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Sample records for rat parkinson model

  1. Exploration of central dopamine D2 receptors by autoradiography, pathology and functional behaviour observation in rat model with experimental parkinsonism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Yansong; Lin Xiangtong

    1996-01-01

    The rat model with experimental parkinsonism mimic the course of human parkinsonism were made by cerebral-stereotaxic techniques. 125 I-IBZM was used to evaluate the D 2 receptors distribution by autoradiographic analysis of coronal brain section. In 6 parkinsonism model rats, on the lesioned side the striatum/frontal cortex ratio was 5.32 +- 0.37, it was significantly (P 125 I-IBZM as the ligand of D 2 receptor can well reflect the distribution and changes of D 2 receptors, and also as the theoretical basis for the clinical imaging diagnosis

  2. Transplantation of ES cells to Parkinson model rat irradiated with carbon ion beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inaji, Motoki; Okauchi, Takashi; Nagai, Yuji; Nojima, Kumie

    2003-01-01

    The present study was designed to make better Parkinson model animal and evaluate the transplantation treatment with ES cell. In the first year, we irradiated left striatum of adult rats with charged carbon particles (290 MeV/nucleon, 5 mm spread-out Bragg peak, 100 Gy) for purpose of making Parkinson model rats. At 4, 8, 12 weeks after the irradiation, we performed the rotation test to methamphetamine and the autoradiography on dopamine D2 receptor and transporter using 11 C-raclopride and 11 C-PE2I to measure the effects of the irradiation. As a result, the number of rotation increased and the distributions of dopamine D2 receptor and transporter in the striatum decreased during the time after the irradiation. These results suggested that the secondary neural damage due to the vascular degeneration caused the progressive destruction of dopamine system. To make more stable Parkinson model rats, we need to use smaller collimator and develop the accurate stereotactic irradiation system in the further research. (author)

  3. Transplantation of ES cells to Parkinson model rat irradiated with carbon ion beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inaji, Motoki; Okauchi, Takashi; Nagai, Yuji; Nojima, Kumie; Suhara, Tetsuya

    2004-01-01

    The present study was designed to make a new Parkinson disease model using carbon ion beam. In this year, we irradiated right middle forebrain bundle of adult rats with charged carbon particles (290 MeV/nucleon, Mono peak, 150 Gy) and damaged right dopaminergic neurons pathway. To irradiate precisely, rats were set in the stereotactic frame with ear bars which was developed in this year. In 4 weeks after the irradiation, we performed methamphetamine induced rotation test and the autoradiography measurement on dopamine transporter using [ 11 C]PE2I to assess degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in caudate putamen (Cpu). As a result, ipsilateral rotation was observed and the distributions of dopamine transporter in the striatum decreased significantly. These results are similar to those of 6-OHDA lesioned rats, and indicate validity of this model. (author)

  4. Neuroprotective effect of ketamine/xylazine on two rat models of Parkinson's disease

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    M.M. Ferro

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a great concern in the literature for the development of neuroprotectant drugs to treat Parkinson's disease. Since anesthetic drugs have hyperpolarizing properties, they can possibly act as neuroprotectants. In the present study, we have investigated the neuroprotective effect of a mixture of ketamine (85 mg/kg and xylazine (3 mg/kg (K/X on the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP or 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA rat models of Parkinson's disease. The bilateral infusion of MPTP (100 µg/side or 6-OHDA (10 µg/side into the substantia nigra pars compacta of adult male Wistar rats under thiopental anesthesia caused a modest (~67% or severe (~91% loss of tyrosine hydroxylase-immunostained cells, respectively. On the other hand, an apparent neuroprotective effect was observed when the rats were anesthetized with K/X, infused 5 min before surgery. This treatment caused loss of only 33% of the nigral tyrosine hydroxylase-immunostained cells due to the MPTP infusion and 51% due to the 6-OHDA infusion. This neuroprotective effect of K/X was also suggested by a less severe reduction of striatal dopamine levels in animals treated with these neurotoxins. In the working memory version of the Morris water maze task, both MPTP- and 6-OHDA-lesioned animals spent nearly 10 s longer to find the hidden platform in the groups where the neurotoxins were infused under thiopental anesthesia, compared to control animals. This amnestic effect was not observed in rats infused with the neurotoxins under K/X anesthesia. These results suggest that drugs with a pharmacological profile similar to that of K/X may be useful to delay the progression of Parkinson's disease.

  5. The hTH-GFP reporter rat model for the study of Parkinson's disease.

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    Lorraine Iacovitti

    Full Text Available Parkinson disease (PD is the second leading neurodegenerative disease in the US. As there is no known cause or cure for PD, researchers continue to investigate disease mechanisms and potential new therapies in cell culture and in animal models of PD. In PD, one of the most profoundly affected neuronal populations is the tyrosine hydroxylase (TH-expressing dopaminergic (DA neurons of the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc. These DA-producing neurons undergo degeneration while neighboring DA-producing cells of the ventral tegmental area (VTA are largely spared. To aid in these studies, The Michael J. Fox Foundation (MJFF partnered with Thomas Jefferson University and Taconic Inc. to generate new transgenic rat lines carrying the human TH gene promoter driving EGFP using a 11 kb construct used previously to create a hTH-GFP mouse reporter line. Of the five rat founder lines that were generated, three exhibited high level specific GFP fluorescence in DA brain structures (ie. SN, VTA, striatum, olfactory bulb, hypothalamus. As with the hTH-GFP mouse, none of the rat lines exhibit reporter expression in adrenergic structures like the adrenal gland. Line 12141, with its high levels of GFP in adult DA brain structures and minimal ectopic GFP expression in non-DA structures, was characterized in detail. We show here that this line allows for anatomical visualization and microdissection of the rat midbrain into SNpc and/or VTA, enabling detailed analysis of midbrain DA neurons and axonal projections after toxin treatment in vivo. Moreover, we further show that embryonic SNpc and/or VTA neurons, enriched by microdissection or FACS, can be used in culture or transplant studies of PD. Thus, the hTH-GFP reporter rat should be a valuable tool for Parkinson's disease research.

  6. Neuronal Entropy-Rate Feature of Entopeduncular Nucleus in Rat Model of Parkinson's Disease.

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    Darbin, Olivier; Jin, Xingxing; Von Wrangel, Christof; Schwabe, Kerstin; Nambu, Atsushi; Naritoku, Dean K; Krauss, Joachim K; Alam, Mesbah

    2016-03-01

    The function of the nigro-striatal pathway on neuronal entropy in the basal ganglia (BG) output nucleus, i.e. the entopeduncular nucleus (EPN) was investigated in the unilaterally 6-hyroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-lesioned rat model of Parkinson's disease (PD). In both control subjects and subjects with 6-OHDA lesion of dopamine (DA) the nigro-striatal pathway, a histological hallmark for parkinsonism, neuronal entropy in EPN was maximal in neurons with firing rates ranging between 15 and 25 Hz. In 6-OHDA lesioned rats, neuronal entropy in the EPN was specifically higher in neurons with firing rates above 25 Hz. Our data establishes that the nigro-striatal pathway controls neuronal entropy in motor circuitry and that the parkinsonian condition is associated with abnormal relationship between firing rate and neuronal entropy in BG output nuclei. The neuronal firing rates and entropy relationship provide putative relevant electrophysiological information to investigate the sensory-motor processing in normal condition and conditions such as movement disorders.

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI to study striatal iron accumulation in a rat model of Parkinson's disease.

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    Ana Virel

    Full Text Available Abnormal accumulation of iron is observed in neurodegenerative disorders. In Parkinson's disease, an excess of iron has been demonstrated in different structures of the basal ganglia and is suggested to be involved in the pathogenesis of the disease. Using the 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA rat model of Parkinson's disease, the edematous effect of 6-OHDA and its relation with striatal iron accumulation was examined utilizing in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. The results revealed that in comparison with control animals, injection of 6-OHDA into the rat striatum provoked an edematous process, visible in T2-weighted images that was accompanied by an accumulation of iron clearly detectable in T2*-weighted images. Furthermore, Prussian blue staining to detect iron in sectioned brains confirmed the existence of accumulated iron in the areas of T2* hypointensities. The presence of ED1-positive microglia in the lesioned striatum overlapped with this accumulation of iron, indicating areas of toxicity and loss of dopamine nerve fibers. Correlation analyses demonstrated a direct relation between the hyperintensities caused by the edema and the hypointensities caused by the accumulation of iron.

  8. Videofluorographic assessment of deglutitive behaviors in a rat model of aging and Parkinson disease.

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    Russell, John A; Ciucci, Michelle R; Hammer, Michael J; Connor, Nadine P

    2013-03-01

    Dysphagia is commonly associated with aging and Parkinson disease and can have a significant impact on a person's quality of life. In some cases, dysphagia may be life-threatening. Animal models may be used to study underlying mechanisms of dysphagia, but paradigms that allow adequate imaging of the swallow in combination with measurement of physiological variables have not been forthcoming. To begin development of methods that allow this, we used videofluorography to record the deglutition behaviors of 22 Fisher 344/Brown Norway rats in young adult (9 months old), old (32 months old), and parkinsonian (unilateral lesion to the medial forebrain bundle) groups. We hypothesized that the old and parkinsonian rats would manifest deficits in deglutition behaviors analogous to those found in human clinical populations. Our results supported our hypothesis in that the old group demonstrated reductions in bolus transport speeds and mastication rate while the parkinsonian rats showed impairments in oral processing. Interpretation of these results should consider the particular animal model, lesion type, and videofluorographic protocol used in this work. Future studies will link swallow imaging data of this kind with physiological and anatomical data in a manner not possible with human participants.

  9. Videofluorographic assessment of deglutitive behaviors in a rat model of aging and Parkinson disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, John A.; Ciucci, Michelle R.; Hammer, Michael J.; Connor, Nadine P.

    2012-01-01

    Dysphagia is commonly associated with aging and Parkinson disease and can have a significant impact on a person’s quality of life. In some cases, dysphagia may be life threatening. Animal models may be used to study underlying mechanisms of dysphagia, but paradigms that allow adequate imaging of the swallow in combination with measurement of physiological variables have not been forthcoming. To begin development of methods that allow this, we used videofluorography to record the deglutition behaviors of 22 Fischer 344-Brown Norway rats in young adult (9 months old), old (32 months old), and parkinsonian (unilateral lesion to the medial forebrain bundle) groups. We hypothesized that the old and parkinsonian rats would manifest deficits in deglutition behaviors analogous to those found in human clinical populations. Our results supported our hypotheses in that the old group demonstrated reductions in bolus transport speeds and mastication rate, while the parkinsonian rats showed impairments in oral processing. Interpretation of these results should consider the particular animal model, lesion type and videoflurographic protocol used in this work. Future studies will link swallow imaging data of this kind with physiological and anatomical data in a manner not possible with human participants. PMID:22763806

  10. Neuroprotective and Therapeutic Effect of Caffeine on the Rat Model of Parkinson's Disease Induced by Rotenone.

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    Khadrawy, Yasser A; Salem, Ahmed M; El-Shamy, Karima A; Ahmed, Emad K; Fadl, Nevein N; Hosny, Eman N

    2017-09-03

    The present study aimed to investigate the protective and therapeutic effects of caffeine on rotenone-induced rat model of Parkinson's disease (PD). Rats were divided into control, PD model induced by rotenone (1.5 mg/kg intraperitoneally (i.p.) for 45 days), protected group injected with caffeine (30 mg/kg, i.p.) and rotenone for 45 days (during the development of PD model), and treated group injected with caffeine (30 mg/kg, i.p.) for 45 days after induction of PD model. The data revealed a state of oxidative and nitrosative stress in the midbrain and the striatum of animal model of PD as indicated from the increased lipid peroxidation and nitric oxide levels and the decreased reduced glutathione level and activities of glutathione-S-transferase and superoxide dismutase. Rotenone induced a decrease in acetylcholinesterase and Na + /K + -ATPase activities and an increase in tumor necrosis factor-α level in the midbrain and the striatum. Protection and treatment with caffeine ameliorated the oxidative stress and the changes in acetylcholinesterase and Na + /K + -ATPase activities induced by rotenone in the midbrain and the striatum. This was associated with improvement in the histopathological changes induced in the two areas of PD model. Caffeine protection and treatment restored the depletion of midbrain and striatal dopamine induced by rotenone and prevented decline in motor activities (assessed by open field test) and muscular strength (assessed by traction and hanging tests) and improved norepinephrine level in the two areas. The present study showed that caffeine offered a significant neuroprotection and treatment against neurochemical, histopathological, and behavioral changes in a rotenone-induced rat model of PD.

  11. Metabolic-dopaminergic mapping of the 6-hydroxydopamine rat model for Parkinson's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casteels, Cindy; Lauwers, Erwin; Baekelandt, Veerle; Bormans, Guy; Laere, Koen van

    2008-01-01

    The unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesion rat model is a well-known acute model for Parkinson's disease (PD). Its validity has been supported by invasive histology, behavioral studies and electrophysiology. Here, we have characterized this model in vivo by multitracer imaging [glucose metabolism and dopamine transporter (DAT)] in relation to behavioral and histological parameters. Eighteen female adult Wistar rats (eight 6-OHDA-lesioned, ten controls) were investigated using multitracer [ 18 F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) and [ 18 F]-FECT 2'-[ 18 F]-fluoroethyl-(1R-2-exo-3-exe)-8-methyl-3-(4-chlorophenyl)- 8-azabicyclo (3.2.1)-octane-2-carboxylate small animal positron emission tomography (PET). Relative glucose metabolism and parametric DAT binding images were anatomically standardized to Paxinos space and analyzed on a voxel-basis using SPM2, supplemented by a template-based predefined volumes-of-interest approach. Behavior was characterized by the limb-use asymmetry test; dopaminergic innervation was validated by in vitro tyrosine hydroxylase staining. In the 6-OHDA model, significant glucose hypometabolism is present in the ipsilateral sensory-motor cortex (-6.3%; p = 4 x 10 -6 ). DAT binding was severely decreased in the ipsilateral caudate-putamen, nucleus accumbens and substantia nigra (all p -9 ), as confirmed by the behavioral and histological outcomes. Correlation analysis revealed a positive relationship between the degree of DAT impairment and the change in glucose metabolism in the ipsilateral hippocampus (p = 3 x 10 -5 ), while cerebellar glucose metabolism was inversely correlated to the level of DAT impairment (p -4 ). In vivo cerebral mapping of 6-OHDA-lesioned rats using [ 18 F ]-FDG and [ 18 F ]-FECT small animal PET shows molecular-functional correspondence to the cortico-subcortical network impairments observed in PD patients. This provides a further molecular validation supporting the validity of the 6-OHDA lesion model to mimic

  12. The Progressive BSSG Rat Model of Parkinson's: Recapitulating Multiple Key Features of the Human Disease.

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    Jackalina M Van Kampen

    Full Text Available The development of effective neuroprotective therapies for Parkinson's disease (PD has been severely hindered by the notable lack of an appropriate animal model for preclinical screening. Indeed, most models currently available are either acute in nature or fail to recapitulate all characteristic features of the disease. Here, we present a novel progressive model of PD, with behavioural and cellular features that closely approximate those observed in patients. Chronic exposure to dietary phytosterol glucosides has been found to be neurotoxic. When fed to rats, β-sitosterol β-d-glucoside (BSSG triggers the progressive development of parkinsonism, with clinical signs and histopathology beginning to appear following cessation of exposure to the neurotoxic insult and continuing to develop over several months. Here, we characterize the progressive nature of this model, its non-motor features, the anatomical spread of synucleinopathy, and response to levodopa administration. In Sprague Dawley rats, chronic BSSG feeding for 4 months triggered the progressive development of a parkinsonian phenotype and pathological events that evolved slowly over time, with neuronal loss beginning only after toxin exposure was terminated. At approximately 3 months following initiation of BSSG exposure, animals displayed the early emergence of an olfactory deficit, in the absence of significant dopaminergic nigral cell loss or locomotor deficits. Locomotor deficits developed gradually over time, initially appearing as locomotor asymmetry and developing into akinesia/bradykinesia, which was reversed by levodopa treatment. Late-stage cognitive impairment was observed in the form of spatial working memory deficits, as assessed by the radial arm maze. In addition to the progressive loss of TH+ cells in the substantia nigra, the appearance of proteinase K-resistant intracellular α-synuclein aggregates was also observed to develop progressively, appearing first in the

  13. Human olfactory bulb neural stem cells mitigate movement disorders in a rat model of Parkinson's disease.

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    Marei, Hany E S; Lashen, Samah; Farag, Amany; Althani, Asmaa; Afifi, Nahla; A, Abd-Elmaksoud; Rezk, Shaymaa; Pallini, Roberto; Casalbore, Patrizia; Cenciarelli, Carlo

    2015-07-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurological disorder characterized by the loss of midbrain dopaminergic (DA) neurons. Neural stem cells (NSCs) are multipotent stem cells that are capable of differentiating into different neuronal and glial elements. The production of DA neurons from NSCs could potentially alleviate behavioral deficits in Parkinsonian patients; timely intervention with NSCs might provide a therapeutic strategy for PD. We have isolated and generated highly enriched cultures of neural stem/progenitor cells from the human olfactory bulb (OB). If NSCs can be obtained from OB, it would alleviate ethical concerns associated with the use of embryonic tissue, and provide an easily accessible cell source that would preclude the need for invasive brain surgery. Following isolation and culture, olfactory bulb neural stem cells (OBNSCs) were genetically engineered to express hNGF and GFP. The hNFG-GFP-OBNSCs were transplanted into the striatum of 6-hydroxydopamin (6-OHDA) Parkinsonian rats. The grafted cells survived in the lesion environment for more than eight weeks after implantation with no tumor formation. The grafted cells differentiated in vivo into oligodendrocyte-like (25 ± 2.88%), neuron-like (52.63 ± 4.16%), and astrocyte -like (22.36 ± 1.56%) lineages, which we differentiated based on morphological and immunohistochemical criteria. Transplanted rats exhibited a significant partial correction in stepping and placing in non-pharmacological behavioral tests, pole and rotarod tests. Taken together, our data encourage further investigations of the possible use of OBNSCs as a promising cell-based therapeutic strategy for Parkinson's disease. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Neuroprotective effect of Buddleja cordata methanolic extract in the 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium Parkinson's disease rat model.

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    Pérez-Barrón, Gabriela; Avila-Acevedo, José Guillermo; García-Bores, Ana María; Montes, Sergio; García-Jiménez, Sara; León-Rivera, Ismael; Rubio-Osornio, Moisés; Monroy-Noyola, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the irreversible loss of dopaminergic neurons in the nigrostriatal pathway with subsequent dopamine deficiency. Environmental causes have been proposed through molecules, such as 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP(+)), to induce oxidative stress. The methanolic extract of plants of the genus Buddleja has been reported to have in vitro and in vivo antioxidant properties to protect against neuronal death. In the present study, the neuroprotective effect of Buddleja cordata methanolic extract in the MPP(+) PD rat model was investigated. Animals were administered orally with 50 or 100 mg/kg of methanolic extract every 24 h for 14 days. Twenty hours later, rats were infused with an intrastriatal stereotaxic microinjection of 10 µg MPP(+) in 8 μl sterile saline solution. Six days later, the animals were treated with 1 mg/kg apomorphine to record ipsilateral rotations for 1 h. All the rats were killed by decapitation and the lesioned striatum was dissected for dopamine and lipid peroxidation quantifications. Both methanolic extract doses led to a significantly lower (P Buddleja cordata methanolic extract in the MPP(+) PD rat model, possibly due to the involvement of phenylpropanoids.

  15. Neuroprotective effect of the methanolic extract of Hibiscus asper leaves in 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rat model of Parkinson's disease.

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    Hritcu, Lucian; Foyet, Harquin Simplice; Stefan, Marius; Mihasan, Marius; Asongalem, Acha Emmanuel; Kamtchouing, Pierre

    2011-09-01

    While the Hibiscus asper Hook.f. (Malvaceae) is a traditional herb largely used in tropical region of the Africa as vegetable, potent sedative, tonic and restorative, anti-inflammatory and antidepressive drug, there is very little scientific data concerning the efficacy of this. The antioxidant and antiapoptotic activities of the methanolic extract of Hibiscus asper leaves (50 and 100 mg/kg) were assessed using superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPX) and catalase (CAT) specific activities, total glutathione (GSH) content, malondialdehyde (MDA) level (lipid peroxidation) and DNA fragmentation assays in male Wistar rats subjected to unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-lesion. In 6-OHDA-lesioned rats, methanolic extract of Hibiscus asper leaves showed potent antioxidant and antiapoptotic activities. Chronic administration of the methanolic extract (50 and 100 mg/kg, i.p., daily, for 7 days) significantly increased antioxidant enzyme activities (SOD, GPX and CAT), total GSH content and reduced lipid peroxidation (MDA level) in rat temporal lobe homogenates, suggesting antioxidant activity. Also, DNA cleavage patterns were absent in the 6-OHDA-lesioned rats treated with methanolic extract of Hibiscus asper leaves, suggesting antiapoptotic activity. Taken together, our results suggest that the methanolic extract of Hibiscus asper leaves possesses neuroprotective activity against 6-OHDA-induced toxicity through antioxidant and antiapoptotic activities in Parkinson's disease model. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Functional reorganization of motor and limbic circuits after exercise training in a rat model of bilateral parkinsonism.

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    Zhuo Wang

    Full Text Available Exercise training is widely used for neurorehabilitation of Parkinson's disease (PD. However, little is known about the functional reorganization of the injured brain after long-term aerobic exercise. We examined the effects of 4 weeks of forced running wheel exercise in a rat model of dopaminergic deafferentation (bilateral, dorsal striatal 6-hydroxydopamine lesions. One week after training, cerebral perfusion was mapped during treadmill walking or at rest using [(14C]-iodoantipyrine autoradiography. Regional cerebral blood flow-related tissue radioactivity (rCBF was analyzed in three-dimensionally reconstructed brains by statistical parametric mapping. In non-exercised rats, lesions resulted in persistent motor deficits. Compared to sham-lesioned rats, lesioned rats showed altered functional brain activation during walking, including: 1. hypoactivation of the striatum and motor cortex; 2. hyperactivation of non-lesioned areas in the basal ganglia-thalamocortical circuit; 3. functional recruitment of the red nucleus, superior colliculus and somatosensory cortex; 4. hyperactivation of the ventrolateral thalamus, cerebellar vermis and deep nuclei, suggesting recruitment of the cerebellar-thalamocortical circuit; 5. hyperactivation of limbic areas (amygdala, hippocampus, ventral striatum, septum, raphe, insula. These findings show remarkable similarities to imaging findings reported in PD patients. Exercise progressively improved motor deficits in lesioned rats, while increasing activation in dorsal striatum and rostral secondary motor cortex, attenuating a hyperemia of the zona incerta and eliciting a functional reorganization of regions participating in the cerebellar-thalamocortical circuit. Both lesions and exercise increased activation in mesolimbic areas (amygdala, hippocampus, ventral striatum, laterodorsal tegmental n., ventral pallidum, as well as in related paralimbic regions (septum, raphe, insula. Exercise, but not lesioning, resulted

  17. Vanillin Attenuated Behavioural Impairments, Neurochemical Deficts, Oxidative Stress and Apoptosis Against Rotenone Induced Rat Model of Parkinson's Disease.

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    Dhanalakshmi, Chinnasamy; Janakiraman, Udaiyappan; Manivasagam, Thamilarasan; Justin Thenmozhi, Arokiasamy; Essa, Musthafa Mohamed; Kalandar, Ameer; Khan, Mohammed Abdul Sattar; Guillemin, Gilles J

    2016-08-01

    Vanillin (4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzaldehyde), a pleasant smelling organic aromatic compound, is widely used as a flavoring additive in food, beverage, cosmetic and drug industries. It is reported to cross the blood brain barrier and also displayed antioxidant and neuroprotective activities. We previously reported the neuroprotective effect of vanillin against rotenone induced in in vitro model of PD. The present experiment was aimed to analyze the neuroprotective effect of vanillin on the motor and non-motor deficits, neurochemical variables, oxidative, anti-oxidative indices and the expression of apoptotic markers against rotenone induced rat model of Parkinson's disease (PD). Rotenone treatment exhibited motor and non-motor impairments, neurochemical deficits, oxidative stress and apoptosis, whereas oral administration of vanillin attenuated the above-said indices. However further studies are needed to explore the mitochondrial protective and anti-inflammatory properties of vanillin, as these processes play a vital role in the cause and progression of PD.

  18. Gypenosides attenuate the development of L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia in 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rat model of Parkinson's disease.

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    Shin, Keon Sung; Zhao, Ting Ting; Park, Keun Hong; Park, Hyun Jin; Hwang, Bang Yeon; Lee, Chong Kil; Lee, Myung Koo

    2015-04-21

    Gypenosides (GPS) and ethanol extract of Gynostemma pentaphyllum (GP-EX) show anxiolytic effects on affective disorders in 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine-lesioned mouse model of Parkinson's disease (PD). Long-term administration of L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA) leads to the development of severe motor side effects such as L-DOPA-induced-dyskinesia (LID) in PD. The present study investigated the effects of GPS and GP-EX on LID in a 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-lesioned rat model of PD. Daily administration of L-DOPA (25 mg/kg) in the 6-OHDA-lesioned rat model of PD for 22 days induced expression of LID, which was determined by the body and locomotive AIMs scores and contralateral rotational behaviors. However, co-treatments of GPS (25 and 50 mg/kg) or GP-EX (50 mg/kg) with L-DOPA significantly attenuated the development of LID without compromising the anti-parkinsonian effects of L-DOPA. In addition, the increases in ∆FosB expression and ERK1/2 phosphorylation in 6-OHDA-lesioned rats induced by L-DOPA administration were significantly reduced by co-treatment with GPS (25 and 50 mg/kg) or GP-EX (50 mg/kg). These results suggest that GPS (25 and 50 mg/kg) and GP-EX (50 mg/kg) effectively attenuate the development of LID by modulating the biomarker activities of ∆FosB expression and ERK1/2 phosphorylation in the 6-OHDA-lesioned rat model of PD. GPS and GP-EX will be useful adjuvant therapeutics for LID in PD.

  19. Photobiomodulation Suppresses Alpha-Synuclein-Induced Toxicity in an AAV-Based Rat Genetic Model of Parkinson's Disease.

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    Abid Oueslati

    Full Text Available Converging lines of evidence indicate that near-infrared light treatment, also known as photobiomodulation (PBM, may exert beneficial effects and protect against cellular toxicity and degeneration in several animal models of human pathologies, including neurodegenerative disorders. In the present study, we report that chronic PMB treatment mitigates dopaminergic loss induced by unilateral overexpression of human α-synuclein (α-syn in the substantia nigra of an AAV-based rat genetic model of Parkinson's disease (PD. In this model, daily exposure of both sides of the rat's head to 808-nm near-infrared light for 28 consecutive days alleviated α-syn-induced motor impairment, as assessed using the cylinder test. This treatment also significantly reduced dopaminergic neuronal loss in the injected substantia nigra and preserved dopaminergic fibers in the ipsilateral striatum. These beneficial effects were sustained for at least 6 weeks after discontinuing the treatment. Together, our data point to PBM as a possible therapeutic strategy for the treatment of PD and other related synucleinopathies.

  20. Protective role of apigenin on rotenone induced rat model of Parkinson's disease: Suppression of neuroinflammation and oxidative stress mediated apoptosis.

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    Anusha, Chandran; Sumathi, Thangarajan; Joseph, Leena Dennis

    2017-05-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra which is associated with oxidative stress, neuroinflammation and apoptosis. Apigenin (AGN), a non-mutagenic flavone found in fruits and vegetables, exhibits a variety of biological effects including anti-apoptotic, anti-inflammatory, and free radical scavenging activities. The current study was aimed to investigate the neuroprotective effects and molecular mechanisms of AGN in a rat model of PD induced by rotenone (ROT). Unilateral stereotaxic intranigral infusion of ROT caused the loss of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) immunoreactivity in striatum and substantia nigra. AGN treatment (10 and 20 mg/kg, i.p.) showed a significant improvement in behavioral, biochemical and mitochondrial enzyme activities as compared to ROT exposed rats. The mRNA expression of inflammatory markers and neurotrophic factors was quantified by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Administration of AGN significantly attenuated the upregulation of NF-κB gene expression in ROT induced group and prevented the neuroinflammation in substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc). Further, AGN inhibited the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF- α, IL-6 and pro-inflammatory enzyme iNOS-1 induced by ROT. Additionally, AGN prevents the reduction of neurotrophic factors BDNF and GDNF mRNA expression in ROT lesioned rats. Immunoblot results illustrated that AGN treatment downregulated α-synuclein aggregation and upregulated the TH protein expression as well as dopamine D2 receptor (D2R) expression in ROT lesioned rats. Thus, the present findings collectively suggest that AGN exerts its neuroprotection in ROT model of PD and may act as an effective agent for treatment of PD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Adenosine A2A receptor blockade Prevents Rotenone-Induced Motor Impairment in a Rat Model of Parkinsonism

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    Ahmed M Fathalla

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Pharmacological studies implicate the blockade of adenosine receptorsas an effective strategy for reducing Parkinson's disease (PD symptoms. The objective of this study is to elucidate the possible protective effects of ZM241385 and 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine, two selective A2Aand A1 receptor antagonists, on a rotenone rat model of PD. Rats were split into four groups: vehicle control (1 ml/kg/48 h, rotenone(1.5 mg/kg/48 h, s.c., ZM241385 (3.3 mg/kg/day, i.p and 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (5 mg/kg/day, i.p. After that, animals were subjected to behavioral (stride length and grid walking and biochemical (measuring concentration of dopamine levels using high performance liquid chromatography. In the rotenone group, rats displayed a reduced motor activity and disturbed movement coordination in the behavioral tests and a decreased dopamine concentration as foundby high performance liquid chromatography. The effect of rotenone was partially preventedin the ZM241385 group, but not with 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine administration. The administration of ZM241385 has led toan improvement improved of motor function and movement coordination (a partial increase of stride length and partial decrease in the number of foot slips and an increase in dopamine concentration in the rotenone-injected rats. However, the 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine and rotenone groups were not significantly different. These results indicate that selective A2Areceptor blockade by ZM241385, but not A1receptor blockadeby 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine, may treat PD motor symptoms. This reinforces the potential use of A2A receptor antagonists as a treatment strategy for PD patients.. This may provide a more selective treatment strategy for PD patients.

  2. Knockdown of GAD67 protein levels normalizes neuronal activity in a rat model of Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horvath, Lazlo; van Marion, Ingrid; Taï, Khalid

    2011-01-01

    Dopamine depletion of the striatum is one of the hallmarks of Parkinson's disease. The loss of dopamine upregulates GAD67 expression in the striatal projection neurons and causes other changes in the activity of the basal ganglia circuit.......Dopamine depletion of the striatum is one of the hallmarks of Parkinson's disease. The loss of dopamine upregulates GAD67 expression in the striatal projection neurons and causes other changes in the activity of the basal ganglia circuit....

  3. Curcumin protects nigral dopaminergic neurons by iron-chelation in the 6-hydroxydopamine rat model of Parkinson's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xi-Xun Du; Hua-Min Xu; Hong Jiang; Ning Song; Jun Wang; Jun-Xia Xie

    2012-01-01

    [Objective] Curcumin is a plant polyphenolic compound and a major component of spice turmeric (Curcuma longa).It has been reported to possess free radical-scavenging,iron-chelating,and anti-inflammatory properties in different tissues.Our previous study showed that curcumin protects MES23.5 dopaminergic cells from 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced neurotoxicity in vitro.The present study aimed to explore this neuroprotective effect in the 6-OHDAlesioned rat model of Parkinson's disease in vivo.[Methods] Rats were given intragastric curcumin for 24 days.6-OHDA lesioning was conducted on day 4 of curcumin treatment.Dopamine content was assessed by high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection,tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-containing neurons by immunohistochemistry,and iron-containing cells by Perls' iron staining.[Results] The dopamine content in the striatum and the number of THimmunoreactive neurons decreased after 6-OHDA treatment.Curcumin pretreatment reversed these changes.Further studies demonstrated that 6-OHDA treatment increased the number of iron-staining cells,which was dramatically decreased by curcumin pretreatment.[Conclusion]The protective effects of curcumin against 6-OHDA may be attributable to the ironchelating activity of curcumin to suppress the iron-induced degeneration of nigral dopaminergic neurons.

  4. Evolution of extra-nigral damage predicts behavioural deficits in a rat proteasome inhibitor model of Parkinson's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony C Vernon

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Establishing the neurological basis of behavioural dysfunction is key to provide a better understanding of Parkinson's disease (PD and facilitate development of effective novel therapies. For this, the relationships between longitudinal structural brain changes associated with motor behaviour were determined in a rat model of PD and validated by post-mortem immunohistochemistry. Rats bearing a nigrostriatal lesion induced by infusion of the proteasome inhibitor lactacystin into the left-medial forebrain bundle and saline-injected controls underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI at baseline (prior to surgery and 1, 3 and 5 weeks post-surgery with concomitant motor assessments consisting of forelimb grip strength, accelerating rotarod, and apormorphine-induced rotation. Lactacystin-injected rats developed early motor deficits alongside decreased ipsilateral cortical volumes, specifically thinning of the primary motor (M1 and somatosensory cortices and lateral ventricle hypertrophy (as determined by manual segmentation and deformation-based morphometry. Although sustained, motor dysfunction and nigrostriatal damage were maximal by 1 week post-surgery. Additional volume decreases in the ipsilateral ventral midbrain; corpus striatum and thalamus were only evident by week 3 and 5. Whilst cortical MRI volume changes best predicted the degree of motor impairment, post-mortem tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivity in the striatum was a better predictor of motor behaviour overall, with the notable exception of performance in the accelerating rotarod, in which, M1 cortical thickness remained the best predictor. These results highlight the importance of identifying extra-nigral regions of damage that impact on behavioural dysfunction from damage to the nigrostriatal system.

  5. Intrastriatal Grafting of Chromospheres: Survival and Functional Effects in the 6-OHDA Rat Model of Parkinson's Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandra Boronat-García

    Full Text Available Cell replacement therapy in Parkinson's disease (PD aims at re-establishing dopamine neurotransmission in the striatum by grafting dopamine-releasing cells. Chromaffin cell (CC grafts produce some transitory improvements of functional motor deficits in PD animal models, and have the advantage of allowing autologous transplantation. However, CC grafts have exhibited low survival, poor functional effects and dopamine release compared to other cell types. Recently, chromaffin progenitor-like cells were isolated from bovine and human adult adrenal medulla. Under low-attachment conditions, these cells aggregate and grow as spheres, named chromospheres. Here, we found that bovine-derived chromosphere-cell cultures exhibit a greater fraction of cells with a dopaminergic phenotype and higher dopamine release than CC. Chromospheres grafted in a rat model of PD survived in 57% of the total grafted animals. Behavioral tests showed that surviving chromosphere cells induce a reduction in motor alterations for at least 3 months after grafting. Finally, we found that compared with CC, chromosphere grafts survive more and produce more robust and consistent motor improvements. However, further experiments would be necessary to determine whether the functional benefits induced by chromosphere grafts can be improved, and also to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the functional effects of the grafts.

  6. Lentivirus-mediated delivery of sonic hedgehog into the striatum stimulates neuroregeneration in a rat model of Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Dong, Weiren; Guo, Suiqun; Zhao, Shu; He, Suifen; Zhang, Lihua; Tang, Yinjuan; Wang, Haihong

    2014-12-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder in which the nigrostriatal pathway, consisting of dopaminergic neuronal projections from the substantia nigra to the striatum, degenerates. Viral transduction is currently the most promising in vivo strategy for delivery of therapeutic proteins into the brain for treatment of PD. Sonic hedgehog (Shh) is necessary for cell proliferation, differentiation and neuroprotection in the central nervous system. In this study, we investigated the effects of overexpressed N-terminal product of SHH (SHH-N) in a PD model rat. A lentiviral vector containing SHH-N was stereotactically injected into the striatum 24 h after a striatal 6-OHDA lesion. We found that overexpressed SHH-N attenuated behavioral deficits and reduced the loss of dopamine neurons in the substantia nigra and the loss of dopamine fibers in the striatum. In addition, fluoro-ruby-labeled nigrostriatal projections were also repaired. Together, our results demonstrate the feasibility and efficacy of using the strategy of lentivirus-mediated Shh-N delivery to delay nigrostriatal pathway degeneration. This strategy holds the potential for therapeutic application in the treatment of PD.

  7. Long-term Levodopa Treatment Accelerates the Circadian Rhythm Dysfunction in a 6-hydroxydopamine Rat Model of Parkinson's Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Si-Yue Li; Ya-Li Wang; Wen-Wen Liu; Dong-Jun Lyu; Fen Wang; Cheng-Jie Mao; Ya-Ping Yang; Li-Fang Hu; Chun-Feng Liu

    2017-01-01

    Background:Parkinson's disease (PD) patients with long-term levodopa (L-DOPA) treatment are suffering from severe circadian dysfunction.However,it is hard to distinguish that the circadian disturbance in patients is due to the disease progression itself,or is affected by L-DOPA replacement therapy.This study was to investigate the role of L-DOPA on the circadian dysfunction in a rat model of PD.Methods:The rat model of PD was constructed by a bilateral striatal injection with 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA),followed by administration of saline or 25 mg/kg L-DOPA for 21 consecutive days.Rotarod test,footprint test,and open-field test were carried out to evaluate the motor function.Striatum,suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN),liver,and plasma were collected at 6:00,12:00,18:00,and 24:00.Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction was used to examine the expression of clock genes.Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to determine the secretion level of cortisol and melatonin.High-performance liquid chromatography was used to measure the neurotransmitters.Analysis of variance was used for data analysis.Results:L-DOPA alleviated the motor deficits induced by 6-OHDA lesions in the footprint and open-field test (P < 0.01,P < 0.001,respectively).After L-DOPA treatment,Bmal1 decreased in the SCN compared with 6-OHDA group at 12:00 (P < 0.01) and 24:00 (P < 0.001).In the striatum,the expression ofBmal1,Rorα was lower than that in the 6-OHDA group at 18:00 (P < 0.05) and L-DOPA seemed to delay the peak of Per2 to 24:00.In liver,L-DOPA did not affect the rhythmicity and expression of these clock genes (P > 0.05).In addition,the cortisol secretion was increased (P > 0.05),but melatonin was further inhibited after L-DOPA treatment at 6:00 (P < 0.01).Conclusions:In the circadian system of advanced PD rat models,circadian dysfunction is not only contributed by the degeneration of the disease itself but also long-term L-DOPA therapy may further aggravate it.

  8. Behavioural effects of basal ganglia rho-kinase inhibition in the unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inan, Salim Yalcin; Soner, Burak Cem; Sahin, Ayse Saide

    2016-08-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is one of the most common neurodegenerative disorders, which affects more than six million people in the world. While current available pharmacological therapies for PD in the early stages of the disease usually improve motor symptoms, they cause side effects, such as fluctuations and dyskinesias in the later stages. In this later stage, high frequency deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN-DBS) is a treatment option which is most successful to treat drug resistant advanced PD. It has previously been demonstrated that activation of Rho/Rho-kinase pathway is involved in the dopaminergic cell degeneration which is one of the main characteristics of PD pathology. In addition, the involvement of this pathway has been suggested in diverse cellular events in the central nervous system; such as epilepsy, anxiety-related behaviors, regulation of dendritic and axonal morphology, antinociception, subarachnoid haemorrhage, spinal cord injury and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. However, up to date, to our knowledge there are no previous reports showing the beneficial effects of the potent Rho-kinase inhibitor Y-27632 in the 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) rat model of PD. Therefore, in the present study, we investigated the behavioural effects of basal ganglia Y-27632 microinjections in this PD model. Our results indicated that basal ganglia Y-27632 microinjections significantly decreased the number of contralateral rotations-induced by apomorphine, significantly increased line crossings in the open-field test, contralateral forelimb use in the limb-use asymmetry test and contralateral tape playing time in the somatosensory asymmetry test, which may suggest that Y-27632 could be a potentially active antiparkinsonian agent.

  9. Correlative single photon emission computed tomography imaging of [123I]altropane binding in the rat model of Parkinson's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gleave, Jacqueline A.; Farncombe, Troy H.; Saab, Chantal; Doering, Laurie C.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: This study used the dopamine transporter (DAT) probe, [ 123 I]-2β-carbomethoxy-3β-(4-fluorophenyl)-N-(3-iodo-E-allyl)nortropane ([ 123 I]altropane), to assess the DAT levels in the 6-hydroxydopamine rat model of Parkinson's disease. We sought to assess if the right to left [ 123 I]altropane striatal ratios correlated with dopamine content in the striatum and substantia nigra and with behavioural outcomes. Methods: [ 123 I]altropane images taken pre- and postlesion were acquired before and after the transplantation of neural stem/progenitor cells. The images obtained using [ 123 I]altropane and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) were compared with specific behavioural tests and the dopamine content assessed by high-performance liquid chromatography. Results: [ 123 I]altropane binding correlated with the content of dopamine in the striatum; however, [ 123 I]altropane binding did not correlate with the dopamine content in the substantia nigra. There was a significant correlation of altropane ratios with the cylinder test and the postural instability test, but not with amphetamine rotations. The low coefficient of determination (r 2 ) for these correlations indicated that [ 123 I]altropane SPECT was not a good predictor of behavioural outcomes. Conclusion: Our data reveal that [ 123 I]altropane predicts the integrity of the striatal dopamine nerve terminals, but does not predict the integrity of the nigrostriatal system. [ 123 I]altropane could be a useful marker to measure dopamine content in cell replacement therapies; however, it would not be able to evaluate outcomes for neuroprotective strategies.

  10. Exploration of D2 receptors and content of DA of striatum in hemi-parkinsonism model rats before and after madopar treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Yansong; Lin Xiangtong

    1998-01-01

    125 I-IBZM autoradiographic analysis, HPLC-ECD were used to study the relationship between D 2 receptors and the content of DA, HVA, DOPAC in striatum of hemi-parkinsonism model rats before and after Madopar treatment. After Madopar treatment, the striatum/cerebellum 125 I-IBZM uptake ratio of lesioned side was 7.23 +- 0.67, showed 17.22 +- 3.94% increasing as compared to the contralateral side, the increasing were significantly declined compared with the pretreatment group and control group (P 2 receptors

  11. Transplantation of human umbilical cord blood-derived mononuclear cells induces recovery of motor dysfunction in a rat model of Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen C

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Chao Chen,1,* Jing Duan,1,* Aifang Shen,2,* Wei Wang,1 Hao Song,1 Yanming Liu,1 Xianjie Lu,1 Xiaobing Wang,2 Zhiqing You,1 Zhongchao Han,3,4 Fabin Han1 1Center for Stem Cells and Regenerative Medicine, The Liaocheng People's Hospital, Affiliated Liaocheng Hospital, Taishan Medical University, Shandong, People's Republic of China; 2Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, The Liaocheng People's Hospital, Affiliated Liaocheng Hospital, Taishan Medical University, Shandong, People's Republic of China; 3The State Key Laboratory of Experimental Hematology, Institute of Hematology and Hospital of Blood Diseases, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Peking Union of Medical College, Tianjin, People's Republic of China; 4National Engineering Research Center of Cell Products, AmCellGene Co. Ltd., TEDA, Tianjin, People's Republic of China*These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Human umbilical cord blood-derived mononuclear cells (hUCB-MNCs were reported to have neurorestorative capacity for neurological disorders such as stroke and traumatic brain injury. This study was performed to explore if hUCB-MNC transplantation plays any therapeutic effects for Parkinson's disease (PD in a 6-OHDA-lesioned rat model of PD. hUCB-MNCs were isolated from umbilical cord blood and administered to the striatum of the 6-OHDA-lesioned rats. The apomorphine-induced locomotive turning-overs were measured to evaluate the improvement of motor dysfunctions of the rats after administration of hUCB-MNCs. We observed that transplanted hUCB-MNCs significantly improve the motor deficits of the PD rats and that grafted hUCB-MNCs integrated to the host brains and differentiated to neurons and dopamine neurons in vivo after 16 weeks of transplantation. Our study provided evidence that transplanted hUCB-MNCs play therapeutic effects in a rat PD model by differentiating to neurons and dopamine neurons. Keywords: hUCB-MNCs, Parkinson's disease, transplantation

  12. Pramipexole but not imipramine or fluoxetine reverses the "depressive-like" behaviour in a rat model of preclinical stages of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berghauzen-Maciejewska, Klemencja; Kuter, Katarzyna; Kolasiewicz, Wacław; Głowacka, Urszula; Dziubina, Anna; Ossowska, Krystyna; Wardas, Jadwiga

    2014-09-01

    Depression is a frequent comorbid disorder in Parkinson's disease and may antedate its motor symptoms. However, mechanisms underlying Parkinson's disease-associated depression are unknown and its current medication is insufficient. The aim of the present study was to compare antidepressant-like effects of imipramine, fluoxetine and pramipexole in a model of preclinical stages of Parkinson's disease in rats. 6-Hydroxydopamine was bilaterally injected into the ventrolateral region of the caudate-putamen in rats. This treatment induced moderate decreases in the levels of dopamine and its metabolites in the caudate-putamen, nucleus accumbens and frontal cortex and reduced the density of tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactive neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta and ventral tegmental area. The lesion increased immobility measured in the forced swimming test without influencing locomotor activity. Chronic (13 days) administration of pramipexole (1mg/kg sc/twice a day) reversed prolongation of the immobility time in lesioned animals but did not stimulate their locomotion. Chronic pramipexole activated dopaminergic transmission in the brain structures which might contribute to its effectiveness in the forced swimming test. In contrast, the 13-day administration of imipramine (10mg/kg ip/day) and fluoxetine (10mg/kg ip/day) did not shorten the immobility time in lesioned rats but reduced their locomotion. The present study indicates that already a moderate lesion of dopaminergic neurons induces "depressive-like" behaviour in animals which is reversed by chronic administration of the antiparkinsonian drug, pramipexole. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Coherence of neuronal firing of the entopeduncular nucleus with motor cortex oscillatory activity in the 6-OHDA rat model of Parkinson's disease with levodopa-induced dyskinesias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xingxing; Schwabe, Kerstin; Krauss, Joachim K; Alam, Mesbah

    2016-04-01

    The pathophysiological mechanisms leading to dyskinesias in Parkinson's disease (PD) after long-term treatment with levodopa remain unclear. This study investigates the neuronal firing characteristics of the entopeduncular nucleus (EPN), the rat equivalent of the human globus pallidus internus and output nucleus of the basal ganglia, and its coherence with the motor cortex (MCx) field potentials in the unilateral 6-OHDA rat model of PD with and without levodopa-induced dyskinesias (LID). 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned hemiparkinsonian (HP) rats, 6-OHDA-lesioned HP rats with LID (HP-LID) rats, and naïve controls were used for recording of single-unit activity under urethane (1.4 g/kg, i.p) anesthesia in the EPN "on" and "off" levodopa. Over the MCx, the electrocorticogram output was recorded. Analysis of single-unit activity in the EPN showed enhanced firing rates, burst activity, and irregularity compared to naïve controls, which did not differ between drug-naïve HP and HP-LID rats. Analysis of EPN spike coherence and phase-locked ratio with MCx field potentials showed a shift of low (12-19 Hz) and high (19-30 Hz) beta oscillatory activity between HP and HP-LID groups. EPN theta phase-locked ratio was only enhanced in HP-LID compared to HP rats. Overall, levodopa injection had no stronger effect in HP-LID rats than in HP rats. Altered coherence and changes in the phase lock ratio of spike and local field potentials in the beta range may play a role for the development of LID.

  14. Application of the Physical Disector Principle for Quantification of Dopaminergic Neuronal Loss in a Rat 6-Hydroxydopamine Nigral Lesion Model of Parkinson's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrine Fabricius

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Stereological analysis is the optimal tool for quantitative assessment of brain morphological and cellular changes induced by neurotoxic lesions or treatment interventions. Stereological methods based on random sampling techniques yield unbiased estimates of particle counts within a defined volume, thereby providing a true quantitative estimate of the target cell population. Neurodegenerative diseases involve loss of specific neuron types, such as the midbrain tyrosine hydroxylase-positive dopamine neurons in Parkinson's disease and in animal models of nigrostriatal degeneration. Therefore, we applied an established automated physical disector principle in a fractionator design for efficient stereological quantitative analysis of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH-positive dopamine neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta of hemiparkinsonian rats with unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA lesions. We obtained reliable estimates of dopamine neuron numbers, and established the relationship between behavioral asymmetry and dopamine neuron loss on the lesioned side. In conclusion, the automated physical disector principle provided a useful and efficient tool for unbiased estimation of TH-positive neurons in rat midbrain, and should prove valuable for investigating neuroprotective strategies in 6-OHDA model of parkinsonism, while generalizing to other immunohistochemically-defined cell populations.

  15. Differential effects of gaseous versus injectable anesthetics on changes in regional cerebral blood flow and metabolism induced by l-DOPA in a rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bimpisidis, Zisis; Öberg, Carl M; Maslava, Natallia; Cenci, M Angela; Lundblad, Cornelia

    2017-06-01

    Preclinical imaging of brain activity requires the use of anesthesia. In this study, we have compared the effects of two widely used anesthetics, inhaled isoflurane and ketamine/xylazine cocktail, on cerebral blood flow and metabolism in a rat model of Parkinson's disease and l-DOPA-induced dyskinesia. Specific tracers were used to estimate regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF - [ 14 C]-iodoantipyrine) and regional cerebral metabolic rate (rCMR - [ 14 C]-2-deoxyglucose) with a highly sensitive autoradiographic method. The two types of anesthetics had quite distinct effects on l-DOPA-induced changes in rCBF and rCMR. Isoflurane did not affect either the absolute rCBF values or the increases in rCBF in the basal ganglia after l-DOPA administration. On the contrary, rats anesthetized with ketamine/xylazine showed lower absolute rCBF values, and the rCBF increases induced by l-DOPA were masked. We developed a novel improved model to calculate rCMR, and found lower metabolic activities in rats anesthetized with isoflurane compared to animals anesthetized with ketamine/xylazine. Both anesthetics prevented changes in rCMR upon l-DOPA administration. Pharmacological challenges in isoflurane-anesthetized rats indicated that drugs mimicking the actions of ketamine/xylazine on adrenergic or glutamate receptors reproduced distinct effects of the injectable anesthetics on rCBF and rCMR. Our results highlight the importance of anesthesia in studies of cerebral flow and metabolism, and provide novel insights into mechanisms mediating abnormal neurovascular responses to l-DOPA in Parkinson's disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Daily chronomics of proteomic profile in aging and rotenone-induced Parkinson's disease model in male Wistar rat and its modulation by melatonin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagota, Anita; Mattam, Ushodaya

    2017-08-01

    Aging is associated with changes in several basic parameters of circadian timing system (CTS) in mammals leading to circadian dysfunction. We had reported earlier that upon aging and in rotenone induced Parkinson's disease (RIPD) rat model there were significant alterations in the core clock genes expression levels and daily pulses. To identify biomarkers of aging and PD chronomics of proteomic day-night profiles in suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), pineal and substantia nigra (SN) in 3 month (m), 12, 24 m and RIPD rat model were studied at two time points i.e. Zeitgeber Time (ZT)-6 (mid-day) and ZT-18 (mid-night). Proteome analysis was done by using two dimensional (2-D) electrophoresis and the spots showing robust day-night variations were identified by using MALDI TOF/TOF analysis. In 3 m rats the number of proteins showing day-night variations were relatively more than 12, 24 m and RIPD rat model in SCN and SN. But in pineal there was increase in number of protein spots showing day-night variations in 24 m. Mass spectroscopy of the protein spots showing robust day night variation in aging and RIPD rats were identified. As melatonin, a multitasking molecule, an endogenous synchronizer of rhythm, an antioxidant and an antiaging drug, declines with aging, the effects of melatonin administration on differential alterations in chronomics of 2-D protein profiles in aging and RIPD male Wistar rats were studied. We report here that the melatonin could be playing an important role in modulating the chronomics of 2-D protein profiles. Additionally, various proteins were identified for the first time in this study showing significant day night variation in SCN, pineal and SN may prove useful towards targeting novel treatments for circadian dysfunction, good health and longevity.

  17. Subthalamic deep brain stimulation reduces pathological information transmission to the thalamus in a rat model of parkinsonism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Collin James Anderson

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta leads to parkinsonian motor symptoms via changes in electrophysiological activity throughout the basal ganglia. High-frequency deep brain stimulation (DBS partially treats these symptoms, but the mechanisms are unclear. We hypothesize that motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease are associated with increased information transmission from basal ganglia output neurons to motor thalamus input neurons, and that therapeutic DBS of the subthalamic nucleus (STN treats these symptoms by reducing this extraneous information transmission. We tested these hypotheses in a unilateral, 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rodent model of hemiparkinsonism. Information transfer between basal ganglia output neurons and motor thalamus input neurons increased in both the orthodromic and antidromic directions with hemiparkinsonian onset, and these changes were reversed by behaviorally therapeutic STN-DBS. Omnidirectional information increases in the parkinsonian state underscore the detrimental nature of that pathological information, and suggest a loss of information channel independence. Therapeutic STN-DBS reduced that pathological information, suggesting an effective increase in the number of independent information channels. We interpret these data with a model in which pathological information and fewer information channels diminishes the scope of possible motor activities, driving parkinsonian symptoms. In this model, STN-DBS restores information-channel independence by eliminating or masking the parkinsonism-associated information, and thus enlarges the scope of possible motor activities, alleviating parkinsonian symptoms.

  18. Comparative studies of D2 receptors and cerebral blood flow in hemi-Parkinsonism rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Yansong; Lin Xiangtong

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To study the relationship between dopamine D 2 receptors and cerebral blood flow in hemi-Parkinsonism rats. Methods: Hemi-Parkinsonism rats were made by stereotaxic 6-hydroxy dopamine (6-OH-DA) lesions in substantia nigra and ventral tegmental area, apomorphine (Apo) which could induce the successful model rat to rotate toward the intact side was used to select the rat models, 125 I-IBZM in vivo autoradiography and 99 Tc m -HMPAO regional cerebral biodistribution analysis were used to study D 2 receptors and cerebral blood flow. The HPLC-ECD was used to measure striatum DA and its metabolite content . Results: the lesioned side striatum DA and its metabolites homovanillic acid (HVA) 3,4-dihyroxy-phenylacetic acid (DOPAC) reduced significantly than that of the intact side and pseudo-operated group, striatum/cerebellum 125 I-IBZM uptake ratio was 8.04 +- 0.71 in lesioned side of hemi-Parkinsonism rats, significantly increased compared with the intact side and the pseudo-operated group (P 0.05). Conclusions: the 6-OH-DA lesioned side DA content decreased significantly and thus induced a compensative up-regulation of striatum D 2 receptor binding sites in hemi-Parkinsonism rats, which show good correlation with rotation behavior induced by Apo. Comparing with cerebral blood flow, D 2 receptor reflected by IBZM seems to be more specific and earlier to detect the cerebral functional impairment in experimental hemi-Parkinsonism

  19. A biophysical model of the cortex-basal ganglia-thalamus network in the 6-OHDA lesioned rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumaravelu, Karthik; Brocker, David T; Grill, Warren M

    2016-04-01

    Electrical stimulation of sub-cortical brain regions (the basal ganglia), known as deep brain stimulation (DBS), is an effective treatment for Parkinson's disease (PD). Chronic high frequency (HF) DBS in the subthalamic nucleus (STN) or globus pallidus interna (GPi) reduces motor symptoms including bradykinesia and tremor in patients with PD, but the therapeutic mechanisms of DBS are not fully understood. We developed a biophysical network model comprising of the closed loop cortical-basal ganglia-thalamus circuit representing the healthy and parkinsonian rat brain. The network properties of the model were validated by comparing responses evoked in basal ganglia (BG) nuclei by cortical (CTX) stimulation to published experimental results. A key emergent property of the model was generation of low-frequency network oscillations. Consistent with their putative pathological role, low-frequency oscillations in model BG neurons were exaggerated in the parkinsonian state compared to the healthy condition. We used the model to quantify the effectiveness of STN DBS at different frequencies in suppressing low-frequency oscillatory activity in GPi. Frequencies less than 40 Hz were ineffective, low-frequency oscillatory power decreased gradually for frequencies between 50 Hz and 130 Hz, and saturated at frequencies higher than 150 Hz. HF STN DBS suppressed pathological oscillations in GPe/GPi both by exciting and inhibiting the firing in GPe/GPi neurons, and the number of GPe/GPi neurons influenced was greater for HF stimulation than low-frequency stimulation. Similar to the frequency dependent suppression of pathological oscillations, STN DBS also normalized the abnormal GPi spiking activity evoked by CTX stimulation in a frequency dependent fashion with HF being the most effective. Therefore, therapeutic HF STN DBS effectively suppresses pathological activity by influencing the activity of a greater proportion of neurons in the output nucleus of the BG.

  20. Imaging mass spectrometry reveals elevated nigral levels of dynorphin neuropeptides in L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia in rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Ljungdahl

    Full Text Available L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia is a troublesome complication of L-DOPA pharmacotherapy of Parkinson's disease and has been associated with disturbed brain opioid transmission. However, so far the results of clinical and preclinical studies on the effects of opioids agonists and antagonists have been contradictory at best. Prodynorphin mRNA levels correlate well with the severity of dyskinesia in animal models of Parkinson's disease; however the identities of the actual neuroactive opioid effectors in their target basal ganglia output structures have not yet been determined. For the first time MALDI-TOF imaging mass spectrometry (IMS was used for unbiased assessment and topographical elucidation of prodynorphin-derived peptides in the substantia nigra of a unilateral rat model of Parkinson's disease and L-DOPA induced dyskinesia. Nigral levels of dynorphin B and alpha-neoendorphin strongly correlated with the severity of dyskinesia. Even if dynorphin peptide levels were elevated in both the medial and lateral part of the substantia nigra, MALDI IMS analysis revealed that the most prominent changes were localized to the lateral part of the substantia nigra. MALDI IMS is advantageous compared with traditional molecular methods, such as radioimmunoassay, in that neither the molecular identity analyzed, nor the specific localization needs to be predetermined. Indeed, MALDI IMS revealed that the bioconverted metabolite leu-enkephalin-arg also correlated positively with severity of dyskinesia. Multiplexing DynB and leu-enkephalin-arg ion images revealed small (0.25 by 0.5 mm nigral subregions with complementing ion intensities, indicating localized peptide release followed by bioconversion. The nigral dynorphins associated with L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia were not those with high affinity to kappa opioid receptors, but consisted of shorter peptides, mainly dynorphin B and alpha-neoendorphin that are known to bind and activate mu and delta opioid receptors

  1. Comparative studies of D2 receptors and brain perfusion in hemi-parkinsonism rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Yansong; Lin Xiangtong

    2000-01-01

    The relationship between dopamine D 2 receptors and brain perfusion in hemi-parkinsonism rats was studied. Hemi-parkinsonism rats were made by stereotaxic 6-hydroxy dopamine (6-OH-DA) lesions in substantia nigra (SN) and ventral tegmental area (VTA), apomorphine (Apo) which could induced the successful model rat rotates toward the intact side was used to select the rats, 125 I-IBZM ex-vivo autoradiography analysis and 99m Tc-HM-PAO regional cerebral biodistribution were used to evaluate D 2 receptors and cerebral blood flow. The HPLC-ECD were used to measure striatum DA and its metabolites content. The lesioned side striatum DA and its metabolites HVA DOPAC reduced significantly than that of the intact side and pseudo-operated group, striatum/cerebellum 125 I-IBZM uptake ratio was 8.04 +- 0.71 in lesioned side of hemi-parkinsonism rats, significantly increased compared with the intact side and the pseudo-operated group (p 0.05). These results indicated that in the 6-OH-DA lesioned side DA content decreased significantly and an up-regulation of striatum D 2 receptor binding sites was induced in hemi-parkinsonism rats, which showed good correlation with rotation behavior induced by Apo. Comparing with cerebral blood flow, D 2 receptor reflected by IBZM seems to be more specific and earlier to detect the cerebral functional impairment in experimental hemi-parkinsonism

  2. Functional Reorganization of Motor and Limbic Circuits after Exercise Training in a Rat Model of Bilateral Parkinsonism

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    Wang, Zhuo; Myers, Kalisa G.; Guo, Yumei; Ocampo, Marco A.; Pang, Raina D.; Jakowec, Michael W.; Holschneider, Daniel P.

    2013-01-01

    Exercise training is widely used for neurorehabilitation of Parkinson’s disease (PD). However, little is known about the functional reorganization of the injured brain after long-term aerobic exercise. We examined the effects of 4 weeks of forced running wheel exercise in a rat model of dopaminergic deafferentation (bilateral, dorsal striatal 6-hydroxydopamine lesions). One week after training, cerebral perfusion was mapped during treadmill walking or at rest using [14C]-iodoantipyrine autoradiography. Regional cerebral blood flow-related tissue radioactivity (rCBF) was analyzed in three-dimensionally reconstructed brains by statistical parametric mapping. In non-exercised rats, lesions resulted in persistent motor deficits. Compared to sham-lesioned rats, lesioned rats showed altered functional brain activation during walking, including: 1. hypoactivation of the striatum and motor cortex; 2. hyperactivation of non-lesioned areas in the basal ganglia-thalamocortical circuit; 3. functional recruitment of the red nucleus, superior colliculus and somatosensory cortex; 4. hyperactivation of the ventrolateral thalamus, cerebellar vermis and deep nuclei, suggesting recruitment of the cerebellar-thalamocortical circuit; 5. hyperactivation of limbic areas (amygdala, hippocampus, ventral striatum, septum, raphe, insula). These findings show remarkable similarities to imaging findings reported in PD patients. Exercise progressively improved motor deficits in lesioned rats, while increasing activation in dorsal striatum and rostral secondary motor cortex, attenuating a hyperemia of the zona incerta and eliciting a functional reorganization of regions participating in the cerebellar-thalamocortical circuit. Both lesions and exercise increased activation in mesolimbic areas (amygdala, hippocampus, ventral striatum, laterodorsal tegmental n., ventral pallidum), as well as in related paralimbic regions (septum, raphe, insula). Exercise, but not lesioning, resulted in decreases

  3. α-Synuclein-induced dopaminergic neurodegeneration in a rat model of Parkinson's disease occurs independent of ATP13A2 (PARK9).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Guillaume; Musso, Alessandra; Tsika, Elpida; Fiser, Aris; Glauser, Liliane; Pletnikova, Olga; Schneider, Bernard L; Moore, Darren J

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the ATP13A2 (PARK9) gene cause early-onset, autosomal recessive Parkinson's disease (PD) and Kufor-Rakeb syndrome. ATP13A2 mRNA is spliced into three distinct isoforms encoding a P5-type ATPase involved in regulating heavy metal transport across vesicular membranes. Here, we demonstrate that three ATP13A2 mRNA isoforms are expressed in the normal human brain and are modestly increased in the cingulate cortex of PD cases. ATP13A2 can mediate protection toward a number of stressors in mammalian cells and can protect against α-synuclein-induced toxicity in cellular and invertebrate models of PD. Using a primary cortical neuronal model combined with lentiviral-mediated gene transfer, we demonstrate that human ATP13A2 isoforms 1 and 2 display selective neuroprotective effects toward toxicity induced by manganese and hydrogen peroxide exposure through an ATPase-independent mechanism. The familial PD mutations, F182L and G504R, abolish the neuroprotective effects of ATP13A2 consistent with a loss-of-function mechanism. We further demonstrate that the AAV-mediated overexpression of human ATP13A2 is not sufficient to attenuate dopaminergic neurodegeneration, neuropathology, and striatal dopamine and motoric deficits induced by human α-synuclein expression in a rat model of PD. Intriguingly, the delivery of an ATPase-deficient form of ATP13A2 (D513N) to the substantia nigra is sufficient to induce dopaminergic neuronal degeneration and motor deficits in rats, potentially suggesting a dominant-negative mechanism of action. Collectively, our data demonstrate a distinct lack of ATP13A2-mediated protection against α-synuclein-induced neurotoxicity in the rat nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathway, and limited neuroprotective capacity overall, and raise doubts about the potential of ATP13A2 as a therapeutic target for PD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. [Alternation of proteins in brain of Parkinson's disease model rats after the transplantation of TH-NTN gene modified bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yue; Chang, Cheng; Zhang, Jie-wen; Gao, Xiao-qun

    2012-09-04

    To explore the effects of tyrosine hydroxylase-neurturin (TH-NTN) gene modified bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell (BMSC) transplantation in Parkinson's disease (PD) model rats and the alternations of correlated proteins. The PD rat model was established by the 2-point injection of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) into unilateral (right) striatum. Successful modeling rats were separated into PD, BMSC and TH-NTN-BMSC groups. BMSC and TH-NTN-BMSC groups were transplanted into BMSCs and TH-NTN gene modified BMSC cells separately into right striatum. After transplantation, ethology detection in all groups was made with an intraperitoneal injection of apomorphine (APO). Dopamine (DA) and Dihydroxyphenylacetic Acid (DOPAC) in striatum were detected by high performance liquid electrochemical analysis. TH and NTN proteins in right striatum were also analyzed by immunohistochemistry and Western blot. Finally the density of dopamine receptors in post synaptic density of dopaminergic synapses of corpus striatum were compared between each group by post-embedding immunogold electron microscopy. After an injection of APO, rotation frequency decreased in TH-NTN-BMSC group, i.e. (5.7 ± 1.3) circles/min versus (10.8 ± 2.2), (9.9 ± 1.2) circles/min in PD and BMSC groups (P TH-NTN-BMSC group versus (923 ± 132)/µm(2) in PD and (860 ± 116)/µm(2) in BMSC groups was also found. The combined therapy of TH and NTN genes increases the synthesis of DA and also protects the dopaminergic neurons to achieve double therapeutic effects. It may provide potential innovations of PD genetic therapy.

  5. Evaluation of blood-brain barrier transport and CNS drug metabolism in diseased and control brain after intravenous L-DOPA in a unilateral rat model of Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravenstijn Paulien GM

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Changes in blood-brain barrier (BBB functionality have been implicated in Parkinson's disease. This study aimed to investigate BBB transport of L-DOPA transport in conjunction with its intra-brain conversion, in both control and diseased cerebral hemispheres in the unilateral rat rotenone model of Parkinson's disease. Methods In Lewis rats, at 14 days after unilateral infusion of rotenone into the medial forebrain bundle, L-DOPA was administered intravenously (10, 25 or 50 mg/kg. Serial blood samples and brain striatal microdialysates were analysed for L-DOPA, and the dopamine metabolites DOPAC and HVA. Ex-vivo brain tissue was analyzed for changes in tyrosine hydroxylase staining as a biomarker for Parkinson's disease severity. Data were analysed by population pharmacokinetic analysis (NONMEM to compare BBB transport of L-DOPA in conjunction with the conversion of L-DOPA into DOPAC and HVA, in control and diseased cerebral hemisphere. Results Plasma pharmacokinetics of L-DOPA could be described by a 3-compartmental model. In rotenone responders (71%, no difference in L-DOPA BBB transport was found between diseased and control cerebral hemisphere. However, in the diseased compared with the control side, basal microdialysate levels of DOPAC and HVA were substantially lower, whereas following L-DOPA administration their elimination rates were higher. Conclusions Parkinson's disease-like pathology, indicated by a huge reduction of tyrosine hydroxylase as well as by substantially reduced levels and higher elimination rates of DOPAC and HVA, does not result in changes in BBB transport of L-DOPA. Taking the results of this study and that of previous ones, it can be concluded that changes in BBB functionality are not a specific characteristic of Parkinson's disease, and cannot account for the decreased benefit of L-DOPA at later stages of Parkinson's disease.

  6. Role of Serotonin Neurons in L-DOPA- and Graft-Induced Dyskinesia in a Rat Model of Parkinson's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eunju Shin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available L-DOPA, the most effective drug to treat motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease, causes abnormal involuntary movements, limiting its use in advanced stages of the disease. An increasing body of evidence points to the serotonin system as a key player in the appearance of L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia (LID. In fact, exogenously administered L-DOPA can be taken up by serotonin neurons, converted to dopamine and released as a false transmitter, contributing to pulsatile stimulation of striatal dopamine receptors. Accordingly, destruction of serotonin fibers or silencing serotonin neurons by serotonin agonists could counteract LID in animal models. Recent clinical work has also shown that serotonin neurons are present in the caudate/putamen of patients grafted with embryonic ventral mesencephalic cells, producing intense serotonin hyperinnervation. These patients experience graft-induced dyskinesia (GID, a type of dyskinesia phenotypically similar to the one induced by L-DOPA but independent from its administration. Interestingly, the 5-HT1A receptor agonist buspirone has been shown to suppress GID in these patients, suggesting that serotonin neurons might be involved in the etiology of GID as for LID. In this paper we will discuss the experimental and clinical evidence supporting the involvement of the serotonin system in both LID and GID.

  7. Effect of l-DOPA on local field potential relationship between the pedunculopontine nucleus and primary motor cortex in a rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Xiwen; Wang, Xuenan; Xie, Jinlu; Zhang, Xiao; Wang, Xiusong; Hou, Yabing; Lei, Chengdong; Li, Min; Han, Hongyu; Yao, Xiaomeng; Zhang, Qun; Wang, Min

    2016-12-15

    Levodopa (l-DOPA) has been proved to reverse the pathologic neuron activities in many brain regions related to Parkinson's disease (PD). But little is known about the effect of l-DOPA on the altered electrophysiological coherent activities between pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN) and motor cortex. To investigate this, local field potentials (LFPs) of PPN and primary motor cortex (M1) were recorded simultaneously in control, 6-hydroxydopamine lesioned and lesioned rats with l-DOPA chronic treatment. The results revealed that in resting state, chronic l-DOPA treatment could correct the suppressed power of LFPs in PPN and M1 in low-frequency band (1-7Hz) and the enhanced power in high-frequency band (7-70Hz in PPN and 12-70Hz in M1) of lesioned rats. In locomotor state, l-DOPA treatment could correct the alterations in most of frequency bands except the δ band in PPN and α band in M1. Moreover, l-DOPA could also reverse the altered coherent relationships caused by dopamine depletion in resting state between PPN and M1 in β band. And in locomotor state, l-DOPA had therapeutic effect on the alterations in δ and β bands but not in the α band. These findings provide evidence that l-DOPA can reverse the altered LFP activities in PPN and M1 and their relationships in a rat model of PD, which contributes to better understanding the electrophysiological mechanisms of the pathophysiology and therapy of PD. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Neuroprotective effects of vildagliptin in rat rotenone Parkinson's disease model: role of RAGE-NFκB and Nrf2-antioxidant signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelsalam, Rania M; Safar, Marwa M

    2015-06-01

    Gliptins have been recently shown to conquer neuronal degeneration in cell cultures via modulating glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1. This peptide produced in the gut not only crosses the blood-brain barrier but is also synthesized in the brain and acts on GLP-1R exerting central anti-inflammatory and antiapoptotic effects, thus impeding neuronal damage. This study investigated the antiparkinsonian effect of vildagliptin, a dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP)-4 inhibitor in a rat rotenone model targeting mainly the RAGE-NFκB/Nrf2-signaling pathways, to judge the potential anti-inflammatory/antioxidant effects of the drug. Vildagliptin markedly improved the motor performance in the open field and rotarod tests, effects that were emphasized by the accompanied reduction in striatal dopamine content. It modified the striatal energy level (ADP/ATP) associated with partial antagonism of body weight reduction. This incretin enhancer suppressed nuclear factor (NF)κB and, consequently, the downstream inflammatory mediator tumor necrosis factor-α. Normalization of receptor for advanced glycated end product (RAGE) is a main finding which justifies the anti-inflammatory effects of vildagliptin, together with hampering striatal inducible nitric oxide synthase, intracellular adhesion molecule-1 as well as myeloperoxidase. The antioxidant potential of vildagliptin was depicted as entailing reduction in thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances and the transcriptional factor Nrf-2 level. Vildagliptin guarded against neuronal demise through an antiapoptotic effect as reflected by the reduction in the mitochondrial matrix component cytochrome c and the key downstream executioner caspase-3. In conclusion, vildagliptin is endowed with various neuroprotective effects and thus can be a promising candidate for the management of Parkinson's disease. In the rat rotenone model of Parkinson's disease (PD), striatal RAGE/NFκB signaling was up-regulated associated with elevated levels of inflammatory

  9. Contrasting gene expression patterns induced by levodopa and pramipexole treatments in the rat model of Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taravini, Irene R.; Larramendy, Celia; Gomez, Gimena; Saborido, Mariano D.; Spaans, Floor; Fresno, Cristobal; Gonzalez, German A.; Fernandez, Elmer; Murer, Mario G.; Gershanik, Oscar S.

    Whether the treatment of Parkinson's disease has to be initiated with levodopa or a D2 agonist like pramipexole remains debatable. Levodopa is more potent against symptoms than D2 agonists, but D2 agonists are less prone to induce motor complications and may have neuroprotective effects. Although

  10. Assessing the Role of Dopamine in Limb and Cranial-Oromotor Control in a Rat Model of Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Jacqueline R.; Ciucci, Michelle R.; Jacobs, Amber N.; Tews, Nathan; Russell, John A.; Ahrens, Allison M.; Ma, Sean T.; Britt, Joshua M.; Cormack, Lawrence K.; Schallert, Timothy

    2011-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder primarily characterized by sensorimotor dysfunction. The neuropathology of PD includes a loss of dopamine (DA) neurons of the nigrostriatal pathway. Classic signs of the disease include rigidity, bradykinesia, and postural instability. However, as many as 90% of patients also experience…

  11. Evaluation of nigrostriatal damage and its change over weeks in a rat model of Parkinson's disease: small animal positron emission tomography studies with [11C]β-CFT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Limin; Wang Yong; Li Bo; Jia Jun; Sun Zuoli; Zhang Jinming; Tian Jiahe; Wang Xiaomin

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: The cardinal pathological feature of Parkinson's disease (PD) is progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons. Since dopamine transporter (DAT) is a protein located presynaptically on dopaminergic nerve terminals, radioligands that bind to these sites are promising radiopharmaceuticals for evaluation of the integrity of the dopamine system. This study using positron emission tomography (PET) tracers, [ 11 C]-2β-carbomethoxy-3β-(4-fluorophenyl)-tropane ([ 11 C]β-CFT, radioligand for DAT), was aimed at evaluating the degree of nigrostriatal damage and its change over weeks in a rat model of PD. Methods: The brains of these rats were unilaterally lesioned by mechanical transection of the nigrostriatal dopamine pathway at the medial forebrain bundle (MFB). Behavioral studies were carried out by apomorphine (APO) challenge prior to and 1, 2 and 4 weeks after MFB axotomy. Small animal PET scans were performed 2 days after the behavioral test. Immunohistochemistry was conducted 4 days after the last PET scan. Results: Compared with the contralateral intact side, a progressively decreased [ 11 C]β-CFT binding was observed on the lesioned side which correlated inversely with the APO-induced rotations. Postmortem immunohistochemical studies confirmed the loss of both striatal dopamine fibers and nigral neurons on the lesioned side. Conclusion: These findings not only demonstrate that the neuronal degeneration in this model is relatively slow, but also suggest [ 11 C]β-CFT is a sensitive marker to monitor the degree of nigrostriatal damage and its change over weeks. This marker can be used prospectively to study the progression of the disease, thereby making detection of early phases of PD possible.

  12. Amniotic fluid stem cells with low γ-interferon response showed behavioral improvement in Parkinsonism rat model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Jen Chang

    Full Text Available Amniotic fluid stem cells (AFSCs are multipotent stem cells that may be used in transplantation medicine. In this study, AFSCs established from amniocentesis were characterized on the basis of surface marker expression and differentiation potential. To further investigate the properties of AFSCs for translational applications, we examined the cell surface expression of human leukocyte antigens (HLA of these cells and estimated the therapeutic effect of AFSCs in parkinsonian rats. The expression profiles of HLA-II and transcription factors were compared between AFSCs and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs following treatment with γ-IFN. We found that stimulation of AFSCs with γ-IFN prompted only a slight increase in the expression of HLA-Ia and HLA-E, and the rare HLA-II expression could also be observed in most AFSCs samples. Consequently, the expression of CIITA and RFX5 was weakly induced by γ-IFN stimulation of AFSCs compared to that of BMMSCs. In the transplantation test, Sprague Dawley rats with 6-hydroxydopamine lesioning of the substantia nigra were used as a parkinsonian-animal model. Following the negative γ-IFN response AFSCs injection, apomorphine-induced rotation was reduced by 75% in AFSCs engrafted parkinsonian rats but was increased by 53% in the control group after 12-weeks post-transplantation. The implanted AFSCs were viable, and were able to migrate into the brain's circuitry and express specific proteins of dopamine neurons, such as tyrosine hydroxylase and dopamine transporter. In conclusion, the relative insensitivity AFSCs to γ-IFN implies that AFSCs might have immune-tolerance in γ-IFN inflammatory conditions. Furthermore, the effective improvement of AFSCs transplantation for apomorphine-induced rotation paves the way for the clinical application in parkinsonian therapy.

  13. The expression and significance of tyrosine hydroxylase in the brain tissue of Parkinsons disease rats

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Yuan; Lian, Yajun; Ma, Yunqing; Wu, Chuanjie; Zheng, Yake; Xie, Nanchang

    2017-01-01

    The expression and significance of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) in brain tissue of rats with Parkinson's disease (PD) were explored and analyzed. A total of 120 clean-grade and healthy adult Wistar rats weighing 180–240 g were randomly divided equally into four groups according to the random number table method. Rats were sacrificed before and after the model establishment for 3, 6 or 8 weeks. The number of revolutions in rats was observed and the relative expression of TH mRNA in brain tissue w...

  14. Anti-dyskinetic mechanisms of amantadine and dextromethorphan in the 6-OHDA rat model of Parkinson's disease: role of NMDA vs. 5-HT1A receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paquette, Melanie A; Martinez, Alex A; Macheda, Teresa; Meshul, Charles K; Johnson, Steven W; Berger, S Paul; Giuffrida, Andrea

    2012-11-01

    Amantadine and dextromethorphan suppress levodopa (L-DOPA)-induced dyskinesia (LID) in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and abnormal involuntary movements (AIMs) in the unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) rat model. These effects have been attributed to N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) antagonism. However, amantadine and dextromethorphan are also thought to block serotonin (5-HT) uptake and cause 5-HT overflow, leading to stimulation of 5-HT(1A) receptors, which has been shown to reduce LID. We undertook a study in 6-OHDA rats to determine whether the anti-dyskinetic effects of these two compounds are mediated by NMDA antagonism and/or 5-HT(1A) agonism. In addition, we assessed the sensorimotor effects of these drugs using the Vibrissae-Stimulated Forelimb Placement and Cylinder tests. Our data show that the AIM-suppressing effect of amantadine was not affected by the 5-HT(1A) antagonist WAY-100635, but was partially reversed by the NMDA agonist d-cycloserine. Conversely, the AIM-suppressing effect of dextromethorphan was prevented by WAY-100635 but not by d-cycloserine. Neither amantadine nor dextromethorphan affected the therapeutic effects of L-DOPA in sensorimotor tests. We conclude that the anti-dyskinetic effect of amantadine is partially dependent on NMDA antagonism, while dextromethorphan suppresses AIMs via indirect 5-HT(1A) agonism. Combined with previous work from our group, our results support the investigation of 5-HT(1A) agonists as pharmacotherapies for LID in PD patients. © 2012 The Authors. European Journal of Neuroscience © 2012 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. Bee Venom Alleviates Motor Deficits and Modulates the Transfer of Cortical Information through the Basal Ganglia in Rat Models of Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurice, Nicolas; Deltheil, Thierry; Melon, Christophe; Degos, Bertrand; Mourre, Christiane; Amalric, Marianne; Kerkerian-Le Goff, Lydia

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence points to a neuroprotective action of bee venom on nigral dopamine neurons in animal models of Parkinson's disease (PD). Here we examined whether bee venom also displays a symptomatic action by acting on the pathological functioning of the basal ganglia in rat PD models. Bee venom effects were assessed by combining motor behavior analyses and in vivo electrophysiological recordings in the substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNr, basal ganglia output structure) in pharmacological (neuroleptic treatment) and lesional (unilateral intranigral 6-hydroxydopamine injection) PD models. In the hemi-parkinsonian 6-hydroxydopamine lesion model, subchronic bee venom treatment significantly alleviates contralateral forelimb akinesia and apomorphine-induced rotations. Moreover, a single injection of bee venom reverses haloperidol-induced catalepsy, a pharmacological model reminiscent of parkinsonian akinetic deficit. This effect is mimicked by apamin, a blocker of small conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (SK) channels, and blocked by CyPPA, a positive modulator of these channels, suggesting the involvement of SK channels in the bee venom antiparkinsonian action. In vivo electrophysiological recordings in the substantia nigra pars reticulata (basal ganglia output structure) showed no significant effect of BV on the mean neuronal discharge frequency or pathological bursting activity. In contrast, analyses of the neuronal responses evoked by motor cortex stimulation show that bee venom reverses the 6-OHDA- and neuroleptic-induced biases in the influence exerted by the direct inhibitory and indirect excitatory striatonigral circuits. These data provide the first evidence for a beneficial action of bee venom on the pathological functioning of the cortico-basal ganglia circuits underlying motor PD symptoms with potential relevance to the symptomatic treatment of this disease.

  16. Polylysine-modified polyethylenimine (PEI-PLL) mediated VEGF gene delivery protects dopaminergic neurons in cell culture and in rat models of Parkinson's Disease (PD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikh, Muhammad Abid; Malik, Yousra Saeed; Xing, Zhenkai; Guo, Zhaopei; Tian, Huayu; Zhu, Xiaojuan; Chen, Xuesi

    2017-05-01

    Parkinson's Disease (PD) is a chronic neurodegenerative disorder characterized by motor deficits which result from the progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons. Gene therapy using growth factors such as VEGF seems to be a viable approach for potential therapeutic treatment of PD. In this study, we utilized a novel non-viral gene carrier designated as PEI-PLL synthesized by our laboratory to deliver VEGF gene to study its effect by using both cell culture as well as animal models of PD. For cell culture experiments, we utilized 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) mediated cell death model of MN9D cells following transfection with either a control plasmid or VEGF expressing plasmid. As compared to control transfected cells, PEI-PLL mediated VEGF gene delivery to MN9D cells resulted in increased cell viability, increase in the number of Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) positive cells and decreased apoptosis following 6-OHDA insult. Next, we studied the therapeutic potential of PEI-PLL mediated VEGF gene delivery in SNPc by using unilateral 6-OHDA Medial forebrain bundle (MFB) lesion model of PD in rats. VEGF administration prevented the loss of motor functions induced by 6-OHDA as determined by behavior analysis. Similarly, VEGF inhibited the 6-OHDA mediated loss of DA neurons in Substantia Nigra Pars Compacta (SNPc) as well as DA nerve fibers in striatum as determined by TH immunostaining. In addition, PEI-PLL mediated VEGF gene delivery also prevented apoptosis and microglial activation in PD rat models. Together, these results clearly demonstrated the beneficial effects of PEI-PLL mediated VEGF gene delivery on dopaminergic system in both cell culture and animal models of PD. In this report, we exploited the potential of PEI-PLL to deliver VEGF gene for the potential therapeutic treatment of PD by using both cell culture and animal models of PD. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report describing the use of novel polymeric gene carriers for the delivery of VEGF gene

  17. Impact of L-DOPA treatment on regional cerebral blood flow and metabolism in the basal ganglia in a rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohlin, K Elisabet; Sebastianutto, Irene; Adkins, Chris E; Lundblad, Cornelia; Lockman, Paul R; Cenci, M Angela

    2012-05-15

    Large increases in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) have been measured in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) following the administration of L-DOPA, but the underlying mechanisms have remained unknown. In this study, rats with unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesions were used to compare patterns of rCBF and regional cerebral glucose utilisation (rCGU) in chronically L-DOPA-treated subjects following a final injection of L-DOPA or saline. The same animal model was used to the leakage of a blood-brain barrier (BBB) tracer molecule at 60 min vs. 24h following the last L-DOPA injection of a chronic treatment. All the parameters under investigation were examined with brain autoradiography following intravenous injections of specific radiotracers in awake animals ([14C]-iodoantipyrine for rCBF, [14C]-2-deoxyglucose for rCGU, and [14C]-α-aminoisobutyric acid for BBB leakage). Significant changes in rCBF and rCGU on the side ipsilateral to the 6-OHDA lesion relative to the non-lesioned side were seen at 60 min ("ON") but not 24h ("OFF") following L-DOPA administration. These changes were not seen in sham-operated rats. In the output nuclei of the basal ganglia (the entopeduncular nucleus and the substantia nigra pars reticulata) both rCBF and rCGU were elevated both in acutely L-DOPA-treated rats and chronically L-DOPA-treated rats displaying dyskinesia, but did not change significantly in chronically L-DOPA-treated non-dyskinetic cases. Acutely and chronically L-DOPA-treated rats with dyskinesia exhibited increases in rCBF "ON L-DOPA" also in the motor cortex, the striatum, and the globus pallidus, but the corresponding changes in rCGU did not show the same direction, magnitude, and/or relative group differences. The uptake of a BBB tracer (studied in the striatum and the substantia nigra reticulata in chronically L-DOPA treated rats) was significantly higher ON vs. OFF L-DOPA. The present results are the first to show that the administration of L-DOPA is

  18. Targeting caspase-3 as dual therapeutic benefits by RNAi facilitating brain-targeted nanoparticles in a rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Guo, Yubo; An, Sai; Kuang, Yuyang; He, Xi; Ma, Haojun; Li, Jianfeng; Lu, Jing; Lv, Jing; Zhang, Ning; Jiang, Chen

    2013-01-01

    The activation of caspase-3 is an important hallmark in Parkinson's disease. It could induce neuron death by apoptosis and microglia activation by inflammation. As a result, inhibition the activation of caspase-3 would exert synergistic dual effect in brain in order to prevent the progress of Parkinson's disease. Silencing caspase-3 genes by RNA interference could inhibit the activation of caspase-3. We developed a brain-targeted gene delivery system based on non-viral gene vector, dendrigraft poly-L-lysines. A rabies virus glycoprotein peptide with 29 amino-acid linked to dendrigraft poly-L-lysines could render gene vectors the ability to get across the blood brain barrier by specific receptor mediated transcytosis. The resultant brain-targeted vector was complexed with caspase-3 short hairpin RNA coding plasmid DNA, yielding nanoparticles. In vivo imaging analysis indicated the targeted nanoparticles could accumulate in brain more efficiently than non-targeted ones. A multiple dosing regimen by weekly intravenous administration of the nanoparticles could reduce activated casapse-3 levels, significantly improve locomotor activity and rescue dopaminergic neuronal loss and in Parkinson's disease rats' brain. These results indicated the rabies virus glycoprotein peptide modified brain-targeted nanoparticles were promising gene delivery system for RNA interference to achieve anti-apoptotic and anti-inflammation synergistic therapeutic effects by down-regulation the expression and activation of caspase-3.

  19. Targeting caspase-3 as dual therapeutic benefits by RNAi facilitating brain-targeted nanoparticles in a rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Liu

    Full Text Available The activation of caspase-3 is an important hallmark in Parkinson's disease. It could induce neuron death by apoptosis and microglia activation by inflammation. As a result, inhibition the activation of caspase-3 would exert synergistic dual effect in brain in order to prevent the progress of Parkinson's disease. Silencing caspase-3 genes by RNA interference could inhibit the activation of caspase-3. We developed a brain-targeted gene delivery system based on non-viral gene vector, dendrigraft poly-L-lysines. A rabies virus glycoprotein peptide with 29 amino-acid linked to dendrigraft poly-L-lysines could render gene vectors the ability to get across the blood brain barrier by specific receptor mediated transcytosis. The resultant brain-targeted vector was complexed with caspase-3 short hairpin RNA coding plasmid DNA, yielding nanoparticles. In vivo imaging analysis indicated the targeted nanoparticles could accumulate in brain more efficiently than non-targeted ones. A multiple dosing regimen by weekly intravenous administration of the nanoparticles could reduce activated casapse-3 levels, significantly improve locomotor activity and rescue dopaminergic neuronal loss and in Parkinson's disease rats' brain. These results indicated the rabies virus glycoprotein peptide modified brain-targeted nanoparticles were promising gene delivery system for RNA interference to achieve anti-apoptotic and anti-inflammation synergistic therapeutic effects by down-regulation the expression and activation of caspase-3.

  20. Correlative single photon emission computed tomography imaging of [{sup 123}I]altropane binding in the rat model of Parkinson's

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gleave, Jacqueline A. [Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, McMaster University, 1200 Main Street West, Hamilton, Ontario, L8N 3Z5 (Canada); Farncombe, Troy H.; Saab, Chantal [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hamilton Health Sciences, Hamilton, Ontario, L8N 3Z5 (Canada); Doering, Laurie C., E-mail: doering@mcmaster.ca [Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, McMaster University, 1200 Main Street West, Hamilton, Ontario, L8N 3Z5 (Canada)

    2011-07-15

    Introduction: This study used the dopamine transporter (DAT) probe, [{sup 123}I]-2{beta}-carbomethoxy-3{beta}-(4-fluorophenyl)-N-(3-iodo-E-allyl)nortropane ([{sup 123}I]altropane), to assess the DAT levels in the 6-hydroxydopamine rat model of Parkinson's disease. We sought to assess if the right to left [{sup 123}I]altropane striatal ratios correlated with dopamine content in the striatum and substantia nigra and with behavioural outcomes. Methods: [{sup 123}I]altropane images taken pre- and postlesion were acquired before and after the transplantation of neural stem/progenitor cells. The images obtained using [{sup 123}I]altropane and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) were compared with specific behavioural tests and the dopamine content assessed by high-performance liquid chromatography. Results: [{sup 123}I]altropane binding correlated with the content of dopamine in the striatum; however, [{sup 123}I]altropane binding did not correlate with the dopamine content in the substantia nigra. There was a significant correlation of altropane ratios with the cylinder test and the postural instability test, but not with amphetamine rotations. The low coefficient of determination (r{sup 2}) for these correlations indicated that [{sup 123}I]altropane SPECT was not a good predictor of behavioural outcomes. Conclusion: Our data reveal that [{sup 123}I]altropane predicts the integrity of the striatal dopamine nerve terminals, but does not predict the integrity of the nigrostriatal system. [{sup 123}I]altropane could be a useful marker to measure dopamine content in cell replacement therapies; however, it would not be able to evaluate outcomes for neuroprotective strategies.

  1. Pre-α-pro-GDNF and Pre-β-pro-GDNF Isoforms Are Neuroprotective in the 6-hydroxydopamine Rat Model of Parkinson's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna-Maija Penttinen

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF is one of the most studied neurotrophic factors. GDNF has two splice isoforms, full-length pre-α-pro-GDNF (α-GDNF and pre-β-pro-GDNF (β-GDNF, which has a 26 amino acid deletion in the pro-region. Thus far, studies have focused solely on the α-GDNF isoform, and nothing is known about the in vivo effects of the shorter β-GDNF variant. Here we compare for the first time the effects of overexpressed α-GDNF and β-GDNF in non-lesioned rat striatum and the partial 6-hydroxydopamine lesion model of Parkinson's disease. GDNF isoforms were overexpressed with their native pre-pro-sequences in the striatum using an adeno-associated virus (AAV vector, and the effects on motor performance and dopaminergic phenotype of the nigrostriatal pathway were assessed. In the non-lesioned striatum, both isoforms increased the density of dopamine transporter-positive fibers at 3 weeks after viral vector delivery. Although both isoforms increased the activity of the animals in cylinder assay, only α-GDNF enhanced the use of contralateral paw. Four weeks later, the striatal tyrosine hydroxylase (TH-immunoreactivity was decreased in both α-GDNF and β-GDNF treated animals. In the neuroprotection assay, both GDNF splice isoforms increased the number of TH-immunoreactive cells in the substantia nigra but did not promote behavioral recovery based on amphetamine-induced rotation or cylinder assays. Thus, the shorter GDNF isoform, β-GDNF, and the full-length α-isoform have comparable neuroprotective efficacy on dopamine neurons of the nigrostriatal circuitry.

  2. Piracetam and vinpocetine ameliorate rotenone-induced Parkinsonism in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaitone, Sawsan A; Abo-Elmatty, Dina M; Elshazly, Shimaa M

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the neuroprotective effect of the nootropic drugs, piracetam (PIR) and vinpocetine (VIN), in rotenone-induced Parkinsonism in rats. Sixty male rats were divided into 6 groups of 10 rats each. The groups were administered vehicle, control (rotenone, 1.5 mg/kg/48 h/6 doses, s.c.), PIR (100 and 200 mg/kg/day, p.o.) and VIN (3 and 6 mg/kg/day, p.o.). The motor performance of the rats was evaluated by the open field and pole test. Striatal dopamine level, malondialdehyde (MDA), reduced glutathione (GSH) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) were assayed. Histopathological study of the substantia nigra was also done. Results showed that rotenone-treated rats exhibited bradykinesia and motor impairment in the open-field test. In addition, GSH level was decreased whereas MDA and TNF-α increased in striata of rotenone-treated rats as compared to vehicle-treated rats. Marked degeneration of the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) neurons and depletion of striatal dopamine was also observed in the rotenone-treated rats. Treatment with PIR or VIN significantly reversed the locomotor deficits and increased striatal dopamine level. Treatment with VIN significantly (P<0.05) reduced the striatal level of MDA and GSH in comparison to rotenone group whereas TNF-α production was found to be significantly decreased in PIR group (P<0.05). VIN and PIR exhibit neuroprotective activity in rotenone-induced Parkinsonism. Hence, these nootropic agents may be considered as possible candidates in the treatment of Parkinson's disease.

  3. Histaminergic activity in a rodent model of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Przemysław; Noras, Lukasz; Jochem, Jerzy; Szkilnik, Ryszard; Brus, Halina; Körossy, Eva; Drab, Jacek; Kostrzewa, Richard M; Brus, Ryszard

    2009-04-01

    Rats lesioned shortly after birth with 6-OHDA have been proposed to be a near-ideal model of severe Parkinson's disease, because of non-lethality of the procedure, near-total destruction of nigrostriatal dopaminergic fibers, and near-total dopamine (DA) denervation of striatum. There are scarce data that in Parkinson's disease, activity of the central histaminergic system is increased. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine histamine content in the brain and the effect of histamine receptor antagonists on behavior of adult rats. At 3 days after birth, Wistar rats were pretreated with desipramine (20.0 mg/kg ip) 1 h before bilateral icv administration of the catecholaminergic neurotoxin 6-OHDA (67 microg base, on each side) or saline-ascorbic acid (0.1%) vehicle (control). At 8 weeks levels of DA and its metabolites L: -3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPAC) and homovanillic acid (HVA) were estimated in the striatum and frontal cortex by HPCL/ED technique. In the hypothalamus, hippocampus, frontal cortex, and medulla oblongata, the level of histamine was analyzed by immunoenzymatic method. Behavioral observations (locomotion, exploratory-, oral-, and stereotyped-activity) were additionally made on control and 6-OHDA neonatally lesioned rats. Effects of DA receptor agonists (SKF 38393, apomorphine) and histamine receptor antagonists (e.g., S(+)chlorpheniramine, H(1); cimetidine, H(2); thioperamide, H(3) agonist) were determined. We confirmed that 6-OHDA significantly reduced contents of DA and its metabolites in the brain in adulthood. Histamine content was significantly increased in the hypothalamus, hipocampus, and medulla oblongata. Moreover, in 6-OHDA-lesioned rats behavioral response was altered mainly by thioperamide (H(3) antagonist). These findings indicate that histamine and the central histaminergic system are altered in the brain of rats lesioned to model Parkinson's disease, and that histaminergic neurons exert a modulating role in Parkinsonian 6

  4. Exercise-induced rescue of tongue function without striatal dopamine sparing in a rat neurotoxin model of Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciucci, Michelle R; Schaser, Allison J; Russell, John A

    2013-09-01

    Unilateral lesions to the medial forebrain bundle with 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lead to force and timing deficits during a complex licking task. We hypothesized that training targeting tongue force generation during licking would improve timing and force measures and also lead to striatal dopamine sparing. Nine month-old male Fisher344/Brown Norway rats were used in this experiment. Sixteen rats were in the control condition and received tongue exercise (n=8) or no exercise (n=8). Fourteen rats were in the 6-OHDA lesion condition and underwent tongue exercise (n=7) and or no exercise (n=7). Following 4 weeks of training and post-training measures, all animals underwent bilateral stimulation of the hypoglossal nerves to measure muscle contractile properties and were then transcardially perfused and brain tissues collected for immunohistochemistry to examine striatal dopamine content. Results demonstrated that exercise animals performed better for maximal force, average force, and press rate than their no-exercise counterparts, and the 6-OHDA animals that underwent exercise performed as well as the Control No Exercise group. Interestingly, there were no group differences for tetanic muscle force, despite behavioral recovery of forces. Additionally, behavioral and neurochemical analyses indicate that there were no differences in striatal dopamine. Thus, targeted exercise can improve tongue force and timing deficits related to 6-OHDA lesions and this exercise likely has a central, versus peripheral (muscle strength) mechanism. However, this mechanism is not related to sparing of striatal dopamine content. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Neurophysiology of Drosophila Models of Parkinson's Disease

    OpenAIRE

    West, Ryan J. H.; Furmston, Rebecca; Williams, Charles A. C.; Elliott, Christopher J. H.

    2015-01-01

    We provide an insight into the role Drosophila has played in elucidating neurophysiological perturbations associated with Parkinson's disease- (PD-) related genes. Synaptic signalling deficits are observed in motor, central, and sensory systems. Given the neurological impact of disease causing mutations within these same genes in humans the phenotypes observed in fly are of significant interest. As such we observe four unique opportunities provided by fly nervous system models of Parkinson's ...

  6. Comparative studies of D2 receptors and cerebral blood flow in hemi-parkinsonism rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Y.; Lin, X.

    2000-01-01

    To study the relationship between dopamine (DA) D 2 receptors and cerebral blood flow in hemiparkinsonism rats. Hemi-parkinsonism rats were made by stereotaxic 6-hydroxy dopamine (6-OH-DA) lesions in substantia nigra and ventral tegmental area, apomorphine (Apo) which could induce the successful model rat rotates toward the intact side was used to screen that rats, 125 I-IBZM in vivo autoradiography and 99m Tc-HM-PAO regional brain biodistribution were used to study D 2 receptors and cerebral blood flow. The HPLC-ECD were used to measure the concentration of DA and it metabolites homovanillic acid (HVA), 3,4-dehydroxyphenyl acetic acid (DOPAC) in bilateral striatum (ST). The lesioned side ST DA and its metabolites HVA DOPAC reduced significantly than that of the intact side and pseudo-operated control group, ST/cerebellum (CB) 125 I-IBZM uptake ratio was 8.04 ±0.71 in lesioned side of hemi-parkinsonism rats, significantly increased compared with the intact side and the pseudo-operated group (p 99m Tc 30.1±4.53% enhancement as compared to the intact side, and also show good correlation with 30 min Apo induced rotation numbers (r=0.98), the regional cerebral blood flow study didn't show significant difference between bilateral brain cortex area (p>0.05). The DA content decreased significantly and induced an up-regulation of ST D 2 receptor binding sites in 6-OH-DA lesioned side in hemi-parkinsonism rats, the increased percentage of lesioned-intact side ST/CB 125 I-IBZM uptake ratio showed good correlation with rotation behavior induced by Apo. Compare with cerebral blood flow, D 2 receptor reflected by IBZM seems to be more specific and earlier to detect the cerebral functional impairment in experimental hemi-parkinsonism

  7. High-frequency stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus modifies the expression of vesicular glutamate transporters in basal ganglia in a rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favier, Mathieu; Carcenac, Carole; Drui, Guillaume; Boulet, Sabrina; El Mestikawy, Salah; Savasta, Marc

    2013-12-05

    It has been suggested that glutamatergic system hyperactivity may be related to the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD). Vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUT1-3) import glutamate into synaptic vesicles and are key anatomical and functional markers of glutamatergic excitatory transmission. Both VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 have been identified as definitive markers of glutamatergic neurons, but VGLUT 3 is also expressed by non glutamatergic neurons. VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 are thought to be expressed in a complementary manner in the cortex and the thalamus (VL/VM), in glutamatergic neurons involved in different physiological functions. Chronic high-frequency stimulation (HFS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is the neurosurgical therapy of choice for the management of motor deficits in patients with advanced PD. STN-HFS is highly effective, but its mechanisms of action remain unclear. This study examines the effect of STN-HFS on VGLUT1-3 expression in different brain nuclei involved in motor circuits, namely the basal ganglia (BG) network, in normal and 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesioned rats. Here we report that: 1) Dopamine(DA)-depletion did not affect VGLUT1 and VGLUT3 expression but significantly decreased that of VGLUT2 in almost all BG structures studied; 2) STN-HFS did not change VGLUT1-3 expression in the different brain areas of normal rats while, on the contrary, it systematically induced a significant increase of their expression in DA-depleted rats and 3) STN-HFS reversed the decrease in VGLUT2 expression induced by the DA-depletion. These results show for the first time a comparative analysis of changes of expression for the three VGLUTs induced by STN-HFS in the BG network of normal and hemiparkinsonian rats. They provide evidence for the involvement of VGLUT2 in the modulation of BG cicuits and in particular that of thalamostriatal and thalamocortical pathways suggesting their key role in its therapeutic effects for alleviating PD motor symptoms.

  8. Improved dopamine transporter binding activity after bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation in a rat model of Parkinson's disease: small animal positron emission tomography study with F-18 FP-CIT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Bok-Nam; Lee, Kwanjae; An, Young-Sil [School of Medicine, Ajou University, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Woncheon-dong, Yeongtong-gu, Gyeonggi-do, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jang-Hee; Park, So Hyun [Ajou University School of Medicine, Department of Pathology, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-01

    We evaluated the effects of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) in a model of Parkinson's disease (PD) using serial F-18 fluoropropylcarbomethoxyiodophenylnortropane (FP-CIT) PET. Hemiparkinsonian rats were treated with intravenously injected BMSCs, and animals without stem cell therapy were used as the controls. Serial FP-CIT PET was performed after therapy. The ratio of FP-CIT uptake in the lesion side to uptake in the normal side was measured. The changes in FP-CIT uptake were also analyzed using SPM. Behavioural and histological changes were observed using the rotational test and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-reactive cells. FP-CIT uptake ratio was significantly different in the BMSCs treated group (n = 28) at each time point. In contrast, there was no difference in the ratio in control rats (n = 25) at any time point. SPM analysis also revealed that dopamine transporter binding activity was enhanced in the right basal ganglia area in only the BMSC therapy group. In addition, rats that received BMSC therapy also exhibited significantly improved rotational behaviour and preservation of TH-positive neurons compared to controls. The therapeutic effect of intravenously injected BMSCs in a rat model of PD was confirmed by dopamine transporter PET imaging, rotational functional studies, and histopathological evaluation. (orig.)

  9. Improved dopamine transporter binding activity after bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation in a rat model of Parkinson's disease: small animal positron emission tomography study with F-18 FP-CIT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Bok-Nam; Lee, Kwanjae; An, Young-Sil; Kim, Jang-Hee; Park, So Hyun

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) in a model of Parkinson's disease (PD) using serial F-18 fluoropropylcarbomethoxyiodophenylnortropane (FP-CIT) PET. Hemiparkinsonian rats were treated with intravenously injected BMSCs, and animals without stem cell therapy were used as the controls. Serial FP-CIT PET was performed after therapy. The ratio of FP-CIT uptake in the lesion side to uptake in the normal side was measured. The changes in FP-CIT uptake were also analyzed using SPM. Behavioural and histological changes were observed using the rotational test and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-reactive cells. FP-CIT uptake ratio was significantly different in the BMSCs treated group (n = 28) at each time point. In contrast, there was no difference in the ratio in control rats (n = 25) at any time point. SPM analysis also revealed that dopamine transporter binding activity was enhanced in the right basal ganglia area in only the BMSC therapy group. In addition, rats that received BMSC therapy also exhibited significantly improved rotational behaviour and preservation of TH-positive neurons compared to controls. The therapeutic effect of intravenously injected BMSCs in a rat model of PD was confirmed by dopamine transporter PET imaging, rotational functional studies, and histopathological evaluation. (orig.)

  10. Impact of surgery targeting the caudal intralaminar thalamic nuclei on the pathophysiological functioning of basal ganglia in a rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerkerian-Le Goff, Lydia; Bacci, Jean-Jacques; Jouve, Loreline; Melon, Christophe; Salin, Pascal

    2009-02-16

    There is accumulating evidence that the centre median-parafascicular (CM/Pf) complex of the thalamus is implicated in basal ganglia-related movement disorders and notably in Parkinson's disease. However, the impact of the changes affecting CM/Pf on the pathophysiological functioning of basal ganglia in parkinsonian state remains poorly understood. To address this issue, we have examined the effects of excitotoxic lesion of CM/Pf and of 6-hydroxydopamine-induced lesion of nigral dopamine neurons, separately or in association, on gene expression of markers of neuronal activity in the rat basal ganglia (striatal neuropeptide precursors, GAD67, cytochrome oxidase subunit I) by quantitative in situ hybridization histochemistry. CM/Pf lesion prevented the changes produced by the dopamine denervation in the components of the indirect pathway connecting the striatum to the output structures (striatopallidal neurons, globus pallidus, subthalamic nucleus), and among the output structures, in the entopeduncular nucleus. Preliminary data on the effects of deep brain stimulation of CM/Pf in rats with nigral dopamine lesion show that this surgical approach produces efficient anti-akinetic effect associated with partial reversal of the dopamine lesion-induced increase in striatal preproenkephalin A mRNA levels, a marker of the striatopallidal neurons. These data, which provide substrates for the potential of CM/Pf surgery in the treatment of movement disorders, are discussed in comparison with the effects of lesion or deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus, the currently preferred target for the surgical treatment of PD.

  11. The effect of low frequency stimulation of the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus on basal ganglia in a rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Eunkyoung; Song, Inho; Jang, Dong Pyo; Kim, In Young

    2014-08-08

    The pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN) has recently been introduced as an alternative target to the subthalamic nucleus (STN) or globus pallidus internus (GPi) for the treatment of advanced Parkinson's disease with severe and medically intractable axial symptoms such as gait and postural impairment. However, it is little known about how electrical stimulation of the PPN affects control of neuronal activities between the PPN and basal ganglia. We examined how low frequency stimulation of the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus (PPTg) affects control of neuronal activities between the PPN and basal ganglia in 6-OHDA lesioned rats. In order to identify the effect of low frequency stimulation on the PPTg, neuronal activity in both the STN and substantia nigra par reticulata (SNr) were recorded and subjected to quantitative analysis, including analysis of firing rates and firing patterns. In this study, we found that the firing rates of the STN and SNr were suppressed during low frequency stimulation of the PPTg. However, the firing pattern, in contrast to the firing rate, did not exhibit significant changes in either the STN or SNr of 6-OHDA lesioned rats during low frequency stimulation of the PPTg. In addition, we also found that the firing rate of STN and SNr neurons displaying burst and random pattern were decreased by low frequency stimulation of PPTg, while the neurons displaying regular pattern were not affected. These results indicate that low frequency stimulation of the PPTg affects neuronal activity in both the STN and SNr, and may represent electrophysiological efficacy of low frequency PPN stimulation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. A subpopulation of dopaminergic neurons co-expresses serotonin in ventral mesencephalic cultures but not after intrastriatal transplantation in a rat model of Parkinsons disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Di Santo, Stefano; Seiler, Stefanie; Ducray, Angélique

    2017-01-01

    Cell replacement therapy is a promising avenue into the investigation and treatment of Parkinson’s disease (PD) and in some cases significant long-term motor improvements have been demonstrated. The main source of donor tissue is the human fetal ventral mesencephalon (VM), which consists...... 30% of the dopaminergic neurons in the donor tissue co-expressed serotonin, no co-localization could be detected in grafts one month after intrastriatal transplantation into hemi-parkinsonian rats. In conclusion, a significant and susceptible sub-population of dopaminergic neurons in fetal VM tissues...... both fetal rat and human dissociated, organotypic and neurosphere VM cultures as well as an animal model of PD were investigated. In dissociated rat VM cultures approximately 30% of the TH positive neurons co-expressed serotonin, while no co-localization with GABA was observed. Interestingly, co...

  13. Effects of SR141716A on Cognitive and Depression-Related Behavior in an Animal Model of Premotor Parkinson's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. T. Tadaiesky

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A previous study from our laboratory revealed that moderate nigral dopaminergic degeneration caused emotional and cognitive deficits in rats, paralleling early signs of Parkinson's disease. Recent evidence suggests that the blockade of cannabinoid CB1 receptors might be beneficial to alleviate motor inhibition typical of Parkinson's disease. Here, we investigated whether antagonism of CB1 receptors would improve emotional and cognitive deficits in a rat model of premotor Parkinson's disease. Depression-like behavior and cognition were assessed with the forced swim test and the social recognition test, respectively. Confirming our previous study, rats injected with 6-hydroxydopamine in striatum presented emotional and cognitive alterations which were improved by acute injection of SR141716A. HPLC analysis of monoamine levels demonstrated alterations in the striatum and prefrontal cortex after SR141716A injection. These findings suggest a role for CB1 receptors in the early symptoms caused by degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the striatum, as observed in Parkinson's disease.

  14. Anti-human α-synuclein N-terminal peptide antibody protects against dopaminergic cell death and ameliorates behavioral deficits in an AAV-α-synuclein rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Shahaduzzaman

    Full Text Available The protein α-synuclein (α-Syn has a central role in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD and immunotherapeutic approaches targeting this molecule have shown promising results. In this study, novel antibodies were generated against specific peptides from full length human α-Syn and evaluated for effectiveness in ameliorating α-Syn-induced cell death and behavioral deficits in an AAV-α-Syn expressing rat model of PD. Fisher 344 rats were injected with rAAV vector into the right substantia nigra (SN, while control rats received an AAV vector expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP. Beginning one week after injection of the AAV-α-Syn vectors, rats were treated intraperitoneally with either control IgG or antibodies against the N-terminal (AB1, or central region (AB2 of α-Syn. An unbiased stereological estimation of TH+, NeuN+, and OX6 (MHC-II immunostaining revealed that the α-Syn peptide antibodies (AB1 and AB2 significantly inhibited α-Syn-induced dopaminergic cell (DA and NeuN+ cell loss (one-way ANOVA (F (3, 30 = 5.8, p = 0.002 and (F (3, 29 = 7.92, p = 0.002 respectively, as well as decreasing the number of activated microglia in the ipsilateral SN (one-way ANOVA F = 14.09; p = 0.0003. Antibody treated animals also had lower levels of α-Syn in the ipsilateral SN (one-way ANOVA F (7, 37 = 9.786; p = 0.0001 and demonstrated a partial intermediate improvement of the behavioral deficits. Our data suggest that, in particular, an α-Syn peptide antibody against the N-terminal region of the protein can protect against DA neuron loss and, to some extent behavioral deficits. As such, these results may be a potential therapeutic strategy for halting the progression of PD.

  15. Treadmill exercise alleviates short-term memory impairment in 6-hydroxydopamine-induced Parkinson's rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Han-Sam; Shin, Mal-Soon; Song, Wook; Jun, Tae-Won; Lim, Baek-Vin; Kim, Young-Pyo; Kim, Chang-Ju

    2013-01-01

    Progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons in substantia nigra is a key pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease. In the present study, we investigated the effects of treadmill exercise on short-term memory, apoptotic dopaminergic neuronal cell death and fiber loss in the nigrostriatum, and cell proliferation in the hippocampal dentate gyrus of Parkinson's rats. Parkinson's rats were made by injection of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) into the striatum using stereotaxic instrument. Four weeks after 6-OHDA injection, the rats in the 6-OHDA-injection group exhibited significant rotational asymmetry following apomorphine challenge. The rats in the exercise groups were put on the treadmill to run for 30 min once a day for 14 consecutive days starting 4 weeks after 6-OHDA injection. In the present results, extensive degeneration of the dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra with loss of dopaminergic fibers in the striatum were produced in the rats without treadmill running, which resulted in short-term memory impairment. However, the rats performing treadmill running for 2 weeks alleviated nigrostriatal dopaminergic cell loss and alleviated short-term memory impairment with increasing cell proliferation in the hippocampal dentate gyrus of Parkinson's rats. The present results show that treadmill exercise may provide therapeutic value for the Parkinson's disease.

  16. PDON: Parkinson's disease ontology for representation and modeling of the Parkinson's disease knowledge domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younesi, Erfan; Malhotra, Ashutosh; Gündel, Michaela; Scordis, Phil; Kodamullil, Alpha Tom; Page, Matt; Müller, Bernd; Springstubbe, Stephan; Wüllner, Ullrich; Scheller, Dieter; Hofmann-Apitius, Martin

    2015-09-22

    Despite the unprecedented and increasing amount of data, relatively little progress has been made in molecular characterization of mechanisms underlying Parkinson's disease. In the area of Parkinson's research, there is a pressing need to integrate various pieces of information into a meaningful context of presumed disease mechanism(s). Disease ontologies provide a novel means for organizing, integrating, and standardizing the knowledge domains specific to disease in a compact, formalized and computer-readable form and serve as a reference for knowledge exchange or systems modeling of disease mechanism. The Parkinson's disease ontology was built according to the life cycle of ontology building. Structural, functional, and expert evaluation of the ontology was performed to ensure the quality and usability of the ontology. A novelty metric has been introduced to measure the gain of new knowledge using the ontology. Finally, a cause-and-effect model was built around PINK1 and two gene expression studies from the Gene Expression Omnibus database were re-annotated to demonstrate the usability of the ontology. The Parkinson's disease ontology with a subclass-based taxonomic hierarchy covers the broad spectrum of major biomedical concepts from molecular to clinical features of the disease, and also reflects different views on disease features held by molecular biologists, clinicians and drug developers. The current version of the ontology contains 632 concepts, which are organized under nine views. The structural evaluation showed the balanced dispersion of concept classes throughout the ontology. The functional evaluation demonstrated that the ontology-driven literature search could gain novel knowledge not present in the reference Parkinson's knowledge map. The ontology was able to answer specific questions related to Parkinson's when evaluated by experts. Finally, the added value of the Parkinson's disease ontology is demonstrated by ontology-driven modeling of PINK1

  17. Neurophysiology of Drosophila models of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Ryan J H; Furmston, Rebecca; Williams, Charles A C; Elliott, Christopher J H

    2015-01-01

    We provide an insight into the role Drosophila has played in elucidating neurophysiological perturbations associated with Parkinson's disease- (PD-) related genes. Synaptic signalling deficits are observed in motor, central, and sensory systems. Given the neurological impact of disease causing mutations within these same genes in humans the phenotypes observed in fly are of significant interest. As such we observe four unique opportunities provided by fly nervous system models of Parkinson's disease. Firstly, Drosophila models are instrumental in exploring the mechanisms of neurodegeneration, with several PD-related mutations eliciting related phenotypes including sensitivity to energy supply and vesicular deformities. These are leading to the identification of plausible cellular mechanisms, which may be specific to (dopaminergic) neurons and synapses rather than general cellular phenotypes. Secondly, models show noncell autonomous signalling within the nervous system, offering the opportunity to develop our understanding of the way pathogenic signalling propagates, resembling Braak's scheme of spreading pathology in PD. Thirdly, the models link physiological deficits to changes in synaptic structure. While the structure-function relationship is complex, the genetic tractability of Drosophila offers the chance to separate fundamental changes from downstream consequences. Finally, the strong neuronal phenotypes permit relevant first in vivo drug testing.

  18. BDNF levels are increased by aminoindan and rasagiline in a double lesion model of Parkinson׳s disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledreux, Aurélie; Boger, Heather A; Hinson, Vanessa K; Cantwell, Kelsey; Granholm, Ann-Charlotte

    2016-01-15

    The anti-Parkinsonian drug rasagiline is a selective, irreversible inhibitor of monoamine oxidase and is used in the treatment of Parkinson׳s disease (PD). Its postulated neuroprotective effects may be attributed to MAO inhibition, or to its propargylamine moiety. The major metabolite of rasagiline, aminoindan, has shown promising neuroprotective properties in vitro but there is a paucity of studies investigating in vivo effects of this compound. Therefore, we examined neuroprotective effects of rasagiline and its metabolite aminoindan in a double lesion model of PD. Male Fisher 344 rats received i.p. injections of the noradrenergic neurotoxin DSP-4 and intra-striatal stereotaxic microinjections of the dopamine neurotoxin 6-OHDA. Saline, rasagiline or aminoindan (3mg/kg/day s.c.) were delivered via Alzet minipumps for 4 weeks. Rats were then tested for spontaneous locomotion and a novel object recognition task. Following behavioral testing, brain tissue was processed for ELISA measurements of growth factors and immunohistochemistry. Double-lesioned rats treated with rasagiline or aminoindan had reduced behavioral deficits, both in motor and cognitive tasks compared to saline-treated double-lesioned rats. BDNF levels were significantly increased in the hippocampus and striatum of the rasagiline- and aminoindan-lesioned groups compared to the saline-treated lesioned group. Double-lesioned rats treated with rasagiline or aminoindan exhibited a sparing in the mitochondrial marker Hsp60, suggesting mitochondrial involvement in neuroprotection. Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) immunohistochemistry revealed a sparing of TH-immunoreactive terminals in double-lesioned rats treated with rasagiline or aminoindan in the striatum, hippocampus, and substantia nigra. These data provide evidence of neuroprotection by aminoindan and rasagiline via their ability to enhance BDNF levels. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. PAIN IN A PARKINSON`S DISEASE RODENT ANIMAL MODEL INDUCED WITH 6-HYDROXYDOPAMINE

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    Antioch, I

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Pain phenomenon, the unpleasant sensory and emotional event, appears to evidently intrude in Parkinson disease (PD, a disease formally considered to be restricted only to motor deficits. Although over a half of persons with PD suffer from pain manifestations, there are very few reports targeting this issue. Considering the cases when motor symptoms of PD are eclipsed by severe pain disclosure, there is an obvious need of clarifying the intricate implications of pain in PD context. Because there are few studies researching the link between pain and PD in clinical context, but as well in animal models we chose to explore the effects of pain stimuli on a rodent model of PD. Materials and methods: We experimentally induced a PD model in Wistar rats (n=12 by injecting in the substantia nigra, a brain area known to be involved in PD occurrence, one dose of a 6-hydroxidopamine (6-OHDA solution (8µm 6-OHDA base and 4µm physiological saline, utilizing neurosurgery, while their control peers received same dose of saline solution. Two weeks after the intervention the animals were subjected to the hot-plate test, a behavioral task for acquiring pain sensitivity. Results: There was noticed a statistical significant (F(1,10 = 5.67, p=0.038 sensibility of the 6-OHDA rats to thermal pain stimuli (8.2 s ± 0.8 s in 6-OHDA group as compared to their peers (13.8 s ± 1.6 s in controls. Conclusions: The involvement of pain in PD animal models is demonstrated raising questions of how it influences PD evolution. Moreover, this result increases awareness of deficient diagnostic methods of pain in PD and as a consequence, poor treatment of pain manifestations.

  20. Neuroprotective effect of curcumin on hippocampal injury in 6-OHDA-induced Parkinson's disease rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jiaqing; Song, Shilei; Li, Jian; Liang, Tao

    2014-06-01

    Clinically, Parkinson's disease (PD)-related neuronal lesions commonly occur. The purpose of this study is to investigate potential therapeutic effect of curcumin against hippocampal damage of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-PD rat model. These results showed that curcumin significantly increased the body weight of 6-OHDA-impaired rats (Pcurcumin-treated PD rats were effectively ameliorated as shown in open field test (Pcurcumin increased the contents of monoaminergic neurotransmitters (PCurcumin effectively alleviated the 6-OHDA-induced hippocampal damage as observed in hematoxylin-eosin (H&E) staining. Furthermore, curcumin obviously up-regulated hippocampal brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), TrkB, phosphatidylinositide 3-kinases (PI3K) protein expressions, respectively as shown in Western blot analysis. These findings demonstrated that curcumin mediated the neuroprotection against 6-OHDA-induced hippocampus neurons in rats, which the underlying mechanism is involved in activating BDNF/TrkB-dependent pathway for promoting neural regeneration of hippocampal tissue. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  1. Comparative assessment of 6-[18 F]fluoro-L-m-tyrosine and 6-[18 F]fluoro-L-dopa to evaluate dopaminergic presynaptic integrity in a Parkinson's disease rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Guillaume; Bahri, Mohamed Ali; Michel, Anne; Hustadt, Fabian; Garraux, Gaëtan; Luxen, André; Lemaire, Christian; Plenevaux, Alain

    2017-05-01

    Because of the progressive loss of nigro-striatal dopaminergic terminals in Parkinson's disease (PD), in vivo quantitative imaging of dopamine (DA) containing neurons in animal models of PD is of critical importance in the preclinical evaluation of highly awaited disease-modifying therapies. Among existing methods, the high sensitivity of positron emission tomography (PET) is attractive to achieve that goal. The aim of this study was to perform a quantitative comparison of brain images obtained in 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesioned rats using two dopaminergic PET radiotracers, namely [ 18 F]fluoro-3,4-dihydroxyphenyl-L-alanine ([ 18 F]FDOPA) and 6-[ 18 F]fluoro-L-m-tyrosine ([ 18 F]FMT). Because the imaging signal is theoretically less contaminated by metabolites, we hypothesized that the latter would show stronger relationship with behavioural and post-mortem measures of striatal dopaminergic deficiency. We used a within-subject design to measure striatal [ 18 F]FMT and [ 18 F]FDOPA uptake in eight partially lesioned, eight fully lesioned and ten sham-treated rats. Animals were pretreated with an L-aromatic amino acid decarboxylase inhibitor. A catechol-O-methyl transferase inhibitor was also given before [ 18 F]FDOPA PET. Quantitative estimates of striatal uptake were computed using conventional graphical Patlak method. Striatal dopaminergic deficiencies were measured with apomorphine-induced rotations and post-mortem striatal DA content. We observed a strong relationship between [ 18 F]FMT and [ 18 F]FDOPA estimates of decreased uptake in the denervated striatum using the tissue-derived uptake rate constant K c . However, only [ 18 F]FMT K c succeeded to discriminate between the partial and the full 6-OHDA lesion and correlated well with the post-mortem striatal DA content. This study indicates that the [ 18 F]FMT could be more sensitive, with respect of [ 18 F]FDOPA, to investigate DA terminals loss in 6-OHDA rats, and open the way to in vivo L

  2. Sensitivity analysis of discharge patterns of subthalamic nucleus in the model of basal ganglia in Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Jyotsna; Singh, Phool; Malik, Vikas

    2017-01-01

    Parkinson disease alters the information patterns in movement related pathways in brain. Experimental results performed on rats show that the activity patterns changes from single spike activity to mixed burst mode in Parkinson disease. However the cause of this change in activity pattern is not yet completely understood. Subthalamic nucleus is one of the main nuclei involved in the origin of motor dysfunction in Parkinson disease. In this paper, a single compartment conductance based model is considered which focuses on subthalamic nucleus and synaptic input from globus pallidus (external). This model shows highly nonlinear behavior with respect to various intrinsic parameters. Behavior of model has been presented with the help of activity patterns generated in healthy and Parkinson condition. These patterns have been compared by calculating their correlation coefficient for different values of intrinsic parameters. Results display that the activity patterns are very sensitive to various intrinsic parameters and calcium shows some promising results which provide insights into the motor dysfunction.

  3. The Effect of Experimental Parkinson on Formalin-Induced Pain in Rat

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    Mohammad Sofiabadi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objectives : Pain is one of the preceding claims of Parkinson's disease (PD, that its mechanisms have not been fully identified. The purpose of this study was to investigate the chemical pain responses induced by subcutaneous injection of formalin in male parkinsonized rats.   Method : In this experimental study, 40 Wistar male rats were used and PD was established by stereotaxic injection of 6-OHDA toxin into the striatum. Parkinson's disease severity determined by apomorphine-induced rotation test and then the pain response of 4 groups, the control, sham and 2 weak or full Parkinson groups, were evaluated using formalin test. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey test.   Results : In both acute and chronic phases of the formalin test, the symptoms of pain in different groups were same, but at the interphase stage, pain intensity increased more in Parkinson 's rats, especially in full PD group compared to control (p<0.01.   Conclusion: These results suggest that the nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathway have important modulating role on chronic pain.

  4. Simultaneous determination of amino acid and monoamine neurotransmitters in PC12 cells and rats models of Parkinson's disease using a sensitizing derivatization reagent by UHPLC-MS/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xian-En; Zhu, Shuyun; Yang, Hongmei; You, Jinmao; Song, Fengrui; Liu, Zhiqiang; Liu, Shuying

    2015-07-15

    Multi-analytes simultaneous monitoring of amino acid and monoamine neurotransmitters (NTs) has important scientific significance for their related pathology, physiology and drug screening. In this work, in virtue of a mass spectrometry sensitizing reagent 10-ethyl-acridone-3-sulfonyl chloride (EASC) as derivatization reagent, an Ultra High Performance Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS) method was developed and validated for simultaneous determination of six amino acid NTs, two monoamine ones and its one metabolite. The simple and rapid derivatization reaction was innovatively combined with plasma preparation by using EASC acetonitrile solution as protein precipitant. This interesting combination brought the advantages of speediness, simpleness and high-throughput in a cost-effective way. Under the optimized conditions, LODs (0.004-3.80nM) and LOQs (0.014-13.3nM) of EASC derivatized-NTs were calculated and found to be significantly lower than those of direct UHPLC-MS/MS detection about 11.5-275.0 and 14.4-371.4 times, respectively. Moreover, EASC derivatization significantly improved chromatographic resolution and matrix effect when compared with direct UPLC-MS/MS detection method without derivatization. Meanwhile, it also brought acceptable precision (3.0-13.0%, peak area CVs%), accuracy (86.4-112.9%), recovery (88.3-107.8%) and stability (3.8-8.5%, peak area CVs%) results. This method was successfully applied for the antiparkinsonian effect evaluation of levodopa and Ginsenoside Rg1 using PC12 cells and rats models by measuring multiple NTs. This provided a new method for the NTs related studies in the future. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Deep brain stimulation of the center median-parafascicular complex of the thalamus has efficient anti-parkinsonian action associated with widespread cellular responses in the basal ganglia network in a rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jouve, Loréline; Salin, Pascal; Melon, Christophe; Kerkerian-Le Goff, Lydia

    2010-07-21

    The thalamic centromedian-parafascicular (CM/Pf) complex, mainly represented by Pf in rodents, is proposed as an interesting target for the neurosurgical treatment of movement disorders, including Parkinson's disease. In this study, we examined the functional impact of subchronic high-frequency stimulation (HFS) of Pf in the 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned hemiparkinsonian rat model. Pf-HFS had significant anti-akinetic action, evidenced by alleviation of limb use asymmetry (cylinder test). Whereas this anti-akinetic action was moderate, Pf-HFS totally reversed lateralized neglect (corridor task), suggesting potent action on sensorimotor integration. At the cellular level, Pf-HFS partially reversed the dopamine denervation-induced increase in striatal preproenkephalin A mRNA levels, a marker of the neurons of the indirect pathway, without interfering with the markers of the direct pathway (preprotachykinin and preprodynorphin). Pf-HFS totally reversed the lesion-induced changes in the gene expression of cytochrome oxidase subunit I in the subthalamic nucleus, the globus pallidus, and the substantia nigra pars reticulata, and partially in the entopeduncular nucleus. Unlike HFS of the subthalamic nucleus, Pf-HFS did not induce per se dyskinesias and directly, although partially, alleviated L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA)-induced forelimb dyskinesia. Conversely, L-DOPA treatment negatively interfered with the anti-parkinsonian effect of Pf-HFS. Altogether, these data show that Pf-DBS, by recruiting a large basal ganglia circuitry, provides moderate to strong anti-parkinsonian benefits that might, however, be affected by L-DOPA. The widespread behavioral and cellular outcomes of Pf-HFS evidenced here demonstrate that CM/Pf is an important node for modulating the pathophysiological functioning of basal ganglia and related disorders.

  6. Modeling proteasome dynamics in Parkinson's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sneppen, Kim; Lizana, Ludvig; Jensen, Mogens H; Pigolotti, Simone; Otzen, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    In Parkinson's disease (PD), there is evidence that α-synuclein (αSN) aggregation is coupled to dysfunctional or overburdened protein quality control systems, in particular the ubiquitin–proteasome system. Here, we develop a simple dynamical model for the on-going conflict between αSN aggregation and the maintenance of a functional proteasome in the healthy cell, based on the premise that proteasomal activity can be titrated out by mature αSN fibrils and their protofilament precursors. In the presence of excess proteasomes the cell easily maintains homeostasis. However, when the ratio between the available proteasome and the αSN protofilaments is reduced below a threshold level, we predict a collapse of homeostasis and onset of oscillations in the proteasome concentration. Depleted proteasome opens for accumulation of oligomers. Our analysis suggests that the onset of PD is associated with a proteasome population that becomes occupied in periodic degradation of aggregates. This behavior is found to be the general state of a proteasome/chaperone system under pressure, and suggests new interpretations of other diseases where protein aggregation could stress elements of the protein quality control system

  7. Untangling dopamine-adenosine receptor-receptor assembly in experimental parkinsonism in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Víctor Fernández-Dueñas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson’s disease (PD is a dopaminergic-related pathology in which functioning of the basal ganglia is altered. It has been postulated that a direct receptor-receptor interaction – i.e. of dopamine D2 receptor (D2R with adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR (forming D2R-A2AR oligomers – finely regulates this brain area. Accordingly, elucidating whether the pathology prompts changes to these complexes could provide valuable information for the design of new PD therapies. Here, we first resolved a long-standing question concerning whether D2R-A2AR assembly occurs in native tissue: by means of different complementary experimental approaches (i.e. immunoelectron microscopy, proximity ligation assay and TR-FRET, we unambiguously identified native D2R-A2AR oligomers in rat striatum. Subsequently, we determined that, under pathological conditions (i.e. in a rat PD model, D2R-A2AR interaction was impaired. Collectively, these results provide definitive evidence for alteration of native D2R-A2AR oligomers in experimental parkinsonism, thus conferring the rationale for appropriate oligomer-based PD treatments.

  8. Primary skin fibroblasts as a model of Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Auburger, G.; Klinkenberg, M.; Droste, J.A.H.; Marcus, K.; Morales-Gordo, B.; Kunz, W.S.; Brandt, U.; Broccoli, V.; Reichmann, H.; Gispert, S.; Jendrach, M.

    2012-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is the second most frequent neurodegenerative disorder. While most cases occur sporadic mutations in a growing number of genes including Parkin (PARK2) and PINK1 (PARK6) have been associated with the disease. Different animal models and cell models like patient skin fibroblasts

  9. The transfection of BDNF to dopamine neurons potentiates the effect of dopamine D3 receptor agonist recovering the striatal innervation, dendritic spines and motor behavior in an aged rat model of Parkinson's disease.

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    Luis F Razgado-Hernandez

    Full Text Available The progressive degeneration of the dopamine neurons of the pars compacta of substantia nigra and the consequent loss of the dopamine innervation of the striatum leads to the impairment of motor behavior in Parkinson's disease. Accordingly, an efficient therapy of the disease should protect and regenerate the dopamine neurons of the substantia nigra and the dopamine innervation of the striatum. Nigral neurons express Brain Derived Neurotropic Factor (BDNF and dopamine D3 receptors, both of which protect the dopamine neurons. The chronic activation of dopamine D3 receptors by their agonists, in addition, restores, in part, the dopamine innervation of the striatum. Here we explored whether the over-expression of BDNF by dopamine neurons potentiates the effect of the activation of D3 receptors restoring nigrostriatal innervation. Twelve-month old Wistar rats were unilaterally injected with 6-hydroxydopamine into the striatum. Five months later, rats were treated with the D3 agonist 7-hydroxy-N,N-di-n-propy1-2-aminotetralin (7-OH-DPAT administered i.p. during 4½ months via osmotic pumps and the BDNF gene transfection into nigral cells using the neurotensin-polyplex nanovector (a non-viral transfection that selectively transfect the dopamine neurons via the high-affinity neurotensin receptor expressed by these neurons. Two months after the withdrawal of 7-OH-DPAT when rats were aged (24 months old, immunohistochemistry assays were made. The over-expression of BDNF in rats receiving the D3 agonist normalized gait and motor coordination; in addition, it eliminated the muscle rigidity produced by the loss of dopamine. The recovery of motor behavior was associated with the recovery of the nigral neurons, the dopamine innervation of the striatum and of the number of dendritic spines of the striatal neurons. Thus, the over-expression of BDNF in dopamine neurons associated with the chronic activation of the D3 receptors appears to be a promising strategy

  10. Linear modeling of possible mechanisms for parkinson tremor generation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lohnberg, P.

    1978-01-01

    The power of Parkinson tremor is expressed in terms of possibly changed frequency response functions between relevant variables in the neuromuscular system. The derivation starts out from a linear loopless equivalent model of mechanisms for general tremor generation. Hypothetical changes in this

  11. Carbidopa/levodopa-loaded biodegradable microspheres: in vivo evaluation on experimental Parkinsonism in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arica, Betül; Kaş, H Süheyla; Moghdam, Amir; Akalan, Nejat; Hincal, A Atilla

    2005-02-16

    The purpose of this study was to prepare and characterize injectable carbidopa (CD)/levodopa (LD)-loaded Poly(L-lactides) (L-PLA), Poly(D,L-lactides) (D,L-PLA) and Poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLAGA) microspheres for the intracerebral treatment of Parkinson's disease. The microspheres were prepared by solvent evaporation method. The polymers' (L-PLA, D,L-PLA and PLAGA) concentrations were 10% (w/w) in the organic phase; the emulsifiers [sodium carboxymethylcellulose (NaCMC):sodium oleate (SO) and Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA):SO mixture (4:1 w/v)] concentrations were 0.75% in the aqueous phase. Microspheres were analyzed for morphological characteristics, size distribution, drug loading and in vitro release. The release profile of CD/LD from microspheres was characterized in the range of 12-35% within the first hour of the in vitro release experiment. The efficiency of CD- and LD-encapsulated microspheres to striatal transplantation and the altering of apomorphine-induced rotational behavior in the 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) unilaterally lesioned rat model were also tested. 6-OHDA/CD-LD-loaded microsphere groups exhibited lower rotation scores than 6-OHDA/Blank microsphere groups as early as 1 week postlesion. These benefits continued throughout the entire experimental period and they were statistically significant during the 1, 2 and 8 weeks (p<0.05). CD/LD-loaded microspheres were specifically prepared to apply as an injectable dosage forms for brain implantation.

  12. Edaravone guards dopamine neurons in a rotenone model for Parkinson's disease.

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    Nian Xiong

    Full Text Available 3-methyl-1-phenyl-2-pyrazolin-5-one (edaravone, an effective free radical scavenger, provides neuroprotection in stroke models and patients. In this study, we investigated its neuroprotective effects in a chronic rotenone rat model for Parkinson's disease. Here we showed that a five-week treatment with edaravone abolished rotenone's activity to induce catalepsy, damage mitochondria and degenerate dopamine neurons in the midbrain of rotenone-treated rats. This abolishment was attributable at least partly to edaravone's inhibition of rotenone-induced reactive oxygen species production or apoptotic promoter Bax expression and its up-regulation of the vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2 expression. Collectively, edaravone may provide novel clinical therapeutics for PD.

  13. Edaravone Guards Dopamine Neurons in a Rotenone Model for Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chunnuan; Huang, Jinsha; Zhao, Ying; Zhang, Zhentao; Qiao, Xian; Feng, Yuan; Reesaul, Harrish; Zhang, Yongxue; Sun, Shenggang; Lin, Zhicheng; Wang, Tao

    2011-01-01

    3-methyl-1-phenyl-2-pyrazolin-5-one (edaravone), an effective free radical scavenger, provides neuroprotection in stroke models and patients. In this study, we investigated its neuroprotective effects in a chronic rotenone rat model for Parkinson's disease. Here we showed that a five-week treatment with edaravone abolished rotenone's activity to induce catalepsy, damage mitochondria and degenerate dopamine neurons in the midbrain of rotenone-treated rats. This abolishment was attributable at least partly to edaravone's inhibition of rotenone-induced reactive oxygen species production or apoptotic promoter Bax expression and its up-regulation of the vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) expression. Collectively, edaravone may provide novel clinical therapeutics for PD. PMID:21677777

  14. In vivo studies of the SERT-selective [{sup 18}F]FPBM and VMAT2-selective [{sup 18}F]AV-133 radiotracers in a rat model of Parkinson's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Julie L. [Department of Pharmacology, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Oya, Shunichi; Parhi, Ajit K.; Lieberman, Brian P.; Ploessl, Karl; Hou, Catherine [Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Kung, Hank F. [Department of Pharmacology, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)], E-mail: kunghf@sunmac.spect.upenn.edu

    2010-05-15

    Introduction: The utility of [{sup 18}F]FPBM [2-(2'-((dimethylamino)methyl)-4'-(3-[{sup 18}F] -fluoropropoxy)phenylthio)benzenamine], a selective serotonin transporter (SERT) tracer, and [{sup 18}F]AV-133 [(+)-2-Hydroxy-3-isobutyl-9-(3-fluoropropoxy)-10-methoxy-1,2,3,4,6, 7-hexahydro-11bH-benzo[a]quinolizine], a selective vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) tracer, were tested in the 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) unilateral lesioned rat model. Methods: Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of three 6-OHDA unilateral lesioned male Sprague Dawley rats (Rats 1-3) were performed with [{sup 18}F]FPBM and [{sup 18}F]AV-133 to examine whether changes in SERT and VMAT2 binding, respectively, could be detected in the brain. The brains of the three rats were then removed and examined by in vitro autoradiography with [{sup 18}F]FPBM and the dopamine transporter ligand, [{sup 125}I]IPT [N-(3'-[{sup 125}I]-iodopropen-2'-yl)-2-beta-carbomethoxy-3-beta-(4-chloro phenyl) tropane, for confirmation. Biodistribution of [{sup 18}F]FPBM in a separate group of p-chloroamphetamine (PCA) treated rats were also performed. Results: PET image analysis showed varying levels of SERT binding reduction (Rat 1=-11%, Rat 2=-4%, Rat 3=-43%; n=2) and a clear and definitive loss of VMAT2 binding (Rat 1=-87%, Rat 2=-72%, and Rat 3=-91%; n=1) in the left striatum when compared to the right (non-lesioned side) striatum. The results from PET imaging were corroborated with quantitative in vitro autoradiography. Rats treated with a selective serotonin toxin (p-chloroamphetamine) showed a significant reduction of [{sup 18}F]FPBM uptake in the cortex and hypothalamus regions of the brain. Conclusion: The preliminary data suggest that [{sup 18}F]FPBM and [{sup 18}F]AV-133 may be useful for the examination of serotonergic and dopaminergic neuron integrity, respectively, in the living brain.

  15. Early life exposure to permethrin: a progressive animal model of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasuti, Cinzia; Brunori, Gloria; Eusepi, Piera; Marinelli, Lisa; Ciccocioppo, Roberto; Gabbianelli, Rosita

    Oxidative stress, alpha-synuclein changes, mitochondrial complex I defects and dopamine loss, observed in the striatum of rats exposed to the pesticide permethrin in early life, could represent neuropathological hallmarks of Parkinson's disease (PD). Nevertheless, an animal model of PD should also fulfill criteria of face and predictive validities. This study was designed to: 1) verify dopaminergic status in the striatum and substantia nigra pars compacta; 2) recognize non-motor symptoms; 3) investigate the time-course development of motor disabilities; 4) assess L-Dopa effectiveness on motor symptoms in rats previously exposed to permethrin in early life. The permethrin-treated group received 34mg/kg daily of permethrin from postnatal day 6 to 21, whereas the age-matched control group was administered with the vehicle only. At adolescent age, the permethrin-treated group showed decreased levels of dopamine in the striatum, loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta and cognitive impairments. Motor coordination defects appeared at adult age (150days old) in permethrin-treated rats on rotarod and beam walking tasks, whereas no differences between the treated and control groups were detected on the foot print task. Predictive validity was evaluated by testing the ability of L-Dopa (5, 10 or 15mg/kg, os) to restore the postural instability in permethrin-treated rats (150days old) tested in a beam walking task. The results revealed full reversal of motor deficits starting from 10mg/kg of L-Dopa. The overall results indicate that this animal model replicates the progressive, time-dependent nature of the neurodegenerative process in Parkinson's disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Neuroprotective effects of lentivirus-mediated cystathionine-beta-synthase overexpression against 6-OHDA-induced parkinson's disease rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Wei-Lan; Yin, Wei-Guo; Huang, Bai-Sheng; Wu, Li-Xiang

    2017-09-14

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is age-related neurodegenerative disorder by a progressive loss of dopaminergic(DA) neurons in the substantia nigra (SN) and striatum, which is at least partly associated with α-synuclein protein accumulation in these neurons. Hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S) plays an important role in the nervous system. Studies have shown that H 2 S has a protective effect on PD. However, as a kind of gas molecules, H 2 S is lively, volatile, and not conducive to scientific research and clinical application. Cystathionine-beta-synthase(CBS) is the main enzymes of synthesis of H 2 S in the brain. In order to examine the neuroprotective effects of CBS on PD, we detected the effects of CBS overexpression on 6-Hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-lesioned PD rats using lentivirus-mediated gene transfection techniques. In the injured SN of 6-OHDA-induced PD rats, the CBS expression and the endogenous H 2 S level markedly decreased, while administration of lentivirus-mediated CBS overexpression increased the CBS expression and the endogenous H 2 S production.CBS overexpression dramatically reversed apomorphine-induced rotation of the 6-OHDA model rats, decreased the number of TUNEL-positive neurons and the loss of the nigral DA neurons,specifically inhibited 6-OHDA-induced oxidase stress injury, and down-regulated the expression of α-synuclein(α-SYN) in the injured SN. NaHS (an H 2 S donor) had similar effects to CBS overexpression, while Amino-oxyacetate(AOAA, a CBS inhibitor) had opposite effects on PD rats. In summary, we demonstrated that CBS overexpression was able to provide neuroprotective on PD rats and improving the expression of CBS may be a potential therapeutic method for PD. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Vagus nerve stimulation improves locomotion and neuronal populations in a model of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrand, Ariana Q; Helke, Kristi L; Gregory, Rebecca A; Gooz, Monika; Hinson, Vanessa K; Boger, Heather A

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive, neurodegenerative disorder with no disease-modifying therapies, and symptomatic treatments are often limited by debilitating side effects. In PD, locus coeruleus noradrenergic (LC-NE) neurons degenerate prior to substantia nigra dopaminergic (SN-DA) neurons. Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) activates LC neurons, and decreases pro-inflammatory markers, allowing improvement of LC targets, making it a potential PD therapeutic. To assess therapeutic potential of VNS in a PD model. To mimic the progression of PD degeneration, rats received a systemic injection of noradrenergic neurotoxin DSP-4, followed one week later by bilateral intrastriatal injection of dopaminergic neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine. At this time, a subset of rats also had vagus cuffs implanted. After eleven days, rats received a precise VNS regimen twice a day for ten days, and locomotion was measured during each afternoon session. Immediately following final stimulation, rats were euthanized, and left dorsal striatum, bilateral SN and LC were sectioned for immunohistochemical detection of monoaminergic neurons (tyrosine hydroxylase, TH), α-synuclein, astrocytes (GFAP) and microglia (Iba-1). VNS significantly increased locomotion of lesioned rats. VNS also resulted in increased expression of TH in striatum, SN, and LC; decreased SN α-synuclein expression; and decreased expression of glial markers in the SN and LC of lesioned rats. Additionally, saline-treated rats after VNS, had higher LC TH and lower SN Iba-1. Our findings of increased locomotion, beneficial effects on LC-NE and SN-DA neurons, decreased α-synuclein density in SN TH-positive neurons, and neuroinflammation suggest VNS has potential as a novel PD therapeutic. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Modeling Parkinson's disease falls associated with brainstem cholinergic systems decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucinski, Aaron; Sarter, Martin

    2015-04-01

    In addition to the primary disease-defining symptoms, approximately half of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) suffer from postural instability, impairments in gait control and a propensity for falls. Consistent with evidence from patients, we previously demonstrated that combined striatal dopamine (DA) and basal forebrain (BF) cholinergic cell loss causes falls in rats traversing dynamic surfaces. Because evidence suggests that degeneration of brainstem cholinergic neurons arising from the pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN) also contributes to impaired gait and falls, here we assessed the effects of selective cholinergic PPN lesions in combination with striatal DA loss or BF cholinergic cells loss as well as losses in all 3 regions. Results indicate that all combination losses that included the BF cholinergic system slowed traversal and increased slips and falls. However, the performance of rats with losses in all 3 regions (PPN, BF, and DA) was not more severely impaired than following combined BF cholinergic and striatal DA lesions. These results confirm the hypothesis that BF cholinergic-striatal disruption of attentional-motor interactions is a primary source of falls. Additional losses of PPN cholinergic neurons may worsen posture and gait control in situations not captured by the current testing conditions. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  19. Development of a unilaterally-lesioned 6-OHDA mouse model of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiele, Sherri L; Warre, Ruth; Nash, Joanne E

    2012-02-14

    The unilaterally lesioned 6-hyroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-lesioned rat model of Parkinson's disease (PD) has proved to be invaluable in advancing our understanding of the mechanisms underlying parkinsonian symptoms, since it recapitulates the changes in basal ganglia circuitry and pharmacology observed in parkinsonian patients(1-4). However, the precise cellular and molecular changes occurring at cortico-striatal synapses of the output pathways within the striatum, which is the major input region of the basal ganglia remain elusive, and this is believed to be site where pathological abnormalities underlying parkinsonian symptoms arise(3,5). In PD, understanding the mechanisms underlying changes in basal ganglia circuitry following degeneration of the nigro-striatal pathway has been greatly advanced by the development of bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) mice over-expressing green fluorescent proteins driven by promoters specific for the two striatal output pathways (direct pathway: eGFP-D1; indirect pathway: eGFP-D2 and eGFP-A2a)(8), allowing them to be studied in isolation. For example, recent studies have suggested that there are pathological changes in synaptic plasticity in parkinsonian mice(9,10). However, these studies utilised juvenile mice and acute models of parkinsonism. It is unclear whether the changes described in adult rats with stable 6-OHDA lesions also occur in these models. Other groups have attempted to generate a stable unilaterally-lesioned 6-OHDA adult mouse model of PD by lesioning the medial forebrain bundle (MFB), unfortunately, the mortality rate in this study was extremely high, with only 14% surviving the surgery for 21 days or longer(11). More recent studies have generated intra-nigral lesions with both a low mortality rate >80% loss of dopaminergic neurons, however expression of L-DOPA induced dyskinesia(11,12,13,14) was variable in these studies. Another well established mouse model of PD is the MPTP-lesioned mouse(15). Whilst this

  20. Dopamine-dependent neurodegeneration in Drosophila models of familial and sporadic Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayersdorfer, Florian; Voigt, Aaron; Schneuwly, Stephan; Botella, José A

    2010-10-01

    Parkinson's disease has been found to be caused by both, genetic and environmental factors. Despite the diversity of causes involved, a convergent pathogenic mechanism might underlie the special vulnerability of dopaminergic neurons in different forms of Parkinsonism. In recent years, a number of reports have proposed dopamine as a common player responsible in the loss of dopaminergic neurons independent of its etiology. Using RNAi lines we were able to generate flies with drastically reduced dopamine levels in the dopaminergic neurons. Combining these flies with a chemically induced Parkinson model (rotenone) and a familial form of Parkinson (mutant alpha-synuclein) we were able to show a strong reduction of neurotoxicity and a protection of the dopaminergic neurons when cellular dopamine levels were reduced. These results show that dopamine homeostasis plays a central role for the susceptibility of dopaminergic neurons to environmental and genetic factors in in vivo models of Parkinson disease. (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Enhanced glutamate, IP3 and cAMP activity in the cerebral cortex of Unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine induced Parkinson's rats: Effect of 5-HT, GABA and bone marrow cell supplementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romeo Chinthu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Parkinson's disease is characterized by progressive cell death in the substantia nigra pars compacta, which leads to dopamine depletion in the striatum and indirectly to cortical dysfunction. Increased glutamatergic transmission in the basal ganglia is implicated in the pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease and glutamate receptor mediated excitotoxicity has been suggested to be one of the possible causes of the neuronal degeneration. In the present study, the effects of serotonin, gamma-aminobutyric acid and bone marrow cells infused intranigrally to substantia nigra individually and in combination on unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine induced Parkinson's rat model was analyzed. Scatchard analysis of total glutamate and NMDA receptor binding parameters showed a significant increase in Bmax (P

  2. A mathematical model of insulin resistance in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braatz, Elise M; Coleman, Randolph A

    2015-06-01

    This paper introduces a mathematical model representing the biochemical interactions between insulin signaling and Parkinson's disease. The model can be used to examine the changes that occur over the course of the disease as well as identify which processes would be the most effective targets for treatment. The model is mathematized using biochemical systems theory (BST). It incorporates a treatment strategy that includes several experimental drugs along with current treatments. In the past, BST models of neurodegeneration have used power law analysis and simulation (PLAS) to model the system. This paper recommends the use of MATLAB instead. MATLAB allows for more flexibility in both the model itself and in data analysis. Previous BST analyses of neurodegeneration began treatment at disease onset. As shown in this model, the outcomes of delayed, realistic treatment and full treatment at disease onset are significantly different. The delayed treatment strategy is an important development in BST modeling of neurodegeneration. It emphasizes the importance of early diagnosis, and allows for a more accurate representation of disease and treatment interactions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Rasagiline ameliorates olfactory deficits in an alpha-synuclein mouse model of Parkinson's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Géraldine H Petit

    Full Text Available Impaired olfaction is an early pre-motor symptom of Parkinson's disease. The neuropathology underlying olfactory dysfunction in Parkinson's disease is unknown, however α-synuclein accumulation/aggregation and altered neurogenesis might play a role. We characterized olfactory deficits in a transgenic mouse model of Parkinson's disease expressing human wild-type α-synuclein under the control of the mouse α-synuclein promoter. Preliminary clinical observations suggest that rasagiline, a monoamine oxidase-B inhibitor, improves olfaction in Parkinson's disease. We therefore examined whether rasagiline ameliorates olfactory deficits in this Parkinson's disease model and investigated the role of olfactory bulb neurogenesis. α-Synuclein mice were progressively impaired in their ability to detect odors, to discriminate between odors, and exhibited alterations in short-term olfactory memory. Rasagiline treatment rescued odor detection and odor discrimination abilities. However, rasagiline did not affect short-term olfactory memory. Finally, olfactory changes were not coupled to alterations in olfactory bulb neurogenesis. We conclude that rasagiline reverses select olfactory deficits in a transgenic mouse model of Parkinson's disease. The findings correlate with preliminary clinical observations suggesting that rasagiline ameliorates olfactory deficits in Parkinson's disease.

  4. Caffeine, Adenosine Receptors and Estrogen in Toxin Models of Parkinson's Disease

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schwarzschild, Michael A; Xu, Kui

    2008-01-01

    Continued progress has been made toward each of the Specific Aims (SAs) 1 and 2 (SA 3 completed) of our research project, Caffeine, adenosine receptors and estrogen in toxin models of Parkinson's disease...

  5. Neuroprotective effects of curcumin on 6-hydroxydopamine-induced Parkinsonism in rats: behavioral, neurochemical and immunohistochemical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khuwaja, Gulrana; Khan, Mohd Moshahid; Ishrat, Tauheed; Ahmad, Ajmal; Raza, Syed Shadab; Ashafaq, Mohammad; Javed, Hayate; Khan, M Badruzzaman; Khan, Andleeb; Vaibhav, Kumar; Safhi, Mohammed M; Islam, Fakhrul

    2011-01-12

    Curcumin, the active principle of turmeric used in Indian curry is known for its antitumor, antioxidant, antiarthritic, anti-ischemic and anti-inflammatory properties and might inhibit the accumulation of destructive beta-amyloid in the brains of Alzheimer's disease patients. A Parkinsonian model in rats was developed by giving 6-hydroxydopamine (10 μg/2 μl in 0.1% ascorbic acid-saline) in the right striatum. After 3 weeks of lesioning, the behavior activities (rotarod, narrow beam test, grip test and contra-lateral rotations) were increased in a lesioned group as compared to a sham group and these activities were protected significantly with the pretreatment of curcumin. A significant protection on lipid peroxidation, glutathione, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, superoxide dismutase, catalase, tyrosine hydroxylase and D(2) receptor binding was observed in the striatum of lesioned group animals pretreated with 80 mg/kg body weight of curcumin for 21 days as compared to lesion group animals. No significant alterations on behavior and biochemical parameters were observed in sham group animals and the animals of sham group pretreated with curcumin. This study indicates that curcumin, which is an important ingredient of diet in India and also used in various systems of indigenous medicine, is helpful in preventing Parkinsonism and has therapeutic potential in combating this devastating neurologic disorder. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. A Systems Model of Parkinson's Disease Using Biochemical Systems Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasidharakurup, Hemalatha; Melethadathil, Nidheesh; Nair, Bipin; Diwakar, Shyam

    2017-08-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD), a neurodegenerative disorder, affects millions of people and has gained attention because of its clinical roles affecting behaviors related to motor and nonmotor symptoms. Although studies on PD from various aspects are becoming popular, few rely on predictive systems modeling approaches. Using Biochemical Systems Theory (BST), this article attempts to model and characterize dopaminergic cell death and understand pathophysiology of progression of PD. PD pathways were modeled using stochastic differential equations incorporating law of mass action, and initial concentrations for the modeled proteins were obtained from literature. Simulations suggest that dopamine levels were reduced significantly due to an increase in dopaminergic quinones and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetaldehyde (DOPAL) relating to imbalances compared to control during PD progression. Associating to clinically observed PD-related cell death, simulations show abnormal parkin and reactive oxygen species levels with an increase in neurofibrillary tangles. While relating molecular mechanistic roles, the BST modeling helps predicting dopaminergic cell death processes involved in the progression of PD and provides a predictive understanding of neuronal dysfunction for translational neuroscience.

  7. Cell cycle regulation of DNA polymerase beta in rotenone-based Parkinson's disease models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongcai Wang

    Full Text Available In Parkinson's disease (PD, neuronal cells undergo mitotic catastrophe and endoreduplication prior to cell death; however, the regulatory mechanisms remain to be defined. In this study, we investigated cell cycle regulation of DNA polymerase β (poly β in rotenone-based dopaminergic cellular and animal models. Incubation with a low concentration (0.25 µM of rotenone for 1.5 to 7 days resulted in a flattened cell body and decreased DNA replication during S phase, whereas a high concentration (2 µM of rotenone exposure resulted in enlarged, multi-nucleated cells and converted the mitotic cycle into endoreduplication. Consistently, DNA poly β, which is mainly involved in DNA repair synthesis, was upregulated to a high level following exposure to 2 µM rotenone. The abrogation of DNA poly β by siRNA transfection or dideoxycytidine (DDC treatment attenuated the rotenone-induced endoreduplication. The cell cycle was reactivated in cyclin D-expressing dopaminergic neurons from the substantia nigra (SN of rats following stereotactic (ST infusion of rotenone. Increased DNA poly β expression was observed in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc and the substantia nigra pars reticulate (SNr of rotenone-treated rats. Collectively, in the in vitro model of rotenone-induced mitotic catastrophe, the overexpression of DNA poly β promotes endoreduplication; in the in vivo model, the upregulation of DNA poly β and cell cycle reentry were also observed in the adult rat substantia nigra. Therefore, the cell cycle regulation of DNA poly β may be involved in the pathological processes of PD, which results in the induction of endoreduplication.

  8. A novel therapeutic approach to 6-OHDA-induced Parkinson's disease in rats via supplementation of PTD-conjugated tyrosine hydroxylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shao Ping; Fu, Ai Ling; Wang, Yu Xia; Yu, Lei Ping; Jia, Pei Yuan; Li, Qian; Jin, Guo Zhang; Sun, Man Ji

    2006-07-21

    The present study aimed to evaluate whether the protein transduction domain (PTD)-conjugated human tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) fusion protein was effective on the 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced Parkinson's disease (PD) model rats. An expression vector pET-PTD-TH harbouring the PTD-TH gene was constructed and transformed to the Escherichia coli BL21 cells for expression. The expressed recombinant PTD-TH with a molecular weight of 61 kD was successfully transduced (1 microM) into the dopaminergic SH-sy5y human neuroblastoma cells in vitro and visualized by immunohistochemical assay. An in vivo experiment in rats showed that the iv administered PTD-TH protein (8 mg/kg) permeated across the blood-brain barrier, penetrated into the striatum and midbrain, and peaked at 5-8 h after the injection. The behavioral effects of PTD-TH on the apomorphine-induced rotations in the PD model rats 8 weeks after the 6-OHDA lesion showed that a single bolus of PTD-TH (8 mg/kg) iv injection caused a decrement of 60% of the contralateral turns on day 1 and 40% on days 5-17. The results imply that iv delivery of PTD-TH is therapeutically effective on the 6-OHDA-induced PD in rats, the PTD-mediated human TH treatment opening a promising therapeutic direction in treatment of PD.

  9. A novel therapeutic approach to 6-OHDA-induced Parkinson's disease in rats via supplementation of PTD-conjugated tyrosine hydroxylase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Shaoping; Fu Ailing; Wang Yuxia; Yu Leiping; Jia Peiyuan; Li Qian; Jin Guozhang; Sun Manji

    2006-01-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate whether the protein transduction domain (PTD)-conjugated human tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) fusion protein was effective on the 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced Parkinson's disease (PD) model rats. An expression vector pET-PTD-TH harbouring the PTD-TH gene was constructed and transformed to the Escherichia coli BL21 cells for expression. The expressed recombinant PTD-TH with a molecular weight of 61 kD was successfully transduced (1 μM) into the dopaminergic SH-sy5y human neuroblastoma cells in vitro and visualized by immunohistochemical assay. An in vivo experiment in rats showed that the iv administered PTD-TH protein (8 mg/kg) permeated across the blood-brain barrier, penetrated into the striatum and midbrain, and peaked at 5-8 h after the injection. The behavioral effects of PTD-TH on the apomorphine-induced rotations in the PD model rats 8 weeks after the 6-OHDA lesion showed that a single bolus of PTD-TH (8 mg/kg) iv injection caused a decrement of 60% of the contralateral turns on day 1 and 40% on days 5-17. The results imply that iv delivery of PTD-TH is therapeutically effective on the 6-OHDA-induced PD in rats, the PTD-mediated human TH treatment opening a promising therapeutic direction in treatment of PD

  10. Stem Cells as In Vitro Model of Parkinson's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia L. Martínez-Morales

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Progress in understanding neurodegenerative cell biology in Parkinson's disease (PD has been hampered by a lack of predictive and relevant cellular models. In addition, the lack of an adequate in vitro human neuron cell-based model has been an obstacle for the uncover of new drugs for treating PD. The ability to generate induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs from PD patients and a refined capacity to differentiate these iPSCs into DA neurons, the relevant disease cell type, promises a new paradigm in drug development that positions human disease pathophysiology at the core of preclinical drug discovery. Disease models derived from iPSC that manifest cellular disease phenotypes have been established for several monogenic diseases, but iPSC can likewise be used for phenotype-based drug screens in complex diseases for which the underlying genetic mechanism is unknown. Here, we highlight recent advances as well as limitations in the use of iPSC technology for modelling PD “in a dish” and for testing compounds against human disease phenotypes in vitro. We discuss how iPSCs are being exploited to illuminate disease pathophysiology, identify novel drug targets, and enhance the probability of clinical success of new drugs.

  11. Neuroprotective Effects of Germinated Brown Rice in Rotenone-Induced Parkinson's-Like Disease Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chompoopong, Supin; Jarungjitaree, Sunit; Punbanlaem, Tideeporn; Rungruang, Thanaporn; Chongthammakun, Sukumal; Kettawan, Aikkarach; Taechowisan, Thongchai

    2016-09-01

    The effects of germinated brown rice (GBR) on the motor deficits and the dopaminergic (DA) cell death were investigated in Parkinson's-like disease (PD) rats. Reactive oxidative species generated by chronic subcutaneous injection of rotenone (RT) lead to neuronal apoptosis particularly in the nigrostriatal DA system and produce many features of PD, bradykinesis, postural instability and rigidity. In this study, 4-phenylbutyric acid (4-PBA), previously reported to inhibit RT-induced DA cell death, was used as the positive control. Results show that pretreatment with GBR as well as 4-PBA significantly enhanced the motor activity after RT injection, and GBR affected significantly in open field test, only in the ambulation but not the mobility duration, and ameliorated the time to orient down (t-turn) and total time to descend the pole (t-total) in pole test as compared to RT group, but significantly lowered both t-turn and t-total only in 4-PBA group. The percentage of apoptotic cells in brain measured by flow cytometry and the inflammatory effect measured by ELISA of TNF-α showed significant increase in RT group as compared to the control (CT) group at P < 0.05. Apoptotic cells in RT group (85.98 %) showed a significant (P < 0.05) increase versus CT group (17.50 %), and this effect was attenuated in GBR+RT group by decreasing apoptotic cells (79.32 %), whereas, increased viable cells (17.94 %) versus RT group (10.79 %). GBR in GBR + RT group could decrease TNF-α both in the serum and in brain. In summary, GBR showed a neuroprotective effect in RT-induced PD rats, and it may be useful as a value-added functional food to prevent neurodegenerative disease or PD.

  12. New transgenic models of Parkinson's disease using genome editing technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cota-Coronado, J A; Sandoval-Ávila, S; Gaytan-Dávila, Y P; Diaz, N F; Vega-Ruiz, B; Padilla-Camberos, E; Díaz-Martínez, N E

    2017-11-28

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder. It is characterised by selective loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta, which results in dopamine depletion, leading to a number of motor and non-motor symptoms. In recent years, the development of new animal models using nuclease-based genome-editing technology (ZFN, TALEN, and CRISPR/Cas9 nucleases) has enabled the introduction of custom-made modifications into the genome to replicate key features of PD, leading to significant advances in our understanding of the pathophysiology of the disease. We review the most recent studies on this new generation of in vitro and in vivo PD models, which replicate the most relevant symptoms of the disease and enable better understanding of the aetiology and mechanisms of PD. This may be helpful in the future development of effective treatments to halt or slow disease progression. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Proteomic Analysis of the Effect of Korean Red Ginseng in the Striatum of a Parkinson?s Disease Mouse Model

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Dongsoo; Jeon, Hyongjun; Ryu, Sun; Koo, Sungtae; Ha, Ki-Tae; Kim, Seungtae

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that Korean Red Ginseng (KRG) suppresses dopaminergic neuronal death in the brain of a Parkinson's disease (PD) mouse model, but the mechanism is still elusive. Using a 2-dimensional electrophoresis technique, we investigated whether KRG can restore the changes in protein expressions in the striatum (ST) of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-injected mice. Male C57BL/6 mice (9 weeks old) were injected with 20 mg/kg MPTP intraperitoneally four times a...

  14. Mitochondrial Insult in a Parkinson's like symptoms model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrizales, Julio; Cantu, Manuel; Plas, Daniel; Daniel Plas Lab Team, Dr.

    2014-03-01

    Healthy cells require healthy mitochondria. If these organelles are damaged, many health consequences follow. For example, Parkinson's Disease (PD) is a major neurodegenerative disorder of unknown cause, but much evidence points to the mitochondrion as a key player in the onset of this disease. PD has been studied in animal models challenged with toxins that target the mitochondria. In our work, we have used the pesticide, Rotenone, a known inhibitor of protein Complex I in the mitochondrial electron transport chain. When this toxin is applied to the freshwater mollusk, Lymnaea stagnalis, or pond snail, severe motor deficits ensue. In this project, we are studying the direct effects of this toxin on mitochondrial structure and physiology. We expected that the morphology of the organelle may be altered. In addition, it is likely that the mitochondrial membrane potential necessary for normal function may decrease as the electron transport loses the ability to move protons from the matrix to the intermembrane space. we also are going to use Electrophysiology to compare and Identify the difference of the electrical signaling among healthy and unhealthy neurons. HHMI

  15. Impaired sense of smell in a Drosophila Parkinson's model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Poddighe

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease (PD is one of the most common neurodegenerative disease characterized by the clinical triad: tremor, akinesia and rigidity. Several studies have suggested that PD patients show disturbances in olfaction at the earliest onset of the disease. The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster is becoming a powerful model organism to study neurodegenerative diseases. We sought to use this system to explore olfactory dysfunction, if any, in PINK1 mutants, which is a model for PD. PINK1 mutants display many important diagnostic symptoms of the disease such as akinetic motor behavior. In the present study, we describe for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, neurophysiological and neuroanatomical results concerning the olfactory function in PINK1 mutant flies. Electroantennograms were recorded in response to synthetic and natural volatiles (essential oils from groups of PINK1 mutant adults at three different time points in their life cycle: one from 3-5 day-old flies, from 15-20 and from 27-30 days. The results obtained were compared with the same age-groups of wild type flies. We found that mutant adults showed a decrease in the olfactory response to 1-hexanol, α-pinene and essential oil volatiles. This olfactory response in mutant adults decreased even more as the flies aged. Immunohistological analysis of the antennal lobes in these mutants revealed structural abnormalities, especially in the expression of Bruchpilot protein, a marker for synaptic active zones. The combination of electrophysiological and morphological results suggests that the altered synaptic organization may be due to a neurodegenerative process. Our results indicate that this model can be used as a tool for understanding PD pathogensis and pathophysiology. These results help to explore the potential of using olfaction as a means of monitoring PD progression and developing new treatments.

  16. Ameliorative effect of Sida cordifolia in rotenone induced oxidative stress model of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khurana, Navneet; Gajbhiye, Asmita

    2013-12-01

    Present study focused on the evaluation of aqueous extract of Sida cordifolia (AESC), and its different fractions; hexane (HFSC), chloroform (CFSC) and aqueous (AFSC), against rotenone induced biochemical, neurochemical, histopathological and behavioral alterations in a rat model of Parkinson's disease (PD). An estimation of the level of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), glutathione (GSH) and catalase (CAT) along with superoxide anion generation (SAG) in different brain regions (cortex, midbrain and cerebellum) was carried out to assess biochemical changes. Behavioral evaluation tests (catalepsy, rearing behavior and posture instability) and neurochemical estimations (norepinephrine, dopamine and serotonin level) along with histopathological evaluations of different brain regions were also performed. The varying doses (50, 100, 250mg/kg; p.o.) of different test treatments (AESC, HFSC, CFSC and AFSC) were co-administered along with rotenone (2mg/kg; s.c.), for a period of 35 days to rats of various groups and compared with rotenone per se (negative control) and l-deprenyl (positive control; 10mg/kg; p.o.) treated groups for the above mentioned parameters. The increase in catalepsy and posture instability along with decrease in rearing behavior observed due to rotenone treatment was significantly attenuated by co-treatment with varying doses of AESC and AFSC. Results of the histopathological studies of different brain regions of rats showed eosinophilic lesions in the mid brain region due to rotenone treatment. The eosinophilic lesions were significantly attenuated in co-treated groups of AESC-100mg/kg and AFSC-100mg/kg. Rotenone induced oxidative damage, revealed by increased level of TBARS, SAG and decreased level of GSH and CAT in mid brain region of rats, was attenuated by the co-treatment of AESC and AFSC. The rotenone induced decrease of dopamine level in the midbrain region of rats was also attenuated by co-treatment of AESC-100mg/kg and AFSC

  17. The antioxidant effect of hesperetin and nano-hesperetin on activity of catalase and superoxide dismutase enzymes in the hippocampus of animal model of Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Alizadeh*

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Hesperetin flavanone is a natural bioflavonoid found abundantly in citrus fruits with antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Nano sizing techniques improve the bioavailability of poorly soluble drugs such as hesperetin. Main feature of Parkinson's disease is the degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. The rate of oxidative damage increases during Parkinson's disease, as the efficiency of antioxidant and repair mechanisms decreases.The purpose of this study was to investigate the beneficial potential of hesperetin and nano-hesperetinon the activity of catalase and superoxide dismutase antioxidant enzymes in the animal model of Parkinson's disease. Methods:  Forty nine male rats were divided into 7 groups. All groups except the control group and vehicle with unilateral injection of 6-hydroxydopamine to striatum were converted to Parkinson's models. The four treatment groups received 5 and 10 mg/kg hesperetin and nano-hesperetinper day orally for four weeks. Then, at the end of the fourth week, the activity of catalase and superoxide dismutase in the hippocampus area was measured. Results: The results showed that intrastriatal injection of 6-hydroxydopamine significantly (p

  18. Inhibition of neuroinflammation and mitochondrial dysfunctions by carbenoxolone in the rotenone model of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Poonam; Nehru, Bimla

    2015-02-01

    α-Synuclein aggregation contributes to the Parkinson's disease (PD) pathology in multiple ways-the two most important being the activation of neuroinflammation and mitochondrial dysfunction. Our recent studies have shown the beneficial effects of a heat shock protein (HSP) inducer, carbenoxolone (Cbx), in reducing the aggregation of α-synuclein in a rotenone-based rat model of PD. The present study was designed to explore its ability to attenuate the α-synuclein-mediated alterations in neuroinflammation and mitochondrial functions. The PD model was generated by the rotenone administration (2 mg/kg b.wt.) to the male SD rats for a period of 5 weeks. Cbx (20 mg/kg b.wt.) co-administration was seen to reduce the activation of astrocytes incited by rotenone. Subsequently, the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β was inhibited. Further, the expression level of various inflammatory mediators such as COX-2, iNOS, and NF-κB was also reduced following Cbx co-treatment. Cbx was also shown to reduce the rotenone-induced decline in activity of mitochondrial complexes-I, -II, and -IV. Protection of mitochondrial functions and reduction in neuroinflammation lead to the lesser production of ROS and subsequently reduced oxidative stress. This was reflected by the increase in both the cytosolic and mitochondrial GSH levels as well as SOD activity during Cbx co-treatment. Thus, Cbx reduces the inflammatory response and improves the mitochondrial dysfunctions by reducing α-synuclein aggregation. In addition, it also reduces the associated oxidative stress. Due to its ability to target the multiple pathways implicated in the PD, Cbx can serve as a highly beneficial prophylactic agent.

  19. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Research We Fund Parkinson's Outcomes Project Grant Opportunities Science News & Progress Patient Engagement Research Our research has ... Nurse Webinars: Nursing Solutions: Improving Caregiver Strain through Science and Model Interventions Expert Briefings: Parkinson's Disease Psychosis: ...

  20. Effects of crocin on brain oxidative damage and aversive memory in a 6-OHDA model of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajaei, Z; Hosseini, M; Alaei, H

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of crocin on brain oxidative damage and memory deficits in a 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) model of Parkinson's disease. Male Wistar rats were subjected to unilateral injection of 6-OHDA (16 µg) into the medial forebrain bundle and treated with crocin (30 and 60 mg/kg) for six weeks. The rats were tested for memory performance at six weeks after 6-OHDA infusion, and then were killed for the estimation of biochemical parameters. The increase in thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and nitrite levels in the hippocampus were observed in the 6-OHDA lesioned rats, which was accompanied by memory deficits in a passive avoidance test at the end of week 6. Moreover, treatment with crocin decreased TBARS and nitrite levels in the hippocampus, and improved aversive memory. The present study conclusively demonstrated that crocin acts as an antioxidant and anti-inflammatory agent in the hippocampus of parkinsonian rats and could improve aversive memory through its properties.

  1. Insights into Parkinson's disease models and neurotoxicity using non-invasive imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez-Pernaute, Rosario; Brownell, Anna-Liisa; Jenkins, Bruce G.; Isacson, Ole

    2005-01-01

    Loss of dopamine in the nigrostriatal system causes a severe impairment in motor function in patients with Parkinson's disease and in experimental neurotoxic models of the disease. We have used non-invasive imaging techniques such as positron emission tomography (PET) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to investigate in vivo the changes in the dopamine system in neurotoxic models of Parkinson's disease. In addition to classic neurotransmitter studies, in these models, it is also possible to characterize associated and perhaps pathogenic factors, such as the contribution of microglia activation and inflammatory responses to neuronal damage. Functional imaging techniques are instrumental to our understanding and modeling of disease mechanisms, which should in turn lead to development of new therapies for Parkinson's disease and other neurodegenerative disorders

  2. Effects of Hypericum perforatum on turning behavior in an animal model of Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Débora Dalla Vecchia

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease (PD is an age-related neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the slow and progressive death of dopaminergic neurons in the (substantia nigra pars compact. Hypericum perforatum (H. perforatum is a plant widely used as an antidepressant, that also presents antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. We evaluated the effects of H. perforatum on the turning behavior of rats submitted to a unilateral administration of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA into the medial forebrain bundle as an animal model of PD. The animals were treated with H. perforatum (100, 200, or 400 mg/kg, v.o. for 35 consecutive days (from the 28th day before surgery to the 7th day after. The turning behavior was evaluated at 7, 14 and 21 days after the surgery, and the turnings were counted as contralateral or ipsilateral to the lesion side. All tested doses significantly reduced the number of contralateral turns in all days of evaluation, suggesting a neuroprotective effect. However, they were not able to prevent the 6-OHDA-induced decrease of tyrosine hydroxylase expression in the lesioned striatum. We propose that H. perforatum may counteract the overexpression of dopamine receptors on the lesioned striatum as a possible mechanism for this effect. The present findings provide new evidence that H. perforatum may represent a promising therapeutic tool for PD.

  3. Vitamin B12-impaired metabolism produces apoptosis and Parkinson phenotype in rats expressing the transcobalamin-oleosin chimera in substantia nigra.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Enrique Orozco-Barrios

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Vitamin B12 is indispensable for proper brain functioning and cytosolic synthesis of S-adenosylmethionine. Whether its deficiency produces effects on viability and apoptosis of neurons remains unknown. There is a particular interest in investigating these effects in Parkinson disease where Levodopa treatment is known to increase the consumption of S-adenosylmethionine. To cause deprivation of vitamin B12, we have recently developed a cell model that produces decreased synthesis of S-adenosylmethionine by anchoring transcobalamin (TCII to the reticulum through its fusion with Oleosin (OLEO. METHODOLOGY: Gene constructs including transcobalamin-oleosin (TCII-OLEO and control constructs, green fluorescent protein-transcobalamin-oleosin (GFP-TCII-OLEO, oleosin-transcobalamin (OLEO-TCII, TCII and OLEO were used for expression in N1E-115 cells (mouse neuroblastoma and in substantia nigra of adult rats, using a targeted transfection with a Neurotensin polyplex system. We studied the viability and the apoptosis in the transfected cells and targeted tissue. The turning behavior was evaluated in the rats transfected with the different plasmids. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The transfection of N1E-115 cells by the TCII-OLEO-expressing plasmid significantly affected cell viability and increased immunoreactivity of cleaved Caspase-3. No change in propidium iodide uptake (used as a necrosis marker was observed. The transfected rats lost neurons immunoreactive to tyrosine hydroxylase. The expression of TCII-OLEO was observed in cells immunoreactive to tyrosine hydroxylase of the substantia nigra, with a superimposed expression of cleaved Caspase-3. These cellular and tissular effects were not observed with the control plasmids. Rats transfected with TCII-OLEO expressing plasmid presented with a significantly higher number of turns, compared with those transfected with the other plasmids. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In conclusion, the TCII-OLEO transfection

  4. Machine learning models for the differential diagnosis of vascular parkinsonism and Parkinson's disease using [123I]FP-CIT SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huertas-Fernandez, I.; Benitez-Rivero, S.; Jesus, S.; Caceres-Redondo, M.T.; Martin-Rodriguez, J.F.; Carrillo, F.; Garcia-Gomez, F.J.; Marin-Oyaga, V.A.; Lojo, J.A.; Garcia-Solis, D.; Mir, P.

    2015-01-01

    The study's objective was to develop diagnostic predictive models using data from two commonly used [ 123 I]FP-CIT SPECT assessment methods: region-of-interest (ROI) analysis and whole-brain voxel-based analysis. We included retrospectively 80 patients with vascular parkinsonism (VP) and 164 patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) who underwent [ 123 I]FP-CIT SPECT. Nuclear-medicine specialists evaluated the scans and calculated bilateral caudate and putamen [ 123 I]FP-CIT uptake and asymmetry indices using BRASS software. Statistical parametric mapping (SPM) was used to compare the radioligand uptake between the two diseases at the voxel level. Quantitative data from these two methods, together with potential confounding factors for dopamine transporter availability (sex, age, disease duration and severity), were used to build predictive models following a tenfold cross-validation scheme. The performance of logistic regression (LR), linear discriminant analysis and support vector machine (SVM) algorithms for ROI data, and their penalized versions for SPM data (penalized LR, penalized discriminant analysis and SVM), were assessed. Significant differences were found in the ROI analysis after covariate correction between VP and PD patients in [ 123 I]FP-CIT uptake in the more affected side of the putamen and the ipsilateral caudate. Age, disease duration and severity were also found to be informative in feeding the statistical model. SPM localized significant reductions in [ 123 I]FP-CIT uptake in PD with respect to VP in two specular clusters comprising areas corresponding to the left and right striatum. The diagnostic predictive accuracy of the LR model using ROI data was 90.3 % and of the SVM model using SPM data was 90.4 %. The predictive models built with ROI data and SPM data from [ 123 I]FP-CIT SPECT provide great discrimination accuracy between VP and PD. External validation of these methods is necessary to confirm their applicability across centres. (orig.)

  5. Amelioration of non-motor dysfunctions after transplantation of human dopamine neurons in a model of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lelos, M J; Morgan, R J; Kelly, C M; Torres, E M; Rosser, A E; Dunnett, S B

    2016-04-01

    Patients suffering from Parkinson's disease (PD) display cognitive and neuropsychiatric dysfunctions, especially with disease progression. Although these impairments have been reported to impact more heavily upon a patient's quality of life than any motor dysfunctions, there are currently no interventions capable of adequately targeting these non-motor deficits. Utilizing a rodent model of PD, we investigated whether cell replacement therapy, using intrastriatal transplants of human-derived ventral mesencephalic (hVM) grafts, could alleviate cognitive and neuropsychiatric, as well as motor, dysfunctions. Rats with unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesions to the medial forebrain bundle were tested on a complex operant task that dissociates motivational, visuospatial and motor impairments sensitive to the loss of dopamine. A subset of lesioned rats received intrastriatal hVM grafts of ~9 weeks gestation. Post-graft, rats underwent repeated drug-induced rotation tests and were tested on two versions of the complex operant task, before post-mortem analysis of the hVM tissue grafts. Post-graft behavioural testing revealed that hVM grafts improved non-motor aspects of task performance, specifically visuospatial function and motivational processing, as well as alleviating motor dysfunctions. We report the first evidence of human VM cell grafts alleviating both non-motor and motor dysfunctions in an animal model of PD. This intervention, therefore, is the first to improve cognitive and neuropsychiatric symptoms long-term in a model of PD. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Neuroprotective effect of curcumin-I in copper-induced dopaminergic neurotoxicity in rats: A possible link with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbaoui, Abdellatif; Chatoui, Hicham; El Hiba, Omar; Gamrani, Halima

    2017-11-01

    Numerous findings indicate an involvement of heavy metals in the neuropathology of several neurodegenerative disorders, especially Parkinson's disease (PD). Previous studies have demonstrated that Copper (Cu) exhibits a potent neurotoxic effect on dopaminergic neurons and triggers profound neurobehavioral alterations. Curcumin is a major component of Curcuma longa rhizomes and a powerful medicinal plant that exerts many pharmacological effects. However, the neuroprotective action of curcumin on Cu-induced dopaminergic neurotoxicity is yet to be investigated. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the impact of acute Cu-intoxication (10mg/kg B.W. i.p) for 3days on the dopaminergic system and locomotor performance as well as the possible therapeutic efficacy of curcumin I (30mg/kg B.W.). Intoxicated rats showed a significant loss of Tyrosine Hydroxylase (TH) expression within substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc), ventral tegmental area (VTA) and the striatal outputs. This was correlated with a clear decrease in locomotor performance. Critically, curcumin-I co-treatment reversed these changes and showed a noticeable protective effect; both TH expression and locomotor performance was reinstated in intoxicated rats. These results demonstrate altered dopaminergic innervations following Cu intoxication and a new therapeutic potential of curcumin against Cu-induced dopaminergic neurotransmission failure. Curcumin may therefore prevent heavy metal related Parkinsonism. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. A process-model based approach to prospective memory impairment in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kliegel, Matthias; Altgassen, Mareike; Hering, Alexandra; Rose, Nathan S

    2011-07-01

    The present review discusses the current state of research on the clinical neuropsychology of prospective memory in Parkinson's disease. To do so the paper is divided in two sections. In the first section, we briefly outline key features of the (partly implicit) rationale underlying the available literature on the clinical neuropsychology of prospective memory. Here, we present a conceptual model that guides our approach to the clinical neuropsychology of prospective memory in general and to the effects of Parkinson's disease on prospective memory in particular. In the second section, we use this model to guide our review of the available literature and suggest some open issues and future directions motivated by previous findings and the proposed conceptual model. The review suggests that certain phases of the prospective memory process (intention formation und initiation) are particularly impaired by Parkinson's disease. In addition, it is argued that prospective memory may be preserved when tasks involve specific features (e.g., focal cues) that reduce the need for strategic monitoring processes. In terms of suggestions for future directions, it is noted that intervention studies are needed which target the specific phases of the prospective memory process that are impaired in Parkinson's disease, such as planning interventions. Moreover, it is proposed that prospective memory deficits in Parkinson's disease should be explored in the context of a general impairment in the ability to form an intention and plan or coordinate an appropriate series of actions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Data-driven modeling of sleep EEG and EOG reveals characteristics indicative of pre-Parkinson's and Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Julie Anja Engelhard; Zoetmulder, Marielle; Koch, Henriette

    2014-01-01

    patients with idiopathic REM sleep behavior disorder (iRBD) and 36 patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). The data were divided into training and validation datasets and features reflecting EEG and EOG characteristics based on topics were computed. The most discriminative feature subset for separating i...... and the ability to maintain NREM and REM sleep have potential as early PD biomarkers. Data-driven analysis of sleep may contribute to the evaluation of neurodegenerative patients. (C) 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.......Background: Manual scoring of sleep relies on identifying certain characteristics in polysomnograph (PSG) signals. However, these characteristics are disrupted in patients with neurodegenerative diseases. New method: This study evaluates sleep using a topic modeling and unsupervised learning...

  9. Functional characterization and expression of thalamic GABA(B) receptors in a rodent model of Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groote, C; Wullner, U; Loschmann, PA; Luiten, PGM; Klockgether, T

    1999-01-01

    Increased GABAergic neurotransmission of the basal ganglia output nuclei projecting to the motor thalamus is thought to contribute to the pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease. We investigated the functional role of thalamic GABA(B) receptors in a rodent model of Parkinson's disease. First, we

  10. Effects of the hook of Uncaria rhynchophylla on neurotoxicity in the 6-hydroxydopamine model of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Jin Sup; Kim, Hyo Geun; Ju, Mi Sun; Choi, Jin Gyu; Jeong, Seo Young; Oh, Myung Sook

    2009-11-12

    While the hook of Uncaria rhynchophylla (URH) is a traditional herb used in northeast Asia for the treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD)-like symptoms such as tremor, it has not been experimentally evaluated in a PD model. We investigated the effects of URH on 6-hydroxydapamine (6-OHDA)-induced neurotoxicity in in vitro and in vivo models of PD. The cell viability, anti-oxidative activity, and anti-apoptotic activity of a water extract of URH (URE) were assessed using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide, reactive oxygen species (ROS), total glutathione (GSH), and caspase-3 assays in PC12 cells stressed by 6-OHDA. We also investigated the behavioral recovery and dopaminergic neuron protection of URE using an apomorphine-induced rotation test and tyrosine hydroxylase immunohistochemistry in the hemi-parkinsonian rat model of the unilateral 6-OHDA lesion of the medial forebrain bundle. In PC12 cells, URE significantly reduced cell death and the generation of ROS, increased GSH levels, and inhibited caspase-3 activity induced by 6-OHDA. In 6-OHDA-lesioned rats, posttreatment with URE (5 mg/kg/day for 14 days) significantly reduced apomorphine-induced rotation, and it lowered dopaminergic neuronal loss in substantia nigra pars compacta. URE possesses neuroprotective activity against 6-OHDA-induced toxicity through anti-oxidative and anti-apoptotic activities in PD models.

  11. Paraquat induces oxidative stress, neuronal loss in substantia nigra region and Parkinsonism in adult rats: Neuroprotection and amelioration of symptoms by water-soluble formulation of Coenzyme Q10

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sridhar TS

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Parkinson's disease, for which currently there is no cure, develops as a result of progressive loss of dopamine neurons in the brain; thus, identification of any potential therapeutic intervention for disease management is of a great importance. Results Here we report that prophylactic application of water-soluble formulation of coenzyme Q10 could effectively offset the effects of environmental neurotoxin paraquat, believed to be a contributing factor in the development of familial PD. In this study we utilized a model of paraquat-induced dopaminergic neurodegeneration in adult rats that received three weekly intra-peritoneal injections of the herbicide paraquat. Histological and biochemical analyses of rat brains revealed increased levels of oxidative stress markers and a loss of approximately 65% of dopamine neurons in the substantia nigra region. The paraquat-exposed rats also displayed impaired balancing skills on a slowly rotating drum (rotorod evidenced by their reduced spontaneity in gait performance. In contrast, paraquat exposed rats receiving a water-soluble formulation of coenzyme Q10 in their drinking water prior to and during the paraquat treatment neither developed neurodegeneration nor reduced rotorod performance and were indistinguishable from the control paraquat-untreated rats. Conclusion Our data confirmed that paraquat-induced neurotoxicity represents a convenient rat model of Parkinsonian neurodegeneration suitable for mechanistic and neuroprotective studies. This is the first preclinical evaluation of a water-soluble coenzyme Q10 formulation showing the evidence of prophylactic neuroprotection at clinically relevant doses.

  12. Predicting early cognitive decline in newly-diagnosed Parkinson's patients: A practical model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogue, Olivia; Fernandez, Hubert H; Floden, Darlene P

    2018-06-19

    To create a multivariable model to predict early cognitive decline among de novo patients with Parkinson's disease, using brief, inexpensive assessments that are easily incorporated into clinical flow. Data for 351 drug-naïve patients diagnosed with idiopathic Parkinson's disease were obtained from the Parkinson's Progression Markers Initiative. Baseline demographic, disease history, motor, and non-motor features were considered as candidate predictors. Best subsets selection was used to determine the multivariable baseline symptom profile that most accurately predicted individual cognitive decline within three years. Eleven per cent of the sample experienced cognitive decline. The final logistic regression model predicting decline included five baseline variables: verbal memory retention, right-sided bradykinesia, years of education, subjective report of cognitive impairment, and REM behavior disorder. Model discrimination was good (optimism-adjusted concordance index = .749). The associated nomogram provides a tool to determine individual patient risk of meaningful cognitive change in the early stages of the disease. Through the consideration of easily-implemented or routinely-gathered assessments, we have identified a multidimensional baseline profile and created a convenient, inexpensive tool to predict cognitive decline in the earliest stages of Parkinson's disease. The use of this tool would generate prediction at the individual level, allowing clinicians to tailor medical management for each patient and identify at-risk patients for clinical trials aimed at disease modifying therapies. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Optogenetic approaches to evaluate striatal function in animal models of Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Krystal L; Kim, Youngcho; Alberico, Stephanie L; Emmons, Eric B; Narayanan, Nandakumar S

    2016-03-01

    Optogenetics refers to the ability to control cells that have been genetically modified to express light-sensitive ion channels. The introduction of optogenetic approaches has facilitated the dissection of neural circuits. Optogenetics allows for the precise stimulation and inhibition of specific sets of neurons and their projections with fine temporal specificity. These techniques are ideally suited to investigating neural circuitry underlying motor and cognitive dysfunction in animal models of human disease. Here, we focus on how optogenetics has been used over the last decade to probe striatal circuits that are involved in Parkinson disease, a neurodegenerative condition involving motor and cognitive abnormalities resulting from degeneration of midbrain dopaminergic neurons. The precise mechanisms underlying the striatal contribution to both cognitive and motor dysfunction in Parkinson disease are unknown. Although optogenetic approaches are somewhat removed from clinical use, insight from these studies can help identify novel therapeutic targets and may inspire new treatments for Parkinson disease. Elucidating how neuronal and behavioral functions are influenced and potentially rescued by optogenetic manipulation in animal models could prove to be translatable to humans. These insights can be used to guide future brain-stimulation approaches for motor and cognitive abnormalities in Parkinson disease and other neuropsychiatric diseases.

  14. Neuroprotective properties of curcumin in toxin-base animal models of Parkinson?s disease: a systematic experiment literatures review

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xin-Shi; Zhang, Zeng-Rui; Zhang, Man-Man; Sun, Miao-Xuan; Wang, Wen-Wen; Xie, Cheng-Long

    2017-01-01

    Background Curcumin (diferuloylmethane), a polyphenol extracted from the plant Curcuma longa, is widely used in Southeast Asia, China and India in food preparation and for medicinal purposes. Meanwhile, the neuroprotective actions of curcumin have been documented for experimental therapy in Parkinson?s disease (PD). Methods In this study, we used a systematic review to comprehensively assess the efficacy of curcumin in experimental PD. Using electronic and manual search for the literatures, w...

  15. Altered Tracer Distribution and Clearance in the Extracellular Space of the Substantia Nigra in a Rodent Model of Parkinson's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Fang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between extracellular space (ECS diffusion parameters and brain drug clearance is not well-studied, especially in the context of Parkinson's disease (PD. Therefore, we used a rodent model of PD to explore the distribution and clearance of a magnetic resonance tracer. Forty male Sprague Dawley rats were randomized into four different groups: a PD group, a Madopar group (PD + Madopar treatment, a sham group, and a control group. All rats received an injection of the extracellular tracer gadolinium-diethylene triaminepentacetic acid (Gd-DTPA directly into the substantia nigra (SN. ECS diffusion parameters including the effective diffusion coefficient (D*, clearance coefficient (k', ratio of the maximum distribution volume of the tracer (Vd-max%, and half-life (t1/2 were measured. We found that all parameters were significantly increased in the PD group compared to the other three groups (D*: F = 5.774, p = 0.0025; k': F = 20.00, P < 0.0001; Vd-max%: F = 12.81, P < 0.0001; and t1/2: F = 23.35, P < 0.0001. In conclusion, the PD group exhibited a wider distribution and lower clearance of the tracer compared to the other groups. Moreover, k' was more sensitive than D* for monitoring morphological and functional changes in the ECS in a rodent model of PD.

  16. Neuroprotective and behavioral efficacy of intravenous transplanted adipose stem cells in experimental Parkinsonian rat models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malihe Nakhaeifard

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Parkinson's disease is a deficiency of dopamine in the striatum, characterized by bradykinesis, rigidity and resting tremor. Adipose tissue-Derived Stem Cells (ADSCs have many advantages for cell therapy because of the easy availability and pluripotency without ethical problems. In this research, the effects of ADSCs transplantation on motor impairment of rat Parkinsonian models were evaluated. Materials and Methods: Parkinson model was constructed by the unilateral lesion of striatum of male Wistar rats using 20µg of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA as lesion group. Cell and α-MEM (α-minimal essential medium groups were lesioned animals that received intravenous injection of 3×106 cells suspended in medium and medium repectively. All rats were evaluated behaviorally with rotarod and apomorphine-induced rotation tests, at 4 and 8 weeks after cell transplantation. Results: Lesion and α-MEM groups showed increased contralateral turns while cell group significantly ameliorated both in rotarod and apomorphine-induced rotation tests. There was a significant difference of contralateral turns between cell and lesioned groups at 8 weeks after transplantation. Lesioned rats showed significant decrease of staying on the rod as compared to control, but in cell group there was a significant increase in comparision with the lesioned animals. Conclusion: ADSCs injected intravenously promote functional recovery in Parkinsonian rats.

  17. Data-driven modeling of sleep EEG and EOG reveals characteristics indicative of pre-Parkinson's and Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Julie A E; Zoetmulder, Marielle; Koch, Henriette; Frandsen, Rune; Arvastson, Lars; Christensen, Søren R; Jennum, Poul; Sorensen, Helge B D

    2014-09-30

    Manual scoring of sleep relies on identifying certain characteristics in polysomnograph (PSG) signals. However, these characteristics are disrupted in patients with neurodegenerative diseases. This study evaluates sleep using a topic modeling and unsupervised learning approach to identify sleep topics directly from electroencephalography (EEG) and electrooculography (EOG). PSG data from control subjects were used to develop an EOG and an EEG topic model. The models were applied to PSG data from 23 control subjects, 25 patients with periodic leg movements (PLMs), 31 patients with idiopathic REM sleep behavior disorder (iRBD) and 36 patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). The data were divided into training and validation datasets and features reflecting EEG and EOG characteristics based on topics were computed. The most discriminative feature subset for separating iRBD/PD and PLM/controls was estimated using a Lasso-regularized regression model. The features with highest discriminability were the number and stability of EEG topics linked to REM and N3, respectively. Validation of the model indicated a sensitivity of 91.4% and a specificity of 68.8% when classifying iRBD/PD patients. The topics showed visual accordance with the manually scored sleep stages, and the features revealed sleep characteristics containing information indicative of neurodegeneration. This study suggests that the amount of N3 and the ability to maintain NREM and REM sleep have potential as early PD biomarkers. Data-driven analysis of sleep may contribute to the evaluation of neurodegenerative patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Nurse Webinars: Nursing Solutions: Improving Caregiver Strain through Science and Model Interventions Expert Briefings: Parkinson's ... Movimientos y Caídas, Parte 2 Caregiver ...

  19. Lead-Induced Atypical Parkinsonism in Rats: Behavioral, Electrophysiological, and Neurochemical Evidence for a Role of Noradrenaline Depletion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariam Sabbar

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Lead neurotoxicity is a major health problem known as a risk factor for neurodegenerative diseases, including the manifestation of parkinsonism-like disorder. While lead is known to preferentially accumulate in basal ganglia, the mechanisms underlying behavioral disorders remain unknown. Here, we investigated the neurophysiological and biochemical correlates of motor deficits induced by sub-chronic injections of lead.Methods: Sprague Dawely rats were exposed to sub-chronic injections of lead (10 mg/kg, i.p. or to a single i.p. injection of 50 mg/kg N-(2-chloroethyl-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine hydrochloride (DSP-4, a drug known to induce selective depletion of noradrenaline. Rats were submitted to a battery of behavioral tests, including the open field for locomotor activity and rotarod for motor coordination. Electrophysiological recordings were carried out in three major basal ganglia nuclei, the subthalamic nucleus (STN, globus pallidus (GP, and substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNr. At the end of experiments, post-mortem tissue level of the three monoamines (dopamine, noradrenaline, and serotonin and their metabolites has been determined using HPLC.Results: Lead intoxication significantly impaired exploratory and locomotor activity as well as motor coordination. It resulted in a significant reduction in the level of noradrenaline in the cortex and dopamine and its metabolites, DOPAC, and HVA, in the striatum. The tissue level of serotonin and its metabolite 5-HIAA was not affected in the two structures. Similarly, DSP-4, which induced a selective depletion of noradrenaline, significantly decreased exploratory, and locomotor activity as well as motor coordination. L-DOPA treatment did not improve motor deficits induced by lead and DSP-4 in the two animal groups. Electrophysiological recordings showed that both lead and DSP-4 did not change the firing rate but resulted in a switch from the regular normal firing to irregular and

  20. Adaptive control of Parkinson's state based on a nonlinear computational model with unknown parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Fei; Wang, Jiang; Deng, Bin; Wei, Xi-Le; Chen, Ying-Yuan; Liu, Chen; Li, Hui-Yan

    2015-02-01

    The objective here is to explore the use of adaptive input-output feedback linearization method to achieve an improved deep brain stimulation (DBS) algorithm for closed-loop control of Parkinson's state. The control law is based on a highly nonlinear computational model of Parkinson's disease (PD) with unknown parameters. The restoration of thalamic relay reliability is formulated as the desired outcome of the adaptive control methodology, and the DBS waveform is the control input. The control input is adjusted in real time according to estimates of unknown parameters as well as the feedback signal. Simulation results show that the proposed adaptive control algorithm succeeds in restoring the relay reliability of the thalamus, and at the same time achieves accurate estimation of unknown parameters. Our findings point to the potential value of adaptive control approach that could be used to regulate DBS waveform in more effective treatment of PD.

  1. Phrenic and hypoglossal nerve activity during respiratory response to hypoxia in 6-OHDA unilateral model of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrzejewski, Kryspin; Budzińska, Krystyna; Kaczyńska, Katarzyna

    2017-07-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) patients apart from motor dysfunctions exhibit respiratory disturbances. Their mechanism is still unknown and requires investigation. Our research was designed to examine the activity of phrenic (PHR) and hypoglossal (HG) nerves activity during a hypoxic respiratory response in the 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) model of PD. Male adult Wistar rats were injected unilaterally with 6-OHDA (20μg) or the vehicle into the right medial forebrain bundle (MFB). Two weeks after the surgery the activity of the phrenic and hypoglossal nerve was registered in anesthetized, vagotomized, paralyzed, and mechanically ventilated rats under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. Lesion effectiveness was confirmed by the cylinder test, performed before the MFB injection and 14days after, before the respiratory experiment. 6-OHDA lesioned animals showed a significant increase in normoxic inspiratory time. Expiratory time and total time of the respiratory cycle were prolonged in PD rats after hypoxia. The amplitude of the PHR activity and its minute activity were increased in comparison to the sham group at recovery time and during 30s of hypoxia. The amplitude of the HG activity was increased in response to hypoxia in 6-OHDA lesioned animals. The degeneration of dopaminergic neurons decreased the pre-inspiratory/inspiratory ratio of the hypoglossal burst amplitude during and after hypoxia. Unilateral MFB lesion changed the activity of the phrenic and hypoglossal nerves. The altered pre-inspiratory hypoglossal nerve activity indicates modifications to the central mechanisms controlling the activity of the HG nerve and may explain respiratory disorders seen in PD, i.e. apnea. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. ASIC1a Deficient Mice Show Unaltered Neurodegeneration in the Subacute MPTP Model of Parkinson Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Komnig

    Full Text Available Inflammation contributes to the death of dopaminergic neurons in Parkinson disease and can be accompanied by acidification of extracellular pH, which may activate acid-sensing ion channels (ASIC. Accordingly, amiloride, a non-selective inhibitor of ASIC, was protective in an acute 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP mouse model of Parkinson disease. To complement these findings we determined MPTP toxicity in mice deficient for ASIC1a, the most common ASIC isoform in neurons. MPTP was applied i.p. in doses of 30 mg per kg on five consecutive days. We determined the number of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra, assayed by stereological counting 14 days after the last MPTP injection, the number of Nissl positive neurons in the substantia nigra, and the concentration of catecholamines in the striatum. There was no difference between ASIC1a-deficient mice and wildtype controls. We are therefore not able to confirm that ASIC1a are involved in MPTP toxicity. The difference might relate to the subacute MPTP model we used, which more closely resembles the pathogenesis of Parkinson disease, or to further targets of amiloride.

  3. Motor learning in animal models of Parkinson's disease: Aberrant synaptic plasticity in the motor cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tonghui; Wang, Shaofang; Lalchandani, Rupa R; Ding, Jun B

    2017-04-01

    In Parkinson's disease (PD), dopamine depletion causes major changes in the brain, resulting in the typical cardinal motor features of the disease. PD neuropathology has been restricted to postmortem examinations, which are limited to only a single time of PD progression. Models of PD in which dopamine tone in the brain is chemically or physically disrupted are valuable tools in understanding the mechanisms of the disease. The basal ganglia have been well studied in the context of PD, and circuit changes in response to dopamine loss have been linked to the motor dysfunctions in PD. However, the etiology of the cognitive dysfunctions that are comorbid in PD patients has remained unclear until now. In this article, we review recent studies exploring how dopamine depletion affects the motor cortex at the synaptic level. In particular, we highlight our recent findings on abnormal spine dynamics in the motor cortex of PD mouse models through in vivo time-lapse imaging and motor skill behavior assays. In combination with previous studies, a role of the motor cortex in skill learning and the impairment of this ability with the loss of dopamine are becoming more apparent. Taken together, we conclude with a discussion on the potential role for the motor cortex in PD, with the possibility of targeting the motor cortex for future PD therapeutics. © 2017 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. © 2017 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  4. Comparison of Perturbed Pathways in Two Different Cell Models for Parkinson's Disease with Structural Equation Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepe, Daniele; Do, Jin Hwan

    2015-12-16

    Increasing evidence indicates that different morphological types of cell death coexist in the brain of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), but the molecular explanation for this is still under investigation. In this study, we identified perturbed pathways in two different cell models for PD through the following procedures: (1) enrichment pathway analysis with differentially expressed genes and the Reactome pathway database, and (2) construction of the shortest path model for the enriched pathway and detection of significant shortest path model with fitting time-course microarray data of each PD cell model to structural equation model. Two PD cell models constructed by the same neurotoxin showed different perturbed pathways. That is, one showed perturbation of three Reactome pathways, including cellular senescence, chromatin modifying enzymes, and chromatin organization, while six modules within metabolism pathway represented perturbation in the other. This suggests that the activation of common upstream cell death pathways in PD may result in various down-stream processes, which might be associated with different morphological types of cell death. In addition, our results might provide molecular clues for coexistence of different morphological types of cell death in PD patients.

  5. The Neuroprotective Mechanism of Low-Frequency rTMS on Nigral Dopaminergic Neurons of Parkinson's Disease Model Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Qiaoyun; Wang, Yanyong; Gu, Ping; Shao, Rusheng; Zhao, Li; Liu, Xiqi; Wang, Zhanqiang; Wang, Mingwei

    2015-01-01

    Background. Parkinson's disease is a neurodegenerative disease in elder people, pathophysiologic basis of which is the severe deficiency of dopamine in the striatum. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the neuroprotective effect of low-frequency rTMS on Parkinson's disease in model mice. Methods. The effects of low-frequency rTMS on the motor function, cortex excitability, neurochemistry, and neurohistopathology of MPTP-induced Parkinson's disease mice were investigated through behavioral detection, electrophysiologic technique, high performance liquid chromatography-electrochemical detection, immunohistochemical staining, and western blot. Results. Low-frequency rTMS could improve the motor coordination impairment of Parkinson's disease mice: the resting motor threshold significantly decreased in the Parkinson's disease mice; the degeneration of nigral dopaminergic neuron and the expression of tyrosine hydroxylase were significantly improved by low-frequency rTMS; moreover, the expressions of brain derived neurotrophic factor and glial cell line derived neurotrophic factor were also improved by low-frequency rTMS. Conclusions. Low-frequency rTMS had a neuroprotective effect on the nigral dopaminergic neuron which might be due to the improved expressions of brain derived neurotrophic factor and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor. The present study provided a theoretical basis for the application of low-frequency rTMS in the clinical treatment and recovery of Parkinson's disease.

  6. Analysis of Oscillatory Neural Activity in Series Network Models of Parkinson's Disease During Deep Brain Stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Clare M; de Paor, Annraoi M; Cagnan, Hayriye; Lowery, Madeleine M

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is a progressive, neurodegenerative disorder, characterized by hallmark motor symptoms. It is associated with pathological, oscillatory neural activity in the basal ganglia. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is often successfully used to treat medically refractive Parkinson's disease. However, the selection of stimulation parameters is based on qualitative assessment of the patient, which can result in a lengthy tuning period and a suboptimal choice of parameters. This study explores fourth-order, control theory-based models of oscillatory activity in the basal ganglia. Describing function analysis is applied to examine possible mechanisms for the generation of oscillations in interacting nuclei and to investigate the suppression of oscillations with high-frequency stimulation. The theoretical results for the suppression of the oscillatory activity obtained using both the fourth-order model, and a previously described second-order model, are optimized to fit clinically recorded local field potential data obtained from Parkinsonian patients with implanted DBS. Close agreement between the power of oscillations recorded for a range of stimulation amplitudes is observed ( R(2)=0.69-0.99 ). The results suggest that the behavior of the system and the suppression of pathological neural oscillations with DBS is well described by the macroscopic models presented. The results also demonstrate that in this instance, a second-order model is sufficient to model the clinical data, without the need for added complexity. Describing the system behavior with computationally efficient models could aid in the identification of optimal stimulation parameters for patients in a clinical environment.

  7. P-glycoprotein mediated efflux limits the transport of the novel anti-Parkinson's disease candidate drug FLZ across the physiological and PD pathological in vitro BBB models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Liu

    Full Text Available FLZ, a novel anti-Parkinson's disease (PD candidate drug, has shown poor blood-brain barrier (BBB penetration based on the pharmacokinetic study using rat brain. P-glycoprotein (P-gp and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP are two important transporters obstructing substrates entry into the CNS as well as in relation to PD neuropathology. However, it is unclear whether P-gp and BCRP are involved in low BBB permeability of FLZ and what the differences of FLZ brain penetration are between normal and Parkinson's conditions. For this purpose, in vitro BBB models mimicking physiological and PD pathological-related BBB properties were constructed by C6 astroglial cells co-cultured with primary normal or PD rat cerebral microvessel endothelial cells (rCMECs and in vitro permeability experiments of FLZ were carried out. High transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER and low permeability for sodium fluorescein (NaF confirmed the BBB functionality of the two models. Significantly greater expressions of P-gp and BCRP were detected in PD rCMECs associated with the lower in vitro BBB permeability of FLZ in pathological BBB model compared with physiological model. In transport studies only P-gp blocker effectively inhibited the efflux of FLZ, which was consistent with the in vivo permeability data. This result was also confirmed by ATPase assays, suggesting FLZ is a substrate for P-gp but not BCRP. The present study first established in vitro BBB models reproducing PD-related changes of BBB functions in vivo and demonstrated that poor brain penetration of FLZ and low BBB permeability were due to the P-gp transport.

  8. Classic and New Animal Models of Parkinson's Disease

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    Javier Blesa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurological disorders can be modeled in animals so as to recreate specific pathogenic events and behavioral outcomes. Parkinson’s Disease (PD is the second most common neurodegenerative disease of an aging population, and although there have been several significant findings about the PD disease process, much of this process still remains a mystery. Breakthroughs in the last two decades using animal models have offered insights into the understanding of the PD disease process, its etiology, pathology, and molecular mechanisms. Furthermore, while cellular models have helped to identify specific events, animal models, both toxic and genetic, have replicated almost all of the hallmarks of PD and are useful for testing new neuroprotective or neurorestorative strategies. Moreover, significant advances in the modeling of additional PD features have come to light in both classic and newer models. In this review, we try to provide an updated summary of the main characteristics of these models as well as the strengths and weaknesses of what we believe to be the most popular PD animal models. These models include those produced by 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA, 1-methyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropiridine (MPTP, rotenone, and paraquat, as well as several genetic models like those related to alpha-synuclein, PINK1, Parkin and LRRK2 alterations.

  9. Date preliminare privind unele manifestări ale durerii într-un model de șobolan MPTP-indus a bolii Parkinson

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Carmen Ababei

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease (PD is less known as a disease causing pain syndromes, although pain is found in 40-80 % of PD patients, as described by the very few reports in this area of research. Moreover, in some PD patients, pain is so severe and intractable that it overshadows the motor symptoms of the disorder. Still, pain in PD frequently goes under acknowledged and undertreated. Also, the studies regarding pain perception in the existing animal models of PD are very few. We experimentally induced the PD model in rats by injecting subcutaneously one dose of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP, 20mg/kg, while the control group received saline. The behavioral testing for pain included the hot-plate task and was performed 7 days after MPTP injection. In this way, our rat model resulted from the acute treatment with a low dose of MPTP, exhibited an increased sensitivity to pain perception, as demonstrated by the significant decrease in the values of the latency time in hot-plate for rats treated with MPTP, as compared to the controls. In this way, further studies in this area of research seem warranted.

  10. Interaction between subclinical doses of the Parkinson's disease associated gene, α-synuclein, and the pesticide, rotenone, precipitates motor dysfunction and nigrostriatal neurodegeneration in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naughton, Carol; O'Toole, Daniel; Kirik, Deniz; Dowd, Eilís

    2017-01-01

    In most patients, Parkinson's disease is thought to emerge after a lifetime of exposure to, and interaction between, various genetic and environmental risk factors. One of the key genetic factors linked to this condition is α-synuclein, and the α-synuclein protein is pathologically associated with idiopathic cases. However, α-synuclein pathology is also present in presymptomatic, clinically "normal" individuals suggesting that environmental factors, such as Parkinson's disease-linked agricultural pesticides, may be required to precipitate Parkinson's disease in these individuals. In this context, the aim of this study was to assess the behavioural and neuropathological impact of exposing rats with a subclinical load of α-synuclein to subclinical doses of the organic pesticide, rotenone. Rats were randomly assigned to two groups for intra-nigral infusion of AAV 2/5- GFP or AAV 2/5 -α-synuclein. Post viral motor function was assessed at 8, 10 and 12 weeks in the Corridor, Stepping and Whisker tests of lateralised motor function. At week 12, animals were performance-matched to receive a subsequent intra-striatal challenge of the organic pesticide rotenone (or its vehicle) to yield four final groups (Control, Rotenone, AAV 2/5 -α-synuclein and Combined). Behavioural testing resumed one week after rotenone surgery and continued for 5 weeks. We found that, when administered alone, neither intra-nigral AAV-α-synuclein nor intra-striatal rotenone caused sufficient nigrostriatal neurodegeneration to induce a significant motor impairment in their own right. However, when these were administered sequentially to the same rats, the interaction between the two Parkinsonian challenges significantly exacerbated nigrostriatal neurodegeneration which precipitated a pronounced impairment in motor function. These results indicate that exposing rats with a subclinical α-synuclein-induced pathology to the pesticide, rotenone, profoundly exacerbates their Parkinsonian

  11. Ibuprofen or piroxicam protects nigral neurons and delays the development of l-dopa induced dyskinesia in rats with experimental Parkinsonism: Influence on angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teema, Asmaa M; Zaitone, Sawsan A; Moustafa, Yasser M

    2016-08-01

    Neuroinflammation and angiogenesis have been involved in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD). This study investigated the effect of ibuprofen or piroxicam on the motor response to l-dopa and development of dyskinesia in Parkinsonian rats focusing on the anti-angiogenic role of the two non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Rats were divided into nine groups as follows: Group I: the vehicle group, Group II: rotenone group, rats were injected with nine doses of rotenone (1 mg/kg/48 h), group III&IV: rats received rotenone + ibuprofen (10 or 30 mg/kg), Group V-VI: rats received rotenone + piroxicam (1 or 3 mg/kg), Group VII: rats received rotenone + l-dopa/carbidopa (100/10 mg/kg), Group VIII-IX: rats received rotenone + l-dopa/carbidopa + ibuprofen (30 mg/kg) or piroxicam (3 mg/kg). In general, drugs were administered daily for ten weeks. Rotenone-treated rats showed motor dysfunction, lower striatal dopamine, lower staining for nigral tyrosine hydroxylase but higher level of striatal cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) compared to vehicle-treated rats (P piroxicam in combination with l-dopa preserved the effect of l-dopa at the end of week 10, delayed the development of dyskinesia and decreased striatal COX-2 and VEGF levels. In conclusion, the current study suggests that ibuprofen and piroxicam are promising candidates for neuroprotection in PD and may have utility in conjunction with l-dopa in order to ensure the longevity of its action and to delay the development of dyskinesia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Neuroprotective effects of riluzole in early phase Parkinson's disease on clinically relevant parameters in the marmoset MPTP model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhave, P.S.; Jongsma, M.J.; Berg, R.M. van den; Vanwersch, R.A.P.; Smit, A.B.; Philippens, I.H.C.H.M.

    2012-01-01

    The present study evaluates neuroprotection in a marmoset MPTP (1-methyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine) model representing early Parkinson's disease (PD). The anti-glutamatergic compound riluzole is used as a model compound for neuroprotection. The compound is one of the few protective compounds used

  13. A Neurocomputational Model of Dopamine and Prefrontal-Striatal Interactions during Multicue Category Learning by Parkinson Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moustafa, Ahmed A.; Gluck, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    Most existing models of dopamine and learning in Parkinson disease (PD) focus on simulating the role of basal ganglia dopamine in reinforcement learning. Much data argue, however, for a critical role for prefrontal cortex (PFC) dopamine in stimulus selection in attentional learning. Here, we present a new computational model that simulates…

  14. Computational Models Describing Possible Mechanisms for Generation of Excessive Beta Oscillations in Parkinson's Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Pavlides

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In Parkinson's disease, an increase in beta oscillations within the basal ganglia nuclei has been shown to be associated with difficulty in movement initiation. An important role in the generation of these oscillations is thought to be played by the motor cortex and by a network composed of the subthalamic nucleus (STN and the external segment of globus pallidus (GPe. Several alternative models have been proposed to describe the mechanisms for generation of the Parkinsonian beta oscillations. However, a recent experimental study of Tachibana and colleagues yielded results which are challenging for all published computational models of beta generation. That study investigated how the presence of beta oscillations in a primate model of Parkinson's disease is affected by blocking different connections of the STN-GPe circuit. Due to a large number of experimental conditions, the study provides strong constraints that any mechanistic model of beta generation should satisfy. In this paper we present two models consistent with the data of Tachibana et al. The first model assumes that Parkinsonian beta oscillation are generated in the cortex and the STN-GPe circuits resonates at this frequency. The second model additionally assumes that the feedback from STN-GPe circuit to cortex is important for maintaining the oscillations in the network. Predictions are made about experimental evidence that is required to differentiate between the two models, both of which are able to reproduce firing rates, oscillation frequency and effects of lesions carried out by Tachibana and colleagues. Furthermore, an analysis of the models reveals how the amplitude and frequency of the generated oscillations depend on parameters.

  15. Fully Implantable Deep Brain Stimulation System with Wireless Power Transmission for Long-term Use in Rodent Models of Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Man Seung; Moon, Hyun Seok; Kim, Hee Chan; Park, Hyung Woo; Lim, Young Hoon; Paek, Sun Ha

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study to develop new deep-brain stimulation system for long-term use in animals, in order to develop a variety of neural prostheses. Our system has two distinguished features, which are the fully implanted system having wearable wireless power transfer and ability to change the parameter of stimulus parameter. It is useful for obtaining a variety of data from a long-term experiment. To validate our system, we performed pre-clinical test in Parkinson's disease-rat models for 4 weeks. Through the in vivo test, we observed the possibility of not only long-term implantation and stability, but also free movement of animals. We confirmed that the electrical stimulation neither caused any side effect nor damaged the electrodes. We proved possibility of our system to conduct the long-term pre-clinical test in variety of parameter, which is available for development of neural prostheses.

  16. Lowered iPLA2γ activity causes increased mitochondrial lipid peroxidation and mitochondrial dysfunction in a rotenone-induced model of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Honglu; Liu, Yinlong; Fu, Xian; Xu, Xiupeng; Bao, Zhongyuan; Lin, Chao; Li, Zheng; Liu, Yan; Wang, Xiaoming; You, Yongping; Liu, Ning; Ji, Jing

    2018-02-01

    iPLA 2 γ, calcium-independent phospholipase A 2 γ, discerningly hydrolyses glycerophospholipids to liberate free fatty acids. iPLA 2 γ-deficiency has been associated with abnormal mitochondrial function. More importantly, the iPLA 2 family is causative proteins in mitochondrial neurodegenerative disorders such as parkinsonian disorders. However, the mechanisms by which iPLA 2 γ affects Parkinson's disease (PD) remain unknown. Mitochondrion stress has a key part in rotenone-induced dopaminergic neuronal degeneration. The present evaluation revealed that lowered iPLA 2 γ function provokes the parkinsonian phenotype and leads to the reduction of dopamine and its metabolites, lowered survival, locomotor deficiencies, and organismal hypersensitivity to rotenone-induced oxidative stress. In addition, lowered iPLA 2 γ function escalated the amount of mitochondrial irregularities, including mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) regeneration, reduced ATP synthesis, reduced glutathione levels, and abnormal mitochondrial morphology. Further, lowered iPLA 2 γ function was tightly linked with strengthened lipid peroxidation and mitochondrial membrane flaws following rotenone treatment, which can cause cytochrome c release and eventually apoptosis. These results confirmed the important role of iPLA 2 γ, whereby decreasing iPLA 2 γ activity aggravates mitochondrial degeneration to induce neurodegenerative disorders in a rotenone rat model of Parkinson's disease. These findings may be useful in the design of rational approaches for the prevention and treatment of PD-associated symptoms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Levodopa/benserazide microsphere (LBM) prevents L-dopa induced dyskinesia by inactivation of the DR1/PKA/P-tau pathway in 6-OHDA-lesioned Parkinson's rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Cheng-long; Wang, Wen-Wen; Zhang, Su-fang; Yuan, Ming-Lu; Che, Jun-Yi; Gan, Jing; Song, Lu; Yuan, Wei-En; Liu, Zhen-Guo

    2014-12-16

    L-3, 4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-dopa) is the gold standard for symptomatic treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD), but long-term therapy is associated with the emergence of L-dopa-induced dyskinesia (LID). In the present study, L-dopa and benserazide were loaded by poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) microspheres (LBM), which can release levodopa and benserazide in a sustained manner in order to continuous stimulate dopaminergic receptors. We investigated the role of striatal DR1/PKA/P-tau signal transduction in the molecular event underlying LID in the 6-OHDA-lesioned rat model of PD. We found that animals rendered dyskinetic by L-dopa treatment, administration of LBM prevented the severity of AIM score, as well as improvement in motor function. Moreover, we also showed L-dopa elicits profound alterations in the activity of three LID molecular markers, namely DR1/PKA/P-tau (ser396). These modifications are totally prevented by LBM treatment, a similar way to achieve continuous dopaminergic delivery (CDD). In conclusion, our experiments provided evidence that intermittent administration of L-dopa, but not continuous delivery, and DR1/PKA/p-tau (ser396) activation played a critical role in the molecular and behavioural induction of LID in 6-OHDA-lesioned rats. In addition, LBM treatment prevented the development of LID by inhibiting the expression of DR1/PKA/p-tau, as well as PPEB mRNA in dyskintic rats.

  18. ATP Maintenance via Two Types of ATP Regulators Mitigates Pathological Phenotypes in Mouse Models of Parkinson's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaki Nakano

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease is assumed to be caused by mitochondrial dysfunction in the affected dopaminergic neurons in the brain. We have recently created small chemicals, KUSs (Kyoto University Substances, which can reduce cellular ATP consumption. By contrast, agonistic ligands of ERRs (estrogen receptor-related receptors are expected to raise cellular ATP levels via enhancing ATP production. Here, we show that esculetin functions as an ERR agonist, and its addition to culture media enhances glycolysis and mitochondrial respiration, leading to elevated cellular ATP levels. Subsequently, we show the neuroprotective efficacies of KUSs, esculetin, and GSK4716 (an ERRγ agonist against cell death in Parkinson's disease models. In the surviving neurons, ATP levels and expression levels of α-synuclein and CHOP (an ER stress-mediated cell death executor were all rectified. We propose that maintenance of ATP levels, by inhibiting ATP consumption or enhancing ATP production, or both, would be a promising therapeutic strategy for Parkinson's disease.

  19. Electroacupuncture Promotes Recovery of Motor Function and Reduces Dopaminergic Neuron Degeneration in Rodent Models of Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jaung-Geng; Chen, Chao-Jung; Yang, Han-Bin; Chen, Yi-Hung; Hung, Shih-Ya

    2017-08-24

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a common neurodegenerative disease. The pathological hallmark of PD is a progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra (SN) pars compacta in the brain, ultimately resulting in severe striatal dopamine deficiency and the development of primary motor symptoms (e.g., resting tremor, bradykinesia) in PD. Acupuncture has long been used in traditional Chinese medicine to treat PD for the control of tremor and pain. Accumulating evidence has shown that using electroacupuncture (EA) as a complementary therapy ameliorates motor symptoms of PD. However, the most appropriate timing for EA intervention and its effect on dopamine neuronal protection remain unclear. Thus, this study used the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-lesioned mouse model (systemic-lesioned by intraperitoneal injection) and the 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP⁺)-lesioned rat model (unilateral-lesioned by intra-SN infusion) of PD, to explore the therapeutic effects and mechanisms of EA at the GB34 (Yanglingquan) and LR3 (Taichong) acupoints. We found that EA increased the latency to fall from the accelerating rotarod and improved striatal dopamine levels in the MPTP studies. In the MPP⁺ studies, EA inhibited apomorphine induced rotational behavior and locomotor activity, and demonstrated neuroprotective effects via the activation of survival pathways of Akt and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the SN region. In conclusion, we observed that EA treatment reduces motor symptoms of PD and dopaminergic neurodegeneration in rodent models, whether EA is given as a pretreatment or after the initiation of disease symptoms. The results indicate that EA treatment may be an effective therapy for patients with PD.

  20. A Neurocomputational Model of the Effect of Cognitive Load on Freezing of Gait in Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muralidharan, Vignesh; Balasubramani, Pragathi P; Chakravarthy, V Srinivasa; Gilat, Moran; Lewis, Simon J G; Moustafa, Ahmed A

    2016-01-01

    Experimental data show that perceptual cues can either exacerbate or ameliorate freezing of gait (FOG) in Parkinson's Disease (PD). For example, simple visual stimuli like stripes on the floor can alleviate freezing whereas complex stimuli like narrow doorways can trigger it. We present a computational model of the cognitive and motor cortico-basal ganglia loops that explains the effects of sensory and cognitive processes on FOG. The model simulates strong causative factors of FOG including decision conflict (a disagreement of various sensory stimuli in their association with a response) and cognitive load (complexity of coupling a stimulus with downstream mechanisms that control gait execution). Specifically, the model simulates gait of PD patients (freezers and non-freezers) as they navigate a series of doorways while simultaneously responding to several Stroop word cues in a virtual reality setup. The model is based on an actor-critic architecture of Reinforcement Learning involving Utility-based decision making, where Utility is a weighted sum of Value and Risk functions. The model accounts for the following experimental data: (a) the increased foot-step latency seen in relation to high conflict cues, (b) the high number of motor arrests seen in PD freezers when faced with a complex cue compared to the simple cue, and (c) the effect of dopamine medication on these motor arrests. The freezing behavior arises as a result of addition of task parameters (doorways and cues) and not due to inherent differences in the subject group. The model predicts a differential role of risk sensitivity in PD freezers and non-freezers in the cognitive and motor loops. Additionally this first-of-its-kind model provides a plausible framework for understanding the influence of cognition on automatic motor actions in controls and Parkinson's Disease.

  1. [Effect of Shouwu Shudi Yin on dopaminegic neurons in MPTP induced Parkinson's disease mouse model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunje, Reginachizi; Ye, Yang-Lie; Sonauddin, Ahmed; Hansraj, Bhugun; Ngawang, Sangye; Shivani, Sharma; Zhang, Xiong; Zhu, Jian-Hong; Liu, Rong-Pei

    2016-09-01

    In order to investigate the effect of Shouwu Shudi Yin on dopaminegic neurons in MPTP induced Parkinson's disease mouse model and the possible mechamism, the experimental mice were randomly divided into 4 groups: control, Shouwu Shudi Yin, MPTP and the treatment (MPTP+Shouwu Shudi Yin) groups. The number of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) positive cells in the substantia nigra was measured by immunohistochemistry, and mRNA expression of TH and glutathione peroxidase (GPX) were detected by PCR. The results showed that the number of TH positive cells and mRNA expression of TH were significantly reduced in MPTP group compared with the control (PYin didn't show protective effect. Compared to MPTP group, the mRNA expression of four subtypes of GPX were increased in various degrees in the treatment group pretreated with Shouwu Shudi Yin, although the difference was not statistically significant. These indicated that the preventive medication of Shouwu Shudi Yin don't have protective effect on the mice with Parkinson' s disease induced by MPTP, but it may enhance the antioxidant capacity through increasing the expression of GPX. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  2. Levodopa pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic modeling and 6-[F-18]levodopa positron emission tomography in patients with Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dietz, M; Harder, S; Graff, J; Kunig, G; Vontobel, P; Leenders, KL; Baas, H

    Objective: Parameters of a pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) model of levodopa have been claimed to reflect the magnitude of the dopaminergic deficit in patients with Parkinson's disease. The aim of this study was to correlate such parameters with positron emission tomography (PET) with

  3. Spread of neuronal degeneration in a dopaminergic, Lrrk-G2019S model of Parkinson disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindle, Samantha J.; Elliott, Christopher J.H.

    2013-01-01

    Flies expressing the most common Parkinson disease (PD)-related mutation, LRRK2-G2019S, in their dopaminergic neurons show loss of visual function and degeneration of the retina, including mitochondrial abnormalities, apoptosis and autophagy. Since the photoreceptors that degenerate are not dopaminergic, this demonstrates nonautonomous degeneration, and a spread of pathology. This provides a model consistent with Braak’s hypothesis on progressive PD. The loss of visual function is specific for the G2019S mutation, implying the cause is its increased kinase activity, and is enhanced by increased neuronal activity. These data suggest novel explanations for the variability in animal models of PD. The specificity of visual loss to G2019S, coupled with the differences in neural firing rate, provide an explanation for the variability between people with PD in visual tests. PMID:23529190

  4. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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  10. Changes in the Serum Urate Level Can Predict the Development of Parkinsonism in the 6-Hydroxydopamine Animal Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarukhani, Mohammad Reza; Haghdoost-Yazdi, Hashem; Khandan-Chelarci, Gilda

    2018-05-01

    Epidemiological studies indicate that a higher plasma level of uric acid (UA) associates with the reduced risk of Parkinson's disease (PD). To confirm the role of UA as a biomarker for PD, we evaluated changes in the serum UA level in the 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced hemiparkinsonism in rat. For this purpose, 6-OHDA was administered in the medial forebrain bundle by stereotaxic surgery. According to the apomorphine-induced rotational test, the increased intensity of behavioral symptoms as a function of time was associated with the further reduction of UA level. On the other hand, the level of UA increased in the midbrain of the injured hemisphere. The level of reduction in the serum UA level of rats with severe and moderate symptoms was significantly higher than that of rats with mild symptoms. The immunohistofluorescence and biochemical analyses showed that the serum UA level was also correlated with the death of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-positive neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc), reduced level of striatal dopamine, and severity of oxidative stress in the midbrain. The rats with mild symptoms also showed a significant decrease in TH-positive neurons and striatal dopamine level. These findings suggest a positive correlation between the level of reduction in the serum urate level and severity of 6-OHDA-induced Parkinsonism. In addition, our findings indicated that UA had no marked neuroprotective effects, at least at concentrations obtained in this study. On the other hand, UA was introduced as a biomarker for PD, as a significant decline was observed in the serum UA level of rats with mild behavioral symptoms but with significant dopaminergic cell death in the SNc.

  11. Machine learning models for the differential diagnosis of vascular parkinsonism and Parkinson's disease using [{sup 123}I]FP-CIT SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huertas-Fernandez, I.; Benitez-Rivero, S.; Jesus, S.; Caceres-Redondo, M.T.; Martin-Rodriguez, J.F.; Carrillo, F. [Instituto de Biomedicina de Sevilla (IBiS), Hospital Universitario Virgen del Rocio/CSIC/Universidad de Sevilla, Unidad de Trastornos del Movimiento, Servicio de Neurologia y Neurofisiologia Clinica, Seville (Spain); Garcia-Gomez, F.J.; Marin-Oyaga, V.A.; Lojo, J.A. [Hospital Universitario Virgen del Rocio, Servicio de Medicina Nuclear, UDIM, Seville (Spain); Garcia-Solis, D. [Hospital Universitario Virgen del Rocio, Servicio de Medicina Nuclear, UDIM, Seville (Spain); Centro de Investigacion Biomedica en Red sobre Enfermedades Neurodegenerativas (CIBERNED), Seville (Spain); Mir, P. [Instituto de Biomedicina de Sevilla (IBiS), Hospital Universitario Virgen del Rocio/CSIC/Universidad de Sevilla, Unidad de Trastornos del Movimiento, Servicio de Neurologia y Neurofisiologia Clinica, Seville (Spain); Centro de Investigacion Biomedica en Red sobre Enfermedades Neurodegenerativas (CIBERNED), Seville (Spain)

    2015-01-15

    The study's objective was to develop diagnostic predictive models using data from two commonly used [{sup 123}I]FP-CIT SPECT assessment methods: region-of-interest (ROI) analysis and whole-brain voxel-based analysis. We included retrospectively 80 patients with vascular parkinsonism (VP) and 164 patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) who underwent [{sup 123}I]FP-CIT SPECT. Nuclear-medicine specialists evaluated the scans and calculated bilateral caudate and putamen [{sup 123}I]FP-CIT uptake and asymmetry indices using BRASS software. Statistical parametric mapping (SPM) was used to compare the radioligand uptake between the two diseases at the voxel level. Quantitative data from these two methods, together with potential confounding factors for dopamine transporter availability (sex, age, disease duration and severity), were used to build predictive models following a tenfold cross-validation scheme. The performance of logistic regression (LR), linear discriminant analysis and support vector machine (SVM) algorithms for ROI data, and their penalized versions for SPM data (penalized LR, penalized discriminant analysis and SVM), were assessed. Significant differences were found in the ROI analysis after covariate correction between VP and PD patients in [{sup 123}I]FP-CIT uptake in the more affected side of the putamen and the ipsilateral caudate. Age, disease duration and severity were also found to be informative in feeding the statistical model. SPM localized significant reductions in [{sup 123}I]FP-CIT uptake in PD with respect to VP in two specular clusters comprising areas corresponding to the left and right striatum. The diagnostic predictive accuracy of the LR model using ROI data was 90.3 % and of the SVM model using SPM data was 90.4 %. The predictive models built with ROI data and SPM data from [{sup 123}I]FP-CIT SPECT provide great discrimination accuracy between VP and PD. External validation of these methods is necessary to confirm their

  12. Neuroprotective effect of the natural iron chelator, phytic acid in a cell culture model of Parkinson's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Qi; Kanthasamy, Anumantha G.; Reddy, Manju B.

    2008-01-01

    Disrupted iron metabolism and excess iron accumulation has been reported in the brains of Parkinson's disease (PD) patients. Because excessive iron can induce oxidative stress subsequently causing degradation of nigral dopaminergic neurons in PD, we determined the protective effect of a naturally occurring iron chelator, phytic acid (IP6), on 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP + )-induced cell death in immortalized rat mesencephalic/dopaminergic cells. Cell death was induced with MPP + in normal and iron-excess conditions and cytotoxicity was measured by thiazolyl blue tetrazolium bromide (MTT assay) and trypan blue staining. Apoptotic cell death was also measured with caspase-3 activity, DNA fragmentation, and Hoechst nuclear staining. Compared to MPP + treatment, IP6 (30 μmol/L) increased cell viability by 19% (P + treatment was decreased by 55% (P < 0.01) and 52% (P < 0.05), respectively with IP6. Cell survival was increased by 18% (P < 0.05) and 42% (P < 0.001) with 30 and 100 μmol/L of IP6, respectively in iron-excess conditions. A 40% and 52% (P < 0.001) protection was observed in caspase-3 activity with 30 and 100 μmol/L IP6, respectively in iron-excess condition. Similarly, a 45% reduction (P < 0.001) in DNA fragmentation was found with 100 μmol/L IP6. In addition, Hoechst nuclear staining results confirmed the protective effect of IP6 against apoptosis. Similar protection was also observed with the differentiated cells. Collectively, our results demonstrate a significant neuroprotective effect of phytate in a cell culture model of PD

  13. Dopamine-independent locomotor actions of amphetamines in a novel acute mouse model of Parkinson disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Brain dopamine is critically involved in movement control, and its deficiency is the primary cause of motor symptoms in Parkinson disease. Here we report development of an animal model of acute severe dopamine deficiency by using mice lacking the dopamine transporter. In the absence of transporter-mediated recycling mechanisms, dopamine levels become entirely dependent on de novo synthesis. Acute pharmacological inhibition of dopamine synthesis in these mice induces transient elimination of striatal dopamine accompanied by the development of a striking behavioral phenotype manifested as severe akinesia, rigidity, tremor, and ptosis. This phenotype can be reversed by administration of the dopamine precursor, L-DOPA, or by nonselective dopamine agonists. Surprisingly, several amphetamine derivatives were also effective in reversing these behavioral abnormalities in a dopamine-independent manner. Identification of dopamine transporter- and dopamine-independent locomotor actions of amphetamines suggests a novel paradigm in the search for prospective anti-Parkinsonian drugs.

  14. Enhancing NAD+ salvage metabolism is neuroprotective in a PINK1 model of Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susann Lehmann

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Familial forms of Parkinson's disease (PD caused by mutations in PINK1 are linked to mitochondrial impairment. Defective mitochondria are also found in Drosophila models of PD with pink1 mutations. The co-enzyme nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+ is essential for both generating energy in mitochondria and nuclear DNA repair through NAD+-consuming poly(ADP-ribose polymerases (PARPs. We found alterations in NAD+ salvage metabolism in Drosophila pink1 mutants and showed that a diet supplemented with the NAD+ precursor nicotinamide rescued mitochondrial defects and protected neurons from degeneration. Additionally, a mutation of Parp improved mitochondrial function and was neuroprotective in the pink1 mutants. We conclude that enhancing the availability of NAD+ by either the use of a diet supplemented with NAD+ precursors or the inhibition of NAD+-dependent enzymes, such as PARPs, which compete with mitochondria for NAD+, is a viable approach to preventing neurotoxicity associated with mitochondrial defects.

  15. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the First Few Years with Parkinson's Expert Briefings: Pain in PD Expert Briefings: Parkinson's Disease: Financial, Legal ... Briefings: Complementary Approaches to Parkinson's Expert Briefings: Understanding Pain in Parkinson's Expert Briefings: The Parkinson's Pipeline 2011: ...

  16. Impairments and compensation in mouth and limb use in free feeding after unilateral dopamine depletions in a rat analog of human Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whishaw, I Q; Coles, B L; Pellis, S M; Miklyaeva, E I

    1997-03-01

    Rats depleted unilaterally of dopamine (DA) with the neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) have contralateral sensorimotor deficits. These include pronounced impairments in using the contralateral limbs (bad limbs) for skilled movements in tests of reaching and bar pressing. There has been no systematic examination of the changes that take place in movements of spontaneous food handling. This was the purpose of the present study. Rats were filmed as they picked up and ate pieces of angel hair pasta (Capelli d'Angelo), a food item that challenges the rats to use delicate and bilaterally coordinated limb and paw movements. Control rats picked up the food with their incisors, transferred it to their paws, and manipulated it using a variety of bilaterally coordinated limb and paw movements. The DA-depleted rats were impaired in both their mouth and paw movements. They seemed unable to use their teeth to grasp the food and so used their tongue. They did not use the bad side of their mouth to chew and relied upon the good side of their mouth. The bad paw was impaired in grasping the food, grasped only with a whole paw grip, did not make manipulatory movements, and did not open to release the food or open to regain support once the food was eaten. Although the rats improved over a 30-day recovery period, much of the improvement was due to compensatory adjustments. That unilateral DA-depletion results in profound contralateral impairments of the mouth and limb with improvements due mainly to compensatory adjustments confirms a role for dopaminergic systems in motor control. Additionally, the behavioral tests described here could provide important adjuncts for assessing therapies in this animal analog of human Parkinson's disease.

  17. Implementation of an Integrative Holistic Healthcare Model for People Living with Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pretzer-Aboff, Ingrid; Prettyman, Allen

    2015-06-01

    Research demonstrates that people with Parkinson's disease (PD) benefit greatly from multidisciplinary medical care. Delaware does not have a Movement Disorder Center or a movement disorder specialist. To address this issue, the University of Delaware Nurse Managed Health Center (NMHC) developed a novel PD Telehealth Clinic serving individuals with PD and their caregivers throughout Delaware. The PD clinic is based on a collaborative framework that uses synchronous videoconferencing telehealth technology to bring together out-of-state clinicians and scientists with expertise in PD to help deliver specialized care to PD patients and their caregivers. The team includes a movement disorder specialist, psychologists, nurse practitioners, researchers, physical and speech therapists, exercise physiologists, nutritionists, and graduate students. The PD Clinic delivery model seamlessly blends telehealth provider and onsite provider interactions, enabling the diagnosis, treatment, and ongoing management of PD. In the first 6 months of the Parkinson's clinic opening, the nurse practitioners along with the movement disorder specialist evaluated 36 PD patients. Several patients have received recommendations to change their medication regimen by the movement disorder specialist. About 20 patients were referred to physical therapy, 7 to speech therapy, 9 to mental health services, 1 to occupational therapy, and 12 to local support groups. The location of the NMHC-PD clinic has reduced travel time and distance by as much as 1.5 hr or 80 miles, each way, and wait time for a new patient appointment is less than 3 months. The NMHC - PD Telehealth Clinic provides access to specialized multidisciplinary and advanced care and was successfully implemented. This model can be replicated in other nurse managed health centers across the United States. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For

  18. Estrogen agonist genistein differentially influences the cognitive and motor disorders in an ovariectomized animal model of Parkinsonism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaheh Arbabi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: Parkinson's disease (PD is a progressive neurological disorder associated with motor disabilities and cognitive dysfunction as well. Evidence indicates that PD occurs less frequently in women than men, confirming a role for steroid hormones in protection of dopaminergic nigrostriatal neurons. It is reported that soy genistein, an estrogen agonist phytoestrogen, display neuroprotective effects against neuronal death. In this study we evaluated the effect of genistein in animal models of Parkinsonism (P and Parkinsonism + ovariectomized (OP. Materials and Methods: The experiments were carried out on the control, P and OP animals. Learning and memory abilities were evaluated using Morris water maze. The latency and speed of locating the platform were measured as cognitive indices. Motor behaviors were assessed by testing the animals in rota rod and the latency to fall from the rod was scored. Results: We found that Parkinsonism leads to the cognitive and motor disabilities; ovariectomy intensified these disorders. Whereas genistein treatment improved the maze performances in both P and OP animals it failed to influence the kinetic problems. Genistein displayed a neuroprotective effect on dopaminergic neurons. Conclusion: Positive impact of genistein on the spatial learning and memory may reflect its effects on the nigrostriatal pathway and striatum. Nevertheless, ineffectiveness of genistein on the motor disorders, despite its neuroprotective impacts, led us to conclude that the cognitive improvement by genistein may also contribute to its effects in other areas of brain.

  19. Morphological and electrophysiological changes in intratelencephalic-type pyramidal neurons in the motor cortex of a rat model of levodopa-induced dyskinesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Tatsuya; Yamada, Junko; Nishijima, Haruo; Arai, Akira; Migita, Keisuke; Baba, Masayuki; Ueno, Shinya; Tomiyama, Masahiko

    2014-04-01

    Levodopa-induced dyskinesia (LID) is a major complication of long-term dopamine replacement therapy for Parkinson's disease, and becomes increasingly problematic in the advanced stage of the disease. Although the cause of LID still remains unclear, there is accumulating evidence from animal experiments that it results from maladaptive plasticity, resulting in supersensitive excitatory transmission at corticostriatal synapses. Recent work using transcranial magnetic stimulation suggests that the motor cortex displays the same supersensitivity in Parkinson's disease patients with LID. To date, the cellular mechanisms underlying the abnormal cortical plasticity have not been examined. The morphology of the dendritic spines has a strong relationship to synaptic plasticity. Therefore, we explored the spine morphology of pyramidal neurons in the motor cortex in a rat model of LID. We used control rats, 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rats (a model of Parkinson's disease), 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rats chronically treated with levodopa (a model of LID), and control rats chronically treated with levodopa. Because the direct pathway of the basal ganglia plays a central role in the development of LID, we quantified the density and size of dendritic spines in intratelencephalic (IT)-type pyramidal neurons in M1 cortex that project to the striatal medium spiny neurons in the direct pathway. The spine density was not different among the four groups. In contrast, spine size became enlarged in the Parkinson's disease and LID rat models. The enlargement was significantly greater in the LID model than in the Parkinson's disease model. This enlargement of the spines suggests that IT-type pyramidal neurons acquire supersensitivity to excitatory stimuli. To confirm this possibility, we monitored miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs) in the IT-type pyramidal neurons in M1 cortex using whole-cell patch clamp. The amplitude of the mEPSCs was significantly increased in the LID

  20. Persistent short-term memory defects following sleep deprivation in a drosophila model of Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seugnet, Laurent; Galvin, James E; Suzuki, Yasuko; Gottschalk, Laura; Shaw, Paul J

    2009-08-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder in the United States. It is associated with motor deficits, sleep disturbances, and cognitive impairment. The pathology associated with PD and the effects of sleep deprivation impinge, in part, upon common molecular pathways suggesting that sleep loss may be particularly deleterious to the degenerating brain. Thus we investigated the long-term consequences of sleep deprivation on shortterm memory using a Drosophila model of Parkinson disease. Transgenic strains of Drosophila melanogaster. Using the GAL4-UAS system, human alpha-synuclein was expressed throughout the nervous system of adult flies. Alpha-synuclein expressing flies (alpha S flies) and the corresponding genetic background controls were sleep deprived for 12 h at age 16 days and allowed to recover undisturbed for at least 3 days. Short-term memory was evaluated using aversive phototaxis suppression. Dopaminergic systems were assessed using mRNA profiling and immunohistochemistry. MEASURMENTS AND RESULTS: When sleep deprived at an intermediate stage of the pathology, alpha S flies showed persistent short-term memory deficits that lasted > or = 3 days. Cognitive deficits were not observed in younger alpha S flies nor in genetic background controls. Long-term impairments were not associated with accelerated loss of dopaminergic neurons. However mRNA expression of the dopamine receptors dDA1 and DAMB were significantly increased in sleep deprived alpha S flies. Blocking D1-like receptors during sleep deprivation prevented persistent shortterm memory deficits. Importantly, feeding flies the polyphenolic compound curcumin blocked long-term learning deficits. These data emphasize the importance of sleep in a degenerating/reorganizing brain and shows that pathological processes induced by sleep deprivation can be dissected at the molecular and cellular level using Drosophila genetics.

  1. Effect of melatonin on sleep disorders in a monkey model of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belaid, Hayat; Adrien, Joelle; Karachi, Carine; Hirsch, Etienne C; François, Chantal

    2015-10-01

    To evaluate and compare the effects of melatonin and levodopa (L-dopa) on sleep disorders in a monkey model of Parkinson's disease. The daytime and nighttime sleep patterns of four macaques that were rendered parkinsonian by administration of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) were recorded using polysomnography in four conditions: at baseline, during the parkinsonian condition; after administration of L-dopa, and after administration of a combination of melatonin with L-dopa. It was confirmed that MPTP intoxication induces sleep disorders, with sleep episodes during daytime and sleep fragmentation at nighttime. L-dopa treatment significantly reduced the awake time during the night and tended to improve all other sleep parameters, albeit not significantly. In comparison to the parkinsonian condition, combined treatment with melatonin and L-dopa significantly increased total sleep time and sleep efficiency, and reduced the time spent awake during the night in all animals. A significant decrease in sleep latencies was also observed in three out of four animals. Compared with L-dopa alone, combined treatment with melatonin and L-dopa significantly improved all these sleep parameters in two animals. On the other hand, combined treatment had no effect on sleep architecture and daytime sleep. These data demonstrated, for the first time, objective improvement on sleep parameters of melatonin treatment in MPTP-intoxicated monkeys, showing that melatonin treatment has a real therapeutic potential to treat sleep disturbances in people with Parkinson's disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Oxidative stress of crystalline lens in rat menopausal model

    OpenAIRE

    Acer, Semra; Pekel, Gökhan; Küçükatay, Vural; Karabulut, Aysun; Yağcı, Ramazan; Çetin, Ebru Nevin; Akyer, Şahika Pınar; Şahin, Barbaros

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: To evaluate lenticular oxidative stress in rat menopausal models. Methods: Forty Wistar female albino rats were included in this study. A total of thirty rats underwent oophorectomy to generate a menopausal model. Ten rats that did not undergo oophorectomy formed the control group (Group 1). From the rats that underwent oophorectomy, 10 formed the menopause control group (Group 2), 10 were administered a daily injection of methylprednisolone until the end of the study (Gro...

  3. Cortical information flow in Parkinson's disease: a composite network/field model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cliff C. Kerr

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The basal ganglia play a crucial role in the execution of movements, as demonstrated by the severe motor deficits that accompany Parkinson's disease (PD. Since motor commands originate in the cortex, an important question is how the basal ganglia influence cortical information flow, and how this influence becomes pathological in PD. To explore this, we developed a composite neuronal network/neural field model. The network model consisted of 4950 spiking neurons, divided into 15 excitatory and inhibitory cell populations in the thalamus and cortex. The field model consisted of the cortex, thalamus, striatum, subthalamic nucleus, and globus pallidus. Both models have been separately validated in previous work. Three field models were used: one with basal ganglia parameters based on data from healthy individuals, one based on data from individuals with PD, and one purely thalamocortical model. Spikes generated by these field models were then used to drive the network model. Compared to the network driven by the healthy model, the PD-driven network had lower firing rates, a shift in spectral power towards lower frequencies, and higher probability of bursting; each of these findings is consistent with empirical data on PD. In the healthy model, we found strong Granger causality in the beta and low gamma bands between cortical layers, but this was largely absent in the PD model. In particular, the reduction in Granger causality from the main "input" layer of the cortex (layer 4 to the main "output" layer (layer 5 was pronounced. This may account for symptoms of PD that seem to reflect deficits in information flow, such as bradykinesia. In general, these results demonstrate that the brain's large-scale oscillatory environment, represented here by the field model, strongly influences the information processing that occurs within its subnetworks. Hence, it may be preferable to drive spiking network models with physiologically realistic inputs rather than

  4. A Translational Approach to Vocalization Deficits and Neural Recovery after Behavioral Treatment in Parkinson Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciucci, Michelle R.; Vinney, Lisa; Wahoske, Emerald J.; Connor, Nadine P.

    2010-01-01

    Parkinson disease is characterized by a complex neuropathological profile that primarily affects dopaminergic neural pathways in the basal ganglia, including pathways that modulate cranial sensorimotor functions such as swallowing, voice and speech. Prior work from our lab has shown that the rat model of unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine infusion to…

  5. A loss of Pdxk model of Parkinson disease in Drosophila can be suppressed by Buffy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    M'Angale, P Githure; Staveley, Brian E

    2017-06-12

    The identification of a DNA variant in pyridoxal kinase (Pdxk) associated with increased risk to Parkinson disease (PD) gene led us to study the inhibition of this gene in the Dopa decarboxylase (Ddc)-expressing neurons of the well-studied model organism Drosophila melanogaster. The multitude of biological functions attributable to the vitamers catalysed by this kinase reveal an overabundance of possible links to PD, that include dopamine synthesis, antioxidant activity and mitochondrial function. Drosophila possesses a single homologue of Pdxk and we used RNA interference to inhibit the activity of this kinase in the Ddc-Gal4-expressing neurons. We further investigated any association between this enhanced disease risk gene with the established PD model induced by expression of α-synuclein in the same neurons. We relied on the pro-survival functions of Buffy, an anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 homologue, to rescue the Pdxk-induced phenotypes. To drive the expression of Pdxk RNA interference in DA neurons of Drosophila, we used Ddc-Gal4 which drives expression in both dopaminergic and serotonergic neurons, to result in decreased longevity and compromised climbing ability, phenotypes that are strongly associated with Drosophila models of PD. The inhibition of Pdxk in the α-synuclein-induced Drosophila model of PD did not alter longevity and climbing ability of these flies. It has been previously shown that deficiency in vitamers lead to mitochondrial dysfunction and neuronal decay, therefore, co-expression of Pdxk-RNAi with the sole pro-survival Bcl-2 homologue Buffy in the Ddc-Gal4-expressing neurons, resulted in increased survival and a restored climbing ability. In a similar manner, when we inhibited Pdxk in the developing eye using GMR-Gal4, we found that there was a decrease in the number of ommatidia and the disruption of the ommatidial array was more pronounced. When Pdxk was inhibited with the α-synuclein-induced developmental eye defects, the eye phenotypes were

  6. Survival, differentiation, and neuroprotective mechanisms of human stem cells complexed with neurotrophin-3-releasing pharmacologically active microcarriers in an ex vivo model of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daviaud, Nicolas; Garbayo, Elisa; Sindji, Laurence; Martínez-Serrano, Alberto; Schiller, Paul C; Montero-Menei, Claudia N

    2015-06-01

    Stem cell-based regenerative therapies hold great potential for the treatment of degenerative disorders such as Parkinson's disease (PD). We recently reported the repair and functional recovery after treatment with human marrow-isolated adult multilineage inducible (MIAMI) cells adhered to neurotrophin-3 (NT3) releasing pharmacologically active microcarriers (PAMs) in hemiparkinsonian rats. In order to comprehend this effect, the goal of the present work was to elucidate the survival, differentiation, and neuroprotective mechanisms of MIAMI cells and human neural stem cells (NSCs), both adhering to NT3-releasing PAMs in an ex vivo organotypic model of nigrostriatal degeneration made from brain sagittal slices. It was shown that PAMs led to a marked increase in MIAMI cell survival and neuronal differentiation when releasing NT3. A significant neuroprotective effect of MIAMI cells adhering to PAMs was also demonstrated. NSCs barely had a neuroprotective effect and differentiated mostly into dopaminergic neuronal cells when adhering to PAM-NT3. Moreover, those cells were able to release dopamine in a sufficient amount to induce a return to baseline levels. Reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay analyses identified vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and stanniocalcin-1 as potential mediators of the neuroprotective effect of MIAMI cells and NSCs, respectively. It was also shown that VEGF locally stimulated tissue vascularization, which might improve graft survival, without excluding a direct neuroprotective effect of VEGF on dopaminergic neurons. These results indicate a prospective interest of human NSC/PAM and MIAMI cell/PAM complexes in tissue engineering for PD. Stem cell-based regenerative therapies hold great potential for the treatment of degenerative disorders such as Parkinson's disease (PD). The present work elucidates and compares the survival, differentiation, and neuroprotective mechanisms

  7. Bee venom and its component apamin as neuroprotective agents in a Parkinson disease mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Fischer, Daniel; Noelker, Carmen; Vulinović, Franca; Grünewald, Anne; Chevarin, Caroline; Klein, Christine; Oertel, Wolfgang H; Hirsch, Etienne C; Michel, Patrick P; Hartmann, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Bee venom has recently been suggested to possess beneficial effects in the treatment of Parkinson disease (PD). For instance, it has been observed that bilateral acupoint stimulation of lower hind limbs with bee venom was protective in the acute 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) mouse model of PD. In particular, a specific component of bee venom, apamin, has previously been shown to have protective effects on dopaminergic neurons in vitro. However, no information regarding a potential protective action of apamin in animal models of PD is available to date. The specific goals of the present study were to (i) establish that the protective effect of bee venom for dopaminergic neurons is not restricted to acupoint stimulation, but can also be observed using a more conventional mode of administration and to (ii) demonstrate that apamin can mimic the protective effects of a bee venom treatment on dopaminergic neurons. Using the chronic mouse model of MPTP/probenecid, we show that bee venom provides sustained protection in an animal model that mimics the chronic degenerative process of PD. Apamin, however, reproduced these protective effects only partially, suggesting that other components of bee venom enhance the protective action of the peptide.

  8. Restorative effect of endurance exercise on behavioral deficits in the chronic mouse model of Parkinson's disease with severe neurodegeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lau Yuen-Sum

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Animal models of Parkinson's disease have been widely used for investigating the mechanisms of neurodegenerative process and for discovering alternative strategies for treating the disease. Following 10 injections with 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP, 25 mg/kg and probenecid (250 mg/kg over 5 weeks in mice, we have established and characterized a chronic mouse model of Parkinson's disease (MPD, which displays severe long-term neurological and pathological defects resembling that of the human Parkinson's disease in the advanced stage. The behavioral manifestations in this chronic mouse model of Parkinson's syndrome remain uninvestigated. The health benefit of exercise in aging and in neurodegenerative disorders including the Parkinson's disease has been implicated; however, clinical and laboratory studies in this area are limited. In this research with the chronic MPD, we first conducted a series of behavioral tests and then investigated the impact of endurance exercise on the identified Parkinsonian behavioral deficits. Results We report here that the severe chronic MPD mice showed significant deficits in their gait pattern consistency and in learning the cued version of the Morris water maze. Their performances on the challenging beam and walking grid were considerably attenuated suggesting the lack of balance and motor coordination. Furthermore, their spontaneous and amphetamine-stimulated locomotor activities in the open field were significantly suppressed. The behavioral deficits in the chronic MPD lasted for at least 8 weeks after MPTP/probenecid treatment. When the chronic MPD mice were exercise-trained on a motorized treadmill 1 week before, 5 weeks during, and 8–12 weeks after MPTP/probenecid treatment, the behavioral deficits in gait pattern, spontaneous ambulatory movement, and balance performance were reversed; whereas neuronal loss and impairment in cognitive skill, motor coordination, and

  9. Restorative effect of endurance exercise on behavioral deficits in the chronic mouse model of Parkinson's disease with severe neurodegeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pothakos, Konstantinos; Kurz, Max J; Lau, Yuen-Sum

    2009-01-01

    Background Animal models of Parkinson's disease have been widely used for investigating the mechanisms of neurodegenerative process and for discovering alternative strategies for treating the disease. Following 10 injections with 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP, 25 mg/kg) and probenecid (250 mg/kg) over 5 weeks in mice, we have established and characterized a chronic mouse model of Parkinson's disease (MPD), which displays severe long-term neurological and pathological defects resembling that of the human Parkinson's disease in the advanced stage. The behavioral manifestations in this chronic mouse model of Parkinson's syndrome remain uninvestigated. The health benefit of exercise in aging and in neurodegenerative disorders including the Parkinson's disease has been implicated; however, clinical and laboratory studies in this area are limited. In this research with the chronic MPD, we first conducted a series of behavioral tests and then investigated the impact of endurance exercise on the identified Parkinsonian behavioral deficits. Results We report here that the severe chronic MPD mice showed significant deficits in their gait pattern consistency and in learning the cued version of the Morris water maze. Their performances on the challenging beam and walking grid were considerably attenuated suggesting the lack of balance and motor coordination. Furthermore, their spontaneous and amphetamine-stimulated locomotor activities in the open field were significantly suppressed. The behavioral deficits in the chronic MPD lasted for at least 8 weeks after MPTP/probenecid treatment. When the chronic MPD mice were exercise-trained on a motorized treadmill 1 week before, 5 weeks during, and 8–12 weeks after MPTP/probenecid treatment, the behavioral deficits in gait pattern, spontaneous ambulatory movement, and balance performance were reversed; whereas neuronal loss and impairment in cognitive skill, motor coordination, and amphetamine

  10. Restorative effect of endurance exercise on behavioral deficits in the chronic mouse model of Parkinson's disease with severe neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pothakos, Konstantinos; Kurz, Max J; Lau, Yuen-Sum

    2009-01-20

    Animal models of Parkinson's disease have been widely used for investigating the mechanisms of neurodegenerative process and for discovering alternative strategies for treating the disease. Following 10 injections with 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP, 25 mg/kg) and probenecid (250 mg/kg) over 5 weeks in mice, we have established and characterized a chronic mouse model of Parkinson's disease (MPD), which displays severe long-term neurological and pathological defects resembling that of the human Parkinson's disease in the advanced stage. The behavioral manifestations in this chronic mouse model of Parkinson's syndrome remain uninvestigated. The health benefit of exercise in aging and in neurodegenerative disorders including the Parkinson's disease has been implicated; however, clinical and laboratory studies in this area are limited. In this research with the chronic MPD, we first conducted a series of behavioral tests and then investigated the impact of endurance exercise on the identified Parkinsonian behavioral deficits. We report here that the severe chronic MPD mice showed significant deficits in their gait pattern consistency and in learning the cued version of the Morris water maze. Their performances on the challenging beam and walking grid were considerably attenuated suggesting the lack of balance and motor coordination. Furthermore, their spontaneous and amphetamine-stimulated locomotor activities in the open field were significantly suppressed. The behavioral deficits in the chronic MPD lasted for at least 8 weeks after MPTP/probenecid treatment. When the chronic MPD mice were exercise-trained on a motorized treadmill 1 week before, 5 weeks during, and 8-12 weeks after MPTP/probenecid treatment, the behavioral deficits in gait pattern, spontaneous ambulatory movement, and balance performance were reversed; whereas neuronal loss and impairment in cognitive skill, motor coordination, and amphetamine-stimulated locomotor activity were not

  11. Neuroprotective effects of the gliopeptide ODN in an in vivo model of Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahdoudi, Seyma; Ghouili, Ikram; Hmiden, Mansour

    2018-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by a progressive loss of dopamine (DA) neurons through apoptotic, inflammatory and oxidative stress mechanisms. The octadecaneuropeptide (ODN) is a diazepam-binding inhibitor (DBI)-derived peptide, expressed by astrocytes, which...

  12. Neuroelectronics and modeling of electrical signals for monitoring and control of Parkinson's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chintakuntla, Ritesh R.; Abraham, Jose K.; Varadan, Vijay K.

    2009-03-01

    The brain and the human nervous system are perhaps the most researched but least understood components of the human body. This is so because of the complex nature of its working and the high density of functions. The monitoring of neural signals could help one better understand the working of the brain and newer recording and monitoring methods have been developed ever since it was discovered that the brain communicates internally by means of electrical pulses. Neuroelectronics is the field which deals with the interface between electronics or semiconductors to living neurons. This includes monitoring of electrical activity from the brain as well as the development of feedback devices for stimulation of parts of the brain for treatment of disorders. In this paper these electrical signals are modeled through a nano/microelectrode arrays based on the electronic equivalent model using Cadence PSD 15.0. The results were compared with those previously published models such as Kupfmuller and Jenik's model, McGrogan's Neuron Model which are based on the Hodgkin and Huxley model. We have developed and equivalent circuit model using discrete passive components to simulate the electrical activity of the neurons. The simulated circuit can be easily be modified by adding some more ionic channels and the results can be used to predict necessary external stimulus needed for stimulation of neurons affected by the Parkinson's disease (PD). Implementing such a model in PD patients could predict the necessary voltages required for the electrical stimulation of the sub-thalamus region for the control tremor motion.

  13. Parkinson's Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the entire Parkinson's community. Learn more Get Involved Moving Day Walk Parkinson's Champions Create Your Own Fundraiser Advocate With ... one of our signature fundraising programs. Whether you walk with us at Moving Day®, run in a marathon or fundraise your ...

  14. Righting elicited by novel or familiar auditory or vestibular stimulation in the haloperidol-treated rat: rat posturography as a model to study anticipatory motor control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Callie A M; Sacrey, Lori-Ann R; Whishaw, Ian Q

    2009-09-15

    External cues, including familiar music, can release Parkinson's disease patients from catalepsy but the neural basis of the effect is not well understood. In the present study, posturography, the study of posture and its allied reflexes, was used to develop an animal model that could be used to investigate the underlying neural mechanisms of this sound-induced behavioral activation. In the rat, akinetic catalepsy induced by a dopamine D2 receptor antagonist (haloperidol 5mg/kg) can model human catalepsy. Using this model, two experiments examined whether novel versus familiar sound stimuli could interrupt haloperidol-induced catalepsy in the rat. Rats were placed on a variably inclined grid and novel or familiar auditory cues (single key jingle or multiple key jingles) were presented. The dependent variable was movement by the rats to regain equilibrium as assessed with a movement notation score. The sound cues enhanced movements used to regain postural stability and familiar sound stimuli were more effective than unfamiliar sound stimuli. The results are discussed in relation to the idea that nonlemniscal and lemniscal auditory pathways differentially contribute to behavioral activation versus tonotopic processing of sound.

  15. New roles of glycosaminoglycans in α-synuclein aggregation in a cellular model of Parkinson disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Lehri-Boufala

    Full Text Available The causes of Parkinson disease (PD remain mysterious, although some evidence supports mitochondrial dysfunctions and α-synuclein accumulation in Lewy bodies as major events. The abnormal accumulation of α-synuclein has been associated with a deficiency in the ubiquitin-proteasome system and the autophagy-lysosomal pathway. Cathepsin D (cathD, the major lysosomal protease responsible of α-synuclein degradation was described to be up-regulated in PD model. As glycosaminoglycans (GAGs regulate cathD activity, and have been recently suggested to participate in PD physiopathology, we investigated their role in α-synuclein accumulation by their intracellular regulation of cathD activity. In a classical neuroblastoma cell model of PD induced by MPP+, the genetic expression of GAGs-biosynthetic enzymes was modified, leading to an increase of GAGs amounts whereas intracellular level of α-synuclein increased. The absence of sulfated GAGs increased intracellular cathD activity and limited α-synuclein accumulation. GAGs effects on cathD further suggested that specific sequences or sulfation patterns could be responsible for this regulation. The present study identifies, for the first time, GAGs as new regulators of the lysosome degradation pathway, regulating cathD activity and affecting two main biological processes, α-synuclein aggregation and apoptosis. Finally, this opens new insights into intracellular GAGs functions and new fields of investigation for glycobiological approaches in PD and neurobiology.

  16. A neural mass model of basal ganglia nuclei simulates pathological beta rhythm in Parkinson's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fei; Wang, Jiang; Liu, Chen; Li, Huiyan; Deng, Bin; Fietkiewicz, Chris; Loparo, Kenneth A.

    2016-12-01

    An increase in beta oscillations within the basal ganglia nuclei has been shown to be associated with movement disorder, such as Parkinson's disease. The motor cortex and an excitatory-inhibitory neuronal network composed of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) and the external globus pallidus (GPe) are thought to play an important role in the generation of these oscillations. In this paper, we propose a neuron mass model of the basal ganglia on the population level that reproduces the Parkinsonian oscillations in a reciprocal excitatory-inhibitory network. Moreover, it is shown that the generation and frequency of these pathological beta oscillations are varied by the coupling strength and the intrinsic characteristics of the basal ganglia. Simulation results reveal that increase of the coupling strength induces the generation of the beta oscillation, as well as enhances the oscillation frequency. However, for the intrinsic properties of each nucleus in the excitatory-inhibitory network, the STN primarily influences the generation of the beta oscillation while the GPe mainly determines its frequency. Interestingly, describing function analysis applied on this model theoretically explains the mechanism of pathological beta oscillations.

  17. The phosphodiesterase inhibitor, ibudilast, attenuates neuroinflammation in the MPTP model of Parkinson's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Schwenkgrub

    Full Text Available Since the degeneration of the nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathway in Parkinson's disease (PD is associated with the inflammation process and decreased levels of cyclic nucleotides, inhibition of up-regulated cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDEs appears to be a promising therapeutic strategy. We used ibudilast (IBD, a non-selective PDE3,4,10,11 inhibitor, due to the abundant PDE 4 and 10 expression in the striatum. The present study for the first time examined the efficacy of IBD in the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP mouse model of PD.IBD [0, 20, 30, 40, or 50 mg/kg] was injected b.i.d. subcutaneously for nine days to three-month-old male C57Bl/10Tar mice, beginning two days prior to MPTP (60 mg/kg intoxication. High-pressure liquid chromatography, Western blot analysis, and real time RT-PCR methods were applied.Our study demonstrated that chronic administration of IBD attenuated astroglial reactivity and increased glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF production in the striatum. Moreover, IBD reduced TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β expression.IBD had a well-defined effect on astroglial activation in the mouse model of PD; however, there was no protective effect in the acute phase of injury. Diminished inflammation and an increased level of GDNF may provide a better outcome in the later stages of neurodegeneration.

  18. Olfaction in three genetic and two MPTP-induced Parkinson's disease mouse models.

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    Stefan Kurtenbach

    Full Text Available Various genetic or toxin-induced mouse models are frequently used for investigation of early PD pathology. Although olfactory impairment is known to precede motor symptoms by years, it is not known whether it is caused by impairments in the brain, the olfactory epithelium, or both. In this study, we investigated the olfactory function in three genetic Parkinson's disease (PD mouse models and mice treated with MPTP intraperitoneally and intranasally. To investigate olfactory function, we performed electro-olfactogram recordings (EOGs and an olfactory behavior test (cookie-finding test. We show that neither a parkin knockout mouse strain, nor intraperitoneal MPTP treated animals display any olfactory impairment in EOG recordings and the applied behavior test. We also found no difference in the responses of the olfactory epithelium to odorants in a mouse strain over-expressing doubly mutated α-synuclein, while this mouse strain was not suitable to test olfaction in a cookie-finding test as it displays a mobility impairment. A transgenic mouse expressing mutated α-synuclein in dopaminergic neurons performed equal to control animals in the cookie-finding test. Further we show that intranasal MPTP application can cause functional damage of the olfactory epithelium.

  19. The antioxidative effect of electro-acupuncture in a mouse model of Parkinson's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haomin Wang

    Full Text Available Accumulating evidence indicates that oxidative stress plays a critical role in Parkinson's disease (PD. Our previous work has shown that 100 Hz electro-acupuncture (EA stimulation at ZUSANLI (ST36 and SANYINJIAO (SP6 protects neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta from 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP toxicity in male C57BL/6 mice, a model of PD. In the present study we administered 100 Hz EA stimulation at the two acupoints to MPTP-lesioned mice for 12 sessions starting from the day prior to the first MPTP injection. We found that in the striatum of MPTP treated mice 100 Hz EA stimulation effectively inhibited the production of hydrogen peroxide and malonaldehyde, and increased glutathione concentration and total superoxide dismutase activity through biochemical methods. However, it decreased glutathione peroxidase activity via biochemical analysis and did not affect the level of 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium in the striatum revealed by high performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection. These data suggest that 100 Hz EA stimulation at ST36 and SP6 has antioxidative effects in the MPTP model of PD. This data, along with our previous work, indicates that 100 Hz EA stimulation at ST36 and SP6 protects the nigrostriatal system by multiple mechanisms including antioxidation and antiapoptosis, and suggests that EA stimulation is a promising therapy for treating PD.

  20. Gypenosides ameliorate memory deficits in MPTP-lesioned mouse model of Parkinson's disease treated with L-DOPA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ting Ting; Kim, Kyung Sook; Shin, Keon Sung; Park, Hyun Jin; Kim, Hyun Jeong; Lee, Kyung Eun; Lee, Myung Koo

    2017-09-06

    Previous studies have revealed that gypenosides (GPS) improve the symptoms of anxiety disorders in a 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-lesioned rat model of Parkinson's disease (PD). The present study aimed to investigate the effects of GPS on memory deficits in an MPTP-lesioned mouse model of PD treated with L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA). MPTP (30 mg/kg/day, 5 days)-lesioned mice were treated with GPS (50 mg/kg) and/or L-DOPA (10 and 25 mg/kg) for 21 days. After the final treatments, behavioral changes were assessed in all mice using passive avoidance and elevated plus-maze tests. We then evaluated the biochemical influences of GPS treatment on levels of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), dopamine, N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2), and cyclic AMP-response element binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation. MPTP-lesioned mice exhibited deficits associated with habit learning and spatial memory, which were further aggravated by treatment with L-DOPA (25 mg/kg). However, treatment with GPS (50 mg/kg) ameliorated memory deficits. Treatment with GPS (50 mg/kg) also improved L-DOPA (25 mg/kg)-treated MPTP lesion-induced decreases in retention latency on the passive avoidance test, as well as levels of TH-immunopositive cells and dopamine in the substantia nigra and striatum. GPS treatment also attenuated increases in retention transfer latency on the elevated plus-maze test and in NMDA receptor expression, as well as decreases in the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and CREB in the hippocampus. Treatment with L-DOPA (10 mg/kg) also ameliorated deficits in habit learning and spatial memory in MPTP-lesioned mice, and this effect was further enhanced by treatment with GPS (50 mg/kg). GPS ameliorate deficits in habit learning and spatial memory by modulating the dopaminergic neuronal and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-mediated signaling systems in MPTP-lesioned mice treated with L-DOPA. GPS may serve as an adjuvant

  1. Simultaneous Transplantation of Fetal Ventral Mesencephalic Tissue and Encapsulated Genetically Modified Cells Releasing GDNF in a Hemi-Parkinsonian Rat Model of Parkinson’s Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perez-Bouza, Alberto; Di Santo, Stefano; Seiler, Stefanie

    2017-01-01

    Transplantation of fetal ventral mesencephalic (VM) neurons for Parkinson's disease (PD) is limited by poor survival and suboptimal integration of grafted tissue into the host brain. In a 6-OHDA rat model of PD we investigated the feasibility of simultaneous transplantation of rat fetal VM tissue...... between groups were observed for the number of surviving TH-ir neurons or graft volume. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate that simultaneous transplantation of fetal VM tissue and encapsulated GDNF-releasing cells is feasible and support the graft survival and function. Pre-treatment of donor tissue...

  2. Protection by Purines in Toxin Models of Parkinson’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    hypothesis we used a rat model of status epilepticus -induced progressive temporal lobe epilepsy and silk-based brain implants engineered to release a defined...Kochanek P. M., Vagni V. A., Janesko K. L. et al. (2006) Adenosine A1 receptor knockout mice develop lethal status epilepticus after experimental...Polidori MC, Mattioli P, Aldred S, et al. Plasma antioxidant status , immunoglobulin g oxidation and lipid peroxidation in demented patients

  3. Dopamine denervation does not alter in vivo 3H-spiperone binding in rat striatum: implications for external imaging of dopamine receptors in Parkinson's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, J.P. Jr.; Wooten, G.F.

    1986-01-01

    Striatal particulate preparations, both from rats with lesion-induced striatal dopamine (DA) loss and from some striatal dopamine (DA) loss and from some patients with Parkinson's disease, exhibit increased 3 H-neuroleptic binding, which is interpreted to be the mechanism of denervation-induced behavioral supersensitivity to dopaminergic compounds. After intravenous 3 H-spiperone ( 3 H-SP) administration to rats with unilateral nigral lesions, we found no differences in accumulation of total or particulate-bound 3 H-SP in dopamine-denervated compared with intact striata. 3 H-SP in vivo binds to less than 10% of striatal sites labeled by 3 H-SP incubated with striatal particulate preparations in vitro. Quantitative autoradiography of 3 H-SP binding to striatal sections in vitro also failed to reveal any effects of dopamine denervation. 3 H-SP bound to striatal sites in vivo dissociates more slowly than that bound to striatal particulate preparations labeled in vitro. Striatal binding properties of 3 H-SP administered in vivo are quite different from the same kinetic binding parameters estimated in vitro using crude membrane preparations of striatum. In addition, striatal binding of in vivo-administered 3H-SP is not affected by prior lesion of the substantia nigra, which results in profound ipsilateral striatal dopamine depletion. Thus, behavioral supersensitivity to dopaminergic compounds may not be associated with altered striatal binding properties for dopamine receptor ligands in vivo

  4. Olfactory impairment is related to REM sleep deprivation in rotenone model of Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana F. Aurich

    Full Text Available Introduction: Olfactory dysfunction affects about 85-90% of Parkinson's disease (PD patients with severe deterioration in the ability of discriminate several types of odors. In addition, studies reported declines in olfactory performances during a short period of sleep deprivation. Besides, PD is also known to strongly affect the occurrence and maintenance of rapid eye movement (REM sleep. Methods: Therefore, we investigated the mechanisms involved on discrimination of a social odor (dependent on the vomeronasal system and a non-social odor (related to the main olfactory pathway in the rotenone model of PD. Also, a concomitant impairment in REM sleep was inflicted with the introduction of two periods (24 or 48 h of REM sleep deprivation (REMSD. Rotenone promoted a remarkable olfactory impairment in both social and non-social odors, with a notable modulation induced by 24 h of REMSD for the non-social odor. Results: Our findings demonstrated the occurrence of a strong association between the density of nigral TH-ir neurons and the olfactory discrimination capacity for both odorant stimuli. Specifically, the rotenone-induced decrease of these neurons tends to elicit reductions in the olfactory discrimination ability. Conclusions: These results are consistent with the participation of the nigrostriatal dopaminergic system mainly in the olfactory discrimination of a non-social odor, probably through the main olfactory pathway. Such involvement may have produce relevant impact in the preclinical abnormalities found in PD patients.

  5. Progranulin gene delivery protects dopaminergic neurons in a mouse model of Parkinson's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jackalina M Van Kampen

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease (PD is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by tremor, rigidity and akinesia/bradykinesia resulting from the progressive loss of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons. To date, only symptomatic treatment is available for PD patients, with no effective means of slowing or stopping the progression of the disease. Progranulin (PGRN is a 593 amino acid multifunction protein that is widely distributed throughout the CNS, localized primarily in neurons and microglia. PGRN has been demonstrated to be a potent regulator of neuroinflammation and also acts as an autocrine neurotrophic factor, important for long-term neuronal survival. Thus, enhancing PGRN expression may strengthen the cells resistance to disease. In the present study, we have used the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP model of PD to investigate the possible use of PGRN gene delivery as a therapy for the prevention or treatment of PD. Viral vector delivery of the PGRN gene was an effective means of elevating PGRN expression in nigrostriatal neurons. When PGRN expression was elevated in the SNC, nigrostriatal neurons were protected from MPTP toxicity in mice, along with a preservation of striatal dopamine content and turnover. Further, protection of nigrostriatal neurons by PGRN gene therapy was accompanied by reductions in markers of MPTP-induced inflammation and apoptosis as well as a complete preservation of locomotor function. We conclude that PGRN gene therapy may have beneficial effects in the treatment of PD.

  6. FACS-Assisted CRISPR-Cas9 Genome Editing Facilitates Parkinson's Disease Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Arias-Fuenzalida

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Genome editing and human induced pluripotent stem cells hold great promise for the development of isogenic disease models and the correction of disease-associated mutations for isogenic tissue therapy. CRISPR-Cas9 has emerged as a versatile and simple tool for engineering human cells for such purposes. However, the current protocols to derive genome-edited lines require the screening of a great number of clones to obtain one free of random integration or on-locus non-homologous end joining (NHEJ-containing alleles. Here, we describe an efficient method to derive biallelic genome-edited populations by the use of fluorescent markers. We call this technique FACS-assisted CRISPR-Cas9 editing (FACE. FACE allows the derivation of correctly edited polyclones carrying a positive selection fluorescent module and the exclusion of non-edited, random integrations and on-target allele NHEJ-containing cells. We derived a set of isogenic lines containing Parkinson's-disease-associated mutations in α-synuclein and present their comparative phenotypes.

  7. Multimodal MRI Evaluation of the MitoPark Mouse Model of Parkinson's Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linlin Cong

    Full Text Available The MitoPark mouse, a relatively new genetic model of Parkinson's disease (PD, has a dopaminergic neuron-specific knock-out that inactivates the mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam, a protein essential for mitochondrial DNA expression and maintenance. This study used multimodal MRI to characterize the neuroanatomical correlates of PD-related deficits in MitoPark mice, along with functional behavioral tests. Compared with age-matched wild-type animals, MitoPark mice at 30 weeks showed: i reduced whole-brain volume and increased ventricular volume, indicative of brain atrophy, ii reduced transverse relaxation time (T2* of the substantia nigra and striatum, suggestive of abnormal iron accumulation, iii reduced apparent diffusion coefficient in the substantia nigra, suggestive of neuronal loss, iv reduced fractional anisotropy in the corpus callosum and substantia nigra, indicative of white-matter damages, v cerebral blood flow was not significantly affected, and vi reduced motor activity in open-field tests, reduced memory in novel object recognition tests, as well as decreased mobility in tail suspension tests, an indication of depression. In sum, MitoPark mice recapitulate changes in many MRI parameters reported in PD patients. Multimodal MRI may prove useful for evaluating neuroanatomical correlates of PD pathophysiology in MitoPark mice, and for longitudinally monitoring disease progression and therapeutic interventions for PD.

  8. Nonmotor symptoms of Parkinson's disease revealed in an animal model with reduced monoamine storage capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Tonya N; Caudle, W Michael; Shepherd, Kennie R; Noorian, AliReza; Jackson, Chad R; Iuvone, P Michael; Weinshenker, David; Greene, James G; Miller, Gary W

    2009-06-24

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder that is characterized by the loss of dopamine neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta, culminating in severe motor symptoms, including resting tremor, rigidity, bradykinesia, and postural instability. In addition to motor deficits, there are a variety of nonmotor symptoms associated with PD. These symptoms generally precede the onset of motor symptoms, sometimes by years, and include anosmia, problems with gastrointestinal motility, sleep disturbances, sympathetic denervation, anxiety, and depression. Previously, we have shown that mice with a 95% genetic reduction in vesicular monoamine transporter expression (VMAT2-deficient, VMAT2 LO) display progressive loss of striatal dopamine, L-DOPA-responsive motor deficits, alpha-synuclein accumulation, and nigral dopaminergic cell loss. We hypothesized that since these animals exhibit deficits in other monoamine systems (norepinephrine and serotonin), which are known to regulate some of these behaviors, the VMAT2-deficient mice may display some of the nonmotor symptoms associated with PD. Here we report that the VMAT2-deficient mice demonstrate progressive deficits in olfactory discrimination, delayed gastric emptying, altered sleep latency, anxiety-like behavior, and age-dependent depressive behavior. These results suggest that the VMAT2-deficient mice may be a useful model of the nonmotor symptoms of PD. Furthermore, monoamine dysfunction may contribute to many of the nonmotor symptoms of PD, and interventions aimed at restoring monoamine function may be beneficial in treating the disease.

  9. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Expert Briefings: Anxiety in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Nutrition and Parkinson's Disease NY Nightly News with Chuck ... Briefings: What's in the Parkinson's Pipeline? Expert Briefings: Nutrition and Parkinson's Disease 2010 Expert Briefings: Legal Issues: ...

  10. Parkinson's Disease Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Find your local chapter Join our online community Parkinson's Disease Dementia Parkinson's disease dementia is an impairment ... disease. About Symptoms Diagnosis Causes & risks Treatments About Parkinson's disease dementia The brain changes caused by Parkinson's ...

  11. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... What Is the Helpline? Unconditional Love How Does Speech Therapy Help Parkinson's Patients? CareMAP: Rest and Sleep: ... Parkinson's Mid-Stride: A Treatment Guide to Parkinson's Speech and Swallowing Psychosis: A Mind Guide to Parkinson's ...

  12. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Care Partners CareMAP: Preparing Paid Caregivers How Does Speech Therapy Help Parkinson's Patients? What Are Some Tips ... Parkinson's Mid-Stride: A Treatment Guide to Parkinson's Speech and Swallowing Psychosis: A Mind Guide to Parkinson's ...

  13. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Moving Day Walker Support a Parkinson's Champion Bequests & Planned Giving Shop More Ways to Give Ways to ... Late Stage Parkinson's Expert Briefings: Impulsive and Compulsive Behaviors in Parkinson's Expert Briefings: Complementary Approaches to Parkinson's ...

  14. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Fatigue, Sleep Disorders and Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: What's in the Parkinson's Pipeline? Expert Briefings: Nutrition and Parkinson's Disease 2010 Expert Briefings: Legal Issues: Planning Ahead When You are Living with Parkinson's Expert ...

  15. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Parkinson's Disease: One Voice, Many Listeners Expert Briefings: Medical Therapies: What's in the Parkinson's Pipeline? Expert Briefings: Under-recognized Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping ...

  16. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... a Fundraiser Understanding Parkinson's What Is Parkinson's? Causes & Statistics Early Signs Movement Symptoms Non-Movement Symptoms Diagnosis ... Solutions: Innovations in PD Nurse Education CareMAP: Managing Advanced Parkinson's Website Nurse Webinars: Nursing Solutions: Improving Parkinson's ...

  17. ATP Maintenance via Two Types of ATP Regulators Mitigates Pathological Phenotypes in Mouse Models of Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Masaki; Imamura, Hiromi; Sasaoka, Norio; Yamamoto, Masamichi; Uemura, Norihito; Shudo, Toshiyuki; Fuchigami, Tomohiro; Takahashi, Ryosuke; Kakizuka, Akira

    2017-08-01

    Parkinson's disease is assumed to be caused by mitochondrial dysfunction in the affected dopaminergic neurons in the brain. We have recently created small chemicals, KUSs (Kyoto University Substances), which can reduce cellular ATP consumption. By contrast, agonistic ligands of ERRs (estrogen receptor-related receptors) are expected to raise cellular ATP levels via enhancing ATP production. Here, we show that esculetin functions as an ERR agonist, and its addition to culture media enhances glycolysis and mitochondrial respiration, leading to elevated cellular ATP levels. Subsequently, we show the neuroprotective efficacies of KUSs, esculetin, and GSK4716 (an ERRγ agonist) against cell death in Parkinson's disease models. In the surviving neurons, ATP levels and expression levels of α-synuclein and CHOP (an ER stress-mediated cell death executor) were all rectified. We propose that maintenance of ATP levels, by inhibiting ATP consumption or enhancing ATP production, or both, would be a promising therapeutic strategy for Parkinson's disease. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Age-Dependence and Aging-Dependence: Neuronal Loss and Lifespan in a C. elegans Model of Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apfeld, Javier; Fontana, Walter

    2017-12-23

    It is often assumed, but not established, that the major neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson's disease, are not just age-dependent (their incidence changes with time) but actually aging-dependent (their incidence is coupled to the process that determines lifespan). To determine a dependence on the aging process requires the joint probability distribution of disease onset and lifespan. For human Parkinson's disease, such a joint distribution is not available, because the disease cuts lifespan short. To acquire a joint distribution, we resorted to an established C. elegans model of Parkinson's disease in which the loss of dopaminergic neurons is not fatal. We find that lifespan is not correlated with the loss of individual neurons. Therefore, neuronal loss is age-dependent and aging-independent. We also find that a lifespan-extending intervention into insulin/IGF1 signaling accelerates the loss of specific dopaminergic neurons, while leaving death and neuronal loss times uncorrelated. This suggests that distinct and compartmentalized instances of the same genetically encoded insulin/IGF1 signaling machinery act independently to control neurodegeneration and lifespan in C. elegans . Although the human context might well be different, our study calls attention to the need to maintain a rigorous distinction between age-dependence and aging-dependence.

  19. Neuroprotective effects of an oxyntomodulin analogue in the MPTP mouse model of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, WeiZhen; Li, Yanwei; Jalewa, Jaishree; Saunders-Wood, Taylor; Li, Lin; Hölscher, Christian

    2015-10-15

    Oxyntomodulin is a hormone and a growth factor. It activates two receptors, the Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) and the glucagon receptor. GLP-1 mimetics are on the market as treatments for type 2 diabetes and are well tolerated. These drugs have shown neuroprotective properties in animal models of neurodegenerative disorders. In addition, the GLP-1 mimetic exendin-4 has shown protective effects in animal models of Parkinson's disease (PD), and a clinical trial in PD patients showed promising first positive results. D-Ser2-oxyntomodulin (Oxy) is a protease resistant oxyntomodulin analogue that has been developed to treat diabetes. Here we demonstrate for the first time that such analogues have neuroprotective effects. The drug showed protective effects in the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) mouse model of PD. MPTP was injected daily (20 mg/kg i.p.) for 7 days, and Oxy injected once-daily for 14 days i.p. Oxy treatment prevented or reversed the MPTP- induced motor impairment (Rotarod, spontaneous locomotion, swim activity, muscle strength test), the MPTP-induced reduction in Tyrosine Hydroxylase (TH) levels (dopamine synthesis) in the substantia nigra and basal ganglia, the reduction of the synaptic marker synapstophysin, the inactivation of the growth factor kinase Akt/PKB and of the anti-apoptotic signaling molecule Bcl-2, and the increase of levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-α. The results demonstrate that oxyntomodulin analogues show promise as a novel treatment of PD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Lesion of the locus coeruleus aggravates dopaminergic neuron degeneration by modulating microglial function in mouse models of Parkinson׳s disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Ning; Wu, Yanhong; Zhou, Yan; Ju, Lili; Liu, Yujun; Ju, Rongkai; Duan, Deyi; Xu, Qunyuan

    2015-11-02

    The degeneration of noradrenergic neurons in the locus coeruleus (LC) commonly occurs in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), which is characterized by a selective injury of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra (SN). The pathological impact of the LC on the SN in the disease is unknown. In the present study, we used a noradrenergic toxin, N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine (DSP4), to deplete noradrenaline (NA) derived from the LC to explore its influence on degeneration or injury of dopaminergic neurons in the SN in mouse model produced by intraperitoneal injection of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) or lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Our results demonstrated that lesion of the LC could change microglial function in the brain, which led to enhanced or prolonged expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, diminished neurotrophic factors, and weakened ability of anti-oxidation in the SN. The in vitro experiments further confirmed that NA could reduce the inflammatory reaction of microglia. The selective injury of dopaminergic neurons by inflammation, however, was due to the inflammation in different brain regions rather than the depletion of NA. Our results indicate that the lesion in the LC is an important factor in promoting dopaminergic neuron degeneration by impacting the function of microglia in the midbrain. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Behavioral Evaluation of hMSC-GFP+ Transplantation in an Hemiparkinson Experimental Model in Wistar Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jéssica Paola Alcázar Arzuza

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The effect of hMSCs-GFP+ transplantation was evaluated in an experimental model of Parkinson's disease (PD in 27 Wistar rats, or in three experimental groups: control (CON  n=7, injured (LES n=10 and transplanted (LES+T n=10. In order to evaluate the influence of the transplantation on the motor behavior, one month after the injury, rotation behavior induced by apomorphine, neurological test, transversal bar and SNpc cells positive to TH were developed. Using the Anova test, there was a decrease in the number of turns in transplanted animals (p=0.005 as well as in the neurological test (p=0.0004 and in the transverse bar that lead to this group in an intermediate position regarding LES and CON groups. There is a possible recovery of the transplantation-mediated nigroestriatal pathway of hMSC-GFP +.

  2. Identifying the Basal Ganglia network model markers for medication-induced impulsivity in Parkinson's disease patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pragathi Priyadharsini Balasubramani

    Full Text Available Impulsivity, i.e. irresistibility in the execution of actions, may be prominent in Parkinson's disease (PD patients who are treated with dopamine precursors or dopamine receptor agonists. In this study, we combine clinical investigations with computational modeling to explore whether impulsivity in PD patients on medication may arise as a result of abnormalities in risk, reward and punishment learning. In order to empirically assess learning outcomes involving risk, reward and punishment, four subject groups were examined: healthy controls, ON medication PD patients with impulse control disorder (PD-ON ICD or without ICD (PD-ON non-ICD, and OFF medication PD patients (PD-OFF. A neural network model of the Basal Ganglia (BG that has the capacity to predict the dysfunction of both the dopaminergic (DA and the serotonergic (5HT neuromodulator systems was developed and used to facilitate the interpretation of experimental results. In the model, the BG action selection dynamics were mimicked using a utility function based decision making framework, with DA controlling reward prediction and 5HT controlling punishment and risk predictions. The striatal model included three pools of Medium Spiny Neurons (MSNs, with D1 receptor (R alone, D2R alone and co-expressing D1R-D2R. Empirical studies showed that reward optimality was increased in PD-ON ICD patients while punishment optimality was increased in PD-OFF patients. Empirical studies also revealed that PD-ON ICD subjects had lower reaction times (RT compared to that of the PD-ON non-ICD patients. Computational modeling suggested that PD-OFF patients have higher punishment sensitivity, while healthy controls showed comparatively higher risk sensitivity. A significant decrease in sensitivity to punishment and risk was crucial for explaining behavioral changes observed in PD-ON ICD patients. Our results highlight the power of computational modelling for identifying neuronal circuitry implicated in learning

  3. Identifying the Basal Ganglia network model markers for medication-induced impulsivity in Parkinson's disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramani, Pragathi Priyadharsini; Chakravarthy, V Srinivasa; Ali, Manal; Ravindran, Balaraman; Moustafa, Ahmed A

    2015-01-01

    Impulsivity, i.e. irresistibility in the execution of actions, may be prominent in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients who are treated with dopamine precursors or dopamine receptor agonists. In this study, we combine clinical investigations with computational modeling to explore whether impulsivity in PD patients on medication may arise as a result of abnormalities in risk, reward and punishment learning. In order to empirically assess learning outcomes involving risk, reward and punishment, four subject groups were examined: healthy controls, ON medication PD patients with impulse control disorder (PD-ON ICD) or without ICD (PD-ON non-ICD), and OFF medication PD patients (PD-OFF). A neural network model of the Basal Ganglia (BG) that has the capacity to predict the dysfunction of both the dopaminergic (DA) and the serotonergic (5HT) neuromodulator systems was developed and used to facilitate the interpretation of experimental results. In the model, the BG action selection dynamics were mimicked using a utility function based decision making framework, with DA controlling reward prediction and 5HT controlling punishment and risk predictions. The striatal model included three pools of Medium Spiny Neurons (MSNs), with D1 receptor (R) alone, D2R alone and co-expressing D1R-D2R. Empirical studies showed that reward optimality was increased in PD-ON ICD patients while punishment optimality was increased in PD-OFF patients. Empirical studies also revealed that PD-ON ICD subjects had lower reaction times (RT) compared to that of the PD-ON non-ICD patients. Computational modeling suggested that PD-OFF patients have higher punishment sensitivity, while healthy controls showed comparatively higher risk sensitivity. A significant decrease in sensitivity to punishment and risk was crucial for explaining behavioral changes observed in PD-ON ICD patients. Our results highlight the power of computational modelling for identifying neuronal circuitry implicated in learning, and its

  4. Neuroprotective effects of (Val8)GLP-1-Glu-PAL in the MPTP Parkinson's disease mouse model

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, YanFang; Chen, YiMei; Li, Lin; Holscher, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) is a hormone and a growth factor. GLP-1 mimetics are currently on the market as treatments for type 2 diabetes. They also have shown neuroprotective properties in animal models of neurodegenerative disorders. In addition, the GLP-1 mimetic exendin-4 has shown protective effects in animal models of Parkinson's disease (PD), and a first clinical trial in PD patients showed promising results. (Val8)GLP-1-glu-PAL is a new GLP-1 analogue which has a longer biologica...

  5. Cost-utility model of rasagiline in the treatment of advanced Parkinson's disease in Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudry, Joumana; Rinne, Juha O; Keränen, Tapani; Eckert, Laurent; Cochran, John M

    2006-04-01

    The economic burden of Parkinson's disease (PD) is high, especially in patients experiencing motor fluctuations. Rasagiline has demonstrated efficacy against symptoms of PD in early and advanced stages of the disease. To assess the cost-utility of rasagiline and entacapone as adjunctive therapies to levodopa versus standard levodopa care in PD patients with motor fluctuations in Finland. A 2 year probabilistic Markov model with 3 health states: "25% or less off-time/day," "greater than 25% off-time/day," and "dead" was used. Off-time represents time awake with poor or absent motor function. Model inputs included transition probabilities from randomized clinical trials, utilities from a preference measurement study, and costs and resources from a Finnish cost-of-illness study. Effectiveness measures were quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) and number of months spent with 25% or less off-time/day. Uncertainty around parameters was taken into account by Monte Carlo simulations. Over 2 years from a societal perspective, rasagiline or entacapone as adjunctive therapies to levodopa showed greater effectiveness than levodopa alone at no additional costs. Benefits after 2 years were 0.13 (95% CI 0.08 to 0.17) additional QALYs and 5.2 (3.6 to 6.7) additional months for rasagiline and 0.12 (0.08 to 0.17) QALYs and 5.1 (3.5 to 6.6) months for entacapone, both in adjunct to levodopa compared with levodopa alone. The results of this study support the use of rasagiline and entacapone as adjunctive cost-effective alternatives to levodopa alone in PD patients with motor fluctuations in Finland. With a different mode of action, rasagiline is a valuable therapeutic alternative to entacapone at no additional charge to society.

  6. Neuroprotective efficacy of aminopropyl carbazoles in a mouse model of Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Jesús-Cortés, Héctor; Xu, Pin; Drawbridge, Jordan; Estill, Sandi Jo; Huntington, Paula; Tran, Stephanie; Britt, Jeremiah; Tesla, Rachel; Morlock, Lorraine; Naidoo, Jacinth; Melito, Lisa M; Wang, Gelin; Williams, Noelle S; Ready, Joseph M; McKnight, Steven L; Pieper, Andrew A

    2012-10-16

    We previously reported the discovery of P7C3, an aminopropyl carbazole having proneurogenic and neuroprotective properties in newborn neural precursor cells of the dentate gyrus. Here, we provide evidence that P7C3 also protects mature neurons in brain regions outside of the hippocampus. P7C3 blocks 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-mediated cell death of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra of adult mice, a model of Parkinson disease (PD). Dose-response studies show that the P7C3 analog P7C3A20 blocks cell death with even greater potency and efficacy, which parallels the relative potency and efficacy of these agents in blocking apoptosis of newborn neural precursor cells of the dentate gyrus. P7C3 and P7C3A20 display similar relative effects in blocking 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP(+))-mediated death of dopaminergic neurons in Caenorhabditis elegans, as well as in preserving C. elegans mobility following MPP(+) exposure. Dimebon, an antihistaminergic drug that is weakly proneurogenic and neuroprotective in the dentate gyrus, confers no protection in either the mouse or the worm models of PD. We further demonstrate that the hippocampal proneurogenic efficacy of eight additional analogs of P7C3 correlates with their protective efficacy in MPTP-mediated neurotoxicity. In vivo screening of P7C3 analogs for proneurogenic efficacy in the hippocampus may thus provide a reliable means of predicting neuroprotective efficacy. We propose that the chemical scaffold represented by P7C3 and P7C3A20 provides a basis for optimizing and advancing pharmacologic agents for the treatment of patients with PD.

  7. Gene and MicroRNA transcriptome analysis of Parkinson's related LRRK2 mouse models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Véronique Dorval

    Full Text Available Mutations in leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2 are the most frequent cause of genetic Parkinson's disease (PD. The biological function of LRRK2 and how mutations lead to disease remain poorly defined. It has been proposed that LRRK2 could function in gene transcription regulation; however, this issue remains controversial. Here, we investigated in parallel gene and microRNA (miRNA transcriptome profiles of three different LRRK2 mouse models. Striatal tissue was isolated from adult LRRK2 knockout (KO mice, as well as mice expressing human LRRK2 wildtype (hLRRK2-WT or the PD-associated R1441G mutation (hLRRK2-R1441G. We identified a total of 761 genes and 24 miRNAs that were misregulated in the absence of LRRK2 when a false discovery rate of 0.2 was applied. Notably, most changes in gene expression were modest (i.e., <2 fold. By real-time quantitative RT-PCR, we confirmed the variations of selected genes (e.g., adra2, syt2, opalin and miRNAs (e.g., miR-16, miR-25. Surprisingly, little or no changes in gene expression were observed in mice expressing hLRRK2-WT or hLRRK2-R1441G when compared to non-transgenic controls. Nevertheless, a number of miRNAs were misexpressed in these models. Bioinformatics analysis identified several miRNA-dependent and independent networks dysregulated in LRRK2-deficient mice, including PD-related pathways. These results suggest that brain LRRK2 plays an overall modest role in gene transcription regulation in mammals; however, these effects seem context and RNA type-dependent. Our data thus set the stage for future investigations regarding LRRK2 function in PD development.

  8. Intranasal mucoadhesivemicroemulsion for neuroprotective effect of curcuminin mptp induced Parkinson model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Snigdha Das Mandal

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This study was to investigate the neuroprotective effect of curcumin against inflammation-mediated dopaminergic neurodegeneration in 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP mice model of Parkinson's disease (PD. Curcumin loaded sodium hyaluronate based mucoadhesive microemulsion (CMME was developed by using Box Behnken design of Response surface method (RSM and was characterized. Male C57BL/6 mice were first treated with four intraperitoneal injections of MPTP (20 mg/kg of body weight at 2 h intervals followed CMME intranasal administration for 14 days at 2.86 mg of curcumin/kg of body weight per once a day. Optimal CMME containing 3% Capmul MCM as oil phase, 37 % of Accenon CC and Transcutol HP at 2.5:1 ratio and 0.5% sodium hyaluronate was stable, non-ciliotoxic with 57.66 nm±3.46 as average globule size. PdI value (0.190 ± 0.19 and TEM result depicted the narrow size distribution of CMME.All three independent variables had a significant effect (p<0.05 on the responses and the designed model was significant for all taken responses. In-vivo results revealed significant reduction of MPTP-mediated dopamine depletion after nasal administration of CMME. MPTP intoxication significantly decreased striatal DA content to 21.29 % which was then elevated to 55.37% after intranasal curcumin treatment. Significant improvement in motor performance as well as gross behavioural activity of mice was observed from rota-rod and open field test findings. Findings of the investigation revealed the symptomatic neuroprotection of curcumin against MPTP-induced neurodegradation in the striatum and hence could be considered as a promising approach to treat PD.

  9. Modification of dopamine D2 receptor activity by pergolide in Parkinson's disease : An in vivo study by PET

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linazasoro, G; Obeso, JA; Gomez, JC; Martinez, M; Antonini, A; Leenders, KL

    1999-01-01

    It is well known that chronic administration of pergolide and other dopamine agonists may induce a downregulation of dopamine D2 receptors in the rat model of Parkinson's disease (PD). To our knowledge, this effect has not been demonstrated in vivo in patients with PD. At present, the status of

  10. 125I-β-CIT imaging study of striatal dopamine transporters in mice model of parkinsonism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Zhenguo; Sun Wenshan; Weng Zhongfang; Chen Shengdi; Shen Minghua; Zhu Chengmo

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To detect the activity of striatal dopamine transporters (DAT) in lesions of different order of severity of MPTP-induced mice model of parkinsonism by autoradiography with 125 I-β-CIT and to evaluate the clinical use of the β-CIT imaging for DAT detection. Methods: With regard to the different duration (days) of MPTP treatment, the C57BL mice were randomly divided into 5 groups, that is MPTP 1, 3, 5 and 7 day groups and control group treated with normal saline instead of MPTP. Two hours after intravenous administration with 125 I-β-CIT of 148 kBq, the brain tissue sections were imaged by autoradiography. The levels of dopamine (DA) and its metabolites were measured by high performance liquid chromatography and electrochemical detection (HPLC-ECD). The tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-positive cells and fibres in the substantia nigra and striatum of the mice were observed by means of immunohistochemical technique. Results: As compared with control group, the radioactivity ratios of striatum to cortex (ST/CX) in 4 MPTP-treated groups were significantly reduced, by 20%, 42%, 45% and 52%, respectively. The concentrations of DA in the striatum of 4 MPTP-treated groups were remarkably decreased, by 47%, 75%, 95% and 95%, respectively. The gradual loss of DA neurons and fibres in the substantia nigra and striatum in 4 MPTP-treated groups was observed under microscopy. Conclusions: The functional abnormality of DAT paralleled the changes observed in neurochemistry and neuropathology studies in the lesions of different order of injury of the MPTP-treated mice. The β-CIT scanning for the activity of DAT may be useful for diagnosing PD at earlier phase and for monitoring the progression of the disease

  11. Ideal Experimental Rat Models for Liver Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Woo; Kim, Sung Hoon; Min, Seon Ok; Kim, Kyung Sik

    2011-05-01

    There are many limitations for conducting liver disease research in human beings due to the high cost and potential ethical issues. For this reason, conducting a study that is difficult to perform in humans using appropriate animal models, can be beneficial in ascertaining the pathological physiology, and in developing new treatment modalities. However, it is difficult to determine the appropriate animal model which is suitable for research purposes, since every patient has different and diverse clinical symptoms, adverse reactions, and complications due to the pathological physiology. Also, it is not easy to reproduce identically various clinical situations in animal models. Recently, the Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals has tightened up the regulations, and therefore it is advisable to select the appropriate animals and decide upon the appropriate quantities through scientific and systemic considerations before conducting animal testing. Therefore, in this review article the authors examined various white rat animal testing models and determined the appropriate usable rat model, and the pros and cons of its application in liver disease research. The authors believe that this review will be beneficial in selecting proper laboratory animals for research purposes.

  12. Protection by Purines in Toxin Models of Parkinson’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Puringergic Pathways to Clinical Trials for Parkinson’s Disease" [pending]. NIH (NINDS/ NIA ) R21 in response to FOA PA-11-261, “NIH Exploratory...pyrimidine bases, ribonucleosides, and ribonucleotides by high-pressure liquid chromatography. Analytical Biochemistry 1980; 106(2): 497– 505 . Quinlan GJ

  13. Sex differences in acupuncture effectiveness in animal models of Parkinson's disease: A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee, S.H.; Noort, M.W.M.L. van den; Bosch, M.P.C.; Lim, S.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Many animal experimental studies have been performed to investigate the efficacy of acupuncture in Parkinson's disease (PD). Sex differences are a major issue in all diseases including PD. However, to our knowledge, there have been no reviews investigating sex differences on the

  14. REM sleep behavior disorder in the marmoset MPTP model of early Parkinson disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhave, P.S.; Jongsma, M.J.; Berg, R.M. van den; Vis, J.C.; Vanwersch, R.A.P.; Smit, A.B.; Someren, E.J.W. van; Philippens, I.H.C.H.M.

    2011-01-01

    Study Objectives: Sleep problems are a common phenomenon in most neurological and psychiatric diseases. In Parkinson disease (PD), for instance, sleep problems may be the most common and burdensome non-motor symptoms in addition to the well-described classical motor symptoms. Since sleep

  15. Predictive genetic model for levodopa-induced dyskinesia in patients with Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ivanova, S.A.; Alifirova, V.M.; Freidin, M.B.; Pozhidaev, I.V.; Fedorenko, O.Y.; Bokhan, N.A.; Zhukova, I.A.; Zhukova, N.G.; Wilffert, B.; Loonen, A.J.M.

    2017-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD), a common neurodegenerative disorder caused by the loss of the dopaminergic input to the basal ganglia, is commonly treated with levodopa (L-DOPA). The use of this drug, however, is severely limited by adverse effects. Levodopa-induced dyskinesia (LID) is one of these and

  16. A process-model based approach to prospective memory impairment in Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kliegel, M.; Altgassen, A.M.; Hering, A.; Rose, N.S.

    2011-01-01

    The present review discusses the current state of research on the clinical neuropsychology of prospective memory in Parkinson's disease. To do so the paper is divided in two sections. In the first section, we briefly outline key features of the (partly implicit) rationale underlying the available

  17. Behavioral and Neurophysiological Correlates of Striatal Dopamine Depletion: A Rodent Model of Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plowman, Emily K.; Kleim, Jeffrey A.

    2011-01-01

    Both limb and cranial motor functions are adversely impacted by Parkinson's disease (PD). While current pharmacological and surgical interventions are effective in alleviating general limb motor symptoms of PD, they have failed to provide significant benefit for cranial motor functions. This suggests that the neuropathologies mediating limb and…

  18. Cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers for Parkinson's disease and L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dammann Andersen, Andreas

    the development of biomarkers for earlier and more precise diagnosis and prognosis. The purpose of this study is the development and evaluation of proposed biomarkers in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of rat models of PD and LID as well as in patients with early and late stage PD with or without LID. Potential....... Cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers in Parkinson disease. Nature reviews Neurology. 2013;9(3):131-40. 5. Goetz CG, Tilley BC, Shaftman SR, et al. Movement Disorder Society-sponsored revision of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (MDS-UPDRS): scale presentation and clinimetric testing results. Movement...

  19. Electro-acupuncture stimulation acts on the basal ganglia output pathway to ameliorate motor impairment in Parkinsonian model rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Jun; Li, Bo; Sun, Zuo-Li; Yu, Fen; Wang, Xuan; Wang, Xiao-Min

    2010-04-01

    The role of electro-acupuncture (EA) stimulation on motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease (PD) has not been well studied. In a rat hemiparkinsonian model induced by unilateral transection of the medial forebrain bundle (MFB), EA stimulation improved motor impairment in a frequency-dependent manner. Whereas EA stimulation at a low frequency (2 Hz) had no effect, EA stimulation at a high frequency (100 Hz) significantly improved motor coordination. However, neither low nor high EA stimulation could significantly enhance dopamine levels in the striatum. EA stimulation at 100 Hz normalized the MFB lesion-induced increase in midbrain GABA content, but it had no effect on GABA content in the globus pallidus. These results suggest that high-frequency EA stimulation improves motor impairment in MFB-lesioned rats by increasing GABAergic inhibition in the output structure of the basal ganglia.

  20. Striatal increase of neurotrophic factors as a mechanism of nicotine protection in experimental parkinsonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggio, R; Riva, M; Vaglini, F; Fornai, F; Racagni, G; Corsini, G U

    1997-01-01

    The repeated finding of an apparent protective effect of cigarette smoking on the risk of Parkinson's disease is one of the few consistent results in the epidemiology of this disorder. Among the innumerous substances that originate from tobacco smoke, nicotine is by far the most widely studied, and the most likely candidate for a protective effect against neuronal degeneration in Parkinson's disease. Nicotine is a natural alkaloid that has considerable stimulatory effects on the central nervous system (CNS). Its effects on the CNS are mediated by the activation of neuronal heteromeric acetylcholine-gated ion channel receptors (nAChR, also termed nicotinic acetylcholine receptors). In the present study, we describe the neuroprotective effects of (-)nicotine in two animal models of parkinsonism: the diethyldithiocarbamate (DDC)-induced enhancement of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) toxicity in mice, and the methamphetamine-induced neurotoxicity in rats and mice. In parallel experiments, we found that (-)nicotine induces the basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2) and the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in rat striatum. As FGF-2 and BDNF have been reported to be neuroprotective for dopaminergic cells, our data indicate that the increase in neurotrophic factors is a possible mechanism by which (-)nicotine protects from experimental parkinsonisms. Moreover, they suggest that nAChR agonists could be of potential benefit in the progression of Parkinson's disease.

  1. 4R-Cembranoid Improves Outcomes after 6-Hydroxydopamine Challenge in Both In vitro and In vivo Models of Parkinson's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Hu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available (1S, 2E, 4R, 6R,-7E, 11E-2, 7, 11-cembratriene-4, 6-diol (4R is one of the cembranoids found in tobacco leaves. Previous studies have found that 4R protected acute rat hippocampal slices against neurotoxicity induced by N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA and against the toxic organophosphorus compounds paraoxon and diisopropylfluorophosphate (DFP. Furthermore, in vivo, 4R reduced the infarct size in a rodent ischemic stroke model and neurodegeneration caused by DFP. The present study expanded our previous study by focusing on the effect of 4R in Parkinson's disease (PD and elucidating its underlying mechanisms using 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA-induced injury models. We found that 4R exhibited significant neuroprotective activity in the rat unilateral 6-OHDA-induced PD model in vivo. The therapeutic effect was evident both at morphological and behavioral levels. 4R (6 and 12 mg/kg treatments significantly improved outcomes of 6-OHDA-induced PD in vivo as indicated by reducing forelimb asymmetry scores and corner test scores 4 weeks after injection of 6-OHDA (p < 0.05. The therapeutic effect of 4R was also reflected by decreased depletion of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH in the striatum and substantia nigra (SN on the side injected with 6-OHDA. TH expression was 70.3 and 62.8% of the contralateral side in striatum and SN, respectively, after 6 mg/kg 4R treatment; furthermore, it was 80.1 and 79.3% after treatment with 12 mg/kg of 4R. In the control group, it was 51.9 and 23.6% of the contralateral striatum and SN (p < 0.05. Moreover, 4R also protected differentiated neuro-2a cells from 6-OHDA-induced cytotoxicity in vitro. The activation of p-AKT and HAX-1, and inhibition of caspase-3 and endothelial inflammation, were involved in 4R-mediated protection against 6-OHDA-induced injury. In conclusion, the present study indicates that 4R shows a therapeutic effect in the rat 6-OHDA-induced PD model in vivo and in 6-OHDA-challenged neuro-2a cells in vitro.

  2. Extracellular Zn2+ Influx into Nigral Dopaminergic Neurons Plays a Key Role for Pathogenesis of 6-Hydroxydopamine-Induced Parkinson's Disease in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamano, Haruna; Nishio, Ryusuke; Morioka, Hiroki; Takeda, Atsushi

    2018-04-29

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurological disease characterized by a selective loss of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons. The exact cause of the neuronal loss remains unclear. Here, we report a unique mechanism of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurodegeneration, in which extracellular Zn 2+ influx plays a key role for PD pathogenesis induced with 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) in rats. 6-OHDA rapidly increased intracellular Zn 2+ only in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) of brain slices and this increase was blocked in the presence of CaEDTA, an extracellular Zn 2+ chelator, and 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX), an α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionate (AMPA) receptor antagonist, indicating that 6-OHDA rapidly increases extracellular Zn 2+ influx via AMPA receptor activation in the SNpc. Extracellular Zn 2+ concentration was decreased under in vivo SNpc perfusion with 6-OHDA and this decrease was blocked by co-perfusion with CNQX, supporting 6-OHDA-induced Zn 2+ influx via AMPA receptor activation in the SNpc. Interestingly, both 6-OHDA-induced loss of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons and turning behavior to apomorphine were ameliorated by co-injection of intracellular Zn 2+ chelators, i.e., ZnAF-2DA and N,N,N',N'-Tetrakis(2-pyridylmethyl)ethylenediamine (TPEN). Co-injection of TPEN into the SNpc blocked 6-OHDA-induced increase in intracellular Zn 2+ but not in intracellular Ca 2+ . These results suggest that the rapid influx of extracellular Zn 2+ into dopaminergic neurons via AMPA receptor activation in the SNpc induces nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurodegeneration, resulting in 6-OHDA-induced PD in rats.

  3. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... A A You are here Home PD Library Search library Topic Type Expert Briefings: Marijuana and PD: What Do We Really Know? Nurse Webinars: Nursing Solutions: Improving Caregiver Strain through Science and Model Interventions Expert Briefings: Parkinson's Disease Psychosis: ...

  4. Intranasal PRGF-Endoret enhances neuronal survival and attenuates NF-κB-dependent inflammation process in a mouse model of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anitua, Eduardo; Pascual, Consuelo; Pérez-Gonzalez, Rocio; Orive, Gorka; Carro, Eva

    2015-04-10

    Parkinson's disease is a common neurodegenerative disorder of unknown pathogenesis characterized by the loss of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons. Oxidative stress, microglial activation and inflammatory responses seem to contribute to the pathogenesis. Recent data showed that growth factors mediate neuroprotection in rodent models of Parkinson's disease, modulating pro-inflammatory processes. Based on our recent studies showing that plasma rich in growth factors (PRGF-Endoret) mediates neuroprotection as inflammatory moderator in Alzheimer's disease, in the present study we examined the effects of plasma rich in growth factors (PRGF-Endoret) in the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-lesioned mouse as a translational therapeutic approach for Parkinson's disease. We found substantial neuroprotection by PRGF-Endoret in our model of Parkinson's disease, which resulted in diminished inflammatory responses and improved motor performance. Additionally, these effects were associated with robust reduction in nuclear transcription factor-κB (NF-κB) activation, and nitric oxide (NO), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) expression in the substantia nigra. We propose that PRGF-Endoret can prevent dopaminergic degeneration via an NF-κB-dependent signaling process. As the clinical safety profile of PRGF-Endoret is already established, these data suggest that PRGF-Endoret provides a novel neuroprotective strategy for Parkinson's disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. [Establishment of rat model of psychical erectile dysfunction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiu-lin; Wang, Shu-ren; Duan, Jin

    2006-01-01

    To set up a method of establishing the animal model of psychical erectile dysfunction with emotional stress. All thirty-six male rats with normal sexual function were divided into three groups, i. e. normal group, model group and demasculinized group randomly according to their weights. The rats in the model group were suspended upside down in midair over the water and irritated repeatedly. Two weeks later, the sexual abilities of all rats, i. e. the times of mounting and intromitting the estrus female rats, the latent period of mounting, intromission and ejaculation, were recorded, and the number of rats that had sexual activities was also counted. And the hemorheology indices of the rats were measured. Compared with the normal rats, the latency of mounting [(152.5 +/- 24.6) s vs (42.4 +/- 9.6) s] and intromission [(437.0 +/- 67.7) s vs (130.8 +/- 39.1) s] of the model rats were longer (P 0.05). The hemorheology indices, e. g. blood viscosity, hematocrit (Hct) and red cell aggregation (RCA), of the model rats was significant higher than that of the normal and demasculinized rats (P erectile dysfunction can be made ideally with psychical stress.

  6. Synergistic antioxidant action of vitamin E and rutin SNEDDS in ameliorating oxidative stress in a Parkinson's disease model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Shrestha; Narang, Jasjeet K; Ali, Javed; Baboota, Sanjula

    2016-09-16

    Oxidative stress is the leading cause in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease. Rutin is a naturally occurring strong antioxidant molecule with wide therapeutic applications. It suffers from the problem of low oral bioavailability which is due to its poor aqueous solubility. In order to increase the solubility self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery systems (SNEDDS) of rutin were prepared. The oil, surfactant and co-surfactant were selected based on solubility/miscibility studies. Optimization was done by a three-factor, four-level (34) Box-Behnken design. The independent factors were oil, surfactant and co-surfactant concentration and the dependent variables were globule size, self-emulsification time, % transmittance and cumulative percentage of drug release. The optimized SNEDDS formulation (RSE6) was evaluated for various release studies. Antioxidant activity was assessed by various in vitro tests such as 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl and reducing power assay. Oxidative stress models which had Parkinson's-type symptoms were used to determine the antioxidant potential of rutin SNEDDS in vivo. Permeation was assessed through confocal laser scanning microscopy. An optimized SNEDDS formulation consisting of Sefsol + vitamin E-Solutol HS 15-Transcutol P at proportions of 25:35:17.5 (w/w) was prepared and characterized. The globule size and polydispersity index of the optimized formulation was found to be 16.08 ± 0.02 nm and 0.124 ± 0.01, respectively. A significant (p < 0.05) increase in the percentage of drug release was achieved in the case of the optimized formulation as compared to rutin suspension. Pharmacokinetic study showed a 2.3-fold increase in relative oral bioavailability. The optimized formulation had significant in vitro and in vivo antioxidant activity. Rutin SNEDDS have been successfully prepared and they can serve as an effective tool in enhancing the oral bioavailability and efficacy of rutin, thus helping in ameliorating oxidative stress in

  7. Hitler's parkinsonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boettcher, Lillian B; Bonney, Phillip A; Smitherman, Adam D; Sughrue, Michael E

    2015-07-01

    Of the multitude of medical and psychiatric conditions ascribed to Hitler both in his lifetime and since his suicide in April 1945, few are more substantiated than parkinsonism. While the timeline of the development of this condition, as well as its etiology, are debated, there is clear evidence for classic manifestations of the disease, most prominently a resting tremor but also stooped posture, bradykinesia, micrographia, and masked facial expressions, with progression steadily seen over his final years. Though ultimately speculation, some have suggested that Hitler suffered from progressive cognitive and mood disturbances, possibly due to parkinsonism, that affected the course of events in the war. Here, the authors discuss Hitler's parkinsonism in the context of the Third Reich and its eventual destruction, maintaining that ultimately his disease had little effect on the end result.

  8. Unaltered lactate and glucose transporter levels in the MPTP mouse model of Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Puchades, Maja; Sogn, Carl Johan; Maehlen, Jan

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Metabolic impairment contributes to development of Parkinson's disease (PD). Mitochondrial dysfunction is involved in degeneration of nigral dopamine neurons. Also, in PD there are alterations in glucose metabolism in nigro-striatal pathways, and increased cerebral lactate levels have...... of MCT1, MCT2 and GLUT1 is not changed following dopaminergic neurodegeneration. This is in contrast to findings in other neurodegenerative disease, such as mesial temporal lobe epilepsy, where there are large alterations in MCT levels....

  9. Neurotoxicity of cerebro-spinal fluid from patients with Parkinson's disease on mesencephalic primary cultures as an in vitro model of dopaminergic neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Ping; Zhang, Ben-Shu; Lei, Ping; Kong, Xiao-Dong; Zhang, Shi-Shuang; Li, Dai; Zhang, Yun

    2015-08-01

    Parkinson's disease is a degenerative disorder of the central nervous system. In spite of extensive research, neither the cause nor the mechanisms have been firmly established thus far. One assumption is that certain toxic substances may exist in the cerebro-spinal fluid (CSF) of Parkinson's disease patients. To confirm the neurotoxicity of CSF and study the potential correlation between neurotoxicity and the severity of Parkinson's disease, CSF was added to cultured cells. By observation of cell morphology, changes in the levels of lactate dehydrogenase, the ratio of tyrosine hydroxylase-positive cells, and the expression of tyrosine hydroxylase mRNA and protein, the differences between the two groups were shown. The created in vitro model of dopaminergic neurons using primary culture of mouse embryonic mesencephalic tissue is suitable for the study of neurotoxicity. The observations of the present study indicated that CSF from Parkinson's disease patients contains factors that can cause specific injury to cultured dopaminergic neurons. However, no obvious correlation was found between the neurotoxicity of CSF and the severity of Parkinson's disease.

  10. Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astradsson, Arnar; Aziz, Tipu Z

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The mean age of onset of Parkinson's disease is about 65 years, with a median time of 9 years between diagnosis and death. METHODS AND OUTCOMES: We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of fetal cell or stem cell......-derived therapy in people with Parkinson's disease? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library and other important databases up to September 2014 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from...

  11. ENU mutagenesis to generate genetically modified rat models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Boxtel, Ruben; Gould, Michael N; Cuppen, Edwin; Smits, Bart M G

    2010-01-01

    The rat is one of the most preferred model organisms in biomedical research and has been extremely useful for linking physiology and pathology to the genome. However, approaches to genetically modify specific genes in the rat germ line remain relatively scarce. To date, the most efficient approach for generating genetically modified rats has been the target-selected N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) mutagenesis-based technology. Here, we describe the detailed protocols for ENU mutagenesis and mutant retrieval in the rat model organism.

  12. Thrombolytic and anticoagulation treatment in a rat embolic stroke model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Rune Skovgaard; Overgaard, K; Meden, P

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The effects of pentasaccharide (PENTA), given alone or combined with thrombolysis using recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA), on infarct size and clinical outcome were evaluated in a rat embolic stroke model. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Ninety-two rats were embolized unilateral...... alone or combined with rt-PA did not significantly increase mortality or tendency for hemorrhage.......OBJECTIVES: The effects of pentasaccharide (PENTA), given alone or combined with thrombolysis using recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA), on infarct size and clinical outcome were evaluated in a rat embolic stroke model. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Ninety-two rats were embolized unilaterally...

  13. Classification of iRBD and Parkinson's patients using a general data-driven sleep staging model built on EEG

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Henriette; Christensen, Julie Anja Engelhard; Frandsen, Rune

    2013-01-01

    Sleep analysis is an important diagnostic tool for sleep disorders. However, the current manual sleep scoring is time-consuming as it is a crude discretization in time and stages. This study changes Esbroeck and Westover's [1] latent sleep staging model into a global model. The proposed data......-driven method trained a topic mixture model on 10 control subjects and was applied on 10 other control subjects, 10 iRBD patients and 10 Parkinson's patients. In that way 30 topic mixture diagrams were obtained from which features reflecting distinct sleep architectures between control subjects and patients...... were extracted. Two features calculated on basis of two latent sleep states classified subjects as “control” or “patient” by a simple clustering algorithm. The mean sleep staging accuracy compared to classical AASM scoring was 72.4% for control subjects and a clustering of the derived features resulted...

  14. Regular exercise and related factors in patients with Parkinson's disease: Applying zero-inflated negative binomial modeling of exercise count data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, JuHee; Park, Chang Gi; Choi, Moonki

    2016-05-01

    This study was conducted to identify risk factors that influence regular exercise among patients with Parkinson's disease in Korea. Parkinson's disease is prevalent in the elderly, and may lead to a sedentary lifestyle. Exercise can enhance physical and psychological health. However, patients with Parkinson's disease are less likely to exercise than are other populations due to physical disability. A secondary data analysis and cross-sectional descriptive study were conducted. A convenience sample of 106 patients with Parkinson's disease was recruited at an outpatient neurology clinic of a tertiary hospital in Korea. Demographic characteristics, disease-related characteristics (including disease duration and motor symptoms), self-efficacy for exercise, balance, and exercise level were investigated. Negative binomial regression and zero-inflated negative binomial regression for exercise count data were utilized to determine factors involved in exercise. The mean age of participants was 65.85 ± 8.77 years, and the mean duration of Parkinson's disease was 7.23 ± 6.02 years. Most participants indicated that they engaged in regular exercise (80.19%). Approximately half of participants exercised at least 5 days per week for 30 min, as recommended (51.9%). Motor symptoms were a significant predictor of exercise in the count model, and self-efficacy for exercise was a significant predictor of exercise in the zero model. Severity of motor symptoms was related to frequency of exercise. Self-efficacy contributed to the probability of exercise. Symptom management and improvement of self-efficacy for exercise are important to encourage regular exercise in patients with Parkinson's disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Metabolic Disturbances in the Striatum and Substantia Nigra in the Onset and Progression of MPTP-Induced Parkinsonism Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Lu

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic confusion has been linked to the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD, while the dynamic changes associated with the onset and progression of PD remain unclear. Herein, dynamic changes in metabolites were detected from the initiation to the development of 1-Methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP -induced Parkinsonism model to elucidate its potential metabolic mechanism. Ex vivo1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy was used to measure metabolite changes in the striatum and substantia nigra (SN of mice at 1, 7, and 21 days after injection of MPTP. Metabolomic analysis revealed a clear separation of the overall metabolites between PD and control mice at different time points. Glutamate (Glu in the striatum was significantly elevated at induction PD day 1 mice, which persisted to day 21. N-acetylaspartate (NAA increased in the striatum of induction PD mice on days 1 and 7, but no significant difference was found in striatum on day 21. Myo-Inositol (mI and taurine (Tau were also disturbed in the striatum in induction PD day 1 mice. Additionally, key enzymes in the glutamate-glutamine cycle were significantly increased in PD mice. These findings suggest that neuron loss and motor function impairment in induction PD mice may be linked to overactive glutamate-glutamine cycle and altered membrane metabolism.

  16. Using a virtual cortical module implementing a neural field model to modulate brain rhythms in Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien Modolo

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available We propose a new method for selective modulation of cortical rhythms based on neural field theory, in which the activity of a cortical area is extensively monitored using a two-dimensional microelectrode array. The example of Parkinson's disease illustrates the proposed method, in which a neural field model is assumed to accurately describe experimentally recorded activity. In addition, we propose a new closed-loop stimulation signal that is both space- and time- dependent. This method is especially designed to specifically modulate a targeted brain rhythm, without interfering with other rhythms. A new class of neuroprosthetic devices is also proposed, in which the multielectrode array is seen as an artificial neural network interacting with biological tissue. Such a bio-inspired approach may provide a solution to optimize interactions between the stimulation device and the cortex aiming to attenuate or augment specific cortical rhythms. The next step will be to validate this new approach experimentally in patients with Parkinson's disease.

  17. Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a long and relatively healthy life. What Causes Parkinson's Disease? In the very deep parts of the brain, there is a collection of nerve cells that help control movement, known as the basal ganglia (say: BAY-sul GAN-glee-ah). In a ...

  18. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... HELPLINE 1-800-4PD-INFO (473-4636) helpline@parkinson.org Search Our Site General Gift Tribute Gift Moving Day Support a Fundraiser Understanding Parkinson's What Is Parkinson's? Causes & Statistics Early Signs Movement ...

  19. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Motor Symptoms in PD Expert Briefings: Swallowing and Dental Challenges Expert Briefings: Caregiving and Parkinson's: Laying the ... Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping Skills for Parkinson's Care Partners Expert Briefings: What's New in Genetics and ...

  20. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Tips for Care Partners Nurse Webinars: Nursing Solutions: Innovations in PD Nurse Education CareMAP: Managing Advanced Parkinson's ... Progression of the Disease? OHSU - Parkinson's Disease: Pharmacological Management of Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis How Is Parkinson's Disease ...

  1. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Nutrition and Parkinson's Disease 2010 Expert Briefings: Legal Issues: Planning Ahead When You are Living with Parkinson's ... for Following a Medication Schedule? Expert Briefings: Cognitive Issues: Advice for Parkinson's Care Partners CareMAP: Medications and ...

  2. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Late Stage Parkinson's Expert Briefings: Impulsive and Compulsive Behaviors in Parkinson's Expert Briefings: Complementary Approaches to Parkinson's ... What Do I Do if I Suspect Compulsive Behavior in a Loved One with PD? CareMAP: Planear ...

  3. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping ... Conference: Lessons Learned How Does the DBS Device Work? OHSU - Parkinson's Disease: Managing Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis CareMAP: ...

  4. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Nutrition and Parkinson's Disease 2010 Expert Briefings: Legal Issues: Planning Ahead When You are Living with Parkinson's ... Care or Team Approach Important? Expert Briefings: Cognitive Issues: Advice for Parkinson's Care Partners Jose Maria Lobo: ...

  5. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping ... with Advanced Parkinson's How Does the DBS Device Work? What Are the Strategies for Managing Problems with ...

  6. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... of Exercise on PD Expert Briefings: Parkinson's and Parenting Expert Briefings: Occupational Therapy and Parkinson's: Tips for ... Briefings: Nutrition and Parkinson's CareMAP: When Is It Time to Get Help? Ask the Helpline: Why Does ...

  7. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Skills for Parkinson's Care Partners Expert Briefings: What's New in Genetics and Parkinson's? Expert Briefings: Understanding the ... Miami, FL 33131 NY: 1359 Broadway, Suite 1509, New York, NY 10018 contact@parkinson.org Press Room ...

  8. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... PD Expert Briefings: Parkinson's Disease: Financial, Legal and Medical Planning Tips for Care Partners Nurse Webinars: Nursing ... Parkinson's Disease: One Voice, Many Listeners Expert Briefings: Medical Therapies: What's in the Parkinson's Pipeline? Expert Briefings: ...

  9. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... options are available. Learn More Living with Parkinson's Managing Parkinson's In Your Area Resources & Support PD Library ... otra canción” Expert Briefings: Diagnosis PD, Now What? Managing the First Few Years with Parkinson's Expert Briefings: ...

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    Full Text Available ... Learn More Research Research We Fund Parkinson's Outcomes Project Grant Opportunities Science News & Progress Patient Engagement Research ... Is Parkinson's Disease Diagnosed? OHSU - Parkinson's Disease: Pharmacological Management of Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis CareMAP: Getting Dressed What ...

  11. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... and Apathy in Parkinson's Disease Nurse Webinars: Interdisciplinary Education on Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Getting Around: Transportation and Travel with PD Expert Briefings: Sleep and Parkinson's Nurse: ...

  12. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Expert Briefings: Parkinson's Disease: Financial, Legal and Medical Planning Tips for Care Partners Nurse Webinars: Nursing Solutions: ... and Parkinson's Disease 2010 Expert Briefings: Legal Issues: Planning Ahead When You are Living with Parkinson's Expert ...

  13. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Parkinson's There is a lot to know about Parkinson's disease. Learn about symptoms, how it is diagnosed and ... your quality of life and live well with Parkinson's disease. Learn More Expert Care Patient Centered Care Centers ...

  14. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Getting Around: Transportation and Travel with PD Expert Briefings: Sleep and Parkinson's Nurse: ... Psychosis Hallucinations and Parkinson's with Dr. Friedman CareMAP: Travel and Transportation: Part 2 Caregiver Summit 2016: Caregiving: ...

  15. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Symptoms of PD Expert Briefings: The Effects of Exercise on PD Expert Briefings: Parkinson's and Parenting Expert ... Non-Motor Symptoms Ask the Helpline: Why Is Exercise Important for People with Parkinson's? How Does Parkinson's ...

  16. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Parkinson's Pipeline 2011: Treating Your Parkinson's Expert Briefings: Cognition and PD: What You've Always Wanted to ... Swallowing: Part 1 How Does Parkinson's Disease Affect Memory? What Do I Do if I Suspect Compulsive ...

  17. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Late Stage Parkinson's Expert Briefings: Impulsive and Compulsive Behaviors in Parkinson's Expert Briefings: Complementary Approaches to Parkinson's ... Prioritizing Health Needs of the Caregiver Is Compulsive Behavior a Side Effect of PD Medications? CareMAP: Preparing ...

  18. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... PD Expert Briefings: Parkinson's and Parenting Expert Briefings: Occupational Therapy and Parkinson's: Tips for Healthy Living Expert ... Expert Briefings: Driving and Parkinson's: Balancing Independence and Safety Expert Briefings: Caring for a Person with Late ...

  19. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Learn More Research Research We Fund Parkinson's Outcomes Project Grant Opportunities Science News & Progress Patient Engagement Research ... Help with Freezing Episodes? OHSU - Parkinson's Disease: Pharmacological Management of Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis Overview of Parkinson's Disease ...

  20. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Nutrition and Parkinson's Disease 2010 Expert Briefings: Legal Issues: Planning Ahead When You are Living with Parkinson's ... 2016: Coping Strategy: Yoga & Stretching Expert Briefings: Cognitive Issues: Advice for Parkinson's Care Partners Expert Briefings: Nutrition ...

  1. Living with Parkinson's

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the entire Parkinson's community. Learn more Get Involved Moving Day Walk Parkinson's Champions Create Your Own Fundraiser Advocate With Us Local Resources Find an Event My PD Story Volunteer ... Support a Moving Day Walker Support a Parkinson's Champion Bequests & Planned ...

  2. Conditions Related to Parkinson's

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the entire Parkinson's community. Learn more Get Involved Moving Day Walk Parkinson's Champions Create Your Own Fundraiser Advocate With Us Local Resources Find an Event My PD Story Volunteer ... Support a Moving Day Walker Support a Parkinson's Champion Bequests & Planned ...

  3. Diagnosis (Parkinson's Disease)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the entire Parkinson's community. Learn more Get Involved Moving Day Walk Parkinson's Champions Create Your Own Fundraiser Advocate With Us Local Resources Find an Event My PD Story Volunteer ... Support a Moving Day Walker Support a Parkinson's Champion Bequests & Planned ...

  4. Symptoms of Parkinson's

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the entire Parkinson's community. Learn more Get Involved Moving Day Walk Parkinson's Champions Create Your Own Fundraiser Advocate With ... Balance & Falls) Rigidity (Stiffness) Stooped Posture Tremor Trouble Moving or Walking ‹ 10 Early Signs of Parkinson's Disease up Bradykinesia ( ...

  5. What Is Parkinson's Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the entire Parkinson's community. Learn more Get Involved Moving Day Walk Parkinson's Champions Create Your Own Fundraiser Advocate With Us Local Resources Find an Event My PD Story Volunteer ... Support a Moving Day Walker Support a Parkinson's Champion Bequests & Planned ...

  6. Parkinson's Disease Foundation News

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the entire Parkinson's community. Learn more Get Involved Moving Day Walk Parkinson's Champions Create Your Own Fundraiser Advocate With Us Local Resources Find an Event My PD Story Volunteer ... Support a Moving Day Walker Support a Parkinson's Champion Bequests & Planned ...

  7. Parkinson's Foundation: For Caregivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the entire Parkinson's community. Learn more Get Involved Moving Day Walk Parkinson's Champions Create Your Own Fundraiser Advocate With Us Local Resources Find an Event My PD Story Volunteer ... Support a Moving Day Walker Support a Parkinson's Champion Bequests & Planned ...

  8. Stages of Parkinson's

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the entire Parkinson's community. Learn more Get Involved Moving Day Walk Parkinson's Champions Create Your Own Fundraiser Advocate With Us Local Resources Find an Event My PD Story Volunteer ... Support a Moving Day Walker Support a Parkinson's Champion Bequests & Planned ...

  9. Young-Onset Parkinson's

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the entire Parkinson's community. Learn more Get Involved Moving Day Walk Parkinson's Champions Create Your Own Fundraiser Advocate With Us Local Resources Find an Event My PD Story Volunteer ... Support a Moving Day Walker Support a Parkinson's Champion Bequests & Planned ...

  10. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Nutrition and Parkinson's Disease 2010 Expert Briefings: Legal Issues: Planning Ahead When You are Living with Parkinson's ... Day Interview with Nathan Slewett Expert Briefings: Cognitive Issues: Advice for Parkinson's Care Partners Who Is a ...

  11. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Improving Parkinson's Care Everywhere Expert Briefings: Apathy or Depression: Which One Is It? CareMAP: El Descanso y ... Expert Briefings: A Closer Look at Anxiety and Depression in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Driving and Parkinson's: ...

  12. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Nutrition and Parkinson's Disease 2010 Expert Briefings: Legal Issues: Planning Ahead When You are Living with Parkinson's ... Prevented? Why Dance for PD? Expert Briefings: Cognitive Issues: Advice for Parkinson's Care Partners Who Is a ...

  13. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Late Stage Parkinson's Expert Briefings: Impulsive and Compulsive Behaviors in Parkinson's Expert Briefings: Complementary Approaches to Parkinson's ... What Do I Do if I Suspect Compulsive Behavior in a Loved One with PD? How Do ...

  14. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Briefings: Dealing with Dementia in PD Expert Briefings: Anxiety in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Nutrition and Parkinson's ... and Tomorrow Expert Briefings: A Closer Look at Anxiety and Depression in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Driving ...

  15. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Late Stage Parkinson's Expert Briefings: Impulsive and Compulsive Behaviors in Parkinson's Expert Briefings: Complementary Approaches to Parkinson's ... y Respuestas con todos los presentadores Is Compulsive Behavior a Side Effect of PD Medications? ¿Cómo Se ...

  16. Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP has a neuroprotective function in dopamine-based neurodegeneration in rat and snail parkinsonian models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabor Maasz

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP rescues dopaminergic neurons from neurodegeneration and improves motor changes induced by 6-hydroxy-dopamine (6-OHDA in rat parkinsonian models. Recently, we investigated the molecular background of the neuroprotective effect of PACAP in dopamine (DA-based neurodegeneration using rotenone-induced snail and 6-OHDA-induced rat models of Parkinson's disease. Behavioural activity, monoamine (DA and serotonin, metabolic enzyme (S-COMT, MB-COMT and MAO-B and PARK7 protein concentrations were measured before and after PACAP treatment in both models. Locomotion and feeding activity were decreased in rotenone-treated snails, which corresponded well to findings obtained in 6-OHDA-induced rat experiments. PACAP was able to prevent the behavioural malfunctions caused by the toxins. Monoamine levels decreased in both models and the decreased DA level induced by toxins was attenuated by ∼50% in the PACAP-treated animals. In contrast, PACAP had no effect on the decreased serotonin (5HT levels. S-COMT metabolic enzyme was also reduced but a protective effect of PACAP was not observed in either of the models. Following toxin treatment, a significant increase in MB-COMT was observed in both models and was restored to normal levels by PACAP. A decrease in PARK7 was also observed in both toxin-induced models; however, PACAP had a beneficial effect only on 6-OHDA-treated animals. The neuroprotective effect of PACAP in different animal models of Parkinson's disease is thus well correlated with neurotransmitter, enzyme and protein levels. The models successfully mimic several, but not all etiological properties of the disease, allowing us to study the mechanisms of neurodegeneration as well as testing new drugs. The rotenone and 6-OHDA rat and snail in vivo parkinsonian models offer an alternative method for investigation of the molecular mechanisms of neuroprotective agents, including PACAP.

  17. Striatal grafts in a rat model of Huntington's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guzman, R; Meyer, M; Lövblad, K O

    1999-01-01

    Survival and integration into the host brain of grafted tissue are crucial factors in neurotransplantation approaches. The present study explored the feasibility of using a clinical MR scanner to study striatal graft development in a rat model of Huntington's disease. Rat fetal lateral ganglionic...... time-points graft location could not be further verified. Measures for graft size and ventricle size obtained from MR images highly correlated with measures obtained from histologically processed sections (R = 0.8, P fetal rat lateral ganglionic...

  18. Functional integration of grafted neural stem cell-derived dopaminergic neurons monitored by optogenetics in an in vitro Parkinson model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tønnesen, Jan; Parish, Clare L; Sørensen, Andreas T

    2011-01-01

    Intrastriatal grafts of stem cell-derived dopamine (DA) neurons induce behavioral recovery in animal models of Parkinson's disease (PD), but how they functionally integrate in host neural circuitries is poorly understood. Here, Wnt5a-overexpressing neural stem cells derived from embryonic ventral...... of post-synaptic currents, and functional expression of DA D₂ autoreceptors. These properties resembled those recorded from identical cells in acute slices of intrastriatal grafts in the 6-hydroxy-DA-induced mouse PD model and from DA neurons in intact substantia nigra. Optogenetic activation...... using optogenetics that ectopically grafted stem cell-derived DA neurons become functionally integrated in the DA-denervated striatum. Further optogenetic dissection of the synaptic wiring between grafted and host neurons will be crucial to clarify the cellular and synaptic mechanisms underlying...

  19. Nitration of soluble proteins in organotypic culture models of Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Trine R; Söderling, Ann-Sofi; Caidahl, Kenneth

    2008-01-01

    Protein nitration due to oxidative and nitrative stress has been linked to the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD), but its relationship to the loss of dopamine (DA) or tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) activity is not clear. Here we quantified protein-bound 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT) by a novel gas...... chromatography/negative chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry technique and DA and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) by HPLC in tissues or medium of organotypic, mouse mesencephalon cultures after acute or chronic treatments with the peroxynitrite donor 3-morpholino-sydnonimine (SIN-1), the dopaminergic...

  20. Model-based rational feedback controller design for closed-loop deep brain stimulation of Parkinson's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorzelic, P.; Schiff, S. J.; Sinha, A.

    2013-04-01

    Objective. To explore the use of classical feedback control methods to achieve an improved deep brain stimulation (DBS) algorithm for application to Parkinson's disease (PD). Approach. A computational model of PD dynamics was employed to develop model-based rational feedback controller design. The restoration of thalamocortical relay capabilities to patients suffering from PD is formulated as a feedback control problem with the DBS waveform serving as the control input. Two high-level control strategies are tested: one that is driven by an online estimate of thalamic reliability, and another that acts to eliminate substantial decreases in the inhibition from the globus pallidus interna (GPi) to the thalamus. Control laws inspired by traditional proportional-integral-derivative (PID) methodology are prescribed for each strategy and simulated on this computational model of the basal ganglia network. Main Results. For control based upon thalamic reliability, a strategy of frequency proportional control with proportional bias delivered the optimal control achieved for a given energy expenditure. In comparison, control based upon synaptic inhibitory output from the GPi performed very well in comparison with those of reliability-based control, with considerable further reduction in energy expenditure relative to that of open-loop DBS. The best controller performance was amplitude proportional with derivative control and integral bias, which is full PID control. We demonstrated how optimizing the three components of PID control is feasible in this setting, although the complexity of these optimization functions argues for adaptive methods in implementation. Significance. Our findings point to the potential value of model-based rational design of feedback controllers for Parkinson's disease.

  1. The Impact of Exercise on the Vulnerability of Dopamine Neurons to Cell Death in Animal Models of Parkinson's Disease

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zigmond, Michael J; Smith, Amanda; Liou, Anthony

    2006-01-01

    Parkinson's disease results in part from the loss of dopamine neurons. We hypothesize that exercise reduces the vulnerability of dopamine neurons to neurotoxin exposure, whereas stress increases vulnerability...

  2. A Rat Excised Larynx Model of Vocal Fold Scar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welham, Nathan V.; Montequin, Douglas W.; Tateya, Ichiro; Tateya, Tomoko; Choi, Seong Hee; Bless, Diane M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To develop and evaluate a rat excised larynx model for the measurement of acoustic, aerodynamic, and vocal fold vibratory changes resulting from vocal fold scar. Method: Twenty-four 4-month-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned to 1 of 4 experimental groups: chronic vocal fold scar, chronic vocal fold scar treated with 100-ng basic…

  3. ENU mutagenesis to generate genetically modified rat models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Boxtel, R.; Gould, M.; Cuppen, E.; Smits, B.M.

    2010-01-01

    The rat is one of the most preferred model organisms in biomedical research and has been extremely useful for linking physiology and pathology to the genome. However, approaches to genetically modify specific genes in the rat germ line remain relatively scarce. To date, the most efficient approach

  4. Knockdown of Hsc70-5/mortalin induces loss of synaptic mitochondria in a Drosophila Parkinson's disease model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Yi Zhu

    Full Text Available Mortalin is an essential component of the molecular machinery that imports nuclear-encoded proteins into mitochondria, assists in their folding, and protects against damage upon accumulation of dysfunctional, unfolded proteins in aging mitochondria. Mortalin dysfunction associated with Parkinson's disease (PD increases the vulnerability of cultured cells to proteolytic stress and leads to changes in mitochondrial function and morphology. To date, Drosophila melanogaster has been successfully used to investigate pathogenesis following the loss of several other PD-associated genes. We generated the first loss-of-Hsc70-5/mortalin-function Drosophila model. The reduction of Mortalin expression recapitulates some of the defects observed in the existing Drosophila PD-models, which include reduced ATP levels, abnormal wing posture, shortened life span, and reduced spontaneous locomotor and climbing ability. Dopaminergic neurons seem to be more sensitive to the loss of mortalin than other neuronal sub-types and non-neuronal tissues. The loss of synaptic mitochondria is an early pathological change that might cause later degenerative events. It precedes both behavioral abnormalities and structural changes at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ of mortalin-knockdown larvae that exhibit increased mitochondrial fragmentation. Autophagy is concomitantly up-regulated, suggesting that mitochondria are degraded via mitophagy. Ex vivo data from human fibroblasts identifies increased mitophagy as an early pathological change that precedes apoptosis. Given the specificity of the observed defects, we are confident that the loss-of-mortalin model presented in this study will be useful for further dissection of the complex network of pathways that underlie the development of mitochondrial parkinsonism.

  5. Review: electrophysiology of basal ganglia and cortex in models of Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellens, Damien J; Leventhal, Daniel K

    2013-01-01

    Incomplete understanding of the systems-level pathophysiology of Parkinson Disease (PD) remains a significant barrier to improving its treatment. Substantial progress has been made, however, due to the availability of neurotoxins that selectively target monoaminergic (in particular, dopaminergic) neurons. This review discusses the in vivo electrophysiology of basal ganglia (BG), thalamic, and cortical regions after dopamine-depleting lesions. These include firing rate changes, neuronal burst-firing, neuronal oscillations, and neuronal synchrony that result from a combination of local microanatomic changes and network-level interactions. While much is known of the clinical and electrophysiological phenomenology of dopamine loss, a critical gap in our conception of PD pathophysiology is the link between them. We discuss potential mechanisms by which these systems-level electrophysiological changes may emerge, as well as how they may relate to clinical parkinsonism. Proposals for an updated understanding of BG function are reviewed, with an emphasis on how emerging frameworks will guide future research into the pathophysiology and treatment of PD.

  6. The nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug piroxicam reverses the onset of depressive-like behavior in 6-OHDA animal model of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago, R M; Tonin, F S; Barbiero, J; Zaminelli, T; Boschen, S L; Andreatini, R; Da Cunha, C; Lima, M M S; Vital, M A B F

    2015-08-06

    Depression is one of the most common psychiatric symptoms in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Some authors have reported that depression is characterized by activation of the inflammatory response. Animal models of PD also present with depressive-like behavior, such as increased immobility time in the modified forced swim test and anhedonia-like behavior in the sucrose preference test. Considering the potential neuroprotective effect of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs in neurodegenerative diseases, the objective of the present study was to investigate the effects of piroxicam on depressive-like behavior in male Wistar rats lesioned with 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) in the substantia nigra (SN). Antidepressant-like effects were observed after prolonged administration of piroxicam for 21days. In the forced swim test, the 6-OHDA+saline group exhibited significant reductions in swimming time and increased immobility time compared with the sham+saline. In the sucrose preference test, the 6-OHDA+piroxicam group exhibited no reduction of sucrose preference compared with the sham+saline, with significant effects of treatment and time and a significant treatment×time interaction. 5-Hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) levels significantly decreased in the hippocampus in the 6-OHDA+saline group and not changed in the 6-OHDA+piroxicam group when compared with the sham+saline on day 21. In conclusion, 21-day treatment with piroxicam reversed the onset of depressive-like behavior and prevented the reduction of hippocampal 5-HT levels. Copyright © 2015 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. COMMUNICATION: Toward closed-loop optimization of deep brain stimulation for Parkinson's disease: concepts and lessons from a computational model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xiao-jiang; Greenwald, Brian; Rabitz, Herschel; Shea-Brown, Eric; Kosut, Robert

    2007-06-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus with periodic, high-frequency pulse trains is an increasingly standard therapy for advanced Parkinson's disease. Here, we propose that a closed-loop global optimization algorithm may identify novel DBS waveforms that could be more effective than their high-frequency counterparts. We use results from a computational model of the Parkinsonian basal ganglia to illustrate general issues relevant to eventual clinical or experimental tests of such an algorithm. Specifically, while the relationship between DBS characteristics and performance is highly complex, global search methods appear able to identify novel and effective waveforms with convergence rates that are acceptably fast to merit further investigation in laboratory or clinical settings.

  8. Aging and Parkinson's disease as functional models of temporal order perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Carolina Feher; Morgero, Kelly Cristina Silva; Mota, Amanda Manzini; Piemonte, Maria Elisa Pimentel; Baldo, Marcus Vinícius Chrysóstomo

    2015-11-01

    Our study evaluates how aging and Parkinson's disease (PD) alter temporal order judgment (TOJ). Two TOJ experiments were performed with young participants, healthy elderly participants, and PD patients. Two white squares were presented on opposite sides of a screen and participants responded which appeared first. In Experiment 1, it was assessed how accurately each group could judge temporal order at intervals from 0ms to 167ms. Detectability, the capacity of detecting which stimulus appeared first, was measured. In Experiment 2, participants were asked to orient their attention to the hemifield indicated by a cue. The PSS ("point of subjective simultaneity"), where the participant was equally likely to respond that either stimulus appeared first, was measured. In Experiment 1, PD patients had smaller detectability than healthy elderly (pnoise ratio in the visual pathways. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Molecular, Neurochemical, and Behavioral Hallmarks of Reserpine as a Model for Parkinson's Disease: New Perspectives to a Long-Standing Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leão, Anderson H F F; Sarmento-Silva, Aldair J; Santos, José R; Ribeiro, Alessandra M; Silva, Regina H

    2015-07-01

    The administration of reserpine to rodents was one of the first models used to investigate the pathophysiology and screening for potential treatments of Parkinson's disease (PD). The reserpine model was critical to the understanding of the role of monoamine system in the regulation of motor and affective disorders, as well as the efficacy of current PD treatments, such as L-DOPA and dopamine agonists. Nevertheless, with the introduction of toxin-induced and genetic models of PD, reserpine became underused. The main rationale to this drawback was the supposed absence of reserpine construct validity with PD. Here, we highlight classical and recent experimental findings that support the face, pharmacological, and construct validity of reserpine PD model and reason against the current rationale for its underuse. We also aim to shed a new perspective upon the model by discussing the main challenges and potentials for the reserpine model of PD. © 2015 International Society of Neuropathology.

  10. Analgesic synergism of gabapentin and carbamazepine in rat model ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Analgesic synergism of gabapentin and carbamazepine in rat model of diabetic neuropathic pain. Sinan Mohammed Abdullah AL-Mahmood, Shahrin Tarmizi Bin Che Abdullah, Nik Nur Fatnoon Nik Ahmad, Abdul Hadi Bin Mohamed, Tariq Abdul Razak ...

  11. Neuroprotective effects of lixisenatide and liraglutide in the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine mouse model of Parkinson's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, W.; Jalewa, Jaishree; Sharma, Mohit; Li, G.; Li, L.; Holscher, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) is a growth factor. GLP-1 mimetics are on the market as treatments for type 2 diabetes and are well tolerated. These drugs have shown neuroprotective properties in animal models of neurodegenerative disorders. In addition, the GLP-1 mimetic exendin-4 has shown protective effects in animal models of Parkinson's disease (PD), and a clinical trial in PD patients showed promising first results. Liraglutide and lixisenatide are two newer GLP-1 mimetics which have a ...

  12. Dietary models for inducing hypercholesterolemia in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheyla Leite Matos

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available The present work aimed at finding a dietetical model capable of promoting the highest hypercholesterolemia without affecting the development of the rats. Sixty female Fisher rats were divided into five groups. The first one was fed a control diet; the remaining four were fed hypercholesterolemic diets with cholesterol and different contents of soybean oil, starch, casein, micronutrients and fiber and, consequently, different caloric values. After eight weeks animals were evaluated in relation to growth, fecal excretion, liver weight and fat, cholesterol and its fractions, serum biochemical parameters and sistolic pressure and compared with controls. The best result was obtained with the diet containing 25 % soybean oil, 1.0 % cholesterol, 13 % fiber and 4,538.4 Kcal/Kg, since it promoted an increase in LDL-cholesterol, a decrease in the HDL fraction and affected less the hepatic function of the animals.Modelos animais têm sido usados para investigar a relação entre desordens no metabolismo do colesterol e a aterogênese. A estratégia utilizada a fim de induzir hipercolesterolemia (dietas com alto teor de gordura e com colesterol adicionado leva à redução de sua ingestão pelos animais, o que induz desnutrição. O presente trabalho objetivou encontrar um modelo dietético capaz de promover a maior hipercolesterolemia, sem afetar o desenvolvimento dos animais. Sessenta ratas Fisher foram divididas em cinco grupos. O primeiro foi alimentado com uma dieta controle; os quatros restantes receberam dietas hipercolesterolêmicas, com colesterol e diferentes teores de óleo de soja, amido, caseína, micronutrientes e fibra e, conseqüentemente, diferentes valores calóricos. Após oito semanas os animais foram avaliados em relação ao crescimento, excreção fecal, peso e teor de gordura do fígado, colesterol e suas frações, parâmetros bioquímicos séricos e pressão sistólica. Os melhores resultados foram obtidos com a dieta contendo 25

  13. Moving Parkinson care to the home

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorsey, E.R.; Vlaanderen, F.P.; Engelen, L.J.; Kieburtz, K.; Zhu, W.; Biglan, K.M.; Faber, M.J.; Bloem, B.R.

    2016-01-01

    In many ways, the care of individuals with Parkinson disease does not meet their needs. Despite the documented benefits of receiving care from clinicians with Parkinson disease expertise, many patients (if not most) do not. Moreover, current care models frequently require older individuals with

  14. Kinesiotherapy of Parkinson`s disease and Parkinson`s syndrom

    OpenAIRE

    Zechovská, Lenka

    2013-01-01

    Author: Lenka Zechovská Institution: Rehabilitation Clinic, Faculty of Medicine in Hradec Králové Title: Kinesiotherapy of Parkinson's disease and Parkinson's syndrome Supervisor: Mgr. Ivana Vondráková Number of pages: 115 Number of attachments: 8 Year of defence: 2013 Keywords: Parkinson's disease, basal ganglia, tremor, rigidity, hypokinesia Bachelor thesis deals with the problems of Parkinson's disease and Parkinson's syndrome. The theoretical part includes the basal ganglia pathophysiolog...

  15. Neuroprotective properties of curcumin in toxin-base animal models of Parkinson's disease: a systematic experiment literatures review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin-Shi; Zhang, Zeng-Rui; Zhang, Man-Man; Sun, Miao-Xuan; Wang, Wen-Wen; Xie, Cheng-Long

    2017-08-17

    Curcumin (diferuloylmethane), a polyphenol extracted from the plant Curcuma longa, is widely used in Southeast Asia, China and India in food preparation and for medicinal purposes. Meanwhile, the neuroprotective actions of curcumin have been documented for experimental therapy in Parkinson's disease (PD). In this study, we used a systematic review to comprehensively assess the efficacy of curcumin in experimental PD. Using electronic and manual search for the literatures, we identified studies describing the efficacy of curcumin in animal models of PD. We identified 13 studies with a total of 298 animals describing the efficacy of curcumin in animal models of PD. The methodological quality of all preclinical trials is ranged from 2 to 5. The majority of the experiment studies demonstrated that curcumin was more significantly neuroprotection effective than control groups for treating PD. Among them, five studies indicated that curcumin had an anti-inflammatory effect in the PD animal models (p curcumin, by which it protected substantia nigra neurons and improved striatal dopamine levels. Furthermore, two studies in this review displayed that curcumin treatment was also effective in reducing neuronal apoptosis and improving functional outcome in animal models of PD. Most of the preclinical studies demonstrated the positive findings while one study reported that curcumin had no beneficial effects against Mn-induced disruption of hippocampal metal and neurotransmitter homeostasis. The results demonstrated a marked efficacy of curcumin in experimental model of PD, suggesting curcumin probably a candidate neuroprotective drug for human PD patients.

  16. Phenotypic Characterization of LEA Rat: A New Rat Model of Nonobese Type 2 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadashi Okamura

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Animal models have provided important information for the genetics and pathophysiology of diabetes. Here we have established a novel, nonobese rat strain with spontaneous diabetes, Long-Evans Agouti (LEA rat derived from Long-Evans (LE strain. The incidence of diabetes in the males was 10% at 6 months of age and 86% at 14 months, while none of the females developed diabetes. The blood glucose level in LEA male rats was between 200 and 300 mg/dl at 120 min according to OGTT. The glucose intolerance in correspondence with the impairment of insulin secretion was observed in male rats, which was the main cause of diabetes in LEA rats. Histological examination revealed that the reduction of β-cell mass was caused by progressive fibrosis in pancreatic islets in age-dependent manner. The intracytoplasmic hyaline droplet accumulation and the disappearance of tubular epithelial cell layer associated with thickening of basement membrane were evident in renal proximal tubules. The body mass index and glycaemic response to exogenous insulin were comparable to those of control rats. The unique characteristics of LEA rat are a great advantage not only to analyze the progression of diabetes, but also to disclose the genes involved in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  17. Neuroprotective effects of (Val8)GLP-1-Glu-PAL in the MPTP Parkinson's disease mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, YanFang; Chen, YiMei; Li, Lin; Hölscher, Christian

    2015-10-15

    Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) is a hormone and a growth factor. GLP-1 mimetics are currently on the market as treatments for type 2 diabetes. They also have shown neuroprotective properties in animal models of neurodegenerative disorders. In addition, the GLP-1 mimetic exendin-4 has shown protective effects in animal models of Parkinson's disease (PD), and a first clinical trial in PD patients showed promising results. (Val8)GLP-1-glu-PAL is a new GLP-1 analogue which has a longer biological half-life than exendin-4. We previously showed that (Val8)GLP-1-glu-PAL has neuroprotective properties. Here we tested the drug in the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) mouse model of PD. MPTP was injected (30mg/kg i.p.) along with (Val8)GLP-1-glu-PAL (25nmol/kg i.p.) once-daily for 8 days. (Val8)GLP-1-glu-PAL showed good effects in preventing the MPTP-induced motor impairment (Rotarod, open field locomotion, swim test), reduction in tyrosine hydroxylase levels (dopamine synthesis) in the substantia nigra, a reduction of activated caspase 3 levels, of TUNEL positive cell numbers, of the pro-apoptotic signaling molecule BAX and an increase in the growth signaling molecule Bcl-2. The results demonstrate that (Val8)GLP-1-glu-PAL shows promise as a novel treatment of PD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Curcumin's Neuroprotective Efficacy in Drosophila Model of Idiopathic Parkinson's Disease Is Phase Specific: Implication of its Therapeutic Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phom, Limamanen; Achumi, Bovito; Alone, Debasmita P.; Muralidhara

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Selective degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra underlies the basic motor impairments of Parkinson's disease (PD). Curcumin has been used for centuries in traditional medicines in India. Our aim is to understand the efficacy of genotropic drug curcumin as a neuroprotective agent in PD. Analysis of different developmental stages in model organisms revealed that they are characterized by different patterns of gene expression which is similar to that of developmental stages of human. Genotropic drugs would be effective only during those life cycle stages for which their target molecules are available. Hence there exists a possibility that targets of genotropic compounds such as curcumin may not be present in all life stages. However, no reports are available in PD models illustrating the efficacy of curcumin in later phases of adult life. This is important because this is the period during which late-onset disorders such as idiopathic PD set in. To understand this paradigm, we tested the protective efficacy of curcumin in different growth stages (early, late health stage, and transition phase) in adult Drosophila flies. Results showed that it can rescue the motor defects during early stages of life but is ineffective at later phases. This observation was substantiated with the finding that curcumin treatment could replenish depleted brain dopamine levels in the PD model only during early stages of life cycle, clearly suggesting its limitation as a therapeutic agent in late-onset neurodegenerative disorders such as PD. PMID:25238331

  19. Dynamic Changes in Striatal mGluR1 But Not mGluR5 during Pathological Progression of Parkinson's Disease in Human Alpha-Synuclein A53T Transgenic Rats: A Multi-PET Imaging Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamasaki, Tomoteru; Fujinaga, Masayuki; Kawamura, Kazunori; Furutsuka, Kenji; Nengaki, Nobuki; Shimoda, Yoko; Shiomi, Satoshi; Takei, Makoto; Hashimoto, Hiroki; Yui, Joji; Wakizaka, Hidekatsu; Hatori, Akiko; Xie, Lin; Kumata, Katsushi; Zhang, Ming-Rong

    2016-01-13

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a prevalent degenerative disorder affecting the CNS that is primarily characterized by resting tremor and movement deficits. Group I metabotropic glutamate receptor subtypes 1 and 5 (mGluR1 and mGluR5, respectively) are important targets for investigation in several CNS disorders. In the present study, we investigated the in vivo roles of mGluR1 and mGluR5 in chronic PD pathology by performing longitudinal positron emission tomography (PET) imaging in A53T transgenic (A53T-Tg) rats expressing an abnormal human α-synuclein (ASN) gene. A53T-Tg rats showed a dramatic decline in general motor activities with age, along with abnormal ASN aggregation and striatal neuron degeneration. In longitudinal PET imaging, striatal nondisplaceable binding potential (BPND) values for [(11)C]ITDM (N-[4-[6-(isopropylamino) pyrimidin-4-yl]-1,3-thiazol-2-yl]-N-methyl-4-[(11)C]methylbenzamide), a selective PET ligand for mGluR1, temporarily increased before PD symptom onset and dramatically decreased afterward with age. However, striatal BPND values for (E)-[(11)C]ABP688 [3-(6-methylpyridin-2-ylethynyl)-cyclohex-2-enone-(E)-O-[(11)C]methyloxime], a specific PET ligand for mGluR5, remained constant during experimental terms. The dynamic changes in striatal mGluR1 BPND values also showed a high correlation in pathological decreases in general motor activities. Furthermore, declines in mGluR1 BPND values were correlated with decreases in BPND values for [(18)F]FE-PE2I [(E)-N-(3-iodoprop-2E-enyl)-2β-carbo-[(18)F]fluoroethoxy-3β-(4-methylphenyl) nortropane], a specific PET ligand for the dopamine transporter, a biomarker for dopaminergic neurons. In conclusion, our results have demonstrated for the first time that dynamic changes occur in mGluR1, but not mGluR5, that accompany pathological progression in a PD animal model. Synaptic signaling by glutamate, the principal excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain, is modulated by group I metabotropic glutamate

  20. Modeling Laterality of the Globus Pallidus Internus in Patients With Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharim, Justin; Yazdi, Daniel; Baohan, Amy; Behnke, Eric; Pouratian, Nader

    2017-04-01

    Neurosurgical interventions such as deep brain stimulation surgery of the globus pallidus internus (GPi) play an important role in the treatment of medically refractory Parkinson's disease (PD), and require high targeting accuracy. Variability in the laterality of the GPi across patients with PD has not been well characterized. The aim of this report is to identify factors that may contribute to differences in position of the motor region of GPi. The charts and operative reports of 101 PD patients following deep brain stimulation surgery (70 males, aged 11-78 years) representing 201 GPi were retrospectively reviewed. Data extracted for each subject include age, gender, anterior and posterior commissures (AC-PC) distance, and third ventricular width. Multiple linear regression, stepwise regression, and relative importance of regressors analysis were performed to assess the predictive ability of these variables on GPi laterality. Multiple linear regression for target vs. third ventricular width, gender, AC-PC distance, and age were significant for normalized linear regression coefficients of 0.333 (p laterality of 0.19 mm per mm of ventricular width, 0.11 mm per mm of AC-PC distance, 0.017 mm per year in age, and 0.54 mm increase for male gender. This variability highlights the limitations of indirect targeting alone, and argues for the continued use of MRI as well as intraoperative physiological testing to account for such factors that contribute to patient-specific variability in GPi localization. © 2016 International Neuromodulation Society.

  1. Clonidine improves attentional and memory components of delayed response performance in a model of early Parkinsonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, J S; Tinker, J P; Decamp, E

    2010-08-25

    Cognitive deficits, including attention and working memory deficits, are often described in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients even during the early stages of the disease. However, cognitive deficits associated with PD have proven difficult to treat and often do not respond well to the dopaminergic therapies used to treat the motor symptoms of the disease. Chronic administration of low doses of the neurotoxin 1-methy,4-phenyl,1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) can induce cognitive dysfunction in non-human primates, including impaired performance on a variable delayed response (VDR) task with attentional and memory components. Since alpha-2 adrenergic receptor agonists have been suggested to improve attention and working memory in a variety of conditions, the present study assessed the extent to which the alpha-2 noradrenergic agonist clonidine might influence VDR performance in early Parkinsonian non-human primates. Clonidine (0.02-0.10 mg/kg) improved performance on both attentional and memory components of the task, performed in a modified Wisconsin General Test Apparatus, in a dose-dependent manner and the cognition enhancing effects of clonidine were blocked by co-administration of the alpha-2 noradrenergic antagonist idazoxan (0.10 mg/kg). These data suggest that clonidine or drugs of this class, perhaps with greater receptor subtype selectivity and low sedation liability, might be effective therapeutics for cognitive dysfunction associated with PD. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Decaffeinated Coffee and Nicotine-Free Tobacco Provide Neuroprotection in Drosophila Models of Parkinson's Disease through an NRF2-Dependent Mechanism

    OpenAIRE

    Trinh, Kien; Andrews, Laurie; Krause, James; Hanak, Tyler; Lee, Daewoo; Gelb, Michael; Pallanck, Leo

    2010-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have revealed a significantly reduced risk of Parkinson's disease (PD) among coffee and tobacco users, although it is unclear whether these correlations reflect neuroprotective/symptomatic effects of these agents or preexisting differences in the brains of tobacco and coffee users. Here, we report that coffee and tobacco, but not caffeine or nicotine, are neuroprotective in fly PD models. We further report that decaffeinated coffee and nicotine-free tobacco are as neur...

  3. The Impact of Exercise on the Vulnerability of Dopamine Neurons to Cell Death in Animal Models of Parkinson's Disease

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zpgmond, Michael J; Smith, Amanda; Liou, Anthony

    2007-01-01

    Parkinson's disease results in part from the loss of dopamine neurons. We hypothesize that exercise reduces the vulnerability of dopamine neurons to neurotoxin exposure, which is modulated by stress...

  4. The Impact of Exercise on the Vulnerability of Dopamine Neurons to Cell Death in Animal Models of Parkinson's Disease

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zigmond, Michael J; Smith, Amanda

    2005-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) results in part from the loss of dopamine (DA) neurons. We hypothesize that exercise reduces the vulnerability of DA neurons to neurotoxin exposure, whereas stress increases vulnerability...

  5. An Overview on the Role of α -Synuclein in Experimental Models of Parkinson's Disease from Pathogenesis to Therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javed, Hayate; Kamal, Mohammad Amjad; Ojha, Shreesh

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a devastating and progressive movement disorder characterized by symptoms of muscles rigidity, tremor, postural instability and slow physical movements. Biochemically, PD is characterized by lack of dopamine production and its action due to loss of dopaminergic neurons and neuropathologically by the presence of intracytoplasmic inclusions known as Lewy bodies, which mainly consist of presynaptic neuronal protein, α-synuclein (α-syn). It is believed that alteration in α-syn homeostasis leads to increased accumulation and aggregation of α-syn in Lewy body. Based on the important role of α-syn from pathogenesis to therapeutics, the recent researches are mainly focused on deciphering the critical role of α-syn at advanced level. Being a major protein in Lewy body that has a key role in pathogenesis of PD, several model systems including immortalized cell lines (SH-SY5Y), primary neuronal cultures, yeast (saccharomyces cerevisiae), drosophila (fruit flies), nematodes (Caenorhabditis elegans) and rodents are being employed to understand the PD pathogenesis and treatment. In order to study the etiopathogensis and develop novel therapeutic target for α -syn aggregation, majority of investigators rely on toxin (rotenone, 1-Methyl-4-Phenyl-1,2,3,6-Tetrahydropyridine, 6-hydroxydopamine, paraquat)-induced animal models of PD as a tool for basic research. Whereas, cell and tissue based models are mostly utilized to elucidate the mechanistic and molecular pathways underlying the α -syn induced toxicity and therapeutic approaches in PD. Gene modified mouse models based on α-syn expression are fascinating for modeling familial PD and toxin induced models provide a suitable approach for sporadic PD. The purpose of this review is to provide a summary and a critical review of the involvement of α-syn in various in vitro and in vivo models of PD based on use of neurotoxins as well as genetic modifications.

  6. Cannabis exacerbates depressive symptoms in rat model induced by reserpine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khadrawy, Yasser A; Sawie, Hussein G; Abdel-Salam, Omar M E; Hosny, Eman N

    2017-05-01

    Cannabis sativa is one of the most widely recreational drugs and its use is more prevalent among depressed patients. Some studies reported that Cannabis has antidepressant effects while others showed increased depressive symptoms in Cannabis users. Therefore, the present study aims to investigate the effect of Cannabis extract on the depressive-like rats. Twenty four rats were divided into: control, rat model of depression induced by reserpine and depressive-like rats treated with Cannabis sativa extract (10mg/kg expressed as Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol). The depressive-like rats showed a severe decrease in motor activity as assessed by open field test (OFT). This was accompanied by a decrease in monoamine levels and a significant increase in acetylcholinesterase activity in the cortex and hippocampus. Na + ,K + -ATPase activity increased in the cortex and decreased in the hippocampus of rat model. In addition, a state of oxidative stress was evident in the two brain regions. This was indicated from the significant increase in the levels of lipid peroxidation and nitric oxide. No signs of improvement were observed in the behavioral and neurochemical analyses in the depressive-like rats treated with Cannabis extract. Furthermore, Cannabis extract exacerbated the lipid peroxidation in the cortex and hippocampus. According to the present findings, it could be concluded that Cannabis sativa aggravates the motor deficits and neurochemical changes induced in the cortex and hippocampus of rat model of depression. Therefore, the obtained results could explain the reported increase in the depressive symptoms and memory impairment among Cannabis users. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Functional integration of grafted neural stem cell-derived dopaminergic neurons monitored by optogenetics in an in vitro Parkinson model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Tønnesen

    Full Text Available Intrastriatal grafts of stem cell-derived dopamine (DA neurons induce behavioral recovery in animal models of Parkinson's disease (PD, but how they functionally integrate in host neural circuitries is poorly understood. Here, Wnt5a-overexpressing neural stem cells derived from embryonic ventral mesencephalon of tyrosine hydroxylase-GFP transgenic mice were expanded as neurospheres and transplanted into organotypic cultures of wild type mouse striatum. Differentiated GFP-labeled DA neurons in the grafts exhibited mature neuronal properties, including spontaneous firing of action potentials, presence of post-synaptic currents, and functional expression of DA D₂ autoreceptors. These properties resembled those recorded from identical cells in acute slices of intrastriatal grafts in the 6-hydroxy-DA-induced mouse PD model and from DA neurons in intact substantia nigra. Optogenetic activation or inhibition of grafted cells and host neurons using channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2 and halorhodopsin (NpHR, respectively, revealed complex, bi-directional synaptic interactions between grafted cells and host neurons and extensive synaptic connectivity within the graft. Our data demonstrate for the first time using optogenetics that ectopically grafted stem cell-derived DA neurons become functionally integrated in the DA-denervated striatum. Further optogenetic dissection of the synaptic wiring between grafted and host neurons will be crucial to clarify the cellular and synaptic mechanisms underlying behavioral recovery as well as adverse effects following stem cell-based DA cell replacement strategies in PD.

  8. Active Targeted Macrophage-mediated Delivery of Catalase to Affected Brain Regions in Models of Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yuling; Haney, Matthew J; Mahajan, Vivek; Reiner, Benjamin C; Dunaevsky, Anna; Mosley, R Lee; Kabanov, Alexander V; Gendelman, Howard E; Batrakova, Elena V

    2011-09-10

    We previously demonstrated that monocyte-macrophage based drug delivery can be applied to a spectrum of infectious, neoplastic, and degenerative disorders. In particular, bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMM) loaded with nano formulated catalase, "nanozyme", were shown to attenuate neuro inflammation and nigrostriatal degeneration in rodent models of Parkinson's disease (PD). Nonetheless, the pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of BMM-incorporated nanozyme has not been explored. To this end, we now demonstrate that BMM, serving as a "depot" for nanozyme, increased area under the curve(AUC), half-life, and mean residence time in blood circulation of the protein when compared to the nanozyme administered alone. Accordingly, bioavailability of the nanozyme for the brain, spleen, kidney, and liver was substantially increased. Importantly, nanozyme-loaded BMM targeted diseased sites and improved transport across the blood brain barrier. This was seen specifically in affected brain subregions in models of PD. Engaging natural immune cells such as monocyte-macrophages as drug carriers provides a new perspective for therapeutic delivery for PD and also likely a range of other inflammatory and degenerative diseases.

  9. A novel model of invasive fungal rhinosinusitis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fang; An, Yunfang; Li, Zeqing; Zhao, Changqing

    2013-01-01

    Invasive fungal rhinosinusitis (IFRS) is a life-threatening inflammatory disease that affects immunocompromised patients, but animal models of the disease are scarce. This study aimed to develop an IFRS model in neutropenic rats. The model was established in three consecutive steps: unilateral nasal obstruction with Merocel sponges, followed by administration of cyclophosphamide (CPA), and, finally, nasal inoculation with Aspergillus fumigatus. Fifty healthy Wistar rats were randomly divided into five groups, with group I as the controls, group II undergoing unilateral nasal obstruction alone, group III undergoing nasal obstruction with fungal inoculation, group IV undergoing nasal obstruction with administration of CPA, and group V undergoing nasal obstruction with administration of CPA and fungal inoculation. Hematology, histology, and mycology investigations were performed. The changes in the rat absolute neutrophil counts (ANCs) were statistically different across the groups. The administration of CPA decreased the ANCs, whereas nasal obstruction with fungal inoculation increased the ANCs, and nasal obstruction did not change them. Histological examination of the rats in group V revealed the hyphal invasion of sinus mucosa and bone, thrombosis, and tissue infarction. No pathology indicative of IFRS was observed in the remaining groups. Positive rates of fungal culture in tissue homogenates from the maxillary sinus (62.5%) and lung (25%) were found in group V, whereas groups I, II, III, and IV showed no fungal culture in the homogenates. A rat IFRS model was successfully developed through nasal obstruction, CPA-induced neutropenia, and fungal inoculation. The disease model closely mimics the pathophysiology of anthropic IFRS.

  10. Cerebral microbleeds in a neonatal rat model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brianna Carusillo Theriault

    Full Text Available In adult humans, cerebral microbleeds play important roles in neurodegenerative diseases but in neonates, the consequences of cerebral microbleeds are unknown. In rats, a single pro-angiogenic stimulus in utero predisposes to cerebral microbleeds after birth at term, a time when late oligodendrocyte progenitors (pre-oligodendrocytes dominate in the rat brain. We hypothesized that two independent pro-angiogenic stimuli in utero would be associated with a high likelihood of perinatal microbleeds that would be severely damaging to white matter.Pregnant Wistar rats were subjected to intrauterine ischemia (IUI and low-dose maternal lipopolysaccharide (mLPS at embryonic day (E 19. Pups were born vaginally or abdominally at E21-22. Brains were evaluated for angiogenic markers, microhemorrhages, myelination and axonal development. Neurological function was assessed out to 6 weeks.mRNA (Vegf, Cd31, Mmp2, Mmp9, Timp1, Timp2 and protein (CD31, MMP2, MMP9 for angiogenic markers, in situ proteolytic activity, and collagen IV immunoreactivity were altered, consistent with an angiogenic response. Vaginally delivered pups exposed to prenatal IUI+mLPS had spontaneous cerebral microbleeds, abnormal neurological function, and dysmorphic, hypomyelinated white matter and axonopathy. Pups exposed to the same pro-angiogenic stimuli in utero but delivered abdominally had minimal cerebral microbleeds, preserved myelination and axonal development, and neurological function similar to naïve controls.In rats, pro-angiogenic stimuli in utero can predispose to vascular fragility and lead to cerebral microbleeds. The study of microbleeds in the neonatal rat brain at full gestation may give insights into the consequences of microbleeds in human preterm infants during critical periods of white matter development.

  11. Oxidative stress of crystalline lens in rat menopausal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acer, Semra; Pekel, Gökhan; Küçükatay, Vural; Karabulut, Aysun; Yağcı, Ramazan; Çetin, Ebru Nevin; Akyer, Şahika Pınar; Şahin, Barbaros

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate lenticular oxidative stress in rat menopausal models. Forty Wistar female albino rats were included in this study. A total of thirty rats underwent oophorectomy to generate a menopausal model. Ten rats that did not undergo oophorectomy formed the control group (Group 1). From the rats that underwent oophorectomy, 10 formed the menopause control group (Group 2), 10 were administered a daily injection of methylprednisolone until the end of the study (Group 3), and the remaining 10 rats were administered intraperitoneal streptozocin to induce diabetes mellitus (Group 4). Total oxidant status (TOS), total antioxidant capacity (TAC), and oxidative stress index (OSI) measurements of the crystalline lenses were analyzed. The mean OSI was the lowest in group 1 and highest in group 4. Nevertheless, the difference between the groups was not statistically significant in terms of OSI (p >0.05). The mean TOS values were similar between the groups (p >0.05), whereas the mean TAC of group 1 was significantly higher than that of the other groups (p <0.001). Our results indicate that menopause may not promote cataract formation.

  12. Oxidative stress of crystalline lens in rat menopausal model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semra Acer

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Purpose: To evaluate lenticular oxidative stress in rat menopausal models. Methods: Forty Wistar female albino rats were included in this study. A total of thirty rats underwent oophorectomy to generate a menopausal model. Ten rats that did not undergo oophorectomy formed the control group (Group 1. From the rats that underwent oophorectomy, 10 formed the menopause control group (Group 2, 10 were administered a daily injection of methylprednisolone until the end of the study (Group 3, and the remaining 10 rats were administered intraperitoneal streptozocin to induce diabetes mellitus (Group 4. Total oxidant status (TOS, total antioxidant capacity (TAC, and oxidative stress index (OSI measurements of the crystalline lenses were analyzed. Results: The mean OSI was the lowest in group 1 and highest in group 4. Nevertheless, the difference between the groups was not statistically significant in terms of OSI (p >0.05. The mean TOS values were similar between the groups (p >0.05, whereas the mean TAC of group 1 was significantly higher than that of the other groups (p <0.001. Conclusions: Our results indicate that menopause may not promote cataract formation.

  13. Long-term BPA infusions. Evaluation in the rat brain tumor and rat spinal cord models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coderre, J.A.; Micca, P.L.; Nawrocky, M.M.; Joel, D.D.; Morris, G.M.

    2000-01-01

    In the BPA-based dose escalation clinical trial, the observations of tumor recurrence in areas of extremely high calculated tumor doses suggest that the BPA distribution is non-uniform. Longer (6-hour) i.v. infusions of BPA are evaluated in the rat brain tumor and spinal cord models to address the questions of whether long-term infusions are more effective against the tumor and whether long-term infusions are detrimental in the central nervous system. In the rat spinal cord, the 50% effective doses (ED 50 ) for myeloparesis were not significantly different after a single i.p. injection of BPA-fructose or a 6 hour i.v. infusion. In the rat 9L gliosarcoma brain tumor model, BNCT following 2-hr or 6-hr infusions of BPA-F produced similar levels of long term survival. (author)

  14. Predicting the multi-domain progression of Parkinson's disease: a Bayesian multivariate generalized linear mixed-effect model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ming; Li, Zheng; Lee, Eun Young; Lewis, Mechelle M; Zhang, Lijun; Sterling, Nicholas W; Wagner, Daymond; Eslinger, Paul; Du, Guangwei; Huang, Xuemei

    2017-09-25

    It is challenging for current statistical models to predict clinical progression of Parkinson's disease (PD) because of the involvement of multi-domains and longitudinal data. Past univariate longitudinal or multivariate analyses from cross-sectional trials have limited power to predict individual outcomes or a single moment. The multivariate generalized linear mixed-effect model (GLMM) under the Bayesian framework was proposed to study multi-domain longitudinal outcomes obtained at baseline, 18-, and 36-month. The outcomes included motor, non-motor, and postural instability scores from the MDS-UPDRS, and demographic and standardized clinical data were utilized as covariates. The dynamic prediction was performed for both internal and external subjects using the samples from the posterior distributions of the parameter estimates and random effects, and also the predictive accuracy was evaluated based on the root of mean square error (RMSE), absolute bias (AB) and the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. First, our prediction model identified clinical data that were differentially associated with motor, non-motor, and postural stability scores. Second, the predictive accuracy of our model for the training data was assessed, and improved prediction was gained in particularly for non-motor (RMSE and AB: 2.89 and 2.20) compared to univariate analysis (RMSE and AB: 3.04 and 2.35). Third, the individual-level predictions of longitudinal trajectories for the testing data were performed, with ~80% observed values falling within the 95% credible intervals. Multivariate general mixed models hold promise to predict clinical progression of individual outcomes in PD. The data was obtained from Dr. Xuemei Huang's NIH grant R01 NS060722 , part of NINDS PD Biomarker Program (PDBP). All data was entered within 24 h of collection to the Data Management Repository (DMR), which is publically available ( https://pdbp.ninds.nih.gov/data-management ).

  15. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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  16. Parkinson disease - discharge

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  4. Urocortin, a CRF-like peptide, restores key indicators of damage in the substantia nigra in a neuroinflammatory model of Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biggs Christopher S

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We have recently observed that the corticotrophin releasing hormone (CRF related peptide urocortin (UCN reverses key features of nigrostriatal damage in the hemiparkinsonian 6-hydroxydopamine lesioned rat. Here we have studied whether similar effects are also evident in the lipopolysaccaride (LPS neuroinflammatory paradigm of Parkinson's disease (PD. To do this we have measured restoration of normal motor behaviour, retention of nigral dopamine (DA and also tyrosine hydroxylase (TH activity. Fourteen days following intranigral injections of LPS and UCN, rats showed only modest circling after DA receptor stimulation with apomorphine, in contrast to those given LPS and vehicle where circling was pronounced. In separate experiments, rats received UCN seven days following LPS, and here apomorphine challenge caused near identical circling intensity to those that received LPS and UCN concomitantly. In a similar and consistent manner with the preservation of motor function, UCN 'protected' the nigra from both DA depletion and loss of TH activity, indicating preservation of DA cells. The effects of UCN were antagonised by the non-selective CRF receptor antagonist α-helical CRF and were not replicated by the selective CRF2 ligand UCN III. This suggests that UCN is acting via CRF1 receptors, which have been shown to be anti-inflammatory in the periphery. Our data therefore indicate that UCN is capable of maintaining adequate nigrostriatal function in vivo, via CRF1 receptors following a neuro-inflammatory challenge. This has potential therapeutic implications in PD.

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging and tensor-based morphometry in the MPTP non-human primate model of Parkinson's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Modo

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease (PD is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder producing a variety of motor and cognitive deficits with the causes remaining largely unknown. The gradual loss of the nigrostriatal pathway is currently considered the pivotal pathological event. To better understand the progression of PD and improve treatment management, defining the disease on a structural basis and expanding brain analysis to extra-nigral structures is indispensable. The anatomical complexity and the presence of neuromelanin, make the use of non-human primates an essential element in developing putative imaging biomarkers of PD. To this end, ex vivo T2-weighted magnetic resonance images were acquired from control and 1-methyl-4 phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP-treated marmosets. Volume measurements of the caudate, putamen, and substantia nigra indicated significant atrophy and cortical thinning. Tensor-based morphometry provided a more extensive and hypothesis free assessment of widespread changes caused by the toxin insult to the brain, especially highlighting regional cortical atrophy. The results highlight the importance of developing imaging biomarkers of PD in non-human primate models considering their distinct neuroanatomy. It is essential to further develop these biomarkers in vivo to provide non-invasive tools to detect pre-symptomatic PD and to monitor potential disease altering therapeutics.

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging and tensor-based morphometry in the MPTP non-human primate model of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modo, Michel; Crum, William R; Gerwig, Madeline; Vernon, Anthony C; Patel, Priya; Jackson, Michael J; Rose, Sarah; Jenner, Peter; Iravani, Mahmoud M

    2017-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder producing a variety of motor and cognitive deficits with the causes remaining largely unknown. The gradual loss of the nigrostriatal pathway is currently considered the pivotal pathological event. To better understand the progression of PD and improve treatment management, defining the disease on a structural basis and expanding brain analysis to extra-nigral structures is indispensable. The anatomical complexity and the presence of neuromelanin, make the use of non-human primates an essential element in developing putative imaging biomarkers of PD. To this end, ex vivo T2-weighted magnetic resonance images were acquired from control and 1-methyl-4 phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-treated marmosets. Volume measurements of the caudate, putamen, and substantia nigra indicated significant atrophy and cortical thinning. Tensor-based morphometry provided a more extensive and hypothesis free assessment of widespread changes caused by the toxin insult to the brain, especially highlighting regional cortical atrophy. The results highlight the importance of developing imaging biomarkers of PD in non-human primate models considering their distinct neuroanatomy. It is essential to further develop these biomarkers in vivo to provide non-invasive tools to detect pre-symptomatic PD and to monitor potential disease altering therapeutics.

  7. Targeting PERK signaling with the small molecule GSK2606414 prevents neurodegeneration in a model of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercado, Gabriela; Castillo, Valentina; Soto, Paulina; López, Nélida; Axten, Jeffrey M; Sardi, Sergio P; Hoozemans, Jeroen J M; Hetz, Claudio

    2018-04-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder, leading to the progressive decline of motor control due to the loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc). Accumulating evidence suggest that altered proteostasis is a salient feature of PD, highlighting perturbations to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), the main compartment involved in protein folding and secretion. PERK is a central ER stress sensor that enforces adaptive programs to recover homeostasis through a block of protein translation and the induction of the transcription factor ATF4. In addition, chronic PERK signaling results in apoptosis induction and neuronal dysfunction due to the repression in the translation of synaptic proteins. Here we confirmed the activation of PERK signaling in postmortem brain tissue derived from PD patients and three different rodent models of the disease. Pharmacological targeting of PERK by the oral administration of GSK2606414 demonstrated efficient inhibition of the pathway in the SNpc after experimental ER stress stimulation. GSK2606414 protected nigral-dopaminergic neurons against a PD-inducing neurotoxin, improving motor performance. The neuroprotective effects of PERK inhibition were accompanied by an increase in dopamine levels and the expression of synaptic proteins. However, GSK2606414 treated animals developed secondary effects possibly related to pancreatic toxicity. This study suggests that strategies to attenuate ER stress levels may be effective to reduce neurodegeneration in PD. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Transduced PEP-1-PON1 proteins regulate microglial activation and dopaminergic neuronal death in a Parkinson's disease model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Mi Jin; Park, Meeyoung; Kim, Dae Won; Shin, Min Jea; Son, Ora; Jo, Hyo Sang; Yeo, Hyeon Ji; Cho, Su Bin; Park, Jung Hwan; Lee, Chi Hern; Kim, Duk-Soo; Kwon, Oh-Shin; Kim, Joon; Han, Kyu Hyung; Park, Jinseu; Eum, Won Sik; Choi, Soo Young

    2015-09-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is an oxidative stress-mediated neurodegenerative disorder caused by selective dopaminergic neuronal death in the midbrain substantia nigra. Paraoxonase 1 (PON1) is a potent inhibitor of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) against oxidation by destroying biologically active phospholipids with potential protective effects against oxidative stress-induced inflammatory disorders. In a previous study, we constructed protein transduction domain (PTD) fusion PEP-1-PON1 protein to transduce PON1 into cells and tissue. In this study, we examined the role of transduced PEP-1-PON1 protein in repressing oxidative stress-mediated inflammatory response in microglial BV2 cells after exposure to lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Moreover, we identified the functions of transduced PEP-1-PON1 proteins which include, mitigating mitochondrial damage, decreasing reactive oxidative species (ROS) production, matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) expression and protecting against 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP(+))-induced neurotoxicity in SH-SY5Y cells. Furthermore, transduced PEP-1-PON1 protein reduced MMP-9 expression and protected against dopaminergic neuronal cell death in a 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-induced PD mice model. Taken together, these results suggest a promising therapeutic application of PEP-1-PON1 proteins against PD and other inflammation and oxidative stress-related neuronal diseases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Proteomic Analysis of the Effect of Korean Red Ginseng in the Striatum of a Parkinson's Disease Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dongsoo; Jeon, Hyongjun; Ryu, Sun; Koo, Sungtae; Ha, Ki-Tae; Kim, Seungtae

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that Korean Red Ginseng (KRG) suppresses dopaminergic neuronal death in the brain of a Parkinson's disease (PD) mouse model, but the mechanism is still elusive. Using a 2-dimensional electrophoresis technique, we investigated whether KRG can restore the changes in protein expressions in the striatum (ST) of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-injected mice. Male C57BL/6 mice (9 weeks old) were injected with 20 mg/kg MPTP intraperitoneally four times at 2-h intervals. KRG (100 mg/kg) was orally administered once a day for 3 days from one hour after the first MPTP injection. Two hours after the third KRG administration a pole test was performed to evaluate motor function, after which the brains were immediately harvested. Survival of dopaminergic neurons in the nigrostriatal pathway and protein expression in the ST were measured by immunohistochemistry and 2-dimensional electrophoresis. KRG suppressed MPTP-induced behavioral dysfunction and neuronal death in the nigrostriatal pathway. Moreover, 30 proteins changed by MPTP and KRG in the ST were identified and shown to be related to glycolysis/gluconeogenesis and neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease and PD. KRG has neuroprotective effects against MPTP toxicity and alleviates protein expression profiles related to enhancing energy metabolism in the ST of MPTP-treated mice.

  10. Gut Microbial Diversity in Rat Model Induced by Rhubarb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Ying; Wu, Chunfu; Yang, Jingyu; Li, Xiaobo

    2014-01-01

    Rhubarb is often used to establish chronic diarrhea and spleen (Pi)-deficiency syndrome animal models in China. In this study, we utilized the enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus-polymerase chain reaction (ERIC-PCR) method to detect changes in bacterial diversity in feces and the bowel mucosa associated with this model. Total microbial genomic DNA from the small bowel (duodenum, jejunum, and ileum), large bowel (proximal colon, distal colon, and rectum), cecum, and feces of normal and rhubarb-exposed rats were used as templates for the ERIC-PCR analysis. We found that the fecal microbial composition did not correspond to the bowel bacteria mix. More bacterial diversity was observed in the ileum of rhubarb-exposed rats (Panalysis with the SPSS software, the Canonical Discriminant Function Formulae for model rats was established. PMID:25048267

  11. Characterizing a Rat Brca2 Knockout Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-05-01

    Brca2 was tested in various tumor inducing experimental settings [49,52] * activated form Hs = Homo sapiens ; Rn = Rattus norvegicus; MMTV...sequencing gDNA from a wild-type 2 SD rat over a region of intron 21 that contains the splicing branch site 2 (underlined). ( el The same sequence from the...from the El pups at 1 week of age for macromolecule isolation. We also visually checked all Fk pups for gross abnormalities in physi- cal

  12. Enfermedad de Parkinson

    OpenAIRE

    Orozco V., Jorge Luis; Fundación Valle de Lili

    2002-01-01

    ¿Qué tan frecuente es la enfermedad de Parkinson?/ ¿Qué ocasiona la enfermedad?/ ¿Existen otras formas de Parkinsonismo?/ ¿Quién desarrolla la enfermedad de Parkinson?/ ¿Cuales son los síntomas principales?/ ¿Cómo se diagnostica la enfermedad de Parkinson?/ ¿Cómo se trata la enfermedad?/Tratamiento quirúrgico/Aspectos prácticos del tratamiento/Verdades sobre la enfermedad de Parkinson.

  13. SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cell line: in vitro cell model of dopaminergic neurons in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Hong-rong; Hu, Lin-sen; Li, Guo-yi

    2010-04-20

    To evaluate the human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cell line as an in vitro model of dopaminergic (DAergic) neurons for Parkinson's disease (PD) research and to determine the effect of differentiation on this cell model. The data of this review were selected from the original reports and reviews related to SH-SY5Y cells published in Chinese and foreign journals (Pubmed 1973 to 2009). After searching the literature, 60 articles were selected to address this review. The SH-SY5Y cell line has become a popular cell model for PD research because this cell line posses many characteristics of DAergic neurons. For example, these cells express tyrosine hydroxylase and dopamine-beta-hydroxylase, as well as the dopamine transporter. Moreover, this cell line can be differentiated into a functionally mature neuronal phenotype in the presence of various agents. Upon differentiation, SH-SY5Y cells stop proliferating and a constant cell number is subsequently maintained. However, different differentiating agents induce different neuronal phenotypes and biochemical changes. For example, retinoic acid induces differentiation toward a cholinergic neuronal phenotype and increases the susceptibility of SH-SY5Y cells to neurotoxins and neuroprotective agents, whereas treatment with retinoic acid followed by phorbol ester 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate results in a DAergic neuronal phenotype and decreases the susceptibility of cells to neurotoxins and neuroprotective agents. Some differentiating agents also alter kinetics of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-pyridinium (MPP(+)) uptake, making SH-SY5Y cells more similar to primary mesencephalic neurons. Differentiated and undifferentiated SH-SY5Y cells have been widely used as a cell model of DAergic neurons for PD research. Some differentiating agents afford SH-SY5Y cells with more potential for studying neurotoxicity and neuroprotection and are thus more relevant to experimental PD research.

  14. Epigallocatechin Gallate Has a Neurorescue Effect in a Mouse Model of Parkinson Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qi; Langley, Monica; Kanthasamy, Anumantha G; Reddy, Manju B

    2017-10-01

    Background: Parkinson disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder that has been associated with many factors, including oxidative stress, inflammation, and iron accumulation. The antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and iron-chelating properties of epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), a major polyphenol in green tea, may offer protection against PD. Objective: We sought to determine the neurorescue effects of EGCG and the role of iron in 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-induced PD. Methods: We evaluated the neurorescue effect of EGCG (25 mg/kg, 7 d, oral administration) against MPTP-induced (20 mg/kg, 3 d, intraperitoneal injection) neurodegeneration in C57 male black mice. Thirty mice weighing ∼25 g were divided into 3 groups: control, MPTP, and MPTP + EGCG. The neurorescue effect of EGCG was assessed with the use of motor behavior tests, neurotransmitter analysis, oxidative stress indicators, and iron-related protein expression. Results: Compared with the control group, MPTP treatment shortened the mice's latency to fall from the rotarod by 16% ( P < 0.05), decreased the striatal dopamine concentration by 58% ( P < 0.001) and dihydroxyphenylacetic acid by 35% ( P < 0.05), and increased serum protein carbonyls by 71% ( P = 0.07). However, EGCG rescued MPTP-induced neurotoxicity by increasing the rotational latency by 17% ( P < 0.05) to a value similar to the control group. Striatal dopamine concentrations were 40% higher in the MPTP + EGCG group than in the MPTP group ( P < 0.05), but the values were significantly lower than in the control group. Compared with the MPTP and control groups, mice in the MPTP + EGCG group had higher substantia nigra ferroportin expression (44% and 35%, respectively) ( P < 0.05) but not hepcidin and divalent metal transporter 1 expression. Conclusion: Overall, our study demonstrated that EGCG regulated the iron-export protein ferroportin in substantia nigra, reduced oxidative stress, and exerted a neurorescue effect

  15. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... PD Expert Briefings: Parkinson's and Parenting Expert Briefings: Occupational Therapy and Parkinson's: Tips for Healthy Living Expert ... Thinking Changes: Part 2 CareMAP: Medications and General Health Part 2 ¿Cómo Se Diagnostica el Parkinson? CareMAP: ...

  16. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Parkinson's Pipeline 2011: Treating Your Parkinson's Expert Briefings: Cognition and PD: What You've Always Wanted to ... Care Between Appointments? How Does Parkinson's Disease Affect Memory? CareMAP: La Alimentación y la Deglución, Parte 2 ...

  17. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping ... How Does Parkinson's Disease Affect Memory? CareMAP: Balancing Life and Caregiving CareMAP: La Alimentación y la Deglución, ...

  18. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Son las Causas del Parkinson? ¿Existen Otros Trastornos que Tienen Síntomas Similares? CareMAP: Advice for Caregivers from ... las diferentes formas y etapas del Parkinson? ¿Cómo es la progresión del Parkinson? Caregiver Summit 2016: The ...

  19. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... progresión del Parkinson? How Can Falls Be Prevented? Expert Briefings: Nutrition and Parkinson's Ask the Helpline: Why Does Caregiving Change from Day to Day? How Does Parkinson's Disease Affect the Urinary System? NPF Caregiver Summit 2016: Tools For Family Caregivers: ...

  20. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping ... Health Part 2 How Does the DBS Device Work? ¿Cómo Se Diagnostica el Parkinson? CareMAP: Cambios para ...

  1. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping ... and Parkinson's Disease? Hallucinations and Delusions CareMAP: Balancing Life and Caregiving CareMAP: Travel and Transportation: Part 1 ...

  2. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Getting Around: Transportation and Travel with PD Expert Briefings: Sleep and Parkinson's Nurse: ... Parkinson's Disease Patients with a Depression Diagnosis? CareMAP: Travel and Transportation: Part 1 CareMAP: Ayudando a una ...

  3. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Getting Around: Transportation and Travel with PD Expert Briefings: Sleep and Parkinson's Nurse: ... the Relationship Between Depression and Parkinson's Disease? CareMAP: Travel and Transportation: Part 1 Hallucinations and Delusions CareMAP: ...

  4. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping ... MAPC - Parkinson- Pasion, Positivismo y Participacion” CareMAP: Balancing Life and Caregiving CareMAP: Travel and Transportation: Part 1 ...

  5. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping ... Expert Briefings: Nutrition and Parkinson's CareMAP: End-of-Life Care CareMAP: Thinking Changes: Part 1 Ask the ...

  6. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Health Part 2 How Does the DBS Device Work? ¿Cómo Se Diagnostica el Parkinson? CareMAP: Cambios para ... OHSU - Overview of Parkinson's Disease CareMAP: Activities at Home Hallucinations and Parkinson's with Dr. Friedman CareMAP: Caring ...

  7. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping ... Foundation How Is Parkinson's Disease Diagnosed? CareMAP: Balancing Life and Caregiving CareMAP: Travel and Transportation: Part 1 ...

  8. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... the entire Parkinson's community. Learn more Get Involved Moving Day Walk Parkinson's Champions Create Your Own Fundraiser Advocate With ... 2 How Can Falls Be Prevented? Why We Walk at Moving Day OHSU - Parkinson's Disease: Managing Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis ...

  9. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping ... How Does Speech Therapy Help Parkinson's Patients? CareMAP: Life Beyond This Life CareMAP: El Vestirse What Are ...

  10. Persistent estrus rat models of polycystic ovary disease: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Krishna B

    2005-10-01

    To critically review published articles on polycystic ovary (PCO) disease in rat models, with a focus on delineating its pathophysiology. Review of the English-language literature published from 1966 to March 2005 was performed through PubMed search. Keywords or phrases used were persistent estrus, chronic anovulation, polycystic ovary, polycystic ovary disease, and polycystic ovary syndrome. Articles were also located via bibliographies of published literature. University Health Sciences Center. Articles on persistent estrus and PCO in rats were selected and reviewed regarding the methods for induction of PCO disease. Changes in the reproductive cycle, ovarian morphology, hormonal parameters, and factors associated with the development of PCO disease in rat models were analyzed. Principal methods for inducing PCO in the rat include exposure to constant light, anterior hypothalamic and amygdaloidal lesions, and the use of androgens, estrogens, antiprogestin, and mifepristone. The validated rat PCO models provide useful information on morphologic and hormonal disturbances in the pathogenesis of chronic anovulation in this condition. These studies have aimed to replicate the morphologic and hormonal characteristics observed in the human PCO syndrome. The implications of these studies to human condition are discussed.

  11. Infrared Thermography in Serotonin-Induced Itch Model in Rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jasemian, Yousef; Gazerani, Parisa; Dagnæs-Hansen, Frederik

    2012-01-01

    The study validated the application of infrared thermography in a serotonin-induced itch model in rats since the only available method in animal models of itch is the count of scratching bouts. Twenty four adult Sprague-Dawley male rats were used in 3 experiments: 1) local vasomotor response...... with no scratching reflex was investigated. Serotonin elicited significant scratching and lowered the local temperature at the site of injection. A negative dose-temperature relationship of serotonin was found by thermography. Vasoregulation at the site of serotonin injection took place in the absence of scratching...

  12. Morphofunctional analysis of experimental model of esophageal achalasia in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabirov, A G; Raginov, I S; Burmistrov, M V; Chelyshev, Y A; Khasanov, R Sh; Moroshek, A A; Grigoriev, P N; Zefirov, A L; Mukhamedyarov, M A

    2010-10-01

    We carried out a detailed analysis of rat model of esophageal achalasia previously developed by us. Manifest morphological and functional disorders were observed in experimental achalasia: hyperplasia of the squamous epithelium, reduced number of nerve fibers, excessive growth of fibrous connective tissue in the esophageal wall, high contractile activity of the lower esophageal sphincter, and reduced motility of the longitudinal muscle layer. Changes in rat esophagus observed in experimental achalasia largely correlate with those in esophageal achalasia in humans. Hence, our experimental model can be used for the development of new methods of disease treatment.

  13. The PPARgamma agonist pioglitazone is effective in the MPTP mouse model of Parkinson's disease through inhibition of monoamine oxidase B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, L P; Crook, B; Hows, M E; Vidgeon-Hart, M; Chapman, H; Upton, N; Medhurst, A D; Virley, D J

    2008-05-01

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPARgamma) agonist pioglitazone has previously been shown to attenuate dopaminergic cell loss in the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) mouse model of Parkinson's disease, an effect attributed to its anti-inflammatory properties. In the present investigation, we provide evidence that pioglitazone is effective in the MPTP mouse model, not via an anti-inflammatory action, but through inhibition of MAO-B, the enzyme required to biotransform MPTP to its active neurotoxic metabolite 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+). Mice were treated with pioglitazone (20 mg kg(-1) b.i.d. (twice a day), p.o., for 7 days), prior and post or post-MPTP (30 mg kg(-1) s.c.) treatment. Mice were then assessed for motor impairments on a beam-walking apparatus and for reductions in TH immunoreactivity in the substantia nigra and depletions in striatal dopamine. The effects of pioglitazone on striatal MPP+ levels and MAO-B activity were also assessed. Mice treated with MPTP showed deficits in motor performance, marked depletions in striatal dopamine levels and a concomitant reduction in TH immunoreactivity in the substantia nigra. Pretreatment with pioglitazone completely prevented these effects of MPTP. However, pretreatment with pioglitazone also significantly inhibited the MPTP-induced production of striatal MPP+ and the activity of MAO-B in the striatum. The neuroprotection observed with pioglitazone pretreatment in the MPTP mouse model was due to the blockade of the conversion of MPTP to its active toxic metabolite MPP+, via inhibition of MAO-B.

  14. Neuroprotective efficacy of a new brain-penetrating C-Abl inhibitor in a murine Parkinson's disease model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Z Imam

    Full Text Available Experimental evidence suggests that oxidative and nitrative mechanisms account for much of the dopaminergic neuronal injury in Parkinson's disease (PD. The ubiquitously expressed non-receptor tyrosine kinase c-Abl is activated by oxidative stress and thus, may play a role in redox-mediated neurodegeneration. Recently, we reported that c-Abl is activated in PD and that a c-Abl inhibitor mitigated neuronal damage in a PD animal model, suggesting a novel neuroprotective therapeutic approach. In the studies presented here, we evaluated the efficacy of a potent and clinically relevant second-generation irreversible Abl kinase inhibitor, INNO-406, as a therapeutic agent for PD. Our studies reveal that INNO-406 is capable of preventing the progression of dopaminergic neuronal damage in a toxin-induced C57 mouse model of PD. Using bovine brain microvessel endothelium as an in vitro blood-brain barrier (BBB model, we detected rapid and significant transfer of INNO-406. Additionally, pharmacokinetic analyses demonstrated significant nanomolar concentrations of INNO-406 in brain in the presence or absence of MPTP administration, however, INNO-406 did not alter the brain levels of MPP+ in MPTP-treated mice. Finally, we showed that 10 mg/kg of INNO-406 given to C57 mice for one week before MPTP treatment (4×20 mg/kg i.p., every 2 h and then for one week after MPTP treatment decreased the loss of dopamine in the striatum by 45% and the loss of TH+ neurons in substantia nigra pars compacts by 40%. This treatment regimen also abrogated activation of c-Abl, tyrosine phosphorylation of the Abl substrate and E3-ubiquitin ligase parkin, and accumulation of the toxic parkin substrate AIMP2. We propose that compounds of the INNO-406 class of Abl inhibitors will be useful new neuroprotective drugs for the treatment of PD-like pathology in preclinical systems that should be easily translated to the clinic.

  15. Sodium phenylbutyrate controls neuroinflammatory and antioxidant activities and protects dopaminergic neurons in mouse models of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Avik; Ghosh, Anamitra; Jana, Arundhati; Liu, Xiaojuan; Brahmachari, Saurav; Gendelman, Howard E; Pahan, Kalipada

    2012-01-01

    Neuroinflammation and oxidative stress underlie the pathogenesis of various neurodegenerative disorders. Here we demonstrate that sodium phenylbutyrate (NaPB), an FDA-approved therapy for reducing plasma ammonia and glutamine in urea cycle disorders, can suppress both proinflammatory molecules and reactive oxygen species (ROS) in activated glial cells. Interestingly, NaPB also decreased the level of cholesterol but involved only intermediates, not the end product of cholesterol biosynthesis pathway for these functions. While inhibitors of both geranylgeranyl transferase (GGTI) and farnesyl transferase (FTI) inhibited the activation of NF-κB, inhibitor of GGTI, but not FTI, suppressed the production of ROS. Accordingly, a dominant-negative mutant of p21(rac), but not p21(ras), attenuated the production of ROS from activated microglia. Inhibition of both p21(ras) and p21(rac) activation by NaPB in microglial cells suggests that NaPB exerts anti-inflammatory and antioxidative effects via inhibition of these small G proteins. Consistently, we found activation of both p21(ras) and p21(rac)in vivo in the substantia nigra of acute 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) mouse model of Parkinson's disease. Oral administration of NaPB reduced nigral activation of p21(ras) and p21(rac), protected nigral reduced glutathione, attenuated nigral activation of NF-κB, inhibited nigral expression of proinflammatory molecules, and suppressed nigral activation of glial cells. These findings paralleled dopaminergic neuronal protection, normalized striatal neurotransmitters, and improved motor functions in MPTP-intoxicated mice. Consistently, FTI and GGTI also protected nigrostriata in MPTP-intoxicated mice. Furthermore, NaPB also halted the disease progression in a chronic MPTP mouse model. These results identify novel mode of action of NaPB and suggest that NaPB may be of therapeutic benefit for neurodegenerative disorders.

  16. Sodium phenylbutyrate controls neuroinflammatory and antioxidant activities and protects dopaminergic neurons in mouse models of Parkinson's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avik Roy

    Full Text Available Neuroinflammation and oxidative stress underlie the pathogenesis of various neurodegenerative disorders. Here we demonstrate that sodium phenylbutyrate (NaPB, an FDA-approved therapy for reducing plasma ammonia and glutamine in urea cycle disorders, can suppress both proinflammatory molecules and reactive oxygen species (ROS in activated glial cells. Interestingly, NaPB also decreased the level of cholesterol but involved only intermediates, not the end product of cholesterol biosynthesis pathway for these functions. While inhibitors of both geranylgeranyl transferase (GGTI and farnesyl transferase (FTI inhibited the activation of NF-κB, inhibitor of GGTI, but not FTI, suppressed the production of ROS. Accordingly, a dominant-negative mutant of p21(rac, but not p21(ras, attenuated the production of ROS from activated microglia. Inhibition of both p21(ras and p21(rac activation by NaPB in microglial cells suggests that NaPB exerts anti-inflammatory and antioxidative effects via inhibition of these small G proteins. Consistently, we found activation of both p21(ras and p21(racin vivo in the substantia nigra of acute 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP mouse model of Parkinson's disease. Oral administration of NaPB reduced nigral activation of p21(ras and p21(rac, protected nigral reduced glutathione, attenuated nigral activation of NF-κB, inhibited nigral expression of proinflammatory molecules, and suppressed nigral activation of glial cells. These findings paralleled dopaminergic neuronal protection, normalized striatal neurotransmitters, and improved motor functions in MPTP-intoxicated mice. Consistently, FTI and GGTI also protected nigrostriata in MPTP-intoxicated mice. Furthermore, NaPB also halted the disease progression in a chronic MPTP mouse model. These results identify novel mode of action of NaPB and suggest that NaPB may be of therapeutic benefit for neurodegenerative disorders.

  17. Neuroprotection by caffeine in the MPTP model of parkinson's disease and its dependence on adenosine A2A receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, K; Di Luca, D G; Orrú, M; Xu, Y; Chen, J-F; Schwarzschild, M A

    2016-05-13

    Considerable epidemiological and laboratory data have suggested that caffeine, a nonselective adenosine receptor antagonist, may protect against the underlying neurodegeneration of parkinson's disease (PD). Although both caffeine and more specific antagonists of the A2A subtype of adenosine receptor (A2AR) have been found to confer protection in animal models of PD, the dependence of caffeine's neuroprotective effects on the A2AR is not known. To definitively determine its A2AR dependence, the effect of caffeine on 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6 tetra-hydropyridine (MPTP) neurotoxicity was compared in wild-type (WT) and A2AR gene global knockout (A2A KO) mice, as well as in central nervous system (CNS) cell type-specific (conditional) A2AR knockout (cKO) mice that lack the receptor either in postnatal forebrain neurons or in astrocytes. In WT and in heterozygous A2AR KO mice caffeine pretreatment (25mg/kgip) significantly attenuated MPTP-induced depletion of striatal dopamine. By contrast in homozygous A2AR global KO mice caffeine had no effect on MPTP toxicity. In forebrain neuron A2AR cKO mice, caffeine lost its locomotor stimulant effect, whereas its neuroprotective effect was mostly preserved. In astrocytic A2AR cKO mice, both caffeine's locomotor stimulant and protective properties were undiminished. Taken together, these results indicate that neuroprotection by caffeine in the MPTP model of PD relies on the A2AR, although the specific cellular localization of these receptors remains to be determined. Copyright © 2016 IBRO. All rights reserved.

  18. There is no Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, William J

    2008-06-01

    The term Parkinson disease defines a specific clinical condition characterized by a typical history and characteristic signs. This review examines the historical evolution of the concept of Parkinson disease and how the misunderstanding of Parkinson disease may be hindering clinical research trials. It is proposed that this syndrome be called Parkinson diseases or parkinsonism type 1 through infinity.

  19. Parkinson's Law Quantified: Three Investigations on Bureaucratic Inefficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Klimek, Peter; Hanel, Rudolf; Thurner, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    We formulate three famous, descriptive essays of C.N. Parkinson on bureaucratic inefficiency in a quantifiable and dynamical socio-physical framework. In the first model we show how the use of recent opinion formation models for small groups can be used to understand Parkinson's observation that decision making bodies such as cabinets or boards become highly inefficient once their size exceeds a critical 'Coefficient of Inefficiency', typically around 20. A second observation of Parkinson - w...

  20. Simvastatin Exposure and Rotator Cuff Repair in a Rat Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deren, Matthew E; Ehteshami, John R; Dines, Joshua S; Drakos, Mark C; Behrens, Steve B; Doty, Stephen; Coleman, Struan H

    2017-03-01

    Simvastatin is a common medication prescribed for hypercholesterolemia that accelerates local bone formation. It is unclear whether simvastatin can accelerate healing at the tendon-bone interface after rotator cuff repair. This study was conducted to investigate whether local and systemic administration of simvastatin increased tendon-bone healing of the rotator cuff as detected by maximum load to failure in a controlled animal-based model. Supraspinatus tendon repair was performed on 120 Sprague-Dawley rats. Sixty rats had a polylactic acid membrane overlying the repair site. Of these, 30 contained simvastatin and 30 did not contain medication. Sixty rats underwent repair without a polylactic acid membrane. Of these, 30 received oral simvastatin (25 mg/kg/d) and 30 received a regular diet. At 4 weeks, 5 rats from each group were killed for histologic analysis. At 8 weeks, 5 rats from each group were killed for histologic analysis and the remaining 20 rats were killed for biomechanical analysis. One rat that received oral simvastatin died of muscle necrosis. Average maximum load to failure was 35.2±6.2 N for those receiving oral simvastatin, 36.8±9.0 N for oral control subjects, 39.5±12.8 N for those receiving local simvastatin, and 39.1±9.3 N for control subjects with a polylactic acid membrane. No statistically significant differences were found between any of the 4 groups (P>.05). Qualitative histologic findings showed that all groups showed increased collagen formation and organization at 8 weeks compared with 4 weeks, with no differences between the 4 groups at each time point. The use of systemic and local simvastatin offered no benefit over control groups. [Orthopedics. 2017; 40(2):e288-e292.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  1. Neuroprotective effect of quercetin in a model of Parkinson’s disease in rat: A histochemical analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Mehdizadeh

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractIntroduction: Parkinson's disease (PD is a neuropathological disorder involving the degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra, with the subsequent loss of their terminals in the striatum. Quercetin, a natural flavonoid, is a strong antioxidant and radical scavenger. Therefore, its neuroprotective effect in a model of Parkinson’s disease in rat was evaluated.Methods: For this purpose, unilateral intrastriatal 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA-lesioned rats were pretreated with quercetin (20 mg/kg; i.p. 1 hour before surgery and treated once a day for one month. Nissl-stained neurons of substantia nigra pars compacta (SNC were counted. Results: Number of Nissl-stained neurons in left side of SNC of lesion group was lower relative to sham-operated group (p<0.005 and it was higher in quercetin-treated lesion group as compared to untreated lesion group (p<0.01.Discussion: Flavonoid quercetin administration for one month could protect the neurons of SNC against 6-OHDA toxicity. 

  2. Neuroprotective effect of quercetin in a model of Parkinson’s disease in rat: A histochemical analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Mehdizadeh

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractIntroduction: Parkinson's disease (PD is a neuropathological disorder involving the degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra, with the subsequent loss of their terminals in the striatum. Quercetin, a natural flavonoid, is a strong antioxidant and radical scavenger. Therefore, its neuroprotective effect in a model of Parkinson’s disease in rat was evaluated.Methods: For this purpose, unilateral intrastriatal 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA-lesioned rats were pretreated with quercetin (20 mg/kg i.p. 1 hour before surgery and treated once a day for one month. Nissl-stained neurons of substantia nigra pars compacta (SNC were counted. Results: Number of Nissl-stained neurons in left side of SNC of lesion group was lower relative to sham-operated group (p<0.005 and it was higher in quercetin-treated lesion group as compared to untreated lesion group (p<0.01.Discussion: Flavonoid quercetin administration for one month could protect the neurons of SNC against 6-OHDA toxicity.

  3. Neuroprotective effects of compounds with antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties in a Drosophila model of Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Yufeng

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Parkinson's disease (PD is the most common movement disorder. Extrapyramidal motor symptoms stem from the degeneration of the dopaminergic pathways in patient brain. Current treatments for PD are symptomatic, alleviating disease symptoms without reversing or retarding disease progression. Although the cause of PD remains unknown, several pathogenic factors have been identified, which cause dopaminergic neuron (DN death in the substantia nigra (SN. These include oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, inflammation and excitotoxicity. Manipulation of these factors may allow the development of disease-modifying treatment strategies to slow neuronal death. Inhibition of DJ-1A, the Drosophila homologue of the familial PD gene DJ-1, leads to oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, and DN loss, making fly DJ-1A model an excellent in vivo system to test for compounds with therapeutic potential. Results In the present study, a Drosophila DJ-1A model of PD was used to test potential neuroprotective drugs. The drugs applied are the Chinese herb celastrol, the antibiotic minocycline, the bioenergetic amine coenzyme Q10 (coQ10, and the glutamate antagonist 2,3-dihydroxy-6-nitro-7-sulphamoylbenzo[f]-quinoxaline (NBQX. All of these drugs target pathogenic processes implicated in PD, thus constitute mechanism-based treatment strategies. We show that celastrol and minocycline, both having antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, confer potent dopaminergic neuroprotection in Drosophila DJ-1A model, while coQ10 shows no protective effect. NBQX exerts differential effects on cell survival and brain dopamine content: it protects against DN loss but fails to restore brain dopamine level. Conclusion The present study further validates Drosophila as a valuable model for preclinical testing of drugs with therapeutic potential for neurodegenerative diseases. The lower cost and amenability to high throughput testing make Drosophila PD

  4. Generation and characterization of rat liver stem cell lines and their engraftment in a rat model of liver failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuijk, Ewart W.; Rasmussen, Shauna; Blokzijl, Francis; Huch, Meritxell; Gehart, Helmuth; Toonen, Pim; Begthel, Harry; Clevers, Hans; Geurts, Aron M.; Cuppen, Edwin

    2016-01-01

    The rat is an important model for liver regeneration. However, there is no in vitro culture system that can capture the massive proliferation that can be observed after partial hepatectomy in rats. We here describe the generation of rat liver stem cell lines. Rat liver stem cells, which grow as cystic organoids, were characterized by high expression of the stem cell marker Lgr5, by the expression of liver progenitor and duct markers, and by low expression of hepatocyte markers, oval cell markers, and stellate cell markers. Prolonged cultures of rat liver organoids depended on high levels of WNT-signalling and the inhibition of BMP-signaling. Upon transplantation of clonal lines to a Fah−/− Il2rg−/− rat model of liver failure, the rat liver stem cells engrafted into the host liver where they differentiated into areas with FAH and Albumin positive hepatocytes. Rat liver stem cell lines hold potential as consistent reliable cell sources for pharmacological, toxicological or metabolic studies. In addition, rat liver stem cell lines may contribute to the development of regenerative medicine in liver disease. To our knowledge, the here described liver stem cell lines represent the first organoid culture system in the rat. PMID:26915950

  5. Optimizing a Rodent Model of Parkinson's Disease for Exploring the Effects and Mechanisms of Deep Brain Stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl Nowak

    2011-01-01

    instrumented rats carrying a backpack stimulator and implanted platinum/iridium electrodes. This model is suitable for (1 elucidating the electrochemical processes at the electrode/tissue interface, (2 analyzing the molecular, cellular and behavioral stimulation effects, (3 testing new target regions for DBS, (4 screening for potential neuroprotective DBS effects, and (5 improving the efficacy and safety of the method. An outlook is given on further developments of experimental DBS, including the use of transgenic animals and the testing of closed-loop systems for the direct on-demand application of electric stimulation.

  6. Adipose-derived Stem Cells Stimulated with n-Butylidenephthalide Exhibit Therapeutic Effects in a Mouse Model of Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Kang; Fu, Ru-Huei; Huang, Yu-Chuen; Chen, Shih-Yin; Hsu, Ching-Ju; Lin, Shinn-Zong; Tu, Chi-Tang; Chang, Li-Hsun; Wu, Ping-An; Liu, Shih-Ping

    2018-03-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) causes motor dysfunction and dopaminergic cell death. Drug treatments can effectively reduce symptoms but often cause unwanted side effects. Stem cell therapies using cell replacement or indirect beneficial secretomes have recently emerged as potential therapeutic strategies. Although various types of stem cells have been proposed as possible candidates, adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) are easily obtainable, more abundant, less ethically disputed, and able to differentiate into multiple cell lineages. However, treatment of PD using adult stem cells is known to be less efficacious than neuron or embryonic stem cell transplantation. Therefore, improved therapies are urgently needed. n-Butylidenephthalide (BP), which is extracted from Angelica sinensis, has been shown to have anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective effects. Indeed, we previously demonstrated that BP treatment of ADSCs enhances the expression of neurogenesis and homing factors such as nuclear receptor related 1 protein, stromal-derived factor 1, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor. In the present study, we examined the ability of BP-pretreated ADSC transplantation to improve PD motor symptoms and protect dopamine neurons in a mouse model of PD. We evaluated the results using neuronal behavior tests such as beam walking, rotarod, and locomotor activity tests. ADSCs with or without BP pretreatment were transplanted into the striatum. Our findings demonstrated that ADSC transplantation improved motor abilities with varied efficacies and that BP stimulation improved the therapeutic effects of transplantation. Dopaminergic cell numbers returned to normal in ADSC-transplanted mice after 22 d. In summary, stimulating ADSCs with BP improved PD recovery efficiency. Thus, our results provide important new strategies to improve stem cell therapies for neurodegenerative diseases in future studies.

  7. Identification of key uric acid synthesis pathway in a unique mutant silkworm Bombyx mori model of Parkinson's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroko Tabunoki

    Full Text Available Plasma uric acid (UA levels decrease following clinical progression and stage development of Parkinson's disease (PD. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying decreases in plasma UA levels remain unclear, and the potential to apply mutagenesis to a PD model has not previously been discovered. We identified a unique mutant of the silkworm Bombyx mori (B.mori op. Initially, we investigated the causality of the phenotypic "op" by microarray analysis using our constructed KAIKO functional annotation pipeline. Consequently, we found a novel UA synthesis-modulating pathway, from DJ-1 to xanthine oxidase, and established methods for large-scale analysis of gene expression in B. mori. We found that the mRNA levels of genes in this pathway were significantly lower in B. mori op mutants, indicating that downstream events in the signal transduction cascade might be prevented. Additionally, levels of B.mori tyrosine hydroxylase (TH and DJ-1 mRNA were significantly lower in the brain of B. mori op mutants. UA content was significantly lower in the B. mori op mutant tissues and hemolymph. The possibility that the B. mori op mutant might be due to loss of DJ-1 function was supported by the observed vulnerability to oxidative stress. These results suggest that UA synthesis, transport, elimination and accumulation are decreased by environmental oxidative stress in the B. mori op mutant. In the case of B. mori op mutants, the relatively low availability of UA appears to be due both to the oxidation of DJ-1 and to its expenditure to mitigate the effects of environmental oxidative stress. Our findings are expected to provide information needed to elucidate the molecular mechanism of decreased plasma UA levels in the clinical stage progression of PD.

  8. Th17 Cells Induce Dopaminergic Neuronal Death via LFA-1/ICAM-1 Interaction in a Mouse Model of Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhan; Huang, Yan; Cao, Bei-Bei; Qiu, Yi-Hua; Peng, Yu-Ping

    2017-12-01

    T helper (Th)17 cells, a subset of CD4 + T lymphocytes, have strong pro-inflammatory property and appear to be essential in the pathogenesis of many inflammatory diseases. However, the involvement of Th17 cells in Parkinson's disease (PD) that is characterized by a progressive degeneration of dopaminergic (DAergic) neurons in the nigrostriatal system is unclear. Here, we aimed to demonstrate that Th17 cells infiltrate into the brain parenchyma and induce neuroinflammation and DAergic neuronal death in 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)- or 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP + )-induced PD models. Blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption in the substantia nigra (SN) was assessed by the signal of FITC-labeled albumin that was injected into blood circulation via the ascending aorta. Live cell imaging system was used to observe a direct contact of Th17 cells with neurons by staining these cells using the two adhesion molecules, leukocyte function-associated antigen (LFA)-1 and intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1, respectively. Th17 cells invaded into the SN where BBB was disrupted in MPTP-induced PD mice. Th17 cells exacerbated DAergic neuronal loss and pro-inflammatory/neurotrophic factor disorders in MPP + -treated ventral mesencephalic (VM) cell cultures. A direct contact of LFA-1-stained Th17 cells with ICAM-1-stained VM neurons was dynamically captured. Either blocking LFA-1 in Th17 cells or blocking ICAM-1 in VM neurons with neutralizing antibodies abolished Th17-induced DAergic neuronal death. These results establish that Th17 cells infiltrate into the brain parenchyma of PD mice through lesioned BBB and exert neurotoxic property by promoting glial activation and importantly by a direct damage to neurons depending on LFA-1/ICAM-1 interaction.

  9. The mechanisms of sirtuin 2-mediated exacerbation of alpha-synuclein toxicity in models of Parkinson disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirtuin genes have been associated with aging and are known to affect multiple cellular pathways. Sirtuin 2 was previously shown to modulate proteotoxicity associated with age-associated neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer and Parkinson disease (PD). However, the precise molecular mechanis...

  10. Pre-fibrillar α-synuclein variants with impaired β-structure increase neurotoxicity in Parkinson's disease models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karpinar, D.P.; Giller, K.; Becker, S.; Baldus, M.

    2009-01-01

    The relation of -synuclein (S) aggregation to Parkinson's disease (PD) has long been recognized, but the mechanism of toxicity, the pathogenic species and its molecular properties are yet to be identified. To obtain insight into the function different aggregated S species have in neurotoxicity in

  11. Anti-Parkinson effects of a selective alpha2C-adrenoceptor antagonist in the MPTP marmoset model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Philippens, I.H.C.H.M.; Joosen, M.J.A.; Ahnaou, A.; Andres, I.; Drinkenburg, W.H.I.M.

    2014-01-01

    Current dopamine replacement therapies, in Parkinson's disease (PD), result in aversive side effects and rapid drug dose escalation over time. Therefore, a non-dopaminergic treatment would be an advantageous supplement to lower the dose of dopamine replacement treatment postponing the occurrence of

  12. Accumulation of phosphorylated alpha-synuclein (p129S) and retinal pathology in a mouse model of Parkinson's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aims: Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by accumulation of misfolded alpha-synuclein within the CNS. Although non-motor clinical phenotypes of PD such as visual dysfunction have become increasingly apparent, retinal pathology associated with PD is not well under...

  13. Steroid-associated osteonecrosis animal model in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Zhen Zheng

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Objective: Established preclinical disease models are essential for not only studying aetiology and/or pathophysiology of the relevant diseases but more importantly also for testing prevention and/or treatment concept(s. The present study proposed and established a detailed induction and assessment protocol for a unique and cost-effective preclinical steroid-associated osteonecrosis (SAON in rats with pulsed injections of lipopolysaccharide (LPS and methylprednisolone (MPS. Methods: Sixteen 24-week-old male Sprague–Dawley rats were used to induce SAON by one intravenous injection of LPS (0.2 mg/kg and three intraperitoneal injections of MPS (100 mg/kg with a time interval of 24 hour, and then, MPS (40 mg/kg was intraperitoneally injected three times a week from week 2 until sacrifice. Additional 12 rats were used as normal controls. Two and six weeks after induction, animals were scanned by metabolic dual energy X-ray absorptiometry for evaluation of tissue composition; serum was collected for bone turnover markers, Microfil perfusion was performed for angiography, the liver was collected for histopathology and bilateral femora and bilateral tibiae were collected for histological examination. Results: Three rats died after LPS injection, i.e., with 15.8% (3/19 mortality. Histological evaluation showed 100% incidence of SAON at week 2. Dual energy X-ray absorptiometry showed significantly higher fat percent and lower lean mass in SAON group at week 6. Micro-computed tomography (Micro-CT showed significant bone degradation at proximal tibia 6 weeks after SAON induction. Angiography illustrated significantly less blood vessels in the proximal tibia and significantly more leakage particles in the distal tibia 2 weeks after SAON induction. Serum amino-terminal propeptide of type I collagen and osteocalcin were significantly lower at both 2 and 6 weeks after SAON induction, and serum carboxy-terminal telopeptide was significantly

  14. Motor assessment in Parkinson`s disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opara, Józef; Małecki, Andrzej; Małecka, Elżbieta; Socha, Teresa

    2017-09-21

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is one of most disabling disorders of the central nervous system. The motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease: shaking, rigidity, slowness of movement, postural instability and difficulty with walking and gait, are difficult to measure. When disease symptoms become more pronounced, the patient experiences difficulties with hand function and walking, and is prone to falls. Baseline motor impairment and cognitive impairment are probable predictors of more rapid motor decline and disability. An additional difficulty is the variability of the symptoms caused by adverse effects of drugs, especially levodopa. Motor assessment of Parkinson`s Disease can be divided into clinimetrics, assessment of balance and posture, arm and hand function, and gait/walking. These are many clinimetric scales used in Parkinson`s Disease, the most popular being the Hoehn and Yahr stages of progression of the disease and Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale. Balance and posture can be assessed by clinimetric scales like the Berg BS, Tinetti, Brunel BA, and Timed Up and Go Test, or measured by posturometric platforms. Among skill tests, the best known are: the Purdue Pegboard Test, Nine-Hole Peg Test, Jebsen and Taylor test, Pig- Tail Test, Frenchay Arm Test, Action Research Arm Test, Wolf FMT and Finger-Tapping Test. Among motricity scales, the most popular are: the Fugl-Meyer Motor Assessment Scale and Södring Motor Evaluation. Gait and walking can also be assessed quantitatively and qualitatively. Recently, the most popular is three-dimensional analysis of movement. This review article presents the current possibilities of motor assessment in Parkinson`s disease.

  15. Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Model for Terbinafine in Rats and Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini-Yeganeh, Mahboubeh; McLachlan, Andrew J.

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PB-PK) model capable of describing and predicting terbinafine concentrations in plasma and tissues in rats and humans. A PB-PK model consisting of 12 tissue and 2 blood compartments was developed using concentration-time data for tissues from rats (n = 33) after intravenous bolus administration of terbinafine (6 mg/kg of body weight). It was assumed that all tissues except skin and testis tissues were well-stirred compartments with perfusion rate limitations. The uptake of terbinafine into skin and testis tissues was described by a PB-PK model which incorporates a membrane permeability rate limitation. The concentration-time data for terbinafine in human plasma and tissues were predicted by use of a scaled-up PB-PK model, which took oral absorption into consideration. The predictions obtained from the global PB-PK model for the concentration-time profile of terbinafine in human plasma and tissues were in close agreement with the observed concentration data for rats. The scaled-up PB-PK model provided an excellent prediction of published terbinafine concentration-time data obtained after the administration of single and multiple oral doses in humans. The estimated volume of distribution at steady state (Vss) obtained from the PB-PK model agreed with the reported value of 11 liters/kg. The apparent volume of distribution of terbinafine in skin and adipose tissues accounted for 41 and 52%, respectively, of the Vss for humans, indicating that uptake into and redistribution from these tissues dominate the pharmacokinetic profile of terbinafine. The PB-PK model developed in this study was capable of accurately predicting the plasma and tissue terbinafine concentrations in both rats and humans and provides insight into the physiological factors that determine terbinafine disposition. PMID:12069977

  16. Establishment of an induced rat model of malignant pleural mesothelioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Dan; Wu Beihai; Yang Hongsheng; Song Guangyi

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To establish a convenient and practical malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) model induced by crocidolite in Da Yao, which has a high induction rate and can be used for imaging and multiple experimental studies and is similar to human MPM. Methods 40 mg of crocidolite suspension was injected into the right chest cavity in 100 Wistar rats in the test group, while same amount of sterilized saline water was injected in 20 rats in the control group. The animals were observed daily , and weighted once a month. CT scanning was performed regularly. When the rats were dead or dying, they were dissected immediately and pathological changes were recorded after CT examination. The experiment lasted for 2 years. Results: The overall induction rate was 71.6%. The survival time of the first MPM rat was 285 days. The mean living span of rats with MPM was (469 ± 21) days. The pathological features of the induced MPMs were multiple morphologically and there were some CT features in different periods. CT imaging could show some MPM features and find the tumour earlier. Conclusion: The cause, positions, tissues and clinical condition of induced tumors were the same as humans. The model had a higher similarity with human MPM in differentiation degree and histological type, and the model can be used to study the mechanism of MPM, to discuss the measures of prevention, and to guide clinical diagnosis and treatment. Multi-morphology of the history from the induced tumors could make up the shortage, which was the difficulty in getting all periods of tissue samples in clinical research and being used in imaging and many kinds of researches. It was a valuable animal model to study MPM. (authors)

  17. Acoustic noise improves motor learning in spontaneously hypertensive rats, a rat model of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Söderlund, Göran B W; Eckernäs, Daniel; Holmblad, Olof; Bergquist, Filip

    2015-03-01

    The spontaneously hypertensive (SH) rat model of ADHD displays impaired motor learning. We used this characteristic to study if the recently described acoustic noise benefit in learning in children with ADHD is also observed in the SH rat model. SH rats and a Wistar control strain were trained in skilled reach and rotarod running under either ambient noise or in 75 dBA white noise. In other animals the effect of methylphenidate (MPH) on motor learning was assessed with the same paradigms. To determine if acoustic noise influenced spontaneous motor activity, the effect of acoustic noise was also determined in the open field activity paradigm. We confirm impaired motor learning in the SH rat compared to Wistar SCA controls. Acoustic noise restored motor learning in SH rats learning the Montoya reach test and the rotarod test, but had no influence on learning in Wistar rats. Noise had no effect on open field activity in SH rats, but increased corner time in Wistar. MPH completely restored rotarod learning and performance but did not improve skilled reach in the SH rat. It is suggested that the acoustic noise benefit previously reported in children with ADHD is shared by the SH rat model of ADHD, and the effect is in the same range as that of stimulant treatment. Acoustic noise may be useful as a non-pharmacological alternative to stimulant medication in the treatment of ADHD. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Metabolic topography of Parkinsonism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae Seung [Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-04-15

    Parkinson's disease is one of the most frequent neurodegenerative diseases, which mainly affects the elderly. Parkinson's disease is often difficult to differentiate from atypical parkinson disorder such as progressive supranuclear palsy, multiple system atrophy, dementia with Lewy body, and corticobasal ganglionic degeneration, based on the clinical findings because of the similarity of phenotypes and lack of diagnostic markers. The accurate diagnosis of Parkinson's disease and atypical Parkinson disorders is not only important for deciding on treatment regimens and providing prognosis, but also it is critical for studies designed to investigate etiology and pathogenesis of parkinsonism and to develop new therapeutic strategies. Although degeneration of the nigrostriatal dopamine system results in marked loss of striatal dopamine content in most of the diseases causing parkinsonism, pathologic studies revealed different topographies of the neuronal cell loss in Parkinsonism. Since the regional cerebral glucose metabolism is a marker of integrated local synaptic activity and as such is sensitive to both direct neuronal/synaptic damage and secondary functional disruption at synapses distant from the primary site of pathology, and assessment of the regional cerebral glucose metabolism with F-18 FDG PET is useful in the differential diagnosis of parkinsonism and evaluating the pathophysiology of Parkinsonism.

  19. Metabolic topography of Parkinsonism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jae Seung

    2007-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is one of the most frequent neurodegenerative diseases, which mainly affects the elderly. Parkinson's disease is often difficult to differentiate from atypical parkinson disorder such as progressive supranuclear palsy, multiple system atrophy, dementia with Lewy body, and corticobasal ganglionic degeneration, based on the clinical findings because of the similarity of phenotypes and lack of diagnostic markers. The accurate diagnosis of Parkinson's disease and atypical Parkinson disorders is not only important for deciding on treatment regimens and providing prognosis, but also it is critical for studies designed to investigate etiology and pathogenesis of parkinsonism and to develop new therapeutic strategies. Although degeneration of the nigrostriatal dopamine system results in marked loss of striatal dopamine content in most of the diseases causing parkinsonism, pathologic studies revealed different topographies of the neuronal cell loss in Parkinsonism. Since the regional cerebral glucose metabolism is a marker of integrated local synaptic activity and as such is sensitive to both direct neuronal/synaptic damage and secondary functional disruption at synapses distant from the primary site of pathology, and assessment of the regional cerebral glucose metabolism with F-18 FDG PET is useful in the differential diagnosis of parkinsonism and evaluating the pathophysiology of Parkinsonism

  20. Parkinson's Disease: Diagnosis and Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Parkinson's Disease Parkinson's Disease: Diagnosis and Treatment Past Issues / Winter 2014 ... live productive lives and maintain mobility. How is Parkinson's Diagnosed? There are no blood or laboratory tests ...

  1. Genetics Home Reference: Parkinson disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Parkinson disease Parkinson disease Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Parkinson disease is a progressive disorder of the nervous ...

  2. How Is Parkinson's Disease Treated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the entire Parkinson's community. Learn more Get Involved Moving Day Walk Parkinson's Champions Create Your Own Fundraiser Advocate With Us Local Resources Find an Event My PD Story Volunteer ... Support a Moving Day Walker Support a Parkinson's Champion Bequests & Planned ...

  3. Shaofu Zhuyu Decoction Regresses Endometriotic Lesions in a Rat Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guanghui Zhu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The current therapies for endometriosis are restricted by various side effects and treatment outcome has been less than satisfactory. Shaofu Zhuyu Decoction (SZD, a classic traditional Chinese medicinal (TCM prescription for dysmenorrhea, has been widely used in clinical practice by TCM doctors to relieve symptoms of endometriosis. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of SZD on a rat model of endometriosis. Forty-eight female Sprague-Dawley rats with regular estrous cycles went through autotransplantation operation to establish endometriosis model. Then 38 rats with successful ectopic implants were randomized into two groups: vehicle- and SZD-treated groups. The latter were administered SZD through oral gavage for 4 weeks. By the end of the treatment period, the volume of the endometriotic lesions was measured, the histopathological properties of the ectopic endometrium were evaluated, and levels of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA, CD34, and hypoxia inducible factor- (HIF- 1α in the ectopic endometrium were detected with immunohistochemistry. Furthermore, apoptosis was assessed using the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT deoxyuridine 5′-triphosphate (dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL assay. In this study, SZD significantly reduced the size of ectopic lesions in rats with endometriosis, inhibited cell proliferation, increased cell apoptosis, and reduced microvessel density and HIF-1α expression. It suggested that SZD could be an effective therapy for the treatment and prevention of endometriosis recurrence.

  4. Characterization of a frozen shoulder model using immobilization in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Du Hwan; Lee, Kil-Ho; Lho, Yun-Mee; Ha, Eunyoung; Hwang, Ilseon; Song, Kwang-Soon; Cho, Chul-Hyun

    2016-12-08

    The objective of this study was to investigate serial changes for histology of joint capsule and range of motion of the glenohumeral joint after immobilization in rats. We hypothesized that a rat shoulder contracture model using immobilization would be capable of producing effects on the glenohumeral joint similar to those seen in patients with frozen shoulder. Sixty-four Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into one control group (n = 8) and seven immobilization groups (n = 8 per group) that were immobilized with molding plaster for 3 days, or for 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, or 6 weeks. At each time point, eight rats were euthanized for histologic evaluation of the axillary recess and for measurement of the abduction angle. Infiltration of inflammatory cells was found in the synovial tissue until 2 weeks after immobilization. However, inflammatory cells were diminished and fibrosis was dominantly observed in the synovium and subsynovial tissue 3 weeks after immobilization. From 1 week after immobilization, the abduction angle of all immobilization groups at each time point was significantly lower than that of the control group. Our study demonstrated that a rat frozen shoulder model using immobilization generates the pathophysiologic process of inflammation leading to fibrosis on the glenohumeral joint similar to that seen in patients with frozen shoulder. This model was attained within 3 weeks after immobilization. It may serve as a useful tool to investigate pathogenesis at the molecular level and identify potential target genes that are involved in the development of frozen shoulder.

  5. Genital mycoplasmosis in rats: a model for intrauterine infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, M B; Peltier, M; Hillier, M; Crenshaw, B; Reyes, L

    2001-09-01

    Microbial infections of the chorioamnion and amniotic fluid have devastating effects on pregnancy outcome and neonatal morbidity and mortality. The mechanisms by which bacterial pathogens cause adverse effects are best addressed by an animal model of the disease with a naturally-occurring pathogen. Intrauterine infection in humans as well as genital mycoplasmosis in humans and rodents is reviewed. We describe a genital infection in rats, which provides a model for the role of infection in pregnancy, pregnancy wastage, low birth weight, and fetal infection. Infection of Sprague-Dawley rats with Mycoplasma pulmonis either vaginally or intravenously resulted in decreased litter size, increased adverse pregnancy outcome, and in utero transmission of the microorganism to the fetus. Mycoplasma pulmonis is an ideal model to study maternal genital infection during pregnancy, the impact of infections on pregnancy outcome, fetal infection, and maternal-fetal immune interactions.

  6. A Mathematical Model of Levodopa Medication Effect on Basal Ganglia in Parkinson's Disease: An Application to the Alternate Finger Tapping Task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baston, Chiara; Contin, Manuela; Calandra Buonaura, Giovanna; Cortelli, Pietro; Ursino, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    Malfunctions in the neural circuitry of the basal ganglia (BG), induced by alterations in the dopaminergic system, are responsible for an array of motor disorders and milder cognitive issues in Parkinson's disease (PD). Recently Baston and Ursino (2015a) presented a new neuroscience mathematical model aimed at exploring the role of basal ganglia in action selection. The model is biologically inspired and reproduces the main BG structures and pathways, modeling explicitly both the dopaminergic and the cholinergic system. The present work aims at interfacing this neurocomputational model with a compartmental model of levodopa, to propose a general model of medicated Parkinson's disease. Levodopa effect on the striatum was simulated with a two-compartment model of pharmacokinetics in plasma joined with a motor effect compartment. The latter is characterized by the levodopa removal rate and by a sigmoidal relationship (Hill law) between concentration and effect. The main parameters of this relationship are saturation, steepness, and the half-maximum concentration. The effect of levodopa is then summed to a term representing the endogenous dopamine effect, and is used as an external input for the neurocomputation model; this allows both the temporal aspects of medication and the individual patient characteristics to be simulated. The frequency of alternate tapping is then used as the outcome of the whole model, to simulate effective clinical scores. Pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic modeling was preliminary performed on data of six patients with Parkinson's disease (both "stable" and "wearing-off" responders) after levodopa standardized oral dosing over 4 h. Results show that the model is able to reproduce the temporal profiles of levodopa in plasma and the finger tapping frequency in all patients, discriminating between different patterns of levodopa motor response. The more influential parameters are the Hill coefficient, related with the slope of the effect sigmoidal

  7. Combating Combination of Hypertension and Diabetes in Different Rat Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talma Rosenthal

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Rat experimental models are used extensively for studying physiological mechanisms and treatments of hypertension and diabetes co-existence. Each one of these conditions is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD, and the combination of the two conditions is a potent enhancer of CVD. Five major animal models that advanced our understanding of the mechanisms and therapeutic approaches in humans are discussed in this review: Zucker, Goto-Kakizaki, SHROB, SHR/NDmcr-cp and Cohen Rosenthal diabetic hypertensive (CRDH rats. The use of various drugs, such as angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE inhibitors (ACEIs, various angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs, and calcium channel blockers (CCBs, to combat the effects of concomitant pathologies on the combination of diabetes and hypertension, as well as the non-pharmacological approach are reviewed in detail for each rat model. Results from experiments on these models indicate that classical factors contributing to the pathology of hypertension and diabetes combination—Including hypertension, hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia and hyperlipidemia—can now be treated, although these treatments do not completely prevent renal complications. Animal studies have focused on several mechanisms involved in hypertension/diabetes that remain to be translated into clinical medicine, including hypoxia, oxidative stress, and advanced glycation. Several target molecules have been identified that need to be incorporated into a treatment modality. The challenge continues to be the identification and interpretation of the clinical evidence from the animal models and their application to human treatment.

  8. Prevention of injury by resveratrol in a rat model of adenine-induced ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    phosphorous, and fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF-23) in rat urine samples after 2 months of adenine ... parathyroid hormone, phosphorous and FGF-23 levels (p < 0.002). In rats ... cartilage degradation in animal models of arthritis. [11].

  9. Protective effects of Naringin in a rat model of spinal cord ischemia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    generation and downregulating inflammatory markers in an SCI rat model. Keywords: Naringin ... intestinal microflora to yield a metabolite called naringenin ... disease (PD). Moreover .... CAT was significantly reduced in SCII rats compared ...

  10. Parkinson's: another look.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broxmeyer, L

    2002-10-01

    Recent studies in the Parkinson's literature have cited a tuberculosis-like germ called Nocardia as being responsible for Parkinson's disease. Kohbata seemingly cemented a relationship between Nocardia and Parkinson's by finding serologic evidence in 20 of 20 Parkinson's patients, acknowledging that blood tests for Nocardia and the mycobacteria such as tuberculosis often cross-react, as they belong to the same order of bacteria, the Actinomycetales. Besides this difficulty in differentiation, a well-used medical school textbook of microbiology, Atlas, points out that even among experts, different observers may classify the same strain of bacteria as Nocardia or Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Parkinson's: another look is a theoretical article which presents compelling, well-documented evidence for an infectious cause for Parkinson's disease on historical, epidemiological, pharmacologic, microbiological, and biochemical levels.

  11. Cholesterol contributes to dopamine-neuronal loss in MPTP mouse model of Parkinson's disease: Involvement of mitochondrial dysfunctions and oxidative stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajib Paul

    Full Text Available Hypercholesterolemia is a known contributor to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease while its role in the occurrence of Parkinson's disease (PD is only conjecture and far from conclusive. Altered antioxidant homeostasis and mitochondrial functions are the key mechanisms in loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra (SN region of the midbrain in PD. Hypercholesterolemia is reported to cause oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunctions in the cortex and hippocampus regions of the brain in rodents. However, the impact of hypercholesterolemia on the midbrain dopaminergic neurons in animal models of PD remains elusive. We tested the hypothesis that hypercholesterolemia in MPTP model of PD would potentiate dopaminergic neuron loss in SN by disrupting mitochondrial functions and antioxidant homeostasis. It is evident from the present study that hypercholesterolemia in naïve animals caused dopamine neuronal loss in SN with subsequent reduction in striatal dopamine levels producing motor impairment. Moreover, in the MPTP model of PD, hypercholesterolemia exacerbated MPTP-induced reduction of striatal dopamine as well as dopaminergic neurons in SN with motor behavioral depreciation. Activity of mitochondrial complexes, mainly complex-I and III, was impaired severely in the nigrostriatal pathway of hypercholesterolemic animals treated with MPTP. Hypercholesterolemia caused oxidative stress in the nigrostriatal pathway with increased generation of hydroxyl radicals and enhanced activity of antioxidant enzymes, which were further aggravated in the hypercholesterolemic mice with Parkinsonism. In conclusion, our findings provide evidence of increased vulnerability of the midbrain dopaminergic neurons in PD with hypercholesterolemia.

  12. Cholesterol contributes to dopamine-neuronal loss in MPTP mouse model of Parkinson's disease: Involvement of mitochondrial dysfunctions and oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Rajib; Choudhury, Amarendranath; Kumar, Sanjeev; Giri, Anirudha; Sandhir, Rajat; Borah, Anupom

    2017-01-01

    Hypercholesterolemia is a known contributor to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease while its role in the occurrence of Parkinson's disease (PD) is only conjecture and far from conclusive. Altered antioxidant homeostasis and mitochondrial functions are the key mechanisms in loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra (SN) region of the midbrain in PD. Hypercholesterolemia is reported to cause oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunctions in the cortex and hippocampus regions of the brain in rodents. However, the impact of hypercholesterolemia on the midbrain dopaminergic neurons in animal models of PD remains elusive. We tested the hypothesis that hypercholesterolemia in MPTP model of PD would potentiate dopaminergic neuron loss in SN by disrupting mitochondrial functions and antioxidant homeostasis. It is evident from the present study that hypercholesterolemia in naïve animals caused dopamine neuronal loss in SN with subsequent reduction in striatal dopamine levels producing motor impairment. Moreover, in the MPTP model of PD, hypercholesterolemia exacerbated MPTP-induced reduction of striatal dopamine as well as dopaminergic neurons in SN with motor behavioral depreciation. Activity of mitochondrial complexes, mainly complex-I and III, was impaired severely in the nigrostriatal pathway of hypercholesterolemic animals treated with MPTP. Hypercholesterolemia caused oxidative stress in the nigrostriatal pathway with increased generation of hydroxyl radicals and enhanced activity of antioxidant enzymes, which were further aggravated in the hypercholesterolemic mice with Parkinsonism. In conclusion, our findings provide evidence of increased vulnerability of the midbrain dopaminergic neurons in PD with hypercholesterolemia.

  13. Reducing C-terminal-truncated alpha-synuclein by immunotherapy attenuates neurodegeneration and propagation in Parkinson's disease-like models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Games, Dora; Valera, Elvira; Spencer, Brian; Rockenstein, Edward; Mante, Michael; Adame, Anthony; Patrick, Christina; Ubhi, Kiren; Nuber, Silke; Sacayon, Patricia; Zago, Wagner; Seubert, Peter; Barbour, Robin; Schenk, Dale; Masliah, Eliezer

    2014-07-09

    Parkinson's disease (PD) and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) are common neurodegenerative disorders of the aging population, characterized by progressive and abnormal accumulation of α-synuclein (α-syn). Recent studies have shown that C-terminus (CT) truncation and propagation of α-syn play a role in the pathogenesis of PD/DLB. Therefore, we explored the effect of passive immunization against the CT of α-syn in the mThy1-α-syn transgenic (tg) mouse model, which resembles the striato-nigral and motor deficits of PD. Mice were immunized with the new monoclonal antibodies 1H7, 5C1, or 5D12, all directed against the CT of α-syn. CT α-syn antibodies attenuated synaptic and axonal pathology, reduced the accumulation of CT-truncated α-syn (CT-α-syn) in axons, rescued the loss of tyrosine hydroxylase fibers in striatum, and improved motor and memory deficits. Among them, 1H7 and 5C1 were most effective at decreasing levels of CT-α-syn and higher-molecular-weight aggregates. Furthermore, in vitro studies showed that preincubation of recombinant α-syn with 1H7 and 5C1 prevented CT cleavage of α-syn. In a cell-based system, CT antibodies reduced cell-to-cell propagation of full-length α-syn, but not of the CT-α-syn that lacked the 118-126 aa recognition site needed for antibody binding. Furthermore, the results obtained after lentiviral expression of α-syn suggest that antibodies might be blocking the extracellular truncation of α-syn by calpain-1. Together, these results demonstrate that antibodies against the CT of α-syn reduce levels of CT-truncated fragments of the protein and its propagation, thus ameliorating PD-like pathology and improving behavioral and motor functions in a mouse model of this disease. Copyright © 2014 the authors 0270-6474/14/349441-14$15.00/0.

  14. Early Postnatal but Not Late Adult Neurogenesis Is Impaired in the Pitx3-Mutant Animal Model of Parkinson's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moritz D. Brandt

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The generation of new neurons in the adult dentate gyrus has functional implications for hippocampal formation. Reduced hippocampal neurogenesis has been described in various animal models of hippocampal dysfunction such as dementia and depression, which are both common non-motor-symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD. As dopamine plays an important role in regulating precursor cell proliferation, the loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra (SN in PD may be related to the reduced neurogenesis observed in the neurogenic regions of the adult brain: subventricular zone (SVZ and dentate gyrus (DG. Here we examined adult hippocampal neurogenesis in the Pitx3-mutant mouse model of PD (aphakia mice, which phenotypically shows a selective embryonic degeneration of dopamine neurons within the SN and to a smaller extent in the ventral tegmental area (VTA. Proliferating cells were labeled with BrdU in aphakia mice and healthy controls from 3 to 42 weeks of age. Three weeks old mutant mice showed an 18% reduction of proliferating cells in the DG and of 26% in the SVZ. Not only proliferation but also the number of new neurons was impaired in young aphakia mice resulting in 33% less newborn cells 4 weeks after BrdU-labeling. Remarkably, however, the decline in the number of proliferating cells in the neurogenic regions vanished in older animals (8–42 weeks indicating that aging masks the effect of dopamine depletion on adult neurogenesis. Region specific reduction in precursor cells proliferation correlated with the extent of dopaminergic degeneration in mesencephalic subregions (VTA and SN, which supports the theory of age- and region-dependent regulatory effects of dopaminergic projections. Physiological stimulation of adult neurogenesis by physical activity (wheel running almost doubled the number of proliferating cells in the dentate gyrus of 8 weeks old aphakia mice to a number comparable to that of wild-type mice, abolishing the slight

  15. Parkinson's disease and anxiety

    OpenAIRE

    Walsh, K; Bennett, G

    2001-01-01

    There has been a recent surge of interest in the subject of anxiety in patients with Parkinson's disease. Up to 40% of patients with Parkinson's disease experience clinically significant anxiety. This anxiety may be a psychological reaction to the stress of the illness or may be related to the neurochemical changes of the disease itself. Antiparkinsonian drugs may have a role in the pathogenesis of the anxiety. The anxiety disorders in Parkinson's disease patients appear to be clustered in th...

  16. Effects of gypenosides on anxiety disorders in MPTP-lesioned mouse model of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Keon Sung; Zhao, Ting Ting; Choi, Hyun Sook; Hwang, Bang Yeon; Lee, Chong Kil; Lee, Myung Koo

    2014-06-03

    Ethanol extract (GP-EX) of Gynostemma pentaphyllum (GP) ameliorates chronic stress-induced anxiety in mice. The present study investigated the effects of gypenoside-enriched components (GPS), GP-EX and water extract of GP (GP-WX) on MPTP lesion-induced affective disorders in C57BL/6 mice. GPS (50mg/kg) and GP-EX (50mg/kg) for 21 day-treatment period improved the symptom of anxiety disorders in the MPTP-lesioned mouse model of PD with or without L-DOPA treatment, which was examined by the elevated plus-maze and marble burying tests. In these states, treatments with GPS (50mg/kg) and GP-EX (50mg/kg) significantly increased the brain levels of dopamine and serotonin in the MPTP-lesioned mouse model of PD with or without l-DOPA treatment. In addition, treatments with GPS (50mg/kg) and GP-EX (50mg/kg) showed protective effects on dopaminergic neurons in MPTP-lesioned mouse model of PD with or without L-DOPA treatment. In contrast, GPS (30 mg/kg) and GP-WX (50mg/kg) showed anxiolytic effects in the same animal models, but it was not significant. These results suggest that GPS (50mg/kg) and GP-EX (50mg/kg) showed anxiolytic effects on affective disorders and protective effects on dopaminergic neurons by modulating the brain levels of dopamine and serotonin in the MPTP-lesioned mouse model of PD with or without l-DOPA treatment. Clinical trials of GPS and GP-EX need to be conducted further so as to develop adjuvant therapeutic agents for PD patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Establishment of reproducible osteosarcoma rat model using orthotopic implantation technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhe; Sun, Honghui; Fan, Qingyu; Long, Hua; Yang, Tongtao; Ma, Bao'an

    2009-05-01

    In experimental musculoskeletal oncology, there remains a need for animal models that can be used to assess the efficacy of new and innovative treatment methodologies for bone tumors. Rat plays a very important role in the bone field especially in the evaluation of metabolic bone diseases. The objective of this study was to develop a rat osteosarcoma model for evaluation of new surgical and molecular methods of treatment for extremity sarcoma. One hundred male SD rats weighing 125.45+/-8.19 g were divided into 5 groups and anesthetized intraperitoneally with 10% chloral hydrate. Orthotopic implantation models of rat osteosarcoma were performed by injecting directly into the SD rat femur with a needle for inoculation with SD tumor cells. In the first step of the experiment, 2x10(5) to 1x10(6) UMR106 cells in 50 microl were injected intraosseously into median or distal part of the femoral shaft and the tumor take rate was determined. The second stage consisted of determining tumor volume, correlating findings from ultrasound with findings from necropsia and determining time of survival. In the third stage, the orthotopically implanted tumors and lung nodules were resected entirely, sectioned, and then counter stained with hematoxylin and eosin for histopathologic evaluation. The tumor take rate was 100% for implants with 8x10(5) tumor cells or more, which was much less than the amount required for subcutaneous implantation, with a high lung metastasis rate of 93.0%. Ultrasound and necropsia findings matched closely (r=0.942; p<0.01), which demonstrated that Doppler ultrasonography is a convenient and reliable technique for measuring cancer at any stage. Tumor growth curve showed that orthotopically implanted tumors expanded vigorously with time-lapse, especially in the first 3 weeks. The median time of survival was 38 days and surgical mortality was 0%. The UMR106 cell line has strong carcinogenic capability and high lung metastasis frequency. The present rat

  18. Creation of Consistent Burn Wounds: A Rat Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elijah Zhengyang Cai

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background Burn infliction techniques are poorly described in rat models. An accurate study can only be achieved with wounds that are uniform in size and depth. We describe a simple reproducible method for creating consistent burn wounds in rats. Methods Ten male Sprague-Dawley rats were anesthetized and dorsum shaved. A 100 g cylindrical stainless-steel rod (1 cm diameter was heated to 100℃ in boiling water. Temperature was monitored using a thermocouple. We performed two consecutive toe-pinch tests on different limbs to assess the depth of sedation. Burn infliction was limited to the loin. The skin was pulled upwards, away from the underlying viscera, creating a flat surface. The rod rested on its own weight for 5, 10, and 20 seconds at three different sites on each rat. Wounds were evaluated for size, morphology and depth. Results Average wound size was 0.9957 cm2 (standard deviation [SD] 0.1845 (n=30. Wounds created with duration of 5 seconds were pale, with an indistinct margin of erythema. Wounds of 10 and 20 seconds were well-defined, uniformly brown with a rim of erythema. Average depths of tissue damage were 1.30 mm (SD 0.424, 2.35 mm (SD 0.071, and 2.60 mm (SD 0.283 for duration of 5, 10, 20 seconds respectively. Burn duration of 5 seconds resulted in full-thickness damage. Burn duration of 10 seconds and 20 seconds resulted in full-thickness damage, involving subjacent skeletal muscle. Conclusions This is a simple reproducible method for creating burn wounds consistent in size and depth in a rat burn model.

  19. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Help with Freezing Episodes? OHSU - Parkinson's Disease: Pharmacological Management of ... or Team Approach Important? OHSU - Therapeutic Approaches for PD: Depression, Anxiety & ...

  20. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... have better quality of life. Learn More Research Research We Fund Parkinson's Outcomes Project Grant Opportunities Science News & Progress Patient Engagement Research Our research has ...

  1. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Medical Planning Tips for Care Partners Nurse Webinars: Nursing Solutions: Innovations in PD Nurse Education CareMAP: Managing Advanced Parkinson's Website Nurse Webinars: Nursing ...

  2. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... live well with Parkinson's disease. Learn More Expert Care Patient Centered Care Centers of Excellence Bringing Care to You Expert Care Programs Professional Education Expert ...

  3. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... CareMAP: Dealing with Dementia OHSU - Parkinson's Disease: Pharmacological Management of Depression, ... Care or Team Approach Important? What Is the Relationship Between Depression and ...

  4. Late-stage alpha-synuclein accumulation in TNWT-61 mouse model of Parkinson's disease detected by diffusion kurtosis imaging

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Khairnar, A.; Rudá-Kučerová, J.; Dražanová, Eva; Szabó, N.; Latta, P.; Arab, A.; Hutter-Paier, B.; Havas, D.; Windisch, M.; Šulcová, A.; Starčuk jr., Zenon; Király, A.; Rektorová, I.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 136, č. 6 (2016), s. 1259-1269 ISSN 0022-3042 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : diffusion kurtosis imaging * diffusion kurtosis imaging * Parkinson's disease * TBSS * TNWT-61 * transgenic mice Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 4.083, year: 2016

  5. induced cerebral injury in a rat model

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: There was a significant decrease in neurological deficit, brain oedema, and volume of ... This is an Open Access article that uses a funding model which does not charge readers or .... Moreover, the percentage of infarct volume was.

  6. Ideal Experimental Rat Models for Liver Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Sang Woo; Kim, Sung Hoon; Min, Seon Ok; Kim, Kyung Sik

    2011-01-01

    There are many limitations for conducting liver disease research in human beings due to the high cost and potential ethical issues. For this reason, conducting a study that is difficult to perform in humans using appropriate animal models, can be beneficial in ascertaining the pathological physiology, and in developing new treatment modalities. However, it is difficult to determine the appropriate animal model which is suitable for research purposes, since every patient has different and dive...

  7. Alpha-synuclein mutations impair axonal regeneration in models of Parkinson´s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars eTönges

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The dopaminergic (DAergic nigrostriatal tract has an intrinsic regenerative capacity which can be impaired in Parkinson’s disease (PD. Alpha-synuclein (aSyn is a major pathogenic component in PD but its impact on DAergic axonal regeneration is largely unknown. In this study, we expressed pathogenic variants of human aSyn by means of recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors in experimental paradigms of DAergic regeneration. In a scratch lesion model in vitro, both aSyn(A30P and aSyn(A53T significantly reduced DAergic neurite regeneration and induced loss of TH-immunopositive cells while aSyn(WT showed only minor cellular neurotoxic effects. The striatal density of TH-immunopositive axons in the striatal 6-OHDA lesion mouse model was attenuated only by aSyn(A30P. However, striatal expression levels of the regeneration marker GAP-43 in TH-immunopositive fibers were reduced by both aSyn(A30P and aSyn(A53T, but not by aSyn(WT which was associated with an activation of the ROCK signaling pathway. Nigral DAergic cell loss was only mildly enhanced by additional overexpression of aSyn variants. Our findings indicate that mutations of aSyn have a strong impact on the regenerative capacity of DAergic neurons, which may contribute to their pathogenic effects.

  8. Assessment of symptomatic and neuroprotective efficacy of Mucuna pruriens seed extract in rodent model of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasture, Sanjay; Pontis, Silvia; Pinna, Annalisa; Schintu, Nicoletta; Spina, Liliana; Longoni, Rosanna; Simola, Nicola; Ballero, Mauro; Morelli, Micaela

    2009-02-01

    Mucuna pruriens (MP) has long been used in Indian traditional medicine as support in the treatment of Parkinson's disease. However, no systematic preclinical studies that aimed at evaluating the efficacy of this substance are available to date. This study undertook an extensive evaluation of the antiparkinsonian effects of an extract of MP seeds known to contain, among other components, 12.5% L: -dihydroxyphenylalanine (L: -DOPA), as compared to equivalent doses of L: -DOPA. Moreover, the neuroprotective efficacy of MP and its potential rewarding effects were evaluated. The results obtained reveal how an acute administration of MP extract at a dose of 16 mg/kg (containing 2 mg/kg of L: -DOPA) consistently antagonized the deficit in latency of step initiation and adjusting step induced by a unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesion, whereas L: -DOPA was equally effective only at the doses of 6 mg/kg. At the same dosage, MP significantly improved the placement of the forelimb in vibrissae-evoked forelimb placing, suggesting a significant antagonistic activity on both motor and sensory-motor deficits. The effects of MP extract were moreover investigated by means of the turning behavior test and in the induction of abnormal involuntary movements (AIMs) after either acute or subchronic administration. MP extract acutely induced a significantly higher contralateral turning behavior than L: -DOPA (6 mg/kg) when administered at a dose of 48 mg/kg containing 6 mg/kg of L: -DOPA. On subchronic administration, both MP extract (48 mg/kg) and L: -DOPA (6 mg/kg) induced sensitization of contralateral turning behavior; however, L: -DOPA alone induced a concomitant sensitization in AIMs suggesting that the dyskinetic potential of MP is lower than that of L: -DOPA. MP (48 mg/kg) was also effective in antagonizing tremulous jaw movements induced by tacrine, a validated test reproducing parkinsonian tremor. Furthermore, MP induced no compartment preference in the place preference test

  9. The concentration of kynurenine in rat model of asthma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Mroczko

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease that involves the immune system activation. Evidence is accumulating about the role of kynurenine pathway in the immune system regulation. The kynurenine pathway includes several metabolites of tryptophan, among others kynurenine (KYN. To study the immunological system regulation in asthma a simple and sensitive models of asthma are required. In the present study we induced rat model of asthma using ovalbumin (OVA sensitization followed by challenge with OVA. The development of asthma has been confirmed by plasma total IgE measurement and the histological examination. The concentration of KYN has been determined in plasma, lungs and liver by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC. In OVA sensitized rats the concentration of total IgE was statistically significantly increased as compared to VEH sensitized control groups (437.6 +/- 97.7 kU/l vs 159.2 +/- 22.7 kU/l, respectively; p< 0.01. In asthmatic animals, the number of eosinophils, neutrophils and mast cells increased considerably, and epithelial lesion and the increase in airway epithelium goblet cells and edema of bronchial mucosa were present. We did not observe any significant changes in the concentration of KYN in plasma, lungs or liver between studied groups. In conclusion, the concentration of KYN remains unchanged in asthmatic animals as compared to control groups. Further studies using rat model of asthma are warranted to establish the role of kynurenine pathway regulation in asthma.

  10. Aerosol Infection Model of Tuberculosis in Wistar Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheshagiri Gaonkar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We explored suitability of a rat tuberculosis aerosol infection model for investigating the pharmacodynamics of new antimycobacterial agents. Infection of rats via the aerosol route led to a reproducible course of M. tuberculosis infection in the lungs. The pulmonary bacterial load increased logarithmically during the first six weeks, thereafter, the infection stabilized for the next 12 weeks. We observed macroscopically visible granulomas in the lungs with demonstrable acid-fast bacilli and associated histopathology. Rifampicin (RIF at a dose range of 30 to 270 mg/kg exhibited a sharp dose response while isoniazid (INH at a dose range of 10 to 90 mg/kg and ethambutol (EMB at 100 to 1000 mg/kg showed shallow dose responses. Pyrazinamide (PZA had no dose response between 300 and 1000 mg/kg dose range. In a separate time kill study at fixed drug doses (RIF 90 mg/kg, INH 30 mg/kg, EMB 300 mg/kg, and PZA 300 mg/kg the bactericidal effect of all the four drugs increased with longer duration of treatment from two weeks to four weeks. The observed infection profile and therapeutic outcomes in this rat model suggest that it can be used as an additional, pharmacologically relevant efficacy model to develop novel antitubercular compounds at the interface of discovery and development.

  11. Experimental rat lung tumor model with intrabronchial tumor cell implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes Neto, Antero; Simão, Antônio Felipe Leite; Miranda, Samuel de Paula; Mourão, Lívia Talita Cajaseiras; Bezerra, Nilfácio Prado; Almeida, Paulo Roberto Carvalho de; Ribeiro, Ronaldo de Albuquerque

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a rat lung tumor model for anticancer drug testing. Sixty-two female Wistar rats weighing 208 +/- 20 g were anesthetized intraperitoneally with 2.5% tribromoethanol (1 ml/100 g live weight), tracheotomized and intubated with an ultrafine catheter for inoculation with Walker's tumor cells. In the first step of the experiment, a technique was established for intrabronchial implantation of 10(5) to 5 x 10(5) tumor cells, and the tumor take rate was determined. The second stage consisted of determining tumor volume, correlating findings from high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) with findings from necropsia and determining time of survival. The tumor take rate was 94.7% for implants with 4 x 10(5) tumor cells, HRCT and necropsia findings matched closely (r=0.953; p<0.0001), the median time of survival was 11 days, and surgical mortality was 4.8%. The present rat lung tumor model was shown to be feasible: the take rate was high, surgical mortality was negligible and the procedure was simple to perform and easily reproduced. HRCT was found to be a highly accurate tool for tumor diagnosis, localization and measurement and may be recommended for monitoring tumor growth in this model.

  12. The Fischer 344 rat as a model of presbycusis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syka, Josef

    2010-06-01

    Due to the rising number of the aged human population all over the world, presbycusis is a phenomenon that deserves the increasing attention of the medical community as regards to prevention and treatment. This requires finding appropriate animal models for human presbycusis that will be useful in future experiments. Among the available rat strains, the Fischer 344 (F344) strain promises to serve as a model producing prompt and profound presbycusis. Hearing thresholds begin to increase in this strain during the first year of life; toward the end of the second year, the thresholds are very high. The threshold shifts progress independently in both ears. The rapid deterioration of distortion product otoacoustic emissions, with the majority of outer hair cells (OHC) being present and morphologically intact, is apparently produced by the disruption of prestin. The age-related changes within inner ear function are accompanied by deterioration of acoustical signal processing within central auditory system, mainly due to impaired GABA inhibition. The loss of GABA inhibition in old animals is expressed primarily in the inferior colliculus but is also present in the cochlear nuclei and the auditory cortex. Sound-evoked behavioral reactions are also impaired in old F344 rats. Taken together, the described characteristics of the aging F344 rat auditory system supports the idea that this strain may serve as a suitable model for studying the mechanisms of presbycusis, its prevention and treatment. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Mathematical model of glucose-insulin homeostasis in healthy rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombarte, Mercedes; Lupo, Maela; Campetelli, German; Basualdo, Marta; Rigalli, Alfredo

    2013-10-01

    According to the World Health Organization there are over 220 million people in the world with diabetes and 3.4 million people died in 2004 as a consequence of this pathology. Development of an artificial pancreas would allow to restore control of blood glucose by coupling an infusion pump to a continuous glucose sensor in the blood. The design of such a device requires the development and application of mathematical models which represent the gluco-regulatory system. Models developed by other research groups describe very well the gluco-regulatory system but have a large number of mathematical equations and require complex methodologies for the estimation of its parameters. In this work we propose a mathematical model to study the homeostasis of glucose and insulin in healthy rats. The proposed model consists of three differential equations and 8 parameters that describe the variation of: blood glucose concentration, blood insulin concentration and amount of glucose in the intestine. All parameters were obtained by setting functions to the values of glucose and insulin in blood obtained after oral glucose administration. In vivo and in silico validations were performed. Additionally, a qualitative analysis has been done to verify the aforementioned model. We have shown that this model has a single, biologically consistent equilibrium point. This model is a first step in the development of a mathematical model for the type I diabetic rat. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. An improved experimental model for peripheral neuropathy in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Q.M. Dias

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available A modification of the Bennett and Xie chronic constriction injury model of peripheral painful neuropathy was developed in rats. Under tribromoethanol anesthesia, a single ligature with 100% cotton glace thread was placed around the right sciatic nerve proximal to its trifurcation. The change in the hind paw reflex threshold after mechanical stimulation observed with this modified model was compared to the change in threshold observed in rats subjected to the Bennett and Xie or the Kim and Chung spinal ligation models. The mechanical threshold was measured with an automated electronic von Frey apparatus 0, 2, 7, and 14 days after surgery, and this threshold was compared to that measured in sham rats. All injury models produced significant hyperalgesia in the operated hind limb. The modified model produced mean ± SD thresholds in g (19.98 ± 3.08, 14.98 ± 1.86, and 13.80 ± 1.00 at 2, 7, and 14 days after surgery, respectively similar to those obtained with the spinal ligation model (20.03 ± 1.99, 13.46 ± 2.55, and 12.46 ± 2.38 at 2, 7, and 14 days after surgery, respectively, but less variable when compared to the Bennett and Xie model (21.20 ± 8.06, 18.61 ± 7.69, and 18.76 ± 6.46 at 2, 7, and 14 days after surgery, respectively. The modified method required less surgical skill than the spinal nerve ligation model.

  15. An improved experimental model for peripheral neuropathy in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dias, Q.M.; Rossaneis, A.C.; Fais, R.S.; Prado, W.A.

    2013-01-01

    A modification of the Bennett and Xie chronic constriction injury model of peripheral painful neuropathy was developed in rats. Under tribromoethanol anesthesia, a single ligature with 100% cotton glace thread was placed around the right sciatic nerve proximal to its trifurcation. The change in the hind paw reflex threshold after mechanical stimulation observed with this modified model was compared to the change in threshold observed in rats subjected to the Bennett and Xie or the Kim and Chung spinal ligation models. The mechanical threshold was measured with an automated electronic von Frey apparatus 0, 2, 7, and 14 days after surgery, and this threshold was compared to that measured in sham rats. All injury models produced significant hyperalgesia in the operated hind limb. The modified model produced mean ± SD thresholds in g (19.98 ± 3.08, 14.98 ± 1.86, and 13.80 ± 1.00 at 2, 7, and 14 days after surgery, respectively) similar to those obtained with the spinal ligation model (20.03 ± 1.99, 13.46 ± 2.55, and 12.46 ± 2.38 at 2, 7, and 14 days after surgery, respectively), but less variable when compared to the Bennett and Xie model (21.20 ± 8.06, 18.61 ± 7.69, and 18.76 ± 6.46 at 2, 7, and 14 days after surgery, respectively). The modified method required less surgical skill than the spinal nerve ligation model

  16. An improved experimental model for peripheral neuropathy in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Q.M. Dias

    Full Text Available A modification of the Bennett and Xie chronic constriction injury model of peripheral painful neuropathy was developed in rats. Under tribromoethanol anesthesia, a single ligature with 100% cotton glace thread was placed around the right sciatic nerve proximal to its trifurcation. The change in the hind paw reflex threshold after mechanical stimulation observed with this modified model was compared to the change in threshold observed in rats subjected to the Bennett and Xie or the Kim and Chung spinal ligation models. The mechanical threshold was measured with an automated electronic von Frey apparatus 0, 2, 7, and 14 days after surgery, and this threshold was compared to that measured in sham rats. All injury models produced significant hyperalgesia in the operated hind limb. The modified model produced mean ± SD thresholds in g (19.98 ± 3.08, 14.98 ± 1.86, and 13.80 ± 1.00 at 2, 7, and 14 days after surgery, respectively similar to those obtained with the spinal ligation model (20.03 ± 1.99, 13.46 ± 2.55, and 12.46 ± 2.38 at 2, 7, and 14 days after surgery, respectively, but less variable when compared to the Bennett and Xie model (21.20 ± 8.06, 18.61 ± 7.69, and 18.76 ± 6.46 at 2, 7, and 14 days after surgery, respectively. The modified method required less surgical skill than the spinal nerve ligation model.

  17. An improved experimental model for peripheral neuropathy in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dias, Q.M.; Rossaneis, A.C.; Fais, R.S.; Prado, W.A. [Departamento de Farmacologia, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2013-03-15

    A modification of the Bennett and Xie chronic constriction injury model of peripheral painful neuropathy was developed in rats. Under tribromoethanol anesthesia, a single ligature with 100% cotton glace thread was placed around the right sciatic nerve proximal to its trifurcation. The change in the hind paw reflex threshold after mechanical stimulation observed with this modified model was compared to the change in threshold observed in rats subjected to the Bennett and Xie or the Kim and Chung spinal ligation models. The mechanical threshold was measured with an automated electronic von Frey apparatus 0, 2, 7, and 14 days after surgery, and this threshold was compared to that measured in sham rats. All injury models produced significant hyperalgesia in the operated hind limb. The modified model produced mean ± SD thresholds in g (19.98 ± 3.08, 14.98 ± 1.86, and 13.80 ± 1.00 at 2, 7, and 14 days after surgery, respectively) similar to those obtained with the spinal ligation model (20.03 ± 1.99, 13.46 ± 2.55, and 12.46 ± 2.38 at 2, 7, and 14 days after surgery, respectively), but less variable when compared to the Bennett and Xie model (21.20 ± 8.06, 18.61 ± 7.69, and 18.76 ± 6.46 at 2, 7, and 14 days after surgery, respectively). The modified method required less surgical skill than the spinal nerve ligation model.

  18. A rat model for embolic encephalitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astrup, Lærke Boye; Rasmussen, Rune Skovgaard; Aalbæk, Bent

    2011-01-01

    have recently shown that sepsis is a common cause of microabscesses in the brain, and that S. aureus is one of the most common organisms isolated from these abscesses. This raises the question whether the blood-brain barrier truly makes the brain an immune-privileged organ or not. This makes the brain...... a most interesting organ in sepsis patients. However, symptoms of brain infection may be confused with systemic responses and gross neuropathologic lesions may be absent. Brain infection in sepsis patients is therefore prone to misclassification or diagnostic delay, and when the diagnosis is made...... it is difficult to obtain tissue for further examination. This puts a hard demand on animal models of brain lesions in sepsis. We hereby present a novel animal model of embolic encephalitis. Our model introduces bacteria by an embolus to an area of brain necrosis and damage to the blood-brain...

  19. The Effects of Melatonin with Memantin on MPTP-Induced Parkinson Model in Male Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Talebi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Oxidative stress and severe neuro-excitation have significant effects on pathogenesis of Parkinson’s disease and agents with antioxidant property can potentially prevent these effects. Herein we examined potential protective effects of melatonin as an antioxidant agent and memantine as an uncompetitive receptor of NMDA, on a model of Parkinson’s disease induced by 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1, 2, 3, 6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP. Materials and Methods: Male mice were divided into 8 groups with 7 mice in each group: saline, ethanol, melatonin, memantin, MPTP, melatonin+MPTP, memantin+ MPTP, melatonin+ memantin+ MPTP. All of agents were injected intraperitoneally once a day for 14 days before beam traversal test. Dopaminergic neurons of the Substantia Nigra Pars compacta (SNPC were determined by immunohistochemical and were counted. Results: Melatonin improved notably movement dysfunction resulted of MPTP such as the number of errors, paces and the time of movement during behavioral test and also the counting of neurons of Substantia Nigra Pars Compacta. Memantin had a synergic effect on the most of improvements. However, the level of improvement and retrieval of signs was not as in saline and ethanol groups. Conclusion: Melatonin especially together with memantine is able to prevent some of the MPTP-induced dysfunctions. However, the protective effects were not enogh, probably because of the amount of dose and the time of injection.

  20. Stratifying Parkinson's Patients With STN-DBS Into High-Frequency or 60 Hz-Frequency Modulation Using a Computational Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khojandi, Anahita; Shylo, Oleg; Mannini, Lucia; Kopell, Brian H; Ramdhani, Ritesh A

    2017-07-01

    High frequency stimulation (HFS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is a well-established therapy for Parkinson's disease (PD), particularly the cardinal motor symptoms and levodopa induced motor complications. Recent studies have suggested the possible role of 60 Hz stimulation in STN-deep brain stimulation (DBS) for patients with gait disorder. The objective of this study was to develop a computational model, which stratifies patients a priori based on symptomatology into different frequency settings (i.e., high frequency or 60 Hz). We retrospectively analyzed preoperative MDS-Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale III scores (32 indicators) collected from 20 PD patients implanted with STN-DBS at Mount Sinai Medical Center on either 60 Hz stimulation (ten patients) or HFS (130-185 Hz) (ten patients) for an average of 12 months. Predictive models using the Random Forest classification algorithm were built to associate patient/disease characteristics at surgery to the stimulation frequency. These models were evaluated objectively using leave-one-out cross-validation approach. The computational models produced, stratified patients into 60 Hz or HFS (130-185 Hz) with 95% accuracy. The best models relied on two or three predictors out of the 32 analyzed for classification. Across all predictors, gait and rest tremor of the right hand were consistently the most important. Computational models were developed using preoperative clinical indicators in PD patients treated with STN-DBS. These models were able to accurately stratify PD patients into 60 Hz stimulation or HFS (130-185 Hz) groups a priori, offering a unique potential to enhance the utilization of this therapy based on clinical subtypes. © 2017 International Neuromodulation Society.