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Sample records for rat parasympathetic ganglia

  1. Anatomical study of the roots of cranial parasympathetic ganglia: a contribution to medical education.

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    Lovasova, Kvetuse; Sulla, Igor J; Bolekova, Adriana; Sulla, Igor; Kluchova, Darina

    2013-05-01

    A major key to increasing the safety of cranial surgery is a thorough understanding of anatomy. The anatomy of the head is of fundamental interest to dental and medical students early in their studies. Clinically, it is mostly relevant to surgeons who are performing interventions and reconstruction in the maxillofacial region, skull base, and the orbit. However, the level of appropriate anatomical knowledge necessary for general and special medical and surgical practice is still under discussion. This study maps the significant areas and structures of the head that are not normally accessible during dissection courses because of time and difficulties involved in the preparation. The detailed photodocumentation enriched by diagrams provides a view of structures until now only partially documented. Three parasympathetic ganglia are located in hardly accessible areas of the head - inside the orbit, infratemporal fossa, and in the pterygopalatine fossa. No detailed photographs have been found in current anatomical textbooks and atlases in relation to the morphology of fibers (roots) connected to the ciliary, otic, and pterygopalatine ganglia. Therefore, this study focused on the detailed display of sensory, sympathetic, and parasympathetic roots of ganglia to provide relevant photodocumentation and an improvement in human anatomy teaching. This study also confirms that cadaver dissection provides an excellent opportunity for the integration of anatomy and clinical medicine into the early clinical training of undergraduate dental and medical students. We believe this article, because of the details mentioned above, will be beneficial not only for the future anatomical undergraduate but also for postgraduate education.

  2. Morphology of parasympathetic neurons innervating rat lingual salivary glands.

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    Kim, Miwon; Chiego, Daniel J; Bradley, Robert M

    2004-03-31

    Saliva is essential for taste function and not only does saliva influence taste reception, but also taste perception initiates salivation. As a first step in investigating circuits involved in gustatory-salivary reflexes, we have studied the morphology of the rat inferior salivatory nucleus (ISN), which contains parasympathetic secretomotor neurons that control the parotid and lingual (von Ebner) salivary glands. By applying the fluorescent label Fluorogold to the cut end of the glossopharyngeal nerve, the neurons supplying only the lingual salivary glands were labeled. Confocal microscopy and three-dimensional reconstruction were used to analyze the labeled neurons in the horizontal plane to determine their morphological characteristics. Additional neurons were studied in the coronal plane to determine the influence of the plane of section on neuron morphology. Reconstructions indicated that inferior salivatory neurons extend in a rostral-caudal distribution just adjacent to the medial border of the nucleus of the solitary tract (NST). There is considerable morphological variability among neurons, with neurons having up to 6 primary dendrites and 17 dendritic segments that extend a maximum of 834 microm from the soma. However, although ISN neurons vary in the size and complexity of their dendritic trees, distributions of all measures of neuron morphology are unimodal, indicating that distinct groups of neurons are not revealed based on these measures. There is, however, variability in the orientation pattern of the dendritic trees that is not represented in either the population or mean measures. Individual neurons can be categorized with either mediolateral, rostro-caudal or no apparent preferred orientation. Comparisons of neurons in rostral, intermediate or caudal third of the ISN revealed regional differences in neuron morphology; neurons in the caudal third have significantly longer dendrites than those in the intermediate or rostral third. Thus, while ISN

  3. Hypertrophy of neurons within cardiac ganglia in human, canine, and rat heart failure: the potential role of nerve growth factor.

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    Singh, Sanjay; Sayers, Scott; Walter, James S; Thomas, Donald; Dieter, Robert S; Nee, Lisa M; Wurster, Robert D

    2013-08-19

    Autonomic imbalances including parasympathetic withdrawal and sympathetic overactivity are cardinal features of heart failure regardless of etiology; however, mechanisms underlying these imbalances remain unknown. Animal model studies of heart and visceral organ hypertrophy predict that nerve growth factor levels should be elevated in heart failure; whether this is so in human heart failure, though, remains unclear. We tested the hypotheses that neurons in cardiac ganglia are hypertrophied in human, canine, and rat heart failure and that nerve growth factor, which we hypothesize is elevated in the failing heart, contributes to this neuronal hypertrophy. Somal morphology of neurons from human (579.54±14.34 versus 327.45±9.17 μm(2); Phypertrophy of neurons in cardiac ganglia compared with controls. Western blot analysis shows that nerve growth factor levels in the explanted, failing human heart are 250% greater than levels in healthy donor hearts. Neurons from cardiac ganglia cultured with nerve growth factor are significantly larger and have greater dendritic arborization than neurons in control cultures. Hypertrophied neurons are significantly less excitable than smaller ones; thus, hypertrophy of vagal postganglionic neurons in cardiac ganglia would help to explain the parasympathetic withdrawal that accompanies heart failure. Furthermore, our observations suggest that nerve growth factor, which is elevated in the failing human heart, causes hypertrophy of neurons in cardiac ganglia.

  4. The parasympathetic responsiveness in young and aged rats : Involvement of aminergic and vasopressinergic mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buwalda, Bauke

    1992-01-01

    The studies presented in this thesis were designed to investigate whether the decline in parasympathetic responsiveness to stress in aged rats can be generalized for various (environmental) challenges. In addition, the contribution of this reduced vagal responsiveness in aged animals to autonomic

  5. Electroacupuncture at ST37 Enhances Jejunal Motility via Excitation of the Parasympathetic System in Rats and Mice

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    Yuan, Mengqian; Li, Yuqin; Wang, Yidan; Zhang, Na; Hu, XuanMing; Yin, Yin; Zhu, Bing

    2016-01-01

    Background. The roles of the sympathetic and parasympathetic systems in mediating the effect of electroacupuncture (EA) at ST37 on jejunal motility have yet to be demonstrated. Aim. We used rats and mice to investigate the effect and mechanism of action of EA at ST37 on jejunal motility. Methods. Jejunal motility was recorded by a balloon placed in the jejunum and connected to a biological signal collection system through a transducer. The effects of EA (3 mA) at ST37 were evaluated in Sprague-Dawley rats without drugs and with the administration of clenbuterol, propranolol, acetylcholine, and atropine. Further, the efficacy of EA at different intensities (1/2/4/6/8 mA) was measured in wild-type mice and β1β2−/− mice and M2M3−/− mice. Results. In Sprague-Dawley rats, the excitatory effect of EA at ST37 on jejunal motility disappeared in the presence of the muscarinic receptor antagonist atropine. EA at ST37 was less effective in M2M3−/− mice than in wild-type mice. Furthermore, to a certain extent, there existed “intensity-response” relationship between jejunal motility and EA. Conclusions. EA at ST37 can enhance jejunal motility in rats and mice mainly via excitation of the parasympathetic pathway. There is an “intensity-response” relationship between EA and effect on jejunal motility.

  6. Neuronal counting and parasympathetic dysfunction in the hearts of chronically Trypanosoma cruzi - infected rats Contagem neuronal e disfunção cardíaca parassimpática em ratos cronicamente infectados pelo Trypanosoma cruzi

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    E. Chapadeiro

    1991-10-01

    Full Text Available Ten male Wistar rats, chronically infected with Colombian, São Felipe (12SF and Y strains of Trypanosoma cruzi and ten non-infected control animals were submitted to the bradycardia responsiveness test, an assessment of heart parasympathetic function, after phenylephrine injection. Six chagasic animals showed heart parasympathetic dysfuntion characterized by reduction in the index of bradycardia baroreflex responsiveness, as compared with the control group. Microscopic examination of the atrial heart ganglia of chagasic rats showed ganglionitis, but no statiscally significant reduction in the number of neurons.Dez ratos machos Wistar cronicamente infectados pelas cepas Colombiana, São Felipe (12SF, e Y do Trypanosoma cruzi, foram submetidos, após 8 meses de infecção, juntamente com dez animais controles, ao teste da resposta bradicárdica barorreflexa pela injeção endovenosa de fenilefrina. Seis ratos chagásicos exibiram disfunção cardíaca parassimpática, caracterizada pela depressão do índice da resposta bradicárdica barorreflexa. Embora o estudo histológico dos corações chagásicos mostrasse lesões dos gânglios atriais, a contagem dos neurônios em cortes seriados, não apresentou redução numérica significativa dos mesmos.

  7. Forebrain parasympathetic control of heart activity : retrograde transneuronal viral labeling in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ter Horst, GJ; Postema, F

    1997-01-01

    Dysfunction of parasympathetic command neurons may be a cause of cardiac autonomic imbalance, which has been implicated as a pathogenic mechanism of lethal arrhythmias. The locations in the brain of these command neurons are not known. The aim of this investigation is to identify selectively the par

  8. CNS CELL GROUPS PROJECTING TO THE SUBMANDIBULAR PARASYMPATHETIC PREGANGLIONIC NEURONS IN THE RAT - A RETROGRADE TRANSNEURONAL VIRAL CELL BODY LABELING STUDY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    JANSEN, ASP; TERHORST, GJ; METTENLEITER, TC; LOEWY, AD

    1992-01-01

    The retrograde transneuronal viral tracing method was used to study the CNS nuclei that innervate the parasympathetic preganglionic neurons controlling the submandibular gland in the rat. A genetically engineered beta-galactosidase expressing Bartha strain of pseudorabies virus (PRV) was injected in

  9. The role of sympathetic and parasympathetic nerve systems on the smooth muscle of rat seminal vesicles - experimental results and speculation for physiological implication on ejaculation.

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    Hsieh, J-T; Kuo, Y-C; Chang, H-C; Liu, S-P; Chen, J-H; Tsai, V F S

    2014-01-01

    Ejaculation is a process involving sympathetic and parasympathetic effects during different stages - emission and ejection. Some conditions of ejaculation dysfunction are associated with autonomic nerves. However, the exact effects of autonomic nerves on ejaculation are not well defined. Autonomic agonists induce different recorded trace patterns of seminal vesicular contraction. The different traces contain different components of phasic and tonic contraction, which may have physiological implications. In this study, we examined isolated rat seminal vesicle (SV) contraction by phenylephrine (PE), acetylcholine, and their respective antagonists and then speculated upon physiological roles of sympathetic and parasympathetic nerves on SV during ejaculation. We found that PE and Ach both achieved good contraction of rat SV. Compared to α1b for sympathetic and M1, M2 for parasympathetic receptors, α1a and M3 are the relatively dominant subtypes on rat SV. Adrenergic and cholinergic agonists cause different trace patterns of SV contraction. We speculated that the sympathetic effect is dominant during emission to squeeze seminal fluid out and that the parasympathetic effect is dominant during ejection to provide an anti-reflux effect on the ejaculatory duct.

  10. Calretinin-immunoreactive nerves in the uterus, pelvic autonomic ganglia, lumbosacral dorsal root ganglia and lumbosacral spinal cord.

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    Papka, R E; Collins, J; Copelin, T; Wilson, K

    1999-10-01

    Nerves containing the calcium-binding protein calretinin have been reported in several organs but not in female reproductive organs and associated ganglia. This study was undertaken to determine if nerves associated with the uterus contain calretinin and the source(s) of calretinin-synthesizing nerves in the rat (are they sensory, efferent, or both?). Calretinin-immunoreactive nerves were present in the uterine horns and cervix where they were associated with arteries, uterine smooth muscle, glands, and the epithelium. Calretinin-immunoreactive terminals were apposed to neurons in the paracervical ganglia; in addition, some postganglionic neurons in this ganglion were calretinin positive. Calretinin perikarya were present in the lumbosacral dorsal root ganglia, no-dose ganglia, and lumbosacral spinal cord. Retrograde axonal tracing, utilizing Fluorogold injected into the uterus or paracervical parasympathetic ganglia, revealed calretinin-positive/Fluorogold-labeled neurons in the dorsal root and nodose ganglia. Also, capsaicin treatment substantially reduced the calretinin-positive fibers in the uterus and pelvic ganglia, thus indicating the sensory nature of these fibers. The presence of calretinin immunoreactivity identifies a subset of nerves that are involved in innervation of the pelvic viscera and have origins from lumbosacral dorsal root ganglia and vagal nodose ganglia. Though the exact function of calretinin in these nerves is not currently known, calretinin is likely to play a role in calcium regulation and their function.

  11. Differential Fos expression in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus, sacral parasympathetic nucleus and colonic motor response to water avoidance stress in Fischer and Lewis rats.

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    Million, M; Wang, L; Martinez, V; Taché, Y

    2000-09-22

    The responsiveness of hypothalamic CRF to various stressors is reduced in the young female Lewis relative to the histocompatible Fischer rat. Whether such a difference impacts the brain-gut response to water avoidance stress was investigated by monitoring Fos immunoreactivity in the brain and sacral spinal cord and fecal pellet output. Exposure for 60 min to water avoidance stress increased the number of Fos positive cells in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN), nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS), and the parasympathetic nucleus of the lumbo-sacral spinal cord (L6-S1) in both Lewis and Fischer rats compared with non stress groups. The Fos response was lower by 32.0% in the PVN, and 63% in sacral parasympathetic nucleus in Lewis compared with Fischer rats while similar Fos expression was observed in the NTS. Stress-induced defecation was reduced by 52% in Lewis compared with Fischer rats while colonic motor response to CRF injected intracisternally resulted in a similar pattern and magnitude of defecation in both strains. The CRF receptor antagonist [D-Phe12,Nle(21,38)C(a)MeLeu(37)]-CRF(12-41) injected intracisternally antagonized partly the defecation response in Lewis and Fischer rats. These data indicate that a lower activation of PVN and sacral parasympathetic nuclei in Lewis compared with Fisher rats may contribute to the differential colonic motor response and that the blunted CRF hypothalamic response to stress, unlike responsiveness to central CRF plays a role.

  12. Lateralization of the connections of the ovary to the celiac ganglia in juvenile rats

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    Handal Anabella

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract During the development of the female rat, a maturing process of the factors that regulate the functioning of the ovaries takes place, resulting in different responses according to the age of the animal. Studies show that peripheral innervation is one relevant factor involved. In the present study we analyzed the anatomical relationship between the neurons in the celiac-superior mesenteric ganglia (CSMG, and the right or left ovary in 24 or 28 days old female pre-pubertal rats. The participation of the superior ovarian nerve (SON in the communication between the CSMG and the ovaries was analyzed in animals with unilateral section of the SON, previous to injecting true blue (TB into the ovarian bursa. The animals were killed seven days after treatment. TB stained neurons were quantified at the superior mesenteric-celiac ganglia. The number of labeled neurons in the CSMG of rats treated at 28 days of age was significantly higher than those treated on day 24. At age 24 days, injecting TB into the right ovary resulted in neuron stains on both sides of the celiac ganglia; whereas, injecting the left side the stains were exclusively ipsilateral. Such asymmetry was not observed when the rats were treated at age of 28 days. In younger rats, sectioning the left SON resulted in significantly lower number of stained neurons in the left ganglia while sectioning the right SON did not modify the number of stained neurons. When sectioning of the SON was performed to 28 days old rats, no staining was observed. Present results show that the number and connectivity of post-ganglionic neurons of the CSMG connected to the ovary of juvenile female rats change as the animal mature; that the SON plays a role in this communication process as puberty approaches; and that this maturing process is different for the right or the left ovary.

  13. Parasympathetic involvement in rapid meal-associated conditioned insulin secretion in the rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strubbe, J.H.

    1992-01-01

    Blood glucose and plasma insulin concentrations were measured in blood sampled via a cardiac catheter in freely moving rats. To obtain a rapid conditioned cephalic phase of insulin secretion, rats were habituated to one of two feeding schedules. Clock-activated opening of doors in front of the food

  14. [Participation of parasympathetic part of nervous system in realization of bioflavonoids action on gastric secretion in rats].

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    Vovkun, T V; Yanchuk, P I; Shtanova, L Y; Veselskyy, S P; Shalamay, A S

    2015-01-01

    In this study we investigated the effects of corvitin--modified form of flavonoid quercetin on the stomach secretory function and physiological mechanisms involved in the maintenance of such effects in rat's pylorus-ligated model. In animals which corvitin was injected at a dose of 5 mg/kg, regardless of the route of administration--in the stomach or duodenum, did not observe any changes in the volume of gastric juice or general production of hydrochloric acid, compared with the control data. Dose of 40 mg/kg caused an increase in the volume of gastric juice and hydrochloric acid output as when administered in the stomach and in the duodenum. We also found that after the application of a large dose of corvitin (intragastrically) in the blood of experimental animals showed reduction in glucose levels, which was not detected when using the drug in a dose of 5 mg/kg. Nonspecific antagonist of M-cholinergic receptors--atropine almost completely blocked the enhancement of gastric secretion, which was caused by the introduction into the stomach of corvitin in large dose. From the present data, it is reasonable to conclude that intragastric administration of a large dose of corvitin to pylorus-ligated rats induces hypoglycemic reaction of blood, which may causes an increase in vagus nerve activity with subsequent stimulation of gastric secretion. The increase in gastric juice volume and gastric acid output induced by corvitin was completely inhibited by atropine. These results suggested that the increase in gastric secretion induced by intragastrically administered corvitin could be mediated by the parasympathetic nervous system.

  15. Development of nNOS-positive neurons in the rat sensory ganglia after capsaicin treatment.

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    Masliukov, Petr M; Moiseev, Konstantin Y; Korzina, Marina B; Porseva, Valentina V

    2015-08-27

    To gain a better understanding of the neuroplasticity of afferent neurons during postnatal ontogenesis, the distribution of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) immunoreactivity was studied in the nodose ganglion (NG) and Th2 and L4 dorsal root ganglia (DRG) from vehicle-treated and capsaicin-treated female Wistar rats at different ages (10-day-old, 20-day-old, 30-day-old, and two-month-old). The percentage of nNOS-immunoreactive (IR) neurons decreased after capsaicin treatment in all studied ganglia in first 20 days of life, from 55.4% to 36.9% in the Th2 DRG, from 54.6% to 26.1% in the L4 DRG and from 37.1% to 15.0% in the NG. However, in the NG, the proportion of nNOS-IR neurons increased after day 20, from 11.8% to 23.9%. In the sensory ganglia of all studied rats, a high proportion of nNOS-IR neurons bound isolectin B4. Approximately 90% of the sensory nNOS-IR neurons bound to IB4 in the DRG and approximately 80% in the NG in capsaicin-treated and vehicle-treated rats. In 10-day-old rats, a large number of nNOS-IR neurons also expressed TrkA, and the proportion of nNOS(+)/TrkA(+) neurons was larger in the capsaicin-treated rats compared with the vehicle-treated animals. During development, the percentage of nNOS(+)/TrkA(+) cells decreased in the first month of life in both groups. The information provided here will also serve as a basis for future studies investigating mechanisms of sensory neuron development.

  16. Ketamine-induced oscillations in the motor circuit of the rat basal ganglia.

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    María Jesús Nicolás

    Full Text Available Oscillatory activity can be widely recorded in the cortex and basal ganglia. This activity may play a role not only in the physiology of movement, perception and cognition, but also in the pathophysiology of psychiatric and neurological diseases like schizophrenia or Parkinson's disease. Ketamine administration has been shown to cause an increase in gamma activity in cortical and subcortical structures, and an increase in 150 Hz oscillations in the nucleus accumbens in healthy rats, together with hyperlocomotion.We recorded local field potentials from motor cortex, caudate-putamen (CPU, substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNr and subthalamic nucleus (STN in 20 awake rats before and after the administration of ketamine at three different subanesthetic doses (10, 25 and 50 mg/Kg, and saline as control condition. Motor behavior was semiautomatically quantified by custom-made software specifically developed for this setting.Ketamine induced coherent oscillations in low gamma (~ 50 Hz, high gamma (~ 80 Hz and high frequency (HFO, ~ 150 Hz bands, with different behavior in the four structures studied. While oscillatory activity at these three peaks was widespread across all structures, interactions showed a different pattern for each frequency band. Imaginary coherence at 150 Hz was maximum between motor cortex and the different basal ganglia nuclei, while low gamma coherence connected motor cortex with CPU and high gamma coherence was more constrained to the basal ganglia nuclei. Power at three bands correlated with the motor activity of the animal, but only coherence values in the HFO and high gamma range correlated with movement. Interactions in the low gamma band did not show a direct relationship to movement.These results suggest that the motor effects of ketamine administration may be primarily mediated by the induction of coherent widespread high-frequency activity in the motor circuit of the basal ganglia, together with a frequency

  17. Immunohistochemical detection of ganglia in the rat stomach serosa, containing neurons immunoreactive for gastrin-releasing peptide and vasoactive intestinal peptide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Steen Seier; Holst, J J

    1987-01-01

    Ganglia, not previously described, were identified in the rat stomach serosa along the minor curvature. The ganglia consisted of varying number of cell bodies lying in clusters along or within nerve bundles. The ganglia were shown to contain GRP and VIP immunoreactive nerve fibers and cell bodies...... and also some NPY immunoreactive fibers, whereas they were devoid of somatostatin immunoreactivity. Nerve ligation experiments indicated that the ganglia are intrinsic to the stomach....

  18. Generation of New Neurons in Dorsal Root Ganglia in Adult Rats after Peripheral Nerve Crush Injury

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    Luisa Muratori

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The evidence of neurons generated ex novo in sensory ganglia of adult animals is still debated. In the present study, we investigated, using high resolution light microscopy and stereological analysis, the changes in the number of neurons in dorsal root ganglia after 30 days from a crush lesion of the rat brachial plexus terminal branches. Results showed, as expected, a relevant hypertrophy of dorsal root ganglion neurons. In addition, we reported, for the first time in the literature, that neuronal hypertrophy was accompanied by massive neuronal hyperplasia leading to a 42% increase of the number of primary sensory neurons. Moreover, ultrastructural analyses on sensory neurons showed that there was not a relevant neuronal loss as a consequence of the nerve injury. The evidence of BrdU-immunopositive neurons and neural progenitors labeled with Ki67, nanog, nestin, and sox-2 confirmed the stereological evidence of posttraumatic neurogenesis in dorsal root ganglia. Analysis of morphological changes following axonal damage in addition to immunofluorescence characterization of cell phenotype suggested that the neuronal precursors which give rise to the newly generated neurons could be represented by satellite glial cells that actively proliferate after the lesion and are able to differentiate toward the neuronal lineage.

  19. Spatial segregation within the sacral parasympathetic nucleus of neurons innervating the bladder or the penis of the rat as revealed by three-dimensional reconstruction.

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    Banrezes, B; Andrey, P; Maschino, E; Schirar, A; Peytevin, J; Rampin, O; Maurin, Y

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of the present investigations was (1) to examine the spatial organization of preganglionic neurons of the sacral parasympathetic nucleus in the lumbosacral spinal cord of male adult rats and (2) to search, in this nucleus, for a possible segregation of sub-populations of neurons innervating the penis or the bladder, respectively. To estimate their spatial organization, neurons of the sacral parasympathetic nucleus were retrogradely labeled by wheat germ agglutinin coupled to horseradish peroxidase applied to the central end of the sectioned pelvic nerve. The sub-populations of lumbosacral neurons innervating the corpus cavernosum of the penis or the dome of the bladder were identified using transsynaptic retrograde labeling by pseudorabies virus injected into these organs in different rats. In both wheat germ agglutinin-labeled and pseudorabies virus-labeled rats, serial coronal sections were cut through the spinal L5-S1 segments. Labeled neurons were revealed by histochemistry (peroxidase experiments) or immunohistochemistry (pseudorabies virus experiments). By means of a three-dimensional reconstruction software developed in our laboratory, three-dimensional models were calculated from each spinal section image series. They revealed the spatial organization of (i) preganglionic neurons and (ii) neurons innervating the bladder or the penis. The different three-dimensional models were subsequently merged into a single one which revealed the segregation, within the sacral parasympathetic nucleus, of the sub-populations of neurons. Neurons labeled by virus injected into the penis extended predominantly from the rostral part of the L6 segment to the rostral part of the S1 segment while those labeled by bladder injections were distributed predominantly from the caudal part of the L6 segment to the caudal part of the S1 segment. These results support the hypothesis of a viscerotopic organization of sacral neurons providing the spinal control of pelvic organs.

  20. Gap junctional communication between the satellite cells of rat dorsal root ganglia.

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    Sakuma, E; Wang, H J; Asai, Y; Tamaki, D; Amano, K; Mabuchi, Y; Herbert, D C; Soji, T

    2001-06-01

    Many studies have described the ultrastructure of the dorsal root ganglia in various embryonic and adult animals, but in spite of the efforts of many investigators the functional role of the satellite cells in this tissue is not clearly understood. In this study, we discuss the function of this cell type based on the concept of cell-to-cell interaction through gap junctions. Five male 60 day-old Wistar strain rats were used. All animals were anesthetized with pentobarbital and perfused with glutaraldehyde fixative, then the dorsal root ganglia in levels L4, L5 and L6 were taken from each rat. After postosmication, the specimens were prepared for observation by transmission electron microscopy. All nerve cells were completely surrounded by satellite cell cytoplasmic expansions. The boundaries between adjacent nerve cells and satellite cells were complicated due to the presence of perikaryal projections of nerve cells. Gap junctions which showed the typical trilamellar structure of plasma membranes were found mainly between satellite cell processes belonging to the same nerve cell. On the other hand, some gap junctions were found between the satellite cell projections belonging to different nerve cells. The size of the gap junctions ranged from 300 to 400 nm. No gap junctions were associated with the plasma membrane of any nerve cell. In conclusion, only satellite cells can share free transcellular exchange of cytoplasmic molecules such as ions, amino acids, sugars and several second messengers including cAMP and inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate by way of gap junctions in dorsal root ganglia.

  1. Effects of Extracellular ATP on Survival of Sensory Neurons in the Dorsal Root Ganglia of Rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    ATP was added to the cultured sensory neurons obtained from the dorsal root ganglia of the neonatal rats and PBS was added to serve as control. MTT assays were conducted to evaluate the survival and activity of the cultured neurons. And the silicone regenerative chamber was used after the sciatic nerve incision of the mature SD rat. 1 mmol/L ATP was injected into the left chamber and 0.09 % natrium chloride was injected into the right chamber as controls. The changes of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity in the corresponding dorsal root ganglia were measured histochemically and image analysis was also performed 4 days after the sciatic nerve injury. The results showed that extracellular ATP could enhance the survival of the neurons and the number of NOS positive neurons were significantly different between the ATP and control groups (P<0.05). It was suggested that extracellular ATP had neurotrophic effect on neurons survival and could inhibit the NOS activity of the sensory neurons after the peripheral nerve incision, hence exerting the protective effect on the neurons, which was valuable for nerve regeneration after nerve injury.

  2. Cysteinyl leukotrienes mediate the response of submucosal ganglia from rat colon to bradykinin.

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    Rehn, Matthias; Diener, Martin

    2012-04-15

    The aim of the present study was to find out the mechanism by which the inflammatory mediator, bradykinin, induces an increase of the cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) in enteric neurons. For this purpose, ganglia in the isolated submucosa from rat colon were loaded with the Ca(2+)-sensitive dye, fura-2, and were exposed to bradykinin (2·10(-8)mol/l). Under control conditions, the kinin evoked a transient increase in [Ca(2+)](i). Preincubation with quinacrine or arachidonyltrifluoromethylketone (AACOCF(3)), i.e. blockers of cytosolic phospholipase A(2), prevented the raise of [Ca(2+)](i). This inhibition was mimicked by 5,8,11,14-eicosatetrayonic acid (ETYA), an inhibitor of cyclooxygenases as well as lipoxygenases, and by BWA4C, a selective inhibitor of lipoxygenases, whereas indomethacin was ineffective, suggesting the mediation of the kinin response by a lipoxygenase metabolite. Indeed, a leukotriene, leukotriene D(4) (LTD(4)), mimicked the effect of bradykinin. The LTD(4) receptor blocker, MK-571, inhibited the increase in [Ca(2+)](i) evoked by LTD(4) and by bradykinin. Consequently, bradykinin receptors in submucosal ganglia from rat colon are coupled to a stimulation of phospholipase A(2), the release of arachidonic acid and the production of LTD(4), which seems to be finally responsible for the change in the cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration.

  3. Simultaneous parasympathetic and sympathetic activation reveals altered autonomic control of heart rate, vascular tension and epinephrine release in anaesthetized hypertensive rats

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    Torill eBerg

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Sympathetic hyperactivity and parasympathetic insufficiency characterize blood pressure control in genetic hypertension, but is difficult to demonstrate experimentally in anesthetized rats. Here we present a pharmacological approach to activate sympathetic and parasympathetic nerves simultaneously, and identify their contribution. Anaesthetized normotensive (WKY and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR were injected i.v. with 4-aminopyridine (4-AP, a voltage-sensitive K+ channel inhibitor. Blood pressure was recorded through a femoral artery catheter, cardiac output and heart rate (HR through an ascending aorta flow probe. Total peripheral vascular resistance (TPVR was calculated. 4-AP induced an immediate, atropine- and hexamethonium-sensitive bradycardia in WKY, and in strains, a subsequent, sustained tachycardia, and norepinephrine but not epinephrine release. The tachycardia was eliminated by reserpine, nadolol or right vagal nerve stimulation, but not adrenalectomy, scopolamine or hexamethonium. 4-AP-induced, atropine-sensitive bradycardia was observed in reserpinized or nadolol-treated SHR, where atropine also increased the late HR-response. 4-AP increased TPVR, transiently in WKY but sustained in SHR. Yohimbine but not phentolamine prevented TPVR down-regulation in WKY. Reserpine, phentolamine and prazosin eliminated the late vasoconstriction in SHR. Plasma epinephrine overflow increased in nadolol-treated SHR. Conclusions: 4-AP activated parasympathetic ganglion transmission and peripheral, sympathetic nerve norepinephrine release. The sympathetic component dominated the HR-response to 4-AP in SHR. α2-adrenceptor-dependent vasodilatation opposed norepinephrine-induced α1-adrenergic vasoconstriction in WKY, but not in SHR. A βAR-activated, probably vagal afferent mechanism, hampered adrenal epinephrine secretion in SHR. Thus, 4-AP exposed mechanisms, which contribute to hypertension, and may allow identification of the factors

  4. Segregation of acetylcholine and GABA in the rat superior cervical ganglia: functional correlation.

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    Diana eElinos

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Sympathetic neurons have the capability to segregate their neurotransmitters (NTs and co-transmitters to separate varicosities of single axons; furthermore, in culture, these neurons can even segregate classical transmitters. In vivo sympathetic neurons employ acetylcholine (ACh and other classical NTs such as gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA. Herein, we explore whether these neurons in vivo segregate these classical NTs in the superior cervical ganglia of the rat. We determined the topographical distribution of GABAergic varicosities, somatic GABAA receptor, as well as the regional distribution of the segregation of ACh and GABA. We evaluated possible regional differences in efficacy of ganglionic synaptic transmission, in the sensitivity of GABAA receptor to GABA and to the competitive antagonist picrotoxin (PTX. We found that sympathetic preganglionic neurons in vivo do segregate ACh and GABA. GABAergic varicosities and GABAA receptor expression showed a rostro-caudal gradient along ganglia; in contrast, segregation exhibited a caudo-rostral gradient. These uneven regional distributions in expression of GABA, GABAA receptors, and level segregation correlate with stronger synaptic transmission found in the caudal region. Accordingly, GABAA receptors of rostral region show larger sensitivity to GABA and PTX. These results suggest the presence of different types of GABAA receptors in each region that result in a different regional levels of endogenous GABA inhibition. Finally, we discuss a possible correlation of these different levels of GABA modulation and the function of the target organs innervated by rostral and caudal ganglionic neurons.

  5. Modulation of catecholamine-synthesizing enzymes in adrenal medulla and stellate ganglia by treadmill exercise of stressed rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavrilovic, Ljubica; Spasojevic, Natasa; Dronjak, Sladjana

    2012-03-01

    The sympatho-adrenal system represents one of the main systems involved in the response to stressful events because its stress-induced activation results in an increased release of catecholamines. Exercise training acts as an important modulator of sympatho-adrenal system, adrenal medulla and stellate ganglia being two components of this system. This study aimed at investigating physical exercise-related changes in gene expression of catecholamine biosynthetic enzymes tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), dopamine-β-hydroxylase (DBH) and phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase in the adrenal medulla and stellate ganglia of chronically psychosocially stressed adult rats exposed daily to 20-min treadmill exercise for 12 weeks, using TaqMan RT-PCR assay. Chronic psychosocial stress decreased gene expression of the examined enzymes in the adrenal medulla and treadmill exercise did not lead to further modulation of the corresponding gene expression. On the other hand, chronic psychosocial stress produced a significant increase of TH (about 51%) and DBH (about 103%) gene expression in stellate ganglia, while treadmill exercise decreased gene expression of these enzymes to control levels in psychosocially stressed rats. Our data indicate that treadmill exercise leads to a decreased gene transcription of catecholamine biosynthetic enzymes in stellate ganglia and attenuation of cardiac noradrenaline production in stressful situations. Reduction of catecholamine synthesis in stellate ganglia may be linked to the beneficial effects of treadmill exercise on cardiovascular system in stressed animals.

  6. Development of nNOS-positive neurons in the rat sensory and sympathetic ganglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masliukov, P M; Emanuilov, A I; Madalieva, L V; Moiseev, K Y; Bulibin, A V; Korzina, M B; Porseva, V V; Korobkin, A A; Smirnova, V P

    2014-01-03

    Neurochemical features in sympathetic and afferent neurons are subject to change during development. Nitric oxide (NO) plays a developmental role in the nervous system. To better understand the neuroplasticity of sympathetic and afferent neurons during postnatal ontogenesis, the distribution of neuronal NO synthase (nNOS) immunoreactivity was studied in the sympathetic para- and prevertebral, nodose ganglion (NG) and Th2 and L4 dorsal root ganglia (DRG) from female Wistar rats of different ages (newborn, 10-day-old, 20-day-old, 30-day-old, 2-month-old, 6-month-old, 1-year-old, and 3-year-old). nNOS-positive neurons were revealed in all sensory ganglia but not in sympathetic ones from birth onward. The percentage of nNOS-immunoreactive (IR) neurons increased during first 10 days of life from 41.3 to 57.6 in Th2 DRG, from 40.9 to 59.1 in L4 DRG and from 31.6 to 38.5 in NG. The percentage of nNOS-IR neurons did not change in the NG later during development and senescence. However, in Th2 and L4 DRG the proportion of nNOS-IR neurons was high in animals between 10 and 30days of life and decreased up to the second month of life. In 2-month-old rats, the percentage of nNOS-IR neurons was 52.9 in Th2 DRG and 51.3 in L4 DRG. We did not find statistically significant differences in the percentage of nNOS-IR neurons between Th2 and L4 DRG and between young and aged rats. In NG and DRG of 10-day-old and older rats, a high proportion of nNOS-IR neurons binds isolectin B4. In newborn animals, only 41.3%, 45.3% and 28.4% of nNOS neuron profiles bind to IB4 in Th2, L4 DRG and NG, respectively. In 10-day-old and older rats, the number of sensory nNOS-IR neurons binding IB4 reached more than 90% in DRG and more than 80% in NG. Only a small number of nNOS-positive cells showed immunoreactivity to calcitonin gene-related peptide, neurofilament 200, calretinin. The information provided here will also serve as a basis for future studies investigating mechanisms of the development of

  7. Noxious chemical stimulation of rat facial mucosa increases intracranial blood flow through a trigemino-parasympathetic reflex--an experimental model for vascular dysfunctions in cluster headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottselig, R; Messlinger, K

    2004-03-01

    Cluster headache is characterized by typical autonomic dysfunctions including facial and intracranial vascular disturbances. Both the trigeminal and the cranial parasympathetic systems may be involved in mediating these dysfunctions. An experimental model was developed in the rat to measure changes in lacrimation and intracranial blood flow following noxious chemical stimulation of facial mucosa. Blood flow was monitored in arteries of the exposed cranial dura mater and the parietal cortex using laser Doppler flowmetry. Capsaicin (0.01-1 mm) applied to oral or nasal mucosa induced increases in dural and cortical blood flow and provoked lacrimation. These responses were blocked by systemic pre-administration of hexamethonium chloride (20 mg/kg). The evoked increases in dural blood flow were also abolished by topical pre-administration of atropine (1 mm) and [Lys1, Pro2,5, Arg3,4, Tyr6]-VIP (0.1 mm), a vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) antagonist, onto the exposed dura mater. We conclude that noxious stimulation of facial mucosa increases intracranial blood flow and lacrimation via a trigemino-parasympathetic reflex. The blood flow responses seem to be mediated by the release of acetylcholine and VIP within the meninges. Similar mechanisms may be involved in the pathogenesis of cluster headache.

  8. [Experimental research on substance P content of hypothalamus and dorsal root ganglia in rats with lumbar vertebrae Gucuofeng model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bo; Lin, Xun; Pang, Jian; Kong, Ling-jun; Zhan, Hong-sheng; Cheng, Ying-wu; Shi, Yin-yu

    2015-01-01

    To detect the effects of lumbar vertebrae Gucuofeng on the substance P content of hypothalamus and dorsal root ganglia in rat models. A hundred and twenty SPF level SD male rats with the weight of 350 to 450 g were randomly divided into rotary fixation group (RF group), simple fixation group (SF group) and sham-operation group (Sham group). The external link fixation system was implanted into the L4-L6 of rats in RF group and SF group; and in RF group, that the L5 spinous process was rotated to the right resulted in L4, L5, L6 spinous process not collinear; in SF group, the external link fixation system was simply implanted and not rotated. The rats of Sham group were not implanted the external link fixation system and only open and suture. The substance P content of hypothalamus and dorsal root ganglia were detected at 1, 4, 8, 12 weeks after operation. Substance P content of hypothalamus in RF group and SF group was lower than Sham group at 1, 4, 8 weeks after operation (Phypothalamus among three groups at 12 weeks after operation (P>0.05). Lumbar vertebrae Gucuofeng can inhibit the analgesic activity of substance P in hypothalamus and promote the synthesis and transmission of substance P in dorsal root ganglia, so as to cause or aggravate the pain.

  9. Validation of decision-making models and analysis of decision variables in the rat basal ganglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Makoto; Doya, Kenji

    2009-08-05

    Reinforcement learning theory plays a key role in understanding the behavioral and neural mechanisms of choice behavior in animals and humans. Especially, intermediate variables of learning models estimated from behavioral data, such as the expectation of reward for each candidate choice (action value), have been used in searches for the neural correlates of computational elements in learning and decision making. The aims of the present study are as follows: (1) to test which computational model best captures the choice learning process in animals and (2) to elucidate how action values are represented in different parts of the corticobasal ganglia circuit. We compared different behavioral learning algorithms to predict the choice sequences generated by rats during a free-choice task and analyzed associated neural activity in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and ventral pallidum (VP). The major findings of this study were as follows: (1) modified versions of an action-value learning model captured a variety of choice strategies of rats, including win-stay-lose-switch and persevering behavior, and predicted rats' choice sequences better than the best multistep Markov model; and (2) information about action values and future actions was coded in both the NAc and VP, but was less dominant than information about trial types, selected actions, and reward outcome. The results of our model-based analysis suggest that the primary role of the NAc and VP is to monitor information important for updating choice behaviors. Information represented in the NAc and VP might contribute to a choice mechanism that is situated elsewhere.

  10. Vitamin D Receptor and Enzyme Expression in Dorsal Root Ganglia of Adult Female Rats: Modulation by Ovarian Hormones

    OpenAIRE

    Tague, Sarah E.; Smith, Peter G.

    2010-01-01

    Vitamin D insufficiency impacts sensory processes including pain and proprioception, but little is known regarding vitamin D signaling in adult sensory neurons. We analyzed female rat dorsal root ganglia (DRG) for vitamin receptor (VDR) and the vitamin D metabolizing enzymes CYP27B1 and CYP24. Western blots and immunofluorescence revealed the presence of these proteins in sensory neurons. Nuclear VDR immunoreactivity was present within nearly all neurons, while cytoplasmic VDR was found prefe...

  11. GABAB receptors in the NTS mediate the inhibitory effect of trigeminal nociceptive inputs on parasympathetic reflex vasodilation in the rat masseter muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Hisayoshi; Izumi, Hiroshi

    2012-03-15

    The present study was designed to examine whether trigeminal nociceptive inputs are involved in the modulation of parasympathetic reflex vasodilation in the jaw muscles. This was accomplished by investigating the effects of noxious stimulation to the orofacial area with capsaicin, and by microinjecting GABA(A) and GABA(B) receptor agonists or antagonists into the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS), on masseter hemodynamics in urethane-anesthetized rats. Electrical stimulation of the central cut end of the cervical vagus nerve (cVN) in sympathectomized animals bilaterally increased blood flow in the masseter muscle (MBF). Increases in MBF evoked by cVN stimulation were markedly reduced following injection of capsaicin into the anterior tongue in the distribution of the lingual nerve or lower lip, but not when injected into the skin of the dorsum of the foot. Intravenous administration of either phentolamine or propranolol had no effect on the inhibitory effects of capsaicin injection on the increases of MBF evoked by cVN stimulation, which were largely abolished by microinjecting the GABA(B) receptor agonist baclofen into the NTS. Microinjection of the GABA(B) receptor antagonist CGP-35348 into the NTS markedly attenuated the capsaicin-induced inhibition of MBF increase evoked by cVN stimulation, while microinjection of the GABA(A) receptor antagonist bicuculline did not. Our results indicate that trigeminal nociceptive inputs inhibit vagal-parasympathetic reflex vasodilation in the masseter muscle and suggest that the activation of GABA(B) rather than GABA(A) receptors underlies the observed inhibition in the NTS.

  12. Early L-dopa, but not pramipexole, restores basal ganglia activity in partially 6-OHDA-lesioned rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin, C; Bonastre, M; Mengod, G; Cortés, R; Giralt, A; Obeso, J A; Schapira, A H

    2014-04-01

    The most appropriate time for the initiation of dopaminergic symptomatic therapy in Parkinson's disease remains debatable. It has been suggested that early correction of basal ganglia pathophysiological abnormalities may have long-term beneficial effects. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the early and delayed actions of L-dopa and pramipexole, using a delayed-start protocol of treatment. The effects of early and delayed administration of these drugs on motor response, development of dyskinesias, neurogenesis and molecular markers in basal ganglia were studied in rats with a unilateral and partial 6-hydroxydopamine-induced nigrostriatal lesion. Ten days after lesioning, rats received treatment with: a) L-dopa methyl ester (25mg/kg with 6.25mg/kg of benserazide, i.p., twice a day); b) pramipexole (0.5mg/kg, sc, twice a day) or c) saline for 4weeks. Four weeks after treatment initiation, rats from the saline group were distributed in three groups that then received the following treatments: d) L-dopa, e) pramipexole or f) saline, for 4weeks more. Three animals in each treatment arm received 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine injections (200mg/kg) 3days before starting treatment. When compared with delayed-start L-dopa, early-start L-dopa treatment induced a lower rotational response (ppramipexole, early-start pramipexole induced a higher rotational response (ppramipexole treatments. Our data support a possible restoration of basal ganglia physiological mechanisms by early-start L-dopa therapy.

  13. Acupuncture inhibits Notch1 and Hes1 protein expression in the basal ganglia of rats with cerebral hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Notch pathway activation maintains neural stem cells in a proliferating state and increases nerve repair capacity. To date, studies have rarely focused on changes or damage to signal transduction pathways during cerebral hemorrhage. Here, we examined the effect of acupuncture in a rat model of cerebral hemorrhage. We examined four groups: in the control group, rats received no treatment. In the model group, cerebral hemorrhage models were established by infusing non-heparinized blood into the brain. In the acupuncture group, modeled rats had Baihui (DU20 and Qubin (GB7 acupoints treated once a day for 30 minutes. In the DAPT group, modeled rats had 0.15 μg/mL DAPT solution (10 mL infused into the brain. Immunohistochemistry and western blot results showed that acupuncture effectively inhibits Notch1 and Hes1 protein expression in rat basal ganglia. These inhibitory effects were identical to DAPT, a Notch signaling pathway inhibitor. Our results suggest that acupuncture has a neuroprotective effect on cerebral hemorrhage by inhibiting Notch-Hes signaling pathway transduction in rat basal ganglia after cerebral hemorrhage.

  14. Neurodevelopment. Parasympathetic neurons originate from nerve-associated peripheral glial progenitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyachuk, Vyacheslav; Furlan, Alessandro; Shahidi, Maryam Khatibi; Giovenco, Marcela; Kaukua, Nina; Konstantinidou, Chrysoula; Pachnis, Vassilis; Memic, Fatima; Marklund, Ulrika; Müller, Thomas; Birchmeier, Carmen; Fried, Kaj; Ernfors, Patrik; Adameyko, Igor

    2014-07-04

    The peripheral autonomic nervous system reaches far throughout the body and includes neurons of diverse functions, such as sympathetic and parasympathetic. We show that the parasympathetic system in mice--including trunk ganglia and the cranial ciliary, pterygopalatine, lingual, submandibular, and otic ganglia--arise from glial cells in nerves, not neural crest cells. The parasympathetic fate is induced in nerve-associated Schwann cell precursors at distal peripheral sites. We used multicolor Cre-reporter lineage tracing to show that most of these neurons arise from bi-potent progenitors that generate both glia and neurons. This nerve origin places cellular elements for generating parasympathetic neurons in diverse tissues and organs, which may enable wiring of the developing parasympathetic nervous system.

  15. High fat diet and body weight have different effects on cannabinoid CB(1) receptor expression in rat nodose ganglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cluny, N L; Baraboi, E D; Mackie, K; Burdyga, G; Richard, D; Dockray, G J; Sharkey, K A

    2013-12-01

    Energy balance is regulated, in part, by the orexigenic signaling pathways of the vagus nerve. Fasting-induced modifications in the expression of orexigenic signaling systems have been observed in vagal afferents of lean animals. Altered basal cannabinoid (CB1) receptor expression in the nodose ganglia in obesity has been reported. Whether altered body weight or a high fat diet modifies independent or additive changes in CB1 expression is unknown. We investigated the expression of CB1 and orexin 1 receptor (OX-1R) in the nodose ganglia of rats fed ad libitum or food deprived (24h), maintained on low or high fat diets (HFD), with differing body weights. Male Wistar rats were fed chow or HFD (diet-induced obese: DIO or diet-resistant: DR) or were body weight matched to the DR group but fed chow (wmDR). CB1 and OX-1R immunoreactivity were investigated and CB1 mRNA density was determined using in situ hybridization. CB1 immunoreactivity was measured in fasted rats after sulfated cholecystokinin octapeptide (CCK8s) administration. In chow rats, fasting did not modify the level of CB1 mRNA. More CB1 immunoreactive cells were measured in fed DIO, DR and wmDR rats than chow rats; levels increased after fasting in chow and wmDR rats but not in DIO or DR rats. In HFD fasted rats CCK8s did not reduce CB1 immunoreactivity. OX-1R immunoreactivity was modified by fasting only in DR rats. These data suggest that body weight contributes to the proportion of neurons expressing CB1 immunoreactivity in the nodose ganglion, while HFD blunts fasting-induced increases, and CCK-induced suppression of, CB1-immunoreactivity. © 2013.

  16. Inhibitory effects of endomorphin-2 on excitatory synaptic transmission and the neuronal excitability of sacral parasympathetic preganglionic neurons in young rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying-Biao; Huang, Fen-Sheng; Fen, Ban; Yin, Jun-Bin; Wang, Wei; Li, Yun-Qing

    2015-01-01

    The function of the urinary bladder is partly controlled by parasympathetic preganglionic neurons (PPNs) of the sacral parasympathetic nucleus (SPN). Our recent work demonstrated that endomorphin-2 (EM-2)-immunoreactive (IR) terminals form synapses with μ-opioid receptor (MOR)-expressing PPNs in the rat SPN. Here, we examined the effects of EM-2 on excitatory synaptic transmission and the neuronal excitability of the PPNs in young rats (24–30 days old) using a whole-cell patch-clamp approach. PPNs were identified by retrograde labeling with the fluorescent tracer tetramethylrhodamine-dextran (TMR). EM-2 (3 μM) markedly decreased both the amplitude and the frequency of the spontaneous and miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs and mEPSCs) of PPNs. EM-2 not only decreased the resting membrane potentials (RMPs) in 61.1% of the examined PPNs with half-maximal response at the concentration of 0.282 μM, but also increased the rheobase current and reduced the repetitive action potential firing of PPNs. Analysis of the current–voltage relationship revealed that the EM-2-induced current was reversed at −95 ± 2.5 mV and was suppressed by perfusion of the potassium channel blockers 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) or BaCl2 or by the addition of guanosine 5′-[β-thio]diphosphate trilithium salt (GDP-β-S) to the pipette solution, suggesting the involvement of the G-protein-coupled inwardly rectifying potassium (GIRK) channel. The above EM-2-invoked inhibitory effects were abolished by the MOR selective antagonist D-Phe-Cys-Tyr-D-Trp-Orn-Thr-Pen-Thr-NH2 (CTOP), indicating that the effects of EM-2 on PPNs were mediated by MOR via pre- and/or post-synaptic mechanisms. EM-2 activated pre- and post-synaptic MORs, inhibiting excitatory neurotransmitter release from the presynaptic terminals and decreasing the excitability of PPNs due to hyperpolarization of their membrane potentials, respectively. These inhibitory effects of EM-2 on PPNs at the spinal cord level may

  17. Electroacupuncture diminishes P2X2 and P2X3 purinergic receptor expression in dorsal root ganglia of rats with visceral hypersensitivity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhijun Weng; Luyi Wu; Yuan Lu; Lidong Wang; Linying Tan; Ming Dong; Yuhu Xin

    2013-01-01

    Electroacupuncture at Shangjuxu (ST37) and Tianshu (ST25) can improve visceral hypersensitivity in rats. Colorectal distension was used to establish a rat model of chronic visceral hypersensitivity. Immunohistochemistry was used to detect P2X2 and P2X3 receptor expression in dorsal root ganglia from rats with chronic visceral hypersensitivity. Results demonstrated that abdominal withdrawal reflex scores obviously increased following establishment of the model, indicating visceral hypersensitivity. Simultaneously, P2X2 and P2X3 receptor expression increased in dorsal root ganglia. After bilateral electroacupuncture at Shangjuxu and Tianshu, abdominal withdrawal reflex scores and P2X2 and P2X3 receptor expression decreased in rats with visceral hypersensitivity. These results indicated that electroacupuncture treatment improved visceral hypersensitivity in rats with irritable bowel syndrome by reducing P2X2 and P2X3 receptor expression in dorsal root ganglia.

  18. A movable microelectrode array for chronic basal ganglia single-unit electrocorticogram co-recording in freely behaving rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xiaobin; Zeng, Jia; Chen, Ting; Lin, Yuanxiang; Yu, Lianghong; Li, Ying; Lin, Zhangya; Wu, Xiyue; Chen, Fuyong; Kang, Dezhi; Zhang, Shizhong

    2014-09-01

    The basal ganglia-cortical circuits are important for information process to brain function. However, chronic recording of single-unit activities in the basal ganglia nucleus has not yet been well established. We present a movable bundled microwire array for chronic subthalamic nucleus (STN) single-unit electrocorticogram co-recording. The electrode assembly contains a screw-advanced microdrive and a microwire array. The array consists of a steel guide tube, five recording wires and one referenced wire which form the shape of a guiding hand, and one screw electrode for cortico-recording. The electrode can acquire stable cortex oscillation-driven STN firing units in rats under different behaving conditions for 8 weeks. We achieved satisfying signal-to-noise ratio, portions of cells retaining viability, and spike waveform similarities across the recording sections. Using this method, we investigated neural correlations of the basal ganglia-cortical circuits in different behaving conditions. This method will become a powerful tool for multi-region recording to study normal statements or movement disorders.

  19. Peripheral 5-HT 1A and 5-HT 7 Serotonergic Receptors Modulate Parasympathetic Neurotransmission in Long-Term Diabetic Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Beatriz Restrepo; María Luisa Martín; Luis San Román; Asunción Morán

    2010-01-01

    We analyzed the modulation of serotonin on the bradycardia induced in vivo by vagal electrical stimulation in alloxan-induced long-term diabetic rats. Bolus intravenous administration of serotonin had a dual effect on the bradycardia induced either by vagal stimulation or exogenous Ach, increasing it at low doses and decreasing it at high doses of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), effect reproduced by 5-carboxamidotryptamine maleate (5-CT), a 5-HT1/7 agonist. The enhancement of the bradycardia at l...

  20. Delta-mediated cross-frequency coupling organizes oscillatory activity across the rat cortico-basal ganglia network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jon eLópez-Azcárate

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The brain's ability to integrate different behavioral and cognitive processes relies on its capacity to generate neural oscillations in a cooperative and coordinated manner. Cross-frequency coupling (CFC has recently been proposed as one of the mechanisms involved in organizing brain activity. Here we investigated the phase-to-amplitude CFC (PA-CFC patterns of the oscillatory activity in the cortico-basal ganglia network of healthy, freely moving rats. Within-structure analysis detected consistent PA-CFC patterns in the four regions analyzed, with the phase of delta waves modulating the amplitude of activity in the gamma (low-gamma ~50 Hz; high-gamma ~80 Hz and high frequency ranges (high frequency oscillations HFO, ~150 Hz. Between-structure analysis revealed that the phase of delta waves parses the occurrence of transient episodes of coherence in the gamma and high frequency bands across the entire network, providing temporal windows of coherence between different structures. Significantly, this specific spatio-temporal organization was affected by the action of dopaminergic drugs. Taken together, our findings suggest that delta-mediated PA-CFC plays a key role in the organization of local and distant activities in the rat cortico-basal ganglia network by fine-tuning the timing of synchronization events across different structures.

  1. [Information analysis of spinal ganglia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobko, P I; Kovaleva, D V; Kovalchuk, I E; Pivchenko, P G; Rudenok, V V; Davydova, L A

    2000-01-01

    Information parameters (entropia and redundancy) of cervical and thoracic spinal ganglia of albino rat foetuses, mature animals (cat and dog) and human subjects were analysed. Information characteristics of spinal ganglia were shown to be level-specified and to depend on their functional peculiarities. Information parameters of thoracic spinal ganglia of man and different animals are specie specified and may be used in assessment of morphological structures as information systems.

  2. Electro-acupuncture stimulation acts on the basal ganglia output pathway to ameliorate motor impairment in Parkinsonian model rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Jun; Li, Bo; Sun, Zuo-Li; Yu, Fen; Wang, Xuan; Wang, Xiao-Min

    2010-04-01

    The role of electro-acupuncture (EA) stimulation on motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease (PD) has not been well studied. In a rat hemiparkinsonian model induced by unilateral transection of the medial forebrain bundle (MFB), EA stimulation improved motor impairment in a frequency-dependent manner. Whereas EA stimulation at a low frequency (2 Hz) had no effect, EA stimulation at a high frequency (100 Hz) significantly improved motor coordination. However, neither low nor high EA stimulation could significantly enhance dopamine levels in the striatum. EA stimulation at 100 Hz normalized the MFB lesion-induced increase in midbrain GABA content, but it had no effect on GABA content in the globus pallidus. These results suggest that high-frequency EA stimulation improves motor impairment in MFB-lesioned rats by increasing GABAergic inhibition in the output structure of the basal ganglia.

  3. Substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide expression in dorsal root ganglia in sciatic nerve injury rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Changma Fu; Zongsheng Yin; Defu Yu; Zuhua Yang

    2013-01-01

    The neuropeptides, substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide, have been shown to be involved in pain transmission and repair of sciatic nerve injury. A model of sciatic nerve defect was prepared by dissecting the sciatic nerve at the middle, left femur in female Sprague Dawley rats. The two ends of the nerve were encased in a silica gel tube. L5 dorsal root ganglia were harvested 7, 14 and 28 days post sciatic nerve injury for immunohistochemical staining. Results showed that substance P and cal-citonin gene-related peptide expression increased significantly in dorsal root ganglion of rats with sci-atic nerve injury. This increase peaked at 7 days, declined at 14 days, and reduced to normal levels by 28 days post injury. The findings indicate that the neuropeptides, substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide, mainly increased in the early stages after sciatic nerve injury.

  4. Brain-gut interactions between central vagal activation and abdominal surgery to influence gastric myenteric ganglia Fos expression in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miampamba, Marcel; Million, Mulugeta; Taché, Yvette

    2011-05-01

    We previously showed that medullary thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) or the stable TRH agonist, RX-77368 administered intracisternally induces vagal-dependent activation of gastric myenteric neurons and prevents post surgery-induced delayed gastric emptying in rats. We investigated whether abdominal surgery alters intracisternal (ic) RX-77368 (50 ng)-induced gastric myenteric neuron activation. Under 10 min enflurane anesthesia, rats underwent an ic injection of saline or RX-77368 followed by a laparotomy and a 1-min cecal palpation, or no surgery and were euthanized 90 min later. Longitudinal muscle/myenteric plexus whole-mount preparations of gastric corpus and antrum were processed for immunohistochemical detection of Fos alone or double labeled with protein gene-product 9.5 (PGP 9.5) and vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT). In the non surgery groups, ic RX-77368 induced a 17 fold increase in Fos-expression in both gastric antrum and corpus myenteric neurons compared to saline injected rats. PGP 9.5 ascertained the neuronal identity of myenteric cells expressing Fos. In the abdominal surgery groups, ic RX-77368 induced a significant increase in Fos-expression in both the corpus and antrum myenteric ganglia compared with ic saline injected rats which has no Fos in the gastric myenteric ganglia. However, the response was reduced by 73-78% compared with that induced by ic RX 77368 without surgery. Abundant VAChT positive nerve fibers were present around Fos positive neurons. These results indicate a bidirectional interaction between central vagal stimulation of gastric myenteric neurons and abdominal surgery. The modulation of gastric vagus-myenteric neuron activity could play an important role in the recovery phase of postoperative gastric ileus.

  5. Peripheral 5-HT1A and 5-HT7 Serotonergic Receptors Modulate Parasympathetic Neurotransmission in Long-Term Diabetic Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restrepo, Beatriz; Martín, María Luisa; San Román, Luis; Morán, Asunción

    2010-01-01

    We analyzed the modulation of serotonin on the bradycardia induced in vivo by vagal electrical stimulation in alloxan-induced long-term diabetic rats. Bolus intravenous administration of serotonin had a dual effect on the bradycardia induced either by vagal stimulation or exogenous Ach, increasing it at low doses and decreasing it at high doses of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), effect reproduced by 5-carboxamidotryptamine maleate (5-CT), a 5-HT1/7 agonist. The enhancement of the bradycardia at low doses of 5-CT was reproduced by 5-HT1A agonist 8-hydroxy-2-dipropylaminotetralin hydrobromide (8-OH-DPAT) and abolished by WAY-100,635, 5-HT1A antagonist. Pretreatment with 5-HT1 antagonist methiothepin blocked the stimulatory and inhibitory effect of 5-CT, whereas pimozide, 5-HT7 antagonist, only abolished 5-CT inhibitory action. In conclusion, long-term diabetes elicits changes in the subtype of the 5-HT receptor involved in modulation of vagally induced bradycardia. Activation of the 5-HT1A receptors induces enhancement, whereas attenuation is due to 5-HT7 receptor activation. This 5-HT dual effect occurs at pre- and postjunctional levels. PMID:21403818

  6. Peripheral 5-HT 1A and 5-HT 7 Serotonergic Receptors Modulate Parasympathetic Neurotransmission in Long-Term Diabetic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Restrepo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We analyzed the modulation of serotonin on the bradycardia induced in vivo by vagal electrical stimulation in alloxan-induced long-term diabetic rats. Bolus intravenous administration of serotonin had a dual effect on the bradycardia induced either by vagal stimulation or exogenous Ach, increasing it at low doses and decreasing it at high doses of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT, effect reproduced by 5-carboxamidotryptamine maleate (5-CT, a 5-HT1/7 agonist. The enhancement of the bradycardia at low doses of 5-CT was reproduced by 5-HT1A agonist 8-hydroxy-2-dipropylaminotetralin hydrobromide (8-OH-DPAT and abolished by WAY-100,635, 5-HT1A antagonist. Pretreatment with 5-HT1 antagonist methiothepin blocked the stimulatory and inhibitory effect of 5-CT, whereas pimozide, 5-HT7 antagonist, only abolished 5-CT inhibitory action. In conclusion, long-term diabetes elicits changes in the subtype of the 5-HT receptor involved in modulation of vagally induced bradycardia. Activation of the 5-HT1A receptors induces enhancement, whereas attenuation is due to 5-HT7 receptor activation. This 5-HT dual effect occurs at pre- and postjunctional levels.

  7. Distribution of intravascularly injected lanthanum ions in ganglia of the autonomic nervous system of the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DePace, D M

    1984-12-01

    Intravascular injection of lanthanum revealed that tight junctions of capillaries in sympathetic ganglia are impermeable to small ions and thus behave like capillaries of the blood-brain barrier. The failure of lanthanum to accumulate in the extracellular space suggests that fenestrated capillaries are not as ion-permeable as use of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) by some authors has indicated. A possible toxic action associated with high concentrations of HRP may be responsible for the high permeability of this substance. Testing with lanthanum demonstrated that sympathetic ganglia possess anatomic features that provide a hematic barrier. The blood-ganglion barrier resembles, but has not yet been demonstrated to be as absolute as the blood-brain barrier.

  8. Effects of castration on the immunoreactivity to NGF, BDNF and their receptors in the pelvic ganglia of the male rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Squillacioti

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Nerve growth factor (NGF and brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF and are members of the neurotrophin family, a family of neurotrophic factors that also includes neurotrophin (NT 3 and NT4/5. Neurotrophins have essential roles in the survival, development and differentiation of neurons in the central and peripheral nervous systems. Neurotrophins exert their effects by binding to corresponding receptors which are formed by the tyrosine protein kinases TrkA, TrkB and TrkC, and the low affinity neurotrophic receptor (p75NTR. In the present study, using immunohistochemistry and quantitative analysis, we have investigated immunoreactivity to BDNF, NGF, TrkB, p75NTR and TrkA in the pelvic ganglia of normal and castrated rats. Neurons of the pelvic ganglia expressed both these neurotrophins and their receptors. After castration the immunoreactivity persisted. However, the number of BDNF- and p75NTR–IR cells statistically significant decreased after castration. These results suggest that castration modulates the expression of neurotrophins and their receptors in pelvic autonomic neurons.

  9. Anatomical location of Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor in urogenital tissues, peripheral ganglia and lumbosacral spinal cord of the rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Pedro L

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous work suggested that macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF may be involved in bladder inflammation. Therefore, the location of MIF was determined immunohistochemically in the bladder, prostate, major pelvic ganglia, sympathetic chain, the L6-S1 dorsal root ganglia (DRG and the lumbosacral spinal cord of the rat. Results In the pelvic organs, MIF immunostaining was prominent in the epithelia. MIF was widely present in neurons in the MPG and the sympathetic chain. Some of those neurons also co-localized tyrosine hydroxylase (TH. In the DRGs, some of the neurons that stained for MIF also stained for Substance P. In the lumbosacral spinal cord, MIF immunostaining was observed in the white mater, the dorsal horn, the intermediolateral region and in the area around the central canal. Many cells were intensely stained for MIF and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP suggesting they were glial cells. However, some cells in the lumbosacral dorsal horn were MIF positive, GFAP negative cells suggestive of neurons. Conclusions Therefore, MIF, a pro-inflammatory cytokine, is localized to pelvic organs and also in neurons of the peripheral and central nervous tissues that innervate those organs. Changes in MIF's expression at the end organ and at peripheral and central nervous system sites suggest that MIF is involved in pelvic viscera inflammation and may act at several levels to promote inflammatory changes.

  10. Antagonism of ionotropic glutamate receptors attenuates chemical ischemia-induced injury in rat primary cultured myenteric ganglia.

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    Elisa Carpanese

    Full Text Available Alterations of the enteric glutamatergic transmission may underlay changes in the function of myenteric neurons following intestinal ischemia and reperfusion (I/R contributing to impairment of gastrointestinal motility occurring in these pathological conditions. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether glutamate receptors of the NMDA and AMPA/kainate type are involved in myenteric neuron cell damage induced by I/R. Primary cultured rat myenteric ganglia were exposed to sodium azide and glucose deprivation (in vitro chemical ischemia. After 6 days of culture, immunoreactivity for NMDA, AMPA and kainate receptors subunits, GluN(1 and GluA(1-3, GluK(1-3 respectively, was found in myenteric neurons. In myenteric cultured ganglia, in normal metabolic conditions, -AP5, an NMDA antagonist, decreased myenteric neuron number and viability, determined by calcein AM/ethidium homodimer-1 assay, and increased reactive oxygen species (ROS levels, measured with hydroxyphenyl fluorescein. CNQX, an AMPA/kainate antagonist exerted an opposite action on the same parameters. The total number and viability of myenteric neurons significantly decreased after I/R. In these conditions, the number of neurons staining for GluN1 and GluA(1-3 subunits remained unchanged, while, the number of GluK(1-3-immunopositive neurons increased. After I/R, -AP5 and CNQX, concentration-dependently increased myenteric neuron number and significantly increased the number of living neurons. Both -AP5 and CNQX (100-500 µM decreased I/R-induced increase of ROS levels in myenteric ganglia. On the whole, the present data provide evidence that, under normal metabolic conditions, the enteric glutamatergic system exerts a dualistic effect on cultured myenteric ganglia, either by improving or reducing neuron survival via NMDA or AMPA/kainate receptor activation, respectively. However, blockade of both receptor pathways may exert a protective role on myenteric neurons following and I

  11. Quantitative Autoradiographic Study on Receptor Regulation in the Basal Ganglia in Rat Model of Levodopa-induced Motor Complications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan XU; Zhentao ZHANG; Kairong QIN; Stella M.Papa; Xuebing CAO

    2009-01-01

    In order to study neurotransmitter receptor regulation in the basal ganglia involved in the functional changes underlying levodopa-induced motor complications,quantitative autoradiography was used to observe receptor bindings of dopamine D1 and D2,N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA),amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole propionic acid (AMPA) and amino butyric acid (GABA) in the basal ganglia of rats that had unilateral nigrostriatal lesions and had been chronically treated with levodopa until motor complications developed.The rats were randomly assigned to three groups:normal,denervated and treatment-complicated groups.The results showed that response duration to levodopa became progressively shorter and abnormal involuntary movement (AIM) score was progressively increased during the course of levodopa treatment.Chronic treatment augmented DI receptors more than denervation,and reduced D2 receptors that were also increased by dopamine denervation.Striatal NMDA receptors were substantially up-regulated in the treatment-complicated group.Levodopa treatment did not change receptors of nigral AMPA,pailidai GABA,and subthalamic GABA,which remained the same as that in denervation group.However,chronic treatment reversed the increase ofnigral GABA receptors caused by the lesion.It was concluded that a shortening of response duration and AIM mimicked levodopa-induced motor complications of Parkinson's patients.These data suggested that up-regulation of dopamine D1 and NMDA receptors in the striatum leads to an imbalance of stimulation through the striatal output pathways,which is associated with levodopa-induced motor complications.

  12. Competitive inhibition of the nondepolarizing muscle relaxant rocuronium on nicotinic acetylcholine receptor channels in the rat superior cervical ganglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chengmi; Wang, Zhenmeng; Zhang, Jinmin; Qiu, Haibo; Sun, Yuming; Yang, Liqun; Wu, Feixiang; Zheng, Jijian; Yu, Weifeng

    2014-05-01

    A number of case reports now indicate that rocuronium can induce a number of serious side effects. We hypothesized that these side effects might be mediated by the inhibition of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) at superior cervical ganglion (SCG) neurons. Conventional patch clamp recordings were used to study the effects of rocuronium on nAChR currents from enzymatically dissociated rat SCG neurons. We found that ACh induced a peak transient inward current in rat SCG neurons. Additionally, rocuronium suppressed the peak ACh-evoked currents in rat SCG neurons in a concentration-dependent and competitive manner, and it increased the extent of desensitization of nAChRs. The inhibitory rate of rocuronium on nAChR currents did not change significantly at membrane potentials between -70 and -20 mV, suggesting that this inhibition was voltage independent. Lastly, rocuronium preapplication enhanced its inhibitory effect, indicating that this drug might prefer to act on the closed state of nAChR channels. In conclusion, rocuronium, at clinically relevant concentrations, directly inhibits nAChRs at the SCG by interacting with both opened and closed states. This inhibition is competitive, dose dependent, and voltage independent. Blockade of synaptic transmission in the sympathetic ganglia by rocuronium might have potentially inhibitory effects on the cardiovascular system.

  13. Modulation of connexin 36 expression in basal ganglia and motor cortex in rat model of Parkinson's disease

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    CHEN Xian-wen

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective To observe the expression of connexin 36 (Cx36 in the striatum and motor cortex of rat model of Parkinson's disease (PD in order to explore whether gap junction is involved in the pathogenesis of the cortex-basal ganglia circuit disturbances in PD. Methods Hemi-parkinsonian rat model was produced by stereotaxically injecting 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA to right medial forebrain bundle (MFB. Immunohistochemical staining and Western blotting analysis were used to observe the expression changes of Cx36 in the striatum and motor cortex. Double immunofluorescence labeling was used to analyze the expression of Cx36 in enkephalin (ENK positive medium spiny neurons and Parvalbumin (PV positive interneurons in the striatum. Results Immunohistochemical staining showed Cx36 expression was elevated in the right striatum as well as right motor cortex of PD group compared with normal control group (t = 2.474, P = 0.048; t = 2.614, P = 0.040. Double immunofluorescence labeling staining revealed that ENK-positive striatum neurons were elevated (t = 3.987, P = 0.007 and Cx36 expression was increased in ENK-positive striatum neurons (t = 3.271, P = 0.017 in PD group compared with normal control group. While PV-positive interneurons decreased (t = 2.777, P = 0.032 and Cx36 expression was down-regulated in PV-positive interneurons (t = 2.624, P = 0.039 compared with the normal control group. Western blotting indicated that the 6-OHDA lesion induced a significant upregulation of Cx36 to (119.31 ± 8.92% in comparison with the normal group [(104.05 ± 3.82%] in right striatum (t = 3.516, P = 0.024. In right motor cortex Cx36 increased to (138.20 ± 17.88% , induced a significant upregulation of Cx36 in the right motor cortex in comparison with the normal control group [(105.27 ± 2.82%; t = 4.068, P = 0.015]. Conclusion The Cx36 expression was generally increased in the striatum and motor cortex of PD rat model, with upregulation in ENK-positive striatum

  14. Effect of Levodopa Chronic Administration on Behavioral Changes and Fos Expression in Basal Ganglia in Rat Model of PD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐岩; 孙圣刚; 曹学兵

    2003-01-01

    To study behavioral character and changes of neuronal activity in the basal ganglia of ratmodel of levodopa-induced dyskinesia, unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesioned rat model of Parkin-son disease (PD) was treated with levodopa/benserazide twice daily for 4 weeks and the behaviorobserved on the 1st, 3rd, 4th, 7th, 9th, 10th, 14th, 21st and 28th day. The animals were sacri-ficed and immunohistochemical technique was used to measure the changes of Fos expression in thecaudate putamen (CPU), globus pallidus (GP) and sensorimotor area of cerebral cortex 2 h afterthe last treatment. The results showed that pulsatile treatment with a subthreshold dose of levodo-pa gradually induced abnormal involuntary movement (AIM), including stereotypy (limb dyskine-sia, axial dystonia and masticatory dyskinesia) towards the side contralateral to the dopamine-den-ervated striatum and increased contraversive rotation. The motor pattern of each subtype was highlystereotypic across individual rats, and the proportion of each subtype was not consistent among in-dividual rats. Fos positive nuclei in the CPU and GP were increased by levodopa acute administra-tion, and more remarkably in the CPU, but not in the cerebral cortex. After repeated levodopatreatment, Fos positive nuclei were reduced remarkably in the CPU, but were increased in the GPand cerebral cortex. It was concluded that the neural mechanisms underlying levodopa induced AIMin rat model of PD was very similar to those seen in levodopa-induced dyskinesia (LID) in PD pa-tients and MPTP-lesioned monkeys, and increased striatopallidal neuronal activity might be involvedin occurrence of LID.

  15. Tang-Luo-Ning Improves Mitochondrial Antioxidase Activity in Dorsal Root Ganglia of Diabetic Rats: A Proteomics Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yanbin; Gong, Yanbin; Zhou, Hui; Xie, Peifeng; Guan, Song; Yi, Wenming

    2017-01-01

    Tang-luo-ning (TLN) is a traditional Chinese herbal recipe for treating diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN). In this study, we investigated mitochondrial protein profiles in a diabetic rat model and explored the potential protective effect of TLN. Diabetic rats were established by injection of streptozocin (STZ) and divided into model, alpha lipoic acid (ALA), and TLN groups. Mitochondrial proteins were isolated from dorsal root ganglia and proteomic analysis was used to quantify the differentially expressed proteins. Tang-luo-ning mitigated STZ-induced diabetic symptoms and blood glucose level, including response time to cold or hot stimulation and nerve conductive velocity. As compared to the normal, there were 388 differentially expressed proteins in the TLN group, 445 in ALA group, and 451 in model group. As compared to the model group, there were 275 differential proteins in TLN group and 251 in ALA group. As compared to model group, mitochondrial complex III was significantly decreased, while glutathione peroxidase and peroxidase were increased in TLN group. When compared with ALA group, the mitochondrial complex III was increased, and mitochondrial complex IV was decreased in TLN group. Together, TLN should have a strong antioxidative activity, which appears to be modulated through regulation of respiratory complexes and antioxidases. PMID:28133612

  16. The effect of NR2B subunit palmitoylation at the spinal level after chronic dorsal root ganglia compression in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Tianjiao; Cui, Yin; Shi, Han; Ma, Zhengliang; Gu, Xiaoping

    2014-11-01

    The NR2B subunit (N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor 2B subunit) regulates the source of pain, and it participates in the formation of central sensitization. Palmitoylation was shown to be involved in the regulation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor internalization. In the present study, we investigated the effects of NR2B subunit palmitoylation in a chronic dorsal root ganglia compression (CCD) rat model. Paw mechanical withdrawal threshold and paw withdrawal thermal latency were used to assess mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia after a CCD operation and an intrathecal injection of the inhibitor of palmitoylation (2-bromopalmitate [2-BP]). The acyl-biotinyl exchange method, Western blotting, and coimmunoprecipitation were used to investigate the effects of pain processing and the expression of levels of NR2B palmitoylation and phosphorylation at the spinal level. CCD rats had long-lasting thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia, leading to upregulation of the level of NR2B palmitoylation and phosphorylation at the spinal level. An intrathecal treatment with 2-BP on day 14 after CCD surgery markedly improved pain behaviors and downregulated the expression of NR2B palmitoylation and phosphorylation. These data suggest that upregulated NR2B palmitoylation in CCD-induced neuropathic pain and intrathecal injection of 2-BP could reduce pain behaviors and NR2B phosphorylation. Our findings indicate that spinal NR2B palmitoylation is an important component of CCD-induced neuropathic pain, and it might be a potential target for chronic pain therapy.

  17. Electrophysiological studies of upregulated P2X7 receptors in rat superior cervical ganglia after myocardial ischemic injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Fanjun; Liu, Shuangmei; Xu, Changshui; Liu, Jun; Li, Guodong; Li, Guilin; Gao, Yun; Lin, Hong; Tu, Guihua; Peng, Haiying; Qiu, Shuyi; Fan, Bo; Zhu, Qicheng; Yu, Shicheng; Zheng, Chaoran; Liang, Shangdong

    2013-09-01

    Myocardial ischemic injury activates cardiac sympathetic afferent fibers and elicits a sympathoexcitatory reflex by exciting sympathetic efferent action, with resultant augmentation of myocardial oxygen consumption, leading to a vicious cycle of exaggerating myocardial ischemia. P2X7 receptor participates in the neuronal functions and the neurological disorders. This study examined the role of P2X7 receptor of superior cervical ganglia (SCG) in sympathoexcitatory reflex. Our results showed that the expression of P2X7 receptor at both mRNA and protein in SCG was increased after myocardial ischemic injury. P2X7 receptor agonists at the same concentration activated much larger amplitudes of the currents in the SCG neurons of myocardial ischemic rats than those in control rats. P2X7 receptor antagonist (brilliant blue G, BBG) significantly inhibited P2X7 receptor agonist-activated currents in the SCG neurons. Excessive phosphorylation of MAPK ERK1/2 upon the activation of P2X7 receptor might be a mechanism mediating the signal transduction after myocardial ischemic injury. Therefore, the sensitized P2X7 receptor in SCG was involved in the nociceptive transmission of sympathoexcitatory reflex induced by myocardial ischemic injury.

  18. The importance of the selection of appropriate reference genes for gene expression profiling in adrenal medulla or sympathetic ganglia of spontaneously hypertensive rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vavřínová, A; Behuliak, M; Zicha, J

    2016-07-18

    Catecholaminergic system plays an important role in hypertension development. The available results on mRNA expression of catecholaminergic system genes in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) are often contradictory. One of the possible causes might be the use of various reference genes as internal controls. In the present study, we searched for suitable reference genes in adrenal medulla or sympathetic ganglia of SHR and Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats, which would enable reliable comparison of mRNA expression between these two strains. The mRNA expression was measured by quantitative real-time PCR in adrenal medulla and superior cervical ganglia of 4-week-old or 24-week-old SHR and WKY rats. We evaluated 12 reference genes by three software tools (Normfinder, BestKeeper, geNorm) and compared them for the standardization of mRNA expression. Combination of reference genes Hprt1 and Ywhaz in adrenal medulla and Gapdh and 18S in sympathetic ganglia were chosen as the best ones. 18S was found as applicable reference gene in both tissues. We found many alterations in expression of catecholaminergic system genes in adrenal medulla and sympathetic ganglia of SHR. The usage of the most or the least stable reference gene as internal control changed results moderately in sympathetic ganglia but seriously in adrenal medulla. For example, tyrosine hydroxylase (Th) gene was underexpressed in adrenal medulla of adult SHR using the appropriate reference gene but unchanged after the standardization to the least stable reference gene. Our results indicate the importance of appropriate internal control. The suitability of reference genes should be checked again in the case of change in experimental conditions.

  19. Bilateral Changes of Cannabinoid Receptor Type 2 Protein and mRNA in the Dorsal Root Ganglia of a Rat Neuropathic Pain Model

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Cannabinoid receptor type 2 (CB2R) plays a critical role in nociception. In contrast to cannabinoid receptor type 1 ligands, CB2R agonists do not produce undesirable central nervous system effects and thus promise to treat neuropathic pain that is often resistant to medical therapy. In the study presented here, we evaluated the bilateral distribution of the CB2R protein and messenger RNA (mRNA) in rat dorsal root ganglia (DRG) after unilateral peripheral nerve injury using immunohistochemistr...

  20. Effect of helium-neon laser on fast excitatory postsynaptic potential of neurons in the isolated rat superior cervical ganglia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Hua; He, Ping; Mo, Ning

    2004-08-01

    The aim of this study is to further measure the effect of 632.8-nm helium-neon laser on fast excitatory postsynaptic potential (f-EPSP) of postganglionic neurons in isolated rat superior cervical ganglia by means of intracellular recording techniques. The neurons with f-EPSP were irradiated by different power densities (1-5 mW/cm2) laser. Irradiated by the 2-mW/cm2 laser, the amplitude of the f-EPSP could augment (PEPSP could descend and last for 3-8 minutes. But the amplitude of the f-EPSP of neurons irradiated by the 5-mW/cm2 laser could depress for the irradiating periods. The results show that: 1) the variation of the amplitude of f-EPSP caused by laser is power density-dependent and time-dependent; 2) there exist the second-order phases in the interaction of the helium-neon laser with neurons. These findings may provide certain evidence in explanation of the mechanisms of clinical helium-neon laser therapy.

  1. Effect of helium-neon laser on fast excitatory postsynaptic potential of neurons in the isolated rat superior cervical ganglia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hua Mo(莫华); Ping He(何萍); Ning Mo(莫宁)

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study is to further measure the effect of 632.8-nm helium-neon laser on fast excitatory postsynaptic potential(f-EPSP)of postganglionic neurons in isolated rat superior cervical ganglia by means of intracellular recording techniques.The neurons with f-EPSP were irradiated by different power densities(1 - 5 mW/cm2)laser.Irradiated by the 2-mW/cm2 laser,the amplitude of the f-EPSP could augment(P < 0.05,paired t test)and even cause action potential at the end of the first 1 - 2 minutes,the f-EPSP could descend and last for 3 - 8 minutes.But the amplitude of the f-EPSP of neurons irradiated by the 5-mW/cm2 laser could depress for the irradiating periods.The results show that:1)the variation of the amplitude of f-EPSP caused by laser is power density-dependent and time-dependent; 2)there exist the second-order phases in the interaction of the helium-neon laser with neurons.These findings may provide certain evidence in explanation of the mechanisms of clinical helium-neon laser therapy.

  2. IL-1β stimulates COX-2 dependent PGE₂ synthesis and CGRP release in rat trigeminal ganglia cells.

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    Lars Neeb

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Pro-inflammatory cytokines like Interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β have been implicated in the pathophysiology of migraine and inflammatory pain. The trigeminal ganglion and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP are crucial components in the pathophysiology of primary headaches. 5-HT1B/D receptor agonists, which reduce CGRP release, and cyclooxygenase (COX inhibitors can abort trigeminally mediated pain. However, the cellular source of COX and the interplay between COX and CGRP within the trigeminal ganglion have not been clearly identified. METHODS AND RESULTS: 1. We used primary cultured rat trigeminal ganglia cells to assess whether IL-1β can induce the expression of COX-2 and which cells express COX-2. Stimulation with IL-1β caused a dose and time dependent induction of COX-2 but not COX-1 mRNA. Immunohistochemistry revealed expression of COX-2 protein in neuronal and glial cells. 2. Functional significance was demonstrated by prostaglandin E2 (PGE(2 release 4 hours after stimulation with IL-1β, which could be aborted by a selective COX-2 (parecoxib and a non-selective COX-inhibitor (indomethacin. 3. Induction of CGRP release, indicating functional neuronal activation, was seen 1 hour after PGE(2 and 24 hours after IL-1β stimulation. Immunohistochemistry showed trigeminal neurons as the source of CGRP. IL-1β induced CGRP release was blocked by parecoxib and indomethacin, but the 5-HT1B/D receptor agonist sumatriptan had no effect. CONCLUSION: We identified a COX-2 dependent pathway of cytokine induced CGRP release in trigeminal ganglia neurons that is not affected by 5-HT1B/D receptor activation. Activation of neuronal and glial cells in the trigeminal ganglion by IL-β leads to an elevated expression of COX-2 in these cells. Newly synthesized PGE(2 (by COX-2 in turn activates trigeminal neurons to release CGRP. These findings support a glia-neuron interaction in the trigeminal ganglion and demonstrate a sequential link between COX-2

  3. Nav1.7 protein and mRNA expression in the dorsal root ganglia of rats with chronic neuropathic pain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chao Liu; Jing Cao; Xiuhua Ren; Weidong Zang

    2012-01-01

    Neuropathic pain was produced by chronic constriction injury of the sciatic nerve in rats. Behavioral tests showed that the thresholds for thermal and mechanical hyperalgesia were significantly reduced in neuropathic pain rats 3-28 days following model induction. The results of immunohistochemistry,western blot assays and reverse transcription-PCR showed that Nav1.7 protein and mRNA expression was significantly increased in the injured dorsal root ganglia. These findings indicated that Nav1.7 might play an important role in the model of chronic neuropathic pain.

  4. Involvement of the pelvic plexus and the suprarenal ganglia in the neuropeptide Y (NPY) innervation of the cervix and the uterus of the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serghini, R; Prud'homme, M J; Vaudry, H; Rousseau, J P

    1997-12-03

    The involvement of the pelvic plexus and suprarenal ganglia in the neuropeptide Y (NPY) innervation of the genital tract was studied in the female rat by means of denervation experiments and retrograde tracing studies. Removal of the paracervical ganglia caused a significant decrease of the NPY-immunoreactive nerve density and NPY concentration in the lower part of the genital tract: cervix, uterine body and lower part of the uterine horn. The decrease in NPY concentration in these three regions was more pronounced after lesion of the pelvic plexus. Lesion of the ovarian nerve plexus caused a depletion in the NPY-immunoreactive nerve fibres and a decrease in NPY concentration in the upper part of the uterine horn. Pelvic nerve section, inferior mesenteric ganglia excision and superior ovarian nerve section had no effect on the NPY innervation in the genital tract. Injection of fluorogold into the cervix and lower part of the uterus combined with immunohistochemistry revealed that 87.5% of labelled neurons in the pelvic plexus were NPY-immunoreactive. Following injection of fluorogold into the upper part of the uterus, 92% of labelled neurons in the suprarenal ganglia were NPY-immunoreactive. Treatment with 6-hydroxydopamine revealed that the NPY-immunoreactive nerve fibres were non-noradrenergic in the cervix, but were noradrenergic in the upper part of the uterus. In the uterine body and lower part of the uterine horn, both noradrenergic and non-noradrenergic NPY-immunoreactive nerve fibres were observed. These data demonstrate the major contribution of pelvic plexus neurons in the non-noradrenergic NPY innervation of the lower part of the genital tract, and the involvement of the suprarenal ganglia in the noradrenergic NPY innervation of the upper part of the uterus via the ovarian nerve plexus.

  5. Temporal changes of CB1 cannabinoid receptor in the basal ganglia as a possible structure-specific plasticity process in 6-OHDA lesioned rats.

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    Gabriela P Chaves-Kirsten

    Full Text Available The endocannabinoid system has been implicated in several neurobiological processes, including neurodegeneration, neuroprotection and neuronal plasticity. The CB1 cannabinoid receptors are abundantly expressed in the basal ganglia, the circuitry that is mostly affected in Parkinson's Disease (PD. Some studies show variation of CB1 expression in basal ganglia in different animal models of PD, however the results are quite controversial, due to the differences in the procedures employed to induce the parkinsonism and the periods analyzed after the lesion. The present study evaluated the CB1 expression in four basal ganglia structures, namely striatum, external globus pallidus (EGP, internal globus pallidus (IGP and substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNpr of rats 1, 5, 10, 20, and 60 days after unilateral intrastriatal 6-hydroxydopamine injections, that causes retrograde dopaminergic degeneration. We also investigated tyrosine hydroxylase (TH, parvalbumin, calbindin and glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD expression to verify the status of dopaminergic and GABAergic systems. We observed a structure-specific modulation of CB1 expression at different periods after lesions. In general, there were no changes in the striatum, decreased CB1 in IGP and SNpr and increased CB1 in EGP, but this increase was not sustained over time. No changes in GAD and parvalbumin expression were observed in basal ganglia, whereas TH levels were decreased and the calbindin increased in striatum in short periods after lesion. We believe that the structure-specific variation of CB1 in basal ganglia in the 6-hydroxydopamine PD model could be related to a compensatory process involving the GABAergic transmission, which is impaired due to the lack of dopamine. Our data, therefore, suggest that the changes of CB1 and calbindin expression may represent a plasticity process in this PD model.

  6. Immunohistochemical detection and gene expression of tyrosine hydroxylase and vesicular monoamine transporter type 2 in intrinsic cardiac ganglia of socially isolated rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovanović Predrag

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Social isolation induced a significant increase in resting heart rate and reduction in heart rate variability. Dysfunction of the intrinsic cardiac nervous system is implicated in the genesis of cardiovascular diseases. Previous evidence suggests that cardiac ganglia contain noradrenergic neurons. Thus, immunohistochemical expression of catecholaminesynthesizing enzyme tyrosine hydroxylase (TH and vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2 were analyzed, as well as the effects of social isolation stress on mRNA and protein levels of this enzyme and transporter in the intrinsic cardiac nervous system of adult rats. Our results indicate that cardiac ganglion neurons express TH and VMAT2 immunoreactivity. Chronic isolated stress of rats caused a decrease in TH mRNA and VMAT2 mRNA in the neurons of intrinsic cardiac ganglia. No significant alterations in the protein levels of TH and VMAT2 were observed in these neurons. These data indicate that the neurons of intrinsic cardiac ganglia express TH as well as VMAT2 but that social isolation stress does not change their protein levels. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 173044

  7. KATP channel subunits in rat dorsal root ganglia: alterations by painful axotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gemes Geza

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP channels in neurons mediate neuroprotection, they regulate membrane excitability, and they control neurotransmitter release. Because loss of DRG neuronal KATP currents is involved in the pathophysiology of pain after peripheral nerve injury, we characterized the distribution of the KATP channel subunits in rat DRG, and determined their alterations by painful axotomy using RT-PCR, immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy. Results PCR demonstrated Kir6.1, Kir6.2, SUR1 and SUR2 transcripts in control DRG neurons. Protein expression for all but Kir6.1 was confirmed by Western blots and immunohistochemistry. Immunostaining of these subunits was identified by fluorescent and confocal microscopy in plasmalemmal and nuclear membranes, in the cytosol, along the peripheral fibers, and in satellite glial cells. Kir6.2 co-localized with SUR1 subunits. Kir6.2, SUR1, and SUR2 subunits were identified in neuronal subpopulations, categorized by positive or negative NF200 or CGRP staining. KATP current recorded in excised patches was blocked by glybenclamide, but preincubation with antibody against SUR1 abolished this blocking effect of glybenclamide, confirming that the antibody targets the SUR1 protein in the neuronal plasmalemmal membrane. In the myelinated nerve fibers we observed anti-SUR1 immunostaining in regularly spaced funneled-shaped structures. These structures were identified by electron microscopy as Schmidt-Lanterman incisures (SLI formed by the Schwann cells. Immunostaining against SUR1 and Kir6.2 colocalized with anti-Caspr at paranodal sites. DRG excised from rats made hyperalgesic by spinal nerve ligation exhibited similar staining against Kir6.2, SUR1 or SUR2 as DRG from controls, but showed decreased prevalence of SUR1 immunofluorescent NF200 positive neurons. In DRG and dorsal roots proximal to axotomy SLI were smaller and showed decreased SUR1 immunofluorescence. Conclusions We

  8. Norepinephrine transporter (NET) is expressed in cardiac sympathetic ganglia of adult rat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The sympathetic nervous system plays a cardinal role in regulating cardiac function through releasing the neurotransmitter norepinephrine (NE). In comparison with central nervous system, the molecular mechanism of NE uptake in myocardium is not clear. In present study, we proved that in rat the CNS type of NE transporter (NET) was also expressed in middle cervical-stellate ganglion complex (MC-SG complex) which is considered to control the activity of heart, but not expressed in myocardium. The results also showed that NET expression level in right ganglion was significantly higher than in the left, rendering the greater capacity of NE uptake in right ventricle, a fact which may contribute to the maintenance of right ventricular function under pathologic state.

  9. Isolation and differentiation of neural stem/progenitor cells from fetal rat dorsal root ganglia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    To find a promising alternative to neurons or schwann cells (SCs) for peripheral nerve repair applications,this study sought to isolate stem cells from fetal rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) explants.Molecular expression analysis confirmed neural stem cell characteristics of DRG-derived neurospheres in terms of expressing neural stem cell-specific genes and a set of well-defined genes related to stem cell niches and glial fate decision.Under the influence of neurotrophic factors,bFGF and NGF,the neurospheres gave rise to neurofilament-expressing neurons and S100-expressing Schwann cell-like cells by different pathways.This study suggests that a subpopulation of stem cells that reside in DRGs is the progenitor of neurons and glia,which could directly induce the differentiation toward neurons,or SCs.

  10. Microarray analysis of rat sensory ganglia after local inflammation implicates novel cytokines in pain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith A Strong

    Full Text Available Inflammation plays a role in neuropathic pain conditions as well as in pain induced solely by an inflammatory stimulus. Robust mechanical hyperalgesia and allodynia can be induced by locally inflaming the L5 dorsal root ganglion (DRG in rat. This model allows investigation of the contribution of inflammation per se to chronic pain conditions. Most previous microarray studies of DRG gene expression have investigated neuropathic pain models. To examine the role of inflammation, we used microarray methods to examine gene expression 3 days after local inflammation of the L5 DRG in rat. We observed significant regulation in a large number of genes (23% of observed transcripts, and examined 221 (3% with a fold-change of 1.5-fold or more in more detail. Immune-related genes were the largest category in this group and included members of the complement system as well as several pro-inflammatory cytokines. However, these upregulated cytokines had no prior links to peripheral pain in the literature other than through microarray studies, though most had previously described roles in CNS (especially neuroinflammatory conditions as well as in immune responses. To confirm an association to pain, qPCR studies examined these cytokines at a later time (day 14, as well as in two different versions of the spinal nerve ligation pain model including a version without any foreign immunogenic material (suture. Cxcl11, Cxcl13, and Cxcl14 were found to be significantly upregulated in all these conditions, while Cxcl9, Cxcl10, and Cxcl16 were upregulated in at least two of these conditions.

  11. Vitamin D receptor and enzyme expression in dorsal root ganglia of adult female rats: modulation by ovarian hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tague, Sarah E; Smith, Peter G

    2011-01-01

    Vitamin D insufficiency impacts sensory processes including pain and proprioception, but little is known regarding vitamin D signaling in adult sensory neurons. We analyzed female rat dorsal root ganglia (DRG) for vitamin receptor (VDR) and the vitamin D metabolizing enzymes CYP27B1 and CYP24. Western blots and immunofluorescence revealed the presence of these proteins in sensory neurons. Nuclear VDR immunoreactivity was present within nearly all neurons, while cytoplasmic VDR was found preferentially in unmyelinated calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)-positive neurons, colocalizing with CYP27B1 and CYP24. These data suggest that 1,25(OH)(2)D3 may affect sensory neurons through nuclear or extranuclear signaling pathways. In addition, local vitamin D metabolite concentrations in unmyelinated sensory neurons may be controlled through expression of CYP27B1 and CYP24. Because vitamin D deficiency appears to exacerbate some peri-menopausal pain syndromes, we assessed the effect of ovariectomy on vitamin D-related proteins. Two weeks following ovariectomy, total VDR expression in DRG dropped significantly, owing to a slight decrease in the percentage of total neurons expressing nuclear VDR and a large drop in unmyelinated CGRP-positive neurons expressing cytoplasmic VDR. Total CYP27B1 expression dropped significantly, predominantly due to decreased expression within unmyelinated CGRP-positive neurons. CYP24 expression remained unchanged. Therefore, unmyelinated CGRP-positive neurons appear to have a distinct vitamin D phenotype with hormonally-regulated ligand and receptor levels. These findings imply that vitamin D signaling may play a specialized role in a neural cell population that is primarily nociceptive.

  12. Functional expression of P2X7 receptors in non-neuronal cells of rat dorsal root ganglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xu-Feng; Han, Ping; Faltynek, Connie R; Jarvis, Michael F; Shieh, Char-Chang

    2005-08-02

    The P2X7 receptor is an ATP-sensitive ligand-gated cation channel, expressed predominantly in cells with immune origin. Recent studies have demonstrated that P2X7 may play an important role in pain signaling. In the present study, the expression of P2X7 receptors in non-neuronal cells and neurons isolated from dorsal root ganglia was characterized using patch clamp, pharmacological and confocal microscopy approaches. In small diameter DRG neurons, 100 microM 2', 3'-O-(4-benzoylbenzoyl)-ATP (BzATP) evoked an inward current, which was inhibited completely by 1 microM A-317491, a potent and selective P2X3 receptor antagonist. In contrast, BzATP evoked concentration-dependent increases in inward currents in non-neuronal DRG cells with an EC50 value of 26 +/- 0.14 microM, which were resistant to the blockade by A-317491. The activity to evoke cationic currents by P2X receptor agonists in non-neuronal cells showed a rank order of BzATP > ATP > alpha,beta-meATP. Pyridoxal-phosphate-6-azophenyl-,2',4'-disulphonic acid (PPADS) and Mg2+ produced concentration-dependent inhibition of BzATP-evoked currents in non-neuronal cells. Confocal microscopy revealed positive immunoreactivity of anti-P2X7 receptor antibodies on non-neuronal cells. No anti-P2X7 immunoreactivity was observed on DRG neurons. Further electrophysiological studies showed that prolonged agonist activation of P2X7 receptors in non-neuronal cells did not lead to cytolytic pore formation. Taken together, the present study demonstrated functional expression of P2X7 receptors in non-neuronal but not in small diameter neurons from rat DRG. Modulation of P2X7 receptors in non-neuronal cells might have impact on peripheral sensory transduction under normal and pathological states.

  13. [Synaptoarchitectonics of the ganglia of the celiac plexus in white rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levkova, N A; Kakabadze, S A; Tepliakova, N P

    1978-01-01

    In 50 intact white rats at the age of 6, 15, 23 and 30 months synapsoarchitectonics of the celiac plexus nodes was studied by an electron microscopy method. Peculiarities in synapsoarchitectonics are stipulated by pericaryon processes in neurons, some of them have no contacts with the axonal terminals, while others have contacts with the axonal terminals. The former include small (about 0.5 mkm) drop-like and large (up to 1.5 mkm) polymorphous processes within the limits of perisomatic membrane, as well as processes penetrating the neuronal capsule. All of them contain, in different combinations, vesicles, ribosomas, fibrillae, and the largest processes--small cisterns of granular cytoplasmatic network and single mitochondria. The processes of the first group are considered as original stages for the development of the second group processes. The latter are represented by different in size (about 1.0--2.0 mkm) in form (digital, cone-, pin-, goblet-shaped, cylindrical, branching) and in content formations. There is, as a rule, one contact on the processes of an uncomplicated form, while on the branching processes there can be up to three and more contacting axonal terminals. Peculiar features in the composition of the processes taken as a whole (specific forms, absence of dendritic tubes, sometimes numerous contacts with axonal terminals in spite of small size) distinguish them from newly forming dendritic processes and these formations are considered as independent specialized receptor apparatus in the pericaryon of neurons of the celiac plexus.

  14. Effects of bradykinin B2 receptor stimulation at submucosal ganglia from rat distal colon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avemary, Janine; Diener, Martin

    2010-02-10

    Bradykinin acts as an inflammatory mediator in the gut. In the present study we characterized bradykinin-induced changes in the intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) in whole-mount submucosal preparations from rat distal colon and examined the bradykinin receptors and subsequent signalling cascades involved. Bradykinin (2.10(-10)-2.10(-7)mol/l) evoked a concentration-dependent increase in [Ca(2+)](i) in about 90% of the investigated neurones. This Ca(2+) response was abolished by the bradykinin B(2) receptor antagonist HOE 140. The B(2) receptor agonist [Hyp(3)]-bradykinin mimicked the kinin response. In contrast, the B(1) receptor antagonist [des-Arg(10)]-HOE 140 and the B(1) receptor agonist bradykinin fragment 1-8 were ineffective. Immunohistochemical experiments confirmed the presence of bradykinin B(2) receptors in submucosal neurones. The effect of bradykinin on [Ca(2+)](i) was not mediated by a release of prostaglandins, as it was resistant against the cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin. Blocking of G(q/11) proteins with YM-254890 suppressed the action of bradykinin, revealing that neuronal bradykinin B(2) receptors are coupled to this G protein. However, the subsequent signalling cascade differed from the classical phospholipase C signalling pathway, as the bradykinin response was resistant against the phospholipase C inhibitor U-73221, the ryanodine receptor antagonist dehydroryanodine, and only marginally sensitive against the blocker of IP(3)-receptors xestospongin C. Vice versa, the effect of bradykinin was nearly completely dependent on the presence of external Ca(2+) and could be reduced by lanthanum, a blocker of voltage-operated Ca(2+) channels, suggesting that the bradykinin-induced Ca(2+) response is achieved by an influx from the extracellular space via voltage-operated Ca(2+) channels.

  15. In vivo transfection of manganese superoxide dismutase gene or nuclear factor κB shRNA in nodose ganglia improves aortic baroreceptor function in heart failure rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dongze; Liu, Jinxu; Tu, Huiyin; Muelleman, Robert L; Cornish, Kurtis G; Li, Yu-Long

    2014-01-01

    Arterial baroreflex sensitivity is attenuated in chronic heart failure (CHF) state, which is associated with cardiac arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death in patients with CHF. Our previous study showed that CHF-induced sodium channel dysfunction in the baroreceptor neurons was involved in the blunted baroreflex sensitivity in CHF rats. Mitochondria-derived superoxide overproduction decreased expression and activation of the sodium channels in the baroreceptor neurons from CHF rats. However, the molecular mechanisms responsible for the sodium channel dysfunction in the baroreceptor neurons from CHF rats remain unknown. We tested the involvement of nuclear factor κB (NFκB) in the sodium channel dysfunction and evaluated the effects of in vivo transfection of manganese superoxide dismutase gene and NFκB shRNA on the baroreflex function in CHF rats. CHF was developed at 6 to 8 weeks after left coronary artery ligation in adult rats. Western blot and chromatin immunoprecipitation data showed that phosphorylated NFκB p65 and ability of NFκB p65 binding to the sodium channel promoter were increased in the nodose ganglia from CHF rats. In vivo transfection of adenoviral manganese superoxide dismutase gene or lentiviral NFκB p65 shRNA into the nodose ganglia partially reversed CHF-reduced sodium channel expression and cell excitability in the baroreceptor neurons and improved CHF-blunted arterial baroreflex sensitivity. Additionally, transfection of adenoviral manganese superoxide dismutase also inhibited the augmentation of phosphorylated NFκB p65 in the nodose neurons from CHF rats. The present study suggests that superoxide-NFκB signaling contributes to CHF-induced baroreceptor dysfunction and resultant impairment of baroreflex function.

  16. Endothelial Proliferation and Increased Blood - Brain Barrier Permeability in the Basal Ganglia in a Rat Model of 3,4-Dihydrozyphenyl-L-Alanine-Induced Dyskinesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westin, Jenny E.; Lindgren, Hanna S.; Gardi, Jonathan Eyal

    2006-01-01

    3,4-Dihydroxyphenyl-L-alanine (L-DOPA)-induced dyskinesia is associated with molecular and synaptic plasticity in the basal ganglia, but the occurrence of structural remodeling through cell genesis has not been explored. In this study, rats with 6-hydroxydopamine lesions received injections of th...... of angiogenesis and blood-brain barrier dysfunction in an experimental model of L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia. These microvascular changes are likely to affect the kinetics of L-DOPA entry into the brain, favoring the occurrence of motor complications....

  17. Bee Venom Alleviates Motor Deficits and Modulates the Transfer of Cortical Information through the Basal Ganglia in Rat Models of Parkinson’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurice, Nicolas; Deltheil, Thierry; Melon, Christophe; Degos, Bertrand; Mourre, Christiane

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence points to a neuroprotective action of bee venom on nigral dopamine neurons in animal models of Parkinson’s disease (PD). Here we examined whether bee venom also displays a symptomatic action by acting on the pathological functioning of the basal ganglia in rat PD models. Bee venom effects were assessed by combining motor behavior analyses and in vivo electrophysiological recordings in the substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNr, basal ganglia output structure) in pharmacological (neuroleptic treatment) and lesional (unilateral intranigral 6-hydroxydopamine injection) PD models. In the hemi-parkinsonian 6-hydroxydopamine lesion model, subchronic bee venom treatment significantly alleviates contralateral forelimb akinesia and apomorphine-induced rotations. Moreover, a single injection of bee venom reverses haloperidol-induced catalepsy, a pharmacological model reminiscent of parkinsonian akinetic deficit. This effect is mimicked by apamin, a blocker of small conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (SK) channels, and blocked by CyPPA, a positive modulator of these channels, suggesting the involvement of SK channels in the bee venom antiparkinsonian action. In vivo electrophysiological recordings in the substantia nigra pars reticulata (basal ganglia output structure) showed no significant effect of BV on the mean neuronal discharge frequency or pathological bursting activity. In contrast, analyses of the neuronal responses evoked by motor cortex stimulation show that bee venom reverses the 6-OHDA- and neuroleptic-induced biases in the influence exerted by the direct inhibitory and indirect excitatory striatonigral circuits. These data provide the first evidence for a beneficial action of bee venom on the pathological functioning of the cortico-basal ganglia circuits underlying motor PD symptoms with potential relevance to the symptomatic treatment of this disease. PMID:26571268

  18. Antinociceptive effect of linear polarized 0.6 to 1.6 microm irradiation of lumbar sympathetic ganglia in chronic constriction injury rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muneshige, Hiroshi; Toda, Katsuhiro; Ma, Dianli; Kimura, Hiroaki; Asou, Tomohiro; Ikuta, Yoshikazu

    2006-01-01

    Linear polarized near-infrared light created with linear polarized near-infrared light therapy equipment (Super Lizer HA-550, Tokyo Iken Co, Ltd, Tokyo, Japan) has been used for the treatment of various painful disorders in Japan. Irradiation near the stellate ganglion with a Super Lizer (ISGL) is an especially notable therapeutic method used with stellate ganglion block (SGB) or substitutes for SGB. ISGL is a safe, simple, well-tolerated, and effective treatment. We examined the effects of irradiation with a Super Lizer applied to an area near the lumbar sympathetic ganglia on the ligated side in a chronic constriction injury (CCI) model, which is believed to be an animal model of complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS). Rats showing thermal hyperalgesia in a radiant heat test 1 wk postoperatively were used in Experiments 1 and 2: (1) Thermal hyperalgesia of irradiation group (n = 11) was less than that of the control or nonirradiation (n = 11) group at 1, 3, and 8 h after irradiation; however, the effect disappeared 12 h after irradiation. (2) Daily irradiation (n = 16) and 1 wk (n = 14) from 7 days after nerve ligation significantly shortened the interval from thermal hyperalgesia until recovery. Rats showing mechanical hyperalgesia in the von Frey hair test 1 wk postoperatively were used in Experiment 3: 1 wk irradiation beginning 7 days after nerve ligation (n = 9) did not promote the recovery from mechanical hyperalgesia. We speculate that repeated ISGL may be more effective than a single ISGL in alleviating pain in CRPS patients. We cannot explain the discrepancy between the results obtained in Experiments 2 and 3. We believe the results of this study are relevant to the effect of ISGL for patients with upper-limb CRPS: irradiation near the lumbar sympathetic ganglia of the rat is effective for thermal but not mechanical pain in CCI.

  19. Parasympathetic nervous system and chronic facial dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehler, Irmgard Kilb

    2009-01-01

    Recognizing the focal role of the CNS and stress in the pathogenesis of chronic facial dermatitis, the author hypothesized that the main responsibility for the persistence of CFD lies in the parasympathetic portion of the CNS. The validity of this hypothesis is challenged with organ specific treatments, leading to the resolution of parasympathetic stress and CFD.

  20. Effect of helium-neon laser on fast excitatory postsynaptic potential (f-EPSP) of neurons in the isolated rat superior cervical ganglia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Mo; Ping, He; Ning, Mo

    2002-06-01

    Single electrical stimulation of the cervical sympathetic trunk elicits in the ganglion cells an excitatory postsynaptic potential (EPSP) or multiple EPSPs of varying latencies, among which a fast excitatory postsynaptic potential (f-EPSP) is the main type of ganglionic transmission in the sympathetic neurons. In previous work, we studied the effects of Helium-Neon laser with wavelength 632.8 nm on membrane conductance of neurons with stable f- EPSP in isolated rat superior cervical ganglia. The aim of this study is to further measure the effect of Helium-Neon Laser with wavelength 632.8 nm on fast excitatory postsynaptic potential of postganglionic neurons in the isolated rate superior cervical ganglia by means of intracellular recording techniques. The neurons with fast excitatory postsynaptic potential were irradiated by different power densities (1 and 5 mW/cm2), pulse frequency of 1 Hz laser. Irradiated by the 2 mW/cm2 laser, the amplitude of the f-EPSP could augment (PEPSP could descend and lasted for 3- 8 minutes later.

  1. Menthol inhibiting parasympathetic function of tracheal smooth muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hsing-Won; Liu, Shao-Cheng; Chao, Pin-Zhir; Lee, Fei-Peng

    2016-01-01

    Menthol is used as a constituent of food and drink, tobacco and cosmetics nowadays. This cold receptor agonist has been used as a nasal inhalation solution in the daily life. The effect of menthol on nasal mucosa in vivo is well known; however, the effect of the drug on tracheal smooth muscle has been rarely explored. Therefore, during administration of the drug for nasal symptoms, it might also affect the trachea via oral intake or inhalation. We used our preparation to test the effectiveness of menthol on isolated rat tracheal smooth muscle. A 5 mm long portion of rat trachea was submersed in 30 ml Krebs solution in a muscle bath at 37ºC. Changes in tracheal contractility in response to the application of a parasympathetic mimetic agent were measured using a transducer connected to a Pentium III computer equipped with polygraph software. The following assessments of menthol were performed: (1) effect on tracheal smooth muscle resting tension; (2) effect on contraction caused by 10-6 M methacholine as a parasympathetic mimetic; (3) effect of the drug on electrically induced tracheal smooth muscle contractions. Results indicated that addition of a parasympathetic mimetic to the incubation medium caused the trachea to contract in a dose-dependent manner. Addition of menthol at doses of 10-5 M or above elicited a relaxation response to 10-6 M methacholine-induced contraction. Menthol could also inhibit electrical field stimulation (EFS) induced spike contraction. However, it alone had a minimal effect on the basal tension of trachea as the concentration increased. We concluded that the degree of drug-induced tracheal contraction or relaxation was dose-dependent. In addition, this study indicated that high concentrations of menthol might actually inhibit parasympathetic function of the trachea. PMID:27994497

  2. High-frequency stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus selectively reverses dopamine denervation-induced cellular defects in the output structures of the basal ganglia in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salin, Pascal; Manrique, Christine; Forni, Claude; Kerkerian-Le Goff, Lydia

    2002-06-15

    High-frequency stimulation (HFS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is now recognized as an effective treatment for advanced Parkinson's disease, but the molecular basis of its effects remains unknown. This study examined the effects of unilateral STN HFS (2 hr of continuous stimulation) in intact and hemiparkinsonian awake rats on STN neuron metabolic activity and on neurotransmitter-related gene expression in the basal ganglia, by means of in situ hybridization histochemistry and immunocytochemistry. In both intact and hemiparkinsonian rats, this stimulation was found to induce c-fos protein expression but to decrease cytochrome oxidase subunit I mRNA levels in STN neurons. STN HFS did not affect the dopamine lesion-mediated overexpression of enkephalin mRNA or the decrease in substance P in the ipsilateral striatum. The lesion-induced increases in intraneuronal glutamate decarboxylase 67 kDa isoform (GAD67) mRNA levels on the lesion side were reversed by STN HFS in the substantia nigra, partially antagonized in the entopeduncular nucleus but unaffected in the globus pallidus. The stimulation did not affect neuropeptide or GAD67 mRNA levels in the side contralateral to the dopamine lesion or in intact animals. These data furnish the first evidence that STN HFS decreases the metabolic activity of STN neurons and antagonizes dopamine lesion-mediated cellular defects in the basal ganglia output structures. They provide molecular substrate to the therapeutic effects of this stimulation consistent with the current hypothesis that HFS blocks STN neuron activity. However, the differential impact of STN HFS on the effects of dopamine lesion among structures receiving direct STN inputs suggests that this stimulation may not cause simply interruption of STN outflow.

  3. Development of cardiac parasympathetic neurons, glial cells, and regional cholinergic innervation of the mouse heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fregoso, S P; Hoover, D B

    2012-09-27

    Very little is known about the development of cardiac parasympathetic ganglia and cholinergic innervation of the mouse heart. Accordingly, we evaluated the growth of cholinergic neurons and nerve fibers in mouse hearts from embryonic day 18.5 (E18.5) through postnatal day 21(P21). Cholinergic perikarya and varicose nerve fibers were identified in paraffin sections immunostained for the vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT). Satellite cells and Schwann cells in adjacent sections were identified by immunostaining for S100β calcium binding protein (S100) and brain-fatty acid binding protein (B-FABP). We found that cardiac ganglia had formed in close association to the atria and cholinergic innervation of the atrioventricular junction had already begun by E18.5. However, most cholinergic innervation of the heart, including the sinoatrial node, developed postnatally (P0.5-P21) along with a doubling of the cross-sectional area of cholinergic perikarya. Satellite cells were present throughout neonatal cardiac ganglia and expressed primarily B-FABP. As they became more mature at P21, satellite cells stained strongly for both B-FABP and S100. Satellite cells appeared to surround most cardiac parasympathetic neurons, even in neonatal hearts. Mature Schwann cells, identified by morphology and strong staining for S100, were already present at E18.5 in atrial regions that receive cholinergic innervation at later developmental times. The abundance and distribution of S100-positive Schwann cells increased postnatally along with nerve density. While S100 staining of cardiac Schwann cells was maintained in P21 and older mice, Schwann cells did not show B-FABP staining at these times. Parallel development of satellite cells and cholinergic perikarya in the cardiac ganglia and the increase in abundance of Schwann cells and varicose cholinergic nerve fibers in the atria suggest that neuronal-glial interactions could be important for development of the parasympathetic nervous

  4. Pentobarbital enhances GABAergic neurotransmission to cardiac parasympathetic neurons, which is prevented by expression of GABA(A) epsilon subunit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irnaten, Mustapha; Walwyn, Wendy M; Wang, Jijiang; Venkatesan, Priya; Evans, Cory; Chang, Kyoung S K; Andresen, Michael C; Hales, Tim G; Mendelowitz, David

    2002-09-01

    Pentobarbital decreases the gain of the baroreceptor reflex on the order of 50%, and this blunting is caused nearly entirely by decreasing cardioinhibitory parasympathetic activity. The most likely site of action of pentobarbital is the gamma-aminobutyric acid type A (GABA(A)) receptor. The authors tested whether pentobarbital augments the inhibitory GABAergic neurotransmission to cardiac parasympathetic neurons, and whether expression of the GABA(A) epsilon subunit prevents this facilitation. The authors used a novel approach to study the effect of pentobarbital on identified cardiac parasympathetic preganglionic neurons in rat brainstem slices. The cardiac parasympathetic neurons in the nucleus ambiguus were retrogradely prelabeled with a fluorescent tracer and were visually identified for patch clamp recording. The effects of pentobarbital on spontaneous GABAergic synaptic events were tested. An adenovirus was used to express the epsilon subunit of the GABA(A) receptor in cardiac parasympathetic neurons to examine whether this transfection alters pentobarbital-mediated changes in GABAergic neurotransmission. Pentobarbital increased the duration but not the frequency or amplitude of spontaneous GABAergic currents in cardiac parasympathetic neurons. Transfection of cardiac parasympathetic neurons with the epsilon subunit of the GABA(A) receptor prevented the pentobarbital-evoked facilitation of GABAergic currents. Pentobarbital, at clinically relevant concentrations, prolongs the duration of spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents that impinge on cardiac parasympathetic neurons. This action would augment the inhibition of cardiac parasympathetic neurons, reduce parasympathetic cardioinhibitory activity, and increase heart rate. Expression of the GABA(A) receptor epsilon subunit in cardiac parasympathetic neurons renders the GABA receptors insensitive to pentobarbital.

  5. Postprandial insulin action relies on meal composition and hepatic parasympathetics: dependency on glucose and amino acids: Meal, parasympathetics & insulin action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afonso, Ricardo A; Gaspar, Joana M; Lamarão, Iva; Lautt, W Wayne; Macedo, M Paula

    2016-01-01

    Insulin sensitivity (IS) increases following a meal. Meal composition affects postprandial glucose disposal but still remains unclear which nutrients and mechanisms are involved. We hypothesized that gut-absorbed glucose and amino acids stimulate hepatic parasympathetic nerves, potentiating insulin action. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were 24 h fasted and anesthetized. Two series of experiments were performed. (A) IS was assessed before and after liquid test meal administration (10 ml.kg(-1), intraenteric): glucose + amino acids + lipids (GAL, n=6); glucose (n=5); amino acids (n=5); lipids (n=3); glucose + amino acids (GA, n=9); amino acids + lipids (n=3); and glucose + lipids (n=4). (B) Separately, fasted animals were submitted to hepatic parasympathetic denervation (DEN); IS was assessed before and after GAL (n=4) or GA administration (n=4). (A) Both GAL and GA induced significant insulin sensitization. GAL increased IS from 97.9±6.2 mg glucose/kg bw (fasting) to 225.4±18.3 mg glucose/kg bw (Pamino acids trigger a vagal reflex that involves hepatic parasympathetic nerves.

  6. Multilevel interactions between the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems: a minireview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ondicova, K; Mravec, B

    2010-04-01

    In order to allow precise regulation of bodily functions, the activity of the autonomic nervous system must be precisely regulated. The traditional model concerning the regulation of norepinephrine and acetylcholine release in target tissues suggests that the activities of the efferent arms of the autonomic nervous system are more or less independent of each other. However, plenty of experimental and clinical studies have demonstrated the presence of multiple interactions between the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous system that are mediated through several pathways and mechanisms at both central and peripheral levels of the neuraxis. Interactions within the central nervous system are mediated predominantly by neurons within the nucleus of the solitary tract and paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus. Peripheral interactions are based on the morphological-functional organization of the sympathetic and parasympathetic pathways at the levels of the sympathetic prevertebral ganglia or neuroeffector connections. Furthermore, evidence suggests that neuroeffector connections may be realized at the axo-axonal, presynaptic, postsynaptic, and post-receptor levels. Alterations in interactions between the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous system can lead to unbalanced autonomic activities, which may influence the development of various disorders, including cardiovascular, inflammatory, metabolic, neurological, and psychiatric diseases. The aim of this article is to illustrate the complexity of interaction between the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems and to describe the role of these interactions in the heart, adrenal medulla, and vagal trunk.

  7. The effect of parasympathetic drugs on energy expenditure: relevance to the autonomic hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulloo, A G; Miller, D S

    1986-05-01

    The influence of the parasympathetic nervous system in the control of energy expenditure was investigated in obese and lean rodents during chronic administration of drugs that alter parasympathetic transmission. In the genetically obese ob/ob mice and fa/fa rats and in monosodium glutamate induced hypothalamic obese mice, administration of the parasympathetic inhibitors hyoscine, benztropine, and mecamylamine either had no effect on energy balance or caused losses in body weight that could entirely be accounted for by a reduction in food intake; 24-h oxygen consumption in drug-treated animals was no different from that of the nontreated controls. In the lean animals, both the parasympathetic inhibitors (hyoscine, benztropine, and mecamylamine) and stimulators (bethanecol and neostigmine) had no influence on energy balance nor on body composition. These studies refute the concept that an overactive parasympathetic tone underlies the elevated energetic efficiency of obese models and suggests that the parasympathetic nervous system is unlikely to play an important role in the long-term control of energy expenditure.

  8. Brain-gut interactions between central vagal activation and abdominal surgery to influence gastric myenteric ganglia Fos expression in rats

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    We previously showed that medullary thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) or the stable TRH agonist, RX-77368 administered intracisternally induces vagal-dependent activation of gastric myenteric neurons and prevents post surgery-induced delayed gastric emptying in rats. We investigated whether abdominal surgery alters intracisternal (ic) RX-77368 (50 ng)-induced gastric myenteric neuron activation. Under 10 min enflurane anesthesia, rats underwent an ic injection of saline or RX-77368 followed...

  9. THE ROLE OF PARASYMPATHETIC AUTONOMIC REGULATION IN ENSURING OF RATS’ RESISTANCE IN THE MODEL OF MULTIPLE ORGAN DYSFUNCTION SYNDROM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Khrypachenko

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available To assess contribution of autonomic regulation in multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS survival ensuring and to test hypothesis about possible correction of clinical course by modulating the activity of parasympathetic influences we performed experiments on rats’ model of the MODS. It was determined that nonresistant animals differentiated by less intensity of parasympathetic regulation response. It was revealed that stimulation of cholinergic system decrease lethality in rats, and inhibits the power of high frequency regulatory effects on the heart rate.

  10. Parasympathetic inhibition of pineal indole metabolism by prejunctional modulation of noradrenaline release

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drijfhout, WJ; Grol, CJ; Westerink, BHC

    1996-01-01

    The role of the parasympathetic nervous system in rat pineal indole metabolism was investigated by transpineal in vivo microdialysis. On-line coupling to a high performance liquid chromatography system with fluorescence detection (HPLC-FD) allowed simultaneous analysis of three major indolic compoun

  11. Expression changes of parvalbumin and microtubule-associated protein 2 induced by chronic constriction injury in rat dorsal root ganglia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Ming-hui; JI Feng-tao; LIU Ling; LI Feng

    2011-01-01

    Background Parvalbumin (PV), as a mobile endogenous calcium buffer, plays an important role in affecting temporospatial characteristics of calcium transients and in modulating calcium homeostasis. PV is expressed in neurons in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and spinal dorsal horn and may be involved in synaptic transmission through regulating cytoplasm calcium concentrations. But the exact role of PV in peripheral sensory neurons remains unknown.Microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP-2), belonging to structural microtubule-associated protein family, is especially vulnerable to acute central nervous system (CNS) injury, and there will be rapid loss of MAP-2 at the injury site. The present study investigated the changes of PV expressing neurons and the MAP-2 neurons in the DRG after an operation for chronic constriction injury to the unilateral sciatic nerve (CCI-SN), in order to demonstrate the possible roles of PV and MAP-2 in transmission and modulation of peripheral nociceptive information.Methods Seventy-two adult male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats, weighing 180-220 g, were randomly divided into two groups (36 rats in each group), the sham operation group and chronic constriction injury (CCI) group. Six rats in each group were randomly selected to receive mechanical and thermal sensitivity tests at one day before operation and 1,3, 5,7, and 14 days after surgery. After pain behavioral test, ipsilateral lumbar fifth DRGs were removed and double immunofluorescence staining was performed to assess the expression changes of PV and of MAP2 expressing neurons in the L5 DRG before or after surgery.Results The animals with CCI-SN showed obvious mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia (P<0.05). Both the thermal and mechanical hyperalgesia decreased to their lowest degree at 7 days after surgery compared to the baseline before surgery (P<0.01). In normal rats before surgery, a large number of neurons were MAP-2 single labeled cells, and just a small number of PV

  12. Basal ganglia dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ganglia dysfunction. They include: Dystonia (muscle tone problems) Huntington disease (disorder in which nerve cells in certain parts ... ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Mosby; 2013:chap 20. Review Date 5/30/2016 Updated by: Amit M. ...

  13. Oxytocin alleviates orofacial mechanical hypersensitivity associated with infraorbital nerve injury through vasopressin-1A receptors of the rat trigeminal ganglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, Asako; Shinoda, Masamichi; Katagiri, Ayano; Takeda, Mamoru; Suzuki, Tatsuro; Asaka, Junichi; Yeomans, David C; Iwata, Koichi

    2016-12-17

    Oxytocin (OXT) is a neuropeptide hormone synthesized and secreted by hypothalamic neurons and has been reported to play a significant role in pain modulation. However, the mechanisms underlying OXT's antinociceptive effect on neuropathic pain are not fully understood. In this study, we examined the peripheral effect of OXT on mechanical hypersensitivity induced by partial ligation of the infraorbital nerve (PNL) in rats. Mechanical hypersensitivity in the whisker pad skin after PNL was attenuated by the direct administration of OXT into the trigeminal ganglion (TG). The proportion of vasopressin-1A receptor (V1A-R)-immunoreactive, but not OXT-receptor-immunoreactive, neurons significantly increased among TG neurons innervating the whisker pad skin after PNL. In a patch-clamp recording from TG neurons isolated from PNL rats, the resting membrane potential of OXT-treated neurons was significantly decreased, and the current thresholds of OXT-treated neurons for spike generation (rheobases) were significantly greater than those of vehicle-treated neurons. In addition, OXT increased voltage-gated K channel currents in PNL animals. Furthermore, intra-TG administration of a selective V1A-R antagonist reversed the OXT-induced alleviation of mechanical hypersensitivity, and coapplication of the antagonist opposed OXT's effects on the resting membrane potential, rheobase, and K current. These findings suggest that OXT is effective at suppressing TG neuronal hyperexcitability after nerve injury, likely by modulation of voltage-gated K channels through V1A-R. This signaling mechanism represents a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of orofacial neuropathic pain.

  14. Increased expression of acid-sensing ion channel 3 within dorsal root ganglia in a rat model of bone cancer pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Fang; Wei, Xiaoli; Zhang, Shuzhuo; Yuan, Weixiu; Mi, Weidong

    2014-08-20

    In an attempt to investigate the underlying mechanisms of cancer-induced bone pain, we investigated the presence of acid-sensing ion channel 3 (ASIC3) in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons in an animal model of bone cancer pain. Forty-five female Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized into three groups: sham-operation group (sham), cancer-bearing animals killed after 7 days (C7), and cancer-bearing animals killed after 14 days (C14). After establishment of the bone cancer pain model, pain-related behavioral tests were performed to determine the paw withdrawal threshold of mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia, respectively. Reverse transcription-PCR, western blot, and immunofluorescence were used to determine mRNA and protein expression of ASIC3 in ipsilateral and contralateral lumbar 4-5 DRG neurons. Compared with the sham group, paw withdrawal threshold of mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia in the C14 group showed a significant decrease (P<0.01) from postoperation day 7 to the termination of the experiment. Compared with the sham group, the ipsilateral but not contralateral mRNA of ASIC3 was upregulated in the C14 group. Meanwhile, the ipsilateral protein expression of ASIC3 was increased in the C7 and C14 group compared with the sham group. Double-labeled immunofluorescence showed that ASIC3 and isolectin-B4 (IB4)-colocalized small DRG neurons in the C14 group were more than that in the sham group. Furthermore, we also found that there were more ASIC3 and neurofilament 200 (NF200)-colocalized DRG neurons in the C14 group than in the sham group. The upregulation of mRNA and protein levels of ASIC3 suggested its potential involvement in the development and maintenance of cancer-induced bone pain.

  15. The Survival Effects of Electeromagnetic Fields on Dorsal Root Ganglia Neurons of the Crushed Sciatic Nerve in the Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.R. Nikravesh

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have been shown that electromagnetic fields (EMF result in increasing the rate of nerve regeneration. Therefore it could be assumed following axotomy the signal induction of these fields may protect neural cells from death. For this study 24 male wistar rats (2 month age divided to 4 groups (experimental 1, 2, control and sham. For axotomy, the animals were anesthetized and their right Sciatic Nerve (SN were exposed and crushed in the mid portion of the thigh in experimental and control groups. In the sham group the SN just exposed (no compression. In the next phase experimental groups were exposed to the 50 HZ electeromagnetic field (EMF, 1.1mTl 2-4 hr/day (for 10 days. After 8 weeks, Dorsal Root Ganglions (DRGs in the lumbar segments (L4-L6 of spinal cord were sampled, processed sectioned serially and stained with toluidine blue (pH=4.5. By using stereological quantitative technique (physical disector, the neurons in the crushed side (DRGs were counted and compared in the all of groups. Statistical analyses of results have been shown a remarkable reduction in neuronal density in (DRGs of control. On the other hand we observed a cell death DRG significant among experimental groups (p<0/05. In addition we compared DRG volume in all groups but they didn’t show any significant difference. These findings indicate that the EMF may play a survival role against neuronal death during nerve injuries.

  16. Cholinergic neurons of the pelvic autonomic ganglia and uterus of the female rat: distribution of axons and presence of muscarinic receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papka, R E; Traurig, H H; Schemann, M; Collins, J; Copelin, T; Wilson, K

    1999-05-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh) stimulates contraction of the uterus and dilates the uterine arterial supply. Uterine cholinergic nerves arise from the paracervical ganglia and were, in the past, characterized based on acetylcholinesterase (AChE) histochemistry. However, the histochemical reaction for acetylcholinesterase provides only indirect evidence of acetylcholine location and is a nonspecific marker for cholinergic nerves. The present study: (1) reevaluated cholinergic neurons of the paracervical ganglia, (2) examined the cholinergic innervation of the uterus by using retrograde axonal tracing and antibodies against molecules specific to cholinergic neurons, choline acetyltransferase and the vesicular acetylcholine transporter, and (3) examined muscarinic receptors in the paracervical ganglia using autoradiography and a radiolabeled agonist. Most ganglionic neurons were choline acetyltransferase- and vesicular acetylcholine transporter-immunoreactive and were apposed by choline acetyltransferase/vesicular acetylcholine transporter-immunoreactive terminals. Retrograde tracing showed that some cholinergic neurons projected axons to the uterus. These nerves formed moderately dense plexuses in the myometrium, cervical smooth muscle and microarterial system of the uterine horns and cervix. Finally, the paracervical ganglia contain muscarinic receptors. These results clearly reveal the cholinergic innervation of the uterus and cervix, a source of these nerves, and demonstrate the muscarinic receptor content of the paracervical ganglia. Cholinergic nerves could play significant roles in the control of uterine myometrium and vasculature.

  17. Celiac ganglia block

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akinci, Devrim [Department of Radiology, Hacettepe University School of Medicine, Sihhiye, 06100 Ankara (Turkey); Akhan, Okan [Department of Radiology, Hacettepe University School of Medicine, Sihhiye, 06100 Ankara (Turkey)]. E-mail: oakhan@hacettepe.edu.tr

    2005-09-01

    Pain occurs frequently in patients with advanced cancers. Tumors originating from upper abdominal viscera such as pancreas, stomach, duodenum, proximal small bowel, liver and biliary tract and from compressing enlarged lymph nodes can cause severe abdominal pain, which do not respond satisfactorily to medical treatment or radiotherapy. Percutaneous celiac ganglia block (CGB) can be performed with high success and low complication rates under imaging guidance to obtain pain relief in patients with upper abdominal malignancies. A significant relationship between pain relief and degree of tumoral celiac ganglia invasion according to CT features was described in the literature. Performing the procedure in the early grades of celiac ganglia invasion on CT can increase the effectiveness of the CGB, which is contrary to World Health Organization criteria stating that CGB must be performed in patients with advanced stage cancer. CGB may also be effectively performed in patients with chronic pancreatitis for pain palliation.

  18. The effect of botulinum neurotoxin A on sciatic nerve injury-induced neuroimmunological changes in rat dorsal root ganglia and spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mika, J; Rojewska, E; Makuch, W; Korostynski, M; Luvisetto, S; Marinelli, S; Pavone, F; Przewlocka, B

    2011-02-23

    Botulinum neurotoxin serotype A (BoNT/A) acts by cleaving synaptosome-associated-protein-25 (SNAP-25) in nerve terminals to inhibit neuronal release and shows long-lasting antinociceptive action in neuropathic pain. However, its precise mechanism of action remains unclear. Our study aimed to characterize BoNT/A-induced neuroimmunological changes after chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve. In the ipsilateral lumbar spinal cords of CCI-exposed rats, the mRNA of microglial marker (complement component 1q, C1q), astroglial marker (glial fibrillary acidic protein, GFAP), and prodynorphin were upregulated, as measured by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). No changes appeared in mRNA for proenkephalin, pronociceptin, or neuronal and inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS1 and NOS2, respectively). In the dorsal root ganglia (DRG), an ipsilateral upregulation of prodynorphin, pronociceptin, C1q, GFAP, NOS1 and NOS2 mRNA and a downregulation of proenkephalin mRNA were observed. A single intraplantar BoNT/A (75 pg/paw) injection induced long-lasting antinociception in this model. BoNT/A diminished the injury-induced ipsilateral spinal upregulation of C1q mRNA. In the ipsilateral DRG a significant decrease of C1q-positive cell activation and of the upregulation of prodynorphin, pronociceptin and NOS1 mRNA was also observed following BoNT/A admistration. BoNT/A also diminished the injury-induced upregulation of SNAP-25 expression in both structures. We provide evidence that BoNT/A impedes injury-activated neuronal function in structures distant from the injection site, which is demonstrated by its influence on NOS1, prodynorphin and pronociceptin mRNA levels in the DRG. Moreover, the silence of microglia/macrophages after BoNT/A administration could be secondary to the inhibition of neuronal activity, but this decrease in neuroimmune interactions could be the key to the long-lasting BoNT/A effect on neuropathic pain.

  19. Effects of estrogens and bladder inflammation on mitogen-activated protein kinases in lumbosacral dorsal root ganglia from adult female rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keast Janet R

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interstitial cystitis is a chronic condition associated with bladder inflammation and, like a number of other chronic pain states, symptoms associated with interstitial cystitis are more common in females and fluctuate during the menstrual cycle. The aim of this study was to determine if estrogens could directly modulate signalling pathways within bladder sensory neurons, such as extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK and p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP kinases. These signalling pathways have been implicated in neuronal plasticity underlying development of inflammatory somatic pain but have not been as extensively investigated in visceral nociceptors. We have focused on lumbosacral dorsal root ganglion (DRG neurons projecting to pelvic viscera (L1, L2, L6, S1 of adult female Sprague-Dawley rats and performed both in vitro and in vivo manipulations to compare the effects of short- and long-term changes in estrogen levels on MAPK expression and activation. We have also investigated if prolonged estrogen deprivation influences the effects of lower urinary tract inflammation on MAPK signalling. Results In studies of isolated DRG neurons in short-term (overnight culture, we found that estradiol and estrogen receptor (ER agonists rapidly stimulated ER-dependent p38 phosphorylation relative to total p38. Examination of DRGs following chronic estrogen deprivation in vivo (ovariectomy showed a parallel increase in total and phosphorylated p38 (relative to β-tubulin. We also observed an increase in ERK1 phosphorylation (relative to total ERK1, but no change in ERK1 expression (relative to β-tubulin. We observed no change in ERK2 expression or phosphorylation. Although ovariectomy increased the level of phosphorylated ERK1 (vs. total ERK1, cyclophosphamide-induced lower urinary tract inflammation did not cause a net increase of either ERK1 or ERK2, or their phosphorylation. Inflammation did, however, cause an increase in p38

  20. 大鼠颈背根神经节和交感神经节分支 支配颈椎关节突关节的关系%Relationship of the Branches of Cervical Dorsal Root Ganglia and Sympathetic Ganglia in Dominating the Zygapophyseal Joints of Rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王金武; 陈德松; 李继峰; 方有生; 顾玉东

    2000-01-01

    目的研究交感神经与支配颈椎关节突关节的初级感觉神经元分支关系,探讨椎间孔外颈神经受压产生颈肩痛和头面部症状的机制。方法选用8只Wistar大白鼠,右侧为实验侧,左侧对照。应用辣根过氧化物酶(horseradish peroxidase,HRP)逆行追踪标记技术,用微量注射器在右侧C5/C6颈椎关节突关节囊上注射30%HRP 5 μl,对照侧注射0.9%的生理盐水5 μl作为对照。动物存活48 h后经升主动脉灌注杀死,切取双侧C1~T1颈部脊髓背根神经节(dorsal root ganglion,DRG)、双侧颈交感神经节和双侧三叉神经节,冰冻切片后利用TMB法进行显色反应,观察切片内HRP标记细胞情况,并应用图像分析系统对实验侧DRG和交感神经节内标记细胞进行分类和计数。结果大鼠右侧C5/C6关节突关节进行HRP注射后,颈中、下(或星状)交感神经节和C5~C7 DRG内发现HRP标记细胞,以中型和小型细胞为主。其中颈中神经节和C6 DRG内标记细胞的平均面积和及平均光密度较高(P<0.01),而对照侧和双侧三叉神经节未发现标记细胞。结论颈椎关节突关节主要受相邻3条颈神经的感觉支和颈交感神经分支支配,可能与椎间孔外颈神经卡压产生颈肩痛及头面部症状有关。%Purpose To study the relationship between sympathetic nerve and the branches of primary sensory neurons in dominating cervical zygapophyseal joints with the HRP retrograde tracing methods.To explore the mechanism of the external intervertebral foramen's cryical nerve compression syndrome with neck-shoulder pain and the symptom of head and face regions. Methods 8 Wistar rats were used with the right side as experimental side and the left side as control side.5 μl of 30% HRP solution was injected into the C5/C6 cervical zygapophyseal joint capsule of the right side by microinjection syringe and 5 μl of 0.9% normal saline was injected into the left side as

  1. Neuropsychiatry of the basal ganglia

    OpenAIRE

    Ring, H.; Serra-Mestres, J

    2002-01-01

    This review aims to relate recent findings describing the role and neural connectivity of the basal ganglia to the clinical neuropsychiatry of basal ganglia movement disorders and to the role of basal ganglia disturbances in "psychiatric"' states. Articles relating to the relevant topics were initially collected through MEDLINE and papers relating to the clinical conditions discussed were also reviewed. The anatomy and connections of the basal ganglia indicate that these structures are import...

  2. Neurite outgrowth in cultured mouse pelvic ganglia - Effects of neurotrophins and bladder tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekman, Mari; Zhu, Baoyi; Swärd, Karl; Uvelius, Bengt

    2017-07-01

    Neurotrophic factors regulate survival and growth of neurons. The urinary bladder is innervated via both sympathetic and parasympathetic neurons located in the major pelvic ganglion. The aim of the present study was to characterize the effects of the neurotrophins nerve growth factor (NGF), brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neurotrophin 3 (NT-3) on the sprouting rate of sympathetic and parasympathetic neurites from the female mouse ganglion. The pelvic ganglion was dissected out and attached to a petri dish and cultured in vitro. All three factors (BDNF, NT-3 and NGF) stimulated neurite outgrowth of both sympathetic and parasympathetic neurites although BDNF and NT-3 had a higher stimulatory effect on parasympathetic ganglion cells. The neurotrophin receptors TrkA, TrkB and TrkC were all expressed in neurons of the ganglia. Co-culture of ganglia with urinary bladder tissue, but not diaphragm tissue, increased the sprouting rate of neurites. Active forms of BDNF and NT-3 were detected in urinary bladder tissue using western blotting whereas tissue from the diaphragm expressed NGF. Neurite outgrowth from the pelvic ganglion was inhibited by a TrkB receptor antagonist. We therefore suggest that the urinary bladder releases trophic factors, including BDNF and NT-3, which regulate neurite outgrowth via activation of neuronal Trk-receptors. These findings could influence future strategies for developing pharmaceuticals to improve re-innervation due to bladder pathologies. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Exercise training preserves vagal preganglionic neurones and restores parasympathetic tonus in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichige, Marcelo H A; Santos, Carla R; Jordão, Camila P; Ceroni, Alexandre; Negrão, Carlos E; Michelini, Lisete C

    2016-11-01

    Heart Failure (HF) is accompanied by reduced ventricular function, activation of compensatory neurohormonal mechanisms and marked autonomic dysfunction characterized by exaggerated sympathoexcitation and reduced parasympathetic activity. With 6 weeks of exercise training, HF-related loss of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT)-positive vagal preganglionic neurones is avoided, restoring the parasympathetic tonus to the heart, and the immunoreactivity of dopamine β-hydroxylase-positive premotor neurones that drive sympathetic outflow to the heart is reduced. Training-induced correction of autonomic dysfunction occurs even with the persistence of abnormal ventricular function. Strong positive correlation between improved parasympathetic tonus to the heart and increased ChAT immunoreactivity in vagal preganglionic neurones after training indicates this is a crucial mechanism to restore autonomic function in heart failure. Exercise training is an efficient tool to attenuate sympathoexcitation, a hallmark of heart failure (HF). Although sympathetic modulation in HF is widely studied, information regarding parasympathetic control is lacking. We examined the combined effects of sympathetic and vagal tonus to the heart in sedentary (Sed) and exercise trained (ET) HF rats and the contribution of respective premotor and preganglionic neurones. Wistar rats submitted to coronary artery ligation or sham surgery were assigned to training or sedentary protocols for 6 weeks. After haemodynamic, autonomic tonus (atropine and atenolol i.v.) and ventricular function determinations, brains were collected for immunoreactivity assays (choline acetyltransferase, ChATir; dopamine β-hydroxylase, DBHir) and neuronal counting in the dorsal motor nucleus of vagus (DMV), nucleus ambiguus (NA) and rostroventrolateral medulla (RVLM). HF-Sed vs. SHAM-Sed exhibited decreased exercise capacity, reduced ejection fraction, increased left ventricle end diastolic pressure, smaller positive and negative

  4. Parasympathetic preganglionic cardiac motoneurons labeled after voluntary diving

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W Michael ePanneton

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A dramatic bradycardia is induced by underwater submersion in vertebrates. The location of parasympathetic preganglionic cardiac motor neurons driving this aspect of the diving response was investigated using cFos immunohistochemistry combined with retrograde transport of cholera toxin subunit B (CTB to double-label neurons. After pericardial injections of CTB, trained rats voluntarily dove underwater, and their heart rates dropped immediately to 95±2bpm, an 80% reduction. After immunohistochemical processing, the vast majority of CTB labeled neurons were located in the reticular formation from the rostral cervical spinal cord to the facial motor nucleus, confirming previous studies. Labeled neurons caudal to the rostral ventrolateral medulla were usually spindle-shaped aligned along an oblique line running from the dorsal vagal nucleus to the ventrolateral reticular formation, while those more rostrally were multipolar with extended dendrites. Nine percent of retrogradely-labeled neurons were positive for both cFos and CTB after diving and 74% of these were found rostral to the obex. CTB also was transported transganglionically in primary afferent fibers, resulting in large granular deposits in dorsolateral, ventrolateral, and commissural subnuclei of the nucleus tractus solitarii and finer deposits in lamina I and IV-V of the trigeminocervical complex. The overlap of parasympathetic preganglionic cardiac motor neurons activated by diving with those activated by baro- and chemoreceptors in the rostral ventrolateral medulla is discussed. Thus the profound bradycardia seen with underwater submersion reinforces the notion that the mammalian diving response is the most powerful autonomic reflex known.

  5. Bilateral lunate intraosseous ganglia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pablos, J.M. [Department of Radiology, Hospital San Juan de Dios, Seville (Spain); Valdes, J.C. [Department of Radiology, Cemedi, Seville (Spain); Gavilan, F. [Department of Pathology, Hospital Universitario Virgen del Rocio, Seville (Spain)

    1998-12-01

    An intraosseous ganglion is a relatively uncommon, benign, cyst-like lesion that occurs in young and middle-aged adults. Most commonly seen adjacent to the hip, ankle, knee, or wrist, they are histologically identical to their soft tissue counterparts. A review of the literature revealed only two previously reported examples of bilateral symmetrical ganglia of the lunate bones. (orig.) With 3 figs., 10 refs.

  6. Flexible parasympathetic responses to sadness facilitate spontaneous affect regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stange, Jonathan P; Hamilton, Jessica L; Fresco, David M; Alloy, Lauren B

    2017-07-01

    The ability of the parasympathetic nervous system to flexibly adapt to changes in environmental context is thought to serve as a physiological indicator of self-regulatory capacity, and deficits in parasympathetic flexibility appear to characterize affective disorders such as depression. However, whether parasympathetic flexibility (vagal withdrawal to emotional or environmental challenges such as sadness, and vagal augmentation during recovery from sadness) could facilitate the effectiveness of adaptive affect regulation strategies is not known. In a study of 178 undergraduate students, we evaluated whether parasympathetic flexibility in response to a sad film involving loss would enhance the effectiveness of regulatory strategies (reappraisal, distraction, and suppression) spontaneously employed to reduce negative affect during a 2-min uninstructed recovery period following the induction. Parasympathetic reactivity and recovery were indexed by fluctuations in respiratory sinus arrhythmia and high-frequency heart rate variability. Cognitive reappraisal and distraction were more effective in attenuating negative affect among individuals with more parasympathetic flexibility, particularly greater vagal augmentation during recovery, relative to individuals with less parasympathetic flexibility. In contrast, suppression was associated with less attenuation of negative affect, but only among individuals who also had less vagal withdrawal during the sad film. Alternative models provided partial support for reversed directionality, with reappraisal predicting greater parasympathetic recovery, but only when individuals also experienced greater reductions in negative affect. These results suggest that contextually appropriate parasympathetic reactivity and recovery may facilitate the success of affect regulation. Impairments in parasympathetic flexibility could confer risk for affective disorders due to attenuated capacity for effective self-regulation. © 2017 Society for

  7. Parasympathetic nervous system activity and children's sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sheikh, Mona; Erath, Stephen A; Bagley, Erika J

    2013-06-01

    We examined indices of children's parasympathetic nervous system activity (PNS), including respiratory sinus arrhythmia during baseline (RSAB) and RSA reactivity (RSAR), to a laboratory challenge, and importantly the interaction between RSAB and RSAR as predictors of multiple parameters of children's sleep. Lower RSAR denotes increased vagal withdrawal (reductions in RSA between baseline and task) and higher RSAR represents decreased vagal withdrawal or augmentation (increases in RSA between baseline and task). A community sample of school-attending children (121 boys and 103 girls) participated [mean age = 10.41 years; standard deviation (SD) = 0.67]. Children's sleep parameters were examined through actigraphy for 7 consecutive nights. Findings demonstrate that RSAB and RSAR interact to predict multiple sleep quality parameters (activity, minutes awake after sleep onset and long wake episodes). The overall pattern of effects illustrates that children who exhibit more disrupted sleep (increased activity, more minutes awake after sleep onset and more frequent long wake episodes) are those with lower RSAB in conjunction with lower RSAR. This combination of low RSAB and low RSAR probably reflects increased autonomic nervous system arousal, which interferes with sleep. Results illustrate the importance of individual differences in physiological regulation indexed by interactions between PNS baseline activity and PNS reactivity for a better understanding of children's sleep quality.

  8. Neurotransmission to parasympathetic cardiac vagal neurons in the brain stem is altered with left ventricular hypertrophy-induced heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cauley, Edmund; Wang, Xin; Dyavanapalli, Jhansi; Sun, Ke; Garrott, Kara; Kuzmiak-Glancy, Sarah; Kay, Matthew W; Mendelowitz, David

    2015-10-01

    Hypertension, cardiac hypertrophy, and heart failure (HF) are widespread and debilitating cardiovascular diseases that affect nearly 23 million people worldwide. A distinctive hallmark of these cardiovascular diseases is autonomic imbalance, with increased sympathetic activity and decreased parasympathetic vagal tone. Recent device-based approaches, such as implantable vagal stimulators that stimulate a multitude of visceral sensory and motor fibers in the vagus nerve, are being evaluated as new therapeutic approaches for these and other diseases. However, little is known about how parasympathetic activity to the heart is altered with these diseases, and this lack of knowledge is an obstacle in the goal of devising selective interventions that can target and selectively restore parasympathetic activity to the heart. To identify the changes that occur within the brain stem to diminish the parasympathetic cardiac activity, left ventricular hypertrophy was elicited in rats by aortic pressure overload using a transaortic constriction approach. Cardiac vagal neurons (CVNs) in the brain stem that generate parasympathetic activity to the heart were identified with a retrograde tracer and studied using patch-clamp electrophysiological recordings in vitro. Animals with left cardiac hypertrophy had diminished excitation of CVNs, which was mediated both by an augmented frequency of spontaneous inhibitory GABAergic neurotransmission (with no alteration of inhibitory glycinergic activity) as well as a diminished amplitude and frequency of excitatory neurotransmission to CVNs. Opportunities to alter these network pathways and neurotransmitter receptors provide future targets of intervention in the goal to restore parasympathetic activity and autonomic balance to the heart in cardiac hypertrophy and other cardiovascular diseases.

  9. Inflammation in the uterus induces phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase and substance P immunoreactivity in dorsal root ganglia neurons innervating both uterus and colon in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jichang; Micevych, Paul; McDonald, John; Rapkin, Andrea; Chaban, Victor

    2008-09-01

    In women, clinical studies suggest that pain syndromes such as irritable bowel syndrome and interstitial cystitis, which are associated with visceral hyperalgesia, are often comorbid with endometriosis and chronic pelvic pain. One of the possible explanations for this phenomenon is viscerovisceral cross-sensitization, in which increased nociceptive input from an inflamed pelvic organ sensitizes neurons that receive convergent input to the same dorsal root ganglion (DRG) from an unaffected visceral organ. Nociception induces up-regulation of cellular mechanisms such as phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (pERK) and substance P (SP), neurotransmitters associated with induced pain sensation. The purpose of this study was to determine, in a rodent model, whether uterine inflammation increased the number of pERK- and SP-positive neurons that received input from both the uterus and the colon. Cell bodies of colonic and uterine DRG were retrogradely labeled with fluorescent tracer dyes microinjected into the colon/rectum and into the uterus. Ganglia were harvested for fluorescent microscopy to identify positively stained neurons. Approximately 6% of neurons were colon specific and 10% uterus specific. Among these uterus- or colon-specific neurons, up to 3-5% of DRG neurons in the lumbosacral neurons (L1-S3 levels) received input from both visceral organs. Uterine inflammation increased the number of pERK- and SP-immunoreactive DRG neurons innervating specifically colon, or innervating specifically uterus, and those innervating both organs. These results suggest that a localized inflammation activates primary visceral afferents, regardless of whether they innervate the affected organ. This visceral sensory integration in the DRG may underlie the observed comorbidity of female pelvic pain syndromes.

  10. Effects of intrathecal injection of glial cell inhibitor on spinal cord astrocytes following chronic compression of dorsal root ganglia in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xianhong Zhang; Wen Shen; Mingde Wang; Yinming Zeng

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Astrocytes are considered to provide nutritional support in the central nervous system. However, recent studies have confirmed that astrocytes also play an important role in chronic pain. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effects of intrathecal injection of fluorocitrate, minocycline or both on astrocyte activation and proliferation in the spinal dorsal horn of compressed dorsal root ganglion in rats. DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: The neurology randomized controlled animal study was performed at the Jiangsu Institute of Anesthesia Medicine, from September 2006 to April 2007. MATERIALS: A total of 96 male Sprague Dawley rats, aged 6-8 weeks, were selected for this study. Following intrathecal catheterization, 80 rats underwent steel bar insertion into the L4-5 intervertebral foramina to make a stable compression on the L4-5 posterior root ganglion. Thus rat models of ganglion compression were established. Minocycline and fluorocitrate were purchased from Sigma, USA. METHODS: A total of 96 rats were randomly and equally divided into six groups. Rat L4, L5 transverse process and intervertebral foramina were exposed in the sham operation group, but without steel bar insertion. The model group did not receive any manipulations. Rats in the phosphate buffered saline (PBS) group were intrathecally injected with 0.01 mmol/L PBS (20 μL). Rats in the fluorocitrate group were subjected to 1 μmol/L fluorocitrate (20 μL). Rats in the minocycline group were intrathecally injected with 5 g/L minocycline (20 μL). Rats in the minocycline and fluorocitrate group received a mixture (20 μL) of 5 g/L minocycline and 1 μmol/L fluorocitrate. Following model establishment, drugs were administered once a day. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: At 7 and 14 days following model induction, glial fibrillary acidic protein expression in the spinal dorsal horn was measured by immunofluorescence microscopy. Six sections with significant glial fibrillary acidic protein -positive expression were

  11. The sea anemone Bunodosoma caissarum toxin BcIII modulates the sodium current kinetics of rat dorsal root ganglia neurons and is displaced in a voltage-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salceda, Emilio; López, Omar; Zaharenko, André J; Garateix, Anoland; Soto, Enrique

    2010-03-01

    Sea anemone toxins bind to site 3 of the sodium channels, which is partially formed by the extracellular linker connecting S3 and S4 segments of domain IV, slowing down the inactivation process. In this work we have characterized the actions of BcIII, a sea anemone polypeptide toxin isolated from Bunodosoma caissarum, on neuronal sodium currents using the patch clamp technique. Neurons of the dorsal root ganglia of Wistar rats (P5-9) in primary culture were used for this study (n=65). The main effects of BcIII were a concentration-dependent increase in the sodium current inactivation time course (IC(50)=2.8 microM) as well as an increase in the current peak amplitude. BcIII did not modify the voltage at which 50% of the channels are activated or inactivated, nor the reversal potential of sodium current. BcIII shows a voltage-dependent action. A progressive acceleration of sodium current fast inactivation with longer conditioning pulses was observed, which was steeper as more depolarizing were the prepulses. The same was observed for other two anemone toxins (CgNa, from Condylactis gigantea and ATX-II, from Anemonia viridis). These results suggest that the binding affinity of sea anemone toxins may be reduced in a voltage-dependent manner, as has been described for alpha-scorpion toxins.

  12. The identification and characteristics of sacral parasympathetic preganglionic neurones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Groat, W C; Ryall, R W

    1968-06-01

    1. Sacral parasympathetic preganglionic neurones were identified by intracellular and extracellular micro-electrode recording of antidromic potentials in response to stimulation of the pelvic nerve or the second or third sacral ventral roots.2. The segmental distribution of autonomic neurones varied in different cats. In some cats they were mainly in S2 segment, in others in S3 and in the remainder, in both S2 and S3.3. The antidromic potentials showed initial segment-somadendritic (IS-SD) inflexions and delayed depolarizations and were slightly less prolonged than those of sympathetic neurones but more prolonged than those of spinal motoneurones. After-hyperpolarization was observed after the antidromic spike potential.4. The conduction velocities for sacral parasympathetic preganglionic fibres were less than 12.5 m/sec and thus were similar to those of sympathetic preganglionic fibres.5. Parasympathetic neurones were not excited by micro-electro-phoretically applied 5-hydroxytryptamine, noradrenaline or acetylcholine.

  13. Leptin Controls Parasympathetic Wiring of the Pancreas during Embryonic Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Croizier

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The autonomic nervous system plays a critical role in glucose metabolism through both its sympathetic and parasympathetic branches, but the mechanisms that underlie the development of the autonomic innervation of the pancreas remain poorly understood. Here, we report that cholinergic innervation of pancreatic islets develops during mid-gestation under the influence of leptin. Leptin-deficient mice display a greater cholinergic innervation of pancreatic islets beginning in embryonic life, and this increase persists into adulthood. Remarkably, a single intracerebroventricular injection of leptin in embryos caused a permanent reduction in parasympathetic innervation of pancreatic β cells and long-term impairments in glucose homeostasis. These developmental effects of leptin involve a direct inhibitory effect on the outgrowth of preganglionic axons from the hindbrain. These studies reveal an unanticipated regulatory role of leptin on the parasympathetic nervous system during embryonic development and may have important implications for our understanding of the early mechanisms that contribute to diabetes.

  14. Leptin Controls Parasympathetic Wiring of the Pancreas during Embryonic Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croizier, Sophie; Prevot, Vincent; Bouret, Sebastien G

    2016-04-05

    The autonomic nervous system plays a critical role in glucose metabolism through both its sympathetic and parasympathetic branches, but the mechanisms that underlie the development of the autonomic innervation of the pancreas remain poorly understood. Here, we report that cholinergic innervation of pancreatic islets develops during mid-gestation under the influence of leptin. Leptin-deficient mice display a greater cholinergic innervation of pancreatic islets beginning in embryonic life, and this increase persists into adulthood. Remarkably, a single intracerebroventricular injection of leptin in embryos caused a permanent reduction in parasympathetic innervation of pancreatic β cells and long-term impairments in glucose homeostasis. These developmental effects of leptin involve a direct inhibitory effect on the outgrowth of preganglionic axons from the hindbrain. These studies reveal an unanticipated regulatory role of leptin on the parasympathetic nervous system during embryonic development and may have important implications for our understanding of the early mechanisms that contribute to diabetes.

  15. Severe intestinal ischemia can trigger cardiovascular collapse and sudden death via a parasympathetic mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penn, Alexander H; Schmid-Schönbein, Geert W

    2011-09-01

    Hemorrhagic shock and splanchnic arterial occlusion (SAO) followed by reperfusion are associated with high mortality. However, rapid cardiovascular failure and death may also occur before reperfusion in hemorrhagic shock and SAO. We show in a rat SAO model that, upon gut ischemia, mean arterial blood pressure transiently elevates and then drops fatally in one of two time courses: (i) gradually over ∼1 to 3 h or (ii) rapidly (often by >80 mmHg) over a period of 1 to 6 min. We hypothesize that fast fatal pressure drops (FFPDs) are due to failure of autonomic nervous system control. To test this, we treated rats with Glucose (10%) in the small intestinal lumen and intramuscularly administered xylazine to activate the parasympathetic nervous system or with a muscarinic anticholinergic (glycopyrrolate) or by total subdiaphragmatic vagotomy to attenuate parasympathetic nervous system activity. We also tested nafamostat mesilate (ANGD [6-amidino-2-naphthyl p-guanidinobenzoate dimethanesulfonate]), a protease inhibitor efficacious in preventing blood pressure loss in SAO with reperfusion, in the intestinal lumen. Fifty percent of animals receiving xylazine and Glucose died by FFPD (vs. 33% with neither, not statistically significant). Total subdiaphragmatic vagotomy or glycopyrrolate treatment significantly reduced the incidence to 0% (P neurogenic shock or autonomic dysregulation associated with sudden death.

  16. Effect of FGF-2 and sciatic nerve grafting on ChAT expression in dorsal root ganglia neurons of spinal cord transected rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzen, Fausto Pierdoná; de Araújo, Dayane Pessoa; Lucena, Eudes Euler de Souza; de Morais, Hécio Henrique Araújo; Cavalcanti, José Rodolfo Lopes de Paiva; do Nascimento, Expedito Silva; Costa, Miriam Stela Maris de Oliveira; Cavalcante, Jeferson Sousa

    2016-03-11

    Neurotrophic factors and peripheral nerves are known to be good substrates for bridging CNS trauma. The involvement of fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) activation in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) was examined following spinal cord injury in the rat. We evaluated whether FGF-2 increases the ability of a sciatic nerve graft to enhance neuronal plasticity, in a gap promoted by complete transection of the spinal cord. The rats were subjected to a 4mm-long gap at low thoracic level and were repaired with saline (Saline or control group, n=10), or fragment of the sciatic nerve (Nerve group, n=10), or fragment of the sciatic nerve to which FGF-2 (Nerve+FGF-2 group, n=10) had been added immediately after lesion. The effects of the FGF-2 and fragment of the sciatic nerve grafts on neuronal plasticity were investigated using choline acetyl transferase (ChAT)-immunoreactivity of neurons in the dorsal root ganglion after 8 weeks. Preservation of the area and diameter of neuronal cell bodies in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) was seen in animals treated with the sciatic nerve, an effect enhanced by the addition of FGF-2. Thus, the addition of exogenous FGF-2 to a sciatic nerve fragment grafted in a gap of the rat spinal cord submitted to complete transection was able to improve neuroprotection in the DRG. The results emphasized that the manipulation of the microenvironment in the wound might amplify the regenerative capacity of peripheral neurons.

  17. Intracerebroventricular Administration of Nerve Growth Factor Induces Gliogenesis in Sensory Ganglia, Dorsal Root, and within the Dorsal Root Entry Zone

    OpenAIRE

    Schlachetzki, Johannes C.M.; Pizzo, Donald P.; Debbi A. Morrissette; Jürgen Winkler

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies indicated that intracerebroventricular administration of nerve growth factor (NGF) leads to massive Schwann cell hyperplasia surrounding the medulla oblongata and spinal cord. This study was designed to characterize the proliferation of peripheral glial cells, that is, Schwann and satellite cells, in the trigeminal ganglia and dorsal root ganglia (DRG) of adult rats during two weeks of NGF infusion using bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) to label dividing cells. The trigeminal ganglia...

  18. Distribution of vasoactive intestinal peptide, pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide, nitric oxide synthase, and their receptors in human and rat sphenopalatine ganglion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Csati, A; Tajti, J; Kuris, A

    2012-01-01

    Cranial parasympathetic outflow is mediated through the sphenopalatine ganglion (SPG). The present study was performed to examine the expression of the parasympathetic signaling transmitters and their receptors in human and rat SPG. Indirect immunofluorescence technique was used for the demonstra...

  19. Discriminative behavioral assessment unveils remarkable reactive astrocytosis and early molecular correlates in basal ganglia of 3-nitropropionic acid subchronic treated rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirillo, Giovanni; Maggio, Nicola; Bianco, Maria Rosaria; Vollono, Cecilia; Sellitti, Stefania; Papa, Michele

    2010-01-01

    Reactive astrocytosis seems to be strongly implicated in the development and maintenance of inflammatory and neurodegenerative disorders. We design a new toxic model treatment with 3-nitropropionic acid (3-NP), a mitochondrial complex II irreversible inhibitor, to induce in rats Huntington's disease (HD) like syndrome, characterized by hindlimb dystonia, involuntary choreiform movements and reduced global activity. In an attempt to find out whether molecular and morphological changes in the neuro-glial network could be involved in the pathogenesis of this disease, we developed a protocol of subchronic intra-peritoneal 3-NP intoxication. Moreover we set up specific, highly discriminative, behavioral tests to detect very early mild motor disabilities in 3-NP treated rats. This treatment did not cause severe cell death. However, in the Caudate-Putamen (CPu) of all 3-NP treated animals we found a massive astrogliosis, revealed by increased GFAP levels, paralleled by changes of the glial glutamate transporter GLAST distribution. To these glial changes we detected a transcriptional upregulation of c-fos and Sub-P in the striatal medium spiny neurons (MSN). We propose that this model of 3-NP intoxication along with the designed set of behavioral analyses allow to unmask in a very early phase the motor deficits and the underlying morpho-molecular changes associated to the onset of motor disabilities in the HD-like syndrome. Therefore this model unveil the key role played by the different components of the tripartite synapse in the pathogenesis of the HD, a putative non-cell-autonomous disease.

  20. Attenuation of pain behaviour by local administration of alpha-2 adrenoceptor antagonists to dorsal root ganglia in a rat radiculopathy model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogon, I; Takebayashi, T; Miyakawa, T; Iwase, T; Tanimoto, K; Terashima, Y; Jimbo, S; Kobayashi, T; Tohse, N; Yamashita, T

    2016-05-01

    There were several reports suggesting α-adrenoceptor antagonists are effective to treat neuropathic pain. The aims of this study were as follows: (1) to introduce drug delivery system for dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons; (2) to elucidate the effects of α-adrenoceptor antagonists in acute, subacute or chronic phase and (3) to determine which subtype of adrenoceptor was mainly involved. We used 130 male Sprague-Dawley rats. After root constriction, rats received three local injections of α-adrenoceptor antagonists around DRG. We administered the non-selective α-adrenoceptor antagonist phentolamine for 3 consecutive days from day 0, 4 or 11 after the surgery, and the α1-adrenoceptor antagonist prazosin, the α1-adrenoceptor antagonist silodosin, the more preferred α1-adrenoceptor than prazosin and the α2-adrenoceptor antagonist yohimbine for 3 consecutive days from day 0 after the surgery. Phentolamine and yohimbine continually attenuated pain behaviour. Prazosin at high dose attenuated pain behaviour, however, prazosin at low dose did not attenuate pain behaviour every experimental day. Silodosin had no analgesic effect. Phentolamine injections from day 4 after surgery attenuated pain behaviour that had been established on the 3rd experimental day until the 28th post-operative day, although effect of phentolamine wore off. Phentolamine injections from day 11 after surgery temporarily attenuated pain behaviour that had been established on the 3rd, 7th and 10th experimental days. This study showed α-adrenoceptor antagonists could suppress pain behaviour via α2-adrenoceptor in acute phase and temporary attenuate pain behaviour in chronic phase. These findings presented potentials sympathetic nerve blockade contributed to treat neuropathic pain. © 2015 European Pain Federation - EFIC®

  1. Effect of unilateral incisor tooth amputation on the glucose metabolism in submandibular glands of rats following sympathetic and parasympathetic denervation Efeito da amputação unilateral do incisivo inferior sobre o metabolismo da glicose em glândulas submandibulares de ratos submetidas a desnervação simpática e parassimpática

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marinez ALMEIDA-DE-FARIA

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available The autonomic nervous system is of major importance in the regulation of physiological functions of the salivary glands, including the sialadenotrophic process. It is well known that the secretory function as well as other functions in the salivary glands depend upon the energy produced in the gland. The acini volume density, some enzymes of the glucose metabolism, such as hexokinase, phosphofructokinase, pyruvate kinase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and lactate dehydrogenase were evaluated following sympathetic and parasympathetic denervation of submandibular glands of rats, submitted to unilateral incisor amputation, five days after denervation. Sympathectomized glands submitted to amputation showed a reduction in the activity of hexokinase and phosphofructokinase-1, varying from 27.5 to 36.7 % for hexokinase and from 22.8 to 38.4 % for phosphofructokinase-1. Although no variation was observed in the enzymatic activity of parasympathectomized animals, the acini volume density showed a significant decrease.O sistema nervoso autônomo é de grande importância na regulação da fisiologia das glândulas salivares, incluindo o processo sialadenotrófico. Já é bem conhecido o fato de que a função secretora, bem como, outras funções desempenhadas pelas glândulas salivares dependem de energia produzida nas glândulas. A histometria dos ácinos, algumas enzimas do metabolismo de carboidratos como, hexoquinase, fosfofrutoquinase-1, piruvato quinase, glicose-6-fosfato desidrogenase e lactato desidrogenase foram avaliados na glândula submandibular de ratos com desnervação simpática e parassimpática, submetidos a amputação unilateral dos dentes incisivos, cinco dias após a desnervação. Nas glândulas simpatectomizadas submetidas a amputação dos incisivos observou-se uma redução nas atividades da hexoquinase (27,5 - 36,7 % e da fosofofrutoquinase-1 (22,8 - 38,4 %. Embora, nehuma variação foi observado nas atividades enzim

  2. Moderate pressure massage elicits a parasympathetic nervous system response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diego, Miguel A; Field, Tiffany

    2009-01-01

    Twenty healthy adults were randomly assigned to a moderate pressure or a light pressure massage therapy group, and EKGs were recorded during a 3-min baseline, during the 15-min massage period and during a 3-min postmassage period. EKG data were then used to derive the high frequency (HF), low frequency (LF) components of heart rate variability and the low to high frequency ratio (LF/HF) as noninvasive markers of autonomic nervous system activity. The participants who received the moderate pressure massage exhibited a parasympathetic nervous system response characterized by an increase in HF, suggesting increased vagal efferent activity and a decrease in the LF/HF ratio, suggesting a shift from sympathetic to parasympathetic activity that peaked during the first half of the massage period. On the other hand, those who received the light pressure massage exhibited a sympathetic nervous system response characterized by decreased HF and increased LF/HF.

  3. The parasympathetic nervous system in the quest for stroke therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheyuo, Cletus; Jacob, Asha; Wu, Rongqian; Zhou, Mian; Coppa, Gene F; Wang, Ping

    2011-05-01

    Stroke is a devastating neurovascular disease with limited therapeutic options. The pathogenesis of stroke involves complex interrelated molecular mechanisms including excitotoxicity, oxidative and nitrosative stress, cortical spreading depolarizations, inflammation, necrosis, and apoptosis. Successful development of stroke therapeutics depends on understanding these molecular mechanisms and how to counteract them to limit tissue damage during stroke. Activation of the parasympathetic nervous system (PNS) has been shown to antagonize a multiplicity of pathologic mechanisms. Elements of parasympathetic activation such as vagus nerve stimulation have already been used successfully in treating brain disorders such as epilepsy and depression. This review discusses the anatomical basis and molecular mechanisms involved in activation of the PNS, and assesses the strength of available evidence for the further development of this modality into a stroke therapy.

  4. Effects of samarium chloride on nicotinic transmission in superior cervical ganglia of rats%氯化钐对大鼠颈上神经节烟碱传递的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何萍; 莫宁

    2006-01-01

    相应浓度直接灌流神经节.③采用配对t检验比较灌流药物前后生物电差异.主要观察指标:①氯化钐对大鼠颈上神经节的快兴奋性突触后电位的影响.②对颈上神经节细胞膜电位和膜电阻的影响.③对乙酰胆碱和氨甲酰胆碱膜除极化反应的影响.④氯化钐对高钙(10 mmol/L)易化快兴奋性突触后电位作用的影响.结果:①1×(10-7~10-4)mol/L的氯化钐能可逆性地抑制大鼠颈上神经节的快兴奋性突触后电位[1×10-4,1×10-5,1×10-6,1×107 mol/L的氯化钐对大鼠颈上神经节细胞快兴奋性突触后电位幅度抑制百分率分别为(49.78±13.85)%(n=20),(39.05±4.05)%(n=10),(29.83±9.73)%(n=10),(16.30±2.16)%(n=10),P<0.05~0.01].1×10-4mol/L的氯化钐可使顺行动作电位变成快兴奋性突触后电位(n=5).②1×10-4 mol/L的氯化钐灌流对乙酰胆碱(n=5)和氨甲酰胆碱(n=7)膜除极化反应无明显影响(P>0.05).③1×(10-7~10-4)mol/L对颈上神经节细胞膜电位、膜电阻无明显影响(n=67,P>0.05).④1×10-4mol/L氯化钐能拮抗高钙(10 mmol/L)对快兴奋性突触后电位的易化作用(n=5,P<0.01).结论:氯化钐通过突触前机制抑制大鼠交感神经节颈上神经节烟碱传递,可能与抑制突触前钙离子内流有关.%BACKGROUND: The rare earth elements (Res) have multiple bio-activities and some extent neurotoxicity, Because of their distinct physical and chemical properties. The studies on neuromuscular junction and sympathet ic ganglia have shown that some Res, such as lanthanum(La), gadolinium (Gd),etc, exert considerable effects on synaptic transmission, but the effects and mechanism of Samarium on synaptic transmission are still unknown.OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effects and impossible mechanism of Samarium Chloride (SmCl3) on the nicotinic transmission in the isolated sympathetic ganglia, superior cervical ganglion (SCG) of rats.DESIGN: Controlled experimental study based on cells.SETTING: Department of Pharmacology

  5. Cold face test demonstrates parasympathetic cardiac dysfunction in familial dysautonomia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilz, M J; Stemper, B; Sauer, P; Haertl, U; Singer, W; Axelrod, F B

    1999-06-01

    In familial dysautonomia (FD), i.e., Riley-Day syndrome, parasympathetic dysfunction has not been sufficiently evaluated. The cold face test is a noninvasive method of activating trigeminal brain stem cardiovagal and sympathetic pathways and can be performed in patients with limited cooperation. We performed cold face tests in 11 FD patients and 15 controls. For 60 s, cold compresses (0-1 degrees C) were applied to the cheeks and forehead while we monitored heart rate, respiration, beat-to-beat radial artery blood pressure, and laser-Doppler skin blood flow at the first toe pulp. From these measurements heart rate variability parameters were calculated: root mean square of successive differences (RMSSD), coefficient of variation (CV), low- and high-frequency (LF and HF, respectively) power spectra of the electrocardiogram, and the LF transfer function gain between blood pressure and heart rate. All patients perceived cold stimulation and acknowledged discomfort. In controls, heart rate and skin blood flow decreased significantly during cold face test; in patients, both parameters decreased only briefly and not significantly. In controls, blood pressure, RMSSD, CV, and heart rate HF-power spectra increased but remained unchanged in patients. Respiration, as well as heart rate LF power spectra, did not change in either group. In controls, LF transfer function gain between blood pressure and heart rate indicated that bradycardia was not secondary to blood pressure increase. We conclude that the cold face test demonstrated that patients with FD have a reduced cardiac parasympathetic response, which implies efferent parasympathetic dysfunction.

  6. [Efferent innervation of pulmonary blood vessels and bronchi in rat (an immunohistochemical study)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chumasov, E I; Voronchikhin, P A; Korzhevskiĭ, D É

    2012-01-01

    In this investigation the peculiarities of innervation of bronchi and blood vessels of the lung were studied in 20 rats using immunohistochemical demonstration of synaptophysin and alpha-actin. The results obtained have showen that the densest innervation is typical for bronchial walls, particularly, for the muscular lamina. Synaptophysin-immunoreactive terminals (SFIT) were detected in the bronchi in close association with both circular bundles of smooth muscle cells and microganglia. Dense network of SFIT was found in the pulmonary vein--in its middle tunic formed by cardiomyocytes. In contrast to the bronchi and pulmonary vein, large branches of the pulmonary artery contained no SFIT. We briefly discuss the problem of the origin of the nerve fibers described and their functions and suggest that SFIT are formed by efferent fibers (axons) of neurons arising from either the intrapulmonary parasympathetic ganglia.

  7. The basal ganglia and apraxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pramstaller, P P; Marsden, C D

    1996-02-01

    Ever since Liepmann's original descriptions at the beginning of the century apraxia has usually been attributed to damage confined to the cerebral cortex and/or cortico-cortical connecting pathways. However, there have been suggestions that apraxia can be due to deep subcortical lesions, which raises the question as to whether damage to the basal ganglia or thalamus can cause apraxia. We therefore analysed 82 cases of such 'deep' apraxias reported in the literature. These reports consisted of a small number (n=9) of cases studied neuropathologically, and a much larger group (n=73) in which CT or MRI was used to identify the size and extent of the lesion. The reports were subdivided into (i) those with small isolated lesions which involved nuclei of the basal ganglia or thalamus only, and not extending to involve periventricular or peristriatal white matter; (ii) those with large lesions which involved two or more of the nuclei, or one or more of these deep structures plus damage to closely adjacent areas including the internal capsule, periventricular or peristriatal white matter; and (iii) lesions sparing basal ganglia and thalamus but involving adjacent white matter. The main conclusions to be drawn from this meta-analysis are that lesions confined to the basal ganglia (putamen, caudate nucleus and globus pallidus) rarely, if ever, cause apraxia. Lesions affecting the lenticular nucleus or putamen nearly always intruded into the adjacent lateral white matter to involve association fibres, in particular those of the superior longitudinal fasciculus and frontostriatal connections. Apraxia occurred with deep lesions of the basal ganglia apparently sparing white matter in only eight out of the 82 cases. Apraxia was most commonly seen when there were lesions in the lenticular nucleus or putamen (58 out of 72 cases) with additional involvement of capsular, and particularly of periventricular or peristriatal, white matter. Lesions of the globus pallidus (no cases) or

  8. The Basal Ganglia and Motor Control

    OpenAIRE

    Groenewegen, Henk J.

    2003-01-01

    This paper briefly reviews the functional anatomy of the basal ganglia and their relationships with the thalamocortical system. The basal ganglia, including the striatum, pallidum, subthalamic nucleus, and substantia nigra, are involved in a number of parallel, functionally segregated cortical-subcortical circuits. These circuits support a wide range of sensorimotor, cognitive and emotional-motivational brain functions. A main role of the basal ganglia is the learning and selection of the mos...

  9. Neural activity in the rat basal ganglia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, Y.; Stegenga, J.; Heida, T.; Wezel, van R.J.A.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Pathological oscillations in the beta frequencies (8-30Hz) have been found in the local field potentials of Parkinson's disease (PD) patients and non-human primate models of PD1. In particular, these synchronizations appear in the subthalamic nucleus (STN), a common target for deep brain

  10. Migraine attacks the Basal Ganglia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bigal Marcelo

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With time, episodes of migraine headache afflict patients with increased frequency, longer duration and more intense pain. While episodic migraine may be defined as 1-14 attacks per month, there are no clear-cut phases defined, and those patients with low frequency may progress to high frequency episodic migraine and the latter may progress into chronic daily headache (> 15 attacks per month. The pathophysiology of this progression is completely unknown. Attempting to unravel this phenomenon, we used high field (human brain imaging to compare functional responses, functional connectivity and brain morphology in patients whose migraine episodes did not progress (LF to a matched (gender, age, age of onset and type of medication group of patients whose migraine episodes progressed (HF. Results In comparison to LF patients, responses to pain in HF patients were significantly lower in the caudate, putamen and pallidum. Paradoxically, associated with these lower responses in HF patients, gray matter volume of the right and left caudate nuclei were significantly larger than in the LF patients. Functional connectivity analysis revealed additional differences between the two groups in regard to response to pain. Conclusions Supported by current understanding of basal ganglia role in pain processing, the findings suggest a significant role of the basal ganglia in the pathophysiology of the episodic migraine.

  11. RNA sequencing of trigeminal ganglia in Rattus Norvegicus after glyceryl trinitrate infusion with relevance to migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Sara Hougaard; Sørensen, Lasse Maretty; Ramachandran, Roshni

    2016-01-01

    transcriptional responses to GTN-infusion in the rat trigeminal ganglia. METHODS: Rats were infused with GTN or vehicle and trigeminal ganglia were isolated either 30 or 90 minutes post infusion. RNA sequencing was used to investigate transcriptomic changes in response to the treatment. Furthermore, we developed......INTRODUCTION: Infusion of glyceryl trinitrate (GTN), a donor of nitric oxide, induces immediate headache in humans that in migraineurs is followed by a delayed migraine attack. In order to achieve increased knowledge of mechanisms activated during GTN-infusion this present study aims to investigate...

  12. Parasympathetic neurons in the cranial medial ventricular fat pad on the dog heart selectively decrease ventricular contractility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickerson, L W; Rodak, D J; Fleming, T J; Gatti, P J; Massari, V J; McKenzie, J C; Gillis, R A

    1998-05-28

    We hypothesized that selective control of ventricular contractility might be mediated by postganglionic parasympathetic neurons in the cranial medial ventricular (CMV) ganglion plexus located in a fat pad at the base of the aorta. Sinus rate, atrioventricular (AV) conduction (ventricular rate during atrial pacing), and left ventricular contractile force (LV dP/dt during right ventricular pacing) were measured in eight chloralose-anesthetized dogs both before and during bilateral cervical vagus stimulation (20-30 V, 0.5 ms pulses, 15-20 Hz). Seven of these dogs were tested under beta-adrenergic blockade (propranolol, 0.8 mg kg(-1) i.v.). Control responses included sinus node bradycardia or arrest during spontaneous rhythm, high grade AV block or complete heart block, and a 30% decrease in contractility from 2118 +/- 186 to 1526 +/- 187 mm Hg s(-1) (P 0.05) decrease in contractility but still elicited the same degree of sinus bradycardia and AV block (N = 8, P < 0.05). Five dogs were re-tested 3 h after trimethaphan fat pad injection, at which time blockade of vagally-induced negative inotropy was partially reversed, as vagal stimulation decreased LV dP/dt by 19%. The same dose of trimethaphan given either locally into other fat pads (PVFP or IVC-ILA) or systemically (i.v.) had no effect on vagally-induced negative inotropy. Thus, parasympathetic ganglia located in the CMV fat pad mediated a decrease in ventricular contractility during vagal stimulation. Blockade of the CMV fat pad had no effect on vagally-mediated slowing of sinus rate or AV conduction.

  13. The neuronal soma trait of trigeminal nerve branch projecting to dental pulp in rat trigeminal ganglia%大鼠牙髓神经胞体在三叉神经节内分布特点

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖芳莉; 李国超; 马腾飞; 黄姗姗; 徐文华; 王烈成; 王元银

    2016-01-01

    目的 了解正常及三叉神经痛( TN)模型大鼠的牙髓神经胞体在三叉神经节( TG)内分布情况及其投射关系,为临床通过TG治疗TN提供解剖学依据. 方法 本实验分为模型组和假手术组,在两组大鼠不同牙髓腔内注入逆行荧光探针,用荧光显微镜观察 TG 中荧光标记神经元的分布情况. 结果 两组大鼠分别在右下及左上中切牙髓腔内注入绿色荧光探针Fast DiO 72 h后,分别在右侧TG后外侧区、左侧TG中段区观察到数个、成簇分布带有绿色荧光标记神经元;将两组大鼠右下及左上中切牙髓腔内分别注入 Fast DiO、Fast DiI两种荧光探针,72 h后在其同侧TG的后外侧区和中间区分别观察到成簇分布的带有绿色和红色荧光的神经元;两组大鼠左侧上中切牙及下颌第一磨牙髓腔内分别注入荧光探针Fast DiI和Fast DiO,72 h后在同侧TG的后外侧区和中段区分别观察到成簇分布带有绿色和红色荧光的神经元. 经统计学比较,两组之间相应牙髓神经胞体在TG内分布区域、数量及荧光强度没有明显区别. 结论 三叉神经上、下颌支神经胞体投射于同侧TG,并有一定区域性;TN产生不改变TG内神经元数量及投射联系,其可能与三叉神经功能活动改变有关.%Objective To observe the position relationship of neuronal somas in trigeminal ganglia ( TG ) , which projects from different dental pulps in the normal and trigeminal neuralgia( TN) model rats, and provides anatomi-cal theoretical guidance for the clinical treatment of TN. Methods Those experiments were divided into model group and control group. The retrograde fluorescent probes were injected into the different dental pulp cavities of rats in the two groups, and fluorescent microscope was used to observe distribution of fluorescence labeled neurons in TG. Results Green fluorescent probes Fast DiO were injected into right lower and left upper central incisor of rats in the two

  14. [Sports practice is related to parasympathetic activity in adolescents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cayres, Suziane Ungari; Vanderlei, Luiz Carlos Marques; Rodrigues, Aristides Machado; Silva, Manuel João Coelho E; Codogno, Jamile Sanches; Barbosa, Maurício Fregonesi; Fernandes, Rômulo Araújo

    2015-01-01

    To analyze the relationship among sports practice, physical education class, habitual physical activity and cardiovascular risk in adolescents. Cross-sectional study with 120 schoolchildren (mean: 11.7±0.7 years old), with no regular use of medicines. Sports practice and physical education classes were assessed through face-to-face interview, while habitual physical activity was assessed by pedometers. Body weight, height and height-cephalic trunk were used to estimate maturation. The following variables were measured: body fatness, blood pressure, resting heart rate, blood flow velocity, intima-media thickness (carotid and femoral) and heart rate variability (mean between consecutive heartbeats and statistical index in the time domain that show the autonomic parasympathetic nervous system activity root-mean by the square of differences between adjacent normal R-R intervals in a time interval. Statistical treatment used Spearman correlation adjusted by sex, ethnicity, age, body fatness and maturation. Independently of potential confounders, sports practice was positively related to autonomic parasympathetic nervous system activity (β=0.039 [0.01; 0.76]). On the other hand, the relationship between sport practice and mean between consecutive heartbeats (β=0,031 [-0.01; 0.07]) was significantly mediated by biological maturation. Sport practice was related to higher heart rate variability at rest. Copyright © 2015 Associação de Pediatria de São Paulo. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  15. Sports practice is related to parasympathetic activity in adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suziane Ungari Cayres

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To analyze the relationship among sports practice, physical education class, habitual physical activity and cardiovascular risk in adolescents. METHODS: Cross-sectional study with 120 schoolchildren (mean: 11.7±0.7 years old, with no regular use of medicines. Sports practice and physical education classes were assessed through face-to-face interview, while habitual physical activity was assessed by pedometers. Bodyweight, height and height-cephalic trunk were used to estimate maturation. The following variables were measured: body fatness, blood pressure, resting heart rate, blood flow velocity, intima-media thickness (carotid and femoral and heart rate variability (mean between consecutive heartbeats and statistical index in the time domain that show the autonomic parasympathetic nervous system activity root-mean by the square of differences between adjacent normal R-R intervals in a time interval. Statistical treatment used Spearman correlation adjusted by sex, ethnicity, age, body fatness and maturation. RESULTS: Independently of potential confounders, sports practice was positively related to autonomic parasympathetic nervous system activity (β=0.039 [0.01; 0.76]. On the other hand, the relationship between sport practice and mean between consecutive heartbeats (β=0,031 [-0.01; 0.07] was significantly mediated by biological maturation. CONCLUSIONS: Sport practice was related to higher heart rate variability at rest.

  16. Cardiovascular parasympathetic nervous system dysfunction in female rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraswathi, P V; Neelambikai, N; Mahesh, Arjun; Govindarajan, K

    2013-01-01

    The autonomic dysfunction has been reported in patients with (rheumatoid arthritis) RA and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) like connective tissue disorders and it may be due to the vasculitis of vasa nervorum and secondary amyloidosis. The pathogenesis may also have an immune component that affects autonomic functions. In the present study, three standard cardiovascular parasympathetic function tests were performed in 207 RA patients and in 106 healthy controls. 14.45% patients were presented with symptoms related to cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction. Heart rate variation to deep breathing (DBD), standing (30:15 ratio), Valsalva ratio (VR) were found to be significantly reduced in RA patients and was weakly associated with female RA patients (r = 0.165, p = 0.018) and was not correlated to disease duration, RF positivity & severity of the disease. In conclusion, this study has confirmed the presence of significant subclinical cardiovascular parasympathetic nervous dysfunction in RA patients and its positive association with female gender. Hence, inclusion of cardiovascular autonomic function tests in the routine clinical examination may be helpful in the early detection of autonomic dysfunction in RA.

  17. Intracerebroventricular administration of nerve growth factor induces gliogenesis in sensory ganglia, dorsal root, and within the dorsal root entry zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlachetzki, Johannes C M; Pizzo, Donald P; Morrissette, Debbi A; Winkler, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies indicated that intracerebroventricular administration of nerve growth factor (NGF) leads to massive Schwann cell hyperplasia surrounding the medulla oblongata and spinal cord. This study was designed to characterize the proliferation of peripheral glial cells, that is, Schwann and satellite cells, in the trigeminal ganglia and dorsal root ganglia (DRG) of adult rats during two weeks of NGF infusion using bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) to label dividing cells. The trigeminal ganglia as well as the cervical and lumbar DRG were analyzed. Along the entire neuraxis a small number of dividing cells were observed within these regions under physiological condition. NGF infusion has dramatically increased the generation of new cells in the neuronal soma and axonal compartments of sensory ganglia and along the dorsal root and the dorsal root entry zone. Quantification of BrdU positive cells within sensory ganglia revealed a 2.3- to 3-fold increase in glial cells compared to controls with a similar response to NGF for the different peripheral ganglia examined. Immunofluorescent labeling with S100β revealed that Schwann and satellite cells underwent mitosis after NGF administration. These data indicate that intracerebroventricular NGF infusion significantly induces gliogenesis in trigeminal ganglia and the spinal sensory ganglia and along the dorsal root entry zone as well as the dorsal root.

  18. Intracerebroventricular Administration of Nerve Growth Factor Induces Gliogenesis in Sensory Ganglia, Dorsal Root, and within the Dorsal Root Entry Zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes C. M. Schlachetzki

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies indicated that intracerebroventricular administration of nerve growth factor (NGF leads to massive Schwann cell hyperplasia surrounding the medulla oblongata and spinal cord. This study was designed to characterize the proliferation of peripheral glial cells, that is, Schwann and satellite cells, in the trigeminal ganglia and dorsal root ganglia (DRG of adult rats during two weeks of NGF infusion using bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU to label dividing cells. The trigeminal ganglia as well as the cervical and lumbar DRG were analyzed. Along the entire neuraxis a small number of dividing cells were observed within these regions under physiological condition. NGF infusion has dramatically increased the generation of new cells in the neuronal soma and axonal compartments of sensory ganglia and along the dorsal root and the dorsal root entry zone. Quantification of BrdU positive cells within sensory ganglia revealed a 2.3- to 3-fold increase in glial cells compared to controls with a similar response to NGF for the different peripheral ganglia examined. Immunofluorescent labeling with S100β revealed that Schwann and satellite cells underwent mitosis after NGF administration. These data indicate that intracerebroventricular NGF infusion significantly induces gliogenesis in trigeminal ganglia and the spinal sensory ganglia and along the dorsal root entry zone as well as the dorsal root.

  19. Override of spontaneous respiratory pattern generator reduces cardiovascular parasympathetic influence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patwardhan, A. R.; Vallurupalli, S.; Evans, J. M.; Bruce, E. N.; Knapp, C. F.

    1995-01-01

    We investigated the effects of voluntary control of breathing on autonomic function in cardiovascular regulation. Variability in heart rate was compared between 5 min of spontaneous and controlled breathing. During controlled breathing, for 5 min, subjects voluntarily reproduced their own spontaneous breathing pattern (both rate and volume on a breath-by-breath basis). With the use of this experimental design, we could unmask the effects of voluntary override of the spontaneous respiratory pattern generator on autonomic function in cardiovascular regulation without the confounding effects of altered respiratory pattern. Results from 10 subjects showed that during voluntary control of breathing, mean values of heart rate and blood pressure increased, whereas fractal and spectral powers in heart rate in the respiratory frequency region decreased. End-tidal PCO2 was similar during spontaneous and controlled breathing. These results indicate that the act of voluntary control of breathing decreases the influence of the vagal component, which is the principal parasympathetic influence in cardiovascular regulation.

  20. Sympathetic and parasympathetic pupillary dysfunction in familial dysautonomia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dütsch, M; Hilz, M J; Rauhut, U; Solomon, J; Neundörfer, B; Axelrod, F B

    2002-03-15

    Objective assessment of autonomic dysfunction in familial dysautonomia (FD) is largely based on the analysis of cardiovascular responses to challenge maneuvers such as orthostatic stress. Infrared pupillometry (IPM) provides an additional reliable method for cranial autonomic evaluation and has the advantage of requiring minimal cooperation.This study was performed to determine whether IPM contributes to the assessment of autonomic function in FD patients. In 14 FD patients and 14 healthy controls, we studied absolute and relative light reflex amplitude, pupillary constriction velocity (v(constr)), pupillary diameter, early and late pupillary re-dilatation velocity (v(dil 1), v(dil 2)) after dark adaptation. Prior to IPM, all patients had an ophthamological examination to evaluate refraction and corneal integrity. In comparison to controls, patients had a significant reduction of the parameters reflecting parasympathetic pupillary function (absolute light reflex amplitude 1.34 +/- 0.21 vs. l.86 +/- 0.14 mm, relative light reflex amplitude 22.74 +/- 7.11% vs. 30.76 +/- 3.57%, v(constr) 3.75 +/- 1.09 vs. 5.80 +/- 0.59 mm/s) and of the parameters reflecting sympathetic pupillary function (diameter 5.69 +/- 0.66 vs. 6.35 +/- 0.60 mm, v(dil 1) 1.29 +/- 0.23 vs. 1.95 +/- 0.23 mm/s, v(dil 2) 0.64 +/- 0.13 vs. 0.72 +/- 0.l2 mm/s; Mann-Whitney U-test: p<0.05). The non-invasive technique of IPM demonstrates dysfunction not only of the cranial parasympathetic, but also of the cranial sympathetic nervous system and, thus, further characterizes autonomic dysfunction in FD.

  1. Phenotypic alterations of neuropeptide Y and calcitonin gene-related peptide-containing neurons innervating the rat temporomandibular joint during carrageenan-induced arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damico, J.P.; Ervolino, E.; Torres, K.R.; Batagello, D.S.; Cruz-Rizzolo, R.J.; Casatti, C.A.; Bauer, J.A.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify immunoreactive neuropeptide Y (NPY) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) neurons in the autonomic and sensory ganglia, specifically neurons that innervate the rat temporomandibular joint (TMJ). A possible variation between the percentages of these neurons in acute and chronic phases of carrageenan-induced arthritis was examined. Retrograde neuronal tracing was combined with indirect immunofluorescence to identify NPY-immunoreactive (NPY-IR) and CGRP- immunoreactive (CGRP-IR) neurons that send nerve fibers to the normal and arthritic temporomandibular joint. In normal joints, NPY-IR neurons constitute 78±3%, 77±6% and 10±4% of double-labeled nucleated neuronal profile originated from the superior cervical, stellate and otic ganglia, respectively. These percentages in the sympathetic ganglia were significantly decreased in acute (58±2% for superior cervical ganglion and 58±8% for stellate ganglion) and chronic (60±2% for superior cervical ganglion and 59±15% for stellate ganglion) phases of arthritis, while in the otic ganglion these percentages were significantly increased to 19±5% and 13±3%, respectively. In the trigeminal ganglion, CGRP-IR neurons innervating the joint significantly increased from 31±3% in normal animals to 54±2% and 49±3% in the acute and chronic phases of arthritis, respectively. It can be concluded that NPY neurons that send nerve fibers to the rat temporomandibular joint are located mainly in the superior cervical, stellate and otic ganglia. Acute and chronic phases of carrageenan-induced arthritis lead to an increase in the percentage of NPY-IR parasympathetic and CGRP-IR sensory neurons and to a decrease in the percentage of NPY-IR sympathetic neurons related to TMJ innervation. PMID:23027347

  2. Phenotypic alterations of neuropeptide Y and calcitonin gene-related peptide-containing neurons innervating the rat temporomandibular joint during carrageenan-induced arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.P. Damico

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to identify immunoreactive neuropeptide Y (NPY and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP neurons in the autonomic and sensory ganglia, specifically neurons that innervate the rat temporomandibular joint (TMJ. A possible variation between the percentages of these neurons in acute and chronic phases of carrageenan-induced arthritis was examined. Retrograde neuronal tracing was combined with indirect immunofluorescence to identify NPY-immunoreactive (NPY-IR and CGRP- immunoreactive (CGRP-IR neurons that send nerve fibers to the normal and arthritic temporomandibular joint. In normal joints, NPY-IR neurons constitute 78±3%, 77±6% and 10±4% of double-labeled nucleated neuronal profile originated from the superior cervical, stellate and otic ganglia, respectively. These percentages in the autonomic ganglia were significantly decreased in acute (58±2% to superior cervical ganglion and 58±8% to stellate ganglion and chronic (60±2% to superior cervical ganglion and 59±15% to stellate ganglion phases of arthritis, while in the otic ganglion these percentages were significantly increased to 19±5% and 13±3%, respectively. In the trigeminal ganglion, CGRP-IR neurons innervating the joint significantly increased from 31±3% in normal animals to 54±2% and 49±3% in the acute and chronic phases of arthritis, respectively. It can be concluded that NPY neurons that send nerve fibers to the rat temporomandibular joint are located mainly in the superior cervical, stellate and otic ganglia. Acute and chronic phases of carrageenan-induced arthritis lead to an increase in the percentage of NPY-IR parasympathetic and CGRP-IR sensory neurons and decrease in the percentage of NPY-IR sympathetic neurons related to TMJ innervation.

  3. Functional Neuroanatomy of the Basal Ganglia

    OpenAIRE

    Lanciego, José L.; Luquin, Natasha; Obeso, José A.

    2012-01-01

    The “basal ganglia” refers to a group of subcortical nuclei responsible primarily for motor control, as well as other roles such as motor learning, executive functions and behaviors, and emotions. Proposed more than two decades ago, the classical basal ganglia model shows how information flows through the basal ganglia back to the cortex through two pathways with opposing effects for the proper execution of movement. Although much of the model has remained, the model has been modified and amp...

  4. Autonomic Modulation by Electrical Stimulation of the Parasympathetic Nervous System: An Emerging Intervention for Cardiovascular Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Bo; Lu, Zhibing; He, Wenbo; Huang, Bing; Jiang, Hong

    2016-06-01

    The cardiac autonomic nervous system has been known to play an important role in the development and progression of cardiovascular diseases. Autonomic modulation by electrical stimulation of the parasympathetic nervous system, which increases the parasympathetic activity and suppresses the sympathetic activity, is emerging as a therapeutic strategy for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Here, we review the recent literature on autonomic modulation by electrical stimulation of the parasympathetic nervous system, including vagus nerve stimulation, transcutaneous auricular vagal stimulation, spinal cord stimulation, and ganglionated plexi stimulation, in the treatment of heart failure, atrial fibrillation, and ventricular arrhythmias.

  5. Effects of rizatriptan on calcitonin gene-related peptide, proenkephalin and cholecystokinin mRNA expressions in the trigeminal ganglia of a rat migraine model%利扎曲普坦对偏头痛大鼠三叉神经节降钙素基因相关肽和脑啡肽原及缩胆囊肽基因表达的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚刚; 郝婷婷; 于挺敏

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study assesses the influence of rizatriptan on calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP),proenkephalin (PENK) and cholecystokinin (CCK) mRNA expressions in the trigeminal ganglia of a rat migraine model and investigates the possible mechanisms by which triptans treat migraine.Methods A total of 24 rats were randomly divided into four groups:normal control group (A),migraine model group(B),rizatriptan control group (C) and rizatriptan treatment group(D).Groups C and D were intragastrically perfused with rizatriptan,1 mg/kg per day.After 7 days,nitroglycerin was subcutaneously injected into the buttocks of the groups B and D to induce migraine.Two hours after nitroglycerin injection,the trigeminal ganglia was isolated.CGRP,PENK and CCK mRNA expressions in the trigeminal ganglia were determined using SYBR Green Ⅰ real-time quantitative PCR.Results The copy number of CGRP mRNA (× 107) in 200 ng total RNA of each group was 0.05 ±0.01,1.30 ±0.52,0.23 ±0.12,0.43 ±0.33 ; The copy number of PENK mRNA (× 103) in 200 ng total RNA of each group was 3.30 ± 1.65,0.34 ±0.14,3.91 ± 2.44,0.71 ± 0.13.The copy number of CGRP mRNA in the trigeminal ganglia of group B was significantly higher than that of group A (q =7.854,P < 0.05) ; CGRP mRNA expressions were significantly lower in the trigeminal ganglia of rats in group D compared with group B (q =5.458,P <0.05).Compared with group A,PENK mRNA expressions in the trigeminal ganglia of rats were significantly lower in group B (q =4.478,P < 0.05).PENK mRNA expressions were significantly higher in trigeminal ganglia of rats in group C compared with group D (q =4.838,P < 0.05).CCK mRNA expression in trigeminal ganglia of rats was similar among groups.Conelusions Rizatriptan can decrease the expressions of CGRP in the trigeminal ganglia of the migraine rats and exhibits neurogenic inflammation triggered by CGRP.PENK expressions decrease in the trigeminal ganglia of the migraine rats,weaken the analgesic

  6. A Role of the Parasympathetic Nervous System in Cognitive Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Feng; Heffner, Kathi L; Ren, Ping; Tadin, Duje

    2017-01-01

    Vision-based speed of processing (VSOP) training can result in broad cognitive improvements in older adults with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI). What remains unknown, however, is what neurophysiological mechanisms account for the observed training effect. Much of the work in this area has focused on the central nervous system, neglecting the fact that the peripheral system can contributes to changes of the central nervous system and vice versa. We examined the prospective relationship between an adaptive parasympathetic nervous system response to cognitive stimuli and VSOP training-induced plasticity. Twenty-one participants with aMCI (10 for VSOP training, and 11 for mental leisure activities (MLA) control) were enrolled. We assessed high-frequency heart rate variability (HF-HRV) during training sessions, and striatum-related neural networks and cognition at baseline and post-training. Compared to MLA, the VSOP group showed a significant U-shaped pattern of HF-HRV response during training, as well as decreases in connectivity strength between bilateral striatal and prefrontal regions. These two effects were associated with training-induced improvements in both the trained (attention and processing speed) and transferred (working memory) cognitive domains. This work provides novel support for interactions between the central and the peripheral nervous systems in relation to cognitive training, and motivates further studies to elucidate the causality of the observed link. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  7. Somatotopic organization of the primate basal ganglia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi eNambu

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Somatotopic organization is a fundamental and key concept to understand how the cortico-basal ganglia loop works. It is also indispensable knowledge to perform stereotaxic surgery for movement disorders. Here I would like to describe the somatotopic organization of the basal ganglia, which consist of the striatum, subthalamic nucleus, globus pallidus and substantia nigra. Projections from motor cortical regions representing different body parts terminate in different regions of these nuclei. Basal ganglia neurons respond not only to the stimulation of the corresponding regions of the motor cortices, but also to active and passive movements of the corresponding body parts. On the basis of these anatomical and physiological findings, somatotopic organization can be identified in the motor territories of these nuclei in the basal ganglia. In addition, projections from functionally interrelated cortical areas partially converge through the cortico-basal ganglia loop, but nevertheless the somatotopy is still preserved. Disorganized somatotopy may explain, at least in part, the pathophysiology of movement disorders, such as Parkinson’s disease and dystonia.

  8. The lateral paragigantocellular nucleus modulates parasympathetic cardiac neurons: a mechanism for rapid eye movement sleep-dependent changes in heart rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dergacheva, Olga; Wang, Xin; Lovett-Barr, Mary R; Jameson, Heather; Mendelowitz, David

    2010-08-01

    Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep is generally associated with a withdrawal of parasympathetic activity and heart rate increases; however, episodic vagally mediated heart rate decelerations also occur during REM sleep. This alternating pattern of autonomic activation provides a physiological basis for REM sleep-induced cardiac arrhythmias. Medullary neurons within the lateral paragigantocellular nucleus (LPGi) are thought to be active after REM sleep recovery and play a role in REM sleep control. In proximity to the LPGi are parasympathetic cardiac vagal neurons (CVNs) within the nucleus ambiguus (NA), which are critical for controlling heart rate. This study examined brain stem pathways that may mediate REM sleep-related reductions in parasympathetic cardiac activity. Electrical stimulation of the LPGi evoked inhibitory GABAergic postsynaptic currents in CVNs in an in vitro brain stem slice preparation in rats. Because brain stem cholinergic mechanisms are involved in REM sleep regulation, we also studied the role of nicotinic neurotransmission in modulation of GABAergic pathway from the LGPi to CVNs. Application of nicotine diminished the GABAergic responses evoked by electrical stimulation. This inhibitory effect of nicotine was prevented by the alpha7 nicotinic receptor antagonist alpha-bungarotoxin. Moreover, hypoxia/hypercapnia (H/H) diminished LPGi-evoked GABAergic current in CVNs, and this inhibitory effect was also prevented by alpha-bungarotoxin. In conclusion, stimulation of the LPGi evokes an inhibitory pathway to CVNs, which may constitute a mechanism for the reduced parasympathetic cardiac activity and increase in heart rate during REM sleep. Inhibition of this pathway by nicotinic receptor activation and H/H may play a role in REM sleep-related and apnea-associated bradyarrhythmias.

  9. Parasympathetic neural activity accounts for the lowering of exercise heart rate at high altitude

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boushel, Robert Christopher; Calbet, J A; Rådegran, G

    2001-01-01

    In chronic hypoxia, both heart rate (HR) and cardiac output (Q) are reduced during exercise. The role of parasympathetic neural activity in lowering HR is unresolved, and its influence on Q and oxygen transport at high altitude has never been studied.......In chronic hypoxia, both heart rate (HR) and cardiac output (Q) are reduced during exercise. The role of parasympathetic neural activity in lowering HR is unresolved, and its influence on Q and oxygen transport at high altitude has never been studied....

  10. Reversible parasympathetic dysautonomia following stinging attributed to the box jelly fish (Chironex fleckeri).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chand, R P; Selliah, K

    1984-10-01

    Following a box jelly fish sting, a 52 year old Chinese fisherman developed acute abdominal distension, inability to pass urine and failure of erection. Examination revealed gaseous abdominal distension and a distended urinary bladder. Absence of lachrimation and absence of changes in the R-R interval in the ECG during breathing and carotid sinus massage gave further evidence of parasympathetic dysautonomia. The patient made a complete recovery. The case highlights the occurrence of reversible parasympathetic dysautonomia following box jelly fish sting.

  11. 用膜片箝技术比较大鼠分离细胞和完整结状神经节的动作电位%Comparisons of somatic action potentials from dispersed and intact rat nodose ganglia using patch-clamp technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI BaiYan; John H SCHILD

    2002-01-01

    AIM: To differentiate the electrophysiological characteristics of somatic action potentials (AP) from isolated Neo and Juv nodose sensory neurons (NSN) and those from slices of intact Juv and adult rat nodose ganglia.METHODS: For isolated cell recordings nodose ganglia from 3- 8 d old Neo and 4 weeks old Juv rats were dissociated using trypsin and collagenase, respectively.Nodose ganglia slices with attached vagus were prepared using a sequential treatment of collagenase and trypsin for both Juv and adult rats. Conduction velocity (CV) was collected by vagal stimulation. Whole-cell patch was applied for somatic AP recordings. RESULTS: (1)281 NSN from both isolated cells and nodose slices were studied. Across all age groups, there was no difference observed among either C- or A-types. The difference between C- and A-type was significant. (2) Neurons exhibiting AP with prominent repolarization hump,broader APD50 ( > 2.0 ms), upstroke velocity at the point of APD50(UVAPD50) and downstroke velocity at the point of APD50(DVAPD50) below 100 V@s-1 and 50 V@s-1 were classified as C-type ( n = 222). Those without a hump,brief APD50 ( < 1.0 ms), and UVAPD50 and DVAPD50greater than 200 V@s-1 and 100 V@s-1 were classified as A-type ( n = 59). (3) With slices, except for hump,APD, UV, and DV, significant differences were also observed (C- vs A-type) in CV from both Juv (0.56±0.15 vs 15.6 m@s-1) and adult (0.9±0.4 vs 14.5±1.0 m@ s- 1 ) nodose slices, discharge rate ( single or burst vs repetitive), and frequency follow ( <20 Hz vs > 100Hz). (4) Phase analysis showed that C-type had higher AP firing threshold, and lower total in- and outward peak currents than A-type. CONCLUSION: C- and A-type AP from isolated NSN of Neo or Juv rats exhibited electrophysiological characteristics that closely followed those of AP recorded in nodose slices. Therefore,isolated NSN can effectively serve as an experimental surrogate for electrophysiological studies of NSN requiring prior

  12. Controlling parasympathetic regulation of heart rate: a gatekeeperrole for RGS proteins in the sinoatrial node

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra eMighiu

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Neurotransmitters released from sympathetic and parasympathetic nerve terminals in the SAN exert their effects via G-protein-coupled receptors. Integration of these different G-protein signals within pacemaker cells of the sinoatrial node (SAN is critical for proper regulation of heart rate and function. For example, excessive parasympathetic signaling can be associated with sinus node dysfunction and supraventricular arrhythmias. Our previous work has shown that one member of the regulator of G-protein signaling (RGS protein family, RGS4, is highly and selectively expressed in pacemaker cells of the SAN. Consistent with its role as an inhibitor of parasympathetic signaling, RGS4-knockout mice have reduced basal heart rates and enhanced negative chronotropic responses to parasympathetic agonists. Moreover, RGS4 appears to be an important part of SA nodal myocyte signaling pathways that mediate G protein-coupled inwardly-rectifying potassium channel (GIRK channel activation/deactivation and desensitization. Since RGS4 acts immediately downstream of M2 muscarinic receptors, it is tempting to speculate that RGS4 functions as a master regulator of parasympathetic signaling upstream of GIRKs, HCNs and L-type Ca2+ channels in the SAN. Thus, loss of RGS4 function may lead to increased susceptibility to conditions associated with increased parasympathetic signaling, including bradyarrhythmia, sinus node dysfunction, and atrial fibrillation.

  13. Modulation of Tyrosine Hydroxylase, Neuropeptide Y, Glutamate, and Substance P in Ganglia and Brain Areas Involved in Cardiovascular Control after Chronic Exposure to Nicotine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merari F. R. Ferrari

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Considering that nicotine instantly interacts with central and peripheral nervous systems promoting cardiovascular effects after tobacco smoking, we evaluated the modulation of glutamate, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH, neuropeptide Y (NPY, and substance P (SP in nodose/petrosal and superior cervical ganglia, as well as TH and NPY in nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS and hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN of normotensive Wistar Kyoto (WKY and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR after 8 weeks of nicotine exposure. Immunohistochemical and in situ hybridization data demonstrated increased expression of TH in brain and ganglia related to blood pressure control, preferentially in SHR, after nicotine exposure. The alkaloid also increased NPY immunoreactivity in ganglia, NTS, and PVN of SHR, in spite of decreasing its receptor (NPY1R binding in NTS of both strains. Nicotine increased SP and glutamate in ganglia. In summary, nicotine positively modulated the studied variables in ganglia while its central effects were mainly constrained to SHR.

  14. Genetics Home Reference: familial idiopathic basal ganglia calcification

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... idiopathic basal ganglia calcification ( FIBGC , formerly known as Fahr disease) is a condition characterized by abnormal deposits of ... on chromosome 14q for idiopathic basal ganglia calcification (Fahr disease). Am J Hum Genet. 1999 Sep;65(3): ...

  15. Study on the Regeneration Effects of NGF on Destructive Superior Cervical Ganglia of Newborn Mice and Peroneal Nerve of Adult Rats%神经生长因子对小鼠颈上神经节和大鼠腓神经损伤后修复的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈红; 佘振珏; 童夙明; 褚云鸿

    2001-01-01

    Purpose The regeneration effects of nerve growth factor(NGF)on superior cervical ganglia innewborn mice destroyed by vincristine(VCR)and peroneal nerve of adult rats destroyed by grip were studiedby morphological methods. Methods Superior cervical ganglia. The Qunming newborn mice at 2 dayswere divided into 3 groups: experiment, control and blank. The experiment animals were injected with VCR,10 μl/g of body weight at a concentration of 0.02 mmol/L. Simultaneously, the NGF was injected 2,5,10μg/g of body weight, respectively. But the control animals were only injected with VCR at the same dose.The blank control animals weren' t treated anything. All of these chemicals were injected once a day for 4days. 24h after the last injection, the superior cervical ganglia were dissected out and analyzed their size andmorphology. Peripheral nerve. The peroneal nerve of SD adult rats were destroyed by grip, and divided into2 groups: experiment and control. The experiment rats were injected with NGF 2,4 and 8 μg/kg of bodyweight respectively, near the gripped nerve,once a day for 12 days after 24 h of the injury. 24 h after the lastinjection, the perone al nerve and extensor longus digitorum were dissected out and analyzed their morphologyand counted the number of nerve fiber at proximal and distal injury. Results VCR injection in newbommice produced severe atrophy of superior cervical ganglia. And the neuronal cells apoptosed and decomposed.Simultaneous injections of NGF prevented the noxious effects of VCR, and resulted in an increase intransverse diameter from 61 to 95 percent and the total number of neuronal cells from 59 to 70 percent. Thisimproved degree was related to the dose of NGF. Furthermore, NGF obviously improved the structure of peroneal nerve and extensor longus digitorum. And this effect was the best in the high dosage. ConclusionsNerve growth factor has an obvious regeneration effects in superior cervical ganglia of newborn mice destroyed by VCR and

  16. Parallel basal ganglia circuits for decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hikosaka, Okihide; Ghazizadeh, Ali; Griggs, Whitney; Amita, Hidetoshi

    2017-02-02

    The basal ganglia control body movements, mainly, based on their values. Critical for this mechanism is dopamine neurons, which sends unpredicted value signals, mainly, to the striatum. This mechanism enables animals to change their behaviors flexibly, eventually choosing a valuable behavior. However, this may not be the best behavior, because the flexible choice is focused on recent, and, therefore, limited, experiences (i.e., short-term memories). Our old and recent studies suggest that the basal ganglia contain separate circuits that process value signals in a completely different manner. They are insensitive to recent changes in value, yet gradually accumulate the value of each behavior (i.e., movement or object choice). These stable circuits eventually encode values of many behaviors and then retain the value signals for a long time (i.e., long-term memories). They are innervated by a separate group of dopamine neurons that retain value signals, even when no reward is predicted. Importantly, the stable circuits can control motor behaviors (e.g., hand or eye) quickly and precisely, which allows animals to automatically acquire valuable outcomes based on historical life experiences. These behaviors would be called 'skills', which are crucial for survival. The stable circuits are localized in the posterior part of the basal ganglia, separately from the flexible circuits located in the anterior part. To summarize, the flexible and stable circuits in the basal ganglia, working together but independently, enable animals (and humans) to reach valuable goals in various contexts.

  17. Basal ganglia infarction demonstrated by radionuclide brain imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, E.E.; Schacht, R.A.; Domstad, P.A.; DeLand, F.H.

    1982-11-01

    Four cases of basal ganglia infarction demonstrated by radionuclide brain imaging are presented. Bilateral basal ganglia infarctions in two patients were probably related to methanol intoxication and meningoencephalitis, and unilateral basal ganglia infarctions in two other patients were presumably due to cerebral atherosclerosis and/or hypertension. Various causes and mechanisms of basal ganglia infarction as well as positive findings of radionuclide brain imaging are briefly reviewed.

  18. Atrophy of the basal ganglia as the initial diagnostic sign of germinoma in the basal ganglia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okamoto, K.; Ishikawa, K.; Takahashi, N.; Furusawa, T.; Sakai, K. [Department of Radiology, Niigata University Faculty of Medicine (Japan); Ito, J.; Tokiguchi, S. [Department of Radiology, Niigata University Faculty of Dentistry (Japan); Morii, K. [Department of Neurosurgery, Niigata University Brain Research Institute (Japan); Yamada, M. [Department of Pathology, Niigata University Brain Research Institute (Japan)

    2002-05-01

    Germ-cell tumors of the central nervous system generally develop in the midline, but the tumors can also occur in the basal ganglia and/or thalamus. However, MR images have rarely been documented in the early stage of the tumor in these regions. We retrospectively reviewed MR images obtained on admission and approximately 3 years earlier in two patients with germinoma in the basal ganglia, and compared them with CT. In addition to hyperdensity on CT, both hyperintensity on T1-weighted images and a small hyperintense lesion on T2-weighted images were commonly seen in the basal ganglia. These findings may be early MRI signs of germinoma in this region, and the earliest and most characteristic diagnostic feature on MRI was atrophy of the basal ganglia, which was recognizable before development of hemiparesis. (orig.)

  19. Quantifying cardiac sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous activities using principal dynamic modes analysis of heart rate variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Yuru; Jan, Kung-Ming; Ju, Ki Hwan; Chon, Ki H

    2006-09-01

    The ratio between low-frequency (LF) and high-frequency (HF) spectral power of heart rate has been used as an approximate index for determining the autonomic nervous system (ANS) balance. An accurate assessment of the ANS balance can only be achieved if clear separation of the dynamics of the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous activities can be obtained, which is a daunting task because they are nonlinear and have overlapping dynamics. In this study, a promising nonlinear method, termed the principal dynamic mode (PDM) method, is used to separate dynamic components of the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous activities on the basis of ECG signal, and the results are compared with the power spectral approach to assessing the ANS balance. The PDM analysis based on the 28 subjects consistently resulted in a clear separation of the two nervous systems, which have similar frequency characteristics for parasympathetic and sympathetic activities as those reported in the literature. With the application of atropine, in 13 of 15 supine subjects there was an increase in the sympathetic-to-parasympathetic ratio (SPR) due to a greater decrease of parasympathetic than sympathetic activity (P=0.003), and all 13 subjects in the upright position had a decrease in SPR due to a greater decrease of sympathetic than parasympathetic activity (Pparasympathetic and sympathetic nervous systems. The culprit is equivalent decreases in both the sympathetic and parasympathetic activities irrespective of the pharmacological blockades. These findings suggest that the PDM shows promise as a noninvasive and quantitative marker of ANS imbalance, which has been shown to be a factor in many cardiac and stress-related diseases.

  20. 对氨基水杨酸钠对染锰大鼠基底核氨基酸类神经递质含量的影响%Effect of sodium para-aminosalicylic on concentrations of amino acid neurotransmitters in basal ganglia of manganese-exposed rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    欧超燕; 黄明立; 姜岳明; 罗海兰; 邓祥发; 王禅; 王芳; 黄晓薇

    2011-01-01

    目的 探讨对氨基水杨酸钠(PAS-Na)对亚急性染锰大鼠基底核γ-氨基丁酸(GABA)、谷氨酸(Glu)、谷氨酰胺(Gln)和片氨酸(Gly)等氨基酸类神经递质水平的影响.方法 将40只SD大鼠按完全随机法分为染锰组、低剂量(L-)PAS-Na(PAS)治疗组、高剂量(H-)PAS治疗组和正常对照组,每组10只.给染锰、L-PAS和H-PAS治疗组腹腔注射MnCl2·4H2O 15 mg/kg,对照组腹腔注射等容量生理盐水,每日 1次,每周5 d,共4周.分别给L-PAS治疗组、H-PAS治疗组背部皮下注射PAS-Na 100、200mg/kg,其余组背部皮下注射等容量生理盐水,每日1次,连续3周和6周.用高效液相色谱荧光检测法测定大鼠基底核Glu、Gln、Gly及GABA含量.结果 PAS-Na治疗3周时,染锰组Gly[(0.165±0.022)μmol/g]含量比对照组[(0.271±0.074)μmol/g]低(t=4.65,P<0.05).PAS-Na治疗6周时,染锰组Glu、Gln和Gly含量[依次为(0.942±0.121)、(0.377±0.070)、(0.142±0.048)tμmol/g]均比对照组低[依次为(1.590±0.302)、(0.563±0.040)、(0.247±0.084)μmol/g;t值分别为7.72、5.85、4.30,P值均<0.05];L-PAS治疗组、H-PAS治疗组Glu、Gln和H-PAS组Gly含量[依次为(1.268±0.124)、(1.465±0.196)、(0.497±0.050)、(0.514±0.103)、(0.219±0.034)μmol/g]均比染锰组高(L-PAS组Glu、Gln与染锰组比较,t值分别为3.89、3.77,P值均<0.05;H-PAS组Glu、Gln、Gly与染锰组比较,t值分别为6.78、4.70、3.42,P值均<0.05).结论 锰对大鼠基底核Glu、Gln和Gly的毒作用明显,以对Gly的毒性影响出现较早,脱离锰暴露后其毒性影响仍然继续发展.PAS-Na对锰的Glu、Gln和Gly毒性影响可能有拮抗作用.%Objective To probe the effect of sodium para-aminosalicylate (PAS-Na) on concentration of amino acid neurotransmitters including glutamate ( Glu), glutamine ( Gln ), glycine (Gly) and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in basal ganglia of subacute manganese (Mn)-exposed rats. Methods Forty Sprague-Dawley male rats were randomly divided

  1. RNA Sequencing of Trigeminal Ganglia in Rattus Norvegicus after Glyceryl Trinitrate Infusion with Relevance to Migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard Pedersen, Sara; Maretty, Lasse; Ramachandran, Roshni;

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Infusion of glyceryl trinitrate (GTN), a donor of nitric oxide, induces immediate headache in humans that in migraineurs is followed by a delayed migraine attack. In order to achieve increased knowledge of mechanisms activated during GTN-infusion this present study aims to investigate...... transcriptional responses to GTN-infusion in the rat trigeminal ganglia. METHODS: Rats were infused with GTN or vehicle and trigeminal ganglia were isolated either 30 or 90 minutes post infusion. RNA sequencing was used to investigate transcriptomic changes in response to the treatment. Furthermore, we developed...... a novel method for Gene Set Analysis Of Variance (GSANOVA) to identify gene sets associated with transcriptional changes across time. RESULTS: 15 genes displayed significant changes in transcription levels in response to GTN-infusion. Ten of these genes showed either sustained up- or down...

  2. Coupling in the cortico-basal ganglia circuit is aberrant in the ketamine model of schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordon, Ivan; Nicolás, María Jesús; Arrieta, Sandra; Lopetegui, Eneko; López-Azcárate, Jon; Alegre, Manuel; Artieda, Julio; Valencia, Miguel

    2015-08-01

    Recent studies have suggested the implication of the basal ganglia in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. To investigate this hypothesis, here we have used the ketamine model of schizophrenia to determine the oscillatory abnormalities induced in the rat motor circuit of the basal ganglia. The activity of free moving rats was recorded in different structures of the cortico-basal ganglia circuit before and after an injection of a subanesthesic dose of ketamine (10mg/kg). Spectral estimates of the oscillatory activity, phase-amplitude cross-frequency coupling interactions (CFC) and imaginary event-related coherence together with animals׳ behavior were analyzed. Oscillatory patterns in the cortico-basal ganglia circuit were highly altered by the effect of ketamine. CFC between the phases of low-frequency activities (delta, 1-4; theta 4-8Hz) and the amplitude of high-gamma (~80Hz) and high-frequency oscillations (HFO) (~150Hz) increased dramatically and correlated with the movement increment shown by the animals. Between-structure analyses revealed that ketamine had also a massive effect in the low-frequency mediated synchronization of the HFO's across the whole circuit. Our findings suggest that ketamine administration results in an aberrant hypersynchronization of the whole cortico-basal circuit where the tandem theta/HFO seems to act as the main actor in the hyperlocomotion shown by the animals. Here we stress the importance of the basal ganglia circuitry in the ketamine model of schizophrenia and leave the door open to further investigations devoted to elucidate to what extent these abnormalities also reflect the prominent neurophysiological deficits observed in schizophrenic patients.

  3. Biphasic dose-dependent modulation of cardiac parasympathetic activity by moxonidine, an imidazoline I1-receptor agonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turcani, Marian

    2008-12-01

    Peripheral beta-adrenergic blockade and activation of central alpha2-adrenergic receptors have parasympathomimetic effects. The impact of activation of central imidazoline I1-receptors on vagal activity is not yet clear, but there is some evidence that imidazoline I1-receptors agonists may inhibit the parasympathetic system. Parasympatholytic effects may represent a risk for patient with reduced parasympathetic activity. To clarify the effect of imidazoline I1-receptors stimulation on vagal activity, increasing doses of moxonidine were applied subcutaneously to rats with implanted telemetric transmitters. Heart rate and blood pressure variability and baroreflex sensitivity were analyzed. Both, low (0.04, 0.12, and 0.36 mg/kg) and high (1.08 and 3.24 mg/kg), doses of moxonidine reduced the low-frequency power of systolic pressure variability, an index of sympathetic vascular modulation. Despite this reduction, low moxonidine doses neither reduced heart rate nor increased baroreflex gain. A decline of very low frequency power of heart rate variability, a sign of parasympatholysis, was observed with low doses of moxonidine, which can explain the absence of change in heart rate. High doses of moxonidine profoundly augmented very low and high-frequency power of heart rate variability and baroreflex sensitivity. These data suggest that the stimulation of imidazoline I1-receptors is not only sympatholytic but also seems to have as well a weak parasympatholytic effect. However, high doses of moxonidine are strongly parasympathomimetic through the activation of central alpha2-adrenoceptors. Recruitment of alpha2-adrenoceptors also results in manifestation of several side effects.

  4. Pain-related mediators underlie incision-induced mechanical nociception in the dorsal root ganglia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiuhong Yuan; Xiangyan Liu; Qiuping Tang; Yunlong Deng

    2013-01-01

    Approximately 50-70% of patients experience incision-induced mechanical nociception after sur-gery. However, the mechanism underlying incision-induced mechanical nociception is stil unclear. Interleukin-10 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor are important pain mediators, but whether in-terleukin-10 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor are involved in incision-induced mechanical no-ciception remains uncertain. In this study, forty rats were divided randomly into the incision surgery (n=32) and sham surgery (n=8) groups. Plantar incision on the central part of left hind paw was performed under anesthesia in rats from the surgery group. Rats in the sham surgery group re-ceived anesthesia, but not an incision. Von Frey test results showed that, compared with the sham surgery group, incision surgery decreased the withdrawal threshold of rats at 0.5, 3, 6 and 24 hours after incision. Immunofluorescence staining in the dorsal root ganglia of the spinal cord (L 3-5 ) showed that interleukin-10 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor were expressed mainly on smal-and medium-sized neurons (diameter40μm) at 6 and 24 hours after incision surgery, which corresponded to the decreased mechanical withdrawal threshold of rats in the surgery group. These experimental findings suggest that expression pattern shift of interleukin-10 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor induced by inci-sion surgery in dorsal root ganglia of rats was closely involved in lowering the threshold to me-chanical stimulus in the hind paw fol owing incision surgery. Pain-related mediators induced by in-cision surgery in dorsal root ganglia of rats possibly underlie mechanical nociception in ipsilateral hind paws.

  5. Evidence of dominant parasympathetic nervous activity of great cormorants (Phalacrocorax carbo).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Maki; Kato, Akiko; Ropert-Coudert, Yan; Kuwahara, Masayoshi; Hayama, Shinichi; Naito, Yasuhiko

    2009-04-01

    The characteristics of autonomic nervous activity were examined on captive great cormorants Phalacrocorax carbo hanedae, using a power spectral analysis of heart rate variability. Heart rates were calculated from recordings of the electrocardiograms of the birds via embarked data loggers. We investigated the effects of blockades of the sympathetic or parasympathetic nervous systems using the indices of autonomic nervous activity such as high frequency (0.061-1.5 Hz) component, low frequency (0.02-0.060 Hz) component and the low frequency power component to high frequency power component ratio. Resting heart rate (85.5 +/- 6.1 bpm) was lower than the intrinsic heart rate (259.2 +/- 15.3 bpm). The heart rate drastically increased after the injection of the parasympathetic nervous blocker, on the other hand it slightly decreased after the injection of the sympathetic nervous blocker. The sympathetic, parasympathetic and net autonomic nervous tones calculated from heart rate with and without blockades were 40.9 +/- 27.6, -44.5 +/- 7.4 and -29.5 +/- 9.0%, respectively. The effect of the parasympathetic nervous blockade on low frequency and high frequency power was greater than that of the sympathetic nervous blockade. Those data suggested that the parasympathetic nervous activity was dominant for great cormorants.

  6. Auricular Acupuncture May Suppress Epileptic Seizures via Activating the Parasympathetic Nervous System: A Hypothesis Based on Innovative Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Wei; Rong, Pei-Jing; Li, Liang; Ben, Hui; Zhu, Bing; Litscher, Gerhard

    2012-01-01

    Auricular acupuncture is a diagnostic and treatment system based on normalizing the body's dysfunction. An increasing number of studies have demonstrated that auricular acupuncture has a significant effect on inducing parasympathetic tone. Epilepsy is a neurological disorder consisting of recurrent seizures resulting from excessive, uncontrolled electrical activity in the brain. Autonomic imbalance demonstrating an increased sympathetic activity and a reduced parasympathetic activation is involved in the development and progress of epileptic seizures. Activation of the parasympathetic nervous system such as vagus nerve stimulation has been used for the treatment of intractable epilepsy. Here, we propose that auricular acupuncture may suppress epileptic seizures via activating the parasympathetic nervous system.

  7. Auricular Acupuncture May Suppress Epileptic Seizures via Activating the Parasympathetic Nervous System: A Hypothesis Based on Innovative Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei He

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Auricular acupuncture is a diagnostic and treatment system based on normalizing the body's dysfunction. An increasing number of studies have demonstrated that auricular acupuncture has a significant effect on inducing parasympathetic tone. Epilepsy is a neurological disorder consisting of recurrent seizures resulting from excessive, uncontrolled electrical activity in the brain. Autonomic imbalance demonstrating an increased sympathetic activity and a reduced parasympathetic activation is involved in the development and progress of epileptic seizures. Activation of the parasympathetic nervous system such as vagus nerve stimulation has been used for the treatment of intractable epilepsy. Here, we propose that auricular acupuncture may suppress epileptic seizures via activating the parasympathetic nervous system.

  8. Neurochemical oscillations in the basal ganglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noori, Hamid Reza; Jäger, Willi

    2010-01-01

    This work represents an attempt to elucidate the neurochemical processes in the basal ganglia by mathematical modelling. The correlation between neurochemistry and electrophysiology has been used to construct a dynamical system based on the basal ganglia's network structure. Mathematical models were constructed for different physical scales to reformulate the neurochemical and electrophysiological behaviour from synapses up to multi-compartment systems. Transformation functions have been developed to transit between the different scales. We show through numerical simulations that this network produces oscillations in the electrical potentials as well as in neurotransmitter concentrations. In agreement with pharmacological experiments, a parameter sensitivity analysis reveals temporary changes in the neurochemical and electrophysiological systems after single exposure to antipsychotic drugs. This behaviour states the structural stability of the system. The correlation between the neurochemical dynamics and drug-induced behaviour provides the perspective for novel neurobiological hypotheses.

  9. Learning Reward Uncertainty in the Basal Ganglia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John G Mikhael

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Learning the reliability of different sources of rewards is critical for making optimal choices. However, despite the existence of detailed theory describing how the expected reward is learned in the basal ganglia, it is not known how reward uncertainty is estimated in these circuits. This paper presents a class of models that encode both the mean reward and the spread of the rewards, the former in the difference between the synaptic weights of D1 and D2 neurons, and the latter in their sum. In the models, the tendency to seek (or avoid options with variable reward can be controlled by increasing (or decreasing the tonic level of dopamine. The models are consistent with the physiology of and synaptic plasticity in the basal ganglia, they explain the effects of dopaminergic manipulations on choices involving risks, and they make multiple experimental predictions.

  10. Investigating the changes in heart rate asymmetry (HRA) with perturbation of parasympathetic nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmakar, Chandan; Khandoker, Ahsan; Palaniswami, Marimuthu

    2012-12-01

    The heart rate asymmetry (HRA) is a disproportionate distribution of heart rate signal. The current study was designed to assess the changes in HRA in experimental conditions using Poincaré plot during parasympathetic blockade (atropine infusion) and parasympathetic enhancement (scopolamine administration). After atropine infusion, the heart rate variability in 5 out of 8 subjects was found asymmetric. In contrast, all 8 subjects were found to be asymmetric during scopolamine administration. The physiological relevance of HRA was demonstrated by showing correlation with standard frequency domain parameters during all phases of the experiment. The deviation of asymmetry index (GI ( p )) from symmetric range was further analyzed, which was maximum during scopolamine administration and minimum during atropine infusion. These findings suggest that parasympathetic block reduces the prevalence of HRA, and has significant correlation of GI ( p ) with frequency domain features of HRV analysis.

  11. Autonomic Nervous System Responses to Viewing Green and Built Settings: Differentiating Between Sympathetic and Parasympathetic Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Berg, Magdalena M H E; Maas, Jolanda; Muller, Rianne; Braun, Anoek; Kaandorp, Wendy; van Lien, René; van Poppel, Mireille N M; van Mechelen, Willem; van den Berg, Agnes E

    2015-12-14

    This laboratory study explored buffering and recovery effects of viewing urban green and built spaces on autonomic nervous system activity. Forty-six students viewed photos of green and built spaces immediately following, and preceding acute stress induction. Simultaneously recorded electrocardiogram and impedance cardiogram signal was used to derive respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) and pre-ejection period (PEP), indicators of respectively parasympathetic and sympathetic activity. The findings provide support for greater recovery after viewing green scenes, as marked by a stronger increase in RSA as a marker of parasympathetic activity. There were no indications for greater recovery after viewing green scenes in PEP as a marker of sympathetic activity, and there were also no indications of greater buffering effects of green space in neither RSA nor PEP. Overall, our findings are consistent with a predominant role of the parasympathetic nervous system in restorative effects of viewing green space.

  12. Autonomic Nervous System Responses to Viewing Green and Built Settings: Differentiating Between Sympathetic and Parasympathetic Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Berg, Magdalena M.H.E.; Maas, Jolanda; Muller, Rianne; Braun, Anoek; Kaandorp, Wendy; van Lien, René; van Poppel, Mireille N.M.; van Mechelen, Willem; van den Berg, Agnes E.

    2015-01-01

    This laboratory study explored buffering and recovery effects of viewing urban green and built spaces on autonomic nervous system activity. Forty-six students viewed photos of green and built spaces immediately following, and preceding acute stress induction. Simultaneously recorded electrocardiogram and impedance cardiogram signal was used to derive respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) and pre-ejection period (PEP), indicators of respectively parasympathetic and sympathetic activity. The findings provide support for greater recovery after viewing green scenes, as marked by a stronger increase in RSA as a marker of parasympathetic activity. There were no indications for greater recovery after viewing green scenes in PEP as a marker of sympathetic activity, and there were also no indications of greater buffering effects of green space in neither RSA nor PEP. Overall, our findings are consistent with a predominant role of the parasympathetic nervous system in restorative effects of viewing green space. PMID:26694426

  13. Autonomic Nervous System Responses to Viewing Green and Built Settings: Differentiating Between Sympathetic and Parasympathetic Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena M.H.E. van den Berg

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This laboratory study explored buffering and recovery effects of viewing urban green and built spaces on autonomic nervous system activity. Forty-six students viewed photos of green and built spaces immediately following, and preceding acute stress induction. Simultaneously recorded electrocardiogram and impedance cardiogram signal was used to derive respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA and pre-ejection period (PEP, indicators of respectively parasympathetic and sympathetic activity. The findings provide support for greater recovery after viewing green scenes, as marked by a stronger increase in RSA as a marker of parasympathetic activity. There were no indications for greater recovery after viewing green scenes in PEP as a marker of sympathetic activity, and there were also no indications of greater buffering effects of green space in neither RSA nor PEP. Overall, our findings are consistent with a predominant role of the parasympathetic nervous system in restorative effects of viewing green space.

  14. Bilateral germinoma of the basal ganglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Andrea; Garrè, Maria Luisa; Ravegnani, Marcello; Nozza, Paolo; Abbruzzese, Arturo; Giangaspero, Felice; Tortori-Donati, Paolo

    2008-01-01

    Germinoma arising in the bilateral basal ganglia is exceedingly rare, with only five cases reported to date. Owing to non-specific clinical findings and the frequent presence of ill-defined abnormalities without a definite tumor mass on neuroimaging, the diagnosis can be difficult. We describe a case in which magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) findings suggested a tumor and supported the decision to perform biopsy of the lesion.

  15. Altered parasympathetic nervous system regulation of the sinoatrial node in Akita diabetic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnaswamy, Pooja S; Egom, Emmanuel E; Moghtadaei, Motahareh; Jansen, Hailey J; Azer, John; Bogachev, Oleg; Mackasey, Martin; Robbins, Courtney; Rose, Robert A

    2015-05-01

    Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN) is a serious complication of diabetes mellitus that impairs autonomic regulation of heart rate (HR). This has been attributed to damage to the nerves that modulate spontaneous pacemaker activity in the sinoatrial node (SAN). Our objective was to test the hypothesis that impaired parasympathetic regulation of HR in diabetes is due to reduced responsiveness of the SAN to parasympathetic agonists. We used the Akita mouse model of type 1 diabetes to study the effects of the parasympathetic agonist carbachol (CCh) on SAN function using intracardiac programmed stimulation, high resolution optical mapping and patch-clamping of SAN myocytes. CCh decreased HR by 30% and increased corrected SAN recovery time (cSNRT) by 123% in wildtype mice. In contrast, CCh only decreased HR by 12%, and only increased cSNRT by 37% in Akita mice. These alterations were due to smaller effects of CCh on SAN electrical conduction and spontaneous action potential firing in isolated SAN myocytes. Voltage clamp experiments demonstrate that the acetylcholine-activated K(+) current (IKACh) is reduced in Akita SAN myocytes due to enhanced desensitization and faster deactivation kinetics. These IKACh alterations were normalized by treating Akita SAN myocytes with PI(3,4,5)P3 or an inhibitor of regulator of G-protein signaling 4 (RGS4). There was no difference in the effects of CCh on the hyperpolarization-activated current (If) between wildtype and Akita mice. Our study demonstrates that Akita diabetic mice demonstrate impaired parasympathetic regulation of HR and SAN function due to reduced responses of the SAN to parasympathetic agonists. Our experiments demonstrate a key role for insulin-dependent phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling in the parasympathetic dysfunction seen in the SAN in diabetes.

  16. 雷氏大疣蛛粗毒对DRG细胞上钠钾钙离子通道的影响%Effects of Venoms from the Spider Macrothele Raveni on Voltage-Gated Na+, K+ and Ca2+ Channels in Rat Dorsal Root Ganglia Neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王小娟; 朱阳慧; 刘中华

    2011-01-01

    By whole-cell patch-clamp recording, it was observed the effects of the vetnon from the spider Mac-rothele raveni on voltage-activated Na+ , K+ and Ca2+ channels in adult rat dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons. It has no evident effect on tetrodotoxin-resistant (TTX-R) Na* currents, K+ currents and Ca2+ currents, while it is able to inhibit tetrodotoxin-sensitive (TTX-S) Na+ currents. The inhibition is dose-dependent with an ICX value of 11.04 mg/L. At a concentration of 100 mg/L it can cause both the initial activated voltage and the membrane reversal potential to shift 10 mV in the hyperpolarizing direction. And it also causes the steady-state inactivation curve of TTX-S Na+ channels to shift approximate 15 mV in the hyperpolarizing direction without changing the slope factor (k) significantly.%采用全细胞记录( whole-cell recording)模式膜片钳技术在大鼠背根神经节细胞(dorsal root ganglia,DRG)上检测了雷氏大疣蛛粗毒对电压门控钠通道、钾通道及钙通道的影响.结果表明,雷氏大疣蛛粗毒对TTX-R型钠电流、电压门控钾电流以及钙电流均无明显作用,但对TTX-S型钠电流表现出较强的浓度依赖性抑制效应,半有效抑制浓度(IC50)为11.04 mg/L.100 mg/L雷氏大疣蛛粗毒对DRG细胞TTX敏感性钠电流的电压-电流(I-V)曲线的激活阈值和逆转电位均有近- 10 mV的漂移作用,并使稳态失活曲线向超极化方向漂移15 mV左右,但并不影响失活曲线的常数k.

  17. Marital Conflict and Children's Externalizing Behavior: Interactions between Parasympathetic and Sympathetic Nervous System Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sheikh, Mona; Kouros, Chrystyna D.; Erath, Stephen; Cummings, E. Mark; Keller, Peggy; Staton, Lori

    2009-01-01

    Toward greater specificity in the prediction of externalizing problems in the context of interparental conflict, interactions between children's parasympathetic and sympathetic nervous system (PNS and SNS) activity were examined as moderators. PNS activity was indexed by respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) and RSA reactivity (RSA-R) to lab…

  18. Habitual traffic noise at home reduces cardiac parasympathetic tone during sleep

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graham, J.M.A.; Janssen, S.A.; Vos, H.; Miedema, H.M.E.

    2009-01-01

    The relationships between road and rail traffic noise with pre-ejection period (PEP) and with respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) during sleep, as indices of cardiac sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous system tone, were investigated in the field (36 subjects, with 188 and 192 valid subject nights

  19. Parasympathetic Regulation and Parental Socialization of Emotion: Biopsychosocial Processes of Adjustment in Preschoolers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastings, Paul D.; De, Ishani

    2008-01-01

    Variations in parents' emotion socialization have been linked to children's social competence (SC) and behavior problems, but parental influences do not act independently of children's characteristics. A biopsychosocial model was tested, in which children's parasympathetic regulation of cardiac function and paternal and maternal socialization of…

  20. Marital Conflict and Children's Externalizing Behavior: Interactions between Parasympathetic and Sympathetic Nervous System Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sheikh, Mona; Kouros, Chrystyna D.; Erath, Stephen; Cummings, E. Mark; Keller, Peggy; Staton, Lori

    2009-01-01

    Toward greater specificity in the prediction of externalizing problems in the context of interparental conflict, interactions between children's parasympathetic and sympathetic nervous system (PNS and SNS) activity were examined as moderators. PNS activity was indexed by respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) and RSA reactivity (RSA-R) to lab…

  1. Evidence for differential sympathetic and parasympathetic reinnervation after heart transplantation in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tio, RA; Reyners, AKL; Van Veldhuisen, DJ; Van den Berg, MP; Brouwer, RMHJ; Haaksma, J; Smit, AJ; Crijns, HJGM

    1997-01-01

    During heart transplantation (HTX) all neural connections are severed, Ln humans, signs of autonomic reinnervation have been found, in this study non-invasive tests were used to compare signs of sympathetic and parasympathetic reinnervation. Non-invasive autonomic function tests and heart rate varia

  2. Abnormal Basal Ganglia Functional Connectivity in Idiopathic Generalized Epilepsy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng Luo; Yang Xia; Zhi-Wei Guo; Dong Zhou

    2011-01-01

    The basal ganglia have been implicated in a modulation role in idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE) by an invasive electrophysioigic means.This paper investigates the basal ganglia functional connectivity by using the region-wise functional connection analysis in resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRi) in IGE.The increased functional connectivity within basal ganglia,and between the basal ganglia and the thalamus,and decreased functional connectivity between basal ganglia and motor cortex are found in IGE compared with the controls. These findings not only implicate dysfunctional integration in the motor loop in IGE and the enhanced interaction in the modulated loop,but also suggest that the basal ganglia modulate the generalized epileptic discharges with the influence over thalamus in the corticothalamus network.

  3. Basal ganglia lesions in children and adults

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bekiesinska-Figatowska, Monika, E-mail: m.figatowska@mp.pl [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Institute of Mother and Child, ul. Kasprzaka 17a, 01-211 Warsaw (Poland); Mierzewska, Hanna, E-mail: h.mierzewska@gmail.com [Department of Neurology of Children and Adolescents, Institute of Mother and Child, ul. Kasprzaka 17a, 01-211 Warsaw (Poland); Jurkiewicz, Elżbieta, E-mail: e-jurkiewicz@o2.pl [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Children' s Memorial Health Institute, Al. Dzieci Polskich 20, 04-730 Warsaw (Poland)

    2013-05-15

    The term “basal ganglia” refers to caudate and lentiform nuclei, the latter composed of putamen and globus pallidus, substantia nigra and subthalamic nuclei and these deep gray matter structures belong to the extrapyramidal system. Many diseases may present as basal ganglia abnormalities. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) – to a lesser degree – allow for detection of basal ganglia injury. In many cases, MRI alone does not usually allow to establish diagnosis but together with the knowledge of age and circumstances of onset and clinical course of the disease is a powerful tool of differential diagnosis. The lesions may be unilateral: in Rassmussen encephalitis, diabetes with hemichorea/hemiballism and infarction or – more frequently – bilateral in many pathologic conditions. Restricted diffusion is attributable to infarction, acute hypoxic–ischemic injury, hypoglycemia, Leigh disease, encephalitis and CJD. Contrast enhancement may be seen in cases of infarction and encephalitis. T1-hyperintensity of the lesions is uncommon and may be observed unilaterally in case of hemichorea/hemiballism and bilaterally in acute asphyxia in term newborns, in hypoglycemia, NF1, Fahr disease and manganese intoxication. Decreased signal intensity on GRE/T2*-weighted images and/or SWI indicating iron, calcium or hemosiderin depositions is observed in panthotenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration, Parkinson variant of multiple system atrophy, Fahr disease (and other calcifications) as well as with the advancing age. There are a few papers in the literature reviewing basal ganglia lesions. The authors present a more detailed review with rich iconography from the own archive.

  4. Mössbauer spectroscopy of Basal Ganglia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miglierini, Marcel, E-mail: marcel.miglierini@stuba.sk [Institute of Nuclear and Physical Engineering, Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology, Slovak University of Technology, Ilkovičova 3, 812 19 Bratislava, Slovakia and Regional Centre of Advanced Technologies and Materials (Czech Republic); Lančok, Adriana [Institute of Inorganic Chemistry AS CR, v. v. i., 250 68 Husinec-Řež 1001 (Czech Republic); Kopáni, Martin [Institute of Medical Physics, Biophysics, Informatics and Telemedicine, Faculty of Medicine, Comenius University, Sasinkova 2, 811 08 Bratislava (Slovakia); Boča, Roman [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Natural Sciences, University of SS. Cyril and Methodius, 917 01 Trnava (Slovakia)

    2014-10-27

    Chemical states, structural arrangement, and magnetic features of iron deposits in biological tissue of Basal Ganglia are characterized. The methods of SQUID magnetometry and electron microscopy are employed. {sup 57}Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy is used as a principal method of investigation. Though electron microscopy has unveiled robust crystals (1-3 μm in size) of iron oxides, they are not manifested in the corresponding {sup 57}Fe Mössbauer spectra. The latter were acquired at 300 K and 4.2 K and resemble ferritin-like behavior.

  5. Electrophysiological evidence of P2X2 receptor expression in the neurons of intracardiac and paratracheal ganglia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Bei; NI Xin; HAN Hong; BURNSTOCK Geoffrey

    2006-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the expression of P2X receptors on rat intracardiac and paratracheal ganglion neurons. Methods: For preparation of intracardiac neurons, hearts were excised, the atria were separated and the medial region containing intracardiac ganglia was isolated and cut into pieces. For preparation of paratracheal neurons, the tracheas were removed and the superficial membranous layer containing paratracheal ganglia was rapidly isolated. Intracardiac and paratracheal ganglion neurons were dissociated after digestion by collagenase and trypsin. Whole-cell patch clamp recording was used to identify the pharmacological properties of P2X receptors in cultured neurons. Results:Neurons from these two ganglia responded to ATP with a rapidly activating, sustained inward current. Αβ-meATP failed to evoke any responses in paratracheal ganglion neurons while a few of intracardiac ganglion neurons responded to αβ-meATP with a tiny sustained inward current. ADP and UTP had no effect on intracardiac neurons. Lowering pH potentiated ATP responses in neurons from these two ganglia whereas increasing pH inhibited ATP responses. Co-application of Zn2+ potentiated ATP responses in intracardiac and paratracheal ganglion neurons. Conclusion: The receptor subtypes involved in intracardiac and paratracheal ganglia appear to be homomeric P2X2, while heteromeric P2X2/3 could not be completely excluded from intracardiac neurons.

  6. Origins of the sympathetic innervation of the cervical end of the uterus in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vera, P L; Haase, E B; Schramm, L P

    1997-01-30

    A retrograde neuronal tracer (Fast Blue) was injected in the cervical end of the uterine horn of virgin rats. The majority of the retrogradely labeled post-ganglionic sympathetic neurons were found in the sympathetic chain (74%). The superior mesenteric ganglia, inferior mesenteric ganglia and suprarenal ganglia accounted for 22, 3 and uterus resembles that described for other pelvic organs.

  7. Expression of NK-1 Receptor in Dorsal Root Ganglia Neuron of Chronic Arsenism Rats%NK-1受体在慢性砷中毒大鼠背根神经节的表达

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵明; 石文艳; 曹玉文; 朱贺; 李丽; 马克涛; 司军强

    2011-01-01

    To discuss the expression of Neurokinin-1 receptor in the dorsal root ganglion(DRG) after chronic arsenism for exploring the mechanism of nerve damages included by arsenic, 30 SD(weight: 180~230g) rats were randomly divided into 2 groups (15 rats in each group) :the control group and the arsenic poisoning group. The normal group drank tap water,and the chronic arsenic poisoning group drank tap water containing 100 mg/L NaAsO2. All rats died 3 months later,observe Neurokinin-1 receptor expression in DRG was detected by immunohitochemical method on frozen sections. Neurokinin-1 receptor were distributed widely in DRG cell membrane. The expression is buff and buffy on cell membrane. Compared with its masc rate (67.23%±6.31% ,96.66% ±0.96%) and demi-quantitation optical density mean (0. 118±0. 012,0. 153±0. 018) in two groups respectively. There were significant differences between the normal group and the chronic arsenic poisoning group(P<0. 05). The chronic arsenism is concomitant with the significant increase of Neurokinin-1 receptor expression in dorsal horn,and Neurokinin-1 receptor might play an important role in the transmisson of pain information in arsenic poisoning induces nerve damages.%为探讨慢性砷中毒对大鼠背根神经节(DRG)神经激肽-1(NK-1)受体的表达影响,以此了解砷中毒引起神经损伤的机制.将清洁级2~3月龄SD大鼠30只,体重180~230 g,随机分为正常对照组和砷中毒组,每组15只,雌雄不拘.将NaAsO2配制成浓度为100 mg/L的水溶液供砷中毒组大鼠自由饮用,正常对照组自由饮用自来水,连续喂养3个月后,采用冰冻切片和ABC免疫组化技术,观察NK-1在大鼠DRG神经元的表达.结果显示,NK-1受体在大鼠DRG神经元细胞膜分布广泛,在正常对照组和慢性砷中毒组细胞膜着色呈浅黄色和棕黄色,DRG神经元表达阳性率分别为67.23%士6.31%和96.66%±0.96%,阳性细胞半定量光密度均值分别为0.118±0.012和0.153

  8. Rat whisker movement after facial nerve lesion: evidence for autonomic contraction of skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaton, James T; Sheu, Shu Hsien; Hohman, Marc H; Knox, Christopher J; Weinberg, Julie S; Kleiss, Ingrid J; Hadlock, Tessa A

    2014-04-18

    Vibrissal whisking is often employed to track facial nerve regeneration in rats; however, we have observed similar degrees of whisking recovery after facial nerve transection with or without repair. We hypothesized that the source of non-facial nerve-mediated whisker movement after chronic denervation was from autonomic, cholinergic axons traveling within the infraorbital branch of the trigeminal nerve (ION). Rats underwent unilateral facial nerve transection with repair (N=7) or resection without repair (N=11). Post-operative whisking amplitude was measured weekly across 10weeks, and during intraoperative stimulation of the ION and facial nerves at ⩾18weeks. Whisking was also measured after subsequent ION transection (N=6) or pharmacologic blocking of the autonomic ganglia using hexamethonium (N=3), and after snout cooling intended to elicit a vasodilation reflex (N=3). Whisking recovered more quickly and with greater amplitude in rats that underwent facial nerve repair compared to resection (Pwhisker movements decreased in all rats during the initial recovery period (indicative of reinnervation), but re-appeared in the resected rats after undergoing ION transection (indicative of motor denervation). Cholinergic, parasympathetic axons traveling within the ION innervate whisker pad vasculature, and immunohistochemistry for vasoactive intestinal peptide revealed these axons branching extensively over whisker pad muscles and contacting neuromuscular junctions after facial nerve resection. This study provides the first behavioral and anatomical evidence of spontaneous autonomic innervation of skeletal muscle after motor nerve lesion, which not only has implications for interpreting facial nerve reinnervation results, but also calls into question whether autonomic-mediated innervation of striated muscle occurs naturally in other forms of neuropathy. Copyright © 2014 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Mineralizing angiopathy with basal ganglia stroke in an infant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puneet Jain

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Basal ganglia stroke is known following trivial head trauma. Recently a distinct clinic-radiological entity termed ′mineralizing angiopathy′ was described. We report an infant who developed basal ganglia stroke following trivial fall. His clinic-radiological features are described.

  10. Protocadherin 17 regulates presynaptic assembly in topographic corticobasal Ganglia circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshina, Naosuke; Tanimura, Asami; Yamasaki, Miwako; Inoue, Takeshi; Fukabori, Ryoji; Kuroda, Teiko; Yokoyama, Kazumasa; Tezuka, Tohru; Sagara, Hiroshi; Hirano, Shinji; Kiyonari, Hiroshi; Takada, Masahiko; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Watanabe, Masahiko; Kano, Masanobu; Nakazawa, Takanobu; Yamamoto, Tadashi

    2013-06-05

    Highly topographic organization of neural circuits exists for the regulation of various brain functions in corticobasal ganglia circuits. Although neural circuit-specific refinement during synapse development is essential for the execution of particular neural functions, the molecular and cellular mechanisms for synapse refinement are largely unknown. Here, we show that protocadherin 17 (PCDH17), one of the nonclustered δ2-protocadherin family members, is enriched along corticobasal ganglia synapses in a zone-specific manner during synaptogenesis and regulates presynaptic assembly in these synapses. PCDH17 deficiency in mice causes facilitated presynaptic vesicle accumulation and enhanced synaptic transmission efficacy in corticobasal ganglia circuits. Furthermore, PCDH17(-/-) mice exhibit antidepressant-like phenotypes that are known to be regulated by corticobasal ganglia circuits. Our findings demonstrate a critical role for PCDH17 in the synaptic development of specific corticobasal ganglia circuits and suggest the involvement of PCDH17 in such circuits in depressive behaviors.

  11. The parasympathetic nervous system as a regulator of mast cell function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsythe, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Often considered as the archetype of neuroimmune communication, much of our understanding of the bidirectional relationship between the nervous and immune systems has come from the study of mast cell-nerve interaction. Mast cells play a role in resistance to infection and are extensively involved in inflammation and subsequent tissue repair. Thus, the relationship between mast cells and neurons enables the involvement of peripheral and central nervous systems in the regulation of host defense mechanisms and inflammation. Recently, with the identification of the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway, there has been increased interest in the role of the parasympathetic nervous system in regulating immune responses. Classical neurotransmitters and neuropeptides released from cholinergic and inhibitory NANC neurons can modulate mast cell activity, and there is good evidence for the existence of parasympathetic nerve-mast cell functional units in the skin, lung, and intestine that have the potential to regulate a range of physiological processes.

  12. Post-adenoviral parasympathetic dysautonomia in a child: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martinez Adalaida

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction This is the first reported case of adenoviral meningoencephalitis that was complicated by persistent parasympathetic dysautonomia, which clinically either stimulated or inhibited its activity. Case presentation A 7-year-old Caucasian girl presented to our hospital in March 2008 with a three day history of upper respiratory infection. Her condition worsened and she was placed on ventilator support for two weeks. Her recovery was complicated by a persistent selective parasympathetic dysautonomia. Her past medical history was unremarkable. Conclusions To the best of our knowledge this is the first case of an adenoviral infection in a child which was complicated after recovery from an acute meningoencephalitis and peripheral neuropathy.

  13. Peripheral mechanism underlying mirror-image mechanical allodynia in the chronic compression of multiple dorsal root ganglia in rats%多节段背根节慢性压迫大鼠机械触刺激诱发痛镜像痛的外周机制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢雅彬; 张天蔚; 焦西英; 解柔刚; 胡三觉; 游思维; 徐晖

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To study the possible peripheral mechanism of mirror-image mechanical allodynia in the chronic compression of multiple dorsal root ganglia( multiple CCD) in rats. Methods; On the basis of unilateral compression of L3-L5 CCD model in the rat, the behavior of mechanical tactile allodynia on both sides were examined with von Frey filaments, and the expression of calcitonin gene-related peptide(CGRP) ,one pain transmission-related neuropeptide, in large or medium and small DRG neurons were examined with immunohistochemical technology on both sides of the DRGs. Results: An obviously behavior of both ipsilateral and contralateral mechanical tactile allodynia could be observed in the multiple CCD model, and there was an obviously high expression of CGRP in both ipsilateral and contralateral large and medium DRG neurons of multiple CCD group compared to control group (P 0.05). Conclusion: The pain transmission neuropep-tide-CGRP was significantly increased in bilateral DRG neurons of multiple CCD rats, it suggest that the change of the plasticity of bilateral peripheral DRG neurons could be involved in the occurrence of mirror-image mechanical allodynia in the multiple CCD rats.%目的:研究多节段背根节慢性压迫(chronic compression of multiple dorsal root ganlia,CCD)大鼠机械触刺激诱发痛镜像痛的外周机制.方法:制作单侧L3-L5 CCD模型大鼠,并应用von Freyfilaments检测双侧机械触刺激诱发痛行为,利用免疫组织化学方法检测该模型大鼠同侧及对侧DRG大中型和小型神经元中与痛觉信息传递相关的神经肽-降钙素基因相关肽(calcitonin gene-related peptide,CGRP)的表达情况.结果:CCD大鼠表现出明显双侧机械触刺激诱发痛行为;免疫组织化学结果显示,CCD模型大鼠同侧及对侧DRG大和中等大小神经元内,CGRP的表达与正常组大鼠DRG神经元比较有明显升高(P<0.05),而同侧及对侧DRG小神经元,CGRP的表达与正常组大鼠DRG神

  14. Music Attenuated a Decrease in Parasympathetic Nervous System Activity after Exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Tiantian; Ogawa, Yoshiko; Miura, Misa; Ito, Osamu; Kohzuki, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Music and exercise can both affect autonomic nervous system activity. However, the effects of the combination of music and exercise on autonomic activity are poorly understood. Additionally, it remains unknown whether music affects post-exercise orthostatic tolerance. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of music on autonomic nervous system activity in orthostatic tolerance after exercise. Twenty-six healthy graduate students participated in four sessions in a random order on four separate days: a sedentary session, a music session, a bicycling session, and a bicycling with music session. Participants were asked to listen to their favorite music and to exercise on a cycle ergometer. We evaluated autonomic nervous system activity before and after each session using frequency analysis of heart rate variability. High frequency power, an index of parasympathetic nervous system activity, was significantly increased in the music session. Heart rate was increased, and high frequency power was decreased, in the bicycling session. There was no significant difference in high frequency power before and after the bicycling with music session, although heart rate was significantly increased. Additionally, both music and exercise did not significantly affect heart rate, systolic blood pressure or also heart rate variability indices in the orthostatic test. These data suggest that music increased parasympathetic activity and attenuated the exercise-induced decrease in parasympathetic activity without altering the orthostatic tolerance after exercise. Therefore, music may be an effective approach for improving post-exercise parasympathetic reactivation, resulting in a faster recovery and a reduction in cardiac stress after exercise.

  15. Excessive parasympathetic responses to sympathetic challenges: a treatable, hidden, dynamic autonomic imbalance

    OpenAIRE

    David L. Bellin; Nicholas L. DePace; Robert J. Bulgarelli; Peng Li; Joe Colombo

    2015-01-01

    Background: A common assumption with autonomic assessment is that one branch opposes the other. With independent measures of parasympathetic (P) and sympathetic (S) activity, based on concurrent time-frequency analysis of respiratory activity and heart rate variability, this assumption has been challenged. Clinical observations of unprovoked P-excess during S-stimulation have been associated with treatable, abnormal responses. Method: Serial autonomic profiling of 12,967 patients was perfo...

  16. Music Attenuated a Decrease in Parasympathetic Nervous System Activity after Exercise.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiantian Jia

    Full Text Available Music and exercise can both affect autonomic nervous system activity. However, the effects of the combination of music and exercise on autonomic activity are poorly understood. Additionally, it remains unknown whether music affects post-exercise orthostatic tolerance. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of music on autonomic nervous system activity in orthostatic tolerance after exercise. Twenty-six healthy graduate students participated in four sessions in a random order on four separate days: a sedentary session, a music session, a bicycling session, and a bicycling with music session. Participants were asked to listen to their favorite music and to exercise on a cycle ergometer. We evaluated autonomic nervous system activity before and after each session using frequency analysis of heart rate variability. High frequency power, an index of parasympathetic nervous system activity, was significantly increased in the music session. Heart rate was increased, and high frequency power was decreased, in the bicycling session. There was no significant difference in high frequency power before and after the bicycling with music session, although heart rate was significantly increased. Additionally, both music and exercise did not significantly affect heart rate, systolic blood pressure or also heart rate variability indices in the orthostatic test. These data suggest that music increased parasympathetic activity and attenuated the exercise-induced decrease in parasympathetic activity without altering the orthostatic tolerance after exercise. Therefore, music may be an effective approach for improving post-exercise parasympathetic reactivation, resulting in a faster recovery and a reduction in cardiac stress after exercise.

  17. Burnout Is Associated with Reduced Parasympathetic Activity and Reduced HPA Axis Responsiveness, Predominantly in Males

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wieke de Vente

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available There is mounting evidence that burnout is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD. Stress-related dysregulation of the sympathetic and parasympathetic system and the hypothalamic pituitary adrenal (HPA axis may explain the enhanced risk for CVD. To test this hypothesis, 55 patients (34 males and 21 females with burnout on sickness absence and 40 healthy participants (16 males and 24 females were exposed to a psychosocial stressor consisting of mental arithmetic and public speech. Physiological variables (i.e., blood pressure, heart rate, cardiac output, vascular resistance, cortisol, and alpha-amylase were measured. Basal levels, reactivity, and recovery were compared between groups. In male patients, baseline systolic blood pressure was higher, whereas basal alpha-amylase and cortisol reactivity were lower than in healthy males. In female patients, a tendency for lower basal cortisol was found as compared to healthy females. Furthermore, reduced basal heart rate variability and a trend for elevated basal cardiac output were observed in both male and female patients. Burnout is characterised by dysregulation of the sympathetic and parasympathetic system and the HPA axis, which was more pronounced in males than in females. This study further supports burnout as being a risk factor for CVD through dysregulation of the sympathetic and parasympathetic system and the HPA axis.

  18. "Hybrid" synapses formed by foreign innervation of parasympathetic neurons: a model for selectivity during competitive reinnervation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor, W; Frenk, S; Taylor, B; Roper, S

    1979-01-01

    Selectivity of synapse formation after nerve regeneration was tested in the parasympathetic cardiac ganglion of frogs (Rana pipiens). First, we tested the ability of somatic motor axons to establish synaptic connections with denervated ganglion cells by implanting the hypoglossus nerve into the vagotomized heart. After several weeks, stimulation of the implanted hypoglossus mediated a parasympathetic-like inhibition of the heart rate, and synaptic responses produced by hypoglossal stimulation were recorded intracellularly in ganglion cells. Light and electron microscopy indicated that implanted hypoglossal nerve terminals contacted parasympathetic ganglion cells only on their axons and not on the cell body (where most vagal synapses are found in control animals). Second, we tested whether regenerating vagal preganglionic axons would complete with foreign (hypoglossal) terminals for innervation of cardiac ganglion cells. We allowed the vagus nerve to regenerate in animals in which the implanted hypoglossus had established functional contacts with the cardiac ganglion. Vagal axons were able to reinnervate the heart and reestablish synaptic connections on the cell bodies of ganglion cells. Furthermore, functional transmission at the foriegn (hypoglossal) terminals disappeared concomitant with vagal reinnervation. Images PMID:315564

  19. Autonomic effects of cognitive reappraisal and acceptance in social anxiety: evidence for common and distinct pathways for parasympathetic reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristea, Ioana A; Valenza, Gaetano; Scilingo, Enzo Pasquale; Szentágotai Tătar, Aurora; Gentili, Claudio; David, Daniel

    2014-12-01

    Few studies investigated the effects of emotion regulation strategies on autonomic parameters in socially anxious individuals. We asked 99 socially anxious participants to give an impromptu speech in front of an audience in a virtual reality environment. In the anticipation phase, they practiced an emotion regulation strategy: negative functional reappraisal, acceptance, negative dysfunctional reappraisal. All strategies led to decreases in parasympathetic activity and increases in heart rate during anticipation. Parasympathetic activity remained low in the recovery phase, while heart rate increased, indicating a possible rebound effect of social performance. Exploratory moderation analysis revealed that for subjects with higher social anxiety, acceptance led to increased parasympathetic activity in the anticipation and recovery phases than negative functional reappraisal. Our results indicate that although globally parasympathetic reactivity seems to be a more general marker of simply attempting to regulate emotions, it could help distinguish between emotion regulation strategies for some participant subgroups.

  20. Factors associated with parasympathetic activation following exercise in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: a cross-sectional study

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) have an increased risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD) with poor parasympathetic function being implicated as an underlying factor. Factors related to parasympathetic function, commonly assessed by heart rate recovery (HRR) following maximal exercise, are currently not known in RA. We aimed to explore the association between HRR with CVD risk factors, inflammatory markers, and wellbeing in patients with RA. Methods Ninety-six RA patients (54...

  1. Effects of alpha-adrenoceptor and of combined sympathetic and parasympathetic blockade on cardiac performance and vascular resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kelbaek, H; Frandsen, Henrik Lund; Hilsted, J

    1992-01-01

    1. Cardiac performance and vascular resistance was studied in seven healthy men by radionuclide cardiography and venous plethysmography before and after alpha-adrenoceptor blockade with phentolamine and after combined alpha-adrenoceptor, beta-adrenoceptor (propranolol) and parasympathetic (atropine...... propranolol and atropine were added. 3. These results indicate that peripheral vasoconstriction especially that exerted by alpha-adrenoceptor nervous tone in skeletal muscle restricts left ventricular emptying of the intact heart. During pharmacologic blockade of the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous...

  2. AB300. SPR-27 Sonic hedgehog promotes sprouting of neurons in the pelvic ganglia and cavernous nerve during regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobbs, Ryan; Choe, Shawn; Harrington, Daniel A.; Stupp, Samuel I.; McVary, Kevin T.; Podlasek, Carol A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective We’ve shown in previous studies that sonic hedgehog (SHH) protein delivered by nanoparticle based peptide amphiphile (PA) hydrogels to the cavernous nerve (CN) at the time of crush injury (mimicking prostatectomy), are neuroprotective and promote CN regeneration in a rat model. The mechanism of how SHH promotes CN regeneration is unknown. We hypothesize that SHH promotes sprouting of CN axons, in order to enhance nerve regeneration. We examine this hypothesis in an in vitro organ culture model. Methods The caudal portion of the pelvic ganglia (innervates penis) and CN were dissected from adult Sprague Dawley rats (n=47) and placed in Matrigel in growth factor reduced medium and were grown for three to five days. Pelvic ganglia were exposed to Affi-Gel beads containing: (I) SHH protein; (II) 5e1 and cyclopamine SHH inhibitors; and (III) SHH protein delivered by PA. Additional pelvic ganglia/CN tissue underwent CN crush and were exposed to SHH protein or PBS/mouse serum albumin (MSA) protein. Sprouting was evaluated for number of sprouts and their length, and by immunohistochemical analysis for sprouting markers (GAP43 and nNOS). Results Sprouting of pelvic ganglia and CN axons was increased with SHH treatment. Sprouts were more abundant, longer in length, with larger arborization of sprouts, in comparison to controls. More sprouting was promoted with SHH treatment of CN injured nerves. The CN had similar sprouting potential at 4 and 9 days after crush injury. Localization of SHH delivery makes a difference in sprouting potential. Conclusions The mechanism of how SHH PA treatment promotes CN regeneration, involves enhanced sprouting of pelvic ganglia and CN neurons. Understanding the mechanism of SHH PA action on neuronal tissue is critical for translation to prostatectomy patients and to further enhance regeneration. Funding Source(s) NIH/NIDDK DK079184

  3. Involvement of dorsal root ganglia in Fabry's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadoth, N; Sandbank, U

    1983-08-01

    Bouts of shooting pain along the extremities are common in the early stages of Fabry's disease. No pathological explanation has been advanced to clarify the mechanism of such pain. In the present case neuronal storage of glycolipid was confined to dorsal root ganglia neurones only. It is suggested that this may explain the shooting pain in Fabry's disease. In hereditary sensory radicular neuropathy, familial dysautonomia, and tabes dorsalis, changes in dorsal root ganglia cells cause similar clinical signs and thus it may be concluded that shooting pains in Fabry's disease may be caused by damage to dorsal root ganglia neurones.

  4. How Basal Ganglia Outputs Generate Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry H. Yin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The basal ganglia (BG are a collection of subcortical nuclei critical for voluntary behavior. According to the standard model, the output projections from the BG tonically inhibit downstream motor centers and prevent behavior. A pause in the BG output opens the gate for behavior, allowing the initiation of actions. Hypokinetic neurological symptoms, such as inability to initiate actions in Parkinson’s disease, are explained by excessively high firing rates of the BG output neurons. This model, widely taught in textbooks, is contradicted by recent electrophysiological results, which are reviewed here. In addition, I also introduce a new model, based on the insight that behavior is a product of closed loop negative feedback control using internal reference signals rather than sensorimotor transformations. The nervous system is shown to be a functional hierarchy comprising independent controllers occupying different levels, each level controlling specific variables derived from its perceptual inputs. The BG represent the level of transition control in this hierarchy, sending reference signals specifying the succession of body orientations and configurations. This new model not only explains the major symptoms in movement disorders but also generates a number of testable predictions.

  5. Basal ganglia calcification on computed tomography in systemic lupus erythematosus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagaoka, Shohei; Tani, Kenji; Ishigatsubo, Yoshiaki and others

    1988-09-01

    The development of basal ganglia calcification was studied in 85 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) by computed tomography (CT). Bilateral calcification of the basal ganglia was found to occur in 5 patients (5.9 %) with SLE, but was not seen in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and progressive systemic sclerosis. All were female with a mean age of 42 years (range 29 - 49). The patients with calcification of the basal ganglia had neurological symptoms, such as psychiatric problems (3 cases), grand mal seizures (1 case), CSF abnormalities (2 cases), and EEG changes (4 cases). There were significantly higher incidences of alopecia, cutaneous vasculitis, leukopenia, and thrombocytopenia in the group with calcifications than those in the group with normal CT findings. Circulating immune complexes were detected and LE tests were positive in 2 patients. Endocrinological examination showed no abnormality in any. We suggest that basal ganglia calcification in SLE might be related to cerebral vasculitis.

  6. Reassessing Models of Basal Ganglia Function and Dysfunction

    OpenAIRE

    Nelson, Alexandra B.; Kreitzer, Anatol C.

    2014-01-01

    The basal ganglia are a series of interconnected subcortical nuclei. The function and dysfunction of these nuclei has been studied intensively as it pertains to motor control, but more recently our knowledge of these functions has broadened to include prominent roles in cognition and affective control. This review will summarize historical models of basal ganglia function, findings which have supported or conflicted with these models, and emphasize recent work in animals and humans directly t...

  7. Familial idiopathic basal ganglia calcification (Fahr’s disease)

    OpenAIRE

    Mufaddel, Amir A.; Al-Hassani, Ghanem A.

    2014-01-01

    Familial idiopathic basal ganglia calcification (Fahr’s disease) is a rare neurodegenerative disorder characterized by symmetrical and bilateral calcification of the basal ganglia. Calcifications may also occur in other brain regions such as dentate nucleus, thalamus, and cerebral cortex. Both familial and non-familial cases of Fahr’s disease have been reported, predominantly with autosomal-dominant fashion. The disease has a wide range of clinical presentations, predominantly with neuropsych...

  8. Cognitive-motor interactions of the basal ganglia in development

    OpenAIRE

    Gerry eLeisman; Orit eBraun-Benjamin; Robert eMelillo

    2014-01-01

    Neural circuits linking activity in anatomically segregated populations of neurons in subcortical structures and the neocortex throughout the human brain regulate complex behaviors such as walking, talking, language comprehension, and other cognitive functions associated with frontal lobes. The basal ganglia, which regulate motor control, are also crucial elements in the circuits that confer human reasoning and adaptive function. The basal ganglia are key elements in the control of reward-bas...

  9. RNA Sequencing of Trigeminal Ganglia in Rattus Norvegicus after Glyceryl Trinitrate Infusion with Relevance to Migraine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Hougaard Pedersen

    Full Text Available Infusion of glyceryl trinitrate (GTN, a donor of nitric oxide, induces immediate headache in humans that in migraineurs is followed by a delayed migraine attack. In order to achieve increased knowledge of mechanisms activated during GTN-infusion this present study aims to investigate transcriptional responses to GTN-infusion in the rat trigeminal ganglia.Rats were infused with GTN or vehicle and trigeminal ganglia were isolated either 30 or 90 minutes post infusion. RNA sequencing was used to investigate transcriptomic changes in response to the treatment. Furthermore, we developed a novel method for Gene Set Analysis Of Variance (GSANOVA to identify gene sets associated with transcriptional changes across time.15 genes displayed significant changes in transcription levels in response to GTN-infusion. Ten of these genes showed either sustained up- or down-regulation in the 90-minute period after infusion. The GSANOVA analysis demonstrate enrichment of pathways pointing towards an increase in immune response, signal transduction, and neuroplasticity in response to GTN-infusion. Future functional in-depth studies of these mechanisms are expected to increase our understanding of migraine pathogenesis.

  10. What basal ganglia changes underlie the parkinsonian state? The significance of neuronal oscillatory activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroga-Varela, A.; Walters, J.R.; Brazhnik, E.; Marin, C.; Obeso, J.A.

    2014-01-01

    One well accepted functional feature of the parkinsonian state is the recording of enhanced beta oscillatory activity in the basal ganglia. This has been demonstrated in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and in animal models such as the rat with 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced lesion and 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-treated monkeys, all of which are associated with severe striatal dopamine depletion. Neuronal hyper-synchronization in the beta (or any other) band is not present despite the presence of bradykinetic features in the rat and monkey models, suggesting that increased beta band power may arise when nigro-striatal lesion is advanced and that it is not an essential feature of the early parkinsonian state. Similar observations and conclusions have been previously made for increased neuronal firing rate in the subthalamic and globus pallidus pars interna nuclei. Accordingly, it is suggested that early parkinsonism may be associated with dynamic changes in basal ganglia output activity leading to reduced movement facilitation that may be an earlier feature of the parkinsonian state. PMID:23727447

  11. RNA Sequencing of Trigeminal Ganglia in Rattus Norvegicus after Glyceryl Trinitrate Infusion with Relevance to Migraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hougaard Pedersen, Sara; Maretty, Lasse; Ramachandran, Roshni; Sibbesen, Jonas Andreas; Yakimov, Victor; Elgaard-Christensen, Rikke; Hansen, Thomas Folkmann; Krogh, Anders; Olesen, Jes; Jansen-Olesen, Inger

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Infusion of glyceryl trinitrate (GTN), a donor of nitric oxide, induces immediate headache in humans that in migraineurs is followed by a delayed migraine attack. In order to achieve increased knowledge of mechanisms activated during GTN-infusion this present study aims to investigate transcriptional responses to GTN-infusion in the rat trigeminal ganglia. Methods Rats were infused with GTN or vehicle and trigeminal ganglia were isolated either 30 or 90 minutes post infusion. RNA sequencing was used to investigate transcriptomic changes in response to the treatment. Furthermore, we developed a novel method for Gene Set Analysis Of Variance (GSANOVA) to identify gene sets associated with transcriptional changes across time. Results 15 genes displayed significant changes in transcription levels in response to GTN-infusion. Ten of these genes showed either sustained up- or down-regulation in the 90-minute period after infusion. The GSANOVA analysis demonstrate enrichment of pathways pointing towards an increase in immune response, signal transduction, and neuroplasticity in response to GTN-infusion. Future functional in-depth studies of these mechanisms are expected to increase our understanding of migraine pathogenesis. PMID:27213950

  12. An MRI atlas of the mouse basal ganglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullmann, Jeremy F P; Watson, Charles; Janke, Andrew L; Kurniawan, Nyoman D; Paxinos, George; Reutens, David C

    2014-07-01

    The basal ganglia are a group of subpallial nuclei that play an important role in motor, emotional, and cognitive functions. Morphological changes and disrupted afferent/efferent connections in the basal ganglia have been associated with a variety of neurological disorders including psychiatric and movement disorders. While high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging has been used to characterize changes in brain structure in mouse models of these disorders, no systematic method for segmentation of the C57BL/6 J mouse basal ganglia exists. In this study we have used high-resolution MR images of ex vivo C57BL/6 J mouse brain to create a detailed protocol for segmenting the basal ganglia. We created a three-dimensional minimum deformation atlas, which includes the segmentation of 35 striatal, pallidal, and basal ganglia-related structures. In addition, we provide mean volumes, mean T2 contrast intensities and mean FA and ADC values for each structure. This MR atlas is available for download, and enables researchers to perform automated segmentation in genetic models of basal ganglia disorders.

  13. Heart rate response and parasympathetic modulation during recovery from exercise in boys and men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilkey, Justin P; Overstreet, Matthew; Fernhall, Bo; Mahon, Anthony D

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of postexercise parasympathetic modulation, measured by heart rate variability (HRV), on heart rate recovery (HRR) in boys (n = 13, 10.1 ± 0.8 years) and men (n = 13, 23.9 ± 1.5 years) following maximal and submaximal exercise. Subjects completed 10 min of supine rest, followed by graded exercise on a cycle ergometer to maximal effort. On a separate day, subjects exercised at an intensity equivalent to ventilatory threshold. Immediately following both exercise bouts, 1-min HRR was assessed in the supine position. HRV was analyzed under controlled breathing during the final 5 min of rest and recovery in the time and frequency domains and transformed to natural log (ln) values. Boys had a greater 1-min HRR than men following maximal (58 ± 8 vs. 47 ± 11 beats·min(-1)) and submaximal (59 ± 8 vs. 47 ± 15 beats·min(-1)) exercise (p exercise, boys had greater ln root mean square successive differences in R-R intervals (2.52 ± 0.95 ms), ln standard deviation of NN intervals (3.34 ± 0.57 ms), ln high-frequency power (4.32 ± 2.00 ms(2)), and ln low-frequency power (4.98 ± 1.17 ms(2)) than men (1.33 ± 0.37 ms, 2.52 ± 0.24 ms, 1.32 ± 1.06 ms(2) and 2.80 ± 0.74 ms(2), respectively) (p exercise (p > 0.05). In conclusion, it appears that greater parasympathetic modulation accounts for greater HRR following maximal exercise in boys versus men. Although submaximal HRR was greater in boys, parasympathetic responses were similar between groups.

  14. Parturition in horses is dominated by parasympathetic activity of the autonomous nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagel, Christina; Erber, Regina; Ille, Natascha; von Lewinski, Mareike; Aurich, Jörg; Möstl, Erich; Aurich, Christine

    2014-07-01

    External and internal stressors prolong parturition in different species. At parturition, sympathoadrenal activation should be avoided because an increased sympathetic tone may cause uterine atonia via β2-receptors. We hypothesized that at physiological parturition, horses are under parasympathetic dominance, and stress-response mechanisms are not activated during delivery of the foal. To evaluate stress responses, heart rate, heart rate variability, catecholamines, and cortisol were analyzed in mares (n = 17) throughout foaling. Heart rate decreased from 2 hours before (51 ± 1 beats/minute) to 2 hours after delivery (41 ± 2 beats/minute; P stress response.

  15. A decrease in the size of the basal ganglia following prenatal alcohol exposure: a preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattson, S N; Riley, E P; Jernigan, T L; Garcia, A; Kaneko, W M; Ehlers, C L; Jones, K L

    1994-01-01

    Prenatal alcohol exposure is known to cause damage to the central nervous system. This study sought to further elucidate the structural brain damage that occurs following prenatal alcohol exposure in both children and rats. Two children with histories of maternal alcohol abuse but who did not qualify for a diagnosis of Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS), based on established criteria, underwent magnetic resonance imaging. Reduced volumes were found for the cerebrum and cerebellum. In addition, the proportional volume of the basal ganglia was reduced, although the proportional volumes of cortical and subcortical fluid, cortical gray matter, limbic and nonlimbic cortex, and diencephalic structures were unaffected. These findings are compared with our recent MRI findings in two cases of FAS. In addition, the caudate-putamen and ventricular areas were assessed in rats exposed to alcohol prenatally. Whereas the overall brain section area was not reduced in size, the area of the caudate-putamen was reduced and that of the ventricles was enlarged.

  16. Basal ganglia - thalamus and the crowning enigma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianela eGarcia-Munoz

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available When Hubel (1982 referred to layer 1 of primary visual cortex as …a ‘crowning mystery’ to keep area-17 physiologists busy for years to come... he could have been talking about any cortical area. In the 80’s and 90’s there were no methods to examine this neuropile on the surface of the cortex: a tangled web of axons and dendrites from a variety of different places with unknown specificities and doubtful connections to the cortical output neurons some hundreds of microns below. Recently, three changes have made the crowning enigma less of an impossible mission: the clear presence of neurons in layer 1 (L1, the active conduction of voltage along apical dendrites and optogenetic methods that might allow us to look at one source of input at a time. For all of those reasons alone, it seems it is time to take seriously the function of L1. The functional properties of this layer will need to wait for more experiments but already L1 cells are GAD67 positive, i.e., inhibitory! They could reverse the sign of the thalamic glutamate (GLU input for the entire cortex. It is at least possible that in the near future normal activity of individual sources of L1 could be detected using genetic tools. We are at the outset of important times in the exploration of thalamic functions and perhaps the solution to the crowning enigma is within sight. Our review looks forward to that solution from the solid basis of the anatomy of the basal ganglia output to motor thalamus. We will focus on L1, its afferents, intrinsic neurons and its influence on responses of pyramidal neurons in layers 2/3 and 5. Since L1 is present in the whole cortex we will provide a general overview considering evidence mainly from the somatosensory cortex before focusing on motor cortex.

  17. Differential effects of adrenergic antagonists (Carvedilol vs Metoprolol on parasympathetic and sympathetic activity: a comparison of clinical results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather L. Bloom

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN is recognized as a significant health risk, correlating with risk of heart disease, silent myocardial ischemia or sudden cardiac death. Beta-blockers are often prescribed to minimize risk. Objectives In this second of two articles, the effects on parasympathetic and sympathetic activity of the alpha/beta-adrenergic blocker, Carvedilol, are compared with those of the selective beta-adrenergic blocker, Metoprolol. Methods Retrospective, serial autonomic nervous system test data from 147 type 2 diabetes mellitus patients from eight ambulatory clinics were analyzed. Patients were grouped according to whether a beta-blocker was (1 introduced, (2 discontinued or (3 continued without adjustment. Group 3 served as the control. Results Introducing Carvedilol or Metoprolol decreased heart rate and blood pressure, and discontinuing them had the opposite effect. Parasympathetic activity increased with introducing Carvedilol. Sympathetic activity increased more after discontinuing Carvedilol, suggesting better sympathetic suppression. With ongoing treatment, resting parasympathetic activity decreased with Metoprolol but increased with Carvedilol. Conclusion Carvedilol has a more profound effect on sympathovagal balance than Metoprolol. While both suppress sympathetic activity, only Carvedilol increases parasympathetic activity. Increased parasympathetic activity may underlie the lower mortality risk with Carvedilol.

  18. Cognitive-Motor Interactions of the Basal Ganglia in Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerry eLeisman

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Neural circuits linking activity in anatomically segregated populations of neurons in subcortical structures regulate complex behaviors such as walking, talking, language comprehension, and other cognitive functions associated with frontal lobes. The basal ganglia are also crucial elements in the circuits that confer human reasoning and adaptive function and are key elements in the control of reward-based learning, sequencing, discrete elements that constitute complete motor acts, and cognitive function. Imaging studies of intact humans and electrophysiologic studies of the brains and behavior of other species confirm these findings. We know that the relation between the basal ganglia and the cerebral cortical region allows for connections organized into discrete circuits. Rather than serving as a means for widespread cortical areas to gain access to the motor system, these loops reciprocally interconnect a large and diverse set of cerebral cortical areas with the basal ganglia. Neuronal activity within the basal ganglia associated with motor areas of the cerebral cortex is highly correlated with parameters of movement. Neuronal activity within the basal ganglia and cerebellar loops associated with the prefrontal cortex is related to the aspects of cognitive function. Thus, individual loops appear to be involved in distinct behavioral functions. Damage to the basal ganglia of circuits with motor areas of the cortex leads to motor symptoms, whereas damage to the subcortical components of circuits with non-motor areas of the cortex causes higher-order deficits. In this report, we review some of the anatomic, physiologic, and behavioral findings that have contributed to a reappraisal of function concerning the basal ganglia and cerebellar loops with the cerebral cortex and apply it in clinical applications to ADHD with biomechanics and a discussion of retention of primitive reflexes being highly associated with the condition.

  19. A single dose of dark chocolate increases parasympathetic modulation and heart rate variability in healthy subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Amélia Machado DUARTE

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the acute effect of a single dose of dark chocolate (70% cocoa on blood pressure and heart rate variability. Methods: Thirty-one healthy subjects (aged 18-25 years; both sexes were divided into two groups: 10 subjects in the white chocolate (7.4 g group and 21 in the dark chocolate (10 g group; measurements were performed at the university's physiology lab. An electrocardiogram measured the sympathovagal balance by spectral and symbolic analysis. Results: A single dose of dark chocolate significantly reduced systolic blood pressure and heart rate. After consuming 10 g of dark chocolate, significant increases were observed for heart rate variability, standard deviation of RR intervals standard deviation of all NN intervals, square root of the mean squared differences between adjacent normal RR intervals root mean square of successive differences, and an increase in the high frequency component in absolute values, representing the parasympathetic modulation. Conclusion: In conclusion the importance of our results lies in the magnitude of the response provoked by a single dose of cocoa. Just 10 g of cocoa triggered a significant increase in parasympathetic modulation and heart rate variability. These combined effects can potentially increase life expectancy because a reduction in heart rate variability is associated with several cardiovascular diseases and higher mortality.

  20. Habitual traffic noise at home reduces cardiac parasympathetic tone during sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Jamie M A; Janssen, Sabine A; Vos, Henk; Miedema, Henk M E

    2009-05-01

    The relationships between road and rail traffic noise with pre-ejection period (PEP) and with respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) during sleep, as indices of cardiac sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous system tone, were investigated in the field (36 subjects, with 188 and 192 valid subject nights for PEP and RSA, respectively). Two analyses were conducted. The first analysis investigated the overall relationships across the entire sleep period. A second analysis investigated differences in the relationships between the first and second halves of the sleep period. Separate multilevel linear regression models for PEP and RSA were employed. Potential covariates for each model were selected from the same pool of variables, which included: gender, age, body-mass index, education level, traffic noise source type, intake of medication, caffeine, alcohol and cigarette smoke, and hindrance during sleep due to the ambulatory recordings. RSA models were adjusted for respiration rate. Mean indoor traffic noise exposure was negatively related to mean RSA during the sleep period, specifically during the second half of the sleep period. Both respiration rate and age were negatively associated with RSA. No significant relationships were observed for PEP. The results indicate that higher indoor traffic noise exposure levels may lead to cardiac parasympathetic withdrawal during sleep, specifically during the second half of the sleep period. No effect of indoor traffic noise on cardiac sympathetic tone was observed.

  1. Perinatal sulfur dioxide exposure alters brainstem parasympathetic control of heart rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woerman, Amanda L; Mendelowitz, David

    2013-07-01

    Sulfur dioxide (SO₂) is an air pollutant that impedes neonatal development and induces adverse cardiorespiratory health effects, including tachycardia. Here, an animal model was developed that enabled characterization of (i) in vivo alterations in heart rate and (ii) altered activity in brainstem neurons that control heart rate after perinatal SO₂ exposure. Pregnant Sprague-Dawley dams and their pups were exposed to 5 parts per million SO₂ for 1 h daily throughout gestation and 6 days postnatal. Electrocardiograms were recorded from pups at 5 days postnatal to examine changes in basal and diving reflex-evoked changes in heart rate following perinatal SO₂ exposure. In vitro studies employed whole-cell patch-clamp electrophysiology to examine changes in neurotransmission to cardiac vagal neurons within the nucleus ambiguus upon SO₂ exposure using a preparation that maintains fictive inspiratory activity recorded from the hypoglossal rootlet. Perinatal SO₂ exposure increased heart rate and blunted the parasympathetic-mediated diving reflex-evoked changes in heart rate. Neither spontaneous nor inspiratory-related inhibitory GABAergic or glycinergic neurotransmission to cardiac vagal neurons was altered by SO₂ exposure. However, excitatory glutamatergic neurotransmission was decreased by 51.2% upon SO₂ exposure. This diminished excitatory neurotransmission was tetrodotoxin-sensitive, indicating SO₂ exposure impaired the activity of preceding glutamatergic neurons that synapse upon cardiac vagal neurons. Diminished glutamatergic, but unaltered inhibitory neurotransmission to cardiac vagal neurons provides a mechanism for the observed SO₂-induced elevated heart rate via an impairment of brainstem cardioinhibitory parasympathetic activity to the heart.

  2. Role of Nav1.7 in dorsal root ganglia in a rat model of diabetic neuropathic pain%背根神经节Nav1.7在大鼠糖尿病神经病理性痛中的作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    柯昌斌; 黄晓霞; 王燕; 刘菊英

    2011-01-01

    目的 评价背根神经节(DRG) Nav1.7在大鼠糖尿病神经病理性痛中的作用.方法 雌性Wistar大鼠32只,月龄3个月,体重180~220 g.采用腹腔注射链脲菌素65 mg/kg的方法制备糖尿病神经病理性痛模型.模型制备成功后第10天鞘内置管.采用随机数字表法,将大鼠随机分为4组(n=8),正常对照组(C组):不做任何处理;假手术组(S组):仅鞘内置管;糖尿病神经病理性痛(DNP组):制备糖尿病神经病理性痛模型,并鞘内置管;Nav1.7阻断剂组(E组):制备糖尿病神经病理性痛模型,鞘内置管后第4天鞘内注射Nav1.7阻断剂ProTx-Ⅱ10 μg/kg,DNP组和S组注射等容量生理盐水.于鞘内注射后1h测定机械缩足阈值(MWT)和神经传导速度(NCV),随后处死大鼠,取L4-6 DRG,采用免疫组化法和Western blot法测定DRG Nav1.7蛋白的表达水平,采用RT-PCR法测定Nav1.7mRNA的表达水平.结果 与C组比较,DNP组和E组MWT和NCV明显下降,DRGNav1.7 mRNA及其蛋白表达上调(P<0.05),S组上述指标差异无统计学意义(P>0.05);与DNP组比较,E组MWT升高(P<0.05),NCV、DRG Nav1.7 mRNA及其蛋白表达水平差异无统计学意义(P>0.05).结论 DRG Nav1.7参与了大鼠糖尿病神经病理性痛的维持.%Objective To investigate the role of Nav1.7 in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) in a rat model of diabetic neuropathic pain (DNP).Methods Thirty-two female Wistar rats aged 3 months weighing 180-220 g were randomly divided into 4 groups ( n = 8 each):control group ( group C),sham operation group ( group S),DNP group and ProTx- Ⅱ (a selective Nav1.7 blocker) group (group E).Diabetes mellitus was induced by intraperitoneal streptozocin 65 mg/kg.Blood glucose level and mechanical paw withdrawal threshold (MWT)to von Froy filamentstimulation were measured 2 weeks later.DNP was confirmed by blood glucose level ≥ 16.0 mmol/L and MWT decreased by more than 50% of the baseline value.Intrathecal catheter was implanted at L5

  3. Effect of lacosamide on expression of Nav1.8 in dorsal root ganglia in a rat model of chronic neuropathic pain%拉科酰胺对神经病理性痛大鼠背根神经节Nav1.8表达的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王昕辉; 易红蕾; 刘春江; 龚政; 熊源长

    2011-01-01

    目的 探讨拉科酰胺对神经病理性痛大鼠背根神经节(DRG)Nav1.8表达的影响.方法 SPF级雌性SD大鼠36只,体重120~130 g,采用随机数字表法,将其随机分为3组(n=12):假手术组(S组)、模型组(M组)、拉科酰胺组(L组).M组和L组将钢棒插入椎间孔压迫L5DRG制备神经病理性痛模型.于术前2 d、术后2,4、6、7、8、9、10 d(T0-7)时测定机械痛阈.于T4时,S组和L组腹腔注射拉科酰胺20 mg/kg(生理盐水溶解至0.5 ml),M组注射生理盐水0.5 ml,2次/d,连续4 d.每天末次给药后测定痛阈.于T7时痛阈测定后取术侧L5DRG,采用RT-PCR法和免疫组织化学法测定Nav1.8mRNA和蛋白表达水平.结果 与S组比较,M组和L组T1~7时机械痛阚降低,Nav1.8 mRNA和蛋白表达上调(P<0.05);与M组比较,L组T4~7时机械痛阈升高,Nav1.8 mRNA和蛋白表达下调(P<0.05).结论 拉科酰胺减轻大鼠慢性神经病理性痛的机制与下调损伤DRG的Nav1.8表达有关.%Objective To investigate the effect of lacosamide on expression of Nav1 .8 in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) in a rat model of chronic neuropathic pain.Methods Thirty-six female specific-pathogen-free (SPF)SD rats were randomly assigned into 3 groups ( n = 12 each): sham operation group (group S), model group (group M) and lacosamide group (group L) . Chronic neuropathic pain was produced by insertion of a small stainless steel rod (4.00 mm in length and 0.63 mm in diameter) into the L, intervertebral foramen in the rat, producing a chronic steady compression of the DRG in M and L groups. The mechanical threshold was measured 2 days before operation and on the 2, 4, 6, 7, 8, 9 and 10 days after operation (T0-7 ) . Intraperitoneal lacosamide 20mg/kg (in normal saline 0.5 ml) was injected at T4-7, twice a day in S and L groups. In group M, normal saline 0.5 ml was injected at T4-7 twice a day and the mechanical threshold was measured after the last administration everyday . The L, DRG on the operated side was

  4. Effects of gabapentin on the expression of p-STAT3 in dorsal roto ganglia of diabetic neuropathological pain rats%加巴喷丁对糖尿病神经病理痛大鼠背根神经节磷酸化信号转导和转录激活因子3表达的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苗蓓; 周田田; 邵翠杰

    2014-01-01

    目的:观察加巴喷丁(gabapentin, GBP)对糖尿病神经病理痛大鼠背根神经节磷酸化信号转导和转录激活因子3(p-STAT3)表达的影响。方法80只成年健康雄性SD大鼠,随机分为正常组(Control 组)、糖尿病神经病理痛组( DNP组)、生理盐水+DNP组( SC+DNP组)和加巴喷丁+DNP组( GBP+DNP组),每组20只。采用链脲佐菌素(STZ)诱导的糖尿病神经病理痛大鼠模型;SC+DNP组和GBP+DNP组于STZ注射15天起分别腹腔注射生理盐水或GBP 50 mg/kg,1次/d,连续7天;采用行为学测试测定STZ注射前1天及注射后3、7、10、14、21、28天大鼠缩足反射机械刺激阈值(PWMT)和缩足反射热辐射潜伏期(PWTL),免疫组化方法检测大鼠背根神经节(DRG)中p-STAT3的表达。结果与Control 组比较, DNP组PWMT〔(3.8±0.84) g〕降低、PWTL〔(5.9±0.94) s〕缩短,DRG中p-STAT3蛋白的表达上调(P<0.05);与DNP组比较, SC+DNP组大鼠在腹腔注射生理盐水后,PWMT〔(4.03±0.5) g〕、PWTL〔(6.2±0.7) s〕和p-STAT3蛋白的表达无明显改变(P>0.05);与DNP组和SC+DNP组比较, GBP+DNP组PWMT〔(8.4±0.87) g〕升高,PWTL〔(10±1.2) s〕延长, DRG中p-STAT3蛋白的表达下调(P<0.05)。结论 GBP能减轻大鼠糖尿病神经病理痛,其机制可能与抑制p-STAT3的表达水平有关。%Objective To investigate the effects of gabapentin on the expression of p -STAT3 in dorsal root ganglia of a rat model of diabetic neuropathological pain ( DNP) .Methods 80 male SD rats weighing 200-220 g were randomly divided into 4groups (20 in each):a control group, a DNP group, a saline (SC+DNP) group and a gabapentin (GBP+DNP) group.Then a rat model of diabetic neuropathological pain was established through injection of streptozocin ( STZ) .Fifteen days after STZ administration , the rats of the SC

  5. Modeling the contributions of Basal ganglia and Hippocampus to spatial navigation using reinforcement learning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepika Sukumar

    Full Text Available A computational neural model that describes the competing roles of Basal Ganglia and Hippocampus in spatial navigation is presented. Model performance is evaluated on a simulated Morris water maze explored by a model rat. Cue-based and place-based navigational strategies, thought to be subserved by the Basal ganglia and Hippocampus respectively, are described. In cue-based navigation, the model rat learns to directly head towards a visible target, while in place-based navigation the target position is represented in terms of spatial context provided by an array of poles placed around the pool. Learning is formulated within the framework of Reinforcement Learning, with the nigrostriatal dopamine signal playing the role of Temporal Difference Error. Navigation inherently involves two apparently contradictory movements: goal oriented movements vs. random, wandering movements. The model hypothesizes that while the goal-directedness is determined by the gradient in Value function, randomness is driven by the complex activity of the SubThalamic Nucleus (STN-Globus Pallidus externa (GPe system. Each navigational system is associated with a Critic, prescribing actions that maximize value gradients for the corresponding system. In the integrated system, that incorporates both cue-based and place-based forms of navigation, navigation at a given position is determined by the system whose value function is greater at that position. The proposed model describes the experimental results of [1], a lesion-study that investigates the competition between cue-based and place-based navigational systems. The present study also examines impaired navigational performance under Parkinsonian-like conditions. The integrated navigational system, operated under dopamine-deficient conditions, exhibits increased escape latency as was observed in experimental literature describing MPTP model rats navigating a water maze.

  6. Time representation in reinforcement learning models of the basal ganglia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Joseph Gershman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Reinforcement learning models have been influential in understanding many aspects of basal ganglia function, from reward prediction to action selection. Time plays an important role in these models, but there is still no theoretical consensus about what kind of time representation is used by the basal ganglia. We review several theoretical accounts and their supporting evidence. We then discuss the relationship between reinforcement learning models and the timing mechanisms that have been attributed to the basal ganglia. We hypothesize that a single computational system may underlie both reinforcement learning and interval timing—the perception of duration in the range of seconds to hours. This hypothesis, which extends earlier models by incorporating a time-sensitive action selection mechanism, may have important implications for understanding disorders like Parkinson's disease in which both decision making and timing are impaired.

  7. Parasympathetic activation is involved in reducing epileptiform discharges when listening to Mozart music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lung-Chang; Chiang, Ching-Tai; Lee, Mei-Wen; Mok, Hin-Kiu; Yang, Yi-Hsin; Wu, Hui-Chuan; Tsai, Chin-Lin; Yang, Rei-Cheng

    2013-08-01

    Listening to Mozart K.448 has been demonstrated to improve spatial task scores, leading to what is known as the Mozart effect. Our previous work revealed the positive effects of Mozart K.448 in reducing epileptiform discharges in children with epilepsy. However, the mechanism remains unclear. parasympathetic activation has been shown to help seizure control in many studies. In this study, we investigated the effect of Mozart music on epileptiform discharges and autonomic activity. Sixty-four epileptic children with epileptiform discharges were included. They all received electroencephalogram and electrocardiogram examinations simultaneously before, during, and after listening to Mozart K.448 or K.545. The total number of epileptiform discharges during each session (before, during, and after music) were divided by the duration (in minutes) of the session and then compared. Heart rate variability including time and frequency domain analysis was used to represent the autonomic function. The results showed that epileptiform discharges were significantly reduced during and right after listening to Mozart music (33.3 ± 31.1% reduction, pMozart K.448 and 38.6 ± 43.3% reduction, pMozart K.545) (28.1 ± 43.2% reduction, pMozart K.448 and 46.0 ± 40.5% reduction, pMozart K.545). No significant difference was noticed between the two pieces of music. The reduction was greatest in patients with generalized seizures and discharges. Significant increases in high-frequency (HF), the square root of the mean squared differences of successive RR intervals (RMSSD), the standard deviation of differences between adjacent RR intervals (SDSD), and a decrease in mean beats per minute (bpm) were found during listening to Mozart music. Most of the patients with reduced epileptiform discharges also showed a decreased LF/HF ratio, low-frequency normalized units (LF nu), mean bpm, and an increased high-frequency normalized units (HF nu). Listening to Mozart music decreased epileptiform

  8. Synaptic dimorphism in Onychophoran cephalic ganglia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z Peña-Contreras

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The taxonomic location of the Onychophora has been controversial because of their phenotypic and genotypic characteristics, related to both annelids and arthropods. We analyzed the ultrastructure of the neurons and their synapses in the cephalic ganglion of a poorly known invertebrate, the velvet worm Peripatus sedgwicki, from the mountainous region of El Valle, Mérida, Venezuela. Cephalic ganglia were dissected, fixed and processed for transmission electron microscopy. The animal has a high degree of neurobiological development, as evidenced by the presence of asymmetric (excitatory and symmetric (inhibitory synapses, as well as the existence of glial cell processes in a wide neuropile zone. The postsynaptic terminals were seen to contain subsynaptic cisterns formed by membranes of smooth endoplasmic reticulum beneath the postsynaptic density, whereas the presynaptic terminal showed numerous electron transparent synaptic vesicles. From the neurophylogenetic perspectives, the ultrastructural characteristics of the central nervous tissue of the Onychophora show important evolutionary acquirements, such as the presence of both excitatory and inhibitory synapses, indicating functional synaptic transmission, and the appearance of mature glial cells. Rev. Biol . Trop. 55 (1: 261-267. Epub 2007 March. 31.Estudiamos la ultraestructura de las neuronas y sus sinapsis del ganglio cefálico de un invertebrado poco conocido del phylum Onychophora: Peripatus sedgwicki de los Andes Venezolanos, utilizando para ello la microscopía electrónica de transmisión. La localización taxonómica de los onicóforos ha sido controversial debido a sus características fenotípicas y genotípicas que los relacionan tanto con los anélidos como con los artrópodos. Para este trabajo se estudió el ganglio cefálico de P. sedgwicki de la zona montañosa de El Valle, Mérida, Venezuela. El ganglio cefálico se localiza en la región anterior del animal y fue diseccionado

  9. Application research of Ganglia in Hadoop monitoring and management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gang; Ding, Jing; Zhou, Lixia; Yang, Yi; Liu, Lei; Wang, Xiaolei

    2017-03-01

    There are many applications of Hadoop System in the field of large data, cloud computing. The test bench of storage and application in seismic network at Earthquake Administration of Tianjin use with Hadoop system, which is used the open source software of Ganglia to operate and monitor. This paper reviews the function, installation and configuration process, application effect of operating and monitoring in Hadoop system of the Ganglia system. It briefly introduces the idea and effect of Nagios software monitoring Hadoop system. It is valuable for the industry in the monitoring system of cloud computing platform.

  10. Differential expression of microRNAs in dorsal root ganglia after sciatic nerve injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anjie Lu; Zufa Huang; Chaoyue Zhang; Xianfang Zhang; Jiuhong Zhao; Haiying Zhang; Quanpeng Zhang; Song Wu; Xinan Yi

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the possible involvement of microRNAs in the regulation of genes that participate in peripheral neural regeneration. A microRNA microarray analysis was conducted and 23 microRNAs were identiifed whose expression was signiifcantly changed in rat dorsal root ganglia after sciatic nerve transection. The expression of one of the downregulated microRNAs, microRNA-214, was validated using quantitative reverse transcriptase-PCR. MicroRNA-214 was predicted to target the 3′-untranslated region of Slit-Robo GTPase-activating protein 3. In situ hybridization veriifed that microRNA-214 was located in the cytoplasm of dorsal root ganglia primary neurons and was downregulated following sciatic nerve transection. Moreover, a com-bination of in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry revealed that microRNA-214 and Slit-Robo GTPase-activating protein 3 were co-localized in dorsal root ganglion primary neu-rons. Western blot analysis suggested that Slit-Robo GTPase-activating protein 3 was upregulated in dorsal root ganglion neurons after sciatic nerve transection. These data demonstrate that mi-croRNA-214 is located and differentially expressed in dorsal root ganglion primary neurons and may participate in regulating the gene expression of Slit-Robo GTPase-activating protein 3 after sciatic nerve transection.

  11. Virtual nature environment with nature sound exposure induce stress recovery by enhanced parasympathetic activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Annerstedt, Matilda; Jönsson, Peter; Wallergård, Mattias

    2013-01-01

    Experimental research on stress recovery in natural environments is limited, as is study of the effect of sounds of nature. After inducing stress by means of a virtual stress test, we explored physiological recovery in two different virtual natural environments (with and without exposure to sounds...... of nature) and in one control condition. Cardiovascular data and saliva cortisol were collected. Repeated ANOVA measurements indicated parasympathetic activation in the group subjected to sounds of nature in a virtual natural environment, suggesting enhanced stress recovery may occur in such surroundings....... The group that recovered in virtual nature without sound and the control group displayed no particular autonomic activation or deactivation. The results demonstrate a potential mechanistic link between nature, the sounds of nature, and stress recovery, and suggest the potential importance of virtual reality...

  12. How well socially wary preschoolers fare over time depends on their parasympathetic regulation and socialization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastings, Paul D; Kahle, Sarah; Nuselovici, Jacob M

    2014-01-01

    Parasympathetic regulation and maternal overprotective parenting were examined in 101 children as moderators of links between preschool (M = 3.53 years) social wariness and childhood (M = 9.07 years) internalizing and anxiety problems, social skills, and scholastic performance. Across these three domains of functioning, more socially wary children were likely to manifest worse adjustment when they had low respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) or highly overprotective mothers. Conversely, maternal overprotection appeared to confer benefits for preschoolers with low wariness and low RSA. These findings point to the importance of both internal self-regulatory capacities and external support for autonomy and competence to understand and assist socially wary children and their families.

  13. Parasympathetic blockade attenuates augmented pancreatic polypeptide but not insulin secretion in Pima Indians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Courten, Barbora; Weyer, Christian; Stefan, Norbert

    2004-01-01

    There is evidence from animal models of obesity and type 2 diabetes that increased parasympathetic vagal input to the pancreas contributes to hyperinsulinemia. Compared with Caucasians, Pima Indians have a high risk of type 2 diabetes and exhibit marked hyperinsulinemia and elevated plasma levels...... was administered for 120 min at the following doses: 0, 2.5, 5, and 10 micro g. kg fat-free mass (FFM)(-1). h(-1). Areas under the curve for early (AUC(0-30 min)) and total (AUC(0-120 min)) postprandial insulin and PP secretory responses were calculated. Early postprandial insulin and PP secretory responses were......, body fat 23 +/- 7% [mean +/- SD]) and 17 Pima Indian males (aged 28 +/- 8 years, body fat 29 +/- 5%) with normal glucose tolerance. Each participant underwent four consecutive standardized liquid meal tests (64% carbohydrate, 22% fat, and 14% protein) during which a primed infusion of atropine...

  14. Cardiac arrest during gamete release in chum salmon regulated by the parasympathetic nerve system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuya Makiguchi

    Full Text Available Cardiac arrest caused by startling stimuli, such as visual and vibration stimuli, has been reported in some animals and could be considered as an extraordinary case of bradycardia and defined as reversible missed heart beats. Variability of the heart rate is established as a balance between an autonomic system, namely cholinergic vagus inhibition, and excitatory adrenergic stimulation of neural and hormonal action in teleost. However, the cardiac arrest and its regulating nervous mechanism remain poorly understood. We show, by using electrocardiogram (ECG data loggers, that cardiac arrest occurs in chum salmon (Oncorhynchus keta at the moment of gamete release for 7.39+/-1.61 s in females and for 5.20+/-0.97 s in males. The increase in heart rate during spawning behavior relative to the background rate during the resting period suggests that cardiac arrest is a characteristic physiological phenomenon of the extraordinarily high heart rate during spawning behavior. The ECG morphological analysis showed a peaked and tall T-wave adjacent to the cardiac arrest, indicating an increase in potassium permeability in cardiac muscle cells, which would function to retard the cardiac action potential. Pharmacological studies showed that the cardiac arrest was abolished by injection of atropine, a muscarinic receptor antagonist, revealing that the cardiac arrest is a reflex response of the parasympathetic nerve system, although injection of sotalol, a beta-adrenergic antagonist, did not affect the cardiac arrest. We conclude that cardiac arrest during gamete release in spawning release in spawning chum salmon is a physiological reflex response controlled by the parasympathetic nervous system. This cardiac arrest represents a response to the gaping behavior that occurs at the moment of gamete release.

  15. Exaggerated Reactivity of Parasympathetic Nerves Is Involved in Ventricular Fibrillation in J-Wave Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinohara, Tetsuji; Kondo, Hidekazu; Otsubo, Toyokazu; Fukui, Akira; Yufu, Kunio; Nakagawa, Mikiko; Takahashi, Naohiko

    2017-03-01

    Brugada syndrome (BrS) and early repolarization syndrome (ERS) are termed the J-wave syndrome. In most cases of J-wave syndrome, ventricular fibrillation (VF) often occurs around midnight or in the early morning when parasympathetic tone is augmented. The purpose of this study was to clarify the relationship between VF and autonomic nervous activity in patients with J-wave syndrome. We enrolled 28 consecutive patients with J-wave syndrome (20 BrS and 8 ERS) in whom implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) were implanted between January 2002 and December 2014. Eleven patients (39%) experienced ICD shock delivery due to VF recurrence after ICD implantation (recurrent-VF group). We investigated baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) using the phenylephrine method, heart rate variability (HRV) with Holter electrocardiography, plasma levels of norepinephrine, and cardiac (123) I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) scintigraphy to estimate autonomic nervous function. Upon measurement of HRV, plasma levels of norepinephrine, and (123) I-MIBG testing, there was no significant difference between recurrent-VF and nonrecurrent-VF groups. However, BRS was significantly higher in the recurrent-VF group than in the nonrecurrent-VF group (P = 0.03). Kaplan-Meier curves suggested that high-BRS patients had higher VF recurrence than those with nonhigh-BRS (P = 0.04). Cox proportional hazards regression analyses showed that high BRS was associated independently with VF recurrence (P = 0.002). Our results suggest that exaggerated reactivity of parasympathetic nerves, as represented by increased BRS, may underlie VF in patients with J-wave syndrome. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Sympathetic pain? A role of poor parasympathetic nervous system engagement in vicarious pain states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazarewicz, Julia; Verdejo-Garcia, Antonio; Giummarra, Melita J

    2015-11-01

    This study investigated the psychophysiological correlates of the subjective experience of vicarious pain; that is, a spontaneous experience of pain when seeing another in pain. Forty-nine healthy, otherwise pain-free individuals aged 18-55 years completed empathy and anxiety questionnaires and were classified into three groups: vicarious responders with high anxiety (n = 11), vicarious responders with low anxiety (n = 22), and nonresponders (n = 16). Electrophysiological recordings of heart rate variability (HRV) during paced breathing and cognitive stress (serial sevens task) were completed before participants viewed short videos of athletes in states of pain or happiness, taken from Australian League Football matches. Change in beats per minute, relative to neutral scenes, were analyzed for the first 4 s after onset of the painful or happy event. Anxious responders had lower HF-HRV than both other groups, implicating poor parasympathetic regulation specific to states of stress. Both vicarious responder groups had elevated HR at the event onset, regardless of valence. After viewing painful injuries, nonanxious vicarious responders showed sustained HR over time, anxious responders showed HR acceleration with a peak at 3 s after the injury onset, and nonresponders showed a pattern of marked HR deceleration. These findings suggest that vicarious pain in anxious responders is associated with poorly regulated sympathetic arousal via insufficient inhibitory parasympathetic activity, whereas nonanxious persons show sustained arousal. Clearly, multiple mechanisms in the central and peripheral nervous system must play a role in vicarious pain states, and the different manifestations are likely to lead to very different behavioral consequences. © 2015 Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  17. Parasympathetic cardio-regulation during social interactions in individuals with obesity-The influence of negative body image.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrimpf, Anne; Kube, Jana; Neumann, Jane; Horstmann, Annette; Villringer, Arno; Gaebler, Michael

    2017-04-01

    Individuals with obesity in Western societies often face weight-related stigmatization and social exclusion. Recurrent exposure to prejudice and negative social feedback alters one's behavior in future social interactions. In this study, we aimed to investigate autonomic nervous system and affective responses to social interactions in individuals with obesity. Women and men with (n = 56) and without (n = 56) obesity participated in episodes of social inclusion and social exclusion using a virtual ball-tossing game. During the experiment, heart rate was measured and parasympathetic activity (overall high-frequency power and event-related cardiac slowing) was analyzed. Our results show that in novel social interactions, women with obesity, relative to the other groups, exhibited the strongest increase in parasympathetic activity. Furthermore, parasympathetic activity was related to a more negative body image in individuals with obesity, but not in lean individuals. Additionally, women with obesity reported a stronger decrease in mood after social exclusion than did the other participants. Our results demonstrate influences of objective and subjective bodily characteristics on parasympathetic cardio-regulation during social interactions. In particular, they show behavioral and physiological alterations during social interactions in women with obesity.

  18. Simultaneous exposure to concentrated ambient particles and acrolein causes cardiac effects mediated by parasympathetic modulation in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study shows that exposure to CAPs and acrolein causes an increase in HRV that is mediated by the parasympathetic nervous system. Numerous studies show that short-term air pollution exposure modulates heart rate variability (HRV), which is an indicator of autonomic influence...

  19. Coordination impairment between the somatic and parasympathetic nervous system divisions in the human sacral micturition centre following spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schalow, G

    2009-01-01

    The detrusor-sphincteric dyssynergia is analyzed by comparing the natural impulse patterns of secondary muscle spindle afferents (SP2) contributing to continence (SP2 fibre activity changes are similar to detrusor pressure changes) and sphincteric motoneurons in a brain-dead human with those in patients with spinal cord injuries. In the brain-dead the sphincteric motoneurons, subserving continence, were inhibited at a time, when preganglionic parasympathetic efferents and a SP2 fibre increased their activity (physiologic). In paraplegics the sphincteric motoneurons were not inhibited (pathophysiologic). In the brain-dead, an SP2 fibre showed doublet firing (interspike interval (II) 10 to 14 ms) for low level parasympathetic activation and multi-ending regular firing for high parasympathetic activation. In one paraplegic with strong bladder dysfunction, the multi-ending regular firing was replaced by a repeated burst firing with a shortest II of 0.2 ms (transmission frequency = 5000 Hz). The pathologic firing patterns of the SP2 fibres, the detrusor-sphincteric dyscoordination, and hyperreflexia in paraplegics are most likely a result of neuronal network changes in the parasympathetic and somatic nervous system divisions of the sacral micturition center after spinal cord injury. It is discussed that urinary bladder functions can be re-learned.

  20. Compression on trigger points in the leg muscle increases parasympathetic nervous activity based on heart rate variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamoto, Kohichi; Sakai, Shigekazu; Hori, Etsuro; Urakawa, Susumu; Umeno, Katsumi; Ono, Taketoshi; Nishijo, Hisao

    2009-05-01

    Massotherapy, the therapeutic use of massage, is used to treat various chronic pain syndromes. One type of massotherapy, pressure stimulus applied over trigger points (TPs), is reported to have excellent therapeutic effects. Its effect is possibly mediated through changes in the autonomic nervous system although little research has been conducted to assess autonomic activity during TP compression. We have investigated how compression applied over TPs affects the autonomic nervous system. Six healthy young adult females whose daily working routine was carried out predominantly in a standing position were enrolled in the study cohort. After a day's work, the subjects were asked to rest supine, and electrocardiograms (ECGs), instantaneous lung volume (ILV) and systolic and diastolic blood pressures (SBP, DBP) were measured before and after pressure application over the TPs in those lower limb muscles where the subjects felt muscle fatigue or discomfort. The subjects were also asked to coordinate breathing with the beeping sounds. The therapeutic effects of TP compression were assessed by a subjective fatigue scale. Parasympathetic nervous activity was also assessed by spectral analysis of heart rate (HR) variability. The transfer function from ILV to HR was evaluated using linear analysis. The results indicated that TP compression (1) decreased HR, SBP and DBP, (2) increased parasympathetic activity, (3) increased the gain from ILV to HR, and (4) improved the fatigue scores. These findings suggest that an increase in parasympathetic nervous activity after the TP compression induced a reduction of fatigue. The therapeutic mechanisms of TP compression to enhance parasympathetic nervous system are discussed.

  1. Sympathetic and parasympathetic responses to a core disgust video clip as a function of disgust propensity and disgust sensitivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Peter J.; van Overveld, Mark; Peters, Madelon L.

    2011-01-01

    It is generally assumed that disgust is accompanied by increased activation of the parasympathetic nervous system (PNS). However, empirical support for the role of PNS in disgust is scarce. This study tested whether (i) activation of the PNS is indeed involved in disgust and (ii) disgust-induced aut

  2. Preliminary evidence for increased parasympathetic activity during social inclusion and exclusion in adolescents with functional abdominal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulewitsch, Marco Daniel; Jusyte, Aiste; Mazurak, Nazar; Weimer, Katja; Schönenberg, Michael

    2017-07-01

    Peer victimization (e.g. social exclusion) has been shown to be associated with physical health problems such as functional somatic complaints and especially symptoms of pain. To date, no study has investigated the mechanisms underlying this association in clinical pediatric samples. The aim of this study was to evaluate the parasympathetic activity during a social exclusion experience in adolescents with functional abdominal pain (FAP). Twenty adolecents with FAP and 21 matched healthy participants were compared regarding parameters of parasympathetic activation before, during, and after participating in the Cyberball-game, a well-established paradigm to induce social exclusion. Adolescents with FAP showed an increase in parasympathetic activation during both consecutive phases of the Cyberball game (inclusion as well as exclusion condition) whereas the healthy control group remained stable. There were no differences in subjective experience of in- and exclusion between the groups. The parasympathetic activation pattern may indicate altered processing of social stimuli in adolescents with FAP. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Estrogen receptor-alpha immunoreactivity in parasympathetic preganglionic neurons innervating the bladder in the adult ovariectomized cat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VanderHorst, VGJM; Meijer, E; Holstege, G

    2001-01-01

    Estrogen affects autonomic functions such as micturition. The sacral cord is important in the control of micturition and contains numerous estrogen receptor-alpha immnoreactive (ER-alpha IR) neurons. Therefore, the present double labeling study examines whether sacral parasympathetic preganglionic

  4. Methyl CpG-binding protein 2 participating in the regulation of differentiation plasticity of nerve regeneration in the basal ganglia after ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LI Pan

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background It is accepted that cerebral ischemia induces neurogenesis and neural stem cells (NSCs differentiation in non-neurogenic regions (especially in the basal ganglia. However, the mechanisms possibly involved in modulating the differentiation plasticity of NSCs are still let to known. This study aims to investigate the possible epigenetic mechanisms involved in the differentiation process of NSCs after ischemic stroke. Methods Western blotting analysis was used to detect the protein levels of methyl CpG-binding protien 2 (MeCP2 and phosphorylated MeCP2 (pMeCP2 in the ischemic basal ganglia of rat model at 3 d following middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO. Immunohistochemical staining was performed to observe the cellular distribution of MeCP2 and pMeCP2, the cellular colocalization of pMeCP2 with NSCs marker nestin and neuronal marker microtubule?associated protein 2 (MAP-2 in the ischemic basal ganglia of rat brains. Results 1 MeCP2 was phosphorylated in the basal ganglia after ischemic stroke, forming pMeCP2. MeCP2 positive cell number was decreased in the ischemic basal ganglia (t = 12.239, P = 0.000, while pMeCP2 positive cell number was increased in the ischemic basal ganglia (t = 5.808, P = 0.000. 2 Ischemic stroke induced a reduction of MeCP2 levels in the nucleus (t = 14.949, P = 0.000 and an elevation of pMeCP2 levels in the cytoplasm (t = 5.026, P = 0.001. 3 MeCP2 phosphorylation mediated the translocation of MeCP2 from nucleus to cytoplasm. 4 pMeCP2 was colocalized with NSCs marker protein nestin in the ischemic basal ganglia at 3 d after MCAO; pMeCP2 was colocalized with the neuronal marker MAP-2 in the ischemic basal ganglia at 1 week after MCAO. Conclusion Ischemic stroke-induced MeCP2 phosphorylation was able to alter the spatial distribution of MeCP2, transferring it from nucleus to cytoplasm and affecting its biological functions. This study further improved our awareness of brain neurogenesis in adult animals

  5. Basal ganglia play a crucial role in decision making

    OpenAIRE

    Thibaut, Florence

    2016-01-01

    Many studies have suggested that the striatum, located at the interface of the cortico-basal ganglia-thalamic circuit, consists of separate circuits that serve distinct functions It plays an important role in motor planning, value processing, and decision making.

  6. Mephedrone alters basal ganglia and limbic neurotensin systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    German, Christopher L; Hoonakker, Amanda H; Fleckenstein, Annette E; Hanson, Glen R

    2014-08-01

    Mephedrone (4-methylmethcathinone) is a synthetic cathinone designer drug that alters pre-synaptic dopamine (DA) activity like many psychostimulants. However, little is known about the post-synaptic dopaminergic impacts of mephedrone. The neuropeptide neurotensin (NT) provides inhibitory feedback for basal ganglia and limbic DA pathways, and post-synaptic D1 -like and D2 -like receptor activity affects NT tissue levels. This study evaluated how mephedrone alters basal ganglia and limbic system NT content and the role of NT receptor activation in drug consumption behavior. Four 25 mg/kg injections of mephedrone increased NT content in basal ganglia (striatum, substantia nigra and globus pallidus) and the limbic regions (nucleus accumbens core), while a lower dosage (5 mg/kg/injection) only increased striatal NT content. Mephedrone-induced increases in basal ganglia NT levels were mediated by D1 -like receptors in the striatum and the substantia nigra by both D1 -like and D2 -like receptors in the globus pallidus. Mephedrone increased substance P content, another neuropeptide, in the globus pallidus, but not in the dorsal striatum or substantia nigra. Finally, the NT receptor agonist PD149163 blocked mephedrone self-administration, suggesting reduced NT release, as indicated by increased tissue levels, likely contributing to patterns of mephedrone consumption.

  7. Do gap junctions regulate synchrony in the parkinsonian basal ganglia?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schwab, B.C.

    2016-01-01

    Patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD) typically suffer severely from different types of symptoms. Motor symptoms, restricting the patients’ ability to perform controlled movements in daily life, are of special clinical interest and have been related to neural activity in the basal ganglia. Low-freq

  8. Derek Denny-Brown: the man behind the ganglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Alberto R M; Faber, Ingrid; Martins, Carlos Roberto; Casseb, Raphael F; Nucci, Anamarli; França, Marcondes C; Teive, Hélio A G

    2017-02-01

    The authors present an historical review about the main contributions of Professor Derek Denny-Brown to neurology. Some of his achievements include the first description of sensory neuronopathies, and some of the essential textbooks on the function and anatomy of the basal ganglia. In 2016, on the 35th anniversary of his death, modern neurologists are still strongly influenced by his legacy.

  9. Phenotypic changes in satellite glial cells in cultured trigeminal ganglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belzer, Vitali; Shraer, Nathanael; Hanani, Menachem

    2010-11-01

    Satellite glial cells (SGCs) are specialized cells that form a tight sheath around neurons in sensory ganglia. In recent years, there is increasing interest in SGCs and they have been studied in both intact ganglia and in tissue culture. Here we studied phenotypic changes in SGCs in cultured trigeminal ganglia from adult mice, containing both neurons and SGCs, using phase optics, immunohistochemistry and time-lapse photography. Cultures were followed for up to 14 days. After isolation virtually every sensory neuron is ensheathed by SGCs, as in the intact ganglia. After one day in culture, SGCs begin to migrate away from their parent neurons, but in most cases the neurons still retain an intact glial cover. At later times in culture, there is a massive migration of SGCs away from the neurons and they undergo clear morphological changes, and at 7 days they become spindle-shaped. At one day in culture SGCs express the glial marker glutamine synthetase, and also the purinergic receptor P2X7. From day 2 in culture the glutamine synthetase expression is greatly diminished, whereas that of P2X7 is largely unchanged. We conclude that SGCs retain most of their characteristics for about 24 h after culturing, but undergo major phenotypic changes at later times.

  10. Normal sexual dimorphism in the human basal ganglia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijpkema, M.J.P.; Everaerd, D.S.; Pol, C.; Franke, B.; Tendolkar, I.; Fernandez, G.S.E.

    2012-01-01

    Male and female brains differ in both structure and function. Investigating this sexual dimorphism in healthy subjects is an important first step to ultimately gain insight into sex-specific differences in behavior and risk for neuropsychiatric disorders. The basal ganglia are among the main regions

  11. Basal ganglia plus insula damage yields stronger disruption of smoking addiction than basal ganglia damage alone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaznick, Natassia; Tranel, Daniel; McNutt, Ashton; Bechara, Antoine

    2014-04-01

    The main objective of this study was to elucidate the importance of the basal ganglia (BG) and insula (INS) for nicotine addiction and smoking behavior. We used a lesion study examining the effects of BG and INS damage on changes in smoking behavior and nicotine dependence over time in a prospective manner. We studied whether combined BG and INS damage yields more substantial disruption of smoking and nicotine dependence than damage to the BG alone and compared with damage to other brain regions outside the BG and INS (brain-damaged comparison [BDC] group). We obtained neuroanatomical and behavioral data for 63 neurological patients with stroke at 1 month after onset and at 3-, 6-, and 12-month follow-ups. All patients were smokers at lesion onset. The BG and BG + INS groups had significantly higher and more sustained rates of smoking cessation than patients with damage elsewhere. By 12 months after onset, only 14.3% of the patients in the BDC group were classified as nonsmokers. In the BG group, 37% were not smoking by the 12-month follow-up, and in the BG + INS group, smoking cessation was even more pronounced, as 75% of this group was not smoking at the 12-month epoch. The findings show that damage to the BG alone can cause disruption of smoking addiction, and when BG damage is combined with INS damage, the disruption increases. The latter finding is consistent with the proposal that the INS has a key role in smoking addiction.

  12. Malignant Lesions as Mammographically Appearing Intramammary Ganglia; Lesiones malignas con apariencia mamografica de ganglios intramamarios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez-Miraveta, P.; Pons, M. J.; Pina, L. J.; Zornoza, G. [Clinica Universitaria de Navarra. Pamplona (Spain)

    2004-07-01

    Intramammary ganglia are frequent mammographic findings of no pathological importance. We present two cases of malignant breast lesions whose mammographic appearance could resemble that of intramammary ganglia. Although the mammographic appearance of a lesion is similar to that of intramammary ganglia, it should be carefully studied, especially if it presents a poorly defined border or is palpable. (Author)

  13. Dexmedetomidine blocks hyperalgesia and dorsal root ganglia ERK signal activation in a rat model of neuropathic pain%右美托咪定缓解神经病理性疼痛大鼠的痛觉过敏并抑制背根神经节内p-ERK信号通路的激活

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹铭辉; 何惠燕; 纪风涛; 刘玲; 刘付宁; 刘安民; 李方成

    2011-01-01

    目的 观察重复腹腔注射右美托咪定(DEX)对神经病理性疼痛大鼠的痛觉过敏和背根神经节(DRG)中ERK信号通路激活的影响.方法 给坐骨神经部分结扎(PSNL)神经病理性疼痛大鼠重复腹腔注射不同剂量的DEX.观察各组大鼠的机械、热痛觉过敏阈值.行为学测试完成后用免疫荧光和Western blot方法检测大鼠手术侧L5 DRG中p-ERK的表达.结果 (1)腹腔注射DEX 40 μg/kg 7、14 d均明显减轻PSNL诱导的机械、热痛觉过敏(P<0.05).而腹腔注射DEX20μg/kg对PSNL大鼠疼痛行为学无明显影响.(2)重复腹腔注射40μg/kg DEX 7、14 d p-ERK的平均荧光强度比同一时间点的PSNL组明显减弱(P<0.05),但仍明显高于对照组(P<0.05).重复腹腔注射20μg/kg对PSNL大鼠p-ERK的平均荧光强度无明显影响(P>0.05).(3)Westem blot 结果显示重复腹腔注射40μg/kg DEX 7、14 d明显抑制PSNL诱导的p-ERK的蛋白表达增多(P<0.05).重复腹腔注射20μg/kg对PSNL大鼠p-ERK的蛋白表达无明显影响(P>0.05).结论 重复腹腔注射DEX能够减轻神经损伤引起的痛觉过敏,抑制外周初级感觉神经系统中ERK信号通路的激活可能是其缓解的疼痛症状的机制之一.%Objective To investigate the effect of systemic administration of dexmedetomidine, a selective alpha 2 adrenergic receptor agonist, on mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia and dorsal root ganglia ERK activation induced by neuropathic pain. Methods Intraperitoneal injection of dexmedetomidine was repeatedly given once daily for 7 days or 14 days with the first injection one day before partial sciatic nerve ligation ( PSNL) surgery. Mechanical and thermal nociceptive thresholds were assessed in all animals. Then, animals were killed at corresponding time points, and the L5 DRG was removed for L5 DRG ERK activation status analysis by using immunoflurecence and Western blotting. Results (1) Partial sciatic never ligation produced a robust mechanical and

  14. Cardiac parasympathetic outflow during dynamic exercise in humans estimated from power spectral analysis of P-P interval variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Makoto; Nakamoto, Tomoko; Matsukawa, Kanji; Ishii, Kei; Watanabe, Tae; Sekikawa, Kiyokazu; Hamada, Hironobu

    2016-03-01

    What is the central question of this study? Should we use the high-frequency (HF) component of P-P interval as an index of cardiac parasympathetic nerve activity during moderate exercise? What is the main finding and its importance? The HF component of P-P interval variability remained even at a heart rate of 120-140 beats min(-1) and was further reduced by atropine, indicating incomplete cardiac vagal withdrawal during moderate exercise. The HF component of R-R interval is invalid as an estimate of cardiac parasympathetic outflow during moderate exercise; instead, the HF component of P-P interval variability should be used. The high-frequency (HF) component of R-R interval variability has been widely used as an indirect estimate of cardiac parasympathetic (vagal) outflow to the sino-atrial node of the heart. However, we have recently found that the variability of the R-R interval becomes much smaller during dynamic exercise than that of the P-P interval above a heart rate (HR) of ∼100 beats min(-1). We hypothesized that cardiac parasympathetic outflow during dynamic exercise with a higher intensity may be better estimated using the HF component of P-P interval variability. To test this hypothesis, the HF components of both P-P and R-R interval variability were analysed using a Wavelet transform during dynamic exercise. Twelve subjects performed ergometer exercise to increase HR from the baseline of 69 ± 3 beats min(-1) to three different levels of 100, 120 and 140 beats min(-1). We also examined the effect of atropine sulfate on the HF components in eight of the 12 subjects during exercise at an HR of 140 beats min(-1) . The HF component of P-P interval variability was significantly greater than that of R-R interval variability during exercise, especially at the HRs of 120 and 140 beats min(-1). The HF component of P-P interval variability was more reduced by atropine than that of R-R interval variability. We conclude that cardiac parasympathetic outflow to the

  15. Adenine nucleotide effect on intraocular pressure: Involvement of the parasympathetic nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peral, Assumpta; Gallar, Juana; Pintor, Jesús

    2009-06-15

    Nucleotides are present in the aqueous humor possibly exerting physiological effects on intraocular pressure (IOP). To determine the effect of nucleotides such as ATP and its related derivatives on IOP, New Zealand white rabbits were used. IOP was measured in rabbits treated topically either with saline (control) or with a single dose (10 microg/microL) of adenine nucleotides (ATP, 2-meS-ATP, ATP-gamma-S, alpha,beta-meADP, alpha,beta-meATP and beta,gamma-meATP). Those nucleotides reducing IOP (alpha,beta-meATP and beta,gamma-meATP) were then tested in concentrations ranging from 1 to 100 microg/microL to obtain the IC(50) value. Several antagonists for the P2 and adenosine A1 receptors (all at 10 microg/microL) were assayed 30 min before the application of the hypotensive nucleotide beta,gamma-meATP. To see whether the nucleotide was acting directly on the structures involved in aqueous humor dynamics or on the autonomic nerves controlling IOP, animal denervation and sympathetic (yohimbine and ICI-118,551 at 10 microg/microL) and parasympathetic (atropine and hexametonium at 10 microg/microL) receptors' antagonists were used 30 min before the instillation of beta,gamma-meATP. alpha,beta-meATP and beta,gamma-meATP decreased IOP to 60% of control value (basal IOP=23.2+/-1.3 mmHg), with IC(50) of 1.59+/-0.21 microg/microLand 0.56+/-0.62 microg/microL, which corresponds to 3mM and 1mM respectively. Denervation completely abolished the effect of beta,gamma-meATP. Sympathetic antagonists did not modify the hypotensive effect of beta,gamma-meATP, but parasympathetic antagonists were able to abolish it. Among the series of adenine nucleotide tested, alpha,beta-meATP and beta,gamma-meATP presented hypotensive actions on IOP. beta,gamma-meATP seems to stimulate cholinergic terminals being its final effect the IOP reduction. Therefore, these two nucleotides are interesting pharmacological tools for those pathologies related with high intraocular pressure.

  16. Abnormal Cardiovascular Sympathetic and Parasympathetic Responses to Physical and Emotional Stimuli in Depersonalization Disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Paul Owens

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Depersonalization disorder (DPD is characterized by subjective unreality, disembodiment, emotional numbing and reduced psychogenic sympathoexcitation. 3 related experiments used physical and emotional challenges in 14 DPD participants and 16 controls to elucidate whether the cardiovascular sympathetic (SNS and parasympathetic (PNS nervous systems are implicated in DPD and if blunted DPD sympathoexcitation is peripherally or centrally mediated. Participants completed the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI, Dissociative Experience Scale (DES and Cambridge Depersonalization Scale (CDS. Study I recorded heart rate (HR and blood pressure (BP during 5mins supine baseline, 3mins handgrip (HG, 3mins cold pressor (CP and 5mins 60°head-up tilt (HUT. Study II recorded HR, BP and heart rate variability (HRV during 5mins HUT and unpleasant images. Study III examined HR and BP orienting responses (ORs to HUT and unpleasant, neutral and pleasant images. DPD BAI (p=0.0004, DES (p=.0002 and CDS (p=< 0.0001 scores were higher than controls. The DPD group produced diminished diastolic BP (DBP (p=0.045 increases to HG. Other indices were comparable between groups. DPD participants produced diminished systolic BP (SBP (p=0.003 and DBP (p=0.002 increases, but greater (p=0.004 HR increases to CP. In study II, DPD high frequency HRV (HF-HRV – indicating parasympathetic vagal activity - was reduced (p=0.029. In study III, DPD DBP was higher throughout the 5s duration of HUT/pseudorandom unpleasant image presentation (1s [p=0.002], 2s [p=0.033], 3s [p=0.001], 4s [p=0.009], 5s [p=0.029]. Study I’s BP pressor data supports previous findings of suppressed sympathoexcitatioin DPD. The greater HR increases to CP, decreased HF-HRV in study II, and increased DBP during unpleasant ORs in study III implicates the SNS and PNS in DPD pathophysiology. These studies suggest the cardiovascular autonomic dysregulation in DPD is likely to be centrally-mediated

  17. MRI of germinomas arising from the basal ganglia and thalamus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, D.I.; Yoon, P.H.; Ryu, Y.H.; Jeon, P.; Hwang, G.J. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-08-01

    We reviewed the MRI findings of germinomas originating from the basal ganglia, thalamus or deep white matter in 13 patients with 14 germinomas, excluding those in the suprasellar or pineal regions. Ten cases were confirmed as germinomas by stereotaxic biopsy, three by partial and one by total removal of the tumour. Analysis was focussed on the location and the signal characteristic of the tumour, haemorrhage, cysts within the tumour and any other associated findings. Thirteen of the tumours were in the basal ganglia and one in the thalamus. Haemorrhage was observed in seven patients, while twelve showed multiple cysts. Associated ipsilateral cerebral hemiatrophy was seen in three patients. The signal intensity of the parenchymal germinomas was heterogeneous on T1- and T2-weighted images due to haemorrhage, cysts and solid portions. We also report the MRI findings of germinomas in an early stage in two patients. (orig.) With 5 figs., 1 tab., 17 refs.

  18. Effect of quinapril or metoprolol on circadian sympathetic and parasympathetic modulation after acute myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontopoulos, A G; Athyros, V G; Papageorgiou, A A; Boudoulas, H

    1999-11-15

    Abnormal autonomic nervous system impairment in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) has a circadian pattern with the greatest manifestation in the morning hours; it probably plays an important role in the pathogenesis of cardiac arrhythmias and acute ischemic syndromes. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors improve autonomic function in patients with AMI, but the circadian pattern of this effect has not been studied. Heart rate variability-normalized frequency domain indexes were assessed 5 days (baseline) after the onset of uncomplicated AMI and 30 days after therapy with quinapril (n = 30), metoprolol (n = 30), or placebo (n = 30) with a solid-state digital Holter monitor. Normal subjects (n = 30) were used as controls. Quinapril increased parasympathetic and decreased sympathetic modulation, and improved sympathovagal interactions manifested by an increase in normalized high-frequency power (HFP), and a decrease in normalized low-frequency power (LFP), and their ratio (LFP/HFP) during the entire 24-hour period (pMetoprolol increased HFP and decreased LFP and the LFP/HFP ratio mainly between 08.00 A.M. to 12.00 noon, and 19.00 to 22.00 P.M. (delta% ratio -21%, and -12% respectively, pMetoprolol had a similar effect during the late morning and evening hours, but at a lower level. These effects may prove beneficial in reducing cardiac arrhythmias and acute ischemic syndromes in past-AMI patients.

  19. Genetic variation in the parasympathetic signaling pathway in patients with reflex syncope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmegard, H N; Benn, M; Mehlsen, J

    2013-01-01

    the vagal signaling in the heart may be involved in reflex syncope pathogenesis. We systematically resequenced the entire coding regions and flanking intron sequences in 5 genes in the cardiac post-synaptic parasympathetic signaling pathway [muscarinic acetylcholine receptor M2 (CHRM2); G-protein beta-1...... International Study (VASIS-IIB), N = 38] or vasodepressor (VASIS-III, N = 36) type. We identified 2 novel genetic variants (CHRM2 c.1114C>G and GNG2 c.87+34G>A) and several known variants (GNB1: c.267+14G>A, c.267+19C>T, and c.738C>T; KCNJ3: c.119A>G, c.591C>T, c.1038T>C, and c.1494T>C; KCNJ5: c. 171T>C, c.810T...... compared to controls. Genetic variations in genes responsible for the vagal signaling in the heart, including CHRM2, GNB1, GNG2, KCNJ3, and KCNJ5, are not major contributors to the pathogenesis of reflex syncope of vasodepressor or cardioinhibitory types....

  20. Cardiac spectral power reflects parasympathetic but not sympathetic nervous system activity in a clinical population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muth, E R; Morrow, G R; Jiang, W; Stern, R M; Dubeshter, B

    1996-11-06

    The purpose of this short communication is to report our clinical findings regarding the use of the low frequency (LF, 0.02-0.15 Hz) and high frequency (HF, > 0.15 Hz) components of the spectral decomposition of heart-rate as indices of sympathetic (SNS) and parasympathetic nervous system (PNS) activity, respectively. Thirty-two females with histologically confirmed ovarian cancer, ranging in age from 46-72 years, participated in an autonomic assessment protocol consisting of a resting heart rate recording and several ANS function tests. The LF, HF and total power measures from the spectral decomposition were highly correlated with one another. In addition, the spectral components were most highly correlated with measures of PNS activity, i.e. standard deviation of heart rate at rest and the ratio of the six longest to the six shortest R-R intervals during deep breathing (E:I ratio). It is concluded, as other researchers have stated, that the use of the HF component of the HR spectrum as a measure of PNS activity is warranted, but caution must be used when interpreting the LF component.

  1. Heart rate recovery post-exercise as an index of parasympathetic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierpont, G L; Stolpman, D R; Gornick, C C

    2000-05-12

    The time constant (T) obtained by fitting post-exercise heart rate (HR) recovery to a first order exponential decay curve has been promoted as an index of parasympathetic activity. However, acceptance has been limited because reported data are inadequate to assess goodness of fit for the model, determine the best exercise protocol, or optimize the duration of post exercise monitoring. Consequently, we evaluated T for nine healthy volunteers (age 24-46) following treadmill exercise at maximal (max) and two stages sub-max exercise (Bruce protocol). T stabilized only after 3 min of post-exercise monitoring. With max exercise, T varied unacceptably with small changes in onset of monitoring, e.g. -16.7+/-16.6 (-13.2%) in the first 5 s, and residuals of the fitted curve were non-random. In contrast, sub-max exercise produced consistent T values, e.g. -1.9+/-3.2 (-4.2%) in the first 5 s, and residuals were more nearly random. In conclusion, first order decay is an inadequate model for HR recovery following max exercise, but may be reasonable for sub-max levels.

  2. Reliability of heart rate variability threshold and parasympathetic reactivation after a submaximal exercise test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Janssen Gomes da Cruz

    Full Text Available Abstract The objective of this study was to evaluate reproducibility of heart rate variability threshold (HRVT and parasympathetic reactivation in physically active men (n= 16, 24.3 ± 5.1 years. During the test, HRVT was assessed by SD1 and r-MSSD dynamics. Immediately after exercise, r-MSSD was analyzed in segments of 60 seconds for a period of five minutes. High absolute and relatively reproducible analysis of HRVT were observed, as assessed by SD1 and r-MSSD dynamics (ICC = 0.92, CV = 10.8, SEM = 5.8. During the recovery phase, a moderate to high reproducibility was observed for r-MSSD from the first to the fifth minute (ICC = 0.69-0.95, CV = 7.5-14.2, SEM = 0.07-1.35. We conclude that HRVT and r-MSSD analysis after a submaximal stress test are highly reproducible measures that might be used to assess the acute and chronic effects of exercise training on cardiac autonomic modulation during and/or after a submaximal stress test.

  3. Depth perception in cerebellar and basal ganglia disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maschke, Matthias; Gomez, Christopher M; Tuite, Paul J; Pickett, Kristen; Konczak, Jürgen

    2006-10-01

    There is increasing evidence that the cerebellum and the basal ganglia serve not only a role in motor control but also in visual perception. Patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) as well as patients with cerebellar lesions exhibit impairments of vision that are not fully explained by ocular motor deficits. It is less clear to which extent these visual deficits contribute to an impaired control of visually guided movements. This study examined whether a dysfunction of the cerebellum or the basal ganglia induces impairments in depth perception, which affect action. We employed an illusionary display, the Ames trapezoidal window, to determine the ability of PD patients (n=10) and patients with spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA) (n=6) to process depth cues when estimating object slant. Participants either pointed to the edges of the window (motor judgement) or verbally indicated the perceived orientation of the display (verbal judgement). To control for ocular and limb motor deficits, participants judged the slant of a non-illusionary display in a second task. Slant estimation of the non-illusionary window was not impaired in either patient group when compared to control subjects (all P>0.2). In contrast, SCA as well as PD patients exhibited significantly greater slant estimation errors than controls when pointing to the illusionary window (P=0.005). In addition, both patient groups made larger errors than controls in their verbal judgements during binocular viewing of the illusion (P=0.005), but not during monocular viewing (P>0.2). In sum, the present findings point towards a role for both the basal ganglia and cerebellum for the processing of visual information about depth. Since the deficits were seen both in the context of action and perception and were only partially reconciled by the availability of binocular depth cues, we conclude that basal ganglia as well as cerebellar disease may affect the visual perception of depth.

  4. A Critical Review of Habit Learning and the Basal Ganglia

    OpenAIRE

    Seger, Carol A.; Spiering, Brian J.

    2011-01-01

    The current paper briefly outlines the historical development of the concept of habit learning and discusses its relationship to the basal ganglia. Habit learning has been studied in many different fields of neuroscience using different species, tasks, and methodologies, and as a result it has taken on a wide range of definitions from these various perspectives. We identify five common but not universal, definitional features of habit learning: that it is inflexible, slow or incremental, unco...

  5. Prospects for cannabinoid therapies in basal ganglia disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Fernández-Ruiz, Javier; Moreno-Martet, Miguel; Rodríguez-Cueto, Carmen; Palomo-Garo, Cristina; Gómez-Cañas, María; Valdeolivas, Sara; Guaza, Carmen; Romero, Julián; Guzmán, Manuel; Mechoulam, Raphael; Ramos, José A

    2011-01-01

    Cannabinoids are promising medicines to slow down disease progression in neurodegenerative disorders including Parkinson's disease (PD) and Huntington's disease (HD), two of the most important disorders affecting the basal ganglia. Two pharmacological profiles have been proposed for cannabinoids being effective in these disorders. On the one hand, cannabinoids like Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol or cannabidiol protect nigral or striatal neurons in experimental models of both disorders, in which oxid...

  6. Control of heart rate variability by cardiac parasympathetic nerve activity during voluntary static exercise in humans with tetraplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Makoto; Matsukawa, Kanji; Nakamoto, Tomoko; Tsuchimochi, Hirotsugu; Sakaguchi, Akihiro; Kawaguchi, Kotaro; Onari, Kiyoshi

    2007-11-01

    Heart rate (HR) is controlled solely by via cardiac parasympathetic outflow in tetraplegic individuals, who lack supraspinal control of sympathetic outflows and circulating catecholamines but have intact vagal pathways. A high-frequency component (HF; at 0.15-0.40 Hz) of the power spectrum of HR variability and its relative value against total power (HF/Total) were assessed using a wavelet transform to identify cardiac parasympathetic outflow. The relative contribution of cardiac parasympathetic and sympathetic outflows to controlling HR was estimated by comparing the HF/Total-HR relationship between age-matched tetraplegic and normal men. Six tetraplegic men with complete cervical spinal cord injury performed static arm exercise at 35% of the maximal voluntary contraction until exhaustion. Although resting cardiac output and arterial blood pressure were lower in tetraplegic than normal subjects, HR, HF, and HF/Total were not statistically different between the two groups. When tetraplegic subjects developed the same force during exercise as normal subjects, HF and HF/Total decreased to 67-90% of the preexercise control and gradually recovered 1.5 min after exercise. The amount and time course of the changes in HF/Total during and after exercise coincided well between both groups. In contrast, the increase in HR at the start of exercise was blunted in tetraplegic compared with normal subjects, and the HR recovery following exercise was also delayed. It is likely that, although the withdrawal response of cardiac parasympathetic outflow is preserved in tetraplegic subjects, sympathetic decentralization impairs the rapid acceleration of HR at the onset of exercise and the rapid deceleration following exercise.

  7. Sympathetic and Parasympathetic Activity in Cancer-Related Fatigue: More Evidence for a Physiological Substrate in Cancer Survivors

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Fatigue is a notable clinical problem in cancer survivors, and understanding its pathophysiology is important. This study evaluated relationships between fatigue and both sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous system activity in breast cancer survivors. Norepinephrine and heart rate variability (HRV) were evaluated at rest, as well as during and after a standardized laboratory speech and mental arithmetic stressor. The participants, 109 women who had completed treatment for stage 0-IIIA brea...

  8. Proactive selective response suppression is implemented via the basal ganglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majid, D S Adnan; Cai, Weidong; Corey-Bloom, Jody; Aron, Adam R

    2013-08-14

    In the welter of everyday life, people can stop particular response tendencies without affecting others. A key requirement for such selective suppression is that subjects know in advance which responses need stopping. We hypothesized that proactively setting up and implementing selective suppression relies on the basal ganglia and, specifically, regions consistent with the inhibitory indirect pathway for which there is scant functional evidence in humans. Consistent with this hypothesis, we show, first, that the degree of proactive motor suppression when preparing to stop selectively (indexed by transcranial magnetic stimulation) corresponds to striatal, pallidal, and frontal activation (indexed by functional MRI). Second, we demonstrate that greater striatal activation at the time of selective stopping correlates with greater behavioral selectivity. Third, we show that people with striatal and pallidal volume reductions (those with premanifest Huntington's disease) have both absent proactive motor suppression and impaired behavioral selectivity when stopping. Thus, stopping goals are used to proactively set up specific basal ganglia channels that may then be triggered to implement selective suppression. By linking this suppression to the striatum and pallidum, these results provide compelling functional evidence in humans of the basal ganglia's inhibitory indirect pathway.

  9. Movement Disorders Following Cerebrovascular Lesion in the Basal Ganglia Circuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jinse

    2016-05-01

    Movement disorders are primarily associated with the basal ganglia and the thalamus; therefore, movement disorders are more frequently manifest after stroke compared with neurological injuries associated with other structures of the brain. Overall clinical features, such as types of movement disorder, the time of onset and prognosis, are similar with movement disorders after stroke in other structures. Dystonia and chorea are commonly occurring post-stroke movement disorders in basal ganglia circuit, and these disorders rarely present with tremor. Rarer movement disorders, including tic, restless leg syndrome, and blepharospasm, can also develop following a stroke. Although the precise mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of these conditions have not been fully characterized, disruptions in the crosstalk between the inhibitory and excitatory circuits resulting from vascular insult are proposed to be the underlying cause. The GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid)ergic and dopaminergic systems play key roles in post-stroke movement disorders. This review summarizes movement disorders induced by basal ganglia and thalamic stroke according to the anatomical regions in which they manifest.

  10. Youth hypertension cerebral hemorrhage in basal ganglia surgery operation analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qi-Hua Wang; Da-Shuang Lu; Jie Cui; Bo-Lin Qiao; Jing-Chun Wang

    2016-01-01

    Objective:Discuss surgical treatment of youth hypertension cerebral hemorrhage in basal ganglia.Methods:Retrospective analysis from January 2012 to April 2015 were adopted to bone flap craniotomy decompression for removal of hematoma and drainage drilling two kinds of surgical treatment of 46 cases of young patients with hypertension cerebral hemorrhage in basal ganglia.Results:Surgical operation, 28 patients postoperative review head CT, no further hemorrhage cases, residual hematoma volume 2-6 mL. Drilling drainage in the treatment of 18 patients, 1 case was bleeding again given surgical operation to remove the hematoma and the rest of the 17 cases without bleeding again, after 3 d, 17 cases of patients of postoperative hematoma drainage thoroughly. After 6 months, 46 cases of patients with postoperative review, GOS score light disability 9 cases, moderate disability 33 cases, 4 cases were severely disabled, curative effect is satisfied.Conclusions:Two kinds of operative methods each have advantages and disadvantages, young patients with hypertension cerebral hemorrhage in basal ganglia should according to patients' disease progression after speed, on admission patient's state of consciousness and head CT measured on admission hematoma volume, respectively.

  11. Parasympathetic reinnervation accompanied by improved post-exercise heart rate recovery and quality of life in heart transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imamura, Teruhiko; Kinugawa, Koichiro; Okada, Ikuko; Kato, Naoko; Fujino, Takeo; Inaba, Toshiro; Maki, Hisataka; Hatano, Masaru; Kinoshita, Osamu; Nawata, Kan; Kyo, Shunei; Ono, Minoru

    2015-01-01

    Although sympathetic reinnervation is accompanied by the improvement of exercise tolerability during the first years after heart transplantation (HTx), little is known about parasympathetic reinnervation and its clinical impact. We enrolled 21 recipients (40 ± 16 years, 71% male) who had received successive cardiopulmonary exercise testing at 6 months, and 1 and 2 years after HTx. Exercise parameters such as peak oxygen consumption or achieved maximum load remained unchanged, whereas recovery parameters including heart rate (HR) recovery during 2 minutes and the delay of peak HR, which are influenced by parasympathetic activity, improved significantly during post-HTx 2 years (P Heart Failure (HF) Questionnaire at post-HTx 6 months and 2 years in the same 18 recipients, and those with improved recovery parameters enjoyed a better HF-specific quality of life (P < 0.05 for both). In conclusion, parasympathetic reinnervation emerges along with improved post-exercise recovery ability of HR and quality of life during post-HTx 2 years.

  12. Dynamic RSA: Examining parasympathetic regulatory dynamics via vector-autoregressive modeling of time-varying RSA and heart period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Aaron J; Reeves, Jonathan W; Chi, Cyrus

    2016-07-01

    Expanding on recently published methods, the current study presents an approach to estimating the dynamic, regulatory effect of the parasympathetic nervous system on heart period on a moment-to-moment basis. We estimated second-to-second variation in respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) in order to estimate the contemporaneous and time-lagged relationships among RSA, interbeat interval (IBI), and respiration rate via vector autoregression. Moreover, we modeled these relationships at lags of 1 s to 10 s, in order to evaluate the optimal latency for estimating dynamic RSA effects. The IBI (t) on RSA (t-n) regression parameter was extracted from individual models as an operationalization of the regulatory effect of RSA on IBI-referred to as dynamic RSA (dRSA). Dynamic RSA positively correlated with standard averages of heart rate and negatively correlated with standard averages of RSA. We propose that dRSA reflects the active downregulation of heart period by the parasympathetic nervous system and thus represents a novel metric that provides incremental validity in the measurement of autonomic cardiac control-specifically, a method by which parasympathetic regulatory effects can be measured in process.

  13. Variation in Parasympathetic Dysregulation Moderates Short-term Memory Problems in Childhood Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Anthony R; Alarcón, Gabriela; Nigg, Joel T; Musser, Erica D

    2015-11-01

    Although attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is associated with impairment in working memory and short-term memory, up to half of individual children with ADHD perform within a normative range. Heterogeneity in other ADHD-related mechanisms, which may compensate for or combine with cognitive weaknesses, is a likely explanation. One candidate is the robustness of parasympathetic regulation (as indexed by respiratory sinus arrhythmia; RSA). Theory and data suggest that a common neural network is likely tied to both heart-rate regulation and certain cognitive functions (including aspects of working and short-term memory). Cardiac-derived indices of parasympathetic reactivity were collected during short-term memory (STM) storage and rehearsal tasks from 243 children (116 ADHD, 127 controls). ADHD was associated with lower STM performance, replicating previous work. In addition, RSA reactivity moderated the association between STM and ADHD - both as a category and a dimension - independent of comorbidity. Specifically, conditional effects revealed that high levels of withdrawal interacted with weakened STM but high levels of augmentation moderated a positive association predicting ADHD. Thus, variations in parasympathetic reactivity may help explain neuropsychological heterogeneity in ADHD.

  14. Virus- and interferon-induced loss of inhibitory M2 muscarinic receptor function and gene expression in cultured airway parasympathetic neurons.

    OpenAIRE

    Jacoby, D B; Xiao, H Q; Lee, N. H.; Chan-Li, Y; Fryer, A. D.

    1998-01-01

    Viral infections increase vagally mediated reflex bronchoconstriction. Decreased function of inhibitory M2 muscarinic receptors on the parasympathetic nerve endings is likely to contribute to increased acetylcholine release. In this study, we used cultured airway parasympathetic neurons to determine the effects of parainfluenza virus and of interferon (IFN)-gamma on acetylcholine release, inhibitory M2 receptor function, and M2 receptor gene expression. In control cultures, electrically stimu...

  15. Selective quantification of the cardiac sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems by multisignal analysis of cardiorespiratory variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaoxiao; Mukkamala, Ramakrishna

    2008-01-01

    Heart rate (HR) power spectral indexes are limited as measures of the cardiac autonomic nervous systems (CANS) in that they neither offer an effective marker of the beta-sympathetic nervous system (SNS) due to its overlap with the parasympathetic nervous system (PNS) in the low-frequency (LF) band nor afford specific measures of the CANS due to input contributions to HR [e.g., arterial blood pressure (ABP) and instantaneous lung volume (ILV)]. We derived new PNS and SNS indexes by multisignal analysis of cardiorespiratory variability. The basic idea was to identify the autonomically mediated transfer functions relating fluctuations in ILV to HR (ILV-->HR) and fluctuations in ABP to HR (ABP-->HR) so as to eliminate the input contributions to HR and then separate each estimated transfer function in the time domain into PNS and SNS indexes using physiological knowledge. We evaluated these indexes with respect to selective pharmacological autonomic nervous blockade in 14 humans. Our results showed that the PNS index derived from the ABP-->HR transfer function was correctly decreased after vagal and double (vagal + beta-sympathetic) blockade (P < 0.01) and did not change after beta-sympathetic blockade, whereas the SNS index derived from the same transfer function was correctly reduced after beta-sympathetic blockade in the standing posture and double blockade (P < 0.05) and remained the same after vagal blockade. However, this SNS index did not significantly decrease after beta-sympathetic blockade in the supine posture. Overall, these predictions were better than those provided by the traditional high-frequency (HF) power, LF-to-HF ratio, and normalized LF power of HR variability.

  16. Correlation transfer from basal ganglia to thalamus in Parkinson's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamela, Reitsma; Brent, Doiron; Jonathan, Rubin

    2011-01-01

    Spike trains from neurons in the basal ganglia of parkinsonian primates show increased pairwise correlations, oscillatory activity, and burst rate compared to those from neurons recorded during normal brain activity. However, it is not known how these changes affect the behavior of downstream thalamic neurons. To understand how patterns of basal ganglia population activity may affect thalamic spike statistics, we study pairs of model thalamocortical (TC) relay neurons receiving correlated inhibitory input from the internal segment of the globus pallidus (GPi), a primary output nucleus of the basal ganglia. We observe that the strength of correlations of TC neuron spike trains increases with the GPi correlation level, and bursty firing patterns such as those seen in the parkinsonian GPi allow for stronger transfer of correlations than do firing patterns found under normal conditions. We also show that the T-current in the TC neurons does not significantly affect correlation transfer, despite its pronounced effects on spiking. Oscillatory firing patterns in GPi are shown to affect the timescale at which correlations are best transferred through the system. To explain this last result, we analytically compute the spike count correlation coefficient for oscillatory cases in a reduced point process model. Our analysis indicates that the dependence of the timescale of correlation transfer is robust to different levels of input spike and rate correlations and arises due to differences in instantaneous spike correlations, even when the long timescale rhythmic modulations of neurons are identical. Overall, these results show that parkinsonian firing patterns in GPi do affect the transfer of correlations to the thalamus. PMID:22355287

  17. Correlation transfer from basal ganglia to thalamus in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitsma, Pamela; Doiron, Brent; Rubin, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    Spike trains from neurons in the basal ganglia of parkinsonian primates show increased pairwise correlations, oscillatory activity, and burst rate compared to those from neurons recorded during normal brain activity. However, it is not known how these changes affect the behavior of downstream thalamic neurons. To understand how patterns of basal ganglia population activity may affect thalamic spike statistics, we study pairs of model thalamocortical (TC) relay neurons receiving correlated inhibitory input from the internal segment of the globus pallidus (GPi), a primary output nucleus of the basal ganglia. We observe that the strength of correlations of TC neuron spike trains increases with the GPi correlation level, and bursty firing patterns such as those seen in the parkinsonian GPi allow for stronger transfer of correlations than do firing patterns found under normal conditions. We also show that the T-current in the TC neurons does not significantly affect correlation transfer, despite its pronounced effects on spiking. Oscillatory firing patterns in GPi are shown to affect the timescale at which correlations are best transferred through the system. To explain this last result, we analytically compute the spike count correlation coefficient for oscillatory cases in a reduced point process model. Our analysis indicates that the dependence of the timescale of correlation transfer is robust to different levels of input spike and rate correlations and arises due to differences in instantaneous spike correlations, even when the long timescale rhythmic modulations of neurons are identical. Overall, these results show that parkinsonian firing patterns in GPi do affect the transfer of correlations to the thalamus.

  18. Chorea due to basal ganglia involvement in a uremic diabetic patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faik Ilik

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Syndromes associated with acute bilateral lesions of the basal ganglia in diabetic uremic patients are uncommon. Uremic encephalopathy is typical of patients showing cortical involvement, with symptoms including confusion, seizures, tremors, or myoclonus. Whenever basal ganglia are anatomically involved, movement disorders arise, including chorea. In this article we present a case with basal ganglia involvement in a uremic diabetic patient causes chorea because of rare presentation. [Cukurova Med J 2014; 39(2.000: 353-356

  19. Input to the lateral habenula from the basal ganglia is excitatory, aversive, and suppressed by serotonin

    OpenAIRE

    Shabel, Steven J.; Proulx, Christophe D.; Trias, Anthony; Murphy, Ryan T.; Malinow, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    The lateral habenula (LHb) has recently been identified as a key regulator of the reward system by driving inhibition onto dopaminergic neurons. However, the nature and potential modulation of the major input to the LHb originating from the basal ganglia are poorly understood. Although the output of the basal ganglia is thought to be primarily inhibitory, here we show that transmission from the basal ganglia to the LHb is excitatory, glutamatergic and suppressed by serotonin. Behaviorally, ac...

  20. The basal ganglia: an overview of circuits and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utter, Amy A; Basso, Michele A

    2008-01-01

    The technique of electrical stimulation of brain tissue-known clinically as deep brain stimulation (DBS)-is at the fore of treatment of human neurological disease. Here we provide a general overview highlighting the anatomy and circuitry of the basal ganglia (BG). We introduce common disease states associated with BG dysfunction and current hypotheses of BG function. Throughout this introductory review we direct the reader to other reviews in this special issue of Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews highlighting the interaction between basic science and clinical investigation to more fully understand the BG in both health and disease.

  1. Further evidence for peptidergic transmission in sympathetic ganglia.

    OpenAIRE

    Jan, Y N; Jan, L Y; Kuffler, S W

    1980-01-01

    We previously proposed that, in sympathetic ganglia of the bullfrog, a peptide which resembles luteinizing hormone-releasing factor (LH-RF, luliberin) functions as the transmitter for the late slow excitatory postsynaptic potential (epsp), a signal that may last 5-10 min. To test this hypothesis further, we have compared the physiological andpharmacological effects of LH-RF with those of the natural transmitter and have found a close parallel. (i) LH-RF, when ejected with a brief pulse of pre...

  2. Volumetric changes in the Basal Ganglia after antipsychotic monotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebdrup, B H; Nørbak, H; Borgwardt, S

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Exposure to antipsychotic medication has been extensively associated with structural brain changes in the basal ganglia (BG). Traditionally antipsychotics have been divided into first and second generation antipsychotics (FGAs and SGAs) however, the validity of this classification has...... monotherapy. Material and Methods: We systematically searched PubMed for longitudinal MRI studies of patients with schizophrenia or non-affective psychosis who had undergone a period of antipsychotic monotherapy. We used specific, predefined search terms and extracted studies were hand searched for additional...

  3. Alleviation of cerebrovascular spasm by cervical sympathetic ganglia block after subarachnoid hemorrhage in rats%颈交感神经节阻滞对兔蛛网膜下腔出血后脑血管痉挛的缓解作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贺纯静; 聂浩雄; 罗依然; 冯亚平

    2012-01-01

    目的 探讨颈交感神经节阻滞对兔实验性蛛网膜下腔出血(SAH)后缓解脑血管痉挛(cerebrovascular spasm,CVS)的作用及其机制. 方法 选择颈交感神经节阻滞模型成功的健康雄性大耳白兔18只,按随机数字表法分为三组,即假手术组(A组)、SAH组(B组)、SAH加颈交感神经节阻滞组(C组).分别于第1次注血前(T1)、注血后30 min(T2)、第1次注血后7 d(T3)取静脉血及脑脊液各2 ml于低温冰箱保存备用,并行脑血管造影测量基底动脉值.并于T3记录神经系统损害级别. 结果 三组T1时基底动脉血管直径差异无统计学意义,T2、T3时B、C两组的基底动脉血管直径均小于A组,B组又小于C组(p<0.01).三组T1时血浆、脑脊液一氧化氮(NO)和一氧化氮合酶(NOS)差异无统计学意义(P>0.05),T2、T3时均低于T1,B、C组又低于A组(P<0.01).T3时B、C组的神经功能均低于A组,C组又优于B组(P<0.01). 结论 颈交感神经节阻滞可缓解SAH后CVS,提高血清、脑脊液NO含量及NOS的活性,促进神经功能恢复.%Objective To investigate the role and mechanism of cervical sympathetic ganglia block in alleviation of cerebrovascular spasm (CVS) of rabbits after subarachnoid hemorrhage ( SAH ).Methods A total of 18 healthy male white rabbits whose cervical sympathetic ganglia were successfully blocked were randomly divided into three groups:sham operation group (Group A),SAH group (Group B) and SAH with cervical sympathetic ganglia block group (Group C).Venous blood (2 ml) and cerebrospinal fluid (2 ml) were obtained before the first blood injection ( T1 ),at 30 minutes after injection ( T2 ) and at day 7 after injection ( T3 ),respectively,and conserved in a low temperature refrigerator for spare use.Basilar artery value at T1,T2 and T3 was measured via cerebral angiography.The degree of damage to nervous system at T3 was recorded. Results There was no significant difference in diameter of basilar artery at T1 among

  4. Expression of varicella-zoster virus and herpes simplex virus in normal human trigeminal ganglia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vafai, A.; Wellish, M.; Devlin, M.; Gilden, D.H. (Univ. of Colorado School of Medicine, Denver (USA)); Murray, R.S. (Univ. of Colorado School of Medicine, Denver (USA) Veterans Administration Medical Center, Denver, CO (USA))

    1988-04-01

    Lysates of radiolabeled explants from four human trigeminal ganglia were immunoprecipitated with antibodies to varicella-zoster virus (VZV) and to herpes simplex virus. Both herpes simplex virus- and VZV-specific proteins were detected in lysates of all four ganglia. Absence of reactivity in ganglion explants with monoclonal antibodies suggested that herpes simplex virus and VZV were not reactivated during the culture period. In situ hybridization studies demonstrated the presence of RNA transcripts from the VZV immediate early gene 63. This approach to the detection of herpes simplex virus and VZV expression in human ganglia should facilitate analysis of viral RNA and proteins in human sensory ganglia.

  5. Probing ganglia dissolution and mobilization in a water-saturated porous medium using MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johns, M.L.; Gladden, L.F.

    2000-05-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is used to probe the evolution of geometric characteristics such as the volume, shape, surface area, and cluster size of octanol ganglia trapped in a model porous medium, in this case a packing of spheres, as they dissolve into a mobile aqueous phase. The resulting pore-scale information is used to assess various assumptions used in existing models of the dissolution process. Dissolution of the ganglia was characterized by a reduction in the overall number of ganglia with little effect on the shape and mean of the volume distribution of the ganglia. This apparently anomalous result is explained by dissolution of the ganglia until they reach a critical size, which is dependent on the structure of the pore space, at which point they are mobilized and subsequently removed from the porous medium. The shape of the entrapped ganglia is characterized by a fractal dimension in the range 2.2--2.3, suggesting that models which assume a Euclidean geometry for the entrapped ganglia are appropriate. No significant change in the shape of entrapped ganglia is observed during dissolution. In agreement with the results of earlier workers, most hydrocarbon ganglia exist as singlets within the pore structure.

  6. Analysis of the galanin-induced decrease in membrane excitability in mudpuppy parasympathetic neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, R L; Konopka, L M

    1991-01-01

    Previously, we showed that the neuropeptide galanin hyperpolarizes and decreases membrane excitability of mudpuppy parasympathetic neurons [Konopka L. M., McKeon T. W. and Parsons R. L. (1989) J. Physiol. 410, 107-122]. We also demonstrated that membrane excitability remains depressed when the agonist-induced potential change is negated electrotonically. We hypothesized that galanin inhibits the membrane conductances associated with spike generation. However, we cannot rule out the possibility that the decreased excitability is due to a galanin-induced increase in membrane potassium conductance which reduces the effectiveness of subsequent depolarizing stimuli. Therefore, in the present study we tested, with the galanin-induced hyperpolarization negated, whether the galanin-induced increased membrane potassium conductance was responsible for the decreased excitability. The results showed that the galanin-induced decreased excitability was not dependent on the peak amplitude of the galanin-induced hyperpolarization. Furthermore, the decreased excitability occurred in cells in which there was no measurable galanin-induced hyperpolarization. Moreover, in most cells the galanin-induced decrease in input resistance, measured at the peak of the hyperpolarization (3-25 mV), was less than 15% and when the hyperpolarization was negated electronically, the decrease was even less (approximately 2%). These results indicated that when the hyperpolarization was negated, the galanin-induced increase in potassium conductance was not responsible for the decreased excitability. In preparations pretreated with 5 mM tetraethylammonium, galanin decreased excitability which indicated that a galanin-induced decrease in the calcium-dependent potassium current was not necessary for the decreased excitability. Galanin also decreased excitability in preparations exposed to either 1-3 microM tetrodotoxin or 100-200 microM cadmium. Following galanin application, the threshold for initiation of

  7. Heart rate recovery and parasympathetic modulation in boys and girls following maximal and submaximal exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilkey, J P; Overstreet, M; Mahon, A D

    2015-10-01

    This study examined heart rate recovery (HRR) and heart rate variability (HRV) following submaximal and maximal exercise in boys (n = 13; 10.1 ± 0.8 years) and girls (n = 12; 10.1 ± 0.7 years). Participants completed 10 min of supine rest followed by a graded exercise test to maximal effort. On a separate day, participants performed submaximal exercise at ventilatory threshold. Immediately following both exercise bouts, 1-min HRR was assessed in the supine position. HRV variables were analyzed under controlled breathing in the time and frequency domains over the final 5 min of rest and recovery. There were no significant differences in HRR following maximal and submaximal exercise between boys (58 ± 8 and 59 ± 8 beats min(-1), respectively) and girls (54 ± 6 and 52 ± 19 beats min(-1), respectively). There also were no significant interactions between groups from rest to recovery from maximal exercise for any HRV variables. However, there was a difference in the response between sexes from rest to recovery from submaximal exercise for log transformed standard deviation of NN intervals (lnSDNN) and log transformed total power (lnTP). No differences were observed for lnSDNN at rest (boys = 4.61 ± 0.28 vs. girls = 4.28 ± 0.52 ms) or during recovery (lnSDNN: boys 3.78 ± 0.46 vs. girls 3.87 ± 0.64 ms and lnTP: boys 7.33 ± 1.09 vs. girls; 7.44 ± 1.24 ms(2)). Post hoc pairwise comparisons showed a significant difference between boys and girls for lnTP at rest (boys = 9.14 ± 0.42 vs. girls = 8.30 ± 1.05 ms(2)). Parasympathetic modulation was similar between boys and girls at rest and during recovery from exercise, which could explain similarities observed in HRR.

  8. Genetic variation in the parasympathetic signaling pathway in patients with reflex syncope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmegard, H N; Benn, M; Mehlsen, J; Haunsø, S

    2013-01-30

    Reflex syncope is defined by a self-terminating transient loss of consciousness associated with an exaggerated response of the vagal reflexes upon orthostatic challenges. A hereditary component has previously been suggested. We hypothesized that variations in genes encoding proteins mediating the vagal signaling in the heart may be involved in reflex syncope pathogenesis. We systematically resequenced the entire coding regions and flanking intron sequences in 5 genes in the cardiac post-synaptic parasympathetic signaling pathway [muscarinic acetylcholine receptor M2 (CHRM2); G-protein beta-1 subunit (GNB1); G-protein gamma-2 subunit (GNG2); potassium inwardly rectifying channel, subfamily J, member 3 (KCNJ3); and potassium inwardly rectifying channel, subfamily J, member 5 (KCNJ5)] in 74 patients with well-characterized reflex syncope of either cardioinhibitory [Vasovagal Syncope International Study (VASIS-IIB), N = 38] or vasodepressor (VASIS-III, N = 36) type. We identified 2 novel genetic variants (CHRM2 c.1114C>G and GNG2 c.87+34G>A) and several known variants (GNB1: c.267+14G>A, c.267+19C>T, and c.738C>T; KCNJ3: c.119A>G, c.591C>T, c.1038T>C, and c.1494T>C; KCNJ5: c. 171T>C, c.810T>G, c.834T>C, c.844C>G, c.938+7C>T, and c.938-10G>A). The minor allele frequency of the KCNJ5 c.938+7C>T variant was significantly lower in patients than in the control group (0.014 versus 0.089, P = 0.001), and the frequency of heterozygosity and homozygosity was lower in cardioinhibitory patients compared to controls. Genetic variations in genes responsible for the vagal signaling in the heart, including CHRM2, GNB1, GNG2, KCNJ3, and KCNJ5, are not major contributors to the pathogenesis of reflex syncope of vasodepressor or cardioinhibitory types.

  9. Consciously controlled breathing decreases the high-frequency component of heart rate variability by inhibiting cardiac parasympathetic nerve activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Konosuke; Maruyama, Ryoko

    2014-01-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV), the beat-to-beat alterations in heart rate, comprises sympathetic and parasympathetic nerve activities of the heart. HRV analysis is used to quantify cardiac autonomic regulation. Since respiration could be a confounding factor in HRV evaluation, some studies recommend consciously controlled breathing to standardize the method. However, it remains unclear whether controlled breathing affects HRV measurement. We compared the effects of controlled breathing on HRV with those of spontaneous breathing. In 20 healthy volunteers, we measured respiratory frequency (f), tidal volume, and blood pressure (BP) and recorded electrocardiograms during spontaneous breathing (14.8 ± 0.7 breaths/min) and controlled breathing at 15 (0.25 Hz) and 6 (0.10 Hz) breaths/min. Compared to spontaneous breathing, controlled breathing at 0.25 Hz showed a higher heart rate and a lower high-frequency (HF) component, an index of parasympathetic nerve activity, although the f was the same. During controlled breathing at 0.10 Hz, the ratio of the low frequency (LF) to HF components (LF/HF), an index of sympathetic nerve activity, increased greatly and HF decreased, while heart rate and BP remained almost unchanged. Thus, controlled breathing at 0.25 Hz, which requires mental concentration, might inhibit parasympathetic nerve activity. During controlled breathing at 0.10 Hz, LF/HF increases because some HF subcomponents are synchronized with f and probably move into the LF band. This increment leads to misinterpretation of the true autonomic nervous regulation. We recommend that the respiratory pattern of participants should be evaluated before spectral HRV analysis to correctly understand changes in autonomic nervous regulation.

  10. Morphological elucidation of basal ganglia circuits contributing reward prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fumino eFujiyama

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Electrophysiological studies in monkeys have shown that dopaminergic neurons respond to the reward prediction error. In addition, striatal neurons alter their responsiveness to cortical or thalamic inputs in response to the dopamine signal, via the mechanism of dopamine-regulated synaptic plasticity. These findings have led to the hypothesis that the striatum exhibits synaptic plasticity under the influence of the reward prediction error and conduct reinforcement learning throughout the basal ganglia circuits.The reinforcement learning model is useful; however, the mechanism by which such a process emerges in the basal ganglia needs to be anatomically explained. The actor–critic model has been previously proposed and extended by the existence of role sharing within the striatum, focusing on the striosome/matrix compartments. However, this hypothesis has been difficult to confirm morphologically, partly because of the complex structure of the striosome/matrix compartments. Here, we review recent morphological studies that elucidate the input/output organization of the striatal compartments.

  11. Familial idiopathic basal ganglia calcification (Fahr’s disease)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mufaddel, Amir A.; Al-Hassani, Ghanem A.

    2014-01-01

    Familial idiopathic basal ganglia calcification (Fahr’s disease) is a rare neurodegenerative disorder characterized by symmetrical and bilateral calcification of the basal ganglia. Calcifications may also occur in other brain regions such as dentate nucleus, thalamus, and cerebral cortex. Both familial and non-familial cases of Fahr’s disease have been reported, predominantly with autosomal-dominant fashion. The disease has a wide range of clinical presentations, predominantly with neuropsychiatric features and movement disorders. Psychiatric features reported in the literature include: cognitive impairment, depression, hallucinations, delusions, manic symptoms, anxiety, schizophrenia-like psychosis, and personality change. Other clinical features include: Parkinsonism, ataxia, headache, seizures, vertigo, stroke-like events, orthostatic hypotension, tremor, dysarthria, and paresis. Fahr’s disease should be considered in the differential diagnosis of psychiatric symptoms, particularly when associated with movement disorder. The disease should be differentiated from other conditions that can cause intracranial calcification. No specific treatment is currently available. Further research is needed to bridge the gap existing in our current knowledge of the prevalence, etiology, symptoms, and treatment of Fahr’s disease. PMID:24983277

  12. Familial idiopathic basal ganglia calcification (Fahr`s disease).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mufaddel, Amir A; Al-Hassani, Ghanem A

    2014-07-01

    Familial idiopathic basal ganglia calcification (Fahr`s disease) is a rare neurodegenerative disorder characterized by symmetrical and bilateral calcification of the basal ganglia. Calcifications may also occur in other brain regions such as dentate nucleus, thalamus, and cerebral cortex. Both familial and non-familial cases of Fahr`s disease have been reported, predominantly with autosomal-dominant fashion. The disease has a wide range of clinical presentations, predominantly with neuropsychiatric features and movement disorders. Psychiatric features reported in the literature include: cognitive impairment, depression, hallucinations, delusions, manic symptoms, anxiety, schizophrenia-like psychosis, and personality change. Other clinical features include: Parkinsonism, ataxia, headache, seizures, vertigo, stroke-like events, orthostatic hypotension, tremor, dysarthria, and paresis. Fahr`s disease should be considered in the differential diagnosis of psychiatric symptoms, particularly when associated with movement disorder. The disease should be differentiated from other conditions that can cause intracranial calcification. No specific treatment is currently available. Further research is needed to bridge the gap existing in our current knowledge of the prevalence, etiology, symptoms, and treatment of Fahr`s disease.

  13. Mephedrone alters basal ganglia and limbic dynorphin systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    German, Christopher L; Alburges, Mario E; Hoonakker, Amanda J; Fleckenstein, Annette E; Hanson, Glen R

    2014-08-25

    Mephedrone (4-methymethcathinone) is a synthetic cathinone designer drug that disrupts central nervous system (CNS) dopamine (DA) signaling. Numerous central neuropeptide systems reciprocally interact with dopaminergic neurons to provide regulatory counterbalance, and are altered by aberrant DA activity associated with stimulant exposure. Endogenous opioid neuropeptides are highly concentrated within dopaminergic CNS regions and facilitate many rewarding and aversive properties associated with drug use. Dynorphin, an opioid neuropeptide and kappa receptor agonist, causes dysphoria and aversion to drug consumption through signaling within the basal ganglia and limbic systems, which is affected by stimulants. This study evaluated how mephedrone alters basal ganglia and limbic system dynorphin content, and the role of DA signaling in these changes. Repeated mephedrone administrations (4 × 25 mg/kg/injection, 2-h intervals) selectively increased dynorphin content throughout the dorsal striatum and globus pallidus, decreased dynorphin content within the frontal cortex, and did not alter dynorphin content within most limbic system structures. Pretreatment with D1 -like (SCH-23380) or D2 -like (eticlopride) antagonists blocked mephedrone-induced changes in dynorphin content in most regions examined, indicating altered dynorphin activity is a consequence of excessive DA signaling. Synapse, 2014. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Satellite glial cells in sensory ganglia: its role in pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipa Alexandra Leite Costa

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Satellite glial cells in sensory ganglia are a recent subject of research in the field of pain and a possible therapeutic target in the future. Therefore, the aim of this study was to summarize some of the important physiological and morphological characteristics of these cells and gather the most relevant scientific evidence about its possible role in the development of chronic pain. CONTENT: In the sensory ganglia, each neuronal body is surrounded by satellite glial cells forming distinct functional units. This close relationship enables bidirectional communication via a paracrine signaling between those two cell types. There is a growing body of evidence that glial satellite cells undergo structural and biochemical changes after nerve injury, which influence neuronal excitability and consequently the development and/or maintenance of pain in different animal models of chronic pain. CONCLUSIONS: Satellite glial cells are important in the establishment of physiological pain, in addition to being a potential target for the development of new pain treatments.

  15. Saccade learning with concurrent cortical and subcortical basal ganglia loops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steve eN'guyen

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The Basal Ganglia is a central structure involved in multiple cortical and subcortical loops. Some of these loops are believed to be responsible for saccade target selection. We study here how the very specific structural relationships of these saccadic loops can affect the ability of learning spatial and feature-based tasks.We propose a model of saccade generation with reinforcement learning capabilities based onour previous basal ganglia and superior colliculus models. It is structured around the interactions of two parallel cortico-basal loops and one tecto-basal loop. The two cortical loops separately deal with spatial and non-spatial information to select targets in a concurrent way. The subcortical loop is used to make the final target selection leading to the production of thesaccade. These different loops may work in concert or disturb each other regarding reward maximization. Interactions between these loops and their learning capabilities are tested on different saccade tasks.The results show the ability of this model to correctly learn basic target selection based on different criteria (spatial or not. Moreover the model reproduces and explains training dependent express saccades toward targets based on a spatial criterion. Finally, the model predicts that in absence of prefrontal control, the spatial loop should dominate.

  16. The basal ganglia: a substrate for fatigue in multiple sclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tellez, N.; Rio, J.; Tintore, M.; Nos, C.; Montalban, X. [Hospital Universitari Vall d' Hebron, Unitat de Neuroimmunologia Clinica, Barcelona (Spain); Alonso, J.; Rovira, A. [Hospital Universitari Vall d' Hebron, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Unitat de Ressonancia Magnetica (IDI), Servei de Radiologia, Barcelona (Spain)

    2008-01-15

    The origin of fatigue in multiple sclerosis (MS) remains uncertain. However, the use of nonconventional magnetic resonance techniques has increased our understanding of this problem. We aimed to study the relationship between fatigue in MS and the presence of focal dysfunction in the basal ganglia and frontal white matter. Included in the study were 41 patients with relapsing-remitting MS with mild disability and 20 healthy controls. Fatigue was assessed by the Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS) and the Modified Fatigue Impact Scale (MFIS). Patients were classified as ''fatigued'' when they expressed a subjective feeling of fatigue, and the FSS score was {>=}5.0 and/or the MFIS score was >38. Patients with no subjective fatigue were classified as ''nonfatigued'' when the FSS score was <4.0. Proton magnetic resonance spectra were obtained from two different regions: the frontal white matter and the lentiform nucleus. The relationships between fatigue and NAA/Cr, NAA/Cho and Cho/Cr ratios were analysed. A significant decrease in NAA/Cr in the lentiform nucleus region in patients with fatigue was observed. No differences between the groups were found in the frontal white matter. Although confirmatory studies are needed, our results would support the idea that a specific dysfunction or involvement of the basal ganglia might partly contribute to the development of MS-related fatigue. (orig.)

  17. [Effect of prednisolon on trachea smooth muscle of normal rats and rats with fibrosing alveolitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedin, A N; Nekrasova, E A; Frolova, S A; Danilov, L N; Lebedeva, E S; Il'kovich, M M

    2007-01-01

    Effect of prednisolone on isolated preparations of trachea of normal rats and rats with fibrosing alveolitis was studied. Prednisolone at a concentration of 0.4 microg/l decreased responses of smooth muscle on stimulation of preganglionar nerve fibers at trachea areas with intramural ganglia in rats with acute alveolitis by 48%, while in normal rats--by 19% of control. In trachea preparations without ganglia, prednisolone at a dose of 10 microg/l decreased responses of muscle to the nerve fiber stimulation by 21.3%. The higher prednisolone doses were less efficient: 0.1-10 microg/l glucocorticoid practically did not affect the smooth muscle responses produced by stimulation of muscle cells. In rats with fibrosing alveolitis, 10 microg/l prednisolone restored the smooth muscle responses to control values in preparations of trachea with intramural ganglia. After the prednisolone treatment, amplitude of the rat trachea muscle contraction in response to the nerve fiber electric stimulation did not differ statistically significantly from control and 0.1-10 microg/l prednisolone did not change the response value. The conclusion is made that prednisolone affected the diseased rats more efficiently than the healthy animals. The character of the glucocorticoid effect depends on the presence of intramural ganglia in the trachea wall.

  18. Mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia and ectopic neuronal discharge after chronic compression of dorsal root ganglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, X J; Hu, S J; Greenquist, K W; Zhang, J M; LaMotte, R H

    1999-12-01

    Chronic compression of the dorsal root ganglion (CCD) was produced in adult rats by implanting a stainless steel rod unilaterally into the intervertebral foramen, one rod at L(4) and another at L(5). Two additional groups of rats received either a sham surgery or an acute injury consisting of a transient compression of the ganglion. Withdrawal of the hindpaw was used as evidence of a nocifensive response to mechanical and thermal stimulation of the plantar surface. In addition, extracellular electrophysiological recordings of spontaneous discharges were obtained from dorsal root fibers of formerly compressed ganglia using an in vitro nerve-DRG-dorsal root preparation. The mean threshold force of punctate indentation and the mean threshold temperature of heating required to elicit a 50% incidence of foot withdrawal ipsilateral to the CCD were significantly lower than preoperative values throughout the 35 days of postoperative testing. The number of foot withdrawals ipsilateral to the CCD during a 20-min contact with a temperature-controlled floor was significantly increased over preoperative values throughout postoperative testing when the floor was 4 degrees C (hyperalgesia) and, to a lesser extent, when it was 30 degrees C (spontaneous pain). Stroking the foot with a cotton wisp never elicited a reflex withdrawal before surgery but did so in most rats tested ipsilateral to the CCD during the first 2 postoperative weeks. In contrast, the CCD produced no changes in responses to mechanical or thermal stimuli on the contralateral foot. The sham operation and acute injury produced no change in behavior other than slight, mechanical hyperalgesia for approximately 1 day, ipsilateral to the acute injury. Ectopic spontaneous discharges generated within the chronically compressed ganglion and, occurring in the absence of blood-borne chemicals and without an intact sympathetic nervous system, were recorded from neurons with intact, conducting, myelinated or unmyelinated

  19. [Neurobiology of parkinsonism. I. Neural substrates an neurochemistry of the basal ganglia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponzoni, S; Garcia-Cairasco, N

    1995-09-01

    Movement disorders, in general, are characterized by a breakdown in the integrated coordination of posture and motion by multiple brain and muscular systems. In the expression of parkinsonism, in particular, critical and altered structures such as substantia nigra, appear to be related to the cortex-basal ganglia and thalamus-basal ganglia sub-circuits.

  20. Relation of impaired interorgan communication and parasympathetic activity in chronic heart failure and multiple-organ dysfunction syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, H; Lotze, U; Ghanem, A; Anker, S D; Said, S M; Braun-Dullaeus, R; Oltmanns, G; Rose, S; Buerke, M; Müller-Werdan, U; Werdan, K; Rauchhaus, M

    2014-06-01

    We investigated the relationship of impaired autonomic function and severity of illness in chronic heart failure (CHF) and multiple-organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) as an end stage of CHF. Furthermore, we assessed the link of parasympathetic modulation of the heart rate and inflammatory activation in CHF and MODS. Sixty-five patients admitted for worsening of CHF were retrospectively enrolled in this study. In addition, 65 age- and sex-matched patients with pronounced MODS were assigned for comparison of autonomic function and C-reactive protein in patients with CHF or MODS, respectively. Heart rate variability (HRV) parameters of the time and frequency domain as markers of autonomic function were analyzed from 24-hour Holter electrocardiograms. The more pronounced the severity of illness as expressed by the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation score, the more the HRV was impaired. This effect was particularly seen for overall variability (SD of RR intervals) and HRV parameters characterizing the parasympathetic modulations of the heart rate (high, very low frequency power). C-reactive protein levels as markers of inflammation were inversely related to high and very low frequencies. Our results allow for speculation that autonomic dysfunction in CHF indicates a beginning of uncoupled interorgan communication potentially leading to MODS as characterized by disruption of communication between the organs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The symphonic structure of childhood stress reactivity: patterns of sympathetic, parasympathetic, and adrenocortical responses to psychological challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quas, Jodi A; Yim, Ilona S; Oberlander, Tim F; Nordstokke, David; Essex, Marilyn J; Armstrong, Jeffrey M; Bush, Nicole; Obradović, Jelena; Boyce, W Thomas

    2014-11-01

    Despite widespread recognition that the physiological systems underlying stress reactivity are well coordinated at a neurobiological level, surprisingly little empirical attention has been given to delineating precisely how the systems actually interact with one another when confronted with stress. We examined cross-system response proclivities in anticipation of and following standardized laboratory challenges in 664 4- to 14-year-olds from four independent studies. In each study, measures of stress reactivity within both the locus coeruleus-norepinephrine system (i.e., the sympathetic and parasympathetic branches of the autonomic nervous system) and the corticotrophin releasing hormone system (i.e., the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis) were collected. Latent profile analyses revealed six distinctive patterns that recurred across the samples: moderate reactivity (average cross-system activation; 52%-80% of children across samples), parasympathetic-specific reactivity (2%-36%), anticipatory arousal (4%-9%), multisystem reactivity (7%-14%), hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis specific reactivity (6%-7%), and underarousal (0%-2%). Groups meaningfully differed in socioeconomic status, family adversity, and age. Results highlight the sample-level reliability of children's neuroendocrine responses to stress and suggest important cross-system regularities that are linked to development and prior experiences and may have implications for subsequent physical and mental morbidity.

  2. Sildenafil Attenuates Inflammation and Oxidative Stress in Pelvic Ganglia Neurons after Bilateral Cavernosal Nerve Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leah A. Garcia

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Erectile dysfunction is a common complication for patients undergoing surgeries for prostate, bladder, and colorectal cancers, due to damage of the nerves associated with the major pelvic ganglia (MPG. Functional re-innervation of target organs depends on the capacity of the neurons to survive and switch towards a regenerative phenotype. PDE5 inhibitors (PDE5i have been successfully used in promoting the recovery of erectile function after cavernosal nerve damage (BCNR by up-regulating the expression of neurotrophic factors in MPG. However, little is known about the effects of PDE5i on markers of neuronal damage and oxidative stress after BCNR. This study aimed to investigate the changes in gene and protein expression profiles of inflammatory, anti-inflammatory cytokines and oxidative stress related-pathways in MPG neurons after BCNR and subsequent treatment with sildenafil. Our results showed that BCNR in Fisher-344 rats promoted up-regulation of cytokines (interleukin- 1 (IL-1 β, IL-6, IL-10, transforming growth factor β 1 (TGFβ1, and oxidative stress factors (Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH oxidase, Myeloperoxidase (MPO, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS, TNF receptor superfamily member 5 (CD40 that were normalized by sildenafil treatment given in the drinking water. In summary, PDE5i can attenuate the production of damaging factors and can up-regulate the expression of beneficial factors in the MPG that may ameliorate neuropathic pain, promote neuroprotection, and favor nerve regeneration.

  3. Long-term enhancement (LTE) of postsynaptic potentials following neural conditioning, in mammalian sympathetic ganglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libet, B; Mochida, S

    1988-11-15

    Orthodromic, preganglionic conditioning stimulation can consistently induce long-term enhancement (LTE) (greater than 3 h) of the muscarinically mediated slow excitatory postsynaptic potential and the slow inhibitory postsynaptic potential. This was shown for superior cervical ganglia of rabbit and rat. Effective conditioning stimuli are in a physiologically observed range (3/s for 7 min, 5/s for 4 min, 10/s for 2 min, 20/s for 1 min). LTE was producible both homosynaptically and heterosynaptically. LTE can thus be associative, with conditioning synaptic input in one line inducing long-term changes in postsynaptic responses to another (heterosynaptic) input. The dopamine antagonist butaclamol depressed LTE, particularly that following the initial postconditioning period of 30 min. Adrenergic antagonists had no effect. This pharmacological evidence, coupled with the heterosynaptic induction of LTE, supports the view that neurally induced LTE may be at least partly mediated by endogenous dopamine. Another non-cholinergic but non-adrenergic transmitter (possibly a peptide) might contribute to the LTE seen in the initial 30 min postconditioning. The present, orthodromically induced LTE is clearly different from the long-term potentiation widely studied in hippocampus, etc., in the modes of induction and synaptic mediation.

  4. Functional neuroanatomy of the basal ganglia as studied by dual-probe microdialysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Connor, William T. E-mail: woconn@iveagh.ucd.ie

    1998-11-01

    Dual probe microdialysis was employed in intact rat brain to investigate the effect of intrastriatal perfusion with selective dopamine D{sub 1} and D{sub 2} receptor agonists and with c-fos antisense oligonucleotide on (a) local GABA release in the striatum; (b) the internal segment of the globus pallidus and the substantia nigra pars reticulata, which is the output site of the strionigral GABA pathway; and (c) the external segment of the globus pallidus, which is the output site of the striopallidal GABA pathway. The data provide functional in vivo evidence for a selective dopamine D{sub 1} receptor-mediated activation of the direct strionigral GABA pathway and a selective dopamine D{sub 2} receptor inhibition of the indirect striopallidal GABA pathway and provides a neuronal substrate for parallel processing in the basal ganglia regulation of motor function. Taken together, these findings offer new therapeutic strategies for the treatment of dopamine-linked disorders such as Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, and schizophrenia.

  5. The role of dorsal root ganglia activation and brain-derived neurotrophic factor in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wenjun; Frost, Emma E; Begum, Farhana; Vora, Parvez; Au, Kelvin; Gong, Yuewen; MacNeil, Brian; Pillai, Prakash; Namaka, Mike

    2012-08-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is characterized by focal destruction of the white matter of the brain and spinal cord. The exact mechanisms underlying the pathophysiology of the disease are unknown. Many studies have shown that MS is predominantly an autoimmune disease with an inflammatory phase followed by a demyelinating phase. Recent studies alongside current treatment strategies, including glatiramer acetate, have revealed a potential role for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in MS. However, the exact role of BDNF is not fully understood. We used the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) model of MS in adolescent female Lewis rats to identify the role of BDNF in disease progression. Dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and spinal cords were harvested for protein and gene expression analysis every 3 days post-disease induction (pdi) up to 15 days. We show significant increases in BDNF protein and gene expression in the DRG of EAE animals at 12 dpi, which correlates with peak neurological disability. BDNF protein expression in the spinal cord was significantly increased at 12 dpi, and maintained at 15 dpi. However, there was no significant change in mRNA levels. We show evidence for the anterograde transport of BDNF protein from the DRG to the dorsal horn of the spinal cord via the dorsal roots. Increased levels of BDNF within the DRG and spinal cord in EAE may facilitate myelin repair and neuroprotection in the CNS. The anterograde transport of DRG-derived BDNF to the spinal cord may have potential implications in facilitating central myelin repair and neuroprotection.

  6. 姜黄素对2型糖尿病大鼠神经病理性痛及脊髓背角和背根神经节IRE1α表达的影响%Effects of curcumin on type 2 diabetic neuropathic pain and expression of inositol-requiring enzyme 1α in spinal dorsal horn and dorsal root ganglia in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    党江坤; 汪小丹; 周林; 曹红; 吴艳; 李军; 连庆泉

    2012-01-01

    目的 评价姜黄素对2型糖尿病大鼠神经病理性痛及脊髓背角和背根神经节肌醇需求激酶1α(IRE1α)表达的影响.方法 高脂高糖喂养雄性SD大鼠8周诱导胰岛素抵抗,以35 mg/kg链脲佐菌素(STZ)单次腹腔注射,3d后血糖≥16.7 mmol/L大鼠为2型糖尿病大鼠.注射STZ 14 d后机械缩足阈值(MWT)和热缩足潜伏期(TWL)低于基础值80%的大鼠为2型糖尿病神经病理性痛大鼠,采用随机数字表法,将其随机分为3组(n=27):2型糖尿病神经病理性痛组(DNP组)、姜黄素组(Cur组)和溶剂对照组(SC组).Cur组和SC组于注射STZ 14 d后腹腔注射姜黄素或玉米油100 mg/kg(25mg/ml),1次/d,连续14d,DNP组不做任何处理.另取27只正常大鼠为对照组(C组),给予普通饲料喂养.给予姜黄素后第3、7和14天时测定MWT和TWL,痛阈测定后用Western blot法检测大鼠脊髓背角和背根神经节IREIα的表达.结果 与C组比较、DNP组、Cur组和SC组MWT降低,TWL缩短,脊髓背角和背根神经节IRE1α表达上H调(P<0.05);与DNP组比较,Cur组MWT升高,TWL延长,脊髓背角和背根神经节IREIα表达下调(p<0.05).SC组和DNP组上述指标比较差异无统计学意义(P>0.05).结论 姜黄素可减轻2型糖尿病大鼠神经病理性痛,其机制与抑制脊髓背角和背根神经节IRE1α表达有关.%Objective To investigate the effects of curcumin on type 2 diabetic neuropathic pain (DNP)and expression of inositol-requiring enzyme 1α (IRE1α) in spinal dorsal horn and dorsal root ganglia (DRG) in rats.Methods Type 2 diabetes mellitus was induced by high-fat and high-sucrose diet and intraperitoneal streptozotocin (STZ) 35 mg/kg,and confirmed by fasting blood glucose level > 16.7 mmol/L in male SD rats.Type 2 DNP was confirmed by the mechanical withdrawal threshold (MWT) and thermal withdrawal latency (TWI.) measured on day 14 after STZ administration < 80% of the baseline value.The rats were then randomly divided into 3

  7. [Dynamics of heart rate changes in rats following stepwise change of treadmill running speed].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasova, O S; Borzykh, A A; Kuz'min, I V; Borovik, A S; Lukoshkova, E V; Sharova, A P; Vinogradova, O L; Grigor'ev, A I

    2012-11-01

    Amplitude and temporal responses of heart rate to stepwise increase or decrease of treadmill running intensity were investigated in rats. Heart rate amplitude response was shown to be connected mainly with the change of sympathetic nervous activity whereas heart rate temporal response was shown to be determined predominantly by parasympathetic cardiotrophic influences.

  8. Basal ganglia calcification as a putative cause for cognitive decline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Ricardo Mendes de Oliveira

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Basal ganglia calcifications (BGC may be present in various medical conditions, such as infections, metabolic, psychiatric and neurological diseases, associated with different etiologies and clinical outcomes, including parkinsonism, psychosis, mood swings and dementia. A literature review was performed highlighting the main neuropsychological findings of BGC, with particular attention to clinical reports of cognitive decline. Neuroimaging studies combined with neuropsychological analysis show that some patients have shown progressive disturbances of selective attention, declarative memory and verbal perseveration. Therefore, the calcification process might represent a putative cause for dementia syndromes, suggesting a probable link among calcinosis, the aging process and eventually with neuronal death. The increasing number of reports available will foster a necessary discussion about cerebral calcinosis and its role in determining symptomatology in dementia patients

  9. Idiopathic Basal Ganglia Calcification Presented with Impulse Control Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Cem; Levent, Mustafa; Akbaba, Gulhan; Kara, Bilge; Yeniceri, Emine Nese; Inanc, Betul Battaloglu

    2015-01-01

    Primary familial brain calcification (PFBC), also referred to as Idiopathic Basal Ganglia Calcification (IBGC) or “Fahr's disease,” is a clinical condition characterized by symmetric and bilateral calcification of globus pallidus and also basal ganglions, cerebellar nuclei, and other deep cortical structures. It could be accompanied by parathyroid disorder and other metabolic disturbances. The clinical features are dysfunction of the calcified anatomic localization. IBGC most commonly presents with mental damage, convulsion, parkinson-like clinical picture, and neuropsychiatric behavior disorders; however, presentation with impulse control disorder is not a frequent presentation. In the current report, a 43-year-old male patient who has been admitted to psychiatry policlinic with the complaints of aggressive behavior episodes and who has been diagnosed with impulse control disorder and IBGC was evaluated in the light of the literature. PMID:26246920

  10. 基底节性失语%Basal Ganglia Aphasia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    隆昱洲; 柳华; 艾青龙

    2008-01-01

    基底节病变常导致语言功能障碍,其表现彤式复杂,既可出现口语语言障碍,也可出现书面语语言障碍,几乎包括所有失语类型.文章就基底节解剖、基底节失语的定义、特点、机制以及病变部位对语言的影响做了综述.%Basal ganglion lesions often result in language impairment. Its patterns of manifestation are complicated. Patients may either have oral language disorders or written language disorders, which almost includes all types of aphasia, The article reviews the anatomy, definition, feature and mechanisms of basal ganglia aphasia as well as the effect of lesion sites on language.

  11. Schwann cell cultures from human fetal dorsal root ganglia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yaping Feng; Hui Zhu; Jiang Hao; Xinmin Wang; Shengping Wu; Li Bai; Xiangming Li; Yun Zha

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Previous studies have used many methods for in vitro Schwann cells (SCs) cul-tures and purification,such as single cell suspension and cytosine arabinoside.However,it has been difficult to obtain sufficient cellular density,and the procedures have been quite tedious.OBJECTIVE:To investigate the feasibility of culturing high-density SCs using fetal human dorsal root ganglion tissue explants.DESIGN,TIME AND SETTING:Cell culture and immunohistochemistry were performed at the Cen-tral Laboratory of Kunming General Hospital of Chinese PLA between March 2001 and October 2008.MATERIALS:Culture media containing 10% fetal bovine serum,as well as 0.2% collagenase and 0.25% trypsin were purchased from Gibco,USA;mouse anti-human S-100 monoclonal antibody and goat anti-mouse IgG labeled with horseradish peroxidase were provided by Beijing Institute of Bi-ological Products,China.METHODS:Primarily cultured SCs were dissociated from dorsal root ganglia of human aborted fe-tuses at 4-6 months pregnancy.Following removal of the dorsal root ganglion perineurium,the gan-glia were dissected into tiny pieces and digested with 0.2% collagenase and 0.25% trypsin (volume ratio 1:1),then explanted and cultured.SC purification was performed with 5 mL 10% fetal bovine serum added to the culture media,followed by differential adhesion.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:SCs morphology was observed under inverted phase contrast light microscopy.SC purity was evaluated according to percentage of S-100 immunostained cells.RESULTS:SCs were primarily cultured for 5-6 days and then subcultured for 4-5 passages.The highly enriched SC population reached > 95% purity and presented with normal morphology.CONCLUSION:A high purity of SCs was obtained with culture methods using human fetal dorsal root ganglion tissue explants.

  12. Exploring the cognitive and motor functions of the basal ganglia: an integrative review of computational cognitive neuroscience models

    OpenAIRE

    Sebastien eHelie; Srinivasa eChakravarthy; Ahmed A. Moustafa

    2013-01-01

    Many computational models of the basal ganglia have been proposed over the past twenty-five years. While computational neuroscience models have focused on closely matching the neurobiology of the basal ganglia, computational cognitive neuroscience models have focused on how the basal ganglia can be used to implement cognitive and motor functions. This review article focuses on computational cognitive neuroscience models of the basal ganglia and how they use the neuroanatomy of the basal gangl...

  13. Diesel Exhaust Inhalation Increases Cardiac Output, Bradyarrhythmias, and Parasympathetic Tone in Aged Heart Failure-Prone Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acute air pollutant inhalation is linked to adverse cardiac events and death, and hospitalizations for heart failure. Diesel exhaust (DE) is a major air pollutant suspected to exacerbate preexisting cardiac conditions, in part, through autonomic and electrophysiologic disturbance...

  14. Characteristics of basal ganglia aphasia after stroke and the rehabilitative interventions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yating Kong; Xifeng Pan; Qimei Zhang

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To introduce the characteristics of basal ganglia aphasia after stroke and the rehabilitative interventions.DATA SOURCES: Articles related to stroke, subcortical aphasia, basal ganglia aphasia and language rehabilitation published in Chinese from January 1988 to December 2005 were searched in Chinese journal full-text database (CJFD) using the keywords of"stroke, basal ganglia aphasia, language rehabilitation" in Chinese. Meanwhile, English articles about aphasia published from January 1982 to December 2005 were searched in and Pubmed database. Besides, several books associated with the contents were looked through manually.STUDY SELECTION: The data were checked primarily, the articles about the pathomechanism and neurolinguistic characteristics of basal ganglia aphasia, diagnostic methods of aphasia and language rehabilitation were selected, and those had no obvious relation with the above contents were excluded.Inclusive criteria: literatures explain the clinical characteristics of basal ganglia aphasia, neurolinguistic pathogenesis and methods of rehabilitation therapy in details. The repetitive studies were excluded.DATA EXTRACTION: Totally 95 literatures about basal ganglia aphasia were collected, including 31 about the clinical characteristics of basal ganglia aphasia, 45 about its neurolinguistic pathogenesis, 5 about the evaluation and classification of aphasia, and 14 about its rehabilitation therapy. Thirty accorded with the inclusive criteria were used for review, and the other 65 were excluded.DATA SYNTHESIS: Concisely introduced the definition, past investigation of basal ganglia aphasia after stroke, then dwelled on the multiplicity neurolinguistics characteristics. Aphasia evaluation was dependent upon clinical aphasic symptoms. The relationship between symptom and focus of infection was explored, and the mechanism of pathosis language behavior on basal ganglia aphasia patients was understood to provide consequence data that could

  15. Identification of the mononuclear cell infiltrate in the superior cervical ganglion of athymic nude and euthymic rats after guanethidine-induced sympathectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thygesen, P; Hougen, H P; Christensen, H B;

    1990-01-01

    Guanethidine sulphate 40 mg/kg intraperitoneally for 14 days induced chromatolysis and nerve cell death in the superior cervical ganglia of athymic nude (rnu/rnu) LEW/Mol rats and their euthymic (+/rnu) LEW/Mol heterozygous littermates. Histologically the sympathetic ganglia were dominated by an ...

  16. Relation between aggression exposure in adolescence and adult posttraumatic stress symptoms: Moderating role of the parasympathetic nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Samantha A; Rabkin, Ari N; Olezeski, Christy L; Rivers, Alison J; Gordis, Elana B

    2015-03-15

    The present study examines the impact of the parasympathetic nervous system (PNS), as measured by respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA), on the link between family aggression experienced during adolescence and posttraumatic stress symptoms during young adulthood. Participants completed retrospective self-report measures of interparental aggression and harsh parenting exposure during adolescence and measures of current posttraumatic stress symptoms. RSA indexed PNS activity. Among females, the three-way interaction between harsh parenting, interparental aggression, and resting RSA was significant in accounting for young adulthood PTSD symptoms. At higher values of resting RSA and higher levels of interparental aggression exposure, harsh parenting experienced during adolescence was positively associated with adulthood PTSD symptoms. Among males, adolescent aggression exposure and resting RSA did not significantly account for variation in adulthood PTSD symptoms. Thus, this study suggests that resting PNS activity may play an important role in the relationship between stressors during adolescence and later PTSD in females.

  17. Chemistry and biology of radiotracers that target changes in sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems in heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckelman, William C; Dilsizian, Vasken

    2015-06-01

    Following the discovery of the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous system, numerous adrenoceptor drugs were radiolabeled and potent radioligands were prepared in order to image the β-adrenergic and the muscarinic systems. But the greatest effort has been in preparing noradrenaline analogs, such as norepinephrine, (11)C-metahydroxyephedrine, and (123)I-metaiodobenzylguanidine that measure cardiac sympathetic nerve varicosities. Given the technical and clinical challenges in designing and validating targeted adrenoceptor-binding radiotracers, namely the heavily weighted flow dependence and relatively low target-to-background ratio, both requiring complicated mathematic analysis, and the inability of targeted adrenoceptor radioligands to have an impact on clinical care of heart disease, the emphasis has been on radioligands monitoring the norepinephrine pathway. The chemistry and biology of such radiotracers, and the clinical and prognostic impact of these innervation imaging studies in patients with heart disease, are examined. © 2015 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  18. Meta-analytic evidence for decreased heart rate variability in chronic pain implicating parasympathetic nervous system dysregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tracy, Lincoln M; Ioannou, Liane; Baker, Katharine S; Gibson, Stephen J; Georgiou-Karistianis, Nellie; Giummarra, Melita J

    2016-01-01

    Both sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems are involved in regulating pain states. The activity of these systems seems to become disturbed in states of chronic pain. This disruption in autonomic balance can be measured through the assessment of heart rate variability (HRV), that is, the variability of the interval between consecutive heart beats. However, there is yet to be a systematic evaluation of the body of literature concerning HRV across several chronic pain conditions. Moreover, modern meta-analytical techniques have never been used to validate and consolidate the extent to which HRV may be decreased in chronic pain. Following the preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses (PRISMA) statement guidelines, this study systematically evaluated and critically appraised the literature concerning HRV in people living with chronic pain. After screening 17,350 sources, 51 studies evaluating HRV in a chronic pain group met the inclusion criteria. Twenty-six moderate-high quality studies were included in quantitative meta-analyses. On average, the quality of studies was moderate. There were 6 frequency-domain and time-domain measures of HRV across a broad range of chronic pain conditions. High heterogeneity aside, pooled results from the meta-analyses reflected a consistent, moderate-to-large effect of decreased high-frequency HRV in chronic pain, implicating a decrease in parasympathetic activation. These effects were heavily influenced by fibromyalgia studies. Future research would benefit from wider use of standardised definitions of measurement, and also investigating the synergistic changes in pain state and HRV throughout the development and implementation of mechanism-based treatments for chronic pain.

  19. Neuronal plasticity of trigeminal ganglia in mice following nerve injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynds, Randi; Lyu, Chuang; Lyu, Gong-Wei; Shi, Xie-Qi; Rosén, Annika; Mustafa, Kamal; Shi, Tie-Jun Sten

    2017-01-01

    Background Nerve injury may induce neuropathic pain. In studying the mechanisms of orofacial neuropathic pain, attention has been paid to the plastic changes that occur in the trigeminal ganglia (TGs) and nucleus in response to an injury of the trigeminal nerve branches. Previous studies have explored the impact of sciatic nerve injury on dorsal root ganglia (DRGs) and it has shown dramatic changes in the expression of multiple biomarkers. In large, the changes in biomarker expression in TGs after trigeminal nerve injury are similar to that in DRGs after sciatic nerve injury. However, important differences exist. Therefore, there is a need to study the plasticity of biomarkers in TGs after nerve injury in the context of the development of neuropathic pain-like behaviors. Aim The aim of this study was to investigate the plasticity of biomarkers associated with chronic persistent pain in TGs after trigeminal nerve injury. Materials and methods To mimic the chronic nature of the disorder, we used an intraoral procedure to access the infraorbital nerve (ION) and induced a nerve injury in mice. Immunohistochemistry and quantification were used for revealing the expression level of each biomarker in TGs after nerve injury. Results Two weeks after partial ION injury, immunohistochemistry results showed strongly upregulated expressions of activating transcription factor 3 and neuropeptide Y (NPY) in the ipsilateral TGs. Microglial cells were also activated after nerve injury. In regard to positive neuronal profile counting, however, no significant difference in expression was observed in galanin, substance P, calcitonin gene-related peptide, neuronal nitric oxide synthase, phosphorylated AKT, or P2X3 in ipsilateral TGs when compared to contralateral TGs. Conclusion In this study, the expression and regulation of biomarkers in TGs have been observed in response to trigeminal nerve injury. Our results suggest that NPY and Iba1 might play crucial roles in the pathogenesis of

  20. Infant diet sets the tone for parasympathetic regulation of resting heart rate: Development of vagal tone from 3 months to 2 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    The parasympathetic nervous system (PS) influences are critical in the autonomic control of the heart. To examine how early postnatal diet affects PS development, we used a measure of tonic PS control of cardiac activity, vagal tone, derived from resting heart rate recordings in 158 breastfed (BF), ...

  1. Intrinsic cardiac ganglia and acetylcholine are important in the mechanism of ischaemic preconditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickard, J M J; Burke, N; Davidson, S M; Yellon, D M

    2017-03-01

    This study aimed to investigate the role of the intrinsic cardiac nervous system in the mechanism of classical myocardial ischaemic preconditioning (IPC). Isolated perfused rat hearts were subjected to 35-min regional ischaemia and 60-min reperfusion. IPC was induced as three cycles of 5-min global ischaemia-reperfusion, and provided significant reduction in infarct size (IS/AAR = 14 ± 2% vs control IS/AAR = 48 ± 3%, p IPC protection (IS/AAR = 37 ± 7%, p IPC). Moreover, the muscarinic antagonist, atropine (100 nM), also abrogated IPC-mediated protection (IS/AAR = 40 ± 3%, p IPC). This indicates that intrinsic cardiac ganglia remain intact in the Langendorff preparation and are important in the mechanism of IPC. In a second group of experiments, coronary effluent collected following IPC, from ex vivo perfused rat hearts, provided significant cardioprotection when perfused through a naïve isolated rat heart prior to induction of regional ischaemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) (IS/ARR = 19 ± 2, p IPC induces protection via an intrinsic neuronal mechanism (IS/AAR = 46 ± 5%, p IPC effluent). In addition, a large release in ACh was observed in coronary effluent was observed following IPC (IPCeff = 0.36 ± 0.03 μM vs C eff = 0.04 ± 0.04 μM, n = 4, p IPC effluent was not able to significantly protect isolated cardiomyocytes from simulated ischaemia-reperfusion injury (cell death = 45 ± 6%, p = 0.09 vs control effluent). In conclusion, IPC involves activation of the intrinsic cardiac nervous system, leading to release of ACh in the ventricles and induction of protection via activation of muscarinic receptors.

  2. Basal ganglia outputs map instantaneous position coordinates during behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barter, Joseph W; Li, Suellen; Sukharnikova, Tatyana; Rossi, Mark A; Bartholomew, Ryan A; Yin, Henry H

    2015-02-11

    The basal ganglia (BG) are implicated in many movement disorders, yet how they contribute to movement remains unclear. Using wireless in vivo recording, we measured BG output from the substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNr) in mice while monitoring their movements with video tracking. The firing rate of most nigral neurons reflected Cartesian coordinates (either x- or y-coordinates) of the animal's head position during movement. The firing rates of SNr neurons are either positively or negatively correlated with the coordinates. Using an egocentric reference frame, four types of neurons can be classified: each type increases firing during movement in a particular direction (left, right, up, down), and decreases firing during movement in the opposite direction. Given the high correlation between the firing rate and the x and y components of the position vector, the movement trajectory can be reconstructed from neural activity. Our results therefore demonstrate a quantitative and continuous relationship between BG output and behavior. Thus, a steady BG output signal from the SNr (i.e., constant firing rate) is associated with the lack of overt movement, when a stable posture is maintained by structures downstream of the BG. Any change in SNr firing rate is associated with a change in position (i.e., movement). We hypothesize that the SNr output quantitatively determines the direction, velocity, and amplitude of voluntary movements. By changing the reference signals to downstream position control systems, the BG can produce transitions in body configurations and initiate actions.

  3. Basal ganglia necrosis: a 'best-fit' approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boca, Mihaela; Lloyd, Katie; Likeman, Marcus; Jardine, Philip; Whone, Alan

    2016-12-01

    A previously well 16-year-old boy developed a rapid-onset hypokinetic syndrome, coupled with a radiological appearance of extensive and highly symmetrical basal ganglia and white matter change. The diagnostic process was challenging and we systematically considered potential causes. After excluding common causes of this clinico-radiological picture, we considered common disorders with this unusual radiological picture and vice versa, before finally concluding that this was a rare presentation of a rare disease. We considered the broad categories of: metabolic; toxic; infective; inflammatory, postinfective and immune-mediated; neoplastic; paraneoplastic and heredodegenerative. Long-term follow-up gave insight into the nature of the insult, confirming the monophasic course. During recovery, and following presumed secondary aberrant reinnervation, his disorder evolved from predominantly hypokinetic to hyperkinetic. Here, we explore the process of finding a 'best-fit' diagnosis: in this case, acute necrotising encephalopathy. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  4. Neuronal morphology and the synaptic organisation of sympathetic ganglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbins, I L; Jobling, P; Messenger, J P; Teo, E H; Morris, J L

    2000-07-01

    In this article, we provide a short review of the structure and synaptic organisation of the final motor neurons in the sympathetic ganglia of mammals. Combinations of pathway tracing, multiple-labelling immunofluorescence and intracellular dye injection have shown that neurons in different functional pathways differ not only in their patterns of neuropeptide expression, but also in the size of their cell bodies and dendritic fields. Thus, vasoconstrictor neurons consistently are smaller than any other major functional class of neurons. Serial section ultrastructural analysis of dye filled neurons, together with electron microscopic and confocal microscopic analysis of immunolabelled synaptic inputs to sympathetic final motor neurons indicate that synapses are rare and randomly distributed over the surface of the neurons. The total number of synapses is simply proportional to the total surface area of the neurons. Many terminal boutons of peptide-containing preganglionic neurons do not make conventional synapses with target neurons. Furthermore, there is a spatial mismatch in the distribution of peptide-containing terminals and neurons expressing receptors for the corresponding peptides. Together, these results suggest that there are likely to be significant differences in the ways that the final sympathetic motor neurons in distinct functional pathways integrate their synaptic inputs. In at least some pathways, heterosynaptic actions of neuropeptides probably contribute to subtle modulation of ganglionic transmission.

  5. Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexey Kondrashov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to perform a chemical analysis of both Alibernet red wine and an alcohol-free Alibernet red wine extract (AWE and to investigate the effects of AWE on nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species production as well as blood pressure development in normotensive Wistar Kyoto (WKY and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs. Total antioxidant capacity together with total phenolic and selected mineral content was measured in wine and AWE. Young 6-week-old male WKY and SHR were treated with AWE (24,2 mg/kg/day for 3 weeks. Total NOS and SOD activities, eNOS and SOD1 protein expressions, and superoxide production were determined in the tissues. Both antioxidant capacity and phenolic content were significantly higher in AWE compared to wine. The AWE increased NOS activity in the left ventricle, aorta, and kidney of SHR, while it did not change NOS activity in WKY rats. Similarly, increased SOD activity in the plasma and left ventricle was observed in SHR only. There were no changes in eNOS and SOD1 expressions. In conclusion, phenolics and minerals included in AWE may contribute directly to increased NOS and SOD activities of SHR. Nevertheless, 3 weeks of AWE treatment failed to affect blood pressure of SHR.

  6. Gliocyte and synapse analyses in cerebral ganglia of the Chinese mitten crab, Eriocheir sinensis: ultrastructural study

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    H. Zhang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The Chinese mitten crab Eriocheir sinensis is an economically important aquatic species in China. Many studies on gene structure, breeding, and diseases of the crab have been reported. However, knowledge about the organization of the nerve system of the crab remains largely unknown. To study the ultrastructure of the cerebral ganglia of E. sinensis and to compare the histological findings regarding the nerve systems of crustaceans, the cerebral ganglia were observed by transmission electron microscopy. The results showed that four types of gliocytes, including type I, II, III, and IV gliocytes were located in the cerebral ganglia. In addition, three types of synapses were present in the cerebral ganglia, including unidirectional synapses, bidirectional synapses, and combined type synapses. 

  7. Cytokine effects on the basal ganglia and dopamine function: the subcortical source of inflammatory malaise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felger, Jennifer C; Miller, Andrew H

    2012-08-01

    Data suggest that cytokines released during the inflammatory response target subcortical structures including the basal ganglia as well as dopamine function to acutely induce behavioral changes that support fighting infection and wound healing. However, chronic inflammation and exposure to inflammatory cytokines appears to lead to persisting alterations in the basal ganglia and dopamine function reflected by anhedonia, fatigue, and psychomotor slowing. Moreover, reduced neural responses to hedonic reward, decreased dopamine metabolites in the cerebrospinal fluid and increased presynaptic dopamine uptake and decreased turnover have been described. This multiplicity of changes in the basal ganglia and dopamine function suggest fundamental effects of inflammatory cytokines on dopamine synthesis, packaging, release and/or reuptake, which may sabotage and circumvent the efficacy of current treatment approaches. Thus, examination of the mechanisms by which cytokines alter the basal ganglia and dopamine function will yield novel insights into the treatment of cytokine-induced behavioral changes and inflammatory malaise. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Varicella-zoster virus reactivation from multiple ganglia: a case report

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    Hashemilar Mazyar

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Simultaneous involvements of multiple cranial nerve ganglia (geniculate ganglion and peripheral ganglia of cranial nerves VIII, IX and X by varicella-zoster virus and its subsequent activation may result in the characteristic eruptions of herpes zoster cephalicus. Coexistence of facial palsy and involvement of upper cervical dermatomes by varicella-zoster virus is quite rare. Case presentation Here, we report a 71-year-old Iranian man with involvement of multiple sensory ganglia (geniculate ganglion and upper dorsal root ganglia by varicella-zoster virus. He presented with right-sided facial weakness along with vesicular eruptions on the right side of his neck, and second and third cervical dermatomes. Conclusion The present case is an example of herpes zoster cephalicus with cervical nerve involvement. Although resembling Ramsay Hunt syndrome with presence of facial nerve paralysis and accompanying vesicles, involvement of cervical dermatomes is not a feature of the classic Ramsay Hunt syndrome.

  9. Endoscopic considerations treating hydrocephalus caused by basal ganglia and large thalamic tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Roth

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: Endoscopic surgery may potentially play a significant role in the initial management of patients with large basal ganglia and large thalamic tumors causing obstructive hydrocephalus. Technical nuances and individualized goals are crucial for optimal outcomes.

  10. Bilateral symmetrical basal ganglia and thalamic lesions in children: an update (2015)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuccoli, Giulio [Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC, Section of Neuroradiology, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Yannes, Michael Paul [University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Nardone, Raffaele [Paracelsus Medical University, Department of Neurology, Christian Doppler Klinik, Salzburg (Austria); Bailey, Ariel [West Virginia University, Department of Radiology, Morgantown, WV (United States); Goldstein, Amy [Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC, Department of Neurology, Section of Metabolic Disorders and Neurogenetics, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2015-10-15

    In children, many inherited or acquired neurological disorders may cause bilateral symmetrical signal intensity alterations in the basal ganglia and thalami. A literature review was aimed at assisting neuroradiologists, neurologists, infectious diseases specialists, and pediatricians to provide further understanding into the clinical and neuroimaging features in pediatric patients presenting with bilateral symmetrical basal ganglia and thalamic lesions on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We discuss hypoxic-ischemic, toxic, infectious, immune-mediated, mitochondrial, metabolic, and neurodegenerative disorders affecting the basal ganglia and thalami. Recognition and correct evaluation of basal ganglia abnormalities, together with a proper neurological examination and laboratory findings, may enable the identification of each of these clinical entities and lead to earlier diagnosis. (orig.)

  11. Basal ganglia dysfunction in idiopathic REM sleep behaviour disorder parallels that in early Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolinski, Michal; Griffanti, Ludovica; Piccini, Paola; Roussakis, Andreas A; Szewczyk-Krolikowski, Konrad; Menke, Ricarda A; Quinnell, Timothy; Zaiwalla, Zenobia; Klein, Johannes C; Mackay, Clare E; Hu, Michele T M

    2016-08-01

    SEE POSTUMA DOI101093/AWW131 FOR A SCIENTIFIC COMMENTARY ON THIS ARTICLE: Resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging dysfunction within the basal ganglia network is a feature of early Parkinson's disease and may be a diagnostic biomarker of basal ganglia dysfunction. Currently, it is unclear whether these changes are present in so-called idiopathic rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder, a condition associated with a high rate of future conversion to Parkinson's disease. In this study, we explore the utility of resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging to detect basal ganglia network dysfunction in rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder. We compare these data to a set of healthy control subjects, and to a set of patients with established early Parkinson's disease. Furthermore, we explore the relationship between resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging basal ganglia network dysfunction and loss of dopaminergic neurons assessed with dopamine transporter single photon emission computerized tomography, and perform morphometric analyses to assess grey matter loss. Twenty-six patients with polysomnographically-established rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder, 48 patients with Parkinson's disease and 23 healthy control subjects were included in this study. Resting state networks were isolated from task-free functional magnetic resonance imaging data using dual regression with a template derived from a separate cohort of 80 elderly healthy control participants. Resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging parameter estimates were extracted from the study subjects in the basal ganglia network. In addition, eight patients with rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder, 10 with Parkinson's disease and 10 control subjects received (123)I-ioflupane single photon emission computerized tomography. We tested for reduction of basal ganglia network connectivity, and for loss of tracer uptake in rapid eye movement sleep

  12. Deep intracerebral (basal ganglia) haematomas in fatal non-missile head injury in man.

    OpenAIRE

    Adams, J H; Doyle, D.; Graham, D I; Lawrence, A E; McLellan, D R

    1986-01-01

    Deep intracerebral (basal ganglia) haematomas were found post mortem in 63 of 635 fatal non-missile head injuries. In patients with a basal ganglia haematoma, contusions were more severe, there was a reduced incidence of a lucid interval, and there was an increased incidence of road traffic accidents, gliding contusions and diffuse axonal injury than in patients without this type of haematoma. Intracranial haematoma is usually thought to be a secondary event, that is a complication of the ori...

  13. Electrophysiological Evidences of Organization of Cortical Motor Information in the Basal Ganglia

    OpenAIRE

    Hirokazu Iwamuro

    2011-01-01

    During the last two decades, the many developments in the treatment of movement disorders such as Parkinson disease and dystonia have enhanced our understanding on organization of the basal ganglia, and this knowledge has led to other advances in the field. According to many electrophysiological and anatomical findings, it is considered that motor information from different cortical areas is processed through several cortico-basal ganglia loops principally in a parallel fashion and somatotopy...

  14. The Pedunculopontine Tegmental Nucleus as a Motor and Cognitive Interface between the Cerebellum and Basal Ganglia

    OpenAIRE

    Fumika Mori; Ken-ichi Okada; Taishin Nomura; Yasushi Kobayashi

    2016-01-01

    As an important component of ascending activating systems, brainstem cholinergic neurons in the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus (PPTg) are involved in the regulation of motor control (locomotion, posture and gaze) and cognitive processes (attention, learning, and memory). The PPTg is highly interconnected with several regions of the basal ganglia, and one of its key functions is to regulate and relay activity from the basal ganglia. Together, they have been implicated in the motor control ...

  15. The Basal Ganglia as a Substrate for the Multiple Actions of Amphetamines

    OpenAIRE

    Natarajan, Reka; Yamamoto, Bryan K.

    2011-01-01

    Amphetamines are psychostimulant drugs with high abuse potential. Acute and chronic doses of amphetamines affect dopamine (DA) neurotransmission in the basal ganglia. The basal ganglia are a group of subcortical nuclei that are anatomically positioned to integrate cognitive, motor and sensorimotor inputs from the cortex. Amphetamines can differentially alter the functioning of specific BG circuits to produce neurochemical changes that affect cognition, movement, and drug seeking behavior thro...

  16. Changes in the basal ganglia and thalamus following reperfusion after complete cerebral ischaemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujioka, M. [Dept. of Emergency and Critical Care Medicine, Nara Medical Univ. (Japan); Okuchi, K. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Osaka Police Hospital (Japan); Miyamoto, S. [Dept. of Emergency and Critical Care Medicine, Nara Medical Univ. (Japan); Sakaki, T. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Nara Medical Univ. (Japan); Hiramatsu, K. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Nara Medical Univ. (Japan); Tominaga, M. [Dept. of Emergency and Critical Care Medicine, Nara Medical Univ. (Japan); Kamada, Y. [Dept. of Emergency and Critical Care Medicine, Nara Medical Univ. (Japan); Iwasaki, S. [Dept. of Radiology, Nara Medical Univ. (Japan)

    1994-11-01

    We report specific changes bilaterally in the basal ganglia and thalamus following reperfusion after complete cerebral ischaemia. A 69-year-old man, resuscitated after cardiac arrest, showed symmetrical low-density lesions in the head of the caudate nucleus and lentiform nucleus on CT. MRI revealed methaemoglobin derived from minor haemorrhage in the basal ganglia and thalamus, not evident on CT. We suggest that this haemorrhage results from diapedesis of red blood cells through the damaged capillary endothelium following reperfusion. (orig.)

  17. Neuronal activity (c-Fos delineating interactions of the cerebral cortex and basal ganglia

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    Mei-Hong eQiu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The cerebral cortex and basal ganglia (BG form a neural circuit that is disrupted in disorders such as Parkinson’s disease. We found that neuronal activity (c-Fos in the BG followed cortical activity, i.e., high in arousal state and low in sleep state. To determine if cortical activity is necessary for BG activity, we administered atropine to rats to induce a dissociative state resulting in slow-wave EEG but hyperactive motor behaviors. Atropine blocked c-Fos expression in the cortex and BG, despite high c-Fos expression in the sub-cortical arousal neuronal groups and thalamus, indicating that cortical activity is required for BG activation. To identify which glutamate receptors in the BG that mediate cortical inputs, we injected ketamine (NMDA receptor antagonist and 6-cyano-nitroquinoxaline-2, 3-dione (CNQX, a non-NMDA receptor antagonist. Systemic ketamine and CNQX administration revealed that NMDA receptors mediated subthalamic nucleus (STN input to internal globus pallidus (GPi and substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNr, while non-NMDA receptor mediated cortical input to the STN. Both types of glutamate receptors were involved in mediating cortical input to the striatum. Dorsal striatal (caudoputamen, CPu dopamine depletion by 6-hydroxydopamine resulted in reduced activity of the CPu, globus pallidus externa (GPe, and STN but increased activity of the GPi, SNr and putative layer V neurons in the motor cortex. Our results reveal that the cortical activity is necessary for BG activity and clarifies the pathways and properties of the BG-cortical network and their putative role in the pathophysiology of BG disorders.

  18. Electrophysiological Evidences of Organization of Cortical Motor Information in the Basal Ganglia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirokazu Iwamuro

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available During the last two decades, the many developments in the treatment of movement disorders such as Parkinson disease and dystonia have enhanced our understanding on organization of the basal ganglia, and this knowledge has led to other advances in the field. According to many electrophysiological and anatomical findings, it is considered that motor information from different cortical areas is processed through several cortico-basal ganglia loops principally in a parallel fashion and somatotopy from each cortical area is also well preserved in each loop. Moreover, recent studies suggest that not only the parallel processing but also some convergence of information occur through the basal ganglia. Information from cortical areas whose functions are close to each other tends to converge in the basal ganglia. The cortico-basal ganglia loops should be comprehended more as a network rather than as separated subdivisions. However, the functions of this convergence still remain unknown. It is important even for clinical doctors to be well informed about this kind of current knowledge because some symptoms of movement disorders may be explained by disorganization of the information network in the basal ganglia.

  19. The pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus as a motor and cognitive interface between the cerebellum and basal ganglia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fumika Mori

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available As an important component of ascending activating systems, brainstem cholinergic neurons in the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus (PPTg are involved in the regulation of motor control (locomotion, posture and gaze and cognitive processes (attention, learning, and memory. The PPTg is highly interconnected with several regions of the basal ganglia, and one of its key functions is to regulate and relay activity from the basal ganglia. Together, they have been implicated in the motor control system (such as voluntary movement initiation or inhibition, and modulate aspects of executive function (such as motivation. In addition to its intimate connection with the basal ganglia, projections from the PPTg to the cerebellum have been recently reported to synaptically activate the deep cerebellar nuclei. Classically, the cerebellum and basal ganglia were regarded as forming separated anatomical loops that play a distinct functional role in motor and cognitive behavioral control. Here, we suggest that the PPTg may also act as an interface device between the basal ganglia and cerebellum. As such, part of the therapeutic effect of PPTg deep brain stimulation to relieve gait freezing and postural instability in advanced Parkinson’s disease patients might also involve modulation of the cerebellum. We review the anatomical position and role of the PPTg in the pathway of basal ganglia and cerebellum in relation to motor control, cognitive function, and Parkinson’s disease.

  20. Dissociating hippocampal and basal ganglia contributions to category learning using stimulus novelty and subjective judgments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seger, Carol A; Dennison, Christina S; Lopez-Paniagua, Dan; Peterson, Erik J; Roark, Aubrey A

    2011-04-15

    We identified factors leading to hippocampal and basal ganglia recruitment during categorization learning. Subjects alternated between blocks of a standard trial and error category learning task and a subjective judgment task. In the subjective judgments task subjects categorized the stimulus and then instead of receiving feedback they indicated the basis of their response using 4 options: Remember: Conscious episodic memory of previous trials. Know-Automatic: Automatic, rapid response accompanied by conscious awareness of category membership. Know-Intuition: A "gut feeling" without fully conscious knowledge of category membership. Guess: Guessing. In addition, new stimuli were introduced throughout the experiment to examine effects of novelty. Categorization overall recruited both the basal ganglia and posterior hippocampus. However, basal ganglia activity was found during Know judgments (both Automatic and Intuition), whereas posterior hippocampus activity was found during Remember judgments. Granger causality mapping indicated interactions between the basal ganglia and hippocampus, with the putamen exerting directed influence on the posterior hippocampus, which in turn exerted directed influence on the posterior caudate nucleus. We also found a region of anterior hippocampus that showed decreased activity relative to baseline during categorization overall, and showed a strong novelty effect. Our results indicate that subjective measures may be effective in dissociating basal ganglia from hippocampal dependent learning, and that the basal ganglia are involved in both conscious and unconscious learning. They also indicate a dissociation within the hippocampus, in which the anterior regions are sensitive to novelty, and the posterior regions are involved in memory based categorization learning.

  1. Aberrant functional connectivity within the basal ganglia of patients with Parkinson's disease

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    Michal Rolinski

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Resting state functional MRI (rs-fMRI has been previously shown to be a promising tool for the assessment of early Parkinson's disease (PD. In order to assess whether changes within the basal ganglia network (BGN are disease specific or relate to neurodegeneration generally, BGN connectivity was assessed in 32 patients with early PD, 19 healthy controls and 31 patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD. Voxel-wise comparisons demonstrated decreased connectivity within the basal ganglia of patients with PD, when compared to patients with AD and healthy controls. No significant changes within the BGN were seen in AD, when compared to healthy controls. Moreover, measures of functional connectivity extracted from regions within the basal ganglia were significantly lower in the PD group. Consistent with previous radiotracer studies, the greatest change when compared to the healthy control group was seen in the posterior putamen of PD subjects. When combined into a single component score, this method differentiated PD from AD and healthy control subjects, with a diagnostic accuracy of 81%. Rs-fMRI can be used to demonstrate the aberrant functional connectivity within the basal ganglia of patients with early PD. These changes are likely to be representative of patho-physiological basal ganglia dysfunction and are not associated with generalised neurodegeneration seen in AD. Further studies are necessary to ascertain whether this method is sensitive enough to detect basal ganglia dysfunction in prodromal PD, and its utility as a potential diagnostic biomarker for premotor and early motoric disease.

  2. Deep Brain Stimulation for Movement Disorders of Basal Ganglia Origin: Restoring Function or Functionality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wichmann, Thomas; DeLong, Mahlon R

    2016-04-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is highly effective for both hypo- and hyperkinetic movement disorders of basal ganglia origin. The clinical use of DBS is, in part, empiric, based on the experience with prior surgical ablative therapies for these disorders, and, in part, driven by scientific discoveries made decades ago. In this review, we consider anatomical and functional concepts of the basal ganglia relevant to our understanding of DBS mechanisms, as well as our current understanding of the pathophysiology of two of the most commonly DBS-treated conditions, Parkinson's disease and dystonia. Finally, we discuss the proposed mechanism(s) of action of DBS in restoring function in patients with movement disorders. The signs and symptoms of the various disorders appear to result from signature disordered activity in the basal ganglia output, which disrupts the activity in thalamocortical and brainstem networks. The available evidence suggests that the effects of DBS are strongly dependent on targeting sensorimotor portions of specific nodes of the basal ganglia-thalamocortical motor circuit, that is, the subthalamic nucleus and the internal segment of the globus pallidus. There is little evidence to suggest that DBS in patients with movement disorders restores normal basal ganglia functions (e.g., their role in movement or reinforcement learning). Instead, it appears that high-frequency DBS replaces the abnormal basal ganglia output with a more tolerable pattern, which helps to restore the functionality of downstream networks.

  3. The role of the basal ganglia in beat perception: neuroimaging and neuropsychological investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grahn, Jessica A

    2009-07-01

    Perception of musical rhythms is culturally universal. Despite this special status, relatively little is known about the neurobiology of rhythm perception, particularly with respect to beat processing. Findings are presented here from a series of studies that have specifically examined the neural basis of beat perception, using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and studying patients with Parkinson's disease. fMRI data indicate that novel beat-based sequences robustly activate the basal ganglia when compared to irregular, nonbeat sequences. Furthermore, although most healthy participants find it much easier to discriminate changes in beat-based sequences compared to irregular sequences, Parkinson's disease patients fail to show the same degree of benefit. Taken together, these data suggest that the basal ganglia are performing a crucial function in beat processing. The results of an additional fMRI study indicate that the role of the basal ganglia is strongly linked to internal generation of the beat. Basal ganglia activity is greater when participants listen to rhythms in which internal generation of the beat is required, as opposed to rhythms with strongly externally cued beats. Functional connectivity between part of the basal ganglia (the putamen) and cortical motor areas (premotor and supplementary motor areas) is also higher during perception of beat rhythms compared to nonbeat rhythms. Increased connectivity between cortical motor and auditory areas is found in those with musical training. The findings from these converging methods strongly implicate the basal ganglia in processing a regular beat, particularly when internal generation of the beat is required.

  4. The subdiaphragmatic part of the phrenic nerve - morphometry and connections to autonomic ganglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loukas, Marios; Du Plessis, Maira; Louis, Robert G; Tubbs, R Shane; Wartmann, Christopher T; Apaydin, Nihal

    2016-01-01

    Few anatomical textbooks offer much information concerning the anatomy and distribution of the phrenic nerve inferior to the diaphragm. The aim of this study was to identify the subdiaphragmatic distribution of the phrenic nerve, the presence of phrenic ganglia, and possible connections to the celiac plexus. One hundred and thirty formalin-fixed adult cadavers were studied. The right phrenic nerve was found inferior to the diaphragm in 98% with 49.1% displaying a right phrenic ganglion. In 22.8% there was an additional smaller ganglion (right accessory phrenic ganglion). The remaining 50.9% had no grossly identifiable right phrenic ganglion. Most (65.5% of specimens) exhibited plexiform communications with the celiac ganglion, aorticorenal ganglion, and suprarenal gland. The left phrenic nerve inferior to the diaphragm was observed in 60% of specimens with 19% containing a left phrenic ganglion. No accessory left phrenic ganglia were observed. The left phrenic ganglion exhibited plexiform communications to several ganglia in 71.4% of specimens. Histologically, the right phrenic and left phrenic ganglia contained large soma concentrated in their peripheries. Both phrenic nerves and ganglia were closely related to the diaphragmatic crura. Surgically, sutures to approximate the crura for repair of hiatal hernias must be placed above the ganglia in order to avoid iatrogenic injuries to the autonomic supply to the diaphragm and abdomen. These findings could also provide a better understanding of the anatomy and distribution of the fibers of that autonomic supply.

  5. Alteration of P2X3 expression in dorsal root ganglia after sciatic nerve ligation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guoxing Zhou; Lesi Xie; Qiben Wang; Qingping Yu; Xiaofu Liu; Qiumei Liu; Wei Peng; Zhicheng Zeng

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The expressions of P2X3 receptor in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) after different peripheral nerve injuries are diverse. It indicates the different roles of P2X3 in different models-caused neuropathologic pains.OBJECTIVE: To observe the expressions of P2X3 in corresponding DRG after sciatic nerve ligation in rats.DESIGN: Controlled observation experiment.SETTING: Department of Morphology, Hunan Traditional Chinese Medical College; Department of Human Anatomy and Neurobiology, Xiangya Medical College, Central South University.MATERIALS: Thirty-five healthy adult SD rats of clean grade an d either gender, weighing (200±20) g,were involved. According to the random digits table, the involved rats were randomized into 3 groups:normal group (n =5), sham-operated group (n =5) and experimental group (n =25). The experimental group were subdivided into 3, 7, 14, 21, 28 days groups according to different surviving time after operation, 5 rats at each time point. Polyclonal rabbit anti-P2X3 antibody (ABCAM company); biotinylated goat anti-rabbit IgG (Zhongshanjingqiao Biotechnical Co., Ltd., Beijing); Motic fluorescence microscope (Motic, Germany).METHODS: The experiments were carried out in the Department of Human Anatomy and Neurobiology,Xiangya Medical College, Central South University from June to December 2006. ① Rats of experimental group were created into models by ligation of right sciatic nerve according to the method of Seltzer et al. Left sciatic nerve was used as self-control. As for rats in the sham-operated group, ligation of sciatic nerve was omitted, but other procedures were the same as those in the experimental group. Rats of normal group were untouched. ② Rats of the normal group and sham-operated group survived for 14 days separately, and those of experimental group survived for corresponding time. After being deeply anesthetized by intraperitoneal injection of over-dose sodium pentobarbital, the rats of experimental group were transcardially

  6. Refractory epilepsy and basal ganglia: the role of seizure frequency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouilleret, V.; Trebossen, R.; Mantzerides, M.; Semah, F.; Ribeiro, M.J. [Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot, I2BM/DSV, CEA, 91 - Orsay (France); Bouilleret, V. [CHU Bicetre, Unite de Neurophysiologie et d' Epileptologie, AP-HP, 75 - Paris (France); Chassoux, F. [Hopital Saint Anne, Service de Neurochirurgie, 75 - Paris (France); Biraben, A. [CHU, Service de Neurologie, Hopital Pontchaillou, 35 - Rennes (France)

    2008-02-15

    Objectives. - A decrease of [{sup 18}F]Fluoro-L-DOPA uptake in basal ganglia (B.G.) was recently reported in medically refractory epilepsy. The purpose of this study was to assess the involvement of dopaminergic neurotransmission in refractory Temporal Lobe Epilepsy (T.L.E.) and its relationship to glucose metabolism and morphological changes. Methods. - Twelve T.L.E. patients were studied using [{sup 18}F]FDG PET, [{sup 18}F]Fluoro-L-DOPA PET and MRI and compared with healthy control volunteers. Morphological cerebral changes were assessed using Voxel-Based Morphometry (V.B.M.). Student t test statistical maps of functional and morphological differences between patients and controls were obtained using a general linear model. Results. - In T.L.E. patients, [{sup 18}F]Fluoro-L-DOPA uptake was reduced to the same extent in caudate and putamen in both cerebral hemispheres as well as in the substantia nigra (S.N.). These dopaminergic functional alterations occurred without any glucose metabolism changes in these areas. The only mild morphological abnormality was found in striatal regions without any changes in the S.N.. Conclusion. - The present study provides support for dopaminergic neurotransmission involvement in T.L.E.. The discrepancies between G.M.V. atrophy and the pattern of [{sup 18}F]Fluoro-L-DOPA suggest that B.G. involvement is not related to structural subcortical abnormalities. A functional decrease can be ruled out as there was no change of the glycolytic pathway metabolism in these areas. (authors)

  7. Caffeine Ingestion Increases Estimated Glycolytic Metabolism during Taekwondo Combat Simulation but Does Not Improve Performance or Parasympathetic Reactivation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Paulo Lopes-Silva

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of caffeine ingestion on performance and estimated energy system contribution during simulated taekwondo combat and on post-exercise parasympathetic reactivation.Ten taekwondo athletes completed two experimental sessions separated by at least 48 hours. Athletes consumed a capsule containing either caffeine (5 mg∙kg-1 or placebo (cellulose one hour before the combat simulation (3 rounds of 2 min separated by 1 min passive recovery, in a double-blind, randomized, repeated-measures crossover design. All simulated combat was filmed to quantify the time spent fighting in each round. Lactate concentration and rating of perceived exertion were measured before and after each round, while heart rate (HR and the estimated contribution of the oxidative (WAER, ATP-PCr (WPCR, and glycolytic (W[La-] systems were calculated during the combat simulation. Furthermore, parasympathetic reactivation after the combat simulation was evaluated through 1 taking absolute difference between the final HR observed at the end of third round and the HR recorded 60-s after (HRR60s, 2 taking the time constant of HR decay obtained by fitting the 6-min post-exercise HRR into a first-order exponential decay curve (HRRτ, or by 3 analyzing the first 30-s via logarithmic regression analysis (T30.Caffeine ingestion increased estimated glycolytic energy contribution in relation to placebo (12.5 ± 1.7 kJ and 8.9 ± 1.2 kJ, P = 0.04. However, caffeine did not improve performance as measured by attack number (CAF: 26. 7 ± 1.9; PLA: 27.3 ± 2.1, P = 0.48 or attack time (CAF: 33.8 ± 1.9 s; PLA: 36.6 ± 4.5 s, P = 0.58. Similarly, RPE (CAF: 11.7 ± 0.4 a.u.; PLA: 11.5 ± 0.3 a.u., P = 0.62, HR (CAF: 170 ± 3.5 bpm; PLA: 174.2 bpm, P = 0.12, oxidative (CAF: 109.3 ± 4.5 kJ; PLA: 107.9 kJ, P = 0.61 and ATP-PCr energy contributions (CAF: 45.3 ± 3.4 kJ; PLA: 46.8 ± 3.6 kJ, P = 0.72 during the combat simulation were unaffected. Furthermore

  8. Caffeine Ingestion Increases Estimated Glycolytic Metabolism during Taekwondo Combat Simulation but Does Not Improve Performance or Parasympathetic Reactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes-Silva, João Paulo; Silva Santos, Jonatas Ferreira da; Branco, Braulio Henrique Magnani; Abad, César Cavinato Cal; Oliveira, Luana Farias de; Loturco, Irineu; Franchini, Emerson

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of caffeine ingestion on performance and estimated energy system contribution during simulated taekwondo combat and on post-exercise parasympathetic reactivation. Ten taekwondo athletes completed two experimental sessions separated by at least 48 hours. Athletes consumed a capsule containing either caffeine (5 mg∙kg-1) or placebo (cellulose) one hour before the combat simulation (3 rounds of 2 min separated by 1 min passive recovery), in a double-blind, randomized, repeated-measures crossover design. All simulated combat was filmed to quantify the time spent fighting in each round. Lactate concentration and rating of perceived exertion were measured before and after each round, while heart rate (HR) and the estimated contribution of the oxidative (WAER), ATP-PCr (WPCR), and glycolytic (W[La-]) systems were calculated during the combat simulation. Furthermore, parasympathetic reactivation after the combat simulation was evaluated through 1) taking absolute difference between the final HR observed at the end of third round and the HR recorded 60-s after (HRR60s), 2) taking the time constant of HR decay obtained by fitting the 6-min post-exercise HRR into a first-order exponential decay curve (HRRτ), or by 3) analyzing the first 30-s via logarithmic regression analysis (T30). Caffeine ingestion increased estimated glycolytic energy contribution in relation to placebo (12.5 ± 1.7 kJ and 8.9 ± 1.2 kJ, P = 0.04). However, caffeine did not improve performance as measured by attack number (CAF: 26. 7 ± 1.9; PLA: 27.3 ± 2.1, P = 0.48) or attack time (CAF: 33.8 ± 1.9 s; PLA: 36.6 ± 4.5 s, P = 0.58). Similarly, RPE (CAF: 11.7 ± 0.4 a.u.; PLA: 11.5 ± 0.3 a.u., P = 0.62), HR (CAF: 170 ± 3.5 bpm; PLA: 174.2 bpm, P = 0.12), oxidative (CAF: 109.3 ± 4.5 kJ; PLA: 107.9 kJ, P = 0.61) and ATP-PCr energy contributions (CAF: 45.3 ± 3.4 kJ; PLA: 46.8 ± 3.6 kJ, P = 0.72) during the combat simulation were unaffected

  9. Involvement of the parasympathetic nervous system in the initiation of regeneration of pancreatic β-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Anya; Yamada, Satoko; Hara, Akemi; Hamamoto, Kohei; Kojima, Itaru

    2013-01-01

    The mechanism that initiates regeneration of pancreatic β-cells is not clear at present. The vagal nerve is implicated in the regulation of gastrointestinal functions, glucose metabolism and proliferation of pancreatic β-cells under physiological conditions. To elucidate the triggering mechanism of the regeneration of pancreatic β-cells, we examined the involvement of the vagal nerve. To this end, we employed a rat pancreatic duct ligation (DL) model, in which profound β-cell neogenesis and β-cell proliferation were observed within a week. We administered atropine to block the vagal nerve. Administration of atropine inhibited proliferation of β-cells in both islets and islet-like cell clusters (ICC), without affecting ductal cell proliferation in the ligated pancreas. The numbers of PDX-1 and MafB-positive cells in or attaching to the ducts were significantly reduced by atropine. MafB/glucagon and MafB/insulin double-positive cells were also decreased by atropine. Finally, atropine reduced the number of MafA-positive ductal cells, all of which were positive for insulin, by 50% on day 5. These results strongly suggest that the vagal nerve is involved in β-cell proliferation, induction of endocrine progenitors and neogenesis of α- and β-cells.

  10. The effect of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on neuropathic pain and nNOS in dorsal root ganglia in a rat model%低频和高频重复经颅磁刺激对大鼠神经病理性疼痛及背根神经节内nNOS的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭铁成; 许惊飞

    2014-01-01

    Objective In order to explore the mechanism of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation rTMS) on neuropathic pain,we observed the effect of different frequencies of rTMS on neuropathic pain and the expression of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG).Methods A total of 28 male Sprague-Dawley rats were used and divided into a control group,in which sham-operation was performed,and an experimental group which was further divided into a sham-rTMS group,a 1 Hz group and a 20 Hz group after successful neuropathic pain model was established by operation to ligate the left sciatic nerves,with 7 rats in each group.Three days after the operation,rTMS was applied to the primary motor cortex (M1) contralateral to the pain once dai ly for 10 consecutive days.The pain behavior and nNOS expression in the DRG were measured before and after 10 days of rTMS intervention.Results All the neuropathic pain model rats demonstrated pain-related behaviors 3 days postoperation,the mechanical pain thresholds were significantly lower than those in the control group (P < 0.05).After rTMS treatment,the mechanical hyperalgsia was significantly relieved in 20 Hz group but not 1 Hz group as demonstrated by a comparison with the sham-rTMS group (P < 0.05).The expression of nNOS in DRG ipsilateral to the neuropathic pain was significantly increased in sham-rTMS group and 1 Hz group (P < 0.05) when compared with the control group.Meanwhile,it was shown that expression of nNOS was down-regulated in 20 Hz group but not 1 Hz group (P < 0.05).The degree of pain relief in 20 Hz group was negatively correlated with the expression of nNOS in DRG (P <0.05).Conclusions Neuropathic pain induced by peripheral nerve injury is associated with elevated expression of nNOS in the DRG.High-frequency rTMS can relieve neuropathic pain through down-regulating the overexpression of nNOS in the DRG,but the low-frequency rTMS has no such effect.%目的 观察不同频率的

  11. Clock face model applied to tibial intraneural ganglia in the popliteal fossa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spinner, Robert J. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Neurologic Surgery, Rochester, MN (United States); Mayo Clinic, Department of Orthopedics, Rochester, MN (United States); Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Hebert-Blouin, Marie-Noelle [Mayo Clinic, Department of Neurologic Surgery, Rochester, MN (United States); Maniker, Allen H. [Beth Israel Hospital, Department of Neurosurgery, New York, NY (United States); Amrami, Kimberly K. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Neurologic Surgery, Rochester, MN (United States); Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2009-07-15

    Tibial intraneural ganglia occurring in the popliteal fossa are often misdiagnosed because of their relative rarity. Their joint connection is typically not recognized and therefore not treated, leading to recurrence. This is a retrospective clinical study. Magnetic resonance images (MRIs) of six patients with confirmed tibial intraneural ganglia arising from the superior tibiofibular joint were analyzed and were compared to ten individuals with normal tibial nerves who were imaged with MRI. All studies were interpreted as left-sided. A previously designed clock face model introduced for peroneal intraneural ganglia was used to describe the superior tibiofibular joint connection (tail sign). A single axial image was sought to determine the normal anatomic and pathologic relationships of the tibial nerve and tibial articular branch to the superior tibiofibular joint. In all patients with intraneural ganglia, a single conventional axial image at the mid-fibular head level could reliably demonstrate: (1) intraneural cyst within the articular branch at the superior tibiofibular joint connection (tail sign) between 8 and 9 o'clock and intraneural cyst within the tibial nerve, (2) the central location of the tibial nerve posterior to the tibia, and (3) popliteus muscle denervation changes and atrophy (popliteus sign). This technique can provide radiologists and surgeons with rapid and reproducible information for diagnosis and treatment planning of tibial intraneural ganglia. Similar to its use with the clock face model in peroneal intraneural ganglia, a standard axial image at the mid-fibular head level can be used to interpret key features of tibial intraneural ganglia and identify the joint connection. Improved identification of the presence of a joint connection will change the therapeutic approach of this pathology and reduce cyst recurrences. (orig.)

  12. Exercise training-induced bradycardia: evidence for enhanced parasympathetic regulation without changes in intrinsic sinoatrial node function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cagnoli, Kristen L.; Csepe, Thomas; Li, Ning; Wright, Patrick; Mohler, Peter J.; Fedorov, Vadim V.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms responsible for exercise-induced reductions in baseline heart rate (HR), known as training bradycardia, remain controversial. Therefore, changes in cardiac autonomic regulation and intrinsic sinoatrial nodal (SAN) rate were evaluated using dogs randomly assigned to either a 10- to 12-wk exercise training (Ex, n = 15) or an equivalent sedentary period (Sed, n = 10). Intrinsic HR was revealed by combined autonomic nervous system (ANS) blockade (propranolol + atropine, iv) before and after completion of the study. At the end of the study, SAN function was further evaluated by examining the SAN recovery time (SNRT) following rapid atrial pacing and the response to adenosine in anesthetized animals. As expected, both the response to submaximal exercise and baseline HR significantly (P heart rate variability (HRV; e.g., high-frequency R-R interval variability) significantly (P change in the Sed group. Atropine also induced significantly (P changes in both groups. In contrast, neither intrinsic HR (Ex before, 141.2 ± 6.7; Ex after, 146.0 ± 8.0 vs. Sed before, 143.3 ± 11.1; Sed after, 141.0 ± 11.3 beats per minute), the response to adenosine, corrected SNRT, nor atrial fibrosis and atrial fibrillation inducibility differed in the Ex group vs. the Sed group. These data suggest that in a large-animal model, training bradycardia results from an enhanced cardiac parasympathetic regulation and not from changes in intrinsic properties of the SAN. PMID:25749448

  13. Sympathetic and parasympathetic activity in cancer-related fatigue: more evidence for a physiological substrate in cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagundes, Christopher P; Murray, David M; Hwang, Beom Seuk; Gouin, Jean-Philippe; Thayer, Julian F; Sollers, John J; Shapiro, Charles L; Malarkey, William B; Kiecolt-Glaser, Janice K

    2011-09-01

    Fatigue is a notable clinical problem in cancer survivors, and understanding its pathophysiology is important. This study evaluated relationships between fatigue and both sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous system activity in breast cancer survivors. Norepinephrine and heart rate variability (HRV) were evaluated at rest, as well as during and after a standardized laboratory speech and mental arithmetic stressor. The participants, 109 women who had completed treatment for stage 0-IIIA breast cancer within the past two years, were at least two months post surgery, radiation or chemotherapy, whichever occurred last. Women who reported more fatigue had significantly higher norepinephrine and lower HRV before and after the stressor than their less fatigued counterparts. Fatigue was not related to treatment or disease variables including treatment type, cancer stage, time since diagnosis, and time since treatment. Importantly, the relationship between HRV and cancer-related fatigue was sizeable. Based on research that has demonstrated characteristic age-related HRV decrements, our findings suggest a 20-year difference between fatigued and non-fatigued cancer survivors, raising the possibility that fatigue may signify accelerated aging. Furthermore, lower HRV and elevated norepinephrine have been associated with a number of adverse health outcomes; accordingly, fatigue may also signal the need for increased vigilance to other health threats.

  14. Imaging features of intraosseous ganglia: a report of 45 cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, H.J.; Davies, A.M.; Allen, G.; Evans, N. [Royal Orthopaedic Hospital, Department of Radiology, Birmingham (United Kingdom); Mangham, D.C. [Royal Orthopaedic Hospital, Department of Pathology, Birmingham (United Kingdom)

    2004-10-01

    The aim of this study is to report the spectrum of imaging findings of intraosseous ganglia (IG) with particular emphasis on the radiographic and magnetic resonance (MR) features. Forty-five patients with a final diagnosis of IG were referred to a specialist orthopaedic oncology service with the presumptive diagnosis of either a primary or secondary bone tumour. The diagnosis was established by histology in 25 cases. In the remainder, the imaging features were considered characteristic and the lesion was stable on follow-up radiographic examination. Radiographs were available for retrospective review in all cases and MR imaging in 29. There was a minor male preponderance with a wide adult age range. Three quarters were found in relation to the weight-bearing long bones of the lower limb, particularly round the knee. On radiographs all were juxta-articular and osteolytic; 74% were eccentric in location, 80% had a sclerotic endosteal margin and 60% of cases showed a degree of trabeculation. Periosteal new bone formation and matrix mineralization were not present. Of the 29 cases that underwent MR imaging, 66% were multiloculated. On T1-weighted images the IG contents were isointense or mildly hypointense in 90% cases. Forty-one per cent of the cases showed a slightly hyperintense rim lining that enhanced with a gadolinium chelate. Thirty-eight per cent were associated with soft tissue extension and 17% with a defect of the adjacent articular cortex. Fifty-five per cent showed surrounding marrow oedema on T2-weighted or STIR images and two cases (7%) a fluid-fluid level prior to any surgical intervention. The authors contend that it is semantics to differentiate between an IG and a degenerate subchondral cyst as, while the initial pathogenesis may vary, the histological endpoint is identical, as are the imaging features apart from the degree of associated degenerative joint disease. IGs, particularly when large, may be mistaken for a bone tumour. Correlation of the

  15. Proceedings of a symposium on the neurobiology of the basal ganglia. Glasgow, United Kingdom, July 1999.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-05-01

    The basal ganglia occupy a commanding place in neuroscience research, in clinical neurology and in biomedical education. The paucity of our understanding of the role of the basal ganglia in normal everyday life combined with our more extensive knowledge of their deficiencies in a variety of clinical syndromes is a potent spur to continuing investigation. That some of these neurodegenerative syndromes-such as Parkinson's disease-are already common only heightens the need for insight in the face of a population with increasing expectations of longevity. About a decade ago an explosion of information on the connectivity and immunocytochemistry of forebrain structures gave rise to concepts which have shaped the fabric of basal ganglia theory-'patch and matrix', 'disinhibition', 'parallel circuits'. Some of these ideas seemed to facilitate an understanding of the basal ganglia, others to render them more complex and impenetrable. Perhaps unsurprisingly, the work of the last decade has tended towards consolidation and refinement. However, several new developments are receiving attention, many of them related to disorders of the basal ganglia. The realisation that some forms of Parkinson's disease have a genetic determinant is gaining strength. The molecular biology of the dopaminergic synapse on the one hand and of the production of insoluble proteins on the other will clearly influence future research into therapeutic options and neuroprotection. The importance of apoptosis, neural plasticity and free radical formation remains unresolved but these are potential areas of promise. Meanwhile, scanning techniques for brain imaging are allowing real time investigation of the working striatum in normal and disordered humans and animals.We believe that the time is opportune for a broad review of current thinking on the basal ganglia in health and disease. The following articles are based on presentations given at a Symposium on the Neurobiology of the Basal Ganglia held at

  16. Exploring the cognitive and motor functions of the basal ganglia: An integrative review of computational cognitive neuroscience models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastien eHelie

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Many computational models of the basal ganglia have been proposed over the past twenty-five years. While computational neuroscience models have focused on closely matching the neurobiology of the basal ganglia, computational cognitive neuroscience models have focused on how the basal ganglia can be used to implement cognitive and motor functions. This review article focuses on computational cognitive neuroscience models of the basal ganglia and how they use the neuroanatomy of the basal ganglia to account for cognitive and motor functions such as categorization, instrumental conditioning, probabilistic learning, working memory, sequence learning, automaticity, reaching, handwriting, and eye saccades. A total of 19 basal ganglia models accounting for one or more of these functions are reviewed and compared. The review concludes with a discussion of the limitations of existing computational cognitive neuroscience models of the basal ganglia and prescriptions for future modeling, including the need for computational models of the basal ganglia that can simultaneously account for cognitive and motor functions, and the need for a more complete specification of the role of the basal ganglia in behavioral functions.

  17. Diffusion tensor imaging of basal ganglia and thalamus in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Khema R; Sheriff, Sulaiman; Maudsley, Andrew; Govind, Varan

    2013-07-01

    To assess the involvement of basal ganglia and thalamus in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) method. Fourteen definite-ALS patients and 12 age-matched controls underwent whole brain DTI on a 3T scanner. Mean-diffusivity (MD) and fractional anisotropy (FA) were obtained bilaterally from the basal ganglia and thalamus in the regions-of-interest (ROIs). The MD was significantly higher (P < .02) in basal ganglia and thalamus in patients with ALS compared with controls. Correspondingly, the FA was significantly lower (P < .02) in these structures, except in caudate (P = .04) and putamen (P = .06) in patients compared with controls. There were mild to strong correlations (r = .3-.7) between the DTI measures of basal ganglia and finger-tap, foot-tap, and lip-and-tongue movement rate. The increased MD in basal ganglia and thalamus and decreased FA in globus pallidus and thalamus are indicative of neuronal loss or dysfunction in these structures. Copyright © 2012 by the American Society of Neuroimaging.

  18. Latency-associated transcripts of equine herpesvirus type 4 in trigeminal ganglia of naturally infected horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borchers, K; Wolfinger, U; Ludwig, H

    1999-08-01

    Equine herpesvirus type 4 (EHV-4) is a major respiratory pathogen of horses. Unlike most other members of the Alphaherpesvirinae, EHV-4 was regarded as non-neurotropic. Here, neural and lymphoid tissues of 17 horses have been analysed post-mortem. EHV-4 DNA was detected in 11 cases (65%) by PCR, exclusively in the trigeminal ganglia. In order to define the transcriptional activity, RNA preparations of 10 EHV-4 DNA-positive ganglia were investigated by nested RT-PCR. EHV-4-specific transcripts derived from genes 63 [herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) ICPO gene homologue] and 64 (HSV-1 ICP4 gene homologue) were detected in six trigeminal ganglia. In one other case, only gene 64-specific transcripts were present. All of the transcripts proved to be antisense orientated when a strand-specific RT-PCR was applied. Type-specific primers for gene 33 (encoding glycoprotein B) served to detect transcripts of an acute EHV-4-infection, which were found in only one of the six ganglia positive for gene 63- and gene 64-specific transcripts. Overall, these studies clearly demonstrate that EHV-4 is latent in trigeminal ganglia.

  19. Anatomy of the nerves and ganglia of the aortic plexus in males

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beveridge, Tyler S; Johnson, Marjorie; Power, Adam; Power, Nicholas E; Allman, Brian L

    2015-01-01

    It is well accepted that the aortic plexus is a network of pre- and post-ganglionic nerves overlying the abdominal aorta, which is primarily involved with the sympathetic innervation to the mesenteric, pelvic and urogenital organs. Because a comprehensive anatomical description of the aortic plexus and its connections with adjacent plexuses are lacking, these delicate structures are prone to unintended damage during abdominal surgeries. Through dissection of fresh, frozen human cadavers (n = 7), the present study aimed to provide the first complete mapping of the nerves and ganglia of the aortic plexus in males. Using standard histochemical procedures, ganglia of the aortic plexus were verified through microscopic analysis using haematoxylin & eosin (H&E) and anti-tyrosine hydroxylase stains. All specimens exhibited four distinct sympathetic ganglia within the aortic plexus: the right and left spermatic ganglia, the inferior mesenteric ganglion and one previously unidentified ganglion, which has been named the prehypogastric ganglion by the authors. The spermatic ganglia were consistently supplied by the L1 lumbar splanchnic nerves and the inferior mesenteric ganglion and the newly characterized prehypogastric ganglion were supplied by the left and right L2 lumbar splanchnic nerves, respectively. Additionally, our examination revealed the aortic plexus does have potential for variation, primarily in the possibility of exhibiting accessory splanchnic nerves. Clinically, our results could have significant implications for preserving fertility in men as well as sympathetic function to the hindgut and pelvis during retroperitoneal surgeries. PMID:25382240

  20. Childhood onset generalised dystonia can be modelled by increased gain in the indirect basal ganglia pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanger, T D

    2003-11-01

    Clinical experience suggests an important role of the indirect basal ganglia pathway in the genesis of childhood onset generalised dystonia, but it has been difficult to reconcile the increased muscle activity in dystonia with the current model of basal ganglia function in which the indirect pathway is considered primarily inhibitory. The aim of this study was to present a modification of the direct-indirect pathway model, in which the indirect pathway is inverting rather than purely inhibitory, so that while high signals are inhibited, low signals are amplified. As the basal ganglia may be a feedback loop that modifies cortical activity, instability from excessive gain in this feedback loop could explain features of dystonia. A detailed mathematical model is provided, together with simulations of cortical cell population spiking behaviour when connected through a basal ganglia loop. The simulations show that increased gain in the indirect pathway relative to the direct pathway can lead to unstable uncontrolled synchronous oscillations in cortex and basal ganglia. This behaviour could result in dystonia. The model provides a consistent explanation for the association of dystonia with parkinsonism and disorders characterised by dopamine depletion, the ability to treat some dystonias with dopamine, the ability of neuroleptic drug treatment to cause an acute dystonic reaction treatable with anticholinergic drugs, and the ability of pallidotomy or deep brain stimulation of the internal pallidum to alleviate symptoms of generalised dystonia.

  1. Acute bilateral basal ganglia lesions in diabetic uraemia: diffusion-weighted MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Eun Ja; Park, Chan Sup [Kwandong University, College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Myongji Hospital, Koyang-City, Gyunggi-Do (Korea); Park, Jong-Ho [Myongji Hospital, Kwandong University, College of Medicine, Department of Neurology, Koyang (Korea); Ihn, Yon kwon; Kim, Young Joo [The Catholic University of Korea, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea); Lee, Seon Kyu [University of Toronto, Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto (Canada)

    2007-12-15

    We studied four patients with diabetes mellitus and chronic renal failure who developed sudden choreic movement disorders. The clinical manifestations, laboratory findings, MR imaging findings, and clinical outcome in each patient were evaluated. All four patients had long-term diabetes mellitus and severe azotaemia. Brain MR findings consisted of bilateral symmetric basal ganglia lesions, with decreased signal intensity on T1-weighted images and increased signal intensity on T2-weighted images. All three patients who underwent diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI) showed signal intensities similar to those of the surroundings in regions corresponding to increased signal intensity on T2-weighted images, with slightly increased apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values. Two of the patients showed small focal areas of restricted diffusion within the basal ganglia lesions. After haemodialysis, follow-up MR imaging in all patients demonstrated that the basal ganglia lesions had regressed markedly, with some residual changes. The movement disorders also improved in all patients. A syndrome associated with acute bilateral basal ganglia lesions in diabetic uraemic patients is rare, with reversible changes demonstrated by clinical and imaging findings. DWI showed that the bilateral basal ganglia lesions in this syndrome were primarily vasogenic in origin, although there were small foci of cytotoxic oedema within the lesions. (orig.)

  2. Chronological changes in nonhaemorrhagic brain infarcts with short T1 in the cerebellum and basal ganglia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komiyama, M.; Nakajima, H.; Nishikawa, M.; Yasui, T. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Osaka City General Hospital, Miyakojima-Hondouri, Miyakojima, Osaka (Japan)

    2000-07-01

    Our purpose was to investigate nonhaemorrhagic infarcts with a short T1 in the cerebellum and basal ganglia. We carried out repeat MRI on 12 patients with infarcts in the cerebellum or basal ganglia with a short T1. Cerebellar cortical lesions showed high signal on T1-weighted spin-echo images beginning at 2 weeks, which became prominent from 3 weeks to 2 months, and persisted for as long as 14 months after the ictus. The basal ganglia lesions demonstrated slightly high signal from a week after the ictus, which became more intense thereafter. Signal intensity began to fade gradually after 2 months. High signal could be seen at the periphery until 5 months, and then disappeared, while low or isointense signal, seen in the central portion from day 20, persisted thereafter. (orig.)

  3. MR-DTI and PET multimodal imaging of dopamine release within subdivisions of basal ganglia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tziortzi, A.; Searle, G.; Tsoumpas, C.; Long, C.; Shotbolt, P.; Rabiner, E.; Jenkinson, M.; Gunn, R. N.

    2011-09-01

    The basal ganglia is a group of anatomical nuclei, functionally organised into limbic, associative and sensorimotor regions, which plays a central role in dopamine related neurological and psychiatric disorders. In this study, we combine two imaging modalities to enable the measurement of dopamine release in functionally related subdivisions of the basal ganglia. [11C]-(+)-PHNO Positron Emission Tomography (PET) measurements in the living human brain pre- and post-administration of amphetamine allow for the estimation of regional dopamine release. Combined Magnetic Resonance Diffusion Tensor Imaging (MR-DTI) data allows for the definition of functional territories of the basal ganglia from connectivity information. The results suggest that there is a difference in dopamine release among the connectivity derived functional subdivisions. Dopamine release is highest in the limbic area followed by the sensorimotor and then the associative area with this pattern reflected in both striatum and pallidum.

  4. Cross-Excitation in Peripheral Sensory Ganglia Associated with Pain Transmission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsuhiro Omoto

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Despite the absence of synaptic contacts, cross-excitation of neurons in sensory ganglia during signal transmission is considered to be chemically mediated and appears increased in chronic pain states. In this study, we modulated neurotransmitter release in sensory neurons by direct application of type A botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT/A to sensory ganglia in an animal model of neuropathic pain and evaluated the effect of this treatment on nocifensive. Unilateral sciatic nerve entrapment (SNE reduced the ipsilateral hindpaw withdrawal threshold to mechanical stimulation and reduced hindpaw withdrawal latency to thermal stimulation. Direct application of BoNT/A to the ipsilateral L4 dorsal root ganglion (DRG was localized in the cell bodies of the DRG and reversed the SNE-induced decreases in withdrawal thresholds within 2 days of BoNT/A administration. Results from this study suggest that neurotransmitter release within sensory ganglia is involved in the regulation of pain-related signal transmission.

  5. A humanized version of Foxp2 affects cortico-basal ganglia circuits in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enard, Wolfgang; Gehre, Sabine; Hammerschmidt, Kurt; Hölter, Sabine M; Blass, Torsten; Somel, Mehmet; Brückner, Martina K; Schreiweis, Christiane; Winter, Christine; Sohr, Reinhard; Becker, Lore; Wiebe, Victor; Nickel, Birgit; Giger, Thomas; Müller, Uwe; Groszer, Matthias; Adler, Thure; Aguilar, Antonio; Bolle, Ines; Calzada-Wack, Julia; Dalke, Claudia; Ehrhardt, Nicole; Favor, Jack; Fuchs, Helmut; Gailus-Durner, Valérie; Hans, Wolfgang; Hölzlwimmer, Gabriele; Javaheri, Anahita; Kalaydjiev, Svetoslav; Kallnik, Magdalena; Kling, Eva; Kunder, Sandra; Mossbrugger, Ilona; Naton, Beatrix; Racz, Ildikó; Rathkolb, Birgit; Rozman, Jan; Schrewe, Anja; Busch, Dirk H; Graw, Jochen; Ivandic, Boris; Klingenspor, Martin; Klopstock, Thomas; Ollert, Markus; Quintanilla-Martinez, Leticia; Schulz, Holger; Wolf, Eckhard; Wurst, Wolfgang; Zimmer, Andreas; Fisher, Simon E; Morgenstern, Rudolf; Arendt, Thomas; de Angelis, Martin Hrabé; Fischer, Julia; Schwarz, Johannes; Pääbo, Svante

    2009-05-29

    It has been proposed that two amino acid substitutions in the transcription factor FOXP2 have been positively selected during human evolution due to effects on aspects of speech and language. Here, we introduce these substitutions into the endogenous Foxp2 gene of mice. Although these mice are generally healthy, they have qualitatively different ultrasonic vocalizations, decreased exploratory behavior and decreased dopamine concentrations in the brain suggesting that the humanized Foxp2 allele affects basal ganglia. In the striatum, a part of the basal ganglia affected in humans with a speech deficit due to a nonfunctional FOXP2 allele, we find that medium spiny neurons have increased dendrite lengths and increased synaptic plasticity. Since mice carrying one nonfunctional Foxp2 allele show opposite effects, this suggests that alterations in cortico-basal ganglia circuits might have been important for the evolution of speech and language in humans.

  6. Hypofractionated Stereotactic Radiosurgery in a Large Bilateral Thalamic and Basal Ganglia Arteriovenous Malformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet Lee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Arteriovenous malformations (AVMs in the basal ganglia and thalamus have a more aggressive natural history with a higher morbidity and mortality than AVMs in other locations. Optimal treatment—complete obliteration without new neurological deficits—is often challenging. We present a patient with a large bilateral basal ganglia and thalamic AVM successfully treated with hypofractionated stereotactic radiosurgery (HFSRS with intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT. Methods. The patient was treated with hypofractionated stereotactic radiosurgery to 30 Gy at margin in 5 fractions of 9 static fields with a minimultileaf collimator and intensity modulated radiotherapy. Results. At 10 months following treatment, digital subtraction angiography showed complete obliteration of the AVM. Conclusions. Large bilateral thalamic and basal ganglia AVMs can be successfully treated with complete obliteration by HFSRS with IMRT with relatively limited toxicity. Appropriate caution is recommended.

  7. Dopaminergic Control of the Exploration-Exploitation Trade-Off via the Basal Ganglia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, Mark D.; Khamassi, Mehdi; Gurney, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    We continuously face the dilemma of choosing between actions that gather new information or actions that exploit existing knowledge. This “exploration-exploitation” trade-off depends on the environment: stability favors exploiting knowledge to maximize gains; volatility favors exploring new options and discovering new outcomes. Here we set out to reconcile recent evidence for dopamine’s involvement in the exploration-exploitation trade-off with the existing evidence for basal ganglia control of action selection, by testing the hypothesis that tonic dopamine in the striatum, the basal ganglia’s input nucleus, sets the current exploration-exploitation trade-off. We first advance the idea of interpreting the basal ganglia output as a probability distribution function for action selection. Using computational models of the full basal ganglia circuit, we showed that, under this interpretation, the actions of dopamine within the striatum change the basal ganglia’s output to favor the level of exploration or exploitation encoded in the probability distribution. We also found that our models predict striatal dopamine controls the exploration-exploitation trade-off if we instead read-out the probability distribution from the target nuclei of the basal ganglia, where their inhibitory input shapes the cortical input to these nuclei. Finally, by integrating the basal ganglia within a reinforcement learning model, we showed how dopamine’s effect on the exploration-exploitation trade-off could be measurable in a forced two-choice task. These simulations also showed how tonic dopamine can appear to affect learning while only directly altering the trade-off. Thus, our models support the hypothesis that changes in tonic dopamine within the striatum can alter the exploration-exploitation trade-off by modulating the output of the basal ganglia. PMID:22347155

  8. Pulmonary vein region ablation in experimental vagal atrial fibrillation: role of pulmonary veins versus autonomic ganglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemola, Kristina; Chartier, Denis; Yeh, Yung-Hsin; Dubuc, Marc; Cartier, Raymond; Armour, Andrew; Ting, Michael; Sakabe, Masao; Shiroshita-Takeshita, Akiko; Comtois, Philippe; Nattel, Stanley

    2008-01-29

    Pulmonary vein (PV) -encircling radiofrequency ablation frequently is effective in vagal atrial fibrillation (AF), and there is evidence that PVs may be particularly prone to cholinergically induced arrhythmia mechanisms. However, PV ablation procedures also can affect intracardiac autonomic ganglia. The present study examined the relative role of PVs versus peri-PV autonomic ganglia in an experimental vagal AF model. Cholinergic AF was studied under carbachol infusion in coronary perfused canine left atrial PV preparations in vitro and with cervical vagal stimulation in vivo. Carbachol caused dose-dependent AF promotion in vitro, which was not affected by excision of all PVs. Sustained AF could be induced easily in all dogs during vagal nerve stimulation in vivo both before and after isolation of all PVs with encircling lesions created by a bipolar radiofrequency ablation clamp device. PV elimination had no effect on atrial effective refractory period or its responses to cholinergic stimulation. Autonomic ganglia were identified by bradycardic and/or tachycardic responses to high-frequency subthreshold local stimulation. Ablation of the autonomic ganglia overlying all PV ostia suppressed the effective refractory period-abbreviating and AF-promoting effects of cervical vagal stimulation, whereas ablation of only left- or right-sided PV ostial ganglia failed to suppress AF. Dominant-frequency analysis suggested that the success of ablation in suppressing vagal AF depended on the elimination of high-frequency driver regions. Intact PVs are not needed for maintenance of experimental cholinergic AF. Ablation of the autonomic ganglia at the base of the PVs suppresses vagal responses and may contribute to the effectiveness of PV-directed ablation procedures in vagal AF.

  9. Global dysrhythmia of cerebro-basal ganglia-cerebellar networks underlies motor tics following striatal disinhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCairn, Kevin W; Iriki, Atsushi; Isoda, Masaki

    2013-01-09

    Motor tics, a cardinal symptom of Tourette syndrome (TS), are hypothesized to arise from abnormalities within cerebro-basal ganglia circuits. Yet noninvasive neuroimaging of TS has previously identified robust activation in the cerebellum. To date, electrophysiological properties of cerebellar activation and its role in basal ganglia-mediated tic expression remain unknown. We performed multisite, multielectrode recordings of single-unit activity and local field potentials from the cerebellum, basal ganglia, and primary motor cortex using a pharmacologic monkey model of motor tics/TS. Following microinjections of bicuculline into the sensorimotor putamen, periodic tics occurred predominantly in the orofacial region, and a sizable number of cerebellar neurons showed phasic changes in activity associated with tic episodes. Specifically, 64% of the recorded cerebellar cortex neurons exhibited increases in activity, and 85% of the dentate nucleus neurons displayed excitatory, inhibitory, or multiphasic responses. Critically, abnormal discharges of cerebellar cortex neurons and excitatory-type dentate neurons mostly preceded behavioral tic onset, indicating their central origins. Latencies of pathological activity in the cerebellum and primary motor cortex substantially overlapped, suggesting that aberrant signals may be traveling along divergent pathways to these structures from the basal ganglia. Furthermore, the occurrence of tic movement was most closely associated with local field potential spikes in the cerebellum and primary motor cortex, implying that these structures may function as a gate to release overt tic movements. These findings indicate that tic-generating networks in basal ganglia mediated tic disorders extend beyond classical cerebro-basal ganglia circuits, leading to global network dysrhythmia including cerebellar circuits.

  10. Primary choriocarcinoma of the bilateral basal ganglia presenting in a teenaged male

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon C. Perry, MD

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Primary intracranial choriocarcinoma (PICCC, a type of germ-cell tumor, is a very rare primary tumor of the central nervous system that generally arises in the pineal or suprasellar region. We present a case of a teenage boy with PICCC of the bilateral basal ganglia, an anatomic site for which we were unable to find the previous reports. We offer discussion of the differential diagnosis, imaging characteristics, and prognosis of PICCC and germ-cell tumors of the basal ganglia, in the hope that it will increase awareness and allow for early detection.

  11. Developmental Venous Anomaly With Asymmetrical Basal Ganglia Calcification: Two Case Reports and Review of the Literature

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    Sarp

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Developmental venous anomaly (DVA is a common lesion formerly known as venous angioma. DVAs drain normal brain parenchyma; however, parenchymal abnormalities surrounding DVAs have been reported. Unilateral putamen and caudate calcification in the drainage territory of DVAs has so far been reported in 7 cases, all with deep venous drainage. We present two additional cases of DVAs, one with superficial and the other one with deep venous drainage, associated with basal ganglia calcifications. We emphasize that DVAs should be in the differential diagnosis of unilateral basal ganglia calcifications.

  12. Reelin signaling in the basal ganglia: comparative neuroanatomy and implications for vocal behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Fraley, Elizabeth Ross

    2017-01-01

    Vocal learning is a complex motor activity that relies on the coordination of different brain regions including the basal ganglia. By studying the vocal learning zebra finch, this work has uncovered a novel pathway that is regulated by singing behavior. The Reelin-signaling pathway like the human language transcription factor, FoxP2, is regulated in a basal ganglia region, Area X. The pathway was found to be regulated during the sensorimotor phase of song learning in finches as well as in adu...

  13. Analysis of Small Ischemic Lesions in the Examinees of a Brain Dock and Neurological Examination of Animals Subjected to Cortical or Basal Ganglia Photothrombotic Infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroiwa, Toshihiko; Tabata, Hitoshi; Xi, Guohua; Hua, Ya; Schallert, Timothy; Keep, Richard F

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed cases of small brain ischemic lesions found in examinees of a brain dock (neurological health screening center). Small cerebral infarction was found in 17 % of the examinees (733 cases). White matter lesions were found in 24 %. Infarctions were located in the cortex or subcortical white matter in 31 % and in the basal ganglia in 44 % of cases. Infratentorial infarction was found in 1.6 %. We have developed an animal model of small infarction in the cortex or basal ganglia induced by photothrombosis in rodents. Sprague-Dawley rats or Mongolian gerbils were anesthetized and photothrombotic infarction was induced in the left caudate nucleus or parietal cortex by light exposure via an optic fiber and intravenous Rose Bengal dye injection. Histological examination revealed development of a small spherical infarction surrounding the tip of the optic fiber. The lesion turned to a cyst by 6 weeks after lesioning. Neurological deficits were found in animals both with cortical and caudate infarction. Behavioral changes in an open field test differed with the lesion site. Neurological deficits were sustained longer in animals with larger infarctions. Thus, photothrombotic infarction is useful for analyzing location-dependent and size-dependent neurological and neuropathological changes after cerebral infarction.

  14. Small conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels regulate firing properties and excitability in parasympathetic cardiac motoneurons in the nucleus ambiguus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Min; Hatcher, Jeff T; Chen, Qin-Hui; Wurster, Robert D; Cheng, Zixi Jack

    2010-12-01

    Small conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels (SK) regulate action potential (AP) firing properties and excitability in many central neurons. However, the functional roles of SK channels of parasympathetic cardiac motoneurons (PCMNs) in the nucleus ambiguus have not yet been well characterized. In this study, the tracer X-rhodamine-5 (and 6)-isothiocyanate (XRITC) was injected into the pericardial sac to retrogradely label PCMNs in FVB mice at postnatal days 7-9. Two days later, XRITC-labeled PCMNs in brain stem slices were identified. With the use of whole cell current clamp, single APs and spike trains of different frequencies were evoked by current injections. We found that 1) PCMNs have two different firing patterns: the majority of PCMNs (90%) exhibited spike frequency adaptation (SFA) and the rest (10%) showed less or no adaptation; 2) application of the specific SK channel blocker apamin significantly increased spike half-width in single APs and trains and reduced the spike frequency-dependent AP broadening in trains; 3) SK channel blockade suppressed afterhyperpolarization (AHP) amplitude following single APs and trains and abolished spike-frequency dependence of AHP in trains; and 4) SK channel blockade increased the spike frequency but did not alter the pattern of SFA. Using whole cell voltage clamp, we measured outward currents and afterhyperpolarization current (I(AHP)). SK channel blockade revealed that SK-mediated outward currents had both transient and persistent components. After bath application of apamin and Ca(2+)-free solution, we found that apamin-sensitive and Ca(2+)-sensitive I(AHP) were comparable, confirming that SK channels may contribute to a major portion of Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channel-mediated I(AHP). These results suggest that PCMNs have SK channels that significantly regulate AP repolarization, AHP, and spike frequency but do not affect SFA. We conclude that activation of SK channels underlies one of the mechanisms for negative

  15. The role of the parasympathetic nervous system in visually induced motion sickness: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Adam D; Al Omran, Yasser; Aziz, Qasim; Andrews, Paul L

    2014-08-01

    The parasympathetic nervous system (PNS) has been implicated in the development of visually induced motion sickness. The objective of this study was to perform a systematic review and meta-analysis of the effect of visually induced motion sickness on validated parameters of PNS tone. Methods followed PRISMA recommendations. Controlled trials reporting validated measures of PNS tone in visually induced motion sickness in healthy adults were included. One reviewer performed the screening of articles and data extraction, and two reviewers independently performed methodological evaluation. Data were synthesised using standardised mean differences (SMDs) for all relevant outcomes using a random-effects model. Publication bias was assessed via funnel plots and Egger's test. The search strategy identified seven citations comprising 237 healthy individuals. The mean quality score was 4/10 (range 3-7). There was no difference between baseline PNS tone between individuals who developed visually induced motion sickness and those that did not. Visually induced motion sickness (VIMS)-sensitive individuals had a reduction in PNS tone, following exposure to the stimulus (mean weighted SMD = -0.45, 95% confidence interval -0.64 to -0.27, Z = -4.8, p < 0.0001). There was no evidence of heterogeneity or publication bias. These data suggest that baseline PNS parameters do not provide a useful measure of predicting the probability of developing visually induced motion sickness. However, a fall in PNS tone, as indicated by cardiac activity, is characteristic in sensitive individuals. Further work is needed to characterise these responses in clinical populations, in conjunction with improvements and standardisation in study design.

  16. Vagal cardiac efferent innervation in F344 rats: Effects of chronic intermittent hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Zixi Jack

    2017-03-01

    Chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH), which is a physiological consequence of obstructive sleep apnea, reduces baroreflex control of heart rate (HR). Previously, we showed that the heart rate (HR) response to electrical stimulation of the vagal efferent nerve was significantly increased following CIH in F344 rats. Since vagal cardiac efferent from the nucleus ambiguus (NA) project to cardiac ganglia and regulate HR, we hypothesized that vagal cardiac efferent innervation of cardiac ganglia is reorganized. Young adult F344 rats were exposed either to room air (RA) or to intermittent hypoxia for 35-50days. Fluorescent tracer DiI was injected into the NA to label vagal efferent innervation of cardiac ganglia which had been counterstained by Fluoro-Gold (FG) injections (i.p). Confocal microscopy was used to examine vagal cardiac efferent axons and terminals in cardiac ganglia. NA axons entered cardiac ganglia and innervated principal neurons (PNs) with robust basket endings in both RA control and CIH animals. In addition, the percentage of PNs which were innervated by DiI-labeled fibers in ganglia was similar. In CIH rats, abnormally large swollen cardiac axon segments and disorganized terminals as well as leaky endings were observed. In general, vagal efferent terminal varicosities around PNs appeared larger and the number of varicosities was significantly increased. Interestingly, some cardiac axons had sprouting-like terminal structures in the cardiac ganglia as well as in cardiac muscle, which had not been found in RA control. Finally, CIH increased the size of PNs and reduced the ratio of nucleus to PN somata. Thus, CIH significantly remodeled the structure of vagal cardiac axons and terminals in cardiac ganglia as well as cardiac PNs.

  17. Comparison of P2X and TRPV1 receptors in ganglia or primary culture of trigeminal neurons and their modulation by NGF or serotonin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giniatullin Rashid

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cultured sensory neurons are a common experimental model to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of pain transduction typically involving activation of ATP-sensitive P2X or capsaicin-sensitive TRPV1 receptors. This applies also to trigeminal ganglion neurons that convey pain inputs from head tissues. Little is, however, known about the plasticity of these receptors on trigeminal neurons in culture, grown without adding the neurotrophin NGF which per se is a powerful algogen. The characteristics of such receptors after short-term culture were compared with those of ganglia. Furthermore, their modulation by chronically-applied serotonin or NGF was investigated. Results Rat or mouse neurons in culture mainly belonged to small and medium diameter neurons as observed in sections of trigeminal ganglia. Real time RT-PCR, Western blot analysis and immunocytochemistry showed upregulation of P2X3 and TRPV1 receptors after 1–4 days in culture (together with their more frequent co-localization, while P2X2 ones were unchanged. TRPV1 immunoreactivity was, however, lower in mouse ganglia and cultures. Intracellular Ca2+ imaging and whole-cell patch clamping showed functional P2X and TRPV1 receptors. Neurons exhibited a range of responses to the P2X agonist α, β-methylene-adenosine-5'-triphosphate indicating the presence of homomeric P2X3 receptors (selectively antagonized by A-317491 and heteromeric P2X2/3 receptors. The latter were observed in 16 % mouse neurons only. Despite upregulation of receptors in culture, neurons retained the potential for further enhancement of P2X3 receptors by 24 h NGF treatment. At this time point TRPV1 receptors had lost the facilitation observed after acute NGF application. Conversely, chronically-applied serotonin selectively upregulated TRPV1 receptors rather than P2X3 receptors. Conclusion Comparing ganglia and cultures offered the advantage of understanding early adaptive changes of nociception

  18. Consensus Paper: Towards a Systems-Level View of Cerebellar Function: the Interplay Between Cerebellum, Basal Ganglia, and Cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caligiore, Daniele; Pezzulo, Giovanni; Baldassarre, Gianluca; Bostan, Andreea C; Strick, Peter L; Doya, Kenji; Helmich, Rick C; Dirkx, Michiel; Houk, James; Jörntell, Henrik; Lago-Rodriguez, Angel; Galea, Joseph M; Miall, R Chris; Popa, Traian; Kishore, Asha; Verschure, Paul F M J; Zucca, Riccardo; Herreros, Ivan

    2017-02-01

    Despite increasing evidence suggesting the cerebellum works in concert with the cortex and basal ganglia, the nature of the reciprocal interactions between these three brain regions remains unclear. This consensus paper gathers diverse recent views on a variety of important roles played by the cerebellum within the cerebello-basal ganglia-thalamo-cortical system across a range of motor and cognitive functions. The paper includes theoretical and empirical contributions, which cover the following topics: recent evidence supporting the dynamical interplay between cerebellum, basal ganglia, and cortical areas in humans and other animals; theoretical neuroscience perspectives and empirical evidence on the reciprocal influences between cerebellum, basal ganglia, and cortex in learning and control processes; and data suggesting possible roles of the cerebellum in basal ganglia movement disorders. Although starting from different backgrounds and dealing with different topics, all the contributors agree that viewing the cerebellum, basal ganglia, and cortex as an integrated system enables us to understand the function of these areas in radically different ways. In addition, there is unanimous consensus between the authors that future experimental and computational work is needed to understand the function of cerebellar-basal ganglia circuitry in both motor and non-motor functions. The paper reports the most advanced perspectives on the role of the cerebellum within the cerebello-basal ganglia-thalamo-cortical system and illustrates other elements of consensus as well as disagreements and open questions in the field.

  19. Coculture of rat embryonic proprioceptive sensory neurons and myotubes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Copray, S; Liem, R; MantinghOtter, [No Value; Brouwer, N

    1996-01-01

    With the aim to study the cellular mechanisms underlying the process of muscle spindle (re)generation, dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons derived from 16-day rat embryos were cocultured with developing myotubes in a compartmentalized culture device. To accomplish the selective survival and neurite fo

  20. Motor control in basal ganglia circuits using fMRI and brain atlas approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehéricy, Stéphane; Bardinet, Eric; Tremblay, Leon; Van de Moortele, Pierre-Francois; Pochon, Jean-Baptiste; Dormont, Didier; Kim, Dae-Shik; Yelnik, Jerome; Ugurbil, Kamil

    2006-02-01

    In this study, we examined how the motor, premotor and associative basal ganglia territories process movement parameters such as the complexity and the frequency of movement. Twelve right-handed volunteers were studied using EPI BOLD contrast (3 T) while performing audio-paced finger tapping tasks designed to differentiate basal ganglia territories. Tasks varied movement complexity (repetitive index tapping, simple sequence of finger movements and complex sequence of 10 moves) and frequency (from 0.5 to 3 Hz). Activation maps were coregistered onto a 3-D brain atlas derived from post-mortem brains. Three main patterns of activation were observed. In the posterior putamen and the sensorimotor cortex, signal increased with movement frequency but not with movement complexity. In premotor areas, the anterior putamen and the ventral posterolateral thalamus, signal increased regularly with increasing movement frequency and complexity. In rostral frontal areas, the caudate nucleus, the subthalamic nucleus and the ventral anterior/ventrolateral thalamus, signal increased mainly during the complex task and the high frequency task (3 Hz). These data show the different roles of motor, premotor and associative basal ganglia circuits in the processing of motor-related operations and suggest that activation can be precisely located within the entire circuitry of the basal ganglia.

  1. Respiratory Responses to Stimulation of Branchial Vagus Nerve Ganglia of a Teleost Fish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ballintijn, C.M.; Luiten, P.G.M.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of electrical stimulation of epibranchial vagus ganglia upon respiration of the carp were investigated. Single shocks evoked fast twitch responses in a number of respiratory muscles with latencies around 18 msec to the beginning and 30-35 msec to the peak of activity. Shocks given during

  2. The Differential Effects of Thalamus and Basal Ganglia on Facial Emotion Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Crystal C. Y.; Lee, Tatia M. C.; Yip, James T. H.; King, Kristin E.; Li, Leonard S. W.

    2006-01-01

    This study examined if subcortical stroke was associated with impaired facial emotion recognition. Furthermore, the lateralization of the impairment and the differential profiles of facial emotion recognition deficits with localized thalamic or basal ganglia damage were also studied. Thirty-eight patients with subcortical strokes and 19 matched…

  3. RNA-Seq Analysis of Human Trigeminal and Dorsal Root Ganglia with a Focus on Chemoreceptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Flegel

    Full Text Available The chemosensory capacity of the somatosensory system relies on the appropriate expression of chemoreceptors, which detect chemical stimuli and transduce sensory information into cellular signals. Knowledge of the complete repertoire of the chemoreceptors expressed in human sensory ganglia is lacking. This study employed the next-generation sequencing technique (RNA-Seq to conduct the first expression analysis of human trigeminal ganglia (TG and dorsal root ganglia (DRG. We analyzed the data with a focus on G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs and ion channels, which are (potentially involved in chemosensation by somatosensory neurons in the human TG and DRG. For years, transient receptor potential (TRP channels have been considered the main group of receptors for chemosensation in the trigeminal system. Interestingly, we could show that sensory ganglia also express a panel of different olfactory receptors (ORs with putative chemosensory function. To characterize OR expression in more detail, we performed microarray, semi-quantitative RT-PCR experiments, and immunohistochemical staining. Additionally, we analyzed the expression data to identify further known or putative classes of chemoreceptors in the human TG and DRG. Our results give an overview of the major classes of chemoreceptors expressed in the human TG and DRG and provide the basis for a broader understanding of the reception of chemical cues.

  4. Activity of the basal ganglia in Parkinson`s disease estimated by PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohye, Chihiro [Gunma Univ., Maebashi (Japan). School of Medicine

    1995-04-01

    Positron emission tomographic (PET) studies on the local cerebral blood flow, oxygen metabolic rate, glucose metabolic rate in the basal ganglia of Parkinson`s disease are reviewed. PET has demonstrated that blood flow was decreased in the cerebral cortex, especially the frontal region, of Parkinson`s disease and that specific change in blood flow or metabolic rate in the basal ganglia was detected only in patients with hemi-parkinsonism. In authors` study on PET using {sup 18}FDG in patients with tremor type and rigid type Parkinson`s disease, changes in blood flow and metabolic rate were minimal at the basal ganglia level in tremor type patients, but cortical blood flow was decreased and metabolic rate was more elevated in the basal ganglia in rigid type patients. These findings were correlated with depth micro-recordings obtained by stereotactic pallidotomy. PET studies have also revealed that activity in the nerve terminal was decreased with decreasing dopamine and that dopamine (mainly D{sub 2}) activity was remarkably increased. PET studies with specific tracers are promising in providing more accurate information about functional state of living human brain with minimal invasion to patients. (N.K.).

  5. [A Role of the Basal Ganglia in Processing of Complex Sounds and Auditory Attention].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silkis, I G

    2015-01-01

    A hypothetical mechanism is suggested for processing of complex sounds and auditory attention in parallel neuronal loops including various auditory cortical areas connected with parts of the medial geniculate body, inferior colliculus and basal ganglia. Release of dopamine in the striatum promotes bidirectional modulation of strong and weak inputs from the neocortex to striatal neurons giving rise to direct and indirect pathways through the basal ganglia. Subsequent synergistic disinhibition of one and inhibition of other groups of thalamic neurons by the basal ganglia result in the creation of contrasted neuronal representations of properties of auditory stimuli in related cortical areas. Contrasting is strengthened due to a simultaneous disinhibition of pedunculopontine nucleus and action at muscarine receptors on neurons in the medial geniculate body. It follows from this mechanism that involuntary attention to sound tone can enhance an early component of the responses of neurons in the primary auditory cortical area (50 msec) in the absence of dopamine due to a disinhibition of thalamic neurons via the direct pathway through the basal ganglia, whereas voluntary attention to complex sounds can enhance only those components of responses of neurones in secondary auditory cortical areas which latencies exceeds latencies of dopaminergic cells (i.e. after 100 msec). Various consequences of proposed mechanism are in agreement with known experimental data.

  6. The Role of the Basal Ganglia in Implicit Contextual Learning: A Study of Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Asselen, Marieke; Almeida, Ines; Andre, Rui; Januario, Cristina; Goncalves, Antonio Freire; Castelo-Branco, Miguel

    2009-01-01

    Implicit contextual learning refers to the ability to memorize contextual information from our environment. This contextual information can then be used to guide our attention to a specific location. Although the medial temporal lobe is important for this type of learning, the basal ganglia might also be involved considering its role in many…

  7. Hereditary haemochromatosis: a case of iron accumulation in the basal ganglia associated with a parkinsonian syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, J.E.; Jensen, L. Neerup; Krabbe, K.

    1995-01-01

    . A patient is reported with hereditary haemochromatosis and a syndrome of dementia, dysarthria, a slowly progressive gait disturbance, imbalance, muscle weakness, rigidity, bradykinesia, tremor, ataxia, and dyssynergia. The findings on MRI of a large signal decrease in the basal ganglia, consistent...

  8. The Differential Effects of Thalamus and Basal Ganglia on Facial Emotion Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Crystal C. Y.; Lee, Tatia M. C.; Yip, James T. H.; King, Kristin E.; Li, Leonard S. W.

    2006-01-01

    This study examined if subcortical stroke was associated with impaired facial emotion recognition. Furthermore, the lateralization of the impairment and the differential profiles of facial emotion recognition deficits with localized thalamic or basal ganglia damage were also studied. Thirty-eight patients with subcortical strokes and 19 matched…

  9. Mapping the basal ganglia alterations in children chronically exposed to manganese

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lao, Yi; Dion, Laurie-Anne; Gilbert, Guillaume; Bouchard, Maryse F.; Rocha, Gabriel; Wang, Yalin; Leporé, Natasha; Saint-Amour, Dave

    2017-01-01

    Chronic manganese (Mn) exposure is associated with neuromotor and neurocognitive deficits, but the exact mechanism of Mn neurotoxicity is still unclear. With the advent of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), in-vivo analysis of brain structures has become possible. Among different sub-cortical structures, the basal ganglia (BG) has been investigated as a putative anatomical biomarker in MR-based studies of Mn toxicity. However, previous investigations have yielded inconsistent results in terms of regional MR signal intensity changes. These discrepancies may be due to the subtlety of brain alterations caused by Mn toxicity, coupled to analysis techniques that lack the requisite detection power. Here, based on brain MRI, we apply a 3D surface-based morphometry method on 3 bilateral basal ganglia structures in school-age children chronically exposed to Mn through drinking water to investigate the effect of Mn exposure on brain anatomy. Our method successfully pinpointed significant enlargement of many areas of the basal ganglia structures, preferentially affecting the putamen. Moreover, these areas showed significant correlations with fine motor performance, indicating a possible link between altered basal ganglia neurodevelopment and declined motor performance in high Mn exposed children. PMID:28155922

  10. Abnormal Astrocytosis in the Basal Ganglia Pathway of Git1(-/-) Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Soo-Yeon; Mah, Won

    2015-06-01

    Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is one of the most common neurodevelopmental disorders, affecting approximately 5% of children. However, the neural mechanisms underlying its development and treatment are yet to be elucidated. In this study, we report that an ADHD mouse model, which harbors a deletion in the Git1 locus, exhibits severe astrocytosis in the globus pallidus (GP) and thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN), which send modulatory GABAergic inputs to the thalamus. A moderate level of astrocytosis was displayed in other regions of the basal ganglia pathway, including the ventrobasal thalamus and cortex, but not in other brain regions, such as the caudate putamen, basolateral amygdala, and hippocampal CA1. This basal ganglia circuit-selective astrocytosis was detected in both in adult (2-3 months old) and juvenile (4 weeks old) Git1(-/-) mice, suggesting a developmental origin. Astrocytes play an active role in the developing synaptic circuit; therefore, we performed an immunohistochemical analysis of synaptic markers. We detected increased and decreased levels of GABA and parvalbumin (PV), respectively, in the GP. This suggests that astrocytosis may alter synaptic transmission in the basal ganglia. Intriguingly, increased GABA expression colocalized with the astrocyte marker, GFAP, indicative of an astrocytic origin. Collectively, these results suggest that defects in basal ganglia circuitry, leading to impaired inhibitory modulation of the thalamus, are neural correlates for the ADHD-associated behavioral manifestations in Git1(-/-) mice.

  11. Structural findings in the basal ganglia in genetically determined and idiopathic Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reetz, Kathrin; Gaser, Christian; Klein, Christine

    2009-01-01

    A bilateral compensatory increase of basal ganglia (BG) gray matter value (GMV) was recently demonstrated in asymptomatic Parkin mutation carriers, who likely have an increased risk to develop Parkinson's disease (PD). We hypothesized BG morphological changes in symptomatic Parkin mutation carrie...

  12. Acute movement disorder with bilateral basal ganglia lesions in diabetic uremia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurusidheshwar M Wali

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute movement disorder associated with symmetrical basal ganglia lesions occurring in the background of diabetic end stage renal disease is a recently described condition. It has distinct clinico-radiological features and is commonly described in Asian patients. We report the first Indian case report of this potentially reversible condition and discuss its various clinico-radiological aspects.

  13. Respiratory Responses to Stimulation of Branchial Vagus Nerve Ganglia of a Teleost Fish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ballintijn, C.M.; Luiten, P.G.M.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of electrical stimulation of epibranchial vagus ganglia upon respiration of the carp were investigated. Single shocks evoked fast twitch responses in a number of respiratory muscles with latencies around 18 msec to the beginning and 30-35 msec to the peak of activity. Shocks given during

  14. The disrupted basal ganglia and behavioural control: an integrative cross-domain perspective of spontaneous stereotypy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Sebastian D; Parker, Matthew O

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous stereotypic behaviour (SB) is common in many captive animal species, as well as in humans with some severe psychiatric disorders, and is often cited as being related to general basal ganglia dysfunction. Despite this assertion, there is little in the literature examining SB specifically in terms of the basal ganglia mechanics. In this review, we attempt to fill this gap by offering an integrative, cross-domain perspective of SB by linking what we currently understand about the SB phenotype with the ever-growing literature on the anatomy and functionality of the basal ganglia. After outlining current models of SB from different theoretical perspectives, we offer a broad but detailed overview of normally functioning basal ganglia mechanics, and attempt to link this with current neurophysiological evidence related to spontaneous SB. Based on this we present an empirically derived theoretical framework, which proposes that SB is the result of a dysfunctional action selection system that may reflect dysregulation of excitatory (direct) and inhibitory (indirect and hyperdirect) pathways as well as alterations in mechanisms of behavioural switching. This approach also suggests behaviours that specifically become stereotypic may reflect inbuilt low selection threshold behavioural sequences associated with early development and the species-specific ethogram or, low threshold behavioural sequences that are the result of stress-induced dopamine exposure at the time of performance.

  15. Opponent and bidirectional control of movement velocity in the basal ganglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yttri, Eric A; Dudman, Joshua T

    2016-05-02

    For goal-directed behaviour it is critical that we can both select the appropriate action and learn to modify the underlying movements (for example, the pitch of a note or velocity of a reach) to improve outcomes. The basal ganglia are a critical nexus where circuits necessary for the production of behaviour, such as the neocortex and thalamus, are integrated with reward signalling to reinforce successful, purposive actions. The dorsal striatum, a major input structure of basal ganglia, is composed of two opponent pathways, direct and indirect, thought to select actions that elicit positive outcomes and suppress actions that do not, respectively. Activity-dependent plasticity modulated by reward is thought to be sufficient for selecting actions in the striatum. Although perturbations of basal ganglia function produce profound changes in movement, it remains unknown whether activity-dependent plasticity is sufficient to produce learned changes in movement kinematics, such as velocity. Here we use cell-type-specific stimulation in mice delivered in closed loop during movement to demonstrate that activity in either the direct or indirect pathway is sufficient to produce specific and sustained increases or decreases in velocity, without affecting action selection or motivation. These behavioural changes were a form of learning that accumulated over trials, persisted after the cessation of stimulation, and were abolished in the presence of dopamine antagonists. Our results reveal that the direct and indirect pathways can each bidirectionally control movement velocity, demonstrating unprecedented specificity and flexibility in the control of volition by the basal ganglia.

  16. Alterations in Neuronal Activity in Basal Ganglia-Thalamocortical Circuits in the Parkinsonian State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana eGalvan

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In patients with Parkinson’s disease and in animal models of this disorder, neurons in the basal ganglia and related regions in thalamus and cortex show changes that can be recorded by using electrophysiologic single-cell recording techniques, including altered firing rates and patterns, pathologic oscillatory activity and increased inter-neuronal synchronization. In addition, changes in synaptic potentials or in the joint spiking activities of populations of neurons can be monitored as alterations in local field potentials, electroencephalograms or electrocorticograms. Most of the mentioned electrophysiologic changes are probably related to the degeneration of diencephalic dopaminergic neurons, leading to dopamine loss in the striatum and other basal ganglia nuclei, although degeneration of non-dopaminergic cell groups may also have a role. The altered electrical activity of the basal ganglia and associated nuclei may contribute to some of the motor signs of the disease. We here review the current knowledge of the electrophysiologic changes at the single cell level, the level of local populations of neural elements, and the level of the entire basal ganglia-thalamocortical network in parkinsonism, and discuss the possible use of this information to optimize treatment approaches to Parkinson’s disease, such as deep brain stimulation therapy.

  17. Hereditary haemochromatosis: a case of iron accumulation in the basal ganglia associated with a parkinsonian syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, J.E.; Jensen, L.N.; Krabbe, K

    1995-01-01

    . A patient is reported with hereditary haemochromatosis and a syndrome of dementia, dysarthria, a slowly progressive gait disturbance, imbalance, muscle weakness, rigidity, bradykinesia, tremor, ataxia, and dyssynergia. The findings on MRI of a large signal decrease in the basal ganglia, consistent...

  18. Homeobox gene expression in adult dorsal root ganglia: Is regeneration a recapitulation of development?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogelaar, C.F.

    2003-01-01

    Neurons of the peripheral nervous system are able to regenerate their peripheral axons after injury, leading to complete recovery of sensory and motor function. The sciatic nerve crush model is frequently used to study peripheral nerve regeneration. Sensory neurons in the dorsal root ganglia (DRGs)

  19. Restricted varicella-zoster virus transcription in human trigeminal ganglia obtained soon after death

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.J.D. Ouwendijk (Werner ); A. Choe (Alexander); M.A. Nagel (Maria ); D. Gilden (Don); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); R.J. Cohrs (Randall ); G.M.G.M. Verjans (George)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractWe analyzed the varicella-zoster virus (VZV) transcriptome in 43 latently infected human trigeminal ganglia (TG) with postmortem intervals (PMIs) ranging from 3.7 to 24 h. Multiplex reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) revealed no VZV transcripts with a PMI of <9 h. Real-time PCR indicated

  20. Synergy as a new and sensitive marker of basal ganglia dysfunction: A study of asymptomatic welders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Mechelle M; Lee, Eun-Young; Jo, Hang Jin; Du, Guangwei; Park, Jaebum; Flynn, Michael R; Kong, Lan; Latash, Mark L; Huang, Xuemei

    2016-09-01

    Multi-digit synergies, a recently developed, theory-based method to quantify stability of motor action, are shown to reflect basal ganglia dysfunction associated with parkinsonian syndromes. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that multi-digit synergies may capture early and subclinical basal ganglia dysfunction. We chose asymptomatic welders to test the hypothesis because the basal ganglia are known to be most susceptible to neurotoxicity caused by welding-related metal accumulation (such as manganese and iron). Twenty right-handed welders and 13 matched controls were invited to perform single- and multi-finger pressing tasks using the fingers of the right or left hand. Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale and Grooved Pegboard scores were used to gauge gross and fine motor dysfunction, respectively. High-resolution (3T) T1-weighted, T2-weighted, T1 mapping, susceptibility, and diffusion tensor MRIs were obtained to reflect manganese, iron accumulation, and microstructural changes in basal ganglia. The synergy index stabilizing total force and anticipatory synergy adjustments were computed, compared between groups, and correlated with estimates of basal ganglia manganese [the pallidal index, R1 (1/T1)], iron [R2* (1/T2*)], and microstructural changes [fractional anisotropy and mean diffusivity]. There were no significant differences in Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (total or motor subscale) or Grooved Pegboard test scores between welders and controls. The synergy index during steady-state accurate force production was decreased significantly in the left hand of welders compared to controls (p=0.004) but did not reach statistical significance in the right hand (p=0.16). Anticipatory synergy adjustments, however, were not significantly different between groups. Among welders, higher synergy indices in the left hand were associated significantly with higher fractional anisotropy values in the left globus pallidus (R=0.731, p<0.001) but not with the

  1. Basal ganglia germinoma in children with associated ipsilateral cerebral and brain stem hemiatrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozelame, Rodrigo V.; Shroff, Manohar; Wood, Bradley; Bouffet, Eric; Bartels, Ute; Drake, James M.; Hawkins, Cynthia; Blaser, Susan [Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2006-04-15

    Germinoma is the most common and least-malignant intracranial germ cell tumor, usually found in the midline. Germinoma that arises in the basal ganglia, called ectopic germinoma, is a rare and well-documented entity representing 5% to 10% of all intracranial germinomas. The association of cerebral and/or brain stem atrophy with basal ganglia germinoma on CT and MRI is found in 33% of the cases. To review the literature and describe the CT and MRI findings of basal ganglia germinoma in children, known as ectopic germinoma, with associated ipsilateral cerebral and brain stem hemiatrophy. Three brain CT and six brain MRI studies performed in four children at two institutions were retrospectively reviewed. All patients were male (case 1, 14 years; case 2, 13 years; case 3, 9 years; case 4, 13 years), with pathologically proved germinoma arising in the basal ganglia, and associated ipsilateral cerebral and/or brain stem hemiatrophy on the first imaging study. It is important to note that three of these children presented with cognitive decline, psychosis and slowly progressive hemiparesis as their indication for imaging. Imaging results on initial scans were varied. In all patients, the initial study showed ipsilateral cerebral and/or brain stem hemiatrophy, representing Wallerian degeneration. All patients who underwent CT imaging presented with a hyperdense or calcified lesion in the basal ganglia on unenhanced scans. Only one of these lesions had a mass effect on the surrounding structures. In one of these patients a large, complex, heterogeneous mass appeared 15 months later. Initial MR showed focal or diffusely increased T2 signal in two cases and heterogeneous signal in the other two. (orig.)

  2. Mineral composition of and the relationships between them of human basal ganglia in very old age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tohno, Yoshiyuki; Tohno, Setsuko; Azuma, Cho; Minami, Takeshi; Ke, Lining; Ongkana, Nutcharin; Sinthubua, Apichat; Mahakkanukrauh, Pasuk

    2013-01-01

    Trace elements and the relationships among them were investigated by direct chemical analysis in three basal ganglia regions in very old age individuals and age- and gender-related differences were assessed. After ordinary dissections at Nara Medical University were finished, the caudate nucleus, putamen, and globus pallidus belonging to the basal ganglia were removed from the identical cerebra of the subjects who consisted of 22 men and 23 women, ranging in age from 70 to 101 years (average age = 83.3 ± 7.5 years). After incineration with nitric acid and perchloric acid, the element contents were determined by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry. It was found that the Ca, P, and Mg contents increased significantly in the putamen with aging and the Mg content increased significantly in the globus pallidus with aging, but no elements increased significantly in the caudate nucleus with aging. Regarding the relationships among elements in the basal ganglia, extremely significant direct correlations were found among the Ca, P, and Mg contents in the putamen. These results suggested that slight calcification occurred in the putamen in very old age. With regard to seven elements of Ca, P, S, Mg, Zn, Fe, and Na, it was examined whether there were significant correlations among the caudate nucleus, putamen, and globus pallidus. It was found that there were extremely significant direct correlations among all of the three basal ganglia in the P content. Likewise, with regard to the Fe content, there were extremely or very significant direct correlations among all of the three basal ganglia. Regarding the gender difference in elements, it was found that the Ca content of the caudate nucleus was significantly higher in women than in men.

  3. Neuroanatomical correlates of intelligence in healthy young adults: the role of basal ganglia volume.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cosima Rhein

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In neuropsychiatric diseases with basal ganglia involvement, higher cognitive functions are often impaired. In this exploratory study, we examined healthy young adults to gain detailed insight into the relationship between basal ganglia volume and cognitive abilities under non-pathological conditions. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We investigated 137 healthy adults that were between the ages of 21 and 35 years with similar educational backgrounds. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI was performed, and volumes of basal ganglia nuclei in both hemispheres were calculated using FreeSurfer software. The cognitive assessment consisted of verbal, numeric and figural aspects of intelligence for either the fluid or the crystallised intelligence factor using the intelligence test Intelligenz-Struktur-Test (I-S-T 2000 R. Our data revealed significant correlations of the caudate nucleus and pallidum volumes with figural and numeric aspects of intelligence, but not with verbal intelligence. Interestingly, figural intelligence associations were dependent on sex and intelligence factor; in females, the pallidum volumes were correlated with crystallised figural intelligence (r = 0.372, p = 0.01, whereas in males, the caudate volumes were correlated with fluid figural intelligence (r = 0.507, p = 0.01. Numeric intelligence was correlated with right-lateralised caudate nucleus volumes for both females and males, but only for crystallised intelligence (r = 0.306, p = 0.04 and r = 0.459, p = 0.04, respectively. The associations were not mediated by prefrontal cortical subfield volumes when controlling with partial correlation analyses. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The findings of our exploratory analysis indicate that figural and numeric intelligence aspects, but not verbal aspects, are strongly associated with basal ganglia volumes. Unlike numeric intelligence, the type of figural intelligence appears to be related to distinct basal ganglia nuclei in a sex

  4. Decreased basal ganglia activation in subjects with chronic fatigue syndrome: association with symptoms of fatigue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew H Miller

    Full Text Available Reduced basal ganglia function has been associated with fatigue in neurologic disorders, as well as in patients exposed to chronic immune stimulation. Patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS have been shown to exhibit symptoms suggestive of decreased basal ganglia function including psychomotor slowing, which in turn was correlated with fatigue. In addition, CFS patients have been found to exhibit increased markers of immune activation. In order to directly test the hypothesis of decreased basal ganglia function in CFS, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to examine neural activation in the basal ganglia to a reward-processing (monetary gambling task in a community sample of 59 male and female subjects, including 18 patients diagnosed with CFS according to 1994 CDC criteria and 41 non-fatigued healthy controls. For each subject, the average effect of winning vs. losing during the gambling task in regions of interest (ROI corresponding to the caudate nucleus, putamen, and globus pallidus was extracted for group comparisons and correlational analyses. Compared to non-fatigued controls, patients with CFS exhibited significantly decreased activation in the right caudate (p = 0.01 and right globus pallidus (p = 0.02. Decreased activation in the right globus pallidus was significantly correlated with increased mental fatigue (r2 = 0.49, p = 0.001, general fatigue (r2 = 0.34, p = 0.01 and reduced activity (r2 = 0.29, p = 0.02 as measured by the Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory. No such relationships were found in control subjects. These data suggest that symptoms of fatigue in CFS subjects were associated with reduced responsivity of the basal ganglia, possibly involving the disruption of projections from the globus pallidus to thalamic and cortical networks.

  5. Relation between Weight, Height, Glycemic Status and Parasympathetic Functions in Nondiabetic Offspring of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangeeta Tuppad

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Objective: Diabetes Mellitus is a group of common metabolic disorders that share the phenotype of hyperglycemia. Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a familial disease with a lifetime risk of 40% if one parent has Type 2 diabetes23 . Overweight is the second risk factor for type 2 diabetes mellitus and as many as 80% of patients with Type 2 Diabetes are Obese. Till now, very few studies have shown early outcome of genetic transmission on cardiac autonomic activity among healthy offsprings with parental type 2 diabetes mellitus. Thus, the aim of this study was to examine the impact of parental Type 2 diabetes on autonomic nervous system and to determine whether autonomic neuropathy is present and its association with glycemic status, weight and height. Method: The cross-sectional study of Height, Weight, Glycemic status and Cardiovascular Autonomic Functions was carried out in 30 healthy offsprings of Type 2 Diabetic Parents (Study group and 30 healthy offsprings of Nondiabetic Parents (Control group in the age range of 18 - 21 years randomly selected among 1st MBBS students. Statistical Analysis is done by and lsquo;Z' test. Results: There is insignificant decrease in parasympathetic functions and insignificant increase in Fasting and Postload Blood Glucose in Study Group compared to Control Group. There significant increase in weight, and height of subjects of Study Group compared to Control. Conclusion:Our observations indicate that subclinical autonomic dysfunction may develop without the presence of long-term hyperglycemia in family members of type 2 diabetic subjects; Thus, it is not simply a complication of the hyperglycemia in these patients. An explanation could be that it is possible to inherit susceptibility genes for autonomic neuropathy, and that these genes could be expressed before or maybe even without the subjects developing diabetes. Insulin resistance is a function of fat mass and because increasing body weight in the

  6. Auditory driving of the autonomic nervous system: Listening to theta-frequency binaural beats post-exercise increases parasympathetic activation and sympathetic withdrawal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, Patrick A; Froeliger, Brett; Garland, Eric L; Ives, Jeffrey C; Sforzo, Gary A

    2014-01-01

    Binaural beats are an auditory illusion perceived when two or more pure tones of similar frequencies are presented dichotically through stereo headphones. Although this phenomenon is thought to facilitate state changes (e.g., relaxation), few empirical studies have reported on whether binaural beats produce changes in autonomic arousal. Therefore, the present study investigated the effects of binaural beating on autonomic dynamics [heart rate variability (HRV)] during post-exercise relaxation. Subjects (n = 21; 18-29 years old) participated in a double-blind, placebo-controlled study during which binaural beats and placebo were administered over two randomized and counterbalanced sessions (within-subjects repeated-measures design). At the onset of each visit, subjects exercised for 20-min; post-exercise, subjects listened to either binaural beats ('wide-band' theta-frequency binaural beats) or placebo (carrier tones) for 20-min while relaxing alone in a quiet, low-light environment. Dependent variables consisted of high-frequency (HF, reflecting parasympathetic activity), low-frequency (LF, reflecting sympathetic and parasympathetic activity), and LF/HF normalized powers, as well as self-reported relaxation. As compared to the placebo visit, the binaural-beat visit resulted in greater self-reported relaxation, increased parasympathetic activation and increased sympathetic withdrawal. By the end of the 20-min relaxation period there were no observable differences in HRV between binaural-beat and placebo visits, although binaural-beat associated HRV significantly predicted subsequent reported relaxation. Findings suggest that listening to binaural beats may exert an acute influence on both LF and HF components of HRV and may increase subjective feelings of relaxation.

  7. Auditory driving of the autonomic nervous system: Listening to theta-frequency binaural beats post-exercise increases parasympathetic activation and sympathetic withdrawal

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, Patrick A.; Froeliger, Brett; Garland, Eric L.; Ives, Jeffrey C.; Sforzo, Gary A.

    2014-01-01

    Binaural beats are an auditory illusion perceived when two or more pure tones of similar frequencies are presented dichotically through stereo headphones. Although this phenomenon is thought to facilitate state changes (e.g., relaxation), few empirical studies have reported on whether binaural beats produce changes in autonomic arousal. Therefore, the present study investigated the effects of binaural beating on autonomic dynamics [heart rate variability (HRV)] during post-exercise relaxation. Subjects (n = 21; 18–29 years old) participated in a double-blind, placebo-controlled study during which binaural beats and placebo were administered over two randomized and counterbalanced sessions (within-subjects repeated-measures design). At the onset of each visit, subjects exercised for 20-min; post-exercise, subjects listened to either binaural beats (‘wide-band’ theta-frequency binaural beats) or placebo (carrier tones) for 20-min while relaxing alone in a quiet, low-light environment. Dependent variables consisted of high-frequency (HF, reflecting parasympathetic activity), low-frequency (LF, reflecting sympathetic and parasympathetic activity), and LF/HF normalized powers, as well as self-reported relaxation. As compared to the placebo visit, the binaural-beat visit resulted in greater self-reported relaxation, increased parasympathetic activation and increased sympathetic withdrawal. By the end of the 20-min relaxation period there were no observable differences in HRV between binaural-beat and placebo visits, although binaural-beat associated HRV significantly predicted subsequent reported relaxation. Findings suggest that listening to binaural beats may exert an acute influence on both LF and HF components of HRV and may increase subjective feelings of relaxation. PMID:25452734

  8. Effects of hypnosis on the relative parasympathetic tone assessed by ANI (Analgesia/Nociception Index) in healthy volunteers: a prospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boselli, E; Musellec, H; Martin, L; Bernard, F; Fusco, N; Guillou, N; Hugot, P; Paqueron, X; Yven, T; Virot, C

    2017-08-20

    Hypnosis has shown an effect on the regulation of the autonomic nervous system by increasing parasympathetic activity. The Analgesia/Nociception Index (ANI) is derived from heart rate variability and represents the relative parasympathetic tone. We investigated the effects of hypnosis on ANI in healthy volunteers. Participants to the 2016 International Hypnosis congress, Saint Malo, France were recruited in this prospective observational study. After comfortable positioning of the subject in the sitting position (T0), the hypnotic trance was induced (T1) then conducted with suggestions of comfort (T2) before return to normal consciousness (T3). The ANI, heart rate (HR) and respiratory rate (RR) were recorded at the different time-points. Forty subjects were enrolled (31 women, 9 men). The mean ± SD ANI at T2 (84 ± 12) was significantly greater than at T0 (60 ± 10), T1 (62 ± 9) and T3 (59 ± 11). The median [25th-75th percentile] ANI values at T2 were significantly greater in women (90 [83-95]) than in men (74 [68-83]). There were no significant variations of HR during time. The median [25th-75th percentile] RR at T1 (16 [14-18] breaths/min) and T2 (14 [12-16] breaths/min) were significantly smaller than at T0 (18 [16-20] breaths/min) and T3 (18 [16-20] breaths/min). This study shows that hypnosis induces an increase in the relative parasympathetic tone assessed by ANI in healthy volunteers, with greater ANI values observed in women. These results suggest that ANI monitoring may provide an objective tool for the measurement of the intensity of the hypnotic process, although this should be confirmed by further studies.

  9. Function and modulation of premotor brainstem parasympathetic cardiac neurons that control heart rate by hypoxia-, sleep-, and sleep-related diseases including obstructive sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dergacheva, Olga; Weigand, Letitia A; Dyavanapalli, Jhansi; Mares, Jacquelyn; Wang, Xin; Mendelowitz, David

    2014-01-01

    Parasympathetic cardiac vagal neurons (CVNs) in the brainstem dominate the control of heart rate. Previous work has determined that these neurons are inherently silent, and their activity is largely determined by synaptic inputs to CVNs that include four major types of synapses that release glutamate, GABA, glycine, or serotonin. Whereas prior reviews have focused on glutamatergic, GABAergic and glycinergic pathways, and the receptors in CVNs activated by these neurotransmitters, this review focuses on the alterations in CVN activity with hypoxia-, sleep-, and sleep-related cardiovascular diseases including obstructive sleep apnea.

  10. Study of central neurotransmitters in stress-induced gastric ulceration in albino rats.

    OpenAIRE

    Bhargava, K P; Daas, M.; Gupta, G. P.; Gupta, M. B.

    1980-01-01

    1 Restraint when combined with cold (4 degrees C) consistently induces gastric ulceration in rats at 2 h. The cold-restraint ulcer (CRU) technique provides a suitable model for acute studies. 2 The peripheral mechanisms in CRU seem to be increased sympathetic and parasympathetic outflow since CRU was significantly reduced by prior spinal transection or vagotomy or by appropriate blocking agents. Since metiamide significantly reduced CRU, H2-histamine receptors are also involved. 3 Central cat...

  11. Functional upregulation of nav1.8 sodium channels on the membrane of dorsal root Ganglia neurons contributes to the development of cancer-induced bone pain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Dan Liu

    Full Text Available We have previously reported that enhanced excitability of dorsal root ganglia (DRG neurons contributes to the development of bone cancer pain, which severely decreases the quality of life of cancer patients. Nav1.8, a tetrodotoxin-resistant (TTX-R sodium channel, contributes most of the sodium current underlying the action potential upstroke and accounts for most of the current in later spikes in a train. We speculate that the Nav1.8 sodium channel is a potential candidate responsible for the enhanced excitability of DRG neurons in rats with bone cancer pain. Here, using electrophysiology, Western blot and behavior assays, we documented that the current density of TTX-R sodium channels, especially the Nav1.8 channel, increased significantly in DRG neurons of rats with cancer-induced bone pain. This increase may be due to an increased expression of Nav1.8 on the membrane of DRG neurons. Accordantly, blockade of Nav1.8 sodium channels by its selective blocker A-803467 significantly alleviated the cancer-induced mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia in rats. Taken together, these results suggest that functional upregulation of Nav1.8 channels on the membrane of DRG neurons contributes to the development of cancer-induced bone pain.

  12. [{sup 68}Ga]PSMA-HBED uptake mimicking lymph node metastasis in coeliac ganglia: an important pitfall in clinical practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krohn, Thomas; Vogg, Andreas; Heinzel, Alexander; Behrendt, Florian F. [RWTH University Hospital Aachen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Aachen (Germany); Verburg, Frederik A.; Mottaghy, Felix M. [RWTH University Hospital Aachen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Aachen (Germany); Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Maastricht (Netherlands); Pufe, Thomas [RWTH University Aachen, Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Aachen (Germany); Neuhuber, Winfried [University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Institute of Anatomy I, Erlangen (Germany)

    2014-09-24

    To determine the frequency of seemingly pathological retroperitoneal uptake in the location of the coeliac ganglia in patients undergoing [{sup 68}Ga]PSMA-HBED PET/CT. The study included 85 men with prostate cancer referred for [{sup 68}Ga]PSMA-HBED PET/CT. The PET/CT scans were evaluated for the local finding in the prostate and the presence of lymph node metastases, distant metastases and coeliac ganglia. The corresponding standardized uptake values (SUV) were determined. SUVmax to background uptake (gluteal muscle SUVmean) ratios were calculated for the ganglia and lymph node metastases. Immunohistochemistry was performed on the ganglia. In 76 of the 85 patients (89.4 %) at least one ganglion with tracer uptake was found. For the ganglia, SUVmax and SUVmax to background SUVmean ratios were 2.97 ± 0.88 and 7.98 ± 2.84 (range 1.57-6.38 and 2.83-30.6), respectively, and 82.8 % of all ganglia showed an uptake ratio of >5.0. For lymph node metastases, SUVmax and SUVmax to background SUVmean ratios were 8.5 ± 7.0 and 23.31 ± 22.23 (range 2.06-35.9 and 5.25-115.8), respectively. In 35 patients (41.2 %), no lymph node metastases were found but tracer uptake was seen in the ganglia. Immunohistochemistry confirmed strong PSMA expression in the ganglia. Coeliac ganglia show a relevant [{sup 68}Ga]PSMA-HBED uptake in most patients and may mimic lymph node metastases. (orig.)

  13. Physical activity, by enhancing parasympathetic tone and activating the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway, is a therapeutic strategy to restrain chronic inflammation and prevent many chronic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lujan, Heidi L; DiCarlo, Stephen E

    2013-05-01

    Chronic diseases are the leading cause of death in the world and chronic inflammation is a key contributor to many chronic diseases. Accordingly, interventions that reduce inflammation may be effective in treating multiple adverse chronic conditions. In this context, physical activity is documented to reduce systemic low-grade inflammation and is acknowledged as an anti-inflammatory intervention. Furthermore, physically active individuals are at a lower risk of developing chronic diseases. However the mechanisms mediating this anti-inflammatory phenotype and range of health benefits are unknown. We hypothesize that the "cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway" (CAP) mediates the anti-inflammatory phenotype and range of health benefits associated with physical activity. The CAP is an endogenous, physiological mechanism by which acetylcholine from the vagus nerve, interacts with the innate immune system to modulate and restrain the inflammatory cascade. Importantly, higher levels of physical activity are associated with enhanced parasympathetic (vagal) tone and lower levels of C-reactive protein, a marker of low-grade inflammation. Accordingly, physical activity, by enhancing parasympathetic tone and activating the CAP, may be a therapeutic strategy to restrain chronic inflammation and prevent many chronic diseases.

  14. Regulating sadness and fear from outside and within: mothers' emotion socialization and adolescents' parasympathetic regulation predict the development of internalizing difficulties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastings, Paul D; Klimes-Dougan, Bonnie; Kendziora, Kimberly T; Brand, Ann; Zahn-Waxler, Carolyn

    2014-11-01

    Multilevel models of developmental psychopathology implicate both characteristics of the individual and their rearing environment in the etiology of internalizing problems and disorders. Maladaptive regulation of fear and sadness, the core of anxiety and depression, arises from the conjoint influences of ineffective parasympathetic regulation of emotion and ineffective emotion socialization experiences. In 171 youths (84 female, M = 13.69 years, SD = 1.84), we measured changes of respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) in response to sadness- and fear-inducing film clips and maternal supportive and punitive responses to youths' internalizing emotions. Youths and mothers reported on youths' internalizing problems and anxiety and depression symptoms concurrently and 2 years later at Time 2. Maternal supportive emotion socialization predicted fewer, and punitive socialization predicted more, mother-reported internalizing problems at Time 2 only for youths who showed RSA suppression to fear-inducing films. More RSA suppression to sadness-inducing films predicted more youth-reported internalizing problems at Time 2 in girls only. In addition, less supportive emotion socialization predicted more youth-reported depression symptoms at Time 2 only for girls who showed more RSA suppression to sadness. RSA suppression to sadness versus fear might reflect different patterns of atypical parasympathetic regulation of emotional arousal, both of which increase the risk for internalizing difficulties in youths, and especially girls, who lack maternal support for regulating emotions.

  15. Amnesia Associated with Bilateral Hippocampal and Bilateral Basal Ganglia Lesions in Anoxia with Stimulant Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haut, Marc W.; Hogg, Jeffery P.; Marshalek, Patrick J.; Suter, Blair C.; Miller, Liv E.

    2017-01-01

    We report a case of a 55-year-old man with ischemic lesions of the bilateral hippocampus and bilateral basal ganglia following a myocardial infarction during an episode of multiple drug use with subsequent anoxia requiring resuscitation. He presented for a neuropsychological evaluation with an anterograde amnesia for both explicit and procedural memory. There are two main points to this case, the unique aspects of the bilateral multifocal lesions and the functional, cognitive impact of these lesions. We hypothesize that his rare focal bilateral lesions of both the hippocampus and basal ganglia are a result of anoxia acting in synergy with his stimulant drug use (cocaine and/or 3,4-methylenedioxy-methamphetamine). Second, his unique lesions produced an explicit and implicit/procedural anterograde amnesia. PMID:28228745

  16. Acute Psychosis Associated with Subcortical Stroke: Comparison between Basal Ganglia and Mid-Brain Lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron McMurtray

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute onset of psychosis in an older or elderly individual without history of previous psychiatric disorders should prompt a thorough workup for neurologic causes of psychiatric symptoms. This report compares and contrasts clinical features of new onset of psychotic symptoms between two patients, one with an acute basal ganglia hemorrhagic stroke and another with an acute mid-brain ischemic stroke. Delusions and hallucinations due to basal ganglia lesions are theorized to develop as a result of frontal lobe dysfunction causing impairment of reality checking pathways in the brain, while visual hallucinations due to mid-brain lesions are theorized to develop due to dysregulation of inhibitory control of the ponto-geniculate-occipital system. Psychotic symptoms occurring due to stroke demonstrate varied clinical characteristics that depend on the location of the stroke within the brain. Treatment with antipsychotic medications may provide symptomatic relief.

  17. Communication between neuronal somata and satellite glial cells in sensory ganglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Li-Yen M; Gu, Yanping; Chen, Yong

    2013-10-01

    Studies of the structural organization and functions of the cell body of a neuron (soma) and its surrounding satellite glial cells (SGCs) in sensory ganglia have led to the realization that SGCs actively participate in the information processing of sensory signals from afferent terminals to the spinal cord. SGCs use a variety ways to communicate with each other and with their enwrapped soma. Changes in this communication under injurious conditions often lead to abnormal pain conditions. "What are the mechanisms underlying the neuronal soma and SGC communication in sensory ganglia?" and "how do tissue or nerve injuries affect the communication?" are the main questions addressed in this review. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Neuropathological Effect of Tributyltin on the Cerebral Ganglia of the Land Snail, Eobania vermiculata

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    Ahmed A. Soffar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was designed to evaluate the neuropathological effect of Tributyltin (TBT on the neurons of the cerebral ganglia in the land snail E. vermiculata. Sublethal dose (1/5 LD50 was used and the experiments lasted for 4 weeks. Light-and electron microscopical examination of treated animals revealed severe histopathological and ultrastructural alterations in the cerebral ganglia. These alterations included hyperchromatic, pyknotic or highly shrunken nuclei, extreme indentation of plasma membrane, atrophy of the perikarya of some neurons, margination of nucleoli, fragmentation or dilation of rough endoplasmic reticulum, damage of mitochondria and vacuolation and destruction of cytoplasm. In addition, degenerated synaptic vesicles and increased number of autophagosomes and myelin figures were frequently observed.

  19. Surprise disrupts cognition via a fronto-basal ganglia suppressive mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessel, Jan R; Jenkinson, Ned; Brittain, John-Stuart; Voets, Sarah H E M; Aziz, Tipu Z; Aron, Adam R

    2016-04-18

    Surprising events markedly affect behaviour and cognition, yet the underlying mechanism is unclear. Surprise recruits a brain mechanism that globally suppresses motor activity, ostensibly via the subthalamic nucleus (STN) of the basal ganglia. Here, we tested whether this suppressive mechanism extends beyond skeletomotor suppression and also affects cognition (here, verbal working memory, WM). We recorded scalp-EEG (electrophysiology) in healthy participants and STN local field potentials in Parkinson's patients during a task in which surprise disrupted WM. For scalp-EEG, surprising events engage the same independent neural signal component that indexes action stopping in a stop-signal task. Importantly, the degree of this recruitment mediates surprise-related WM decrements. Intracranially, STN activity is also increased post surprise, especially when WM is interrupted. These results suggest that surprise interrupts cognition via the same fronto-basal ganglia mechanism that interrupts action. This motivates a new neural theory of how cognition is interrupted, and how distraction arises after surprising events.

  20. Asymptomatic moyamoya syndrome, atlantoaxial subluxation and basal ganglia calcification in a child with Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyung Yeon; Lee, Kun-Soo; Weon, Young Cheol

    2013-12-01

    Down syndrome, the most common chromosomal abnormality, may be associated with various neurologic complications such as moyamoya syndrome, cervical spinal cord compression due to atlantoaxial subluxation, and basal ganglia damage, as well as epileptic seizures and stroke. Many cases of Down syndrome accompanied by isolated neurologic manifestations have been reported in children; however, Down syndrome with multiple neurologic conditions is rare. Here, we have reported a case of Down syndrome in a 10-year-old girl who presented with asymptomatic moyamoya syndrome, atlantoaxial subluxation with spinal cord compression, and basal ganglia calcification. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of Down syndrome, in a child, which was accompanied by these 3 neurologic complications simultaneously. As seen in this case, patients with Down syndrome may have neurologic conditions without any obvious neurologic symptoms; hence, patients with Down syndrome should be carefully examined for the presence of neurologic conditions.

  1. Extrahepatic portal vein obstruction with parkinsonism and symmetric hyperintense basal ganglia on T1 weighted MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayalakshmi Sita

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abnormal high signal in the globus pallidus on T1 weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of the brain has been well described in patients with chronic liver disease. It may be related to liver dysfunction or portal-systemic shunting. We report a case of extra hepatic portal vein obstruction with portal hypertension and esophageal varices that presented with extra pyramidal features. T1 weighted MRI brain scans showed increased symmetrical signal intensities in the basal ganglia. Normal hepatic function in this patient emphasizes the role of portal- systemic communications in the development of these hyperintensities, which may be due to deposition of paramagnetic substances like manganese in the basal ganglia.

  2. Bilateral basal ganglia and unilateral cortical involvement in a diabetic uremic patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Chang Hyo; Seok, Jung Im; Lee, Dong Kuck; An, Gee Sung

    2009-06-01

    We report a 57-year-old woman with uremic encephalopathy who presented with dysarthria, dysphagia, hypophonia, and drowsiness. The patient's radiologic findings were rather unusual in that magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed abnormal findings involving the basal ganglia bilaterally and frontal cortex unilaterally. After intensified hemodialysis, her symptoms and follow-up brain MRI showed marked improvement. We postulated that the underlying mechanism of uremic encephalopathy based on diffusion-weighted imaging and apparent diffusion coefficient maps.

  3. Shape of the basal ganglia in preadolescent children is associated with cognitive performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandman, Curt A; Head, Kevin; Muftuler, L Tugan; Su, Lydia; Buss, Claudia; Davis, Elysia Poggi

    2014-10-01

    Current studies support the belief that high levels of performance and intellectual abilities are associated with increased brain size or volume. With few exceptions, this conclusion is restricted to studies of post-adolescent subjects and to cerebral cortex. There is evidence that "bigger is better" may not pertain to children and further, that there are areas of the brain in which larger structures are associated with cognitive deficits. In 50 preadolescent children (21 girls) a structural survey of the brain (VBM) was conducted to determine and locate areas in which gray matter volume was associated with poor cognitive performance. Only increased gray matter volume in particular areas of the basal ganglia and specifically the putamen was significantly associated with poor performance on tests of memory, response speed and a general marker and subtests of intelligence. Based on the VBM findings, volumetric analysis of basal ganglia structures was performed using FSL/FIRST. However, no significant changes in total volume of putamen or other basal ganglia structures were detected with this analysis. The disagreement between measures of localized gray matter differences and volumetric analysis suggested that there might be local regional deformity rather than widespread volumetric changes of the putamen. Surface analysis with FSL/FIRST demonstrated that bilateral outward deformation of the putamen, but especially the left, was associated with poor performance on several cognitive tests. Expansion of the globus pallidus and caudate nucleus also was associated with poor performance. Moreover a significant association was detected between a reliable test of language-free intelligence and topographically distinct outward and inward deformation of the putamen. Expansion and contraction of the putamen as a predictor of intelligence may explain why this association was not observed with measures of total volume. These results suggest that deformity is a sensitive measure

  4. Dopamine transporter density of the basal ganglia assessed with I-123 IPT SPECT in methamphetamine abusers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Joo Ryung; Ahn, Byeong Cheol [Kyungpook National University Medical School, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Kewm, Do Hun [National Bugok Mental Hospital, Changryung (Korea, Republic of)] (and others)

    2005-10-15

    Functional imaging of dopamine transporter (DAT) defines integrity of the dopaminergic system, and DAT is the target site of drugs of abuse such as cocaine and methamphetamine. Functional imaging the DAT may be a sensitive and selective indicator of neurotoxic change by the drug. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the clinical implications of qualitative/quantitative analyses of dopamine transporter imaging in methamphetamine abusers. Six detoxified methamphetamine abusers (abuser group) and 4 volunteers (control group) were enrolled in this study. Brain MRI was performed in all of abuser group. Abuser group underwent psychiatric and depression assessment using brief psychiatric rating scale (BPRS) and Hamilton depression rating scale (HAMD), respectively. All of the subjects underwent I-123 IPT SPECT (IPT SPECT). IPT SPECT image was analysed with visual qualitative method and quantitative method using basal ganglia dopamine transporter (DAT) specific/non-specific binding ratio (SBR). Comparison of DAT SBR between abuser and control groups was performed. We also performed correlation tests between psychiatric and depression assessment results and DAT SBR in abuser group. All of abuser group showed normal MRI finding, but had residual psychiatric and depressive symptoms, and psychiatric and depressive symptom scores were exactly correlated (r=1.0, {rho} =0.005) each other. Five of them showed abnormal finding on qualitative visual I-123 IPT SPECT. Abuser group had lower basal ganglia DAT SBR than that of control (2.38 {+-} 0.20 vs 3.04 {+-} 0.27, {rho} =0.000). Psychiatric and depressive symptoms were negatively well correlated with basal ganglia DAT SBR (r=-0.908, {rho} =0.012, r=-0.924, {rho} =0.009) This results suggest that dopamine transporter imaging using I-123 IPT SPECT may be used to evaluate dopaminergic system of the basal ganglia and the clinical status in methamphetamine abusers.

  5. Migration and maturation pattern of fetal enteric ganglia: A study of 16 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranjana Bandyopadhyay

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To study the migration and developmental pattern of ganglion cells in fetuses aged 9-21 weeks, and to document whether the migration was occurring circumferentially equally in the entire axis or if there were discrepancies in different portions at the same level. Settings and Design: The hypothesis regarding the pathogenesis of Hirschsprung′s disease mainly revolves around two schools. One is the single gradient migration of ganglia and the other is a dual gradient migration theory. Understanding the embryological development of enteric ganglia is necessary to study the pathogenesis of intestinal innervation disorders. Materials and Methods: We studied the development of intestinal ganglia in fetuses aged 9-21 weeks. Serial longitudinal sections from the colon were studied, the first one including the squamo-columnar junction, for the presence and the nature of ganglion cells with Hematoxylin and Eosin, and neurone-specific enolase immunostaining. Transverse sections from proximal gut were studied in a similar fashion. Thus, we evaluated the migration pattern as well as the nature of ganglia in the fetuses. We also measured the length of distal aganglionic segment in these growing fetuses. Results: We noted that ganglion cells appear first in the myenteric plexus followed by deep and superficial submucous plexus. We also found evidences in favor of dual migration theory, and the distal aganglionic segment varies around the circumference of the rectal wall. Conclusions: We got evidences in support of a dual migration pattern of intestinal ganglion cells. The level of distal aganglionic segments when measured from squamo-columnar junction varied with the age of gestation and the length was incongruous. The description of distal aganglionic segment may help surgeons while taking biopsies or during operative procedures.

  6. Basal ganglia modulation of thalamocortical relay in Parkinson’s disease and dystonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yixin eGuo

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Basal ganglia dysfunction has being implied in both Parkinson's disease and dystonia. While these disorders probably involve different cellular and circuit pathologies within and beyond basal ganglia, there may be some shared neurophysiological pathways. For example, pallidotomy and pallidal Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS are used in symptomatic treatment of both disorders. Both conditions are marked by alterations of rhythmicity of neural activity throughout basal ganglia-thalamocortical circuits. Increased synchronized oscillatory activity in beta band is characteristic of Parkinson’s disease, while different frequency bands, theta and alpha, are involved in dystonia. We compare the effect of the activity of GPi, the output nuclei of the basal ganglia, on the information processing in the downstream neural circuits of thalamus in Parkinson’s disease and dystonia. We use a data-driven computational approach, a computational model of the thalamocortical (TC cell modulated by experimentally recorded data, to study the differences and similarities of thalamic dynamics in dystonia and Parkinson's disease. Our analysis shows no substantial differences in TC relay between the two conditions. Our results suggest that, similar to Parkinson’s disease, a disruption of thalamic processing could also be involved in dystonia. Moreover, the degree to which TC relay fidelity is impaired is approximately the same in both conditions. While Parkinson’s disease and dystonia may have different pathologies and differ in the oscillatory content of neural discharge, our results suggest that the effect of patterning of pallidal discharge is similar in both conditions. Furthermore, these results suggest that the mechanisms of GPi DBS in dystonia maybe involve improvement of TC relay fidelity.

  7. Basal ganglia modulation of thalamocortical relay in Parkinson's disease and dystonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yixin; Park, Choongseok; Worth, Robert M; Rubchinsky, Leonid L

    2013-01-01

    Basal ganglia dysfunction has being implied in both Parkinson's disease and dystonia. While these disorders probably involve different cellular and circuit pathologies within and beyond basal ganglia, there may be some shared neurophysiological pathways. For example, pallidotomy and pallidal Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) are used in symptomatic treatment of both disorders. Both conditions are marked by alterations of rhythmicity of neural activity throughout basal ganglia-thalamocortical circuits. Increased synchronized oscillatory activity in beta band is characteristic of Parkinson's disease, while different frequency bands, theta and alpha, are involved in dystonia. We compare the effect of the activity of GPi, the output nuclei of the basal ganglia, on information processing in the downstream neural circuits of thalamus in Parkinson's disease and dystonia. We use a data-driven computational approach, a computational model of the thalamocortical (TC) cell modulated by experimentally recorded data, to study the differences and similarities of thalamic dynamics in dystonia and Parkinson's disease. Our analysis shows no substantial differences in TC relay between the two conditions. Our results suggest that, similar to Parkinson's disease, a disruption of thalamic processing could also be involved in dystonia. Moreover, the degree to which TC relay fidelity is impaired is approximately the same in both conditions. While Parkinson's disease and dystonia may have different pathologies and differ in the oscillatory content of neural discharge, our results suggest that the effect of patterning of pallidal discharge is similar in both conditions. Furthermore, these results suggest that the mechanisms of GPi DBS in dystonia may involve improvement of TC relay fidelity.

  8. Mean-field modeling of the basal ganglia-thalamocortical system. II Dynamics of parkinsonian oscillations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Albada, S J; Gray, R T; Drysdale, P M; Robinson, P A

    2009-04-21

    Neuronal correlates of Parkinson's disease (PD) include a shift to lower frequencies in the electroencephalogram (EEG) and enhanced synchronized oscillations at 3-7 and 7-30 Hz in the basal ganglia, thalamus, and cortex. This study describes the dynamics of a recent physiologically based mean-field model of the basal ganglia-thalamocortical system, and shows how it accounts for many key electrophysiological correlates of PD. Its detailed functional connectivity comprises partially segregated direct and indirect pathways through two populations of striatal neurons, a hyperdirect pathway involving a corticosubthalamic projection, thalamostriatal feedback, and local inhibition in striatum and external pallidum (GPe). In a companion paper, realistic steady-state firing rates were obtained for the healthy state, and after dopamine loss modeled by weaker direct and stronger indirect pathways, reduced intrapallidal inhibition, lower firing thresholds of the GPe and subthalamic nucleus (STN), a stronger projection from striatum to GPe, and weaker cortical interactions. Here it is shown that oscillations around 5 and 20 Hz can arise with a strong indirect pathway, which also causes increased synchronization throughout the basal ganglia. Furthermore, increased theta power with progressive nigrostriatal degeneration is correlated with reduced alpha power and peak frequency, in agreement with empirical results. Unlike the hyperdirect pathway, the indirect pathway sustains oscillations with phase relationships that coincide with those found experimentally. Alterations in the responses of basal ganglia to transient stimuli accord with experimental observations. Reduced cortical gains due to both nigrostriatal and mesocortical dopamine loss lead to slower changes in cortical activity and may be related to bradykinesia. Finally, increased EEG power found in some studies may be partly explained by a lower effective GPe firing threshold, reduced GPe-GPe inhibition, and/or weaker

  9. The contribution of synaptic plasticity in the basal ganglia to the processing of visual information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sil'kis, I G

    2007-10-01

    A mechanism for the involvement of the basal ganglia in the processing of visual information, based on dopamine-dependent modulation of the efficiency of synaptic transmission in interconnected parallel associative and limbic cortex-basal ganglia-thalamus-cortex circuits, is proposed. Each circuit consists of a visual or prefrontal area of the cortex connected with the thalamic nucleus and the corresponding areas in different nuclei of the basal ganglia. The circulation of activity in these circuits is supported by the recurrent arrival of information in the thalamus and cortex. Dopamine released in response to a visual stimulus modulates the efficiencies of "strong" and "weak" corticostriatal inputs in different directions, and the subsequent reorganization of activity in the circuit leads to disinhibition (inhibition) of the activity of those cortical neurons which are "strongly" ("weakly") excited by the visual stimulus simultaneously with dopaminergic cells. The pattern in each cortical area is the neuronal reflection of the properties of the visual stimulus processed by this area. Excitation of dopaminergic cells by the visual stimulus via the superior colliculi requires parallel activation of the disinhibitory input to the superior colliculi via the thalamus and the "direct" pathway" in the basal ganglia. The prefrontal cortex, excited by the visual stimulus via the mediodorsal nucleus of the thalamus, mediates the descending influence on the activity of dopaminergic cells, simultaneously controlling dopamine release in different areas of the striatum and thus facilitating the mutual selection of neural reflections of the individual properties of the visual stimulus and their binding into an integral image.

  10. Dissociating hippocampal and basal ganglia contributions to category learning using stimulus novelty and subjective judgments

    OpenAIRE

    Seger, Carol A.; Dennison, Christina S.; Lopez-Paniagua, Dan; Peterson, Erik J.; Roark, Aubrey A.

    2011-01-01

    We identified factors leading to hippocampal and basal ganglia recruitment during categorization learning. Subjects alternated between blocks of a standard trial and error category learning task and a subjective judgment task. In the subjective judgments task subjects categorized the stimulus and then instead of receiving feedback they indicated the basis of their response using 4 options: Remember: Conscious episodic memory of previous trials. Know-Automatic: Automatic, rapid response accomp...

  11. Functional properties of the basal ganglia's re-entrant loop architecture: selection and reinforcement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redgrave, P; Vautrelle, N; Reynolds, J N J

    2011-12-15

    Multifunctional agents with limited motor resources must decide what actions will best ensure their survival. Moreover, given that in an unpredictable world things don't always work out, considerable advantage is to be gained by learning from experience - instrumental behaviour that maximises reward and minimises punishment. In this review we will argue that the re-entrant looped architecture of the basal ganglia represents biological solutions to these fundamental behavioural problems of selection and reinforcement. A potential solution to the selection problem is provided for by selective disinhibition within the parallel loop architecture that connects the basal ganglia with external neural structures. The relay points within these loops permit the signals of a particular channel to be modified by external influences. In part, these influences have the capacity to modify overall selections so that the probability of re-selecting reinforced behaviours in the future is altered. This is the basic process of instrumental learning, which we suggest decomposes into two sub-problems for the agent: (i) learning which external events it causes to happen and learning precisely what it is doing that is causal; and (ii) having determined agency and discovered novel action-outcome routines, how best to exploit this knowledge to maximise future reward acquisitions. Considerations of connectional architecture and signal timing suggest that the short-latency, sensory-evoked dopamine response, which can modulate the re-entrant loop structure within the basal ganglia, is ideally suited to reinforce the determination of agency and the discovery of novel actions. Alternatively, recent studies showing that presence or absence of reward can selectively modulate the magnitude of signals in structures providing input signals to the basal ganglia, offer an alternative mechanism for biasing selection within the re-entrant loop architecture. We suggest that this mechanism may be better

  12. Extensive Direct Subcortical Cerebellum-Basal Ganglia Connections in Human Brain as Revealed by Constrained Spherical Deconvolution Tractography

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    Demetrio eMilardi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The connections between the cerebellum and basal ganglia were assumed to occur at the level of neocortex. However evidences from animal data have challenged this old perspective showing extensive subcortical pathways linking the cerebellum with the basal ganglia. Here we tested the hypothesis if these connections also exist between the cerebellum and basal ganglia in the human brain by using diffusion magnetic resonance imaging and tractography. Fifteen healthy subjects were analyzed by using constrained spherical deconvolution technique obtained with a 3T magnetic resonance imaging scanner. We found extensive connections running between the subthalamic nucleus and cerebellar cortex and, as novel result, we demonstrated a direct route linking the dentate nucleus to the internal globus pallidus as well as to the substantia nigra. These findings may open a new scenario on the interpretation of basal ganglia disorders.

  13. A neural mass model of basal ganglia nuclei simulates pathological beta rhythm in Parkinson's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fei; Wang, Jiang; Liu, Chen; Li, Huiyan; Deng, Bin; Fietkiewicz, Chris; Loparo, Kenneth A.

    2016-12-01

    An increase in beta oscillations within the basal ganglia nuclei has been shown to be associated with movement disorder, such as Parkinson's disease. The motor cortex and an excitatory-inhibitory neuronal network composed of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) and the external globus pallidus (GPe) are thought to play an important role in the generation of these oscillations. In this paper, we propose a neuron mass model of the basal ganglia on the population level that reproduces the Parkinsonian oscillations in a reciprocal excitatory-inhibitory network. Moreover, it is shown that the generation and frequency of these pathological beta oscillations are varied by the coupling strength and the intrinsic characteristics of the basal ganglia. Simulation results reveal that increase of the coupling strength induces the generation of the beta oscillation, as well as enhances the oscillation frequency. However, for the intrinsic properties of each nucleus in the excitatory-inhibitory network, the STN primarily influences the generation of the beta oscillation while the GPe mainly determines its frequency. Interestingly, describing function analysis applied on this model theoretically explains the mechanism of pathological beta oscillations.

  14. Bilateral basal ganglia lesions in patients with end-stage diabetic nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jordan Y Z; Yong, Tuck Y; Sebben, Ruben; Khoo, Eewin; Disney, Alex P S

    2008-02-01

    Acute movement disorder associated with reversible bilateral basal ganglia lesions is an increasingly recognized syndrome in patients with end-stage renal disease, especially in the setting of concurrent diabetes mellitus. We report an elderly man with end-stage diabetic nephropathy treated by daily automated peritoneal dialysis who developed subacute symptoms of gait disturbance, dysarthria, dysphagia and lethargy. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging of the head revealed bilateral symmetrical basal ganglia lesions. Repeat imaging 3 weeks later showed that these lesions had regressed spontaneously. However, his neurological symptoms improved slowly. These findings were similar to 23 other cases in the literature. Review of these cases shows that clinical features were predominantly bradykinesia, gait disturbance and concurrent metabolic acidosis (observed in 90% of cases). The pathogenesis of this condition has not been clearly defined, but uraemia may be an aggravating factor in predisposed patients, particularly in the presence of diabetic microvascular disease. There is no specific treatment for this condition; supportive measures are the mainstay of management. In the majority of patients, neurological improvement lags behind regression of basal ganglia lesions seen with neuroimaging, and the long-term outcome is variable.

  15. Dissociable neural systems for timing: evidence from subjects with basal ganglia lesions.

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    H Branch Coslett

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The neural basis of timing remains poorly understood. Although controversy persists, many lines of evidence, including studies in animals, functional imaging studies in humans and lesion studies in humans and animals suggest that the basal ganglia are important for temporal processing [1]. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We report data from a wide range of timing tasks from two subjects with disabling neurologic deficits caused by bilateral lesions of the basal ganglia. Both subjects perform well on tasks assessing time estimation, reproduction and production tasks. Additionally, one subject performed normally on psychophysical tasks requiring the comparison of time intervals ranging from milliseconds to seconds; the second subject performed abnormally on the psychophysical task with a 300ms standard but did well with 600ms, 2000ms and 8000ms standards. Both subjects performed poorly on an isochronous rhythm production task on which they are required to maintain rhythmic tapping. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: As studies of subjects with brain lesions permit strong inferences regarding the necessity of brain structures, these data demonstrate that the basal ganglia are not crucial for many sub- or supra-second timing operations in humans but are needed for the timing procedures that underlie the production of movements. This dissociation suggests that distinct and dissociable processes may be employed to measure time intervals. Inconsistencies in findings regarding the neural basis of timing may reflect the availability of multiple temporal processing routines that are flexibly implemented in response to task demands.

  16. Solubilization of nerve growth factor receptors of rabbit superior cervical ganglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, S P; Cuatrecasas, P; Snyder, S H

    1976-09-25

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) receptors of rabbit superior cervical ganglia can be solubilized by treatment with detergents and readily assayed in the soluble state. Triton X-100 and deoxycholate reduce specific binding of NGF to ganglia membranes. In membranes treated with Triton X-100 (0.5 to 2.0%) the reduction in NGF binding by membranes is accompanied by a corresponding increase in binding in the supernatant fluid. NGF binding in soluble preparations can be rapidly assayed by precipitating NGF bound to receptors with polyethylene glycol under conditions in which unbound NGF is not precipitated. NGF binding to soluble preparations is saturable whether evaluated by the binding of 125I-NGF or by diluting 125I-NGF with native NGF. Using both techniques, the dissociation constant for NGF binding to soluble receptors is about 0.2 nM, the same as its dissociation constant from receptor sites in intact membranes. NGF binding to soluble receptors displays a high degree of peptide specificity, similar to receptor sites in intact membranes of superior cervical ganglia. A method of labeling NGF with 125I-3(4-hydroxyphenyl) propionic acid N-hydroxysuccinimide ester is described which leads to binding properties that are superior to those obtained with previously described 125I-NGF preparations.

  17. Evidence for altered basal ganglia-brainstem connections in cervical dystonia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne J Blood

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There has been increasing interest in the interaction of the basal ganglia with the cerebellum and the brainstem in motor control and movement disorders. In addition, it has been suggested that these subcortical connections with the basal ganglia may help to coordinate a network of regions involved in mediating posture and stabilization. While studies in animal models support a role for this circuitry in the pathophysiology of the movement disorder dystonia, thus far, there is only indirect evidence for this in humans with dystonia. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In the current study we investigated probabilistic diffusion tractography in DYT1-negative patients with cervical dystonia and matched healthy control subjects, with the goal of showing that patients exhibit altered microstructure in the connectivity between the pallidum and brainstem. The brainstem regions investigated included nuclei that are known to exhibit strong connections with the cerebellum. We observed large clusters of tractography differences in patients relative to healthy controls, between the pallidum and the brainstem. Tractography was decreased in the left hemisphere and increased in the right hemisphere in patients, suggesting a potential basis for the left/right white matter asymmetry we previously observed in focal dystonia patients. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings support the hypothesis that connections between the basal ganglia and brainstem play a role in the pathophysiology of dystonia.

  18. MANAGEMENT OF WRIST GANGLIA BY TRANSFIXATION TECHNIQUE: OUR EXPERIENCE IN A RURAL TEACHING INSTITUTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma Man

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Ganglion is one of the commonly seen lesions in minor surgical practice. Treatment of wrist ganglia includes simple reassurance, watchful waiting, non-operative aspiration, injection, surgical excision and even sometimes advanced endoscopic excision. Although treatment is not often necessary, many patients seeking consultation ask for some form of definitive treatment. High incidence of recurrence is seen with cyst aspiration/injection or after surgical excision. Recurrence is the common problem, irrespective of the treatment modality. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This study evaluates results of a modified minimally invasive surgical technique used for the management of ganglia of the wrist. Thirty six wrist ganglia have been treated by using the transfixation technique. RESULTS: The successful results for the procedure were seen in 94.44% patients. Consequent to the procedure, an average of 2days off work were lost. Recurrence in the 2 year follow-up was seen in two patients. DISCUSSION: On comparing with other modalities this method is minimally invasive, cost-effective, less time consuming, low rate of recurrence and at the same time can be carried out under local anesthesia as a day case procedure and even not requiring any specific instrument and further this technique can be easily learned.

  19. Acute Chorea Characterized by Bilateral Basal Ganglia Lesions in a Patient with Diabetic Nephropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İbrahim DOĞAN

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The syndrome of acute bilateral basal ganglia lesions associated with uremia presents with parkinsonism, altered mental status, and chorea in association with specific imaging findings in the basal ganglia. It is an uncommon syndrome seen generally in patients with diabetes mellitus and renal failure. We report a male patient with diabetes mellitus who received hemodialysis treatment 3 days a week for 5 years and suffered from choreic movements developed suddenly and associated with bilateral basal ganglia lesions. In the brain magnetic resonance (MR imaging, isointense was detected in sequence T1 in the bilateral basal ganglions and hyperintense lesion was determined in T2 and FLAIR sequences. The patient was administered daily hemodialysis and neuroleptic treatment. After intensified hemodialysis, his symptoms and follow-up brain MR imaging showed marked improvement. The underlying mechanism of such lesions may be associated with metabolic, as well as vascular factors. Acute choreic movements may be seen in patients with diabetic nephropathy and intensification of hemodialysis treatment along with blood glucose regulation may provide improvement in this syndrome.

  20. Early imaging findings in germ cell tumors arising from the basal ganglia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, So Mi [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, 101 Daehak-ro, Jongno-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kyungpook National University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Kim, In-One; Choi, Young Hun; Cheon, Jung-Eun; Kim, Woo Sun [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Institute of Radiation Medicine, 101 Daehak-ro, Jongno-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Hyun-Hae [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, 101 Daehak-ro, Jongno-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ewha Woman' s University Mokdong Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); You, Sun Kyoung [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, 101 Daehak-ro, Jongno-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chungnam National University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    It is difficult to diagnosis early stage germ cell tumors originating in the basal ganglia, but early recognition is important for better outcome. To evaluate serial MR images of basal ganglia germ cell tumors, with emphasis on the features of early stage tumors. We retrospectively reviewed serial MR images of 15 tumors in 14 children and young adults. We categorized MR images of the tumors as follows: type I, ill-defined patchy lesions (<3 cm) without cyst; type II, small mass lesions (<3 cm) with cyst; and type III, large lesions (≥3 cm) with cyst. We also assessed temporal changes of the MR images. On the initial images, 8 of 11 (73%) type I tumors progressed to types II or III, and 3 of 4 (75%) type II tumors progressed to type III. The remaining 4 tumors did not change in type. All type II tumors (5/5, 100%) that changed from type I had a few tiny cysts. Intratumoral hemorrhage was observed even in the type I tumor. Ipsilateral hemiatrophy was observed in most of the tumors (13/15, 87%) on initial MR images. As tumors grew, cystic changes, intratumoral hemorrhage, and ipsilateral hemiatrophy became more apparent. Early stage basal ganglia germ cell tumors appear as ill-defined small patchy hyperintense lesions without cysts on T2-weighted images, are frequently associated with ipsilateral hemiatrophy, and sometimes show microhemorrhage. Tumors develop tiny cysts at a relatively early stage. (orig.)

  1. Integration of reinforcement learning and optimal decision-making theories of the basal ganglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogacz, Rafal; Larsen, Tobias

    2011-04-01

    This article seeks to integrate two sets of theories describing action selection in the basal ganglia: reinforcement learning theories describing learning which actions to select to maximize reward and decision-making theories proposing that the basal ganglia selects actions on the basis of sensory evidence accumulated in the cortex. In particular, we present a model that integrates the actor-critic model of reinforcement learning and a model assuming that the cortico-basal-ganglia circuit implements a statistically optimal decision-making procedure. The values of cortico-striatal weights required for optimal decision making in our model differ from those provided by standard reinforcement learning models. Nevertheless, we show that an actor-critic model converges to the weights required for optimal decision making when biologically realistic limits on synaptic weights are introduced. We also describe the model's predictions concerning reaction times and neural responses during learning, and we discuss directions required for further integration of reinforcement learning and optimal decision-making theories.

  2. Listening to Rhythmic Music Reduces Connectivity within the Basal Ganglia and the Reward System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodal, Hans P; Osnes, Berge; Specht, Karsten

    2017-01-01

    Music can trigger emotional responses in a more direct way than any other stimulus. In particular, music-evoked pleasure involves brain networks that are part of the reward system. Furthermore, rhythmic music stimulates the basal ganglia and may trigger involuntary movements to the beat. In the present study, we created a continuously playing rhythmic, dance floor-like composition where the ambient noise from the MR scanner was incorporated as an additional instrument of rhythm. By treating this continuous stimulation paradigm as a variant of resting-state, the data was analyzed with stochastic dynamic causal modeling (sDCM), which was used for exploring functional dependencies and interactions between core areas of auditory perception, rhythm processing, and reward processing. The sDCM model was a fully connected model with the following areas: auditory cortex, putamen/pallidum, and ventral striatum/nucleus accumbens of both hemispheres. The resulting estimated parameters were compared to ordinary resting-state data, without an additional continuous stimulation. Besides reduced connectivity within the basal ganglia, the results indicated a reduced functional connectivity of the reward system, namely the right ventral striatum/nucleus accumbens from and to the basal ganglia and auditory network while listening to rhythmic music. In addition, the right ventral striatum/nucleus accumbens demonstrated also a change in its hemodynamic parameter, reflecting an increased level of activation. These converging results may indicate that the dopaminergic reward system reduces its functional connectivity and relinquishing its constraints on other areas when we listen to rhythmic music.

  3. Evidence of sympathetic fibers in the male rat pelvic nerve by gross anatomy, retrograde labeling and high resolution autoradiographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuliano, F; Facchinetti, P; Bernabé, J; Benoit, G; Calas, A; Rampin, O

    1997-12-01

    Several arguments exist in various animal species and man for the presence of a sympathetic component in the pelvic nerve, classically regarded as parasympathetic. We tested this hypothesis in the male rat. Nerve bundles issued from the sacral region of the paravertebral sympathetic chain and reaching the S1 spinal nerve were identified. Neurons in the sacral parasympathetic nucleus of the L6-S1 spinal cord and in the L2-S1 paravertebral sympathetic chain were retrogradely labeled from the pelvic nerve. Radioautography evidenced labeling of unmyelinated fibers in the pelvic nerve following in vitro incubation with 3H-noradrenaline. A population of sympathetic fibers issued from the lumbosacral sympathetic chain exists in the pelvic nerve of the male rat. This qualitative study provides a morphological basis to uncover the role of the sympathetic outflow present in the pelvic nerve.

  4. Expression of the short chain fatty acid receptor GPR41/FFAR3 in autonomic and somatic sensory ganglia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nøhr, Mark Klitgaard; Egerod, K L; Christiansen, S H

    2015-01-01

    in the ganglia of the transgenic mice was confirmed by immunohistochemistry using an antibody directed against the receptor protein, and double labeling colocalized mRFP and the FFAR3-protein in the same neurons. Finally, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) on extracts from the ganglia...... but also directly by modifying physiological reflexes integrating the peripheral nervous system and the gastro-intestinal tract....

  5. A review of pathologies associated with high T1W signal intensity in the basal ganglia on Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Zaitout, Zahia; Romanowski, Charles; Karunasaagarar, Kavitasagary; Connolly, Daniel; Batty, Ruth

    2014-01-01

    Summary With several functions and a fundamental influence over cognition and motor functions, the basal ganglia are the cohesive centre of the brain. There are several conditions which affect the basal ganglia and these have various clinical and radiological manifestations. Nevertheless, on magnetic resonance imaging there is a limited differential diagnosis for those conditions presenting with T1 weighted spin echo hyperintensity within the central nervous system in general and the basal ga...

  6. TNFα levels and macrophages expression reflect an inflammatory potential of trigeminal ganglia in a mouse model of familial hemiplegic migraine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessia Franceschini

    Full Text Available Latent changes in trigeminal ganglion structure and function resembling inflammatory conditions may predispose to acute attacks of migraine pain. Here, we investigated whether, in trigeminal sensory ganglia, cytokines such as TNFα might contribute to a local inflammatory phenotype of a transgenic knock-in (KI mouse model of familial hemiplegic migraine type-1 (FHM-1. To this end, macrophage occurrence and cytokine expression in trigeminal ganglia were compared between wild type (WT and R192Q mutant Ca(V2.1 Ca(2+ channel (R192Q KI mice, a genetic model of FHM-1. Cellular and molecular characterization was performed using a combination of confocal immunohistochemistry and cytokine assays. With respect to WT, R192Q KI trigeminal ganglia were enriched in activated macrophages as suggested by their morphology and immunoreactivity to the markers Iba1, CD11b, and ED1. R192Q KI trigeminal ganglia constitutively expressed higher mRNA levels of IL1β, IL6, IL10 and TNFα cytokines and the MCP-1 chemokine. Consistent with the report that TNFα is a major factor to sensitize trigeminal ganglia, we observed that, following an inflammatory reaction evoked by LPS injection, TNFα expression and macrophage occurrence were significantly higher in R192Q KI ganglia with respect to WT ganglia. Our data suggest that, in KI trigeminal ganglia, the complex cellular and molecular environment could support a new tissue phenotype compatible with a neuroinflammatory profile. We propose that, in FHM patients, this condition might contribute to trigeminal pain pathophysiology through release of soluble mediators, including TNFα, that may modulate the crosstalk between sensory neurons and resident glia, underlying the process of neuronal sensitisation.

  7. BLOOD VESSELS IN GANGLIA IN HUMAN ESOPHAGUS MIGHT EXPLAIN THE HIGHER FREQUENCY OF MEGAESOPHAGUS COMPARED WITH MEGACOLON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila Jorge Adad

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to determine the existence of blood vessels within ganglia of the myenteric plexus of the human esophagus and colon. At necropsy, 15 stillborns, newborns and children up to two years of age, with no gastrointestinal disorders, were examined. Rings of the esophagus and colon were analyzed and then fixed in formalin and processed for paraffin. Histological sections were stained by hematoxylin-eosin, Giemsa and immunohistochemistry for the characterization of endothelial cells, using antibodies for anti-factor VIII and CD31. Blood vessels were identified within the ganglia of the myenteric plexus of the esophagus, and no blood vessels were found in any ganglia of the colon. It was concluded that the ganglia of the myenteric plexus of the esophagus are vascularized, while the ganglia of the colon are avascular. Vascularization within the esophageal ganglia could facilitate the entrance of infectious agents, as well as the development of inflammatory responses (ganglionitis and denervation, as found in Chagas disease and idiopathic achalasia. This could explain the higher frequency of megaesophagus compared with megacolon.

  8. LncRNA NONRATT021972 involved the pathophysiologic processes mediated by P2X7 receptors in stellate ganglia after myocardial ischemic injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Lifang; Tu, Guihua; Xie, Wei; Wen, Shiyao; Xie, Qiuyu; Liu, Shuangmei; Li, Guilin; Gao, Yun; Xu, Hong; Wang, Shouyu; Xue, Yun; Wu, Bing; Lv, Qiulan; Ying, Mofeng; Zhang, Xi; Liang, Shangdong

    2016-03-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) acts on P2X receptors to initiate signal transmission. P2X7 receptors play a role in the pathophysiological process of myocardial ischemic injury. Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) participate in numerous biological functions independent of protein translation. LncRNAs are implicated in nervous system diseases. This study investigated the effects of NONRATT021972 small interference RNA (siRNA) on the pathophysiologic processes mediated by P2X7 receptors in stellate ganglia (SG) after myocardial ischemic injury. Our results demonstrated that the expression of NONRATT021972 in SG was significantly higher in the myocardial ischemic (MI) group than in the control group. Treatment of MI rats with NONRATT021972 siRNA, the P2X7 antagonist brilliant blue G (BBG), or P2X7 siRNA improved the histology of injured ischemic cardiac tissues and decreased the elevated concentrations of serum myocardial enzymes, creatine kinase (CK), CK isoform MB (CK-MB), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) compared to the MI rats. NONRATT021972 siRNA, BBG, or P2X7 siRNA treatment in MI rats decreased the expression levels of P2X7 immunoreactivity, P2X7 messenger RNA (mRNA), and P2X7 protein, interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and phosphorylated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) in the SG compared to MI rats. NONRATT021972 siRNA treatment prevented the pathophysiologic processes mediated by P2X7 receptors in the SG after myocardial ischemic injury.

  9. Guanethidine-induced sympathectomy in the nude rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, A; Juul, P; Christensen, H B

    1989-01-01

    Guanethidine sulphate 40 mg/kg was administered intraperitoneally daily for 14 days to normal Lewis rats and athymic nude rats of a Lewis background (rnu/rnu). Histological examination of the superior cervical ganglia demonstrated a pronounced chromatolysis of the neurones and a loss of the major...... part of the nerve cells accompanied by an increased number of small mononuclear inflammatory cells. The extent of chromatolysis and nerve cell death induced by guanethidine did not differ between normal and nude rats, whereas the increase of the number of mononuclear cells was lower in the nude rats...... than in the normal rats (163 and 268 per cent respectively of the saline treated controls, P less than 0.01). Since guanethidine induced nerve cell death in the T-cell deficient nude rat to the same extent as in normal rats, it is concluded, that the effect is caused by either a thymus...

  10. Dopamine transporter density of the basal ganglia in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder assessed with I-123 IPT SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Won Gee; Kim, Tae Hoon; Ryu, Young Hoon; Yun, Mi Jin; Lee, Jong Doo; Cheon, Keun Ah [College of Medicine, Yonsei Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chi, Dae Yoon [College of Medicine, Inha Univ., Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jong Ho; Choi, Tae Hyun [School of Medicine, Gachon Univ., Gachon (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-08-01

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) has been known as psychiatric disorder in childhood associated with dopamine dysregulation. In present study, we investigated changes in dopamine transporter (DAT) density of the basal ganglias using I-123 N-(3-iodopropen-2-yl) -2-carbomethoxy-3beta-(4-chlorphenyl) tropane (I-123 IPT) SPECT in children with ADHD before and after methylphenidate treatment. Nine drug-naive children with ADHD and seven normal children were included in the study. We performed brain SPECT two hours after the intravenous administration of I-123 IPT and made both quantitative and qualitative analyses using the obtained SPECT data, which were reconstructed for the assessment of specific/nonspecific DAT binding ratios in the basal ganglia. All children with ADHD reperformed (123I)IPT SPECT after treatment with methylphenidate (0.7mg/kg/d) during about 8 weeks. SPECT data reconstructed for the assessment of specific/nonspecific DAT binding ratio of the basal ganglia were compared between before and after treatment methyphenidate. We investigated correlation between the change of ADHD symptom severity assessed with ADHD rating scale-IV and specific/nonspecific DAT binding ratio of basal ganglia. Children with ADHD had a significantly greater specific/nonspecific DAT binding ratio of the basal ganglia comparing to normal children (Right : z = 2.057, p = 0.041 ; Left : z = 2.096, p = 0.032). Under treatment with methylphenidate in all children with ADHD, specific/nonspecific DAT binding ratio of both ganglia decreased significantly greater than before treatment with methylphenidate (Right : t = 3.239, p = 0.018 ; Left : t = 3.133, p 0.020). However, no significant correlation between the change of ADHD symptom severity scores and specific/nonspecific DAT binding ratio of the basal ganglia were found. These findings support the complex dysregulation of the dopaminergic neurotransmitter system in children with ADHD.

  11. Dopamine transporter density of basal ganglia assessed with [{sup 123}I]IPT SPET in obsessive-compulsive disorder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Chan-Hyung; Cheon, Keun-Ah; Lee, Hong-Shick [Department of Psychiatry, College of Medicine, Yonsei University, 146-92 Dogokdong, 135-720, Gangnam-Gu, Seoul (Korea); Koo, Min-Seong [Department of Psychiatry, College of Medicine, Kwandong University, Kangwon (Korea); Ryu, Young-Hoon; Lee, Jong-Doo [Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, College of Medicine, Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea)

    2003-12-01

    It has been suggested that dopamine, as well as serotonin, is associated with the pathophysiology of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Thus, many studies have been performed on brain regions associated with dopamine in patients with OCD. In the present study, we investigated the DAT density of the basal ganglia using iodine-123 labelled N-(3-iodopropen-2-yl)-2{beta}-carbomethoxy-3{beta}-(4-chlorophenyl) tropane ([{sup 123}I]IPT) single-photon emission tomography (SPET) and evaluated the activity of the presynaptic dopamine function in patients with OCD. Fifteen patients with OCD and 19 normal control adults were included in the study. We performed brain SPET 2 h after the intravenous administration of [{sup 123}I]IPT and carried out both quantitative and qualitative analyses using the obtained SPET data, which were reconstructed for the assessment of the specific/non-specific dopamine transporter (DAT) binding ratio in the basal ganglia. We then investigated the correlation between the severity scores of OCD symptoms assessed with the Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale (Y-BOCS) and the specific/non-specific DAT binding ratio of the basal ganglia. Compared with normal control adults, patients with OCD showed a significantly increased specific/non-specific DAT binding ratio in the right basal ganglia and a tendency towards an increased specific/non-specific DAT binding ratio in the left basal ganglia. No significant correlation was found between the total scores on the Y-BOCS and the specific/non-specific DAT binding ratio of the basal ganglia. These findings suggest that the dopaminergic neurotransmitter system of the basal ganglia in patients with OCD could be involved in the pathophysiology of OCD. (orig.)

  12. Dopamine Transporter Density of the Basal Ganglia Assessed with I-123 IPT SPECT in Patients with Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, W. K.; Ryu, Y. H.; Yoon, M. J.; Kim, C. H.; Chun, K. A.; Lee, J. D. [College of Medicine, Univ. of Yonsei, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jee, D. Y. [College of Medicine, Univ. of Inhwa, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, T. H. [Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-07-01

    It has been suggested that dopamine as well as serotonin is associated with the pathophysiology of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Thus, many studies about brain regions associated with dopamine in OCD have been performed. In the present study, we investigated the DAT density of the basal ganglia using iodine-123 labelled N-(3-iodopropen-2-yl) - 2beta - carbomethoxy - 3beta - (4 - chloropheny1) tropane (I-123 IPT) single-photon emission tomography (SPECT) in patients with OCD and evaluated the activity of the presynaptic dopamine function in patients with OCD. Fifteen patients with OCD and nineteen normal control adults were included in the study. We performed brain SPET 2 hours after the intravenous administration of I-123 IPT and carried out both quantitative and qualitative analyses using the obtained SPET data, which were reconstructed for the assessment of the specific/non-specific DAT binding ratio in the basal ganglia. We then investigated the correlation between the severity scores of OCD symptoms assessed with the Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale (Y-BOCS) and the specific/non-specific DAT binding ratio of the basal ganglia. Patients with OCD showed a significantly increased specific/non-specific DAT binding ratio in right basal ganglia compared with normal control adults and an increased tendency in the specific/non-specific DAT binding ratio in left basal ganglia. No significant correlation was found between the total scores of the Y-BOCS and the specific/non-specific DAT binding ratio of the basal ganglia. Our findings suggest that the dopaminergic neurotransmitter system of the basal ganglia in patients with OCD plays an important role in fronto-subcortical circuit well-known as the pathophysiological mechanism of OCD.

  13. Anti-asialo GM1 antibodies prevents guanethidine-induced sympathectomy in athymic rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thygesen, P; Hougen, H P; Christensen, H B;

    1992-01-01

    Guanethidine sulphate induces destruction of peripheral sympathetic neurons and infiltration of mononuclear cells in rat sympathetic ganglia. The effect of guanethidine is believed to be an autoimmune reaction. In order to determine the effect of anti-asialo GM1, an antibody that binds to the gly...

  14. Increased basal ganglia binding of (18) F-AV-1451 in patients with progressive supranuclear palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ruben; Schain, Martin; Nilsson, Christer; Strandberg, Olof; Olsson, Tomas; Hägerström, Douglas; Jögi, Jonas; Borroni, Edilio; Schöll, Michael; Honer, Michael; Hansson, Oskar

    2017-01-01

    Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) is difficult to diagnose accurately. The recently developed tau PET tracers may improve the diagnostic work-up of PSP. Regional tau accumulation was studied using (18) F-AV-1451 PET in 11 patients with PSP and 11 age-matched healthy controls in the Swedish BioFinder study. (18) F-AV-1451 standard uptake volume ratios were significantly higher in the basal ganglia in PSP patients when compared with controls (globus pallidus 1.75 vs 1.50; putamen 1.51 vs 1.35). Retention in the basal ganglia was correlated with age in both groups (r = .43-.78, P AV-1451 retention was observed in the cerebral cortex or white matter of either PSP patients or controls, and autoradiography did not reveal any specific binding of AV-1451 to PSP tau aggregates. We found higher (18) F-AV-1451 retention in the basal ganglia of PSP patients when compared with healthy elderly controls, but also increases with age in both controls and patients. As a result of the overlap in retention between diagnostic groups and the age-dependent increase present also in controls, (18) F-AV-1451 PET might not reliably distinguish individual patients with PSP from controls. However, further studies are needed to evaluate whether (18) F-AV-1451 PET might be useful as a progression marker in clinical PSP trials. © The Authors. Movement Disorders published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  15. Listening to Rhythmic Music Reduces Connectivity within the Basal Ganglia and the Reward System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodal, Hans P.; Osnes, Berge; Specht, Karsten

    2017-01-01

    Music can trigger emotional responses in a more direct way than any other stimulus. In particular, music-evoked pleasure involves brain networks that are part of the reward system. Furthermore, rhythmic music stimulates the basal ganglia and may trigger involuntary movements to the beat. In the present study, we created a continuously playing rhythmic, dance floor-like composition where the ambient noise from the MR scanner was incorporated as an additional instrument of rhythm. By treating this continuous stimulation paradigm as a variant of resting-state, the data was analyzed with stochastic dynamic causal modeling (sDCM), which was used for exploring functional dependencies and interactions between core areas of auditory perception, rhythm processing, and reward processing. The sDCM model was a fully connected model with the following areas: auditory cortex, putamen/pallidum, and ventral striatum/nucleus accumbens of both hemispheres. The resulting estimated parameters were compared to ordinary resting-state data, without an additional continuous stimulation. Besides reduced connectivity within the basal ganglia, the results indicated a reduced functional connectivity of the reward system, namely the right ventral striatum/nucleus accumbens from and to the basal ganglia and auditory network while listening to rhythmic music. In addition, the right ventral striatum/nucleus accumbens demonstrated also a change in its hemodynamic parameter, reflecting an increased level of activation. These converging results may indicate that the dopaminergic reward system reduces its functional connectivity and relinquishing its constraints on other areas when we listen to rhythmic music. PMID:28400717

  16. Prox1 identifies proliferating neuroblasts and nascent neurons during neurogenesis in sympathetic ganglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzmann, Julia; Hennchen, Melanie; Rohrer, Hermann

    2015-12-01

    Neurogenesis in embryonic sympathetic ganglia involves neuroblasts that resume proliferation following neuronal differentiation. As cell cycle exit is not associated with neuronal differentiation, the identity of proliferating neuroblasts is incompletely understood. Here, we use sympathetic ganglia of chick embryos to define the timing of neurogenesis and neuroblast identity focusing on the expression and function of the transcription factor Prox1. We show that a large fraction of neuroblasts has initially withdrawn from the cell cycle at embryonic day 3 (E3), which is reflected by a high proportion of p27(+)/Islet1(+) neuroblasts (63%) and low numbers of EdU(+)/Islet1(+) cells (12%). The proportion of proliferating Islet1(+) neuroblasts, identified by EdU pulse labeling and by the absence of the postmitotic marker p27 increases to reach maximal levels at E5, when virtually all neuroblasts are in the cell cycle (95%). Subsequently, the proportion of EdU-labeled and p27(-) neuroblasts is reduced to reach low levels at E11. Interestingly, the expression of the transcription factor Prox1 is restricted to the neuronal lineage, that is, Sox10(+)/Phox2b(+) neuron progenitors, proliferating p27(-)/Islet1(+) neuroblasts and nascent neurons but is rapidly lost in postmitotic neurons. In vitro and in vivo knockdown and overexpression experiments demonstrate effects of Prox1 in the support of neuroblast proliferation and survival. Taken together, these results define the neurogenesis period in the chick paravertebral sympathetic ganglia including an initial cell cycle withdrawal and identify Prox1 as a marker and regulator of proliferating sympathetic neuroblasts.

  17. {sup 1}H MR spectroscopy of the basal ganglia in childhood: a semiquantitative analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lam, W.W.M. [Chinese Univ. of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiol. and Organ Imaging; Wang, Z.J.; Bilaniuk, L.T.; Hunter, J.V.; Haselgrove, J.C.; Zimmermann, R.A. [Department of Radiology, The Children`s Hospital of Philadelphia, 34th St. and Civic Center Blvd., Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Zhao, H. [Division of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, The Children`s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Berry, G.T.; Kaplan, P.; Gibson, J. [Division of Metabolism, The Children`s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Kaplan, B.S. [Division of Nephrology, The Children`s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    1998-05-01

    Proton MR spectra of the basal ganglia were obtained from 28 patients, 24 male and 14 female, median age 16.3 months (5 weeks to 31 years). They included 17 patients with normal MRI of the basal ganglia without metabolic disturbance (control group) and 11 patients with various metabolic diseases: one case each of high serum sodium and high serum osmolarity, cobalamin C deficiency, Leigh disease, Galloway-Mowat syndrome, Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease, hemolytic-uremic syndrome and Wilson disease and two cases of Alagille syndrome and methylmalonic acidemia with abnormal MRI of the basal ganglia or blood or urine analysis (abnormal group). The MR spectrum was measured by using STEAM. The MR-visible water content of the region of interest was obtained. Levels of myoinositol, choline, creatine and N -acetylaspartate were measured using a semiquantitative approach, with absolute reference calibration. In the control group, there was a gradual drop of water content over the first year of life; N -acetylaspartate, creatine and myoinositol levels showed no significant change with age, in contrast to the occipital, parietal and cerebellar regions. Choline showed a gradual decrease for the first 2 years of life and then remained fairly constant. In the abnormal group the water content was not significantly different. N -Acetylaspartate was decreased in patients with high serum sodium and high serum osmolarity, cobalamin C deficiency, Leigh disease and one case of methylmalonic acidemia. Decreased creatine was also found in Leigh disease, and decreased choline in Galloway-Mowat syndrome and Wilson disease. Myoinositol was elevated in the patient with abnormally high serum sodium, and decreased in the hemolytic-uremic syndrome. (orig.) With 3 figs., 4 tabs., 35 refs.

  18. Models of basal ganglia and cerebellum for sensorimotor integration and predictive control

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    Jabri, Marwan A.; Huang, Jerry; Coenen, Olivier J. D.; Sejnowski, Terrence J.

    2000-10-01

    This paper presents a sensorimotor architecture integrating computational models of a cerebellum and a basal ganglia and operating on a microrobot. The computational models enable a microrobot to learn to track a moving object and anticipate future positions using a CCD camera. The architecture features pre-processing modules for coordinate transformation and instantaneous orientation extraction. Learning of motor control is implemented using predictive Hebbian reinforcement-learning algorithm in the basal ganglia model. Learning of sensory predictions makes use of a combination of long-term depression (LTD) and long-term potentiation (LTP) adaptation rules within the cerebellum model. The basal ganglia model uses the visual inputs to develop sensorimotor mapping for motor control, while the cerebellum module uses robot orientation and world- coordinate transformed inputs to predict the location of the moving object in a robot centered coordinate system. We propose several hypotheses about the functional role of cell populations in the cerebellum and argue that mossy fiber projections to the deep cerebellar nucleus (DCN) could play a coordinate transformation role and act as gain fields. We propose that such transformation could be learnt early in the brain development stages and could be guided by the activity of the climbing fibers. Proprioceptor mossy fibers projecting to the DCN and providing robot orientation with respect to a reference system could be involved in this case. Other mossy fibers carrying visual sensory input provide visual patterns to the granule cells. The combined activities of the granule and the Purkinje cells store spatial representations of the target patterns. The combinations of mossy and Purkinje projections to the DCN provide a prediction of the location of the moving target taking into consideration the robot orientation. Results of lesion simulations based on our model show degradations similar to those reported in cerebellar lesion

  19. Re-evaluation of the functional anatomy of the basal ganglia in normal and Parkinsonian states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, R; Hazrati, L N; Herrero, M T; Vila, M; Hassani, O K; Mouroux, M; Ruberg, M; Asensi, H; Agid, Y; Féger, J; Obeso, J A; Parent, A; Hirsch, E C

    1997-01-01

    In the late 1980s, a functional and anatomical model of basal ganglia organization was proposed in order to explain the clinical syndrome of Parkinson's disease. According to this model, the pathological overactivity observed in the subthalamic nucleus and the output station of the basal ganglia plays a crucial role in the pathophysiology of the motor signs of Parkinson's disease. The hyperactivity of subthalamic neurons in Parkinsonism is viewed as a direct consequence of a pathological hypoactivity of the external segment of the pallidum. This article reviews recent data from different experimental approaches that challenge the established model of basal ganglia organization by reinterpreting the functional interaction between the external segment of the pallidum and the subthalamic nucleus in both the normal and pathological state. Indeed, recent neurobiochemical studies have rather unexpectedly shown that the GABAergic and metabolic activities of the external pallidum are not decreased in human and non-human primates with Parkinsonism. This absence of any decrease in activity might be explained by the functionally antagonistic influences of the striatal and subthalamic afferences within the external pallidum, as suggested by several anatomical studies. In addition, there are clues from electrophysiological studies to suggest that the hyperactivity found in the subthalamic neurons in Parkinsonism may not depend solely on the level of activity in the external pallidum. In such a framework, the hyperactivity of the subthalamic neurons would have to be explained, at least in part, by other sources of excitation or disinhibition. However, any explanation for the origin of the subthalamic overactivity in Parkinsonism remains speculative.

  20. Automatic evaluation of speech rhythm instability and acceleration in dysarthrias associated with basal ganglia dysfunction

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    Jan eRusz

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Speech rhythm abnormalities are commonly present in patients with different neurodegenerative disorders. These alterations are hypothesized to be a consequence of disruption to the basal ganglia circuitry involving dysfunction of motor planning, programming and execution, which can be detected by a syllable repetition paradigm. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to design a robust signal processing technique that allows the automatic detection of spectrally-distinctive nuclei of syllable vocalizations and to determine speech features that represent rhythm instability and acceleration. A further aim was to elucidate specific patterns of dysrhythmia across various neurodegenerative disorders that share disruption of basal ganglia function. Speech samples based on repetition of the syllable /pa/ at a self-determined steady pace were acquired from 109 subjects, including 22 with Parkinson's disease (PD, 11 progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP, 9 multiple system atrophy (MSA, 24 ephedrone-induced parkinsonism (EP, 20 Huntington's disease (HD, and 23 healthy controls. Subsequently, an algorithm for the automatic detection of syllables as well as features representing rhythm instability and rhythm acceleration were designed. The proposed detection algorithm was able to correctly identify syllables and remove erroneous detections due to excessive inspiration and nonspeech sounds with a very high accuracy of 99.6%. Instability of vocal pace performance was observed in PSP, MSA, EP and HD groups. Significantly increased pace acceleration was observed only in the PD group. Although not significant, a tendency for pace acceleration was observed also in the PSP and MSA groups. Our findings underline the crucial role of the basal ganglia in the execution and maintenance of automatic speech motor sequences. We envisage the current approach to become the first step towards the development of acoustic technologies allowing automated assessment of rhythm

  1. Hyperintense basal ganglia lesions on T1-weighted MR images in asymptomatic patients with hepatic dysfunction

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    Saatci, I. [Dept. of Radiology, Hacettepe Univ. Hospital, Ankara (Turkey); Cila, A. [Dept. of Radiology, Hacettepe Univ. Hospital, Ankara (Turkey); Dincer, F.F. [Dept. of Radiology, Hacettepe Univ. Hospital, Ankara (Turkey)

    1995-12-31

    Cranial MRI findings in four patients who had hepatic dysfunction, including one with sole hepatic form of Wilson`s disease, were reported. The MR examinations revealed bilateral, symmetric hyperintensity in the globus pallidus, subthalamic nuclei and mesencephalon on T1-weighted images with no corresponding abnormality on T2-weighted sequences. The basal ganglia were normal on CT examinations in all patients. None of the patients had the clinical findings of hepatic encephalopathy. The MR findings in our patients did not correlate with the degree or duration of hepatic dysfunction. (orig.)

  2. Isolated symmetrical bilateral basal ganglia T2 hyperintensity in carbon monoxide poisoning

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    Subhaschandra S

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon monoxide poisoning is not uncommon during the winter months. To make a diagnosis, strong clinical suspicion and acumen, and history of the exposure are necessary. Many a time, the presenting complaints may fail to help reach a diagnosis, in the absence of history. Imaging plays a role in the diagnosis of brain injury with the characteristic features, which are correlated with the clinical profile. Isolated bilateral basal ganglia injury revealing T2 hyperintensity in MRI may be observed in acute carbon monoxide poisoning.

  3. "Off-Target" (18)F-AV-1451 Binding in the Basal Ganglia Correlates with Age-Related Iron Accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jae Yong; Cho, Hanna; Ahn, Sung Jun; Lee, Jae Hoon; Ryu, Young Hoon; Lee, Myung Sik; Lyoo, Chul Hyoung

    2017-08-03

    Backgrounds: "Off-target" binding in the basal ganglia is commonly observed in the (18)F-AV-1451 positron emission tomography (PET) studies of the elderly. We sought to investigate the relationship between this phenomenon in the basal ganglia and iron accumulation using iron-sensitive R2(*) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Methods: 59 healthy controls and 61 patients with Alzheimer's disease and mild cognitive impairment (AD/MCI) underwent (18)F-AV-1451 PET and R2(*) MR imaging studies. A correlation analysis was performed for age, (18)F-AV-1451 binding, and R2(*) values. Results: There was an age-related increase in both (18)F-AV-1451 binding in the basal ganglia and R2(*) values in the putamen in both the controls and AD/MCI patients. (18)F-AV-1451 binding in the basal ganglia increased with R2(*) values. Conclusion: "Off-target" (18)F-AV-1451 binding in the basal ganglia is associated with the age-related increases in iron accumulation. Postmortem studies are required to further investigate the nature of this association. Copyright © 2017 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  4. Longitudinal Assessment of Motor Recovery of Contralateral Hand after Basal Ganglia Infarction Using Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Yue Fu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We used functional fMRI to study the brain activation during active finger movements at different time points during the recovery phase following basal ganglia infarction. Four hemiplegic patients with basal ganglia infarction were serially evaluated at different time points spanning the acute and chronic phase using fMRI. To evaluate motor recovery, the patients were asked to perform functional tasks arranged in a block design manner with their hand. On follow-up (chronic phase, three patients achieved significant recovery of motor function of affected limbs. Activation of bilateral sensorimotor cortex (SMC was observed in two of these patients, while activation of cerebellum was observed in all patients. No remarkable recovery of motor function was noted in one patient with left basal ganglia infarction. In this patient, the activation domain was located in SMC of both sides in acute phase and in ipsilateral SMC in chronic phase. Contralateral SMC appears to be involved in the functional rehabilitation following basal ganglia infarction. The cerebellum may act as an intermediary during functional recovery following basal ganglia infarction. The activation domain associated with active finger movement may be bilateral in acute phase; one patient was ipsilateral in the chronic stage.

  5. Maintenance of bladder innervation in diabetes: a stereological study of streptozotocin-treated female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langdale, C L; Thor, K B; Marson, L; Burgard, E C

    2014-10-01

    Neuropathy and cystopathy are two common conditions in patients with chronic diabetes. Despite obvious bladder sensory and motor nerve dysfunction in diabetes, no studies have selectively explored whether sensory or motor innervation is affected in the bladder. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that loss of bladder sensory and motor fibers is responsible for bladder sensory and motor dysfunction. Parasympathetic and sensory innervation of the bladder dome and neck were examined using immunohistochemistry (IHC) and stereology in adult female rats 12weeks after induction of diabetes by streptozotocin. Naïve and age matched rats were evaluated as controls. Diabetic rats had mean blood glucose level of >400mg/dl, and bladder weights and thicknesses that were more than doubled compared to naïve rats. In naïve rats, parasympathetic vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAT) and sensory calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) immunopositive nerve fibers were located in bladder smooth muscle and were more densely distributed in the neck compared to the dome. Within the urothelial region, CGRP nerve fibers were densely distributed while VAT nerve fibers were sparsely distributed in the bladder neck and both were virtually absent in the bladder dome. Streptozotocin induced diabetes did not change the total nerve fiber length of either VAT or CGRP stained fibers in either the neck or dome. These studies indicate that hyperglycemia, induced by streptozotocin treatment, does not result in a loss of parasympathetic VAT or CGRP sensory nerve fibers, per se, but the doubling of bladder weight and mass does indicate a decrease in innervation density.

  6. Mutations in SLC20A2 are a major cause of familial idiopathic basal ganglia calcification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Sandy Chan; Sears, Renee L.; Lemos, Roberta R.; Quintáns, Beatriz; Huang, Alden; Spiteri, Elizabeth; Nevarez, Lisette; Mamah, Catherine; Zatz, Mayana; Pierce, Kerrie D.; Fullerton, Janice M.; Adair, John C.; Berner, Jon E.; Bower, Matthew; Brodaty, Henry; Carmona, Olga; Dobricić, Valerija; Fogel, Brent L.; García-Estevez, Daniel; Goldman, Jill; Goudreau, John L.; Hopfer, Suellen; Janković, Milena; Jaumà, Serge; Jen, Joanna C.; Kirdlarp, Suppachok; Klepper, Joerg; Kostić, Vladimir; Lang, Anthony E.; Linglart, Agnès; Maisenbacher, Melissa K.; Manyam, Bala V.; Mazzoni, Pietro; Miedzybrodzka, Zofia; Mitarnun, Witoon; Mitchell, Philip B.; Mueller, Jennifer; Novaković, Ivana; Paucar, Martin; Paulson, Henry; Simpson, Sheila A.; Svenningsson, Per; Tuite, Paul; Vitek, Jerrold; Wetchaphanphesat, Suppachok; Williams, Charles; Yang, Michele; Schofield, Peter R.; de Oliveira, João R. M.; Sobrido, María-Jesús

    2014-01-01

    Familial idiopathic basal ganglia calcification (IBGC) or Fahr’s disease is a rare neurodegenerative disorder characterized by calcium deposits in the basal ganglia and other brain regions, which is associated with neuropsychiatric and motor symptoms. Familial IBGC is genetically heterogeneous and typically transmitted in an autosomal dominant fashion. We performed a mutational analysis of SLC20A2, the first gene found to cause IBGC, to assess its genetic contribution to familial IBGC. We recruited 218 subjects from 29 IBGC-affected families of varied ancestry and collected medical history, neurological exam, and head CT scans to characterize each patient’s disease status. We screened our patient cohort for mutations in SLC20A2. Twelve novel (nonsense, deletions, missense, and splice site) potentially pathogenic variants, one synonymous variant, and one previously reported mutation were identified in 13 families. Variants predicted to be deleterious cosegregated with disease in five families. Three families showed nonsegregation with clinical disease of such variants, but retrospective review of clinical and neuroimaging data strongly suggested previous misclassification. Overall, mutations in SLC20A2 account for as many as 41 % of our familial IBGC cases. Our screen in a large series expands the catalog of SLC20A2 mutations identified to date and demonstrates that mutations in SLC20A2 are a major cause of familial IBGC. Non-perfect segregation patterns of predicted deleterious variants highlight the challenges of phenotypic assessment in this condition with highly variable clinical presentation. PMID:23334463

  7. Genetic screening and functional characterization of PDGFRB mutations associated with Basal Ganglia Calcification of Unknown Etiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Contreras, Monica; Baker, Matthew C.; Finch, NiCole A.; Nicholson, Alexandra; Wojtas, Aleksandra; Wszolek, Zbigniew K.; Ross, Owen A.; Dickson, Dennis W.; Rademakers, Rosa

    2014-01-01

    Three causal genes for Idiopathic Basal Ganglia Calcification (IBGC) have been identified. Most recently, mutations in PDGFRB, encoding a member of the platelet-derived growth factor receptor family type β, and PDGFB, encoding PDGF-B, the specific ligand of PDGFRβ, were found implicating the PDGF-B/PDGFRβ pathway in abnormal brain calcification. In this study we aimed to identify and study mutations in PDGFRB and PDGFB in a series of 26 patients from the Mayo Clinic Florida Brain Bank with moderate to severe basal ganglia calcification (BCG) of unknown etiology. No mutations in PDGFB were found. However, we identified one mutation in PDGFRB, p.R695C located in the tyrosine kinase domain, in one BGC patient. We further studied the function of p.R695C mutant PDGFRβ and two previously reported mutants, p.L658P and p.R987W PDGFRβ in cell culture. We show that, in response to PDGF-BB stimulation, the p.L658P mutation completely suppresses PDGFRβ autophosphorylation whereas the p.R695C mutation results in partial loss of autophosphorylation. For the p.R987W mutation, our data suggest a different mechanism involving reduced protein levels. These genetic and functional studies provide the first insight into the pathogenic mechanisms associated with PDGFRB mutations and provide further support for a pathogenic role of PDGFRB mutations in BGC. PMID:24796542

  8. The "olfactostriatum" of snakes: a basal ganglia vomeronasal structure in tetrapods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Marcos, Alino; Ubeda-Bañon, Isabel; Lanuza, Enrique; Halpern, Mimi

    2005-09-15

    The olfactostriatum is a portion of the basal ganglia of snakes situated ventromedially to the nucleus accumbens proper. It receives a major vomeronasal input from the nucleus sphericus, the primary target of accessory olfactory bulb efferents. Recently, the ophidian olfactostriatum has been characterized on the basis of chemoarchitecture (distribution of serotonin, neuropeptide Y and tyrosine hydroxylase) and hodology (afferent and efferent connections). In contrast to the nucleus accumbens proper, the olfactostriatum is densely immunoreactive for serotonin and neuropeptide Y and sparsely immunoreactive for tyrosine hydroxylase. The nucleus accumbens proper and the olfactostriatum share most afferent connections except those originating in the nucleus sphericus, which are exclusively directed to the olfactostriatum. Similarly, the nucleus accumbens proper and the olfactostriatum show a similar pattern of efferent connections including those going to the ventral pallidum, although the olfactostriatum alone projects to the main and accessory olfactory bulbs as well as some amygdaloid nuclei. On the basis of its chemoarchitecture, the olfactostriatum resembles the mammalian ventral pallidum (but also the shell of the nucleus accumbens). Its connections, however, suggests that the olfactostriatum could be a specialized portion of the shell of nucleus accumbens extended more ventromedially than previously believed and devoted to processing vomeronasal information. Comparative data suggest that a similar structure is present in the basal ganglia of amphibians and mammals.

  9. A population level computational model of the basal ganglia that generates parkinsonian Local Field Potential activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsirogiannis, George L; Tagaris, George A; Sakas, Damianos; Nikita, Konstantina S

    2010-02-01

    Recordings from the basal ganglia's subthalamic nucleus are acquired via microelectrodes immediately prior to the application of Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) treatment for Parkinson's Disease (PD) to assist in the selection of the final point for the implantation of the DBS electrode. The acquired recordings reveal a persistent characteristic beta band peak in the power spectral density function of the Local Field Potential (LFP) signals. This peak is considered to lie at the core of the causality-effect relationships of the parkinsonian pathophysiology. Based on LFPs acquired from human subjects during DBS for PD, we constructed a computational model of the basal ganglia on the population level that generates LFPs to identify the critical pathophysiological alterations that lead to the expression of the beta band peak. To this end, we used experimental data reporting that the strengths of the synaptic connections are modified under dopamine depletion. The hypothesis that the altered dopaminergic modulation may affect both the amplitude and the time course of the postsynaptic potentials is validated by the model. The results suggest a pivotal role of both of these parameters to the pathophysiology of PD.

  10. MRI pattern of infarcts in basal ganglia region in patients with tuberculous meningitis

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    Nair, P.P.; Kalita, J.; Misra, U.K. [Sanjay Gandhi Postgraduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Department of Neurology, Lucknow (India); Kumar, S. [Sanjay Gandhi Postgraduate Institute of Medical sciences, Department of Radiology, Lucknow (India)

    2009-04-15

    This study aimed to evaluate the pattern of infarct in basal ganglia region in tuberculous meningitis (TBM) and ischemic strokes and its sensitivity and specificity in the diagnosis of these disorders. Patients with TBM and ischemic strokes in basal ganglia region were retrospectively evaluated from our tuberculous meningitis and ischemic stroke registry. Magnetic resonance imaging findings were grouped into anterior (caudate, genu, anterior limb of internal capsule, anteromedial thalamus) and posterior (lentiform nuclei, posterior limb of internal capsule, posterolateral thalamus). The sensitivity and specificity of these patterns in diagnosing TBM and ischemic stroke were evaluated. There were 24 patients in each group. Infarct in TBM was purely anterior in eight patients and in ischemic stroke purely posterior in 18 patients. The frequency of caudate infarct was significantly higher in TBM compared to ischemic stroke (37.5% vs 8.3%). In TBM patients, purely posterior infarcts were present in seven patients; three had associated risk factors of ischemic stroke. The sensitivity of pure anterior infarct in the diagnosis of TBM was 33%, specificity 91.66%. For ischemic stroke, the sensitivity of posterior infarct was 75% and specificity 70.83%. TBM patients having infarcts in posterior region should be looked for associated risk factors of ischemic stroke. (orig.)

  11. Phosphodiesterase 10A Inhibition Improves Cortico-Basal Ganglia Function in Huntington's Disease Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaumont, Vahri; Zhong, Sheng; Lin, Hai; Xu, WenJin; Bradaia, Amyaouch; Steidl, Esther; Gleyzes, Melanie; Wadel, Kristian; Buisson, Bruno; Padovan-Neto, Fernando E; Chakroborty, Shreaya; Ward, Karen M; Harms, John F; Beltran, Jose; Kwan, Mei; Ghavami, Afshin; Häggkvist, Jenny; Tóth, Miklós; Halldin, Christer; Varrone, Andrea; Schaab, Christoph; Dybowski, J Nikolaj; Elschenbroich, Sarah; Lehtimäki, Kimmo; Heikkinen, Taneli; Park, Larry; Rosinski, James; Mrzljak, Ladislav; Lavery, Daniel; West, Anthony R; Schmidt, Christopher J; Zaleska, Margaret M; Munoz-Sanjuan, Ignacio

    2016-12-21

    Huntington's disease (HD) symptoms are driven to a large extent by dysfunction of the basal ganglia circuitry. HD patients exhibit reduced striatal phoshodiesterase 10 (PDE10) levels. Using HD mouse models that exhibit reduced PDE10, we demonstrate the benefit of pharmacologic PDE10 inhibition to acutely correct basal ganglia circuitry deficits. PDE10 inhibition restored corticostriatal input and boosted cortically driven indirect pathway activity. Cyclic nucleotide signaling is impaired in HD models, and PDE10 loss may represent a homeostatic adaptation to maintain signaling. Elevation of both cAMP and cGMP by PDE10 inhibition was required for rescue. Phosphoproteomic profiling of striatum in response to PDE10 inhibition highlighted plausible neural substrates responsible for the improvement. Early chronic PDE10 inhibition in Q175 mice showed improvements beyond those seen with acute administration after symptom onset, including partial reversal of striatal deregulated transcripts and the prevention of the emergence of HD neurophysiological deficits. VIDEO ABSTRACT. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Basal ganglia neuronal activity during scanning eye movements in Parkinson's disease.

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    Tomáš Sieger

    Full Text Available The oculomotor role of the basal ganglia has been supported by extensive evidence, although their role in scanning eye movements is poorly understood. Nineteen Parkinsońs disease patients, which underwent implantation of deep brain stimulation electrodes, were investigated with simultaneous intraoperative microelectrode recordings and single channel electrooculography in a scanning eye movement task by viewing a series of colored pictures selected from the International Affective Picture System. Four patients additionally underwent a visually guided saccade task. Microelectrode recordings were analyzed selectively from the subthalamic nucleus, substantia nigra pars reticulata and from the globus pallidus by the WaveClus program which allowed for detection and sorting of individual neurons. The relationship between neuronal firing rate and eye movements was studied by crosscorrelation analysis. Out of 183 neurons that were detected, 130 were found in the subthalamic nucleus, 30 in the substantia nigra and 23 in the globus pallidus. Twenty percent of the neurons in each of these structures showed eye movement-related activity. Neurons related to scanning eye movements were mostly unrelated to the visually guided saccades. We conclude that a relatively large number of basal ganglia neurons are involved in eye motion control. Surprisingly, neurons related to scanning eye movements differed from neurons activated during saccades suggesting functional specialization and segregation of both systems for eye movement control.

  13. Excessive synchronization of basal ganglia neurons at 20 Hz slows movement in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chiung Chu; Litvak, Vladimir; Gilbertson, Thomas; Kühn, Andrea; Lu, Chin Song; Lee, Shih Tseng; Tsai, Chon Haw; Tisch, Stephen; Limousin, Patricia; Hariz, Marwan; Brown, Peter

    2007-05-01

    Excessive synchronization of neuronal activity at around 20 Hz is a common finding in the basal ganglia of patients with untreated Parkinson's disease (PD). Correlative evidence suggests, but does not prove, that this spontaneous activity may contribute to slowness of movement in this condition. Here we investigate whether externally imposed synchronization through direct stimulation of the region of the subthalamic nucleus at 20 Hz can slow motor performance in a simple unimanual tapping task and whether this effect is frequency selective. Tapping rates were recorded on 42 sides in 22 patients with PD after overnight withdrawal of medication. Tapping was performed without stimulation and during bilateral stimulation at 20 Hz, 50 Hz and 130 Hz. We found that tapping rates were slowed by 8.2+/-3.2% (p=0.014) during 20-Hz stimulation in subjects with relatively preserved baseline function in the task. This effect was frequency selective. The current data provide proof of the principle that excessive beta synchrony within the basal ganglia-cortical loop may contribute to the slowing of movements in Parkinson's disease.

  14. Role of Estrogens in the Size of Neuronal Somata of Paravaginal Ganglia in Ovariectomized Rabbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Aragón, Laura G.; García-Villamar, Verónica; Carrasco-Ruiz, María de los Ángeles; Nicolás-Toledo, Leticia; Ortega, Arturo; Cuevas-Romero, Estela; Martínez-Gómez, Margarita

    2017-01-01

    We aimed to determine the role of estrogens in modulating the size of neuronal somata of paravaginal ganglia. Rabbits were allocated into control (C), ovariectomized (OVX), and OVX treated with estradiol benzoate (OVX + EB) groups to evaluate the neuronal soma area; total serum estradiol (E2) and testosterone (T) levels; the percentage of immunoreactive (ir) neurons anti-aromatase, anti-estrogen receptor (ERα, ERβ) and anti-androgen receptor (AR); the intensity of the immunostaining anti-glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) and the GDNF family receptor alpha type 1 (GFRα1); and the number of satellite glial cells (SGCs) per neuron. There was a decrease in the neuronal soma size for the OVX group, which was associated with low T, high percentages of aromatase-ir and neuritic AR-ir neurons, and a strong immunostaining anti-GDNF and anti-GFRα1. The decrease in the neuronal soma size was prevented by the EB treatment that increased the E2 without affecting the T levels. Moreover, there was a high percentage of neuritic AR-ir neurons, a strong GDNF immunostaining in the SGC, and an increase in the SGCs per neuron. Present findings show that estrogens modulate the soma size of neurons of the paravaginal ganglia, likely involving the participation of the SGC. PMID:28316975

  15. Neuroanatomy of the optic ganglia and central brain of the water flea Daphnia magna (Crustacea, Cladocera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kress, Timm; Harzsch, Steffen; Dircksen, Heinrich

    2016-03-01

    We reveal the neuroanatomy of the optic ganglia and central brain in the water flea Daphnia magna by use of classical neuroanatomical techniques such as semi-thin sectioning and neuronal backfilling, as well as immunohistochemical markers for synapsins, various neuropeptides and the neurotransmitter histamine. We provide structural details of distinct neuropiles, tracts and commissures, many of which were previously undescribed. We analyse morphological details of most neuron types, which allow for unravelling the connectivities between various substructural parts of the optic ganglia and the central brain and of ascending and descending connections with the ventral nerve cord. We identify 5 allatostatin-A-like, 13 FMRFamide-like and 5 tachykinin-like neuropeptidergic neuron types and 6 histamine-immunoreactive neuron types. In addition, novel aspects of several known pigment-dispersing hormone-immunoreactive neurons are re-examined. We analyse primary and putative secondary olfactory pathways and neuronal elements of the water flea central complex, which displays both insect- and decapod crustacean-like features, such as the protocerebral bridge, central body and lateral accessory lobes. Phylogenetic aspects based upon structural comparisons are discussed as well as functional implications envisaging more specific future analyses of ecotoxicological and endocrine disrupting environmental chemicals.

  16. Role of Estrogens in the Size of Neuronal Somata of Paravaginal Ganglia in Ovariectomized Rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura G. Hernández-Aragón

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to determine the role of estrogens in modulating the size of neuronal somata of paravaginal ganglia. Rabbits were allocated into control (C, ovariectomized (OVX, and OVX treated with estradiol benzoate (OVX + EB groups to evaluate the neuronal soma area; total serum estradiol (E2 and testosterone (T levels; the percentage of immunoreactive (ir neurons anti-aromatase, anti-estrogen receptor (ERα, ERβ and anti-androgen receptor (AR; the intensity of the immunostaining anti-glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF and the GDNF family receptor alpha type 1 (GFRα1; and the number of satellite glial cells (SGCs per neuron. There was a decrease in the neuronal soma size for the OVX group, which was associated with low T, high percentages of aromatase-ir and neuritic AR-ir neurons, and a strong immunostaining anti-GDNF and anti-GFRα1. The decrease in the neuronal soma size was prevented by the EB treatment that increased the E2 without affecting the T levels. Moreover, there was a high percentage of neuritic AR-ir neurons, a strong GDNF immunostaining in the SGC, and an increa