's objective is the standard treatment with optimal supportive care (fit patients), tailor-made adapted chemotherapy (unfit patients) or preservation of quality of life (frail patients).

  3. [Rational approach of leucocytosis in adults].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bron, D

    2013-09-01

    Several factors may influence the increased level of white blood cells (physical and/or emotional stimuli, infections, inflammations, drugs, toxins, etc.). The best approach to identify these disorders gets through a physical examination and a precise history. A particular attention should be focused on the onset of lymph nodes and/or splenomegaly. Among severe haematological disorders to take into consideration, we should exclude acute leukemias, chronic leukemias and myeloproliferative disorders.

  4. Rationalism and emotivism from a neuroethic approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Jesús Pérez Zafrilla

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The development of neuroethics has used to privilege the role of emotion in contrast to reasoning in moral deliberation. My aim in this paper to oppose two models of moral deliberation articulated from neuroethics: the emotivist one, developed by Haidt and Lakoff; and the rationalist one, elaborated by Hugo Mercier. My aim is to stablish if Mercier rehabilitates reasoning in neuroethics or if his approach is an emotivist one too.

  5. A rational approach for ω-transaminase-catalyzed process design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    T. Gundersen, Maria; Lloyd, Richard; Tufvesson, Pär

    Herein we describe a novel rational approach to the design of a ω-transaminase process such that it will fulfill criteria necessary for industrial use. By first determining the fundamental properties of the reaction system, it is possible to suggest appropriate process strategies that may be used...

  6. A rational approach to public safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sidall, E.A.

    The proposed approach considers safety from the point of view of the victims, i.e. the public. It is taken as axiomatic that all premature loss of life is equal and that the cost of public safety measures falls in the last analysis on the public. The effort to counter risk is considered to be divided into many safety activities and sub-activities. At present, there is virtually no coordination between activities, but sub-activities are effectively compared with each other within each activity. If an activity is organized for best efficiency, its sub-activities would be carried out in order of diminishing return for money, or in other words in increasing cost per extra statistical life saved (CSX), up to a cut-off point. Evidence is quoted which indicates that, at present, the CSX at cut-off varies over several orders of magnitude between different activities. It is suggested that it is the ease or otherwise with which money can be made available for the activity which accounts for this wide range. If these activities with a high terminal CSX are cut back and the money saved is diverted to activities of low CSX, it appears that large amounts of money could be saved for the same overall cost. These measures simply amount to spending money when it will save most lives. The implementation of these ideas is discussed. (author)

  7. [Rational drug use: an economic approach to decision making].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mota, Daniel Marques; da Silva, Marcelo Gurgel Carlos; Sudo, Elisa Cazue; Ortún, Vicente

    2008-04-01

    The present article approaches rational drug use (RDU) from the economical point of view. The implementation of RDU implies in costs and involves acquisition of knowledge and behavioral changes of several agents. The difficulties in implementing RDU may be due to shortage problems, information asymmetry, lack of information, uncertain clinical decisions, externalities, time-price, incentives for drug prescribers and dispensers, drug prescriber preferences and marginal utility. Health authorities, among other agencies, must therefore regularize, rationalize and control drug use to minimize inefficiency in pharmaceutical care and to prevent exposing the population to unnecessary health risks.

  8. Toxin-Based Therapeutic Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Itai Benhar

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Protein toxins confer a defense against predation/grazing or a superior pathogenic competence upon the producing organism. Such toxins have been perfected through evolution in poisonous animals/plants and pathogenic bacteria. Over the past five decades, a lot of effort has been invested in studying their mechanism of action, the way they contribute to pathogenicity and in the development of antidotes that neutralize their action. In parallel, many research groups turned to explore the pharmaceutical potential of such toxins when they are used to efficiently impair essential cellular processes and/or damage the integrity of their target cells. The following review summarizes major advances in the field of toxin based therapeutics and offers a comprehensive description of the mode of action of each applied toxin.

  9. Toxin-Based Therapeutic Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapira, Assaf; Benhar, Itai

    2010-01-01

    Protein toxins confer a defense against predation/grazing or a superior pathogenic competence upon the producing organism. Such toxins have been perfected through evolution in poisonous animals/plants and pathogenic bacteria. Over the past five decades, a lot of effort has been invested in studying their mechanism of action, the way they contribute to pathogenicity and in the development of antidotes that neutralize their action. In parallel, many research groups turned to explore the pharmaceutical potential of such toxins when they are used to efficiently impair essential cellular processes and/or damage the integrity of their target cells. The following review summarizes major advances in the field of toxin based therapeutics and offers a comprehensive description of the mode of action of each applied toxin. PMID:22069564

  10. Malignant mesothelioma: biology, diagnosis and therapeutic approaches

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tomasetti, M.; Amati, M.; Santarelli, L.; Alleva, R.; Neužil, Jiří

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 2, č. 2 (2009), s. 190-206 ISSN 1874-4672 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : malignant mesothelioma * biology * diagnosis and therapeutic approaches Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  11. New Insights into the Pathogenesis of MDS and the rational therapeutic opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou Zahr, Abdallah; Bernabe Ramirez, Carolina; Wozney, Jocelyn; Prebet, Thomas; Zeidan, Amer M

    2016-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) include a heterogeneous group of acquired hematopoietic malignancies characterized by ineffective hematopoiesis, peripheral cytopenias, and a varying propensity for progression to acute myeloid leukemia. The clinical heterogeneity in MDS is a reflection of its molecular heterogeneity. Better understanding of aberrant epigenetics, dysregulation of immune responses, and del(5q) MDS has provided the rationale for well-established treatments in MDS. Further understanding of abnormal signal transduction and aberrant apoptosis pathways has led to development of new rational therapies that are in advanced phases of clinical translation. This review seeks to describe recent developments in our understanding of the pathogenesis of MDS and the potential therapeutic implications of these observations.

  12. Recent advances in rational approaches for enzyme engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerstin Steiner

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Enzymes are an attractive alternative in the asymmetric syntheses of chiral building blocks. To meet the requirements of industrial biotechnology and to introduce new functionalities, the enzymes need to be optimized by protein engineering. This article specifically reviews rational approaches for enzyme engineering and de novo enzyme design involving structure-based approaches developed in recent years for improvement of the enzymes’ performance, broadened substrate range, and creation of novel functionalities to obtain products with high added value for industrial applications.

  13. Measuring inflation under rationing: A virtual price approach

    OpenAIRE

    Christophe Starzec; François Gardes

    2014-01-01

    URL des Documents de travail : http://ces.univ-paris1.fr/cesdp/cesdp2014.html; Documents de travail du Centre d'Economie de la Sorbonne 2014.01 - ISSN : 1955-611X; The presence of rationing or more generally of the situations of constrained demand can make the traditional methods of measuring inflation questionable and give an erroneous image of the reality. In this paper, we use the virtual price approach (Neary, Roberts, 1980) to estimate the real inflation level in a centrally planned econ...

  14. Interpreting quantum theory a therapeutic approach

    CERN Document Server

    Friederich, S

    2014-01-01

    Is it possible to approach quantum theory in a 'therapeutic' vein that sees its foundational problems as arising from mistaken conceptual presuppositions? The book explores the prospects for this project and, in doing so, discusses such fascinating issues as the nature of quantum states, explanation in quantum theory, and 'quantum non-locality'.

  15. Rational design of highly potent HIV-1 fusion inhibitory proteins: Implication for developing antiviral therapeutics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ni Ling; Gao, George F.; Tien Po

    2005-01-01

    Recombinant protein containing one heptad-repeat 1 (HR1) segment and one HR2 segment of the HIV-1 gp41 (HR1-HR2) has been shown to fold into thermally stable six-helix bundle, representing the fusogenic core of gp41. In this study, we have used the fusogenic core as a scaffold to design HIV-1 fusion inhibitory proteins by linking another HR1 to the C terminus of HR1-HR2 (HR121) or additional HR2 to the N terminus of HR1-HR2 (HR212). Both recombinant proteins could be abundantly and solubly expressed and easily purified, exhibiting high stability and potent inhibitory activity on HIV-1 fusion with IC 50 values of 16.2 ± 2.8 and 2.8 ± 0.63 nM, respectively. These suggest that these rationally designed proteins can be further developed as novel anti-HIV-1 therapeutics

  16. [How I treat: from specialized pharmacology to drug therapy: a plea for an optimal educational program for rational therapeutics, from decision making to drug prescription].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheen, A J

    2000-09-01

    Clinical pharmacology and therapeutics are two complementary disciplines which should lead the medical student, through an optimized training, to a rational prescription of drugs, ultimate and important step of the medical approach. Such a learning should occur progressively throughout the medical education, focusing, first, on the therapeutic reasoning ("why?") and, second, on the practical application leading to the prescription ("how?"). The medical student should learn the difficult task of integrating disease, drug and patient, in order to optimize the benefit/risk ratio, while being informed about new concepts such as "Evidence-Based Medicine" and pharmacoeconomics.

  17. The Rational-Reality Based Approach to Treating the Criminal Child Abuser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Steven G.

    1979-01-01

    This appraoch to treating child abusers incorporates the philosophies of Rational Behavior Training and Reality Therapy into a therapeutic strategy that helps clients to learn skills in making rational decisions that can aid them in living harmoniously within the family structure. Five specific techniques are presented. (Author)

  18. Rational design of an EGF-IL18 fusion protein: Implication for developing tumor therapeutics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Jianxin; Peng Ying; Meng Zhefeng; Jin Liqin; Lu Yongsui; Guan Minxin

    2005-01-01

    Interleukin-18 (IL-18) is a proinflammatory cytokine. This protein has a role in regulating immune responses and exhibits significant anti-tumor activities. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) is an important growth factor that plays a central role in the regulation of cell cycle and differentiation. It was proposed that a targeted delivery of IL-18 by generation of IL-18-EGF fusion protein might decrease adverse effects and result in enhancing cytotoxic and antitumor activities. In the present study, a fusion protein, consisting of EGFR binding domain fused to human IL-18 mature peptide via a linker peptide of (Gly 4 Ser) 3, was constructed and expressed in the insect cell line Sf9 using Bac-to-Bac baculovirus expression system. We showed that the purified recombinant fusion protein induced similar levels of IFN-γ to that of native IL-18 protein in human PBMC in the presence of ConA. Furthermore, EGF receptor competitive test in human epithelial cancer A431 cell line showed that EGF-IL18 fusion protein can specifically bind with EGFR by competing with native EGF protein. These suggest that this rationally designed protein can be further developed as novel tumor therapeutics

  19. Consumers' evaluations of ecological packaging - rational and emotional approaches

    OpenAIRE

    Koenig-Lewis, Nicole; Palmer, Adrian; Dermody, Janine; Urbye, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Ecological marketing claims have been criticized for confusing or misleading buyers, leading to calls for more rationality in promoting and evaluating ‘green’ products. However, emotions are important drivers influencing pro-environmental purchase decisions. This study investigates consumers' emotional and rational evaluations of pro-environmental packaging. A conceptual model incorporates individuals' general environmental concerns, their rational beliefs about environmental effects of produ...

  20. How rational should bioethics be? The value of empirical approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, A A

    2001-10-01

    Rational justification of claims with empirical content calls for empirical and not only normative philosophical investigation. Empirical approaches to bioethics are epistemically valuable, i.e., such methods may be necessary in providing and verifying basic knowledge about cultural values and norms. Our assumptions in moral reasoning can be verified or corrected using these methods. Moral arguments can be initiated or adjudicated by data drawn from empirical investigation. One may argue that individualistic informed consent, for example, is not compatible with the Asian communitarian orientation. But this normative claim uses an empirical assumption that may be contrary to the fact that some Asians do value and argue for informed consent. Is it necessary and factual to neatly characterize some cultures as individualistic and some as communitarian? Empirical investigation can provide a reasonable way to inform such generalizations. In a multi-cultural context, such as in the Philippines, there is a need to investigate the nature of the local ethos before making any appeal to authenticity. Otherwise we may succumb to the same ethical imperialism we are trying hard to resist. Normative claims that involve empirical premises cannot be reasonable verified or evaluated without utilizing empirical methods along with philosophical reflection. The integration of empirical methods to the standard normative approach to moral reasoning should be reasonably guided by the epistemic demands of claims arising from cross-cultural discourse in bioethics.

  1. The art of rationing - the need for a new approach to rationing health ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A key element in dealing with HIV/AIDS in South Africa depends on the resolution of the antiretroviral therapy (ART) paradox: while a universal First-World-style ART programme is unaffordable, a rationed treatment programme that includes ART is not only affordable but also vital for basic human rights reasons, to enhance ...

  2. Clinical decision-making and therapeutic approaches in osteopathy - a qualitative grounded theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Oliver P; Petty, Nicola J; Moore, Ann P

    2014-02-01

    There is limited understanding of how osteopaths make decisions in relation to clinical practice. The aim of this research was to construct an explanatory theory of the clinical decision-making and therapeutic approaches of experienced osteopaths in the UK. Twelve UK registered osteopaths participated in this constructivist grounded theory qualitative study. Purposive and theoretical sampling was used to select participants. Data was collected using semi-structured interviews which were audio-recorded and transcribed. As the study approached theoretical sufficiency, participants were observed and video-recorded during a patient appointment, which was followed by a video-prompted interview. Constant comparative analysis was used to analyse and code data. Data analysis resulted in the construction of three qualitatively different therapeutic approaches which characterised participants and their clinical practice, termed; Treater, Communicator and Educator. Participants' therapeutic approach influenced their approach to clinical decision-making, the level of patient involvement, their interaction with patients, and therapeutic goals. Participants' overall conception of practice lay on a continuum ranging from technical rationality to professional artistry, and contributed to their therapeutic approach. A range of factors were identified which influenced participants' conception of practice. The findings indicate that there is variation in osteopaths' therapeutic approaches to practice and clinical decision-making, which are influenced by their overall conception of practice. This study provides the first explanatory theory of the clinical decision-making and therapeutic approaches of osteopaths. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Structurally Based Therapeutic Evaluation: A Therapeutic and Practical Approach to Teaching Medicinal Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsharif, Naser Z.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Explains structurally based therapeutic evaluation of drugs, which uses seven therapeutic criteria in translating chemical and structural knowledge into therapeutic decision making in pharmaceutical care. In a Creighton University (Nebraska) medicinal chemistry course, students apply the approach to solve patient-related therapeutic problems in…

  4. BET inhibitors in metastatic prostate cancer: therapeutic implications and rational drug combinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markowski, Mark C; De Marzo, Angelo M; Antonarakis, Emmanuel S

    2017-12-01

    The bromodomain and extra-terminal (BET) family of proteins are epigenetic readers of acetylated histones regulating a vast network of protein expression across many different cancers. Therapeutic targeting of BET is an attractive area of clinical development for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC), particularly due to its putative effect on c-MYC expression and its interaction with the androgen receptor (AR). Areas covered: We speculate that a combination approach using inhibitors of BET proteins (BETi) with other targeted therapies may be required to improve the therapeutic index of BET inhibition in the management of prostate cancer. Preclinical data has identified several molecular targets that may enhance the effect of BET inhibition in the clinic. This review will summarize the known preclinical data implicating BET as an important therapeutic target in advanced prostate cancer, highlight the ongoing clinical trials targeting this protein family, and speculate on rationale combination strategies using BETi together with other agents in prostate cancer. A literature search using Pubmed was performed for this review. Expert opinion: Use of BETi in the treatment of mCRPC patients may require the addition of a second novel agent.

  5. A "Mindful Rational Living" Approach for Addressing HIV in the School Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenneville, Tiffany; St. John Walsh, Audra

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes a "mindful rational living" approach, which incorporates mindfulness techniques with rational emotive behavioral therapy strategies for addressing HIV in the school setting. The utility of this approach for attending to the physical, mental, and psychosocial aspects of school-based HIV prevention and treatment will…

  6. Therapeutic approaches for spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Fogaça Cristante

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This study reviews the literature concerning possible therapeutic approaches for spinal cord injury. Spinal cord injury is a disabling and irreversible condition that has high economic and social costs. There are both primary and secondary mechanisms of damage to the spinal cord. The primary lesion is the mechanical injury itself. The secondary lesion results from one or more biochemical and cellular processes that are triggered by the primary lesion. The frustration of health professionals in treating a severe spinal cord injury was described in 1700 BC in an Egyptian surgical papyrus that was translated by Edwin Smith; the papyrus reported spinal fractures as a ''disease that should not be treated.'' Over the last biological or pharmacological treatment method. Science is unraveling the mechanisms of cell protection and neuroregeneration, but clinically, we only provide supportive care for patients with spinal cord injuries. By combining these treatments, researchers attempt to enhance the functional recovery of patients with spinal cord injuries. Advances in the last decade have allowed us to encourage the development of experimental studies in the field of spinal cord regeneration. The combination of several therapeutic strategies should, at minimum, allow for partial functional recoveries for these patients, which could improve their quality of life.

  7. Fetal neonatal hyperthyroidism: diagnostic and therapeutic approachment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtoğlu, Selim; Özdemir, Ahmet

    2017-01-01

    Fetal and neonatal hyperthyroidism may occur in mothers with Graves’ disease. Fetal thyrotoxicosis manifestation is observed with the transition of TSH receptor stimulating antibodies to the fetus from the 17th–20th weeks of pregnancy and with the fetal TSH receptors becoming responsive after 20 weeks. The diagnosis is confirmed by fetal tachycardia, goiter and bone age advancement in pregnancy and maternal treatment is conducted in accordance. The probability of neonatal hyperthyroidism is high in the babies of mothers that have ongoing antithyroid requirement and higher antibody levels in the last months of pregnancy. Clinical manifestation may be delayed by 7–17 days because of the antithyroid drugs taken by the mother. Neonatal hyperthyroidism symptoms can be confused with sepsis and congenital viral infections. Herein, the diagnosis and therapeutic approach are reviewed in cases of fetal neonatal hyperthyroidism. PMID:28439194

  8. Approaches to Preventative and Therapeutic HIV vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Glenda E.; Laher, Fatima; Lazarus, Erica; Ensoli, Barbara; Corey, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    Novel strategies are being researched to discover vaccines to prevent and treat HIV-1. Nonefficacious preventative vaccine approaches include bivalent recombinant gp120 alone, HIV gene insertion into an Adenovirus 5 (Ad5) virus vector and the DNA prime/Ad5 boost vaccine regimen. However, the ALVAC-HIV prime/AIDSVAX® B/E gp120 boost regimen showed 31.2% efficacy at 3.5 years, and is being investigated as clade C constructs with an additional boost. Likewise, although multiple therapeutic vaccines have failed in the past, in a non-placebo controlled trial, a Tat vaccine demonstrated immune cell restoration, reduction of immune activation, and reduced HIV-1 DNA viral load. Monoclonal antibodies for passive immunization or treatment show promise, with VRC01 entering advanced clinical trials. PMID:26985884

  9. Rational Solutions to the ABS List: Transformation Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Danda; Zhang, Da-Jun

    2017-10-01

    In the paper we derive rational solutions for the lattice potential modified Korteweg-de Vries equation, and Q2, Q1(δ), H3(δ), H2 and H1 in the Adler-Bobenko-Suris list. Bäcklund transformations between these lattice equations are used. All these rational solutions are related to a unified τ function in Casoratian form which obeys a bilinear superposition formula.

  10. A more rational approach to new-product development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonabeau, Eric; Bodick, Neil; Armstrong, Robert W

    2008-03-01

    Companies often treat new-product development as a monolithic process, but it can be more rationally divided into two parts: an early stage that focuses on evaluating prospects and eliminating bad bets, and a late stage that maximizes the remaining candidates' market potential. Recognizing the value of this approach, Eli Lilly designed and piloted Chorus, an autonomous unit dedicated solely to the early stage. This article demonstrates how segmenting development in this way can speed it up and make it more cost-effective. Two classes of decision-making errors can impede NPD, the authors say. First, managers often ignore evidence challenging their assumptions that projects will succeed. As a result, many projects go forward despite multiple red flags; some even reach the market, only to fail dramatically after their introduction. Second, companies sometimes terminate projects prematurely because people fail to conduct the right experiments to reveal products' potential. Most companies promote both kinds of errors by focusing disproportionately on late-stage development; they lack the early, truth-seeking functions that would head such errors off. In segmented NPD, however, the early-stage organization maintains loyalty to the experiment rather than the product, whereas the late-stage organization pursues commercial success. Chorus has significantly improved NPD efficiency and productivity at Lilly. Although the unit absorbs just one-tenth of Lilly's investment in early-stage development, it delivers a substantially greater fraction of the molecules slated for late Phase II trials--at almost twice the speed and less than a third of the cost of the standard process, sometimes shaving as much as two years off the usual development time.

  11. Rational design of single-molecule magnets: a supramolecular approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaser, Thorsten

    2011-01-07

    )Cr(III)](3+), [Mn(III)(6)Fe(III)](3+), and [Mn(III)(6)Co(III)](3+) with [Mn(III)(6)Cr(III)](3+) being a SMM. A detailed analysis and comparison of the magnetic properties of the three heptanuclear complexes and the tetranuclear half-unit [Mn(III)(3)Cr(III)](3+) provides significant insight for further optimization of the SMM properties. The modular assembly of the heptanuclear complexes from three molecular building blocks allows the fine-tuning of the molecular and steric properties of each building block without losing the driving force for the formation of the heptanuclear complexes. This possibility of rational improvements of our isostructural series is the main advantage of our supramolecular approach.

  12. Segmented arch or continuous arch technique? A rational approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergei Godeiro Fernandes Rabelo Caldas

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This study aims at revising the biomechanical principles of the segmented archwire technique as well as describing the clinical conditions in which the rational use of scientific biomechanics is essential to optimize orthodontic treatment and reduce the side effects produced by the straight wire technique.

  13. a rational approach for predicting the minimum composition of anti ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of Cv may deviate from what is predicted by the formula given above are discussed. Extensive literature search on malaria, onchocerciasis and schistosomiasis sub-unit vaccine development ... provides a rational framework for constituting a sub-unit anti-parasite vaccine. ..... vaccine formulation produced greater protection.

  14. Comparison of a rational vs. high throughput approach for rapid salt screening and selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collman, Benjamin M; Miller, Jonathan M; Seadeek, Christopher; Stambek, Julie A; Blackburn, Anthony C

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, high throughput (HT) screening has become the most widely used approach for early phase salt screening and selection in a drug discovery/development setting. The purpose of this study was to compare a rational approach for salt screening and selection to those results previously generated using a HT approach. The rational approach involved a much smaller number of initial trials (one salt synthesis attempt per counterion) that were selected based on a few strategic solubility determinations of the free form combined with a theoretical analysis of the ideal solvent solubility conditions for salt formation. Salt screening results for sertraline, tamoxifen, and trazodone using the rational approach were compared to those previously generated by HT screening. The rational approach produced similar results to HT screening, including identification of the commercially chosen salt forms, but with a fraction of the crystallization attempts. Moreover, the rational approach provided enough solid from the very initial crystallization of a salt for more thorough and reliable solid-state characterization and thus rapid decision-making. The crystallization techniques used in the rational approach mimic larger-scale process crystallization, allowing smoother technical transfer of the selected salt to the process chemist.

  15. The Soft Constraints Hypothesis: A Rational Analysis Approach to Resource Allocation for Interactive Behavior

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gray, Wayne D; Sims, Chris R; Schoelles, Michael J; Fu, Wai-Tat

    2006-01-01

    Soft constraints hypothesis (SCH) is a rational analysis approach that holds that the mixture of perceptual-motor and cognitive resources allocated for interactive behavior is adjusted based on temporal cost-benefit tradeoff...

  16. A Critical Analysis of Rational & Emotional Approaches in Car Selling

    OpenAIRE

    Krishn A. Goyal; A. Sadasivam

    2010-01-01

    A well known fact is that investment in a Car is the costliest investment made in a life time only next to construction of a house, for any human being. It is a common knowledge that all of us are attracted towards cars right from childhood and we have developed our own perceptions for cars. When we acquire the capacity to buy cars, our experience of buying, involves both emotional and rational aspects which lead to a purchase decision. Unlike other consumable durables, the decision to buy sp...

  17. A rational approach to decision making in toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, B A; Sass, N L

    1984-06-01

    The application of the Kepner-Tregoe (C. H. Kepner and B. B. Tregoe, 1981, The New Rational Manager, Princeton Res. Press, Princeton, N. J.) problem solving technique to the evaluation and interpretation of toxicological information is described. Data from a chronic study provide an illustrative example. In this study an excess in the number of urinary bladder neoplasms was observed in male rats exposed to diets containing the test chemical. No similar effect was seen in treated female rats. Both male and female mice exposed to treatment also exhibited no effect. Whether treatment was the cause of the observed increase should be based on all the scientific and technical information that is relevant to this decision. The Kepner-Tregoe method of problem analysis captures this information in a framework that makes it easily understood. This is especially desirable if the judgments that are a vital part of regulatory decision making are to be adequately communicated.

  18. A rational approach to heavy-atom derivative screening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joyce, M. Gordon; Radaev, Sergei; Sun, Peter D.

    2010-01-01

    In order to overcome the difficulties associated with the ‘classical’ heavy-atom derivatization procedure, an attempt has been made to develop a rational crystal-free heavy-atom-derivative screening method and a quick-soak derivatization procedure which allows heavy-atom compound identification. Despite the development in recent times of a range of techniques for phasing macromolecules, the conventional heavy-atom derivatization method still plays a significant role in protein structure determination. However, this method has become less popular in modern high-throughput oriented crystallography, mostly owing to its trial-and-error nature, which often results in lengthy empirical searches requiring large numbers of well diffracting crystals. In addition, the phasing power of heavy-atom derivatives is often compromised by lack of isomorphism or even loss of diffraction. In order to overcome the difficulties associated with the ‘classical’ heavy-atom derivatization procedure, an attempt has been made to develop a rational crystal-free heavy-atom derivative-screening method and a quick-soak derivatization procedure which allows heavy-atom compound identification. The method includes three basic steps: (i) the selection of likely reactive compounds for a given protein and specific crystallization conditions based on pre-defined heavy-atom compound reactivity profiles, (ii) screening of the chosen heavy-atom compounds for their ability to form protein adducts using mass spectrometry and (iii) derivatization of crystals with selected heavy-metal compounds using the quick-soak method to maximize diffraction quality and minimize non-isomorphism. Overall, this system streamlines the process of heavy-atom compound identification and minimizes the problem of non-isomorphism in phasing

  19. A rational approach to heavy-atom derivative screening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joyce, M. Gordon; Radaev, Sergei; Sun, Peter D., E-mail: psun@nih.gov [Structural Immunology Section, Laboratory of Immunogenetics, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, 12441 Parklawn Drive, Rockville, Maryland 20852 (United States)

    2010-04-01

    In order to overcome the difficulties associated with the ‘classical’ heavy-atom derivatization procedure, an attempt has been made to develop a rational crystal-free heavy-atom-derivative screening method and a quick-soak derivatization procedure which allows heavy-atom compound identification. Despite the development in recent times of a range of techniques for phasing macromolecules, the conventional heavy-atom derivatization method still plays a significant role in protein structure determination. However, this method has become less popular in modern high-throughput oriented crystallography, mostly owing to its trial-and-error nature, which often results in lengthy empirical searches requiring large numbers of well diffracting crystals. In addition, the phasing power of heavy-atom derivatives is often compromised by lack of isomorphism or even loss of diffraction. In order to overcome the difficulties associated with the ‘classical’ heavy-atom derivatization procedure, an attempt has been made to develop a rational crystal-free heavy-atom derivative-screening method and a quick-soak derivatization procedure which allows heavy-atom compound identification. The method includes three basic steps: (i) the selection of likely reactive compounds for a given protein and specific crystallization conditions based on pre-defined heavy-atom compound reactivity profiles, (ii) screening of the chosen heavy-atom compounds for their ability to form protein adducts using mass spectrometry and (iii) derivatization of crystals with selected heavy-metal compounds using the quick-soak method to maximize diffraction quality and minimize non-isomorphism. Overall, this system streamlines the process of heavy-atom compound identification and minimizes the problem of non-isomorphism in phasing.

  20. Internet addiction neuroscientific approaches and therapeutical interventions

    CERN Document Server

    Reuter, Martin

    2015-01-01

    This book combines a scholarly introduction with state-of-the-art research in the characterization of Internet addiction. It is intended for a broad audience including scientists, students and practitioners. The first part of the book contains an introduction to Internet addiction and their pathogenesis. The second part of the book is dedicated to an in-depth review of neuroscientific findings which cover studies using a variety of biological techniques including brain imaging and molecular genetics. The last part of the book will focus on therapeutic interventions for Internet addiction.

  1. Towards new therapeutic approaches for malignant melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco, Ivan; Buzea, Cristina; Tron, Victor

    2011-11-01

    Recent progress in understanding the molecular mechanisms of the initiation and progression of melanoma has created new opportunities for developing novel therapeutic modalities to manage this potentially lethal disease. Although at first glance, melanoma carcinogenesis appears to be a chaotic system, it is indeed, arguably, a deterministic multistep process involving sequential alterations of proto-oncogenes, tumour suppressors and miRNA genes. The scope of this article is to discuss the most recent and significant advances in melanoma molecular therapeutics. It is apparent that using single agents targeting solely individual melanoma pathways might be insufficient for long-term survival. However, the outstanding results on melanoma survival observed with novel selective inhibitors of B-RAF, such as PLX4032 give hope that melanoma can be cured. The fact that melanoma develops acquired resistance to PLX4032 emphasises the importance of simultaneously targeting several pathways. Because the most striking feature of melanoma is its unsurpassed ability to metastasise, it is important to implement newer systems for drug delivery adapted from research on stem cells and nanotechnology.

  2. Therapeutic Approaches of Botulinum Toxin in Gynecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moga, Marius Alexandru; Dimienescu, Oana Gabriela; Bălan, Andreea; Scârneciu, Ioan; Barabaș, Barna; Pleș, Liana

    2018-04-21

    Botulinum toxins (BoNTs) are produced by several anaerobic species of the genus Clostridium and, although they were originally considered lethal toxins, today they find their usefulness in the treatment of a wide range of pathologies in various medical specialties. Botulinum neurotoxin has been identified in seven different isoforms (BoNT-A, BoNT-B, BoNT-C, BoNT-D, BoNT-E, BoNT-F, and BoNT-G). Neurotoxigenic Clostridia can produce more than 40 different BoNT subtypes and, recently, a new BoNT serotype (BoNT-X) has been reported in some studies. BoNT-X has not been shown to actually be an active neurotoxin despite its catalytically active LC, so it should be described as a putative eighth serotype. The mechanism of action of the serotypes is similar: they inhibit the release of acetylcholine from the nerve endings but their therapeutically potency varies. Botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A) is the most studied serotype for therapeutic purposes. Regarding the gynecological pathology, a series of studies based on the efficiency of its use in the treatment of refractory myofascial pelvic pain, vaginism, dyspareunia, vulvodynia and overactive bladder or urinary incontinence have been reported. The current study is a review of the literature regarding the efficiency of BoNT-A in the gynecological pathology and on the long and short-term effects of its administration.

  3. Therapeutic Approaches of Botulinum Toxin in Gynecology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Alexandru Moga

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Botulinum toxins (BoNTs are produced by several anaerobic species of the genus Clostridium and, although they were originally considered lethal toxins, today they find their usefulness in the treatment of a wide range of pathologies in various medical specialties. Botulinum neurotoxin has been identified in seven different isoforms (BoNT-A, BoNT-B, BoNT-C, BoNT-D, BoNT-E, BoNT-F, and BoNT-G. Neurotoxigenic Clostridia can produce more than 40 different BoNT subtypes and, recently, a new BoNT serotype (BoNT-X has been reported in some studies. BoNT-X has not been shown to actually be an active neurotoxin despite its catalytically active LC, so it should be described as a putative eighth serotype. The mechanism of action of the serotypes is similar: they inhibit the release of acetylcholine from the nerve endings but their therapeutically potency varies. Botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A is the most studied serotype for therapeutic purposes. Regarding the gynecological pathology, a series of studies based on the efficiency of its use in the treatment of refractory myofascial pelvic pain, vaginism, dyspareunia, vulvodynia and overactive bladder or urinary incontinence have been reported. The current study is a review of the literature regarding the efficiency of BoNT-A in the gynecological pathology and on the long and short-term effects of its administration.

  4. Nelson Syndrome: Update on Therapeutic Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azad, Tej D; Veeravagu, Anand; Kumar, Sunny; Katznelson, Laurence

    2015-06-01

    To review the pathophysiology and therapeutic modalities availble for Nelson syndrome. We reviewed the current literature including managment for Nelson syndrome. For patients with NS, surgical intervention is often the first-line therapy. With refractory NS or tumors with extrasellar involvement, radiosurgery offers an important alternative or adjuvant option. Pharmacologic interventions have demonstrated limited usefulness, although recent evidence supports the feasibility of a novel somatostatin analog for patients with NS. Modern neuroimaging, improved surgical techniques, and the advent of stereotactic radiotherapy have transformed the management of NS. An up-to-date understanding of the pathophysiology underlying Nelson Syndrome and evidence-based management is imperative. Early detection may allow for more successful therapy in patients with Nelson Syndrome. Improved radiotherapeutic interventions and rapidly evolving pharmacologic therapies offer an opportunity to create targeted, multifocal treatment regiments for patients with Nelson Syndrome. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Rationally Designed Peptides and Peptidomimetics as Inhibitors of Amyloid-β (Aβ) Aggregation: Potential Therapeutics of Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Deepti; Shuaib, Suniba; Mann, Sukhmani; Goyal, Bhupesh

    2017-02-13

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease with no clinically accepted treatment to cure or halt its progression. The worldwide effort to develop peptide-based inhibitors of amyloid-β (Aβ) aggregation can be considered an unplanned combinatorial experiment. An understanding of what has been done and achieved may advance our understanding of AD pathology and the discovery of effective therapeutic agents. We review here the history of such peptide-based inhibitors, including those based on the Aβ sequence and those not derived from that sequence, containing both natural and unnatural amino acid building blocks. Peptide-based aggregation inhibitors hold significant promise for future AD therapy owing to their high selectivity, effectiveness, low toxicity, good tolerance, low accumulation in tissues, high chemical and biological diversity, possibility of rational design, and highly developed methods for analyzing their mode of action, proteolytic stability (modified peptides), and blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability.

  6. The utilization of Clinical Protocols and Therapeutic Guidelines and the rationalization of judicialization for the right to health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clarice Seixas Duarte

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes the adoption of the Clinical Protocols and Therapeutic Guidelines (CPTGs as an objective measure to be used by the courts in cases where the purpose is to offer positive benefits in terms of realization of the right to health. Such a benchmark can assist the judge in the task of deciding the legal situation of medication supplies, guaranteeing the prevalence of rationality as outlined in the formulation of related public policies and, consequently, the use of technical-political arguments in the distribution of healthcare goods and resources. However, this is not an absolute parameter, and the content of the CPTGs may be questioned, even judicially. With this, judicial action is used as an instrument of democratization and social control among public choices, which can impact health policy itself.

  7. Nanotechnology based approaches in cancer therapeutics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biswas, Amit Kumer; Islam, Md Reazul; Choudhury, Zahid Sadek; Kadir, Mohammad Fahim; Mostafa, Asif

    2014-01-01

    The current decades are marked not by the development of new molecules for the cure of various diseases but rather the development of new delivery methods for optimum treatment outcome. Nanomedicine is perhaps playing the biggest role in this concern. Nanomedicine offers numerous advantages over conventional drug delivery approaches and is particularly the hot topic in anticancer research. Nanoparticles (NPs) have many unique criteria that enable them to be incorporated in anticancer therapy. This topical review aims to look at the properties and various forms of NPs and their use in anticancer treatment, recent development of the process of identifying new delivery approaches as well as progress in clinical trials with these newer approaches. Although the outcome of cancer therapy can be increased using nanomedicine there are still many disadvantages of using this approach. We aim to discuss all these issues in this review. (review)

  8. Recent novel tumor gatekeepers and potential therapeutic approaches

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keywords: Cancer, Potent inhibitors, Gatekeepers, Therapeutic approaches, Oncogenic pathways. Tropical Journal ..... effects of the target suppression support change from a one gene .... Siegel RL, Miller KD, Jemal A. Cancer statistics, 2017.

  9. Clinical Significance: a Therapeutic Approach Topsychological Assessment in Treatment Planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afolabi Olusegun Emmanuel

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Psychological assessment has long been reported as a key component of clinical psychology. This paper examines the complexities surrounding the clinical significance of therapeutic approach to treatment planning. To achieve this objective, the paper searched and used the PsycINFO and PubMed databases and the reference sections of chapters and journal articles to analysed, 1 a strong basis for the usage of therapeutic approach to psychological assessment in treatment plans, 2 explained the conceptual meaning of clinical significant change in therapeutic assessment, 3 answered some of the questions regarding practicability and the clinical significance of therapeutic approach to treatment plans, particularly during or before treatment, 4 linked therapeutic assessment to change in clients’ clinical impression, functioning and therapeutic needs 5 analysed the empirically documenting clinically significant change in therapeutic assessment. Finally, the study suggested that though therapeutic assessment is not sufficient for the systematic study of psychotherapy outcome and process, it is still consistent with both the layman and professional expectations regarding treatment outcome and also provides a precise method for classifying clients as ‘changed’ or ‘unchanged’ on the basis of clinical significance criteria.

  10. Neuroimaging revolutionizes therapeutic approaches to chronic pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borsook David

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract An understanding of how the brain changes in chronic pain or responds to pharmacological or other therapeutic interventions has been significantly changed as a result of developments in neuroimaging of the CNS. These developments have occurred in 3 domains : (1 Anatomical Imaging which has demonstrated changes in brain volume in chronic pain; (2 Functional Imaging (fMRI that has demonstrated an altered state in the brain in chronic pain conditions including back pain, neuropathic pain, and complex regional pain syndromes. In addition the response of the brain to drugs has provided new insights into how these may modify normal and abnormal circuits (phMRI or pharmacological MRI; (3 Chemical Imaging (Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy or MRS has helped our understanding of measures of chemical changes in chronic pain. Taken together these three domains have already changed the way in which we think of pain – it should now be considered an altered brain state in which there may be altered functional connections or systems and a state that has components of degenerative aspects of the CNS.

  11. Diagnostic and therapeutic approach to hypothalamic amenorrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genazzani, Alessandro D; Ricchieri, Federica; Lanzoni, Chiara; Strucchi, Claudia; Jasonni, Valerio M

    2006-12-01

    Hypothalamic amenorrhea (HA) is a secondary amenorrhea with no evidence of endocrine/systemic causal factors, mainly related to various stressors affecting neuroendocrine control of the reproductive axis. In clinical practice, HA is mainly associated with metabolic, physical, or psychological stress. Stress is the adaptive response of our body through all its homeostatic systems, to external and/or internal stimuli that activate specific and nonspecific physiological pathways. HA occurs generally after severe stress conditions/situations such as dieting, heavy training, or intense emotional events, all situations that can induce amenorrhea with or without body weight loss and HA is a secondary amenorrhea with a diagnosis of exclusion. In fact, the diagnosis is essentially based on a good anamnestic investigation. It has to be investigated using the clinical history of the patient: occurrence of menarche, menstrual cyclicity, time and modality of amenorrhea, and it has to be exclude any endocrine disease or any metabolic (i.e., diabetes) and systemic disorders. It is necessary to identify any stress situation induced by loss, family or working problems, weight loss or eating disorders, or physical training or agonist activity. Peculiar, though not specific, endocrine investigations might be proposed but no absolute parameter can be proposed since HA is greatly dependent from individual response to stressors and/or the adaptive response to stress. This article tries to give insights into diagnosis and putative therapeutic strategies.

  12. Hypothalamic amenorrhea: from diagnosis to therapeutical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genazzani, A D; Chierchia, E; Santagni, S; Rattighieri, E; Farinetti, A; Lanzoni, C

    2010-05-01

    Among secondary amenorrheas, hypothalamic amenorrhea (HA) is the one with no evidence of endocrine/systemic causal factors. HA is mainly related to various stressors affecting neuroendocrine control of the reproductive axis. In clinical practice, HA is mainly associated with metabolic, physical, or psychological stress. Stress is the adaptive response of our body through all its homeostatic systems, to external and/or internal stimuli that activate specific and nonspecific physiological pathways. HA occurs generally after severe stressed conditions/situations such as dieting, heavy training, or intense emotional events, all situations that can induce amenorrhea with or without body weight loss and HA is a secondary amenorrhea with a diagnosis of exclusion. In fact, the diagnosis is essentially based on a good anamnestic investigation. It has to be investigated using the clinical history of the patient: occurrence of menarche, menstrual cyclicity, time and modality of amenorrhea, and it has to be excluded any endocrine disease or any metabolic (i.e., diabetes) and systemic disorders. It is necessary to identify any stressed situation induced by loss, family or working problems, weight loss or eating disorders, or physical training or agonist activity. Peculiar, though not specific, endocrine investigations might be proposed but no absolute parameter can be proposed since HA is greatly dependent from individual response to stressors and/or the adaptive response to stress. This chapter aims to give insights into diagnosis and putative therapeutic strategies. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Emerging Therapeutic Approaches to Mitochondrial Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenz, Tina; Williams, Sion L.; Bacman, Sandra R.; Moraes, Carlos T.

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondrial diseases are very heterogeneous and can affect different tissues and organs. Moreover, they can be caused by genetic defects in either nuclear or mitochondrial DNA as well as by environmental factors. All of these factors have made the development of therapies difficult. In this review article, we will discuss emerging approaches to…

  14. Therapeutic Approaches to Target Cancer Stem Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz, Arlhee; Leon, Kalet

    2011-01-01

    The clinical relevance of cancer stem cells (CSC) remains a major challenge for current cancer therapies, but preliminary findings indicate that specific targeting may be possible. Recent studies have shown that these tumor subpopulations promote tumor angiogenesis through the increased production of VEGF, whereas the VEGF neutralizing antibody bevacizumab specifically inhibits CSC growth. Moreover, nimotuzumab, a monoclonal antibody against the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) with a potent antiangiogenic activity, has been shown by our group to reduce the frequency of CSC-like subpopulations in mouse models of brain tumors when combined with ionizing radiation. These studies and subsequent reports from other groups support the relevance of approaches based on molecular-targeted therapies to selectively attack CSC. This review discusses the relevance of targeting both the EGFR and angiogenic pathways as valid approaches to this aim. We discuss the relevance of identifying better molecular markers to develop drug screening strategies that selectively target CSC

  15. Précis of bayesian rationality: The probabilistic approach to human reasoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oaksford, Mike; Chater, Nick

    2009-02-01

    According to Aristotle, humans are the rational animal. The borderline between rationality and irrationality is fundamental to many aspects of human life including the law, mental health, and language interpretation. But what is it to be rational? One answer, deeply embedded in the Western intellectual tradition since ancient Greece, is that rationality concerns reasoning according to the rules of logic--the formal theory that specifies the inferential connections that hold with certainty between propositions. Piaget viewed logical reasoning as defining the end-point of cognitive development; and contemporary psychology of reasoning has focussed on comparing human reasoning against logical standards. Bayesian Rationality argues that rationality is defined instead by the ability to reason about uncertainty. Although people are typically poor at numerical reasoning about probability, human thought is sensitive to subtle patterns of qualitative Bayesian, probabilistic reasoning. In Chapters 1-4 of Bayesian Rationality (Oaksford & Chater 2007), the case is made that cognition in general, and human everyday reasoning in particular, is best viewed as solving probabilistic, rather than logical, inference problems. In Chapters 5-7 the psychology of "deductive" reasoning is tackled head-on: It is argued that purportedly "logical" reasoning problems, revealing apparently irrational behaviour, are better understood from a probabilistic point of view. Data from conditional reasoning, Wason's selection task, and syllogistic inference are captured by recasting these problems probabilistically. The probabilistic approach makes a variety of novel predictions which have been experimentally confirmed. The book considers the implications of this work, and the wider "probabilistic turn" in cognitive science and artificial intelligence, for understanding human rationality.

  16. NGO-provided free HIV treatment and services in Burkina Faso: scarcity, therapeutic rationality and unfair process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ridde Valéry

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Until 2010, Burkina Faso was an exception to the international trend of abolishing user fees for antiretroviral treatment (ART. Patients were still expected to pay 1,500F CFA (2 Euros per month for ART. Nevertheless, many non-governmental organizations (NGOs exempted patients from payment. The objective of this study was to investigate how NGOs selected the beneficiaries of payment exemptions for government-provided ART and rationed out complementary medical and psychosocial services. For this qualitative study, we conducted 13 individual interviews and three focus group discussions (n = 13 persons with program staff in nine NGOs (4,000 patients, two NGO coordinating structures and one national program. These encounters were recorded and transcribed, and their content was thematically analyzed. The results were presented to the NGOs for feedback. Results indicate that there are no concrete guidelines for identifying patients warranting payment exemptions. Formerly, ART was scarce in Burkina Faso and the primary criterion for treatment selection was clinical. Our results suggest that this scarcity, mediated by an approach we call sociotherapeutic rationality (i.e. maximization of clinical success, may have led to inequities in the provision of free ART. This approach may be detrimental to assuring equity since the most impoverished lack resources to pay for services that maximize clinical success (e.g. viral load that would increase their chances of being selected for treatment. However, once selected into treatment, attempts were made to ration-out complementary services more equitably. This study demonstrates the risks entailed by medication scarcity, which presents NGOs and health professionals with impossible choices that run counter to the philosophy of equity in access to treatment. Amid growing concerns of an international funding retreat for ART, it is important to learn from the past in order to better manage the potentially

  17. NGO-provided free HIV treatment and services in Burkina Faso: scarcity, therapeutic rationality and unfair process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridde, Valéry; Somé, Paul Andre; Pirkle, Catherine M

    2012-03-06

    Until 2010, Burkina Faso was an exception to the international trend of abolishing user fees for antiretroviral treatment (ART). Patients were still expected to pay 1,500F CFA (2 Euros) per month for ART. Nevertheless, many non-governmental organizations (NGOs) exempted patients from payment. The objective of this study was to investigate how NGOs selected the beneficiaries of payment exemptions for government-provided ART and rationed out complementary medical and psychosocial services. For this qualitative study, we conducted 13 individual interviews and three focus group discussions (n = 13 persons) with program staff in nine NGOs (4,000 patients), two NGO coordinating structures and one national program. These encounters were recorded and transcribed, and their content was thematically analyzed. The results were presented to the NGOs for feedback. Results indicate that there are no concrete guidelines for identifying patients warranting payment exemptions. Formerly, ART was scarce in Burkina Faso and the primary criterion for treatment selection was clinical. Our results suggest that this scarcity, mediated by an approach we call sociotherapeutic rationality (i.e. maximization of clinical success), may have led to inequities in the provision of free ART. This approach may be detrimental to assuring equity since the most impoverished lack resources to pay for services that maximize clinical success (e.g. viral load) that would increase their chances of being selected for treatment. However, once selected into treatment, attempts were made to ration-out complementary services more equitably.This study demonstrates the risks entailed by medication scarcity, which presents NGOs and health professionals with impossible choices that run counter to the philosophy of equity in access to treatment. Amid growing concerns of an international funding retreat for ART, it is important to learn from the past in order to better manage the potentially inequitable consequences

  18. A rapid and rational approach to generating isomorphous heavy-atom phasing derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jinghua; Sun, Peter D

    2014-09-01

    In attempts to replace the conventional trial-and-error heavy-atom derivative search method with a rational approach, we previously defined heavy metal compound reactivity against peptide ligands. Here, we assembled a composite pH- and buffer-dependent peptide reactivity profile for each heavy metal compound to guide rational heavy-atom derivative search. When knowledge of the best-reacting heavy-atom compound is combined with mass spectrometry assisted derivatization, and with a quick-soak method to optimize phasing, it is likely that the traditional heavy-atom compounds could meet the demand of modern high-throughput X-ray crystallography. As an example, we applied this rational heavy-atom phasing approach to determine a previously unknown mouse serum amyloid A2 crystal structure. Published 2014. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  19. [Therapeutic approach to patients with neurocardiogenic syncope].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zyśko, Dorota; Gajek, Jacek; Halawa, Bogumił

    2004-11-01

    Vasovagal syncopes are the most common cause of loss of consciousness and if they occur frequently they contribute to the marked decrease of the quality of life and need treatment. One of important problems is the possibility of injury during the syncope. In older patients it can lead to the fractures of extremities, complications of which could be life-threatening. Another problem is the reaction of the surrounding people trying to help the unconscious by keeping him in the vertical position. It promotes hypotonia and could cause damage of organs such as brain or heart. The authors review the current literature on the management of patients with vasovagal syncope. It seems that the conservative approaches preferring patient reassurance and training methods are successful in syncope prevention and help avoid the side effects and complications of pharmacological therapy or pacemaker implantation. These last two methods should be reserved for patients with the most severe symptoms of the disease.

  20. MUCOLYTIC AGENTS IN PEDIATRICS: RATIONAL SELECTION, THERAPEUTIC EFFECTS AND SPECIFIC ASPECTS OF TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. I. Simonova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the cough treatment options with mucolytic agents administration at the first several days of acute respiratory tract infections in children. Efficacy of treatment with secretolytic and secretomotoric drugs significantly depends on certain factors. The article contains the criteria of therapeutic efficacy of expectorants. A special attention is given to N-acetylcysteine — a direct acting mucolytic agent, which effect is caused by presence of free sulfhydryl groups, disrupting disulfide bonds between molecules of acid mucopolysaccharides and glycoproteins therefore changing the structure of sputum. Acetylcysteine is active against every type of sputum (mucous, muco-purulent, purulent, that is especially important in treatment of bacterial infections, when it is necessary to quickly decrease sputum thickness, eliminate it from the respiratory tract and prevent dissemination of the infection. High efficacy of acetylcysteine is caused by its unique triple action: mucolytic, antioxidant and antitoxic. Mechanism of action of acetylcysteine is discussed in detail. Timely administered treatment will improve sputum discharge and therefore eliminate one of the main factors of bronchial obstruction and decrease the risk of microbial colonization of the respiratory tract. The article also includes indications, contraindications and dosage regimens of acetylcysteine in children. The most common mistakes and specific aspects of mucolytic drugs in pediatrics are listed in the conclusion. 

  1. [The therapeutic approach to drug addicts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucher, R E; Costa, P F

    1985-06-01

    Difficulties of biological, psychological, social and legal nature may be seen involved in the treatment of drug-addict persons. In this study, the major models used in the treatment are analysed, so as so one may arrived at a new model which will better integrate the various factors involved. The major models may be brought down to three: the medical psychiatric model which emphasizes the biological dependency on drugs and which equates drug addiction and "mental illness"; the behavioristic model which utilizes directive conditioning and desensitizing techniques, as well as educational and suggestional means, in order to determine new kinds of behavior; the relational model which takes origin from psychoanalysis and the systemic approach and sponsors a non-directive treatment of the drug-addict through the exploration and work on his personal and social unconscious conflicts, drive and desires, as well as his self-destructive tendencies. To assure the drug-addict a way to assume responsibility for his own behavior and to be free by respecting other people's rights, it is necessary to elaborate an integrative model of treatment which will consider also the anthropological specificity of the problems, referring also to the Brazilian society.

  2. [Diagnostic and therapeutic approach to pancreatic trauma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidali, Maria; Doulgerakis, George; Condilis, Nicolas; Karmiri, Eleni; Poygouras, Ihon; Papaioannoy, George; Ioannoy, Christos; Pierrakakis, Stefanos; Setakis, Nicolas

    2005-01-01

    The pancreatic trauma is rare, compared with the injuries of the other abdominal organs and occurs in 0.2-6 per cent of the cases of abdominal trauma. The aim of this essay is to demonstrate the Authors' experience in the treatment of five cases of pancreatic injury during the last five years, as well as to retrospect the contemporary bibliography, connected with the diagnostic and curative approach of the pancreatic trauma. The diagnosis of the pancreatic trauma is difficult and many times, late. In their experience of pancreatic trauma, the Authors ascertained the pancreatic injury during the laparotomy which was made in order to treat other abdominal injuries. The surgical techniques were chosen taking into account the extent of the injury, the detection and the existence of accompanying. Marginal resection of pancreas, splenectomy and drainage were applied to three patients, suture of the pancreas and drainage to one patient, drainage alone and treatment of synchronous rupture of the duodenum to one patient. The mortality was 0%. Came whereas the morbidity came basically on the seriousness of the accompanying injuries.

  3. Calculation of Complexity Costs – An Approach for Rationalizing a Product Program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Christian Lindschou; Mortensen, Niels Henrik; Hvam, Lars

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposes an operational method for rationalizing a product program based on the calculation of complexity costs. The method takes its starting point in the calculation of complexity costs on a product program level. This is done throughout the value chain ranging from component invento...... of a product program. These findings represent an improved decision basis for the planning of reactive and proactive initiatives of rationalizing a product program.......This paper proposes an operational method for rationalizing a product program based on the calculation of complexity costs. The method takes its starting point in the calculation of complexity costs on a product program level. This is done throughout the value chain ranging from component...... inventories at the factory sites, all the way to the distribution of finished goods from distribution centers to the customers. The method proposes a step-wise approach including the analysis, quantification and allocation of product program complexity costs by the means of identifying of a number...

  4. Production of bioinspired and rationally designed polymer hydrogels for controlled delivery of therapeutic proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung Hye

    Hydrogel systems for controlled delivery therapeutic growth factors have been developed in a wide spectrum of strategies: these systems aim for the release of growth factors via a passive diffusion, electrostatic interaction, degradation of hydrogels, and responsiveness to external stimuli. Heparin, a highly sulfated glycosaminoglycan (GAG), was employed for a targeted delivery system of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) to endothelial cells overexpressing a relevant receptor VEGFR-2. Addition of dimeric VEGF to 4-arm star-shaped poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) immobilized with low-molecular weight heparin (LMWH) afforded a non-covalently assembled hydrogel via interaction between heparin and VEGF, with storage modulus 10 Pa. The release of VEGF and hydrogel erosion reached maximum 100 % at day 4 in the presence of VEGFR-2 overexpressing pocine aortic endothelial cell (PAE/KDR), while those of 80% were achieved via passive release at day 5 in the presence of PAE cell lacking VEGFR-2 or in the absence of cell, indicating that the release of VEGF was in targeted manner toward cell receptor. The proliferation of PAE/KDR in the presence of [PEG-LMWH/VEGF] hydrogel was greater by ca. 30% at day 4 compared to that of PAE, confirming that the release of VEGF was in response to the cellular demand. The phosphorylation fraction of VEGFR-2 on PAE/KDR was greater in the presence of [PEG-LMWH/VEGF] hydrogel, increasing from 0.568 at day 1 to 0.790 at day 4, whereas it was maintained at 0.230 at day 4 in the presence of [PEG-LMWH] hydrogel. This study has proven that this hydrogel, assembled via bio-inspired non-covalent interaction, liberating VEGFon celluar demand to target cell, eroding upon VEGF release, and triggering endothelial cell proliferation, could be used in multiple applications including targeted delivery and angiogenesis. Heparin has been widely exploited in growth factor delivery systems owing to its ability to bind many growth factors through the flexible

  5. [Rationalization, rationing, prioritization: terminology and ethical approaches to the allocation of limited resources in hematology/oncology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Eva

    2011-01-01

    The field of oncology with its numerous high-priced innovations contributes considerably to the fact that medical progress is expensive. Additionally, due to the demographic changes and the increasing life expectancy, a growing number of cancer patients want to profit from this progress. Since resources are limited also in the health system, the fair distribution of the available resources urgently needs to be addressed. Dealing with scarcity is a typical problem in the domain of justice theory; therefore, this article first discusses different strategies to manage limited resources: rationalization, rationing, and prioritization. It then presents substantive as well as procedural criteria that assist in the just distribution of effective health benefits. There are various strategies to reduce the utilization of limited resources: Rationalization means that efficiency reserves are being exhausted; by means of rationing, effective health benefits are withheld due to cost considerations. Rationing can occur implicitly and thus covertly, e.g. through budgeting or the implementation of waiting periods, or explicitly, through transparent rules or policies about healthcare coverage. Ranking medical treatments according to their importance (prioritization) is often a prerequisite for rationing decisions. In terms of requirements of justice, both procedural and substantive criteria (e.g. equality, urgency, benefit) are relevant for the acceptance and quality of a decision to limit access to effective health benefits. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Therapeutic Recreation in the Community: An Inclusive Approach. Second Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Marcia Jean; LeConey, Stephen P.

    2004-01-01

    The second edition of Therapeutic Recreation in the Community: An Inclusive Approach reflects the changing and evolving nature of recreation and health care services. A number of social, economic, and political directives and technological advancements have fostered recreation in the community for all individuals. Due in part to a rising awareness…

  7. Focusing on changing clinical practice to enhance rational prescribing--collaboration and networking enable comprehensive approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helin-Salmivaara, Arja; Huupponen, Risto; Klaukka, Timo; Hoppu, Kalle

    2003-10-01

    Most western societies are enhancing rational pharmacotherapy to get best value for the constantly increasing expenditure on drugs. Government bodies and the medical profession took joint responsibility for the education programme for rational prescribing, launched in Finland at the end of the 1990s. The goals were to enhance critical thinking, and when appropriate, change prescribing behaviour. Various approaches that included evidence-based continuing medical education (CME), implementing clinical guidelines, delivering information, and providing prescribing feedback were used simultaneously. The commitment of the stakeholders and participants has been strong and the approaches have succeeded even though there is no clear outcome measure. The Government has recently decided to continue and widen the process, which started as a pilot programme, on a tight budget.

  8. The Soft Constraints Hypothesis: A Rational Analysis Approach to Resource Allocation for Interactive Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Gray, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Carnegie Building, 110 8th St., Troy, NY 12180. E-mail: grayw@rpi.edu Psychological Review Copyright 2006 by...the American Psychological Association 2006, Vol. 113, No. 3, 461–482 0033-295X/06/$12.00 DOI: 10.1037/0033-295X.113.3.461 461 Report Documentation...analysis approach from signal-detection theorists (Geisler, 2003; Macmillan & Creelman , 2004) with rational analysis (Anderson, 1990, 1991) to present an

  9. Intuition and emotion: examining two non-rational approaches in complex decision making

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Tori Yu-wen

    2012-01-01

    This thesis was designed to examine two non-rational decision approaches in individual and team decision making. In Chapter 2 (Paper 1), a normative theory about how people should use intuition in making complex decisions is proposed. I draw from extant literature to derive why allowing intuition to interrupt analysis is beneficial to complex decision processes. In Chapter 3 (Paper 2), the theory of intuitive interruptions is applied to the entrepreneurial context. I argue that allowing intui...

  10. Rationality, Intuition and Flair in Entrepreneur’s Configuration - an Epistemological Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Zoltan Raluca; Vancea Romulus

    2011-01-01

    The present paper proposes an overview of the evolution of the concept of entrepreneur in an epistemological approach. After a brief history of the concept, there are some basic economic and managerial guidelines in entrepreneur’s configuration; these guidelines are found in the work of experts in management, respectively, leading economists. Rationality, flair and intuition of the entrepreneur are then analyzed in terms of existing trends in the economy, acknowledging the entrepreneurship an...

  11. THERAPEUTIC SUPPORT OF REALIZATION OF THE COMPETENCE APPROACH IN EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktoriia A. Lykova

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The article analyses mechanisms of realization of the competence approach in education. Its therapeutic support actualizes factors of nonlinearity, processuality, subjectivity, conformity with nature, feedback in the educational environment. Behind each person there is a variety of tendencies, therefore to foresee or plan, «limit by standards» what exactly will be personally significant for a particular student in pedagogical interaction, is impossible. Therapeutic competence of teachers allows to realize individual learning pathways with support on a «fan of indicators» within a circle of competences.

  12. Plantinga\\\\\\'s Internal and External Approach toRationality of Belief in God

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Farajipak

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Various views about the rationality/irrationality of believing in God have been suggested by western religious and secular thinners. The theory of "Basicalism" together with its similar views such as "Evidentialism", "Fideism" and"Pragmatism" is one of the epistemological views posed about the belief in God and seeks to prove its rationality. In general, based on this view, believing in God does not require any rational reasoning. Various versions of this view have been presented so far.One of its versions expressed by scholars like Swinburne, Alston and Plantinga is what is known as Experientialism. In his special exposition of Experientialism – which he refers to as "reformed epistemology" –Plantinga has had two different dictions in his works. In his early woks such as God and other Minds, "Is Belief in God Rational?", "Is Belief in God Properly Basic?" and"Reformed Epistemology and Christian Apologetics", he endeavored to prove the rationality and justificationof believing in God and tried to offer certain and compelling arguments to prove the existence of God. In these works, Plantinga has adopted an internal approach toward the rationality of believing in God and regards it as a basic belief. Criticizing classic foundationalism, he sought to expand a different version of foundationalism according to which God's existence is regarded as basic for a believer. Based on this approach, Palntinga, like other proponents of foundationalism, considers the knowledgea "True Justified Belief". His view is, however, different from other foundationalists in defining the nature of the third element of knowledge. According to Plantinga's early exposition of his theory, the criteria of rationality of believing in God include the principles of classic foundationalism(such as evident to senses, evident to reason and incorrigibility and other elements. He rejected the deductive-priori method concerning the criteria of determining basic belief and

  13. Plantinga's Internal and External Approach toRationality of Belief in God

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Farajipak

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Various views about the rationality/irrationality of believing in God have been suggested by western religious and secular thinners. The theory of "Basicalism" together with its similar views such as "Evidentialism", "Fideism" and"Pragmatism" is one of the epistemological views posed about the belief in God and seeks to prove its rationality. In general, based on this view, believing in God does not require any rational reasoning. Various versions of this view have been presented so far.One of its versions expressed by scholars like Swinburne, Alston and Plantinga is what is known as Experientialism. In his special exposition of Experientialism – which he refers to as "reformed epistemology" –Plantinga has had two different dictions in his works. In his early woks such as God and other Minds, "Is Belief in God Rational?", "Is Belief in God Properly Basic?" and"Reformed Epistemology and Christian Apologetics", he endeavored to prove the rationality and justificationof believing in God and tried to offer certain and compelling arguments to prove the existence of God. In these works, Plantinga has adopted an internal approach toward the rationality of believing in God and regards it as a basic belief. Criticizing classic foundationalism, he sought to expand a different version of foundationalism according to which God's existence is regarded as basic for a believer. Based on this approach, Palntinga, like other proponents of foundationalism, considers the knowledgea "True Justified Belief". His view is, however, different from other foundationalists in defining the nature of the third element of knowledge. According to Plantinga's early exposition of his theory, the criteria of rationality of believing in God include the principles of classic foundationalism(such as evident to senses, evident to reason and incorrigibility and other elements. He rejected the deductive-priori method concerning the criteria of determining basic belief and

  14. Modified rational Legendre approach to laminar viscous flow over a semi-infinite flat plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tajvidi, T.; Razzaghi, M.; Dehghan, M.

    2008-01-01

    A numerical method for solving the classical Blasius' equation is proposed. The Blasius' equation is a third order nonlinear ordinary differential equation , which arises in the problem of the two-dimensional laminar viscous flow over a semi-infinite flat plane. The approach is based on a modified rational Legendre tau method. The operational matrices for the derivative and product of the modified rational Legendre functions are presented. These matrices together with the tau method are utilized to reduce the solution of Blasius' equation to the solution of a system of algebraic equations. A numerical evaluation is included to demonstrate the validity and applicability of the method and a comparison is made with existing results

  15. Bioinformatics approaches for identifying new therapeutic bioactive peptides in food

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nora Khaldi

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT:The traditional methods for mining foods for bioactive peptides are tedious and long. Similar to the drug industry, the length of time to identify and deliver a commercial health ingredient that reduces disease symptoms can take anything between 5 to 10 years. Reducing this time and effort is crucial in order to create new commercially viable products with clear and important health benefits. In the past few years, bioinformatics, the science that brings together fast computational biology, and efficient genome mining, is appearing as the long awaited solution to this problem. By quickly mining food genomes for characteristics of certain food therapeutic ingredients, researchers can potentially find new ones in a matter of a few weeks. Yet, surprisingly, very little success has been achieved so far using bioinformatics in mining for food bioactives.The absence of food specific bioinformatic mining tools, the slow integration of both experimental mining and bioinformatics, and the important difference between different experimental platforms are some of the reasons for the slow progress of bioinformatics in the field of functional food and more specifically in bioactive peptide discovery.In this paper I discuss some methods that could be easily translated, using a rational peptide bioinformatics design, to food bioactive peptide mining. I highlight the need for an integrated food peptide database. I also discuss how to better integrate experimental work with bioinformatics in order to improve the mining of food for bioactive peptides, therefore achieving a higher success rates.

  16. Rational screening of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ agonists from natural products: potential therapeutics for heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Rui; Wan, Jing; Song, Jing; Qian, Yan; Liu, Yong; Gu, Shuiming

    2017-12-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) is a member of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily of ligand-activated transcription factors. Activation of PPARγ pathway has been shown to enhance fatty acid oxidation, improve endothelial cell function, and decrease myocardial fibrosis in heart failure. Thus, the protein has been raised as an attractive target for heart failure therapy. This work attempted to discover new and potent PPARγ agonists from natural products using a synthetic strategy of computer virtual screening and transactivation reporter assay. A large library of structurally diverse, drug-like natural products was compiled, from which those with unsatisfactory pharmacokinetic profile and/or structurally redundant compounds were excluded. The binding mode of remaining candidates to PPARγ ligand-binding domain (LBD) was computationally modelled using molecular docking and their relative binding potency was ranked by an empirical scoring scheme. Consequently, eight commercially available hits with top scores were selected and their biological activity was determined using a cell-based reporter-gene assay. Four natural product compounds, namely ZINC13408172, ZINC4292805, ZINC44179 and ZINC901461, were identified to have high or moderate agonistic potency against human PPARγ with EC 50 values of 0.084, 2.1, 0.35 and 5.6 μM, respectively, which are comparable to or even better than that of the approved PPARγ full agonists pioglitazone (EC 50  =   0.16 μM) and rosiglitazone (EC 50  =   0.034 μM). Hydrophobic interactions and van der Waals contacts are the primary chemical forces to stabilize the complex architecture of PPARγ LBD domain with these agonist ligands, while few hydrogen bonds, salt bridges and/or π-π stacking at the complex interfaces confer selectivity and specificity for the domain-agonist recognition. The integrated in vitro-in silico screening strategy can be successfully applied to rational discovery of

  17. Therapeutic approaches to preventing cell death in Huntington disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Anna; Stockwell, Brent R

    2012-12-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases affect the lives of millions of patients and their families. Due to the complexity of these diseases and our limited understanding of their pathogenesis, the design of therapeutic agents that can effectively treat these diseases has been challenging. Huntington disease (HD) is one of several neurological disorders with few therapeutic options. HD, like numerous other neurodegenerative diseases, involves extensive neuronal cell loss. One potential strategy to combat HD and other neurodegenerative disorders is to intervene in the execution of neuronal cell death. Inhibiting neuronal cell death pathways may slow the development of neurodegeneration. However, discovering small molecule inhibitors of neuronal cell death remains a significant challenge. Here, we review candidate therapeutic targets controlling cell death mechanisms that have been the focus of research in HD, as well as an emerging strategy that has been applied to developing small molecule inhibitors-fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD). FBDD has been successfully used in both industry and academia to identify selective and potent small molecule inhibitors, with a focus on challenging proteins that are not amenable to traditional high-throughput screening approaches. FBDD has been used to generate potent leads, pre-clinical candidates, and has led to the development of an FDA approved drug. This approach can be valuable for identifying modulators of cell-death-regulating proteins; such compounds may prove to be the key to halting the progression of HD and other neurodegenerative disorders. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Therapeutic Approaches Using Riboflavin in Mitochondrial Energy Metabolism Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriques, Bárbara J; Lucas, Tânia G; Gomes, Cláudio M

    2016-01-01

    Riboflavin, or vitamin B2, plays an important role in the cell as biological precursor of FAD and FMN, two important flavin cofactors which are essential for the structure and function of flavoproteins. Riboflavin has been used in therapeutic approaches of various inborn errors of metabolism, notably in metabolic disorders resulting either from defects in proteins involved in riboflavin metabolism and transport or from defects in flavoenzymes. The scope of this review is to provide an updated perspective of clinical cases in which riboflavin was used as a potential therapeutic agent in disorders affecting mitochondrial energy metabolism. In particular, we discuss available mechanistic insights on the role of riboflavin as a pharmacological chaperone for the recovery of misfolded metabolic flavoenzymes.

  19. Internet addiction neuroscientific approaches and therapeutical implications including smartphone addiction

    CERN Document Server

    Reuter, Martin

    2017-01-01

    The second edition of this successful book provides further and in-depth insight into theoretical models dealing with Internet addiction, as well as includes new therapeutical approaches. The editors also broach the emerging topic of smartphone addiction. This book combines a scholarly introduction with state-of-the-art research in the characterization of Internet addiction. It is intended for a broad audience including scientists, students and practitioners. The first part of the book contains an introduction to Internet addiction and their pathogenesis. The second part of the book is dedicated to an in-depth review of neuroscientific findings which cover studies using a variety of biological techniques including brain imaging and molecular genetics. The third part of the book focuses on therapeutic interventions for Internet addiction. The fourth part of the present book is an extension to the first edition and deals with a new emerging potential disorder related to Internet addiction – smartphone addicti...

  20. New therapeutic approaches for treatment of tularaemia: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandrine eBOISSET

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic treatment of tularaemia is based on a few drugs, including the fluoroquinolones, the tetracyclines and the aminoglycosides. Because no effective and safe vaccine is currently available, tularaemia prophylaxis following proven exposure to F. tularensis also relies on administration of antibiotics. A number of reasons make it necessary to search for new therapeutic alternatives: the potential toxicity of first-line drugs, especially in children and pregnant women; a high rate of treatment relapses and failures, especially for severe and/or suppurated forms of the disease; and the possible use of antibiotic-resistant strains in the context of a biological threat. This review presents novel therapeutic approaches that have been explored in recent years to improve tularaemia patients’ management and prognosis. First, the activities of newly available antibiotic compounds were evaluated against F. tularensis, including tigecycline (a glycylcycline, ketolides (telithromycin and cethromycin and fluoroquinolones (moxifloxacin, gatifloxacin, trovafloxacin and grepafloxacin. The liposome delivery of some antibiotics was evaluated. The effect of antimicrobial peptides against F. tularensis was also considered. Other drugs were evaluated for their ability to suppress the intracellular multiplication of F. tularensis. The effects of the modulation of the innate immune response (especially via TLR receptors on the course of F. tularensis infection were characterized. Another approach was the administration of specific antibodies to induce passive resistance to F. tularensis infection. All of these studies highlight the need to develop new therapeutic strategies to improve the management of patients with tularaemia. Many possibilities exist, some unexplored. Moreover, it is likely that new therapeutic alternatives that are effective against this intracellular pathogen could be, at least partially, extrapolated to other human pathogens.

  1. Does an outcome-based approach to continuing medical education improve physicians' competences in rational prescribing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmaily, Hamideh M; Savage, Carl; Vahidi, Rezagoli; Amini, Abolghasem; Dastgiri, Saeed; Hult, Hakan; Dahlgren, Lars Owe; Wahlstrom, Rolf

    2009-11-01

    Continuing medical education (CME) is compulsory in Iran, and traditionally it is lecture-based, which is mostly not successful. Outcome-based education has been proposed for CME programs. To evaluate the effectiveness of an outcome-based educational intervention with a new approach based on outcomes and aligned teaching methods, on knowledge and skills of general physicians (GPs) working in primary care compared with a concurrent CME program in the field of "Rational prescribing". The method used was cluster randomized controlled design. All GPs working in six cities in one province in Iran were invited to participate. The cities were matched and randomly divided into an intervention arm for education on rational prescribing with an outcome-based approach, and a control arm for a traditional program on the same topic. Knowledge and skills were assessed using a pre- and post-test, including case scenarios. In total, 112 GPs participated. There were significant improvements in knowledge and prescribing skills after the training in the intervention arm as well as in comparison with the changes in the control arm. The overall intervention effect was 26 percentage units. The introduction of an outcome-based approach in CME appears to be effective when creating programs to improve GPs' knowledge and skills.

  2. Embodying rationality

    OpenAIRE

    Mastrogiorgio, Antonio; Petracca, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    The current notions of bounded rationality in economics share distinctive features with Simon’s original notion, which still influences the theoretical and experimental research in the fields of choice, judgment, decision making, problem solving, and social cognition. All these notions of bounded rationality are in fact equally rooted in the information-processing approach to human cognition, expressing the view that reasoning is disembodied and that it can be reduced to the processing of abs...

  3. Mathematical models for therapeutic approaches to control HIV disease transmission

    CERN Document Server

    Roy, Priti Kumar

    2015-01-01

    The book discusses different therapeutic approaches based on different mathematical models to control the HIV/AIDS disease transmission. It uses clinical data, collected from different cited sources, to formulate the deterministic as well as stochastic mathematical models of HIV/AIDS. It provides complementary approaches, from deterministic and stochastic points of view, to optimal control strategy with perfect drug adherence and also tries to seek viewpoints of the same issue from different angles with various mathematical models to computer simulations. The book presents essential methods and techniques for students who are interested in designing epidemiological models on HIV/AIDS. It also guides research scientists, working in the periphery of mathematical modeling, and helps them to explore a hypothetical method by examining its consequences in the form of a mathematical modelling and making some scientific predictions. The model equations, mathematical analysis and several numerical simulations that are...

  4. Interim analysis: A rational approach of decision making in clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Amal; Chakraborty, Bhaswat S

    2016-01-01

    Interim analysis of especially sizeable trials keeps the decision process free of conflict of interest while considering cost, resources, and meaningfulness of the project. Whenever necessary, such interim analysis can also call for potential termination or appropriate modification in sample size, study design, and even an early declaration of success. Given the extraordinary size and complexity today, this rational approach helps to analyze and predict the outcomes of a clinical trial that incorporate what is learned during the course of a study or a clinical development program. Such approach can also fill the gap by directing the resources toward relevant and optimized clinical trials between unmet medical needs and interventions being tested currently rather than fulfilling only business and profit goals.

  5. Interim analysis: A rational approach of decision making in clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amal Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Interim analysis of especially sizeable trials keeps the decision process free of conflict of interest while considering cost, resources, and meaningfulness of the project. Whenever necessary, such interim analysis can also call for potential termination or appropriate modification in sample size, study design, and even an early declaration of success. Given the extraordinary size and complexity today, this rational approach helps to analyze and predict the outcomes of a clinical trial that incorporate what is learned during the course of a study or a clinical development program. Such approach can also fill the gap by directing the resources toward relevant and optimized clinical trials between unmet medical needs and interventions being tested currently rather than fulfilling only business and profit goals.

  6. Molecular Therapeutic Approaches for Pediatric Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah K Tasian

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Approximately two thirds of children with acute myeloid leukemia (AML are cured with intensive multi-agent chemotherapy. However, primary chemorefractory and relapsed AML remains a significant source of childhood cancer mortality, highlighting the need for new therapies. Further therapy intensification with traditional cytotoxic agents is not feasible given the potential for significant toxicity to normal tissues with conventional chemotherapy and the risk for long-term end-organ dysfunction. Significant emphasis has been placed upon the development of molecularly targeted therapeutic approaches for adults and children with high-risk subtypes of AML with the goal of improving remission induction and minimizing relapse. Several promising agents are currently in clinical testing or late preclinical development for AML, including monoclonal antibodies against leukemia cell surface proteins, kinase inhibitors, proteasome inhibitors, epigenetic agents, and chimeric antigen receptor engineered T cell immunotherapies. Many of these therapies have been specifically tested in children with relapsed/refractory AML via phase 1 and 2 trials with a smaller number of new agents under phase 3 evaluation for children with de novo AML. Although successful identification and implementation of new drugs for children with AML remains a formidable challenge, enthusiasm for novel molecular therapeutic approaches is great given the potential for significant clinical benefit for children who will otherwise fail standard therapy.

  7. Therapeutic Enzymes: Applications and Approaches to Pharmacological Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yari, Maryam; Ghoshoon, Mohammad B; Vakili, Bahareh; Ghasemi, Younes

    2017-01-01

    Among therapeutic proteins, enzymes represent small and of course profitable market. They can be used to treat important, rare, and deadly diseases. Enzyme therapy is the only available treatment for certain disorders. Here, pharmaceutical enzymes are reviewed. They are categorized in four main groups, enzymes in replacement therapy, enzymes in cancer treatment, enzymes for fibrinolysis, and finally enzymes that are used topically for various treatments. Furthermore, enzyme gene therapy and future perspective of therapeutic enzymes are mentioned in brief. There are many important approved enzymes in pharmaceutical market. Several approaches such as point mutation, fusion protein designing, glycoengineering, and PEGylation were used to achieve improved enzymes. Although sometimes enzymes were engineered to facilitate production and purification process, appropriate delivery to target sites, extending half-life, and reducing immunogenicity are among the main goals of engineering approaches. Overall, enzymes play a critical role in treatment of common and rare diseases. Evaluation of new enzymes as well as improvement of approved enzymes are of the most important challenges in biotechnology. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  8. Concepts and Bounded Rationality: An Application of Niestegge's Approach to Conditional Quantum Probabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blutner, Reinhard

    2009-03-01

    Recently, Gerd Niestegge developed a new approach to quantum mechanics via conditional probabilities developing the well-known proposal to consider the Lüders-von Neumann measurement as a non-classical extension of probability conditionalization. I will apply his powerful and rigorous approach to the treatment of concepts using a geometrical model of meaning. In this model, instances are treated as vectors of a Hilbert space H. In the present approach there are at least two possibilities to form categories. The first possibility sees categories as a mixture of its instances (described by a density matrix). In the simplest case we get the classical probability theory including the Bayesian formula. The second possibility sees categories formed by a distinctive prototype which is the superposition of the (weighted) instances. The construction of prototypes can be seen as transferring a mixed quantum state into a pure quantum state freezing the probabilistic characteristics of the superposed instances into the structure of the formed prototype. Closely related to the idea of forming concepts by prototypes is the existence of interference effects. Such inference effects are typically found in macroscopic quantum systems and I will discuss them in connection with several puzzles of bounded rationality. The present approach nicely generalizes earlier proposals made by authors such as Diederik Aerts, Andrei Khrennikov, Ricardo Franco, and Jerome Busemeyer. Concluding, I will suggest that an active dialogue between cognitive approaches to logic and semantics and the modern approach of quantum information science is mandatory.

  9. [TORCH syndrome: Rational approach of pre and post natal diagnosis and treatment. Recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Neonatal Infections Sociedad Chilena de Infectología, 2016].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cofre, Fernanda; Delpiano, Luis; Labraña, Yenis; Reyes, Alejandra; Sandoval, Alejandra; Izquierdo, Giannina

    2016-04-01

    There is a lot of bacterial, viral or parasite infections who are able to be transmitted vertically from the mother to the fetus or newborn which implicates an enormous risk for it. The TORCH acronym is used universally to refer to a fetus or newborn which presents clinical features compatible with a vertically acquired infection and allows a rational diagnostic and therapeutic approach. The traditional "TORCH test" is nowadays considered not appropriate and it has been replaced for specific test for specific pathogens under well defined circumstances. The present document reviews the general characteristics, epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnostic and therapeutic options for the most frequently involved pathogens in the fetus or newborn with TORCH suspicion.

  10. Polymer Therapeutics: Biomarkers and New Approaches for Personalized Cancer Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Stuart P; Andreu, Zoraida; Vicent, María J

    2018-01-23

    Polymer therapeutics (PTs) provides a potentially exciting approach for the treatment of many diseases by enhancing aqueous solubility and altering drug pharmacokinetics at both the whole organism and subcellular level leading to improved therapeutic outcomes. However, the failure of many polymer-drug conjugates in clinical trials suggests that we may need to stratify patients in order to match each patient to the right PT. In this concise review, we hope to assess potential PT-specific biomarkers for cancer treatment, with a focus on new studies, detection methods, new models and the opportunities this knowledge will bring for the development of novel PT-based anti-cancer strategies. We discuss the various "hurdles" that a given PT faces on its passage from the syringe to the tumor (and beyond), including the passage through the bloodstream, tumor targeting, tumor uptake and the intracellular release of the active agent. However, we also discuss other relevant concepts and new considerations in the field, which we hope will provide new insight into the possible applications of PT-related biomarkers.

  11. Triple negative breast cancer: new therapeutic approaches and BRCA status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guney Eskiler, Gamze; Cecener, Gulsah; Egeli, Unal; Tunca, Berrin

    2018-05-01

    Treatment of triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) is a clinically challenging problem due to intriguing clinical and pathologic features of TNBC and natural or induced resistance to existing therapies. However, a great understanding of features of TNBC particularly associated with BRCA mutations has led to the development of different therapeutic approaches. Besides, identification of TNBC subtypes contribute to investigation of the underlying molecular differences and development of new strategies for the treatment of TNBC patients. In this review, we discussed the definition and characteristic properties of TNBC. We summarized an up-to-date description of the reported clinical trials of novel targeted strategies especially PARP inhibitors (PARPi) due to novel and highly potent for the treatment of TNBC. Additionally, we reviewed published studies which investigated the prevalence and types of BRCA1/2 mutation in breast cancer patients to assess and draw attention of association of BRCA status with TNBC. Consequently, the definition subtype of TNBC has important predictive value for the development of new therapeutic agents in the treatment of TNBC. Additionally, the incidence and types of mutations in BRCA-related pathways may be affected by ethnic origin and contribute to the risk of developing TNBC. © 2018 APMIS. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: Insights into the Therapeutic Approach with Inositols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sortino, Maria A.; Salomone, Salvatore; Carruba, Michele O.; Drago, Filippo

    2017-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is characterized by hormonal abnormalities that cause menstrual irregularity and reduce ovulation rate and fertility, associated to insulin resistance. Myo-inositol (cis-1,2,3,5-trans-4,6-cyclohexanehexol, MI) and D-chiro-inositol (cis-1,2,4-trans-3,5,6-cyclohexanehexol, DCI) represent promising treatments for PCOS, having shown some therapeutic benefits without substantial side effects. Because the use of inositols for treating PCOS is widespread, a deep understanding of this treatment option is needed, both in terms of potential mechanisms and efficacy. This review summarizes the current knowledge on the biological effects of MI and DCI and the results obtained from relevant intervention studies with inositols in PCOS. Based on the published results, both MI and DCI represent potential valid therapeutic approaches for the treatment of insulin resistance and its associated metabolic and reproductive disorders, such as those occurring in women affected by PCOS. Furthermore, the combination MI/DCI seems also effective and might be even superior to either inositol species alone. However, based on available data, a particular MI:DCI ratio to be administered to PCOS patients cannot be established. Further studies are then necessary to understand the real contents of MI or DCI uptaken by the ovary following oral administration in order to identify optimal doses and/or combination ratios. PMID:28642705

  13. Rational Discovery of (+) (S) Abscisic Acid as a Potential Antifungal Agent: a Repurposing Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khedr, Mohammed A; Massarotti, Alberto; Mohamed, Maged E

    2018-06-04

    Fungal infections are spreading widely worldwide, and the types of treatment are limited due to the lack of diverse therapeutic agents and their associated side effects and toxicity. The discovery of new antifungal classes is vital and critical. We discovered the antifungal activity of abscisic acid through a rational drug design methodology that included the building of homology models for fungal chorismate mutases and a pharmacophore model derived from a transition state inhibitor. Ligand-based virtual screening resulted in some hits that were filtered using molecular docking and molecular dynamic simulations studies. Both in silico methods and in vitro antifungal assays were used as tools to select and validate the abscisic acid repurposing. Abscisic acid inhibition assays confirmed the inhibitory effect of abscisic acid on chorismate mutase through the inhibition of phenylpyruvate production. The repositioning of abscisic acid, the well-known and naturally occurring plant growth regulator, as a potential antifungal agent because of its suggested action as an inhibitor to several fungal chorismate mutases was the main result of this work.

  14. Targeting the Nrf2/Amyloid-Beta Liaison in Alzheimer's Disease: A Rational Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoni, Elena; Serafini, Melania M; Caporaso, Roberta; Marchetti, Chiara; Racchi, Marco; Minarini, Anna; Bartolini, Manuela; Lanni, Cristina; Rosini, Michela

    2017-07-19

    Amyloid is a prominent feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Yet, a linear linkage between amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) and the disease onset and progression has recently been questioned. In this context, the crucial partnership between Aβ and Nrf2 pathways is acquiring paramount importance, offering prospects for deciphering the Aβ-centered disease network. Here, we report on a new class of antiaggregating agents rationally designed to simultaneously activate transcription-based antioxidant responses, whose lead 1 showed interesting properties in a preliminary investigation. Relying on the requirements of Aβ recognition, we identified the catechol derivative 12. In SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells, 12 combined remarkable free radical scavenger properties to the ability to trigger the Nrf2 pathway and induce the Nrf2-dependent defensive gene NQO1 by means of electrophilic activation of the transcriptional response. Moreover, 12 prevented the formation of cytotoxic stable oligomeric intermediates, being significantly more effective, and per se less toxic, than prototype 1. More importantly, as different chemical features were exploited to regulate Nrf2 and Aβ activities, the two pathways could be tuned independently. These findings point to compound 12 and its derivatives as promising tools for investigating the therapeutic potential of the Nrf2/Aβ cellular network, laying foundation for generating new drug leads to confront AD.

  15. OSTEOARTHRITIS: CURRENT CLINICAL CONCEPT AND SOME PROMISING THERAPEUTIC APPROACHES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. E. Karateev

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, there has been a trend toward changing the clinical concept of osteoarthritis (OA. This disease has been considered as an age-related disease and the long-term result of a current pathological process for a very long time. However, many experts are now inclined to consider it necessary to identify the early, pre-X-ray stage of OA, when adequate treatment may not only halt the progression, but also achieve the regression of joint structural changes. This review deals with a number of pathogenetic and clinical aspects of the early stages of OA, which are important for timely diagnosis and pathogenetic therapy choice. It also considers some therapeutic approaches, both a "classic" and recently actively discussed methods for using platelet-rich plasma and autologous chondrocyte transplantation.

  16. Control of Bovine Mastitis: Old and Recent Therapeutic Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Fernanda; Henriques, Mariana

    2016-04-01

    Mastitis is defined as the inflammatory response resulting of the infection of the udder tissue and it is reported in numerous species, namely in domestic dairy animals. This pathology is the most frequent disease of dairy cattle and can be potentially fatal. Mastitis is an economically important pathology associated with reduced milk production, changes in milk composition and quality, being considered one of the most costly to dairy industry. Therefore, the majority of research in the field has focused on control of bovine mastitis and many efforts are being made for the development of new and effective anti-mastitis drugs. Antibiotic treatment is an established component of mastitis control programs; however, the continuous search for new therapeutic alternatives, effective in the control and treatment of bovine mastitis, is urgent. This review will provide an overview of some conventional and emerging approaches in the management of bovine mastitis' infections.

  17. Bounded Rational Managers Struggle with Talent Management - An Agent-based Modelling Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adamsen, Billy; Thomsen, Svend Erik

    This study applies an agent-based modeling approach to explore some aspects of an important managerial task: finding and cultivating talented individuals capable of creating value for their organization at some future state. Given that the term talent in talent management is an empty signifier...... and its denotative meaning floating, we propose that bounded rational managers base their decisions on a simple heuristic, i.e. selecting and cultivating individuals so that their capabilities resemble their own capabilities the most (Adamsen 2015). We model the consequences of this talent management...... heuristic by varying the capabilities of today’s managers, which in turn impact which individuals will be selected as talent. We model the average level of capabilities and the distribution thereof in the sample where managers identify and select individuals from. We consider varying degrees of path...

  18. Fetal stem cells and skeletal muscle regeneration: a therapeutic approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michela ePozzobon

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available More than 40% of the body mass is represented by muscle tissue, which possesses the innate ability to regenerate after damage through the activation of muscle specific stem cell, namely satellite cells. Muscle diseases, in particular chronic degenerative state of skeletal muscle such as dystrophies, lead to a perturbation of the regenerative process, which causes the premature exhaustion of satellite cell reservoir due to continue cycles of degeneration/regeneration. Nowadays, the research is focused on different therapeutic approaches, ranging from gene and cell to pharmacological therapy, but still there is not a definitive cure in particular for genetic muscle disease. Taking this in mind, in this article we will give special consideration to muscle diseases and the use of fetal derived stem cells as new approach for therapy. Cells of fetal origin, from cord blood to placenta and amniotic fluid, can be easily obtained without ethical concern, expanded and differentiated in culture, and possess immunemodulatory properties. The in vivo approach in animal models can be helpful to study the mechanism underneath the operating principle of the stem cell reservoir, namely the niche, which holds great potential to understand the onset of muscle pathologies.

  19. Genome Editing: A New Approach to Human Therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porteus, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    The ability to manipulate the genome with precise spatial and nucleotide resolution (genome editing) has been a powerful research tool. In the past decade, the tools and expertise for using genome editing in human somatic cells and pluripotent cells have increased to such an extent that the approach is now being developed widely as a strategy to treat human disease. The fundamental process depends on creating a site-specific DNA double-strand break (DSB) in the genome and then allowing the cell's endogenous DSB repair machinery to fix the break such that precise nucleotide changes are made to the DNA sequence. With the development and discovery of several different nuclease platforms and increasing knowledge of the parameters affecting different genome editing outcomes, genome editing frequencies now reach therapeutic relevance for a wide variety of diseases. Moreover, there is a series of complementary approaches to assessing the safety and toxicity of any genome editing process, irrespective of the underlying nuclease used. Finally, the development of genome editing has raised the issue of whether it should be used to engineer the human germline. Although such an approach could clearly prevent the birth of people with devastating and destructive genetic diseases, questions remain about whether human society is morally responsible enough to use this tool.

  20. The common risk factor approach: a rational basis for promoting oral health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheiham, A; Watt, R G

    2000-12-01

    Conventional oral health education is not effective nor efficient. Many oral health programmes are developed and implemented in isolation from other health programmes. This often leads, at best to a duplication of effort, or worse, conflicting messages being delivered to the public. In addition, oral health programmes tend to concentrate on individual behaviour change and largely ignore the influence of socio-political factors as the key determinants of health. Based upon the general principles of health promotion this paper presents a rationale for an alternative approach for oral health policy. The common risk factor approach addresses risk factors common to many chronic conditions within the context of the wider socio-environmental milieu. Oral health is determined by diet, hygiene, smoking, alcohol use, stress and trauma. As these causes are common to a number of other chronic diseases, adopting a collaborative approach is more rational than one that is disease specific. The common risk factor approach can be implemented in a variety of ways. Food policy development and the Health Promoting Schools initiative are used as examples of effective ways of promoting oral health.

  1. Rational design of modular circuits for gene transcription: A test of the bottom-up approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giordano Emanuele

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most of synthetic circuits developed so far have been designed by an ad hoc approach, using a small number of components (i.e. LacI, TetR and a trial and error strategy. We are at the point where an increasing number of modular, inter-changeable and well-characterized components is needed to expand the construction of synthetic devices and to allow a rational approach to the design. Results We used interchangeable modular biological parts to create a set of novel synthetic devices for controlling gene transcription, and we developed a mathematical model of the modular circuits. Model parameters were identified by experimental measurements from a subset of modular combinations. The model revealed an unexpected feature of the lactose repressor system, i.e. a residual binding affinity for the operator site by induced lactose repressor molecules. Once this residual affinity was taken into account, the model properly reproduced the experimental data from the training set. The parameters identified in the training set allowed the prediction of the behavior of networks not included in the identification procedure. Conclusions This study provides new quantitative evidences that the use of independent and well-characterized biological parts and mathematical modeling, what is called a bottom-up approach to the construction of gene networks, can allow the design of new and different devices re-using the same modular parts.

  2. Therapeutic Approaches to Delay the Onset of Alzheimer's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raj Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The key cytopathologies in the brains of Alzheimer's disease (AD patients include mitochondrial dysfunction and energy hypometabolism, which are likely caused by the accumulation of small aggregates of amyloid-β (Aβ peptides. Thus, targeting these two abnormalities of the AD brain may hold promising therapeutic value for delaying the onset of AD. In his paper, we discuss two potential approaches to delay the onset of AD. The first is the use of low dose of diaminophenothiazins (redox active agents to prevent mitochondrial dysfunction and to attenuate energy hypometabolism. Diaminophenothiazines enhance mitochondrial metabolic activity and heme synthesis, both key factors in intermediary metabolism of the AD brain.The second is to use the naturally occurring osmolytes to prevent the formation of toxic forms of Aβ and prevent oxidative stress. Scientific evidence suggests that both approaches may change course of the basic mechanism of neurodegeneration in AD. Osmolytes are brain metabolites which accumulate in tissues at relatively high concentrations following stress conditions. Osmolytes enhance thermodynamic stability of proteins by stabilizing natively-folded protein conformation, thus preventing aggregation without perturbing other cellular processes. Osmolytes may inhibit the formation of Aβ oligomers in vivo, thus preventing the formation of soluble oligomers. The potential significance of combining diaminophenothiazins and osmolytes to treat AD is discussed.

  3. Novel approach to cancer therapeutics using comparative cancer biology

    OpenAIRE

    Revi, Bhindu

    2018-01-01

    Developing personalized cancer therapies based on cancer genomics methodologies forms the basis for future cancer therapeutics. A genomics platform was developed based on canine cancer to produce a proof-of-concept for personalized genomics led therapeutic choices but also developing personalized therapeutics for canine cancer patients themselves. The platform identified the genetic state of a canine cancer patient within two drugable pathways; p53 and HSP90/IRF1. The former ge...

  4. Fit for purpose? Introducing a rational priority setting approach into a community care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelissen, Evelyn; Mitton, Craig; Davidson, Alan; Reid, Colin; Hole, Rachelle; Visockas, Anne-Marie; Smith, Neale

    2016-06-20

    Purpose - Program budgeting and marginal analysis (PBMA) is a priority setting approach that assists decision makers with allocating resources. Previous PBMA work establishes its efficacy and indicates that contextual factors complicate priority setting, which can hamper PBMA effectiveness. The purpose of this paper is to gain qualitative insight into PBMA effectiveness. Design/methodology/approach - A Canadian case study of PBMA implementation. Data consist of decision-maker interviews pre (n=20), post year-1 (n=12) and post year-2 (n=9) of PBMA to examine perceptions of baseline priority setting practice vis-à-vis desired practice, and perceptions of PBMA usability and acceptability. Findings - Fit emerged as a key theme in determining PBMA effectiveness. Fit herein refers to being of suitable quality and form to meet the intended purposes and needs of the end-users, and includes desirability, acceptability, and usability dimensions. Results confirm decision-maker desire for rational approaches like PBMA. However, most participants indicated that the timing of the exercise and the form in which PBMA was applied were not well-suited for this case study. Participant acceptance of and buy-in to PBMA changed during the study: a leadership change, limited organizational commitment, and concerns with organizational capacity were key barriers to PBMA adoption and thereby effectiveness. Practical implications - These findings suggest that a potential way-forward includes adding a contextual readiness/capacity assessment stage to PBMA, recognizing organizational complexity, and considering incremental adoption of PBMA's approach. Originality/value - These insights help us to better understand and work with priority setting conditions to advance evidence-informed decision making.

  5. Revising Rationality: The Use of "Nudge" Approaches in Neoliberal Education Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradbury, Alice; McGimpsey, Ian; Santori, Diego

    2013-01-01

    This article argues that the concept of rationality is undergoing significant revision in UK education policy-making, influenced by developments in several academic fields. This article focuses on the take up of behavioural economics in policy as one aspect of this revision of the concept of rationality, discussing how this has happened and its…

  6. The Rational Approach to Budget Cuts: One University's Experience. ASHE 1987 Annual Meeting Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Cynthia

    The experiences of the University of Montreal in using a rational-analytic framework to allocate resources at a time of budget costs are discussed. The following characteristics for rational decision-making are identified and applied to the University of Montreal: whether goals were known, whether alternative methods of resource allocation were…

  7. Teaching a Rational Approach to Career Decision Making: Who Benefits Most?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumboltz, John D.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Rational, intuitive, fatalistic, and dependent decision makers were compared on how much they learned from a rational decision-making training intervention. Individuals who had been highly impulsive, dependent, or fatalistic in prior course selections and those who exhibited dependency in prior job choices appeared to learn most from the rational…

  8. Therapeutical Approach of Osteoporosis — a Multidisciplinary Issue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camelia Gliga

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Osteoporosis is the most frequent systemic disease of the bone, that affects elderly, mainly women in menopause. It can be defined by lowering of bone mass and microarchitectural deterioration of the bone tissue, resulting in an increased bone fragility. Main complications of osteoporosis are fractures of the vertebrae, hips and forearm. In view of its large variety of causes and manifestations, diagnostic and therapeutical approach in osteoporosis represents a multidisciplinary issue. The accurate diagnosis of osteoporosis is based on a method that measures the bone mineral density, expressed by the T-score, using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry, so called DXA. Lately, in practice in order for establishing the risk of osteoporosis and osteoporotic fracture the FRAX tool is increasingly used (The Fracture Risk Assessment. Treatment of osteoporosis is complex involving non-pharmacological and pharmacological measures. Non-pharmacological methods include preventive measures like exercise, external hip protectors, increase of dietary intake of calcium, vitamin D and proteins, especially in elderly, over 65 years. Pharmacological measures are represented by different types of drugs, including biphosphonates, bone formation stimulatory drugs, agents with new mechanisms of action, hormone replacement therapy and they will be indicated only after a detailed clinical and paraclinical examination of the patient. Regardless of the chosen pharmacological measure, periodical follow-up of efficacy, side-effects and complications of antiosteoporotic treatment, by clinical examination and laboratory investigations targeting bone remodelling, is strongly indicated.

  9. Silver Nanoparticles: Synthesis, Characterization, Properties, Applications, and Therapeutic Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xi-Feng; Liu, Zhi-Guo; Shen, Wei; Gurunathan, Sangiliyandi

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in nanoscience and nanotechnology radically changed the way we diagnose, treat, and prevent various diseases in all aspects of human life. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are one of the most vital and fascinating nanomaterials among several metallic nanoparticles that are involved in biomedical applications. AgNPs play an important role in nanoscience and nanotechnology, particularly in nanomedicine. Although several noble metals have been used for various purposes, AgNPs have been focused on potential applications in cancer diagnosis and therapy. In this review, we discuss the synthesis of AgNPs using physical, chemical, and biological methods. We also discuss the properties of AgNPs and methods for their characterization. More importantly, we extensively discuss the multifunctional bio-applications of AgNPs; for example, as antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral, anti-inflammatory, anti-angiogenic, and anti-cancer agents, and the mechanism of the anti-cancer activity of AgNPs. In addition, we discuss therapeutic approaches and challenges for cancer therapy using AgNPs. Finally, we conclude by discussing the future perspective of AgNPs. PMID:27649147

  10. Smoking and atherosclerosis: mechanisms of disease and new therapeutic approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siasos, Gerasimos; Tsigkou, Vasiliki; Kokkou, Eleni; Oikonomou, Evangelos; Vavuranakis, Manolis; Vlachopoulos, Charalambos; Verveniotis, Alexis; Limperi, Maria; Genimata, Vasiliki; Papavassiliou, Athanasios G; Stefanadis, Christodoulos; Tousoulis, Dimitris

    2014-01-01

    It has been clear that at least 1 billion adults worldwide are smokers and at least 700 million children are passive smokers at home. Smoking exerts a detrimental effect to many organ systems and is responsible for illnesses such as lung cancer, pneumonia, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, cancer of head and neck, cancer of the urinary and gastrointestinal tract, periodontal disease, cataract and arthritis. Additionally, smoking is an important modifiable risk factor for the development of cardiovascular disease such as coronary artery disease, stable angina, acute coronary syndromes, sudden death, stroke, peripheral vascular disease, congestive heart failure, erectile dysfunction and aortic aneurysms via initiation and progression of atherosclerosis. A variety of studies has proved that cigarette smoking induces oxidative stress, vascular inflammation, platelet coagulation, vascular dysfunction and impairs serum lipid pro-file in both current and chronic smokers, active and passive smokers and results in detrimental effects on the cardiovascular system. The aim of this review is to depict the physical and biochemical properties of cigarette smoke and, furthermore, elucidate the main pathophysiological mechanisms of cigarette-induced atherosclerosis and overview the new therapeutic approaches for smoking cessation and augmentation of cardiovascular health.

  11. Remodeling Functional Connectivity in Multiple Sclerosis: A Challenging Therapeutic Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stampanoni Bassi, Mario; Gilio, Luana; Buttari, Fabio; Maffei, Pierpaolo; Marfia, Girolama A; Restivo, Domenico A; Centonze, Diego; Iezzi, Ennio

    2017-01-01

    Neurons in the central nervous system are organized in functional units interconnected to form complex networks. Acute and chronic brain damage disrupts brain connectivity producing neurological signs and/or symptoms. In several neurological diseases, particularly in Multiple Sclerosis (MS), structural imaging studies cannot always demonstrate a clear association between lesion site and clinical disability, originating the "clinico-radiological paradox." The discrepancy between structural damage and disability can be explained by a complex network perspective. Both brain networks architecture and synaptic plasticity may play important roles in modulating brain networks efficiency after brain damage. In particular, long-term potentiation (LTP) may occur in surviving neurons to compensate network disconnection. In MS, inflammatory cytokines dramatically interfere with synaptic transmission and plasticity. Importantly, in addition to acute and chronic structural damage, inflammation could contribute to reduce brain networks efficiency in MS leading to worse clinical recovery after a relapse and worse disease progression. These evidence suggest that removing inflammation should represent the main therapeutic target in MS; moreover, as synaptic plasticity is particularly altered by inflammation, specific strategies aimed at promoting LTP mechanisms could be effective for enhancing clinical recovery. Modulation of plasticity with different non-invasive brain stimulation (NIBS) techniques has been used to promote recovery of MS symptoms. Better knowledge of features inducing brain disconnection in MS is crucial to design specific strategies to promote recovery and use NIBS with an increasingly tailored approach.

  12. Remodeling Functional Connectivity in Multiple Sclerosis: A Challenging Therapeutic Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Stampanoni Bassi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Neurons in the central nervous system are organized in functional units interconnected to form complex networks. Acute and chronic brain damage disrupts brain connectivity producing neurological signs and/or symptoms. In several neurological diseases, particularly in Multiple Sclerosis (MS, structural imaging studies cannot always demonstrate a clear association between lesion site and clinical disability, originating the “clinico-radiological paradox.” The discrepancy between structural damage and disability can be explained by a complex network perspective. Both brain networks architecture and synaptic plasticity may play important roles in modulating brain networks efficiency after brain damage. In particular, long-term potentiation (LTP may occur in surviving neurons to compensate network disconnection. In MS, inflammatory cytokines dramatically interfere with synaptic transmission and plasticity. Importantly, in addition to acute and chronic structural damage, inflammation could contribute to reduce brain networks efficiency in MS leading to worse clinical recovery after a relapse and worse disease progression. These evidence suggest that removing inflammation should represent the main therapeutic target in MS; moreover, as synaptic plasticity is particularly altered by inflammation, specific strategies aimed at promoting LTP mechanisms could be effective for enhancing clinical recovery. Modulation of plasticity with different non-invasive brain stimulation (NIBS techniques has been used to promote recovery of MS symptoms. Better knowledge of features inducing brain disconnection in MS is crucial to design specific strategies to promote recovery and use NIBS with an increasingly tailored approach.

  13. Endoscopic Therapeutic Approach for Dysplasia in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Noh Hong

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Long-standing intestinal inflammation in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD induces dysplastic change in the intestinal mucosa and increases the risk of subsequent colorectal cancer. The evolving endoscopic techniques and technologies, including dye spraying methods and high-definition images, have been replacing random biopsies and have been revealed as more practical and efficient for detection of dysplasia in IBD patients. In addition, they have potential usefulness in detailed characterization of lesions and in the assessment of endoscopic resectability. Most dysplastic lesions without an unclear margin, definite ulceration, non-lifting sign, and high index of malignant change with suspicion for lymph node or distant metastases can be removed endoscopically. However, endoscopic resection of dysplasia in chronic IBD patients is usually difficult because it is often complicated by submucosal fibrosis. In patients with dysplasias that demonstrate submucosa fibrosis or a large size (≥20 mm, endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD or ESD with snaring (simplified or hybrid ESD is an alternative option and may avoid a colectomy. However, a standardized endoscopic therapeutic approach for dysplasia in IBD has not been established yet, and dedicated specialized endoscopists with interest in IBD are needed to fully investigate recent emerging techniques and technologies.

  14. Adapting Rational Unified Process (RUP) approach in designing a secure e-Tendering model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohd, Haslina; Robie, Muhammad Afdhal Muhammad; Baharom, Fauziah; Darus, Norida Muhd; Saip, Mohamed Ali; Yasin, Azman

    2016-08-01

    e-Tendering is an electronic processing of the tender document via internet and allow tenderer to publish, communicate, access, receive and submit all tender related information and documentation via internet. This study aims to design the e-Tendering system using Rational Unified Process approach. RUP provides a disciplined approach on how to assign tasks and responsibilities within the software development process. RUP has four phases that can assist researchers to adjust the requirements of various projects with different scope, problem and the size of projects. RUP is characterized as a use case driven, architecture centered, iterative and incremental process model. However the scope of this study only focusing on Inception and Elaboration phases as step to develop the model and perform only three of nine workflows (business modeling, requirements, analysis and design). RUP has a strong focus on documents and the activities in the inception and elaboration phases mainly concern the creation of diagrams and writing of textual descriptions. The UML notation and the software program, Star UML are used to support the design of e-Tendering. The e-Tendering design based on the RUP approach can contribute to e-Tendering developers and researchers in e-Tendering domain. In addition, this study also shows that the RUP is one of the best system development methodology that can be used as one of the research methodology in Software Engineering domain related to secured design of any observed application. This methodology has been tested in various studies in certain domains, such as in Simulation-based Decision Support, Security Requirement Engineering, Business Modeling and Secure System Requirement, and so forth. As a conclusion, these studies showed that the RUP one of a good research methodology that can be adapted in any Software Engineering (SE) research domain that required a few artifacts to be generated such as use case modeling, misuse case modeling, activity

  15. The effects of antibiotics on the microbiome throughout development and alternative approaches for therapeutic modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langdon, Amy; Crook, Nathan; Dantas, Gautam

    2016-04-13

    The widespread use of antibiotics in the past 80 years has saved millions of human lives, facilitated technological progress and killed incalculable numbers of microbes, both pathogenic and commensal. Human-associated microbes perform an array of important functions, and we are now just beginning to understand the ways in which antibiotics have reshaped their ecology and the functional consequences of these changes. Mounting evidence shows that antibiotics influence the function of the immune system, our ability to resist infection, and our capacity for processing food. Therefore, it is now more important than ever to revisit how we use antibiotics. This review summarizes current research on the short-term and long-term consequences of antibiotic use on the human microbiome, from early life to adulthood, and its effect on diseases such as malnutrition, obesity, diabetes, and Clostridium difficile infection. Motivated by the consequences of inappropriate antibiotic use, we explore recent progress in the development of antivirulence approaches for resisting infection while minimizing resistance to therapy. We close the article by discussing probiotics and fecal microbiota transplants, which promise to restore the microbiota after damage of the microbiome. Together, the results of studies in this field emphasize the importance of developing a mechanistic understanding of gut ecology to enable the development of new therapeutic strategies and to rationally limit the use of antibiotic compounds.

  16. Tools in the orbit space approach to the study of invariant functions: rational parametrization of strata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sartori, G; Valente, G

    2003-01-01

    Functions which are equivariant or invariant under the transformations of a compact linear group G acting in a Euclidean space R n , can profitably be studied as functions defined in the orbit space of the group. The orbit space is the union of a finite set of strata, which are semialgebraic manifolds formed by the G-orbits with the same orbit-type. In this paper, we provide a simple recipe to obtain rational parametrizations of the strata. Our results can be easily exploited, in many physical contexts where the study of equivariant or invariant functions is important, for instance in the determination of patterns of spontaneous symmetry breaking, in the analysis of phase spaces and structural phase transitions (Landau theory), in equivariant bifurcation theory, in crystal field theory and in most areas where use is made of symmetry-adapted functions. A physically significant example of utilization of the recipe is given, related to spontaneous polarization in chiral biaxial liquid crystals, where the advantages with respect to previous heuristic approaches are shown

  17. Tools in the orbit space approach to the study of invariant functions: rational parametrization of strata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sartori, G; Valente, G [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Padova and INFN, Sezione di Padova, I-35131 Padova (Italy)

    2003-02-21

    Functions which are equivariant or invariant under the transformations of a compact linear group G acting in a Euclidean space R{sup n}, can profitably be studied as functions defined in the orbit space of the group. The orbit space is the union of a finite set of strata, which are semialgebraic manifolds formed by the G-orbits with the same orbit-type. In this paper, we provide a simple recipe to obtain rational parametrizations of the strata. Our results can be easily exploited, in many physical contexts where the study of equivariant or invariant functions is important, for instance in the determination of patterns of spontaneous symmetry breaking, in the analysis of phase spaces and structural phase transitions (Landau theory), in equivariant bifurcation theory, in crystal field theory and in most areas where use is made of symmetry-adapted functions. A physically significant example of utilization of the recipe is given, related to spontaneous polarization in chiral biaxial liquid crystals, where the advantages with respect to previous heuristic approaches are shown.

  18. A rationalized approach to the imaging of space-occupying lesions in the liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engelbrecht, H.E.

    1985-01-01

    A rational approach to the imaging of mass lesions within the liver has been presented. An attempt has been made to advocate a philosophy which emphasizes the importance of considering pathological, biochemical, clinical and likely management criteria in each case before selecting a first-line imaging procedure. The subject is presented under three headings: i) What That is, clinical and pathological criteria for assesing the nature of a suspected space-occupying lesion in the liver; ii) Why That is a projection of the likely practical value of the result; iii) How That is determination of a logical imaging program depending on the assesment of criteria under the first two headings. The following examples of active treatment are discussed: partial hepotectomy, highly vascular lesions, toxaemia and pyrexia. The following factors influence the decision of the imaging procedure to be used: the accuracy of the modality in relation to the suspected lesion, local availability of equipment and expentise, invasive versus non-invasive aspects and cost-effectiveness

  19. Renal denervation: a new therapeutic approach for resistant hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Longxing; Fu, Qiang; Wang, Binghui; Li, Zhiliang

    2014-01-01

    To review the advances in studies on renal denervation. References concerning renal denervation and resistant hypertension cited in this review were collected from PubMed published in English and those of renal denervation devices from official websites of device manufacturers up to January 2014. Articles with keywords "renal denervation" and "resistant hypertension" were selected. Renal and systemic sympathetic overactivity plays an important role in pathology of hypertension as well as other diseases characterized by sympathetic overactivity. Renal denervation is a new, catheter based procedure to reduce renal and systemic sympathetic overactivity by disruption of renal sympathetic efferent and afferent nerves through radiofrequency or ultrasound energy delivered to the endoluminal surface of both renal arteries. Although several studies have shown the efficacy and safety of renal denervation in the treatment of resistant hypertension and the potential benefit of the procedure in other diseases, Symplicity HTN 3 study, the most rigorous clinical trial of renal denervation to date, failed to meet its primary endpoint. The procedure also has other limitations such as the lack of long term, efficacy and safety data and the lack of the predictors for the blood pressure lowering response and nonresponse to the procedure. An overview of current renal denervation devices holding Conformité Européenne mark is also included in this review. Renal denervation is a promising therapeutic approach in the management of resistant hypertension and other diseases characterized by sympathetic overactivity. In its early stage of clinical application, the efficacy of the procedure is still controversial. Large scale, blind, randomized, controlled clinical trials are still necessary to address the limitations of the procedure.

  20. Cognition As a Therapeutic Target in the Suicidal Patient Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Antônio Geraldo; Malloy-Diniz, Leandro Fernandes; Garcia, Marina Saraiva; Figueiredo, Carlos Guilherme Silva; Figueiredo, Renata Nayara; Diaz, Alexandre Paim; Palha, António Pacheco

    2018-01-01

    The current considerations about completed suicides and suicide attempts in different cultures call the attention of professionals to this serious public health problem. Integrative approaches have shown that the confluence of multiple biological and social factors modulate various psychopathologies and dysfunctional behaviors, such as suicidal behavior. Considering the level of intermediate analysis, personality traits and cognitive functioning are also of great importance for understanding the suicide phenomenon. About cognitive factors, we can group them into cognitive schemas of reality interpretation and underlying cognitive processes. On the other hand, different types of primary cognitive alterations are related to suicidal behavior, especially those resulting from changes in frontostriatal circuits. Among such cognitive mechanisms can be highlighted the attentional bias for environmental cues related to suicide, impulsive behavior, verbal fluency deficits, non-adaptive decision-making, and reduced planning skills. Attentional bias consists in the effect of thoughts and emotions, frequently not conscious, about the perception of environmental stimuli. Suicidal ideation and hopelessness can make the patient unable to find alternative solutions to their problems other than suicide, biasing their attention to environmental cues related to such behavior. Recent research efforts are directed to assess the possible use of attention bias as a therapeutic target in patients presenting suicide behavior. The relationship between impulsivity and suicide has been largely investigated over the last decades, and there is still controversy about the theme. Although there is strong evidence linking impulsivity to suicide attempts. Effective interventions address to reduce impulsivity in clinical populations at higher risk for suicide could help in the prevention. Deficits in problem-solving ability also seem to be distorted in patients who attempt suicide. Understanding

  1. Cognition As a Therapeutic Target in the Suicidal Patient Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antônio Geraldo da Silva

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The current considerations about completed suicides and suicide attempts in different cultures call the attention of professionals to this serious public health problem. Integrative approaches have shown that the confluence of multiple biological and social factors modulate various psychopathologies and dysfunctional behaviors, such as suicidal behavior. Considering the level of intermediate analysis, personality traits and cognitive functioning are also of great importance for understanding the suicide phenomenon. About cognitive factors, we can group them into cognitive schemas of reality interpretation and underlying cognitive processes. On the other hand, different types of primary cognitive alterations are related to suicidal behavior, especially those resulting from changes in frontostriatal circuits. Among such cognitive mechanisms can be highlighted the attentional bias for environmental cues related to suicide, impulsive behavior, verbal fluency deficits, non-adaptive decision-making, and reduced planning skills. Attentional bias consists in the effect of thoughts and emotions, frequently not conscious, about the perception of environmental stimuli. Suicidal ideation and hopelessness can make the patient unable to find alternative solutions to their problems other than suicide, biasing their attention to environmental cues related to such behavior. Recent research efforts are directed to assess the possible use of attention bias as a therapeutic target in patients presenting suicide behavior. The relationship between impulsivity and suicide has been largely investigated over the last decades, and there is still controversy about the theme. Although there is strong evidence linking impulsivity to suicide attempts. Effective interventions address to reduce impulsivity in clinical populations at higher risk for suicide could help in the prevention. Deficits in problem-solving ability also seem to be distorted in patients who attempt

  2. A Rational-Emotive Approach to Mental Health for College Students: Study 1 and Study 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kujoth, Richard K.; Topetzes, Nick J.

    1977-01-01

    Further replication using other test instruments and measured variables is suggested, but the results of two studies appear to support the view that providing rational ideas fosters mental health while providing psychodynamic insight does not. (Author)

  3. Comparative risk assessment: an element for a more rational and ethical approach to radiation risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danesi, P.R.

    2006-01-01

    Peaceful nuclear technologies are still perceived by a large fraction of the general public, the media as well as by some decision makers, as more risky than many other 'conventional' technologies. One of the approaches that can help bringing more rationality and ethics into the picture is to present the risk associated with radiation and nuclear technologies in the frame of correctly conducted comparative risk assessments. However, comparing different risks is not so straightforward because quantifying different risks on a comparable scale requires overcoming both conceptual and practical difficulties. Risk (R) can be expressed as the product of the probability (P) that a given undesired event, the risk, will occur, times the consequences of this event (C), i.e. R = P x C. Although in principle risks could be compared by simply ranking them according to the different values of R, this simplistic approach is not always possible because to correctly compare risks all factors, circumstances and assumptions should be mutually equivalent and quantified and the (often large) uncertainties taken into proper account. In the case of radiation risk, ICRP has assumed as valid the LNT model, (probability coefficient of 5 % per Sievert for attributable death from cancer) and selected the present equivalent dose limit of 1 mSv per year for public exposure. This dose corresponds to 50 lethal cancers by 1 million people exposed and is approximately equivalent (in terms of probability of death) to the risk of bicycling for 600 km, driving for 3200 km, crossing a busy road twice a day for 1 year, smoking 2.5 packets of cigarettes or being X-rayed once for kidney metabolism. However, according to many scientists on the basis of both epidemiological and biological results and considerations, the actual risk is far lower than that predicted by the LNT model. Nevertheless, the policies and myths that were created about half a century ago are still persisting and have lead the general

  4. A rational inference approach to group and individual-level sentence comprehension performance in aphasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Tessa; Dickey, Michael Walsh; Liburd, Teljer L

    2017-07-01

    The rational inference, or noisy channel, account of language comprehension predicts that comprehenders are sensitive to the probabilities of different interpretations for a given sentence and adapt as these probabilities change (Gibson, Bergen & Piantadosi, 2013). This account provides an important new perspective on aphasic sentence comprehension: aphasia may increase the likelihood of sentence distortion, leading people with aphasia (PWA) to rely more on the prior probability of an interpretation and less on the form or structure of the sentence (Gibson, Sandberg, Fedorenko, Bergen & Kiran, 2015). We report the results of a sentence-picture matching experiment that tested the predictions of the rational inference account and other current models of aphasic sentence comprehension across a variety of sentence structures. Consistent with the rational inference account, PWA showed similar sensitivity to the probability of particular kinds of form distortions as age-matched controls, yet overall their interpretations relied more on prior probability and less on sentence form. As predicted by rational inference, but not by other models of sentence comprehension in aphasia, PWA's interpretations were more faithful to the form for active and passive sentences than for direct object and prepositional object sentences. However contra rational inference, there was no evidence that individual PWA's severity of syntactic or semantic impairment predicted their sensitivity to form versus the prior probability of a sentence, as cued by semantics. These findings confirm and extend previous findings that suggest the rational inference account holds promise for explaining aphasic and neurotypical comprehension, but they also raise new challenges for the account. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. [Historical development of vaccines. Introduction: Hazards and rationality in the vaccinal approach].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulin, A M

    1995-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to introduce the one hundred years of vaccination that has passed since Louis Pasteur first coined this generic term. According to the late Jonas Salk, vaccinology is a science encompassing all aspects of vaccine from its conception in the laboratory to its production by companies and its application and distribution in the field. In this historical survey I explore how vaccination never consisted of a simple and uniform application of a rational model, but rather diverged along various pathways, several of which were discarded in retrospect as being hazardous, and I analyse the ongoing interplay between rational and inventive thinking.

  6. Drought Water Rationing Necessitates an Equitable and Multidimensional Approach: Evidence from California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponce de Leon Barido, D.; Fildier, B.; Cucchi, K.

    2016-12-01

    Since 2011 many areas across California have experienced their driest years on record, with conditions barely improving since then. Reservoirs and snowpack water content have recorded some of the lowest measurements ever, with users (individuals, towns and cities) using groundwater to buffer the potentially devastating effects of the drought. Among other strategies, rationing has been one of they key interventions that the state has adopted to better manage its water resources. April 1st 2015 marked the first day in California's history when mandatory water reductions were instated statewide. By executive order, Governor Brown directed the State Water Resources Control Board to impose a 25% reduction on California's 400 local water supply agencies, which serve 90% of California residents. Since then, local agencies have been responsible for allocating restrictions to reduce water consumption and monitor compliance. A variety of research organizations and media outlets have begun exploring the equity considerations of the drought, but their analyses are often one-dimensional (water consumption per capita). Here we explore the multi-dimensional dynamics of rationing and drought in California using Census and California Water Resources Board data for over 300 communities in the state. We use data mining, parallel coordinates, and a nearest neighbors clustering algorithm to explore relationships between rationing and community spatial distribution, weather, drought related climate variables, economic sector employment, race, localized income inequality, household size, and income. The data suggests that there are nine distinct rationing groups across the state, that rationing was performed without taking into account the localized effects of the drought (hard hit communities rationing as much as less affected communities), that severely drought affected low-income communities (using SPI and SPEI 3 year indices) were asked to ration as much (and sometimes more) than

  7. A Strategy for Understanding and Correcting Irrational Beliefs in Pupils: The Rational-Emotional Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zionts, Paul

    1983-01-01

    Rational-emotive education integrates the cognitive, behavioral, and emotional aspects of personality and encourages behavior disordered students to discuss and work through their problems. Teachers need to display warmth, empathy, and be active-directive to help students manage their feelings and behaviors. (CL)

  8. A Market Segmentation Approach for Higher Education Based on Rational and Emotional Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angulo, Fernando; Pergelova, Albena; Rialp, Josep

    2010-01-01

    Market segmentation is an important topic for higher education administrators and researchers. For segmenting the higher education market, we have to understand what factors are important for high school students in selecting a university. Extant literature has probed the importance of rational factors such as teaching staff, campus facilities,…

  9. An Outreach Program in Drug Education; Teaching a Rational Approach to Drug Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorensen, James L.; Joffe, Stephen J.

    1975-01-01

    Aimed at encouraging rational decision making about drug use, a peer oriented drug education program was conducted in a community youth project. Youth and leaders shared feelings and knowledge about drugs. Compared with four program dropouts, six participants exhibited more positive attitudes toward the drug group, its leaders and themselves.…

  10. Novel therapeutic approaches for disease-modification of epileptogenesis for curing epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clossen, Bryan L; Reddy, Doodipala Samba

    2017-06-01

    This article describes the recent advances in epileptogenesis and novel therapeutic approaches for the prevention of epilepsy, with a special emphasis on the pharmacological basis of disease-modification of epileptogenesis for curing epilepsy. Here we assess animal studies and human clinical trials of epilepsy spanning 1982-2016. Epilepsy arises from a number of neuronal factors that trigger epileptogenesis, which is the process by which a brain shifts from a normal physiologic state to an epileptic condition. The events precipitating these changes can be of diverse origin, including traumatic brain injury, cerebrovascular damage, infections, chemical neurotoxicity, and emergency seizure conditions such as status epilepticus. Expectedly, the molecular and system mechanisms responsible for epileptogenesis are not well defined or understood. To date, there is no approved therapy for the prevention of epilepsy. Epigenetic dysregulation, neuroinflammation, and neurodegeneration appear to trigger epileptogenesis. Targeted drugs are being identified that can truly prevent the development of epilepsy in at-risk people. The promising agents include rapamycin, COX-2 inhibitors, TRK inhibitors, epigenetic modulators, JAK-STAT inhibitors, and neurosteroids. Recent evidence suggests that neurosteroids may play a role in modulating epileptogenesis. A number of promising drugs are under investigation for the prevention or modification of epileptogenesis to halt the development of epilepsy. Some drugs in development appear rational for preventing epilepsy because they target the initial trigger or related signaling pathways as the brain becomes progressively more prone to seizures. Additional research into the target validity and clinical investigation is essential to make new frontiers in curing epilepsy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. A Brief Review of Computer-Assisted Approaches to Rational Design of Peptide Vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashesh Nandy

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The growing incidences of new viral diseases and increasingly frequent viral epidemics have strained therapeutic and preventive measures; the high mutability of viral genes puts additional strains on developmental efforts. Given the high cost and time requirements for new drugs development, vaccines remain as a viable alternative, but there too traditional techniques of live-attenuated or inactivated vaccines have the danger of allergenic reactions and others. Peptide vaccines have, over the last several years, begun to be looked on as more appropriate alternatives, which are economically affordable, require less time for development and hold the promise of multi-valent dosages. The developments in bioinformatics, proteomics, immunogenomics, structural biology and other sciences have spurred the growth of vaccinomics where computer assisted approaches serve to identify suitable peptide targets for eventual development of vaccines. In this mini-review we give a brief overview of some of the recent trends in computer assisted vaccine development with emphasis on the primary selection procedures of probable peptide candidates for vaccine development.

  12. Vectorization of Nucleic Acids for Therapeutic Approach: Tutorial Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geinguenaud, Frederic; Guenin, Erwann; Lalatonne, Yoann; Motte, Laurence

    2016-05-20

    Oligonucleotides present a high therapeutic potential for a wide variety of diseases. However, their clinical development is limited by their degradation by nucleases and their poor blood circulation time. Depending on the administration mode and the cellular target, these macromolecules will have to cross the vascular endothelium, to diffuse through the extracellular matrix, to be transported through the cell membrane, and finally to reach the cytoplasm. To overcome these physiological barriers, many strategies have been developed. Here, we review different methods of DNA vectorization, discuss limitations and advantages of the various vectors, and provide new perspectives for future development.

  13. The effect of rational emotive behavior therapy (REBT) on antiretroviral therapeutic adherence and mental health in women infected with HIV/AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surilena; Ismail, R Irawati; Irwanto; Djoerban, Zubairi; Utomo, Budi; Sabarinah; Iwan; Akip, Arwin A P

    2014-10-01

    To identify the effectiveness of rational-emotive-behavior-based therapy (REBT-based therapy) on improved mental health and antiretroviral (ART) therapeutic adherence in women infected with HIV/AIDS (female subjects with HIV/AIDS). A randomized and single-blinded clinical trial in women infected with HIV/AIDS who had their treatment at the outpatient clinic of Pokdiksus AIDS RSCM and at the AIDS Comprehensive Diagnostic Unit of Dharmais Hospital was conducted between October 2011 and March 2012. A block randomization of 160 female subjects with AIDS was performed that resulted in a REBT-based treatment group (n=80) and a control group (n=80). The treatment group received REBT-based intervention of 8 sessions weekly including 6 individual-therapeutic sessions/week and 2 group-therapeutic sessions/week. Instruments used in the study were questionnaires on demography, ART adherence (measured by self report and pill count), and mental health (SRQ-20). Data were analyzed using Chi-Square test, Generalized Linear Model, and Generalized Estimating Equations. There were 148 respondents analyzed including in the REBT-based group (n=72) and in the control group (n=76) with mean age of 33-34 years. After 8 weeks of REBT-based intervention, there was improved (increased) mean value of the self-reported adherence score (self-report) compared to control group (100%; CI 95%,83.3-96.7 vs. 84%; CI 95%,77.5-87.8) and improved (decreased) SRQ-20 mean score in REBT-based treatment group compared to control group (2.9; CI 95%, 2.7-13.0 vs. 5.4; CI 95%: 5.0-13.6). ART adherence based on viral load titer was not analyzed in both group since most of VL titer were undetected (decrement of SRQ-20 would increase self-reported ART adherence as much as 0.722 point and the correlation was statistically significant (p<0.00). After 8 weeks of REBT-based intervention to female subjects with HIV/AIDS, there is a decrease of SRQ-20 mean score which may result in increased ART adherence mean score in

  14. Are security analysts rational? a literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Peixinho, Rúben; Coelho, Luís; Taffler, Richard J.

    2005-01-01

    Rational choice theory and bounded rationality constitute the basis for the discussion in several areas regarding human rationality. In finance, this discussion has been made between traditional finance and behavioural finance approach, which have different perspectives concerning market agents’ rationality. This paper reviews several studies addressing rationality among security analysts. The analysis shows that analysts’systematic optimism seems to be inconsistent with rationality....

  15. Therapeutic Approaches to Histone Reprogramming in Retinal Degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berner, Andre K; Kleinman, Mark E

    2016-01-01

    Recent data have revealed epigenetic derangements and subsequent chromatin remodeling as a potent biologic switch for chronic inflammation and cell survival which are important therapeutic targets in the pathogenesis of several retinal degenerations. Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are a major component of this system and serve as a unique control of the chromatin remodeling process. With a multitude of targeted HDAC inhibitors now available, their use in both basic science and clinical studies has widened substantially. In the field of ocular biology, there are data to suggest that HDAC inhibition may suppress neovascularization and may be a possible treatment for retinitis pigmentosa and dry age-related macular degeneration (AMD). However, the effects of these inhibitors on cell survival and chemokine expression in the chorioretinal tissues remain very unclear. Here, we review the multifaceted biology of HDAC activity and pharmacologic inhibition while offering further insight into the importance of this epigenetic pathway in retinal degenerations. Our laboratory investigations aim to open translational avenues to advance dry AMD therapeutics while exploring the role of acetylation on inflammatory gene expression in the aging and degenerating retina.

  16. Protein and Peptide in Drug Targeting and its Therapeutic Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raj K. Keservani

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The main aim of this review article is to provide information like advantages of protein and peptides via different routes of drug administration, targeted to a particular site and its implication in drug delivery system. Methods: To that aim, from the web sites of PubMed, HCAplus, Thomson, and Registry were used as the main sources to perform the search for the most significant research articles published on the subject. The information was then carefully analyzed, highlighting the most important results in the development of protein and peptide drug targeting as well as its therapeutic activity. Results: In recent years many researchers use protein and peptide as a target site of drug by a different delivery system. Proteins and peptides are used as specific and effective therapeutic agents, due to instability and side effects their use is complicated. Protein kinases are important regulators of most, if not all, biological processes. Abnormal activity of proteins and peptides has been implicated in many human diseases, such as diabetes, cancer and neurodegenerative disorders. Conclusions: It is concluded that the protein and peptide were used in drug targeting to specific site and also used in different diseased states like cancer, diabetes, immunomodulating, neurodegenerative effects and antimicrobial activity.

  17. Lung Regeneration: Endogenous and Exogenous Stem Cell Mediated Therapeutic Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akram, Khondoker M; Patel, Neil; Spiteri, Monica A; Forsyth, Nicholas R

    2016-01-19

    The tissue turnover of unperturbed adult lung is remarkably slow. However, after injury or insult, a specialised group of facultative lung progenitors become activated to replenish damaged tissue through a reparative process called regeneration. Disruption in this process results in healing by fibrosis causing aberrant lung remodelling and organ dysfunction. Post-insult failure of regeneration leads to various incurable lung diseases including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Therefore, identification of true endogenous lung progenitors/stem cells, and their regenerative pathway are crucial for next-generation therapeutic development. Recent studies provide exciting and novel insights into postnatal lung development and post-injury lung regeneration by native lung progenitors. Furthermore, exogenous application of bone marrow stem cells, embryonic stem cells and inducible pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) show evidences of their regenerative capacity in the repair of injured and diseased lungs. With the advent of modern tissue engineering techniques, whole lung regeneration in the lab using de-cellularised tissue scaffold and stem cells is now becoming reality. In this review, we will highlight the advancement of our understanding in lung regeneration and development of stem cell mediated therapeutic strategies in combating incurable lung diseases.

  18. Design of a Discrete Tracking Controller for a Magnetic Levitation System: A Nonlinear Rational Model Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Gómez-Salas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This work proposes a discrete-time nonlinear rational approximate model for the unstable magnetic levitation system. Based on this model and as an application of the input-output linearization technique, a discrete-time tracking control design will be derived using the corresponding classical state space representation of the model. A simulation example illustrates the efficiency of the proposed methodology.

  19. Electricity generation, rational energy use and CO2 emissions. The Electrabel approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulteel, P.

    1995-01-01

    Electrabel (Belgium) commitments in integrating the goals of rational and sustainable energy use and CO 2 emissions control are presented: demand side measures with promotion and decision-making help to the customers in order to reduce technical, commercial and financial barriers, and supply side measures such as integrated resource planning, high efficiency fossil-fuel generating stations (gas fired combined cycle units), cogeneration schemes. The expected impact on CO 2 emissions are discussed

  20. A diagnostic and therapeutic approach to primary burning mouth syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghadam-Kia, Siamak; Fazel, Nasim

    Primary burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is an oral mucosal disorder that is characterized by a chronic and often debilitating intraoral burning sensation for which no localized or systemic cause can be found. BMS most commonly affects postmenopausal women. The pathophysiology of primary BMS is not well understood. Diagnosing BMS can prove to be challenging. BMS patients can also pose a therapeutic challenge to clinicians who are consulted to evaluate these patients. Most commonly used therapies include tricyclic antidepressants, α-lipoic acid, clonazepam, and cognitive-behavioral therapy. Clinical judgment, patient counseling, and monitoring of pain are important. Further research is required to assess the effectiveness of serotonin and newer serotonin-noradrenalin reuptake inhibitors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. [Sleep disturbances in Parkinson's disease: characteristics, evaluation and therapeutic approaches].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faludi, Béla; Janszky, József; Komoly, Sámuel; Kovács, Norbert

    2015-07-05

    Parkinson's disease is a well known representent of the movement disorder group of neurological disorders. The diagnosis of Parkinson's disease is based on specific symptoms and signs of movement abnormalities. In addition to classic motor symptoms, Parkinson's disease has characteristic non-motor features, and some of these emerges the classic signs. The authors discuss characteristics and therapeutic interventions in Parkinson's disease related sleep disturbances. The authors reviewed and summarised literature data on sleep disorders in Parkinson's disease published in the PubMed database up to January 2015. Sleep problems are important non-motor complains (insomnia, hypersomnia, REM behaviour disorder, sleep apnea and restless legs syndrome). The neurodegenerative process of the brain-stem, the effect of symptoms of Parkinson's disease on sleep and concomitant sleep disorders constitute the background of the patient's complains. Appropriate diagnosis and therapy of the consequential or concomitant sleep disorders in Parkinson's disease will help to improve the patient's quality of life.

  2. [Limitation of therapeutic effort: Approach to a combined view].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno Muñoz, M J

    2013-01-01

    Over the past few decades, we have been witnessing that increasing fewer people pass away at home and increasing more do so within the hospital. More specifically, 20% of deaths now occur in an intensive care unit (ICU). However, death in the ICU has become a highly technical process. This sometimes originates excesses because the resources used are not proportionate related to the purposes pursued (futility). It may create situations that do not respect the person's dignity throughout the death process. It is within this context that the situation of the clinical procedure called "limitation of the therapeutic effort" (LTE) is reviewed. This has become a true bridge between Intensive Care and Palliative Care. Its final goal is to guarantee a dignified and painless death for the terminally ill. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. y SEEIUC. All rights reserved.

  3. Pathophysiological aspects and therapeutic approaches of tumoral osteolysis and hypercalcemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonjour, J P; Rizzoli, R

    1989-01-01

    Malignant tumors can affect the integrity of the skeletal tissue and the homeostasis of the two main components of bone mineral, calcium (Ca) and inorganic phosphate (Pi). Various tumoral cell products can increase bone resorption by influencing the number of osteoclasts and/or their activity. These tumoral products could act either directly on bone cells of the osteoblastic or osteoclastic lineages, or indirectly by influencing cells secreting osteotropic factors, such as interleukin-1, tumor necrosis factors, transforming growth factors, and colony-stimulating factor. Among the classical calciotropic hormones, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 could be implicated in lymphoma. In hypercalcemia of malignancy, an increase in bone resorption is observed in most patients. However, in many cases an increased tubular reabsorption of Ca has been documented as well. This phenomenon when present after adequate rehydration is probably due to the secretion by the tumoral cells of a parathyroid hormone-related peptide (PTHrP). This factor has been recently identified as a protein containing 141 amino acids. This protein or some very close analogs have been shown to be secreted by lung, kidney and also breast carcinoma. Besides increasing bone resorption and stimulating tubular reabsorption of Ca, PTHrP also selectively decreases the tubular reabsorption of Pi, an action that may explain the hypophosphatemia observed in some types of neoplasm. Therapeutically, administration of antiresorbing agents such as clodronate or other bisphosphonates can normalize the increased osteolysis and, if present, the associated elevation in the plasma level of Ca in most cancer patients. However in some cases, wherein the prevailing hypercalcemic mechanism is due to an enhancement in the tubular reabsorption of Ca, other therapeutic means should be associated with the antiosteolytic bisphosphonate therapy.

  4. Therapeutic approaches for treating hemophilia A using embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasuda, Shogo; Tatsumi, Kohei; Sakurai, Yoshihiko; Shima, Midori; Hatake, Katsuhiko

    2016-06-01

    Hemophilia A is an X-linked rescessive bleeding disorder that results from F8 gene aberrations. Previously, we established embryonic stem (ES) cells (tet-226aa/N6-Ainv18) that secrete human factor VIII (hFVIII) by introducing the human F8 gene in mouse Ainv18 ES cells. Here, we explored the potential of cell transplantation therapy for hemophilia A using the ES cells. Transplant tet-226aa/N6-Ainv18 ES cells were injected into the spleens of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice, carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-pretreated wild-type mice, and CCl4-pretreated hemophilia A mice. F8 expression was induced by doxycycline in drinking water, and hFVIII-antigen production was assessed in all cell transplantation experiments. Injecting the ES cells into SCID mice resulted in an enhanced expression of the hFVIII antigen; however, teratoma generation was confirmed in the spleen. Transplantation of ES cells into wild-type mice after CCl4-induced liver injury facilitated survival and engraftment of transplanted cells without teratoma formation, resulting in hFVIII production in the plasma. Although CCl4 was lethal to most hemophilia A mice, therapeutic levels of FVIII activity, as well as the hFVIII antigen, were detected in surviving hemophilia A mice after cell transplantation. Immunolocalization results for hFVIII suggested that transplanted ES cells might be engrafted at the periportal area in the liver. Although the development of a safer induction method for liver regeneration is required, our results suggested the potential for developing an effective ES-cell transplantation therapeutic model for treating hemophilia A in the future. Copyright © 2016 King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Centre. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Rational Targeting of Cellular Cholesterol in Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma (DLBCL) Enabled by Functional Lipoprotein Nanoparticles: A Therapeutic Strategy Dependent on Cell of Origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rink, Jonathan S; Yang, Shuo; Cen, Osman; Taxter, Tim; McMahon, Kaylin M; Misener, Sol; Behdad, Amir; Longnecker, Richard; Gordon, Leo I; Thaxton, C Shad

    2017-11-06

    Cancer cells have altered metabolism and, in some cases, an increased demand for cholesterol. It is important to identify novel, rational treatments based on biology, and cellular cholesterol metabolism as a potential target for cancer is an innovative approach. Toward this end, we focused on diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) as a model because there is differential cholesterol biosynthesis driven by B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling in germinal center (GC) versus activated B-cell (ABC) DLBCL. To specifically target cellular cholesterol homeostasis, we employed high-density lipoprotein-like nanoparticles (HDL NP) that can generally reduce cellular cholesterol by targeting and blocking cholesterol uptake through the high-affinity HDL receptor, scavenger receptor type B-1 (SCARB1). As we previously reported, GC DLBCL are exquisitely sensitive to HDL NP as monotherapy, while ABC DLBCL are less sensitive. Herein, we report that enhanced BCR signaling and resultant de novo cholesterol synthesis in ABC DLBCL drastically reduces the ability of HDL NPs to reduce cellular cholesterol and induce cell death. Therefore, we combined HDL NP with the BCR signaling inhibitor ibrutinib and the SYK inhibitor R406. By targeting both cellular cholesterol uptake and BCR-associated de novo cholesterol synthesis, we achieved cellular cholesterol reduction and induced apoptosis in otherwise resistant ABC DLBCL cell lines. These results in lymphoma demonstrate that reduction of cellular cholesterol is a powerful mechanism to induce apoptosis. Cells rich in cholesterol require HDL NP therapy to reduce uptake and molecularly targeted agents that inhibit upstream pathways that stimulate de novo cholesterol synthesis, thus, providing a new paradigm for rationally targeting cholesterol metabolism as therapy for cancer.

  6. Model-based Rational and Systematic Protein Purification Process Development : A Knowledge-based Approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kungah Nfor, B.

    2011-01-01

    The increasing market and regulatory (quality and safety) demands on therapeutic proteins calls for radical improvement in their manufacturing processes. Addressing these challenges requires the adoption of strategies and tools that enable faster and more efficient process development. This thesis

  7. Synthetic Lethal Therapeutic Approaches for ARID1A-Mutated Ovarian Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-16-1-0496 TITLE: Synthetic lethal therapeutic approaches for ARID1A-mutated ovarian cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Rugang...AND SUBTITLE Synthetic lethal therapeutic approaches for ARID1A-mutated ovarian cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-16-1-0496 5c...Release; Distribution Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is the leading cause of death among gynecological

  8. A new approach to the Schrödinger equation with rational potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Ming-de; Chu, Jue-Hui

    1984-04-01

    A new analytic theory is established for the Schrödinger equation with a rational potential, including a complete classification of the regular eigenfunctions into three different types, an exact method of obtaining wavefunctions, an explicit formulation of the spectral equation (3 x 3 determinant) etc. All representations are exhibited in a unifying way via function-theoretic methods and therefore given in explicit form, in contrast to the prevailing discussion appealing to perturbation or variation methods or continued-fraction techniques. The irregular eigenfunctions at infinity can be obtained analogously and will be discussed separately as another solvable case for singular potentials.

  9. Analysis of Queues with Rational Arrival Process Components - A General Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bean, Nigel; Nielsen, Bo Friis

    In a previous paper we demonstrated that the well known matrix-geometric solution of Quasi-Birth-and-Death processes is valid also if we introduce Rational Arrival Process (RAP) components. Here we extend those results and we offer an alternative proof by using results obtained by Tweedie. We prove...... the matrix-geometric form for a certain kind of operators on the stationary measure for discrete time Markov chains of GI/M/1 type. We apply this result to an embedded chain with RAP components. We then discuss the straight- forward modification of the standard algorithms for calculating the matrix R...

  10. A rational approach for evaluation and screening of treatment and disposal options for the solar pond sludges at Rocky Flats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickerson, K.S.

    1995-01-01

    This document consists of information about the treatment options for the sludge that is located in the evaporation ponds at the Rocky Flats Plant. The sludges are mixed low-level radioactive wastes whose composition and character were variable. Sludges similar to these are typically treated prior to ultimate disposal. Disposal of treated sludges includes both on-site and off-site options. The rational approach described in this paper is useful for technology evaluation and screening because it provides a format for developing objectives, listing alternatives, and weighing the alternatives against the objectives and against each other

  11. Bloody nipple discharge (BND) in an 8 months old girl and a 9 months old male--rational diagnostic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmsen, S; Mayatepek, E; Klee, D; Meissner, T

    2010-03-01

    Bloody nipple discharge in adults is, in men as well as in women, often a symptom of an underlying malignant disease. In respect of this, multiple invasive and mutilating diagnostic procedures have been performed in infants and older children. Apart from individual cases in older and pubertal children, in childhood benign conditions are most common and can be diagnosed by non-invasive diagnostic procedures. Here we discuss a rational diagnostic approach on the basis of 2 patients with bloody nipple discharge at the age of 8 and 9 months which resolved spontaneously without treatment after 3 and 6 months, respectively. (c) Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart-New York.

  12. A New Approach to Rational Discrete-Time Approximations to Continuous-Time Fractional-Order Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Matos , Carlos; Ortigueira , Manuel ,

    2012-01-01

    Part 10: Signal Processing; International audience; In this paper a new approach to rational discrete-time approximations to continuous fractional-order systems of the form 1/(sα+p) is proposed. We will show that such fractional-order LTI system can be decomposed into sub-systems. One has the classic behavior and the other is similar to a Finite Impulse Response (FIR) system. The conversion from continuous-time to discrete-time systems will be done using the Laplace transform inversion integr...

  13. A rational approach for evaluation and screening of treatment and disposal options for the solar pond sludges at Rocky Flats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dickerson, K.S.

    1995-12-31

    This document consists of information about the treatment options for the sludge that is located in the evaporation ponds at the Rocky Flats Plant. The sludges are mixed low-level radioactive wastes whose composition and character were variable. Sludges similar to these are typically treated prior to ultimate disposal. Disposal of treated sludges includes both on-site and off-site options. The rational approach described in this paper is useful for technology evaluation and screening because it provides a format for developing objectives, listing alternatives, and weighing the alternatives against the objectives and against each other.

  14. A rational approach to resonance saturation in large-Nc QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masjuan, Pere; Peris, Santiago

    2007-01-01

    We point out that resonance saturation in QCD can be understood in the large-N c limit from the mathematical theory of Pade Approximants to meromorphic functions. These approximants are rational functions which encompass any saturation with a finite number of resonances as a particular example, explaining several results which have appeared in the literature. We review the main properties of Pade Approximants with the help of a toy model for the (VV-AA) two-point correlator, paying particular attention to the relationship among the Chiral Expansion, the Operator Product Expansion and the resonance spectrum. In passing, we also comment on an old proposal made by Migdal in 1977 which has recently attracted much attention in the context of AdS/QCD models. Finally, we apply the simplest Pade Approximant to the (VV-AA) correlator in the real case of QCD. The general conclusion is that a rational approximant may reliably describe a Green's function in the Euclidean, but the same is not true in the Minkowski regime due to the appearance of unphysical poles and/or residues

  15. Current Therapeutic Strategies and Novel Approaches in Osteosarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ando, Kosei; Heymann, Marie-Françoise; Stresing, Verena; Mori, Kanji; Rédini, Françoise; Heymann, Dominique

    2013-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is the most frequent malignant primary bone tumor and a main cause of cancer-related death in children and adolescents. Although long-term survival in localized osteosarcoma has improved to about 60% during the 1960s and 1970s, long-term survival in both localized and metastatic osteosarcoma has stagnated in the past several decades. Thus, current conventional therapy consists of multi-agent chemotherapy, surgery and radiation, which is not fully adequate for osteosarcoma treatment. Innovative drugs and approaches are needed to further improve outcome in osteosarcoma patients. This review describes the current management of osteosarcoma as well as potential new therapies

  16. Therapeutic approach to Gradenigo's syndrome: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aspris Andreas

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Traditional management of Gradenigo's syndrome requires aggressive and radical surgery without any attempt to preserve hearing. Recent reports, however, describe a successful outcome after conservative surgical intervention without labyrinthectomy. A similar outcome has also been reported in patients who were only prescribed with antibiotics and did not undergo myringotomy. Case presentation We report the case of a 24-year-old Caucasian Greek woman with Gradenigo's syndrome who was treated by draining her petrous apex via an infralabyrithine approach between her posterior semicircular canal and the jugular bulb. Her inner ear was not sacrificed during the procedure. She presented pre-operatively with ipsilateral conductive hearing loss, which recovered completely four weeks after the surgery. Conclusions Patients with Gradenigo's syndrome may be successfully treated with a combination of long-term permanent drainage and ventilation of the apical cells with corresponding hearing preservation. This can be achieved via a combination of transmastoid, infralabyrinthine and suprajugular approaches, if such would be allowed by the anatomy of the region or if there is enough space between the posterior semicircular canal and the jugular bulb.

  17. Towards a rational approach for heavy-atom derivative screening in protein crystallography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agniswamy, Johnson; Joyce, M. Gordon; Hammer, Carl H.; Sun, Peter D.

    2008-01-01

    Heavy-atom derivatization is routinely used in protein structure determination and is thus of critical importance in structural biology. In order to replace the current trial-and-error heavy-atom derivative screening with a knowledge-based rational derivative-selection method, the reactivity of more than 40 heavy-atom compounds over a wide range of buffer and pH values was systematically examined using peptides which contained a single reactive amino-acid residue. Heavy-atom derivatization is routinely used in protein structure determination and is thus of critical importance in structural biology. In order to replace the current trial-and-error heavy-atom derivative screening with a knowledge-based rational derivative-selection method, the reactivity of more than 40 heavy-atom compounds over a wide range of buffer and pH values was systematically examined using peptides which contained a single reactive amino-acid residue. Met-, Cys- and His-containing peptides were derivatized against Hg, Au and Pt compounds, while Tyr-, Glu-, Asp-, Asn- and Gln-containing peptides were assessed against Pb compounds. A total of 1668 reactive conditions were examined using mass spectrometry and were compiled into heavy-atom reactivity tables. The results showed that heavy-atom derivatization reactions are highly linked to buffer and pH, with the most accommodating buffer being MES at pH 6. A group of 21 compounds were identified as most successful irrespective of ligand or buffer/pH conditions. To assess the applicability of the peptide heavy-atom reactivity to proteins, lysozyme crystals were derivatized with a list of peptide-reactive compounds that included both known and new compounds for lysozyme derivatization. The results showed highly consistent heavy-atom reactivities between the peptides and lysozyme

  18. [Cormorbidity in multiple sclerosis and its therapeutic approach].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estruch, Bonaventura Casanova

    2014-12-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a long-term chronic disease, in which intercurrent processes develop three times more frequently in affected individuals than in persons without MS. Knowledge of the comorbidity of MS, its definition and measurement (Charlson index) improves patient management. Acting on comorbid conditions delays the progression of disability, which is intimately linked to the number of concurrent processes and with health states and habits. Moreover, the presence of comorbidities delays the diagnosis of MS, which in turn delays the start of treatment. The main comorbidity found in MS includes other autoimmune diseases (thyroiditis, systemic lupus erythematosus, or pemphigus) but can also include general diseases, such as asthma or osteomuscular alterations, and, in particular, psychiatric disturbances. All these alterations should be evaluated with multidimensional scales (Disability Expectancy Table, DET), which allow more accurate determination of the patient's real clinical course and quality of life. These scales also allow identification of how MS, concurrent and intercurrent processes occurring during the clinical course, and the treatment provided affect patients with MS. An overall approach to patients' health status helps to improve quality of life. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Physical urticarias: mast cell disfunction. Preventive, diagnostic and therapeutical approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Geller

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To present and discuss the current classification of physicalurticarias based on immunologic and pathophysiological mechanisms.To describe clinical symptoms, triggering and worsening factors,different diagnostic tools, and to list the available pharmacologicaltherapeutic approaches as well as the methods of physicaldesensitization. Methods: The literature search was carried out usingMedline. Forty studies were evaluated including case-control series,meta-analyses, case reports and reviews in the English language. Thekeywords used were physical urticarias, classification, and physicaldesensitization. A didactic diagnostic classification of differentgroups of physical urticarias was made, as well as a description ofthe several modalities of these dermatatologic conditions causedby physical stimuli, as localized or diffuse, classical or atypical,acquired or familial, with or without IgE involvement. The geneticpredisposing factors were determined. Results: Physical urticaria isdue to mast cell dysfunction with lowered threshold for the releaseof cytoplasmic anaphylactic mediators triggered by physical factors.These precipitating environmental physical factors include cold, heat,mechanical stimuli, exercises, exposure to sunlight and skin contactwith water. Conclusions: Physical urticarias occur in approximately17% of chronic urticaria patients and different forms may coexist inthe same individual. Treatments include prevention, antihistamines(classical and non-sedating presentations and, occasionally,corticosteroids, dapsone and other anti-inflammatory drugs, and thepotential use of specific physical desensitization.

  20. Novel diagnostic approaches and biological therapeutics for intrinsic asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vennera MC

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available María del Carmen Vennera,1–3 César Picado1–3 1Department of Pneumology and Respiratory Allergy, Hospital Clínic, Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain; 2Institut d'Investigacions Biomèdiques August Pi i Sunyer (IDIBAPS, Barcelona, Spain; 3Centro de Investigaciones Biomédicas en Red de Enfermedades Respiratorias (CIBERES, Spain Abstract: Intrinsic asthma has been considered as a specific disease entity for a long time, although many controversies have emerged in relation to this concept. Of note, not finding specific allergen sensitization in an asthmatic patient neither excludes an allergic component nor the essential role that immunoglobulin E may play in asthma. The diagnostic approach should be similar in any patient suspected to have asthma. The atopic status is one among many other questions. Omalizumab, the only monoclonal anti-immunoglobulin E antibody commercialized for asthma, should be tried in patients with uncontrolled severe asthma independent of their atopic status. Keywords: nonatopic asthma, immunoglobulin E, omalizumab

  1. Pediatric Multiple Sclerosis: Genes, Environment, and a Comprehensive Therapeutic Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappa, Ryan; Theroux, Liana; Brenton, J Nicholas

    2017-10-01

    Pediatric multiple sclerosis is an increasingly recognized and studied disorder that accounts for 3% to 10% of all patients with multiple sclerosis. The risk for pediatric multiple sclerosis is thought to reflect a complex interplay between environmental and genetic risk factors. Environmental exposures, including sunlight (ultraviolet radiation, vitamin D levels), infections (Epstein-Barr virus), passive smoking, and obesity, have been identified as potential risk factors in youth. Genetic predisposition contributes to the risk of multiple sclerosis, and the major histocompatibility complex on chromosome 6 makes the single largest contribution to susceptibility to multiple sclerosis. With the use of large-scale genome-wide association studies, other non-major histocompatibility complex alleles have been identified as independent risk factors for the disease. The bridge between environment and genes likely lies in the study of epigenetic processes, which are environmentally-influenced mechanisms through which gene expression may be modified. This article will review these topics to provide a framework for discussion of a comprehensive approach to counseling and ultimately treating the pediatric patient with multiple sclerosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Authorship matrix: a rational approach to quantify individual contributions and responsibilities in multi-author scientific articles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clement, T Prabhakar

    2014-06-01

    We propose a rational method for addressing an important question-who deserves to be an author of a scientific article? We review various contentious issues associated with this question and recommend that the scientific community should view authorship in terms of contributions and responsibilities, rather than credits. We propose a new paradigm that conceptually divides a scientific article into four basic elements: ideas, work, writing, and stewardship. We employ these four fundamental elements to modify the well-known International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE) authorship guidelines. The modified ICMJE guidelines are then used as the basis to develop an approach to quantify individual contributions and responsibilities in multi-author articles. The outcome of the approach is an authorship matrix, which can be used to answer several nagging questions related to authorship.

  3. Endovascular Therapeutic Approaches for Acute Superior Mesenteric Artery Occlusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acosta, S.; Sonesson, B.; Resch, T.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the outcome of attempted endovascular intervention in patients with acute embolic or thrombotic superior mesenteric artery (SMA) occlusion. The records of 21 patients during a 3-year period between 2005 and 2008 were retrieved from the in-hospital registry. The first group included 10 patients (6 women and 4 men; median age 78 years) with acute embolic occlusion of the SMA. The median duration of symptoms from symptom onset to angiography was 30 hours (range 6 to 120). Synchronous emboli (n = 12) occurred in 6 patients. Embolus aspiration was performed in 9 patients, and 7 of these had satisfactory results. Complementary local thrombolysis was successful in 2 of 3 patients. Residual emboli were present at completion angiography in all 7 patients who underwent successful aspiration embolectomy, and bowel resection was necessary in only 1 of these patients. One serious complication occurred because of a long SMA dissection. The in-hospital survival rate was 90% (9 of 10 patients). The second group included 11 patients (10 women and 1 man; median age 68 years) with atherosclerotic acute SMA occlusions. The median time of symptom duration before intervention was 97 hours (range 17 to 384). The brachial, femoral, and SMA routes were used in 6, 7, and 5 patients, respectively. SMA stenting was performed through an antegrade (n = 7) or retrograde (n = 3) approach. Bowel resection was necessary in 4 patients. No major complications occurred. The in-hospital survival rate was 82% (9 of 11 patients). Endovascular therapy of acute SMA occlusion provides a good alternative to open surgery.

  4. Aligning Animal Models of Clinical Germinal Matrix Hemorrhage, From Basic Correlation to Therapeutic Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekic, Tim; Klebe, Damon; Pichon, Pilar; Brankov, Katarina; Sultan, Sally; McBride, Devin; Casel, Darlene; Al-Bayati, Alhamza; Ding, Yan; Tang, Jiping; Zhang, John H

    2017-01-01

    Germinal matrix hemorrhage is a leading cause of mortality and morbidity from prematurity. This brain region is vulnerable to bleeding and re-bleeding within the first 72 hours of preterm life. Cerebroventricular expansion of blood products contributes to the mechanisms of brain injury. Consequences include lifelong hydrocephalus, cerebral palsy, and intellectual disability. Unfortunately little is known about the therapeutic needs of this patient population. This review discusses the mechanisms of germinal matrix hemorrhage, the animal models utilized, and the potential therapeutic targets. Potential therapeutic approaches identified in pre-clinical investigations include corticosteroid therapy, iron chelator administration, and transforming growth factor-β pathway modulation, which all warrant further investigation. Thus, effective preclinical modeling is essential for elucidating and evaluating novel therapeutic approaches, ahead of clinical consideration. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  5. Rational Design Approach for Enhancing Higher-Mode Response of a Microcantilever in Vibro-Impacting Mode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ieva Migliniene

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes an approach for designing an efficient vibration energy harvester based on a vibro-impacting piezoelectric microcantilever with a geometric shape that has been rationally modified in accordance with results of dynamic optimization. The design goal is to increase the amplitudes of higher-order vibration modes induced during the vibro-impact response of the piezoelectric transducer, thereby providing a means to improve the energy conversion efficiency and power output. A rational configuration of the energy harvester is proposed and it is demonstrated that the new design retains essential modal characteristics of the optimal microcantilever structures, further providing the added benefit of less costly fabrication. The effects of structural dynamics associated with advantageous exploitation of higher vibration modes are analyzed experimentally by means of laser vibrometry as well as numerically via transient simulations of microcantilever response to random excitation. Electrical characterization results indicate that the proposed harvester outperforms its conventional counterpart (based on the microcantilever of the constant cross-section in terms of generated electrical output. Reported results may serve for the development of impact-type micropower generators with harvesting performance that is enhanced by virtue of self-excitation of large intensity higher-order mode responses when the piezoelectric transducer is subjected to relatively low-frequency excitation with strongly variable vibration magnitudes.

  6. Rational pharmacological approaches for cognitive dysfunction and depression in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoval-Rincón, Maritza; Sáenz-Farret, Michel; Miguel-Puga, Adán; Micheli, Federico; Arias-Carrión, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is not a single entity but rather a heterogeneous neurodegenerative disorder. The present study aims to conduct a critical systematic review of the literature to describe the main pharmacological strategies to treat cognitive dysfunction and major depressive disorder in PD patients. We performed a search of articles cited in PubMed from 2004 to 2014 using the following MeSH terms (Medical subject headings) "Parkinson disease"; "Delirium," "Dementia," "Amnestic," "Cognitive disorders," and "Parkinson disease"; "depression," "major depressive disorder," "drug therapy." We found a total of 71 studies related to pharmacological treatment in cognitive dysfunction and 279 studies for pharmacological treatment in major depressive disorder. After fulfillment of all the inclusion and exclusion criteria, 13 articles remained for cognitive dysfunction and 11 for major depressive disorder, which are presented and discussed in this study. Further research into non-motor symptoms of PD may provide insights into mechanisms of neurodegeneration, and provide better quality of life by using rational drugs.

  7. Rational Pharmacological Approaches for Cognitive Dysfunction and Depression in Parkinson’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoval-Rincón, Maritza; Sáenz-Farret, Michel; Miguel-Puga, Adán; Micheli, Federico; Arias-Carrión, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is not a single entity but rather a heterogeneous neurodegenerative disorder. The present study aims to conduct a critical systematic review of the literature to describe the main pharmacological strategies to treat cognitive dysfunction and major depressive disorder in PD patients. We performed a search of articles cited in PubMed from 2004 to 2014 using the following MeSH terms (Medical subject headings) “Parkinson disease”; “Delirium,” “Dementia,” “Amnestic,” “Cognitive disorders,” and “Parkinson disease”; “depression,” “major depressive disorder,” “drug therapy.” We found a total of 71 studies related to pharmacological treatment in cognitive dysfunction and 279 studies for pharmacological treatment in major depressive disorder. After fulfillment of all the inclusion and exclusion criteria, 13 articles remained for cognitive dysfunction and 11 for major depressive disorder, which are presented and discussed in this study. Further research into non-motor symptoms of PD may provide insights into mechanisms of neurodegeneration, and provide better quality of life by using rational drugs. PMID:25873910

  8. The Least Costs Hypothesis: A rational analysis approach to the voluntary symbolic control of attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauszek, Joseph R; Gibson, Bradley S

    2018-04-30

    Here we propose a rational analysis account of voluntary symbolic attention control-the Least Costs Hypothesis (LCH)-that construes voluntary control as a decision between intentional cue use and unguided search. Consistent with the LCH, the present study showed that this decision is sensitive to variations in cue processing efficiency. In Experiment 1, observers demonstrated a robust preference for using "easy-to-process" arrow cues but not "hard-to-process" spatial word cues to satisfy an easy visual search goal; Experiment 2 showed that this preference persisted even when the temporal costs of cue processing were neutralized. Experiment 3 showed that observers reported this cue type preference outside the context of a speeded task, and Experiment 4 showed empirical measures of this bias to be relatively stable over the course of the task. Together with previous evidence suggesting that observers' decision between intentional cue use and unguided search is also influenced by variations in unguided search efficiency, these findings suggest that voluntary symbolic attention control is mediated by ongoing metacognitive evaluations of demand that are sensitive to perceived variations in the time, effort, and opportunity costs associated with each course of action. Thus, voluntary symbolic attention control is far more complex than previously held. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  9. Introduction to the Theme "New Methods and Novel Therapeutic Approaches in Pharmacology and Toxicology".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insel, Paul A; Amara, Susan G; Blaschke, Terrence F; Meyer, Urs A

    2017-01-06

    Major advances in scientific discovery and insights can result from the development and use of new techniques, as exemplified by the work of Solomon Snyder, who writes a prefatory article in this volume. The Editors have chosen "New Methods and Novel Therapeutic Approaches in Pharmacology and Toxicology" as the Theme for a number of articles in this volume. These include ones that review the development and use of new experimental tools and approaches (e.g., nanobodies and techniques to explore protein-protein interactions), new types of therapeutics (e.g., aptamers and antisense oligonucleotides), and systems pharmacology, which assembles (big) data derived from omics studies together with information regarding drugs and patients. The application of these new methods and therapeutic approaches has the potential to have a major impact on basic and clinical research in pharmacology and toxicology as well as on patient care.

  10. Using a Praxeology Approach to the Rational Choice of Specialized Software in the Preparation of the Computer Science Teacher

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Semenikhina

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available From the positions of Praxeology, the aspects of the forming of the future teachers’ abilities to choose software that turns out to be the most rational for the solving of the professional task are considered in the article (on the example of computer science teachers’ preparation to use dynamic mathematics software (DMS. The forming of such abilities based on a formula "one task – different software" is described. The methodology of organization of such experimental studies on the base of Sumy State Pedagogical University (Ukraine is described. The results of the statistical analysis of data are given on the basis of non-parametric sign test for dependent sample. It is educed that taking into account such approach provides the positive dynamics of the level of future informatics teachers’ preparation at the significance level of 0.05.

  11. Exploring G Protein-Coupled Receptors (GPCRs) Ligand Space via Cheminformatics Approaches: Impact on Rational Drug Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basith, Shaherin; Cui, Minghua; Macalino, Stephani J. Y.; Park, Jongmi; Clavio, Nina A. B.; Kang, Soosung; Choi, Sun

    2018-01-01

    The primary goal of rational drug discovery is the identification of selective ligands which act on single or multiple drug targets to achieve the desired clinical outcome through the exploration of total chemical space. To identify such desired compounds, computational approaches are necessary in predicting their drug-like properties. G Protein-Coupled Receptors (GPCRs) represent one of the largest and most important integral membrane protein families. These receptors serve as increasingly attractive drug targets due to their relevance in the treatment of various diseases, such as inflammatory disorders, metabolic imbalances, cardiac disorders, cancer, monogenic disorders, etc. In the last decade, multitudes of three-dimensional (3D) structures were solved for diverse GPCRs, thus referring to this period as the “golden age for GPCR structural biology.” Moreover, accumulation of data about the chemical properties of GPCR ligands has garnered much interest toward the exploration of GPCR chemical space. Due to the steady increase in the structural, ligand, and functional data of GPCRs, several cheminformatics approaches have been implemented in its drug discovery pipeline. In this review, we mainly focus on the cheminformatics-based paradigms in GPCR drug discovery. We provide a comprehensive view on the ligand– and structure-based cheminformatics approaches which are best illustrated via GPCR case studies. Furthermore, an appropriate combination of ligand-based knowledge with structure-based ones, i.e., integrated approach, which is emerging as a promising strategy for cheminformatics-based GPCR drug design is also discussed. PMID:29593527

  12. Insomnia in childhood and adolescence: clinical aspects, diagnosis, and therapeutic approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magda Lahorgue Nunes

    2015-11-01

    Conclusions: Insomnia complaints in children and adolescents should be taken into account and appropriately investigated by the pediatrician, considering the association with several comorbidities, which must also be diagnosed. The main causes of insomnia and triggering factors vary according to age and development level. The therapeutic approach must include sleep hygiene and behavioral techniques and, in individual cases, pharmacological treatment.

  13. Non-Clinical Models for Neurodegenerative Diseases: Therapeutic Approach and Drug Validation in Animal Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caridad Ivette Fernandez

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In 2016, 19.8% of the Cuban population was aged 60 or over. As a result, age-associated degenerative diseases and other diseases have become priority targets from a prophylactic, diagnostic and therapeutic perspective. As a result, the Cuban biomedical scientific community has addressed its basic, preclinical and epidemiological research in order to rise up to the challenge. A firm step in this direction has been the international congress “State of the art in non-clinical models for neurodegenerative diseases” which has brought together preclinical and clinical researchers, technicians and regulatory staff members from different countries to review the state of the art in neurodegenerations, find unifying ideas, objectives and collaborations or partnership. The objective is to expose the perspectives of new biotechnological products from Cuba and other countries from the diagnostic, therapeutic and neuroprotective point of view. It is crucial, therefore, that the irreplaceable role of laboratory animals in achieving these objectives is understood but they must be used in rational, adequate and ethical manner. We expose the current development trends in this field, being of common interest to the work directed to the search for potential drugs, diagnostic tools and the promotion of changes in lifestyle as a preventive projection.

  14. Cytoreductive nephrectomy vs medical therapy as initial treatment: a rational approach to the sequence question in metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiess, Philippe E; Fishman, Mayer N

    2010-10-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) can be considered as two distinct entities: localized and metastatic disease. We conducted a review of the scientific literature published within the past decade pertaining to cytoreductive nephrectomy for metastatic RCC. Retrospective data and historical prospective series have demonstrated the survival benefit of debulking nephrectomy in well-selected RCC patients. New medical therapies, including vascular endothelial growth factor and mTOR pathway blocking drugs, are active biological agents, with survival improvement and potential regression of metastatic and primary tumors. Our current therapeutic challenge is the optimal integration of multimodal therapy consisting of systemic therapy and surgery including cytoreductive nephrectomy, debulking, and metastasectomy. Empiric data to guide this decision are limited. The decision concerning whether medical or surgical therapy should be the primary treatment approach selected must be made on an individual basis, taking into account patient performance status, clinical parameters, and physician expertise and recommendations, thus making each case a unique therapeutic challenge.

  15. Pragmatics & rationality.

    OpenAIRE

    Allott, N. E.

    2007-01-01

    This thesis is about the reconciliation of realistic views of rationality with inferential-intentional theories of communication. Grice (1957 1975) argued that working out what a speaker meant by an utterance is a matter of inferring the speaker's intentions on the presumption that she is acting rationally. This is abductive inference: inference to the best explanation for the utterance. Thus an utterance both rationalises and causes the interpretation the hearer constructs. Human rationality...

  16. Rational Emotive Approaches to the Problems of Parents with Exceptional Children: A Brief Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McInerney, John F.

    Parents of exceptional children face numerous challenges in their efforts to meet the needs of their child. Reaction to the realization that a problem exists in the child's development or educational achievement may lead to emotional distress which can be self-defeating. Such parents often benefit from a direct approach to addressing these issues…

  17. The Teaching of Mechanics: Some Criticisms, and Suggestions for a Rational Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkin, Keith

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines the common confusion associated with the meaning of mass encountered in modern textbooks, and describes some of the misconceptions to be found in the teaching of mechanics. A new teaching approach is suggested, which may provide a more logical basis for these important ideas.

  18. Photobiomodulation of distinct lineages of human dermal fibroblasts: a rational approach towards the selection of effective light parameters for skin rejuvenation and wound healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mignon, Charles; Uzunbajakava, Natallia E.; Raafs, Bianca; Moolenaar, Mitchel; Botchkareva, Natalia V.; Tobin, Desmond J.

    2016-03-01

    Distinct lineages of human dermal fibroblasts play complementary roles in skin rejuvenation and wound healing, which makes them a target of phototherapy. However, knowledge about differential responses of specific cell lineages to different light parameters and moreover the actual molecular targets remain to be unravelled. The goal of this study was to investigate the impact of a range of parameters of light on the metabolic activity, collagen production, and cell migration of distinct lineages of human dermal fibroblasts. A rational approach was used to identify parameters with high therapeutic potential. Fibroblasts exhibited both inhibitory and cytotoxic change when exposed to a high dose of blue and cyan light in tissue culture medium containing photo-reactive species, but were stimulated by high dose red and near infrared light. Cytotoxic effects were eliminated by refreshing the medium after light exposure by removing potential ROS formed by extracellular photo-reactive species. Importantly, distinct lineages of fibroblasts demonstrated opposite responses to low dose blue light treatment when refreshing the medium after exposure. Low dose blue light treatment also significantly increased collagen production by papillary fibroblasts; high dose significantly retarded closure of the scratch wound without signs of cytotoxicity, and this is likely to have involved effects on both cell migration and proliferation. We recommend careful selection of fibroblast subpopulations and their culture conditions, a systematic approach in choosing and translating treatment parameters, and pursuit of fundamental research on identification of photoreceptors and triggered molecular pathways, while seeking effective parameters to address different stages of skin rejuvenation and wound healing.

  19. Enigma of urethral pain syndrome: why are there so many ascribed etiologies and therapeutic approaches?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillip, Harris; Okewole, Idris; Chilaka, Victor

    2014-06-01

    Urethral pain syndrome has had several sobriquets, which have led to much confusion over the existence of this pathological condition and the useful options in the care of the afflicted patient. Our aim was to explore the proposed etiologies of this syndrome, and to provide a critical analysis of each proposed etiology and present a balanced argument on the plausibility of the proposed etiology and therapeutic approaches. We carried out an English language electronic search in the following databases: Medline, Embase, Amed, Cinahl, Pubmed, Cochrane Library, Trip Database and SUMSearch using the following search terms: urethral syndrome, urethral diseases, urethra, urologic diseases etiology/etiology, presentation, treatment, outcome, therapeutics and treatment from 1951 to 2011. In excess of 200 articles were recovered. With the clearly defined objectives of analyzing the proposed etiologies and therapeutic regimes, two author(s) (HP and IO) perused the abstracts of all the recovered articles, selecting those that addressed the etiologies and therapeutic approaches to treating the urethral pain syndrome. The number of articles was reduced to 25. The full text of all 25 articles were retrieved and reviewed. Through the present article, we hope to elucidate the most probable etiology of this condition whilst simultaneously, advance a logical explanation for the apparent success in the treatment of this condition using a range of different therapeutic modalities. We have carried out a narrative review, which we hope will reduce some of the confusion around this clinical entity by combining the known facts about the disease. © 2014 The Japanese Urological Association.

  20. Immunology of Cryptococcal Infections: Developing a Rational Approach to Patient Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsegeiny, Waleed; Marr, Kieren A; Williamson, Peter R

    2018-01-01

    Cryptococcal meningoencephalitis is responsible for upwards of 15% of HIV-related deaths worldwide and is currently the most common cause of non-viral meningitis in the US, affecting both previously healthy and people with immune suppression caused by cancer chemotherapy, transplantation, and biologic therapies. Despite a continued 30-50% attributable mortality, recommended therapeutic strategies have remained largely unchanged since the 1950s. Recent murine models and human studies examining the role of the immune system in both susceptibility to the infection as well as host damage have begun to influence patient care decisions. The Damage Framework Response, originally proposed in 1999, was recently used to discuss dichotomous etiologies of host damage in cryptococcal disease. These include patients suffering microbiological damage with low host immunity (especially those immunosuppressed with HIV) and those having low (live) microbiological burden but high immune-mediated damage (HIV-related immune reconstitution syndrome and non-HIV-related postinfectious inflammatory response syndrome). Cryptococcal disease in previously healthy hosts, albeit rare, has been known for a long time. Immunophenotyping and dendritic cell-T cell signaling studies on cerebral spinal fluid of these rare patients reveal immune capacity for recognition and T-cell activation pathways including increased levels of HLA-DR and CD56. However, despite effective T-cell signals, brain biopsy and autopsy specimens demonstrated an M2 alternative macrophage polarization and poor phagocytosis of fungal cells. These studies expand the paradigm for cryptococcal disease susceptibility to include a prominent role for immune-mediated damage and suggest a need for careful individual consideration of immune activation during therapy of cryptococcal disease in diverse hosts.

  1. Immunology of Cryptococcal Infections: Developing a Rational Approach to Patient Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waleed Elsegeiny

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Cryptococcal meningoencephalitis is responsible for upwards of 15% of HIV-related deaths worldwide and is currently the most common cause of non-viral meningitis in the US, affecting both previously healthy and people with immune suppression caused by cancer chemotherapy, transplantation, and biologic therapies. Despite a continued 30–50% attributable mortality, recommended therapeutic strategies have remained largely unchanged since the 1950s. Recent murine models and human studies examining the role of the immune system in both susceptibility to the infection as well as host damage have begun to influence patient care decisions. The Damage Framework Response, originally proposed in 1999, was recently used to discuss dichotomous etiologies of host damage in cryptococcal disease. These include patients suffering microbiological damage with low host immunity (especially those immunosuppressed with HIV and those having low (live microbiological burden but high immune-mediated damage (HIV-related immune reconstitution syndrome and non-HIV-related postinfectious inflammatory response syndrome. Cryptococcal disease in previously healthy hosts, albeit rare, has been known for a long time. Immunophenotyping and dendritic cell-T cell signaling studies on cerebral spinal fluid of these rare patients reveal immune capacity for recognition and T-cell activation pathways including increased levels of HLA-DR and CD56. However, despite effective T-cell signals, brain biopsy and autopsy specimens demonstrated an M2 alternative macrophage polarization and poor phagocytosis of fungal cells. These studies expand the paradigm for cryptococcal disease susceptibility to include a prominent role for immune-mediated damage and suggest a need for careful individual consideration of immune activation during therapy of cryptococcal disease in diverse hosts.

  2. Multilevel Molecular Modeling Approach for a Rational Design of Ionic Current Sensors for Nanofluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirch, Alexsandro; de Almeida, James M; Miranda, Caetano R

    2018-05-10

    The complexity displayed by nanofluidic-based systems involves electronic and dynamic aspects occurring across different size and time scales. To properly model such kind of system, we introduced a top-down multilevel approach, combining molecular dynamics simulations (MD) with first-principles electronic transport calculations. The potential of this technique was demonstrated by investigating how the water and ionic flow through a (6,6) carbon nanotube (CNT) influences its electronic transport properties. We showed that the confinement on the CNT favors the partially hydrated Na, Cl, and Li ions to exchange charge with the nanotube. This leads to a change in the electronic transmittance, allowing for the distinguishing of cations from anions. Such an ionic trace may handle an indirect measurement of the ionic current that is recorded as a sensing output. With this case study, we are able to show the potential of this top-down multilevel approach, to be applied on the design of novel nanofluidic devices.

  3. Two Concepts of Rationality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danny Frederick

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The dominant tradition in Western philosophy sees rationality as dictating. Thus rationality may require that we believe the best explanation and simple conceptual truths and that we infer in accordance with evident rules of inference. I argue that, given what we know about the growth of knowledge, this authoritarian concept of rationality leads to absurdities and should be abandoned. I then outline a libertarian concept of rationality, derived from Popper, which eschews the dictates and which sees a rational agent as one who questions, criticises, conjectures and experiments. I argue that, while the libertarian approach escapes the absurdities of the authoritarian, it requires two significant developments and an important clarification to be made fully consistent with itself.

  4. Rational Decision Making as Performative Praxis: Explaining Rationality's Éternel Retour

    OpenAIRE

    Cabantous, L.; Gond, J-P.

    2011-01-01

    Organizational theorists built their knowledge of decision making through a progressive critique of rational choice theory. Their positioning towards rationality, however, is at odds with the observation of rationality persistence in organizational life. This paper addresses this paradox. It proposes a new perspective on rationality that allows the theorizing of the production of rational decisions by organizations. To account for rationality's éternel retour, we approach rational decision ma...

  5. Human iPSC for Therapeutic Approaches to the Nervous System: Present and Future Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Giuseppina Cefalo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Many central nervous system (CNS diseases including stroke, spinal cord injury (SCI, and brain tumors are a significant cause of worldwide morbidity/mortality and yet do not have satisfying treatments. Cell-based therapy to restore lost function or to carry new therapeutic genes is a promising new therapeutic approach, particularly after human iPSCs became available. However, efficient generation of footprint-free and xeno-free human iPSC is a prerequisite for their clinical use. In this paper, we will first summarize the current methodology to obtain footprint- and xeno-free human iPSC. We will then review the current iPSC applications in therapeutic approaches for CNS regeneration and their use as vectors to carry proapoptotic genes for brain tumors and review their applications for modelling of neurological diseases and formulating new therapeutic approaches. Available results will be summarized and compared. Finally, we will discuss current limitations precluding iPSC from being used on large scale for clinical applications and provide an overview of future areas of improvement. In conclusion, significant progress has occurred in deriving iPSC suitable for clinical use in the field of neurological diseases. Current efforts to overcome technical challenges, including reducing labour and cost, will hopefully expedite the integration of this technology in the clinical setting.

  6. A rational approach to predict and modulate stereolability of chiral alpha substituted ketones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirilli, Roberto; Costi, Roberta; Di Santo, Roberto; Gasparrini, Francesco; La Torre, Francesco; Pierini, Marco; Siani, Gabriella

    2009-01-01

    An effective strategy to assess and modulate the stereolability of chiral alpha substituted ketones (C alpha SKs) is presented. The tendency of C alpha SKs to retain or change their configuration in water is analyzed as a function of thermodynamic proton-release attitude of alpha asymmetric atoms inside the structures by linear Brønsted correlations. A molecular modeling procedure was developed to analyze and suggest chemical modifications of C alpha SKs in view to obtain the desired grade of stereochemical stability. The approach was employed to predict the tendency to enantiomerize in water of two ketones (1 and 2) endowed with inhibitory activity against monoamine oxidases (MAOs) and the results were confirmed by experimental kinetics measurements performed in organic medium. As a demonstration of practical potentialities of the approach, four new structures, conceived as simple chemical modifications of 1 and 2, were designed to improve/reduce the stereostability grade of the starting anti-MAO ketones. The possibility to extend easily the procedure to other classes of C-H acids appears of interest.

  7. Rationalizing the GMO Debate: The Ordonomic Approach to Addressing Agricultural Myths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hielscher, Stefan; Pies, Ingo; Valentinov, Vladislav; Chatalova, Lioudmila

    2016-05-09

    The public discourse on the acceptability of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) is not only controversial, but also infused with highly emotional and moralizing rhetoric. Although the assessment of risks and benefits of GMOs must be a scientific exercise, many debates on this issue seem to remain impervious to scientific evidence. In many cases, the moral psychology attributes of the general public create incentives for both GMO opponents and proponents to pursue misleading public campaigns, which impede the comprehensive assessment of the full spectrum of the risks and benefits of GMOs. The ordonomic approach to economic ethics introduced in this research note is helpful for disentangling the socio-economic and moral components of the GMO debate by re- and deconstructing moral claims.

  8. Time to foster a rational approach to preventing cardiovascular morbid events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohn, Jay N; Duprez, Daniel A

    2008-07-29

    Efforts to prevent atherosclerotic morbid events have focused primarily on risk factor prevention and intervention. These approaches, based on the statistical association of risk factors with events, have dominated clinical practice in the last generation. Because the cardiovascular abnormalities eventuating in morbid events are detectable in the arteries and heart before the development of symptomatic disease, recent efforts have focused on identifying the presence of these abnormalities as a more sensitive and specific guide to the need for therapy. Advances in noninvasive techniques for studying the vasculature and the left ventricle now provide the opportunity to use early disease rather than risk factors as the tool for clinical decision making. A disease scoring system has been developed using 10 tests of vascular and cardiac function and structure. More extensive data to confirm the sensitivity and specificity of this scoring system and to demonstrate its utility in tracking the response to therapy are needed to justify widespread application in clinical practice.

  9. A multi-attribute approach to the rationalization of radiation protection options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lombard, J.; Oudiz, A.

    1979-01-01

    Application of the ALARA principle requires the use of quantitative methods such as cost-benefit, cost-effectiveness, multi-attribute and other analyses. An example is presented of the application of a multi-attribute analysis in connection with the determination of ALARA levels for the light-water fuel cycle. Thirty-nine processing options for waste from different fuel cycle facilities have been identified. These are categorized on the basis of cost, of performance in terms of reduction of collective and individual detriment and, finally, of a subjective index of data reliability. Multi-attribute analysis can be used for classifying options on the basis of these four criteria. In particular, a method known as ''total outclassing analysis'' can be used for initial classification of options independently of the ''implicit value of human life''. The value of total outclassing analysis lies in the fact that it can be used for a classification of options which takes collective and individual detriment simultaneously into account. It thus represents a satisfactory synthesis of the individual approach (critical groups) and the collective approach. A finer classification can be obtained by carrying out a non-total outclassing analysis (ELECTRE method). At this stage the weighting of criteria becomes a necessity. The results, however, are fairly insensitive to modification of the ''implicit value of human life''. Generally, the study shows traditional radiation protection options to be justified, especially where the trapping of iodine in reactors is concerned, and stresses the value of retaining noble gases in reprocessing plants

  10. Narrative Financial Therapy: Integrating a Financial Planning Approach with Therapeutic Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan A. McCoy

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The article serves as one of the first attempts to develop an integrated theoretical approach to financial therapy that can be used by practitioners from multiple disciplines. The presented approach integrates the components of the six-step financial planning process with components of empirically-supported therapeutic methods. This integration provides the foundation for a manualized approach to financial therapy, shaped by the writings of narrative theorists and select cognitive-behavioral interventions that can be used both by mental health and financial professionals.

  11. Rational design of mesoporous metals and related nanomaterials by a soft-template approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi, Yusuke; Kuroda, Kazuyuki

    2008-04-07

    We review recent developments in the preparation of mesoporous metals and related metal-based nanomaterials. Among the many types of mesoporous materials, mesoporous metals hold promise for a wide range of potential applications, such as in electronic devices, magnetic recording media, and metal catalysts, owing to their metallic frameworks. Mesoporous metals with highly ordered networks and narrow pore-size distributions have traditionally been produced by using mesoporous silica as a hard template. This method involves the formation of an original template followed by deposition of metals within the mesopores and subsequent removal of the template. Another synthetic method is the direct-template approach from lyotropic liquid crystals (LLCs) made of nonionic surfactants at high concentrations. Direct-template synthesis creates a novel avenue for the production of mesoporous metals as well as related metal-based nanomaterials. Many mesoporous metals have been prepared by the chemical or electrochemical reduction of metal salts dissolved in aqueous LLC domains. As a soft template, LLCs are more versatile and therefore more advantageous than hard templates. It is possible to produce various nanostructures (e.g., lamellar, 2D hexagonal (p6mm), and 3D cubic (Ia\\3d)), nanoparticles, and nanotubes simply by controlling the composition of the reaction bath.

  12. Study of rational energy consumption in electric appliances. An integrated approach; Estudio de racionalizacion del consumo energetico en electrodomesticos. Un enfoque integrador

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massa, Pablo A.; Romero Tirado, Rene R. [La Plata Univ. Nacional (Argentina). Facultad de Ingenieria. Dept. de Electrotecnia

    1997-12-31

    This work presents a global and integrated approach about rational energy consumption concerning the use of electric appliances based on studies carried out in this investigation and information obtained through a joint action of government agents and electric power manufacturers, producers and distributors. It also presents a program named `procaeh`(home electric appliances quality program) in the scope of the communications and energy bureau and energy rational use (URE) management 8 refs., 2 figs., 7 tabs.; e-mail: massa at isis.unlp.edu.ar

  13. Seasonal rationalization of river water quality sampling locations: a comparative study of the modified Sanders and multivariate statistical approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varekar, Vikas; Karmakar, Subhankar; Jha, Ramakar

    2016-02-01

    The design of surface water quality sampling location is a crucial decision-making process for rationalization of monitoring network. The quantity, quality, and types of available dataset (watershed characteristics and water quality data) may affect the selection of appropriate design methodology. The modified Sanders approach and multivariate statistical techniques [particularly factor analysis (FA)/principal component analysis (PCA)] are well-accepted and widely used techniques for design of sampling locations. However, their performance may vary significantly with quantity, quality, and types of available dataset. In this paper, an attempt has been made to evaluate performance of these techniques by accounting the effect of seasonal variation, under a situation of limited water quality data but extensive watershed characteristics information, as continuous and consistent river water quality data is usually difficult to obtain, whereas watershed information may be made available through application of geospatial techniques. A case study of Kali River, Western Uttar Pradesh, India, is selected for the analysis. The monitoring was carried out at 16 sampling locations. The discrete and diffuse pollution loads at different sampling sites were estimated and accounted using modified Sanders approach, whereas the monitored physical and chemical water quality parameters were utilized as inputs for FA/PCA. The designed optimum number of sampling locations for monsoon and non-monsoon seasons by modified Sanders approach are eight and seven while that for FA/PCA are eleven and nine, respectively. Less variation in the number and locations of designed sampling sites were obtained by both techniques, which shows stability of results. A geospatial analysis has also been carried out to check the significance of designed sampling location with respect to river basin characteristics and land use of the study area. Both methods are equally efficient; however, modified Sanders

  14. ALS Pathogenesis and Therapeutic Approaches: The Role of Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Extracellular Vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonafede, Roberta; Mariotti, Raffaella

    2017-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease characterized by progressive muscle paralysis determined by the degeneration of motoneurons in the motor cortex brainstem and spinal cord. The ALS pathogenetic mechanisms are still unclear, despite the wealth of studies demonstrating the involvement of several altered signaling pathways, such as mitochondrial dysfunction, glutamate excitotoxicity, oxidative stress and neuroinflammation. To date, the proposed therapeutic strategies are targeted to one or a few of these alterations, resulting in only a minimal effect on disease course and survival of ALS patients. The involvement of different mechanisms in ALS pathogenesis underlines the need for a therapeutic approach targeted to multiple aspects. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) can support motoneurons and surrounding cells, reduce inflammation, stimulate tissue regeneration and release growth factors. On this basis, MSC have been proposed as promising candidates to treat ALS. However, due to the drawbacks of cell therapy, the possible therapeutic use of extracellular vesicles (EVs) released by stem cells is raising increasing interest. The present review summarizes the main pathological mechanisms involved in ALS and the related therapeutic approaches proposed to date, focusing on MSC therapy and their preclinical and clinical applications. Moreover, the nature and characteristics of EVs and their role in recapitulating the effect of stem cells are discussed, elucidating how and why these vesicles could provide novel opportunities for ALS treatment.

  15. NANOINTERACT: A rational approach to the interaction between nanoscale materials and living matter?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lynch, Iseult; Linse, Sara; Howard, C Vyvyan; Stepnik, Maciej; Rydzynski, Konrad; Hanrahan, John; Jong, Wim de; Langevin, Dominique; Raedler, Joachim; Parak, Wolfgang; Volkov, Yuri; Radomski, Marek; Thomas, Robert; Klein, Jacob; Barron, Andrew A; Janssen, Colin; Lyons, Fiona M; Quinn, Francis; Swennen, Bert; Cuypers, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The importance of understanding the interactions between nanoscale materials and living matter has now begun to be appreciated by an extraordinaryly large range of stakeholders, including researchers, industry, governments and society, all of whom appreciate both the opportunities presented by and challenges raised by this arena of research. Not only does it open up new directions in nanomedicine and nanodiagnostics, but it also offers the chance to implement nanotechnology across all industry in a safe and responsible manner. The underlying reasons for this arena as a new scientific paradigm are real and durable. Less than 100 nm nanoparticles can enter cells, less that 40 nm they can enter cell nucleus, and less that 35 nm they can pass through the blood brain barrier. These are fundamental length scales of biological relevance that will ensure that engineered nanoscience will impinge on biology and medicine for many decades to come. One important issue is the current lack of reproducibility of the outcomes of many experiments in this arena. Differences are likely a consequence of such things as uncontrolled nanoparticle aggregation leading to unpredictable doses being presented to cells, interference of the nanoparticles themselves with many of the tests being applied, differences in the degree of confluency of the cells used, and a host of other factors. NanoInteract has shown how careful control of all aspects of the test system, combined with round robin type approaches, can help resolve these issues and begin to ensure that the field can become a quantitative science. The basic principle of NanoInteract is that given identical nanomaterials, cells and biological materials, and using a common protocol, experiments must yield identical answers. Thus, any deviations result from errors in (applying) the protocol which can be tracked and eliminated, until quantitatively reproducible results are obtained by any researcher in any location. This paper outlines the

  16. NANOINTERACT: A rational approach to the interaction between nanoscale materials and living matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Iseult; Linse, Sara; Vyvyan Howard, C.; Stepnik, Maciej; Rydzynski, Konrad; Hanrahan, John; de Jong, Wim; Langevin, Dominique; Rädler, Joachim; Parak, Wolfgang; Volkov, Yuri; Radomski, Marek; Thomas, Robert; Klein, Jacob; Barron, Andrew A.; Janssen, Colin; Lyons, Fiona M.; Quinn, Francis; Swennen, Bert; Cuypers, Peter; Duffy, Angela; Dawson, Kenneth A.

    2009-05-01

    The importance of understanding the interactions between nanoscale materials and living matter has now begun to be appreciated by an extraordinaryly large range of stakeholders, including researchers, industry, governments and society, all of whom appreciate both the opportunities presented by and challenges raised by this arena of research. Not only does it open up new directions in nanomedicine and nanodiagnostics, but it also offers the chance to implement nanotechnology across all industry in a safe and responsible manner. The underlying reasons for this arena as a new scientific paradigm are real and durable. Less than 100 nm nanoparticles can enter cells, less that 40 nm they can enter cell nucleus, and less that 35 nm they can pass through the blood brain barrier. These are fundamental length scales of biological relevance that will ensure that engineered nanoscience will impinge on biology and medicine for many decades to come. One important issue is the current lack of reproducibility of the outcomes of many experiments in this arena. Differences are likely a consequence of such things as uncontrolled nanoparticle aggregation leading to unpredictable doses being presented to cells, interference of the nanoparticles themselves with many of the tests being applied, differences in the degree of confluency of the cells used, and a host of other factors. NanoInteract has shown how careful control of all aspects of the test system, combined with round robin type approaches, can help resolve these issues and begin to ensure that the field can become a quantitative science. The basic principle of NanoInteract is that given identical nanomaterials, cells and biological materials, and using a common protocol, experiments must yield identical answers. Thus, any deviations result from errors in (applying) the protocol which can be tracked and eliminated, until quantitatively reproducible results are obtained by any researcher in any location. This paper outlines the

  17. Weighing the Anti-Ischemic Benefits and Bleeding Risks from Aspirin Therapy: a Rational Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugani, Sagar; Ames, Jeffrey M; Manson, JoAnn E; Mora, Samia

    2018-02-21

    The role of aspirin in secondary cardiovascular prevention is well understood; however, the role in primary prevention is less clear, and requires careful balancing of potential benefits with risks. Here, we summarize the evidence base on the benefits and risks of aspirin therapy, discuss clinical practice guidelines and decision support tools to assist in initiating aspirin therapy, and highlight ongoing trials that may clarify the role of aspirin in cardiovascular disease prevention. In 2016, the USPSTF released guidelines on the use of aspirin for primary prevention. Based on 11 trials (n = 118,445), aspirin significantly reduced all-cause mortality and nonfatal myocardial infarction, and in 7 trials that evaluated aspirin ≤ 100 mg/day, there was significant reduction in nonfatal stroke. The USPSTF recommends individualized use of aspirin based on factors including age, 10-year atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease risk score, and bleeding risk. Several ongoing trials are evaluating the role of aspirin in primary prevention, secondary prevention, and in combination therapy for atrial fibrillation. Evidence-based approaches to aspirin use should consider the anti-ischemic benefits and bleeding risks from aspirin. In this era of precision medicine, tools that provide the personalized benefit to risk assessment, such as the freely available clinical decision support tool (Aspirin-Guide), can be easily incorporated into the electronic health record and facilitate more informed decisions about initiating aspirin therapy for primary prevention. Aspirin has a complex matrix of benefits and risks, and its use in primary prevention requires individualized decision-making. Results from ongoing trials may guide healthcare providers in identifying appropriate candidates for aspirin therapy.

  18. Rational approach to solvent system selection for liquid-liquid extraction-assisted sample pretreatment in counter-current chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiajia; Gu, Dongyu; Wang, Miao; Guo, Xinfeng; Li, Haoquan; Dong, Yue; Guo, Hong; Wang, Yi; Fan, Mengqi; Yang, Yi

    2017-05-15

    A rational liquid-liquid extraction approach was established to pre-treat samples for high-speed counter-current chromatography (HSCCC). n-Hexane-ethyl acetate-methanol-water (4:5:4:5, v/v) and (1:5:1:5, v/v) were selected as solvent systems for liquid-liquid extraction by systematically screening K of target compounds to remove low- and high-polarity impurities in the sample, respectively. After liquid-liquid extraction was performed, 1.4g of crude sample II was obtained from 18.5g of crude sample I which was extracted from the flowers of Robinia pseudoacacia L., and then separated with HSCCC by using a solvent system composed of n-hexane-ethyl acetate-methanol-water (1:2:1:2, v/v). As a result, 31mg of robinin and 37mg of kaempferol 7-O-α-l-rhamnopyranoside were isolated from 200mg of crude sample II in a single run of HSCCC. A scale-up separation was also performed, and 160mg of robinin with 95% purity and 188mg of kaempferol 7-O-α-l-rhamnopyranoside with 97% purity were produced from 1.2g of crude sample II. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Structure-function dependence and allopurinol inhibition of ratiosensitizer/nitroreductase interaction: approaches to improving therapeutic rations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raleigh, J.A.; Shum, F.Y.; Koziol, D.R.; Saunders, W.M.

    1980-01-01

    Normal tissue toxicity of nitroaromatic radiosensitizers may originate in radiosensitizer/nitroreductase interaction. A study of two mammalian cell nitroreductases, xanthine oxidase and NADH cytochrome c reductase, shows that the efficiency of electron transfer is dependent on sensitizer electron affinity and not lipid solubility. Misonidazole and its demethylated metabolite (RO-05-9963), for example, are equally efficient as electron acceptors from xanthine oxidase. The only exception to the electron affinity correlation is m-nitrobenzamidine hydrochloride xanthine oxidase from its cofactor, xanthine. Allopurinol inhibits electron transfer and might be a useful adjuvant to the nitroreductases in vivo is deduced from the observation that allopurinol significantly alters the serum lifetimes in mice of misonidazole and RO-05-9963

  20. [From tic disorders to Tourette syndrome: current data, comorbidities, and therapeutic approach in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fourneret, P; Desombre, H; Broussolle, E

    2014-06-01

    Motor tics are frequently observed in children during development. Usually transient and benign, they can become chronic over time, join various morbid disorders (vocal tics, attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder, and obsessive-compulsive disorders) and move toward genuine Tourette syndrome. In this case, it will be necessary to prevent impacts - mainly in terms of quality of life and emotional and relational problems - using a global therapeutic strategy combining psychoeducational approaches with appropriate medication. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Neoadjuvant Therapy in Patients with Pancreatic Cancer: A Disappointing Therapeutic Approach?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmermann, Carolin; Folprecht, Gunnar; Zips, Daniel; Pilarsky, Christian; Saeger, Hans Detlev; Grutzmann, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a devastating disease. It is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death in Germany. The incidence in 2003/2004 was 16 cases per 100.000 inhabitants. Of all carcinomas, pancreatic cancer has the highest mortality rate, with one- and five-year survival rates of 25% and less than 5%, respectively, regardless of the stage at diagnosis. These low survival rates demonstrate the poor prognosis of this carcinoma. Previous therapeutic approaches including surgical resection combined with adjuvant therapy or palliative chemoradiation have not achieved satisfactory results with respect to overall survival. Therefore, it is necessary to evaluate new therapeutic approaches. Neoadjuvant therapy is an interesting therapeutic option for patients with pancreatic cancer. For selected patients with borderline or unresectable disease, neoadjuvant therapy offers the potential for tumor downstaging, increasing the probability of a margin-negative resection and decreasing the occurrence of lymph node metastasis. Currently, there is no universally accepted approach for treating patients with pancreatic cancer in the neoadjuvant setting. In this review, the most common neoadjuvant strategies will be described, compared and discussed

  2. Baseline rationing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Jens Leth; Moreno-Ternero, Juan D.; Østerdal, Lars Peter Raahave

    The standard problem of adjudicating conflicting claims describes a situation in which a given amount of a divisible good has to be allocated among agents who hold claims against it exceeding the available amount. This paper considers more general rationing problems in which, in addition to claims...... to international protocols for the reduction of greenhouse emissions, or water distribution in drought periods. We define a family of allocation methods for such general rationing problems - called baseline rationing rules - and provide an axiomatic characterization for it. Any baseline rationing rule within...... the family is associated with a standard rule and we show that if the latter obeys some properties reflecting principles of impartiality, priority and solidarity, the former obeys them too....

  3. Adolescent rationality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moshman, David

    2013-01-01

    Adolescents are commonly seen as irrational, a position supported to varying degrees by many developmentalists, who often appeal to recent research on adolescent brains. Careful review of relevant evidence, however, shows that (1) adults are less rational than is generally assumed, (2) adolescents (and adults) are categorically different from children with respect to the attainment of advanced levels of rationality and psychological functioning, and (3) adolescents and adults do not differ categorically from each other with respect to any rational competencies, irrational tendencies, brain structures, or neurological functioning. Development often continues in adolescence and beyond but categorical claims about adolescents as distinct from adults cannot be justified. A review of U.S. Supreme Court decisions concerning intellectual freedom, reproductive freedom, and criminal responsibility shows ongoing ambivalence and confusion about the rationality of adolescents. Developmental theory and research suggest that adolescents should be conceptualized as young adults, not immature brains, with important implications for their roles, rights, and responsibilities.

  4. Hydrogen initiative: An integrated approach toward rational nanocatalyst design for hydrogen production. Technical Report-Year 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vlachos, Dionisios G. [Univ. of Delaware, Newark, DE (United States); Buttrey, Douglas J. [Univ. of Delaware, Newark, DE (United States); Lauterbach, Jochen A. [Univ. of Delaware, Newark, DE (United States)

    2007-03-29

    The overall objective of this grant is to develop a rational framework for the discovery of low cost, robust, and active nano-catalysts that will enable efficient hydrogen production. Our approach will be the first demonstration of integrated multiscale model, nano-catalyst synthesis, and nanoscale characterization assisted high throughput experimentation (HTE). We will initially demonstrate our approach with ammonia decomposition on noble metal catalysts. Our research focuses on many elements of the Hydrogen Initiative in the Focus Area of “Design of Catalysts at the Nanoscale’. It combines high-throughput screening methods with various nanostructure synthesis protocols, advanced measurements, novel in situ and ex situ characterization techniques, and multiscale theory, modeling and simulation. This project directly addresses several of the long-term goals of the DOE/BES program. In particular, new nanoscale catalytic materials will be synthesized, characterized and modeled for the production of hydrogen from ammonia and a computational framework will be developed for efficient extraction of information from experimental data and for rational design of catalysts whose impact goes well beyond the proposed hydrogen production project. In the first year of the grant, we have carried out HTE screening using a 16 parallel microreactor coupled with an FTIR analysis system. We screened nearly twenty single metals and several bimetallic catalysts as a function of temperature, catalyst loading, inlet composition, and temperature (order of 400 experiments). We have found that Ru is the best single metal catalyst and no better catalysts were found among the library of bimetallics we have created so far. Furthermore, we have investigated promoting effects (i.e., K, Cs, and Ba) of the Ru catalyst. We have found that K is the dominant promoter of increased Ru activity. Response surface experimental design has led to substantial improvements of the Ru catalyst with promotion

  5. Insights into cell-free therapeutic approach: Role of stem cell "soup-ernatant".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raik, Shalini; Kumar, Ajay; Bhattacharyya, Shalmoli

    2018-03-01

    Current advances in medicine have revolutionized the field of regenerative medicine dramatically with newly evolved therapies for repair or replacement of degenerating or injured tissues. Stem cells (SCs) can be harvested from different sources for clinical therapeutics, which include fetal tissues, umbilical cord blood, embryos, and adult tissues. SCs can be isolated and differentiated into desired lineages for tissue regeneration and cell replacement therapy. However, several loopholes need to be addressed properly before this can be extended for large-scale therapeutic application. These include a careful approach for patient safety during SC treatments and tolerance of recipients. SC treatments are associated with a number of risk factors and require successful integration and survival of transplanted cells in the desired microenvironment with concurrent tissue regeneration. Recent studies have focused on developing alternatives that can replace the cell-based therapy using paracrine factors. The development of stem "cell free" therapies can be devoted mainly to the use of soluble factors (secretome), extracellular vesicles, and mitochondrial transfer. The present review emphasizes on the paradigms related to the use of SC-based therapeutics and the potential applications of a cell-free approach as an alternative to cell-based therapy in the area of regenerative medicine. © 2017 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  6. Bone Marrow-Derived Cells as a Therapeutic Approach to Optic Nerve Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise A. Mesentier-Louro

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Following optic nerve injury associated with acute or progressive diseases, retinal ganglion cells (RGCs of adult mammals degenerate and undergo apoptosis. These diseases have limited therapeutic options, due to the low inherent capacity of RGCs to regenerate and due to the inhibitory milieu of the central nervous system. Among the numerous treatment approaches investigated to stimulate neuronal survival and axonal extension, cell transplantation emerges as a promising option. This review focuses on cell therapies with bone marrow mononuclear cells and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells, which have shown positive therapeutic effects in animal models of optic neuropathies. Different aspects of available preclinical studies are analyzed, including cell distribution, potential doses, routes of administration, and mechanisms of action. Finally, published and ongoing clinical trials are summarized.

  7. Host-Directed Therapeutics as a Novel Approach for Tuberculosis Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ye-Ram; Yang, Chul-Su

    2017-09-28

    Despite significant efforts to improve the treatment of tuberculosis (TB), it remains a prevalent infectious disease worldwide owing to the limitations of current TB therapeutic regimens. Recent work on novel TB treatment strategies has suggested that directly targeting host factors may be beneficial for TB treatment. Such strategies, termed host-directed therapeutics (HDTs), focus on host-pathogen interactions. HDTs may be more effective than the currently approved TB drugs, which are limited by the long durations of treatment needed and the emergence of drug-resistant strains. Targets of HDTs include host factors such as cytokines, immune checkpoints, immune cell functions, and essential enzyme activities. This review article discusses examples of potentially promising HDTs and introduces novel approaches for their development.

  8. A rational approach to estimating the surgical demand elasticity needed to guide manpower reallocation during contagious outbreaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsao, Hsiao-Mei; Sun, Ying-Chou; Liou, Der-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Emerging infectious diseases continue to pose serious threats to global public health. So far, however, few published study has addressed the need for manpower reallocation needed in hospitals when such a serious contagious outbreak occurs. To quantify the demand elasticity of the major surgery types in order to guide future manpower reallocation during contagious outbreaks. Based on a nationwide research database in Taiwan, we extracted the monthly volumes of major surgery types for the period 1998-2003, which covered the SARS period, in order to carry out a time series analysis. The demand elasticity of each surgery type was then estimated by autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) analysis. During the study period, the surgical volumes of most selected surgery types either increased or remained steady. We categorized these surgery types into low-, moderate- and high-elastic groups according to their demand elasticity. Appendectomy, 'open reduction of fracture with internal fixation' and 'free skin graft' were in the low demand elasticity group. Transurethral prostatectomy and extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) were in the high demand elasticity group. The manpower of the departments carrying out the surgeries with low demand elasticity should be maintained during outbreaks. In contrast, departments in charge of surgeries mainly with high demand elasticity, like urology departments, may be in a position to have part of their staff reallocated. Taking advantage of the demand variation during the SARS period in 2003, we adopted the concept of demand elasticity and used a time series approach to figure out an effective index of demand elasticity for various types of surgery that could be used as a rational reference to carry out manpower reallocation during contagious outbreak situations.

  9. Combined analgesics in (headache) pain therapy: shotgun approach or precise multi-target therapeutics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straube, Andreas; Aicher, Bernhard; Fiebich, Bernd L; Haag, Gunther

    2011-03-31

    Pain in general and headache in particular are characterized by a change in activity in brain areas involved in pain processing. The therapeutic challenge is to identify drugs with molecular targets that restore the healthy state, resulting in meaningful pain relief or even freedom from pain. Different aspects of pain perception, i.e. sensory and affective components, also explain why there is not just one single target structure for therapeutic approaches to pain. A network of brain areas ("pain matrix") are involved in pain perception and pain control. This diversification of the pain system explains why a wide range of molecularly different substances can be used in the treatment of different pain states and why in recent years more and more studies have described a superior efficacy of a precise multi-target combination therapy compared to therapy with monotherapeutics. In this article, we discuss the available literature on the effects of several fixed-dose combinations in the treatment of headaches and discuss the evidence in support of the role of combination therapy in the pharmacotherapy of pain, particularly of headaches. The scientific rationale behind multi-target combinations is the therapeutic benefit that could not be achieved by the individual constituents and that the single substances of the combinations act together additively or even multiplicatively and cooperate to achieve a completeness of the desired therapeutic effect.As an example the fixed-dose combination of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), paracetamol (acetaminophen) and caffeine is reviewed in detail. The major advantage of using such a fixed combination is that the active ingredients act on different but distinct molecular targets and thus are able to act on more signalling cascades involved in pain than most single analgesics without adding more side effects to the therapy. Multitarget therapeutics like combined analgesics broaden the array of therapeutic options, enable the completeness

  10. Combined analgesics in (headache pain therapy: shotgun approach or precise multi-target therapeutics?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiebich Bernd L

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pain in general and headache in particular are characterized by a change in activity in brain areas involved in pain processing. The therapeutic challenge is to identify drugs with molecular targets that restore the healthy state, resulting in meaningful pain relief or even freedom from pain. Different aspects of pain perception, i.e. sensory and affective components, also explain why there is not just one single target structure for therapeutic approaches to pain. A network of brain areas ("pain matrix" are involved in pain perception and pain control. This diversification of the pain system explains why a wide range of molecularly different substances can be used in the treatment of different pain states and why in recent years more and more studies have described a superior efficacy of a precise multi-target combination therapy compared to therapy with monotherapeutics. Discussion In this article, we discuss the available literature on the effects of several fixed-dose combinations in the treatment of headaches and discuss the evidence in support of the role of combination therapy in the pharmacotherapy of pain, particularly of headaches. The scientific rationale behind multi-target combinations is the therapeutic benefit that could not be achieved by the individual constituents and that the single substances of the combinations act together additively or even multiplicatively and cooperate to achieve a completeness of the desired therapeutic effect. As an example the fixesd-dose combination of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA, paracetamol (acetaminophen and caffeine is reviewed in detail. The major advantage of using such a fixed combination is that the active ingredients act on different but distinct molecular targets and thus are able to act on more signalling cascades involved in pain than most single analgesics without adding more side effects to the therapy. Summary Multitarget therapeutics like combined analgesics broaden

  11. Combined analgesics in (headache) pain therapy: shotgun approach or precise multi-target therapeutics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Pain in general and headache in particular are characterized by a change in activity in brain areas involved in pain processing. The therapeutic challenge is to identify drugs with molecular targets that restore the healthy state, resulting in meaningful pain relief or even freedom from pain. Different aspects of pain perception, i.e. sensory and affective components, also explain why there is not just one single target structure for therapeutic approaches to pain. A network of brain areas ("pain matrix") are involved in pain perception and pain control. This diversification of the pain system explains why a wide range of molecularly different substances can be used in the treatment of different pain states and why in recent years more and more studies have described a superior efficacy of a precise multi-target combination therapy compared to therapy with monotherapeutics. Discussion In this article, we discuss the available literature on the effects of several fixed-dose combinations in the treatment of headaches and discuss the evidence in support of the role of combination therapy in the pharmacotherapy of pain, particularly of headaches. The scientific rationale behind multi-target combinations is the therapeutic benefit that could not be achieved by the individual constituents and that the single substances of the combinations act together additively or even multiplicatively and cooperate to achieve a completeness of the desired therapeutic effect. As an example the fixesd-dose combination of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), paracetamol (acetaminophen) and caffeine is reviewed in detail. The major advantage of using such a fixed combination is that the active ingredients act on different but distinct molecular targets and thus are able to act on more signalling cascades involved in pain than most single analgesics without adding more side effects to the therapy. Summary Multitarget therapeutics like combined analgesics broaden the array of therapeutic

  12. Rational BRDF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacanowski, Romain; Salazar Celis, Oliver; Schlick, Christophe; Granier, Xavier; Poulin, Pierre; Cuyt, Annie

    2012-11-01

    Over the last two decades, much effort has been devoted to accurately measuring Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Functions (BRDFs) of real-world materials and to use efficiently the resulting data for rendering. Because of their large size, it is difficult to use directly measured BRDFs for real-time applications, and fitting the most sophisticated analytical BRDF models is still a complex task. In this paper, we introduce Rational BRDF, a general-purpose and efficient representation for arbitrary BRDFs, based on Rational Functions (RFs). Using an adapted parametrization, we demonstrate how Rational BRDFs offer 1) a more compact and efficient representation using low-degree RFs, 2) an accurate fitting of measured materials with guaranteed control of the residual error, and 3) efficient importance sampling by applying the same fitting process to determine the inverse of the Cumulative Distribution Function (CDF) generated from the BRDF for use in Monte-Carlo rendering.

  13. Rational emotions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meshulam, Meir; Winter, Eyal; Ben-Shakhar, Gershon; Aharon, Itzhak

    2012-01-01

    We present here the concept of rational emotions: Emotions may be directly controlled and utilized in a conscious, analytic fashion, enabling an individual to size up a situation, to determine that a certain "mental state" is strategically advantageous and adjust accordingly. Building on the growing body of literature recognizing the vital role of emotions in determining decisions, we explore the complementary role of rational choice in choosing emotional states. Participants played the role of "recipient" in the dictator game, in which an anonymous "dictator" decides how to split an amount of money between himself and the recipient. A subset of recipients was given a monetary incentive to be angry at low-split offers. That subset demonstrated increased physiological arousal at low offers relative to high offers as well as more anger than other participants. These results provide a fresh outlook on human decision-making and contribute to the continuing effort to build more complete models of rational behavior.

  14. Rational decision making in a wide scenario of different minimally invasive lumbar interbody fusion approaches and devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimenta, Luiz; Tohmeh, Antoine; Jones, David; Amaral, Rodrigo; Marchi, Luis; Oliveira, Leonardo; Pittman, Bruce C; Bae, Hyun

    2018-03-01

    With the proliferation of a variety of modern MIS spine surgery procedures, it is mandatory that the surgeon dominate all aspects involved in surgical indication. The information related to the decision making in patient selection for specific procedures is mandatory for surgical success. The objective of this study is to present decision-making criteria in minimally invasive surgery (MIS) selection for a variety of patients and pathologies. In this article, practicing surgeons who specialize in various MIS approaches for spinal fusion were engaged to provide expert opinion and literature review on decision making criteria for several MIS procedures. Pros, cons, relative limitations, and case examples are provided for patient selection in treatment with MIS posterolateral fusion (MIS-PLF), mini anterior lumbar interbody fusion (mini-ALIF), lateral interbody fusion (LLIF), MIS posterior lumbar interbody fusion (MIS-PLIF) and MIS transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MIS-TLIF). There is a variety of aspects to consider when deciding which modern MIS surgical approach is most appropriate to use based on patient and pathologic characteristics. The surgeon must adapt them to the characteristic of each type of patients, helping them to choose the most effective and efficient therapeutic option for each case.

  15. Novel therapeutic approach targeting the HIF-HRE system in the kidney.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nangaku, Masaomi

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies emphasize the role of chronic hypoxia in the tubulointerstitium as a final common pathway to end-stage renal disease. Therefore, therapeutic approaches which target the chronic hypoxia should prove effective against a broad range of renal diseases. Many of hypoxia-triggered protective mechanisms are hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-dependent. Although HIF-1 alpha and HIF-2 alpha share both structural and functional similarity, they have different localization and can contribute in a non-redundant manner. While gene transfer of constitutively active HIF has been shown effective, pharmacological approaches to activate HIF are more desirable. Oxygen-dependent activation of prolyl hydroxylases (PHD) regulates the amount of HIF by degradation of this transcription factor. Therefore, PHD inhibitors have been the focus of recent studies on novel strategies to stabilize HIF. Cobalt is one of the inhibitors of PHD, and stimulation of HIF with cobalt is effective in a variety of kidney disease models. Furthermore, crystal structures of the catalytic domain of human prolyl hydroxylase 2 have been clarified recently. The structure aids in the design of PHD selective inhibitors for the treatment of hypoxic tissue injury. Current advance has elucidated the detailed mechanism of hypoxia-induced transcription, giving hope for the development of novel therapeutic approaches against hypoxia.

  16. ABO-incompatible blood transfusion and invasive therapeutic approaches during pediatric cardiopulmonary bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliç, Yasin; Akpek, Elif A; Dönmez, Asli; Ozkan, Süleyman; Perfusionist, Güray Yener; Aslamaci, Sait

    2008-10-01

    Human error has been identified as a major source of ABO-incompatible blood transfusion which most often results from blood being given to the wrong patient. We present a case of inadvertent administration of ABO-incompatible blood to a 6-mo-old child who underwent congenital heart surgery and discuss the use of invasive therapeutic approaches. Invasive techniques included total circulatory arrest and large-volume exchange transfusion, along with conventional ultrafiltration and plasmapheresis, which could all be performed rapidly and effectively. The combination of standard pharmacologic therapies and alternative invasive techniques after a massive ABO-incompatible blood transfusion led to a favorable outcome in our patient.

  17. A Therapeutic Approach to Teaching Poetry: Individual Development, Psychology, and Social Reparation. Psychoanalysis, Education and Social Transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Todd O.

    2012-01-01

    A Therapeutic Approach to Teaching Poetry develops a poetry pedagogy that offers significant benefits to students by helping them to achieve a sense of renewal (a deeper awareness of self and potentials) and reparation (a realistic, but positive and proactive worldview). Todd O. Williams offers a thorough examination of the therapeutic potential…

  18. Nor-Ursodeoxycholic Acid as a Novel Therapeutic Approach for Cholestatic and Metabolic Liver Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halilbasic, Emina; Steinacher, Daniel; Trauner, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Norursodeoxycholic acid (norUDCA) is a side-chain-shortened derivative of ursodeoxycholic acid with relative resistance to amidation, which enables its cholehepatic shunting. Based on its specific pharmacologic properties, norUDCA is a promising drug for a range of cholestatic liver and bile duct disorders. Recently, norUDCA has been successfully tested clinically in patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) as first application in patients. Moreover, hepatic enrichment of norUDCA facilitates direct therapeutic effects on both parenchymal and non-parenchymal liver cells, thereby counteracting cholestasis, steatosis, hepatic inflammation and fibrosis, inhibiting hepatocellular proliferation, and promoting autophagy. This may open its therapeutic use to other non-cholestatic and metabolic liver diseases. This review article is a summary of a lecture given at the XXIV International Bile Acid Meeting (Falk Symposium 203) on "Bile Acids in Health and Disease" held in Düsseldorf, on June 17-18, 2016 and summarizes the recent progress of norUDCA as novel therapeutic approach in cholestatic and metabolic liver disorders with a specific focus on PSC. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Novel Therapeutic Approaches to the Treatment of Chronic Abdominal Visceral Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franca Patrizi

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic abdominal visceral pain (CAVP has a significant clinical impact and represents one of the most frequent and debilitating disorders in the general population. It also leads to a significant economic burden due to workdays lost, reduced productivity, and long-term use of medications with their associated side effects. Despite the availability of several therapeutic options, the management of patients with CAVP is often inadequate, resulting in frustration for both patients and physicians. This may in part be explained by the lack of understanding of the mechanisms underlying chronic pain; in contrast with acute pain in which the pathophysiology is relatively well known and has several satisfactory therapeutic options. Recently, the development of tools for brain investigation, such as functional magnetic resonance imaging, has provided new insights on the pathophysiology of chronic pain. These new data have shown that plastic changes in the central and peripheral nervous system might play an important role in the maintenance of chronic pain. Therefore, approaches aimed at the modulation of the nervous system, rather than the ones interfering with the inflammatory pathways, may be more effective for chronic pain treatment. We propose that noninvasive central nervous system stimulation, with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS, might be a novel therapeutic option for CAVP. This paper will present an overview of the pathophysiology and the available therapies for CAVP, focusing on the recent advances in the treatment of this pathology.

  20. Rational Emotive Behaviour Therapy in a Nutshell. 2nd edition

    OpenAIRE

    Neenan, Michael; Dryden, Windy

    2011-01-01

    Rational Emotive Behaviour Therapy in a Nutshell provides a concise overview of a popular therapeutic approach, starting with the ABCDE Model of Emotional Disturbance and Change.\\ud \\ud Written by leading REBT specialists, Michael Neenan and Windy Dryden, the book goes on to explain the core of the therapeutic process:\\ud \\ud - Assessment\\ud \\ud - Disputing\\ud \\ud - Homework\\ud \\ud - Working through\\ud \\ud - Promoting self-change.\\ud \\ud As an introduction to the basics of the approach, this ...

  1. Confucian Rationalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Chi-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays, there is still a widely held view that the Chinese and Western modes of thought are quite distinct from each other. In particular, the Chinese mode of thought derived from Confucianism is considered as comparatively less rational than the Western one. In this article, I first argue that although the analogical mode of argumentation,…

  2. Batch-To-Batch Rational Feedforward Control : From Iterative Learning to Identification Approaches, with Application to a Wafer Stage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blanken, L.; Boeren, F.A.J.; Bruijnen, D.J.H.; Oomen, T.A.E.

    2017-01-01

    Feedforward control enables high performance for industrial motion systems that perform nonrepeating motion tasks. Recently, learning techniques have been proposed that improve both performance and flexibility to nonrepeating tasks in a batch-To-batch fashion by using a rational parameterization in

  3. A Response-Time Approach to Comparing Generalized Rational and Take-the-Best Models of Decision Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergert, F. Bryan; Nosofsky, Robert M.

    2007-01-01

    The authors develop and test generalized versions of take-the-best (TTB) and rational (RAT) models of multiattribute paired-comparison inference. The generalized models make allowances for subjective attribute weighting, probabilistic orders of attribute inspection, and noisy decision making. A key new test involves a response-time (RT)…

  4. The use of nanoparticles as a promising therapeutic approach in cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Maryam; Haji-Fatahaliha, Mostafa; Jadidi-Niaragh, Farhad; Majidi, Jafar; Yousefi, Mehdi

    2016-06-01

    Cancer is one of the most important causes of death all over the world, which has not yet been treated efficiently. Although several therapeutic approaches have been used, some side effects such as toxicity and drug resistance have been observed in patients, particularly with chemotherapy. The nanoparticle-mediated drug delivery systems (DDS) have a great potential to improve cancer treatment by transferring therapeutic factors directly to the tumor site. Such a treatment significantly decreases the adverse effects associated with cancer therapy on healthy tissues. Two main strategies, including passive and active methods, have been considered to be effective techniques which can target the drugs to the tumor sites. The current review sheds some light on the place of nanotechnology in cancer drug delivery, and introduces nanomaterials and their specific characteristics that can be used in tumor therapy. Moreover, passive and active targeting approaches focus on antibodies, particularly single chain variable fragments (scFv), as a novel and important ligand in a drug delivery system.

  5. Recruiting endogenous stem cells: a novel therapeutic approach for erectile dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong-Cheng Xin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Transplanted stem cells (SCs, owing to their regenerative capacity, represent one of the most promising methods to restore erectile dysfunction (ED. However, insufficient source, invasive procedures, ethical and regulatory issues hamper their use in clinical applications. The endogenous SCs/progenitor cells resident in organ and tissues play critical roles for organogenesis during development and for tissue homeostasis in adulthood. Even without any therapeutic intervention, human body has a robust self-healing capability to repair the damaged tissues or organs. Therefore, SCs-for-ED therapy should not be limited to a supply-side approach. The resident endogenous SCs existing in patients could also be a potential target for ED therapy. The aim of this review was to summarize contemporary evidence regarding: (1 SC niche and SC biological features in vitro; (2 localization and mobilization of endogenous SCs; (3 existing evidence of penile endogenous SCs and their possible mode of mobilization. We performed a search on PubMed for articles related to these aspects in a wide range of basic studies. Together, numerous evidences hold the promise that endogenous SCs would be a novel therapeutic approach for the therapy of ED.

  6. Do stone size and impaction influence therapeutic approach to proximal ureteral stones?

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    Radulović Slobodan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Primary therapeutic approach to lumbar ureteral stones is still contraversial. The aim of the study was to investigate the influence of stone impaction and size on the effectiveness of proximal ureteral stone lithotripsy. Methods. A total of 123 patients with proximal ureteral stones were investigated in this prospective study performed in a 10- month period. The patients were divided into the group I - 86 patients treated with extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL and the group II - 37 patients treated with 'Swiss' Lithoclast. In the group I, 49 stones (57% were classified as impacted, while 20 stones (23.3% were larger than 100 mm2. In the group II, 26 stones (70.3% were impacted, and 11 stones (29.7% were larger than 100 mm2. Stones were defined as impacted by the radiographic, echosonographic as well as endoscopic findings in the group II of patients. Stone size was presented in mm2. Chemical composition of stones were almost the same in both groups of the patients. Results. Generally, there was no statistically significant difference in the treatment success between the groups. However, stones larger than 100 mm2 were statistically more successfully treated endoscopically, while there was no statistical difference in the treatment success of impacted stones between these two groups. Conclusion. ESWL can by considered as primary first therapeutic approach in treatment of all proximal ureteral stones except for stones larger than 100 mm2 that should primarily be treated endoscopically.

  7. Consumer rationality in choice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Conlon, B.J.

    2001-01-01

    The dissertation concentrates on consumer choice and the ability of current modelling approaches to capture the underlying behaviour of the individual decision-makers. The standard assumption of a rational utility maximising individual and its implications for observed behaviour are examined and

  8. Rational Emotive Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knaus, William

    1977-01-01

    Rational Emotive Education--an outgrowth of theories developed by Albert Ellis--is a teaching design of mental health concepts and problem-solving activities designed to help students to approach and cope with their problems through experiential learning, via a structured, thematic sequence of emotive education lessons. (MJB)

  9. Consideration of therapeutic approach to advanced colorectal cancer in elderly patients

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    Yasuhiro Inoue

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is predominantly a disease of elderly and is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the elderly population. The increased availability of treatment options for CRC has made it more difficult for clinicians to decide on the optimal therapeutic approach in elderly patients, because of the potential for poorer outcomes due to an increased burden of comorbidities, functional dependency, and limited life expectancy. It is necessary to determine which elderly patients are likely to benefit from active cancer therapy, and the establishment of treatment markers for multimodality approaches is eagerly awaited. Elderly cancer patients are at risk of exposure to various intrinsic inflammatory mediators, such as tumor-generating cytokines and surgery-induced pro-inflammatory cytokines. It is therefore important to understand the immunological changes occurring in the elderly and to adjust treatment strategies accordingly to reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with multimodality therapy for CRC that induce systemic inflammation. Several inflammation-based factors such as the Glasgow Prognostic Score (GPS may reflect the balance between tumor progression and host-related immunity, especially in elderly CRC patients. Appropriate selection criteria for multimodality therapy in elderly CRC patients may include not only tumor characteristics, but also host- and/or treatment-related factors such as comorbidities or surrogate markers using inflammation-based factors.----------------------------------------------Cite this article as: Inoue Y, Toiyama Y, Tanaka K, Mohri Y, Kusunoki M. Consideration of therapeutic approach to advanced colorectal cancer in elderly patients. Int J Cancer Ther Oncol 2014; 2(1:02014.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.14319/ijcto.0201.4

  10. Introduction to Dossier: Lessons from Latin America on the rational choice, cognitive and institutional approaches to policy change

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    Fontaine, Guillaume

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A review of the pertinent academic literature identifies three analytical focuses in studies of policy change. Rational choice- with its theories of incrementalism, multiple currents and punctuated equilibrium- privilege the decision-making process and the rational nature of the individual actor. The cognitivists- with their framework of promoter coalitions, the theory of social/ global references and critical theory- emphasize the presentation of policy problems and the legitimating discourse behind the decision-making process. The neo-institutionalist- with their theories of the logic of the adequate, path dependence and the three-order process of policy change- emphasize the importance of formal and informal institutions in the development of public policies.

  11. Rational valuations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georg Spielthenner

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Valuations are ubiquitous. We may be for or against genetically modified food; we find some politicians irresponsible; we prefer Beethoven to rock ‘n’ roll or vice versa; some enjoy bird-watching while others find it boring; and we may think that we have to tighten up on green-house gas emissions. Valuing is pervasive and often we are not even aware that we are valuing. However, many of ourvaluations are ill grounded and rationally defective. They are frequently based on misinformation, sloppy thinking, prejudice, and are biased in many ways as psychological research shows. For this reason there is widespread agreement among phi-losophers that we need an account of substantive valuational rationality, both for the theory of practical reasoning and for ethics as well. My main objectin this paper is to outline such an account and to present a principle that allows a non-technical rational criticism of valuations

  12. Treatment for Sulfur Mustard Lung Injuries; New Therapeutic Approaches from Acute to Chronic Phase

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    Zohreh Poursaleh

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Sulfur mustard (SM is one of the major potent chemical warfare and attractive weapons for terrorists. It has caused deaths to hundreds of thousands of victims in World War I and more recently during the Iran-Iraq war (1980-1988. It has ability to develop severe acute and chronic damage to the respiratory tract, eyes and skin. Understanding the acute and chronic biologic consequences of SM exposure may be quite essential for developing efficient prophylactic/therapeutic measures. One of the systems majorly affected by SM is the respiratory tract that numerous clinical studies have detailed processes of injury, diagnosis and treatments of lung. The low mortality rate has been contributed to high prevalence of victims and high lifetime morbidity burden. However, there are no curative modalities available in such patients. In this review, we collected and discussed the related articles on the preventive and therapeutic approaches to SM-induced respiratory injury and summarized what is currently known about the management and therapeutic strategies of acute and long-term consequences of SM lung injuries.Method:This review was done by reviewing all papers found by searching following key words sulfur mustard; lung; chronic; acute; COPD; treatment.Results:Mustard lung has an ongoing pathological process and is active disorder even years after exposure to SM. Different drug classes have been studied, nevertheless there are no curative modalities for mustard lung. Conclusion:Complementary studies on one hand regarding pharmacokinetic of drugs and molecular investigations are mandatory to obtain more effective treatments.

  13. Treatment for sulfur mustard lung injuries; new therapeutic approaches from acute to chronic phase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poursaleh Zohreh

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective Sulfur mustard (SM is one of the major potent chemical warfare and attractive weapons for terrorists. It has caused deaths to hundreds of thousands of victims in World War I and more recently during the Iran-Iraq war (1980–1988. It has ability to develop severe acute and chronic damage to the respiratory tract, eyes and skin. Understanding the acute and chronic biologic consequences of SM exposure may be quite essential for developing efficient prophylactic/therapeutic measures. One of the systems majorly affected by SM is the respiratory tract that numerous clinical studies have detailed processes of injury, diagnosis and treatments of lung. The low mortality rate has been contributed to high prevalence of victims and high lifetime morbidity burden. However, there are no curative modalities available in such patients. In this review, we collected and discussed the related articles on the preventive and therapeutic approaches to SM-induced respiratory injury and summarized what is currently known about the management and therapeutic strategies of acute and long-term consequences of SM lung injuries. Method This review was done by reviewing all papers found by searching following key words sulfur mustard; lung; chronic; acute; COPD; treatment. Results Mustard lung has an ongoing pathological process and is active disorder even years after exposure to SM. Different drug classes have been studied, nevertheless there are no curative modalities for mustard lung. Conclusion Complementary studies on one hand regarding pharmacokinetic of drugs and molecular investigations are mandatory to obtain more effective treatments.

  14. Retrospective analysis of 104 histologically proven adult brainstem gliomas: clinical symptoms, therapeutic approaches and prognostic factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reithmeier, Thomas; Kuzeawu, Aanyo; Hentschel, Bettina; Loeffler, Markus; Trippel, Michael; Nikkhah, Guido

    2014-01-01

    Adult brainstem gliomas are rare primary brain tumors (<2% of gliomas). The goal of this study was to analyze clinical, prognostic and therapeutic factors in a large series of histologically proven brainstem gliomas. Between 1997 and 2007, 104 patients with a histologically proven brainstem glioma were retrospectively analyzed. Data about clinical course of disease, neuropathological findings and therapeutic approaches were analyzed. The median age at diagnosis was 41 years (range 18-89 years), median KPS before any operative procedure was 80 (range 20-100) and median survival for the whole cohort was 18.8 months. Histopathological examinations revealed 16 grade I, 31 grade II, 42 grade III and 14 grade IV gliomas. Grading was not possible in 1 patient. Therapeutic concepts differed according to the histopathology of the disease. Median overall survival for grade II tumors was 26.4 months, for grade III tumors 12.9 months and for grade IV tumors 9.8 months. On multivariate analysis the relative risk to die increased with a KPS ≤ 70 by factor 6.7, with grade III/IV gliomas by the factor 1.8 and for age ≥ 40 by the factor 1.7. External beam radiation reduced the risk to die by factor 0.4. Adult brainstem gliomas present with a wide variety of neurological symptoms and postoperative radiation remains the cornerstone of therapy with no proven benefit of adding chemotherapy. Low KPS, age ≥ 40 and higher tumor grade have a negative impact on overall survival

  15. Recent Trends in Therapeutic Approaches for Diabetes Management: A Comprehensive Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pragya Tiwari

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes highlights a growing epidemic imposing serious social economic crisis to the countries around the globe. Despite scientific breakthroughs, better healthcare facilities, and improved literacy rate, the disease continues to burden several sections, especially middle and low income countries. The present trends indicate the rise in premature death, posing a major threat to global development. Scientific and technological advances have witnessed the development of newer generation of drugs like sulphonylureas, biguanides, alpha glucosidase inhibitors, and thiazolidinediones with significant efficacy in reducing hyperglycemia. Recent approaches in drug discovery have contributed to the development of new class of therapeutics like Incretin mimetics, Amylin analogues, GIP analogs, Peroxisome proliferator activated receptors, and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor as targets for potential drugs in diabetes treatment. Subsequently, the identification and clinical investigation of bioactive substances from plants have revolutionized the research on drug discovery and lead identification for diabetes management. With a focus on the emerging trends, the review article explores the current statistical prevalence of the disease, discussing the benefits and limitations of the commercially available drugs. Additionally, the critical areas in clinical diabetology are discussed, with respect to prospects of statins, nanotechnology, and stem cell technology as next generation therapeutics and why the herbal formulations are consistently popular choice for diabetes medication and management.

  16. Mechanisms of protein misfolding: Novel therapeutic approaches to protein-misfolding diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salahuddin, Parveen; Siddiqi, Mohammad Khursheed; Khan, Sanaullah; Abdelhameed, Ali Saber; Khan, Rizwan Hasan

    2016-11-01

    In protein misfolding, protein molecule acquires wrong tertiary structure, thereby induces protein misfolding diseases. Protein misfolding can occur through various mechanisms. For instance, changes in environmental conditions, oxidative stress, dominant negative mutations, error in post-translational modifications, increase in degradation rate and trafficking error. All of these factors cause protein misfolding thereby leading to diseases conditions. Both in vitro and in vivo observations suggest that partially unfolded or misfolded intermediates are particularly prone to aggregation. These partially misfolded intermediates aggregate via the interaction with the complementary intermediates and consequently enhance oligomers formation that grows into fibrils and proto-fibrils. The amyloid fibrils for example, accumulate in the brain and central nervous system (CNS) as amyloid deposits in the Parkinson's disease (PD), Alzheimer's disease (AD), Prion disease and Amylo lateral Sclerosis (ALS). Furthermore, tau protein shows intrinsically disorder conformation; therefore its interaction with microtubule is impaired and this protein undergoes aggregation. This is also underlying cause of Alzheimers and other neurodegenerative diseases. Treatment of such misfolding maladies is considered as one of the most important challenges of the 21st century. Currently, several treatments strategies have been and are being discovered. These therapeutic interventions partly reversed or prevented the pathological state. More recently, a new approach was discovered, which employs nanobodies that targets multisteps in fibril formation pathway that may possibly completely cure these misfolding diseases. Keeping the above views in mind in the current review, we have comprehensively discussed the different mechanisms underlying protein misfolding thereby leading to diseases conditions and their therapeutic interventions.

  17. Nano-particles for therapeutical purposes: an innovative approach for the radiotherapy of cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borghi, E.; Said, P.; Pottier, A.; Levy, L.

    2010-01-01

    Nano-technology can be used to manage and assemble substances in unprecedented ways in the history of products for human health. Underlying this revolution are the possibilities for using new therapeutic processes and separating a drug's various functions (distribution, effects, etc.). This is not possible with classical drugs. Nano-medicine has made it possible to develop new approaches to treating cancer, by using nano-particles with physical effects at the scale of the malignant cell. Hard metallic oxide nano-particles have been designed so that they can play a therapeutic role when activated by x-rays. The x-rays irradiation will free electrons from the metallic oxide, these electrons will lose energy through collisions with water molecules and will create free radicals in the cells. These free radicals are very reactive and will damage the covalent bounds of the molecules located around the nano-particles. Clinical tests on man are expected to begin very soon. These 'x-ray-activable' nano-particles might set off a revolution in the practice of radiotherapy for destroying or controlling malignant tumors

  18. Medicinal plants growing in the Judea region: network approach for searching potential therapeutic targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arie Budovsky

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Plants growing in the Judea region are widely used in traditional medicine of the Levant region. Nevertheless, they have not so far been sufficiently analyzed and their medicinal potential has not been evaluated. This study is the first attempt to fill the gap in the knowledge of the plants growing in the region. Comprehensive data mining of online botanical databases and peer-reviewed scientific literature including ethno-pharmacological surveys from the Levant region was applied to compile a full list of plants growing in the Judea region, with the focus on their medicinal applications. Around 1300 plants growing in the Judea region were identified. Of them, 25% have medicinal applications which were analyzed in this study. Screening for chemical-protein interactions, together with the network-based analysis of potential targets, will facilitate discovery and therapeutic applications of the Judea region plants. Such an approach could also be applied as an integrative platform for further searching the potential therapeutic targets of plants growing in other regions of the world.

  19. [Research on Depression in the GDR - Historical Lines of Development and Therapeutic Approaches].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thormann, J; Himmerich, H; Steinberg, H

    2014-02-01

    Historical research has raised the issue of whether GDR psychiatry was isolated from Western influences to such an extent that an autonomous East German psychiatry developed. Taking a chronological approach and being based on a clearly defined range of topics, the objective of this paper is to identify specific contributions made by GDR psychiatry to academic research as well as the degree of its international orientation by focusing on the treatment and research on depression. We have performed a systematic review of the East German psychiatric journal "Psychiatrie, Neurologie und medizinische Psychologie" and a screening of all psychiatric textbooks that appeared in the GDR. Although East German psychiatry was oriented towards Soviet as well as Western developments, some internationally used therapeutic or conceptual innovations reached East German clinics only with some delay. Yet, East German psychiatrists have also contributed their own, independent nosological and therapeutic concepts to research on depression. Pivotal figures included, among others, R. Lemke (Jena), D. Müller-Hegemann (Leipzig) or K. Leonhard (Berlin). With regard to research on depression one cannot truly speak of an autonomous East German psychiatry. Developments in East and West were largely running in parallel. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  20. How noninvasive investigation has modified our therapeutic approach in vascular medicine

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    Antignani PL

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available PL AntignaniItalian Society for Vascular InvestigationNoninvasive diagnostic methods have modified our therapeutic decision-making in several vascular diseases. In particular, many forms of surgical treatment, both endovascular and open, are performed based exclusively on evaluation with duplex scanning. The purpose of noninvasive ultrasound testing is to distinguish normal from pathological vessels, to classify a wide range of disease states, to assess the collateral circulation, and to do so in a safe and cost-effective manner. The primary aim is to identify patients who are at risk for acute and chronic vascular disease and who may require specific treatment. A secondary aim is to document progressive or recurrent disease in patients already known to be at risk. Of course, individual vascular laboratories must validate their own results against a suitable gold standard, and they have to guarantee the best quality and maximum accuracy.1     With regard to diseases of the carotid artery, color flow duplex scanning is the investigation of choice for diagnosis and measurement of carotid stenosis, provided that objective criteria are used and scanning is done by experienced operators. Several velocity criteria used to detect the presence and severity of carotid artery disease and the morphological evaluation of lesions allow us to have a specificity of 90% and a sensitivity of 99% when all categories of carotid disease are considered. On the basis of these criteria, we can identify the best therapeutic approach for specific pathological conditions.

  1. Exploring miRNA based approaches in cancer diagnostics and therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Shivangi; Yadav, Tanuja; Rani, Vibha

    2016-02-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs), a highly conserved class of tissue specific, small non-protein coding RNAs maintain cell homeostasis by negative gene regulation. Proper controlling of miRNA expression is required for a balanced physiological environment, as these small molecules influence almost every genetic pathway from cell cycle checkpoint, cell proliferation to apoptosis, with a wide range of target genes. Deregulation in miRNAs expression correlates with various cancers by acting as tumor suppressors and oncogenes. Although promising therapies exist to control tumor development and progression, there is a lack of efficient diagnostic and therapeutic approaches for delineating various types of cancer. The molecularly different tumors can be differentiated by specific miRNA profiling as their phenotypic signatures, which can hence be exploited to surmount the diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. Present review discusses the involvement of miRNAs in oncogenesis with the analysis of patented research available on miRNAs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Generalised pustular psoriasis – a case report and review of therapeutic approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Osmola-Mańkowska

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Generalised pustular psoriasis (GPP is regarded as a rare clinical subtype of psoriasis. The severity of GPP varies from a benign, chronic course to severe and widespread, life-threatening disease. Due to the uncommon nature of GPP, establishing treatment guidelines for this variant of psoriasis is challenging. Objective. To present the case of a patient with GPP with a short review of therapeutic approaches. Case report. Our patient was treated with standard methods such as acitretin, then cyclosporine and methotrexate as well as with biologic drug – infliximab. During the last and the most severe flare, combination therapy with systemic retinoid and PUVA (Re-PUVA was used. Conclusions. The treatment in GPP should be determined individually according to the severity of the disease, age, gender and comorbidities, as well as according to the physician’s experience with particular methods and their side effects. In addition, the availability of therapeutic options should be taken into consideration.

  3. New Therapeutic Approaches to Prevent or Delay Beta-Cell Failure in Diabetes

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    Ionica Floriana Elvira

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims: The most recent estimates of International Diabetes Federation indicate that 382 million people have diabetes, and the incidence of this disease is increasing. While in type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM beta-cell death is autoimmunemediated, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM results from an interaction between genetic and environmental factors that impair beta-cell function and insulin action. Many people with T2DM remain unaware of their illness for a long time because symptoms may take years to appear or be recognized, while the body is affected by excess blood glucose. These patients are often diagnosed only when diabetes complications have already developed. The aim of this article was to perform a review based on literature data on therapeutic modalities to prevent/delay beta cell function decline. Material and Methods: We searched MEDLINE from 2000 to the present to identify the therapeutic approaches to prevent or delay beta-cell failure in patients with T2DM. Results and conclusions: Several common polymorphisms in genes linked to monogenic forms of diabetes appear to influence the response to T2DM pharmacotherapy. Recent studies report the role of the G protein coupled receptor 40 (GPR40, also known as Free Fatty Acids Receptor 1 (FFAR1 in the regulation of beta-cell function- CNX-011-67 (a GPR40 agonist has the potential to provide good and durable glycemic control in T2DM patients.

  4. Promising novel therapeutic approaches in the management of gastrointestinal stromal tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szucs, Zoltan; Thway, Khin; Fisher, Cyril; Bulusu, Ramesh; Constantinidou, Anastasia; Benson, Charlotte; van der Graaf, Winette Ta; Jones, Robin L

    2017-01-01

    Primary and secondary resistance to currently available licensed tyrosine kinase inhibitors poses a real clinical challenge in the management of advanced gastrointestinal stromal tumors. Within the frame of early phase clinical trials novel systemic treatments are currently being evaluated to target both the well explored and novel emerging downstream effectors of KIT and PDGFRA signaling. Alternative therapeutic approaches also include exploring novel inhibitors of the KIT/PDGFRA receptors, immune checkpoint and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors. The final clinical trial outcome data for these agents are highly anticipated. Integration of new diagnostic techniques into routine clinical practice can potentially guide tailored delivery of agents in the treatment of a highly polyclonal, heterogeneous disease such as heavily pretreated advanced gastrointestinal stromal tumor.

  5. Emerging targets and therapeutic approaches for the treatment of osteoarthritis pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Wahida; Dickenson, Anthony H

    2015-06-01

    Osteoarthritis is a complex and often painful disease that is inadequately controlled with current analgesics. This review discusses emerging targets and therapeutic approaches that may lead to the development of better analgesics. Aberrant excitability in peripheral and central pain pathways drives osteoarthritis pain, reversing this via modulation of nerve growth factor, voltage-gated sodium channel, voltage-gated calcium channel and transient receptor potential vanilloid one activity, and increasing inhibitory mechanisms through modulation of cannabinoid and descending modulatory systems hold promise for osteoarthritis pain therapy. Somatosensory phenotyping of chronic pain patients, as a surrogate of putative pain generating mechanisms, may predict patient response to treatment. Identification of new targets will inform and guide future research, aiding the development of more effective analgesics. Future clinical trial designs should implement sensory phenotyping of patients, as an inclusion or stratification criterion, in order to establish an individualized, mechanism-based treatment of osteoarthritis pain.

  6. An integrative in-silico approach for therapeutic target identification in the human pathogen Corynebacterium diphtheriae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Babar Jamal

    Full Text Available Corynebacterium diphtheriae (Cd is a Gram-positive human pathogen responsible for diphtheria infection and once regarded for high mortalities worldwide. The fatality gradually decreased with improved living standards and further alleviated when many immunization programs were introduced. However, numerous drug-resistant strains emerged recently that consequently decreased the efficacy of current therapeutics and vaccines, thereby obliging the scientific community to start investigating new therapeutic targets in pathogenic microorganisms. In this study, our contributions include the prediction of modelome of 13 C. diphtheriae strains, using the MHOLline workflow. A set of 463 conserved proteins were identified by combining the results of pangenomics based core-genome and core-modelome analyses. Further, using subtractive proteomics and modelomics approaches for target identification, a set of 23 proteins was selected as essential for the bacteria. Considering human as a host, eight of these proteins (glpX, nusB, rpsH, hisE, smpB, bioB, DIP1084, and DIP0983 were considered as essential and non-host homologs, and have been subjected to virtual screening using four different compound libraries (extracted from the ZINC database, plant-derived natural compounds and Di-terpenoid Iso-steviol derivatives. The proposed ligand molecules showed favorable interactions, lowered energy values and high complementarity with the predicted targets. Our proposed approach expedites the selection of C. diphtheriae putative proteins for broad-spectrum development of novel drugs and vaccines, owing to the fact that some of these targets have already been identified and validated in other organisms.

  7. Precision medicine and molecular imaging: new targeted approaches toward cancer therapeutic and diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasemi, Mojtaba; Nabipour, Iraj; Omrani, Abdolmajid; Alipour, Zeinab; Assadi, Majid

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a review of the importance and role of precision medicine and molecular imaging technologies in cancer diagnosis with therapeutics and diagnostics purposes. Precision medicine is progressively becoming a hot topic in all disciplines related to biomedical investigation and has the capacity to become the paradigm for clinical practice. The future of medicine lies in early diagnosis and individually appropriate treatments, a concept that has been named precision medicine, i.e. delivering the right treatment to the right patient at the right time. Molecular imaging is quickly being recognized as a tool with the potential to ameliorate every aspect of cancer treatment. On the other hand, emerging high-throughput technologies such as omics techniques and systems approaches have generated a paradigm shift for biological systems in advanced life science research. In this review, we describe the precision medicine, difference between precision medicine and personalized medicine, precision medicine initiative, systems biology/medicine approaches (such as genomics, radiogenomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, and metabolomics), P4 medicine, relationship between systems biology/medicine approaches and precision medicine, and molecular imaging modalities and their utility in cancer treatment and diagnosis. Accordingly, the precision medicine and molecular imaging will enable us to accelerate and improve cancer management in future medicine. PMID:28078184

  8. Precision medicine and molecular imaging: new targeted approaches toward cancer therapeutic and diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasemi, Mojtaba; Nabipour, Iraj; Omrani, Abdolmajid; Alipour, Zeinab; Assadi, Majid

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a review of the importance and role of precision medicine and molecular imaging technologies in cancer diagnosis with therapeutics and diagnostics purposes. Precision medicine is progressively becoming a hot topic in all disciplines related to biomedical investigation and has the capacity to become the paradigm for clinical practice. The future of medicine lies in early diagnosis and individually appropriate treatments, a concept that has been named precision medicine, i.e. delivering the right treatment to the right patient at the right time. Molecular imaging is quickly being recognized as a tool with the potential to ameliorate every aspect of cancer treatment. On the other hand, emerging high-throughput technologies such as omics techniques and systems approaches have generated a paradigm shift for biological systems in advanced life science research. In this review, we describe the precision medicine, difference between precision medicine and personalized medicine, precision medicine initiative, systems biology/medicine approaches (such as genomics, radiogenomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, and metabolomics), P4 medicine, relationship between systems biology/medicine approaches and precision medicine, and molecular imaging modalities and their utility in cancer treatment and diagnosis. Accordingly, the precision medicine and molecular imaging will enable us to accelerate and improve cancer management in future medicine.

  9. The third international meeting on genetic disorders in the RAS/MAPK pathway: towards a therapeutic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korf, Bruce; Ahmadian, Reza; Allanson, Judith; Aoki, Yoko; Bakker, Annette; Wright, Emma Burkitt; Denger, Brian; Elgersma, Ype; Gelb, Bruce D; Gripp, Karen W; Kerr, Bronwyn; Kontaridis, Maria; Lazaro, Conxi; Linardic, Corinne; Lozano, Reymundo; MacRae, Calum A; Messiaen, Ludwine; Mulero-Navarro, Sonia; Neel, Benjamin; Plotkin, Scott; Rauen, Katherine A; Roberts, Amy; Silva, Alcino J; Sittampalam, Sitta G; Zhang, Chao; Schoyer, Lisa

    2015-08-01

    "The Third International Meeting on Genetic Disorders in the RAS/MAPK Pathway: Towards a Therapeutic Approach" was held at the Renaissance Orlando at SeaWorld Hotel (August 2-4, 2013). Seventy-one physicians and scientists attended the meeting, and parallel meetings were held by patient advocacy groups (CFC International, Costello Syndrome Family Network, NF Network and Noonan Syndrome Foundation). Parent and patient advocates opened the meeting with a panel discussion to set the stage regarding their hopes and expectations for therapeutic advances. In keeping with the theme on therapeutic development, the sessions followed a progression from description of the phenotype and definition of therapeutic endpoints, to definition of genomic changes, to identification of therapeutic targets in the RAS/MAPK pathway, to preclinical drug development and testing, to clinical trials. These proceedings will review the major points of discussion. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Systems Bioinformatics: increasing precision of computational diagnostics and therapeutics through network-based approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oulas, Anastasis; Minadakis, George; Zachariou, Margarita; Sokratous, Kleitos; Bourdakou, Marilena M; Spyrou, George M

    2017-11-27

    Systems Bioinformatics is a relatively new approach, which lies in the intersection of systems biology and classical bioinformatics. It focuses on integrating information across different levels using a bottom-up approach as in systems biology with a data-driven top-down approach as in bioinformatics. The advent of omics technologies has provided the stepping-stone for the emergence of Systems Bioinformatics. These technologies provide a spectrum of information ranging from genomics, transcriptomics and proteomics to epigenomics, pharmacogenomics, metagenomics and metabolomics. Systems Bioinformatics is the framework in which systems approaches are applied to such data, setting the level of resolution as well as the boundary of the system of interest and studying the emerging properties of the system as a whole rather than the sum of the properties derived from the system's individual components. A key approach in Systems Bioinformatics is the construction of multiple networks representing each level of the omics spectrum and their integration in a layered network that exchanges information within and between layers. Here, we provide evidence on how Systems Bioinformatics enhances computational therapeutics and diagnostics, hence paving the way to precision medicine. The aim of this review is to familiarize the reader with the emerging field of Systems Bioinformatics and to provide a comprehensive overview of its current state-of-the-art methods and technologies. Moreover, we provide examples of success stories and case studies that utilize such methods and tools to significantly advance research in the fields of systems biology and systems medicine. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  11. Rational decisions

    CERN Document Server

    Binmore, Ken

    2008-01-01

    It is widely held that Bayesian decision theory is the final word on how a rational person should make decisions. However, Leonard Savage--the inventor of Bayesian decision theory--argued that it would be ridiculous to use his theory outside the kind of small world in which it is always possible to ""look before you leap."" If taken seriously, this view makes Bayesian decision theory inappropriate for the large worlds of scientific discovery and macroeconomic enterprise. When is it correct to use Bayesian decision theory--and when does it need to be modified? Using a minimum of mathematics,

  12. Rationalization: A Bibliography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrini, D. T.; Pedrini, Bonnie C.

    Rationalization was studied by Sigmund Freud and was specifically labeled by Ernest Jones. Rationalization ought to be differentiated from rational, rationality, logical analysis, etc. On the one hand, rationalization is considered a defense mechanism, on the other hand, rationality is not. Haan has done much work with self-report inventories and…

  13. [Therapeutic approaches to improve blood glucose control in a patient with type 2 diabetes on a metformin-sulfonylurea combination].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheen, A J; Paquot, N

    2011-04-01

    Beyond lifestyle changes, the management of type 2 diabetes comprises the administration of oral glucose-lowering agents, especially the classical metformin-sulfonylurea combination. If such a dual oral therapy could not (any more) obtain an adequate glucose control, intensified management becomes mandatory. Several therapeutic approaches may be proposed at this stage, with some advantages and disadvantages of each of them. The present clinical case aims at illustrating such difficult therapeutic choice. We will provide the pro-contra arguments concerning each therapeutic alternative and describe the practical modalities of an appropriate management according to the patient's characteristics.

  14. New therapeutic approaches for management of sport-induced muscle strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Carli, Angelo; Volpi, Piero; Pelosini, Iva; Ferretti, Andrea; Melegati, Gianluca; Mossa, Luigi; Tornese, Davide; de Girolamo, Laura; Scarpignato, Carmelo

    2009-12-01

    Muscle strains are one of the most common sports-induced injuries. Depending on the severity and location of the muscle strain, different treatment approaches can be taken. This review highlights recent trends in conservative, pharmacologic, and surgical approaches to the management of sports-induced muscle injuries as presented at a symposium held during the 93rd Annual Congress of the Italian Society of Orthopedics and Traumatology (SIOT) in Rome, Italy in November 2008. Conservative approaches now include growth factor therapy and administration of autologous platelet-rich plasma during the early postinjury period; however, its use is currently considered a doping violation under the World Anti-Doping Agency code, therefore restricting its use to nonelite sports people only. Topical anti-inflammatory therapy is a promising therapeutic strategy, since it allows local analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects while minimizing systemic adverse events. As the drug delivery system is critical to clinical effectiveness, the advent of a new delivery system for ketoprofen via a new-generation plaster with a marked increase in tissue penetration and a clinical efficacy comparable with that of oral administration, provides a viable option in the treatment of single sport lesions. Surgical treatment of muscle lesions is less common than conservative and topical therapies and indications are limited to more serious injuries. Presentations from SIOT 2008 show that advances in our understanding of the healing process and in conservative, pharmacologic, and surgical treatment approaches to the management of sports-induced muscle strains contribute to better clinical outcomes, faster healing, and a swifter return to normal training and activity levels.

  15. Early hypopharyngeal cancer treated with different therapeutic approaches: a single-institution cohort analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Nalee; Lee, Jeong Shin; Kim, Kyung Hwan; Park, Jong Eon; Lee, Chang Geol; Keum, Ki Chang [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Early hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (HPSCC) is a rarely diagnosed disease, for which the optimal treatment has not been defined yet. We assessed patterns of failure and outcomes in early HPSCC treated with various therapeutic approaches to identify its optimal treatment. Thirty-six patients with stage I (n = 10) and II (n = 26) treated between January 1992 and March 2014 were reviewed. Patients received definitive radiotherapy (RT) (R group, n = 10), surgery only (S group, n = 19), or postoperative RT (PORT group, n = 7). All patients in both the R and PORT groups received elective bilateral neck irradiation. In the S group, 7 patients had ipsilateral and 8 had bilateral dissection, while 4 patients had no elective dissection. At a median follow-up of 48 months, the 5-year locoregional control (LRC) rate was 65%. Six patients had local failure, 1 regional failure (RF), 3 combined locoregional failures, and 2 distant failures. There was no difference in 5-year LRC among the R, S, and PORT groups (p = 0.17). The presence with a pyriform sinus apex extension was a prognosticator related to LRC (p = 0.01) in the multivariate analysis. Patients with a bilaterally treated neck showed a trend toward a lower RF rate (p = 0.08). This study shows that patients with early stage HPSCC involving the pyriform sinus apex might need a tailored approach to improve LRC. Additionally, our study confirms elective neck treatment might have an efficacious role in regional control.

  16. Usher syndrome (sensorineural deafness and retinitis pigmentosa): pathogenesis, molecular diagnosis and therapeutic approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnet, Crystel; El-Amraoui, Aziz

    2012-02-01

    Usher syndrome (USH) is the most prevalent cause of hereditary deafness-blindness in humans. In this review, we pinpoint new insights regarding the molecular mechanisms defective in this syndrome, its molecular diagnosis and prospective therapies. Animal models wherein USH proteins were targeted at different maturation stages of the auditory hair cells have been engineered, shedding new light on the development and functioning of the hair bundle, the sound receptive structure. Improved protocols and guidelines for early molecular diagnosis of USH (USH genotyping microarrays, otochips and complete Sanger sequencing of the 366 coding exons of identified USH genes) have been developed. Approaches to alleviate or cure hearing and visual impairments have been initiated, leading to various degrees of functional rescuing. Whereas the mechanisms underlying hearing impairment in USH patients are being unraveled, showing in particular that USH1 proteins are involved in the shaping of the hair bundle and the functioning of the mechanoelectrical transduction machinery, the mechanisms underlying the retinal defects are still unclear. Efforts to improve clinical diagnosis have been successful. Yet, despite some encouraging results, further development of therapeutic approaches is necessary to ultimately treat this dual sensory defect.

  17. The Roles of Carcinoembryonic Antigen in Liver Metastasis and Therapeutic Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Metastasis is a highly complicated and sequential process in which primary cancer spreads to secondary organic sites. Liver is a well-known metastatic organ from colorectal cancer. Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) is expressed in most gastrointestinal, breast, and lung cancer cells. Overexpression of CEA is closely associated with liver metastasis, which is the main cause of death from colorectal cancer. CEA is widely used as a diagnostic and prognostic tumor marker in cancer patients. It affects many steps of liver metastasis from colorectal cancer cells. CEA inhibits circulating cancer cell death. CEA also binds to heterogeneous nuclear RNA binding protein M4 (hnRNP M4), a Kupffer cell receptor protein, and activates Kupffer cells to secrete various cytokines that change the microenvironments for the survival of colorectal cancer cells in the liver. CEA also activates cell adhesion-related molecules. The close correlation between CEA and cancer has spurred the exploration of many CEA-targeted approaches as anticancer therapeutics. Understanding the detailed functions and mechanisms of CEA in liver metastasis will provide great opportunities for the improvement of anticancer approaches against colorectal cancers. In this report, the roles of CEA in liver metastasis and CEA-targeting anticancer modalities are reviewed. PMID:28588612

  18. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute and the translation of cardiovascular discoveries into therapeutic approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galis, Zorina S; Black, Jodi B; Skarlatos, Sonia I

    2013-04-26

    The molecular causes of ≈4000 medical conditions have been described, yet only 5% have associated therapies. For decades, the average time for drug development through approval has taken 10 to 20 years. In recent years, the serious challenges that confront the private sector have made it difficult to capitalize on new opportunities presented by advances in genomics and cellular therapies. Current trends are disturbing. Pharmaceutical companies are reducing their investments in research, and biotechnology companies are struggling to obtain venture funds. To support early-stage translation of the discoveries in basic science, the National Institutes of Health and the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute have developed new approaches to facilitating the translation of basic discoveries into clinical applications and will continue to develop a variety of programs that create teams of academic investigators and industry partners. The goal of these programs is to maximize the public benefit of investment of taxpayer dollars in biomedical research and to lessen the risk required for industry partners to make substantial investments. This article highlights several examples of National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute-initiated translational programs and National Institutes of Health translational resources designed to catalyze and enable the earliest stages of the biomedical product development process. The translation of latest discoveries into therapeutic approaches depends on continued federal funding to enhance the early stages of the product development process and to stimulate and catalyze partnerships between academia, industry, and other sources of capital.

  19. Paths in contemporary economics and sciences of artificial intelligence that originate from Simon’s bounded rationality approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Egidi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Based on the work of Herbert A. Simon, the author critically reflects on the past and current state of crucial behavioural assumptions such as rational expectations and bounded rationality. Simon recognized that the core of every organization is the pattern underlying the division of tasks and their coordination: behaviour within organizations is oriented toward goals, and goals are generally complex and hierarchical. Many intermediate sub-goals must be realized in a specific order for the final goal to be achieved. Additionally, the dynamics of organizational decisions are very complex and have two relevant aspects. First, goals are often defined in very general and ambiguous ways, thus necessitating revision of the sub-goals’ hierarchy. Second, many hidden conflicting objectives can be discovered during organizational decisions, when, again, a revision of the sub-goals and their hierarchy may become necessary. It is easy to see that, with this analytical setup, the classical theme of division of labour and coordination would dominate the scenario, leaving utility theory behind. JEL codes: B21, D03, D81

  20. Chitosan and thiolated chitosan: Novel therapeutic approach for preventing corneal haze after chemical injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahir-Jouzdani, Forouhe; Mahbod, Mirgholamreza; Soleimani, Masoud; Vakhshiteh, Faezeh; Arefian, Ehsan; Shahosseini, Saeed; Dinarvand, Rasoul; Atyabi, Fatemeh

    2018-01-01

    Corneal haze, commonly caused by deep physical and chemical injuries, can greatly impair vision. Growth factors facilitate fibroblast proliferation and differentiation, which leads to haze intensity. In this study, the potential effect of chitosan (CS) and thiolated-chitosan (TCS) nanoparticles and solutions on inhibition of fibroblast proliferation, fibroblast to myofibroblast differentiation, neovascularization, extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition, and pro-fibrotic cytokine expression was examined. Transforming growth factor beta-1 (TGFβ 1 ) was induced by interleukin-6 (IL6) in human corneal fibroblasts and expression levels of TGFβ 1 , Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), α-smooth muscle actins (α-SMA), collagen type I (Col I), fibronectin (Fn) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) were quantified using qRT-PCR. To assess wound-healing capacity, TCS-treated mice were examined for α-SMA positive cells, collagen deposition, inflammatory cells and neovascularization through pathological immunohistochemistry. The results revealed that CS and TCS could down-regulate the expression levels of TGFβ 1 and PDGF comparable to that of TGFβ 1 knockdown experiment. However, down-regulation of TGFβ 1 was not regulated through miR29b induction. Neovascularization along with α-SMA and ECM deposition were significantly diminished. According to these findings, CS and TCS can be considered as potential anti-fibrotic and anti-angiogenic therapeutics. Furthermore, TCS, thiolated derivative of CS, will increase mucoadhesion of the polymer at the corneal surface which makes the polymer efficient and non-toxic therapeutic approach for corneal injuries. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Proteoglycans as Target for an Innovative Therapeutic Approach in Chondrosarcoma: Preclinical Proof of Concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyrode, Caroline; Weber, Valérie; Voissière, Aurélien; Maisonial-Besset, Aurélie; Vidal, Aurélien; Auzeloux, Philippe; Gaumet, Vincent; Borel, Michèle; Dauplat, Marie-Mélanie; Quintana, Mercedes; Degoul, Françoise; Rédini, Françoise; Chezal, Jean-Michel; Miot-Noirault, Elisabeth

    2016-11-01

    To date, surgery remains the only option for the treatment of chondrosarcoma, which is radio- and chemoresistant due in part to its large extracellular matrix (ECM) and poor vascularity. In case of unresectable locally advanced or metastatic diseases with a poor prognosis, improving the management of chondrosarcoma still remains a challenge. Our team developed an attractive approach of improvement of the therapeutic index of chemotherapy by targeting proteoglycan (PG)-rich tissues using a quaternary ammonium (QA) function conjugated to melphalan (Mel). First of all, we demonstrated the crucial role of the QA carrier for binding to aggrecan by surface plasmon resonance. In the orthotopic model of Swarm rat chondrosarcoma, an in vivo biodistribution study of Mel and its QA derivative (Mel-QA), radiolabeled with tritium, showed rapid radioactivity accumulation in healthy cartilaginous tissues and tumor after [ 3 H]-Mel-QA injection. The higher T/M ratio of the QA derivative suggests some advantage of QA-active targeting of chondrosarcoma. The antitumoral effects were characterized by tumor volume assessment, in vivo 99m Tc-NTP 15-5 scintigraphic imaging of PGs, 1 H-HRMAS NMR spectroscopy, and histology. The conjugation of a QA function to Mel did not hamper its in vivo efficiency and strongly improved the tolerability of Mel leading to a significant decrease of side effects (hematologic analyses and body weight monitoring). Thus, QA conjugation leads to a significant improvement of the therapeutic index, which is essential in oncology and enable repeated cycles of chemotherapy in patients with chondrosarcoma. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(11); 2575-85. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  2. Oxidative stress drivers and modulators in obesity and cardiovascular disease: from biomarkers to therapeutic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santilli, F; Guagnano, M T; Vazzana, N; La Barba, S; Davi, G

    2015-01-01

    This review article is intended to describe how oxidative stress regulates cardiovascular disease development and progression. Epigenetic mechanisms related to oxidative stress, as well as more reliable biomarkers of oxidative stress, are emerging over the last years as potentially useful tools to design therapeutic approaches aimed at modulating enhanced oxidative stress "in vivo", thereby mitigating the consequent atherosclerotic burden. As a paradigm, we describe the case of obesity, in which the intertwining among oxidative stress, due to caloric overload, chronic low-grade inflammation induced by adipose tissue dysfunction, and platelet activation represents a vicious cycle favoring the progression of atherothrombosis. Oxidative stress is a major player in the pathobiology of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Reactive oxygen species (ROS)- dependent signaling pathways prompt transcriptional and epigenetic dysregulation, inducing chronic low-grade inflammation, platelet activation and endothelial dysfunction. In addition, several oxidative biomarkers have been proposed with the potential to improve current understanding of the mechanisms underlying CVD. These include ROS-generating and/or quenching molecules, and ROS-modified compounds, such as F2-isoprostanes. There is also increasing evidence that noncoding micro- RNA (mi-RNA) are critically involved in post- transcriptional regulation of cell functions, including ROS generation, inflammation, regulation of cell proliferation, adipocyte differentiation, angiogenesis and apoptosis. These molecules have promising translational potential as both markers of disease and site of targeted interventions. Finally, oxidative stress is a critical target of several cardioprotective drugs and nutraceuticals, including antidiabetic agents, statins, renin-angiotensin system blockers, polyphenols and other antioxidants. Further understanding of ROS-generating mechanisms, their biological role as well as potential therapeutic

  3. Therapeutic approaches to genetic ion channelopathies and perspectives in drug discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola eImbrici

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In the human genome more than 400 genes encode ion channels, which are transmembrane proteins mediating ion fluxes across membranes. Being expressed in all cell types, they are involved in almost all physiological processes, including sense perception, neurotransmission, muscle contraction, secretion, immune response, cell proliferation and differentiation. Due to the widespread tissue distribution of ion channels and their physiological functions, mutations in genes encoding ion channel subunits, or their interacting proteins, are responsible for inherited ion channelopathies. These diseases can range from common to very rare disorders and their severity can be mild, disabling, or life-threatening. In spite of this, ion channels are the primary target of only about 5% of the marketed drugs suggesting their potential in drug discovery. The current review summarizes the therapeutic management of the principal ion channelopathies of central and peripheral nervous system, heart, kidney, bone, skeletal muscle and pancreas, resulting from mutations in calcium, sodium, potassium and chloride ion channels. For most channelopathies the therapy is mainly empirical and symptomatic, often limited by lack of efficacy and tolerability for a significant number of patients. Other channelopathies can exploit ion channel targeted drugs, such as marketed sodium channel blockers. Developing new and more specific therapeutic approaches is therefore required. To this aim, a major advancement in the pharmacotherapy of channelopathies has been the discovery that ion channel mutations lead to change in biophysics that can in turn specifically modify the sensitivity to drugs: this opens the way to a pharmacogenetics strategy, allowing the development of a personalized therapy with increased efficacy and reduced side effects. In addition, the identification of disease modifiers in ion channelopathies appears an alternative strategy to discover novel druggable targets.

  4. Book Selection, Collection Development, and Bounded Rationality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Charles A.

    1989-01-01

    Reviews previously proposed schemes of classical rationality in book selection, describes new approaches to rational choice behavior, and presents a model of book selection based on bounded rationality in a garbage can decision process. The role of tacit knowledge and symbolic content in the selection process are also discussed. (102 references)…

  5. Rational inattention or rational overreaction?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Browning, Martin; Hansen, Lars Gårn; Smed, Sinne

    We investigate differences in how consumers of fish react to health information in the mass media. We specify a dynamic empirical model that allows for heterogeneity in all basic parameters of consumer behavior as well as in how consumers react to information. We estimate the model using a unique...... houshold panel tracking consumption, prices, news stories and media habits over 24 quarters. We fi nd that the consumers most likely to be ’rationally ignorant’ of health effects react more dramatically to health news than the consumers who most likely are well informed....

  6. Rationality of limited rationality : some aggregate implications

    OpenAIRE

    Uri M. Possen; Mikko Puhakka

    1994-01-01

    In this paper we let economic agents choose whether to become fully rational or stay boundedly rational. Boundedly rational agents are less sophisticated in their information processing abilities. It is costly to acquire information needed to become fully rational, and thus not all agents are willing to incur those costs. We then explore the aggregate effects of endogenizing the decision whether the agent should or should not become fully rational in handling information. Since fully and boun...

  7. Geographic Information System and Remote Sensing Approach with Hydrologic Rational Model for Flood Event Analysis in Jakarta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aditya, M. R.; Hernina, R.; Rokhmatuloh

    2017-12-01

    Rapid development in Jakarta which generates more impervious surface has reduced the amount of rainfall infiltration into soil layer and increases run-off. In some events, continuous high rainfall intensity could create sudden flood in Jakarta City. This article used rainfall data of Jakarta during 10 February 2015 to compute rainfall intensity and then interpolate it with ordinary kriging technique. Spatial distribution of rainfall intensity then overlaid with run-off coefficient based on certain land use type of the study area. Peak run-off within each cell resulted from hydrologic rational model then summed for the whole study area to generate total peak run-off. For this study area, land use types consisted of 51.9 % industrial, 37.57% parks, and 10.54% residential with estimated total peak run-off 6.04 m3/sec, 0.39 m3/sec, and 0.31 m3/sec, respectively.

  8. On hereditarily rational functions

    OpenAIRE

    Nowak, Krzysztof Jan

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we give a short proof of a theorem by Koll\\'{a}r on hereditarily rational functions. This is an answer to his appeal to find an elementary proof which does not rely so much on resolution of singularities. Our approach does not make use of desingularization techniques. Instead, we apply a stronger version of the \\L{}ojasiewicz inequality. Moreover, this allows us to sharpen Koll\\'{a}r's theorem.

  9. Therapeutic approach to patients complaining of high blood pressure in a cardiological emergency room

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Gus

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the management of patients complaining of high blood pressure (BP in a cardiological emergency room. METHODS: Patients referred to the cardiological emergency room with the main complaint of high blood pressure were consecutively selected. The prescriptions and the choice of antihypertensive drugs were assessed. The classification of these patients as hypertensive emergencies or pseudoemergencies, according to the physician who provided initial care, was recorded. RESULTS: From a total of 858 patients presenting to the emergency room, 80 (9.3% complained of high BP, and 61 (76.3% received antihypertensive drugs. Sublingual nifedipine was the most commonly used drug (59%. One patient received intravenous medication, one patient was hospitalized and 6 patients (7.5% were classified as hypertensive emergencies or pseudoemergencies. CONCLUSION: High BP could seldom be classified as a hypertensive emergency or pseudoemergency, even though it was a frequent complaint (9.3% of visits. Currently, the therapeutic approach is not recommended, even in specialized clinics.

  10. Targeting developmental regulators of zebrafish exocrine pancreas as a therapeutic approach in human pancreatic cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson S. Yee

    2012-02-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs and RNA polymerase III (POLR3 play vital roles in fundamental cellular processes, and deregulation of these enzymes has been implicated in malignant transformation. Hdacs and Polr3 are required for exocrine pancreatic epithelial proliferation during morphogenesis in zebrafish. We aim to test the hypothesis that Hdacs and Polr3 cooperatively control exocrine pancreatic growth, and combined inhibition of HDACs and POLR3 produces enhanced growth suppression in pancreatic cancer. In zebrafish larvae, combination of a Hdac inhibitor (Trichostatin A and an inhibitor of Polr3 (ML-60218 synergistically prohibited the expansion of exocrine pancreas. In human pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells, combination of the HDAC inhibitor suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA and ML-60218 produced augmented suppression of colony formation and proliferation, and induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptotic cell death. The enhanced cytotoxicity was associated with supra-additive upregulation of the pro-apoptotic regulator BAX and the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21CDKN1A. tRNAs have been shown to have pro-proliferative and anti-apoptotic roles, and SAHA-stimulated expression of tRNAs was reversed by ML-60218. These findings demonstrate that chemically targeting developmental regulators of exocrine pancreas can be translated into an approach with potential impact on therapeutic response in pancreatic cancer, and suggest that counteracting the pro-malignant side effect of HDAC inhibitors can enhance their anti-tumor activity.

  11. Mining the Proteome of subsp. ATCC 25586 for Potential Therapeutics Discovery: An Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Musaweer Habib

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The plethora of genome sequence information of bacteria in recent times has ushered in many novel strategies for antibacterial drug discovery and facilitated medical science to take up the challenge of the increasing resistance of pathogenic bacteria to current antibiotics. In this study, we adopted subtractive genomics approach to analyze the whole genome sequence of the Fusobacterium nucleatum, a human oral pathogen having association with colorectal cancer. Our study divulged 1,499 proteins of F. nucleatum, which have no homolog's in human genome. These proteins were subjected to screening further by using the Database of Essential Genes (DEG that resulted in the identification of 32 vitally important proteins for the bacterium. Subsequent analysis of the identified pivotal proteins, using the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG Automated Annotation Server (KAAS resulted in sorting 3 key enzymes of F. nucleatum that may be good candidates as potential drug targets, since they are unique for the bacterium and absent in humans. In addition, we have demonstrated the three dimensional structure of these three proteins. Finally, determination of ligand binding sites of the 2 key proteins as well as screening for functional inhibitors that best fitted with the ligands sites were conducted to discover effective novel therapeutic compounds against F. nucleatum.

  12. The role of surgery in the therapeutic approach of gastric cancer liver metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastoraki, Aikaterini; Benetou, Christina; Mastoraki, Sotiria; Papanikolaou, Ioannis S; Danias, Nikolaos; Smyrniotis, Vassilios; Arkadopoulos, Nikolaos

    2016-09-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) currently prevails as the second cause of death by malignancy worldwide. Estimations suggest that 35 % of affected patients appear with synchronous distant metastases. The vast majority of patients present with hepatic metastatic disease, sometimes accompanied by synchronous peritoneal and lung dissemination. The disease mostly remains asymptomatic at an early stage, with few reported cases of incidental abdominal discomfort. As the cancer advances, symptoms such as nausea or vomiting arise, along with indigestion and dysphagia, blood loss in the form of melena or hematemesis, as well as anorexia and weight loss. Having spread to the liver, it also causes jaundice due to hepatomegaly and general inanition. Despite recent research on the therapeutic strategies against GC metastatic disease, surgical resection appears the only potentially curative approach. Unfortunately, the majority of patients are not eligible to undergo surgical intervention. With regard to treatment modalities of the advanced stage disease, the role of metastasectomy is still debatable and quite unclear, while prolonged survival was succeeded only under certain specific circumstances. Systemic chemotherapy remains however another option, as well as local management in the form of cryotherapy, radiofrequency ablation, or transcatheter arterial chemoembolization. The aims of this review were to evaluate the results of surgical treatment for metastatic GC with special reference to the extent of its histological spread and to present the recent literature in order to provide an update on the current concepts of advanced surgical management of this entity. Relevant publications in the last two decades are briefly reviewed.

  13. Dapoxetine: An Innovative Approach in the Therapeutic Management In Animal Model of Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hira Rafi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Stress is a complicated condition that effects on person’s mental and physical health, and it is the precursor of other psychological disorders mainly depression. Serotonin (5-Hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT is well known to have hypofunction in unpredictable chronic mild stress whereas, unpredictable chronic mild stress (UCMS has produced the most steady and continuous results of anhedonia and learned helplessness particularly in rats. The stress-induced depressive like behavior can be reversed by many antidepressants such as SSRIs. Selective serotonin [5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT] reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs is mostly prescribed antidepressant that can deplete neurochemical and behavioral deficits. The present study was designed to investigate whether repeated administration of dapoxetine at dose (1.0 mg/kg could reverse the behavioral deficits induced by UCMS in rat model of depression. UCMS induced behavioral deficits. Locomotor  activity in familiar environment (home cage, novel (open field environment and anxiolytic behavior in light/dark activity box were greater in unstressed group than stressed group. The inhibition of serotonin reuptake at pre-synaptic receptors by repeated dapoxetine administration is mainly the mechanism involved and discussed. This particular study may assist in novel approach for understanding the interaction between stress and behavioral functions and extending the therapeutic use of dapoxetine.

  14. Refractory pulmonary sarcoidosis - proposal of a definition and recommendations for the diagnostic and therapeutic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korsten, Peter; Strohmayer, Katharina; Baughman, Robert P; Sweiss, Nadera J

    2016-03-01

    Patients with sarcoidosis undergo spontaneous remission or may be effectively controlled with glucocorticoids alone in many cases. Progressive and refractory pulmonary sarcoidoisis constitute more than 10% of patients seen at specialized centers. Pulmonary fibrosis and associated complications, such as infections and pulmonary hypertension are leading causes of mortality. No universal definition of refractoriness exists, we therefore propose classifying patients as having refractory disease when the following criteria are fulfilled: (1) progressive disease despite at least 10 mg of prednisolone or equivalent for at least three months and need for additional disease-modifying anti-sarcoid drugs due to lack of efficacy, drug toxicity or intolerability and (2) treatment started for significant impairment of life due to progressive pulmonary symptoms. Both criteria should be fulfilled. Treatment options in addition to or instead of glucocorticoids for these patients include second- (methotrexate, azathioprine, leflunomide) and third-line agents (infliximab, adalimumab). Other immunmodulating agents can be used, but the evidence is very limited. Newer agents with anti-fibrotic properties, such as pirfenidone or nintedanib, might hold promise also for the pulmonary fibrosis seen in sarcoidosis. Treating physicians have to actively look for potentially treatable complications, such as pulmonary hypertension, cardiac disease or infections before patients should be classified as treatment-refractory. Ultimately, lung transplantation has to be considered as treatment option for patients not responding to medical therapy. In this review, we aim to propose a new definition of refractoriness, describe the associated clinical features and suggest the therapeutic approach.

  15. Insomnia in childhood and adolescence: clinical aspects, diagnosis, and therapeutic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Magda Lahorgue; Bruni, Oliviero

    2015-01-01

    To review the clinical characteristics, comorbidities, and management of insomnia in childhood and adolescence. This was a non-systematic literature review carried out in the PubMed database, from where articles published in the last five years were selected, using the key word "insomnia" and the pediatric age group filter. Additionally, the study also included articles and classic textbooks of the literature on the subject. During childhood, there is a predominance of behavioral insomnia as a form of sleep-onset association disorder (SOAD) and/or limit-setting sleep disorder. Adolescent insomnia is more associated with sleep hygiene problems and delayed sleep phase. Psychiatric (anxiety, depression) or neurodevelopmental disorders (attention deficit disorder, autism, epilepsy) frequently occur in association with or as a comorbidity of insomnia. Insomnia complaints in children and adolescents should be taken into account and appropriately investigated by the pediatrician, considering the association with several comorbidities, which must also be diagnosed. The main causes of insomnia and triggering factors vary according to age and development level. The therapeutic approach must include sleep hygiene and behavioral techniques and, in individual cases, pharmacological treatment. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  16. Ebola Virus Altered Innate and Adaptive Immune Response Signalling Pathways: Implications for Novel Therapeutic Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Anoop

    2016-01-01

    Ebola virus (EBOV) arise attention for their impressive lethality by the poor immune response and high inflammatory reaction in the patients. It causes a severe hemorrhagic fever with case fatality rates of up to 90%. The mechanism underlying this lethal outcome is poorly understood. In 2014, a major outbreak of Ebola virus spread amongst several African countries, including Leone, Sierra, and Guinea. Although infections only occur frequently in Central Africa, but the virus has the potential to spread globally. Presently, there is no vaccine or treatment is available to counteract Ebola virus infections due to poor understanding of its interaction with the immune system. Accumulating evidence indicates that the virus actively alters both innate and adaptive immune responses and triggers harmful inflammatory responses. In the literature, some reports have shown that alteration of immune signaling pathways could be due to the ability of EBOV to interfere with dendritic cells (DCs), which link innate and adaptive immune responses. On the other hand, some reports have demonstrated that EBOV, VP35 proteins act as interferon antagonists. So, how the Ebola virus altered the innate and adaptive immune response signaling pathways is still an open question for the researcher to be explored. Thus, in this review, I try to summarize the mechanisms of the alteration of innate and adaptive immune response signaling pathways by Ebola virus which will be helpful for designing effective drugs or vaccines against this lethal infection. Further, potential targets, current treatment and novel therapeutic approaches have also been discussed.

  17. Mechanisms of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease in antiphospholipid syndrome and systemic lupus erythematosus. New therapeutic approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Pedrera, Chary; Aguirre-Zamorano, M Ángeles; Pérez-Sánchez, Carlos

    2017-08-22

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) are 2 highly related autoimmune-rheumatic diseases associated with an increased risk of developing cardiovascular (CV) diseases. Despite the great progresses made in understanding the pathological mechanisms leading to CV diseases in those pathologies, there is still the unmet need to improve long term prognosis. CV diseases in SLE and APS is thought to happen as the result of a complex interaction between traditional CV risk factors, immune deregulation and disease activity, including the synergic effect of cytokines, chemokines, adipokines, proteases, autoantibodies, adhesion receptors, oxidative stress and a plethora of intracellular signalling molecules. Genomic and epigenomic analyses have further allowed the identification of specific signatures explaining the proathero-thrombotic profiles of APS and SLE patients. This review examines the complex role of these heterogeneous factors, and analyses new therapeutic approaches under study to reduce the CV risk in these autoimmune disorders. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Xeroderma pigmentosum: diagnostic procedures, interdisciplinary patient care, and novel therapeutic approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Janin; Schubert, Steffen; Emmert, Steffen

    2014-10-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is an autosomal recessive disease, caused by a gene defect in the nucleotide-excision-repair (NER) pathway or in translesional DNA synthesis. At the age of eight, patients already develop their first skin cancers due to this DNA repair defect. In contrast, in the Caucasian population the first tumor formation in UV exposed skin regions occurs at a mean age of 60. The clinical picture among patients suffering from XP is highly diverse and includes signs of accelerated skin aging, and UV-induced skin cancers, as well as ophthalmologic and neurological symptoms. Patients should therefore receive interdisciplinary care. This includes dermatologists, ophthalmologists, ENT specialists, neurologists, and human geneticists. Patients with XP are clinically diagnosed, but this may be supported by molecular-genetic and functional analyses. These analyses allow pinpointing the exact disease-causing gene defect (complementation group assignment, detection of the type and location of the mutation within the gene). The resulting information is already relevant to predict the course of disease and symptoms and probably will be utilized for individualized therapeutic approaches in the future. Recently, enhanced repair of UV photolesions in xeroderma pigmentosum group C cells induced by translational readthrough of premature termination codons by certain antibiotics could be demonstrated. © 2014 Deutsche Dermatologische Gesellschaft (DDG). Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. A multidisciplinary approach to therapeutic risk management of the suicidal patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grant CL

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Cynthia L Grant,1,2 Jaimie L Lusk3 1Arapahoe/Douglas Mental Health Network, Englewood, CO, 2School of Education and Human Development, University of Colorado Denver, Denver, CO, 3Mental Health Service, VA Portland Health Care System, Portland, OR, USA Abstract: As health care trends toward a system of care approach, providers from various disciplines strive to collaborate to provide optimal care for their patients. While a multidisciplinary approach to suicide risk assessment and management has been identified as important for reducing suicidality, standardized clinical guidelines for such an approach do not yet exist. In this article, the authors propose the adoption of the therapeutic risk management of the suicidal patient (TRMSP to improve suicide risk assessment and management within multidisciplinary systems of care. The TRMSP, which has been fully articulated in previous articles, involves augmenting clinical risk assessment with structured instruments, stratifying risk in terms of both severity and temporality, and developing and documenting a safety plan. Augmenting clinical risk assessments with reliable and valid structured instruments serves several functions, including ensuring important aspects of suicide are addressed, establishing a baseline for suicidal thoughts and behaviors, facilitating interprofessional communication, and mitigating risk. Similarly, a two-dimensional risk stratification qualifying suicide risk in terms of both severity and temporality can enhance communication across providers and settings and improve understanding of acute crises in the context of chronic risk. Finally, safety planning interventions allow providers and patients to collaboratively create a personally meaningful plan for managing a suicidal crisis that can be continually modified across time with multiple providers in different care settings. In a busy care environment, the TRMSP can provide concrete guidance on conducting clinically and

  20. Interferon-α Subtypes As an Adjunct Therapeutic Approach for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Functional Cure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Jeffy; Mattapallil, Joseph J

    2018-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) establishes life-long latency in infected individuals. Although highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has had a significant impact on the course of HIV infection leading to a better long-term outcome, the pool of latent reservoir remains substantial even under HAART. Numerous approaches have been under development with the goal of eradicating the latent HIV reservoir though with limited success. Approaches that combine immune-mediated control of HIV to activate both the innate and the adaptive immune system under suppressive therapy along with "shock and kill" drugs may lead to a better control of the reactivated virus. Interferon-α (IFN-α) is an innate cytokine that has been shown to activate intracellular defenses capable of restricting and controlling HIV. IFN-α, however, harbors numerous functional subtypes that have been reported to display different binding affinities and potency. Recent studies have suggested that certain subtypes such as IFN-α8 and IFN-α14 have potent anti-HIV activity with little or no immune activation, whereas other subtypes such as IFN-α4, IFN-α5, and IFN-α14 activate NK cells. Could these subtypes be used in combination with other strategies to reduce the latent viral reservoir? Here, we review the role of IFN-α subtypes in HIV infection and discuss the possibility that certain subtypes could be potential adjuncts to a "shock and kill" or therapeutic vaccination strategy leading to better control of the latent reservoir and subsequent functional cure.

  1. Phosphodiesterase-4 inhibition as a therapeutic approach to treat capillary leakage in systemic inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schick, Martin Alexander; Wunder, Christian; Wollborn, Jakob; Roewer, Norbert; Waschke, Jens; Germer, Christoph-Thomas; Schlegel, Nicolas

    2012-06-01

    In sepsis and systemic inflammation, increased microvascular permeability and consecutive breakdown of microcirculatory flow significantly contribute to organ failure and death. Evidence points to a critical role of cAMP levels in endothelial cells to maintain capillary endothelial barrier properties in acute inflammation. However, approaches to verify this observation in systemic models are rare. Therefore we tested here whether systemic application of the phosphodiesterase-4-inhibitors (PD-4-Is) rolipram or roflumilast to increase endothelial cAMP was effective to attenuate capillary leakage and breakdown of microcirculatory flow in severe lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced systemic inflammation in rats. Measurements of cAMP in mesenteric microvessels demonstrated significant LPS-induced loss of cAMP levels which was blocked by application of rolipram. Increased endothelial cAMP by application of either PD-4-I rolipram or roflumilast led to stabilization of endothelial barrier properties as revealed by measurements of extravasated FITC-albumin in postcapillary mesenteric venules. Accordingly, microcirculatory flow in mesenteric venules was significantly increased following PD-4-I treatment and blood gas analyses indicated improved metabolism. Furthermore application of PD-4-I after manifestation of LPS-induced systemic inflammation and capillary leakage therapeutically stabilized endothelial barrier properties as revealed by significantly reduced volume resuscitation for haemodynamic stabilization. Accordingly microcirculation was significantly improved following treatment with PD-4-Is. Our results demonstrate that inflammation-derived loss of endothelial cAMP contributes to capillary leakage which was blocked by systemic PD-4-I treatment. Therefore these data suggest a highly clinically relevant and applicable approach to stabilize capillary leakage in sepsis and systemic inflammation.

  2. Melatonin effects on Plasmodium life cycle: new avenues for therapeutic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Venkataramanujam; Ahmad, Asma H; Mohamed, Mahaneem; Zakaria, Rahimah

    2012-05-01

    Malaria remains a global health problem affecting more than 515 million people all over the world including Malaysia. It is on the rise, even within unknown regions that previous to this were free of malaria. Although malaria eradication programs carried out by vector control programs are still effective, anti-malarial drugs are also used extensively for curtailing this disease. But resistance to the use of anti-malarial drugs is also increasing on a daily basis. With an increased understanding of mechanisms that cause growth, differentiation and development of malarial parasites in rodents and humans, new avenues of therapeutic approaches for controlling the growth, synchronization and development of malarial parasites are essential. Within this context, the recent discoveries related to IP3 interconnected signalling pathways, the release of Ca2+ from intracellular stores of Plasmodium, ubiquitin protease systems as a signalling pathway, and melatonin influencing the growth and differentiation of malarial parasites by its effects on these signalling pathways have opened new therapeutic avenues for arresting the growth and differentiation of malarial parasites. Indeed, the use of melatonin antagonist, luzindole, has inhibited the melatonin's effect on these signalling pathways and thereby has effectively reduced the growth and differentiation of malarial parasites. As Plasmodium has effective sensors which detect the nocturnal plasma melatonin concentrations, suppression of plasma melatonin levels with the use of bright light during the night or by anti-melatonergic drugs and by using anti-kinase drugs will help in eradicating malaria on a global level. A number of patients have been admitted with regards to the control and management of malarial growth. Patents related to the discovery of serpentine receptors on Plasmodium, essential for modulating intra parasitic melatonin levels, procedures for effective delivery of bright light to suppress plasma melatonin

  3. When is it rational to participate in a clinical trial? A game theory approach incorporating trust, regret and guilt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Djulbegovic Benjamin

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Randomized controlled trials (RCTs remain an indispensable form of human experimentation as a vehicle for discovery of new treatments. However, since their inception RCTs have raised ethical concerns. The ethical tension has revolved around “duties to individuals” vs. “societal value” of RCTs. By asking current patients “to sacrifice for the benefit of future patients” we risk subjugating our duties to patients’ best interest to the utilitarian goal for the good of others. This tension creates a key dilemma: when is it rational, from the perspective of the trial patients and researchers (as societal representatives of future patients, to enroll in RCTs? Methods We employed the trust version of the prisoner’s dilemma since interaction between the patient and researcher in the setting of a clinical trial is inherently based on trust. We also took into account that the patient may have regretted his/her decision to participate in the trial, while a researcher may feel guilty because he/she abused the patient’s trust. Results We found that under typical circumstances of clinical research, most patients can be expected not to trust researchers, and most researchers can be expected to abuse the patients’ trust. The most significant factor determining trust was the success of experimental or standard treatments, respectively. The more that a researcher believes the experimental treatment will be successful, the more incentive the researcher has to abuse trust. The analysis was sensitive to the assumptions about the utilities related to success and failure of therapies that are tested in RCTs. By varying all variables in the Monte Carlo analysis we found that, on average, the researcher can be expected to honor a patient’s trust 41% of the time, while the patient is inclined to trust the researcher 69% of the time. Under assumptions of our model, enrollment into RCTs represents a rational strategy that can meet

  4. When is it rational to participate in a clinical trial? A game theory approach incorporating trust, regret and guilt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djulbegovic, Benjamin; Hozo, Iztok

    2012-06-22

    Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) remain an indispensable form of human experimentation as a vehicle for discovery of new treatments. However, since their inception RCTs have raised ethical concerns. The ethical tension has revolved around "duties to individuals" vs. "societal value" of RCTs. By asking current patients "to sacrifice for the benefit of future patients" we risk subjugating our duties to patients' best interest to the utilitarian goal for the good of others. This tension creates a key dilemma: when is it rational, from the perspective of the trial patients and researchers (as societal representatives of future patients), to enroll in RCTs? We employed the trust version of the prisoner's dilemma since interaction between the patient and researcher in the setting of a clinical trial is inherently based on trust. We also took into account that the patient may have regretted his/her decision to participate in the trial, while a researcher may feel guilty because he/she abused the patient's trust. We found that under typical circumstances of clinical research, most patients can be expected not to trust researchers, and most researchers can be expected to abuse the patients' trust. The most significant factor determining trust was the success of experimental or standard treatments, respectively. The more that a researcher believes the experimental treatment will be successful, the more incentive the researcher has to abuse trust. The analysis was sensitive to the assumptions about the utilities related to success and failure of therapies that are tested in RCTs. By varying all variables in the Monte Carlo analysis we found that, on average, the researcher can be expected to honor a patient's trust 41% of the time, while the patient is inclined to trust the researcher 69% of the time. Under assumptions of our model, enrollment into RCTs represents a rational strategy that can meet both patients' and researchers' interests simultaneously 19% of the time

  5. A forgotten approach after cardiac arrest due to acute myocardial ınfarction: Neuroprotective therapeutic hypothermia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Özçelik

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In patients with spontaneous circulation after cardiopulmonary resuscitation, therapeutic hypothermia is defined as the reduction of body temperature to 32-34 ° C within the first 4-6 hours for neuroprotective purposes and to be maintained at this level for 12-24 hours after reaching the target temperature. Therapeutic hypothermia has been practiced since the 1940s. The aim of therapeutic hypothermia is to reduce cerebral edema, convulsive activity, metabolic demand and associated complications by providing low body heat. Therapeutic hypothermia is applied to increase life expectancy and quality of life. In out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, should be performed in comatose patients where initial rhythm is ventricular fibrillation and spontaneous circulation is returned. Herein, we present a 44 years old patient who had an aborted sudden cardiac death due to acute myocardial infarction and performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation for 30 minutes and discharged after 6 days with a successful therapeutic hypothermia.

  6. The diagnostic and therapeutic approach of a primary bilateral leiomyoma of the ovaries: a case report and a literature review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Esch, E.M. van; Wijngaarden, S.E. van; Schaafsma, H.E.; Smeets, M.J.; Rhemrev, J.P.

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: A primary fibroid (leiomyoma) arising from both ovaries is rare and can be difficult to diagnose as a result of the low incidence and its indistinctive presentation. A literature review on the diagnostic and therapeutic approach of this rare benign tumour is presented. We describe a

  7. Rational kinematics

    CERN Document Server

    Angeles, Jorge

    1988-01-01

    A rational study of kinematics is a treatment of the subject based on invariants, i.e., quantities that remain essentially unchanged under a change of observer. An observer is understood to be a reference frame supplied with a clock (Truesdell 1966). This study will therefore include an introduction to invariants. The language of these is tensor analysis and multilinear algebra, both of which share many isomorphic relations, These subjects are treated in full detail in Ericksen (1960) and Bowen and Wang (1976), and hence will not be included here. Only a short account of notation and definitions will be presented. Moreover, definitions and basic concepts pertaining to the kinematics of rigid bodies will be also included. Although the kinematics of rigid bodies can be regarded as a particular case of the kinematics of continua, the former deserves attention on its own merits for several reasons. One of these is that it describes locally the motions undergone by continua. Another reason is that a whole area of ...

  8. Coping More Effectively Through Rational Self-Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, George W., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Rational Self-Counseling, a variation of rational-emotive therapy, is a self-help therapeutic technique in which students are encouraged to be responsible for their own behavior and emotions. The primary function of self-counseling is to evaluate whether thoughts are rational. A list of questions which students might ask themselves is presented.…

  9. Uso racional de medicamentos: uma abordagem econômica para tomada de decisões Rational drug use: an economic approach to decision making

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Marques Mota

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available O artigo aborda o uso racional de medicamentos (URM sob um ponto de vista da economia. O URM, para ser implementado, implica custos e envolve a apropriação de conhecimentos e mudanças de conduta de diversos agentes. A dificuldade na adoção da prática do URM pode estar relacionada a problemas de escassez, assimetria de informação, informação incompleta, incertezas nas decisões clínicas, externalidades, preço-tempo, incentivos para prescritores e dispensadores, preferências dos prescritores e utilidade marginal. Assim, cabe às autoridades sanitárias, entre outras entidades, regular, reduzir e controlar essas falhas que poderão introduzir ineficiências na assistência farmacêutica, bem como produzir riscos à vida humana.The present article approaches rational drug use (RDU from the economical point of view. The implementation of RDU implies in costs and involves acquisition of knowledge and behavioral changes of several agents. The difficulties in implementing RDU may be due to shortage problems, information asymmetry, lack of information, uncertain clinical decisions, externalities, time-price, incentives for drug prescribers and dispensers, drug prescriber preferences and marginal utility. Health authorities, among other agencies, must therefore regularize, rationalize and control drug use to minimize inefficiency in pharmaceutical care and to prevent exposing the population to unnecessary health risks.

  10. Contact refusal by children following acrimonious separation: therapeutic approaches with children and parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dejong, Margaret; Davies, Hilary

    2013-04-01

    This paper aims to build on the existing literature, by presenting some thoughts based on clinical experience with nine families of children referred for intractable contact refusal with one parent following marital separation. This particular group of high-conflict divorce cases engenders an inordinate amount of frustration both within the courts and therapeutic agencies. We outline here our assessment process and therapeutic strategies, as well as consideration of the role of the wider professional system and the courts. We conclude that whether or not direct contact with the rejected parent is achieved, useful therapeutic work can be carried out to assist children in moving on with their lives.

  11. Evaluating statistical approaches to leverage large clinical datasets for uncovering therapeutic and adverse medication effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Leena; Carroll, Robert J; Beck, Cole; Mosley, Jonathan D; Roden, Dan M; Denny, Joshua C; Van Driest, Sara L

    2018-04-18

    Phenome-wide association studies (PheWAS) have been used to discover many genotype-phenotype relationships and have the potential to identify therapeutic and adverse drug outcomes using longitudinal data within electronic health records (EHRs). However, the statistical methods for PheWAS applied to longitudinal EHR medication data have not been established. In this study, we developed methods to address two challenges faced with reuse of EHR for this purpose: confounding by indication, and low exposure and event rates. We used Monte Carlo simulation to assess propensity score (PS) methods, focusing on two of the most commonly used methods, PS matching and PS adjustment, to address confounding by indication. We also compared two logistic regression approaches (the default of Wald vs. Firth's penalized maximum likelihood, PML) to address complete separation due to sparse data with low exposure and event rates. PS adjustment resulted in greater power than propensity score matching, while controlling Type I error at 0.05. The PML method provided reasonable p-values, even in cases with complete separation, with well controlled Type I error rates. Using PS adjustment and the PML method, we identify novel latent drug effects in pediatric patients exposed to two common antibiotic drugs, ampicillin and gentamicin. R packages PheWAS and EHR are available at https://github.com/PheWAS/PheWAS and at CRAN (https://www.r-project.org/), respectively. The R script for data processing and the main analysis is available at https://github.com/choileena/EHR. leena.choi@vanderbilt.edu. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  12. Assessment and rationalization of water quality monitoring network: a multivariate statistical approach to the Kabbini River (India).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavukkandy, Musthafa Odayooth; Karmakar, Subhankar; Harikumar, P S

    2014-09-01

    network is assessed. Significance of seasonal redesign of the monitoring network is demonstrated. Rationalization of water quality parameters is performed in a statistical framework.

  13. Rational and evolutionary engineering approaches uncover a small set of genetic changes efficient for rapid xylose fermentation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soo Rin Kim

    Full Text Available Economic bioconversion of plant cell wall hydrolysates into fuels and chemicals has been hampered mainly due to the inability of microorganisms to efficiently co-ferment pentose and hexose sugars, especially glucose and xylose, which are the most abundant sugars in cellulosic hydrolysates. Saccharomyces cerevisiae cannot metabolize xylose due to a lack of xylose-metabolizing enzymes. We developed a rapid and efficient xylose-fermenting S. cerevisiae through rational and inverse metabolic engineering strategies, comprising the optimization of a heterologous xylose-assimilating pathway and evolutionary engineering. Strong and balanced expression levels of the XYL1, XYL2, and XYL3 genes constituting the xylose-assimilating pathway increased ethanol yields and the xylose consumption rates from a mixture of glucose and xylose with little xylitol accumulation. The engineered strain, however, still exhibited a long lag time when metabolizing xylose above 10 g/l as a sole carbon source, defined here as xylose toxicity. Through serial-subcultures on xylose, we isolated evolved strains which exhibited a shorter lag time and improved xylose-fermenting capabilities than the parental strain. Genome sequencing of the evolved strains revealed that mutations in PHO13 causing loss of the Pho13p function are associated with the improved phenotypes of the evolved strains. Crude extracts of a PHO13-overexpressing strain showed a higher phosphatase activity on xylulose-5-phosphate (X-5-P, suggesting that the dephosphorylation of X-5-P by Pho13p might generate a futile cycle with xylulokinase overexpression. While xylose consumption rates by the evolved strains improved substantially as compared to the parental strain, xylose metabolism was interrupted by accumulated acetate. Deletion of ALD6 coding for acetaldehyde dehydrogenase not only prevented acetate accumulation, but also enabled complete and efficient fermentation of xylose as well as a mixture of glucose and

  14. An Approach to Optimise Therapeutic Vancomycin Dosage in a Haemodialysis Population

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gunning, H

    2016-10-01

    Haemodialysis patients are at risk of gram-positive bacteraemia and commonly require intravenous vancomycin. Intravenously administered vancomycin is primarily excreted by the kidney and exhibits complex pharmacokinetics in haemodialysis patients; achieving therapeutic levels can be challenging. An audit in our unit showed current practises of vancomycin administration resulted in a high proportion of sub-therapeutic levels. A new protocol was developed with fixed weight-based loading and subsequent dosing guided by pre-dialysis levels, target levels were 10-20mg\\/L. Its effectiveness was prospectively evaluated between 24th September 2012, and 8th February 2013. During this period 25 patients commenced vancomycin, 15 were included. In total, 112 vancomycin levels were taken, 94 (84%) were therapeutic, this was a significant improvement compared to previous practise (odds ratio 5.4, CI 3.1-9.4, p < 0.0001). In conclusion, our study shows this protocol can consistently and reliably achieve therapeutic vancomycin levels

  15. The Study of Two Psychotherapy Approaches (Rogers Self Theory and Ellis Rational Theory) in Improvement of Bowen Self-differentiation and Intimacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousefi, Naser; Kiani, Mohammad Ali

    2014-01-01

    To compare the effectiveness of rational, behavioral and emotive therapy (REBT) and person-centered therapy (PCT) on self-differentiation and intimacy among divorce clients. In quasi-experimental study, 42 divorce clients (both males and females) who presented to the Counsling Center of Sanandaj, Iran were sampled. They were categorized into three groups of PCT, REBT, and control group (each group contained 14 subjects). The recovery indices (dependent variables) employed were the subject of self-differentiation and intimacy, which were measured twice before and after intervention of Differentiation of Self Inventory-2 (DSI-2) and intimacy. The therapy involved 8 one-hour sessions. It was held twice a week and therapeutic effects were traced after 8 months. The results showed that REBT and PCT were effective on self-differentiation scale and intimacy. Also they were influential in recovery self-differentiation scale and intimacy follow up stage. REBT and PCT were effective on self-differentiation and its subscales (Emotional reactivity, "I" position, Emotional cut off and Fusion with other) and general intimacy. None.

  16. Evidence of novel miR-34a-based therapeutic approaches for multiple myeloma treatment

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zarone, M.R.; Misso, G.; Grimaldi, A.; Zappavigna, S.; Russo, M.; Amler, Evžen; Di Martino, M.T.; Amodio, N.; Tagliaferri, P.; Tassone, P.; Caraglia, M.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 7, dec (2017), s. 17949 ISSN 2045-2322 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : gamma-secretase inhibitors * tumor-suppressor network * breast - cancer Subject RIV: FP - Other Medical Disciplines OBOR OECD: Technologies involving identifying the functioning of DNA, proteins and enzymes and how they influence the onset of disease and maintenance of well-being (gene-based diagnostics and therapeutic interventions (pharmacogenomics, gene-based therapeutics) Impact factor: 4.259, year: 2016

  17. The spectrum-effect relationship-a rational approach to screening effective compounds, reflecting the internal quality of Chinese herbal medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chun-Sheng; Lin, Zhi-Jian; Xiao, Ming-Liang; Niu, Hong-Juan; Zhang, Bing

    2016-03-01

    Since the chromatographic fingerprint was introduced, it has been accepted by many countries to assess the quality and authenticity of Chinese herbal medicine (CHM). However, solely using the chromatographic fingerprint to assay numerous chemicals is not suitable for the assessment of the whole internal quality and pharmacodynamics of CHM. Consequently, it is necessary to develop a rational approach to connecting the chromatographic fingerprint with effective components to assess the internal quality of CHM. For this purpose, a spectrum-effect relationship theory was proposed and accepted as a new method for the assessment of CHM because of its potential use to screen effective components from CHM. In this paper, we systematically reviewed the application of the spectrum-effect relationship theory in the research of CHM, including research mentality, different chromatographic analysis techniques, data processing technologies, and structure determination. Copyright © 2016 China Pharmaceutical University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Development of new therapeutic methods of lung cancer through team approach study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jong Ho; Zo, Jae Ill; Baek, Hee Jong; Jung, Jin Haeng; Lee, Jae Cheol; Ryoo, Baek Yeol; Kim, Mi Sook; Choi, Du Hwan; Park, Sun Young; Lee, Hae Young

    2000-12-01

    The aims of this study were to make the lung cancer clinics in Korea Cancer Center Hospital, and to establish new therapeutic methods of lung cancer for increasing the cure rate and survival rate of patients. Also another purpose of this study was to establish a common treatment method in our hospital. All patients who were operated in Korea Cancer Center Hospital from 1987 due to lung cancer were followed up and evaluated. And we have been studied the effect of postoperative adjuvant therapy in stage I, II, IIIA non-small cell lung cancer patients from 1989 with the phase three study form. Follow-up examinations were scheduled in these patients and interim analysis was made. Also we have been studied the effect of chemo-therapeutic agents in small cell lung cancer patients from 1997 with the phase two study form. We evaluated the results of this study. Some important results of this study were as follows. 1. The new therapeutic method (surgery + MVP chemotherapy) was superior to the standard therapeutic one in stage I Non-small cell lung cancer patients. So, we have to change the standard method of treatment in stage I NSCLC. 2. Also, this new therapeutic method made a good result in stage II NSCLC patients. And this result was reported in The Annals of Thoracic Surgery. 3. However, this new therapeutic method was not superior to the standard treatment method (surgery only) in stage IIIA NSCLC patients. So, we must develop new chemo-therapeutic agents in the future for advanced NSCLC patients. 4. In the results of the randomized phase II studies about small cell lung cancer, there was no difference in survival between Etoposide + Carboplatin + Ifosfamide + Cisplatin group and Etoposide + Carboplatin + Ifosfamide + Cisplatin + Tamoxifen group in both the limited and extended types of small cell lung cancer patients

  19. Gene editing in hematopoietic stem cells: a potential therapeutic approach for Fanconi anemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diez Cabezas, B.

    2015-01-01

    targeting efficiency, due to the toxicity associated with the nucleofection of cells treated with these nanoparticles. In our next step, we moved from healthy donor HSCs to FA hematopoietic cells. Using a therapeutic donor vector carrying the FANCA gene, we demonstrated that gene targeting can correct the phenotype in a FA-A LCL. This was deduced from the restoration of FANCD2 foci formation and the reversion of the sensitivity of FA-A cells to interstrand cross linkers, such as mitomycin C (MMC). To improve the gene targeting efficiency in FA-A hematopoietic cells, we also investigated the effects mediated by the transient inhibition of anti-recombinase PARI. Although the inhibition of PARI increased RAD51 foci, no significant increase of homology directed repair efficiency was observed. In a final set of experiments we demonstrated that our gene targeting approach has also taken place in hematopoietic progenitor cells from FA-A patients, leading to a partial reversion in their hyper-sensitivity to MMC. Our study demonstrates for the first time that gene targeting in the AAVS1 safe harbor locus is feasible in hematopoietic cells from Fanconi anemia-A patients, opening up new perspectives for the future gene therapy of this and other monogenic diseases of the hematopoietic system.(Author)

  20. Gene editing in hematopoietic stem cells: a potential therapeutic approach for Fanconi anemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diez Cabezas, B.

    2015-07-01

    targeting efficiency, due to the toxicity associated with the nucleofection of cells treated with these nanoparticles. In our next step, we moved from healthy donor HSCs to FA hematopoietic cells. Using a therapeutic donor vector carrying the FANCA gene, we demonstrated that gene targeting can correct the phenotype in a FA-A LCL. This was deduced from the restoration of FANCD2 foci formation and the reversion of the sensitivity of FA-A cells to interstrand cross linkers, such as mitomycin C (MMC). To improve the gene targeting efficiency in FA-A hematopoietic cells, we also investigated the effects mediated by the transient inhibition of anti-recombinase PARI. Although the inhibition of PARI increased RAD51 foci, no significant increase of homology directed repair efficiency was observed. In a final set of experiments we demonstrated that our gene targeting approach has also taken place in hematopoietic progenitor cells from FA-A patients, leading to a partial reversion in their hyper-sensitivity to MMC. Our study demonstrates for the first time that gene targeting in the AAVS1 safe harbor locus is feasible in hematopoietic cells from Fanconi anemia-A patients, opening up new perspectives for the future gene therapy of this and other monogenic diseases of the hematopoietic system.(Author)

  1. Therapeutic drug monitoring in epilepsy clinic: a multi-disciplinary approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunee Lertsinudom

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is a common public health problem and needs multi-disciplinary treatment. Therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM is one of step of the multi-disciplinary treatment in epilepsy at Epilepsy clinic, Khon Kaen University (Thailand. The TDM service has been established since 2008. Here, we aimed to study the roles of TDM order and epilepsy control. This is a prospective descriptive study in which data collection was done from January 1 to December 31, 2010, the period when pharmacists took part in assessing the appropriateness in measurement and interpretation of TDM in order to provide suggestions for physicians. The 112 patients under study had an average age of 38.21±15.36 years; 254 samples were collected for therapeutic drug monitoring; phenytoin was submitted mostly for drug monitoring at 46.46%; 44.49% of sub-missions for drug level monitoring were made owing to a suspected sub-therapeutic level. Associations were found between reasons of sending samples for drug level monitoring and the measured drug levels, i.e., 66.67% of drug levels found was so low that they were undetectable in sample for patients’ compliance investigation and 38.94% of the drug levels were found to be sub-therapeutic as for the case where submission of samples was done because of suspected sub-therapeutic level, 40% of the cases were found to be in toxicity range in the cases with suspected over-therapeutic levels and monitoring levels, 58.25% were found to be within the therapeutic range. Pharmacists used the interpreted results in patients’ care by recommending physicians to monitor therapeutic drug closely, to adjust the dosage of drugs, and to recommend checking patients’ compliance in their use of drugs at 56.5, 38.9, and 4.3%, respectively. Physicians’ responses were found to be absolute follow, partial follow and not follow at 77.95, 11.03, and 7.48%, respectively. In conclusion, associations were found between reasons of TDM order and measured drug

  2. Maternally Sequestered Therapeutic Polypeptides – A New Approach for the Management of Preeclampsia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric eGeorge

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The last several decades have seen intensive research into the molecular mechanisms underlying the symptoms of preeclampsia. While the underlying cause of preeclampsia is believed to be defective placental development and resulting placental ischemia, it is only recently that the links between the ischemic placenta and maternal symptomatic manifestation have been elucidated. Several different pathways have been implicated in the development of the disorder; most notably production of the anti-angiogenic protein sFlt-1, induction of auto-immunity and inflammation, and production of reactive oxygen species. While the molecular mechanisms are becoming clearer, translating that knowledge into effective therapeutics has proven elusive. Here we describe a number of peptide based therapies we have developed to target theses pathways, and which are currently being tested in preclinical models. These therapeutics are based on a synthetic polymeric carrier elastin-like polypeptide (ELP, which can be synthesized in various sequences and sizes to stabilize the therapeutic peptide and avoid crossing the placental interface. This prevents fetal exposure and potential developmental effects. The therapeutics designed will target known pathogenic pathways, and the ELP carrier could prove to be a versatile delivery system for administration of a variety of therapeutics during pregnancy.

  3. Rational reconstructions of modern physics

    CERN Document Server

    Mittelstaedt, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Newton’s classical physics and its underlying ontology are loaded with several metaphysical hypotheses that cannot be justified by rational reasoning nor by experimental evidence. Furthermore, it is well known that some of these hypotheses are not contained in the great theories of Modern Physics, such as the theory of Special Relativity and Quantum Mechanics. This book shows that, on the basis of Newton’s classical physics and by rational reconstruction, the theory of Special Relativity as well as Quantum Mechanics can be obtained by partly eliminating or attenuating the metaphysical hypotheses. Moreover, it is shown that these reconstructions do not require additional hypotheses or new experimental results. In the second edition the rational reconstructions are completed with respect to General Relativity and Cosmology. In addition, the statistics of quantum objects is elaborated in more detail with respect to the rational reconstruction of quantum mechanics. The new material completes the approach of t...

  4. Rational approach to identify newer caspase-1 inhibitors using pharmacophore based virtual screening, docking and molecular dynamic simulation studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Shivani; Modi, Palmi; Chhabria, Mahesh

    2018-05-01

    Caspase-1 is a key endoprotease responsible for the post-translational processing of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β, 18 & 33. Excessive secretion of IL-1β leads to numerous inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Thus caspase-1 inhibition would be considered as an important therapeutic strategy for development of newer anti-inflammatory agents. Here we have employed an integrated virtual screening by combining pharmacophore mapping and docking to identify small molecules as caspase-1 inhibitors. The ligand based 3D pharmacophore model was generated having the essential structural features of (HBA, HY & RA) using a data set of 27 compounds. A validated pharmacophore hypothesis (Hypo 1) was used to screen ZINC and Minimaybridge chemical databases. The retrieved virtual hits were filtered by ADMET properties and molecular docking analysis. Subsequently, the cross-docking study was also carried out using crystal structure of caspase-1, 3, 7 and 8 to identify the key residual interaction for specific caspase-1 inhibition. Finally, the best mapped and top scored (ZINC00885612, ZINC72003647, BTB04175 and BTB04410) molecules were subjected to molecular dynamics simulation for accessing the dynamic structure of protein after ligand binding. This study identifies the most promising hits, which can be leads for the development of novel caspase-1 inhibitors as anti-inflammatory agents. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The teaching–learning of Therapeutic Physical Culture from a didactic approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Alejandro Romero-León

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The theoretical analysis of the main references of the Therapeutic Physical Culture, from a didactic perspective, allows to recognize the marked therapeutic intentionality that has prevailed in the teaching-learning of the TPC, to the detriment of the formation for the life and the solution of the problems Which are presented with the disease by the students, independently. Therefore, it is important to promote from the didactics to the teaching of this subject. In order to do so, three fundamental components were elaborated: cultural-procedural, instrumental-executor and an interactive component of personal involvement from which the objectives, contents and methods of the teaching of Therapeutic Physical Culture were strengthened. In this way a process is conceived that enables an active cognitive activity and the formation of abilities for the interaction with the different ailments.

  6. Non-parametric identification of multivariable systems : a local rational modeling approach with application to a vibration isolation benchmark

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voorhoeve, R.J.; van der Maas, A.; Oomen, T.A.J.

    2018-01-01

    Frequency response function (FRF) identification is often used as a basis for control systems design and as a starting point for subsequent parametric system identification. The aim of this paper is to develop a multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) local parametric modeling approach for FRF

  7. An Introduction to Equilibrium Thermodynamics. A Rational Approach to Its Teaching. Part 2: Internal Energy, Entropy, and Temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Donald F.; Glasser, David

    1991-01-01

    An approach that may be used to introduce the fundamental ideas of thermodynamics using a mathematical background with the knowledge of the behavior of matter is described. The physical background, conservation of energy, predicting the behavior of a system, and solving problems are topics of discussion. (KR)

  8. Novel therapeutic approaches for chronic kidney disease due to glomerular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Nogal-Avila, Maria; Donoro-Blazquez, Hector; Saha, Manish K; Marshall, Caroline B; Clement, Lionel C; Macé, Camille E A; Chugh, Sumant S

    2016-07-01

    Improved understanding of glomerular disease mechanisms over the past decade has led to the emergence of new and targeted therapeutic strategies for chronic kidney disease (CKD). Most promising among these are the administration of recombinant mutated human angiopoietin-like 4, sialic acid-related sugars that induce sialylation in vivo, compounds related to Bis-T-23, and immune depletion of the soluble urokinase receptor from the circulation. Taking these therapeutic strategies into clinical trials will be the first step away from repurposed and relatively toxic drugs currently used for treating kidney disease. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  9. Rationality in Society

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flache, Andreas; Dijkstra, Jacob; Wright, James D.

    2015-01-01

    Contemporary theories of rational behavior in human society augment the orthodox model of rationality both by adding various forms of bounded rationality and relaxing the assumptions of self-interest and materialistic preferences. This entry discusses how these extensions of the theory of rational

  10. Usefulness of CT-scan in the diagnosis and therapeutic approach of gallstone ileus: report of two surgically treated cases

    OpenAIRE

    Michele, Danzi; Luciano, Grimaldi; Massimiliano, Fabozzi; Stefano, Reggio; Roberta, Danzi; Ernesto, Soscia; Bruno, Amato

    2013-01-01

    Background Gallstone ileus is a rare cause of gastrointestinal obstruction, more frequent in elderly patients, whose treatment is essentially surgical, although some para-surgical and mini-invasive possibilities exist, allowing the solution of such obstructive condition in a completely non-invasive way. Description In our study, after reporting two cases of biliary ileus managed by our surgical division, we will analyze the most suitable diagnostic procedures and the therapeutic approaches to...

  11. Clinical course and therapeutic approach to varicella zoster virus infection in children with rheumatic autoimmune diseases under immunosuppression

    OpenAIRE

    Leuvenink, Raphael; Aeschlimann, Florence; Baer, Walter; Berthet, Gerald; Cannizzaro, Elvira; Hofer, Michael; Kaiser, Daniela; Schroeder, Silke; Heininger, Ulrich; Woerner, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Background To analyze the clinical presentation and complications of varicella zoster virus (VZV) infection in children with rheumatic diseases treated with immunosuppressive medication such as biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (bDMARDs) and/or conventional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (cDMARDs), and to analyze the therapeutic approach to VZV infections with respect to the concomitant immunosuppressive treatment. Methods Retrospective multicenter study using the Swiss ...

  12. The Third International Meeting on Genetic Disorders in the RAS/MAPK Pathway: Toward a Therapeutic Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Korf, Bruce; Ahmadian, Reza; Allanson, Judith; Aoki, Yoko; Bakker, Annette; Wright, Emma Burkitt; Denger, Brian; Elgersma, Ype; Gelb, Bruce D.; Gripp, Karen W.; Kerr, Bronwyn; Kontaridis, Maria; Lazaro, Conxi; Linardic, Corinne; Lozano, Reymundo

    2015-01-01

    "The Third International Meeting on Genetic Disorders in the RAS/MAPK Pathway: Towards a Therapeutic Approach" was held at the Renaissance Orlando at SeaWorld Hotel (August 2-4, 2013). Seventy-one physicians and scientists attended the meeting, and parallel meetings were held by patient advocacy groups (CFC International, Costello Syndrome Family Network, NF Network and Noonan Syndrome Foundation). Parent and patient advocates opened the meeting with a panel discussion to set the stage regard...

  13. Disruption of the Interaction of the Androgen Receptor with Chromatin: A Novel Therapeutic Approach in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0543 TITLE: Disruption of the Interaction of the Androgen Receptor with Chromatin : A Novel Therapeutic Approach in...DATES COVERED 8 Sep 2015 - 7 Sep 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Disruption of the Interaction of the Androgen Receptor with Chromatin : A Novel 5a. CONTRACT...1: Select and evaluate peptides/peptidomimetics in models of PCa. Aim 2: Determine the molecular action of peptide /peptidomimetics at the chromatin

  14. The therapeutic short story as a way from resilience. A first approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica Bruder

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Starting from the “therapeutic short story” tool, we wonder its possible relationship with the concept of “resiliencia” and the level of influence. Theory is complemented by an experimental study and a model case of example. 

  15. Therapeutic landscapes and postcolonial theory: a theoretical approach to medical tourism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzinde, Christine N; Yarnal, Careen

    2012-03-01

    This paper draws on two conceptual frameworks, therapeutic landscapes and postcolonial theory, to discuss aspects of medical tourism not addressed in extant literature. Building on the intersection between postcolonial and therapeutic landscapes scholarship, it highlights inequalities related to the production of national therapeutic landscapes located in postcolonial regions as well as their discursive (re)positioning as medical tourism destinations. As a framework, therapeutic landscapes can facilitate an understanding of medical tourism sites as curative spaces which combine modern and alternative forms of medicine with travel and leisure. Postcolonial theory critiques the economic, moral and cultural tensions emerging from the intersection between corporations that provide cheaper and more attractive medical services, and the nations on the periphery struggling to offer high medical standards that may not be accessible to their own local populations. In an effort to enhance scholarship on medical tourism, these conceptual frameworks are offered as points of departure, rather than sites of arrival, through which critical dialog on medical tourism can be sustained and broadened. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Computer-Aided Drug Design Approaches to Study Key Therapeutic Targets in Alzheimer’s Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lemos, A.; Melo, Rita; de Sousa Moreira, I.; Cordeiro, Maria Natália D S

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) is one of the most common and complex age-related neurodegenerative disorders in elderly people. Currently there is no cure for AD, and available therapeutic alternatives only improve both cognitive and behavioral functions. For that reason, the search for anti-AD

  17. Integrative Therapeutic Approaches for the Management and Control of Nausea in Children Undergoing Cancer Treatment: A Systematic Review of Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momani, Tha'er G; Berry, Donna L

    Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) continues to be a common symptom experienced by children undergoing cancer treatment despite the use of contemporary antiemetics. Integrative therapeutic approaches in addition to standard pharmacologic antiemetic regimes offer potential to control CINV. The purpose of this review was to identify current evidence on integrative therapeutic approaches for the control of CINV in children with cancer. Online search engines (PubMed, CINAHL, PsychINFO) were queried using MESH terms. Titles, abstracts, and then full-text articles were reviewed for relevance to the review. The search resulted in 53 studies. Twenty-one studies met our review criteria. Integrative therapies identified included acupuncture/acupressure, aromatherapy, herbal supplements, hypnosis, and other cognitive behavioral interventions. Our review identified little information on the effectiveness and safety of most integrative therapeutic approaches for the control and management of CINV in children with cancer. However, evidence from adult cancer studies and some pediatric studies identify promising interventions for further testing.

  18. Multimodal therapeutic approach of vaginismus: an innovative approach through trigger point infiltration and pulsed radiofrequency of the pudendal nerve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana Chaves Gonçalves Rodrigues de Carvalho

    Full Text Available Abstract Vaginismus is a poorly understood disorder, characterized by an involuntary muscular spasm of the pelvic floor muscles and outer third of the vagina during intercourse attempt, which results in aversion to penetration. It is reported to affect 1-7% of women worldwide. With this report the authors aim to describe the case of a young patient with vaginismus in whom techniques usually from the chronic pain domain were used as part of her multimodal therapeutic regimen.

  19. Tailored coating of gold nanostars: rational approach to prototype of theranostic device based on SERS and photothermal effects at ultralow irradiance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassi, B.; Dacarro, G.; Galinetto, P.; Giulotto, E.; Marchesi, N.; Pallavicini, P.; Pascale, A.; Perversi, S.; Taglietti, A.

    2018-06-01

    The last decade has come across an increasing demand for theranostic biocompatible nanodevices possessing the double ability of diagnosis and therapy. In this work, we report the design, synthesis and step-by-step characterization of rationally coated gold nanostars (GNSs) for the SERS imaging and photothermal therapy of HeLa cancer cells. The nanodevices were realized by synthesizing GNSs with a seed growth approach, coating them with a controlled mixture of thiols composed of a Raman reporter and a polyethylene glycol with a terminal amino group, and then reacting these amino groups with folic acid (FA), in order to impart selectivity towards cancer cells which overexpress folate receptors on their membranes. After a complete characterization, we demonstrate that these FA-functionalized GNSs (FA-GNSs) are able to bind selectively to the membranes of HeLa cells, acting as SERS tags and allowing SERS imaging. Moreover, we demonstrate that once bound to HeLa cell membranes, FA-GNSs exhibit photothermal effect which can be exploited to kill the same cells in vitro using laser irradiation in the NIR at a very low and safe irradiance. We thus demonstrate that the FA-GNSs designed following the described approach are an efficient prototype of theranostic nanodevices.

  20. Insomnia in childhood and adolescence: clinical aspects, diagnosis, and therapeutic approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magda Lahorgue Nunes

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To review the clinical characteristics, comorbidities, and management of insomnia in childhood and adolescence. Sources: This was a non-systematic literature review carried out in the PubMed database, from where articles published in the last five years were selected, using the key word “insomnia” and the pediatric age group filter. Additionally, the study also included articles and classic textbooks of the literature on the subject. Data synthesis: During childhood, there is a predominance of behavioral insomnia as a form of sleep-onset association disorder (SOAD and/or limit-setting sleep disorder. Adolescent insomnia is more associated with sleep hygiene problems and delayed sleep phase. Psychiatric (anxiety, depression or neurodevelopmental disorders (attention deficit disorder, autism, epilepsy frequently occur in association with or as a comorbidity of insomnia. Conclusions: Insomnia complaints in children and adolescents should be taken into account and appropriately investigated by the pediatrician, considering the association with several comorbidities, which must also be diagnosed. The main causes of insomnia and triggering factors vary according to age and development level. The therapeutic approach must include sleep hygiene and behavioral techniques and, in individual cases, pharmacological treatment. Resumo: Objetivos: Revisar as características clinicas, as comorbidades e o manejo da insônia na infância e adolescência. Fonte dos dados: Revisão não sistemática da literatura realizada na base dados PubMed,onde foram selecionados artigos publicados nos últimos 5 anos, selecionados com o uso da palavra chave insônia e o filtro faixa etária pediátrica. Adicionalmente foram também incluídos artigos e livros texto clássicos da literatura sobre o tema. Síntese dos dados: Na infância existe predomínio da insônia comportamental na forma de distúrbio de início do sono por associações inadequadas e

  1. A Rational Approach for Discovering and Validating Cancer Markers in Very Small Samples Using Mass Spectrometry and ELISA Microarrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard C. Zangar

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Identifying useful markers of cancer can be problematic due to limited amounts of sample. Some samples such as nipple aspirate fluid (NAF or early-stage tumors are inherently small. Other samples such as serum are collected in larger volumes but archives of these samples are very valuable and only small amounts of each sample may be available for a single study. Also, given the diverse nature of cancer and the inherent variability in individual protein levels, it seems likely that the best approach to screen for cancer will be to determine the profile of a battery of proteins. As a result, a major challenge in identifying protein markers of disease is the ability to screen many proteins using very small amounts of sample. In this review, we outline some technological advances in proteomics that greatly advance this capability. Specifically, we propose a strategy for identifying markers of breast cancer in NAF that utilizes mass spectrometry (MS to simultaneously screen hundreds or thousands of proteins in each sample. The best potential markers identified by the MS analysis can then be extensively characterized using an ELISA microarray assay. Because the microarray analysis is quantitative and large numbers of samples can be efficiently analyzed, this approach offers the ability to rapidly assess a battery of selected proteins in a manner that is directly relevant to traditional clinical assays.

  2. Immunology, epidemiology and mathematical modelling towards a better understanding of invasive non-typhoidal Salmonella disease and rational vaccination approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastroeni, Pietro; Rossi, Omar

    2016-12-01

    Invasive non-typhoidal Salmonella (iNTS) infections cause a high burden of lethal sepsis in young children and HIV patients, often associated with malaria, anaemia, malnutrition and sickle-cell disease. Vaccines against iNTS are urgently needed but none are licensed yet. Areas covered: This review illustrates how immunology, epidemiology and within-host pathogen behaviour affect invasive Salmonella infections and highlights how this knowledge can assist the improvement and choice of vaccines. Expert Commentary: Control of iNTS disease requires approaches that reduce transmission and improve diagnosis and treatment. These are often difficult to implement due to the fragile ecology and economies in endemic countries. Vaccines will be key tools in the fight against iNTS disease. To optimise vaccine design, we need to better define protective antigens and mechanisms of resistance to disease in susceptible populations even in those individuals where innate immunity may be impaired by widespread comorbidities.

  3. The relationship between clinical findings and therapeutic approach in the treatment of fractured frontal sinus walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pešić Zoran

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The incidence of fractured frontal sinus walls vary from 6% to 12% of all craniofacial injuries. Objective Estimated relation between clinical findings and performed therapeutic procedures in treating fractured frontal sinus walls. To estimate success in performed therapeutic procedures, according to the incidence of postoperative complications and the integrity of injured regions from the functional and esthetical aspect. Method We analyzed, by retrospective clinical investigation, 19 patients with fractured frontal sinus walls and dislocated fragments, treated at the Department for Maxillofacial Surgery, Clinic of Dentistry in Niš, in the period March 1995 - March 2006. The success of therapy was estimated based on the incidence and type of complications and esthetical results in relation to preoperative findings. Results Predominant etiological factor in fractures of frontal sinus walls is trauma sustained in traffic accidents, which occurred in 52.6% of patients in our investigation. In clinical findings, the impression was the predominant sign, present in 16 patients. In 6 cases soft tissue access through already present lacerations or their extensions was employed, in 4 cases it was done by supraciliary access and in 9 by bicoronal access. As a therapeutic measure, drainage was performed in 5 cases, cranialisation in one, ostheoneogenetic access in 11 cases and a simple reposition of fragments in 2 patients with fractured frontal sinus walls. Infection as a complication was absent. All patients were satisfied with postoperative esthetical appearance of the injured region. Conclusion The infection, the lacerations and the direction of fractured lines are dominant factors in the determination of therapeutic procedures used to treat fractured frontal sinus walls. This will result in the low incidence of infection as a postoperative complication and in patient’s satisfaction with postoperative esthetical result of the injured

  4. Ivacaftor: A Novel Gene-Based Therapeutic Approach for Cystic Fibrosis

    OpenAIRE

    Condren, Michelle E.; Bradshaw, Marquita D.

    2013-01-01

    Ivacaftor is a new therapeutic agent that acts at the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) channel to alter activity. It is approved for use in patients 6 years and older with cystic fibrosis who have at least 1 G551D mutation in the CFTR gene. It is unlike any other current pharmacologic agent for cystic fibrosis in that it specifically targets the gene defect associated with cystic fibrosis as opposed to treating resulting symptomology. Mucoactive agents, antibiotics, ...

  5. Breaching the Castle Walls: Hyaluronan-Depletion as a Therapeutic Approach to Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Michael eShepard

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Hyaluronan (HA has many functions in the extracellular milieu of normal and diseased tissues. Disease-associated HA accumulation has been shown to predict a worsened prognosis in cancer patients, with tumors having a high extracellular HA content (HA-high being more aggressive than their HA-low counterparts. HA-high tumor aggressiveness is derived from the specialized biomechanical and molecular properties of the HA-based assembly of HA binding proteins and the growth-promoting factors that accumulate in it. Biophysical characteristics of an HA-high tumor microenvironment include high tumor interstitial pressure, compression of tumor vasculature, and resulting tumor hypoxia. Within the tumor cell membrane, HA receptors, primarily CD44 and RHAMM, anchor the HA-high extracellular network. HA-CD44 association on the tumor cell surface enhances receptor tyrosine kinase activity to drive tumor progression and treatment resistance. Together, malignant cells in this HA-high matrix may evolve dependency on it for growth. This yields the hypothesis that depleting HA in HA-high tumors may be associated with a therapeutic benefit. A pegylated form of recombinant human hyaluronidase PH20 (PEGPH20 has been deployed as a potential cancer therapeutic in HA-high tumors. PEGPH20 can collapse this matrix by degrading the HA-assembled tumor extracellular framework, leading to tumor growth inhibition, preferentially in HA-high tumors. Enzymatic depletion of HA by PEGPH20 results in re-expansion of the tumor vasculature, reduction in tumor hypoxia, and increased penetration of therapeutic molecules into the tumor. Finally, HA depletion results in reduced signaling via CD44/RHAMM. Taken together, HA-depletion strategies accomplish their antitumor effects by multiple mechanisms that include targeting both biophysical and molecular signaling pathways. Ongoing clinical trials are examining the potential of PEGPH20 in combination with partner therapeutics in several

  6. Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms of Diabetic Atherosclerosis: Herbal Medicines as a Potential Therapeutic Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinfan Tian

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available An increasing number of patients diagnosed with diabetes mellitus eventually develop severe coronary atherosclerosis disease. Both type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus increase the risk of cardiovascular disease associated with atherosclerosis. The cellular and molecular mechanisms affecting the incidence of diabetic atherosclerosis are still unclear, as are appropriate strategies for the prevention and treatment of diabetic atherosclerosis. In this review, we discuss progress in the study of herbs as potential therapeutic agents for diabetic atherosclerosis.

  7. On rationally supported surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gravesen, Jens; Juttler, B.; Sir, Z.

    2008-01-01

    We analyze the class of surfaces which are equipped with rational support functions. Any rational support function can be decomposed into a symmetric (even) and an antisymmetric (odd) part. We analyze certain geometric properties of surfaces with odd and even rational support functions....... In particular it is shown that odd rational support functions correspond to those rational surfaces which can be equipped with a linear field of normal vectors, which were discussed by Sampoli et al. (Sampoli, M.L., Peternell, M., Juttler, B., 2006. Rational surfaces with linear normals and their convolutions...... with rational surfaces. Comput. Aided Geom. Design 23, 179-192). As shown recently, this class of surfaces includes non-developable quadratic triangular Bezier surface patches (Lavicka, M., Bastl, B., 2007. Rational hypersurfaces with rational convolutions. Comput. Aided Geom. Design 24, 410426; Peternell, M...

  8. Simplifications of rational matrices by using UML

    OpenAIRE

    Tasić, Milan B.; Stanimirović, Ivan P.

    2013-01-01

    The simplification process on rational matrices consists of simplifying each entry represented by a rational function. We follow the classic approach of dividing the numerator and denominator polynomials by their common GCD polynomial, and provide the activity diagram in UML for this process. A rational matrix representation as the quotient of a polynomial matrix and a polynomial is also discussed here and illustrated via activity diagrams. Also, a class diagram giving the links between the c...

  9. [Clinical presentation, therapeutic approach and outcomes in acute poisoning treated with activated charcoal. Are there differences between men and women?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amigó-Tadín, Montserrat; Nogué-Xarau, Santiago; Miró-Andreu, Oscar

    2010-01-01

    To determine whether there are gender-based differences in the clinical presentation, therapeutic approaches and outcomes in acute poisoning treated with activated charcoal. A descriptive study conducted in the Emergency Department of the Hospital Clínic de Barcelona over the 7 years between the years 2001 and 2008. The study included poisoned patients who had received activated charcoal. The variables included, epidemiological data, clinical and toxicological presentation, therapeutic approach, time in emergency department and outcomes. A total of 575 patients were included in the study. The mean age was 37.8 (SD 14.8) years and 65.7% were females. No differences were observed between males and females with respect to age, number of drugs involved in the poisoning or the number of tablets ingested, but a higher prevalence of benzodiazepine poisoning was observed in females compared to males (69.8 vs. 61.2%; Ppoisoning was more common in males than in females (32.4 vs.18.8%; Ppoisoning was also more common in males than in females (7.9 vs. 3.2%; Ppoisonings, delays in care, hours of emergency department stay, treatment or outcome. Benzodiazepine poisoning was more prevalent in females than in males. Non-drug poisonings and alcohol combined with drug ingestion were more common in males. The clinical outcomes of the poisonings, delays in care, therapeutic requirements and admissions were similar between genders. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  10. Rationalization of dye uptake on titania slides for dye-sensitized solar cells by a combined chemometric and structural approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianotti, Valentina; Favaro, Giada; Bonandini, Luca; Palin, Luca; Croce, Gianluca; Boccaleri, Enrico; Artuso, Emma; van Beek, Wouter; Barolo, Claudia; Milanesio, Marco

    2014-11-01

    A model photosensitizer (D5) for application in dye-sensitized solar cells has been studied by a combination of XRD, theoretical calculations, and spectroscopic/chemometric methods. The conformational stability and flexibility of D5 and molecular interactions between adjacent molecules were characterized to obtain the driving forces that govern D5 uptake and grafting and to infer the most likely arrangement of the molecules on the surface of TiO2. A spectroscopic/chemometric approach was then used to yield information about the correlations between three variables that govern the uptake itself: D5 concentration, dispersant (chenodeoxycholic acid; CDCA) concentration, and contact time. The obtained regression model shows that large uptakes can be obtained at high D5 concentrations in the presence of CDCA with a long contact time, or in absence of CDCA if the contact time is short, which suggests how dye uptake and photovoltaic device preparation can be optimized. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. The discriminant pixel approach: a new tool for the rational interpretation of GCxGC-MS chromatograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vial, Jérôme; Pezous, Benoît; Thiébaut, Didier; Sassiat, Patrick; Teillet, Béatrice; Cahours, Xavier; Rivals, Isabelle

    2011-01-30

    GCxGC is now recognized as the most suited analytical technique for the characterization of complex mixtures of volatile compounds; it is implemented worldwide in academic and industrial laboratories. However, in the frame of comprehensive analysis of non-target analytes, going beyond the visual examination of the color plots remains challenging for most users. We propose a strategy that aims at classifying chromatograms according to the chemical composition of the samples while determining the origin of the discrimination between different classes of samples: the discriminant pixel approach. After data pre-processing and time-alignment, the discriminatory power of each chromatogram pixel for a given class was defined as its correlation with the membership to this class. Using a peak finding algorithm, the most discriminant pixels were then linked to chromatographic peaks. Finally, crosschecking with mass spectrometry data enabled to establish relationships with compounds that could consequently be considered as candidate class markers. This strategy was applied to a large experimental data set of 145 GCxGC-MS chromatograms of tobacco extracts corresponding to three distinct classes of tobacco. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. [Multimodal therapeutic approach of vaginismus: an innovative approach through trigger point infiltration and pulsed radiofrequency of the pudendal nerve].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Joana Chaves Gonçalves Rodrigues de; Agualusa, Luís Miguel; Moreira, Luísa Manuela Ribeiro; Costa, Joana Catarina Monteiro da

    Vaginismus is a poorly understood disorder, characterized by an involuntary muscular spasm of the pelvic floor muscles and outer third of the vagina during intercourse attempt, which results in aversion to penetration. It is reported to affect 1-7% of women worldwide. With this report the authors aim to describe the case of a young patient with vaginismus in whom techniques usually from the chronic pain domain were used as part of her multimodal therapeutic regimen. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  13. Epigenetic Modulating Agents as a New Therapeutic Approach in Multiple Myeloma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maes, Ken; Menu, Eline; Van Valckenborgh, Els; Van Riet, Ivan; Vanderkerken, Karin; De Bruyne, Elke

    2013-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is an incurable B-cell malignancy. Therefore, new targets and drugs are urgently needed to improve patient outcome. Epigenetic aberrations play a crucial role in development and progression in cancer, including MM. To target these aberrations, epigenetic modulating agents, such as DNA methyltransferase inhibitors (DNMTi) and histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi), are under intense investigation in solid and hematological cancers. A clinical benefit of the use of these agents as single agents and in combination regimens has been suggested based on numerous studies in pre-clinical tumor models, including MM models. The mechanisms of action are not yet fully understood but appear to involve a combination of true epigenetic changes and cytotoxic actions. In addition, the interactions with the BM niche are also affected by epigenetic modulating agents that will further determine the in vivo efficacy and thus patient outcome. A better understanding of the molecular events underlying the anti-tumor activity of the epigenetic drugs will lead to more rational drug combinations. This review focuses on the involvement of epigenetic changes in MM pathogenesis and how the use of DNMTi and HDACi affect the myeloma tumor itself and its interactions with the microenvironment

  14. Metabolism and Ovarian Function in PCOS Women: A Therapeutic Approach with Inositols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Simone Laganà

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS is characterized by chronical anovulation and hyperandrogenism which may be present in a different degree of severity. Insulin-resistance and hyperinsulinemia are the main physiopathological basis of this syndrome and the failure of inositol-mediated signaling may concur to them. Myo (MI and D-chiro-inositol (DCI, the most studied inositol isoforms, are classified as insulin sensitizers. In form of glycans, DCI-phosphoglycan and MI-phosphoglycan control key enzymes were involved in glucose and lipid metabolism. In form of phosphoinositides, they play an important role as second messengers in several cellular biological functions. Considering the key role played by insulin-resistance and androgen excess in PCOS patients, the insulin-sensitizing effects of both MI and DCI were tested in order to ameliorate symptoms and signs of this syndrome, including the possibility to restore patients’ fertility. Accumulating evidence suggests that both isoforms of inositol are effective in improving ovarian function and metabolism in patients with PCOS, although MI showed the most marked effect on the metabolic profile, whereas DCI reduced hyperandrogenism better. The purpose of this review is to provide an update on inositol signaling and correlate data on biological functions of these multifaceted molecules, in view of a rational use for the therapy in women with PCOS.

  15. Enzymatic shaving of the tegument surface of live schistosomes for proteomic analysis: a rational approach to select vaccine candidates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Castro-Borges

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The membrane-associated and membrane-spanning constituents of the Schistosoma mansoni tegument surface, the parasite's principal interface with the host bloodstream, have recently been characterized using proteomic techniques. Biotinylation of live worms using membrane-impermeant probes revealed that only a small subset of the proteins was accessible to the reagents. Their position within the multilayered architecture of the surface has not been ascertained.An enzymatic shaving approach on live worms has now been used to release the most accessible components, for analysis by MS/MS. Treatment with trypsin, or phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PiPLC, only minimally impaired membrane integrity. PiPLC-enriched proteins were distinguished from those released in parasite vomitus or by handling damage, using isobaric tagging. Trypsin released five membrane proteins, Sm200, Sm25 and three annexins, plus host CD44 and the complement factors C3 and C4. Nutrient transporters and ion channels were absent from the trypsin fraction, suggesting a deeper location in the surface complex; surprisingly, two BAR-domain containing proteins were released. Seven parasite and two host proteins were enriched by PiPLC treatment, the vaccine candidate Sm29 being the most prominent along with two orthologues of human CD59, potentially inhibitors of complement fixation. The enzymes carbonic anhydrase and APD-ribosyl cyclase were also enriched, plus Sm200 and alkaline phosphatase. Host GPI-anchored proteins CD48 and CD90, suggest 'surface painting' during worm peregrination in the portal system.Our findings suggest that the membranocalyx secreted over the tegument surface is not the inert barrier previously proposed, some tegument proteins being externally accessible to enzymes and thus potentially located within it. Furthermore, the detection of C3 and C4 indicates that the complement cascade is initiated, while two CD59 orthologues suggest a potential

  16. Consensus categorization of cheese based on water activity and pH-A rational approach to systemizing cheese diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trmčić, A; Ralyea, R; Meunier-Goddik, L; Donnelly, C; Glass, K; D'Amico, D; Meredith, E; Kehler, M; Tranchina, N; McCue, C; Wiedmann, M

    2017-01-01

    Development of science-based interventions in raw milk cheese production is challenging due to the large diversity of production procedures and final products. Without an agreed upon categorization scheme, science-based food safety evaluations and validation of preventive controls would have to be completed separately on each individual cheese product, which is not feasible considering the large diversity of products and the typically small scale of production. Thus, a need exists to systematically group raw milk cheeses into logically agreed upon categories to be used for food safety evaluations. This paper proposes and outlines one such categorization scheme that provides for 30 general categories of cheese. As a base for this systematization and categorization of raw milk cheese, we used Table B of the US Food and Drug Administration's 2013 Food Code, which represents the interaction of pH and water activity for control of vegetative cells and spores in non-heat-treated food. Building on this table, we defined a set of more granular pH and water activity categories to better represent the pH and water activity range of different raw milk cheeses. The resulting categorization scheme was effectively validated using pH and water activity values determined for 273 different cheese samples collected in the marketplace throughout New York State, indicating the distribution of commercially available cheeses among the categories proposed here. This consensus categorization of cheese provides a foundation for a feasible approach to developing science-based solutions to assure compliance of the cheese processors with food safety regulations, such as those required by the US Food Safety Modernization Act. The key purpose of the cheese categorization proposed here is to facilitate product assessment for food safety risks and provide scientifically validated guidance on effective interventions for general cheese categories. Once preventive controls for a given category have

  17. Controlling the spread of carbapenemase-producing Gram-negatives: therapeutic approach and infection control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmeli, Y; Akova, M; Cornaglia, G; Daikos, G L; Garau, J; Harbarth, S; Rossolini, G M; Souli, M; Giamarellou, H

    2010-02-01

    Although the rapid spread of carbapenemase-producing Gram-negatives (CPGNs) is providing the scientific community with a great deal of information about the molecular epidemiology of these enzymes and their genetic background, data on how to treat multidrug-resistant or extended drug-resistant carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae and how to contain their spread are still surprisingly limited, in spite of the rapidly increasing prevalence of these organisms and of their isolation from patients suffering from life-threatening infections. Limited clinical experience and several in vitro synergy studies seem to support the view that antibiotic combinations should be preferred to monotherapies. But, in light of the data available to date, it is currently impossible to quantify the real advantage of drug combinations in the treatment of these infections. Comprehensive clinical studies of the main therapeutic options, broken down by pathogen, enzyme and clinical syndrome, are definitely lacking and, as carbapenemases keep spreading, are urgently needed. This spread is unveiling the substantial unpreparedness of European public health structures to face this worrisome emergency, although experiences from different countries-chiefly Greece and Israel-have shown that CPGN transmission and cross-infection can cause a substantial threat to the healthcare system. This unpreparedness also affects the treatment of individual patients and infection control policies, with dramatic scarcities of both therapeutic options and infection control measures. Although correct implementation of such measures is presumably cumbersome and expensive, the huge clinical and public health problems related to CPGN transmission, alongside the current scarcity of therapeutic options, seem to fully justify this choice.

  18. Radiation protection for innovative diagnostic and therapeutic approaches in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aubert, B.; Chatal, J.F.

    2006-01-01

    A real technological revolution has deeply modified the field of application and perspectives of nuclear medicine, and nuclear oncology in particular, during the past 5 years. Diagnostic applications such as positron emission tomography (PET) with 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) have had a significant impact on the diagnostic strategy adopted by medical oncologists, with the addition of invaluable functional data to already available anatomical data provided by conventional imaging modalities. Numerous other 18 F-labeled tracers currently under clinical evaluation have been developed to study various tumor functions (tumor proliferation, hypoxia, hemo-therapy-induced apoptosis, etc.). These tracers may have a considerable impact on therapeutic strategies. Other positron-emitting radionuclides, such as copper-64, iodine-124, and yttrium-86 (whose respective half-lives are 12.7 hours, 4.2 days. and 14.7 hours) will soon be available for certain clinical indications, such as immuno-PET (with monoclonal antibodies or antibody fragments used as carriers) or pretreatment dosimetry, which cannot be performed with fluorine-18 due its short half-life. As far as therapeutic applications are concerned, the use of internal radiotherapy, which has been restricted to thyroid cancer for a long time, was recently extended to other cancers as new carriers, such as monoclonal antibodies (radioimmunotherapy) or peptides (radio-peptide therapy), new targeting methods (pre-targeting), and new radionuclides, especially alpha particle emitters (alpha therapy), became available. These technological advances require that specific radiation safety regulations be implemented to protect nuclear medicine personnel, patients' close relatives, and the environment. Most current regulations concern diagnostic applications with technetium-99m and therapeutic applications with iodine-131. Regulations pertaining to the clinical use of 18 F-FDG were recently enacted (2001). Regarding exposure nuclear

  19. Recent progress of diagnostic and therapeutic approach to cancers using polyclonal or monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koji, Toshihiko

    1982-01-01

    Among the major topics of interest in cancer immunology, immunodiagnosis and immunotherapy with the antibodies are summarized historically and prospectively. The concept of injecting anti-tumor cell antibodies to localize tumors was first introduced in experimental systems by Pressman (1957). Since then, various trials have been achieved with human tumors using specific or nonspecific tumor-localizing antibodies diagnostically or therapeutically. In 1970's, successes in immunodiagnosis with the antibodies to oncofetal proteins also have been reported. Recently, there are numerous papers dealed with a series of external scanning or serotherapeutic trials by the use of monoclonal antibodies that bind selectively to tumor cells. Various relevant problems with them are discussed. (author)

  20. Angioedema hereditário: considerações sobre terapia Therapeutic approach of hereditary angioedema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kélem de Nardi Chagas

    2004-09-01

    HAE ser causado pelo mesmo defeito e acometer membros da mesma família, diferentes critérios têm sido estabelecidos para o tratamento desses pacientes. Foram indicados diferentes esquemas terapêuticos para HAE e alguns dos pacientes puderam ser seguidos sem terapia medicamentosa.PURPOSE: Hereditary Angioedema was first described by William Osler in 1888 and it is caused by a hereditary or acquired deficiency of C1 esterase inhibitor (C1-INH. Treatment is indicated for acute attacks or prophylaxis of angioedema which occur in the subcutaneous tissue respiratory or gastrointestinal tracts. Treatment includes attenuated androgens, inhibitors of kininogen or plasminogen, like tranexamic acid or e-aminocaproic acid and the administration of C1-INH concentrate. We describe the peculiarities of the treatment chosen for 10 patients (4 families with HAE and their evolution. METHODS: Ten patients (1-38 years old with HAE were diagnosed by clinical history and laboratory evaluation. The following tests were performed for the complement system: C1-INH, C4 and C3 levels and hemolytic assay (CH50 and APH50 for the classic and alternative pathways. Treatment was initiated considering severity of symptoms, age, gender and therapeutic response of the patient. RESULTS: Clinical evaluation showed: 4/10 patients with recurrent subcutaneous edema; 3/10 with previous laryngeal edema and 3/10 with sporadic symptoms. Different severity of symptoms was verified in the same family. The laboratory evaluation detected: low C1-INH levels (10/10; low serum C4 level (8/10; undetectable CH50 (3/10 and low CH50 levels (6/10; low APH50 levels (2/10. Six out of ten patients did not receive any specific treatment and 2 of them had high risk of asphyxia. One adolescent had been controlled with e-aminocaproic acid, one child had been changed from danazol to tranexamic acid, a 30 year old female patient had received oxandrolone and a 38 year old man had been treated with danazol. CONCLUSIONS: Although

  1. Development of a model for the rational design of molecular imprinted polymer: Computational approach for combined molecular dynamics/quantum mechanics calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong Cunku; Li Xin; Guo Zechong; Qi Jingyao

    2009-01-01

    A new rational approach for the preparation of molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) based on the combination of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and quantum mechanics (QM) calculations is described in this work. Before performing molecular modeling, a virtual library of functional monomers was created containing forty frequently used monomers. The MD simulations were first conducted to screen the top three monomers from virtual library in each porogen-acetonitrile, chloroform and carbon tetrachloride. QM simulations were then performed with an aim to select the optimum monomer and progen solvent in which the QM simulations were carried out; the monomers giving the highest binding energies were chosen as the candidate to prepare MIP in its corresponding solvent. The acetochlor, a widely used herbicide, was chosen as the target analyte. According to the theoretical calculation results, the MIP with acetochlor as template was prepared by emulsion polymerization method using N,N-methylene bisacrylamide (MBAAM) as functional monomer and divinylbenzene (DVB) as cross-linker in chloroform. The synthesized MIP was then tested by equilibrium-adsorption method, and the MIP demonstrated high removal efficiency to the acetochlor. Mulliken charge distribution and 1 H NMR spectroscopy of the synthesized MIP provided insight on the nature of recognition during the imprinting process probing the governing interactions for selective binding site formation at a molecular level. We think the computer simulation method first proposed in this paper is a novel and reliable method for the design and synthesis of MIP.

  2. The Role of the Endothelium in HPS Pathogenesis and Potential Therapeutic Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Gavrilovskaya

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available American hantaviruses cause a highly lethal acute pulmonary edema termed hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS. Hantaviruses nonlytically infect endothelial cells and cause dramatic changes in barrier functions of the endothelium without disrupting the endothelium. Instead hantaviruses cause changes in the function of infected endothelial cells that normally regulate fluid barrier functions of capillaries. The endothelium of arteries, veins, and lymphatic vessels is unique and central to the function of vast pulmonary capillary beds, which regulate pulmonary fluid accumulation. The endothelium maintains vascular barrier functions through a complex series of redundant receptors and signaling pathways that serve to both permit fluid and immune cell efflux into tissues and restrict tissue edema. Infection of the endothelium provides several mechanisms for hantaviruses to alter capillary permeability but also defines potential therapeutic targets for regulating acute pulmonary edema and HPS disease. Here we discuss interactions of HPS causing hantaviruses with the endothelium, potential endothelial cell-directed permeability mechanisms, and therapeutic targeting of the endothelium as a means of reducing the severity of HPS disease.

  3. The approach of cancer related fatigue in rehabilitation medicine: Part II – Therapeutic interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salca Amalia

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Starting with patient’ diagnose and continuing throughout the treatment and thereafter, cancer-related fatigue (CRF is a distressing and disabling symptom, highly prevalent across the cancer continuum2. This is a review article mainly focusing on the rehabilitation objectives and interventions in CRF, and implementation issues, according to the report of an NCCN member institution4. Implementation is the most problematic, considering the large number of patients to whom it is addressed to and the variety of pathologies within this group of patients. The onset of CRF is difficult to establish, because of the limitations of reporting this symptom4, but it is a valuable predictor in prognosis. The main interventions in rehabilitation applicable to these patients are discussed in correlation to the objectives of each phase of therapeutic management in cancer: pre-operatory, before, during or after radio and/or chemotherapy Conclusion: Rehabilitation interventions should be applied to all patients diagnosed with cancer, according to their phase of oncologic treatment and the objectives. This should be practiced as preventive measure, but as a therapeutic one to, considering the high incidence of CFR before diagnose.

  4. Pelvic floor muscle rehabilitation for patients with lifelong premature ejaculation: a novel therapeutic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastore, Antonio L; Palleschi, Giovanni; Fuschi, Andrea; Maggioni, Cristina; Rago, Rocco; Zucchi, Alessandro; Costantini, Elisabetta; Carbone, Antonio

    2014-06-01

    Premature ejaculation is the most common male sexual disorder. The aim of the study was to evaluate the possible therapeutic role of pelvic floor muscle rehabilitation in patients affected by lifelong premature ejaculation. We treated 40 men with lifelong premature ejaculation, reporting, a baseline intravaginal ejaculatory latency time (IELT) ≤ 1 min, with 12-week pelvic floor muscle rehabilitation. At the end of the rehabilitation, mean IELTs were calculated to evaluate the effectiveness of the therapy. At the end of the treatment, 33 (82.5%) of the 40 patients gained control of their ejaculatory reflex, with a mean IELT of 146.2 s (range: 123.6-152.4 s). A total of 13 out of 33 (39%) patients were evaluated at 6 months follow up, and they maintained a significant IELT (112.6 s) compared with their initial IELT (mean 39.8 s). The results obtained in our subjects treated with pelvic floor rehabilitation are promising. This therapy represents an important cost reduction compared with the standard treatment (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors). Based on the present data, we propose pelvic floor muscle rehabilitation as a new, viable therapeutic option for the treatment of premature ejaculation.

  5. Psychological variables implied in the therapeutic effect of ayahuasca: A contextual approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franquesa, Alba; Sainz-Cort, Alberto; Gandy, Sam; Soler, Joaquim; Alcázar-Córcoles, Miguel Ángel; Bouso, José Carlos

    2018-04-04

    Ayahuasca is a psychedelic decoction originating from Amazonia. The ayahuasca-induced introspective experience has been shown to have potential benefits in the treatment of several pathologies, to protect mental health and to improve neuropsychological functions and creativity, and boost mindfulness. The underlying psychological processes related to the use of ayahuasca in a psychotherapeutic context are not yet well described in the scientific literature, but there is some evidence to suggest that psychological variables described in psychotherapies could be useful in explaining the therapeutic effects of the brew. In this study we explore the link between ayahuasca use and Decentering, Values and Self, comparing subjects without experience of ayahuasca (n = 41) with subjects with experience (n = 81). Results confirm that ayahuasca users scored higher than non-users in Decentering and Positive self, but not in Valued living, Life fulfillment, Self in social relations, Self in close relations and General self. Scores in Decentering were higher in the more experienced subjects (more than 15 occasions) than in those with less experience (less than 15 occasions). Our results show that psychological process variables may explain the outcomes in ayahuasca psychotherapy. The introduction of these variables is warranted in future ayahuasca therapeutic studies. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Epigenetics: A novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adwan, Lina; Zawia, Nasser H.

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common type of dementia in the elderly. It is characterized by the deposition of two forms of aggregates within the brain, the amyloid β plaques and tau neurofibrillary tangles. Currently, no disease-modifying agent is approved for the treatment of AD. Approved pharmacotherapies target the peripheral symptoms but they do not prevent or slow down the progression of the disease. Although several disease-modifying immunotherapeutic agents are in clinical development, many have failed due to lack of efficacy or serious adverse events. Epigenetic changes including DNA methylation and histone modifications are involved in learning and memory and have been recently highlighted for holding promise as potential targets for AD therapeutics. Dynamic and latent epigenetic alterations are incorporated in AD pathological pathways and present valuable reversible targets for AD and other neurological disorders. The approval of epigenetic drugs for cancer treatment has opened the door for the development of epigenetic drugs for other disorders including neurodegenerative diseases. In particular, methyl donors and histone deacetylase inhibitors are being investigated for possible therapeutic effects to rescue memory and cognitive decline found in such disorders. This review explores the area of epigenetics for potential AD interventions and presents the most recent findings in this field. PMID:23562602

  7. Rationing medical education.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper discussed the pros and cons of the application of rationing to medical education and the different ... Different types of rationing exist in healthcare professional education. ... state-of-the-art resources, technology and tutors con-.

  8. On Counting the Rational Numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almada, Carlos

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we show how to construct a function from the set N of natural numbers that explicitly counts the set Q[superscript +] of all positive rational numbers using a very intuitive approach. The function has the appeal of Cantor's function and it has the advantage that any high school student can understand the main idea at a glance…

  9. Rationing with baselines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Jens Leth; Moreno-Ternero, Juan D.; Østerdal, Lars Peter Raahave

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a new operator for general rationing problems in which, besides conflicting claims, individual baselines play an important role in the rationing process. The operator builds onto ideas of composition, which are not only frequent in rationing, but also in related problems...... such as bargaining, choice, and queuing. We characterize the operator and show how it preserves some standard axioms in the literature on rationing. We also relate it to recent contributions in such literature....

  10. CONTRIBUTIONS TO RATIONAL APPROXIMATION,

    Science.gov (United States)

    Some of the key results of linear Chebyshev approximation theory are extended to generalized rational functions. Prominent among these is Haar’s...linear theorem which yields necessary and sufficient conditions for uniqueness. Some new results in the classic field of rational function Chebyshev...Furthermore a Weierstrass type theorem is proven for rational Chebyshev approximation. A characterization theorem for rational trigonometric Chebyshev approximation in terms of sign alternation is developed. (Author)

  11. Pre-exenterative chemotherapy, a novel therapeutic approach for patients with persistent or recurrent cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uribe Jesus

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most cervical cancer patients with pelvic recurrent or persistent disease are not candidates for exenteration, therefore, they only receive palliative chemotherapy. Here we report the results of a novel treatment modality for these patients pre-exenterative chemotherapy- under the rational that the shrinking of the pelvic tumor would allow its resection. Methods Patients with recurrent or persistent disease and no evidence of systemic disease, considered not be candidates for pelvic exenteration because of the extent of pelvic tumor, received 3-courses of platinum-based chemotherapy. Response was evaluated by CT scan and bimanual pelvic examination; however the decision to perform exenteration relied on the physical findings. Toxicity to chemotherapy was evaluated with standard criteria. Survival was analyzed with the Kaplan-Meier method. Results Seventeen patients were studied. The median number of chemotherapy courses was 4. There were 9 patients who responded to chemotherapy, evaluated by bimanual examination and underwent pelvic exenteration. Four of them had pathological complete response. Eight patients did not respond and were not subjected to surgery. One patient died due to exenteration complications. At a median follow-up of 11 months, the median survival for the whole group was 11 months, 3 months in the non-operated and 32 months in those subjected to exenteration. Conclusion Pre-exenterative chemotherapy is an alternative for cervical cancer patients that are no candidates for exenteration because of the extent of the pelvic disease. Its place in the management of recurrent disease needs to be investigated in randomized studies, however, its value for offering long-term survival in some of these patients with no other option than palliative care must be stressed.

  12. The Problem of Rational Moral Enlistment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillson, John

    2017-01-01

    How can one bring children to recognize the requirements of morality without resorting only to non-rational means of persuasion (i.e. what rational ground can be offered to children for their moral enlistment)? Michael Hand has recently defended a foundationalist approach to answering this question and John White has responded by (a) criticizing…

  13. MARSI: metabolite analogues for rational strain improvement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cardoso, João G. R.; Zeidan, Ahmad A; Jensen, Kristian

    2018-01-01

    reactions in an organism can be used to predict effects of MAs on cellular phenotypes. Here, we present the Metabolite Analogues for Rational Strain Improvement (MARSI) framework. MARSI provides a rational approach to strain improvement by searching for metabolites as targets instead of genes or reactions...

  14. Therapeutic Significance of Loligo vulgaris (Lamarck, 1798) ink Extract: A Biomedical Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadarajah, Sri Kumaran; Vijayaraj, Radha; Mani, Jayaprakashvel

    2017-01-01

    Background: The squid ink extract is well known for its biomedical properties. Objective: In this study, squid Loligo vulgaris was collected from Tuticorin costal water, Bay of Bengal, India. Materials and Methods: Proximate composition of the crude squid ink was studied and found to have protein as the major component over lipid and carbohydrates. Further, bioactive fractions of squid ink were extracted with ethanol, and therapeutic applications such as hemolytic, antioxidant, antimicrobial, and in vitro anti-inflammatory properties were analyzed using standard methods. Results: In hemolytic assay, the squid ink extract exhibited a maximum hemolytic activity of 128 hemolytic unit against tested erythrocytes. In DPPH assay, the ethanolic extract of squid ink has exhibited an antioxidant activity of 83.5%. The squid ink was found to be potent antibacterial agent against the pathogens tested. 200 μL of L. vulgaris ink extract showed remarkable antibacterial activity as zone of inhibition against Escherichia coli (28 mm), Klebsiella pneumoniae (22 mm), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (21 mm), and Staphylococcus aureus (24 mm). The 68.9% inhibition of protein denaturation by the squid ink extract indicated that it has very good in vitro anti-inflammatory properties. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis of the ethanolic extracts of the squid ink indicated the presence of functional groups such as 1° and 2° amines, amides, alkynes (terminal), alkenes, aldehydes, nitriles, alkanes, aliphatic amines, carboxylic acids, and alkyl halides, which complements the biochemical background of therapeutic applications. Conclusion: Hence, results of this study concluded that the ethanolic extract of L. vulgaris has many therapeutic applications such as antimicrobial, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory activities. SUMMARY Squid ink is very high in a number of important nutrients. It’s particularly high in antioxidants for instance, which as well all know help to protect

  15. BET inhibition as a single or combined therapeutic approach in primary paediatric B-precursor acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Da Costa, D; Agathanggelou, A; Perry, T; Weston, V; Petermann, E; Zlatanou, A; Oldreive, C; Wei, W; Stewart, G; Longman, J; Smith, E; Kearns, P; Knapp, S; Stankovic, T

    2013-01-01

    Paediatric B-precursor ALL is a highly curable disease, however, treatment resistance in some patients and the long-term toxic effects of current therapies pose the need for more targeted therapeutic approaches. We addressed the cytotoxic effect of JQ1, a highly selective inhibitor against the transcriptional regulators, bromodomain and extra-terminal (BET) family of proteins, in paediatric ALL. We showed a potent in vitro cytotoxic response of a panel of primary ALL to JQ1, independent of their prognostic features but dependent on high MYC expression and coupled with transcriptional downregulation of multiple pro-survival pathways. In agreement with earlier studies, JQ1 induced cell cycle arrest. Here we show that BET inhibition also reduced c-Myc protein stability and suppressed progression of DNA replication forks in ALL cells. Consistent with c-Myc depletion and downregulation of pro-survival pathways JQ1 sensitised primary ALL samples to the classic ALL therapeutic agent dexamethasone. Finally, we demonstrated that JQ1 reduces ALL growth in ALL xenograft models, both as a single agent and in combination with dexamethasone. We conclude that targeting BET proteins should be considered as a new therapeutic strategy for the treatment of paediatric ALL and particularly those cases that exhibit suboptimal responses to standard treatment

  16. Development of new therapeutic methods of lung cancer through team approach study (II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zo, Jae Ill; Park, Jong Ho; Baek, Hee Jong

    1999-12-01

    The aims of this study were to make the lung cancer clinics in Korea Cancer Center Hospital, and to establish new therapeutic methods of lung cancer for increasing the cure rate and survival rate of patients. Also another purpose of this study was to establish a common treatment method in our hospital. All patients who were operated in Korea Cancer Center Hospital from 1987 due to lung cancer were followed up and evaluated. And we have been studied the effect of postoperative adjuvant therapy in stage 1, 2, 3A non-small cell lung cancer patients from 1989 with the phase three study form. Follow-up examinations were scheduled in these patients and interim analysis was made. Also we have been studied the effect of chemotherapeutic agents in small cell lung cancer patients from 1997 with the phase two study form. We evaluated the results of this study

  17. Combined approach with therapeutic drug monitoring and pharmacogenomics in renal transplant recipients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Manvizhi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In patients undergoing renal transplantation, dose individualization for tacrolimus is routinely achieved with therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM. The patient started on 5.5 mg/day of tacrolimus had a significantly elevated tacrolimus trough concentration. The tacrolimus dose was regularly reduced following TDM at many time periods in the post transplant period but the tacrolimus concentration was consistently elevated. Genomic analysis done after four years revealed mutations in the genes encoding for CYP3A5 and MDR1 (2677G > T. Pharmacogenomics alongside TDM, will soon emerge as the backbone of dose individualization. But for genomics to be beneficial, it should be advocated in the pre-transplant or early post transplant period.

  18. Sclerosing Angiomatoid Nodular Transformation: Laparoscopic Splenectomy as Therapeutic and Diagnostic Approach at the Same Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calogero Cipolla

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Sclerosing angiomatoid nodular transformation (SANT of the spleen is a rare benign vascular lesion with unknown etiopathogenesis and with definite features of imaging, histopathology, and immunohistochemistry. It was first described by Martel et al. in 2004, and to date, only 151 cases have been reported. Case Description. We report a case of SANT of the spleen detected in a 66-year-old Caucasian, without comorbidities, presented to our department with epigastric pain. We, also, presented a review of the literature. Conclusions. SANT is a benign incidentally vascular condition in the majority of cases. The wide age and gender distribution in our review is in accordance with that in previous studies in English literature. In our opinion, splenectomy is the choice treatment because it is at the same time diagnostic and therapeutic in a definitive way.

  19. Sclerosing Angiomatoid Nodular Transformation: Laparoscopic Splenectomy as Therapeutic and Diagnostic Approach at the Same Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipolla, Calogero; Florena, Ada Maria; Ferrara, Gabriella; Di Gregorio, Riccardo; Unti, Elettra; Giannone, Antonino G; Lazzaro, Luigi A; Graceffa, Giuseppa; Pantuso, Gianni

    2018-01-01

    Sclerosing angiomatoid nodular transformation (SANT) of the spleen is a rare benign vascular lesion with unknown etiopathogenesis and with definite features of imaging, histopathology, and immunohistochemistry. It was first described by Martel et al. in 2004, and to date, only 151 cases have been reported. We report a case of SANT of the spleen detected in a 66-year-old Caucasian, without comorbidities, presented to our department with epigastric pain. We, also, presented a review of the literature. SANT is a benign incidentally vascular condition in the majority of cases. The wide age and gender distribution in our review is in accordance with that in previous studies in English literature. In our opinion, splenectomy is the choice treatment because it is at the same time diagnostic and therapeutic in a definitive way.

  20. Oral Lichen Planus in a Pediatric Patient: A Novel Therapeutic Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Gaurav; Vohra, Puneeta; Rehani, Shweta; Nagpal, Archna

    2017-01-01

    Lichen planus is a mucocutaneous disease, predominantly affecting the middle-aged individuals and may be associated with a plethora of signs and symptoms related to the skin, scalp, nails and mucous membranes. The definitive etiology of lichen planus is not yet known and no therapeutic modality has yet been universally accepted. Lichen planus in pediatric patients is a rare phenomenon and its presence in the oral mucosa is even rarer. The aim of this article is to present a rare case of a symptomatic oral lichen planus (OLP) occurring in a 12-year old child that was managed successfully with a novel sequential modality of topical retinoids followed by aloe vera gel application. PMID:29104603

  1. Oral Lichen Planus in a Pediatric Patient: A Novel Therapeutic Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Gaurav; Sardana, Divesh; Vohra, Puneeta; Rehani, Shweta; Nagpal, Archna

    2017-03-01

    Lichen planus is a mucocutaneous disease, predominantly affecting the middle-aged individuals and may be associated with a plethora of signs and symptoms related to the skin, scalp, nails and mucous membranes. The definitive etiology of lichen planus is not yet known and no therapeutic modality has yet been universally accepted. Lichen planus in pediatric patients is a rare phenomenon and its presence in the oral mucosa is even rarer. The aim of this article is to present a rare case of a symptomatic oral lichen planus (OLP) occurring in a 12-year old child that was managed successfully with a novel sequential modality of topical retinoids followed by aloe vera gel application.

  2. Mast cell inhibition as a therapeutic approach in fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva (FOP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Tracy A; Lindborg, Carter M; Bergbauer, Christian R; Wang, Haitao; Kaplan, Frederick S; Pignolo, Robert J

    2018-04-01

    Episodic flare-ups of fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva (FOP) are characterized clinically by severe, often posttraumatic, connective tissue swelling and intramuscular edema, followed histologically by an intense and highly angiogenic fibroproliferative reaction. This early inflammatory and angiogenic fibroproliferative response is accompanied by the presence of abundant mast cells far in excess of other reported myopathies. Using an injury-induced, constitutively-active transgenic mouse model of FOP we show that mast cell inhibition by cromolyn, but not aprepitant, results in a dramatic reduction of heterotopic ossification. Cromolyn, but not aprepitant, significantly decreases the total number of mast cells in FOP lesions. Furthermore, cromolyn specifically diminishes the number of degranulating and resting degranulated mast cells in pre-osseous lesions. This work demonstrates that consideration of FOP as a type of localized mastocytosis may offer new therapeutic interventions for treatment of this devastating condition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Statins as a new therapeutic approach in dedifferentiated thyroid cancer? A case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmann, A.; John, P.; Sinzinger, H.; Staudenherz, A.; Schaffarich, M.P.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: In general differentiated thyroid tumours are removed surgically and afterwards treated with radioiodine. However, still about one third of patients with differentiated tumours, metastasise. Also 30 percent of recurrent thyroid carcinomas do not respond to iodine treatment due to loss of differentiation. Retinoic acid, biological metabolites of vitamin A, are considered to induce re-differentiation of the thyrocyte and thereby induce tumor regression. In follicular carcinoma cells, it also plays an important role in inducing iodine uptake. Retinoids, however, cannot be used in liver disease as they may induce hepatic enzyme increase. In addition 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors (statins) are reported to induce on the one hand cellular apoptosis and on the other hand, in a lower dosage, differentiation in anaplastic thyroid carcinoma cells in vitro. We are presenting a 79 years old female patient with an oxyphilic follicular thyroid carcinoma and histologically verified autoimmune hepatitis. The first post therapeutic scan, showed only focal cervical localized iodine uptake. Also 3 months later no pathologic iodine uptake was recognized on the diagnostic scan, whereas the FDG-PET showed solid uptake of FDG cervical, in both lungs, in the mediastinum, the pelvis and the right hip. Due to contraindication for retinoic acid the patient was treated with usual dose statin for about 4 weeks to induce re-differentiation. Following, the patient was administered 9,25 GBq I-131 again and the post therapeutic scan showed iodine uptake cervical and in the right femur. We conclude that the administration of Statins, at low dose (20 mg/day) even over a short period of time, only may induce re-differentiation as well as an antiproliferative effect in vivo. (author)

  4. Attenuated Recombinant Influenza A Virus Expressing HPV16 E6 and E7 as a Novel Therapeutic Vaccine Approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Jindra

    Full Text Available Persistent infection with high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV types, most often HPV16 and HPV18, causes all cervical and most anal cancers, and a subset of vulvar, vaginal, penile and oropharyngeal carcinomas. Two prophylactic virus-like particle (VLPs-based vaccines, are available that protect against vaccine type-associated persistent infection and associated disease, yet have no therapeutic effect on existing lesions or infections. We have generated recombinant live-attenuated influenza A viruses expressing the HPV16 oncogenes E6 and E7 as experimental immunotherapeutic vaccine candidates. The influenza A virus life cycle lacks DNA intermediates as important safety feature. Different serotypes were generated to ensure efficient prime and boost immunizations. The immune response to vaccination in C57BL/6 mice was characterized by peptide ELISA and IFN-γ ELISpot, demonstrating induction of cell-mediated immunity to HPV16 E6 and E7 oncoproteins. Prophylactic and therapeutic vaccine efficacy was analyzed in the murine HPV16-positive TC-1 tumor challenge model. Subcutaneous (s.c. prime and boost vaccinations of mice with recombinant influenza A serotypes H1N1 and H3N2, followed by challenge with TC-1 cells resulted in complete protection or significantly reduced tumor growth as compared to control animals. In a therapeutic setting, s.c. vaccination of mice with established TC-1 tumors decelerated tumor growth and significantly prolonged survival. Importantly, intralesional vaccine administration induced complete tumor regression in 25% of animals, and significantly reduced tumor growth in 50% of mice. These results suggest recombinant E6E7 influenza viruses as a promising new approach for the development of a therapeutic vaccine against HPV-induced disease.

  5. Self-inflicted skin lesions: the importance of a proper diagnostic and therapeutic approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitre Dimitrov

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction . Patients with self-inflicted skin lesions (SISL are most often referred to dermatologists. Since psychological and psychiatric conditions might be the underlying reasons for the behavior of these patients, the psychology-associated component should always be kept in mind when approaching such individuals. Objective. To discuss distinctive aspects of the approach towards patients with SISL and emphasize the most relevant issues concerning the management of psychodermatoses. Case report. We present a case of a 13-year-old girl with a 6-month history of skin lesions misdiagnosed as allergic contact dermatitis. Conscientious history taking and physical examination enabled the diagnosis of SISL. Conclusions. The proper approach to patients presenting with psychodermatoses differs from that for other dermatological patients and requires considering several additional aspects. We would like to emphasize the distinguishing aspects and importance of the proper approach to patients with SISL that might aid clinicians in diagnosing and treating these individuals in the future.

  6. Self-inflicted skin lesions: the importance of a proper diagnostic and therapeutic approach

    OpenAIRE

    Dimitre Dimitrov; Radomir Reszke; Jacek Szepietowski

    2016-01-01

    Introduction . Patients with self-inflicted skin lesions (SISL) are most often referred to dermatologists. Since psychological and psychiatric conditions might be the underlying reasons for the behavior of these patients, the psychology-associated component should always be kept in mind when approaching such individuals. Objective. To discuss distinctive aspects of the approach towards patients with SISL and emphasize the most relevant issues concerning the management of psychodermatose...

  7. Presence of Cx43 in extracellular vesicles reduces the cardiotoxicity of the anti-tumour therapeutic approach with doxorubicin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania Martins-Marques

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles (EVs are major conveyors of biological information, mediating local and systemic cell-to-cell communication under physiological and pathological conditions. These endogenous vesicles have been recognized as prominent drug delivery vehicles of several therapeutic cargoes, including doxorubicin (dox, presenting major advantages over the classical approaches. Although dox is one of the most effective anti-tumour agents in the clinical practice, its use is very often hindered by its consequent dramatic cardiotoxicity. Despite significant advances witnessed in the past few years, more comprehensive studies, supporting the therapeutic efficacy of EVs, with decreased side effects, are still scarce. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the role of the gap junction protein connexin43 (Cx43 in mediating the release of EV content into tumour cells. Moreover, we investigated whether Cx43 improves the efficiency of dox-based anti-tumour treatment, with a concomitant decrease of cardiotoxicity. In the present report, we demonstrate that the presence of Cx43 in EVs increases the release of luciferin from EVs into tumour cells in vitro and in vivo. In addition, using cell-based approaches and a subcutaneous mouse tumour model, we show that the anti-tumour effect of dox incorporated into EVs is similar to the administration of the free drug, regardless the presence of Cx43. Strikingly, we demonstrate that the presence of Cx43 in dox-loaded EVs reduces the cardiotoxicity of the drug. Altogether, these results bring new insights into the concrete potential of EVs as therapeutic vehicles and open new avenues toward the development of strategies that help to reduce unwanted side effects.

  8. From Mollusks to Medicine: A Venomics Approach for the Discovery and Characterization of Therapeutics from Terebridae Peptide Toxins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aida Verdes

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Animal venoms comprise a diversity of peptide toxins that manipulate molecular targets such as ion channels and receptors, making venom peptides attractive candidates for the development of therapeutics to benefit human health. However, identifying bioactive venom peptides remains a significant challenge. In this review we describe our particular venomics strategy for the discovery, characterization, and optimization of Terebridae venom peptides, teretoxins. Our strategy reflects the scientific path from mollusks to medicine in an integrative sequential approach with the following steps: (1 delimitation of venomous Terebridae lineages through taxonomic and phylogenetic analyses; (2 identification and classification of putative teretoxins through omics methodologies, including genomics, transcriptomics, and proteomics; (3 chemical and recombinant synthesis of promising peptide toxins; (4 structural characterization through experimental and computational methods; (5 determination of teretoxin bioactivity and molecular function through biological assays and computational modeling; (6 optimization of peptide toxin affinity and selectivity to molecular target; and (7 development of strategies for effective delivery of venom peptide therapeutics. While our research focuses on terebrids, the venomics approach outlined here can be applied to the discovery and characterization of peptide toxins from any venomous taxa.

  9. Targeted therapeutic approach for an anaplastic thyroid cancer in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenner, Frank; Liewen, Heike; Zweifel, Martin; Weber, Achim; Tchinda, Joelle; Bode, Beata; Samaras, Panagiotis; Bauer, Stefan; Knuth, Alexander; Renner, Christoph

    2008-09-01

    Anaplastic thyroid carcinoma (ATC) is among the most aggressive human malignancies, being responsible for the majority of thyroid cancer-related deaths. Despite multimodal therapy including surgery, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy, the outcome of ATC is poor. The human ATC cell line MB1, derived from tumor tissue of a 57-year-old man with thyroid cancer and pronounced neutrophilia, was established from surgically excised tumor tissue. The karyotype of the cell line shows many chromosomal abnormalities. Preclinical investigations have shown antitumor activity and effectiveness of the BRAF kinase inhibitor Sorafenib and the proteasome inhibitor Bortezomib. After establishment of the MB1 cell line these agents were applied in vitro and, showing activity in a cell culture model, were also used for in vivo treatment. Sorafenib had some clinical effect, namely normalization of leucocytosis, but had no sustained impact on subsequent tumor growth and development of distant metastasis. Molecular diagnostics of the tumor demonstrated no BRAF mutations in exons 11 and 15 concordant with a rather modest effect of Sorafenib on MB1 cell growth. Clinical benefit was seen with subsequent bortezomib therapy inducing a temporary halt to lymph node growth and a progression-free interval of 7 weeks. Our observations together with previous data from preclinical models could serve as a rationale for selecting those patients suffering from ATC most likely to benefit from targeted therapy. A prospective controlled randomized trial integrating kinase and proteasome inhibitors into a therapeutic regime for ATC is warranted.

  10. Recurrent parotid swelling secondary to masseter muscle hypertrophy: a multidisciplinary diagnostic and therapeutic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capaccio, Pasquale; Gaffuri, Michele; Pignataro, Lorenzo; Assandri, Fausto; Pereira, Pollyanna; Farronato, Giampietro

    2016-11-01

    To present a patient with an atypical recurrent parotid swelling due to masseter muscle hypertrophy and the diagnostic/therapeutic assessment to treat this condition. A patient referring recurrent right facial swelling underwent a complete multidisciplinary assessment of the parotid region that revealed masseter muscle hypertrophy, confirmed by means of clinical (otolaryngological and gnathological evaluation), radiological (utrasonography, dynamic magnetic resonance imaging, and cone beam computed tomography), instrumental (electromyography to evaluate the right masseter muscle function and kinesiography to evaluate maximum right deflection - MaxRDefl and maximum opening - MaxMO) and sialendoscopy assessment where T0 indicates the pre-treatment values. All electromyographic and kinesiographic parameters were evaluated six months after the orthodontic application of a neuromuscular orthosis at T1. At T1, the effectiveness of the orthodontic therapy was demonstrated by the complete resolution of symptoms, and instrumental results documented more efficient muscle activity at rest and during clenching and a better mandibular position. At EMG T1, the resting and post-TENS values were, respectively, 1.2 and 1.8 microV. At kinesiography, MaxRDefl increased from 10.2 (T0) to 10.5 mm (T1); maxMO increased from 41.2 (T0) to 48 mm (T1). The proposed multidisciplinary assessment based on otolaryngological, gnathological, and radiological evaluation may be useful in the case of recurrent parotid swelling secondary to masseter muscle hypertrophy to plan an appropriate management with a removable neuromuscular orthosis.

  11. Mesenchymal stem/stromal cells as a pharmacological and therapeutic approach to accelerate angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronckaers, Annelies; Hilkens, Petra; Martens, Wendy; Gervois, Pascal; Ratajczak, Jessica; Struys, Tom; Lambrichts, Ivo

    2014-08-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells or multipotent stromal cells (MSCs) have initially captured attention in the scientific world because of their differentiation potential into osteoblasts, chondroblasts and adipocytes and possible transdifferentiation into neurons, glial cells and endothelial cells. This broad plasticity was originally hypothesized as the key mechanism of their demonstrated efficacy in numerous animal models of disease as well as in clinical settings. However, there is accumulating evidence suggesting that the beneficial effects of MSCs are predominantly caused by the multitude of bioactive molecules secreted by these remarkable cells. Numerous angiogenic factors, growth factors and cytokines have been discovered in the MSC secretome, all have been demonstrated to alter endothelial cell behavior in vitro and induce angiogenesis in vivo. As a consequence, MSCs have been widely explored as a promising treatment strategy in disorders caused by insufficient angiogenesis such as chronic wounds, stroke and myocardial infarction. In this review, we will summarize into detail the angiogenic factors found in the MSC secretome and their therapeutic mode of action in pathologies caused by limited blood vessel formation. Also the application of MSC as a vehicle to deliver drugs and/or genes in (anti-)angiogenesis will be discussed. Furthermore, the literature describing MSC transdifferentiation into endothelial cells will be evaluated critically. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Targeting NK-1 Receptors to Prevent and Treat Pancreatic Cancer: A New Therapeutic Approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muñoz, Miguel; Coveñas, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is the fourth leading cause of cancer related-deaths in both men and women, and the 1- and 5-year relative survival rates are 25% and 6%, respectively. It is known that smoking, alcoholism and psychological stress are risk factors that can promote PC and increase PC progression. To date, the prevention of PC is crucial because there is no curative treatment. After binding to the neurokinin-1 (NK-1) receptor (a receptor coupled to the stimulatory G-protein Gαs that activates adenylate cyclase), the peptide substance P (SP)—at high concentrations—is involved in many pathophysiological functions, such as depression, smoking, alcoholism, chronic inflammation and cancer. It is known that PC cells and samples express NK-1 receptors; that the NK-1 receptor is overexpressed in PC cells in comparison with non-tumor cells, and that nanomolar concentrations of SP induce PC cell proliferation. By contrast, NK-1 receptor antagonists exert antidepressive, anxiolytic and anti-inflammatory effects and anti-alcohol addiction. These antagonists also exert an antitumor action since in vitro they inhibit PC cell proliferation (PC cells death by apoptosis), and in a xenograft PC mouse model they exert both antitumor and anti-angiogenic actions. NK-1 receptor antagonists could be used for the treatment of PC and hence the NK-1 receptor could be a new promising therapeutic target in PC

  13. A Review of Therapeutic Aptamer Conjugates with Emphasis on New Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John G. Bruno

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The potential to emulate or enhance antibodies with nucleic acid aptamers while lowering costs has prompted development of new aptamer-protein, siRNA, drug, and nanoparticle conjugates. Specific focal points of this review discuss DNA aptamers covalently bound at their 3' ends to various proteins for enhanced stability and greater pharmacokinetic lifetimes in vivo. The proteins can include Fc tails of IgG for opsonization, and the first component of complement (C1q to trigger complement-mediated lysis of antibiotic-resistant Gram negative bacteria, cancer cells and possibly some parasites during vulnerable stages. In addition, the 3' protein adduct may be a biotoxin, enzyme, or may simply be human serum albumin (HSA or a drug known to bind HSA, thereby retarding kidney and other organ clearance and inhibiting serum exonucleases. In this review, the author summarizes existing therapeutic aptamer conjugate categories and describes his patented concept for PCR-based amplification of double-stranded aptamers followed by covalent attachment of proteins or other agents to the chemically vulnerable overhanging 3' adenine added by Taq polymerase. PCR amplification of aptamers could dramatically lower the current $2,000/gram cost of parallel chemical oligonucleotide synthesis, thereby enabling mass production of aptamer-3'-protein or drug conjugates to better compete against expensive humanized monoclonal antibodies.

  14. Targeting NK-1 Receptors to Prevent and Treat Pancreatic Cancer: A New Therapeutic Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muñoz, Miguel, E-mail: mmunoz@cica.es [Research Laboratory on Neuropeptides (IBIS), Virgen del Rocío University Hospital, 41013 Sevilla (Spain); Coveñas, Rafael [Laboratory of Neuroanatomy of the Peptidergic System (Lab. 14), Institute of Neurosciences of Castilla y León (INCYL), University of Salamanca, 37008 Salamanca (Spain)

    2015-07-06

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is the fourth leading cause of cancer related-deaths in both men and women, and the 1- and 5-year relative survival rates are 25% and 6%, respectively. It is known that smoking, alcoholism and psychological stress are risk factors that can promote PC and increase PC progression. To date, the prevention of PC is crucial because there is no curative treatment. After binding to the neurokinin-1 (NK-1) receptor (a receptor coupled to the stimulatory G-protein Gαs that activates adenylate cyclase), the peptide substance P (SP)—at high concentrations—is involved in many pathophysiological functions, such as depression, smoking, alcoholism, chronic inflammation and cancer. It is known that PC cells and samples express NK-1 receptors; that the NK-1 receptor is overexpressed in PC cells in comparison with non-tumor cells, and that nanomolar concentrations of SP induce PC cell proliferation. By contrast, NK-1 receptor antagonists exert antidepressive, anxiolytic and anti-inflammatory effects and anti-alcohol addiction. These antagonists also exert an antitumor action since in vitro they inhibit PC cell proliferation (PC cells death by apoptosis), and in a xenograft PC mouse model they exert both antitumor and anti-angiogenic actions. NK-1 receptor antagonists could be used for the treatment of PC and hence the NK-1 receptor could be a new promising therapeutic target in PC.

  15. Muscle–Bone Crosstalk: Emerging Opportunities for Novel Therapeutic Approaches to Treat Musculoskeletal Pathologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delphine B. Maurel

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Osteoporosis and sarcopenia are age-related musculoskeletal pathologies that often develop in parallel. Osteoporosis is characterized by a reduced bone mass and an increased fracture risk. Sarcopenia describes muscle wasting with an increasing risk of injuries due to falls. The medical treatment of both diseases costs billions in health care per year. With the impact on public health and economy, and considering the increasing life expectancy of populations, more efficient treatment regimens are sought. The biomechanical interaction between both tissues with muscle acting on bone is well established. Recently, both tissues were also determined as secretory endocrine organs affecting the function of one another. New exciting discoveries on this front are made each year, with novel signaling molecules being discovered and potential controversies being described. While this review does not claim completeness, it will summarize the current knowledge on both the biomechanical and the biochemical link between muscle and bone. The review will highlight the known secreted molecules by both tissues affecting the other and finish with an outlook on novel therapeutics that could emerge from these discoveries.

  16. Combined Dynamic Light Scattering and Raman Spectroscopy Approach for Characterizing the Aggregation of Therapeutic Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Neil Lewis

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Determination of the physicochemical properties of protein therapeutics and their aggregates is critical for developing formulations that enhance product efficacy, stability, safety and manufacturability. Analytical challenges are compounded for materials: (1 that are formulated at high concentration, (2 that are formulated with a variety of excipients, and (3 that are available only in small volumes. In this article, a new instrument is described that measures protein secondary and tertiary structure, as well as molecular size, over a range of concentrations and formulation conditions of low volume samples. Specifically, characterization of colloidal and conformational stability is obtained through a combination of two well-established analytical techniques: dynamic light scattering (DLS and Raman spectroscopy, respectively. As the data for these two analytical modalities are collected on the same sample at the same time, the technique enables direct correlation between them, in addition to the more straightforward benefit of minimizing sample usage by providing multiple analytical measurements on the same aliquot non-destructively. The ability to differentiate between unfolding and aggregation that the combination of these techniques provides enables insights into underlying protein aggregation mechanisms. The article will report on mechanistic insights for aggregation that have been obtained from the application of this technique to the characterization of lysozyme, which was evaluated as a function of concentration and pH.

  17. Muscle-Bone Crosstalk: Emerging Opportunities for Novel Therapeutic Approaches to Treat Musculoskeletal Pathologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurel, Delphine B; Jähn, Katharina; Lara-Castillo, Nuria

    2017-10-24

    Osteoporosis and sarcopenia are age-related musculoskeletal pathologies that often develop in parallel. Osteoporosis is characterized by a reduced bone mass and an increased fracture risk. Sarcopenia describes muscle wasting with an increasing risk of injuries due to falls. The medical treatment of both diseases costs billions in health care per year. With the impact on public health and economy, and considering the increasing life expectancy of populations, more efficient treatment regimens are sought. The biomechanical interaction between both tissues with muscle acting on bone is well established. Recently, both tissues were also determined as secretory endocrine organs affecting the function of one another. New exciting discoveries on this front are made each year, with novel signaling molecules being discovered and potential controversies being described. While this review does not claim completeness, it will summarize the current knowledge on both the biomechanical and the biochemical link between muscle and bone. The review will highlight the known secreted molecules by both tissues affecting the other and finish with an outlook on novel therapeutics that could emerge from these discoveries.

  18. Antisense Oligonucleotide-mediated Exon Skipping as a Systemic Therapeutic Approach for Recessive Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bremer, Jeroen; Bornert, Olivier; Nyström, Alexander; Gostynski, Antoni; Jonkman, Marcel F; Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke; van den Akker, Peter C; Pasmooij, Anna Mg

    2016-10-18

    The "generalized severe" form of recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB-gen sev) is caused by bi-allelic null mutations in COL7A1, encoding type VII collagen. The absence of type VII collagen leads to blistering of the skin and mucous membranes upon the slightest trauma. Because most patients carry exonic point mutations or small insertions/deletions, most exons of COL7A1 are in-frame, and low levels of type VII collagen already drastically improve the disease phenotype, this gene seems a perfect candidate for antisense oligonucleotide (AON)-mediated exon skipping. In this study, we examined the feasibility of AON-mediated exon skipping in vitro in primary cultured keratinocytes and fibroblasts, and systemically in vivo using a human skin-graft mouse model. We show that treatment with AONs designed against exon 105 leads to in-frame exon 105 skipping at the RNA level and restores type VII collagen protein production in vitro. Moreover, we demonstrate that systemic delivery in vivo induces de novo expression of type VII collagen in skin grafts generated from patient cells. Our data demonstrate strong proof-of-concept for AON-mediated exon skipping as a systemic therapeutic strategy for RDEB.

  19. Serial comparisons of quality of life after distal subtotal or total gastrectomy: what are the rational approaches for quality of life management?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sujin; Chung, Ho Young; Lee, Seung Soo; Kwon, Ohkyoung; Yu, Wansik

    2014-03-01

    The aims of this study were to make serial comparisons of the quality of life (QoL) between patients who underwent total gastrectomy and those who underwent distal subtotal gastrectomy for gastric cancer and to identify the affected scales with consistency. QoL data of 275 patients who were admitted for surgery between September 2008 and June 2011 and who underwent subtotal gastrectomy or total gastrectomy were obtained preoperatively and postoperatively at 3, 6, 9, 12, 18, and 24 months. The Korean versions of the European Organization for Research and Treatment (EORTC) Quality of Life Questionnaire Core 30 (QLQ-C30) and the gastric cancer specific module, the EORTC QLQ-STO22, were used to assess QoL. QoL, as assessed by the global health status/QoL and physical functioning, revealed a brief divergence with worse QoL in the total gastrectomy group 3 months postoperatively, followed by rapid convergence. QoL related to restrictive symptoms (nausea/vomiting, dysphagia, reflux, and eating restrictions) and dry mouth was consistently worse in the total gastrectomy group during the first 2 postoperative years. The general QoL of patients after gastrectomy is highly congruent with subjective physical functioning, and the differences between patients who undergo total gastrectomy and subtotal gastrectomy are no longer valid several months after surgery. In order to further reduce the differences in QoL between patients who underwent total gastrectomy and subtotal gastrectomy, definitive preoperative informing, followed by postoperative symptomatic management, of restrictive symptoms in total gastrectomy patients is the most rational approach.

  20. An application of the rational choice approach to the offending process of sex offenders: a closer look at the decision-making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beauregard, Eric; Leclerc, Benoît

    2007-06-01

    Although the study of both offense processes and implicit theories provides in-depth knowledge about the decision-making of sex offenders, these studies focus solely on the internal psychological processes of the offender leading to the commission of a sexual assault. These studies neglect to look specifically at the offender's decision-making during the offense in interaction with the immediate situations encountered at the offense scene, such as the choices of behavior while interacting with the victim in a specific context. Based on a rational choice approach, this study investigates the decision-making involved in the offending process of 69 serial sexual offenders who have committed their crimes against stranger victims. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with offenders in order to identify the rationale behind their actions during the pre-crime phase (premeditation of the crime, estimation of risk of apprehension by the offender, and forensic awareness of the offender), crime phase (use of a weapon, use of restraints, use of a vehicle, and level of force used), and the post-crime phase (event leading to the end of crime and victim release site location choice). Results show that sex offenders, even if traditionally described as "irrational" and impulsive individuals, are capable, up to a certain point, of an analysis of the costs/benefits related to their actions. Moreover, results emphasize the important role of situational factors, such as victim resistance, on the decision-making process of sex offenders. Implications of the results are briefly discussed in regard of clinical practice and crime prevention.

  1. Live-Cell Imaging of Protease Activity: Assays to Screen Therapeutic Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalasani, Anita; Ji, Kyungmin; Sameni, Mansoureh; Mazumder, Samia H; Xu, Yong; Moin, Kamiar; Sloane, Bonnie F

    2017-01-01

    Methodologies to image and quantify the activity of proteolytic enzymes have been developed in an effort to identify protease-related druggable pathways that are involved in malignant progression of cancer. Our laboratory has pioneered techniques for functional live-cell imaging of protease activity in pathomimetic avatars for breast cancer. We analyze proteolysis in the context of proliferation and formation of structures by tumor cells in 3-D cultures over time (4D). In order to recapitulate the cellular composition and architecture of tumors in the pathomimetic avatars, we include other tumor-associated cells (e.g., fibroblasts, myoepithelial cells, microvascular endothelial cells). We also model noncellular aspects of the tumor microenvironment such as acidic pericellular pH. Use of pathomimetic avatars in concert with various types of imaging probes has allowed us to image, quantify, and follow the dynamics of proteolysis in the tumor microenvironment and to test interventions that impact directly or indirectly on proteolytic pathways. To facilitate use of the pathomimetic avatars for screening of therapeutic modalities, we have designed and fabricated custom 3D culture chambers with multiple wells that are either individual or connected by a channel to allow cells to migrate between wells. Optical glass microscope slides underneath an acrylic plate allow the cultures to be imaged with an inverted microscope. Fluid ports in the acrylic plate are at a level above the 3D cultures to allow introduction of culture media and test agents such as drugs into the wells and the harvesting of media conditioned by the cultures for immunochemical and biochemical analyses. We are using the pathomimetic avatars to identify druggable pathways, screen drug and natural product libraries and accelerate entry of validated drugs or natural products into clinical trials.

  2. Glucocorticoids for the treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder and phobias: a novel therapeutic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Quervain, Dominique J-F; Margraf, Jürgen

    2008-04-07

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and phobias belong to the most common anxiety disorders and to the most common psychiatric illnesses in general. In both disorders, aversive memories are thought to play an important role in the pathogenesis and symptomatology. Previously, we have reported that elevated glucocorticoid levels inhibit memory retrieval in animals and healthy humans. We therefore hypothesized that the administration of glucocorticoids might also inhibit the retrieval of aversive memory, thereby reducing symptoms in patients with PTSD and phobias. In recent clinical studies, we found first evidence to support this hypothesis. In patients with PTSD, low-dose cortisol treatment for one month reduced symptoms of traumatic memories without causing adverse side effects. Furthermore, we found evidence for a prolonged effect of the cortisol treatment. Persistent retrieval and reconsolidation of traumatic memories is a process that keeps these memories vivid and thereby the disorder alive. By inhibiting memory retrieval, cortisol may weaken the traumatic memory trace, and thus reduce symptoms even beyond the treatment period. In patients with social phobia, we found that a single oral administration of cortisone 1 h before a socio-evaluative stressor significantly reduced self-reported fear during the anticipation-, exposure-, and recovery phase of the stressor. In subjects with spider phobia, repeated oral administration of cortisol 1 h before exposure to a spider photograph induced a progressive reduction of stimulus-induced fear. This effect was maintained when subjects were exposed to the stimulus again two days after the last cortisol administration, indicating that cortisol facilitated the extinction of phobic fear. In conclusion, by a common mechanism of reducing the retrieval of aversive memories, glucocorticoids may be suited for the treatment of PTSD as well as phobias. More studies are needed to further evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of

  3. Therapeutic approaches to asthma-chronic obstructive pulmonary disease overlap syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Peter J

    2015-09-01

    The recognition that there are some patients with features of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) has highlighted the need to develop more specific treatments for these clinical phenotypes. Some patients with COPD have predominantly eosinophilic inflammation and might respond to high doses of inhaled corticosteroids and newly developed specific antieosinophil therapies, including blocking antibodies against IL-5, IL-13, IL-33, and thymic stromal lymphopoietin, as well as oral chemoattractant receptor-homologous molecule expressed on TH2 cells antagonists. Other patients have severe asthma or are asthmatic patients who smoke with features of COPD-induced inflammation and might benefit from treatments targeting neutrophils, including macrolides, CXCR2 antagonists, phosphodiesterase 4 inhibitors, p38 mitogen-activating protein kinase inhibitors, and antibodies against IL-1 and IL-17. Other patients appear to have largely fixed obstruction with little inflammation and might respond to long-acting bronchodilators, including long-acting muscarinic antagonists, to reduce hyperinflation. Highly selected patients with severe asthma might benefit from bronchial thermoplasty. Some patients with overlap syndromes can be conveniently treated with triple fixed-dose combination inhaler therapy with an inhaled corticosteroid, long-acting β2-agonist, and long-acting muscarinic antagonist, several of which are now in development. Corticosteroid resistance is a feature of asthma-COPD overlap syndrome, and understanding the various molecular mechanisms of this resistance has identified novel therapeutic targets and presented the prospect of therapies that can restore corticosteroid responsiveness. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Rational Rhymes for Addressing Common Childhood Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Jeffrey M.

    2011-01-01

    Music-based interventions are valuable tools counselors can use when working with children. Specific types of music-based interventions, such as songs or rhymes, can be especially pertinent in addressing the thoughts, feelings, and behaviors of children. Rational-emotive behavior therapy (REBT) provides a therapeutic framework that encourages…

  5. Dipeptidyl peptidase IV inhibitors: a promising new therapeutic approach for the management of type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deacon, Carolyn F; Holst, Jens J

    2005-01-01

    of appetite. Glucagon-like peptide-1 is, however, extremely rapidly inactivated by the serine peptidase, dipeptidyl peptidase IV, so that the native peptide is not useful clinically. A new approach to utilise the beneficial effects of glucagon-like peptide-1 in the treatment of type 2 diabetes has been...... the development of orally active dipeptidyl peptidase IV inhibitors. Preclinical studies have demonstrated that this approach is effective in enhancing endogenous levels of glucagon-like peptide-1, resulting in improved glucose tolerance in glucose-intolerant and diabetic animal models. In recent studies of 3......-12 months duration in patients with type 2 diabetes, dipeptidyl peptidase IV inhibitors have proved efficacious, both as monotherapy and when given in combination with metformin. Fasting and postprandial glucose concentrations were reduced, leading to reductions in glycosylated haemoglobin levels, while...

  6. Burning mouth syndrome: A review on its diagnostic and therapeutic approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Aravindhan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Burning mouth syndrome (BMS, a chronic and intractable orofacial pain syndrome is characterized by the presence of burning sensation of the oral mucosa in the absence of specific oral lesion. This condition affects chiefly of middle aged and elderly woman with hormonal changes or psychological disorders. In addition to burning sensation, patient with BMS also complains of oral mucosal pain, altered taste sensation, and dry mouth. This condition is probably of multifactorial origin, often idiopathic and its exact etiopathogenesis remains unclear. So far, there is no definitive cure for this condition and most of the treatment approaches, medications remains unsatisfactory. An interdisciplinary and systematic approach is required for better patient management. The purpose of this article is to present a review of epidemiology, clinical presentation, classification, etiopathogenesis, diagnosis and management of BMS.

  7. Burning mouth syndrome: A review on its diagnostic and therapeutic approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aravindhan, R.; Vidyalakshmi, Santhanam; Kumar, Muniapillai Siva; Satheesh, C.; Balasubramanium, A. Murali; Prasad, V. Srinivas

    2014-01-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS), a chronic and intractable orofacial pain syndrome is characterized by the presence of burning sensation of the oral mucosa in the absence of specific oral lesion. This condition affects chiefly of middle aged and elderly woman with hormonal changes or psychological disorders. In addition to burning sensation, patient with BMS also complains of oral mucosal pain, altered taste sensation, and dry mouth. This condition is probably of multifactorial origin, often idiopathic and its exact etiopathogenesis remains unclear. So far, there is no definitive cure for this condition and most of the treatment approaches, medications remains unsatisfactory. An interdisciplinary and systematic approach is required for better patient management. The purpose of this article is to present a review of epidemiology, clinical presentation, classification, etiopathogenesis, diagnosis and management of BMS. PMID:25210377

  8. Current psychological therapeutic approaches for gambling disorder with psychiatric comorbidities: A narrative review

    OpenAIRE

    Echeburúa, Enrique; Amor, Pedro J.; Gómez, Montserrat

    2017-01-01

    Abstract: Background: Although the presence of a gambling disorder (GD) together with another mental disorder poses special treatment challenges, such as relapses, severe outcomes for patients and families, and increased number of hospitalizations, there are only a few critical reviews in the literature. Objective: To review empirical evidence of psychological approaches to cope specifically with these dual disorders. Method: A narrative review of the relevant bibliography on this topic wa...

  9. New diagnostic and therapeutic approach to thyroid-associated orbitopathy based on applied kinesiology and homeopathic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moncayo, Roy; Moncayo, Helga; Ulmer, Hanno; Kainz, Hartmann

    2004-08-01

    To investigate pathogenetic mechanisms related to the lacrimal and lymphatic glands in patients with thyroid-associated orbitopathy (TAO), and the potential of applied kinesiology diagnosis and homeopathic therapeutic measures. Prospective. Thyroid outpatient unit and a specialized center for complementary medicine (WOMED, Innsbruck; R.M. and H.M.). Thirty-two (32) patients with TAO, 23 with a long-standing disease, and 9 showing discrete initial changes. All patients were euthyroid at the time of the investigation. Clinical investigation was done, using applied kinesiology methods. Departing from normal reacting muscles, both target organs as well as therapeutic measures were tested. Affected organs will produce a therapy localization (TL) that turns a normal muscle tone weak. Using the same approach, specific counteracting therapies (i.e., tonsillitis nosode and lymph mobilizing agents) were tested. Change of lid swelling, of ocular movement discomfort, ocular lock, tonsil reactivity and Traditional Chinese Medicine criteria including tenderness of San Yin Jiao (SP6) and tongue diagnosis were recorded in a graded fashion. Positive TL reactions were found in the submandibular tonsillar structures, the pharyngeal tonsils, the San Yin Jiao point, the lacrimal gland, and with the functional ocular lock test. Both Lymphdiaral (Pascoe, Giessen, Germany) and the homeopathic preparation chronic tonsillitis nosode at a C3 potency (Spagyra, Grödig, Austria) counteracted these changes. Both agents were used therapeutically over 3-6 months, after which all relevant parameters showed improvement. Our study demonstrates the involvement of lymphatic structures and flow in the pathogenesis of TAO. The tenderness of the San Yin Jiao point correlates to the above mentioned changes and should be included in the clinical evaluation of these patients.

  10. Novel therapeutic strategy in the management of COPD: a systems medicine approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lococo, Filippo; Cesario, Alfredo; Del Bufalo, Alessandra; Ciarrocchi, Alessia; Prinzi, Giulia; Mina, Marco; Bonassi, Stefano; Russo, Patrizia

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory diseases including chronic-obstructive-pulmonary-disease (COPD) are globally increasing, with COPD predicted to become the third leading cause of global mortality by 2020. COPD is a heterogeneous disease with COPD-patients displaying different phenotypes as a result of a complex interaction between various genetic, environmental and life-style factors. In recent years, several investigations have been performed to better define such interactions, but the identification of the resulting phenotypes is still somewhat difficult, and may lead to inadequate assessment and management of COPD (usually based solely on the severity of airflow limitation parameter FEV1). In this new scenario, the management of COPD has been driven towards an integrative and holistic approach. The degree of complexity requires analyses based on large datasets (also including advanced functional genomic assays) and novel computational biology approaches (essential to extract information relevant for the clinical decision process and for the development of new drugs). Therefore, according to the emerging "systems/network medicine", COPD should be re.-evaluated considering multiple network(s) perturbations such as genetic and environmental changes. Systems Medicine (SM) platforms, in which patients are extensively characterized, offer a basis for a more targeted clinical approach, which is predictive, preventive, personalized and participatory ("P4-medicine"). It clearly emerges that in the next future, new opportunities will become available for clinical research on rare COPD patterns and for the identification of new biomarkers of comorbidity, severity, and progression. Herein, we overview the literature discussing the opportunity coming from the adoption of SMapproaches in COPD management, focusing on proteomics and metabolomics, and emphasizing the identification of disease sub-clusters, to improve the development of more effective therapies.

  11. Pelvic belt effects on sacroiliac joint ligaments: a computational approach to understand therapeutic effects of pelvic belts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sichting, Freddy; Rossol, Jerome; Soisson, Odette; Klima, Stefan; Milani, Thomas; Hammer, Niels

    2014-01-01

    The sacroiliac joint is a widely described source of low back pain. Therapeutic approaches to relieve pain include the application of pelvic belts. However, the effects of pelvic belts on sacroiliac joint ligaments as potential pain generators are mostly unknown. The aim of our study was to analyze the influence of pelvic belts on ligament load by means of a computer model. Experimental computer study using a finite element method. A computer model of the human pelvis was created, comprising bones, ligaments, and cartilage. Detailed geometries, material properties of ligaments, and in-vivo pressure distribution patterns of a pelvic belt were implemented. The effects of pelvic belts on ligament strain were computed in the double-leg stance. Pelvic belts increase sacroiliac joint motion around the sagittal axis but decrease motion around the transverse axis. With pelvic belt application, most of the strained sacroiliac joint ligaments were relieved, especially the sacrospinous, sacrotuberous, and the interosseous sacroiliac ligaments. Sacroiliac joint motion and ligament strains were minute. These results agree with validation data from other studies. Assigning homogenous and linear material properties and excluding muscle forces are clear simplifications of the complex reality. Pelvic belts alter sacroiliac joint motion and provide partial relief of ligament strain that is subjectively marked, although minimal in absolute terms. These findings confirm theories that besides being mechanical stabilizers, the sacroiliac joint ligaments are likely involved in neuromuscular feedback mechanisms. The results from our computer model help with unraveling the therapeutic mechanisms of pelvic belts.

  12. Conditioned Medium of Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells as a Therapeutic Approach to Neuropathic Pain: A Preclinical Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Barbosa Gama

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuropathic pain is a type of chronic pain caused by injury or dysfunction of the nervous system, without effective therapeutic approaches. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs, through their paracrine action, have great potential in the treatment of this syndrome. In the present study, the therapeutic potential of MSC-derived conditioned medium (CM was investigated in a mouse model of neuropathic pain induced by partial sciatic nerve ligation (PSL. PSL mice were treated by endovenous route with bone marrow-derived MSCs (1 × 106, CM, or vehicle. Gabapentin was the reference drug. Twelve hours after administration, neuropathic mice treated with CM exhibited an antinociceptive effect that was maintained throughout the evaluation period. MSCs also induced nonreversed antinociception, while gabapentin induced short-lasting antinociception. The levels of IL-1β, TNF-α, and IL-6 were reduced, while IL-10 was enhanced on sciatic nerve and spinal cord by treatment with CM and MSCs. Preliminary analysis of the CM secretome revealed the presence of growth factors and cytokines likely involved in the antinociception. In conclusion, the CM, similar to injection of live cells, produces a powerful and long-lasting antinociceptive effect on neuropathic pain, which is related with modulatory properties on peripheral and central levels of cytokines involved with the maintenance of this syndrome.

  13. Bounded Rationality and Budgeting

    OpenAIRE

    Ibrahim, Mukdad

    2016-01-01

    This article discusses the theory of bounded rationality which had been introduced by Herbert Simon in the 1950s. Simon introduced the notion of bounded rationality stating that while decision-makers strive for rationality, they are limited by the effect of the environment, their information process capacity and by the constraints on their information storage and retrieval capabilities. Moreover, this article tries to specifically blend this notion into budgeting, using the foundations of inc...

  14. Rational Multiparty Computation

    OpenAIRE

    Wallrabenstein, John Ross

    2014-01-01

    The field of rational cryptography considers the design of cryptographic protocols in the presence of rational agents seeking to maximize local utility functions. This departs from the standard secure multiparty computation setting, where players are assumed to be either honest or malicious. ^ We detail the construction of both a two-party and a multiparty game theoretic framework for constructing rational cryptographic protocols. Our framework specifies the utility function assumptions neces...

  15. Imaging and therapeutic approach of hemangiomas and vascular malformations in the pediatric age group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dubois, J; Garel, L [Dept. of Medical Imaging, Hopital Sainte-Justine, Montreal, QB (Canada)

    1999-12-01

    Terminology regarding the vascular lesions of the soft tissues remains confusing. A single classification is necessary in order to decide on the proper investigation and the best treatment. At the Workshop on Vascular Anomalies in Rome in June 1996, the membership accepted the Mulliken and Glowacki classification, which differentiates vascular lesions into vascular tumors, including hemangiomas and vascular malformations. At Sainte-Justine, we have set up a multidisciplinary clinic for the discussion of problem patients with vascular anomalies, both in terms of diagnosis and treatment. In this review, we present our experience regarding the classification, the imaging modalities and the treatment of vascular anomalies. In our experience, Doppler ultrasound should be the initial imaging modality for recognizing vascular tumors from vascular malformations. CT scan or magnetic resonance imaging is best to evaluate the extent of the lesions prior to treatment. A multidisciplinary approach is essential to establish a correct diagnosis and define accordingly the appropriate treatment and follow-up. (orig.)

  16. Combining Upper Limb Robotic Rehabilitation with Other Therapeutic Approaches after Stroke: Current Status, Rationale, and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Mazzoleni

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A better understanding of the neural substrates that underlie motor recovery after stroke has led to the development of innovative rehabilitation strategies and tools that incorporate key elements of motor skill relearning, that is, intensive motor training involving goal-oriented repeated movements. Robotic devices for the upper limb are increasingly used in rehabilitation. Studies have demonstrated the effectiveness of these devices in reducing motor impairments, but less so for the improvement of upper limb function. Other studies have begun to investigate the benefits of combined approaches that target muscle function (functional electrical stimulation and botulinum toxin injections, modulate neural activity (noninvasive brain stimulation, and enhance motivation (virtual reality in an attempt to potentialize the benefits of robot-mediated training. The aim of this paper is to overview the current status of such combined treatments and to analyze the rationale behind them.

  17. Determinants of Actor Rationality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellegaard, Chris

    Industrial companies must exercise influence on their suppliers (or supplier actors). Actor rationality is a central theme connected to this management task. In this article, relevant literature is studied with the purpose of shedding light on determinants of actor rationality. Two buyer-supplier...... relations are investigated in a multiple case study, leading to the proposal of various additional factors that determine and shape actor rationality. Moreover a conceptual model of rationality determinants in the buyer-supplier relation is proposed, a model that may help supply managers analyse...

  18. A novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of central sleep apnea: The remedē{sup ®} system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Germany, Robin, E-mail: rgermany@respicardia.com [University of Oklahoma School of Medicine (United States); Joseph, Susan [Washington University School of Medicine (United States); James, Kristofer [Respicardia, Inc., Hopkins, MN (United States); Kao, Andrew [University of Missouri School of Medicine, Kansas City (United States); St. Luke' s Mid-America Heart Institute, Kansas City, MO (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Central sleep apnea (CSA) occurs primarily in cardiovascular patients and is associated with high morbidity and mortality. The disorder often is unrecognized due to the overlap of symptoms with those of the underlying cardiac disease. CSA can be easily diagnosed with a sleep study. Following optimization of all co-morbidities, the therapeutic approach available currently focuses on mask-based therapies which suffer from poor patient adherence. A new therapy, the remedē{sup ®} System, has been developed; it utilizes a transvenous, fully implantable system providing phrenic nerve stimulation intended to restore a more normal breathing pattern. The therapy demonstrated promising results based on an initial chronic study and a randomized trial is underway to further evaluate safety and efficacy of this novel system in patients with CSA.

  19. Altered joint tribology in osteoarthritis: Reduced lubricin synthesis due to the inflammatory process. New horizons for therapeutic approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szychlinska, M A; Leonardi, R; Al-Qahtani, M; Mobasheri, A; Musumeci, G

    2016-06-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common form of joint disease. This review aimed to consolidate the current evidence that implicates the inflammatory process in the attenuation of synovial lubrication and joint tissue homeostasis in OA. Moreover, with these findings, we propose some evidence for novel therapeutic strategies for preventing and/or treating this complex disorder. The studies reviewed support that inflammatory mediators participate in the onset and progression of OA after joint injury. The flow of pro-inflammatory cytokines following an acute injury seems to be directly associated with altered lubricating ability in the joint tissue. The latter is associated with reduced level of lubricin, one of the major joint lubricants. Future research should focus on the development of new therapies that attenuate the inflammatory process and restore lubricin synthesis and function. This approach could support joint tribology and synovial lubrication leading to improved joint function and pain relief. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. A novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of central sleep apnea: The remedē® system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Germany, Robin; Joseph, Susan; James, Kristofer; Kao, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Central sleep apnea (CSA) occurs primarily in cardiovascular patients and is associated with high morbidity and mortality. The disorder often is unrecognized due to the overlap of symptoms with those of the underlying cardiac disease. CSA can be easily diagnosed with a sleep study. Following optimization of all co-morbidities, the therapeutic approach available currently focuses on mask-based therapies which suffer from poor patient adherence. A new therapy, the remedē ® System, has been developed; it utilizes a transvenous, fully implantable system providing phrenic nerve stimulation intended to restore a more normal breathing pattern. The therapy demonstrated promising results based on an initial chronic study and a randomized trial is underway to further evaluate safety and efficacy of this novel system in patients with CSA

  1. A Rational Emotive Behavioral Approach to Improve Anger Management and Reduce Office Referrals in Middle School Children: A Formative Investigation and Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Shannon R.

    2005-01-01

    Sixteen seventh and eighth graders previously identified as having behavioral problems earned significantly higher post-test scores on a test of REBT concepts immediately after participation in a Rational Emotive Behavioral Therapy (REBT) training program, and this knowledge was retained after an 8-week follow-up period (p less than 0.01).…

  2. Doxycycline hinders phenylalanine fibril assemblies revealing a potential novel therapeutic approach in phenylketonuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Luigi, Ada; Mariani, Alessandro; De Paola, Massimiliano; Re Depaolini, Andrea; Colombo, Laura; Russo, Luca; Rondelli, Valeria; Brocca, Paola; Adler-Abramovich, Lihi; Gazit, Ehud; Del Favero, Elena; Cantù, Laura; Salmona, Mario

    2015-10-29

    A new paradigm for the aetiopathology of phenylketonuria suggests the presence of amyloid-like assemblies in the brains of transgenic mouse models and patients with phenylketonuria, possibly shedding light on the selective cognitive deficit associated with this disease. Paralleling the amyloidogenic route that identifies different stages of peptide aggregation, corresponding to different levels of toxicity, we experimentally address for the first time, the physico-chemical properties of phenylalanine aggregates via Small Angle, Wide Angle X-ray Scattering and Atomic Force Microscopy. Results are consistent with the presence of well-structured, aligned fibres generated by milliMolar concentrations of phenylalanine. Moreover, the amyloid-modulating doxycycline agent affects the local structure of phenylalanine aggregates, preventing the formation of well-ordered crystalline structures. Phenylalanine assemblies prove toxic in vitro to immortalized cell lines and primary neuronal cells. Furthermore, these assemblies also cause dendritic sprouting alterations and synaptic protein impairment in neurons. Doxycycline counteracts these toxic effects, suggesting an approach for the development of future innovative non-dietary preventive therapies.

  3. The blood-brain barrier: structure, function and therapeutic approaches to cross it.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajes, Marta; Ramos-Fernández, Eva; Weng-Jiang, Xian; Bosch-Morató, Mònica; Guivernau, Biuse; Eraso-Pichot, Abel; Salvador, Bertrán; Fernàndez-Busquets, Xavier; Roquer, Jaume; Muñoz, Francisco J

    2014-08-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is constituted by a specialized vascular endothelium that interacts directly with astrocytes, neurons and pericytes. It protects the brain from the molecules of the systemic circulation but it has to be overcome for the proper treatment of brain cancer, psychiatric disorders or neurodegenerative diseases, which are dramatically increasing as the population ages. In the present work we have revised the current knowledge on the cellular structure of the BBB and the different procedures utilized currently and those proposed to cross it. Chemical modifications of the drugs, such as increasing their lipophilicity, turn them more prone to be internalized in the brain. Other mechanisms are the use of molecular tools to bind the drugs such as small immunoglobulins, liposomes or nanoparticles that will act as Trojan Horses favoring the drug delivery in brain. This fusion of the classical pharmacology with nanotechnology has opened a wide field to many different approaches with promising results to hypothesize that BBB will not be a major problem for the new generation of neuroactive drugs. The present review provides an overview of all state-of-the-art of the BBB structure and function, as well as of the classic strategies and these appeared in recent years to deliver drugs into the brain for the treatment of Central Nervous System (CNS) diseases.

  4. An Unusual Endovascular Therapeutic Approach for a Rare Case of May-Thurner Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DaSilva-DeAbreu, Adrian; Masha, Luke; Peerbhai, Shareez

    2017-03-06

    BACKGROUND The etiology of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) may pose a significant diagnostic challenge because truly reversible causes of DVT are rare. In this regard, known pelvic anatomic abnormalities such as aortic and iliac aneurysms should be seriously considered as a complicating factor in patients presenting with acute DVT so as not to miss a potentially curable etiology of May-Thurner syndrome (MTS). CASE REPORT We report the case of a 69-year-old man with a known abdominal aortic aneurysm and bilateral iliac artery aneurysms who presented with an acute DVT. A computed tomography scan of the abdomen and pelvis showed increased dilation of his aneurysmal disease with new resultant compression of the left iliac vein representing acquired MTS. The patient underwent endovascular aneurysm repair of the infra-renal abdominal aortic aneurysm and right common iliac artery aneurysm with a Gore Excluder endoprosthesis in lieu of venous stenting, with resolution of symptoms. CONCLUSIONS Infra-renal aortic and iliac aneurysms causing MTS are extremely rare, and patients at risk for MTS through these mechanisms do not fit the classical demographics associated with this syndrome. Furthermore, this is the first case described in which MTS was treated by addressing the aneurysm through an endoprosthetic approach instead of venous stenting, which is the conventional intervention for MTS.

  5. Human microbiomes and their roles in dysbiosis, common diseases, and novel therapeutic approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belizário, José E; Napolitano, Mauro

    2015-01-01

    The human body is the residence of a large number of commensal (non-pathogenic) and pathogenic microbial species that have co-evolved with the human genome, adaptive immune system, and diet. With recent advances in DNA-based technologies, we initiated the exploration of bacterial gene functions and their role in human health. The main goal of the human microbiome project is to characterize the abundance, diversity and functionality of the genes present in all microorganisms that permanently live in different sites of the human body. The gut microbiota expresses over 3.3 million bacterial genes, while the human genome expresses only 20 thousand genes. Microbe gene-products exert pivotal functions via the regulation of food digestion and immune system development. Studies are confirming that manipulation of non-pathogenic bacterial strains in the host can stimulate the recovery of the immune response to pathogenic bacteria causing diseases. Different approaches, including the use of nutraceutics (prebiotics and probiotics) as well as phages engineered with CRISPR/Cas systems and quorum sensing systems have been developed as new therapies for controlling dysbiosis (alterations in microbial community) and common diseases (e.g., diabetes and obesity). The designing and production of pharmaceuticals based on our own body's microbiome is an emerging field and is rapidly growing to be fully explored in the near future. This review provides an outlook on recent findings on the human microbiomes, their impact on health and diseases, and on the development of targeted therapies.

  6. Evolution of and perspectives on therapeutic approaches to nerve agent poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masson, Patrick

    2011-09-25

    After more than 70 years of considerable efforts, research on medical defense against nerve agents has come to a standstill. Major progress in medical countermeasures was achieved between the 50s and 70s with the development of anticholinergic drugs and carbamate-based pretreatment, the introduction of pyridinium oximes as antidotes, and benzodiazepines in emergency treatments. These drugs ensure good protection of the peripheral nervous system and mitigate the acute effects of exposure to lethal doses of nerve agents. However, pyridostigmine and cholinesterase reactivators currently used in the armed forces do not protect/reactivate central acetylcholinesterases. Moreover, other drugs used are not sufficiently effective in protecting the central nervous system against seizures, irreversible brain damages and long-term sequelae of nerve agent poisoning.New developments of medical counter-measures focus on: (a) detoxification of organophosphorus molecules before they react with acetylcholinesterase and other physiological targets by administration of stoichiometric or catalytic scavengers; (b) protection and reactivation of central acetylcholinesterases, and (c) improvement of neuroprotection following delayed therapy.Future developments will aim at treatment of acute and long-term effects of low level exposure to nerve agents, research on alternative routes for optimizing drug delivery, and therapies. Though gene therapy for in situ generation of bioscavengers, and cell therapy based on neural progenitor engraftment for neuronal regeneration have been successfully explored, more studies are needed before practical medical applications can be made of these new approaches. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Type 2 diabetes: epidemiologic trends, evolving pathogenetic [corrected] concepts, and recent changes in therapeutic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizvi, Ali A

    2004-11-01

    The prevalence of type 2 diabetes has assumed epidemic dimensions. Children are now vulnerable to a disease that was once the exclusive domain of adulthood. Increased body weight and sedentary behavior accelerate insulin resistance and beta-cell dysfunction, leading to the clinical manifestation of hyperglycemia. Other cardiovascular risk factors tend to cluster in this milieu, setting the stage for vastly increased macrovascular morbidity. Many more people have impaired glucose tolerance ('prediabetes'). They are not only at risk for frank diabetes but also for the recently recognized entity of 'metabolic syndrome,' which is further characterized by hypertension, dyslipidemia, and central adiposity. A multifactorial approach addressing these aspects in addition to intensive glycemic control is the most efficacious therapy, optimally achieved through a team effort comprising the clinician, diabetes nurse, dietitian, and other professionals. Early use of oral-agent combinations is gaining favor. Insulin is best utilized in a basal-bolus fashion to manage both fasting and postprandial glycemia, delivered with multiple-dose injections or continuously via the pump. In hospitalized patients, good diabetic control reduces mortality. Finally, recent trials show that optimal weight maintenance and regular exercise can prevent or delay type 2 diabetes. Such information can serve as the foundation for large-scale preventive endeavors at the community level.

  8. HUMAN MICROBIOMES AND THEIR ROLES IN DYSBIOSIS, COMMON DISEASES AND NOVEL THERAPEUTIC APPROACHES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Ernesto Belizario

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The human body is the residence of a large number of commensal (non-pathogenic and pathogenic microbial species that have co-evolved with the human genome, adaptive immune system and diet. With recent advances in DNA-based technologies, we initiated the exploration of bacterial gene functions and their role in human health. The main goal of the human microbiome project is to characterize the abundance, diversity and functionality of the genes present in all microorganisms that permanently live in different sites of the human body. The gut microbiota expresses over 3.3 million bacterial genes, while the human genome expresses only 20 thousand genes. Microbe gene-products exert pivotal functions via the regulation of food digestion and immune system development. Studies are confirming that manipulation of non-pathogenic bacterial strains in the host can stimulate the recovery of the immune response to pathogenic bacteria causing diseases. Different approaches, including the use of nutraceutics (prebiotics and probiotics as well as phages engineered with CRISPR/cas systems and quorum sensing systems have been developed as new therapies for controlling dysbiosis (alterations in microbial community and common diseases (e.g. diabetes and obesity. The designing and production of pharmaceuticals based on our own body’s microbiome is an emerging field and is rapidly growing to be fully explored in the near future. This review provides an outlook on recent findings on the human microbiomes, their impact on health and diseases, and on the development of targeted therapies.

  9. Prevention and treatment of allergic asthma in pregnancy: from conventional drugs to new therapeutical approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadavid, Angela P; Bannenberg, Gérard L; Arck, Petra C; Fitzgerald, Justine S; Markert, Udo R

    2011-05-01

    Different conventional anti-asthmatic and anti-allergic drugs are commonly used in pregnancy, including inhaled corticosteroids, long- and short-acting β-agonists, leukotriene modifiers, cromolyn, and theophylline. Alternatively, immunotherapy with allergens before and during pregnancy is accepted as a causal treatment of allergies, but the allergy specifity and severity in combination with a variety of application protocols and procedures cause wide heterogenity of this treatment principle. Furthermore, the pharmacokinetic characteristics and the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) classification of conventional anti-allergic drugs and immunological implications of immunotherapy are summarized in this review, and insights on fetal programming of allergies are introduced. We propose a potential perspective of treatment with anti-inflammatory and pro-resolving mediators, such as lipoxins, resolvins and protectins; these are lipid mediators physiologically generated during the immune response from arachidonic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid. This proposal fits with the recently appreciated approaches to allergy prevention for the newborn child by a balanced maternal nutrition and omega-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid consumption.

  10. Bortezomib as a new therapeutic approach for blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippe, Laure; Ceroi, Adam; Bôle-Richard, Elodie; Jenvrin, Alizée; Biichle, Sabeha; Perrin, Sophie; Limat, Samuel; Bonnefoy, Francis; Deconinck, Eric; Saas, Philippe; Garnache-Ottou, Francine; Angelot-Delettre, Fanny

    2017-11-01

    Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm is an aggressive hematologic malignancy with a poor prognosis. No consensus regarding optimal treatment modalities is currently available. Targeting the nuclear factor-kappa B pathway is considered a promising approach since blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm has been reported to exhibit constitutive activation of this pathway. Moreover, nuclear factor-kappa B inhibition in blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm cell lines, achieved using either an experimental specific inhibitor JSH23 or the clinical drug bortezomib, interferes in vitro with leukemic cell proliferation and survival. Here we extended these data by showing that primary blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm cells from seven patients were sensitive to bortezomib-induced cell death. We confirmed that bortezomib efficiently inhibits the phosphorylation of the RelA nuclear factor-kappa B subunit in blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm cell lines and primary cells from patients in vitro and in vivo in a mouse model. We then demonstrated that bortezomib can be associated with other drugs used in different chemotherapy regimens to improve its impact on leukemic cell death. Indeed, when primary blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm cells from a patient were grafted into mice, bortezomib treatment significantly increased the animals' survival, and was associated with a significant decrease of circulating leukemic cells and RelA nuclear factor-kappa B subunit expression. Overall, our results provide a rationale for the use of bortezomib in combination with other chemotherapy for the treatment of patients with blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm. Based on our data, a prospective clinical trial combining proteasome inhibitor with classical drugs could be envisaged. Copyright© Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  11. [First SIBEN clinical consensus: diagnostic and therapeutic approach to patent ductus arteriosus in premature newborns].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golombek, S G; Sola, A; Baquero, H; Borbonet, D; Cabañas, F; Fajardo, C; Goldsmit, G; Lemus, L; Miura, E; Pellicer, A; Pérez, J M; Rogido, M; Zambosco, G; van Overmeire, B

    2008-11-01

    To report the process and results of the first neonatal clinical consensus of the Ibero-American region. Two recognized experts in the field (Clyman and Van Overmeire) and 45 neonatologists from 23 countries were invited for active participation and collaboration. We developed 46 questions of clinical-physiological relevance in all aspects of patent ductus arteriosus (PDA). Guidelines for consensus process, literature search and future preparation of educational material and authorship were developed, reviewed and agreed by all. Participants from different countries were distributed in groups, and assigned to interact and work together to answer 3-5 questions, reviewing all global literature and local factors. Answers and summaries were received, collated and reviewed by 2 coordinators and the 2 experts. Participants and experts met in Granada, Spain for 4.5 h (lectures by experts, presentations by groups, discussion, all literature available). 31 neonatologists from 16 countries agreed to participate. Presentations by each group and general discussion were used to develop a consensus regarding: general management, availability of drugs (indomethacin vs. ibuprofen), costs, indications for echo/surgery, etc. Many steps were learnt by all present in a collaborative forum. This first consensus group of Ibero-American neonatologists SIBEN led to active and collaborative participation of neonatologists of 16 countries, improved education of all participants and ended with consensus development on clinical approaches to PDA. Furthermore, it provides recommendations for clinical care reached by consensus. Additionally, it will serve as a useful foundation for future SIBEN Consensus on other topics and it could become valuable as a model to decrease disparity in care and improve outcomes in this and other regions.

  12. Rational approximation of vertical segments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar Celis, Oliver; Cuyt, Annie; Verdonk, Brigitte

    2007-08-01

    In many applications, observations are prone to imprecise measurements. When constructing a model based on such data, an approximation rather than an interpolation approach is needed. Very often a least squares approximation is used. Here we follow a different approach. A natural way for dealing with uncertainty in the data is by means of an uncertainty interval. We assume that the uncertainty in the independent variables is negligible and that for each observation an uncertainty interval can be given which contains the (unknown) exact value. To approximate such data we look for functions which intersect all uncertainty intervals. In the past this problem has been studied for polynomials, or more generally for functions which are linear in the unknown coefficients. Here we study the problem for a particular class of functions which are nonlinear in the unknown coefficients, namely rational functions. We show how to reduce the problem to a quadratic programming problem with a strictly convex objective function, yielding a unique rational function which intersects all uncertainty intervals and satisfies some additional properties. Compared to rational least squares approximation which reduces to a nonlinear optimization problem where the objective function may have many local minima, this makes the new approach attractive.

  13. Standby Gasoline Rationing Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-06-01

    The final rules adopted by the President for a Standby Gasoline Rationing Plan are presented. The plan provides that eligibility for ration allotments will be determined primarily on the basis of motor vehicle registrations, taking into account historical differences in the use of gasoline among states. The regulations also provide authority for supplemental allotments to firms so that their allotment will equal a specified percentage of gasoline use during a base period. Priority classifications, i.e., agriculture, defense, etc., are established to assure adequate gasoline supplies for designated essential services. Ration rights must be provided by end-users to their suppliers for each gallon sold. DOE will regulate the distribution of gasoline at the wholesale level according to the transfer by suppliers of redeemed ration rights and the gasoline allocation regulations. Ration rights are transferable. A ration banking system is created to facilitate transfers of ration rights. Each state will be provided with a reserve of ration rights to provide for hardship needs and to alleviate inequities. (DC)

  14. Many faces of rationality: Implications of the great rationality debate for clinical decision-making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djulbegovic, Benjamin; Elqayam, Shira

    2017-10-01

    Given that more than 30% of healthcare costs are wasted on inappropriate care, suboptimal care is increasingly connected to the quality of medical decisions. It has been argued that personal decisions are the leading cause of death, and 80% of healthcare expenditures result from physicians' decisions. Therefore, improving healthcare necessitates improving medical decisions, ie, making decisions (more) rational. Drawing on writings from The Great Rationality Debate from the fields of philosophy, economics, and psychology, we identify core ingredients of rationality commonly encountered across various theoretical models. Rationality is typically classified under umbrella of normative (addressing the question how people "should" or "ought to" make their decisions) and descriptive theories of decision-making (which portray how people actually make their decisions). Normative theories of rational thought of relevance to medicine include epistemic theories that direct practice of evidence-based medicine and expected utility theory, which provides the basis for widely used clinical decision analyses. Descriptive theories of rationality of direct relevance to medical decision-making include bounded rationality, argumentative theory of reasoning, adaptive rationality, dual processing model of rationality, regret-based rationality, pragmatic/substantive rationality, and meta-rationality. For the first time, we provide a review of wide range of theories and models of rationality. We showed that what is "rational" behaviour under one rationality theory may be irrational under the other theory. We also showed that context is of paramount importance to rationality and that no one model of rationality can possibly fit all contexts. We suggest that in context-poor situations, such as policy decision-making, normative theories based on expected utility informed by best research evidence may provide the optimal approach to medical decision-making, whereas in the context

  15. Exploring rationality in schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Revsbech, Rasmus; Mortensen, Erik Lykke; Owen, Gareth

    2015-01-01

    Background Empirical studies of rationality (syllogisms) in patients with schizophrenia have obtained different results. One study found that patients reason more logically if the syllogism is presented through an unusual content. Aims To explore syllogism-based rationality in schizophrenia. Meth...... differences became non-significant. Conclusions When taking intelligence and neuropsychological performance into account, patients with schizophrenia and controls perform similarly on syllogism tests of rationality.......Background Empirical studies of rationality (syllogisms) in patients with schizophrenia have obtained different results. One study found that patients reason more logically if the syllogism is presented through an unusual content. Aims To explore syllogism-based rationality in schizophrenia. Method...... Thirty-eight first-admitted patients with schizophrenia and 38 healthy controls solved 29 syllogisms that varied in presentation content (ordinary v. unusual) and validity (valid v. invalid). Statistical tests were made of unadjusted and adjusted group differences in models adjusting for intelligence...

  16. Irrational Rationality of Terrorism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Nalbandov

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The present article deals with the ontological problem of applying the rational choice frameworks to the study of terrorism. It testing the application of the rational choice to the “old” (before the end of the Cold War and the “new” (after the end of the Cold War terrorisms. It starts with analyzing the fundamentals of rationality and applies it at two levels: the individual (actors and group (collective via two outlooks: tactical (short-term and strategic (long-term. The main argument of the article is that while the “old” terrorism can be explained by the rational choice theory its “new” version represents a substantial departure from rationality.

  17. Respect for rational autonomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Rebecca L

    2009-12-01

    The standard notion of autonomy in medical ethics does not require that autonomous choices not be irrational. The paper gives three examples of seemingly irrational patient choices and discusses how a rational autonomy analysis differs from the standard view. It then considers whether a switch to the rational autonomy view would lead to overriding more patient decisions but concludes that this should not be the case. Rather, a determination of whether individual patient decisions are autonomous is much less relevant than usually considered in determining whether health care providers must abide by these decisions. Furthermore, respect for rational autonomy entails strong positive requirements of respect for the autonomy of the person as a rational decision maker. The rationality view of autonomy is conceptually stronger than the standard view, allows for a more nuanced understanding of the practical moral calculus involved in respecting patient autonomy, and promotes positive respect for patient autonomy.

  18. New concepts in the management of diffuse low-grade glioma: Proposal of a multistage and individualized therapeutic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffau, Hugues; Taillandier, Luc

    2015-03-01

    Diffuse low-grade glioma grows, migrates along white matter tracts, and progresses to high-grade glioma. Rather than a "wait and see" policy, an aggressive attitude is now recommended, with early surgery as the first therapy. Intraoperative mapping, with maximal resection according to functional boundaries, is associated with a longer overall survival (OS) while minimizing morbidity. However, most studies have investigated the role of only one specific treatment (surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy) without taking a global view of managing the cumulative time while preserving quality of life (QoL) versus time to anaplastic transformation. Our aim is to switch towards a more holistic concept based upon the anticipation of a personalized and long-term multistage therapeutic approach, with online adaptation of the strategy over the years using feedback from clinical, radiological, and histomolecular monitoring. This dynamic strategy challenges the traditional approach by proposing earlier therapy, by repeating treatments, and by reversing the classical order of therapies (eg, neoadjuvant chemotherapy when maximal resection is impossible, no early radiotherapy) to improve OS and QoL. New individualized management strategies should deal with the interactions between the course of this chronic disease, reaction brain remapping, and oncofunctional modulation elicited by serial treatments. This philosophy supports a personalized, functional, and preventive neuro-oncology. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Neuro-Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. [Common physiological basis for post-traumatic stress disorder and dependence to drugs of abuse: Implications for new therapeutic approaches].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gisquet-Verrier, Pascale; Tolédano, Daniel; Le Dorze, Claire

    2017-06-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and addiction to drugs of abuse are two common diseases, showing high comorbidity rates. This review presents a number of evidence showing similarities between these two pathologies, especially the hyper-responsiveness to environmental cues inducing a reactivation of the target memory leading either to re-experiencing (PTSD), or drug craving. Accordingly, PTSD and addiction to drug of abuse might by considered as memory pathologies, underlined by the same physiological process. We propose that these two pathologies rely on an uncoupling of the monoaminergic systems. According to this hypothesis, exposure to extreme conditions, either negative (trauma) or positive (drugs) induced a loss of the reciprocal control that one system usually exerts on the other monoaminergic system, resulting to an uncoupling between the noradrenergic and the serotonergic systems. Results obtained in our laboratory, using animal models of these pathologies, demonstrate that after a trauma, such as after repeated drug injections, rats developed both a behavioral sensitization (increases of the locomotion in response to a stimulation of the monoaminergic systems) and a pharmacological sensitization (increases of noradrenergic release within the prefrontal cortex). These results support our hypothesis and led us to propose new and innovative therapeutic approaches consisting either to induce a re-coupling of the monoaminergic systems, or to modify the pathological memories by using an emotional memory remodeling. Extremely encouraging results have already been obtained in rats and in humans, opening new and promising therapeutic avenues. Copyright © 2016 Société française de pharmacologie et de thérapeutique. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Bounded rational choice behaviour: applications in transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anders Fjendbo

    2016-01-01

    Even though the theory of rational behaviour has been challenged for almost 100 years, the dominant approach within the field of transport has been based upon the assumptions of neoclassical economics that we live in a world of rational decision makers who always have perfect knowledge and aim...... rational choice behaviour focuses on how the latter approach can be seriously taken into account within transport applications. As the editors discuss in the introduction, a true optimal choice can only be made if an individual has full and perfect information of all relevant attributes in his/her choice...... set. An individual is said to demonstrate bounded rational behaviour if he/she does not systematically consider all attributes deemed relevant for the decision problem at hand, does not consider all choice options and/or does not choose the best choice alternative. Such simplified representation...

  1. Many faces of rationality: Implications of the great rationality debate for clinical decision‐making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elqayam, Shira

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Given that more than 30% of healthcare costs are wasted on inappropriate care, suboptimal care is increasingly connected to the quality of medical decisions. It has been argued that personal decisions are the leading cause of death, and 80% of healthcare expenditures result from physicians' decisions. Therefore, improving healthcare necessitates improving medical decisions, ie, making decisions (more) rational. Drawing on writings from The Great Rationality Debate from the fields of philosophy, economics, and psychology, we identify core ingredients of rationality commonly encountered across various theoretical models. Rationality is typically classified under umbrella of normative (addressing the question how people “should” or “ought to” make their decisions) and descriptive theories of decision‐making (which portray how people actually make their decisions). Normative theories of rational thought of relevance to medicine include epistemic theories that direct practice of evidence‐based medicine and expected utility theory, which provides the basis for widely used clinical decision analyses. Descriptive theories of rationality of direct relevance to medical decision‐making include bounded rationality, argumentative theory of reasoning, adaptive rationality, dual processing model of rationality, regret‐based rationality, pragmatic/substantive rationality, and meta‐rationality. For the first time, we provide a review of wide range of theories and models of rationality. We showed that what is “rational” behaviour under one rationality theory may be irrational under the other theory. We also showed that context is of paramount importance to rationality and that no one model of rationality can possibly fit all contexts. We suggest that in context‐poor situations, such as policy decision‐making, normative theories based on expected utility informed by best research evidence may provide the optimal approach to medical decision

  2. SGLT2 inhibitors – an insulin-independent therapeutic approach for treatment of type 2 diabetes: focus on canagliflozin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seufert J

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Jochen SeufertDepartment of Endocrinology and Diabetology, Clinic for Internal Medicine II, Freiburg University Hospital, Freiburg, GermanyAbstract: Despite the availability of a great variety of medications, a significant proportion of people with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM are not able to achieve or maintain adequate glycemic control. Beyond improved glucose control, novel treatments would ideally provide a reduction of cardiovascular risk, with a favorable impact on excess weight, and a low intrinsic hypoglycemia risk, as well as a synergistic mechanism of action for broad combination therapy. With the development of sodium glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2 inhibitors, an antidiabetic pharmacologic option has recently become available that comes close to meeting these requirements. For the first time, SGLT2 inhibitors offer a therapeutic approach acting directly on the kidneys without requiring insulin secretion or action. Canagliflozin, dapagliflozin, and empagliflozin are the SGLT2 inhibitors approved to date. Taken once a day, these medications can be combined with all other antidiabetic medications including insulin, due to their insulin-independent mechanism of action, with only a minimal risk of hypoglycemia. SGLT2 inhibitors provide additional reductions in body weight and blood pressure due to the therapeutically induced excretion of glucose and sodium through the kidneys. These "concomitant effects" are particularly interesting with regard to the increased cardiovascular risk in T2DM. In many cases, T2DM treatment requires a multidimensional approach where the treatment goals have to be adapted to the individual patient. While there is a consensus on the use of metformin as a first-line drug therapy, various antidiabetics are used for treatment intensification. New mechanisms of action like that of SGLT2 inhibitors such as canagliflozin, which can be used both in early and late stages of diabetes, are a welcome addition to expand

  3. Rational use of diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Racoveanu, N.T.; Volodin, V.

    1992-01-01

    The escalating number of radiodiagnostic investigations has, as a consequence, an increase in medical irradiation of patients and of cost of radiological services. Radiologists in USA and UK have since early 1970 questioned the efficacy of various radiological investigations and produced substantial evidence that more rational approaches are necessary. WHO initiated, in 1977, a programme in this direction which has issued four technical reports which give practical recommendations on how to rationalize the use of radiological examinations. Three main directions are considered: (1) Abandonment of routine radiological examinations, as procedures with no clinical or epidemiologic significance and which represent a waste of resources and patient dose. (2) Patient selection for various radiological investigations based on clinical criteria (high, intermediate, low yield). Selected patients have an increased prevalence of the given disease and the predictive value of radiological investigation is much higher. (3) Use of diagnostic algorithms with higher cost/efficiency and risk/benefit ratios, improving the outcome of radiological examinations

  4. Rational maps, monopoles and skyrmions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houghton, C.J.; Manton, N.S.

    1998-01-01

    We discuss the similarities between BPS monopoles and skyrmions, and point to an underlying connection in terms of rational maps between Riemann spheres. This involves the introduction of a new ansatz for Skyrme fields. We use this to construct good approximations to several known skyrmions, including all the minimal energy configurations up to baryon number nine, and some new solutions such as a baryon number seventeen Skyrme field with the truncated icosahedron structure of a buckyball. The new approach is also used to understand the low-lying vibrational modes of skyrmions, which are required for quantization. Along the way we discover an interesting Morse function on the space of rational maps which may be of use in understanding the Sen forms on the monopole moduli spaces. (orig.)

  5. Obesity, Metabolic Syndrome, and Dietary Therapeutical Approaches with a Special Focus on Nutraceuticals (Polyphenols): A Mini-Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ríos-Hoyo, Alejandro; Cortés, María José; Ríos-Ontiveros, Huguette; Meaney, Eduardo; Ceballos, Guillermo; Gutiérrez-Salmeán, Gabriela

    2014-01-01

    More than half of all global deaths in 2010 were related to non-communicable diseases, including obesity, cancers, diabetes, and cardiovascular illnesses. It has been suggested that the alarming increase in the incidence of cardiovascular disease is the epidemiologic result of a nutrition transition characterized by dietary patterns featuring an increase in the intake of total fat, cholesterol, sugars, and other refined carbohydrates, concomitant with low consumption of polyunsaturated fatty acids and fiber. Although traditional dietary approaches have proven successful as part of the treatment for obesity and cardiometabolic derangements within clinical trial scenarios, they lack effectiveness in the long term, mainly due to poor compliance. Research has thus turned its attention to nutraceutics, nutrients that have the ability to modulate physiological and pathophysiological molecular mechanisms, thus resulting in favorable health outcomes. Polyphenols have been considered as among the bioactive molecules as they are thought to yield beneficial effects by exerting antioxidant activity; however, there are other--and even more robust--metabolic pathways through which polyphenols enhance cardiovascular health, such as via promoting vasodilatory, anti-atherogenic, antithrombotic, and anti-inflammatory effects. No standard dose has yet been determined, as the effects greatly vary among polyphenols and food sources; thus, there is an imperative need to generate more evidence in order to support dietary recommendations aimed at the prevention and therapeutics of obesity and its associated cardiometabolic diseases.

  6. The Impact of CRISPR/Cas9 Technology on Cardiac Research: From Disease Modelling to Therapeutic Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pramstaller, Peter P.; Hicks, Andrew A.; Rossini, Alessandra

    2017-01-01

    Genome-editing technology has emerged as a powerful method that enables the generation of genetically modified cells and organisms necessary to elucidate gene function and mechanisms of human diseases. The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats- (CRISPR-) associated 9 (Cas9) system has rapidly become one of the most popular approaches for genome editing in basic biomedical research over recent years because of its simplicity and adaptability. CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing has been used to correct DNA mutations ranging from a single base pair to large deletions in both in vitro and in vivo model systems. CRISPR/Cas9 has been used to increase the understanding of many aspects of cardiovascular disorders, including lipid metabolism, electrophysiology and genetic inheritance. The CRISPR/Cas9 technology has been proven to be effective in creating gene knockout (KO) or knockin in human cells and is particularly useful for editing induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). Despite these progresses, some biological, technical, and ethical issues are limiting the therapeutic potential of genome editing in cardiovascular diseases. This review will focus on various applications of CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing in the cardiovascular field, for both disease research and the prospect of in vivo genome-editing therapies in the future. PMID:29434642

  7. History of Economic Rationalities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This book concentrates upon how economic rationalities have been embedded into particular historical practices, cultures, and moral systems. Through multiple case-studies, situated in different historical contexts of the modern West, the book shows that the development of economic rationalities...... takes place in the meeting with other regimes of thought, values, and moral discourses. The book offers new and refreshing insights, ranging from the development of early economic thinking to economic aspects and concepts in the works of classical thinkers such as Thomas Hobbes, John Locke and Karl Marx......, to the role of economic reasoning in contemporary policies of art and health care. With economic rationalities as the read thread, the reader is offered a unique chance of historical self-awareness and recollection of how economic rationality became the powerful ideological and moral force that it is today....

  8. Rationing medical education.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper discussed the pros and cons of the application of rationing to medical education and the different ... Even though some stakeholders in medical education might be taken aback at .... Walsh K. Online educational tools to improve the.

  9. Crab Rationalization Permit Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Crab Rationalization Program (Program) allocates BSAI crab resources among harvesters, processors, and coastal communities. The North Pacific Fishery Management...

  10. Insights into the role of components of the tumor microenvironment in oral carcinoma call for new therapeutic approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salo, Tuula; Vered, Marilena; Bello, Ibrahim O.; Nyberg, Pia; Bitu, Carolina Cavalcante; Zlotogorski Hurvitz, Ayelet; Dayan, Dan

    2014-01-01

    The research on oral cancer has focused mainly on the cancer cells, their genetic changes and consequent phenotypic modifications. However, it is increasingly clear that the tumor microenvironment (TME) has been shown to be in a dynamic state of inter-relations with the cancer cells. The TME contains a variety of components including the non-cancerous cells (i.e., immune cells, resident fibroblasts and angiogenic vascular cells) and the ECM milieu [including fibers (mainly collagen and fibronectin) and soluble factors (i.e., enzymes, growth factors, cytokines and chemokines)]. Thus, it is currently assumed that TME is considered a part of the cancerous tissue and the functionality of its key components constitutes the setting on which the hallmarks of the cancer cells can evolve. Therefore, in terms of controlling a malignancy, one should control the growth, invasion and spread of the cancer cells through modifications in the TME components. This mini review focuses on the TME as a diagnostic approach and reports the recent insights into the role of different TME key components [such as carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) and inflammation (CAI) cells, angiogenesis, stromal matrix molecules and proteases] in the molecular biology of oral carcinoma. Furthermore, the impact of TME components on clinical outcomes and the concomitant need for development of new therapeutic approaches will be discussed. - Highlights: • Tumor depth and budding, hypoxia and TME cells associate with worse prognosis. • Pro-tumoral CAFs and CAI cells aid proliferation, invasion and spread hypoxia. • Some ECM-bound factors exert pro-angiogenic or pro-tumor activities. • Tumor spread is greatly dependent on ECM proteolysis, mediated by TME cells. • Direct targeting of TME components for treatment is still experimental

  11. Intermittent hypoxia initiated plasticity in humans: A multipronged therapeutic approach to treat sleep apnea and overlapping co-morbidities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateika, Jason H; Komnenov, Dragana

    2017-01-01

    Over the past three decades exposure to intermittent hypoxia (IH) has generally been considered a stimulus associated with a number of detrimental outcomes. However, there is sufficient evidence to link IH to many beneficial outcomes but they have largely been ignored, particularly in the field of sleep medicine in the United States. Recent reviews have postulated that this apparent contradiction is related to the severity and duration of exposure to IH; mild forms of IH initiate beneficial outcomes while severe forms of IH are coupled to detrimental consequences. In the present review we explore the role that IH has in initiating respiratory plasticity and the potential this form of plasticity has to mitigate obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in humans. In taking this approach, we address the possibility that IH could serve as an adjunct therapy coupled with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) to treat OSA. Our working hypothesis is that exposure to mild IH leads to respiratory plasticity that manifests in increased stability of the upper airway, which could ultimately reduce the CPAP required to treat OSA. In turn, this reduction could increase CPAP compliance and extend the length of treatment each night, which might improve the magnitude of outcome measures. Improved treatment compliance coupled with the direct effect that IH has on numerous overlapping conditions (i.e. asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, spinal cord injury) may well lead to substantial improvements that exceed outcomes following treatment with CPAP alone. Overall, this review will consider evidence from the published literature which suggests that IH could serve as an effective multipronged therapeutic approach to treat sleep apnea and its overlapping co-morbidities. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Insights into the role of components of the tumor microenvironment in oral carcinoma call for new therapeutic approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salo, Tuula, E-mail: Tuula.salo@oulu.fi [Department of Diagnostics and Oral Medicine, Institute of Dentistry, University of Oulu, and Medical Research Center, Oulu (Finland); Oulu University Central Hospital, Oulu (Finland); Institute of Dentistry, University of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland); Vered, Marilena [Institute of Pathology, The Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Ramat Gan (Israel); Department of Oral Pathology and Oral Medicine, School of Dentistry, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); Bello, Ibrahim O. [Department of Oral Medicine and Diagnostic Sciences, King Saud University, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Nyberg, Pia [Oulu University Central Hospital, Oulu (Finland); Bitu, Carolina Cavalcante [Department of Diagnostics and Oral Medicine, Institute of Dentistry, University of Oulu, and Medical Research Center, Oulu (Finland); Zlotogorski Hurvitz, Ayelet [Department of Oral Pathology and Oral Medicine, School of Dentistry, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Rabin Medical Center, Beilinson Campus, Petah Tikva (Israel); Dayan, Dan [Department of Oral Pathology and Oral Medicine, School of Dentistry, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel)

    2014-07-15

    The research on oral cancer has focused mainly on the cancer cells, their genetic changes and consequent phenotypic modifications. However, it is increasingly clear that the tumor microenvironment (TME) has been shown to be in a dynamic state of inter-relations with the cancer cells. The TME contains a variety of components including the non-cancerous cells (i.e., immune cells, resident fibroblasts and angiogenic vascular cells) and the ECM milieu [including fibers (mainly collagen and fibronectin) and soluble factors (i.e., enzymes, growth factors, cytokines and chemokines)]. Thus, it is currently assumed that TME is considered a part of the cancerous tissue and the functionality of its key components constitutes the setting on which the hallmarks of the cancer cells can evolve. Therefore, in terms of controlling a malignancy, one should control the growth, invasion and spread of the cancer cells through modifications in the TME components. This mini review focuses on the TME as a diagnostic approach and reports the recent insights into the role of different TME key components [such as carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) and inflammation (CAI) cells, angiogenesis, stromal matrix molecules and proteases] in the molecular biology of oral carcinoma. Furthermore, the impact of TME components on clinical outcomes and the concomitant need for development of new therapeutic approaches will be discussed. - Highlights: • Tumor depth and budding, hypoxia and TME cells associate with worse prognosis. • Pro-tumoral CAFs and CAI cells aid proliferation, invasion and spread hypoxia. • Some ECM-bound factors exert pro-angiogenic or pro-tumor activities. • Tumor spread is greatly dependent on ECM proteolysis, mediated by TME cells. • Direct targeting of TME components for treatment is still experimental.

  13. THE HICKSIAN RATIONAL CONSUMER

    OpenAIRE

    Manuel FERNÁNDEZ-GRELA

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to trace the evolution of the concept of ''rational consumer'' in Hicks's writings. After being one of the pioneers in the introduction of rationality assumptions about consumer behaviour in economic models, Hicks gradually developed a sceptical view about some of the uses to which those assumptions were put into. The focus of the paper is on continuity in Hicksian views, providing a picture of gradual changes in the long series of Hicks's works

  14. Insomnio: enfoque diagnóstico y terapéutico Diagnostic and therapeutic approach to insomnia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna Diago García

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available El sueño excesivo, insuficiente o desbalanceado disminuye la calidad de vida y afecta el funcionamiento biopsicosocial de la persona. Entre 20 y 50% de los adultos refieren una alteración en su dormir, y esta frecuencia aumenta con la edad. El insomnio es la queja más común en la población general y en los pacientes psiquiátricos; de ahí la importancia de enfocar adecuadamente, desde los puntos de vista diagnóstico y terapéutico, este problema de salud. El insomnio es un síntoma y se deben corregir primero sus causas; el estudio debe incluir el diario del sueño y la información de un testigo del dormir del paciente. El tratamiento varía según el tipo de insomnio y su etiología; las medidas generales pueden o no ser de tipo farmacológico e incluyen: higiene del sueño, intervenciones cognitivo-conductuales, restricción del sueño, técnicas de relajación y administración de medicamentos. En general se acepta que cuando el insomnio lleva menos de tres semanas de evolución no requiere ninguna intervención excepto las medidas sobre higiene del sueño; si esto no es suficiente, se perpetúa en el tiempo o se identifican otras causas, se deberá hacer un manejo de tipo específico. Excessive, insufficient or unbalanced sleep reduces life quality and severely affects the biopsychosocial functioning of the person. Between 20 and 50% of adults suffer from sleep disturbances and their frequency increases withaging. Insomnia is the most common complaint in the general population and in psychiatric patients; therefore, it is important to have an adequate diagnostic and therapeutic approach in order to be able to solve the problem. Insomnia is just a symptom and its causes must be solved in the first place; the diagnostic study must include a sleep diary and the information provided by relatives. Treatment varies depending on the kind of insomnia and its etiology; general measures can be pharmacological or non-pharmacological; they

  15. Sol-gel derived manganese-releasing bioactive glass as a therapeutical approach for bone tissue engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrioni, B.R.; Oliveira, A.C.; Leite, M.F.; Pereira, M.M. [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), MG (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    Full text: Bioactive glasses (BG) have been highlighted in tissue engineering, due to their high bioactivity and biocompatibility, being potential materials for bone tissue repair. Its composition is variable and quite flexible, allowing the incorporation of therapeutic metallic ions, which has been regarded as a promising approach in the development of BG with superior properties for tissue engineering. These ions can be released in a controlled manner during the dissolution process of the glass, having the advantage of being released at the exactly implant site where they are needed, thus optimizing the therapeutic efficacy and reducing undesired side effects in the patient. Among several ions that have been studied, Manganese (Mn) has been shown to favor osteogenic differentiation. Besides, this ion is also a cofactor for several enzymes involved in remodeling of extracellular matrix, presenting an important role in cell adhesion. Therefore, it is very important to study the Mn role in the BG network and its influence on the glass bioactivity. In this context, new bioactive glass compositions derived from the 58S (60%SiO2-36%CaO-4%P2O5, mol%) were synthesized in this work, using the sol-gel method, by the incorporation of Mn into their structure. FTIR and Raman spectra showed the presence of typical BG chemical groups, whereas the amorphous structure typical of these materials was confirmed by XRD analysis, which also indicated that the Mn incorporation in the glass network was well succeeded, as its precursor did not recrystallize. The role of Mn in the glass network was also evaluated by XPS. The influence of Mn on carbonated hydroxyapatite layer formation after different periods of immersion of the BG powder in Simulated Body Fluid was evaluated using zeta potential, SEM, EDS and FTIR, whereas the controlled ion release was measured through ICP-OES. MTT assay revealed that Mn-containing BG showed no cytotoxic effect on cell culture. All these results indicate

  16. Sol-gel derived manganese-releasing bioactive glass as a therapeutical approach for bone tissue engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrioni, B.R.; Oliveira, A.C.; Leite, M.F.; Pereira, M.M.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: Bioactive glasses (BG) have been highlighted in tissue engineering, due to their high bioactivity and biocompatibility, being potential materials for bone tissue repair. Its composition is variable and quite flexible, allowing the incorporation of therapeutic metallic ions, which has been regarded as a promising approach in the development of BG with superior properties for tissue engineering. These ions can be released in a controlled manner during the dissolution process of the glass, having the advantage of being released at the exactly implant site where they are needed, thus optimizing the therapeutic efficacy and reducing undesired side effects in the patient. Among several ions that have been studied, Manganese (Mn) has been shown to favor osteogenic differentiation. Besides, this ion is also a cofactor for several enzymes involved in remodeling of extracellular matrix, presenting an important role in cell adhesion. Therefore, it is very important to study the Mn role in the BG network and its influence on the glass bioactivity. In this context, new bioactive glass compositions derived from the 58S (60%SiO2-36%CaO-4%P2O5, mol%) were synthesized in this work, using the sol-gel method, by the incorporation of Mn into their structure. FTIR and Raman spectra showed the presence of typical BG chemical groups, whereas the amorphous structure typical of these materials was confirmed by XRD analysis, which also indicated that the Mn incorporation in the glass network was well succeeded, as its precursor did not recrystallize. The role of Mn in the glass network was also evaluated by XPS. The influence of Mn on carbonated hydroxyapatite layer formation after different periods of immersion of the BG powder in Simulated Body Fluid was evaluated using zeta potential, SEM, EDS and FTIR, whereas the controlled ion release was measured through ICP-OES. MTT assay revealed that Mn-containing BG showed no cytotoxic effect on cell culture. All these results indicate

  17. Relationship between potential aggregation-prone regions and HLA-DR-binding T-cell immune epitopes: implications for rational design of novel and follow-on therapeutic antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sandeep; Mitchell, Mark A; Rup, Bonita; Singh, Satish K

    2012-08-01

    Aggregation and unwanted immunogenicity are hurdles to avoid in successful commercial development of antibody-based therapeutics. In this article, the relationship between aggregation-prone regions (APRs), capable of forming cross-β motifs/amyloid fibrils, and major histocompatibility complex class II-restricted human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DR-binding T-cell immune epitopes (TcIEs) is analyzed using amino acid sequences of 25 therapeutic antibodies, 55 TcIEs recognized by T-regulatory cells (tregitopes), 1000 randomly generated 15-residue-long peptides, 2257 human self-TcIEs (autoantigens), and 11 peptides in HLA-peptide cocrystal structures. Sequence analyses from these diverse sources consistently show a high level of correlation between APRs and TcIEs: approximately one-third of TcIEs contain APRs, but the majority of APRs occur within TcIE regions (TcIERs). Tregitopes also contain APRs. Most APR-containing TcIERs can bind multiple HLA-DR alleles, suggesting that aggregation-driven adverse immune responses could impact a broad segment of patient population. This article has identified common molecular sequence-structure loci that potentially contribute toward both manufacturability and safety profiles of the therapeutic antibodies, thereby laying a foundation for simultaneous optimization of these attributes in novel and follow-on candidates. Incidence of APRs within TcIERs is not special to biotherapeutics, self-TcIEs from human proteins, involved in various diseases, also contain predicted APRs and experimentally proven amyloid-fibril-forming peptide sequence portions. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Dual Targeting of Amyloid-beta Clearance and Neuroinflammation as a Novel Therapeutic Approach against Alzheimer's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batarseh, Yazan S.

    Amyloid-beta (Abeta) cascade hypothesis suggests that Alzheimer's disease (AD) is related to an imbalance between the production and clearance of Abeta peptide. Sporadic AD has been related to faulty clearance of Abeta. Accumulation of Abeta oligomers (Abetao) has been linked to several downstream toxic effects including neuroinflammation, synaptic loss, and cellular death. Abeta transport across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is one of the primary pathways for reducing Abeta load in the brain, which work hand in hand with other parenchymal mechanisms to reduce Abeta levels including intra and extracellular degradation by a family of Abeta degrading enzymes. Established AD drugs, such as the cholinesterase inhibitor donepezil, have been reported to have several additional non-cholinergic effects that alter Abeta pathology; reduce Abeta load, anti-inflammatory response, and attenuate synaptic loss. However, their limited effect only lead to minor improvements in AD symptoms without improving the prognosis of the disease. The lack of effective medical treatment for AD led to several studies focusing on establishing new therapeutic approaches to reduce Abeta pathology. We aimed to identify and characterize natural products that are capable of enhancing the BBB clearance of Abeta in addition to reducing neuroinflammation. Our first project was to investigate the role of oleocanthal (one of the active ingredients in extra-virgin olive oil; EVOO) on attenuating Abeta toxic effects on neurons and astrocytes. We developed Abeta oligomers (Abetao) induced inflammatory environment by exposing neurons and astrocytes to accumulative doses of Abetao to investigate oleocanthal effect on modulating Abetao pathological changes in neurons and astrocytes. Our findings demonstrated oleocanthal prevented Abetao-induced synaptic proteins, SNAP-25 and PSD-95, down-regulation in neurons, attenuated Abetao-induced inflammation, and restored glutamine transporter (GLT1) and glucose

  19. Standby Gasoline Rationing Plan. Contingency gasoline rationing regulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-02-01

    The Economic Regulatory Administration issues final rules with respect to standby gasoline rationing. The plan is designed for and would be used only in the event of a severe gasoline shortage. The plan provides that eligibility for ration allotments will be primarily on the basis of motor vehicle registrations. DOE will mail government ration checks to the parties named in a national vehicle registration file to be maintained by DOE. Ration recipients may cash these checks for ration coupons at various designated coupon issuance points. Retail outlets and other suppliers will be required to redeem the ration coupons received in exchange for gasoline sold. Supplemental gas will be given to high-priority activities. A ration banking system will be established with two separate and distinct of ration accounts: retail outlets and other suppliers will open redemption accounts for the deposit of redeemed ration rights; and individuals or firms may open ration rights accounts, which will operate in much the same manner as monetary checking accounts. A white market will be permitted for the sale of transfer of ration rights. A percentage of the total ration rights to be issued will be reserved for distribution to the states as a State Ration Reserve, to be used by the states primarily for the relief of hardship. A National Ration Reserave will also be established. All sections of the Standby Gasoline Rationing Regulations are analyzed. (MCW)

  20. Coherent states and rational surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brody, Dorje C; Graefe, Eva-Maria

    2010-01-01

    The state spaces of generalized coherent states associated with special unitary groups are shown to form rational curves and surfaces in the space of pure states. These curves and surfaces are generated by the various Veronese embeddings of the underlying state space into higher dimensional state spaces. This construction is applied to the parameterization of generalized coherent states, which is useful for practical calculations, and provides an elementary combinatorial approach to the geometry of the coherent state space. The results are extended to Hilbert spaces with indefinite inner products, leading to the introduction of a new kind of generalized coherent states.

  1. The role of biological sciences in understanding the genesis and a new therapeutic approach to Alzheimer’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugenia Tęgowska

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper contrasts the historical view on causal factors in Alzheimer’s disease (AD with the modern concept of the symptoms’ origin. Biological sciences dealing with cell structure and physiology enabled comprehension of the role of mitochondrial defects in the processes of formation of neurofibrillary tangles and β-amyloid, which in turn gives hope for developing a new, more effective therapeutic strategy for AD. It has been established that although mitochondria constantly generate free radicals, from which they are protected by their own defensive systems, in some situations these systems become deregulated, which leads to free radical-based mitochondrial defects. This causes an energetic deficit in neurons and a further increase in the free radical pool. As a result, due to compensation processes, formation of tangles and/or acceleration of β-amyloid production takes place. The nature of these processes is initially a protective one, due to their anti-oxidative action, but as the amount of the formations increases, their beneficial effect wanes. They become a storage place for substances enhancing free radical processes, which makes them toxic themselves. It is such an approach to the primary causal factor for AD which lies at the roots of the new view on AD therapy, suggesting the use of methylene blue-based drugs, laser or intranasally applied insulin. A necessary condition, however, for these methods’ effectiveness is definitely an earlier diagnosis of the disease. Although there are numerous diagnostic methods for AD, their low specificity and high price, often accompanied by a considerable level of patient discomfort, make them unsuitable for early, prodromal screening. In this matter a promising method may be provided using an olfactory test, which is an inexpensive and non-invasive method and thus suitable for screening, although as a test of low specificity, it should be combined with other methods. Introducing new methods

  2. Clinical course and therapeutic approach to varicella zoster virus infection in children with rheumatic autoimmune diseases under immunosuppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leuvenink, Raphael; Aeschlimann, Florence; Baer, Walter; Berthet, Gerald; Cannizzaro, Elvira; Hofer, Michael; Kaiser, Daniela; Schroeder, Silke; Heininger, Ulrich; Woerner, Andreas

    2016-06-02

    To analyze the clinical presentation and complications of varicella zoster virus (VZV) infection in children with rheumatic diseases treated with immunosuppressive medication such as biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (bDMARDs) and/or conventional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (cDMARDs), and to analyze the therapeutic approach to VZV infections with respect to the concomitant immunosuppressive treatment. Retrospective multicenter study using the Swiss Pediatric Rheumatology registry. Children with rheumatic diseases followed in a Swiss center for pediatric rheumatology and treated with cDMARD and/or bDMARD with a clinical diagnosis of varicella or herpes zoster between January 2004 and December 2013 were included. Twenty-two patients were identified, of whom 20 were treated for juvenile idiopathic arthritis, 1 for a polyglandular autoimmune syndrome type III, and 1 for uveitis. Of these 22 patients, 16 had varicella and 6 had herpes zoster. Median age at VZV disease was 7.6 years (range 2 to 17 years), with 6.3 years (range 2 to 17 years) for those with varicella and 11.6 years (range 5 to 16 years) for those with herpes zoster. The median interval between start of immunosuppression and VZV disease was 14.1 months (range 1 to 63 months). Two patients had received varicella vaccine (1 dose each) prior to start of immunosuppression. Concomitant immunosuppressive therapy was methotrexate (MTX) monotherapy (n = 9) or bDMARD monotherapy (n = 2), or a combination of bDMARD with prednisone, MTX or Leflunomide (n = 11). Four patients experienced VZV related complications: cellulitis in 1 patient treated with MTX, and cellulitis, sepsis and cerebellitis in 3 patients treated with biological agents and MTX combination therapy. Six children were admitted to hospital (range of duration: 4 to 9 days) and 12 were treated with valaciclovir or aciclovir. The clinical course of varicella and herpes zoster in children under

  3. Universal and Relative Rationality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathaniel Goldberg

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper I illustrate how a basic kind of universal rationality can be profitably combined with undeniable instances of relativism. I do so by engaging Michael Friedman’s recent response to a challenge from Thomas Kuhn.

  4. The rational complementarity problem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heemels, W.P.M.H.; Schumacher, J.M.; Weiland, S.

    1999-01-01

    An extension of the linear complementarity problem (LCP) of mathematical programming is the so-called rational complementarity problem (RCP). This problem occurs if complementarity conditions are imposed on input and output variables of linear dynamical input/state/output systems. The resulting

  5. Rational equity bubbles

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Ge

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses the existence of a bubble in the pricing of an asset that pays positive dividends. I show that rational bubbles can exist in a growing economy. The existence of bubbles depends on the relative magnitudes of risk aversion to consumption and to wealth. Furthermore, I examine how an exogenous shock in technology might trigger bubbles.

  6. Ideal Theory, Real Rationality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flyvbjerg, Bent

    Understanding rationality and power are key to understanding actual political and administrative behavior. Political and administrative theory that ignores this fact stand in danger of being at best irrelevant or, at worst part of the problem it whishes to solve. The paper presents Jürgen Habermas...

  7. Diagnosis, Dogmatism, and Rationality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabinowitz, Jonathan; Efron, Noah J.

    1997-01-01

    Presents findings suggesting that misdiagnoses frequently stem from flaws in human information processing, particularly in collecting and using information. Claims that improved diagnostic tools will not remedy the problem. Drawing on the work of Karl Popper and Robin Collingwood, proposes operational principles to ensure a rational diagnostic…

  8. Hegel's phenomenology of rationality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huggler, Jørgen

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this chapter is to elucidate Hegel's conception of rationality in the Phänomenologie des Geistes (1807), and to defend the thesis that he is an author engaged in discussion with a wide variety of sources. He uses sceptical reasoning to form a line of argument with a necessary progression...

  9. The Therapeutic Approach to a Patient's Criminal Offense in a Forensic Mental Health Nurse-Patient Relationship-The Nurses' Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askola, Riitta; Nikkonen, Merja; Putkonen, Hanna; Kylmä, Jari; Louheranta, Olavi

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe the therapeutic approach to a patient's criminal offense in a forensic mental health nurse-patient relationship from the nurse's perspective. Eight nurses in a Finnish forensic psychiatric hospital were interviewed, and the resultant research material was analyzed by inductive content analysis. The results revealed the process of the therapeutic approach to a patient's offense, which comprises numerous steps and various phases. For the nurse, the process of working through the offense can be divided into stages in which an attempt is made to respond to the patient's behavior and interaction in a manner that leads to working through the criminal act. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. A research approach to support the empowerment of alternatives to prison / Une approche de recherche pour soutenir le renforcement des mesures alternatives à l’incarcération

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregori Emilio

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Il Progetto Europeo “Reducing prison population: advanced tools of justice in Europe” è stato finanziato dalla Commissione Europea al fine di migliorare la conoscenza e lo scambio di misure innovative di pratiche alternative alla detenzione, sia nella fase pre-processuale, sia in quella dell’esecuzione della pena. La progettazione delle linee guida per l'attuazione di alternative alla detenzione in tutti i paesi europei e del pacchetto formativo, indirizzato al personale che lavora nei servizi che si occupano di alternative alla prigione, è stata preceduta da diverse attività di ricerca svolte in sette paesi europei (Italia, Lettonia, Scozia, Francia, Bulgaria, Romania e Germania. Questo articolo descrive la metodologia utilizzata nelle attività di ricerca e la gestione di queste ultime, condotte in diversi paesi e indirizzate ad una popolazione complessa. Le projet européen « Reducing Prison Population: advanced tools of justice in Europe » a été financé par la Commission Européenne afin d’améliorer la connaissance et d’échanger les approches innovantes de mesures alternatives à l’incarcération, avant comme après le procès. La définition de lignes directrices pour la mise en ɶuvre des alternatives à l’incarcération dans chaque pays européen et du dossier de formation conçu à l’intention du personnel des services offrant des alternatives à la prison, a été précédé par des recherches menées dans sept pays européens (Italie, Lettonie, Écosse, France, Bulgarie, Roumanie et Allemagne. Cet article décrit la méthodologie de recherche utilisée dans ce projet et la gestion des différentes activités menées dans plusieurs pays et ciblées sur une population complexe. The European Project “Reducing prison population: advanced tools of justice in Europe” was funded by the European Commission in order to improve the knowledge and to exchange innovative measures of practices alternative to

  11. Cyborg pantocrator: international relations theory from decisionism to rational choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilhot, Nicolas

    2011-01-01

    International relations theory took shape in the 1950s in reaction to the behavioral social science movement, emphasizing the limits of rationality in a context of high uncertainty, weak rules, and the possibility of lethal conflict. Yet the same discipline rapidly developed "rational choice" models applied to foreign policy decision making or nuclear strategy. This paper argues that this transformation took place almost seamlessly around the concept of "decision." Initially associated with an antirationalist or "decisionist" approach to politics, the sovereign decision became the epitome of political rationality when it was redescribed as "rational choice," thus easing the cultural acceptance of political realism in the postwar years. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. A discussion of theoretical and practical rationality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wahlstroem, B. [Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland). VTT Automation

    1999-12-01

    Theoretical rationality as defined in Expected Utility Theory and amended with other considerations gives a good basis for decision making. One should however always keep in mind that practical rationality often is far more complicated. People use their everyday experience when placed before new problems and this may lead to apparently irrational choices which on a closer scrutiny may be completely rational. Theories in human decision making unfortunately becomes untestable, firstly because a theory taking all considerations into account would be to complex to be practical and secondly because the data needed to test the theory cannot be collected. The benefit of EUT is that it is simple and straightforward as compared with competing theories. In the natural sciences rationality is often seen simply as a problem of optimisation. This view is practical, but it has to include also psychological and sociological considerations. The apparent controversy between natural and behavioural sciences could at least in principle be resolved by a better understanding of the complexity of human rationality. The human mind does not work in isolation, but it is adapted to a social community and a continuously changing environment. Understanding all components of human rationality is a challenge which cannot be solved on a short term basis. An important part of human rationality is connected to the intricate balance between individual and societal utility. The human mind has over thousands of years learnt to resolve that balance, but in the modern society there are decisions which may not be solvable with an intuitive approach and a strategy of trial and error. For these decisions more solid theories of rationality will be needed. EUT can in spite of its dismerits be used as the backbone for such a theory, but it has to be extended with better explanations of both individual and social rationality. If this understanding of the practical aspects of human rationality can be reached

  13. A discussion of theoretical and practical rationality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wahlstroem, B.

    1999-01-01

    Theoretical rationality as defined in Expected Utility Theory and amended with other considerations gives a good basis for decision making. One should however always keep in mind that practical rationality often is far more complicated. People use their everyday experience when placed before new problems and this may lead to apparently irrational choices which on a closer scrutiny may be completely rational. Theories in human decision making unfortunately becomes untestable, firstly because a theory taking all considerations into account would be to complex to be practical and secondly because the data needed to test the theory cannot be collected. The benefit of EUT is that it is simple and straightforward as compared with competing theories. In the natural sciences rationality is often seen simply as a problem of optimisation. This view is practical, but it has to include also psychological and sociological considerations. The apparent controversy between natural and behavioural sciences could at least in principle be resolved by a better understanding of the complexity of human rationality. The human mind does not work in isolation, but it is adapted to a social community and a continuously changing environment. Understanding all components of human rationality is a challenge which cannot be solved on a short term basis. An important part of human rationality is connected to the intricate balance between individual and societal utility. The human mind has over thousands of years learnt to resolve that balance, but in the modern society there are decisions which may not be solvable with an intuitive approach and a strategy of trial and error. For these decisions more solid theories of rationality will be needed. EUT can in spite of its dismerits be used as the backbone for such a theory, but it has to be extended with better explanations of both individual and social rationality. If this understanding of the practical aspects of human rationality can be reached

  14. Capital Requirements and Credit Rationing

    OpenAIRE

    Itai Agur

    2010-01-01

    This paper analyzes the trade-off between financial stability and credit rationing that arises when increasing capital requirements. It extends the Stiglitz-Weiss model of credit rationing to allow for bank default. Bank capital structure then matters for lending incentives. With default and rationing endogenous, optimal capital requirements can be analyzed. Introducing bank financiers, the paper also shows that uninsured funding raises the sensitivity of rationing to capital requirements. In...

  15. Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy: Origins, Constructs, and Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Joshua C.

    In 1956, Dr. Albert Ellis presented his seminal work on Rational Therapy, subsequently renamed Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy (REBT) in 1993. This paper explores the origins, theoretical foundations, applications, and implications of REBT and provides a look at the empirical research available in support of the approach's efficacy. REBT is…

  16. Rationality and ritual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wynne, B.

    1982-01-01

    The book concerns the Windscale Public Inquiry, held to investigate the application by British Nuclear Fuels to build a 1200 tonne per year thermal oxide reprocessing plant (THORP) for spent nuclear fuels from Britain and overseas. The subject is discussed under the headings: introduction (international dimensions; the Windscale Inquiry; conflict resolution and social drama; public debate and the sociology of knowledge); the decision-making legacy; oxide reprocessing - the background; the public inquiry tradition - a comparative perspective; the emergence of THORP from a private to a public issue (local and national planning politics); the process and impact of the Inquiry (opposition groups); judicial rationality, expert conflict, and political authority); the rationality and politics of analysis (proliferation; radiation risks; relative risks; the Ravenglass issue; discharge targets; general radiation protection arrangements); conclusion. (U.K.)

  17. Rational management of epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Venkataraman

    2014-09-01

    Management of epilepsies in children has improved considerably over the last decade, all over the world due to the advances seen in the understanding of the patho-physiology of epileptogenesis, availability of both structural and functional imaging studies along with better quality EEG/video-EEG recordings and the availability of a plethora of newer anti-epileptic drugs which are tailormade to act on specific pathways. In spite of this, there is still a long way to go before one is able to be absolutely rational about which drug to use for which type of epilepsy. There have been a lot of advances in the area of epilepsy surgery and is certainly gaining ground for specific cases. Better understanding of the genetic basis of epilepsies will hopefully lead to a more rational treatment plan in the future. Also, a lot of work needs to be done to dispel various misunderstandings and myths about epilepsy which still exists in our country.

  18. Multivariate rational data fitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuyt, Annie; Verdonk, Brigitte

    1992-12-01

    Sections 1 and 2 discuss the advantages of an object-oriented implementation combined with higher floating-point arithmetic, of the algorithms available for multivariate data fitting using rational functions. Section 1 will in particular explain what we mean by "higher arithmetic". Section 2 will concentrate on the concepts of "object orientation". In sections 3 and 4 we shall describe the generality of the data structure that can be dealt with: due to some new results virtually every data set is acceptable right now, with possible coalescence of coordinates or points. In order to solve the multivariate rational interpolation problem the data sets are fed to different algorithms depending on the structure of the interpolation points in then-variate space.

  19. Models for Rational Number Bases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Jean J.; Armbruster, Frank O.

    1975-01-01

    This article extends number bases to negative integers, then to positive rationals and finally to negative rationals. Methods and rules for operations in positive and negative rational bases greater than one or less than negative one are summarized in tables. Sample problems are explained and illustrated. (KM)

  20. Rational Unified Process

    OpenAIRE

    Kopal, Nils

    2016-01-01

    In this German seminar paper, which was written in the year 2011 at the University of Duisburg for a Bachelor Colloquium in Applied computer science, we show a brief overview of the Rational Unified Process (RUP). Thus, interested students or generally interested people in software development gain a first impression of RUP. The paper includes a survey and overview of the underlying process structure, the phases of the process, its workflows, and describes the always by the RUP developers pos...

  1. Maps of Bounded Rationality

    OpenAIRE

    Kahneman, Daniel

    2002-01-01

    The work cited by the Nobel committee was done jointly with the late Amos Tversky (1937-1996) during a long and unusually close collaboration. Together, we explored the psychology of intuitive beliefs and choices and examined their bounded rationality. This essay presents a current perspective on the three major topics of our joint work: heuristics of judgment, risky choice, and framing effects. In all three domains we studied intuitions - thoughts and preferences that come to mind quickly an...

  2. Emotional Theory of Rationality

    OpenAIRE

    Garcés, Mario; Finkel, Lucila

    2011-01-01

    In recent decades, it has been definitely established the existence of a close relationship between the emotional phenomena and rational processes, but we still do not have a unified definition, or effective models to describe any of them well. To advance our understanding of the mechanisms governing the behavior of living beings we must integrate multiple theories, experiments and models from both fields. In this paper we propose a new theoretical framework that allows integrating and unders...

  3. Grade Expectations: Rationality and Overconfidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnus, Jan R.; Peresetsky, Anatoly A.

    2018-01-01

    Confidence and overconfidence are essential aspects of human nature, but measuring (over)confidence is not easy. Our approach is to consider students' forecasts of their exam grades. Part of a student's grade expectation is based on the student's previous academic achievements; what remains can be interpreted as (over)confidence. Our results are based on a sample of about 500 second-year undergraduate students enrolled in a statistics course in Moscow. The course contains three exams and each student produces a forecast for each of the three exams. Our models allow us to estimate overconfidence quantitatively. Using these models we find that students' expectations are not rational and that most students are overconfident, in agreement with the general literature. Less obvious is that overconfidence helps: given the same academic achievement students with larger confidence obtain higher exam grades. Female students are less overconfident than male students, their forecasts are more rational, and they are also faster learners in the sense that they adjust their expectations more rapidly. PMID:29375449

  4. Grade Expectations: Rationality and Overconfidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan R. Magnus

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Confidence and overconfidence are essential aspects of human nature, but measuring (overconfidence is not easy. Our approach is to consider students' forecasts of their exam grades. Part of a student's grade expectation is based on the student's previous academic achievements; what remains can be interpreted as (overconfidence. Our results are based on a sample of about 500 second-year undergraduate students enrolled in a statistics course in Moscow. The course contains three exams and each student produces a forecast for each of the three exams. Our models allow us to estimate overconfidence quantitatively. Using these models we find that students' expectations are not rational and that most students are overconfident, in agreement with the general literature. Less obvious is that overconfidence helps: given the same academic achievement students with larger confidence obtain higher exam grades. Female students are less overconfident than male students, their forecasts are more rational, and they are also faster learners in the sense that they adjust their expectations more rapidly.

  5. Probability and rational choice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Botting

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/1808-1711.2014v18n1p1 In this paper I will discuss the rationality of reasoning about the future. There are two things that we might like to know about the future: which hypotheses are true and what will happen next. To put it in philosophical language, I aim to show that there are methods by which inferring to a generalization (selecting a hypothesis and inferring to the next instance (singular predictive inference can be shown to be normative and the method itself shown to be rational, where this is due in part to being based on evidence (although not in the same way and in part on a prior rational choice. I will also argue that these two inferences have been confused, being distinct not only conceptually (as nobody disputes but also in their results (the value given to the probability of the hypothesis being not in general that given to the next instance and that methods that are adequate for one are not by themselves adequate for the other. A number of debates over method founder on this confusion and do not show what the debaters think they show.

  6. Imaging and Molecular Markers for Patients with Lung Cancer: Approaches with Molecular Targets, Complementary/Innovative Treatment, and Therapeutic Modalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-01

    Therapeutic and Imaging Agents to Lung Cancer (PI and co-PI: Renata Pasqualini , Ph.D., Wadih Arap, M.D., Ph.D.) The studies outlined in this proposal...with Drs. Pasqualini , Arap, and Wistuba. The IHC staining of lung cancer TMAs (390 cases) has been completed. We are working with investigators to...Project 3, R. Pasqualini ). This project was completed and a manuscript is in preparation by Dr. Pasqualini’s lab. b) Molecular abnormalities

  7. Deciphering mirror neurons: rational decision versus associative learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Elias L

    2014-04-01

    The rational-decision approach is superior to the associative-learning approach of Cook et al. at explaining why mirror neurons fire or do not fire - even when the stimulus is the same. The rational-decision approach is superior because it starts with the analysis of the intention of the organism, that is, with the identification of the specific objective or goal that the organism is trying to maximize.

  8. Adaptive information-theoretic bounded rational decision-making with parametric priors

    OpenAIRE

    Grau-Moya, Jordi; Braun, Daniel A.

    2015-01-01

    Deviations from rational decision-making due to limited computational resources have been studied in the field of bounded rationality, originally proposed by Herbert Simon. There have been a number of different approaches to model bounded rationality ranging from optimality principles to heuristics. Here we take an information-theoretic approach to bounded rationality, where information-processing costs are measured by the relative entropy between a posterior decision strategy and a given fix...

  9. Effects of therapeutic approach on the neonatal evolution of very low birth weight infants with patent ductus arteriosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilian S.R. Sadeck

    2014-11-01

    Conclusion: The conservative approach of PDA was associated to high mortality, the surgical approach to the occurrence of BPD36wks and ROPsur, and the pharmacological treatment was protective for the outcome death/BPD36wks.

  10. Synthetic biology approaches to engineer T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chia-Yung; Rupp, Levi J; Roybal, Kole T; Lim, Wendell A

    2015-08-01

    There is rapidly growing interest in learning how to engineer immune cells, such as T lymphocytes, because of the potential of these engineered cells to be used for therapeutic applications such as the recognition and killing of cancer cells. At the same time, our knowhow and capability to logically engineer cellular behavior is growing rapidly with the development of synthetic biology. Here we describe how synthetic biology approaches are being used to rationally alter the behavior of T cells to optimize them for therapeutic functions. We also describe future developments that will be important in order to construct safe and precise T cell therapeutics. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Inhibition of HSP27 alone or in combination with pAKT inhibition as therapeutic approaches to target SPARC-induced glioma cell survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schultz Chad R

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The current treatment regimen for glioma patients is surgery, followed by radiation therapy plus temozolomide (TMZ, followed by 6 months of adjuvant TMZ. Despite this aggressive treatment regimen, the overall survival of all surgically treated GBM patients remains dismal, and additional or different therapies are required. Depending on the cancer type, SPARC has been proposed both as a therapeutic target and as a therapeutic agent. In glioma, SPARC promotes invasion via upregulation of the p38 MAPK/MAPKAPK2/HSP27 signaling pathway, and promotes tumor cell survival by upregulating pAKT. As HSP27 and AKT interact to regulate the activity of each other, we determined whether inhibition of HSP27 was better than targeting SPARC as a therapeutic approach to inhibit both SPARC-induced glioma cell invasion and survival. Results Our studies found the following. 1 SPARC increases the expression of tumor cell pro-survival and pro-death protein signaling in balance, and, as a net result, tumor cell survival remains unchanged. 2 Suppressing SPARC increases tumor cell survival, indicating it is not a good therapeutic target. 3 Suppressing HSP27 decreases tumor cell survival in all gliomas, but is more effective in SPARC-expressing tumor cells due to the removal of HSP27 inhibition of SPARC-induced pro-apoptotic signaling. 4 Suppressing total AKT1/2 paradoxically enhanced tumor cell survival, indicating that AKT1 or 2 are poor therapeutic targets. 5 However, inhibiting pAKT suppresses tumor cell survival. 6 Inhibiting both HSP27 and pAKT synergistically decreases tumor cell survival. 7 There appears to be a complex feedback system between SPARC, HSP27, and AKT. 8 This interaction is likely influenced by PTEN status. With respect to chemosensitization, we found the following. 1 SPARC enhances pro-apoptotic signaling in cells exposed to TMZ. 2 Despite this enhanced signaling, SPARC protects cells against TMZ. 3 This protection can be reduced

  12. Rational use of diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Racoveanu, N.T.; Volodin, V.

    1992-01-01

    Radiologists in USA and UK have since early 1970 questioned the efficacy of various radiological investigations and produced substantial evidence that more rational approaches are necessary. WHO initiated, in 1977, a programme which has issued four technical reports giving practical recommendations on how to rationalise the use of radiological examinations. Three main directions are considered: (1) Abandonment of routine radiological examinations, as procedures with no clinical or epidemiologic significance and which represent a waste of resources and patient dose. (2) Patient selection for various radiological investigations based on clinical criteria (high, intermediate, low yield). Selected patients have an increased prevalence of the given disease and the predictive value of radiological investigation is much higher. (3) Use of diagnostic algorithms with higher cost/efficiency and risk/benefit ratios, improving the outcome of radiological examinations. (author)

  13. Complementary and Alternative Medicine Strategies for Therapeutic Gut Microbiota Modulation in Inflammatory Bowel Disease and their Next-Generation Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basson, Abigail R; Lam, Minh; Cominelli, Fabio

    2017-12-01

    The human gut microbiome exerts a major impact on human health and disease, and therapeutic gut microbiota modulation is now a well-advocated strategy in the management of many diseases, including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Scientific and clinical evidence in support of complementary and alternative medicine, in targeting intestinal dysbiosis among patients with IBD, or other disorders, has increased dramatically over the past years. Delivery of "artificial" stool replacements for fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) could provide an effective, safer alternative to that of human donor stool. Nevertheless, optimum timing of FMT administration in IBD remains unexplored, and future investigations are essential. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. IMPACT (Imaging and Molecular Markers for Patients with Lung Cancer: Approaches with Molecular Targets and Complementary, Innovative and Therapeutic Modalities)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hong, Waun Ki; Herbst, Roy

    2006-01-01

    .... These projects combine targeted approaches using molecular and imaging techniques to validate activity against a target and monitor response using imaging modalities specific to the receptor using...

  15. IMPACT (Imaging and Molecular Markers for Patients with Lung Cancer: Approaches with Molecular Targets and Complementary, Innovative and Therapeutic Modalities)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hong, Waun K; Herbst, Roy

    2008-01-01

    .... These projects combine targeted approaches using molecular and imaging techniques to validate activity against a target and monitor response using imaging modalities specific to the receptor using...

  16. IMPACT (Imaging and Molecular Markers for Patients with Lung Cancer: Approaches with Molecular Targets and Complementary, Innovative and Therapeutic Modalities)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hong, Waun K; Herbst, Roy

    2007-01-01

    .... These projects combine targeted approaches using molecular and imaging techniques to validate activity against a target and monitor response using imaging modalities specific to the receptor using...

  17. Novel therapeutic approaches to correct retinal metabolic abnormalities in primary open-angle glaucoma and age-related macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. A. Mirzabekova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Common pathogenic aspects of age-related macular degeneration (AMD and primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG, i.e., the role of free radicals inducing oxidative damage of the retina and optic nerve, are discussed. Factors that activate free radical reactions as well as multilevel antioxidant protection system are reviewed. Data derived from studies on current antioxidants that are used to treat and prevent dry AMD and glaucomatous optic nerve damage are compared. Neuroprotection for glaucoma will be considered soon as a basis for its treatment. B vitamins are generally included into therapeutic algorithms for glaucomatous optic neuropathy. While being metabolic therapeutics, they stimulate adaptive compensatory mechanisms and reduce the severity of various pathological processes, e.g., hypoxia, lipid peroxidation etc. Neurotrophic, antioxidant, and regenerative effects of B vitamins as wells as their involvement in metabolism, myelinsynthesis and other processes are of special importance for ophthalmologists. Currently, several vitamin and mineral supplements that differ in composition, dosage, and schedule are approved in Russia. SuperOptic, a biologically activeadditive, contains more free lutein (10 mg and zeaxanthin (500 μg as well as potent antioxidants (vitamin E and vitamin C, microelements (zinc and copper, and balanced vitamin B complex. These components play an important role in ocular health. SuperOptic can be recommended for the prevention and treatment of AMD and glaucomatous optic nerve damage.

  18. Novel therapeutic approaches to correct retinal metabolic abnormalities in primary open-angle glaucoma and age-related macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. A. Mirzabekova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Common pathogenic aspects of age-related macular degeneration (AMD and primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG, i.e., the role of free radicals inducing oxidative damage of the retina and optic nerve, are discussed. Factors that activate free radical reactions as well as multilevel antioxidant protection system are reviewed. Data derived from studies on current antioxidants that are used to treat and prevent dry AMD and glaucomatous optic nerve damage are compared. Neuroprotection for glaucoma will be considered soon as a basis for its treatment. B vitamins are generally included into therapeutic algorithms for glaucomatous optic neuropathy. While being metabolic therapeutics, they stimulate adaptive compensatory mechanisms and reduce the severity of various pathological processes, e.g., hypoxia, lipid peroxidation etc. Neurotrophic, antioxidant, and regenerative effects of B vitamins as wells as their involvement in metabolism, myelinsynthesis and other processes are of special importance for ophthalmologists. Currently, several vitamin and mineral supplements that differ in composition, dosage, and schedule are approved in Russia. SuperOptic, a biologically activeadditive, contains more free lutein (10 mg and zeaxanthin (500 μg as well as potent antioxidants (vitamin E and vitamin C, microelements (zinc and copper, and balanced vitamin B complex. These components play an important role in ocular health. SuperOptic can be recommended for the prevention and treatment of AMD and glaucomatous optic nerve damage.

  19. Adaptive Rationality, Adaptive Behavior and Institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volchik Vyacheslav, V.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The economic literature focused on understanding decision-making and choice processes reveals a vast collection of approaches to human rationality. Theorists’ attention has moved from absolutely rational, utility-maximizing individuals to boundedly rational and adaptive ones. A number of economists have criticized the concepts of adaptive rationality and adaptive behavior. One of the recent trends in the economic literature is to consider humans irrational. This paper offers an approach which examines adaptive behavior in the context of existing institutions and constantly changing institutional environment. It is assumed that adaptive behavior is a process of evolutionary adjustment to fundamental uncertainty. We emphasize the importance of actors’ engagement in trial and error learning, since if they are involved in this process, they obtain experience and are able to adapt to existing and new institutions. The paper aims at identifying relevant institutions, adaptive mechanisms, informal working rules and practices that influence actors’ behavior in the field of Higher Education in Russia (Rostov Region education services market has been taken as an example. The paper emphasizes the application of qualitative interpretative methods (interviews and discourse analysis in examining actors’ behavior.

  20. Rational-Emotive Education with Learning Disabled Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knaus, William; McKeever, Cynthia

    1977-01-01

    Rational-emotive education provides a positive, constructive approach for helping young children with learning problems who have psychogenic overlays to cope with worries and troubles effectively and to accept themselves affirmatively. (Author/SBH)