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Sample records for rare e196k mutation

  1. Rare and unexpected beta thalassemic mutations in Qazvin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    About 13 beta-globin mutations encompass 70 - 90% of mutation spectrum in Iran. These mutations are called common beta-globin mutations. The rest are rare or unknown mutations. The objective of this study was to identify and describe rare or unknown beta-globin mutations in Qazvin province. EDTAcontaining venous ...

  2. Rare and unexpected beta thalassemic mutations in Qazvin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2010-01-04

    Jan 4, 2010 ... About 13 beta-globin mutations encompass 70 - 90% of mutation spectrum in Iran. These mutations are called common beta-globin mutations. The rest are rare or unknown mutations. The objective of this study was to identify and describe rare or unknown beta-globin mutations in Qazvin province. EDTA-.

  3. Rare beneficial mutations can halt Muller's ratchet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balick, Daniel; Goyal, Sidhartha; Jerison, Elizabeth; Neher, Richard; Shraiman, Boris; Desai, Michael

    2012-02-01

    In viral, bacterial, and other asexual populations, the vast majority of non-neutral mutations are deleterious. This motivates the application of models without beneficial mutations. Here we show that the presence of surprisingly few compensatory mutations halts fitness decay in these models. Production of deleterious mutations is balanced by purifying selection, stabilizing the fitness distribution. However, stochastic vanishing of fitness classes can lead to slow fitness decay (i.e. Muller's ratchet). For weakly deleterious mutations, production overwhelms purification, rapidly decreasing population fitness. We show that when beneficial mutations are introduced, a stable steady state emerges in the form of a dynamic mutation-selection balance. We argue this state is generic for all mutation rates and population sizes, and is reached as an end state as genomes become saturated by either beneficial or deleterious mutations. Assuming all mutations have the same magnitude selective effect, we calculate the fraction of beneficial mutations necessary to maintain the dynamic balance. This may explain the unexpected maintenance of asexual genomes, as in mitochondria, in the presence of selection. This will affect in the statistics of genetic diversity in these populations.

  4. Rare suprasellar chordoid meningioma with INI1 gene mutation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Chordoid Meningioma is a rare brain tumour characterized genetically by loss of genetic material from chromosome 22q at cytogenetic level resulting in mutation of NF2 gene. Objectives and case report: In the present report, we described a rare case of suprasellar chordoid meningioma, which presented in a ...

  5. Detection of Ultra-Rare Mitochondrial Mutations in Breast Stem Cells by Duplex Sequencing.

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    Eun Hyun Ahn

    Full Text Available Long-lived adult stem cells could accumulate non-repaired DNA damage or mutations that increase the risk of tumor formation. To date, studies on mutations in stem cells have concentrated on clonal (homoplasmic mutations and have not focused on rarely occurring stochastic mutations that may accumulate during stem cell dormancy. A major challenge in investigating these rare mutations is that conventional next generation sequencing (NGS methods have high error rates. We have established a new method termed Duplex Sequencing (DS, which detects mutations with unprecedented accuracy. We present a comprehensive analysis of mitochondrial DNA mutations in human breast normal stem cells and non-stem cells using DS. The vast majority of mutations occur at low frequency and are not detectable by NGS. The most prevalent point mutation types are the C>T/G>A and A>G/T>C transitions. The mutations exhibit a strand bias with higher prevalence of G>A, T>C, and A>C mutations on the light strand of the mitochondrial genome. The overall rare mutation frequency is significantly lower in stem cells than in the corresponding non-stem cells. We have identified common and unique non-homoplasmic mutations between non-stem and stem cells that include new mutations which have not been reported previously. Four mutations found within the MT-ND5 gene (m.12684G>A, m.12705C>T, m.13095T>C, m.13105A>G are present in all groups of stem and non-stem cells. Two mutations (m.8567T>C, m.10547C>G are found only in non-stem cells. This first genome-wide analysis of mitochondrial DNA mutations may aid in characterizing human breast normal epithelial cells and serve as a reference for cancer stem cell mutation profiles.

  6. Germline TERT promoter mutations are rare in familial melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harland, Mark; Petljak, Mia; Robles-Espinoza, Carla Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Germline CDKN2A mutations occur in 40 % of 3-or-more case melanoma families while mutations of CDK4, BAP1, and genes involved in telomere function (ACD, TERF2IP, POT1), have also been implicated in melanomagenesis. Mutation of the promoter of the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) gene (c.-57...... T>G variant) has been reported in one family. We tested for the TERT promoter variant in 675 multicase families wild-type for the known high penetrance familial melanoma genes, 1863 UK population-based melanoma cases and 529 controls. Germline lymphocyte telomere length was estimated in carriers....... The c.-57 T>G TERT promoter variant was identified in one 7-case family with multiple primaries and early age of onset (earliest, 15 years) but not among population cases or controls. One family member had multiple primary melanomas, basal cell carcinomas and a bladder tumour. The blood leukocyte...

  7. Brothers with constrictive pericarditis – A novel mutation in a rare disease

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    Devendra V. Patil

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Familial constrictive pericarditis is extremely rare. We report a case of two brothers both suffering constrictive pericarditis along with having multiple painless joint deformities. Genetic workup confirmed the clinical diagnosis of camptodactyly-arthropathy-coxa vara-pericarditis (CACP syndrome CACP syndrome and also revealed a rare mutation in the causative gene.

  8. Constitutional NRAS mutations are rare among patients with Noonan syndrome or juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraoua, Lilia; Journel, Hubert; Bonnet, Philippe; Amiel, Jeanne; Pouvreau, Nathalie; Baumann, Clarisse; Verloes, Alain; Cavé, Hélène

    2012-10-01

    Recently, germline mutations of NRAS have been shown to be associated with Noonan syndrome (NS), a relatively common developmental disorder characterized by short stature, congenital heart disease, and distinctive facial features. We report on the mutational analysis of NRAS in a cohort of 125 French patients with NS and no known mutation for PTPN11, KRAS, SOS1, MEK1, MEK2, RAF1, BRAF, and SHOC2. The c.179G>A (p.G60E) mutation was identified in two patients with typical NS, confirming that NRAS germline mutations are a rare cause of this syndrome. We also screened our cohort of 95 patients with juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML). Among 17 patients with NRAS-mutated JMML, none had clinical features suggestive of NS. None of the 11 JMML patients for which germline DNA was available had a constitutional NRAS mutation. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. SIN3A mutations are rare in men with azoospermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, T; Koh, E; Tsujimura, A; Miyagawa, Y; Minase, G; Ueda, Y; Namiki, M; Sengoku, K

    2015-11-01

    A loss of function of the murine Sin3A gene resulted in male infertility with Sertoli cell-only syndrome (SCOS) phenotype in mice. Here, we investigated the relevance of this gene to human male infertility with azoospermia caused by SCOS. Mutation analysis of SIN3A in the coding region was performed on 80 Japanese patients. However, no variants could be detected. This study suggests a lack of association of SIN3A gene sequence variants with azoospermia caused by SCOS in humans. © 2014 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  10. Ras mutations are rare in solitary cold and toxic thyroid nodules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krohn, K; Reske, A; Ackermann, F; Müller, A; Paschke, R

    2001-08-01

    Activation of ras proto-oncogenes as a result of point mutations is detectable in a significant percentage of most types of tumour. Similar to neoplasms of other organs, mutations of all three ras genes can be found in thyroid tumours. H-, K- and N-ras mutations have been detected in up to 20% of follicular adenomas and adenomatous nodules which were not functionally characterized. This raises the question as to whether ras mutations are specific for hypofunctional nodules and TSH receptor mutations for hyperfunctioning nodules. To investigate ras and TSH receptor mutations with respect to functional differentiation we studied 41 scintigraphically cold nodules and 47 toxic thyroid nodules. To address the likelihood of a somatic mutation we also studied the clonal origin of these tumours. Genomic DNA was extracted from nodular and surrounding tissue. Mutational hot spots in exons 1 and 2 of the H- and K-ras gene were PCR amplified and sequenced using big dye terminator chemistry. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) was used to verify sequencing results for the H-ras gene and to analyse the N-ras gene because its greater sensitivity in detecting somatic mutations. Clonality of nodular thyroid tissue was evaluated using X-Chromosome inactivation based on PCR amplification of the human androgen receptor locus. Monoclonal origin was detectable in 14 of 23 informative samples from cold thyroid nodules. In toxic thyroid nodules the frequency of clonal tissue was 20 in 30 informative cases. Only one point mutation could be found in the N-ras gene codon 61 (Gly to Arg) in a cold adenomatous nodule which was monoclonal. In toxic thyroid nodules no ras mutation was detectable. Our study suggests that ras mutations are rare in solitary cold and toxic thyroid nodules and that the frequent monoclonal origin of these tumours implies somatic mutations in genes other than H-, K- and N-ras.

  11. TREM2 mutations are rare in a French cohort of patients with frontotemporal dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lattante, Serena; Le Ber, Isabelle; Camuzat, Agnès; Dayan, Sarah; Godard, Chloé; Van Bortel, Inge; De Septenville, Anne; Ciura, Sorana; Brice, Alexis; Kabashi, Edor

    2013-10-01

    Homozygous mutations in TREM2 have been recently identified by exome sequencing in families presenting with frontotemporal dementia (FTD)-like phenotype. No study has evaluated the exact frequency of TREM2 mutations in cohorts of FTD patients so far. We sequenced TREM2 in 175 patients with pure FTD, mostly French, to test whether mutations could be implicated in the pathogenesis of the disease. No disease-causing mutation was identified in 175 individuals from the French cohort of FTD patients. We did not identify the polymorphism p.R47H (rs75932628), strongly associated with an increased risk of developing Alzheimer's disease. We conclude that TREM2 mutations are extremely rare in patients with pure FTD, although further investigation in larger populations is needed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Estimating Exceptionally Rare Germline and Somatic Mutation Frequencies via Next Generation Sequencing.

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    Jordan Eboreime

    Full Text Available We used targeted next generation deep-sequencing (Safe Sequencing System to measure ultra-rare de novo mutation frequencies in the human male germline by attaching a unique identifier code to each target DNA molecule. Segments from three different human genes (FGFR3, MECP2 and PTPN11 were studied. Regardless of the gene segment, the particular testis donor or the 73 different testis pieces used, the frequencies for any one of the six different mutation types were consistent. Averaging over the C>T/G>A and G>T/C>A mutation types the background mutation frequency was 2.6x10-5 per base pair, while for the four other mutation types the average background frequency was lower at 1.5x10-6 per base pair. These rates far exceed the well documented human genome average frequency per base pair (~10-8 suggesting a non-biological explanation for our data. By computational modeling and a new experimental procedure to distinguish between pre-mutagenic lesion base mismatches and a fully mutated base pair in the original DNA molecule, we argue that most of the base-dependent variation in background frequency is due to a mixture of deamination and oxidation during the first two PCR cycles. Finally, we looked at a previously studied disease mutation in the PTPN11 gene and could easily distinguish true mutations from the SSS background. We also discuss the limits and possibilities of this and other methods to measure exceptionally rare mutation frequencies, and we present calculations for other scientists seeking to design their own such experiments.

  13. Two novel mutations in the PPIB gene cause a rare pedigree of osteogenesis imperfecta type IX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yu; Pan, Jingxin; Guo, Dongwei; Zhang, Wei; Xie, Jie; Fang, Zishui; Guo, Chunmiao; Fang, Qun; Jiang, Weiying; Guo, Yibin

    2017-06-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a rare genetic skeletal disorder characterized by increased bone fragility and vulnerability to fractures. PPIB is identified as a candidate gene for OI-IX, here we detect two pathogenic mutations in PPIB and analyze the genotype-phenotype correlation in a Chinese family with OI. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) was used to screen the whole exome of the parents of proband. Screening of variation frequency, evolutionary conservation comparisons, pathogenicity evaluation, and protein structure prediction were conducted to assess the pathogenicity of the novel mutations. Sanger sequencing was used to confirm the candidate variants. RTQ-PCR was used to analyze the PPIB gene expression. All mutant genes screened out by NGS were excluded except PPIB. Two novel heterozygous PPIB mutations (father, c.25A>G; mother, c.509G>A) were identified in relation to osteogenesis imperfecta type IX. Both mutations were predicted to be pathogenic by bioinformatics analysis and RTQ-PCR analysis revealed downregulated PPIB expression in the two carriers. We report a rare pedigree with an autosomal recessive osteogenesis imperfecta type IX (OI-IX) caused by two novel PPIB mutations identified for the first time in China. The current study expands our knowledge of PPIB mutations and their associated phenotypes, and provides new information on the genetic defects associated with this disease for clinical diagnosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Structural and functional analysis of rare missense mutations in human chorionic gonadotrophin β-subunit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nagirnaja, Liina; Venclovas, Česlovas; Rull, Kristiina

    2012-01-01

    Heterodimeric hCG is one of the key hormones determining early pregnancy success. We have previously identified rare missense mutations in hCGβ genes with potential pathophysiological importance. The present study assessed the impact of these mutations on the structure and function of hCG by appl...... of intact hCG as also supported by an in silico analysis. In summary, the accumulated data indicate that only mutations with neutral or mild functional consequences might be tolerated in the major hCGβ genes CGB5 and CGB8.......Heterodimeric hCG is one of the key hormones determining early pregnancy success. We have previously identified rare missense mutations in hCGβ genes with potential pathophysiological importance. The present study assessed the impact of these mutations on the structure and function of h......CG by applying a combination of in silico (sequence and structure analysis, molecular dynamics) and in vitro (co-immunoprecipitation, immuno- and bioassays) approaches. The carrier status of each mutation was determined for 1086 North-Europeans [655 patients with recurrent miscarriage (RM)/431 healthy controls...

  15. Ultra-rare mutation in long-range enhancer predisposes to thyroid carcinoma with high penetrance.

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    Huiling He

    Full Text Available Thyroid cancer shows high heritability but causative genes remain largely unknown. According to a common hypothesis the genetic predisposition to thyroid cancer is highly heterogeneous; being in part due to many different rare alleles. Here we used linkage analysis and targeted deep sequencing to detect a novel single-nucleotide mutation in chromosome 4q32 (4q32A>C in a large pedigree displaying non-medullary thyroid carcinoma (NMTC. This mutation is generally ultra-rare; it was not found in 38 NMTC families, in 2676 sporadic NMTC cases or 2470 controls. The mutation is located in a long-range enhancer element whose ability to bind the transcription factors POU2F and YY1 is significantly impaired, with decreased activity in the presence of the C- allele compared with the wild type A-allele. An enhancer RNA (eRNA is transcribed in thyroid tissue from this region and is greatly downregulated in NMTC tumors. We suggest that this is an example of an ultra-rare mutation predisposing to thyroid cancer with high penetrance.

  16. Novel compound heterozygous mutations in SERPINH1 cause rare autosomal recessive osteogenesis imperfecta type X.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Y; Zhao, D; Xu, X; Lv, F; Li, L; Jiang, Y; Wang, O; Xia, W; Xing, X; Li, M

    2018-03-09

    We identified novel compound heterozygous mutations in SERPINH1 in a Chinese boy suffering from recurrent fractures, femoral deformities, and growth retardation, which resulted in extremely rare autosomal recessive OI type X. Long-term treatment of BPs was effective in increasing BMD Z-score, reducing fracture incidence and reshaping vertebrae compression. Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a heritable bone disorder characterized by low bone mineral density, recurrent fractures, and progressive bone deformities. Mutation in serpin peptidase inhibitor clade H, member 1 (SERPINH1), which encodes heat shock protein 47 (HSP47), leads to rare autosomal recessive OI type X. We aimed to detect the phenotype and the pathogenic mutation of OI type X in a boy from a non-consanguineous Chinese family. We investigated the pathogenic mutations and analyzed their relationship with the phenotype in the patient using next-generation sequencing (NGS) and Sanger sequencing. Moreover, the efficacy of long-term bisphosphonate treatment in this patient was evaluated. The patient suffered from multiple fractures, low bone mass, and bone deformities in the femur, without dentinogenesis imperfecta or hearing loss. Compound heterozygous variants were found in SERPINH1 as follows: c.149 T>G in exon 2 and c.1214G>A in exon 5. His parents were heterozygous carriers of each of these mutations, respectively. Bisphosphonates could be helpful in increasing BMD Z-score, reducing bone fracture risk and reshaping the compressed vertebral bodies of this patient. We reported novel compound heterozygous mutations in SERPINH1 in a Chinese OI patient for the first time, which expanded the spectrum of phenotype and genotype of extremely rare OI type X.

  17. Waardenburg syndrome: a rare cause of inherited neuropathy due to SOX10 mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanova-Mihaylova, Petya; Alexander, Michael D; Murphy, Raymond P J; Murphy, Sinéad M

    2017-09-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is a rare disorder comprising sensorineural deafness and pigmentation abnormalities. Four distinct subtypes are defined based on the presence or absence of additional symptoms. Mutations in six genes have been described in WS. SOX10 mutations are usually associated with a more severe phenotype of WS with peripheral demyelinating neuropathy, central dysmyelinating leukodystrophy, and Hirschsprung disease. Here we report a 32-year-old man with a novel heterozygous missense variant in SOX10 gene, who presented with congenital deafness, Hirschsprung disease, iris heterochromia, foot deformity, and intermediate conduction velocity length-dependent sensorimotor neuropathy. This case highlights that the presence of other non-neuropathic features in a patient with presumed hereditary neuropathy should alert the clinician to possible atypical rare causes. © 2017 Peripheral Nerve Society.

  18. Normosmic idiopathic hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism due to a rare KISS1R gene mutation

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    N Chelaghma

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism is due to impaired or reduced gonadotrophin secretion from the pituitary gland. In the absence of any anatomical or functional lesions of the pituitary or hypothalamic gland, the hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism is referred to as idiopathic hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism (IHH. We present a case of a young lady born to consanguineous parents who was found to have IHH due to a rare gene mutation.

  19. Functional characterization of rare missense mutations in MLH1 and MSH2 identified in Danish colorectal cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Lise Lotte; Kariola, Reetta; Korhonen, Mari K

    2009-01-01

    Recently, we have performed a population based study to analyse the frequency of colorectal cancer related MLH1 and MSH2 missense mutations in the Danish population. Half of the analyzed mutations were rare and most likely only present in the families where they were identified originally. Some...... of the missense mutations were located in conserved regions in the MLH1 and MSH2 proteins indicating a relation to disease development. In the present study, we functionally characterized 10 rare missense mutations in MLH1 and MSH2 identified in 13 Danish CRC families. To elucidate the pathogenicity...

  20. Case Report: Exome sequencing reveals recurrent RETSAT mutations and a loss-of-function POLDIP2 mutation in a rare undifferentiated tongue sarcoma [version 1; referees: 2 approved

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    Jason Y. K. Chan

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Soft tissue sarcoma of the tongue represents a very rare head and neck cancer with connective tissue features, and the genetics underlying this rare cancer are largely unknown. There are less than 20 cases reported in the literature thus far. Here, we reported the first whole-exome characterization (>×200 depth of an undifferentiated sarcoma of the tongue in a 31-year-old male. Even with a very good sequencing depth, only 19 nonsynonymous mutations were found, indicating a relatively low mutation rate of this rare cancer (lower than that of human papillomavirus (HPV-positive head and neck cancer. Yet, among the few genes that are somatically mutated in this HPV-negative undifferentiated tongue sarcoma, a noticeable deleterious frameshift mutation (with a very high allele frequency of >93% of a gene for DNA replication and repair, namely POLDIP2 (DNA polymerase delta interacting protein 2, and two recurrent mutations of the adipogenesis and adipocyte differentiation gene RETSAT (retinol saturase, were identified. Thus, somatic events likely affecting adipogenesis and differentiation, as well as potential stem mutations to POLDIP2, may be implicated in the formation of this rare cancer. This identified somatic whole-exome sequencing profile appears to be distinct from that of other reported adult sarcomas from The Cancer Genome Atlas, suggesting a potential unique genetic profile for this rare sarcoma of the tongue. Interestingly, this low somatic mutation rate is unexpectedly found to be accompanied by multiple tumor protein p53 and NOTCH1 germline mutations of the patient’s blood DNA. This may explain the very early age of onset of head and neck cancer, with likely hereditary predisposition. Our findings are, to our knowledge, the first to reveal a unique genetic profile of this very rare undifferentiated sarcoma of the tongue.

  1. Rare mutations in RINT1 predispose carriers to breast and Lynch Syndrome-spectrum cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Daniel J.; Tao, Kayoko; Le Calvez-Kelm, Florence; Nguyen-Dumont, Tu; Robinot, Nivonirina; Hammet, Fleur; Odefrey, Fabrice; Tsimiklis, Helen; Teo, Zhi L.; Thingholm, Louise B.; Young, Erin L.; Voegele, Catherine; Lonie, Andrew; Pope, Bernard J.; Roane, Terrell C.; Bell, Russell; Hu, Hao; Shankaracharya; Huff, Chad D.; Ellis, Jonathan; Li, Jun; Makunin, Igor V.; John, Esther M.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Terry, Mary B.; Daly, Mary; Buys, Saundra S.; Snyder, Carrie; Lynch, Henry T.; Devilee, Peter; Giles, Graham G.; Hopper, John L.; Feng, Bing J.; Lesueur, Fabienne; Tavtigian, Sean V.; Southey, Melissa C.; Goldgar, David E.

    2014-01-01

    Approximately half of the familial aggregation of breast cancer remains unexplained. A multiple-case breast cancer family exome sequencing study identified three likely pathogenic mutations in RINT1 (NM_021930.4) not present in public sequencing databases: RINT1 c.343C>T (p.Q115X), c.1132_1134del (p.M378del) and c.1207G>T (p.D403Y). Based on this finding, a population-based case-control mutation-screening study was conducted and identified 29 carriers of rare (MAF Lynch syndrome-spectrum cancers (SIR 3.35, 95% CI 1.7-6.0; P=0.005), particularly for relatives diagnosed with cancer under age 60 years (SIR 10.9, 95%CI 4.7-21; P=0.0003). PMID:25050558

  2. Further evidence that mutations in INS can be a rare cause of Maturity-Onset Diabetes of the Young (MODY)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesgaard, Trine W; Pruhova, Stepanka; Andersson, Ehm A

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Insulin gene (INS) mutations have recently been described as a common cause of permanent neonatal diabetes (PNDM) and a rare cause of diabetes diagnosed in childhood or adulthood. METHODS: INS was sequenced in 116 maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODYX) patients (n = 48 Danish an......, and were treated with oral hypoglycaemic agents and/or insulin. CONCLUSION: Mutations in INS can be a rare cause of MODY and we conclude that screening for mutations in INS should be recommended in MODYX patients....

  3. A rare CYP21A2 mutation in a congenital adrenal hyperplasia kindred displaying genotype-phenotype nonconcordance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khattab, Ahmed; Yuen, Tony; Al-Malki, Sultan; Yau, Mabel; Kazmi, Diya; Sun, Li; Harbison, Madeleine; Haider, Shozeb; Zaidi, Mone; New, Maria I

    2016-01-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) owing to 21-hydroxylase deficiency is caused by the autosomal recessive inheritance of mutations in the gene CYP21A2. CYP21A2 mutations lead to variable impairment of the 21-hydroxylase enzyme, which, in turn, is associated with three clinical phenotypes, namely, salt wasting, simple virilizing, and nonclassical CAH. However, it is known that a given mutation can associate with different clinical phenotypes, resulting in a high rate of genotype-phenotype nonconcordance. We aimed to study the genotype-phenotype nonconcordance in a family with three siblings affected with nonclassical CAH. All had hormonal evidence of nonclassical CAH, but this phenotype could not be explained by the genotype obtained from commercial CYP21A2 genetic testing, which revealed heterozygosity for the maternal 30 kb deletion mutation. We performed Sanger sequencing of the entire CYP21A2 gene in this family to search for a rare mutation that was not covered by commercial testing and found in the three siblings a second, rare c.1097G>A (p.R366H) mutation in exon 8. Computational modeling confirmed that this was a mild mutation consistent with nonclassical CAH. We recommend that sequencing of entire genes for rare mutations should be carried out when genotype-phenotype nonconcordance is observed in patients with autosomal recessive monogenic disorders, including CAH. © 2015 New York Academy of Sciences.

  4. A rare variant of α 1 antitrypsin mutations detected in Vietnamese children with liver disease.

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    Hoàng, Thu Hà; Phạm, Thiên Ngọc; Nguyễn, Gia Khánh; Lê, Quang Huấn

    2013-07-01

    Alpha 1 antitrypsin (A1AT) is the major plasma serine protease inhibitor that is produced in liver cells. A1AT deficiency is recognized globally as a common genetic cause of liver disease in children, which results from mutations in the SERine Protease INhibitor A1 (SERPINA1) gene. The importance of A1AT deficiency in Viet Nam is unclear. The aim of this study was to determine the A1AT variants present in paediatric patients with liver diseases in order to clarify whether A1AT deficiency is present in Viet Nam. A1AT studies were carried out in 130 children with liver disease of indeterminate aetiology. A1AT levels were determined by immunoturbidimetry. Phenotype analysis of A1AT was performed by isoelectric focusing (IEF) in all patients. Genotype analyses to determine A1AT mutations were performed by direct sequencing. We identified a rare variant of A1AT named Zbristol. The Zbristol appeared to be deficient in the plasma to about the same degree as the PI S protein resulting in low concentration of A1AT in one of these two Vietnamese patients. No other deficient A1AT allele was detected, although 11 patients (8.5%) showed a reduced serum concentration of A1AT. These are the first two cases of a rare A1AT deficiency allele to be found in Viet Nam clearly inferring that A1AT deficiency is not just a disease of Caucasians. As such, the laboratory diagnosis of A1AT deficiency including A1AT concentration determination and phenotype and genotype testing should form part of the routine differential diagnosis of paediatric liver disease of indeterminate aetiology in Vietnamese patients.

  5. Whole-exome sequencing reveals a rare interferon gamma receptor 1 mutation associated with myasthenia gravis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Guoyan; Liu, Peng; Gu, Shanshan; Yang, Hongxia; Dong, Huimin; Xue, Yinping

    2018-04-01

    Our study is aimed to explore the underlying genetic basis of myasthenia gravis. We collected a Chinese pedigree with myasthenia gravis, and whole-exome sequencing was performed on the two affected siblings and their parents. The candidate pathogenic gene was identified by bioinformatics filtering, which was further verified by Sanger sequencing. The homozygous mutation c.G40A (p.V14M) in interferon gamma receptor 1was identified. Moreover, the mutation was also detected in 3 cases of 44 sporadic myasthenia gravis patients. The p.V14M substitution in interferon gamma receptor 1 may affect the signal peptide function and the translocation on cell membrane, which could disrupt the binding of the ligand of interferon gamma and antibody production, contributing to myasthenia gravis susceptibility. We discovered that a rare variant c.G40A in interferon gamma receptor 1 potentially contributes to the myasthenia gravis pathogenesis. Further functional studies are needed to confirm the effect of the interferon gamma receptor 1 on the myasthenia gravis phenotype.

  6. Frequency of rare mutations and common genetic variations in severe hypertriglyceridemia in the general population of Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamiquiz-Moneo, Itziar; Blanco-Torrecilla, Cristian; Bea, Ana M; Mateo-Gallego, Rocío; Pérez-Calahorra, Sofía; Baila-Rueda, Lucía; Cenarro, Ana; Civeira, Fernando; de Castro-Orós, Isabel

    2016-04-23

    Hypertriglyceridemia (HTG) is a common complex metabolic trait that results of the accumulation of relatively common genetic variants in combination with other modifier genes and environmental factors resulting in increased plasma triglyceride (TG) levels. The majority of severe primary hypertriglyceridemias is diagnosed in adulthood and their molecular bases have not been fully defined yet. The prevalence of HTG is highly variable among populations, possibly caused by differences in environmental factors and genetic background. However, the prevalence of very high TG and the frequency of rare mutations causing HTG in a whole non-selected population have not been previously studied. The total of 23,310 subjects over 18 years from a primary care-district in a middle-class area of Zaragoza (Spain) with TG >500 mg/dL were selected to establish HTG prevalence. Those affected of primary HTG were considered for further genetic analysis. The promoters, coding regions and exon-intron boundaries of LPL, LMF1, APOC2, APOA5, APOE and GPIHBP1 genes were sequenced. The frequency of rare variants identified was studied in 90 controls. One hundred ninety-four subjects (1.04%) had HTG and 90 subjects (46.4%) met the inclusion criteria for primary HTG. In this subgroup, nine patients (12.3%) were carriers of 7 rare variants in LPL, LMF1, APOA5, GPIHBP1 or APOE genes. Three of these mutations are described for the first time in this work. The presence of a rare pathogenic mutation did not confer a differential phenotype or a higher family history of HTG. The prevalence of rare mutations in candidate genes in subjects with primary HTG is low. The low frequency of rare mutations, the absence of a more severe phenotype or the dominant transmission of the HTG would not suggest the use of genetic analysis in the clinical practice in this population.

  7. Characterisation and confirmation of rare beta-thalassaemia mutations in the Malay, Chinese and Indian ethnic groups in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Jin Ai Mary Anne; Chin, Pui See; Wong, Yean Ching; Tan, Kim Lian; Chan, Lee Lee; George, Elizabeth

    2006-10-01

    In Malaysia, about 4.5% of the Malay and Chinese populations are heterozygous carriers of beta-thalassaemia. The initial identification of rare beta-globin gene mutations by genomic sequencing will allow the development of simpler and cost-effective PCR-based techniques to complement the existing amplification refractory mutation system (ARMS) and gap-PCR used for the identification of beta-thalassaemia mutations. DNA from 173 beta-thalassaemia carriers and five beta-thalassaemia major patients from the Malay, Chinese and Indian ethnic groups were first analysed by ARMS and gap-PCR. Ninety-five per cent (174/183) of the 183 beta-globin genes studied were characterised using these two techiques. The remaining nine uncharacterised beta-globin genes (4.9%) were analysed using genomic sequencing of a 904 bp amplified PCR product consisting of the promoter region, exon 1, intervening sequence (IVS) 1, exon 2 and the 5' IVS2 regions of the beta-globin gene. The rare beta-globin mutations detected in the Chinese patients were CD27/28 (+C) and CD43 (GAG-TAG), and -88 (C-T) in an Indian patient. Beta-globin mutations at CD16 (-C), IVS1-1 (G-A), IVS2-1 (G-A), -86 (C-G) and Haemoglobin South Florida (CD1, GTG-ATG) were confirmed in the Malay patients. The seven rare beta-globin mutations and a rare haemoglobin variant confirmed in this study have been described in other populations but have not been previously described in Malaysian beta-thalassemia patients.

  8. Neurodevelopmental disease-associated de novo mutations and rare sequence variants affect TRIO GDP/GTP exchange factor activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katrancha, Sara M; Wu, Yi; Zhu, Minsheng; Eipper, Betty A; Koleske, Anthony J; Mains, Richard E

    2017-12-01

    Bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, autism and intellectual disability are complex neurodevelopmental disorders, debilitating millions of people. Therapeutic progress is limited by poor understanding of underlying molecular pathways. Using a targeted search, we identified an enrichment of de novo mutations in the gene encoding the 330-kDa triple functional domain (TRIO) protein associated with neurodevelopmental disorders. By generating multiple TRIO antibodies, we show that the smaller TRIO9 isoform is the major brain protein product, and its levels decrease after birth. TRIO9 contains two guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) domains with distinct specificities: GEF1 activates both Rac1 and RhoG; GEF2 activates RhoA. To understand the impact of disease-associated de novo mutations and other rare sequence variants on TRIO function, we utilized two FRET-based biosensors: a Rac1 biosensor to study mutations in TRIO (T)GEF1, and a RhoA biosensor to study mutations in TGEF2. We discovered that one autism-associated de novo mutation in TGEF1 (K1431M), at the TGEF1/Rac1 interface, markedly decreased its overall activity toward Rac1. A schizophrenia-associated rare sequence variant in TGEF1 (F1538Intron) was substantially less active, normalized to protein level and expressed poorly. Overall, mutations in TGEF1 decreased GEF1 activity toward Rac1. One bipolar disorder-associated rare variant (M2145T) in TGEF2 impaired inhibition by the TGEF2 pleckstrin-homology domain, resulting in dramatically increased TGEF2 activity. Overall, genetic damage to both TGEF domains altered TRIO catalytic activity, decreasing TGEF1 activity and increasing TGEF2 activity. Importantly, both GEF changes are expected to decrease neurite outgrowth, perhaps consistent with their association with neurodevelopmental disorders. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Genotype-phenotype analysis of a rare type of osteogenesis imperfecta in four Chinese families with WNT1 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi; Song, Lijie; Ma, Doudou; Lv, Fang; Xu, Xiaojie; Wang, Jianyi; Xia, Weibo; Jiang, Yan; Wang, Ou; Song, Yuwen; Xing, Xiaoping; Asan; Li, Mei

    2016-10-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a rare inherited disease characterized by increased bone fragility and vulnerability to fractures. Recently, WNT1 is identified as a new candidate gene for OI, here we detect pathogenic mutations in WNT1 and analyze the genotype-phenotype association in four Chinese families with OI. We designed a targeted next generation sequencing panel with known fourteen OI-related genes. We applied the approach to detect pathogenic mutations in OI patients and confirmed the mutations with Sanger sequencing and cosegregation analysis. Clinical fractures, bone mineral density (BMD) and the other clinical manifestations were evaluated. We also observed the effects of bisphosphonates in OI patients with WNT1 mutations. Four compound heterozygous mutations (c.110T>C; c.505 G>T; c. 385G>A; c.506 G>A) in WNT1 were detected in three unrelated families. These four mutations had not been reported yet. A recurrent homozygous mutation (c.506dupG) was identified in the other two families. These patients had moderate to severe OI, white to blue sclera, absence of dentinogenesis imperfecta and no brain malformation. We did not observe clear genotype-phenotype correlation in WNT1 mutated OI patients. Though bisphosphonates increased BMD in WNT1 related OI patients, height did not increase and fracture continued. We reported four novel heterozygous variants and confirmed a previous reported WNT1 mutation in four Chinese families with a clinical diagnosis of OI. Our study expanded OI spectrum and confirmed moderate to severe bone fragility induced by WNT1 defects. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome With Normal-Sized Platelets in an Eighteen-Month-Old Boy: A Rare Mutation

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    Jayitri Mazumdar

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS is an X-linked recessive disorder characterized by thrombocytopenia, eczema, and recurrent infections. The disease is usually associated with small defective platelets. Case Presentation: We described an 18-month-old boy who presented with lower gastrointestinal bleeding, eczema, and recurrent infections. There was pancytopenia with normal-sized platelets. In addition, the CD4 count was significantly low and serum IgA and IgE levels were increased. The diagnosis of WAS was confirmed by detecting a mutation of WAS gene, which was due to a deletion mutation resulting in frameshift (c.177DelT. Conclusions: Usually microplatelets with mean platelet volume of 4-5 fL are seen in WAS, but in this case, the patient had normal-sized platelets with a rare mutation of WAS gene. Therefore, high index of clinical suspicion is needed to diagnose WAS.

  11. Further evidence that mutations in INS can be a rare cause of Maturity-Onset Diabetes of the Young (MODY

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    Pisinger Charlotta

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Insulin gene (INS mutations have recently been described as a common cause of permanent neonatal diabetes (PNDM and a rare cause of diabetes diagnosed in childhood or adulthood. Methods INS was sequenced in 116 maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODYX patients (n = 48 Danish and n = 68 Czech, 83 patients with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM, 34 type 1 diabetic patients screened negative for glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD, and 96 glucose tolerant individuals. The control group was randomly selected from the population-based sampled Inter99 study. Results One novel heterozygous mutation c.17G>A, R6H, was identified in the pre-proinsulin gene (INS in a Danish MODYX family. The proband was diagnosed at 20 years of age with mild diabetes and treated with diet and oral hypoglycaemic agent. Two other family members who carried the INS R6H were diagnosed with diabetes when 51 years old and with GDM when 27 years old, respectively. A fourth mutation carrier had normal glucose tolerance when 20 years old. Two carriers of INS R6H were also examined twice with an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT with 5 years interval. They both had a ~30% reduction in beta-cell function measured as insulinogenic index. In a Czech MODYX family a previously described R46Q mutation was found. The proband was diagnosed at 13 years of age and had been treated with insulin since onset of diabetes. Her mother and grandmother were diagnosed at 14 and 35 years of age, respectively, and were treated with oral hypoglycaemic agents and/or insulin. Conclusion Mutations in INS can be a rare cause of MODY and we conclude that screening for mutations in INS should be recommended in MODYX patients.

  12. Are All Mutations the Same? A Rare Case Report of Coexisting Mutually Exclusive KRAS and BRAF Mutations in a Patient with Metastatic Colon Adenocarcinoma

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    Anusha Vittal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available 29-year-old Hispanic woman presented to the clinic with complaints of abdominal pain, nausea, fatigue, and constipation. Laboratory tests indicated the presence of iron deficiency anemia and transaminitis. Imaging evaluation revealed marked hepatomegaly with multiple hepatic metastases and pelvic lymphadenopathy. Biopsy of the hepatic lesions showed adenocarcinoma positive for pan-cytokeratin, CMA5.2, villin, and CDX2. She was positive for tumor markers CA 19-9, CA-125, and CEA. Upon further evaluation, she was found to have colorectal cancer positive for KRAS and BRAF mutations. Unfortunately, her disease progressed rapidly and she expired within 3 months from the time of her first diagnosis. KRAS and BRAF mutations are rare enough to be considered virtually mutually exclusive but coexistent mutations appear to be a distinct molecular and clinical subset with aggressive course of illness, which is in dire need of new treatment strategies. Panitumumab and Cetuximab are approved for patients with wild type KRAS CRC. Vemurafenib is a potent inhibitor of the kinase domain in mutant BRAF and its use in BRAF mutated colon cancer remains to be well established. Our report highlights the need to obtain tissue samples from these patients for analysis and to evaluate the benefit of Vemurafenib in colorectal cancers.

  13. Computational Simulation and Analysis of Mutations: Nucleotide Fixation, Allelic Age and Rare Genetic Variations in Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Shuhao

    2015-01-01

    In order to investigate the complexity of mutations, a computational approach named Genome Evolution by Matrix Algorithms ("GEMA") has been implemented. GEMA models genomic changes, taking into account hundreds of mutations within each individual in a population. By modeling of entire human chromosomes, GEMA precisely mimics real…

  14. Rare mutations predisposing to familial adenomatous polyposis in Greek FAP patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mihalatos, Markos; Fountzilas, George; Agnantis, Niki J; Nasioulas, Georgios; Apessos, Angela; Dauwerse, Hans; Velissariou, Voula; Psychias, Aristidis; Koliopanos, Alexander; Petropoulos, Konstantinos; Triantafillidis, John K; Danielidis, Ioannis

    2005-01-01

    Familial Adenomatous Polyposis (FAP) is caused by germline mutations in the APC (Adenomatous Polyposis Coli) gene. The vast majority of APC mutations are point mutations or small insertions / deletions which lead to truncated protein products. Splicing mutations or gross genomic rearrangements are less common inactivating events of the APC gene. In the current study genomic DNA or RNA from ten unrelated FAP suspected patients was examined for germline mutations in the APC gene. Family history and phenotype were used in order to select the patients. Methods used for testing were dHPLC (denaturing High Performance Liquid Chromatography), sequencing, MLPA (Multiplex Ligation – dependent Probe Amplification), Karyotyping, FISH (Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization) and RT-PCR (Reverse Transcription – Polymerase Chain Reaction). A 250 Kbp deletion in the APC gene starting from intron 5 and extending beyond exon 15 was identified in one patient. A substitution of the +5 conserved nucleotide at the splice donor site of intron 9 in the APC gene was shown to produce frameshift and inefficient exon skipping in a second patient. Four frameshift mutations (1577insT, 1973delAG, 3180delAAAA, 3212delA) and a nonsense mutation (C1690T) were identified in the rest of the patients. Screening for APC mutations in FAP patients should include testing for splicing defects and gross genomic alterations

  15. Imputation of the rare HOXB13 G84E mutation and cancer risk in a large population-based cohort.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas J Hoffmann

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An efficient approach to characterizing the disease burden of rare genetic variants is to impute them into large well-phenotyped cohorts with existing genome-wide genotype data using large sequenced referenced panels. The success of this approach hinges on the accuracy of rare variant imputation, which remains controversial. For example, a recent study suggested that one cannot adequately impute the HOXB13 G84E mutation associated with prostate cancer risk (carrier frequency of 0.0034 in European ancestry participants in the 1000 Genomes Project. We show that by utilizing the 1000 Genomes Project data plus an enriched reference panel of mutation carriers we were able to accurately impute the G84E mutation into a large cohort of 83,285 non-Hispanic White participants from the Kaiser Permanente Research Program on Genes, Environment and Health Genetic Epidemiology Research on Adult Health and Aging cohort. Imputation authenticity was confirmed via a novel classification and regression tree method, and then empirically validated analyzing a subset of these subjects plus an additional 1,789 men from Kaiser specifically genotyped for the G84E mutation (r2 = 0.57, 95% CI = 0.37–0.77. We then show the value of this approach by using the imputed data to investigate the impact of the G84E mutation on age-specific prostate cancer risk and on risk of fourteen other cancers in the cohort. The age-specific risk of prostate cancer among G84E mutation carriers was higher than among non-carriers. Risk estimates from Kaplan-Meier curves were 36.7% versus 13.6% by age 72, and 64.2% versus 24.2% by age 80, for G84E mutation carriers and non-carriers, respectively (p = 3.4x10-12. The G84E mutation was also associated with an increase in risk for the fourteen other most common cancers considered collectively (p = 5.8x10-4 and more so in cases diagnosed with multiple cancer types, both those including and not including prostate cancer, strongly suggesting

  16. Moyamoya disease and artery tortuosity as rare phenotypes in a patient with an elastin mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishiwata, Tsukasa; Tanabe, Nobuhiro; Shigeta, Ayako; Yokota, Hajime; Tsushima, Kenji; Terada, Jiro; Sakao, Seiichiro; Morisaki, Hiroko; Morisaki, Takayuki; Tatsumi, Koichiro

    2016-07-01

    Sporadic and familial elastin mutations can occur in large vessel stenosis such as supravalvular aortic stenosis and narrowing of the descending aorta. However, there are very few reports regarding the arteriopathy of cerebral, pulmonary or abdominal arteries in elastin mutations. We herein report the case of a Japanese female patient presenting with multiple arteriopathy including moyamoya disease, a tortuosity of abdominal arteries and pulmonary hypertension due to peripheral pulmonary artery stenosis. This case suggests the possible progression of cerebral arteriopathy including moyamoya disease in patients with elastin mutations. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Statistical guidance for experimental design and data analysis of mutation detection in rare monogenic mendelian diseases by exome sequencing.

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    Degui Zhi

    Full Text Available Recently, whole-genome sequencing, especially exome sequencing, has successfully led to the identification of causal mutations for rare monogenic Mendelian diseases. However, it is unclear whether this approach can be generalized and effectively applied to other Mendelian diseases with high locus heterogeneity. Moreover, the current exome sequencing approach has limitations such as false positive and false negative rates of mutation detection due to sequencing errors and other artifacts, but the impact of these limitations on experimental design has not been systematically analyzed. To address these questions, we present a statistical modeling framework to calculate the power, the probability of identifying truly disease-causing genes, under various inheritance models and experimental conditions, providing guidance for both proper experimental design and data analysis. Based on our model, we found that the exome sequencing approach is well-powered for mutation detection in recessive, but not dominant, Mendelian diseases with high locus heterogeneity. A disease gene responsible for as low as 5% of the disease population can be readily identified by sequencing just 200 unrelated patients. Based on these results, for identifying rare Mendelian disease genes, we propose that a viable approach is to combine, sequence, and analyze patients with the same disease together, leveraging the statistical framework presented in this work.

  18. Beta-Binomial Model for the Detection of Rare Mutations in Pooled Next-Generation Sequencing Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakaitiene, Audrone; Avino, Mariano; Guarracino, Mario Rosario

    2017-04-01

    Against diminishing costs, next-generation sequencing (NGS) still remains expensive for studies with a large number of individuals. As cost saving, sequencing genome of pools containing multiple samples might be used. Currently, there are many software available for the detection of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Sensitivity and specificity depend on the model used and data analyzed, indicating that all software have space for improvement. We use beta-binomial model to detect rare mutations in untagged pooled NGS experiments. We propose a multireference framework for pooled data with ability being specific up to two patients affected by neuromuscular disorders (NMD). We assessed the results comparing with The Genome Analysis Toolkit (GATK), CRISP, SNVer, and FreeBayes. Our results show that the multireference approach applying beta-binomial model is accurate in predicting rare mutations at 0.01 fraction. Finally, we explored the concordance of mutations between the model and software, checking their involvement in any NMD-related gene. We detected seven novel SNPs, for which the functional analysis produced enriched terms related to locomotion and musculature.

  19. Identification of rare heterozygous missense mutations in FANCA in esophageal atresia patients using next-generation sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yu; Chen, Runsen; Da, Min; Qian, Bo; Mo, Xuming

    2018-06-30

    Esophageal atresia and tracheoesophageal fistula (EA/TEF) are relatively common malformations in newborns, but the etiology of EA/TEF remains unknown. Fanconi anemia (FA) complementation group A (FANCA) is a key component of the FA core complex and is essential for the activation of the DNA repair pathway. The middle region (amino acids 674-1208) of FANCA is required for its interaction with FAAP20. We performed targeted sequencing of this binding region of FANCA (exons 23-36) in 40 EA/TEF patients. We also investigated the effect of the p.A958V mutation on the protein-protein interaction between FANCA and FAAP20 using an in vitro binding assay and co-immunoprecipitation. Immunolocalization analysis was performed to investigate the subcellular localization of FANCA, and tissue sections and immunohistochemistry were used to explore the expression of FANCA. We identified four rare missense variants in the FANCA binding region. FANCA mutations were significantly overrepresented in EA/TEF patients compared with 4300 control subjects from the NHLBI-ESP project (Fisher's exact p = 2.17 × 10 -5 , odds ratio = 31.75). p.A958V, a novel de novo mutation in the FANCA gene, was identified in one patient with EA/TEF. We provide further evidence that the p.A958V mutation reduces the binding affinity of FANCA for FAAP20. Interestingly, the p.A958V mutation impaired the nuclear localization of the FANCA protein expressed in HeLa cells. We found that FANCA was more highly expressed in stratified squamous epithelium than in smooth muscle. In conclusion, mutations in the FANCA gene are associated with EA/TEF in humans. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Mutations in the VNTR of the carboxyl-ester lipase gene (CEL) are a rare cause of monogenic diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torsvik, Janniche; Johansson, Stefan; Johansen, Anders; Ek, Jakob; Minton, Jayne; Raeder, Helge; Ellard, Sian; Hattersley, Andrew; Pedersen, Oluf; Hansen, Torben; Molven, Anders; Njølstad, Pål R

    2010-01-01

    We have previously shown that heterozygous single-base deletions in the carboxyl-ester lipase (CEL) gene cause exocrine and endocrine pancreatic dysfunction in two multigenerational families. These deletions were found in the first and fourth repeats of a variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR), which has proven challenging to sequence due to high GC-content and considerable length variation. We have therefore developed a screening method consisting of a multiplex PCR followed by fragment analysis. The method detected putative disease-causing insertions and deletions in the proximal repeats of the VNTR, and determined the VNTR-length of each allele. When blindly testing 56 members of the two families with known single-base deletions in the CEL VNTR, the method correctly assessed the mutation carriers. Screening of 241 probands from suspected maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY) families negative for mutations in known MODY genes (95 individuals from Denmark and 146 individuals from UK) revealed no deletions in the proximal repeats of the CEL VNTR. However, we found one Danish patient with a short, novel CEL allele containing only three VNTR repeats (normal range 7-23 in healthy controls). This allele co-segregated with diabetes or impaired glucose tolerance in the patient's family as six of seven mutation carriers were affected. We also identified individuals who had three copies of a complete CEL VNTR. In conclusion, the CEL gene is highly polymorphic, but mutations in CEL are likely to be a rare cause of monogenic diabetes.

  1. A rare male patient with classic Rett syndrome caused by MeCP2_e1 mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokaji, Narumi; Ito, Hiromichi; Kohmoto, Tomohiro; Naruto, Takuya; Takahashi, Rizu; Goji, Aya; Mori, Tatsuo; Toda, Yoshihiro; Saito, Masako; Tange, Shoichiro; Masuda, Kiyoshi; Kagami, Shoji; Imoto, Issei

    2018-03-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a severe neurodevelopmental disorder typically affecting females. It is mainly caused by loss-of-function mutations that affect the coding sequence of exon 3 or 4 of methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2). Severe neonatal encephalopathy resulting in death before the age of 2 years is the most common phenotype observed in males affected by a pathogenic MECP2 variant. Mutations in MECP2 exon 1 affecting the MeCP2_e1 isoform are relatively rare causes of RTT in females, and only one case of a male patient with MECP2-related severe neonatal encephalopathy caused by a mutation in MECP2 exon 1 has been reported. This is the first reported case of a male with classic RTT caused by a 5-bp duplication in the open-reading frame of MECP2 exon 1 (NM_001110792.1:c.23_27dup) that introduced a premature stop codon [p.(Ser10Argfs*36)] in the MeCP2_e1 isoform, which has been reported in one female patient with classic RTT. Therefore, both males and females displaying at least some type of MeCP2_e1 mutation may exhibit the classic RTT phenotype. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Severe steatohepatitis in a patient with a rare neutral lipid storage disorder due to ABHD5 mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronchetti, Anna; Prati, Daniele; Pezzotta, Maria Grazia; Tavian, Daniela; Colombo, Roberto; Callea, Francesco; Colli, Agostino

    2008-09-01

    Fatty liver disease is mainly caused by alcohol consumption, excessive body weight, dyslipidemia and impaired glucose tolerance, but inherited disorders can sometimes be involved. We report the case of a 40-year-old woman with steatohepatitis and severe portal hypertension, associated with ichthyosis, cataract and hypoacusia. The clinical, pathological and genetic findings were consistent with a diagnosis of Chanarin-Dorfman syndrome (CDS), a rare autosomal recessive inherited neutral lipid storage disorder, and genetic analysis showed that a novel ABHD5 mutation is responsible.

  3. Sequencing the GRHL3 Coding Region Reveals Rare Truncating Mutations and a Common Susceptibility Variant for Nonsyndromic Cleft Palate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangold, Elisabeth; Böhmer, Anne C.; Ishorst, Nina; Hoebel, Ann-Kathrin; Gültepe, Pinar; Schuenke, Hannah; Klamt, Johanna; Hofmann, Andrea; Gölz, Lina; Raff, Ruth; Tessmann, Peter; Nowak, Stefanie; Reutter, Heiko; Hemprich, Alexander; Kreusch, Thomas; Kramer, Franz-Josef; Braumann, Bert; Reich, Rudolf; Schmidt, Gül; Jäger, Andreas; Reiter, Rudolf; Brosch, Sibylle; Stavusis, Janis; Ishida, Miho; Seselgyte, Rimante; Moore, Gudrun E.; Nöthen, Markus M.; Borck, Guntram; Aldhorae, Khalid A.; Lace, Baiba; Stanier, Philip; Knapp, Michael; Ludwig, Kerstin U.

    2016-01-01

    Nonsyndromic cleft lip with/without cleft palate (nsCL/P) and nonsyndromic cleft palate only (nsCPO) are the most frequent subphenotypes of orofacial clefts. A common syndromic form of orofacial clefting is Van der Woude syndrome (VWS) where individuals have CL/P or CPO, often but not always associated with lower lip pits. Recently, ∼5% of VWS-affected individuals were identified with mutations in the grainy head-like 3 gene (GRHL3). To investigate GRHL3 in nonsyndromic clefting, we sequenced its coding region in 576 Europeans with nsCL/P and 96 with nsCPO. Most strikingly, nsCPO-affected individuals had a higher minor allele frequency for rs41268753 (0.099) than control subjects (0.049; p = 1.24 × 10−2). This association was replicated in nsCPO/control cohorts from Latvia, Yemen, and the UK (pcombined = 2.63 × 10−5; ORallelic = 2.46 [95% CI 1.6–3.7]) and reached genome-wide significance in combination with imputed data from a GWAS in nsCPO triads (p = 2.73 × 10−9). Notably, rs41268753 is not associated with nsCL/P (p = 0.45). rs41268753 encodes the highly conserved p.Thr454Met (c.1361C>T) (GERP = 5.3), which prediction programs denote as deleterious, has a CADD score of 29.6, and increases protein binding capacity in silico. Sequencing also revealed four novel truncating GRHL3 mutations including two that were de novo in four families, where all nine individuals harboring mutations had nsCPO. This is important for genetic counseling: given that VWS is rare compared to nsCPO, our data suggest that dominant GRHL3 mutations are more likely to cause nonsyndromic than syndromic CPO. Thus, with rare dominant mutations and a common risk variant in the coding region, we have identified an important contribution for GRHL3 in nsCPO. PMID:27018475

  4. Direct detection of common and rare inversion mutations in the genetic diagnosis of severe hemophilia A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Windsor, A.S.; Lillicrap, D.P.; Taylor, S.A.M. [Queen`s Univ., Ontario (Canada)

    1994-09-01

    Approximately 50% of the cases of severe hemophilia A (factor VIII:C < 0.01 units/ml) may be due to gross rearrangements of the factor VIII gene. The mutation involves homologous sequences upstream of the factor VIII locus and within intron 22 in an intrachromosomal recombination, inversion, event. The rearrangements can readily be detected on a Southern blot using a probe that is complementary to sequences from within intron 22. We describe here the analysis of this mutation in 71 severe hemophilia A patients. Thirty two of the patients (45%) showed evidence of a rearrangement. Five different patterns of rearrangements were seen, two of which have previously been described and account for the majority of cases (pattern 1, 70% and pattern 2, 16%). Three other abnormal patterns were observed. The inversion mechanism does not usually result in the loss or gain of any genetic material, but in one patient, in whom a unique rearrangement pattern was observed (pattern 3), we have previously documented a gross deletion which removes exons 1-22 of the factor VII gene as well as sequences 5{prime} to the gene. In another individual a fourth pattern in which an extra 19.0 kb band is present was detected. In this case it is unclear as to whether the rearrangement is responsible for the disease or is simply coincident normal variation. A fifth pattern, in which an extra 16.0 kb band was detected, was observed in a family with a new mutation causing hemophilia A. The affected individual and his mother inherited a de novo rearrangement of the factor VIII gene from his unaffected grandfather, implicating it as the cause of the disease. In conclusion, testing for the factor VIII inversion mutation was positive in approximately 45% of severe hemophiliacs, 72% of whom were isolated cases, and as such should constitute the initial stage in the genetic testing protocol for these patients` families.

  5. Neonatal severe hyperparathyroidism caused by homozygous mutation in CASR: A rare cause of life-threatening hypercalcemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Heidi; Patrick, Jessica; Báez-Irizarry, Eileen; Lacassie, Yves; Gómez, Ricardo; Vargas, Alfonso; Barkemeyer, Brian; Kanotra, Sohit; Zambrano, Regina M

    2016-04-01

    Neonatal severe hyperparathyroidism (NSHPT) is a rare, life-threatening condition that presents with severe hypercalcemia, hyperparathyroidism, and osteopenia in the newborn period. Treatment of NSHPT traditionally includes hydration and bisphosphonates; however newer calcimimetic agents, such as cinacalcet, are now being utilized to prevent or delay parathyroidectomy which is technically difficult in the newborn. Medical treatment success is related to calcium sensing receptor (CaSR) genotype. We report a 4-day-old infant who presented with hyperbilirubinemia, poor feeding, weight loss, severe hypotonia and was ultimately diagnosed with NSHPT. The patient's total serum calcium level of 36.8 mg/dL (reference range: 8.5-10.4 mg/dL) is, to our knowledge, the highest ever documented in this setting. Exome data previously obtained on the infant's parents was re-analyzed demonstrating bi-parental heterozygosity for a mutation of the CASR gene: c.206G > A, and Sanger sequencing data confirmed the patient was a homozygote for the same mutation. Though a patient with the same CaSR gene mutation described here has responded to cinacalcet, our patient did not respond and required parathyroidectomy. Though this case has previously been published as a surgical case report, a full report of the medical management and underlying genetic etiology is warranted; this case underscores the importance of disclosing bi-parental heterozygosity for a gene causing severe neonatal disease particularly when treatment is available and illustrates the need for further in vitro studies of this CaSR mutation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. cDNA Clones with Rare and Recurrent Mutations Found in Cancers | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    The CTD2 Center at UT- MD Anderson Cancer Center has developed High-Throughput Mutagenesis and Molecular Barcoding (HiTMMoB)1,2 pipeline to construct mutant alleles open reading frame expression clones that are either recurrent or rare in cancers. These barcoded genes can be used for context-specific functional validation, detection of novel biomarkers (pathway activation) and targets (drug sensitivity).

  7. hnRNPA2B1 and hnRNPA1 mutations are rare in patients with "multisystem proteinopathy" and frontotemporal lobar degeneration phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Ber, Isabelle; Van Bortel, Inge; Nicolas, Gael; Bouya-Ahmed, Kawtar; Camuzat, Agnès; Wallon, David; De Septenville, Anne; Latouche, Morwena; Lattante, Serena; Kabashi, Edor; Jornea, Ludmila; Hannequin, Didier; Brice, Alexis

    2014-04-01

    hnRNPA2B1 and hnRNPA1 mutations have been recently identified by exome sequencing in three families presenting with multisystem proteinopathy (MSP), a rare complex phenotype associating frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD), Paget disease of bone (PDB), inclusion body myopathy (IBM), and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). No study has evaluated the exact frequency of these genes in cohorts of MSP or FTD patients so far. We sequenced both genes in 17 patients with MSP phenotypes, and in 60 patients with FTLD and FTLD-ALS to test whether mutations could be implicated in the pathogenesis of these disorders. No disease-causing mutation was identified. We conclude that hnRNPA2B1 and hnRNPA1 mutations are rare in MSP and FTLD spectrum of diseases, although further investigations in larger populations are needed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. TED, an Autonomous and Rare Maize Transposon of the Mutator Superfamily with a High Gametophytic Excision Frequency[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yubin; Harris, Linda; Dooner, Hugo K.

    2013-01-01

    Mutator (Mu) elements, one of the most diverse superfamilies of DNA transposons, are found in all eukaryotic kingdoms, but are particularly numerous in plants. Most of the present knowledge on the transposition behavior of this superfamily comes from studies of the maize (Zea mays) Mu elements, whose transposition is mediated by the autonomous Mutator-Don Robertson (MuDR) element. Here, we describe the maize element TED (for Transposon Ellen Dempsey), an autonomous cousin that differs significantly from MuDR. Element excision and reinsertion appear to require both proteins encoded by MuDR, but only the single protein encoded by TED. Germinal excisions, rare with MuDR, are common with TED, but arise in one of the mitotic divisions of the gametophyte, rather than at meiosis. Instead, transposition-deficient elements arise at meiosis, suggesting that the double-strand breaks produced by element excision are repaired differently in mitosis and meiosis. Unlike MuDR, TED is a very low-copy transposon whose number and activity do not undergo dramatic changes upon inbreeding or outcrossing. Like MuDR, TED transposes mostly to unlinked sites and can form circular transposition products. Sequences closer to TED than to MuDR were detected only in the grasses, suggesting a rather recent evolutionary split from a common ancestor. PMID:24038653

  9. TED, an autonomous and rare maize transposon of the mutator superfamily with a high gametophytic excision frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yubin; Harris, Linda; Dooner, Hugo K

    2013-09-01

    Mutator (Mu) elements, one of the most diverse superfamilies of DNA transposons, are found in all eukaryotic kingdoms, but are particularly numerous in plants. Most of the present knowledge on the transposition behavior of this superfamily comes from studies of the maize (Zea mays) Mu elements, whose transposition is mediated by the autonomous Mutator-Don Robertson (MuDR) element. Here, we describe the maize element TED (for Transposon Ellen Dempsey), an autonomous cousin that differs significantly from MuDR. Element excision and reinsertion appear to require both proteins encoded by MuDR, but only the single protein encoded by TED. Germinal excisions, rare with MuDR, are common with TED, but arise in one of the mitotic divisions of the gametophyte, rather than at meiosis. Instead, transposition-deficient elements arise at meiosis, suggesting that the double-strand breaks produced by element excision are repaired differently in mitosis and meiosis. Unlike MuDR, TED is a very low-copy transposon whose number and activity do not undergo dramatic changes upon inbreeding or outcrossing. Like MuDR, TED transposes mostly to unlinked sites and can form circular transposition products. Sequences closer to TED than to MuDR were detected only in the grasses, suggesting a rather recent evolutionary split from a common ancestor.

  10. Exome sequencing in schizophrenic patients with high levels of homozygosity identifies novel and extremely rare mutations in the GABA/glutamatergic pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edoardo Giacopuzzi

    Full Text Available Inbreeding is a known risk factor for recessive Mendelian diseases and previous studies have suggested that it could also play a role in complex disorders, such as psychiatric diseases. Recent inbreeding results in the presence of long runs of homozygosity (ROHs along the genome, which are also defined as autozygosity regions. Genetic variants in these regions have two alleles that are identical by descent, thus increasing the odds of bearing rare recessive deleterious mutations due to a homozygous state. A recent study showed a suggestive enrichment of long ROHs in schizophrenic patients, suggesting that recent inbreeding could play a role in the disease. To better understand the impact of autozygosity on schizophrenia risk, we selected, from a cohort of 180 Italian patients, seven subjects with extremely high numbers of large ROHs that were likely due to recent inbreeding and characterized the mutational landscape within their ROHs using Whole Exome Sequencing and, gene set enrichment analysis. We identified a significant overlap (17%; empirical p-value = 0.0171 between genes inside ROHs affected by low frequency functional homozygous variants (107 genes and the group of most promising candidate genes mutated in schizophrenia. Moreover, in four patients, we identified novel and extremely rare damaging mutations in the genes involved in neurodevelopment (MEGF8 and in GABA/glutamatergic synaptic transmission (GAD1, FMN1, ANO2. These results provide insights into the contribution of rare recessive mutations and inbreeding as risk factors for schizophrenia. ROHs that are likely due to recent inbreeding harbor a combination of predisposing low-frequency variants and extremely rare variants that have a high impact on pivotal biological pathways implicated in the disease. In addition, this study confirms that focusing on patients with high levels of homozygosity could be a useful prioritization strategy for discovering new high-impact mutations in

  11. Exome sequencing in schizophrenic patients with high levels of homozygosity identifies novel and extremely rare mutations in the GABA/glutamatergic pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacopuzzi, Edoardo; Gennarelli, Massimo; Minelli, Alessandra; Gardella, Rita; Valsecchi, Paolo; Traversa, Michele; Bonvicini, Cristian; Vita, Antonio; Sacchetti, Emilio; Magri, Chiara

    2017-01-01

    Inbreeding is a known risk factor for recessive Mendelian diseases and previous studies have suggested that it could also play a role in complex disorders, such as psychiatric diseases. Recent inbreeding results in the presence of long runs of homozygosity (ROHs) along the genome, which are also defined as autozygosity regions. Genetic variants in these regions have two alleles that are identical by descent, thus increasing the odds of bearing rare recessive deleterious mutations due to a homozygous state. A recent study showed a suggestive enrichment of long ROHs in schizophrenic patients, suggesting that recent inbreeding could play a role in the disease. To better understand the impact of autozygosity on schizophrenia risk, we selected, from a cohort of 180 Italian patients, seven subjects with extremely high numbers of large ROHs that were likely due to recent inbreeding and characterized the mutational landscape within their ROHs using Whole Exome Sequencing and, gene set enrichment analysis. We identified a significant overlap (17%; empirical p-value = 0.0171) between genes inside ROHs affected by low frequency functional homozygous variants (107 genes) and the group of most promising candidate genes mutated in schizophrenia. Moreover, in four patients, we identified novel and extremely rare damaging mutations in the genes involved in neurodevelopment (MEGF8) and in GABA/glutamatergic synaptic transmission (GAD1, FMN1, ANO2). These results provide insights into the contribution of rare recessive mutations and inbreeding as risk factors for schizophrenia. ROHs that are likely due to recent inbreeding harbor a combination of predisposing low-frequency variants and extremely rare variants that have a high impact on pivotal biological pathways implicated in the disease. In addition, this study confirms that focusing on patients with high levels of homozygosity could be a useful prioritization strategy for discovering new high-impact mutations in genetically

  12. A Rare Cause of Short Stature: 3M Syndrome in a Patient with Novel Mutation in OBSL1 Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keskin, Melikşah; Muratoğlu Şahin, Nursel; Kurnaz, Erdal; Bayramoğlu, Elvan; Savaş Erdeve, Şenay; Aycan, Zehra; Çetinkaya, Semra

    2017-03-01

    The Miller-McKusick-Malvaux (3M) syndrome is a rare autosomal disorder that can lead to short stature, dysmorphic features, and skeletal abnormalities with normal intelligence. A 16-month-old female patient had been referred to our clinic due to short stature. Case history revealed a birth weight of 1740 grams on the 39 th week of gestation, with a birth length of 42 cm and no prior hereditary conditions of clinical significance in her family. On physical examination, her length was 67 cm [-3.6 standard deviation (SD) score], weight 7.2 kg (-2.9 SD score), and head circumference 42 cm (below 3 rd percentile). She also had numerous characteristic physical features such as a triangular face, fleshy nose tip, a long philtrum, prominent mouth and lips, pointed chin, lumbar lordosis, and prominent heels. As her growth retardation had a prenatal onset and the physical examination results were suggestive of a characteristic profile, the diagnosis of 3M syndrome was strongly considered. Genetic assessment of the patient revealed a novel homozygous p.T45Nfs*40 mutation in the OBSL1 gene. It is recommended that physicians pay further attention to this condition in the differential diagnosis of children with severe short stature.

  13. Identification of Variant-Specific Functions of PIK3CA by Rapid Phenotyping of Rare Mutations | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Large-scale sequencing efforts are uncovering the complexity of cancer genomes, which are composed of causal "driver" mutations that promote tumor progression along with many more pathologically neutral "passenger" events. The majority of mutations, both in known cancer drivers and uncharacterized genes, are generally of low occurrence, highlighting the need to functionally annotate the long tail of infrequent mutations present in heterogeneous cancers.

  14. Whole Exome Sequencing Identified a Novel Heterozygous Mutation in HMBS Gene in a Chinese Patient With Acute Intermittent Porphyria With Rare Type of Mild Anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongjiang Zheng

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP is a rare hereditary metabolic disease with an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance. Germline mutations of HMBS gene causes AIP. Mutation of HMBS gene results into the partial deficiency of the heme biosynthetic enzyme hydroxymethylbilane synthase. AIP is clinically manifested with abdominal pain, vomiting, and neurological complaints. Additionally, an extreme phenotypic heterogeneity has been reported in AIP patients with mutations in HMBS gene. Here, we investigated a Chinese patient with AIP. The proband is a 28-year-old Chinese male manifested with severe stomach ache, constipation, nausea and depression. Proband’s father and mother is normal. Proband’s blood sample was collected and genomic DNA was extracted. Whole exome sequencing and Sanger sequencing identified a heterozygous novel single nucleotide deletion (c.809delC in exon 12 of HMBS gene in the proband. This mutation leads to frameshift followed by formation of a truncated (p.Ala270Valfs∗2 HMBS protein with 272 amino acids comparing with the wild type HMBS protein of 361 amino acids. This mutation has not been found in proband’s unaffected parents as well as in 100 healthy normal control. According to the variant interpretation guidelines of American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics (ACMG, this variant is classified as “likely pathogenic” variant. Our findings expand the mutational spectra of HMBS gene related AIP which are significant for screening and genetic diagnosis for AIP.

  15. Genetic counseling for a three-generation Chinese family with Waardenburg syndrome type II associated with a rare SOX10 mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kaitian; Zong, Ling; Zhan, Yuan; Wu, Xuan; Liu, Min; Jiang, Hongyan

    2015-05-01

    Waardenburg syndrome is clinically and genetically heterogeneous. The SOX10 mutation related with Waardenburg syndrome type II is rare in Chinese. This study aimed to uncover the genetic causes of Waardenburg syndrome type II in a three-generation family to improve genetic counseling. Complete clinical and molecular evaluations were conducted in a three-generation Han Chinese family with Waardenburg syndrome type II. Targeted genetic counseling was provided to this family. We identified a rare heterozygous dominant mutation c.621C>A (p.Y207X) in SOX10 gene in this family. The premature termination codon occurs in exon 4, 27 residues downstream of the carboxyl end of the high mobility group box. Bioinformatics prediction suggested this variant to be disease-causing, probably due to nonsense-mediated mRNA decay. Useful genetic counseling was given to the family for prenatal guidance. Identification of a rare dominant heterozygous SOX10 mutation c.621C>A in this family provided an efficient way to understand the causes of Waardenburg syndrome type II and improved genetic counseling. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Exome sequencing identifies rare deleterious mutations in DNA repair genes FANCC and BLM as potential breast cancer susceptibility alleles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ella R Thompson

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Despite intensive efforts using linkage and candidate gene approaches, the genetic etiology for the majority of families with a multi-generational breast cancer predisposition is unknown. In this study, we used whole-exome sequencing of thirty-three individuals from 15 breast cancer families to identify potential predisposing genes. Our analysis identified families with heterozygous, deleterious mutations in the DNA repair genes FANCC and BLM, which are responsible for the autosomal recessive disorders Fanconi Anemia and Bloom syndrome. In total, screening of all exons in these genes in 438 breast cancer families identified three with truncating mutations in FANCC and two with truncating mutations in BLM. Additional screening of FANCC mutation hotspot exons identified one pathogenic mutation among an additional 957 breast cancer families. Importantly, none of the deleterious mutations were identified among 464 healthy controls and are not reported in the 1,000 Genomes data. Given the rarity of Fanconi Anemia and Bloom syndrome disorders among Caucasian populations, the finding of multiple deleterious mutations in these critical DNA repair genes among high-risk breast cancer families is intriguing and suggestive of a predisposing role. Our data demonstrate the utility of intra-family exome-sequencing approaches to uncover cancer predisposition genes, but highlight the major challenge of definitively validating candidates where the incidence of sporadic disease is high, germline mutations are not fully penetrant, and individual predisposition genes may only account for a tiny proportion of breast cancer families.

  17. Identification of a rare point mutation at C-terminus of merozoite surface antigen-1 gene of Plasmodium falciparum in eastern Indian isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, Dipak Kumar; Das, Bibhu Ranjan; Dash, A P; Supakar, Prakash C

    2004-01-01

    Merozoite surface antigen-1 (MSA-1) of Plasmodium falciparum is highly immunogenic in human. Several studies suggest that MSA-1 protein is an effective target for a protective immune response. Attempt has been made to find new point mutations by analyzing 244 bp [codon 1655(R) to 1735 (I)] relatively conserved C-terminus region of MSA-1 gene in 125 isolates. This region contains two EGF like domains, which are involved in generating protective immune response in human. Point mutations in this region are very much important in view of vaccine development. Searching of mutational hot spots in MSA-1 protein by sequencing method in a representative number of isolates is quite critical and expensive. Therefore, in this study slot blot and PCR-SSCP method have been used to find out new mutations in the individual isolates showing alterations in the mobility of DNA fragment. Sequencing of the altered bands from the SSCP gel shows a rare non-synonymous point mutation in 7 (5.6%) of the 125 isolates at amino acid position 1704 of MSA-1 gene where isoleucine is replaced by valine.

  18. A rare mutation in the RET-protooncogen associated with mixed medullary-follicular micro-carcinoma of the thyroid gland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richter, K.; Huwe, A.; Boldt, H.; Dresel, S. [Nuklearmedizinische Klinik, HELIOS-Klinikum Berlin-Buch (Germany); Geipel, D. [St.-Hedwig-Krankenhaus, Bereich Endokrine Chirurgie (Germany); Mairinger, T. [Inst. fuer Pathologie, HELIOS-Klinikum Emil von Behring (Germany); Schwabe, M. [Inst. fuer Pathologie, Charite Berlin Campus Mitte (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    Medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) arises from parafollicular C-cells of the thyroid and accounts for 1% to 10% of all thyroid cancers (1). MTC can be sporadic or hereditary. Hereditary MTC represents 20% to 30% of all MTC with an autosomal dominant pattern of transmission and a high degree of penetrance (>90%). It can be transmitted as a single entity (sporadic), familial MTC (FMTC), or it can arise as part of a multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) syndrome type 2A or 2B. Both genders are equally affected. (1, 9) The identification of hereditary MTC has been facilitated in recent years by the direct analysis of germline point mutations of the RET(rearranged during transfection)-protooncogene, a 21 exon gene that encodes a plasma membrane-bound tyrosine kinase receptor, localised on chromosome 10q11.2, which is expressed in tissues derived from the neural crest. To date codon mutations in nine different exons were identified (7, 8, 16, 22, 29) causing MEN 2A (MTC in combination with pheochromocytoma and hyperparathyroidism, including rare variants with Hirschsprung's disease and cutaneous lichen amyloidosis), FMTC (MTC as a sole disease phenotype) and MEN 2B (MTC in combination with pheochromocytoma, multiple mucosa neuromas, and marfanoid habitus). The most common mutation, accounting for over 80% of all mutations associated with MEN 2A (or Sipple's) syndrome affects codon 634 in exon 11 of the RET-protooncogene. Other mutations affect codon 630 in exon 11, and codons 609, 611, 618, 620 in exon 10 - they also cause FMTC, although some have a classic MEN 2A syndrome. 5% to 10% of families with FMTC have mutations that affect codons 768, 790, 791 in exon 13: codons 804, 844 in exon 14, and codon 891 in exon 15 (3, 4, 10). The much more aggressive MEN 2B is caused by a single mutation converting a methionine into a threonine at codon 918 in exon 16, and has been identified in approximately 95% of patients with MEN 2B. Other rare mutations associated with MEN 2

  19. Whole-exome sequencing of a rare case of familial childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia reveals putative predisposing mutations in Fanconi anemia genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinella, Jean-François; Healy, Jasmine; Saillour, Virginie; Richer, Chantal; Cassart, Pauline; Ouimet, Manon; Sinnett, Daniel

    2015-07-23

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common pediatric cancer. While the multi-step model of pediatric leukemogenesis suggests interplay between constitutional and somatic genomes, the role of inherited genetic variability remains largely undescribed. Nonsyndromic familial ALL, although extremely rare, provides the ideal setting to study inherited contributions to ALL. Toward this goal, we sequenced the exomes of a childhood ALL family consisting of mother, father and two non-twinned siblings diagnosed with concordant pre-B hyperdiploid ALL and previously shown to have inherited a rare form of PRDM9, a histone H3 methyltransferase involved in crossing-over at recombination hotspots and Holliday junctions. We postulated that inheritance of additional rare disadvantaging variants in predisposing cancer genes could affect genomic stability and lead to increased risk of hyperdiploid ALL within this family. Whole exomes were captured using Agilent's SureSelect kit and sequenced on the Life Technologies SOLiD System. We applied a data reduction strategy to identify candidate variants shared by both affected siblings. Under a recessive disease model, we focused on rare non-synonymous or frame-shift variants in leukemia predisposing pathways. Though the family was nonsyndromic, we identified a combination of rare variants in Fanconi anemia (FA) genes FANCP/SLX4 (compound heterozygote - rs137976282/rs79842542) and FANCA (rs61753269) and a rare homozygous variant in the Holliday junction resolvase GEN1 (rs16981869). These variants, predicted to affect protein function, were previously identified in familial breast cancer cases. Based on our in-house database of 369 childhood ALL exomes, the sibs were the only patients to carry this particularly rare combination and only a single hyperdiploid patient was heterozygote at both FANCP/SLX4 positions, while no FANCA variant allele carriers were identified. FANCA is the most commonly mutated gene in FA and is essential for

  20. Boucher Neuhäuser Syndrome - A rare cause of inherited hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. A case of two adult siblings with two novel mutations in PNPLA6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langdahl, Jakob H; Frederiksen, Anja L; Nguyen, Nina; Brusgaard, Klaus; Juhl, Claus B

    2017-02-01

    Boucher Neuhäuser Syndrome (BNS) is a rare clinical syndrome with autosomal recessive inheritance defined by early-onset ataxia, hypogonadism and chorioretinal dystrophy. We present two siblings diagnosed with BNS in late adult life identified with compound heterozygous state of two novel PNPLA6 mutations. Five healthy siblings were non- or heterozygous carriers of the mutations. The cases, which presented with ataxia in childhood and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (HH), were diagnosed at age 17 and 25, respectively, when examined for delayed puberty. The youngest case, a 55-year old male, was referred to our department in 2006 for evaluation of secondary causes of osteoporosis, which he developed despite adequate testosterone replacement therapy. The unusual medical history with childhood ataxia and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism lead to further examinations and eventually the diagnosis of BNS. The older sister of the proband also displayed the triad of ataxia, HH and chorioretinal dystrophy accompanied by cerebellar atrophy and in 2014, we found the mutations in PNPLA6. BNS is a rare cause of HH and secondary osteoporosis, but should be considered in patients presenting with one or more of the key features. Genetic screening is becoming increasingly available and inexpensive and accordingly this may be considered earlier and by broader indication in unusual phenotypic presentations. The increasing knowledge of causes for inherited diseases should extend the use of genetic screening, as the correct diagnosis will benefit the patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Mutations in the VNTR of the carboxyl-ester lipase gene (CEL) are a rare cause of monogenic diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torsvik, Janniche; Johansson, Stefan; Johansen, Anders

    2009-01-01

    of the VNTR, and determined the VNTR-length of each allele. When blindly testing 56 members of the two families with known single-base deletions in the CEL VNTR, the method correctly assessed the mutation carriers. Screening of 241 probands from suspected maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY) families...... negative for mutations in known MODY genes (95 individuals from Denmark and 146 individuals from UK) revealed no deletions in the proximal repeats of the CEL VNTR. However, we found one Danish patient with a short, novel CEL allele containing only three VNTR repeats (normal range 7-23 in healthy controls......). This allele co-segregated with diabetes or impaired glucose tolerance in the patient's family as six of seven mutation carriers were affected. We also identified individuals who had three copies of a complete CEL VNTR. In conclusion, the CEL gene is highly polymorphic, but mutations in CEL are likely...

  2. Unilateral follicular variant of papillary thyroid carcinoma with unique KRAS mutation in struma ovarii in bilateral ovarian teratoma: a rare case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanojevic Boban

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Struma ovarii (SO is a rare form of ovarian mature teratoma in which thyroid tissue is the predominant element. Because of its rarity, the differential diagnosis between benign and malignant SO has not been clearly defined. It is believed that malignant transformation of SO has similar molecular features with and its prognosis corresponds to that of malignant tumors originating in the thyroid. Case presentation We report 35-year-old woman with bilateral ovarian cysts incidentally detected by ultrasound during the first trimester of pregnancy. Four months after delivery of a healthy child without complication she was admitted to the hospital for acute abdominal pain. Laparoscopic left adnexectomy was performed initially in a regional hospital; right cystectomy was done later in a specialized clinic. Intraoperative frozen section and a final pathology revealed that the cyst from the left ovary was composed of mature teratomatous elements, normal thyroid tissue (>50% and a non-encapsulated focus of follicular variant of papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC. Normal and cancerous thyroid tissues were tested for BRAF and RAS mutations by direct sequencing, and for RET/PTC rearrangements by RT-PCR/Southern blotting. A KRAS codon 12 mutation, the GGT → GTT transversion, corresponding to the Gly → Val amino acid change was identified in the absence of other genetic alterations commonly found in PTC. Conclusion To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time this mutation is described in a papillary thyroid carcinoma arising in struma in the ovarii. This finding provides further evidence that even rare mutations specific for PTC may occur in such tumors. Molecular testing may be a useful adjunct to common differential diagnostic methods of thyroid malignancy in SO.

  3. Severe fluoropyrimidine toxicity due to novel and rare DPYD missense mutations, deletion and genomic amplification affecting DPD activity and mRNA splicing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Kuilenburg, André B P; Meijer, Judith; Maurer, Dirk

    2017-01-01

    Dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD) is the initial and rate-limiting enzyme in the catabolism of 5-fluorouracil (5FU). Genetic variations in DPD have emerged as predictive risk factors for severe fluoropyrimidine toxicity. Here, we report novel and rare genetic variants underlying DPD deficiency...... in 9 cancer patients presenting with severe fluoropyrimidine-associated toxicity. All patients possessed a strongly reduced DPD activity, ranging from 9 to 53% of controls. Analysis of the DPD gene (DPYD) showed the presence of 21 variable sites including 4 novel and 4 very rare aberrations: 3 missense...... of exon 4 immediately upstream of the mutated splice-donor site in the process of DPD pre-mRNA splicing. A lethal toxicity in two DPD patients suggests that fluoropyrimidines combined with other therapies such as radiotherapy might be particularly toxic for DPD deficient patients. Our study advocates...

  4. Mutations of the Spliceosome Complex Genes Occur In Adult Patients but Are Very Rare In Children with Myeloid Neoplasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hirabayashi, Shinsuke; Moetter, Jessica; Yoshida, Kenichi

    -protein complexes that remove noncoding introns from precursor mRNA. We hypothesized that the disruption of the spliceosome complex might play a driving role in the leukemogenesis in pediatric MDS. Using targeted re-sequencing we investigated the 3 exclusive hotspots of 2 spliceosome genes that were found...... negative. The drastically reduced frequency of spliceosome mutations in pediatric compared to adult myeloid malignancies suggests a different pathogenetic mechanism in childhood disease, and fits well with previous reports that somatic mutations of non-Ras-pathway genes, such as DNMT3A, are less prevalent...

  5. Frequent genes in rare diseases: panel-based next generation sequencing to disclose causal mutations in hereditary neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohrn, Maike F; Glöckle, Nicola; Mulahasanovic, Lejla; Heller, Corina; Mohr, Julia; Bauer, Christine; Riesch, Erik; Becker, Andrea; Battke, Florian; Hörtnagel, Konstanze; Hornemann, Thorsten; Suriyanarayanan, Saranya; Blankenburg, Markus; Schulz, Jörg B; Claeys, Kristl G; Gess, Burkhard; Katona, Istvan; Ferbert, Andreas; Vittore, Debora; Grimm, Alexander; Wolking, Stefan; Schöls, Ludger; Lerche, Holger; Korenke, G Christoph; Fischer, Dirk; Schrank, Bertold; Kotzaeridou, Urania; Kurlemann, Gerhard; Dräger, Bianca; Schirmacher, Anja; Young, Peter; Schlotter-Weigel, Beate; Biskup, Saskia

    2017-12-01

    Hereditary neuropathies comprise a wide variety of chronic diseases associated to more than 80 genes identified to date. We herein examined 612 index patients with either a Charcot-Marie-Tooth phenotype, hereditary sensory neuropathy, familial amyloid neuropathy, or small fiber neuropathy using a customized multigene panel based on the next generation sequencing technique. In 121 cases (19.8%), we identified at least one putative pathogenic mutation. Of these, 54.4% showed an autosomal dominant, 33.9% an autosomal recessive, and 11.6% an X-linked inheritance. The most frequently affected genes were PMP22 (16.4%), GJB1 (10.7%), MPZ, and SH3TC2 (both 9.9%), and MFN2 (8.3%). We further detected likely or known pathogenic variants in HINT1, HSPB1, NEFL, PRX, IGHMBP2, NDRG1, TTR, EGR2, FIG4, GDAP1, LMNA, LRSAM1, POLG, TRPV4, AARS, BIC2, DHTKD1, FGD4, HK1, INF2, KIF5A, PDK3, REEP1, SBF1, SBF2, SCN9A, and SPTLC2 with a declining frequency. Thirty-four novel variants were considered likely pathogenic not having previously been described in association with any disorder in the literature. In one patient, two homozygous mutations in HK1 were detected in the multigene panel, but not by whole exome sequencing. A novel missense mutation in KIF5A was considered pathogenic because of the highly compatible phenotype. In one patient, the plasma sphingolipid profile could functionally prove the pathogenicity of a mutation in SPTLC2. One pathogenic mutation in MPZ was identified after being previously missed by Sanger sequencing. We conclude that panel based next generation sequencing is a useful, time- and cost-effective approach to assist clinicians in identifying the correct diagnosis and enable causative treatment considerations. © 2017 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  6. Rare mutations and potentially damaging missense variants in genes encoding fibrillar collagens and proteins involved in their production are candidates for risk for preterm premature rupture of membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modi, Bhavi P; Teves, Maria E; Pearson, Laurel N; Parikh, Hardik I; Chaemsaithong, Piya; Sheth, Nihar U; York, Timothy P; Romero, Roberto; Strauss, Jerome F

    2017-01-01

    Preterm premature rupture of membranes (PPROM) is the leading identifiable cause of preterm birth with ~ 40% of preterm births being associated with PPROM and occurs in 1% - 2% of all pregnancies. We hypothesized that multiple rare variants in fetal genes involved in extracellular matrix synthesis would associate with PPROM, based on the assumption that impaired elaboration of matrix proteins would reduce fetal membrane tensile strength, predisposing to unscheduled rupture. We performed whole exome sequencing (WES) on neonatal DNA derived from pregnancies complicated by PPROM (49 cases) and healthy term deliveries (20 controls) to identify candidate mutations/variants. Genotyping for selected variants from the WES study was carried out on an additional 188 PPROM cases and 175 controls. All mothers were self-reported African Americans, and a panel of ancestry informative markers was used to control for genetic ancestry in all genetic association tests. In support of the primary hypothesis, a statistically significant genetic burden (all samples combined, SKAT-O p-value = 0.0225) of damaging/potentially damaging rare variants was identified in the genes of interest-fibrillar collagen genes, which contribute to fetal membrane strength and integrity. These findings suggest that the fetal contribution to PPROM is polygenic, and driven by an increased burden of rare variants that may also contribute to the disparities in rates of preterm birth among African Americans.

  7. Brief Report: Human Acute Myeloid Leukemia Reprogramming to Pluripotency Is a Rare Event and Selects for Patient Hematopoietic Cells Devoid of Leukemic Mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong-Hee; Salci, Kyle R; Reid, Jennifer C; Orlando, Luca; Tanasijevic, Borko; Shapovalova, Zoya; Bhatia, Mickie

    2017-09-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cell reprogramming has provided critical insights into disease processes by modeling the genetics and related clinical pathophysiology. Human cancer represents highly diverse genetics, as well as inter- and intra-patient heterogeneity, where cellular model systems capable of capturing this disease complexity would be invaluable. Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) represents one of most heterogeneous cancers and has been divided into genetic subtypes correlated with unique risk stratification over the decades. Here, we report our efforts to induce pluripotency from the heterogeneous population of human patients that represents this disease in the clinic. Using robust optimized reprogramming methods, we demonstrate that reprogramming of AML cells harboring leukemic genomic aberrations is a rare event with the exception of those with de novo mixed-lineage leukemia (MLL) mutations that can be reprogrammed and model drug responses in vitro. Our findings indicate that unlike hematopoietic cells devoid of genomic aberrations, AML cells harboring driver mutations are refractory to reprogramming. Expression of MLL fusion proteins in AML cells did not contribute to induced reprogramming success, which continued to select for patient derived cells devoid of AML patient-specific aberrations. Our study reveals that unanticipated blockades to achieving pluripotency reside within the majority of transformed AML patient cells. Stem Cells 2017;35:2095-2102. © 2017 AlphaMed Press.

  8. [Safety Evaluation of Rare Sugar Syrup: Single-dose Oral Toxicity in Rats, Reverse Mutation Assay, Chromosome Aberration Assay, and Acute Non-Effect Level for Diarrhea of a Single Dose in Humans].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Takako; Iida, Tetsuo; Takamine, Satoshi; Hayashi, Noriko; Okuma, Kazuhiro

    2015-01-01

    The safety of rare sugar syrup obtained from high-fructose corn syrup under slightly alkaline conditions was studied. Mutagenicity of rare sugar syrup was assessed by a reverse mutation assay using Salmonella typhimurium and Escherichia coli, and an in vitro chromosomal aberration assay using Chinese hamster lung cell line (CHL/IU). No mutagenicity of rare sugar syrup was detected under these experimental conditions. Oral administration of single dose (15,000 mg/kg) of rare sugar syrup to rats caused no abnormalities, suggesting no adverse effect of rare sugar syrup. In humans, the acute non-effect level of rare sugar syrup for causing diarrhea was estimated as 0.9 g/kg body weight as dry solid base in both males and females.

  9. No evidence for association of autism with rare heterozygous point mutations in Contactin-Associated Protein-Like 2 (CNTNAP2, or in Other Contactin-Associated Proteins or Contactins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John D Murdoch

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Contactins and Contactin-Associated Proteins, and Contactin-Associated Protein-Like 2 (CNTNAP2 in particular, have been widely cited as autism risk genes based on findings from homozygosity mapping, molecular cytogenetics, copy number variation analyses, and both common and rare single nucleotide association studies. However, data specifically with regard to the contribution of heterozygous single nucleotide variants (SNVs have been inconsistent. In an effort to clarify the role of rare point mutations in CNTNAP2 and related gene families, we have conducted targeted next-generation sequencing and evaluated existing sequence data in cohorts totaling 2704 cases and 2747 controls. We find no evidence for statistically significant association of rare heterozygous mutations in any of the CNTN or CNTNAP genes, including CNTNAP2, placing marked limits on the scale of their plausible contribution to risk.

  10. The novel RAF1 mutation p.(Gly361Ala) located outside the kinase domain of the CR3 region in two patients with Noonan syndrome, including one with a rare brain tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harms, Frederike L; Alawi, Malik; Amor, David J; Tan, Tiong Y; Cuturilo, Goran; Lissewski, Christina; Brinkmann, Julia; Schanze, Denny; Kutsche, Kerstin; Zenker, Martin

    2018-02-01

    Noonan syndrome is characterized by typical craniofacial dysmorphism, postnatal growth retardation, congenital heart defect, and learning difficulties and belongs to the RASopathies, a group of neurodevelopmental disorders caused by germline mutations in genes encoding components of the RAS-MAPK pathway. Mutations in the RAF1 gene are associated with Noonan syndrome, with a high prevalence of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). RAF1 mutations cluster in exons encoding the conserved region 2 (CR2), the kinase activation segment of the CR3 domain, and the C-terminus. We present two boys with Noonan syndrome and the identical de novo RAF1 missense variant c.1082G>C/p.(Gly361Ala) affecting the CR3, but located outside the kinase activation segment. The p.(Gly361Ala) mutation has been identified as a RAF1 allele conferring resistance to RAF inhibitors. This amino acid change favors a RAF1 conformation that allows for enhanced RAF dimerization and increased intrinsic kinase activity. Both patients with Noonan syndrome showed typical craniofacial dysmorphism, macrocephaly, and short stature. One individual developed HCM and was diagnosed with a disseminated oligodendroglial-like leptomeningeal tumor (DOLT) of childhood at the age of 9 years. While there is a well-established association of NS with malignant tumors, especially childhood hemato-oncological diseases, brain tumors have rarely been reported in Noonan syndrome. Our data demonstrate that mutation scanning of the entire coding region of genes associated with Noonan syndrome is mandatory not to miss rare variants located outside the known mutational hotspots. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Recurrent vomiting and ethylmalonic aciduria associated with rare mutations in the short-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (SCAD) gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seidel, J.; Streck, S.; Bellstedt, K.

    2003-01-01

    blood spots. Neither of the frequent SCAD gene variants 625G>A and 511C>T was present, but direct sequencing of the promoter and coding regions of the SCAD gene revealed that the patient had mutations on both alleles: 417G>C (Trpl15Cys) and 1095G>T (Gln341His). Neither mutation has been described before...

  12. Spliceosomal gene aberrations are rare, coexist with oncogenic mutations, and are unlikely to exert a driver effect in childhood MDS and JMML

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Hirabayashi (Shinsuke); C. Flotho (Christian); J. Moetter (Jessica); M. Heuser (Michael); H. Hasle (Henrik); B. Gruhn (Bernd); T. Klingebiel (Thomas); F. Thol (Felicitas); B. Schlegelberger (Brigitte); I. Baumann (Irith); B. Strahm (Brigitte); J. Stary (Jan); F. Locatelli (Franco); M. Zecca (Marco); E. Bergstraesser (Eva); M.N. Dworzak (Michael); M.M. van den Heuvel-Eibrink (Marry); B. de Moerloose (Barbara); S. Ogawa (Susumu); C.M. Niemeyer (Charlotte); M. Wlodarski (Marcin)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractSomatic mutations of the spliceosomal machinery occur frequently in adult patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). We resequenced SF3B1, U2AF35, and SRSF2 in 371 children with MDS or juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia. We found missense mutations in 2 juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia

  13. Targeted exome sequencing integrated with clinicopathological information reveals novel and rare mutations in atypical, suspected and unknown cases of Alport syndrome or proteinuria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajshekhar Chatterjee

    Full Text Available We applied customized targeted next-generation exome sequencing (NGS to determine if mutations in genes associated with renal malformations, Alport syndrome (AS or nephrotic syndrome are a potential cause of renal abnormalities in patients with equivocal or atypical presentation. We first sequenced 4,041 exons representing 292 kidney disease genes in a Caucasian woman with a history of congenital vesicoureteral reflux (VUR, recurrent urinary tract infections and hydronephrosis who presented with nephrotic range proteinuria at the age of 45. Her biopsy was remarkable for focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS, a potential complication of longstanding VUR. She had no family history of renal disease. Her proteinuria improved initially, however, several years later she presented with worsening proteinuria and microhematuria. NGS analysis revealed two deleterious COL4A3 mutations, one novel and the other previously reported in AS, and a novel deleterious SALL2 mutation, a gene linked to renal malformations. Pedigree analysis confirmed that COL4A3 mutations were nonallelic and compound heterozygous. The genomic results in conjunction with subsequent abnormal electron microscopy, Collagen IV minor chain immunohistochemistry and progressive sensorineural hearing loss confirmed AS. We then modified our NGS approach to enable more efficient discovery of variants associated with AS or a subset of FSGS by multiplexing targeted exome sequencing of 19 genes associated with AS or FSGS in 14 patients. Using this approach, we found novel or known COL4A3 or COL4A5 mutations in a subset of patients with clinically diagnosed or suspected AS, APOL1 variants associated with FSGS in African Americans and novel mutations in genes associated with nephrotic syndrome. These studies demonstrate the successful application of targeted capture-based exome sequencing to simultaneously evaluate genetic variations in many genes in patients with complex renal phenotypes and

  14. Activation of the MAPK pathway is a common event in uveal melanomas although it rarely occurs through mutation of BRAF or RAS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuidervaart, W; van Nieuwpoort, F; Stark, M; Dijkman, R; Packer, L; Borgstein, A-M; Pavey, S; van der Velden, P; Out, C; Jager, M J; Hayward, N K; Gruis, N A

    2005-06-06

    In contrast to cutaneous melanoma, there is no evidence that BRAF mutations are involved in the activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway in uveal melanoma, although there is increasing evidence that this pathway is activated frequently in the latter tumours. In this study, we performed mutation analysis of the RAS and BRAF genes in a panel of 11 uveal melanoma cell lines and 19 primary uveal melanoma tumours. In addition, Western blot and immunohistochemical analyses were performed on downstream members of the MAPK pathway in order to assess the contribution of each of these components. No mutations were found in any of the three RAS gene family members and only one cell line carried a BRAF mutation (V599E). Despite this, mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase kinase (MEK), ERK and ELK were constitutively activated in all samples. These data suggest that activation of the MAPK pathway is commonly involved in the development of uveal melanoma, but occurs through a mechanism different to that of cutaneous melanoma.

  15. High resolution melting curve analysis targeting the HBB gene mutational hot-spot offers a reliable screening approach for all common as well as most of the rare beta-globin gene mutations in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Md Tarikul; Sarkar, Suprovath Kumar; Sultana, Nusrat; Begum, Mst Noorjahan; Bhuyan, Golam Sarower; Talukder, Shezote; Muraduzzaman, A K M; Alauddin, Md; Islam, Mohammad Sazzadul; Biswas, Pritha Promita; Biswas, Aparna; Qadri, Syeda Kashfi; Shirin, Tahmina; Banu, Bilquis; Sadya, Salma; Hussain, Manzoor; Sarwardi, Golam; Khan, Waqar Ahmed; Mannan, Mohammad Abdul; Shekhar, Hossain Uddin; Chowdhury, Emran Kabir; Sajib, Abu Ashfaqur; Akhteruzzaman, Sharif; Qadri, Syed Saleheen; Qadri, Firdausi; Mannoor, Kaiissar

    2018-01-02

    Bangladesh lies in the global thalassemia belt, which has a defined mutational hot-spot in the beta-globin gene. The high carrier frequencies of beta-thalassemia trait and hemoglobin E-trait in Bangladesh necessitate a reliable DNA-based carrier screening approach that could supplement the use of hematological and electrophoretic indices to overcome the barriers of carrier screening. With this view in mind, the study aimed to establish a high resolution melting (HRM) curve-based rapid and reliable mutation screening method targeting the mutational hot-spot of South Asian and Southeast Asian countries that encompasses exon-1 (c.1 - c.92), intron-1 (c.92 + 1 - c.92 + 130) and a portion of exon-2 (c.93 - c.217) of the HBB gene which harbors more than 95% of mutant alleles responsible for beta-thalassemia in Bangladesh. Our HRM approach could successfully differentiate ten beta-globin gene mutations, namely c.79G > A, c.92 + 5G > C, c.126_129delCTTT, c.27_28insG, c.46delT, c.47G > A, c.92G > C, c.92 + 130G > C, c.126delC and c.135delC in heterozygous states from the wild type alleles, implying the significance of the approach for carrier screening as the first three of these mutations account for ~85% of total mutant alleles in Bangladesh. Moreover, different combinations of compound heterozygous mutations were found to generate melt curves that were distinct from the wild type alleles and from one another. Based on the findings, sixteen reference samples were run in parallel to 41 unknown specimens to perform direct genotyping of the beta-thalassemia specimens using HRM. The HRM-based genotyping of the unknown specimens showed 100% consistency with the sequencing result. Targeting the mutational hot-spot, the HRM approach could be successfully applied for screening of beta-thalassemia carriers in Bangladesh as well as in other countries of South Asia and Southeast Asia. The approach could be a useful supplement of hematological and

  16. Rare lung cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berzinec, P.

    2013-01-01

    The RARECARE Project (Rare Cancers in the Europe) supported by the European Union defined the rare cancers by the incidence rate of less than 6/100 000. There are several variants of lung cancer which are rare according to this definition. From the clinical point of view the most interesting are the rare adenocarcinomas and large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma. There are important differences in the diagnostic probability of EGFR and ALK mutations in the mutinous and non-mucin ous adenocarcinomas, in the signet ring cell adenocarcinomas, and large cell carcinomas. The optimal chemotherapy for neuroendocrine large cell carcinomas remains undefined. There is only very limited number of clinical trials aimed on the rare lung cancers and actually none phase III trial. Rare lung cancers continue to be a challenge both for the laboratory and the clinical research. (author)

  17. An Alzheimer Disease-linked Rare Mutation Potentiates Netrin Receptor Uncoordinated-5C-induced Signaling That Merges with Amyloid β Precursor Protein Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Yuichi; Toyama, Yuka; Kusakari, Shinya; Nawa, Mikiro; Matsuoka, Masaaki

    2016-06-03

    A missense mutation (T835M) in the uncoordinated-5C (UNC5C) netrin receptor gene increases the risk of late-onset Alzheimer disease (AD) and also the vulnerability of neurons harboring the mutation to various insults. The molecular mechanisms underlying T835M-UNC5C-induced death remain to be elucidated. In this study, we show that overexpression of wild-type UNC5C causes low-grade death, which is intensified by an AD-linked mutation T835M. An AD-linked survival factor, calmodulin-like skin protein (CLSP), and a natural ligand of UNC5C, netrin1, inhibit this death. T835M-UNC5C-induced neuronal cell death is mediated by an intracellular death-signaling cascade, consisting of death-associated protein kinase 1/protein kinase D/apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1)/JNK/NADPH oxidase/caspases, which merges at ASK1 with a death-signaling cascade, mediated by amyloid β precursor protein (APP). Notably, netrin1 also binds to APP and partially inhibits the death-signaling cascade, induced by APP. These results may provide new insight into the amyloid β-independent pathomechanism of AD. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. A novel frameshift mutation of SMPX causes a rare form of X-linked nonsyndromic hearing loss in a Chinese family.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhijie Niu

    Full Text Available X-linked hearing impairment is the rarest form of genetic hearing loss (HL and represents only a minor fraction of all cases. The aim of this study was to investigate the cause of X-linked inherited sensorineural HL in a four-generation Chinese family. A novel duplication variant (c.217dupA, p.Ile73Asnfs*5 in SMPX was identified by whole-exome sequencing. The frameshift mutation predicted to result in the premature truncation of the SMPX protein was co-segregated with the HL phenotype and was absent in 295 normal controls. Subpopulation screening of the coding exons and flanking introns of SMPX was further performed for 338 Chinese patients with nonsydromic HL by Sanger sequencing, and another two potential causative substitutions (c.238C>A and c.55A>G in SMPX were identified in additional sporadic cases of congenital deafness. Collectively, this study is the first to report the role of SMPX in Chinese population and identify a novel frameshift mutation in SMPX that causes not only nonsyndromic late-onset progressive HL, but also congenital hearing impairment. Our findings extend the mutation and phenotypic spectrum of the SMPX gene.

  19. Acute WT1-positive promyelocytic leukemia with hypogranular variant morphology, bcr-3 isoform of PML-RARα and Flt3-ITD mutation: a rare case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi Zhang

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT CONTEXT: Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL accounts for 8% to 10% of cases of acute myeloid leukemia (AML. Remission in cases of high-risk APL is still difficult to achieve, and relapses occur readily. CASE REPORT: Here, we describe a case of APL with high white blood cell counts in blood tests and hypogranular variant morphology in bone marrow, together with fms-like tyrosine kinase-3 with internal tandem duplication mutations (FLT3-ITD, and bcr-3 isoform of PML-RARα. Most importantly, we detected high level of Wilms’ tumor gene (WT1 in marrow blasts, through the reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. To date, no clear conclusions about an association between WT1 expression levels and APL have been reached. This patient successively received a combined treatment regimen consisting of hydroxycarbamide, arsenic trioxide and idarubicin plus cytarabine, which ultimately enabled complete remission. Unfortunately, he subsequently died of sudden massive hemoptysis because of pulmonary infection. CONCLUSION: Based on our findings and a review of the literature, abnormal functioning of WT1 may be a high-risk factor in cases of APL. Further studies aimed towards evaluating the impact of WT1 expression on the prognosis for APL patients are of interest.

  20. The Role of a Novel TRMT1 Gene Mutation and Rare GRM1 Gene Defect in Intellectual Disability in Two Azeri Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davarniya, Behzad; Hu, Hao; Kahrizi, Kimia; Musante, Luciana; Fattahi, Zohreh; Hosseini, Masoumeh; Maqsoud, Fariba; Farajollahi, Reza; Wienker, Thomas F; Ropers, H Hilger; Najmabadi, Hossein

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive impairment or intellectual disability (ID) is a widespread neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by low IQ (below 70). ID is genetically heterogeneous and is estimated to affect 1-3% of the world's population. In affected children from consanguineous families, autosomal recessive inheritance is common, and identifying the underlying genetic cause is an important issue in clinical genetics. In the framework of a larger project, aimed at identifying candidate genes for autosomal recessive intellectual disorder (ARID), we recently carried out single nucleotide polymorphism-based genome-wide linkage analysis in several families from Ardabil province in Iran. The identification of homozygosity-by-descent loci in these families, in combination with whole exome sequencing, led us to identify possible causative homozygous changes in two families. In the first family, a missense variant was found in GRM1 gene, while in the second family, a frameshift alteration was identified in TRMT1, both of which were found to co-segregate with the disease. GRM1, a known causal gene for autosomal recessive spinocerebellar ataxia (SCAR13, MIM#614831), encodes the metabotropic glutamate receptor1 (mGluR1). This gene plays an important role in synaptic plasticity and cerebellar development. Conversely, the TRMT1 gene encodes a tRNA methyltransferase that dimethylates a single guanine residue at position 26 of most tRNAs using S-adenosyl methionine as the methyl group donor. We recently presented TRMT1 as a candidate gene for ARID in a consanguineous Iranian family (Najmabadi et al., 2011). We believe that this second Iranian family with a biallelic loss-of-function mutation in TRMT1 gene supports the idea that this gene likely has function in development of the disorder.

  1. The Role of a Novel TRMT1 Gene Mutation and Rare GRM1 Gene Defect in Intellectual Disability in Two Azeri Families.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behzad Davarniya

    Full Text Available Cognitive impairment or intellectual disability (ID is a widespread neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by low IQ (below 70. ID is genetically heterogeneous and is estimated to affect 1-3% of the world's population. In affected children from consanguineous families, autosomal recessive inheritance is common, and identifying the underlying genetic cause is an important issue in clinical genetics. In the framework of a larger project, aimed at identifying candidate genes for autosomal recessive intellectual disorder (ARID, we recently carried out single nucleotide polymorphism-based genome-wide linkage analysis in several families from Ardabil province in Iran. The identification of homozygosity-by-descent loci in these families, in combination with whole exome sequencing, led us to identify possible causative homozygous changes in two families. In the first family, a missense variant was found in GRM1 gene, while in the second family, a frameshift alteration was identified in TRMT1, both of which were found to co-segregate with the disease. GRM1, a known causal gene for autosomal recessive spinocerebellar ataxia (SCAR13, MIM#614831, encodes the metabotropic glutamate receptor1 (mGluR1. This gene plays an important role in synaptic plasticity and cerebellar development. Conversely, the TRMT1 gene encodes a tRNA methyltransferase that dimethylates a single guanine residue at position 26 of most tRNAs using S-adenosyl methionine as the methyl group donor. We recently presented TRMT1 as a candidate gene for ARID in a consanguineous Iranian family (Najmabadi et al., 2011. We believe that this second Iranian family with a biallelic loss-of-function mutation in TRMT1 gene supports the idea that this gene likely has function in development of the disorder.

  2. The Role of a Novel TRMT1 Gene Mutation and Rare GRM1 Gene Defect in Intellectual Disability in Two Azeri Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahrizi, Kimia; Musante, Luciana; Fattahi, Zohreh; Hosseini, Masoumeh; Maqsoud, Fariba; Farajollahi, Reza; Wienker, Thomas F.; Ropers, H. Hilger; Najmabadi, Hossein

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive impairment or intellectual disability (ID) is a widespread neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by low IQ (below 70). ID is genetically heterogeneous and is estimated to affect 1–3% of the world’s population. In affected children from consanguineous families, autosomal recessive inheritance is common, and identifying the underlying genetic cause is an important issue in clinical genetics. In the framework of a larger project, aimed at identifying candidate genes for autosomal recessive intellectual disorder (ARID), we recently carried out single nucleotide polymorphism-based genome-wide linkage analysis in several families from Ardabil province in Iran. The identification of homozygosity-by-descent loci in these families, in combination with whole exome sequencing, led us to identify possible causative homozygous changes in two families. In the first family, a missense variant was found in GRM1 gene, while in the second family, a frameshift alteration was identified in TRMT1, both of which were found to co-segregate with the disease. GRM1, a known causal gene for autosomal recessive spinocerebellar ataxia (SCAR13, MIM#614831), encodes the metabotropic glutamate receptor1 (mGluR1). This gene plays an important role in synaptic plasticity and cerebellar development. Conversely, the TRMT1 gene encodes a tRNA methyltransferase that dimethylates a single guanine residue at position 26 of most tRNAs using S-adenosyl methionine as the methyl group donor. We recently presented TRMT1 as a candidate gene for ARID in a consanguineous Iranian family (Najmabadi et al., 2011). We believe that this second Iranian family with a biallelic loss-of-function mutation in TRMT1 gene supports the idea that this gene likely has function in development of the disorder. PMID:26308914

  3. Rare Mutations of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Gamma: Frequencies and Relationship with Insulin Resistance and Diabetes Risk in the Mixed Ancestry Population from South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Vergotine

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Genetic variants in the nuclear transcription receptor, PPARG, are associated with cardiometabolic traits, but reports remain conflicting. We determined the frequency and the clinical relevance of PPARG SNPs in an African mixed ancestry population. Methods. In a cross-sectional study, 820 participants were genotyped for rs1800571, rs72551362, rs72551363, rs72551364, and rs3856806, using allele-specific TaqMan technology. The homeostatic model assessment of insulin (HOMA-IR, β-cells function (HOMA-B%, fasting insulin resistance index (FIRI, and the quantitative insulin-sensitivity check index (QUICKI were calculated. Results. No sequence variants were found except for the rs3856806. The frequency of the PPARG-His447His variant was 23.8% in the overall population group, with no difference by diabetes status (P=0.215. The His447His allele T was associated with none of the markers of insulin resistance overall and by diabetes status. In models adjusted for 2-hour insulin, the T allele was associated with lower prevalent diabetes risk (odds ratio 0.56 (95% CI 0.31–0.95. Conclusion. Our study confirms the almost zero occurrences of known rare PPARG SNPs and has shown for the first time in an African population that one of the common SNPs, His447His, may be protective against type 2 diabetes.

  4. Oral manifestations, dental management, and a rare homozygous mutation of the PRDM12 gene in a boy with hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type VIII: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elhennawy, Karim; Reda, Seif; Finke, Christian; Graul-Neumann, Luitgard; Jost-Brinkmann, Paul-Georg; Bartzela, Theodosia

    2017-08-15

    Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type VIII is a rare autosomal recessive inherited disorder. Chen et al. recently identified the causative gene and characterized biallelic mutations in the PR domain-containing protein 12 gene, which plays a role in the development of pain-sensing nerve cells. Our patient's family was included in Chen and colleagues' study. We performed a literature review of the PubMed library (January 1985 to December 2016) on hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type I to VIII genetic disorders and their orofacial manifestations. This case report is the first to describe the oral manifestations, and their treatment, of the recently discovered hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type VIII in the medical and dental literature. We report on the oral manifestations and dental management of an 8-month-old white boy with hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy-VIII over a period of 16 years. Our patient was homozygous for a mutation of PR domain-containing protein 12 gene and was characterized by insensitivity to pain and thermal stimuli, self-mutilation behavior, reduced sweat and tear production, absence of corneal reflexes, and multiple skin and bone infections. Oral manifestations included premature loss of teeth, associated with dental traumata and self-mutilation, severe soft tissue injuries, dental caries and submucosal abscesses, hypomineralization of primary teeth, and mandibular osteomyelitis. The lack of scientific knowledge on hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy due to the rarity of the disease often results in a delay in diagnosis, which is of substantial importance for the prevention of many complications and symptoms. Interdisciplinary work of specialized medical and dental teams and development of a standardized treatment protocols are essential for the management of the disease. There are many knowledge gaps concerning the management of patients with hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy

  5. Rare earths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cranstone, D A

    1979-01-01

    Rare earth elements are commonly extracted from the minerals monazite, bastnaesite, and xenotine. New uses for these elements are constantly developing; they have found applications in glass polishing, television tube phosphors, high-strength low-alloy steels, magnets, catalysts, refractory ceramics, and hydrogen sponge alloys. In Canada, rare earths have been produced as byproducts of the uranium mining industry, but there was no production of rare earths in 1978 or 1979. The world sources of and markets for the rare earth elements are discussed.

  6. A rare disease-associated mutation in the medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD) gene changes a conserved arginine, previously shown to be functionally essential in short-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (SCAD)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, B S; Bross, P; Jensen, T G

    1993-01-01

    157 mutation was verified in genomic DNA from the patient and her mother by a PCR-based assay. The mutation changes conserved arginine at position 28 (R28C) of the mature MCAD protein. The effect of the T157 mutation on MCAD protein was investigated by expression of mutant MCAD cDNA in COS-7 cells...

  7. Rare earths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    The conference was held from September 12 to 13, 1984 in Jetrichovice, Czechoslovakia. The participants heard 16 papers of which 4 were inputted in INIS. These papers dealt with industrial separation processes of rare earths, the use of chemical methods of separation from the concentrate of apatite and bastnesite, the effect of the relative permittivity of solvents in the elution of rare earth elements from a cation exchanger, and the determination of the content of different rare earth elements using X-ray fluorescence analysis and atomic absorption spectroscopy. (E.S.)

  8. Rare particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutschera, W.

    1984-01-01

    The use of Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) to search for hypothetical particles and known particles of rare processes is discussed. The hypothetical particles considered include fractionally charged particles, anomalously heavy isotopes, and superheavy elements. The known particles produced in rare processes discussed include doubly-charged negative ions, counting neutrino-produced atoms in detectors for solar neutrino detection, and the spontaneous emission of 14 C from 223 Ra. 35 references

  9. AIP mutations and gigantism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostomyan, Liliya; Potorac, Iulia; Beckers, Pablo; Daly, Adrian F; Beckers, Albert

    2017-06-01

    AIP mutations are rare in sporadic acromegaly but they are seen at a higher frequency among certain specific populations of pituitary adenoma patients (pituitary gigantism cases, familial isolated pituitary adenoma (FIPA) kindreds, and patients with macroadenomas who are diagnosed ≤30 years). AIP mutations are most prevalent in patients with pituitary gigantism (29% of this group were found to have mutations in AIP gene). These data support targeted genetic screening for AIP mutations/deletions in these groups of pituitary adenoma patients. Earlier diagnosis of AIP-related acromegaly-gigantism cases enables timely clinical evaluation and treatment, thereby improving outcomes in terms of excessive linear growth and acromegaly comorbidities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Rare Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-01

    Limited Operational Exercise 1. 1A Limited Operational Exercise is a multiplayer experiment designed to exploit and study information sharing and...1.4 Summary of the Study The “rare event” of interest is an extreme, deliberate act of violence , destruction or socioeconomic disruption, such as an...connection with terrorism inves- tigations. The programs then use some combination of doctrinal revision and rewards to induce the people to abandon violence

  11. Expanding CEP290 mutational spectrum in ciliopathies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Travaglini, Lorena; Brancati, Francesco; Attie-Bitach, Tania; Audollent, Sophie; Bertini, Enrico; Kaplan, Josseline; Perrault, Isabelle; Iannicelli, Miriam; Mancuso, Brunella; Rigoli, Luciana; Rozet, Jean-Michel; Swistun, Dominika; Tolentino, Jerlyn; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Gleeson, Joseph G.; Valente, Enza Maria; Zankl, A.; Leventer, R.; Grattan-Smith, P.; Janecke, A.; D'Hooghe, M.; Sznajer, Y.; van Coster, R.; Demerleir, L.; Dias, K.; Moco, C.; Moreira, A.; Kim, C. Ae; Maegawa, G.; Petkovic, D.; Abdel-Salam, G. M. H.; Abdel-Aleem, A.; Zaki, M. S.; Marti, I.; Quijano-Roy, S.; Sigaudy, S.; de Lonlay, P.; Romano, S.; Touraine, R.; Koenig, M.; Lagier-Tourenne, C.; Messer, J.; Collignon, P.; Wolf, N.; Philippi, H.; Kitsiou Tzeli, S.; Halldorsson, S.; Johannsdottir, J.; Ludvigsson, P.; Phadke, S. R.; Udani, V.; Stuart, B.; Magee, A.; Lev, D.; Michelson, M.; Ben-Zeev, B.; Fischetto, R.; Benedicenti, F.; Stanzial, F.; Borgatti, R.; Accorsi, P.; Battaglia, S.; Fazzi, E.; Giordano, L.; Pinelli, L.; Boccone, L.; Bigoni, S.; Ferlini, A.; Donati, M. A.; Caridi, G.; Divizia, M. T.; Faravelli, F.; Ghiggeri, G.; Pessagno, A.; Briguglio, M.; Briuglia, S.; Salpietro, C. D.; Tortorella, G.; Adami, A.; Castorina, P.; Lalatta, F.; Marra, G.; Riva, D.; Scelsa, B.; Spaccini, L.; Uziel, G.; del Giudice, E.; Laverda, A. M.; Ludwig, K.; Permunian, A.; Suppiej, A.; Signorini, S.; Uggetti, C.; Battini, R.; Di Giacomo, M.; Cilio, M. R.; Di Sabato, M. L.; Leuzzi, V.; Parisi, P.; Pollazzon, M.; Silengo, M.; de Vescovi, R.; Greco, D.; Romano, C.; Cazzagon, M.; Simonati, A.; Al-Tawari, A. A.; Bastaki, L.; Mégarbané, A.; Sabolic Avramovska, V.; de Jong, M. M.; Stromme, P.; Koul, R.; Rajab, A.; Azam, M.; Barbot, C.; Martorell Sampol, L.; Rodriguez, B.; Pascual-Castroviejo, I.; Teber, S.; Anlar, B.; Comu, S.; Karaca, E.; Kayserili, H.; Yüksel, A.; Akcakus, M.; Al Gazali, L.; Sztriha, L.; Nicholl, D.; Woods, C. G.; Bennett, C.; Hurst, J.; Sheridan, E.; Barnicoat, A.; Hennekam, R.; Lees, M.; Blair, E.; Bernes, S.; Sanchez, H.; Clark, A. E.; DeMarco, E.; Donahue, C.; Sherr, E.; Hahn, J.; Sanger, T. D.; Gallager, T. E.; Dobyns, W. B.; Daugherty, C.; Krishnamoorthy, K. S.; Sarco, D.; Walsh, C. A.; McKanna, T.; Milisa, J.; Chung, W. K.; de Vivo, D. C.; Raynes, H.; Schubert, R.; Seward, A.; Brooks, D. G.; Goldstein, A.; Caldwell, J.; Finsecke, E.; Maria, B. L.; Holden, K.; Cruse, R. P.; Swoboda, K. J.; Viskochil, D.

    2009-01-01

    Ciliopathies are an expanding group of rare conditions characterized by multiorgan involvement, that are caused by mutations in genes encoding for proteins of the primary cilium or its apparatus. Among these genes, CEP290 bears an intriguing allelic spectrum, being commonly mutated in Joubert

  12. Rare endocrine cancers have novel genetic alterations

    Science.gov (United States)

    A molecular characterization of adrenocortical carcinoma, a rare cancer of the adrenal cortex, analyzed 91 cases for alterations in the tumor genomes and identified several novel genetic mutations as likely mechanisms driving the disease as well as whole genome doubling as a probable driver of the disease.

  13. Twenty-First Century Diseases: Commonly Rare and Rarely Common?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daunert, Sylvia; Sittampalam, Gurusingham Sitta; Goldschmidt-Clermont, Pascal J

    2017-09-20

    Alzheimer's drugs are failing at a rate of 99.6%, and success rate for drugs designed to help patients with this form of dementia is 47 times less than for drugs designed to help patients with cancers ( www.scientificamerican.com/article/why-alzheimer-s-drugs-keep-failing/2014 ). How can it be so difficult to produce a valuable drug for Alzheimer's disease? Each human has a unique genetic and epigenetic makeup, thus endowing individuals with a highly unique complement of genes, polymorphisms, mutations, RNAs, proteins, lipids, and complex sugars, resulting in distinct genome, proteome, metabolome, and also microbiome identity. This editorial is taking into account the uniqueness of each individual and surrounding environment, and stresses the point that a more accurate definition of a "common" disorder could be simply the amalgamation of a myriad of "rare" diseases. These rare diseases are being grouped together because they share a rather constant complement of common features and, indeed, generally respond to empirically developed treatments, leading to a positive outcome consistently. We make the case that it is highly unlikely that such treatments, despite their statistical success measured with large cohorts using standardized clinical research, will be effective on all patients until we increase the depth and fidelity of our understanding of the individual "rare" diseases that are grouped together in the "buckets" of common illnesses. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 27, 511-516.

  14. Distinct pattern of p53 mutations in bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spruck, C H; Rideout, W M; Olumi, A F

    1993-01-01

    A distinct mutational spectrum for the p53 tumor suppressor gene in bladder carcinomas was established in patients with known exposures to cigarette smoke. Single-strand conformational polymorphism analysis of exons 5 through 8 of the p53 gene showed inactivating mutations in 16 of 40 (40%) bladder...... tumors from smokers and 13 of 40 (33%) tumors from lifetime nonsmokers. Overall, 13 of the 50 (26%) total point mutations discovered in this and previous work were G:C-->C:G transversions, a relatively rare mutational type in human tumors. In six tumors, identical AGA (Arg)-->ACA (Thr) point mutations...... double mutations, four of which were tandem mutations on the same allele. No double mutations were found in tumors from nonsmoking patients. None of the mutations in smokers were G:C-->T:A transversions, which would be anticipated for exposure to the suspected cigarette smoke carcinogen 4-aminobiphenyl...

  15. Rare earth germanates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bondar', I.A.; Vinogradova, N.V.; Dem'yanets, L.N.

    1983-01-01

    Rare earth germanates attract close attention both as an independent class of compounds and analogues of a widely spread class of natural and synthetic minerals. The methods of rare earth germanate synthesis (solid-phase, hydrothermal) are considered. Systems on the basis of germanium and rare earth oxides, phase diagrams, phase transformations are studied. Using different chemical analysese the processes of rare earth germanate formation are investigated. IR spectra of alkali and rare earth metal germanates are presented, their comparative analysis being carried out. Crystal structures of the compounds, lattice parameters are studied. Fields of possible application of rare earth germanates are shown

  16. Mining with Rare Cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Gary M.

    Rare cases are often the most interesting cases. For example, in medical diagnosis one is typically interested in identifying relatively rare diseases, such as cancer, rather than more frequently occurring ones, such as the common cold. In this chapter we discuss the role of rare cases in Data Mining. Specific problems associated with mining rare cases are discussed, followed by a description of methods for addressing these problems.

  17. Volatility of Mutator Phenotypes at Single Cell Resolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott R Kennedy

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Mutator phenotypes accelerate the evolutionary process of neoplastic transformation. Historically, the measurement of mutation rates has relied on scoring the occurrence of rare mutations in target genes in large populations of cells. Averaging mutation rates over large cell populations assumes that new mutations arise at a constant rate during each cell division. If the mutation rate is not constant, an expanding mutator population may contain subclones with widely divergent rates of evolution. Here, we report mutation rate measurements of individual cell divisions of mutator yeast deficient in DNA polymerase ε proofreading and base-base mismatch repair. Our data are best fit by a model in which cells can assume one of two distinct mutator states, with mutation rates that differ by an order of magnitude. In error-prone cell divisions, mutations occurred on the same chromosome more frequently than expected by chance, often in DNA with similar predicted replication timing, consistent with a spatiotemporal dimension to the hypermutator state. Mapping of mutations onto predicted replicons revealed that mutations were enriched in the first half of the replicon as well as near termination zones. Taken together, our findings show that individual genome replication events exhibit an unexpected volatility that may deepen our understanding of the evolution of mutator-driven malignancies.

  18. Mutation breeding in soybean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baradjanegara, A.A.

    1983-01-01

    In Indonesia, soybean is one of the important crop after rice. It is generally cultivated in the lowlands and rarely in the highlands. Seeds of soybean variety ORBA were treated with various doses of fast neutrons, gamma rays, EMS and NaN 3 with the aims of studying the mutagen effects in M-1 and M-2 generations and also to select mutants adapted to highland conditions. D-50 doses for gamma rays, fast neutrons and EMS were around 23 krad, 2,300 rad, 0.3%, respectively. Much higher chlorophyll mutation frequency was observed in EMS treatment of 0.3%. Seven mutants were shorter and four early mutants matured from 4 to 20 days earlier than the control plants. Two early mutants were quite adaptable in both the low and highlands and produced better yields than the parental material. (author)

  19. Rare earth sulfates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komissarova, L.N.; Shatskij, V.M.; Pokrovskij, A.N.; Chizhov, S.M.; Bal'kina, T.I.; Suponitskij, Yu.L.

    1986-01-01

    Results of experimental works on the study of synthesis conditions, structure and physico-chemical properties of rare earth, scandium and yttrium sulfates, have been generalized. Phase diagrams of solubility and fusibility, thermodynamic and crystallochemical characteristics, thermal stability of hydrates and anhydrous sulfates of rare earths, including normal, double (with cations of alkali and alkaline-earth metals), ternary and anion-mixed sulfates of rare earths, as well as their adducts, are considered. The state of ions of rare earths, scandium and yttrium in aqueous sulfuric acid solutions is discussed. Data on the use of rare earth sulfates are given

  20. Emergence of MPLW515 mutation in a patient with CALR deletion: Evidence of secondary acquisition of MPL mutation in the CALR clone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partouche, Nicolas; Conejero, Carole; Barathon, Quentin; Moroch, Julien; Tulliez, Michel; Cordonnier, Catherine; Giraudier, Stephane

    2018-02-01

    Myeloproliferative neoplasms are characterized by transduction pathway recognized as mutually exclusive molecular abnormalities such as BCR-ABL translocation, JAK2V617F or JAK2 exon 12 mutations, MPL w515, and CALR mutations. However, in some rare cases, associations of such mutations are found in 1 patient. This can be related to 2 pathologies (at least 2 different clones harboring 2 mutations) or associated mutations in 1 clone. We describe here such an association of CALR and MPL mutations in a patient harboring the second mutation in a subclone during the phenotypic evolution of the myeloproliferative neoplasms. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. POLE somatic mutations in advanced colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Joana; Pinto, Carla; Pinto, Diana; Pinheiro, Manuela; Silva, Romina; Peixoto, Ana; Rocha, Patrícia; Veiga, Isabel; Santos, Catarina; Santos, Rui; Cabreira, Verónica; Lopes, Paula; Henrique, Rui; Teixeira, Manuel R

    2017-12-01

    Despite all the knowledge already gathered, the picture of somatic genetic changes in colorectal tumorigenesis is far from complete. Recently, germline and somatic mutations in the exonuclease domain of polymerase epsilon, catalytic subunit (POLE) gene have been reported in a small subset of microsatellite-stable and hypermutated colorectal carcinomas (CRCs), affecting the proofreading activity of the enzyme and leading to misincorporation of bases during DNA replication. To evaluate the role of POLE mutations in colorectal carcinogenesis, namely in advanced CRC, we searched for somatic mutations by Sanger sequencing in tumor DNA samples from 307 cases. Microsatellite instability and mutation analyses of a panel of oncogenes were performed in the tumors harboring POLE mutations. Three heterozygous mutations were found in two tumors, the c.857C>G, p.Pro286Arg, the c.901G>A, p.Asp301Asn, and the c.1376C>T, p.Ser459Phe. Of the POLE-mutated CRCs, one tumor was microsatellite-stable and the other had low microsatellite instability, whereas KRAS and PIK3CA mutations were found in one tumor each. We conclude that POLE somatic mutations exist but are rare in advanced CRC, with further larger studies being necessary to evaluate its biological and clinical implications. © 2017 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Somatic RET mutation in a patient with pigmented adrenal pheochromocytoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maison, Nicole; Korpershoek, Esther; Eisenhofer, Graeme; Robledo, Mercedes; de Krijger, Ronald; Beuschlein, Felix

    UNLABELLED: Pheochromocytomas (PCC) and paraganglioma (PGL) are rare neuroendocrine tumors arising from chromaffin cells of the neural crest. Mutations in the RET-proto-oncogene are associated with sporadic pheochromocytoma, familial or sporadic medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) and multiple

  3. Predictable Phenotypes of Antibiotic Resistance Mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knopp, M; Andersson, D I

    2018-05-15

    Antibiotic-resistant bacteria represent a major threat to our ability to treat bacterial infections. Two factors that determine the evolutionary success of antibiotic resistance mutations are their impact on resistance level and the fitness cost. Recent studies suggest that resistance mutations commonly show epistatic interactions, which would complicate predictions of their stability in bacterial populations. We analyzed 13 different chromosomal resistance mutations and 10 host strains of Salmonella enterica and Escherichia coli to address two main questions. (i) Are there epistatic interactions between different chromosomal resistance mutations? (ii) How does the strain background and genetic distance influence the effect of chromosomal resistance mutations on resistance and fitness? Our results show that the effects of combined resistance mutations on resistance and fitness are largely predictable and that epistasis remains rare even when up to four mutations were combined. Furthermore, a majority of the mutations, especially target alteration mutations, demonstrate strain-independent phenotypes across different species. This study extends our understanding of epistasis among resistance mutations and shows that interactions between different resistance mutations are often predictable from the characteristics of the individual mutations. IMPORTANCE The spread of antibiotic-resistant bacteria imposes an urgent threat to public health. The ability to forecast the evolutionary success of resistant mutants would help to combat dissemination of antibiotic resistance. Previous studies have shown that the phenotypic effects (fitness and resistance level) of resistance mutations can vary substantially depending on the genetic context in which they occur. We conducted a broad screen using many different resistance mutations and host strains to identify potential epistatic interactions between various types of resistance mutations and to determine the effect of strain

  4. Homozygous mutation in the NPHP3 gene causing foetal nephronophthisis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdullah, Uzma; Farooq, Muhammad; Fatima, Ambrin

    2017-01-01

    We present a case of a foetal sonographic finding of hyper-echogenic kidneys, which led to a strategic series of genetic tests and identified a homozygous mutation (c.424C > T, p. R142*) in the NPHP3 gene. Our study provides a rare presentation of NPHP3-related ciliopathy and adds to the mutation...

  5. Frontotemporal dementia caused by CHMP2B mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isaacs, A M; Johannsen, P; Holm, I

    2011-01-01

    CHMP2B mutations are a rare cause of autosomal dominant frontotemporal dementia (FTD). The best studied example is frontotemporal dementia linked to chromosome 3 (FTD-3) which occurs in a large Danish family, with a further CHMP2B mutation identified in an unrelated Belgian familial FTD patient. ...

  6. Spectrum of mutations in homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia in India, with four novel mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setia, Nitika; Saxena, Renu; Arora, Anjali; Verma, Ishwar C

    2016-12-01

    Homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is a rare but serious, inherited disorder of lipid metabolism characterized by very high total and LDL cholesterol levels from birth. It presents as cutaneous and tendon xanthomas since childhood, with or without cardiac involvement. FH is commonly caused by mutations in three genes, i.e. LDL receptor (LDLR), apolipoprotein B (ApoB) and PCSK9. We aimed to determine the spectrum of mutations in cases of homozygous FH in Asian Indians and evaluate if there was any similarity to the mutations observed in Caucasians. Sixteen homozygous FH subjects from eleven families were analyzed for mutations by Sanger sequencing. Large rearrangements in LDLR gene were evaluated by multiplex ligation probe dependent amplification (MLPA) technique. Ten mutations were observed in LDLR gene, of which four mutations were novel. No mutation was detected in ApoB gene and common PCSK9 mutation (p.D374Y). Fourteen cases had homozygous mutations; one had compound heterozygous mutation, while no mutation was detected in one clinically homozygous case. We report an interesting "Triple hit" case with features of homozygous FH. The spectrum of mutations in the Asian Indian population is quite heterogeneous. Of the mutations identified, 40% were novel. No mutation was observed in exons 3, 9 and 14 of LDLR gene, which are considered to be hot spots in studies done on Asian Indians in South Africa. Early detection followed by aggressive therapy, and cascade screening of extended families has been initiated to reduce the morbidity and mortality in these patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Towards Rare Itemset Mining

    OpenAIRE

    Szathmary , Laszlo; Napoli , Amedeo; Valtchev , Petko

    2007-01-01

    site de la conférence : http://ictai07.ceid.upatras.gr/; International audience; We describe here a general approach for rare itemset mining. While mining literature has been almost exclusively focused on frequent itemsets, in many practical situations rare ones are of higher interest (e.g., in medical databases, rare combinations of symptoms might provide useful insights for the physicians). Based on an examination of the relevant substructures of the mining space, our approach splits the ra...

  8. Rare earth octacyanomolybdates(4)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zubritskaya, D.I.; Sergeeva, A.N.; Pisak, Yu.V.

    1980-01-01

    Optimal conditions for synthesis of rare-earth octacyanomolybdates(4) of the Ln 4 [Mo(CN) 8 ] 3 xnH 2 O composition (where Ln is a rare-earth element, other than Pr, Pm, Lu, Tb) have been worked out. The synthesis has been accomplished by neutralization with octacianomolybdic acid with rare-earth carbonates. The composition and structure of the compounds synthesized have been studied by infrared-spectroscopy. It has been established that rare-earth octacyanomolybdates(4) form three isostructural groups

  9. Acromelic frontonasal dysostosis and ZSWIM6 mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Twigg, Stephen R F; Ousager, Lilian Bomme; Miller, Kerry A

    2016-01-01

    Acromelic frontonasal dysostosis (AFND) is a distinctive and rare frontonasal malformation that presents in combination with brain and limb abnormalities. A single recurrent heterozygous missense substitution in ZSWIM6, encoding a protein of unknown function, was previously shown to underlie this...... sequencing of DNA isolated from a variety of tissues, which each contain different levels of mutation. This has important implications for genetic counselling....

  10. Database for Parkinson Disease Mutations and Rare Variants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    up to 26 candidate genes (June 2016). These searches have been time consuming and will continue past the end date of this award. As more data becomes...PD development. Learning Objectives: Define areas of new neuroscience knowledge and research Understand Clinicopathologic (CPC) correlations of...neurologic disease Illuminate areas of practice-based improvement within the neurosciences based on advancing scientific research or Practice- based

  11. Autism Spectrum Disorder: FRAXE Mutation, a Rare Etiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, F.; Café, C.; Almeida, J.; Mouga, S.; Oliveira, G.

    2015-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is characterized by impaired social interaction and communication, restricted interests and repetitive behaviors. Fragile X E is associated with X-linked non-specific mild intellectual disability (ID) and with behavioral problems. Most of the known genetic causes of ASD are also causes of ID, implying that these two…

  12. Database for Parkinson Disease Mutations and Rare Variants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    the author( s ) and should not be construed as an official Department of the Army position, policy or decision unless so designated by other...other provision of law , no person shall be subject to any penalty for failing to comply with a collection of information if it does not display a

  13. Screening of 99 Danish patients with congenital heart disease for GATA4 mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Litu; Tümer, Zeynep; Jacobsen, Joes Ramsøe

    2006-01-01

    stenosis. We have screened 99 unrelated Danish patients with different CHD phenotypes to evaluate the prevalence of GATA4 mutations in CHD. No pathogenic mutations were found among the patients, suggesting that GATA4 mutations are relatively rare among CHD patients. Thus, the diagnostic importance of GATA4...

  14. Alzheimer's Disease Phenotypes and Genotypes Associated with Mutations in Presenilin 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayadev, Suman; Leverenz, James B.; Steinbart, Ellen; Stahl, Justin; Klunk, William; Yu, Cheng-En; Bird, Thomas D.

    2010-01-01

    Mutations in presenilin 2 are rare causes of early onset familial Alzheimer's disease. Eighteen presenilin 2 mutations have been reported, although not all have been confirmed pathogenic. Much remains to be learned about the range of phenotypes associated with these mutations. We have analysed our unique collection of 146 affected cases in 11…

  15. Spectrum of mutations in RARS-T patients includes TET2 and ASXL1 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szpurka, Hadrian; Jankowska, Anna M; Makishima, Hideki; Bodo, Juraj; Bejanyan, Nelli; Hsi, Eric D; Sekeres, Mikkael A; Maciejewski, Jaroslaw P

    2010-08-01

    While a majority of patients with refractory anemia with ring sideroblasts and thrombocytosis harbor JAK2V617F and rarely MPLW515L, JAK2/MPL-negative cases constitute a diagnostic problem. 23 RARS-T cases were investigated applying immunohistochemical phospho-STAT5, sequencing and SNP-A-based karyotyping. Based on the association of TET2/ASXL1 mutations with MDS/MPN we studied molecular pattern of these genes. Two patients harbored ASXL1 and another 2 TET2 mutations. Phospho-STAT5 activation was present in one mutated TET2 and ASXL1 case. JAK2V617F/MPLW515L mutations were absent in TET2/ASXL1 mutants, indicating that similar clinical phenotype can be produced by various MPN-associated mutations and that additional unifying lesions may be present in RARS-T. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Novel FANCI mutations in Fanconi anemia with VACTERL association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Sharon A; Ballew, Bari J; Giri, Neelam; Chandrasekharappa, Settara C; Ameziane, Najim; de Winter, Johan; Alter, Blanche P

    2016-02-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is an inherited bone marrow failure syndrome caused by mutations in DNA repair genes; some of these patients may have features of the VACTERL association. Autosomal recessive mutations in FANCI are a rare cause of FA. We identified FANCI mutations by next generation sequencing in three patients in our FA cohort among several whose mutated gene was unknown. Four of the six mutations are novel and all mutations are likely deleterious to protein function. There are now 16 reported cases of FA due to FANCI of whom 7 have at least 3 features of the VACTERL association (44%). This suggests that the VACTERL association in patients with FA may be seen in patients with FANCI mutations more often than previously recognized. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Rare Disease Video Portal

    OpenAIRE

    Sánchez Bocanegra, Carlos Luis

    2011-01-01

    Rare Disease Video Portal (RD Video) is a portal web where contains videos from Youtube including all details from 12 channels of Youtube. Rare Disease Video Portal (RD Video) es un portal web que contiene los vídeos de Youtube incluyendo todos los detalles de 12 canales de Youtube. Rare Disease Video Portal (RD Video) és un portal web que conté els vídeos de Youtube i que inclou tots els detalls de 12 Canals de Youtube.

  18. Rare earth germanates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bondar', I.A.; Vinogradova, N.V.; Dem'yanets, L.N.

    1983-01-01

    From the viewpoint of structural chemistry and general regularities controlling formation reactions of compounds and phases in melts, solid and gaseous states, recent achievements in the chemistry of rare earth germanates are generalized. Methods of synthesizing germanates, systems on the base of germanium oxides and rare earths are considered. The data on crystallochemical characteristics are tabulated. Individual compounds of scandium germanate are also characterized. Processes of germanate formation using the data of IR-spectroscopy, X-ray phase analysis are studied. The structure and morphotropic series of rare earth germanates and silicates are determined. Fields of their present and possible future application are considered

  19. A rare cause of osteonecrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Agostinis

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionHereditary hemochromatosis (HH is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the HFE gene, which increase intestinal iron absorption. The prevalence of C282Y homozygosity, which causes the disorder, is 0.5% in Caucasian populations. The clinical manifestations are related to excess iron in the tissues, especially the liver, heart, pancreas, pituitary, and skin. They include fatigue, loss of libido or impotence in males, liver disease, skin pigmentation, diabetes mellitus, cardiac enlargement—with or without heart failure, and conduction defects. The classic triad of cirrhosis, diabetes mellitus, and skin pigmentation (“bronze diabetes” results from a combination of iron deposits and melanin. It occurs late in the disease, when the total body iron content is more than five times the normal value, about 20 grams. Left untreated, approximately half of all patients with HH eventually develop arthralgia or arthropathy. Chondrocalcinosis, chronic pseudo-osteoarthritis, and osteoporosis are the major rheumatic manifestations of HH. The cause of the arthropathy is still unknown. Iron deposits within joints may trigger a number of pathologic events, such as free radical generation and crystal deposition, which stimulate immune complex formation and inflammation.Materials and methodsWe describe the case of a 48-year-old male suffering from chronic bilateral ankle pain.ResultsThe work-up revealed osteonecrosis of ankle. The patient also presented high plasma ferritin levels and homozygosity for the C282Y mutation. Other than HH, which was confirmed by liver biopsy, the patient had no other risk factors for osteonecrosis.DiscussionHH represents a rare cause of osteonecrosis, and there are no prior reports of aseptic osteonecrosis of the ankle in a patient with this disease. The pathogenetic mechanism remains unknown.

  20. DNA mutation motifs in the genes associated with inherited diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Růžička

    Full Text Available Mutations in human genes can be responsible for inherited genetic disorders and cancer. Mutations can arise due to environmental factors or spontaneously. It has been shown that certain DNA sequences are more prone to mutate. These sites are termed hotspots and exhibit a higher mutation frequency than expected by chance. In contrast, DNA sequences with lower mutation frequencies than expected by chance are termed coldspots. Mutation hotspots are usually derived from a mutation spectrum, which reflects particular population where an effect of a common ancestor plays a role. To detect coldspots/hotspots unaffected by population bias, we analysed the presence of germline mutations obtained from HGMD database in the 5-nucleotide segments repeatedly occurring in genes associated with common inherited disorders, in particular, the PAH, LDLR, CFTR, F8, and F9 genes. Statistically significant sequences (mutational motifs rarely associated with mutations (coldspots and frequently associated with mutations (hotspots exhibited characteristic sequence patterns, e.g. coldspots contained purine tract while hotspots showed alternating purine-pyrimidine bases, often with the presence of CpG dinucleotide. Using molecular dynamics simulations and free energy calculations, we analysed the global bending properties of two selected coldspots and two hotspots with a G/T mismatch. We observed that the coldspots were inherently more flexible than the hotspots. We assume that this property might be critical for effective mismatch repair as DNA with a mutation recognized by MutSα protein is noticeably bent.

  1. NIPA1 mutation in complex hereditary spastic paraplegia with epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svenstrup, K; Møller, R S; Christensen, J

    2011-01-01

    or signs are found. Mutations in the NIPA1 gene have been reported to cause spastic paraplegia type 6 (SPG6) in 10 families. SPG6 is a rare form of autosomal dominantly inherited HSP associated with a pure phenotype; however, in one complex SPG6 family, idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE) has been...... described and in addition, recurrent microdeletions at 15q11.2 including NIPA1 have been identified in patients with IGE. The purpose was to identify NIPA1 mutations in patients with pure and complex HSP. Methods: Fifty-two patients with HSP were screened for mutations in NIPA1. Results: One previously...... reported missense mutation c.316G>A, p.Gly106Arg, was identified in a complex HSP patient with spastic dysarthria, facial dystonia, atrophy of the small hand muscles, upper limb spasticity, and presumably IGE. The epilepsy co-segregated with HSP in the family. Conclusion: NIPA1 mutations were rare in our...

  2. Analysis of rare categories

    CERN Document Server

    He, Jingrui

    2012-01-01

    This book focuses on rare category analysis where the majority classes have smooth distributions and the minority classes exhibit the compactness property. It focuses on challenging cases where the support regions of the majority and minority classes overlap.

  3. SYMPOSIUM: Rare decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1989-04-15

    Late last year, a symposium entitled 'Rare Decays' attracted 115 participants to a hotel in Vancouver, Canada. These participants were particle physicists interested in checking conventional selection rules to look for clues of possible new behaviour outside today's accepted 'Standard Model'. For physicists, 'rare decays' include processes that have so far not been seen, explicitly forbidden by the rules of the Standard Model, or processes highly suppressed because the decay is dominated by an easier route, or includes processes resulting from multiple transitions.

  4. Kallmann syndrome and paranoid schizophrenia: A rare combination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.M.A. Verhoeven (Wim); J.I.M. Egger (Jos); J.E.J.M. Hovens (Hans); E.H. Hoefsloot (Lies)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractKallmann syndrome (KS) is a genetically heterogeneous and rare disorder characterised by the combination of hypothalamic hypogonadism and anosmia/hyposmia, a variable degree of intellectual disability and several somatic anomalies. In about one-third of the patients, mutations have been

  5. HARLEQUIN ICTHYOSIS: A RARE CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradipprava Paria

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Harlequin ichthyosis is the most severe form of congenital ichthyosis. It is a rare autosomal recessive disorder (1:300,000. The vast majority of affected individuals are due to mutation in the ABCA12 gene, which cause a deficiency of the epidermal lipid transporter, resulting in hyperkeratosis and abnormal barrier function of skin. Infants are very susceptible to metabolic abnormalitites and infections. They usually do not survive for very long. we report here a case of a new born with harlequin ichthyosis of consaguinious parentage who had a history of similar birth previously.

  6. Rare earths and actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coqblin, B.

    1982-01-01

    This paper reviews the different properties of rare-earths and actinides, either as pure metals or as in alloys or compounds. Three different cases are considered: (i) First, in the case of 'normal' rare-earths which are characterized by a valence of 3, we discuss essentially the magnetic ordering, the coexistence between superconductivity and magnetism and the properties of amorphous rare-earth systems. (ii) Second, in the case of 'anomalous' rare-earths, we distinguish between either 'intermediate-valence' systems or 'Kondo' systems. Special emphasis is given to the problems of the 'Kondo lattice' (for compounds such as CeAl 2 ,CeAl 3 or CeB 6 ) or the 'Anderson lattice' (for compounds such as TmSe). The problem of neutron diffraction in these systems is also discussed. (iii) Third, in the case of actinides, we can separate between the d-f hybridized and almost magnetic metals at the beginning of the series and the rare-earth like the metals after americium. (orig.)

  7. Tale of two rare diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravindra Shukla

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic Hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (IHH phenotype is variable & various genes have been decribed in association with IHH.We describe association of IHH with mosaic trisomy 13. A 20 year old male presented with lack of development of secondary sexual characters, normal height, micropenis, small testes, gynaecomastia, absence of axillary and pubic hairs, hyposmia,synkinesis, bilateral horizontal nystagmus and high arched palate. Investigations showed low gonadotropin,low total testosterone, LH after stimulation with 100 mcg tryptorelin sc was 11.42 mU/mL at 40 min. MRI of hypothalamo-pituitary region showed normal olfactory bulb and tract but shallow olfactory sulcus . Karyotype showed homologous Robertsonian translocation of chromosome 13. This case fits classical IHH except for LH rise on stimulation.Features of Patau syndrome which is associated with trisomy 13 are absent in our case. Mosaic trisomy 13, which can otherwise be rare incidental finding , has not been described in association with IHH.Causal association of novel mutation on chromosome 13 leading to aforementioned phenotype cannot be rule out.

  8. Pachyonychia congenita: A rare genodermatosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puneet Agarwal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pachyonychia congenita (PC is a rare genodermatosis with only 450 cases reported since 1906. It is of two types, type I due to mutation in genes 6a and 16, and 6b and 17 in type II with an autosomal dominant inheritance in both types. A 22 yr old female patient presented in our OPD with hypertrophy of finger and toe nails, palmoplantar keratoderma, oral punctuate leukokeratosis, hyperhidrosis in palms and soles with maceration and malodour since childhood. She had a positive family history with father and grandfather affected but less severely. Microscopy and culture of nail clippings and scrapping were done to rule out fungal infection. On biopsy acanthotic epidermis, parakeratosis, orthokeratosis were seen. No evidence of any associated malignancy was found after thorough workup. She was diagnosed as PC Type 1. She was put on topical steroids and orally on acetretin 25 mg OD. Paring of the nails was done too reduce the thickness of nails & to provide symptomatic relief. She was on a regular treatment for 3-4 months and showed some improvement in the form of reduced palmoplantar hyperkeratosis and reduced oral punctate keratosis but was later lost on followup. She showed no adverse effect to therapy during this period. This case is being reported because of its rarity.

  9. PALB2, CHEK2 and ATM rare variants and cancer risk: data from COGS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Southey, M.C.; Goldgar, D.E.; Winqvist, R.; Pylkas, K.; Couch, F.; Tischkowitz, M.; Foulkes, W.D.; Dennis, J.; Michailidou, K.; Rensburg, E.J. van; Heikkinen, T.; Nevanlinna, H.; Hopper, J.L.; Dork, T.; Claes, K.B.; Reis-Filho, J.; Teo, Z.L.; Radice, P.; Catucci, I.; Peterlongo, P.; Tsimiklis, H.; Odefrey, F.A.; Dowty, J.G.; Schmidt, M.K.; Broeks, A.; Hogervorst, F.B.; Verhoef, S.; Carpenter, J.; Clarke, C.; Scott, R.J.; Fasching, P.A.; Haeberle, L.; Ekici, A.B.; Beckmann, M.W.; Peto, J.; Dos-Santos-Silva, I.; Fletcher, O.; Johnson, N.; Bolla, M.K.; Sawyer, E.J.; Tomlinson, I.; Kerin, M.J.; Miller, N.; Marme, F.; Burwinkel, B.; Yang, R.; Guenel, P.; Truong, T.; Menegaux, F.; Sanchez, M.; Bojesen, S.; Nielsen, S.F.; Flyger, H.; Benitez, J.; Zamora, M.P.; Perez, J.I.; Menendez, P.; Anton-Culver, H.; Neuhausen, S.; Ziogas, A.; Clarke, C.A.; Brenner, H.; Arndt, V.; Stegmaier, C.; Brauch, H.; Bruning, T.; Ko, Y.D.; Muranen, T.A.; Aittomaki, K.; Blomqvist, C.; Bogdanova, N.V.; Antonenkova, N.N.; Lindblom, A.; Margolin, S.; Mannermaa, A.; Kataja, V.; Kosma, V.M.; Hartikainen, J.M.; Spurdle, A.B.; Wauters, E.; Smeets, D.; Beuselinck, B.; Floris, G.; Chang-Claude, J.; Rudolph, A.; Seibold, P.; Flesch-Janys, D.; Olson, J.E.; Vachon, C.; Pankratz, V.S.; McLean, C.; Haiman, C.A.; Henderson, B.E.; Schumacher, F.; Marchand, L. Le; Kristensen, V.; Alnaes, G.G.; Zheng, W.; Hunter, D.J.; Altena, A.M. van; Aben, K.K.H.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Massuger, L.F.A.G.; et al.,

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The rarity of mutations in PALB2, CHEK2 and ATM make it difficult to estimate precisely associated cancer risks. Population-based family studies have provided evidence that at least some of these mutations are associated with breast cancer risk as high as those associated with rare BRCA2

  10. High mutation rates limit evolutionary adaptation in Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen Sprouffske

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Mutation is fundamental to evolution, because it generates the genetic variation on which selection can act. In nature, genetic changes often increase the mutation rate in systems that range from viruses and bacteria to human tumors. Such an increase promotes the accumulation of frequent deleterious or neutral alleles, but it can also increase the chances that a population acquires rare beneficial alleles. Here, we study how up to 100-fold increases in Escherichia coli's genomic mutation rate affect adaptive evolution. To do so, we evolved multiple replicate populations of asexual E. coli strains engineered to have four different mutation rates for 3000 generations in the laboratory. We measured the ability of evolved populations to grow in their original environment and in more than 90 novel chemical environments. In addition, we subjected the populations to whole genome population sequencing. Although populations with higher mutation rates accumulated greater genetic diversity, this diversity conveyed benefits only for modestly increased mutation rates, where populations adapted faster and also thrived better than their ancestors in some novel environments. In contrast, some populations at the highest mutation rates showed reduced adaptation during evolution, and failed to thrive in all of the 90 alternative environments. In addition, they experienced a dramatic decrease in mutation rate. Our work demonstrates that the mutation rate changes the global balance between deleterious and beneficial mutational effects on fitness. In contrast to most theoretical models, our experiments suggest that this tipping point already occurs at the modest mutation rates that are found in the wild.

  11. SYMPOSIUM: Rare decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    Late last year, a symposium entitled 'Rare Decays' attracted 115 participants to a hotel in Vancouver, Canada. These participants were particle physicists interested in checking conventional selection rules to look for clues of possible new behaviour outside today's accepted 'Standard Model'. For physicists, 'rare decays' include processes that have so far not been seen, explicitly forbidden by the rules of the Standard Model, or processes highly suppressed because the decay is dominated by an easier route, or includes processes resulting from multiple transitions

  12. Rare (Earth Elements [score

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilo Méndez

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Rare (Earth Elements is a cycle of works for solo piano. The cycle was inspired by James Dillon’s Book of Elements (Vol. I-V. The complete cycle will consist of 14 pieces; one for each selected rare (earth element. The chosen elements are Neodymium, Erbium, Tellurium, Hafnium, Tantalum, Technetium, Indium, Dysprosium, Lanthanium, Cerium, Europium, Terbium, Yttrium and Darmstadtium. These elements were selected due to their special atomic properties that in many cases make them extremely valuable for the development of new technologies, and also because of their scarcity. To date, only 4 works have been completed Yttrium, Technetium, Indium and Tellurium.

  13. Rare muon processes: Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walter, H.K.

    1998-01-01

    The decay properties of muons, especially their rare decays, can be used to study very accurately deviations from the Standard Model. Muons with extremely low energies and good spatial definition are preferred for the majority of such studies. With the upgrade of the 590-MeV ring accelerator, PSI possesses the most powerful cyclotron in the world. This makes it possible to operate high-intensity beams of secondary pions and muons. A short review on rare muon processes is presented, concerning μ-e conversion and muonium-antimuonium oscillations. A possible new search for μ→eγ is also mentioned

  14. A novel mutation in the connexin 26 gene (GJB2) in a child with clinical and histological features of keratitis-ichthyosis-deafness (KID) syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koppelhus, Uffe; Tranebjaerg, L; Esberg, G

    2011-01-01

    Keratitis-ichthyosis-deafness (KID) syndrome is a rare congenital ectodermal disorder, caused by heterozygous missense mutation in GJB2, encoding the gap junction protein connexin 26. The commonest mutation is the p.Asp50Asn mutation, and only a few other mutations have been described to date....

  15. IRF6 mutation screening in non-syndromic orofacial clefting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leslie, Elizabeth J; Koboldt, Daniel C; Kang, C. J.

    2016-01-01

    -syndromic OFCs. About 70% of causal VWS mutations occur in IRF6, a gene that is also associated with non-syndromic OFCs. Screening for IRF6 mutations in apparently non-syndromic cases has been performed in several modestly sized cohorts with mixed results. In this study, we screened 1521 trios with presumed non......-syndromic OFCs to determine the frequency of causal IRF6 mutations. We identified seven likely causal IRF6 mutations, although a posteriori review identified two misdiagnosed VWS families based on the presence of lip pits. We found no evidence for association between rare IRF6 polymorphisms and non......-syndromic OFCs. We combined our results with other similar studies (totaling 2472 families) and conclude that causal IRF6 mutations are found in 0.24–0.44% of apparently non-syndromic OFC families. We suggest that clinical mutation screening for IRF6 be considered for certain family patterns such as families...

  16. Surveillance of rare cancers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Zwan, Johannes Martinus

    2016-01-01

    The widespread incidence and effects of cancer have led to a growing development in cancer prevention in the form of screening and research programs and cancer registries. Because of the low number of patients with rare cancers this improvement is not applied to the same extent to all cancer

  17. Afganistan and rare earths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilian M. Dobrescu

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available On our planet, over a quarter of new technologies for the economic production of industrial goods, are using rare earths, which are also called critical minerals and industries that rely on these precious items being worth of an estimated nearly five trillion dollars, or 5 percent of world gross domestic product. In the near future, competition will increase for the control of rare earth minerals embedded in high-tech products. Rare minerals are in the twenty-first century what oil accounted for in the twentieth century and coal in the nineteenth century: the engine of a new industrial revolution. Future energy will be produced increasingly by more sophisticated technological equipment based not just on steel and concrete, but incorporating significant quantities of metals and rare earths. Widespread application of these technologies will result in an exponential increase in demand for such minerals, and what is worrying is that minerals of this type are almost nowhere to be found in Europe and in other industrialized countries in the world, such as U.S. and Japan, but only in some Asian countries, like China and Afghanistan.

  18. Magnetic rare earth superlattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Majkrzak, C.F.; Kwo, J.; Hong, M.

    1991-01-01

    Advances in molecular beam epitaxy deposition techniques have recently made it possible to grow, an atomic plane at a time, single crystalline superlattices composed of alternating layers of a magnetic rare earth, such as Gd, Dy, Ho, or Er, and metallic Y, which has an identical chemical structure...

  19. Genetic mutations in Gorlin-Goltz syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Daneswari, Muthumula; Reddy, Mutjumula Swamy Ranga

    2013-01-01

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome is a rare multisystemic disease inherited in a dominant autosomal at a high level of penetrance and variable expressiveness. It is mainly characterized by basal cell carcinoma, odontogenic keratocyst and skeletal anomalies. Diagnosis is based upon established major and minor clinical and radiographic criteria and gene mutation analysis. This article presents a case of Gorlin-Goltz syndrome, its genetic predisposition, diagnosis and management.

  20. Genetic mutations in Gorlin-Goltz syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daneswari, Muthumula; Reddy, Mutjumula Swamy Ranga

    2013-07-01

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome is a rare multisystemic disease inherited in a dominant autosomal at a high level of penetrance and variable expressiveness. It is mainly characterized by basal cell carcinoma, odontogenic keratocyst and skeletal anomalies. Diagnosis is based upon established major and minor clinical and radiographic criteria and gene mutation analysis. This article presents a case of Gorlin-Goltz syndrome, its genetic predisposition, diagnosis and management.

  1. Somatic mutations in histiocytic sarcoma identified by next generation sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qingqing; Tomaszewicz, Keith; Hutchinson, Lloyd; Hornick, Jason L; Woda, Bruce; Yu, Hongbo

    2016-08-01

    Histiocytic sarcoma is a rare malignant neoplasm of presumed hematopoietic origin showing morphologic and immunophenotypic evidence of histiocytic differentiation. Somatic mutation importance in the pathogenesis or disease progression of histiocytic sarcoma was largely unknown. To identify somatic mutations in histiocytic sarcoma, we studied 5 histiocytic sarcomas [3 female and 2 male patients; mean age 54.8 (20-72), anatomic sites include lymph node, uterus, and pleura] and matched normal tissues from each patient as germ line controls. Somatic mutations in 50 "Hotspot" oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes were examined using next generation sequencing. Three (out of five) histiocytic sarcoma cases carried somatic mutations in BRAF. Among them, G464V [variant frequency (VF) of 43.6 %] and G466R (VF of 29.6 %) located at the P loop potentially interfere with the hydrophobic interaction between P and activating loops and ultimately activation of BRAF. Also detected was BRAF somatic mutation N581S (VF of 7.4 %), which was located at the catalytic loop of BRAF kinase domain: its role in modifying kinase activity was unclear. A similar mutational analysis was also performed on nine acute monocytic/monoblastic leukemia cases, which did not identify any BRAF somatic mutations. Our study detected several BRAF mutations in histiocytic sarcomas, which may be important in understanding the tumorigenesis of this rare neoplasm and providing mechanisms for potential therapeutical opportunities.

  2. Fixation probability of a nonmutator in a large population of asexual mutators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Kavita; James, Ananthu

    2017-11-21

    In an adapted population of mutators in which most mutations are deleterious, a nonmutator that lowers the mutation rate is under indirect selection and can sweep to fixation. Using a multitype branching process, we calculate the fixation probability of a rare nonmutator in a large population of asexual mutators. We show that when beneficial mutations are absent, the fixation probability is a nonmonotonic function of the mutation rate of the mutator: it first increases sublinearly and then decreases exponentially. We also find that beneficial mutations can enhance the fixation probability of a nonmutator. Our analysis is relevant to an understanding of recent experiments in which a reduction in the mutation rates has been observed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Deletion mutations of bacteriophage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryo, Yeikou

    1975-01-01

    Resolution of mutation mechanism with structural changes of DNA was discussed through the studies using bacteriophage lambda. One of deletion mutations inductions of phage lambda is the irradiation of ultraviolet ray. It is not clear if the inductions are caused by errors in reparation of ultraviolet-induced damage or by the activation of int gene. Because the effective site of int gene lies within the regions unnecessary for existing, it is considered that int gene is connected to deletion mutations induction. A certain system using prophage complementarity enables to detect deletion mutations at essential hereditary sites and to solve the relations of deletion mutations with other recombination system, DNA reproduction and repairment system. Duplication and multiplication of hereditary elements were discussed. If lambda deletion mutations of the system, which can control recombination, reproduction and repairment of added DNA, are constructed, mutations mechanism with great changes of DNA structure can be solved by phage lambda. (Ichikawa, K.)

  4. Mutation profiles of phenylketonuria in Quebec populations: Evidence of stratification and novel mutations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rozen, R.; Mascisch, A.; Scriver, C.R. (McGill Univ., Montreal (Canada)); Lambert, M. (Hopital Ste-Justine, Montreal (Canada)); Laframboise, R. (Centre Hospitalier Universite Laval, Quebec (Canada))

    1994-08-01

    Independent phenylketonuria (PKU) chromosomes (n=109) representing 80% of a proband cohort in Quebec province carry 18 different identified mutations in 20 different mutation/haplotype combinations. The study reported here, the third in a series on Quebec populations, was done in the Montreal region and predominantly on French Canadians. It has identified three novel mutations (A309D, D338Y, and 1054/1055delG [352fs]) and one unusual mutation/RFLP haplotype combination (E280K on Hp 2). The relative frequencies and distribution of PKU mutations were then compared in three regions and population subsets (eastern Quebec, French Canadian; western Quebec, French Canadian; and Montreal, non-French Canadian). The distributions of the prevalent and rare mutations are nonrandom and provide evidence for genetic stratification. The latter and the presence of eight unusual mutation/haplotype combinations in Quebec families with European ancestries (the aforementioned four and M1V, 165T, S349P, and R408W on Hp 1) corroborate demographic and anthropologic evidence, from elsewhere, for different origins of French Canadians in eastern and western Quebec. 29 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  5. Phenylketonuria mutation analysis in Northern Ireland: A rapid stepwise approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zschocke, J.; Graham, C.A.; Nevin, N.C. [Queen`s Univ., Belfast (Australia)] [and others

    1995-12-01

    We present a multistep approach for the rapid analysis of phenylketonuria (PKU) mutations. In the first step, three common mutations and a polymorphic short tandem repeat (STR) system are rapidly analyzed with a fluorescent multiplex assay. In the second step, minihaplotypes combining STR and VNTR data are used to determine rare mutations likely to be present in an investigated patient, which are then confirmed by restriction enzyme analysis. The remaining mutations are analyzed with denaturant gradient-gel electrophoresis and sequencing. The first two steps together identify both mutations in 90%-95% of PKU patients, and results can be obtained within 2 d. We have investigated 121 Northern Irish families with hyperphenylalaninemia, including virtually all patients born since 1972, and have found 34 different mutations on 241 of the 242 mutant alleles. Three mutations (R408W, 165T, and F39L) account for 57.5% of mutations, while 14 mutations occur with a frequency of 1%-6%. The present analysis system is efficient and inexpensive and is particularly well suited to routine mutation analysis in a diagnostic setting. 19 refs., 5 tabs.

  6. First report of HGD mutations in a Chinese with alkaptonuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yong-jia; Guo, Ji-hong; Chen, Wei-jian; Zhao, Rui; Tang, Jin-song; Meng, Xiao-hua; Zhao, Liu; Tu, Ming; He, Xin-yu; Wu, Ling-qian; Zhu, Yi-min

    2013-04-15

    Alkaptonuria (AKU) is one of the first prototypic inborn errors in metabolism and the first human disease found to be transmitted via Mendelian autosomal recessive inheritance. It is caused by HGD mutations, which leads to a deficiency in homogentisate 1,2-dioxygenase (HGD) activity. To date, several HGD mutations have been identified as the cause of the prototypic disease across different ethnic populations worldwide. However, in Asia, the HGD mutation is very rarely reported. For the Chinese population, no literature on HGD mutation screening is available to date. In this paper, we describe two novel HGD mutations in a Chinese AKU family, the splicing mutation of IVS7+1G>C, a donor splice site of exon 7, and a missense mutation of F329C in exon 12. The predicted new splicing site of the mutated exon 7 sequence demonstrated a 303bp extension after the mutation site. The F329C mutation most probably disturbed the stability of the conformation of the two loops critical to the Fe(2+) active site of the HGD enzyme. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Loss-of-Function Mutations in APOC3, Triglycerides, and Coronary Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Plasma triglyceride levels are heritable and are correlated with the risk of coronary heart disease. Sequencing of the protein-coding regions of the human genome (the exome) has the potential to identify rare mutations that have a large effect on phenotype. Methods We sequenced the protein-coding regions of 18,666 genes in each of 3734 participants of European or African ancestry in the Exome Sequencing Project. We conducted tests to determine whether rare mutations in coding sequence, individually or in aggregate within a gene, were associated with plasma triglyceride levels. For mutations associated with triglyceride levels, we subsequently evaluated their association with the risk of coronary heart disease in 110,970 persons. Results An aggregate of rare mutations in the gene encoding apolipoprotein C3 (APOC3) was associated with lower plasma triglyceride levels. Among the four mutations that drove this result, three were loss-of-function mutations: a nonsense mutation (R19X) and two splice-site mutations (IVS2+1G→A and IVS3+1G→T). The fourth was a missense mutation (A43T). Approximately 1 in 150 persons in the study was a heterozygous carrier of at least one of these four mutations. Triglyceride levels in the carriers were 39% lower than levels in noncarriers (Ptriglycerides and APOC3. Carriers of these mutations were found to have a reduced risk of coronary heart disease. (Funded by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute and others.) PMID:24941081

  8. Inheritance of deleterious mutations at both BRCA1 and BRCA2 in an international sample of 32,295 women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Friebel, Tara M.; Mitra, Nandita; Wan, Fei; Chen, Stephanie; Andrulis, Irene L.; Apostolou, Paraskevi; Arnold, Norbert; Arun, Banu K.; Barrowdale, Daniel; Benitez, Javier; Berger, Raanan; Berthet, Pascaline; Borg, Ake; Buys, Saundra S.; Caldes, Trinidad; Carter, Jonathan; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Claes, Kathleen B. M.; Couch, Fergus J.; Cybulski, Cezary; Daly, Mary B.; de la Hoya, Miguel; Diez, Orland; Domchek, Susan M.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Durda, Katarzyna; Ellis, Steve; Evans, D. Gareth; Foretova, Lenka; Friedman, Eitan; Frost, Debra; Ganz, Patricia A.; Garber, Judy; Glendon, Gord; Godwin, Andrew K.; Greene, Mark H.; Gronwald, Jacek; Hahnen, Eric; Hallberg, Emily; Hamann, Ute; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Imyanitov, Evgeny N.; Isaacs, Claudine; Jakubowska, Anna; Janavicius, Ramunas; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Ligtenberg, Jakobus; Oosterwijk, Jan; van der Hout, Annemarie

    2016-01-01

    Background: Most BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers have inherited a single (heterozygous) mutation. Transheterozygotes (TH) who have inherited deleterious mutations in both BRCA1 and BRCA2 are rare, and the consequences of transheterozygosity are poorly understood. Methods: From 32,295 female BRCA1/2

  9. Inheritance of deleterious mutations at both BRCA1 and BRCA2 in an international sample of 32,295 women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Rebbeck (Timothy); M.O.W. Friebel (Mark ); N. Mitra (Nandita); Wan, F. (Fei); Chen, S. (Stephanie); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); P. Apostolou (Paraskevi); N. Arnold (Norbert); B.K. Arun (Banu); D. Barrowdale (Daniel); J. Benítez (Javier); R. Berger (Raanan); P. Berthet (Pascaline); Å. Borg (Åke); Buys, S.S. (Saundra S.); T. Caldes (Trinidad); J. Carter (Jonathan); Chiquette, J. (Jocelyne); K.B.M. Claes (Kathleen B.M.); Couch, F.J. (Fergus J.); C. Cybulski (Cezary); M.B. Daly (Mary); M. de La Hoya (Miguel); O. Díez (Orland); S.M. Domchek (Susan); K.L. Nathanson (Katherine); Durda, K. (Katarzyna); S.D. Ellis (Steve); Evans, D.G. (D.Gareth); L. Foretova (Lenka); E. Friedman (Eitan); D. Frost (Debra); P.A. Ganz (Patricia); J. Garber (Judy); G. Glendon (Gord); A.K. Godwin (Andrew); M.H. Greene (Mark); J. Gronwald (Jacek); E. Hahnen (Eric); Hallberg, E. (Emily); U. Hamann (Ute); T.V.O. Hansen (Thomas); E.N. Imyanitov (Evgeny); C. Isaacs (Claudine); A. Jakubowska (Anna); R. Janavicius (Ramunas); Jaworska-Bieniek, K. (Katarzyna); E.M. John (Esther); B.Y. Karlan (Beth); B. Kaufman (Bella); A. Kwong (Ava); Y. Laitman (Yael); C. Lasset (Christine); C. Lazaro (Conxi); K.J. Lester (Kathryn); N. Loman (Niklas); J. Lubinski (Jan); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); G. Mitchell (Gillian); M. Montagna (Marco); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); D. Niederacher (Dieter); R. Nussbaum (Robert); K. Offit (Kenneth); E. Olah; O.I. Olopade (Olofunmilayo); S.K. Park (Sue K.); Piedmonte, M. (Marion); P. Radice (Paolo); Rappaport-Fuerhauser, C. (Christine); M.A. Rookus (Matti); C.M. Seynaeve (Caroline); J. Simard (Jacques); C.F. Singer (Christian); Soucy, P. (Penny); M.C. Southey (Melissa); D. Stoppa-Lyonnet (Dominique); G. Sukiennicki (Grzegorz); C. Szabo (Csilla); Tancredi, M. (Mariella); P.J. Teixeira; S.-H. Teo (Soo-Hwang); M.B. Terry (Mary Beth); M. Thomassen (Mads); L. Tihomirova (Laima); M. Tischkowitz (Marc); A.E. Toland (Amanda); A. Toloczko-Grabarek (Aleksandra); N. Tung (Nadine); E.J. van Rensburg (Elizabeth); Villano, D. (Danylo); S. Wang-Gohrke (Shan); B. Wapenschmidt (Barbara); J.N. Weitzel (Jeffrey); J. Zidan (Jamal); Zorn, K.K. (Kristin K.); L. McGuffog (Lesley); D.F. Easton (Douglas); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); A.C. Antoniou (Antonis C.); S.J. Ramus (Susan)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Most BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers have inherited a single (heterozygous) mutation. Transheterozygotes (TH) who have inherited deleterious mutations in both BRCA1 and BRCA2 are rare, and the consequences of transheterozygosity are poorly understood. Methods: From 32,295

  10. Variable clinical expressivity of STAT3 mutation in hyperimmunoglobulin E syndrome: genetic and clinical studies of six patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolach, Ofir; Kuijpers, Taco; Ben-Ari, Josef; Gavrieli, Ronit; Feinstein-Goren, Neta; Alders, Marielle; Garty, Ben Zion; Wolach, Baruch

    2014-01-01

    Autosomal dominant Hyper IgE syndrome (AD-HIES) is a rare and complex primary immunodeficiency that affects multiple systems. Mutations in signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) gene cause AD-HIES. These mutations have a dominant-negative effect and the presence of such mutations

  11. Inheritance of deleterious mutations at both BRCA1 and BRCA2 in an international sample of 32,295 women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rebbeck, Timothy R; Friebel, Tara M; Mitra, Nandita

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Most BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers have inherited a single (heterozygous) mutation. Transheterozygotes (TH) who have inherited deleterious mutations in both BRCA1 and BRCA2 are rare, and the consequences of transheterozygosity are poorly understood. METHODS: From 32,295 female BRCA...

  12. Sharing Rare Attitudes Attracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Hans

    2018-04-01

    People like others who share their attitudes. Online dating platforms as well as other social media platforms regularly rely on the social bonding power of their users' shared attitudes. However, little is known about moderating variables. In the present work, I argue that sharing rare compared with sharing common attitudes should evoke stronger interpersonal attraction among people. In five studies, I tested this prediction for the case of shared interests from different domains. I found converging evidence that people's rare compared with their common interests are especially potent to elicit interpersonal attraction. I discuss the current framework's theoretical implications for impression formation and impression management as well as its practical implications for improving online dating services.

  13. Drugs for rare disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremers, Serge; Aronson, Jeffrey K

    2017-08-01

    Estimates of the frequencies of rare disorders vary from country to country; the global average defined prevalence is 40 per 100 000 (0.04%). Some occur in only one or a few patients. However, collectively rare disorders are fairly common, affecting 6-8% of the US population, or about 30 million people, and a similar number in the European Union. Most of them affect children and most are genetically determined. Diagnosis can be difficult, partly because of variable presentations and partly because few clinicians have experience of individual rare disorders, although they may be assisted by searching databases. Relatively few rare disorders have specific pharmacological treatments (so-called orphan drugs), partly because of difficulties in designing trials large enough to determine benefits and harms alike. Incentives have been introduced to encourage the development of orphan drugs, including tax credits and research aids, simplification of marketing authorization procedures and exemption from fees, and extended market exclusivity. Consequently, the number of applications for orphan drugs has grown, as have the costs of using them, so much so that treatments may not be cost-effective. It has therefore been suggested that not-for-profit organizations that are socially motivated to reduce those costs should be tasked with producing them. A growing role for patient organizations, improved clinical and translational infrastructures, and developments in genetics have also contributed to successful drug development. The translational discipline of clinical pharmacology is an essential component in drug development, including orphan drugs. Clinical pharmacologists, skilled in basic pharmacology and its links to clinical medicine, can be involved at all stages. They can contribute to the delineation of genetic factors that determine clinical outcomes of pharmacological interventions, develop biomarkers, design and perform clinical trials, assist regulatory decision

  14. RARE BRANCHIAL ARCH ANOMALIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayanta Kumar

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available AIM Amongst the branchial arch anomalies third arch anomaly occurs rarely and more so the fourth arch anomalies. We present our experience with cases of rare branchial arch anomalies. PATIENTS AND METHODS From June 2006 to January 2016, cases having their external opening in the lower third of sternocleidomastoid muscle with the tract going through thyroid gland and directing to pyriform sinus (PFS or cysts with internal opening in the PFS were studied. RESULTS No fourth arch anomaly was encountered. One cyst with internal opening which later on formed a fistula, three fistulae from beginning and two sinuses were encountered. The main stay of diagnosis was the fistula in the PFS and the tract lying posterior to the internal carotid artery. Simple excision technique with a small incision around the external opening was done. There was no recurrence. CONCLUSION Third arch fistula is not very rare as it was thought. Internal fistula is found in most of the cases. Though radiological investigations are helpful, fistulae can be diagnosed clinically and during operation. Extensive operation of the neck, mediastinum and pharynx is not required.

  15. TP53 germline mutation testing in 180 families suspected of Li-Fraumeni syndrome: mutation detection rate and relative frequency of cancers in different familial phenotypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruijs, M.W.G.; Verhoef, S.; Rookus, M.A.; Pruntel, R.; van der Hout, A.H.; Hogervorst, F.B.L.; Kluijt, I.; Sijmons, R.H.; Aalfs, C.M.; Wagner, A.; Ausems, M.G.E.M.; Hoogerbrugge, N.; van Asperen, C.J.; Gómez García, E.B.; Meijers-Heijboer, H.; ten Kate, L.P.; Menko, F.H.; van 't Veer, L.J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS) is a rare autosomal dominant cancer predisposition syndrome. Most families fulfilling the classical diagnostic criteria harbour TP53 germline mutations. However, TP53 germline mutations may also occur in less obvious phenotypes. As a result, different criteria

  16. Spectrum of mutations in RARS-T patients includes TET2 and ASXL1 mutations

    OpenAIRE

    Szpurka, Hadrian; Jankowska, Anna M.; Makishima, Hideki; Bodo, Juraj; Bejanyan, Nelli; Hsi, Eric D.; Sekeres, Mikkael A.; Maciejewski, Jaroslaw P.

    2010-01-01

    While a majority of patients with refractory anemia with ring sideroblasts and thrombocytosis harbor JAK2V617F and rarely MPLW515L, JAK2/MPL-negative cases constitute a diagnostic problem. 23 RARS-T cases were investigated applying immunohistochemical phospho-STAT5, sequencing and SNP-A-based karyotyping. Based on the association of TET2/ASXL1 mutations with MDS/MPN we studied molecular pattern of these genes. Two patients harbored ASXL1 and another 2 TET2 mutations. Phospho-STAT5 activation ...

  17. Rare Earth Polyoxometalates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boskovic, Colette

    2017-09-19

    Longstanding and important applications make use of the chemical and physical properties of both rare earth metals and polyoxometalates of early transition metals. The catalytic, optical, and magnetic features of rare earth metal ions are well-known, as are the reversible multielectron redox and photoredox capabilities of polyoxomolybdates and polyoxotungstates. The combination of rare earth ions and polyoxometalates in discrete molecules and coordination polymers is of interest for the unique combination of chemical and physical properties that can arise. This Account surveys our efforts to synthesize and investigate compounds with rare earth ions and polyoxometalates (RE-POMs), sometimes with carboxylate-based organic coligands. Our general synthetic approach is "bottom-up", which affords well-defined nanoscale molecules, typically in crystalline form and amenable to single-crystal X-ray diffraction for structure determination. Our particular focus is on elucidation of the physical properties conferred by the different structural components with a view to ultimately being able to tune these properties chemically. For this purpose, we employ a variety of spectroscopic, magnetochemical, electrochemical, and scattering techniques in concert with theoretical modeling and computation. Studies of RE-POM single-molecule magnets (SMMs) have utilized magnetic susceptibility, inelastic neutron scattering, and ab initio calculations. These investigations have allowed characterization of the crystal field splitting of the rare earth(III) ions that is responsible for the SMM properties of slow magnetic relaxation and magnetization quantum tunneling. Such SMMs are promising for applications in quantum computing and molecular spintronics. Photophysical measurements of a family of hybrid RE-POMs with organic ligands have afforded insights into sensitization of Tb(III) and Eu(III) emission through both organic and polyoxometalate chromophores in the same molecule. Detailed

  18. Progress and tendency in heavy ion irradiation mutation breeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Libin; Li Wenjian; Qu Ying; Li Ping

    2008-01-01

    In recent years, the intermediate energy heavy ion biology has been concerned rarely comparing to that of the low-energy ions. In this paper, we summarized the advantage of a new mutation breeding method mediated by intermediate energy heavy ion irradiations. Meanwhile, the present state of this mutation technique in applications of the breeding in grain crops, cash crops and model plants were introduced. And the preview of the heavy ion irradiations in gene-transfer, molecular marker assisted selection and spaceflight mutation breeding operations were also presented. (authors)

  19. Fanconi anemia founder mutation in Macedonian patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madjunkova, Svetlana; Kocheva, Svetlana A; Plaseska-Karanfilska, Dijana

    2014-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder clinically characterized by developmental abnormalities, progressive bone marrow failure (BMF) and profound cancer predisposition. Approximately 65% of all affected individuals have mutation in the FANCA (Fanconi anemia complementation group A) gene. The mutation spectrum of the FANCA gene is highly heterogeneous. FA-A is usually associated with private FANCA mutations in individual families. We describe 3 unrelated patients with FA with a similar clinical presentation: BMF, renal anomalies and café-au-lait pigmentation without major skeletal abnormality. The molecular analysis of the FANCA gene using the FA MLPA kit P031-A2/P032 FANCA, showed homozygous deletion of exon 3 in all 3 patients. Molecular analysis of the flanking regions of exon 3 precisely defined unique deletion of 2,040 bp and duplication of C (1788_3828dupC). These are the first 3 patients homozygous for deletion of FANCA exon 3 described to date. Although not related, the patients originated from the same Gypsy-like ethnic population. We conclude that c.190-256_283 + 1680del2040 dupC mutation in the FANCA gene is a founder mutation in Macedonian FA patients of Gypsy-like ethnic origin. Our finding has very strong implications for these patients in formulating diagnostic and carrier-screening strategy for BMF and FA and to enable comprehensive genetic counseling. © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Better plants through mutations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    This is a public relations film describing problems associated with the genetic improvement of crop plants through induced mutations. Mutations are the ultimate source of genetic variation in plants. Mutation induction is now established as a practical tool in plant breeding. The Joint FAO/IAEA Division and the IAEA's laboratory at Seibersdorf have supported research and practical implementation of mutation breeding of both seed propagated and vegetatively propagated plants. Plant biotechnology based on in vitro culture and recombinant DNA technology will make a further significant contribution to plant breeding

  1. Neonatal Cushing Syndrome: A Rare but Potentially Devastating Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatsi, Christina; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2018-03-01

    Neonatal Cushing syndrome (CS) is most commonly caused by exogenous administration of glucocorticoids and rarely by endogenous hypercortisolemia. CS owing to adrenal lesions is the most common cause of endogenous CS in neonates and infants, and adrenocortical tumors (ACTs) represent most cases. Many ACTs develop in the context of a TP53 gene mutation, which causes Li-Fraumeni syndrome. More rarely, neonatal CS presents as part of other syndromes such as McCune-Albright syndrome or Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome. Management usually includes resection of the primary tumor with or without additional medical treatment, but manifestations may persist after resolution of hypercortisolemia. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Rapid identification of HEXA mutations in Tay-Sachs patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giraud, Carole; Dussau, Jeanne; Azouguene, Emilie; Feillet, François; Puech, Jean-Philippe; Caillaud, Catherine

    2010-02-19

    Tay-Sachs disease (TSD) is a recessively inherited neurodegenerative disorder due to mutations in the HEXA gene resulting in a beta-hexosaminidase A (Hex A) deficiency. The purpose of this study was to characterize the molecular abnormalities in patients with infantile or later-onset forms of the disease. The complete sequencing of the 14 exons and flanking regions of the HEXA gene was performed with a unique technical condition in 10 unrelated TSD patients. Eleven mutations were identified, including five splice mutations, one insertion, two deletions and three single-base substitutions. Four mutations were novel: two splice mutations (IVS8+5G>A, IVS2+4delAGTA), one missense mutation in exon 6 (c.621T>G (p.D207E)) and one small deletion (c.1211-1212delTG) in exon 11 resulting in a premature stop codon at residue 429. The c.621T>G missense mutation was found in a patient presenting an infantile form. Its putative role in the pathogenesis of TSD is suspected as residue 207 is highly conserved in human, mouse and rat. Moreover, structural modelling predicted changes likely to affect substrate binding and catalytic activity of the enzyme. The time-saving procedure reported here could be useful for the characterization of Tay-Sachs-causing mutations, in particular in non-Ashkenazi patients mainly exhibiting rare mutations. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Mutation spectrum of Chinese patients with Bartter syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yue; Lin, Yi; Sun, Qing; Wang, Shujuan; Gao, Yanxia; Shao, Leping

    2017-11-24

    Bartter syndrome (BS) has been rarely reported in Chinese population except for a few case reports. This investigation was aimed to analyze the mutations of the causal genes in sixteen Chinese patients with BS, and review their followup and treatment. Identify mutations by the next generation sequencing and the multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA). Clinical characteristics and biochemical findings at the first presentation as well as follow-up were reviewed. 15 different CLCNKB gene mutations were identified in fourteen patients with BS, including 11 novel ones. A novel missense mutation and a novel small deletion were found from SLC12A1 gene. A novel gross deletion was found in CLCNKA gene. A recurrent missense mutation was identified from BSND gene. We found that the whole gene deletion mutation of CLCNKB gene was the most frequent mutation (32%), and the rate of gross deletion was up to 50 percent in this group of Chinese patients. The present study has found 19 mutations, including 14 novel ones, which would enrich the human gene mutation database (HGMD) and provide valuable references to the genetic counseling and diagnosis of the Chinese population.

  4. BRCA2 Mutations in 154 Finnish Male Breast Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsi Syrjäkoski

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The etiology and pathogenesis of male breast cancer (MBC are poorly known. This is due to the fact that the disease is rare, and large-scale genetic epidemiologic studies have been difficult to carry out. Here, we studied the frequency of eight recurrent Finnish BRCA2 founder mutations in a large cohort of 154 MBC patients (65% diagnosed in Finland from 1967 to 1996. Founder mutations were detected in 10 patients (6.5%, eight of whom carried the 9346(-2 A>G mutation. Two novel mutations (4075 delGT and 5808 del5 were discovered in a screening of the entire BRCA2 coding region in 34 samples. However, these mutations were not found in the rest of the 120 patients studied. Patients with positive family history of breast and/or ovarian cancer were often BRCA2 mutation carriers (44%, whereas those with no family history showed a low frequency of involvement (3.6%; P < .0001. Finally, we found only one Finnish MBC patient with 999 dell, the most common founder mutation in Finnish female breast cancer (FBC patients, and one that explains most of the hereditary FBC and MBC cases in Iceland. The variation in BRCA2 mutation spectrum between Finnish MBC patients and FBC patients in Finland and breast cancer patients in Iceland suggests that modifying genetic and environmental factors may significantly influence the penetrance of MBC and FBC in individuals carrying germline BRCA2 mutations in some populations.

  5. six novel mutations in the TSC1 and TSC2 genes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M. GLUSHKOVA

    2018-04-30

    Apr 30, 2018 ... RESEARCH ARTICLE ... nant disorder caused by inactivating TSC1 or TSC2 gene variants (Van ... premature protein truncation, while missense mutations are rare ..... TSC2 variants in our cohort are missense, frame-shift.

  6. Progressive cerebellar atrophy and polyneuropathy: expanding the spectrum of PNKP mutations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poulton, C.; Oegema, R.; Heijsman, D.; Hoogeboom, J.; Schot, R.; Stroink, H.; Willemsen, M.A.A.P.; Verheijen, F.W.; Spek, P. van der; Kremer, A.; Mancini, G.M.S.

    2013-01-01

    We present a neurodegenerative disorder starting in early childhood of two brothers consisting of severe progressive polyneuropathy, severe progressive cerebellar atrophy, microcephaly, mild epilepsy, and intellectual disability. The cause of this rare syndrome was found to be a homozygous mutation

  7. Pitfalls in genetic testing: the story of missed SCN1A mutations

    OpenAIRE

    Jennings, Lawrence J.; Kirschmann, Dawn

    2016-01-01

    Investigators from the EuroEPINOMICS rare epilepsy syndromes Dravet working group performed whole-exome sequencing on 31 trios that had been reported negative for SCN1A mutations by Sanger sequencing.

  8. Rare B decays at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Kluit, P M

    2001-01-01

    The results of the LEP experiments for rare B decays will be reviewed, covering hadronic final states, radiative and other rare decays and results for the inclusive charmless branching ratio. (8 refs).

  9. New mutations in the NHS gene in Nance-Horan Syndrome families from the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florijn, Ralph J; Loves, Willem; Maillette de Buy Wenniger-Prick, Liesbeth J J M; Mannens, Marcel M A M; Tijmes, Nel; Brooks, Simon P; Hardcastle, Alison J; Bergen, Arthur A B

    2006-09-01

    Mutations in the NHS gene cause Nance-Horan Syndrome (NHS), a rare X-chromosomal recessive disorder with variable features, including congenital cataract, microphthalmia, a peculiar form of the ear and dental anomalies. We investigated the NHS gene in four additional families with NHS from the Netherlands, by dHPLC and direct sequencing. We identified an unique mutation in each family. Three out of these four mutations were not reported before. We report here the first splice site sequence alteration mutation and three protein truncating mutations. Our results suggest that X-linked cataract and NHS are allelic disorders.

  10. A rare sight

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso and The LHCb Collaboration

    2012-01-01

    Today, at the Hadron Collider Physics Symposium in Kyoto, the LHCb collaboration has presented the evidence of a very rare B decay, the rarest ever seen. The result further shrinks the region in which scientists can still look for supersymmetry.   The graph showing evidence of the Bs0 → μ+ μ- decay. The result was presented Monday 12 November at the HCP Conference in Kyoto (photo courtesy of the LHCb Collaboration). Particle decays tell us about the inner properties and functioning of Nature’s physics processes. By studying them and their occurrence, physicists infer the rules that control them. Often, it turns out that some rare decays, which are very difficult to observe, are those in which Nature could reveal the presence of new physics. This is the case of some decays of the Bs0 particle (a particle made of a bottom anti-quark bound to a strange quark), and in particular Bs0 → μ+ μ- whose...

  11. Mitochondrial mutations in subjects with psychiatric disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adolfo Sequeira

    Full Text Available A considerable body of evidence supports the role of mitochondrial dysfunction in psychiatric disorders and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA mutations are known to alter brain energy metabolism, neurotransmission, and cause neurodegenerative disorders. Genetic studies focusing on common nuclear genome variants associated with these disorders have produced genome wide significant results but those studies have not directly studied mtDNA variants. The purpose of this study is to investigate, using next generation sequencing, the involvement of mtDNA variation in bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, major depressive disorder, and methamphetamine use. MtDNA extracted from multiple brain regions and blood were sequenced (121 mtDNA samples with an average of 8,800x coverage and compared to an electronic database containing 26,850 mtDNA genomes. We confirmed novel and rare variants, and confirmed next generation sequencing error hotspots by traditional sequencing and genotyping methods. We observed a significant increase of non-synonymous mutations found in individuals with schizophrenia. Novel and rare non-synonymous mutations were found in psychiatric cases in mtDNA genes: ND6, ATP6, CYTB, and ND2. We also observed mtDNA heteroplasmy in brain at a locus previously associated with schizophrenia (T16519C. Large differences in heteroplasmy levels across brain regions within subjects suggest that somatic mutations accumulate differentially in brain regions. Finally, multiplasmy, a heteroplasmic measure of repeat length, was observed in brain from selective cases at a higher frequency than controls. These results offer support for increased rates of mtDNA substitutions in schizophrenia shown in our prior results. The variable levels of heteroplasmic/multiplasmic somatic mutations that occur in brain may be indicators of genetic instability in mtDNA.

  12. Nance–Horan Syndrome: A Rare Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, Shambhu; Datta, Pankaj; Sabharwal, Janak Raj; Datta, Sonia

    2017-01-01

    Dentofacial anomalies may guide us to the diagnosis of many congenital and hereditary syndromes. A 9-year-old boy was diagnosed with Nance–Horan syndrome. This syndrome is an extremely rare X-linked genetic disorder which is entirely expressed in males with semi-dominant transmission which results from mutations occurring in male gametes. It is characterized by facial dysmorphism such as long face, prominent nose and mandibular prognathism, ocular abnormalities such as congenital cataract, mi...

  13. Dorfman-Chanarin syndrome: A rare neutral lipid storage disease

    OpenAIRE

    Mitra Souvik; Samanta Moumita; Sarkar Mihir; Chatterjee Sukanta

    2010-01-01

    Dorfman-Chanarin syndrome is a rare neutral lipid storage disorder characterized by ichthyosis, lipid vacuolations in peripheral leucocytes, and multisystem involvement. It is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the CGI-58 gene. A total of 42 cases have been reported worldwide till February 2009 out of which 4 have been previously reported from India. We report a case of a 20-month-old male with congenital ichthyosis, organomegaly, and bilateral cryptorchidism. Examination ...

  14. Kallmann syndrome and paranoid schizophrenia: a rare combination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhoeven, Willem M A; Egger, Jos I M; Hovens, Johannes E; Hoefsloot, Lies

    2013-01-17

    Kallmann syndrome (KS) is a genetically heterogeneous and rare disorder characterised by the combination of hypothalamic hypogonadism and anosmia/hyposmia, a variable degree of intellectual disability and several somatic anomalies. In about one-third of the patients, mutations have been identified in at least seven different genes. Virtually no data are available about possible neuropsychiatric symptoms in KS. Here, a young adult male is described with a previous clinical diagnosis of KS and recent paranoid schizophrenia of which positive, but not negative symptoms, fully remitted upon treatment with antipsychotics. Neither genome-wide array analysis nor mutation analyses disclosed imbalances or mutations in any of presently known KS disease genes. This is the first report on a patient with KS and paranoid schizophrenia in whom extensive genetic analyses were performed. It is concluded that further studies are warranted in order to elucidate a possible increased risk for psychiatric symptoms in patients with KS.

  15. Rare earth superlattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McMorrow, D.F.

    1997-01-01

    A review is given of recent experiments on the magnetism of rare earth superlattices. Early experiments in this field were concerned mainly with systems formed by combining a magnetic and a non-magnetic element in a superlattice structure. From results gathered on a variety of systems it has been established that the propagation of magnetic order through the non-magnetic spacer can be understood mostly on the basis of an RKKY-like model, where the strength and range of the coupling depends on the details of the conduction electron susceptibility of the spacer. Recent experiments on more complex systems indicate that this model does not provide a complete description. Examples include superlattices where the constituents can either be both magnetic, adopt different crystal structures (Fermi surfaces), or where one of the constituents has a non-magnetic singlet ground state. The results from such systems are presented and discussed in the context of the currently accepted model. (au)

  16. Rare nocturnal headaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Anna S; Kaube, Holger

    2004-06-01

    This review describes rare headaches that can occur at night or during sleep, with a focus on cluster headaches, paroxysmal hemicrania, short-lasting unilateral neuralgiform headache attacks with conjunctival injection and tearing, hypnic headache and exploding head syndrome. It is known that cluster headaches and hypnic headache are associated with rapid eye movement sleep, as illustrated by recent polysomnographic studies. Functional imaging studies have documented hypothalamic activation that is likely to be of relevance to circadian rhythms. These headache syndromes have been shown to respond to melatonin and lithium therapy, both of which have an indirect impact on the sleep-wake cycle. There is growing evidence that cluster headache and hypnic headache are chronobiological disorders.

  17. Rare earth (3) pivalates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuz'mina, N.P.; Martynenko, L.I.; Zoan An' Tu; Ch'eu Tkhi Nguet; Troyanov, S.I.; Rykov, A.N.; Korenev, Yu.M.

    1994-01-01

    Depending on synthesis conditions rare earth pivalates can be obtained in the form of either adducts NPiv·HPiv or hydrates MPiv 3 ·mH 2 O. Adducts are the most stable form of pivalates. Heating of adducts result in formation of corresponding MPiv 3 . MPiv 3 ·nHPiv compounds are characterized by IR-spectroscopy and thermal analysis data. Behaviour of MPiv 3 was studied in the regime of vacuum sublemation. Using mass spectroscopy of NdPiv 3 it was shown that gaseous phase above MPiv 3 had complex composition and contained ligomer fragments. X-ray structure analysis of [NdPiv 3 ·3HPiv] was conducted

  18. A Rare Stapes Abnormality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hala Kanona

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to increase awareness of rare presentations, diagnostic difficulties alongside management of conductive hearing loss and ossicular abnormalities. We report the case of a 13-year-old female reporting progressive left-sided hearing loss and high resolution computed tomography was initially reported as normal. Exploratory tympanotomy revealed an absent stapedius tendon and lack of connection between the stapes superstructure and footplate. The footplate was fixed. Stapedotomy and stapes prosthesis insertion resulted in closure of the air-bone gap by 50 dB. A review of world literature was performed using MedLine. Middle ear ossicular discontinuity can result in significant conductive hearing loss. This can be managed effectively with surgery to help restore hearing. However, some patients may not be suitable or decline surgical intervention and can be managed safely conservatively.

  19. Rare Decays at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Belyaev, Ivan

    2006-01-01

    Rare loop-induced decays are sensitive to New Physics in many Standard Model extensions. In this paper we discuss the reconstruction of the radiative penguin decays $B^0_d \\to K^{*0} \\gamma, B^0_s \\to \\phi \\gamma , B^0_d \\to \\omega \\gamma, \\Lambda_b \\to \\Lambda \\gamma$, the electroweak penguin decays $B^0_d \\to K^{*0} \\mu^+ \\mu^-, B^+_u \\to K^+ \\mu^+ \\mu^-$, the gluonic penguin decays $B^0_d \\to \\phi K^0_S, B^0_s \\to \\phi \\phi$, and the decay $B^0_s \\to \\mu^+\\mu^-$ at LHCb. The selection criteria, evaluated efficiencies, expected annual yields and $B/S$ estimates are presented.

  20. Mutation and premating isolation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodruff, R. C.; Thompson, J. N. Jr

    2002-01-01

    While premating isolation might be traceable to different genetic mechanisms in different species, evidence supports the idea that as few as one or two genes may often be sufficient to initiate isolation. Thus, new mutation can theoretically play a key role in the process. But it has long been thought that a new isolation mutation would fail, because there would be no other individuals for the isolation-mutation-carrier to mate with. We now realize that premeiotic mutations are very common and will yield a cluster of progeny carrying the same new mutant allele. In this paper, we discuss the evidence for genetically simple premating isolation barriers and the role that clusters of an isolation mutation may play in initiating allopatric, and even sympatric, species divisions.

  1. Pseudoachondroplasia: A rare cause of rhizomelic dwarfism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tandon Anupama

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Pseudoachondroplasia is a rare rhizomelic short-limbed skeletal dysplasia. Its inheritance is varied; autosomal dominant pattern and germline or somatic mutations can occur. Children at 2-3 years of age present with short height, gait disturbances, or limb deformities. Characteristic skeletal changes include shortening of long bones, predominantly of femur and humerus with irregular, flared metaphysis and fragmented epiphysis. Platyspondyly is also present, but the interpedicular distance is normal. The diagnosis is essentially based on imaging, and thus, it is important to be aware of the radiological features. Here, we report a case of two brothers where the elder sibling had classical radiological features of pseudoachondroplasia, whereas the younger one had early changes of this disorder.

  2. Familial gingival fibromatosis: A rare case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shweta Sharma

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary gingival fibromatosis is a rare condition that can occur as an isolated disease or as part of a syndrome or chromosomal abnormality. In severe cases, the gingival enlargement may cover the crowns of teeth and cause severe functional and aesthetic concerns. Here, we present a case of an 8-year-old girl with severe enlargement of gums in maxilla and mandible. Both deciduous and permanent teeth were not erupted in the oral cavity at all. Mutation in the Son-of-Sevenless (SOS-1 gene has been associated with the disease. The diagnosis was made based on clinical examination and family history. Surgical removal of the hyperplastic tissue was performed under general anesthesia.

  3. Rare cancers are not so rare: The rare cancer burden in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gatta, Gemma; van der Zwan, Jan Maarten; Casali, Paolo G.; Siesling, Sabine; Dei Tos, Angelo Paolo; Kunkler, Ian; Otter, Renee; Licitra, Lisa

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Epidemiologic information on rare cancers is scarce. The project Surveillance of Rare Cancers in Europe (RARECARE) provides estimates of the incidence, prevalence and survival of rare cancers in Europe based on a new and comprehensive list of these diseases. Materials and methods: RARECARE

  4. A novel mutation in MED12 causes FG syndrome (Opitz-Kaveggia syndrome)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rump, P.; Niessen, R. C.; Verbruggen, K. T.; Brouwer, O. F.; de Raad, M.; Hordijk, R.

    Opitz-Kaveggia syndrome is a rare X-linked multiple congenital anomalies and intellectual disability disorder caused by the recurrent p.R961W mutation in the MED12 gene. Twenty-three affected males from 10 families with this mutation in the MED12 gene have been described so far. Here we report on a

  5. The Inherited p53 Mutation in the Brazilian Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achatz, Maria Isabel; Zambetti, Gerard P

    2016-12-01

    A common criticism of studying rare diseases is the often-limited relevance of the findings to human health. Here, we review ∼15 years of research into an unusual germline TP53 mutation (p.R337H) that began with its detection in children with adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC), a remarkably rare childhood cancer that is associated with poor prognosis. We have come to learn that the p.R337H mutation exists at a very high frequency in Southern and Southeastern Brazil, occurring in one of 375 individuals within a total population of ∼100 million. Moreover, it has been determined that carriers of this founder mutation display variable tumor susceptibility, ranging from isolated cases of pediatric ACC to Li-Fraumeni or Li-Fraumeni-like (LFL) syndromes, thus representing a significant medical issue for this country. Studying the biochemical and molecular consequences of this mutation on p53 tumor-suppressor activity, as well as the putative additional genetic alterations that cooperate with this mutation, is advancing our understanding of how p53 functions in tumor suppression in general. These studies, which originated with a rare childhood tumor, are providing important information for guiding genetic counselors and physicians in treating their patients and are already providing clinical benefit. Copyright © 2016 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  6. Deep sequencing of natural and experimental populations of Drosophila melanogaster reveals biases in the spectrum of new mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assaf, Zoe June; Tilk, Susanne; Park, Jane; Siegal, Mark L; Petrov, Dmitri A

    2017-12-01

    Mutations provide the raw material of evolution, and thus our ability to study evolution depends fundamentally on having precise measurements of mutational rates and patterns. We generate a data set for this purpose using (1) de novo mutations from mutation accumulation experiments and (2) extremely rare polymorphisms from natural populations. The first, mutation accumulation (MA) lines are the product of maintaining flies in tiny populations for many generations, therefore rendering natural selection ineffective and allowing new mutations to accrue in the genome. The second, rare genetic variation from natural populations allows the study of mutation because extremely rare polymorphisms are relatively unaffected by the filter of natural selection. We use both methods in Drosophila melanogaster , first generating our own novel data set of sequenced MA lines and performing a meta-analysis of all published MA mutations (∼2000 events) and then identifying a high quality set of ∼70,000 extremely rare (≤0.1%) polymorphisms that are fully validated with resequencing. We use these data sets to precisely measure mutational rates and patterns. Highlights of our results include: a high rate of multinucleotide mutation events at both short (∼5 bp) and long (∼1 kb) genomic distances, showing that mutation drives GC content lower in already GC-poor regions, and using our precise context-dependent mutation rates to predict long-term evolutionary patterns at synonymous sites. We also show that de novo mutations from independent MA experiments display similar patterns of single nucleotide mutation and well match the patterns of mutation found in natural populations. © 2017 Assaf et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  7. A Novel Mutation in ERCC8 Gene Causing Cockayne Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Taghdiri

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Cockayne syndrome (CS is a rare autosomal recessive multisystem disorder characterized by impaired neurological and sensory functions, cachectic dwarfism, microcephaly, and photosensitivity. This syndrome shows a variable age of onset and rate of progression, and its phenotypic spectrum include a wide range of severity. Due to the progressive nature of this disorder, diagnosis can be more important when additional signs and symptoms appear gradually and become steadily worse over time. Therefore, mutation analysis of genes involved in CS pathogenesis can be helpful to confirm the suspected clinical diagnosis. Here, we report a novel mutation in ERCC8 gene in a 16-year-old boy who suffers from poor weight gain, short stature, microcephaly, intellectual disability, and photosensitivity. The patient was born to consanguineous family with no previous documented disease in his parents. To identify disease-causing mutation in the patient, whole exome sequencing utilizing next-generation sequencing on an Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform was performed. Results revealed a novel homozygote mutation in ERCC8 gene (NM_000082: exon 11, c.1122G>C in our patient. Another gene (ERCC6, which is also involved in CS did not have any disease-causing mutations in the proband. The new identified mutation was then confirmed by Sanger sequencing in the proband, his parents, and extended family members, confirming co-segregation with the disease. In addition, different bioinformatics programs which included MutationTaster, I-Mutant v2.0, NNSplice, Combined Annotation Dependent Depletion, The PhastCons, Genomic Evolutationary Rate Profiling conservation score, and T-Coffee Multiple Sequence Alignment predicted the pathogenicity of the mutation. Our study identified a rare novel mutation in ERCC8 gene and help to provide accurate genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis to minimize new affected individuals in this family.

  8. A Novel Mutation in ERCC8 Gene Causing Cockayne Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghdiri, Maryam; Dastsooz, Hassan; Fardaei, Majid; Mohammadi, Sanaz; Farazi Fard, Mohammad Ali; Faghihi, Mohammad Ali

    2017-01-01

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) is a rare autosomal recessive multisystem disorder characterized by impaired neurological and sensory functions, cachectic dwarfism, microcephaly, and photosensitivity. This syndrome shows a variable age of onset and rate of progression, and its phenotypic spectrum include a wide range of severity. Due to the progressive nature of this disorder, diagnosis can be more important when additional signs and symptoms appear gradually and become steadily worse over time. Therefore, mutation analysis of genes involved in CS pathogenesis can be helpful to confirm the suspected clinical diagnosis. Here, we report a novel mutation in ERCC8 gene in a 16-year-old boy who suffers from poor weight gain, short stature, microcephaly, intellectual disability, and photosensitivity. The patient was born to consanguineous family with no previous documented disease in his parents. To identify disease-causing mutation in the patient, whole exome sequencing utilizing next-generation sequencing on an Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform was performed. Results revealed a novel homozygote mutation in ERCC8 gene (NM_000082: exon 11, c.1122G>C) in our patient. Another gene ( ERCC6 ), which is also involved in CS did not have any disease-causing mutations in the proband. The new identified mutation was then confirmed by Sanger sequencing in the proband, his parents, and extended family members, confirming co-segregation with the disease. In addition, different bioinformatics programs which included MutationTaster, I-Mutant v2.0, NNSplice, Combined Annotation Dependent Depletion, The PhastCons, Genomic Evolutationary Rate Profiling conservation score, and T-Coffee Multiple Sequence Alignment predicted the pathogenicity of the mutation. Our study identified a rare novel mutation in ERCC8 gene and help to provide accurate genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis to minimize new affected individuals in this family.

  9. IDH Mutation Analysis in Ewing Sarcoma Family Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ki Yong Na

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH catalyzes the oxidative decarboxylation of isocitrate to yield α-ketoglutarate (α-KG with production of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH. Dysfunctional IDH leads to reduced production of α-KG and NADH and increased production of 2-hydroxyglutarate, an oncometabolite. This results in increased oxidative damage and stabilization of hypoxia-inducible factor α, causing cells to be prone to tumorigenesis. Methods: This study investigated IDH mutations in 61 Ewing sarcoma family tumors (ESFTs, using a pentose nucleic acid clamping method and direct sequencing. Results: We identified four cases of ESFTs harboring IDH mutations. The number of IDH1 and IDH2 mutations was equal and the subtype of IDH mutations was variable. Clinicopathologic analysis according to IDH mutation status did not reveal significant results. Conclusions: This study is the first to report IDH mutations in ESFTs. The results indicate that ESFTs can harbor IDH mutations in previously known hot-spot regions, although their incidence is rare. Further validation with a larger case-based study would establish more reliable and significant data on prevalence rate and the biological significance of IDH mutations in ESFTs.

  10. Genetic mutations associated with status epilepticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatnagar, M; Shorvon, S

    2015-08-01

    This paper reports the results of a preliminary search of the literature aimed at identifying the genetic mutations reported to be strongly associated with status epilepticus. Genetic mutations were selected for inclusion if status epilepticus was specifically mentioned as a consequence of the mutation in standard genetic databases or in a case report or review article. Mutations in 122 genes were identified. The genetic mutations identified were found in only rare conditions (sometimes vanishingly rare) and mostly in infants and young children with multiple other handicaps. Most of the genetic mutations can be subdivided into those associated with cortical dysplasias, inborn errors of metabolism, mitochondrial disease, or epileptic encephalopathies and childhood syndromes. There are no identified 'pure status epilepticus genes'. The range of genes underpinning status epilepticus differs in many ways from the range of genes underpinning epilepsy, which suggests that the processes underpinning status epilepticus differ from those underpinning epilepsy. It has been frequently postulated that status epilepticus is the result of a failure of 'seizure termination mechanisms', but the wide variety of genes affecting very diverse biochemical pathways identified in this survey makes any unitary cause unlikely. The genetic influences in status epilepticus are likely to involve a wide range of mechanisms, some related to development, some to cerebral energy production, some to diverse altered biochemical pathways, some to transmitter and membrane function, and some to defects in networks or systems. The fact that many of the identified genes are involved with cerebral development suggests that status epilepticus might often be a system or network phenomenon. To date, there are very few genes identified which are associated with adult-onset status epilepticus (except in those with preexisting neurological damage), and this is disappointing as the cause of many adult

  11. Rare psi decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Partridge, R.

    1986-01-01

    Slightly more than ten years have passed since the psi was discovered, yet the study of psi decays continues to be an active and fruitful area of research. One reason for such longevity is that each successive experiment has increased their sensitivity over previous experiments either by improving detection efficiency or by increasing statistics. This has allowed the observation and, in some cases, detailed studies of rare psi decays. Branching ratios of ≅10-/sup 4/ are now routinely studied, while certain decay channels are beginning to show interesting effects at the 10-/sup 5/ level. Future experiments at the Beijing Electron Positron Collider (BEPC) have the potential for increasing sensitivities by one or two orders of magnitude, thus enabling many interesting studies impossible with current data samples. The author first examines the extent to which psi decays can be used to study electroweak phenomena. The remainder of this work is devoted to the more traditional task of using the psi to study quarks, gluons, and the properties of the strong interaction. Of particular interest is the study of radioactive psi decays, where a number of new particles have been discovered. Recent results regarding two of these particles, the θ(1700) and iota(1450), are discussed, as well as a study of the quark content of the eta and eta' using decays of the psi to vector-pseudoscalar final states

  12. Alkaptonuria: a very rare metabolic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquaron, Robert

    2013-10-01

    Alkaptonuria (AKU) is a very rare autosomal recessive disorder of tyrosine metabolism in the liver due to deficiency of homogentisate 1,2 dioxygenase (HGD) activity, resulting in the accumulation of homogentisic acid (HGA). Circulating HGA pass into various tissues through-out the body, mainly in cartilage and connective tissues, where its oxidation products polymerize and deposit as a melanin-like pigment. Gram quantities of HGA are excreted in the urine. AKU is a progressive disease and the three main features, according the chronology of appearance, are: darkening of the urine at birth, then ochronosis (blue-dark pigmentation of the connective tissue) clinically visible at around 30 yrs in the ear and eye, and finally a severe ochronotic arthropathy at around 50 yrs with spine and large joints involvements. Cardiovascular and renal complications have been described in numerous case report studies. A treatment now is available in the form of a drug nitisinone, which decreases the production of HGA. The enzymatic defect in AKU is caused by the homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations within the HGD gene. This disease has a very low prevalence (1:100,000-250,000) in most of the ethnic groups, except Slovakia and Dominican Republic, where the incidence has shown increase up to 1:19,000. This review highlights classical and recent findings on this very rare disease.

  13. Rare B decays at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Puig Navarro, Albert

    2017-01-01

    Rare decays are flavour changing neutral current processes that allow sensitive searches for phenomena beyond the Standard Model (SM). In the SM, rare decays are loop-suppressed and new particles in SM extensions can give significant contributions. The very rare decay $B^0_s\\to\\mu^+\\mu^-$ in addition helicity suppressed and constitutes a powerful probe for new (pseudo) scalar particles. Of particular interest are furthermore tests of lepton universality in rare $b\\to s\\ell^+\\ell^-$ decays. The LHCb experiment is designed for the study of b-hadron decays and ideally suited for the analysis of rare decays due to its high trigger efficiency, as well as excellent tracking and particle identification performance. Recent results from the LHCb experiment in the area of rare decays are presented, including tests of lepton universality and searches for lepton flavour violation.

  14. Glucokinase gene mutations (MODY 2) in Asian Indians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanthimathi, Sekar; Jahnavi, Suresh; Balamurugan, Kandasamy; Ranjani, Harish; Sonya, Jagadesan; Goswami, Soumik; Chowdhury, Subhankar; Mohan, Viswanathan; Radha, Venkatesan

    2014-03-01

    Heterozygous inactivating mutations in the glucokinase (GCK) gene cause a hyperglycemic condition termed maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY) 2 or GCK-MODY. This is characterized by mild, stable, usually asymptomatic, fasting hyperglycemia that rarely requires pharmacological intervention. The aim of the present study was to screen for GCK gene mutations in Asian Indian subjects with mild hyperglycemia. Of the 1,517 children and adolescents of the population-based ORANGE study in Chennai, India, 49 were found to have hyperglycemia. These children along with the six patients referred to our center with mild hyperglycemia were screened for MODY 2 mutations. The GCK gene was bidirectionally sequenced using BigDye(®) Terminator v3.1 (Applied Biosystems, Foster City, CA) chemistry. In silico predictions of the pathogenicity were carried out using the online tools SIFT, Polyphen-2, and I-Mutant 2.0 software programs. Direct sequencing of the GCK gene in the patients referred to our Centre revealed one novel mutation, Thr206Ala (c.616A>G), in exon 6 and one previously described mutation, Met251Thr (c.752T>C), in exon 7. In silico analysis predicted the novel mutation to be pathogenic. The highly conserved nature and critical location of the residue Thr206 along with the clinical course suggests that the Thr206Ala is a MODY 2 mutation. However, we did not find any MODY 2 mutations in the 49 children selected from the population-based study. Hence prevalence of GCK mutations in Chennai is MODY 2 mutations from India and confirms the importance of considering GCK gene mutation screening in patients with mild early-onset hyperglycemia who are negative for β-cell antibodies.

  15. High mutation rates limit evolutionary adaptation in Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Andreas

    2018-01-01

    Mutation is fundamental to evolution, because it generates the genetic variation on which selection can act. In nature, genetic changes often increase the mutation rate in systems that range from viruses and bacteria to human tumors. Such an increase promotes the accumulation of frequent deleterious or neutral alleles, but it can also increase the chances that a population acquires rare beneficial alleles. Here, we study how up to 100-fold increases in Escherichia coli’s genomic mutation rate affect adaptive evolution. To do so, we evolved multiple replicate populations of asexual E. coli strains engineered to have four different mutation rates for 3000 generations in the laboratory. We measured the ability of evolved populations to grow in their original environment and in more than 90 novel chemical environments. In addition, we subjected the populations to whole genome population sequencing. Although populations with higher mutation rates accumulated greater genetic diversity, this diversity conveyed benefits only for modestly increased mutation rates, where populations adapted faster and also thrived better than their ancestors in some novel environments. In contrast, some populations at the highest mutation rates showed reduced adaptation during evolution, and failed to thrive in all of the 90 alternative environments. In addition, they experienced a dramatic decrease in mutation rate. Our work demonstrates that the mutation rate changes the global balance between deleterious and beneficial mutational effects on fitness. In contrast to most theoretical models, our experiments suggest that this tipping point already occurs at the modest mutation rates that are found in the wild. PMID:29702649

  16. PMS2 mutations in childhood cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vos, Michel; Hayward, Bruce E; Charlton, Ruth; Taylor, Graham R; Glaser, Adam W; Picton, Susan; Cole, Trevor R; Maher, Eamonn R; McKeown, Carole M E; Mann, Jill R; Yates, John R; Baralle, Diana; Rankin, Julia; Bonthron, David T; Sheridan, Eamonn

    2006-03-01

    Until recently, the PMS2 DNA mismatch repair gene has only rarely been implicated as a cancer susceptibility locus. New studies have shown, however, that earlier analyses of this gene have had technical limitations and also that the genetic behavior of mutant PMS2 alleles is unusual, in that, unlike MLH1 or MSH2 mutations, PMS2 mutations show low heterozygote penetrance. As a result, a dominantly inherited cancer predisposition has not been a feature reported in families with PMS2 mutations. Such families have instead been ascertained through childhood-onset cancers in homozygotes or through apparently sporadic colorectal cancer in heterozygotes. We present further information on the phenotype associated with homozygous PMS2 deficiency in 13 patients from six families of Pakistani origin living in the United Kingdom. This syndrome is characterized by café-au-lait skin pigmentation and a characteristic tumor spectrum, including leukemias, lymphomas, cerebral malignancies (such as supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumors, astrocytomas, and glioblastomas), and colorectal neoplasia with an onset in early adult life. We present evidence for a founder effect in five families, all of which carried the same R802-->X mutation (i.e., arginine-802 to stop) in PMS2. This cancer syndrome can be mistaken for neurofibromatosis type 1, with important management implications including the risk of the disorder occurring in siblings and the likelihood of tumor development in affected individuals.

  17. Mutation screening of the HGD gene identifies a novel alkaptonuria mutation with significant founder effect and high prevalence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakthivel, Srinivasan; Zatkova, Andrea; Nemethova, Martina; Surovy, Milan; Kadasi, Ludevit; Saravanan, Madurai P

    2014-05-01

    Alkaptonuria (AKU) is an autosomal recessive disorder; caused by the mutations in the homogentisate 1, 2-dioxygenase (HGD) gene located on Chromosome 3q13.33. AKU is a rare disorder with an incidence of 1: 250,000 to 1: 1,000,000, but Slovakia and the Dominican Republic have a relatively higher incidence of 1: 19,000. Our study focused on studying the frequency of AKU and identification of HGD gene mutations in nomads. HGD gene sequencing was used to identify the mutations in alkaptonurics. For the past four years, from subjects suspected to be clinically affected, we found 16 positive cases among a randomly selected cohort of 41 Indian nomads (Narikuravar) settled in the specific area of Tamil Nadu, India. HGD gene mutation analysis showed that 11 of these patients carry the same homozygous splicing mutation c.87 + 1G > A; in five cases, this mutation was found to be heterozygous, while the second AKU-causing mutation was not identified in these patients. This result indicates that the founder effect and high degree of consanguineous marriages have contributed to AKU among nomads. Eleven positive samples were homozygous for a novel mutation c.87 + 1G > A, that abolishes an intron 2 donor splice site and most likely causes skipping of exon 2. The prevalence of AKU observed earlier seems to be highly increased in people of nomadic origin. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/University College London.

  18. LRIG2 mutations cause urofacial syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Helen M; Roberts, Neil A; Burgu, Berk; Daly, Sarah B; Urquhart, Jill E; Bhaskar, Sanjeev; Dickerson, Jonathan E; Mermerkaya, Murat; Silay, Mesrur Selcuk; Lewis, Malcolm A; Olondriz, M Beatriz Orive; Gener, Blanca; Beetz, Christian; Varga, Rita E; Gülpınar, Omer; Süer, Evren; Soygür, Tarkan; Ozçakar, Zeynep B; Yalçınkaya, Fatoş; Kavaz, Aslı; Bulum, Burcu; Gücük, Adnan; Yue, Wyatt W; Erdogan, Firat; Berry, Andrew; Hanley, Neil A; McKenzie, Edward A; Hilton, Emma N; Woolf, Adrian S; Newman, William G

    2013-02-07

    Urofacial syndrome (UFS) (or Ochoa syndrome) is an autosomal-recessive disease characterized by congenital urinary bladder dysfunction, associated with a significant risk of kidney failure, and an abnormal facial expression upon smiling, laughing, and crying. We report that a subset of UFS-affected individuals have biallelic mutations in LRIG2, encoding leucine-rich repeats and immunoglobulin-like domains 2, a protein implicated in neural cell signaling and tumorigenesis. Importantly, we have demonstrated that rare variants in LRIG2 might be relevant to nonsyndromic bladder disease. We have previously shown that UFS is also caused by mutations in HPSE2, encoding heparanase-2. LRIG2 and heparanase-2 were immunodetected in nerve fascicles growing between muscle bundles within the human fetal bladder, directly implicating both molecules in neural development in the lower urinary tract. Copyright © 2013 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Genetic Mutations in Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many different types of genetic mutations are found in cancer cells. This infographic outlines certain types of alterations that are present in cancer, such as missense, nonsense, frameshift, and chromosome rearrangements.

  20. Mutation breeding in peas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaranowski, J [Institute of Genetics and Plant Breeding, Academy of Agriculture, Poznan (Poland); Micke, A [Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Isotope and Radiation Applications of Atomic Energy for Food and Agricultural Development, International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)

    1985-02-01

    The pea as an ancient crop plant still today has wide uses and is an import source of food protein. It is also an important object for genetic studies and as such has been widely used in mutation induction experiments. However, in comparison with cereals this ancient crop plant (like several other grain legumes) has gained relatively little from advances in breeding. The review focuses on the prospects of genetic improvement of pea by induced mutations, discusses principles and gives methodological information. (author)

  1. Mutation breeding in peas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaranowski, J.; Micke, A.

    1985-01-01

    The pea as an ancient crop plant still today has wide uses and is an import source of food protein. It is also an important object for genetic studies and as such has been widely used in mutation induction experiments. However, in comparison with cereals this ancient crop plant (like several other grain legumes) has gained relatively little from advances in breeding. The review focuses on the prospects of genetic improvement of pea by induced mutations, discusses principles and gives methodological information. (author)

  2. Rare-earth elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Gosen, Bradley S.; Verplanck, Philip L.; Seal, Robert R.; Long, Keith R.; Gambogi, Joseph; Schulz, Klaus J.; DeYoung,, John H.; Seal, Robert R.; Bradley, Dwight C.

    2017-12-19

    The rare-earth elements (REEs) are 15 elements that range in atomic number from 57 (lanthanum) to 71 (lutetium); they are commonly referred to as the “lanthanides.” Yttrium (atomic number 39) is also commonly regarded as an REE because it shares chemical and physical similarities and has affinities with the lanthanides. Although REEs are not rare in terms of average crustal abundance, the concentrated deposits of REEs are limited in number.Because of their unusual physical and chemical properties, the REEs have diverse defense, energy, industrial, and military technology applications. The glass industry is the leading consumer of REE raw materials, which are used for glass polishing and as additives that provide color and special optical properties to the glass. Lanthanum-based catalysts are used in petroleum refining, and cerium-based catalysts are used in automotive catalytic converters. The use of REEs in magnets is a rapidly increasing application. Neodymium-iron-boron magnets, which are the strongest known type of magnets, are used when space and weight are restrictions. Nickel-metal hydride batteries use anodes made of a lanthanum-based alloys.China, which has led the world production of REEs for decades, accounted for more than 90 percent of global production and supply, on average, during the past decade. Citing a need to retain its limited REE resources to meet domestic requirements as well as concerns about the environmental effects of mining, China began placing restrictions on the supply of REEs in 2010 through the imposition of quotas, licenses, and taxes. As a result, the global rare-earth industry has increased its stockpiling of REEs; explored for deposits outside of China; and promoted new efforts to conserve, recycle, and substitute for REEs. New mine production began at Mount Weld in Western Australia, and numerous other exploration and development projects noted in this chapter are ongoing throughout the world.The REE-bearing minerals are

  3. Targeted molecular profiling of rare genetic alterations in colorectal cancer using next-generation sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauhri, Mayank; Bhatnagar, Akanksha; Gupta, Satish; Shokeen, Yogender; Minhas, Sachin; Aggarwal, Shyam

    2016-10-01

    Mutation frequencies of common genetic alterations in colorectal cancer have been in the spotlight for many years. This study highlights few rare somatic mutations, which possess the attributes of a potential CRC biomarker yet are often neglected. Next-generation sequencing was performed over 112 tumor samples to detect genetic alterations in 31 rare genes in colorectal cancer. Mutations were detected in 26/31 (83.9 %) uncommon genes, which together contributed toward 149 gene mutations in 67/112 (59.8 %) colorectal cancer patients. The most frequent mutations include KDR (19.6 %), PTEN (17 %), FBXW7 (10.7 %), SMAD4 (10.7 %), VHL (8 %), KIT (8 %), MET (7.1 %), ATM (6.3 %), CTNNB1 (4.5 %) and CDKN2A (4.5 %). RB1, ERBB4 and ERBB2 mutations were persistent in 3.6 % patients. GNAS, FGFR2 and FGFR3 mutations were persistent in 1.8 % patients. Ten genes (EGFR, NOTCH1, SMARCB1, ABL1, STK11, SMO, RET, GNAQ, CSF1R and FLT3) were found mutated in 0.9 % patients. Lastly, no mutations were observed in AKT, HRAS, MAP2K1, PDGFR and JAK2. Significant associations were observed between VHL with tumor site, ERBB4 and SMARCB1 with tumor invasion, CTNNB1 with lack of lymph node involvement and CTNNB1, FGFR2 and FGFR3 with TNM stage. Significantly coinciding mutation pairs include PTEN and SMAD4, PTEN and KDR, EGFR and RET, EGFR and RB1, FBXW7 and CTNNB1, KDR and FGFR2, FLT3 and CTNNB1, RET and RB1, ATM and SMAD4, ATM and CDKN2A, ERBB4 and SMARCB1. This study elucidates few potential colorectal cancer biomarkers, specifically KDR, PTEN, FBXW7 and SMAD4, which are found mutated in more than 10 % patients.

  4. Atypical Vitamin B-6 Deficiency A Rare Cause of Unexplained Neonatal and Infantile Epilepsies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baumgart, A.; von Spiczak, S.; Verhoeven-Duif, N. M.

    2014-01-01

    ALDH7A1 and PNPO deficiencies are rare inborn errors of vitamin B-6 metabolism causing perinatal seizure disorders. The phenotypic variability, however, is broad. To assess the frequency of these deficiencies in unexplained infantile epilepsy, we screened 113 patients for mutations in both genes...... pyridoxine treatment. "Hidden" vitamin B-6 deficiencies might be rare but treatable causes of unexplained epilepsy extending beyond the classical phenotypes........ We identified 1 patient with an epilepsy phenotype resembling Dravet syndrome and likely pathogenic mutations in ALDH7A1. Presenting features were highly atypical of pyridoxine-dependent epilepsy, including febrile seizures, response to anticonvulsive drugs, and periods of seizure freedom without...

  5. China's rare-earth industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, Pui-Kwan

    2011-01-01

    Introduction China's dominant position as the producer of over 95 percent of the world output of rare-earth minerals and rapid increases in the consumption of rare earths owing to the emergence of new clean-energy and defense-related technologies, combined with China's decisions to restrict exports of rare earths, have resulted in heightened concerns about the future availability of rare earths. As a result, industrial countries such as Japan, the United States, and countries of the European Union face tighter supplies and higher prices for rare earths. This paper briefly reviews China's rare-earth production, consumption, and reserves and the important policies and regulations regarding the production and trade of rare earths, including recently announced export quotas. The 15 lanthanide elements-lanthanum, cerium, praseodymium, neodymium, promethium, samarium, europium, gadolinium, terbium, dysprosium, holmium, erbium, thulium, ytterbium, and lutetium (atomic numbers 57-71)-were originally known as the rare earths from their occurrence in oxides mixtures. Recently, some researchers have included two other elements-scandium and yttrium-in their discussion of rare earths. Yttrium (atomic number 39), which lies above lanthanum in transition group III of the periodic table and has a similar 3+ ion with a noble gas core, has both atomic and ionic radii similar in size to those of terbium and dysprosium and is generally found in nature with lanthanides. Scandium (atomic number 21) has a smaller ionic radius than yttrium and the lanthanides, and its chemical behavior is intermediate between that of aluminum and the lanthanides. It is found in nature with the lanthanides and yttrium. Rare earths are used widely in high-technology and clean-energy products because they impart special properties of magnetism, luminescence, and strength. Rare earths are also used in weapon systems to obtain the same properties.

  6. Rare earths 1998 market update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tourre, J.M.

    1998-01-01

    The rare earth industry has always been a world of rapid change with the emergence of new markets, new ores and new players, as well as the disappearance of old applications. Rare earth based products are used in a great diversity of applications such as hard disk drives, CD drives, batteries, capacitors, pigments, ceramics, polishing powders, fuel cells, flints, catalyst converter, fluid cracking catalysts, etc. South East Asia holds the largest share of the known reserve of rare earth ores and is one of the major markets for rare earth compounds; in the last ten years, China has become the largest producer of rare earth intermediates as well as an important exporter of separated rare earth elements. Today, China has approximately 150 factories producing rare earth compounds, most of which are experiencing financial difficulties due to the lack of knowledge of true market needs, lack of control of their distribution channels and production over-capacity. Recently the Chinese rare earth producers have recognized the situation and efforts are underway to rationalize rare earth production. Japan has dominated many of the major application markets, and is by far the largest market for metal and alloy products. This will remain the case for the next five years; however, new countries are emerging as significant users of rare earth products such as Korea, Taiwan and Malaysia. During the last ten years rare earth producers adjusted to several radical changes that affected the raw materials, the application mix and the price structure. New producers have emerged, especially from China; some have subsequently stopped their activities while others have focused their efforts in a specific market segment

  7. Identification of seven novel mutations including the first two genomic rearrangements in SLC26A3 mutated in congenital chloride diarrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höglund, P; Sormaala, M; Haila, S; Socha, J; Rajaram, U; Scheurlen, W; Sinaasappel, M; de Jonge, H; Holmberg, C; Yoshikawa, H; Kere, J

    2001-09-01

    Congenital chloride diarrhea (CLD) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by defective intestinal electrolyte absorption, resulting in voluminous osmotic diarrhea with high chloride content. A variety of mutations in the solute carrier family 26, member 3 gene (SLC26A3, previously known as CLD or DRA) are responsible for the disease. Since the identification of the SLC26A3 gene and the determination of its genomic structure, altogether three founder and 17 private mutations have been characterized within miscellaneous ethnic groups. We screened for mutations in seven unrelated families with CLD. The diagnoses were confirmed by fecal chloride measurements. The combined PCR-SSCP and sequencing analyses revealed altogether seven novel mutations including two missense mutations (S206P, D468V), two splicing defects (IVS12-1G>C, IVS13-2delA), one nonsense mutation (Q436X), one insertion/deletion mutation (2104-2105delGGins29-bp), and an intragenic deletion of SLC26A3 exons 7 and 8. Two previously identified mutations were also found. This is the first report of rearrangement mutations in SLC26A3. Molecular features predisposing SLC26A3 for the two rearrangements may include repetitive elements and palindromic-like sequences. The increasingly wide diversity of SLC26A3 mutations suggests that mutations in the SLC26A3 gene may not be rare events. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. Spatial Fleming-Viot models with selection and mutation

    CERN Document Server

    Dawson, Donald A

    2014-01-01

    This book constructs a rigorous framework for analysing selected phenomena in evolutionary theory of populations arising due to the combined effects of migration, selection and mutation in a spatial stochastic population model, namely the evolution towards fitter and fitter types through punctuated equilibria. The discussion is based on a number of new methods, in particular multiple scale analysis, nonlinear Markov processes and their entrance laws, atomic measure-valued evolutions and new forms of duality (for state-dependent mutation and multitype selection) which are used to prove ergodic theorems in this context and are applicable for many other questions and renormalization analysis for a variety of phenomena (stasis, punctuated equilibrium, failure of naive branching approximations, biodiversity) which occur due to the combination of rare mutation, mutation, resampling, migration and selection and make it necessary to mathematically bridge the gap (in the limit) between time and space scales.

  9. Zebra: searching for rare diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dragusin, Radu; Petcu, Paula; Lioma, Christina

    2012-01-01

    disease diagnostic hypotheses in the domain of medical IR. In this work, we build upon an existing vertical medical search engine, Zebra, that is focused on rare disease diagnosis. In previous work, Zebra has been evaluated using real-life medical cases of rare and difficult diseases, and has been found...

  10. The molecular anatomy of spontaneous germline mutations in human testes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Qin

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The frequency of the most common sporadic Apert syndrome mutation (C755G in the human fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 gene (FGFR2 is 100-1,000 times higher than expected from average nucleotide substitution rates based on evolutionary studies and the incidence of human genetic diseases. To determine if this increased frequency was due to the nucleotide site having the properties of a mutation hot spot, or some other explanation, we developed a new experimental approach. We examined the spatial distribution of the frequency of the C755G mutation in the germline by dividing four testes from two normal individuals each into several hundred pieces, and, using a highly sensitive PCR assay, we measured the mutation frequency of each piece. We discovered that each testis was characterized by rare foci with mutation frequencies 10(3 to >10(4 times higher than the rest of the testis regions. Using a model based on what is known about human germline development forced us to reject (p < 10(-6 the idea that the C755G mutation arises more frequently because this nucleotide simply has a higher than average mutation rate (hot spot model. This is true regardless of whether mutation is dependent or independent of cell division. An alternate model was examined where positive selection acts on adult self-renewing Ap spermatogonial cells (SrAp carrying this mutation such that, instead of only replacing themselves, they occasionally produce two SrAp cells. This model could not be rejected given our observed data. Unlike the disease site, similar analysis of C-to-G mutations at a control nucleotide site in one testis pair failed to find any foci with high mutation frequencies. The rejection of the hot spot model and lack of rejection of a selection model for the C755G mutation, along with other data, provides strong support for the proposal that positive selection in the testis can act to increase the frequency of premeiotic germ cells carrying a mutation

  11. Mutator activity in Schizophyllum commune

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shneyour, Y.; Koltin, Y. (Tel Aviv Univ. (Israel). Dept. of Microbiology)

    1983-01-01

    A strain with an elevated level of spontaneous mutations and an especially high rate of reversion at a specific locus (pab/sup -/) was identified. The mutator trait is recessive. UV sensitivity and the absence of a UV-specific endonucleolytic activity were associated with the enhancement of the mutation rate in mutator strains. The endonuclease associated with the regulation of the mutation rate also acted on single-stranded DNA. The molecular weight of this enzyme is about 38,000 daltons.

  12. MED12 exon 2 mutations in phyllodes tumors of the breast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagasawa, Satoi; Maeda, Ichiro; Fukuda, Takayo; Wu, Wenwen; Hayami, Ryosuke; Kojima, Yasuyuki; Tsugawa, Ko-ichiro; Ohta, Tomohiko

    2015-01-01

    Exon 2 of MED12, a subunit of the transcriptional mediator complex, has been frequently mutated in uterine leiomyomas and breast fibroadenomas; however, it has been rarely mutated in other tumors. Although the mutations were also found in uterine leiomyosarcomas, the frequency was significantly lower than in uterine leiomyomas. Here, we examined the MED12 mutation in phyllodes tumors, another biphasic tumor with epithelial and stromal components related to breast fibroadenomas. Mutations in MED12 exon 2 were analyzed in nine fibroadenomas and eleven phyllodes tumors via Sanger sequencing. A panel of cancer- and sarcoma-related genes was also analyzed using Ion Torrent next-generation sequencing. Six mutations in fibroadenomas, including those previously reported (6/9, 67%), and five mutations in phyllodes tumors (5/11, 45%) were observed. Three mutations in the phyllodes tumors were missense mutations at Gly44, which is common in uterine leiomyomas and breast fibroadenomas. In addition, two deletion mutations (in-frame c.133-144del12 and loss of splice acceptor c.100-68-137del106) were observed in the phyllodes tumors. No other recurrent mutation was observed with next-generation sequencing. Frequent mutations in MED12 exon 2 in the phyllodes tumors suggest that it may share genetic etiology with uterine leiomyoma, a subgroup of uterine leiomyosarcomas and breast fibroadenoma

  13. Oncogenic mutations in melanomas and benign melanocytic nevi of the female genital tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Diane; Kim, Julie; Warrick, Andrea; Nelson, Dylan; Pukay, Marina; Beadling, Carol; Heinrich, Michael; Selim, Maria Angelica; Corless, Christopher L; Nelson, Kelly

    2014-08-01

    The genetic heterogeneity of melanomas and melanocytic nevi of the female genital tract is poorly understood. We aim to characterize the frequency of mutations of the following genes: BRAF, NRAS, KIT, GNA11, and GNAQ in female genital tract melanomas. We also characterize the frequency of BRAF mutations in female genital tract melanomas compared with melanocytic nevi. Mutational screening was performed on the following female genital tract melanocytic neoplasms: 25 melanomas, 7 benign melanocytic nevi, and 4 atypical melanocytic nevi. Of the 25 female genital tract melanoma specimens queried, KIT mutations were detected in 4 (16.0%), NRAS mutations in 4 (16.0%), and BRAF mutations in 2 (8.0%) samples. Two of the tumors with KIT mutations harbored double mutations in the same exon. No GNAQ or GNA11 mutations were identified among 11 melanomas screened. BRAF V600E mutations were detected in 7 of 7 benign melanocytic genital nevi (100%) and 3 of 4 atypical genital nevi (75%). Our study is limited by the small sample size of this rare subset of melanomas. KIT, NRAS, and BRAF mutations are found in a subset of female genital tract melanomas. Screening for oncogenic mutations is important for developing and applying clinical therapies for melanomas of the female genital tract. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Xeroderma Pigmentosum: Low Prevalence of Germline XPA Mutations in a Brazilian XP Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Miranda Santiago

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by DNA repair defects that cause photophobia, sunlight-induced cancers, and neurodegeneration. Prevalence of germline mutations in the nucleotide excision repair gene XPA vary significantly in different populations. No Brazilian patients have been reported to carry a germline mutation in this gene. In this study, the germline mutational status of XPA was determined in Brazilian patients exhibiting major clinical features of XP syndrome. The study was conducted on 27 unrelated patients from select Brazilian families. A biallelic inactivating transition mutation c.619C>T (p.Arg207Ter was identified in only one patient with a history of neurological impairment and mild skin abnormalities. These findings suggest that XP syndrome is rarely associated with inherited disease-causing XPA mutations in the Brazilian population. Additionally, this report demonstrates the effectiveness of genotype-phenotype correlation as a valuable tool to guide direct genetic screening.

  15. Xeroderma pigmentosum: low prevalence of germline XPA mutations in a Brazilian XP population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago, Karina Miranda; França de Nóbrega, Amanda; Rocha, Rafael Malagoli; Rogatto, Silvia Regina; Achatz, Maria Isabel

    2015-04-22

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by DNA repair defects that cause photophobia, sunlight-induced cancers, and neurodegeneration. Prevalence of germline mutations in the nucleotide excision repair gene XPA vary significantly in different populations. No Brazilian patients have been reported to carry a germline mutation in this gene. In this study, the germline mutational status of XPA was determined in Brazilian patients exhibiting major clinical features of XP syndrome. The study was conducted on 27 unrelated patients from select Brazilian families. A biallelic inactivating transition mutation c.619C>T (p.Arg207Ter) was identified in only one patient with a history of neurological impairment and mild skin abnormalities. These findings suggest that XP syndrome is rarely associated with inherited disease-causing XPA mutations in the Brazilian population. Additionally, this report demonstrates the effectiveness of genotype-phenotype correlation as a valuable tool to guide direct genetic screening.

  16. Rare co-occurrence of osteogenesis imperfecta type I and autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoefele, Julia; Mayer, Karin; Marschall, Christoph; Alberer, Martin; Klein, Hanns-Georg; Kirschstein, Martin

    2016-11-01

    There are several clinical reports about the co-occurrence of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) and connective tissue disorders. A simultaneous occurrence of osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) type I and ADPKD has not been observed so far. This report presents the first patient with OI type I and ADPKD. Mutational analysis of PKD1 and COL1A1 in the index patient revealed a heterozygous mutation in each of the two genes. Mutational analysis of the parents indicated the mother as a carrier of the PKD1 mutation and the father as a carrier of the COL1A1 mutation. The simultaneous occurrence of both disorders has an estimated frequency of 3.5:100 000 000. In singular cases, ADPKD can occur in combination with other rare disorders, e.g. connective tissue disorders.

  17. Preleukemic and second-hit mutational events in an acute myeloid leukemia patient with a novel germline RUNX1 mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Isaac Ks; Lee, Joanne; Ng, Christopher; Kosmo, Bustamin; Chiu, Lily; Seah, Elaine; Mok, Michelle Meng Huang; Tan, Karen; Osato, Motomi; Chng, Wee-Joo; Yan, Benedict; Tan, Lip Kun

    2018-01-01

    Germline mutations in the RUNX1 transcription factor give rise to a rare autosomal dominant genetic condition classified under the entity: Familial Platelet Disorders with predisposition to Acute Myeloid Leukaemia (FPD/AML). While several studies have identified a myriad of germline RUNX1 mutations implicated in this disorder, second-hit mutational events are necessary for patients with hereditary thrombocytopenia to develop full-blown AML. The molecular picture behind this process remains unclear. We describe a patient of Malay descent with an unreported 7-bp germline RUNX1 frameshift deletion, who developed second-hit mutations that could have brought about the leukaemic transformation from a pre-leukaemic state. These mutations were charted through the course of the treatment and stem cell transplant, showing a clear correlation between her clinical presentation and the mutations present. The patient was a 27-year-old Malay woman who presented with AML on the background of hereditary thrombocytopenia affecting her father and 3 brothers. Initial molecular testing revealed the same novel RUNX1 mutation in all 5 individuals. The patient received standard induction, consolidation chemotherapy, and a haploidentical stem cell transplant from her mother with normal RUNX1 profile. Comprehensive genomic analyses were performed at diagnosis, post-chemotherapy and post-transplant. A total of 8 mutations ( RUNX1 , GATA2 , DNMT3A , BCORL1 , BCOR , 2 PHF6 and CDKN2A ) were identified in the pre-induction sample, of which 5 remained ( RUNX1 , DNMT3A , BCORL1 , BCOR and 1 out of 2 PHF6 ) in the post-treatment sample and none were present post-transplant. In brief, the 3 mutations which were lost along with the leukemic cells at complete morphological remission were most likely acquired leukemic driver mutations that were responsible for the AML transformation from a pre-leukemic germline RUNX1 -mutated state. On the contrary, the 5 mutations that persisted post

  18. Mutational spectrum of Xeroderma pigmentosum group A in Egyptian patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amr, Khalda; Messaoud, Olfa; El Darouti, Mohamad; Abdelhak, Sonia; El-Kamah, Ghada

    2014-01-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is a rare autosomal recessive hereditary disease characterized by hyperphotosensitivity, DNA repair defects and a predisposition to skin cancers. The most frequently occurring type worldwide is the XP group A (XPA). There is a close relationship between the clinical features that ranged from severe to mild form and the mutational site in XPA gene. The aim of this study is to carry out the mutational analysis in Egyptian patients with XP-A. This study was carried out on four unrelated Egyptian XP-A families. Clinical features were examined and direct sequencing of the coding region of XPA gene was performed in patients and their parents. Direct sequencing of the whole coding region of the XPA gene revealed the identification of two homozygous nonsense mutations: (c.553C >T; p.(Gln185)) and (c.331G>T; p.(Glu111)), which create premature, stop codon and a homodeletion (c.374delC: p.Thr125Ilefs 15) that leads to frameshift and premature translation termination. We report the identification of one novel XPA gene mutation and two known mutations in four unrelated Egyptian families with Xermoderma pigmentosum. All explored patients presented severe neurological abnormalities and have mutations located in the DNA binding domain. This report gives insight on the mutation spectrum of XP-A in Egypt. This would provide a valuable tool for early diagnosis of this severe disease. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Wolfram syndrome: new mutations, different phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Concetta Aloi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Wolfram Syndrome (WS is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by Diabetes Insipidus, Diabetes Mellitus, Optic Atrophy, and Deafness identified by the acronym "DIDMOAD". The WS gene, WFS1, encodes a transmembrane protein called Wolframin, which recent evidence suggests may serve as a novel endoplasmic reticulum calcium channel in pancreatic β-cells and neurons. WS is a rare disease, with an estimated prevalence of 1/550.000 children, with a carrier frequency of 1/354. The aim of our study was to determine the genotype of WS patients in order to establish a genotype/phenotype correlation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We clinically evaluated 9 young patients from 9 unrelated families (6 males, 3 females. Basic criteria for WS clinical diagnosis were coexistence of insulin-treated diabetes mellitus and optic atrophy occurring before 15 years of age. Genetic analysis for WFS1 was performed by direct sequencing. Molecular sequencing revealed 5 heterozygous compound and 3 homozygous mutations. All of them were located in exon 8, except one in exon 4. In one proband only an heterozygous mutation (A684V was found. Two new variants c.2663 C>A and c.1381 A>C were detected. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our study increases the spectrum of WFS1 mutations with two novel variants. The male patient carrying the compound mutation [c.1060_1062delTTC]+[c.2663 C>A] showed the most severe phenotype: diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy (visual acuity 5/10, deafness with deep auditory bilaterally 8000 Hz, diabetes insipidus associated to reduced volume of posterior pituitary and pons. He died in bed at the age of 13 years. The other patient carrying the compound mutation [c.409_424dup16]+[c.1381 A>C] showed a less severe phenotype (DM, OA.

  20. Norrie-Warburg syndrome: two novel mutations in patients with classical clinical phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal, A; Veske, A; Jojart, G; Grammatico, B; Huber, B; Gu, S; del Porto, G; Senyi, K

    1996-01-01

    Norrie-Warburg syndrome (NWS) is a rare X-linked disorder characterized by blindness, which is invariable, deafness and mental disturbances, which are present occasionally. We describe here two novel mutations, a missense mutation (C126S) and a 1-base pair insertion (insT466/T467), together with a recurrent mutation (M1V), found in patients presenting with the classical clinical phenotype of NWS. All three mutations are likely to result in prominent structural changes of the norrin protein.

  1. Plasma Screening for Progranulin Mutations in Patients with Progressive Supranuclear Palsy and Corticobasal Syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galimberti, Daniela; Bertram, Kelly; Formica, Alessandra; Fenoglio, Chiara; Cioffi, Sara M G; Arighi, Andrea; Scarpini, Elio; Colosimo, Carlo

    2016-05-04

    Progranulin gene (GRN) mutations are characterized by heterogeneous presentations. Corticobasal syndrome (CBS) is often associated with GRN mutations, whereas association with progressive supranuclear palsy syndrome (PSPS) is rare. Plasma progranulin levels were evaluated in 34 patients, including 19 with PSPS, 12 with CBS, and 3 with mixed signs, with the purpose to screen for the presence of causal mutations, associated with low levels. We found undetectable levels in a patient with CBS. Sequencing confirmed the presence of the Thr272fs deletion. Progranulin mutation screening is suggested in cases of CBS, even in the absence of positive family history for dementia and/or movement disorders.

  2. Rare transformation to double hit lymphoma in Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okolo, Onyemaechi N; Johnson, Ariel C; Yun, Seongseok; Arnold, Stacy J; Anwer, Faiz

    2017-08-01

    Waldenström macroglobulinemia (WM) is a lymphoproliferative lymphoma that is characterized by monoclonal immunoglobulin M (IgM) protein and bone marrow infiltration. Its incidence is rare and rarer still is its ability to transform to a B-cell lymphoma, particularly the aggressive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, which bodes a poor prognosis. When transformation includes mutations of MYC, BCL-2 and/or BCL-6, it is known as a 'double hit' or 'triple hit' lymphoma respectively. This paper presents a rare case of WM with mutations positive for MYC and BCL2, making it a case of double hit B-cell lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma with plasmatic differentiation without morphological transformation to aggressive histology like DLBCL. The paper also broadens to include discussions on current topics in the classification, diagnosis, possible causes of transformation, and treatment of WM, including transformation to double hit lymphoma. The significance of this case lies in that the presence of double hit lymphoma-like genetic mutations in WM have not been previously described in the literature and potentially such changes are harbinger of extra-nodal presentation, aggressive growth, and possibly poor prognosis, if data from other double-hit lymphoma are extrapolated.

  3. Genetic/metabolic effect of iron metabolism and rare anemias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara Camaschella

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Advances in iron metabolism have allowed a novel classification of iron disorders and to identify previously unknown diseases. These disorders include genetic iron overload (hemochromatosis and inherited iron-related anemias, in some cases accompanied by iron overload. Rare inherited anemias may affect the hepcidin pathway, iron absorption, transport, utilization and recycling. Among the genetic iron-related anemias the most common form is likely the iron-refractory iron-deficiency anemia (IRIDA, due to mutations of the hepcidin inhibitor TMPRSS6 encoding the serine protease matriptase-2. IRIDA is characterized by hepcidin up-regulation, decrease iron absorption and macrophage recycling and by microcytic- hypochromic anemia, unresponsive to oral iron. High serum hepcidin levels may suggest the diagnosis, which requires demonstrating the causal TMPRSS6 mutations by gene sequencing. Other rare microcytic hypochromic anemias associated with defects of iron transport-uptake are the rare hypotransferrinemia, and DMT1 and STEAP3 mutations. The degree of anemia is variable and accompanied by secondary iron overload even in the absence of blood transfusions. This is due to the iron-deficient or expanded erythropoiesis that inhibits hepcidin transcription, increases iron absorption, through the erythroid regulator, as in untransfused beta-thalassemia. Sideroblastic anemias are due to decreased mitochondrial iron utilization for heme or sulfur cluster synthesis. Their diagnosis requires demonstrating ringed sideroblasts by Perl’s staining of the bone marrow smears. The commonest X-linked form is due to deltaamino- levulinic-synthase-2-acid (ALAS2 mutations. The recessive, more severe form, affects SLC25A38, which encodes a potential mitochondrial importer of glycine, an amino acid essential for ALA synthesis and thus results in heme deficiency. Two disorders affect iron/sulfur cluster biogenesis: deficiency of the ATP-binding cassette B7 (ABCB7 causes X

  4. Shah-Waardenburg syndrome and PCWH associated with SOX10 mutations : A case report and review of the literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verheij, Johanna B G M; Sival, Deborah A; van der Hoeven, Johannes H; Vos, Yvonne J; Meiners, Linda C; Brouwer, Oebele F; van Essen, Anthonie J

    Shah-Waardenburg syndrome is a rare congenital disorder with variable clinical expression, characterised by aganglionosis of the rectosigmoid (Hirschsprung disease), and abnormal melanocyte migration, resulting in pigmentary abnormalities and sensorineural deafness (Waardenburg syndrome). Mutations

  5. Functionally significant, rare transcription factor variants in tetralogy of Fallot.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Töpf

    Full Text Available Rare variants in certain transcription factors involved in cardiac development cause Mendelian forms of congenital heart disease. The purpose of this study was to systematically assess the frequency of rare transcription factor variants in sporadic patients with the cardiac outflow tract malformation tetralogy of Fallot (TOF.We sequenced the coding, 5'UTR, and 3'UTR regions of twelve transcription factor genes implicated in cardiac outflow tract development (NKX2.5, GATA4, ISL1, TBX20, MEF2C, BOP/SMYD1, HAND2, FOXC1, FOXC2, FOXH, FOXA2 and TBX1 in 93 non-syndromic, non-Mendelian TOF cases. We also analysed Illumina Human 660W-Quad SNP Array data for copy number variants in these genes; none were detected. Four of the rare variants detected have previously been shown to affect transactivation in in vitro reporter assays: FOXC1 p.P297S, FOXC2 p.Q444R, FOXH1 p.S113T and TBX1 p.P43_G61del PPPPRYDPCAAAAPGAPGP. Two further rare variants, HAND2 p.A25_A26insAA and FOXC1 p.G378_G380delGGG, A488_491delAAAA, affected transactivation in in vitro reporter assays. Each of these six functionally significant variants was present in a single patient in the heterozygous state; each of the four for which parental samples were available were maternally inherited. Thus in the 93 TOF cases we identified six functionally significant mutations in the secondary heart field transcriptional network.This study indicates that rare genetic variants in the secondary heart field transcriptional network with functional effects on protein function occur in 3-13% of patients with TOF. This is the first report of a functionally significant HAND2 mutation in a patient with congenital heart disease.

  6. Poster "Maladies rares & sciences sociales"

    OpenAIRE

    Duysens, Fanny

    2018-01-01

    Le poster "Maladies rares & sciences sociales" visait à présenter la recherche doctorale de l'auteure au grand public dans le cadre de la Journée des Maladies Rares du Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Liège dont le thème était "la recherche sur les maladies rares". Réalisé spécialement pour l'occasion, le poster explicitait de manière synthétique le sujet de recherche, la méthodologie, certains résultats, ainsi que les apports possibles des échanges entre chercheurs en sciences et sociales...

  7. Rare metal and rare earth pegmatites of Western India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maithani, P.B.; Nagar, R.K.

    1999-01-01

    Rajasthan Mica Belt in western India is one of the three major mica-producing Proterozoic pegmatite belts of India, the others being in Bihar and Andhra Pradesh. The pegmatites of these mica belts, in general, are associated with the rare metal (RM) and rare earth element (REE)-bearing minerals like columbite-tantalite, beryl, lepidolite and other multiple oxides. RM-REE pegmatites of Gujarat are devoid of commercially workable mica. These pegmatites are geologically characterised in this paper, based on their association with granite plutons geochemistry, and RM and REE potential. In addition to RM and RE-bearing pegmatites, granites of the Umedpur area, Gujarat also show anomalous concentration (0.97 wt%) of rare metals (6431 ppm Nb, 1266 ppm Ta, 454 ppm Sn, 173 ppm W), (1098 ppm Ce 1.36% Y 2 O 3 ) rare earths, and uranium (0.40% eU 3 O 8 ). Eluvial concentrations in the soil and panned concentrate (0.04-0.28 wt%) analysed up to 7.4%Nb 2 O 5 , 836 ppm Ta, and 1.31% Y. Discrete columbite-tantalite and betafite have been identified in these concentrates in addition to other minerals like zircon, rutile, sphene and xenotime. This area with discrete RM R EE mineral phases could be significant as a non-pegmatite source for rare metal and rare earths. (author)

  8. SDHAF2 mutations in familial and sporadic paraganglioma and phaeochromocytoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayley, Jean-Pierre; Kunst, Henricus P M; Cascon, Alberto; Sampietro, Maria Lourdes; Gaal, José; Korpershoek, Esther; Hinojar-Gutierrez, Adolfo; Timmers, Henri J L M; Hoefsloot, Lies H; Hermsen, Mario A; Suárez, Carlos; Hussain, A Karim; Vriends, Annette H J T; Hes, Frederik J; Jansen, Jeroen C; Tops, Carli M; Corssmit, Eleonora P; de Knijff, Peter; Lenders, Jacques W M; Cremers, Cor W R J; Devilee, Peter; Dinjens, Winand N M; de Krijger, Ronald R; Robledo, Mercedes

    2010-04-01

    Paragangliomas and phaeochromocytomas are neuroendocrine tumours associated frequently with germline mutations of SDHD, SDHC, and SDHB. Previous studies have shown the imprinted SDHAF2 gene to be mutated in a large Dutch kindred with paragangliomas. We aimed to identify SDHAF2 mutation carriers, assess the clinical genetic significance of SDHAF2, and describe the associated clinical phenotype. We undertook a multicentre study in Spain and The Netherlands in 443 apparently sporadic patients with paragangliomas and phaeochromocytomas who did not have mutations in SDHD, SDHC, or SDHB. We analysed DNA of 315 patients for germline mutations of SDHAF2; a subset (n=200) was investigated for gross gene deletions. DNA from a group of 128 tumours was studied for somatic mutations. We also examined a Spanish family with head and neck paragangliomas with a young age of onset for the presence of SDHAF2 mutations, undertook haplotype analysis in this kindred, and assessed their clinical phenotype. We did not identify any germline or somatic mutations of SDHAF2, and no gross gene deletions were noted in the subset of apparently sporadic patients analysed. Investigation of the Spanish family identified a pathogenic germline DNA mutation of SDHAF2, 232G-->A (Gly78Arg), identical to the Dutch kindred. SDHAF2 mutations do not have an important role in phaeochromocytoma and are rare in head and neck paraganglioma. Identification of a second family with the Gly78Arg mutation suggests that this is a crucial residue for the function of SDHAF2. We conclude that SDHAF2 mutation analysis is justified in very young patients with isolated head and neck paraganglioma without mutations in SDHD, SDHC, or SDHB, and in individuals with familial antecedents who are negative for mutations in all other risk genes. Dutch Cancer Society, European Union 6th Framework Program, Fondo Investigaciones Sanitarias, Fundación Mutua Madrileña, and Red Temática de Investigación Cooperativa en Cáncer. 2010

  9. Rare vertebral metastasis in a case of Hereditary Paraganglioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    da Silva Manuel Eduardo

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Paragangliomas are rare tumours with a prevalence of 1/10000 to 1/30000. Tumors arising from the paraganglia are characteristically of low malignant potential. Vertebral metastases are exceedingly rare, and only isolated case reports have described them. The authors present the clinical course of a 47 years-old female patient with a familial paraganglioma [PGL] with vertebral metastastization, who underwent an intralesional tumor excision and corpectomy. Genetic screening demonstrated a new germinal frameshift mutation of the SDHB exon 6 [c.587-591DelC]. After surgery there was normalization of the analytical parameters and imagiologic screening. One year later she presented a new image in the the pedicle of T11 on the contralateral side of the surgical incision. She performed 2 treatments with MIBG and 1 cicle of radiotherapy that made the new lesion regress. Currently the patient does not present any clinical or analytical evidence of new metastasis. This case outlines the clinical course of a patient with a PGL syndrome for whom a rare vertebral metastasis was diagnosed. It highlights the importance of identifying patients with germline SDHB mutations, as these patients are at a high risk of developing malignant disease.

  10. Are There Mutator Polymerases?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Garcia-Diaz

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA polymerases are involved in different cellular events, including genome replication and DNA repair. In the last few years, a large number of novel DNA polymerases have been discovered, and the biochemical analysis of their properties has revealed a long list of intriguing features. Some of these polymerases have a very low fidelity and have been suggested to play mutator roles in different processes, like translesion synthesis or somatic hypermutation. The current view of these processes is reviewed, and the current understanding of DNA polymerases and their role as mutator enzymes is discussed.

  11. MUTATIONS IN CALMODULIN GENES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    The present invention relates to an isolated polynucleotide encoding at least a part of calmodulin and an isolated polypeptide comprising at least a part of a calmodulin protein, wherein the polynucleotide and the polypeptide comprise at least one mutation associated with a cardiac disorder. The ...... the binding of calmodulin to ryanodine receptor 2 and use of such compound in a treatment of an individual having a cardiac disorder. The invention further provides a kit that can be used to detect specific mutations in calmodulin encoding genes....

  12. Organizational Learning in Rare Events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kristina Vaarst; Tyler, Beverly; Beukel, Karin

    When organizations encounter rare events they often find it challenging to extract learning from the experience. We analyze opportunities for organizational learning in one such rare event, namely Intellectual Property (IP) litigation, i.e., when organizations take disputes regarding their intell......When organizations encounter rare events they often find it challenging to extract learning from the experience. We analyze opportunities for organizational learning in one such rare event, namely Intellectual Property (IP) litigation, i.e., when organizations take disputes regarding...... the organization little discretion to utilize any learning from past litigation success. Thus, learning appears be to most beneficial in infringement cases. Based on statistical analysis of 10,211 litigation court cases in China, we find support for our hypotheses. Our findings suggest that organizations can learn...

  13. Economic aspects of rare diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borski, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    Economic problems related to the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of rare diseases are presented paying particular attention to the costs of financing treatment, including the issue of its refund, which is a fundamental and difficult to solve economic problem of the health care system. Rare diseases, despite the low frequency of occurrence, together cover a large group of diseases being a serious medical, social and economic problem. The adoption of Polish National Plan for Rare Diseases resulting from the recommendations of the Council of the European Union, the extension of institutional activities related to the area of public health and social initiatives seeking innovative solutions to create a model of social support for patients and their families, with very high complexity of the issues regarding rare diseases, results in the need for a coherent, comprehensive, system operations and adoption of comprehensive solutions.

  14. Primary microcephaly caused by novel compound heterozygous mutations in ASPM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Nobuhiko; Kohmoto, Tomohiro; Naruto, Takuya; Masuda, Kiyoshi; Imoto, Issei

    2018-01-01

    Autosomal recessive primary microcephaly (microcephaly primary hereditary, MCPH) is a genetically heterogeneous rare developmental disorder that is characterized by prenatal onset of abnormal brain growth, which leads to intellectual disability of variable severity. We report a 5-year-old male who presented with a severe form of primary microcephaly. Targeted panel sequencing revealed compound heterozygous truncating mutations of the abnormal spindle-like microcephaly-associated ( ASPM ) gene, which confirmed the MCPH5 diagnosis. A novel NM_018136.4: c.9742_9745del (p.Lys3248Serfs*13) deletion mutation was identified.

  15. Rare earth metals, rare earth hydrides, and rare earth oxides as thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasgnier, M.

    1980-01-01

    The review deals with pure rare earth materials such as rare earth metals, rare earth hydrides, and rare earth oxides as thin films. Several preparation techniques, control methods, and nature of possible contaminations of thin films are described. These films can now be produced in an extremely well-known state concerning chemical composition, structure and texture. Structural, electric, magnetic, and optical properties of thin films are studied and discussed in comparison with the bulk state. The greatest contamination of metallic rare earth thin films is caused by reaction with hydrogen or with water vapour. The compound with an f.c.c. structure is the dihydride LnH 2 (Ln = lanthanides). The oxygen contamination takes place after annealing at higher temperatures. Then there appears a compound with a b.c.c. structure which is the C-type sesquioxide C-Ln 2 O 3 . At room atmosphere dihydride light rare earth thin films are converted to hydroxide Ln(OH) 3 . For heavy rare earth thin films the oxinitride LnNsub(x)Osub(y) is observed. The LnO-type compound was never seen. The present review tries to set the stage anew for the investigations to be undertaken in the future especially through the new generations of electron microscopes

  16. Mutation spectrum of RB1 mutations in retinoblastoma cases from Singapore with implications for genetic management and counselling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swati Tomar

    Full Text Available Retinoblastoma (RB is a rare childhood malignant disorder caused by the biallelic inactivation of RB1 gene. Early diagnosis and identification of carriers of heritable RB1 mutations can improve disease outcome and management. In this study, mutational analysis was conducted on fifty-nine matched tumor and peripheral blood samples from 18 bilateral and 41 unilateral unrelated RB cases by a combinatorial approach of Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification (MLPA assay, deletion screening, direct sequencing, copy number gene dosage analysis and methylation assays. Screening of both blood and tumor samples yielded a mutation detection rate of 94.9% (56/59 while only 42.4% (25/59 of mutations were detected if blood samples alone were analyzed. Biallelic mutations were observed in 43/59 (72.9% of tumors screened. There were 3 cases (5.1% in which no mutations could be detected and germline mutations were detected in 19.5% (8/41 of unilateral cases. A total of 61 point mutations were identified, of which 10 were novel. There was a high incidence of previously reported recurrent mutations, occurring at 38.98% (23/59 of all cases. Of interest were three cases of mosaic RB1 mutations detected in the blood from patients with unilateral retinoblastoma. Additionally, two germline mutations previously reported to be associated with low-penetrance phenotypes: missense-c.1981C>T and splice variant-c.607+1G>T, were observed in a bilateral and a unilateral proband, respectively. These findings have implications for genetic counselling and risk prediction for the affected families. This is the first published report on the spectrum of mutations in RB patients from Singapore and shows that further improved mutation screening strategies are required in order to provide a definitive molecular diagnosis for every case of RB. Our findings also underscore the importance of genetic testing in supporting individualized disease management plans for patients and

  17. Rare earth industries: Downstream business

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    The value chain of the rare earths business involves mining, extraction, processing, refining and the manufacture of an extensive range of downstream products which find wide applications in such industries including aerospace, consumer electronics, medical, military, automotive, renewable wind and solar energy and telecommunications. In fact the entire gamut of the high-tech industries depends on a sustainable supply of rare earths elements. The explosive demand in mobile phones is an excellent illustration of the massive potential that the rare earths business offers. In a matter of less than 20 years, the number of cell phones worldwide has reached a staggering 5 billion. Soon, going by the report of their growth in sales, the world demand for cell phones may even exceed the global population. Admittedly, the rare earths business does pose certain risks. Top among the risks are the health and safety risks. The mining, extraction and refining of rare earths produce residues and wastes which carry health and safety risks. The residues from the extraction and refining are radioactive, while their effluent waste streams do pose pollution risks to the receiving rivers and waterways. But, as clearly elaborated in a recent report by IAEA experts, there are technologies and systems available to efficiently mitigate such risks. The risks are Rare Earth manageable. However, it is crucial that the risk and waste management procedures are strictly followed and adhered to. This is where effective monitoring and surveillance throughout the life of all such rare earths facilities is crucial. Fortunately, Malaysia's regulatory standards on rare earths follow international standards. In some areas, Malaysia's regulatory regime is even more stringent than the international guidelines. (author)

  18. Rare earth metal alloy magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, I.R.; Evans, J.M.; Nyholm, P.S.

    1979-01-01

    This invention relates to rare earth metal alloy magnets and to methods for their production. The technique is based on the fact that rare earth metal alloys (for e.g. cerium or yttrium) which have been crumbled to form a powder by hydride formation and decomposition can be used for the fabrication of magnets without the disadvantages inherent in alloy particle size reduction by mechanical milling. (UK)

  19. Rare beauty and charm decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blake, T.

    2016-01-01

    Rare beauty and charm decays can provide powerful probes of physics beyond the Standard Model. These proceedings summarise the latest measurements of rare beauty and charm decays from the LHCb experiment at the end of Run 1 of the LHC. Whilst the majority of the measurements are consistent with SM predictions, small differences are seen in the rate and angular distribution of b → sℓ"+ℓ"− decay processes.

  20. Characterization of an aquaporin-2 water channel gene mutation causing partial nephrogenic diabetes insipidus in a Mexican family: evidence of increased frequency of the mutation in the town of origin.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boccalandro, C.; Mattia, F.P. de; Guo, D.C.; Xue, L.; Orlander, P.; King, T.M.; Gupta, P.; Deen, P.M.T.; Lavis, V.R.; Milewicz, D.M.

    2004-01-01

    A Mexican family with partial congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI) that resulted from a mutation in the aquaporin-2 water channel (AQP2) was characterized, and the source of this rare mutation was traced to the family's town of origin in Mexico. Affected individuals with profound polyuria

  1. Distribution of the PKU mutation 165T in Spain and Latin America

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez, B.; deLucca, M.; Desviat, L.R. [UAM-CSIC, Madrid (Spain)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The 165T mutation is the second most common mutation in the Spanish PKU patients. In order to provide some additional data about the origin of this mutation, we have analyzed 452 PKU alleles from all regions of Spain. The mutation was found in 9% of alleles. We have found a South-North gradient with a highest frequency in the South and the lowest in the North. In the North-West regions (which has the greatest Celtic influence in Spain) the frequency was 7%. The chromosomes bearing this mutation contained the 8 repeat VNTR allele, as has been described in other populations. In view of these results, we suggest an origin other than Celtic for this mutation. On the other hand, we have analyzed 406 PKU alleles from five Latin American countries, 158 from Brazil, 170 from Chile, 56 from Argentina, 14 from Mexico and 8 from Venezuela. Unlike the results of the IVS10 mutation, 165T is present in Latin America with a low frequency. The results show that this mutation is rare in Chile (1%) and is absent in the chromosomes analyzed from Argentina, Mexico and Venezuela. Only in Brazil has this mutation been found in 5% of the alleles. Up to now, Spain is the only Mediterranean country where this mutation is present with a relatively high frequency. This mutation has been detected in the Portuguese patients and would also have migrated to Brazil.

  2. Mutations in HPSE2 Cause Urofacial Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Sarah B.; Urquhart, Jill E.; Hilton, Emma; McKenzie, Edward A.; Kammerer, Richard A.; Lewis, Malcolm; Kerr, Bronwyn; Stuart, Helen; Donnai, Dian; Long, David A.; Burgu, Berk; Aydogdu, Ozgu; Derbent, Murat; Garcia-Minaur, Sixto; Reardon, Willie; Gener, Blanca; Shalev, Stavit; Smith, Rupert; Woolf, Adrian S.; Black, Graeme C.; Newman, William G.

    2010-01-01

    Urinary voiding dysfunction in childhood, manifesting as incontinence, dysuria, and urinary frequency, is a common condition. Urofacial syndrome (UFS) is a rare autosomal recessive disease characterized by facial grimacing when attempting to smile and failure of the urinary bladder to void completely despite a lack of anatomical bladder outflow obstruction or overt neurological damage. UFS individuals often have reflux of infected urine from the bladder to the upper renal tract, with a risk of kidney damage and renal failure. Whole-genome SNP mapping in one affected individual defined an autozygous region of 16 Mb on chromosome 10q23-q24, within which a 10 kb deletion encompassing exons 8 and 9 of HPSE2 was identified. Homozygous exonic deletions, nonsense mutations, and frameshift mutations in five further unrelated families confirmed HPSE2 as the causative gene for UFS. Mutations were not identified in four additional UFS patients, indicating genetic heterogeneity. We show that HPSE2 is expressed in the fetal and adult central nervous system, where it might be implicated in controlling facial expression and urinary voiding, and also in bladder smooth muscle, consistent with a role in renal tract morphology and function. Our findings have broader implications for understanding the genetic basis of lower renal tract malformations and voiding dysfunction. PMID:20560210

  3. Mutations in HPSE2 cause urofacial syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Sarah B; Urquhart, Jill E; Hilton, Emma; McKenzie, Edward A; Kammerer, Richard A; Lewis, Malcolm; Kerr, Bronwyn; Stuart, Helen; Donnai, Dian; Long, David A; Burgu, Berk; Aydogdu, Ozgu; Derbent, Murat; Garcia-Minaur, Sixto; Reardon, Willie; Gener, Blanca; Shalev, Stavit; Smith, Rupert; Woolf, Adrian S; Black, Graeme C; Newman, William G

    2010-06-11

    Urinary voiding dysfunction in childhood, manifesting as incontinence, dysuria, and urinary frequency, is a common condition. Urofacial syndrome (UFS) is a rare autosomal recessive disease characterized by facial grimacing when attempting to smile and failure of the urinary bladder to void completely despite a lack of anatomical bladder outflow obstruction or overt neurological damage. UFS individuals often have reflux of infected urine from the bladder to the upper renal tract, with a risk of kidney damage and renal failure. Whole-genome SNP mapping in one affected individual defined an autozygous region of 16 Mb on chromosome 10q23-q24, within which a 10 kb deletion encompassing exons 8 and 9 of HPSE2 was identified. Homozygous exonic deletions, nonsense mutations, and frameshift mutations in five further unrelated families confirmed HPSE2 as the causative gene for UFS. Mutations were not identified in four additional UFS patients, indicating genetic heterogeneity. We show that HPSE2 is expressed in the fetal and adult central nervous system, where it might be implicated in controlling facial expression and urinary voiding, and also in bladder smooth muscle, consistent with a role in renal tract morphology and function. Our findings have broader implications for understanding the genetic basis of lower renal tract malformations and voiding dysfunction.

  4. Investigation of FANCA mutations in Greek patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selenti, Nikoletta; Sofocleous, Christalena; Kattamis, Antonis; Kolialexi, Aggeliki; Kitsiou, Sophia; Fryssira, Elena; Polychronopoulou, Sophia; Kanavakis, Emmanouel; Mavrou, Ariadni

    2013-08-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare genetic disease characterized by considerable heterogeneity. Fifteen subtypes are currently recognised and deletions of the Fanconi anemia complementation group A (FANCA) gene account for more than 65% of FA cases. We report on the results from a cohort of 166 patients referred to the Department of Medical Genetics of Athens University for genetic investigation after the clinical suspicion of FA. For clastogen-induced chromosome damage, cultures were set up with the addition of mitomycin C (MMC) and diepoxybutane (DEB), respectively. Following a positive cytogenetic result, molecular analysis was performed to allow identification of causative mutations in the FANCA gene. A total of 13/166 patients were diagnosed with FA and 8/13 belonged to the FA-A subtype. A novel point mutation was identified in exon 26 of FANCA gene. In our study 62% of FA patients were classified in the FA-A subtype and a point mutation in exon 26 was noted for the first time.

  5. Mutation, somatic mutation and diseases of man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burnet, F.M.

    1976-01-01

    The relevance of the intrinsic mutagenesis for the evolution process, genetic diseases and the process of aging is exemplified. The fundamental reaction is the function of the DNA and the DNA-enzymes like the DNA-polymerases in replication, repair, and transcription. These defects are responsible for the mutation frequency and the genetic drift in the evolution process. They cause genetic diseases like Xeroderma pigmentosum which is described here in detail. The accumulation of structural and functional mistakes leads to diseases of old age, for example to autoimmune diseases and immune suppression. There is a proportionality between the duration of life and the frequency of mistakes in the enzymatic repair system. No possibility of prophylaxis or therapy is seen. Methods for prognosis could be developed. (AJ) [de

  6. Mutations and chromosomal aberrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kihlman, B.A.

    1977-01-01

    The genetic changes of mutations and chromosomal aberrations are discussed. The consequences of both depend not only on the type of genetic change produced but also on the type of cell that is affected and on the development stage of the organism. (C.F.)

  7. Mutations in GABRB3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Rikke S; Wuttke, Thomas V; Helbig, Ingo

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the role of mutations in GABRB3 encoding the β3 subunit of the GABAA receptor in individual patients with epilepsy with regard to causality, the spectrum of genetic variants, their pathophysiology, and associated phenotypes. METHODS: We performed massive parallel sequencing ...

  8. Kin Selection - Mutation Balance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyken, J. David Van; Linksvayer, Timothy Arnold; Wade, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    selection-mutation balance, which provides an evolutionary null hypothesis for the statics and dynamics of cheating. When social interactions have linear fitness effects and Hamilton´s rule is satisfied, selection is never strong enough to eliminate recurrent cheater mutants from a population, but cheater...

  9. Molecular genetics and phenotypic characteristics of MODY caused by hepatocyte nuclear factor 4alpha mutations in a large European collection.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pearson, E.R.; Pruhova, S.; Tack, C.J.J.; Johansen, A.; Castleden, H.A.; Lumb, P.J.; Wierzbicki, A.S.; Clark, P.M.; Lebl, J.; Pedersen, O.; Ellard, S.; Hansen, T.; Hattersley, A.T.

    2005-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Heterozygous mutations in the gene of the transcription factor hepatocyte nuclear factor 4alpha (HNF-4alpha) are considered a rare cause of MODY with only 14 mutations reported to date. The description of the phenotype is limited to single families. We investigated the genetics and

  10. Investigating the role of rare heterozygous TREM2 variants in Alzheimer's disease and frontotemporal dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cuyvers, Elise; Bettens, Karolien; Philtjens, Stephanie; Van Langenhove, Tim; Gijselinck, Ilse; van der Zee, Julie; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan; Vandenbulcke, Mathieu; Van Dongen, Jasper; Geerts, Nathalie; Maes, Githa; Mattheijssens, Maria; Peeters, Karin; Cras, Patrick; Vandenberghe, Rik; De Deyn, Peter P.; Van Broeckhoven, Christine; Cruts, Marc; Sleegers, Kristel

    Homozygous mutations in exon 2 of TREM2, a gene involved in Nasu-Hakola disease, can cause frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Moreover, a rare TREM2 exon 2 variant (p.R47H) was reported to increase the risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD) with an odds ratio as strong as that for APOE epsilon 4. We

  11. Exome sequencing identifies rare LDLR and APOA5 alleles conferring risk for myocardial infarction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Do, Ron; Stitziel, Nathan O.; Won, Hong-Hee; Jørgensen, Anders Berg; Duga, Stefano; Angelica Merlini, Pier; Kiezun, Adam; Farrall, Martin; Goel, Anuj; Zuk, Or; Guella, Illaria; Asselta, Rosanna; Lange, Leslie A.; Peloso, Gina M.; Auer, Paul L.; Girelli, Domenico; Martinelli, Nicola; Farlow, Deborah N.; DePristo, Mark A.; Roberts, Robert; Stewart, Alexander F. R.; Saleheen, Danish; Danesh, John; Epstein, Stephen E.; Sivapalaratnam, Suthesh; Hovingh, G. Kees; Kastelein, John J.; Samani, Nilesh J.; Schunkert, Heribert; Erdmann, Jeanette; Shah, Svati H.; Kraus, William E.; Davies, Robert; Nikpay, Majid; Johansen, Christopher T.; Wang, Jian; Hegele, Robert A.; Hechter, Eliana; Marz, Winfried; Kleber, Marcus E.; Huang, Jie; Johnson, Andrew D.; Li, Mingyao; Burke, Greg L.; Gross, Myron; Liu, Yongmei; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Heiss, Gerardo; Lange, Ethan M.; Folsom, Aaron R.; Taylor, Herman A.; Olivieri, Oliviero; Hamsten, Anders; Clarke, Robert; Reilly, Dermot F.; Yin, Wu; Rivas, Manuel A.; Donnelly, Peter; Rossouw, Jacques E.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Herrington, David M.; Wilson, James G.; Rich, Stephen S.; Bamshad, Michael J.; Tracy, Russell P.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Rader, Daniel J.; Reilly, Muredach P.; Spertus, John A.; Cresci, Sharon; Hartiala, Jaana; Tang, W. H. Wilson; Hazen, Stanley L.; Allayee, Hooman; Reiner, Alex P.; Carlson, Christopher S.; Kooperberg, Charles; Jackson, Rebecca D.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Lander, Eric S.; Schwartz, Stephen M.; Siscovick, David S.; McPherson, Ruth; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne; Abecasis, Goncalo R.; Watkins, Hugh; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Ardissino, Diego; Sunyaev, Shamil R.; O'Donnell, Christopher J.; Altshuler, David; Gabriel, Stacey; Kathiresan, Sekar; Gabriel, Stacey B.; Altshuler, David M.; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Daly, Mark J.; de Bakker, Paul I. W.; Fennell, Tim; Garimella, Kiran; Hu, Youna; Jordan, Daniel M.; Jun, Goo; Kang, Hyun Min; Lettre, Guillaume; Li, Bingshan; Newton-Cheh, Christopher H.; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Peloso, Gina; Pulit, Sara; Reich, David; Schwartz, Steve; Scott, Laura; Stoletzki, Nina; Voight, Benjamin F.; Willer, Cristen J.; Akylbekova, Ermeg; Atwood, Larry D.; Ballantyne, Christie M.; Barbalic, Maja; Barr, R. Graham; Benjamin, Emelia J.; Bis, Joshua; Bowden, Donald W.; Brody, Jennifer; Budoff, Matthew; Burke, Greg; Buxbaum, Sarah; Carr, Jeff; Chen, Donna T.; Chen, Ida Y.; Chen, Wei-Min; Concannon, Pat; Crosby, Jacy; D'Agostino, Ralph; DeStefano, Anita L.; Dreisbach, Albert; Dupuis, Josée; Durda, J. Peter; Ellis, Jaclyn; Fornage, Myriam; Fox, Caroline S.; Fox, Ervin; Funari, Vincent; Ganesh, Santhi K.; Gardin, Julius; Goff, David; Gordon, Ora; Grody, Wayne; Guo, Xiuqing; Hall, Ira M.; Heard-Costa, Nancy L.; Heckbert, Susan R.; Heintz, Nicholas; Hickson, DeMarc; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Jacobs, David R.; Jenny, Nancy S.; Johnson, Craig W.; Kawut, Steven; Kronmal, Richard; Kurz, Raluca; Larson, Martin G.; Lawson, Mark; Lewis, Cora E.; Levy, Daniel; Li, Dalin; Lin, Honghuang; Liu, Chunyu; Liu, Jiankang; Liu, Kiang; Liu, Xiaoming; Longstreth, William T.; Loria, Cay; Lumley, Thomas; Lunetta, Kathryn; Mackey, Aaron J.; Mackey, Rachel; Manichaikul, Ani; Maxwell, Taylor; McKnight, Barbara; Meigs, James B.; Morrison, Alanna C.; Musani, Solomon K.; Mychaleckyj, Josyf C.; Nettleton, Jennifer A.; North, Kari; O'Leary, Daniel; Ong, Frank S.; Palmas, Walter; Pankow, James S.; Pankratz, Nathan D.; Paul, Shom; Perez, Marco; Person, Sharina D.; Polak, Joseph; Post, Wendy S.; Quinlan, Aaron R.; Raffel, Leslie J.; Ramachandran, Vasan S.; Reiner, Alexander P.; Rice, Kenneth; Rotter, Jerome I.; Sanders, Jill P.; Schreiner, Pamela; Seshadri, Sudha; Shea, Steve; Sidney, Stephen; Silverstein, Kevin; Smith, Nicholas L.; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Srinivasan, Asoke; Taylor, Kent; Thomas, Fridtjof; Tsai, Michael Y.; Volcik, Kelly A.; Wassel, Chrstina L.; Watson, Karol; Wei, Gina; White, Wendy; Wiggins, Kerri L.; Wilk, Jemma B.; Williams, O. Dale; Wilson, Gregory; Wolf, Phillip; Zakai, Neil A.; Hardy, John; Meschia, James F.; Nalls, Michael; Singleton, Andrew; Worrall, Brad; Barnes, Kathleen C.; Abdulhamid, Ibrahim; Accurso, Frank; Anbar, Ran; Beaty, Terri; Bigham, Abigail; Black, Phillip; Bleecker, Eugene; Buckingham, Kati; Cairns, Anne Marie; Caplan, Daniel; Chatfield, Barbara; Chidekel, Aaron; Cho, Michael; Christiani, David C.; Crapo, James D.; Crouch, Julia; Daley, Denise; Dang, Anthony; Dang, Hong; de Paula, Alicia; DeCelie-Germana, Joan; Dozor, Allen; Drumm, Mitch; Dyson, Maynard; Emerson, Julia; Emond, Mary J.; Ferkol, Thomas; Fink, Robert; Foster, Cassandra; Froh, Deborah; Gao, Li; Gershan, William; Gibson, Ronald L.; Godwin, Elizabeth; Gondor, Magdalen; Gutierrez, Hector; Hansel, Nadia N.; Hassoun, Paul M.; Hiatt, Peter; Hokanson, John E.; Howenstine, Michelle; Hummer, Laura K.; Jamal, Seema M.; Kanga, Jamshed; Kim, Yoonhee; Knowles, Michael R.; Konstan, Michael; Lahiri, Thomas; Laird, Nan; Lange, Christoph; Lin, Lin; Lin, Xihong; Louie, Tin L.; Lynch, David; Make, Barry; Martin, Thomas R.; Mathai, Steve C.; Mathias, Rasika A.; McNamara, John; McNamara, Sharon; Meyers, Deborah; Millard, Susan; Mogayzel, Peter; Moss, Richard; Murray, Tanda; Nielson, Dennis; Noyes, Blakeslee; O'Neal, Wanda; Orenstein, David; O'Sullivan, Brian; Pace, Rhonda; Pare, Peter; Parker, H. Worth; Passero, Mary Ann; Perkett, Elizabeth; Prestridge, Adrienne; Rafaels, Nicholas M.; Ramsey, Bonnie; Regan, Elizabeth; Ren, Clement; Retsch-Bogart, George; Rock, Michael; Rosen, Antony; Rosenfeld, Margaret; Ruczinski, Ingo; Sanford, Andrew; Schaeffer, David; Sell, Cindy; Sheehan, Daniel; Silverman, Edwin K.; Sin, Don; Spencer, Terry; Stonebraker, Jackie; Tabor, Holly K.; Varlotta, Laurie; Vergara, Candelaria I.; Weiss, Robert; Wigley, Fred; Wise, Robert A.; Wright, Fred A.; Wurfel, Mark M.; Zanni, Robert; Zou, Fei; Rieder, Mark J.; Green, Phil; Shendure, Jay; Akey, Joshua M.; Bustamante, Carlos D.; Crosslin, David R.; Eichler, Evan E.; Fox, P. Keolu; Fu, Wenqing; Gordon, Adam; Gravel, Simon; Jarvik, Gail P.; Johnsen, Jill M.; Kan, Mengyuan; Kenny, Eimear E.; Kidd, Jeffrey M.; Lara-Garduno, Fremiet; Leal, Suzanne M.; Liu, Dajiang J.; McGee, Sean; O'Connor, Timothy D.; Paeper, Bryan; Robertson, Peggy D.; Smith, Joshua D.; Staples, Jeffrey C.; Tennessen, Jacob A.; Turner, Emily H.; Wang, Gao; Yi, Qian; Jackson, Rebecca; Peters, Ulrike; Anderson, Garnet; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Beresford, Shirley; Bizon, Chris; Black, Henry; Brunner, Robert; Brzyski, Robert; Burwen, Dale; Caan, Bette; Carty, Cara L.; Chlebowski, Rowan; Cummings, Steven; Curb, J. David; Eaton, Charles B.; Ford, Leslie; Franceschini, Nora; Fullerton, Stephanie M.; Gass, Margery; Geller, Nancy; Howard, Barbara V.; Hsu, Li; Hutter, Carolyn M.; Ioannidis, John; Jiao, Shuo; Johnson, Karen C.; Kuller, Lewis; LaCroix, Andrea; Lakshminarayan, Kamakshi; Lane, Dorothy; Lasser, Norman; LeBlanc, Erin; Li, Kuo-Ping; Limacher, Marian; Lin, Dan-Yu; Logsdon, Benjamin A.; Hutchinson, Fred; Ludlam, Shari; Manson, JoAnn E.; Margolis, Karen; Martin, Lisa; McGowan, Joan; Monda, Keri L.; Kotchen, Jane Morley; Nathan, Lauren; Ockene, Judith; O'Sullivan, Mary Jo; Phillips, Lawrence S.; Prentice, Ross L.; Robbins, John; Robinson, Jennifer G.; Sangi-Haghpeykar, Haleh; Sarto, Gloria E.; Shumaker, Sally; Simon, Michael S.; Stefanick, Marcia L.; Stein, Evan; Tang, Hua; Taylor, Kira C.; Thomson, Cynthia A.; Thornton, Timothy A.; van Horn, Linda; Vitolins, Mara; Wactawski-Wende, Jean; Wallace, Robert; Wassertheil-Smoller, Sylvia; Zeng, Donglin; Applebaum-Bowden, Deborah; Feolo, Michael; Gan, Weiniu; Paltoo, Dina N.; Sholinsky, Phyliss; Sturcke, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI), a leading cause of death around the world, displays a complex pattern of inheritance(1,2). When MI occurs early in life, genetic inheritance is a major component to risk(1). Previously, rare mutations in low-density lipoprotein (LDL) genes have been shown to contribute to

  12. Functional annotation of rare gene aberration drivers of pancreatic cancer | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    As we enter the era of precision medicine, characterization of cancer genomes will directly influence therapeutic decisions in the clinic. Here we describe a platform enabling functionalization of rare gene mutations through their high-throughput construction, molecular barcoding and delivery to cancer models for in vivo tumour driver screens. We apply these technologies to identify oncogenic drivers of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC).

  13. Permanent neonatal diabetes mellitus - a case report of a rare cause ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disease characterised by chronically high glucose levels. Genetic factors have been implicated in the aetiology following mutations in a single gene. An extremely rare form of diabetes mellitus is monogenic diabetes, a subset of which is permanent neonatal diabetes, and is usually ...

  14. Mutations in galactosemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reichardt, J.K.V. [Univ. of Southern California School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1995-10-01

    This Letter raises four issues concerning two papers on galactosemia published in the March 1995 of the Journal. First, table 2 in the paper by Elsas et al. incorrectly attributes seven galactose-l-phosphate uridyl transferase (GALT) mutations (S135L, L195P, K285N, N314D, R333W, R333G, and K334R). The table also fails to mention that others have reported the same two findings attributed to {open_quotes}Leslie et al.; Elsas et al. and in press{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}Leslie et al.; Elsas et al.{close_quotes} The first finding on the prevalence of the Q188R galactosemia mutation in the G/G Caucasian population has also been described by Ng et al., and the second finding on the correlation of the N314D GALT mutation with the Duarte variant was reported by Lin et al. Second, Elsas et al. suggest that the E203K and N314D mutations may {open_quotes}produce intra-allelic complementation when in cis{close_quotes}. This speculation is supported by the activity data of individual III-2 but is inconsistent with the activities of three other individuals I-1, II-1, and III-1 of the same pedigree. The GALT activity measured in these three individuals suggests a dominant negative effect of E203K in E203K-N314D chromosomes, since they all have less than normal activity. Thus, the preponderance of the data in this paper is at odds with the authors speculation. It is worth recalling that Lin et al. also identified four N314D GALT mutations on 95 galactosemic chromosomes examined. A similar situation also appears to be the case in proband III-1 (with genotype E203K-N314D/IVSC) in the Elsas et al. paper. 9 refs.

  15. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 45

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-07-01

    This issue of the Mutation Breeding newsletter contains 39 articles dealing with radiation induced mutations and chemical mutagenesis techniques in plant breeding programs with the aims of improving crop productivity and disease resistance as well as exploring genetic variabilities

  16. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 33

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1989-01-01

    This issue of the newsletter reports a number of research news and research abstracts on application of radiation induced mutation techniques to increase mutagenesis and mutation frequency in plant breeding projects.

  17. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 33

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    This issue of the newsletter reports a number of research news and research abstracts on application of radiation induced mutation techniques to increase mutagenesis and mutation frequency in plant breeding projects

  18. RARE DISEASES AND GENETIC DISCRIMINATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariela Yaneva – Deliverska

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Rare diseases are characterised by their low prevalence (less than 1/2,000 and their heterogeneity. They affect both children and adults anywhere in the world. From the medical perspective, rare diseases are characterised by the large number and broad diversity of disorders and symptoms that vary not only from disease to disease, but also within the same disease.Main characteristics of rare diseases include:· Rare diseases are often chronic, progressive, degenerative, and often life-threatening· Rare diseases are disabling: the quality of life of patients is often compromised by the lack or loss of autonomy· High level of pain and suffering for the patient and his/ her family · No existing effective cure· There are between 6000 and 8000 rare diseases· 75% of rare diseases affect children· 30% of rare disease patients die before the age of 5· 80% of rare diseases have identified genetic origins. Other rare diseases are the result of infections (bacterial or viral, allergies and environmental causes, or are degenerative and proliferative.Beyond the diversity of the diseases, rare disease patients and their families are confronted with the same wide range of difficulties arising directly from the rarity of these pathologies. The period between the emergence of the first symptoms and the appropriate diagnosis involves unacceptable and highly risky delays, as well as wrong diagnosis leading to inaccurate treatments. Living with a rare disease has implications in all areas of life, whether school, choice of future work, leisure time with friends, or affective life. It may lead to stigmatisation, isolation, exclusion from social community, discrimination for insurance subscription (health insurance, travel insurance, mortgage, and often reduced professional opportunities.Innovative treatments are often unevenly available in the EU because of delays in price determination and/or reimbursement decision, lack of experience of the treating

  19. No evidence of somatic aryl hydrocarbon receptor interacting protein mutations in sporadic endocrine neoplasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raitila, A; Georgitsi, M; Karhu, A

    2007-01-01

    . Here, we have analyzed 32 pituitary adenomas and 79 other tumors of the endocrine system for somatic AIP mutations by direct sequencing. No somatic mutations were identified. However, two out of nine patients with prolactin-producing adenoma were shown to harbor a Finnish founder mutation (Q14X...... as non-secreting pituitary adenomas have been reported, most mutation-positive patients have had growth hormone-producing adenomas diagnosed at relatively young age. Pituitary adenomas are also component tumors of some familial endocrine neoplasia syndromes such as multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1...... (MEN1) and Carney complex (CNC). Genes underlying MEN1 and CNC are rarely mutated in sporadic pituitary adenomas, but more often in other lesions contributing to these two syndromes. Thus far, the occurrence of somatic AIP mutations has not been studied in endocrine tumors other than pituitary adenomas...

  20. Gene-specific function prediction for non-synonymous mutations in monogenic diabetes genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quan Li

    Full Text Available The rapid progress of genomic technologies has been providing new opportunities to address the need of maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY molecular diagnosis. However, whether a new mutation causes MODY can be questionable. A number of in silico methods have been developed to predict functional effects of rare human mutations. The purpose of this study is to compare the performance of different bioinformatics methods in the functional prediction of nonsynonymous mutations in each MODY gene, and provides reference matrices to assist the molecular diagnosis of MODY. Our study showed that the prediction scores by different methods of the diabetes mutations were highly correlated, but were more complimentary than replacement to each other. The available in silico methods for the prediction of diabetes mutations had varied performances across different genes. Applying gene-specific thresholds defined by this study may be able to increase the performance of in silico prediction of disease-causing mutations.

  1. Norrie disease: first mutation report and prenatal diagnosis in an Indian family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Manju; Sharma, Shipra; Shastri, Shivaram; Arora, Sadhna; Shukla, Rashmi; Gupta, Neerja; Deka, Deepika; Kabra, Madhulika

    2012-11-01

    Norrie Disease (ND) is a rare X-linked recessive disorder characterised by congenital blindness due to severe retinal dysgenesis. Hearing loss and intellectual disability is present in 30-50 % cases. ND is caused by mutations in the NDP gene, located at Xp11.3. The authors describe mutation analysis of a proband with ND and subsequently prenatal diagnosis. Sequence analysis of the NDP gene revealed a hemizygous missense mutation arginine to serine in codon 41 (p.Arg41Ser) in the affected child. Mother was carrier for the mutation. In a subsequent di-chorionic di-amniotic pregnancy, the authors performed prenatal diagnosis by mutation analysis on chorionic villi sample at 11 wk of gestation. The fetuses were unaffected. This is a first mutation report and prenatal diagnosis of a familial case of Norrie disease from India. The importance of genetic testing of Norrie disease for confirmation, carrier testing, prenatal diagnosis and genetic counseling is emphasized.

  2. PALB2, CHEK2 and ATM rare variants and cancer risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Southey, Melissa C; Goldgar, David E; Winqvist, Robert

    2016-01-01

    2 mutations. We aimed to estimate the relative risks associated with specific rare variants in PALB2, CHEK2 and ATM via a multicentre case-control study. METHODS: We genotyped 10 rare mutations using the custom iCOGS array: PALB2 c.1592delT, c.2816T>G and c.3113G>A, CHEK2 c.349A>G, c.538C>T, c.715G...

  3. Mitochondrial Mutation Rate, Spectrum and Heteroplasmy in Caenorhabditis elegans Spontaneous Mutation Accumulation Lines of Differing Population Size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konrad, Anke; Thompson, Owen; Waterston, Robert H; Moerman, Donald G; Keightley, Peter D; Bergthorsson, Ulfar; Katju, Vaishali

    2017-06-01

    Mitochondrial genomes of metazoans, given their elevated rates of evolution, have served as pivotal markers for phylogeographic studies and recent phylogenetic events. In order to determine the dynamics of spontaneous mitochondrial mutations in small populations in the absence and presence of selection, we evolved mutation accumulation (MA) lines of Caenorhabditis elegans in parallel over 409 consecutive generations at three varying population sizes of N = 1, 10, and 100 hermaphrodites. The N =1 populations should have a minimal influence of natural selection to provide the spontaneous mutation rate and the expected rate of neutral evolution, whereas larger population sizes should experience increasing intensity of selection. New mutations were identified by Illumina paired-end sequencing of 86 mtDNA genomes across 35 experimental lines and compared with published genomes of natural isolates. The spontaneous mitochondrial mutation rate was estimated at 1.05 × 10-7/site/generation. A strong G/C→A/T mutational bias was observed in both the MA lines and the natural isolates. This suggests that the low G + C content at synonymous sites is the product of mutation bias rather than selection as previously proposed. The mitochondrial effective population size per worm generation was estimated to be 62. Although it was previously concluded that heteroplasmy was rare in C. elegans, the vast majority of mutations in this study were heteroplasmic despite an experimental regime exceeding 400 generations. The frequencies of frameshift and nonsynonymous mutations were negatively correlated with population size, which suggests their deleterious effects on fitness and a potent role for selection in their eradication. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Bayesian analysis of rare events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Straub, Daniel, E-mail: straub@tum.de; Papaioannou, Iason; Betz, Wolfgang

    2016-06-01

    In many areas of engineering and science there is an interest in predicting the probability of rare events, in particular in applications related to safety and security. Increasingly, such predictions are made through computer models of physical systems in an uncertainty quantification framework. Additionally, with advances in IT, monitoring and sensor technology, an increasing amount of data on the performance of the systems is collected. This data can be used to reduce uncertainty, improve the probability estimates and consequently enhance the management of rare events and associated risks. Bayesian analysis is the ideal method to include the data into the probabilistic model. It ensures a consistent probabilistic treatment of uncertainty, which is central in the prediction of rare events, where extrapolation from the domain of observation is common. We present a framework for performing Bayesian updating of rare event probabilities, termed BUS. It is based on a reinterpretation of the classical rejection-sampling approach to Bayesian analysis, which enables the use of established methods for estimating probabilities of rare events. By drawing upon these methods, the framework makes use of their computational efficiency. These methods include the First-Order Reliability Method (FORM), tailored importance sampling (IS) methods and Subset Simulation (SuS). In this contribution, we briefly review these methods in the context of the BUS framework and investigate their applicability to Bayesian analysis of rare events in different settings. We find that, for some applications, FORM can be highly efficient and is surprisingly accurate, enabling Bayesian analysis of rare events with just a few model evaluations. In a general setting, BUS implemented through IS and SuS is more robust and flexible.

  5. A Rare Presentation of a Rare Disease: Pulmonary Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghulam Rehman Mohyuddin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A 70-year-old female presented with a 4-week history of dry cough and wheezing. Chest radiograph showed a 10.5 cm mass-like density in the anterior mediastinum which had not been previously visualized. Computed tomography scan (CT of the chest showed a right hilar mass encasing and narrowing right upper lobe bronchus and right mainstem bronchus and secondary atelectatic changes. Biopsy was consistent with a diagnosis of lymphomatoid granulomatosis Grade 3. She responded well clinically and radiologically to therapy. Lymphomatoid granulomatosis is a rare EBV-associated disorder which is considered a lymphoproliferative disease. The most common radiographic feature is multiple lung nodules. An isolated hilar mass is an exceptionally rare presentation of this rare disease.

  6. Thanatophoric Dysplasia; a Rare Case Report on a Congenital Anomaly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Francis Yuvaraj

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The rare form of skeletal dysplasia is thanatophoric dysplasia. The meaning for thanatophoric dysplasia is death bearing which is derived from Greek word. It occurs 1in 20,000 to 50,000. It is mainly due to mutations in the fibroblast growth factor receptor 3gene. Features of thanatophoric dysplasia are frontal bossing, prominent eyes, narrow thorax, protruded abdomen and bowed legs. The knowledge about this condition is useful in the fields of Anatomy, Paediatrics, Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Ultrasonagraphy and Genetics, for future research purpose.

  7. Kindler syndrome - a rare type of hereditary epidermolysis bullosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. I. Albanova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Kindler syndrome is one of the types of hereditary epidermolysis bullosa with its onset related to mutations of the KIND1 gene. The authors describe a case of a family with three members suffering from this rare disease. All of these patients have typical clinical manifestations of the Kindler syndrome such as the formation of blisters on the skin and mucous membranes right after the birth, scarring with the formation of contractures, pseudosyndactyly, microstomia and ankyloglossia, progressive poikiloderma, photosensibility, affections of the gastrointestinal tract - dysphagia, esophagostenosis, stool disorders, dental pathology, phimosis vaginalis in women.

  8. MSX1 Mutation in Witkop Syndrome; A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faezeh Ghaderi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The Witkop syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant disorder characterized by the absence of several teeth and abnormalities of the nails. This is the first report of a rare genetic tooth and nail syndrome diagnosed in a 2.5-year-old boy with early exfoliation of the primary canine, absence of the primary incisors, and nail dysplasia. A homozygous mutation was identified in 3’-UTR of MSX1 gene in the proband. The parents of the patient had no dental and nail anomalies.

  9. A rare metastasis from a rare brain tumour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aabenhus, Kristine; Hahn, Christoffer Holst

    2014-01-01

    This case report presents the story of a patient with an oligodendroglioma metastasizing to the bone marrow and to lymph nodes of the neck. The patient had undergone primary brain surgery 13 years prior to the discovery of metastases and radiotherapy directed at the brain tumour two months prior........ Oligodendroglioma are rare primary brain tumours of which extraneural metastasis is even more rare. The incidence of cases like this may be increasing because of better treatment and thus longer survival of patients with oligodendroglioma....

  10. Rare earth element and rare metal inventory of central Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihalasky, Mark J.; Tucker, Robert D.; Renaud, Karine; Verstraeten, Ingrid M.

    2018-03-06

    Rare earth elements (REE), with their unique physical and chemical properties, are an essential part of modern living. REE have enabled development and manufacture of high-performance materials, processes, and electronic technologies commonly used today in computing and communications, clean energy and transportation, medical treatment and health care, glass and ceramics, aerospace and defense, and metallurgy and chemical refining. Central Asia is an emerging REE and rare metals (RM) producing region. A newly compiled inventory of REE-RM-bearing mineral occurrences and delineation of areas-of-interest indicate this region may have considerable undiscovered resources.

  11. Nance-Horan Syndrome: A Rare Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Shambhu; Datta, Pankaj; Sabharwal, Janak Raj; Datta, Sonia

    2017-01-01

    Dentofacial anomalies may guide us to the diagnosis of many congenital and hereditary syndromes. A 9-year-old boy was diagnosed with Nance-Horan syndrome. This syndrome is an extremely rare X-linked genetic disorder which is entirely expressed in males with semi-dominant transmission which results from mutations occurring in male gametes. It is characterized by facial dysmorphism such as long face, prominent nose and mandibular prognathism, ocular abnormalities such as congenital cataract, microcornea, microphthalmia and strabismus, and dental anomalies including mulberry molars and screwdriver-shaped incisors. Heterozygous females inherit this disease and also suffer from this syndrome but in a milder form. Approximately one-third of the affected males show signs of developmental delay and intellectual abnormalities. This syndrome is very rare and the incidence of the disease has not been established so far. The present article describes the clinical and radiological features and the genetic implications of this syndrome.

  12. Nance–Horan syndrome: A rare case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shambhu Sharma

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Dentofacial anomalies may guide us to the diagnosis of many congenital and hereditary syndromes. A 9-year-old boy was diagnosed with Nance–Horan syndrome. This syndrome is an extremely rare X-linked genetic disorder which is entirely expressed in males with semi-dominant transmission which results from mutations occurring in male gametes. It is characterized by facial dysmorphism such as long face, prominent nose and mandibular prognathism, ocular abnormalities such as congenital cataract, microcornea, microphthalmia and strabismus, and dental anomalies including mulberry molars and screwdriver-shaped incisors. Heterozygous females inherit this disease and also suffer from this syndrome but in a milder form. Approximately one-third of the affected males show signs of developmental delay and intellectual abnormalities. This syndrome is very rare and the incidence of the disease has not been established so far. The present article describes the clinical and radiological features and the genetic implications of this syndrome.

  13. Nance–Horan Syndrome: A Rare Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Shambhu; Datta, Pankaj; Sabharwal, Janak Raj; Datta, Sonia

    2017-01-01

    Dentofacial anomalies may guide us to the diagnosis of many congenital and hereditary syndromes. A 9-year-old boy was diagnosed with Nance–Horan syndrome. This syndrome is an extremely rare X-linked genetic disorder which is entirely expressed in males with semi-dominant transmission which results from mutations occurring in male gametes. It is characterized by facial dysmorphism such as long face, prominent nose and mandibular prognathism, ocular abnormalities such as congenital cataract, microcornea, microphthalmia and strabismus, and dental anomalies including mulberry molars and screwdriver-shaped incisors. Heterozygous females inherit this disease and also suffer from this syndrome but in a milder form. Approximately one-third of the affected males show signs of developmental delay and intellectual abnormalities. This syndrome is very rare and the incidence of the disease has not been established so far. The present article describes the clinical and radiological features and the genetic implications of this syndrome. PMID:29042737

  14. Family studies to find rare high risk variants in migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Rikke Dyhr; Christensen, Anne Francke; Olesen, Jes

    2017-01-01

    genetic variants with bigger effect size may be involved in the disease. Since migraine has a tendency to cluster in families, a family approach might be the way to find these variants. This is also indicated by identification of migraine-associated loci in classical linkage-analyses in migraine families....... A single migraine study using a candidate-gene approach was performed in 2010 identifying a rare mutation in the TRESK potassium channel segregating in a large family with migraine with aura, but this finding has later become questioned. The technologies of next-generation sequencing (NGS) now provides...... an affordable tool to investigate the genetic variation in the entire exome or genome. The family-based study design using NGS is described in this paper. We also review family studies using NGS that have been successful in finding rare variants in other common complex diseases in order to argue the promising...

  15. Characterization of mutations at the mouse phenylalanine hydroxylase locus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonald, J.D.; Charlton, C.K. [Wichita State Univ., KS (United States)

    1997-02-01

    Two genetic mouse models for human phenylketonuria have been characterized by DNA sequence analysis. For each, a distinct mutation was identified within the protein coding sequence of the phenylalanine hydroxylase gene. This establishes that the mutated locus is the same as that causing human phenylketonuria and allows a comparison between these mouse phenylketonuria models and the human disease. A genotype/phenotype relationship that is strikingly similar to the human disease emerges, underscoring the similarity of phenylketonuria in mouse and man. In PAH{sup ENU1}, the phenotype is mild. The Pah{sup enu1} mutation predicts a conservative valine to alanine amino acid substitution and is located in exon 3, a gene region where serious mutations are rare in humans. In PAH{sup ENU2} the phenotype is severe. The Pah{sup enu2} mutation predicts a radical phenylalanine to serine substitution and is located in exon 7, a gene region where serious mutations are common in humans. In PAH{sup ENU2}, the sequence information was used to devise a direct genotyping system based on the creation of a new Alw26I restriction endonuclease site. 26 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Thyroglobulin Gene Mutation with Cold Nodule on Thyroid Scintigraphy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshio Kahara

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Thyroglobulin gene mutation is a rare cause of congenital hypothyroidism, but thyroglobulin gene mutations are thought to be associated with thyroid cancer development. A 21-year-old Japanese man treated with levothyroxine for congenital hypothyroidism had an enlarged thyroid gland with undetectable serum thyroglobulin despite elevated serum TSH level. The patient was diagnosed with thyroglobulin gene mutation, with compound heterozygosity for Gly304Cys missense mutation and Arg432X nonsense mutation. Ultrasonography showed a hypovascular large tumor in the left lobe that appeared as a cold nodule on thyroid scintigraphy. He underwent total thyroidectomy, but pathological study did not reveal findings of thyroid carcinoma, but rather a hyperplastic nodule with hemorrhage. Strong cytoplasmic thyroglobulin immunostaining was observed, but sodium iodide symporter immunostaining was hardly detected in the hyperplastic nodule. The clinical characteristics of patients with thyroglobulin gene mutations are diverse, and some patients are diagnosed by chance on examination of goiter in adults. The presence of thyroid tumors that appear as cold nodules on thyroid scintigraphy should consider the potential for thyroid carcinoma, if the patient has relatively low serum thyroglobulin concentration in relation to the degree of TSH without thyroglobulin autoantibody.

  17. Family studies to find rare high risk variants in migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Rikke Dyhr; Christensen, Anne Francke; Olesen, Jes

    2017-12-01

    Migraine has long been known as a common complex disease caused by genetic and environmental factors. The pathophysiology and the specific genetic susceptibility are poorly understood. Common variants only explain a small part of the heritability of migraine. It is thought that rare genetic variants with bigger effect size may be involved in the disease. Since migraine has a tendency to cluster in families, a family approach might be the way to find these variants. This is also indicated by identification of migraine-associated loci in classical linkage-analyses in migraine families. A single migraine study using a candidate-gene approach was performed in 2010 identifying a rare mutation in the TRESK potassium channel segregating in a large family with migraine with aura, but this finding has later become questioned. The technologies of next-generation sequencing (NGS) now provides an affordable tool to investigate the genetic variation in the entire exome or genome. The family-based study design using NGS is described in this paper. We also review family studies using NGS that have been successful in finding rare variants in other common complex diseases in order to argue the promising application of a family approach to migraine. PubMed was searched to find studies that looked for rare genetic variants in common complex diseases through a family-based design using NGS, excluding studies looking for de-novo mutations, or using a candidate-gene approach and studies on cancer. All issues from Nature Genetics and PLOS genetics 2014, 2015 and 2016 (UTAI June) were screened for relevant papers. Reference lists from included and other relevant papers were also searched. For the description of the family-based study design using NGS an in-house protocol was used. Thirty-two successful studies, which covered 16 different common complex diseases, were included in this paper. We also found a single migraine study. Twenty-three studies found one or a few family specific

  18. A Rare Case: Touraine Solente Gole Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamil Şahin

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Touraine-Solente-Gole syndrome, also known as pachydermoperiostosis, is transmitted as an autosomal recessive trait. It is characterized by enlargement of fingers and toes, pachyderma, excessive sweating, and pain. In this paper, we present a 9-year-old patient to attract attention to this rare disease. A 9-year-old female patient was brought to our outpatient clinics with sweating and enlargement of hands and feet. She was the fourth child born to consanguineous parents. Her 26-year-old elder sister also had the same symptoms. Her physical examination revealed clubbing of the hands, and thick and sweating fingers. Her test results were unremarkable. Hand x-ray revealed epiphyseal, and metaphyseal thickening of the hands, and periostal hyperosteosis. Pachydermoperiostosis usually begins in childhood, progresses till 20 years of age, then, ceases. Delayed closure of fontanelles, and patent ductus arteriosus may be symptoms of the disease. Patients with deletions and mutations in HPGD (15-hydroxy prostaglandin dehydrogenase gene (4q33-q34 demonstrate this phenotype. This syndrome is more frequent in females, and mimics rheumatic diseases. Ibuprofen therapy may be used for bone pain. Colchicine is the alternative treatment. In cases of excessive hand and feet sweating associated with clubbed fingers pachydermoperiostosis should be brought to mind.

  19. Rare human diseases: 9p deletion syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galagan V.O.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective of the study was to review the anamnesis, pheno - and genotype in patients with rare chromosome disorders such as 9p deletion syndrome. Genetic methods of investigation (clinical and genealogical, cytogenetic, FISH- method, paraclinical and instrumental methods of examination were used. Karyotyping was performed by the G-method of differential staining of chromosomes. Only three cases of pathology were diagnosed in the Medical Genetics Center over the last 10 years. By anamnesis data nobody in the probands’ families had bad habits, was exposed to occupational hazards, took part in the elimination of the Chernobyl accident or lived in contaminated areas. Clinical signs of diseases have not been identified in probands’ parents. All probands had trigonocephaly, bilateral epicanthal folds, ocular hypertelorism, downslanting palpebral fissures, long philtrum, flat face and nasal bridge, low set ears with malformed auricles. Two patients of three ones had exophthalmos, contracture of the second and third fingers, abnormal external genitalia. In all three cases there was monosomy of chromosome 9 of critical segment p 24. Normal karyotypes were seen in all parents, so there were three cases of new mutations of 9p deletion syndrome. Retardation of physical, psycho-spech, mental development in proband with or without congenital anomalies requires medical genetic counseling in a specialized institution. Cases of reproductive loss in anamnesis require cytogenetic investigation of fetal membranes and amniotic fluid.

  20. Safety aspects in rare earths recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharya, R.

    2014-01-01

    Recovery of rare earths involves mining of beach sands, mineral separation to obtain monazite and its chemical processing to obtain rare earth composites. The composites are then subjected to further chemical treatment to obtain individual rare earths. Although the separated out rare earths are not radioactive, the process for recovery of rare earths involve both radiological as well as conventional hazards. This paper highlights the safety aspects in the mining, mineral separation and chemical processing of monazite to obtain rare earths

  1. Lectures on rare B decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masiero, A.

    1989-01-01

    This paper provides a pedagogical presentation of the class of the rare charmless B decays with strange particles in the final state. These processes involve the flavour changing neutral current transition b → s and, thus, they are GIM suppresses. They constitute a specially promising ground to test the Standard Model and the possible presence of new physics beyond it. In particular I show that the radiative decays b → s + π and b → s + g are priviledged places to look for large supersymmetric enhancements. The author reviews both the present experimental and theoretical situations in this field and point out the challenges that we have to meet in the 90's to have rare B physics play a role comparable to that of rare K physics

  2. Rare KL decays at Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schnetzer, St.

    1997-01-01

    Recent results and the future prospects for rare K L decay at Fermilab are described. A summary of all rare decay results from E799 Phase I (the 1991 run) are presented. Three new results: K L → e + e - μ + μ - , K L → π 0 μe, and π 0 → e + e - e + e - are discussed in detail. Improvements for KTeV (the 1996-1997 run) are discussed and the expected sensitivities listed. Finally, the KAMI program for rare decays with the Main Injector (2000 and beyond) is presented with emphasis on a search for the decay K L → π 0 νν-bar at O(10 -12 ) single-event-sensitivity. (author)

  3. A rare cause of hemoptysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meghan Aversa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Angiosarcomas are rare, malignant, endothelial-cell tumors of vascular origin that can arise at any body site. They frequently metastasize to the lung, heralded by dyspnea, hemoptysis, chest pain, pneumothoraces, and diffuse pulmonary hemorrhage. However, in most cases lung metastases are discovered after the diagnosis of a primary angiosarcoma has already been established. Very rarely will an undiagnosed metastatic angiosarcoma present as diffuse pulmonary hemorrhage. We describe the case of a 59-year-old male who presented to hospital with dyspnea and hemoptysis. CT chest revealed rapidly progressing nodular changes and broncho-alveolar lavage returns were progressively bloody. Open lung wedge biopsy ultimately revealed metastatic angiosarcoma and extensive pulmonary hemorrhage. Our case highlights the key clinical, radiological, and pathological features of this rare malignancy that frequently metastasizes to the lung and reminds clinicians to consider it as a cause of hemoptysis and pulmonary hemorrhage.

  4. Ainhum - A Rare Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhu, Ravi; Kannan, Narayanasamy Subbaraju; Vinoth, Sundaresan; Praveen, Chinnappan Balasubramanian

    2016-04-01

    The term 'AINHUM' is derived from the African word meaning 'to saw or cut'. True ainhum otherwise called dactylolysis spontanea is a condition involving soft tissue or digits with constricting rings commonly presenting in fifth toes, usually bilateral. It is to be differentiated from Pseudo-ainhum that occurs secondary to some hereditary and nonhereditary diseases that lead to annular constriction of digits. We report a rare case of true ainhum involving the left fourth toe only. It is a very rare case and a very few were reported worldwide. The highest incidence of ainhum has been reported in South Africa and South America. It is rarely reported in India. Ainhum when diagnosed and treated in early stages can be prevented from progressing to mutilating deformities.

  5. Rare and semi-rare decays at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00213194; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The measurements of the rare $B^0$-mesons decays processes performed by the ATLAS experiment at LHC are reviewed. Particular attention will be given to the measurement of the branching ratio of the $B^0_s$ and $B^0_d$ mesons decays into a pair of muons with the full Run 1 dataset corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 25 $\\rm{fb^{-1}}$.

  6. Mutation breeding in pepper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daskalov, S [Plant Breeding Unit, Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Isotope and Radiation Applications of Atomic Energy for Food and Agricultural Development, Seibersdorf Laboratory, International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)

    1986-03-01

    Pepper (Capsicum sp.) is an important vegetable and spice crop widely grown in tropical as well as in temperate regions. Until recently the improvement programmes were based mainly on using natural sources of germ plasma, crossbreeding and exploiting the heterosis of F{sub 1} hybrids. However, interest in using induced mutations is growing. A great number of agronomically useful mutants as well as mutants valuable for genetic, cytological and physiological studies have been induced and described. In this review information is presented about suitable mutagen treatment procedures with radiation as well as chemicals, M{sub 1} effects, handling the treated material in M{sub 1}, M{sub 2} and subsequent generations, and mutant screening procedures. This is supplemented by a description of reported useful mutants and released cultivars. Finally, general advice is given on when and how to incorporate mutation induction in Capsicum improvement programmes. (author)

  7. Mutation breeding in pepper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daskalov, S.

    1986-01-01

    Pepper (Capsicum sp.) is an important vegetable and spice crop widely grown in tropical as well as in temperate regions. Until recently the improvement programmes were based mainly on using natural sources of germ plasma, crossbreeding and exploiting the heterosis of F 1 hybrids. However, interest in using induced mutations is growing. A great number of agronomically useful mutants as well as mutants valuable for genetic, cytological and physiological studies have been induced and described. In this review information is presented about suitable mutagen treatment procedures with radiation as well as chemicals, M 1 effects, handling the treated material in M 1 , M 2 and subsequent generations, and mutant screening procedures. This is supplemented by a description of reported useful mutants and released cultivars. Finally, general advice is given on when and how to incorporate mutation induction in Capsicum improvement programmes. (author)

  8. Tufting enteropathy with EpCAM mutation: case report

    OpenAIRE

    Pêgas,Karla Lais; Cambruzzi,Eduardo; Ferrelli,Regis Schander; Silva,Carolina Soares da; Guedes,Renata Rostirola; Adami,Marina; Dias,Eduardo Montagner; Melere,Melina Utz; Ceza,Marilia Rosso; Steinhaus,Cintia; Epifanio,Matias; Salomon,Julie; Ferreira,Cristina Targa

    2014-01-01

    Tufting enteropathy (TE), also known as intestinal epithelial dysplasia (IED), is a rare congenital enteropathy related to an earlyonset of severe intractable diarrhea due to specific abnormalities of the intestinal epithelium and mutations of the EpCAM gene. TE is characterized by clinical and histological heterogeneity, such as with low or without mononuclear cell infiltration of the lamina propria, and abnormalities of basement membrane. TE can be associated with malformations, other epith...

  9. Assessment of SLX4 Mutations in Hereditary Breast Cancers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sohela Shah

    Full Text Available SLX4 encodes a DNA repair protein that regulates three structure-specific endonucleases and is necessary for resistance to DNA crosslinking agents, topoisomerase I and poly (ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP inhibitors. Recent studies have reported mutations in SLX4 in a new subtype of Fanconi anemia (FA, FA-P. Monoallelic defects in several FA genes are known to confer susceptibility to breast and ovarian cancers.To determine if SLX4 is involved in breast cancer susceptibility, we sequenced the entire SLX4 coding region in 738 (270 Jewish and 468 non-Jewish breast cancer patients with 2 or more family members affected by breast cancer and no known BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations. We found a novel nonsense (c.2469G>A, p.W823* mutation in one patient. In addition, we also found 51 missense variants [13 novel, 23 rare (MAF1%], of which 22 (5 novel and 17 rare were predicted to be damaging by Polyphen2 (score = 0.65-1. We performed functional complementation studies using p.W823* and 5 SLX4 variants (4 novel and 1 rare cDNAs in a human SLX4-null fibroblast cell line, RA3331. While wild type SLX4 and all the other variants fully rescued the sensitivity to mitomycin C (MMC, campthothecin (CPT, and PARP inhibitor (Olaparib the p.W823* SLX4 mutant failed to do so.Loss-of-function mutations in SLX4 may contribute to the development of breast cancer in very rare cases.

  10. Mutations in AAGAB underlie autosomal dominant punctate palmoplantar keratoderma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinani, N; Ali, M; Liu, L; McGrath, J; Mellerio, J

    2017-04-01

    Punctate palmoplantar keratoderma type 1 (PPPK1) is a rare autosomal dominant inherited skin disease, characterized by multiple hyperkeratotic lesions on the palms and soles. The causative gene for PPPK1 has been identified as AAGAB, which encodes α- and γ-adaptin-binding protein p34. We describe the clinical features in three unrelated families with PPPK1, and report three recurrent causative mutations in AAGAB. © 2017 British Association of Dermatologists.

  11. Dioctophymiasis: A Rare Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Sapna; Kaval, Sunil; Tewari, Swati

    2016-02-01

    Dioctophyma renale commonly known as "giant kidney worm' is found in the kidney of carnivorous mammals. Human infestation is rare, but results in destruction of the kidneys. Very few cases have been reported worldwide. We are here reporting a case of Dioctophymiasis in a 35-year-old male patient who presented with retention of urine and subsequent passage of worm and blood in urine. The worm was confirmed as Dioctophyma renale based on its morphology and clinical presentation. This is a very rare case report and to best of our knowledge only two cases have been reported from India.

  12. Rare B decays, rare τ decays, and grand unification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sher, M.; Yuan, Y.

    1991-01-01

    In multi-Higgs-boson extensions of the standard model, tree-level flavor-changing neutral currents exist naturally, unless suppressed by some symmetry. For a given rate, the exchanged scalar or pseudoscalar mass is very sensitive to the flavor-changing coupling between the first two generations. Since the Yukawa couplings of the first two generations are unknown and certainly very small, bounds which rely on some assumed value of this flavor-changing coupling are quite dubious. One might expect the size (and reliability) of the Yukawa couplings involving the third generation to be greater. In this paper, we consider processes involving τ's and B's, and determine the bounds on the flavor-changing couplings which involve third-generation fields. The strongest bound in the quark sector comes from B-bar B mixing and in the lepton sector, surprisingly, from μ→eγ. It is then noted that the flavor-changing couplings in the quark sector are related to those in the lepton sector in many grand unified theories, and one can ask whether an analysis of rare τ decays or rare B decays will provide the strongest constraints. We show that rare B decays provide the strongest bounds, and that no useful information can be obtained from rare τ decays. It is also noted that the most promising decay modes are B→Kμτ and B s →μτ, and we urge experimenters to look for rare decay modes of the B in which a τ is in the final state

  13. Mutated hilltop inflation revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Barun Kumar

    2018-05-01

    In this work we re-investigate pros and cons of mutated hilltop inflation. Applying Hamilton-Jacobi formalism we solve inflationary dynamics and find that inflation goes on along the {W}_{-1} branch of the Lambert function. Depending on the model parameter mutated hilltop model renders two types of inflationary solutions: one corresponds to small inflaton excursion during observable inflation and the other describes large field inflation. The inflationary observables from curvature perturbation are in tune with the current data for a wide range of the model parameter. The small field branch predicts negligible amount of tensor to scalar ratio r˜ O(10^{-4}), while the large field sector is capable of generating high amplitude for tensor perturbations, r˜ O(10^{-1}). Also, the spectral index is almost independent of the model parameter along with a very small negative amount of scalar running. Finally we find that the mutated hilltop inflation closely resembles the α -attractor class of inflationary models in the limit of α φ ≫ 1.

  14. Mutation breeding in jute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshua, D.C.

    1980-01-01

    Mutagenic studies in jute in general dealt with the morphological abnormalities of the M 1 generation in great detail. Of late, induction of a wide spectrum of viable mutations have been reported in different varieties of both the species. Mutations affecting several traits of agronomic importance such as, plant height, time of flowering, fibre yield and quality, resistance to pests and diseases are also available. Cytological analysis of a large collection of induced mutants resulted in the isolation of seven trisomics in an olitorius variety. Several anatomical parameters which are the components of fibre yield, have also received attention. Some mutants with completely altered morphology were used for interpreting the evolution of leaf shape in Tiliaceas and related families. A capsularis variety developed using mutation breeding technique has been released for cultivation. Several others, including derivatives of inter-mutant hybridization have been found to perform well at different locations in the All India Coordinated Trials. Presently, chemical mutagenesis and induction of mutants of physiological significance are receiving considerable attention. The induced variability is being used in genetic and linkage studies. (author)

  15. Rare earths as a future resource

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornell, D.H.

    1988-01-01

    The fourteen rare earth or lanthanide elements have recently emerged as an important natural resource because of the rapidly growing demand in the electronic, chemical and metallurgical industries. The Symposium on rare earth elements as a future resource presented a multidisciplinary review of rare earth chemistry, geology, beneficiation, industrial applications and marketing. Papers by experts in many fields were presented on the following topics: chemical properties of the rare earth elements; the analysis of rare earth elements and minerals; beneficiation and extraction of rare earth elements; economic geochemistry and mineralogy of rare earths; present industrial uses of rare earth elements; the role of rare earth elements in high-temperature superconductors; the technical application of high-temperature superconductors; supply and demand for rare earth products - now and in the future, and the geology of rare earth deposits

  16. Calreticulin Mutations in Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noa Lavi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available With the discovery of the JAK2V617F mutation in patients with Philadelphia chromosome-negative (Ph− myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs in 2005, major advances have been made in the diagnosis of MPNs, in understanding of their pathogenesis involving the JAK/STAT pathway, and finally in the development of novel therapies targeting this pathway. Nevertheless, it remains unknown which mutations exist in approximately one-third of patients with non-mutated JAK2 or MPL essential thrombocythemia (ET and primary myelofibrosis (PMF. At the end of 2013, two studies identified recurrent mutations in the gene encoding calreticulin (CALR using whole-exome sequencing. These mutations were revealed in the majority of ET and PMF patients with non-mutated JAK2 or MPL but not in polycythemia vera patients. Somatic 52-bp deletions (type 1 mutations and recurrent 5-bp insertions (type 2 mutations in exon 9 of the CALR gene (the last exon encoding the C-terminal amino acids of the protein calreticulin were detected and found always to generate frameshift mutations. All detected mutant calreticulin proteins shared a novel amino acid sequence at the C-terminal. Mutations in CALR are acquired early in the clonal history of the disease, and they cause activation of JAK/STAT signaling. The CALR mutations are the second most frequent mutations in Ph− MPN patients after the JAK2V617F mutation, and their detection has significantly improved the diagnostic approach for ET and PMF. The characteristics of the CALR mutations as well as their diagnostic, clinical, and pathogenesis implications are discussed in this review.

  17. Pheochromocytomatosis associated with a novel TMEM127 mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Run Yu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Pheochromocytomatosis, a very rare form of pheochromocytoma recurrence, refers to new, multiple, and often small pheochromocytomas growing in and around the surgical resection bed of a previous adrenalectomy for a solitary pheochromocytoma. We here report a case of pheochromocytomatosis in a 70-year-old female. At age 64 years, she was diagnosed with a 6-cm right pheochromocytoma. She underwent laparoscopic right adrenalectomy, during which the tumor capsule was ruptured. At age 67 years, CT of abdomen did not detect recurrence. At age 69 years, she began experiencing episodes of headache and diaphoresis. At age 70 years, biochemical markers of pheochromocytoma became elevated with normal calcitonin level. CT revealed multiple nodules of various sizes in the right adrenal fossa, some of which were positive on metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG scan. She underwent open resection of pheochromocytomatosis. Histological examination confirmed numerous pheochromocytomas ranging 0.1–1.2 cm in size. Next-generation sequencing of a panel of genes found a novel heterozygous germline c.570delC mutation in TMEM127, one of the genes that, if mutated, confers susceptibility to syndromic pheochromocytoma. Molecular analysis showed that the c.570delC mutation is likely pathogenic. Our case highlights the typical presentation of pheochromocytomatosis, a rare complication of adrenalectomy for pheochromocytoma. Previous cases and ours collectively demonstrate that tumor capsule rupture during adrenalectomy is a risk factor for pheochromocytomatosis. We also report a novel TMEM127 mutation in this case.

  18. Rare pion and kaon decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryman, D.

    1983-09-01

    Some rare pion and kaon decays, which provide clues to the generation puzzle, are discussed. The π→ eν/π→μ/ν branching ratio test of universality and the status of searches for K + → π + rho anti rho are reviewed

  19. Cardiofaciocutaneous syndrome: A rare entity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Pavithra

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The cardiofaciocutaneous (CFC syndrome is a condition of sporadic occurrence, with patients showing multiple congenital anomalies and mental retardation and characteristic dysmorphic features. We, thus, report a rare case of this syndrome in a 1-year-old child who presented with typical features of CFC syndrome.

  20. Rare Animal Education Usingaugmented Reality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hening Artdias

    2018-01-01

    They are extinction because destruction of forest habitats, a conflict between humans and animals, trade, hunting, the arrests beyond capacity. [1]. Is that the issue of the extinction of the animals is dominated by human behavior and nature of the wrath of them. For that, education game “Rare Animal” become formulations to raise awareness of endangered species.

  1. Rare localisations of osteochondrosis juvenilis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schumacher, R; Schuster, W; Mueller, U

    1981-04-01

    A survey of rare localisations of osteochondrosis juvenilis is given and illustrated by cases of Morbus Friedrich, Morbus Panner, Vertebra plana Calve, Morbus Blount, Morbus Iselin, Morbus Hegemann and Morbus Thiemann. This is followed by discussion of etiology and differential diagnosis.

  2. Rare diseases and orphan drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenica Taruscio

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available According to the Regulation (EC N. 141/2000 of the European Parliament and of the Council, rare diseases are life-threatening or chronically debilitating conditions, affecting no more than 5 in 10 000 persons in the European Community. It is estimated that between 6000 to 8000 distinct rare diseases affect up to 6% of the total EU population. Therefore, these conditions can be considered rare if taken individually but they affect a significant proportion of the European population when considered as a single group. Several initiatives have been undertaken at international, European and national level to tackle public health as well as research issues related to the prevention, diagnosis, treatment and surveillance of these diseases. The development of innovative and effective medical products for their diagnosis and treatment is frequently hampered by several factors, including the limited knowledge of their natural history, the difficulties in setting up clinical studies due to the limited numbers of patients affected by a specific disease, the weak interest of sponsors due to the restricted market opportunities. Therefore, incentives and other facilitations have been adopted in many parts of the world, including in the EU, in order to facilitate the development and commercialization of diagnostic tools and treatments devoted to rare diseases. This paper illustrates mainly the European initiatives and will discuss the problematic and controversial aspects surrounding orphan drugs. Finally, activities and measures adopted in Italy are presented.

  3. WS1 gene mutation analysis of Wolfram syndrome in a Chinese patient and a systematic review of literatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Guang; Yu, Man-li; Wang, Jia-feng; Gao, Cong-rong; Chen, Zhong-jin

    2010-10-01

    Wolfram syndrome is a rare hereditary disease characterized by diabetes mellitus and optic atrophy. The outcome of this disease is always poor. WFS1 gene mutation is the main cause of this disease. A patient with diabetes mellitus, diabetes insipidus, renal tract disorder, psychiatric abnormality, and cataract was diagnosed with Wolfram syndrome. Mutations in open reading frame (ORF) of WFS1 gene was analyzed by sequencing. Mutations in WFS1 gene was also summarized by a systematic review in Pubmed and Chinese biological and medical database. Sequencing of WFS1 gene in this patient showed a new mutation, 1962G>A, and two other non-sense mutations, 2433A>G and 2565G>A. Systematic review included 219 patients in total and identified 172 WFS1 gene mutations, most of which were located in Exon 8. These mutations in WFS1 gene might be useful in prenatal diagnosis of Wolfram syndrome.

  4. Frequency and clinical features of the JAK2 V617F mutation in pediatric patients with sporadic essential thrombocythemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakatani, Takuya; Imamura, Toshihiko; Ishida, Hiroyuki; Wakaizumi, Katsuji; Yamamoto, Tohru; Otabe, Osamu; Ishigami, Tsuyoshi; Adachi, Souichi; Morimoto, Akira

    2008-12-01

    Pediatric essential thrombocythemia (ET) is a rare and heterogenous disease entity. While several recent studies have focused on the role of the JAK2 V617F mutation in pediatric ET, the frequency of pediatric ET cases with this mutation and the associated clinical features remain unclear. We examined six childhood cases who had been diagnosed with ET according to WHO criteria (onset age: 0.2-14 years) for the presence of the JAK2 V617F mutation, MPLW515L mutation and JAK2 exon 12 mutations. Two sensitive PCR-based methods were used for the JAK2 V617F genotyping. We also examined the expression of polycythemia rubra vera-1 (PRV-1), which is a diagnostic marker for clonal ET. We found that three of the six cases had the JAK2 V617F mutation and that all six cases expressed PRV-1 in their peripheral granulocytes. Neither MPL W515L mutation nor JAK2 exon 12 mutations was detected in the patients without JAK2 V617F mutation. The two patients who developed thrombocythemia during infancy were JAK2 V617F-negative. These findings suggest that the JAK2 V617F mutation is not rare in childhood sporadic ET cases, and that these cases might be older and myeloproliferative features.

  5. Mitochondrial leukoencephalopathy and complex II deficiency associated with a recessive SDHB mutation with reduced penetrance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Ardissone

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial disease involving complex II is rare among respiratory chain deficiencies and its genetic cause remains often unknown. Two main clinical presentations are associated with this biochemical defect: mitochondrial encephalomyopathy and susceptibility to tumors. Only one homozygous SDHB mutation has been described in a patient with mitochondrial disorder. We report here two sisters, who presented highly different phenotypes (neurological impairment with leukoencephalopathy vs. asymptomatic status and harbored the same homozygous SDHB mutation, suggesting reduced penetrance.

  6. A novel PAX3 mutation in a Japanese boy with Waardenburg syndrome type 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Yu; Doi, Rieko; Adachi, Kaori; Nanba, Eiji; Kodani, Isamu; Ryoke, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Waardenburg syndrome type 1 (WS1) is a rare autosomal dominant disorder characterized by hair hypopigmentation, abnormal iris pigmentation, and congenital hearing loss. WS1 is caused by mutations in paired box gene 3 (PAX3). We identified a novel PAX3 mutation (c.1107 C>G, p.Ser369Arg) in a Japanese WS1 patient showing abnormal right iris pigmentation, right-sided congenital hearing loss, synophrys, incomplete left cleft lip, and cryptorchidism. PMID:27081571

  7. Autosomal dominant epidermodysplasia verruciformis lacking a known EVER1 or EVER2 mutation

    OpenAIRE

    McDermott, David H.; Gammon, Bryan; Snijders, Peter J.; Mbata, Ihunanya; Phifer, Beth; Hartley, A. Howland; Lee, Chyi-Chia Richard; Murphy, Philip M.; Hwang, Sam T.

    2009-01-01

    Epidermodysplasia verruciformis (EV) is a rare genodermatosis characterized by abnormal susceptibility to infection with specific human papillomavirus (HPV) serotypes. EV is a genetically heterogeneous disease, and autosomal recessive and X-linked inheritance patterns have been reported. Nonsense mutations in the genes EVER1 and EVER2 have been identified in over 75% of cases. We present EV in a father and son with typical histologic and clinical findings that occur in the absence of mutation...

  8. Detection of microsatellite instability but not truncating APC mutations in gastric adenocarcinomas in Brazilian patients

    OpenAIRE

    Bevilacqua Roberta A.U.; Corvello Cassandra M.; Duarte Ana Paula; Simpson Andrew J.G.

    2000-01-01

    A crucial role for the adenomatous polyposis colonic (APC) gene in colorectal carcinogenesis has been conclusively established, but, the role of APC in gastric tumors remains controversial. APC mutations have been detected at a relatively high frequency in gastric tumors of Japanese patients, yet such mutations have been reported to be extremely rare in British patients and patients from north-central-Italy. We here report the analysis of 40 primary sporadic gastric adenocarcinomas and 35 pri...

  9. Acral peeling skin syndrome associated with a novel CSTA gene mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muttardi, K; Nitoiu, D; Kelsell, D P; O'Toole, E A; Batta, K

    2016-06-01

    Acral peeling skin syndrome (APSS) is a rare autosomal recessive condition, characterized by asymptomatic peeling of the skin of the hands and feet, often linked to mutations in the gene TGM5. However, more recently recessive loss of function mutations in CSTA, encoding cystatin A, have been linked with APSS and exfoliative ichthyosis. We describe the clinical features in two sisters with APSS, associated with a novel large homozygous deletion encompassing exon 1 of CSTA. © 2015 British Association of Dermatologists.

  10. A novel PAX3 mutation in a Japanese boy with Waardenburg syndrome type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Yu; Doi, Rieko; Adachi, Kaori; Nanba, Eiji; Kodani, Isamu; Ryoke, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Waardenburg syndrome type 1 (WS1) is a rare autosomal dominant disorder characterized by hair hypopigmentation, abnormal iris pigmentation, and congenital hearing loss. WS1 is caused by mutations in paired box gene 3 (PAX3). We identified a novel PAX3 mutation (c.1107 C>G, p.Ser369Arg) in a Japanese WS1 patient showing abnormal right iris pigmentation, right-sided congenital hearing loss, synophrys, incomplete left cleft lip, and cryptorchidism.

  11. A novel PAX3 mutation in a Japanese boy with Waardenburg syndrome type 1

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshida, Yu; Doi, Rieko; Adachi, Kaori; Nanba, Eiji; Kodani, Isamu; Ryoke, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Waardenburg syndrome type 1 (WS1) is a rare autosomal dominant disorder characterized by hair hypopigmentation, abnormal iris pigmentation, and congenital hearing loss. WS1 is caused by mutations in paired box gene 3 (PAX3). We identified a novel PAX3 mutation (c.1107 C>G, p.Ser369Arg) in a Japanese WS1 patient showing abnormal right iris pigmentation, right-sided congenital hearing loss, synophrys, incomplete left cleft lip, and cryptorchidism.

  12. Parkinson disease: α-synuclein mutational screening and new clinical insight into the p.E46K mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimentel, Márcia M G; Rodrigues, Fabíola C; Leite, Marco Antônio A; Campos Júnior, Mário; Rosso, Ana Lucia; Nicaretta, Denise H; Pereira, João S; Silva, Delson José; Della Coletta, Marcus V; Vasconcellos, Luiz Felipe R; Abreu, Gabriella M; Dos Santos, Jussara M; Santos-Rebouças, Cíntia B

    2015-06-01

    Amongst Parkinson's disease-causing genetic factors, missense mutations and genomic multiplications in the gene encoding α-synuclein are well established causes of the disease, although genetic data in populations with a high degree of admixture, such as the Brazilian one, are still scarce. In this study, we conducted a molecular screening of α-synuclein point mutations and copy number variation in the largest cohort of Brazilian patients with Parkinson's disease (n = 549) and also in twelve Portuguese and one Bolivian immigrants. Genomic DNA was isolated from peripheral blood leukocytes or saliva, and the mutational screening was performed by quantitative and qualitative real-time PCR. The only alteration identified was the p.E46K mutation in a 60-year-old man, born in Bolivia, with a familial history of autosomal dominant Parkinson's disease. This is the second family ever reported, in which this rare pathogenic mutation is segregating. The same mutation was firstly described ten years ago in a Spanish family with a neurodegenerative syndrome combining parkinsonism, dementia and visual hallucinations. The clinical condition of our proband reveals a less aggressive phenotype than previously described and reinforces that marked phenotypic heterogeneity is common among patients with Parkinson's disease, even among those carriers sharing the same mutation. Our findings add new insight into the preexisting information about α-synuclein p.E46K, improving our understanding about the endophenotypes associated to this mutation and corroborate that missense alterations and multiplications in α-synuclein are uncommon among Brazilian patients with Parkinson's disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Rare adverse events associated with oral poliovirus vaccine in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friedrich F.

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV developed by A. Sabin has been effectively used to control poliomyelitis in Brazil, and the last case with the isolation of a wild poliovirus strain occurred in March 1989. Although the vaccine controlled the circulation of wild strains and poliomyelitis cases associated with these strains were not detected during the last eight years, rare cases classified as vaccine-associated paralytic poliomyelitis (VAPP have been detected. Molecular characterization studies of poliovirus strains isolated from VAPP cases and from healthy contacts have confirmed that the isolates are derived from the Sabin vaccine strains and also detected genomic modifications known or suspected to increase neurovirulence such as mutations and recombination. The molecular characterization of polioviruses isolated during the last eight years from paralysis cases classified as Guillain-Barré (GBS syndrome and transverse myelitits (TM, and from facial paralysis (FP cases also confirmed the vaccine origin of the strains and demonstrated mutations known to increase neurovirulence. Analysis of the epidemiologic data of these GBS, TM and FP cases demonstrated that in most of them the last OPV dose was given months or years before the onset of the disease and the isolation of the polioviruses. The temporal association between the isolation of these strains and the GBS, TM and FP suggested that the Sabin vaccine-derived poliovirus strains could also rarely trigger the diseases.

  14. Rare and semi-rare decays at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00213194; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The measurements of the rare $B^0$-meson-decay processes performed by the ATLAS experiment at the LHC are reviewed. Particular attention will be given to the measurement of the branching ratio of the $B^0_s$ and $B^0_d$ mesons decays into a pair of muons with the full Run 1 dataset corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 25 $\\rm{fb^{-1}}$.

  15. Rare events: a state of the art

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uppuluri, V.R.R.

    1980-12-01

    The study of rare events has become increasingly important in the context of nuclear safety. Some philosophical considerations, such as the framework for the definition of a rare event, rare events and science, rare events and trans-science, and rare events and public perception, are discussed. The technical work of the Task Force on problems of Rare Events in the Reliability Analysis of Nuclear Plants (1976-1978), sponsored by OECD, is reviewed. Some recent technical considerations are discussed, and conclusions are drawn. The appendix contains an essay written by Anne E. Beachey, under the title: A Study of Rare Events - Problems and Promises

  16. Rare Earth Garnet Selective Emitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, Roland A.; Chubb, Donald L.; Farmer, Serene C.; Good, Brian S.

    1994-01-01

    Thin film Ho-YAG and Er-YAG emitters with a platinum substrate exhibit high spectral emittance in the emission band (epsilon(sub lambda) approx. = 0.75, sup 4)|(sub 15/2) - (sup 4)|(sub 13/2),for Er-YAG and epsilon(sub lambda) approx. = 0.65, (sup 5)|(sub 7) - (sup 5)|(sub 8) for Ho-YAG) at 1500 K. In addition, low out-of-band spectral emittance, epsilon(sub lambda) less than 0.2, suggest these materials would be excellent candidates for high efficiency selective emitters in thermophotovoltaic (TPV) systems operating at moderate temperatures (1200-1500 K). Spectral emittance measurements of the thin films were made (1.2 less than lambda less than 3.0 microns) and compared to the theoretical emittances calculated using measured values of the spectral extinction coefficient. In this paper we present the results for a new class of rare earth ion selective emitters. These emitters are thin sections (less than 1 mm) of yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) single crystal with a rare earth substitutional impurity. Selective emitters in the near IR are of special interest for thermophotovoltaic (TPV) energy conversion. The most promising solid selective emitters for use in a TPV system are rare earth oxides. Early spectral emittance work on rare earth oxides showed strong emission bands in the infrared (0.9 - 3 microns). However, the emittance outside the emission band was also significant and the efficiency of these emitters was low. Recent improvements in efficiency have been made with emitters fabricated from fine (5 - 10 microns) rare earth oxide fibers similar to the Welsbach mantle used in gas lanterns. However, the rare earth garnet emitters are more rugged than the mantle type emitters. A thin film selective emitter on a low emissivity substrate such as gold, platinum etc., is rugged and easily adapted to a wide variety of thermal sources. The garnet structure and its many subgroups have been successfully used as hosts for rare earth ions, introduced as substitutional

  17. Mutation breeding in chickpea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    Chickpea is an important food legume in Turkey. Turkey is one of the most important gene centers in the world for legumes. The most widely known characteristic of chickpea is that it is an important vegetable protein source used in human and animal nutrition. However, the dry grains of chickpea, has 2-3 times more protein than our traditional food of wheat. In addition, cheakpea is also energy source because of its high carbohydrate content. It is very rich in some vitamin and mineral basis. In the plant breeding, mutation induction has become an effective way of supplementing existing germplasm and improving cultivars. Many successful examples of mutation induction have proved that mutation breeding is an effective and important approach to food legume improvement. The induced mutation technique in chickpea has proved successful and good results have been attained. Realizing the potential of induced mutations, a mutation breeding programme was initiated at the Nuclear Agriculture Section of the Saraykoey Nuclear Research and Training Center in 1994. The purpose of the study was to obtain high yielding chickpea mutants with large seeds, good cooking quality and high protein content. Beside this some characters such as higher adaptation ability, tolerant to cold and drought, increased machinery harvest type, higher yield, resistant to diseases especially to antracnose and pest were investigated too. Parents varieties were ILC-482, AK-7114 and AKCIN-91 (9 % seed moisture content and germination percentage 98 %) in these experiments. The irradiation doses were 0 (control), 50, 100, 150, 200, 250, 300, 350, 400, 500 ve 600 Gy for greenhouse experiments and 0 (control), 50, 100, 150, 200, 250, 300, 350 ve 400 Gy for field experiments, respectively. One thousand seeds for per treatment were sown in the field for the M 1 . At maturity, 3500 single plants were harvested and 20 seeds were taken from each M 1 plant and planted in the following season. During plant growth

  18. Low frequency of c-MPL gene mutations in Iranian patients with Philadelphia-negative myeloproliferative disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghotaslou, A; Nadali, F; Chahardouli, B; Alizad Ghandforosh, N; Rostami, S H; Alimoghaddam, K; Ghavamzadeh, A

    2015-01-01

    Myeloproliferative disorders are a group of diseases characterized by increased proliferation of myeloid lineage. In addition to JAK2V617F mutation, several mutations in the c-MPL gene have been reported in patients with philadelphia-negative chronic myeloproliferative disorders that could be important in the pathogenesis of diseases. The aim of the present study was to investigate the frequency of c-MPL and JAK2V617F mutations in Iranian patients with Philadelphia-negativemyeloproliferative disorders. Peripheral blood samples were collected from 60 patients with Philadelphia-negative MPD) Subgroups ET and PMF) and 25 healthy subjects as control group. The mutation status of c-MPL and Jak2V617F were investigated by using Amplification-refractory mutation system (ARMS) and Allele-Specific PCR (AS-PCR), respectively. The results were confirmed by sequencing. Among 60 patients, 34 (56.6%) and 1(1.7%) had Jak2V617F and c-MPL mutation, respectively. Patients with Jak2V617F mutation had higher WBC counts and hemoglobin concentration than those without the mutation (p= 0.005, p=0.003). In addition, for all healthy subjects in control group, mutations were negative. The present study revealed that the c-MPL mutations unlike the Jak2V617F mutations are rare in Iranian patients with Ph-negative MPNs and the low mutation rate should be considered in the design of screening strategies of MPD patients.

  19. GCM2-Activating Mutations in Familial Isolated Hyperparathyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Bin; Welch, James M; Sapp, Julie C; Ling, Hua; Li, Yulong; Johnston, Jennifer J; Kebebew, Electron; Biesecker, Leslie G; Simonds, William F; Marx, Stephen J; Agarwal, Sunita K

    2016-11-03

    Primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) is a common endocrine disease characterized by parathyroid hormone excess and hypercalcemia and caused by hypersecreting parathyroid glands. Familial PHPT occurs in an isolated nonsyndromal form, termed familial isolated hyperparathyroidism (FIHP), or as part of a syndrome, such as multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 or hyperparathyroidism-jaw tumor syndrome. The specific genetic or other cause(s) of FIHP are unknown. We performed exome sequencing on germline DNA of eight index-case individuals from eight unrelated kindreds with FIHP. Selected rare variants were assessed for co-segregation in affected family members and screened for in an additional 32 kindreds with FIHP. In eight kindreds with FIHP, we identified three rare missense variants in GCM2, a gene encoding a transcription factor required for parathyroid development. Functional characterization of the GCM2 variants and deletion analyses revealed a small C-terminal conserved inhibitory domain (CCID) in GCM2. Two of the three rare variants were recurrent, located in the GCM2 CCID, and found in seven of the 40 (18%) kindreds with FIHP. These two rare variants acted as gain-of-function mutations that increased the transcriptional activity of GCM2, suggesting that GCM2 is a parathyroid proto-oncogene. Our results demonstrate that germline-activating mutations affecting the CCID of GCM2 can cause FIHP. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Modeling AEC—New Approaches to Study Rare Genetic Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Peter J.; Dinella, Jason; Fete, Mary; Siegfried, Elaine C.; Koster, Maranke I.

    2015-01-01

    Ankyloblepharon-ectodermal defects-cleft lip/palate (AEC) syndrome is a rare monogenetic disorder that is characterized by severe abnormalities in ectoderm-derived tissues, such as skin and its appendages. A major cause of morbidity among affected infants is severe and chronic skin erosions. Currently, supportive care is the only available treatment option for AEC patients. Mutations in TP63, a gene that encodes key regulators of epidermal development, are the genetic cause of AEC. However, it is currently not clear how mutations in TP63 lead to the various defects seen in the patients’ skin. In this review, we will discuss current knowledge of the AEC disease mechanism obtained by studying patient tissue and genetically engineered mouse models designed to mimic aspects of the disorder. We will then focus on new approaches to model AEC, including the use of patient cells and stem cell technology to replicate the disease in a human tissue culture model. The latter approach will advance our understanding of the disease and will allow for the development of new in vitro systems to identify drugs for the treatment of skin erosions in AEC patients. Further, the use of stem cell technology, in particular induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC), will enable researchers to develop new therapeutic approaches to treat the disease using the patient’s own cells (autologous keratinocyte transplantation) after correction of the disease-causing mutations. PMID:24665072

  1. Global Carrier Rates of Rare Inherited Disorders Using Population Exome Sequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohei Fujikura

    Full Text Available Exome sequencing has revealed the causative mutations behind numerous rare, inherited disorders, but it is challenging to find reliable epidemiological values for rare disorders. Here, I provide a genetic epidemiology method to identify the causative mutations behind rare, inherited disorders using two population exome sequences (1000 Genomes and NHLBI. I created global maps of carrier rate distribution for 18 recessive disorders in 16 diverse ethnic populations. Out of a total of 161 mutations associated with 18 recessive disorders, I detected 24 mutations in either or both exome studies. The genetic mapping revealed strong international spatial heterogeneities in the carrier patterns of the inherited disorders. I next validated this methodology by statistically evaluating the carrier rate of one well-understood disorder, sickle cell anemia (SCA. The population exome-based epidemiology of SCA [African (allele frequency (AF = 0.0454, N = 2447, Asian (AF = 0, N = 286, European (AF = 0.000214, N = 4677, and Hispanic (AF = 0.0111, N = 362] was not significantly different from that obtained from a clinical prevalence survey. A pair-wise proportion test revealed no significant differences between the two exome projects in terms of AF (46/48 cases; P > 0.05. I conclude that population exome-based carrier rates can form the foundation for a prospectively maintained database of use to clinical geneticists. Similar modeling methods can be applied to many inherited disorders.

  2. Induced mutations in citrus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spiegel-Roy, P.; Vardi, Aliza

    1990-01-01

    Full text: Parthenocarpic tendency is an important prerequisite for successful induction of seedlessness in breeding and especially in mutation breeding. A gene for asynapsis and accompanying seedless fruit has been found by us in inbred progeny of cv. 'Wilking'. Using budwood irradiation by gamma rays, seedless mutants of 'Eureka' and 'Villafranca' lemon (original clone of the latter has 25 seeds) and 'Minneola' tangelo have been obtained. Ovule sterility of the three mutants is nearly complete, with some pollen fertility still remaining. A semi-compact mutant of Shamouti orange has been obtained by irradiation. A programme for inducing seedlessness in easy peeling citrus varieties and selections has been initiated. (author)

  3. Induced skeletal mutations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selby, P.B.

    1979-01-01

    This paper describes a large-scale experiment that, by means of breeding tests, confirmed that many dominant skeletal mutations are induced by large-dose radiation exposure. The author also discusses: (1) the major advantages and disadvantages of the skeletal method in improving estimates of genetic hazard to man; (2) future uses of the skeletal method; (3) direct estimation of risk beyond the first generation using the skeletal method; and (4) the possibility of using the skeletal method as a quick and easy screen for chemical mutagens

  4. Consequences of Marfan mutations to expression of fibrillin gene and to the structure of microfibrils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peltonen, L.; Karttunen, L.; Rantamaeki, T. [NPHI, Helsinki (Finland)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Marfan syndrome (MFS) is a dominantly inherited connective tissue disorder which is caused by mutations in the fibrillin-1 gene (FBN1). Over 40 family-specific FBN1 mutations have been identified. We have characterized 18 different heterozygous mutations including amino acid substitutions, premature stop, and splicing defects leading to deletions or one insertion, and one compound heterozygote with two differently mutated FBN1 alleles inherited from his affected parents. To unravel the consequences of FBN1 mutations to the transcription of FBN1 gene, we have measured the steady state levels of mRNA transcribed from the normal and mutated alleles. The missense mutations do not affect the transcription of the allele while the nonsense mutation leads to lower steady state amount of mutated allele. For the dissection of molecular pathogenesis of FBN1 mutations we have performed rotary shadowing of the microfibrils produced by the cell cultures from MFS patients. The cells from the neonatal patients with established mutations produced only disorganized fibrillin aggregates but no clearly defined microfibrils could be detected, suggesting a major role of this gene region coding for exons 24-26 in stabilization and organization of the bead structure of microfibrils. From the cells of a rare compound heterozygote case carrying two different mutations, no detectable microfibrils could be detected whereas the cells of his parents with heterozygous mutations were able to form identifiable but disorganized microfibrils. In the cells of an MFS case caused by a premature stop removing the C-terminus of fibrillin, the microfibril assembly takes place but the appropriate packing of the microfibrils is disturbed suggesting that C-terminae are actually located within the interbead domain of the microfibrils.

  5. Mutation Breeding Newsletter. No. 39

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This newsletter contains brief articles on the use of radiation to induce mutations in plants; radiation-induced mutants in Chrysanthemum; disrupting the association between oil and protein content in soybean seeds; mutation studies on bougainvillea; a new pepper cultivar; and the use of mutation induction to improve the quality of yam beans. A short review of the seminar on the use of mutation and related biotechnology for crop improvement in the Middle East and Mediterranean regions, and a description of a Co-ordinated Research Programme on the application of DNA-based marker mutations for the improvement of cereals and other sexually reproduced crop species are also included. Two tables are given: these are based on the ''FAO/IAEA Mutant Varieties Database'' and show the number of mutated varieties and the number of officially released mutant varieties in particular crops/species. Refs and tabs

  6. Detection of mutations in the COL4A5 gene by SSCP in X-linked Alport syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertz, Jens Michael; Juncker, I; Persson, U

    2001-01-01

    , three in-frame deletions, four nonsense mutations, and six splice site mutations. Twenty-two of the mutations have not previously been reported. Furthermore, we found one non-pathogenic amino acid substitution, one rare variant in a non-coding region, and one polymorphism with a heterozygosity of 28...... of type IV-collagen. We performed mutation analysis of the COL4A5 gene by PCR-SSCP analysis of each of the 51 exons with flanking intronic sequences in 81 patients suspected of X-linked Alport syndrome including 29 clear X-linked cases, 37 cases from families with a pedigree compatible with X...

  7. Testicular calculus: A rare case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Volkan; Bozkurt, Ozan; Demır, Omer; Tuna, Burcin; Yorukoglu, Kutsal; Esen, Adil

    2015-01-01

    Testicular calculus is an extremely rare case with unknown etiology and pathogenesis. To our knowledge, here we report the third case of testicular calculus. A 31-year-old man was admitted to our clinic with painful solid mass in left testis. After diagnostic work-up for a possible testicular tumour, he underwent inguinal orchiectomy and histopathologic examination showed a testicular calculus. Case hypothesis: Solid testicular lesions in young adults generally correspond to testicular cancer. Differential diagnosis should be done carefully. Future implications: In young adults with painful and solid testicular mass with hyperechogenic appearance on scrotal ultrasonography, testicular calculus must be kept in mind in differential diagnosis. Further reports on this topic may let us do more clear recommendations about the etiology and treatment of this rare disease.

  8. Neonatal hemophilia: a rare presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuno Ferreira

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Hemophilia A is a X-linked hereditary condition that lead to decreased factor VIII activity, occurs mainly in males. Decreased factor VIII activity leads to increased risk of bleeding events. During neonatal period, diagnosis is made after post-partum bleeding complication or unexpected bleeding after medical procedures. Subgaleal hemorrhage during neonatal period is a rare, severe extracranial bleeding with high mortality and usually related to traumatic labor or coagulation disorders. Subgaleal hemorrhage complications result from massive bleeding. We present a neonate with unremarkable family history and uneventful pregnancy with a vaginal delivery with no instrumentation, presenting with severe subgaleal bleeding at 52 hours of life. Aggressive support measures were implemented and bleeding managed. The unexpected bleeding lead to a coagulation study and the diagnosis of severe hemophilia A. There were no known sequelae. This case shows a rare hemophilia presentation reflecting the importance of coagulation studies when faced with unexplained severe bleeding.

  9. Chondroectodermal dysplasia: a rare syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana Tahririan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Chondroectodermal dysplasia (Ellis-Van Creveld syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive congenital abnormality. This syndrome is characterized by a spectrum of clinical findings, among which chondrodystrophy, polydactyly, ectodermal dysplasia, and congenital cardiac anomalies are the most common. It is imperative to not overlook the cardiac complications in patients with this syndrome during dental procedures. The case presented here, although quite rare, was detected under normal conditions and can be alarming for dental care providers. Clinical reports outline the classical and unusual oral and dental manifestations, which help health care providers diagnose chondroectodermal dysplasia, and refer patients with this syndrome to appropriate health care professionals to receive treatment to prevent further cardiac complications and bone deformities.

  10. Rare earth industries: Upstream business

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    Evidently, many factors contribute to the rush to invest in the unprecedented revival of rare earths. One major reason has to do with the rapidly growing world demand. The other reason relates to the attractive price of rare earths which is projected to stay strong in the coming years. This is because supply is predicted to have difficulty keeping pace with demand. Experts believe a major driver of global rare earths demand is the forecasted expansion in the green economy. Climate change is a major driver of the green economy. With climate change, there is concern that the uncontrolled emission of the greenhouse gases, especially carbon dioxide, can lead to catastrophic consequences for the world. This has been documented in countless studies and reports. Another important driver of the green economy is the growing shortfall in many resources. The world is now experiencing declines in key resources to meet a growing global demand. With more than 6 billion people now in the world and growing, the pressure exerted on global resources including energy, water and food is a major concern. Recent demand surge in China and India has dented the supply position of major world resources. The much quoted Stern Report from the UK has warned that, unless immediate steps are taken to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, it may be a costly exercise to undertake the corrections later. Since energy use, especially fossil fuels, is a major contributor to climate change, greener options are being sought. Add to that the fact that the fossil energy resources of the world are declining, the need to seek alternatives becomes even more urgent. One option is to change to renewable energy sources. These include such potentials as solar, wind and biomass. Rare earths have somehow become a critical feature of the technologies in such renewable. Another option is to improve the efficient use of energy in transport, buildings and all the other energy intensive industries. Again the technologies in

  11. Mutations induced in plant breeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barriga B, P.

    1984-01-01

    The most significant aspects of the use of ionizing radiations in plant breeding are reviewed. Aspects such as basic principles of mutation, expression and selection in obtention of mutants, methods for using induced mutations and sucess achieved with this methodology in plant breeding are reviewed. Results obtained in a program of induced mutation on wheat for high content of protein and lysine at the Universidad Austral de Chile are presented. (Author)

  12. Mutations induced in plant breeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barriga B, P. (Universidad Austral de Chile, Valdivia. Inst. de Produccion y Sanidad Vegetal)

    1984-10-01

    The most significant aspects of the use of ionizing radiations in plant breeding are reviewed. Aspects such as basic principles of mutation, expression and selection in obtention of mutants, methods for using induced mutations and sucess achieved with this methodology in plant breeding are reviewed. Results obtained in a program of induced mutation on wheat for high content of protein and lysine at the Universidad Austral de Chile are presented.

  13. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase homozygous mutation in a young boy with cerebellar infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Spalice

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Posterior circulation vascular occlusive disease in children is a rare and uncommonly reported event. Among the numerous risk factors, the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR mutation is considered to be a common genetic cause of thrombosis in adults and children. Recently, a link between the MTHFR mutation and cerebrovascular disorders was reported in children. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI is a great improvement on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, making the in vivo anatomical and pathological study of the brain and its fibers possible. In our patient cerebellar infarction was associated with MTHFR mutation and, in a standard neurological examination, DTI revealed normal white matter tracts.

  14. FANCA Gene Mutations with 8 Novel Molecular Changes in Indian Fanconi Anemia Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Solanki, Avani; Mohanty, Purvi; Shukla, Pallavi; Rao, Anita; Ghosh, Kanjaksha; Vundinti, Babu Rao

    2016-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA), a rare heterogeneous genetic disorder, is known to be associated with 19 genes and a spectrum of clinical features. We studied FANCA molecular changes in 34 unrelated and 2 siblings of Indian patients with FA and have identified 26 different molecular changes of FANCA gene, of which 8 were novel mutations (a small deletion c.2500delC, 4 non-sense mutations c.2182C>T, c.2630C>G, c.3677C>G, c.3189G>A; and 3 missense mutations; c.1273G>C, c.3679 G>C, and c.3992 T>C). Among t...

  15. A novel nonsense mutation in the WFS1 gene causes the Wolfram syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noorian, Shahab; Savad, Shahram; Mohammadi, Davood Shah

    2016-05-01

    Wolfram syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder, which is mostly caused by mutations in the WFS1 gene. The WFS1 gene product, which is called wolframin, is thought to regulate the function of endoplasmic reticulum. The endoplasmic reticulum has a critical role in protein folding and material transportation within the cell or to the surface of the cell. Identification of new mutations in WFS1 gene will unravel the molecular pathology of WS. The aim of this case report study is to describe a novel mutation in exon 4 of the WFS1 gene (c.330C>A) in a 9-year-old boy with WS.

  16. Glaucoma and Cytochrome P4501B1 Gene Mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukesh Tanwar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Developmental anomalies of the ocular anterior chamber angle may lead to an incomplete development of the structures that form the conventional aqueous outflow pathway. Thus, disorders that present with such dysfunction tend to be associated with glaucoma. Among them, Axenfeld-Rieger (ARS malformation is a rare clinical entity with an estimated prevalence of one in every 200,000 individuals. The changes in eye morphogenesis in ARS are highly penetrant and are associated with 50% risk of development of glaucoma. Mutations in the cytochrome P4501B1 (CYP1B1 gene have been reported to be associated with primary congenital glaucoma and other forms of glaucoma and mutations in pituitary homeobox 2 (PITX2 gene have been identified in ARS in various studies. This case was negative for PITX2 mutations and compound heterozygote for CYP1B1 mutations. Clinical manifestations of this patient include bilateral elevated intraocular pressure (>40 mmHg with increased corneal diameter (>14 mm and corneal opacity. Patient also had iridocorneal adhesions, anteriorly displaced Schwalbe line, anterior insertion of iris, broad nasal bridge and protruding umbilicus. This is the first study from north India reporting CYP1B1 mutations in Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome with bilateral buphthalmos and early onset glaucoma. Result of this study supports the role of CYP1B1 as a causative gene in ASD disorders and its role in oculogenesis.

  17. Expanding the mutation and clinical spectrum of Roberts syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afifi, Hanan H; Abdel-Salam, Ghada M H; Eid, Maha M; Tosson, Angie M S; Shousha, Wafaa Gh; Abdel Azeem, Amira A; Farag, Mona K; Mehrez, Mennat I; Gaber, Khaled R

    2016-07-01

    Roberts syndrome and SC phocomelia syndrome are rare autosomal recessive genetic disorders representing the extremes of the spectrum of severity of the same condition, caused by mutations in ESCO2 gene. We report three new patients with Roberts syndrome from three unrelated consanguineous Egyptian families. All patients presented with growth retardation, mesomelic shortening of the limbs more in the upper than in the lower limbs and microcephaly. Patients were subjected to clinical, cytogenetic and radiologic examinations. Cytogenetic analysis showed the characteristic premature separation of centromeres and puffing of heterochromatic regions. Further, sequencing of the ESCO2 gene identified a novel mutation c.244_245dupCT (p.T83Pfs*20) in one family besides two previously reported mutations c.760_761insA (p.T254Nfs*27) and c.764_765delTT (p.F255Cfs*25). All mutations were in homozygous state, in exon 3. The severity of the mesomelic shortening of the limbs and craniofacial anomalies showed variability among patients. Interestingly, patient 1 had abnormal skin hypopigmentation. Serial fetal ultrasound examinations and measurements of long bones diagnosed two affected fetuses in two of the studied families. A literature review and case comparison was performed. In conclusion, we report a novel ESCO2 mutation and expand the clinical spectrum of Roberts syndrome. © 2015 Japanese Teratology Society.

  18. Validation of an NGS mutation detection panel for melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiman, Anne; Kikuchi, Hugh; Scocchia, Daniela; Smith, Peter; Tsang, Yee Wah; Snead, David; Cree, Ian A

    2017-02-22

    Knowledge of the genotype of melanoma is important to guide patient management. Identification of mutations in BRAF and c-KIT lead directly to targeted treatment, but it is also helpful to know if there are driver oncogene mutations in NRAS, GNAQ or GNA11 as these patients may benefit from alternative strategies such as immunotherapy. While polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods are often used to detect BRAF mutations, next generation sequencing (NGS) is able to determine all of the necessary information on several genes at once, with potential advantages in turnaround time. We describe here an Ampliseq hotspot panel for melanoma for use with the IonTorrent Personal Genome Machine (PGM) which covers the mutations currently of most clinical interest. We have validated this in 151 cases of skin and uveal melanoma from our files, and correlated the data with PCR based assessment of BRAF status. There was excellent agreement, with few discrepancies, though NGS does have greater coverage and picks up some mutations that would be missed by PCR. However, these are often rare and of unknown significance for treatment. PCR methods are rapid, less time-consuming and less expensive than NGS, and could be used as triage for patients requiring more extensive diagnostic workup. The NGS panel described here is suitable for clinical use with formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) samples.

  19. Homozygous STIL mutation causes holoprosencephaly and microcephaly in two siblings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Mouden

    Full Text Available Holoprosencephaly (HPE is a frequent congenital malformation of the brain characterized by impaired forebrain cleavage and midline facial anomalies. Heterozygous mutations in 14 genes have been identified in HPE patients that account for only 30% of HPE cases, suggesting the existence of other HPE genes. Data from homozygosity mapping and whole-exome sequencing in a consanguineous Turkish family were combined to identify a homozygous missense mutation (c.2150G>A; p.Gly717Glu in STIL, common to the two affected children. STIL has a role in centriole formation and has previously been described in rare cases of microcephaly. Rescue experiments in U2OS cells showed that the STIL p.Gly717Glu mutation was not able to fully restore the centriole duplication failure following depletion of endogenous STIL protein indicating the deleterious role of the mutation. In situ hybridization experiments using chick embryos demonstrated that expression of Stil was in accordance with a function during early patterning of the forebrain. It is only the second time that a STIL homozygous mutation causing a recessive form of HPE was reported. This result also supports the genetic heterogeneity of HPE and increases the panel of genes to be tested for HPE diagnosis.

  20. Consistent absence of BRAF mutations in salivary gland carcinomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nooshin Mohtasham

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Malignant salivary gland tumors are rare entities. Despite advances in surgery, radiation therapy and chemotherapy, the rate of the mortality and five-year survival has not been improved markedly over the last few decades. The activation of EGFR- RAS-RAF signaling pathway contributes to the initiation and progression of many human cancers, promising a key pathway for therapeutic molecules. Thus, the objective of this study was to evaluate BRAF mutations in salivary gland carcinomas. Methods: We designed PCR- RFLP (Polymerase Chain Reaction -Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism and screened 50 salivary gland carcinomas (SGCs including mucoepidermoid carcinoma (MEC, adenoid cystic carcinoma (AdCC and polymorphous low grade adenocarcinoma (PLGA for the BRAF V600E mutation. Results: PCR-RFLP analyses demonstrated no mutation in BRAF exon 15 for SGC samples at position V600, which is the most commonly mutated site for BRAF in human cancer. Conclusions: According to our results SGCs didn’t acquire BRAF mutations that result in a constitutive activation of the signaling cascade downstream of EGFR, hence SGCs can be a good candidate for anti EGFR therapies.

  1. Rare gases in Samoan xenoliths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poreda, R. J.; Farley, K. A.

    1992-09-01

    The rare gas isotopic compositions of residual harzburgite xenoliths from Savai'i (SAV locality) and an unnamed seamount south of the Samoan chain (PPT locality) provide important constraints on the rare gas evolution of the mantle and atmosphere. Despite heterogeneous trace element compositions, the rare gas characteristics of the xenoliths from each of the two localities are strikingly similar. SAV and PPT xenoliths have 3He/ 4He ratios of11.1 ± 0.5 R A and21.6 ± 1 R A, respectively; this range is comparable to the 3He/ 4He ratios in Samoan lavas and clearly demonstrates that they have trapped gases from a relatively undegassed reservoir. The neon results are not consistent with mixing between MORB and a plume source with an atmospheric signature. Rather, the neon isotopes reflect either a variably degassed mantle (with a relative order of degassing of Loihi Honda et al. that the 20Ne/ 22Ne ratio in the mantle more closely resembles the solar ratio than the atmospheric one. 40Ar/ 36Ar ratios in the least contaminated samples range from 4,000 to 12,000 with the highest values in the 22 RA PPT xenoliths. There is no evidence for atmospheric 40Ar/ 36Ar ratios in the mantle source of these samples, which indicates that the lower mantle may have 40Ar/ 36Ar ratios in excess of 5,000. Xenon isotopic anomalies in 129Xe and 136Xe are as high as 6%, or about half of the maximum MORB excess and are consistent with the less degassed nature of the Samoan mantle source. These results contradict previous suggestions that the high 3He/ 4He mantle has a near-atmospheric heavy rare gas isotopic composition.

  2. Os Odontoideum: Rare Cervical Lesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristie A Robson

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a 22-year-old Marine who presented to the emergency department, after a martial arts exercise, with transient weakness and numbness in all extremities. Computed tomography cervical spine radiographs revealed os odontoideum. Lateral flexion–extension radiographs identified atlanto-axillary instability. This abnormality is rare and can be career ending for military members who do not undergo surgical fusion. [West J Emerg Med. 2011;12(4:520–522.

  3. Carcinoma caecum - a rare presentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, T.; Mudasser, S.; Mudsser, S.; Sarwar, M.

    2010-01-01

    Caecal and right sided colonic cancers mostly present with fatigue, weakness and iron deficiency anemia. Such tumours rarely perforate posteriorly and involve the retroperitoneum. We report a case of an old Omani lady who came with insidious sign and symptoms of perforated caecum leading to retroperitoneal collection and necrotizing fasciitis of abdominal wall due to carcinoma of caecum. She underwent surgery but despite active intervention, she died because of septicemic shock. (author)

  4. Intracranial chondroma: a rare entity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maheshwari, Veena; Mehdi, Ghazala; Varshney, Manoranjan; Jain, Anshu; Vashishtha, Sonal; Gaur, Kavita; Srivastava, Vinod Kumar

    2011-05-12

    Intracranial chondroma is a rare benign cartilaginous tumour with an incidence of less than 1% of all primary intracranial tumours. The authors are reporting here a case of intracranial chondroma in a 40-year-old man who presented with 5-month history of headache and gradual diminution of vision. A tentative diagnosis of chondroma was made on imprint cytology which was confirmed on histopathological examination.

  5. Sirenomelia Apus: A Rare Deformity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kshirsagar, Vinayak Y.; Ahmed, Minhajuddin; Colaco, Sylvia M.

    2012-01-01

    Sirenomelia also known as the mermaid syndrome, is a rare congenital malformation of uncertain etiology. It is characterized by fusion of the lower limbs and commonly associated with severe urogenital and gastrointestinal malformations. There are approximately 300 cases reported in the literature, 15% of which are associated with twinning, most often monozygotic. The syndrome of caudal regression is thought to be the result of injury to the caudal mesoderm early in gestation. PMID:24027712

  6. Sirenomelia apus: a rare deformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kshirsagar, Vinayak Y; Ahmed, Minhajuddin; Colaco, Sylvia M

    2012-07-01

    Sirenomelia also known as the mermaid syndrome, is a rare congenital malformation of uncertain etiology. It is characterized by fusion of the lower limbs and commonly associated with severe urogenital and gastrointestinal malformations. There are approximately 300 cases reported in the literature, 15% of which are associated with twinning, most often monozygotic. The syndrome of caudal regression is thought to be the result of injury to the caudal mesoderm early in gestation.

  7. Macrodystrophia lipomatosa: a rare presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushil G. Kachewar

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Macrodystrophia lipomatosa is a rare congenital nonhereditary mesenchymal hamartomatous malformation resulting in localized gigantism of parts of extremities that manifests clinically as macrodactyly or megalodactyly. Radiological and Pathological hallmark is the disproportionate fibroadipose tissue proliferation in subcutaneous tissue, nerve sheaths, and periosteum that leads to soft tissue and bony enlargement. As imaging is the key to early diagnosis, findings on various modalities like plain radiographs, CT scan and MRI are highlighted here.

  8. Genetic analysis of rare disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van den Berg, Stéphanie M; von Bornemann Hjelmborg, Jacob

    2012-01-01

    Twin concordance rates provide insight into the possibility of a genetic background for a disease. These concordance rates are usually estimated within a frequentistic framework. Here we take a Bayesian approach. For rare diseases, estimation methods based on asymptotic theory cannot be applied due....... The Bayesian method is able to include prior information on both concordance rates and prevalence rates at the same time and is illustrated using twin data on cleft lip and rheumatoid arthritis....

  9. Rare Earth Oxide Thin Films

    CERN Document Server

    Fanciulli, Marco

    2007-01-01

    Thin rare earth (RE) oxide films are emerging materials for microelectronic, nanoelectronic, and spintronic applications. The state-of-the-art of thin film deposition techniques as well as the structural, physical, chemical, and electrical properties of thin RE oxide films and of their interface with semiconducting substrates are discussed. The aim is to identify proper methodologies for the development of RE oxides thin films and to evaluate their effectiveness as innovative materials in different applications.

  10. Rare earth niobate coordination polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muniz, Collin N.; Patel, Hiral; Fast, Dylan B.; Rohwer, Lauren E. S.; Reinheimer, Eric W.; Dolgos, Michelle; Graham, Matt W.; Nyman, May

    2018-03-01

    Rare-earth (RE) coordination polymers are infinitely tailorable to yield luminescent materials for various applications. Here we described the synthesis of a heterometallic rare-earth coordination compound ((CH3)2SO)3(RE)NbO(C2O4)3((CH3)2SO) = dimethylsulfoxide, DMSO, (C2O2= oxalate), (RE=La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb). The structure was obtained from single crystal X-ray diffraction of the La analogue. The Nb˭O and DMSO terminal-bonding character guides assembly of an open framework structure with noncentrosymmetric RE-coordination geometry, and large spacing between the RE centers. A second structure was observed by PXRD for the smaller rare earths (Dy, Ho, Er, Yb); this structure has not yet been determined. The materials were further characterized using FTIR, and photoluminescence measurements. Characteristic excitation and emission transitions were observed for RE = Nd, Sm, Eu, and Tb. Quantum yield (QY) measurements were performed by exciting Eu and Tb analoges at 394 nm (QY 66%) and 464 nm (QY 71%) for Eu; and 370 nm (QY=40%) for Tb. We attribute the high QY and bright luminescence to two main structure-function properties of the system; namely the absence of water in the structure, and absence of concentration quenching.

  11. Rare earth industry in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, D.S.

    2016-01-01

    Rare Earths (RE) comprises of 17 elements i.e. elements from atomic No. 57-71 (lanthanide series) along with yttrium (atomic No. 39) and scandium (atomic No. 21). They exhibit special electronic, magnetic, optical and catalytic properties. The first 7 elements in the lanthanide series from atomic Nos. 57 to 63 (La to Eu) are called Light Rare Earths (LRE), while the remaining elements from atomic Nos. 64 to 71 (Gd to Lu) are grouped as Heavy Rare Earths (HRE). Scandium and Yttrium have properties similar to HRE. The concentration of the REs in the earth's crust is as high as some other elements including that of copper. The only difference is that REs do not occur as separate minerals amenable for easy exploration and mining and are widely distributed across the earth's surface, hence they are called as REs. Resources In India, monazite has been the principal source of RE. It occurs in association with other heavy minerals, such as ilmenite, rutile, zircon etc. in the beach sands and inland placer deposits. The monazite content in this assemblage varies from negligible quantity to as high as 5%. As per AMD resource estimation, the reported resource of monazite in India is about 11.93 million tons which corresponds with about 6.9 million tons of RE oxides. Although India possesses large deposits of monazite, the heavier RE are not present in sufficient quantities in this mineral. (author)

  12. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 43

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-10-01

    This issue of the Newsletter includes articles dealing with radiation induced mutation based plant breeding research findings aimed at improving productivity, disease resistance and tolerance of stress conditions

  13. Mutation breeding in mangosteen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Khalid Mohd Zain

    2002-01-01

    Mangosteen the queen of the tropical fruits is apomitic and only a cultivar is reported and it reproduces asexually. Conventional breeding is not possible and the other methods to create variabilities are through genetic engineering and mutation breeding. The former technique is still in the infantry stage in mangosteen research while the latter has been an established tool in breeding to improve cultivars. In this mutation breeding seeds of mangosteen were irradiated using gamma rays and the LD 50 for mangosteen was determined and noted to be very low at 10 Gy. After sowing in the seedbed, the seedlings were transplanted in polybags and observed in the nursery bed for about one year before planted in the field under old oil palm trees in Station MARDI, Kluang. After evaluation and screening, about 120 mutant mangosteen plants were selected and planted in Kluang. The plants were observed and some growth data taken. There were some mutant plants that have good growth vigour and more vigorous that the control plants. The trial are now in the fourth year and the plants are still in the juvenile stage. (Author)

  14. Mutation breeding in chickpea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagel, Z.; Tutluer, M. I.; Peskircioglu, H.; Kantoglu, Y.; Kunter, B.

    2009-01-01

    Chickpea is an important food legume in Turkey. Turkey is one of the most important gene centers in the world for legumes. Realizing the potential of induced mutations, a mutation breeding programme was initiated at the Nuclear Agriculture Section of the Saraykoy Nuclear Research and Training Center in 1994. The purpose of the study was to obtain high yielding chickpea mutants with large seeds, good cooking quality and high protein content. Beside this some characters such as higher adaptation ability, tolerant to cold and drought, increased machinery harvest type, higher yield, resistant to diseases especially to antracnose and pest were investigated too. Parent varieties were ILC-482, AK-7114 and AKCIN-91 had been used in these experiments. The irradiation doses were 0 (control), 50, 100, 150, 200, 250, 300, 350 and 400 Gy for field experiments, respectively. As a result of these experiments, two promising mutant lines were chosen and given to the Seed Registration and Certification Center for official registration These two promising mutants were tested at five different locations of Turkey, in 2004 and 2005 years. After 2 years of registration experiments one of outstanding mutants was officially released as mutant chickpea variety under the name TAEK-SAGEL, in 2006. Some basic characteristics of this mutant are; earliness (95-100 day), high yield capacity (180-220 kg/da), high seed protein (22-25 %), first pot height (20-25 cm), 100 seeds weight (42-48 g), cooking time (35-40 min) and resistance to Ascochyta blight.

  15. A frame-shift mutation of PMS2 is a widespread cause of Lynch syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clendenning, Mark; Senter, Leigha; Hampel, Heather

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: When compared to the other mismatch repair genes involved in Lynch syndrome, the identification of mutations within PMS2 has been limited (Lynch syndrome cases...... on immunohistochemical analysis. RESULTS: We have identified a frequently occurring frame-shift mutation (c.736_741del6ins11) in 12 ostensibly unrelated Lynch syndrome patients (20% of patients we have identified with a deleterious mutation in PMS2, n=61). These individuals all display the rare allele (population...... are caused by PMS2. This disparity is primarily due to complications in the study of this gene caused by interference from pseudogene sequences. METHODS: Using a recently developed method for detecting PMS2 specific mutations, we have screened 99 patients who are likely candidates for PMS2 mutations based...

  16. A new nonsense mutation in the NF1 gene with neurofibromatosis-Noonan syndrome phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yimenicioğlu, Sevgi; Yakut, Ayten; Karaer, Kadri; Zenker, Martin; Ekici, Arzu; Carman, Kürşat Bora

    2012-12-01

    Neurofibromatosis-Noonan syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant disorder which combines neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) features with Noonan syndrome. NF1 gene mutations are reported in the majority of these patients. Sequence analysis of the established genes for Noonan syndrome revealed no mutation; a heterozygous NF1 point mutation c.7549C>T in exon 51, creating a premature stop codon (p.R2517X), had been demonstrated. Neurofibromatosis-Noonan syndrome recently has been considered a subtype of NF1 and caused by different NF1 mutations. We report the case of a 14-year-old boy with neurofibromatosis type 1 with Noonan-like features, who complained of headache with triventricular hydrocephaly and a heterozygous NF1 point mutation c.7549C>T in exon 51.

  17. De novo activating epidermal growth factor mutations (EGFR) in small-cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thai, Alesha; Chia, Puey L; Russell, Prudence A; Do, Hongdo; Dobrovic, Alex; Mitchell, Paul; John, Thomas

    2017-09-01

    In Australia, mutations in epidermal growth factor mutations (EGFR) occur in 15% of patients diagnosed with non-small-cell lung cancer and are found with higher frequency in female, non-smokers of Asian ethnicity. Activating mutations in the EGFR gene are rarely described in SCLC. We present two cases of de novo EGFR mutations in patients with SCLC detected in tissue and in plasma cell free DNA, both of whom were of Asian ethnicity and never-smokers. These two cases add to the growing body of evidence suggesting that screening for EGFR mutations in SCLC should be considered in patients with specific clinical features. © 2017 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  18. Exercise Intolerance and Myoglobinuria Associated with a Novel Maternally Inherited MT-ND1 Mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rafiq, Jabin; Duno, Morten; Østergaard, Elsebet

    2016-01-01

    The most common clinical phenotype caused by a mtDNA mutation in complex I of the mitochondrial respiratory chain is Leber hereditary optic neuropathy. We report a family with a novel maternally inherited homoplasmic mtDNA m.4087A>G mutation in the ND1 gene (MT-ND1) associated with isolated...... myopathy, recurrent episodes of myoglobinuria, and rhabdomyolysis. DNA from blood in seven family members and muscle from four family members were PCR amplified and sequenced directly and assessed for the m.4087A>G variation in MT-ND1. Mitochondrial enzyme activity in all muscle biopsies was measured. PCR...... myoglobinuria is a rare phenotype of mitochondrial myopathies. We report this phenotype in a family affected by a novel homoplasmic mutation in MT-ND1. It is the first time such a phenotype has been associated with complex I gene mutations and a homoplasmic mutation of mtDNA....

  19. A frame-shift mutation of PMS2 is a widespread cause of Lynch syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clendenning, Mark; Senter, Leigha; Hampel, Heather

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: When compared to the other mismatch repair genes involved in Lynch syndrome, the identification of mutations within PMS2 has been limited (Lynch syndrome cases...... on immunohistochemical analysis. RESULTS: We have identified a frequently occurring frame-shift mutation (c.736_741del6ins11) in 12 ostensibly unrelated Lynch syndrome patients (20% of patients we have identified with a deleterious mutation in PMS2, n=61). These individuals all display the rare allele (population...... and Swedish ancestry. We estimate that there are >10,000 carriers of this mutation in the United States alone. The identification of both the mutation and the common haplotype in one Swedish control sample (n = 225), along with evidence that Lynch syndrome associated cancers are rarer than expected...

  20. Concurrent IDH1 and SMARCB1 Mutations in Pediatric Medulloblastoma: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moatasem El-Ayadi

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Isocitrate Dehydrogenase-1 (IDH1 is a driver gene in several cancers including brain tumors such as low-grade and high-grade gliomas. Mutations of SMARCB1 were described in atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumors and to date have not been associated with the pathogenesis of medulloblastoma. We report concurrent IDH1 and SMARCB1 mutations in a medulloblastoma patient. We searched the catalog of somatic mutations in cancer (COSMIC database and other mutation databases and -to our knowledge- this is the first reported case of medulloblastoma harboring both mutations together. Our patient is a 13-year-old male presenting with headache and vomiting at diagnosis. MRI revealed left cerebellar expansive lesion with no evidence of metastasis. A histopathological diagnosis of desmoplastic/nodular medulloblastoma was made after complete resection of the tumor. Immunophenotypic characterization and methylation profiling suggested a medulloblastoma with SHH activation. Next generation sequencing of a panel of 400 genes revealed heterozygous somatic IDH1(p.R132C, SMARCB1(p.R201Q, and CDH11(p.L625T mutations. The patient was treated according to the HIT-SIOP PNET 4 protocol. He is in complete remission more than 2 years after diagnosis. In conclusion, increasing use of high throughput sequencing will certainly increase the frequency with which rare mutations or mutation combinations are identified. The exact frequency of this mutation combination and whether it has any particular therapeutic implications or prognostic relevance requires further investigation.

  1. Clinical and biological characteristics of cervical neoplasias with FGFR3 mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiery Jean

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have previously reported activating mutations of the gene coding for the fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3 in invasive cervical carcinoma. To further analyze the role of FGFR3 in cervical tumor progression, we extended our study to screen a total of 75 invasive tumors and 80 cervical intraepithelial neoplasias (40 low-grade and 40 high-grade lesions. Results Using single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP followed by DNA sequencing, we found FGFR3 mutation (S249C in all cases in 5% of invasive cervical carcinomas and no mutation in intraepithelial lesions. These results suggest that, unlike in bladder carcinoma, FGFR3 mutation does not or rarely occur in non invasive lesions. Compared to patients with wildtype FGFR3 tumor, patients with S249C FGFR3 mutated tumors were older (mean age 64 vs. 49.4 years, P = 0.02, and were more likely to be associated with a non-16/18 HPV type in their tumor. Gene expression analysis demonstrated that FGFR3 mutated tumors were associated with higher FGFR3b mRNA expression levels compared to wildtype FGFR3 tumors. Supervised analysis of Affymetrix expression data identified a significant number of genes specifically differentially expressed in tumors with respect to FGFR3 mutation status. Conclusion This study suggest that tumors with FGFR3 mutation appear to have distinctive clinical and biological characteristics that may help in defining a population of patients for FGFR3 mutation screening.

  2. Identification of four novel mutations of the WFS1 gene in Iranian Wolfram syndrome pedigrees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghahraman, Martha; Abbaszadegan, Mohammad Reza; Vakili, Rahim; Hosseini, Sousan; Fardi Golyan, Fatemeh; Ghaemi, Nosrat; Forghanifard, Mohammad Mahdi

    2016-12-01

    Wolfram syndrome is a rare neurodegenerative disorder with an autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance characterized by various clinical manifestations. The related gene, WFS1, encodes a transmembrane glycoprotein, named wolframin. Genetic analyses demonstrated that mutations in this gene are associated with WS type 1. Our aim in this study was to sequence WFS1 coding region in Iranian Wolfram syndrome pedigrees. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood of 12 WS patients and their healthy parents. Exons 2-8 and the exon-intron junctions of WFS1 were sequenced. DNA sequences were compared to the reference using Sequencher software. Molecular analysis of WFS1 revealed six different mutations. Four novel and two previously reported mutations were identified. One novel mutation, c.1379_1381del, is predicted to produce an aberrant protein. A second novel mutation, c.1384G > T, encodes a truncated protein. Novel mutation, c.1097-1107dup (11 bp), causes a frameshift which results in a premature stop codon. We screened for the novel missense mutation, c.1010C > T, in 100 control alleles. This mutation was not found in any of the healthy controls. Our study increased the spectrum of WFS1 mutations and supported the role of WFS1 in susceptibility to WS. We hope that these findings open new horizons to future molecular investigations which may help to prevent and treat this devastating disease.

  3. Characterization of Autosomal Dominant Hypercholesterolemia Caused by PCSK9 Gain of Function Mutations and Its Specific Treatment With Alirocumab, a PCSK9 Monoclonal Antibody

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hopkins, Paul N.; Defesche, Joep; Fouchier, Sigrid W.; Bruckert, Eric; Luc, Gérald; Cariou, Bertrand; Sjouke, Barbara; Leren, Trond P.; Harada-Shiba, Mariko; Mabuchi, Hiroshi; Rabès, Jean-Pierre; Carrié, Alain; van Heyningen, Charles; Carreau, Valérie; Farnier, Michel; Teoh, Yee P.; Bourbon, Mafalda; Kawashiri, Masa-Aki; Nohara, Atsushi; Soran, Handrean; Marais, A. David; Tada, Hayato; Abifadel, Marianne; Boileau, Catherine; Chanu, Bernard; Katsuda, Shoji; Kishimoto, Ichiro; Lambert, Gilles; Makino, Hisashi; Miyamoto, Yoshihiro; Pichelin, Matthieu; Yagi, Kunimasa; Yamagishi, Masakazu; Zair, Yassine; Mellis, Scott; Yancopoulos, George D.; Stahl, Neil; Mendoza, Johanna; Du, Yunling; Hamon, Sara; Krempf, Michel; Swergold, Gary D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients with PCSK9 gene gain of function (GOF) mutations have a rare form of autosomal dominant hypercholesterolemia. However, data examining their clinical characteristics and geographic distribution are lacking. Furthermore, no randomized treatment study in this population has been

  4. Novel homozygous FANCL mutation and somatic heterozygous SETBP1 mutation in a Chinese girl with Fanconi Anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Weiqing; Liu, Yang; Zhou, Qinghua; Wang, Qin; Luo, Fuwei; Xu, Zhiyong; Geng, Qian; Li, Peining; Zhang, Hui Z; Xie, Jiansheng

    2017-07-01

    Fanconi Anemia (FA) is a rare genetically heterogeneous disorder with 17 known complement groups caused by mutations in different genes. FA complementation group L (FA-L, OMIM #608111) occurred in 0.2% of all FA and only eight mutant variants in the FANCL gene were documented. Phenotype and genotype correlation in FANCL associated FA is still obscure. Here we describe a Chinese girl with FA-L caused by a novel homozygous mutation c.822_823insCTTTCAGG (p.Asp275LeufsX13) in the FANCL gene. The patient's clinical course was typical for FA with progression to bone marrow failure, and death from acute myelomonocytic leukemia (AML-M4) at 9 years of age. Mutation analysis also detected a likely somatic c.2608G > A (p.Gly870Ser) in the SETBP1 gene. Consistent copy number losses of 7q and 18p and gains of 3q and 21q and accumulated non-clonal single cell chromosomal abnormalities were detected in blood leukocytes as her FA progressed. This is the first Chinese FA-L case caused by a novel FANCL mutation. The somatic gene mutation and copy number aberrations could be used to monitor disease progression and the clinical findings provide further information for genotype-phenotype correlation for FA-L. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Rare earths: occurrence, production and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murthy, T.K.S.; Mukherjee, T.K.

    2002-01-01

    The mining and processing of rare earth minerals, particularly of monazite, began in a modest way in 1880s for commercialized production of mantle for gas lighting. For all major applications up to mid-twentieth century- production of lighter flints, misch metal as a metallurgical alloying agent, colouring, decolourizing and polishing agents for glass, petroleum cracking catalysts and arc-carbons, unseparated or partially separated rare earths were adequate. These applications continue till today. With the development and industrial application of powerful techniques like ion exchange and solvent extraction for the separation of rare earths, the decades after 1960 saw increasing utilization of the specific properties of the individual rare earths. Some of these advanced technological applications include: special glass for optical systems including camera lenses, phosphors for colour television, cathode ray tubes and fluorescent lighting, X-ray intensification screens, high intensity permanent magnets, electro optical devices, lasers, hydrogen storage materials, hydride rechargeable batteries, photomagnetic data storage systems, autoexhaust catalysts, special ceramics of unusual toughness, artificial diamonds and nonpoisonous plastic colorants. The topics covered in the book include rare earths: their story identity, rare earth resources, processing of ores and recovery of mixed rare earths products, separation and purification of rare earths, nonmetallic applications of rare earths, rare earth metals: production and applications, rare earth alloys and their applications, analysis of rare earth, processing of rare earth resources in India by Indian Rare Earth Ltd. and availability and market conditions

  6. A genetic cluster of patients with variant xeroderma pigmentosum with two different founder mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munford, V; Castro, L P; Souto, R; Lerner, L K; Vilar, J B; Quayle, C; Asif, H; Schuch, A P; de Souza, T A; Ienne, S; Alves, F I A; Moura, L M S; Galante, P A F; Camargo, A A; Liboredo, R; Pena, S D J; Sarasin, A; Chaibub, S C; Menck, C F M

    2017-05-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is a rare human syndrome associated with hypersensitivity to sunlight and a high frequency of skin tumours at an early age. We identified a community in the state of Goias (central Brazil), a sunny and tropical region, with a high incidence of XP (17 patients among approximately 1000 inhabitants). To identify gene mutations in the affected community and map the distribution of the affected alleles, correlating the mutations with clinical phenotypes. Functional analyses of DNA repair capacity and cell-cycle responses after ultraviolet exposure were investigated in cells from local patients with XP, allowing the identification of the mutated gene, which was then sequenced to locate the mutations. A specific assay was designed for mapping the distribution of these mutations in the community. Skin primary fibroblasts showed normal DNA damage removal but abnormal DNA synthesis after ultraviolet irradiation and deficient expression of the Polη protein, which is encoded by POLH. We detected two different POLH mutations: one at the splice donor site of intron 6 (c.764 +1 G>A), and the other in exon 8 (c.907 C>T, p.Arg303X). The mutation at intron 6 is novel, whereas the mutation at exon 8 has been previously described in Europe. Thus, these mutations were likely brought to the community long ago, suggesting two founder effects for this rare disease. This work describes a genetic cluster involving POLH, and, particularly unexpected, with two independent founder mutations, including one that likely originated in Europe. © 2016 British Association of Dermatologists.

  7. Sex enhances adaptation by unlinking beneficial from detrimental mutations in experimental yeast populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gray Jeremy C

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The maintenance of sexuality is a classic problem in evolutionary biology because it is a less efficient mode of reproduction compared with asexuality; however, many organisms are sexual. Theoretical work suggests sex facilitates natural selection, and experimental data support this. However, there are fewer experimental studies that have attempted to determine the mechanisms underlying the advantage of sex. Two main classes of hypotheses have been proposed to explain its advantage: detrimental mutation clearance and beneficial mutation accumulation. Here we attempt to experimentally differentiate between these two classes by evolving Saccharomyces cerevisiae populations that differ only in their ability to undergo sex, and also manipulate mutation rate. We cannot manipulate the types of mutation that occur, but instead propagate populations in both stressful and permissive environments and assume that the extent of detrimental mutation clearance and beneficial mutation incorporation differs between them. Results After 300 mitotic generations interspersed with 11 rounds of sex we found there was no change or difference in fitness between sexuals and asexuals propagated in the permissive environment, regardless of mutation rate. Sex conferred a greater extent of adaptation in the stressful environment, and wild-type and elevated mutation rate sexual populations adapted equivalently. However, the asexual populations with an elevated mutation rate appeared more retarded in their extent of adaptation compared to asexual wild-type populations. Conclusions Sex provided no advantage in the permissive environment where beneficial mutations were rare. We could not evaluate if sex functioned to clear detrimental mutations more effectively or not here as no additional fitness load was observed in the mutator populations. However, in the stressful environment, where detrimental mutations were likely of more consequence, and where

  8. Hot-spot KIF5A mutations cause familial ALS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, David; Yilmaz, Rüstem; Müller, Kathrin; Grehl, Torsten; Petri, Susanne; Meyer, Thomas; Grosskreutz, Julian; Weydt, Patrick; Ruf, Wolfgang; Neuwirth, Christoph; Weber, Markus; Pinto, Susana; Claeys, Kristl G; Schrank, Berthold; Jordan, Berit; Knehr, Antje; Günther, Kornelia; Hübers, Annemarie; Zeller, Daniel; Kubisch, Christian; Jablonka, Sibylle; Sendtner, Michael; Klopstock, Thomas; de Carvalho, Mamede; Sperfeld, Anne; Borck, Guntram; Volk, Alexander E; Dorst, Johannes; Weis, Joachim; Otto, Markus; Schuster, Joachim; Del Tredici, Kelly; Braak, Heiko; Danzer, Karin M; Freischmidt, Axel; Meitinger, Thomas; Strom, Tim M; Ludolph, Albert C; Andersen, Peter M; Weishaupt, Jochen H

    2018-01-12

    Heterozygous missense mutations in the N-terminal motor or coiled-coil domains of the kinesin family member 5A (KIF5A) gene cause monogenic spastic paraplegia (HSP10) and Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2 (CMT2). Moreover, heterozygous de novo frame-shift mutations in the C-terminal domain of KIF5A are associated with neonatal intractable myoclonus, a neurodevelopmental syndrome. These findings, together with the observation that many of the disease genes associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis disrupt cytoskeletal function and intracellular transport, led us to hypothesize that mutations in KIF5A are also a cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Using whole exome sequencing followed by rare variant analysis of 426 patients with familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and 6137 control subjects, we detected an enrichment of KIF5A splice-site mutations in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (2/426 compared to 0/6137 in controls; P = 4.2 × 10-3), both located in a hot-spot in the C-terminus of the protein and predicted to affect splicing exon 27. We additionally show co-segregation with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis of two canonical splice-site mutations in two families. Investigation of lymphoblast cell lines from patients with KIF5A splice-site mutations revealed the loss of mutant RNA expression and suggested haploinsufficiency as the most probable underlying molecular mechanism. Furthermore, mRNA sequencing of a rare non-synonymous missense mutation (predicting p.Arg1007Gly) located in the C-terminus of the protein shortly upstream of the splice donor of exon 27 revealed defective KIF5A pre-mRNA splicing in respective patient-derived cell lines owing to abrogation of the donor site. Finally, the non-synonymous single nucleotide variant rs113247976 (minor allele frequency = 1.00% in controls, n = 6137), also located in the C-terminal region [p.(Pro986Leu) in exon 26], was significantly enriched in familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients (minor allele

  9. Hot-spot KIF5A mutations cause familial ALS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Rüstem; Müller, Kathrin; Grehl, Torsten; Petri, Susanne; Meyer, Thomas; Grosskreutz, Julian; Weydt, Patrick; Ruf, Wolfgang; Neuwirth, Christoph; Weber, Markus; Pinto, Susana; Claeys, Kristl G; Schrank, Berthold; Jordan, Berit; Knehr, Antje; Günther, Kornelia; Hübers, Annemarie; Zeller, Daniel; Kubisch, Christian; Jablonka, Sibylle; Klopstock, Thomas; de Carvalho, Mamede; Sperfeld, Anne; Borck, Guntram; Volk, Alexander E; Dorst, Johannes; Weis, Joachim; Otto, Markus; Schuster, Joachim; Del Tredici, Kelly; Braak, Heiko; Danzer, Karin M; Freischmidt, Axel; Meitinger, Thomas; Strom, Tim M; Ludolph, Albert C; Andersen, Peter M; Weishaupt, Jochen H; Weyen, Ute; Hermann, Andreas; Hagenacker, Tim; Koch, Jan Christoph; Lingor, Paul; Göricke, Bettina; Zierz, Stephan; Baum, Petra; Wolf, Joachim; Winkler, Andrea; Young, Peter; Bogdahn, Ulrich; Prudlo, Johannes; Kassubek., Jan

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Heterozygous missense mutations in the N-terminal motor or coiled-coil domains of the kinesin family member 5A (KIF5A) gene cause monogenic spastic paraplegia (HSP10) and Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2 (CMT2). Moreover, heterozygous de novo frame-shift mutations in the C-terminal domain of KIF5A are associated with neonatal intractable myoclonus, a neurodevelopmental syndrome. These findings, together with the observation that many of the disease genes associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis disrupt cytoskeletal function and intracellular transport, led us to hypothesize that mutations in KIF5A are also a cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Using whole exome sequencing followed by rare variant analysis of 426 patients with familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and 6137 control subjects, we detected an enrichment of KIF5A splice-site mutations in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (2/426 compared to 0/6137 in controls; P = 4.2 × 10−3), both located in a hot-spot in the C-terminus of the protein and predicted to affect splicing exon 27. We additionally show co-segregation with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis of two canonical splice-site mutations in two families. Investigation of lymphoblast cell lines from patients with KIF5A splice-site mutations revealed the loss of mutant RNA expression and suggested haploinsufficiency as the most probable underlying molecular mechanism. Furthermore, mRNA sequencing of a rare non-synonymous missense mutation (predicting p.Arg1007Gly) located in the C-terminus of the protein shortly upstream of the splice donor of exon 27 revealed defective KIF5A pre-mRNA splicing in respective patient-derived cell lines owing to abrogation of the donor site. Finally, the non-synonymous single nucleotide variant rs113247976 (minor allele frequency = 1.00% in controls, n = 6137), also located in the C-terminal region [p.(Pro986Leu) in exon 26], was significantly enriched in familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients (minor

  10. Suppression of severe achondroplasia with developmental delay and acanthosis nigricans by the p.Thr651Pro mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manickam, Kandamurugu; Donoghue, Daniel J; Meyer, April N; Snyder, Pamela J; Prior, Thomas W

    2014-01-01

    Severe achondroplasia with developmental delay and acanthosis nigricans (SADDAN) is an extremely rare severe skeletal dysplasia characterized by significant developmental delay, brain structural abnormalities, hearing loss, and acanthosis nigricans. The disorder is the result of a single missense mutation at codon 650 (p.Lys650Met) in the fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 gene (FGFR3). We describe a child who initially presented with a mild achondroplasia or hypochondroplasia like phenotype. Molecular analysis of the FGFR3 gene showed the common SADDAN mutation and a second novel mutation at codon 651 (p.Thr651Pro). Both mutations were shown to occur on the same allele (cis) and de novo. Transient transfection studies with FGFR3 double mutant constructs show that the p.Thr651Pro mutation causes a dramatic decrease in constitutive receptor kinase activity than that observed by the p.Lys650Met mutation. Our data suggest that the molecular effect by the p.Thr651Pro is to elicit a conformational change that decreases the FGFR3 tyrosine kinase activity, which is constitutively activated by the SADDAN mutation. Due to the inheritance of both a gain-of-function and a loss-of-function mutation, we conclude that a reduction of constitutive activation caused the milder skeletal phenotype. Although the occurrence of double mutations are expected to be rare, the presence of other FGFR3 modifiers may be responsible for some of the clinically discrepant skeletal dysplasia cases. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Studies on mutation techniques in rice breeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Cailian; Chen Qiufang; Jin Wei

    2001-01-01

    Synthetical techniques for improving rice mutation breeding efficiency were studied. The techniques consist of corresponding relationship between radiosensitivity and mutation frequency, choosing appropriate materials, combination of physical and chemical mutagens, mutagenic effects of the new mutagenic agents as proton, ions, synchronous irradiation and space mutation. These techniques and methods for inducing mutations are very valuable to increase inducing mutation efficiency and breeding level

  12. Mutations in HAMP and HJV genes and their impact on expression of clinical hemochromatosis in a cohort of 100 Spanish patients homozygous for the C282Y mutation of HFE gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altès, Albert; Bach, Vanessa; Ruiz, Angels; Esteve, Anna; Felez, Jordi; Remacha, Angel F; Sardà, M Pilar; Baiget, Montserrat

    2009-10-01

    Most hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) patients are homozygous for the C282Y mutation of the HFE gene. Nevertheless, penetrance of the disease is very variable. In some patients, penetrance can be mediated by concomitant mutations in other iron master genes. We evaluated the clinical impact of hepcidin (HAMP) and hemojuvelin mutations in a cohort of 100 Spanish patients homozygous for the C282Y mutation of the HFE gene. HAMP and hemojuvelin mutations were evaluated in all patients by bidirectional direct cycle sequencing. Phenotype-genotype interactions were evaluated. A heterozygous mutation of the HAMP gene (G71D) was found in only one out of 100 cases. Following, we performed a study of several members of that family, and we observed several members had a digenic inheritance of the C282Y mutation of the HFE gene and the G71D mutation of the HAMP gene. This mutation in the HAMP gene did not modify the phenotype of the individuals who were homozygous for the C282Y mutation. One other patient presented a new polymorphism in the hemojuvelin gene, without consequences in iron load or clinical course of the disease. In conclusion, HAMP and hemojuvelin mutations are rare among Spanish HH patients, and their impact in this population is not significant.

  13. Detecting negative selection on recurrent mutations using gene genealogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Whether or not a mutant allele in a population is under selection is an important issue in population genetics, and various neutrality tests have been invented so far to detect selection. However, detection of negative selection has been notoriously difficult, partly because negatively selected alleles are usually rare in the population and have little impact on either population dynamics or the shape of the gene genealogy. Recently, through studies of genetic disorders and genome-wide analyses, many structural variations were shown to occur recurrently in the population. Such “recurrent mutations” might be revealed as deleterious by exploiting the signal of negative selection in the gene genealogy enhanced by their recurrence. Results Motivated by the above idea, we devised two new test statistics. One is the total number of mutants at a recurrently mutating locus among sampled sequences, which is tested conditionally on the number of forward mutations mapped on the sequence genealogy. The other is the size of the most common class of identical-by-descent mutants in the sample, again tested conditionally on the number of forward mutations mapped on the sequence genealogy. To examine the performance of these two tests, we simulated recurrently mutated loci each flanked by sites with neutral single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), with no recombination. Using neutral recurrent mutations as null models, we attempted to detect deleterious recurrent mutations. Our analyses demonstrated high powers of our new tests under constant population size, as well as their moderate power to detect selection in expanding populations. We also devised a new maximum parsimony algorithm that, given the states of the sampled sequences at a recurrently mutating locus and an incompletely resolved genealogy, enumerates mutation histories with a minimum number of mutations while partially resolving genealogical relationships when necessary. Conclusions With their

  14. Founder Mutations in Xeroderma Pigmentosum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Deborah; DiGiovanna, John J.; Kraemer, Kenneth H.

    2012-01-01

    In this issue, Soufir et al. report a founder mutation in the XPC DNA repair gene in 74% of families with xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) in the Maghreb region (Algeria, Morocco, and Tunisia) of northern Africa. These patients have a high frequency of skin cancer. The presence of this founder mutation provides an opportunity for genetic counseling and early diagnosis of XP. PMID:20463673

  15. Mutations causative of familial hypercholesterolaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benn, Marianne; Watts, Gerald F; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne

    2016-01-01

    causing mutations in 98 098 participants from the general population, the Copenhagen General Population Study. METHODS AND RESULTS: We genotyped for LDLR[W23X;W66G;W556S] and APOB[R3500Q] accounting for 38.7% of pathogenic FH mutations in Copenhagen. Clinical FH assessment excluded mutation information......-cholesterol concentration to discriminate between mutation carriers and non-carriers was 4.4 mmol/L. CONCLUSION: Familial hypercholesterolaemia-causing mutations are estimated to occur in 1:217 in the general population and are best identified by a definite or probable phenotypic diagnosis of FH based on the DLCN criteria....... The prevalence of the four FH mutations was 0.18% (1:565), suggesting a total prevalence of FH mutations of 0.46% (1:217). Using the Dutch Lipid Clinic Network (DLCN) criteria, odds ratios for an FH mutation were 439 (95% CI: 170-1 138) for definite FH, 90 (53-152) for probable FH, and 18 (13-25) for possible FH...

  16. BRAF, KIT, NRAS, GNAQ and GNA11 mutation analysis in cutaneous melanomas in Turkish population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismail Yilmaz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: KIT and mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade are important for melanomagenesis. In the present study, we analyzed the frequency of BRAF, NRAS, KIT, GNAQ and GNA11 gene mutations and investigated their association with clinicopathological features of melanomas in Turkish population. Materials and Methods: Forty-seven primary cutaneous melanomas were included in our study. Sanger sequencing method was used for mutation analysis in all cases. Results: Mean age was 62.1 (29-101 years. Female:male ratio was 17:30. Among 47 melanomas, 14 (29.8% BRAF, 10 (21.3% NRAS, 4 (8.5% KIT and 1(2.1% GNAQ gene mutations were detected. Two of the KIT mutations were found in acral lentiginous melanoma (ALM. In the head and neck region, mutation frequency was significantly lower than in other locations (P = 0.035. The only GNAQ gene mutation (p.Q209L was detected in a melanoma arising from blue nevus located on the scalp. None of the melanomas harbored NRAS exon 2, KIT exon 13/17/18, GNAQ exon 4 and GNA11 exon 4/5 mutations. Overall mutation frequency did not show significant difference between metastatic (8/14, 57.1% and nonmetastatic (18/33, 54.5% patients. We did not observe any significant association between mutation status and gender or age of various patients. Conclusions: Our results support that BRAF and NRAS gene mutations are common in cutaneous melanomas. The activating mutations of KIT gene are rare and especially seen in ALM. GNAQ and GNA11 mutations are infrequent in cutaneous melanomas and may be associated only with melanomas arising from blue nevus.

  17. Mutational analysis of FLASH and PTPN13 genes in colorectal carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Eun Goo; Lee, Sung Hak; Yoo, Nam Jin; Lee, Sug Hyung

    2008-01-01

    The Fas-Fas ligand system is considered a major pathway for induction of apoptosis in cells and tissues. FLASH was identified as a pro-apoptotic protein that transmits apoptosis signal during Fas-mediated apoptosis. PTPN13 interacts with Fas and functions as both suppressor and inducer of Fas-mediated apoptosis. There are polyadenine tracts in both FLASH (A8 and A9 in exon 8) and PTPN13 (A8 in exon 7) genes that could be frameshift mutation targets in colorectal carcinomas. Because genes encoding proteins in Fas-mediated apoptosis frequently harbor somatic mutations in cancers, we explored the possibility as to whether mutations of FLASH and PTPN13 are a feature of colorectal carcinomas. We analysed human FLASH in exon 8 and PTPN13 in exon 7 for the detection of somatic mutations in 103 colorectal carcinomas by a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)- based single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP). We detected two mutations in FLASH gene, but none in PTPN13 gene. However, the two mutations were not frameshift (deletion or insertion) mutations in the polyadenine tracts of FLASH. The two mutations consisted of a deletion mutation (c.3734-3737delAGAA) and a missense mutation (c.3703A>C). These data indicate that frameshift mutation in the polyadenine tracts in both FLASH and PTPN13 genes is rare in colorectal carcinomas. Also, the data suggest that both FLASH and PTPN13 mutations in the polyadenine tracts may not have a crucial role in the pathogenesis of colorectal carcinomas.

  18. Thanatophoric Dysplasia: A Rare Entity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.S. Naveen

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Thanatophoric dysplasia is the lethal skeletal dysplasia characterized by marked underdevelopment of the skeleton and short-limb dwarfism. The child will be having a short neck, narrow thoracic cage and protuberant abdomen. Other anatomical features include a relatively enlarged head with frontal bossing, prominent eyes, hypertelorism and the depressed nasal bridge. The diagnosis is usually made with the ultrasonography in the second trimester. In this study we report a case of this rare entity with emphasis on its anatomical features, abnormalities and clinical profile with relevant review of literature.

  19. Microfibrillar cardiomyopathy: A rare case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narender Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Microfibrillar cardiomyopathy is a very rare cause of restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM. The index case was a male patient who presented with shortness of breath and pedal edema. Further clinical investigations favored a clinical diagnosis of RCM. An endomyocardial biopsy revealed subendocardial and interstitial hyaline eosinophillic material resembling amyloid that did not stain with Congo red. An electron microscopic examination showed that this material was composed of twisted linear and bundles of tangled microfibrils. The etiology of the microfibrillar deposition is currently unknown. The pathologists should entertain the diagnosis of microfibrillar cardiomyopathy in suspected cases of amyloidosis that are negative for Congo red.

  20. Maxillary Osteomyelitis: A Rare Entity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayaaz Habib

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteomyelitis of the maxilla is now a rare event with the advent of antibiotics. The two predominant causes are odontogenic infections and sinusitis. Immunocompromised states such as diabetes, HIV, and malnutrition increase the risk of osteomyelitis. It is important to recognize this early as it is a difficult entity to treat with potentially serious consequences. We report an unusual case of right sided maxillary osteomyelitis in a lady with poorly controlled diabetes in rural Lincolnshire. Biopsy of the right maxillary bone showed features of acute osteomyelitis. This responded well to a prolonged course of oral antibiotics.

  1. Retroperitoneal Schwannoma: A Rare Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Kalaycı

    2011-01-01

    Case Presentation. A 38-year-old woman was admitted to the emergency service with the complaints of progressive abdominal pain and nausea for the last 24 hours. Abdominal examination was compatible with acute abdomen. Acute appendicitis was diagnosed by CT. During CT evaluation, a round shaped soft-tissue mass at the retroperitoneal area inferior to the right kidney was detected, The mass was resected and histology revealed schwannoma. Conclusion. Rare tumoral lesions with benign course such as schwannoma can be detected incidentally.

  2. MPL mutations in myeloproliferative disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beer, Philip A.; Campbell, Peter J.; Scott, Linda M.

    2008-01-01

    Activating mutations of MPL exon 10 have been described in a minority of patients with idiopathic myelofibrosis (IMF) or essential thrombocythemia (ET), but their prevalence and clinical significance are unclear. Here we demonstrate that MPL mutations outside exon 10 are uncommon in platelet c......DNA and identify 4 different exon 10 mutations in granulocyte DNA from a retrospective cohort of 200 patients with ET or IMF. Allele-specific polymerase chain reaction was then used to genotype 776 samples from patients with ET entered into the PT-1 studies. MPL mutations were identified in 8.5% of JAK2 V617F......(-) patients and a single V617F(+) patient. Patients carrying the W515K allele had a significantly higher allele burden than did those with the W515L allele, suggesting a functional difference between the 2 variants. Compared with V617F(+) ET patients, those with MPL mutations displayed lower hemoglobin...

  3. Mutation induction by heavy ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiefer, J.; Stoll, U.; Schneider, E.

    1994-10-01

    Mutation induction by heavy ions is compared in yeast and mammalian cells. Since mutants can only be recovered in survivors the influence of inactivation cross sections has to be taken into account. It is shown that both the size of the sensitive cellular site as well as track structure play an important role. Another parameter which influences the probability of mutation induction is repair: Contrary to naive assumptions primary radiation damage does not directly lead to mutations but requires modification to reconstitute the genetic machinery so that mutants can survive. The molecular structure of mutations was analyzed after exposure to deuterons by amplification with the aid of polymerase chain reaction. The results-although preliminary-demonstrate that even with densely ionizing particles a large fraction does not carry big deletions which suggests that point mutations may also be induced by heavy ions.

  4. Mutation breeding in ornamental plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Datta, S.K.

    1990-01-01

    Full text: Mutation induction produced a large number of new promising varieties in ornamental species. 37 new mutants of Chrysanthemum and 14 of rose have been developed by mutations and released for commercialisation. The mutations in flower colour/shape were detected as chimeras in M 1 V 1 , M 1 V 2 , M 1 V 3 generations. The mutation frequency varied with the cultivar and exposure to gamma rays. Comparative analysis of original cultivars and their respective induced mutants on cytomorphological, anatomical and biochemical characters are being carried out for better understanding of the mechanism involved in the origin and evolution of somatic flower colour/shape mutations. Cytological analysis with reference to chromosomal aberrations, chromosome number, ICV, INV and DNA content gave no differences between the original and mutant cultivars. Analysis of florets/petal pigments by TLC and spectrophotometric methods indicated both qualitative and quantitative changes. (author)

  5. A genome-wide study reveals rare CNVs exclusive to extreme phenotypes of Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovelet-Lecrux, Anne; Legallic, Solenn; Wallon, David; Flaman, Jean-Michel; Martinaud, Olivier; Bombois, Stéphanie; Rollin-Sillaire, Adeline; Michon, Agnès; Le Ber, Isabelle; Pariente, Jérémie; Puel, Michèle; Paquet, Claire; Croisile, Bernard; Thomas-Antérion, Catherine; Vercelletto, Martine; Lévy, Richard; Frébourg, Thierry; Hannequin, Didier; Campion, Dominique

    2012-06-01

    Studying rare extreme forms of Alzheimer disease (AD) may prove to be a useful strategy in identifying new genes involved in monogenic determinism of AD. Amyloid precursor protein (APP), PSEN1, and PSEN2 mutations account for only 85% of autosomal dominant early-onset AD (ADEOAD) families. We hypothesised that rare copy number variants (CNVs) could be involved in ADEOAD families without mutations in known genes, as well as in rare sporadic young-onset AD cases. Using high-resolution array comparative genomic hybridisation, we assessed the presence of rare CNVs in 21 unrelated ADEOAD cases, having no alteration on known genes, and 12 sporadic AD cases, with an age of onset younger than 55 years. The analysis revealed the presence of 7 singleton CNVs (4 in ADEOAD and 3 in sporadic cases) absent in 1078 controls and 912 late-onset AD cases. Strikingly, 4 out of 7 rearrangements target genes (KLK6, SLC30A3, MEOX2, and FPR2) encoding proteins that are tightly related to amyloid-β peptide metabolism or signalling. Although these variants are individually rare and restricted to particular subgroups of patients, these findings support the causal role, in human pathology, of a set of genes coding for molecules suspected for a long time to modify Aβ metabolism or signalling, and for which animal or cellular models have already been developed.

  6. Comprehensive Mutation Analysis of PMS2 in a Large Cohort of Probands Suspected of Lynch Syndrome or Constitutional Mismatch Repair Deficiency Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klift, H.M. van der; Mensenkamp, A.R.; Drost, M.; Bik, E.C.; Vos, Y.J.; Gille, H.J.; Redeker, B.E.; Tiersma, Y.; Zonneveld, J.B.; Garcia, E.G.; Letteboer, T.G.; Olderode-Berends, M.J.; Hest, L.P. van; Os, T.A. van; Verhoef, S.; Wagner, A.; Asperen, C.J. van; Broeke, S.W. ten; Hes, F.J.; Wind, N. de; Nielsen, M.; Devilee, P.; Ligtenberg, M.J.L.; Wijnen, J.T.; Tops, C.M.

    2016-01-01

    Monoallelic PMS2 germline mutations cause 5%-15% of Lynch syndrome, a midlife cancer predisposition, whereas biallelic PMS2 mutations cause approximately 60% of constitutional mismatch repair deficiency (CMMRD), a rare childhood cancer syndrome. Recently improved DNA- and RNA-based strategies are

  7. Comprehensive Mutation Analysis of PMS2 in a Large Cohort of Probands Suspected of Lynch Syndrome or Constitutional Mismatch Repair Deficiency Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Klift, Heleen M.; Mensenkamp, Arjen R.; Drost, Mark; Bik, Elsa C.; Vos, Yvonne J.; Gille, Hans J. J. P.; Redeker, Bert E. J. W.; Tiersma, Yvonne; Zonneveld, Jose B. M.; Garcia, Encarna Gomez; Letteboer, Tom G. W.; Olderode-Berends, Maran J. W.; van Hest, Liselotte P.; van Os, Theo A.; Verhoef, Senno; Wagner, Anja; van Asperen, Christi J.; ten Broeke, Sanne W.; Hes, Frederik J.; de Wind, Niels; Nielsen, Maartje; Devilee, Peter; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J. L.; Wijnen, Juul T.; Tops, Carli M. J.

    Monoallelic PMS2 germline mutations cause 5%-15% of Lynch syndrome, a midlife cancer predisposition, whereas biallelic PMS2 mutations cause approximately 60% of constitutional mismatch repair deficiency (CMMRD), a rare childhood cancer syndrome. Recently improved DNA- and RNA-based strategies are

  8. Comprehensive Mutation Analysis of PMS2 in a Large Cohort of Probands Suspected of Lynch Syndrome or Constitutional Mismatch Repair Deficiency (CMMRD) Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Klift, Heleen M; Mensenkamp, Arjen R; Drost, Mark; Bik, Elsa C; Vos, Yvonne J; Gille, Hans J J P; Redeker, Bert E J W; Tiersma, Yvonne; Zonneveld, José B M; García, Encarna Gómez; Letteboer, Tom G W; Olderode-Berends, Maran J W; van Hest, Liselotte P; van Os, Theo A; Verhoef, Senno; Wagner, Anja; van Asperen, Christi J; Ten Broeke, Sanne W; Hes, Frederik J; de Wind, Niels; Nielsen, Maartje; Devilee, Peter; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J L; Wijnen, Juul T; Tops, Carli M J

    2016-01-01

    Monoallelic PMS2 germline mutations cause 5-15% of Lynch syndrome, a midlife cancer predisposition, whereas biallelic PMS2 mutations cause approximately 60% of constitutional MMR deficiency (CMMRD), a rare childhood cancer syndrome. Recently improved DNA and RNA-based strategies are applied to

  9. Changing phenotypic expression in a patient with a mitochondrial encephalopathy due to 13042G>A de novo mutation--a 5 year follow up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schinwelski, M; Kierdaszuk, B; Dulski, J; Tońska, K; Kodroń, A; Sitek, E J; Bartnik, E; Kamińska, A; Kwieciński, H; Sławek, J

    2015-08-01

    Mutations in NADH dehydrogenase (ND) subunits of complex I lead to mitochondrial encephalomyopathies associated with various phenotypes. This report aims to present the patient's clinical symptomatology in the context of a very rare 13042G>A de novo mutation and with an emphasis on changing phenotypic expression and pronounced, long-standing response to levetiracetam.

  10. Genotype-Phenotype Correlation of Coffin-Siris Syndrome Caused by Mutations in SMARCB1, SMARCA4, SMARCE1, and ARID1A

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kosho, Tomoki; Okamoto, Nobuhiko; Imai, Yoko; Ohashi, Hirofumi; van Eerde, Albertien M.; Chrzanowska, Krystyna; Clayton-Smith, Jill; Kingston, Helen; Mari, Francesca; Aggarwal, Shagun; Mowat, David; Niikawa, Norio; Hiraki, Yoko; Matsumoto, Naoya; Fukushima, Yoshimitsu; Josifova, Dragana; Dean, John; Smigiel, Robert; Sakazume, Satoru; Silengo, Margherita; Tinschert, Sigrid; Kawame, Hiroshi; Yano, Shoji; Yamagata, Takanori; van Bon, Bregje W. M.; Vulto-van Silfhout, Anneke T.; Ben-Omran, Tawfeg; Bigoni, Stefania; Alanay, Yasemin; Miyake, Noriko; Tsurusaki, Yoshinori; Matsumoto, Naomichi; Santen, Gijs W. E.; Wieczorek, Dagmar; Wollnik, Bernd; Hennekam, Raul C. M.

    2014-01-01

    Coffin-Siris syndrome (CSS) is a rare congenital malformation syndrome, recently found to be caused by mutations in several genes encoding components of the BAF complex. To date, 109 patients have been reported with their mutations: SMARCB1 (12%), SMARCA4 (11%), SMARCE1 (2%), ARID1A (7%), ARID1B

  11. Genotype-phenotype correlation of Coffin-Siris syndrome caused by mutations in SMARCB1, SMARCA4, SMARCE1, and ARID1A

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kosho, T.; Okamoto, N.; Bon, B.W. van; Vulto-van Silfhout, A.T.; et al.,

    2014-01-01

    Coffin-Siris syndrome (CSS) is a rare congenital malformation syndrome, recently found to be caused by mutations in several genes encoding components of the BAF complex. To date, 109 patients have been reported with their mutations: SMARCB1 (12%), SMARCA4 (11%), SMARCE1 (2%), ARID1A (7%), ARID1B

  12. The role of SLC2A1 mutations in myoclonic astatic epilepsy and absence epilepsy, and the estimated frequency of GLUT1 deficiency syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jan; Johannesen, Katrine Marie; Ek, Jakob

    2015-01-01

    The first mutations identified in SLC2A1, encoding the glucose transporter type 1 (GLUT1) protein of the blood-brain barrier, were associated with severe epileptic encephalopathy. Recently, dominant SLC2A1 mutations were found in rare autosomal dominant families with various forms of epilepsy inc...

  13. Putting a Face on Rare Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... who have a rare and potentially dangerous disease, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. Photo Courtesy of: Patricia Weltin That has been ... daughters with a rare and potentially dangerous disease, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS), a connective tissue disorder causing joint dislocations, ...

  14. Catalogue of Korean manuscripts and rare books

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lerbæk Pedersen, Bent

    2014-01-01

    Catalogue of Korean manuscripts and rare books in The Royal Library, Copenhagen and the National Museum of Denmark......Catalogue of Korean manuscripts and rare books in The Royal Library, Copenhagen and the National Museum of Denmark...

  15. Mutational meltdown in laboratory yeast populations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeyl, C.; Mizesko, M.; Visser, de J.A.G.M.

    2001-01-01

    In small or repeatedly bottlenecked populations, mutations are expected to accumulate by genetic drift, causing fitness declines. In mutational meltdown models, such fitness declines further reduce population size, thus accelerating additional mutation accumulation and leading to extinction. Because

  16. Ovarian embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma is a rare manifestation of the DICER1 syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Kock, Leanne; Druker, Harriet; Weber, Evan; Hamel, Nancy; Traubici, Jeffrey; Malkin, David; Arseneau, Jocelyne; Stewart, Colin J R; Bouron-Dal Soglio, Dorothée; Priest, John R; Foulkes, William D

    2015-06-01

    Embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma (ERMS), a soft tissue sarcoma, is one of the most common pediatric cancers. Certain ERMSs are associated with the DICER1 syndrome, a tumor predisposition syndrome caused by germ-line DICER1 mutations. Characteristic somatic mutations have also been identified in DICER1-associated tumor types. These "hotspot" mutations affect the catalytic activity of the DICER1 ribonuclease IIIb domain. Primary ovarian ERMS (oERMS) is extremely rare. We present a case of a 6-year-old girl with an oERMS harboring 2 DICER1 mutations. The girl also exhibited other DICER1 phenotypes: cystic nephroma (CN) and multinodular goiter. Somatic investigations of the CN identified a hotspot DICER1 mutation different from that in the oERMS. Significantly, the CN presented at 12 years of age, which is much older than the previously reported age range of susceptibility. This report documents the occurrence of DICER1 mutations in a case of oERMS, expanding the spectrum of DICER1-associated tumors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Microcephalic primordial dwarfism in an Emirati patient with PNKP mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Pratibha; Hamzeh, Abdul Rezzak; Mohamed, Madiha; Saif, Fatima; Tawfiq, Nafisa; El Halik, Majdi; Al-Ali, Mahmoud Taleb; Bastaki, Fatma

    2016-08-01

    Microcephaly is a rare neurological condition, both in isolation and when it occurs as part of a syndrome. One of the syndromic forms of microcephaly is microcephaly, seizures and developmental delay (MCSZ) (OMIM #613402), a rare autosomal recessive neurodevelopmental disorder with a range of phenotypic severity, and known to be caused by mutations in the polynucleotide kinase 3' phosphatase (PNKP) gene. The PNK protein is a key enzyme involved in the repair of single and double stranded DNA breaks, a process which is particularly important in the nervous system. We describe an Emirati patient who presented with microcephaly, short stature, uncontrollable tonic-clonic seizures, facial dysmorphism, and developmental delay, while at the same time showing evidence of brain atrophy and agenesis of the corpus callosum. We used whole exome sequencing to identify homozygosity for a missense c.1385G > C (p.Arg462Pro) mutation in PNKP in the patient and heterozygosity for this mutation in her consanguineous parents. The Arg 462 residue forms a part of the lid subdomain helix of the P-loop Kinase domain. Although our patient's phenotype resembled that of MCSZ, the short stature and evidence of brain atrophy distinguished it from other classic cases of the condition. The report raises the question of whether to consider this case as an atypical variant of MCSZ or as a novel form of microcephalic primordial dwarfism. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Radioactive rare gas recoverying device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasai, Shigeo

    1989-01-01

    The apparatus of the present invention comprises a vessel for containing coolants, an introduction valve and an introduction pipe for introducing radioactive rare gases and an adsorption floor disposed in the coolants. A josephson device is disposed being immersed in the coolants between a radiation detector for detecting the radioactive level adsorbed to the adsorption floor and a driving section for driving the introduction valve by the signal from the detector. With this constitution, radioactive rare gases introduced into the coolants and then cooled and liquefied are recovered by the adsorption floor. As the adsorption proceeds and when the radioactivity level exceeds a maximum level in the effective shielding range of the recovery apparatus, the signal current from the radiation detector also exceeds a predetermined level. If radioactivity exceeds the maximum level, the electrical resistance of the josephson device is increased infinitely by the josephson effect to close the introduction valve. Accordingly, the radioactivity is not absorbed beyond the effective shielding range. (I.S.)

  19. Ethical aspects on rare diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrera, Luis A; Galindo, Gilberto Cely

    2010-01-01

    In this chapter we discuss several of the most relevant subjects related to ethics on Rare Diseases. Some general aspects are discussed such as the socio-psychological problems that confront the patients and their families that finally lead to marginalization and exclusion of patients affected by these diseases from the health programs, even in wealthy countries. Then we address problems related to diagnosis and some ethical aspects of newborn screening, prenatal, pre-implantation diagnosis and reference centers, as well as some conditions that should be met by the persons and institutions performing such tasks. Alternatives of solutions for the most critical situations are proposed. Subsequently the orphan drugs subject is discussed not only from the availability point of view, prizes, industrial practices, and purchasing power in developed and developing societies. The research related to rare disease in children and other especially vulnerable conditions, the need for informed consent, review boards or ethics comities, confidentiality of the information, biobanks and pharmacogenetics are discussed.

  20. Purdue Rare Isotope Measurement Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caffee, M.; Elmore, D.; Granger, D.; Muzikar, P.

    2002-12-01

    The Purdue Rare Isotope Measurement Laboratory (PRIME Lab) is a dedicated research and service facility for accelerator mass spectrometry. AMS is an ultra-sensitive analytical technique used to measure low levels of long-lived cosmic-ray-produced and anthropogenic radionuclides, and rare trace elements. We measure 10Be (T1/2 = 1.5 My), 26Al (.702 My), 36Cl (.301 My), and 129I (16 My), in geologic samples. Applications include dating the cosmic-ray-exposure time of rocks on Earth's surface, determining rock and sediment burial ages, measuring the erosion rates of rocks and soils, and tracing and dating ground water. We perform sample preparation and separation chemistries for these radio-nuclides for our internal research activities and for those external researchers not possessing this capability. Our chemical preparation laboratories also serve as training sites for members of the geoscience community developing these techniques at their institutions. Research at Purdue involves collaborators among members of the Purdue Departments of Physics, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Chemistry, Agronomy, and Anthropology. We also collaborate and serve numerous scientists from other institutions. We are currently in the process of modernizing the facility with the goals of higher precision for routinely measured radio-nuclides, increased sample throughput, and the development of new measurement capabilities for the geoscience community.

  1. Metallothermic reduction of rare earth oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    Rare earth oxides can be reduced to rare earth metals by a novel, high yield, metallothermic process. The oxides are dispersed in a suitable, molten, calcium chloride bath along with sodium metal. The sodium reacts with the calcium chloride to produce calcium metal which reduces the rare earth oxides to rare earth metals. The metals are collected in a discrete layer in the reaction vessel

  2. Rare earth-iron-boron premanent magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghendehari, M.H.

    1988-01-01

    This patent describes a method for producing rare earth-iron-boron permanent magnets containing added rare earth oxide, comprising the steps of: (a) mixing a particulate alloy containing at least one rare earth metal, iron, and boron with at least one particulate rare earth oxide; (b) aligning magnetic domains of the mixture in a magnetic field; (c) compacting the aligned mixture to form a shape; and (d) sintering the compacted shape

  3. [Anorectal pain in children: rare or rarely recognised?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonneveld, Laura J H; Engelberts, Adèle C; van den Elzen, Annette P M

    2016-01-01

    Anorectal pain is a common symptom, often as part of functional gastrointestinal disorders. Children seldom present with this complaint. Proctalgia fugax and chronic proctalgia are both anorectal pain syndromes but differ in duration and frequency of episodes and in pain characteristics. No research has been conducted on anorectal pain syndromes in children. We present two patients. Firstly, an 8-year-old girl who suffered from anorectal cramps. We found no underlying cause apart from constipation. The symptoms disappeared spontaneously. The second concerned an 8-year-old boy who presented with recurrent anorectal cramps. He was diagnosed with celiac disease. Anorectal dysfunction and visceral hypersensitivity have been described in adult celiac patients. Symptoms of anorectal pain in children are rare probably because it often remains unrecognised. Noninvasive diagnostic methods and interventions are preferred in paediatric medicine. Screening for celiac disease in children with anorectal pain episodes should be considered.

  4. A Rare Cutaneous Adnexal Tumour with a Rare Presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijayalaxmi S. Patil

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Proliferating Trichilemmal Tumour (PTT is a rapidly growing large cutaneous adnexal neoplasm. Although biologically considered as benign, it may be locally aggressive. Malignant transformation of these lesions, known as Malignant Proliferating Trichilemmal Tumour (MPTT has rarely been reported. So far in the literature, only 39 well-documented cases of MPTT have been reported. MPTT has been stated to be a neoplasm of the older age group according to review of the literature. We present a case of MPTT in a young male. A 25 year old male presented with a scalp swelling of 2 years duration with a recent rapid enlargement. The swelling was excised and histopathological examination of the excised specimen revealed features of MPTT. The differential diagnosis of MPTTis squamous cell carcinoma as both share common features. Accurate diagnosis of MPTT is essential since it has a tendency to metastasize and recur more frequently than squamous cell carcinoma.

  5. A Novel MAPT Mutation Causing Corticobasal Syndrome Led by Progressive Apraxia of Speech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Charles R; Guerreiro, Rita; Thust, Steffi; Fletcher, Phillip; Rohrer, Jonathan D; Fox, Nick C

    2015-01-01

    The authors describe a case of corticobasal syndrome led by progressive apraxia of speech, associated with a novel mutation in exon 10 of the MAPT gene. Genetic bases for progressive apraxia of speech and corticobasal syndrome are only rarely described, and have not been described in conjunction.

  6. New mutations in the NHS gene in Nance-Horan Syndrome families from the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Florijn, Ralph J.; Loves, Willem; Maillette de Buy Wenniger-Prick, Liesbeth J. J. M.; Mannens, Marcel M. A. M.; Tijmes, Nel; Brooks, Simon P.; Hardcastle, Alison J.; Bergen, Arthur A. B.

    2006-01-01

    Mutations in the NHS gene cause Nance-Horan Syndrome (NHS), a rare X-chromosomal recessive disorder with variable features, including congenital cataract, microphthalmia, a peculiar form of the ear and dental anomalies. We investigated the NHS gene in four additional families with NHS from the

  7. Molecular pathogenesis of megalencephalic leukoencephalopathy with subcortical cysts: mutations in MLC1 cause folding defects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duarri, A.; Teijido, O.; Lopez-Hernandez, T.; Scheper, G.C.; Barriere, H.; Boor, P.K.I.; Aguado, F.; Zorzano, A.; Palacin, M.; Martinez, A; Lukacs, G.L.; van der Knaap, M.S.; Nunes, V.; Estevez, R.

    2008-01-01

    Megalencephalic leukoencephalopathy with subcortical cysts (MLC) is a rare type of leukodystrophy, most often caused by mutations in the MLC1 gene. MLC1 is an oligomeric plasma membrane (PM) protein of unknown function expressed mainly in glial cells and neurons. Most disease-causing missense

  8. Prion protein amyloidosis with divergent phenotype associated with two novel nonsense mutations in PRNP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Casper; Parchi, Piero; Capellari, Sabina; Vermeij, Ad J.; Corrado, Patrizia; Baas, Frank; Strammiello, Rosaria; van Gool, Willem A.; van Swieten, John C.; Rozemuller, Annemieke J. M.

    2010-01-01

    Stop codon mutations in the gene encoding the prion protein (PRNP) are very rare and have thus far only been described in two patients with prion protein cerebral amyloid angiopathy (PrP-CAA). In this report, we describe the clinical, histopathological and pathological prion protein (PrPSc)

  9. Reduced secreted clusterin as a mechanism for Alzheimer-associated CLU mutations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bettens, Karolien; Vermeulen, Steven; Van Cauwenberghe, Caroline; Heeman, Bavo; Asselbergh, Bob; Robberecht, Caroline; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan; Vandenbulcke, Mathieu; Vandenberghe, Rik; De Deyn, Peter Paul; Cruts, Marc; Van Broeckhoven, Christine; Sleegers, Kristel

    2015-01-01

    Background: The clusterin (CLU) gene has been identified as an important risk locus for Alzheimer's disease (AD). Although the actual risk-increasing polymorphisms at this locus remain to be identified, we previously observed an increased frequency of rare non-synonymous mutations and small

  10. Altered intracellular localization and mobility of SBDS protein upon mutation in Shwachman-Diamond syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Orelio, Claudia; van der Sluis, Renée M.; Verkuijlen, Paul; Nethe, Micha; Hordijk, Peter L.; van den Berg, Timo K.; Kuijpers, Taco W.

    2011-01-01

    Shwachman-Diamond Syndrome (SDS) is a rare inherited disease caused by mutations in the SBDS gene. Hematopoietic defects, exocrine pancreas dysfunction and short stature are the most prominent clinical features. To gain understanding of the molecular properties of the ubiquitously expressed SBDS

  11. A germline RET proto-oncogene mutation in multiple members of an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2A (MEN2A) is a rare cancer associated-syndrome, inherited in an autosomal dominant fashion and caused by germline mutation in RET proto-oncogene. Clinical diagnosis depends on the manifestation of two or more certain endocrine tumors in an individual, such as ...

  12. Confirmation of the recurrent ACVR1 617G>A mutation in South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective. Fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva (FOP) is a rare genetic condition in which progressive ossification of fibrous tissue, tendons and ligaments leads to severe physical handicap. Most affected individuals who have been studied have a recurrent 617G>A mutation in the ACVR1/ALK2 gene that codes for activin ...

  13. Novel nonsense mutation of BRCA2 gene in a Moroccan man with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women worldwide. About 5 to 10% of cases are due to an inherited predisposition in two major genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2, transmitted as an autosomal dominant form. Male breast cancer is rare and is mainly due to BRCA2 than BRCA1 germline mutations.

  14. Familial juvenile hyperuricemic nephropathy : report on a new mutation and a pregnancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lhotta, Karl; Gehringer, A; Jennings, P; Kronenberg, F.; Brezinka, C; Andersone, I; Strazdins, V

    BACKGROUND: Familial juvenile hyperuricemic nephropathy (FJHN) is a rare autosomal dominant disease caused by mutations in the uromodulin gene (UMOD) and leading to gout, tubulointerstitial nephropathy and end-stage renal disease. CASE REPORTS AND RESULTS: A Latvian family suffering from FJHN is

  15. Recessive mutations in PTHR1 cause contrasting skeletal dysplasias in Eiken and Blomstrand syndromes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duchatelet, Sabine; Ostergaard, Elsebet; Cortes, Dina

    2005-01-01

    Eiken syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive skeletal dysplasia. We identified a truncation mutation in the C-terminal cytoplasmic tail of the parathyroid hormone (PTH)/PTH-related peptide (PTHrP) type 1 receptor (PTHR1) gene as the cause of this syndrome. Eiken syndrome differs from Jansen...

  16. Seven mutations in the human insulin gene linked to permanent neonatal/infancy-onset diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colombo, Carlo; Porzio, Ottavia; Liu, Ming

    2008-01-01

    Permanent neonatal diabetes mellitus (PNDM) is a rare disorder usually presenting within 6 months of birth. Although several genes have been linked to this disorder, in almost half the cases documented in Italy, the genetic cause remains unknown. Because the Akita mouse bearing a mutation in the ...

  17. Mohs micrographic surgery of rare cutaneous tumours

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flohil, S.C.; Lee, C.B. van; Beisenherz, J.; Mureau, M.A.M.; Overbeek, L.I.H.; Nijsten, T.; Bos, R.R.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Recurrence rates after Mohs micrographic surgery (MMS) for rare cutaneous tumours are poorly defined. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the recurrence rate after MMS for rare cutaneous tumours at a university centre. METHODS & MATERIALS: Retrospective review of all rare cutaneous tumours treated

  18. 75 FR 47458 - TRICARE; Rare Diseases Definition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-06

    ... tribal governments, in aggregate or by the private sector, of $100 million or more in any one year... TRICARE; Rare Diseases Definition AGENCY: Office of the Secretary, DoD. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: This final rule revises the definition of rare diseases to adopt the definition of a rare disease as...

  19. Rare copy number deletions predict individual variation in intelligence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald A Yeo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Phenotypic variation in human intellectual functioning shows substantial heritability, as demonstrated by a long history of behavior genetic studies. Many recent molecular genetic studies have attempted to uncover specific genetic variations responsible for this heritability, but identified effects capture little variance and have proven difficult to replicate. The present study, motivated an interest in "mutation load" emerging from evolutionary perspectives, examined the importance of the number of rare (or infrequent copy number variations (CNVs, and the total number of base pairs included in such deletions, for psychometric intelligence. Genetic data was collected using the Illumina 1MDuoBeadChip Array from a sample of 202 adult individuals with alcohol dependence, and a subset of these (N = 77 had been administered the Wechsler Abbreviated Scale of Intelligence (WASI. After removing CNV outliers, the impact of rare genetic deletions on psychometric intelligence was investigated in 74 individuals. The total length of the rare deletions significantly and negatively predicted intelligence (r = -.30, p = .01. As prior studies have indicated greater heritability in individuals with relatively higher parental socioeconomic status (SES, we also examined the impact of ethnicity (Anglo/White vs. Other, as a proxy measure of SES; these groups did not differ on any genetic variable. This categorical variable significantly moderated the effect of length of deletions on intelligence, with larger effects being noted in the Anglo/White group. Overall, these results suggest that rare deletions (between 5% and 1% population frequency or less adversely affect intellectual functioning, and that pleotropic effects might partly account for the association of intelligence with health and mental health status. Significant limitations of this research, including issues of generalizability and CNV measurement, are discussed.

  20. Rare Copy Number Deletions Predict Individual Variation in Intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Ronald A.; Gangestad, Steven W.; Liu, Jingyu; Calhoun, Vince D.; Hutchison, Kent E.

    2011-01-01

    Phenotypic variation in human intellectual functioning shows substantial heritability, as demonstrated by a long history of behavior genetic studies. Many recent molecular genetic studies have attempted to uncover specific genetic variations responsible for this heritability, but identified effects capture little variance and have proven difficult to replicate. The present study, motivated an interest in “mutation load” emerging from evolutionary perspectives, examined the importance of the number of rare (or infrequent) copy number variations (CNVs), and the total number of base pairs included in such deletions, for psychometric intelligence. Genetic data was collected using the Illumina 1MDuoBeadChip Array from a sample of 202 adult individuals with alcohol dependence, and a subset of these (N = 77) had been administered the Wechsler Abbreviated Scale of Intelligence (WASI). After removing CNV outliers, the impact of rare genetic deletions on psychometric intelligence was investigated in 74 individuals. The total length of the rare deletions significantly and negatively predicted intelligence (r = −.30, p = .01). As prior studies have indicated greater heritability in individuals with relatively higher parental socioeconomic status (SES), we also examined the impact of ethnicity (Anglo/White vs. Other), as a proxy measure of SES; these groups did not differ on any genetic variable. This categorical variable significantly moderated the effect of length of deletions on intelligence, with larger effects being noted in the Anglo/White group. Overall, these results suggest that rare deletions (between 5% and 1% population frequency or less) adversely affect intellectual functioning, and that pleotropic effects might partly account for the association of intelligence with health and mental health status. Significant limitations of this research, including issues of generalizability and CNV measurement, are discussed. PMID:21298096

  1. Gradual Loss of ACTH Due to a Novel Mutation in LHX4: Comprehensive Mutation Screening in Japanese Patients with Congenital Hypopituitarism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Masaki; Ishii, Tomohiro; Inokuchi, Mikako; Amano, Naoko; Narumi, Satoshi; Asakura, Yumi; Muroya, Koji; Hasegawa, Yukihiro; Adachi, Masanori; Hasegawa, Tomonobu

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in transcription factors genes, which are well regulated spatially and temporally in the pituitary gland, result in congenital hypopituitarism (CH) in humans. The prevalence of CH attributable to transcription factor mutations appears to be rare and varies among populations. This study aimed to define the prevalence of CH in terms of nine CH-associated genes among Japanese patients. We enrolled 91 Japanese CH patients for DNA sequencing of POU1F1, PROP1, HESX1, LHX3, LHX4, SOX2, SOX3, OTX2, and GLI2. Additionally, gene copy numbers for POU1F1, PROP1, HESX1, LHX3, and LHX4 were examined by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification. The gene regulatory properties of mutant LHX4 proteins were characterized in vitro. We identified two novel heterozygous LHX4 mutations, namely c.249-1G>A, p.V75I, and one common POU1F1 mutation, p.R271W. The patient harboring the c.249-1G>A mutation exhibited isolated growth hormone deficiency at diagnosis and a gradual loss of ACTH, whereas the patient with the p.V75I mutation exhibited multiple pituitary hormone deficiency. In vitro experiments showed that both LHX4 mutations were associated with an impairment of the transactivation capacities of POU1F1 andαGSU, without any dominant-negative effects. The total mutation prevalence in Japanese CH patients was 3.3%. This study is the first to describe, a gradual loss of ACTH in a patient carrying an LHX4 mutation. Careful monitoring of hypothalamic–pituitary -adrenal function is recommended for CH patients with LHX4 mutations. PMID:23029363

  2. Burden of rare variants in ALS genes influences survival in familial and sporadic ALS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Shirley Yin-Yu; Hsu, Jacob Shujui; Teo, Kay-Cheong; Li, Yan; Kung, Michelle H W; Cheah, Kathryn S E; Chan, Danny; Cheung, Kenneth M C; Li, Miaoxin; Sham, Pak-Chung; Ho, Shu-Leong

    2017-10-01

    Genetic variants are implicated in the development of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), but it is unclear whether the burden of rare variants in ALS genes has an effect on survival. We performed whole genome sequencing on 8 familial ALS (FALS) patients with superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) mutation and whole exome sequencing on 46 sporadic ALS (SALS) patients living in Hong Kong and found that 67% had at least 1 rare variant in the exons of 40 ALS genes; 22% had 2 or more. Patients with 2 or more rare variants had lower probability of survival than patients with 0 or 1 variant (p = 0.001). After adjusting for other factors, each additional rare variant increased the risk of respiratory failure or death by 60% (p = 0.0098). The presence of the rare variant was associated with the risk of ALS (Odds ratio 1.91, 95% confidence interval 1.03-3.61, p = 0.03), and ALS patients had higher rare variant burden than controls (MB, p = 0.004). Our findings support an oligogenic basis with the burden of rare variants affecting the development and survival of ALS. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Orphan missense mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator: A three-step biological approach to establishing a correlation between genotype and phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fresquet, Fleur; Clement, Romain; Norez, Caroline; Sterlin, Adélaïde; Melin, Patricia; Becq, Frédéric; Kitzis, Alain; Thoreau, Vincent; Bilan, Frédéric

    2011-09-01

    More than 1860 mutations have been found within the human cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene sequence. These mutations can be classified according to their degree of severity in CF disease. Although the most common mutations are well characterized, few data are available for rare mutations. Thus, genetic counseling is particularly difficult when fetuses or patients with CF present these orphan variations. We describe a three-step in vitro assay that can evaluate rare missense CFTR mutation consequences to establish a correlation between genotype and phenotype. By using a green fluorescent protein-tagged CFTR construct, we expressed mutated proteins in COS-7 cells. CFTR trafficking was visualized by confocal microscopy, and the cellular localization of CFTR was determined using intracellular markers. We studied the CFTR maturation process using Western blot analysis and evaluated CFTR channel activity by automated iodide efflux assays. Of six rare mutations that we studied, five have been isolated in our laboratory. The cellular and functional impact that we observed in each case was compared with the clinical data concerning the patients in whom we encountered these mutations. In conclusion, we propose that performing this type of analysis for orphan CFTR missense mutations can improve CF genetic counseling. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Investigative Pathology and the Association for Molecular Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Novel mutations and phenotypic associations identified through APC, MUTYH, NTHL1, POLD1, POLE gene analysis in Indian Familial Adenomatous Polyposis cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Nikhat; Lipsa, Anuja; Arunachal, Gautham; Ramadwar, Mukta; Sarin, Rajiv

    2017-05-22

    Colo-Rectal Cancer is a common cancer worldwide with 5-10% cases being hereditary. Familial Adenomatous Polyposis (FAP) syndrome is due to germline mutations in the APC or rarely MUTYH gene. NTHL1, POLD1, POLE have been recently reported in previously unexplained FAP cases. Unlike the Caucasian population, FAP phenotype and its genotypic associations have not been widely studied in several geoethnic groups. We report the first FAP cohort from South Asia and the only non-Caucasian cohort with comprehensive analysis of APC, MUTYH, NTHL1, POLD1, POLE genes. In this cohort of 112 individuals from 53 FAP families, we detected germline APC mutations in 60 individuals (45 families) and biallelic MUTYH mutations in 4 individuals (2 families). No NTHL1, POLD1, POLE mutations were identified. Fifteen novel APC mutations and a new Indian APC mutational hotspot at codon 935 were identified. Eight very rare FAP phenotype or phenotypes rarely associated with mutations outside specific APC regions were observed. APC genotype-phenotype association studies in different geo-ethnic groups can enrich the existing knowledge about phenotypic consequences of distinct APC mutations and guide counseling and risk management in different populations. A stepwise cost-effective mutation screening approach is proposed for genetic testing of south Asian FAP patients.

  5. Minisequencing mitochondrial DNA pathogenic mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carracedo Ángel

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are a number of well-known mutations responsible of common mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA diseases. In order to overcome technical problems related to the analysis of complete mtDNA genomes, a variety of different techniques have been proposed that allow the screening of coding region pathogenic mutations. Methods We here propose a minisequencing assay for the analysis of mtDNA mutations. In a single reaction, we interrogate a total of 25 pathogenic mutations distributed all around the whole mtDNA genome in a sample of patients suspected for mtDNA disease. Results We have detected 11 causal homoplasmic mutations in patients suspected for Leber disease, which were further confirmed by standard automatic sequencing. Mutations m.11778G>A and m.14484T>C occur at higher frequency than expected by change in the Galician (northwest Spain patients carrying haplogroup J lineages (Fisher's Exact test, P-value Conclusion We here developed a minisequencing genotyping method for the screening of the most common pathogenic mtDNA mutations which is simple, fast, and low-cost. The technique is robust and reproducible and can easily be implemented in standard clinical laboratories.

  6. Mutation breeding in malting barley

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiraki, Makoto; Sanada, Matsuyoshi

    1984-03-01

    The released varieties of malting barley through mutation breeding is more than ten in number, including foreign varieties. In Japan four varieties has been released so far. We started mutation breeding in 1956 together with cross breeding that we employed before. Until now, Gamma 4, Amagi Nijo 1 and Fuji Nijo 2 have been produced from the direct use of induced mutations and Nirasaki Nijo 8 from the indirect use of them. Mutation breeding has been used mainly in the partial improvement of agronomic characteristics since the selection for malting quality was very complicated. As the variety bred by induced mutation is usually equivalent to the original variety in malting quality, both this new variety and the original one could be cultivated in the same area without any problem on later malt production. Particularly when one farmer cultivates barley in an extensive acreage, he can harvest at the best time according to the different maturing time of each variety. From these points of view, mutation breeding is an efficient tool in malting barley breeding. Mutagens we have used so far are X-rays, ..gamma..-rays, neutron and chemicals such as dES. From our experience in selection, the low dose of radiation and chemical mutagens are more effective in selection of point mutation than the high dose of radiation which tends to produce many abnormal but few practical mutants. (author).

  7. [Identification of novel pathogenic gene mutations in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia by whole-exome resequencing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiba, Norio

    2015-12-01

    A new class of gene mutations, identified in the pathogenesis of adult acute myeloid leukemia (AML), includes DNMT3A, IDH1/2, TET2 and EZH2. However, these mutations are rare in pediatric AML cases, indicating that pathogeneses differ between adult and pediatric forms of AML. Meanwhile, the recent development of massively parallel sequencing technologies has provided a new opportunity to discover genetic changes across entire genomes or proteincoding sequences. In order to reveal a complete registry of gene mutations, we performed whole exome resequencing of paired tumor-normal specimens from 19 pediatric AML cases using Illumina HiSeq 2000. In total, 80 somatic mutations or 4.2 mutations per sample were identified. Many of the recurrent mutations identified in this study involved previously reported targets in AML, such as FLT3, CEBPA, KIT, CBL, NRAS, WT1 and EZH2. On the other hand, several genes were newly identified in the current study, including BCORL1 and major cohesin components such as SMC3 and RAD21. Whole exome resequencing revealed a complex array of gene mutations in pediatric AML genomes. Our results indicate that a subset of pediatric AML represents a discrete entity that could be discriminated from its adult counterpart, in terms of the spectrum of gene mutations.

  8. Mutational status of EGFR and KIT in thymoma and thymic carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoh, Kiyotaka; Nishiwaki, Yutaka; Ishii, Genichiro; Goto, Koichi; Kubota, Kaoru; Ohmatsu, Hironobu; Niho, Seiji; Nagai, Kanji; Saijo, Nagahiro

    2008-12-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the prevalence of EGFR and KIT mutations in thymomas and thymic carcinomas as a means of exploring the potential for molecularly targeted therapy with tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Genomic DNA was isolated from 41 paraffin-embedded tumor samples obtained from 24 thymomas and 17 thymic carcinomas. EGFR exons 18, 19, and 21, and KIT exons 9, 11, 13, and 17, were analyzed for mutations by PCR and direct sequencing. Protein expression of EGFR and KIT was evaluated immunohistochemically. EGFR mutations were detected in 2 of 20 thymomas, but not in any of the thymic carcinomas. All of the EGFR mutations detected were missense mutations (L858R and G863D) in exon 21. EGFR protein was expressed in 71% of the thymomas and 53% of the thymic carcinomas. The mutational analysis of KIT revealed only a missense mutation (L576P) in exon 11 of one thymic carcinoma. KIT protein was expressed in 88% of the thymic carcinomas and 0% of the thymomas. The results of this study indicate that EGFR and KIT mutations in thymomas and thymic carcinomas are rare, but that many of the tumors express EGFR or KIT protein.

  9. Mismatch repair gene mutation spectrum in the Swedish Lynch syndrome population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lagerstedt-Robinson, Kristina; Rohlin, Anna; Aravidis, Christos

    2016-01-01

    Lynch syndrome caused by constitutional mismatch‑repair defects is one of the most common hereditary cancer syndromes with a high risk for colorectal, endometrial, ovarian and urothelial cancer. Lynch syndrome is caused by mutations in the mismatch repair (MMR) genes i.e., MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2...... Lynch syndrome families. These mutations affected MLH1 in 40%, MSH2 in 36%, MSH6 in 18% and PMS2 in 6% of the families. A large variety of mutations were identified with splice site mutations being the most common mutation type in MLH1 and frameshift mutations predominating in MSH2 and MSH6. Large...... deletions of one or several exons accounted for 21% of the mutations in MLH1 and MSH2 and 22% in PMS2, but were rare (4%) in MSH6. In 66% of the Lynch syndrome families the variants identified were private and the effect from founder mutations was limited and predominantly related to a Finnish founder...

  10. A frame-shift mutation of PMS2 is a widespread cause of Lynch syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clendenning, M; Senter, L; Hampel, H; Robinson, K Lagerstedt; Sun, S; Buchanan, D; Walsh, M D; Nilbert, M; Green, J; Potter, J; Lindblom, A; de la Chapelle, A

    2008-06-01

    When compared to the other mismatch repair genes involved in Lynch syndrome, the identification of mutations within PMS2 has been limited (PMS2. This disparity is primarily due to complications in the study of this gene caused by interference from pseudogene sequences. Using a recently developed method for detecting PMS2 specific mutations, we have screened 99 patients who are likely candidates for PMS2 mutations based on immunohistochemical analysis. We have identified a frequently occurring frame-shift mutation (c.736_741del6ins11) in 12 ostensibly unrelated Lynch syndrome patients (20% of patients we have identified with a deleterious mutation in PMS2, n = 61). These individuals all display the rare allele (population frequency 10 000 carriers of this mutation in the USA alone. The identification of both the mutation and the common haplotype in one Swedish control sample (n = 225), along with evidence that Lynch syndrome associated cancers are rarer than expected in the probands' families, would suggest that this is a prevalent mutation with reduced penetrance.

  11. Analysis of SLX4/FANCP in non-BRCA1/2-mutated breast cancer families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernández-Rodríguez Juana

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genes that, when mutated, cause Fanconi anemia or greatly increase breast cancer risk encode for proteins that converge on a homology-directed DNA damage repair process. Mutations in the SLX4 gene, which encodes for a scaffold protein involved in the repair of interstrand cross-links, have recently been identified in unclassified Fanconi anemia patients. A mutation analysis of SLX4 in German or Byelorussian familial cases of breast cancer without detected mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2 has been completed, with globally negative results. Methods The genomic region of SLX4, comprising all exons and exon-intron boundaries, was sequenced in 94 Spanish familial breast cancer cases that match a criterion indicating the potential presence of a highly-penetrant germline mutation, following exclusion of BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations. Results This mutational analysis revealed extensive genetic variation of SLX4, with 21 novel single nucleotide variants; however, none could be linked to a clear alteration of the protein function. Nonetheless, genotyping 10 variants (nine novel, all missense amino acid changes in a set of controls (138 women and 146 men did not detect seven of them. Conclusions Overall, while the results of this study do not identify clearly pathogenic mutations of SLX4 contributing to breast cancer risk, further genetic analysis, combined with functional assays of the identified rare variants, may be warranted to conclusively assess the potential link with the disease.

  12. Analysis of SLX4/FANCP in non-BRCA1/2-mutated breast cancer families

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernández-Rodríguez, Juana; Schindler, Detlev; Capellá, Gabriel; Brunet, Joan; Lázaro, Conxi; Pujana, Miguel Angel; Quiles, Francisco; Blanco, Ignacio; Teulé, Alex; Feliubadaló, Lídia; Valle, Jesús del; Salinas, Mónica; Izquierdo, Àngel; Darder, Esther

    2012-01-01

    Genes that, when mutated, cause Fanconi anemia or greatly increase breast cancer risk encode for proteins that converge on a homology-directed DNA damage repair process. Mutations in the SLX4 gene, which encodes for a scaffold protein involved in the repair of interstrand cross-links, have recently been identified in unclassified Fanconi anemia patients. A mutation analysis of SLX4 in German or Byelorussian familial cases of breast cancer without detected mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2 has been completed, with globally negative results. The genomic region of SLX4, comprising all exons and exon-intron boundaries, was sequenced in 94 Spanish familial breast cancer cases that match a criterion indicating the potential presence of a highly-penetrant germline mutation, following exclusion of BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations. This mutational analysis revealed extensive genetic variation of SLX4, with 21 novel single nucleotide variants; however, none could be linked to a clear alteration of the protein function. Nonetheless, genotyping 10 variants (nine novel, all missense amino acid changes) in a set of controls (138 women and 146 men) did not detect seven of them. Overall, while the results of this study do not identify clearly pathogenic mutations of SLX4 contributing to breast cancer risk, further genetic analysis, combined with functional assays of the identified rare variants, may be warranted to conclusively assess the potential link with the disease

  13. De novo mutations in ATP1A3 cause alternating hemiplegia of childhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinzen, Erin L.; Swoboda, Kathryn J.; Hitomi, Yuki; Gurrieri, Fiorella; Nicole, Sophie; de Vries, Boukje; Tiziano, F. Danilo; Fontaine, Bertrand; Walley, Nicole M.; Heavin, Sinéad; Panagiotakaki, Eleni; Fiori, Stefania; Abiusi, Emanuela; Di Pietro, Lorena; Sweney, Matthew T.; Newcomb, Tara M.; Viollet, Louis; Huff, Chad; Jorde, Lynn B.; Reyna, Sandra P.; Murphy, Kelley J.; Shianna, Kevin V.; Gumbs, Curtis E.; Little, Latasha; Silver, Kenneth; Ptác̆ek, Louis J.; Haan, Joost; Ferrari, Michel D.; Bye, Ann M.; Herkes, Geoffrey K.; Whitelaw, Charlotte M.; Webb, David; Lynch, Bryan J.; Uldall, Peter; King, Mary D.; Scheffer, Ingrid E.; Neri, Giovanni; Arzimanoglou, Alexis; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M.J.M.; Sisodiya, Sanjay M.; Mikati, Mohamad A.; Goldstein, David B.; Nicole, Sophie; Gurrieri, Fiorella; Neri, Giovanni; de Vries, Boukje; Koelewijn, Stephany; Kamphorst, Jessica; Geilenkirchen, Marije; Pelzer, Nadine; Laan, Laura; Haan, Joost; Ferrari, Michel; van den Maagdenberg, Arn; Zucca, Claudio; Bassi, Maria Teresa; Franchini, Filippo; Vavassori, Rosaria; Giannotta, Melania; Gobbi, Giuseppe; Granata, Tiziana; Nardocci, Nardo; De Grandis, Elisa; Veneselli, Edvige; Stagnaro, Michela; Gurrieri, Fiorella; Neri, Giovanni; Vigevano, Federico; Panagiotakaki, Eleni; Oechsler, Claudia; Arzimanoglou, Alexis; Nicole, Sophie; Giannotta, Melania; Gobbi, Giuseppe; Ninan, Miriam; Neville, Brian; Ebinger, Friedrich; Fons, Carmen; Campistol, Jaume; Kemlink, David; Nevsimalova, Sona; Laan, Laura; Peeters-Scholte, Cacha; van den Maagdenberg, Arn; Casaer, Paul; Casari, Giorgio; Sange, Guenter; Spiel, Georg; Boneschi, Filippo Martinelli; Zucca, Claudio; Bassi, Maria Teresa; Schyns, Tsveta; Crawley, Francis; Poncelin, Dominique; Vavassori, Rosaria

    2012-01-01

    Alternating hemiplegia of childhood (AHC) is a rare, severe neurodevelopmental syndrome characterized by recurrent hemiplegic episodes and distinct neurologic manifestations. AHC is usually a sporadic disorder with unknown etiology. Using exome sequencing of seven patients with AHC, and their unaffected parents, we identified de novo nonsynonymous mutations in ATP1A3 in all seven AHC patients. Subsequent sequence analysis of ATP1A3 in 98 additional patients revealed that 78% of AHC cases have a likely causal ATP1A3 mutation, including one inherited mutation in a familial case of AHC. Remarkably, six ATP1A3 mutations explain the majority of patients, including one observed in 36 patients. Unlike ATP1A3 mutations that cause rapid-onset-dystonia-parkinsonism, AHC-causing mutations revealed consistent reductions in ATPase activity without effects on protein expression. This work identifies de novo ATP1A3 mutations as the primary cause of AHC, and offers insight into disease pathophysiology by expanding the spectrum of phenotypes associated with mutations in this gene. PMID:22842232

  14. Screening for mutations in two exons of FANCG gene in Pakistani population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aymun, Ujala; Iram, Saima; Aftab, Iram; Khaliq, Saba; Nadir, Ali; Nisar, Ahmed; Mohsin, Shahida

    2017-06-01

    Fanconi anemia is a rare autosomal recessive disorder of genetic instability. It is both molecularly and clinically, a heterogeneous disorder. Its incidence is 1 in 129,000 births and relatively high in some ethnic groups. Sixteen genes have been identified among them mutations in FANCG gene are most common after FANCA and FANCC gene mutations. To study mutations in exon 3 and 4 of FANCG gene in Pakistani population. Thirty five patients with positive Diepoxybutane test were included in the study. DNA was extracted and amplified for exons 3 and 4. Thereafter Sequencing was done and analyzed for the presence of mutations. No mutation was detected in exon 3 whereas a carrier of known mutation c.307+1 G>T was found in exon 4 of the FANCG gene. Absence of any mutation in exon 3 and only one heterozygous mutation in exon 4 of FANCG gene points to a different spectrum of FA gene pool in Pakistan that needs extensive research in this area.

  15. Low Prevalence of TP53 Mutations and MDM2 Amplifications in Pediatric Rhabdomyosarcoma

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    Simona Ognjanovic

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The tumor suppressor gene TP53 is the most commonly mutated gene in human cancer. The reported prevalence of mutations in rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS varies widely, with recent larger studies suggesting that TP53 mutations in pediatric RMS may be extremely rare. Overexpression of MDM2 also attenuates p53 function. We have performed TP53 mutation/MDM2 amplification analyses in the largest series analyzed thus far, including DNA isolated from 37 alveolar and 38 embryonal RMS tumor samples obtained from the Cooperative Human Tissue Network (CHTN. Available samples were frozen tumor tissues (N=48 and histopathology slides. TP53 mutations in exons 4–9 were analyzed by direct sequencing in all samples, and MDM2 amplification analysis was performed by differential PCR on a subset of 22 samples. We found only one sample (1/75, 1.3% carrying a TP53 mutation at codon 259 (p.D259Y and no MDM2 amplification. Two SNPs in the TP53 pathway, associated with accelerated tumor onset in germline TP53 mutation carriers, (TP53 SNP72 (rs no. 1042522 and MDM2 SNP309 (rs no. 2279744, were not found to confer earlier tumor onset. In conclusion, we confirm the extremely low prevalence of TP53 mutations/MDM2 amplifications in pediatric RMS (1.33% and 0%, respectively. The possible inactivation of p53 function by other mechanisms thus remains to be elucidated.

  16. Schwartz–jampel syndrome: Clinical and diagnostic phenotype of a rare genetic disorder

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    Bhaskara P Shelley

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The distinctive phenotypic, clinical, skeletal characteristics with the typical electrophysiological features of an 11-year-old male child who presented to the neurology outpatient service are described, with the objective of emphasizing the diagnostic awareness of chondrodystrophic myotonia or Schwartz–Jampel syndrome, a very rare genetic disorder. This autosomal recessive disorder due to mutations in the gene Perlecan leads to abnormal cartilage development and anomalous neuromuscular activity.

  17. Sentinel and other mutational effects in offspring of cancer survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulvihill, J.J.

    1990-01-01

    To date, no agent has been documented to cause germ cell mutation in human beings, with the possible exception of radiation causing abnormal meiotic chromosomes in testes. For studies in humans, mutation epidemiologists prefer the cohort approach, starting with an exposed population and looking for mutations that may be expressed in offspring as variants in health, chromosomes, proteins, or nucleic acids. Currently patients with cancer are the cohort exposed to the largest doses of potential mutagens, i.e., radiotherapy and drugs. In 12 large studies with over 825 patients and 1573 pregnancies, 46 (4%) of 1240 liveborns had a major birth defect, a rate comparable to that in the general population. One of these was a classic sentinel phenotype, i.e., a new sporadic case of a dominant mendelian syndrome. In collaboration with 5 U.S. cancer registries, we interviewed a retrospective cohort of 2383 patients diagnosed with cancer under age 20 years, from 1945 through 1975. Records were sought to verify major genetic disease, defined as a cytogenetic or single gene disorder or 1 of 15 isolated birth defects. In 2308 offspring of survivors, 5 had a chromosomal syndrome, 11 had a single gene disorder, and 62 had at least one major malformation. Among 4722 offspring of sibling controls, the respective numbers were 7, 12, and 127, nonsignificant differences. 7% of the parents of the offspring with possibly new mutations received potentially mutagenic therapy, compared with 12% of parents of normal children. Since pregnancy in or by cancer survivors is still a rare event, future efforts to document germ cell mutation may be best studied through international cooperation coupled with diverse laboratory measures of mutation

  18. Neuroimaging Correlates of Frontotemporal Dementia Associated with SQSTM1 Mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luis, Elkin; Ortiz, Alexandra; Eudave, Luis; Ortega-Cubero, Sara; Borroni, Barbara; van der Zee, Julie; Gazzina, Stefano; Caroppo, Paola; Rubino, Elisa; D'Agata, Federico; Le Ber, Isabelle; Santana, Isabel; Cunha, Gil; Almeida, Maria R; Boutoleau-Bretonnière, Claire; Hannequin, Didier; Wallon, David; Rainero, Innocenzo; Galimberti, Daniela; Van Broeckhoven, Christine; Pastor, Maria A; Pastor, Pau

    2016-05-07

    Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) is a progressive dementia characterized by focal atrophy of frontal and/or temporal lobes caused by mutations in the gene coding for sequestosome 1 (SQSTM1), among other genes. Rare SQSTM1 gene mutations have been associated with Paget's disease of bone, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and, more recently, frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). The aim of the study was to determine whether a characteristic pattern of grey and white matter loss is associated with SQSTM1 dysfunction. We performed a voxel-based morphometry (VBM) study in FTD subjects carrying SQSTM1 pathogenic variants (FTD/SQSTM1 mutation carriers; n = 10), compared with FTD subjects not carrying SQSTM1 mutations (Sporadic FTD; n = 20) and healthy controls with no SQSTM1 mutations (HC/SQSTM1 noncarriers; n = 20). The groups were matched according to current age, disease duration, and gender. After comparing FTD/SQSTM1 carriers with Sporadic FTD, a predominantly right cortical atrophy pattern was localized in the inferior frontal, medial orbitofrontal, precentral gyri, and the anterior insula. White matter atrophy was found in both medial and inferior frontal gyri, pallidum, and putamen. FTD/SQSTM1 carriers compared with HC/SQSTM1 noncarriers showed atrophy at frontal, temporal, and parietal lobes of both hemispheres whereas the MRI pattern found in Sporadic FTD compared with controls was frontal and left temporal lobe atrophy, extending toward parietal and occipital lobes of both hemispheres. These results suggest that fronto-orbito-insular regions including corticospinal projections as described in ALS are probably more susceptible to the damaging effect of SQSTM1 mutations delineatinga specific gene-linked atrophy pattern.

  19. HFE gene mutations and iron status of Brazilian blood donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, P C J L; Cançado, R D; Terada, C T; Rostelato, S; Gonzales, I; Hirata, R D C; Hirata, M H; Chiattone, C S; Guerra-Shinohara, E M

    2010-01-01

    Mutations of the HFE and TFR2 genes have been associated with iron overload. HFE and TFR2 mutations were assessed in blood donors, and the relationship with iron status was evaluated. Subjects (N = 542) were recruited at the Hemocentro da Santa Casa de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil. Iron status was not influenced by HFE mutations in women and was independent of blood donation frequency. In contrast, men carrying the HFE 282CY genotype had lower total iron-binding capacity (TIBC) than HFE 282CC genotype carriers. Men who donated blood for the first time and were carriers of the HFE 282CY genotype had higher transferrin saturation values and lower TIBC concentrations than those with the homozygous wild genotype for the HFE C282Y mutation. Moreover, in this group of blood donors, carriers of HFE 63DD plus 63HD genotypes had higher serum ferritin values than those with the homozygous wild genotype for HFE H63D mutation. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that HFE 282CY leads to a 17.21% increase (P = 0.018) and a 83.65% decrease (P = 0.007) in transferrin saturation and TIBC, respectively. In addition, serum ferritin is influenced by age (3.91%, P = 0.001) and the HFE 63HD plus DD genotype (55.84%, P = 0.021). In conclusion, the HFE 282Y and 65C alleles were rare, while the HFE 63D allele was frequent in Brazilian blood donors. The HFE C282Y and H63D mutations were associated with alterations in iron status in blood donors in a gender-dependent manner.

  20. HFE gene mutations and iron status of Brazilian blood donors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.C.J.L. Santos

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Mutations of the HFE and TFR2 genes have been associated with iron overload. HFE and TFR2 mutations were assessed in blood donors, and the relationship with iron status was evaluated. Subjects (N = 542 were recruited at the Hemocentro da Santa Casa de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil. Iron status was not influenced by HFE mutations in women and was independent of blood donation frequency. In contrast, men carrying the HFE 282CY genotype had lower total iron-binding capacity (TIBC than HFE 282CC genotype carriers. Men who donated blood for the first time and were carriers of the HFE 282CY genotype had higher transferrin saturation values and lower TIBC concentrations than those with the homozygous wild genotype for the HFE C282Y mutation. Moreover, in this group of blood donors, carriers of HFE 63DD plus 63HD genotypes had higher serum ferritin values than those with the homozygous wild genotype for HFE H63D mutation. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that HFE 282CY leads to a 17.21% increase (P = 0.018 and a 83.65% decrease (P = 0.007 in transferrin saturation and TIBC, respectively. In addition, serum ferritin is influenced by age (3.91%, P = 0.001 and the HFE 63HD plus DD genotype (55.84%, P = 0.021. In conclusion, the HFE 282Y and 65C alleles were rare, while the HFE 63D allele was frequent in Brazilian blood donors. The HFE C282Y and H63D mutations were associated with alterations in iron status in blood donors in a gender-dependent manner.

  1. Dominant KCNA2 mutation causes episodic ataxia and pharmacoresponsive epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbett, Mark A; Bellows, Susannah T; Li, Melody; Carroll, Renée; Micallef, Silvana; Carvill, Gemma L; Myers, Candace T; Howell, Katherine B; Maljevic, Snezana; Lerche, Holger; Gazina, Elena V; Mefford, Heather C; Bahlo, Melanie; Berkovic, Samuel F; Petrou, Steven; Scheffer, Ingrid E; Gecz, Jozef

    2016-11-08

    To identify the genetic basis of a family segregating episodic ataxia, infantile seizures, and heterogeneous epilepsies and to study the phenotypic spectrum of KCNA2 mutations. A family with 7 affected individuals over 3 generations underwent detailed phenotyping. Whole genome sequencing was performed on a mildly affected grandmother and her grandson with epileptic encephalopathy (EE). Segregating variants were filtered and prioritized based on functional annotations. The effects of the mutation on channel function were analyzed in vitro by voltage clamp assay and in silico by molecular modeling. KCNA2 was sequenced in 35 probands with heterogeneous phenotypes. The 7 family members had episodic ataxia (5), self-limited infantile seizures (5), evolving to genetic generalized epilepsy (4), focal seizures (2), and EE (1). They had a segregating novel mutation in the shaker type voltage-gated potassium channel KCNA2 (CCDS_827.1: c.765_773del; p.255_257del). A rare missense SCN2A (rs200884216) variant was also found in 2 affected siblings and their unaffected mother. The p.255_257del mutation caused dominant negative loss of channel function. Molecular modeling predicted repositioning of critical arginine residues in the voltage-sensing domain. KCNA2 sequencing revealed 1 de novo mutation (CCDS_827.1: c.890G>A; p.Arg297Gln) in a girl with EE, ataxia, and tremor. A KCNA2 mutation caused dominantly inherited episodic ataxia, mild infantile-onset seizures, and later generalized and focal epilepsies in the setting of normal intellect. This observation expands the KCNA2 phenotypic spectrum from EE often associated with chronic ataxia, reflecting the marked variation in severity observed in many ion channel disorders. © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  2. HNPCC: Six new pathogenic mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Epplen Joerg T

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC is an autosomal dominant disease with a high risk for colorectal and endometrial cancer caused by germline mutations in DNA mismatch-repair genes (MMR. HNPCC accounts for approximately 2 to 5% of all colorectal cancers. Here we present 6 novel mutations in the DNA mismatch-repair genes MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6. Methods Patients with clinical diagnosis of HNPCC were counselled. Tumor specimen were analysed for microsatellite instability and immunohistochemistry for MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6 protein was performed. If one of these proteins was not detectable in the tumor mutation analysis of the corresponding gene was carried out. Results We identified 6 frameshift mutations (2 in MLH1, 3 in MSH2, 1 in MSH6 resulting in a premature stop: two mutations in MLH1 (c.2198_2199insAACA [p.N733fsX745], c.2076_2077delTG [p.G693fsX702], three mutations in MSH2 (c.810_811delGT [p.C271fsX282], c.763_766delAGTGinsTT [p.F255fsX282], c.873_876delGACT [p.L292fsX298] and one mutation in MSH6 (c.1421_1422dupTG [p.C475fsX480]. All six tumors tested for microsatellite instability showed high levels of microsatellite instability (MSI-H. Conclusions HNPCC in families with MSH6 germline mutations may show an age of onset that is comparable to this of patients with MLH1 and MSH2 mutations.

  3. Absence of mutations in HCRT, HCRTR1 and HCRTR2 in patients with ROHHAD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barclay, Sarah F; Rand, Casey M; Gray, Paul A; Gibson, William T; Wilson, Richard J A; Berry-Kravis, Elizabeth M; Ize-Ludlow, Diego; Bech-Hansen, N Torben; Weese-Mayer, Debra E

    2016-01-15

    Rapid-onset obesity with hypothalamic dysfunction, hypoventilation, and autonomic dysregulation (ROHHAD) is a rare pediatric disease of unknown cause. Here, in response to a recent case report describing a ROHHAD patient who suffered from secondary narcolepsy confirmed by an absence of hypocretin-1 in the cerebrospinal fluid, we consider whether the ROHHAD phenotype is owing to one or more mutations in genes specific to hypocretin protein signalling. DNA samples from 16 ROHHAD patients were analyzed using a combination of next-generation and Sanger sequencing to identify exonic sequence variations in three genes: HCRT, HCRTR1, and HCRTR2. No rare or novel mutations were identified in the exons of HCRT, HCRTR1, or HCRTR2 genes in a set of 16 ROHHAD patients. ROHHAD is highly unlikely to be caused by mutations in the exons of the genes for hypocretin and its two receptors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Factor V Leiden Mutation and PT 20210 Mutation Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disorders Fibromyalgia Food and Waterborne Illness Fungal Infections Gout Graves Disease Guillain-Barré Syndrome Hashimoto Thyroiditis Heart ... Tested? To determine whether you have an inherited gene mutation that increases your risk of developing a ...

  5. Not all epidermal growth factor receptor mutations in lung cancer are created equal: Perspectives for individualized treatment strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Yoshihisa; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya

    2016-09-01

    Somatic mutations in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene are present in approximately 20% (in Caucasians) to 40% (in East Asians) of adenocarcinomas of the lung. Targeted therapy for these lung cancers has been established based on evidence regarding mainly common mutations; that is, exon 19 deletions (Del19) and L858R. EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI), gefitinib, erlotinib or afatinib showed high objective response rates (ORR) of approximately 60%. Several studies suggested that Del19 might be more sensitive to EGFR-TKI than L858R. On the other hand, it has been difficult to establish evidence for other less common mutations, accounting for 12% of all EGFR mutations, because there are many variants and many studies have excluded patients with these uncommon mutations. However, recent studies revealed that these rare genotypes could be targetable if appropriate TKI are selected. For example, G719X (X denotes A, S, C and so on), Del18, E709K, insertions in exon 19 (Ins19), S768I or L861Q showed moderate sensitivities to gefitinib or erlotinb with ORR of 30%-50%. However, afatinib appeared to be especially effective for these tumors. Although Ins20s (except for insFQEA) have been regarded as resistant mutations, osimertinib may be effective for rare subtypes of them and nazartinib (EGF816) is promising for the majority of them. For the further development of targeted therapy in all EGFR mutations, it is important to precisely detect targetable mutations, to select the most appropriate TKI for each mutation, and to continue investigating in vitro studies and collecting clinical data on even rare mutations. © 2016 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  6. Mutations induced by ultraviolet light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfeifer, Gerd P.; You, Young-Hyun; Besaratinia, Ahmad

    2005-01-01

    The different ultraviolet (UV) wavelength components, UVA (320-400 nm), UVB (280-320 nm), and UVC (200-280 nm), have distinct mutagenic properties. A hallmark of UVC and UVB mutagenesis is the high frequency of transition mutations at dipyrimidine sequences containing cytosine. In human skin cancers, about 35% of all mutations in the p53 gene are transitions at dipyrimidines within the sequence 5'-TCG and 5'-CCG, and these are localized at several mutational hotspots. Since 5'-CG sequences are methylated along the p53 coding sequence in human cells, these mutations may be derived from sunlight-induced pyrimidine dimers forming at sequences that contain 5-methylcytosine. Cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) form preferentially at dipyrimidines containing 5-methylcytosine when cells are irradiated with UVB or sunlight. In order to define the contribution of 5-methylcytosine to sunlight-induced mutations, the lacI and cII transgenes in mouse fibroblasts were used as mutational targets. After 254 nm UVC irradiation, only 6-9% of the base substitutions were at dipyrimidines containing 5-methylcytosine. However, 24-32% of the solar light-induced mutations were at dipyrimidines that contain 5-methylcytosine and most of these mutations were transitions. Thus, CPDs forming preferentially at dipyrimidines with 5-methylcytosine are responsible for a considerable fraction of the mutations induced by sunlight in mammalian cells. Using mouse cell lines harboring photoproduct-specific photolyases and mutational reporter genes, we showed that CPDs (rather than 6-4 photoproducts or other lesions) are responsible for the great majority of UVB-induced mutations. An important component of UVB mutagenesis is the deamination of cytosine and 5-methylcytosine within CPDs. The mutational specificity of long-wave UVA (340-400 nm) is distinct from that of the shorter wavelength UV and is characterized mainly by G to T transversions presumably arising through mechanisms involving oxidized DNA

  7. Iron overload in HFE C282Y heterozygotes at first genetic testing: a strategy for identifying rare HFE variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar-Martinez, Patricia; Grandchamp, Bernard; Cunat, Séverine; Cadet, Estelle; Blanc, François; Nourrit, Marlène; Lassoued, Kaiss; Schved, Jean-François; Rochette, Jacques

    2011-04-01

    Heterozygotes for the p.Cys282Tyr (C282Y) mutation of the HFE gene do not usually express a hemochromatosis phenotype. Apart from the compound heterozygous state for C282Y and the widespread p.His63Asp (H63D) variant allele, other rare HFE mutations can be found in trans on chromosome 6. We performed molecular investigation of the genes implicated in hereditary hemochromatosis in six patients who presented with iron overload but were simple heterozygotes for the HFE C282Y mutation at first genetic testing. Functional impairment of new variants was deduced from computational methods including molecular modeling studies. We identified four rare HFE mutant alleles, three of which have not been previously described. One mutation is a 13-nucleotide deletion in exon 6 (c.1022_1034del13, p.His341_Ala345 > LeufsX119), which is predicted to lead to an elongated and unstable protein. The second one is a substitution of the last nucleotide of exon 2 (c.340G > A, p.Glu114Lys) which modifies the relative solvent accessibility in a loop interface. The third mutation, p.Arg67Cys, also lies in exon 2 and introduces a destabilization of the secondary structure within a loop of the α1 domain. We also found the previously reported c.548T > C (p.Leu183Pro) missense mutation in exon 3. No other known iron genes were mutated. We present an algorithm at the clinical and genetic levels for identifying patients deserving further investigation. Conclusions Our results suggest that additional mutations in HFE may have a clinical impact in C282Y carriers. In conjunction with results from previously described cases we conclude that an elevated transferrin saturation level and elevated hepatic iron index should indicate the utility of searching for further HFE mutations in C282Y heterozygotes prior to other iron gene studies.

  8. Waardenburg syndrome: A rare case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivlal M Rawlani

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Waardenburg Syndrome is a rare disorder of neural crest cell development. It is genetically inherited. Varying in prevalence from 1:42000 to 1:50,000, it compromises approximately 2-5% of congenital deaf children. The syndrome is not expressed in its complete form, in about 20% cases, which adds for its heterogenisity . Even among people affected in the same family,the features do vary. Unilateral heterochromia that manifests as lighter pigmentation of one iris is associated with Waardenburg syndrome and Parry-Romberg syndrome and less commonly with Hirschsprung disease. A case of ten yrs. old boy with a typical facial profile and hearing loss is reported.

  9. Ultra-Rare B Decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grinstein, Benjamin

    2004-01-01

    A good place to look for deviations from the Standard Model is in decay modes of B mesons, like purely leptonic decays B → lv, for which a very long Standard Model lifetime is due to an accidental suppression of the decay amplitude. For other rare decay modes involving no hadrons in the final state (e.g., B → γl+l-, B → γlvl and B → vv-barγ) new results on QCD factorization in exclusive processes show that all the decay rates are given in terms of a single universal form factor. Hence, trustworthy relations between different processes can be used to test the Standard Model of electroweak interactions. Sometimes, surprisingly, a large energy expansion may allow computation when a hadron is in the final state. An example is B → πl+l- which can be used to settle the ambiguity in α from a measurement of sin2α from CP asymmetries

  10. Rare complications of cesarean scar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahajan, Divyesh; Kang, Mandeep; Sandhu, Manavjit Singh; Jain, Vanita; Kalra, Naveen; Khandelwal, Niranjan

    2013-01-01

    Cesarean scar pregnancy (CSP) and cesarean scar dehiscence (CSD) are the most dreaded complications of cesarean scar (CS). As the incidence of CS is increasing worldwide, so is the incidence of CSP, especially in cases with assisted reproduction techniques. It is of utmost importance to diagnose CSP in the early first trimester, as it can lead to myometrial rupture with fatal outcome. On the other hand, CSD may be encountered during pregnancy or in the postpartum period. CSD in the postpartum period is very rare and can cause secondary postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) leading to increased maternal morbidity or even death if not diagnosed and managed promptly. Both complications can be diagnosed on ultrasonography (USG) and confirmed on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). These two conditions carry high morbidity and mortality. In this article, we highlight the role of imaging in the early diagnosis and management of these conditions

  11. Rare complications of cesarean scar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divyesh Mahajan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cesarean scar pregnancy (CSP and cesarean scar dehiscence (CSD are the most dreaded complications of cesarean scar (CS. As the incidence of CS is increasing worldwide, so is the incidence of CSP, especially in cases with assisted reproduction techniques. It is of utmost importance to diagnose CSP in the early first trimester, as it can lead to myometrial rupture with fatal outcome. On the other hand, CSD may be encountered during pregnancy or in the postpartum period. CSD in the postpartum period is very rare and can cause secondary postpartum hemorrhage (PPH leading to increased maternal morbidity or even death if not diagnosed and managed promptly. Both complications can be diagnosed on ultrasonography (USG and confirmed on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. These two conditions carry high morbidity and mortality. In this article, we highlight the role of imaging in the early diagnosis and management of these conditions.

  12. Photochemistry in rare gas clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moeller, T.; Haeften, K. von; Pietrowski, R. von

    1999-01-01

    In this contribution photochemical processes in pure rare gas clusters will be discussed. The relaxation dynamics of electronically excited He clusters is investigated with luminescence spectroscopy. After electronic excitation of He clusters many sharp lines are observed in the visible and infrared spectral range which can be attributed to He atoms and molecules desorbing from the cluster. It turns out that the desorption of electronically excited He atoms and molecules is an important decay channel. The findings for He clusters are compared with results for Ar clusters. While desorption of electronically excited He atoms is observed for all clusters containing up to several thousand atoms a corresponding process in Ar clusters is only observed for very small clusters (N<10). (orig.)

  13. Photochemistry in rare gas clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moeller, T.; Haeften, K. von; Pietrowski, R. von [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany). Hamburger Synchrotronstrahlungslabor; Laarman, T. [Universitaet Hamburg, II. Institut fuer Experimentalphysik, Luruper Chaussee 149, D-22761 Hamburg (Germany)

    1999-12-01

    In this contribution photochemical processes in pure rare gas clusters will be discussed. The relaxation dynamics of electronically excited He clusters is investigated with luminescence spectroscopy. After electronic excitation of He clusters many sharp lines are observed in the visible and infrared spectral range which can be attributed to He atoms and molecules desorbing from the cluster. It turns out that the desorption of electronically excited He atoms and molecules is an important decay channel. The findings for He clusters are compared with results for Ar clusters. While desorption of electronically excited He atoms is observed for all clusters containing up to several thousand atoms a corresponding process in Ar clusters is only observed for very small clusters (N<10). (orig.)

  14. Splenic abscess: a rare presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohit Bhatia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Splenic abscess is a rare clinical entity with an incidence of 0.2-0.7% in autopsy-based studies. When untreated, splenic abscess is associated with nearly 100% mortality; in treated patients, the mortality rate is 16.6% during the first 90 days. It mostly occurs in patients with neoplasia, immunodeficiency, trauma, diabetes or splenic infarct. The incidence of splenic abscess is thought to be growing because of the increase in the number of immunocompromised patients who are particularly at risk for this disease and also because of the widespread use of diagnostic modalities. However, the optimal treatment for this remains unclear. We present a case of a 42-year-old man diagnosed with multiloculated splenic abscess and was subjected to splenectomy.

  15. WHY ARE PULSAR PLANETS RARE?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Rebecca G.; Livio, Mario; Palaniswamy, Divya [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, 4505 South Maryland Parkway, Las Vegas, NV 89154 (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Pulsar timing observations have revealed planets around only a few pulsars. We suggest that the rarity of these planets is due mainly to two effects. First, we show that the most likely formation mechanism requires the destruction of a companion star. Only pulsars with a suitable companion (with an extreme mass ratio) are able to form planets. Second, while a dead zone (a region of low turbulence) in the disk is generally thought to be essential for planet formation, it is most probably rare in disks around pulsars, because of the irradiation from the pulsar. The irradiation strongly heats the inner parts of the disk, thus pushing the inner boundary of the dead zone out. We suggest that the rarity of pulsar planets can be explained by the low probability for these two requirements to be satisfied: a very low-mass companion and a dead zone.

  16. Liposarcome dorsal: aspect clinique rare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agbessi, Odry; Arrob, Adil; Fiqhi, Kamal; Khalfi, Lahcen; Nassih, Mohammed; El Khatib, Karim

    2015-01-01

    Décrit la première fois par Virchow en 1860, le liposarcome est une tumeur mésenchymateuse rare. Cette rareté est relative car les liposarcomes représentent quand même 14 à 18% de l'ensemble des tumeurs malignes des parties molles et ils constituent le plus fréquent des sarcomes des parties molles. Pour la majorité des auteurs, il ne se développerait jamais sur un lipome ou une lipomatose préexistant. Nous rapportons un cas de volumineux liposarcome de la face dorsale du tronc. L'histoire de la maladie, l'aspect clinique inhabituel « de tumeur dans tumeur », l'aspect de la pièce opératoire nous fait évoquer la possibilité de la transformation maligne d'un lipome bénin préexistant. PMID:26113914

  17. Radiation mutation breeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Hi Sup; Kim, Jae Sung; Kim, Jin Kyu; Shin, In Chul; Lim, Young Taek

    1998-04-01

    In order to develop an advanced technical knowledge for the selection of better mutants, some of the crops were irradiated and the mutation rate, the survival rate and the method for selction of a mutant were studied. Furthermore, this study aimed to obtain basic data applicable to the development of genetic resources by evaluation and analysis the specific character for selection of the superior mutant and its plant breeding. 1. selection of the mutant with a superior resistance against environment in the principal crops 1) New varieties of mutant rices such as Wonpyeongbyeo, Wongwangbyeo, Winmibyeo, and heogseon chalbeyeo (sticky forma) were registered in the national variety list and made an application to crop variety protection right. They are under review now. 2) We also keep on studying on the number of a grain of 8 lines of excellent mutant rice for the purpose of improvement of breeding . 3) We selected 3 lines which have a resistance to pod and stem blight in large soybean, 31 lines with small grain size and higher yield, 112 lines of soybean of cooking, 7 lines of low lipoxygenase content, and 12 lines with decreased phytic acid content by 20 % compared to the previous level. 2. Selection of advanced Mugunwha (Rose of Sharon) mutant 1) Bagseul, a new variety of mutant, was developed and 30 plantlets of it are being proliferated. 2) Fifty-three lines of a mutant having a various morphologies were selected

  18. Radiation mutation breeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Hi Sup; Kim, Jae Sung; Kim, Jin Kyu; Shin, In Chul; Lim, Young Taek

    1998-04-01

    In order to develop an advanced technical knowledge for the selection of better mutants, some of the crops were irradiated and the mutation rate, the survival rate and the method for selction of a mutant were studied. Furthermore, this study aimed to obtain basic data applicable to the development of genetic resources by evaluation and analysis the specific character for selection of the superior mutant and its plant breeding. 1. selection of the mutant with a superior resistance against environment in the principal crops 1) New varieties of mutant rices such as Wonpyeongbyeo, Wongwangbyeo, Winmibyeo, and heogseon chalbeyeo (sticky forma) were registered in the national variety list and made an application to crop variety protection right. They are under review now. 2) We also keep on studying on the number of a grain of 8 lines of excellent mutant rice for the purpose of improvement of breeding . 3) We selected 3 lines which have a resistance to pod and stem blight in large soybean, 31 lines with small grain size and higher yield, 112 lines of soybean of cooking, 7 lines of low lipoxygenase content, and 12 lines with decreased phytic acid content by 20 % compared to the previous level. 2. Selection of advanced Mugunwha (Rose of Sharon) mutant 1) Bagseul, a new variety of mutant, was developed and 30 plantlets of it are being proliferated. 2) Fifty-three lines of a mutant having a various morphologies were selected.

  19. Mutation breeding in wheat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amer, I.M.

    2002-01-01

    The study aims to improve the productivity of wheat by using gamma ray (100 - 600 Gy) in mutation breading. Five local varieties were used and the program continued for the Sakha 69 for seven generations. Seeds irradiated with 600 Gy were not germinated in the field, while low doses (100-150 Gy) stimulated the root growth and spike length. The higher doses caused gradual decrease of growth with differences in varieties response. in the second generation, a genetic differences were noticed in most varieties using doses of 100-300 Gy, and the dispike was disappeared when 250 Gy was used. 79 plants from irradiated Sakha 69 were selected according to spike length and the number of grains and planted with the control to test the third generation. differences between the varieties were noticed and 8 mutants with high productivity were selected and evaluated in the fourth and fifth generations with the local variety. The mutants improve the productivity and in particular the mutants Nos.. (19-1), (14-3), and (30-2). The experiment showed the relation between the planting sites and the mutants in the sixth and seven generations

  20. Induced mutations in castor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganesan, K.; Javad Hussain, H.S.; Vindhiyavarman, P.

    2001-01-01

    Castor (Ricinus communis L.) is an important oilseed crop in India. To create variability mutations were induced in two cultivars 'TMV5' (maturing in 130-140 days) and 'CO1' (perennial type). Gamma rays and diethyl sulphate and ethidium bromide were used for seed treatment. Ten doses, from 100 to 1000 Gy were employed. For chemical mutagenesis five concentrations of mutagenes from 10 to 50 mM were tried. No economic mutants could be isolated after treatment with the chemical mutagens. The following economic mutants were identified in the dose 300 Gy of gamma rays. Annual types from perennial CO 1 castor CO 1 is a perennial variety (8-10 years) with bold seeds (100 seed weight 90 g) and high oil content (57%). Twenty-one lines were isolated with annual types (160-180 days) with high yield potential as well as bold seeds and high oil content. These mutants, identified in M 3 generation were bred true in subsequent generations up to M 8 generation. Critical evaluation of the mutants in yield evaluation trials is in progress

  1. Plantar vein thrombosis: a rare cause of plantar foot pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siegal, Daniel S.; Wu, Jim S.; Brennan, Darren D.; Hochman, Mary G.; Challies, Tracy

    2008-01-01

    Plantar vein thrombosis is a rare condition, with only a handful of cases reported in the literature. The cause is unknown; however, the disease has been attributed to prior surgery, trauma, and paraneoplastic conditions. We present a case of a 32-year-old female runner with plantar vein thrombosis diagnosed on contrast-enhanced MRI and confirmed on ultrasound. The symptoms resolved with conservative treatment and evaluation revealed the presence of a prothrombin gene mutation and use of oral contraceptive pills. To our knowledge, this is the first case of plantar vein thrombosis diagnosed initially by MRI. Moreover, this case suggests that plantar vein thrombosis should be considered in patients with hypercoagulable states and plantar foot pain. (orig.)

  2. Ectodermal dysplasia-skin fragility syndrome: A rare case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subhash Kashyap

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ectodermal dysplasia/skin fragility syndrome (ED-SFS is a newly described autosomal recessive disorder characterized by skin fragility and blistering, palmoplantar keratoderma, abnormal hair growth, nail dystrophy, and occasionally defective sweating. It results from mutations in the PKP1 gene encoding plakophilin 1 (PKP1, which is an important component of stratifying epithelial desmosomes and a nuclear component of many cell types. Only 12 cases of this rare genodermatosis have been reported so far. We present an unusual case of ED-SFS in a 12-year boy who was normal at birth but subsequently developed skin fragility, hair and nail deformities, abnormal dentition, palmoplantar keratoderma, and abnormal sweating but no systemic abnormality.

  3. Plantar vein thrombosis: a rare cause of plantar foot pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siegal, Daniel S.; Wu, Jim S.; Brennan, Darren D.; Hochman, Mary G. [Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Challies, Tracy [Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Department of Pathology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2008-03-15

    Plantar vein thrombosis is a rare condition, with only a handful of cases reported in the literature. The cause is unknown; however, the disease has been attributed to prior surgery, trauma, and paraneoplastic conditions. We present a case of a 32-year-old female runner with plantar vein thrombosis diagnosed on contrast-enhanced MRI and confirmed on ultrasound. The symptoms resolved with conservative treatment and evaluation revealed the presence of a prothrombin gene mutation and use of oral contraceptive pills. To our knowledge, this is the first case of plantar vein thrombosis diagnosed initially by MRI. Moreover, this case suggests that plantar vein thrombosis should be considered in patients with hypercoagulable states and plantar foot pain. (orig.)

  4. Dorfman-Chanarin syndrome: a rare neutral lipid storage disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Souvik; Samanta, Moumita; Sarkar, Mihir; Chatterjee, Sukanta

    2010-01-01

    Dorfman-Chanarin syndrome is a rare neutral lipid storage disorder characterized by ichthyosis, lipid vacuolations in peripheral leucocytes, and multisystem involvement. It is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the CGI-58 gene. A total of 42 cases have been reported worldwide till February 2009 out of which 4 have been previously reported from India. We report a case of a 20-month-old male with congenital ichthyosis, organomegaly, and bilateral cryptorchidism. Examination of the peripheral smear revealed lipid vacuoles in the leucocytes consistent with Jordan's anomaly, which was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy. Liver biopsy revealed micronodular cirrhosis with macrovesicular steatosis while skin biopsy showed ichthyosis vulgaris. Dorfman-Chanarin syndrome was diagnosed on the basis of clinical and laboratory criteria with certain unreported manifestations. Dietary modifications were instituted and followed up after 1 year with promising results. This emphasizes the importance of neonatal screening for lipid vacuolations in peripheral blood in all cases of congenital ichthyosis.

  5. Xeroderma pigmentosum: A rare case report with review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Anand

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Xeroderma pigmentosum, or XP, is an autosomal recessive genetic disorder in which the ability to repair DNA damage caused by ultraviolet (UV light is deficient. In extreme cases, all exposure to sunlight must be forbidden, no matter how small. As such, individuals with the disease are often colloquially referred to as ′Children of the Night′. Mutations in XP genes that regulate nucleotide excision repair, not only predispose persons with xeroderma pigmentosum to multiple malignancies, but also promote premature cutaneous and ocular ageing, and in some cases promote progressive neurodegenerative changes. There is a great involvement of many parts of the body, especially head and neck. The oral manifestations are mainly related to the occurrence of malignant tumors in the lips, tongue and buccal mucosa. This paper reports a rare case of XP in a 40-year-old female presenting with dermatological, oral and ophthalmological involvement.

  6. Spectrum of mutations in CRM-positive and CRM-reduced hemophilia A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGinniss, M.J.; Kazazian, H.H. Jr.; Bi, L.; Antonarakis, S.E. (John Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States)); Hoyer, L.W. (American Red Cross Blood Services, Rockville, MD (United States)); Inaba, H. (Tokyo Medical College (Japan))

    1993-02-01

    Hemophilia A is due to the functional deficiency of factor VIII (FVIII, gene locus F8C). Although half the patients have no detectable FVIII protein in their plasma, the more rare patients ([approximately]5%) have normal levels of a dysfunctional FVIII and are termed cross-reacting material (CRM)-positive. More commonly ([approximately]45%), patients have plasma FVIII protein reduced to an extent roughly comparable to the level of FVIII activity and are designated CRM-reduced. We used denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis to screen for mutations within the F8C gene of 11 patients (6CRM-positive, 5 CRM-reduced) and identified 9 different mutations in 9 patients after analyses of all 26 exons, the promoter region, and the polyadenylation site. Six mutations have not been described previously. Five weree missense (Ser289Leu, Ser558Phe, Val634Ala, Val634Met, Asn1441Lys), and the sixth was a 3-bp deletion ([Delta]Phe652). A review of the literature and the assay of FVIII antigen in 5 hemophilia A patients with previously identified missense mutations from this laboratory yielded a total of 20 other unique CRM-reduced and CRM-positive mutations. Almost all CRM-positive/reduced mutations (24/26) were missense, and many (12/26) occurred at CpG dinucleotides. We examined 19 missense mutation for evolutionary conservation using the portions of the porcine and murine F8C sequences that are known, and 18/19 amino acid residue altered by mutation in these patients wer conserved. Almost 50% of mutations (11/26) clustered in the A2 domain, suggesting that this region is critical for the function of FVIII. The results indicate a nonrandom distribution of mutations and suggest that mutations in a limited number of FVIII regions may cause CRM-positive and CRM-reduced heomphilia A. 48 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  7. A FBN1 mutation association with different phenotypes of Marfan syndrome in a Chinese family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yapeng; Xu, Jianhua; Chen, Mingjie; Du, Binbin; Li, Qiaoli; Xing, Qinghe; Zhang, Yanzhou

    2016-09-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that patients with different FBN1 mutations often present more considerable phenotypic variation compared to different members of the related family carrying a same mutation. The purpose of our study was to identify pathogenic mutation and provide more information about genotype-phenotypic correlations in a large Chinese family with Marfan syndrome. 15 related family members from a Chinese 4-generation pedigree with Marfan syndrome underwent physical, ophthalmologic, radiological and cardiovascular examinations. The propositus has De Bakey III aortic dissection and didn't fulfill the revised Ghent criteria for Marfan syndrome. Nine family members have ectopia lentis and their echocardiogram was normal. Five other family members have no evidence of Marfan syndrome. Genomic DNA was isolated from blood leukocytes. The exome sequencing was employed on the propositus, then the Sanger sequencing was conducted for mutation verification in other 14 participants of this family. The causative mutation in FBN1 discovered in the propositus was a known heterozygous missense mutation, c.1633T>G (p.R545C), in exon 14 (NM 000138). This same mutation was also identified in all 9 ectopia lentis patients and one unaffected 8-year-old girl. However, the same mutation was not discovered in other 4 unaffected family members. Our data enhance the information of genotype-phenotype correlation owing to FBN1 mutations. To our current knowledge, we firstly reported that the same FBN1 mutation, c. 1633C>T (Arg545Cys), was detected simultaneously in three different cardinal phenotypes (ectopia lentis, aortic dissection and unaffected) within one family. The unaffected girl with FBN1 mutation may presumably represent a rare case of nonpenetrance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. mtDNA mutation C1494T, haplogroup A, and hearing loss in Chinese

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Chengye; Kong Qingpeng; Yao Yonggang; Zhang Yaping

    2006-01-01

    Mutation C1494T in mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene was recently reported in two large Chinese families with aminoglycoside-induced and nonsyndromic hearing loss (AINHL) and was claimed to be pathogenic. This mutation, however, was first reported in a sample from central China in our previous study that was aimed to reconstruct East Asian mtDNA phylogeny. All these three mtDNAs formed a subclade defined by mutation C1494T in mtDNA haplogroup A. It thus seems that mutation C1494T is a haplogroup A-associated mutation and this matrilineal background may contribute a high risk for the penetrance of mutation C1494T in Chinese with AINHL. To test this hypothesis, we first genotyped mutation C1494T in 553 unrelated individuals from three regional Chinese populations and performed an extensive search for published complete or near-complete mtDNA data sets (>3000 mtDNAs), we then screened the C1494T mutation in 111 mtDNAs with haplogroup A status that were identified from 1823 subjects across China. The search for published mtDNA data sets revealed no other mtDNA besides the above-mentioned three carrying mutation C1494T. None of the 553 randomly selected individuals and the 111 haplogroup A mtDNAs was found to bear this mutation. Therefore, our results suggest that C1494T is a very rare event. The mtDNA haplogroup A background in general is unlikely to play an active role in the penetrance of mutation C1494T in AINHL

  9. Rare earth elements: end use and recyclability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goonan, Thomas G.

    2011-01-01

    Rare earth elements are used in mature markets (such as catalysts, glassmaking, lighting, and metallurgy), which account for 59 percent of the total worldwide consumption of rare earth elements, and in newer, high-growth markets (such as battery alloys, ceramics, and permanent magnets), which account for 41 percent of the total worldwide consumption of rare earth elements. In mature market segments, lanthanum and cerium constitute about 80 percent of rare earth elements used, and in new market segments, dysprosium, neodymium, and praseodymium account for about 85 percent of rare earth elements used. Regardless of the end use, rare earth elements are not recycled in large quantities, but could be if recycling became mandated or very high prices of rare earth elements made recycling feasible.

  10. Mutation spectrum of homogentisic acid oxidase (HGD) in alkaptonuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilboux, Thierry; Kayser, Michael; Introne, Wendy; Suwannarat, Pim; Bernardini, Isa; Fischer, Roxanne; O'Brien, Kevin; Kleta, Robert; Huizing, Marjan; Gahl, William A

    2009-12-01

    Alkaptonuria (AKU) is a rare autosomal recessive metabolic disorder, characterized by accumulation of homogentisic acid, leading to darkened urine, pigmentation of connective tissue (ochronosis), joint and spine arthritis, and destruction of cardiac valves. AKU is due to mutations in the homogentisate dioxygenase gene (HGD) that converts homogentisic acid to maleylacetoacetic acid in the tyrosine catabolic pathway. Here we report a comprehensive mutation analysis of 93 patients enrolled in our study, as well as an extensive update of all previously published HGD mutations associated with AKU. Within our patient cohort, we identified 52 HGD variants, of which 22 were novel. This yields a total of 91 identified HGD variations associated with AKU to date, including 62 missense, 13 splice site, 10 frameshift, 5 nonsense, and 1 no-stop mutation. Most HGD variants reside in exons 3, 6, 8, and 13. We assessed the potential effect of all missense variations on protein function, using five bioinformatic tools specifically designed for interpretation of missense variants (SIFT, POLYPHEN, PANTHER, PMUT, and SNAP). We also analyzed the potential effect of splice-site variants using two different tools (BDGP and NetGene2). This study provides valuable resources for molecular analysis of alkaptonuria and expands our knowledge of the molecular basis of this disease.

  11. Dominant de novo DSP mutations cause erythrokeratodermia-cardiomyopathy syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyden, Lynn M; Kam, Chen Y; Hernández-Martín, Angela; Zhou, Jing; Craiglow, Brittany G; Sidbury, Robert; Mathes, Erin F; Maguiness, Sheilagh M; Crumrine, Debra A; Williams, Mary L; Hu, Ronghua; Lifton, Richard P; Elias, Peter M; Green, Kathleen J; Choate, Keith A

    2016-01-15

    Disorders of keratinization (DOK) show marked genotypic and phenotypic heterogeneity. In most cases, disease is primarily cutaneous, and further clinical evaluation is therefore rarely pursued. We have identified subjects with a novel DOK featuring erythrokeratodermia and initially-asymptomatic, progressive, potentially fatal cardiomyopathy, a finding not previously associated with erythrokeratodermia. We show that de novo missense mutations clustered tightly within a single spectrin repeat of DSP cause this novel cardio-cutaneous disorder, which we term erythrokeratodermia-cardiomyopathy (EKC) syndrome. We demonstrate that DSP mutations in our EKC syndrome subjects affect localization of desmosomal proteins and connexin 43 in the skin, and result in desmosome aggregation, widening of intercellular spaces, and lipid secretory defects. DSP encodes desmoplakin, a primary component of desmosomes, intercellular adhesion junctions most abundant in the epidermis and heart. Though mutations in DSP are known to cause other disorders, our cohort features the unique clinical finding of severe whole-body erythrokeratodermia, with distinct effects on localization of desmosomal proteins and connexin 43. These findings add a severe, previously undescribed syndrome featuring erythrokeratodermia and cardiomyopathy to the spectrum of disease caused by mutation in DSP, and identify a specific region of the protein critical to the pathobiology of EKC syndrome and to DSP function in the heart and skin. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Novel FAM20A mutation causes autosomal recessive amelogenesis imperfecta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volodarsky, Michael; Zilberman, Uri; Birk, Ohad S

    2015-06-01

    To relate the peculiar phenotype of amelogenesis imperfecta in a large Bedouin family to the genotype determined by whole genome linkage analysis. Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) is a broad group of inherited pathologies affecting enamel formation, characterized by variability in phenotypes, causing mutations and modes of inheritance. Autosomal recessive or compound heterozygous mutations in FAM20A, encoding sequence similarity 20, member A, have been shown to cause several AI phenotypes. Five members from a large consanguineous Bedouin family presented with hypoplastic amelogenesis imperfecta with unerupted and resorbed permanent molars. Following Soroka Medical Center IRB approval and informed consent, blood samples were obtained from six affected offspring, five obligatory carriers and two unaffected siblings. Whole genome linkage analysis was performed followed by Sanger sequencing of FAM20A. The sequencing unravelled a novel homozygous deletion mutation in exon 11 (c.1523delC), predicted to insert a premature stop codon (p.Thr508Lysfs*6). We provide an interesting case of novel mutation in this rare disorder, in which the affected kindred is unique in the large number of family members sharing a similar phenotype. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Novel TGM5 mutations in acral peeling skin syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Velden, Jaap J A J; van Geel, Michel; Nellen, Ruud G L; Jonkman, Marcel F; McGrath, John A; Nanda, Arti; Sprecher, Eli; van Steensel, Maurice A M; McLean, W H Irwin; Cassidy, Andrew J

    2015-04-01

    Acral peeling skin syndrome (APSS, MIM #609796) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by superficial exfoliation and blistering of the volar and dorsal aspects of hands and feet. The level of separation is at the junction of the stratum granulosum and stratum corneum. APSS is caused by mutations in the TGM5 gene encoding transglutaminase-5, which is important for structural integrity of the outermost epidermal layers. The majority of patients originate from Europe and carry a p.(Gly113Cys) mutation in TGM5. In this study, we report both European and non-European families carrying other mutations in the TGM5 gene. In 5 patients, we found 3 novel mutations: c.1001+2_1001+3del, c.1171G>A and c.1498C>T. To confirm their pathogenicity, we performed functional analyses with a transglutaminase activity assay, determined alternative splicing by reverse-transcribed PCR analysis and used databases and in silico prediction tools. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. The Chinese Society of Rare Earth is Studying The Feasibility of Marketing Rare Earth Futures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    Lin Donglu,secretary-general of the Chinese Society of Rare Earth recently said,the Chinese Society of Rare Earth undertook the research on subject of the National Social Science Fund Foundation on the reform of Chinese rare earth trading pricing mechanism on promoting RMB globalization,and is focusing on studying the feasibility of marketing rare earth futures variety.

  15. Mutations of PTPN23 in developmental and epileptic encephalopathy

    KAUST Repository

    Sowada, Nadine

    2017-10-31

    Developmental and epileptic encephalopathies (DEE) are a heterogeneous group of neurodevelopmental disorders with poor prognosis. Recent discoveries have greatly expanded the repertoire of genes that are mutated in epileptic encephalopathies and DEE, often in a de novo fashion, but in many patients, the disease remains molecularly uncharacterized. Here, we describe a new form of DEE in patients with likely deleterious biallelic variants in PTPN23. The phenotype is characterized by early onset drug-resistant epilepsy, severe and global developmental delay, microcephaly, and sometimes premature death. PTPN23 encodes a tyrosine phosphatase with strong brain expression, and its knockout in mouse is embryonically lethal. Structural modeling supports a deleterious effect of the identified alleles. Our data suggest that PTPN23 mutations cause a rare severe form of autosomal-recessive DEE in humans, a finding that requires confirmation.

  16. Mutations in calmodulin cause ventricular tachycardia and sudden cardiac death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyegaard, Mette; Overgaard, Michael Toft; Sondergaard, M.T.

    2012-01-01

    a substantial part of sudden cardiac deaths in young individuals. Mutations in RYR2, encoding the cardiac sarcoplasmic calcium channel, have been identified as causative in approximately half of all dominantly inherited CPVT cases. Applying a genome-wide linkage analysis in a large Swedish family with a severe......Catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT) is a devastating inherited disorder characterized by episodic syncope and/or sudden cardiac arrest during exercise or acute emotion in individuals without structural cardiac abnormalities. Although rare, CPVT is suspected to cause...... calmodulin-binding-domain peptide at low calcium concentrations. We conclude that calmodulin mutations can cause severe cardiac arrhythmia and that the calmodulin genes are candidates for genetic screening of individual cases and families with idiopathic ventricular tachycardia and unexplained sudden cardiac...

  17. Tufting enteropathy with EpCAM mutation: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karla Lais Pêgas

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Tufting enteropathy (TE, also known as intestinal epithelial dysplasia (IED, is a rare congenital enteropathy related to an earlyonset of severe intractable diarrhea due to specific abnormalities of the intestinal epithelium and mutations of the EpCAM gene. TE is characterized by clinical and histological heterogeneity, such as with low or without mononuclear cell infiltration of the lamina propria, and abnormalities of basement membrane. TE can be associated with malformations, other epithelial diseases, or to abnormal enterocytes development and/or differentiation. The authors report a case of a Brazilian child with TE associated with c.556-14A>G mutation in the EpCAM gene (NM_002354.2.

  18. Nephropathic Cystinosis Mimicking Bartter Syndrome: a Novel Mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastug, Funda; Nalcacioglu, Hulya; Ozaltin, Fatih; Korkmaz, Emine; Yel, Sibel

    2018-01-01

    Cystinosis is a rare autosomal recessive disorder resulting from defective lysosomal transport of cystine due to mutations in the cystinosin lysosomal cystine transporter (CTNS) gene. The clinical phenotype of nephropathic cystinosis is characterized by renal tubular Fanconi syndrome and development of end-stage renal disease during the first decade. Although metabolic acidosis is the classically prominent finding of the disease, a few cases may present with hypokalemic metabolic alkalosis mimicking Bartter syndrome. Bartter-like presentation may lead to delay in diagnosis and initiation of specific treatment for cystinosis. We report a case of a 6-year-old girl initially presenting with the features of Bartter syndrome that was diagnosed 2 years later with nephropathic cystinosis and a novel CTNS mutation.

  19. Inflammatory peeling skin syndrome caused a novel mutation in CDSN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telem, Dana Fuchs; Israeli, Shirli; Sarig, Ofer; Sprecher, Eli

    2012-04-01

    Generalized peeling skin syndrome (PSS) is a rare autosomal recessive dermatosis manifesting with continuous exfoliation of the stratum corneum. The inflammatory (type B) subtype of PSS was recently found to be caused by deleterious mutations in the CDSN gene encoding corneodesmosin, a major component of desmosomal junctions in the uppermost layers of the epidermis. In the present study, we assessed a 10-month-old baby, who presented with generalized superficial peeling of the skin. Using PCR amplification and direct sequencing, we identified the third PSS-associated mutation in CDSN, a homozygous 4 bp duplication in the second exon of the gene (c.164_167dup GCCT; p.Thr57ProfsX6). These data further support the notion that corneodesmosin deficiency impairs cell-cell adhesion in the upper epidermis, paving the way for an abnormal inflammatory response due to epidermal barrier disruption.

  20. The role of weak selection and high mutation rates in nearly neutral evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Daniel John; Jensen, Henrik Jeldtoft

    2009-04-21

    Neutral dynamics occur in evolution if all types are 'effectively equal' in their reproductive success, where the definition of 'effectively equal' depends on the population size and the details of mutations. Empirically observed neutral genetic evolution in extremely large clonal populations can only be explained under current models if selection is completely absent. Such models typically consider the case where population dynamics occurs on a different timescale to evolution. However, this assumption is invalid when mutations are not rare in a whole population. We show that this has important consequences for the occurrence of neutral evolution in clonal populations. In highly connected type spaces, neutral dynamics can occur for all population sizes despite significant selective differences, via the forming of effectively neutral networks connecting rare neutral types. Biological implications include an explanation for the high diversity of rare types that survive in large clonal populations, and a theoretical justification for the use of neutral null models.

  1. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 22

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1983-07-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents new reports on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants.

  2. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 34

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1989-07-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents abstracts and short communications of research results on radiation and chemical induced mutation breeding projects. Positive traits such as disease resistance and increased productivity are highlighted.

  3. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 29

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1987-02-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents reports and rea search abstracts on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants.

  4. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 15

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1980-02-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents new reports on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants.

  5. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-02-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents reports and rea search abstracts on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  6. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 15

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-02-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents new reports on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  7. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 14

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-07-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents new reports on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  8. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 16

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-07-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents new reports on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  9. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-07-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents new reports on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  10. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 28

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1986-09-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents reports and research abstracts on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants.

  11. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 29

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-02-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents reports and rea search abstracts on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  12. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents new reports on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  13. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1976-01-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents reports and rea search abstracts on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants.

  14. Mutation Breeding Newsletter. No. 37

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This newsletter contains a brief account of FAO/IAEA meetings held in 1990 on plant breeding involving the use of induced mutations. It also features a list of commercially available plant cultivars produced by such techniques. Refs and tabs

  15. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1974-08-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents reports and rea search abstracts on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  16. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 18

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1981-07-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents new reports on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants.

  17. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1977-01-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents new reports on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants.

  18. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 34

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-07-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents abstracts and short communications of research results on radiation and chemical induced mutation breeding projects. Positive traits such as disease resistance and increased productivity are highlighted

  19. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 24

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1984-07-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents reports and research abstracts on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants.

  20. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 32

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1988-07-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents new reports on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants.