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Sample records for rapidly inactivating t-type

  1. Rapid inactivation of SARS-like coronaviruses.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kapil, Sanjay (Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS); Oberst, R. D. (Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS); Bieker, Jill Marie; Tucker, Mark David; Souza, Caroline Ann; Williams, Cecelia Victoria

    2004-03-01

    Chemical disinfection and inactivation of viruses is largely understudied, but is very important especially in the case of highly infectious viruses. The purpose of this LDRD was to determine the efficacy of the Sandia National Laboratories developed decontamination formulations against Bovine Coronavirus (BCV) as a surrogate for the coronavirus that causes Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) in humans. The outbreak of SARS in late 2002 resulted from a highly infectious virus that was able to survive and remain infectious for extended periods. For this study, preliminary testing with Escherichia coli MS-2 (MS-2) and Escherichia coli T4 (T4) bacteriophages was conducted to develop virucidal methodology for verifying the inactivation after treatment with the test formulations following AOAC germicidal methodologies. After the determination of various experimental parameters (i.e. exposure, concentration) of the formulations, final testing was conducted on BCV. All experiments were conducted with various organic challenges (horse serum, bovine feces, compost) for results that more accurately represent field use condition. The MS-2 and T4 were slightly more resistant than BCV and required a 2 minute exposure while BCV was completely inactivated after a 1 minute exposure. These results were also consistent for the testing conducted in the presence of the various organic challenges indicating that the test formulations are highly effective for real world application.

  2. Rapid Bedside Inactivation of Ebola Virus for Safe Nucleic Acid Tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenstierne, Maiken Worsøe; Karlberg, Helen; Bragstad, Karoline

    2016-01-01

    for nucleic acid extraction inactivates Ebola virus. A rapid bedside inactivation method for nucleic acid tests is obtained by simply adding Magna Pure lysis/binding buffer directly into vacuum blood collection EDTA tubes using a thin needle and syringe prior to sampling. The ready-to-use inactivation vacuum......Rapid bedside inactivation of Ebola virus would be a solution for the safety of medical and technical staff, risk containment, sample transport, and high-throughput or rapid diagnostic testing during an outbreak. We show that the commercially available Magna Pure lysis/binding buffer used...... tubes are stable for more than 4 months, and Ebola virus RNA is preserved in the Magna Pure lysis/binding buffer for at least 5 weeks independent of the storage temperature. We also show that Ebola virus RNA can be manually extracted from Magna Pure lysis/binding buffer-inactivated samples using...

  3. Oxidation of multiple methionine residues impairs rapid sodium channel inactivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassmann, Mario; Hansel, Alfred; Leipold, Enrico; Birkenbeil, Jan; Lu, Song-Qing; Hoshi, Toshinori; Heinemann, Stefan H.

    2010-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) readily oxidize the sulfur-containing amino acids cysteine and methionine (Met). The impact of Met oxidation on the fast inactivation of the skeletal muscle sodium channel NaV1.4 expressed in human embryonic kidney cells was studied by applying the Met-preferring oxidant chloramine-T (ChT) or by irradiating the ROS-producing dye Lucifer Yellow in the patch pipettes. Both interventions dramatically slowed down inactivation of the sodium channels. Replacement of Met in the Ile-Phe-Met inactivation motif with Leu (M1305L) strongly attenuated the oxidizing effect on inactivation but did not eliminate it completely. Mutagenesis of conserved Met residues in the intracellular linkers connecting the membrane-spanning segments of the channel (M1469L and M1470L) also markedly diminished the oxidation sensitivity of the channel, while that of other conserved Met residues (442, 1139, 1154, 1316) were without any noticeable effect. The results of mutagenesis of results, assays of other NaV channel isoforms (NaV1.2, NaV1.5, NaV1.7) and the kinetics of the oxidation-induced removal of inactivation collectively indicate that multiple Met target residues need to be oxidized to completely impair inactivation. This arrangement using multiple Met residues confers a finely graded oxidative modulation of NaV channels and allows organisms to adapt to a variety of oxidative stress conditions, such as ischemic reperfusion. PMID:18369661

  4. Rapid inactivation of Penicillium digitatum spores using high-density nonequilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iseki, Sachiko; Ohta, Takayuki; Aomatsu, Akiyoshi; Ito, Masafumi; Kano, Hiroyuki; Higashijima, Yasuhiro; Hori, Masaru

    2010-04-01

    A promising, environmentally safe method for inactivating fungal spores of Penicillium digitatum, a difficult-to-inactivate food spoilage microorganism, was developed using a high-density nonequilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma (NEAPP). The NEAPP employing Ar gas had a high electron density on the order of 1015 cm-3. The spores were successfully and rapidly inactivated using the NEAPP, with a decimal reduction time in spores (D value) of 1.7 min. The contributions of ozone and UV radiation on the inactivation of the spores were evaluated and concluded to be not dominant, which was fundamentally different from the conventional sterilizations.

  5. Nanoscale Structural and Mechanical Analysis of Bacillus anthracis Spores Inactivated with Rapid Dry Heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felker, Daniel L.; Burggraf, Larry W.

    2014-01-01

    Effective killing of Bacillus anthracis spores is of paramount importance to antibioterrorism, food safety, environmental protection, and the medical device industry. Thus, a deeper understanding of the mechanisms of spore resistance and inactivation is highly desired for developing new strategies or improving the known methods for spore destruction. Previous studies have shown that spore inactivation mechanisms differ considerably depending upon the killing agents, such as heat (wet heat, dry heat), UV, ionizing radiation, and chemicals. It is believed that wet heat kills spores by inactivating critical enzymes, while dry heat kills spores by damaging their DNA. Many studies have focused on the biochemical aspects of spore inactivation by dry heat; few have investigated structural damages and changes in spore mechanical properties. In this study, we have inactivated Bacillus anthracis spores with rapid dry heating and performed nanoscale topographical and mechanical analysis of inactivated spores using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Our results revealed significant changes in spore morphology and nanomechanical properties after heat inactivation. In addition, we also found that these changes were different under different heating conditions that produced similar inactivation probabilities (high temperature for short exposure time versus low temperature for long exposure time). We attributed the differences to the differential thermal and mechanical stresses in the spore. The buildup of internal thermal and mechanical stresses may become prominent only in ultrafast, high-temperature heat inactivation when the experimental timescale is too short for heat-generated vapor to efficiently escape from the spore. Our results thus provide direct, visual evidences of the importance of thermal stresses and heat and mass transfer to spore inactivation by very rapid dry heating. PMID:24375142

  6. Lack of delta waves and sleep disturbances during non-rapid eye movement sleep in mice lacking α1G-subunit of T-type calcium channels

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Jungryun; Kim, Daesoo; Shin, Hee-Sup

    2004-01-01

    T-type calcium channels have been implicated as a pacemaker for brain rhythms during sleep but their contribution to behavioral states of sleep has been relatively uncertain. Here, we found that mice lacking α1G T-type Ca2+ channels showed a loss of the thalamic delta (1–4 Hz) waves and a reduction of sleep spindles (7–14 Hz), whereas slow (16 sec compared with the wild-type, whereas no difference was seen in BAs of

  7. Lack of delta waves and sleep disturbances during non-rapid eye movement sleep in mice lacking alpha1G-subunit of T-type calcium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jungryun; Kim, Daesoo; Shin, Hee-Sup

    2004-12-28

    T-type calcium channels have been implicated as a pacemaker for brain rhythms during sleep but their contribution to behavioral states of sleep has been relatively uncertain. Here, we found that mice lacking alpha1(G) T-type Ca(2+) channels showed a loss of the thalamic delta (1-4 Hz) waves and a reduction of sleep spindles (7-14 Hz), whereas slow (sleep. Analysis of sleep disturbances, as defined by the occurrence of brief awakening (BA) episodes during NREM sleep, revealed that mutant mice exhibited a higher incidence of BAs of >16 sec compared with the wild-type, whereas no difference was seen in BAs of sleep spindles from cortically generated slow waves. These results also suggest that the alpha1(G)-subunit of T-type calcium channels plays a critical role in the genesis of thalamocortical oscillations and contributes to the modulation of sleep states and the transition between NREM sleep and wake states.

  8. Lack of delta waves and sleep disturbances during non-rapid eye movement sleep in mice lacking α1G-subunit of T-type calcium channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jungryun; Kim, Daesoo; Shin, Hee-Sup

    2004-01-01

    T-type calcium channels have been implicated as a pacemaker for brain rhythms during sleep but their contribution to behavioral states of sleep has been relatively uncertain. Here, we found that mice lacking α1G T-type Ca2+ channels showed a loss of the thalamic delta (1–4 Hz) waves and a reduction of sleep spindles (7–14 Hz), whereas slow (sleep. Analysis of sleep disturbances, as defined by the occurrence of brief awakening (BA) episodes during NREM sleep, revealed that mutant mice exhibited a higher incidence of BAs of >16 sec compared with the wild-type, whereas no difference was seen in BAs of sleep spindles from cortically generated slow waves. These results also suggest that the α1G-subunit of T-type calcium channels plays a critical role in the genesis of thalamocortical oscillations and contributes to the modulation of sleep states and the transition between NREM sleep and wake states. PMID:15601764

  9. Short communication: HIV type 1 escapes inactivation by saliva via rapid escape into oral epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, Elizabeth A; Gebhard, Kristin H; Fasching, Claudine E; Giacaman, Rodrigo A; Kappes, John C; Ross, Karen F; Herzberg, Mark C

    2012-12-01

    Saliva contains anti-HIV-1 factors, which show unclear efficacy in thwarting mucosal infection. When incubated in fresh, unfractionated whole saliva, infectious HIV-1 IIIb and BaL (X4- and R5-tropic, respectively) persisted from 4 to at least 30 min in a saliva concentration-dependent manner. In salivary supernatant for up to 6 h, both infectious HIV-1 strains "escaped" into immortalized oral epithelial cells; infectious BaL showed selectively enhanced escape in the presence of saliva. Fluorescently labeled HIV-1 virus-like particles entered oral epithelial cells within minutes of exposure. Using a previously unrecognized mechanism, therefore, strains of HIV-1 escape inactivation by saliva via rapid uptake into oral epithelial cells.

  10. The Rapid Inactivation of Porcine Skin by Applying High Hydrostatic Pressure without Damaging the Extracellular Matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoki Morimoto

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We previously reported that high hydrostatic pressure (HHP of 200 MPa for 10 minutes could induce cell killing. In this study, we explored whether HHP at 200 MPa or HHP at lower pressure, in combination with hyposmotic distilled water (DW, could inactivate the skin, as well as cultured cells. We investigated the inactivation of porcine skin samples 4 mm in diameter. They were immersed in either a normal saline solution (NSS or DW, and then were pressurized at 100 and 200 MPa for 5, 10, 30, or 60 min. Next, we explored the inactivation of specimens punched out from the pressurized skin 10 × 2 cm in size. The viability was evaluated using a WST-8 assay and an outgrowth culture. The histology of specimens was analyzed histologically. The mitochondrial activity was inactivated after the pressurization at 200 MPa in both experiments, and no outgrowth was observed after the pressurization at 200 MPa. The arrangement and proportion of the dermal collagen fibers or the elastin fibers were not adversely affected after the pressurization at 200 MPa for up to 60 minutes. This study showed that a HHP at 200 MPa for 10 min could inactivate the skin without damaging the dermal matrix.

  11. The rapid inactivation of porcine skin by applying high hydrostatic pressure without damaging the extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimoto, Naoki; Mahara, Atsushi; Shima, Kouji; Ogawa, Mami; Jinno, Chizuru; Kakudo, Natsuko; Kusumoto, Kenji; Fujisato, Toshia; Suzuki, Shigehiko; Yamaoka, Tetsuji

    2015-01-01

    We previously reported that high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) of 200 MPa for 10 minutes could induce cell killing. In this study, we explored whether HHP at 200 MPa or HHP at lower pressure, in combination with hyposmotic distilled water (DW), could inactivate the skin, as well as cultured cells. We investigated the inactivation of porcine skin samples 4 mm in diameter. They were immersed in either a normal saline solution (NSS) or DW, and then were pressurized at 100 and 200 MPa for 5, 10, 30, or 60 min. Next, we explored the inactivation of specimens punched out from the pressurized skin 10×2 cm in size. The viability was evaluated using a WST-8 assay and an outgrowth culture. The histology of specimens was analyzed histologically. The mitochondrial activity was inactivated after the pressurization at 200 MPa in both experiments, and no outgrowth was observed after the pressurization at 200 MPa. The arrangement and proportion of the dermal collagen fibers or the elastin fibers were not adversely affected after the pressurization at 200 MPa for up to 60 minutes. This study showed that a HHP at 200 MPa for 10 min could inactivate the skin without damaging the dermal matrix.

  12. Rapid voltage-dependent dissociation of scorpion alpha-toxins coupled to Na channel inactivation in amphibian myelinated nerves

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    The voltage-dependent action of several scorpion alpha-toxins on Na channels was studied in toad myelinated nerve under voltage clamp. These toxins slow the declining phase of macroscopic Na current, apparently by inhibiting an irreversible channel inactivation step and thus permitting channels to reopen from a closed state in depolarized membranes. In this article, we describe the rapid reversal of alpha- toxin action by membrane depolarizations more positive than +20 mV, an effect not achieved by extensive washing. Depolarizations that were increasingly positive and of longer duration caused the toxin to dissociate faster and more completely, but only up to a limiting extent. Repetitive pulses had a cumulative effect equal to that of a single pulse lasting as long as their combined duration. When the membrane of a nonperfused fiber was repolarized, the effects of the toxin returned completely, but if the fiber was perfused during the conditioning procedure, recovery was incomplete and occurred more slowly, as it did at lower applied toxin concentrations. Other alpha- type toxins, from the scorpion Centruroides sculpturatus (IVa) and the sea anemone Anemonia sulcata (ATXII), exhibited similar voltage- dependent binding, though each had its own voltage range and dissociation rate. We suggest that the dissociation of the toxin molecule from the Na channel is coupled to the inactivation process. An equivalent valence for inactivation gating, of less than 1 e per channel, is calculated from the voltage-dependent change in toxin affinity. PMID:2428923

  13. A new method for rapid identification of ansamycin compounds by inactivating KLM gene clusters in potential ansamycin-producing actinomyces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, G; Zhang, H; Sun, G; Wu, L; Zhang, J; Wang, Y

    2012-02-01

    In this study, we explored the possibility of construction of a 'universal targeting vector' by Red/ET recombination to inactivate L gene encoding 3-amino-5-hydroxybenzoic acid (AHBA)-oxidoreductase in AHBA biosynthetic gene cluster to facilitate the detection of ansamycins production in actinomycetes. Based on the conserved regions of linked AHBA synthase (K), oxidoreductase (L) and phosphatase (M) gene clusters, degenerate primers were designed and PCR was performed to detect KLM gene clusters within 33 AHBA synthase gene-positive actinomycetes strains. Among them, 22 KLM gene cluster-positive strains were identified. A 'universal targeting vector' was further constructed using the 50-nt homologous sequences chosen from four strains internal L gene in KLM gene clusters through Red/ET recombination. The L gene from nine of the KLM gene cluster-positive actinomycetes strains was inactivated by insertion of a kanamycin (Km) resistance marker into its internal region from the 'universal targeting vector'. By comparison of the metabolites produced in parent strains with those in L gene-inactivated mutants, we demonstrated the possible ansamycins production produced by these strains. One strain (4089) was proved to be a geldanamycin producer. Three strains (3-20, 7-32 and 8-32) were identified as potential triene-ansamycins producers. Another strain (3-27) was possible to be a streptovaricin C producer. Strains 24-100 and 4-124 might be served as ansamitocin-like producers. The results confirmed the feasibility that a 'universal targeting vector' could be constructed through Red/ET recombination using the conserved regions of KLM gene clusters to detect ansamycins production in actinomycetes. The 'universal targeting vector' provides a rapid approach in certain degree to detect the potential ansamycin producers from the 22 KLM gene cluster-positive actinomycetes strains. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Applied Microbiology © 2011 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  14. Overcoming rapid inactivation of lung surfactant: analogies between competitive adsorption and colloid stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zasadzinski, Joseph A; Stenger, Patrick C; Shieh, Ian; Dhar, Prajna

    2010-04-01

    Lung surfactant (LS) is a mixture of lipids and proteins that line the alveolar air-liquid interface, lowering the interfacial tension to levels that make breathing possible. In acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), inactivation of LS is believed to play an important role in the development and severity of the disease. This review examines the competitive adsorption of LS and surface-active contaminants, such as serum proteins, present in the alveolar fluids of ARDS patients, and how this competitive adsorption can cause normal amounts of otherwise normal LS to be ineffective in lowering the interfacial tension. LS and serum proteins compete for the air-water interface when both are present in solution either in the alveolar fluids or in a Langmuir trough. Equilibrium favors LS as it has the lower equilibrium surface pressure, but the smaller proteins are kinetically favored over multi-micron LS bilayer aggregates by faster diffusion. If albumin reaches the interface, it creates an energy barrier to subsequent LS adsorption that slows or prevents the adsorption of the necessary amounts of LS required to lower surface tension. This process can be understood in terms of classic colloid stability theory in which an energy barrier to diffusion stabilizes colloidal suspensions against aggregation. This analogy provides qualitative and quantitative predictions regarding the origin of surfactant inactivation. An important corollary is that any additive that promotes colloid coagulation, such as increased electrolyte concentration, multivalent ions, hydrophilic non-adsorbing polymers such as PEG, dextran, etc. added to LS, or polyelectrolytes such as chitosan, also promotes LS adsorption in the presence of serum proteins and helps reverse surfactant inactivation. The theory provides quantitative tools to determine the optimal concentration of these additives and suggests that multiple additives may have a synergistic effect. A variety of physical and chemical

  15. A Simple Modification to the Mosquito Homogenization Protocol Safely Inactivates West Nile Virus and Allows Virus Detection by the Rapid Analyte Measurement Platform (RAMP®) ASSAY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhalter, Kristen L; Biggerstaff, Brad J; Horiuchi, Kalanthe; Savage, Harry M

    2016-06-01

    We evaluated the ability of the Rapid Analyte Measurement Platform (RAMP(®)) mosquito-grinding buffer to inactivate West Nile virus (WNV) by subjecting WNV-positive samples ground in RAMP buffer to incubation intervals ranging from 5 min to 60 min. At each time point an aliquot was removed and serially diluted in bovine albumin (BA)-1 cell culture media to stop the inactivation process by RAMP buffer. Each BA-1 sample was tested for viable virus using Vero 6-well cell culture plaque assay and observed for plaques. We observed very limited inactivation of WNV (1-2 log10 plaque-forming units/ml) by RAMP buffer. Concerned for RAMP operators who may be using this assay in low-level biocontainment facilities, we developed an alternate sample homogenization protocol using Triton X-100 detergent that ensures complete WNV inactivation without compromising the performance of the RAMP assay.

  16. Rapid inactivation of Cronobacter sakazakii on copper alloys following periods of desiccation stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elguindi, Jutta; Alwathnani, Hend A; Rensing, Christopher

    2012-04-01

    Cronobacter spp. have been identified as the causative agent in meningitis and necrotizing enterocolitis in premature infants which can be linked to the bacterium's desiccation resistance and persistence in powdered infant formula. In this study we examined the efficacy of copper cast alloys in contact killing of Cronobacter sakazakii following periods of desiccation stress. Cronobacter sakazakii cells suspended in Tryptic Soy Broth (TSB) were killed within 10 min while kept moist on 99.9% copper alloys and within 1 min of drying on 99.9% copper alloys. Survival times were unchanged after cells suspended in TSB were desiccated for 33 days. Cronobacter sakazakii cells suspended in infant formula were killed within 30 min under moist conditions and within 3 min of drying on 99.9% copper alloys. However, when desiccated in infant formula for 45 days, survival times decreased to 10 and 1 min in moist and dry conditions, respectively. In contrast, no decrease in viable cells was noted on stainless steel surfaces under the experimental conditions employed in this study. Cronobacter sakazakii was rapidly killed on copper alloys under all testing conditions of this study indicating that desiccation and copper ion resistance do not prolong survival. These results could have important implications for the utilization of copper in the production and storage of powdered infant formula.

  17. Noradrenaline upregulates T-type calcium channels in rat pinealocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Haijie; Seo, Jong Bae; Jung, Seung-Ryoung; Koh, Duk-Su; Hille, Bertil

    2015-02-15

    The mammalian pineal gland is a neuroendocrine organ that responds to circadian and seasonal rhythms. Its major function is to secrete melatonin as a hormonal night signal in response to nocturnal delivery of noradrenaline from sympathetic neurons. Culturing rat pinealocytes in noradrenaline for 24 h induced a low-voltage activated transient Ca(2+) current whose pharmacology and kinetics corresponded to a CaV3.1 T-type channel. The upregulation of the T-type Ca(2+) current is initiated by β-adrenergic receptors, cyclic AMP and cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase. Messenger RNA for CaV3.1 T-type channels is significantly elevated by noradrenaline at 8 h and 24 h. The noradrenaline-induced T-type channel mediated an increased Ca(2+) entry and supported modest transient electrical responses to depolarizing stimuli, revealing the potential for circadian regulation of pinealocyte electrical excitability and Ca(2+) signalling. Our basic hypothesis is that mammalian pinealocytes have cycling electrical excitability and Ca(2+) signalling that may contribute to the circadian rhythm of pineal melatonin secretion. This study asked whether the functional expression of voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels (CaV channels) in rat pinealocytes is changed by culturing them in noradrenaline (NA) as a surrogate for the night signal. Channel activity was assayed as ionic currents under patch clamp and as optical signals from a Ca(2+)-sensitive dye. Channel mRNAs were assayed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Cultured without NA, pinealocytes showed only non-inactivating L-type dihydropyridine-sensitive Ca(2+) current. After 24 h in NA, additional low-voltage activated transient Ca(2+) current developed whose pharmacology and kinetics corresponded to a T-type CaV3.1 channel. This change was initiated by β-adrenergic receptors, cyclic AMP and protein kinase A as revealed by pharmacological experiments. mRNA for CaV3.1 T-type channels became significantly elevated, but mRNA for

  18. T-Type Calcium Channels Are Required to Maintain Viability of Neural Progenitor Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji-Woon; Oh, Hyun Ah; Lee, Sung Hoon; Kim, Ki Chan; Eun, Pyung Hwa; Ko, Mee Jung; Gonzales, Edson Luck T; Seung, Hana; Kim, Seonmin; Bahn, Geon Ho; Shin, Chan Young

    2018-02-21

    T-type calcium channels are low voltage-activated calcium channels that evoke small and transient calcium currents. Recently, T-type calcium channels have been implicated in neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism spectrum disorder and neural tube defects. However, their function during embryonic development is largely unknown. Here, we investigated the function and expression of T-type calcium channels in embryonic neural progenitor cells (NPCs). First, we compared the expression of T-type calcium channel subtypes (CaV3.1, 3.2, and 3.3) in NPCs and differentiated neural cells (neurons and astrocytes). We detected all subtypes in neurons but not in astrocytes. In NPCs, CaV3.1 was the dominant subtype, whereas CaV3.2 was weakly expressed, and CaV3.3 was not detected. Next, we determined CaV3.1 expression levels in the cortex during early brain development. Expression levels of CaV3.1 in the embryonic period were transiently decreased during the perinatal period and increased at postnatal day 11. We then pharmacologically blocked T-type calcium channels to determine the effects in neuronal cells. The blockade of T-type calcium channels reduced cell viability, and induced apoptotic cell death in NPCs but not in differentiated astrocytes. Furthermore, blocking T-type calcium channels rapidly reduced AKT-phosphorylation (Ser473) and GSK3β-phosphorylation (Ser9). Our results suggest that T-type calcium channels play essential roles in maintaining NPC viability, and T-type calcium channel blockers are toxic to embryonic neural cells, and may potentially be responsible for neurodevelopmental disorders.

  19. Signal processing by T-type calcium channel interactions in the cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engbers, Jordan D T; Anderson, Dustin; Zamponi, Gerald W; Turner, Ray W

    2013-11-27

    T-type calcium channels of the Cav3 family are unique among voltage-gated calcium channels due to their low activation voltage, rapid inactivation, and small single channel conductance. These special properties allow Cav3 calcium channels to regulate neuronal processing in the subthreshold voltage range. Here, we review two different subthreshold ion channel interactions involving Cav3 channels and explore the ability of these interactions to expand the functional roles of Cav3 channels. In cerebellar Purkinje cells, Cav3 and intermediate conductance calcium-activated potassium (IKCa) channels form a novel complex which creates a low voltage-activated, transient outward current capable of suppressing temporal summation of excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs). In large diameter neurons of the deep cerebellar nuclei, Cav3-mediated calcium current (I T) and hyperpolarization-activated cation current (I H) are activated during trains of inhibitory postsynaptic potentials. These currents have distinct, and yet synergistic, roles in the subthreshold domain with I T generating a rebound burst and I H controlling first spike latency and rebound spike precision. However, by shortening the membrane time constant the membrane returns towards resting value at a faster rate, allowing I H to increase the efficacy of I T and increase the range of burst frequencies that can be generated. The net effect of Cav3 channels thus depends on the channels with which they are paired. When expressed in a complex with a KCa channel, Cav3 channels reduce excitability when processing excitatory inputs. If functionally coupled with an HCN channel, the depolarizing effect of Cav3 channels is accentuated, allowing for efficient inversion of inhibitory inputs to generate a rebound burst output. Therefore, signal processing relies not only on the activity of individual subtypes of channels but also on complex interactions between ion channels whether based on a physical complex or by indirect

  20. Signal processing by T-type calcium channel interactions in the cerebellum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordan D.T. Engbers

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available T-type calcium channels of the Cav3 family are unique among voltage-gated calcium channels due to their low activation voltage, rapid inactivation, and small single channel conductance. These special properties allow Cav3 calcium channels to regulate neuronal processing in the subthreshold voltage range. Here, we review two different subthreshold ion channel interactions involving Cav3 channels and explore the ability of these interactions to expand the functional roles of Cav3 channels. In cerebellar Purkinje cells, Cav3 and intermediate conductance calcium-activated potassium (IKCa channels form a novel complex which creates a low voltage-activated, transient outward current capable of suppressing temporal summation of excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs. In large diameter neurons of the deep cerebellar nuclei, Cav3-mediated calcium current (IT and hyperpolarization-activated cation current (IH are activated during trains of IPSPs. These currents have distinct, and yet synergistic, roles in the subthreshold domain with IT generating a rebound burst and IH controlling first spike latency and rebound spike precision. However, by shortening the membrane time constant the membrane returns towards resting value at a faster rate, allowing IH to increase the efficacy of IT, and increase the range of burst frequencies that can be generated. The net effect of Cav3 channels thus depends on the channels with which they are paired. When expressed in a complex with a KCa channel, Cav3 channels reduce excitability when processing excitatory inputs. If functionally coupled with an HCN channel, the depolarizing effect of Cav3 channels is accentuated, allowing for efficient inversion of inhibitory inputs to generate a rebound burst output. Therefore, signal processing relies not only on the activity of individual subtypes of channels but also on complex interactions between ion channels whether based on a physical complex or by indirect effects on

  1. Complete inactivation of photosynthetic activity during desiccation and rapid recovery by rehydration in the aerial microalga Trentepohlia jolithus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L; Li, Y; Liu, J

    2016-11-01

    Aerial microalgae are more exposed to harsh and rapidly changing environmental conditions, including desiccation and radiation. Under high light, aerial algae in the desiccated state would be highly subject to photodamage. Therefore, aerial algae need effective protective mechanisms to dissipate excess excitation energy. In this study, the changes in photosynthetic behaviors during desiccation and after rehydration in Trentepohlia jolithus were confirmed using chlorophyll a fluorescence (OJIP) transient, allowing determination of the photoprotection mechanisms of this aerial alga. The filaments of T. jolithus cells at 25% relative air humidity (RH) are significantly shrunken compared with those at 100% and 87% RH, decreasing the surface area for light absorption. At 25% RH, the shape and intensity of the OJIP transient disappeared, but recovered rapidly to the level at 100% RH after 5 s of rehydration. Compared with 100% RH, the maximum quantum yield of PSII (φPo ), phenomenological energy fluxes for absorption (ABS/CSm) and active PSII reaction centers (RCs) at 25% RH decreased significantly, the specific energy fluxes for absorption (ABS/RC) increased significantly, but the specific energy fluxes for trapping (TRo/RC) at 25% RH did not change. These parameters at 25% RH recovered rapidly to the level at 100% RH after 5 s of rehydration. These results suggest that the efficiency of PSII light absorption and activities of PSII RCs were reversibly down-regulated in desiccated T. jolithus, which may be a special adaptive mechanism for the survivability of aerial microalgae in habitats with rapidly changing water availability. © 2016 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  2. Rapid and efficient CRISPR/Cas9 gene inactivation in human neurons during human pluripotent stem cell differentiation and direct reprogramming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio, Alicia; Luoni, Mirko; Giannelli, Serena G; Radice, Isabella; Iannielli, Angelo; Cancellieri, Cinzia; Di Berardino, Claudia; Regalia, Giulia; Lazzari, Giovanna; Menegon, Andrea; Taverna, Stefano; Broccoli, Vania

    2016-11-18

    The CRISPR/Cas9 system is a rapid and customizable tool for gene editing in mammalian cells. In particular, this approach has widely opened new opportunities for genetic studies in neurological disease. Human neurons can be differentiated in vitro from hPSC (human Pluripotent Stem Cells), hNPCs (human Neural Precursor Cells) or even directly reprogrammed from fibroblasts. Here, we described a new platform which enables, rapid and efficient CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome targeting simultaneously with three different paradigms for in vitro generation of neurons. This system was employed to inactivate two genes associated with neurological disorder (TSC2 and KCNQ2) and achieved up to 85% efficiency of gene targeting in the differentiated cells. In particular, we devised a protocol that, combining the expression of the CRISPR components with neurogenic factors, generated functional human neurons highly enriched for the desired genome modification in only 5 weeks. This new approach is easy, fast and that does not require the generation of stable isogenic clones, practice that is time consuming and for some genes not feasible.

  3. Role of T-type channels in vasomotor function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuo, Ivana Y-T; Howitt, Lauren; Sandow, Shaun L

    2014-01-01

    Low-voltage-activated T-type calcium channels play an important role in regulating cellular excitability and are implicated in conditions, such as epilepsy and neuropathic pain. T-type channels, especially Cav3.1 and Cav3.2, are also expressed in the vasculature, although patch clamp studies of i...

  4. T-type calcium channels in synaptic plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leresche, Nathalie; Lambert, Régis C

    2017-03-04

    The role of T-type calcium currents is rarely considered in the extensive literature covering the mechanisms of long-term synaptic plasticity. This situation reflects the lack of suitable T-type channel antagonists that till recently has hampered investigations of the functional roles of these channels. However, with the development of new pharmacological and genetic tools, a clear involvement of T-type channels in synaptic plasticity is starting to emerge. Here, we review a number of studies showing that T-type channels participate to numerous homo- and hetero-synaptic plasticity mechanisms that involve different molecular partners and both pre- and post-synaptic modifications. The existence of T-channel dependent and independent plasticity at the same synapse strongly suggests a subcellular localization of these channels and their partners that allows specific interactions. Moreover, we illustrate the functional importance of T-channel dependent synaptic plasticity in neocortex and thalamus.

  5. L- and T-type voltage-gated Ca2+ channels in human granulosa cells: functional characterization and cholinergic regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platano, Daniela; Magli, M Cristina; Ferraretti, Anna Pia; Gianaroli, Luca; Aicardi, Giorgio

    2005-04-01

    Using the whole-cell configuration of the patch-clamp technique, we have characterized two types of ionic currents through voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels in human granulosa cells. One is long-lasting, activates at approximately -20 mV, reaches the peak at approximately +20 mV, has an inactivation time constant of 132.5 +/- 5.6 msec at 20 mV, and is sensitive to dihydropyridines. The other is transient, activates at approximately -40 mV, peaks at approximately -10 mV, has an inactivation time constant of 38.8 +/- 1.8 msec at -10 mV, displays a voltage-dependent inactivation, and is sensitive to 100 microm Ni2+, but not to dihydropyridines. Biophysical and pharmacological properties of these currents indicate that they are gated through L- and T-type calcium channels, respectively. The cholinergic receptor agonist carbachol (50 microm) reduces the amplitude of the currents through both L-type (-34.7 +/- 6.4%; n = 10) and T-type (-52.6 +/- 7.4%; n = 8) channels, suggesting a possible role of these channels in the cholinergic regulation of human ovarian functions.

  6. Rapid assessment of bovine spongiform encephalopathy prion inactivation by heat treatment in yellow grease produced in the industrial manufacturing process of meat and bone meals

    OpenAIRE

    YOSHIOKA, Miyako; Matsuura, Yuichi; Okada, Hiroyuki; Shimozaki, Noriko; Yamamura, Tomoaki; Murayama, Yuichi; Yokoyama, Takashi; Mohri, Shirou

    2013-01-01

    Background Prions, infectious agents associated with transmissible spongiform encephalopathy, are primarily composed of the misfolded and pathogenic form (PrPSc) of the host-encoded prion protein. Because PrPSc retains infectivity after undergoing routine sterilizing processes, the cause of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) outbreaks are suspected to be feeding cattle meat and bone meals (MBMs) contaminated with the prion. To assess the validity of prion inactivation by heat treatment in...

  7. "Mind the Gap": Raman Evidence for Rapid Inactivation of CTX-M-9 β-Lactamase Using Mechanism-Based Inhibitors that Bridge the Active Site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidari-Torkabadi, Hossein; Bethel, Christopher R; Ding, Zhe; Pusztai-Carey, Marianne; Bonnet, Richard; Bonomo, Robert A; Carey, Paul R

    2015-10-14

    CTX-M β-lactamases are one of the fastest growing extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) families found in Escherichia coli rendering this organism extremely difficult to treat with β-lactam antibiotics. Although they are grouped in class A β-lactamases, the CTX-M family possesses low sequence identity with other enzymes. In addition, they have high hydrolytic activity against oxyimino-cephalosporins, despite having smaller active sites compared to other ESBLs in class A. Similar to most class A enzymes, most of the CTX-M β-lactamases can be inhibited by the clinical inhibitors (clavulanic acid, sulbactam, and tazobactam), but the prevalence of inhibitor resistance is an emerging clinical threat. Thus, the mechanistic details of inhibition pathways are needed for new inhibitor development. Here, we use Raman microscopy to study the CTX-M-9 inactivation reaction with the three commercially available inhibitors and compare these findings to the analysis of the S130G variant. Characterization of the reactions in CTX-M-9 single crystals and solution show the formation of a unique cross-linked species, probably involving Ser70 and Ser130, with subsequent hydrolysis leading to an acrylate species linked to Ser130. In solution, a major population of this species is seen at 25 ms after mixing. Support for this finding comes from the CTX-M-9 S130G variant that reacts with clavulanic acid, sulbactam, and tazobactam in solution, but lacks the characteristic spectroscopic signature for the Ser130-linked species. Understanding the mechanism of inactivation of this clinically important ESBL-type class A lactamase permits us to approach the challenge of inhibitor resistance using knowledge of the bridging species in the inactivation pathway.

  8. Rapid assessment of bovine spongiform encephalopathy prion inactivation by heat treatment in yellow grease produced in the industrial manufacturing process of meat and bone meals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshioka, Miyako; Matsuura, Yuichi; Okada, Hiroyuki; Shimozaki, Noriko; Yamamura, Tomoaki; Murayama, Yuichi; Yokoyama, Takashi; Mohri, Shirou

    2013-07-09

    Prions, infectious agents associated with transmissible spongiform encephalopathy, are primarily composed of the misfolded and pathogenic form (PrPSc) of the host-encoded prion protein. Because PrPSc retains infectivity after undergoing routine sterilizing processes, the cause of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) outbreaks are suspected to be feeding cattle meat and bone meals (MBMs) contaminated with the prion. To assess the validity of prion inactivation by heat treatment in yellow grease, which is produced in the industrial manufacturing process of MBMs, we pooled, homogenized, and heat treated the spinal cords of BSE-infected cows under various experimental conditions. Prion inactivation was analyzed quantitatively in terms of the infectivity and PrPSc of the treated samples. Following treatment at 140°C for 1 h, infectivity was reduced to 1/35 of that of the untreated samples. Treatment at 180°C for 3 h was required to reduce infectivity. However, PrPSc was detected in all heat-treated samples by using the protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA) technique, which amplifies PrPScin vitro. Quantitative analysis of the inactivation efficiency of BSE PrPSc was possible with the introduction of the PMCA50, which is the dilution ratio of 10% homogenate needed to yield 50% positivity for PrPSc in amplified samples. Log PMCA50 exhibited a strong linear correlation with the transmission rate in the bioassay; infectivity was no longer detected when the log PMCA50 of the inoculated sample was reduced to 1.75. The quantitative PMCA assay may be useful for safety evaluation for recycling and effective utilization of MBMs as an organic resource.

  9. Inactivation of rabies virus by hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd-Elghaffar, Asmaa A; Ali, Amal E; Boseila, Abeer A; Amin, Magdy A

    2016-02-03

    Development of safe and protective vaccines against infectious pathogens remains a challenge. Inactivation of rabies virus is a critical step in the production of vaccines and other research reagents. Beta-propiolactone (βPL); the currently used inactivating agent for rabies virus is expensive and proved to be carcinogenic in animals. This study aimed to investigate the ability of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) to irreversibly inactivate rabies virus without affecting its antigenicity and immunogenicity in pursuit of finding safe, effective and inexpensive alternative inactivating agents. H2O2 3% rapidly inactivated a Vero cell adapted fixed rabies virus strain designated as FRV/K within 2h of exposure without affecting its antigenicity or immunogenicity. No residual infectious virus was detected and the H2O2-inactivated vaccine proved to be safe and effective when compared with the same virus harvest inactivated with the classical inactivating agent βPL. Mice immunized with H2O2-inactivated rabies virus produced sufficient level of antibodies and were protected when challenged with lethal CVS virus. These findings reinforce the idea that H2O2 can replace βPL as inactivating agent for rabies virus to reduce time and cost of inactivation process. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) inhibits voltage-gated T-type calcium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevalier, M; Gilbert, G; Lory, P; Marthan, R; Quignard, J F; Savineau, J P

    2012-06-01

    Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and its sulfated form, DHEAS, are the most abundant steroid hormones in the mammalian blood flow. DHEA may have beneficial effects in various pathophysiological conditions such as cardiovascular diseases or deterioration of the sense of well-being. However to date, the cellular mechanism underlying DHEA action remains elusive and may involve ion channel modulation. In this study, we have characterized the effect of DHEA on T-type voltage-activated calcium channels (T-channels), which are involved in several cardiovascular and neuronal diseases. Using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique, we demonstrate that DHEA inhibits the three recombinant T-channels (Ca(V)3.1, Ca(V)3.2 and Ca(V)3.3) expressed in NG108-15 cell line, as well as native T-channels in pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells. This effect of DHEA is both concentration (IC(50) between 2 and 7μM) and voltage-dependent and results in a significant shift of the steady-state inactivation curves toward hyperpolarized potentials. Consequently, DHEA reduces window T-current and inhibits membrane potential oscillations induced by Ca(V)3 channels. DHEA inhibition is not dependent on the activation of nuclear androgen or estrogen receptors and implicates a PTX-sensitive Gi protein pathway. Functionally, DHEA and the T-type inhibitor NNC 55-0396 inhibited KCl-induced contraction of pulmonary artery rings and their effect was not cumulative. Altogether, the present data demonstrate that DHEA inhibits T-channels by a Gi protein dependent pathway. DHEA-induced alteration in T-channel activity could thus account for its therapeutic action and/or physiological effects. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Tonotopic Variation of the T-Type Ca2+ Current in Avian Auditory Coincidence Detector Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukaya, Ryota; Yamada, Rei; Kuba, Hiroshi

    2018-01-10

    Neurons in avian nucleus laminaris (NL) are binaural coincidence detectors for sound localization and are characterized by striking structural variations in dendrites and axon initial segment (AIS) according to their acoustic tuning [characteristic frequency (CF)]. T-type Ca2+ (CaT) channels regulate synaptic integration and firing behavior at these neuronal structures. However, whether or how CaT channels contribute to the signal processing in NL neurons is not known. In this study, we addressed this issue with whole-cell recording and two-photon Ca2+ imaging in brain slices of posthatch chicks of both sexes. We found that the CaT current was prominent in low-CF neurons, whereas it was almost absent in higher-CF neurons. In addition, a large Ca2+ transient occurred at the dendrites and the AIS of low-CF neurons, indicating a localization of CaT channels at these structures in the neurons. Because low-CF neurons have long dendrites, dendritic CaT channels may compensate for the attenuation of EPSPs at dendrites. Furthermore, the short distance of AIS from the soma may accelerate activation of axonal CaT current in the neurons and help EPSPs reach spike threshold. Indeed, the CaT current was activated by EPSPs and augmented the synaptic response and spike generation of the neurons. Notably, the CaT current was inactivated during repetitive inputs, and these augmenting effects predominated at the initial phase of synaptic activity. These results suggested that dendritic and axonal CaT channels increase the sensitivity to sound at its onset, which may expand the dynamic range for binaural computation in low-CF NL neurons.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Neurons in nucleus laminaris are binaural coincidence detectors for sound localization. We report that T-type Ca2+ (CaT) current was prominent at dendrites and the axonal trigger zone in neurons tuned to low-frequency sound. Because these neurons have long dendrites and a closer trigger zone compared with those tuned to higher

  12. Modulation of T-type Ca2+ channels by Lavender and Rosemary extracts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaymae El Alaoui

    Full Text Available Medicinal plants represent a significant reservoir of unexplored substances for early-stage drug discovery. Of interest, two flowering Mediterranean plants have been used for thousands of years for their beneficial effects on nervous disorders, including anxiety and mood. However, the therapeutic potential of these plants regarding their ability to target ion channels and neuronal excitability remains largely unknown. Towards this goal, we have investigated the ability of Lavender and Rosemary to modulate T-type calcium channels (TTCCs. TTCCs play important roles in neuronal excitability, neuroprotection, sensory processes and sleep. These channels are also involved in epilepsy and pain. Using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique, we have characterized how Lavender and Rosemary extracts, as well as their major active compounds Linalool and Rosmarinic acid, modulate the electrophysiological properties of recombinant TTCCs (CaV3.2 expressed in HEK-293T cells. Both the methanolic and essential oil extracts as well as the active compounds of these plants inhibit Cav3.2 current in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, these products also induce a negative shift of the steady-state inactivation of CaV3.2 current with no change in the activation properties. Taken together, our findings reveal that TTCCs are a molecular target of the Lavender and Rosemary compounds, suggesting that inhibition of TTCCs could contribute to the anxiolytic and the neuroprotective effects of these plants.

  13. Modulation of T-type Ca2+ channels by Lavender and Rosemary extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Alaoui, Chaymae; Chemin, Jean; Fechtali, Taoufiq; Lory, Philippe

    2017-01-01

    Medicinal plants represent a significant reservoir of unexplored substances for early-stage drug discovery. Of interest, two flowering Mediterranean plants have been used for thousands of years for their beneficial effects on nervous disorders, including anxiety and mood. However, the therapeutic potential of these plants regarding their ability to target ion channels and neuronal excitability remains largely unknown. Towards this goal, we have investigated the ability of Lavender and Rosemary to modulate T-type calcium channels (TTCCs). TTCCs play important roles in neuronal excitability, neuroprotection, sensory processes and sleep. These channels are also involved in epilepsy and pain. Using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique, we have characterized how Lavender and Rosemary extracts, as well as their major active compounds Linalool and Rosmarinic acid, modulate the electrophysiological properties of recombinant TTCCs (CaV3.2) expressed in HEK-293T cells. Both the methanolic and essential oil extracts as well as the active compounds of these plants inhibit Cav3.2 current in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, these products also induce a negative shift of the steady-state inactivation of CaV3.2 current with no change in the activation properties. Taken together, our findings reveal that TTCCs are a molecular target of the Lavender and Rosemary compounds, suggesting that inhibition of TTCCs could contribute to the anxiolytic and the neuroprotective effects of these plants.

  14. H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-assisted photocatalysis on flower-like rutile TiO{sub 2} nanostructures: Rapid dye degradation and inactivation of bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kőrösi, László, E-mail: ltkorosi@gmail.com [Research Institute for Viticulture and Oenology, University of Pécs, H-7634 Pécs, Pázmány Péter u. 4 (Hungary); Prato, Mirko; Scarpellini, Alice [Department of Nanochemistry, Istituto Italianodi Tecnologia, via Morego 30, 16163, Genova (Italy); Kovács, János [Department of Geology & Meteorology, University of Pécs, Ifjúság u. 6, H-7624, Pécs (Hungary); Environmental Analytical and Geoanalytical Research Group, Szentágothai Research Centre, University of Pécs, Ifjúság u. 20, H-7624, Pécs (Hungary); Dömötör, Dóra; Kovács, Tamás; Papp, Szilvia [Department of Biotechnology, Nanophage Therapy Center, Enviroinvest Corporation, Kertváros u. 2, H-7632, Pécs (Hungary)

    2016-03-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Hierarchically assembled rutile TiO{sub 2} was synthesized at room temperature. • Hydrothermal treatment enhanced the crystallinity, while morphology was maintained. • Hydrothermal treatment also led to larger crystallites and a lower surface area. • Effective K. pneumoniae killing and MO degradation were achieved with the use of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. • Higher crystallinity enhanced the reaction rate in the presence of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. - Abstract: Hierarchically assembled flower-like rutile TiO{sub 2} (FLH-R-TiO{sub 2}) nanostructures were successfully synthesized from TiCl{sub 4} at room temperature without the use of surfactants or templates. An initial sol–gel synthesis at room temperature allowed long-term hydrolysis and condensation of the precursors. The resulting FLH-R-TiO{sub 2} possessed relatively high crystallinity (85 wt%) and consisted of rod-shaped subunits assembling into cauliflower-like nanostructures. Hydrothermal evolution of FLH-R-TiO{sub 2} at different temperatures (150, 200 and 250 °C) was followed by means of X-ray diffraction, transmission and scanning electron microscopy. These FLH-R-TiO{sub 2} nanostructures were tested as photocatalysts under simulated daylight (full-spectrum lighting) in the degradation of methyl orange and in the inactivation of a multiresistant bacterium, Klebsiella pneumoniae. The effects of hydrothermal treatment on the structure, photocatalytic behavior and antibacterial activity of FLH-R-TiO{sub 2} are discussed.

  15. Pathophysiological significance of T-type Ca2+ channels: expression of T-type Ca2+ channels in fetal and diseased heart

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yasui, Kenji; Niwa, Noriko; Takemura, Haruki; Opthof, Tobias; Muto, Takao; Horiba, Mitsuru; Shimizu, Atsuya; Lee, Jong-Kook; Honjo, Haruo; Kamiya, Kaichiro; Kodama, Itsuo

    2005-01-01

    Re-expression of fetal genes has been considered to underlie ionic remodeling in diseased heart. T-type Ca(2+) channels have been reported to be functionally expressed in embryonic hearts. In this review, we summarize developmental changes of T-type Ca(2+) channels in mouse ventricles from 9.5 days

  16. Inactivation Data.xlsx

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The data set is a spreadsheet that contains results of inactivation experiments that were conducted to to determine the effectiveness of chlorine in inactivating B....

  17. Upregulation of T-type Ca2+ channels in primary sensory neurons in spinal nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Jing; Liu, Lieju; Liu, Zhiguo; Shu, Bin; Zhang, Yi

    2013-03-15

    Painful behavior testing, whole-cell patch clamp recordings, and PCR analysis were served to test the influence of T-type Ca channels in spinal nerve-injured rats. To determine the changes of T-type Ca channels in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons of different sizes and the contribution to neuronal firing and painful behavior in neuropathic pain induced by nerve injury. T-type and high-voltage-activated Ca channels play an important role in the transmission of nociceptive signals, especially in neuronal hyperexcitability in neuropathic pain. However, little is known about how nerve injury affects T-type Ca channels in DRG neurons of different sizes. The effect of intrathecal administration of mibefradil in nerve-ligated rats was examined by painful behavior testing and current clamp. The changes of T-type Ca channels in DRG neurons caused by spinal nerve ligation were determined by RT-PCR analysis and voltage clamp. Spinal nerve injury significantly increased current density of T-type Ca channels in small DRG neurons. In addition, nerve injury significantly increased the percentage of T-type Ca channels in medium and large DRG neurons. Nerve injury significantly increased the mRNA levels of Cav3.2 and Cav3.3 in DRGs. Block of T-type Ca channels on mibefradil administration significantly normalized painful behavior and hyperexcitability in neuronal firing in spinal nerve-injured rats. Our study first indicated the upregulation of functional T-type Ca channels in DRG neurons of different sizes and the changes in different subtypes of T-type Ca channels by spinal nerve injury. Considering the effect of blocking T-type Ca channels in painful behavior and abnormal neuronal firing in rats with nerve injury, our results suggest that T-type Ca channels are potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of spinal nerve ligation-induced neuropathic pain.

  18. Melatonin-mediated inhibition of Cav3.2 T-type Ca2+channels induces sensory neuronal hypoexcitability through the novel protein kinase C-eta isoform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuan; Ji, Heyi; Wang, Jiangong; Sun, Yufang; Qian, Zhiyuan; Jiang, Xinghong; Snutch, Terrance P; Sun, Yangang; Tao, Jin

    2018-02-13

    Recent studies implicate melatonin in the anti-nociceptive activity of sensory neurons. However, the underlying mechanisms are still largely unknown. Here, we identify a critical role of melatonin in functionally regulating Cav3.2 T-type Ca 2+ channels (T-type channel) in trigeminal ganglion (TG) neurons. Melatonin inhibited T-type channels in small TG neurons via the melatonin receptor 2 (MT 2 receptor) and a pertussis toxin-sensitive G-protein pathway. Immunoprecipitation analyses revealed that the intracellular subunit of the MT 2 receptor coprecipitated with Gα o . Both shRNA-mediated knockdown of Gα o and intracellular application of QEHA peptide abolished the inhibitory effects of melatonin. Protein kinase C (PKC) antagonists abolished the melatonin-induced T-type channel response whereas inhibition of conventional PKC isoforms elicited no effect. Further, application of melatonin increased membrane abundance of PKC-eta (PKC η ) while antagonism of PKC η or shRNA targeting PKC η prevented the melatonin-mediated effects. In a heterologous expression system, activation of MT 2 receptor strongly inhibited Cav3.2 T-type channel currents but had no effect on Cav3.1 and Cav3.3 current amplitudes. The selective Cav3.2 response was PKC η dependent and was accompanied by a negative shift in the steady-state inactivation curve. Further, melatonin decreased the action potential firing rate of small TG neurons and attenuated the mechanical hypersensitivity in a mouse model of Complete Freund's adjuvant-induced inflammatory pain. These actions were inhibited by T-type channel blockade. Together, our results demonstrated that melatonin inhibits Cav3.2 T-type channel activity through the MT 2 receptor coupled to novel G βγ -mediated PKC η signaling, subsequently decreasing the membrane excitability of TG neurons and pain hypersensitivity in mice. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  19. The potential roles of T-type Ca2+ channels in motor coordination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Gyun ePark

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Specific behavioral patterns are expressed by complex combinations of muscle coordination. Tremors are simple behavioral patterns and are the focus of studies investigating motor coordination mechanisms in the brain. T-type Ca2+ channels mediate intrinsic neuronal oscillations and rhythmic burst spiking, and facilitate the generation of tremor rhythms in motor circuits. Despite substantial evidence that T-type Ca2+ channels mediate pathological tremors, their roles in physiological motor coordination and behavior remain unknown. Here, we review recent progress in understanding the roles that T-type Ca2+ channels play under pathological conditions, and discuss the potential relevance of these channels in mediating physiological motor coordination.

  20. The role of T-type calcium channel genes in absence seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yucai eChen

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The thalamic relay neurons, reticular thalamic nucleus, and neocortical pyramidal cells form a circuit that sustains oscillatory burst firing, and is regarded as the underlying mechanism of absence seizures. T-type calcium channels play a key role in this circuit. Here we review the role of T-type calcium channel genes in the development of absence seizures, and emphasize gain or loss of function mutations, and other variations that alter both quantity and quality of transcripts, and methylation status of isoforms of T-type calcium channel proteins might be of equal importance in understanding the pathological mechanism of absence seizures.

  1. T-type Ca2+ channels. New players in the aging brain

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Proft, Juliane; Weiss, Norbert

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 2 (2014), e28424/1-e28424/4 ISSN 1942-0889 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : Alzheimer's disease * Amyloid beta * calcium channel * calcium signaling * T-type channel Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  2. Improved Control Strategy for T-type Isolated DC/DC Converters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Dong; Deng, Fujin; Wang, Yanbo

    2017-01-01

    . Under the proposed strategy, the primary circulating current flows through the auxiliary switches (metal–oxide–semiconductor field-effect transistors) instead of their body diodes in free-wheeling periods. Such feature can reduce conduction losses, thereby improving the efficiency of T-type isolated DC......T-type isolated DC/DC converters have recently attracted attention due to their numerous advantages, including few components, low cost, and symmetrical operation of transformers. This study proposes an improved control strategy for increasing the efficiency of T-type isolated DC/DC converters....../DC converters. The operation principles and performances of T-type isolated DC/DC converters under the proposed control strategy are analyzed in detail and verified through the simulation and experimental results....

  3. Ca-α1T, a fly T-type Ca2+ channel, negatively modulates sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Kyunghwa; Lee, Soyoung; Seo, Haengsoo; Oh, Yangkyun; Jang, Donghoon; Choe, Joonho; Kim, Daesoo; Lee, Jung-Ha; Jones, Walton D

    2015-12-09

    Mammalian T-type Ca(2+) channels are encoded by three separate genes (Cav3.1, 3.2, 3.3). These channels are reported to be sleep stabilizers important in the generation of the delta rhythms of deep sleep, but controversy remains. The identification of precise physiological functions for the T-type channels has been hindered, at least in part, by the potential for compensation between the products of these three genes and a lack of specific pharmacological inhibitors. Invertebrates have only one T-type channel gene, but its functions are even less well-studied. We cloned Ca-α1T, the only Cav3 channel gene in Drosophila melanogaster, expressed it in Xenopus oocytes and HEK-293 cells, and confirmed it passes typical T-type currents. Voltage-clamp analysis revealed the biophysical properties of Ca-α1T show mixed similarity, sometimes falling closer to Cav3.1, sometimes to Cav3.2, and sometimes to Cav3.3. We found Ca-α1T is broadly expressed across the adult fly brain in a pattern vaguely reminiscent of mammalian T-type channels. In addition, flies lacking Ca-α1T show an abnormal increase in sleep duration most pronounced during subjective day under continuous dark conditions despite normal oscillations of the circadian clock. Thus, our study suggests invertebrate T-type Ca(2+) channels promote wakefulness rather than stabilizing sleep.

  4. Low threshold T-type calcium channels as targets for novel epilepsy treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Kim L; Cain, Stuart M; Snutch, Terrance P; O'Brien, Terence J

    2014-05-01

    Low voltage-activated T-type calcium channels were originally cloned in the 1990s and much research has since focused on identifying the physiological roles of these channels in health and disease states. T-type calcium channels are expressed widely throughout the brain and peripheral tissues, and thus have been proposed as therapeutic targets for a variety of diseases such as epilepsy, insomnia, pain, cancer and hypertension. This review discusses the literature concerning the role of T-type calcium channels in physiological and pathological processes related to epilepsy. T-type calcium channels have been implicated in pathology of both the genetic and acquired epilepsies and several anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) in clinical use are known to suppress seizures via inhibition of T-type calcium channels. Despite the fact that more than 15 new AEDs have become clinically available over the past 20 years at least 30% of epilepsy patients still fail to achieve seizure control, and many patients experience unwanted side effects. Furthermore there are no treatments that prevent the development of epilepsy or mitigate the epileptic state once established. Therefore there is an urgent need for the development of new AEDs that are effective in patients with drug resistant epilepsy, are anti-epileptogenic and are better tolerated. We also review the mechanisms of action of the current AEDs with known effects on T-type calcium channels and discuss novel compounds that are being investigated as new treatments for epilepsy. © 2013 The British Pharmacological Society.

  5. Fibroblast growth factor type 1 receptor stimulation of T-type Ca2+channels in sensory neurons requires the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and protein kinase A pathways, independently of Akt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Weibing; Zhang, Yuan; Chen, Kun; Hu, Dan; Qian, Zhiyuan; Gong, Shan; Li, Hua; Hao, Yuefeng; Tao, Jin

    2018-01-31

    Fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF-23) secreted by osteocytes is known as a circulating factor that is essential for phosphate homeostasis. Recent studies have implicated FGF-23 in the nociceptive signalling of peripheral sensory neurons. However, the relevant mechanisms underlying this effect are not known. In this study, we determine the role of FGF-23 in regulating T-type Ca 2+ channels (T-type channels) in small-diameter dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons in mice. Our results show that FGF-23 increases T-type channel currents in a concentration-dependent manner. This FGF-23-induced response was dependent on FGF type 1 receptor (FGFR1) and was accompanied by a depolarizing shift in the steady-state inactivation curve. Pretreatment of neurons with the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor LY294002 prevented the FGF-23-mediated T-type channel response. Analysis of phospho-Akt (p-Akt) revealed that FGF-23 significantly activated Akt, but Akt inhibition did not affect the FGF-23-induced T-type channel current increase. The cell-permeable protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor KT-5720 pretreatment and intracellular application of PKI 6-22 both abolished the stimulatory effects of FGF-23 on T-type channels, but inhibition of PKC had no effect. In summary, these findings indicate that FGF-23 stimulates T-type channel activity via activation of FGFR1, which is coupled to the PI3K-dependent PKA signalling cascade in small DRG neurons. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Blockade of T-type calcium channels prevents tonic-clonic seizures in a maximal electroshock seizure model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakkaki, Sophie; Gangarossa, Giuseppe; Lerat, Benoit; Françon, Dominique; Forichon, Luc; Chemin, Jean; Valjent, Emmanuel; Lerner-Natoli, Mireille; Lory, Philippe

    2016-02-01

    T-type (Cav3) calcium channels play important roles in neuronal excitability, both in normal and pathological activities of the brain. In particular, they contribute to hyper-excitability disorders such as epilepsy. Here we have characterized the anticonvulsant properties of TTA-A2, a selective T-type channel blocker, in mouse. Using the maximal electroshock seizure (MES) as a model of tonic-clonic generalized seizures, we report that mice treated with TTA-A2 (0.3 mg/kg and higher doses) were significantly protected against tonic seizures. Although no major change in Local Field Potential (LFP) pattern was observed during the MES seizure, analysis of the late post-ictal period revealed a significant increase in the delta frequency power in animals treated with TTA-A2. Similar results were obtained for Cav3.1-/- mice, which were less prone to develop tonic seizures in the MES test, but not for Cav3.2-/- mice. Analysis of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK) phosphorylation and c-Fos expression revealed a rapid and elevated neuronal activation in the hippocampus following MES clonic seizures, which was unchanged in TTA-A2 treated animals. Overall, our data indicate that TTA-A2 is a potent anticonvulsant and that the Cav3.1 isoform plays a prominent role in mediating TTA-A2 tonic seizure protection. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. No apparent role for T-type Ca2+ channels in renal autoregulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Rasmus Hassing; Salomonsson, Max; Hansen, Pernille B. Lærkegaard

    2016-01-01

    Renal autoregulation protects glomerular capillaries against increases in renal perfusion pressure (RPP). In the mesentery, both L- and T-type calcium channels are involved in autoregulation. L-type calcium channels participate in renal autoregulation, but the role of T-type channels is not fully......-type and CaV3.1 knockout mice were assessed. Autoregulation of renal blood flow was examined during acute increases in RPP in normo- and hypertensive rats under pharmacological blockade of T- and L-type calcium channels using mibefradil (0.1 μM) and nifedipine (1 μM). In contrast to the results from previous...... pharmacological studies, genetic deletion of T-type channels CaV3.1 did not affect renal autoregulation. Pharmacological blockade of T-type channels using concentrations of mibefradil which specifically blocks T-type channels also had no effect in wild-type or knockout mice. Blockade of L-type channels...

  8. Inactivation of rabies virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Guanghui; Selden, David; Fooks, Anthony R; Banyard, Ashley

    2017-05-01

    Rabies virus is a notifiable pathogen that must be handled in high containment facilities where national and international guidelines apply. For the effective inactivation of rabies virus, a number of reagents were tested. Virkon S (1%) solution caused more than 4log reduction of rabies virus in culture medium supplemented with 10% foetal calf serum within 1min. Isopropyl alcohol (70%) treatment resulted in >3log reduction of rabies virus within 20s when applied at a ratio of 19:1, making it a suitable agent for surface decontamination whereas 70% ethanol was ineffective. Rabies virus (from 102.33 to 103ffu/ml) was also inactivated when cell cultures were fixed with 3% or 4% paraformaldehyde for 30min. Regardless of inactivation procedure, when taking inactivated virus preparations out of a biological containment envelope, proof of inocuity must be demonstrated to cover any possible error/deviation from procedure. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. T-type Ca(2+) channels and Autoregulation of Local Blood Flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars Jørn; Nielsen, Morten Schak; Salomonsson, Max

    2017-01-01

    L-type voltage gated Ca(2+) channels are considered to be the primary source of calcium influx during the myogenic response. However, many vascular beds also express T-type voltage gated Ca(2+) channels. Recent studies suggest that these channels may also play a role in autoregulation. At low...

  10. 5,6-EET potently inhibits T-type calcium channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cazade, M.; Bidaud, I.; Hansen, Pernille B. Lærkegaard

    2014-01-01

    T-type calcium channels (T-channels) are important actors in neuronal pacemaking, in heart rhythm, and in the control of the vascular tone. T-channels are regulated by several endogenous lipids including the primary eicosanoid arachidonic acid (AA), which display an important role in vasodilation...

  11. Role of T-type calcium channels in myogenic tone of skeletal muscle resistance arteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    VanBavel, Ed; Sorop, Oana; Andreasen, Ditte

    2002-01-01

    T-type calcium channels may be involved in the maintenance of myogenic tone. We tested their role in isolated rat cremaster arterioles obtained after CO(2) anesthesia and decapitation. Total RNA was analyzed by RT-PCR and Southern blotting for calcium channel expression. We observed expression......); K(+) -5.4 +/- 0.3 (n = 4); all log(IC(50)) P maintenance of myogenic tone in rat cremaster muscle arterioles....

  12. Inflammatory mediator bradykinin increases population of sensory neurons expressing functional T-type Ca(2+) channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Dongyang; Liang, Ce; Zhang, Fan; Men, Hongchao; Du, Xiaona; Gamper, Nikita; Zhang, Hailin

    2016-04-29

    T-type Ca(2+) channels are important regulators of peripheral sensory neuron excitability. Accordingly, T-type Ca(2+) currents are often increased in various pathological pain conditions, such as inflammation or nerve injury. Here we investigated effects of inflammation on functional expression of T-type Ca(2+) channels in small-diameter cultured dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. We found that overnight treatment of DRG cultures with a cocktail of inflammatory mediators bradykinin (BK), adenosine triphosphate (ATP), norepinephrine (NE) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) strongly increased the population size of the small-diameter neurons displaying low-voltage activated (LVA, T-type) Ca(2+) currents while having no effect on the peak LVA current amplitude. When applied individually, BK and ATP also increased the population size of LVA-positive neurons while NE and PGE2 had no effect. The PLC inhibitor U-73122 and B2 receptor antagonist, Hoe-140, both abolished the increase of the population of LVA-positive DRG neurons. Inflammatory treatment did not affect CaV3.2 mRNA or protein levels in DRG cultures. Furthermore, an ubiquitination inhibitor, MG132, did not increase the population of LVA-positive neurons. Our data suggest that inflammatory mediators BK and ATP increase the abundance of LVA-positive DRG neurons in total neuronal population by stimulating the recruitment of a 'reserve pool' of CaV3.2 channels, particularly in neurons that do not display measurable LVA currents under control conditions. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Calmodulin regulates Cav3 T-type channels at their gating brake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemin, Jean; Taiakina, Valentina; Monteil, Arnaud; Piazza, Michael; Guan, Wendy; Stephens, Robert F; Kitmitto, Ashraf; Pang, Zhiping P; Dolphin, Annette C; Perez-Reyes, Edward; Dieckmann, Thorsten; Guillemette, Joseph Guy; Spafford, J David

    2017-09-25

    Calcium (Cav1 and Cav2) and sodium channels possess homologous CaM-binding motifs, known as IQ motifs in their C-termini, which associate with calmodulin (CaM), a universal calcium sensor. Cav3 T-type channels, which serve as pacemakers of the mammalian brain and heart, lack a C-terminal IQ motif. We illustrate that T-type channels associate with CaM using co-immunoprecipitation experiments and single particle cryo-electron microscopy. We demonstrate that protostome invertebrate (LCav3) and human Cav3.1, Cav3.2, and Cav3.3 T-type channels specifically associate with CaM at helix 2 of the gating brake in the I-II linker of the channels. Isothermal titration calorimetry results revealed that the gating brake and CaM bind each other with high nanomolar affinity. We show that the gating brake assumes a helical conformation upon binding CaM, with associated conformational changes to both CaM lobes as indicated by amide chemical shifts of the amino acids of CaM in 1H-15N HSQC NMR spectra. Intact Ca2+-binding sites on CaM and an intact gating brake sequence (first 39 aa of the I-II linker) were required in Cav3.2 channels to prevent the runaway gating phenotype, a hyperpolarizing shift in voltage sensitivities and faster gating kinetics. We conclude that the presence of high-nanomolar affinity binding sites for CaM at its universal gating brake and its unique form of regulation via the tuning of the voltage range of activity could influence the participation of Cav3 T-type channels in heart and brain rhythms. Our findings may have implications for arrhythmia disorders arising from mutations in the gating brake or CaM. Copyright © 2017, The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  14. Enzymatic synthesis of capsaicin analogs and their effect on the T-type Ca2+ channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Edmundo; López-González, Ignacio; De Regil-Hernández, Rubén; Reyes-Duarte, Dolores; Sánchez-Herrera, Daniel; López-Munguía, Agustín; Darszon, Alberto

    2007-05-04

    Capsaicin (Cap) and its analogs (CAPanalogs) have diverse effects in sensory neurons including analgesia, implying they modulate other cellular targets besides the TRPV1 Cap receptor. Since Cap and CAPanalogs are not largely available and their chemical synthesis is cumbersome, they have been obtained through a direct lipase-catalyzed reaction. Capsiate, the ester CAPanalog, was synthesized using a novel enzymatic transacylation one-pot strategy. Five different CAPanalogs were synthesized by amidation in 2-methyl-2-butanol with higher yields than previously reported. Voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels (Ca(v)s) are among the main Ca(2+) entry paths into cells. They are classified as high-voltage-activated Ca(2+) channels (HVA) and low-voltage-activated Ca(2+) channels (LVA) constituted only by T-type channels. Though HVA Ca(v)s are Cap sensitive, it is not known if capsaicinoids inhibit LVA Ca(v)s which participate in the primary sensory neuron pain pathway. Here we first report that Cap, dihydrocapsaicin, N-VAMC(8), N-VAMC(9), and N-VAMC(10) can directly and partially reversibly inhibit T-type Ca(v)s, whereas olvanil, capsiate, and vanillylamine cannot. The Cap inhibition of T-type Ca(v)s was independent of TRPV1 activation.

  15. Thermal Inactivation of Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-10-01

    S) VIKU3FS THERMAL RESISTANCE FOODS FLUIDS FOOD PROCESSING FOOD PRESERVATION CONTAMINATION HEAT VIRAL NUCLEIC ACIDS ao’.AjUsTNACT (Conilnum...an rm**— •**» It nmc +nmy m>d Id+atttr by M«o* fmbm) A review of the literature pertaining to thermal inactivation of virus in fluid media» fluid...vacuum packaged in cans or in flexible pouches , frozen to ca. -40 C, and irradiated within a temperature range of -40 C to -8 C to obtain the

  16. Role of tumour necrosis factor-a in the regulation of T-type calcium channel current in HL-1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Fang; Xue, Yu-Mei; Wei, Wei; Yang, Hui; Liu, Fang-Zhou; Chen, Shao-Xian; Kuang, Su-Juan; Zhu, Jie-Ning; Wu, Shu-Lin; Deng, Chun-Yu

    2016-07-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that inflammation contributes to the initiation and perpetuation of atrial fibrillation (AF). Although tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α levels are increased in patients with AF, the role of TNF-α in the pathogenesis of AF remains unclear. Besides L-type Ca(2+) currents (IC a,L ), T-type Ca(2+) currents (IC a,T ) also plays an important role in the pathogenesis of AF. This study was designed to use the whole-cell voltage-clamp technique and biochemical assays to explore if TNF-α is involved in the pathogenesis of AF through regulating IC a,T in atrial myocytes. It was found that compared with sinus rhythm (SR) controls, T-type calcium channel (TCC) subunit mRNA levels were decreased, while TNF-α expression levels were increased, in human atrial tissue from patients with AF. In murine atrial myocyte HL-1 cells, after culturing for 24 h, 12.5, 25 and 50 ng/mL TNF-α significantly reduced the protein expression levels of the TCC α1G subunit in a concentration-dependent manner. The peak current was reduced by the application of 12.5 or 25 ng/mL TNF-α in a concentration-dependent manner (from -15.08 ± 1.11 pA/pF in controls to -11.89 ± 0.83 pA/pF and -8.54 ± 1.55 pA/pF in 12.5 or 25 ng/mL TNF-α group respectively). TNF-α application also inhibited voltage-dependent inactivation of IC a,T, shifted the inactivation curve to the left. These results suggest that TNF-α is involved in the pathogenesis of AF, probably via decreasing IC a,T current density in atrium-derived myocytes through impaired channel function and down-regulation of channel protein expression. This pathway thus represents a potential pathogenic mechanism in AF. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  17. Inactivation of Microorganisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzamora, Stella Maris; Guerrero, Sandra N.; Schenk, Marcela; Raffellini, Silvia; López-Malo, Aurelio

    Minimal processing techniques for food preservation allow better retention of product flavor, texture, color, and nutrient content than comparable conventional treatments. A wide range of novel alternative physical factors have been intensely investigated in the last two decades. These physical factors can cause inactivation of microorganisms at ambient or sublethal temperatures (e.g., high hydrostatic pressure, pulsed electric fields, ultrasound, pulsed light, and ultraviolet light). These technologies have been reported to reduce microorganism population in foods while avoiding the deleterious effects of severe heating on quality. Among technologies, high-energy ultrasound (i.e., intensities higher than 1 W/cm2, frequencies between 18 and 100 kHz) has attracted considerable interest for food preservation applications (Mason et al., 1996; Povey and Mason, 1998).

  18. Allantoinase from Pseudomonas Aeruginosa. Purification, Properties and Immunochemical Characterization of Its In Vivo Inactivation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, Dick B.; Smits, Rob A.M.M.; Drift, Chris van der

    1982-01-01

    The catabolic enzyme allantoinase is rapidly inactivated in cells of Pseudomonas aeruginosa when the stationary phase of growth is reached. This process is irreversible since the protein synthesis inhibitor chloramphenicol completely blocked the reappearance of allantoinase activity that is observed

  19. Calcium-dependent inhibition of T-type calcium channels by TRPV1 activation in rat sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comunanza, Valentina; Carbone, Emilio; Marcantoni, Andrea; Sher, Emanuele; Ursu, Daniel

    2011-11-01

    We studied the inhibitory effects of transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) activation by capsaicin on low-voltage-activated (LVA, T-type) Ca(2+) channel and high-voltage-activated (HVA; L, N, P/Q, R) currents in rat DRG sensory neurons, as a potential mechanism underlying capsaicin-induced analgesia. T-type and HVA currents were elicited in whole-cell clamped DRG neurons using ramp commands applied before and after 30-s exposures to 1 μM capsaicin. T-type currents were estimated at the first peak of the I-V characteristics and HVA at the second peak, occurring at more positive potentials. Small and medium-sized DRG neurons responded to capsaicin producing transient inward currents of variable amplitudes, mainly carried by Ca(2+). In those cells responding to capsaicin with a large Ca(2+) influx (59% of the total), a marked inhibition of both T-type and HVA Ca(2+) currents was observed. The percentage of T-type and HVA channel inhibition was prevented by replacing Ca(2+) with Ba(2+) during capsaicin application or applying high doses of intracellular BAPTA (20 mM), suggesting that TRPV1-mediated inhibition of T-type and HVA channels is Ca(2+)-dependent and likely confined to membrane nano-microdomains. Our data are consistent with the idea that TRPV1-induced analgesia may derive from indirect inhibition of both T-type and HVA channels which, in turn, would reduce the threshold of nociceptive signals generation (T-type channel inhibition) and nociceptive synaptic transmission (HVA-channels inhibition).

  20. Inactivation of Herpes Simplex Viruses by Nonionic Surfactants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asculai, Samuel S.; Weis, Margaret T.; Rancourt, Martha W.; Kupferberg, A. B.

    1978-01-01

    Nonionic surface-active agents possessing ether or amide linkages between the hydrophillic and hydrophobic portions of the molecule rapidly inactivated the infectivity of herpes simplex viruses. The activity stemmed from the ability of nonionic surfactants to dissolve lipid-containing membranes. This was confirmed by observing surfactant destruction of mammalian cell plasma membranes and herpes simplex virus envelopes. Proprietary vaginal contraceptive formulations containing nonionic surfactants also inactivated herpes simplex virus infectivity. This observation suggests that nonionic surfactants in appropriate formulation could effectively prevent herpes simplex virus transmission. Images PMID:208460

  1. Characterization of the known T-type dwarfs towards the σ Orionis cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña Ramírez, K.; Zapatero Osorio, M. R.; Béjar, V. J. S.

    2015-02-01

    Aims: The detailed study of T-type candidate members of the young σ Orionis cluster (~3 Myr, ~352 pc, solar metallicity) is fundamental to properly assess the objects' cluster membership and their contribution to the definition of the substellar mass function. Methods: A total of three T-type candidates (S Ori 70, S Ori 73, and S Ori J053804.65-021352.5) lying in the line of sight towards σ Orionis were characterized by means of near-infrared photometric, astrometric, and spectroscopic studies. H-band methane images were collected for all three sources and an additional sample of 15 field T-type dwarfs using the LIRIS instrument on the 4.2 m William Herschel Telescope (WHT). J-band spectra of resolution of ~500 were obtained for S Ori J053804.65-021352.5 with the ISAAC spectrograph on the 8 m Very Large Telescope (VLT), and JH spectra of resolution of ~50 acquired with the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) on board the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) were employed for the spectroscopic classification of S Ori 70 and 73. Accurate proper motions with a typical uncertainty of ±3 mas yr-1 and a time interval of ~7-9 yr were derived using old images and new data collected with ISAAC/VLT and WFC3/HST. Results: Using the LIRIS observations of the field T dwarfs, we calibrated this imager for T spectral typing via methane photometry. The three S Ori objects were spectroscopically classified as T4.5 ± 0.5 (S Ori 73), T5 ± 0.5 (S Ori J053804.65-021352.5), and T7 +0.5-1.0 (S Ori 70). These spectral types agree with the measured H-band methane colors. The similarity between the observed JH spectra and the methane colors and the data of field ultra-cool dwarfs of related classifications suggests that S Ori 70, 73, and S Ori J053804.65-021352.5 do not deviate significantly in surface gravity in relation to the field. Additionally, the detection of K I at ~1.25 μm in S Ori J053804.65-021352.5 points to a high-gravity atmosphere. Only the K-band reddish nature of S Ori 70 may be

  2. T-type calcium channel: a privileged gate for calcium entry and control of adrenal steroidogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Florian Rossier

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Intracellular calcium plays a crucial role in modulating a variety of functions such as muscle contraction, hormone secretion, gene expression or cell growth. Calcium signaling has been however shown to be more complex than initially thought. Indeed, it is confined within cell microdomains and different calcium channels are associated with different functions, as shown by various channelopathies.Sporadic mutations on voltage-operated L-type calcium channels in adrenal glomerulosa cells have been shown recently to be the second most prevalent genetic abnormalities present in human aldosterone-producing adenoma. The observed modification of the threshold of activation of the mutated channels not only provides an explanation for this gain of function but reminds us on the importance of maintaining adequate electrophysiological characteristics to make channels able to exert specific cellular functions. Indeed, the contribution to steroid production of the various calcium channels expressed in adrenocortical cells is not equal and the reason has been investigated for a long time. Given the very negative resting potential of these cells, and the small membrane depolarization induced by their physiological agonists, low threshold T-type calcium channels are particularly well suited for responding under these conditions and conveying calcium into the cell, at the right place for controlling steroidogenesis. In contrast, high threshold L-type channels are normally activated by much stronger cell depolarizations. The fact that dihydropyridine calcium antagonists, specific for L-type channels, are poorly efficient for reducing aldosterone secretion either in vivo or in vitro, strongly supports the view that these two types of channels differently affect steroid biosynthesis.Whether a similar analysis is transposable to fasciculata cells and cortisol secretion is one of the questions addressed in the present review. No similar mutations on L-type or T-type

  3. A mutation in segment I-S6 alters slow inactivation of sodium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S Y; Wang, G K

    1997-01-01

    Slow inactivation occurs in voltage-gated Na+ channels when the membrane is depolarized for several seconds, whereas fast inactivation takes place rapidly within a few milliseconds. Unlike fast inactivation, the molecular entity that governs the slow inactivation of Na+ channels has not been as well defined. Some regions of Na+ channels, such as mu1-W402C and mu1-T698M, have been reported to affect slow inactivation. A mutation in segment I-S6 of mu1 Na+ channels, N434A, shifts the voltage dependence of activation and fast inactivation toward the depolarizing direction. The mutant Na+ current at +50 mV is diminished by 60-80% during repetitive stimulation at 5 Hz, resulting in a profound use-dependent phenomenon. This mutant phenotype is due to the enhancement of slow inactivation, which develops faster than that of wild-type channels (tau = 0.46 +/- 0.01 s versus 2.11 +/- 0.10 s at +30 mV, n = 9). An oxidant, chloramine-T, abolishes fast inactivation and yet greatly accelerates slow inactivation in both mutant and wild-type channels (tau = 0.21 +/- 0.02 s and 0.67 +/- 0.05 s, respectively, n = 6). These findings together demonstrate that N434 of mu1 Na+ channels is also critical for slow inactivation. We propose that this slow form of Na+ channel inactivation is analogous to the "C-type" inactivation in Shaker K+ channels. PMID:9083667

  4. Expanded alternative splice isoform profiling of the mouse Cav3.1/α1G T-type calcium channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernst Wayne L

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alternative splicing of low-voltage-activated T-type calcium channels contributes to the molecular and functional diversity mediating complex network oscillations in the normal brain. Transcript scanning of the human CACNA1G gene has revealed the presence of 11 regions within the coding sequence subjected to alternative splicing, some of which enhance T-type current. In mouse models of absence epilepsy, elevated T-type calcium currents without clear increases in channel expression are found in thalamic neurons that promote abnormal neuronal synchronization. To test whether enhanced T-type currents in these models reflect pathogenic alterations in channel splice isoforms, we determined the extent of alternative splicing of mouse Cacna1g transcripts and whether evidence of altered transcript splicing could be detected in mouse absence epilepsy models. Results Transcript scanning of the murine Cacna1g gene detected 12 regions encoding alternative splice isoforms of Cav3.1/α1G T-type calcium channels. Of the 12 splice sites, six displayed homology to the human CACNA1G splice sites, while six novel mouse-specific splicing events were identified, including one intron retention, three alternative acceptor sites, one alternative donor site, and one exon exclusion. In addition, two brain region-specific alternative splice patterns were observed in the cerebellum. Comparative analyses of brain regions from four monogenic absence epilepsy mouse models with altered thalamic T-type currents and wildtype controls failed to reveal differences in Cacna1g splicing patterns. Conclusion The determination of six novel alternative splice sites within the coding region of the mouse Cacna1g gene greatly expands the potential biophysical diversity of voltage-gated T-type channels in the mouse central nervous system. Although alternative splicing of Cav3.1/α1G channels does not explain the enhancement of T-type current identified in four mouse

  5. Functional expression of T-type Ca2+ channels in spinal motoneurons of the adult turtle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Canto-Bustos

    Full Text Available Voltage-gated Ca2+ (CaV channels are transmembrane proteins comprising three subfamilies named CaV1, CaV2 and CaV3. The CaV3 channel subfamily groups the low-voltage activated Ca2+ channels (LVA or T-type a significant role in regulating neuronal excitability. CaV3 channel activity may lead to the generation of complex patterns of action potential firing such as the postinhibitory rebound (PIR. In the adult spinal cord, these channels have been found in dorsal horn interneurons where they control physiological events near the resting potential and participate in determining excitability. In motoneurons, CaV3 channels have been found during development, but their functional expression has not yet been reported in adult animals. Here, we show evidence for the presence of CaV3 channel-mediated PIR in motoneurons of the adult turtle spinal cord. Our results indicate that Ni2+ and NNC55-0396, two antagonists of CaV3 channel activity, inhibited PIR in the adult turtle spinal cord. Molecular biology and biochemical assays revealed the expression of the CaV3.1 channel isotype and its localization in motoneurons. Together, these results provide evidence for the expression of CaV3.1 channels in the spinal cord of adult animals and show also that these channels may contribute to determine the excitability of motoneurons.

  6. Control of Grid Connected Photovoltaic System Using Three-Level T-Type Inverter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorig, Abdelmalik; Belkeiri, Mohammed; Barkat, Said; Rabhi, Abdelhamid

    2016-08-01

    Three-level T-Type inverter (3LT2I) topology has numerous advantageous compared to three-level neutral-point-clamped (NPC) inverter. The main benefits of 3LT2I inverter are the efficiency, inverter cost, switching losses, and the quality of output voltage waveforms. In this paper, a photovoltaic distributed generation system based on dual-stage topology of DC-DC boost converter and 3LT2I is introduced. To that end, a decoupling control strategy of 3LT2I is proposed to control the current injected into the grid, reactive power compensation, and DC-link voltage. The resulting system is able to extract the maximum power from photovoltaic generator, to achieve sinusoidal grid currents, and to ensure reactive power compensation. The voltage-balancing control of two split DC capacitors of the 3LT2I is achieved using three-level space vector modulation with balancing strategy based on the effective use of the redundant switching states of the inverter voltage vectors. The proposed system performance is investigated at different operating conditions.

  7. The eag domain regulates hERG channel inactivation gating via a direct interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustina, Ahleah S.

    2013-01-01

    Human ether-á-go-go (eag)-related gene (hERG) potassium channel kinetics are characterized by rapid inactivation upon depolarization, along with rapid recovery from inactivation and very slow closing (deactivation) upon repolarization. These factors combine to create a resurgent hERG current, where the current amplitude is paradoxically larger with repolarization than with depolarization. Previous data showed that the hERG N-terminal eag domain regulated deactivation kinetics by making a direct interaction with the C-terminal region of the channel. A primary mechanism for fast inactivation depends on residues in the channel pore; however, inactivation was also shown to be slower after deletion of a large N-terminal region. The mechanism for N-terminal region regulation of inactivation is unclear. Here, we investigated the contributions of the large N-terminal domains (amino acids 1–354), including the eag domain (amino acids 1–135), to hERG channel inactivation kinetics and steady-state inactivation properties. We found that N-deleted channels lacking just the eag domain (Δ2–135) or both the eag domain and the adjacent proximal domain (Δ2–354) had less rectifying current–voltage (I-V) relationships, slower inactivation, faster recovery from inactivation, and lessened steady-state inactivation. We coexpressed genetically encoded N-terminal fragments for the eag domain (N1–135) or the eag domain plus the proximal domain (N1–354) with N-deleted hERG Δ2–135 or hERG Δ2–354 channels and found that the resulting channels had more rectifying I-V relationships, faster inactivation, slower recovery from inactivation, and increased steady-state inactivation, similar to those properties measured for wild-type (WT) hERG. We also found that the eag domain–containing fragments regulated the time to peak and the voltage at the peak of a resurgent current elicited with a ramp voltage protocol. The eag domain–containing fragments effectively converted N

  8. Phenylbutazone radicals inactivate creatine kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, T; Muraoka, S; Fujimoto, Y

    2001-02-01

    Creatine kinase (CK) was used as a marker molecule to examine the side effect of damage to tissues by phenylbutazone (PB), an effective drug to treat rheumatic and arthritic diseases, with horseradish peroxidase and hydrogen peroxide (HRP-H(2)O2). PB inactivated CK during its interaction with HRP-H(2) O(2), and inactivated CK in rat heart homogenate. PB carbon-centered radicals were formed during the interaction of PB with HRP-H(2)O2. The CK efficiently reduced electron spin resonance signals of the PB carbon-centered radicals. The spin trap agent 2-methyl-2-nitrosopropane strongly prevented CK inactivation. These results show that CK was inactivated through interaction with PB carbon-centered radicals. Sulfhydryl groups and tryptophan residues in CK were lost during the interaction of PB with HRP-H(2)O2, suggesting that cysteine and tryptophan residues are oxidized by PB carbon-centered radicals. Other enzymes, including alcohol dehydrogenase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, but not lactate dehydrogenase, were also inactivated. Sulfhydryl enzymes seem to be sensitive to attack by PB carbon-centered radicals. Inhibition of SH enzymes may explain some of the deleterious effects induced by PB.

  9. The Benefits of SiC MOSFETs in a T-Type Inverter for Grid-Tie Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anthon, Alexander; Zhang, Zhe; Andersen, Michael A. E.

    2016-01-01

    at the expense of increased switching losses since these outer switches must now block the full DC link voltage. Silicon Carbide (SiC) MOSFET devices potentially offer substantial advantage in this context with their lower switching losses, but the benefit of replacing all switching devices in a T-Type inverter...... with SiC MOSFETs is not so clear-cut. This paper now explores this issue by presenting a detailed comparison of the use of Si and SiC devices for a three-level T-Type inverter operating in grid-tie applications. The study uses datasheet values, switching loss measurements and calibrated heat sink thermal...

  10. Chemical-free inactivated whole influenza virus vaccine prepared by ultrashort pulsed laser treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsen, Shaw-Wei David; Donthi, Nisha; La, Victor; Hsieh, Wen-Han; Li, Yen-Der; Knoff, Jayne; Chen, Alexander; Wu, Tzyy-Choou; Hung, Chien-Fu; Achilefu, Samuel; Tsen, Kong-Thon

    2015-05-01

    There is an urgent need for rapid methods to develop vaccines in response to emerging viral pathogens. Whole inactivated virus (WIV) vaccines represent an ideal strategy for this purpose; however, a universal method for producing safe and immunogenic inactivated vaccines is lacking. Conventional pathogen inactivation methods such as formalin, heat, ultraviolet light, and gamma rays cause structural alterations in vaccines that lead to reduced neutralizing antibody specificity, and in some cases, disastrous T helper type 2-mediated immune pathology. We have evaluated the potential of a visible ultrashort pulsed (USP) laser method to generate safe and immunogenic WIV vaccines without adjuvants. Specifically, we demonstrate that vaccination of mice with laser-inactivated H1N1 influenza virus at about a 10-fold lower dose than that required using conventional formalin-inactivated influenza vaccines results in protection against lethal H1N1 challenge in mice. The virus, inactivated by the USP laser irradiation, has been shown to retain its surface protein structure through hemagglutination assay. Unlike conventional inactivation methods, laser treatment did not generate carbonyl groups in protein, thereby reducing the risk of adverse vaccine-elicited T helper type 2 responses. Therefore, USP laser treatment is an attractive potential strategy to generate WIV vaccines with greater potency and safety than vaccines produced by current inactivation techniques.

  11. A novel active T-type three-level converter with open-circuit fault-tolerant control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Choi, Uimin; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel active T-type three-level converter concept with fault-tolerant control. With the proposed topology, the converter can be operated continuously under open-circuit faults. It is shown that the proposed topology not only can keep its outputs under open-circuit fault cond...

  12. Reliability Improvement of a T-Type Three-Level Inverter With Fault-Tolerant Control Strategy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Choi, Uimin; Blaabjerg, Frede; Lee, Kyo-Beum

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a fault-tolerant control strategy for a T-type three-level inverter when an open-circuit fault occurs. The proposed method is explained by dividing fault into two cases: the faulty condition of half-bridge switches and neutral-point switches. In case of the open-circuit fault ...

  13. Antagonism of T-type calcium channels inhibits high-fat diet-induced weight gain in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uebele, Victor N; Gotter, Anthony L; Nuss, Cindy E; Kraus, Richard L; Doran, Scott M; Garson, Susan L; Reiss, Duane R; Li, Yuxing; Barrow, James C; Reger, Thomas S; Yang, Zhi-Qiang; Ballard, Jeanine E; Tang, Cuyue; Metzger, Joseph M; Wang, Sheng-Ping; Koblan, Kenneth S; Renger, John J

    2009-06-01

    The epidemics of obesity and metabolic disorders have well-recognized health and economic burdens. Pharmacologic treatments for these diseases remain unsatisfactory with respect to both efficacy and side-effect profiles. Here, we have identified a potential central role for T-type calcium channels in regulating body weight maintenance and sleep. Previously, it was shown that mice lacking CaV3.1 T-type calcium channels have altered sleep/wake activity. We found that these mice were also resistant to high-fat diet-induced weight gain, without changes in food intake or sensitivity to high-fat diet-induced disruptions of diurnal rhythm. Administration of a potent and selective antagonist of T-type calcium channels, TTA-A2, to normal-weight animals prior to the inactive phase acutely increased sleep, decreased body core temperature, and prevented high-fat diet-induced weight gain. Administration of TTA-A2 to obese rodents reduced body weight and fat mass while concurrently increasing lean muscle mass. These effects likely result from better alignment of diurnal feeding patterns with daily changes in circadian physiology and potentially an increased metabolic rate during the active phase. Together, these studies reveal what we believe to be a previously unknown role for T-type calcium channels in the regulation of sleep and weight maintenance and suggest the potential for a novel therapeutic approach to treating obesity.

  14. Thermal Inactivation of Bacillus anthracis Spores Using Rapid Resistive Heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-24

    I have to extend my gratitude and thanks to one of my previous active duty Air Force units. The AFRL Battlespace Acoustics Branch (RHCB) within...coating (CARC)-painted steel (non-smooth steel surface), polycarbonate, and vinyl tile (Lewandowski et al., 2010; Edmonds et al., 2009). The highest

  15. Influenza Vaccine, Inactivated or Recombinant

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... die from flu, and many more are hospitalized.Flu vaccine can:keep you from getting flu, make flu ... What is inactivated or recombinant influenza vaccine?A dose of flu vaccine is recommended every flu season. Children 6 months through 8 years of age may need two ...

  16. T-type calcium channels promote predictive homeostasis of input-output relations in thalamocortical neurons of lateral geniculate nucleus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Z. Hong

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A general theory views the function of all neurons as prediction, and one component of this theory is that of predictive homeostasis or prediction error. It is well established that sensory systems adapt so that neuronal output maintains sensitivity to sensory input, in accord with information theory. Predictive homeostasis applies the same principle at the cellular level, where the challenge is to maintain membrane excitability at the optimal homeostatic level so that spike generation is maximally sensitive to small gradations in synaptic drive. Negative feedback is a hallmark of homeostatic mechanisms, as exemplified by depolarization-activated potassium channels. However, T-type calcium channels exhibit positive feedback that appears at odds with the theory. In thalamocortical neurons of lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN, T-type channels are capable of causing bursts of spikes with an all-or-none character in response to excitation from a hyperpolarized potential. This burst mode would partially uncouple visual input from spike output and reduce the information spikes convey about gradations in visual input. However, past observations of T-type-driven bursts may have resulted from unnaturally high membrane excitability. By mimicking natural patterns of synaptic conductance that occur during vision, we found that T-type channels in rat brain slices did not cause bursts, but rather enabled retinogeniculate excitation to cause spikes despite sustained hyperpolarization, thereby restoring the homeostatic input-output relation observed at depolarized potentials. Our results suggest that T-type channels help to maintain a single optimal mode of transmission rather than creating a second mode. In addition, our results provide evidence for the general theory, which seeks to predict the properties of a neuron’s ion channels and synapses given knowledge of natural patterns of synaptic input.

  17. Sociability impairments in Genetic Absence Epilepsy Rats from Strasbourg: Reversal by the T-type calcium channel antagonist Z944.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henbid, Mark T; Marks, Wendie N; Collins, Madeline J; Cain, Stuart M; Snutch, Terrance P; Howland, John G

    2017-10-01

    Childhood absence epilepsy (CAE) is associated with interictal co-morbid symptoms including abnormalities in social behaviour. Genetic Absence Epilepsy Rats from Strasbourg (GAERS) is a model of CAE that exhibits physiological and behavioural alterations characteristic of the human disorder. However, it is unknown if GAERS display the social deficits often observed in CAE. Sociability in rodents is thought to be mediated by neural circuits densely populated with T-type calcium channels and GAERS contain a missense mutation in the Cav3.2 T-type calcium channel gene. Thus, the objective of this study was to examine the effects of the clinical stage pan-T-type calcium channel blocker, Z944, on sociability behaviour in male and female GAERS and non-epileptic control (NEC) animals. Female GAERS showed reduced sociability in a three-chamber sociability task whereas male GAERS, male NECs, and female NECs all showed a preference for the chamber containing a stranger rat. In drug trials, pre-treatment with 5mg/kg of Z944 normalized sociability in female GAERS. In contrast, female NECs showed impaired sociability following Z944 treatment. Dose-dependent decreases in locomotor activity were noted following Z944 treatment in both strains. Treatment with 10mg/kg of Z944 altered exploration such that only 8 of the 16 rats tested explored both sides of the testing chamber. In those that explored the chamber, significant preference for the stranger rat was observed in GAERS but not NECs. Overall, the data suggest that T-type calcium channels are critical in regulating sociability in both GAERS and NEC animals. Future research should focus on T-type calcium channels in the treatment of sociability deficits observed in disorders such as CAE. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Inactivation of human and simian rotaviruses by chlorine dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y S; Vaughn, J M

    1990-01-01

    The inactivation of single-particle stocks of human (type 2, Wa) and simian (SA-11) rotaviruses by chlorine dioxide was investigated. Experiments were conducted at 4 degrees C in a standard phosphate-carbonate buffer. Both virus types were rapidly inactivated, within 20 s under alkaline conditions, when chlorine dioxide concentrations ranging from 0.05 to 0.2 mg/liter were used. Similar reductions of 10(5)-fold in infectivity required additional exposure time of 120 s at 0.2 mg/liter for Wa and at 0.5 mg/liter for SA-11, respectively, at pH 6.0. The inactivation of both virus types was moderate at neutral pH, and the sensitivities to chlorine dioxide were similar. The observed enhancement of virucidal efficiency with increasing pH was contrary to earlier findings with chlorine- and ozone-treated rotavirus particles, where efficiencies decreased with increasing alkalinity. Comparison of 99.9% virus inactivation times revealed ozone to be the most effective virucidal agent among these three disinfectants. PMID:2160222

  19. Inactivation of norovirus on dry copper alloy surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warnes, Sarah L; Keevil, C William

    2013-01-01

    Noroviruses (family Caliciviridae) are the primary cause of viral gastroenteritis worldwide. The virus is highly infectious and touching contaminated surfaces can contribute to infection spread. Although the virus was identified over 40 years ago the lack of methods to assess infectivity has hampered the study of the human pathogen. Recently the murine virus, MNV-1, has successfully been used as a close surrogate. Copper alloys have previously been shown to be effective antimicrobial surfaces against a range of bacteria and fungi. We now report rapid inactivation of murine norovirus on alloys, containing over 60% copper, at room temperature but no reduction of infectivity on stainless steel dry surfaces in simulated wet fomite and dry touch contamination. The rate of inactivation was initially very rapid and proportional to copper content of alloy tested. Viral inactivation was not as rapid on brass as previously observed for bacteria but copper-nickel alloy was very effective. The use of chelators and quenchers of reactive oxygen species (ROS) determined that Cu(II) and especially Cu(I) ions are still the primary effectors of toxicity but quenching superoxide and hydroxyl radicals did not confer protection. This suggests Fenton generation of ROS is not important for the inactivation mechanism. One of the targets of copper toxicity was the viral genome and a reduced copy number of the gene for a viral encoded protein, VPg (viral-protein-genome-linked), which is essential for infectivity, was observed following contact with copper and brass dry surfaces. The use of antimicrobial surfaces containing copper in high risk closed environments such as cruise ships and care facilities could help to reduce the spread of this highly infectious and costly pathogen.

  20. Inactivation of norovirus on dry copper alloy surfaces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah L Warnes

    Full Text Available Noroviruses (family Caliciviridae are the primary cause of viral gastroenteritis worldwide. The virus is highly infectious and touching contaminated surfaces can contribute to infection spread. Although the virus was identified over 40 years ago the lack of methods to assess infectivity has hampered the study of the human pathogen. Recently the murine virus, MNV-1, has successfully been used as a close surrogate. Copper alloys have previously been shown to be effective antimicrobial surfaces against a range of bacteria and fungi. We now report rapid inactivation of murine norovirus on alloys, containing over 60% copper, at room temperature but no reduction of infectivity on stainless steel dry surfaces in simulated wet fomite and dry touch contamination. The rate of inactivation was initially very rapid and proportional to copper content of alloy tested. Viral inactivation was not as rapid on brass as previously observed for bacteria but copper-nickel alloy was very effective. The use of chelators and quenchers of reactive oxygen species (ROS determined that Cu(II and especially Cu(I ions are still the primary effectors of toxicity but quenching superoxide and hydroxyl radicals did not confer protection. This suggests Fenton generation of ROS is not important for the inactivation mechanism. One of the targets of copper toxicity was the viral genome and a reduced copy number of the gene for a viral encoded protein, VPg (viral-protein-genome-linked, which is essential for infectivity, was observed following contact with copper and brass dry surfaces. The use of antimicrobial surfaces containing copper in high risk closed environments such as cruise ships and care facilities could help to reduce the spread of this highly infectious and costly pathogen.

  1. The assessment of efficacy of porcine reproductive respiratory syndrome virus inactivated vaccine based on the viral quantity and inactivation methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Byeongchun

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There have been many efforts to develop efficient vaccines for the control of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV. Although inactivated PRRSV vaccines are preferred for their safety, they are weak at inducing humoral immune responses and controlling field PRRSV infection, especially when heterologous viruses are involved. Results In all groups, the sample to positive (S/P ratio of IDEXX ELISA and the virus neutralization (VN titer remained negative until challenge. While viremia did not reduce in the vaccinated groups, the IDEXX-ELISA-specific immunoglobulin G increased more rapidly and to significantly greater levels 7 days after the challenge in all the vaccinated groups compared to the non-vaccinated groups (p 6 PFU/mL PRRSV vaccine-inoculated and binary ethylenimine (BEI-inactivated groups 22 days after challenge (p Conclusions The inactivated vaccine failed to show the humoral immunity, but it showed different immune response after the challenge compared to mock group. Although the 106 PFU/mL-vaccinated and BEI-inactivated groups showed significantly greater VN titers 22 days after challenge, all the groups were already negative for viremia.

  2. Transient inactivation of myostatin induces muscle hypertrophy and overcompensatory growth in zebrafish via inactivation of the SMAD signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, Eduardo N; Pino, Katherine; Navarro, Cristina; Delgado, Iselys; Valdés, Juan Antonio; Molina, Alfredo

    2013-12-01

    Myostatin (MSTN) is the main negative regulator of muscle growth and development in vertebrates. In fish, little is known about the molecular mechanisms behind how MSTN inactivation triggers skeletal muscle enhancement, particularly regarding the signaling pathways involved in this process. Moreover, there have not been reports on the biotechnological applications of MSTN and its signal transduction. In this context, zebrafish underwent compensatory growth using fasting and refeeding trials, and MSTN activity was inactivated with dominant negative LAPD76A recombinant proteins during the refeeding period, when a rapid, compensatory muscle growth was observed. Treated fish displayed an overcompensation of growth characterized by higher muscle hypertrophy and growth performance than constantly fed, control fish. Treatment with LAPD76A recombinant proteins triggered inactivation of the SMAD signaling pathway in skeletal muscle, the main signal transduction used by MSTN to achieve its biological actions. Therefore, transient inactivation of MSTN during the compensatory growth of zebrafish led to a decrease in the SMAD signaling pathway in muscle, triggering muscle hypertrophy and finally improving growth performance, thus, zebrafish achieved an overcompensation of growth. The present study shows an attractive strategy for improving muscle growth in a fish species by mixing a classical strategy, such as compensatory growth, and a biotechnological approach, such as the use of recombinant proteins for inhibiting the biological actions of MSTN. The mix of both strategies may represent a method that could be applied in order to improve growth in commercial fish of interest for aquaculture. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Calcium dependence of inactivation of calcium release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum in skeletal muscle fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, B J; Klein, M G; Schneider, M F

    1991-03-01

    The steady-state calcium dependence of inactivation of calcium release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum was studied in voltage-clamped, cut segments of frog skeletal muscle fibers containing two calcium indicators, fura-2 and anti-pyrylazo III (AP III). Fura-2 fluorescence was used to monitor resting calcium and relatively small calcium transients during small depolarizations. AP III absorbance signals were used to monitor larger calcium transients during larger depolarizations. The rate of release (Rrel) of calcium from the sarcoplasmic reticulum was calculated from the calcium transients. The equilibrium calcium dependence of inactivation of calcium release was determined using 200-ms prepulses of various amplitudes to elevate [Ca2+] to various steady levels. Each prepulse was followed by a constant test pulse. The suppression of peak Rrel during the test pulse provided a measure of the extent of inactivation of release at the end of the prepulse. The [Ca2+] dependence of inactivation indicated that binding of more than one calcium ion was required to inactivate each release channel. Half-maximal inactivation was produced at a [Ca2+] of approximately 0.3 microM. Variation of the prepulse duration and amplitude showed that the suppression of peak release was consistent with calcium-dependent inactivation of calcium release but not with calcium depletion. The same calcium dependence of inactivation was obtained using different amplitude test pulses to determine the degree of inactivation. Prepulses that produced near maximal inactivation of release during the following test pulse produced no suppression of intramembrane charge movement during the test pulse, indicating that inactivation occurred at a step beyond the voltage sensor for calcium release. Three alternative set of properties that were assumed for the rapidly equilibrating calcium-binding sites intrinsic to the fibers gave somewhat different Rrel records, but gave very similar calcium dependence of

  4. Inactivation of allergens and toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morandini, Piero

    2010-11-30

    Plants are replete with thousands of proteins and small molecules, many of which are species-specific, poisonous or dangerous. Over time humans have learned to avoid dangerous plants or inactivate many toxic components in food plants, but there is still room for ameliorating food crops (and plants in general) in terms of their allergens and toxins content, especially in their edible parts. Inactivation at the genetic rather than physical or chemical level has many advantages and classical genetic approaches have resulted in significant reduction of toxin content. The capacity, offered by genetic engineering, of turning off (inactivating) specific genes has opened up the possibility of altering the plant content in a far more precise manner than previously available. Different levels of intervention (genes coding for toxins/allergens or for enzymes, transporters or regulators involved in their metabolism) are possible and there are several tools for inactivating genes, both direct (using chemical and physical mutagens, insertion of transposons and other genetic elements) and indirect (antisense RNA, RNA interference, microRNA, eventually leading to gene silencing). Each level/strategy has specific advantages and disadvantages (speed, costs, selectivity, stability, reversibility, frequency of desired genotype and regulatory regime). Paradigmatic examples from classical and transgenic approaches are discussed to emphasize the need to revise the present regulatory process. Reducing the content of natural toxins is a trade-off process: the lesser the content of natural toxins, the higher the susceptibility of a plant to pests and therefore the stronger the need to protect plants. As a consequence, more specific pesticides like Bt are needed to substitute for general pesticides. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Diagnosis and Tolerant Strategy of an Open-Switch Fault for T-type Three-Level Inverter Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Choi, Uimin; Lee, Kyo Beum; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a new diagnosis method of an open-switch fault and fault-tolerant control strategy for T-type three-level inverter systems. The location of faulty switch can be identified by the average of normalized phase current and the change of the neutral-point voltage. The proposed fault...... components and complex calculations. Simulation and experimental results verify the feasibility of the proposed fault diagnosis and fault-tolerant control strategy.......-tolerant strategy is explained by dividing into two cases: the faulty condition of half-bridge switches and the neutral-point switches. The performance of the T-type inverter system improves considerably by the proposed fault tolerant algorithm when a switch fails. The roposed method does not require additional...

  6. It takes two T to shape immunity: emerging role for T-type calcium channels in immune cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lacinová, L.; Weiss, Norbert

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 35, č. 4 (2016), s. 393-396 ISSN 0231-5882 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-13556S; GA MŠk 7AMB15FR015 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : calcium channel * T-type channel * Ca(v)3.1 * immune cells Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 1.170, year: 2016

  7. Functional importance of T-type voltage-gated calcium channels in the cardiovascular and renal system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Pernille B L

    2015-01-01

    to the conclusion that Cav3.1 and Cav3.2 channels have important, but different, functions in mice. T-type Cav3.1 channels affect heart rate, whereas Cav3.2 channels are involved in cardiac hypertrophy. In the vascular system, Cav3.2 activation leads to dilation of blood vessels, whereas Cav3.1 channels are mainly...

  8. T-type Ca2+ channels are required for enhanced sympathetic axon growth by TNFα reverse signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisiswa, Lilian; Erice, Clara; Ferron, Laurent; Wyatt, Sean; Osório, Catarina; Dolphin, Annette C; Davies, Alun M

    2017-01-01

    Tumour necrosis factor receptor 1 (TNFR1)-activated TNFα reverse signalling, in which membrane-integrated TNFα functions as a receptor for TNFR1, enhances axon growth from developing sympathetic neurons and plays a crucial role in establishing sympathetic innervation. Here, we have investigated the link between TNFα reverse signalling and axon growth in cultured sympathetic neurons. TNFR1-activated TNFα reverse signalling promotes Ca(2+) influx, and highly selective T-type Ca(2+) channel inhibitors, but not pharmacological inhibitors of L-type, N-type and P/Q-type Ca(2+) channels, prevented enhanced axon growth. T-type Ca(2+) channel-specific inhibitors eliminated Ca(2+) spikes promoted by TNFα reverse signalling in axons and prevented enhanced axon growth when applied locally to axons, but not when applied to cell somata. Blocking action potential generation did not affect the effect of TNFα reverse signalling on axon growth, suggesting that propagated action potentials are not required for enhanced axon growth. TNFα reverse signalling enhanced protein kinase C (PKC) activation, and pharmacological inhibition of PKC prevented the axon growth response. These results suggest that TNFα reverse signalling promotes opening of T-type Ca(2+) channels along sympathetic axons, which is required for enhanced axon growth. © 2017 The Authors.

  9. Thalamic Cav3.1 T-type Ca2+ channel plays a crucial role in stabilizing sleep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Matthew P.; Mochizuki, Takatoshi; Xie, Jinghui; Fischler, Walter; Manger, Jules P.; Talley, Edmund M.; Scammell, Thomas E.; Tonegawa, Susumu

    2005-01-01

    It has long been suspected that sensory signal transmission is inhibited in the mammalian brain during sleep. We hypothesized that Cav3.1 T-type Ca2+ channel currents inhibit thalamic sensory transmission to promote sleep. We found that T-type Ca2+ channel activation caused prolonged inhibition (>9 s) of action-potential firing in thalamic projection neurons of WT but not Cav3.1 knockout mice. Inhibition occurred with synaptic transmission blocked and required an increase of intracellular Ca2+. Furthermore, focal deletion of the gene encoding Cav3.1 from the rostral–midline thalamus by using Cre/loxP recombination led to frequent and prolonged arousal, which fragmented and reduced sleep. Interestingly, sleep was not disturbed when Cav3.1 was deleted from cortical pyramidal neurons. These findings support the hypothesis that thalamic T-type Ca2+ channels are required to block transmission of arousal signals through the thalamus and to stabilize sleep. PMID:15677322

  10. Enveloped virus inactivation using neutral arginine solutions and applications in therapeutic protein purification processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCue, Justin T; Selvitelli, Keith; Cecchini, Doug; Brown, Rhonda

    2014-01-01

    For the manufacturing of recombinant protein therapeutics produced from mammalian cell culture, demonstrating the capacity of the purification process to effectively clear infectious viruses is a regulatory requirement. At least two process steps, using different mechanisms of virus removal and/or inactivation, should be validated in support of the regulatory approval process. For example, exposure of the product stream to low pH, detergents or solvent/detergent combinations is commonly incorporated in protein purification processes for the inactivation of lipid-enveloped viruses. However, some proteins have limited stability at low pH or in the presence of the detergents, and alternative techniques for achieving the inactivation of enveloped viruses would be beneficial. We present here an alternative and novel approach for the rapid inactivation of enveloped viruses using pH-neutral buffer solutions containing arginine. The implementation of this approach in a monoclonal antibody or Fc-fusion protein purification process is described and illustrated with several different therapeutic proteins. The use of the neutral pH arginine solution was able to effectively inactivate two enveloped model viruses, with no measurable effect on the product quality of the investigated proteins. Thus, the use of pH-neutral arginine containing buffer solutions provides an alternative means of virus inactivation where other forms of virus inactivation, such as low pH and/or solvent/detergent treatments are not possible or undesirable due to protein stability limitations. © 2013 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  11. Buffer AVL Alone Does Not Inactivate Ebola Virus in a Representative Clinical Sample Type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smither, Sophie J; Weller, Simon A; Phelps, Amanda; Eastaugh, Lin; Ngugi, Sarah; O'Brien, Lyn M; Steward, Jackie; Lonsdale, Steve G; Lever, Mark S

    2015-10-01

    Rapid inactivation of Ebola virus (EBOV) is crucial for high-throughput testing of clinical samples in low-resource, outbreak scenarios. The EBOV inactivation efficacy of Buffer AVL (Qiagen) was tested against marmoset serum (EBOV concentration of 1 × 10(8) 50% tissue culture infective dose per milliliter [TCID50 · ml(-1)]) and murine blood (EBOV concentration of 1 × 10(7) TCID50 · ml(-1)) at 4:1 vol/vol buffer/sample ratios. Posttreatment cell culture and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) analysis indicated that treatment with Buffer AVL did not inactivate EBOV in 67% of samples, indicating that Buffer AVL, which is designed for RNA extraction and not virus inactivation, cannot be guaranteed to inactivate EBOV in diagnostic samples. Murine blood samples treated with ethanol (4:1 [vol/vol] ethanol/sample) or heat (60°C for 15 min) also showed no viral inactivation in 67% or 100% of samples, respectively. However, combined Buffer AVL and ethanol or Buffer AVL and heat treatments showed total viral inactivation in 100% of samples tested. The Buffer AVL plus ethanol and Buffer AVL plus heat treatments were also shown not to affect the extraction of PCR quality RNA from EBOV-spiked murine blood samples. © Crown copyright 2015.

  12. The genetic background affects the vascular response in T-type calcium channels 3.2 deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svenningsen, Per; Hansen, Pernille B L

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-gated calcium channels (Cav ) are important regulators of vascular tone and are attractive targets for pharmacological treatment of hypertension. The clinical used calcium blockers are often not selective for one channel but affect several types of calcium channels (Hansen 2015). L......-type channels are the dominant Ca(2+) entry pathway in vascular smooth muscle cells, however, T-type calcium channels are also expressed in the cardiovascular system where they play a functional role in the regulation of both contraction and vasodilation in (Chen et al. 2003; Hansen et al. 2001). This article...... is protected by copyright. All rights reserved....

  13. Genetic Tracing of Cav3.2 T-Type Calcium Channel Expression in the Peripheral Nervous System

    OpenAIRE

    Bernal Sierra, Yinth A.; Haseleu, Julia; Kozlenkov, Alexey; B?gay, Val?rie; Lewin, Gary R.

    2017-01-01

    Characterizing the distinct functions of the T-type ion channel subunits Cav3.1, 3.2 or 3.3 has proven difficult due to their highly conserved amino-acid sequences and the lack of pharmacological blockers specific for each subunit. To precisely determine the expression pattern of the Cav3.2 channel in the nervous system we generated two knock-in mouse strains that express EGFP or Cre recombinase under the control of the Cav3.2 gene promoter. We show that in the brains of these animals, the Ca...

  14. Inactivation of porcine epidemic diarrhea virus using heated water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele M. Zentkovich

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV is a very contagious swine pathogen that spreads easily via the fecal-oral route, notably from contaminated fomites. The present study investigated heated water as a method for rapid thermal inactivation of PEDV. Cell-culture adapted PEDV was treated with water at varying temperatures and viral titers were measured at multiple time points post-treatment. Viable PEDV was not recovered after a ten second or longer treatment with water heated to ≥76 °C; however, PEDV nucleic acid was detected in all samples regardless of treatment. Hot water decontamination could be considered in settings where chemical disinfection is impractical.

  15. Anti-Epileptic Drugs Delay Age-Related Loss of Spiral Ganglion Neurons via T-type Calcium Channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Debin; Gao, Xia; Perez, Philip; Ohlemiller, Kevin K; Chen, Chien-Chang; Campbell, Kevin P.; Hood, Aizhen Yang; Bao, Jianxin

    2011-01-01

    Loss of spiral ganglion neurons is a major cause of age-related hearing loss (presbycusis). Despite being the third most prevalent condition afflicting elderly persons, there are no known medications to prevent presbycusis. Because calcium signaling has long been implicated in age-related neuronal death, we investigated T-type calcium channels. This family is comprised of three members (Cav3.1, Cav3.2, and Cav3.3), based on their respective main pore-forming alpha subunits: α1G, α1H, and α1I. In the present study, we report a significant delay of age-related loss of cochlear function and preservation of spiral ganglion neurons in α1H null and heterozygous mice, clearly demonstrating an important role for Cav3.2 in age-related neuronal loss. Furthermore, we show that anticonvulsant drugs from a family of T-type calcium channel blockers can significantly preserve spiral ganglion neurons during aging. To our knowledge, this is the first report of drugs capable of diminishing age-related loss of spiral ganglion neurons. PMID:21640179

  16. Amyloid Beta Peptides Block New Synapse Assembly by Nogo Receptor-Mediated Inhibition of T-Type Calcium Channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yanjun; Sivaji, Sivaprakash; Chiang, Michael C; Ali, Haadi; Zukowski, Monica; Ali, Sareen; Kennedy, Bryan; Sklyar, Alex; Cheng, Alice; Guo, Zihan; Reed, Alexander K; Kodali, Ravindra; Borowski, Jennifer; Frost, Georgia; Beukema, Patrick; Wills, Zachary P

    2017-10-11

    Compelling evidence links amyloid beta (Aβ) peptide accumulation in the brains of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients with the emergence of learning and memory deficits, yet a clear understanding of the events that drive this synaptic pathology are lacking. We present evidence that neurons exposed to Aβ are unable to form new synapses, resulting in learning deficits in vivo. We demonstrate the Nogo receptor family (NgR1-3) acts as Aβ receptors mediating an inhibition of synapse assembly, plasticity, and learning. Live imaging studies reveal Aβ activates NgRs on the dendritic shaft of neurons, triggering an inhibition of calcium signaling. We define T-type calcium channels as a target of Aβ-NgR signaling, mediating Aβ's inhibitory effects on calcium, synapse assembly, plasticity, and learning. These studies highlight deficits in new synapse assembly as a potential initiator of cognitive pathology in AD, and pinpoint calcium dysregulation mediated by NgRs and T-type channels as key components. VIDEO ABSTRACT. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Photodynamic Inactivation of Mammalian Viruses and Bacteriophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Costa

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Photodynamic inactivation (PDI has been used to inactivate microorganisms through the use of photosensitizers. The inactivation of mammalian viruses and bacteriophages by photosensitization has been applied with success since the first decades of the last century. Due to the fact that mammalian viruses are known to pose a threat to public health and that bacteriophages are frequently used as models of mammalian viruses, it is important to know and understand the mechanisms and photodynamic procedures involved in their photoinactivation. The aim of this review is to (i summarize the main approaches developed until now for the photodynamic inactivation of bacteriophages and mammalian viruses and, (ii discuss and compare the present state of the art of mammalian viruses PDI with phage photoinactivation, with special focus on the most relevant mechanisms, molecular targets and factors affecting the viral inactivation process.

  18. Inactivation of alpha1-antiproteinase induced by phenylbutazone: participation of peroxyl radicals and hydroperoxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muraoka, Sanae; Miura, Toshiaki

    2006-09-01

    To clarify the action of a side-effect of phenylbutazone, we investigated the inactivation of alpha(1)-antiproteinase induced by phenylbutazone in the presence of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and H(2)O(2) (HRP-H(2)O(2)). The activity of alpha(1)-antiproteinase was rapidly lost during the interaction of phenylbutazone with HRP-H(2)O(2) under aerobic conditions. Phenylbutazone showed a marked spectral change under aerobic conditions but not under anaerobic conditions. Spin trap agents were very effective in inhibiting alpha(1)-antiproteinase inactivation induced by phenylbutazone. Oxidation of phenylbutazone was stopped by catalase, but the inactivation reaction of alpha(1)-antiproteinase proceeded even after removal of H(2)O(2) in the reaction mixture. Formation of the peroxidative product from phenylbutazone was detected by iodometric assay. These results indicate that both peroxyl radicals and the peroxidative product of phenylbutazone participated in the inactivation of alpha(1)-antiproteinase. Other anti-inflammatory drugs did not inactivate alpha(1)-antiproteinase during interaction with HRP-H(2)O(2). Inactivation of alpha(1)-antiproteinase may contribute to serious side effects of phenylbutazone.

  19. Inactivation kinetics and pharmacology distinguish two calcium currents in mouse pancreatic B-cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopkins, W.F.; Satin, L.S.; Cook, D.L. (Univ. of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle (USA))

    1991-02-01

    Voltage-dependent calcium currents were studied in cultured adult mouse pancreatic B-cells using the whole-cell voltage-clamp technique. When calcium currents were elicited with 10-sec depolarizing command pulses, the time course of inactivation was well fit by the sum of two exponentials. The more rapidly-inactivating component had a time constant of 75 +/- 5 msec at 0 mV and displayed both calcium influx- and voltage-dependent inactivation, while the more slowly-inactivating component had a time constant of 2750 +/- 280 msec at 0 mV and inactivated primarily via voltage. The fast component was subject to greater steady-state inactivation at holding potentials between -100 and -40 mV and activated at a lower voltage threshold. This component was also significantly reduced by nimodipine (0.5 microM) when a holding potential of -100 mV was used, whereas the slow component was unaffected. In contrast, the slow component was greatly increased by replacing external calcium with barium, while the fast component was unchanged. Cadmium (1-10 microM) displayed a voltage-dependent block of calcium currents consistent with a greater effect on the high-threshold, more-slowly inactivating component. Taken together, the data suggest that cultured mouse B-cells, as with other insulin-secreting cells we have studied, possess at least two distinct calcium currents. The physiological significance of two calcium currents having distinct kinetic and steady-state inactivation characteristics for B-cell burst firing and insulin secretion is discussed.

  20. Inactivation of Ascaris suum and poliovirus in biosolids under thermophilic anaerobic digestion conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aitken, Michael D; Sobsey, Mark D; Blauth, Kimberly E; Shehee, Mina; Crunk, Phillip L; Walters, Glenn W

    2005-08-01

    There is considerable interest in the United States in production of Class A (low pathogen content) biosolids from the treatment of municipal wastewater sludge. Current requirements imposed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency make it difficult for thermophilic anaerobic digestion, in its simplest process configurations, to achieve Class A status. In particular, the time-temperature requirements necessitate long batch treatment times at temperatures associated with thermophilic anaerobic digestion. The time-temperature requirements are meant to ensure extensive inactivation of helminth eggs and enteric viruses, considered to be the most heat-resistant of the relevant pathogen classes. However, data on inactivation kinetics of these pathogens at precisely controlled and well-characterized temperatures are scarce. We measured inactivation of vaccine-strain poliovirus and eggs from the helminth Ascaris suum at temperatures from 49 to 55 degrees C in a lab-scale batch reactor containing biosolids from a continuous-flow thermophilic anaerobic digester. Both microbes were inactivated rapidly, with Ascaris more resistant to inactivation than poliovirus, and the relationships between inactivation rate and temperature were steep. The Arrhenius correlation between inactivation rate and temperature over the range 49-53 degrees C is consistent with protein denaturation as the inactivation mechanism for both microbes. The least stringent of the EPA time-temperature equations for thermal processes requires batch treatment times more than 2 orders of magnitude greater than would be required for three-log reduction of Ascaris at the rates we measured, suggesting an overly conservative regulatory approach. Such a grossly conservative approach can hinder full-scale implementation of thermophilic anaerobic digestion.

  1. Inactivation of poliovirus by chloramine-T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowda, N M; Trieff, N M; Stanton, G J

    1981-01-01

    Since concern has recently been expressed about the presence of genotoxic substances due to chlorination of water and wastewater, chloramine-T (CAT) is proposed as an alternative disinfectant to chlorine. The viricidal properties of chlorine and CAT were compared. Kinetics of inactivation of poliovirus type 2 by chlorine and CAT in chlorine demand-free water were investigated by using a kinetic apparatus. Inactivation of the virus by chlorine and CAT occurred in two steps. The initial linear part of the inactivation curve followed a pseudo-first-order reaction with the virus. An obvious dose-response relationship was demonstrated with CAT. The rate of inactivation of the virus by CAT was faster in acid medium than in alkaline medium. Inactivation kinetic studies were performed at different temperatures, and the kinetic, Arrhenius, and thermodynamic parameters were evaluated. The rate of inactivation of poliovirus type 2 by chlorine was faster than that by CAT under identical conditions. A mechanism for the viral inactivation in acid conditions was proposed which led to a rate equation consistent with the experimental results. The results indicate that CAT may be an effective viricide against poliovirus type 2 in an acid medium. PMID:6271058

  2. Analytical investigation on the minimum traffic delay at a three-phase signalized T-type intersection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong-Ze; Jiang, Rui; Hu, Mao-Bin; Jia, Bin

    2017-02-01

    The traffic delay at intersections is crucial for the performance of urban traffic system. This paper analytically investigated the minimum traffic delay at a three-phase T-type intersection. We firstly demonstrate that the minimum traffic delay must be achieved on the surface of the 3D space constituted by the three constraints. Next, we prove that the minimum traffic delay must be achieved on the three borderlines of the surface. Finally, we show that the minimum delay is achieved either on one specific borderline or at the vertex of the surface. In the former case, extra green time is needed for the stream with largest demand, while no extra green time should be assigned to any stream in the latter case.

  3. Assessing Photocatalytic Oxidation Using Modified TiO 2 Nanomaterials for Virus Inactivation in Drinking Water: Mechanisms and Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liga, Michael Vincent

    Photocatalytic oxidation is an alternative water treatment method under consideration for disinfecting water. Chlorine disinfection can form harmful byproducts, and some viruses (e.g. adenoviruses) are resistant to other alternative disinfection methods. Photocatalytic oxidation using nano-sized photocatalytic particles (e.g. TiO2, fullerene) holds promise; however, it is limited by its low efficiency and long required treatment times. This research focuses on improving virus inactivation by photocatalytic oxidation by modifying catalysts for improved activity, by analyzing virus inactivation kinetics, and by elucidating the inactivation mechanisms of adenovirus serotype 2 (AdV2) and bacteriophage MS2. Modifying TiO2 with silver (nAg/TiO2) or silica (SiO2-TiO2) improves the inactivation kinetics of bacteriophage MS2 by a factor of 3-10. nAg/ TiO2 increases hydroxyl radical (HO·) production while SiO2 increases the adsorption of MS2 to TiO 2. These results suggest that modifying the photocatalyst surface to increase contaminant adsorption is an important improvement strategy along with increasing HO· production. The inactivation kinetics of AdV2 by P25 TiO2 is much slower than the MS2 inactivation kinetics and displays a strong shoulder, which is not present in the MS2 kinetics. nAg/TiO2 initially improves the inactivation rate of AdV2. SiO2-TiO2 reduces the AdV2 inactivation kinetics since adsorption is not significantly enhanced, as it is with MS2. Amino-C60 is highly effective for AdV2 inactivation under visible light irradiation, making it a good material for use in solar disinfection systems. The efficacy of amino-fullerene also demonstrates that singlet oxygen is effective for AdV2 inactivation. When exposed to irradiated TiO2, AdV2 hexon proteins are heavily damaged resulting in the release of DNA. DNA damage is also present but may occur after capsids break. With MS2, the host interaction protein is rapidly damaged, but not the coat protein. The kinetics

  4. T-type calcium channel Cav3.2 deficient mice show elevated anxiety, impaired memory and reduced sensitivity to psychostimulants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe eGangarossa

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The fine-tuning of neuronal excitability relies on a tight control of Ca2+ homeostasis. The low voltage-activated T-type calcium channels (Cav3.1, Cav3.2 and Cav3.3 isoforms play a critical role in regulating these processes. Despite their wide expression throughout the central nervous system, the implication of T-type Cav3.2 isoform in brain functions is still poorly characterized. Here we investigate the effect of genetic ablation of this isoform in affective disorders, including anxiety, cognitive functions as well as sensitivity to drugs of abuse. Using a wide range of behavioral assays we show that genetic ablation of the cacna1h gene results in an anxiety-like phenotype, whereas novelty-induced locomotor activity is unaffected. Deletion of the T-type channel Cav3.2 also triggers impairment of hippocampus-dependent recognition memories. Acute and sensitized hyperlocomotion induced by d-amphetamine and cocaine are dramatically reduced in T-type Cav3.2 deficient mice. In addition, the administration of the T-type blocker TTA-A2 prevented the expression of locomotor sensitization observed in wildtype mice. In conclusion, our data reveal that physiological activity of this specific Ca2+ channel is required for affective and cognitive behaviors. Moreover, our work highlights the interest of T-type channel blockers as therapeutic strategies to reverse drug-associated alterations.

  5. T-type channels become highly permeable to sodium ions using an alternative extracellular turret region (S5-P) outside the selectivity filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senatore, Adriano; Guan, Wendy; Boone, Adrienne N; Spafford, J David

    2014-04-25

    T-type (Cav3) channels are categorized as calcium channels, but invertebrate ones can be highly sodium-selective channels. We illustrate that the snail LCav3 T-type channel becomes highly sodium-permeable through exon splicing of an extracellular turret and descending helix in domain II of the four-domain Cav3 channel. Highly sodium-permeable T-type channels are generated without altering the invariant ring of charged residues in the selectivity filter that governs calcium selectivity in calcium channels. The highly sodium-permeant T-type channel expresses in the brain and is the only splice isoform expressed in the snail heart. This unique splicing of turret residues offers T-type channels a capacity to serve as a pacemaking sodium current in the primitive heart and brain in lieu of Nav1-type sodium channels and to substitute for voltage-gated sodium channels lacking in many invertebrates. T-type channels would also contribute substantially to sodium leak conductances at rest in invertebrates because of their large window currents.

  6. Method for flow cytometric monitoring of Renibacterium salmoninarum inactivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascho, R.J.; Ongerth, J.E.

    2000-01-01

    The slow growth of Renibacterium salmoninarum limits the usefulness of culture as a research tool. Development of a 2-color flow cytometric assay to quantify the proportions of live and dead R. salmoninarum in a test population is described. Bacteria were simultaneously stained with fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated immunoglobulin and exposed to the exclusion dye propidium iodide. Propidium iodide red fluorescence profiles of control groups of untreated and killed R. salmoninarum were compared with those for bacteria exposed to chlorine. Bacterial inactivation was based on mean red fluorescence intensity, and analyzed by high-red fluorescence intensity (HRFI) and curve subtraction (CS) analyses. When the concentration of R. salmoninarum was 8.65 x 106 bacteria ml-1 and the bacteria exposed to chlorine at 1 mg l-1 for periods from 1 to 20 min (high-Rs assessment), the mean red fluorescence intensity of the profile for each chlorine-exposure group was higher than that for the untreated control (p mean red fluorescence intensities of the exposure groups were higher than that for the untreated control only when the R. salmoninarum was exposed to chlorine for at least 1 min (p ??? 0.01). On the basis of red fluorescence intensity, the proportion of dead cells generally increased with the duration of chlorine exposure. Whereas the rates of inactivation derived from the HRFI and CS analyses did not correlate with the duration of exposure in the high-Rs assessment (r2 ??? 0.27), there was a correlation between these estimates and the duration of exposure in the reduced-Rs assessment (r2 ??? 0.92). Because of the rapid loss of culturable R. salmoninarum in both assessments following chlorine exposure, neither the duration of exposure nor the inactivation estimates correlated with bacteriological culture (r2 ??? 0.22). In both assessments, there was a correlation between the estimates of inactivation based upon HRFI and CS analyses (r2 > 0.99). These results suggest that

  7. Silence of the fathers: early X inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Mimi K; Disteche, Christine M

    2004-08-01

    X chromosome inactivation is the mammalian answer to the dilemma of dosage compensation between males and females. The study of this fascinating form of chromosome-wide gene regulation has yielded surprising insights into early development and cellular memory. In the past few months, three papers reported unexpected findings about the paternal X chromosome (X(p)). All three studies agree that the X(p) is imprinted to become inactive earlier than ever suspected during embryonic development. Although apparently incomplete, this early form of inactivation insures dosage compensation throughout development. Silencing of the X(p) persists in cells of extraembryonic tissues, but it is erased and followed by random X inactivation in cells of the embryo proper. These findings challenge several aspects of the current view of X inactivation during early development and may have profound impact on studies of pluripotency and epigenetics.

  8. Microbial Inactivation by Ultrasound Assisted Supercritical Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedito, Jose; Ortuño, Carmen; Castillo-Zamudio, Rosa Isela; Mulet, Antonio

    A method combining supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2) and high power ultrasound (HPU) has been developed and tested for microbial/enzyme inactivation purposes, at different process conditions for both liquid and solid matrices. In culture media, using only SC-CO2, the inactivation rate of E. coli and S. cerevisiae increased with pressure and temperature; and the total inactivation (7-8 log-cycles) was attained after 25 and 140 min of SC-CO2 (350 bar, 36 °C) treatment, respectively. Using SC-CO2+HPU, the time for the total inactivation of both microorganisms was reduced to only 1-2 min, at any condition selected. The SC-CO2+HPU inactivation of both microorganisms was slower in juices (avg. 4.9 min) than in culture media (avg. 1.5 min). In solid samples (chicken, turkey ham and dry-cured pork cured ham) treated with SC-CO2 and SC-CO2+HPU, the inactivation rate of E. coli increased with temperature. The application of HPU to the SC-CO2 treatments accelerated the inactivation rate of E. coli and that effect was more pronounced in treatments with isotonic solution surrounding the solid food samples. The application of HPU enhanced the SC-CO2 inactivation mechanisms of microorganisms, generating a vigorous agitation that facilitated the CO2 solubilization and the mass transfer process. The cavitation generated by HPU could damage the cell walls accelerating the extraction of vital constituents and the microbial death. Thus, using the combined technique, reasonable industrial processing times and mild process conditions could be used which could result into a cost reduction and lead to the minimization in the food nutritional and organoleptic changes.

  9. Photodynamic-induced inactivation of Propionibacterium acnes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, Karsten; Teschke, M.; Eick, Stephen G.; Pfister, W.; Meyer, Herbert; Halbhuber, Karl-Juergen

    1998-05-01

    We report on photodynamically induced inactivation of the skin bacterium Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes) using endogenous as well as exogenous photosensitizers and red light sources. P. acnes is involved in the pathogenesis of the skin disease acne vulgaris. The skin bacterium is able to synthesize the metal-free fluorescent porphyrins protoporphyrin IX (PP) and coproporphyrin (CP) as shown by in situ spectrally-resolved detection of natural autofluorescence of human skin and bacteria colonies. These naturally occurring intracellular porphyrins act as efficient endogenous photosensitizers. Inactivation of P. acnes suspensions was achieved by irradiation with He-Ne laser light in the red spectral region (632.8 nm). We monitored the photodynamically-induced death of single bacteria using a fluorescent viability kit in combination with confocal laser scanning microscopy. In addition, the photo-induced inactivation was calculated by CFU (colony forming units) determination. We found 633 nm-induced inactivation (60 mW, 0.12 cm2 exposure area, 1 hour irradiation) of 72% in the case of non-incubated bacteria based on the destructive effect of singlet oxygen produced by red light excited endogenous porphyrins and subsequent energy transfer to molecular oxygen. In order to achieve a nearly complete inactivation within one exposure procedure, the exogenous photosensitizer Methylene Blue (Mb) was added. Far red exposure of Mb-labeled bacteria using a krypton ion laser at 647 nm and 676 nm resulted in 99% inactivation.

  10. Possible involvement of transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 in Ca2+signaling via T-type Ca2+channel in mouse sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishizawa, Yuki; Takahashi, Kenji; Oguma, Naoko; Tominaga, Makoto; Ohta, Toshio

    2017-12-28

    T-type Ca 2+ channels and TRPA1 are expressed in sensory neurons and both are associated with pain transmission, but their functional interaction is unclear. Here we demonstrate that pharmacological evidence of the functional relation between T-type Ca 2+ channels and TRPA1 in mouse sensory neurons. Low concentration of KCl at 15 mM (15K) evoked increases of intracellular Ca 2+ concentration ([Ca 2+ ] i ), which were suppressed by selective T-type Ca 2+ channel blockers. RT-PCR showed that mouse sensory neurons expressed all subtypes of T-type Ca 2+ channel. The magnitude of 15K-induced [Ca 2+ ] i increase was significantly larger in neurons sensitive to allylisothiocyanate (AITC, a TRPA1 agonist) than in those insensitive to it, and in TRPA1 -/- mouse sensory neurons. TRPA1 blockers diminished the [Ca 2+ ] i responses to 15K in neurons sensitive to AITC, but failed to inhibit 40 mM KCl-induced [Ca 2+ ] i increases even in AITC-sensitive neurons. TRPV1 blockers did not inhibit the 15K-induced [Ca 2+ ] i increase regardless of the sensitivity to capsaicin. [Ca 2+ ] i responses to TRPA1 agonist were enhanced by co-application with 15K. These pharmacological data suggest the possibility of functional interaction between T-type Ca 2+ channels and TRPA1 in sensory neurons. Since TRPA1 channel is activated by intracellular Ca 2+ , we hypothesize that Ca 2+ entered via T-type Ca 2+ channel activation may further stimulate TRPA1, resulting in an enhancement of nociceptive signaling. Thus, T-type Ca 2+ channel may be a potential target for TRPA1-related pain. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Structure of the inactivating gate from the Shaker voltage gated K{sup +} channel analyzed by NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schott, M.K.; Antz, C. [Institute of Physiology, University of Tuebingen (Germany)]|[Department of Biophysics, Max-Planck-Institute for Medical Research, Heidelberg (Germany); Frank, R. [Center of Molecular Biology, Heidelberg (Germany); Ruppersberg, J.P. [Institute of Physiology, University of Tuebingen (Germany); Kalbitzer, H.R. [Department of Biophysics, University of Regensburg (Germany)]|[Department of Biophysics, Max-Planck-Institute for Medical Research, Heidelberg (Germany)

    1998-04-01

    Rapid inactivation of voltage-gated K{sup +} (K{sub V}) channels is mediated by an N-terminal domain (inactivating ball domain) which blocks the open channel from the cytoplasmic side. Inactivating ball domains of various K{sub V} channels are also biologically active when synthesized separately and added as a peptide to the solution. Synthetic inactivating ball domains from different K{sub V} channels with hardly any sequence homology mediate quite similar effects even on unrelated K{sub V} channel subtypes whose inactivation domain has been deleted. The solution structure of the inactivating ball peptide from Shaker (Sh-P22) was analyzed with NMR spectroscopy. The NMR data indicate a non-random structure in an aqueous environment. However, while other inactivating ball peptides showed well-defined three-dimensional structures under these conditions, Sh-P22 does not have a unique, compactly folded structure in solution. (orig.) With 3 figs., 2 tabs., 34 refs.

  12. Genetic Tracing of Cav3.2 T-Type Calcium Channel Expression in the Peripheral Nervous System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernal Sierra, Yinth A; Haseleu, Julia; Kozlenkov, Alexey; Bégay, Valérie; Lewin, Gary R

    2017-01-01

    Characterizing the distinct functions of the T-type ion channel subunits Cav3.1, 3.2 or 3.3 has proven difficult due to their highly conserved amino-acid sequences and the lack of pharmacological blockers specific for each subunit. To precisely determine the expression pattern of the Cav3.2 channel in the nervous system we generated two knock-in mouse strains that express EGFP or Cre recombinase under the control of the Cav3.2 gene promoter. We show that in the brains of these animals, the Cav3.2 channel is predominantly expressed in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. In the peripheral nervous system, the activation of the promoter starts at E9.5 in neural crest cells that will give rise to dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons, but not sympathetic neurons. As development progresses the number of DRG cells expressing the Cav3.2 channel reaches around 7% of the DRG at E16.5, and remains constant until E18.5. Characterization of sensory neuron subpopulations at E18.5 showed that EGFP+ cells are a heterogeneous population consisting mainly of TrkB+ and TrkC+ cells, while only a small percentage of DRG cells were TrkA+. Genetic tracing of the sensory nerve end-organ innervation of the skin showed that the activity of the Cav3.2 channel promoter in sensory progenitors marks many mechanoreceptor and nociceptor endings, but spares slowly adapting mechanoreceptors with endings associated with Merkel cells. Our genetic analysis reveals for the first time that progenitors that express the Cav3.2 T-type calcium channel, defines a sensory specific lineage that populates a large proportion of the DRG. Using our Cav3.2-Cre mice together with AAV viruses containing a conditional fluorescent reporter (tdTomato) we could also show that Cre expression is largely restricted to two functionally distinct sensory neuron types in the adult ganglia. Cav3.2 positive neurons innervating the skin were found to only form lanceolate endings on hair follicles and are probably identical to D

  13. T-type calcium channels, but not Cav3.2, in the peripheral sensory afferents are involved in acute itch in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Si-Fang; Wang, Bing; Zhang, Feng-Ming; Fei, Yuan-Hui; Gu, Jia-Hui; Li, Jie; Bi, Ling-Bo; Liu, Xing-Jun

    2017-06-10

    T-type calcium channels are prominently expressed in primary nociceptive fibers and well characterized in pain processes. Although itch and pain share many similarities including primary sensory fibers, the function of T-type calcium channels on acute itch has not been explored. We investigated whether T-type calcium channels expressed within primary sensory fibers of mouse skin, especially Cav3.2 subtype, involve in chloroquine-, endothelin-1- and histamine-evoked acute itch using pharmacological, neuronal imaging and behavioral analyses. We found that pre-locally blocking three subtypes of T-type calcium channels in the peripheral afferents of skins, yielded an inhibition in acute itch or pain behaviors, while selectively blocking the Cav3.2 channel in the skin peripheral afferents only inhibited acute pain but not acute itch. These results suggest that T-type Cav3.1 or Cav3.3, but not Cav3.2 channel, have an important role in acute itch processing, and their distinctive roles in modulating acute itch are worthy of further investigation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Prognostic relevance of a T-type calcium channels gene signature in solid tumours: A correlation ready for clinical validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornaro, Lorenzo; Vivaldi, Caterina; Lin, Dong; Xue, Hui; Falcone, Alfredo; Wang, Yuzhuo; Crea, Francesco; Bootman, Martin D

    2017-01-01

    T-type calcium channels (TTCCs) mediate calcium influx across the cell membrane. TTCCs regulate numerous physiological processes including cardiac pacemaking and neuronal activity. In addition, they have been implicated in the proliferation, migration and differentiation of tumour tissues. Although the signalling events downstream of TTCC-mediated calcium influx are not fully elucidated, it is clear that variations in the expression of TTCCs promote tumour formation and hinder response to treatment. We examined the expression of TTCC genes (all three subtypes; CACNA-1G, CACNA-1H and CACNA-1I) and their prognostic value in three major solid tumours (i.e. gastric, lung and ovarian cancers) via a publicly accessible database. In gastric cancer, expression of all the CACNA genes was associated with overall survival (OS) among stage I-IV patients (all p<0.05). By combining the three potential biomarkers, a TTCC signature was developed, which retained a significant association with OS both in stage IV and stage I-III patients. In lung and ovarian cancer, association with OS was also significant when all tumour stages were considered, but was partly lost or inconclusive after splitting cases into localized and metastatic subsets. Alterations in CACNA gene expression are linked to tumour prognosis. Gastric cancer represents the most promising setting for further evaluation.

  15. Inactivation of pathogenic bacteria in food matrices: high pressure processing, photodynamic inactivation and pressure-assisted photodynamic inactivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, A.; Couceiro, J.; Bonifácio, D.; Martins, C.; Almeida, A.; Neves, M. G. P. M. S.; Faustino, M. A. F.; Saraiva, J. A.

    2017-09-01

    Traditional food processing methods frequently depend on the application of high temperature. However, heat may cause undesirable changes in food properties and often has a negative impact on nutritional value and organoleptic characteristics. Therefore, reducing the microbial load without compromising the desirable properties of food products is still a technological challenge. High-pressure processing (HPP) can be classified as a cold pasteurization technique, since it is a non-thermal food preservation method that uses hydrostatic pressure to inactivate spoilage microorganisms. At the same time, it increases shelf life and retains the original features of food. Photodynamic inactivation (PDI) is also regarded as promising approach for the decontamination of food matrices. In this case, the inactivation of bacterial cells is achieved by the cytotoxic effects of reactive oxygens species (ROS) produced from the combined interaction of a photosensitizer molecule, light and oxygen. This short review examines some recent developments on the application of HPP and PDI with food-grade photosensitizers for the inactivation of listeriae, taken as a food pathogen model. The results of a proof-of-concept trial of the use of high-pressure as a coadjutant to increase the efficiency of photodynamic inactivation of bacterial endospores is also addressed.

  16. Inactivation of Salmonella during cocoa roasting and chocolate conching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, Maristela da Silva do; Brum, Daniela Merlo; Pena, Pamela Oliveira; Berto, Maria Isabel; Efraim, Priscilla

    2012-10-15

    The high heat resistance of Salmonella in foods with low water activity raises particular issues for food safety, especially chocolate, where outbreak investigations indicate that few colony-forming units are necessary to cause salmonellosis. This study evaluated the efficiency of cocoa roasting and milk chocolate conching in the inactivation of Salmonella 5-strain suspension. Thermal resistance of Salmonella was greater in nibs compared to cocoa beans upon exposure at 110 to 130°C. The D-values in nibs were 1.8, 2.2 and 1.5-fold higher than those calculated for cocoa beans at 110, 120 and 130°C. There was no significant difference (p>0.05) between the matrices only at 140°C. Since in the conching of milk chocolate the inactivation curves showed rapid death in the first 180 min followed by a lower inactivation rate, and two D-values were calculated. For the first time interval (0-180 min) the D-values were 216.87, 102.27 and 50.99 min at 50, 60 and 70°C, respectively. The other D-values were determined from the second time interval (180-1440 min), 1076.76 min at 50°C, 481.94 min at 60°C and 702.23 min at 70°C. The results demonstrated that the type of matrix, the process temperature and the initial count influenced the Salmonella resistance. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Kinetics of Hydrothermal Inactivation of Endotoxins ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lixiong; Wilbur, Chris L.; Mintz, Kathryn L.

    2011-01-01

    A kinetic model was established for the inactivation of endotoxins in water at temperatures ranging from 210°C to 270°C and a pressure of 6.2 × 106 Pa. Data were generated using a bench scale continuous-flow reactor system to process feed water spiked with endotoxin standard (Escherichia coli O113:H10). Product water samples were collected and quantified by the Limulus amebocyte lysate assay. At 250°C, 5-log endotoxin inactivation was achieved in about 1 s of exposure, followed by a lower inactivation rate. This non-log-linear pattern is similar to reported trends in microbial survival curves. Predictions and parameters of several non-log-linear models are presented. In the fast-reaction zone (3- to 5-log reduction), the Arrhenius rate constant fits well at temperatures ranging from 120°C to 250°C on the basis of data from this work and the literature. Both biphasic and modified Weibull models are comparable to account for both the high and low rates of inactivation in terms of prediction accuracy and the number of parameters used. A unified representation of thermal resistance curves for a 3-log reduction and a 3 D value associated with endotoxin inactivation and microbial survival, respectively, is presented. PMID:21193667

  18. The subcellular distribution of T-type Ca2+ channels in interneurons of the lateral geniculate nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allken, Vaneeda; Chepkoech, Joy-Loi; Einevoll, Gaute T; Halnes, Geir

    2014-01-01

    Inhibitory interneurons (INs) in the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) provide both axonal and dendritic GABA output to thalamocortical relay cells (TCs). Distal parts of the IN dendrites often enter into complex arrangements known as triadic synapses, where the IN dendrite plays a dual role as postsynaptic to retinal input and presynaptic to TC dendrites. Dendritic GABA release can be triggered by retinal input, in a highly localized process that is functionally isolated from the soma, but can also be triggered by somatically elicited Ca(2+)-spikes and possibly by backpropagating action potentials. Ca(2+)-spikes in INs are predominantly mediated by T-type Ca(2+)-channels (T-channels). Due to the complex nature of the dendritic signalling, the function of the IN is likely to depend critically on how T-channels are distributed over the somatodendritic membrane (T-distribution). To study the relationship between the T-distribution and several IN response properties, we here run a series of simulations where we vary the T-distribution in a multicompartmental IN model with a realistic morphology. We find that the somatic response to somatic current injection is facilitated by a high T-channel density in the soma-region. Conversely, a high T-channel density in the distal dendritic region is found to facilitate dendritic signalling in both the outward direction (increases the response in distal dendrites to somatic input) and the inward direction (the soma responds stronger to distal synaptic input). The real T-distribution is likely to reflect a compromise between several neural functions, involving somatic response patterns and dendritic signalling.

  19. Inactivation of glutathione peroxidase by benzaldehyde.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabatabaie, T; Floyd, R A

    1996-12-01

    Chronic benzaldehyde exposure is known to cause central nervous system (CNS) disturbances. Previous studies have shown that benzaldehyde causes the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in rat synaptosomal fractions. Benzaldehyde has also been implicated in ROS formation in the CNS of rats treated with toluene. We have found that benzaldehyde effectively inactivates the antioxidant enzyme glutathione peroxidase (Ki approximately 15 microM), but has no effect on the other antioxidant enzymes tested: catalase, superoxide dismutase, and glutathione reductase. This effect has been found to be specific to benzaldehyde since other structurally related and unrelated aldehydes tested were found to be devoid of inactivating capacity toward glutathione peroxidase. Since glutathione peroxidase is the main enzyme responsible for removal of hydrogen peroxide and organic hydroperoxides in brain, its inactivation by benzaldehyde may be a main contributor to the observed ROS formation and the observed neurotoxicity caused by either benzaldehyde or toluene exposure.

  20. Inactivation characteristics of ozone and electrolysis process for ballast water treatment using B. subtilis spores as a probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Youmi; Yoon, Yeojoon; Hong, Eunkyung; Kwon, Minhwan; Kang, Joon-Wun

    2013-07-15

    Since ballast water affects the ocean ecosystem, the International Maritime Organization (IMO) sets a standard for ballast water management and might impose much tighter regulations in the future. The aim of this study is to evaluate the inactivation efficiency of ozonation, electrolysis, and an ozonation-electrolysis combined process, using B. subtilis spores. In seawater ozonation, HOBr is the key active substance for inactivation, because of rapid reactivity of ozone with Br(-) in seawater. In seawater electrolysis, it is also HOBr, but not HOCl, because of the rapid reaction of HOCl with Br(-), which has not been recognized carefully, even though many electrolysis technologies have been approved by the IMO. Inactivation pattern was different in ozonation and electrolysis, which has some limitations with the tailing or lag-phase, respectively. However, each deficiency can be overcome with a combined process, which is most effective as a sequential application of ozonation followed by electrolysis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Kinetics of Hydrothermal Inactivation of Endotoxins ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Lixiong; Wilbur, Chris L.; Mintz, Kathryn L.

    2011-01-01

    A kinetic model was established for the inactivation of endotoxins in water at temperatures ranging from 210°C to 270°C and a pressure of 6.2 × 106 Pa. Data were generated using a bench scale continuous-flow reactor system to process feed water spiked with endotoxin standard (Escherichia coli O113:H10). Product water samples were collected and quantified by the Limulus amebocyte lysate assay. At 250°C, 5-log endotoxin inactivation was achieved in about 1 s of exposure, followed by a lower ina...

  2. Evaluation of a two-site, three-barrier model for permeation in Ca(V)3.1 (alpha1G) T-type calcium channels: Ca (2+), Ba (2+), Mg (2+), and Na (+).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopin, Kyle V; Obejero-Paz, Carlos A; Jones, Stephen W

    2010-06-01

    We explored the ability of a two-site, three-barrier (2S3B) Eyring model to describe recently reported data on current flow through open Ca(V)3.1 T-type calcium channels, varying Ca(2+) and Ba(2+) over a wide range (100 nM: -110 mM: ) while recording whole-cell currents over a wide voltage range (-150 mV to +100 mV) from channels stably expressed in HEK 293 cells. Effects on permeation were isolated using instantaneous current-voltage relationships (IIV) after strong, brief depolarizations to activate channels with minimal inactivation. Most experimental results were reproduced by a 2S3B model. The model described the IIV relationships, apparent affinities for permeation and block for Ca(2+) and Ba(2+), and shifts in reversal potential between Ca(2+) and Ba(2+). The fit to block by 1 mM Mg(2+)(i) was reasonable, but block by Mg(2+)(0) was described less well. Surprisingly, fits were comparable with strong ion-ion repulsion, with no repulsion, or with intermediate values. With weak repulsion, there was a single high-affinity site, with a low-affinity site near the cytoplasmic side of the pore. With strong repulsion, the net charge of ions in the pore was near +2 over a relatively wide range of concentration and voltage, suggesting a knockoff mechanism. With strong repulsion, Ba(2+) preferred the inner site, while Ca(2+) preferred the outer site, potentially explaining faster entry of Ni(2+) and other pore blockers when Ba(2+) is the charge carrier.

  3. A Comparison of Y-Type and T-Type Metallic Bilateral Biliary Stents in Patients with Malignant Hilar Biliary Obstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koh, Esther; Jin, Gong Yong; Hwang, Seung Bae; Choi, Eun Jung; Song, Ji Soo; Han, Young Min; Kwon, Keun Sang [Dept. of Chonbuk National University Hospital and Medical School, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-04-15

    To compare the Y type (side-by-side) and T type (stent-in-stent) bilateral biliary metal stenting in malignant hilar obstruction in terms of treatment outcomes, including post-stenting serum bilirubin level and stent patency. 41 consecutive patients with advanced hilar malignancies who underwent percutaneous placement of bilateral metallic stents - Y (n = 23) and T types (n = 18) - were retrospectively reviewed. We evaluated stent patency after the procedure by cholangiogram and abdominal CT. Pre- and post-stenting serum bilirubin level (total, direct bilirubin) at 1 week and at 1 month were compared. Student t-test and Kaplan-Meier method were used in the statistical analysis. After comparing the median stent patency according to both types, they did not differ significantly (Y: 38 days, T: 61 days; p 0.141). There was a more decrease in the total and direct bilirubin of the T type compared to the Y type after 1 week (p = 0.013, 0.025). However, no significant difference existed between the decreasing bilirubin rates of both types after 1 month (p = 0.923, 0.742). In patients with malignant hilar obstruction, both Y and T type bilateral metallic biliary stents are effective methods. Stent patency and bilirubin decrease rates were not significantly different.

  4. GABA(A) Increases Calcium in Subventricular Zone Astrocyte-Like Cells Through L- and T-Type Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Young, Stephanie Z; Platel, Jean-Claude; Nielsen, Jakob V

    2010-01-01

    induced Ca(2+) increases in 40-50% of SVZ astrocytes. GABA(A)-induced Ca(2+) increases were prevented with nifedipine and mibefradil, blockers of L- and T-type voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCC). The L-type Ca(2+) channel activator BayK 8644 increased the percentage of GABA(A)-responding astrocyte...

  5. Differential effect of T-type voltage-gated calcium channel disruption on renal plasma flow and glomerular filtration rate in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thuesen, Anne D; Andersen, Henrik; Cardel, Majken

    2014-01-01

    of two T-type Cav knock-out mice strains. Continuous recordings of blood pressure and heart rate, and para-aminohippurate clearance (renal plasma flow) and inulin clearance (GFR) were performed in conscious, chronically catheterized, wild type and Cav 3.1-/- and Cav 3.2-/- mice. Contractility of afferent...

  6. Relative insignificance of virus inactivation during aluminum electrocoagulation of saline waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanneru, Charan Tej; Jothikumar, N; Hill, Vincent R; Chellam, Shankararaman

    2014-12-16

    Combined removal and inactivation of the MS2 bacteriophage from model saline (0-100 mM NaCl) waters by electrochemical treatment using a sacrificial aluminum anode was evaluated. Both chemical and electrodissolution contributed to coagulant dosing since measured aluminum concentrations were statistically higher than purely electrochemical predictions using Faraday's law. Electrocoagulation generated only small amounts of free chlorine in situ but effectively destabilized viruses and incorporated them into Al(OH)3(s) flocs during electrolysis. Low chlorine concentrations combined with virus shielding and aggregation within flocs resulted in very slow disinfection rates necessitating extended flocculation/contact times to achieve significant log-inactivation. Therefore, the dominant virus control mechanism during aluminum electrocoagulation of saline waters is "physical" removal by uptake onto flocs rather than "chemical" inactivation by chlorine. Attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy provided evidence for oxidative transformations of capsid proteins including formation of oxyacids, aldehydes, and ketones. Electrocoagulation significantly altered protein secondary structures decreasing peak areas associated with turns, bends, α-helices, β-structures, and random coils for inactivated viruses compared with the MS2 stock. Quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) measurements showed rapid initial RNA damage following a similar trend as plaque assay measurements of infectious viruses. However, ssRNA cleavage measured by qRT-PCR underestimated inactivation over longer durations. Although aluminum electrocoagulation of saline waters disorders virus capsids and damages RNA, inactivation occurs at a sufficiently low rate so as to only play a secondary role to floc-encapsulation during residence times typical of electrochemical treatment.

  7. Ursodeoxycholic acid prevents ventricular conduction slowing and arrhythmia by restoring T-type calcium current in fetuses during cholestasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oladipupo Adeyemi

    Full Text Available Increased maternal serum bile acid concentrations in intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (ICP are associated with fetal cardiac arrhythmias. Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA has been shown to demonstrate anti-arrhythmic properties via preventing ICP-associated cardiac conduction slowing and development of reentrant arrhythmias, although the cellular mechanism is still being elucidated.High-resolution fluorescent optical mapping of electrical activity and electrocardiogram measurements were used to characterize effects of UDCA on one-day-old neonatal and adult female Langendorff-perfused rat hearts. ICP was modelled by perfusion of taurocholic acid (TC, 400μM. Whole-cell calcium currents were recorded from neonatal rat and human fetal cardiomyocytes.TC significantly prolonged the PR interval by 11.0±3.5% (P<0.05 and slowed ventricular conduction velocity (CV by 38.9±5.1% (P<0.05 exclusively in neonatal and not in maternal hearts. A similar CV decline was observed with the selective T-type calcium current (ICa,T blocker mibefradil 1μM (23.0±6.2%, P<0.05, but not with the L-type calcium current (ICa,L blocker nifedipine 1μM (6.9±6.6%, NS. The sodium channel blocker lidocaine (30μM reduced CV by 60.4±4.5% (P<0.05. UDCA co-treatment was protective against CV slowing induced by TC and mibefradil, but not against lidocaine. UDCA prevented the TC-induced reduction in the ICa,T density in both isolated human fetal (-10.2±1.5 versus -5.5±0.9 pA/pF, P<0.05 and neonatal rat ventricular myocytes (-22.3±1.1 versus -9.6±0.8 pA/pF, P<0.0001, whereas UDCA had limited efficacy on the ICa,L.Our findings demonstrate that ICa,T plays a significant role in ICP-associated fetal cardiac conduction slowing and arrhythmogenesis, and is an important component of the fetus-specific anti-arrhythmic activity of UDCA.

  8. Ursodeoxycholic acid prevents ventricular conduction slowing and arrhythmia by restoring T-type calcium current in fetuses during cholestasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeyemi, Oladipupo; Alvarez-Laviada, Anita; Schultz, Francisca; Ibrahim, Effendi; Trauner, Michael; Williamson, Catherine; Glukhov, Alexey V; Gorelik, Julia

    2017-01-01

    Increased maternal serum bile acid concentrations in intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (ICP) are associated with fetal cardiac arrhythmias. Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) has been shown to demonstrate anti-arrhythmic properties via preventing ICP-associated cardiac conduction slowing and development of reentrant arrhythmias, although the cellular mechanism is still being elucidated. High-resolution fluorescent optical mapping of electrical activity and electrocardiogram measurements were used to characterize effects of UDCA on one-day-old neonatal and adult female Langendorff-perfused rat hearts. ICP was modelled by perfusion of taurocholic acid (TC, 400μM). Whole-cell calcium currents were recorded from neonatal rat and human fetal cardiomyocytes. TC significantly prolonged the PR interval by 11.0±3.5% (P<0.05) and slowed ventricular conduction velocity (CV) by 38.9±5.1% (P<0.05) exclusively in neonatal and not in maternal hearts. A similar CV decline was observed with the selective T-type calcium current (ICa,T) blocker mibefradil 1μM (23.0±6.2%, P<0.05), but not with the L-type calcium current (ICa,L) blocker nifedipine 1μM (6.9±6.6%, NS). The sodium channel blocker lidocaine (30μM) reduced CV by 60.4±4.5% (P<0.05). UDCA co-treatment was protective against CV slowing induced by TC and mibefradil, but not against lidocaine. UDCA prevented the TC-induced reduction in the ICa,T density in both isolated human fetal (-10.2±1.5 versus -5.5±0.9 pA/pF, P<0.05) and neonatal rat ventricular myocytes (-22.3±1.1 versus -9.6±0.8 pA/pF, P<0.0001), whereas UDCA had limited efficacy on the ICa,L. Our findings demonstrate that ICa,T plays a significant role in ICP-associated fetal cardiac conduction slowing and arrhythmogenesis, and is an important component of the fetus-specific anti-arrhythmic activity of UDCA.

  9. Mycoplasma gallisepticum inactivated by targeting the hydrophobic domain of the membrane preserves surface lipoproteins and induces a strong immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atalla, Hazem; Lysnyansky, Inna; Raviv, Yossef; Rottem, Shlomo

    2015-01-01

    An innovative approach for inactivation of Mycoplasma gallisepticum using the hydrophobic photoinduced alkylating probe 1, 5-iodonaphthylazide (INA) is described. Treatment of washed M. gallisepticum mid-exponential culture (0.2 mg cell protein /mL) with INA followed by irradiation with far-ultraviolet light (310-380 nm) completely abolished viability. Transmission electron microscopy showed that the majority of the inactivated M. gallisepticum were comparable in size to intact cells, but that part of the INA-treated M. gallisepticum preparation also contained low density cells and membrane vesicles. Confocal microscopy revealed that untreated M. gallisepticum cells were internalized by chicken red blood cells (c-RBCs), whereas the INA-inactivated cells remained attached to the outer surface of the c-RBCs. INA treatment of M. gallisepticum resulted in a complete inactivation of F0F1 -ATPase and of the L-arginine uptake system, but the cytoplasmatic soluble NADH2 dehydrogenase was only partially affected. Western blot analysis of the lipoprotein fraction showed that the INA-treated M. gallisepticum retained their lipoproteins. Following subcutaneous injection of M. gallisepticum INA-bacterin, 100% and 68.8% of chickens were positive by the rapid serum agglutination test and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay respectively, 2 weeks post-injection. These data suggest that the photoinducible alkylating agent INA inactivates M. gallisepticum but preserves its surface lipoproteins and thus has the potential to be used as a general approach for the inactivation of mycoplasmas for vaccine development.

  10. Modeling Bacteriocin Resistance and Inactivation of Listeria innocua LMG 13568 by Lactobacillus sakei CTC 494 under Sausage Fermentation Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Leroy, Frédéric; Lievens, Kristoff; Vuyst, Luc De

    2005-01-01

    In mixed cultures, bacteriocin production by the sausage isolate Lactobacillus sakei CTC 494 rapidly inactivated sensitive Listeria innocua LMG 13568 cells, even at low bacteriocin activity levels. A small fraction of the listerial population was bacteriocin resistant. However, sausage fermentation conditions inhibited regrowth of resistant cells.

  11. X-chromosome inactivation and escape

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-11-06

    Nov 6, 2015 ... She predicted many of the features of X inactivation, for e.g., .... feature that locks silencing, i.e. DNA methylation at CpG islands of X-linked ..... 1996 XIST RNA paints the inactive X chromosome at interphase: evidence for a novel RNA involved in nuclear/chromosome structure. J. Cell Biol. 132, 259–275.

  12. Inactivation of Bacillus atrophaeus by OH radicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Ryo; Yonetamari, Kenta; Tokumitsu, Yusuke; Yonemori, Seiya; Yasuda, Hachiro; Mizuno, Akira

    2016-08-01

    The inactivation of Bacillus atrophaeus by OH radicals is measured. This study aims to evaluate the bactericidal effects of OH radicals produced by atmospheric-pressure nonthermal plasma widely used for plasma medicine; however, in this study, OH radicals are produced by vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photolysis of water vapor instead of plasma to allow the production of OH radicals with almost no other reactive species. A 172 nm VUV light from a Xe2 excimer lamp irradiates a He-H2O mixture flowing in a quartz tube to photodissociate H2O to produce OH, H, O, HO2, H2O2, and O3. The produced reactive oxygen species (ROS) flow out of the quartz tube nozzle to the bacteria on an agar plate and cause inactivation. The inactivation by OH radicals among the six ROS is observed by properly setting the experimental conditions with the help of simulations calculating the ROS densities. A 30 s treatment with approximately 0.1 ppm OH radicals causes visible inactivation.

  13. Bioinactivation: Software for modelling dynamic microbial inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garre, Alberto; Fernández, Pablo S; Lindqvist, Roland; Egea, Jose A

    2017-03-01

    This contribution presents the bioinactivation software, which implements functions for the modelling of isothermal and non-isothermal microbial inactivation. This software offers features such as user-friendliness, modelling of dynamic conditions, possibility to choose the fitting algorithm and generation of prediction intervals. The software is offered in two different formats: Bioinactivation core and Bioinactivation SE. Bioinactivation core is a package for the R programming language, which includes features for the generation of predictions and for the fitting of models to inactivation experiments using non-linear regression or a Markov Chain Monte Carlo algorithm (MCMC). The calculations are based on inactivation models common in academia and industry (Bigelow, Peleg, Mafart and Geeraerd). Bioinactivation SE supplies a user-friendly interface to selected functions of Bioinactivation core, namely the model fitting of non-isothermal experiments and the generation of prediction intervals. The capabilities of bioinactivation are presented in this paper through a case study, modelling the non-isothermal inactivation of Bacillus sporothermodurans. This study has provided a full characterization of the response of the bacteria to dynamic temperature conditions, including confidence intervals for the model parameters and a prediction interval of the survivor curve. We conclude that the MCMC algorithm produces a better characterization of the biological uncertainty and variability than non-linear regression. The bioinactivation software can be relevant to the food and pharmaceutical industry, as well as to regulatory agencies, as part of a (quantitative) microbial risk assessment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Pulsed electric field inactivation in a microreactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fox, M.B.

    2006-01-01

    Pulsed electric fields (PEF) is a novel, non-thermal pasteurization method which uses short, high electric field pulses to inactivate microorganisms. The advantage of a pasteurization method like PEF compared to regular heat pasteurization is that the taste, flavour, texture and nutritional value

  15. Inactivation of human norovirus using chemical sanitizers

    Science.gov (United States)

    The porcine gastric mucin binding magnetic bead (PGM-MB) assay was used to evaluate the ability of chlorine, chlorine dioxide, peroxyacetic acid, hydrogen peroxide, and trisodium phosphate to inactivate human norovirus within 10 percent stool filtrate. One min free chlorine treatments at concentrat...

  16. Photodynamic Inactivation of Food Pathogen Listeria monocytogenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Buchovec

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to examine the possibility to inactivate food pathogen Listeria monocytogenes by nonthermal antimicrobial treatment – photosensitization. L. monocytogenes was incubated with 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA (7.5 mM for 0–2 h to produce endogenous photosensitizers and then illuminated with visible light. The LED-based light source used for the illumination of L. monocytogenes emitted light at λ=400 nm with energy density of 20 mW/cm2. The illumination time varied from 0 to 20 min, and a total energy dose reached 0–24 J/cm2. The obtained results reveal that L. monocytogenes can effectively produce endogenous porphyrins after incubation with 7.5 mM ALA. Subsequent illumination of cells with visible light significantly decreased their viability in vitro (4 log. After adhesion of Listeria to the surface of packaging material and following photosensitization, the surface-attached bacterial population was inactivated by 3.7 log. In addition, most resistant Listeria biofilms are susceptible to this treatment. Their inactivation reached 3.1 log under certain experimental conditions. The cells and biofilms of Gram-positive bacteria L. monocytogenes ATCL3C 7644 could be effectively inactivated by ALA-based photosensitization in the solution as well as adhered onto the surface of packaging material in a nonthermal way.

  17. Inactivation of prion infectivity by ionizing rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gominet, M. [Ionisos, ZI les Chatinieres, F01120 Dagneux (France); Vadrot, C.; Austruy, G. [Paris V University, Central Pharmacy of Hospitals, 4 avenue de l' Observatoire, F-75006, Paris (France); Darbord, J.C. [Paris V University, Central Pharmacy of Hospitals, 4 avenue de l' Observatoire, F-75006, Paris (France)], E-mail: darbord@pharmacie.univ-paris5.fr

    2007-11-15

    Inactivation of prion deposits on medical devices or prion contamination in pharmaceutical raw materials is considered as impossible by using gamma irradiation. Early, the guideline WHO/CDS/CSR/APH/2000 has described irradiation as an ineffective process. But, in 2003, S. Miekka et al. noted radiation inactivation of prions in a particular application to purify human albumin, shown by the physical denaturation of the infectious protein (PrP). The aim of our study was to determine the inactivation of prions with a scrapie model (strain C506M3) by irradiating standardised preparations. Results: Gamma irradiation was partially effective, showing a 4-5 log reduction on exposure to 50 kGy. A characteristic effect-dose curve was not observed (25, 50 and 100 kGy), only an increase in the incubation period of the murine disease (229 days with 25 kGy to 290 days with 100 kGy) compared with 170 days without irradiation. Since the inactivation was not a total one, the observed effect is significant. It is proposed that further work be undertaken with the model to investigate the application of gamma radiation known levels of prion contamination.

  18. Inactivation of Escherichia coli by citral.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somolinos, M; García, D; Condón, S; Mackey, B; Pagán, R

    2010-06-01

    The aim was to evaluate (i) the resistance of Escherichia coli BJ4 to citral in a buffer system as a function of citral concentration, treatment medium pH, storage time and initial inoculum size, (ii) the role of the sigma factor RpoS on citral resistance of E. coli, (iii) the role of the cell envelope damage in the mechanism of microbial inactivation by citral and (iiii) possible synergistic effects of mild heat treatment and pulsed electric fields (PEF) treatment combined with citral. The initial inoculum size greatly affected the efficacy of citral against E. coli cells. Exposure to 200 microl l(-1) of citral at pH 4.0 for 24 h at 20 degrees C caused the inactivation of more than 5 log(10) cycles of cells starting at an inoculum size of 10(6) or 10(7) CFU ml(-1), whereas increasing the cell concentration to 10(9) CFU ml(-1) caused citral at pH 4.0 than pH 7.0. The rpoS null mutant strain E. coli BJ4L1 was less resistant to citral than the wild-type strain. Occurrence of sublethal injury to both the cytoplasmic and outer membranes was demonstrated by adding sodium chloride or bile salts to the recovery media. The majority of sublethally injured cells by citral required energy and lipid synthesis for repair. A strongly synergistic lethal effect was shown by mild heat treatment combined with citral but the presence of citral during the application of a PEF treatment did not show any advantage. This work confirms that cell envelope damage is an important event in citral inactivation of bacteria, and it describes the key factors on the inactivation of E. coli cells by citral. Knowledge about the mechanism of microbial inactivation by citral helps establish successful combined preservation treatments.

  19. Effects of Bacterial Inactivation Methods on Downstream Proteomic Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Andy; Merkley, Eric D.; Clowers, Brian H.; Hutchison, Janine R.; Kreuzer, Helen W.

    2015-05-01

    Inactivation of pathogenic microbial samples is often necessary for the protection of researchers and to comply with local and federal regulations. By its nature, biological inactivation causes changes to microbial samples, potentially affecting observed experimental results. While inactivation induced damage to materials such as DNA has been evaluated, the effect of various inactivation strategies on proteomic data, to our knowledge, has not been discussed. To this end, we inactivated samples of Yersinia pestis and Escherichia coli by autoclave, ethanol, or irradiation treatment to determine how inactivation changes liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry data quality as well as apparent protein content of cells. Proteomic datasets obtained from aliquots of samples inactivated by different methods were highly similar, with Pearson correlation coefficients ranging from 0.822 to 0.985 and 0.816 to 0.985 for E. coli and Y. pestis, respectively, suggesting that inactivation had only slight impacts on the set of proteins identified. In addition, spectral quality metrics such as distributions of various database search algorithm scores remained constant across inactivation methods, indicating that inactivation does not appreciably degrade spectral quality. Though overall changes resulting from inactivation were small, there were detectable trends. For example, one-sided Fischer exact tests determined that periplasmic proteins decrease in observed abundance after sample inactivation by autoclaving (α = 1.71x10-2 for E. coli, α = 4.97x10-4 for Y. pestis) and irradiation (α = 9.43x10-7 for E. coli, α = 1.21x10-5 for Y. pestis) when compared to controls that were not inactivated. Based on our data, if sample inactivation is necessary, we recommend inactivation with ethanol treatment with secondary preference given to irradiation.

  20. Ontogenic Changes and Differential Localization of T-type Ca2+ Channel Subunits Cav3.1 and Cav3.2 in Mouse Hippocampus and Cerebellum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguado, Carolina; García-Madrona, Sebastián; Gil-Minguez, Mercedes; Luján, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    T-type calcium (Ca2+) channels play a central role in regulating membrane excitability in the brain. Although the contributions of T-type current to neuron output is often proposed to reflect a differential distribution of T-type channel subtypes to somato-dendritic compartments, their precise subcellular distributions in central neurons are not fully determined. Using histoblot and high-resolution immunoelectron microscopic techniques, we have investigated the expression, regional distribution and subcellular localization of T-type Cav3.1 and Cav3.2 channel subunits in the adult brain, as well as the ontogeny of expression during postnatal development. Histoblot analysis showed that Cav3.1 and Cav3.2 proteins were widely expressed in the brain, with mostly non-overlapping patterns. Cav3.1 showed the highest expression level in the molecular layer (ml) of the cerebellum (Cb), and Cav3.2 in the hippocampus (Hp) and the ml of Cb. During development, levels of Cav3.1 and Cav3.2 increased with age, although there were marked region- and developmental stage-specific differences in their expression. At the cellular and subcellular level, immunoelectron microscopy showed that labeling for Cav3.1 was present in somato-dendritic domains of hippocampal interneurons and Purkinje cells (PCs), while Cav3.2 was present in somato-dendritic domains of CA1 pyramidal cells, hippocampal interneurons and PCs. Most of the immunoparticles for Cav3.1 and Cav3.2 were either associated with the plasma membrane or the intracellular membranes, with notable differences depending on the compartment. Thus, Cav3.1 was mainly located in the plasma membrane of interneurons, whereas Cav3.2 was mainly located in the plasma membrane of dendritic spines and had a major intracellular distribution in dendritic shafts. In PCs, Cav3.1 and Cav3.2 showed similar distribution patterns. In addition to its main postsynaptic distribution, Cav3.2 but not Cav3.1 was also detected in axon terminals establishing

  1. Inactivation of a Norovirus by High-Pressure Processing▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingsley, David H.; Holliman, Daniel R.; Calci, Kevin R.; Chen, Haiqiang; Flick, George J.

    2007-01-01

    Murine norovirus (strain MNV-1), a propagable norovirus, was evaluated for susceptibility to high-pressure processing. Experiments with virus stocks in Dulbecco's modified Eagle medium demonstrated that at room temperature (20°C) the virus was inactivated over a pressure range of 350 to 450 MPa, with a 5-min, 450-MPa treatment being sufficient to inactivate 6.85 log10 PFU of MNV-1. The inactivation of MNV-1 was enhanced when pressure was applied at an initial temperature of 5°C; a 5-min pressure treatment of 350 MPa at 30°C inactivated 1.15 log10 PFU of virus, while the same treatment at 5°C resulted in a reduction of 5.56 log10 PFU. Evaluation of virus inactivation as a function of treatment times ranging from 0 to 150 s and 0 to 900 s at 5°C and 20°C, respectively, indicated that a decreasing rate of inactivation with time was consistent with Weibull or log-logistic inactivation kinetics. The inactivation of MNV-1 directly within oyster tissues was demonstrated; a 5-min, 400-MPa treatment at 5°C was sufficient to inactivate 4.05 log10 PFU. This work is the first demonstration that norovirus can be inactivated by high pressure and suggests good prospects for inactivation of nonpropagable human norovirus strains in foods. PMID:17142353

  2. Diagnosis method of an open-switch fault for a grid-connected T-type three-level inverter system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Choi, U. M.; Lee, K. B.; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposes a diagnosis method of an open-switch fault and fault-tolerant control algorithm for a grid-connected T-type three-level inverter. The location of the faulty switch is identified by using the changes of average phase current and the neutral-point voltage. The fault-tolerant con......This paper proposes a diagnosis method of an open-switch fault and fault-tolerant control algorithm for a grid-connected T-type three-level inverter. The location of the faulty switch is identified by using the changes of average phase current and the neutral-point voltage. The fault...... is cost-effective and industrial interesting. The simulation results confirm the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed fault-diagnosis and tolerant methods....

  3. CACNA1H missense mutations associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis alter Cav3.2 T-type calcium channel activity and reticular thalamic neuron firing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rzhepetskyy, Yuriy; Lazniewska, Joanna; Blesneac, Iulia; Pamphlett, Roger; Weiss, Norbert

    2016-11-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that affects nerve cells in the brain and the spinal cord. In a recent study by Steinberg and colleagues, 2 recessive missense mutations were identified in the Cav3.2 T-type calcium channel gene (CACNA1H), in a family with an affected proband (early onset, long duration ALS) and 2 unaffected parents. We have introduced and functionally characterized these mutations using transiently expressed human Cav3.2 channels in tsA-201 cells. Both of these mutations produced mild but significant changes on T-type channel activity that are consistent with a loss of channel function. Computer modeling in thalamic reticular neurons suggested that these mutations result in decreased neuronal excitability of thalamic structures. Taken together, these findings implicate CACNA1H as a susceptibility gene in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

  4. A Ca(v)3.2/Stac1 molecular complex controls T-type channel expression at the plasma membrane

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rzhepetskyy, Yuriy; Lazniewska, Joanna; Proft, Juliane; Campiglio, M.; Flucher, B. E.; Weiss, Norbert

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 5 (2016), s. 346-354 ISSN 1933-6950 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-13556S; GA MŠk 7AMB15FR015 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : Ca(v)3 * 2 channel * Stac adaptor protein * trafficking * T-type calcium channel Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 2.042, year: 2016

  5. Redox-Dependent Modulation of T-Type Ca2+ Channels in Sensory Neurons Contributes to Acute Anti-Nociceptive Effect of Substance P

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Dongyang; Huang, Sha; Gao, Haixia; Liu, Yani; Qi, Jinlong; Chen, Pingping; Wang, Caixue; Scragg, Jason L.; Vakurov, Alexander; Peers, Chris; Du, Xiaona

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Neuropeptide substance P (SP) is produced and released by a subset of peripheral sensory neurons that respond to tissue damage (nociceptors). SP exerts excitatory effects in the central nervous system, but peripheral SP actions are still poorly understood; therefore, here, we aimed at investigating these peripheral mechanisms. Results: SP acutely inhibited T-type voltage-gated Ca2+ channels in nociceptors. The effect was mediated by neurokinin 1 (NK1) receptor-induced stimulation of intracellular release of reactive oxygen species (ROS), as it can be prevented or reversed by the reducing agent dithiothreitol and mimicked by exogenous or endogenous ROS. This redox-mediated T-type Ca2+ channel inhibition operated through the modulation of CaV3.2 channel sensitivity to ambient zinc, as it can be prevented or reversed by zinc chelation and mimicked by exogenous zinc. Elimination of the zinc-binding site in CaV3.2 rendered the channel insensitive to SP-mediated inhibition. Importantly, peripherally applied SP significantly reduced bradykinin-induced nociception in rats in vivo; knock-down of CaV3.2 significantly reduced this anti-nociceptive effect. This atypical signaling cascade shared the initial steps with the SP-mediated augmentation of M-type K+ channels described earlier. Innovation: Our study established a mechanism underlying the peripheral anti-nociceptive effect of SP whereby this neuropeptide produces ROS-dependent inhibition of pro-algesic T-type Ca2+ current and concurrent enhancement of anti-algesic M-type K+ current. These findings will lead to a better understanding of mechanisms of endogenous analgesia. Conclusion: SP modulates T-type channel activity in nociceptors by a redox-dependent tuning of channel sensitivity to zinc; this novel modulatory pathway contributes to the peripheral anti-nociceptive effect of SP. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 25, 233–251. PMID:27306612

  6. Microdamage induced calcium efflux from bone matrix activates intracellular calcium signaling in osteoblasts via L-type and T-type voltage-gated calcium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Hyungjin; Best, Makenzie; Akkus, Ozan

    2015-07-01

    Mechanisms by which bone microdamage triggers repair response are not completely understood. It has been shown that calcium efflux ([Ca(2+)]E) occurs from regions of bone undergoing microdamage. Such efflux has also been shown to trigger intracellular calcium signaling ([Ca(2+)]I) in MC3T3-E1 cells local to damaged regions. Voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) are implicated in the entry of [Ca(2+)]E to the cytoplasm. We investigated the involvement of VGCC in the extracellular calcium induced intracellular calcium response (ECIICR). MC3T3-E1 cells were subjected to one dimensional calcium efflux from their basal aspect which results in an increase in [Ca(2+)]I. This increase was concomitant with membrane depolarization and it was significantly reduced in the presence of Bepridil, a non-selective VGCC inhibitor. To identify specific type(s) of VGCC in ECIICR, the cells were treated with selective inhibitors for different types of VGCC. Significant changes in the peak intensity and the number of [Ca(2+)]I oscillations were observed when L-type and T-type specific VGCC inhibitors (Verapamil and NNC55-0396, respectively) were used. So as to confirm the involvement of L- and T-type VGCC in the context of microdamage, cells were seeded on devitalized notched bone specimen, which were loaded to induce microdamage in the presence and absence of Verapamil and NNC55-0396. The results showed significant decrease in [Ca(2+)]I activity of cells in the microdamaged regions of bone when L- and T-type blockers were applied. This study demonstrated that extracellular calcium increase in association with damage depolarizes the cell membrane and the calcium ions enter the cell cytoplasm by L- and T-type VGCCs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Redox-Dependent Modulation of T-Type Ca(2+) Channels in Sensory Neurons Contributes to Acute Anti-Nociceptive Effect of Substance P.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Dongyang; Huang, Sha; Gao, Haixia; Liu, Yani; Qi, Jinlong; Chen, Pingping; Wang, Caixue; Scragg, Jason L; Vakurov, Alexander; Peers, Chris; Du, Xiaona; Zhang, Hailin; Gamper, Nikita

    2016-08-10

    Neuropeptide substance P (SP) is produced and released by a subset of peripheral sensory neurons that respond to tissue damage (nociceptors). SP exerts excitatory effects in the central nervous system, but peripheral SP actions are still poorly understood; therefore, here, we aimed at investigating these peripheral mechanisms. SP acutely inhibited T-type voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels in nociceptors. The effect was mediated by neurokinin 1 (NK1) receptor-induced stimulation of intracellular release of reactive oxygen species (ROS), as it can be prevented or reversed by the reducing agent dithiothreitol and mimicked by exogenous or endogenous ROS. This redox-mediated T-type Ca(2+) channel inhibition operated through the modulation of CaV3.2 channel sensitivity to ambient zinc, as it can be prevented or reversed by zinc chelation and mimicked by exogenous zinc. Elimination of the zinc-binding site in CaV3.2 rendered the channel insensitive to SP-mediated inhibition. Importantly, peripherally applied SP significantly reduced bradykinin-induced nociception in rats in vivo; knock-down of CaV3.2 significantly reduced this anti-nociceptive effect. This atypical signaling cascade shared the initial steps with the SP-mediated augmentation of M-type K(+) channels described earlier. Our study established a mechanism underlying the peripheral anti-nociceptive effect of SP whereby this neuropeptide produces ROS-dependent inhibition of pro-algesic T-type Ca(2+) current and concurrent enhancement of anti-algesic M-type K(+) current. These findings will lead to a better understanding of mechanisms of endogenous analgesia. SP modulates T-type channel activity in nociceptors by a redox-dependent tuning of channel sensitivity to zinc; this novel modulatory pathway contributes to the peripheral anti-nociceptive effect of SP. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 25, 233-251.

  8. Congenital heart block maternal sera autoantibodies target an extracellular epitope on the α1G T-type calcium channel in human fetal hearts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linn S Strandberg

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Congenital heart block (CHB is a transplacentally acquired autoimmune disease associated with anti-Ro/SSA and anti-La/SSB maternal autoantibodies and is characterized primarily by atrioventricular (AV block of the fetal heart. This study aims to investigate whether the T-type calcium channel subunit α1G may be a fetal target of maternal sera autoantibodies in CHB. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We demonstrate differential mRNA expression of the T-type calcium channel CACNA1G (α1G gene in the AV junction of human fetal hearts compared to the apex (18-22.6 weeks gestation. Using human fetal hearts (20-22 wks gestation, our immunoprecipitation (IP, Western blot analysis and immunofluorescence (IF staining results, taken together, demonstrate accessibility of the α1G epitope on the surfaces of cardiomyocytes as well as reactivity of maternal serum from CHB affected pregnancies to the α1G protein. By ELISA we demonstrated maternal sera reactivity to α1G was significantly higher in CHB maternal sera compared to controls, and reactivity was epitope mapped to a peptide designated as p305 (corresponding to aa305-319 of the extracellular loop linking transmembrane segments S5-S6 in α1G repeat I. Maternal sera from CHB affected pregnancies also reacted more weakly to the homologous region (7/15 amino acids conserved of the α1H channel. Electrophysiology experiments with single-cell patch-clamp also demonstrated effects of CHB maternal sera on T-type current in mouse sinoatrial node (SAN cells. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Taken together, these results indicate that CHB maternal sera antibodies readily target an extracellular epitope of α1G T-type calcium channels in human fetal cardiomyocytes. CHB maternal sera also show reactivity for α1H suggesting that autoantibodies can target multiple fetal targets.

  9. Cathepsin D inactivates cysteine proteinase inhibitors, cystatins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenarcic, B; Kos, J; Dolenc, I; Lucovnik, P; Krizaj, I; Turk, V

    1988-07-29

    The formation of inactive complexes in excess molar amounts of human cathepsins H and L with their protein inhibitors human stefin A, human stefin B and chicken cystatin at pH 5.6 has been shown by measurement of enzyme activity coupled with reverse-phase HPLC not to involve covalent cleavage of the inhibitors. Inhibition must be the direct result of binding. On the contrary the interaction of cystatins with aspartic proteinase cathepsin D at pH 3.5 for 60 min followed by HPLC resulted in their inactivation accompanied by peptide bond cleavage at several sites, preferentially those involving hydrophobic amino acid residues. The released peptides do not inhibit papain and cathepsin L. These results explain reported elevated levels of cysteine proteinases and lead to the proposal that cathepsin D exerts an important function, through inactivation of cystatins, in the increased activities of cysteine proteinases in human diseases including muscular distrophy.

  10. Female meiotic sex chromosome inactivation in chicken.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sam Schoenmakers

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available During meiotic prophase in male mammals, the heterologous X and Y chromosomes remain largely unsynapsed, and meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI leads to formation of the transcriptionally silenced XY body. In birds, the heterogametic sex is female, carrying Z and W chromosomes (ZW, whereas males have the homogametic ZZ constitution. During chicken oogenesis, the heterologous ZW pair reaches a state of complete heterologous synapsis, and this might enable maintenance of transcription of Z- and W chromosomal genes during meiotic prophase. Herein, we show that the ZW pair is transiently silenced, from early pachytene to early diplotene using immunocytochemistry and gene expression analyses. We propose that ZW inactivation is most likely achieved via spreading of heterochromatin from the W on the Z chromosome. Also, persistent meiotic DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs may contribute to silencing of Z. Surprisingly, gammaH2AX, a marker of DSBs, and also the earliest histone modification that is associated with XY body formation in mammalian and marsupial spermatocytes, does not cover the ZW during the synapsed stage. However, when the ZW pair starts to desynapse, a second wave of gammaH2AX accumulates on the unsynapsed regions of Z, which also show a reappearance of the DSB repair protein RAD51. This indicates that repair of meiotic DSBs on the heterologous part of Z is postponed until late pachytene/diplotene, possibly to avoid recombination with regions on the heterologously synapsed W chromosome. Two days after entering diplotene, the Z looses gammaH2AX and shows reactivation. This is the first report of meiotic sex chromosome inactivation in a species with female heterogamety, providing evidence that this mechanism is not specific to spermatogenesis. It also indicates the presence of an evolutionary force that drives meiotic sex chromosome inactivation independent of the final achievement of synapsis.

  11. Chlorine Inactivation of Spores of Encephalitozoon spp.

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, C. H.; Marshall, M. M.; DeMaria, L. A.; Moffet, J. M.; Korich, D. G.

    2003-01-01

    This report is an extension of a preliminary investigation on the use of chlorine to inactivate spores of Encephalitozoon intestinalis and to investigate the effect of chlorine on two other species, E cuniculi and E. hellem, associated with human infection. The 50% tissue culture infective doses of these three species were also determined. On the basis of the results obtained, it appears that chlorination of water is an effective means of controlling spores of these organisms in the aquatic e...

  12. Optimization of Resin Infusion Processing for Composite Pipe Key-Part and K/T Type Joints Using Vacuum-Assisted Resin Transfer Molding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Changchun; Bai, Guanghui; Yue, Guangquan; Wang, Zhuxi; Li, Jin; Zhang, Boming

    2016-10-01

    In present study, the optimization injection processes for manufacturing the composite pipe key-part and K/T type joints in vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) were determined by estimating the filling time and flow front shape of four kinds of injection methods. Validity of the determined process was proved with the results of a scaling-down composite pipe key-part containing of the carbon fiber four axial fabrics and a steel core with a complex surface. In addition, an expanded-size composite pipe part was also produced to further estimate the effective of the determined injection process. Moreover, the resin injection method for producing the K/T type joints via VARTM was also optimized with the simulation method, and then manufactured on a special integrated mould by the determined injection process. The flow front pattern and filling time of the experiments show good agreement with that from simulation. Cross-section images of the cured composite pipe and K/T type joints parts prove the validity of the optimized injection process, which verify the efficiency of simulation method in obtaining a suitable injection process of VARTM.

  13. Molecular pharmacology of human Cav3.2 T-type Ca2+ channels: block by antihypertensives, antiarrhythmics, and their analogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Reyes, Edward; Van Deusen, Amy L; Vitko, Iuliia

    2009-02-01

    Antihypertensive drugs of the "calcium channel blocker" or "calcium antagonist" class have been used to establish the physiological role of L-type Ca(2+) channels in vascular smooth muscle. In contrast, there has been limited progress on the pharmacology T-type Ca(2+) channels. T-type channels play a role in cardiac pacemaking, aldosterone secretion, and renal hemodynamics, leading to the hypothesis that mixed T- and L-type blockers may have therapeutic advantages over selective L-type blockers. The goal of this study was to identify compounds that block the Ca(v)3.2 T-type channel with high affinity, focusing on two classes of compounds: phenylalkylamines (e.g., mibefradil) and dihydropyridines (e.g., efonidipine). Compounds were tested using a validated Ca(2+) influx assay into a cell line expressing recombinant Ca(v)3.2 channels. This study identified four clinically approved antihypertensive drugs (efonidipine, felodipine, isradipine, and nitrendipine) as potent T-channel blockers (IC(50) drugs block a substantial fraction of T-current at therapeutically relevant concentrations, contributing to their mechanism of action.

  14. Ghrelin inhibits proliferation and increases T-type Ca{sup 2+} channel expression in PC-3 human prostate carcinoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz-Lezama, Nundehui; Hernandez-Elvira, Mariana [Laboratory of Neuroendocrinology, Institute of Physiology, Autonomous University of Puebla (BUAP), Puebla (Mexico); Sandoval, Alejandro [School of Medicine FES Iztacala, National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM), Tlalnepantla (Mexico); Monroy, Alma; Felix, Ricardo [Department of Cell Biology, Center for Research and Advanced Studies of the National Polytechnic Institute (Cinvestav-IPN), Mexico City (Mexico); Monjaraz, Eduardo, E-mail: emguzman@siu.buap.mx [Laboratory of Neuroendocrinology, Institute of Physiology, Autonomous University of Puebla (BUAP), Puebla (Mexico)

    2010-12-03

    Research highlights: {yields} Ghrelin decreases prostate carcinoma PC-3 cells proliferation. {yields} Ghrelin favors apoptosis in PC-3 cells. {yields} Ghrelin increase in intracellular free Ca{sup 2+} levels in PC-3 cells. {yields} Grelin up-regulates expression of T-type Ca{sup 2+} channels in PC-3 cells. {yields} PC-3 cells express T-channels of the Ca{sub V}3.1 and Ca{sub V}3.2 subtype. -- Abstract: Ghrelin is a multifunctional peptide hormone with roles in growth hormone release, food intake and cell proliferation. With ghrelin now recognized as important in neoplastic processes, the aim of this report is to present findings from a series of in vitro studies evaluating the cellular mechanisms involved in ghrelin regulation of proliferation in the PC-3 human prostate carcinoma cells. The results showed that ghrelin significantly decreased proliferation and induced apoptosis. Consistent with a role in apoptosis, an increase in intracellular free Ca{sup 2+} levels was observed in the ghrelin-treated cells, which was accompanied by up-regulated expression of T-type voltage-gated Ca{sup 2+} channels. Interestingly, T-channel antagonists were able to prevent the effects of ghrelin on cell proliferation. These results suggest that ghrelin inhibits proliferation and may promote apoptosis by regulating T-type Ca{sup 2+} channel expression.

  15. Hyaluronan decreases surfactant inactivation in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Karen W; Goerke, Jon; Clements, John A; Taeusch, H William

    2005-02-01

    Hyaluronan (HA) is an anionic polymer and a constituent of alveolar fluid that can bind proteins, phospholipids, and water. Previous studies have established that nonionic polymers improve the surface activity of pulmonary surfactants by decreasing inactivation of surfactant. In this work, we investigate whether HA can also have beneficial effects when added to surfactants. We used a modified pulsating bubble surfactometer to measure mixtures of several commercially available pulmonary surfactants or native calf surfactant with and without serum inactivation. Surface properties such as equilibrium surface tension, minimum and maximum surface tensions on compression and expansion of a surface film, and degree of surface area reduction required to reach a surface tension of 10 mN/m were measured. In the presence of serum, addition of HA dramatically improved the surface activities of all four surfactants and in some cases in the absence of serum as well. These results indicate that HA reduces inactivation of surfactants caused by serum and add evidence that endogenous HAs may interact with alveolar surfactant under normal and abnormal conditions.

  16. Antithrombin inactivation by neutrophil elastase requires heparin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, R E; Nelson, R M; Kilpatrick, J; Newgren, J O; Esmon, P C; Fournel, M A

    1989-09-11

    In certain thrombotic states, large declines in the levels of functional circulating antithrombin occur, which may reflect the highly active nature of the endothelial surface in suppressing excessive amounts of activated coagulation enzymes. Alternatively, we have recently observed an unexpected and paradoxical in vitro functioning of heparin that could result in the inactivation of antithrombin in pathologic conditions. Specifically, antithrombin was rendered nonfunctional as an inhibitor of clotting enzymes as a result of a limited, heparin-dependent cleavage by neutrophil elastase. This inactivation occurred only in the presence of the active anticoagulant heparin fraction, which suggested that the heparin-antithrombin complex was the substrate for elastase attack. Interestingly, neutrophil elastase was found to bind tightly to heparin and heparin-like materials. Neutrophil elastase has been previously linked to nonspecific proteinolysis occurring in inflammatory thrombotic reactions. This affinity of both antithrombin and elastase for heparin suggests a novel mechanism of potential specificity. An important component of this hypothesis is the localization of the elastase/antithrombin reaction away from the high circulating levels of elastase inhibitors. The proposed inactivation of antithrombin on the vascular surface would likely occur only in pathologic states associated with neutrophil sequestration and activation. Nevertheless, this mechanism could lead to a localized reversal of the nonthrombogenic nature of the endothelium and potentially lead to significant reductions of functional antithrombin in certain disease states.

  17. Quantitative reverse transcription PCR to determine the inactivation of Human Rotavirus by chlorine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Bin; Li, Chenyu; Zhang, Bin; Zhao, Tianyu; Shen, Zhiqiang; Qiu, Zhigang; Jin, Min; Wang, Jingfeng; Li, Junwen

    2017-06-01

    Human rotaviruses (HRVs) are the major cause of acute diarrhea in infants and young children. Here, a real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction assay targeting the rotaviral VP4 gene (VP4-RT-qPCR) was established to evaluate the inactivation of HRV upon chlorine disinfection, based on a previous report that damage to the 1227-2354bp region of the VP4 gene was associated with eliminated HRV infectivity by chlorine. In this study, inactivation of HRV by 0.6mg/L free chlorine was assessed in phosphate buffered saline (PBS; pH 7.2), and tap and river water samples, using both TCID50 and RT-qPCR (VP2- and VP4-RT-qPCR) assays, respectively. Among the samples tested, the VP2-RT-qPCR method did not show significant inactivation after chlorine disinfection; however, the reduction in VP4-RT-qPCR signal was correlated with decreased HRV infectivity. Moreover, the higher sensitivity of the VP4-RT-qPCR assay allowed for assessment of chlorine HRV inactivation at longer exposure times compared with the conventional TCID50 assay. Collectively, these results indicated that the VP4-RT-qPCR assay is a rapid, sensitive, and reliable tool to detect infectious HRV following chlorine inactivation, and highlights the potential for further development of qPCR/RT-qPCR assays to provide information regarding viral infectivity from drinking water plants. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  18. Inactivation of the AIDS-causing retrovirus and other human viruses in antihemophilic plasma protein preparations by pasteurization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilfenhaus, J; Herrmann, A; Mauler, R; Prince, A M

    1986-01-01

    Heat treatment at 60 degrees C for 10 h in solution (pasteurization) was introduced into the manufacturing process of antihemophilic cryoprecipitate (AHC) and factor VIII concentrates (F VIII) to reduce the risk of transmission of hepatitis to hemophiliacs. Since the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) may also be transmitted to hemophiliacs by antihemophilic plasma protein preparations, we have investigated inactivation of the AIDS virus HTLV III by pasteurization in AHC or F VIII and included in this study cytomegalovirus (CMV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), herpes simplex virus (HSV), poliovirus and vaccinia virus. Each of these viruses was efficiently inactivated by pasteurization although considerable differences were observed between the different viruses HTLV III was rapidly inactivated, becoming nondetectable within 30-60 min. Our findings indicate that pasteurized AHC or F VIII should have a high margin of safety regarding the transmission of AIDS or any other infectious disease caused by viruses such as those tested.

  19. Rapid Prototyping

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    Javelin, a Lone Peak Engineering Inc. Company has introduced the SteamRoller(TM) System as a commercial product. The system was designed by Javelin during a Phase II NASA funded small commercial product. The purpose of the invention was to allow automated-feed of flexible ceramic tapes to the Laminated Object Manufacturing rapid prototyping equipment. The ceramic material that Javelin was working with during the Phase II project is silicon nitride. This engineered ceramic material is of interest for space-based component.

  20. Inactivation of Mechanically Activated Piezo1 Ion Channels Is Determined by the C-Terminal Extracellular Domain and the Inner Pore Helix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Wu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Piezo proteins form mechanically activated ion channels that are responsible for our sense of light touch, proprioception, and vascular blood flow. Upon activation by mechanical stimuli, Piezo channels rapidly inactivate in a voltage-dependent manner through an unknown mechanism. Inactivation of Piezo channels is physiologically important, as it modulates overall mechanical sensitivity, gives rise to frequency filtering of repetitive mechanical stimuli, and is itself the target of numerous human disease-related channelopathies that are not well understood mechanistically. Here, we identify the globular C-terminal extracellular domain as a structure that is sufficient to confer the time course of inactivation and a single positively charged lysine residue at the adjacent inner pore helix as being required for its voltage dependence. Our results are consistent with a mechanism for inactivation that is mediated through voltage-dependent conformations of the inner pore helix and allosteric coupling with the C-terminal extracellular domain.

  1. Inactivation and removal of Zika virus during manufacture of plasma-derived medicinal products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blümel, Johannes; Musso, Didier; Teitz, Sebastian; Miyabayashi, Tomoyuki; Boller, Klaus; Schnierle, Barbara S; Baylis, Sally A

    2017-03-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an emerging mosquito-borne Flavivirus of major public health concern. The potential for ZIKV transmission by blood transfusion has been demonstrated; however, inactivation or removal of ZIKV during the manufacture of plasma-derived medicinal products has not been specifically investigated. Inactivation of ZIKV by pasteurization and solvent/detergent (S/D) treatment was investigated by spiking high-titer ZIKV stocks into human serum albumin and applying either heat or adding different mixtures of S/D reagents and assaying for infectious virus particles. Removal of ZIKV was evaluated using filters of differing pore sizes (75, 40, 35, and 19 nm), assaying for infectious virus and RNA. Electron microscopy was performed to determine the size of ZIKV particles. Neutralization of virus infectivity by immunoglobulins was investigated. ZIKV was effectively and rapidly inactivated by liquid heat treatment as well as by various mixtures of S/D reagents with reduction factors more than 4 log, in each case. Effective reduction of ZIKV infectivity was demonstrated for virus filtration for filters with average pore sizes of not more than 40 nm, although a significant proportion of virus RNA was detected in the 40- to 35-nm filtrates likely due to the presence of subviral particles observed by electron microscopy. None of the immunoglobulin preparations investigated neutralized ZIKV infectivity. Pasteurization and S/D treatment very rapidly inactivated ZIKV and filters with a pore size of not more than 40 nm removed all infectious ZIKV, demonstrating the effectiveness of these virus reduction strategies used during the manufacture of plasma-derived medicinal products. © 2016 The Authors Transfusion published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of AABB.

  2. Chlorine inactivation of Tubifex tubifex in drinking water and the synergistic effect of sequential inactivation with UV irradiation and chlorine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Xiao-Bao; Li, Zhi-Hong; Long, Yuan-Nan; He, Pan-Pan; Xu, Chao

    2017-06-01

    The inactivation of Tubifex tubifex is important to prevent contamination of drinking water. Chlorine is a widely-used disinfectant and the key factor in the inactivation of T. tubifex. This study investigated the inactivation kinetics of chlorine on T. tubifex and the synergistic effect of the sequential use of chlorine and UV irradiation. The experimental results indicated that the Ct (concentration × timereaction) concept could be used to evaluate the inactivation kinetics of T. tubifex with chlorine, thus allowing for the use of a simpler Ct approach for the assessment of T. tubifex chlorine inactivation requirements. The inactivation kinetics of T. tubifex by chlorine was found to be well-fitted to a delayed pseudo first-order Chick-Watson expression. Sequential experiments revealed that UV irradiation and chlorine worked synergistically to effectively inactivate T. tubifex as a result of the decreased activation energy, Ea, induced by primary UV irradiation. Furthermore, the inactivation effectiveness of T. tubifex by chlorine was found to be affected by several drinking water quality parameters including pH, turbidity, and chemical oxygen demand with potassium permanganate (CODMn) concentration. High pH exhibited pronounced inactivation effectiveness and the decrease in turbidity and CODMn concentrations contributed to the inactivation of T. tubifex. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. X Inactivation and Progenitor Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruben Agrelo

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In mammals, silencing of one of the two X chromosomes is necessary to achieve dosage compensation. The 17 kb non-coding RNA called Xist triggers X inactivation. Gene silencing by Xist can only be achieved in certain contexts such as in cells of the early embryo and in certain hematopoietic progenitors where silencing factors are present. Moreover, these epigenetic contexts are maintained in cancer progenitors in which SATB1 has been identified as a factor related to Xist-mediated chromosome silencing.

  4. Modeling the pressure inactivation dynamics of Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamamoto K.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli, as a model microorganism, was treated in phosphate-buffered saline under high hydrostatic pressure between 100 and 300 MPa, and the inactivation dynamics was investigated from the viewpoint of predictive microbiology. Inactivation data were curve fitted by typical predictive models: logistic, Gompertz and Weibull functions. Weibull function described the inactivation curve the best. Two parameters of Weibull function were calculated for each holding pressure and their dependence on holding pressure was obtained by interpolation. With the interpolated parameters, inactivation curves were simulated and compared with the experimental data sets.

  5. Distinct roles of L- and T-type voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels in regulation of lymphatic vessel contractile activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Stewart; Roizes, Simon; von der Weid, Pierre-Yves

    2014-12-15

    Lymph drainage maintains tissue fluid homeostasis and facilitates immune response. It is promoted by phasic contractions of collecting lymphatic vessels through which lymph is propelled back into the blood circulation. This rhythmic contractile activity (i.e. lymphatic pumping) increases in rate with increase in luminal pressure and relies on activation of nifedipine-sensitive voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels (VDCCs). Despite their importance, these channels have not been characterized in lymphatic vessels. We used pressure- and wire-myography as well as intracellular microelectrode electrophysiology to characterize the pharmacological and electrophysiological properties of L-type and T-type VDCCs in rat mesenteric lymphatic vessels and evaluated their particular role in the regulation of lymphatic pumping by stretch. We complemented our study with PCR and confocal immunofluorescence imaging to investigate the expression and localization of these channels in lymphatic vessels. Our data suggest a delineating role of VDCCs in stretch-induced lymphatic vessel contractions, as the stretch-induced increase in force of lymphatic vessel contractions was significantly attenuated in the presence of L-type VDCC blockers nifedipine and diltiazem, while the stretch-induced increase in contraction frequency was significantly decreased by the T-type VDCC blockers mibefradil and nickel. The latter effect was correlated with a hyperpolarization. We propose that activation of T-type VDCCs depolarizes membrane potential, regulating the frequency of lymphatic contractions via opening of L-type VDCCs, which drive the strength of contractions. © 2014 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2014 The Physiological Society.

  6. Cav3.1 T-type calcium channel modulates the epileptogenicity of hippocampal seizures in the kainic acid-induced temporal lobe epilepsy model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chong-Hyun

    2015-10-05

    The molecular mechanism of temporal lobe epilepsy has not been clearly identified. T-type calcium channels play a role in burst firing in neurons and have been implicated in several seizure models. In this study, the role of Cav3.1 T-type (α1G) calcium channel has been investigated in the kainic acid (KA)-induced temporal lobe epilepsy model (TLE) by using conventional α1G knock-out (ko) mice. After intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration or intrahippocampal injection of KA, depth hippocampal and cortical electroencephalogram (EEG) and behavioral monitoring were recorded, and timm and Nissl staining of brain sections were made later. Seizure was mainly identified by EEG signals, rather than behaviorally, with analytic criteria. During the acute status epilepticus (SE) period, both the duration and the frequency of hippocampal seizures were significantly reduced and increased, respectively, in αlG ko mice compared to those of wild type mice. Epileptogenicity, the total period of seizures (hr(-1)), was also significantly reduced in α1G ko mice. However, the latency of seizure occurrence was not significantly different between wild type and ko mice. These differential effects were not observed in cortical seizures. Furthermore, the injection of KA caused a strong increase in δ rhythm power spectrum density (PSD) of EEG in αlG ko mice compared to that in wild type mice. The results with conventional ko mice indicate that α1G T-type calcium channel plays a modulatory role in the duration and frequency of hippocampal seizures as well as the epileptogenicity of KA-induced TLE in mice, mostly during acute periods. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Inactivation of virus in solution by cold atmospheric pressure plasma: identification of chemical inactivation pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboubakr, Hamada A.; Gangal, Urvashi; Youssef, Mohammed M.; Goyal, Sagar M.; Bruggeman, Peter J.

    2016-05-01

    Cold atmospheric pressure plasma (CAP) inactivates bacteria and virus through in situ production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS). While the bactericidal and virucidal efficiency of plasmas is well established, there is limited knowledge about the chemistry leading to the pathogen inactivation. This article describes a chemical analysis of the CAP reactive chemistry involved in the inactivation of feline calicivirus. We used a remote radio frequency CAP produced in varying gas mixtures leading to different plasma-induced chemistries. A study of the effects of selected scavengers complemented with positive control measurements of relevant RONS reveal two distinctive pathways based on singlet oxygen and peroxynitrous acid. The first mechanism is favored in the presence of oxygen and the second in the presence of air when a significant pH reduction is induced in the solution by the plasma. Additionally, smaller effects of the H2O2, O3 and \\text{NO}2- produced were also found. Identification of singlet oxygen-mediated 2-imidazolone/2-oxo-His (His  +14 Da)—an oxidative modification of His 262 comprising the capsid protein of feline calicivirus links the plasma induced singlet oxygen chemistry to viral inactivation.

  8. The Role of L- and T-Type Calcium Channels in Local and Remote Calcium Responses in Rat Mesenteric Terminal Arterioles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Braunstein, Thomas Hartig; Inoue, Ryuji; Cribbs, Leanne

    2009-01-01

    with micro-ejection of depolarizing KCl solution and VDCC blockers, and immunohistochemical and RT-PCR techniques were applied to isolated rat mesenteric terminal arterioles (n = 71 from 47 rats; intraluminal diameter: 24 +/- 1 mum; length: 550-700 mum). Results: Local application of KCl (at 0 mum) led...... on the arterioles (at 200-300 mum) using micro-application of VDCC blockers. Conclusion: Both L- and T-type channels mediate Ca(2+) entry during conducted vasoconstriction to local KCl in mesenteric arterioles. However, these channels do not participate in the conduction process per se....

  9. A Blocker of N- and T-type Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels Attenuates Ethanol-Induced Intoxication, Place Preference, Self-Administration, and Reinstatement

    OpenAIRE

    Newton, Philip M.; Zeng, Lily; Wang, Victoria; Connolly, Jacklyn; Wallace, Melisa Joellan; Kim, Chanki; Shin, Hee-sup; Belardetti, Francesco; Snutch, Terrance P; Messing, Robert O.

    2008-01-01

    There is a clear need for new therapeutics to treat alcoholism. Here, we test our hypothesis that selective inhibitors of neuronal calcium channels will reduce ethanol consumption and intoxication, based on our previous studies using knock-out mice and cell culture systems. We demonstrate that pretreatment with the novel mixed N-type and T-type calcium channel antagonist 1-(6,6-bis(4-fluorophenyl)hexyl)-4-(3,4,5-trimethoxybenzyl)piperazine (NP078585) reduced ethanol intoxication. NP078585 als...

  10. Numerical and experimental study of the slug-flow regime in a mixture of castor and paraffin oils in a T-type microchannel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minakov, A. V.; Shebeleva, A. A.; Yagodnitsyna, A. A.; Kovalev, A. V.; Bilsky, A. V.

    2017-09-01

    The slow-flug regime in a mixture of castor and paraffin oils in a T-type microchannel with crosssectional dimensions of 200 × 400 μm has been studied by numerical and experimental methods. The domain of existence of the slow-flug regime in this system has been determined. Dependence of the paraffin-oil slug length on the ratio of flow rates of the mixture components is established. Comparison of the calculated and experimental data shows their good agreement.

  11. Photodynamic inactivation of pathogens causing infectious keratitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Carole; Wolf, G.; Walther, M.; Winkler, K.; Finke, M.; Hüttenberger, D.; Bischoff, Markus; Seitz, B.; Cullum, J.; Foth, H.-J.

    2014-03-01

    The increasing prevalence of antibiotic resistance requires new approaches also for the treatment of infectious keratitis. Photodynamic Inactivation (PDI) using the photosensitizer (PS) Chlorin e6 (Ce6) was investigated as an alternative to antibiotic treatment. An in-vitro cornea model was established using porcine eyes. The uptake of Ce6 by bacteria and the diffusion of the PS in the individual layers of corneal tissue were investigated by fluorescence. After removal of the cornea's epithelium Ce6-concentrations keratitis patients were tested in liquid culture against different concentrations of Ce6 (1 - 512 μM) using 10 minutes irradiation (E = 18 J/cm2 ). This demonstrated that a complete inactivation of the pathogen strains were feasible whereby SA was slightly more susceptible than PA. 3909 mutants of the Keio collection of Escherichia coli (E.coli) were screened for potential resistance factors. The sensitive mutants can be grouped into three categories: transport mutants, mutants in lipopolysaccharide synthesis and mutants in the bacterial SOS-response. In conclusion PDI is seen as a promising therapy concept for infectious keratitis.

  12. Efficacy of select disinfectants at inactivating Ranavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, Laura K; Baldwin, Charles A; Gray, Matthew J; Miller, Debra L

    2009-04-06

    Ranavirus can cause disease in reptiles and amphibians. Because survival time outside of a host remains uncertain, equipment must be disinfected to prevent transmission of ranaviruses. However, disinfectant efficacy against amphibian ranaviruses has not been investigated for chlorhexidine (Nolvasan), sodium hypochlorite (bleach), or potassium compounds. Our goal was to determine the efficacy of Nolvasan (0.25, 0.75 and 2.0%), bleach (0.2, 1.0, 3.0 and 5.0%), and Virkon S (1.0%) at inactivating Ranavirus at 1 and 5 min contact durations. Potassium permanganate (KMnO4) (2.0 and 5.0 ppm) was also tested with a 60 min contact time. Nolvasan at 0.75 and 2.0% and bleach at 3.0 and 5.0% concentration were effective for both contact durations. Virkon S was effective for both durations, but KMnO4 was not effective at either concentration. Concentrations of Nolvasan, bleach and Virkon S that are at least 0.75, 3.0 and 1.0%, respectively, are effective at inactivating Ranavirus after 1 min exposure time.

  13. X-changing information on X inactivation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barakat, Tahsin Stefan; Jonkers, Iris; Monkhorst, Kim [Department of Reproduction and Development, Room Ee 09-71, Erasmus MC, PO Box 2040, 3000 CA Rotterdam (Netherlands); Gribnau, Joost, E-mail: j.gribnau@erasmusmc.nl [Department of Reproduction and Development, Room Ee 09-71, Erasmus MC, PO Box 2040, 3000 CA Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2010-03-10

    In female somatic cells of mammalian species one X chromosome is inactivated to ensure dosage equality of X-encoded genes between females and males, during development and adulthood. X chromosome inactivation (XCI) involves various epigenetic mechanisms, including RNA mediated gene silencing in cis, DNA methylation, and changes in chromatin modifications and composition. XCI therefore provides an attractive paradigm to study epigenetic gene regulation in a more general context. The XCI process starts with counting of the number of X chromosomes present in a nucleus, and initiation of XCI follows if this number exceeds one per diploid genome. Recently, X-encoded RNF12 has been identified as a dose-dependent activator of XCI. In addition, other factors, including the pluripotency factors OCT4, SOX2 and Nanog, have been implicated to play a role in suppression of initiation of XCI. In this review, we highlight and explain these new and old findings in the context of a stochastic model for X chromosome counting and XCI initiation.

  14. Structures and Ribosomal Interaction of Ribosome-Inactivating Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Wei-Wei; Mak, Amanda Nga-Sze; Wong, Kam-Bo; Shaw, Pang-Chui

    2016-11-21

    Ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) including ricin, Shiga toxin, and trichosanthin, are RNA N-glycosidases that depurinate a specific adenine residue (A-4324 in rat 28S ribosomal RNA, rRNA) in the conserved α-sarcin/ricin loop (α-SRL) of rRNA. RIPs are grouped into three types according to the number of subunits and the organization of the precursor sequences. RIPs are two-domain proteins, with the active site located in the cleft between the N- and C-terminal domains. It has been found that the basic surface residues of the RIPs promote rapid and specific targeting to the ribosome and a number of RIPs have been shown to interact with the C-terminal regions of the P proteins of the ribosome. At present, the structural basis for the interaction of trichosanthin and ricin-A chain toward P2 peptide is known. This review surveys the structural features of the representative RIPs and discusses how they approach and interact with the ribosome.

  15. Inactivation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa by Chitosan Coated Iron Oxide Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Munmun; De, Sirshendu

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the potent opportunistic pathogens associated with respiratory and urinary tract infection. The bacterium owes its pathogenicity due to the intrinsic resistance to antibiotics and disinfectants. The present study is focused on the synthesis of antibacterial chitosan coated iron oxide nanoparticles for rapid inactivation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We have discussed the relevant patents on synthesis and antibacterial potential of metallic nanoparticles and chitosan. Chitosan coated iron oxide nanoparticles were synthesized by coprecipitation method at room temperature using non-toxic chitosan and iron salts in alkali media. The particles were characterized and evaluated for antibacterial property against Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The average size of the particles was measured as 52 nm. The surface area of the coated particles was as high as 90 ±5 m2/g. FTIR spectra confirmed the coating of chitosan on nanoparticles. The coated particles showed excellent antibacterial activity against the bacteria. The minimum inhibitory concentration of the coated particles was 105)µg mol-1. The morphological alteration and cytoplasmic leakage of bacteria were confirmed by SEM image and release of intracellular constituents, respectively. Higher 260 nm absorbance value confirmed stronger antibacterial activity of the coated nanoparticles as compared to pure chitosan and bare iron oxide nanoparticles. The study indicated that chitosan coated iron oxide nanoparticles have superior antibacterial property as compared to pure chitosan and iron oxide nanoparticles.

  16. Competitive adsorption: a physical model for lung surfactant inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernsler, Jonathan G; Zasadzinski, Joseph A

    2009-07-21

    Charged, surface-active serum proteins can severely reduce or eliminate the adsorption of lung surfactant from the subphase to the alveolar air-liquid interface via a kinetically controlled competitive adsorption process. The decreased surfactant concentration at the interface leads to higher surface tensions during the compression of the interface during breathing. The correspondence between the factors governing colloid stability and competitive adsorption is validated via a new method of measuring surfactant and serum protein adsorption rates to the air-water interface, using quantitative Brewster angle microscopy (BAM). Competitive adsorption from a 10 mg/mL albumin subphase prevents the adsorption of lung surfactant from even high subphase concentrations due to the fast diffusion of the water-soluble proteins to the interface. The formation of an albumin film causes an electrostatic and steric barrier to subsequent surfactant adsorption, which can destroy the necessary properties of functional lung surfactant: low surface tension during compression and rapid respreading after film collapse. Surfactant inactivation is at least partially due to decreased surfactant adsorption; such decreased adsorption due to the presence of serum proteins may play a role in the development and severity of acute respiratory distress syndrome.

  17. Effect of L- type Calcium Channel Blocker Nimodipine and T-type Calcium Channel Blocker Flunarizine on Motor Control in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swapnil Balkrishna Kaikade

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the effect of L-type of Calcium channel blocker nimodipine and T-type of calcium channel blocker funarizine on locomotor activity in mice without pretreatment by any other drug. Materials and method: The study was carried out following permission from the Institutional animal ethics committee. Healthy Swiss albino mice of either sex were selected by the strict inclusion and exclusion criteria and the grouping is done. Group A is control treated with normal saline, Group B and C received two titrated doses of nimodipine while Group D and E received two titrated doses of flunarizine. The animals were then observed for motor control on inclined plane and the Statistical analysis was done by using unpaired‘t’ test. Results: L-type calcium channel blocker nimodipine has dose dependent effect on motor control on inclined plane while the T- type calcium channel blocker flunarizine has no effect on motor control. Conclusion: Nimodipine has significant dose dependent depressant action on motor control on inclined plane while flunarizine has no effect on the above mentioned parameter.

  18. T-type Ca2+channels elicit pro-proliferative and anti-apoptotic responses through impaired PP2A/Akt1 signaling in PASMCs from patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankhe, Safietou; Manousakidi, Sevasti; Antigny, Fabrice; Arthur Ataam, Jennifer; Bentebbal, Sana; Ruchon, Yann; Lecerf, Florence; Sabourin, Jessica; Price, Laura; Fadel, Elie; Dorfmüller, Peter; Eddahibi, Saadia; Humbert, Marc; Perros, Frédéric; Capuano, Véronique

    2017-10-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (iPAH) is characterized by obstructive hyperproliferation and apoptosis resistance of distal pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs). T-type Ca 2+ channel blockers have been shown to reduce experimental pulmonary hypertension, although the impact of T-type channel inhibition remains unexplored in PASMCs from iPAH patients. Here we show that T-type channels Cav3.1 and Cav3.2 are present in the lung and PASMCs from iPAH patients and control subjects. The blockade of T-type channels by the specific blocker, TTA-A2, prevents cell cycle progression and PASMCs growth. In iPAH cells, T-type channel signaling fails to activate phosphatase PP2A, leading to an increase in ERK1/2, P38 activation. Moreover, T-type channel signaling is redirected towards the activation of the kinase Akt1, leading to increased expression of the anti-apoptotic protein survivin, and a decrease in the pro-apoptotic mediator FoxO3A. Finally, in iPAH cells, Akt1 is no longer able to regulate caspase 9 activation, whereas T-type channel overexpression reverses PP2A defect in iPAH cells but reinforces the deleterious effects of Akt1 activation. Altogether, these data highlight T-type channel signaling as a strong trigger of the pathological phenotype of PASMCs from iPAH patients (hyper-proliferation/cells survival and apoptosis resistance), suggesting that both T-type channels and PP2A may be promising therapeutic targets for pulmonary hypertension. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Inactivation of koi-herpesvirus in water using bacteria isolated from carp intestines and carp habitats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, N; Sasaki, R-K; Kasai, H; Yoshimizu, M

    2013-12-01

    Since its first outbreak in Japan in 2003, koi-herpesvirus (KHV) remains a challenge to the carp Cyprinus carpio L. breeding industry. In this study, inactivation of KHV in water from carp habitats (carp habitat water) was investigated with the aim of developing a model for rapidly inactivating the pathogen in aquaculture effluent. Experiments with live fish showed that, in carp habitat water, KHV lost its infectivity within 3 days. Indications were that inactivation of KHV was caused by the antagonistic activity of bacteria (anti-KHV bacteria) in the water from carp habitats. Carp habitat water and the intestinal contents of carp were therefore screened for anti-KHV bacteria. Of 581 bacterial isolates, 23 showed anti-KHV activity. An effluent treatment model for the disinfection of KHV in aquaculture effluent water using anti-KHV bacteria was developed and evaluated. The model showed a decrease in cumulative mortality and in the number of KHV genome copies in kidney tissue of fish injected with treated effluent compared with a positive control. It is thought that anti-KHV bacteria isolated from the intestinal contents of carp and from carp habitat water can be used to control KHV outbreaks. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Inactivation of Cryptosporidium parvum oocyst infectivity by disinfection and sterilization processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbee, S L; Weber, D J; Sobsey, M D; Rutala, W A

    1999-05-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum is a common cause of self-limited gastroenteritis in the normal host but may cause severe disease in immunocompromised persons. Person-to-person transmission has been well documented in households, child care centers, and hospitals. Because contaminated environmental surfaces and medical devices such as endoscopes may play a role in disease transmission, we studied the susceptibility of C parvum to chemical agents commonly used for disinfection and evaluated the efficacy of sterilization processes. Seven disinfectants were studied at their use dilution using a suspension test. Antimicrobial activity was assessed with the use of a cell infectivity assay. All sterilization processes tested (steam, ethylene oxide, Sterrad 100) inactivated 3 logs or greater of C parvum. The only liquid disinfectant/sterilant able to inactivate greater than 3 logs of C parvum was 6% and 7.5% hydrogen peroxide. Agents that did not completely inactivate C parvum included hydrogen peroxide at lower concentrations or exposure times, peracetic acid, sodium hypochlorite, a phenolic, a quaternary ammonium compound, 2% glutaraldehyde, and ortho-phthalaldehyde. Most high-level disinfectants used on endoscopes have limited efficacy against C parvum. However, the infectivity of C parvum on dry surfaces decreases rapidly. Therefore, current cleaning and high-level disinfection guidelines are adequate to prevent nosocomial transmission of C parvum by means of endoscopes.

  1. Comparison of treatments to inactivate viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV-IVb) in frozen baitfish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelps, Nicholas B D; Goodwin, Andrew E; Marecaux, Emily; Goyal, Sagar M

    2013-02-28

    Current US state and federal fish health regulations target the spread of viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus-IVb (VHSV-IVb) through movement restrictions of live fish; however, they largely ignore the potential for the virus to be spread through commercial distribution and use of frozen baitfish from VHSV-IVb-positive regions. Some state laws do require treatment of frozen baitfish to inactivate VHSV, and additional methods have been proposed, but few scientific studies have examined the efficacy of these treatments. In this study, bluegills Lepomis macrochirus were challenged with VHSV-IVb and frozen to represent standard industry methods, disinfected by various treatments, and tested for infectious VHSV-IVb using virus isolation. The virus was isolated from 70% of fish subjected to 3 freeze/thaw cycles. All other treatment methods were effective in inactivating the virus, including treatment with isopropyl alcohol, mineral oil, salt and borax, and dehydration. Dehydration followed by rehydration is rapid and effective, and therefore, seems to be the best option for inactivating VHSV-IVb present in frozen baitfish while maintaining their usefulness as bait.

  2. [Polyphenolic antioxidants efficiently protect urease from inactivation by ultrasonic cavitation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metelitsa, D I; Tarun, E I; Losev, Iu P

    2002-01-01

    Inactivation of urease (25 nM) in aqueous solutions (pH 5.0-6.0) treated with low-frequency ultrasound (LFUS; 27 kHz, 60 Wt/cm2, 36-56 degrees C) or high-frequency ultrasound (HFUS; 2.64 MHz, 1 Wt/cm2, 36 or 56 degrees C) has been characterized quantitatively, using first-order rate constants: kin, aggregate inactivation; kin*, thermal inactivation; and kin* (US), ultrasonic inactivation. Within the range from 1 nM to 10 microM, propyl gallate (PG) decreases approximately threefold the rate of LFUS-induced inactivation of urease (56 degrees C), whereas resorcinol poly-2-disulfide prevents this process at 1 nM or higher concentrations. PG completely inhibits HFUS-induced inactivation of urease at 1 nM (36 degrees C) or 10 nM (56 degrees C). At 0.2-10 microM, human serum albumin (HSA) increases the resistance of urease (at 56 degrees C) treated with HFUS to temperature- and cavitation-induced inactivation. Complexes of gallic acid polydisulfide (GAPDS) with HSA (GAPDS-HSA), formed by conjugation of 1.0 nM PGDS with 0.33 nM HSA, prevent HFUS-induced urease inactivation (56 degrees C).

  3. Scale down of the inactivated polio vaccine production process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thomassen, Y.E.; Oever, van 't R.; Vinke, C.M.; Spiekstra, A.; Wijffels, R.H.; Pol, van der L.A.; Bakker, W.A.M.

    2013-01-01

    The anticipated increase in the demand for inactivated polio vaccines resulting from the success in the polio eradication program requires an increase in production capacity and cost price reduction of the current inactivated polio vaccine production processes. Improvement of existing production

  4. Suicide inactivation of horseradish peroxidase by excess hydrogen ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In reactions carried out in sodium acetate buffer, higher inactivation rates were observed when the buffer ion concentration was increased, an indication that peroxidase might be generating reactive radicals from the buffer molecules. Promethazine exerted a modest protective effect against inactivation; however, higher ...

  5. Effects of electrolytes on virus inactivation by acidic solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishide, Mitsunori; Tsujimoto, Kazuko; Uozaki, Misao; Ikeda, Keiko; Yamasaki, Hisashi; Koyama, A Hajime; Arakawa, Tsutomu

    2011-06-01

    Acidic pH is frequently used to inactivate viruses. We have previously shown that arginine synergizes with low pH in enhancing virus inactivation. Considering a potential application of the acid inactivation of viruses for the prevention and treatment of superficial virus infection at body surfaces and fixtures, herein we have examined the effects of various electrolytes on the acid-induced inactivation of the herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and type 2 (HSV-2), the influenza A virus (IAV) and the poliovirus upon their incubation at 30˚C for 5 min. Eight electrolytes, i.e., phosphate, NaCl, glutamate, aspartate, pyrrolidone carboxylate, citrate, malate and acetate were tested. No detectable inactivation of the poliovirus was observed under the conditions examined, reflecting its acid-resistance. HSV-1 and HSV-2 responded similarly to the acid-treatment and electrolytes. Some electrolytes showed a stronger virus inactivation than others at a given pH and concentration. The effects of the electrolytes were virus-dependent, as IAV responded differently from HSV-1 and HSV-2 to these electrolytes, indicating that certain combinations of the electrolytes and a low pH can exert a more effective virus inactivation than other combinations and that their effects are virus-specific. These results should be useful in designing acidic solvents for the inactivation of viruses at various surfaces.

  6. Ebola Virus Inactivation by Detergents Is Annulled in Serum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Kampen, Jeroen J. A.; Tintu, Andrei; Russcher, Henk; Fraaij, Pieter L. A.; Reusken, Chantal B. E. M.; Rijken, Mikel; van Hellemond, Jaap J.; van Genderen, Perry J. J.; Koelewijn, Rob; de Jong, Menno D.; Haddock, Elaine; Fischer, Robert J.; Munster, Vincent J.; Koopmans, Marion P. G.

    2017-01-01

    Treatment of blood samples from hemorrhagic fever virus (HFV)-infected patients with 0.1% detergents has been recommended for virus inactivation and subsequent safe laboratory testing. However, data on virus inactivation by this procedure are lacking. Here we show the effect of this procedure on

  7. Mycoplasma gallisepticum inactivated by targeting the hydrophobic domain of the membrane preserves surface lipoproteins and induces a strong immune response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hazem Atalla

    Full Text Available An innovative approach for inactivation of Mycoplasma gallisepticum using the hydrophobic photoinduced alkylating probe 1, 5-iodonaphthylazide (INA is described. Treatment of washed M. gallisepticum mid-exponential culture (0.2 mg cell protein /mL with INA followed by irradiation with far-ultraviolet light (310-380 nm completely abolished viability. Transmission electron microscopy showed that the majority of the inactivated M. gallisepticum were comparable in size to intact cells, but that part of the INA-treated M. gallisepticum preparation also contained low density cells and membrane vesicles. Confocal microscopy revealed that untreated M. gallisepticum cells were internalized by chicken red blood cells (c-RBCs, whereas the INA-inactivated cells remained attached to the outer surface of the c-RBCs. INA treatment of M. gallisepticum resulted in a complete inactivation of F0F1 -ATPase and of the L-arginine uptake system, but the cytoplasmatic soluble NADH2 dehydrogenase was only partially affected. Western blot analysis of the lipoprotein fraction showed that the INA-treated M. gallisepticum retained their lipoproteins. Following subcutaneous injection of M. gallisepticum INA-bacterin, 100% and 68.8% of chickens were positive by the rapid serum agglutination test and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay respectively, 2 weeks post-injection. These data suggest that the photoinducible alkylating agent INA inactivates M. gallisepticum but preserves its surface lipoproteins and thus has the potential to be used as a general approach for the inactivation of mycoplasmas for vaccine development.

  8. Chlorophyll mediated photodynamic inactivation of blue laser on Streptococcus mutans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astuti, Suryani Dyah; Zaidan, A.; Setiawati, Ernie Maduratna; Suhariningsih

    2016-03-01

    Photodynamic inactivation is an inactivation method in microbial pathogens that utilize light and photosensitizer. This study was conducted to investigate photodynamic inactivation effects of low intensity laser exposure with various dose energy on Streptococcus mutans bacteria. The photodynamic inactivation was achieved with the addition of chlorophyll as photosensitizers. To determine the survival percentage of Streptococcus mutans bacteria after laser exposure, the total plate count method was used. For this study, the wavelength of the laser is 405 nm and variables of energy doses are 1.44, 2.87, 4.31, 5.74, 7.18, and 8.61 in J/cm2. The results show that exposure to laser with energy dose of 7.18 J/cm2 has the best photodynamic inactivation with a decrease of 78% in Streptococcus

  9. The inactivation of a bovine enterovirus and a bovine parvovirus in cattle manure by anaerobic digestion, heat treatment, gamma irradiation, ensilage and composting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteith, H D; Shannon, E E; Derbyshire, J B

    1986-08-01

    A bovine enterovirus and a bovine parvovirus seeded into liquid cattle manure were rapidly inactivated by anaerobic digestion under thermophilic conditions (55 degrees C), but the same viruses survived for up to 13 and 8 days respectively under mesophilic conditions (35 degrees C). The enterovirus was inactivated in digested liquid manure heated to 70 degrees C for 30 min, but the parvovirus was not inactivated by this treatment. The enterovirus, seeded into single cell protein (the solids recovered by centrifugation of digested liquid manure), was inactivated by a gamma irradiation dose of 1.0 Mrad, but the parvovirus survived this dose. When single cell protein seeded with bovine enterovirus or bovine parvovirus was ensiled with cracked corn, the enterovirus was inactivated after a period of 30 days, while the parvovirus survived for 30 days in one of two experiments. Neither the enterovirus nor the parvovirus survived composting for 28 days in a thermophilic aerobic environment when seeded into the solid fraction of cattle manure. It was concluded that, of the procedures tested, only anaerobic digestion under thermophilic conditions appeared to be reliable method of viral inactivation to ensure the safety of single cell protein for refeeding to livestock. Composting appeared to be a suitable method for the disinfection of manure for use as a soil conditioner.

  10. Inactivation of Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris in orange juice by saponin extracts combined with heat-treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberice, Juliana Vieira; Funes-Huacca, Maribel Elizabeth; Guterres, Sheila Barreto; Carrilho, Emanuel

    2012-10-01

    Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris is a spoilage-causing bacterium in fruit juices. The inactivation of this bacterium by commercial saponin and saponin purified extract from Sapindus saponaria fruits combined with heat-treatment is described. We investigated heat treatment (87, 90, 95, and 99°C) with incubation time ranging from 0 to 50min, in both concentrated and reconstituted juice. Juices were inoculated with 1.0×10(4)CFU/mL of A. acidoterrestris spores for the evaluation of the best temperature for inactivation. For the temperatures of 87, 90, and 95°C counts of cell viability decreased rapidly within the first 10 to 20min of incubation in both concentrated and reconstituted juices; inactivation at 99°C ensued within 1 and 2min. Combination of commercial saponin (100mg/L) with a very short incubation time (1min) at 99°C showed a reduction of 2.34 log cycle for concentrated juice A. acidoterrestris spores (1.0×10(4)CFU/mL) in the first 24h of incubation after treatments. The most efficient treatment was reached with 300, 400 or 500mg/L of purified extract of saponins from S. saponaria after 5days of incubation in concentrated juice, and after 5days with 300 and 400mg/L or 72h with 500mg/L in reconstituted juice. Commercial saponin and purified extracts from S. saponaria had similar inactivation power on A. acidoterrestris spores, without significant differences (P>0.05). Therefore, purified extract of saponins can be an alternative for the control of A. acidoterrestris in fruit juices. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Kinetic modelling of enzyme inactivation : kinetics of heat inactivation of the extracellular proteinase from Pseudomonas fluorescens 22F

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schokker, E.P.

    1997-01-01

    The kinetics of heat inactivation of the extracellular proteinase from Pseudomonas fluorescens 22F was studied. It was established, by making use of kinetic modelling, that heat inactivation in the temperature range 35 - 70 °C was most likely caused

  12. Development of thermostable lyophilized inactivated polio vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraan, Heleen; van Herpen, Paul; Kersten, Gideon; Amorij, Jean-Pierre

    2014-10-01

    The aim of current study was to develop a dried inactivated polio vaccine (IPV) formulation with minimal loss during the drying process and improved stability when compared with the conventional liquid IPV. Extensive excipient screening was combined with the use of a Design of Experiment (DoE) approach in order to achieve optimal results with high probability. Although it was shown earlier that the lyophilization of a trivalent IPV while conserving its antigenicity is challenging, we were able to develop a formulation that showed minimal loss of potency during drying and subsequent storage at higher temperatures. This study showed the potential of a highly stable and safe lyophilized polio vaccine, which might be used in developing countries without the need of a cold-chain.

  13. Inactivation of Coxiella burnetti by gamma irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, G.H.; McCaul, T.F.; Williams, J.C.

    1989-01-01

    The gamma radiation inactivation kinetics for Coxiella burnetii at - 79 C were exponential. The radiation dose needed to reduce the number of infective C. burnetii by 90% varied from 0-64 to 1.2 kGy depending on the phase of hte micro-organism, purity of the culture and composition of suspending menstruum. The viability of preparations containing C. burnetti was completely abolished by 10 kGy without diminishing antigenicity or ability to elicit a protective immune response in vaccinated mice. Immunocytochemical examinations using monoclonal antibodies and electron microscopy demonstrated that radiation doses of 20 kGy did not alter cell-wall morphology or cell-surface antigenic epitopes.

  14. Inactivation of Coxiella burnetii by gamma irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, G.H.; McCaul, T.F. (Army Medical Research Inst. of Infectious Diseases, Fort Detrick, Frederick, MD (USA)); Williams, J.C. (National Inst. of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1989-12-01

    The gamma radiation inactivation kinetics for Coxiella burnetii at - 79{sup 0}C were exponential. The radiation dose needed to reduce the number of infective C. burnetii by 90% varied from 0.64 to 1.2 kGy depending on the phase of the micro-organism, purity of the culture and composition of suspending menstruum. The viability of preparations containing 10{sup 11} C. burnetii ml{sup -1} was completely abolished by 10 kGy without diminishing antigenicity or ability to elicit a protective immune response in vaccinated mice. Immunocytochemical examinations using monoclonal antibodies and electron microscopy demonstrated that radiation doses of 20 kGy did not alter cell-wall morphology or cell-surface antigenic epitopes. (author).

  15. Esterase resistant to inactivation by heavy metals

    KAUST Repository

    El, Dorry Hamza

    2014-09-25

    EstATII is an esterase that a halotolerant, thermophilic and resistant to a spectrum of heavy metals including toxic concentration of metals. It was isolated from the lowest convective layer of the Atlantis II Red Sea brine pool. The Atlantis II brine pool is an extreme environment that possesses multiple harsh conditions such as; high temperature, salinity, pH and high concentration of metals, including toxic heavy metals. A fosmid metagenomic library using DNA isolated from the lowest convective layer this pool was used to identify EstATII. Polynucleotides encoding EstATII and similar esterases are disclosed and can be used to make EstATII. EstATII or compositions or apparatuses that contain it may be used in various processes employing lipases/esterases especially when these processes are performed under harsh conditions that inactivate other kinds of lipases or esterases.

  16. Human male meiotic sex chromosome inactivation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marieke de Vries

    Full Text Available In mammalian male gametogenesis the sex chromosomes are distinctive in both gene activity and epigenetic strategy. At first meiotic prophase the heteromorphic X and Y chromosomes are placed in a separate chromatin domain called the XY body. In this process, X,Y chromatin becomes highly phosphorylated at S139 of H2AX leading to the repression of gonosomal genes, a process known as meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI, which has been studied best in mice. Post-meiotically this repression is largely maintained. Disturbance of MSCI in mice leads to harmful X,Y gene expression, eventuating in spermatocyte death and sperm heterogeneity. Sperm heterogeneity is a characteristic of the human male. For this reason we were interested in the efficiency of MSCI in human primary spermatocytes. We investigated MSCI in pachytene spermatocytes of seven probands: four infertile men and three fertile controls, using direct and indirect in situ methods. A considerable degree of variation in the degree of MSCI was detected, both between and within probands. Moreover, in post-meiotic stages this variation was observed as well, indicating survival of spermatocytes with incompletely inactivated sex chromosomes. Furthermore, we investigated the presence of H3K9me3 posttranslational modifications on the X and Y chromatin. Contrary to constitutive centromeric heterochromatin, this heterochromatin marker did not specifically accumulate on the XY body, with the exception of the heterochromatic part of the Y chromosome. This may reflect the lower degree of MSCI in man compared to mouse. These results point at relaxation of MSCI, which can be explained by genetic changes in sex chromosome composition during evolution and candidates as a mechanism behind human sperm heterogeneity.

  17. X chromosome inactivation in women with alcoholism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzardo, Ann M; Henkhaus, Rebecca; Hidaka, Brandon; Penick, Elizabeth C; Poje, Albert B; Butler, Merlin G

    2012-08-01

    All female mammals with 2 X chromosomes balance gene expression with males having only 1 X by inactivating one of their X chromosomes (X chromosome inactivation [XCI]). Analysis of XCI in females offers the opportunity to investigate both X-linked genetic factors and early embryonic development that may contribute to alcoholism. Increases in the prevalence of skewing of XCI in women with alcoholism could implicate biological risk factors. The pattern of XCI was examined in DNA isolated in blood from 44 adult women meeting DSM-IV criteria for an alcohol use disorder and 45 control women with no known history of alcohol abuse or dependence. XCI status was determined by analyzing digested and undigested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products of the polymorphic androgen receptor (AR) gene located on the X chromosome. Subjects were categorized into 3 groups based upon the degree of XCI skewness: random (50:50 to 64:36%), moderately skewed (65:35 to 80:20%), and highly skewed (>80:20%). XCI status from informative women with alcoholism was found to be random in 59% (n = 26), moderately skewed in 27% (n = 12), or highly skewed in 14% (n = 6). Control subjects showed 60, 29, and 11%, respectively. The distribution of skewed XCI observed among women with alcoholism did not differ statistically from that of control subjects (χ(2) test = 0.14, 2 df, p = 0.93). Our data did not support an increase in XCI skewness among women with alcoholism or implicate early developmental events associated with embryonic cell loss or unequal (nonrandom) expression of X-linked gene(s) or defects in alcoholism among women. Copyright © 2012 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.

  18. Z944, a Novel Selective T-Type Calcium Channel Antagonist Delays the Progression of Seizures in the Amygdala Kindling Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Miguel Casillas-Espinosa

    Full Text Available Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE is the most common form of drug resistant epilepsy. Current treatment is symptomatic, suppressing seizures, but has no disease modifying effect on epileptogenesis. We examined the effects of Z944, a potent T-type calcium channel antagonist, as an anti-seizure agent and against the progression of kindling in the amygdala kindling model of TLE. The anti-seizure efficacy of Z944 (5mg/kg, 10mg/kg, 30mg/kg and 100mg/kg was assessed in fully kindled rats (5 class V seizures as compared to vehicle, ethosuximide (ETX, 100mg/kg and carbamazepine (30mg/kg. Each animal received the seven treatments in a randomised manner. Seizure class and duration elicited by six post-drug stimulations was determined. To investigate for effects in delaying the progression of kindling, naive animals received Z944 (30mg/kg, ETX (100mg/kg or vehicle 30-minutes prior to each kindling stimulation up to a maximum of 30 stimulations, with seizure class and duration recorded after each stimulation. At the completion of drug treatment, CaV3.1, CaV3.2 and CaV3.3 mRNA expression levels were assessed in the hippocampus and amygdala using qPCR. Z944 was not effective at suppressing seizures in fully kindled rats compared to vehicle. Animals receiving Z944 required significantly more stimulations to evoke a class III (p<0.05, IV (p<0.01 or V (p<0.0001 seizure, and to reach a fully kindled state (p<0.01, than animals receiving vehicle. There was no significant difference in the mRNA expression of the T-type Ca2+ channels in the hippocampus or amygdala. Our results show that selectively targeting T-type Ca2+ channels with Z944 inhibits the progression of amygdala kindling. This could be a potential for a new therapeutic intervention to mitigate the development and progression of epilepsy.

  19. ICA-105574 interacts with a common binding site to elicit opposite effects on inactivation gating of EAG and ERG potassium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Vivek; Stary-Weinzinger, Anna; Sanguinetti, Michael C

    2013-04-01

    Rapid and voltage-dependent inactivation greatly attenuates outward currents in ether-a-go-go-related gene (ERG) K(+) channels. In contrast, inactivation of related ether-a-go-go (EAG) K(+) channels is very slow and minimally reduces outward currents. ICA-105574 (ICA, or 3-nitro-N-[4-phenoxyphenyl]-benzamide) has opposite effects on inactivation of these two channel types. Although ICA greatly attenuates ERG inactivation by shifting its voltage dependence to more positive potentials, it enhances the rate and extent of EAG inactivation without altering its voltage dependence. Here, we investigate whether the inverse functional response to ICA in EAG and ERG channels is related to differences in ICA binding site or to intrinsic mechanisms of inactivation. Molecular modeling coupled with site-directed mutagenesis suggests that ICA binds in a channel-specific orientation to a hydrophobic pocket bounded by the S5/pore helix/S6 of one subunit and S6 of an adjacent subunit. ICA is a mixed agonist of mutant EAG and EAG/ERG chimera channels that inactivate by a combination of slow and fast mechanisms. With the exception of three residues, the specific amino acids that form the putative binding pocket for ICA in ERG are conserved in EAG. Mutations introduced into EAG to replicate the ICA binding site in ERG did not alter the functional response to ICA. Together these findings suggest that ICA binds to the same site in EAG and ERG channels to elicit opposite functional effects. The resultant agonist or antagonist activity is determined solely by channel-specific differences in the mechanisms of inactivation gating.

  20. A blocker of N- and T-type voltage-gated calcium channels attenuates ethanol-induced intoxication, place preference, self-administration, and reinstatement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Philip M; Zeng, Lily; Wang, Victoria; Connolly, Jacklyn; Wallace, Melisa J; Kim, Chanki; Shin, Hee-Sup; Belardetti, Francesco; Snutch, Terrance P; Messing, Robert O

    2008-11-05

    There is a clear need for new therapeutics to treat alcoholism. Here, we test our hypothesis that selective inhibitors of neuronal calcium channels will reduce ethanol consumption and intoxication, based on our previous studies using knock-out mice and cell culture systems. We demonstrate that pretreatment with the novel mixed N-type and T-type calcium channel antagonist 1-(6,6-bis(4-fluorophenyl)hexyl)-4-(3,4,5-trimethoxybenzyl)piperazine (NP078585) reduced ethanol intoxication. NP078585 also attenuated the reinforcing and rewarding properties of ethanol, measured by operant self-administration and the expression of an ethanol conditioned place preference, and abolished stress-induced reinstatement of ethanol seeking. NP078585 did not affect alcohol responses in mice lacking N-type calcium channels. These results suggest that selective calcium channel inhibitors may be useful in reducing acute ethanol intoxication and alcohol consumption by human alcoholics.

  1. Role of the T-type calcium channel CaV3.2 in the chronotropic action of corticosteroids in isolated rat ventricular myocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maturana, Andrés; Lenglet, Sébastien; Python, Magaly; Kuroda, Shun'ichi; Rossier, Michel F

    2009-08-01

    The mineralocorticoid receptor is involved in the development of several cardiac dysfunctions, including lethal ventricular arrhythmias associated with heart failure or hyperaldosteronism, but the molecular mechanisms responsible for these effects remain to be clarified. Reexpression of low voltage-activated T-type calcium channels in ventricular myocytes together with other fetal genes during cardiac pathologies could confer automaticity to these cells and would represent a pro-arrhythmogenic condition if occurring in vivo. In the present study, we demonstrated that in isolated neonatal rat ventricular myocytes, corticosteroids selectively induced the expression of a particular isoform of T channel, Ca(V)3.2/alpha1H. This response was accompanied by an increase of the Ca(V)3.2 T-type current, identified with the patch clamp technique by its sensitivity to nickel, and a concomitant acceleration of the myocyte spontaneous contractions. Silencing Ca(V)3.2 expression markedly reduced the chronotropic response to steroids. Moreover, modulation of the frequency of cell contractions by different redox agents was independent of channel expression but involved a direct regulation of channel activity. Although oxidants increased both Ca(V)3.2 current amplitude and beating frequency, they decreased L-type channel activity. Reducing agents had the opposite effect on these parameters. In conclusion, the acceleration of ventricular myocyte spontaneous contractions induced by corticosteroids in vitro appears dependent on the expression of the Ca(V)3.2 T channel isoform and modulated by the redox potential of the cells. These results provide a molecular model that could explain the high incidence of arrhythmias observed in patients upon combination of inappropriate activation of the mineralocorticoid receptor and oxidative stress.

  2. Increased density and coverage uniformity of viruses on a sensor surface by using U-type, T-type, and W-type microfluidic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chia-Che; Tseng, Ping-Kuo; Tsai, Ching-Hsiu; Liu, Yao-Lung

    2012-01-01

    Microorganisms, molecules, or viruses in the fluidic environment are usually at considerably low Reynolds numbers because of small diameters. The viscous forces of molecules and viruses dominate at considerably low Reynolds numbers. This study developed three microfluidic devices, that is, T type, U type, and W type devices, to control the flow movement, which can increase the adhesion density of viruses on the surface of the sensor. The linker 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid (11-MUA) and Turnip yellow mosaic virus (TYMV) were used in this study and measured by a confocal microscope. Fluorescent intensity and coverage of 11-MUA and TYMV were used to identify the adhesion density quantitatively. Results indicate that 11-MUA layers and TYMV disperse randomly by the dipping method. Attachment tests for T-, U-, and W-type devices demonstrated average fluorescence intensities of 1.56, 2.18, and 2.67, respectively, and average fluorescence coverage of 1.31, 1.87, and 2.55 times those of dipping techniques, respectively. The T-type device produced the lowest fluorescence coverage uniformity (10%–80%), whereas the W-type device produced the highest fluorescence coverage uniformity (80%–90%). Fluorescence intensity correlates positively with flow within a specified flow range; however, the exact relationship between fluorescence intensity and flow requires further study. Attachment tests for TYMV virus samples indicated that the W-type device produced an average fluorescence intensity of 3.59 and average fluorescence coverage of 19.13 times greater than those achieved through dipping techniques. Traditional immersion methods achieved fluorescence coverage of 0%–10%, whereas that of the W-type device reached 70%–90%. PMID:22712035

  3. Virus-specific thermostability and heat inactivation profiles of alphaviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, So Lee; Huang, Yan-Jang S; Hsu, Wei-Wen; Hettenbach, Susan M; Higgs, Stephen; Vanlandingham, Dana L

    2016-08-01

    Serological diagnosis is a critical component for disease surveillance and is important to address the increase in incidence and disease burden of alphaviruses, such as the chikungunya (CHIKV) and Ross River (RRV) viruses. The gold standard for serological diagnosis is the plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT), which demonstrates the neutralizing capacity of serum samples after the removal of complement activity and adventitious viruses. This procedure is normally performed following inactivation of the virus at 56°C for 30min. Although this protocol has been widely accepted for the inactivation of envelope RNA viruses, recent studies have demonstrated that prolonged heat inactivation is required to completely inactivate two alphaviruses, Western equine encephalitis virus and CHIKV. Incomplete inactivation of viruses poses a laboratory biosafety risk and can also lead to spurious test results. Despite its importance in ensuring the safety of laboratory personnel as well as test integrity, systematic investigation on the thermostability of alphaviruses has not been performed. In this study, the temperature tolerance and heat inactivation profiles of RRV, Barmah Forest, and o'nyong-nyong viruses were determined. Variations in thermostability were observed within the Semliki forest serocomplex. Therefore, evidence-based heat inactivation procedures for alphaviruses are recommended. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Relative Inactivation by Staphylococcus aureus of Eight Cephalosporin Antibiotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Ignatius W.; Engelking, Elin R.; Kirby, William M. M.

    1976-01-01

    These studies extend the recent observation that cefazolin is inactivated to a greater extent than cephaloridine by some strains of penicillinase-producing Staphylococcus aureus, whereas cephalothin undergoes little if any inactivation. In Mueller-Hinton broth (inoculum, 3 × 106) 100 recently isolated strains had minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) ≤ 2 μg/ml for cephalothin and cephaloridine, whereas in Trypticase soy broth (TSB) 50% had MICs > 2 μg/ml and 10% (designated “resistant” strains) were >8 μg/ml for cephaloridine but remained ≤2 μg/ml for cephalothin. A large inoculum (3 × 107) of strains with high MICs in TSB almost completely inactivated 50 μg of cefazolin per ml in 6 h, with progressively less inactivation, in the following order, of cephaloridine, cephalexin, cephradine, cephapirin, and cefamandole; cefoxitin and cephalothin underwent little if any inactivation. The greater inactivation in TSB than in Mueller-Hinton broth appeared to be due to a greater production of β-lactamases by each colony-forming unit, since the inoculum size in the two broths was not significantly different. In contrast, “susceptible” strains (MICs ≤ 2 μg/ml in both broths) inactivated cephaloridine more than cefazolin, and equal amounts of powdered bacterial extracts confirmed the fact that qualitatively different β-lactamases were produced by the susceptible and resistant strains. Disk diffusion tests were unreliable in separating the two groups of staphylococci. The clinical significance of inactivation by strains with high MICs is not known but, unless susceptibility can be clearly established, cephalothin appears preferable for severe staphylococcal infections, since it undergoes little if any inactivation by any strains of staphylococci. PMID:938023

  5. Thermoradiation inactivation of naturally occurring organisms in soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, M. C.; Lindell, K. F.; David, T. J.

    1973-01-01

    Samples of soil collected from Kennedy Space Center near spacecraft assembly facilities were found to contain microorganisms very resistant to conventional sterilization techniques. The inactivation behavior of the naturally occurring spores in soil was investigated using dry heat and ionizing radiation, first separately, then in combination. Dry heat inactivation rates of spores were determined for 105 and 125 C. Radiation inactivation rates were determined for dose rates of 660 and 76 krad/hr at 25 C. Simultaneous combinations of heat and radiation were then investigated at 105, 110, 115, 120, and 125 C. Combined treatment was found to be highly synergistic requiring greatly reduced radiation doses to accomplish sterilization.

  6. Photodynamic inactivation of microorganisms sensitized by cationic BODIPY derivatives potentiated by potassium iodide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynoso, Eugenia; Quiroga, Ezequiel D; Agazzi, Maximiliano L; Ballatore, María B; Bertolotti, Sonia G; Durantini, Edgardo N

    2017-10-11

    The photodynamic inactivation mediated by 1,3,5,7-tetramethyl-8-[4-(N,N,N-trimethylamino)phenyl]-4,4-difluoro-4-bora-3a,4a-diaza-s-indacene 3 and 8-[4-(3-(N,N,N-trimethylamino)propoxy)phenyl]-4,4-difluoro-4-bora-3a,4a-diaza-s-indacene 4 was investigated on Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Candida albicans. In vitro experiments indicated that BODIPYs 3 and 4 were rapidly bound to microbial cells at short incubation periods. Also, fluorescence microscopy images showed green emission of BODIPYs bound to microbial cells. Photosensitized inactivation improved with an increase of the irradiation time. Similar photoinactivation activities were found for both BODIPYs in bacteria. The photoinactivation induced by these BODIPYs was effective for both bacteria. However, the Gram-positive bacterium was inactivated sooner and with a lower concentration of a photosensitizer than the Gram-negative bacterium. After 15 min irradiation, the complete eradication of S. aureus was obtained with 1 μM photosensitizer. A reduction of 4.5 log in the E. coli viability was found when using 5 μM photosensitizer and 30 min irradiation. Also, the last conditions produced a decrease of 4.5 log in C. albicans cells treated with BODIPY 3, while 4 was poorly effective. On the other hand, the effect of the addition of KI on photoinactivation at different irradiation periods and salt concentrations was investigated. A smaller effect was observed in S. aureus because the photosensitizers alone were already very effective. In E. coli, photokilling potentiation was mainly found at longer irradiation periods. Moreover, the photoinactivation of C. albicans mediated by these BODIPYs was increased in the presence of KI. In solution, an increase in the formation of the BODIPY triplet states was observed with the addition of the salt, due to the effect of external heavy atoms. The greater intersystem crossing together with the formation of reactive iodine species induced by BODIPYs may be

  7. Aβ seeds resist inactivation by formaldehyde.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritschi, Sarah K; Cintron, Amarallys; Ye, Lan; Mahler, Jasmin; Bühler, Anika; Baumann, Frank; Neumann, Manuela; Nilsson, K Peter R; Hammarström, Per; Walker, Lary C; Jucker, Mathias

    2014-10-01

    Cerebral β-amyloidosis can be exogenously induced by the intracerebral injection of brain extracts containing aggregated β-amyloid (Aβ) into young, pre-depositing Aβ precursor protein- (APP) transgenic mice. Previous work has shown that the induction involves a prion-like seeding mechanism in which the seeding agent is aggregated Aβ itself. Here we report that the β-amyloid-inducing activity of Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain tissue or aged APP-transgenic mouse brain tissue is preserved, albeit with reduced efficacy, after formaldehyde fixation. Moreover, spectral analysis with amyloid conformation-sensitive luminescent conjugated oligothiophene dyes reveals that the strain-like properties of aggregated Aβ are maintained in fixed tissues. The resistance of Aβ seeds to inactivation and structural modification by formaldehyde underscores their remarkable durability, which in turn may contribute to their persistence and spread within the body. The present findings can be exploited to establish the relationship between the molecular structure of Aβ aggregates and the variable clinical features and disease progression of AD even in archived, formalin-fixed autopsy material.

  8. Inactivation of RNA viruses by gamma irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nonomiya, Takashi; Morimoto, Akinori; Iwatsuki, Kazuo; Tsutsumi, Takamasa (Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and fisheries, Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan). Animal Quarantine Service); Ito, Hitoshi; Yamashiro, Tomio; Ishigaki, Isao

    1992-09-01

    Four kinds of RNA viruses, Bluetongue virus (BT), Bovine Virus Diarrhea-Mucosal Disease virus (BVD[center dot]MD), Bovine Respiratory Syncytial virus (RS), Vesicular Stmatitis virus (VS), were subjected to various doses of gamma irradiation to determine the lethal doses. The D[sub 10] values, which are the dose necessary to decimally reduce infectivity, ranged from 1.5 to 3.4 kGy under frozen condition at dry-ice temperature, and they increased to 2.6 to 5.0 kGy under frozen condition at dry-ice temperature. Serum neutralzing antibody titer of Infectious Bovine Rhinotracheitis (IBR) was not adversely changed by the exposure to 36 kGy of gamma-rays under frozen condition. Analysis of electrophoresis patterns of the bovine serum also reveales that the serum proteins were not remarkably affected, even when exposed to 36 kGy of gamma radiation under frozen condition. The results suggested that gamma irradiation under frozen condition is an effective means for inactivating both DNA and RNA viruses without adversely affecting serum proteins and neutralizing antibody titer. (author).

  9. CHLORINE INACTIVATION OF CATEGORY "A" BIO-TERRORISM AGENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    This poster presents information on the inactivation of select bioterrorist agents. Information will be presented on chlorine disinfection of vegetative cells of Brucella suis, Brucella melitensis, Burkholderia mallei, Burkholderia pseudomallei, Francisella tularensis and endos...

  10. Use of genetic algorithms for high hydrostatic pressure inactivation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-10-24

    ) for high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) inactivation of Bacillus cereus spores, Bacillus subtilis spores and cells,. Staphylococcus aureus and Listeria monocytogenes, all in milk buffer, were used to demonstrate the utility of ...

  11. Inactivation Strategies for Clostridium perfringens Spores and Vegetative Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talukdar, Prabhat K; Udompijitkul, Pathima; Hossain, Ashfaque; Sarker, Mahfuzur R

    2017-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens is an important pathogen to human and animals and causes a wide array of diseases, including histotoxic and gastrointestinal illnesses. C. perfringens spores are crucial in terms of the pathogenicity of this bacterium because they can survive in a dormant state in the environment and return to being live bacteria when they come in contact with nutrients in food or the human body. Although the strategies to inactivate C. perfringens vegetative cells are effective, the inactivation of C. perfringens spores is still a great challenge. A number of studies have been conducted in the past decade or so toward developing efficient inactivation strategies for C. perfringens spores and vegetative cells, which include physical approaches and the use of chemical preservatives and naturally derived antimicrobial agents. In this review, different inactivation strategies applied to control C. perfringens cells and spores are summarized, and the potential limitations and challenges of these strategies are discussed. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Microbiology.

  12. Inactivation of rabies diagnostic reagents by gamma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gamble, W.C.; Chappell, W.A.; George, E.H.

    1980-11-01

    Treatment of CVS-11 rabies adsorbing suspensions and street rabies infected mouse brains with gamma radiation resulted in inactivated reagents that are safer to distribute and use. These irradiated reagents were as sensitive and reactive as the nonirradiated control reagents.

  13. Biocontrol interventions for inactivation of foodborne pathogens on produce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post-harvest interventions for control of foodborne pathogens on minimally processed foods are crucial for food safety. Biocontrol interventions have the primary objective of developing novel antagonists in combinations with physical and chemical interventions to inactivate pathogenic microbes. Ther...

  14. Enzyme inactivation kinetics: Coupled effects of temperature and moisture content

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perdana, J.A.; Fox, M.B.; Schutyser, M.A.I.; Boom, R.M.

    2012-01-01

    Enzymes are often dried for stability reasons and to facilitate handling. However, they are often susceptible to inactivation during drying. It is generally known that temperature and moisturecontent influence the enzymeinactivation kinetics. However, the coupledeffect of both variables on

  15. Enterococcus faecalis and pathogenic streptococci inactivate daptomycin by releasing phospholipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledger, Elizabeth V K; Pader, Vera; Edwards, Andrew M

    2017-10-01

    Daptomycin is a lipopeptide antibiotic with activity against Gram-positive bacteria. We showed previously that Staphylococcus aureus can survive daptomycin exposure by releasing membrane phospholipids that inactivate the antibiotic. To determine whether other pathogens possess this defence mechanism, phospholipid release and daptomycin activity were measured after incubation of Staphylococcus epidermidis, group A or B streptococci, Streptococcus gordonii or Enterococcus faecalis with the antibiotic. All bacteria released phospholipids in response to daptomycin, which resulted in at least partial inactivation of the antibiotic. However, E. faecalis showed the highest levels of lipid release and daptomycin inactivation. As shown previously for S. aureus, phospholipid release by E. faecalis was inhibited by the lipid biosynthesis inhibitor platensimycin. In conclusion, several pathogenic Gram-positive bacteria, including E. faecalis, inactivate daptomycin by releasing phospholipids, which may contribute to the failure of daptomycin to resolve infections caused by these pathogens.

  16. Evaluation of the Efficacy of Inactivated Oil-Emulsion Newcastle ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evaluation of the Efficacy of Inactivated Oil-Emulsion Newcastle Disease Komarov Vaccine against Clinical Disease, Lesions and Immune Response, Following Challenge with Velogenic Newcastle Disease Virus in Laying Chickens.

  17. 21 CFR 610.11a - Inactivated influenza vaccine, general safety test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Inactivated influenza vaccine, general safety test... Inactivated influenza vaccine, general safety test. For inactivated influenza vaccine, the general safety test... subcutaneous or intraperitoneal injection of 5.0 milliliters of inactivated influenza vaccine into each guinea...

  18. Shaker IR T449 mutants separate C- from U-type inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamieson, Quentin; Jones, Stephen W

    2014-04-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that slow inactivation of the Shaker potassium channel can be made ~100-fold faster or slower by point mutations at a site in the outer pore (T449). However, the discovery that two forms of slow inactivation coexist in Shaker raises the question of which inactivation process is affected by mutation. Equivalent mutations in K(V)2.1, a channel exhibiting only U-type inactivation, have minimal effects on inactivation, suggesting that mutation of Shaker T449 acts on C-type inactivation alone, a widely held yet untested hypothesis. This study reexamines mutations at Shaker T449, confirming that T449A speeds inactivation and T449Y/V slow it. T449Y and T449V exhibit U-type inactivation that is enhanced by high extracellular potassium, in contrast to C-type inactivation in T449A which is inhibited by high potassium. Automated parameter estimation for a 12-state Markov model suggests that U-type inactivation occurs mainly from closed states upon weak depolarization, but primarily from the open state at positive voltages. The model also suggests that WT channels, which in this study exhibit mostly C-type inactivation, recover from inactivation through closed-inactivated states, producing voltage-dependent recovery. This suggests that both C-type and U-type inactivation involve both open-inactivated and closed-inactivated states.

  19. Non-thermal plasma for inactivated-vaccine preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guomin; Zhu, Ruihao; Yang, Licong; Wang, Kaile; Zhang, Qian; Su, Xia; Yang, Bing; Zhang, Jue; Fang, Jing

    2016-02-17

    Vaccines are of great importance in controlling the spread of infectious diseases in poultry farming. The safety and efficacy of vaccines are also essential. To explore the feasibility of a novel technology (non-thermal plasma) in inactivated vaccine preparation, an alternating current atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasma (NTP) jet with Ar/O2/N2 as the operating gas was used to inactivate a Newcastle disease virus (NDV, LaSota) strain and H9N2 avian influenza virus (AIV, A/Chicken/Hebei/WD/98) for vaccine preparation. The results showed that complete inactivation could be achieved with 2 min of NTP treatment for both NDV and AIV. Moreover, a proper NTP treatment time is needed for inactivation of a virus without destruction of the antigenic determinants. Compared to traditional formaldehyde-inactivated vaccine, the vaccine made from NDV treated by NTP for 2 min (NTP-2 min-NDV-vaccine) could induce a higher NDV-specific antibody titer in specific pathogen-free (SPF) chickens, and the results of a chicken challenge experiment showed that NTP-2 min-NDV-vaccine could protect SPF chickens from a lethal NDV challenge. Vaccines made from AIV treated by NTP for 2 min (NTP-2 min-AIV-vaccine) also showed a similar AIV-specific antibody titer compared with traditional AIV vaccines prepared using formaldehyde inactivation. Studies of the morphological changes of the virus, chemical analysis of NDV allantoic fluid and optical emission spectrum analysis of NTP suggested that reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species produced by NTP played an important role in the virus inactivation process. All of these results demonstrated that it could be feasible to use non-thermal NTP as an alternative strategy to prepare inactivated vaccines for Newcastle disease and avian influenza. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Stochastic and deterministic model of microbial heat inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corradini, Maria G; Normand, Mark D; Peleg, Micha

    2010-03-01

    Microbial inactivation is described by a model based on the changing survival probabilities of individual cells or spores. It is presented in a stochastic and discrete form for small groups, and as a continuous deterministic model for larger populations. If the underlying mortality probability function remains constant throughout the treatment, the model generates first-order ("log-linear") inactivation kinetics. Otherwise, it produces survival patterns that include Weibullian ("power-law") with upward or downward concavity, tailing with a residual survival level, complete elimination, flat "shoulder" with linear or curvilinear continuation, and sigmoid curves. In both forms, the same algorithm or model equation applies to isothermal and dynamic heat treatments alike. Constructing the model does not require assuming a kinetic order or knowledge of the inactivation mechanism. The general features of its underlying mortality probability function can be deduced from the experimental survival curve's shape. Once identified, the function's coefficients, the survival parameters, can be estimated directly from the experimental survival ratios by regression. The model is testable in principle but matching the estimated mortality or inactivation probabilities with those of the actual cells or spores can be a technical challenge. The model is not intended to replace current models to calculate sterility. Its main value, apart from connecting the various inactivation patterns to underlying probabilities at the cellular level, might be in simulating the irregular survival patterns of small groups of cells and spores. In principle, it can also be used for nonthermal methods of microbial inactivation and their combination with heat.

  1. Pathogen Inactivation Technologies for Cellular Blood Components: an Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlenke, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Summary Nowadays patients receiving blood components are exposed to much less transfusion-transmitted infectious diseases than three decades before when among others HIV was identified as causative agent for the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and the transmission by blood or coagulation factors became evident. Since that time the implementation of measures for risk prevention and safety precaution was socially and politically accepted. Currently emerging pathogens like arboviruses and the well-known bacterial contamination of platelet concentrates still remain major concerns of blood safety with important clinical consequences, but very rarely with fatal outcome for the blood recipient. In contrast to the well-established pathogen inactivation strategies for fresh frozen plasma using the solvent-detergent procedure or methylene blue and visible light, the bench-to-bedside translation of novel pathogen inactivation technologies for cell-containing blood components such as platelets and red blood cells are still underway. This review summarizes the pharmacological/toxicological assessment and the inactivation efficacy against viruses, bacteria, and protozoa of each of the currently available pathogen inactivation technologies and highlights the impact of the results obtained from several randomized clinical trials and hemovigilance data. Until now in some European countries pathogen inactivation technologies are in in routine use for single-donor plasma and platelets. The invention and adaption of pathogen inactivation technologies for red blood cell units and whole blood donations suggest the universal applicability of these technologies and foster a paradigm shift in the manufacturing of safe blood. PMID:25254027

  2. Thermal inactivation kinetics of β-galactosidase during bread baking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lu; Chen, Xiao Dong; Boom, Remko M; Schutyser, Maarten A I

    2017-06-15

    In this study, β-galactosidase was utilized as a model enzyme to investigate the mechanism of enzyme inactivation during bread baking. Thermal inactivation of β-galactosidase was investigated in a wheat flour/water system at varying temperature-moisture content combinations, and in bread during baking at 175 or 205°C. In the wheat flour/water system, the thermostability of β-galactosidase increased with decreased moisture content, and a kinetic model was accurately fitted to the corresponding inactivation data (R 2 =0.99). Interestingly, the residual enzyme activity in the bread crust (about 30%) was hundredfold higher than that in the crumb (about 0.3%) after baking, despite the higher temperature in the crust throughout baking. This result suggested that the reduced moisture content in the crust increased the thermostability of the enzyme. Subsequently, the kinetic model reasonably predicted the enzyme inactivation in the crumb using the same parameters derived from the wheat flour/water system. However, the model predicted a lower residual enzyme activity in the crust compared with the experimental result, which indicated that the structure of the crust may influence the enzyme inactivation mechanism during baking. The results reported can provide a quantitative understanding of the thermal inactivation kinetics of enzyme during baking, which is essential to better retain enzymatic activity in bakery products supplemented with heat-sensitive enzymes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Kinetic analysis of Legionella inactivation using ozone in wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Li, Kunquan; Zhou, Yan; Li, Xuebin; Tao, Tao

    2017-02-01

    Legionella inactivation using ozone was studied in wastewater using kinetic analysis and modeling. The experimental results indicate that the relationship between the ozone concentration, germ concentration, and chemical oxygen demand (COD) can be used to predict variations in germ and COD concentrations. The ozone reaction with COD and inactivation of Legionella occurred simultaneously, but the reaction with COD likely occurred at a higher rate than the inactivation, as COD is more easily oxidized by ozone than Legionella. Higher initial COD concentrations resulted in a lower inactivation rate and higher lnN/N0. Higher temperature led to a higher inactivation efficiency. The relationship of the initial O3 concentration and Legionella inactivation rate was not linear, and thus, the Ct value required for a 99.99% reduction was not constant. The initial O3 concentration was more important than the contact time, and a reduction of the initial O3 concentration could not be compensated by increasing the contact time. The Ct values were compared over a narrow range of initial concentrations; the Ct values could only be contrasted when the initial O3 concentrations were very similar. A higher initial O3 concentration led to a higher inflection point value for the lnN/N0 vs C0t curve. Energy consumption using a plasma corona was lower than when using boron-doped diamond electrodes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Thermal Inactivation of Feline Calicivirus in Pet Food Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, J; Patel, M; Knight, A I; Corley, D; Gibson, G; Schaaf, J; Moulin, J; Zuber, S

    2015-12-01

    Extrusion is the most common manufacturing process used to produce heat-treated dry dog and cat food (pet food) for domestic use and international trade. Due to reoccurring outbreaks of notifiable terrestrial animal diseases and their impact on international trade, experiments were undertaken to demonstrate the effectiveness of heat-treated extruded pet food on virus inactivation. The impact of extrusion processing in a pet food matrix on virus inactivation has not been previously reported and very few inactivation studies have examined the thermal inactivation of viruses in complex food matrices. The feline calicivirus vaccine strain FCV F-9 was used as a surrogate model RNA virus pathogen. Small-scale heat inactivation experiments using animal-derived pet food raw materials showed that a > 4 log10 reduction (log10 R) in infectivity occurred at 70 °C prior to reaching the minimum extrusion manufacturing operating temperature of 100 °C. As anticipated, small-scale pressure studies at extrusion pressure (1.6 MPa) showed no apparent effect on FCV F-9 inactivation. Additionally, FCV F-9 was shown not to survive the acidic conditions used to produce pet food palatants of animal origin that are typically used as a coating after the extrusion process.

  5. High pressure inactivation of Brettanomyces bruxellensis in red wine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wyk, Sanelle; Silva, Filipa V M

    2017-05-01

    Brettanomyces bruxellensis ("Brett") is a major spoilage concern for the wine industry worldwide, leading to undesirable sensory properties. Sulphur dioxide, is currently the preferred method for wine preservation. However, due to its negative effects on consumers, the use of new alternative non-thermal technologies are increasingly being investigated. The aim of this study was to determine and model the effect of high pressure processing (HPP) conditions and yeast strain on the inactivation of "Brett" in Cabernet Sauvignon wine. Processing at 200 MPa for 3 min resulted in 5.8 log reductions. However higher pressure is recommended to achieve high throughput in the wine industry, for example >6.0 log reductions were achieved after 400 MPa for 5 s. The inactivation of B. bruxellensis is pressure and time dependent, with increased treatment time and pressure leading to increased yeast inactivation. It was also found that yeast strain had a significant effect on HPP inactivation, with AWRI 1499 being the most resistant strain. The Weibull model successfully described the HPP "Brett" inactivation. HPP is a viable alternative for the inactivation of B. bruxellensis in wine, with the potential to reduce the industry's reliance on sulphur dioxide. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Viral inactivation in hemotherapy: systematic review on inactivators with action on nucleic acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Marial Sobral

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to conduct a systematic review on the photoinactivators used in hemotherapy, with action on viral genomes. The SciELO, Science Direct, PubMed and Lilacs databases were searched for articles. The inclusion criterion was that these should be articles on inactivators with action on genetic material that had been published between 2000 and 2010. The key words used in identifying such articles were "hemovigilance", "viral inactivation", "photodynamics", "chemoprevention" and "transfusion safety". Twenty-four articles on viral photoinactivation were found with the main photoinactivators covered being: methylene blue, amotosalen HCl, S-303 frangible anchor linker effector (FRALE, riboflavin and inactin. The results showed that methylene blue has currently been studied least, because it diminishes coagulation factors and fibrinogen. Riboflavin has been studied most because it is a photoinactivator of endogenous origin and has few collateral effects. Amotosalen HCl is effective for platelets and is also used on plasma, but may cause changes both to plasma and to platelets, although these are not significant for hemostasis. S-303 FRALE may lead to neoantigens in erythrocytes and is less indicated for red-cell treatment; in such cases, PEN 110 is recommended. Thus, none of the methods for pathogen reduction is effective for all classes of agents and for all blood components, but despite the high cost, these photoinactivators may diminish the risk of blood-transmitted diseases.

  7. Laser-induced inactivation of Plasmodium falciparum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBlanc, Danielle; Story, Robert; Gross, Eitan

    2012-08-08

    Haemozoin crystals, produced by Plasmodium during its intra-erythrocytic asexual reproduction cycle, can generate UV light via the laser-induced, non-linear optical process of third harmonic generation (THG). In the current study the feasibility of using haemozoin, constitutively stored in the parasite's food vacuole, to kill the parasite by irradiation with a near IR laser was evaluated. Cultured Plasmodium parasites at different stages of development were irradiated with a pulsed NIR laser and the viability of parasites at each stage was evaluated from their corresponding growth curves using the continuous culture method. Additional testing for germicidal effects of haemozoin and NIR laser was performed by adding synthetic haemozoin crystals to Escherichia coli in suspension. Cell suspensions were then irradiated with the laser and small aliquots taken and spread on agar plates containing selective agents to determine cell viability (CFU). Parasites in the late-trophozoites form as well as trophozoites in early-stage of DNA synthesis were found to be the most sensitive to the treatment with -4-log reduction in viability after six passes through the laser beam; followed by parasites in ring phase (-2-log reduction). A -1-log reduction in E. coli viability was obtained following a 60 min irradiation regimen of the bacteria in the presence of 1 μM synthetic haemozoin and a -2-log reduction in the presence of 10 μM haemozoin. Minimal (≤ 15%) cell kill was observed in the presence of 10 μM haemin. Laser-induced third-harmonic generation by haemozoin can be used to inactivate Plasmodium. This result may have clinical implications for treating severe malaria symptoms by irradiating the patient's blood through the skin or through dialysis tubing with a NIR laser.

  8. Laser-induced inactivation of Plasmodium falciparum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LeBlanc Danielle

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Haemozoin crystals, produced by Plasmodium during its intra-erythrocytic asexual reproduction cycle, can generate UV light via the laser-induced, non-linear optical process of third harmonic generation (THG. In the current study the feasibility of using haemozoin, constitutively stored in the parasite’s food vacuole, to kill the parasite by irradiation with a near IR laser was evaluated. Methods Cultured Plasmodium parasites at different stages of development were irradiated with a pulsed NIR laser and the viability of parasites at each stage was evaluated from their corresponding growth curves using the continuous culture method. Additional testing for germicidal effects of haemozoin and NIR laser was performed by adding synthetic haemozoin crystals to Escherichia coli in suspension. Cell suspensions were then irradiated with the laser and small aliquots taken and spread on agar plates containing selective agents to determine cell viability (CFU. Results Parasites in the late-trophozoites form as well as trophozoites in early-stage of DNA synthesis were found to be the most sensitive to the treatment with ~4-log reduction in viability after six passes through the laser beam; followed by parasites in ring phase (~2-log reduction. A ~1-log reduction in E. coli viability was obtained following a 60 min irradiation regimen of the bacteria in the presence of 1 μM synthetic haemozoin and a ~2-log reduction in the presence of 10 μM haemozoin. Minimal (≤15% cell kill was observed in the presence of 10 μM haemin. Conclusions Laser-induced third-harmonic generation by haemozoin can be used to inactivate Plasmodium. This result may have clinical implications for treating severe malaria symptoms by irradiating the patient’s blood through the skin or through dialysis tubing with a NIR laser.

  9. Green Tea Catechin-Inactivated Viral Vaccine Platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun H. Lee

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally, chemical agents such as formalin (FA and β-propiolactone (BPL have long been used for the preparation of inactivated vaccines or toxoids. It has been shown that FA extensively modifies vaccine antigens and thus affects immunogenicity profiles, sometimes compromising the protective efficacy of the vaccines or even exacerbating the disease upon infection. In this study, we show that natural catechins from green tea extracts (GT can be used as an inactivating agent to prepare inactivated viral vaccines. GT treatment resulted in complete and irreversible inactivation of influenza virus as well as dengue virus. In contrast to FA that reacted extensively with multiple amino acids including lysine, a major anchor residue for epitope binding to MHC molecules, GT catechin epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG crosslinked primarily with cysteine residues and thus preserved the major epitopes of the influenza hemagglutinin. In a mouse model, vaccination with GT-inactivated influenza virus (GTi virus elicited higher levels of viral neutralizing antibodies than FA-inactivated virus (FAi virus. The vaccination completely protected the mice from a lethal challenge and restricted the challenge viral replication in the lungs. Of note, the quality of antibody responses of GTi virus was superior to that with FAi virus, in terms of the magnitude of antibody titer, cross-reactivity to hetero-subtypes of influenza viruses, and the avidity to viral antigens. As the first report of using non-toxic natural compounds for the preparation of inactivated viral vaccines, the present results could be translated into a clinically relevant vaccine platform with improved efficacy, safety, productivity, and public acceptance.

  10. Infective and inactivated filamentous phage as carriers for immunogenic peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samoylova, Tatiana I; Norris, Mandy D; Samoylov, Alexandre M; Cochran, Anna M; Wolfe, Karen G; Petrenko, Valery A; Cox, Nancy R

    2012-07-01

    The focus of this study is on development of vaccines using filamentous phage as a delivery vector for immunogenic peptides. The use of phage as a carrier for immunogenic peptides provides significant benefits such as high immunogenicity, low production costs, and high stability of phage preparations. However, introduction of live recombinant phage into the environment might represent a potential ecological problem. This, for example, may occur when vaccines are used in oral or nasal formulations in field conditions for wild and feral animals. To address this issue, comparative studies of antigenic properties of live and inactivated (non-viable) phage were accomplished. Inactivated phage, if released, will not propagate and will degrade as any other protein. In these experiments, a model phage clone that was previously selected from a phage display library and shown to stimulate production of anti-sperm antibodies with contraceptive properties was used. Multiple methods of phage inactivation were tested, including drying, freezing, autoclaving, heating, and UV irradiation. Under studied conditions, heating at 76°C for 3h, UV irradiation, and autoclaving resulted in complete phage inactivation. Phage samples treated by heat and UV were characterized by spectrophotometry and electron microscopy. To test antigenicity, live and inactivated phage preparations were injected into mice and antibody responses assayed by ELISA. It was found that phage killed by heat causes little to no immune responses, probably due to destruction of phage particles. In contrast, UV-inactivated phage stimulated production of IgG serum antibodies at the levels comparable to live phage. Thus, vaccines formulated to include UV-inactivated filamentous phage might represent environmentally safe alternatives to live phage vaccines. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Age-dependent impact of CaV3.2 T-type calcium channel deletion on myogenic tone and flow-mediated vasodilatation in small arteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Miriam F.; Björling, Karl; Jensen, Lars Jørn

    2016-01-01

    The myogenic response and flow-mediated vasodilatation are important regulators of local blood perfusion and total peripheral resistance, and are known to entail a calcium influx into vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and endothelial cells (ECs), respectively. CaV3.2 T-type calcium channels...... are expressed in both VSMCs and ECs of small arteries. The T-type channels are important drug targets but due to the lack of specific antagonists our understanding of the role of CaV3.2 channels in vasomotor tone at various ages is scarce. We evaluated the myogenic response, flow-mediated vasodilatation....... Our study shows important roles of the CaV3.2 T-type calcium channels in myogenic tone and flow-mediated vasodilation that disappear with aging. Since increased arterial tone is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease we conclude that CaV3.2 channels, by modulating pressure- and flow...

  12. Real time, in situ observation of the photocatalytic inactivation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jingtao [School of Food and Bioengineering, Zhengzhou University of Light Industry, Zhengzhou 450002 (China); Environment Functional Materials Division, Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Wang, Xiaoxin [Environment Functional Materials Division, Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Li, Qi, E-mail: qili@imr.ac.cn [Environment Functional Materials Division, Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Shang, Jian Ku [Environment Functional Materials Division, Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)

    2015-04-01

    An in situ microscopy technique was developed to observe in real time the photocatalytic inactivation process of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) cells by palladium-modified nitrogen-doped titanium oxide (TiON/PdO) under visible light illumination. The technique was based on building a photocatalytic micro-reactor on the sample stage of a fluorescence/phase contrast microscopy capable of simultaneously providing the optical excitation to activate the photocatalyst in the micro-reactor and the illumination to acquire phase contrast images of the cells undergoing the photocatalytic inactivation process. Using TiON/PdO as an example, the technique revealed for the first time the vacuolar activities inside S. cerevisiae cells subjected to a visible light photocatalytic inactivation. The vacuoles responded to the photocatalytic attack by the first expansion of the vacuolar volume and then contraction, before the vacuole disappeared and the cell structure collapsed. Consistent with the aggregate behavior observed from the cell culture experiments, the transition in the vacuolar volume provided clear evidence that photocatalytic disinfection of S. cerevisiae cells started with an initiation period in which cells struggled to offset the photocatalytic damage and moved rapidly after the photocatalytic damage overwhelmed the defense mechanisms of the cells against oxidative attack. - Highlights: • Palladium-modified nitrogen-doped titanium oxidephotocatalyst (TiON/PdO) • Effective visible-light photocatalytic disinfection of yeast cells by TiON/PdO • Real time, in situ observation technique was developed for photocatalytic disinfection. • The fluorescence/phase contrast microscope with a photocatalytic micro-reactor • Yeast cell disinfection happened before the cell structure collapsed.

  13. Characterization and thermal inactivation kinetics of highly thermostable ramie leaf β-amylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Liqin; Park, Sung-Hoon; Hai Dang, Nguyen Dang; Duong, Hoa Xo; Duong, Thi Phung Cac; Tran, Phuong Lan; Park, Jong-Tae; Ni, Li; Park, Kwan-Hwa

    2017-06-01

    We characterized ramie leaf β-amylase, and determined its thermostability and kinetic parameters. The enzyme was purified 53-fold using ammonium sulfate fractionation (40-60% saturation), anion exchange chromatography on DEAE-cellulose and gel permeation chromatography on Superdex-200. The purified enzyme was identified as β-amylase with molecular mass of 42kD. The enzyme displayed Km and kcat values for soluble potato starch of 1.1mg/mL and 7.8s-1, respectively. The enzyme had a temperature optimum of 65°C, and its activity at 70°C was 92% of that at the optimal temperature after a 15-min incubation. Furthermore, enzyme activity was stable during treatment at 55°C for 60min but was inactivated rapidly at >75°C. This thermal behavior indicates that ramie leaf β-amylase has excellent intermediate temperature-stable enzyme properties for the baking and bio-industries. Inactivation of the enzyme followed first-order kinetics in the range of 55-80°C. The enthalpy change of thermal inactivation (ΔH‡), ΔG‡, and ΔS‡ were 237.2kJ/mol, 107.7kJ/mol, and 0.39kJ/molK at 333K, respectively. The D-value at 65°C (=110min) and the z-value (=9.4°C) are given for food processing. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. ERADIKASI POLIO DAN IPV (INACTIVATED POLIO VACCINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gendrowahyuhono Gendrowahyuhono

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In the year 1988, World Health Organization (WHO claims that polio viruses should be eradicated after year 2000. However, until year 2010 the world have not been free from polio viruses circulation. So many effort had been achieved and it is estimated that the world will be free from polio virus after the year 2013. Control of poliomyelitis in Indonesia has been commenced since 1982 with routine immunization of polio program and the National Immunization Days (NID has been commenced since 1995,1996,2005 and 2006. When the world is free from polio virus, WHO suggests several alternative effort to maintain the world free from polio viruses : I stop the OPV (Oral Polio Vaccine and no polio immunization, 2 stop OPV and stock pile mOPV (monovalent OPV, 3 use OPV and IPV (Inactivated Polio Vaccine in a certain times, 4 use IPV only in a certain times. IPV has been used routinely in develop countries but has not been used in the developing countries. Several studies in development countries has been conducted, but had not been done in the developing countries. Indonesia collaboration with WHO has conducted the study of IPV in Yogyakarta Province since year 2002 until year 2010. The overall aim of the study is to compile the necessary data that will inform global and national decision-making regarding future polio immunization policies for the OPV cessation era. The data generated from the study will be particularly important to make decisions regarding optimal IPV use in developing tropical countries. It is unlikely that this data can be assembled through other means than through this study. The tentative result of the study shows that OPV immunization coverage in the year 2004 is 99% in four district and 93 % in the Yogyakarta city. Environment surveillance shows that there are 65.7% polio virus detected from 137 sewage samples pre IPV swich, and 4.8% polio virus detected from 83 sewage samples post IPV swich. Survey polio antibody serologis shows

  15. Inactivation of viruses in labile blood derivatives. II. Physical methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horowitz, B.; Wiebe, M.E.; Lippin, A.; Vandersande, J.; Stryker, M.H.

    1985-11-01

    The thermal inactivation of viruses in labile blood derivatives was evaluated by addition of marker viruses (VSV, Sindbis, Sendai, EMC) to anti-hemophilic factor (AHF) concentrates. The rate of virus inactivation at 60 degrees C was decreased by at least 100- to 700-fold by inclusion of 2.75 M glycine and 50 percent sucrose, or 3.0 M potassium citrate, additives which contribute to retention of protein biologic activity. Nonetheless, at least 10(4) infectious units of each virus was inactivated within 10 hours. Increasing the temperature from 60 to 70 or 80 degrees C caused a 90 percent or greater loss in AHF activity. An even greater decline in the rate of virus inactivation was observed on heating AHF in the lyophilized state, although no loss in AHF activity was observed after 72 hours of heating at 60 degrees C. Several of the proteins present in lyophilized AHF concentrates displayed an altered electrophoretic mobility as a result of exposure to 60 degrees C for 24 hours. Exposure of lyophilized AHF to irradiation from a cobalt 60 source resulted in an acceptable yield of AHF at 1.0, but not at 2.0, megarads. At 1 megarad, greater than or equal to 6.0 logs of VSV and 3.3 logs of Sindbis virus were inactivated.

  16. Effect of heat on virus inactivation by ammonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burge, W D; Cramer, W N; Kawata, K

    1983-08-01

    The rate of inactivation of bacteriophage f2 and poliovirus 1 (CHAT) by NH3 was strongly influenced by temperature. The process was pseudo-first order at all temperatures and NH3 concentrations. Poliovirus was inactivated at a greater rate than f2, but the change in the rate of inactivation with increasing temperature in the range of approximately 10 to 40 degrees C was greater for f2 than for poliovirus. At higher temperatures, the rate of change was greater for poliovirus. Arrhenius plots of the data were biphasic, indicating that two inactivation processes were occurring, one for the low temperature range and another for the high temperature range. However, the magnitudes of the thermodynamic variables for f2 were low enough, as calculated for the low (10 to 35 degrees C) and high (35 to 60 degrees C) phases, that inactivation could have occurred by breakage of nucleic acid chains. For poliovirus, the sizes indicated possible involvement of nucleic acid at the low temperatures (10 to 40 degrees C) but some unknown mechanism for the high temperatures (40 and 50 degrees C).

  17. Efficacy of chlorine dioxide tablets on inactivation of cryptosporidium oocysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Jennifer L; Haas, Charles N; Arrowood, Michael J; Hlavsa, Michele C; Beach, Michael J; Hill, Vincent R

    2014-05-20

    The ability of chlorine dioxide (ClO2) to achieve 2-log inactivation of Cryptosporidium in drinking water has been documented. No studies have specifically addressed the effects of ClO2 on C. parvum oocyst infectivity in chlorinated recreational water venues (e.g., pools). The aim of this research was to determine the efficacy of ClO2 as an alternative to existing hyperchlorination protocols that are used to achieve a 3-log inactivation of Cryptosporidium in such venues. To obtain a 3-log inactivation of C. parvum Iowa oocysts, contact times of 105 and 128 min for a solution containing 5 mg/L ClO2 with and without the addition of 2.6 mg/L free chlorine, respectively, were required. Contact times of 294 and 857 min for a solution containing 1.4 mg/L ClO2 with and without the addition of 3.6 mg/L free chlorine, respectively, were required. The hyperchlorination control (21 mg/L free chlorine only) required 455 min for a 3-log inactivation. Use of a solution containing 5 mg/L ClO2 and solutions containing 5 or 1.4 mg/L ClO2 with the addition of free chlorine appears to be a promising alternative to hyperchlorination for inactivating Cryptosporidium in chlorinated recreational water venues, but further studies are required to evaluate safety constraints on use.

  18. Thermal inactivation of the wine spoilage yeasts Dekkera/Brettanomyces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couto, José António; Neves, Filipe; Campos, Francisco; Hogg, Tim

    2005-10-25

    The heat resistance of three strains of Dekkera/Brettanomyces (Dekkera anomala PYCC 5,153, Dekkera bruxellensis PYCC 4,801 and Dekkera/Brettanomyces 093) was evaluated at different temperatures between 32.5 and 55 degrees C. Thermal inactivation tests were performed in tartrate buffer solution (pH 4.0) and in wines. In the studies employing buffer as the heating menstruum, measurable thermal inactivation began only at temperatures of 50 degrees C. When heating was performed in wine, significant inactivation begins at 35 degrees C. Subsequent thermal inactivation tests were performed in buffer at various levels of pH, ethanol concentration, and various phenolic acids. Results from experiments in buffer with added ethanol suggest that the greater heat sensitivity shown in wines can be largely attributed to ethanol, although potentiation of this effect might be due to the phenolic content, particularly from ferulic acid. In the range of pH values tested (2.5-4.5), this factor had no influence in the heat inactivation kinetics. Relevant data, in the form of D and Z values calculated in the various environments, potentially useful for the establishment of regimes of thermal control of Dekkera/Brettanomyces yeasts in wine and contaminated equipment is presented.

  19. Inactivation of citrus tristeza virus by gamma ray irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ieki, Hiroyuki; Yamaguchi, Akira

    1984-12-01

    The total exposure of gamma ray and the intensity of gamma ray per hour for the inactivation of citrus tristeza virus (CTV) and also the effect on citrus tissues are described. The budwoods of Morita navel orange infected with a severe seedling-yellow strain of CTV were irradiated with gamma ray from a /sup 60/Co source for 20 - 52 hours. The buds or small tissue pieces of the irradiated budwoods were subsequently grafted onto Mexcan lime. CTV was easily inactivated by the irradiation from 10 to 18 kR for from 20 to 52 hours. The higher the total exposure, the higher the rate of inactivation. The CTV in the budwoods was almost inactivated after the irradiation with 20 kR. When the total exposure to gamma ray on budwoods was the same, CTV was more efficiently inactivated by the irradiation for long period with low intensity of gamma ray per hour than that for short period with high intensity per hour. Gamma ray irradiation was effective to eliminate CTV from citrus tissues. (Mori, K.).

  20. Comparative innocuity and efficacy of live and inactivated sheeppox vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boumart, Zineb; Daouam, Samira; Belkourati, Imane; Rafi, Lamya; Tuppurainen, Eeva; Tadlaoui, Khalid Omari; El Harrak, Mehdi

    2016-06-29

    Sheeppox (SPP) is one of the priorities, high-impact animal diseases in many developing countries, where live attenuated vaccines are routinely used against sheeppox virus (SPPV). In an event of an SPP outbreak, historically disease-free countries would hesitate to use of live vaccines against SPPVdue to the safety and trade reasons. Currently no killed SPPV vaccines are commercially available. In this study, we developed an inactivated Romanian SPPVvaccine and assessed its efficacy and potency in comparison with a live attenuated Romanian SPPV vaccine. Four naïve sheep were vaccinated once with the Romanian SPPV live attenuated vaccine and16 sheep were vaccinated twice with the inactivated vaccine. All sheep in the live vaccine group were included in the challenge trial, which was conducted using a highly virulent Moroccan SPPV field strain. Eight sheep of the inactivated vaccine group were challenged and the remaining sheep were monitored for seroconversion. Experimental animals were closely monitored for the appearance of clinical signs, body temperature and inflammation at the injection site. Two naïve sheep were used as unvaccinated controls. The inactivated Romanian SPPV vaccine was found to be safe and confer a good protection, similar to the live vaccine. Specific antibodies appeared from seven days post vaccination and remained up to nine months. This study showed that the developed inactivated Romanian SPPV vaccine has a potential to replace attenuated vaccine to control and prevent sheep pox in disease-free or endemic countries.

  1. Raman spectroscopy-compatible inactivation method for pathogenic endospores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stöckel, S; Schumacher, W; Meisel, S; Elschner, M; Rösch, P; Popp, J

    2010-05-01

    Micro-Raman spectroscopy is a fast and sensitive tool for the detection, classification, and identification of biological organisms. The vibrational spectrum inherently serves as a fingerprint of the biochemical composition of each bacterium and thus makes identification at the species level, or even the subspecies level, possible. Therefore, microorganisms in areas susceptible to bacterial contamination, e.g., clinical environments or food-processing technology, can be sensed. Within the scope of point-of-care-testing also, detection of intentionally released biosafety level 3 (BSL-3) agents, such as Bacillus anthracis endospores, or their products is attainable. However, no Raman spectroscopy-compatible inactivation method for the notoriously resistant Bacillus endospores has been elaborated so far. In this work we present an inactivation protocol for endospores that permits, on the one hand, sufficient microbial inactivation and, on the other hand, the recording of Raman spectroscopic signatures of single endospores, making species-specific identification by means of highly sophisticated chemometrical methods possible. Several physical and chemical inactivation methods were assessed, and eventually treatment with 20% formaldehyde proved to be superior to the other methods in terms of sporicidal capacity and information conservation in the Raman spectra. The latter fact has been verified by successfully using self-learning machines (such as support vector machines or artificial neural networks) to identify inactivated B. anthracis-related endospores with adequate accuracies within the range of the limited model database employed.

  2. Inactivation of complement by Loxosceles reclusa spider venom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebel, H M; Finke, J H; Elgert, K D; Cambell, B J; Barrett, J T

    1979-07-01

    Zymosan depletion of serum complement in guinea pigs rendered them highly resistant to lesion by Loxosceles reclusa spider venom. Guinea pigs deficient in C4 of the complement system are as sensitive to the venom as normal guinea pigs. The injection of 35 micrograms of whole recluse venom intradermally into guinea pigs lowered their complement level by 35.7%. Brown recluse spider venom in concentrations as slight as 0.02 micrograms protein/ml can totally inactivate one CH50 of guinea pig complement in vitro. Bee, scorpion, and other spider venoms had no influence on the hemolytic titer of complement. Fractionation of recluse spider venom by Sephadex G-200 filtration separated the complement-inactivating property of the venom into three major regions which could be distinguished on the basis of heat stability as well as size. None was neutralized by antivenom. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of venom resolved the complement inactivators into five fractions. Complement inactivated by whole venom or the Sephadex fractions could be restored to hemolytic activity by supplements of fresh serum but not by heat-inactivated serum, pure C3, pure C5, or C3 and C5 in combination.

  3. Thermal and high pressure inactivation kinetics of blueberry peroxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terefe, Netsanet Shiferaw; Delon, Antoine; Versteeg, Cornelis

    2017-10-01

    This study for the first time investigated the stability and inactivation kinetics of blueberry peroxidase in model systems (McIlvaine buffer, pH=3.6, the typical pH of blueberry juice) during thermal (40-80°C) and combined high pressure-thermal processing (0.1-690MPa, 30-90°C). At 70-80°C, the thermal inactivation kinetics was best described by a biphasic model with ∼61% labile and ∼39% stable fractions at temperature between 70 and 75°C. High pressure inhibited the inactivation of the enzyme with no inactivation at pressures as high as 690MPa and temperatures less than 50°C. The inactivation kinetics of the enzyme at 60-70°C, and pressures higher than 500MPa was best described by a first order biphasic model with ∼25% labile fraction and 75% stable fraction. The activation energy values at atmospheric pressure were 548.6kJ/mol and 324.5kJ/mol respectively for the stable and the labile fractions. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Transcriptome analysis of PDGFRα+ cells identifies T-type Ca2+ channel CACNA1G as a new pathological marker for PDGFRα+ cell hyperplasia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Se Eun Ha

    Full Text Available Platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha (PDGFRα+ cells are distributed into distinct morphological groups within the serosal, muscular, and submucosal layers as well as the myenteric and deep muscular plexi. PDGFRα+ cells directly interact with interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC and smooth muscle cells (SMC in gastrointestinal smooth muscle tissue. These three cell types, SMC, ICC, and PDGFRα+ cells (SIP cells, form an electrical syncytium, which dynamically regulates gastrointestinal motility. We have previously reported the transcriptomes of SMC and ICC. To complete the SIP cell transcriptome project, we obtained transcriptome data from jejunal and colonic PDGFRα+ cells. The PDGFRα+ cell transcriptome data were added to the Smooth Muscle Genome Browser that we previously built for the genome-scale gene expression data of ICC and SMC. This browser provides a comprehensive reference for all transcripts expressed in SIP cells. By analyzing the transcriptomes, we have identified a unique set of PDGFRα+ cell signature genes, growth factors, transcription factors, epigenetic enzymes/regulators, receptors, protein kinases/phosphatases, and ion channels/transporters. We demonstrated that the low voltage-dependent T-type Ca2+ channel Cacna1g gene was particularly expressed in PDGFRα+ cells in the intestinal serosal layer in mice. Expression of this gene was significantly induced in the hyperplasic PDGFRα+ cells of obstructed small intestine in mice. This gene was also over-expressed in colorectal cancer, Crohn's disease, and diverticulitis in human patients. Taken together, our data suggest that Cacna1g exclusively expressed in serosal PDGFRα+ cells is a new pathological marker for gastrointestinal diseases.

  5. T-type calcium channels cause bursts of spikes in motor but not sensory thalamic neurons during mimicry of natural patterns of synaptic input

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Haram R.; Hong, Su Z.; Fiorillo, Christopher D.

    2015-01-01

    Although neurons within intact nervous systems can be classified as ‘sensory’ or ‘motor,’ it is not known whether there is any general distinction between sensory and motor neurons at the cellular or molecular levels. Here, we extend and test a theory according to which activation of certain subtypes of voltage-gated ion channel (VGC) generate patterns of spikes in neurons of motor systems, whereas VGC are proposed to counteract patterns in sensory neurons. We previously reported experimental evidence for the theory from visual thalamus, where we found that T-type calcium channels (TtCCs) did not cause bursts of spikes but instead served the function of ‘predictive homeostasis’ to maximize the causal and informational link between retinogeniculate excitation and spike output. Here, we have recorded neurons in brain slices from eight sensory and motor regions of rat thalamus while mimicking key features of natural excitatory and inhibitory post-synaptic potentials. As predicted by theory, TtCC did cause bursts of spikes in motor thalamus. TtCC-mediated responses in motor thalamus were activated at more hyperpolarized potentials and caused larger depolarizations with more spikes than in visual and auditory thalamus. Somatosensory thalamus is known to be more closely connected to motor regions relative to auditory and visual thalamus, and likewise the strength of its TtCC responses was intermediate between these regions and motor thalamus. We also observed lower input resistance, as well as limited evidence of stronger hyperpolarization-induced (‘H-type’) depolarization, in nuclei closer to motor output. These findings support our theory of a specific difference between sensory and motor neurons at the cellular level. PMID:26582654

  6. Caveolin-3 Overexpression Attenuates Cardiac Hypertrophy via Inhibition of T-type Ca2+ Current Modulated by Protein Kinase Cα in Cardiomyocytes*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markandeya, Yogananda S.; Phelan, Laura J.; Woon, Marites T.; Keefe, Alexis M.; Reynolds, Courtney R.; August, Benjamin K.; Hacker, Timothy A.; Roth, David M.; Patel, Hemal H.; Balijepalli, Ravi C.

    2015-01-01

    Pathological cardiac hypertrophy is characterized by subcellular remodeling of the ventricular myocyte with a reduction in the scaffolding protein caveolin-3 (Cav-3), altered Ca2+ cycling, increased protein kinase C expression, and hyperactivation of calcineurin/nuclear factor of activated T cell (NFAT) signaling. However, the precise role of Cav-3 in the regulation of local Ca2+ signaling in pathological cardiac hypertrophy is unclear. We used cardiac-specific Cav-3-overexpressing mice and in vivo and in vitro cardiac hypertrophy models to determine the essential requirement for Cav-3 expression in protection against pharmacologically and pressure overload-induced cardiac hypertrophy. Transverse aortic constriction and angiotensin-II (Ang-II) infusion in wild type (WT) mice resulted in cardiac hypertrophy characterized by significant reduction in fractional shortening, ejection fraction, and a reduced expression of Cav-3. In addition, association of PKCα and angiotensin-II receptor, type 1, with Cav-3 was disrupted in the hypertrophic ventricular myocytes. Whole cell patch clamp analysis demonstrated increased expression of T-type Ca2+ current (ICa, T) in hypertrophic ventricular myocytes. In contrast, the Cav-3-overexpressing mice demonstrated protection from transverse aortic constriction or Ang-II-induced pathological hypertrophy with inhibition of ICa, T and intact Cav-3-associated macromolecular signaling complexes. siRNA-mediated knockdown of Cav-3 in the neonatal cardiomyocytes resulted in enhanced Ang-II stimulation of ICa, T mediated by PKCα, which caused nuclear translocation of NFAT. Overexpression of Cav-3 in neonatal myocytes prevented a PKCα-mediated increase in ICa, T and nuclear translocation of NFAT. In conclusion, we show that stable Cav-3 expression is essential for protecting the signaling mechanisms in pharmacologically and pressure overload-induced cardiac hypertrophy. PMID:26170457

  7. T-type calcium channels cause bursts of spikes in motor but not sensory thalamic neurons during mimicry of natural patterns of synaptic input.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Haram R; Hong, Su Z; Fiorillo, Christopher D

    2015-01-01

    Although neurons within intact nervous systems can be classified as 'sensory' or 'motor,' it is not known whether there is any general distinction between sensory and motor neurons at the cellular or molecular levels. Here, we extend and test a theory according to which activation of certain subtypes of voltage-gated ion channel (VGC) generate patterns of spikes in neurons of motor systems, whereas VGC are proposed to counteract patterns in sensory neurons. We previously reported experimental evidence for the theory from visual thalamus, where we found that T-type calcium channels (TtCCs) did not cause bursts of spikes but instead served the function of 'predictive homeostasis' to maximize the causal and informational link between retinogeniculate excitation and spike output. Here, we have recorded neurons in brain slices from eight sensory and motor regions of rat thalamus while mimicking key features of natural excitatory and inhibitory post-synaptic potentials. As predicted by theory, TtCC did cause bursts of spikes in motor thalamus. TtCC-mediated responses in motor thalamus were activated at more hyperpolarized potentials and caused larger depolarizations with more spikes than in visual and auditory thalamus. Somatosensory thalamus is known to be more closely connected to motor regions relative to auditory and visual thalamus, and likewise the strength of its TtCC responses was intermediate between these regions and motor thalamus. We also observed lower input resistance, as well as limited evidence of stronger hyperpolarization-induced ('H-type') depolarization, in nuclei closer to motor output. These findings support our theory of a specific difference between sensory and motor neurons at the cellular level.

  8. Inhibition of CaV3.2 T-type calcium channels in peripheral sensory neurons contributes to analgesic properties of epipregnanolone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayoola, Christine; Hwang, Sung Mi; Hong, Sung Jun; Rose, Kirstin E; Boyd, Christopher; Bozic, Neda; Park, Ji-Yong; Osuru, Hari Prasad; DiGruccio, Michael R; Covey, Douglas F; Jevtovic-Todorovic, Vesna; Todorovic, Slobodan M

    2014-09-01

    T-type calcium channels (T-channels) play an important role in controlling excitability of nociceptors. We have previously shown that a synthetic series of 5β-reduced steroids induce a voltage-dependent blockade of T-currents in rat dorsal root ganglia (DRG) cells in vitro and induce potent analgesia to thermal stimuli in rats in vivo (Mol Pharmacol 66:1223-1235, 2004). Here, we investigated the effects of the endogenous 5β-reduced neuroactive steroid molecule, epipregnanolone [(3β,5β)-3-hydroxypregnan-20-one], on peripheral nociception. We used acutely dissociated DRG cells in vitro from adult rats as well as in vivo pain studies in mice and rats to investigate the effects of epipregnanolone on DRG T-channels. We found that epipregnanolone reversibly blocked DRG T-currents with a half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 2 μM and stabilized the channel in the inactive state. However, sodium, potassium, and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-gated ionic currents were not sensitive to the blocking effects of epipregnanolone even at 10 μM. In ensuing in vivo studies, we found that intraplantar (i.pl.) injections of epipregnanolone directly into peripheral receptive fields reduced responses to nociceptive heat stimuli in rats in a dose-dependent fashion. Furthermore, i.pl. epipregnanolone injections effectively reduced responses to peripheral nociceptive thermal and mechanical stimuli in wild-type mice but had no effect on the responses of CaV3.2 knockout mice. We conclude that the inhibition of peripheral CaV3.2 T-channels contributes to the potent analgesic effect of the endogenous steroid epipregnanolone.

  9. Inhibition of cancer cell growth by exposure to a specific time-varying electromagnetic field involves T-type calcium channels.

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    Carly A Buckner

    Full Text Available Electromagnetic field (EMF exposures affect many biological systems. The reproducibility of these effects is related to the intensity, duration, frequency, and pattern of the EMF. We have shown that exposure to a specific time-varying EMF can inhibit the growth of malignant cells. Thomas-EMF is a low-intensity, frequency-modulated (25-6 Hz EMF pattern. Daily, 1 h, exposures to Thomas-EMF inhibited the growth of malignant cell lines including B16-BL6, MDA-MB-231, MCF-7, and HeLa cells but did not affect the growth of non-malignant cells. Thomas-EMF also inhibited B16-BL6 cell proliferation in vivo. B16-BL6 cells implanted in syngeneic C57b mice and exposed daily to Thomas-EMF produced smaller tumours than in sham-treated controls. In vitro studies showed that exposure of malignant cells to Thomas-EMF for > 15 min promoted Ca(2+ influx which could be blocked by inhibitors of voltage-gated T-type Ca(2+ channels. Blocking Ca(2+ uptake also blocked Thomas-EMF-dependent inhibition of cell proliferation. Exposure to Thomas-EMF delayed cell cycle progression and altered cyclin expression consistent with the decrease in cell proliferation. Non-malignant cells did not show any EMF-dependent changes in Ca(2+ influx or cell growth. These data confirm that exposure to a specific EMF pattern can affect cellular processes and that exposure to Thomas-EMF may provide a potential anti-cancer therapy.

  10. Inhibition of cancer cell growth by exposure to a specific time-varying electromagnetic field involves T-type calcium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckner, Carly A; Buckner, Alison L; Koren, Stan A; Persinger, Michael A; Lafrenie, Robert M

    2015-01-01

    Electromagnetic field (EMF) exposures affect many biological systems. The reproducibility of these effects is related to the intensity, duration, frequency, and pattern of the EMF. We have shown that exposure to a specific time-varying EMF can inhibit the growth of malignant cells. Thomas-EMF is a low-intensity, frequency-modulated (25-6 Hz) EMF pattern. Daily, 1 h, exposures to Thomas-EMF inhibited the growth of malignant cell lines including B16-BL6, MDA-MB-231, MCF-7, and HeLa cells but did not affect the growth of non-malignant cells. Thomas-EMF also inhibited B16-BL6 cell proliferation in vivo. B16-BL6 cells implanted in syngeneic C57b mice and exposed daily to Thomas-EMF produced smaller tumours than in sham-treated controls. In vitro studies showed that exposure of malignant cells to Thomas-EMF for > 15 min promoted Ca(2+) influx which could be blocked by inhibitors of voltage-gated T-type Ca(2+) channels. Blocking Ca(2+) uptake also blocked Thomas-EMF-dependent inhibition of cell proliferation. Exposure to Thomas-EMF delayed cell cycle progression and altered cyclin expression consistent with the decrease in cell proliferation. Non-malignant cells did not show any EMF-dependent changes in Ca(2+) influx or cell growth. These data confirm that exposure to a specific EMF pattern can affect cellular processes and that exposure to Thomas-EMF may provide a potential anti-cancer therapy.

  11. Reactivity to the p305 Epitope of the α1G T-Type Calcium Channel and Autoimmune-Associated Congenital Heart Block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markham, Androo J; Rasmussen, Sara E; Salmon, Jane E; Martinez-Ortiz, Wilnelly; Cardozo, Timothy J; Clancy, Robert M; Buyon, Jill P

    2015-05-20

    Only 2% of mothers positive for anti-SSA/Ro (Ro) antibodies have children with congenital heart block (CHB). This study aimed to determine whether reactivity with p305, an epitope within the α1G T-type calcium channel, confers added risk over anti-Ro antibodies. Using sera from anti-Ro-exposed pregnancies resulting in offspring with CHB, no disease but CHB-sibling, and no disease and no CHB-sibling, as well as disease (lupus without anti-Ro) and healthy controls, reactivities were determined for binding to Ro60, p305, and an epitope within Ro60, p133-Ro60, which shares structural properties with p305, including key amino acids and an α-helical structure. Candidate peptides were further evaluated in an in vitro model that assessed the binding of maternal antibodies to apoptotic cells. In anti-Ro-positive mothers, anti-p305 autoantibodies (>3 SD above healthy controls) were detected in 3/59 (5%) CHB pregnancies, 4/30 (13%) unaffected pregnancies with a CHB-sibling, and 0/42 (0%) of unaffected pregnancies with no CHB-sibling. For umbilical bloods (61 CHB, 41 healthy with CHB sibling), no association of anti-p305 with outcome was detected; however, overall levels of anti-p305 were elevated compared to mothers during pregnancy in all groups studied. For anti-p133-Ro60, reactivity paralleled that of anti-p305. In the screen employing apoptotic cells, p133-Ro60, but not p305, significantly attenuated the binding of immunoglobulin G isolated from a mother whose child had CHB (42.1% reduced to 13.9%, absence/presence of p133-Ro60, respectively, PHeart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  12. Differential inactivation of alfalfa nodule glutamine synthetases by tabtoxinine-. beta. -lactam. [Pseudomonas syringae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knight, T.J.; Unkefer, P.J.

    1987-04-01

    The presence of the pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci within the rhizosphere of nodulated alfalfa plants results in an increase in N/sub 2/-fixation potential and growth, but a 40-50% decrease in nodule glutamine synthetase (GS) activity, as compared to nodulated control plants. Tabtoxinine-..beta..-Lactam an exocellular toxin produced by Pseudomonas syringae pv tabaci irreversibly inhibits glutamine synthetase. Partial purification of nodule GS by DEAE-cellulose chromatography reveals two enzyme forms are present (GS/sub n1/ and GS/sub n2/). In vitro inactivation of the two glutamine synthetases associated with the nodule indicates a differential sensitivity to T-..beta..-L. The nodule specific GS/sub n1/ is much less sensitive to T-..beta..-L than the GS/sub n2/ enzyme, which was found to coelute with the root enzyme (GS/sub r/). However, both GS/sub n1/ and GS/sub n2/ are rapidly inactivated by methionine sulfoximine, another irreversible inhibitor of GS.

  13. Inactivation of Heterosigma akashiwo in ballast water by circular orifice plate-generated hydrodynamic cavitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Daolun; Zhao, Jie; Liu, Tian

    2016-01-01

    The discharge of alien ballast water is a well-known, major reason for marine species invasion. Here, circular orifice plate-generated hydrodynamic cavitation was used to inactivate Heterosigma akashiwo in ballast water. In comparison with single- and multihole orifice plates, the conical-hole orifice plate yielded the highest inactivation percentage, 51.12%, and consumed only 6.84% energy (based on a 50% inactivation percentage). Repeating treatment, either using double series-connection or circling inactivation, elevated the inactivation percentage, yet consumed much more energy. The results indicate that conical-hole-generated hydrodynamic cavitation shows great potential as a pre-inactivation method for ballast water treatment.

  14. Microbial inactivation by microwave radiation in the home environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Dong-Kyoo; Bitton, Gabriel; Melker, Richard

    2006-12-01

    The study reported here looked at the survival of microorganisms (heterotrophic plate counts, total coliforms, E. coli, and bacterial spores) in a consumer-type microwave oven. Kitchen sponges, scrubbing pads, and syringes were experimentally contaminated with wastewater and subsequently exposed to microwave radiation. At 100 percent power level, it was found that the heterotrophic plate count (i.e., total bacterial count) of the wastewater was reduced by more that 99 percent within 1 to 2 minutes, and the total coliform and E. coli were totally inactivated after 30 seconds of microwave radiation. Bacterial phage MS2 was totally inactivated within 1 to 2 minutes. Spores of Bacillus cereus were more resistant than the other microorganisms tested, and were completely eradicated only after 4-minute irradiation. Similar inactivation rates were obtained in wastewater-contaminated scrubbing pads. Microorganisms attached to plastic syringes were more resistant to microwave irradiation than those associated with kitchen sponges or scrubbing pads. It took 10 minutes for total inactivation of the heterotrophic plate count and 4 minutes for total inactivation of total coliform and E. coli. A 4-log reduction of phage MS2 was obtained after 2 minutes; 97.4 percent reduction was observed after 12 minutes. The authors also observed a higher inactivation of B. cereus spores in syringes placed in a ceramic container than of spores in syringes placed in a glass container. This finding could have some implications for the design of containers to be used in exposure of medical devices to microwave radiation. The article discusses the implications of these findings for consumer safety in the home environment.

  15. Assessing the efficacy of an inactivated chicken anemia virus vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinheng; Wu, Boliang; Liu, Yuanjia; Chen, Weiguo; Dai, Zhenkai; Bi, Yingzuo; Xie, Qingmei

    2015-04-15

    Chicken anemia virus (CAV) is an immunosuppressive virus that causes chicken infectious anemia (CIA) which is a highly contagious avian disease. CAV causes major economic losses in the poultry industry worldwide. The current CAV vaccine is a live attenuated strain administered in the drinking water that risks horizontal infection of other chickens. The purpose of this study was to develop a novel vaccine against CAV that can be administered safely using a highly pathogenic isolate inactivated with β-propiolactone hydrolysis that would protect chicks from CAV. Hens were vaccinated twice intramuscularly with a novel CAV GD-G-12 inactivated vaccine and the humoral immune responses of the hens and offspring were monitored by ELISA. A heterologous intramuscular challenge using the CAV strain GD-E-12 was conducted in the chicks hatched from vaccinated or unvaccinated hens. The vaccine strain, GD-G-12, was shown to be highly pathogenic prior to inactivation evidenced by thymic atrophy and bleeding, and weight loss. The inactivated vaccine was considered safe and showed no signs of pathogenicity. High titers of CAV specific antibodies were detected in the vaccinated hens and in their chicks, indicating vertical transfer of maternal antibodies. Furthermore, the chicks hatched from vaccinated hens were resistant to a heterologous CAV challenge and showed no signs of weight loss and thymic atrophy and bleeding. Our studies are proof of principle that inactivated GD-G-12 might be a novel vaccine candidate to prevent CAV infection, and highlight the utility of using an inactivated virus for this vaccine. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Genetic architecture of skewed X inactivation in the laboratory mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John D Calaway

    Full Text Available X chromosome inactivation (XCI is the mammalian mechanism of dosage compensation that balances X-linked gene expression between the sexes. Early during female development, each cell of the embryo proper independently inactivates one of its two parental X-chromosomes. In mice, the choice of which X chromosome is inactivated is affected by the genotype of a cis-acting locus, the X-chromosome controlling element (Xce. Xce has been localized to a 1.9 Mb interval within the X-inactivation center (Xic, yet its molecular identity and mechanism of action remain unknown. We combined genotype and sequence data for mouse stocks with detailed phenotyping of ten inbred strains and with the development of a statistical model that incorporates phenotyping data from multiple sources to disentangle sources of XCI phenotypic variance in natural female populations on X inactivation. We have reduced the Xce candidate 10-fold to a 176 kb region located approximately 500 kb proximal to Xist. We propose that structural variation in this interval explains the presence of multiple functional Xce alleles in the genus Mus. We have identified a new allele, Xce(e present in Mus musculus and a possible sixth functional allele in Mus spicilegus. We have also confirmed a parent-of-origin effect on X inactivation choice and provide evidence that maternal inheritance magnifies the skewing associated with strong Xce alleles. Based on the phylogenetic analysis of 155 laboratory strains and wild mice we conclude that Xce(a is either a derived allele that arose concurrently with the domestication of fancy mice but prior the derivation of most classical inbred strains or a rare allele in the wild. Furthermore, we have found that despite the presence of multiple haplotypes in the wild Mus musculus domesticus has only one functional Xce allele, Xce(b. Lastly, we conclude that each mouse taxa examined has a different functional Xce allele.

  17. Inactivation of Tautomerase Activity of Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor by Sulforaphane: A Potential Biomarker for Anti-inflammatory Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, Zachary R.; Liu, Hua; Holtzclaw, W. David; Talalay, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Background Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), a proinflammatory cytokine with keto-enol tautomerase activity, rises rapidly in response to inflammation, and is elevated in many chronic diseases. Isothiocyanates, such as sulforaphane from broccoli, are very potent inactivators of MIF tautomerase activity. A simple rapid method for determining this activity in tissues and body fluids may therefore be valuable for assessing severity of inflammation and efficacy of intervention. Methods Existing spectrophotometric assays of MIF, based on conversion of methyl L-dopachrome to methyl 5,6-dihydroxyindole-2-carboxylate and associated loss of absorption at 475 nm, lack sensitivity. Assay sensitivity and efficiency were markedly improved by reducing the nonenzymatic rate, by lowering pH to 6.2, replacing phosphate (which catalyzes the reaction) with Bis-Tris buffer, and converting to a microtiter plate format. Results A structure-potency study of MIF tautomerase inactivation by isothiocyanates showed that sulforaphane, benzyl, n-hexyl, and phenethyl isothiocyanates were especially potent. MIF tautomerase could be readily quantified in human urine concentrated by ultrafiltration. This activity comprised: (i) a heat-labile, sulforaphane-inactivated macromolecular fraction (presumably MIF) that was concentrated during ultrafiltration; (ii) a flow-through fraction, with constant activity during filtration, that was heat-stable, and insensitive to sulforaphane. Administration of the sulforaphane precursor glucoraphanin to human volunteers almost completely abolished urinary tautomerase activity, which was recovered over many hours. Conclusions A simple, rapid, quantitative MIF tautomerase assay has been developed as a potential biomarker for assessing inflammatory severity and effectiveness of intervention. Impact An improved assay for measuring MIF tautomerase activity and its applications are described. PMID:21602309

  18. Inactivation of VHSV by Percolation and Salt Under Experimental Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skall, Helle Frank; Olesen, Niels Jørgen; Jørgensen, Claus

    2012-01-01

    At the moment the only legal method in Denmark to sanitize wastewater from fish cutting plants is by percolation. To evaluate the inactivation effect of percolation on VHSV an experimental examination was initiated. A column packed with gravel as top- and bottom layer (total of 22 cm) and a mid...... method to sanitize VHSV infected water. Changes in temperature, pH, earth types in the area used for percolation etc. may change the virus reduction, though. As some of the fish cutting plants are also smoking rainbow trout fillets, the question arose whether a brine solution will inactivate VHSV...

  19. Inactivation of VHSV by infiltration and salt under experimental conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skall, Helle Frank; Jørgensen, Claus; Olesen, Niels Jørgen

    2014-01-01

    At the moment the only legal method in Denmark to sanitize wastewater from fish cutting plants is by infiltration. To evaluate the inactivation effect of infiltration on VHSV an experimental examination was initiated. A column packed with gravel as top- and bottom layer (total of 22 cm) and a mid...... be a valuable method to sanitize VHSV infected water. Changes in temperature, pH, earth types in the area used for infiltration etc. may change the virus reduction, though. As some of the fish cutting plants are also smoking rainbow trout fillets, the question arose whether a brine solution will inactivate VHSV...

  20. An insight on bacterial cellular targets of photodynamic inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Eliana; Faustino, Maria Af; Neves, Maria Gpms; Cunha, Angela; Tome, Joao; Almeida, Adelaide

    2014-02-01

    The emergence of microbial resistance is becoming a global problem in clinical and environmental areas. As such, the development of drugs with novel modes of action will be vital to meet the threats created by the rise in microbial resistance. Microbial photodynamic inactivation is receiving considerable attention for its potentialities as a new antimicrobial treatment. This review addresses the interactions between photosensitizers and bacterial cells (binding site and cellular localization), the ultrastructural, morphological and functional changes observed at initial stages and during the course of photodynamic inactivation, the oxidative alterations in specific molecular targets, and a possible development of resistance.

  1. Myogenic tone is impaired at low arterial pressure in mice deficient in the low-voltage-activated Cav3.1 T-type Ca2+ channel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Björling, K.; Morita, H.; Olsen, M. F.

    2013-01-01

    Using mice deficient in the CaV 3.1 T-type Ca(2+) channel, the aim of the present study was to elucidate the molecular identity of non-L-type channels involved in vascular tone regulation in mesenteric arteries and arterioles....

  2. Orchestrated Action of PP2A Antagonizes Atg13 Phosphorylation and Promotes Autophagy after the Inactivation of TORC1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akter Mst Yeasmin

    Full Text Available Target of rapamycin complex 1 (TORC1 phosphorylates autophagy-related Atg13 and represses autophagy under nutrient-rich conditions. However, when TORC1 becomes inactive upon nutrient depletion or treatment with the TORC1 inhibitor rapamycin, Atg13 dephosphorylation occurs rapidly, and autophagy is induced. At present, the phosphatases involved in Atg13 dephosphorylation remain unknown. Here, we show that two protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A phosphatases, PP2A-Cdc55 and PP2A-Rts1, which are activated by inactivation of TORC1, are required for sufficient Atg13 dephosphorylation and autophagy induction after TORC1 inactivation in budding yeast. After rapamycin treatment, dephosphorylation of Atg13, activation of Atg1 kinase, pre-autophagosomal structure (PAS formation and autophagy induction are all impaired in PP2A-deleted cells. Conversely, overexpression of non-phosphorylatable Atg13 suppressed defects in autophagy in PP2A mutant. This study revealed that the orchestrated action of PP2A antagonizes Atg13 phosphorylation and promotes autophagy after the inactivation of TORC1.

  3. Inactivation of Candida biofilms by non-thermal plasma and its enhancement for fungistatic effect of antifungal drugs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Sun

    Full Text Available We investigated the antifungal effect of non-thermal plasma, as well as its combination with common antifungal drugs, against Candida biofilms. A direct current atmospheric pressure He/O(2 (2% plasma microjet (PMJ was used to treat Candida biofilms in a 96-well plate. Inactivation efficacies of the biofilms were evaluated by XTT assay and counting colony forming units (CFUs. Morphological properties of the biofilms were evaluated by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM. The sessile minimal inhibitory concentrations (SMICs of fluconazole, amphotericin B, and caspofungin for the biofilms were also tested. Electron Spin Resonance (ESR spectroscopy was used to detect the reactive oxygen species (ROS generated directly and indirectly by PMJ. The Candida biofilms were completely inactivated after 1 min PMJ treatment, where severely deformed fungal elements were observed in SEM images. The SMICs of the tested antifungal drugs for the plasma-treated biofilms were decreased by 2-6 folds of dilution, compared to those of the untreated controls. ROS such as hydroxyl radical ((•OH, superoxide anion radical ((•O(2 (- and singlet molecular oxygen ((1O(2 were detected by ESR. We hence conclude that He/O(2 (2% plasma alone, as well as in combination with common antifungal drugs, is able to inactivate Candida biofilms rapidly. The generation of ROS is believed to be one of the underlying mechanisms for the fungicidal activity of plasma.

  4. Inactivation of Candida biofilms by non-thermal plasma and its enhancement for fungistatic effect of antifungal drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yi; Yu, Shuang; Sun, Peng; Wu, Haiyan; Zhu, Weidong; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Jue; Fang, Jing; Li, Ruoyu

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the antifungal effect of non-thermal plasma, as well as its combination with common antifungal drugs, against Candida biofilms. A direct current atmospheric pressure He/O(2) (2%) plasma microjet (PMJ) was used to treat Candida biofilms in a 96-well plate. Inactivation efficacies of the biofilms were evaluated by XTT assay and counting colony forming units (CFUs). Morphological properties of the biofilms were evaluated by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). The sessile minimal inhibitory concentrations (SMICs) of fluconazole, amphotericin B, and caspofungin for the biofilms were also tested. Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) spectroscopy was used to detect the reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated directly and indirectly by PMJ. The Candida biofilms were completely inactivated after 1 min PMJ treatment, where severely deformed fungal elements were observed in SEM images. The SMICs of the tested antifungal drugs for the plasma-treated biofilms were decreased by 2-6 folds of dilution, compared to those of the untreated controls. ROS such as hydroxyl radical ((•)OH), superoxide anion radical ((•)O(2) (-)) and singlet molecular oxygen ((1)O(2)) were detected by ESR. We hence conclude that He/O(2) (2%) plasma alone, as well as in combination with common antifungal drugs, is able to inactivate Candida biofilms rapidly. The generation of ROS is believed to be one of the underlying mechanisms for the fungicidal activity of plasma.

  5. A bivalent recombinant protein inactivates HIV-1 by targeting the gp41 prehairpin fusion intermediate induced by CD4 D1D2 domains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Lu

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most currently approved anti-HIV drugs (e.g., reverse transcriptase inhibitors, protease inhibitors and fusion/entry inhibitors must act inside or on surface of the target cell to inhibit HIV infection, but none can directly inactivate virions away from cells. Although soluble CD4 (sCD4 can inactivate laboratory-adapted HIV-1 strains, it fails to reduce the viral loads in clinical trials because of its low potency against primary isolates and tendency to enhance HIV-1 infection at low concentration. Thus, it is essential to design a better HIV inactivator with improved potency for developing new anti-HIV therapeutics that can actively attack the virus in the circulation before it attaches to and enter into the target cell. Results We engineered a bivalent HIV-1 inactivator, designated 2DLT, by linking the D1D2 domain of CD4 to T1144, the next generation HIV fusion inhibitor, with a 35-mer linker. The D1D2 domain in this soluble 2DLT protein could bind to the CD4-binding site and induce the formation of the gp41 prehairpin fusion-intermediate (PFI, but showed no sCD4-mediated enhancement of HIV-1 infection. The T1144 domain in 2DLT then bound to the exposed PFI, resulting in rapid inactivation of HIV-1 virions in the absence of the target cell. Beside, 2DLT could also inhibit fusion of the virus with the target cell if the virion escapes the first attack of 2DLT. Conclusion This bivalent molecule can serve as a dual barrier against HIV infection by first inactivating HIV-1 virions away from cells and then blocking HIV-1 entry on the target cell surface, indicating its potential for development as a new class of anti-HIV drug.

  6. Inactivation of penicillin acylase from Kluyvera citrophila by N-ethoxycarbonyl-2-ethoxy-1,2-dihydroquinoline: a case of time-dependent non-covalent enzyme inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín, J; Mancheño, J M; Arche, R

    1993-01-01

    Penicillin acylase (PA) from Kluyvera citrophila was inhibited by N-ethoxycarbonyl-2-ethoxy-1,2-dihydroquinoline (EEDQ), a specific carboxy-group-reactive reagent. Enzyme activity progressively decreased to a residual value depending on EEDQ concentration. Neither enzymic nor non-enzymic decomposition of EEDQ is concomitant with PA inactivation. Moreover, enzyme re-activation is achieved by chromatographic removal of EEDQ, pH increase or displacement of the reagent with penicillin G. It was then concluded that PA inactivation is due to an equilibrium reaction. The kinetics of enzyme inactivation was analysed by fitting data to theoretical equations derived in accordance with this mechanism. Corrections for re-activation during the enzyme assay were a necessary introduction. The pH-dependence of the rate constant for EEDQ hydrolysis either alone or in the presence of enzyme was studied by u.v. spectroscopy. It turned out to be coincident with the pH-dependence of the forward and reverse rate constants for the inactivation process. It is suggested that previous protonation of the EEDQ molecule is required for these reactions to occur. The thermodynamic values associated with the overall reaction showed little change. Finally it is proposed that the inactivation of PA by EEDQ proceeds through a two-step reaction. The initial and rapid reversible binding is followed by a slow, time-dependent, non-covalent, reversible inactivating step. The expected behaviour in the case of enzyme modification by covalent activation of carboxy residues is also reviewed. PMID:8489517

  7. Influenza (flu) vaccine (Inactivated or Recombinant): What you need to know

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... taken in its entirety from the CDC Inactivated Influenza Vaccine Information Statement (VIS) www.cdc.gov/vaccines/hcp/vis/vis-statements/flu.html CDC review information for Inactivated Influenza VIS: ...

  8. High pressure processing's potential to inactivate norovirus and other fooodborne viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    High pressure processing (HPP) can inactivate human norovirus. However, all viruses are not equally susceptible to HPP. Pressure treatment parameters such as required pressure levels, initial pressurization temperatures, and pressurization times substantially affect inactivation. How food matrix ...

  9. X inactivation in Rett syndrome: A preliminary study showing partial preferential inactivation of paternal X with the M27{beta} probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camus, P.; Abbadi, N.; Gilgenkrantz, S. [Laboratoire de Genetique, Vandoeuvre les Nancy (France)

    1994-04-15

    Rett syndrome (RS) is a severe progressive neurological disorder occurring exclusively in females. Most cases are sporadic. The few familial cases (less than 1%) cannot be explained by a simple mode of inheritance. Several hypotheses have been proposed: X-linked male lethal mutation, maternal uniparental disomy, fresh mutation on the X chromosome, involvement of mitochondrial DNA and differential inactivation with metabolic interference of X-borne alleles. The authors have examined the pattern of X inactivation in 10 affected girls who were selected according to the clinical criteria previously described and accepted by the French Rett Scientific Committee. The X inactivation pattern was studied by analysis of methylation at the hypervariable locus DXS255 with the M27{beta} probe. The results show a more-or-less skewed inactivation of paternal X in 8 Rett females, and 2 cases of symmetrical inactivation. In control girls, inactivation was symmetrical cases and the maternal X has been preferentially inactivated in the other 2 cases. In no case was a total skewed inactivation observed. Though there was clear evidence for a preferential paternal X inactivation that was statistically significant further studies are necessary to establish a relationship between X inactivation pattern and Rett syndrome.

  10. Inactivation of Ascaris suum by short-chain fatty acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascaris suum eggs were inactivated in distilled water and digested sludge by butanoic, pentanoic and hexanoic acids. The fatty acids (FA) were only effective when protonated and at sufficient concentration. The conjugate bases were not effective at the concentrations evaluated. Predictions from an ...

  11. Testing household disinfectants for the inactivation of helminth eggs ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-10-04

    Oct 4, 2016 ... Keywords: Ascaris, carbolic acid, disinfectant, eggs, inactivation, pit latrine, sanitation, sodium hypochlorite. INTRODUCTION. The lack of ... ronment providing temperature (25°C) and humidity (> 55%) are optimal. ...... The pH of the stomach is strongly acidic, but pH of the gas- trointestinal tract is in the ...

  12. 40 CFR 141.720 - Inactivation toolbox components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Cryptosporidium, Giardia lamblia, and virus treatment credits for ultraviolet (UV) light reactors by achieving the... unfiltered systems. UV Dose Table for Cryptosporidium, Giardia lamblia, and Virus Inactivation Credit Log credit Cryptosporidium UV dose (mJ/cm2) Giardia lamblia UV dose (mJ/cm2) VirusUV dose (mJ/cm2) (i) 0.5 1...

  13. Application of electrolysis to inactivation of antibacterials in clinical use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Takashi; Hirose, Jun; Kobayashi, Toyohide; Hiro, Naoki; Kondo, Fumitake; Tamai, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Kazuhiko; Sano, Kouichi

    2013-04-01

    Contamination of surface water by antibacterial pharmaceuticals (antibacterials) from clinical settings may affect aquatic organisms, plants growth, and environmental floral bacteria. One of the methods to decrease the contamination is inactivation of antibacterials before being discharged to the sewage system. Recently, we reported the novel method based on electrolysis for detoxifying wastewater containing antineoplastics. In the present study, to clarify whether the electrolysis method is applicable to the inactivation of antibacterials, we electrolyzed solutions of 10 groups of individual antibacterials including amikacin sulfate (AMK) and a mixture (MIX) of some commercial antibacterials commonly prescribed at hospitals, and measured their antibacterial activities. AMK was inactivated in its antibacterial activities and its concentration decreased by electrolysis in a time-dependent manner. Eighty to ninety-nine percent of almost all antibacterials and MIX were inactivated within 6h of electrolysis. Additionally, cytotoxicity was not detected in any of the electrolyzed solutions of antibacterials and MIX by the Molt-4-based cytotoxicity test. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Expression of a ribosome inactivating protein (curcin 2) in Jatropha ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Expression of a ribosome inactivating protein (curcin 2) in Jatropha curcas is induced by stress ... In addition, the 32 kDa band is nearly the molecular weight of curcin 2. ... curcin 2. The presence of this protein molecular marker under stresses may provide an experimental foundation to study the stress proteins in J. curcas.

  15. Significance of cobalamin inactivation in normal and malignant hematopoiesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.A.M. Ermens (Anton)

    1990-01-01

    textabstractThis thesis deals with several aspects of the effects of cobalamin inactivation by nitrous oxide on cellular folate metabolism and the consequences on normal and malignant hematopoiesis. Kroes et al. demonstrated the antileukemic effects of nitrous oxide either or not in combination

  16. Inactivation of pathogens on pork by steam-ultrasound treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morild, Rikke K; Christiansen, Pia; Sørensen, Anders Morten Hay

    2011-01-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate a new pathogen inactivation concept that combines application of pressurized steam simultaneously with high-power ultrasound through a series of nozzles. On skin and meat surfaces of pork jowl samples, counts of total viable bacteria were reduced by 1...

  17. Inactivation of bacteria in sewage sludge by gamma radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandya, G A; Kapila, S; Kelkar, V B; Negi, S; Modi, V V

    1987-01-01

    The survival of certain bacterial cultures suspended in sewage sludge and exposed to gamma-radiation was studied. The inactivation patterns of most of the organisms were significantly different when irradiation was performed using sewage samples collected in the summer and monsoon seasons. The summer sample collected from the anaerobic digestor afforded significant protection to both Gram negative and Gram positive organisms. This was evident by the increase in dose required to bring about a 6 log cycle reduction in viable count of the bacterial cultures, when suspended in sewage samples instead of phosphate buffer. The observations made using monsoon digestor samples were quite different. This sewage sludge greatly enhanced inactivation by gamma-radiation in most cases. The effects of certain chemicals on the inactivation patterns of two organisms-Salmonella typhi and Shigella flexneri-were examined. Arsenate, mercury and lead salts sensitised S. typhi, while barium acetate and sodium sulphide protected this culture against gamma-radiation. In the case of Sh. flexneri, barium acetate and iodacetamide proved to be radioprotectors. The effects of some chemicals on the inactivation pattern of Sh. flexneri cells irradiated in sludge are also discussed.

  18. Use of genetic algorithms for high hydrostatic pressure inactivation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Use of genetic algorithms for high hydrostatic pressure inactivation of microorganisms. ... Depending on the properties of HHP equipment (maximum operating pressure) or the type of the food product (heat-sensitive), it could be possible to select the suitable P-T-t trio among the alternatives. This study reveals that GAs could ...

  19. Inactivation of enveloped virus by laser-driven protein aggregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsen, Shaw-Wei D.; Chapa, Travis; Beatty, Wandy; Tsen, Kong-Thon; Yu, Dong; Achilefu, Samuel

    2012-12-01

    Ultrafast lasers in the visible and near-infrared range have emerged as a potential new method for pathogen reduction of blood products and pharmaceuticals. However, the mechanism of enveloped virus inactivation by this method is unknown. We report the inactivation as well as the molecular and structural effects caused by visible (425 nm) femtosecond laser irradiation on murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV), an enveloped, double-stranded DNA virus. Our results show that laser irradiation (1) caused a 5-log reduction in MCMV titer, (2) did not cause significant changes to the global structure of MCMV virions including membrane and capsid, as assessed by electron microscopy, (3) produced no evidence of double-strand breaks or crosslinking in MCMV genomic DNA, and (4) caused selective aggregation of viral capsid and tegument proteins. We propose a model in which ultrafast laser irradiation induces partial unfolding of viral proteins by disrupting hydrogen bonds and/or hydrophobic interactions, leading to aggregation of closely associated viral proteins and inactivation of the virus. These results provide new insight into the inactivation of enveloped viruses by visible femtosecond lasers at the molecular level, and help pave the way for the development of a new ultrafast laser technology for pathogen reduction.

  20. Inactivation of a transgene due to transposition of insertion ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Agrobacterium strains harbour insertion sequences, which are known to transpose into genomes as well as into Ti plasmids. In this study we report the inactivation of a transgene due to transposition of the A. tumefaciens insertion sequence IS136. The transposition was discovered following transformation of plant tissues, ...

  1. Photoactivated polycationic bioactive chitosan nanoparticles inactivate bacterial endotoxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Annie; Cordova, Martha; Kishen, Anil

    2015-05-01

    The current root canal disinfection protocols fail to markedly inactivate bacterial endotoxins from infected root dentin. This study aimed to evaluate the ability of antibacterial photodynamic therapy with chitosan-conjugated rose bengal nanoparticles (CSRBnps) to selectively inactivate endotoxins/lipopolysaccharides (LPSs). Antimicrobial agents such as calcium hydroxide (Ca[OH]2), chitosan nanoparticles (CSnps), CSRBnps, and methylene blue (MB) were assessed for their ability to neutralize LPSs obtained from Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a time-dependent interaction with/without photoactivation (20 and 40 J/cm(2)). The inflammatory potential of the treated/untreated LPSs was assessed on macrophage cells (RAW 267.4) using nitric oxide- and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (tumor necrosis factor α and interleukin-6 expression)-based analysis. These antimicrobials were tested directly on macrophage cells for cytotoxicity using the mitochondrial activity assay and light microscopy. The data were analyzed using 1-way analysis of variance and the Tukey test. CSnps were least effective in LPS inactivation. Interluekin-6 expression was reduced only with CSRBnp treatment. CSnps and CSRBnps were completely nontoxic, and MB showed slight toxicity to macrophage cells. Ca(OH)2 was highly cytotoxic (P endotoxins and the subsequent reduction of all tested inflammatory markers from activated macrophages. Antimicrobial CSRBnps in combination with photodynamic therapy showed the potential to effectively inactivate bacterial endotoxins. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Inactivation of dairy manure-borne pathogens by anaerobic digestion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Anaerobic digestion of animal manure has the potential to inactivate enteric pathogens, thereby reducing exposures to livestock and humans when the products of digestion are disposed by land-spreading or irrigation or returned to livestock uses such as bedding. Data on digester effectiv...

  3. Photodynamic inactivation of fibroblasts by a cationic porphyrin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lambrechts, Saskia A. G.; Schwartz, Kevin R.; Aalders, Maurice C. G.; Dankert, Jacob B.

    2005-01-01

    An important determinant of the clinical applicability and value of antimicrobial photodynamic inactivation (PDI) is the cytotoxicity of the treatment to human cells. We evaluated the in vitro cytotoxicity of PDI to human dermal fibroblasts using 5-phenyl-10,15,20-tris(N-methyl-4-pyridyl)porphyrin

  4. Drying of liquid food droplets : enzyme inactivation and multicomponent diffusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meerdink, G.

    1993-01-01

    In this thesis the drying of liquid food droplets is studied from three different points of view: drying kinetics, enzyme inactivation and multicomponent diffusion. Mathematical models are developed and validated experimentally.

    Drying experiments are performed with suspended

  5. Evaluation of the Efficacy of Inactivated Oil-Emulsion Newcastle ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Since the first recognition of Newcastle disease (ND) in Nigeria, it has been observed to be enzootic despite the intensive vaccination policy, leading to significant economic losses in the poultry industry. This study evaluated the ability of inactivated oil-emulsion ND Komarov vaccine to protect laying chickens from challenge ...

  6. Indicators for suicide substrate inactivation: A kinetic investigation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Suicide substrate kinetic pathway and a proposed set of indicators, some theoretical and a few practical ones, that can decisively conclude enzyme inactivation are considered. Steady-state approximation is assumed not only when a catalytic amount of enzyme is used but also for any substrate-enzyme ratio. In each ...

  7. Photodynamic inactivation of Aspergillus flavus mediated by Bidens ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Occurrence of mycotoxins in food and animal feeds poses major health risks to human and animals, and effective control requires integration of crop management strategies both in the field and during post-harvest storage and processing. Photodynamic inactivation is a novel light-based approach which offers a promising ...

  8. Strategy to inactivate Clostridium perfringens spores in meat products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtar, Saeed; Paredes-Sabja, Daniel; Torres, J Antonio; Sarker, Mahfuzur R

    2009-05-01

    The current study aimed to develop an inactivation strategy for Clostridium perfringens spores in meat through a combination of spore activation at low pressure (100-200 MPa, 7 min) and elevated temperature (80 degrees C, 10 min); spore germination at high temperatures (55, 60 or 65 degrees C); and inactivation of germinated spores with elevated temperatures (80 and 90 degrees C, 10 and 20 min) and high pressure (586 MPa, at 23 and 73 degrees C, 10 min). Low pressures (100-200 MPa) were insufficient to efficiently activate C. perfringens spores for germination. However, C. perfringens spores were efficiently activated with elevated temperature (80 degrees C, 10 min), and germinated at temperatures lethal for vegetative cells (>or= 55 degrees C) when incubated for 60 min with a mixture of L-asparagine and KCl (AK) in phosphate buffer (pH 7) and in poultry meat. Inactivation of spores (approximately 4 decimal reduction) in meat by elevated temperatures (80-90 degrees C for 20 min) required a long germination period (55 degrees C for 60 min). However, similar inactivation level was reached with shorter germination period (55 degrees C for 15 min) when spore contaminated-meat was treated with pressure-assisted thermal processing (568 MPa, 73 degrees C, 10 min). Therefore, the most efficient strategy to inactivate C. perfringens spores in poultry meat containing 50 mM AK consisted: (i) a primary heat treatment (80 degrees C, 10 min) to pasteurize and denature the meat proteins and to activate C. perfringens spores for germination; (ii) cooling of the product to 55 degrees C in about 20 min and further incubation at 55 degrees C for about 15 min for spore germination; and (iii) inactivation of germinated spores by pressure-assisted thermal processing (586 MPa at 73 degrees C for 10 min). Collectively, this study demonstrates the feasibility of an alternative and novel strategy to inactivate C. perfringens spores in meat products formulated with germinants specific for C

  9. 21 CFR 866.5250 - Complement C2 inhibitor (inactivator) immunological test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Test Systems § 866.5250 Complement C2 inhibitor (inactivator) immunological test system. (a) Identification. A complement C1 inhibitor (inactivator) immunological test system is a device that consists of... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Complement C2 inhibitor (inactivator...

  10. Inactivation Effect of Antibiotic-Resistant Gene Using Chlorine Disinfection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Furukawa

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to elucidate the inactivation effects on the antibiotic-resistance gene (vanA of vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE using chlorination, a disinfection method widely used in various water treatment facilities. Suspensions of VRE were prepared by adding VRE to phosphate-buffered saline, or the sterilized secondary effluent of a wastewater treatment plant. The inactivation experiments were carried out at several chlorine concentrations and stirring time. Enterococci concentration and presence of vanA were determined. The enterococci concentration decreased as chlorine concentrations and stirring times increased, with more than 7.0 log reduction occurring under the following conditions: 40 min stirring at 0.5 mg Cl2/L, 20 min stirring at 1.0 mg Cl2/L, and 3 min stirring at 3.0 mg Cl2/L. In the inactivation experiment using VRE suspended in secondary effluent, the culturable enterococci required much higher chlorine concentration and longer treatment time for complete disinfection than the cases of suspension of VRE. However, vanA was detected in all chlorinated suspensions of VRE, even in samples where no enterococcal colonies were present on the medium agar plate. The chlorine disinfection was not able to destroy antibiotic-resistance genes, though it can inactivate and decrease bacterial counts of antibiotic-resistant bacteria (ARB. Therefore, it was suggested that remaining ARB and/or antibiotic-resistance gene in inactivated bacterial cells after chlorine disinfection tank could be discharged into water environments.

  11. Randomized Trials Comparing Inactivated Vaccine after Medium- or High-titer Measles Vaccine with Standard Titer Measles Vaccine after Inactivated Vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aaby, Peter; Ravn, Henrik; Benn, Christine S.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Observational studies have suggested that girls have higher mortality if their most recent immunization is an inactivated vaccine rather than a live vaccine. We therefore reanalyzed 5 randomized trials of early measles vaccine (MV) in which it was possible to compare an inactivated...... vaccines [after medium-titer MV (MTMV) or high-titer MV (HTMV)] and a live standard titer MV (after an initial inactivated vaccine). Methods: The trials were conducted in Sudan, Senegal, The Gambia and Guinea-Bissau. The intervention group received live MTMV or HTMV from 4 to 5 months...... and then an inactivated vaccine from 9 to 10 months of age; the control children received inactivated vaccine/placebo from 4 to 5 months and standard titer MV from 9 to 10 months of age. We compared mortality from 9 months until end of study at 3 to 5 years of age for children who received inactivated vaccine (after MTMV...

  12. Cytolytic T lymphocyte responses to metabolically inactivated stimulator cells. I. Metabolic inactivation impairs both CD and LD antigen signals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelso, A.; Boyle, W.

    1982-03-01

    The effects of metabolic inactivation of spleen cells on antigen presentation to precursors of alloreactive cytolytic T lymphocytes (T/sub c/) were examined. By serological methods, populations inactivated by ultraviolet irradiation, glutaraldehyde fixation or plasma membrane isolation were found to retain normal levels of H-2K/D and Ia antigens. However, comparison of the antigen doses required to stimulate secondary T/sub c/ responses in mixed leukocyte culture showed that the inactivated preparations were approximately 10-fold less immunogenic than X-irradiated spleen cells. Their total inability to stimulate primary cytolytic responses pointed to at least a 100-fold impairment of immunogenicity for unprimed T/sub c/ precursors in the case of uv-irradiated and glutaraldehyde-treated stimulator cells, and at least a 10-fold impairment for membrane fragments. Experiments showing that the capacity of cell monolayers to absorb precursor T/sub c/ from unprimed spleen populations was reduced following uv-irradiation or glutaraldehyde treatment provided direct evidence that this loss of immunogenicity was due in part to suboptimal antigen presentation to precursor T/sub c/. It is concluded that, in addition to the traditional view that these treatments damage the ''LD'' signal to helper T lymphocytes, metabolic inactivation also impairs recognition of ''CD'' determinants by precursor T/sub c/.

  13. First comparison of adjuvant for trivalent inactivated Haemophilus parasuis serovars 4, 5 and 12 vaccines against Glässer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Qiao; Zhao, Zhanqin; Liu, Huisheng; Chen, Kunpeng; Xue, Yun; Wang, Le

    2015-12-15

    Haemophilus parasuis has had a huge impact in the swine industry throughout the world. Inactivated bacterium for H. parasuis is a traditional vaccine that can elicit efficient protection against homologous challenges. The objective of this study was to screen for the adjuvant-enhanced immune effect of trivalent inactivated H. parasuis serovars 4, 5 and 12 (prevalent serovars in China) vaccines against Glässer's disease. The adjuvants of mineral oil, aluminum hydroxide, Montanide GEL 01 PR, Montanide IMS 1313N VG and Montanide ISA 760 VG were used to make emulsified inactivated H. parasuis serovars 4, 5 and 12, respectively. Safety, antibody titer and protective efficacy of these vaccines were examined separately in piglets, and the feasibility of microagglutination test for detecting antibody titer of H. parasuis was confirmed for the first time. Due to easy of injection, high safety, rapidly immune responses, high concentrations of antibody, and 100% of protective efficacy for piglets, Montanide GEL 01 PR adjuvant can provide more homologous serovar protection than other domestically developed inactivated vaccines and should be used as a candidate adjuvant. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Synergistic Effect of Atmospheric-pressure Plasma and TiO2 Photocatalysis on Inactivation of Escherichia coli Cells in Aqueous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Renwu; Zhou, Rusen; Zhang, Xianhui; Li, Jiangwei; Wang, Xingquan; Chen, Qiang; Yang, Size; Chen, Zhong; Bazaka, Kateryna; (Ken) Ostrikov, Kostya

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric-pressure plasma and TiO2 photocatalysis have been widely investigated separately for the management and reduction of microorganisms in aqueous solutions. In this paper, the two methods were combined in order to achieve a more profound understanding of their interactions in disinfection of water contaminated by Escherichia coli. Under water discharges carried out by microplasma jet arrays can result in a rapid inactivation of E. coli cells. The inactivation efficiency is largely dependent on the feed gases used, the plasma treatment time, and the discharge power. Compared to atmospheric-pressure N2, He and air microplasma arrays, O2 microplasma had the highest activity against E. coli cells in aqueous solution, and showed >99.9% bacterial inactivation efficiency within 4 min. Addition of TiO2 photocatalytic film to the plasma discharge reactor significantly enhanced the inactivation efficiency of the O2 microplasma system, decreasing the time required to achieve 99.9% killing of E. coli cells to 1 min. This may be attributed to the enhancement of ROS generation due to high catalytic activity and stability of the TiO2 photocatalyst in the combined plasma-TiO2 systems. Present work demonstrated the synergistic effect of the two agents, which can be correlated in order to maximize treatment efficiency. PMID:28004829

  15. Proposed ionic bond between Arg300 and Glu270 and Glu271 are not involved in inactivation of a mutant firefly luciferase (LRR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobhani-Damavandifar, Zahra; Hosseinkhani, Saman; Sajedi, Reza H

    2016-05-01

    The weakness of firefly luciferase is its rapid inactivation. Many studies have been done to develop thermostable luciferases. One of these modifications was LRR mutant in which the Leu300 was substituted with Arg in the E(354)RR(356)Lampyris turkestanicus luciferase as template. LRR was more thermostable than the wild type but with only 0.02% activity. In this study, site-directed mutagenesis was used to change the proposed ionic bond between the Arg and two neighboring residues (Glu270 and Glu271), to understand if the induced interactions were responsible for inactivation in LRR. Our results showed that substitution of Glu270 and 271 with Ala removed the interactions but the activity of enzyme did not return. The E270A mutant was more active than LRR but the E271A and E270A/E271A mutants were inactive. Fluorescence and CD measurements showed that these mutations were accompanied by conformational changes. Extrinsic fluorescence measurement and obtained quenching data by KI and acrylamide also confirmed that the mutants were less compact than the LRR enzyme. In conclusion, in LRR, the interactions between Arg300 and Glu270 and Glu271 were not responsible for the enzyme inactivation and it is proposed that the enzyme inactivation is due to conformational changes of LRR mutant of firefly luciferase. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Pulsed light inactivation of murine norovirus, Tulane virus, Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella in suspension and on berry surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yaoxin; Ye, Mu; Cao, Xinang; Chen, Haiqiang

    2017-02-01

    Pulsed light (PL) inactivation of two human norovirus (HuNoV) surrogates, murine norovirus (MNV-1) and Tulane virus (TV), and two bacterial pathogens, Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella, were evaluated. The viruses and bacteria were suspended in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) to final populations of ∼6 log PFU/mL and ∼6 log CFU/mL, respectively. Both viral and bacterial suspensions were then irradiated by PL for different durations and the reductions of each microorganisms were determined. MNV-1 and TV were significantly (P suspension. MNV-1, Salmonella and E. coli O157:H7 were also inoculated on strawberries and blueberries and the PL inactivation of each microorganism was determined. Lower inactivation of each microorganism was achieved on berry surfaces than in PBS suspension. This study shows that PL can induce rapid inactivation of MNV-1, TV, Salmonella and E. coli O157:H7 in clear suspension with viruses more resistant to PL treatment than bacteria. The efficacy of PL treatment is substantially influenced by food surface structure. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Calcium current-dependent and voltage-dependent inactivation of calcium channels in Helix aspersa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, A. M.; Morimoto, K.; Tsuda, Y.; Wilson, D. L.

    1981-01-01

    1. Inactivation of the Ca channels has been examined in isolated nerve cell bodies of Helix aspersa using the suction pipette method for voltage clamp and internal perfusion. 2. Satisfactory suppression of outward currents was essential. This was achieved over most of the voltage range by substitution of Cs ion for K ion and by the use of TEA intra- and extracellularly and 4-AP extracellularly. A small time- and voltage-dependent non-specific current remained at potentials above +60 mV. 3. In these solutions, Ca current approaches ECa but cannot be detected in the outward direction. The Ca channel appears to be impermeable to Cs and Tris ions. 4. Inactivation of Ca currents occurs as a bi-exponential process. The faster rate is 10-20 times the slower rate and is about one twentieth the rate of activation. The development of inactivation during a single voltage-clamp step and the onset of inactivation produced by prepulses followed after brief intervals by a test pulse, have roughly similar time courses. 5. The rates of inactivation increase monotonically at potentials more positive than about -25 mV. The amount of steady-state inactivation increases with membrane depolarizations to potentials of about +50 mV. At more positive potentials, steady-state inactivation is reduced. 6. Intracellular EGTA slows the faster rate of inactivation of ICa and reduces the amount of steady-state inactivation measured with a standard two pulse protocol. The effect is specifically related to Ca chelation and hydrogen ions are not involved. This component of inactivation is referred to as Ca current-dependent inactivation and is consistent with observations that increased Cai inactivates the Ca channel. The process does not depend upon current flow alone since Ba currents of comparable or greater magnitude have smaller initial rates of inactivation. Furthermore, application of Ba ion intracellularly in large concentrations has no effect on steady-state inactivation. 7. The bi

  18. Rapid Prototyping Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The ARDEC Rapid Prototyping (RP) Laboratory was established in December 1992 to provide low cost RP capabilities to the ARDEC engineering community. The Stratasys,...

  19. Photochemical inactivation of pathogenic bacteria in human platelet concentrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, L; Londe, H; Janda, J M; Hanson, C V; Corash, L

    1994-05-01

    Platelet concentrates (PC) may be infrequently contaminated with low levels of bacteria that can cause septicemia and death in patients receiving transfusion therapy. We evaluated the efficacy of a photochemical decontamination (PCD) technique using 8-methoxypsoralen (8-MOP) and long wavelength UV light (UVA) to inactivate bacteria in standard therapeutic PC. Twelve phylogenetically distinct pathogenic bacteria, 5 gram-positive and 7 gram-negative organisms, were seeded into PC to a final challenge dose ranging from 10(5) to 10(7) colony-forming units (CFU)/mL. Contaminated PC were treated with 8-MOP (5 micrograms/mL) and 5 J/cm2 of UVA, a PCD treatment regimen found to adequately preserve in vitro platelet function. Greater than 10(5) CFU/mL of all 5 gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus epidermidis, Streptococcus pyogenes, Listeria monocytogenes, and Corynebacterium minutissimum) and 2 of the gram-negative (Escherichia coli and Yersinia enterocolitica) organisms were inactivated. The remaining 5 gram-negative organisms were more resistant, with less than 10(1) to 10(3.7) CFU/mL inactivated under these conditions. The inactivation efficiency for this resistant group of gram-negative organisms was improved when PC were resuspended in a synthetic storage medium with reduced plasma protein concentration (15%) and an increased 8-MOP concentration (23.4 micrograms/mL). Illumination with 3 J/cm2 of UVA in this system inactivated greater than 10(5) CFU/mL of 4 resistant gram-negative organisms (Salmonella choleraesuis, Enterobacter cloacae, Serratia marcescens, and Klebsiella pneumoniae) and 10(4.1) CFU/mL of the most resistant gram-negative organism (Pseudomonas aeruginosa). This level of PCD treatment did not adversely affect in vitro platelet function. These results demonstrate that PCD using 8-MOP (5 to 23.4 micrograms/mL) effectively inactivated high levels of pathogenic bacteria in PC with adequate preservation of in vitro platelet properties.

  20. Modeling of human factor Va inactivation by activated protein C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bravo Maria

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Because understanding of the inventory, connectivity and dynamics of the components characterizing the process of coagulation is relatively mature, it has become an attractive target for physiochemical modeling. Such models can potentially improve the design of therapeutics. The prothrombinase complex (composed of the protease factor (FXa and its cofactor FVa plays a central role in this network as the main producer of thrombin, which catalyses both the activation of platelets and the conversion of fibrinogen to fibrin, the main substances of a clot. A key negative feedback loop that prevents clot propagation beyond the site of injury is the thrombin-dependent generation of activated protein C (APC, an enzyme that inactivates FVa, thus neutralizing the prothrombinase complex. APC inactivation of FVa is complex, involving the production of partially active intermediates and “protection” of FVa from APC by both FXa and prothrombin. An empirically validated mathematical model of this process would be useful in advancing the predictive capacity of comprehensive models of coagulation. Results A model of human APC inactivation of prothrombinase was constructed in a stepwise fashion by analyzing time courses of FVa inactivation in empirical reaction systems with increasing number of interacting components and generating corresponding model constructs of each reaction system. Reaction mechanisms, rate constants and equilibrium constants informing these model constructs were initially derived from various research groups reporting on APC inactivation of FVa in isolation, or in the presence of FXa or prothrombin. Model predictions were assessed against empirical data measuring the appearance and disappearance of multiple FVa degradation intermediates as well as prothrombinase activity changes, with plasma proteins derived from multiple preparations. Our work integrates previously published findings and through the cooperative

  1. Fast- or slow-inactivated state preference of Na+ channel inhibitors: a simulation and experimental study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Karoly

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Sodium channels are one of the most intensively studied drug targets. Sodium channel inhibitors (e.g., local anesthetics, anticonvulsants, antiarrhythmics and analgesics exert their effect by stabilizing an inactivated conformation of the channels. Besides the fast-inactivated conformation, sodium channels have several distinct slow-inactivated conformational states. Stabilization of a slow-inactivated state has been proposed to be advantageous for certain therapeutic applications. Special voltage protocols are used to evoke slow inactivation of sodium channels. It is assumed that efficacy of a drug in these protocols indicates slow-inactivated state preference. We tested this assumption in simulations using four prototypical drug inhibitory mechanisms (fast or slow-inactivated state preference, with either fast or slow binding kinetics and a kinetic model for sodium channels. Unexpectedly, we found that efficacy in these protocols (e.g., a shift of the "steady-state slow inactivation curve", was not a reliable indicator of slow-inactivated state preference. Slowly associating fast-inactivated state-preferring drugs were indistinguishable from slow-inactivated state-preferring drugs. On the other hand, fast- and slow-inactivated state-preferring drugs tended to preferentially affect onset and recovery, respectively. The robustness of these observations was verified: i by performing a Monte Carlo study on the effects of randomly modifying model parameters, ii by testing the same drugs in a fundamentally different model and iii by an analysis of the effect of systematically changing drug-specific parameters. In patch clamp electrophysiology experiments we tested five sodium channel inhibitor drugs on native sodium channels of cultured hippocampal neurons. For lidocaine, phenytoin and carbamazepine our data indicate a preference for the fast-inactivated state, while the results for fluoxetine and desipramine are inconclusive. We suggest that

  2. Cometabolic degradation of chlorinated solvents: Bacterial inhibition, inactivation, and recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ely, R.L.; Williamson, K.J.; Hyman, M.R.; Arp, D.J. [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering

    1995-12-31

    This paper summarizes an approach for quantifying degradation kinetics and bacterial activity changes during cometabolic degradation of chlorinated solvents, results from trichloroethylene (TCE) degradation experiments, and a mathematical model addressing fluctuations in activity caused by enzyme inhibition, inactivation, and respondent enzyme synthesis. Using Nitrosomonas duropaea as a slow-growing exemplar capable of effecting cometabolic transformations, quasi-steady-state ammonia oxidation was established in a small bioreactor. A chlorinated solvent was injected to perturb the system, and bacterial activity and solvent degradation were monitored. At TCE concentrations to about 3.5 mg/L, from slight to nearly complete ammonia monooxygenase (AMO) inactivation occurred without causing immediate cell death. Results suggested cellular injury was limited primarily to AMO, most metabolic systems remained functional, and bacterial recovery processes, independent of cell growth, were initiated while degrading TCE.

  3. Polio endgame: the global introduction of inactivated polio vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Manish; Zipursky, Simona; Orenstein, Walt; Garon, Julie; Zaffran, Michel

    2015-05-01

    In 2013, the World Health Assembly endorsed a plan that calls for the ultimate withdrawal of oral polio vaccines (OPV) from all immunization programs globally. The withdrawal would begin in a phased manner with removal of the type 2 component of OPV in 2016 through a global switch from trivalent OPV to bivalent OPV (containing only types 1 and 3). To mitigate risks associated with immunity gaps after OPV type 2 withdrawal, the WHO Strategic Advisory Group of Experts has recommended that all 126 OPV-only using countries introduce at least one dose of inactivated polio vaccine into routine immunization programs by end-2015, before the trivalent OPV-bivalent OPV switch. The introduction of inactivated polio vaccine would reduce risks of reintroduction of type 2 poliovirus by providing some level of seroprotection, facilitating interruption of transmission if outbreaks occur, and accelerating eradication by boosting immunity to types 1 and 3 polioviruses.

  4. Stratosphere Conditions Inactivate Bacterial Endospores from a Mars Spacecraft Assembly Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodadad, Christina L.; Wong, Gregory M.; James, Leandro M.; Thakrar, Prital J.; Lane, Michael A.; Catechis, John A.; Smith, David J.

    2017-04-01

    Every spacecraft sent to Mars is allowed to land viable microbial bioburden, including hardy endospore-forming bacteria resistant to environmental extremes. Earth's stratosphere is severely cold, dry, irradiated, and oligotrophic; it can be used as a stand-in location for predicting how stowaway microbes might respond to the martian surface. We launched E-MIST, a high-altitude NASA balloon payload on 10 October 2015 carrying known quantities of viable Bacillus pumilus SAFR-032 (4.07 × 107 spores per sample), a radiation-tolerant strain collected from a spacecraft assembly facility. The payload spent 8 h at ˜31 km above sea level, exposing bacterial spores to the stratosphere. We found that within 120 and 240 min, spore viability was significantly reduced by 2 and 4 orders of magnitude, respectively. By 480 min, <0.001% of spores carried to the stratosphere remained viable. Our balloon flight results predict that most terrestrial bacteria would be inactivated within the first sol on Mars if contaminated spacecraft surfaces receive direct sunlight. Unfortunately, an instrument malfunction prevented the acquisition of UV light measurements during our balloon mission. To make up for the absence of radiometer data, we calculated a stratosphere UV model and conducted ground tests with a 271.1 nm UVC light source (0.5 W/m2), observing a similarly rapid inactivation rate when using a lower number of contaminants (640 spores per sample). The starting concentration of spores and microconfiguration on hardware surfaces appeared to influence survivability outcomes in both experiments. With the relatively few spores that survived the stratosphere, we performed a resequencing analysis and identified three single nucleotide polymorphisms compared to unexposed controls. It is therefore plausible that bacteria enduring radiation-rich environments (e.g., Earth's upper atmosphere, interplanetary space, or the surface of Mars) may be pushed in evolutionarily consequential directions.

  5. Nonthermal Plasma Inactivation of Food-Borne Pathogens

    OpenAIRE

    Misra, N.; Tiwari, B.; Rahavarao, K.; Cullen, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    Non-thermal plasma (NTP) is electrically energized matter, composed of highly reactive species including gas molecules, charged particles in the form of positive ions, negative ions, free radicals, electrons and quanta of electromagnetic radiation (photons) at near-room temperature. NTP is an emerging nonthermal technology with potential applications for decontamination in the food industries. An upsurge in the research activities for plasma based inactivation of food borne pathogens is evide...

  6. Drying of liquid food droplets : enzyme inactivation and multicomponent diffusion

    OpenAIRE

    Meerdink, G.

    1993-01-01

    In this thesis the drying of liquid food droplets is studied from three different points of view: drying kinetics, enzyme inactivation and multicomponent diffusion. Mathematical models are developed and validated experimentally.

    Drying experiments are performed with suspended droplets and with free falling droplets under spray-drying conditions. The experiments with the free falling droplets are performed in a specially designed drying tower using a resonance nozzle. The reso...

  7. Thermal inactivation of eight Salmonella serotypes on dry corn flour.

    OpenAIRE

    VanCauwenberge, J E; Bothast, R J; Kwolek, W F

    1981-01-01

    Dry heat was used to inactivate Salmonella newington, Salmonella typhimurium, Salmonella anatum, Salmonella kentucky, Salmonella cubana, Salmonella seftenberg, Salmonella thompson, and Salmonella tennessee in corn flour at 10 and 15% moisture. The flour was spray inoculated at 10(5) Salmonella cells per g and then stored at 49 degrees C (120 degrees F); viable Salmonella cells were counted on Trypticase (BBL Microbiology Systems) soy agar plates every 30 min for the first 4 h and then at 4-h ...

  8. Mechanism for Mutational Inactivation of the Tumor Suppressor Smad2

    OpenAIRE

    Prunier, Celine; Ferrand, Nathalie; Frottier, Bertrand; Pessah, Marcia; Atfi, Azeddine

    2001-01-01

    Transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) is a potent natural antiproliferative agent that plays an important role in suppressing tumorigenicity. In numerous tumors, loss of TGF-β responsiveness is associated with inactivating mutations that can occur in components of this signaling pathway, such as the tumor suppressor Smad2. Although a general framework for how Smads transduce TGF-β signals has been proposed, the physiological relevance of alterations of Smad2 functions in promoting tumorigenesi...

  9. Significance of cobalamin inactivation in normal and malignant hematopoiesis

    OpenAIRE

    Ermens, Anton

    1990-01-01

    textabstractThis thesis deals with several aspects of the effects of cobalamin inactivation by nitrous oxide on cellular folate metabolism and the consequences on normal and malignant hematopoiesis. Kroes et al. demonstrated the antileukemic effects of nitrous oxide either or not in combination with other drugs interfering with the folate metabolism (132-136). Especially the potentiation of methotrexate activity in the employed rat model for myeloid leukemia (BNML) after preexposure to nitrou...

  10. The efficacy of preservation methods to inactivate foodborne viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baert, L; Debevere, J; Uyttendaele, M

    2009-05-31

    During the last decade an increased incidence of infections and outbreaks attributed to foodborne viruses, in particular noroviruses (NoV), was observed world wide. The awareness of the presence of viruses on food emphasized the need to acquire knowledge regarding the effect of preservation methods upon viruses. Most foodborne viruses cannot be cultured in the laboratory, which hinders studies of their stability in food. Cultivable surrogate viruses, genetically related to the human infecting strains, are taken as a substitute to define inactivation rates. The last years, the number of survival and inactivation studies using various surrogate viruses increased. In this review, state-of-the-art information regarding the efficacy of preservation methods to reduce the level of viruses on food is compiled. In the first place, the effect of preservation methods establishing microbial growth inhibition (chilling, freezing, acidification, reduced water activity and modified atmosphere packaging) upon foodborne viruses is described. Secondly, the use of preservation methods establishing microbial inactivation such as heat treatment, high hydrostatic pressure processing and irradiation to eliminate viruses is discussed. In the third place, the efficacy of decontamination methods on fresh produce and purification procedures applied on live bivalve shellfish to reduce the viral load is included. These studies indicate that viruses persist well on chilled, acidified, frozen foods and foods packed under modified atmosphere or in dried conditions. Intervention strategies inducing microbial inactivation are required to achieve a 3 log reduction of the level of viruses. Decontamination of fresh produce reduces viruses with a maximum of 1 to 2 log while purification of live bivalves is not adequate to prevent viral outbreaks. It was noted that the effect of a particular food preservation method is dependent upon the virus tested and type of food.

  11. Patulin reduction in apple juice by inactivated Alicyclobacillus spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Y; Wang, X; Hatab, S; Wang, Z; Wang, Y; Luo, Y; Yue, T

    2014-12-01

    This study aimed to investigate the reduction of patulin (PAT) in apple juice by 12 inactivated Alicyclobacillus strains. The reduction rate of PAT by each strain was determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The results indicated that the removal of PAT was strain specific. Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris 92 and A. acidoterrestris 96 were the most effective ones among the 12 tested strains in the removal of PAT. Therefore, these two strains were selected to study the effects of incubation time, initial PAT concentration and bacteria powder amount on PAT removal abilities of Alicyclobacillus. The highest PAT reduction rates of 88·8 and 81·6% were achieved after 24-h incubation with initial PAT concentration of 100 μg l(-1) and bacteria powder amount of 40 g l(-1) , respectively. Moreover, it was found that the treatment by these 12 inactivated Alicyclobacillus strains had no negative effect on the quality parameters of apple juice. Similar assays were performed in supermarket apple juice, where inactivated Alicyclobacillus cells could efficiently reduce PAT content. Taken together, these data suggest the possible application of this strategy as a means to detoxify PAT-contaminated juices. Inactivated Alicyclobacillus cells can efficiently reduce patulin concentration in apple juice. It provides a theoretical foundation for recycling of Alicyclobacillus cells from spoiled apple juice to reduce the source of pollution and the cost of juice industry. This is the first report on the use of Alicyclobacillus to remove patulin from apple juice. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  12. Inactivation of murine norovirus by chemical biocides on stainless steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steinmann Jörg

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human norovirus (NoV causes more than 80% of nonbacterial gastroenteritis in Europe and the United States. NoV transmission via contaminated surfaces may be significant for the spread of viruses. Therefore, measures for prevention and control, such as surface disinfection, are necessary to interrupt the dissemination of human NoV. Murine norovirus (MNV as a surrogate for human NoV was used to study the efficacy of active ingredients of chemical disinfectants for virus inactivation on inanimate surfaces. Methods The inactivating properties of different chemical biocides were tested in a quantitative carrier test with stainless steel discs without mechanical action. Vacuum-dried MNV was exposed to different concentrations of alcohols, peracetic acid (PAA or glutaraldehyde (GDA for 5 minutes exposure time. Detection of residual virus was determined by endpoint-titration on RAW 264.7 cells. Results PAA [1000 ppm], GDA [2500 ppm], ethanol [50% (v/v] and 1-propanol [30% (v/v] were able to inactivate MNV under clean conditions (0.03% BSA on the carriers by ≥ 4 log10 within 5 minutes exposure time, whereas 2-propanol showed a reduced effectiveness even at 60% (v/v. Furthermore, there were no significant differences in virus reduction whatever interfering substances were used. When testing with ethanol, 1- and 2-propanol, results under clean conditions were nearly the same as in the presence of dirty conditions (0.3% BSA plus 0.3% erythrocytes. Conclusion Products based upon PAA, GDA, ethanol and 1-propanol should be used for NoV inactivation on inanimate surfaces. Our data provide valuable information for the development of strategies to control NoV transmission via surfaces.

  13. Inactivation of Bacillus Anthracis Spores Using Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-30

    AND SUBTITLE 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 12. DISTRIBUTION AVAILIBILITY STATEMENT 6. AUTHORS 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAMES AND ADDRESSES 15. SUBJECT...2010 31-May-2014 Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited Final Report: (Life Science Division/Biochemistry) Inactivation of Bacillus ...S) AND ADDRESS (ES) U.S. Army Research Office P.O. Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 Bacillus Anthracis, Spores, Biofilm, Inhibition

  14. Degradation and inactivation of Shiga toxins by nitrogen gas plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakudo, Akikazu; Imanishi, Yuichiro

    2017-12-01

    Shiga toxin (Stx)-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) leads to food poisoning by causing hemorrhagic colitis and hemolytic uremic syndrome. Some STEC produce Shiga toxin 1 (Stx1) and/or Shiga toxin 2 (Stx2), a relatively stable protein toxin, necessitating the development of an efficient inactivation method. Here we applied a nitrogen gas plasma apparatus to the inactivation of Stx. Samples of Stx1 and Stx2 were treated with a nitrogen gas plasma generated by a plasma device using a short high-voltage pulse applied by a static induction thyristor power supply at 1.5 kpps (kilo pulse per second). The recovered Stx samples were then analyzed for immunological and biological activities. Immunochromatography demonstrated that Stx1 and Stx2 were degraded by the gas plasma. Quantification by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) showed that both toxins were efficiently degraded to less than 1/10th of their original concentration within 5 min of treatment. Western blotting further showed the gas plasma treatment degraded the A subunit, which mediates the toxicity of Stx. Moreover, an assay using HEp-2 cells as an index of cytotoxicity showed that gas plasma treatment reduced the toxic activity of Stx. Therefore, nitrogen gas plasma might be an efficient method for the inactivation of Stx.

  15. Influenza Vaccination Strategies: Comparing Inactivated and Live Attenuated Influenza Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridhar, Saranya; Brokstad, Karl A.; Cox, Rebecca J.

    2015-01-01

    Influenza is a major respiratory pathogen causing annual outbreaks and occasional pandemics. Influenza vaccination is the major method of prophylaxis. Currently annual influenza vaccination is recommended for groups at high risk of complications from influenza infection such as pregnant women, young children, people with underlying disease and the elderly, along with occupational groups such a healthcare workers and farm workers. There are two main types of vaccines available: the parenteral inactivated influenza vaccine and the intranasal live attenuated influenza vaccine. The inactivated vaccines are licensed from 6 months of age and have been used for more than 50 years with a good safety profile. Inactivated vaccines are standardized according to the presence of the viral major surface glycoprotein hemagglutinin and protection is mediated by the induction of vaccine strain specific antibody responses. In contrast, the live attenuated vaccines are licensed in Europe for children from 2–17 years of age and provide a multifaceted immune response with local and systemic antibody and T cell responses but with no clear correlate of protection. Here we discuss the immunological immune responses elicited by the two vaccines and discuss future work to better define correlates of protection. PMID:26343192

  16. Raman spectroscopy of Bacillus thuringiensis physiology and inactivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, J. B.; Almeida, J.; Cole, K. D.; Reipa, V.

    2012-12-01

    The ability to detect spore contamination and inactivation is relevant to developing and determining decontamination strategy success for food and water safety. This study was conducted to develop a systematic comparison of nondestructive vibrational spectroscopy techniques (Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy, SERS, and normal Raman) to determine indicators of Bacillus thuringiensis physiology (spore, vegetative, outgrown, germinated and inactivated spore forms). SERS was found to provide better resolution of commonly utilized signatures of spore physiology (dipicolinic acid at 1006 cm-1 and 1387 cm-1) compared to normal Raman and native fluorescence indigenous to vegetative and outgrown cell samples was quenched in SERS experiment. New features including carotenoid pigments (Raman features at 1142 cm-1, 1512 cm-1) were identified for spore cell forms. Pronounced changes in the low frequency region (300 cm-1 to 500 cm-1) in spore spectra occurred upon germination and inactivation (with both free chlorine and by autoclaving) which is relevant to guiding decontamination and detection strategies using Raman techniques.

  17. Pulsed light inactivation of horseradish peroxidase and associated structural changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellicer, José Antonio; Gómez-López, Vicente M

    2017-12-15

    Pulsed light (PL) is a non-thermal preservation method in which foods are subjected to one or several intense pulses of wide-spectrum light. Peroxidase (POD) is an enzyme that needs to be inactivated or inhibited because of its deleterious effects on the quality of fruits and vegetables. The feasibility of using PL to inactivate POD was tested and results explained based on measurements of UV-vis spectrum, far-UV circular dichroism and tryptophan fluorescence, and the phase-diagram method. PL reduced the activity of POD by more than 95% after applying 128Jcm -2 . There was observed a decrease in the Reinheitzahl value and ellipticity and an increase in tryptophan fluorescence at incremental fluences, as well as linear phase diagrams. The study indicates that the inactivation of POD by PL is an all-or-none process related to loss of helical structure, weak unfolding and ejection of the prostetic group. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Photosensitized inactivation of infectious blood-borne human parasites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judy, Millard M.; Sogandares-Bernal, Franklin M.; Matthews, James Lester

    1995-05-01

    Blood-borne viruses and protozoan parasites that are infectious to humans pose risk world-wide of infection transmission through blood and blood product transfusion. Blood-borne infectious viruses include human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-I), which causes AIDS; hepatitis C virus, which can cause chronic hepatitis; and cytomegalovirus, which can be dangerous to immunocompromised patients, e.g., the newborn, transplant recipients, and AIDS patients. Infectious blood-borne protozoan parasites include Trypanosoma cruzi, which causes Chagas' disease, endemic throughout Central and South America; the Trypanosoma species causing African sleeping sickness endemic in Central Africa; and Plasmodium falciparum, which causes malignant and increasingly drug- resistant human malaria prevalent throughout the tropics. Some researchers have focused on using photosensitizers to inactivate HIV-I and other viruses in whole blood, packed red cells, and platelet concentrates without compromising blood product function. Our group previously has reported photosensitized in vitro inactivation of P. falciparum and the mouse malaria organism Plasmodium berghei in whole blood using hematoporphyrin derivative (HPD) and of T. cruzi using benzoporphyrin derivatives BPDMA and BPDDA, dihematoporphyrin ether (DHE), and hydroxyethylvinyldeuteroporphyrin (HEVD). These results suggest that continued investigation is warranted to evaluate the potential for photosensitized inactivation of blood-borne parasites in blood banking.

  19. Influenza Vaccination Strategies: Comparing Inactivated and Live Attenuated Influenza Vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saranya Sridhar

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Influenza is a major respiratory pathogen causing annual outbreaks and occasional pandemics. Influenza vaccination is the major method of prophylaxis. Currently annual influenza vaccination is recommended for groups at high risk of complications from influenza infection such as pregnant women, young children, people with underlying disease and the elderly, along with occupational groups such a healthcare workers and farm workers. There are two main types of vaccines available: the parenteral inactivated influenza vaccine and the intranasal live attenuated influenza vaccine. The inactivated vaccines are licensed from 6 months of age and have been used for more than 50 years with a good safety profile. Inactivated vaccines are standardized according to the presence of the viral major surface glycoprotein hemagglutinin and protection is mediated by the induction of vaccine strain specific antibody responses. In contrast, the live attenuated vaccines are licensed in Europe for children from 2–17 years of age and provide a multifaceted immune response with local and systemic antibody and T cell responses but with no clear correlate of protection. Here we discuss the immunological immune responses elicited by the two vaccines and discuss future work to better define correlates of protection.

  20. Thermal inactivation kinetics of hepatitis A virus in spinach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozkurt, Hayriye; Ye, Xiaofei; Harte, Federico; D'Souza, Doris H; Davidson, P Michael

    2015-01-16

    Leafy vegetables have been recognized as important vehicles for the transmission of foodborne viral pathogens. To control hepatitis A viral foodborne illness outbreaks associated with mildly heated (e.g., blanched) leafy vegetables such as spinach, generation of adequate thermal processes is important both for consumers and the food industry. Therefore, the objectives of this study were to determine the thermal inactivation behavior of hepatitis A virus (HAV) in spinach, and provide insights on HAV inactivation in spinach for future studies and industrial applications. The D-values calculated from the first-order model (50-72 °C) ranged from 34.40 ± 4.08 to 0.91 ± 0.12 min with a z-value of 13.92 ± 0.87 °C. The calculated activation energy value was 162 ± 11 kJ/mol. Using the information generated in the present study and the thermal parameters of industrial blanching conditions for spinach as a basis (100 °C for 120-180 s), the blanching of spinach in water at 100 °C for 120-180 s under atmospheric conditions will provide greater than 6 log reduction of HAV. The results of this study may be useful to the frozen food industry in designing blanching conditions for spinach to inactivate or control hepatitis A virus outbreaks. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Inactivation of the cloned potassium channel mouse Kv1.1 by the human Kv3.4 'ball' peptide and its chemical modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, G J; Robertson, B

    1995-01-01

    1. This study used the whole-cell patch clamp technique to investigate the action of a 28-mer 'inactivation peptide' based on part of the N-terminal sequence of the human Kv3.4 K+ channel (hKv3.4 peptide) on the cloned mouse brain K+ channel mKv1.1 expressed in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, and compared this with the inactivation produced by Shaker B inactivation peptide (ShB peptide). 2. Inclusion of the hKv3.4 peptide in the patch electrode (320 microM) transformed non-inactivating mKv1.1 into a rapidly inactivating current. The voltage dependence of time constants of decay and steady-state inactivation induced by hKv3.4 peptide were characteristic of an 'A-type' K+ current. 3. The hKv3.4 peptide had no effect on the voltage dependence of activation of mKv1.1, with a mid-point of activation of -8 mV, and a slope factor of 15 mV. Steady-state inactivation curves had a mid-point of inactivation of -36 mV and a slope factor of -7 mV; the time constant of recovery from inactivation at -90 mV was 1.3 s. 4. The chemical modification reagents N-bromoacetamide (NBA, 100 microM) and chloramine-T (CL-T, 500 microM) had no effect on the fast inactivation of mKv1.1 induced by ShB peptide. In contrast, the inactivation caused by hKv3.4 peptide was removed by brief exposure to NBA and CL-T. 5. Chemical modification resulted in a hyperpolarizing shift of -8 mV (CL-T) and -11 mV (NBA) in the voltage dependence of activation of mKv1.1 in the presence of hKv3.4 peptide. 6. Chemical modification was critically dependent on the presence of a cysteine residue at position 6, and not position 24, of hKv3.4 peptide. 7. NBA and CL-T caused only a slight inhibition of unmodified mKv1.1 current with no significant effect on the voltage dependence of mKv1.1 activation, and also had no effect on channel deactivation at -90 mV. 8. Chemical modification experiments were consistent with a selective action on the hKv3.4 peptide itself, specifically at the cysteine residue at position 6

  2. Effect of surface pretreatment of TiO2 films on interfacial processes leading to bacterial inactivation in the dark and under light irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rtimi, Sami; Nesic, Jelena; Pulgarin, Cesar; Sanjines, Rosendo; Bensimon, Michael; Kiwi, John

    2015-01-01

    Evidence is presented for radio-frequency plasma pretreatment enhancing the amount and adhesion of TiO2 sputtered on polyester (PES) and on polyethylene (PE) films. Pretreatment is necessary to attain a suitable TiO2 loading leading to an acceptable Escherichia coli reduction kinetics in the dark or under light irradiation for PES–TiO2 and PE–TiO2 samples. The amount of TiO2 on the films was monitored by diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and X-ray fluorescence. X-ray electron spectroscopy shows the lack of accumulation of bacterial residues such as C, N and S during bacterial inactivation since they seem to be rapidly destroyed by TiO2 photocatalysis. Evidence was found for Ti4+/Ti3+ redox catalysis occurring on PES–TiO2 and PE–TiO2 during the bacterial inactivation process. On PE–TiO2 surfaces, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) provides evidence for a systematic shift of the na(CH2) stretching vibrations preceding bacterial inactivation within 60 min. The discontinuous IR-peak shifts reflect the increase in the C–H inter-bond distance leading to bond scission. The mechanism leading to E. coli loss of viability on PES–TiO2 was investigated in the dark up to complete bacterial inactivation by monitoring the damage in the bacterial outer cell by transmission electron microscopy. After 30 min, the critical step during the E. coli inactivation commences for dark disinfection on 0.1–5% wt PES–TiO2 samples. The interactions between the TiO2 aggregates and the outer lipopolysaccharide cell wall involve electrostatic effects competing with the van der Waals forces. PMID:25657831

  3. Rapid Airplane Parametric Input Design (RAPID)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Robert E.

    1995-01-01

    RAPID is a methodology and software system to define a class of airplane configurations and directly evaluate surface grids, volume grids, and grid sensitivity on and about the configurations. A distinguishing characteristic which separates RAPID from other airplane surface modellers is that the output grids and grid sensitivity are directly applicable in CFD analysis. A small set of design parameters and grid control parameters govern the process which is incorporated into interactive software for 'real time' visual analysis and into batch software for the application of optimization technology. The computed surface grids and volume grids are suitable for a wide range of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation. The general airplane configuration has wing, fuselage, horizontal tail, and vertical tail components. The double-delta wing and tail components are manifested by solving a fourth order partial differential equation (PDE) subject to Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions. The design parameters are incorporated into the boundary conditions and therefore govern the shapes of the surfaces. The PDE solution yields a smooth transition between boundaries. Surface grids suitable for CFD calculation are created by establishing an H-type topology about the configuration and incorporating grid spacing functions in the PDE equation for the lifting components and the fuselage definition equations. User specified grid parameters govern the location and degree of grid concentration. A two-block volume grid about a configuration is calculated using the Control Point Form (CPF) technique. The interactive software, which runs on Silicon Graphics IRIS workstations, allows design parameters to be continuously varied and the resulting surface grid to be observed in real time. The batch software computes both the surface and volume grids and also computes the sensitivity of the output grid with respect to the input design parameters by applying the precompiler tool

  4. Inactivation of B. subtilis spores by low pressure plasma—influence of optical filters and photon/particle fluxes on the inactivation efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiebrandt, Marcel; Hillebrand, Bastian; Lackmann, Jan-Wilm; Raguse, Marina; Moeller, Ralf; Awakowicz, Peter; Stapelmann, Katharina

    2018-01-01

    Inactivation experiments were performed with Bacillus subtilis spores in a low pressure double inductively coupled plasma (DICP) system. Argon, nitrogen and oxygen at 5 Pa were used as feed gas to change the emission spectrum in the range of 100 nm to 400 nm, as well as between radical and metastable densities. Optical filters were applied, to block particles and selected wavelengths from the spores. By determining absolute photon fluxes, the sporicidal efficiency of various wavelength ranges was evaluated. The results showed good agreement with other plasma experiments, as well as with monochromatic light inactivation experiments from a synchrotron. The findings indicated that the inactivation rate constants of broadband plasma emission and monochromatic light were identical, and that no synergistic effect exists. Furthermore, the influence of radicals, ions and metastables on the inactivation efficiency was of minor importance in the set-up used, and radiation was the main reason for spore inactivation.

  5. Rapid shallow breathing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the smallest air passages of the lungs in children ( bronchiolitis ) Pneumonia or other lung infection Transient tachypnea of the newborn Anxiety and panic Other serious lung disease Home Care Rapid, shallow breathing should not be treated at home. It is ...

  6. Rapid Strep Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... worse than normal. Your first thoughts turn to strep throat. A rapid strep test in your doctor’s office ... your suspicions.Viruses cause most sore throats. However, strep throat is an infection caused by the Group A ...

  7. RAPID3? Aptly named!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthelot, J-M

    2014-01-01

    The RAPID3 score is the sum of three 0-10 patient self-report scores: pain, functional impairment on MDHAQ, and patient global estimate. It requires 5 seconds for scoring and can be used in all rheumatologic conditions, although it has mostly been used in rheumatoid arthritis where cutoffs for low disease activity (12/30) have been set. A RAPID3 score of ≤ 3/30 with 1 or 0 swollen joints (RAPID3 ≤ 3 + ≤ SJ1) provides remission criteria comparable to Boolean, SDAI, CDAI, and DAS28 remission criteria, in far less time than a formal joint count. RAPID3 performs as well as the DAS28 in separating active drugs from placebos in clinical trials. RAPID3 also predicts subsequent structural disease progression. RAPID3 can be determined at short intervals at home, allowing the determination of the area under the curve of disease activity between two visits and flare detection. However, RAPID3 should not be seen as a substitute for DAS28 and face to face visits in routine care. Monitoring patient status with only self-report information without a rheumatologist's advice (including joints and physical examination, and consideration of imaging and laboratory tests) may indeed be as undesirable for most patients than joint examination without a patient questionnaire. Conversely, combining the RAPID3 and the DAS28 may consist in faster or more sensitive confirmation that a medication is effective. Similarly, better enquiring of most important concerns of patients (pain, functional status and overall opinion on their disorder) should reinforces patients' confidence in their rheumatologist and treatments.

  8. Influence of activation and germination on high pressure inactivation of ascospores of the mould Eurotium repens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eicher, R; Ludwig, H

    2002-03-01

    We investigated heat activation and germination of Eurotium repens ascospores to follow high pressure inactivation. Activation energy and entropy values strengthen the idea of protein denaturation as the underlying mechanism of heat activation. Preceding activation, germination or a combination of both affected high pressure inactivation in different ways. Activation followed immediately by high pressure treatment led to the most efficient improvement in inactivation. However, a pause after activation caused a partial re-establishment of the spores' stability and less efficient high pressure inactivation. Germination stabilized the spores against high pressure. A combined treatment of activation and germination led to an initially fast inactivation, but compared to high pressure treatment of only activated spores the time course of inactivation was slowed down.

  9. Inactivation of Staphylococcus aureus in Oat and Soya Drinks by Enterocin AS-48 in Combination with Other Antimicrobials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgos, María José Grande; Aguayo, M Carmen López; Pulido, Rubén Pérez; Gálvez, Antonio; López, Rosario Lucas

    2015-09-01

    The presence of toxicogenic Staphylococcus aureus in foods and the dissemination of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) in the food chain are matters of concern. In the present study, the circular bacteriocin enterocin AS-48, applied singly or in combination with phenolic compounds (carvacrol, eugenol, geraniol, and citral) or with 2-nitro-1-propanol (2NPOH), was investigated in the control of a cocktail made from 1 methicillin-sensitive and 1 MRSA strains inoculated on commercial oat and soya drinks. Enterocin AS-48 exhibited low bactericidal activity against staphylococci in the drinks investigated when applied singly. The combinations of sub-inhibitory concentrations of enterocin AS-48 (25 μg/mL) and phenolic compounds or 2NPOH caused complete inactivation of staphylococci in the drinks within 24 h of incubation at 22 °C. When tested in oat and soya drinks stored for 7 d at 10 °C, enterocin AS-48 (25 μg/mL) in combination with 2NPOH (5.5 mM) reduced viable counts rapidly in the case of oat drink (4.2 log cycles after 12 h) or slowly in soya drink (3.8 log cycles after 3 d). The same combined treatment applied on drinks stored at 22 °C achieved a fast inactivation of staphylococci within 12 to 24 h in both drinks, and no viable staphylococci were detected for up to 7 d of storage. Results from the study highlight the potential of enterocin AS-48 in combination with 2NPOH for inactivation of staphylococci. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  10. Efficacy of an inactivated bivalent vaccine against the prevalent strains of Newcastle disease and H9N2 avian influenza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jing; Yang, Huiming; Xu, Hongjun; Ma, Zengbin; Zhang, Guozhong

    2017-03-16

    Newcastle disease (ND) and avian influenza subtype H9N2 (H9N2 AI) are two of the most important diseases of poultry, causing severe economic losses in the global poultry industry. Vaccination is an effective way to prevent and control the spread of ND virus (NDV) and H9N2 AI virus (AIV), but the antigenic differences between the current circulating strains and the vaccine strains might account for recent ND and H9N2 AI outbreaks in vaccinated poultry flocks. We developed an inactivated bivalent H9N2 and NDV vaccine based on the current prevalent strains of H9N2 AIV and NDV in China and evaluated its efficacy in chickens in this study. The results indicated that the inactivated bivalent vaccine could induce a fast antibody response in vaccinated chickens. The hemagglutination inhibition (HI) titer in the sera increased rapidly, and the highest HI titer was observed at 4 weeks post-vaccination (wpv) with a mean titre of 8.6 log2 for NDV and 9.5 log2 for H9N2. Up until 15 wpv, HI titers were still detectable at a high level of over 6 log2. The immunized chickens showed no signs of disease after challenge at 3 wpv with the prevalent strains of NDV and H9N2 AIV isolated in 2012-2014. Moreover, viral shedding was completely inhibited in vaccinated chickens after challenge with H9N2 AIV and inhibited by at least 90% with NDV compared to the controls at 5dpc. Our findings suggest that the inactivated NDV and H9N2 vaccine induces a fast and strong antibody response in vaccinated chickens and is efficacious in poultry against NDVs and H9N2 AIVs.

  11. Evaluation and clinical validation of an alcohol-based transport medium for preservation and inactivation of respiratory viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luinstra, Kathy; Petrich, Astrid; Castriciano, Santina; Ackerman, Mona; Chong, Sylvia; Carruthers, Susan; Ammons, Brenna; Mahony, James B; Smieja, Marek

    2011-06-01

    The clinical and public health importance of influenza and other respiratory viruses has accelerated the development of highly sensitive molecular diagnostics, but data are limited regarding preanalytical stages of diagnostic testing. We evaluated CyMol, an alcohol-based transport medium, for its ability to maintain specimen integrity for up to 21 days of storage at various temperatures; for its ability to inactivate virus; and for its compatibility with antigen- or nucleic acid-based diagnostics for respiratory viruses in clinical samples. In mock-infected samples, both universal transport medium (UTM-RT) and CyMol maintained equivalent viral quantities for at least 14 days at room temperature or colder, whereas a dry swab collection maintained viral quantities only if refrigerated or frozen. CyMol inactivated influenza virus within 5 min of sample immersion. UTM-RT- and CyMol-collected nasal swab specimens from 73 symptomatic students attending a campus health clinic were positive for a respiratory virus in 56.2% of subjects by multiplex PCR testing, including influenza A and B viruses, rhinovirus/enteroviruses, coronaviruses, respiratory syncytial virus, parainfluenza viruses, metapneumovirus, and adenovirus. Detection by PCR was equivalent in UTM-RT- and CyMol-collected specimens and in self- and staff-collected swabs. Direct fluorescent antibody (DFA) testing was substantially less sensitive (23.3%) than multiplex PCR, and DFA testing from UTM-RT-collected swabs was more sensitive than that from CyMol-collected swabs. These data indicate that an alcohol-based transport medium such as CyMol preserves respiratory virus integrity, rapidly inactivates viruses, and is compatible with PCR-based respiratory diagnostics.

  12. Inhibition of bone resorption by selective inactivators of cysteine proteinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, P A; Buttle, D J; Jones, S J; Boyde, A; Murata, M; Reynolds, J J; Meikle, M C

    1994-09-01

    Inactivators of cysteine proteinases (CPs) were tested as inhibitors of bone resorption in vitro and in vivo. The following four CP inactivators were tested: Ep475, a compound with low membrane permeability which inhibits cathepsins B, L, S, H, and calpain; Ep453, the membrane-permeant prodrug of Ep475; CA074, a compound with low membrane permeability which selectively inactivates cathepsin B; and CA074Me, the membrane-permeant prodrug of CA074. The test systems consisted of 1) monitoring the release of radioisotope from prelabelled mouse calvarial explants and 2) assessing the extent of bone resorption in an isolated osteoclast assay using confocal laser microscopy. Ep453, Ep475, and CA074Me inhibited both stimulated and basal bone resorption in vitro while CA074 was without effect; the inhibition was reversible and dose dependent. None of the inhibitors affected protein synthesis, DNA synthesis, the PTH-enhanced secretion of beta-glucuronidase, and N-acetyl-beta-glucosaminidase, or the spontaneous release of lactate dehydrogenase. Ep453, Ep475, and CA074Me dose-dependently inhibited the resorptive activity of isolated rat osteoclasts cultured on bone slices with a maximal effect at 50 microM. The number of resorption pits and their mean volume was reduced, whilst the mean surface area remained unaffected. Again, CA074 was without effect. Ep453, Ep475, and CA074Me, but not CA074, when administered subcutaneously at a dose of 60 micrograms/g body weight inhibited bone resorption in vivo as measured by an in vivo/in vitro assay, by about 20%. This study demonstrates that cathepsins B, L, and/or S are involved in bone resorption in vitro and in vivo. Whilst cathepsin L and/or S act extracellularly, and possibly intracellularly, cathepsin B mediates its effects intracellularly perhaps through the activation of other proteinases involved in subosteoclastic collagen degradation.

  13. Inactivation of foodborne microorganisms using engineered water nanostructures (EWNS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyrgiotakis, Georgios; Vasanthakumar, Archana; Gao, Ya; Eleftheriadou, Mary; Toledo, Eduardo; DeAraujo, Alice; McDevitt, James; Han, Taewon; Mainelis, Gediminas; Mitchell, Ralph; Demokritou, Philip

    2015-03-17

    Foodborne diseases caused by the consumption of food contaminated with pathogenic microorganisms or their toxins have very serious economic and public health consequences. Here, we explored the effectiveness of a recently developed intervention method for inactivation of microorganisms on fresh produce, and food production surfaces. This method utilizes Engineered Water Nanostructures (EWNS) produced by electrospraying of water vapor. EWNS possess unique properties; they are 25 nm in diameter, remain airborne in indoor conditions for hours, contain Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) and have very strong surface charge (on average 10 e/structure). Here, their efficacy in inactivating representative foodborne bacteria such as Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica, and Listeria innocua, on stainless steel surfaces and on organic tomatoes, was assessed. The inactivation was facilitated using two different exposure approaches in order to optimize the delivery of EWNS to bacteria: (1) EWNS were delivered on the surfaces by diffusion and (2) a "draw through" Electrostatic Precipitator Exposure System (EPES) was developed and characterized for EWNS delivery to surfaces. Using the diffusion approach and an EWNS concentration of 24,000 #/cm3, the bacterial concentrations on the surfaces were reduced, depending on the bacterium and the surface type, by values ranging between 0.7 to 1.8 logs. Using the EPES approach and for an aerosol concentration of 50,000 #/cm3 at 90 min of exposure, results show a 1.4 log reduction for E. coli on organic tomato surfaces, as compared to the control (same conditions in regards to temperature and Relative Humidity). Furthermore, for L. innocua, the dose-response relationship was demonstrated and found to be a 0.7 and 1.2 logs removal at 12,000 and 23,000 #/cm3, respectively. The results presented here indicate that this novel, chemical-free, and environmentally friendly intervention method holds potential for development and application in the

  14. Combination of endolysins and high pressure to inactivate Listeria monocytogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Nassau, Tomas J; Lenz, Christian A; Scherzinger, Anna S; Vogel, Rudi F

    2017-12-01

    Outbreaks of listeriosis are often related to the consumption of low-processed ready-to-eat food products (e.g. soft cheeses or smoked fish) contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes. Traditional preservation techniques, such as heat treatment, cannot eliminate Listeria from these products without strongly affecting the quality of the foods. We therefore investigated the use of endolysin (PlyP40, Ply511, or PlyP825) in combination with high hydrostatic pressure processing to kill L. monocytogenes in buffer. The results demonstrated a more than additive effect when both treatments were combined. For example, whereas 0.16 μg/mL PlyP825 or 300 MPa (1 min, 30 °C) applied individually reduced the cell count by 0.2 and 0.3 log cfu, respectively, a combined treatment resulted in a reduction of 5.5 log cfu. Similar results were obtained for the other endolysins combined with high pressure processing. We also showed that the synergistic inactivation of cells by endolysin and HHP is possible at a pressure level of only 200 MPa (2 min, 30 °C). Thus, the application of endolysins did not only substantially increase the bactericidal effect of high pressure, but it also enabled the inactivation of bacterial cells at much lower pressure levels. This shows the potential of using such combined processes for the inactivation of L. monocytogenes and food preservation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Inactivation of Prions and Amyloid Seeds with Hypochlorous Acid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew G Hughson

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Hypochlorous acid (HOCl is produced naturally by neutrophils and other cells to kill conventional microbes in vivo. Synthetic preparations containing HOCl can also be effective as microbial disinfectants. Here we have tested whether HOCl can also inactivate prions and other self-propagating protein amyloid seeds. Prions are deadly pathogens that are notoriously difficult to inactivate, and standard microbial disinfection protocols are often inadequate. Recommended treatments for prion decontamination include strongly basic (pH ≥~12 sodium hypochlorite bleach, ≥1 N sodium hydroxide, and/or prolonged autoclaving. These treatments are damaging and/or unsuitable for many clinical, agricultural and environmental applications. We have tested the anti-prion activity of a weakly acidic aqueous formulation of HOCl (BrioHOCl that poses no apparent hazard to either users or many surfaces. For example, BrioHOCl can be applied directly to skin and mucous membranes and has been aerosolized to treat entire rooms without apparent deleterious effects. Here, we demonstrate that immersion in BrioHOCl can inactivate not only a range of target microbes, including spores of Bacillus subtilis, but also prions in tissue suspensions and on stainless steel. Real-time quaking-induced conversion (RT-QuIC assays showed that BrioHOCl treatments eliminated all detectable prion seeding activity of human Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, bovine spongiform encephalopathy, cervine chronic wasting disease, sheep scrapie and hamster scrapie; these findings indicated reductions of ≥103- to 106-fold. Transgenic mouse bioassays showed that all detectable hamster-adapted scrapie infectivity in brain homogenates or on steel wires was eliminated, representing reductions of ≥~105.75-fold and >104-fold, respectively. Inactivation of RT-QuIC seeding activity correlated with free chlorine concentration and higher order aggregation or destruction of proteins generally, including prion

  16. Inactivation of oenological lactic acid bacteria (Lactobacillus hilgardii and Pediococcus pentosaceus) by wine phenolic compounds

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    García-Ruiz, A; Bartolomé, B; Cueva, C; Martín-Alvarez, P J; Moreno-Arribas, M V

    2009-01-01

    To investigate the inactivation properties of different classes of phenolic compounds present in wine against two wine isolates of Lactobacillus hilgardii and Pediococcus pentosaceus, and to explore...

  17. Pathogen Inactivation Technologies: The Advent of Pathogen-Reduced Blood Components to Reduce Blood Safety Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devine, Dana V; Schubert, Peter

    2016-06-01

    Pathogen inactivation technologies represent a shift in blood safety from a reactive approach to a proactive protective strategy. Commercially available technologies demonstrate effective killing of most viruses, bacteria, and parasites and are capable of inactivating passenger leukocytes in blood products. The use of pathogen inactivation causes a decrease in the parameters of products that can be readily measured in laboratory assays but that do not seem to cause any alteration in hemostatic effect of plasma or platelet transfusions. Effort needs to be made to further develop these technologies so that the negative quality impact is ameliorated without reducing the pathogen inactivation effectiveness. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Inactivation of E. Coli in Water Using Photocatalytic, Nanostructured Films Synthesized by Aerosol Routes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pratim Biswas

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available TiO2 nanostructured films were synthesized by an aerosol chemical vapor deposition (ACVD method with different controlled morphologies: columnar, granular, and branched structures for the photocatalytic inactivation of Escherichia coli (E. coli in water. Effects of film morphology and external applied voltage on inactivation rate were investigated. As-prepared films were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, X-ray diffractometry (XRD, and UV-VIS. Photocatalytic and photoelectrochemical inactivation of E. coli using as-prepared TiO2 films were performed under irradiation of UVA light (note: UVA has a low efficiency to inactivate E. coli. Inactivation rate constants for each case were obtained from their respective inactivation curve through a 2 h incubation period. Photocatalytic inactivation rate constants of E. coli are 0.02/min (using columnar films, and 0.08/min (using branched films. The inactivation rate constant for the columnar film was enhanced by 330% by applied voltage on the film while that for the branched film was increased only by 30%. Photocatalytic microbial inactivation rate of the columnar and the branched films were also compared taking into account their different surface areas. Since the majority of the UV radiation that reaches the Earth’s surface is UVA, this study provides an opportunity to use sunlight to efficiently decontaminate drinking water.

  19. Influenza (Flu) Vaccine (Inactivated or Recombinant): What You Need to Know

    Science.gov (United States)

    VACCINE INFORMATION STATEMENT Influenza (Flu) Vaccine (Inactivated or Recombinant): What you need to know Many Vaccine Information Statements are available in Spanish and other languages. See www. immunize. ...

  20. Effects of heat inactivation on HIV antibody screening and confirmatory test systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fipps, D R; Damato, J J; Burke, D S

    1988-06-01

    In order to evaluate the effect of heat inactivation on serum undergoing testing for HIV antibody, 100 heat-inactivated and nonheat-inactivated serum samples were tested by two modifications of Abbott's screening assays for human T-cell lymphotropic virus type-III (lot numbers 1037 and 3036) and by two confirmatory assays (Cambridge BioScience CBre3-EIA; Damon Corporation Western blot). The samples consisted of 75 HIV antibody-negative and 25 HIV antibody-positive sera. The specimens were divided into two equal aliquots. One set was not subjected to heat inactivation, while the others were subjected to heat inactivation at 56 degrees C for 30 min. Heat inactivation had no significant effect on the HIV-position sera; however, heat-inactivated, negative sera evaluated by Abbott lot numbers 1037 and 3036 resulted in false-positive rates of 8% and 7%, respectively. No false positives were generated by the two confirmatory assays; however, the CBre3-EIA recombinant envelope protein assay had a significantly increased optical density reading following heat inactivation of the negative sera. The Western blot procedure used in the study was not affected by heat inactivation.

  1. Inactivation of RNA Viruses by Gamma Irradiation: A Study on Mitigating Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam J. Hume

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Effective inactivation of biosafety level 4 (BSL-4 pathogens is vital in order to study these agents safely. Gamma irradiation is a commonly used method for the inactivation of BSL-4 viruses, which among other advantages, facilitates the study of inactivated yet morphologically intact virions. The reported values for susceptibility of viruses to inactivation by gamma irradiation are sometimes inconsistent, likely due to differences in experimental protocols. We analyzed the effects of common sample attributes on the inactivation of a recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus expressing the Zaire ebolavirus glycoprotein and green fluorescent protein. Using this surrogate virus, we found that sample volume and protein content of the sample modulated viral inactivation by gamma irradiation but that air volume within the sample container and the addition of external disinfectant surrounding the sample did not. These data identify several factors which alter viral susceptibility to inactivation and highlight the usefulness of lower biosafety level surrogate viruses for such studies. Our results underscore the need to validate inactivation protocols of BSL-4 pathogens using “worst-case scenario” procedures to ensure complete sample inactivation.

  2. Lack of X inactivation associated with maternal X isodisomy: Evidence for a counting mechanism prior to X inactivation during human embryogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Migeon, B.R.; Torchia, B.S.; Fu, S. [Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)] [and others

    1996-01-01

    We have previously reported functional disomy for X-linked genes in females with tiny ring X chromosomes and a phenotype significantly more abnormal than Turner syndrome. In such cases the disomy results from failure of these X chromosomes to inactivate because they lack DNA sequences essential for cis X inactivation. Here we describe a novel molecular mechanism for functional X disomy that is associated with maternal isodisomy. In this case, the severe mental retardation and multiple congenital abnormalities in a female with a mosaic 45,X/46,X,del(X) (q21.3-qter)/46X,r(X) karyotype are associated with overexpression of the genes within Xpter to Xq21.31 in many of her cells. Her normal X, ring X, and deleted linear X chromosomes originate from the same maternal X chromosome, and all are transcriptionally active. None expresses X inactive specific transcript (XIST), although the locus and region of the putative X inactivation center (XIC) are present on both normal and linear deleted X chromosomes. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a functional maternal X isodisomy, and the largest X chromosome to escape inactivation. In addition, these results (1) show that cis inactivation does not invariably occur in human females with two X chromosomes, even when the XIC region is present on both of them; (2) provide evidence for a critical time prior to the visible onset of X inactivation in the embryo when decisions about X inactivation are made; and (3) support the hypothesis that the X chromosome counting mechanism involves chromosomal imprinting, occurs prior to the onset of random inactivation, and is required for subsequent inactivation of the chromosome. 41 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. UV Light Inactivation of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in Milk as Assessed by FASTPlaqueTB Phage Assay and Culture▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altic, Leslie C.; Rowe, Michael T.; Grant, Irene R.

    2007-01-01

    UV light inactivation of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in Middlebrook 7H9 broth and whole and semiskim milk was investigated using a laboratory-scale UV machine that incorporated static mixers within UV-penetrable pipes. UV treatment proved to be less effective in killing M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis suspended in milk (0.5- to 1.0-log10 reduction per 1,000 mJ/ml) than that suspended in Middlebrook 7H9 broth (2.5- to 3.3-log10 reduction per 1,000 mJ/ml). The FASTPlaqueTB phage assay provided more rapid enumeration of surviving M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis (within 24 h) than culture on Herrold's egg yolk medium (6 to 8 weeks). Despite the fact that plaque counts were consistently 1 to 2 log10 lower than colony counts throughout the study, UV inactivation rates for M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis derived using the phage assay and culture results were not significantly different (P = 0.077). PMID:17435001

  4. UV light inactivation of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in milk as assessed by FASTPlaqueTB phage assay and culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altic, Leslie C; Rowe, Michael T; Grant, Irene R

    2007-06-01

    UV light inactivation of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in Middlebrook 7H9 broth and whole and semiskim milk was investigated using a laboratory-scale UV machine that incorporated static mixers within UV-penetrable pipes. UV treatment proved to be less effective in killing M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis suspended in milk (0.5- to 1.0-log(10) reduction per 1,000 mJ/ml) than that suspended in Middlebrook 7H9 broth (2.5- to 3.3-log(10) reduction per 1,000 mJ/ml). The FASTPlaqueTB phage assay provided more rapid enumeration of surviving M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis (within 24 h) than culture on Herrold's egg yolk medium (6 to 8 weeks). Despite the fact that plaque counts were consistently 1 to 2 log(10) lower than colony counts throughout the study, UV inactivation rates for M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis derived using the phage assay and culture results were not significantly different (P = 0.077).

  5. Investigation of E. coli bacteria inactivation by photocatalytic activity of TiO2 coated expanded polystyrene foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varnagiris, S.; Sakalauskaite, S.; Tuckute, S.; Lelis, M.; Daugelavicius, R.; Milcius, D.

    2017-03-01

    Photocatalytic properties of anatase and other TiO2 polymorphs are widely researched and applied in practical application. In current study TiO2 films on the plasma pre-treated expanded polystyrene (EPS) foam were deposited using magnetron sputtering technique. Main properties of the films were characterised using combination of XRD, XPS and SEM techniques. Photocatalytic properties of the observed crystalline anatase phase were tested by investigating bleaching of the methylene blue (MB) aqueous solution and by testing Escherichia coli (E. coli) viability after incubation under UV-B irradiation. E. coli viability experiments indicated that there are two mechanisms of E. coli bacteria inactivation. UV irradiation alone causes rapid damage to the outer membrane of E. coli bacteria. The second mechanism of E. coli inactivation is invoked only with synergistic combination of TiO2 and UV. Acting as photocatalyst TiO2 generates active radicals who initiate the chain peroxidation of organic molecules and within 45 min reduce E. coli bacteria viability by nearly 90%.

  6. Protective effect of milk constituents and sublethal injuries limiting process effectiveness during PEF inactivation of Lb. rhamnosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeger, H; Schulz, A; Karapetkov, N; Knorr, D

    2009-08-31

    The inactivation of Lb. rhamnosus by pulsed electric field treatment (PEF) was studied in different fractions of raw milk and Ringer solution in order to evaluate the protective effect of nutrient rich media in comparison to aqueous buffer solutions. Apart from monitoring of culturability, analysis of the physiological fitness of Lb. rhamnosus was conducted aiming to identify sublethally damaged cells. Therefore, flow cytometry and a selective medium plating technique were used and compared to each other. The goal of the study was to apply three different parameters describing the physiological fitness of the model organism Lb. rhamnosus after PEF treatment such as culturability, membrane permeability and metabolic activity depending on treatment media and parameters. A concentration dependent protective effect of the milk protein fraction could be shown and allocated to micellar casein as the major milk protein. Increasing the concentration of whey proteins up to 2% showed a similar impact on limiting the PEF inactivation of Lb. rhamnosus. The evaluation of physiological fitness of cells was based on a determination of structural and functional characteristics by rapid cellular staining using carboxyfluorescein diacetate and propidium iodide. This approach showed good accordance to the conventional selective medium plating technique for the enumeration of sublethally-injured bacteria but flow cytometry provided additional information for the characterisation of this fraction. The extent of occurrence of dead, sublethal and vital fractions of cells was found dependent on the PEF treatment parameters such as electrical field strength and energy input as well as the different milk fractions used as treatment media.

  7. Inactivating the spindle checkpoint kinase Bub1 during embryonic development results in a global shutdown of proliferation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taylor Stephen S

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bub1 is a component of the spindle assembly checkpoint, a surveillance mechanism that maintains chromosome stability during M-phase. Bub1 is essential during the early stages of embryogenesis, with homozygous BUB1-null mice dying shortly after day E3.5. Bub1 is also required later during embryogenesis; inactivation of BUB1 on day E10.5 appears to rapidly block all further development. However, the mechanism(s responsible for this phenotype remain unclear. Findings Here we show that inactivating BUB1 on day E10.5 stalls embryogenesis within 48 hours. This is accompanied by a global shutdown of proliferation, widespread apoptosis and haemorrhaging. Conclusion Our results suggest that Bub1 is required throughout the developing embryo for cellular proliferation. Therefore, Bub1 has been shown to be essential in all scenarios analyzed thus far in mice: proliferation of cultured fibroblasts, spermatogenesis, oogenesis and both early and late embryonic development. This likely reflects the fact that Bub1 has dual functions during mitosis, being required for both SAC function and chromosome alignment.

  8. Photodynamic inactivation of Klebsiella pneumoniae biofilms and planktonic cells by 5-aminolevulinic acid and 5-aminolevulinic acid methyl ester.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chengcheng; Zhou, Yingli; Wang, Li; Han, Lei; Lei, Jin'e; Ishaq, Hafiz Muhammad; Nair, Sean P; Xu, Jiru

    2016-04-01

    The treatment of Klebsiella pneumoniae, particularly extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing K. pneumoniae, is currently a great challenge. Photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy is a promising approach for killing antibiotic-resistant bacteria. The aim of this study was to evaluate the capacity of 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) and its derivative 5-ALA methyl ester (MAL) in the presence of white light to cause photodynamic inactivation (PDI) of K. pneumoniae planktonic and biofilm cells. In the presence of white light, 5-ALA and MAL inactivated planktonic cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Biofilms were also sensitive to 5-ALA and MAL-mediated PDI. The mechanisms by which 5-ALA and MAL caused PDI of ESBL-producing K. pneumonia were also investigated. Exposure of K. pneumonia to light in the presence of either 5-ALA or MAL induced cleavage of genomic DNA and the rapid release of intracellular biopolymers. Intensely denatured cytoplasmic contents and aggregated ribosomes were also detected by transmission electron microscopy. Scanning electron microscopy showed that PDI of biofilms caused aggregated bacteria to detach and that the bacterial cell envelope was damaged. This study provides insights into 5-ALA and MAL-mediated PDI of ESBL-producing K. pneumoniae.

  9. Sexy transgenes: the impact of gene transfer and gene inactivation technologies on the understanding of mammalian sex determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaiman, Daniel

    2003-06-01

    Amongst the various developmental pathways ending in a sound mammal, sex determination presents the peculiarity of a choice between two equally viable options: female or male. Therefore, destroying a 'male-determining gene' or a 'female-determining gene' should generally not be lethal. Genetic sex determination is divided into two consecutive steps: construction of the bipotential gonad, and then sex determination per se. The genes involved in the first step are in fact involved in the development of various body compartments, and their mutation is generally far from innocuous. From transgenic and inactivation studies carried out on the laboratory mouse, a complete picture of the two steps is beginning to emerge, where the gonad itself and the necessary ducts are shown to evolve in a very coordinate way, with well-defined sex-specificities. Compared with testis determination, the ovarian side of the picture is still relatively empty, but this situation can change rapidly as candidate ovarian genes for inactivation studies are beginning to be identified.

  10. Serum inactivation contributes to the failure of stromal-derived factor-1 to block HIV-I infection in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalba, Sabrina; Salvucci, Ombretta; Aoki, Yoshiyasu; De La Luz Sierra, Maria; Gupta, Ghanshyam; Davis, David; Wyvill, Kathleen; Little, Richard; Yarchoan, Robert; Tosato, Giovanna

    2003-11-01

    The chemokine stromal-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) can block human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection in vitro by binding to the CXC chemokine receptor, CXCR-4, which serves as a coreceptor for T cell tropic HIV-1. In spite of being constitutively expressed in vivo, SDF-1 does not appear to block HIV-1 infection and spread in vivo. We report that SDF-1 is consistently measured in normal serum (15.4+/-3.0 ng/ml; mean+/-sd) and in serum from AIDS patients (16.6+/-3.7 ng/ml). However, we find that circulating SDF-1 is modified to an inactive form. When exposed to serum, recombinant SDF-1 is specifically and rapidly altered to yield an apparently smaller chemokine that does not bind to SDF-1 receptor-expressing cells, does not have chemoattractive or pre-B cell stimulatory activity, and does not block HIV-1 infection. Thus, serum modification and inactivation contribute to the failure of SDF-1 to block HIV-1 infection and spread in man. The inactivation of circulating SDF-1 may be critical in permitting local gradients to develop and direct cell trafficking.

  11. Randomized Trials Comparing Inactivated Vaccine After Medium- or High-titer Measles Vaccine With Standard Titer Measles Vaccine After Inactivated Vaccine: A Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaby, Peter; Ravn, Henrik; Benn, Christine S; Rodrigues, Amabelia; Samb, Badara; Ibrahim, Salah A; Libman, Michael D; Whittle, Hilton C

    2016-11-01

    Observational studies have suggested that girls have higher mortality if their most recent immunization is an inactivated vaccine rather than a live vaccine. We therefore reanalyzed 5 randomized trials of early measles vaccine (MV) in which it was possible to compare an inactivated vaccines [after medium-titer MV (MTMV) or high-titer MV (HTMV)] and a live standard titer MV (after an initial inactivated vaccine). The trials were conducted in Sudan, Senegal, The Gambia and Guinea-Bissau. The intervention group received live MTMV or HTMV from 4 to 5 months and then an inactivated vaccine from 9 to 10 months of age; the control children received inactivated vaccine/placebo from 4 to 5 months and standard titer MV from 9 to 10 months of age. We compared mortality from 9 months until end of study at 3 to 5 years of age for children who received inactivated vaccine (after MTMV or HTMV) and standard titer MV (after inactivated vaccine), respectively. The original datasets were analyzed using a Cox proportional hazards model stratified by trial. The mortality rate ratio (MRR) was 1.38 (95% confidence interval: 1.05-1.83) after an inactivated vaccine (after MTMV or HTMV) compared with a standard titer MV (after inactivated vaccine). Girls had a MRR of 1.89 (1.27-2.80), whereas there was no effect for boys, the sex-differential effect being significant (P = 0.02). Excluding measles cases did not alter these conclusions, the MRR after inactivated vaccines (after MTMV or HTMV) being 1.40 (1.06-1.86) higher overall and 1.92 (1.29-2.86) for girls. Control for variations in national immunization schedules for other vaccines did not modify these results. After 9 months of age, all children had been immunized against measles, and mortality in girls was higher when they had received inactivated vaccines (after MTMV or HTMV) rather than live standard titer MV (after an inactivated vaccine).

  12. Rapid small lot manufacturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrigan, R.W.

    1998-05-09

    The direct connection of information, captured in forms such as CAD databases, to the factory floor is enabling a revolution in manufacturing. Rapid response to very dynamic market conditions is becoming the norm rather than the exception. In order to provide economical rapid fabrication of small numbers of variable products, one must design with manufacturing constraints in mind. In addition, flexible manufacturing systems must be programmed automatically to reduce the time for product change over in the factory and eliminate human errors. Sensor based machine control is needed to adapt idealized, model based machine programs to uncontrolled variables such as the condition of raw materials and fabrication tolerances.

  13. Rapid Cycling and Its Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Announcements Public Service Announcements Partnering with DBSA Rapid Cycling and its Treatment What is bipolar disorder? Bipolar ... to Depression and Manic Depression . What is rapid cycling? Rapid cycling is defined as four or more ...

  14. Low pH gel intranasal sprays inactivate influenza viruses in vitro and protect ferrets against influenza infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lambkin-Williams Robert

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Developing strategies for controlling the severity of pandemic influenza is a global public health priority. In the event of a pandemic there may be a place for inexpensive, readily available, effective adjunctive therapies to support containment strategies such as prescription antivirals, vaccines, quarantine and restrictions on travel. Inactivation of virus in the intranasal environment is one possible approach. The work described here investigated the sensitivity of influenza viruses to low pH, and the activity of low pH nasal sprays on the course of an influenza infection in the ferret model. Methods Inactivation of influenza A and avian reassortment influenza was determined using in vitro solutions tests. Low pH nasal sprays were tested using the ferret model with an influenza A Sydney/5/97 challenge. Clinical measures were shed virus, weight loss and body temperature. Results The virus inactivation studies showed that influenza viruses are rapidly inactivated by contact with acid buffered solutions at pH 3.5. The titre of influenza A Sydney/5/97 [H3N2] was reduced by at least 3 log cycles with one minute contact with buffers based on simple acid mixtures such as L-pyroglutamic acid, succinic acid, citric acid and ascorbic acid. A pH 3.5 nasal gel composition containing pyroglutamic acid, succinic acid and zinc acetate reduced titres of influenza A Hong Kong/8/68 [H3N2] by 6 log cycles, and avian reassortment influenza A/Washington/897/80 X A Mallard/New York/6750/78 [H3N2] by 5 log cycles, with 1 min contact. Two ferret challenge studies, with influenza A Sydney/5/97, demonstrated a reduction in the severity of the disease with early application of low pH nasal sprays versus a saline control. In the first study there was decreased weight loss in the treatment groups. In the second study there were reductions in virus shedding and weight loss, most notably when a gelling agent was added to the low pH formulation

  15. Class B Alkaline Stabilization to Achieve Pathogen Inactivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Widmer

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Liming is a cost-effective treatment currently employed in many Class B biosolids production plants in the United States. A bench scale model of lime stabilization was designed to evaluate the persistence of viral, bacterial and parasitic pathogens. The survival of fecal coliforms, Salmonella, adenovirus type 5, rotavirus Wa, bacteriophage MS-2, Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts, Giardia lamblia cysts, and Ascaris lumbricoides ova was evaluated under lime stabilization conditions in a water matrix. Fecal coliforms and Salmonella were undetectable following 2 hours of lime stabilization, demonstrating a 7-log reduction. Adenovirus, MS-2 and rotavirus were below detectable levels following 2 h of liming, demonstrating a 4-log reduction. G. lamblia cysts were also inactivated. A. lumbricoides ova remained viable following 72 hours of liming as did C. parvum oocysts. While this study confirmed that Ascaris ova are resistant to liming, their scarcity in sludge and low recovery efficiencies limit their use as indicator. The persistence of C. parvum oocysts after exposure to lime, suggests that this parasite would be a better choice as indicator for evaluating biosolids intended for land application. The studies done with adenovirus Type 5, rotavirus Wa and male specific bacteriophage provided preliminary data demonstrating similar inactivation rates. Monitoring anthropogenic viruses is a time consuming, labor intensive and expensive process. If further studies could demonstrate that phage could be used as an indicator of other enteric viruses, enhanced monitoring could result in greater acceptance of land application of biosolids while demonstrating no increased public health threat.

  16. Evidence update: GlaxoSmithKline's inactivated quadrivalent influenza vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekkat-Berkani, Rafik; Ray, Riju; Jain, Varsha K; Chandrasekaran, Vijayalakshmi; Innis, Bruce L

    2016-01-01

    Inactivated trivalent influenza vaccines (IIV3s) are designed to protect against illness caused by two influenza A virus subtypes and one influenza B virus lineage. They may provide inadequate protection due to the co-circulation of viruses from two antigenically distinct influenza B lineages. Incorporating strains from both B lineages as in inactivated quadrivalent influenza vaccines (IIV4s) reduces this risk. We summarize the evidence supporting two IIV4s manufactured by GSK Vaccines. Compared to IIV3s, these two IIV4s demonstrated noninferior immunogenicity against the shared influenza strains and superior immunogenicity for the strain of the additional B lineage, particularly in subjects who were seronegative for that B strain. One IIV4's efficacy in children aged 3-8 years was 55.4% against influenza of any severity and 73.1% against moderate-to-severe influenza. Both IIV4s were well-tolerated with a similar safety profile to IIV3s. These IIV4s are more likely than IIV3s to protect against the added influenza B strain.

  17. Role of Merlin/NF2 inactivation in tumor biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrilli, A M; Fernández-Valle, C

    2016-02-04

    Merlin (Moesin-ezrin-radixin-like protein, also known as schwannomin) is a tumor suppressor protein encoded by the neurofibromatosis type 2 gene NF2. Loss of function mutations or deletions in NF2 cause neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2), a multiple tumor forming disease of the nervous system. NF2 is characterized by the development of bilateral vestibular schwannomas. Patients with NF2 can also develop schwannomas on other cranial and peripheral nerves, as well as meningiomas and ependymomas. The only potential treatment is surgery/radiosurgery, which often results in loss of function of the involved nerve. There is an urgent need for chemotherapies that slow or eliminate tumors and prevent their formation in NF2 patients. Interestingly NF2 mutations and merlin inactivation also occur in spontaneous schwannomas and meningiomas, as well as other types of cancer including mesothelioma, glioma multiforme, breast, colorectal, skin, clear cell renal cell carcinoma, hepatic and prostate cancer. Except for malignant mesotheliomas, the role of NF2 mutation or inactivation has not received much attention in cancer, and NF2 might be relevant for prognosis and future chemotherapeutic approaches. This review discusses the influence of merlin loss of function in NF2-related tumors and common human cancers. We also discuss the NF2 gene status and merlin signaling pathways affected in the different tumor types and the molecular mechanisms that lead to tumorigenesis, progression and pharmacological resistance.

  18. Inactivation of adenovirus types 5 and 6 by Virkon S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, Lisa; Maheshwari, Gargi

    2004-10-01

    Throughout the pharmaceutical industry, adenovirus-based products are being developed for human use as vaccine vectors and gene therapy delivery vehicles. The implementation of effective decontamination procedures is critical to the successful manufacture of these products to minimize the risk of personnel exposure and prevent product cross-contamination in the manufacturing facility. In this investigation, we have conducted small-scale decontamination studies to determine the efficacy of Virkon S on the inactivation of adenovirus types 5 and 6 in suspension. Virkon S is a commercially available oxidative disinfectant used against a variety of bacteria, spores, fungi, and viruses. A cytotoxicity-based endpoint dilution assay was used to quantify adenovirus potency before and after Virkon S treatment. We show that the level of organic content in the inactivation sample matrix has a significant impact on Virkon S activity. The potency of adenovirus types 5 and 6 was reduced by greater than six logs upon a five minute exposure to the appropriate concentration of Virkon S. Based on these results, we propose that Virkon S liquid decontamination procedures for adenovirus types 5 and 6 use 0.9% Virkon S for contact times greater than five minutes.

  19. Demeanor of rivaroxaban in activated/inactivated FXa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaname Seki

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Activated factor X (FXa plays an important role in thrombin generation and inflammation. Factor X is not converted constitutively to FXa, but only after intrinsic clotting factors are activated and/or cellular injury occurs. Although rivaroxaban is one of direct FXa inhibitors, its function in the inactivated coagulation cascade is unclear. In human umbilical vein endothelial cells that natively express protease-activated receptor-1 and -2, high dose rivaroxaban did not alter gene transcripts including pro-inflammatory genes in DNA microarray. Upon FXa stimulation, the expressions of pro-inflammatory genes such as monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1, intracellular adhesion molecule-1, and interleukin-8 were maximally increased at 4 h after stimulation, and were suppressed by rivaroxaban. To confirm these results, quantitative polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA for MCP-1 were performed. FXa evoked the expression of MCP-1 maximally at 4 h after stimulation, whereas MCP-1 displayed a different temporal activation in ELISA. Interestingly, rivaroxaban inhibited both time courses of MCP-1 expression. These results suggest that rivaroxaban may not influence gene modulation in the inactivated coagulation state, but can attenuate the endothelial damage evoked by FXa and pro-inflammatory cytokine genes.

  20. Assaying the Stability and Inactivation of AAV Serotype 1 Vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Douglas B; Harvey, Brandon K

    2017-02-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors are a commonplace tool for gene delivery ranging from cell culture to human gene therapy. One feature that makes AAV a desirable vector is its stability, in regard to both the duration of transgene expression and retention of infectivity as a viral particle. This study examined the stability of AAV serotype 1 (AAV1) vectors under different conditions. First, transducibility after storage at 4°C decreased 20% over 7 weeks. Over 10 freeze-thaw cycles, the resulting transduction efficiency became variable at 60-120% of a single thaw. Using small stainless steel slugs to mimic a biosafety cabinet or metal lab bench surface, it was found that an AAV1 vector can be reconstituted after 6 days of storage at room temperature. The stability of AAV is a desired feature, but effective decontamination procedures must be available for safety and experimental integrity. Multiple disinfectants commonly used in the laboratory for ability to inactivate an AAV1 vector were tested, and it was found that autoclaving, 0.25% peracetic acid, iodine, or 10% Clorox bleach completely prevented AAV-mediated transgene expression. These data suggest that peracetic acid should be used for inactivating AAV1 vectors on metal-based surfaces or instruments in order to avoid inadvertent transgene expression in human cells or cross-contamination of instruments.

  1. Pulsed light inactivation of naturally occurring moulds on wheat grain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aron Maftei, Nicoleta; Ramos-Villarroel, Ana Y; Nicolau, Anca I; Martín-Belloso, Olga; Soliva-Fortuny, Robert

    2014-03-15

    Pulsed light (PL) is emerging as a non-thermal technology with excellent prospects for the decontamination of foods and food contact surfaces. Its application for mould inactivation on cereal grains would allow a reduction of storage losses as well as the prevention of mycotoxin contamination at a post-harvest level. The potential of PL for the decontamination of naturally occurring moulds on wheat grain was investigated in this study. Treatments of up to 40 flashes of a fluence of 0.4 J cm⁻² per pulse were applied to both sides of the grain, with an overall energy release ranging from 6.4 to 51.2 J g⁻¹. The most powerful treatment applied to wheat in this study (51.2 J g⁻¹) resulted in a mould reduction of approximately 4 log cycles on samples displaying an initial mould contamination level of 2.2 × 10⁵ CFU g⁻¹. At the same time, the seed germination percentage was only slightly affected. For PL treatments causing an inactivation of 3-4 log cycles, only 14-15% of the germination power of the wheat seeds was lost. The PL treatments attained greater microbial reductions for higher treatment times and lower initial mould loads. The absence of the UV portion of the radiation spectrum was found to significantly reduce the treatment effectiveness. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  2. Inactivation of enveloped viruses by anthraquinones extracted from plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sydiskis, R J; Owen, D G; Lohr, J L; Rosler, K H; Blomster, R N

    1991-01-01

    To determine the extent of antiviral activity present in a number of plant extracts, hot glycerin extracts were prepared from Rheum officinale, Aloe barbadensis, Rhamnus frangula, Rhamnus purshianus, and Cassia angustifolia and their virucidal effects were tested against herpes simplex virus type 1. All the plant extracts inactivated the virus. The active components in these plants were separated by thin-layer chromatography and identified as anthraquinones. A purified sample of aloe emodin was prepared from aloin, and its effects on the infectivity of herpes simplex virus type 1 and type 2, varicella-zoster virus, pseudorabies virus, influenza virus, adenovirus, and rhinovirus were tested by mixing virus with dilutions of aloe emodin for 15 min at 37 degrees C, immediately diluting the sample, and assaying the amount of infectious virus remaining in the sample. The results showed that aloe emodin inactivated all of the viruses tested except adenovirus and rhinovirus. Electron microscopic examination of anthraquinone-treated herpes simplex virus demonstrated that the envelopes were partially disrupted. These results show that anthraquinones extracted from a variety of plants are directly virucidal to enveloped viruses. PMID:1810179

  3. Removal of inactivation causes time-invariant sodium current decays

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    The kinetic properties of the closing of Na channels were studied in frog skeletal muscle to obtain information about the dependence of channel closing on the past history of the channel. Channel closing was studied in normal and modified channels. Chloramine-T was used to modify the channels so that inactivation was virtually removed. A series of depolarizing prepulse potentials was used to activate Na channels, and a -140-mV postpulse was used to monitor the closing of the channels. Unmodified channels decay via a biexponential process with time constants of 72 and 534 microseconds at 12 degrees C. The observed time constants do not depend upon the potential used to activate the channels. The contribution of the slow component to the total decay increases as the activating prepulse is lengthened. After inactivation is removed, the biexponential character of the decay is retained, with no change in the magnitude of the time constants. However, increases in the duration of the activating prepulse over the range where the current is maximal 1-75 ms) produce identical biexponential decays. The presence of biexponential decays suggests that either two subtypes of Na channels are found in muscle, or Na channels can exist in one of two equally conductive states. The time- invariant decays observed suggest that channel closure does not depend upon their past history. PMID:2852208

  4. Glutamine Substitution at Alanine1649 in the S4–S5 Cytoplasmic Loop of Domain 4 Removes the Voltage Sensitivity of Fast Inactivation in the Human Heart Sodium Channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Lihui; Chehab, Nabil; Wieland, Steven J.; Kallen, Roland G.

    1998-01-01

    Normal activation–inactivation coupling in sodium channels insures that inactivation is slow at small but rapid at large depolarizations. M1651Q/M1652Q substitutions in the cytoplasmic loop connecting the fourth and fifth transmembrane segments of Domain 4 (S4–S5/D4) of the human heart sodium channel subtype 1 (hH1) affect the kinetics and voltage dependence of inactivation (Tang, L., R.G. Kallen, and R. Horn. 1996. J. Gen. Physiol. 108:89–104.). We now show that glutamine substitutions NH2-terminal to the methionines (L1646, L1647, F1648, A1649, L1650) also influence the kinetics and voltage dependence of inactivation compared with the wild-type channel. In contrast, mutations at the COOH-terminal end of the S4–S5/D4 segment (L1654, P1655, A1656) are without significant effect. Strikingly, the A1649Q mutation renders the current decay time constants virtually voltage independent and decreases the voltage dependences of steady state inactivation and the time constants for the recovery from inactivation. Single-channel measurements show that at negative voltages latency times to first opening are shorter and less voltage dependent in A1649Q than in wild-type channels; peak open probabilities are significantly smaller and the mean open times are shorter. This indicates that the rate constants for inactivation and, probably, activation are increased at negative voltages by the A1649Q mutation reminiscent of Y1494Q/ Y1495Q mutations in the cytoplasmic loop between the third and fourth domains (O'Leary, M.E., L.Q. Chen, R.G. Kallen, and R. Horn. 1995. J. Gen. Physiol. 106:641–658.). Other substitutions, A1649S and A1649V, decrease but fail to eliminate the voltage dependence of time constants for inactivation, suggesting that the decreased hydrophobicity of glutamine at either residues A1649 or Y1494Y1495 may disrupt a linkage between S4–S5/D4 and the interdomain 3–4 loop interfering with normal activation–inactivation coupling. PMID:9565402

  5. Rapid manufacturing for microfluidics

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Land, K

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available . Microfluidics is at the forefront of developing solutions for drug discovery, diagnostics (from glucose tests to malaria and TB testing) and environmental diagnostics (E-coli monitoring of drinking water). In order to quickly implement new designs, a rapid...

  6. Rapid Prototyping in PVS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz, Cesar A.; Butler, Ricky (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    PVSio is a conservative extension to the PVS prelude library that provides basic input/output capabilities to the PVS ground evaluator. It supports rapid prototyping in PVS by enhancing the specification language with built-in constructs for string manipulation, floating point arithmetic, and input/output operations.

  7. Rapid Prototyping Reconsidered

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desrosier, James

    2011-01-01

    Continuing educators need additional strategies for developing new programming that can both reduce the time to market and lower the cost of development. Rapid prototyping, a time-compression technique adapted from the high technology industry, represents one such strategy that merits renewed evaluation. Although in higher education rapid…

  8. Effects of inactivated Enterococcus faecalis on the proliferation and osteogenic induction of osteoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Zhongchun; Ma, Jinglei; Tan, Jiali; Huang, Lijia; Ling, Junqi

    2016-12-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the effects of Enterococcus faecalis, inactivated by the common intracanal irrigants sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) and chlorhexidine (CHX), on osteoblasts. E. faecalis was inactivated with 2% CHX or 5.25% NaOCl. Subsequently, the Cell Counting kit‑8 assay was used to examine the effects of CHX‑ and NaOCl-inactivated E. faecalis on MC3T3‑E1 osteoblast cell proliferation. Alizarin red staining was used to determine osteoblast mineralization, and osteogenic induction was quantified by determining the optical density of the dye solution. The relative expression levels of osteogenic genes were detected after 1, 4, 7 and 14 days of stimulation with CHX‑ and NaOCl-inactivated E. faecalis by reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The results indicated that CHX‑inactivated E. faecalis inhibited osteoblast proliferation, whereas NaOCl‑inactivated E. faecalis did not suppress cell proliferation. Various concentrations of CHX‑ and NaOCl‑inactivated E. faecalis induced different degrees of osteoblast mineralization. The expression levels of osteocalcin, alkaline phosphatase, runt‑related transcription factor 2, osteopontin and osterix were upregulated in cells following stimulation with 107 and 105 colony‑forming units/ml E. faecalis inactivated by CHX and NaOCl; the upregulation of these osteogenic genes occurred at various time points. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that CHX‑inactivated E. faecalis exerted more of an effect on osteoblast proliferation compared with NaOCl‑inactivated E. faecalis. In addition, CHX‑ and NaOCl‑inactivated E. faecalis was able to induce mineralization and relevant osteogenic gene expression in osteoblast cells.

  9. Effects of inactivated Enterococcus faecalis on the proliferation and osteogenic induction of osteoblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Zhongchun; Ma, Jinglei; Tan, Jiali; Huang, Lijia; Ling, Junqi

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the effects of Enterococcus faecalis, inactivated by the common intracanal irrigants sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) and chlorhexidine (CHX), on osteoblasts. E. faecalis was inactivated with 2% CHX or 5.25% NaOCl. Subsequently, the Cell Counting kit-8 assay was used to examine the effects of CHX- and NaOCl-inactivated E. faecalis on MC3T3-E1 osteoblast cell proliferation. Alizarin red staining was used to determine osteoblast mineralization, and osteogenic induction was quantified by determining the optical density of the dye solution. The relative expression levels of osteogenic genes were detected after 1, 4, 7 and 14 days of stimulation with CHX- and NaOCl-inactivated E. faecalis by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The results indicated that CHX-inactivated E. faecalis inhibited osteoblast proliferation, whereas NaOCl-inactivated E. faecalis did not suppress cell proliferation. Various concentrations of CHX- and NaOCl-inactivated E. faecalis induced different degrees of osteoblast mineralization. The expression levels of osteocalcin, alkaline phosphatase, runt-related transcription factor 2, osteopontin and osterix were upregulated in cells following stimulation with 107 and 105 colony-forming units/ml E. faecalis inactivated by CHX and NaOCl; the upregulation of these osteogenic genes occurred at various time points. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that CHX-inactivated E. faecalis exerted more of an effect on osteoblast proliferation compared with NaOCl-inactivated E. faecalis. In addition, CHX- and NaOCl-inactivated E. faecalis was able to induce mineralization and relevant osteogenic gene expression in osteoblast cells. PMID:27840919

  10. Contributions of the hippocampus and entorhinal cortex to rapid visuomotor learning in rhesus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tianming; Bavley, Rachel L; Fomalont, Kevin; Blomstrom, Kevin J; Mitz, Andrew R; Turchi, Janita; Rudebeck, Peter H; Murray, Elisabeth A

    2014-09-01

    The hippocampus and adjacent structures in the medial temporal lobe are essential for establishing new associative memories. Despite this knowledge, it is not known whether the hippocampus proper is essential for establishing such memories, nor is it known whether adjacent regions like the entorhinal cortex might contribute. To test the contributions of these regions to the formation of new associative memories, we trained rhesus monkeys to rapidly acquire arbitrary visuomotor associations, i.e., associations between visual stimuli and spatially directed actions. We then assessed the effects of reversible inactivations of either the hippocampus (Experiment 1) or entorhinal cortex (Experiment 2) on the within-session rate of learning. For comparison, we also evaluated the effects of the inactivations on performance of problems of the same type that had been well learned prior to any inactivations. We found that inactivation of the entorhinal cortex but not hippocampus produced impairments in acquiring novel arbitrary associations. The impairment did not extend to the familiar, previously established associations. These data indicate that the entorhinal cortex is causally involved in establishing new associations, as opposed to retrieving previously learned associations. Published 2014. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. Published 2014. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  11. Inactivation of various influenza strains to model avian influenza (Bird Flu) with various disinfectant chemistries.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oberst, R. D.; Bieker, Jill Marie; Souza, Caroline Ann

    2005-12-01

    Due to the grave public health implications and economic impact possible with the emergence of the highly pathogenic avian influenza A isolate, H5N1, currently circulating in Asia we have evaluated the efficacy of various disinfectant chemistries against surrogate influenza A strains. Chemistries included in the tests were household bleach, ethanol, Virkon S{reg_sign}, and a modified version of the Sandia National Laboratories developed DF-200 (DF-200d, a diluted version of the standard DF-200 formulation). Validation efforts followed EPA guidelines for evaluating chemical disinfectants against viruses. The efficacy of the various chemistries was determined by infectivity, quantitative RNA, and qualitative protein assays. Additionally, organic challenges using combined poultry feces and litter material were included in the experiments to simulate environments in which decontamination and remediation will likely occur. In all assays, 10% bleach and Sandia DF-200d were the most efficacious treatments against two influenza A isolates (mammalian and avian) as they provided the most rapid and complete inactivation of influenza A viruses.

  12. Survival of H5N1 influenza virus in water and its inactivation by chemical methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihai, Maria Elena; Tecu, Cristina; Ivanciuc, Alina Elena; Necula, Gheorghe; Lupulescu, Emilia; Onu, Adrian

    2011-01-01

    The ability of H5N1 Avian Influenza Virus (AIV) to survive in surface water has been assessed in experimental laboratory conditions, based on non-pathogenic avian reassortant model, by titration of infectivity (TCID50) at different time intervals, in three different types of water. The effect of different chemicals on AIV's survival was assessed using the same type of experimental model. After exposure to the chemical, followed by growth on a suitable substrate, the AIV was quantified by a real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (qRT-PCR). The reassortant virus persisted, and remained infective in aquatic environments, for 12 days at 22-35 degrees C and up to 20 days at 4 degrees C, irrespective of the type of water, supporting the hypothesis of a potential risk for transmitting the virus among birds and contaminating the household water via common sources of water. A significant decrease for AIV persistence models was recorded for sea water, after 12 days, at 35 degrees C. An effective inactivation has been shown when using commercially available products based on glutaraldehyde and penta potassium bis (peroxy mono sulphate) bis(sulphate), respectively. This rapid and safe method for decontamination, developed in this study, might be helpful in implementation of biosafety measures in laboratory and farms against AIV.

  13. Inactivation and inducible oncogenic mutation of p53 in gene targeted pigs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Leuchs

    Full Text Available Mutation of the tumor suppressor p53 plays a major role in human carcinogenesis. Here we describe gene-targeted porcine mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs and live pigs carrying a latent TP53(R167H mutant allele, orthologous to oncogenic human mutant TP53(R175H and mouse Trp53(R172H, that can be activated by Cre recombination. MSCs carrying the latent TP53(R167H mutant allele were analyzed in vitro. Homozygous cells were p53 deficient, and on continued culture exhibited more rapid proliferation, anchorage independent growth, and resistance to the apoptosis-inducing chemotherapeutic drug doxorubicin, all characteristic of cellular transformation. Cre mediated recombination activated the latent TP53(R167H allele as predicted, and in homozygous cells expressed mutant p53-R167H protein at a level ten-fold greater than wild-type MSCs, consistent with the elevated levels found in human cancer cells. Gene targeted MSCs were used for nuclear transfer and fifteen viable piglets were produced carrying the latent TP53(R167H mutant allele in heterozygous form. These animals will allow study of p53 deficiency and expression of mutant p53-R167H to model human germline, or spontaneous somatic p53 mutation. This work represents the first inactivation and mutation of the gatekeeper tumor suppressor gene TP53 in a non-rodent mammal.

  14. [Neutralizing capacity, pepsin inactivation and binding to bile acids and lysolecithin of the antacid magaldrate (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baur, C; Becker, A; Linder, R; Schwan, T

    1981-01-01

    The neutralizing capacity of pentaaluminum-decamagnesiumhentriacontahydroxide-bis(sulfate)-hydrate (magaldrate, Riopan), a stable Al-Mg-hydroxide mono-substance, determined by a modification of the method described in literature, surpasses the efficacy index (mval divided by g) of various commercial antacids. These results coincide with the findings of other workers. The intragastric pH is rapidly and consistently raised to a value between 3 and 5 which is not exceeded (no acid rebound). Due to this fact, pepsin is inactivated and finally adsorbed by magaldrate. Moreover, magaldrate binds a considerable amount of substances contained in duodeno-gastric reflux, such as bile acids and lysolecithin (aggressors in case of gastritis, peptic ulcer, stress ulcer, peptic esophagitis).

  15. Inactivation of Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Lactobacillus brevis in Low-fat Milk by Pulsed Electric Field Treatment: A Pilot-scale Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Bok Kung; Choi, Hyuk Joon; Kang, Shin Ho; Baick, Seung Chun

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the effects of a pulsed electric field (PEF) treatment on microbial inactivation and the physical properties of low-fat milk. Milk inoculated with Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, or Lactobacillus brevis was supplied to a pilot-scale PEF treatment system at a flow rate of 30 L/h. Pulses with an electric field strength of 10 kV/cm and a pulse width of 30 μs were applied to the milk with total pulse energies of 50-250 kJ/L achieved by varying the pulse frequency. The inactivation curves of the test microorganisms were biphasic with an initial lag phase (or shoulder) followed by a phase of rapid inactivation. PEF treatments with a total pulse energy of 200 kJ/L resulted in a 4.5-log reduction in E. coli, a 4.4-log reduction in L. brevis, and a 6.0-log reduction in S. cerevisiae. Total pulse energies of 200 and 250 kJ/L resulted in greater than 5-log reductions in microbial counts in stored PEF-treated milk, and the growth of surviving microorganisms was slow during storage for 15 d at 4℃. PEF treatment did not change milk physical properties such as pH, color, or particle-size distribution (pelectric-field strength of 10 kV/cm can be used to pasteurize low-fat milk. PMID:26877640

  16. A novel microfluidic mixer-based approach for determining inactivation kinetics of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in chlorine solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Boce; Luo, Yaguang; Zhou, Bin; Wang, Qin; Millner, Patricia D

    2015-08-01

    Determination of the minimum free chlorine concentration needed to prevent pathogen survival/cross-contamination during produce washing is essential for the development of science-based food safety regulations and practices. Although the trend of chlorine concentration-contact time on pathogen inactivation is generally understood, specific information on chlorine and the kinetics of pathogen inactivation at less than 1.00 s is urgently needed by the produce processing industry. However, conventional approaches to obtain this critical data have been unable to adequately measure very rapid responses. This paper reports our development, fabrication, and test of a novel microfluidic device, and its application to obtain the necessary data on pathogen inactivation by free chlorine in produce wash solution in times as short as 0.10 s. A novel microfluidic mixer with the capability to accurately determine the reaction time and control the chlorine concentration was designed with three inlets for bacterial, chlorine and dechlorinating solutions, and one outlet for effluent collection. The master mold was fabricated on a silicon wafer with microchannels via photopolymerization. Polydimethylsiloxane replicas with patterned microchannels were prototyped via soft lithography. The replicas were further assembled into the micromixer on glass via O2 plasma treatment, and the inlets were connected to a syringe pump for solution delivery. To determine the kinetics of free chlorine on pathogen inactivation, chlorine solutions of varying concentrations were first pumped into the micromixer, together with the addition of bacterial suspension of Escherichia coli O157:H7 through a separate inlet. This was followed by injection of dechlorinating solution to stop the chlorine-pathogen reaction. The effluent was collected and the surviving bacteria cells were enumerated using a modified 'Most Probable Number' method. Free chlorine concentration was determined using a standard colorimetric

  17. Cost-effectiveness of pathogen inactivation for platelet transfusions in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postma, MJ; van Hulst, M; De Wolf, JTM; Botteman, M; Staginnus, U

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this study is to estimate cost-effectiveness of pathogen inactivation for platelet transfusions in the Netherlands. We used decision tree analysis to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of the addition of pathogen inactivation of pooled platelets to standard procedures for platelet

  18. The inactivating and mutagenic effect of hydroxylamine on bacteriophage φX174

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pol, J.H. van de; Arkel, G.A. van

    1965-01-01

    The inactivation of bacteriophage ΦXI74 by the mutagenic agents nitrous acid and ultraviolet irradiation proceeds according to a single-hit kinetics. However, treatment of purified ΦXI74 by hydroxylamine (HA) at pH 6 and 25° results in an inactivation that is not strictly exponential. The

  19. Curing conditions to inactivate Trichinella spiralis muscle larvae in ready-to-eat pork sausage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curing processes for ready to eat (RTE) pork products currently require individual validation of methods to demonstrate inactivation of Trichinella spiralis. This is a major undertaking for each process; currently no model of meat chemistry exists that can be correlated with inactivation of Trichin...

  20. ASSESSING THE EFFECTIVENESS OF LOW PRESSURE ULTRAVIOLET LIGHT FOR INACTIVATING HELICOBACTER PYLORI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Three strains of Helicobacter pylori were exposed to ultraviolet (UV) light from a low-pressure source to determine log inactivation versus applied fluence. Results indicate that H. pylori is readily inactivated at UV fluences typically used in water treatment r...

  1. Inactivation of porcine endogenous retrovirus in pigs using CRISPR-Cas9

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niu, Dong; Wei, Hong-Jiang; Lin, Lin

    2017-01-01

    of this approach. Earlier, we demonstrated the feasibility of inactivating PERV activity in an immortalized pig cell line. Here, we confirmed that PERVs infect human cells, and observed the horizontal transfer of PERVs among human cells. Using CRISPR-Cas9, we inactivated all the PERVs in a porcine primary cell...

  2. A systematic approach to determine global thermal inactivation parameters for various food pathogens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asselt, van E.D.; Zwietering, M.H.

    2006-01-01

    Thermal inactivation of pathogens has been studied extensively, which has resulted in a wide range of D- and z-values. Estimating the inactivation rate for a specific condition based on these reported values is difficult, since one has to select representative conditions, and data obtained exactly

  3. Inactivation of 12 viruses by heating steps applied during manufacture of a hepatitis B vaccine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lelie, P. N.; Reesink, H. W.; Lucas, C. J.

    1987-01-01

    The efficacy of two heating cycles (90 sec at 103 degrees C and 10 hr at 65 degrees C) used during manufacture of a plasma-derived hepatitis-B vaccine was validated for the inactivation of 12 virus families. A period of 15 min warming up to 65 degrees C had already completely inactivated

  4. Inactivation of soybean trypsin inhibitors and lipoxygenases by high-pressure processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ven, van der C.; Matser, A.M.; Berg, van den R.W.

    2005-01-01

    Trypsin inhibitors (TIA), one of the antinutritional factors of soy milk, are usually inactivated by heat treatment. In the current study, high-pressure processing (HPP) was evaluated as an alternative for the inactivation of TIA in soy milk. Moreover, the effect of HPP on lipoxygenase (LOX) in

  5. Modelling fungal solid-state fermentation: The role of inactivation kinetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, J.P.; Sonsbeek, H.M. van; Knol, W.; Tramper, J.; Geelhoed, W.; Peeters, M.; Rinzema, A.

    1999-01-01

    The theoretical mathematical models described in this paper are used to evaluate the effects of fungal biomass inactivation kinetics on a non- isothermal tray solid-state fermentation (SSF). The inactivation kinetics, derived from previously reported experiments done under isothermal conditions and

  6. Inactivation of recombinant bacteriophage lambda by use of chemical agents and UV radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Ewan M; Wright, Harry; Lennon, Kelly-Anne; Craik, Vicki A; Clark, Jason R; March, John B

    2012-04-01

    Several approaches for the inactivation of bacteriophage lambda, including UV germicidal irradiation (UVGI) and the chemical agents Virkon-S, Chloros, Decon-90, and sodium hydroxide (NaOH), were compared. Virkon, NaOH, and UVGI caused a ≥7-log(10) reduction in phage titers. This study successfully describes several methods with potential for bacteriophage inactivation in industrial settings.

  7. Mechanism of Bacillus subtilis spore inactivation by and resistance to supercritical CO2 plus peracetic acid

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Setlow, B; Korza, G; Blatt, K.M.S; Fey, J.P; Setlow, P

    2016-01-01

    Determine how supercritical CO2 (scCO2 ) plus peracetic acid (PAA) inactivates Bacillus subtilis spores, factors important in spore resistance to scCO2 -PAA, and if spores inactivated by scCO2 -PAA are truly dead...

  8. The non-enzymatic inactivation of thirteen β-lactam antibiotics in human faeces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, G; Weissing, F; de Vries Hospers, H; Tonk, R; van der Waaij, D

    1992-01-01

    In order to obtain a method that could predict the in vitro inactivation of an antibiotic in the digestive tract, the non-enzymatic inactivation of 13 beta-lactam antibiotics by human faeces was investigated. Benzylpenicillin, amoxicillin, amoxicillin/clavulanate, cloxacillin, piperacillin,

  9. The non-enzymatic inactivation of thirteen beta-lactam antibiotics in human faeces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, G; Weissing, F; de Vries-Hospers, H; Tonk, R; van der Waaij, D

    1992-01-01

    In order to obtain a method that could predict the in vitro inactivation of an antibiotic in the digestive tract, the non-enzymatic inactivation of 13 beta-lactam antibiotics by human faeces was investigated. Benzylpenicillin, amoxicillin, amoxicillin/clavulanate, cloxacillin, piperacillin,

  10. Inactivation of Escherichia coli by superoxide radicals and their dismutation products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hemmen, J.J. van; Meuling, W.J.A.

    1977-01-01

    E. coli cells are inactivated by the products of the reaction between dialuric acid and oxygen, of which the primary product is superoxide. The rate of inactivation is decreased by superoxide dismutase, by catalase, and by EDTA, whereas it is increased by addition of cupric ions or hydrogen

  11. 21 CFR 866.5260 - Complement C3b inactivator immunological test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Systems § 866.5260 Complement C3b inactivator immunological test system. (a) Identification. A complement... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Complement C3b inactivator immunological test system. 866.5260 Section 866.5260 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND...

  12. Thermal inactivation of infectious hematopoietic necrosis and infectious pancreatic necrosis virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosting, L.; Gould, R.W.

    1981-01-01

    A plaque assay was used to follow the inactivation kinetics of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus and infectious pancreatic necrosis virus in cell culture media at various temperatures. Inactivation of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus in a visceral organ slurry was compared with that in culture media.

  13. Growth and inactivation of Salmonella at low refrigerated storage temperatures and thermal inactivation on raw chicken meat and laboratory media: mixed effect meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smadi, Hanan; Sargeant, Jan M; Shannon, Harry S; Raina, Parminder

    2012-12-01

    Growth and inactivation regression equations were developed to describe the effects of temperature on Salmonella concentration on chicken meat for refrigerated temperatures (⩽10°C) and for thermal treatment temperatures (55-70°C). The main objectives were: (i) to compare Salmonella growth/inactivation in chicken meat versus laboratory media; (ii) to create regression equations to estimate Salmonella growth in chicken meat that can be used in quantitative risk assessment (QRA) modeling; and (iii) to create regression equations to estimate D-values needed to inactivate Salmonella in chicken meat. A systematic approach was used to identify the articles, critically appraise them, and pool outcomes across studies. Growth represented in density (Log10CFU/g) and D-values (min) as a function of temperature were modeled using hierarchical mixed effects regression models. The current meta-analysis analysis found a significant difference (P⩽0.05) between the two matrices - chicken meat and laboratory media - for both growth at refrigerated temperatures and inactivation by thermal treatment. Growth and inactivation were significantly influenced by temperature after controlling for other variables; however, no consistent pattern in growth was found. Validation of growth and inactivation equations against data not used in their development is needed. Copyright © 2012 Ministry of Health, Saudi Arabia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Inactivation of hepatitis A virus and norovirus surrogate in suspension and on food-contact surfaces using pulsed UV light (pulsed light inactivation of food-borne viruses).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jean, Julie; Morales-Rayas, Rocío; Anoman, Marie-Natacha; Lamhoujeb, Safaa

    2011-05-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the inactivation of murine norovirus (MNV-1) and hepatitis A virus (HAV) by pulsed ultraviolet (UV) light. MNV-1 was used as a model for human norovirus. Viral suspensions of about 10(6) PFU/ml were exposed to pulses of UV light for different times and at different distances in a Xenon Steripulse device (model RS-3000C). Inactivation studies were also carried out on 1-cm(2) stainless steel and polyvinyl chloride disks with 10(5) PFU/ml. Inactivation of MNV-1 and HAV at 10.5 cm from the UV source was greater on inert surfaces than in suspension. The presence of organic matter (fetal bovine serum) reduced the effectiveness of pulsed light both in suspension and on surfaces. However, 2-s treatment in the absence of FBS completely inactivated (5 log reduction) the viral load at different distances tested, whether in suspension (MNV-1) or on disks (MNV-1 and HAV). The same treatment in the presence of fetal bovine serum (5%) allowed a reduction of about 3 log. This study showed that short duration pulses represent an excellent alternative for inactivation of food-borne viruses. This technology could be used to inactivate viruses in drinking water or on food-handling surfaces. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Differential effects of deep cerebellar nuclei inactivation on reaching and adaptive control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, J H; Cooper, S E; Hacking, A; Ghez, C

    2000-04-01

    This study examined the effects of selective inactivation of the cerebellar nuclei in the cat on the control of multijoint trajectories and trajectory adaptation to avoid obstacles. Animals were restrained in a hammock and trained to perform a prehension task in which they reached to grasp a small cube of meat from a narrow food well. To examine trajectory adaptation, reaching was obstructed by placing a horizontal bar in the limb's path. Inactivation was produced by microinjection of the GABA agonist muscimol (0.25-1.0 microg in 1 microL saline). Fastigial nucleus inactivation produced a severe impairment in balance and in head and trunk control but no effect on reaching and grasping. Dentate inactivation slowed movements significantly and produced a significant increase in tip path curvature but did not impair reaching and grasping. Selective inactivation of the anterior and posterior interpositus nuclei did not impair grasping but severely decreased the accuracy of reaching movements and produced different biases in wrist and paw paths. Anterior interpositus inactivation produced movement slowing (wrist speed) and under-reaching to the food well. Wrist and tip paths showed anterior biases and became more curved. Also animals could no longer make anticipatory adjustments in limb kinematics to avoid obstructions but sensory-evoked corrective responses were preserved. Posterior interpositus inactivation produced a significant increase in wrist speed and overreaching. Wrist and tip paths showed a posterior bias and became more curved, although in a different way than during anterior interpositus inactivation. Posterior interpositus inactivation did not impair trajectory adaptation to reach over the obstacle. During inactivation of either interpositus nucleus, all measures of kinematic temporal and spatial variability increased with somewhat greater effects being produced by anterior interpositus inactivation. We discuss our results in relation to the hypothesis that

  16. Proton transfer unlocks inactivation in cyclic nucleotide-gated A1 channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchesi, Arin; Arcangeletti, Manuel; Mazzolini, Monica; Torre, Vincent

    2015-02-15

    Desensitization and inactivation provide a form of short-term memory controlling the firing patterns of excitable cells and adaptation in sensory systems. Unlike many of their cousin K(+) channels, cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channels are thought not to desensitize or inactivate. Here we report that CNG channels do inactivate and that inactivation is controlled by extracellular protons. Titration of a glutamate residue within the selectivity filter destabilizes the pore architecture, which collapses towards a non-conductive, inactivated state in a process reminiscent of the usual C-type inactivation observed in many K(+) channels. These results indicate that inactivation in CNG channels represents a regulatory mechanism that has been neglected thus far, with possible implications in several physiological processes ranging from signal transduction to growth cone navigation. Ion channels control ionic fluxes across biological membranes by residing in any of three functionally distinct states: deactivated (closed), activated (open) or inactivated (closed). Unlike many of their cousin K(+) channels, cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channels do not desensitize or inactivate. Using patch recording techniques, we show that when extracellular pH (pHo ) is decreased from 7.4 to 6 or lower, wild-type CNGA1 channels inactivate in a voltage-dependent manner. pHo titration experiments show that at pHo  < 7 the I-V relationships are outwardly rectifying and that inactivation is coupled to current rectification. Single-channel recordings indicate that a fast mechanism of proton blockage underlines current rectification while inactivation arises from conformational changes downstream from protonation. Furthermore, mutagenesis and ionic substitution experiments highlight the role of the selectivity filter in current decline, suggesting analogies with the C-type inactivation observed in K(+) channels. Analysis with Markovian models indicates that the non-independent binding of two

  17. Virus-inactivated plasma - Plasmasafe: a one-year experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Silvestro, Giustina; Bagatella, Paola; Tison, Tiziana; Quaino, Vania; Carraro, Paolo; Tenderini, Maria Luisa; Lazzaro, Annarosa; Marotti, Alberto

    2007-01-01

    Background Fresh-frozen plasma (FFP) is a widely used blood transfusion product. The transfusion safety of this product is ensured by legally obligatory tests, but can be further improved by using some technical procedures, such as methylene blue (MB) and solvent-detergent (SD) viral inactivation methods. Mainly organisational criteria led us to introduce the SD viral inactivation technique as a service activity. In this report we describe our first year of experience, following the introduction of the SD technique, and thus the use of SD-virally inactivated plasma (PlasmaSafe). Materials and methods In order to evaluate the appropriate use and the therapeutic efficacy of PlasmaSafe in our Blood Transfusion Unit, the following programme was planned: quality control [prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT), fibrinogen] of the FFP units (N=312); evaluation of the clinical effectiveness on 490 patients (879 transfusion events); pre- and post-treatment monitoring of indicators of coagulation (PT, aPTT, fibrinogen, proteins S and C, factor VIII) on 15 patients; treatment of three patients with thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) undergoing plasma-exchange; haemovigilance of adverse reactions provoked by SD-plasma. Results The indicators of coagulation in the FFP units varied greatly: the PT ranged from 50–120%, the aPTT from 24–41 seconds and the fibrinogen concentration from 1.42–6.84 g/L. Seventy-six percent of the patients responded to the plasma administration; moreover, two of 15 patients in whom protein S was assayed, showed no increase of this haemostatic protein. The TTP patients responded to plasma exchange treatment following four sessions of apheresis. During the observation period 8,422 PlasmaSafe units were transfused and no adverse reactions were recorded. Conclusion PlasmaSafe, a pharmaceutical-like product with a standardised content of coagulation factors, was found to be effective at correcting coagulation

  18. Inactivation of C4orf26 in toothless placental mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, Mark S; Starrett, James; Morin, Phillip A; Lanzetti, Agnese; Hayashi, Cheryl; Gatesy, John

    2016-02-01

    Previous studies have reported inactivated copies of six enamel-related genes (AMBN, AMEL, AMTN, ENAM, KLK4, MMP20) and one dentin-related gene (DSPP) in one or more toothless vertebrates and/or vertebrates with enamelless teeth, thereby providing evidence that these genes are enamel or tooth-specific with respect to their critical functions that are maintained by natural selection. Here, we employ available genome sequences for edentulous and enamelless mammals to evaluate the enamel specificity of four genes (WDR72, SLC24A4, FAM83H, C4orf26) that have been implicated in amelogenesis imperfecta, a condition in which proper enamel formation is abrogated during tooth development. Coding sequences for WDR72, SCL24A4, and FAM83H are intact in four edentulous taxa (Chinese pangolin, three baleen whales) and three taxa (aardvark, nine-banded armadillo, Hoffmann's two-toed sloth) with enamelless teeth, suggesting that these genes have critical functions beyond their involvement in tooth development. By contrast, genomic data for C4orf26 reveal inactivating mutations in pangolin and bowhead whale as well as evidence for deletion of this gene in two minke whale species. Hybridization capture of exonic regions and PCR screens provide evidence for inactivation of C4orf26 in eight additional baleen whale species. However, C4orf26 is intact in all three species with enamelless teeth that were surveyed, as well as in 95 additional mammalian species with enamel-capped teeth. Estimates of selection intensity suggest that dN/dS ratios on branches leading to taxa with enamelless teeth are similar to the dN/dS ratio on branches leading to taxa with enamel-capped teeth. Based on these results, we conclude that C4orf26 is tooth-specific, but not enamel-specific, with respect to its essential functions that are maintained by natural selection. A caveat is that an alternative splice site variant, which translates exon 3 in a different reading frame, is putatively functional in

  19. MECHANISM OF FUSARIUM TRICINCTUM (CORDA SACC. SPORE INACTIVATION BY CHLORINE DIOXIDE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Chen

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The mechanism of Fusarium tricinctum (Corda Sacc. spore inactivation by chlorine dioxide (ClO2 was investigated. During F. tricinctum spore inactivation by ClO2, protein, DNA, and metal ion leakage, enzyme activity, and cell ultrastructure were examined. Protein and DNA leakages were not detected, while there were metal ion leakages of K+, Ca2+, and Mg2+, which were well-correlated with the inactivation rate. The enzyme activities of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, citrate synthase, and phosphofructokinase were inhibited and were also well-correlated with the inactivation rate. Electron micrographs showed the ultrastructural modifications of spores and demonstrated that spores were heavily distorted and collapsed from their regular structure. Spore surface damage and disruption in inner components was also severe. The metal ion leakage, the inhibition of enzyme activities, and the damage of spore structure were significant in F. tricinctum spore inactivation by ClO2.

  20. Inactivation disinfection property of Moringa Oleifera seed extract: optimization and kinetic studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idris, M. A.; Jami, M. S.; Hammed, A. M.

    2017-05-01

    This paper presents the statistical optimization study of disinfection inactivation parameters of defatted Moringa oleifera seed extract on Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacterial cells. Three level factorial design was used to estimate the optimum range and the kinetics of the inactivation process was also carried. The inactivation process involved comparing different disinfection models of Chicks-Watson, Collins-Selleck and Homs models. The results from analysis of variance (ANOVA) of the statistical optimization process revealed that only contact time was significant. The optimum disinfection range of the seed extract was 125 mg/L, 30 minutes and 120rpm agitation. At the optimum dose, the inactivation kinetics followed the Collin-Selleck model with coefficient of determination (R2) of 0.6320. This study is the first of its kind in determining the inactivation kinetics of pseudomonas aeruginosa using the defatted seed extract.

  1. Rapid manufacturing facilitated customisation

    OpenAIRE

    Tuck, Christopher John; Hague, Richard; Ruffo, Massimiliano; Ransley, Michelle; Adams, Paul Russell

    2008-01-01

    Abstract This paper describes the production of body-fitting customised seat profiles utilising the following digital methods: three dimensional laser scanning, reverse engineering and Rapid Manufacturing (RM). The seat profiles have been manufactured in order to influence the comfort characteristics of an existing ejector seat manufactured by Martin Baker Aircraft Ltd. The seat, known as Navy Aircrew Common Ejection Seat (NACES), was originally designed with a generic profile. ...

  2. Rapid Detection of Pathogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Perlin

    2005-08-14

    Pathogen identification is a crucial first defense against bioterrorism. A major emphasis of our national biodefense strategy is to establish fast, accurate and sensitive assays for diagnosis of infectious diseases agents. Such assays will ensure early and appropriate treatment of infected patients. Rapid diagnostics can also support infection control measures, which monitor and limit the spread of infectious diseases agents. Many select agents are highly transmissible in the early stages of disease, and it is critical to identify infected patients and limit the risk to the remainder of the population and to stem potential panic in the general population. Nucleic acid-based molecular approaches for identification overcome many of the deficiencies associated with conventional culture methods by exploiting both large- and small-scale genomic differences between organisms. PCR-based amplification of highly conserved ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes, intergenic sequences, and specific toxin genes is currently the most reliable approach for bacterial, fungal and many viral pathogenic agents. When combined with fluorescence-based oligonucleotide detection systems, this approach provides real-time, quantitative, high fidelity analysis capable of single nucleotide allelic discrimination (4). These probe systems offer rapid turn around time (<2 h) and are suitable for high throughput, automated multiplex operations that are critical for clinical diagnostic laboratories. In this pilot program, we have used molecular beacon technology invented at the Public health Research Institute to develop a new generation of molecular probes to rapidly detect important agents of infectious diseases. We have also developed protocols to rapidly extract nucleic acids from a variety of clinical specimen including and blood and tissue to for detection in the molecular assays. This work represented a cooperative research development program between the Kramer-Tyagi/Perlin labs on probe development

  3. Distinct molecular sites of anaesthetic action: pentobarbital block of human brain sodium channels is alleviated by removal of fast inactivation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wartenberg, H. C.; Urban, B. W.; Duch, D. S.

    1999-01-01

    Fast inactivation of sodium channel function is modified by anaesthetics. Its quantitative contribution to the overall anaesthetic effect is assessed by removing the fast inactivation mechanism enzymatically. Sodium channels from human brain cortex were incorporated into planar lipid bilayers. After

  4. Tiber Personal Rapid Transit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Carlo D'agostino

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The project “Tiber Personal Rapid Transit” have been presented by the author at the Rome City Vision Competition1 2010, an ideas competition, which challenges architects, engineers, designers, students and creatives individuals to develop visionary urban proposals with the intention of stimulating and supporting the contemporary city, in this case Rome. The Tiber PRT proposal tries to answer the competition questions with the definition of a provocative idea: a Personal Rapid transit System on the Tiber river banks. The project is located in the central section of the Tiber river and aims at the renewal of the river banks with the insertion of a Personal Rapid Transit infrastructure. The project area include the riverbank of Tiber from Rome Transtevere RFI station to Piazza del Popolo, an area where main touristic and leisure attractions are located. The intervention area is actually no used by the city users and residents and constitute itself a strong barrier in the heart of the historic city.

  5. Visible-light-driven photocatalytic inactivation of MS2 by metal-free g-C3N4: Virucidal performance and mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yi; Zhang, Chi; Shuai, Danmeng; Naraginti, Saraschandra; Wang, Dawei; Zhang, Wenlong

    2016-12-01

    The challenge to achieve effective water disinfection of pathogens, especially viruses, with minimized harmful disinfection byproducts calls for a cost-effective and environmentally benign technology. Here, polymeric graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4), as a metal-free robust photocatalyst, was explored for the first time for its ability to inactivate viruses under visible light irradiation. MS2 with an initial concentration of 1 × 10(8) PFU/mL was completely inactivated by g-C3N4 with a loading of 150 mg/L under visible light irradiation of 360 min. g-C3N4 was a robust photocatalyst, and no decrease in its virucidal performance was observed over five cycles of sequential MS2 photocatalytic inactivation. The reactive oxygen species (ROSs) were measured by a range of scavengers, and photo-generated electrons and its derived ROSs (O- 2) were found to be the leading contributor for viral inactivation. TEM images indicated that the viral particle shape was distorted and the capsid shell was ruptured after photocatalysis. Viral surface proteins, particularly replicase proteins and maturation proteins, were damaged by photocatalytic oxidation. The loss of proteins would result in the leakage and rapid destruction of interior components (four main types of RNA genes), finally leading to viral death without regrowth. Our work opens a new avenue for the exploration and applications of a low-cost, high-efficient, and robust metal-free photocatalyst for green/sustainable viral disinfection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Net energy production associated with pathogen inactivation during mesophilic and thermophilic anaerobic digestion of sewage sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziemba, Christopher; Peccia, Jordan

    2011-10-15

    The potential for anaerobic digester energy production must be balanced with the sustainability of reusing the resultant biosolids for land application. Mesophilic, thermophilic, temperature-phased, and high temperature (60 or 70 °C) batch pre-treatment digester configurations have been systematically evaluated for net energy production and pathogen inactivation potential. Energy input requirements and net energy production were modeled for each digester scheme. First-order inactivation rate coefficients for Escherichia coli, Enterococcus faecalis and bacteriophage MS-2 were measured at each digester temperature and full-scale pathogen inactivation performance was estimated for each indicator organism and each digester configuration. Inactivation rates were found to increase dramatically at temperatures above 55 °C. Modeling full-scale performance using retention times based on U.S. EPA time and temperature constraints predicts a 1-2 log inactivation in mesophilic treatment, and a 2-5 log inactivation in 50-55 °C thermophilic and temperature-phased treatments. Incorporating a 60 or 70 °C batch pre-treatment phase resulted in dramatically higher potency, achieving MS-2 inactivation of 14 and 16 logs respectively, and complete inactivation (over 100 log reduction) of E. coli and E. faecalis. For temperatures less than 70 °C, viability staining of thermally-treated E. coli showed significantly reduced inactivation relative to standard culture enumeration. Due to shorter residence times in thermophilic reactors, the net energy production for all digesters was similar (less than 20% difference) with the 60 or 70 °C batch treatment configurations producing the most net energy and the mesophilic treatment producing the least. Incorporating a 60 or 70 °C pre-treatment phase can dramatically increase pathogen inactivation performance without decreasing net energy capture from anaerobic digestion. Energy consumption is not a significant barrier against

  7. Inactivation of Zika virus in platelet components using amotosalen and ultraviolet A illumination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santa Maria, Felicia; Laughhunn, Andrew; Lanteri, Marion C; Aubry, Maite; Musso, Didier; Stassinopoulos, Adonis

    2017-08-01

    Concerned over the risk of Zika virus (ZIKV) transfusion transmission, public health agencies recommended the implementation of mitigation strategies for its prevention. Those strategies included the use of pathogen inactivation for the treatment of plasma and platelets. The efficacy of amotosalen/ultraviolet A to inactivate ZIKV in plasma had been previously demonstrated, and the efficacy of inactivation in platelets with the same technology was assumed. These studies quantify ZIKV inactivation in platelet components using amotosalen/ultraviolet A. Platelet components were spiked with ZIKV, and ZIKV infectious titers and RNA loads were measured by cell culture-based assays and real-time polymerase chain reaction in spiked platelet components before and after photochemical treatment using amotosalen/ultraviolet A. The mean ZIKV infectivity titers and RNA loads in platelet components before inactivation were either 4.9 log10 plaque forming units per milliliter, or 4.4 log10 50% tissue culture infective dose per milliliter and 7.5 log10 genome equivalents per milliliter, respectively. No infectivity was detected immediately after amotosalen/ultraviolet A treatment. No replicative virus remained after treatment, as demonstrated by multiple passages on Vero cell cultures; and ZIKV RNA was not detected from the first passage after inactivation. Additional experiments in this study demonstrated efficient inactivation to the limit of detection in platelets manufactured in 65% platelet additive solution, 35% plasma, or 100% plasma. As previously demonstrated for plasma, robust levels of ZIKV inactivation were achieved in platelet components. With inactivation of higher levels of ZIKV than those reported in asymptomatic, RNA-reactive blood donors, the pathogen-inactivation system using amotosalen/ultraviolet A offers the potential to mitigate the risk of ZIKV transmission by plasma and platelet transfusion. © 2017 The Authors Transfusion published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc

  8. Modification of C-type inactivating Shaker potassium channels by chloramine-T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlief, T; Schönherr, R; Heinemann, S H

    1996-02-01

    Shaker potassium channels undergo a slow C-type inactivation which can be hastened dramatically by single-point mutations in or near the pore region. We found that the oxidizing agent chloramine-T (Chl-T) causes an irreversible loss of current for those mutants which show C-type inactivation. For several mutants at position T449, which show a wide spectrum of inactivation time constants, the time constant of current rundown induced by Chl-T correlated with the speed of inactivation. Rundown was accelerated when the channels were in the inactivated state but rundown also occurred when channels were not opened or inactivated. Apparently, only those channels which can undergo C-type inactivation are accessible to Chl-T. In order to gain information about the target amino-acid residue for the action of Chl-T and the structural rearrangements occurring during C-type inactivation, several mutant channel proteins were compared with respect to their response to Chl-T. Since Chl-T can oxidize cysteine and methionine residues, we mutated the possible targets in and close to the pore region, namely C462 to A, and M440 and M448 to I. While the residues M440 and C462 were not important for channel rundown, mutation of M448 to I made the channels more resistant to Chl-T by about one order of magnitude. While inactivation was accelerated upon application of Chl-T in most mutants, mutation of M448 to I abolished this effect on the time course of inactivation, indicating that M448 is one of the target residues for Chl-T.

  9. Inactivation of microorganisms with microwaves at reduced temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozempel, M F; Annous, B A; Cook, R D; Scullen, O J; Whiting, R C

    1998-05-01

    We developed a pilot-plant nonthermal flow process using microwave energy to inactivate microorganisms. The process consists of multiple passes through the microwave generator. Each passed material goes to a receiving tank for subsequent passes. The flow rate was 0.96 to 1.26 kg/min and the dwell time per pass was 1.1 to 1.5 min. Five passes were used. The microwave energy is instantaneously and simultaneously applied to the system, and thermal energy is removed by a cooling tube within the process line in the microwave generator. The cooling tube maintains the temperature below 40 degrees C. There was significant reduction in microorganisms in water, 10% glucose solution, and apple juice, and in yeast in beer. There was a slight decrease in microorganisms in tomato juice, pineapple juice, apple cider, and beer; and no effect in skim milk.

  10. Experience of vaccination with inactivated poliomyelitis vaccines in Iceland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudnadóttir, M

    1981-01-01

    Iceland, as a few other European countries, has used inactivated vaccine against poliomyelitis from the beginning in 1956. No cases of paralytic polio occurred since 1960. For 17 years neither isolations of poliovirus nor suspected cases of the clinical disease have been recorded. Studies on neutralizing antibodies in sera of vaccinees were not too encouraging after 4 injections. A 5th vaccination of IPV was therefore given to those children who lacked antibodies to any type of poliovirus. One month after the 5th injection 70% had antibodies against all 3 types of poliovirus and only 2% lacked antibodies against both types 1 and 3. In countries where no virus to boost immunity exists any longer during the life of an individual it may be necessary to secure booster effects at regular intervals after primary vaccination and later in life. This will be included in the vaccination schedule against polio in Iceland.

  11. Enzyme stability in downstream processing. Part 2: quantification of inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weijers, S R; Van't Riet, K

    1992-01-01

    In biotechnological recovery processes the instability of the product can lead to large losses in the sequence of recovery processes needed to purify the product. As the cost of the final active product is strongly dependent on the recovery yield, this will lead to an increase in product cost. Therefore knowledge of factors that influence stability is important. This Part 2 provides the basic principles for design and operation of processes in which inactivation takes place. Simple kinetics and reactor modelling are discussed. These are applied to a number of unit operations: cell disruption, membrane filtration, drying and reversed micellar extraction. It is thus shown that the basic tools for modeling of biochemical processes provide us with the data needed for optimal process design and operation.

  12. Inactivation pathogenic microorganisms in water by laser methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iakovlev, Alexey; Grishkanich, Aleksandr; Kascheev, Sergey; Ruzankina, Julia; Afanasyev, Mikhail; Hafizov, Nail

    2017-02-01

    As a result of the research the following methods have been proposed for controlling harmful microorganisms: sterilization of water by laser radiation at wavelengths of 425 nm, 355 nm and 308 nm. The results of theoretical and experimental studies on the development and establishment of a system of ultraviolet disinfection of water for injection (UFOVI) intended for research sterilized water for injections. The pipe created a strong turbulent water flow. Performance irradiation laminar flow of 1.5 liters per second. Irradiation was carried out at three wavelengths 425 nm, 355 nm and 308 nm with energies semiconductor laser diode arrays to 4 MJ / cm3. Wavelength tuning implemented current in the range of 10 nm. For large capacities, we have developed a miniature solid state laser, which was used in fluid microorganisms inactivator. In the water treatment process breaks up to 98% of microbes, but can be left among pathogenic viruses destruction which requires special handling.

  13. New developments in gold-catalyzed manipulation of inactivated alkenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Chiarucci

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Over the recent years, the nucleophilic manipulation of inactivated carbon–carbon double bonds has gained remarkable credit in the chemical community. As a matter of fact, despite lower reactivity with respect to alkynyl and allenyl counterparts, chemical functionalization of isolated alkenes, via carbon- as well as hetero atom-based nucleophiles, would provide direct access to theoretically unlimited added value of molecular motifs. In this context, homogenous [Au(I] and [Au(III] catalysis continues to inspire developments within organic synthesis, providing reliable responses to this interrogative, by combining crucial aspects such as chemical selectivity/efficiency with mild reaction parameters. This review intends to summarize the recent progresses in the field, with particular emphasis on mechanistic details.

  14. Influence of bacterial interactions on the susceptibility to photodynamic inactivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadya, M. H.; Tegos, G.; Hamblin, M.; Kishen, A.

    2009-06-01

    Photodynamic therapy has emerged as a possible supplement to the existing protocols for endodontic disinfection. Microbes are known to gain significant ecological advantage when they survive as coaggregates and biofilms in an infected tissue. Such microbial coaggregates and biofilms have been confirmed to play a key role in the pathogenicity of many infections. So far, not many studies have correlated the efficacy of antimicrobial photodynamic inactivation (APDI) to the different modes of bacterial growth. This study aims to evaluate the APDI of 3 strains of Enterococcus faecalis in planktonic phase, in a co-aggregated suspension and in a 4-day old biofilm. The results showed that the biofilm mode of growth offered the greatest resistance to APDI and the inclusion of an efflux pump inhibitor significantly increased the APDI of biofilm bacteria. From this study, we conclude that APDI of bacteria in biofilms is the most challenging and that the use of bacterial efflux pump inhibitors enhances its photodynamic antibiofilm efficacy.

  15. Ribosome-Inactivating Proteins: From Plant Defense to Tumor Attack

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Serena Fabbrini

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs are EC3.2.32.22 N-glycosidases that recognize a universally conserved stem-loop structure in 23S/25S/28S rRNA, depurinating a single adenine (A4324 in rat and irreversibly blocking protein translation, leading finally to cell death of intoxicated mammalian cells. Ricin, the plant RIP prototype that comprises a catalytic A subunit linked to a galactose-binding lectin B subunit to allow cell surface binding and toxin entry in most mammalian cells, shows a potency in the picomolar range. The most promising way to exploit plant RIPs as weapons against cancer cells is either by designing molecules in which the toxic domains are linked to selective tumor targeting domains or directly delivered as suicide genes for cancer gene therapy. Here, we will provide a comprehensive picture of plant RIPs and discuss successful designs and features of chimeric molecules having therapeutic potential.

  16. Adsorption and inactivation of proteolytic enzymes by Triaenophorus nodulosus (Cestoda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izvekova G.I.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The proteolytic activity in washings off the Triaenophorus nodulosus cestode tegument and the ability of the worms to inactivate proteolytic enzymes were studied. It was found that the major proteolytic activity in the washing samples is represented by the easily desorbed fraction most probably characterizing the activity of the host’s enzymes. Serine proteinases are an essential part of these enzymes. It was shown that the worms’ incubation medium and their homogenates can inhibit host proteinases and commercial trypsin samples. Suppressive activity of the incubation medium suggests that the inhibitors are rather spontaneously produced by the worms than induced by the presence of proteinases in the surrounding medium. The inhibitor produced by the cestode is hypothesized to be trypsin-specific.

  17. Evaluation of an inactivated vaccine for nephropathogenic infectious bronchitis virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. R. Gopalakrishnamurthy

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To evaluate an inactivated vaccine for nephropathogenic infectious bronchitis in broiler with special reference to its ability for passing maternal antibodies to broiler chicks. Materials and Methods: An inactivated vaccine against nephropathogenic infectious bronchitis (NIB, prepared using an isolate obtained from natural outbreak of NIB was administered to broiler parents at the point of lay, leaving the control birds unvaccinated. Eggs laid below the desired weight (> 52 g by vaccinated hens were utilized for yolk serology. Chicks obtained from hens of both group were subjected for serology and challenge with wild type of nephropathogenic IB isolates. Serology of the yolk and serum was carried out using haemagglutination (HI test and ELISA. Results: Yolk serology revealed a geometric mean titre of 415.9 and 15188±768 in HI test and ELISA respectively on 28 days post vaccination (dpv as against 16.0 and 1881±86 in yolk from unvaccinated hens. The HI test and ELISA indicated that the level of maternal antibody (MAb in the chicks obtained from vaccinated hens was significantly (P< 0.01 higher on seven days of age than that of chicks from unvaccinated hens. However, the level of Mab of the chicks obtained from vaccinated hens decreased to below the level of protection at two weeks of age. Wild isolate and another isolate obtained from different geographical area were used for challenge dividing the chicks from vaccinated and unvaccinated hens equally. Mortality was observed in the challenged chicks from vaccinated (one in heterologus challenge and unvaccinated (two hens. Examination of kidney specimens collected from dead chicks revealed mottling and severe congestion grossly and inflammatory, degenerative and necrotic changes microscopically. Conclusion: The partial cross-protection against heterologous challenge and incomplete protection against homologous challenge with wild isolates were noticed. [Vet World 2013; 6(3.000: 134-138

  18. Role of FAAH-like anandamide transporter in anandamide inactivation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwannok Leung

    Full Text Available The endocannabinoid system modulates numerous physiological processes including nociception and reproduction. Anandamide (AEA is an endocannabinoid that is inactivated by cellular uptake followed by intracellular hydrolysis by fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH. Recently, FAAH-like anandamide transporter (FLAT, a truncated and catalytically-inactive variant of FAAH, was proposed to function as an intracellular AEA carrier and mediate its delivery to FAAH for hydrolysis. Pharmacological inhibition of FLAT potentiated AEA signaling and produced antinociceptive effects. Given that endocannabinoids produce analgesia through central and peripheral mechanisms, the goal of the current work was to examine the expression of FLAT in the central and peripheral nervous systems. In contrast to the original report characterizing FLAT, expression of FLAT was not observed in any of the tissues examined. To investigate the role of FLAT as a putative AEA binding protein, FLAT was generated from FAAH using polymerase chain reaction and further analyzed. Despite its low cellular expression, FLAT displayed residual catalytic activity that was sensitive to FAAH inhibitors and abolished following mutation of its catalytic serine. Overexpression of FLAT potentiated AEA cellular uptake and this appeared to be dependent upon its catalytic activity. Immunofluorescence revealed that FLAT localizes primarily to intracellular membranes and does not contact the plasma membrane, suggesting that its capability to potentiate AEA uptake may stem from its enzymatic rather than transport activity. Collectively, our data demonstrate that FLAT does not serve as a global intracellular AEA carrier, although a role in mediating localized AEA inactivation in mammalian tissues cannot be ruled out.

  19. MSA prions exhibit remarkable stability and resistance to inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woerman, Amanda L; Kazmi, Sabeen A; Patel, Smita; Freyman, Yevgeniy; Oehler, Abby; Aoyagi, Atsushi; Mordes, Daniel A; Halliday, Glenda M; Middleton, Lefkos T; Gentleman, Steve M; Olson, Steven H; Prusiner, Stanley B

    2018-01-01

    In multiple system atrophy (MSA), progressive neurodegeneration results from the protein α-synuclein misfolding into a self-templating prion conformation that spreads throughout the brain. MSA prions are transmissible to transgenic (Tg) mice expressing mutated human α-synuclein (TgM83+/-), inducing neurological disease following intracranial inoculation with brain homogenate from deceased patient samples. Noting the similarities between α-synuclein prions and PrP scrapie (PrPSc) prions responsible for Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), we investigated MSA transmission under conditions known to result in PrPSc transmission. When peripherally exposed to MSA via the peritoneal cavity, hind leg muscle, and tongue, TgM83+/- mice developed neurological signs accompanied by α-synuclein prions in the brain. Iatrogenic CJD, resulting from PrPSc prion adherence to surgical steel instruments, has been investigated by incubating steel sutures in contaminated brain homogenate before implantation into mouse brain. Mice studied using this model for MSA developed disease, whereas wire incubated in control homogenate had no effect on the animals. Notably, formalin fixation did not inactivate α-synuclein prions. Formalin-fixed MSA patient samples also transmitted disease to TgM83+/- mice, even after incubating in fixative for 244 months. Finally, at least 10% sarkosyl was found to be the concentration necessary to partially inactivate MSA prions. These results demonstrate the robustness of α-synuclein prions to denaturation. Moreover, they establish the parallel characteristics between PrPSc and α-synuclein prions, arguing that clinicians should exercise caution when working with materials that might contain α-synuclein prions to prevent disease.

  20. Radiation inactivation target size of rat adipocyte glucose transporter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, C.Y.; Jacobs, D.B.; Berenski, C.J.; Spangler, R.A.

    1987-05-01

    In situ assembly states of rat adipocyte glucose transport protein in plasma membrane (PM) and in microsomal pool (MM) were assessed by measuring target size (TS) of D glucose-sensitive, cytochalasin B binding activity. High energy radiation inactivated the binding in both PM and MM by reducing the total capacity of the binding (B/sub T/) without affecting the dissociation constant (K/sub D/). The reduction in B/sub T/ as a function of radiation dose was analyzed based on classical target theory, from which TS was calculated. TS in the PM of insulin-treated adipocytes was 58 KDa. TS in the MM of noninsulin-treated and insulin-treated adipocytes were 112 and 109 KDa, respectively. With MM, however, inactivation data showed anomalously low radiation sensitivities at low radiation doses showing a shoulder in the semilog plots, which may be due to an interaction with a radiation sensitive inhibitor. With these results, they propose the following model: Adipocyte glucose transporter, while exists as a monomer (T) in PM, occurs in MM either as a homodimer (T/sub 2/) or as a heterodimer (TX) with a protein X of a similar size. These dimers (T/sub 2/ or TX) in MM, furthermore, may form a multi-molecular assembly with another, large (300-400 KDa) protein Y, and insulin increases this assembly formation. These putative, transporter-associated proteins X and Y may play an important role in control of transporter distribution between PM and MM, particularly in response to insulin.

  1. Calcium current inactivation in identified neurones of Helix aspersa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plant, T D; Standen, N B

    1981-01-01

    1. A two-electrode voltage clamp method was used to study Ca inward currents in identified Helix aspersa neurones bathed in 25 mM-Ca, Na-free saline with TEA and 4-AP. 2. Inward currents were blocked by CdCl2. In Cd delayed outward currents appeared at +30 mV. When two identical depolarizations were separated by a gap inward current turned off to the same level during the two pulses up to +20 mV; above this potential the records cross over. 3. The turn-off of inward current at potentials up to +20 mV was not affected by 0.2 mM-quinine, which reduced outward currents at more depolarized potentials. Inward currents declined exponentially over the first 100 msec with a time constant around 60 msec at 0 mV. Double-pulse experiments gave the same time course of turn-off. 4. When Ca inward current was reduced by lowering [Ca]o or by partial block by Cd the rate and extent of turn-off was reduced. 5. The inactivation curve (obtained using a double pulse with gap method) was U-shaped. The curve was not significantly changed by addition of quinine (0.2 mM) or by changing test pulse size. 6. Recovery of inward currents after a depolarizing prepulse was a double-exponential process, with time constants of 120 msec and 9.4 sec at 10--11 degrees C. 7. Our results are discussed in terms of possible Ca-dependent Ca inactivation and in terms of the possibility of development of an outward Ca-dependent K current. PMID:7338811

  2. Visual fixation as equilibrium: Evidence from superior colliculus inactivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goffart, Laurent; Hafed, Ziad M.; Krauzlis, Richard J.

    2012-01-01

    During visual fixation, the image of an object is maintained within the fovea. Previous studies have shown that such maintenance involves the deep superior colliculus (dSC). However, the mechanisms by which the dSC supports visual fixation remain controversial. According to one view, activity in the rostral dSC maintains gaze direction by preventing neurons in the caudal dSC from issuing saccade commands. An alternative hypothesis proposes that gaze direction is achieved through equilibrium of target position signals originating from the two dSC. Here we show in monkeys that artificially reducing activity in the rostral half of one dSC results in a biased estimate of target position during fixation, consistent with the second hypothesis, rather than an inability to maintain gaze fixation as predicted by the first hypothesis. After injection of muscimol at rostral sites in the dSC, fixation became more stable since microsaccade rate was reduced rather than increased. Moreover, the scatter of eye positions was offset relative to pre-inactivation baselines. The magnitude and the direction of the offsets depended upon both the target size and the injected site in the collicular map. Other oculomotor parameters, such as the accuracy of saccades to peripheral targets and the amplitude and velocity of fixational saccades, were largely unaffected. These results suggest that the rostral half of the dSC supports visual fixation through a distributed representation of behaviorally-relevant target position signals. The inactivation-induced fixation offset establishes the foveal visual stimulation that is required to restore the balance of activity between the two dSC. PMID:22855812

  3. Porinas as an adyuvant of inactivated Newcastle vaccine in broilers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Bustos M.

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Three groups of 25 broilers were vaccinated on two opportunities by aerosol using inactivated NC (Newcastle virus and different helper concentrations of porinas (20 ìg, 50 ìg, 125 ìg. A fourth group was injected with live B1 virus (12 and 28 days of age nasally. The NC inactivated virus (La Sota strain was concentrated 10 times with PEG with a final titer of 1:2.056. Twenty serums for each group were taken in order to evaluate NC antibodies using the HI and double immuno-difusion tests for IgA detection at 1, 12, 28 and 42 days of age. During the study the chickens were on a restricted diet in order to control ascites (2.640 mosl. On day 42, two broilers of the fourth group (live virus presented ascites and 1 broiler of group 1 presented lung edema (20 ìg. The geometric mean for NC antibodies titers at 42 days of age was 2 in the groups 1,2,3 and 5.7 in the group 4 (Log 2. For IgA, 180 mg/dl, 135 mg/dl, 120 mg/dl and 176 mg/dl respectively. Three broilers of each group were challenged with a pathogenic strain of NC, at 42 day of age, without signs of disease after 72 hours when the positive control group was dead. Gross and microscopic lesions were not detected in the bursa of Fabricius or thymo. [thymo sounds like short hand for something that should be properly named.] Very good animal weight, conversion and efficiency results were observed in all the groups. New studies using a fixed dose of porinas, larger numbers of broilers and the establishment of protective levels of IgA against NC challenge are recommended.

  4. A novel method for bacterial inactivation using electrosprayed water nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyrgiotakis, Georgios; McDevitt, James; Yamauchi, Toshiyuki; Demokritou, Philip

    2012-08-01

    This is a study focusing on the potential to deactivate biological agents (bacteria and endospores) using engineered water nanostructures (EWNS). The EWNS were generated using an electrospray device that collects water by condensing atmospheric water vapor on a Peltier-cooled electrode. A high voltage is applied between the collection electrode and a grounded electrode resulting in aerosolization of the condensed water and a constant generation of EWNS. Gram-negative Serratia marcescens, gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus, and Bacillus atrophaeus endospores were placed on stainless steel coupons and exposed to generated EWNS at multiple time intervals. Upon exposures, the bacteria were recovered and placed on nutrient agar to grow, and the colony forming units were counted. Ozone levels as well as air temperature and relative humidity were monitored during the experiments. Qualitative confirmation of bacterial destruction was also obtained by transmission electron microscopy. In addition, important EWNS aerosol properties such as particle number concentration as a function of size as well as the average surface charge of the generated EWNS were measured using real-time instrumentation. It was shown that the novel electrospray method can generate over time a constant flux of EWNS. EWNS have a peak number concentration of 8,000 particles per cubic centimeter with a modal peak size around 20 nm. The average surface charge of the generated EWNS was found to be 10 ± 2 electrons per particle. In addition, it was shown that the EWNS have the potential to deactivate both bacteria types from surfaces. At the same administrate dose, however, the endospores were not inactivated. This novel method and the unique properties of the generated EWNS could potentially be used to develop an effective, environmentally friendly, and inexpensive method for bacteria inactivation.

  5. A novel method for bacterial inactivation using electrosprayed water nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pyrgiotakis, Georgios, E-mail: gpyrgiot@hsph.harvard.edu; McDevitt, James [Harvard School of Public Health, Center for Nanotechnology and Nanotoxicology (United States); Yamauchi, Toshiyuki [Panasonic Corporation, Appliances Company (Japan); Demokritou, Philip [Harvard School of Public Health, Center for Nanotechnology and Nanotoxicology (United States)

    2012-08-15

    This is a study focusing on the potential to deactivate biological agents (bacteria and endospores) using engineered water nanostructures (EWNS). The EWNS were generated using an electrospray device that collects water by condensing atmospheric water vapor on a Peltier-cooled electrode. A high voltage is applied between the collection electrode and a grounded electrode resulting in aerosolization of the condensed water and a constant generation of EWNS. Gram-negative Serratia marcescens, gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus, and Bacillusatrophaeus endospores were placed on stainless steel coupons and exposed to generated EWNS at multiple time intervals. Upon exposures, the bacteria were recovered and placed on nutrient agar to grow, and the colony forming units were counted. Ozone levels as well as air temperature and relative humidity were monitored during the experiments. Qualitative confirmation of bacterial destruction was also obtained by transmission electron microscopy. In addition, important EWNS aerosol properties such as particle number concentration as a function of size as well as the average surface charge of the generated EWNS were measured using real-time instrumentation. It was shown that the novel electrospray method can generate over time a constant flux of EWNS. EWNS have a peak number concentration of {approx}8,000 particles per cubic centimeter with a modal peak size around 20 nm. The average surface charge of the generated EWNS was found to be 10 {+-} 2 electrons per particle. In addition, it was shown that the EWNS have the potential to deactivate both bacteria types from surfaces. At the same administrate dose, however, the endospores were not inactivated. This novel method and the unique properties of the generated EWNS could potentially be used to develop an effective, environmentally friendly, and inexpensive method for bacteria inactivation.

  6. High glucose induces N-linked glycosylation-mediated functional upregulation and overexpression of Cav3.2 T-type calcium channels in neuroendocrine-like differentiated human prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukami, Kazuki; Asano, Erina; Ueda, Mai; Sekiguchi, Fumiko; Yoshida, Shigeru; Kawabata, Atsufumi

    2017-01-01

    Given that Cav3.2 T-type Ca(2+) channels were functionally regulated by asparagine (N)-linked glycosylation, we examined effects of high glucose on the function of Cav3.2, known to regulate secretory function, in neuroendocrine-like differentiated prostate cancer LNCaP cells. High glucose accelerated the increased channel function and overexpression of Cav3.2 during neuroendocrine differentiation, the former prevented by enzymatic inhibition of N-glycosylation and cleavage of N-glycans. Hyperglycemia thus appears to induce N-linked glycosylation-mediated functional upregulation and overexpression of Cav3.2 in neuroendocrine-like differentiated prostate cancer cells. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. High glucose induces N-linked glycosylation-mediated functional upregulation and overexpression of Cav3.2 T-type calcium channels in neuroendocrine-like differentiated human prostate cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuki Fukami

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Given that Cav3.2 T-type Ca2+ channels were functionally regulated by asparagine (N-linked glycosylation, we examined effects of high glucose on the function of Cav3.2, known to regulate secretory function, in neuroendocrine-like differentiated prostate cancer LNCaP cells. High glucose accelerated the increased channel function and overexpression of Cav3.2 during neuroendocrine differentiation, the former prevented by enzymatic inhibition of N-glycosylation and cleavage of N-glycans. Hyperglycemia thus appears to induce N-linked glycosylation-mediated functional upregulation and overexpression of Cav3.2 in neuroendocrine-like differentiated prostate cancer cells.

  8. Gender specific hippocampal whole genome transcriptome data from mice lacking the Cav2.3 R-type or Cav3.2 T-type voltage-gated calcium channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Papazoglou

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Voltage-gated Ca2+ channels are of central relevance in mediating numerous intracellular and transcellular processes including excitation-contraction coupling, excitation secretion-coupling, hormone and neurotransmitter release and gene expression. The Cav2.3 R-type Ca2+ channel is a high-voltage activated channel which plays a crucial role in neurotransmitter release, long-term potentiation and hormone release. Furthermore, Cav2.3 R-type channels were reported to be involved in ictogenesis, epileptogenesis, fear behavior, sleep, pre-and postsynaptic integration and rhythmicity within the hippocampus. Cav3 T-type Ca2+ channels are low-voltage activated and also widely expressed throughout the brain enabling neurons to switch between different firing patterns and to modulate burst activity. Disruption of T-type Ca2+ current has been related to sleep disorders, epilepsy, Parkinson׳s disease, depression, schizophrenia and pain. Cav3.2 ablation was further attributed to elevated anxiety and hippocampal alterations resulting in impaired long-term potentiation and memory. Given the importance of Cav2.3 and Cav3.2 voltage-gated Ca2+ channels within the CNS, particularly the hippocampus, we collected gender specific microarray transcriptome data of murine hippocampal RNA probes using the Affymetrix Exon Expression Chip Mouse Gene 1.0 ST v1. Information presented here includes transcriptome data from Cav2.3+/+, Cav2.3+/−, Cav2.3−/−, Cav3.2+/+, Cav3.2+/− and Cav3.2−/− mice from both genders, the protocol and list of primers used for genotyping animals, the hippocampal RNA isolation procedure and quality controls.

  9. Elective Inactivation of Total Artificial Heart Technology in Non-Futile Situations: Inpatients, Outpatients and Research Participants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bramstedt, Katrina A.

    2004-01-01

    Total artificial heart technology as a potential clinical therapy raises the issue of elective device inactivation in both futile and non-futile situations. This article explores elective device inactivation in non-futile situations. In reply to such requests for inactivation, the medical team should reflect on the individual's decision-making…

  10. Rapidly variable relatvistic absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, M.; Pinto, C.; Fabian, A.; Lohfink, A.; Buisson, D.; Alston, W.; Jiang, J.

    2017-10-01

    I will present results from the 1.5Ms XMM-Newton observing campaign on the most X-ray variable AGN, IRAS 13224-3809. We find a series of nine absorption lines with a velocity of 0.24c from an ultra-fast outflow. For the first time, we are able to see extremely rapid variability of the UFO features, and can link this to the X-ray variability from the inner accretion disk. We find a clear flux dependence of the outflow features, suggesting that the wind is ionized by increasing X-ray emission.

  11. Rapid prototype and test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregory, D.L.; Hansche, B.D.

    1996-06-01

    In order to support advanced manufacturing, Sandia has acquired the capability to produce plastic prototypes using stereolithography. Currently, these prototypes are used mainly to verify part geometry and ``fit and form`` checks. This project investigates methods for rapidly testing these plastic prototypes, and inferring from prototype test data actual metal part performance and behavior. Performances examined include static load/stress response, and structural dynamic (modal) and vibration behavior. The integration of advanced non-contacting measurement techniques including scanning laser velocimetry, laser holography, and thermoelasticity into testing of these prototypes is described. Photoelastic properties of the epoxy prototypes to reveal full field stress/strain fields are also explored.

  12. Right-Rapid-Rough

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Craig

    2003-01-01

    IDEO (pronounced 'eye-dee-oh') is an international design, engineering, and innovation firm that has developed thousands of products and services for clients across a wide range of industries. Its process and culture attracted the attention of academics, businesses, and journalists around the world, and are the subject of a bestselling book, The Art of Innovation by Tom Kelley. One of the keys to IDEO's success is its use of prototyping as a tool for rapid innovation. This story covers some of IDEO's projects, and gives reasons for why they were successful.

  13. Safety and immunogenicity of a quadrivalent inactivated influenza vaccine compared to licensed trivalent inactivated influenza vaccines in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, David P; Robertson, Corwin A; Noss, Michael J; Blatter, Mark M; Biedenbender, Rex; Decker, Michael D

    2013-01-21

    To evaluate the safety and immunogenicity of a prototype quadrivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (QIV) containing two influenza B strains, one of each lineage, compared with licensed trivalent inactivated influenza vaccines (TIVs) containing either a Victoria B-lineage strain (2009-2010 TIV) or a Yamagata B-lineage strain (2008-2009 TIV). Healthy adults ≥18 years of age were eligible to participate in this phase II, open-label, randomized, controlled, multicenter study conducted in the US. Participants received a single dose of 2009-2010 TIV, 2008-2009 TIV, or QIV. Sera were collected before and 21 days after vaccine administration to test for hemagglutination inhibition (HAI) antibodies to each of the four influenza strains. Immunogenicity endpoints included geometric mean HAI antibody titers (GMTs) and rates of seroprotection (titer ≥1:40) and seroconversion (4-fold rise pre- to post-vaccination). Safety endpoints included frequency of solicited injection-site and systemic reactions occurring within 3 days of vaccination, and unsolicited non-serious adverse events (AEs) and serious AEs (SAEs) within 21 days of vaccination. One hundred and ninety participants were enrolled to each vaccine group. QIV induced GMTs to each A and B strain that were noninferior to those induced by the 2009-2010 and 2008-2009 TIVs (i.e., lower limit of the two-sided 95% confidence interval of the ratio of GMT(QIV)/GMT(TIV)>0.66 for each strain). Rates of seroprotection and seroconversion were similar in all groups. Incidence and severity of solicited injection-site and systemic reactions, AEs, and SAEs were similar among groups. QIV, containing two B strains (one from each B lineage), was as safe and immunogenic as licensed TIV. QIV has the potential to be a useful alternative to TIV and offer protection against both B lineages. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Inactivation of oenological lactic acid bacteria (Lactobacillus hilgardii and Pediococcus pentosaceus) by wine phenolic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Ruiz, A; Bartolomé, B; Cueva, C; Martín-Alvarez, P J; Moreno-Arribas, M V

    2009-09-01

    To investigate the inactivation properties of different classes of phenolic compounds present in wine against two wine isolates of Lactobacillus hilgardii and Pediococcus pentosaceus, and to explore their inactivation mechanism. After a first screening of the inactivation potency of 21 phenolic compounds (hydroxybenzoic and hydroxycinnamic acids, phenolic alcohols, stilbenes, flavan-3-ols and flavonols) at specific concentrations, the survival parameters (MIC and MBC) of the most active compounds were determined. For the L. hilgardii strain, the flavonols morin and kaempferol showed the strongest inactivation (MIC values of one and 5 mg l(-1), and MBC values of 7.5 and 50 mg l(-1), respectively). For the P. pentosaceus strain, flavonols also showed the strongest inactivation effects, with MIC values between one and 10 mg l(-1) and MBC values between 7.5 and 300 mg l(-1). Observations by epifluorescence and scanning electron microscopy revealed that the phenolics damaged the cell membrane and promoted the subsequent release of the cytoplasm material into the medium. The antibacterial activity of wine phenolics against L. hilgardii and P. pentosaceus was dependent on the phenolic compound tested, and led not only to bacteria inactivation, but also to the cell death. New information about the inactivation properties of wine lactic acid bacteria by phenolic compounds is presented. It opens up a new area of study for selecting/obtaining wine phenolic preparations with potential applications as a natural alternative to SO(2) in winemaking.

  15. X inactivation in females with X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, Sinéad M

    2012-07-01

    X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT1X) is the second most common inherited neuropathy, caused by mutations in gap junction beta-1 (GJB1). Males have a uniformly moderately severe phenotype while females have a variable phenotype, suggested to be due to X inactivation. We aimed to assess X inactivation pattern in females with CMT1X and correlate this with phenotype using the CMT examination score to determine whether the X inactivation pattern accounted for the variable phenotype in females with CMT1X. We determined X inactivation pattern in 67 females with CMT1X and 24 controls using the androgen receptor assay. We were able to determine which X chromosome carried the GJB1 mutation in 30 females. There was no difference in X inactivation pattern between patients and controls. In addition, there was no correlation between X inactivation pattern in blood and phenotype. A possible explanation for these findings is that the X inactivation pattern in Schwann cells rather than in blood may explain the variable phenotype in females with CMT1X.

  16. MS2 inactivation by TiO2 nanoparticles in the presence of quartz sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syngouna, Vasiliki I.; Chrysikopoulos, Constantinos V.

    2017-04-01

    Virus inactivation by nanoparticles (NPs) is hypothesized to affect virus fate and transport in the subsurface. This study examines the interactions of viruses with titanium dioxide (TiO2) anatase NPs, which is a good disinfectant with unique physiochemical properties, using three different virus concentrations. The bacteriophage MS2 was used as a model virus. A series of batch experiments of MS2 inactivation by TiO2 NPs were conducted at room temperature (25 °C), in the presence of quartz sand, with and without ambient light. The virus inactivation experimental data were satisfactorily fitted with a pseudo-first order expression with a time dependent rate coefficient. Quartz sand was shown to affect MS2 inactivation by TiO2 NPs both in the presence and absence of ambient light, because, under the experimental conditions of this study, the quartz sand offers a protection to the attached MS2 against inactivation. Moreover, in most cases similar inactivation rates were observed in reactor and control tubes (absence of TiO2 NPs) suggesting that low TiO2 concentration (10 mg/L) affects only slightly MS2 inactivation with and without ambient light.

  17. Identifying possible non-thermal effects of radio frequency energy on inactivating food microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kou, Xiaoxi; Li, Rui; Hou, Lixia; Zhang, Lihui; Wang, Shaojin

    2018-02-01

    Radio frequency (RF) heating has been successfully used for inactivating microorganisms in agricultural and food products. Athermal (non-thermal) effects of RF energy on microorganisms have been frequently proposed in the literature, resulting in difficulties for developing effective thermal treatment protocols. The purpose of this study was to identify if the athermal inactivation of microorganisms existed during RF treatments. Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus in apple juice and mashed potato were exposed to both RF and conventional thermal energies to compare their inactivation populations. A thermal death time (TDT) heating block system was used as conventional thermal energy source to simulate the same heating treatment conditions, involving heating temperature, heating rate and uniformity, of a RF treatment at a frequency of 27.12 MHz. Results showed that a similar and uniform temperature distribution in tested samples was achieved in both heating systems, so that the central sample temperature could be used as representative one for evaluating thermal inactivation of microorganisms. The survival patterns of two target microorganisms in two food samples were similar both for RF and heating block treatments since their absolute difference of survival populations was  0.05) in inactivating bacteria between the RF and the heating block treatments at each set of temperatures. The solid temperature and microbial inactivation data demonstrated that only thermal effect of RF energy at 27.12 MHz was observed on inactivating microorganisms in foods. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Weed seed inactivation in soil mesocosms via biosolarization with mature compost and tomato processing waste amendments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achmon, Yigal; Fernández-Bayo, Jesús D; Hernandez, Katie; McCurry, Dlinka G; Harrold, Duff R; Su, Joey; Dahlquist-Willard, Ruth M; Stapleton, James J; VanderGheynst, Jean S; Simmons, Christopher W

    2017-05-01

    Biosolarization is a fumigation alternative that combines passive solar heating with amendment-driven soil microbial activity to temporarily create antagonistic soil conditions, such as elevated temperature and acidity, that can inactivate weed seeds and other pest propagules. The aim of this study was to use a mesocosm-based field trial to assess soil heating, pH, volatile fatty acid accumulation and weed seed inactivation during biosolarization. Biosolarization for 8 days using 2% mature green waste compost and 2 or 5% tomato processing residues in the soil resulted in accumulation of volatile fatty acids in the soil, particularly acetic acid, and >95% inactivation of Brassica nigra and Solanum nigrum seeds. Inactivation kinetics data showed that near complete weed seed inactivation in soil was achieved within the first 5 days of biosolarization. This was significantly greater than the inactivation achieved in control soils that were solar heated without amendment or were amended but not solar heated. The composition and concentration of organic matter amendments in soil significantly affected volatile fatty acid accumulation at various soil depths during biosolarization. Combining solar heating with organic matter amendment resulted in accelerated weed seed inactivation compared with either approach alone. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  19. Selective inactivation of various acyl-CoA dehydrogenases by (methylenecyclopropyl)acetyl-CoA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Y; Tanaka, K

    1990-04-19

    Inactivation of five distinct acyl-CoA dehydrogenases by (methylenecyclopropyl)acetyl-CoA (MCPA-CoA), the toxic metabolite of hypoglycin from unripe ackee fruit, was investigated using purified enzyme preparations. Short-chain acyl-CoA (SCADH), medium-chain acyl-CoA (MCADH) and isovaleryl-CoA (IVDH) dehydrogenases were severely and irreversibly inactivated by MCPA-CoA, while 2-methyl-branched chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (2-meBCADH) was only slowly and mildly inactivated. Long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (LCADH) was not significantly inactivated, even after prolonged incubation with MCPA-CoA. Inactivation of SCADH, MCADH and IVDH was effectively prevented by the addition of substrate. This mode of inactivation by MCPA-CoA explains the urinary metabolite profile in hypoglycin treated-rats, which includes large amounts of metabolites from fatty acids and leucine, and relatively small amounts of those from valine and isoleucine. Spectrophotometric titration of SCADH and MCADH with MCPA-CoA, together with the protective effects of substrate, indicates that MCPA-CoA is acted upon by, and exerts in turn irreversible inactivation of, SCADH and MCADH, confirming that MCPA-CoA is a suicide inhibitor (Wenz et al. (1981) J. Biol. Chem. 256, 9809-9812). Spectrophotometric titration data of LCADH and MCPA-CoA is typical of non-reacting CoA ester.

  20. Evaluation of Virus Inactivation by Formaldehyde to Enhance Biosafety of Diagnostic Electron Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars Möller

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Formaldehyde (FA fixation of infectious samples is a well-established protocol in diagnostic electron microscopy of viruses. However, published experimental data that demonstrate virus inactivation by these fixation procedures are lacking. Usually, fixation is performed immediately before the sample preparation for microscopy. The fixation procedure should transform viruses in a non–infectious but nonetheless structurally intact form in order to allow a proper diagnosis based on morphology. FA provides an essential advantage in comparison to other disinfectants, because it preserves the ultrastructure of biological material without interfering significantly with the preparation (i.e., the negative staining and the detection of viruses. To examine the efficiency of FA inactivation, we used Vaccinia virus, Human adenovirus and Murine norovirus as models and treated them with FA under various conditions. Critical parameters for the inactivation efficiency were the temperature, the duration of the FA treatment, and the resistance of the virus in question. Our results show that FA inactivation at low temperature (4 °C bears a high risk of incomplete inactivation. Higher temperatures (25 °C are more efficient, although they still require rather long incubation times to fully inactivate a complex and highly robust virus like Vaccinia. A protocol, which applied 2% buffered FA for 60 min and a temperature–shift from 25 to 37 °C after 30 min was efficient for the complete inactivation of all test viruses, and therefore has the potential to improve both biosafety and speed of diagnostic electron microscopy.

  1. Sunlight inactivation of human viruses and bacteriophages in coastal waters containing natural photosensitizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Andrea I; Peterson, Britt M; Boehm, Alexandria B; McNeill, Kristopher; Nelson, Kara L

    2013-02-19

    Sunlight inactivation of poliovirus type 3 (PV3), adenovirus type 2 (HAdV2), and two bacteriophage (MS2 and PRD1) was investigated in an array of coastal waters to better understand solar inactivation mechanisms and the effect of natural water constituents on observed inactivation rates (k(obs)). Reactor scale inactivation experiments were conducted using a solar simulator, and k(obs) for each virus was measured in a sensitizer-free control and five unfiltered surface water samples collected from different sources. k(obs) values varied between viruses in the same water matrix, and for each virus in different matrices, with PV3 having the fastest and MS2 the slowest k(obs) in all waters. When exposed to full-spectrum sunlight, the presence of photosensitizers increased k(obs) of HAdV2, PRD1 and MS2, but not PV3, which provides evidence that the exogenous sunlight inactivation mechanism, involving damage by exogenously produced reactive intermediates, played a greater role for these viruses. While PV3 inactivation was observed to be dominated by endogenous mechanisms, this may be due to a masking of exogenous k(obs) by significantly faster endogenous k(obs). Results illustrate that differences in water composition can shift absolute and relative inactivation rates of viruses, which has important implications for natural wastewater treatment systems, solar disinfection (SODIS), and the use of indicator organisms for monitoring water quality.

  2. Hemozoin as a novel adjuvant for inactivated whole virion influenza vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uraki, Ryuta; Das, Subash C; Hatta, Masato; Kiso, Maki; Iwatsuki-Horimoto, Kiyoko; Ozawa, Makoto; Coban, Cevayir; Ishii, Ken J; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro

    2014-09-15

    Because vaccination is an effective means to protect humans from influenza viruses, extensive efforts have been made to develop not only new vaccines, but also for new adjuvants to enhance the efficacy of existing inactivated vaccines. Here, we examined the adjuvanticity of synthetic hemozoin, a synthetic version of the malarial by-product hemozoin, on the vaccine efficacy of inactivated whole influenza viruses in a mouse model. We found that mice immunized twice with hemozoin-adjuvanted inactivated A/California/04/2009 (H1N1pdm09) or A/Vietnam/1203/2004 (H5N1) virus elicited higher virus-specific antibody responses than did mice immunized with non-adjuvanted counterparts. Furthermore, mice immunized with hemozoin-adjuvanted inactivated viruses were better protected from lethal challenge with influenza viruses than were mice immunized with non-adjuvanted inactivated vaccines. Our results show that hemozoin improves the immunogenicity of inactivated influenza viruses, and is thus a promising adjuvant for inactivated whole virion influenza vaccines. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Pathogens Inactivated by Low-Energy-Electron Irradiation Maintain Antigenic Properties and Induce Protective Immune Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fertey, Jasmin; Bayer, Lea; Grunwald, Thomas; Pohl, Alexandra; Beckmann, Jana; Gotzmann, Gaby; Casado, Javier Portillo; Schönfelder, Jessy; Rögner, Frank-Holm; Wetzel, Christiane; Thoma, Martin; Bailer, Susanne M.; Hiller, Ekkehard; Rupp, Steffen; Ulbert, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Inactivated vaccines are commonly produced by incubating pathogens with chemicals such as formaldehyde or β-propiolactone. This is a time-consuming process, the inactivation efficiency displays high variability and extensive downstream procedures are often required. Moreover, application of chemicals alters the antigenic components of the viruses or bacteria, resulting in reduced antibody specificity and therefore stimulation of a less effective immune response. An alternative method for inactivation of pathogens is ionizing radiation. It acts very fast and predominantly damages nucleic acids, conserving most of the antigenic structures. However, currently used irradiation technologies (mostly gamma-rays and high energy electrons) require large and complex shielding constructions to protect the environment from radioactivity or X-rays generated during the process. This excludes them from direct integration into biological production facilities. Here, low-energy electron irradiation (LEEI) is presented as an alternative inactivation method for pathogens in liquid solutions. LEEI can be used in normal laboratories, including good manufacturing practice (GMP)- or high biosafety level (BSL)-environments, as only minor shielding is necessary. We show that LEEI efficiently inactivates different viruses (influenza A (H3N8), porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), equine herpesvirus 1 (EHV-1)) and bacteria (Escherichia coli) and maintains their antigenicity. Moreover, LEEI-inactivated influenza A viruses elicit protective immune responses in animals, as analyzed by virus neutralization assays and viral load determination upon challenge. These results have implications for novel ways of developing and manufacturing inactivated vaccines with improved efficacy. PMID:27886076

  4. Hippocampal inactivation with TTX impairs long-term spatial memory retrieval and modifies brain metabolic activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nélida María Conejo

    Full Text Available Functional inactivation techniques enable studying the hippocampal involvement in each phase of spatial memory formation in the rat. In this study, we applied tetrodotoxin unilaterally or bilaterally into the dorsal hippocampus to evaluate the role of this brain structure in retrieval of memories acquired 28 days before in the Morris water maze. We combined hippocampal inactivation with the assessment of brain metabolism using cytochrome oxidase histochemistry. Several brain regions were considered, including the hippocampus and other related structures. Results showed that both unilateral and bilateral hippocampal inactivation impaired spatial memory retrieval. Hence, whereas subjects with bilateral hippocampal inactivation showed a circular swim pattern at the side walls of the pool, unilateral inactivation favoured swimming in the quadrants adjacent to the target one. Analysis of cytochrome oxidase activity disclosed regional differences according to the degree of hippocampal functional blockade. In comparison to control group, animals with bilateral inactivation showed increased CO activity in CA1 and CA3 areas of the hippocampus during retrieval, while the activity of the dentate gyrus substantially decreased. However, unilateral inactivated animals showed decreased CO activity in Ammon's horn and the dentate gyrus. This study demonstrated that retrieval recruits differentially the hippocampal subregions and the balance between them is altered with hippocampal functional lesions.

  5. Rapid mineralocorticoid receptor trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gekle, M; Bretschneider, M; Meinel, S; Ruhs, S; Grossmann, C

    2014-03-01

    The mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) is a ligand-dependent transcription factor that physiologically regulates water-electrolyte homeostasis and controls blood pressure. The MR can also elicit inflammatory and remodeling processes in the cardiovascular system and the kidneys, which require the presence of additional pathological factors like for example nitrosative stress. However, the underlying molecular mechanism(s) for pathophysiological MR effects remain(s) elusive. The inactive MR is located in the cytosol associated with chaperone molecules including HSP90. After ligand binding, the MR monomer rapidly translocates into the nucleus while still being associated to HSP90 and after dissociation from HSP90 binds to hormone-response-elements called glucocorticoid response elements (GREs) as a dimer. There are indications that rapid MR trafficking is modulated in the presence of high salt, oxidative or nitrosative stress, hypothetically by induction or posttranslational modifications. Additionally, glucocorticoids and the enzyme 11beta hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase may also influence MR activation. Because MR trafficking and its modulation by micro-milieu factors influence MR cellular localization, it is not only relevant for genomic but also for nongenomic MR effects. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Rapid response manufacturing (RRM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cain, W.D. [Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Waddell, W.L. [National Centers for Manufacturing Sciences, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    1997-02-18

    US industry is fighting to maintain its competitive edge in the global market place. Today markets fluctuate rapidly. Companies, to survive, have to be able to respond with quick-to-market, improved, high quality, cost efficient products. The way products are developed and brought to market can be improved and made more efficient through the proper incorporation of emerging technologies. The RRM project was established to leverage the expertise and resources of US private industries and federal agencies to develop, integrate, and deploy new technologies that meet critical needs for effective product realization. The RRM program addressed a needed change in the US Manufacturing infrastructure that will ensure US competitiveness in world market typified by mass customization. This project provided the effort needed to define, develop and establish a customizable infrastructure for rapid response product development design and manufacturing. A major project achievement was the development of a broad-based framework for automating and integrating the product and process design and manufacturing activities involved with machined parts. This was accomplished by coordinating and extending the application of feature-based product modeling, knowledge-based systems, integrated data management, and direct manufacturing technologies in a cooperative integrated computing environment. Key technological advancements include a product model that integrates product and process data in a consistent, minimally redundant manner, an advanced computer-aided engineering environment, knowledge-based software aids for design and process planning, and new production technologies to make products directly from design application software.

  7. Sex-differential selection and the evolution of X inactivation strategies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim Connallon

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available X inactivation--the transcriptional silencing of one X chromosome copy per female somatic cell--is universal among therian mammals, yet the choice of which X to silence exhibits considerable variation among species. X inactivation strategies can range from strict paternally inherited X inactivation (PXI, which renders females haploid for all maternally inherited alleles, to unbiased random X inactivation (RXI, which equalizes expression of maternally and paternally inherited alleles in each female tissue. However, the underlying evolutionary processes that might account for this observed diversity of X inactivation strategies remain unclear. We present a theoretical population genetic analysis of X inactivation evolution and specifically consider how conditions of dominance, linkage, recombination, and sex-differential selection each influence evolutionary trajectories of X inactivation. The results indicate that a single, critical interaction between allelic dominance and sex-differential selection can select for a broad and continuous range of X inactivation strategies, including unequal rates of inactivation between maternally and paternally inherited X chromosomes. RXI is favored over complete PXI as long as alleles deleterious to female fitness are sufficiently recessive, and the criteria for RXI evolution is considerably more restrictive when fitness variation is sexually antagonistic (i.e., alleles deleterious to females are beneficial to males relative to variation that is deleterious to both sexes. Evolutionary transitions from PXI to RXI also generally increase mean relative female fitness at the expense of decreased male fitness. These results provide a theoretical framework for predicting and interpreting the evolution of chromosome-wide expression of X-linked genes and lead to several useful predictions that could motivate future studies of allele-specific gene expression variation.

  8. Development and Preclinical Evaluation of a Trivalent, Formalin-Inactivated Shigella Whole-Cell Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminski, R. W.; Wu, M.; Turbyfill, K. R.; Clarkson, K.; Tai, B.; Bourgeois, A. L.; Van De Verg, L. L.; Walker, R. I.

    2014-01-01

    Studies were undertaken to manufacture a multivalent Shigella inactivated whole-cell vaccine that is safe, effective, and inexpensive. By using several formalin concentrations, temperatures, and incubation periods, an optimized set of inactivation conditions was established for Shigella flexneri 2a, S. sonnei, and S. flexneri 3a to produce inactivated whole cells expressing a full repertoire of Ipa proteins and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The inactivation conditions selected were treatment with 0.2% formalin (S. flexneri 2a and 3a) or 0.6% formalin (S. sonnei) for 48 h at 25°C. Vaccine formulations prepared under different inactivation conditions, in different doses (10E5, 10E7, and 10E9 cells), and with or without the inclusion of double-mutant heat-labile toxin (dmLT) were evaluated in mice. Two intranasal immunizations with ≥10E7 inactivated whole cells resulted in high levels of anti-Invaplex and moderate levels of LPS-specific IgG and IgA in serum and in lung and intestinal wash samples. Addition of dmLT to the vaccine formulations did not significantly enhance humoral immunogenicity. Minimal humoral responses for IpaB, IpaC, or IpaD were detected after immunization with inactivated whole Shigella cells regardless of the vaccine inactivation conditions. In guinea pigs, monovalent formulations of S. flexneri 2a of 3a or S. sonnei consisting of 10E8, 10E9, or 10E10 cells were protective in a keratoconjunctivitis assay. A trivalent formulation provided protection against all three serotypes (S. flexneri 2a, P = 0.018; S. flexneri 3a, P = 0.04; S. sonnei, P inactivated Shigella whole-cell vaccine approach incorporates an uncomplicated manufacturing process that is compatible with multivalency and the future development of a broadly protective Shigella vaccine. PMID:24403527

  9. Paternal X inactivation does not correlate with X chromosome evolutionary strata in marsupials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Delgado, Claudia L; Waters, Shafagh A; Waters, Paul D

    2014-12-24

    X chromosome inactivation is the transcriptional silencing of one X chromosome in the somatic cells of female mammals. In eutherian mammals (e.g. humans) one of the two X chromosomes is randomly chosen for silencing, with about 15% (usually in younger evolutionary strata of the X chromosome) of genes escaping this silencing. In contrast, in the distantly related marsupial mammals the paternally derived X is silenced, although not as completely as the eutherian X. A chromosome wide examination of X inactivation, using RNA-seq, was recently undertaken in grey short-tailed opossum (Monodelphis domestica) brain and extraembryonic tissues. However, no such study has been conduced in Australian marsupials, which diverged from their American cousins ~80 million years ago, leaving a large gap in our understanding of marsupial X inactivation. We used RNA-seq data from blood or liver of a family (mother, father and daughter) of tammar wallabies (Macropus eugenii), which in conjunction with available genome sequence from the mother and father, permitted genotyping of 42 expressed heterozygous SNPs on the daughter's X. These 42 SNPs represented 34 X loci, of which 68% (23 of the 34) were confirmed as inactivated on the paternally derived X in the daughter's liver; the remaining 11 X loci escaped inactivation. Seven of the wallaby loci sampled were part of the old X evolutionary stratum, of which three escaped inactivation. Three loci were classified as part of the newer X stratum, of which two escaped inactivation. A meta-analysis of previously published opossum X inactivation data revealed that 5 of 52 genes in the old X stratum escaped inactivation. We demonstrate that chromosome wide inactivation of the paternal X is common to an Australian marsupial representative, but that there is more escape from inactivation than reported for opossum (32% v 14%). We also provide evidence that, unlike the human X chromosome, the location of loci within the oldest evolutionary stratum on

  10. The Eag domain regulates the voltage-dependent inactivation of rat Eag1 K+ channels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting-Feng Lin

    Full Text Available Eag (Kv10 and Erg (Kv11 belong to two distinct subfamilies of the ether-à-go-go K+ channel family (KCNH. While Erg channels are characterized by an inward-rectifying current-voltage relationship that results from a C-type inactivation, mammalian Eag channels display little or no voltage-dependent inactivation. Although the amino (N-terminal region such as the eag domain is not required for the C-type inactivation of Erg channels, an N-terminal deletion in mouse Eag1 has been shown to produce a voltage-dependent inactivation. To further discern the role of the eag domain in the inactivation of Eag1 channels, we generated N-terminal chimeras between rat Eag (rEag1 and human Erg (hERG1 channels that involved swapping the eag domain alone or the complete cytoplasmic N-terminal region. Functional analyses indicated that introduction of the homologous hERG1 eag domain led to both a fast phase and a slow phase of channel inactivation in the rEag1 chimeras. By contrast, the inactivation features were retained in the reverse hERG1 chimeras. Furthermore, an eag domain-lacking rEag1 deletion mutant also showed the fast phase of inactivation that was notably attenuated upon co-expression with the rEag1 eag domain fragment, but not with the hERG1 eag domain fragment. Additionally, we have identified a point mutation in the S4-S5 linker region of rEag1 that resulted in a similar inactivation phenotype. Biophysical analyses of these mutant constructs suggested that the inactivation gating of rEag1 was distinctly different from that of hERG1. Overall, our findings are consistent with the notion that the eag domain plays a critical role in regulating the inactivation gating of rEag1. We propose that the eag domain may destabilize or mask an inherent voltage-dependent inactivation of rEag1 K+ channels.

  11. The inactivation of eggs of helminthes under the action of narrowband ultraviolet radiation of excilamps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipatov, Evgeniy I.; Sosnin, Edward A.; Avdeev, Sergey M.

    2015-12-01

    The inactivation of eggs of Opisthorchis felineus and Diphyllobothrium latum in the water under the action of UV excilamps at 222 and 282 nm in dependence on the surface dose of radiation was studied. It was observed that the water disinfection from eggs of helminthes was more efficient at 222 nm, than at 282 nm. At the surface dose up to 5 mJ/cm2 of UV radiation at 222 nm up to 85 % of Opisthorchis felineus eggs were inactivated. At the comparable surface dose of UV radiation at 222 nm up to 56 % of Diphyllobothrium latum eggs were inactivated.

  12. Inactivation of possible microorganism food contaminants on packaging foils using nonthermal plasma and hydrogen peroxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scholtz, V., E-mail: Vladimir.Scholtz@vscht.cz; Khun, J. [Institute of Chemical Technology in Prague, Department of Physics and Measurements, Faculty of Chemical Engineering (Czech Republic); Soušková, H. [Institute of Chemical Technology in Prague, Department of Computing and Control Engineering, Faculty of Chemical Engineering (Czech Republic); Čeřovský, M. [Institute of Chemical Technology in Prague, Department of Food Preservation, Faculty of Food and Biochemical Technology (Czech Republic)

    2015-07-15

    The inactivation effect of nonthermal plasma generated in electric discharge burning in air atmosphere with water or hydrogen peroxide aerosol for the application to the microbial decontamination of packaging foils is studied. The microbial inactivation is studied on two bacterial, two yeasts, and two filamentous micromycete species. The inactivation of all contaminating microorganisms becomes on the area of full 8.5 cm in diameter circular sample after short times of several tens of seconds. Described apparatus may present a possible alternative method of microbial decontamination of food packaging material or other thermolabile materials.

  13. Inactivation of batrachotoxin-modified Na+ channels in GH3 cells. Characterization and pharmacological modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    Batrachotoxin (BTX)-modified Na+ currents were characterized in GH3 cells with a reversed Na+ gradient under whole-cell voltage clamp conditions. BTX shifts the threshold of Na+ channel activation by approximately 40 mV in the hyperpolarizing direction and nearly eliminates the declining phase of Na+ currents at all voltages, suggesting that Na+ channel inactivation is removed. Paradoxically, the steady-state inactivation (h infinity) of BTX-modified Na+ channels as determined by a two-pulse protocol shows that inactivation is still present and occurs maximally near -70 mV. About 45% of BTX-modified Na+ channels are inactivated at this voltage. The development of inactivation follows a sum of two exponential functions with tau d(fast) = 10 ms and tau d(slow) = 125 ms at -70 mV. Recovery from inactivation can be achieved after hyperpolarizing the membrane to voltages more negative than -120 mV. The time course of recovery is best described by a sum of two exponentials with tau r(fast) = 6.0 ms and tau r(slow) = 240 ms at -170 mV. After reaching a minimum at -70 mV, the h infinity curve of BTX-modified Na+ channels turns upward to reach a constant plateau value of approximately 0.9 at voltages above 0 mV. Evidently, the inactivated, BTX-modified Na+ channels can be forced open at more positive potentials. The reopening kinetics of the inactivated channels follows a single exponential with a time constant of 160 ms at +50 mV. Both chloramine-T (at 0.5 mM) and alpha-scorpion toxin (at 200 nM) diminish the inactivation of BTX-modified Na+ channels. In contrast, benzocaine at 1 mM drastically enhances the inactivation of BTX-modified Na+ channels. The h infinity curve reaches minimum of less than 0.1 at -70 mV, indicating that benzocaine binds preferentially with inactivated, BTX-modified Na+ channels. Together, these results imply that BTX-modified Na+ channels are governed by an inactivation process. PMID:1311019

  14. Modification of sodium channel inactivation in single myelinated nerve fibers by methionine-reactive chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, G K

    1984-01-01

    Several methionine-reactive reagents, including N-bromoacetamide, N-bromosuccinimide, chloramine-T, and N-chlorosuccinimide, irreversibly slowed and prevented Na channel inactivation in single myelinated nerve fibers, whereas sulfhydryl- or tyrosine-modifying reagents had little effect. The activation process was not modified by the reagents that altered inactivation and could be modulated normally by Ca++ ions and Centruroides scorpion toxin II alpha. These results suggest that externally applied N-bromoacetamide and its related compounds specifically affect Na channel inactivation by modifying methionine residues of the channel. PMID:6331542

  15. Rapid Refresh (RAP) [13 km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Rapid Refresh (RAP) numerical weather model took the place of the Rapid Update Cycle (RUC) on May 1, 2012. Run by the National Centers for Environmental...

  16. Rapid Refresh (RAP) [20 km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Rapid Refresh (RAP) numerical weather model took the place of the Rapid Update Cycle (RUC) on May 1, 2012. Run by the National Centers for Environmental...

  17. Rapid chemical separations

    CERN Document Server

    Trautmann, N

    1976-01-01

    A survey is given on the progress of fast chemical separation procedures during the last few years. Fast, discontinuous separation techniques are illustrated by a procedure for niobium. The use of such techniques for the chemical characterization of the heaviest known elements is described. Other rapid separation methods from aqueous solutions are summarized. The application of the high speed liquid chromatography to the separation of chemically similar elements is outlined. The use of the gas jet recoil transport method for nuclear reaction products and its combination with a continuous solvent extraction technique and with a thermochromatographic separation is presented. Different separation methods in the gas phase are briefly discussed and the attachment of a thermochromatographic technique to an on-line mass separator is shown. (45 refs).

  18. Bim nuclear translocation and inactivation by viral interferon regulatory factor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Bong Choi

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Viral replication efficiency is in large part governed by the ability of viruses to counteract pro-apoptotic signals induced by infection of the host cell. Human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8 uses several strategies to block the host's innate antiviral defenses via interference with interferon and apoptotic signaling. Contributors include the four viral interferon regulatory factors (vIRFs 1-4, which function in dominant negative fashion to block cellular IRF activities in addition to targeting IRF signaling-induced proteins such as p53 and inhibiting other inducers of apoptosis such as TGFbeta receptor-activated Smad transcription factors. Here we identify direct targeting by vIRF-1 of BH3-only pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 family member Bim, a key negative regulator of HHV-8 replication, to effect its inactivation via nuclear translocation. vIRF-1-mediated relocalization of Bim was identified in transfected cells, by both immunofluorescence assay and western analysis of fractionated cell extracts. Also, co-localization of vIRF-1 and Bim was detected in nuclei of lytically infected endothelial cells. In vitro co-precipitation assays using purified vIRF-1 and Bim revealed direct interaction between the proteins, and Bim-binding residues of vIRF-1 were mapped by deletion and point mutagenesis. Generation and experimental utilization of Bim-refractory vIRF-1 variants revealed the importance of vIRF-1:Bim interaction, specifically, in pro-replication and anti-apoptotic activity of vIRF-1. Furthermore, blocking of the interaction with cell-permeable peptide corresponding to the Bim-binding region of vIRF-1 confirmed the relevance of vIRF-1:Bim association to vIRF-1 pro-replication activity. To our knowledge, this is the first report of an IRF protein that interacts with a Bcl-2 family member and of nuclear sequestration of Bim or any other member of the family as a means of inactivation. The data presented reveal a novel mechanism utilized by a virus to control

  19. Rapid onsite assessment of spore viability.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Branda, Steven; Lane, Todd W.; VanderNoot, Victoria A.; Gaucher, Sara P.; Jokerst, Amanda S.

    2005-12-01

    This one year LDRD addresses problems of threat assessment and restoration of facilities following a bioterror incident like the incident that closed down mail facilities in late 2001. Facilities that are contaminated with pathogenic spores such as B. anthracis spores must be shut down while they are treated with a sporicidal agent and the effectiveness of the treatment is ascertained. This process involves measuring the viability of spore test strips, laid out in a grid throughout the facility; the CDC accepted methodologies require transporting the samples to a laboratory and carrying out a 48 hr outgrowth experiment. We proposed developing a technique that will ultimately lead to a fieldable microfluidic device that can rapidly assess (ideally less than 30 min) spore viability and effectiveness of sporicidal treatment, returning facilities to use in hours not days. The proposed method will determine viability of spores by detecting early protein synthesis after chemical germination. During this year, we established the feasibility of this approach and gathered preliminary results that should fuel a future more comprehensive effort. Such a proposal is currently under review with the NIH. Proteomic signatures of Bacillus spores and vegetative cells were assessed by both slab gel electrophoresis as well as microchip based gel electrophoresis employing sensitive laser-induced fluorescence detection. The conditions for germination using a number of chemical germinants were evaluated and optimized and the time course of protein synthesis was ascertained. Microseparations were carried out using both viable spores and spores inactivated by two different methods. A select number of the early synthesis proteins were digested into peptides for analysis by mass spectrometry.

  20. Stratosphere Conditions Inactivate Bacterial Endospores from a Mars Spacecraft Assembly Facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodadad, Christina L; Wong, Gregory M; James, Leandro M; Thakrar, Prital J; Lane, Michael A; Catechis, John A; Smith, David J

    2017-04-01

    Every spacecraft sent to Mars is allowed to land viable microbial bioburden, including hardy endospore-forming bacteria resistant to environmental extremes. Earth's stratosphere is severely cold, dry, irradiated, and oligotrophic; it can be used as a stand-in location for predicting how stowaway microbes might respond to the martian surface. We launched E-MIST, a high-altitude NASA balloon payload on 10 October 2015 carrying known quantities of viable Bacillus pumilus SAFR-032 (4.07 × 10 7 spores per sample), a radiation-tolerant strain collected from a spacecraft assembly facility. The payload spent 8 h at ∼31 km above sea level, exposing bacterial spores to the stratosphere. We found that within 120 and 240 min, spore viability was significantly reduced by 2 and 4 orders of magnitude, respectively. By 480 min, Mars if contaminated spacecraft surfaces receive direct sunlight. Unfortunately, an instrument malfunction prevented the acquisition of UV light measurements during our balloon mission. To make up for the absence of radiometer data, we calculated a stratosphere UV model and conducted ground tests with a 271.1 nm UVC light source (0.5 W/m 2 ), observing a similarly rapid inactivation rate when using a lower number of contaminants (640 spores per sample). The starting concentration of spores and microconfiguration on hardware surfaces appeared to influence survivability outcomes in both experiments. With the relatively few spores that survived the stratosphere, we performed a resequencing analysis and identified three single nucleotide polymorphisms compared to unexposed controls. It is therefore plausible that bacteria enduring radiation-rich environments (e.g., Earth's upper atmosphere, interplanetary space, or the surface of Mars) may be pushed in evolutionarily consequential directions. Key Words: Planetary protection-Stratosphere-Balloon-Mars analog environment-E-MIST payload-Bacillus pumilus SAFR-032. Astrobiology 17, 337-350.

  1. Isatis indigotica root polysaccharides as adjuvants for an inactivated rabies virus vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weijiao; Zheng, Xuexing; Cheng, Nan; Gai, Weiwei; Xue, Xianghong; Wang, Yuxia; Gao, Yuwei; Shan, Junjie; Yang, Songtao; Xia, Xianzhu

    2016-06-01

    Adjuvants can enhance vaccine immunogenicity and induce long-term enhancement of immune responses. Thus, adjuvants are important for vaccine research. Polysaccharides isolated from select Chinese herbs have been demonstrated to possess various beneficial functions and excellent adjuvant abilities. In the present study, the polysaccharides IIP-A-1 and IIP-2 were isolated from Isatis indigotica root and compared with the common vaccine adjuvant aluminum hydroxide via intramuscular co-administration of inactivated rabies virus rCVS-11-G into mice. Blood was collected to determine virus neutralizing antibody (VNA) titers and B and T lymphocyte activation status. Inguinal lymph node samples were collected and used to measure B lymphocyte proliferation. Splenocytes were isolated, from which antigen-specific cellular immune responses were detected via ELISpot, ELISA and intracellular cytokine staining. The results revealed that both types of polysaccharides induce more rapid changes and higher VNA titers than aluminum hydroxide. Flow cytometry assays revealed that the polysaccharides activated more B lymphocytes in the lymph nodes and more B and T lymphocytes in the blood than aluminum hydroxide. Antigen-specific cellular immune responses showed that IIP-2 strongly induced T lymphocyte proliferation in the spleen and high levels of cytokine secretion from splenocytes, whereas aluminum hydroxide induced proliferation in only a small number of lymphocytes and the secretion of only small quantities of cytokines. Collectively, these data suggest that the polysaccharide IIP-2 exhibits excellent adjuvant activity and can enhance both cellular and humoral immunity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Ranolazine inhibition of hERG potassium channels: drug-pore interactions and reduced potency against inactivation mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Chunyun; Zhang, Yihong; El Harchi, Aziza; Dempsey, Christopher E; Hancox, Jules C

    2014-09-01

    The antianginal drug ranolazine, which combines inhibitory actions on rapid and sustained sodium currents with inhibition of the hERG/IKr potassium channel, shows promise as an antiarrhythmic agent. This study investigated the structural basis of hERG block by ranolazine, with lidocaine used as a low potency, structurally similar comparator. Recordings of hERG current (IhERG) were made from cell lines expressing wild-type (WT) or mutant hERG channels. Docking simulations were performed using homology models built on MthK and KvAP templates. In conventional voltage clamp, ranolazine inhibited IhERG with an IC50 of 8.03μM; peak IhERG during ventricular action potential clamp was inhibited ~62% at 10μM. The IC50 values for ranolazine inhibition of the S620T inactivation deficient and N588K attenuated inactivation mutants were respectively ~73-fold and ~15-fold that for WT IhERG. Mutations near the bottom of the selectivity filter (V625A, S624A, T623A) exhibited IC50s between ~8 and 19-fold that for WT IhERG, whilst the Y652A and F656A S6 mutations had IC50s ~22-fold and 53-fold WT controls. Low potency lidocaine was comparatively insensitive to both pore helix and S6 mutations, but was sensitive to direction of K(+) flux and particularly to loss of inactivation, with an IC50 for S620T-hERG ~49-fold that for WT IhERG. Docking simulations indicated that the larger size of ranolazine gives it potential for a greater range of interactions with hERG pore side chains compared to lidocaine, in particular enabling interaction of its two aromatic groups with side chains of both Y652 and F656. The N588K mutation is responsible for the SQT1 variant of short QT syndrome and our data suggest that ranolazine is unlikely to be effective against IKr/hERG in SQT1 patients. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Low pH inactivation for xenotropic gamma retrovirus in recombinant human TNF-α receptor immunoglobulin G and mechanism of inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Rong; Cui, Xiaolan

    2014-01-01

    CHO-derived recombinant proteins for human therapeutic are used commonly. There are noninfectious endogenous retroviruses in CHO cells. Validation study for inactivation process is required. Murine xenotropic gamma retrovirus (X-MulV) is a model virus in validation study. In our previous study, optimum conditions for X-MulV inactivation were sifted. In this study, we performed a further research on low pH inactivation for evaluation of X-MulV clearance in manufacturing of recombinant human TNF-α receptor immunoglobulin G fusion proteins (rhTNF-α) for injection. Cell-based infectivity assay was used for the evaluation of X-MulV clearance. RhTNF-α were spiked with X-MulV and were inactivated at pH 3.60 ∼ 3.90, 25 ± 2 °C, and 0 ∼ 240 min, respectively. Samples incubated at the conditions for 15 ∼ 180 min were not inactivated effectively. For 4 h incubation, log10 reductions were achieved 5.0 log10. Biological activity of rhTNF-α incubated at pH 3.60, 25 °C for 4 h, which was assayed on murine L929 fibroblasts cells, was not affected by low pH. Env gene of X-MulV, which was detected by conventional PCR method for the first time, was not detected after incubation at pH 3.60, and it may be the mechanism of low pH inactivation. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Suppression of Sleep Spindle Rhythmogenesis in Mice with Deletion of CaV3.2 and CaV3.3 T-type Ca2+ Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrini, Chiara; Lecci, Sandro; Lüthi, Anita; Astori, Simone

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Low-threshold voltage-gated T-type Ca2+ channels (T-channels or CaV3 channels) sustain oscillatory discharges of thalamocortical (TC) and nucleus Reticularis thalami (nRt) cells. The CaV3.3 subtype dominates nRt rhythmic bursting and mediates a substantial fraction of spindle power in the NREM sleep EEG. CaV3.2 channels are also found in nRt, but whether these contribute to nRt-dependent spindle generation is unexplored. We investigated thalamic rhythmogenesis in mice lacking this subtype in isolation (CaV3.2KO mice) or in concomitance with CaV3.3 deletion (CaV3.double-knockout (DKO) mice). Methods: We examined discharge characteristics of thalamic cells and intrathalamic evoked synaptic transmission in brain slices from wild-type, CaV3.2KO and CaV3.DKO mice through patch-clamp recordings. The sleep profile of freely behaving CaV3.2KO and CaV3.DKO mice was assessed by polysomnographic recordings. Results: CaV3.2 channel deficiency left nRt discharge properties largely unaltered, but additional deletion of CaV3.3 channels fully abolished low-threshold whole-cell Ca2+ currents and bursting, and suppressed burst-mediated inhibitory responses in TC cells. CaV3.DKO mice had more fragmented sleep, with shorter NREM sleep episodes and more frequent microarousals. The NREM sleep EEG power spectrum displayed a relative suppression of the σ frequency band (10–15 Hz), which was accompanied by an increase in the δ band (1–4 Hz). Conclusions: Consistent with previous findings, CaV3.3 channels dominate nRt rhythmogenesis, but the lack of CaV3.2 channels further aggravates neuronal, synaptic, and EEG deficits. Therefore, CaV3.2 channels can boost intrathalamic synaptic transmission, and might play a modulatory role adjusting the relative presence of NREM sleep EEG rhythms. Citation: Pellegrini C, Lecci S, Lüthi A, Astori S. Suppression of sleep spindle rhythmogenesis in mice with deletion of Cav3.2 and Cav3.3 T-type Ca2+ channels. SLEEP 2016;39(4):875

  5. Inactivation of murine norovirus on a range of copper alloy surfaces is accompanied by loss of capsid integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warnes, Sarah L; Summersgill, Emma N; Keevil, C William

    2015-02-01

    Norovirus is one of the most common causes of acute viral gastroenteritis. The virus is spread via the fecal-oral route, most commonly from infected food and water, but several outbreaks have originated from contamination of surfaces with infectious virus. In this study, a close surrogate of human norovirus causing gastrointestinal disease in mice, murine norovirus type 1 (MNV-1), retained infectivity for more than 2 weeks following contact with a range of surface materials, including Teflon (polytetrafluoroethylene [PTFE]), polyvinyl chloride (PVC), ceramic tiles, glass, silicone rubber, and stainless steel. Persistence was slightly prolonged on ceramic surfaces. A previous study in our laboratory observed that dry copper and copper alloy surfaces rapidly inactivated MNV-1 and destroyed the viral genome. In this new study, we have observed that a relatively small change in the percentage of copper, between 70 and 80% in copper nickels and 60 and 70% in brasses, had a significant influence on the ability of the alloy to inactivate norovirus. Nickel alone did not affect virus, but zinc did have some antiviral effect, which was synergistic with copper and resulted in an increased efficacy of brasses with lower percentages of copper. Electron microscopy of purified MNV-1 that had been exposed to copper and stainless steel surfaces suggested that a massive breakdown of the viral capsid had occurred on copper. In addition, MNV-1 that had been exposed to copper and treated with RNase demonstrated a reduction in viral gene copy number. This suggests that capsid integrity is compromised upon contact with copper, allowing copper ion access to the viral genome. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  6. Modelling effect of physical and chemical parameters on heat inactivation kinetics of hepatitis A virus in a fruit model system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deboosere, N; Legeay, O; Caudrelier, Y; Lange, M

    2004-05-15

    While thermal destruction of pathogenic bacteria has been thoroughly studied in food industry, heat inactivation of viruses in food has been poorly investigated. Experiments were carried out to characterize the effects of controlled physical and chemical characteristics of a food matrix upon heat resistance parameters (D and z values) of hepatitis A virus (HAV), taken as model because of its reported heat resistance. Sucrose content (28-52 degrees Brix), calcium concentration (90-1700 mg kg(-1)) and pH (3.3-4.3) were selected for possible influence on thermal inactivation of HAV in strawberry mashes and thus included in an experimental design according to a Doehlert matrix. Use of this design not only allowed to detect and quantify the direct influence of sucrose concentration upon the D85 degrees C value to be higher than the one of pH, but also to reveal a sucrose concentration/pH specific interaction, while no effect of calcium concentration was evidenced. Although the model cannot be directly used to predict heat resistance in real fruit systems, because of differences observed between predicted and measured D85 degrees C values, it is useful for predicting the trends and relative changes in D values due to sucrose concentration and pH variations. Results suggested possible effects of other constituents of strawberry products on heat resistance of HAV and confirmed the importance of experimental validation of any model-derived process. Nevertheless, such a modelling approach using response surface methodology provides a rapid answer to heat resistance evaluation of a food-borne virus as a function of specific physical and chemical parameters of specific food products. Copyright 2003 Elsevier B.V.

  7. Strategies to optimize photosensitizers for photodynamic inactivation of bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tim, Maisch

    2015-09-01

    The Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) highlights that over the past several years, the number of new antibacterial drugs approved continues to decrease (Boucher et al., 2009) [1]. Bacteria are very good in developing resistance against antibiotics in a short time. Therefore new approaches like antibacterial photodynamic inactivation of bacteria (aPDI) will become more important in the future as antimicrobial resistance is expected to continue to increase. This review summarises the potential of the susceptibility of bacteria to aPDI and the strategies to optimize leading photosensitizers which are useful for aPDI. The most appropriate photosensitizers belonging to the chemical classes of phenothiazinium, porphyrine, fullerene and perinaphthenone. They all share the following characteristics: positively-charged, water-soluble and photostable. Taken together the most promising clinical applications of aPDI are (i) decolonization of pathogens on skin, (ii) treatments of the oral cavity like periodontitis and root canal infection and (iii) superinfected burn wounds, because these are relatively accessible for photosensitizer application and illumination. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Advances in antimicrobial photodynamic inactivation at the nanoscale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashef, Nasim; Huang, Ying-Ying; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2017-08-01

    The alarming worldwide increase in antibiotic resistance amongst microbial pathogens necessitates a search for new antimicrobial techniques, which will not be affected by, or indeed cause resistance themselves. Light-mediated photoinactivation is one such technique that takes advantage of the whole spectrum of light to destroy a broad spectrum of pathogens. Many of these photoinactivation techniques rely on the participation of a diverse range of nanoparticles and nanostructures that have dimensions very similar to the wavelength of light. Photodynamic inactivation relies on the photochemical production of singlet oxygen from photosensitizing dyes (type II pathway) that can benefit remarkably from formulation in nanoparticle-based drug delivery vehicles. Fullerenes are a closed-cage carbon allotrope nanoparticle with a high absorption coefficient and triplet yield. Their photochemistry is highly dependent on microenvironment, and can be type II in organic solvents and type I (hydroxyl radicals) in a biological milieu. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles act as a large band-gap semiconductor that can carry out photo-induced electron transfer under ultraviolet A light and can also produce reactive oxygen species that kill microbial cells. We discuss some recent studies in which quite remarkable potentiation of microbial killing (up to six logs) can be obtained by the addition of simple inorganic salts such as the non-toxic sodium/potassium iodide, bromide, nitrite, and even the toxic sodium azide. Interesting mechanistic insights were obtained to explain this increased killing.

  9. Mechanism for Mutational Inactivation of the Tumor Suppressor Smad2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prunier, Celine; Ferrand, Nathalie; Frottier, Bertrand; Pessah, Marcia; Atfi, Azeddine

    2001-01-01

    Transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) is a potent natural antiproliferative agent that plays an important role in suppressing tumorigenicity. In numerous tumors, loss of TGF-β responsiveness is associated with inactivating mutations that can occur in components of this signaling pathway, such as the tumor suppressor Smad2. Although a general framework for how Smads transduce TGF-β signals has been proposed, the physiological relevance of alterations of Smad2 functions in promoting tumorigenesis is still unknown. Here, we show that expression of Smad2.P445H, a tumor-derived mutation of Smad2 found in human cancer, suppresses the ability of the Smads to mediate TGF-β-induced growth arrest and transcriptional responses. Smad2.P445H is phosphorylated by the activated TGF-β receptor at the carboxy-terminal serine residues and associates with Smad3 and Smad4 but is unable to dissociate from the receptor. Upon ligand-induced phosphorylation, Smad2.P445H interacts stably with wild-type Smad2, thereby blocking TGF-β-induced nuclear accumulation of wild-type Smad2 and Smad2-dependent transcription. The ability of the Smad2.P445H to block the nuclear accumulation of wild-type Smad2 protein reveals a new mechanism for loss of sensitivity to the growth-inhibitory functions of TGF-β in tumor development. PMID:11313456

  10. Photodynamic inactivation of Gram-positive bacteria employing natural resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamone, L; Di Venosa, G; Gándara, L; Sáenz, D; Vallecorsa, P; Schickinger, S; Rossetti, M V; Batlle, A; Buzzola, F; Casas, A

    2014-04-05

    The aim of this paper was to investigate a collection of plant extracts from Argentina as a source of new natural photosensitizers (PS) to be used in Photodynamic Inactivation (PDI) of bacteria. A collection of plants were screened for phototoxicity upon the Gram-positive species Staphylococcus epidermidis. Three extracts turned out to be photoactive: Solanum verbascifolium flower, Tecoma stans flower and Cissus verticillata root. Upon exposure to a light dose of 55J/cm(2), they induced 4, 2 and 3logs decrease in bacterial survival, respectively. Photochemical characterisation of S. verbascifolium extract was carried out. PDI reaction was dependent mainly on singlet oxygen and to a lesser extent, on hydroxyl radicals, through type II and I reactions. Photodegradation experiments revealed that the active principle of the extract was not particularly photolabile. It is noticeable that S. verbascifolium -PDI was more efficient under sunlight as compared to artificial light (total eradication vs. 4 logs decrease upon 120min of sunlight). The balance between oxidant and antioxidant compounds is likely to be masking or unmasking potential PS of plant extracts, but employing the crude extract, the level of photoactivity of S. verbascifolium is similar to some artificial PS upon exposure to sunlight, demonstrating that natural resources can be employed in PDI of bacteria. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Characterization and inactivation of an agmatine deiminase from Helicobacter pylori

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Justin E.; Causey, Corey P.; Lovelace, Leslie; Knuckley, Bryan; Flick, Heather; Lebioda, Lukasz; Thompson, Paul R. (SC)

    2010-11-12

    Helicobacter pylori encodes a potential virulence factor, agmatine deiminase (HpAgD), which catalyzes the conversion of agmatine to N-carbamoyl putrescine (NCP) and ammonia - agmatine is decarboxylated arginine. Agmatine is an endogenous human cell signaling molecule that triggers the innate immune response in humans. Unlike H. pylori, humans do not encode an AgD; it is hypothesized that inhibition of this enzyme would increase the levels of agmatine, and thereby enhance the innate immune response. Taken together, these facts suggest that HpAgD is a potential drug target. Herein we describe the optimized expression, isolation, and purification of HpAgD (10-30 mg/L media). The initial kinetic characterization of this enzyme has also been performed. Additionally, the crystal structure of wild-type HpAgD has been determined at 2.1 {angstrom} resolution. This structure provides a molecular basis for the preferential deimination of agmatine, and identifies Asp198 as a key residue responsible for agmatine recognition, which has been confirmed experimentally. Information gathered from these studies led to the development and characterization of a novel class of haloacetamidine-based HpAgD inactivators. These compounds are the most potent AgD inhibitors ever described.

  12. Effect of Activated Plastic Films on Inactivation of Foodborne Pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belén Soriano Cuadrado

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, low density polyethylene films were activated by co-extrusion with zinc oxide, zinc acetate or potassium sorbate. Films were also surface-activated with tyrosol singly or in combination with lactic acid or p-hydroxybenzoic acid. Activated films were tested on Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica and Pseudomonas fluorescens. The combinations showing greatest inhibition zones and broadest inhibitory spectrum were the films activated with tyrosol plus p-hydroxybenzoic acid. A small delay in growth of Listeria innocua was observed on seabream packed in ZnO-activated films during refrigerated storage for 7 days. When films activated with 2.5% tyrosol or with 1.5% tyrosol plus 0.5 p-hydroxybenzoic acid were used for vacuum packaging of smoked salmon and smoked tuna challenged with cocktails of S. enterica and L. monocytogenes strains, the combination of tyrosol and p-hydroxybenzoic acid improved inactivation of both pathogens during chill storage compared to films singly activated with tyrosol. The best results were obtained in smoked salmon, since no viable pathogens were detected after 7 days of chill storage for the activated film. Results from the study highlight the potential of plastic films surface-activated with tyrosol and p-hydroxybenzoic acid in the control of foodborne pathogens in smoked seafood.

  13. Field trials of an inactivated virus vaccine against porcine parvovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, J M; del Pozo, M; Simarro, I

    1992-07-01

    Serological response and reproductive performance were estimated in field trials of an inactivated virus vaccine against porcine parvovirus. Experiments were carried out in 10 selected pig breeding herds. A total of 277 seronegative gilts were used. Two hundred and twenty animals were vaccinated twice before mating, fourteen days apart and revaccinated after farrowing. Blood samples were obtained from both vaccinated and non-vaccinated (57 animal) control gilts, one week after the 2nd dose of vaccination, at farrowing time and one week after revaccination. Although there were considerable variations among the herds, the number of returns to oestrus in all herds was higher in vaccinated gilts (11.81%) than in the controls (10.52%). This difference, however, was not statistically significant. The reproductive performance results revealed the absence of an increase in the total born, as pooled values, in vaccinated gilts compared to controls. However, when these results are interpreted in relation to serological data, many control gilts were already seropositive before mating, or remained seronegative at farrowing. According to our results, the duration of immunity with this vaccine is apparently short, as there is a clear decrease in the titres between the 1st and the 2nd sampling times (2.35 +/- 0.14 and 1.97 +/- 0.08, respectively).

  14. Inactivation of Salmonella on Eggshells by Chlorine Dioxide Gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyobi; Yum, Bora; Yoon, Sung-Sik; Song, Kyoung-Ju; Kim, Jong-Rak; Myeong, Donghoon; Chang, Byungjoon; Choe, Nong-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Microbiological contamination of eggs should be prevented in the poultry industry, as poultry is one of the major reservoirs of human Salmonella. ClO2 gas has been reported to be an effective disinfectant in various industry fields, particularly the food industry. The aims of this study were to evaluate the antimicrobial effect of chlorine dioxide gas on two strains of Salmonella inoculated onto eggshells under various experimental conditions including concentrations, contact time, humidity, and percentage organic matter. As a result, it was shown that chlorine dioxide gas under wet conditions was more effective in inactivating Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Gallinarum compared to that under dry conditions independently of the presence of organic matter (yeast extract). Under wet conditions, a greater than 4 log reduction in bacterial populations was achieved after 30 min of exposure to ClO2 each at 20 ppm, 40 ppm, and 80 ppm against S. Enteritidis; 40 ppm and 80 ppm against S. Gallinarum. These results suggest that chlorine dioxide gas is an effective agent for controlling Salmonella, the most prevalent contaminant in the egg industry.

  15. Potentiation of antimicrobial photodynamic inactivation by inorganic salts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamblin, Michael R

    2017-11-01

    Antimicrobial photodynamic inactivation (aPDI) involves the use of non-toxic dyes excited with visible light to produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) that can destroy all classes of microorganisms including bacteria, fungi, parasites, and viruses. Selectivity of killing microbes over host mammalian cells allows this approach (antimicrobial photodynamic therapy, aPDT) to be used in vivo as an alternative therapeutic approach for localized infections especially those that are drug-resistant. Areas covered: We have discovered that aPDI can be potentiated (up to 6 logs of extra killing) by the addition of simple inorganic salts. The most powerful and versatile salt is potassium iodide, but potassium bromide, sodium thiocyanate, sodium azide and sodium nitrite also show potentiation. The mechanism of potentiation with iodide is likely to be singlet oxygen addition to iodide to form iodine radicals, hydrogen peroxide and molecular iodine. Another mechanism involves two-electron oxidation of iodide/bromide to form hypohalites. A third mechanism involves a one-electron oxidation of azide anion to form azide radical. Expert commentary: The addition of iodide has been shown to improve the performance of aPDT in several animal models of localized infection. KI is non-toxic and is an approved drug for antifungal therapy, so its transition to clinical use in aPDT should be straightforward.

  16. Advances in antimicrobial photodynamic inactivation at the nanoscale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kashef Nasim

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The alarming worldwide increase in antibiotic resistance amongst microbial pathogens necessitates a search for new antimicrobial techniques, which will not be affected by, or indeed cause resistance themselves. Light-mediated photoinactivation is one such technique that takes advantage of the whole spectrum of light to destroy a broad spectrum of pathogens. Many of these photoinactivation techniques rely on the participation of a diverse range of nanoparticles and nanostructures that have dimensions very similar to the wavelength of light. Photodynamic inactivation relies on the photochemical production of singlet oxygen from photosensitizing dyes (type II pathway that can benefit remarkably from formulation in nanoparticle-based drug delivery vehicles. Fullerenes are a closed-cage carbon allotrope nanoparticle with a high absorption coefficient and triplet yield. Their photochemistry is highly dependent on microenvironment, and can be type II in organic solvents and type I (hydroxyl radicals in a biological milieu. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles act as a large band-gap semiconductor that can carry out photo-induced electron transfer under ultraviolet A light and can also produce reactive oxygen species that kill microbial cells. We discuss some recent studies in which quite remarkable potentiation of microbial killing (up to six logs can be obtained by the addition of simple inorganic salts such as the non-toxic sodium/potassium iodide, bromide, nitrite, and even the toxic sodium azide. Interesting mechanistic insights were obtained to explain this increased killing.

  17. Probing Mercaptobenzamides as HIV Inactivators via Nucleocapsid Protein 7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Mrinmoy; Scerba, Michael T; Shank, Nathaniel I; Hartman, Tracy L; Buchholz, Caitlin A; Buckheit, Robert W; Durell, Stewart R; Appella, Daniel H

    2017-05-22

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) nucleocapsid protein 7 (NCp7), a zinc finger protein, plays critical roles in viral replication and maturation and is an attractive target for drug development. However, the development of drug-like molecules that inhibit NCp7 has been a significant challenge. In this study, a series of novel 2-mercaptobenzamide prodrugs were investigated for anti-HIV activity in the context of NCp7 inactivation. The molecules were synthesized from the corresponding thiosalicylic acids, and they are all crystalline solids and stable at room temperature. Derivatives with a range of amide side chains and aromatic substituents were synthesized and screened for anti-HIV activity. Wide ranges of antiviral activity were observed, with IC 50 values ranging from 1 to 100 μm depending on subtle changes to the substituents on the aromatic ring and side chain. Results from these structure-activity relationships were fit to a probable mode of intracellular activation and interaction with NCp7 to explain variations in antiviral activity. Our strategy to make a series of mercaptobenzamide prodrugs represents a general new direction to make libraries that can be screened for anti-HIV activity. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Inactivation of food spoilage fungi by ultra violet (UVC) irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begum, Mariam; Hocking, Ailsa D; Miskelly, Di

    2009-01-31

    The effect of ultraviolet irradiation (254 nm, UVC) on Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus niger, Penicillium corylophilum and Eurotium rubrum was investigated using three different exposure techniques. Survival was determined for spores suspended in liquid medium after 1, 2 and 3 min UVC exposure at 4644 J/m(2)/min. The same UVC dose was applied to spores on the surface of agar plates for 5, 10, 15, 30, 60 and 120 s. Spores of A. niger were dried onto a membrane filter, then exposed to UVC treatment. In the liquid medium, treatments from 1-3 min significantly (P<0.001) reduce the number of viable spores. On the surface of agar plates, after a 15 s exposure, a 80-99% reduction of viable spores was observed for all species except A. niger, for which the reduction was only 62%. For spores dried onto filter membranes, a 3.5 log(10) reduction was achieved for A. niger after 180 s exposure. These observations suggest that UVC irradiation can effectively inactivate spores of A. flavus, P. corylophilum, E. rubrum and A. niger but the efficacy of UVC radiation against fungal spores varies significantly according to methods of exposure to the irradiation, and among genera.

  19. Diltiazem and verapamil preferentially block inactivated cardiac calcium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanaya, S; Arlock, P; Katzung, B G; Hondeghem, L M

    1983-02-01

    Diltiazem has been proposed to act by blocking calcium channels of cardiac and smooth muscle since it has pharmacological [12-14] and clinical [10] effects that resemble those of verapamil, an agent that has been shown to block these channels [3]. However, block of the slow inward current by diltiazem has not been directly demonstrated. In fact, it has been suggested that diltiazem has an entirely different mechanism of action [7]. We therefore studied the blocking effects of diltiazem and verapamil on cardiac calcium channels by measuring the slow inward current in voltage-clamped ferret myocardium. Both drugs blocked the slow inward current in a use-dependent fashion, i.e. the block was enhanced by increased frequency of activating clamps and by more positive holding potentials. However, we found that short single activating clamps resulted in minimal block, whereas prolonging the clamp step progressively enhanced the blockade. Thus, a single long clamp caused as much blockade as a train of shorter pulses. These results demonstrate that diltiazem and verapamil block the slow inward current by binding to calcium channels in a state-dependent fashion, i.e. inactivated channels have a high affinity for the drugs, while rested and open channels have a lower affinity.

  20. Ribosome-Inactivating Proteins from Plants: A Historical Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Bolognesi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This review provides a historical overview of the research on plant ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs, starting from the first studies at the end of eighteenth century involving the purification of abrin and ricin, as well as the immunological experiments of Paul Erlich. Interest in these plant toxins was revived in 1970 by the observation of their anticancer activity, which has given rise to a large amount of research contributing to the development of various scientific fields. Biochemistry analyses succeeded in identifying the enzymatic activity of RIPs and allowed for a better understanding of the ribosomal machinery. Studies on RIP/cell interactions were able to detail the endocytosis and intracellular routing of ricin, thus increasing our knowledge of how cells handle exogenous proteins. The identification of new RIPs and the finding that most RIPs are single-chain polypeptides, together with their genetic sequencing, has aided in the development of new phylogenetic theories. Overall, the biological properties of these proteins, including their abortifacient, anticancer, antiviral and neurotoxic activities, suggest that RIPs could be utilized in agriculture and in many biomedical fields, including clinical drug development.

  1. Plants Producing Ribosome-Inactivating Proteins in Traditional Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Letizia Polito

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs are enzymes that deadenylate nucleic acids and are broadly distributed in the plant kingdom. Many plants that contain RIPs are listed in the pharmacopoeias of folk medicine all over the world, mostly because of their toxicity. This review analyses the position occupied in traditional medicine by plants from which RIPs have been isolated. The overview starts from the antique age of the Mediterranean area with ancient Egypt, followed by the Greek and Roman classic period. Then, the ancient oriental civilizations of China and India are evaluated. More recently, Unani medicine and European folk medicine are examined. Finally, the African and American folk medicines are taken into consideration. In conclusion, a list of RIP-expressing plants, which have been used in folk medicine, is provided with the geographical distribution and the prescriptions that are recommended by traditional healers. Some final considerations are provided on the present utilization of such herbal treatments, both in developing and developed countries, often in the absence of scientific validation. The most promising prospect for the medicinal use of RIP-expressing plants is the conjugation of purified RIPs to antibodies that recognise tumour antigens for cancer therapy.

  2. Photodynamic inactivation of Candida albicans by BAM-SiPc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, Cheung-Wai; Tsang, Paul W K; Lo, Pui-Chi; Seneviratne, C J; Samaranayake, Lakshman P; Fong, Wing-Ping

    2010-05-01

    Photodynamic therapy is a treatment that combines the use of three non-toxic components, viz. photosensitiser, light and oxygen to cause localised oxidative photodamage. In the present study, the antifungal effect of the photosensitiser, BAM-SiPc, an unsymmetrical bisamino phthalocyanine, was investigated. BAM-SiPc was effective in photo-inactivating Candida albicans in a dose-dependent manner. The cell viability as determined by the clonogenic assay was reduced to c. 10% at 0.02 micromol l(-1) BAM-SiPc with a total fluence of 12 J cm(-2) at a cell density of 10(7) cells ml(-1). A short incubation time of 5-15 min was sufficient to allow the photosensitiser to exert its optimal antifungal activity. Microscopical analysis showed that BAM-SiPc was effectively internalised by the fungal cells. Photodynamic treatment led to an increase in the intracellular reactive oxygen species level and disturbed the membrane integrity of the fungal cells.

  3. Blue light-mediated inactivation of Enterococcus faecalis in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pileggi, Giorgio; Wataha, John C; Girard, Myriam; Grad, Iwona; Schrenzel, Jacques; Lange, Norbert; Bouillaguet, Serge

    2013-05-01

    In dentistry, residual infection remains a major cause of failure after endodontic treatment; many of these infections involve Enterococcus faecalis. In the current study, we explored the possibility that blue light activated photosensitizers could be used, in principle, to inactivate this microbe as an adjunct disinfection strategy for endodontic therapy. Three blue light absorbing photosensitizers, eosin-Y, rose bengal, and curcumin, were tested on E. faecalis grown in planktonic suspensions or biofilms. Photosensitizers were incubated for 30 min with bacteria then exposed to blue light (450-500 nm) for 240 s. Sodium hypochlorite (3%) was used as a control. After 48 h, the viability of E. faecalis was estimated by measuring colony-forming units post-exposure vs. untreated controls (CFU/mL). Blue light irradiation alone did not alter E. faecalis viability. For planktonic cultures, blue light activated eosin-Y (5 μM), rose bengal (1 μM), or curcumin (5 μM) significantly (pfaecalis viability compared to exposure to the unirradiated photochemicals. For biofilm cultures, concentrations of light-activated eosin-Y, rose bengal, and curcumin of 100, 10, and 10 μM respectively, completely suppressed E. faecalis viability (p<0.05). Although the current results are limited to an in vitro model, they support further exploration of blue light activated antimicrobials as an adjunct therapy in endodontic treatment. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Highly efficient gene inactivation by adenoviral CRISPR/Cas9 in human primary cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Olaf Voets; Frans Tielen; Edo Elstak; Julian Benschop; Max Grimbergen; Jan Stallen; Richard Janssen; Andre van Marle; Christian Essrich

    2017-01-01

    .... Therefore, efficient and fast modes of protein KD in phenotypic assays are required. The CRISPR/Cas9 system has been shown to be a versatile and efficient means of gene inactivation in immortalized cell lines...

  5. Carbohydrates and dehydration inactivation of Lactobacillus plantarum: The role of moisture distribution and water activity.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linders, L.J.M.; Jong, de G.I.W.; Meerdink, G.; Riet, van 't K.

    1997-01-01

    Sucrose, maltose, lactose, trehalose, glucose, fructose and sorbitol were tested for their ability to minimize the dehydration inactivation of Lactobacillus plantarum during fluidized bed drying. Desorption isotherms were measured for starch and L. plantarum, for binary mixtures containing starch

  6. Synergetic inactivation of microorganisms in drinking water by short-term free chlorination and subsequent monochloramination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao-Jian; Chen, Chao; Wang, Yun

    2007-10-01

    To introduce synergetic inactivation of microorganisms in drinking water by short-term free chlorination for less than 15 minutes followed by monochloramination. Indicator microorganisms such as Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Candida albicans, and spores of Bacillus subtilis were used to assess the efficiency of sequential chlorination and free chlorination. The sequential chlorination was more efficient in inactivating these microorganisms than free chlorination, indicating that synergy was provided by free chlorine and monochloramine. Ammonia addition time, temperature and pH had influences on this synergy. The possible mechanism of this synergy might involve three aspects: free chlorine causing sublethal injury to microorganisms and monochloramine further inactivating them; different ability of free chlorine and monochloramine to penetrate and inactivate microorganism congeries; and higher concentration of residual chlorine in sequential chlorination than in free chlorination.

  7. Heat inactivation of wine spoilage yeast Dekkera bruxellensis by hot water treatment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fabrizio, V; Vigentini, I; Parisi, N; Picozzi, C; Compagno, C; Foschino, R

    2015-01-01

    .... The thermal inactivation of D. bruxellensis cells by hot water treatment proves to be efficacious and easy to perform, provided that the holding time at the killing temperature takes into account the filling time of the vessel...

  8. Incompatibility of lyophilized inactivated polio vaccine with liquid pentavalent whole-cell-pertussis-containing vaccine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraan, H.; Have, Ten R.; Maas, van der L.; Kersten, G.F.A.; Amorij, J.P.

    2016-01-01

    A hexavalent vaccine containing diphtheria toxoid, tetanus toxoid, whole cell pertussis, Haemophilius influenza type B, hepatitis B and inactivated polio vaccine (IPV) may: (i) increase the efficiency of vaccination campaigns, (ii) reduce the number of injections thereby reducing needlestick

  9. Provider Knowledge of Trivalent Inactivated and High-Dose Influenza Vaccines

    OpenAIRE

    Tewell, Chad; Wright, Patty W.; Talbot, H. Keipp

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess provider knowledge about trivalent inactivated and high dose influenza vaccines. Hence, a 20 item survey was distributed to providers within the Internal Medicine department at an urban academic medical center.

  10. Mechanistic insight into digoxin inactivation by Eggerthella lenta augments our understanding of its pharmacokinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haiser, Henry J; Seim, Kristen L; Balskus, Emily P; Turnbaugh, Peter J

    2014-01-01

    The human gut microbiota plays a key role in pharmacology, yet the mechanisms responsible remain unclear, impeding efforts toward personalized medicine. We recently identified a cytochrome-encoding operon in the common gut Actinobacterium Eggerthella lenta that is transcriptionally activated by the cardiac drug digoxin. These genes represent a predictive microbial biomarker for the inactivation of digoxin. Gnotobiotic mouse experiments revealed that increased protein intake can limit microbial drug inactivation. Here, we present a biochemical rationale for how the proteins encoded by this operon might inactivate digoxin through substrate promiscuity. We discuss digoxin signaling in eukaryotic systems, and consider the possibility that endogenous digoxin-like molecules may have selected for microbial digoxin inactivation. Finally, we highlight the diverse contributions of gut microbes to drug metabolism, present a generalized approach to studying microbe-drug interactions, and argue that mechanistic studies will pave the way for the clinical application of this work.

  11. BIM mediates oncogene inactivation-induced apoptosis in multiple transgenic mouse models of acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yulin; Deutzmann, Anja; Choi, Peter S; Fan, Alice C; Felsher, Dean W

    2016-05-10

    Oncogene inactivation in both clinical targeted therapies and conditional transgenic mouse cancer models can induce significant tumor regression associated with the robust induction of apoptosis. Here we report that in MYC-, RAS-, and BCR-ABL-induced acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), apoptosis upon oncogene inactivation is mediated by the same pro-apoptotic protein, BIM. The induction of BIMin the MYC- and RAS-driven leukemia is mediated by the downregulation of miR-17-92. Overexpression of miR-17-92 blocked the induction of apoptosis upon oncogene inactivation in the MYC and RAS-driven but not in the BCR-ABL-driven ALL leukemia. Hence, our results provide novel insight into the mechanism of apoptosis upon oncogene inactivation and suggest that induction of BIM-mediated apoptosis may be an important therapeutic approach for ALL.

  12. Multi-Layered TiO2 Films towards Enhancement of Escherichia coli Inactivation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yoriya, Sorachon; Chumphu, Angkana; Pookmanee, Pusit; Laithong, Wreerat; Thepa, Sirichai; Songprakorp, Roongrojana

    2016-01-01

    .... This work presents a design fabrication of low-cost, layered TiO2 films assembled reactors and a study of their performance for a better understanding to elucidate the photocatalytic effect on inactivation of E. coli in water...

  13. Allergic-like reactions to asparaginase: Atypical allergies without asparaginase inactivation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.Q.H. Kloos (Robin); R. Pieters (Rob); G. Escherich (Gabriele); I.M. van der Sluis (Inge)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Asparaginase is an important component of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) therapy. Unfortunately, this treatment is hampered by hypersensitivity reactions. In general, allergies – regardless of severity – cause complete inactivation of the drug. However, we

  14. Optimization and Characterization of Candidate Strain for Coxsackievirus A16 Inactivated Vaccine

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Li, Jingliang; Liu, Guanchen; Liu, Xin; Yang, Jiaxin; Chang, Junliang; Zhang, Wenyan; Yu, Xiao-Fang

    2015-01-01

    ...), are responsible for large epidemics in Asian and Pacific areas. Although inactivated EV71 vaccines have completed testing in phase III clinical trials in Mainland China, CA16 vaccines are still under development...

  15. ALTERNATIVE EQUATIONS FOR DYNAMIC BEHAVIOR OF IONIC CHANNEL ACTIVATION AND INACTIVATION GATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmut ÖZER

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, alternative equations for dynamics of ionic channel activation and inactivation gates are proposed based on the path probability method. Dynamic behavior of a voltage-gated ionic channel is modeled by the conventional Hodgkin-Huxley (H-H mathematical formalism. In that model, conductance of the channel is defined in terms of activation and inactivation gates. Dynamics of the activation and inactivation gates is modeled by first-order differential equations dependent on the gate variable and the membrane potential. In the new approach proposed in this study, dynamic behavior of activation and inactivation gates is modeled by a firstorder differential equation dependent on internal energy and membrane potential by using the path probability method which is widely used in statistical physics. The new model doesn't require the time constant and steadystate values which are used explicitly in the H-H model. The numerical results show validity of the proposed method.

  16. Studies of inactivation mechanism of non-enveloped icosahedral virus by a visible ultrashort pulsed laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsen, Shaw-Wei D; Kingsley, David H; Poweleit, Christian; Achilefu, Samuel; Soroka, Douglas S; Wu, T C; Tsen, Kong-Thon

    2014-02-05

    Low-power ultrashort pulsed (USP) lasers operating at wavelengths of 425 nm and near infrared region have been shown to effectively inactivate viruses such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), M13 bacteriophage, and murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV). It was shown previously that non-enveloped, helical viruses such as M13 bacteriophage, were inactivated by a USP laser through an impulsive stimulated Raman scattering (ISRS) process. Recently, enveloped virus like MCMV has been shown to be inactivated by a USP laser via protein aggregation induced by an ISRS process. However, the inactivation mechanism for a clinically important class of viruses--non-enveloped, icosahedral viruses remains unknown. We have ruled out the following four possible inactivation mechanisms for non-enveloped, icosahedral viruses, namely, (1) inactivation due to ultraviolet C (UVC) photons produced by non-linear optical process of the intense, fundamental laser beam at 425 nm; (2) inactivation caused by thermal heating generated by the direct laser absorption/heating of the virion; (3) inactivation resulting from a one-photon absorption process via chromophores such as porphyrin molecules, or indicator dyes, potentially producing reactive oxygen or other species; (4) inactivation by the USP lasers in which the extremely intense laser pulse produces shock wave-like vibrations upon impact with the viral particle. We present data which support that the inactivation mechanism for non-enveloped, icosahedral viruses is the impulsive stimulated Raman scattering process. Real-time PCR experiments show that, within the amplicon size of 273 bp tested, there is no damage on the genome of MNV-1 caused by the USP laser irradiation. We conclude that our model non-enveloped virus, MNV-1, is inactivated by the ISRS process. These studies provide fundamental knowledge on photon-virus interactions on femtosecond time scales. From the analysis of the transmission electron microscope (TEM) images of viral particles

  17. Studies of inactivation mechanism of non-enveloped icosahedral virus by a visible ultrashort pulsed laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Low-power ultrashort pulsed (USP) lasers operating at wavelengths of 425 nm and near infrared region have been shown to effectively inactivate viruses such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), M13 bacteriophage, and murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV). It was shown previously that non-enveloped, helical viruses such as M13 bacteriophage, were inactivated by a USP laser through an impulsive stimulated Raman scattering (ISRS) process. Recently, enveloped virus like MCMV has been shown to be inactivated by a USP laser via protein aggregation induced by an ISRS process. However, the inactivation mechanism for a clinically important class of viruses – non-enveloped, icosahedral viruses remains unknown. Results and discussions We have ruled out the following four possible inactivation mechanisms for non-enveloped, icosahedral viruses, namely, (1) inactivation due to ultraviolet C (UVC) photons produced by non-linear optical process of the intense, fundamental laser beam at 425 nm; (2) inactivation caused by thermal heating generated by the direct laser absorption/heating of the virion; (3) inactivation resulting from a one-photon absorption process via chromophores such as porphyrin molecules, or indicator dyes, potentially producing reactive oxygen or other species; (4) inactivation by the USP lasers in which the extremely intense laser pulse produces shock wave-like vibrations upon impact with the viral particle. We present data which support that the inactivation mechanism for non-enveloped, icosahedral viruses is the impulsive stimulated Raman scattering process. Real-time PCR experiments show that, within the amplicon size of 273 bp tested, there is no damage on the genome of MNV-1 caused by the USP laser irradiation. Conclusion We conclude that our model non-enveloped virus, MNV-1, is inactivated by the ISRS process. These studies provide fundamental knowledge on photon-virus interactions on femtosecond time scales. From the analysis of the transmission

  18. Building a rapid response team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halvorsen, Lisa; Garolis, Salomeja; Wallace-Scroggs, Allyson; Stenstrom, Judy; Maunder, Richard

    2007-01-01

    The use of rapid response teams is a relatively new approach for decreasing or eliminating codes in acute care hospitals. Based on the principles of a code team for cardiac and/or respiratory arrest in non-critical care units, the rapid response teams have specially trained nursing, respiratory, and medical personnel to respond to calls from general care units to assess and manage decompensating or rapidly changing patients before their conditions escalate to a full code situation. This article describes the processes used to develop a rapid response team, clinical indicators for triggering a rapid response team call, topics addressed in an educational program for the rapid response team members, and methods for evaluating effectiveness of the rapid response team.

  19. Inactivation of medial prefrontal cortex or acute stress impairs odor span in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Don A Davies; Molder, Joel J.; Greba, Quentin; Howland, John G.

    2013-01-01

    The capacity of working memory is limited and is altered in brain disorders including schizophrenia. In rodent working memory tasks, capacity is typically not measured (at least not explicitly). One task that does measure working memory capacity is the odor span task (OST) developed by Dudchenko and colleagues. In separate experiments, the effects of medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) inactivation or acute stress on the OST were assessed in rats. Inactivation of the mPFC profoundly impaired odor...

  20. Immunogenicity of an inactivated oil-emulsion canine distemper vaccine in African wild dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirone, Francesco; Elia, Gabriella; Campolo, Marco; Friedrich, Klaus; Martella, Vito; Pratelli, Annamaria; Buonavoglia, Canio

    2004-04-01

    The immunogenicity of an inactivated oil-emulsion vaccine against canine distemper virus was evaluated in nine captive African wild dogs (Lycaon pictus). Antibody levels were determined by neutralization test in Vero cells. No significant local or systemic adverse reactions were observed in the animals. Virus neutralizing antibody levels >1:20 were detected, especially in animals that were vaccinated twice. The use of oil adjuvants is suggested as a good way to enhance the immune response to inactivated canine distemper vaccine.