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Sample records for rapidly fluctuating structures

  1. Chaotic Maps Dynamics, Fractals, and Rapid Fluctuations

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Goong

    2011-01-01

    This book consists of lecture notes for a semester-long introductory graduate course on dynamical systems and chaos taught by the authors at Texas A&M University and Zhongshan University, China. There are ten chapters in the main body of the book, covering an elementary theory of chaotic maps in finite-dimensional spaces. The topics include one-dimensional dynamical systems (interval maps), bifurcations, general topological, symbolic dynamical systems, fractals and a class of infinite-dimensional dynamical systems which are induced by interval maps, plus rapid fluctuations of chaotic maps as a

  2. RAPID FLUCTUATIONS IN THE LOWER SOLAR ATMOSPHERE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence, J. K.; Cadavid, A. C.; Christian, D. J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, California State University, Northridge, Northridge, CA 91330-8268 (United States); Jess, D. B.; Mathioudakis, M., E-mail: john.lawrence@csun.edu [Astrophysics Research Centre, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast, BT7 1NN (United Kingdom)

    2011-12-10

    The Rapid Oscillations in the Solar Atmosphere instrument reveals solar atmospheric fluctuations at high frequencies. Spectra of variations of the G-band intensity (I{sub G} ) and Ca II K-line intensity (I{sub K} ) show correlated fluctuations above white noise to frequencies beyond 300 mHz and 50 mHz, respectively. The noise-corrected G-band spectrum for f = 28-326 mHz shows a power law with exponent -1.21 {+-} 0.02, consistent with the presence of turbulent motions. G-band spectral power in the 25-100 mHz ('UHF') range is concentrated at the locations of magnetic bright points in the intergranular lanes and is highly intermittent in time. The intermittence of the UHF G-band fluctuations, shown by a positive kurtosis {kappa}, also suggests turbulence. Combining values of I{sub G} , I{sub K} , UHF power, and {kappa} reveals two distinct states of the solar atmosphere. State 1, including almost all the data, is characterized by low I{sub G} , I{sub K} , and UHF power and {kappa} Almost-Equal-To 6. State 2, including only a very small fraction of the data, is characterized by high I{sub G} , I{sub K} , and UHF power and {kappa} Almost-Equal-To 3. Superposed epoch analysis shows that the UHF power peaks simultaneously with spatio-temporal I{sub G} maxima in either state. For State 1, I{sub K} shows 3.5 minute chromospheric oscillations with maxima occurring 21 s after I{sub G} maxima implying a 150-210 km effective height difference. However, for State 2 the I{sub K} and I{sub G} maxima are simultaneous; in this highly magnetized environment sites of G-band and K-line emission may be spatially close together.

  3. Rapid Fluctuations in the Lower Solar Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, J. K.; Cadavid, A. C.; Christian, D. J.; Jess, D. B.; Mathioudakis, M.

    2011-12-01

    The Rapid Oscillations in the Solar Atmosphere instrument reveals solar atmospheric fluctuations at high frequencies. Spectra of variations of the G-band intensity (IG ) and Ca II K-line intensity (IK ) show correlated fluctuations above white noise to frequencies beyond 300 mHz and 50 mHz, respectively. The noise-corrected G-band spectrum for f = 28-326 mHz shows a power law with exponent -1.21 ± 0.02, consistent with the presence of turbulent motions. G-band spectral power in the 25-100 mHz ("UHF") range is concentrated at the locations of magnetic bright points in the intergranular lanes and is highly intermittent in time. The intermittence of the UHF G-band fluctuations, shown by a positive kurtosis κ, also suggests turbulence. Combining values of IG , IK , UHF power, and κ reveals two distinct states of the solar atmosphere. State 1, including almost all the data, is characterized by low IG , IK , and UHF power and κ ≈ 6. State 2, including only a very small fraction of the data, is characterized by high IG , IK , and UHF power and κ ≈ 3. Superposed epoch analysis shows that the UHF power peaks simultaneously with spatio-temporal IG maxima in either state. For State 1, IK shows 3.5 minute chromospheric oscillations with maxima occurring 21 s after IG maxima implying a 150-210 km effective height difference. However, for State 2 the IK and IG maxima are simultaneous; in this highly magnetized environment sites of G-band and K-line emission may be spatially close together.

  4. Rapidly fluctuating anosmia: A clinical sign for unilateral smell impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negoias, Simona; Friedrich, Hergen; Caversaccio, Marco D; Landis, Basile N

    2016-02-01

    Reports about fluctuating olfactory deficits are rare, as are reports of unilateral olfactory loss. We present a case of unilateral anosmia with contralateral normosmia, presenting as rapidly fluctuating anosmia. The olfactory fluctuation occurred in sync with the average nasal cycle duration. Examination after nasal decongestion, formal smell testing, and imaging revealed unilateral, left-sided anosmia of sinonasal cause, with right-sided normosmia. We hypothesize that the nasal cycle induced transient anosmia when blocking the normosmic side. Fluctuating olfactory deficits might hide a unilateral olfactory loss and require additional unilateral testing and thorough workup. © 2015 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  5. Fluctuations and structure of amphiphilic films; Fluctuations et structure de films d`amphiphiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gourier, CH

    1996-07-01

    This thesis is divided in three parts.The first part exposes in a theoretical point of view, how the fluctuations spectrum of an amphiphilic film is governed by its properties and its bidimensional characteristics.The measurements of fluctuations spectra of an interface are accessible with the measurement of intensity that interface diffuses out of the specular angle, we present in the second chapter the principles of the X rays diffusion by a real interface and see how the diffuse diffusion experiments allow to determine the fluctuations spectrum of an amphiphilic film. The second part is devoted to the different experimental techniques that have allowed to realize the study of fluctuation as well as the structural study.The third part is devoted to experimental results concerning the measurements of fluctuations spectra and to the study of the structure of amphiphilic films. We show that it is possible by using an intense source of X rays (ESRF: European Synchrotron Radiation Facility) to measure the water and amphiphilic films fluctuations spectra until molecular scales. The last chapter is devoted to the structural study and film fluctuations made of di-acetylenic molecules. (N.C.)

  6. Effects of rapid temperature fluctuations prior to breeding on reproductive efficiency in replacement gilts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recently, we determined that rapidly cooling pigs after acute heat stress (HS) resulted in a pathological condition, and because rapid temperature fluctuations are often associated with reduced reproductive success in sows it lends itself to the hypothesis that these conditions may be linked. Study ...

  7. Structure, stabilité et fluctuations

    CERN Document Server

    Glansdorff, P

    1971-01-01

    Théorie générale : lois de conservation et bilans ; le second principe de la thermodynamique et le bilan entropique ; thermodynamique linéaire des phénomènes irréversibles ; théorie de la stabilité de l'équilibre thermodynamique par la méthode Gibbs-Duhem ; théorie générale de la stabilité de l'équilibre thermodynamique ; conditions de stabilité thermodynamique et hydrodynamique des syst¿mes hors d'équilibre ; forme explicite des conditions de stablité des processus hors d'équilibre ; stabilité et fluctuations ; le critère général d'évolution.

  8. Multi-particle long-range rapidity correlations from fluctuation of the fireball longitudinal shape

    OpenAIRE

    Bzdak, Adam; Bozek, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    We calculate the genuine long-range multi-particle rapidity correlation functions, $C_{n}(y_1,...,y_n)$ for $n=3,4,5,6$, originating from fluctuations of the fireball longitudinal shape. In these correlation functions any contribution from the short-range two-particle correlations, and in general up to $(n-1)$-particle in $C_n$, is suppressed. The information about the fluctuating fireball shape in rapidity is encoded in the cumulants of coefficients of the orthogonal polynomial expansion of ...

  9. On parton number fluctuations at various stages of the rapidity evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, A.H. [Department of Physics, Columbia University, New York (United States); Munier, S., E-mail: Stephane.Munier@polytechnique.edu [Centre de physique théorique, École Polytechnique, CNRS, Palaiseau (France)

    2014-10-07

    Starting with the interpretation of parton evolution with rapidity as a branching–diffusion process, we describe the different kinds of fluctuations of the density of partons which affect the properties of QCD scattering amplitudes at moderately high energies. We then derive some of these properties as direct consequences of the stochastic picture. We get new results on the expression of the saturation scale of a large nucleus, and a modified geometric scaling valid at intermediate rapidities for dipole–dipole scattering.

  10. Towards uncovering the structure of power fluctuations of wind farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huiwen; Jin, Yaqing; Tobin, Nicolas; Chamorro, Leonardo P

    2017-12-01

    The structure of the turbulence-driven power fluctuations in a wind farm is fundamentally described from basic concepts. A derived tuning-free model, supported with experiments, reveals the underlying spectral content of the power fluctuations of a wind farm. It contains two power-law trends and oscillations in the relatively low- and high-frequency ranges. The former is mostly due to the turbulent interaction between the flow and the turbine properties, whereas the latter is due to the advection between turbine pairs. The spectral wind-farm scale power fluctuations Φ_{P} exhibit a power-law decay proportional to f^{-5/3-2} in the region corresponding to the turbulence inertial subrange and at relatively large scales, Φ_{P}∼f^{-2}. Due to the advection and turbulent diffusion of large-scale structures, a spectral oscillation exists with the product of a sinusoidal behavior and an exponential decay in the frequency domain.

  11. Towards uncovering the structure of power fluctuations of wind farms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huiwen; Jin, Yaqing; Tobin, Nicolas; Chamorro, Leonardo P.

    2017-12-01

    The structure of the turbulence-driven power fluctuations in a wind farm is fundamentally described from basic concepts. A derived tuning-free model, supported with experiments, reveals the underlying spectral content of the power fluctuations of a wind farm. It contains two power-law trends and oscillations in the relatively low- and high-frequency ranges. The former is mostly due to the turbulent interaction between the flow and the turbine properties, whereas the latter is due to the advection between turbine pairs. The spectral wind-farm scale power fluctuations ΦP exhibit a power-law decay proportional to f-5 /3 -2 in the region corresponding to the turbulence inertial subrange and at relatively large scales, ΦP˜f-2 . Due to the advection and turbulent diffusion of large-scale structures, a spectral oscillation exists with the product of a sinusoidal behavior and an exponential decay in the frequency domain.

  12. On parton number fluctuations at various stages of the rapidity evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.H. Mueller

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Starting with the interpretation of parton evolution with rapidity as a branching–diffusion process, we describe the different kinds of fluctuations of the density of partons which affect the properties of QCD scattering amplitudes at moderately high energies. We then derive some of these properties as direct consequences of the stochastic picture. We get new results on the expression of the saturation scale of a large nucleus, and a modified geometric scaling valid at intermediate rapidities for dipole–dipole scattering.

  13. Structural fluctuation governed dynamic diradical character in pentacene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hongfang; Chen, Mengzhen; Song, Xinyu; Bu, Yuxiang

    2015-06-07

    We unravel intriguing dynamical diradical behavior governed by structural fluctuation in pentacene using ab initio molecular dynamics simulation. In contrast to static equilibrium configuration of pentacene with a closed-shell ground state without diradical character, due to structural fluctuation, some of its dynamical snapshot configurations exhibit an open-shell broken-symmetry singlet ground state with diradical character, and such diradical character presents irregular pulsing behavior in time evolution. Not all structural changes can lead to diradical character, only those involving the shortening of cross-linking C-C bonds and variations of the C-C bonds in polyacetylene chains are the main contributors. This scenario about diradicalization is distinctly different from that in long acenes. The essence is that structural distortion cooperatively raises the HOMO and lowers the LUMO, efficiently reducing the HOMO-LUMO and singlet-triplet energy gaps, which facilitate the formation of a broken-symmetry open-shell singlet state. The irregular pulsing behavior originates from the mixing of normal vibrations in pentacene. This fascinating behavior suggests the potential application of pentacene as a suitable building block in the design of new electronic devices due to its magnetism-controllability through energy induction. This work provides new insight into inherent electronic property fluctuation in acenes.

  14. Atypical Miller Fisher Syndrome with Anisocoria and Rapidly Fluctuating Pupillary Diameter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garima Gupta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Miller Fisher syndrome is a variant of Guillain-Barre syndrome characterized by the classic triad of ophthalmoplegia, ataxia, and areflexia. Pupillary involvement is common in MFS and has been reported in 35–42% of MFS patients. Although case reports have discussed isolated ophthalmoplegia as a presentation of MFS, anisocoria and rapid fluctuation of pupillary diameter have not been reported in anti-GQ1b antibody positive individuals. Here we describe an individual who presented with diplopia and was found to have progressive internal and external ophthalmoplegia with frequent fluctuations in pupillary diameter and anisocoria. These exam findings are not commonly described even in atypical presentations of MFS. The onset of symptoms was preceded by an upper respiratory infection but no gastrointestinal symptoms. Imaging and CSF studies were unremarkable; however serum levels of immunoglobulin G anti-GQ1b antibody and anti-GAD antibody were elevated confirming the diagnosis of MFS. The patient was treated with IVIG and intravenous steroids with mild resolution of external ophthalmoplegia. He did not go on to develop more typical features of MFS such as ataxia or areflexia. This demonstrates that isolated external and internal ophthalmoparesis with rapidly fluctuating pupillary diameter and associated anisocoria can be the sole manifestation of atypical MFS.

  15. Perspective: Structural fluctuation of protein and Anfinsen's thermodynamic hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Fumio; Sugita, Masatake; Yoshida, Masasuke; Akasaka, Kazuyuki

    2018-01-14

    The thermodynamics hypothesis, casually referred to as "Anfinsen's dogma," is described theoretically in terms of a concept of the structural fluctuation of protein or the first moment (average structure) and the second moment (variance and covariance) of the structural distribution. The new theoretical concept views the unfolding and refolding processes of protein as a shift of the structural distribution induced by a thermodynamic perturbation, with the variance-covariance matrix varying. Based on the theoretical concept, a method to characterize the mechanism of folding (or unfolding) is proposed. The transition state, if any, between two stable states is interpreted as a gap in the distribution, which is created due to an extensive reorganization of hydrogen bonds among back-bone atoms of protein and with water molecules in the course of conformational change. Further perspective to applying the theory to the computer-aided drug design, and to the material science, is briefly discussed.

  16. Rapid fluctuations of the air and surface temperature in the city of Bucharest (Romania)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheval, Sorin; Dumitrescu, Alexandru; Hustiu, Mihaita-Cristinel

    2016-04-01

    Urban areas derive significant changes of the ambient temperature generating specific challenges for society and infrastructure. Extreme temperature events, heat and cold waves affect the human comfort, increase the health risk, and require specific building regulations and emergency preparedness, strongly related to the magnitude and frequency of the thermal hazards. Rapid changes of the temperature put a particular stress for the urban settlements, and the topic has been approached constantly in the scientific literature. Due to its geographical position in a plain area with a temperate climate and noticeable continental influence, the city of Bucharest (Romania) deals with high seasonal and daily temperature variations. However, rapid fluctuations also occur at sub-daily scale caused by cold or warm air advections or by very local effects (e.g. radiative heat exchange, local precipitation). For example, in the area of Bucharest, the cold fronts of the warm season may trigger temperature decreasing up to 10-15 centigrades / hour, while warm advections lead to increasing of 1-2 centigrades / hour. This study focuses on the hourly and sub-hourly temperature variations over the period November 2014 - February 2016, using air temperature data collected from urban sensors and meteorological stations of the national network, and land surface temperature data obtained from satellite remote sensing. The analysis returns different statistics, such as magnitude, intensity, frequency, simultaneous occurrence and areal coverage of the rapid temperature fluctuations. Furthermore, the generating factors for each case study are assessed, and the results are used to define some preliminary patterns and enhance the urban temperature forecast at fine scale. The study was funded by the Romanian Programme Partnership in Priority Domains, PN - II - PCCA - 2013 - 4 - 0509 - Reducing UHI effects to improve urban comfort and balance energy consumption in Bucharest (REDBHI).

  17. Stomatal control and leaf thermal and hydraulic capacitances under rapid environmental fluctuations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanislaus J Schymanski

    Full Text Available Leaves within a canopy may experience rapid and extreme fluctuations in ambient conditions. A shaded leaf, for example, may become exposed to an order of magnitude increase in solar radiation within a few seconds, due to sunflecks or canopy motions. Considering typical time scales for stomatal adjustments, (2 to 60 minutes, the gap between these two time scales raised the question whether leaves rely on their hydraulic and thermal capacitances for passive protection from hydraulic failure or over-heating until stomata have adjusted. We employed a physically based model to systematically study effects of short-term fluctuations in irradiance on leaf temperatures and transpiration rates. Considering typical amplitudes and time scales of such fluctuations, the importance of leaf heat and water capacities for avoiding damaging leaf temperatures and hydraulic failure were investigated. The results suggest that common leaf heat capacities are not sufficient to protect a non-transpiring leaf from over-heating during sunflecks of several minutes duration whereas transpirative cooling provides effective protection. A comparison of the simulated time scales for heat damage in the absence of evaporative cooling with observed stomatal response times suggested that stomata must be already open before arrival of a sunfleck to avoid over-heating to critical leaf temperatures. This is consistent with measured stomatal conductances in shaded leaves and has implications for water use efficiency of deep canopy leaves and vulnerability to heat damage during drought. Our results also suggest that typical leaf water contents could sustain several minutes of evaporative cooling during a sunfleck without increasing the xylem water supply and thus risking embolism. We thus submit that shaded leaves rely on hydraulic capacitance and evaporative cooling to avoid over-heating and hydraulic failure during exposure to typical sunflecks, whereas thermal capacitance provides

  18. Apomorphine: a rapid rescue agent for the management of motor fluctuations in advanced Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolls, Brad J; Stacy, Mark

    2006-01-01

    Parkinson disease is one of the most common neurodegenerative diseases in the United States, and the number of late stage patients is rising. In advance-stage disease, fluctuations in motor function, variability in response to dopaminergic therapy, and dyskinesias related to increasing doses of dopamine agonists and levodopa, present a variety of challenges to a managing physician. Traditional methods of treatment have concentrated on therapies to anticipate or prevent states of poor motor function. With the approval of apomorphine as a rapid-acting, subcutaneous injectable anti-Parkinson disease therapy, these off periods may now be treated with apomorphine as a "rescue" medication when they occur. This article reviews the pharmacology of apomorphine, the clinical data that support its use and suggest dosing and methods for initiating therapy in this challenging population of patients with Parkinson disease.

  19. Rapid fluctuation of the vaginal microbiota measured by Gram stain analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brotman, Rebecca M; Ravel, Jacques; Cone, Richard A; Zenilman, Jonathan M

    2010-08-01

    The aetiology of bacterial vaginosis (BV) remains unknown. To describe longitudinal changes in vaginal microbiota. Thirty-nine women (mean age 36.8 years; 22 (56.4%) African-American) self-collected vaginal specimens twice weekly for 16 weeks as part of a vaginal douching cessation study. In an analysis where each woman serves as her own control, conditional logistic regression was used to evaluate daily, time-varying factors associated with a woman's incident BV episode(s) as compared with her persistently BV-negative sample(s). BV was defined by a Nugent's Gram stain score >or=7. 46.2% of participants had BV in the first 4 weeks of observation. Rapid fluctuation of vaginal microbiota was observed in 226 transitions to BV or spontaneous remission. Duration of BV was often short: 51% of the episodes lasted for only one sample interval (3 days). Among women who had at least one BV episode, the median number of episodes per woman was 8.7 (SD 7.4, range 1-22). Lubricant use 1 day before specimen collection (adjusted OR (aOR)=11.75, 95% CI 1.96 to 70.27) and rectal sex 2 days before (aOR=4.48, 95% CI 2.79 to 7.17) were associated with BV onset. Rapid fluctuation of the vaginal microbiota was seen. Longitudinal studies with long intervals between sampling are likely to miss episodes of BV. Recent report of lubricant use and rectal sex were associated with incident BV.

  20. Giant fluctuations and structural effects in a flocking epithelium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giavazzi, Fabio; Malinverno, Chiara; Corallino, Salvatore; Ginelli, Francesco; Scita, Giorgio; Cerbino, Roberto

    2017-09-01

    Epithelial cells cultured in a monolayer are very motile in isolation but reach a near-jammed state when mitotic division increases their number above a critical threshold. We have recently shown that a monolayer can be reawakened by over-expression of a single protein, RAB5A, a master regulator of endocytosis. This reawakening of motility was explained in terms of a flocking transition that promotes the emergence of a large-scale collective migratory pattern. Here we focus on the impact of this reawakening on the structural properties of the monolayer. We find that the unjammed monolayer is characterised by a fluidisation at the single cell level, and by enhanced non-equilibrium large-scale number fluctuations at a larger length scale. Also, with the help of numerical simulations, we trace back the origin of these fluctuations to the self-propelled active nature of the constituents, and to the existence of a local alignment mechanism, leading to the spontaneous breaking of the orientational symmetry.

  1. Probing structural heterogeneities and conformational fluctuations of biopolymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laurence, T; Kong, X; Jaeger, M; Weiss, S

    2004-12-15

    We study protein and nucleic acid structure and dynamics using single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer measurements with alternating-laser excitation. Freely diffusing molecules are sorted into subpopulations based on stoichiometry, detecting donor and acceptor coincidence for periods over 100 {micro}s-1 ms. Faster (< 100 {micro}s) fluctuating distance distributions are studied within these subpopulations using time-resolved single photon counting measurements. We find that short double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) is more flexible than expected from persistence lengths measured on long dsDNA. We find that the electrostatic portion of the persistence length of single-stranded poly-dT varies as the ionic strength (I) to the -1/2 power (I{sup -1/2}). Lastly, we find that the unfolded protein Chymotrypsin Inhibitor 2 (CI2) is unstructured at high denaturant. However, in the presence of folded CI2 (at lower denaturant), unfolded CI2 is more compact and displays larger distance fluctuations, possibly due to unsuccessful attempts to cross the folding barrier.

  2. Kinetic Scale Structure of Low-frequency Waves and Fluctuations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    López, Rodrigo A.; Yoon, Peter H. [Institute for Physical Science and Technology, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Viñas, Adolfo F. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Heliophysics Science Division, Geospace Physics Laboratory, Mail Code 673, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Araneda, Jaime A., E-mail: rlopezh@umd.edu, E-mail: yoonp@umd.edu [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Físicas y Matemáticas, Universidad de Concepción, Concepción (Chile)

    2017-08-10

    The dissipation of solar wind turbulence at kinetic scales is believed to be important for the heating of the corona and for accelerating the wind. The linear Vlasov kinetic theory is a useful tool for identifying various wave modes, including kinetic Alfvén, fast magnetosonic/whistler, and ion-acoustic (or kinetic slow), and their possible roles in the dissipation. However, the kinetic mode structure in the vicinity of ion-cyclotron modes is not clearly understood. The present paper aims to further elucidate the structure of these low-frequency waves by introducing discrete particle effects through hybrid simulations and Klimontovich formalism of spontaneous emission theory. The theory and simulation of spontaneously emitted low-frequency fluctuations are employed to identify and distinguish the detailed mode structures associated with ion-Bernstein modes versus quasi-modes. The spontaneous emission theory and simulation also confirm the findings of the Vlasov theory in that the kinetic Alfvén waves can be defined over a wide range of frequencies, including the proton cyclotron frequency and its harmonics, especially for high-beta plasmas. This implies that these low-frequency modes may play predominant roles even in the fully kinetic description of kinetic scale turbulence and dissipation despite the fact that cyclotron harmonic and Bernstein modes may also play important roles in wave–particle interactions.

  3. Survival of rapidly fluctuating natural low winter temperatures by High Arctic soil invertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Convey, Peter; Abbandonato, Holly; Bergan, Frode; Beumer, Larissa Teresa; Biersma, Elisabeth Machteld; Bråthen, Vegard Sandøy; D'Imperio, Ludovica; Jensen, Christina Kjellerup; Nilsen, Solveig; Paquin, Karolina; Stenkewitz, Ute; Svoen, Mildrid Elvik; Winkler, Judith; Müller, Eike; Coulson, Stephen James

    2015-12-01

    both direct exposure to at least -24 °C and the rapid and large temperature fluctuations. These results suggest that the studied polar soil invertebrate community may be robust to at least one important predicted consequence of projected climate change. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Fluctuations of multiplicities in rapidity windows in sulphur-sulphur collisions at 200 A GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Bächler, J; Runge, K; Schmoetten, E; Bartke, Jerzy; Gladysz-Dziadus, E; Kowalski, M; Stefanski, P; Bialkowska, H; Böck, R K; Brockmann, R; Sandoval, A; Buncic, P; Ferenc, D; Kadija, K; Ljubicic, A; Vranic, D; Chase, S I; Harris, J W; Odyniec, Grazyna Janina; Pugh, Howel G; Rai, G; Teitelbaum, L; Tonse, S R; Derado, I; Eckardt, V; Gebauer, H J; Rauch, W; Schmitz, N; Seyboth, P; Seyerlein, J; Vesztergombi, G; Eschke, J; Heck, W; Kabana, S; Kühmichel, A; Lahanas, L; Lee, Y; Le Vine, M J; Margetis, S; Renfordt, R E; Röhrich, D; Rothard, H; Schmidt, E; Schneider, I; Stock, Reinhard; Ströbele, H; Wenig, S; Fleischmann, B; Fuchs, M; Gazdzicki, M; Kosiec, J; Skrzypczak, E; Keidel, R; Piper, A; Pühlhofer, F; Nappi, E; Posa, F; Paic, G; Panagiotou, A D; Petridis, A; Vasileiadis, G; Pfennig, J

    1992-01-01

    Multiplicity distributions and their second moments fornegatively charged particles produced in32S-S central and minimum bias interactions at 200A GeV are studied in various rapidity intervals. Fritiof and Venus models mostly describe the dependence of second moments on rapidity intervals in minimum bias interactions, but not in central collisions. For central collisions the behaviour of second moments might indicate enhanced multiplicity fluctuations.

  5. Characteristics of Turbulent Airflow Deduced from Rapid Surface Thermal Fluctuations: An Infrared Surface Anemometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aminzadeh, Milad; Breitenstein, Daniel; Or, Dani

    2017-12-01

    The intermittent nature of turbulent airflow interacting with the surface is readily observable in fluctuations of the surface temperature resulting from the thermal imprints of eddies sweeping the surface. Rapid infrared thermography has recently been used to quantify characteristics of the near-surface turbulent airflow interacting with the evaporating surfaces. We aim to extend this technique by using single-point rapid infrared measurements to quantify properties of a turbulent flow, including surface exchange processes, with a view towards the development of an infrared surface anemometer. The parameters for the surface-eddy renewal (α and β ) are inferred from infrared measurements of a single-point on the surface of a heat plate placed in a wind tunnel with prescribed wind speeds and constant mean temperatures of the surface. Thermally-deduced parameters are in agreement with values obtained from standard three-dimensional ultrasonic anemometer measurements close to the plate surface (e.g., α = 3 and β = 1/26 (ms)^{-1} for the infrared, and α = 3 and β = 1/19 (ms)^{-1} for the sonic-anemometer measurements). The infrared-based turbulence parameters provide new insights into the role of surface temperature and buoyancy on the inherent characteristics of interacting eddies. The link between the eddy-spectrum shape parameter α and the infrared window size representing the infrared field of view is investigated. The results resemble the effect of the sampling height above the ground in sonic anemometer measurements, which enables the detection of larger eddies with higher values of α . The physical basis and tests of the proposed method support the potential for remote quantification of the near-surface momentum field, as well as scalar-flux measurements in the immediate vicinity of the surface.

  6. The Warburg effect as an adaptation of cancer cells to rapid fluctuations in energy demand.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamir Epstein

    Full Text Available To maintain optimal fitness, a cell must balance the risk of inadequate energy reserve for response to a potentially fatal perturbation against the long-term cost of maintaining high concentrations of ATP to meet occasional spikes in demand. Here we apply a game theoretic approach to address the dynamics of energy production and expenditure in eukaryotic cells. Conventionally, glucose metabolism is viewed as a function of oxygen concentrations in which the more efficient oxidation of glucose to CO2 and H2O produces all or nearly all ATP except under hypoxic conditions when less efficient (2 ATP/ glucose vs. about 36ATP/glucose anaerobic metabolism of glucose to lactic acid provides an emergency backup. We propose an alternative in which energy production is governed by the complex temporal and spatial dynamics of intracellular ATP demand. In the short term, a cell must provide energy for constant baseline needs but also maintain capacity to rapidly respond to fluxes in demand particularly due to external perturbations on the cell membrane. Similarly, longer-term dynamics require a trade-off between the cost of maintaining high metabolic capacity to meet uncommon spikes in demand versus the risk of unsuccessfully responding to threats or opportunities. Here we develop a model and computationally explore the cell's optimal mix of glycolytic and oxidative capacity. We find the Warburg effect, high glycolytic metabolism even under normoxic conditions, is represents a metabolic strategy that allow cancer cells to optimally meet energy demands posed by stochastic or fluctuating tumor environments.

  7. Structural features that predict real-value fluctuations of globular proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamroz, Michal; Kolinski, Andrzej; Kihara, Daisuke

    2012-05-01

    It is crucial to consider dynamics for understanding the biological function of proteins. We used a large number of molecular dynamics (MD) trajectories of nonhomologous proteins as references and examined static structural features of proteins that are most relevant to fluctuations. We examined correlation of individual structural features with fluctuations and further investigated effective combinations of features for predicting the real value of residue fluctuations using the support vector regression (SVR). It was found that some structural features have higher correlation than crystallographic B-factors with fluctuations observed in MD trajectories. Moreover, SVR that uses combinations of static structural features showed accurate prediction of fluctuations with an average Pearson's correlation coefficient of 0.669 and a root mean square error of 1.04 Å. This correlation coefficient is higher than the one observed in predictions by the Gaussian network model (GNM). An advantage of the developed method over the GNMs is that the former predicts the real value of fluctuation. The results help improve our understanding of relationships between protein structure and fluctuation. Furthermore, the developed method provides a convienient practial way to predict fluctuations of proteins using easily computed static structural features of proteins. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Rapid change of multiplicity fluctuations in system size dependence at SPS energies arXiv

    CERN Document Server

    Recent preliminary results on multiplicity fluctuations in p+p, Be+Be and Ar+Sc collisions from the NA61/SHINE collaboration are presented. The scaled variance of charged hadron multiplicity changes little when going from p+p to Be+Be collisions and drops dramatically from Be+Be to Ar+Sc interactions. The centrality selection procedure and the influence of volume fluctuations are discussed. Comparisons with the EPOS event generator are shown.

  9. Quantized fluctuational electrodynamics for three-dimensional plasmonic structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Partanen, Mikko; Häyrynen, Teppo; Tulkki, Jukka

    2017-01-01

    We recently introduced a quantized fluctuational electrodynamics (QFED) formalism that provides a physically insightful definition of an effective position-dependent photon-number operator and the associated ladder operators. However, this far the formalism has been applicable only for the normal...

  10. Influence of neutrons on signal fluctuations for APD structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kılıç, Adnan, E-mail: adnank@uludag.edu.tr [Uludağ University, Department of Physics, 16059 Bursa (Turkey); Koçak, Fatma; Piliçer, Ercan; Tapan, İlhan [Uludağ University, Department of Physics, 16059 Bursa (Turkey)

    2013-08-01

    Silicon Avalanche Photo-diodes (APDs) working in proportional were chosen as a readout device for the PbWO{sub 4} crystals in the barrel of the CMS Electromagnetic Calorimeter (ECAL). During 10 years of operation, the CMS ECAL will be exposed to 2×10{sup 13}neutrons/cm{sup 2} under a severe radiation environment. In this study, we studied on the effect of photo-statistical fluctuations from those of neutrons by using Geant4 toolkit.

  11. Model for calcium-mediated reduction of structural fluctuations in epidermis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Yasuaki; Kitahata, Hiroyuki; Nagayama, Masaharu

    2015-08-01

    We propose a reaction-advection-diffusion model of epidermis consisting of two variables, the degree of differentiation and the calcium ion concentration, where calcium ions enhance differentiation. By analytically and numerically investigating this system, we show that a calcium localization layer formed beneath the stratum corneum helps reduce spatiotemporal fluctuations of the structure of the stratum corneum. In particular, spatially or temporally small-scale fluctuations in the lower structure are suppressed and do not affect the upper structure, due to acceleration of differentiation by calcium ions. Analytical expressions for the reduction rate of fluctuation amplitudes are shown.

  12. Scale-invariant structure of energy fluctuations in real earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ping; Chang, Zhe; Wang, Huanyu; Lu, Hong

    2017-11-01

    Earthquakes are obviously complex phenomena associated with complicated spatiotemporal correlations, and they are generally characterized by two power laws: the Gutenberg-Richter (GR) and the Omori-Utsu laws. However, an important challenge has been to explain two apparently contrasting features: the GR and Omori-Utsu laws are scale-invariant and unaffected by energy or time scales, whereas earthquakes occasionally exhibit a characteristic energy or time scale, such as with asperity events. In this paper, three high-quality datasets on earthquakes were used to calculate the earthquake energy fluctuations at various spatiotemporal scales, and the results reveal the correlations between seismic events regardless of their critical or characteristic features. The probability density functions (PDFs) of the fluctuations exhibit evidence of another scaling that behaves as a q-Gaussian rather than random process. The scaling behaviors are observed for scales spanning three orders of magnitude. Considering the spatial heterogeneities in a real earthquake fault, we propose an inhomogeneous Olami-Feder-Christensen (OFC) model to describe the statistical properties of real earthquakes. The numerical simulations show that the inhomogeneous OFC model shares the same statistical properties with real earthquakes.

  13. Influence of the quark-gluon string fusion mechanism on long-range rapidity correlations and fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andronov, E. V.

    2015-10-01

    Multiparticle production in soft hadronic interactions can be successfully described in the framework of the color-string approach, which will probably be derived from the first principles of chromodynamics in the future. A fundamental property of this approach is the translation invariance of the rapidity spectrum of charged particles produced by one source at high energies. This symmetry results in the appearance of long-range rapidity correlations through event-by-event fluctuations of the number and/or type of strings. We describe the behavior of correlations between multiplicities ( n-n) and between the transverse momentum and multiplicities ( pt-n) of charged particles with the mechanism of forming sources of two types taken into account. We obtain an exact analytic expression for the ( n-n)-correlation coefficient. Because no exact solution can be obtained for the ( pt-n)-correlation coefficient, we propose an effective approximation that significantly simplifies numerical computations. We verify all these results by direct simulation using the Monte Carlo method. We also investigate how the fusion mechanism influences the behavior of strongly intensive variables characterizing the multiplicity fluctuations in two rapidity windows.

  14. Rapid prototyping of composite aircraft structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, George; Rais-Rohani, Masoud; Hall, Kenneth; Holifield, Walt; Sullivan, Rani; Brown, Scott

    The faculty, staff and students of the Raspet Flight Research Laboratory (RFRL) have developed a rapid prototyping capability in a series of research aircraft and unmanned aircraft development projects. There has been a steady change in the technologies used to accomplish these tasks at the RFRL. The most recent development has been the utilization of computer graphics and a 5-axis gantry robot router to accelerate the design, moldmaking and parts trimming tasks. The composite structure fabrication processes at the RFRL have evolved from wet-lay-up to autoclave curve. Currently, the feasibility of the stitched composite material preform and resin transfer molding process is being explored.

  15. Coherent structures in presence of dust charge fluctuations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-11-27

    Nov 27, 2015 ... This paper shows the formation of nonlinear coherent structures in a dusty plasma in presence of dust charge fluctuations. Using the typical plasma parameters the potential of the nonlinear coherent structures is derived. Author Affiliations. M Kakati1 K S Goswami1. Centre of Plasma Physics, Dispur, ...

  16. Survival of rapidly fluctuating natural low winter temperatures by High Arctic soil invertebrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Convey, Peter; Abbandonato, Holly; Bergan, Frode

    2015-01-01

    The extreme polar environment creates challenges for its resident invertebrate communities and the stress tolerance of some of these animals has been examined over many years. However, although it is well appreciated that standard air temperature records often fail to describe accurately conditio...... polar soil invertebrate community may be robust to at least one important predicted consequence of projected climate change....... may insulate terrestrial habitats from extreme air temperature fluctuations. Further, climate projections suggest large changes in precipitation will occur in the polar regions, with the greatest changes expected during the winter period and, hence, implications for the insulation of overwintering...... microhabitats. To assess survival of natural High Arctic soil invertebrate communities contained in soil and vegetation cores to natural winter temperature variations, the overwintering temperatures they experienced were manipulated by deploying cores in locations with varying snow accumulation: No Snow...

  17. Increased heterozygosity at the Mdh-B locus in fish inhabiting a rapidly fluctuating thermal environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmerman, E.G.; Richmond, M.C.

    1981-05-01

    Populations of a common forage fish, red shiner Notropis lutrensis, were sampled from four localities on the Brazos River, Texas, affected by cold-water discharge from a hydroelectric dam and from unaltered sites in the same region. Polymorphism at the Mdh-B locus, encoding supernatant malate dehydrogenase, indicates that populations within 57 km of the dam are distinctive from other regional populations and possess a unique Mdh-B allele, have significantly higher levels of heterozygosity at the Mdh-B locus, represent a homogeneous set that have significantly different Mdh-B zygotic frequencies from other regional populations, and have significantly different Mdh-B zygotic proportions than would be expected under a Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. Increased levels of heterozygosity in fish within 57 km of the dam were correlated with discharge-associated fluctuations in water temperature at sampling stations.

  18. Rapid fluctuations in extracellular brain glucose levels induced by natural arousing stimuli and intravenous cocaine: fueling the brain during neural activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenoir, Magalie

    2012-01-01

    Glucose, a primary energetic substrate for neural activity, is continuously influenced by two opposing forces that tend to either decrease its extracellular levels due to enhanced utilization in neural cells or increase its levels due to entry from peripheral circulation via enhanced cerebral blood flow. How this balance is maintained under physiological conditions and changed during neural activation remains unclear. To clarify this issue, enzyme-based glucose sensors coupled with high-speed amperometry were used in freely moving rats to evaluate fluctuations in extracellular glucose levels induced by brief audio stimulus, tail pinch (TP), social interaction with another rat (SI), and intravenous cocaine (1 mg/kg). Measurements were performed in nucleus accumbens (NAcc) and substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNr), which drastically differ in neuronal activity. In NAcc, where most cells are powerfully excited after salient stimulation, glucose levels rapidly (latency 2–6 s) increased (30–70 μM or 6–14% over baseline) by all stimuli; the increase differed in magnitude and duration for each stimulus. In SNr, where most cells are transiently inhibited by salient stimuli, TP, SI, and cocaine induced a biphasic glucose response, with the initial decrease (−20–40 μM or 5–10% below baseline) followed by a reboundlike increase. The critical role of neuronal activity in mediating the initial glucose response was confirmed by monitoring glucose currents after local microinjections of glutamate (GLU) or procaine (PRO). While intra-NAcc injection of GLU transiently increased glucose levels in this structure, intra-SNr PRO injection resulted in rapid, transient decreases in SNr glucose. Therefore, extracellular glucose levels in the brain change very rapidly after physiological and pharmacological stimulation, the response is structure specific, and the pattern of neuronal activity appears to be a critical factor determining direction and magnitude of physiological

  19. Rapid fluctuations in extracellular brain glucose levels induced by natural arousing stimuli and intravenous cocaine: fueling the brain during neural activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyatkin, Eugene A; Lenoir, Magalie

    2012-09-01

    Glucose, a primary energetic substrate for neural activity, is continuously influenced by two opposing forces that tend to either decrease its extracellular levels due to enhanced utilization in neural cells or increase its levels due to entry from peripheral circulation via enhanced cerebral blood flow. How this balance is maintained under physiological conditions and changed during neural activation remains unclear. To clarify this issue, enzyme-based glucose sensors coupled with high-speed amperometry were used in freely moving rats to evaluate fluctuations in extracellular glucose levels induced by brief audio stimulus, tail pinch (TP), social interaction with another rat (SI), and intravenous cocaine (1 mg/kg). Measurements were performed in nucleus accumbens (NAcc) and substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNr), which drastically differ in neuronal activity. In NAcc, where most cells are powerfully excited after salient stimulation, glucose levels rapidly (latency 2-6 s) increased (30-70 μM or 6-14% over baseline) by all stimuli; the increase differed in magnitude and duration for each stimulus. In SNr, where most cells are transiently inhibited by salient stimuli, TP, SI, and cocaine induced a biphasic glucose response, with the initial decrease (-20-40 μM or 5-10% below baseline) followed by a reboundlike increase. The critical role of neuronal activity in mediating the initial glucose response was confirmed by monitoring glucose currents after local microinjections of glutamate (GLU) or procaine (PRO). While intra-NAcc injection of GLU transiently increased glucose levels in this structure, intra-SNr PRO injection resulted in rapid, transient decreases in SNr glucose. Therefore, extracellular glucose levels in the brain change very rapidly after physiological and pharmacological stimulation, the response is structure specific, and the pattern of neuronal activity appears to be a critical factor determining direction and magnitude of physiological

  20. Structural Origins of Conductance Fluctuations in Gold–Thiolate Molecular Transport Junctions

    KAUST Repository

    French, William R.

    2013-03-21

    We report detailed atomistic simulations combined with high-fidelity conductance calculations to probe the structural origins of conductance fluctuations in thermally evolving Au-benzene-1,4-dithiolate-Au junctions. We compare the behavior of structurally ideal junctions (where the electrodes are modeled as flat surfaces) to structurally realistic, experimentally representative junctions resulting from break-junction simulations. The enhanced mobility of metal atoms in structurally realistic junctions results in significant changes to the magnitude and origin of the conductance fluctuations. Fluctuations are larger by a factor of 2-3 in realistic junctions compared to ideal junctions. Moreover, in junctions with highly deformed electrodes, the conductance fluctuations arise primarily from changes in the Au geometry, in contrast to results for junctions with nondeformed electrodes, where the conductance fluctuations are dominated by changes in the molecule geometry. These results provide important guidance to experimentalists developing strategies to control molecular conductance, and also to theoreticians invoking simplified structural models of junctions to predict their behavior. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  1. Time scale defined by the fractal structure of the price fluctuations in foreign exchange markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumagai, Yoshiaki

    2010-04-01

    In this contribution, a new time scale named C-fluctuation time is defined by price fluctuations observed at a given resolution. The intraday fractal structures and the relations of the three time scales: real time (physical time), tick time and C-fluctuation time, in foreign exchange markets are analyzed. The data set used is trading prices of foreign exchange rates; US dollar (USD)/Japanese yen (JPY), USD/Euro (EUR), and EUR/JPY. The accuracy of the data is one minute and data within a minute are recorded in order of transaction. The series of instantaneous velocity of C-fluctuation time flowing are exponentially distributed for small C when they are measured by real time and for tiny C when they are measured by tick time. When the market is volatile, for larger C, the series of instantaneous velocity are exponentially distributed.

  2. Population fluctuations and community structure of small mammals ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Small mammals were live trapped monthly over a three year period in a subtropical grassland in Swaziland. Seven species of small mammals were recorded from the study grid. There were significant seasonal and inter annual differences in rodent numbers, breeding intensity and community structure. Mastomys natalensis ...

  3. Structure fluctuation in Gd- and Mg-substituted BaTiO3 with cubic structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Shoichi; Zhang, Zhi-Gang; Moriyoshi, Chikako; Kuroiwa, Yoshihiro; Honda, Atsushi; Inoue, Noriyuki; Higai, Shin'ichi; Ando, Akira

    2017-10-01

    Gd- and Mg-substituted barium titanate crystals (Ba1- x Gd x )(Ti1- x /2Mg x /2)O3 with the Gd composition range of x > 0.1 show no ferroelectric phase transition. To discuss atomic thermal fluctuations in such unusual barium titanate crystals with cubic symmetry, accurate crystal structure analyses were performed by the maximum entropy method (MEM)/Rietveld method with the split-atom model and anharmonic temperature factor model using high-energy synchrotron radiation X-ray diffraction data. The off-centered positions of Gd ions at the Ba site in the probability density function were clearly observed at a low temperature but smeared in the high-temperature region by the over-barrier motion of Gd ions.

  4. BREATHING FIRE: HOW STELLAR FEEDBACK DRIVES RADIAL MIGRATION, RAPID SIZE FLUCTUATIONS, AND POPULATION GRADIENTS IN LOW-MASS GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Badry, Kareem; Geha, Marla [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, New Haven, CT (United States); Wetzel, Andrew; Hopkins, Philip F. [TAPIR, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA USA (United States); Kereš, Dusan; Chan, T. K. [Department of Physics, Center for Astrophysics and Space Sciences, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla (United States); Faucher-Giguère, Claude-André, E-mail: kareem.el-badry@yale.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy and CIERA, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL (United States)

    2016-04-01

    We examine the effects of stellar feedback and bursty star formation on low-mass galaxies (M{sub star} = 2 × 10{sup 6} − 5 × 10{sup 10} M{sub ⊙}) using the Feedback in Realistic Environments (FIRE) simulations. While previous studies emphasized the impact of feedback on dark matter profiles, we investigate the impact on the stellar component: kinematics, radial migration, size evolution, and population gradients. Feedback-driven outflows/inflows drive significant radial stellar migration over both short and long timescales via two processes: (1) outflowing/infalling gas can remain star-forming, producing young stars that migrate ∼1 kpc within their first 100 Myr, and (2) gas outflows/inflows drive strong fluctuations in the global potential, transferring energy to all stars. These processes produce several dramatic effects. First, galaxies’ effective radii can fluctuate by factors of >2 over ∼200 Myr, and these rapid size fluctuations can account for much of the observed scatter in the radius at fixed M{sub star}. Second, the cumulative effects of many outflow/infall episodes steadily heat stellar orbits, causing old stars to migrate outward most strongly. This age-dependent radial migration mixes—and even inverts—intrinsic age and metallicity gradients. Thus, the galactic-archaeology approach of calculating radial star formation histories from stellar populations at z = 0 can be severely biased. These effects are strongest at M{sub star} ≈ 10{sup 7–9.6} M{sub ⊙}, the same regime where feedback most efficiently cores galaxies. Thus, detailed measurements of stellar kinematics in low-mass galaxies can strongly constrain feedback models and test baryonic solutions to small-scale problems in ΛCDM.

  5. Equilibrium structure and fluctuations of suspensions of colloidal dumbbells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heptner, Nils; Dzubiella, Joachim

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the structure and equilibrium linear-response dynamics of suspensions of hard colloidal dumbbells using Brownian dynamics computer simulations. The focus lies on the dense fluid and plastic crystal states of the colloids with investigated aspect (elongation-to-diameter) ratios varying from the hard sphere limit up to 0.39, which is roughly the stability limit of the plastic crystal phase. We find expected structural changes with larger elongation with respect to the hard sphere reference case and very localised orientational correlations, typically just involving next-neighbour couplings. These relatively weak correlations are also reflected in only minor effects on the translational and rotational diffusion coefficients for most of the investigated elongations. However, the linear response shear viscosity exhibits a dramatic increase at high packing fractions (φ ≳ 0.5) beyond a critical anisotropy factor of about L* ≃ 0.15 which is surprising in view of the relatively weak changes found before on the level of colloidal self-dynamics. We suspect that even for the small investigated anisotropies, newly occurring, collective rotational-translational couplings must be made responsible for the slow time scales appearing in the plastic crystal.

  6. Stochastic and information-thermodynamic structures of population dynamics in a fluctuating environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Tetsuya J.; Sughiyama, Yuki

    2017-07-01

    Adaptation in a fluctuating environment is a process of fueling environmental information to gain fitness. Living systems have gradually developed strategies for adaptation from random and passive diversification of the phenotype to more proactive decision making, in which environmental information is sensed and exploited more actively and effectively. Understanding the fundamental relation between fitness and information is therefore crucial to clarify the limits and universal properties of adaptation. In this work, we elucidate the underlying stochastic and information-thermodynamic structure in this process, by deriving causal fluctuation relations (FRs) of fitness and information. Combined with a duality between phenotypic and environmental dynamics, the FRs reveal the limit of fitness gain, the relation of time reversibility with the achievability of the limit, and the possibility and condition for gaining excess fitness due to environmental fluctuation. The loss of fitness due to causal constraints and the limited capacity of real organisms is shown to be the difference between time-forward and time-backward path probabilities of phenotypic and environmental dynamics. Furthermore, the FRs generalize the concept of the evolutionary stable state (ESS) for fluctuating environment by giving the probability that the optimal strategy on average can be invaded by a suboptimal one owing to rare environmental fluctuation. These results clarify the information-thermodynamic structures in adaptation and evolution.

  7. Deformation analysis and prediction of bank protection structure with river level fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Rui; Xing, Yixuan

    2017-04-01

    Bank structure is an important barrier to maintain the safety of the embankment. The deformation of bank protection structure is not only affected by soil pressure caused by the excavation of the riverway, but also by the water pressure caused river water level fluctuations. Thus, it is necessary to establish a coupled soil-water model to analyze the deformation of bank structure. Based on Druck-Prager failure criteria and groundwater seepage theory, a numerical model of bank protection structure with consideration of the pore water pressure of soil mass is established. According to the measured river level data with seasonal fluctuating, numerical analysis of the deformation of bank protection structure is implemented. The simulation results show that the river water level fluctuation has clear influence on the maximum lateral displacement of the pile. Meanwhile, the distribution of plastic zone is related to the depth of groundwater level. Finally, according to the river water level data of the recent ten years, we analyze the deformation of the bank structure under extreme river level. The result shows that, compared with the scenario of extreme high river level, the horizontal displacement of bank protection structure is larger (up to 65mm) under extreme low river level, which is a potential risk to the embankment. Reference Schweiger H F. On the use of drucker-prager failure criteria for earth pressure problems[J]. Computers and Geotechnics, 1994, 16(3): 223-246. DING Yong-chun,CHENG Ze-kun. Numerical study on performance of waterfront excavation[J]. Chinese Journal of Geotechnical Engineering,2013,35(2):515-521. Wu L M, Wang Z Q. Three gorges reservoir water level fluctuation influents on the stability of the slope[J]. Advanced Materials Research. Trans Tech Publications, 2013, 739: 283-286.

  8. Direct evidence of atomic-scale structural fluctuations in catalyst nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Pin Ann; Gomez-Ballesteros, Jose L; Burgos, Juan C; Balbuena, Perla B; Natarajan, Bharath; Sharma, Renu

    2017-05-01

    Rational catalyst design requires an atomic scale mechanistic understanding of the chemical pathways involved in the catalytic process. A heterogeneous catalyst typically works by adsorbing reactants onto its surface, where the energies for specific bonds to dissociate and/or combine with other species (to form desired intermediate or final products) are lower. Here, using the catalytic growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) as a prototype reaction, we show that the chemical pathway may in-fact involve the entire catalyst particle, and can proceed via the fluctuations in the formation and decomposition of metastable phases in the particle interior. We record in situ and at atomic resolution, the dynamic phase transformations occurring in a Cobalt catalyst nanoparticle during SWCNT growth, using a state-of-the-art environmental transmission electron microscope (ETEM). The fluctuations in catalyst carbon content are quantified by the automated, atomic-scale structural analysis of the time-resolved ETEM images and correlated with the SWCNT growth rate. We find the fluctuations in the carbon concentration in the catalyst nanoparticle and the fluctuations in nanotube growth rates to be of complementary character. These findings are successfully explained by reactive molecular dynamics (RMD) simulations that track the spatial and temporal evolution of the distribution of carbon atoms within and on the surface of the catalyst particle. We anticipate that our approach combining real-time, atomic-resolution image analysis and molecular dynamics simulations will facilitate catalyst design, improving reaction efficiencies and selectivity towards the growth of desired structure.

  9. Structural and dipolar fluctuations in liquid water: a Car–Parrinello molecular dynamics study

    OpenAIRE

    Skarmoutsos, Ioannis; Masia, Marco; Guàrdia Manuel, Elvira

    2016-01-01

    A Car–Parrinello molecular dynamics simulation was performed to investigate the local tetrahedral order, molecular dipole fluctuations and their interrelation with hydrogen bonding in liquid water. Water molecules were classified in three types, exhibiting low, intermediate and high tetrahedral order. Transitions from low to high tetrahedrally ordered structures take place only through transitions to the intermediate state. The molecular dipole moments depend strongly on the tetrahedral order...

  10. Identifying large scale structures at 1 AU using fluctuations and wavelets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niembro, T.; Lara, A.

    2016-12-01

    The solar wind (SW) is inhomogeneous and it is dominated for two types of flows: one quasi-stationary and one related to large scale transients (such as coronal mass ejections and co-rotating interaction regions). The SW inhomogeneities can be study as fluctuations characterized by a wide range of length and time scales. We are interested in the study of the characteristic fluctuations caused by large scale transient events. To do so, we define the vector space F with the normalized moving monthly/annual deviations as the orthogonal basis. Then, we compute the norm in this space of the solar wind parameters (velocity, magnetic field, density and temperature) fluctuations using WIND data from August 1992 to August 2015. This norm gives important information about the presence of a large structure disturbance in the solar wind and by applying a wavelet transform to this norm, we are able to determine, without subjectivity, the duration of the compression regions of these large transient structures and, even more, to identify if the structure corresponds to a single or complex (or merged) event. With this method we have automatically detected most of the events identified and published by other authors.

  11. Evolutions of fluctuation modes and inner structures of global stock markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yan; Wang, Lei; Liu, Maoxin; Chen, Xiaosong

    2016-09-01

    The paper uses empirical data, including 42 globally main stock indices in the period 1996-2014, to systematically study the evolution of fluctuation modes and inner structures of global stock markets. The data are large in scale considering both time and space. A covariance matrix-based principle fluctuation mode analysis (PFMA) is used to explore the properties of the global stock markets. It has been ignored by previous studies that covariance matrix is more suitable than the correlation matrix to be the basis of PFMA. It is found that the principle fluctuation modes of global stock markets are in the same directions, and global stock markets are divided into three clusters, which are found to be closely related to the countries’ locations with exceptions of China, Russia and Czech Republic. A time-stable correlation network constructing method is proposed to solve the problem of high-level statistical uncertainty when the estimated periods are very short, and the complex dynamic network (CDN) is constructed to investigate the evolution of inner structures. The results show when the clusters emerge and how long the clusters exist. When the 2008 financial crisis broke out, the indices form one cluster. After these crises, only the European cluster still exists. These findings complement the previous studies, and can help investors and regulators to understand the global stock markets.

  12. Imaging the real space structure of the spin fluctuations in an iron-based superconductor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Shun; Aluru, Ramakrishna; Grothe, Stephanie; Kreisel, A; Singh, Udai Raj; Andersen, Brian M; Hardy, W N; Liang, Ruixing; Bonn, D A; Burke, S A; Wahl, Peter

    2017-06-29

    Spin fluctuations are a leading candidate for the pairing mechanism in high temperature superconductors, supported by the common appearance of a distinct resonance in the spin susceptibility across the cuprates, iron-based superconductors and many heavy fermion materials. The information we have about the spin resonance comes almost exclusively from neutron scattering. Here we demonstrate that by using low-temperature scanning tunnelling microscopy and spectroscopy we can characterize the spin resonance in real space. We show that inelastic tunnelling leads to the characteristic dip-hump feature seen in tunnelling spectra in high temperature superconductors and that this feature arises from excitations of the spin fluctuations. Spatial mapping of this feature near defects allows us to probe non-local properties of the spin susceptibility and to image its real space structure.

  13. Resting-state functional connectivity emerges from structurally and dynamically shaped slow linear fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deco, Gustavo; Ponce-Alvarez, Adrián; Mantini, Dante; Romani, Gian Luca; Hagmann, Patric; Corbetta, Maurizio

    2013-07-03

    Brain fluctuations at rest are not random but are structured in spatial patterns of correlated activity across different brain areas. The question of how resting-state functional connectivity (FC) emerges from the brain's anatomical connections has motivated several experimental and computational studies to understand structure-function relationships. However, the mechanistic origin of resting state is obscured by large-scale models' complexity, and a close structure-function relation is still an open problem. Thus, a realistic but simple enough description of relevant brain dynamics is needed. Here, we derived a dynamic mean field model that consistently summarizes the realistic dynamics of a detailed spiking and conductance-based synaptic large-scale network, in which connectivity is constrained by diffusion imaging data from human subjects. The dynamic mean field approximates the ensemble dynamics, whose temporal evolution is dominated by the longest time scale of the system. With this reduction, we demonstrated that FC emerges as structured linear fluctuations around a stable low firing activity state close to destabilization. Moreover, the model can be further and crucially simplified into a set of motion equations for statistical moments, providing a direct analytical link between anatomical structure, neural network dynamics, and FC. Our study suggests that FC arises from noise propagation and dynamical slowing down of fluctuations in an anatomically constrained dynamical system. Altogether, the reduction from spiking models to statistical moments presented here provides a new framework to explicitly understand the building up of FC through neuronal dynamics underpinned by anatomical connections and to drive hypotheses in task-evoked studies and for clinical applications.

  14. Role of an elliptical structure in photosynthetic energy transfer: Collaboration between quantum entanglement and thermal fluctuation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oka, Hisaki

    2016-05-13

    Recent experiments have revealed that the light-harvesting complex 1 (LH1) in purple photosynthetic bacteria has an elliptical structure. Generally, symmetry lowering in a structure leads to a decrease in quantum effects (quantum coherence and entanglement), which have recently been considered to play a role in photosynthetic energy transfer, and hence, elliptical structure seems to work against efficient photosynthetic energy transfer. Here we analyse the effect of an elliptical structure on energy transfer in a purple photosynthetic bacterium and reveal that the elliptical distortion rather enhances energy transfer from peripheral LH2 to LH1 at room temperature. Numerical results show that quantum entanglement between LH1 and LH2 is formed over a wider range of high energy levels than would have been the case with circular LH1. Light energy absorbed by LH2 is thermally pumped via thermal fluctuation and is effectively transferred to LH1 through the entangled states at room temperature rather than at low temperature. This result indicates the possibility that photosynthetic systems adopt an elliptical structure to effectively utilise both quantum entanglement and thermal fluctuation at physiological temperature.

  15. Constructing a folding model for protein S6 guided by native fluctuations deduced from NMR structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lammert, Heiko; Noel, Jeffrey K.; Haglund, Ellinor; Onuchic, José N., E-mail: jonuchic@rice.edu [Center for Theoretical Biological Physics and Department of Physics, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States); Schug, Alexander [Steinbuch Centre for Computing, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2015-12-28

    The diversity in a set of protein nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) structures provides an estimate of native state fluctuations that can be used to refine and enrich structure-based protein models (SBMs). Dynamics are an essential part of a protein’s functional native state. The dynamics in the native state are controlled by the same funneled energy landscape that guides the entire folding process. SBMs apply the principle of minimal frustration, drawn from energy landscape theory, to construct a funneled folding landscape for a given protein using only information from the native structure. On an energy landscape smoothed by evolution towards minimal frustration, geometrical constraints, imposed by the native structure, control the folding mechanism and shape the native dynamics revealed by the model. Native-state fluctuations can alternatively be estimated directly from the diversity in the set of NMR structures for a protein. Based on this information, we identify a highly flexible loop in the ribosomal protein S6 and modify the contact map in a SBM to accommodate the inferred dynamics. By taking into account the probable native state dynamics, the experimental transition state is recovered in the model, and the correct order of folding events is restored. Our study highlights how the shared energy landscape connects folding and function by showing that a better description of the native basin improves the prediction of the folding mechanism.

  16. STRUCTURAL FLUCTUATIONS, ELECTRICAL RESPONSE AND THE RELIABILITY OF NANOSTRUCTURES (FINAL REPORT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philip J. Rous; Ellen D. Williams; Michael S. Fuhrer

    2006-07-31

    The goal of the research supported by DOE-FG02-01ER45939 was to synthesize a number of experimental and theoretical approaches to understand the relationship between morphological fluctuations, the electrical response and the reliability (failure) of metallic nanostructures. The primary focus of our work was the study of metallic nanowires which we regard as prototypical of nanoscale interconnects. Our research plan has been to link together these materials properties and behaviors by understanding the phenomenon of, and the effects of electromigration at nanometer length scales. The thrust of our research has been founded on the concept that, for nanostructures where the surface-to-volume ratio is necessarily high, surface diffusion is the dominant mass transport mechanism that governs the fluctuations, electrical properties and failure modes of nanostructures. Our approach has been to develop experimental methods that permit the direct imaging of the electromagnetic distributions within nanostructures, their structural fluctuations and their electrical response. This experimental research is complemented by a parallel theoretical and computational program that describes the temporal evolution of nanostructures in response to current flow.

  17. Path-integral and Ornstein-Zernike computations of quantum fluid structures under strong fluctuations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis M. Sesé

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This work deals with the computation of the structure factors of quantum fluids under complex conditions involving substantial density fluctuations and/or large particle delocalization effects. The method is based on the combination of path-integral Monte Carlo (PIMC simulations and the pair Ornstein-Zernike framework (OZ2. PIMC provides the radial correlation functions (centroid, instantaneous, and thermalized-continuous total linear response, which are used as data input to the OZ2 calculations that lead to their associated structure factors. To undertake this project normal liquid 4He and supercritical 3He are selected, studying conditions in the range (T = 4.2 K; 0.01886 <ρN/Å-3 < 0.02687. Full inter-comparison between the structure factors determined via both OZ2 and direct PIMC calculations is made. In addition, comparison with experimental data, including thermodynamic properties, is made wherever possible. The results establish that, even under severe thermodynamic and/or quantum fluctuation conditions, OZ2 remains in the quantum domain as a highly reliable and cost-effective framework to determine accurate structure factors, also allowing one to understand the related isotopic shifts in fluid He.

  18. Identification of Large-Scale Structure Fluctuations in IC Engines using POD-Based Conditional Averaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buhl Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cycle-to-Cycle Variations (CCV in IC engines is a well-known phenomenon and the definition and quantification is well-established for global quantities such as the mean pressure. On the other hand, the definition of CCV for local quantities, e.g. the velocity or the mixture distribution, is less straightforward. This paper proposes a new method to identify and calculate cyclic variations of the flow field in IC engines emphasizing the different contributions from large-scale energetic (coherent structures, identified by a combination of Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD and conditional averaging, and small-scale fluctuations. Suitable subsets required for the conditional averaging are derived from combinations of the the POD coefficients of the second and third mode. Within each subset, the velocity is averaged and these averages are compared to the ensemble-averaged velocity field, which is based on all cycles. The resulting difference of the subset-average and the global-average is identified as a cyclic fluctuation of the coherent structures. Then, within each subset, remaining fluctuations are obtained from the difference between the instantaneous fields and the corresponding subset average. The proposed methodology is tested for two data sets obtained from scale resolving engine simulations. For the first test case, the numerical database consists of 208 independent samples of a simplified engine geometry. For the second case, 120 cycles for the well-established Transparent Combustion Chamber (TCC benchmark engine are considered. For both applications, the suitability of the method to identify the two contributions to CCV is discussed and the results are directly linked to the observed flow field structures.

  19. Structural and dipolar fluctuations in liquid water: A Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skarmoutsos, Ioannis; Masia, Marco; Guardia, Elvira

    2016-03-01

    A Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulation was performed to investigate the local tetrahedral order, molecular dipole fluctuations and their interrelation with hydrogen bonding in liquid water. Water molecules were classified in three types, exhibiting low, intermediate and high tetrahedral order. Transitions from low to high tetrahedrally ordered structures take place only through transitions to the intermediate state. The molecular dipole moments depend strongly on the tetrahedral order and hydrogen bonding. The average dipole moment of water molecules with a strong tetrahedral order around them comes in excellent agreement with previous estimations of the dipole moment of ice Ih molecules.

  20. FDC, rapid fabrication of structural components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agarwala, M.K.; Bandyopadhyay, A.; Weeren, R. van; Safari, A.; Danforth, S.C.; Langrana, N.A. [Rutgers-the State Univ., Piscataway, NJ (United States); Jamalabad, V.R.; Whalen, P.J. [AlliedSignal Research and Technology, Morristown, NJ (United States)

    1996-11-01

    Solid freeform fabrication (SFF) is used to make 3-D components directly from computer-aided design (CAD) files. Many SFF techniques have been developed to fabricate parts and prototypes from CAD without hard tooling, dies or molds. Most of these techniques have been commercialized for fabrication of polymer and plastic parts for design verification and form and fit. Other SFF techniques are being developed for production of ceramic components with functional properties. One such technique, called fused deposition of ceramics (FDC), has been developed and demonstrated for structural ceramics. FDC is based on existing fused deposition modeling (FDM{trademark}) technology, commercialized by Stratasys Inc. (Eden Prairie, Minn.), for processing of polymers and waxes. High-green-density, simple- and complex-shaped silicon nitride parts have been formed by fused deposition of ceramics.

  1. Estimation of the Scale of Fluctuation for Spatial Variables of RC Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilyati S.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Dimensional and structural properties of RC structures are nonhomogenous due to the quality of workmanship, environmental and material variability. One of the required statistical information for spatial variability analysis of RC structures includes the scale of fluctuation, θ. This paper discusses the estimation of θ for two spatial variables; concrete compressive strength and concrete cover. Methods used to estimate the θ are the Curve fitting method and the Kriging Method. Kriging is an optimal interpolation method which uses the concept of randomness that allows the uncertainty of the predicted values to be calculated. Data measurements for concrete compressive strength and concrete cover were obtained from Peterson (1964 and Public Work Department of Malaysia respectively. The most reliable value for θ of fcu was determined and the value obtained for θ of c was found unreliable due to the insufficient of data points from the available data.

  2. Wall-attached structures of streamwise velocity fluctuations in turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Jinyul; Sung, Hyung Jin

    2017-11-01

    The wall-attached structures of streamwise velocity fluctuations (u) are explored using direct numerical simulation data of turbulent boundary layer at Reτ = 1000 . We identify the structures of u, which are extended close to the wall. Their height (ly) ranges from the near-wall region to the edge of turbulent boundary layer. They are geometrically self-similar in a sense that the length and width of the structures are proportional to the distance from the wall. The population density of the attached structures shows that the tall attached structures (290 attached eddies addressed by Perry and coworkers. The streamwise turbulent intensity of these tall attached structures follows the logarithmic distribution with the distance from the wall. The wall-attached structures of u identified in the present work are a proper candidate for Townsend's attached eddy hypothesis and these structures exist in the low Reynolds number turbulent boundary layer. This work was supported by the Creative Research Initiatives (No. 2017-013369) program of the National Research Foundation of Korea (MSIP) and supported by the Supercomputing Center (KISTI).

  3. Structures of alkyl benzoate binary mixtures. A Kirkwood-Buff fluctuation theory study using UNIFAC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcalde, Rafael; Aparicio, Santiago; García, Begoña; Leal, José M

    2005-10-27

    The structure of the alkyl benzoate + n-alkane, and + alkan-1-ol binary mixtures were analyzed according to the Kirkwood-Buff fluctuation theory on the basis of both the mixture properties measured over a wide temperature range and the activity coefficients calculated with the modified UNIFAC (Dortmund) model as well. Application of this model reveals that both the microheterogeneous structure and the clustering effects are strongly dependent on the chain length of the n-alkane and alkan-1-ol cosolvents. Knowledge of the local composition around each type of molecule is drawn from the Kirkwood-Buff integrals and the excess (or deficit) molecules aggregated around a central one. The rather high values of the integrals evaluated for some of these systems provide first-hand evidence for phase splitting. The conclusions drawn support previous analyses and confirm the adequacy of the methodology put forward for studying liquid mixtures at microscopic level; easily measurable experimental properties can advantageously be used with the fluctuation theory.

  4. Spatial correlations of density and structural fluctuations in liquid water: a comparative simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedlmeier, Felix; Horinek, Dominik; Netz, Roland R

    2011-02-09

    We use large-scale classical simulations employing different force fields to study spatial correlations between local density and structural order for water in the liquid temperature range. All force fields investigated reproduce the main features of the experimental SAXS structure factor S(q), including the minimum at small q, and the recent TIP4P/2005 parametrization yields almost quantitative agreement. As local structural order parameters we consider the tetrahedrality and the number of hydrogen bonds and calculate all pure and mixed spatial two-point correlation functions. Except for the density-density correlation function, there are only weak features present in all other correlation functions, showing that the tendency to form structural clusters is much weaker than the well-known tendency of water to form density clusters (i.e., spatially correlated regions where the density deviates from the mean). In particular, there are only small spatial correlations between local density and structural fluctuations, suggesting that features in density-density correlations (such as measured by the structure factor) are not straightforwardly related to spatial correlations of structure in liquid water.

  5. Large-scale structure from quantum fluctuations in the early universe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael Turner

    2000-05-25

    A better understanding of the formation of large-scale structure in the Universe is arguably the most pressing question in cosmology. The most compelling and promising theoretical paradigm, Inflation + Cold Dark Matter, holds that the density inhomogeneities that seeded the formation of structure in the Universe originated from quantum fluctuations arising during inflation and that the bulk of the dark matter exists as slowing moving elementary particles (cold dark matter) left over from the earliest, fiery moments. Large redshift surveys (such as the SDSS and 2dF) and high-resolution measurements of CBR anisotropy (to be made by the MAP and Planck Surveyor satellites) have the potential to decisively test Inflation + Cold Dark Matter and to open a window to the very early Universe and fundamental physics.

  6. Changes of statistical structural fluctuations unveils an early compacted degraded stage of PNS myelin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poccia, Nicola; Campi, Gaetano; Ricci, Alessandro; Caporale, Alessandra S.; di Cola, Emanuela; Hawkins, Thomas A.; Bianconi, Antonio

    2014-06-01

    Degradation of the myelin sheath is a common pathology underlying demyelinating neurological diseases from Multiple Sclerosis to Leukodistrophies. Although large malformations of myelin ultrastructure in the advanced stages of Wallerian degradation is known, its subtle structural variations at early stages of demyelination remains poorly characterized. This is partly due to the lack of suitable and non-invasive experimental probes possessing sufficient resolution to detect the degradation. Here we report the feasibility of the application of an innovative non-invasive local structure experimental approach for imaging the changes of statistical structural fluctuations in the first stage of myelin degeneration. Scanning micro X-ray diffraction, using advances in synchrotron x-ray beam focusing, fast data collection, paired with spatial statistical analysis, has been used to unveil temporal changes in the myelin structure of dissected nerves following extraction of the Xenopus laevis sciatic nerve. The early myelin degeneration is a specific ordered compacted phase preceding the swollen myelin phase of Wallerian degradation. Our demonstration of the feasibility of the statistical analysis of SµXRD measurements using biological tissue paves the way for further structural investigations of degradation and death of neurons and other cells and tissues in diverse pathological states where nanoscale structural changes may be uncovered.

  7. How Redox Fluctuation Shapes Microbial Community Structure and Mineral-Organic Matter Relationships in a Humid Tropical Forest Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, A.; Bhattacharyya, A.; Lin, Y.; Tfaily, M. M.; Paša-Tolić, L.; Chu, R. K.; Silver, W. L.; Nico, P. S.; Pett-Ridge, J.

    2016-12-01

    Wet tropical soils can alternate frequently between fully oxygenated and anaerobic conditions, constraining both the metabolism of tropical soil microorganisms, and the mineral-organic matter relationships that regulate many aspects of soil C cycling. Tropical forests are predicted to experience a 2-5°C temperature increase and substantial differences in the amount and timing of rainfall in the coming half century. Yet we have a poor understanding of how soil microbial activity and C cycling in these systems will respond to changes in environmental variability caused by climate change. Using a 44 day redox manipulation and isotope tracing experiment with soils from the Luquillo Experimental Forest, Puerto Rico, we examined patterns of tropical soil microorganisms, metabolites and soil chemistry when soils were exposed to different redox regimes - static oxic, static anoxic, high frequency redox fluctuation (4 days oxic, 4 days anoxic), or low frequency redox fluctuation (8 days oxic, 4 days anoxic). Replicate microcosms were harvested throughout the incubation to understand how changes in redox oscillation frequency altered microbial community structure and activity, organic matter turnover and fate, and soil chemistry. While gross soil respiration was highest in static oxic soils, respiration derived from added litter was highest in static anoxic soils, suggesting that decomposition of preexisting SOM was limited by O2 availability in the anoxic treatment. Microbial communities responded to shifting O2 availability in the different treatments, resulting in significant differences in DOC concentration and molecular composition (measured by FTICR-MS). DOC and Fe2+ concentrations were positively correlated for all four redox treatments, and rapidly increased following oscillation from oxic to anoxic conditions. These results, along with parallel studies of biogeochemical responses (Fe speciation, pH, P availability), suggest a highly responsive microbial and

  8. Temporal structure of aggregate power fluctuations in large-eddy simulations of extended wind-farms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stevens, Richard Johannes Antonius Maria; Meneveau, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Fluctuations represent a major challenge for the incorporation of electric power from large wind-farms into power grids. Wind-farm power output fluctuates strongly in time, over various time scales. Understanding these fluctuations, especially their spatio-temporal characteristics, is particularly

  9. Multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis for clustering structures of electricity price periods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fang; Liao, Gui-ping; Li, Jian-hui; Li, Xiao-chun; Zhou, Tie-jun

    2013-11-01

    A new model is proposed to investigate the structure of electricity price in different time periods. A popular method - the multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis (MF-DFA) method is employed to analyze the features achieved from three types of electricity price data after filtering some trends by Fourier detrended fluctuation function. Twelve multifractal parameters are calculated and selected as the characteristic indicators for comparison. Moreover, the minimum number of indicators is determined so that the discriminant accuracy reaches maximum based on Fisher’s linear discriminant algorithm (Fisher’s LDA) for each time period. These indicators form a multi-dimensional space, in which each point represents a price time series. This allows us to cluster the three price time periods, namely, the low price time periods, the average price time periods and the peak price time periods. Fisher’s LDA is employed to evaluate the discriminant accuracy on these three kinds of time periods. Our analysis is then applied to the data in California1999-2000 and PJM2001-2002 electricity markets to demonstrate the applicability of our methods.

  10. Fluctuation in Interface and Electronic Structure of Single-Molecule Junctions Investigated by Current versus Bias Voltage Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isshiki, Yuji; Fujii, Shintaro; Nishino, Tomoaki; Kiguchi, Manabu

    2018-02-22

    Structural and electronic detail at the metal-molecule interface has a significant impact on the charge transport across the molecular junctions, but its precise understanding and control still remain elusive. On the single-molecule scale, the metal-molecule interface structures and relevant charge transport properties are subject to fluctuation, which contains fundamental science of the single-molecule transport and implication for manipulability of the transport properties in the electronic devices. Here, we present a comprehensive approach to investigate the fluctuation in the metal-molecule interface in single-molecule junctions, based on current-voltage (I-V) measurements in combination with first-principles simulation. Contrary to conventional molecular conductance studies, this I-V approach provides a correlated statistical description of both, the degree of electronic coupling across the metal-molecule interface, and the molecular orbital-energy level. This statistical approach was employed to study fluctuation in single-molecule junctions of 1,4-butanediamine (DAB), pyrazine (PY), 4,4'-bipyridine (BPY), and fullerene (C60). We demonstrate that molecular dependent fluctuation of σ-, π-, and π-plane- type interface can be captured by analyzing molecular orbital-energy (MO) level under mechanical perturbation. While the MO level of DAB with the σ-type interface shows weak distance dependence and fluctuation, the MO level of PY, BPY, and C60 features unique distance dependence and molecular dependent fluctuation against the mechanical perturbation. The MO level of PY and BPY with the σ+π-type interface increases with the increase in the stretch distance. In contrary, the MO level of C60 with the π-plane-type interface decreases with the increase in the stretching perturbation. This study provides an approach to resolve the structural and electronic fluctuation in the single-molecule junctions and insight into the molecular dependent fluctuation in the

  11. Fluctuation relations between hierarchical kinetically equivalent networks with Arrhenius-type transitions and their roles in systems and structural biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, De-Ming; Lu, Yi-Ta; Chang, Cheng-Hung

    2017-06-01

    The legality of using simple kinetic schemes to determine the stochastic properties of a complex system depends on whether the fluctuations generated from hierarchical equivalent schemes are consistent with one another. To analyze this consistency, we perform lumping processes on the stochastic differential equations and the generalized fluctuation-dissipation theorem and apply them to networks with the frequently encountered Arrhenius-type transition rates. The explicit Langevin force derived from those networks enables us to calculate the state fluctuations caused by the intrinsic and extrinsic noises on the free energy surface and deduce their relations between kinetically equivalent networks. In addition to its applicability to wide classes of network related systems, such as those in structural and systems biology, the result sheds light on the fluctuation relations for general physical variables in Keizer's canonical theory.

  12. Can log-periodic power law structures arise from random fluctuations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wosnitza, Jan Henrik; Leker, Jens

    2014-05-01

    Recent research has established log-periodic power law (LPPL) patterns prior to the detonation of the German stock index (DAX) bubble in 1998. The purpose of this article is to explore whether a Langevin equation extracted from real world data can generate synthetic time series with comparable LPPL structures. To this end, we first estimate the stochastic process underlying the DAX log-returns during the period from mid-1997 until end-2003. The employed data set contains about 3.93ṡ106 intraday DAX quotes at a sampling rate of 15 s. Our results indicate that the DAX log-returns can be described as a Markov process. As a consequence, a Langevin equation is derived. Based on this model equation, we run extensive simulations in order to generate 100 synthetic DAX trajectories each covering 3000 trading days. We find LPPL behavior in ten artificial time series. Moreover, we can establish a link between LPPL patterns and ensuing bubble bursts in seven synthetic 600-week windows. However, the LPPL components in most synthetic trajectories differ fundamentally from those LPPL structures that have previously been detected in real financial time series. Summarized, this paper demonstrates that LPPL structures are not necessarily the signature of imitative behavior among investors but can also stem from noise, even though the likelihood of this is extremely low. Thus, our findings confirm with high statistical confidence that the LPPL structures in the DAX development are rooted deeper than only in the random fluctuations of the German stock market.

  13. Rapid structural analysis of nanomaterials in aqueous solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryuzaki, Sou; Tsutsui, Makusu; He, Yuhui; Yokota, Kazumichi; Arima, Akihide; Morikawa, Takanori; Taniguchi, Masateru; Kawai, Tomoji

    2017-04-01

    Rapid structural analysis of nanoscale matter in a liquid environment represents innovative technologies that reveal the identities and functions of biologically important molecules. However, there is currently no method with high spatio-temporal resolution that can scan individual particles in solutions to gain structural information. Here we report the development of a nanopore platform realizing quantitative structural analysis for suspended nanomaterials in solutions with a high z-axis and xy-plane spatial resolution of 35.8 ± 1.1 and 12 nm, respectively. We used a low thickness-to-diameter aspect ratio pore architecture for achieving cross sectional areas of analyte (i.e. tomograms). Combining this with multiphysics simulation methods to translate ionic current data into tomograms, we demonstrated rapid structural analysis of single polystyrene (Pst) beads and single dumbbell-like Pst beads in aqueous solutions.

  14. Imaging chromatin nanostructure with binding-activated localization microscopy based on DNA structure fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczurek, Aleksander; Klewes, Ludger; Xing, Jun; Gourram, Amine; Birk, Udo; Knecht, Hans; Dobrucki, Jurek W; Mai, Sabine; Cremer, Christoph

    2017-05-05

    Advanced light microscopy is an important tool for nanostructure analysis of chromatin. In this report we present a general concept for Single Molecule localization Microscopy (SMLM) super-resolved imaging of DNA-binding dyes based on modifying the properties of DNA and the dye. By careful adjustment of the chemical environment leading to local, reversible DNA melting and hybridization control over the fluorescence signal of the DNA-binding dye molecules can be introduced. We postulate a transient binding as the basis for our variation of binding-activated localization microscopy (BALM). We demonstrate that several intercalating and minor-groove binding DNA dyes can be used to register (optically isolate) only a few DNA-binding dye signals at a time. To highlight this DNA structure fluctuation-assisted BALM (fBALM), we applied it to measure, for the first time, nanoscale differences in nuclear architecture in model ischemia with an anticipated structural resolution of approximately 50 nm. Our data suggest that this approach may open an avenue for the enhanced microscopic analysis of chromatin nano-architecture and hence the microscopic analysis of nuclear structure aberrations occurring in various pathological conditions. It may also become possible to analyse nuclear nanostructure differences in different cell types, stages of development or environmental stress conditions. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  15. Damage detection of structures with detrended fluctuation and detrended cross-correlation analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tzu-Kang; Fajri, Haikal

    2017-03-01

    Recently, fractal analysis has shown its potential for damage detection and assessment in fields such as biomedical and mechanical engineering. For its practicability in interpreting irregular, complex, and disordered phenomena, a structural health monitoring (SHM) system based on detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) and detrended cross-correlation analysis (DCCA) is proposed. First, damage conditions can be swiftly detected by evaluating ambient vibration signals measured from a structure through DFA. Damage locations can then be determined by analyzing the cross correlation of signals of different floors by applying DCCA. A damage index is also proposed based on multi-scale DCCA curves to improve the damage location accuracy. To verify the performance of the proposed SHM system, a four-story numerical model was used to simulate various damage conditions with different noise levels. Furthermore, an experimental verification was conducted on a seven-story benchmark structure to assess the potential damage. The results revealed that the DFA method could detect the damage conditions satisfactorily, and damage locations can be identified through the DCCA method with an accuracy of 75%. Moreover, damage locations can be correctly assessed by the damage index method with an improved accuracy of 87.5%. The proposed SHM system has promising application in practical implementations.

  16. Spectral structure and linear mechanisms in a 'rapidly' distorted boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diwan, Sourabh; Morrison, Jonathan

    2016-11-01

    A characteristic feature of a turbulent boundary layer (TBL) at high Reynolds numbers is the presence of coherent motions such as the 'large scale motions' and 'superstructures'. In this work we attempt to mimic such coherent motions and their spectral structure using a simplified experimental arrangement of a boundary layer flow over a flat plate subjected to grid-generated turbulence and/or localized patch of surface roughness. The velocity measurements done downstream of a grit roughness patch (in absence of grid turbulence) show that over a certain distance the energy spectrum of streamwise velocity fluctuations shows a bi-modal shape which resembles that found in a high-Re TBL. We also carry out experiments with both grid turbulence and grit roughness present and show that it is possible to 'synthesize' the structure of a TBL in the wall-normal direction, in the limited context of streamwise coherent motions, using the present experimental design. These results indicate that the predictions of the Rapid Distortion Theory (RDT) can be applied to the present case in a region close to the plate leading edge, and we examine the linearized effects of 'blocking' and 'shear' on turbulent fluctuations near the edge of the boundary layer and close to the wall in the framework of the RDT. We acknowledge financial support from EPSRC (Grant No. EP/1037938).

  17. Influence of structural fluctuations on lifetimes of adsorbate states at hybrid organic-semiconductor interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, M.; Sánchez-Portal, D.; Lin, H.; Fratesi, G.; Brivio, G. P.; Selloni, A.

    On the road towards a more realistic description of charge transfer processes at hybrid organic-semiconductor interfaces for photovoltaic applications we extend our first-principles scheme for the extraction of elastic linewidths to include the effects of structural fluctuations. Based on snapshots obtained from Car-Parinello molecular dynamics simulations at room temperature, we set up geometries in which dye molecules at interfaces are attached to a semi-infinite TiO2 substrate. The elastic linewidths are computed using a Green's function method. This effectively introduces the coupling to a continuum of states in the substrate. In particular we investigate catechol and isonicotinic acid on rutile(110) and anatase(101) at the level of semi-local density functional theory. We perform multiple calculations of linewidths and peak-positions associated with the adsorbate's frontier orbitals for different geometric configurations to obtain a time-averaged analysis of such physical properties. We compare the results from the considered systems to understand the effects of dynamics onto interfacial charge transfer and systematically assess the dependence of the extracted elastic lifetimes on the relative alignment between adsorbate and substrate states. This project has received funding from the European Union Seventh Framework Programme under Grant Agreement No. 607323 [THINFACE].

  18. Studying topological structure of 21-cm line fluctuations with 3D Minkowski functionals before reionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshiura, Shintaro; Shimabukuro, Hayato; Takahashi, Keitaro; Matsubara, Takahiko

    2017-02-01

    The brightness temperature of the redshifted 21-cm line brings rich information about the intergalactic medium (IGM) from the cosmic dawn and epoch of reionization (EoR). While the power spectrum is a useful tool to investigate the 21-cm signal statistically, the 21-cm brightness temperature field is highly non-Gaussian and the power spectrum is inadequate to characterize the non-Gaussianity. Minkowski functionals (MFs) are promising tools to extract non-Gaussian features of the 21-cm signal and give topological information, such as morphology of ionized bubbles. In this work, we study the 21-cm line signal in detail with MFs. To promote understanding of basic features of the 21-cm signal, we calculate the MFs of not only the hydrogen neutral fraction but also the matter density and spin temperature, which contribute to brightness-temperature fluctuations. We find that the structure of the brightness temperature depends mainly on the ionized fraction and the spin temperature at late and early stages of the EoR, respectively. Further, we investigate the redshift evolution of MFs at 7 < z < 20. We find that, after the onset of reionization, MFs mainly reflect the ionized bubble property. In addition, MFs are sensitive to model parameters related to the topology of ionized bubbles and we consider the possibility of constraining the parameters using future 21-cm signal observations.

  19. Detection of the Earth rotation response to a rapid fluctuation of Southern Ocean circulation in November 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, S. L.; Dickey, J. O.; Fukumori, I.; de Viron, O.

    2012-02-01

    At seasonal and shorter periods the solid Earth and its overlying geophysical fluids form a closed dynamical system, which (except for tidal forcing) conserves its total angular momentum. While atmospheric effects dominate changes in the Earth's rate of rotation and hence length-of-day (LOD) on these time scales, the addition of oceanic angular momentum (OAM) estimates has been shown to improve closure of the LOD budget in a statistical sense. Here we demonstrate, for the first time, the signature of a specific, sub-monthly ocean current fluctuation on the Earth's rotation rate, coinciding with recently-reported anomalies which developed in southeast Pacific surface temperature and bottom pressure fields during late 2009. Our results show that concurrent variations in the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC), which saw a sharp drop and recovery in zonal transport during a two-week period in November, were strong enough to cause a detectable change in LOD following the removal of atmospheric angular momentum (AAM) computed from the Modern Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) database. The strong OAM variations driving the LOD-AAM changes were diagnosed from ocean state estimates of the Consortium for Estimating the Circulation and Climate of the Ocean (ECCO) and involved roughly equal contributions from the current and pressure terms, with in situ confirmation for the latter provided by tide-corrected bottom pressure recorder data from the South Drake Passage site of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current Levels by Altimetry and Island Measurements (ACCLAIM) network.

  20. A method for rapid similarity analysis of RNA secondary structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Na

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Owing to the rapid expansion of RNA structure databases in recent years, efficient methods for structure comparison are in demand for function prediction and evolutionary analysis. Usually, the similarity of RNA secondary structures is evaluated based on tree models and dynamic programming algorithms. We present here a new method for the similarity analysis of RNA secondary structures. Results Three sets of real data have been used as input for the example applications. Set I includes the structures from 5S rRNAs. Set II includes the secondary structures from RNase P and RNase MRP. Set III includes the structures from 16S rRNAs. Reasonable phylogenetic trees are derived for these three sets of data by using our method. Moreover, our program runs faster as compared to some existing ones. Conclusion The famous Lempel-Ziv algorithm can efficiently extract the information on repeated patterns encoded in RNA secondary structures and makes our method an alternative to analyze the similarity of RNA secondary structures. This method will also be useful to researchers who are interested in evolutionary analysis.

  1. Rapid interferometric imaging of printed drug laden multilayer structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandler, Niklas; Kassamakov, Ivan; Ehlers, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    /and active pharmaceutical ingredients (API) adhere to each other. This is crucial in order to have predetermined drug release profiles. We also demonstrate non-invasive measurement of a polymer structure in a microfluidic channel. It shown that traceable interferometric 3D microscopy is a viable technique......The developments in printing technologies allow fabrication of micron-size nano-layered delivery systems to personal specifications. In this study we fabricated layered polymer structures for drug-delivery into a microfluidic channel and aimed to interferometrically assure their topography...... and adherence to each other. We present a scanning white light interferometer (SWLI) method for quantitative assurance of the topography of the embedded structure. We determined rapidly in non-destructive manner the thickness and roughness of the structures and whether the printed layers containing polymers or...

  2. Quantum effect on the internal proton transfer and structural fluctuation in the H+ 5 cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, Yasuhito; Ohta, Koji; Kinugawa, Kenichi

    2004-12-08

    The thermal equilibrium state of H+(5) is investigated by means of an ab initio path integral molecular dynamics (PIMD) method, in which degrees of freedom of both nuclei and electrons at finite temperature are quantized within the adiabatic approximation. The second-order Moller-Plesset force field has been employed for the present ab initio PIMD. At 5-200 K, H+(5) is shown to have the structure that the proton is surrounded by the two H(2) units without any exchange of an atom between the central proton and the H(2) unit. At 5 K, the quantum tunneling of the central proton occurs more easily when the distance between the two H(2) units is shortened. At the high temperature of 200 K, the central proton is more delocalized in space between the two H(2) units, with less correlation with the stretching of the distance between the two H(2) units. As for the rotation of the H(2) units around the C(2) axis of H+(5) , the dihedral angle distribution is homogeneous at all temperatures, suggesting that the two H(2) units freely rotate around the C(2) axis, while this quantum effect on the rotation of the H(2) units becomes more weakened with increasing temperature. The influence of the structural fluctuation of H+(5) on molecular orbital energies has been examined to conclude that the highest occupied molecular orbital-lowest unoccupied molecular orbital energy gap is largely reduced with the increase of temperature because of the spatial expansion of the whole cluster. (c) 2004 American Institute of Physics.

  3. Rapid and reliable protein structure determination via chemical shift threading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafsa, Noor E; Berjanskii, Mark V; Arndt, David; Wishart, David S

    2017-12-01

    Protein structure determination using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy can be both time-consuming and labor intensive. Here we demonstrate how chemical shift threading can permit rapid, robust, and accurate protein structure determination using only chemical shift data. Threading is a relatively old bioinformatics technique that uses a combination of sequence information and predicted (or experimentally acquired) low-resolution structural data to generate high-resolution 3D protein structures. The key motivations behind using NMR chemical shifts for protein threading lie in the fact that they are easy to measure, they are available prior to 3D structure determination, and they contain vital structural information. The method we have developed uses not only sequence and chemical shift similarity but also chemical shift-derived secondary structure, shift-derived super-secondary structure, and shift-derived accessible surface area to generate a high quality protein structure regardless of the sequence similarity (or lack thereof) to a known structure already in the PDB. The method (called E-Thrifty) was found to be very fast (often structure) and to significantly outperform other shift-based or threading-based structure determination methods (in terms of top template model accuracy)-with an average TM-score performance of 0.68 (vs. 0.50-0.62 for other methods). Coupled with recent developments in chemical shift refinement, these results suggest that protein structure determination, using only NMR chemical shifts, is becoming increasingly practical and reliable. E-Thrifty is available as a web server at http://ethrifty.ca .

  4. Temporal structure of aggregate power fluctuations in large-eddy simulations of extended wind-farms

    CERN Document Server

    Stevens, Richard J A M

    2014-01-01

    Fluctuations represent a major challenge for the incorporation of electric power from large wind-farms into power grids. Wind farm power output fluctuates strongly in time, over various time scales. Understanding these fluctuations, especially their spatio-temporal characteristics, is particularly important for the design of backup power systems that must be readily available in conjunction with wind-farms. In this work we analyze the power fluctuations associated with the wind-input variability at scales between minutes to several hours, using large eddy simulations (LES) of extended wind-parks, interacting with the atmospheric boundary layer. LES studies enable careful control of parameters and availability of wind-velocities simultaneously across the entire wind-farm. The present study focuses on neutral atmospheric conditions and flat terrain, using actuator-disk representations of the individual wind-turbines. We consider power from various aggregates of wind-turbines such as the total average power sign...

  5. Particle density fluctuations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aggarwal, M.M.; Ahammed, Z.; Angelis, A.L.S.; Antonenko, V.; Arefiev, V.; Astakhov, V.; Avdeitchikov, V.; Awes, T.C.; Baba, P.V.K.S.; Badyal, S.K.; Bathe, S.; Batiounia, B.; Bernier, T.; Bhalla, K.B.; Bhatia, V.S.; Blume, C.; Bucher, D.; Buesching, H.; Carlen, L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Das, A.C.; Decowski, M.P.; Donni, P.; Dubey, A.K.; Dutta Majumdar, M.R.; Enosawa, K.; Fokin, S.; Frolov, V.; Ganti, M.S.; Garpman, S.; Gavrishcuk, O.; Geurts, F.J.M.; Glasow, R.; Guskov, B.; Gustafsson, H.A.; Gutbrod, H.H.; Hrivnacova, I.; Ippolitov, M.; Kalechofsky, H.; Kamermans, R.; Karadjev, K.; Karpio, K.; Kolb, B.W.; Kosarev, I.; Koutcheryaev, I.; Kugler, A.; Kulinich, P.; Kurata, M.; Lebedev, A.; Loehner, H.; Mahapatra, D.P.; Manko, V.; Martin, M.; Miake, Y.; Mishra, G.C.; Mohanty, B.; Morrison, D.; Mukhopadhayay, D.S.; Naef, H.; Nandi, B.K.; Nayak, S.K.; Nayak, T.K.; Nianine, A.; Nikitine, V.; Nikolaev, S.; Nishimura, S.; Nomokov, P.; Petracek, V.; Plasil, F.; Purschke, M.L.; Rak, J.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Rao, N.K.; Retiere, F.; Reygers, K.; Roland, G.; Rosselet, L.; Roufanov, I.; Rubio, J.M.; Sambyal, S.S.; Santo, R.; Sato, S.; Schlagheck, H.; Schmidt, H.-R.; Schutz, Y.; Shabratova, G.; Sibiriak, I.; Siemiarczuk, T.; Sinha, B.C.; Slavine, N.; Soederstroem, K.; Sood, G.; Soerensen, S.P.; Stankus, P.; Steinberg, P.; Stenlund, E.; Sumbera, M.; Svensson, T.; Trivedi, M.D.; Tsvetkov, A.; Tykarski, L.; Urbahn, J.; Eijinhoven, N. van; Niewenhuizen, G.J. van; Vinogradov, A.; Viyogi, Y.P.; Vodopianov, A.; Voeroes, S.; Wyslouch, B.; Young, G.R

    2003-03-10

    Event-by-event fluctuations in the multiplicities of charged particles and photons at SPS energies are discussed. Fluctuations are studied by controlling the centrality of the reaction and rapidity acceptance of the detectors. Results are also presented on the event-by-event study of correlations between the multiplicity of charged particles and photons to search for DCC-like signals.

  6. Particle density fluctuations

    CERN Document Server

    Mohanty, Bedangadas; Ahammed, Z.; Angelis, A.L.S.; Antonenko, V.; Arefev, V.; Astakhov, V.; Avdeitchikov, V.; Awes, T.C.; Baba, P.V.K.S.; Badyal, S.K.; Bathe, S.; Batiounia, B.; Bernier, T.; Bhalla, K.B.; Bhatia, V.S.; Blume, C.; Bucher, D.; Busching, H.; Carlen, L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Das, A.C.; Decowski, M.P.; Donni, P.; Dubey, A.K.; Dutta Majumdar, M.R.; Enosawa, K.; Fokin, S.; Frolov, V.; Ganti, M.S.; Garpman, S.; Gavrishchuk, O.; Geurts, F.J.M.; Glasow, R.; Guskov, B.; Gustafsson, H.A.; Gutbrod, H.H.; Hrivnacova, I.; Ippolitov, M.; Kalechofsky, H.; Kamermans, R.; Karadjev, K.; Karpio, K.; Kolb, B.W.; Kosarev, I.; Koutcheryaev, I.; Kugler, A.; Kulinich, P.; Kurata, M.; Lebedev, A.; Lohne, H.; Mahapatra, D.P.; Manko, V.; Martin, M.; Miake, Y.; Mishra, G.C.; Morrison, D.; Mukhopadhyay, D.S.; Naef, H.; Nandi, B.K.; Nayak, S.K.; Nayak, T.K.; Nianine, A.; Nikitine, V.; Nikolaev, S.; Nishimura, S.; Nomokov, P.; Nystrand, J.; Oskarsson, A.; Otterlund, I.; Phatak, S.C.; Pavliouk, S.; Peitzmann, T.; Petracek, V.; Plasil, F.; Purschke, M.L.; Rak, J.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Rao, N.K.; Retiere, F.; Reygers, K.; Roland, G.; Rosselet, L.; Roufanov, I.; Rubio, J.M.; Sambyal, S.S.; Santo, R.; Sato, S.; Schlagheck, H.; Schmidt, H.R.; Schutz, Y.; Shabratova, G.; Sibiriak, I.; Siemiarczuk, T.; Sinha, B.C.; Slavine, N.; Soderstrom, K.; Sood, G.; Sorensen, S.P.; Stankus, P.; Stefanek, G.; Steinberg, P.; Stenlund, E.; Sumbera, M.; Svensson, T.; Trivedi, M.D.; Tsvetkov, A.; Tykarski, L.; Urbahn, J.; van Eijndhoven, N.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.J.; Vinogradov, A.; Viyogi, Y.P.; Vodopianov, A.S.; Voros, S.; Wyslouch, B.; Young, G.R.; Mohanty, Bedangadas

    2003-01-01

    Event-by-event fluctuations in the multiplicities of charged particles and photons at SPS energies are discussed. Fluctuations are studied by controlling the centrality of the reaction and rapidity acceptance of the detectors. Results are also presented on the event-by-event study of correlations between the multiplicity of charged particles and photons to search for DCC-like signals.

  7. The structure of turbulence in a rapid tidal flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milne, I. A.; Sharma, R. N.; Flay, R. G. J.

    2017-08-01

    The structure of turbulence in a rapid tidal flow is characterized through new observations of fundamental statistical properties at a site in the UK which has a simple geometry and sedate surface wave action. The mean flow at the Sound of Islay exceeded 2.5 m s-1 and the turbulent boundary layer occupied the majority of the water column, with an approximately logarithmic mean velocity profile identifiable close to the seabed. The anisotropic ratios, spectral scales and higher-order statistics of the turbulence generally agree well with values reported for two-dimensional open channels in the laboratory and other tidal channels, therefore providing further support for the application of universal models. The results of the study can assist in developing numerical models of turbulence in rapid tidal flows such as those proposed for tidal energy generation.

  8. The structure of turbulence in a rapid tidal flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milne, I A; Sharma, R N; Flay, R G J

    2017-08-01

    The structure of turbulence in a rapid tidal flow is characterized through new observations of fundamental statistical properties at a site in the UK which has a simple geometry and sedate surface wave action. The mean flow at the Sound of Islay exceeded 2.5 m s-1 and the turbulent boundary layer occupied the majority of the water column, with an approximately logarithmic mean velocity profile identifiable close to the seabed. The anisotropic ratios, spectral scales and higher-order statistics of the turbulence generally agree well with values reported for two-dimensional open channels in the laboratory and other tidal channels, therefore providing further support for the application of universal models. The results of the study can assist in developing numerical models of turbulence in rapid tidal flows such as those proposed for tidal energy generation.

  9. Rapid Measurement of Tectonic Deformation Using Structure-from-Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickering, A.; DeLong, S.; Lienkaemper, J. J.; Hecker, S.; Prentice, C. S.; Schwartz, D. P.; Sickler, R. R.

    2016-12-01

    Rapid collection and distribution of accurate surface slip data after earthquakes can support emergency response, help coordinate scientific response, and constrain coseismic slip that can be rapidly overprinted by postseismic slip, or eliminated as evidence of surface deformation is repaired or obscured. Analysis of earthquake deformation can be achieved quickly, repeatedly and inexpensively with the use of Structure-from-Motion (SfM) photogrammetry. Traditional methods of measuring surface slip (e.g. manual measurement with tape measures) have proven inconsistent and irreproducible, and sophisticated methods such as laser scanning require specialized equipment and longer field time. Here we present a simple, cost-effective workflow for rapid, three-dimensional imaging and measurement of features affected by earthquake rupture. As part of a response drill performed by the USGS and collaborators on May 11, 2016, geologists documented offset cultural features along the creeping Hayward Fault in northern California, in simulation of a surface-rupturing earthquake. We present several photo collections from smart phones, tablets, and DSLR cameras from a number of locations along the fault collected by users with a range of experience. Using professionally calibrated photogrammetric scale bars we automatically and accurately scale our 3D models to 1 mm accuracy for precise measurement in three dimensions. We then generate scaled 3D point clouds and extract offsets from manual measurement and multiple linear regression for comparison with collected terrestrial scanner data. These results further establish dense photo collection and SfM processing as an important, low-cost, rapid means of quantifying surface deformation in the critical hours after a surface-rupturing earthquake and emphasize that researchers with minimal training can rapidly collect three-dimensional data that can be used to analyze and archive the surface effects of damaging earthquakes.

  10. EMRS Spring Meeting 2014 Symposium D: Phonons and fluctuations in low dimensional structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-01

    The E-MRS 2014 Spring meeting, held from 26-30th May 2014 in Lille included the Symposium D entitled ''Phonons and Fluctuations in Low Dimensional Structures'', the first edition of its kind. The symposium was organised in response to the increasing interest in the study of phonons in the context of advances in condensed matter physics, electronics, experimental methods and theory and, in particular, the transfer of energy across atomic interfaces and the propagation of energy in the nm-scale. Steering heat by light or vice versa and examining nano-scale energy conversion (as in thermoelectricity and harvesting e.g. in biological systems) are two aspects that share the underlying science of energy processes across atomic interfaces and energy propagation in the nanoscale and or in confined systems. The nanometer scale defies several of the bulk relationships as confinement of electrons and phonons, locality and non-equilibrium become increasingly important. The propagation of phonons as energy carriers impacts not only heat transfer, but also the very concept and handling of temperature in non-equilibrium and highly localised conditions. Much of the needed progress depends on the materials studied and this symposium targeted the interface material aspects as well as the emerging concepts to advance in this field. The symposium had its origins in a series of meetings and seminars including: (1) the first Phonon Engineering Workshop, funded by Catalan Institute for Research and Advanced Studies (ICREA), the then MICINN, the CNRS, VTT, and several EU projects, held in Saint Feliu de Guixols (Girona, Spain) from 24th to 27th of May 2010 with 65 participants from Europe, the USA and Japan; (2) the first Phonons and Fluctuations workshop, held in Paris on 8th and 9th November 2010, supported by French, Spanish and Finnish national projects and EU projects, attended by about 50 researchers; (3) the second Phonon and Fluctuations workshop, held in Paris on 8th and 9th

  11. Quantifying Vegetation Structure with Lightweight, Rapid-Scanning Terrestrial Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paynter, I.; Genest, D.; Saenz, E. J.; Strahler, A. H.; Li, Z.; Peri, F.; Schaaf, C.

    2016-12-01

    Light Detection and Ranging (lidar) is proving a competent technology for observing vegetation structure. Terrestrial laser scanners (TLS) are ground-based instruments which utilize hundreds of thousands to millions of lidar observations to provide detailed structural and reflective information of their surroundings. TLS has enjoyed initial success as a validation tool for satellite and airborne estimates of vegetation structure, and are producing independent estimates with increasing accuracy. Reconstruction techniques for TLS observations of vegetation have also improved rapidly, especially for trees. However, uncertainties and challenges still remain in TLS modelling of vegetation structure, especially in geometrically complex ecosystems such as tropical forests (where observation extent and density is hampered by occlusion) and highly temporally dynamic coastal ecosystems (such as saltmarshes and mangroves), where observations may be restricted to narrow microstates. Some of these uncertainties can be mitigated, and challenges met, through the use of lidar instruments optimized for favorable deployment logistics through low weight, rapid scanning, and improved durability. We have conducted studies of vegetation structure in temperate and tropical forests, saltmarshes and mangroves, utilizing a highly portable TLS with considerable deployment flexibility, the Compact Biomass Lidar (CBL). We show results from studies in the temperate Long Term Ecological Research site of Harvard Forest (MA, USA); the tropical forested long-term Carbono sites of La Selva Biological Station (Sarapiqui, Costa Rica); and the saltmarsh LTER of Plum Island (MA, USA). These results demonstrate the improvements to observations in these ecosystems which are facilitated by the specifications of the CBL (and similar TLS) which are optimized for favorable deployment logistics and flexibility. We show the benefits of increased numbers of scanning positions, and specialized deployment

  12. Structural Changes in the Korean Housing Market before and after Macroeconomic Fluctuations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanghyun Kim

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to identify structural changes in the Korean housing market for evaluating the sustainability of the Korean housing market and to derive important implications to seek housing business strategies and public policies. Two time periods were analyzed: April 2001–December 2007 and January 2008–December 2014 to identify the impact after the global financial crisis of 2008. The market was divided into transaction, chonsei, and monthly rent. The correlations were analyzed using a vector error correction model (VECM. A key result was that during the economic depression, demand for chonsei did not flow to the transaction market; this phenomenon affected the overall recovery of the housing market. The supply of chonsei today is rapidly decreasing with the depression in the transaction. Increases in chonsei prices are expected to continue along with the possibility that demand for chonsei will flow into the transaction or monthly rent market. Based on recent trends, the chonsei market, once main stream, will gradually weaken, and the Korean housing market will reorganize into transactions and monthly rent. This structural change may turn the Korean housing market into a target for long-term investments.

  13. Structural evolution in the crystallization of rapid cooling silver melt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Z. A.; Dong, K. J.; Yu, A. B.

    2015-03-01

    The structural evolution in a rapid cooling process of silver melt has been investigated at different scales by adopting several analysis methods. The results testify Ostwald's rule of stages and Frank conjecture upon icosahedron with many specific details. In particular, the cluster-scale analysis by a recent developed method called LSCA (the Largest Standard Cluster Analysis) clarified the complex structural evolution occurred in crystallization: different kinds of local clusters (such as ico-like (ico is the abbreviation of icosahedron), ico-bcc like (bcc, body-centred cubic), bcc, bcc-like structures) in turn have their maximal numbers as temperature decreases. And in a rather wide temperature range the icosahedral short-range order (ISRO) demonstrates a saturated stage (where the amount of ico-like structures keeps stable) that breeds metastable bcc clusters. As the precursor of crystallization, after reaching the maximal number bcc clusters finally decrease, resulting in the final solid being a mixture mainly composed of fcc/hcp (face-centred cubic and hexagonal-closed packed) clusters and to a less degree, bcc clusters. This detailed geometric picture for crystallization of liquid metal is believed to be useful to improve the fundamental understanding of liquid-solid phase transition.

  14. Fluctuation-driven mechanotransduction regulates mitochondrial-network structure and function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolák-Suki, Erzsébet; Imsirovic, Jasmin; Parameswaran, Harikrishnan; Wellman, Tyler J.; Martinez, Nuria; Allen, Philip G.; Frey, Urs; Suki, Béla

    2015-10-01

    Cells can be exposed to irregular mechanical fluctuations, such as those arising from changes in blood pressure. Here, we report that ATP production, assessed through changes in mitochondrial membrane potential, is downregulated in vascular smooth muscle cells in culture exposed to monotonous stretch cycles when compared with cells exposed to a variable cyclic stretch that incorporates physiological levels of cycle-by-cycle variability in stretch amplitude. Variable stretch enhances ATP production by increasing the expression of ATP synthase’s catalytic domain, cytochrome c oxidase and its tyrosine phosphorylation, mitofusins and PGC-1α. Such a fluctuation-driven mechanotransduction mechanism is mediated by motor proteins and by the enhancement of microtubule-, actin- and mitochondrial-network complexity. We also show that, in aorta rings isolated from rats, monotonous stretch downregulates--whereas variable stretch maintains--physiological vessel-wall contractility through mitochondrial ATP production. Our results have implications for ATP-dependent and mechanosensitive intracellular processes.

  15. Structural evolution in the crystallization of rapid cooling silver melt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Z.A., E-mail: ze.tian@gmail.com [School of Physics and Electronics, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Laboratory for Simulation and Modelling of Particulate Systems School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia); Dong, K.J.; Yu, A.B. [Laboratory for Simulation and Modelling of Particulate Systems School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia)

    2015-03-15

    The structural evolution in a rapid cooling process of silver melt has been investigated at different scales by adopting several analysis methods. The results testify Ostwald’s rule of stages and Frank conjecture upon icosahedron with many specific details. In particular, the cluster-scale analysis by a recent developed method called LSCA (the Largest Standard Cluster Analysis) clarified the complex structural evolution occurred in crystallization: different kinds of local clusters (such as ico-like (ico is the abbreviation of icosahedron), ico-bcc like (bcc, body-centred cubic), bcc, bcc-like structures) in turn have their maximal numbers as temperature decreases. And in a rather wide temperature range the icosahedral short-range order (ISRO) demonstrates a saturated stage (where the amount of ico-like structures keeps stable) that breeds metastable bcc clusters. As the precursor of crystallization, after reaching the maximal number bcc clusters finally decrease, resulting in the final solid being a mixture mainly composed of fcc/hcp (face-centred cubic and hexagonal-closed packed) clusters and to a less degree, bcc clusters. This detailed geometric picture for crystallization of liquid metal is believed to be useful to improve the fundamental understanding of liquid–solid phase transition. - Highlights: • A comprehensive structural analysis is conducted focusing on crystallization. • The involved atoms in our analysis are more than 90% for all samples concerned. • A series of distinct intermediate states are found in crystallization of silver melt. • A novelty icosahedron-saturated state breeds the metastable bcc state.

  16. Lagrangian coherent structures are associated with fluctuations in airborne microbial populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tallapragada, P.; Ross, S. D.; Schmale, D. G.

    2011-09-01

    Many microorganisms are advected in the lower atmosphere from one habitat to another with scales of motion being hundreds to thousands of kilometers. The concentration of these microbes in the lower atmosphere at a single geographic location can show rapid temporal changes. We used autonomous unmanned aerial vehicles equipped with microbe-sampling devices to collect fungi in the genus Fusarium 100 m above ground level at a single sampling location in Blacksburg, Virginia, USA. Some Fusarium species are important plant and animal pathogens, others saprophytes, and still others are producers of dangerous toxins. We correlated punctuated changes in the concentration of Fusarium to the movement of atmospheric transport barriers identified as finite-time Lyapunov exponent-based Lagrangian coherent structures (LCSs). An analysis of the finite-time Lyapunov exponent field for periods surrounding 73 individual flight collections of Fusarium showed a relationship between punctuated changes in concentrations of Fusarium and the passage times of LCSs, particularly repelling LCSs. This work has implications for understanding the atmospheric transport of invasive microbial species into previously unexposed regions and may contribute to information systems for pest management and disease control in the future.

  17. Barrancaceae: A new green algal lineage with structural and behavioral adaptations to a fluctuating environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caisová, Lenka; Reyes, Carolina Pérez; Álamo, Virginia Cruz; Quintana, Antera Martel; Surek, Barbara; Melkonian, Michael

    2015-09-01

    To enhance our knowledge of the diversity of microalgae, a phycological survey of the Canary Islands (Spain) was undertaken. Here we report the discovery of a (semi)terrestrial green filamentous alga isolated from a steep volcanic canyon on La Palma. This alga is continually exposed to changing weather conditions (floods vs. droughts) and thus provides a good opportunity to investigate possible adaptations to a semiterrestrial habitat with large fluctuations of environmental parameters. We used axenic cultures, simulated flood and drought stresses and studied their effect on the life history of the alga using light, confocal laser scanning and scanning electron microscopy including fluorescent staining. Furthermore, phylogenetic analyses using rDNA sequence comparisons were performed. Three specific life-history traits that likely represent adaptations to the fluctuating environment of the canyon were observed: (1) fragmentation through "filament splitting", a unique branching mechanism not reported before in algae and initiated by formation of oblique cross walls, (2) aplanospore formation, and (3) reproduction by multiflagellate zoospores with 4-24 flagella arranged in groups of four. Phylogenetic analyses identified the alga as Barranca multiflagellata gen. et sp. nov. (Barrancaceae fam. nov., Chaetophorales, Chlorophyceae). Moreover, the Chaetophoraceae Greville, 1824 was emended and a new family, Uronemataceae (fam. nov.) erected. The discovery of Barrancaceae fam. nov. highlights the importance of investigating nonconventional habitats to explore microalgal diversity. The reproductive versatility demonstrated by Barranca suggests adaptation to a semiterrestrial habitat with large fluctuations in water availability. © 2015 Botanical Society of America.

  18. Rapid fluctuations in flow and water-column properties in Asan Bay, Guam: implications for selective resilience of coral reefs in warming seas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storlazzi, C.D.; Field, M.E.; Cheriton, O.M.; Presto, M.K.; Logan, J.B.

    2013-01-01

    Hydrodynamics and water-column properties were investigated off west-central Guam from July 2007 through January 2008. Rapid fluctuations, on time scales of 10s of min, in currents, temperature, salinity, and acoustic backscatter were observed to occur on sub-diurnal frequencies along more than 2 km of the fore reef but not at the reef crest. During periods characterized by higher sea-surface temperatures (SSTs), weaker wind forcing, smaller ocean surface waves, and greater thermal stratification, rapid decreases in temperature and concurrent rapid increases in salinity and acoustic backscatter coincided with onshore-directed near-bed currents and offshore-directed near-surface currents. During the study, these cool-water events, on average, lasted 2.3 h and decreased the water temperature 0.57 °C, increased the salinity 0.25 PSU, and were two orders of magnitude more prevalent during the summer season than the winter. During the summer season when the average satellite-derived SST anomaly was +0.63 °C, these cooling events, on average, lowered the temperature 1.14 °C along the fore reef but only 0.11 °C along the reef crest. The rapid shifts appear to be the result of internal tidal bores pumping cooler, more saline, higher-backscatter oceanic water from depths >50 m over cross-shore distances of 100 s of m into the warmer, less saline waters at depths of 20 m and shallower. Such internal bores appear to have the potential to buffer shallow coral reefs from predicted increases in SSTs by bringing cool, offshore water to shallow coral environments. These cooling internal bores may also provide additional benefits to offset stress such as supplying food to thermally stressed corals, reducing stress due to ultraviolet radiation and/or low salinity, and delivering coral larvae from deeper reefs not impacted by surface thermal stress. Thus, the presence of internal bores might be an important factor locally in the resilience of select coral reefs facing increased

  19. Metrics for rapid quality control in RNA structure probing experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Krishna; Shih, Nathan P; Deng, Fei; Ledda, Mirko; Li, Bo; Aviran, Sharon

    2016-12-01

    The diverse functionalities of RNA can be attributed to its capacity to form complex and varied structures. The recent proliferation of new structure probing techniques coupled with high-throughput sequencing has helped RNA studies expand in both scope and depth. Despite differences in techniques, most experiments face similar challenges in reproducibility due to the stochastic nature of chemical probing and sequencing. As these protocols expand to transcriptome-wide studies, quality control becomes a more daunting task. General and efficient methodologies are needed to quantify variability and quality in the wide range of current and emerging structure probing experiments. We develop metrics to rapidly and quantitatively evaluate data quality from structure probing experiments, demonstrating their efficacy on both small synthetic libraries and transcriptome-wide datasets. We use a signal-to-noise ratio concept to evaluate replicate agreement, which has the capacity to identify high-quality data. We also consider and compare two methods to assess variability inherent in probing experiments, which we then utilize to evaluate the coverage adjustments needed to meet desired quality. The developed metrics and tools will be useful in summarizing large-scale datasets and will help standardize quality control in the field. The data and methods used in this article are freely available at: http://bme.ucdavis.edu/aviranlab/SPEQC_software CONTACT: saviran@ucdavis.eduSupplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Investigating the radial structure of axisymmetric fluctuations in the TCV tokamak with local and global gyrokinetic GENE simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlo, G.; Brunner, S.; Huang, Z.; Coda, S.; Görler, T.; Villard, L.; Bañón Navarro, A.; Dominski, J.; Fontana, M.; Jenko, F.; Porte, L.; Told, D.

    2018-03-01

    Axisymmetric (n = 0) density fluctuations measured in the TCV tokamak are observed to possess a frequency f 0 which is either varying (radially dispersive oscillations) or a constant over a large fraction of the plasma minor radius (radially global oscillations) as reported in a companion paper (Z Huang et al, this issue). Given that f 0 scales with the sound speed and given the poloidal structure of density fluctuations, these oscillations were interpreted as Geodesic Acoustic Modes, even though f 0 is in fact smaller than the local linear GAM frequency {f}{GAM}. In this work we employ the Eulerian gyrokinetic code GENE to simulate TCV relevant conditions and investigate the nature and properties of these oscillations, in particular their relation to the safety factor profile. Local and global simulations are carried out and a good qualitative agreement is observed between experiments and simulations. By varying also the plasma temperature and density profiles, we conclude that a variation of the edge safety factor alone is not sufficient to induce a transition from global to radially inhomogeneous oscillations, as was initially suggested by experimental results. This transition appears instead to be the combined result of variations in the different plasma profiles, collisionality and finite machine size effects. Simulations also show that radially global GAM-like oscillations can be observed in all fluxes and fluctuation fields, suggesting that they are the result of a complex nonlinear process involving also finite toroidal mode numbers and not just linear global GAM eigenmodes.

  1. Turbulent Fluctuations in G-band and K-line Intensities Observed with the Rapid Oscillations in the Solar Atmosphere (ROSA) Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadavid, A. C.; Lawrence, J. K.; Christian, D. J.; Jess, D. B.; Mathioudakis, M.

    2012-12-01

    Using the Rapid Oscillation in the Solar Atmosphere (ROSA) instrument at the Dunn Solar Telescope we have found that the spectra of fluctuations of the G-band (cadence 1.05 s) and Ca II K-line (cadence 4.2 s) intensities show correlated fluctuations above white noise out to frequencies beyond 300 mHz and up to 70 mHz, respectively. The noise-corrected G-band spectrum presents a scaling range (Ultra High Frequency “UHF”) for f = 25-100 mHz, with an exponent consistent with the presence of turbulent motions. The UHF power, is concentrated at the locations of magnetic bright points in the intergranular lanes, it is highly intermittent in time and characterized by a positive kurtosis κ. Combining values of G-band and K-line intensities, the UHF power, and κ, reveals two distinct “states” of the internetwork solar atmosphere. State 1, with κ ≍ 6, which includes almost all the data, is characterized by low intensities and low UHF power. State 2, with κ ≍ 3, including a very small fraction of the data, is characterized by high intensities and high UHF power. Superposed epoch analysis shows that for State 1, the K-line intensity presents 3.5 min chromospheric oscillations with maxima occurring 21 s after G-band intensity maxima implying a 150-210 km effective height difference. For State 2, the G-band and K-line intensity maxima are simultaneous, suggesting that in the highly magnetized environment sites of G-band and K-line emission may be spatially close together. Analysis of observations obtained with Hinode/SOT confirm a scaling range in the G-band spectrum up to 53 mHz also consistent with turbulent motions as well as the identification of two distinct states in terms of the H-line intensity and G-band power as functions of G-band intensity.

  2. Filopodia: A Rapid Structural Plasticity Substrate for Fast Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet S. Ozcan

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Formation of new synapses between neurons is an essential mechanism for learning and encoding memories. The vast majority of excitatory synapses occur on dendritic spines, therefore, the growth dynamics of spines is strongly related to the plasticity timescales. Especially in the early stages of the developing brain, there is an abundant number of long, thin and motile protrusions (i.e., filopodia, which develop in timescales of seconds and minutes. Because of their unique morphology and motility, it has been suggested that filopodia can have a dual role in both spinogenesis and environmental sampling of potential axonal partners. I propose that filopodia can lower the threshold and reduce the time to form new dendritic spines and synapses, providing a substrate for fast learning. Based on this proposition, the functional role of filopodia during brain development is discussed in relation to learning and memory. Specifically, it is hypothesized that the postnatal brain starts with a single-stage memory system with filopodia playing a significant role in rapid structural plasticity along with the stability provided by the mushroom-shaped spines. Following the maturation of the hippocampus, this highly-plastic unitary system transitions to a two-stage memory system, which consists of a plastic temporary store and a long-term stable store. In alignment with these architectural changes, it is posited that after brain maturation, filopodia-based structural plasticity will be preserved in specific areas, which are involved in fast learning (e.g., hippocampus in relation to episodic memory. These propositions aim to introduce a unifying framework for a diversity of phenomena in the brain such as synaptogenesis, pruning and memory consolidation.

  3. 3D Printing for the Rapid Prototyping of Structural Electronics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Macdonald, Eric; Salas, Rudy; Espalin, David; Perez, Mireya; Aguilera, Efrain; Muse, Dan; Wicker, Ryan B

    2014-01-01

    .... The use of advanced 3D printing technology enhanced with component placement and electrical interconnect deposition can provide electronic prototypes that now can be rapidly fabricated in comparable...

  4. Lagrangian coherent structures are associated with fluctuations in airborne microbial populations

    OpenAIRE

    P. Tallapragada; Ross, Shane D.; Schmale, D. G., III

    2011-01-01

    Many microorganisms are advected in the lower atmosphere from one habitat to another with scales of motion being hundreds to thousands of kilometers. The concentration of these microbes in the lower atmosphere at a single geographic location can show rapid temporal changes. We used autonomous unmanned aerial vehicles equipped with microbe-sampling devices to collect fungi in the genus Fusarium 100 m above ground level at a single sampling location in Blacksburg, Virginia, USA. Some Fusarium s...

  5. Quantum phase transitions in strained graphene due to the interplay between spin fluctuations and anisotropic band structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arya, S.; Laad, M. S.; Hassan, S. R.

    2017-08-01

    Strain tuning is increasingly being recognized as a clean tuning parameter to induce novel behavior in quantum matter. Motivated by the possibility of straining graphene up to 20 percent, we investigate novel quantum criticality due to interplay between strain-induced anisotropic band structure and critical antiferromagnetic (AF) spin fluctuations in this setting. We detail how this interplay drives (i) a quantum phase transition (QPT) between the Dirac-semimetal-incoherent pseudogapped metal-correlated insulator as a function of strain (ɛ ), and (ii) critical AF spin fluctuations-driven divergent nematic susceptibility near critical strain (ɛc) manifesting as critical singularities in magnetothermal expansion and Grüneisen coefficients. The correlated band insulator at large strain affords realization of a two-dimensional dimerized spin-singlet state due to this interplay, and doping such an insulator can lead to a spin-charge separated metal, leading to anomalous metallicity and possible unconventional superconductivity. On a wider front, our work serves to illustrate the range of novel states realizable by strain-tuning quantum materials.

  6. Theoretical study of the thermally induced structural fluctuations in sub-nanometre size gold clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera-Trujillo, José Manuel; Martín Montejano-Carrizales, Juan; Aguilera-Granja, Faustino; Posada-Amarillas, Álvaro

    2015-07-01

    A reactive potential model and the classical molecular dynamics method (RMD) have been used to study the structure and energetics of sub-nanometre size gold clusters through well-known structural models reported in the literature for AuN, with N = 19, 20 and 21 atoms. After several simulated-annealing simulations for temperatures up to 1500 K, the AuN clusters clearly evolve to well-defined structures at room temperature. For the studied gold clusters, the low-lying structures are single- and double-icosahedra with mobile atoms on the surface, in agreement with experimental results on sub-nanometre size gold clusters exhibiting shape oscillations at room temperature and also with those involved in the design of molecules based on gold superatoms [J.-I. Nishigaki, K. Koyasu, T. Tsukuda, Chem. Rec. 14, 897 (2014)]. The evolution of the structural stability of the AuN clusters under exceptional thermal conditions is analysed by comparing the size and temperature variations of the centrosymmetry parameter and the potential energy. A key understanding of the various possible structural changes undergone by these tiny particles is thus developed. The usefulness of the RMD to study nanometre or sub-nanometre size gold clusters is shown.

  7. Modeling multiphase flow using fluctuating hydrodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhri, Anuj; Bell, John B; Garcia, Alejandro L; Donev, Aleksandar

    2014-09-01

    Fluctuating hydrodynamics provides a model for fluids at mesoscopic scales where thermal fluctuations can have a significant impact on the behavior of the system. Here we investigate a model for fluctuating hydrodynamics of a single-component, multiphase flow in the neighborhood of the critical point. The system is modeled using a compressible flow formulation with a van der Waals equation of state, incorporating a Korteweg stress term to treat interfacial tension. We present a numerical algorithm for modeling this system based on an extension of algorithms developed for fluctuating hydrodynamics for ideal fluids. The scheme is validated by comparison of measured structure factors and capillary wave spectra with equilibrium theory. We also present several nonequilibrium examples to illustrate the capability of the algorithm to model multiphase fluid phenomena in a neighborhood of the critical point. These examples include a study of the impact of fluctuations on the spinodal decomposition following a rapid quench, as well as the piston effect in a cavity with supercooled walls. The conclusion in both cases is that thermal fluctuations affect the size and growth of the domains in off-critical quenches.

  8. Spontaneous Slow Fluctuation of EEG Alpha Rhythm Reflects Activity in Deep-Brain Structures: A Simultaneous EEG-fMRI Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kei Omata

    Full Text Available The emergence of the occipital alpha rhythm on brain electroencephalogram (EEG is associated with brain activity in the cerebral neocortex and deep brain structures. To further understand the mechanisms of alpha rhythm power fluctuation, we performed simultaneous EEGs and functional magnetic resonance imaging recordings in human subjects during a resting state and explored the dynamic relationship between alpha power fluctuation and blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD signals of the brain. Based on the frequency characteristics of the alpha power time series (APTS during 20-minute EEG recordings, we divided the APTS into two components: fast fluctuation (0.04-0.167 Hz and slow fluctuation (0-0.04 Hz. Analysis of the correlation between the MRI signal and each component revealed that the slow fluctuation component of alpha power was positively correlated with BOLD signal changes in the brain stem and the medial part of the thalamus and anterior cingulate cortex, while the fast fluctuation component was correlated with the lateral part of the thalamus and the anterior cingulate cortex, but not the brain stem. In summary, these data suggest that different subcortical structures contribute to slow and fast modulations of alpha spectra on brain EEG.

  9. Fluctuations in ammonia oxidizing communities across agricultural soils are driven by soil structure and pH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele C ePereira e Silva

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The milieu in soil in which microorganisms dwell is never constant. Conditions such as temperature, water availability, pH and nutrients frequently change, impacting the overall functioning of the soil system. To understand the effects of such factors on soil functioning, proxies (indicators of soil function are needed that, in a sensitive manner, reveal normal amplitude of variation. Thus, the so-called normal operating range (NOR of soil can be defined. In this study we determined different components of nitrification by analyzing, in eight agricultural soils, how the community structures and sizes of ammonia oxidizing bacteria and archaea (AOB and AOA, respectively, and their activity, fluctuate over spatial and temporal scales. The results indicated that soil pH and soil type are the main factors that influence the size and structure of the AOA and AOB, as well as their function. The nitrification rates varied between 0.11 ± 0.03 µgN.h-1.gdw-1 and 1.68 ± 0.11 µgN.h-1.gdw-1, being higher in soils with higher clay content (1.09 ± 0.12 µgN.h-1.gdw-1 and lower in soils with lower clay percentages (0.27 ± 0.04 µgN.h-1.gdw-1. Nitrifying activity was driven by soil pH, mostly related to its effect on AOA but not on AOB abundance. Regarding the influence of soil parameters, clay content was the main soil factor shaping the structure of both the AOA and AOB communities. Overall, the potential nitrifying activities were higher and more variable over time in the clayey than in the sandy soils. Whereas the structure of AOB fluctuated more (62.7 ± 2.10% the structure of AOA communities showed lower amplitude of variation (53.65 ± 3.37%. Similar trends were observed for the sizes of these communities. The present work represents a first step towards defining a NOR for soil nitrification. Moreover, the clear effect of soil texture established here suggests that the NOR should be defined in a soil-type-specific manner.

  10. Electronic instabilities and structural fluctuations in self-assembled atom wires

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snijders, P.C.

    2006-01-01

    One-dimensional (1D) solid state systems can behave drastically different from their higher dimensional counterparts. Increased interactions can produce electronic and/or structural instabilities. In this respect, the following fundamental questions are important for a proper understanding of the

  11. Continuous information flow fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosinberg, Martin Luc; Horowitz, Jordan M.

    2016-10-01

    Information plays a pivotal role in the thermodynamics of nonequilibrium processes with feedback. However, much remains to be learned about the nature of information fluctuations in small-scale devices and their relation with fluctuations in other thermodynamics quantities, like heat and work. Here we derive a series of fluctuation theorems for information flow and partial entropy production in a Brownian particle model of feedback cooling and extend them to arbitrary driven diffusion processes. We then analyze the long-time behavior of the feedback-cooling model in detail. Our results provide insights into the structure and origin of large deviations of information and thermodynamic quantities in autonomous Maxwell's demons.

  12. Magnetism-Structure Correlations during the ε→τ Transformation in Rapidly-Solidified MnAl Nanostructured Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Jiménez-Villacorta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic and structural aspects of the annealing-induced transformation of rapidly-solidified Mn55Al45 ribbons from the as-quenched metastable antiferromagnetic (AF ε-phase to the target ferromagnetic (FM L10 τ-phase are investigated. The as-solidified material exhibits a majority hexagonal ε-MnAl phase revealing a large exchange bias shift below a magnetic blocking temperature TB~95 K (Hex~13 kOe at 10 K, ascribed to the presence of compositional fluctuations in this antiferromagnetic phase. Heat treatment at a relatively low annealing temperature Tanneal ≈ 568 K (295 °C promotes the nucleation of the metastable L10 τ-MnAl phase at the expense of the parent ε-phase, donating an increasingly hard ferromagnetic character. The onset of the ε→τ transformation occurs at a temperature that is ~100 K lower than that reported in the literature, highlighting the benefits of applying rapid solidification for synthesis of the rapidly-solidified parent alloy.

  13. Magnetism-Structure Correlations during the epsilon ->tau Transformation in Rapidly-Solidified MnAl Nanostructured Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez-Villacorta, F; Marion, JL; Oldham, JT; Daniil, M; Willard, MA; Lewis, LH

    2014-01-21

    Magnetic and structural aspects of the annealing-induced transformation of rapidly-solidified Mn55Al45 ribbons from the as-quenched metastable antiferromagnetic (AF) epsilon-phase to the target ferromagnetic (FM) L1(0) tau-phase are investigated. The as-solidified material exhibits a majority hexagonal epsilon-MnAl phase revealing a large exchange bias shift below a magnetic blocking temperature T-B similar to 95 K (H-ex similar to 13 kOe at 10 K), ascribed to the presence of compositional fluctuations in this antiferromagnetic phase. Heat treatment at a relatively low annealing temperature T-anneal approximate to 568 K (295 degrees C) promotes the nucleation of the metastable L1(0) tau-MnAl phase at the expense of the parent epsilon-phase, donating an increasingly hard ferromagnetic character. The onset of the epsilon ->tau transformation occurs at a temperature that is similar to 100 K lower than that reported in the literature, highlighting the benefits of applying rapid solidification for synthesis of the rapidly-solidified parent alloy.

  14. Consumptive and nonconsumptive effects of cannibalism in fluctuating age-structured populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wissinger, Scott A; Whiteman, Howard H; Denoël, Mathieu; Mumford, Miranda L; Aubee, Catherine B

    2010-02-01

    Theory and empirical studies suggest that cannibalism in age-structured populations can regulate recruitment depending on the intensity of intraspecific competition between cannibals and victims and the nature of the cannibalism window, i.e., which size classes interact as cannibals and victims. Here we report on a series of experiments that quantify that window for age-structured populations of salamander larvae and paedomorphic adults. We determined body size limits on cannibalism in microcosms and then the consumptive and nonconsumptive (injuries, foraging and activity, diet, growth) effects on victims in mesocosms with seminatural levels of habitat complexity and alternative prey. We found that cannibalism by the largest size classes (paedomorphs and > or = age 3+ yr larvae) occurs mainly on young-of-the-year (YOY) victims. Surviving YOY and other small larvae had increased injuries, reduced activity levels, and reduced growth rates in the presence of cannibals. Data on YOY survival in an experiment in which we manipulated the density of paedomorphs combined with historical data on the number of cannibals in natural populations indicate that dominant cohorts of paedomorphs can cause observed recruitment failures. Dietary data indicate that ontogenetic shifts in diet should preclude strong intraspecific competition between YOY and cannibals in this species. Thus our results are consistent with previous empirical and theoretical work that suggests that recruitment regulation by cannibalism is most likely when YOY are vulnerable to cannibalism but have low dietary overlap with cannibals. Understanding the role of cannibalism in regulating recruitment in salamander populations is timely, given the widespread occurrences of amphibian decline. Previous studies have focused on extrinsic (including anthropogenic) factors that affect amphibian population dynamics, whereas the data presented here combined with long-term field observations suggest the potential for

  15. Population structure, fluctuating asymmetry and genetic variability in an endemic and highly isolated Astyanax fish population (Characidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Claudia Gross

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Morphological and chromosomal markers were used to infer the structure and genetic variability of a population of fish of the genus Astyanax, geographically isolated at sinkhole 2 of Vila Velha State Park, Paraná, Brazil. Two morphotypes types were observed, the standard phenotype I and phenotype II which showed an anatomical alteration probably due to an inbreeding process. Fluctuating asymmetry (FA analysis of different characters showed low levels of morphological variation among the population from sinkhole 2 and in another population from the Tibagi river (Paraná, Brazil. The Astyanax karyotype was characterized in terms of chromosomal morphology, constitutive heterochromatin and nucleolar organizer regions. Males and females presented similar karyotypes (2n=48, 6M+18SM+14ST+10A with no evidence of a sex chromosome system. One female from sinkhole 2 was a natural triploid with 2n=3x=72 chromosomes (9M+27SM+21ST+15A. The data are discussed regarding the maintenance of population structure and their evolutionary importance, our data suggesting that Astyanax from the Vila Velha State Park sinkhole 2 is a recently isolated population.

  16. Changes in the Fine Structure of Stochastic Distributions as a Consequence of Space-Time Fluctuations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shnoll S. E.

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available This is a survey of the fine structure stochastic distributions in measurements obtained by me over 50 years. It is shown: (1 The forms of the histograms obtained at each geographic point (at each given moment of time are similar with high probability, even if we register phenomena of completely different nature --- from biochemical reactions to the noise in a gravitational antenna, or alpha-decay. (2 The forms of the histograms change with time. The iterations of the same form have the periods of the stellar day (1.436 min, the solar day (1.440 min, the calendar year (365 solar days, and the sidereal year (365 solar days plus 6 hours and 9 min. (3 At the same instants of the local time, at different geographic points, the forms of the histograms are the same, with high probability. (4 The forms of the histograms depend on the locations of the Moon and the Sun with respect to the horizon. (5 All the facts are proof of the dependance of the form of the histograms on the location of the measured objects with respect to stars, the Sun, and the Moon. (6 At the instants of New Moon and the maxima of solar eclipses there are specific forms of the histograms. (7 It is probable that the observed correlations are not connected to flow power changes (the changes of the gravity force --- we did not find the appropriate periods in changes in histogram form. (8 A sharp anisotropy of space was discovered, registered by alpha-decay detectors armed with collimators. Observations at 54 North (the collimator was pointed at the Pole Star showed no day-long periods, as was also the case for observations at 82 North, near the Pole. Histograms obtained by observations with an Easterly-directed collimator were determined every 718 minutes (half stellar day and with observations using a Westerly-directed collimator. (9 Collimators rotating counter-clockwise, in parallel with the celestial equator, gave the probability of changes in histograms as the number of the

  17. Changes in the Fine Structure of Stochastic Distributions as a Consequence of Space-Time Fluctuations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shnoll S. E.

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available This is a survey of the fine structure stochastic distributions in measurements obtained by me over 50 years. It is shown: (1 The forms of the histograms obtained at each geographic point (at each given moment of time are similar with high probability, even if we register phenomena of completely different nature — from biochemical reactions to the noise in a gravitational antenna, or α-decay. (2 The forms of the histograms change with time. The iterations of the same form have the periods of the stellar day (1.436 min, the solar day (1.440 min, the calendar year (365 solar days, and the sidereal year (365 solar days plus 6 hours and 9 min. (3 At the same instants of the local time, at different geographic points, the forms of the histograms are the same, with high probability. (4 The forms of the histograms depend on the locations of the Moon and the Sun with respect to the horizon. (5 All the facts are proof of the dependance of the form of the histograms on the location of the measured objects with respect to stars, the Sun, and the Moon. (6 At the instants of New Moon and the maxima of solar eclipses there are specific forms of the histograms. (7 It is probable that the observed correlations are not connected to flow power changes (the changes of the gravity force — we did not find the appropriate periods in changes in histogram form. (8 A sharp anisotropy of space was discovered, registered by α-decay detectors armed with collimators. Observations at 54◦ North (the collimator was pointed at the Pole Star showed no day-long periods, as was also the case for observations at 82◦ North, near the Pole. Histograms obtained by observations with an Easterly-directed collimator were determined every 718 minutes (half stellar day and with observations using a Westerly-directed collimator. (9 Collimators rotating counter-clockwise, in parallel with the celestial equator, gave the probability of changes in histograms as the number of the

  18. Sound Transmission through Cylindrical Shell Structures Excited by Boundary Layer Pressure Fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yvette Y.; Silcox, Richard J.; Robinson, Jay H.

    1996-01-01

    This paper examines sound transmission into two concentric cylindrical sandwich shells subject to turbulent flow on the exterior surface of the outer shell. The interior of the shells is filled with fluid medium and there is an airgap between the shells in the annular space. The description of the pressure field is based on the cross-spectral density formulation of Corcos, Maestrello, and Efimtsov models of the turbulent boundary layer. The classical thin shell theory and the first-order shear deformation theory are applied for the inner and outer shells, respectively. Modal expansion and the Galerkin approach are used to obtain closed-form solutions for the shell displacements and the radiation and transmission pressures in the cavities including both the annular space and the interior. The average spectral density of the structural responses and the transmitted interior pressures are expressed explicitly in terms of the summation of the cross-spectral density of generalized force induced by the boundary layer turbulence. The effects of acoustic and hydrodynamic coincidences on the spectral density are observed. Numerical examples are presented to illustrate the method for both subsonic and supersonic flows.

  19. [Correlation of fine structures of distributions of amplitudes of a photomultiplier dark current fluctuations with the Earth rotations about its axis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorov, M V; Belousov, L V; Voeĭkov, V L; Zenchenko, K I; Zenchenko, T A; Konradov, A A; Shnol', S E

    2001-01-01

    The fine structures of distributions of photomultiplier dark current fluctuations measured in two laboratories 2000 km distant from other: in the international Institute of Biophysics (Neuss, Germany) and in the Moscow State University (Moscow, Russia) were compared. It is shown that similar forms of appropriate histograms are apparently more often realized at both locations at the same local time. This confirms the previous conclusion that the fine structure of distributions correlates with rotation of the Earth about its axis.

  20. Rapid NMR screening of RNA secondary structure and binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helmling, Christina; Keyhani, Sara; Sochor, Florian; Fürtig, Boris; Hengesbach, Martin; Schwalbe, Harald, E-mail: schwalbe@nmr.uni-frankfurt.de [Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universität, Institut für Organische Chemie und Chemische Biologie, Center for Biomolecular Magnetic Resonance (BMRZ) (Germany)

    2015-09-15

    Determination of RNA secondary structures by NMR spectroscopy is a useful tool e.g. to elucidate RNA folding space or functional aspects of regulatory RNA elements. However, current approaches of RNA synthesis and preparation are usually time-consuming and do not provide analysis with single nucleotide precision when applied for a large number of different RNA sequences. Here, we significantly improve the yield and 3′ end homogeneity of RNA preparation by in vitro transcription. Further, by establishing a native purification procedure with increased throughput, we provide a shortcut to study several RNA constructs simultaneously. We show that this approach yields μmol quantities of RNA with purities comparable to PAGE purification, while avoiding denaturation of the RNA.

  1. Structural instability and phase co-existence driven non-Gaussian resistance fluctuations in metal nanowires at low temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bid, Aveek; Raychaudhuri, A. K.

    2016-11-01

    We report a detailed experimental study of the resistance fluctuations measured at low temperatures in high quality metal nanowires ranging in diameter from 15-200 nm. The wires exhibit co-existing face-centered-cubic and 4H hcp phases of varying degrees as determined from the x-ray diffraction data. We observe the appearance of a large non-Gaussian noise for nanowires of diameter smaller than 50 nm over a certain temperature range around ≈30 K. The diameter range ˜30 nm, where the noise has maxima coincides with the maximum volume fraction of the co-existing 4H hcp phase thus establishing a strong link between the fluctuation and the phase co-existence. The resistance fluctuation in the same temperature range also shows a deviation of 1/f behavior at low frequency with appearance of single frequency Lorentzian type contribution in the spectral power density. The fluctuations are thermally activated with an activation energy {E}{{a}}˜ 35 meV, which is of same order as the activation energy of creation of stacking fault in FCC metals that leads to the co-existing crystallographic phases. Combining the results of crystallographic studies of the nanowires and analysis of the resistance fluctuations we could establish the correlation between the appearance of the large resistance noise and the onset of phase co-existence in these nanowires.

  2. Development of flexural vibration inspection techniques to rapidly assess the structural health of rural bridge systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brian K. Brashaw; Robert Vatalaro; Xiping Wang; Kevin Sarvela; James P. Wacker

    2008-01-01

    Approximately 4,000 vehicle bridges in the State of Minnesota contain structural timber members. Recent research at the University of Minnesota Duluth Natural Resources Research Institute (UMD NRRI) has been conducted on vibration testing of timber bridges as a means of developing rapid in-place testing techniques for assessing the structural health of bridges. The...

  3. Effects of the layered structure of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} on the superconducting fluctuations; Influence de la structure lamellaire sur les fluctuations supraconductrices dans YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baraduc, C.

    1994-06-01

    The study mainly addresses Gaussian fluctuations, with the Lawrence-Doniach model used as a framework for describing the coupled superconducting planes. The fluctuations in zero magnetic field and especially the conductivity fluctuations are studied theoretically and experimentally. It is shown that the conductivity does not follow the same mechanism when current flows along the planes or perpendicularly to them. When fluctuations are confined in each plane, a two-dimensional mechanism is observed for the parallel conductivity whereas a zero-dimensional one controls the perpendicular conductivity, which can be understood as a hopping process. Fluctuations under magnetic field, applied in the perpendicular direction, are also examined. Different scaling laws are proposed and compared for experimental magnetization data. It is shown that the 2D-3D cross-over, characterizing a layered structure, still remains under field. The observation of a crossing point in the magnetic curves raises the problem of vortex fluctuations even in this moderately anisotropic compound. 48 figs., 86 refs.

  4. Cosmological density fluctuations and large-scale structure From N-point correlation functions to the probability distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, J. N.

    1985-01-01

    Knowledge of N-point correlation functions for all N allows one to invert and obtain the probability distribution of mass fluctuations in a fixed volume. The hierarchical sequence of higher order is applied to correlations with dimensionless amplitudes suggested by the BBGKY equations. The resulting distribution is significantly non-Gaussian, even for quite small mean square fluctuations. The qualitative and to some degree quantitative results are to a large degree independent of the exact sequence of amplitudes. An ensemble of such models compared with N-body simulations fails in detail to account for the low-density frequency distribution.

  5. Spin fluctuations and the

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.M. Loktev

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available We analyze the spectral properties of a phenomenological model for a weakly doped two-dimensional antiferromagnet, in which the carriers move within one of the two sublattices where they were introduced. Such a constraint results in the free carrier spectra with the maxima at k=(± π/2 , ± π/2 observed in some cuprates. We consider the spectral properties of the model by taking into account fluctuations of the spins in the antiferromagnetic background. We show that such fluctuations lead to a non-pole-like structure of the single-hole Green's function and these fluctuations can be responsible for some anomalous "strange metal" properties of underdoped cuprates in the nonsuperconducting regime.

  6. Rapid Assessment of Aircraft Structural Topologies for Multidisciplinary Optimization and Weight Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samareh, Jamshid A.; Sensmeier, mark D.; Stewart, Bret A.

    2006-01-01

    Algorithms for rapid generation of moderate-fidelity structural finite element models of air vehicle structures to allow more accurate weight estimation earlier in the vehicle design process have been developed. Application of these algorithms should help to rapidly assess many structural layouts before the start of the preliminary design phase and eliminate weight penalties imposed when actual structure weights exceed those estimated during conceptual design. By defining the structural topology in a fully parametric manner, the structure can be mapped to arbitrary vehicle configurations being considered during conceptual design optimization. Recent enhancements to this approach include the porting of the algorithms to a platform-independent software language Python, and modifications to specifically consider morphing aircraft-type configurations. Two sample cases which illustrate these recent developments are presented.

  7. Rapidity-Rank Structure of $p\\overline{p}$ Pairs in Hadronic $Z^{0}$ Decays

    CERN Document Server

    Abreu, P.; Adye, T.; Adzic, P.; Azhinenko, I.; Albrecht, Z.; Alderweireld, T.; Alekseev, G.D.; Alemany, R.; Allmendinger, T.; Allport, P.P.; Almehed, S.; Amaldi, U.; Amapane, N.; Amato, S.; Anassontzis, E.G.; Andersson, P.; Andreazza, A.; Andringa, S.; Antilogus, P.; Apel, W.D.; Arnoud, Y.; Asman, B.; Augustin, J.E.; Augustinus, A.; Baillon, P.; Bambade, P.; Barao, F.; Barbiellini, G.; Barbier, R.; Bardin, D.Yu.; Barker, G.J.; Baroncelli, A.; Battaglia, M.; Baubillier, M.; Becks, K.H.; Begalli, M.; Behrmann, A.; Beilliere, P.; Belokopytov, Yu.; Benekos, N.C.; Benvenuti, A.C.; Berat, C.; Berggren, M.; Bertrand, D.; Besancon, M.; Bigi, M.; Bilenky, Mikhail S.; Bizouard, M.A.; Bloch, D.; Blom, H.M.; Bonesini, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Booth, P.S.L.; Borgland, A.W.; Borisov, G.; Bosio, C.; Botner, O.; Boudinov, E.; Bouquet, B.; Bourdarios, C.; Bowcock, T.J.V.; Boyko, I.; Bozovic, I.; Bozzo, M.; Bracko, M.; Branchini, P.; Brenner, R.A.; Bruckman, P.; Brunet, J.M.; Bugge, L.; Buran, T.; Buschbeck, B.; Buschmann, P.; Cabrera, S.; Caccia, M.; Calvi, M.; Camporesi, T.; Canale, V.; Carena, F.; Carroll, L.; Caso, C.; Castillo Gimenez, M.V.; Cattai, A.; Cavallo, F.R.; Chabaud, V.; Charpentier, P.; Checchia, P.; Chelkov, G.A.; Chierici, R.; Shlyapnikov, P.; Chochula, P.; Chorowicz, V.; Chudoba, J.; Cieslik, K.; Collins, P.; Contri, R.; Cortina, E.; Cosme, G.; Cossutti, F.; Crawley, H.B.; Crennell, D.; Crepe-Renaudin, Sabine; Crosetti, G.; Cuevas Maestro, J.; Czellar, S.; Davenport, M.; Da Silva, W.; Della Ricca, G.; Delpierre, P.; Demaria, N.; De Angelis, A.; De Boer, W.; De Clercq, C.; De Lotto, B.; De Min, A.; De Paula, L.; Dijkstra, H.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Dolbeau, J.; Doroba, K.; Dracos, M.; Drees, J.; Dris, M.; Duperrin, A.; Durand, J.D.; Eigen, G.; Ekelof, T.; Ekspong, G.; Ellert, M.; Elsing, M.; Engel, J.P.; Espirito Santo, M.C.; Fanourakis, G.; Fassouliotis, D.; Fayot, J.; Feindt, M.; Ferrer, A.; Ferrer-Ribas, E.; Ferro, F.; Fichet, S.; Firestone, A.; Flagmeyer, U.; Foeth, H.; Fokitis, E.; Fontanelli, F.; Franek, B.; Frodesen, A.G.; Fruhwirth, R.; Fulda-Quenzer, F.; Fuster, J.; Galloni, A.; Gamba, D.; Gamblin, S.; Gandelman, M.; Garcia, C.; Gaspar, C.; Gaspar, M.; Gasparini, U.; Gavillet, P.; Gazis, Evangelos; Gele, D.; Gerdyukov, L.; Ghodbane, N.; Gil Botella, Ines; Glege, F.; Gokieli, R.; Golob, B.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncalves, P.; Gonzalez Caballero, I.; Gopal, G.; Gorn, L.; Gracco, V.; Grahl, J.; Graziani, E.; Gris, P.; Grosdidier, G.; Grzelak, K.; Guy, J.; Haag, C.; Hahn, F.; Hahn, S.; Haider, S.; Hallgren, A.; Hamacher, K.; Hansen, J.; Harris, F.J.; Hedberg, V.; Heising, S.; Hernandez, J.J.; Herquet, P.; Herr, H.; Hessing, T.L.; Heuser, J.M.; Higon, E.; Holmgren, S.O.; Holt, P.J.; Hoorelbeke, S.; Houlden, M.; Hrubec, J.; Huber, M.; Huet, K.; Hughes, G.J.; Hultqvist, K.; Jackson, John Neil; Jacobsson, R.; Jalocha, P.; Janik, R.; Jarlskog, C.; Jarlskog, G.; Jarry, P.; Jean-Marie, B.; Jeans, D.; Johansson, Erik Karl; Jonsson, P.; Joram, C.; Juillot, P.; Jungermann, L.; Kapusta, Frederic; Karafasoulis, K.; Katsanevas, S.; Katsoufis, E.C.; Keranen, R.; Kernel, G.; Kersevan, B.P.; Khokhlov, Yu.A.; Khomenko, B.A.; Khovansky, N.N.; Kiiskinen, A.; King, B.; Kinvig, A.; Kjaer, N.J.; Klapp, O.; Klein, Hansjorg; Kluit, P.; Kokkinias, P.; Kostyukhin, V.; Kourkoumelis, C.; Kuznetsov, O.; Krammer, M.; Kriznic, E.; Krumshtein, Z.; Kubinec, P.; Kurowska, J.; Kurvinen, K.; Lamsa, J.W.; Lane, D.W.; Lapin, V.; Laugier, J.P.; Lauhakangas, R.; Leder, G.; Ledroit, Fabienne; Lefebure, V.; Leinonen, L.; Leisos, A.; Leitner, R.; Lemonne, J.; Lenzen, G.; Lepeltier, V.; Lesiak, T.; Lethuillier, M.; Libby, J.; Liebig, W.; Liko, D.; Lipniacka, A.; Lippi, I.; Lorstad, B.; Loken, J.G.; Lopes, J.H.; Lopez, J.M.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Loukas, D.; Lutz, P.; Lyons, L.; MacNaughton, J.; Mahon, J.R.; Maio, A.; Malek, A.; Malmgren, T.G.M.; Maltezos, S.; Malychev, V.; Mandl, F.; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Marechal, B.; Margoni, M.; Marin, J.C.; Mariotti, C.; Markou, A.; Martinez-Rivero, C.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Marti i Garcia, S.; Masik, J.; Mastroyiannopoulos, N.; Matorras, F.; Matteuzzi, C.; Matthiae, G.; Mazzucato, F.; Mazzucato, M.; McCubbin, M.; McKay, R.; McNulty, R.; McPherson, G.; Meroni, C.; Meyer, W.T.; Myagkov, A.; Migliore, E.; Mirabito, L.; Mitaroff, W.A.; Mjornmark, U.; Moa, T.; Moch, M.; Moller, Rasmus; Monig, Klaus; Monge, M.R.; Moraes, D.; Moreau, X.; Morettini, P.; Morton, G.; Muller, U.; Munich, K.; Mulders, M.; Mulet-Marquis, C.; Muresan, R.; Murray, W.J.; Muryn, B.; Myatt, G.; Myklebust, T.; Naraghi, F.; Nassiakou, M.; Navarria, F.L.; Navas, Sergio; Nawrocki, K.; Negri, P.; Neufeld, N.; Nicolaidou, R.; Nielsen, B.S.; Niezurawski, P.; Nikolenko, M.; Nomokonov, V.; Nygren, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Olshevsky, A.G.; Onofre, A.; Orava, R.; Orazi, G.; Osterberg, K.; Ouraou, A.; Paganoni, M.; Paiano, S.; Pain, R.; Paiva, R.; Palacios, J.; Palka, H.; Papadopoulou, T.D.; Papageorgiou, K.; Pape, L.; Parkes, C.; Parodi, F.; Parzefall, U.; Passeri, A.; Passon, O.; Pavel, T.; Pegoraro, M.; Peralta, L.; Pernicka, M.; Perrotta, A.; Petridou, C.; Petrolini, A.; Phillips, H.T.; Pierre, F.; Pimenta, M.; Piotto, E.; Podobnik, T.; Pol, M.E.; Polok, G.; Poropat, P.; Pozdnyakov, V.; Privitera, P.; Pukhaeva, N.; Pullia, A.; Radojicic, D.; Ragazzi, S.; Rahmani, H.; Rames, J.; Ratoff, P.N.; Read, Alexander L.; Rebecchi, P.; Redaelli, Nicola Giuseppe; Regler, M.; Rehn, J.; Reid, D.; Reinhardt, R.; Renton, P.B.; Resvanis, L.K.; Richard, F.; Ridky, J.; Rinaudo, G.; Ripp-Baudot, Isabelle; Rohne, O.; Romero, A.; Ronchese, P.; Rosenberg, E.I.; Rosinsky, P.; Roudeau, P.; Rovelli, T.; Royon, C.; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V.; Ruiz, A.; Saarikko, H.; Sacquin, Y.; Sadovsky, A.; Sajot, G.; Salt, J.; Sampsonidis, D.; Sannino, M.; Schwemling, P.; Schwering, B.; Schwickerath, U.; Scuri, Fabrizio; Seager, P.; Sedykh, Yu.; Segar, A.M.; Seibert, N.; Sekulin, R.; Shellard, R.C.; Siebel, M.; Simard, L.; Simonetto, F.; Sisakian, A.N.; Smadja, G.; Smirnov, N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, G.R.; Sokolov, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sosnowski, R.; Spassoff, T.; Spiriti, E.; Squarcia, S.; Stanescu, C.; Stanic, S.; Stanitzki, M.; Stevenson, K.; Stocchi, A.; Strauss, J.; Strub, R.; Stugu, B.; Szczekowski, M.; Szeptycka, M.; Tabarelli, T.; Taffard, A.; Tegenfeldt, F.; Terranova, F.; Thomas, J.; Timmermans, Jan; Tinti, N.; Tkachev, L.G.; Tobin, M.; Todorova, S.; Tomaradze, A.; Tome, B.; Tonazzo, A.; Tortora, L.; Tortosa, P.; Transtromer, G.; Treille, D.; Tristram, G.; Trochimczuk, M.; Troncon, C.; Turluer, M.L.; Tyapkin, I.A.; Tzamarias, S.; Ullaland, O.; Uvarov, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallazza, E.; Van Dam, Piet; Van den Boeck, W.; Van Eldik, J.; Van Lysebetten, A.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Vulpen, I.; Vegni, G.; Ventura, L.; Venus, W.; Verbeure, F.; Verdier, P.; Verlato, M.; Vertogradov, L.S.; Verzi, V.; Vilanova, D.; Vitale, L.; Vlasov, E.; Vodopianov, A.S.; Voulgaris, G.; Vrba, V.; Wahlen, H.; Walck, C.; Washbrook, A.J.; Weiser, C.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, J.H.; Wilkinson, G.R.; Winter, M.; Witek, M.; Wolf, G.; Yi, J.; Yushchenko, O.; Zalewska, A.; Zalewski, P.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zevgolatakos, E.; Zimine, N.I.; Zinchenko, A.; Zoller, P.; Zucchelli, G.C.; Zumerle, G.

    2000-01-01

    The rapidity-rank structure of \\ppb pairs is used to analyze the mechanism of baryon production in hadronic \\zz decay. The relative occurrence of the rapidity-ordered configuration \\pmpb, where $M$ is a meson, and that of \\ppb adjacent pairs is compared. The data are found to be consistent with predictions from a mechanism producing adjacent-rank \\ppb pairs, without requiring `string-ordered' \\pmpb configurations. An upper limit of 15\\% at 90\\% confidence is determined for the \\pmpb contribution.

  8. Dynamical fluctuation of the mesoscopic structure in ternary C12E5-water-n-octane amphiphilic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komura, S; Takeda, T; Kawabata, Y; Ghosh, S K; Seto, H; Nagao, M

    2001-04-01

    Dynamical fluctuations of the bicontinuous microemulsion and lamellar structures in ternary C12E5-water-n-octane amphiphilic system are studied by means of neutron spin echo (NSE) spectrometry. The decay rates of the time correlation of the concentration were analyzed in terms of three theories: (1) A. G. Zilman and R. Granek, Phys. Rev. Lett. 77, 4788 (1996), (2) M. Nonomura and T. Ohta, J. Chem. Phys. 110, 7516 (1999), and (3) R. Granek and M. E. Cates, Phys. Rev. A 46, 3319 (1992), in the first of which a Langevin equation for membrane plaquettes and in the latter two of which time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau equations for the order parameters are considered. The result shows that the intermediate correlation functions I(q,t) for the ranges of 0

  9. Fluctuating Selection in the Moran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Antony M; Lehman, Clarence; Yi, Xiao

    2017-03-01

    Contrary to classical population genetics theory, experiments demonstrate that fluctuating selection can protect a haploid polymorphism in the absence of frequency dependent effects on fitness. Using forward simulations with the Moran model, we confirm our analytical results showing that a fluctuating selection regime, with a mean selection coefficient of zero, promotes polymorphism. We find that increases in heterozygosity over neutral expectations are especially pronounced when fluctuations are rapid, mutation is weak, the population size is large, and the variance in selection is big. Lowering the frequency of fluctuations makes selection more directional, and so heterozygosity declines. We also show that fluctuating selection raises dn /ds ratios for polymorphism, not only by sweeping selected alleles into the population, but also by purging the neutral variants of selected alleles as they undergo repeated bottlenecks. Our analysis shows that randomly fluctuating selection increases the rate of evolution by increasing the probability of fixation. The impact is especially noticeable when the selection is strong and mutation is weak. Simulations show the increase in the rate of evolution declines as the rate of new mutations entering the population increases, an effect attributable to clonal interference. Intriguingly, fluctuating selection increases the dn /ds ratios for divergence more than for polymorphism, a pattern commonly seen in comparative genomics. Our model, which extends the classical neutral model of molecular evolution by incorporating random fluctuations in selection, accommodates a wide variety of observations, both neutral and selected, with economy. Copyright © 2017 by the Genetics Society of America.

  10. Structure and Dissipation Characteristics of an Electron Diffusion Region Observed by MMS During a Rapid, Normal-Incidence Magnetopause Crossing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torbert, R. B.; Burch, J. L.; Argall, M. R.; Alm, L.; Farrugia, C. J.; Forbes, T. G.; Giles, B. L.; Rager, A.; Dorelli, J.; Strangeway, R. J.; Ergun, R. E.; Wilder, F. D.; Ahmadi, N.; Lindqvist, P.-A.; Khotyaintsev, Y.

    2017-12-01

    On 22 October 2016, the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) spacecraft encountered the electron diffusion region (EDR) when the magnetosheath field was southward, and there were signatures of fast reconnection, including flow jets, Hall fields, and large power dissipation. One rapid, normal-incidence crossing, during which the EDR structure was almost stationary in the boundary frame, provided an opportunity to observe the spatial structure for the zero guide field case of magnetic reconnection. The reconnection electric field was determined unambiguously to be 2-3 mV/m. There were clear signals of fluctuating parallel electric fields, up to 6 mV/m on the magnetosphere side of the diffusion region, associated with a Hall-like parallel current feature on the electron scale. The width of the main EDR structure was determined to be 2 km (1.8 de). Although the MMS spacecraft were in their closest tetrahedral separation of 8 km, the divergences and curls for these thin current structures could therefore not be computed in the usual manner. A method is developed to determine these quantities on a much smaller scale and applied to compute the normal component of terms in the generalized Ohm's law for the positions of each individual spacecraft (not a barocentric average). Although the gradient pressure term has a qualitative dependence that follows the observed variation of E + Ve × B, the quantitative magnitude of these terms differs by more than a factor of 2, which is shown to be greater than the respective errors. Thus, future research is required to find the manner in which Ohm's law is balanced.

  11. Atomic and electronic structure transformations of silver nanoparticles under rapid cooling conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Lobato, I.; Rojas, J.; Landauro, C.V.; Torres, J

    2008-01-01

    The structural evolution and dynamics of silver nanodrops Ag${}_{2896}$ (4.4 nm in diameter) during rapid cooling conditions has been studied by means of molecular dynamics simulations and electronic density of state calculations. The interaction of silver atoms is modeled by a tight-binding semiempirical interatomic potential proposed by Cleri and Rosato. The pair correlation functions and the pair analysis technique is applied to reveal the structural transition in the process of solidifica...

  12. Effects of spectral smearing and temporal fine-structure distortion on the fluctuating-masker benefit for speech at a fixed signal-to-noise ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Joshua G. W.; Brungart, Douglas S.

    2011-01-01

    Normal-hearing listeners receive less benefit from momentary dips in the level of a fluctuating masker for speech processed to degrade spectral detail or temporal fine structure (TFS) than for unprocessed speech. This has been interpreted as evidence that the magnitude of the fluctuating-masker benefit (FMB) reflects the ability to resolve spectral detail and TFS. However, the FMB for degraded speech is typically measured at a higher signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) to yield performance similar to normal speech for the baseline (stationary-noise) condition. Because the FMB decreases with increasing SNR, this SNR difference might account for the reduction in FMB for degraded speech. In this study, the FMB for unprocessed and processed (TFS-removed or spectrally smeared) speech was measured in a paradigm that adjusts word-set size, rather than SNR, to equate stationary-noise performance across processing conditions. Compared at the same SNR and percent-correct level (but with different set sizes), processed and unprocessed stimuli yielded a similar FMB for four different fluctuating maskers (speech-modulated noise, one opposite-gender interfering talker, two same-gender interfering talkers, and 16-Hz interrupted noise). These results suggest that, for these maskers, spectral or TFS distortions do not directly impair the ability to benefit from momentary dips in masker level. PMID:21786913

  13. Genome-wide DNA methylation alterations of Alternanthera philoxeroides in natural and manipulated habitats: implications for epigenetic regulation of rapid responses to environmental fluctuation and phenotypic variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Lexuan; Geng, Yupeng; Li, Bo; Chen, Jiakuan; Yang, Ji

    2010-11-01

    Alternanthera philoxeroides (alligator weed) is an invasive weed that can colonize both aquatic and terrestrial habitats. Individuals growing in different habitats exhibit extensive phenotypic variation but little genetic differentiation in its introduced range. The mechanisms underpinning the wide range of phenotypic variation and rapid adaptation to novel and changing environments remain uncharacterized. In this study, we examined the epigenetic variation and its correlation with phenotypic variation in plants exposed to natural and manipulated environmental variability. Genome-wide methylation profiling using methylation-sensitive amplified fragment length polymorphism (MSAP) revealed considerable DNA methylation polymorphisms within and between natural populations. Plants of different source populations not only underwent significant morphological changes in common garden environments, but also underwent a genome-wide epigenetic reprogramming in response to different treatments. Methylation alterations associated with response to different water availability were detected in 78.2% (169/216) of common garden induced polymorphic sites, demonstrating the environmental sensitivity and flexibility of the epigenetic regulatory system. These data provide evidence of the correlation between epigenetic reprogramming and the reversible phenotypic response of alligator weed to particular environmental factors. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. Adiabatic-connection fluctuation-dissipation DFT for the structural properties of solids - The renormalized ALDA and electron gas kernels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Patrick, Christopher E.; Thygesen, Kristian Sommer

    2015-01-01

    We present calculations of the correlation energies of crystalline solids and isolated systems within the adiabatic-connection fluctuation-dissipation formulation of density-functional theory. We perform a quantitative comparison of a set of model exchange-correlation kernels originally derived...... the kernels to inhomogeneous systems through a reciprocal-space averaging procedure, we calculate the lattice constants and bulk moduli of a test set of 10 solids consisting of tetrahedrally bonded semiconductors (C, Si, SiC), ionic compounds (MgO, LiCl, LiF), and metals (Al, Na, Cu, Pd). We also consider...

  15. Fluctuations in catalytic surface reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Imbihl, R

    2003-01-01

    The internal reaction-induced fluctuations which occur in catalytic CO oxidation on a Pt field emitter tip have been studied using field electron microscopy (FEM) as a spatially resolving method. The structurally heterogeneous Pt tip consists of facets of different orientations with nanoscale dimensions. The FEM resolution of roughly 2 nm corresponds to a few hundred reacting adsorbed particles whose variations in the density are imaged as brightness fluctuations. In the bistable range of the reaction one finds fluctuation-induced transitions between the two stable branches of the reaction kinetics. The fluctuations exhibit a behaviour similar to that of an equilibrium phase transition, i.e. the amplitude diverges upon approaching the bifurcation point terminating the bistable range of the reaction. Simulations with a hybrid Monte Carlo/mean-field model reproduce the experimental observations. Fluctuations on different facets are typically uncorrelated but within a single facet a high degree of spatial cohere...

  16. Properties of polycrystals and nanotwinned structures in silicon during rapid cooling process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Tinghong; Li, Kaiwen; Tian, Zean; Xie, Quan; Hu, Xuechen; Li, Yidan; Luo, Xiangyan; Ren, Lei

    2017-11-01

    The evolution characteristics of polycrystals and nano-twinned structures during the rapid solidification of silicon under cooling rate of 1010 K s‑1 are investigated based on molecular dynamics simulation. The microstructural properties of silicon were analyzed by several structural characterization methods. The distorted tetrahedral units with 5 nearest-neighbor atoms play different roles in three stages of the quenching process. As transitional structures, they play a significant part in liquid to liquid and liquid to crystal transition, and break the translational symmetry of the crystalline structures. The tetrahedral units can aggregate to form polycrystals with high stability in this system. When the temperature was decreased at a cooling rate of 1010 K s‑1, Coherent twin boundaries, having excellent structural stability and configurational continuity, were easily formed between zinc-blende and wurtzite structures.

  17. Effect of TEMPO-oxidization and rapid cooling on thermo-structural properties of nanocellulose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mhd Haniffa, Mhd Abd Cader; Ching, Yern Chee; Chuah, Cheng Hock; Yong Ching, Kuan; Nazri, Nik; Abdullah, Luqman Chuah; Nai-Shang, Liou

    2017-10-01

    Recently, surface functionality and thermal property of the green nanomaterials have received wide attention in numerous applications. In this study, microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) was used to prepare the nanocrystalline celluloses (NCCs) using acid hydrolysis method. The NCCs was treated with TEMPO [(2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidin-1-yl)oxy radical]-oxidation to prepare TEMPO-oxidized NCCs. Cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs) also prepared from MCC using TEMPO-oxidation. The effects of rapid cooling and chemical treatments on the thermo-structural property studies of the prepared nanocelluloses were investigated through FTIR, thermogravimetric analysis-derivative thermogravimetric (TGA-DTG), and XRD. A posteriori knowledge of the FTIR and TGA-DTG analysis revealed that the rapid cooling treatment enhanced the hydrogen bond energy and thermal stability of the TEMPO-oxidized NCC compared to other nanocelluloses. XRD analysis exhibits the effect of rapid cooling on pseudo 2I helical conformation. This was the first investigation performed on the effect of rapid cooling on structural properties of the nanocellulose. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Rapid increase of near atomic resolution virus capsid structures determined by cryo-electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Phuong T; Reddy, Vijay S

    2017-10-27

    The recent technological advances in electron microscopes, detectors, as well as image processing and reconstruction software have brought single particle cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) into prominence for determining structures of bio-molecules at near atomic resolution. This has been particularly true for virus capsids, ribosomes, and other large assemblies, which have been the ideal specimens for structural studies by cryo-EM approaches. An analysis of time series metadata of virus structures on the methods of structure determination, resolution of the structures, and size of the virus particles revealed a rapid increase in the virus structures determined by cryo-EM at near atomic resolution since 2010. In addition, the data highlight the median resolution (∼3.0 Å) and size (∼310.0 Å in diameter) of the virus particles determined by X-ray crystallography while no such limits exist for cryo-EM structures, which have a median diameter of 508 Å. Notably, cryo-EM virus structures in the last four years have a median resolution of 3.9 Å. Taken together with minimal sample requirements, not needing diffraction quality crystals, and being able to achieve similar resolutions of the crystal structures makes cryo-EM the method of choice for current and future virus capsid structure determinations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Evolution of nano-structures of silver due to rapid thermal annealing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mondal, Shyamal, E-mail: shyamal.mondal@saha.ac.in; Bhattacharyya, S. R., E-mail: shyamal.mondal@saha.ac.in [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhan Nagar, Kolkata-700064 (India)

    2014-04-24

    This report deals with rapid thermal annealing (RTA) effect on continuous silver film on Si(100) substrate. For this purpose silver films of different thicknesses were deposited and subsequently annealed at 500 and 800 °C. The as-deposited and annealed samples were investigated by scanning electron microscope (SEM). Formations of different nano-structures have been observed. Fragmentation of formed nanoislands also observed at temperature below melting temperature.

  20. The Rapid Analysis of Scattering from Periodic Dielectric Structures Using Accelerated Cartesian Expansions (ACE)

    CERN Document Server

    Baczewski, Andrew D; Shanker, Balasubramaniam

    2011-01-01

    The analysis of fields in periodic dielectric structures arise in numerous applications of recent interest, ranging from photonic bandgap (PBG) structures and plasmonically active nanostructures to metamaterials. To achieve an accurate representation of the fields in these structures using numerical methods, dense spatial discretization is required. This, in turn, affects the cost of analysis, particularly for integral equation based methods, for which traditional iterative methods require O(N^2) operations, N being the number of spatial degrees of freedom. In this paper, we introduce a method for the rapid solution of volumetric electric field integral equations used in the analysis of doubly periodic dielectric structures. The crux of our method is the ACE algorithm, which is used to evaluate the requisite potentials in O(N) cost. Results are provided that corroborate our claims of acceleration without compromising accuracy, as well as the application of our method to a number of compelling photonics applic...

  1. mRNA secondary structures fold sequentially but exchange rapidly in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth M Mahen

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available RNAs adopt defined structures to perform biological activities, and conformational transitions among alternative structures are critical to virtually all RNA-mediated processes ranging from metabolite-activation of bacterial riboswitches to pre-mRNA splicing and viral replication in eukaryotes. Mechanistic analysis of an RNA folding reaction in a biological context is challenging because many steps usually intervene between assembly of a functional RNA structure and execution of a biological function. We developed a system to probe mechanisms of secondary structure folding and exchange directly in vivo using self-cleavage to monitor competition between mutually exclusive structures that promote or inhibit ribozyme assembly. In previous work, upstream structures were more effective than downstream structures in blocking ribozyme assembly during transcription in vitro, consistent with a sequential folding mechanism. However, upstream and downstream structures blocked ribozyme assembly equally well in vivo, suggesting that intracellular folding outcomes reflect thermodynamic equilibration or that annealing of contiguous sequences is favored kinetically. We have extended these studies to learn when, if ever, thermodynamic stability becomes an impediment to rapid equilibration among alternative RNA structures in vivo. We find that a narrow thermodynamic threshold determines whether kinetics or thermodynamics govern RNA folding outcomes in vivo. mRNA secondary structures fold sequentially in vivo, but exchange between adjacent secondary structures is much faster in vivo than it is in vitro. Previous work showed that simple base-paired RNA helices dissociate at similar rates in vivo and in vitro so exchange between adjacent structures must occur through a different mechanism, one that likely involves facilitation of branch migration by proteins associated with nascent transcripts.

  2. Fluctuations and Instability in Sedimentation

    KAUST Repository

    Guazzelli, Élisabeth

    2011-01-21

    This review concentrates on the fluctuations of the velocities of sedimenting spheres, and on the structural instability of a suspension of settling fibers. For many years, theoretical estimates and numerical simulations predicted the fluctuations of the velocities of spheres to increase with the size of the container, whereas experiments found no such variation. Two ideas have increased our understanding. First, the correlation length of the velocity fluctuations was found experimentally to be 20 interparticle separations. Second, in dilute suspensions, a vertical variation in the concentration due to the spreading of the front with the clear fluid can inhibit the velocity fluctuations. In a very dilute regime, a homogeneous suspension of fibers suffers a spontaneous instability in which fast descending fiber-rich columns are separated by rising fiber-sparse columns. In a semidilute regime, the settling is hindered, more so than for spheres. © 2011 by Annual Reviews. All rights reserved.

  3. Thickness fluctuations in turbulent soap films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greffier, O; Amarouchene, Y; Kellay, H

    2002-05-13

    Rapidly flowing soap films provide a simple and attractive system to study two-dimensional hydrodynamics and turbulence. By measuring the rapid fluctuations of the thickness of the film in the turbulent regime, we find that the statistics of these fluctuations closely resemble those of a passive scalar field in a turbulent flow. The scalar spectra are well described by Kolmogorov-like scaling while the high-order moments show clear deviations from regular scaling just like dye or temperature fluctuations in 3D turbulent flows.

  4. Molecular dynamics simulation studies of structural and dynamical properties of rapidly quenched Al

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, B.; Liu, C. Y.; Jia, Y.; Yue, G. Q.; Ke, F. S.; Zhao, H. B.; Chen, L. Y.; Wang, S. Y.; Wang, C. Z.; Ho, K. M.

    2014-01-01

    The structural and dynamical properties of rapidly quenched Al are studied by molecular dynamics simulations. The pair-correlation function of high temperature liquid Al agrees well with the experimental results. Different cooling rates are applied with high cooling rates leading to glass formation, while low cooling rates leading to crystallization. The local structures are characterized by Honeycutt–Andersen indices and Voronoi tessellation analysis. The results show that for high cooling rates, the local structures of the liquid and glassy Al are predominated by icosahedral clusters, together with considerable amount of face-centered cubic and hexagonal close packed short-range orders. These short-range order results are further confirmed using the recently developed atomic cluster alignment method. Moreover, the atomic cluster alignment clearly shows the crystal nucleation process in supercooled liquid of Al. Finally, the mean square displacement for the liquid is also analyzed, and the corresponding diffusion coefficient as a function of temperature is calculated.

  5. Atomic and electronic structure transformations of silver nanoparticles under rapid cooling conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobato, I; Rojas, J; Landauro, C V; Torres, J

    2009-02-04

    The structural evolution and dynamics of silver nanodrops Ag(2869) (4.4 nm in diameter) under rapid cooling conditions have been studied by means of molecular dynamics simulations and electronic density of state calculations. The interaction of silver atoms is modelled by a tight-binding semiempirical interatomic potential proposed by Cleri and Rosato. The pair correlation functions and the pair analysis technique are used to reveal the structural transition in the process of solidification. It is shown that Ag nanoparticles evolve into different nanostructures under different cooling processes. At a cooling rate of 1.5625 × 10(13) K s(-1) the nanoparticles preserve an amorphous-like structure containing a large amount of 1551 and 1541 pairs which correspond to icosahedral symmetry. For a lower cooling rate (1.5625 × 10(12) K s(-1)), the nanoparticles transform into a crystal-like structure consisting mainly of 1421 and 1422 pairs which correspond to the face centred cubic and hexagonal close packed structures, respectively. The variations of the electronic density of states for the differently cooled nanoparticles are small, but in correspondence with the structural changes.

  6. Disentangling the effects of feedback structure and climate on Poaceae annual airborne pollen fluctuations and the possible consequences of climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García de León, David; García-Mozo, Herminia; Galán, Carmen; Alcázar, Purificación; Lima, Mauricio; González-Andújar, José L

    2015-10-15

    Pollen allergies are the most common form of respiratory allergic disease in Europe. Most studies have emphasized the role of environmental processes, as the drivers of airborne pollen fluctuations, implicitly considering pollen production as a random walk. This work shows that internal self-regulating processes of the plants (negative feedback) should be included in pollen dynamic systems in order to give a better explanation of the observed pollen temporal patterns. This article proposes a novel methodological approach based on dynamic systems to investigate the interaction between feedback structure of plant populations and climate in shaping long-term airborne Poaceae pollen fluctuations and to quantify the effects of climate change on future airborne pollen concentrations. Long-term historical airborne Poaceae pollen data (30 years) from Cordoba city (Southern Spain) were analyzed. A set of models, combining feedback structure, temperature and actual evapotranspiration effects on airborne Poaceae pollen were built and compared, using a model selection approach. Our results highlight the importance of first-order negative feedback and mean annual maximum temperature in driving airborne Poaceae pollen dynamics. The best model was used to predict the effects of climate change under two standardized scenarios representing contrasting temporal patterns of economic development and CO2 emissions. Our results predict an increase in pollen levels in southern Spain by 2070 ranging from 28.5% to 44.3%. The findings from this study provide a greater understanding of airborne pollen dynamics and how climate change might impact the future evolution of airborne Poaceae pollen concentrations and thus the future evolution of related pollen allergies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. View-Angle Dependent AIRS Cloud Radiances and Fluctuations: Implications of Organized Cloud Structures for Tropical Circulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dong L.; Gong, Jie

    2012-01-01

    Interactions between wave dynamics and moisture generate clouds in a wide range of scales. Organized cloud structures produce statistically asymmetric radiances and perturbations in AIRS and AMSU-B measurements. With high resolution (approx.14 km beamwidth) and high-sensitivity instruments, these wave-modulated cloud structures can be readily detected from calibrated Levell radiance data. In this study we analyzed eight-year (2003 - 2010) statistics of AIRS cloud-induced radiances and found that in tropical convective regions the ascending (13:30 LST) measurements reveal higher view-angle asymmetry in cloud radiance than the descending (1:30 LST). The daytime asymmetry suggests 10% more cloudiness when the instrument views east, implying tilted and banded structures in most of the anvil clouds to which AIRS is sensitive. Such banded cloud structures are likely a manifestation of embedded westward propagating gravity waves in tropical convective systems. More importantly, organized cloud structures carry asymmetric momentum fluxes in addition to energy fluxes, which must be taken into account for modeling wave-wave and wave-mean flow interactions in tropical circulations.

  8. Organizational Perspectives on Rapid Response Team Structure, Function, and Cost: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Patricia L; McSweeney, Jean

    Understanding how an organization determines structure and function of a rapid response team (RRT), as well as cost evaluation and implications, can provide foundational knowledge to guide decisions about RRTs. The objectives were to (1) identify influencing factors in organizational development of RRT structure and function and (2) describe evaluation of RRT costs. Using a qualitative, ethnographic design, nurse executives and experts in 15 moderate-size hospitals were interviewed to explore their decision-making processes in determining RRT structure and function. Face-to-face interviews were audio recorded and transcribed verbatim and verified for accurateness. Using content analysis and constant comparison, interview data were analyzed. Demographic data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. The sample included 27 participants from 15 hospitals in 5 south-central states. They described a variety of RRT responders and functions, with the majority of hospitals having a critical care charge nurse attending all RRT calls for assistance. Others described a designated RRT nurse with primary RRT duties as responder to all RRT calls. Themes of RRT development from the data included influencers, decision processes, and thoughts about cost. It is important to understand how hospitals determine optimal structure and function to enhance support of quality nursing care. Determining the impact of an RRT on costs and benefits is vital in balancing patient safety and limited resources. Future research should focus on clarifying differences between team structure and function in outcomes as well as the most effective means to estimate costs and benefits.

  9. Rapid changes in brain structure predict improvements induced by perceptual learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ditye, Thomas; Kanai, Ryota; Bahrami, Bahador; Muggleton, Neil G; Rees, Geraint; Walsh, Vincent

    2013-11-01

    Practice-dependent changes in brain structure can occur in task relevant brain regions as a result of extensive training in complex motor tasks and long-term cognitive training but little is known about the impact of visual perceptual learning on brain structure. Here we studied the effect of five days of visual perceptual learning in a motion-color conjunction search task using anatomical MRI. We found rapid changes in gray matter volume in the right posterior superior temporal sulcus, an area sensitive to coherently moving stimuli, that predicted the degree to which an individual's performance improved with training. Furthermore, behavioral improvements were also predicted by volumetric changes in an extended white matter region underlying the visual cortex. These findings point towards quick and efficient plastic neural mechanisms that enable the visual brain to deal effectively with changing environmental demands. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Rapid fabrication of hierarchically structured supramolecular nanocomposite thin films in one minute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ting; Kao, Joseph

    2016-11-08

    Functional nanocomposites containing nanoparticles of different chemical compositions may exhibit new properties to meet demands for advanced technology. It is imperative to simultaneously achieve hierarchical structural control and to develop rapid, scalable fabrication to minimize degradation of nanoparticle properties and for compatibility with nanomanufacturing. The assembly kinetics of supramolecular nanocomposite in thin films is governed by the energetic cost arising from defects, the chain mobility, and the activation energy for inter-domain diffusion. By optimizing only one parameter, the solvent fraction in the film, the assembly kinetics can be precisely tailored to produce hierarchically structured thin films of supramolecular nanocomposites in approximately one minute. Moreover, the strong wavelength dependent optical anisotropy in the nanocomposite highlights their potential applications for light manipulation and information transmission. The present invention opens a new avenue in designing manufacture-friendly continuous processing for the fabrication of functional nanocomposite thin films.

  11. Deceleration of the electron transfer reaction in the photosynthetic reaction centre as a manifestation of its structure fluctuations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knox P. P.

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To extract information on the nature of protein structural relaxation from the kinetics of electron transfer reaction in the photosynthetic reaction centre (RC. Methods. The kinetic curves obtained by absorption spectroscopy are processed by a maximum entropy method to get the spectrum of relaxation times. Results. A series of distinctive peaks of this spectrum in the interval from 0.1 s to hundreds of seconds is revealed. With the time of exposure of the sample to actinic light increasing, the positions of the peak maxima grow linearly. Conclusions. Theoretical analysis of these results reveals the formation of several structural states of the RC protein. Remarkably, in each of these states the slow reaction kinetics follow the same fractional power law that reflects the glass-like properties of the protein.

  12. On the recovery of ISW fluctuations using large-scale structure tracers and CMB temperature and polarization anisotropies

    OpenAIRE

    Bonavera, Laura; Barreiro, R. Belén; Marcos-Caballero, A.; Vielva, P.

    2016-01-01

    In this work we present a method to extract the signal induced by the integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect in the cosmic microwave background (CMB). It makes use of the Linear Covariance-Based filter introduced by Barreiro et al., and combines CMB data with any number of large-scale structure (LSS) surveys and lensing information. It also exploits CMB polarization to reduce cosmic variance. The performance of the method has been thoroughly tested with simulations taking into account the impact...

  13. Quantum fluctuations and stability of vortex lattices in a nonresonantly pumped exciton-polariton condensate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ting-Wei; Jheng, Shih-Da; Jiang, T F; Cheng, Szu-Cheng

    2017-03-01

    The dynamics of an exciton-polariton condensate (EPC) subject to harmonic confinement can cause spontaneously formed vortices to arrange into a triangular vortex lattice. The stability of such a spontaneously formed vortex lattice is still unknown. We investigate the quantum fluctuations of vortex lattices in a rapidly rotating EPC with a rotation frequency close to the harmonic trap. In such a large condensate, we find that a vortex lattice with a triangular structure is stable, whereas one with a square structure becomes unstable. This result indicates that a driven-dissipative vortex array with strong quantum fluctuations can occur in an EPC.

  14. Evaluation of the temporal structure of postural sway fluctuations based on a comprehensive set of analysis tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchner, M.; Schubert, P.; Schmidtbleicher, D.; Haas, C. T.

    2012-10-01

    The analysis of postural control has a long history. Traditionally, the amount of body sway is solely used as an index of postural stability. Although this leads to some extent to an effective evaluation of balance performance, the control mechanisms involved have not yet been fully understood. The concept of nonlinear dynamics suggests that variability in the motor output is not randomness but structure, providing the stimulus to reveal the functionality of postural sway. The present work evaluates sway dynamics by means of COP excursions in a quiet standing task versus a dual-task condition in three different test times (30, 60, 300 s). Besides the application of traditional methods-which estimate the overall size of sway-the temporal pattern of body sway was quantified via wavelet transform, multiscale entropy and fractal analysis. We found higher sensitivity of the structural parameters to modulations of postural control strategies and partly an improved evaluation of sway dynamics in longer recordings. It could be shown that postural control modifications take place on different timescales corresponding to the interplay of the sensory systems. A continued application of nonlinear analysis can help to better understand postural control mechanisms.

  15. Quantum Fluctuation Relations

    OpenAIRE

    Facchi, Paolo; Garnero, Giancarlo; Ligabò, Marilena

    2017-01-01

    We present here a set of lecture notes on exact fluctuation relations. We prove the Jarzynski equality and the Crooks fluctuation theorem, two paradigmatic examples of classical fluctuation relations. Finally we consider their quantum versions, and analyze analogies and differences with the classical case.

  16. Manta: rapid detection of structural variants and indels for germline and cancer sequencing applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaoyu; Schulz-Trieglaff, Ole; Shaw, Richard; Barnes, Bret; Schlesinger, Felix; Källberg, Morten; Cox, Anthony J; Kruglyak, Semyon; Saunders, Christopher T

    2016-04-15

    : We describe Manta, a method to discover structural variants and indels from next generation sequencing data. Manta is optimized for rapid germline and somatic analysis, calling structural variants, medium-sized indels and large insertions on standard compute hardware in less than a tenth of the time that comparable methods require to identify only subsets of these variant types: for example NA12878 at 50× genomic coverage is analyzed in less than 20 min. Manta can discover and score variants based on supporting paired and split-read evidence, with scoring models optimized for germline analysis of diploid individuals and somatic analysis of tumor-normal sample pairs. Call quality is similar to or better than comparable methods, as determined by pedigree consistency of germline calls and comparison of somatic calls to COSMIC database variants. Manta consistently assembles a higher fraction of its calls to base-pair resolution, allowing for improved downstream annotation and analysis of clinical significance. We provide Manta as a community resource to facilitate practical and routine structural variant analysis in clinical and research sequencing scenarios. Manta is released under the open-source GPLv3 license. Source code, documentation and Linux binaries are available from https://github.com/Illumina/manta. csaunders@illumina.com Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Rapid prototyping of flexible intrafascicular electrode arrays by picosecond laser structuring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Matthias; de la Oliva, Natalia; del Valle, Jaume; Delgado-Martínez, Ignacio; Navarro, Xavier; Stieglitz, Thomas

    2017-12-01

    Objective. Interfacing the peripheral nervous system can be performed with a large variety of electrode arrays. However, stimulating and recording a nerve while having a reasonable amount of channels limits the number of available systems. Translational research towards human clinical trial requires device safety and biocompatibility but would benefit from design flexibility in the development process to individualize probes. Approach. We selected established medical grade implant materials like precious metals and Parylene C to develop a rapid prototyping process for novel intrafascicular electrode arrays using a picosecond laser structuring. A design for a rodent animal model was developed in conjunction with an intrafascicular implantation strategy. Electrode characterization and optimization was performed first in saline solution in vitro before performance and biocompatibility were validated in sciatic nerves of rats in chronic implantation. Main results. The novel fabrication process proved to be suitable for prototyping and building intrafascicular electrode arrays. Electrochemical properties of the electrode sites were enhanced and tested for long-term stability. Chronic implantation in the sciatic nerve of rats showed good biocompatibility, selectivity and stable stimulation thresholds. Significance. Established medical grade materials can be used for intrafascicular nerve electrode arrays when laser structuring defines structure size in the micro-scale. Design flexibility reduces re-design cycle time and material certificates are beneficial support for safety studies on the way to clinical trials.

  18. The evolution of structural and chemical heterogeneity during rapid solidification at gas atomization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golod, V. M.; Sufiiarov, V. Sh

    2017-04-01

    Gas atomization is a high-performance process for manufacturing superfine metal powders. Formation of the powder particles takes place primarily through the fragmentation of alloy melt flow with high-pressure inert gas, which leads to the formation of non-uniform sized micron-scale particles and subsequent their rapid solidification due to heat exchange with gas environment. The article presents results of computer modeling of crystallization process, simulation and experimental studies of the cellular-dendrite structure formation and microsegregation in different size particles. It presents results of adaptation of the approach for local nonequilibrium solidification to conditions of crystallization at gas atomization, detected border values of the particle size at which it is possible a manifestation of diffusionless crystallization.

  19. On the recovery of ISW fluctuations using large-scale structure tracers and CMB temperature and polarization anisotropies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonavera, L.; Barreiro, R. B.; Marcos-Caballero, A.; Vielva, P.

    2016-06-01

    In this work we present a method to extract the signal induced by the integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect in the cosmic microwave background (CMB). It makes use of the Linear Covariance-Based filter introduced by Barreiro et al., and combines CMB data with any number of large-scale structure (LSS) surveys and lensing information. It also exploits CMB polarization to reduce cosmic variance. The performance of the method has been thoroughly tested with simulations taking into account the impact of non-ideal conditions such as incomplete sky coverage or the presence of noise. In particular, three galaxy surveys are simulated, whose redshift distributions peak at low (z ≃ 0.3), intermediate (z ≃ 0.6) and high redshift (z ≃ 0.9). The contribution of each of the considered data sets as well as the effect of a mask and noise in the reconstructed ISW map is studied in detail. When combining all the considered data sets (CMB temperature and polarization, the three galaxy surveys and the lensing map), the proposed filter successfully reconstructs a map of the weak ISW signal, finding a perfect correlation with the input signal for the ideal case and around 80 per cent, on average, in the presence of noise and incomplete sky coverage. We find that including CMB polarization improves the correlation between input and reconstruction although only at a small level. Nonetheless, given the weakness of the ISW signal, even modest improvements can be of importance. In particular, in realistic situations, in which less information is available from the LSS tracers, the effect of including polarization is larger. For instance, for the case in which the ISW signal is recovered from CMB plus only one survey, and taking into account the presence of noise and incomplete sky coverage, the improvement in the correlation coefficient can be as large as 10 per cent.

  20. Nanoscale Structural and Mechanical Analysis of Bacillus anthracis Spores Inactivated with Rapid Dry Heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felker, Daniel L.; Burggraf, Larry W.

    2014-01-01

    Effective killing of Bacillus anthracis spores is of paramount importance to antibioterrorism, food safety, environmental protection, and the medical device industry. Thus, a deeper understanding of the mechanisms of spore resistance and inactivation is highly desired for developing new strategies or improving the known methods for spore destruction. Previous studies have shown that spore inactivation mechanisms differ considerably depending upon the killing agents, such as heat (wet heat, dry heat), UV, ionizing radiation, and chemicals. It is believed that wet heat kills spores by inactivating critical enzymes, while dry heat kills spores by damaging their DNA. Many studies have focused on the biochemical aspects of spore inactivation by dry heat; few have investigated structural damages and changes in spore mechanical properties. In this study, we have inactivated Bacillus anthracis spores with rapid dry heating and performed nanoscale topographical and mechanical analysis of inactivated spores using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Our results revealed significant changes in spore morphology and nanomechanical properties after heat inactivation. In addition, we also found that these changes were different under different heating conditions that produced similar inactivation probabilities (high temperature for short exposure time versus low temperature for long exposure time). We attributed the differences to the differential thermal and mechanical stresses in the spore. The buildup of internal thermal and mechanical stresses may become prominent only in ultrafast, high-temperature heat inactivation when the experimental timescale is too short for heat-generated vapor to efficiently escape from the spore. Our results thus provide direct, visual evidences of the importance of thermal stresses and heat and mass transfer to spore inactivation by very rapid dry heating. PMID:24375142

  1. Seismogeodetic monitoring techniques for tsunami and earthquake early warning and rapid assessment of structural damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haase, J. S.; Bock, Y.; Saunders, J. K.; Goldberg, D.; Restrepo, J. I.

    2016-12-01

    As part of an effort to promote the use of NASA-sponsored Earth science information for disaster risk reduction, real-time high-rate seismogeodetic data are being incorporated into early warning and structural monitoring systems. Seismogeodesy combines seismic acceleration and GPS displacement measurements using a tightly-coupled Kalman filter to provide absolute estimates of seismic acceleration, velocity and displacement. Traditionally, the monitoring of earthquakes and tsunamis has been based on seismic networks for estimating earthquake magnitude and slip, and tide gauges and deep-ocean buoys for direct measurement of tsunami waves. Real-time seismogeodetic observations at subduction zones allow for more robust and rapid magnitude and slip estimation that increase warning time in the near-source region. A NASA-funded effort to utilize GPS and seismogeodesy in NOAA's Tsunami Warning Centers in Alaska and Hawaii integrates new modules for picking, locating, and estimating magnitudes and moment tensors for earthquakes into the USGS earthworm environment at the TWCs. In a related project, NASA supports the transition of this research to seismogeodetic tools for disaster preparedness, specifically by implementing GPS and low-cost MEMS accelerometers for structural monitoring in partnership with earthquake engineers. Real-time high-rate seismogeodetic structural monitoring has been implemented on two structures. The first is a parking garage at the Autonomous University of Baja California Faculty of Medicine in Mexicali, not far from the rupture of the 2011 Mw 7.2 El Mayor Cucapah earthquake enabled through a UCMexus collaboration. The second is the 8-story Geisel Library at University of California, San Diego (UCSD). The system has also been installed for several proof-of-concept experiments at the UCSD Network for Earthquake Engineering Simulation (NEES) Large High Performance Outdoor Shake Table. We present MEMS-based seismogeodetic observations from the 10 June

  2. Rapid manufacture of integrated self-powered sensing systems using additive manufacturing for critical structure health monitoring

    OpenAIRE

    Nie, Meng; Wharton, Julian; Stokes, Keith

    2015-01-01

    In this project, the feasibility of rapid manufacturing of integrated corrosion monitoring sensing systems within critical engineering structural components using advanced AM technologies has been demonstrated with an exemplar model structure of crevice corrosion monitoring with integrated carbon-based electrochemical sensors. Corrosion performance of all five different materials model crevice former structures built using different AM technologies have been investigated for the first time in...

  3. Hydrogen bonded structure, polarity, molecular motion and frequency fluctuations at liquid-vapor interface of a water-methanol mixture: an ab initio molecular dynamics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhuri, Jyoti Roy; Chandra, Amalendu

    2014-10-07

    We have performed ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of a liquid-vapor interfacial system consisting of a mixture of water and methanol molecules. Detailed results are obtained for the structural and dynamical properties of the bulk and interfacial regions of the mixture. Among structural properties, we have looked at the inhomogeneous density profiles of water and methanol molecules, hydrogen bond distributions and also the orientational profiles of bulk and interfacial molecules. The methanol molecules are found to have a higher propensity to be at the interface than water molecules. It is found that the interfacial molecules show preference for specific orientations so as to form water-methanol hydrogen bonds at the interface with the hydrophobic methyl group pointing towards the vapor side. It is also found that for both types of molecules, the dipole moment decreases at the interface. It is also found that the local electric field of water influences the dipole moment of methanol molecules. Among the dynamical properties, we have calculated the diffusion, orientational relaxation, hydrogen bond dynamics, and vibrational frequency fluctuations in bulk and interfacial regions. It is found that the diffusion and orientation relaxation of the interfacial molecules are faster than those of the bulk. However, the hydrogen bond lifetimes are longer at the interface which can be correlated with the time scales found from the decay of frequency time correlations. The slower hydrogen bond dynamics for the interfacial molecules with respect to bulk can be attributed to diminished cooperative effects at the interface due to reduced density and number of hydrogen bonds.

  4. Longitudinal fluctuations and decorrelation of anisotropic flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pang, Long-Gang [Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, Ruth-Moufang-Strasse 1, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Petersen, Hannah [Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, Ruth-Moufang-Strasse 1, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Institute for Theoretical Physics, Goethe University, Max-von-Laue-Strasse 1, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Planckstr. 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Qin, Guang-You [Key Laboratory of Quark & Lepton Physics (MOE) and Institute of Particle Physics, Central China Normal University, Wuhan 430079 (China); Roy, Victor [Institute for Theoretical Physics, Goethe University, Max-von-Laue-Strasse 1, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Wang, Xin-Nian [Key Laboratory of Quark & Lepton Physics (MOE) and Institute of Particle Physics, Central China Normal University, Wuhan 430079 (China); Nuclear Science Division MS70R0319, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2016-12-15

    We investigate the decorrelation of 2nd and 3rd order anisotropic flow for charged particles in two different pseudo rapidity (η) windows by varying the pseudo rapidity gap, in an event-by-event (3+1)D ideal hydrodynamic model, with fluctuating initial conditions from A Multi-Phase Transport (AMPT) model. We visualize the parton distribution at initial state for Pb+Pb collisions at LHC and Au+Au collisions at RHIC, and demonstrate the longitudinal fluctuations originating from the asymmetry between forward and backward going participants, the fluctuations of the string length and the fluctuations due to finite number of partons at different beam energies. The decorrelation of anisotropic flow of final hadrons with large η gaps is found to originate from the spatial decorrelation along the longitudinal direction in the AMPT initial conditions through hydrodynamic evolution. The agreement between our results and recent CMS data in most centralities suggests that the string-like mechanism of initial parton production in AMPT model captures the initial longitudinal fluctuation that is responsible for the measured decorrelation of anisotropic flow in Pb+Pb collisions at LHC. Our predictions for Au+Au collisions at the highest RHIC energy show stronger longitudinal decorrelation than at LHC, indicating larger longitudinal fluctuations at lower beam energies.

  5. Fluctuating hydrodynamics for ionic liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazaridis, Konstantinos [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Washington State University, Pullman, 99163 (United States); Wickham, Logan [Department of Computer Science, Washington State University, Richland, 99354 (United States); Voulgarakis, Nikolaos, E-mail: n.voulgarakis@wsu.edu [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Washington State University, Pullman, 99163 (United States)

    2017-04-25

    We present a mean-field fluctuating hydrodynamics (FHD) method for studying the structural and transport properties of ionic liquids in bulk and near electrified surfaces. The free energy of the system consists of two competing terms: (1) a Landau–Lifshitz functional that models the spontaneous separation of the ionic groups, and (2) the standard mean-field electrostatic interaction between the ions in the liquid. The numerical approach used to solve the resulting FHD-Poisson equations is very efficient and models thermal fluctuations with remarkable accuracy. Such density fluctuations are sufficiently strong to excite the experimentally observed spontaneous formation of liquid nano-domains. Statistical analysis of our simulations provides quantitative information about the properties of ionic liquids, such as the mixing quality, stability, and the size of the nano-domains. Our model, thus, can be adequately parameterized by directly comparing our prediction with experimental measurements and all-atom simulations. Conclusively, this work can serve as a practical mathematical tool for testing various theories and designing more efficient mixtures of ionic liquids. - Highlights: • A new fluctuating hydrodynamics method for ionic liquids. • Description of ionic liquid morphology in bulk and near electrified surfaces. • Direct comparison with experimental measurements.

  6. Rapid mapping of ultrafine fault zone topography with structure from motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kendra; Nissen, Edwin; Saripalli, Srikanth; Arrowsmith, J. Ramón; McGarey, Patrick; Scharer, Katherine M.; Williams, Patrick; Blisniuk, Kimberly

    2014-01-01

    Structure from Motion (SfM) generates high-resolution topography and coregistered texture (color) from an unstructured set of overlapping photographs taken from varying viewpoints, overcoming many of the cost, time, and logistical limitations of Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) and other topographic surveying methods. This paper provides the first investigation of SfM as a tool for mapping fault zone topography in areas of sparse or low-lying vegetation. First, we present a simple, affordable SfM workflow, based on an unmanned helium balloon or motorized glider, an inexpensive camera, and semiautomated software. Second, we illustrate the system at two sites on southern California faults covered by existing airborne or terrestrial LiDAR, enabling a comparative assessment of SfM topography resolution and precision. At the first site, an ∼0.1 km2 alluvial fan on the San Andreas fault, a colored point cloud of density mostly >700 points/m2 and a 3 cm digital elevation model (DEM) and orthophoto were produced from 233 photos collected ∼50 m above ground level. When a few global positioning system ground control points are incorporated, closest point vertical distances to the much sparser (∼4 points/m2) airborne LiDAR point cloud are mostly 530 points/m2 and a 2 cm DEM and orthophoto were produced from 450 photos taken from ∼60 m above ground level. Closest point vertical distances to existing terrestrial LiDAR data of comparable density are mostly <6 cm. Each SfM survey took ∼2 h to complete and several hours to generate the scene topography and texture. SfM greatly facilitates the imaging of subtle geomorphic offsets related to past earthquakes as well as rapid response mapping or long-term monitoring of faulted landscapes.

  7. Plant Growth and Development: An Outline for a Unit Structured Around the Life Cycle of Rapid-Cycling Brassica Rapa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Wayne M.

    This outline is intended for use in a unit of 10-12 lectures on plant growth and development at the introductory undergraduate level as part of a course on organismal biology. The series of lecture outlines is structured around the life cycle of rapid-cycling Brassica rapa (RCBr). The unit begins with three introductory lectures on general plant…

  8. Science in the Sandbox: Fluctuations, Friction and Instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behringer, Robert P.; Clement, Eric; Geng, Junfei; Kondic, Ljubinko; Metcalfe, Guy; Reydellet, Guillaume; Tennakoon, Sarath

    The study of granular materials is a novel and rapidly growing field. These materials are interest for a number of reasons, both practical and theoretical. They exhibit a rich of novel dyanamical states, and they exhibit 'phases'-solid, liquid, and gas-that resemble conventional thermodynamic phases. However, the presence of strong dissipation through friction and inelasticity places these systems well outside the usual class of systems that can be explained by equilibrium thermodynamics. Thus, there are important challenges to create new kinds of statistical physics and new analytical descriptions for the mean and fluctuating behavior of these materials. We explore recent work that focuses on several important issues. These include force propagation and fluctuations in static and driven systems. It is well known that forces propagate through granular structures along networks-force chains, whose structure is a function of history. It is much less clear how to describe this process, and even what kind of structures evolve in physical experiments. After a brief overview of the field, we consider models of force propagation and recent experiments to test these models. Among the latter are experiments that probe force profiles at the base of sandpiles, and experiments that determine the Green's function response to point perturbations in granular systems. We also explore the nature of force fluctuations in slowly evolving systems, particulary sheared granular systems. These can be very strong-with rms fluctuations in the force that are as strong as the mean force. Finally, we pursue the analogy between conventional phases of matter, where we particularly focus on the transition between fluid and solid granular states in the presence of sustained horizontal shaking.

  9. Biomolecules: Fluctuations and relaxations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parak, F.; Ostermann, A.; Gassmann, A.; Scherk, C.; Chong, S.-H.; Kidera, A.; Go, N.

    1999-10-01

    The normal-mode refinement of X-ray crystallographic data opened a new possibility to analyze the mean-square displacements in a protein molecule. A comparison of the X-ray structure of myoglobin at several temperatures with Mössbauer data is performed. In the low-temperature regime below 180 K the iron mean-square displacements obtained by Mössbauer spectroscopy are in good agreement with a normal-mode analysis. The X-ray mean-square displacements at the position of the iron, after the motion originated from the external degrees of freedom are subtracted, have practically the same temperature dependence as those from Mössbauer spectroscopy. The difference between the X-ray mean-square displacements and those predicted by normal-mode analysis measures the distribution of molecules into conformational substates. Above 180 K the Mössbauer effect indicates fluctuations between conformational substates. The relaxation from a Fe(III) conformation to a Fe(II) conformation is shown for superoxide dismutase of Propionibacterium shermanii.

  10. The Origin of the Density Fluctuations in De Sitter Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morikawa, M.

    1987-05-01

    As the origin of the large scale structure in the universe, statistical fluctuations of a c-number scalar field are evaluated on the basis of the double time-contour path integral method. The source of the fluctuation is a backreaction of spontaneous particle production in de Sitter space. The evaluated fluctuations are quite different from the ordinary quantum fluctuations and are proportional to the particle production rate.

  11. [Application of multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification for rapid detection of aneuploidies and structural chromosomal abnormalities in prenatal diagnosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingjing; Hu, Ping; Luo, Chunyu; Ji, Qiuqing; Zhou, Jing; Liu, An; Ma, Dingyuan; Xu, Zhengfeng

    2014-02-01

    To explore the value of multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) for rapid detection of aneuploidies and structural chromosomal abnormalities during prenatal diagnosis. Two hundred and eight six amniotic fluid samples were analyzed with both MLPA and conventional karyotyping. Structural abnormalities were verified with array comparative genomic hybridization. Ten cases of trisomy 21, 2 cases of trisomy 18, 1 case of trisomy 13, 1 case of mosaic trisomy 21, 1 case of 45,X, 1 case of large deletion of Xp, 1 case of trisomy 18p and 1 case of large deletion of 18p and 18q were identified. The same results were derived by both MLPA and conventional karyotyping. Structural abnormalities were verified by array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) with 100% accuracy. In addition to aneuploidies, MLPA can rapidly identify large deletions and duplications of chromosomes 21, 18, 13, X and Y. MLPA is supplementary to conventional karyotyping for identification of such chromosomal abnormalities prenatal diagnosis.

  12. Mechanical response of local rapid cooling by spray water on constrained steel frame structure at high temperature in fire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia Yunchun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Locally rapid cooling of spray water had strong impact on high temperature steel structure. When temperature of beam reached 600°C and cooling rate was more than 20°C/s, the maximum axial tension could reach more than 5 times of the originally compressive force. The compressive bending moment at joint of beam-to-column changed to tensile bending moment, and the maximum bending moment could reach above 4 times as that when heated. After rapid cooling by spray water, deflection at mid-span increased slightly.

  13. Effect of dust charge fluctuations on dust acoustic structures in magnetized dusty plasma containing nonextensive electrons and two-temperature isothermal ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araghi, F. [Islamic Azad University, North Tehran Branch, Physics Department, Science Faculty (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Dorranian, D., E-mail: doran@srbiau.ac.ir [Islamic Azad University, Laser Laboratory, Plasma Physics Research Center, Science and Research Branch (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    Effect of dust electrical charge fluctuations on the nature of dust acoustic solitary waves (DASWs) in a four-species magnetized dusty plasma containing nonextensive electrons and two-temperature isothermal ions has been investigated. In this model, the negative dust electric charge is considered to be proportional to the plasma space potential. The nonlinear Zakharov–Kuznetsov (ZK) and modified Zakharov–Kuznetsov (mZK) equations are derived for DASWs by using the standard reductive perturbation method. The combined effects of electron nonextensivity and dust charge fluctuations on the DASW profile are analyzed. The different ranges of the nonextensive q-parameter are considered. The results show that solitary waves the amplitude and width of which depend sensitively on the nonextensive q-parameter can exist. Due to the electron nonextensivity and dust charge fluctuation rate, our dusty plasma model can admit both positive and negative potential solitons. The results show that the amplitude of the soliton increases with increasing electron nonextensivity, but its width decreases. Increasing the electrical charge fluctuations leads to a decrease in both the amplitude and width of DASWs.

  14. Scaling metabolic rate fluctuations

    OpenAIRE

    Labra, Fabio A.; Marquet, Pablo A.; Bozinovic, Francisco

    2007-01-01

    Complex ecological and economic systems show fluctuations in macroscopic quantities such as exchange rates, size of companies or populations that follow non-Gaussian tent-shaped probability distributions of growth rates with power-law decay, which suggests that fluctuations in complex systems may be governed by universal mechanisms, independent of particular details and idiosyncrasies. We propose here that metabolic rate within individual organisms may be considered as an example of an emerge...

  15. Rapid characterisation of vegetation structure to predict refugia and climate change impacts across a global biodiversity hotspot.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonius G T Schut

    Full Text Available Identification of refugia is an increasingly important adaptation strategy in conservation planning under rapid anthropogenic climate change. Granite outcrops (GOs provide extraordinary diversity, including a wide range of taxa, vegetation types and habitats in the Southwest Australian Floristic Region (SWAFR. However, poor characterization of GOs limits the capacity of conservation planning for refugia under climate change. A novel means for the rapid identification of potential refugia is presented, based on the assessment of local-scale environment and vegetation structure in a wider region. This approach was tested on GOs across the SWAFR. Airborne discrete return Light Detection And Ranging (LiDAR data and Red Green and Blue (RGB imagery were acquired. Vertical vegetation profiles were used to derive 54 structural classes. Structural vegetation types were described in three areas for supervised classification of a further 13 GOs across the region. Habitat descriptions based on 494 vegetation plots on and around these GOs were used to quantify relationships between environmental variables, ground cover and canopy height. The vegetation surrounding GOs is strongly related to structural vegetation types (Kappa = 0.8 and to its spatial context. Water gaining sites around GOs are characterized by taller and denser vegetation in all areas. The strong relationship between rainfall, soil-depth, and vegetation structure (R(2 of 0.8-0.9 allowed comparisons of vegetation structure between current and future climate. Significant shifts in vegetation structural types were predicted and mapped for future climates. Water gaining areas below granite outcrops were identified as important putative refugia. A reduction in rainfall may be offset by the occurrence of deeper soil elsewhere on the outcrop. However, climate change interactions with fire and water table declines may render our conclusions conservative. The LiDAR-based mapping approach presented

  16. Fluctuations, Environment, Mutations Accumulation and Ageing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biecek, Przemysław; Cebrat, Stanisław

    We present a model of evolution of the age structured population based on the Monte Carlo method. We have assumed that the health status of an individual is described by variance of its fluctuations. Each expressed deleterious mutation increases the fluctuations. Additionally, the fluctuations of the environment are superimposed on the fluctuations of individuals in the population. An individual dies if the combination of both stochastic processes trespass the limit (level of homeostasis) set as the model parameter. The genes are switched on chronologically, what leads to accumulating defective genes expressed during the late periods of life in the genetic pool of the population. That results in the specific age structured population, in accordance with the predictions of Medawar's hypothesis of ageing and the results of the Penna model simulations. A decrease of the variation of the environmental noise increases the average expected lifespan of individuals.

  17. Optofluidic refractive-index sensors employing bent waveguide structures for low-cost, rapid chemical and biomedical sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, I-Chen; Chen, Pin-Chuan; Chau, Lai-Kwan; Chang, Guo-En

    2018-01-08

    We propose and develop an intensity-detection-based refractive-index (RI) sensor for low-cost, rapid RI sensing. The sensor is composed of a polymer bent ridge waveguide (BRWG) structure on a low-cost glass substrate and is integrated with a microfluidic channel. Different-RI solutions flowing through the BRWG sensing region induce output optical power variations caused by optical bend losses, enabling simple and real-time RI detection. Additionally, the sensors are fabricated using rapid and cost-effective vacuum-less processes, attaining the low cost and high throughput required for mass production. A good RI solution of 5.31 10-4 × RIU-1 is achieved from the RI experiments. This study demonstrates mass-producible and compact RI sensors for rapid and sensitive chemical analysis and biomedical sensing.

  18. Fluctuation Diamagnetism in Two-Band Superconductors

    OpenAIRE

    Adachi, Kyosuke; Ikeda, Ryusuke

    2016-01-01

    Anomalously large fluctuation diamagnetism around the superconducting critical temperature has been recently observed on iron selenide (FeSe) [S. Kasahara et al., unpublished]. This indicates that superconducting fluctuations (SCFs) play a more significant role in FeSe, which supposedly has two-band structure, than in the familiar single-band superconductors. Motivated by the data in FeSe, SCF-induced diamagnetism is examined in a two-band system, on the basis of a phenomenological approach w...

  19. Rapid Growth of Psychology Programs in Turkey: Undergraduate Curriculum and Structural Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sümer, Nebi

    2016-01-01

    Similar to the other developing countries, undergraduate psychology programs in Turkish universities have rapidly grown in the last two decades. Although this sharp increment signifies the need for psychologists, it has also caused a number of challenges for effective teaching of psychology. The department chairs (N = 42) were interviewed with an…

  20. Microbial community structure and a core microbiome in biological rapid sand filters at Danish waterworks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gülay, Arda; Musovic, Sanin; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen

    Rapid sand filtration is a traditional and common technology for drinking water purification from groundwater. Despite its wide scale and long-term use, the diversity and characterization of microbial communities in these engineered systems have remained unexplored and their roles in removal...

  1. Classical fluctuations in dissipative quantum systems - metamorphosisof quantum fluctuations into cosmic non-uniformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morikawa, M.

    Assuming an inflationary phase in the early universe, this paper studies the generation of non-uniformity from an entirely uniform universe where no statistical fluctuations nor structure are present.

  2. Fluctuating shells under pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulose, Jayson; Vliegenthart, Gerard A.; Gompper, Gerhard; Nelson, David R.

    2012-01-01

    Thermal fluctuations strongly modify the large length-scale elastic behavior of cross-linked membranes, giving rise to scale-dependent elastic moduli. Whereas thermal effects in flat membranes are well understood, many natural and artificial microstructures are modeled as thin elastic shells. Shells are distinguished from flat membranes by their nonzero curvature, which provides a size-dependent coupling between the in-plane stretching modes and the out-of-plane undulations. In addition, a shell can support a pressure difference between its interior and its exterior. Little is known about the effect of thermal fluctuations on the elastic properties of shells. Here, we study the statistical mechanics of shape fluctuations in a pressurized spherical shell, using perturbation theory and Monte Carlo computer simulations, explicitly including the effects of curvature and an inward pressure. We predict novel properties of fluctuating thin shells under point indentations and pressure-induced deformations. The contribution due to thermal fluctuations increases with increasing ratio of shell radius to thickness and dominates the response when the product of this ratio and the thermal energy becomes large compared with the bending rigidity of the shell. Thermal effects are enhanced when a large uniform inward pressure acts on the shell and diverge as this pressure approaches the classical buckling transition of the shell. Our results are relevant for the elasticity and osmotic collapse of microcapsules. PMID:23150558

  3. Fluctuations in solidification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karma, A. (Physics Department, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States))

    1993-11-01

    We present an analytical treatment of (i) the incorporation of thermal noise in the basic continuum models of solidification, (ii) fluctuations about nonequilibrium steady states, and (iii) the amplification of noise near the onset of morphological instability. In (i), we find that the proper Langevin formalism, consistent with both bulk and interfacial equilibrium fluctuations, consists of the usual bulk forces and an extra stochastic force on the interface associated with its local kinetics. At sufficiently large solidification rate, this force affects interfacial fluctuations on scales where they are macroscopically amplified and, thus, becomes relevant. An estimate of this rate is given. In (ii), we extend the Langevin formalism outside of equilibrium to characterize the fluctuations of a stationary and a directionally solidified planar interface in a temperature gradient. Finally, in (iii), we derive an analytic expression for the linear growth of the mean-square amplitude of fluctuations slightly above the onset of morphological instability. The amplitude of the noise is found to be determined by the small parameter [ital k][sub [ital B]T[ital E]d0][sup [ital c]l][sub [ital T

  4. Thermal and mechanical effect during rapid heating of astroloy for improving structural integrity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popoolaa, A.P.I., E-mail: popoolaapi@tut.ac.za [Department of Chemical, Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Tshwane University of Technology, Pretoria (South Africa); Oluwasegun, K.M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Obafemi Awolowo University (Nigeria); Olorunniwo, O.E., E-mail: segun_nniwo@yahoo.com [Department of Chemical, Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Tshwane University of Technology, Pretoria (South Africa); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Obafemi Awolowo University (Nigeria); Atanda, P.O. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Obafemi Awolowo University (Nigeria); Aigbodion, V.S. [Department of Chemical, Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Tshwane University of Technology, Pretoria (South Africa); Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, University of Nigeria, Nsukka (Nigeria)

    2016-05-05

    The behaviour of γ′ phase to thermal and mechanical effects during rapid heating of Astroloy(Turbine Disc alloy) a Powder metallurgy (PM) nickel base superalloy has been investigated. The thermo-mechanical affected zone (TMAZ) and heat affected zone (HAZ) microstructure of an inertia friction welded Astroloy were simulated using a Gleeble thermo-mechanical simulation system. Detailed microstructural examination of the simulated TMAZ and HAZ and those present in actual inertial friction welded specimens showed that γ′ particles persisted during rapid heating up to a temperature where the formation of liquid is thermodynamically favoured, and subsequently re-solidified eutectically. The result obtained showed that forging during the thermo-mechanical simulation significantly enhanced resistance to weld liquation cracking of the alloy. This is attributable to strain-induced rapid isothermal dissolution of the constitutional liquation products within 150 μm from the centre of the forged sample. This was not observed in purely thermally simulated samples. The microstructure within the TMAZ of the as-welded alloy is similar to the microstructure in the forged Gleeble specimens. - Highlights: • The behaviour of γ′ phase to thermal and mechanical effects during rapid heating of Astrology • The thermo-mechanical affected zone (TMAZ) and heat affected zone (HAZ). • significantly enhanced resistance to weld liquation cracking of the alloy. • This was not observed in purely thermally simulated samples. • The microstructure within the TMAZ of the as-welded alloy is similar to the microstructure in the forged Gleeble specimens.

  5. Kappa-alpha plot derived structural alphabet and BLOSUM-like substitution matrix for rapid search of protein structure database

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    We present a novel protein structure database search tool, 3D-BLAST, that is useful for analyzing novel structures and can return a ranked list of alignments. This tool has the features of BLAST (for example, robust statistical basis, and effective and reliable search capabilities) and employs a kappa-alpha (κ, α) plot derived structural alphabet and a new substitution matrix. 3D-BLAST searches more than 12,000 protein structures in 1.2 s and yields good results in zones with low sequence similarity. PMID:17335583

  6. Investigation of the Ionospheric Fluctuations Caused by Space Weather Effects Using GNSS TEC Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shagimuratov, Irk; Krankowski, Andrzej; Cherniak, Iurii; Ephishov, Ivan; Zakharenkova, Irina; Yakimova, Galina

    2013-04-01

    It is known that GPS radio signals passing through the ionosphere suffer varying degrees of rapid variations of their amplitude and phase - signal scintillations. The scintillations are caused by the presence of wide range of scale size irregularities in the ionosphere. It is very important to estimate scintillation and phase fluctuation effects on GNSS navigation system (GPS/GLONASS) performance and consequently on the precession of the obtained position. Effects of the ionospheric irregularities on the GPS signals can be evaluated by measurements of the differential phase time rate of dual frequency GPS signals. GPS observations carried out at the Arctic IGS (International GNSS Service) stations were used to study the development of TEC fluctuations in the high latitude ionosphere. Standard GPS measurements with 30s sampling rate allow the detection of middle- and large-scale ionospheric irregularities. For detection of ionospheric fluctuations the rate of TEC (ROT, in the unit of TECU/min) at 1 min interval was used. The temporal occurrence of TEC fluctuations is clearly observed in time variations in the dual frequency carrier phase along satellite passes. As a measure of the fluctuation activity level the Rate of TEC Index (ROTI) based on standard deviation of ROT was also used. ROTI was estimated in 10-minute interval. These techniques and IGS data were used to study the occurrence of TEC fluctuations at the northern latitude ionosphere for selected geomagnetic storms occurred at the end of 23rd and beginning of new 24th solar cycles. Results demonstrate that fluctuation activity of GPS signals in the high latitude ionosphere is depended on geomagnetic conditions. Intensity of fluctuations essentially increases during geomagnetic storms. The strongest TEC fluctuations occurred as short time rate of TEC enhancements of a factor of 2-5 relative to the quiet time. During geomagnetic disturbed conditions strong phase fluctuations can register at latitudes low

  7. Robust Analysis and Prediction for Integrated Design of Structures (RAPIDS) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Commercially available software suites such as the Automate Structural Optimization System (ASTROS) and MSC/NASTRAN represent the current industry standard in...

  8. Measurement of magnetic turbulence structure and nonlinear mode coupling of tearing fluctuations in the Madison Symmetric Torus reversed field pinch edge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assadi, Saeed [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    1994-01-01

    Linear and nonlinear magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stability of current-driven modes are studied in the MST reversed field pinch. Measured low frequency (f < 35 kHz) magnetic fluctuations are consistent with the global resistive tearing instabilities predicted by 3-D MHD simulations. At frequencies above 35 kHz, the magnetic fluctuations were detected to be localized and externally resonant. Discrete dynamo events, ``sawtooth oscillations,`` have been observed in the experimental RFP plasmas. This phenomenon causes the plasma to become unstable to m = 1 tearing modes. The modes that may be important in different phases of these oscillations are identified. These results then assist in nonlinear studies and also help to interpret the spectral broadening of the measured data during a discrete dynamo event. Three-wave nonlinear coupling of spectral Fourier modes is measured in the MST by applying bispectral analysis to magnetic fluctuations measured at the plasma edge at 64 toroidal locations and 16 poloidal locations, permitting observation of coupling over 8 poloidal and 32 toroidal modes. Comparison to bispectra predicted by resistive MHD computation indicates reasonably good agreement. However, during the crash phase of the sawtooth oscillation the nonlinear coupling is strongly enhanced, concomitant with a broadened k-spectrum. During the sawtooth formation the plasma is undergoing a pure diffusive process. The dynamo only occurs during the sawtooth crash. High frequency activity prior to a sawtooth crash is caused by nonlinear frequency (small-scale) mode coupling. Growth rate and coupling coefficients of toroidal mode spectra are calculated by statistical modeling. Temporal evolution of edge toroidal mode spectra has been predicted by transfer function analysis. The driving sources of electrostatic fields are different than for the magnetic fields. The characteristics of tearing modes can be altered by external field errors and addition of impurities to the plasma.

  9. Perceptions of consent, permission structures and approaches to the community: a rapid ethical assessment performed in North West Cameroon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kengne-Ouafo, Jonas A; Nji, Theobald M; Tantoh, William F; Nyoh, Doris N; Tendongfor, Nicholas; Enyong, Peter A; Newport, Melanie J; Davey, Gail; Wanji, Samuel

    2014-10-02

    Understanding local contextual factors is important when conducting international collaborative studies in low-income country settings. Rapid ethical assessment (a brief qualitative intervention designed to map the ethical terrain of a research setting prior to recruitment of participants), has been used in a range of research-naïve settings. We used rapid ethical assessment to explore ethical issues and challenges associated with approaching communities and gaining informed consent in North West Cameroon. This qualitative study was carried out in two health districts in the North West Region of Cameroon between February and April 2012. Eleven focus group discussions (with a total of 107 participants) were carried out among adult community members, while 72 in-depth interviews included health workers, non-government organisation staff and local community leaders. Data were collected in English and pidgin, translated where necessary into English, transcribed and coded following themes. Many community members had some understanding of informed consent, probably through exposure to agricultural research in the past. Participants described a centralised permission-giving structure in their communities, though there was evidence of some subversion of these structures by the educated young and by women. Several acceptable routes for approaching the communities were outlined, all including the health centre and the Fon (traditional leader). The importance of time spent in sensitizing the community and explaining information was stressed. Respondents held relatively sophisticated understanding of consent and were able to outline the structures of permission-giving in the community. Although the structures are unique to these communities, the role of certain trusted groups is common to several other communities in Kenya and Ethiopia explored using similar techniques. The information gained through Rapid Ethical Assessment will form an important guide for future studies in

  10. Catalog-library approach for the rapid and sensitive structural elucidation of oligosaccharides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, K; Hedrick, J L; Lebrilla, C B

    1999-09-01

    We obtained the nearly complete structural elucidation of oligosaccharide components, including sequence, linkage, and even stereochemistry in the picomolar levels. The "catalog-library" approach is used for elucidating the structures of minor components in a mixture of oligosaccharides. Oligosaccharides released from a family of glycoproteins are often composed of a small finite set of monosaccharides. In this regard, the numerous oligosaccharide species are analogous to the products found in syntheses involving combinatorial libraries. The great structural diversity in the library is the result of the nearly infinite combinations in which even a small number of monosaccharides can be arranged. Fortunately, structural similarities exist between different oligosaccharides, as specific substructural motifs are preserved among different compounds. We propose that a catalog of substructural motifs can be identified and characterized by collision-induced dissociation mass spectrometry. The catalog is constructed from a set of known compounds that have been fully structurally elucidated by, for example, nuclear magnetic resonance. The catalog consists of the characteristic fragmentation patterns belonging to a set of specific substructural motifs. Collision-induced dissociation is used to determine the presence of these motifs and reconstruct the structures of less abundant components.

  11. Rapid and high throughput fabrication of high temperature stable structures through PDMS transfer printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohenberger, Erik; Freitag, Nathan; Korampally, Venumadhav

    2017-07-01

    We report on a facile and low cost fabrication approach for structures—gratings and enclosed nanochannels, through simple solution processed chemistries in conjunction with nanotransfer printing techniques. The ink formulation primarily consisting of an organosilicate polymeric network with a small percentage of added 3-aminopropyl triethoxysilane crosslinker allows one to obtain robust structures that are not only stable towards high temperature processing steps as high as 550 °C but also exhibit exceptional stability against a host of organic solvent washes. No discernable structure distortion was observed compared to the as-printed structures (room temperature processed) when printed structures were subjected to temperatures as high as 550 °C. We further demonstrate the applicability of this technique towards the fabrication of more complex nanostructures such as enclosed channels through a double transfer method, leveraging the exceptional room temperature cross-linking ability of the printed structures and their subsequent resistance to dissolution in organic solvent washes. The exceptional temperature and physico-chemical stability of the nanotransfer printed structures makes this a useful fabrication tool that may be applied as is, or integrated with conventional lithographic techniques for the large area fabrication of functional nanostructures and devices.

  12. Implications of the circumpolar genetic structure of polar bears for their conservation in a rapidly warming Arctic.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Peacock

    Full Text Available We provide an expansive analysis of polar bear (Ursus maritimus circumpolar genetic variation during the last two decades of decline in their sea-ice habitat. We sought to evaluate whether their genetic diversity and structure have changed over this period of habitat decline, how their current genetic patterns compare with past patterns, and how genetic demography changed with ancient fluctuations in climate. Characterizing their circumpolar genetic structure using microsatellite data, we defined four clusters that largely correspond to current ecological and oceanographic factors: Eastern Polar Basin, Western Polar Basin, Canadian Archipelago and Southern Canada. We document evidence for recent (ca. last 1-3 generations directional gene flow from Southern Canada and the Eastern Polar Basin towards the Canadian Archipelago, an area hypothesized to be a future refugium for polar bears as climate-induced habitat decline continues. Our data provide empirical evidence in support of this hypothesis. The direction of current gene flow differs from earlier patterns of gene flow in the Holocene. From analyses of mitochondrial DNA, the Canadian Archipelago cluster and the Barents Sea subpopulation within the Eastern Polar Basin cluster did not show signals of population expansion, suggesting these areas may have served also as past interglacial refugia. Mismatch analyses of mitochondrial DNA data from polar and the paraphyletic brown bear (U. arctos uncovered offset signals in timing of population expansion between the two species, that are attributed to differential demographic responses to past climate cycling. Mitogenomic structure of polar bears was shallow and developed recently, in contrast to the multiple clades of brown bears. We found no genetic signatures of recent hybridization between the species in our large, circumpolar sample, suggesting that recently observed hybrids represent localized events. Documenting changes in subpopulation

  13. Implications of the circumpolar genetic structure of polar bears for their conservation in a rapidly warming Arctic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peacock, Elizabeth; Sonsthagen, Sarah A; Obbard, Martyn E; Boltunov, Andrei; Regehr, Eric V; Ovsyanikov, Nikita; Aars, Jon; Atkinson, Stephen N; Sage, George K; Hope, Andrew G; Zeyl, Eve; Bachmann, Lutz; Ehrich, Dorothee; Scribner, Kim T; Amstrup, Steven C; Belikov, Stanislav; Born, Erik W; Derocher, Andrew E; Stirling, Ian; Taylor, Mitchell K; Wiig, Øystein; Paetkau, David; Talbot, Sandra L

    2015-01-01

    We provide an expansive analysis of polar bear (Ursus maritimus) circumpolar genetic variation during the last two decades of decline in their sea-ice habitat. We sought to evaluate whether their genetic diversity and structure have changed over this period of habitat decline, how their current genetic patterns compare with past patterns, and how genetic demography changed with ancient fluctuations in climate. Characterizing their circumpolar genetic structure using microsatellite data, we defined four clusters that largely correspond to current ecological and oceanographic factors: Eastern Polar Basin, Western Polar Basin, Canadian Archipelago and Southern Canada. We document evidence for recent (ca. last 1-3 generations) directional gene flow from Southern Canada and the Eastern Polar Basin towards the Canadian Archipelago, an area hypothesized to be a future refugium for polar bears as climate-induced habitat decline continues. Our data provide empirical evidence in support of this hypothesis. The direction of current gene flow differs from earlier patterns of gene flow in the Holocene. From analyses of mitochondrial DNA, the Canadian Archipelago cluster and the Barents Sea subpopulation within the Eastern Polar Basin cluster did not show signals of population expansion, suggesting these areas may have served also as past interglacial refugia. Mismatch analyses of mitochondrial DNA data from polar and the paraphyletic brown bear (U. arctos) uncovered offset signals in timing of population expansion between the two species, that are attributed to differential demographic responses to past climate cycling. Mitogenomic structure of polar bears was shallow and developed recently, in contrast to the multiple clades of brown bears. We found no genetic signatures of recent hybridization between the species in our large, circumpolar sample, suggesting that recently observed hybrids represent localized events. Documenting changes in subpopulation connectivity will allow

  14. Implications of the circumpolar genetic structure of polar bears for their conservation in a rapidly warming Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peacock, Elizabeth; Sonsthagen, Sarah A.; Obbard, Martyn E.; Boltunov, Andrei N.; Regehr, Eric V.; Ovsyanikov, Nikita; Aars, Jon; Atkinson, Stephen N.; Sage, George K.; Hope, Andrew G.; Zeyl, Eve; Bachmann, Lutz; Ehrich, Dorothee; Scribner, Kim T.; Amstrup, Steven C.; Belikov, Stanislav; Born, Erik W.; Derocher, Andrew E.; Stirling, Ian; Taylor, Mitchell K.; Wiig, Øystein; Paetkau, David; Talbot, Sandra L.

    2015-01-01

    We provide an expansive analysis of polar bear (Ursus maritimus) circumpolar genetic variation during the last two decades of decline in their sea-ice habitat. We sought to evaluate whether their genetic diversity and structure have changed over this period of habitat decline, how their current genetic patterns compare with past patterns, and how genetic demography changed with ancient fluctuations in climate. Characterizing their circumpolar genetic structure using microsatellite data, we defined four clusters that largely correspond to current ecological and oceanographic factors: Eastern Polar Basin, Western Polar Basin, Canadian Archipelago and Southern Canada. We document evidence for recent (ca. last 1–3 generations) directional gene flow from Southern Canada and the Eastern Polar Basin towards the Canadian Archipelago, an area hypothesized to be a future refugium for polar bears as climate-induced habitat decline continues. Our data provide empirical evidence in support of this hypothesis. The direction of current gene flow differs from earlier patterns of gene flow in the Holocene. From analyses of mitochondrial DNA, the Canadian Archipelago cluster and the Barents Sea subpopulation within the Eastern Polar Basin cluster did not show signals of population expansion, suggesting these areas may have served also as past interglacial refugia. Mismatch analyses of mitochondrial DNA data from polar and the paraphyletic brown bear (U. arctos) uncovered offset signals in timing of population expansion between the two species, that are attributed to differential demographic responses to past climate cycling. Mitogenomic structure of polar bears was shallow and developed recently, in contrast to the multiple clades of brown bears. We found no genetic signatures of recent hybridization between the species in our large, circumpolar sample, suggesting that recently observed hybrids represent localized events. Documenting changes in subpopulation connectivity will

  15. Structural and compositional properties of CZTS thin films formed by rapid thermal annealing of electrodeposited layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehner, J.; Ganchev, M.; Loorits, M.; Revathi, N.; Raadik, T.; Raudoja, J.; Grossberg, M.; Mellikov, E.; Volobujeva, O.

    2013-10-01

    In this work Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) thin films were formed by rapid thermal annealing (RTA) of sequentially electrodeposited Cu-Zn and Sn films in 5% H2S containing atmosphere. Six different thermal profiles were used in the experiments. In three of these, the temperature ramping up was varied, while the variable in the other three profiles was the cooling down rate. The optimising parameters for RTA of electrodeposited films were found and annealed films were characterised by X-ray diffraction (XRD), micro-Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM+EDS). The material parameters such as lattice strain and crystallite size were also determined and the influence of annealing temperature and heating rate on these parameters was discussed.The pathway of MoS2 formation was investigated.

  16. Preparation of core-shell structured CaCO3 microspheres as rapid and recyclable adsorbent for anionic dyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Mengen; Chen, Zhenhua; Lv, Xinyan; Zhou, Kang; Zhang, Jie; Tian, Xiaohan; Ren, Xiuli; Mei, Xifan

    2017-09-01

    Core-shell structured CaCO3 microspheres (MSs) were prepared by a facile, one-pot method at room temperature. The adsorbent dosage and adsorption time of the obtained CaCO3 MSs were investigated. The results suggest that these CaCO3 MSs can rapidly and efficiently remove 99-100% of anionic dyes within the first 2 min. The obtained CaCO3 MSs have a high Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area (211.77 m2 g-1). In addition, the maximum adsorption capacity of the obtained CaCO3 MSs towards Congo red was 99.6 mg g-1. We also found that the core-shell structured CaCO3 MSs have a high recycling capability for removing dyes from water. Our results demonstrate that the prepared core-shell structured CaCO3 MSs can be used as an ideal, rapid, efficient and recyclable adsorbent to remove dyes from aqueous solution.

  17. Rapid detection of structural variation in a human genome using nanochannel-based genome mapping technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cao, Hongzhi; Hastie, Alex R.; Cao, Dandan

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Structural variants (SVs) are less common than single nucleotide polymorphisms and indels in the population, but collectively account for a significant fraction of genetic polymorphism and diseases. Base pair differences arising from SVs are on a much higher order (>100 fold) than poi...... mapping technology as a comprehensive and cost-effective method for detecting structural variation and studying complex regions in the human genome, as well as deciphering viral integration into the host genome.......BACKGROUND: Structural variants (SVs) are less common than single nucleotide polymorphisms and indels in the population, but collectively account for a significant fraction of genetic polymorphism and diseases. Base pair differences arising from SVs are on a much higher order (>100 fold) than point...... mutations; however, none of the current detection methods are comprehensive, and currently available methodologies are incapable of providing sufficient resolution and unambiguous information across complex regions in the human genome. To address these challenges, we applied a high-throughput, cost...

  18. Strategies for rapid and reliable fabrication of microoptical structures using two-photon polymerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steenhusen, Sönke; Hasselmann, Sebastian; Domann, Gerhard

    2017-02-01

    Two-Photon Polymerization (2PP) has attracted broad interest for the fabrication of microoptical elements due to its design flexibility and precision. Along with tailored hybrid polymers a higher level of functional integration and new application concepts are enabled. As the entire volume of the desired 3D structure is filled in a point-by-point fashion, the fabrication can require several days inhibiting the adoption of 2PP as an additive manufacturing process at industrial level. We review different strategies to overcome the limitation in throughput and their impact on the patterning result. Particularly, processing using galvoscanner technology and replication of 2PP structures are highlighted.

  19. Microcanonical quantum fluctuation theorems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talkner, Peter; Hänggi, Peter; Morillo, Manuel

    2008-05-01

    Previously derived expressions for the characteristic function of work performed on a quantum system by a classical external force are generalized to arbitrary initial states of the considered system and to Hamiltonians with degenerate spectra. In the particular case of microcanonical initial states, explicit expressions for the characteristic function and the corresponding probability density of work are formulated. Their classical limit as well as their relations to the corresponding canonical expressions are discussed. A fluctuation theorem is derived that expresses the ratio of probabilities of work for a process and its time reversal to the ratio of densities of states of the microcanonical equilibrium systems with corresponding initial and final Hamiltonians. From this Crooks-type fluctuation theorem a relation between entropies of different systems can be derived which does not involve the time-reversed process. This entropy-from-work theorem provides an experimentally accessible way to measure entropies.

  20. Ideas for the rapid development of the structural models in mechanical engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oanta, E.; Raicu, A.; Panait, C.

    2017-08-01

    Conceiving computer based instruments is a long run concern of the authors. Some of the original solutions are: optimal processing of the large matrices, interfaces between the programming languages, approximation theory using spline functions, numerical programming increased accuracy based on the extended arbitrary precision libraries. For the rapid development of the models we identified the following directions: atomization, ‘librarization’, parameterization, automatization and integration. Each of these directions has some particular aspects if we approach mechanical design problems or software development. Atomization means a thorough top-down decomposition analysis which offers an insight regarding the basic features of the phenomenon. Creation of libraries of reusable mechanical parts and libraries of programs (data types, functions) save time, cost and effort when a new model must be conceived. Parameterization leads to flexible definition of the mechanical parts, the values of the parameters being changed either using a dimensioning program or in accord to other parts belonging to the same assembly. The resulting templates may be also included in libraries. Original software applications are useful for the model’s input data generation, to input the data into CAD/FEA commercial applications and for the data integration of the various types of studies included in the same project.

  1. Bovine rumen epithelium undergoes rapid structural adaptations during grain-induced subacute ruminal acidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Michael A; Croom, Jim; Kahler, Melissa; AlZahal, Ousama; Hook, Sarah E; Plaizier, Kees; McBride, Brian W

    2011-06-01

    Alterations in rumen epithelial structure and function during grain-induced subacute ruminal acidosis (SARA) are largely undescribed. In this study, four mature nonlactating dairy cattle were transitioned from a high-forage diet (HF; 0% grain) to a high-grain diet (HG; 65% grain). After feeding the HG diet for 3 wk, the cattle were transitioned back to the original HF diet, which was fed for an additional 3 wk. Continuous ruminal pH was measured on a weekly basis, and rumen papillae were biopsied during the baseline and at the first and final week of each diet. The mean, minimum, and maximum daily ruminal pH were depressed (P rumen epithelium is compromised during grain feeding and is associated with the differential expression of genes involved in epithelial growth and structure.

  2. Surface modification induced phase transformation and structure variation on the rapidly solidified recast layer of titanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, Ming-Hung [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Graduate Institute of Mechanical and Precision Engineering, National Kaoshiung University of Applied Sciences, Kaoshiung 807, Taiwan (China); School of Dentistry, College of Oral Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Haung, Chiung-Fang [School of Dental Technology, College of Oral Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Division of Family and Operative Dentistry, Department of Dentistry, Taipei Medical University Hospital, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Research Center for Biomedical Devices and Prototyping Production, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Shyu, Shih-Shiun [Department of Dentistry, Taipei Tzu Chi Hospital, Buddhist Tzu Chi Medical Foundation, New Taipei City 231, Taiwan (China); Chou, Yen-Ru [Research Center for Biomedical Devices and Prototyping Production, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Biomedical Materials and Tissue Engineering, College of Oral Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Research Center for Biomedical Implants and Microsurgery Devices, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Lin, Ming-Hong [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Graduate Institute of Mechanical and Precision Engineering, National Kaoshiung University of Applied Sciences, Kaoshiung 807, Taiwan (China); Peng, Pei-Wen, E-mail: apon@tmu.edu.tw [School of Dental Technology, College of Oral Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); and others

    2015-08-15

    In this study, neodymium-doped yttrium orthovanadate (Nd:YVO{sub 4}) as a laser source with different scanning speeds was used on biomedical Ti surface. The microstructural and biological properties of laser-modified samples were investigated by means of optical microscope, electron microscope, X-ray diffraction, surface roughness instrument, contact angle and cell cytotoxicity assay. After laser modification, the rough volcano-like recast layer with micro-/nanoporous structure and wave-like recast layer with nanoporous structure were generated on the surfaces of laser-modified samples, respectively. It was also found out that, an α → (α + rutile-TiO{sub 2}) phase transition occurred on the recast layers of laser-modified samples. The Ti surface becomes hydrophilic at a high speed laser scanning. Moreover, the cell cytotoxicity assay demonstrated that laser-modified samples did not influence the cell adhesion and proliferation behaviors of osteoblast (MG-63) cell. The laser with 50 mm/s scanning speed induced formation of rough volcano-like recast layer accompanied with micro-/nanoporous structure, which can promote cell adhesion and proliferation of MG-63 cell on Ti surface. The results indicated that the laser treatment was a potential technology to enhance the biocompatibility for titanium. - Highlights: • Laser induced the formation of recast layer with micro-/nanoporous structure on Ti. • An α → (α + rutile-TiO{sub 2}) phase transition was observed within the recast layer. • The Ti surface becomes hydrophilic at a high speed laser scanning. • Laser-modified samples exhibit good biocompatibility to osteoblast (MG-63) cell.

  3. Rapid discovery of inhibitors of Toxoplasma gondii using hybrid structure-based computational approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortagere, Sandhya; Mui, Ernest; McLeod, Rima; Welsh, William J.

    2011-05-01

    Toxoplasma (T.) gondii, the causative agent of toxoplasmosis, is a ubiquitous opportunistic pathogen that infects individuals worldwide, and is a leading cause of severe congenital neurologic and ocular disease in humans. No vaccine to protect humans is available, and hypersensitivity and toxicity limit the use of the few available medicines. Therefore, safer and more effective medicines to treat toxoplasmosis are urgently needed. Using the Hybrid Structure Based (HSB) method, we have previously identified small molecule inhibitors of P. falciparum that seem to target a novel protein-protein interaction between the Myosin tail interacting protein and myosin light chain. This pathway has been hypothesized to be involved in invasion of host erythrocytes by the parasite and is broadly conserved among the apicomplexans. Guided by similar computational drug design approaches, we investigated this series of small molecules as potential inhibitors of T. gondii. Compound C3-21, identified as the most active inhibitor in this series, exhibited an IC50 value 500 nM against T. gondii. Among the 16 structural analogs of C3-21 tested thus far, nine additional compounds were identified with IC50 values <10.0 μM. In vitro assays have revealed that C3-21 markedly limits intracellular growth of T. gondii tachyzoites, but has no effect on host cell human foreskin fibroblasts (HFF) at concentrations more than a log greater than the concentration that inhibits the parasites.

  4. Rapid, Quantitative Assessment of Submerged Cultural Resource Degradation Using Repeat Video Surveys and Structure from Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertes, J. R.; Zant, C. N.; Gulley, J. D.; Thomsen, T. L.

    2017-08-01

    Monitoring, managing and preserving submerged cultural resources (SCR) such as shipwrecks can involve time consuming detailed physical surveys, expensive side-scan sonar surveys, the study of photomosaics and even photogrammetric analysis. In some cases, surveys of SCR have produced 3D models, though these models have not typically been used to document patterns of site degradation over time. In this study, we report a novel approach for quantifying degradation and changes to SCR that relies on diver-acquired video surveys, generation of 3D models from data acquired at different points in time using structure from motion, and differencing of these models. We focus our study on the shipwreck S.S. Wisconsin, which is located roughly 10.2 km southeast of Kenosha, Wisconsin, in Lake Michigan. We created two digital elevation models of the shipwreck using surveys performed during the summers of 2006 and 2015 and differenced these models to map spatial changes within the wreck. Using orthomosaics and difference map data, we identified a change in degradation patterns. Degradation was anecdotally believed to be caused by inward collapse, but maps indicated a pattern of outward collapse of the hull structure, which has resulted in large scale shifting of material in the central upper deck. In addition, comparison of the orthomosaics with the difference map clearly shows movement of objects, degradation of smaller pieces and in some locations, an increase in colonization of mussels.

  5. Multifractal conductance fluctuations in graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bid, Aveek; Rafsanjani Amin, Kazi; Pal, Nairita; Sankar Ray, Samriddhi; Pandit, Rahul

    A multifractal (MF) system is characterized by scaling laws involving an infinite number of exponents. In condensed-matter systems, signatures of multifractality have typically been found in the structure of the critical wave functions at localization delocalization (LD) transitions. We report here the first experimental observation of MF statistics in the transport coefficients of a quantum-condensed matter system. We unearth this through a careful investigation of the magneto-conductance fluctuations in ultra-high mobility single layer graphene at ultra-low temperatures. We obtain the MF spectra over a wide range of temperature and doping levels and show that the multifractality decreases as the temperature increases or as the doping moves the system away from the Dirac point. We show that the fractal exponents are a universal function of the phase coherence length of the carriers. We propose that a probable origin of the MF magneto-conductance fluctuations observed by us is an incipient Anderson LD transition in graphene near the charge neutrality point - a phenomenon predicted but never observed in single layer graphene. We also explore alternate possibilities of the origin of the multifractality namely relativistic quantum scars. AB acknowledges funding from Nanomission, DST, Govt. of India and SERB, DST, Govt. of India.

  6. Protrusion Fluctuations Direct Cell Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero, David; Voituriez, Raphaël; Riveline, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Many physiological phenomena involve directional cell migration. It is usually attributed to chemical gradients in vivo. Recently, other cues have been shown to guide cells in vitro, including stiffness/adhesion gradients or micropatterned adhesive motifs. However, the cellular mechanism leading to these biased migrations remains unknown, and, often, even the direction of motion is unpredictable. In this study, we show the key role of fluctuating protrusions on ratchet-like structures in driving NIH3T3 cell migration. We identified the concept of efficient protrusion and an associated direction index. Our analysis of the protrusion statistics facilitated the quantitative prediction of cell trajectories in all investigated conditions. We varied the external cues by changing the adhesive patterns. We also modified the internal cues using drug treatments, which modified the protrusion activity. Stochasticity affects the short- and long-term steps. We developed a theoretical model showing that an asymmetry in the protrusion fluctuations is sufficient for predicting all measures associated with the long-term motion, which can be described as a biased persistent random walk. PMID:24988339

  7. Entropic fluctuations in DNA sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanos, Dimitrios; Li, Wentian; Provata, Astero

    2018-03-01

    The Local Shannon Entropy (LSE) in blocks is used as a complexity measure to study the information fluctuations along DNA sequences. The LSE of a DNA block maps the local base arrangement information to a single numerical value. It is shown that despite this reduction of information, LSE allows to extract meaningful information related to the detection of repetitive sequences in whole chromosomes and is useful in finding evolutionary differences between organisms. More specifically, large regions of tandem repeats, such as centromeres, can be detected based on their low LSE fluctuations along the chromosome. Furthermore, an empirical investigation of the appropriate block sizes is provided and the relationship of LSE properties with the structure of the underlying repetitive units is revealed by using both computational and mathematical methods. Sequence similarity between the genomic DNA of closely related species also leads to similar LSE values at the orthologous regions. As an application, the LSE covariance function is used to measure the evolutionary distance between several primate genomes.

  8. Consistency of detrended fluctuation analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Løvsletten, O.

    2017-07-01

    The scaling function F (s ) in detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) scales as F (s ) ˜sH for stochastic processes with Hurst exponent H . This scaling law is proven for stationary stochastic processes with 0 DFA is equal in expectation to (i) a weighted sum of the ACF and (ii) a weighted sum of the second-order structure function. These results enable us to compute the exact finite-size bias for signals that are scaling and to employ DFA in a meaningful sense for signals that do not exhibit power-law statistics. The usefulness is illustrated by examples where it is demonstrated that a previous suggested modified DFA will increase the bias for signals with Hurst exponents 1 application of these developments, an estimator F ̂(s ) is proposed. This estimator can handle missing data in regularly sampled time series without the need of interpolation schemes. Under mild regularity conditions, F ̂(s ) is equal in expectation to the fluctuation function F (s ) in the gap-free case.

  9. Biogas in a future energy supply structure with a high proportion of fluctuating renewable energies; Biogas in einer zukuenftigen Energieversorgungsstruktur mit hohen Anteilen fluktuierender Erneuerbarer Energien

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holzhammer, Uwe Abraham

    2015-07-01

    The power supply must integrate in the future an increasing share of renewable energies for the supply of electricity customers to meet the climate protection requirements. The proportion of weather-dependent renewable energy plays a leading role of renewable power supply in the future. These highly volatile provided electricity volumes do not match in base-load power generated amounts, as it has come in the past biogas park and still mostly delivers. It seems necessary that the non-fluctuating production units ''make room'' the wind and PV electricity volumes in the energy system and provide the electricity in phases when the fluctuating renewable energy electricity volumes are not available. In this study, it is determined how the biogas park with its high number of production systems should behave from total cost perspective in the energy system in 2030. It primarily concerns the question whether the base-load electricity production of biogas parks should be changed and made more flexible from the perspective of the overall costs and if so, to what extent. [German] Die Stromversorgung muss in Zukunft einen stetig steigenden Anteil an Erneuerbarer Energien zur Versorgung der Stromkunden integrieren, um die den Klimaschutzanforderungen zu genuegen. Der Anteil an wetterabhaengigen Erneuerbaren Energien nimmt dabei zukuenftig die tragende Rolle der Erneuerbaren Stromversorgung ein. Diese sehr volatil bereitgestellten Strommengen passen nicht zu in Grundlast erzeugten Strommengen, wie sie in der Vergangenheit der BiogasPark geliefert hat und immer noch groesstenteils liefert. Es scheint erforderlich, dass die nicht fluktuierenden Erzeugungseinheiten den Wind-und PV-Strommengen im Energiesystem ''Platz machen'' und den Strom in Phasen bereitstellen, wenn die fluktuierende Erneuerbaren Energie-Strommengen nicht zur Verfuegung stehen. Im Rahmen dieser Arbeit wird ermittelt, wie sich der BiogasPark mit seiner hohen Zahl an

  10. Prototipaje rápido de estructuras craneofaciales Rapid prototyping of craniofacial structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Felipe Isaza

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo presenta una descripción de la tecnología de Prototipaje Rápido o Rapid Prototyping (RP aplicada a la medicina, específicamente a problemas craneofaciales, con la cual se pueden fabricar modelos sólidos 3D por adición de material. A su vez se describe una aplicación a partir de la simulación de una cirugía para insertar cuatro implantes mandibulares, los cuales constituyen la base de una prótesis fija soportada por implantes. La simulación del procedimiento quirúrgico comenzó con la obtención de la geometría mandibular a partir del procesamiento de imágenes biomédicas, provenientes de una Tomografia Axial Computarizada (TAC de una mujer adulta, totalmente edéntula. Dicho proceso se realizó utilizando el software GIB Points 3D, desarrollado dentro del presente trabajo. Con el software se obtuvo un archivo de texto con la nube de puntos 3D de la mandíbula que posteriormente fue exportado a ProEngineer Wildfire 3.0, desde el cual se generó un archivo en formato estándar STL, compatible con la mayoría de máquinas RP. La tecnología usada para la impresión 3D, fue la de “deposición de hilo fundido” o Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM. Se logró obtener un modelo plástico de una mandíbula, de gran calidad anatómica y dimensional, utilizando tecnología disponible enColombia. Además, se simuló con éxito el procedimiento quirúrgico para lainstalación de cuatro implantes utilizando las herramientas que se usarían enla cirugía real. En general, la metodología implementada puede ser utilizadapara la planificación quirúrgica y así evitar procedimientos de ensayo y errorque puedan poner en riesgo la salud del paciente. También como herramientade comunicación para explicarle al paciente los procedimientos quirúrgicos aque será sometido. Además, puede ser usado con fines docentes para el entrenamientode estudiantes, haciendo más efectivos los procesos de aprendizajeen el ámbito clínico que a su

  11. Advantages of storage in a fluctuating environment.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooi, B.W.; Troost, T.A.

    2006-01-01

    We will elaborate the evolutionary course of an ecosystem consisting of a population in a chemostat environment with periodically fluctuating nutrient supply. The organisms that make up the population consist of structural biomass and energy storage compartments. In a constant chemostat environment

  12. Accurate and rapid optical characterization of an anisotropic guided structure based on a neural method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, Stéphane; Battie, Yann; Jamon, Damien; Royer, Francois

    2007-04-10

    Optimal performances of integrated optical devices are obtained by the use of an accurate and reliable characterization method. The parameters of interest, i.e., optical indices and thickness of the waveguide structure, are calculated from effective indices by means of an inversion procedure. We demonstrate how an artificial neural network can achieve such a process. The artificial neural network used is a multilayer perceptron. The first result concerns a simulated anisotropic waveguide. The accuracy in the determination of optical indices and waveguide thickness is 5 x 10(-5) and 4 nm, respectively. Then an experimental application on a silica-titania thin film is performed. In addition, effective indices are measured by m-lines spectroscopy. Finally, a comparison with a classical optimization algorithm demonstrates the robustness of the neural method.

  13. Dynamic photosynthesis under a fluctuating environment: a modelling-based analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morales Sierra, Alejandro

    2017-01-01

    In their natural environment, leaves are exposed to rapid fluctuations of irradiance. Research on CO2 assimilation under fluctuating irradiance often relies on measurements of gas exchange during transients where irradiance is rapidly increased or decreased, after the leaf has adapted to a

  14. Gambling with Superconducting Fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foltyn, Marek; Zgirski, Maciej

    2015-08-01

    Josephson junctions and superconducting nanowires, when biased close to superconducting critical current, can switch to a nonzero voltage state by thermal or quantum fluctuations. The process is understood as an escape of a Brownian particle from a metastable state. Since this effect is fully stochastic, we propose to use it for generating random numbers. We present protocol for obtaining random numbers and test the experimentally harvested data for their fidelity. Our work is prerequisite for using the Josephson junction as a tool for stochastic (probabilistic) determination of physical parameters such as magnetic flux, temperature, and current.

  15. Fluctuation relations for anisotropic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villavicencio-Sanchez, R.; Harris, R. J.; Touchette, H.

    2014-02-01

    Currents of particles or energy in driven non-equilibrium steady states are known to satisfy certain symmetries, referred to as fluctuation relations, determining the ratio of the probabilities of positive fluctuations to negative ones. A generalization of these fluctuation relations has been proposed recently for extended non-equilibrium systems of dimension greater than one, assuming, crucially, that they are isotropic (Hurtado P. I., Pérez-Espigares C., del Pozo J. J. and Garrido P. L., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A., 108 (2011) 7704). Here we relax this assumption and derive a fluctuation relation for d-dimensional systems having anisotropic bulk driving rates. We test the validity of this anisotropic fluctuation relation by calculating the particle current fluctuations in the 2d anisotropic zero-range process, using both exact and fluctuating hydrodynamic approaches.

  16. Rapid chloride permeability test as durability index of the concrete structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martínez-Sánchez, B.

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available From the RCPT publication, this test has been frequently used in the concrete structures durability assessment. This test it could be determined in a relatively short time the material permeability, within a rank or quality level that allows comparing concretes as far as their characteristics. In this document, is present an intense investigation to evaluate mix designs with the principal objective to measure the participation and contribution of the components that take part in the concrete manufacture. A detailed review of the components contribution is applied to know specifically the properties in the product during any state: fresh or hard path. In this paper, are identified and included the most influence variables in the concrete properties modification.

    Desde su lanzamiento, la prueba de permeabilidad rápida a la penetración de cloruros ha sido usada frecuentemente en la evaluación de la durabilidad en las estructuras de hormigón, ya que se puede establecer, en un tiempo relativamente corto, la determinación de la permeabilidad del material, dentro de un nivel de calidad que permite comparar hormigones en cuanto a esta característica. En este articulo se presenta una investigación en donde se evalúan diseños de mezcla con la finalidad de medir la participación y contribución de cada uno de los componentes que intervienen en la fabricación del hormigón, revisando con detalle su contribución en las propiedades finales del producto, sin olvidar sus efectos en su comportamiento en estado fresco o cuando se encuentra en fase de endurecimiento. En el trabajo se incluyen e identifican las variables de mayor influencia y su relación con la propiedad que modificaron en el hormigón.

  17. Fluctuation diamagnetism in two-band superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Kyosuke; Ikeda, Ryusuke

    2016-04-01

    Anomalously large fluctuation diamagnetism around the superconducting critical temperature has been recently observed in iron selenide (FeSe) [Kasahara et al. (unpublished)]. This indicates that superconducting fluctuations (SCFs) play a more significant role in FeSe, which supposedly has a two-band structure, than in the familiar single-band superconductors. Motivated by the data on FeSe, SCF-induced diamagnetism is examined in a two-band system, on the basis of a phenomenological approach with a Ginzburg-Landau functional. The obtained results indicate that the SCF-induced diamagnetism may be more enhanced than that in a single-band system due to the existence of two distinct fluctuation modes. Such enhancement of diamagnetism unique to a two-band system seems consistent with the large diamagnetism observed in FeSe, though still far from a quantitative agreement.

  18. Correlation length of magnetosheath fluctuations: Cluster statistics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Gutynska

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Magnetosheath parameters are usually described by gasdynamic or magnetohydrodynamic (MHD models but these models cannot account for one of the most important sources of magnetosheath fluctuations – the foreshock. Earlier statistical processing of a large amount of magnetosheath observations has shown that the magnetosheath magnetic field and plasma flow fluctuations downstream of the quasiparallel shock are much larger than those at the opposite flank. These studies were based on the observations of a single spacecraft and thus they could not provide full information on propagation of the fluctuations through the magnetosheath. We present the results of a statistical survey of the magnetosheath magnetic field fluctuations using two years of Cluster observations. We discuss the dependence of the cross-correlation coefficients between different spacecraft pairs on the orientation of the separation vector with respect to the average magnetic field and plasma flow vectors and other parameters. We have found that the correlation length does not exceed ~1 RE in the analyzed frequency range (0.001–0.125 Hz and does not depend significantly on the magnetic field or plasma flow direction. A close connection of cross-correlation coefficients computed in the magnetosheath with the cross-correlation coefficients between a solar wind monitor and a magnetosheath spacecraft suggests that solar wind structures persist on the background of magnetosheath fluctuations.

  19. The dynamics of natural populations: feedback structures in fluctuating environments La dinámica de las poblaciones naturales: estructuras de retroalimentación en ambientes fluctuantes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MAURICIO LIMA

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available The fluctuations exhibited by natural populations have fascinated ecologists for the last eighty years. However, a vigorous debate between different schools of population ecologists has hampered reaching a consensus about the causes of such numerical fluctuations. Recent findings and a more synthetic view of population change espoused by ecologists, statisticians, and mathematicians have integrated the role of nonlinear feedback (deterministic and external environmental (deterministic or stochastic processes in the dynamics of natural populations. The new challenge for population ecologists is to understand how these two different forces interact in nature. In this commentary, I review some of the basic principles of population analysis during the last 50 years. Finally, this commentary emphasize that one of the most promising approaches in population ecology will be the analysis and interpretation of time series data from several species in the same place, and the integration of demographic analysis and mathematical modeling. In both cases we need long-term data of biological populations and the factors that effect them. The potential insights gained from such an approach will help ecologists to understand better the dynamics of natural populations and will have large implications for applied issues such as conservation, management, and control of natural populationsLas fluctuaciones exhibidas por las poblaciones naturales han fascinado a los ecólogos durante los últimos ochenta años. Sin embargo, las acaloradas controversias entre las dos escuelas de ecólogos poblacionales han retrasado la explicación de dichas fluctuaciones numéricas. Recientes hallazgos y una visión más sintética del cambio poblacional lograda por los ecólogos, estadísticos y matemáticos han integrado el papel de los procesos no lineales (deterministas y los procesos externos ambientales (deterministas o estocásticos en la dinámica de las poblaciones naturales

  20. 2012 IUPAP C10 Young Scientist Prize on the Structure and Dynamics of Condensed Matter Lecture: Spin Fluctuations and Pairing in Fe-based Superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christianson, A. D.

    2012-02-01

    The origin of superconductivity in the Fe-based superconductors, like that in other unconventional superconductors, remains shrouded in mystery. How the pairing bosons emerge either due to or in spite of the strong magnetic interactions found in the Fe-based superconductors is one of the most thoroughly investigated questions in the field. A prominent example of the interplay of superconductivity and magnetism is the dramatic shift of spectral weight from the low energy spin excitations to an energy which is related to the superconducting gap resulting in a peak in the spin excitation spectrum localized in both momentum and energy which occurs at the onset of superconductivity. The appearance of the new peak in the spin excitation spectrum below the superconducting transition temperature is referred to as s spin resonance and is most commonly interpreted as indicating a sign change of the superconducting order parameter on different portions of the Fermi surface and thus is consistent with an extended s-wave or s± pairing symmetry in many Fe-based superconductors. We will review the observations and implications of the spin resonance across the Fe-based superconductors. In particular we will examine the relationship between the resonance energy and the superconducting transition temperature as a function of chemical doping and pressure. While the spin resonance provides important information about pairing symmetry, there does not appear to be sufficient spectral to explain the pairing strength. Thus the remainder of the spin excitation spectrum must be examined to determine if spin fluctuations are ultimately responsible for pairing in the Fe-based materials. Consequently, we will discuss in detail the way in which the spin excitations evolve from the nonsuperconducting compounds to their superconducting relatives as a function of chemical doping.

  1. Rapid, decimeter-resolution fault zone topography mapped with Structure from Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, K. L.; Nissen, E.; Saripalli, S.; Arrowsmith, R.; McGarey, P.; Scharer, K. M.; Williams, P. L.

    2013-12-01

    Recent advances in the generation of high-resolution topography have revolutionized our ability to detect subtle geomorphic features related to ground-rupturing earthquakes. Currently, the most popular topographic mapping methods are airborne Light Detection And Ranging (LiDAR) and terrestrial laser scanning (TLS). Though powerful, these laser scanning methods have some inherent drawbacks: airborne LiDAR is expensive and can be logistically complicated, while TLS is time consuming even for small field sites and suffers from patchy coverage due to its restricted field-of-view. An alternative mapping technique, called Structure from Motion (SfM), builds upon traditional photogrammetry to reproduce the topography and texture of a scene from photographs taken at varying viewpoints. The improved availability of cheap, unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) as camera platforms further expedites data collection by covering large areas efficiently with optimal camera angles. Here, we introduce a simple and affordable UAV- or balloon-based SfM mapping system which can produce dense point clouds and sub-decimeter resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) registered to geospatial coordinates using either the photograph's GPS tags or a few ground control points across the scene. The system is ideally suited for studying ruptures of prehistoric, historic, and modern earthquakes in areas of sparse or low-lying vegetation. We use two sites from southern California faults to illustrate. The first is the ~0.1 km2 Washington Street site, located on the Banning strand of the San Andreas fault near Thousand Palms. A high-resolution DEM with ~700 point/m2 was produced from 230 photos collected on a balloon platform flying at 50 m above the ground. The second site is the Galway Lake Road site, which spans a ~1 km strip of the 1992 Mw 7.3 Landers earthquake on the Emerson Fault. The 100 point/m2 DEM was produced from 267 photos taken with a balloon platform at a height of 60 m above the ground

  2. Dopamine agonist suppression of rapid-eye-movement sleep is secondary to sleep suppression mediated via limbic structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miletich, R.S.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of pergolide, a direct dopamine receptor agonist, on sleep and wakefulness, motor behavior and /sup 3/H-spiperone specific binding in limbic structures and striatum in rats was studied. The results show that pergolide induced a biphasic dose effect, with high doses increasing wakefulness and suppressing sleep while low dose decreased wakefulness, but increased sleep. It was shown that pergolide-induced sleep suppression was blocked by ..cap alpha..-glupenthixol and pimozide, two dopamine receptor antagonists. It was further shown that pergolide merely delayed the rebound resulting from rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep deprivation, that dopamine receptors stimulation had no direct effect on the period, phase or amplitude of the circadian rhythm of REM sleep propensity and that there was no alteration in the coupling of REM sleep episodes with S/sub 2/ episodes. Rapid-eye-movement sleep deprivation resulted in increased sensitivity to the pergolide-induced wakefulness stimulation and sleep suppression and pergolide-induced motor behaviors of locomotion and head bobbing. /sup 3/H-spiperone specific binding to dopamine receptors was shown to be altered by REM sleep deprivation in the subcortical limbic structures. It is concluded that the REM sleep suppressing action of dopamine receptor stimulation is secondary to sleep suppression per se and not secondary to a unique effect on the REM sleep. Further, it is suggested that the wakefulness stimulating action of dopamine receptor agonists is mediated by activation of the dopamine receptors in the terminal areas of the mesolimbocortical dopamine projection system.

  3. The mechanisms for passive suppression of fluctuating surface pressure in a supersonic cavity flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudley, Jonathan G.

    The study of the passive suppression of supersonic cavity flow using a rod immersed in the upstream boundary layer is a unique and challenging fluid mechanics problem. The flowfield includes a compressible shear layer interacting with a complex pattern of compression and expansion waves. The turbulent fluctuations inside the shear layer may be amplified through a feedback-receptivity cycle resulting in increased pressure loading on the surfaces of the cavity. Studying the mechanisms dictating the suppression of these amplified turbulent fluctuations when control is present makes for an enlightening and challenging problem. A combined experimental and time accurate numerical study using detached-eddy simulation was conducted to study the suppression of pressure fluctuations due to supersonic cavity flow at Minfinity = 1.4 over an open rectangular cavity with a length-to-depth ratio of six. In this study, the focus is confined to suppression due to a rod spoiler. The experimental measurements included temporally resolved fluctuating surface pressure measurements coupled with spatially resolved particle image velocimetry. Analysis of the fluctuating pressures on the cavity surfaces included investigations of the root-mean-square fluctuating pressure, spectral analysis, correlation and coherence analysis and joint time-frequency spectrograms. The shear layer flowfield and turbulence was studied using ensemble averaged turbulent statistics including two-point spatial turbulent velocity correlations and Proper Orthogonal Decomposition. Results indicate that the most effective suppression of the fluctuating pressures was achieved when a rod sized roughly 40% of the boundary layer was placed such that the top of the rod was near the top edge of the boundary layer. It was shown that the rod leads to a thicker shear layer that initially spreads more rapidly. The turbulent structures in the wake of the rod interact with the cavity shear layer with a time periodic excitation

  4. Investigations of rapid thermal annealing induced structural evolution of ZnO: Ge nanocomposite thin films via GISAXS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ceylan, Abdullah, E-mail: aceylanabd@yahoo.com [Department of Physics Eng., Hacettepe University, Beytepe, 06800 Ankara (Turkey); Ozcan, Yusuf [Department of Electricity and Energy, Pamukkale University, Denizli (Turkey); Orujalipoor, Ilghar [Department of Nanotechnology and Nanomedicine, Hacettepe University, Beytepe, 06800 Ankara (Turkey); Huang, Yen-Chih; Jeng, U-Ser [National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, 101 Hsin-Ann Road, Hsinchu Science Park, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Ide, Semra [Department of Physics Eng., Hacettepe University, Beytepe, 06800 Ankara (Turkey); Department of Nanotechnology and Nanomedicine, Hacettepe University, Beytepe, 06800 Ankara (Turkey)

    2016-06-07

    In this work, we present in depth structural investigations of nanocomposite ZnO: Ge thin films by utilizing a state of the art grazing incidence small angle x-ray spectroscopy (GISAXS) technique. The samples have been deposited by sequential r.f. and d.c. sputtering of ZnO and Ge thin film layers, respectively, on single crystal Si(100) substrates. Transformation of Ge layers into Ge nanoparticles (Ge-np) has been initiated by ex-situ rapid thermal annealing of asprepared thin film samples at 600 °C for 30, 60, and 90 s under forming gas atmosphere. A special attention has been paid on the effects of reactive and nonreactive growth of ZnO layers on the structural evolution of Ge-np. GISAXS analyses have been performed via cylindrical and spherical form factor calculations for different nanostructure types. Variations of the size, shape, and distributions of both ZnO and Ge nanostructures have been determined. It has been realized that GISAXS results are not only remarkably consistent with the electron microscopy observations but also provide additional information on the large scale size and shape distribution of the nanostructured components.

  5. Mesoscale wind fluctuations over Danish waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vincent, C.L.

    2010-12-15

    Mesoscale wind fluctuations affect the large scale integration of wind power because they undermine the day-ahead predictability of wind speed and power production, and because they can result in large fluctuations in power generation that must be balanced using reserve power. Large fluctuations in generated power are a particular problem for offshore wind farms because the typically high concentration of turbines within a limited geographical area means that fluctuations can be correlated across large numbers of turbines. Furthermore, organised mesoscale structures that often form over water, such as convective rolls and cellular convection, have length scales of tens of kilometers, and can cause large wind fluctuations on a time scale of around an hour. This thesis is an exploration of the predictability of mesoscale wind fluctuations using observations from the world's first two large offshore wind farms - Horns Rev I in the North Sea, and Nysted in the Baltic Sea. The thesis begins with a climatological analysis of wind fluctuations on time scales of 1-10 hours at the two sites. A novel method for calculating conditional climatologies of spectral information is proposed, based on binning and averaging the time axis of the Hilbert spectrum. Results reveal clear patterns between wind fluctuations and locally observed meteorological conditions. The analysis is expanded by classifying wind fluctuations on time scales of 1-3 hours according to synoptic patterns, satellite pictures and wind classes. Results indicate that cold air outbreaks and open cellular convection are a significant contributor to mesoscale wind variability at Horns Rev. The predictability of mesoscale wind fluctuations is tested by implementing standard statistical models that relate local wind variability to parameters based on a large scale weather analysis. The models show some skill, but only achieve a 15% improvement on a persistence forecast. The possibility of explicitly modelling

  6. Inverse scattering problem in turbulent magnetic fluctuations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Treumann

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available We apply a particular form of the inverse scattering theory to turbulent magnetic fluctuations in a plasma. In the present note we develop the theory, formulate the magnetic fluctuation problem in terms of its electrodynamic turbulent response function, and reduce it to the solution of a special form of the famous Gelfand–Levitan–Marchenko equation of quantum mechanical scattering theory. The last of these applies to transmission and reflection in an active medium. The theory of turbulent magnetic fluctuations does not refer to such quantities. It requires a somewhat different formulation. We reduce the theory to the measurement of the low-frequency electromagnetic fluctuation spectrum, which is not the turbulent spectral energy density. The inverse theory in this form enables obtaining information about the turbulent response function of the medium. The dynamic causes of the electromagnetic fluctuations are implicit to it. Thus, it is of vital interest in low-frequency magnetic turbulence. The theory is developed until presentation of the equations in applicable form to observations of turbulent electromagnetic fluctuations as input from measurements. Solution of the final integral equation should be done by standard numerical methods based on iteration. We point to the possibility of treating power law fluctuation spectra as an example. Formulation of the problem to include observations of spectral power densities in turbulence is not attempted. This leads to severe mathematical problems and requires a reformulation of inverse scattering theory. One particular aspect of the present inverse theory of turbulent fluctuations is that its structure naturally leads to spatial information which is obtained from the temporal information that is inherent to the observation of time series. The Taylor assumption is not needed here. This is a consequence of Maxwell's equations, which couple space and time evolution. The inversion procedure takes

  7. Fluctuating attention in Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Starrfelt, Randi; Aarsland, Dag; Janvin, Carmen

    2001-01-01

    Lewy body dementia (DLB), which share many clinical and pathological features with Parkinson’s disease (PD), is charac- terised by marked fluctuations in cognition and consciousness. Fluctuating cognition has not been formally studied in PD, although some studies indicate that PD patients show...

  8. Quantum Correction of Fluctuation Theorem

    OpenAIRE

    Monnai, T.; Tasaki, S.

    2003-01-01

    Quantum analogues of the transient fluctuation theorem(TFT) and steady-state fluctuation theorem(SSFT) are investigated for a harmonic oscillator linearly coupled with a harmonic reservoir. The probability distribution for the work done externally is derived and quantum correction for TFT and SSFT are calculated.

  9. Fluctuation conductivity in cuprate superconductors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    superconducting layers in each unit cell is also not adequate. We suggest the fluctuation conductivity to be reduced due to the reduction in the density of states (DOS) of the quasiparticles which results due to the formation of Cooper pairs at the onset of the fluctuations. The data agrees with the theory proposed by Dorin et al ...

  10. Pressure Fluctuations in Nonideal Plasma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lankin, A.; Norman, G.; Saitov, I.

    Fluctuations of pressure of singly ionized nonideal plasma are studied using the fluctuation approach which provides the self-consistent joint description of free and weakly bound electron states. The classical molecular dynamics method is used. The electron-ion interaction is described by the

  11. The Iso-electronic Series $Ca_{2-x}Sr_{x}RuO_{4}$: Structural Distortion, Effective Dimensionality, Spin Fluctuations and Quantum Criticality

    OpenAIRE

    Acharya, Swagata; Dey, Dibyendu; Maitra, T.; Taraphder, A.

    2016-01-01

    The iso-electronic $d^{4}$ compounds of the $4d$ series show rich phase diagrams due to competing spin, charge and orbital degrees of freedom in presence of strong correlations and structural distortions. One such iso-electronic series, $Ca_{2-x}Sr_{x}RuO_{4}$, is studied within the GGA (and spin-orbit coupled GGA) plus DMFT formalism using the hybridization expansion of continuous time Quantum Monte Carlo solver. While the local dynamical correlations make $Sr_{2}RuO_{4}$ a Hund's metal, the...

  12. Intermittent character of interplanetary magnetic field fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, Roberto; Carbone, Vincenzo; Chapman, Sandra; Hnat, Bogdan; Noullez, Alain; Sorriso-Valvo, Luca

    2007-03-01

    Interplanetary magnetic field magnitude fluctuations are notoriously more intermittent than velocity fluctuations in both fast and slow wind. This behavior has been interpreted in terms of the anomalous scaling observed in passive scalars in fully developed hydrodynamic turbulence. In this paper, the strong intermittent nature of the interplanetary magnetic field is briefly discussed comparing results performed during different phases of the solar cycle. The scaling properties of the interplanetary magnetic field magnitude show solar cycle variation that can be distinguished in the scaling exponents revealed by structure functions. The scaling exponents observed around the solar maximum coincide, within the errors, to those measured for passive scalars in hydrodynamic turbulence. However, it is also found that the values are not universal in the sense that the solar cycle variation may be reflected in dependence on the structure of the velocity field.

  13. Nonmotor Fluctuations in Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franke, Christiana; Storch, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    The advanced stage of Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by motor complications such as motor fluctuations and dyskinesias induced by long-term levodopa treatment. Recent clinical research provides growing evidence that various nonmotor symptoms such as neuropsychiatric, autonomic, and sensory symptoms (particularly pain) also show fluctuations in patients with motor fluctuations (called nonmotor fluctuations or NMF). However, NMF have not yet been adequately considered in routine care of advanced PD patients and only few therapeutic studies are available. Since the pathophysiology of NMF remains largely unknown, innovative therapeutic concepts are largely missing. The close connection of NMF and motor fluctuations, however, strongly suggests that the strategies used to treat motor complications-namely continuous dopaminergic stimulation-also apply for the therapy of NMF. Future controlled clinical trials specifically addressing NMF are urgently warranted. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Staggered Schemes for Fluctuating Hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Balboa, F; Delgado-Buscalioni, R; Donev, A; Fai, T; Griffith, B; Peskin, C S

    2011-01-01

    We develop numerical schemes for solving the isothermal compressible and incompressible equations of fluctuating hydrodynamics on a grid with staggered momenta. We develop a second-order accurate spatial discretization of the diffusive, advective and stochastic fluxes that satisfies a discrete fluctuation-dissipation balance, and construct temporal discretizations that are at least second-order accurate in time deterministically and in a weak sense. Specifically, the methods reproduce the correct equilibrium covariances of the fluctuating fields to third (compressible) and second (incompressible) order in the time step, as we verify numerically. We apply our techniques to model recent experimental measurements of giant fluctuations in diffusively mixing fluids in a micro-gravity environment [A. Vailati et. al., Nature Communications 2:290, 2011]. Numerical results for the static spectrum of non-equilibrium concentration fluctuations are in excellent agreement between the compressible and incompressible simula...

  15. Structural stability of hydrogenated amorphous carbon overcoats used in heat-assisted magnetic recording investigated by rapid thermal annealing

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, N.

    2013-01-01

    Ultrathin amorphous carbon (a-C) films are extensively used as protective overcoats of magnetic recording media. Increasing demands for even higher storage densities have necessitated the development of new storage technologies, such as heat-assisted magnetic recording (HAMR), which uses laser-assisted heating to record data on high-stability media that can store single bits in extremely small areas (∼1 Tbit/in.2). Because HAMR relies on locally changing the coercivity of the magnetic medium by raising the temperature above the Curie temperature for data to be stored by the magnetic write field, it raises a concern about the structural stability of the ultrathin a-C film. In this study, rapid thermal annealing (RTA) experiments were performed to examine the thermal stability of ultrathin hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) films deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Structural changes in the a-C:H films caused by RTA were investigated by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, x-ray reflectivity, and conductive atomic force microscopy. The results show that the films exhibit thermal stability up to a maximum temperature in the range of 400-450 °C. Heating above this critical temperature leads to hydrogen depletion and sp 2 clustering. The critical temperature determined by the results of this study represents an upper bound of the temperature rise due to laser heating in HAMR hard-disk drives and the Curie temperature of magnetic materials used in HAMR hard disks. © 2013 American Institute of Physics.

  16. Rapid structural and compositional change in an old-growth subtropical forest: using plant traits to identify probable drivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malizia, Agustina; Easdale, Tomás A; Grau, H Ricardo

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies have shown directional changes in old-growth tropical forests, but changes are complex and diverse, and their drivers unclear. Here, we report rapid net structural and compositional changes in an old-growth subtropical forest and we assess the functional nature of these changes to test hypothetical drivers including recovery from past disturbances, reduction in ungulate browsing, CO2 fertilization, and increases in rainfall and temperature. The study relies on 15 years of demographic monitoring within 8 ha of subtropical montane forest in Argentina. Between 1992 and 2007, stem density markedly increased by 50% (12 stems ha(-1) y(-1)) and basal area by 6% (0.13 m(2) ha(-1) y(-1)). Increased stem density resulted from enhanced recruitment of understory treelets (Piper tucumanum, Eugenia uniflora, Allophylus edulis) into small size classes. Among 27 common tree species, net population growth was negatively correlated with maximum tree size and longevity, and positively correlated with leaf size and leaf nutrient content, especially so when initial population size was controlled for. Changes were inconsistent with predictions derived from past disturbances (no increase in shade-tolerant or long-lived late-succesional species), rainfall or temperature increase (no increase in evergreen or deciduous species, respectively). However, the increase in nutrient-rich soft-leaved species was consistent with exclusion of large herbivores two decades before monitoring started; and CO2 fertilization could help explain the disproportionate increase in small stems. Reductions in populations of large vertebrates have been observed in many otherwise undisturbed tropical forests, and our results suggest they can have important structural and functional repercussions in these forests.

  17. Rapid structural and compositional change in an old-growth subtropical forest: using plant traits to identify probable drivers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agustina Malizia

    Full Text Available Recent studies have shown directional changes in old-growth tropical forests, but changes are complex and diverse, and their drivers unclear. Here, we report rapid net structural and compositional changes in an old-growth subtropical forest and we assess the functional nature of these changes to test hypothetical drivers including recovery from past disturbances, reduction in ungulate browsing, CO2 fertilization, and increases in rainfall and temperature. The study relies on 15 years of demographic monitoring within 8 ha of subtropical montane forest in Argentina. Between 1992 and 2007, stem density markedly increased by 50% (12 stems ha(-1 y(-1 and basal area by 6% (0.13 m(2 ha(-1 y(-1. Increased stem density resulted from enhanced recruitment of understory treelets (Piper tucumanum, Eugenia uniflora, Allophylus edulis into small size classes. Among 27 common tree species, net population growth was negatively correlated with maximum tree size and longevity, and positively correlated with leaf size and leaf nutrient content, especially so when initial population size was controlled for. Changes were inconsistent with predictions derived from past disturbances (no increase in shade-tolerant or long-lived late-succesional species, rainfall or temperature increase (no increase in evergreen or deciduous species, respectively. However, the increase in nutrient-rich soft-leaved species was consistent with exclusion of large herbivores two decades before monitoring started; and CO2 fertilization could help explain the disproportionate increase in small stems. Reductions in populations of large vertebrates have been observed in many otherwise undisturbed tropical forests, and our results suggest they can have important structural and functional repercussions in these forests.

  18. Critical point fluctuations in supported lipid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connell, Simon D; Heath, George; Olmsted, Peter D; Kisil, Anastasia

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate that it is possible to observe many aspects of critical phenomena in supported lipid bilayers using atomic force microscopy (AFM) with the aid of stable and precise temperature control. The regions of criticality were determined by accurately measuring and calculating phase diagrams for the 2 phase L(d)-L(o) region, and tracking how it moves with temperature, then increasing the sampling density around the estimated critical regions. Compositional fluctuations were observed above the critical temperature (T(c)) and characterised using a spatial correlation function. From this analysis, the phase transition was found to be most closely described by the 2D Ising model, showing it is a critical transition. Below T(c) roughening of the domain boundaries occurred due to the reduction in line tension close to the critical point. Smaller scale density fluctuations were also detected just below T(c). At T(c), we believe we have observed fluctuations on length scales greater than 10 microm. The region of critically fluctuating 10-100 nm nanodomains has been found to extend a considerable distance above T(c) to temperatures within the biological range, and seem to be an ideal candidate for the actual structure of lipid rafts in cell membranes. Although evidence for this idea has recently emerged, this is the first direct evidence for nanoscale domains in the critical region.

  19. Crystal Structure of the HLA-DM - HLA-DR1 Complex Defines Mechanisms for Rapid Peptide Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pos, Wouter; Sethi, Dhruv K.; Call, Melissa J.; Schulze, Monika-Sarah E. D.; Anders, Anne-Kathrin; Pyrdol, Jason; Wucherpfennig, Kai W.

    2012-01-01

    Summary HLA-DR molecules bind microbial peptides in an endosomal compartment and present them on the cell surface for CD4 T cell surveillance. HLA-DM plays a critical role in the endosomal peptide selection process. The structure of the HLA-DM – HLA-DR complex shows major rearrangements of the HLA-DR peptide binding groove. Flipping of a tryptophan away from the HLA-DR1 P1 pocket enables major conformational changes that position hydrophobic HLA-DR residues into the P1 pocket. These conformational changes accelerate peptide dissociation and stabilize the empty HLA-DR peptide binding groove. Initially, incoming peptides have access to only part of the HLA-DR groove and need to compete with HLA-DR residues for access to the P2 site and the hydrophobic P1 pocket. This energetic barrier creates a rapid and stringent selection process for the highest-affinity binders. Insertion of peptide residues into the P2 and P1 sites reverses the conformational changes, terminating selection through DM dissociation. PMID:23260142

  20. Hydrogen-induced changes in the crystalline structure and mechanical properties of a Zn-Al eutectoid alloy rapidly solidified

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandoval Jimenez, Alberto; Iturbe Garcia, Jose Luis [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)]. E-mail: alberto.sandoval@inin.gob.mx; asandovalj@correo.unam.mx; Negrete Sanchez, Jesus [Universidad Autonoma de San Luis Potosi, San Luis Potosi (Mexico); Torres Villasenor, Gabriel [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, UNAM, Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2009-09-15

    Ribbon fractions of a zinc-aluminum eutectoid (Zn40.8Al%at.) alloy, obtained by rapid solidification using melt spinning technique, were submitted to a thermo-hydrogenation process by periods of 1, 6, 18, 24, 30, and 48 hours, to 200 degrees Celsius and 20 atmospheres. Thermo-hydrogenated samples were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Hydrogen-induced changes were produced, such as microstructure refining, development of crystalline defects, microhardness changes and modification of stable crystalline structures to {alpha}R meta-stable phase at room temperature. [Spanish] Fracciones de tiras de una aleacion eutectoide de zinc-aluminio (Zn40.8Al%at.), obtenidas mediante solidificacion rapida usando la tecnica de melt spinning, se sometieron a un proceso de termohidrogenacion por periodos de 1, 6, 18, 24, 30 y 48 horas, a 200 grados centigrados y 20 atmosferas. Las muestras termohidrogenadas se analizaron por microscopia electronica de transmision (MET). Se produjeron cambios inducidos por hidrogeno, tales como la refinacion de la microestructura, el desarrollo de defectos cristalinos, cambios de microdureza y modificacion de las estructuras cristalinas estables a fase metaestable {alpha}R a temperatura ambiente.

  1. Rapid transition in the structure of a coral reef community: the effects of coral bleaching and physical disturbance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrander, G K; Armstrong, K M; Knobbe, E T; Gerace, D; Scully, E P

    2000-05-09

    Coral reef communities are in a state of change throughout their geographical range. Factors contributing to this change include bleaching (the loss of algal symbionts), storm damage, disease, and increasing abundance of macroalgae. An additional factor for Caribbean reefs is the aftereffects of the epizootic that reduced the abundance of the herbivorous sea urchin, Diadema antillarum. Although coral reef communities have undergone phase shifts, there are few studies that document the details of such transitions. We report the results of a 40-month study that documents changes in a Caribbean reef community affected by bleaching, hurricane damage, and an increasing abundance of macroalgae. The study site was in a relatively pristine area of the reef surrounding the island of San Salvador in the Bahamas. Ten transects were sampled every 3-9 months from November 1994 to February 1998. During this period, the corals experienced a massive bleaching event resulting in a significant decline in coral abundance. Algae, especially macroalgae, increased in abundance until they effectively dominated the substrate. The direct impact of Hurricane Lili in October 1996 did not alter the developing community structure and may have facilitated increasing algal abundance. The results of this study document the rapid transition of this reef community from one in which corals and algae were codominant to a community dominated by macroalgae. The relatively brief time period required for this transition illustrates the dynamic nature of reef communities.

  2. [The accuracy of rapid equilibrium assumption in steady-state enzyme kinetics is the function of equilibrium segment structure and properties].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrzheshch, P V

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative evaluation of the accuracy of the rapid equilibrium assumption in the steady-state enzyme kinetics was obtained for an arbitrary mechanism of an enzyme-catalyzed reaction. This evaluation depends only on the structure and properties of the equilibrium segment, but doesn't depend on the structure and properties of the rest (stationary part) of the kinetic scheme. The smaller the values of the edges leaving equilibrium segment in relation to values of the edges within the equilibrium segment, the higher the accuracy of determination of intermediate concentrations and reaction velocity in a case of the rapid equilibrium assumption.

  3. Rapidity Density Fluctuations in Hadron-Nucleus Interactions: Spikes, Intermittency, and Fractal Properties of Multiple Production in Ag, Au, and Mg Targets with p, $\\bar{p}$, and π- Projectiles at 100 and 320 GeV/c

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattingly, Margarita Claudia Krieghoff [Univ. of Notre Dame, IN (United States)

    1991-01-01

    The space-time development of hadron-nucleus interactions is examined using bubble chamber and downstream particle identifier data from the hybrid spectrometer of Fermilab experiment E597. 5583 events representing 12 interactions are studied with conventional and fractal techniques. Comparisons are made to simulated events from the Lund Monte Carlo FRITIOF 1.6. Multiplicities are studied conventionally. Negative binomial descriptions of produced particle multiplicities are interpreted in terms of clusters and cascading and in terms of partial stimulated emission; forwardbackward correlations, in terms of short- and long-range correlations and multiple scattering. Multiplicities are consistent with a multiple collision view of multiparticle production mechanisms and are investigated in terms of the number of collisions v. Rapidity density fluctuations are studied fractally. The possibility of new dynamics is considered on the basis of event-by-event studies of spike phenomena, intermittency, and fractal dimensions. Results from these exploratory studies are consistent with predictions made for quark-gluon plasma transitions. 131 spike events are analyzed; intermittency is investigated with normalized factorial moments and cumulants; and fractal dimensions and correlations dimensions are calculated. ··Seagull effects and production region sizes from Bose-Einstein pion interferometry are also considered.

  4. Effects of phase transition induced density fluctuations on pulsar dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Partha Bagchi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We show that density fluctuations during phase transitions in pulsar cores may have non-trivial effects on pulsar timings, and may also possibly account for glitches and anti-glitches. These density fluctuations invariably lead to non-zero off-diagonal components of the moment of inertia, leading to transient wobbling of star. Thus, accurate measurements of pulsar timing and intensity modulations (from wobbling may be used to identify the specific pattern of density fluctuations, hence the particular phase transition, occurring inside the pulsar core. Changes in quadrupole moment from rapidly evolving density fluctuations during the transition, with very short time scales, may provide a new source for gravitational waves.

  5. Fluctuations of Bacteria-laden Microbeads in a Liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kara, Vural; Lissandrello, Charles; O'Connor, Joan; Romero Rodriguez, Jose Alberto; Li, Le; Ekinci, Kamil

    2015-11-01

    The motion of bacteria adhered on surfaces may lead to powerful approaches for novel diagnostic tests. Examples were recently shown using microcantilevers on which bacteria were adhered using surface chemistry. In these experiments, the presence of bacteria led to an increase in the fluctuations of the microcantilevers in the frequency range 1-100 Hz. After administering antibiotics, the fluctuations returned to their control value. Here, we build on these studies by monitoring the fluctuations of micro-beads with bacteria adhered on their surfaces. We coat the micro-beads with Poly D Lysine (PDL) in order to attach Escherichia coli. We measure the fluctuations of the beads in motility buffer media using an optical microscope with and without bacteria. We calculate the diffusion coefficients from the mean square displacements (MSD) and correlate these with the presence of bacteria on the beads. These studies lay the foundation for the development of a rapid antibiotic susceptibility test based on bacterial activity.

  6. Multiplane 3D superresolution optical fluctuation imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Geissbuehler, Stefan; Sharipov, Azat; Godinat, Aurélien; Bocchio, Noelia; Dubikovskaya, Elena; Lasser, Theo; Leutenegger, Marcel

    2013-01-01

    By switching fluorophores on and off in either a deterministic or a stochastic manner, superresolution microscopy has enabled the imaging of biological structures at resolutions well beyond the diffraction limit. Superresolution optical fluctuation imaging (SOFI) provides an elegant way of overcoming the diffraction limit in all three spatial dimensions by computing higher-order cumulants of image sequences of blinking fluorophores acquired with a conventional widefield microscope. So far, th...

  7. Rapidity dependence of multiplicity fluctuations and correlations in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2011-08-02

    nucleus and hadron–nucleus interactions at accelerator energies. They have been interpreted in terms of several models: as a possible indication of hadronic phase transition, as Cherenkov radi- ation or simply originating from ...

  8. Quantum fluctuations from thermal fluctuations in Jacobson formalism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faizal, Mir [University of British Columbia-Okanagan, Irving K. Barber School of Arts and Sciences, Kelowna, BC (Canada); University of Lethbridge, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Lethbridge, AB (Canada); Ashour, Amani; Alcheikh, Mohammad [Damascus University, Mathematics Department, Faculty of Science, Damascus (Syrian Arab Republic); Alasfar, Lina [Universite Clermont Auvergne, Laboratoire de Physique Corpusculaire de Clermont-Ferrand, Aubiere (France); Alsaleh, Salwa; Mahroussah, Ahmed [King Saud University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia)

    2017-09-15

    In the Jacobson formalism general relativity is obtained from thermodynamics. This is done by using the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy-area relation. However, as a black hole gets smaller, its temperature will increase. This will cause the thermal fluctuations to also increase, and these will in turn correct the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy-area relation. Furthermore, with the reduction in the size of the black hole, quantum effects will also start to dominate. Just as the general relativity can be obtained from thermodynamics in the Jacobson formalism, we propose that the quantum fluctuations to the geometry can be obtained from thermal fluctuations. (orig.)

  9. Fluctuation microscopy analysis of amorphous silicon models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibson, J.M., E-mail: jmgibson@fsu.edu [Northeastern University, Department of Physics, Boston MA 02115 (United States); FAMU/FSU Joint College of Engineering, 225 Pottsdamer Street, Tallahassee, FL 32310 (United States); Treacy, M.M.J. [Arizona State University, Department of Physics, Tempe AZ 85287 (United States)

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • Studied competing computer models for amorphous silicon and simulated fluctuation microscopy data. • Show that only paracrystalline/random network composite can fit published data. • Specifically show that pure random network or random network with void models do not fit available data. • Identify a new means to measure volume fraction of ordered material. • Identify unreported limitations of the Debye model for simulating fluctuation microscopy data. - Abstract: Using computer-generated models we discuss the use of fluctuation electron microscopy (FEM) to identify the structure of amorphous silicon. We show that a combination of variable resolution FEM to measure the correlation length, with correlograph analysis to obtain the structural motif, can pin down structural correlations. We introduce the method of correlograph variance as a promising means of independently measuring the volume fraction of a paracrystalline composite. From comparisons with published data, we affirm that only a composite material of paracrystalline and continuous random network that is substantially paracrystalline could explain the existing experimental data, and point the way to more precise measurements on amorphous semiconductors. The results are of general interest for other classes of disordered materials.

  10. THE INFLUENCE OF THE DAILY FLUCTUATIONS OF OUTSIDE AIR TEMPERATURE ON THE INDOOR CLIMATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. E. Zakharevich

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The investigation of indoor air temperature fluctuations within the occupied zone (habitable zone induced by the periodic changes of outdoor air temperature was carried out with the use of numerical simulation of heat transfer processes in the heated room. The developed and programme-implemented two-dimensional physical and mathematical model takes into account unsteady nature of the complex conjugate heat transfer in building envelopes and indoor air spaces when using different types of heating devices. The design features of building structures and windows are considered. The model includes the equations of radiative heat transfer between indoor surfaces, window panes and outdoor environment. In the study, the harmonic changes of outside temperature are specified by the cosine law with the twenty-four-hour period. Two types of heaters are examined: radiator and underfloor heating. Heating output of the devices is specified time-invariable according to the thermal balance defined by the traditional method. Simulations are performed for the three combinations of heat-transfer properties of building structures. The quantitative characteristics of the induced indoor air temperature fluctuations within the occupied zone depending on the building envelope thermal inertia and the type of used heater were found out. The analysis of results yielded the following conclusions. Reducing inertia of glazing leads to more rapid penetration of outdoor temperature wave into the room. While the amplitude of the indoor air temperature fluctuations within the occupied zone remains constant by reason of the unchanged thermal inertia of the main building structures. The significant increase in the amplitude of harmonic changes of indoor air temperature within the occupied zone is observed when reducing inertia of walls and floors whereas the delay with respect to outside air temperature fluctuations remains almost invariable.

  11. Long-term observation of a pollination network: fluctuation in species and interactions, relative invariance of network structure and implications for estimates of specialization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petanidou, Theodora; Kallimanis, Athanasios S; Tzanopoulos, Joseph; Sgardelis, Stefanos P; Pantis, John D

    2008-06-01

    We analysed the dynamics of a plant-pollinator interaction network of a scrub community surveyed over four consecutive years. Species composition within the annual networks showed high temporal variation. Temporal dynamics were also evident in the topology of the network, as interactions among plants and pollinators did not remain constant through time. This change involved both the number and the identity of interacting partners. Strikingly, few species and interactions were consistently present in all four annual plant-pollinator networks (53% of the plant species, 21% of the pollinator species and 4.9% of the interactions). The high turnover in species-to-species interactions was mainly the effect of species turnover (c. 70% in pairwise comparisons among years), and less the effect of species flexibility to interact with new partners (c. 30%). We conclude that specialization in plant-pollinator interactions might be highly overestimated when measured over short periods of time. This is because many plant or pollinator species appear as specialists in 1 year, but tend to be generalists or to interact with different partner species when observed in other years. The high temporal plasticity in species composition and interaction identity coupled with the low variation in network structure properties (e.g. degree centralization, connectance, nestedness, average distance and network diameter) imply (i) that tight and specialized coevolution might not be as important as previously suggested and (ii) that plant-pollinator interaction networks might be less prone to detrimental effects of disturbance than previously thought. We suggest that this may be due to the opportunistic nature of plant and animal species regarding the available partner resources they depend upon at any particular time.

  12. Photoprotection of photosystems in fluctuating light intensities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allahverdiyeva, Yagut; Suorsa, Marjaana; Tikkanen, Mikko; Aro, Eva-Mari

    2015-05-01

    Oxygenic photosynthetic organisms experience strong fluctuations in light intensity in their natural terrestrial and aquatic growth environments. Recent studies with both plants and cyanobacteria have revealed that Photosystem (PS) I is the potential target of damage upon abrupt changes in light intensity. Photosynthetic organisms have, however, developed powerful mechanisms in order to protect their photosynthetic apparatus against such potentially hazardous light conditions. Although the electron transfer chain has remained relatively unchanged in both plant chloroplasts and their cyanobacterial ancestors, the photoprotective and regulatory mechanisms of photosynthetic light reactions have experienced conspicuous evolutionary changes. In cyanobacteria, the specific flavodiiron proteins (Flv1 and Flv3) are responsible for safeguarding PSI under rapidly fluctuating light intensities, whilst the thylakoid located terminal oxidases are involved in the protection of PSII during 12h diurnal cycles involving abrupt, square-wave, changes from dark to high light. Higher plants such as Arabidopsis thaliana have evolved different protective mechanisms. In particular, the PGR5 protein controls electron flow during sudden changes in light intensity by allowing the regulation mostly via the Cytochrome b6f complex. Besides the function of PGR5, plants have also acquired other dynamic regulatory mechanisms, among them the STN7-related LHCII protein phosphorylation that is similarly responsible for protection against rapid changes in the light environment. The green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, as an evolutionary intermediate between cyanobacteria and higher plants, probably possesses both protective mechanisms. In this review, evolutionarily different photoprotective mechanisms under fluctuating light conditions are described and their contributions to cyanobacterial and plant photosynthesis are discussed. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of

  13. Skewness of elliptic flow fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacalone, Giuliano; Yan, Li; Noronha-Hostler, Jacquelyn; Ollitrault, Jean-Yves

    2017-01-01

    Using event-by-event hydrodynamic calculations, we find that the fluctuations of the elliptic flow (v2) in the reaction plane have a negative skew. We compare the skewness of v2 fluctuations to that of initial eccentricity fluctuations. We show that skewness is the main effect lifting the degeneracy between higher-order cumulants, with negative skew corresponding to the hierarchy v2{4 } >v2{6 } observed in Pb+Pb collisions at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. We describe how the skewness can be measured experimentally and show that hydrodynamics naturally reproduces its magnitude and centrality dependence.

  14. Fluctuation theorem: A critical review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malek Mansour, M.; Baras, F.

    2017-10-01

    Fluctuation theorem for entropy production is revisited in the framework of stochastic processes. The applicability of the fluctuation theorem to physico-chemical systems and the resulting stochastic thermodynamics were analyzed. Some unexpected limitations are highlighted in the context of jump Markov processes. We have shown that these limitations handicap the ability of the resulting stochastic thermodynamics to correctly describe the state of non-equilibrium systems in terms of the thermodynamic properties of individual processes therein. Finally, we considered the case of diffusion processes and proved that the fluctuation theorem for entropy production becomes irrelevant at the stationary state in the case of one variable systems.

  15. Density fluctuations in traffic flow

    CERN Document Server

    Yukawa, S

    1996-01-01

    Density fluctuations in traffic current are studied by computer simulations using the deterministic coupled map lattice model on a closed single-lane circuit. By calculating a power spectral density of temporal density fluctuations at a local section, we find a power-law behavior, \\sim 1/f^{1.8}, on the frequency f, in non-congested flow phase. The distribution of the headway distance h also shows the power law like \\sim 1/h^{3.0} at the same time. The power law fluctuations are destroyed by the occurence of the traffic jam.

  16. Day-to-Day Dynamics of Commensal Escherichia coli in Zimbabwean Cows Evidence Temporal Fluctuations within a Host-Specific Population Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massot, Méril; Couffignal, Camille; Clermont, Olivier; D'Humières, Camille; Chatel, Jérémie; Plault, Nicolas; Andremont, Antoine; Mentré, France

    2017-01-01

    qualitative aspects of E. coli commensal populations, with a focus on both Shiga toxin-producing E. coli and antibiotic-resistant E. coli strains. We show that the structure of these commensal populations was highly specific to the host, even though the cows ate and roamed together, and was highly dynamic between days. Such data are of importance to understand the ecological forces that drive the dynamics of the emergence of E. coli clones of particular interest within the gastrointestinal tract and their transmission between hosts. PMID:28411228

  17. Day-to-Day Dynamics of Commensal Escherichia coli in Zimbabwean Cows Evidence Temporal Fluctuations within a Host-Specific Population Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massot, Méril; Couffignal, Camille; Clermont, Olivier; D'Humières, Camille; Chatel, Jérémie; Plault, Nicolas; Andremont, Antoine; Caron, Alexandre; Mentré, France; Denamur, Erick

    2017-07-01

    qualitative aspects of E. coli commensal populations, with a focus on both Shiga toxin-producing E. coli and antibiotic-resistant E. coli strains. We show that the structure of these commensal populations was highly specific to the host, even though the cows ate and roamed together, and was highly dynamic between days. Such data are of importance to understand the ecological forces that drive the dynamics of the emergence of E. coli clones of particular interest within the gastrointestinal tract and their transmission between hosts. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  18. A novel framework for fluid/structure interaction in rapid subject specific simulations of blood flow in coronary artery bifurcations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blagojević Milan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Practical difficulties, particularly long model development time, have limited the types and applicability of computational fluid dynamics simulations in numerical modeling of blood flow in serial manner. In these simulations, the most revealing flow parameters are the endothelial shear stress distribution and oscillatory shear index. The aim of this study was analyze their role in the diagnosis of the occurrence and prognosis of plaque development in coronary artery bifurcations. Methods. We developed a novel modeling technique for rapid cardiovascular hemodynamic simulations taking into account interactions between fluid domain (blood and solid domain (artery wall. Two numerical models that represent the observed subdomains of an arbitrary patient-specific coronary artery bifurcation were created using multi-slice computed tomography (MSCT coronagraphy and ultrasound measurements of blood velocity. Coronary flow using an in-house finite element solver PAK-FS was solved. Results. Overall behavior of coronary artery bifurcation during one cardiac cycle is described by: velocity, pressure, endothelial shear stress, oscillatory shear index, stress in arterial wall and nodal displacements. The places where (a endothelial shear stress is less than 1.5, and (b oscillatory shear index is very small (close or equal to 0 are prone to plaque genesis. Conclusion. Finite element simulation of fluid-structure interaction was used to investigate patient-specific flow dynamics and wall mechanics at coronary artery bifurcations. Simulation model revealed that lateral walls of the main branch and lateral walls distal to the carina are exposed to low endothelial shear stress which is a predilection site for development of atherosclerosis. This conclusion is confirmed by the low values of oscillatory shear index in those places.

  19. Rise and fall of a wolf population: genetic diversity and structure during recovery, rapid expansion and drastic decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansson, E; Ruokonen, M; Kojola, I; Aspi, J

    2012-11-01

    The grey wolves (Canis lupus) of Finland have had a varied history, with a period of rapid population expansion after the mid-1990s followed by a decline with a current census size of about 140 wolves. Here, we investigate the impact of unstable population size and connectivity on genetic diversity and structure in a long-term genetic study of 298 Finnish wolves born in 1995-2009 and genotyped for 17 microsatellite loci. During the initial recovery and prior to population expansion, genetic diversity was high (1995-1997: LD-N(e)  = 67.2; H(o)  = 0.749; H(e)  = 0.709) despite a small census size and low number of breeders (N(c)  < 100; N(b)  < 10) likely reflecting the status of the Russian source population. Surprisingly, observed heterozygosity decreased significantly during the study period (t = -2.643, P = 0.021) despite population expansion, likely a result of an increase in inbreeding (F(IS)  = 0.108 in 2007-2009) owing to a low degree of connectivity with adjacent Russian wolf population (m = 0.016-0.090; F(ST)  = 0.086, P < 0.001) and population crash after 2006. However, population growth had a temporary positive impact on N(e) and number of family lines. This study shows that even strong population growth alone might not be adequate to retain genetic diversity, especially when accompanied with low amount of subsequent gene flow and population decline. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  20. Parents' experiences of living with a child with a long-term condition: a rapid structured review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Joanna; Cheater, Francine; Bekker, Hilary

    2015-08-01

    Living with a child with a long-term condition can result in challenges above usual parenting because of illness-specific demands. A critical evaluation of research exploring parents' experiences of living with a child with a long-term condition is timely because international health policy advocates that patients with long-term conditions become active collaborators in care decisions. A rapid structured review was undertaken (January 1999-December 2009) in accordance with the United Kingdom Centre for Reviews and Dissemination guidance. Three data bases (MEDLINE, CINAHL, PSYCINFO) were searched and also hand searching of the Journal of Advanced Nursing and Child: Care, Health and Development. Primary research studies written in English language describing parents' experiences of living with a child with a long-term condition were included. Thematic analysis underpinned data synthesis. Quality appraisal involved assessing each study against predetermined criteria. Thirty-four studies met the inclusion criteria. The impact of living with a child with a long-term condition related to dealing with immediate concerns following the child's diagnosis and responding to the challenges of integrating the child's needs into family life. Parents' perceived they are not always supported in their quest for information and forming effective relationships with health-care professionals can be stressful. Although having ultimate responsibility for their child's health can be overwhelming, parents developed considerable expertise in managing their child's condition. Parents' accounts suggest they not always supported in their role as manager for their child's long-term condition and their expertise, and contribution to care is not always valued. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. A rapid method for identifying and characterizing structural impacts using distributed sensors: An application for automotive pedestrian protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Andrew C.

    This research is motivated by recent activity to improve automotive safety, especially for pedestrians. In many parts of the world today, injuries and fatalities from road accidents are a significant problem. Safety features such as seat restraints and air bags provide considerable levels of protection for car occupants; however, no such protective measures currently exist for pedestrians. Drawing upon the success and effectiveness of occupant air bag systems, current research aims to develop similar devices for pedestrians. These active pedestrian protection systems deploy a safety feature such as an external air bag when a pedestrian is hit by a vehicle. Contact with the front bumper induces a body rotation that may result in a violent head collision. The deployable safety device provides a cushioning surface for the vulnerable pedestrian during impact. The challenge of such a system is an effective sensory unit that can rapidly and correctly discriminate pedestrian impacts from non-pedestrian ones. The fast kinematics of the automobile-pedestrian impact leaves a minimal amount of time for signal processing and computation. This research study focuses on a discrimination scheme that satisfies both the time and accuracy requirements for a proposed sensory system for pedestrian protection. A unique methodology was developed to identify structural impacts using dominant frequency features extracted from sensory data. Contact sensors mounted on the front bumper of an automobile measure the strain response from an impact event. The dominant frequencies obtained from these sensor signals are greatly influenced by the impact object's properties and can be used to discriminate between different objects. Extensive tests were conducted to gather sensor data and validate the proposed methodology and impact discrimination algorithm. Results of the impact tests indicate that the approach is sound, and the sensory system effectively identifies "pedestrian" impacts within a

  2. Molecular evolution under fitness fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustonen, Ville; Lässig, Michael

    2008-03-14

    Molecular evolution is a stochastic process governed by fitness, mutations, and reproductive fluctuations in a population. Here, we study evolution where fitness itself is stochastic, with random switches in the direction of selection at individual genomic loci. As the correlation time of these fluctuations becomes larger than the diffusion time of mutations within the population, fitness changes from an annealed to a quenched random variable. We show that the rate of evolution has its maximum in the crossover regime, where both time scales are comparable. Adaptive evolution emerges in the quenched fitness regime (evidence for such fitness fluctuations has recently been found in genomic data). The joint statistical theory of reproductive and fitness fluctuations establishes a conceptual connection between evolutionary genetics and statistical physics of disordered systems.

  3. Gaussian fluctuations in chaotic eigenstates

    CERN Document Server

    Srednicki, M A; Srednicki, Mark; Stiernelof, Frank

    1996-01-01

    We study the fluctuations that are predicted in the autocorrelation function of an energy eigenstate of a chaotic, two-dimensional billiard by the conjecture (due to Berry) that the eigenfunction is a gaussian random variable. We find an explicit formula for the root-mean-square amplitude of the expected fluctuations in the autocorrelation function. These fluctuations turn out to be O(\\hbar^{1/2}) in the small \\hbar (high energy) limit. For comparison, any corrections due to scars from isolated periodic orbits would also be O(\\hbar^{1/2}). The fluctuations take on a particularly simple form if the autocorrelation function is averaged over the direction of the separation vector. We compare our various predictions with recent numerical computations of Li and Robnik for the Robnik billiard, and find good agreement. We indicate how our results generalize to higher dimensions.

  4. Quantum entanglement and temperature fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ourabah, Kamel; Tribeche, Mouloud

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, we consider entanglement in a system out of equilibrium, adopting the viewpoint given by the formalism of superstatistics. Such an approach yields a good effective description for a system in a slowly fluctuating environment within a weak interaction between the system and the environment. For this purpose, we introduce an alternative version of the formalism within a quantum mechanical picture and use it to study entanglement in the Heisenberg XY model, subject to temperature fluctuations. We consider both isotropic and anisotropic cases and explore the effect of different temperature fluctuations (χ^{2}, log-normal, and F distributions). Our results suggest that particular fluctuations may enhance entanglement and prevent it from vanishing at higher temperatures than those predicted for the same system at thermal equilibrium.

  5. Classicalization of Quantum Fluctuation in Inflationary Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubotani, H.; Uesugi, T.; Morikawa, M.; Sugamoto, A.

    1997-11-01

    We discuss the classicalization of a quantum state induced by an environment in the inflationary stage of the universe. The classicalization is necessary for the homogeneous ground state to become the inhomogeneous classical one accompanied with statistical fluctuations, which is a plausible candidate for the seeds of structure formation. Using simple models, we show that i) the two classicalization criteria, the classical correlation and quantum decoherence, are simultaneously satisfied by the environment and that ii) the power spectrum of the resultant statistical fluctuations depends upon the details of the classicalization process. In particular, the result ii) means that, taking into account the classicalization process, the inflationary scenario does not necessarily predict the unique spectrum which is usually believed.

  6. The scaling properties of dynamical fluctuations in temporal networks

    CERN Document Server

    Chi, Liping

    2015-01-01

    The factorial moments analyses are performed to study the scaling properties of the dynamical fluctuations of contacts and nodes in temporal networks based on empirical data sets. The intermittent behaviors are observed in the fluctuations for all orders of the moments. It indicates that the interaction has self-similarity structure in time interval and the fluctuations are not purely random but dynamical and correlated. The scaling exponents for contacts in Prostitution data and nodes in Conference data are very close to that for 2D Ising model undergoing a second-order phase transition.

  7. An Efficient Null Model for Conformational Fluctuations in Proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harder, Tim Philipp; Borg, Mikael; Bottaro, Sandro

    2012-01-01

    Protein dynamics play a crucial role in function, catalytic activity, and pathogenesis. Consequently, there is great interest in computational methods that probe the conformational fluctuations of a protein. However, molecular dynamics simulations are computationally costly and therefore are often...... limited to comparatively short timescales. TYPHON is a probabilistic method to explore the conformational space of proteins under the guidance of a sophisticated probabilistic model of local structure and a given set of restraints that represent nonlocal interactions, such as hydrogen bonds or disulfide...... on conformational fluctuations that is in correspondence with experimental measurements. TYPHON provides a flexible, yet computationally efficient, method to explore possible conformational fluctuations in proteins....

  8. Rapid characterisation of vegetation structure to predict refugia and climate change impacts across a global biodiversity hotspot

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schut, A.G.T.; Wardell-Johnson, G.W.; Yates, C.J.; Keppel, G.; Baran, I.; Franklin, S.E.; Hopper, S.D.; Niel, Van K.P.; Mucina, L.; Byrne, M.

    2014-01-01

    Identification of refugia is an increasingly important adaptation strategy in conservation planning under rapid anthropogenic climate change. Granite outcrops (GOs) provide extraordinary diversity, including a wide range of taxa, vegetation types and habitats in the Southwest Australian Floristic

  9. Power spectrum of fluctuation for ultrasonic cavitation process in glycerin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skokov, V. N.; Koverda, V. P.; Reshetnikov, A. V.; Vinogradov, A. V.

    2007-03-01

    Experiments were carried out on ultrasonic cavitation in glycerin. The zone near the emitter has a structure from interacting gas-vapor bubbles; this structure takes the form of fractal clusters. The photometry of passed laser emission was the tool for studying dynamics of fluctuations. In transitive mode, the power spectrum of fluctuation varies by the law inversely proportional to frequency. Distributions of local fluctuations are different from Gaussian and exhibit the property of scale invariance. The qualitative behavior of the frequency dependence of the spectral fluctuation density was tested while varying the power of the ultrasonic emitter. It was demonstrated that the growth of the high-frequency margin of flicker-type behavior evidences for growing instability and can be considered as a forerunner of possible large-scale outbursts.

  10. Magnetic probe array with high sensitivity for fluctuating field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanamaru, Yuki; Gota, Hiroshi; Fujimoto, Kayoko; Ikeyama, Taeko; Asai, Tomohiko; Takahashi, Tsutomu; Nogi, Yasuyuki

    2007-03-01

    A magnetic probe array is constructed to measure precisely the spatial structure of a small fluctuating field included in a strong confinement field that varies with time. To exclude the effect of the confinement field, the magnetic probes consisting of figure-eight-wound coils are prepared. The spatial structure of the fluctuating field is obtained from a Fourier analysis of the probe signal. It is found that the probe array is more sensitive to the fluctuating field with a high mode number than that with a low mode number. An experimental demonstration of the present method is attempted using a field-reversed configuration plasma, where the fluctuating field with 0.1% of the confinement field is successfully detected.

  11. Controlling tax evasion fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaklan, Georg; Lima, F. W. S.; Westerhoff, Frank

    2008-10-01

    We incorporate the behaviour of tax evasion into the standard two-dimensional Ising model and augment it by providing policy-makers with the opportunity to curb tax evasion via an appropriate enforcement mechanism. We find that tax evasion may vary greatly over time if no measures of control are taken. Furthermore, we show that even minimal audit rates of a tax authority may help to alleviate this problem substantially. Similar results are observed for other network structures.

  12. Predation and resource fluctuations drive eco-evolutionary dynamics of a bacterial community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiltunen, Teppo; Friman, Ville-Petri; Kaitala, Veijo; Mappes, Johanna; Laakso, Jouni

    2012-01-01

    Predation and temporal resource availability are among the most important factors determining prey community dynamics and composition. Both factors have been shown to affect prey diversity, but less is known about their interactive effects, especially in rapidly evolving prey communities. In a laboratory microcosm experiment, we manipulated the presence of the predatory protozoan Tetrahymena thermophila and the temporal patterns in the availability of resources for a bacterial prey community. We found that both predation and temporal fluctuations in prey resources resulted in a more even prey community, and these factors also interacted so that the effect of predation was only seen in a fluctuating environment. One possible explanation for this finding could be differences in prey species grazing resistance and resource use abilities, which likely had the greatest effect on prey community structure in fluctuating environments with periodical resource limitation. We also found that prey communities evolved to be more grazing-resistant during the experiment, and that this effect was due to a clear increase in the grazing resistance of the bacterium Serratia marcescens. Our results demonstrate that temporal variability in prey resources and predation can promote more even prey species proportions by allowing the existence of both defensive and competitive prey life-history strategies.

  13. The effect of rapid thermal annealing on the photoluminescence of InAsN/InGaAs dot-in-a-well structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gargallo-Caballero, R; Miguel-Sanchez, J; Guzman, A; Hierro, A; Munoz, E [Instituto de Sistemas Optoelectronicos y MicrotecnologIa (ISOM)-Departamento de IngenierIa Electronica, ETSI Telecomunicacion, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Ciudad Universitaria s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: rgargallo@die.upm.es

    2008-03-21

    The effect of post-growth rapid thermal annealing on the optical characteristics of InAsN/InGaAs dot-in-a-well DWELL structures grown by molecular beam epitaxy on GaAs(1 0 0) has been studied. InAs/InGaAs DWELL structures have been used as a reference. Photoluminescence measurements of these samples show similar optical effects, such as a blueshift of the peak wavelength and a reduction of the full width of at half maximum PL emission, in both types of structures up to an annealing temperature of 750 deg. C. Nevertheless, at 850 deg. C, these effects are much more pronounced in the structures with N. These results suggest that an additional As-N interdiffusion process inside the InAsN quantum dots plays a dominant role in these effects at high annealing temperatures (850 deg. C) on InAsN/InGaAs structures.

  14. Enhanced conductance fluctuation by quantum confinement effect in graphene nanoribbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Guangyu; Torres, Carlos M; Song, Emil B; Tang, Jianshi; Bai, Jingwei; Duan, Xiangfeng; Zhang, Yuegang; Wang, Kang L

    2010-11-10

    Conductance fluctuation is usually unavoidable in graphene nanoribbons (GNR) due to the presence of disorder along its edges. By measuring the low-frequency noise in GNR devices, we find that the conductance fluctuation is strongly correlated with the density-of-states of GNR. In single-layer GNR, the gate-dependence of noise shows peaks whose positions quantitatively match the subband positions in the band structures of GNR. This correlation provides a robust mechanism to electrically probe the band structure of GNR, especially when the subband structures are smeared out in conductance measurement.

  15. Thermodynamic constraints on fluctuation phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maroney, O. J. E.

    2009-12-01

    The relationships among reversible Carnot cycles, the absence of perpetual motion machines, and the existence of a nondecreasing globally unique entropy function form the starting point of many textbook presentations of the foundations of thermodynamics. However, the thermal fluctuation phenomena associated with statistical mechanics has been argued to restrict the domain of validity of this basis of the second law of thermodynamics. Here we demonstrate that fluctuation phenomena can be incorporated into the traditional presentation, extending rather than restricting the domain of validity of the phenomenologically motivated second law. Consistency conditions lead to constraints upon the possible spectrum of thermal fluctuations. In a special case this uniquely selects the Gibbs canonical distribution and more generally incorporates the Tsallis distributions. No particular model of microscopic dynamics need be assumed.

  16. Fluctuation theorems for quantum processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albash, Tameem; Lidar, Daniel A; Marvian, Milad; Zanardi, Paolo

    2013-09-01

    We present fluctuation theorems and moment generating function equalities for generalized thermodynamic observables and quantum dynamics described by completely positive trace preserving maps, with and without feedback control. Our results include the quantum Jarzynski equality and Crooks fluctuation theorem, and clarify the special role played by the thermodynamic work and thermal equilibrium states in previous studies. We show that for a specific class of generalized measurements, which include projective measurements, unitality replaces microreversibility as the condition for the physicality of the reverse process in our fluctuation theorems. We present an experimental application of our theory to the problem of extracting the system-bath coupling magnitude, which we do for a system of pairs of coupled superconducting flux qubits undergoing quantum annealing.

  17. Fluctuation theorems for stochastic dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, R. J.; Schütz, G. M.

    2007-07-01

    Fluctuation theorems make use of time reversal to make predictions about entropy production in many-body systems far from thermal equilibrium. Here we review the wide variety of distinct, but interconnected, relations that have been derived and investigated theoretically and experimentally. Significantly, we demonstrate, in the context of Markovian stochastic dynamics, how these different fluctuation theorems arise from a simple fundamental time-reversal symmetry of a certain class of observables. Appealing to the notion of Gibbs entropy allows for a microscopic definition of entropy production in terms of these observables. We work with the master equation approach, which leads to a mathematically straightforward proof and provides direct insight into the probabilistic meaning of the quantities involved. Finally, we point to some experiments that elucidate the practical significance of fluctuation relations.

  18. Fluctuation theorems for quantum processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albash, Tameem; Lidar, Daniel A.; Marvian, Milad; Zanardi, Paolo

    2013-09-01

    We present fluctuation theorems and moment generating function equalities for generalized thermodynamic observables and quantum dynamics described by completely positive trace preserving maps, with and without feedback control. Our results include the quantum Jarzynski equality and Crooks fluctuation theorem, and clarify the special role played by the thermodynamic work and thermal equilibrium states in previous studies. We show that for a specific class of generalized measurements, which include projective measurements, unitality replaces microreversibility as the condition for the physicality of the reverse process in our fluctuation theorems. We present an experimental application of our theory to the problem of extracting the system-bath coupling magnitude, which we do for a system of pairs of coupled superconducting flux qubits undergoing quantum annealing.

  19. Modeling fluctuations in scattered waves

    CERN Document Server

    Jakeman, E

    2006-01-01

    Fluctuations in scattered waves limit the performance of imaging and remote sensing systems that operate on all wavelengths of the electromagnetic spectrum. To better understand these fluctuations, Modeling Fluctuations in Scattered Waves provides a practical guide to the phenomenology, mathematics, and simulation of non-Gaussian noise models and discusses how they can be used to characterize the statistics of scattered waves.Through their discussion of mathematical models, the authors demonstrate the development of new sensing techniques as well as offer intelligent choices that can be made for system analysis. Using experimental results and numerical simulation, the book illustrates the properties and applications of these models. The first two chapters introduce statistical tools and the properties of Gaussian noise, including results on phase statistics. The following chapters describe Gaussian processes and the random walk model, address multiple scattering effects and propagation through an extended med...

  20. Pressure measurements in a rapidly sheared turbulent wall layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diwan, Sourabh; Morrison, Jonathan

    2014-11-01

    The aim of the present work is to improve understanding of the role of pressure fluctuations in the generation of coherent structures in wall-bounded turbulent flows, with particular regard to the rapid and slow source terms. The work is in part motivated by the recent numerical simulations of Sharma et al. (Phy. Fluids, 23, 2011), which showed the importance of pressure fluctuations (and their spatial gradients) in the dynamics of large-scale turbulent motions. Our experimental design consists of first generating a shearless boundary layer in a wind tunnel by passing a grid-generated turbulent flow over a moving floor whose speed is matched to the freestream velocity, and then shearing it rapidly by passing it over a stationary floor further downstream. Close to the leading edge of the stationary floor, the resulting flow is expected to satisfy the approximations of the Rapid Distortion Theory and therefore would be an ideal candidate for studying linear processes in wall turbulence. We carry out pressure measurements on the wall as well as within the flow - the former using surface mounted pressure transducers and the latter using a static pressure probe similar in design to that used by Tsuji et al. (J. Fluid. Mech. 585, 2007). We also present a comparison between the rapidly sheared flow and a more conventional boundary layer subjected to a turbulent free stream. We acknowledge the financial support from EPSRC (Grant No. EP/I037938).

  1. Differential conductance as a promising approach for rapid DNA sequencing with nanopore-embedded electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yuhui; Shao, Lubing; Scheicher, Ralph H.; Grigoriev, Anton; Ahuja, Rajeev; Long, Shibing; Ji, Zhuoyu; Yu, Zhaoan; Liu, Ming

    2010-07-01

    We propose an approach for nanopore-based DNA sequencing using characteristic transverse differential conductance. Molecular dynamics and electron transport simulations show that the transverse differential conductance during the translocation of DNA through the nanopore is distinguishable enough for the detection of the base sequence and can withstand electrical noise caused by DNA structure fluctuation. Our findings demonstrate several advantages of the transverse conductance approach, which may lead to important applications in rapid genome sequencing.

  2. Local Polar Fluctuations in Lead Halide Perovskite Crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaffe, Omer; Guo, Yinsheng; Tan, Liang Z; Egger, David A; Hull, Trevor; Stoumpos, Constantinos C; Zheng, Fan; Heinz, Tony F; Kronik, Leeor; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G; Owen, Jonathan S; Rappe, Andrew M; Pimenta, Marcos A; Brus, Louis E

    2017-03-31

    Hybrid lead-halide perovskites have emerged as an excellent class of photovoltaic materials. Recent reports suggest that the organic molecular cation is responsible for local polar fluctuations that inhibit carrier recombination. We combine low-frequency Raman scattering with first-principles molecular dynamics (MD) to study the fundamental nature of these local polar fluctuations. Our observations of a strong central peak in the cubic phase of both hybrid (CH_{3}NH_{3}PbBr_{3}) and all-inorganic (CsPbBr_{3}) lead-halide perovskites show that anharmonic, local polar fluctuations are intrinsic to the general lead-halide perovskite structure, and not unique to the dipolar organic cation. MD simulations indicate that head-to-head Cs motion coupled to Br face expansion, occurring on a few hundred femtosecond time scale, drives the local polar fluctuations in CsPbBr_{3}.

  3. Generalized noise terms for the quantized fluctuational electrodynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Partanen, Mikko; Hayrynen, Teppo; Tulkki, Jukka

    2017-01-01

    position-dependent quantum models for the photon number in resonant structures have only been formulated very recently and only for dielectric media. Here we present a general position-dependent quantized fluctuational electrodynamics (QFED) formalism that extends the consistent field quantization...... to describe the photon number also in the presence of magnetic field-matter interactions. It is shown that the magnetic fluctuations provide an additional degree of freedom in media where the magnetic coupling to the field is prominent. Therefore, the field quantization requires an additional independent...... noise operator that is commuting with the conventional bosonic noise operator describing the polarization current fluctuations in dielectric media. In addition to allowing the detailed description of field fluctuations, our methods provide practical tools for modeling optical energy transfer...

  4. Local Polar Fluctuations in Lead Halide Perovskite Crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yaffe, Omer; Guo, Yinsheng; Tan, Liang Z.; Egger, David A.; Hull, Trevor; Stoumpos, Constantinos C.; Zheng, Fan; Heinz, Tony F.; Kronik, Leeor; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G.; Owen, Jonathan S.; Rappe, Andrew M.; Pimenta, Marcos A.; Brus, Louis E.

    2017-03-01

    Hybrid lead-halide perovskites have emerged as an excellent class of photovoltaic materials. Recent reports suggest that the organic molecular cation is responsible for local polar fluctuations that inhibit carrier recombination. We combine low-frequency Raman scattering with first-principles molecular dynamics (MD) to study the fundamental nature of these local polar fluctuations. Our observations of a strong central peak in the cubic phase of both hybrid (CH3NH3PbBr3) and all-inorganic (CsPbBr3) leadhalide perovskites show that anharmonic, local polar fluctuations are intrinsic to the general lead-halide perovskite structure, and not unique to the dipolar organic cation. MD simulations indicate that head-tohead Cs motion coupled to Br face expansion, occurring on a few hundred femtosecond time scale, drives the local polar fluctuations in CsPbBr3.

  5. Sources of Economic Fluctuations in Central America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilfredo Toledo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Using panel data from Central America, this paper studies the determining factors of inflation and aggregate output fluctuations by estimating two Structural Vector Autoregressive (SVAR models. Price and output variables are included in one of the models, whereas M2 and the price of oil are additional variables in the other one. Findings of this study suggest that price is determined by the demand, while output seems to be influenced mainly by the supply shocks in that area. It was also evidenced that the price of oil does not have a significant impact on the general price level in that region.

  6. Chromodynamic Fluctuations in Quark-Gluon Plasma

    OpenAIRE

    Mrowczynski, Stanislaw

    2008-01-01

    Fluctuations of chromodynamic fields in the collisionless quark-gluon plasma are found as a solution of the initial value linearized problem. The plasma initial state is on average colorless, stationary and homogeneous. When the state is stable, the initial fluctuations decay exponentially and in the long-time limit a stationary spectrum of fluctuations is established. For the equilibrium plasma it reproduces the spectrum which is provided by the fluctuation-dissipation relation. Fluctuations...

  7. Measurement of magnetic fluctuation-induced heat transport in tokamaks and RFP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiksel, G.; Hartog, D.D.; Cekic, M.; Prager, S.C. [and others

    1996-08-01

    It has long been recognized that fluctuations in the magnetic field are a potent mechanism for the anomalous transport of energy in confined plasmas. The energy transport process originates from particle motion along magnetic fields, which have a fluctuating component in the radial direction (perpendicular to the confining equilibrium magnetic surfaces). A key feature is that the transport can be large even if the fluctuation amplitude is small. If the fluctuations are resonant with the equilibrium magnetic field (i.e., the fluctuation amplitude is constant along an equilibrium field line) then a small fluctuation can introduce stochasticity to the field line trajectories. Particles following the chaotically wandering field lines can rapidly carry energy across the plasma.

  8. Rapid detection of listeria spp. using an internalin A aptasensor based on carbon-metal nanohybrid structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanegas, D. C.; Rong, Yue; Schwalb, N.; Hills, K. D.; Gomes, C.; McLamore, E. S.

    2015-05-01

    Foodborne outbreaks caused by Listeria monocytogenes continue to raise major public health concerns worldwide. In the United States alone, the centers for disease control and prevention have confirmed the occurrence of 183 cases of listeriosis with 39 fatalities within the last 3 years. Standard methods for the detection of pathogenic strains require up to 7 days to yield results, thus faster techniques with the same level of reliability for bacteria detection are desirable. This study reports on the development of a rapid, accurate, and sensitive electrochemical biosensor for rapid testing of Listeria spp. based on the selective binding of InlA aptamers to internalins in the cell membrane of the target bacteria. Hybrid nanomaterial platforms based on reduced graphene oxide and nanoplatinum were deposited onto Pt/Ir electrodes for enhancing electrochemical transduction during the recognition events. InlA aptamers were immobilized onto the nanomaterial platforms via metal-thiol adsorption. Aptamer loading onto different platform nanostructures was investigated through cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The detection mechanism was evaluated by recording the electrochemical response to several bacterial dilutions in PBS buffer using the non-pathogenic species Listeria innocua. These preliminary results show that the aptasensor can be tuned for detection of Listeria concentrations as low as 100 CFU/ml in less than 3 hours (including incubation time and data analysis). The developed aptasensor opens a promising direction for rapid testing of Listeria monocytogenes in food products.

  9. Linear modeling of glacier fluctuations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oerlemans, J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/06833656X

    2012-01-01

    In this contribution a linear first-order differential equation is used to model glacier length fluctuations. This equation has two parameters describing the physical characteristics of a glacier: the climate sensitivity, expressing how the equilibrium glacier length depends on the climatic state,

  10. Reaction rates when barriers fluctuate

    OpenAIRE

    Reimann, Peter

    1999-01-01

    Reaction rates when barriers fluctuate : a path integral approach / P. Hänggi and P. Reimann. - In: International Conference on Path Integrals from peV to TeV : Proceedings of the ... / eds.: R. Casalbuoni ... - Singapore u.a. : World Scientific, 1999. - S. 407-409

  11. Mobile tablet audiometry in fluctuating autoimmune ear disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohlert, Scott; Bromwich, Matthew

    2017-03-07

    Autoimmune inner ear disease (AIED) is a rare condition characterized by bilateral fluctuating sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL). The labile nature of this hearing loss makes it difficult to accurately quantify with conventional methods, and therefore it is challenging to rehabilitate. Over a 9-month period one pediatric patient with severe AIED was monitored and conducted home audiograms using a previously validated testing system (Shoebox Audiometry). During this period he also underwent several clinical audiograms. The correlation between clinical and home audiograms was analyzed with a Pearson coefficient, and the range and frequency of fluctuations was recorded. Sixty-four automated home audiograms and nine clinical audiograms were conducted. When tested at home using a calibrated system the pure tone average (PTA) fluctuated between 12 dB and 72 dB indicating large variability in hearing. Fluctuations were frequent: on 28 occasions the PTA varied by at least 5 dB when retested within 4 days. The mean PTA was 50 dB and 95% of the thresholds were within 36 dB of the mean. Clinical audiograms obtained on the same day or within 1 day of home testing were highly concordant (with a Pearson coefficient of 0.93). AIED can result in significant fluctuations in hearing over short periods of time. Home testing enables a more granular look at variations over time and correlates well with clinical testing, and thus facilitates rapid action and informed rehabilitation.

  12. Influence of temperature fluctuations during cryopreservation on vital parameters, differentiation potential, and transgene expression of placental multipotent stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogozhykh, Denys; Pogozhykh, Olena; Prokopyuk, Volodymyr; Kuleshova, Larisa; Goltsev, Anatoliy; Blasczyk, Rainer; Mueller, Thomas

    2017-03-11

    Successful implementation of rapidly advancing regenerative medicine approaches has led to high demand for readily available cellular suspensions. In particular, multipotent stromal cells (MSCs) of placental origin have shown therapeutic efficiency in the treatment of numerous pathologies of varied etiology. Up to now, cryopreservation is the only effective way to preserve the viability and unique properties of such cells in the long term. However, practical biobanking is often associated with repeated temperature fluctuations or interruption of a cold chain due to various technical, transportation, and stocking events. While biochemical processes are expected to be suspended during cryopreservation, such temperature fluctuations may lead to accumulation of stress as well as to periodic release of water fractions in the samples, possibly leading to damage during long-term storage. In this study, we performed a comprehensive analysis of changes in cell survival, vital parameters, and differentiation potential, as well as transgene expression of placental MSCs after temperature fluctuations within the liquid nitrogen steam storage, mimicking long-term preservation in practical biobanking, transportation, and temporal storage. It was shown that viability and metabolic parameters of placental MSCs did not significantly differ after temperature fluctuations in the range from -196 °C to -100 °C in less than 20 cycles in comparison to constant temperature storage. However, increasing the temperature range to -80 °C as well as increasing the number of cycles leads to significant lowering of these parameters after thawing. The number of apoptotic changes increases depending on the number of cycles of temperature fluctuations. Besides, adhesive properties of the cells after thawing are significantly compromised in the samples subjected to temperature fluctuations during storage. Differentiation potential of placental MSCs was not compromised after cryopreservation

  13. Mercury exposure may influence fluctuating asymmetry in waterbirds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herring, Garth; Eagles-Smith, Collin A; Ackerman, Joshua T

    2017-06-01

    Variation in avian bilateral symmetry can be an indicator of developmental instability in response to a variety of stressors, including environmental contaminants. The authors used composite measures of fluctuating asymmetry to examine the influence of mercury concentrations in 2 tissues on fluctuating asymmetry within 4 waterbird species. Fluctuating asymmetry increased with mercury concentrations in whole blood and breast feathers of Forster's terns (Sterna forsteri), a species with elevated mercury concentrations. Specifically, fluctuating asymmetry in rectrix feather 1 was the most strongly correlated structural variable of those tested (wing chord, tarsus, primary feather 10, rectrix feather 6) with mercury concentrations in Forster's terns. However, for American avocets (Recurvirostra americana), black-necked stilts (Himantopus mexicanus), and Caspian terns (Hydroprogne caspia), the authors found no relationship between fluctuating asymmetry and either whole-blood or breast feather mercury concentrations, even though these species had moderate to elevated mercury exposure. The results indicate that mercury contamination may act as an environmental stressor during development and feather growth and contribute to fluctuating asymmetry of some species of highly contaminated waterbirds. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:1599-1605. Published 2016 Wiley Periodicals Inc. on behalf of SETAC. This article is a US government work and, as such, is in the public domain in the United States of America. Published 2016 Wiley Periodicals Inc. on behalf of SETAC. This article is a US government work and, as such, is in the public domain in the United States of America.

  14. Importance of Fluctuations in Light on Plant Photosynthetic Acclimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vialet-Chabrand, Silvere; Matthews, Jack S A; Simkin, Andrew J; Raines, Christine A; Lawson, Tracy

    2017-04-01

    The acclimation of plants to light has been studied extensively, yet little is known about the effect of dynamic fluctuations in light on plant phenotype and acclimatory responses. We mimicked natural fluctuations in light over a diurnal period to examine the effect on the photosynthetic processes and growth of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). High and low light intensities, delivered via a realistic dynamic fluctuating or square wave pattern, were used to grow and assess plants. Plants subjected to square wave light had thicker leaves and greater photosynthetic capacity compared with fluctuating light-grown plants. This, together with elevated levels of proteins associated with electron transport, indicates greater investment in leaf structural components and photosynthetic processes. In contrast, plants grown under fluctuating light had thinner leaves, lower leaf light absorption, but maintained similar photosynthetic rates per unit leaf area to square wave-grown plants. Despite high light use efficiency, plants grown under fluctuating light had a slow growth rate early in development, likely due to the fact that plants grown under fluctuating conditions were not able to fully utilize the light energy absorbed for carbon fixation. Diurnal leaf-level measurements revealed a negative feedback control of photosynthesis, resulting in a decrease in total diurnal carbon assimilated of at least 20%. These findings highlight that growing plants under square wave growth conditions ultimately fails to predict plant performance under realistic light regimes and stress the importance of considering fluctuations in incident light in future experiments that aim to infer plant productivity under natural conditions in the field. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  15. A Portable, Linear-Array Ultrasonic Imaging System for Rapid Inspection of Large-Area Composite Structures Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The use of composites in aircraft manufacturing is growing dramatically. To ensure the integrity of composite structures and bonded joints, a variety of...

  16. The fumarate sensor DcuS: progress in rapid protein fold elucidation by combining protein structure prediction methods with NMR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meiler, Jens; Baker, David

    2005-04-01

    We illustrate how moderate resolution protein structures can be rapidly obtained by interlinking computational prediction methodologies with un- or partially assigned NMR data. To facilitate the application of our recently described method of ranking and subsequent refining alternative structural models using unassigned NMR data [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 100 (2003) 15404] for such "structural genomics"-type experiments it is combined with protein models from several prediction techniques, enhanced to utilize partial assignments, and applied on a protein with an unknown structure and fold. From the original NMR spectra obtained for the 140 residue fumarate sensor DcuS, 1100 1H, 13C, and 15N chemical shift signals, 3000 1H- 1H NOESY cross peak intensities, and 209 backbone residual dipolar couplings were extracted and used to rank models produced by de novo structure prediction and comparative modeling methods. The ranking proceeds in two steps: first, an optimal assignment of the NMR peaks to atoms is found for each model independently, and second, the models are ranked based on the consistency between the NMR data and the model assuming these optimal assignments. The low-resolution model selected using this ranking procedure had the correct overall fold and a global backbone RMSD of 6.0Å, and was subsequently refined to 3.7 Å RMSD. With the incorporation of a small number of NOE and residual dipolar coupling constraints available very early in the traditional spectral assignment process, a model with an RMSD of 2.8 Å could rapidly be built. The ability to generate moderate resolution models within days of NMR data collection should facilitate large scale NMR structure determination efforts.

  17. Parity fluctuations in stellar dynamos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, D. L.; Sokoloff, D. D.

    2017-10-01

    Observations of the solar butterfly diagram from sunspot records suggest persistent fluctuations in parity, away from the overall, approximately dipolar pattern. A simple mean-field dynamo model is used with a solar-like rotation law and perturbed α effect. The parity of the magnetic field relative to the rotational equator can demonstrate can be described as resonance behavior, while the magnetic energy behaves in a more or less expected way. Possible applications of this effect are discussed in the context of various deviations of the solar magnetic field from dipolar symmetry, as reported from analyses of archival sunspot data. The model produces fluctuations in field parity, and hence in the butterfly diagram, that are consistent with observed fluctuaions in solar behavior.

  18. Edge transport and fluctuation induced turbulence characteristics in early SST-1 plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kakati, B., E-mail: bharat.kakati@ipr.res.in; Pradhan, S., E-mail: pradhan@ipr.res.in; Dhongde, J.; Semwal, P.; Yohan, K.; Banaudha, M.

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • Anomalous particle transport during the high MHD activity at SST-1. • Electrostatic turbulence is modulated by MHD activity at SST-1 tokamak. • Edge floating potential fluctuations shows poloidal long-range cross correlation. - Abstract: Plasma edge transport characteristics are known to be heavily influenced by the edge fluctuation induced turbulences. These characteristics play a critical role towards the confinement of plasma column in a Tokamak. The edge magnetic fluctuations and its subsequent effect on electrostatic fluctuations have been experimentally investigated for the first time at the edge of the SST-1 plasma column. This paper reports the correlations that exist and is experimentally been observed between the edge densities and floating potential fluctuations with the magnetic fluctuations. The edge density and floating potential fluctuations have been measured with the help of poloidally separated Langmuir probes, whereas the magnetic fluctuations have been measured with poloidally spaced Mirnov coils. Increase in magnetic fluctuations associated with enhanced MHD activities has been found to increase the floating potential and ion saturation current. These observations indicate electrostatic turbulence getting influenced with the MHD activities and reveal the edge anomalous particle transport during SST-1 tokamak discharge. Large-scale coherent structures have been observed in the floating potential fluctuations, indicating long-distance cross correlation in the poloidal directions. From bispectral analysis, a strong nonlinear coupling among the floating potential fluctuations is observed in the low-frequency range about 0–15 kHz.

  19. Fuel Temperature Fluctuations During Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitin, R. E.; Zemenkov, Yu D.

    2016-10-01

    When oil and petroleum products are stored, their temperature significantly impacts how their properties change. The paper covers the problem of determining temperature fluctuations of hydrocarbons during storage. It provides results of the authors’ investigations of the stored product temperature variations relative to the ambient temperature. Closeness and correlation coefficients between these values are given. Temperature variations equations for oil and petroleum products stored in tanks are deduced.

  20. Rapid, autonomous analysis of He spectra I: Overview of the RadID program, user experience, and structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gosnell, Thomas B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Chavez, Joseph R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Rowland, Mark S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wong, James L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-02-26

    RadID is a new gamma-ray spectrum analysis program for rapid screening of HPGe gamma-ray data to reveal the presence of radionuclide signatures. It is an autonomous, rule-based heuristic system that can identify well over 200 radioactive sources with particular interest in uranium and plutonium characteristics. It executes in about one second. RadID does not require knowledge of the detector efficiency, the source-to-detector distance, or the geometry of the inspected radiation source—including any shielding. In this first of a three-document series we sketch the RadID program’s origin, its minimal requirements, the user experience, and the program operation.

  1. Relationship among phenotypic plasticity, phenotypic fluctuations ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prakash

    These results provide quantitative formulation on canalization and genetic assimilation, in terms of fluctuations of gene expression levels. [Kaneko K 2009 Relationship among phenotypic plasticity, phenotypic fluctuations, robustness, and evolvability; Waddington's legacy revisited under the spirit of Einstein; J. Biosci.

  2. Some comments to the quantum fluctuation theorems

    OpenAIRE

    Kuzovlev, Yu. E.

    2011-01-01

    It is demonstrated that today's quantum fluctuation theorems are component part of old quantum fluctuation-dissipation relations [Sov.Phys.-JETP 45, 125 (1977)], and typical misunderstandings in this area are pointed out.

  3. Correlated interaction fluctuations in photosynthetic complexes

    CERN Document Server

    Vlaming, Sebastiaan M

    2011-01-01

    The functioning and efficiency of natural photosynthetic complexes is strongly influenced by their embedding in a noisy protein environment, which can even serve to enhance the transport efficiency. Interactions with the environment induce fluctuations of the transition energies of and interactions between the chlorophyll molecules, and due to the fact that different fluctuations will partially be caused by the same environmental factors, correlations between the various fluctuations will occur. We argue that fluctuations of the interactions should in general not be neglected, as these have a considerable impact on population transfer rates, decoherence rates and the efficiency of photosynthetic complexes. Furthermore, while correlations between transition energy fluctuations have been studied, we provide the first quantitative study of the effect of correlations between interaction fluctuations and transition energy fluctuations, and of correlations between the various interaction fluctuations. It is shown t...

  4. Effect of Homogenizing Heat Treatment of Liquid Aluminum-Copper Alloys on the Structure of Rapidly Crystallized Specimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astaf'ev, V. V.; Kurochkin, A. R.; Yablonskikh, T. I.; Brodova, I. G.; Popel', P. S.

    2017-11-01

    Centrifugal casting into a massive slot chill mold was used to prepare two series of specimens of alloys of the Al - Cu system, containing from 10 to 32.2 at.% Cu. The first series was fabricated without a homogenizing heat treatment of the melt, while the second series was fabricated with heating of the melt to 1400°C. Both kinds of specimens were cast at the same temperature in order to provide for the same cooling rate of about 104 K/sec. The structures, phase compositions and microhardnesses of the structural components are compared. It is established that the homogenizing heat treatment changes the kinetics of crystallization and, hence, the proportion of phases in the alloy structure and the copper content in them.

  5. Rapid change with depth in megabenthic structure-forming communities of the Makapu'u deep-sea coral bed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Dustin J.; Baco, Amy R.

    2014-01-01

    Seamounts are largely unexplored undersea mountains rising abruptly from the ocean floor, which can support an increased abundance and diversity of organisms. Deep-sea corals are important benthic structure-formers on current-swept hard substrates in these habitats. While depth is emerging as a factor structuring the fauna of seamounts on a large spatial scale, most work addressing deep-sea coral and seamount community structure has not considered the role of small-scale variation in species distributions. Video from six ROV dives over a depth range of ~320-530 m were analyzed to assess the diversity and density of benthic megafaunal invertebrates across the Makapu'u deep-sea coral bed, offshore of Oahu, Hawaii. At the same time, the physical environment along the dive track was surveyed to relate biotic patterns with abiotic variables including depth, aspect, rugosity, substrate, slope and relief to test the factors structuring community assemblages. Despite the narrow range examined, depth was found to be the strongest structuring gradient, and six unique macrobenthic communities were found, with a 93% faunal dissimilarity over the depth surveyed. Relief, rugosity and slope were also factors in the final model. Alcyonacean octocorals were the dominant macrofaunal invertebrates at all but the deepest depth zone. The commercially harvested precious coral C. secundum was the dominant species at depths 370-470 m, with a distribution that is on average deeper than similar areas. This may be artificial due to the past harvesting of this species on the shallower portion of its range. Primnoid octocorals were the most abundant octocoral family overall. This work yields new insight on the spatial ecology of seamounts, pointing out that community changes can occur over narrow depth ranges and that communities can be structured by small-scale physiography.

  6. Refractive-index and absorption fluctuations in the infrared caused by temperature, humidity, and pressure fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, R. J.; Clifford, S. F.; Lawrence, R. S.

    1980-10-01

    The dependence of fluctuations in atmospheric absorption and refraction upon fluctuations in temperature, humidity, and pressure is found for infrared frequencies. This dependence has contributions from line and continuum absorption and from anomalous refraction by water vapor. The functions that relate these fluctuations are necessary for evaluating degradation of electromagnetic radiation by turbulence. They are computed for a given choice of mean atmospheric conditions and graphed as functions of frequency in the wavelength range 5.7 microns to radio waves. It is found that turbulent fluctuations in total pressure give a negligible contribution to absorption and refraction fluctuations. Humidity fluctuations dominate absorption fluctuations, but contributions by temperature and humidity affect refraction fluctuations. Sufficiently strong humidity fluctuations can dominate the refraction fluctuations for some infrared frequencies but not for visible frequencies. The variance of log amplitude is examined for scintillation of infrared light to determine whether absorption or refraction fluctuations dominate under several conditions.

  7. Output and price fluctuations in China's reform years: What role did money play?

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Yin; Wan, Guanghua

    2004-01-01

    The Chinese economy underwent cyclical fluctuations in growth and inflation in the reform period. Contrasting views exist on the role of money in such fluctuations. This paper assesses these views employing structural VEC models based on the exchange equation. It is found that in the long run money accommodates, rather than causes, changes in output and prices. In the short run, price fluctuations are mostly attributable to shocks that have permanent effects on prices and money but not on rea...

  8. Rapid calculation of protein chemical shifts using bond polarization theory and its application to protein structure refinement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakovkin, Igor; Klipfel, Marco; Muhle-Goll, Claudia; Ulrich, Anne S; Luy, Burkhard; Sternberg, Ulrich

    2012-09-21

    Although difficult to analyze, NMR chemical shifts provide detailed information on protein structure. We have adapted the semi-empirical bond polarization theory (BPT) to protein chemical shift calculation and chemical shift driven protein structure refinement. A new parameterization for BPT amide nitrogen chemical shift calculation has been derived from MP2 ab initio calculations and successfully evaluated using crystalline tripeptides. We computed the chemical shifts of the small globular protein ubiquitin, demonstrating that BPT calculations can match the results obtained at the DFT level of theory at very low computational cost. In addition to the calculation of chemical shift tensors, BPT allows the calculation of chemical shift gradients and consequently chemical shift driven geometry optimizations. We applied chemical shift driven protein structure refinement to the conformational analysis of a set of Trypanosoma brucei (the causative agent of African sleeping sickness) tryparedoxin peroxidase Px III structures. We found that the interaction of Px III with its reaction partner Tpx seems to be governed by conformational selection rather than by induced fit.

  9. Distribution of Pressure Fluctuations in a Prototype Pump Turbine at Pump Mode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuekun Sun

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Pressure fluctuations are very important characteristics in pump turbine's operation. Many researches have focused on the characteristics (amplitude and frequencies of pressure fluctuations at specific locations, but little researches mentioned the distribution of pressure fluctuations in a pump turbine. In this paper, 3D numerical simulations using SSTk − ω turbulence model were carried out to predict the pressure fluctuations distribution in a prototype pump turbine at pump mode. Three operating points with different mass flow rates and different guide vanes’ openings were simulated. The numerical results show how pressure fluctuations at blade passing frequency (BPF and its harmonics vary along the whole flow path direction, as well as along the circumferential direction. BPF is the first dominant frequency in vaneless space. Pressure fluctuation component at this frequency rapidly decays towards upstream (to draft tube and downstream (to spiral casing. In contrast, pressure fluctuations component at 3BPF spreads to upstream and downstream with almost constant amplitude. Amplitude and frequencies of pressure fluctuations also vary along different circumferential locations in vaneless space. When the mass flow and guide vanes’ opening are different, the distribution of pressure fluctuations along the two directions is different basically.

  10. Fluctuation theory of luminance and chromaticity discrimination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouman, M.A.; Vos, J.J.; Walraven, P.L.

    1963-01-01

    An attempt has been made to describe brightness and color discrimination in the framework of a fluctuation theory. The fluctuation theory states that a difference between two stimuli will be just noticeable if it exceeds, by some factor, the average of the fluctuations in the stimuli. If the

  11. SOL width and intermittent fluctuations in KSTAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.E. Garcia

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Radial profiles of the ion saturation current and its fluctuation statistics are presented from probe measurements in L-mode, neutral beam heated plasmas at the outboard mid-plane region of KSTAR. The results are consistent with the familiar two-layer structure, seen elsewhere in tokamak L-mode discharges, with a steep near-SOL profile and a broad far-SOL profile. The profile scale length in the far-SOL increases drastically with line-averaged density, thereby enhancing plasma interactions with the main chamber walls. Time series from the far-SOL region are characterised by large-amplitude bursts attributed to the radial motion of blob-like plasma filaments. Analysis of a data time series of several seconds duration under stationary plasma conditions reveals the statistical properties of these fluctuations, including the rate of level crossings and the average duration of periods spent above a given threshold level. This is shown to be in excellent agreement with predictions of a stochastic model, giving novel predictions of plasma–wall interactions due to transient transport events.

  12. SOL width and intermittent fluctuations in KSTAR

    CERN Document Server

    Garcia, O E; Theodorsen, A; Bak, J -G; Hong, S -H; Kim, H -S; Pitts, R A

    2016-01-01

    Radial profiles of the ion saturation current and its fluctuation statistics are presented from probe measurements in L-mode, neutral beam heated plasmas at the outboard mid-plane region of KSTAR. The familiar two-layer structure, seen elsewhere in tokamak L-mode discharges, with a steep near-SOL profile and a broad far-SOL profile, is observed. The profile scale length in the far-SOL increases drastically with line-averaged density, thereby enhancing plasma interactions with the main chamber walls. Time series from the far-SOL region are characterised by large-amplitude bursts attributed to the radial motion of blob-like plasma filaments. Analysis of a data time series of several seconds duration under stationary plasma conditions reveals the statistical properties of these fluctuations, including the rate of level crossings and the average duration of periods spent above a given threshold level. This is shown to be in excellent agreement with predictions of a stochastic model, giving novel predictions of pl...

  13. Assessing the Potential of Low-Cost 3D Cameras for the Rapid Measurement of Plant Woody Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Nock

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Detailed 3D plant architectural data have numerous applications in plant science, but many existing approaches for 3D data collection are time-consuming and/or require costly equipment. Recently, there has been rapid growth in the availability of low-cost, 3D cameras and related open source software applications. 3D cameras may provide measurements of key components of plant architecture such as stem diameters and lengths, however, few tests of 3D cameras for the measurement of plant architecture have been conducted. Here, we measured Salix branch segments ranging from 2–13 mm in diameter with an Asus Xtion camera to quantify the limits and accuracy of branch diameter measurement with a 3D camera. By scanning at a variety of distances we also quantified the effect of scanning distance. In addition, we also test the sensitivity of the program KinFu for continuous 3D object scanning and modeling as well as other similar software to accurately record stem diameters and capture plant form (<3 m in height. Given its ability to accurately capture the diameter of branches >6 mm, Asus Xtion may provide a novel method for the collection of 3D data on the branching architecture of woody plants. Improvements in camera measurement accuracy and available software are likely to further improve the utility of 3D cameras for plant sciences in the future.

  14. Application of electrical capacitance tomography and artificial neural networks to rapid estimation of cylindrical shape parameters of industrial flow structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garbaa Hela

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A new approach to solve the inverse problem in electrical capacitance tomography is presented. The proposed method is based on an artificial neural network to estimate three different parameters of a circular object present inside a pipeline, i.e. radius and 2D position coordinates. This information allows the estimation of the distribution of material inside a pipe and determination of the characteristic parameters of a range of flows, which are characterised by a circular objects emerging within a cross section such as funnel flow in a silo gravitational discharging process. The main advantages of the proposed approach are explicitly: the desired characteristic flow parameters are estimated directly from the measured capacitances and rapidity, which in turn is crucial for online flow monitoring. In a classic approach in order to obtain these parameters in the first step the image is reconstructed and then the parameters are estimated with the use of image processing methods. The obtained results showed significant reduction of computations time in comparison to the iterative LBP or Levenberg-Marquard algorithms.

  15. Rapid and sensitive homogenous detection of the Ibaraki virus non-structural protein using magnetic modulation biosensing system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielli, Amos; Porat, Noga; Arie, Ady; Ehrlich, Marcelo

    2010-02-01

    Magnetic modulation biosensing (MMB) system rapidly and homogeneously detected coding sequences of the nonstructural Ibaraki virus protein 3 (NS3) complementary DNA (cDNA). A novel fluorescent resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based probe discriminated the target DNA from the control. When the target sequence is detected, the FRETbased probe is cleaved using Taq-polymerase activity and upon excitation with a laser beam fluorescent light is produced. The biotinylated probes are attached to streptavidin-coupled superparamagnetic beads and are maneuvered into oscillatory motion by applying an alternating magnetic field gradient. The beads are condensed into the detection area and their movement in and out of an orthogonal laser beam produces a periodic fluorescent signal that is demodulated using synchronous detection. Condensation of the beads from the entire volume increases the signal while modulation separates the signal from the background noise of the non-magnetized solution. 1.9 picomolar of the Ibaraki virus NS3 cDNA was detected in homogeneous solution within 18 minutes without separation or washing steps. In this paper we will review the magnetic modulation system and present its capability in specific DNA sequences detection.

  16. An emerging method for rapid characterization of feed structures and feed component matrix at a cellular level and relation to feed quality and nutritive value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Peiqiang

    2006-06-01

    Feed quality, feed characteristics, nutrient utilization and digestive behaviour are closely related to: (i) total feed composition, (ii) feed intrinsic structures, and (iii) biological component matrix (such as protein to starch matrix, protein to carbohydrate matrix). Conventional "wet" chemical analysis can determine total chemical composition, but fails to detect the feed intrinsic structures and biological component matrix due to destruction of feed samples during the processing for chemical analysis and the "wet" chemical analysis cannot link structural information to chemical information within intact feed tissue. Recently, advanced synchrotron-based Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) microspectroscopy has been developed as a non-destructive and non-invasive structural-chemical analytical technique. This technique can link chemical information to structural information of biological samples within intact tissue within cellular dimensions. It can provide four kinds of information simultaneously: tissue composition, tissue structure, tissue chemistry and tissue environment. However, this novel technique has been found mainly for medical science research, extremely rare for feed science and nutrition research. The objective of this review article was to illustrate synchrotron-based FTIR microspectroscopy as a novel research tool for rapid characterization of feed structures at a cellular level and for detection of chemical features and molecular chemical make-up of feed biological component matrix and nutrient interaction. The emphasis of this article was to show that feed structural-chemical features at a cellular level are closely related to feed characteristics, feed quality and nutritive value in animals. The synchrotron-based technology will provide us with a greater understanding of the plant-animal interface.

  17. Phase transitions, interfacial fluctuations and hidden symmetries for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Universidad de Sevilla, Apartado de Correos 1065, 41080 Sevilla, Spain. E-mail: a.o.parry@ic.ac.uk. Abstract. Fluids adsorbed at micro-patterned and geometrically structured substrates can exhibit novel phase transitions and interfacial fluctuation effects distinct from those characteristic of wetting at planar, homogeneous ...

  18. Structure and phase transformations in copper-alloyed rapidly melt-quenched Ni50Ti32Hf18-based alloys with high-temperature shape memory effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pushin, A. V.; Pushin, V. G.; Kuranova, N. N.; Kourov, N. I.; Kuntsevich, T. E.; Makarov, V. V.; Uksusnikov, A. N.

    2017-10-01

    Methods of transmission and scanning electron microscopy, chemical microanalysis, electron diffraction, and X-ray diffraction have been used to carry out the comparative study of the structure and chemical and phase composition of thin ribbons of four quasi-binary alloys (Ni50Ti32Hf18, Ni45Ti32Hf18Cu5, Ni35Ti32Hf18Cu15, and Ni25Ti32Hf18Cu25) obtained in the amorphous state by rapid quenching from the melt by jet spinning. The critical temperatures of the devitrification and B2 ↔ B19' martensitic transformation of the alloys have been determined based on the data of temperature dependences of the electrical resistivity. The specific features of the formation of the ultrafine-grained structure upon the devitrification and of the phase transformations have been studied depending on the heat-treatment regimes and chemical composition of the alloys (concentration of copper atoms).

  19. Directed percolation process in the presence of velocity fluctuations: Effect of compressibility and finite correlation time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonov, N. V.; Hnatič, M.; Kapustin, A. S.; Lučivjanský, T.; Mižišin, L.

    2016-01-01

    The direct bond percolation process (Gribov process) is studied in the presence of random velocity fluctuations generated by the Gaussian self-similar ensemble with finite correlation time. We employ the renormalization group in order to analyze a combined effect of the compressibility and finite correlation time on the long-time behavior of the phase transition between an active and an absorbing state. The renormalization procedure is performed to the one-loop order. Stable fixed points of the renormalization group and their regions of stability are calculated in the one-loop approximation within the three-parameter (ɛ ,y ,η ) expansion. Different regimes corresponding to the rapid-change limit and frozen velocity field are discussed, and their fixed points' structure is determined in numerical fashion.

  20. A planar conducting micro-loop structure for transportation of magnetic beads: An approach towards rapid sensing and quantification of biological entities

    KAUST Repository

    Gooneratne, Chinthaka Pasan

    2012-03-01

    Magnetic beads are utilized effectively in a wide variety of medical applications due to their small size, biocompatibility and large surface to volume ratio. Microfluidic lab-on-a-chip (LOC) devices, which utilize magnetic beads, are promising tools for accurate and rapid cell sorting and counting. Effective manipulation of beads is a critical factor for the performance of LOC devices. In this paper we propose a planar conducting micro-loop structure to trap, manipulate and transport magnetic beads. Current through the micro-loops produces magnetic field gradients that are proportional to the force required to manipulate the beads. Numerical analyses were performed to study the magnetic forces and their spatial distributions. Experimental results showed that magnetic beads could not only be transported towards a target region, e.g., for sensing purposes, but also the trapping rate could be increased by switching current between the different loops in the micro-loop structure. This method could lead to rapid and accurate quantification of biological entities tagged with magnetic beads. Copyright © 2012 American Scientific Publishers. All rights reserved.

  1. Homogenous Population Genetic Structure of the Non-Native Raccoon Dog (Nyctereutes procyonoides) in Europe as a Result of Rapid Population Expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drygala, Frank; Korablev, Nikolay; Ansorge, Hermann; Fickel, Joerns; Isomursu, Marja; Elmeros, Morten; Kowalczyk, Rafał; Baltrunaite, Laima; Balciauskas, Linas; Saarma, Urmas; Schulze, Christoph; Borkenhagen, Peter; Frantz, Alain C

    2016-01-01

    The extent of gene flow during the range expansion of non-native species influences the amount of genetic diversity retained in expanding populations. Here, we analyse the population genetic structure of the raccoon dog (Nyctereutes procyonoides) in north-eastern and central Europe. This invasive species is of management concern because it is highly susceptible to fox rabies and an important secondary host of the virus. We hypothesized that the large number of introduced animals and the species' dispersal capabilities led to high population connectivity and maintenance of genetic diversity throughout the invaded range. We genotyped 332 tissue samples from seven European countries using 16 microsatellite loci. Different algorithms identified three genetic clusters corresponding to Finland, Denmark and a large 'central' population that reached from introduction areas in western Russia to northern Germany. Cluster assignments provided evidence of long-distance dispersal. The results of an Approximate Bayesian Computation analysis supported a scenario of equal effective population sizes among different pre-defined populations in the large central cluster. Our results are in line with strong gene flow and secondary admixture between neighbouring demes leading to reduced genetic structuring, probably a result of its fairly rapid population expansion after introduction. The results presented here are remarkable in the sense that we identified a homogenous genetic cluster inhabiting an area stretching over more than 1500km. They are also relevant for disease management, as in the event of a significant rabies outbreak, there is a great risk of a rapid virus spread among raccoon dog populations.

  2. Beam Energy and System Size Dependence of Dynamical Net Charge Fluctuations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    STAR Coll

    2008-07-21

    We present measurements of net charge fluctuations in Au + Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 19.6, 62.4, 130, and 200 GeV, Cu + Cu collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 62.4, 200 GeV, and p + p collisions at {radical}s = 200 GeV using the dynamical net charge fluctuations measure {nu}{sub {+-},dyn}. We observe that the dynamical fluctuations are non-zero at all energies and exhibit a modest dependence on beam energy. A weak system size dependence is also observed. We examine the collision centrality dependence of the net charge fluctuations and find that dynamical net charge fluctuations violate 1/N{sub ch} scaling, but display approximate 1/N{sub part} scaling. We also study the azimuthal and rapidity dependence of the net charge correlation strength and observe strong dependence on the azimuthal angular range and pseudorapidity widths integrated to measure the correlation.

  3. Sample to sample fluctuations in fragmentation and agglomeration processes

    CERN Document Server

    Olla, P

    1995-01-01

    The fluctuations in the particle size distribution for processes of fragmentation and aggregation are studied for stationary state regimes. The system is described in terms of a stochastic process over an adequate tree structure. The RMS fluctuations appear to scale with the square root of the mean distribution, as in the case of sums of statistically independent events. Implications for the applicability of a mean field description to fragmentation and agglomeration processes, and possible relation with intermittency phenomena in three dimensional turbulence are discussed.

  4. Phase transitions in polypeptides: analysis of energy fluctuations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yakubovich, Alexander V.; Solov'yov, Ilia; Solov'yov, Andrey V.

    2009-01-01

    The helix random coil transition in alanine, valine, and leucine polypeptides consisting of 30 amino acids is studied in vacuo using the Langevin molecular dynamics approach. The influence of side chain radicals on internal energy and heat capacity of the polypeptides is discussed. The heat...... capacity of these polypeptides is calculated as a function of temperature using two different methods, namely, as the derivative of the energy with respect to temperature, and on the basis of energy fluctuations in the system. The convergence of the fluctuations based approach is analyzed as a function...... of simulation time. This study provides a comparison of methods for the description of structural transitions in polypeptides....

  5. Chaotic fluctuations in mathematical economics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Hiroyuki, E-mail: yoshida.hiroyuki@nihon-u.ac.jp [College of Economics, Nihon University, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101-8360 (Japan)

    2011-03-01

    In this paper we examine a Cournot duopoly model, which expresses the strategic interaction between two firms. We formulate the dynamic adjustment process and investigate the dynamic properties of the stationary point. By introducing a memory mechanism characterized by distributed lag functions, we presuppose that each firm makes production decisions in a cautious manner. This implies that we have to deal with the system of integro-differential equations. By means of numerical simulations we show the occurrence of chaotic fluctuations in the case of fixed delays.

  6. Noise and fluctuations an introduction

    CERN Document Server

    MacDonald, D K C

    2006-01-01

    An understanding of fluctuations and their role is both useful and fundamental to the study of physics. This concise study of random processes offers graduate students and research physicists a survey that encompasses both the relationship of Brownian Movement with statistical mechanics and the problem of irreversible processes. It outlines the basics of the physics involved, without the strictures of mathematical rigor.The three-part treatment starts with a general survey of Brownian Movement, including electrical Brownian Movement and ""shot-noise,"" Part two explores correlation, frequency

  7. Electrostatic fluctuations in soap films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, D S; Horgan, R R

    2002-06-01

    A field theory to describe electrostatic interactions in soap films, described by electric multilayers with a generalized thermodynamic surface-charging mechanism, is studied. In the limit where the electrostatic interactions are weak, this theory is exactly soluble. The theory incorporates in a consistent way, the surface-charging mechanism and the fluctuations in the electrostatic field that correspond to the zero-frequency component of the van der Waals force. It is shown that these terms lead to a Casimir-like attraction that can be sufficiently large to explain the transition between the common black film to a Newton black film.

  8. An objective fluctuation score for Parkinson's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malcolm K Horne

    Full Text Available Establishing the presence and severity of fluctuations is important in managing Parkinson's Disease yet there is no reliable, objective means of doing this. In this study we have evaluated a Fluctuation Score derived from variations in dyskinesia and bradykinesia scores produced by an accelerometry based system.The Fluctuation Score was produced by summing the interquartile range of bradykinesia scores and dyskinesia scores produced every 2 minutes between 0900-1800 for at least 6 days by the accelerometry based system and expressing it as an algorithm.This Score could distinguish between fluctuating and non-fluctuating patients with high sensitivity and selectivity and was significant lower following activation of deep brain stimulators. The scores following deep brain stimulation lay in a band just above the score separating fluctuators from non-fluctuators, suggesting a range representing adequate motor control. When compared with control subjects the score of newly diagnosed patients show a loss of fluctuation with onset of PD. The score was calculated in subjects whose duration of disease was known and this showed that newly diagnosed patients soon develop higher scores which either fall under or within the range representing adequate motor control or instead go on to develop more severe fluctuations.The Fluctuation Score described here promises to be a useful tool for identifying patients whose fluctuations are progressing and may require therapeutic changes. It also shows promise as a useful research tool. Further studies are required to more accurately identify therapeutic targets and ranges.

  9. Live, video-rate super-resolution microscopy using structured illumination and rapid GPU-based parallel processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefman, Jonathan; Scott, Keana; Stranick, Stephan

    2011-04-01

    Structured illumination fluorescence microscopy is a powerful super-resolution method that is capable of achieving a resolution below 100 nm. Each super-resolution image is computationally constructed from a set of differentially illuminated images. However, real-time application of structured illumination microscopy (SIM) has generally been limited due to the computational overhead needed to generate super-resolution images. Here, we have developed a real-time SIM system that incorporates graphic processing unit (GPU) based in-line parallel processing of raw/differentially illuminated images. By using GPU processing, the system has achieved a 90-fold increase in processing speed compared to performing equivalent operations on a multiprocessor computer--the total throughput of the system is limited by data acquisition speed, but not by image processing. Overall, more than 350 raw images (16-bit depth, 512 × 512 pixels) can be processed per second, resulting in a maximum frame rate of 39 super-resolution images per second. This ultrafast processing capability is used to provide immediate feedback of super-resolution images for real-time display. These developments are increasing the potential for sophisticated super-resolution imaging applications.

  10. Effect of Ce on Casting Structure of Near-rapidly Solidified Al-Zn-Mg-Cu Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HUANG Gao-ren

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Through using XRD,DSC,SEM,EDS and other modern analysis methods, the effects of rare earth element Ce on microstructure and solidification temperature of Al-Zn-Mg-Cu under different cooling rates were studied, the principle of Ce on grain refining and melt cleaning of alloys was analyzed and discussed. The results show that MgZn2 phase and α-Al matrix are the main precipitations, Al,Cu,Mg and other elements dissolve in MgZn2 phase, a new phase Mg(Zn, Cu, Al2 is formed, solute elements in the grain boundary have higher concentration, eutectic reaction takes place between MgZn2 and α-Al, lamellar eutectic structure is generated. The addition of Ce decreases the dendritic arm spacing,reduces the layer spacing between eutectic phases and refines the eutectic structure and the grain significantly, and inhibits the appearance of the impurity phase Al7Cu2Fe in aluminum alloys. The addition of Ce also reduces the precipitation temperature of α-Al matrix and eutectic phase by 6.4℃ and 5.6℃ respectively.

  11. Entangled scalar and tensor fluctuations during inflation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, Hael; Vardanyan, Tereza [Department of Physics, Carnegie Mellon University,5000 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2016-11-29

    We show how the choice of an inflationary state that entangles scalar and tensor fluctuations affects the angular two-point correlation functions of the T, E, and B modes of the cosmic microwave background. The propagators for a state starting with some general quadratic entanglement are solved exactly, leading to predictions for the primordial scalar-scalar, tensor-tensor, and scalar-tensor power spectra. These power spectra are expressed in terms of general functions that describe the entangling structure of the initial state relative to the standard Bunch-Davies vacuum. We illustrate how such a state would modify the angular correlations in the CMB with a simple example where the initial state is a small perturbation away from the Bunch-Davies state. Because the state breaks some of the rotational symmetries, the angular power spectra no longer need be strictly diagonal.

  12. Multiplane 3D superresolution optical fluctuation imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Geissbuehler, Stefan; Godinat, Aurélien; Bocchio, Noelia L; Dubikovskaya, Elena A; Lasser, Theo; Leutenegger, Marcel

    2013-01-01

    By switching fluorophores on and off in either a deterministic or a stochastic manner, superresolution microscopy has enabled the imaging of biological structures at resolutions well beyond the diffraction limit. Superresolution optical fluctuation imaging (SOFI) provides an elegant way of overcoming the diffraction limit in all three spatial dimensions by computing higher-order cumulants of image sequences of blinking fluorophores acquired with a conventional widefield microscope. So far, three-dimensional (3D) SOFI has only been demonstrated by sequential imaging of multiple depth positions. Here we introduce a versatile imaging scheme which allows for the simultaneous acquisition of multiple focal planes. Using 3D cross-cumulants, we show that the depth sampling can be increased. Consequently, the simultaneous acquisition of multiple focal planes reduces the acquisition time and hence the photo-bleaching of fluorescent markers. We demonstrate multiplane 3D SOFI by imaging the mitochondria network in fixed ...

  13. Outer magnetospheric fluctuations and pulsar timing noise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, K.S.

    1987-10-01

    The Cheng, Ho, and Ruderman (1986) outer-magnetosphere gap model was used to investigate the stability of Crab-type outer magnetosphere gaps for pulsars having the parameter (Omega-square B) similar to that of the Crab pulsar. The Lamb, Pines, and Shaham (1978) fluctuating magnetosphere noise model was applied to the Crab pulsar to examine the type of the equation of state that best describes the structure of the neutron star. The noise model was also applied to other pulsars, and the theoretical results were compared with observational data. The results of the comparison are consistent with the stiff equation of state, as suggested by the vortex creep model of the neutron star interior. The timing-noise observations also contribute to the evidence for the existence of superfluid in the core of the neutron star. 37 references.

  14. Order and Symmetry Breaking in the Fluctuations of Driven Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tizón-Escamilla, N.; Pérez-Espigares, C.; Garrido, P. L.; Hurtado, P. I.

    2017-09-01

    Dynamical phase transitions (DPTs) in the space of trajectories are one of the most intriguing phenomena of nonequilibrium physics, but their nature in realistic high-dimensional systems remains puzzling. Here we observe for the first time a DPT in the current vector statistics of an archetypal two-dimensional (2D) driven diffusive system and characterize its properties using the macroscopic fluctuation theory. The complex interplay among the external field, anisotropy, and vector currents in 2D leads to a rich phase diagram, with different symmetry-broken fluctuation phases separated by lines of first- and second-order DPTs. Remarkably, different types of 1D order in the form of jammed density waves emerge to hinder transport for low-current fluctuations, revealing a connection between rare events and self-organized structures which enhance their probability.

  15. The origin of density fluctuations in the 'new inflationary universe'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, M. S.

    1983-01-01

    Cosmological mysteries which are not explained by the Big Bang hypothesis but may be approached by a revamped inflationary universe model are discussed. Attention is focused on the isotropy, the large-scale homogeneity, small-scale inhomogeneity, the oldness/flatness of the universe, and the baryon asymmetry. The universe is assumed to start in the lowest energy state, be initially dominated by false vacuum energy, enter a de Sitter phase, and then cross a barrier which is followed by the formation of fluctuation regions that lead to structure. The scalar fields (perturbation regions) experience quantum fluctuations which produce spontaneous symmetry breaking on a large scale. The scalar field value would need to be much greater than the expansion rate during the de Sitter epoch. A supersymmetric (flat) potential which satisfies the requirement, yields fluctuations of the right magnitude, and allows inflation to occur is described.

  16. Cosmophysical Factors in the Fluctuation Amplitude Spectrum of Brownian Motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaminsky A. V.

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Phenomenon of the regular variability of the fine structure of the fluctuation in the am- plitude distributions (shapes of related histograms for the case of Brownian motion was investigated. We took an advantage of the dynamic light scattering method (DLS to get a stochastically fluctuated signal determined by Brownian motion. Shape of the histograms is most likely to vary, synchronous, in two proximally located independent cells containing Brownian particles. The synchronism persists in the cells distant at 2 m from each other, and positioned meridionally. With a parallel-wise positioning of the cells, high probability of the synchronous variation in the shape of the histograms by local time has been observed. This result meets the previous conclusion about the dependency of histogram shapes (“fluctuation amplitudes” of the spectra of stochastic processes upon rotation of the Earth.

  17. Fluctuation conductivity in Y-Ba-Cu-O films with artificially produced defects

    CERN Document Server

    Solovjov, A L

    2002-01-01

    The fluctuation-induced conductivity (paraconductivity) measured in YBa sub 2 Cu sub 3 O sub 7 sub - sub d (YBCO) films grown on 10 degree miscut SrTiO sub 3 (001) substrates is analyzed using various theoretical models describing weak fluctuations in high-Tc superconductors and considering both Aslamazov-Larkin and Maki-Thompson fluctuation contributions in the clean limit approach. The analysis reveals a highly anisotropic pair-breaking caused by structural defects produced. This result is in favor of an idea that pseudogap in high-Tc oxides is mainly governed by the fluctuating pairing.

  18. Combining a Ru(II) "Building Block" and Rapid Screening Approach to Identify DNA Structure-Selective "Light Switch" Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachter, Erin; Moyá, Diego; Glazer, Edith C

    2017-02-13

    A chemically reactive Ru(II) "building block", able to undergo condensation reactions with substituted diamines, was utilized to create a small library of luminescent "light switch" dipyrido-[3,2-a:2',3'-c] phenazine (dppz) complexes. The impact of substituent identity, position, and the number of substituents on the light switch effect was investigated. An unbiased, parallel screening approach was used to evaluate the selectivity of the compounds for a variety of different biomolecules, including protein, nucleosides, single stranded DNA, duplex DNA, triplex DNA, and G-quadruplex DNA. Combining these two approaches allowed for the identification of hit molecules that showed different selectivities for biologically relevant DNA structures, particularly triplex and quadruplex DNA.

  19. Energy dependence of multiplicity fluctuations in heavy ion collisions at 20A to 158A GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Alt, C.; Baatar, B.; Barna, D.; Bartke, J.; Betev, L.; Bialkowska, Helena; Blume, Christoph; Boimska, B.; Botje, Michiel; Bracinik, J.; Bramm, R.; Buncic, P.; Cerny, V.; Christakoglou, P.; Chung, P.; Chvala, O.; Cramer, J.G.; Csato, P.; Dinkelaker, P.; Eckardt, V.; Flierl, D.; Fodor, Zoltan; Foka, P.; Friese, Volker; Gal, J.; Gazdzicki, Marek; Genchev, V.; Georgopoulos, G.; Gladysz, E.; Grebieszkow, K.; Hegyi, S.; Hohne, C.; Kadija, K.; Karev, A.; Kikola, D.; Kliemant, M.; Kniege, S.; Kolesnikov, V.I.; Kornas, E.; Korus, R.; Kowalski, M.; Kraus, I.; Kreps, M.; Laszlo, A.; Lacey, Roy A.; van Leeuwen, M.; Levai, P.; Litov, Leandar; Makariev, M.; Malakhov, A.I.; Mateev, M.; Melkumov, G.L.; Mischke, A.; Mitrovski, M.; Molnar, J.; Mrowczynski, St.; Nicolic, V.; Palla, G.; Panagiotou, Apostolos D.; Panayotov, D.; Peryt, W.; Pikna, M.; Pluta, J.; Prindle, D.; Puhlhofer, F.; Renfordt, R.; Roland, C.; Roland, Gunther; Rybczynski, M.; Rybicki, A.; Sandoval, Andres; Schmitz, Norbert; Schuster, T.; Seyboth, P.; Sikler, F.; Sitar, B.; Skrzypczak, E.; Slodkowski, M.; Stefanek, Grzegorz; Stock, R.; Strabel, C.; Strobele, H.; Susa, T.; Szentpetery, I.; Sziklai, J.; Szuba, M.; Szymanski, P.; Trubnikov, V.; Utvic, M.; Varga, D.; Vassiliou, M.; Veres, G.I.; Vesztergombi, G.; Vranic, D.; Wetzler, A.; Wlodarczyk, Z.; Wojtaszek, A.; Yoo, I.K.

    2008-01-01

    Multiplicity fluctuations of positively, negatively and all charged hadrons in the forward hemisphere were studied in central Pb+Pb collisions at 20A, 30A, 40A, 80A and 158A GeV. The multiplicity distributions and their scaled variances $\\omega$ are presented in dependence of collision energy as well as of rapidity and transverse momentum. The distributions have bell-like shape and their scaled variances are in the range from 0.8 to 1.2 without any significant structure in their energy dependence. No indication of the critical point fluctuations are observed. The string-hadronic model UrQMD significantly overpredicts the mean, but approximately reproduces the scaled variance of the multiplicity distributions. The predictions of the statistical hadron-resonance gas model obtained within the grand-canonical and canonical ensembles disagree with the measured scaled variances. The narrower than Poissonian multiplicity fluctuations measured in numerous cases may be explained by the impact of conservation laws on f...

  20. A framework for rapid post-earthquake assessment of bridges and restoration of transportation network functionality using structural health monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omenzetter, Piotr; Ramhormozian, Shahab; Mangabhai, Poonam; Singh, Ravikash; Orense, Rolando

    2013-04-01

    Quick and reliable assessment of the condition of bridges in a transportation network after an earthquake can greatly assist immediate post-disaster response and long-term recovery. However, experience shows that available resources, such as qualified inspectors and engineers, will typically be stretched for such tasks. Structural health monitoring (SHM) systems can therefore make a real difference in this context. SHM, however, needs to be deployed in a strategic manner and integrated into the overall disaster response plans and actions to maximize its benefits. This study presents, in its first part, a framework of how this can be achieved. Since it will not be feasible, or indeed necessary, to use SHM on every bridge, it is necessary to prioritize bridges within individual networks for SHM deployment. A methodology for such prioritization based on structural and geotechnical seismic risks affecting bridges and their importance within a network is proposed in the second part. An example using the methodology application to selected bridges in the medium-sized transportation network of Wellington, New Zealand is provided. The third part of the paper is concerned with using monitoring data for quick assessment of bridge condition and damage after an earthquake. Depending on the bridge risk profile, it is envisaged that data will be obtained from either local or national seismic monitoring arrays or SHM systems installed on bridges. A method using artificial neural networks is proposed for using data from a seismic array to infer key ground motion parameters at an arbitrary bridges site. The methodology is applied to seismic data collected in Christchurch, New Zealand. Finally, how such ground motion parameters can be used in bridge damage and condition assessment is outlined.

  1. Experimental triplet and quadruplet fluctuation densities and spatial distribution function integrals for liquid mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ploetz, Elizabeth A.; Smith, Paul E. [Department of Chemistry, Kansas State University, 213 CBC Building, Manhattan, Kansas 66506 (United States)

    2015-03-07

    Kirkwood-Buff or Fluctuation Solution Theory can be used to provide experimental pair fluctuations, and/or integrals over the pair distribution functions, from experimental thermodynamic data on liquid mixtures. Here, this type of approach is used to provide triplet and quadruplet fluctuations, and the corresponding integrals over the triplet and quadruplet distribution functions, in a purely thermodynamic manner that avoids the use of structure factors. The approach is then applied to binary mixtures of water + methanol and benzene + methanol over the full composition range under ambient conditions. The observed correlations between the different species vary significantly with composition. The magnitude of the fluctuations and integrals appears to increase as the number of the most polar molecule involved in the fluctuation or integral also increases. A simple physical picture of the fluctuations is provided to help rationalize some of these variations.

  2. Transverse Momentum Fluctuations in Nuclear Collisions at 158 AGeV

    CERN Document Server

    Anticic, T.; Barna, D.; Bartke, J.; Behler, M.; Betev, L.; Bialkowska, H.; Billmeier, A.; Blume, C.; Boimska, B.; Botje, M.; Bracinik, J.; Bramm, R.; Brun, R.; Buncic, P.; Cerny, V.; Christakoglou, P.; Chvala, O.; Cramer, J.G.; Csato, P.; Darmenov, N.; Dimitrov, A.; Dinkelaker, P.; Eckardt, V.; Filip, P.; Flierl, D.; Fodor, Z.; Foka, P.; Freund, P.; Friese, V.; Gal, J.; Gazdzicki, M.; Georgopoulos, G.; Gladysz, E.; Hegyi, S.; Hohne, C.; Kadija, K.; Karev, A.; Kolesnikov, V.I.; Kollegger, T.; Korus, R.; Kowalski, M.; Kraus, I.; Kreps, M.; van Leeuwen, M.; Levai, P.; Litov, L.; Makariev, M.; Malakhov, A.I.; Markert, C.; Mateev, M.; Mayes, B.W.; Melkumov, G.L.; Meurer, C.; Mischke, A.; Mitrovski, M.; Molnar, J.; Mrowczynski, S.; Palla, G.; Panagiotou, A.D.; Panayotov, D.; Perl, K.; Petridis, A.; Pikna, M.; Pinsky, Lawrence S.; Puhlhofer, F.; Reid, J.G.; Renfordt, R.; Retyk, W.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rybczynski, M.; Rybicki, A.; Sandoval, A.; Sann, H.; Schmitz, N.; Seyboth, P.; Sikler, F.; Sitar, B.; Skrzypczak, E.; Stefanek, G.; Stock, R.; Strobele, H.; Susa, T.; Szentpetery, I.; Sziklai, J.; Trainor, T.A.; Varga, D.; Vassiliou, M.; Veres, G.I.; Vesztergombi, G.; Vranic, D.; Wetzler, A.; Wlodarczyk, Z.; Yoo, I.K.; Zaranek, J.; Zimanyi, J.

    2004-01-01

    Results are presented on event-by-event fluctuations in transverse momentum of charged particles, produced at forward rapidities in p+p, C+C, Si+Si and Pb+Pb collisions at 158 AGeV. Three different characteristics are discussed: the average transverse momentum of the event, the Phi_pT fluctuation measure and two-particle transverse momentum correlations. In the kinematic region explored, the dynamical fluctuations are found to be small. However, a significant system size dependence of Phi_pT is observed, with the largest value measured in peripheral Pb+Pb interactions. The data are compared with predictions of several models.

  3. Pulsed Neutron Scattering Studies of Strongly Fluctuating solids, Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collin Broholm

    2006-06-22

    The conventional description of a solid is based on a static atomic structure with small amplitude so-called harmonic fluctuations about it. This is a final technical report for a project that has explored materials where fluctuations are sufficiently strong to severely challenge this approach and lead to unexpected and potentially useful materials properties. Fluctuations are enhanced when a large number of configurations share the same energy. We used pulsed spallation source neutron scattering to obtain detailed microscopic information about structure and fluctuations in such materials. The results enhance our understanding of strongly fluctuating solids and their potential for technical applications. Because new materials require new experimental techniques, the project has also developed new techniques for probing strongly fluctuating solids. Examples of material that were studied are ZrW2O8 with large amplitude molecular motion that leads to negative thermal expansion, NiGa2S4 where competing interactions lead to an anomalous short range ordered magnet, Pr1- xBixRu2O7 where a partially filled electron shell (Pr) in a weakly disordered environment produces anomalous metallic properties, and TbMnO3 where competing interactions lead to a magneto-electric phase. The experiments on TbMnO3 exemplify the relationship between research funded by this project and future applications. Magneto-electric materials may produce a magnetic field when an electric field is applied or vise versa. Our experiments have clarified the reason why electric and magnetic polarization is coupled in TbMnO3. While this knowledge does not render TbMnO3 useful for applications it will focus the search for a practical room temperature magneto-electric for applications.

  4. Pressure Fluctuations Induced by a Hypersonic Turbulent Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Lian; Choudhari, Meelan M.; Zhang, Chao

    2016-01-01

    Direct numerical simulations (DNS) are used to examine the pressure fluctuations generated by a spatially-developed Mach 5.86 turbulent boundary layer. The unsteady pressure field is analyzed at multiple wall-normal locations, including those at the wall, within the boundary layer (including inner layer, the log layer, and the outer layer), and in the free stream. The statistical and structural variations of pressure fluctuations as a function of wall-normal distance are highlighted. Computational predictions for mean velocity pro les and surface pressure spectrum are in good agreement with experimental measurements, providing a first ever comparison of this type at hypersonic Mach numbers. The simulation shows that the dominant frequency of boundary-layer-induced pressure fluctuations shifts to lower frequencies as the location of interest moves away from the wall. The pressure wave propagates with a speed nearly equal to the local mean velocity within the boundary layer (except in the immediate vicinity of the wall) while the propagation speed deviates from the Taylor's hypothesis in the free stream. Compared with the surface pressure fluctuations, which are primarily vortical, the acoustic pressure fluctuations in the free stream exhibit a significantly lower dominant frequency, a greater spatial extent, and a smaller bulk propagation speed. The freestream pressure structures are found to have similar Lagrangian time and spatial scales as the acoustic sources near the wall. As the Mach number increases, the freestream acoustic fluctuations exhibit increased radiation intensity, enhanced energy content at high frequencies, shallower orientation of wave fronts with respect to the flow direction, and larger propagation velocity.

  5. Rapid development of entity-based data models for bioinformatics with persistence object-oriented design and structured interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezra Tsur, Elishai

    2017-01-01

    Databases are imperative for research in bioinformatics and computational biology. Current challenges in database design include data heterogeneity and context-dependent interconnections between data entities. These challenges drove the development of unified data interfaces and specialized databases. The curation of specialized databases is an ever-growing challenge due to the introduction of new data sources and the emergence of new relational connections between established datasets. Here, an open-source framework for the curation of specialized databases is proposed. The framework supports user-designed models of data encapsulation, objects persistency and structured interfaces to local and external data sources such as MalaCards, Biomodels and the National Centre for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) databases. The proposed framework was implemented using Java as the development environment, EclipseLink as the data persistency agent and Apache Derby as the database manager. Syntactic analysis was based on J3D, jsoup, Apache Commons and w3c.dom open libraries. Finally, a construction of a specialized database for aneurysms associated vascular diseases is demonstrated. This database contains 3-dimensional geometries of aneurysms, patient's clinical information, articles, biological models, related diseases and our recently published model of aneurysms' risk of rapture. Framework is available in: http://nbel-lab.com.

  6. Bedrock geology of snyderville basin: Structural geology techniques applied to understanding the hydrogeology of a rapidly developing region, Summit County, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keighley, K.E.; Yonkee, W.A.; Ashland, F.X.; Evans, J.P.

    1997-01-01

    limbs with a fold axis that plunges to the northeast. The fold is cut by several faults including the Toll Canyon fault, which we interpret as a west-directed folded hanging-wall splay off the east-directed Mt. Raymond thrust. These complex geometries may be due to at least two phases of deformation. Results from outcrop analyses show that the fractured bedrock aquifers are lithologically heterogeneous, anisotropic, and compartmentalized. Two exposures of the Toll Canyon fault show that even though the fault cores may be thin, extensive damage zones develop in the Nugget Sandstone and Thaynes Limestone, and shale smears form in the Triassic shales. The damaged zones may be regions of enhanced fracture permeability, whereas the shale smears act as flow barriers. The orientation, density, and hydrogeologic characteristics for predominate fracture sets vary within meters. In the Summit Park area, chronic water shortages required new wells to be sited in the northeast-plunging Summit Park anticline. The anticline experienced two phases of folding and at least one episode of faulting. Structural analysis of the fold defined the geometry of the structure, and a down plunge projection along the fold hinge was used to estimate the location of the Nugget Sandstone at a depth of 700 ft (213 m). The crestal region of the anticline was drilled in order to intercept regions of higher fracture density in the fold. The test well penetrated the Nugget Sandstone at 698 ft depth, and two production wells with long-term yields of 120 and 180 gpm completed. One well in the Sliderock Member (Twin Creek Formation) experiences seasonal fluctuations whereas production in the Nugget sandstone has only subdued seasonal variations, suggesting the Nugget may have great storage. Complex structures work against the typical basin yield approach for water budgets, therefore, water supply estimates may benefit from detailed studies within local areas. The results of this study demonstrate how tradition

  7. Effect of bone-borne rapid maxillary expanders with and without surgical assistance on the craniofacial structures using finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seong Cheon; Park, Jae Hyun; Bayome, Mohamed; Kim, Ki Beom; Araujo, Eustaquio A; Kook, Yoon-Ah

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze stress distribution and displacement of the craniofacial structures resulting from bone-borne rapid maxillary expanders with and without surgical assistance using finite element analysis. Five designs of rapid maxillary expanders were made: a tooth-borne hyrax expander (type A); a bone-borne expander (type B); and 3 bone-borne surgically assisted modalities: separation of the midpalatal suture (type C), added separation of the pterygomaxillary sutures (type D), and added LeFort I corticotomy (type E). The geometric nonlinear theory was applied to evaluate the Von Mises stress distribution and displacement. The surgical types C, D, and E demonstrated more transverse movement than did the nonsurgical types A and B. The amounts of expansion were greater in the posterior teeth in types A and B, but in types C, D, and E, the amounts of expansion were greater in the anterior teeth. At the midpalatal suture, the nonsurgical types showed more anterior expansion than did the posterior region, and higher stresses than with the surgical types. Type B showed the highest stresses at the infraorbital margin, anterior and posterior nasal spines, maxillary tuberosity, and pterygoid plate and hamulus. The 3 surgical models showed similar amounts of stress and displacement along the teeth, midpalatal sutures, and craniofacial sutures. Therefore, when using a bone-borne rapid maxillary expander in an adult, it is recommended to assist it with midpalatal suture separation, which requires minimal surgical intervention. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Fluctuations in plasma oestradiol levels in normal men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kicóvíc, P M; Luisi, M; Cortés-Prieto, J; Franchi, F

    1980-01-01

    Plasma levels of oestradiol were measured in blood samples obtained from 6 normal men every 12 minutes for two 4-hour periods: between 08.00 and 12.00h and between 18.00 and 22.00h. Circulating oestradiol was measured by radioimmunoassay after chromatographic separation on microcolumns of Sephadex LH-20. Mean values of oestradiol concentrations and coefficients of variation for two 4-hour periods were calculated for each subject and for the whole group. Data were statistically evaluated by means of the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Rapid fluctuations in plasma oestradiol levels were observed in all subjects. The pattern of the fluctuations was found to be irregular and different in each subject. The mean concentration and coefficient of variation were significantly (p less than 0.05) higher in the morning, suggesting the possibility of a circadian rhythm in the secretion of oestradiol in men.

  9. Effects of Rapid Thermal Annealing on the Structural, Electrical, and Optical Properties of Zr-Doped ZnO Thin Films Grown by Atomic Layer Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingjin Wu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The 4 at. % zirconium-doped zinc oxide (ZnO:Zr films grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD were annealed at various temperatures ranging from 350 to 950 °C. The structural, electrical, and optical properties of rapid thermal annealing (RTA treated ZnO:Zr films have been evaluated to find out the stability limit. It was found that the grain size increased at 350 °C and decreased between 350 and 850 °C, while creeping up again at 850 °C. UV–vis characterization shows that the optical band gap shifts towards larger wavelengths. The Hall measurement shows that the resistivity almost keeps constant at low annealing temperatures, and increases rapidly after treatment at 750 °C due to the effect of both the carrier concentration and the Hall mobility. The best annealing temperature is found in the range of 350–550 °C. The ZnO:Zr film-coated glass substrates show good optical and electrical performance up to 550 °C during superstrate thin film solar cell deposition.

  10. Bet Hedging against Demographic Fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, BingKan; Leibler, Stanislas

    2017-09-01

    Biological organisms have to cope with stochastic variations in both the external environment and the internal population dynamics. Theoretical studies and laboratory experiments suggest that population diversification could be an effective bet-hedging strategy for adaptation to varying environments. Here we show that bet hedging can also be effective against demographic fluctuations that pose a trade-off between growth and survival for populations even in a constant environment. A species can maximize its overall abundance in the long term by diversifying into coexisting subpopulations of both "fast-growing" and "better-surviving" individuals. Our model generalizes statistical physics models of birth-death processes to incorporate dispersal, during which new populations are founded, and can further incorporate variations of local environments. In this way, we unify different bet-hedging strategies against demographic and environmental variations as a general means of adaptation to both types of uncertainties in population growth.

  11. Fluctuating hydrodynamics, current fluctuations, and hyperuniformity in boundary-driven open quantum chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carollo, Federico; Garrahan, Juan P.; Lesanovsky, Igor; Pérez-Espigares, Carlos

    2017-11-01

    We consider a class of either fermionic or bosonic noninteracting open quantum chains driven by dissipative interactions at the boundaries and study the interplay of coherent transport and dissipative processes, such as bulk dephasing and diffusion. Starting from the microscopic formulation, we show that the dynamics on large scales can be described in terms of fluctuating hydrodynamics. This is an important simplification as it allows us to apply the methods of macroscopic fluctuation theory to compute the large deviation (LD) statistics of time-integrated currents. In particular, this permits us to show that fermionic open chains display a third-order dynamical phase transition in LD functions. We show that this transition is manifested in a singular change in the structure of trajectories: while typical trajectories are diffusive, rare trajectories associated with atypical currents are ballistic and hyperuniform in their spatial structure. We confirm these results by numerically simulating ensembles of rare trajectories via the cloning method, and by exact numerical diagonalization of the microscopic quantum generator.

  12. Fluctuations within folded proteins: implications for thermodynamic and allosteric regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuBay, Kateri H; Bowman, Gregory R; Geissler, Phillip L

    2015-04-21

    Folded protein structures are both stable and dynamic. Historically, our clearest window into these structures came from X-ray crystallography, which generally provided a static image of each protein's singular "folded state", highlighting its stability. Deviations away from that crystallographic structure were difficult to quantify, and as a result, their potential functional consequences were often neglected. However, several dynamical and statistical studies now highlight the structural variability that is present within the protein's folded state. Here we review mounting evidence of the importance of these structural rearrangements; both experiment and computation indicate that folded proteins undergo substantial fluctuations that can greatly influence their function. Crucially, recent studies have shown that structural elements of proteins, especially their side-chain degrees of freedom, fluctuate in ways that generate significant conformational heterogeneity. The entropy associated with these motions contributes to the folded structure's thermodynamic stability. In addition, since these fluctuations can shift in response to perturbations such as ligand binding, they may play an important role in the protein's capacity to respond to environmental cues. In one compelling example, the entropy associated with side-chain fluctuations contributes significantly to regulating the binding of calmodulin to a set of peptide ligands. The neglect of fluctuations within proteins' native states was often justified by the dense packing within folded proteins, which has inspired comparisons with crystalline solids. Many liquids, however, can achieve similarly dense packing yet fluidity is maintained through correlated molecular motions. Indeed, the studies we discuss favor comparison of folded proteins not with solids but instead with dense liquids, where the internal side chain fluidity is facilitated by collective motions that are correlated over long distances. These

  13. Glacial greenhouse-gas fluctuations controlled by ocean circulation changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmittner, Andreas; Galbraith, Eric D

    2008-11-20

    Earth's climate and the concentrations of the atmospheric greenhouse gases carbon dioxide (CO(2)) and nitrous oxide (N(2)O) varied strongly on millennial timescales during past glacial periods. Large and rapid warming events in Greenland and the North Atlantic were followed by more gradual cooling, and are highly correlated with fluctuations of N(2)O as recorded in ice cores. Antarctic temperature variations, on the other hand, were smaller and more gradual, showed warming during the Greenland cold phase and cooling while the North Atlantic was warm, and were highly correlated with fluctuations in CO(2). Abrupt changes in the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) have often been invoked to explain the physical characteristics of these Dansgaard-Oeschger climate oscillations, but the mechanisms for the greenhouse-gas variations and their linkage to the AMOC have remained unclear. Here we present simulations with a coupled model of glacial climate and biogeochemical cycles, forced only with changes in the AMOC. The model simultaneously reproduces characteristic features of the Dansgaard-Oeschger temperature, as well as CO(2) and N(2)O fluctuations. Despite significant changes in the land carbon inventory, CO(2) variations on millennial timescales are dominated by slow changes in the deep ocean inventory of biologically sequestered carbon and are correlated with Antarctic temperature and Southern Ocean stratification. In contrast, N(2)O co-varies more rapidly with Greenland temperatures owing to fast adjustments of the thermocline oxygen budget. These results suggest that ocean circulation changes were the primary mechanism that drove glacial CO(2) and N(2)O fluctuations on millennial timescales.

  14. Fluctuations in strongly coupled cosmologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonometto, Silvio A. [Department of Physics, Astronomy Unit, Trieste University, Via Tiepolo 11, I 34143 Trieste (Italy); Mainini, Roberto, E-mail: bonometto@oats.inaf.it, E-mail: mainini@mib.infn.it [Department of Physics G. Occhialini, Milano-Bicocca University, Piazza della Scienza 3, I 20126 Milano (Italy)

    2014-03-01

    In the early Universe, a dual component made of coupled CDM and a scalar field Φ, if their coupling β > (3){sup 1/2}/2, owns an attractor solution, making them a stationary fraction of cosmic energy during the radiation dominated era. Along the attractor, both such components expand ∝a{sup −4} and have early density parameters Ω{sub d} = 1/(4β{sup 2}) and Ω{sub c} = 2 Ω{sub d} (field and CDM, respectively). In a previous paper it was shown that, if a further component, expanding ∝a{sup −3}, breaks such stationary expansion at z ∼ 3–5 × 10{sup 3}, cosmic components gradually acquire densities consistent with observations. This paper, first of all, considers the case that this component is warm. However, its main topic is the analysis of fluctuation evolution: out of horizon modes are then determined; their entry into horizon is numerically evaluated as well as the dependence of Meszaros effect on the coupling β; finally, we compute: (i) transfer function and linear spectral function; (ii) CMB C{sub l} spectra. Both are close to standard ΛCDM models; in particular, the former one can be so down to a scale smaller than Milky Way, in spite of its main DM component being made of particles of mass < 1 keV. The previously coupled CDM component, whose present density parameter is O(10{sup −3}), exhibits wider fluctuations δρ/ρ, but approximately β-independent δρ values. We discuss how lower scale features of these cosmologies might ease quite a few problems that ΛCDM does not easily solve.

  15. Hydrodynamic conditions on the slope apron of a rapid hydraulic structure (RHS) and within the influence of it - an example from the Czarny Dunajec River, Polish Carpathians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plesiński, Karol; Radecki-Pawlik, Artur

    2013-04-01

    The paper focuses on understanding some basic hydrodynamic conditions along a regulated river engineered with rapid hydraulic structures (RHS) - the modern hydraulic structure used in river engineering works, to reduce slope of the river bed, stabilize it and reducing river channel bed erosion, at the same time structures being friendly to river environment, allowing fish and invertebrate to migrate and built according the expectations of River Framework Directive EU. The measurements were performed upstream and downstream of RHS within the influence of the structure as well as on the slope apron of the structure where the artificial roughness is created by fixing along all the apron very coarse gravel and small boulders to make the RHS similar to natural rapids in a gravel river. It the field, we measured water depth h, average velocity Va, maximum velocity Vm for different discharges, near bed velocities and all geometry of the RHS. The value of these parameters were used to calculate the shear velocity V*, shear stresses ?, Reynolds number and Froude number. Using our results, we observed that there is a greater range of the values of hydrodynamic parameters downstream of the RHS, where braids and small channels are formed, although this section of a river was engineered. The values of velocities were varied here as follows: Va = 0.194 - 2.210 m s-1 for a high water level and Va = 0.104 - 1.720 m s-1 for a low water level. Consequently, the values of shear stresses were varied here between ? = 0.106 - 4.720 N m-2and ? = 0.013 - 6.084 N m-2 respectively for a high and a low water level. Then, upstream of the RHS, the values of these parameters were comparable. The values of velocities were here as follows: Va = 0.264 - 0.590 m s-1 for a high water level and Va = 0.066 - 0.346 m s-1 for a low water level. And, the values of shear stresses were noticed here as: ? = 0.067 - 0.660 N m-2 and ? = 0.009 - 0.269 N m-2 respectively for high and low water level. Downstream

  16. Homogenous Population Genetic Structure of the Non-Native Raccoon Dog (Nyctereutes procyonoides in Europe as a Result of Rapid Population Expansion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Drygala

    Full Text Available The extent of gene flow during the range expansion of non-native species influences the amount of genetic diversity retained in expanding populations. Here, we analyse the population genetic structure of the raccoon dog (Nyctereutes procyonoides in north-eastern and central Europe. This invasive species is of management concern because it is highly susceptible to fox rabies and an important secondary host of the virus. We hypothesized that the large number of introduced animals and the species' dispersal capabilities led to high population connectivity and maintenance of genetic diversity throughout the invaded range. We genotyped 332 tissue samples from seven European countries using 16 microsatellite loci. Different algorithms identified three genetic clusters corresponding to Finland, Denmark and a large 'central' population that reached from introduction areas in western Russia to northern Germany. Cluster assignments provided evidence of long-distance dispersal. The results of an Approximate Bayesian Computation analysis supported a scenario of equal effective population sizes among different pre-defined populations in the large central cluster. Our results are in line with strong gene flow and secondary admixture between neighbouring demes leading to reduced genetic structuring, probably a result of its fairly rapid population expansion after introduction. The results presented here are remarkable in the sense that we identified a homogenous genetic cluster inhabiting an area stretching over more than 1500km. They are also relevant for disease management, as in the event of a significant rabies outbreak, there is a great risk of a rapid virus spread among raccoon dog populations.

  17. Propagation of radio frequency waves through density fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valvis, S. I.; Papagiannis, P.; Papadopoulos, A.; Hizanidis, K.; Glytsis, E.; Bairaktaris, F.; Zisis, A.; Tigelis, I.; Ram, A. K.

    2017-10-01

    On their way to the core of a tokamak plasma, radio frequency (RF) waves, excited in the vacuum region, have to propagate through a variety of density fluctuations in the edge region. These fluctuations include coherent structures, like blobs that can be field aligned or not, as well as turbulent and filamentary structures. We have been studying the effect of fluctuations on RF propagation using both theoretical (analytical) and computational models. The theoretical results are being compared with those obtained by two different numerical codes ``a Finite Difference Frequency Domain code and the commercial COMSOL package. For plasmas with arbitrary distribution of coherent and turbulent fluctuations, we have formulated an effective dielectric permittivity of the edge plasma. This permittivity tensor is then used in numerical simulations to study the effect of multi-scale turbulence on RF waves. We not only consider plane waves but also Gaussian beams in the electron cyclotron and lower hybrid range of frequencies. The analytical theory and results from simulations on the propagation of RF waves will be presented. Supported in part by the Hellenic National Programme on Controlled Thermonuclear Fusion associated with the EUROfusion Consortium and by DoE Grant DE-FG02-91ER-54109.

  18. Wind fluctuations over the North Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vincent, Claire Louise; Pinson, Pierre; Giebel, Gregor

    2011-01-01

    Climatological patterns in wind speed fluctuations with periods of 1 min to 10 h are analysed using data from a meteorological mast in the Danish North Sea. Fluctuations on these time scales are of particular relevance to the effective management of the power supply from large wind farms. The Hil......Climatological patterns in wind speed fluctuations with periods of 1 min to 10 h are analysed using data from a meteorological mast in the Danish North Sea. Fluctuations on these time scales are of particular relevance to the effective management of the power supply from large wind farms...

  19. General framework for fluctuating dynamic density functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durán-Olivencia, Miguel A.; Yatsyshin, Peter; Goddard, Benjamin D.; Kalliadasis, Serafim

    2017-12-01

    We introduce a versatile bottom-up derivation of a formal theoretical framework to describe (passive) soft-matter systems out of equilibrium subject to fluctuations. We provide a unique connection between the constituent-particle dynamics of real systems and the time evolution equation of their measurable (coarse-grained) quantities, such as local density and velocity. The starting point is the full Hamiltonian description of a system of colloidal particles immersed in a fluid of identical bath particles. Then, we average out the bath via Zwanzig’s projection-operator techniques and obtain the stochastic Langevin equations governing the colloidal-particle dynamics. Introducing the appropriate definition of the local number and momentum density fields yields a generalisation of the Dean–Kawasaki (DK) model, which resembles the stochastic Navier–Stokes description of a fluid. Nevertheless, the DK equation still contains all the microscopic information and, for that reason, does not represent the dynamical law of observable quantities. We address this controversial feature of the DK description by carrying out a nonequilibrium ensemble average. Adopting a natural decomposition into local-equilibrium and nonequilibrium contribution, where the former is related to a generalised version of the canonical distribution, we finally obtain the fluctuating-hydrodynamic equation governing the time-evolution of the mesoscopic density and momentum fields. Along the way, we outline the connection between the ad hoc energy functional introduced in previous DK derivations and the free-energy functional from classical density-functional theory. The resultant equation has the structure of a dynamical density-functional theory (DDFT) with an additional fluctuating force coming from the random interactions with the bath. We show that our fluctuating DDFT formalism corresponds to a particular version of the fluctuating Navier–Stokes equations, originally derived by Landau and

  20. ZnO nanorod arrays prepared by chemical bath deposition combined with rapid thermal annealing: structural, photoluminescence and field emission characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hung-Wei; Yang, Hsi-Wen; He, Hsin-Min; Lee, Yi-Mu

    2016-01-01

    ZnO nanorod arrays were prepared by low temperature chemical bath deposition (CBD) combined with rapid thermal annealing (RTA) under different ambient conditions. The structure and morphology of the synthesized ZnO have been characterized by field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and x-ray diffraction (XRD). The obtained ZnO samples are highly crystalline with a hexagonal wurtzite phase and also display well-aligned array structure. A pronounced effect on increased nanorod length was found for the RTA-treated ZnO as compared to the as-grown ZnO. Analysis of XRD indicates that the (0 0 2) feature peak of the as-grown ZnO was shifted towards a lower angle as compared to the peaks of RTA-treated ZnO samples due to the reduction of tensile strain along the c-axis by RTA. Photoluminescence (PL) studies reveal that the ZnO nanorod arrays receiving RTA in an O2 environment have the sharpest UV emission band and greatest intensity ratio of near band-edge emission (NBE) to deep level emission (DLE). Additionally, the effects of RTA on the field emission properties were evaluated. The results demonstrate that RTA an O2 environment can lower the turn-on field and improve the field enhancement factor. The stability of the field emission current was also tested for 4 h.

  1. Rapid response manufacturing (RRM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cain, W.D. [Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Waddell, W.L. [National Centers for Manufacturing Sciences, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    1997-02-18

    US industry is fighting to maintain its competitive edge in the global market place. Today markets fluctuate rapidly. Companies, to survive, have to be able to respond with quick-to-market, improved, high quality, cost efficient products. The way products are developed and brought to market can be improved and made more efficient through the proper incorporation of emerging technologies. The RRM project was established to leverage the expertise and resources of US private industries and federal agencies to develop, integrate, and deploy new technologies that meet critical needs for effective product realization. The RRM program addressed a needed change in the US Manufacturing infrastructure that will ensure US competitiveness in world market typified by mass customization. This project provided the effort needed to define, develop and establish a customizable infrastructure for rapid response product development design and manufacturing. A major project achievement was the development of a broad-based framework for automating and integrating the product and process design and manufacturing activities involved with machined parts. This was accomplished by coordinating and extending the application of feature-based product modeling, knowledge-based systems, integrated data management, and direct manufacturing technologies in a cooperative integrated computing environment. Key technological advancements include a product model that integrates product and process data in a consistent, minimally redundant manner, an advanced computer-aided engineering environment, knowledge-based software aids for design and process planning, and new production technologies to make products directly from design application software.

  2. Rapid profiling and structural characterization of bioactive compounds and their distribution in different parts of Berberis petiolaris Wall. ex G. Don applying hyphenated mass spectrometric techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, A; Bajpai, V; Srivastava, M; Arya, K R; Kumar, B

    2014-10-15

    Berberis petiolaris Wall. is a lesser known medicinal plant, belonging to the family Berberidaceae. The genus Berberis is known for many biological activities such as anti-microbial, anti-inflammatory and anti-diarrheal, etc. There are not many reports of the isolation of components from Berberis petiolaris. This study aims to seek identification, characterization and quantification of components. A method was developed for rapid screening of phytochemicals using high-pressure liquid chromatography hyphenated with quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (HPLC/ESI-QTOF-MS/MS). Suitable collision-induced dissociation mass spectrometry (CID-MS/MS) methods were developed for structural investigation of alkaloids, flavanoids and other classes of compounds using nine reference standards for authentication. Multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) methods were developed for quantitative study of five constituents using triple quadrupole-linear ion trap mass spectrometry (UPLC/QqLIT-MS/MS). On the basis of HPLC retention behavior and fragmentation pathways obtained by high-resolution MS and MS/MS, 32 compounds were identified and characterized in different parts of Berberis petiolaris. Quantitative studies of chlorogenic acid, magnoflorine, jatrorrhizine, palmatine and berberine were also completed successfully. Rapid and accurate HPLC/ESI-QTOF-MS/MS and UPLC/ESI-QqLIT-MS/MS methods were established for identification, characterization and quantification of phytochemicals in the ethanolic extract of Berberis petiolaris. These methods, therefore, can be used for studies on phytochemical variation in different parts of the plant. Principle components analysis (PCA) may be used for plant part discrimination. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Optofluidics-based DNA structure-competitive aptasensor for rapid on-site detection of lead(II) in an aquatic environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Feng; Zhu, Anna; Wang, Hongchen

    2014-11-07

    Lead ions (Pb(2+)), ubiquitous and one of the most toxic metallic pollutants, have attracted increasing attentions because of their various neurotoxic effects. Pb(2+) has been proven to induce a conformational change in G-quadruplex (G4) aptamers to form a stabilizing G4/Pb(2+) complex. Based on this principle, an innovative optofluidics-based DNA structure-competitive aptasensor was developed for Pb(2+) detection in an actual aquatic environment. The proposed sensing system has good characteristics, such as high sensitivity and selectivity, reusability, easy operation, rapidity, robustness, portability, use of a small sample volume, and cost effectiveness. A fluorescence-labeled G4 aptamer was utilized as a molecular probe. A DNA probe, a complementary strand of G4 aptamer, was immobilized onto the sensor surface. When the mixture of Pb(2+) solution and G4 aptamer was introduced into the optofluidic cell, Pb(2+) and the DNA probe bound competitively with the G4 aptamer. A high Pb(2+) concentration reduced the binding of the aptamer and the DNA probe; thus, a low-fluorescence signal was detected. A sensitive sensing response to Pb(2+) in the range of 1.0-300.0 nM with a low detection limit of 0.22 nM was exhibited under optimal conditions. The potential interference of the environmental sample matrix was assessed with spiked samples, and the recovery of Pb(2+) ranged from 80 to 105% with a relative standard deviation value of <8.5%. These observations clearly illustrate that with the use of different DNA or aptamer probes, the sensing strategy presented can be easily extended to the rapid on-site monitoring of other trace analytes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Fluctuations in Urban Traffic Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Dong; Li, Li; Zhang, Yi; Hu, Jian-Ming; Jin, Xue-Xiang

    Urban traffic network is a typical complex system, in which movements of tremendous microscopic traffic participants (pedestrians, bicyclists and vehicles) form complicated spatial and temporal dynamics. We collected flow volumes data on the time-dependent activity of a typical urban traffic network, finding that the coupling between the average flux and the fluctuation on individual links obeys a certain scaling law, with a wide variety of scaling exponents between 1/2 and 1. These scaling phenomena can explain the interaction between the nodes' internal dynamics (i.e. queuing at intersections, car-following in driving) and changes in the external (network-wide) traffic demand (i.e. the every day increase of traffic amount during peak hours and shocking caused by traffic accidents), allowing us to further understand the mechanisms governing the transportation system's collective behavior. Multiscaling and hotspot features are observed in the traffic flow data as well. But the reason why the separated internal dynamics are comparable to the external dynamics in magnitude is still unclear and needs further investigations.

  5. Wave Beam Propagation Through Density Fluctuations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balakin, A. A.; Bertelli, N.; Westerhof, E.

    2011-01-01

    Perturbations induced by edge density fluctuations on electron cyclotron wave beams propagating in fusion plasmas are studied by means of a quasi-optical code. The effects of such fluctuations are illustrated here by showing the beam propagation in the case of single harmonic perturbations to the

  6. temperature fluctuation inside inert atmosphere silos

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This research was conducted to study temperature fluctuation inside the inert atmosphere silos loaded with wheat, compare the temperature fluctuation across the top, middle and bottom part of the silo in relation to the ambient temperature. Temperature readings of the ambient and at the top, middle and bottom part of the ...

  7. Nonconformal Fluctuations in Radiation Dominated Anisotropic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tribpo

    the non-conformal quantum fluctuations (of expansion and shear) and axisymmetric singularity case in radiation dominated anisotropic cosmology. We show that near the classical singularity the quantum fluctuations tend to diverge. Key words. Quantum Cosmology—Anisotropic universes. 1. Introduction. It has been ...

  8. Pairing fluctuations in trapped Fermi gases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Georg Morten; Minguzzi, Anna; Rosario, F.

    2004-01-01

    A0530F- Fermion-systems-and-electron-gas-quantum-statistical-mechanics; A0540-Fluctuation-phenomena-random-processes-and-Brownian-motion......A0530F- Fermion-systems-and-electron-gas-quantum-statistical-mechanics; A0540-Fluctuation-phenomena-random-processes-and-Brownian-motion...

  9. A data set of worldwide glacier fluctuations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leclercq, P.W.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/339579951; Oerlemans, J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/06833656X; Basagic, H.J.; Bushueva, I.; Cook, A.J.; Le Bris, R.

    2014-01-01

    Glacier fluctuations contribute to variations in sea level and historical glacier length fluctuations are natural indicators of past climate change. To study these subjects, longterm information of glacier change is needed. In this paper we present a data set of global long-term glacier length

  10. The Spectrum of Wind Power Fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandi, Mahesh

    2016-11-01

    Wind is a variable energy source whose fluctuations threaten electrical grid stability and complicate dynamical load balancing. The power generated by a wind turbine fluctuates due to the variable wind speed that blows past the turbine. Indeed, the spectrum of wind power fluctuations is widely believed to reflect the Kolmogorov spectrum; both vary with frequency f as f - 5 / 3. This variability decreases when aggregate power fluctuations from geographically distributed wind farms are averaged at the grid via a mechanism known as geographic smoothing. Neither the f - 5 / 3 wind power fluctuation spectrum nor the mechanism of geographic smoothing are understood. In this work, we explain the wind power fluctuation spectrum from the turbine through grid scales. The f - 5 / 3 wind power fluctuation spectrum results from the largest length scales of atmospheric turbulence of order 200 km influencing the small scales where individual turbines operate. This long-range influence spatially couples geographically distributed wind farms and synchronizes farm outputs over a range of frequencies and decreases with increasing inter-farm distance. Consequently, aggregate grid-scale power fluctuations remain correlated, and are smoothed until they reach a limiting f - 7 / 3 spectrum. This work was funded by the Collective Interactions Unit, OIST Graduate University, Japan.

  11. Computer simulations of phospholipid - membrane thermodynamic fluctuations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, U.R.; Peters, Günther H.j.; Schröder, T.B.

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports all-atom computer simulations of five phospholipid membranes, DMPC, DPPC, DMPG, DMPS, and DMPSH, with a focus on the thermal equilibrium fluctuations of volume, energy, area, thickness, and order parameter. For the slow fluctuations at constant temperature and pressure (defined...

  12. Response of Fusarium solani to Fluctuating Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith F. Jensen; Phillip E. Reynolds; Phillip E. Reynolds

    1971-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure growth under a range of constant temperatures and under a series of fluctuating temperature regimes, and to determine if growth in the fluctuating temperiture regimes could be predicted satisfactorily from the growth data collected in the constant temperature experiments. Growth was measured on both agar and liquid culture to...

  13. Seasonal fluctuations in photochemical efficiency of Symbiodinium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A. formosa and P. verucosa responded significantly to seasonal fluctuation in both solar radiation and sea surface temperature by regulating their Symbiodinium cells densities and photochemical efficiencies except P. cylindrica. However, such seasonal fluctuations in these environmental parameters are not accompanied ...

  14. Introduction to multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis in matlab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihlen, Espen A F

    2012-01-01

    Fractal structures are found in biomedical time series from a wide range of physiological phenomena. The multifractal spectrum identifies the deviations in fractal structure within time periods with large and small fluctuations. The present tutorial is an introduction to multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis (MFDFA) that estimates the multifractal spectrum of biomedical time series. The tutorial presents MFDFA step-by-step in an interactive Matlab session. All Matlab tools needed are available in Introduction to MFDFA folder at the website www.ntnu.edu/inm/geri/software. MFDFA are introduced in Matlab code boxes where the reader can employ pieces of, or the entire MFDFA to example time series. After introducing MFDFA, the tutorial discusses the best practice of MFDFA in biomedical signal processing. The main aim of the tutorial is to give the reader a simple self-sustained guide to the implementation of MFDFA and interpretation of the resulting multifractal spectra.

  15. Multiplicity Distributions and Charged-neutral Fluctuations

    CERN Document Server

    Nayak, Tapan K.; Agnihotri, A.; Ahammed, Z.; Angelis, A.L.S.; Antonenko, V.; Arefev, V.; Astakhov, V.; Avdeitchikov, V.; Awes, T.C.; Baba, P.V.K.S.; Badyal, S.K.; Baldine, A.; Barabach, L.; Barlag, C.; Bathe, S.; Batiounia, B.; Bernier, T.; Bhalla, K.B.; Bhatia, V.S.; Blume, C.; Bock, R.; Bohne, E.M.; Bucher, D.; Buijs, A.; Buis, E.J.; Busching, H.; Carlen, L.; Chalyshev, V.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chenawi, K.E.; Cherbatchev, R.; Chujo, T.; Claussen, A.; Das, A.C.; Decowski, M.P.; Djordjadze, V.; Donni, P.; Doubovik, I.; Dubey, A.K.; Dutta Majumda, M.R.; Eliseev, S.; Enosawa, K.; Feldmann, H.; Foka, P.; Fokin, S.; Frolov, V.; Ganti, M.S.; Garpman, S.; Gavrishchuk, O.; Geurts, F.J.M.; Ghosh, T.K.; Glasow, R.; Gupta, S.K.; Guskov, B.; Gustafsson, H.A.; Gutbrod, H.H.; Higuchi, R.; Hrivnacova, I.; Ippolitov, M.; Kalechofsky, H.; Kamermans, R.; Kampert, K.H.; Karadjev, K.; Karpio, K.; Kato, S.; Kees, S.; Kim, H.; Kolb, B.W.; Kosarev, I.; Koutcheryaev, I.; Kugler, A.; Kulinich, P.; Kumar, V.; Kurata, M.; Kurita, K.; Kuzmin, N.; Langbein, I.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, Y.Y.; Lohner, H.; Mahapatra, D.P.; Manko, V.; Martin, M.; Maximov, A.; Mehdiyev, Rashid R.; Mgebrichvili, G.; Miake, Y.; Mikhalev, D.; Mishra, G.C.; Miyamoto, Y.; Mohanty, B.; Morrison, Douglas R.O.; Mukhopadhyay, D.S.; Myalkovski, V.; Naef, H.; Nandi, B.K.; Nayak, S.K.; Nayak, T.K.; Neumaier, S.; Nianine, A.; Nikitine, V.; Nikolaev, S.; Nishimura, S.; Nomokov, P.; Nystrand, J.; Obenshain, F.E.; Oskarsson, A.; Otterlund, I.; Pachr, M.; Parfenov, A.; Pavliouk, S.; Peitzmann, T.; Petracek, V.; Plasil, F.; Purschke, M.L.; Raeven, B.; Rak, J.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ramamurthy, V.S.; Rao, N.K.; Retiere, F.; Reygers, K.; Roland, G.; Rosselet, L.; Roufanov, I.; Rubio, J.M.; Sambyal, S.S.; Santo, R.; Sato, S.; Schlagheck, H.; Schmidt, H.R.; Shabratova, G.; Sibiriak, I.; Siemiarczuk, T.; Sinha, B.C.; Slavine, N.; Soderstrom, K.; Solomey, N.; Sood, G.; Sorensen, S.P.; Stankus, P.; Stefanek, G.; Steinberg, P.; Stenlund, E.; Stuken, D.; Sumbera, M.; Svensson, T.; Trivedi, M.D.; Tsvetkov, A.; Twenhofel, C.; Tykarski, L.; Urbahn, J.; van Eijndhoven, N.; van Heeringen, W.H.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.J.; Vinogradov, A.; Viyogi, Y.P.; Vodopianov, A.S.; Voros, S.; Vos, M.A.; Wyslouch, B.; Yagi, K.; Yokota, Y.; Young, G.R.; Nayak, Tapan K.

    2001-01-01

    Results from the multiplicity distributions of inclusive photons and charged particles, scaling of particle multiplicities, event-by-event multiplicity fluctuations, and charged-neutral fluctuations in 158$\\cdot A$ GeV Pb+Pb collisions are presented and discussed. A scaling of charged particle multiplicity as $N_{part}^{1.07\\pm 0.05}$ and photons as $N_{part}^{1.12\\pm 0.03}$ have been observed, indicating violation of naive wounded nucleon model. The analysis of localized charged-neutral fluctuation indicates a model-independent demonstration of non-statistical fluctuations in both charged particles and photons in limited azimuthal regions. However, no correlated charged-neutral fluctuations are observed.

  16. Origin and nature of spontaneous shape fluctuations in "small" nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ying; Zhang, Hao; Douglas, Jack F

    2014-07-22

    Normally chemically inert materials such as Au have been found to be catalytically active in the form of particles whose size is about 1 nm. Direct and indirect observations of various types of metal nanoparticles (NPs) in this size range, under catalytically relevant conditions for fuel-cell operation and catalysis, have indicated that such "small" particles can exhibit large spontaneous shape fluctuations and significant changes in shape and chemical activity in response to alterations in environmental conditions. NPs also normally exhibit facile coalescence when in proximity, impacting their stability and reactivity in applications. We perform molecular dynamics simulations on Ni nanoparticles, a commonly used NP in catalytic applications and carbon nanotube growth, in the ≈1 nm size regime where large-scale shape fluctuations have been observed experimentally. An analysis of the large-scale shape fluctuations observed in our simulations of these "small" NPs indicates that they are accompanied by collective motion of Ni atoms through the NP center, and we quantify these dynamic structures and their impact on NP shape. In contrast, stringlike collective atomic motion is confined to the NP interfacial region of NPs having a diameter greater than a few nanometers, and correspondingly, the overall NP shape remains roughly spherical, a case studied in our prior Ni NP simulations. Evidently, the large spontaneous NP shape fluctuations reflect a change in character of the collective atomic dynamics when the NPs become critically small in size.

  17. Fluctuations in work motivation: tasks do not matter!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Jose; Curioso, Fernando; Gomes, Duarte; Arrieta, Carlos; Cortes, Mauricio

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that work motivation fluctuates considerably and in a nonlinear way over time. In the present research, we are interested in studying if the task at hand does or does not influence the presence of these fluctuations. We gathered daily registers from 69 workers during 21 consecutive working days (7036 registers) of task developed and levels of motivation, self-efficacy beliefs and instrumentalities perception. These registers were then categorized into a list of labor activities in main tasks and subtasks by means of three judges with a high level of agreement (97.47% for tasks, and 98.64% for subtasks). Taking the MSSD statistic (mean squared successive difference) of the average of motivation, self-efficacy and instrumentality, and using hierarchical regression analysis we have found that tasks (beta = .03; p = .188) and subtasks (beta = .10; p = .268) do not affect the presence of fluctuations in motivation. These results reveal instability in work motivation independently from the tasks and subtasks that the workers do. We proceed to find that fluctuations in work motivation show a fractal structure across the different tasks we do in a working day. Implications of these results to motivational theory will be discussed as well as possible explanations (e.g. the influence of affect in work motivation) and directions for future research are provided.

  18. Fluctuation Modes of a Twist-Bend Nematic Liquid Crystal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Parsouzi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available We report a dynamic light-scattering study of the fluctuation modes in a thermotropic liquid crystalline mixture of monomer and dimer compounds that exhibits the twist-bend nematic (N_{TB} phase. The results reveal a spectrum of overdamped fluctuations that includes two nonhydrodynamic modes and one hydrodynamic mode in the N_{TB} phase, and a single nonhydrodynamic mode plus two hydrodynamic modes (the usual nematic optic axis or director fluctuations in the higher temperature, uniaxial nematic phase. The properties of these fluctuations and the conditions for their observation are comprehensively explained by a Landau-de Gennes expansion of the free-energy density in terms of heliconical director and helical polarization fields that characterize the N_{TB} structure, with the latter serving as the primary order parameter. A “coarse-graining” approximation simplifies the theoretical analysis and enables us to demonstrate quantitative agreement between the calculated and experimentally determined temperature dependence of the mode relaxation rates.

  19. Toward models for fluctuating wall quantities in incompressible turbulent flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towne, Aaron; Yang, Xiang; Moin, Parviz

    2017-11-01

    Wall models for large-eddy simulation have been developed that provide accurate estimates of mean wall quantities such as shear stress, heat transfer, and pressure. However, these models typically do not deliver accurate predictions of the space-time fluctuations of these quantities. In this presentation, we describe some first steps toward constructing new wall models that predict the spatiotemporal properties of wall quantities by taking advantage of recent advances in our ability to identify and model the coherent structures that are known to play a central role in the near-wall dynamics. We first analyze data from a direct numerical simulation of a channel at Reτ = 1000 using spectral estimation techniques to isolate the contribution from different scales to fluctuating wall quantities and correlation analysis to link different spatial locations. Then, we explore how modes obtained via singular value decomposition of the resolvent operator, which is obtained from the linearized flow equations, could be used to model these fluctuations. This analysis provides a starting point for leveraging these model reduction ideas to improve the prediction of near-wall fluctuations using wall-modelled large-eddy simulation. Funded by NASA Grant No. NNX15AU93A and PSAAPII Grant No. DE-NA0002373.

  20. Research on the Voltage Fluctuation Rules of Power System Containing Wind Farms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yixi; Xu, Guchao; Ma, Gang; Li, Feng; Ju, Rong

    2017-05-01

    The global energy shortage and environmental problems have contributed to the rapid development of wind power. However, due to the randomness and volatility of wind power, large-scale access may cause voltage fluctuation in power grid. Therefore, the reactive power control of power system containing wind farms has become a hot research topic in recent years, in which finding key nodes of voltage fluctuation is a foundation work. In this paper, the power model of wind farm is established first. Then, the influence on nodes voltage when wind farms access simple power system is analysed, and promoted to complex power systems in order to reveal the fluctuation rules of nodes voltage, and to summarize the distribution characteristics of key nodes of voltage fluctuation, which can provide the basis for reactive power optimization. At last, the conclusions are verified by IEEE 30-node system.

  1. Spin and charge fluctuations in the Hubbard model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, A.

    2017-10-01

    Using the strong coupling diagram technique for calculating the electron Green's function of the two-dimensional Hubbard model we have summed infinite sequences of ladder diagrams, which describe interactions of electrons with spin and charge fluctuations. For sufficiently low temperatures and doping a pronounced four-band structure is observed in spectral functions. Its appearance is related to the proximity of the transition to the long-range antiferromagnetic order.

  2. Experimental methods and data analysis for fluctuation microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voyles, P. M.; Treacy, M. M. J.; Gibson, J. M.; Jin, H.-C.; Abelson, J. R.

    2000-02-16

    The authors have developed a new electron microscopy technique called fluctuation microscopy which is sensitive to medium-range order in disordered materials. The technique relies on quantitative statistical analysis of low-resolution dark-field electron micrographs. Extracting useful information from such micrographs involves correcting for the effects of the imaging system, incoherent image contrast caused by large scale structure in the sample, and the effects of the foil thickness.

  3. Rapid response manufacturing (RRM). Final CRADA report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cain, W.D. [Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Waddell, W.L. [National Centers for Manufacturing Sciences, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    1998-02-10

    US industry is fighting to maintain its competitive edge in the global market place. Markets fluctuate rapidly. Companies have to be able to respond quickly with improved, high quality, cost efficient products. Because companies and their suppliers are geographically distributed, rapid product realization is dependent on the development of a secure integrated concurrent engineering environment operating across multiple business entities. The way products are developed and brought to market can be improved and made more efficient through the proper incorporation of emerging technologies implemented in a secure environment. This documents the work done under this CRADA to develop capabilities, which permit the effective application, incorporation, and use of advanced technologies in a secure environment to facilitate the product realization process. Lockheed Martin Energy Systems (LMES), through a CRADA with the National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (NCMS), worked within a consortium of major industrial firms--Ford, General Motors, Texas Instruments, United Technologies, and Eastman Kodak--and several small suppliers of advanced manufacturing technology--MacNeal-Schwendler Corp., Teknowledge Corp., Cimplex Corp., Concentra, Spatial Technology, and Structural Dynamics Research Corp. (SDRC)--to create infrastructure to support the development and implementation of secure engineering environments for Rapid Response Manufacturing. The major accomplishment achieved under this CRADA was the demonstration of a prototypical implementation of a broad-based generic framework for automating and integrating the design-to-manufacturing activities associated with machined parts in a secure NWC compliant environment. Specifically, methods needed to permit the effective application, incorporation, and use of advanced technologies in a secure environment to facilitate the product realization process were developed and demonstrated. An important aspect of this demonstration was

  4. Time fluctuation analysis of forest fire sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega Orozco, Carmen D.; Kanevski, Mikhaïl; Tonini, Marj; Golay, Jean; Pereira, Mário J. G.

    2013-04-01

    Forest fires are complex events involving both space and time fluctuations. Understanding of their dynamics and pattern distribution is of great importance in order to improve the resource allocation and support fire management actions at local and global levels. This study aims at characterizing the temporal fluctuations of forest fire sequences observed in Portugal, which is the country that holds the largest wildfire land dataset in Europe. This research applies several exploratory data analysis measures to 302,000 forest fires occurred from 1980 to 2007. The applied clustering measures are: Morisita clustering index, fractal and multifractal dimensions (box-counting), Ripley's K-function, Allan Factor, and variography. These algorithms enable a global time structural analysis describing the degree of clustering of a point pattern and defining whether the observed events occur randomly, in clusters or in a regular pattern. The considered methods are of general importance and can be used for other spatio-temporal events (i.e. crime, epidemiology, biodiversity, geomarketing, etc.). An important contribution of this research deals with the analysis and estimation of local measures of clustering that helps understanding their temporal structure. Each measure is described and executed for the raw data (forest fires geo-database) and results are compared to reference patterns generated under the null hypothesis of randomness (Poisson processes) embedded in the same time period of the raw data. This comparison enables estimating the degree of the deviation of the real data from a Poisson process. Generalizations to functional measures of these clustering methods, taking into account the phenomena, were also applied and adapted to detect time dependences in a measured variable (i.e. burned area). The time clustering of the raw data is compared several times with the Poisson processes at different thresholds of the measured function. Then, the clustering measure value

  5. Fine-Scale Fluctuations in the Corona Observed with Hi-C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winebarger, Amy; Schuler, Timothy

    2013-01-01

    The High Resolution Coronal Imager(HiC) flew aboard a NASA sounding rocket on 2012 July11 and captured roughly 345 s of high spatial and temporal resolution images of the solar corona in a narrowband 193 Angstrom channel. We have analyzed the fluctuations in intensity of Active Region11520.We selected events based on a lifetime greater than 11s (twoHiC frames)and intensities greater than a threshold determined from the average background intensity in a pixel and the photon and electronic noise. We find fluctuations occurring down to the smallest timescale(11s).Typical intensity fluctuations are 20% background intensity, while some events peaka t100%the background intensity.Generally the fluctuations are clustered in solar structures, particularly the moss.We interpret the fluctuations in the moss as indicative of heating events. We use the observed events to model the active region core.

  6. Wall shear stress fluctuations: Mixed scaling and their effects on velocity fluctuations in a turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz-Daniel, Carlos; Laizet, Sylvain; Vassilicos, J. Christos

    2017-05-01

    The present work investigates numerically the statistics of the wall shear stress fluctuations in a turbulent boundary layer (TBL) and their relation to the velocity fluctuations outside of the near-wall region. The flow data are obtained from a Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of a zero pressure-gradient TBL using the high-order flow solver Incompact3D [S. Laizet and E. Lamballais, "High-order compact schemes for incompressible flows: A simple and efficient method with quasi-spectral accuracy," J. Comput. Phys. 228(16), 5989 (2009)]. The maximum Reynolds number of the simulation is R e𝜃≈2000 , based on the free-stream velocity and the momentum thickness of the boundary layer. The simulation data suggest that the root-mean-squared fluctuations of the streamwise and spanwise wall shear-stress components τx and τz follow a logarithmic dependence on the Reynolds number, consistent with the empirical correlation of Örlü and Schlatter [R. Örlü and P. Schlatter, "On the fluctuating wall-shear stress in zero pressure-gradient turbulent boundary layer flows," Phys. Fluids 23, 021704 (2011)]. These functional dependencies can be used to estimate the Reynolds number dependence of the wall turbulence dissipation rate in good agreement with reference DNS data. Our results suggest that the rare negative events of τx can be associated with the extreme values of τz and are related to the presence of coherent structures in the buffer layer, mainly quasi-streamwise vortices. We also develop a theoretical model, based on a generalisation of the Townsend-Perry hypothesis of wall-attached eddies, to link the statistical moments of the filtered wall shear stress fluctuations and the second order structure function of fluctuating velocities at a distance y from the wall. This model suggests that the wall shear stress fluctuations may induce a higher slope in the turbulence energy spectra of streamwise velocities than the one predicted by the Townsend-Perry attached

  7. Bridging the gap between event-by-event fluctuation measurements and theory predictions in relativistic nuclear collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braun-Munzinger, P., E-mail: p.braun-munzinger@gsi.de [Extreme Matter Institute EMMI, GSI, Darmstadt (Germany); Physikalisches Institut, Universität Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Rustamov, A., E-mail: a.rustamov@cern.ch [Physikalisches Institut, Universität Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); National Nuclear Research Center, Baku (Azerbaijan); Stachel, J., E-mail: stachel@physi.uni-heidelberg.de [Physikalisches Institut, Universität Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2017-04-15

    We develop methods to deal with non-dynamical contributions to event-by-event fluctuation measurements of net-particle numbers in relativistic nuclear collisions. These contributions arise from impact parameter fluctuations and from the requirement of overall net-baryon number or net-charge conservation and may mask the dynamical fluctuations of interest, such as those due to critical endpoints in the QCD phase diagram. Within a model of independent particle sources we derive formulae for net-particle fluctuations and develop a rigorous approach to take into account contributions from participant fluctuations in realistic experimental environments and at any cumulant order. Interestingly, contributions from participant fluctuations to the second and third cumulants of net-baryon distributions are found to vanish at mid-rapidity for LHC energies while higher cumulants of even order are non-zero even when the net-baryon number at mid-rapidity is zero. At lower beam energies the effect of participant fluctuations increases and induces spurious higher moments. The necessary corrections become large and need to be carefully taken into account before comparison to theory. We also provide a procedure for selecting the optimal phase–space coverage of particles for fluctuation analyses and discuss quantitatively the necessary correction due to global charge conservation.

  8. Density fluctuations in lattice-Boltzmann simulations of multiphase fluids in a closed system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    H. Basagaoglu; Paul Meakin

    2007-02-01

    A two-dimensional single component two-phase lattice Boltzmann model was used to simulate the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in a closed system. Spatiotemporally variable densities were generated by gravity acting on the fluid density. The density fluctuations were triggered by rapid changes in the fluid velocity induced by changes in the interface geometry and impact of the dense fluid on the rigid lower boundary of the computational domain. The ratio of the maximum density fluctuations to the maximum fluid velocity increased more rapidly at low velocities than at high velocities. The ratio of the maximum density fluctuations in the dense phase to its maximum velocity was on the order of the inverse of the sound speed. The solution became unstable when the density-based maximum local Knudsen number exceeded 0.13.

  9. Rapid Prototyping

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    Javelin, a Lone Peak Engineering Inc. Company has introduced the SteamRoller(TM) System as a commercial product. The system was designed by Javelin during a Phase II NASA funded small commercial product. The purpose of the invention was to allow automated-feed of flexible ceramic tapes to the Laminated Object Manufacturing rapid prototyping equipment. The ceramic material that Javelin was working with during the Phase II project is silicon nitride. This engineered ceramic material is of interest for space-based component.

  10. Intraocular pressure fluctuation during microincision vitrectomy with constellation vision system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiura, Yoshimi; Okamoto, Fumiki; Okamoto, Yoshifumi; Hiraoka, Takahiro; Oshika, Tetsuro

    2013-11-01

    To investigate intraocular pressure (IOP) fluctuation during various vitrectomy maneuvers using the vitrectomy system (Alcon Constellation Vision System). An experimental study as laboratory investigation. In porcine eyes, 23- and 25-gauge vitrectomy was performed, and IOP fluctuations were evaluated in vitreous cutting mode, in aspiration mode, and during scleral compression. The measurements were performed with the IOP control setting turned on or off. Using the 23-gauge system with the IOP control setting turned on, IOP decreased from 30 to 23.7 mm Hg after starting vitreous cutting, and then returned to 30 mm Hg in 2.6 seconds. When the IOP control setting was turned off, IOP decreased to 19.1 mm Hg in 0.9 seconds, and remained at that pressure. Under aspiration at 650 mm Hg without cutting, IOP showed a sharp depression from 30 to 12.2 mm Hg, and then returned to 30.6 mm Hg in 2.6 seconds with the IOP control setting turned on. When the IOP control setting was turned off, IOP decreased to 2.2 mm Hg in 9.7 seconds, and did not recover. When the sclera was compressed without aspiration, IOP rapidly increased to 70-100 mm Hg, and then slowly decreased to 30 mm Hg in 3.5-4.0 seconds, with or without the IOP control system. Similar data were obtained with 25-gauge vitrectomy. The IOP control system can attenuate IOP fluctuations during vitrectomy maneuvers. There was no significant difference in IOP fluctuations between 23- and 25-gauge systems. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Fluctuating Asymmetry of Human Populations: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John H. Graham

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Fluctuating asymmetry, the random deviation from perfect symmetry, is a widely used population-level index of developmental instability, developmental noise, and robustness. It reflects a population’s state of adaptation and genomic coadaptation. Here, we review the literature on fluctuating asymmetry of human populations. The most widely used bilateral traits include skeletal, dental, and facial dimensions; dermatoglyphic patterns and ridge counts; and facial shape. Each trait has its advantages and disadvantages, but results are most robust when multiple traits are combined into a composite index of fluctuating asymmetry (CFA. Both environmental (diet, climate, toxins and genetic (aneuploidy, heterozygosity, inbreeding stressors have been linked to population-level variation in fluctuating asymmetry. In general, these stressors increase average fluctuating asymmetry. Nevertheless, there have been many conflicting results, in part because (1 fluctuating asymmetry is a weak signal in a sea of noise; and (2 studies of human fluctuating asymmetry have not always followed best practices. The most serious concerns are insensitive asymmetry indices (correlation coefficient and coefficient of indetermination, inappropriate size scaling, unrecognized mixture distributions, inappropriate corrections for directional asymmetry, failure to use composite indices, and inattention to measurement error. Consequently, it is often difficult (or impossible to compare results across traits, and across studies.

  12. Human and Climate Amplified Rapid River Bluff Erosion: an Application of Terrestrial-Based Structure-from-Motion and Time-Lapse Photogrammetry in the Midwestern USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, S. A.; Belmont, P.

    2016-12-01

    The Minnesota River Basin (MRB), south central Minnesota, is an extraordinary natural laboratory, and is currently impaired for excess sediments and nutrients. Tributaries of the Minnesota River have been actively incising and meandering into glacial tills for the last 13,400 years in response to a catastrophic base level drop. It is this geologic history combined with modern agricultural intensification and hydrologic change that provide a unique opportunity to study remarkably rapid bluff erosion using photogrammetry. Here we seek to understand the dominant mechanisms (fluvial toe erosion, freeze-thaw, groundwater sapping, tree throw, positive pore water pressures) and magnitude of bluff erosion using daily time-lapse photographs, repeat photo surveys, Structure-from-Motion (SfM), and calculations of bluff volumetric change through time. We expect for increased precipitation and streamflows in the basin to have accelerated bluff erosion via channel widening and migration. In general, we find that bluff failures occur during or immediately following (1-2 days) heavy rainfall events, especially during spring thaw, and the removal, or transport of the failed material out of the reach coincides with hydrograph flood peaks. Through the combined use of time-lapse and SfM photogrammetry we are able to identify the precipitation and flow events which occur with a frequency and magnitude large enough to effectively dominate bluff erosion. Identifying this `effective discharge' of bluff erosion is regionally important for sediment reduction strategies in the MRB.

  13. Core-Shell Structure of Gold Nanoparticles with Inositol Hexaphosphate Nanohybrids for Label-Free and Rapid Detection by SERS Nanotechnology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas H. H. Mevold

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Gold nanoparticles bound with inositol hexaphosphate (IP6 (AuNPs/IP6 were prepared by in situ reduction of various concentrations of IP6 (0~320 µM through modified Frens method for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS detection. The resultant AuNPs/IP6 were subject to characterization including UV/Vis spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, dynamic light scattering (DLS, zeta potential, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS. The results showed that AuNPs with 65 µM of IP6 would result in a core AuNPs-shell (IP6 layer structure, which exhibited the strongest SERS signal, due to the “hot spot effect” generated from the 1-2 nm interparticle gaps of AuNPs/IP6 nanohybrids (ionic interaction of IP6 and Au+. Furthermore, the reaction kinetics of Au and IP6 were also investigated in this work. Higher concentration of IP6 (190 and 260 µM will make AuNPs become irregularly shaped, because IP6 is a basic salt and served as a pH mediator. The morphology and distribution of AuNPs were greatly improved by addition of 65 µM of IP6. This novel AuNPs/IP6 nanohybrid showed great stability and Raman enhancement. It is promising in the application of rapid and label-free biological detection of bacteria or tumor cells.

  14. Assessment of the dental and skeletal effects of fan-type rapid maxillary expansion screw and Hyrax screw on craniofacial structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umarevathi Gopalakrishnan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims and Objectives: The purpose of the study was to assess the skeletal and dental effects of fan-type rapid maxillary expansion (RME appliance and Hyrax RME appliance on the craniofacial structures. Materials and Methods: The sample of the study included 12 patients with constricted maxillary arches. Acrylic bonded type of attachment was used for both groups. Changes in sagittal, vertical, and transverse relationship were assessed with lateral and frontal cephalograms, respectively. Intercanine and intermolar widths were measured with stone models. Pre- and immediate post-treatment records were statistically analyzed with Wilcoxon signed-rank test. The differences between the groups were evaluated using Mann–Whitney U-test. Since the data pertaining to intercanine width and intermolar width were normally distributed, parametric test of signifi cance (unpaired t-test was used to compare them. Results: Results showed that Hyrax presented with signifi cantly greater increments for both nasal cavity width and maxillary width when compared to fan-type RME. Both groups had retroclination of incisors. The increase in the intercanine width was almost similar in both groups. Conclusion: Fan-type RME caused only minimal expansion of the intermolar width when compared to the Hyrax. The ratio between the intercanine and intermolar width expansion was nearly 4:1 in the fan-type RME and 0.75:1 in Hyrax.

  15. Fluctuations in the Dynamics of Glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castillo, Horacio E. [Ohio Univ., Athens, OH (United States). Department of Physics and Astronomy

    2015-05-06

    This research program addressed the question of the presence of dynamical heterogeneities – strong spatial fluctuations in the dynamics – in glass forming liquids and jamming systems near dynamical arrest, with particular emphasis on aging systems, i.e. systems that are in the (non-equilibrium) glass regime. The main goals proposed for this research were: to perform numerical simulations of atomistic structural glass models to characterize dynamical heterogeneities in out of equilibrium (aging) glassy systems; to test the hypothesis that a certain symmetry (“time reparametrization symmetry”) is present in microscopic models of glassy systems and that this symmetry can explain the main features of dynamical heterogeneities; and to test to what extent these phenomena are universal across different glassy/jamming systems. It was found that: most of the important features of dynamical heterogeneities in the aging regime could be described in terms of simple scaling behaviors; that some of the most basic theoretical models of glassy systems indeed have time reparametrization symmetry; that all tests performed in numerical simulation data were consistent with the predictions from time reparametrization symmetry; and that to a large degree, the main features of dynamical heterogeneities were universal across different glassy systems. Most of the findings that came out of this research have been reported in detail in eight papers in high quality journals, two unpublished but publicly accessible manuscripts, and 27 invited and contributed talks.

  16. RAPID3? Aptly named!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthelot, J-M

    2014-01-01

    The RAPID3 score is the sum of three 0-10 patient self-report scores: pain, functional impairment on MDHAQ, and patient global estimate. It requires 5 seconds for scoring and can be used in all rheumatologic conditions, although it has mostly been used in rheumatoid arthritis where cutoffs for low disease activity (12/30) have been set. A RAPID3 score of ≤ 3/30 with 1 or 0 swollen joints (RAPID3 ≤ 3 + ≤ SJ1) provides remission criteria comparable to Boolean, SDAI, CDAI, and DAS28 remission criteria, in far less time than a formal joint count. RAPID3 performs as well as the DAS28 in separating active drugs from placebos in clinical trials. RAPID3 also predicts subsequent structural disease progression. RAPID3 can be determined at short intervals at home, allowing the determination of the area under the curve of disease activity between two visits and flare detection. However, RAPID3 should not be seen as a substitute for DAS28 and face to face visits in routine care. Monitoring patient status with only self-report information without a rheumatologist's advice (including joints and physical examination, and consideration of imaging and laboratory tests) may indeed be as undesirable for most patients than joint examination without a patient questionnaire. Conversely, combining the RAPID3 and the DAS28 may consist in faster or more sensitive confirmation that a medication is effective. Similarly, better enquiring of most important concerns of patients (pain, functional status and overall opinion on their disorder) should reinforces patients' confidence in their rheumatologist and treatments.

  17. Spin-fluctuation theory beyond Gaussian approximation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melnikov, N B [Moscow State University, 119992 Moscow (Russian Federation); Reser, B I; Grebennikov, V I, E-mail: melnikov@cs.msu.s, E-mail: reser@imp.uran.r, E-mail: greben@imp.uran.r [Institute of Metal Physics, Ural Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 620041 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation)

    2010-05-14

    A characteristic feature of the Gaussian approximation in the functional-integral approach to the spin-fluctuation theory is the jump phase transition to the paramagnetic state. We eliminate the jump and obtain a continuous second-order phase transition by taking into account high-order terms in the expansion of the free energy in powers of the fluctuating exchange field. The third-order term of the free energy renormalizes the mean field, and the fourth-order term, responsible for the interaction of the fluctuations, renormalizes the spin susceptibility. The extended theory is applied to the calculation of magnetic properties of Fe-Ni Invar.

  18. Fluctuation theorems for quantum master equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Massimiliano; Mukamel, Shaul

    2006-04-01

    A quantum fluctuation theorem for a driven quantum subsystem interacting with its environment is derived based solely on the assumption that its reduced density matrix obeys a closed evolution equation--i.e., a quantum master equation (QME). Quantum trajectories and their associated entropy, heat, and work appear naturally by transforming the QME to a time-dependent Liouville space basis that diagonalizes the instantaneous reduced density matrix of the subsystem. A quantum integral fluctuation theorem, a steady-state fluctuation theorem, and the Jarzynski relation are derived in a similar way as for classical stochastic dynamics.

  19. Population Genetics with Fluctuating Population Sizes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chotibut, Thiparat; Nelson, David R.

    2017-05-01

    Standard neutral population genetics theory with a strictly fixed population size has important limitations. An alternative model that allows independently fluctuating population sizes and reproduces the standard neutral evolution is reviewed. We then study a situation such that the competing species are neutral at the equilibrium population size but population size fluctuations nevertheless favor fixation of one species over the other. In this case, a separation of timescales emerges naturally and allows adiabatic elimination of a fast population size variable to deduce the fluctuation-induced selection dynamics near the equilibrium population size. The results highlight the incompleteness of the standard population genetics with a strictly fixed population size.

  20. Spin-current noise from fluctuation relations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Jong Soo [Institut de Fisica Interdisciplinària i Sistemes Complexos IFISC (UIB-CSIC), E-07122 Palma de Mallorca (Spain); Sánchez, David; López, Rosa [Institut de Fisica Interdisciplinària i Sistemes Complexos IFISC (UIB-CSIC), E-07122 Palma de Mallorca, Spain and Departement de Fisica, Universitat de les Illes Balears, E-07122 Palma de Mallorca (Spain)

    2013-12-04

    We present fluctuation relations that connect spin-polarized current and noise in mesoscopic conductors. In linear response, these relations are equivalent to the fluctuation-dissipation theorem that relates equilibrium current-current correlations to the linear conductance. More interestingly, in the weakly nonlinear regime of transport, these relations establish a connection between the leading-order rectification spin conductance, the spin noise susceptibility and the third cumulant of spin current fluctuations at equilibrium. Our results are valid even for systems in the presence of magnetic fields and coupled to ferromagnetic electrodes.

  1. Probability distribution of vertical longitudinal shear fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichtl, G. H.

    1972-01-01

    This paper discusses some recent measurements of third and fourth moments of vertical differences (shears) of longitudinal velocity fluctuations obtained in unstable air at the NASA 150 m meteorological tower site at Cape Kennedy, Fla. Each set of measurements consisted of longitudinal velocity fluctuation time histories obtained at the 18, 30, 60, 90, 120 and 150 m levels, so that 15 wind-shear time histories were obtained from each set of measurements. It appears that the distribution function of the longitudinal wind fluctuations at two levels is not bivariate Gaussian. The implications of the results relative to the design and operation of aerospace vehicles are discussed.-

  2. Macroscopic realism of quantum work fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blattmann, Ralf; Mølmer, Klaus

    2017-07-01

    We study the fluctuations of the work performed on a driven quantum system, defined as the difference between subsequent measurements of energy eigenvalues. These work fluctuations are governed by statistical theorems with similar expressions in classical and quantum physics. We show that we can distinguish quantum and classical work fluctuations, as the latter can be described by a macrorealistic theory and hence obey Leggett-Garg inequalities. We show that these inequalities are violated by quantum processes in a driven two-level system and in a harmonic oscillator subject to a squeezing transformation.

  3. Out of control: Fluctuation of cascading dynamics in networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianwei; Cai, Lin; Xu, Bo; Li, Peng; Sun, Enhui; Zhu, Zhiguo

    2016-11-01

    Applying two preferential selection mechanisms of flow destination, we develop two new methods to quantify the initial load of a node, where the flow is transported along the shortest path between two nodes. We propose a simple cascading model and study cascading dynamics induced by attacking the node with the highest load in some synthetic and actual networks. Surprisingly, we observe the abnormal fluctuation of cascading dynamics, i.e., more damage can be triggered if we spend significantly higher cost to protect a network. In particular, this phenomenon is independent of the initial flow distribution and the preferential selection mechanisms of flow destination. However, it remains unclear which specific structural patterns may affect the fluctuation of cascading dynamics. In this paper, we examine the local evolution of the cascading propagation by constructing some special networks. We show that revivals of some nodes in the double ring structure facilitate the transportation of the flow between two unconnected sub-networks, cause more damage and subsequently lead to the abnormal fluctuation of cascading dynamics. Compared with the traditional definition of the betweenness, we adopt two new proposed methods to further evaluate the resilience of several actual networks. We find that some real world networks reach the strongest resilience level against cascading failures in our preferential selection mechanisms of flow destination. Moreover, we explore how to use the minimum cost to maximize the resilience of the studied networks.

  4. temperature fluctuation inside inert atmosphere silos

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    This research was conducted to study temperature fluctuation inside the inert atmosphere silos loaded with wheat, compare ... gases most especially carbondioxide (CO2) is due to safety of ... even to agriculture and resistance of pests to some.

  5. Fluctuations of Intensive Quantities in Statistical Thermodynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artur E. Ruuge

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In phenomenological thermodynamics, the canonical coordinates of a physical system split in pairs, with each pair consisting of an extensive quantity and an intensive one. In the present paper, the quasithermodynamic fluctuation theory of a model system of a large number of oscillators is extended to statistical thermodynamics based on the idea of perceiving the fluctuations of intensive variables as the fluctuations of specific extensive ones in a “thermodynamically dual” system. The extension is motivated by the symmetry of the problem in the context of an analogy with quantum mechanics, which is stated in terms of a generalized Pauli problem for the thermodynamic fluctuations. The doubled Boltzmann constant divided by the number of particles plays a similar role as the Planck constant.

  6. A stochastic model of river discharge fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livina, V.; Ashkenazy, Y.; Kizner, Z.; Strygin, V.; Bunde, A.; Havlin, S.

    2003-12-01

    We study the daily river flow fluctuations of 30 international rivers. Using the detrended fluctuation analysis, we study the correlations in the magnitudes of river flow increments (volatilities), and find power-law correlations in volatilities for time scales less than 1 year; these correlations almost disappear for time scales larger than 1 year. Using surrogate data test for nonlinearity, we show that correlations in the magnitudes of river flow fluctuations are a measure for nonlinearity. We propose a simple nonlinear stochastic model for river flow fluctuations that reproduces the main scaling properties of the river flow series as well as the correlations and periodicities in the magnitudes of river flow increments. According to our model, the source of nonlinearity observed in the data is an interaction between a long-term correlated process and the river discharge itself.

  7. Fluctuating Asymmetry: Methods, Theory, and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John H. Graham

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Fluctuating asymmetry consists of random deviations from perfect symmetry in populations of organisms. It is a measure of developmental noise, which reflects a population’s average state of adaptation and coadaptation. Moreover, it increases under both environmental and genetic stress, though responses are often inconsistent. Researchers base studies of fluctuating asymmetry upon deviations from bilateral, radial, rotational, dihedral, translational, helical, and fractal symmetries. Here, we review old and new methods of measuring fluctuating asymmetry, including measures of dispersion, landmark methods for shape asymmetry, and continuous symmetry measures. We also review the theory, developmental origins, and applications of fluctuating asymmetry, and attempt to explain conflicting results. In the process, we present examples from the literature, and from our own research at “Evolution Canyon” and elsewhere.

  8. Multiphoton Effects Enhanced due to Ultrafast Photon-Number Fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spasibko, Kirill Yu.; Kopylov, Denis A.; Krutyanskiy, Victor L.; Murzina, Tatiana V.; Leuchs, Gerd; Chekhova, Maria V.

    2017-12-01

    The rate of an n -photon effect generally scales as the n th order autocorrelation function of the incident light, which is high for light with strong photon-number fluctuations. Therefore, "noisy" light sources are much more efficient for multiphoton effects than coherent sources with the same mean power, pulse duration, and repetition rate. Here we generate optical harmonics of the order of 2-4 from a bright squeezed vacuum, a state of light consisting of only quantum noise with no coherent component. We observe up to 2 orders of magnitude enhancement in the generation of optical harmonics due to ultrafast photon-number fluctuations. This feature is especially important for the nonlinear optics of fragile structures, where the use of a noisy pump can considerably increase the effect without overcoming the damage threshold.

  9. [Research on conditional fluctuation characteristics of CHF heart rate variation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Junfeng; Zhou, Lingling; Huang, Xiaoling; Bian, Chunhua

    2013-12-01

    In this study, we applied generalized autoregressive conditional heteroskedasticity (GARCH) model to conditional fluctuation characteristics of heart rate variation (HRV) series (congestive heart failure, Normal), with all the data from PhysioNet ECG database. Research results proved the existence of condition fluctuation characteristic in the series of changing rate of HRV. In the GARCH model family, threshold GARCH (1,1)(TGARCH (1,1)) model performs best in fitting changing rate of HRV. Although the structure of ARCH (1) model is simple, its error is the closest to that of TGARCH (1, 1) model. The results also showed that the difference was obvious between disease group and normal group. All these results provide a new method to the research and clinical application of HRV.

  10. Fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy (FFS), part A

    CERN Document Server

    Tetin, Sergey

    2013-01-01

    This new volume of Methods in Enzymology continues the legacy of this premier serial by containing quality chapters authored by leaders in the field. This volume covers Fluorescence Fluctuation SpectroscopyContains chapters on such topics as Time-integrated fluorescence cumulant analysis, Pulsed Interleaved Excitation, and raster image correlation spectroscopy and number and brightness analysis.Continues the legacy of this premier serial with quality chapters authored by leaders in the fieldCovers fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopyContains chapte

  11. Quantum fluctuations of the superconducting cosmic string

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shoucheng

    1987-01-01

    Quantum fluctuations of the proposed superconducting string with Bose charge carriers are studied in terms of the vortices on the string world sheet. In the thermodynamical limit, it is found that they appear in the form of free vortices rather than as bound pairs. This fluctuation mode violates the topological conservation law on which superconductivity is based. However, this limit may not be reached. The critical size of the superconducting string is estimated as a function of the coupling constants involved.

  12. Thermal Fluctuations in Electroweak Phase Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiromizu, T.; Morikawa, M.; Yokoyama, J.

    1995-11-01

    We estimate the amplitude of thermal fluctuations by calculating the typical size of subcritical bubbles in cosmological electroweak phase transition and show that this thermal fluctuation effect drastically changes dynamics of the phase transition from the ordinary first order type with supercooling. From this fact, we conclude that the standard electroweak baryogenesis scenario associated with such a first order transition does not work in the minimal standard model in certain conditions.

  13. Kink fluctuation asymptotics and zero modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izquierdo, A.A. [Universidad de Salamanca, Departamento de Matematica Aplicada and IUFFyM, Salamanca (Spain); Guilarte, J.M. [Universidad de Salamanca, Departamento de Fisica Fundamental and IUFFyM, Salamanca (Spain)

    2012-10-15

    In this paper we propose a refinement of the heat-kernel/zeta function treatment of kink quantum fluctuations in scalar field theory, further analyzing the existence and implications of a zero-energy fluctuation mode. Improved understanding of the interplay between zero modes and the kink heat-kernel expansion delivers asymptotic estimations of one-loop kink mass shifts with remarkably higher precision than previously obtained by means of the standard Gilkey-DeWitt heat-kernel expansion. (orig.)

  14. Molecular thermodynamics using fluctuation solution theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellegaard, Martin Dela

    to relevant experimental data is limited. This thesis addresses the issue of generating and using simple thermodynamic models within a rigorous statistical mechanical framework, the so-called fluctuation solution theory, from which relations connecting properties and phase equilibria can be obtained....... The framework relates thermodynamic variables to molecular pair correlation functions of liquid mixtures. In this thesis, application of the framework is illustrated using two approaches: 1. Solubilities of solid solutes in mixed solvent systems are determined from fluctuation solution theory application...

  15. Semiclassical form factor of matrix element fluctuations

    CERN Document Server

    Eckhardt, B; Eckhardt, Bruno; Main, Joerg

    1995-01-01

    We analyze within a semiclassical approximation the form factor for the fluctuations of quantum matrix elements around their classical average. We find two contributions: one is proportional to the form factor for the density of states, with an amplitude determined by the squared average of the matrix elements. The other is constant and related to the fluctuations of finite time classical trajectory segments around the phase space average. The results are illustrated for an observable in the quadratic Zeeman effect.

  16. Hydrodynamic fluctuations in thermostatted multiparticle collision dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Híjar, Humberto; Sutmann, Godehard

    2011-04-01

    In this work we study the behavior of mesoscopic fluctuations of a fluid simulated by Multiparticle Collision Dynamics when this is applied together with a local thermostatting procedure that constrains the strength of temperature fluctuations. We consider procedures in which the thermostat interacts with the fluid at every simulation step as well as cases in which the thermostat is applied only at regular time intervals. Due to the application of the thermostat temperature fluctuations are forced to relax to equilibrium faster than they do in the nonthermostatted, constant-energy case. Depending on the interval of application of the thermostat, it is demonstrated that the thermodynamic state changes gradually from isothermal to adiabatic conditions. In order to exhibit this effect we compute from simulations diverse correlation functions of the hydrodynamic fluctuating fields. These correlation functions are compared with those predicted by a linearized hydrodynamic theory of a simple fluid in which a thermostat is applied locally. We find a good agreement between the model and the numerical results, which confirms that hydrodynamic fluctuations in Multiparticle Collision Dynamics in the presence of the thermostat have the properties expected for spontaneous fluctuations in fluids in contact with a heat reservoir.

  17. Multiscale temporal integrators for fluctuating hydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delong, Steven; Sun, Yifei; Griffith, Boyce E.; Vanden-Eijnden, Eric; Donev, Aleksandar

    2014-12-01

    Following on our previous work [S. Delong, B. E. Griffith, E. Vanden-Eijnden, and A. Donev, Phys. Rev. E 87, 033302 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevE.87.033302], we develop temporal integrators for solving Langevin stochastic differential equations that arise in fluctuating hydrodynamics. Our simple predictor-corrector schemes add fluctuations to standard second-order deterministic solvers in a way that maintains second-order weak accuracy for linearized fluctuating hydrodynamics. We construct a general class of schemes and recommend two specific schemes: an explicit midpoint method and an implicit trapezoidal method. We also construct predictor-corrector methods for integrating the overdamped limit of systems of equations with a fast and slow variable in the limit of infinite separation of the fast and slow time scales. We propose using random finite differences to approximate some of the stochastic drift terms that arise because of the kinetic multiplicative noise in the limiting dynamics. We illustrate our integrators on two applications involving the development of giant nonequilibrium concentration fluctuations in diffusively mixing fluids. We first study the development of giant fluctuations in recent experiments performed in microgravity using an overdamped integrator. We then include the effects of gravity and find that we also need to include the effects of fluid inertia, which affects the dynamics of the concentration fluctuations greatly at small wave numbers.

  18. Net-Charge Fluctuations in Pb-Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}= 2.76$ TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abelev, Betty; Adamova, Dagmar; Adare, Andrew Marshall; Aggarwal, Madan; Aglieri Rinella, Gianluca; Agocs, Andras Gabor; Agostinelli, Andrea; Aguilar Salazar, Saul; Ahammed, Zubayer; Ahmad, Arshad; Ahmad, Nazeer; Ahn, Sang Un; Akindinov, Alexander; Aleksandrov, Dmitry; Alessandro, Bruno; Alfaro Molina, Jose Ruben; Alici, Andrea; Alkin, Anton; Almaraz Avina, Erick Jonathan; Alme, Johan; Alt, Torsten; Altini, Valerio; Altinpinar, Sedat; Altsybeev, Igor; Andrei, Cristian; Andronic, Anton; Anguelov, Venelin; Anielski, Jonas; Anticic, Tome; Antinori, Federico; Antonioli, Pietro; Aphecetche, Laurent Bernard; Appelshauser, Harald; Arbor, Nicolas; Arcelli, Silvia; Armesto, Nestor; Arnaldi, Roberta; Aronsson, Tomas Robert; Arsene, Ionut Cristian; Arslandok, Mesut; Augustinus, Andre; Averbeck, Ralf Peter; Awes, Terry; Aysto, Juha Heikki; Azmi, Mohd Danish; Bach, Matthias Jakob; Badala, Angela; Baek, Yong Wook; Bailhache, Raphaelle Marie; Bala, Renu; Baldini Ferroli, Rinaldo; Baldisseri, Alberto; Baldit, Alain; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, Fernando; Ban, Jaroslav; Baral, Rama Chandra; Barbera, Roberto; Barile, Francesco; Barnafoldi, Gergely Gabor; Barnby, Lee Stuart; Barret, Valerie; Bartke, Jerzy Gustaw; Basile, Maurizio; Bastid, Nicole; Basu, Sumit; Bathen, Bastian; Batigne, Guillaume; Batyunya, Boris; Baumann, Christoph Heinrich; Bearden, Ian Gardner; Beck, Hans; Behera, Nirbhay Kumar; Belikov, Iouri; Bellini, Francesca; Bellwied, Rene; Belmont-Moreno, Ernesto; Bencedi, Gyula; Beole, Stefania; Berceanu, Ionela; Bercuci, Alexandru; Berdnikov, Yaroslav; Berenyi, Daniel; Bergognon, Anais Annick Erica; Berzano, Dario; Betev, Latchezar; Bhasin, Anju; Bhati, Ashok Kumar; Bhom, Jihyun; Bianchi, Livio; Bianchi, Nicola; Bianchin, Chiara; Bielcik, Jaroslav; Bielcikova, Jana; Bilandzic, Ante; Bjelogrlic, Sandro; Blanco, F; Blanco, Francesco; Blau, Dmitry; Blume, Christoph; Bock, Nicolas; Boettger, Stefan; Bogdanov, Alexey; Boggild, Hans; Bogolyubsky, Mikhail; Boldizsar, Laszlo; Bombara, Marek; Book, Julian; Borel, Herve; Borissov, Alexander; Bose, Suvendu Nath; Bossu, Francesco; Botje, Michiel; Boyer, Bruno Alexandre; Braidot, Ermes; Braun-Munzinger, Peter; Bregant, Marco; Breitner, Timo Gunther; Browning, Tyler Allen; Broz, Michal; Brun, Rene; Bruna, Elena; Bruno, Giuseppe Eugenio; Budnikov, Dmitry; Buesching, Henner; Bufalino, Stefania; Busch, Oliver; Buthelezi, Edith Zinhle; Caffarri, Davide; Cai, Xu; Caines, Helen Louise; Calvo Villar, Ernesto; Camerini, Paolo; Canoa Roman, Veronica; Cara Romeo, Giovanni; Carena, Francesco; Carena, Wisla; Carminati, Federico; Casanova Diaz, Amaya Ofelia; Castillo Castellanos, Javier Ernesto; Casula, Ester Anna Rita; Catanescu, Vasile; Cavicchioli, Costanza; Ceballos Sanchez, Cesar; Cepila, Jan; Cerello, Piergiorgio; Chang, Beomsu; Chapeland, Sylvain; Charvet, Jean-Luc Fernand; Chattopadhyay, Sukalyan; Chattopadhyay, Subhasis; Chawla, Isha; Cherney, Michael Gerard; Cheshkov, Cvetan; Cheynis, Brigitte; Chiavassa, Emilio; Chibante Barroso, Vasco Miguel; 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de Rooij, Raoul Stefan; Delagrange, Hugues; Deloff, Andrzej; Demanov, Vyacheslav; Denes, Ervin; Deppman, Airton; Di Bari, Domenico; Di Giglio, Carmelo; Di Liberto, Sergio; Di Mauro, Antonio; Di Nezza, Pasquale; Diaz Corchero, Miguel Angel; Dietel, Thomas; Divia, Roberto; Djuvsland, Oeystein; Dobrin, Alexandru Florin; Dobrowolski, Tadeusz Antoni; Dominguez, Isabel; Donigus, Benjamin; Dordic, Olja; Driga, Olga; Dubey, Anand Kumar; Dubla, Andrea; Ducroux, Laurent; Dupieux, Pascal; Dutta Majumdar, AK; Dutta Majumdar, Mihir Ranjan; Elia, Domenico; Emschermann, David Philip; Engel, Heiko; Erazmus, Barbara; Erdal, Hege Austrheim; Espagnon, Bruno; Estienne, Magali Danielle; Esumi, Shinichi; Evans, David; Eyyubova, Gyulnara; Fabris, Daniela; Faivre, Julien; Falchieri, Davide; Fantoni, Alessandra; Fasel, Markus; Fedunov, Anatoly; Fehlker, Dominik; Feldkamp, Linus; Felea, Daniel; Fenton-Olsen, Bo; Feofilov, Grigory; Fernandez Tellez, Arturo; Ferretti, Alessandro; Ferretti, Roberta; Festanti, Andrea; 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Lechman, Mateusz; Lee, Graham Richard; Lee, Ki Sang; Lee, Sung Chul; Lefevre, Frederic; Lehnert, Joerg Walter; Leistam, Lars; Lemmon, Roy Crawford; Lenti, Vito; Leon Monzon, Ildefonso; Leon Vargas, Hermes; Leoncino, Marco; Levai, Peter; Lien, Jorgen; Lietava, Roman; Lindal, Svein; Lindenstruth, Volker; Lippmann, Christian; Lisa, Michael Annan; Liu, Lijiao; Loggins, Vera; Loginov, Vitaly; Lohn, Stefan Bernhard; Lohner, Daniel; Loizides, Constantinos; Loo, Kai Krister; Lopez, Xavier Bernard; Lopez Torres, Ernesto; Lovhoiden, Gunnar; Lu, Xianguo; Luettig, Philipp; Lunardon, Marcello; Luo, Jiebin; Luparello, Grazia; Luquin, Lionel; Luzzi, Cinzia; Ma, Rongrong; Maevskaya, Alla; Mager, Magnus; Mahapatra, Durga Prasad; Maire, Antonin; Mal'Kevich, Dmitry; Malaev, Mikhail; Maldonado Cervantes, Ivonne Alicia; Malinina, Ludmila; Malzacher, Peter; Mamonov, Alexander; Manceau, Loic Henri Antoine; Manko, Vladislav; Manso, Franck; Manzari, Vito; Mao, Yaxian; Marchisone, Massimiliano; Mares, Jiri; Margagliotti, Giacomo Vito; 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Nania, Rosario; Nappi, Eugenio; Nattrass, Christine; Naumov, Nikolay; Navin, Sparsh; Nayak, Tapan Kumar; Nazarenko, Sergey; Nazarov, Gleb; Nedosekin, Alexander; Nicassio, Maria; Niculescu, Mihai; Nielsen, Borge Svane; Niida, Takafumi; Nikolaev, Sergey; Nikolic, Vedran; Nikulin, Sergey; Nikulin, Vladimir; Nilsen, Bjorn Steven; Nilsson, Mads Stormo; Noferini, Francesco; Nomokonov, Petr; Nooren, Gerardus; Novitzky, Norbert; Nyanin, Alexandre; Nyatha, Anitha; Nygaard, Casper; Nystrand, Joakim Ingemar; Oeschler, Helmut Oskar; Oh, Saehanseul; Oh, Sun Kun; Oleniacz, Janusz; Oppedisano, Chiara; Ortona, Giacomo; Oskarsson, Anders Nils Erik; Otwinowski, Jacek Tomasz; Oyama, Ken; Pachmayer, Yvonne Chiara; Pachr, Milos; Padilla, Fatima; Pagano, Paola; Paic, Guy; Painke, Florian; Pajares, Carlos; Pal, Susanta Kumar; Palaha, Arvinder Singh; Palmeri, Armando; Papikyan, Vardanush; Pappalardo, Giuseppe; Park, Woo Jin; Passfeld, Annika; Patalakha, Dmitri Ivanovich; Paticchio, Vincenzo; Pavlinov, Alexei; 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Quercigh, Emanuele; Qvigstad, Henrik; Rachevski, Alexandre; Rademakers, Alphonse; Raiha, Tomi Samuli; Rak, Jan; Rakotozafindrabe, Andry Malala; Ramello, Luciano; Ramirez Reyes, Abdiel; Raniwala, Rashmi; Raniwala, Sudhir; Rasanen, Sami Sakari; Rascanu, Bogdan Theodor; Rathee, Deepika; Read, Kenneth Francis; Real, Jean-Sebastien; Redlich, Krzysztof; Rehman, Attiq Ur; Reichelt, Patrick; Reicher, Martijn; Renfordt, Rainer Arno Ernst; Reolon, Anna Rita; Reshetin, Andrey; Rettig, Felix Vincenz; Revol, Jean-Pierre; Reygers, Klaus Johannes; Riccati, Lodovico; Ricci, Renato Angelo; Richert, Tuva; Richter, Matthias Rudolph; Riedler, Petra; Riegler, Werner; Riggi, Francesco; Rodrigues Fernandes Rabacal, Bartolomeu; Rodriguez Cahuantzi, Mario; Rodriguez Manso, Alis; Roed, Ketil; Rohr, David; Rohrich, Dieter; Romita, Rosa; Ronchetti, Federico; Rosnet, Philippe; Rossegger, Stefan; Rossi, Andrea; Roy, Christelle Sophie; Roy, Pradip Kumar; Rubio Montero, Antonio Juan; Rui, Rinaldo; Russo, Riccardo; Ryabinkin, Evgeny; 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Verweij, Marta; Vickovic, Linda; Viesti, Giuseppe; Vikhlyantsev, Oleg; Vilakazi, Zabulon; Villalobos Baillie, Orlando; Vinogradov, Alexander; Vinogradov, Leonid; Vinogradov, Yury; Virgili, Tiziano; Viyogi, Yogendra; Vodopianov, Alexander; Voloshin, Kirill; Voloshin, Sergey; Volpe, Giacomo; von Haller, Barthelemy; Vranic, Danilo; Øvrebekk, Gaute; Vrlakova, Janka; Vulpescu, Bogdan; Vyushin, Alexey; Wagner, Boris; Wagner, Vladimir; Wan, Renzhuo; Wang, Dong; Wang, Mengliang; Wang, Yifei; Wang, Yaping; Watanabe, Kengo; Weber, Michael; Wessels, Johannes; Westerhoff, Uwe; Wiechula, Jens; Wikne, Jon; Wilde, Martin Rudolf; Wilk, Alexander; Wilk, Grzegorz Andrzej; Williams, Crispin; Windelband, Bernd Stefan; Xaplanteris Karampatsos, Leonidas; Yaldo, Chris G; Yamaguchi, Yorito; Yang, Hongyan; Yang, Shiming; Yasnopolsky, Stanislav; Yi, JunGyu; Yin, Zhongbao; Yoo, In-Kwon; Yoon, Jongik; Yu, Weilin; Yuan, Xianbao; Yushmanov, Igor; Zach, Cenek; Zampolli, Chiara; Zaporozhets, Sergey; Zarochentsev, Andrey; Zavada, Petr; Zaviyalov, Nikolai; Zbroszczyk, Hanna Paulina; Zelnicek, Pierre; Zgura, Sorin Ion; Zhalov, Mikhail; Zhang, Haitao; Zhang, Xiaoming; Zhou, Daicui; Zhou, Fengchu; Zhou, You; Zhu, Jianhui; Zhu, Xiangrong; Zichichi, Antonino; Zimmermann, Alice; Zinovjev, Gennady; Zoccarato, Yannick Denis; Zynovyev, Mykhaylo; Zyzak, Maksym

    2013-04-10

    We report the first measurement of the net-charge fluctuations in Pb-Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 2.76 TeV, measured with the ALICE detector at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. The dynamical fluctuations per unit entropy are observed to decrease when going from peripheral to central collisions. An additional reduction in the amount of fluctuations is seen in comparison to the results from lower energies. We examine the dependence of fluctuations on the pseudo-rapidity interval, which may account for the dilution of fluctuations during the evolution of the system. We find that the ALICE data points are between the theoretically predicted values for a hadron gas and a Quark-Gluon Plasma.

  19. Environmental impact assessment of structural flood mitigation measures by a rapid impact assessment matrix (RIAM) technique: a case study in Metro Manila, Philippines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbuena, Romeo; Kawamura, Akira; Medina, Reynaldo; Amaguchi, Hideo; Nakagawa, Naoko; Bui, Duong Du

    2013-07-01

    In recent decades, the practice of environmental impact assessment (EIA) in the planning processes of infrastructure projects has created significant awareness on the benefits of environmentally sound and sustainable urban development around the world. In the highly urbanized megacities in the Philippines, like Metro Manila, high priority is given by the national government to structural flood mitigation measures (SFMM) due to the persistently high frequency of flood-related disasters, which are exacerbated by the on-going effects of climate change. EIA thus, should be carefully and effectively executed to maximize the potential benefits of the SFMM. The common practice of EIA in the Philippines is generally qualitative and lacks clear methodology in evaluating multi-criteria systems. Thus, this study proposes the use of the rapid impact assessment matrix (RIAM) technique to provide a method that would systematically and quantitatively evaluate the socio-economic and environmental impacts of planned SFMM in Metro Manila. The RIAM technique was slightly modified to fit the requirements of this study. The scale of impact was determined for each perceived impact, and based on the results, the planned SFMM for Metro Manila will likely bring significant benefits; however, significant negative impacts may also likely occur. The proposed modifications were found to be highly compatible with RIAM, and the results of the RIAM analysis provided a clear view of the impacts associated with the implementation of SFMM projects. This may prove to be valuable in the practice of EIA in the Philippines. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Ultrasonic assisted rapid synthesis of high uniform super-paramagnetic microspheres with core-shell structure and robust magneto-chromatic ability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Wenyan, E-mail: wiseyanyan@jit.edu.cn [College of Material Engineering, Jinling Institute of technology, Nanjing (China); Chen, Jiahua [College of Material Engineering, Jinling Institute of technology, Nanjing (China); Wang, Wei [Jiangsu Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Inorganic Function Composites, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing (China); School of Physics and Optoelectronic Engineering, Nanjing University of Information Science & Technology, Nanjing (China); Lu, GongXuan [State Key Laboratory for Oxo Synthesis and Selective Oxidation, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Hao, Lingyun [College of Material Engineering, Jinling Institute of technology, Nanjing (China); Ni, Yaru; Lu, Chunhua; Xu, Zhongzi [Jiangsu Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Inorganic Function Composites, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing (China); State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented Chemical Engineering, College of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing (China)

    2017-03-15

    Super-paramagnetic core-shell microspheres were synthesized by ultrasonic assisted routine under low ultrasonic irradiation powers. Compared with conventional routine, ultrasonic effect could not only improve the uniformity of the core-shell structure of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@SiO{sub 2}, but shorten the synthesis time in large scale. Owing to their hydrophilicity and high surface charge, the Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@SiO{sub 2} microspheres could be dispersed well in distilled water to form homogeneous colloidal suspension. The suspensions have favorable magneto-chromatic ability that they sensitively exhibit brilliant colorful ribbons by magnetic attraction. The colorful ribbons, which distributed along the magnetic lines, make morphology of the magnetic fields become “visible” to naked eyed. Those colorful ribbons originate from strong magnetic interaction between the microspheres and magnetic fields. Furthermore, the magneto-chromatic performance is reversible as the colorful ribbons vanished rapidly with the removing of magnetic fields. The silica layer effectively enhanced the acid resistance and surface-oxidation resistance of theFe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@SiO{sub 2} microspheres, so they could exhibit stable magnetic nature and robust magneto-chromatic property in acid environment. - Graphical abstract: The Graphical abstract shows the sensitive magneto-chromatic ability, the acid resistance ability as well as the magneto-chromatic mechanism of the Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@SiO{sub 2} suspension. - Highlights: • Sensitive and reversible robust magneto-chromatic property under magnetic attraction. • Morphology of magnetic field “visible” to naked eyes. • Enhance acid resistance and surface-oxidation resistance. • Ultrasonic effect largely shorten the synthesis time of high uniform microspheres.

  1. Astrocyte Structural and Molecular Response to Elevated Intraocular Pressure Occurs Rapidly and Precedes Axonal Tubulin Rearrangement within the Optic Nerve Head in a Rat Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shandiz Tehrani

    Full Text Available Glaucomatous axon injury occurs at the level of the optic nerve head (ONH in response to uncontrolled intraocular pressure (IOP. The temporal response of ONH astrocytes (glial cells responsible for axonal support to elevated IOP remains unknown. Here, we evaluate the response of actin-based astrocyte extensions and integrin-based signaling within the ONH to 8 hours of IOP elevation in a rat model. IOP elevation of 60 mm Hg was achieved under isoflurane anesthesia using anterior chamber cannulation connected to a saline reservoir. ONH astrocytic extension orientation was significantly and regionally rearranged immediately after IOP elevation (inferior ONH, 43.2° ± 13.3° with respect to the anterior-posterior axis versus 84.1° ± 1.3° in controls, p<0.05, and re-orientated back to baseline orientation 1 day post IOP normalization. ONH axonal microtubule filament label intensity was significantly reduced 1 and 3 days post IOP normalization, and returned to control levels on day 5. Phosphorylated focal adhesion kinase (FAK levels steadily decreased after IOP normalization, while levels of phosphorylated paxillin (a downstream target of FAK involved in focal adhesion dynamics were significantly elevated 5 days post IOP normalization. The levels of phosphorylated cortactin (a downstream target of Src kinase involved in actin polymerization were significantly elevated 1 and 3 days post IOP normalization and returned to control levels by day 5. No significant axon degeneration was noted by morphologic assessment up to 5 days post IOP normalization. Actin-based astrocyte structure and signaling within the ONH are significantly altered within hours after IOP elevation and prior to axonal cytoskeletal rearrangement, producing some responses that recover rapidly and others that persist for days despite IOP normalization.

  2. Fluctuation dynamics and 1/ f spectra characterizing the acoustic cavitation of liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skokov, V. N.; Reshetnikov, A. V.; Vinogradov, A. V.; Koverda, V. P.

    2007-04-01

    The dynamics of acoustic cavitation in water and glycerin is studied experimentally. The power spectra and distribution functions of fluctuations are determined. In transient regimes, bubble structures in the form of fractal clusters are formed near the ultrasonic radiator. The power spectra have the form 1/ f, and the distribution functions of local fluctuations differ from the Gaussian ones and exhibit the scale invariance property.

  3. Studies of Fluctuation Processes in Nuclear Collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayik, Sakir [Tennessee Technological Univ., Cookeville, TN (United States). Dept. of Physics

    2016-04-14

    The standard one-body transport approaches have been extensively applied to investigate heavy-ion collision dynamics at low and intermediate energies. At low energies the approach is the mean-field description of the time-dependent Hartree-Fock (TDHF) theory. At intermediate energies the approach is extended by including a collision term, and its application has been carried out mostly in the semi-classical framework of the Boltzmann-Uhling-Uhlenbeck (BUU) model. The standard transport models provide a good understanding of the average properties of the collision dynamics in terms of the effective interactions in both low and intermediate energies. However, the standard models are inadequate for describing the fluctuation dynamics of collective motion at low energies and disassembling of the nuclear system into fragments at intermediate energies resulting from the growth of density fluctuations in the spinodal region. Our tasks have been to improve the standard transport approaches by incorporating fluctuation mechanisms into the description. There are mainly two different mechanisms for fluctuations: (i) Collisional fluctuations generated by binary nucleon collisions, which provide the dominant mechanism at intermediate energies, and (ii) One-body mechanism or mean-field fluctuations, which is the dominant mechanism at low energies. In the first part of our project, the PI extended the standard transport model at intermediate energies by incorporating collisional mechanism according to the “Generalized Langevin Description” of Mori formalism. The PI and his collaborators carried out a number of applications for describing dynamical mechanism of nuclear multi fragmentations, and nuclear collective response in the semi-classical framework of the approach, which is known as the Boltzmann-Langevin model. In the second part of the project, we considered dynamical description at low energies. Because of the effective Pauli blocking, the collisional dissipation and

  4. Asymptotics of QCD traveling waves with fluctuations and running coupling effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beuf, Guillaume

    2008-09-01

    Extending the Balitsky-Kovchegov (BK) equation independently to running coupling or to fluctuation effects due to pomeron loops is known to lead in both cases to qualitative changes of the traveling-wave asymptotic solutions. In this paper we study the extension of the forward BK equation, including both running coupling and fluctuations effects, extending the method developed for the fixed coupling case [E. Brunet, B. Derrida, A.H. Mueller, S. Munier, Phys. Rev. E 73 (2006) 056126, cond-mat/0512021]. We derive the exact asymptotic behavior in rapidity of the probabilistic distribution of the saturation scale.

  5. Fluctuation Limit for Interacting Diffusions with Partial Annihilations Through Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhen-Qing; Fan, Wai-Tong Louis

    2016-08-01

    We study fluctuations of the empirical processes of a non-equilibrium interacting particle system consisting of two species over a domain that is recently introduced in Chen and Fan (Ann Probab, to appear) and establish its functional central limit theorem. This fluctuation limit is a distribution-valued Gaussian Markov process which can be represented as a mild solution of a stochastic partial differential equation. The drift of our fluctuation limit involves a new partial differential equation with nonlinear coupled term on the interface that characterized the hydrodynamic limit of the system. The covariance structure of the Gaussian part consists two parts, one involving the spatial motion of the particles inside the domain and other involving a boundary integral term that captures the boundary interactions between two species. The key is to show that the Boltzmann-Gibbs principle holds for our non-equilibrium system. Our proof relies on generalizing the usual correlation functions to the join correlations at two different times.

  6. Fluctuations and nematic order in collective motion of filamentous bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiguchi, Daiki; Nagai, Ken H.; Sano, Masaki

    Although there are many numerical and theoretical studies on Vicsek-like models, there have been no convincing experiments that clearly observe predicted properties of collective motion such as giant number fluctuations. To realize such experiments with a biological system, we used filamentous bacteria, which are 20 times as long as usual bacteria. Due to strong alignment interactions arising from their elongated shapes, these bacteria exhibit a nematic state when their dense suspensions are confined in a quasi-two-dimensional plane. We have quantitatively evaluated the nematic order parameter in this ordered state and concluded that it has true long-range order, and we have obtained giant number fluctuations in this true long-range ordered state. All the obtained experimental results are consistent with a Vicsek-like model with the same symmetry as our experiments, namely, the Vicsek-like self-propelled rods model, in which each particle has polarity and their interactions are nematic. This work is supported by a Grant-in-Aid for Japan Society for Promotion of Science (JSPS) Fellows (Grant No. 26-9915) and KAKENHI (No. 25103004, ``Fluctuation & Structure'') from MEXT, Japan.

  7. Influence of Turbulent Fluctuations on Detonation Propagation

    CERN Document Server

    Maxwell, Brian McN; Lau-Chapdelaine, Sebastien S M; Falle, Sam A E G; Sharpe, Gary J; Radulescu, Matei I

    2016-01-01

    The present study addresses the reaction zone structure and burning mechanism of unstable detonations. Experiments investigated mainly two-dimensional methane-oxygen cellular detonations in a thin channel geometry. The sufficiently high temporal resolution permitted to determine the PDF of the shock distribution, a power-law with an exponent of -3, and the burning rate of unreacted pockets from their edges - through surface turbulent flames with a speed approximately 3-7 times larger than the laminar one at the local conditions. Numerical simulations were performed using a novel Large Eddy Simulation method where the reactions due to both auto-ignition and turbulent transport and treated exactly at the sub-grid scale in a reaction-diffusion formulation. The model is an extension of Kerstein & Menon's Linear Eddy Model for Large Eddy Simulation to treat flows with shock waves and rapid gasdynamic transients. The two-dimensional simulations recovered well the amplification of the laminar flame speed owing t...

  8. Equilibrium & Nonequilibrium Fluctuation Effects in Biopolymer Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachan, Devin Michael

    Fluctuation-induced interactions are an important organizing principle in a variety of soft matter systems. In this dissertation, I explore the role of both thermal and active fluctuations within cross-linked polymer networks. The systems I study are in large part inspired by the amazing physics found within the cytoskeleton of eukaryotic cells. I first predict and verify the existence of a thermal Casimir force between cross-linkers bound to a semi-flexible polymer. The calculation is complicated by the appearance of second order derivatives in the bending Hamiltonian for such polymers, which requires a careful evaluation of the the path integral formulation of the partition function in order to arrive at the physically correct continuum limit and properly address ultraviolet divergences. I find that cross linkers interact along a filament with an attractive logarithmic potential proportional to thermal energy. The proportionality constant depends on whether and how the cross linkers constrain the relative angle between the two filaments to which they are bound. The interaction has important implications for the synthesis of biopolymer bundles within cells. I model the cross-linkers as existing in two phases: bound to the bundle and free in solution. When the cross-linkers are bound, they behave as a one-dimensional gas of particles interacting with the Casimir force, while the free phase is a simple ideal gas. Demanding equilibrium between the two phases, I find a discontinuous transition between a sparsely and a densely bound bundle. This discontinuous condensation transition induced by the long-ranged nature of the Casimir interaction allows for a similarly abrupt structural transition in semiflexible filament networks between a low cross linker density isotropic phase and a higher cross link density bundle network. This work is supported by the results of finite element Brownian dynamics simulations of semiflexible filaments and transient cross-linkers. I

  9. Exchange fluctuation theorem for correlated quantum systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jevtic, Sania; Rudolph, Terry; Jennings, David; Hirono, Yuji; Nakayama, Shojun; Murao, Mio

    2015-10-01

    We extend the exchange fluctuation theorem for energy exchange between thermal quantum systems beyond the assumption of molecular chaos, and describe the nonequilibrium exchange dynamics of correlated quantum states. The relation quantifies how the tendency for systems to equilibrate is modified in high-correlation environments. In addition, a more abstract approach leads us to a "correlation fluctuation theorem". Our results elucidate the role of measurement disturbance for such scenarios. We show a simple application by finding a semiclassical maximum work theorem in the presence of correlations. We also present a toy example of qubit-qudit heat exchange, and find that non-classical behaviour such as deterministic energy transfer and anomalous heat flow are reflected in our exchange fluctuation theorem.

  10. Faraday polarization fluctuations of satellite beacon signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, M. C.; Klobuchar, J. A.

    1988-01-01

    The anisotropic effects of random density irregularities in causing Faraday polarization fluctuations of VHF radio signals are examined, taking both rod-like and sheet-like irregularities into consideration. It is found that the variance of Faraday polarization fluctuations depends on the ratio of perpendicular to parallel correlation lengths. The anisotropic effect of rod-like ionospheric irregularities are shown to be most appreciable for longitudinal propagation. The anisotropic effect of sheet-like ionospheric irregularities, however, is not strongly dependent on the radio propagation angle. During transionospheric propagation at large angles with respect to the geomagnetic field, sheet-like irregularities may cause greater Faraday polarization fluctuations than rod-like irregularities.

  11. Low Mach Number Fluctuating Hydrodynamics for Electrolytes

    CERN Document Server

    Péraud, Jean-Philippe; Chaudhri, Anuj; Bell, John B; Donev, Aleksandar; Garcia, Alejandro L

    2016-01-01

    We formulate and study computationally the low Mach number fluctuating hydrodynamic equations for electrolyte solutions. We are interested in studying transport in mixtures of charged species at the mesoscale, down to scales below the Debye length, where thermal fluctuations have a significant impact on the dynamics. Continuing our previous work on fluctuating hydrodynamics of multicomponent mixtures of incompressible isothermal miscible liquids (A. Donev, et al., Physics of Fluids, 27, 3, 2015), we now include the effect of charged species using a quasielectrostatic approximation. Localized charges create an electric field, which in turn provides additional forcing in the mass and momentum equations. Our low Mach number formulation eliminates sound waves from the fully compressible formulation and leads to a more computationally efficient quasi-incompressible formulation. We demonstrate our ability to model saltwater (NaCl) solutions in both equilibrium and nonequilibrium settings. We show that our algorithm...

  12. Classical and quantum temperature fluctuations via holography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balatsky, Alexander V. [KTH Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden); Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Gudnason, Sven Bjarke [KTH Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden); Thorlacius, Larus [KTH Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden); University of Iceland, Reykjavik (Iceland); Zarembo, Konstantin [KTH Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden); Inst. of Theoretical and Experimental Physics (ITEP), Moscow (Russian Federation); Uppsala Univ. (Sweden); Krikun, Alexander [KTH Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden); Inst. of Theoretical and Experimental Physics (ITEP), Moscow (Russian Federation); Kedem, Yaron [KTH Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2014-05-27

    We study local temperature fluctuations in a 2+1 dimensional CFT on the sphere, dual to a black hole in asymptotically AdS space-time. The fluctuation spectrum is governed by the lowest-lying hydrodynamic sound modes of the system whose frequency and damping rate determine whether temperature fluctuations are thermal or quantum. We calculate numerically the corresponding quasinormal frequencies and match the result with the hydrodynamics of the dual CFT at large temperature. As a by-product of our analysis we determine the appropriate boundary conditions for calculating low-lying quasinormal modes for a four-dimensional Reissner-Nordstrom black hole in global AdS.

  13. RSA fluctuation in major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rottenberg, Jonathan; Clift, April; Bolden, Sarah; Salomon, Kristen

    2007-05-01

    Cardiac vagal control, as measured by indices of respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA), has been investigated as a marker of impaired self-regulation in mental disorders, including depression. Past work in depressed samples has focused on deficits in resting RSA levels, with mixed results. This study tested the hypothesis that depression involves abnormal RSA fluctuation. RSA was measured in depressed and healthy control participants during rest and during two reactivity tasks, each followed by a recovery period. Relative to controls, depressed persons exhibited lower resting RSA levels as well as less RSA fluctuation, primarily evidenced by a lack of task-related vagal suppression. Group differences in RSA fluctuation were not accounted for by differences in physical health or respiration, whereas group differences in resting RSA level did not survive covariate analyses. Depression may involve multiple deficits in cardiac vagal control.

  14. Numerical simulation of long-period fluid temperature fluctuation at a mixing tee for the thermal fatigue problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Utanohara, Yoichi, E-mail: utanohara@inss.co.jp [Institute of Nuclear Safety System, Inc., 64 Sata, Mihama-cho, Mikata-gun, Fukui 919-1205 (Japan); Nakamura, Akira, E-mail: a-naka@inss.co.jp [Institute of Nuclear Safety System, Inc., 64 Sata, Mihama-cho, Mikata-gun, Fukui 919-1205 (Japan); Miyoshi, Koji, E-mail: miyoshi.koji@inss.co.jp [Institute of Nuclear Safety System, Inc., 64 Sata, Mihama-cho, Mikata-gun, Fukui 919-1205 (Japan); Kasahara, Naoto, E-mail: kasahara@n.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • A large eddy simulation of a mixing tee was carried out. • Fluid temperature fluctuation could be predicted qualitatively. • Grid convergence was almost attained and the simulation continued until 100 s. • A longer-period temperature fluctuation than the well-known St = 0.2 appeared. • Prediction of long-period temperature fluctuations improves the thermal fatigue assessment. - Abstract: Thermal fatigue cracks may be initiated at mixing tees where high and low temperature fluids flow in and mix. According to a previous study, damage by thermal fatigue depends on the frequency of the fluid temperature fluctuation near the wall surface. Structures have the time constant of structural response that depends on physical properties of the structure and the gain of the frequency response tends to become maximum at the frequency lower than the typical frequency of fluid temperature fluctuation. Hence the effect of the lower frequency, that is, long-period temperature fluctuation is important for the thermal fatigue assessment. The typical frequency of fluid temperature fluctuation is about St = 0.2 (nearly 6 Hz), where St is Strouhal number and means non-dimensional frequency. In the experimental study by Miyoshi et al. (2014), a longer-period fluctuation than St = 0.2 was also observed. Results of a fluid–structure coupled analysis by Kamaya et al. (2011) showed this long-period temperature fluctuation causes severer damage to piping. In the present study, a large eddy simulation was carried out to investigate the predictive performance of the long-period fluid temperature fluctuation more quantitatively. Numerical simulation was conducted for the WATLON experiment which was the water experiment of a mixing tee performed at the Japan Atomic Energy Agency. Four computational grids were used to confirm grid convergence. In the short time (9 s) simulations, tendencies of time-averaged and fluctuated velocities could be followed. Time

  15. Fluctuations between multiple EF-G-induced chimeric tRNA states during translocation on the ribosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adio, Sarah; Senyushkina, Tamara; Peske, Frank; Fischer, Niels; Wintermeyer, Wolfgang; Rodnina, Marina V.

    2015-06-01

    The coupled translocation of transfer RNA and messenger RNA through the ribosome entails large-scale structural rearrangements, including step-wise movements of the tRNAs. Recent structural work has visualized intermediates of translocation induced by elongation factor G (EF-G) with tRNAs trapped in chimeric states with respect to 30S and 50S ribosomal subunits. The functional role of the chimeric states is not known. Here we follow the formation of translocation intermediates by single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer. Using EF-G mutants, a non-hydrolysable GTP analogue, and fusidic acid, we interfere with either translocation or EF-G release from the ribosome and identify several rapidly interconverting chimeric tRNA states on the reaction pathway. EF-G engagement prevents backward transitions early in translocation and increases the fraction of ribosomes that rapidly fluctuate between hybrid, chimeric and posttranslocation states. Thus, the engagement of EF-G alters the energetics of translocation towards a flat energy landscape, thereby promoting forward tRNA movement.

  16. Scale invariance and universality of economic fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, H. E.; Amaral, L. A. N.; Gopikrishnan, P.; Plerou, V.

    2000-08-01

    In recent years, physicists have begun to apply concepts and methods of statistical physics to study economic problems, and the neologism “econophysics” is increasingly used to refer to this work. Much recent work is focused on understanding the statistical properties of time series. One reason for this interest is that economic systems are examples of complex interacting systems for which a huge amount of data exist, and it is possible that economic time series viewed from a different perspective might yield new results. This manuscript is a brief summary of a talk that was designed to address the question of whether two of the pillars of the field of phase transitions and critical phenomena - scale invariance and universality - can be useful in guiding research on economics. We shall see that while scale invariance has been tested for many years, universality is relatively less frequently discussed. This article reviews the results of two recent studies - (i) The probability distribution of stock price fluctuations: Stock price fluctuations occur in all magnitudes, in analogy to earthquakes - from tiny fluctuations to drastic events, such as market crashes. The distribution of price fluctuations decays with a power-law tail well outside the Lévy stable regime and describes fluctuations that differ in size by as much as eight orders of magnitude. (ii) Quantifying business firm fluctuations: We analyze the Computstat database comprising all publicly traded United States manufacturing companies within the years 1974-1993. We find that the distributions of growth rates is different for different bins of firm size, with a width that varies inversely with a power of firm size. Similar variation is found for other complex organizations, including country size, university research budget size, and size of species of bird populations.

  17. Transition between two regimes describing internal fluctuation of DNA in a nanochannel.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianxiang Su

    Full Text Available We measure the thermal fluctuation of the internal segments of a piece of DNA confined in a nanochannel about 50-100 nm wide. This local thermodynamic property is key to accurate measurement of distances in genomic analysis. For DNA in ~100 nm channels, we observe a critical length scale ~10 m for the mean extension of internal segments, below which the de Gennes' theory describes the fluctuations with no fitting parameters, and above which the fluctuation data falls into Odijk's deflection theory regime. By analyzing the probability distributions of the extensions of the internal segments, we infer that folded structures of length 150-250 nm, separated by ~10 m exist in the confined DNA during the transition between the two regimes. For ~50 nm channels we find that the fluctuation is significantly reduced since the Odijk regime appears earlier. This is critical for genomic analysis. We further propose a more detailed theory based on small fluctuations and incorporating the effects of confinement to explicitly calculate the statistical properties of the internal fluctuations. Our theory is applicable to polymers with heterogeneous mechanical properties confined in non-uniform channels. We show that existing theories for the end-to-end extension/fluctuation of polymers can be used to study the internal fluctuations only when the contour length of the polymer is many times larger than its persistence length. Finally, our results suggest that introducing nicks in the DNA will not change its fluctuation behavior when the nick density is below 1 nick per kbp DNA.

  18. Fluctuations and localization in mesoscopic electron

    CERN Document Server

    Janssen, Martin

    2001-01-01

    The quantum phenomena of tunneling and interference show up not only in the microscopic world of atoms and molecules, but also in cold materials of the real world, such as metals and semiconductors. Though not fully macroscopic, such mesoscopic systems contain a huge number of particles, and the holistic nature of quantum mechanics becomes evident already in simple electronic measurements. The measured quantity fluctuates as a function of applied fields in an unpredictable, yet reproducible way. Despite this fingerprint character of fluctuations, their statistical properties are universal, i.e

  19. Chiral edge fluctuations of colloidal membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Leroy; Zakhary, Mark; Dogic, Zvonimir; Pelcovits, Robert; Powers, Thomas

    Using experiments and theory we study chiral fluctuations of the edge of a nearly flat colloidal membrane, consisting of rod-like viruses held together by the depletion interaction. Our measurements show an anomalous peak in the power spectrum around 1 inverse micron. Using an effective theory to describe the liquid crystal degrees of freedom by geometric properties of the edge, such as length, geodesic torsion, and curvature, we calculate the spectrum of out-of-plane edge fluctuations. The peak arises for sufficiently strong chirality, and corresponds to the instability of a flat membrane to a shape with helical, rippled edges.

  20. Fluctuation theorems for continuously monitored quantum fluxes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campisi, Michele; Talkner, Peter; Hänggi, Peter

    2010-10-01

    It is shown that quantum fluctuation theorems remain unaffected if measurements of any kind and number of observables are performed during the action of a force protocol. That is, although the backward and forward probabilities entering the fluctuation theorems are both altered by these measurements, their ratio remains unchanged. This observation allows us to describe the measurement of fluxes through interfaces and, in this way, to bridge the gap between the current theory, based on only two measurements performed at the beginning and end of the protocol, and experiments that are based on continuous monitoring.

  1. Two beam surface fluctuation specular reflection spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raudsepp, Allan; Fretigny, Christian; Lequeux, François; Talini, Laurence

    2012-01-01

    In surface fluctuation specular reflection spectroscopy (SFSRS) deflections of a specularly reflected laser beam are used to characterize thermally excited surface waves. Here we report on a new two beam version of SFSRS in which the deflections of two reflected laser beams from separate locations on a surface are correlated. We demonstrate that this new two beam SFSRS technique can be used to determine directly the power spectrum of height fluctuation of thermally excited surface waves over a large range of both frequencies and wavevectors. In addition, we show that the technique is well suited for materials ranging from simple liquids to complex liquids and soft solids, including turbid materials.

  2. Quantum Fluctuation Theorems, Contextuality, and Work Quasiprobabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lostaglio, Matteo

    2018-01-01

    We discuss the role of contextuality within quantum fluctuation theorems, in the light of a recent no-go result by Perarnau-Llobet et al. We show that any fluctuation theorem reproducing the two-point-measurement scheme for classical states either admits a notion of work quasiprobability or fails to describe protocols exhibiting contextuality. Conversely, we describe a protocol that smoothly interpolates between the two-point-measurement work distribution for projective measurements and Allahverdyan's work quasiprobability for weak measurements, and show that the negativity of the latter is a direct signature of contextuality.

  3. The business fluctuations and the lobbying evolution in European Union, Canada and USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oanta Ilie Stefan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Business fluctuations are associated with business cycles but are not implying the regularity. We consider that the lobbying activities can influence the periods of economic recession and expansion from business fluctuations. The role of lobbying is to affect the decisions made by officials in the government or international corporations and agencies or organizations. In this paper we describe the structure of lobbying practice in European Union, Canada and United States of America and the characteristics of business fluctuations. Specifically, this paper looks at the lobbying activities evolution in European Union, Canada and United States of America and also at a potential relationship between lobbying and business fluctuations, from periods of boom to periods of recession.

  4. Theory and application of Detrended Fluctuation Analysis for "gappy" time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Løvsletten, Ola

    2016-04-01

    A new theorem is presented which shows that the fluctuation function in detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) can be written as a weighted sum of variograms (or second order structure functions). From this theorem we derive a new estimator for the fluctuation function, which can properly handle missing values in regularly sampled time series. Under mild conditions on the distribution of gaps, the new estimator is equal in expectation to the corresponding fluctuation function in the gap-free case. In the gap-free case these two estimators coincide. In addition to a description of the algorithm for this new DFA estimator and its theoretical foundation, application to geophysical time series with missing data will be presented.

  5. Acute intermittent porphyria with SIADH and fluctuating dysautonomia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabin, A; Thapa, L J; Paudel, R; Rana, P V S

    2012-01-01

    Three cases of acute intermittent porphyria are reported. While in first case severe pain in abdomen with intermittent exacerbation was the only presentation, the second patient presented as accelerated hypertension and acute abdominal crises in whom the clinical course was characterized by development of deep coma due to inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone before she made complete recovery. The third patient, initially manifested as acute encephalitic syndrome. After initial improvement, she developed features of acute intermittent porphyria i.e. acute abdomen, neuropsychiatric symptoms, and rapidly progressing acute motor neuropathy leading to respiratory and bulbar paralysis. In addition, she developed severe and fluctuating dysautonomia leading to cardiac arrest and fatal termination. The importance of early diagnosis, recognition of autonomic disturbances, prompt treatment and counseling for avoidance of precipitating factors is stressed.

  6. Characterization of initial fluctuations for the hydrodynamical description of heavy ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Floerchinger, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Event-by-event fluctuations in the initial conditions for a hydrodynamical description of heavy-ion collisions are characterized. We propose a Bessel-Fourier decomposition with respect to the azimuthal angle, the radius in the transverse plane and rapidity. This allows for a complete characterization of fluctuations in all hydrodynamical fields including energy density, pressure, fluid velocity, shear stress and bulk viscous pressure. It has the advantage that fluctuations can be ordered with respect to their wave length and that they can be propagated mode-by-mode within the hydrodynamical formalism. Event ensembles can then be characterized in terms of a functional probability distribution. For the event ensemble of a Monte Carlo Glauber model, we provide evidence that the latter is close to Gaussian form, thus allowing for a particularly simple characterization of the event distribution.

  7. Geometric fluctuation theorem for a spin-boson system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Kota L; Hayakawa, Hisao

    2017-08-01

    We derive an extended fluctuation theorem for geometric pumping of a spin-boson system under periodic control of environmental temperatures by using a Markovian quantum master equation. We obtain the current distribution, the average current, and the fluctuation in terms of the Monte Carlo simulation. To explain the results of our simulation we derive an extended fluctuation theorem. This fluctuation theorem leads to the fluctuation dissipation relations but the absence of the conventional reciprocal relation.

  8. Comparison and evaluation of stresses generated by rapid maxillary expansion and the implant-supported rapid maxillary expansion on the craniofacial structures using finite element method of stress analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Varun; Shyagali, Tarulatha R; Kambalyal, Prabhuraj; Rajpara, Yagnesh; Doshi, Jigar

    2017-12-01

    The study aimed to evaluate and compare the stress distribution and 3-dimensional displacements along the craniofacial sutures in between the Rapid maxillary Expansion (RME) and Implant supported RME (I-RME). METHODS: Finite element model of the skull and the implants were created using ANSYS software. The finite element model thus built composed of 537692 elements and 115694 nodes in RME model & 543078 elements and 117948 nodes with implants model. The forces were applied on the palatal surface of the posterior teeth to cause 5mm of transverse displacement on either side of the palatal halves, making it a total of 10mm. The stresses and the displacement values were obtained and interpreted. Varying pattern of stress and the displacements with both positive and negative values were seen. The maximum displacement was seen in the case of plain RME model and that too at Pterygomaxillary suture and Mid-palatal suture in descending order. In the case of I-RME maximum displacement was seen at Zygomaticomaxillary suture followed by Pterygomaxillary suture. The displacements produced in all the three planes of space for the plain RME model were greater in comparison to the Implant Supported RME model. And the stresses remained high for all the sutures in case of an I-RME. There is a definite difference in the stress and the displacement pattern produced by RME and I-RME model and each can be used according to the need of the patient. The stresses generated in case of conventional RME were considerably less than that of the I-RME for all the sutures.

  9. Generalized entropy production fluctuation theorems for quantum ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics; Volume 80; Issue 2. Generalized entropy ... Based on trajectory-dependent path probability formalism in state space, we derive generalized entropy production fluctuation relations for a quantum system in the presence of measurement and feedback. We have obtained these ...

  10. Magnetic fluctuations in UNi4B

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mentink, S.A.M.; Mason, T.E.; Buyers, W.J.L.

    1997-01-01

    We investigate the magnetic fluctuation spectrum of the geometrically frustrated antiferromagnetic compound UNi4B, which partially orders below T-N = 20 K. An overdamped spin excitation is observed at the AF wave vector around 2.4 meV. Low-frequency, weakly Q-dependent inelastic scattering...

  11. Relationship among phenotypic plasticity, phenotypic fluctuations ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2009-09-04

    Sep 4, 2009 ... ... and evolution speed is obtained. The correlation between developmental robustness to noise and evolutionary robustness to mutation is analysed by simulations of the gene network model. These results provide quantitative formulation on canalization and genetic assimilation, in terms of fluctuations of ...

  12. temperature fluctuation inside inert atmosphere silos

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    TEMPERATURE FLUCTUATION INSIDE INERT ATMOSPHERE SILOS. E. S. Ajayi, et al. Nigerian Journal of Technology. Vol. 35, No. 3, July 2016. 643 also resist heat flow from solar radiation from outside. This is usually achieved by painting the silo wall with white paint. Some of the advantages of inert atmosphere storage ...

  13. Fluctuation scaling, Taylor's law, and crime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanley, Quentin S; Khatun, Suniya; Yosef, Amal; Dyer, Rachel-May

    2014-01-01

    Fluctuation scaling relationships have been observed in a wide range of processes ranging from internet router traffic to measles cases. Taylor's law is one such scaling relationship and has been widely applied in ecology to understand communities including trees, birds, human populations, and insects. We show that monthly crime reports in the UK show complex fluctuation scaling which can be approximated by Taylor's law relationships corresponding to local policing neighborhoods and larger regional and countrywide scales. Regression models applied to local scale data from Derbyshire and Nottinghamshire found that different categories of crime exhibited different scaling exponents with no significant difference between the two regions. On this scale, violence reports were close to a Poisson distribution (α = 1.057 ± 0.026) while burglary exhibited a greater exponent (α = 1.292 ± 0.029) indicative of temporal clustering. These two regions exhibited significantly different pre-exponential factors for the categories of anti-social behavior and burglary indicating that local variations in crime reports can be assessed using fluctuation scaling methods. At regional and countrywide scales, all categories exhibited scaling behavior indicative of temporal clustering evidenced by Taylor's law exponents from 1.43 ± 0.12 (Drugs) to 2.094 ± 0081 (Other Crimes). Investigating crime behavior via fluctuation scaling gives insight beyond that of raw numbers and is unique in reporting on all processes contributing to the observed variance and is either robust to or exhibits signs of many types of data manipulation.

  14. Fluctuations in doubly scattered laser light

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijswijk, F.C. van; Smith, U.L.

    1975-01-01

    Fluctuations in laser light, doubly scattered by brownian particles, were analysed by measuring the spectral noise power of the photodetector current. Scattering took place at two spatially separated systems of spherical particles. Analytic expressions for the field and intensity correlations are

  15. Effect of programmed circadian temperature fluctuations on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of programmed circadian temperature fluctuations on population dynamics of. Biomphalaria pfeifferi (Krauss). K.N. de Kock and J.A. van Eeden. Snail Research Unit, Medical Research Council, Potchefstroom University for Christian Higher Education,. Potchefstroom. Until now all life-table studies on freshwater snails.

  16. Quantum and Thermal Fluctuations in Field Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Liao, Sen-Ben; Polonyi, Janos; Xu, Dapeng

    1994-01-01

    Blocking transformation is performed in quantum field theory at finite temperature. It is found that the manner temperature deforms the renormalized trajectories can be used to understand better the role played by the quantum fluctuations. In particular, it is conjectured that domain formation and mass parameter generation can be observed in theories without spontaneous symmetry breaking.

  17. PREDICTION OF VOLTAGE FLUCTUATION IN ELECTRIC GRIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.A. Sapryka

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available A mathematical model of voltage fluctuation versus parameters of power quality and power consumption is developed to allow predicting parameters of the power quality in electric grids. Application of the model will result in an electrical complex functioning optimization

  18. Fluctuation scaling, Taylor's law, and crime.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quentin S Hanley

    Full Text Available Fluctuation scaling relationships have been observed in a wide range of processes ranging from internet router traffic to measles cases. Taylor's law is one such scaling relationship and has been widely applied in ecology to understand communities including trees, birds, human populations, and insects. We show that monthly crime reports in the UK show complex fluctuation scaling which can be approximated by Taylor's law relationships corresponding to local policing neighborhoods and larger regional and countrywide scales. Regression models applied to local scale data from Derbyshire and Nottinghamshire found that different categories of crime exhibited different scaling exponents with no significant difference between the two regions. On this scale, violence reports were close to a Poisson distribution (α = 1.057 ± 0.026 while burglary exhibited a greater exponent (α = 1.292 ± 0.029 indicative of temporal clustering. These two regions exhibited significantly different pre-exponential factors for the categories of anti-social behavior and burglary indicating that local variations in crime reports can be assessed using fluctuation scaling methods. At regional and countrywide scales, all categories exhibited scaling behavior indicative of temporal clustering evidenced by Taylor's law exponents from 1.43 ± 0.12 (Drugs to 2.094 ± 0081 (Other Crimes. Investigating crime behavior via fluctuation scaling gives insight beyond that of raw numbers and is unique in reporting on all processes contributing to the observed variance and is either robust to or exhibits signs of many types of data manipulation.

  19. A theory of fluctuations in plasmas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Felderhof, B.U.

    A theory of thermal fluctuations in plasmas is developed based on a probability ensemble for one-particle distribution functions ƒ(r, ν). The probability for a specific ƒ(r, ν) is obtained from the canonical ensemble with the aid of the continuum approximation. Subsequently the probability

  20. Macroeconomic fluctuations and mortality in postwar Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granados, José A Tapia

    2008-05-01

    Recent research has shown that after long-term declining trends are excluded, mortality rates in industrial countries tend to rise in economic expansions and fall in economic recessions. In the present work, co-movements between economic fluctuations and mortality changes in postwar Japan are investigated by analyzing time series of mortality rates and eight economic indicators. To eliminate spurious associations attributable to trends, series are detrended either via Hodrick-Prescott filtering or through differencing. As previously found in other industrial economies, general mortality and age-specific death rates in Japan tend to increase in expansions and drop in recessions, for both males and females. The effect, which is slightly stronger for males, is particularly noticeable in those aged 45-64. Deaths attributed to heart disease, pneumonia, accidents, liver disease, and senility--making up about 41% of total mortality--tend to fluctuate procyclically, increasing in expansions. Suicides, as well as deaths attributable to diabetes and hypertensive disease, make up about 4% of total mortality and fluctuate countercyclically, increasing in recessions. Deaths attributed to other causes, making up about half of total deaths, don't show a clearly defined relationship with the fluctuations of the economy.

  1. Low Mach number fluctuating hydrodynamics for electrolytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Péraud, Jean-Philippe; Nonaka, Andy; Chaudhri, Anuj; Bell, John B.; Donev, Aleksandar; Garcia, Alejandro L.

    2016-11-01

    We formulate and study computationally the low Mach number fluctuating hydrodynamic equations for electrolyte solutions. We are interested in studying transport in mixtures of charged species at the mesoscale, down to scales below the Debye length, where thermal fluctuations have a significant impact on the dynamics. Continuing our previous work on fluctuating hydrodynamics of multicomponent mixtures of incompressible isothermal miscible liquids [A. Donev et al., Phys. Fluids 27, 037103 (2015), 10.1063/1.4913571], we now include the effect of charged species using a quasielectrostatic approximation. Localized charges create an electric field, which in turn provides additional forcing in the mass and momentum equations. Our low Mach number formulation eliminates sound waves from the fully compressible formulation and leads to a more computationally efficient quasi-incompressible formulation. We demonstrate our ability to model saltwater (NaCl) solutions in both equilibrium and nonequilibrium settings. We show that our algorithm is second order in the deterministic setting and for length scales much greater than the Debye length gives results consistent with an electroneutral approximation. In the stochastic setting, our model captures the predicted dynamics of equilibrium and nonequilibrium fluctuations. We also identify and model an instability that appears when diffusive mixing occurs in the presence of an applied electric field.

  2. Quantum fluctuations in FRLW space-time

    OpenAIRE

    Rabochaya, Y.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we study a quantum field theoretical approach, where a quantum probe is used to investigate the properties of generic non-flat FRLW space time. The fluctuations related to a massless conformal coupled scalar field defined on a space-time with horizon is identified with a probe and the procedure to measure the local temperature is presented.

  3. Thermal turbulent convection: thermal plumes and fluctuations; Convection thermique turbulente: panaches et fluctuations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibert, M

    2007-10-15

    In this study we investigate the phenomenon of thermal turbulent convection in new and unprecedented ways. The first system we studied experimentally is an infinite vertical channel, where a constant vertical mean gradient of temperature exists. Inside this channel the average mass flux is null. The results obtained from our measurements reveal that the flow is mainly inertial; indeed the dissipative coefficients (here the viscosity) play a role only to define a coherence length L. This length is the distance over which the thermal plumes can be considered as 'free falling' objects. The horizontal transport, of heat and momentum, is entirely due to fluctuations. The associated 'mixing length' is small compared to the channel width. In the other hand, the vertical heat transport is due to coherent structures: the heat plumes. Those objects were also investigated in a Lagrangian study of the flow in the bulk of a Rayleigh-Benard cell. The probe, which has the same density as the fluid used in this experiment, is a sphere of 2 cm in diameter with embarked thermometers and radio-emitter. The heat plumes transport it, which allows a statistical study of such objects. (author)

  4. Critical fluctuations in cortical models near instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J. Aburn

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Computational studies often proceed from the premise that cortical dynamics operate in a linearly stable domain, where fluctuations dissipate quickly and show only short memory. Studies of human EEG, however, have shown significant autocorrelation at time lags on the scale of minutes, indicating the need to consider regimes where nonlinearities influence the dynamics. Statistical properties such as increased autocorrelation length, increased variance, power-law scaling and bistable switching have been suggested as generic indicators of the approach to bifurcation in nonlinear dynamical systems. We study temporal fluctuations in a widely-employed computational model (the Jansen-Rit model of cortical activity, examining the statistical signatures that accompany bifurcations. Approaching supercritical Hopf bifurcations through tuning of the background excitatory input, we find a dramatic increase in the autocorrelation length that depends sensitively on the direction in phase space of the input fluctuations and hence on which neuronal subpopulation is stochastically perturbed. Similar dependence on the input direction is found in the distribution of fluctuation size and duration, which show power law scaling that extends over four orders of magnitude at the Hopf bifurcation. We conjecture that the alignment in phase space between the input noise vector and the center manifold of the Hopf bifurcation is directly linked to these changes. These results are consistent with the possibility of statistical indicators of linear instability being detectable in real EEG time series. However, even in a simple cortical model, we find that these indicators may not necessarily be visible even when bifurcations are present because their expression can depend sensitively on the neuronal pathway of incoming fluctuations.

  5. Rapid prototype and test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregory, D.L.; Hansche, B.D.

    1996-06-01

    In order to support advanced manufacturing, Sandia has acquired the capability to produce plastic prototypes using stereolithography. Currently, these prototypes are used mainly to verify part geometry and ``fit and form`` checks. This project investigates methods for rapidly testing these plastic prototypes, and inferring from prototype test data actual metal part performance and behavior. Performances examined include static load/stress response, and structural dynamic (modal) and vibration behavior. The integration of advanced non-contacting measurement techniques including scanning laser velocimetry, laser holography, and thermoelasticity into testing of these prototypes is described. Photoelastic properties of the epoxy prototypes to reveal full field stress/strain fields are also explored.

  6. Heat fluctuations of Brownian oscillators in nonstationary processes: Fluctuation theorem and condensation transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisanti, A; Sarracino, A; Zannetti, M

    2017-05-01

    We study analytically the probability distribution of the heat released by an ensemble of harmonic oscillators to the thermal bath, in the nonequilibrium relaxation process following a temperature quench. We focus on the asymmetry properties of the heat distribution in the nonstationary dynamics, in order to study the forms taken by the fluctuation theorem as the number of degrees of freedom is varied. After analyzing in great detail the cases of one and two oscillators, we consider the limit of a large number of oscillators, where the behavior of fluctuations is enriched by a condensation transition with a nontrivial phase diagram, characterized by reentrant behavior. Numerical simulations confirm our analytical findings. We also discuss and highlight how concepts borrowed from the study of fluctuations in equilibrium under symmetry-breaking conditions [Gaspard, J. Stat. Mech. (2012) P0802110.1088/1742-5468/2012/08/P08021] turn out to be quite useful in understanding the deviations from the standard fluctuation theorem.

  7. Scaling in sub- substorm scale fluctuations in epsilon, AU and AL- solar cycle dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hnat, B.; Chapman, S. C.

    2006-12-01

    A key property of magnetospheric energy release is intermittent, non-Gaussian fluctuations in geomagnetic indices and in single station magnetometer data occurring on shorter than substorm timescales. However, the turbulent solar wind is also intermittent, so that the Poynting flux into the magnetosphere shares these qualitative features. We study the properties of fluctuations of the AU and AL geomagnetic indices and of the epsilon parameter which is a measure of the solar wind driver. We perform analyses that provide quantitative measures within the framework of models for turbulence and for critical phenomena; that is, we find the exponent that captures the self-similarity in the time series, and the functional form of the non- Gaussian Probability Density Function (PDF) that expresses its intermittency. Generalized structure function analysis is accompanied by PDF rescaling. Fluctuations in all quantities are found to exhibit self-similar statistics for up to 1-2 hours. We divide the data into intervals of solar maximum and minimum and find that whereas fluctuations in epsilon and AU change their properties with the solar cycle, fluctuations in AL do not. This places strong statistical constraints on the propagation of information from these below- substorm scale fluctuations from the solar wind to the magnetosphere as seen by the indices.

  8. Universal Property of Quantum Measurements of Equilibrium Fluctuations and Violation of the Fluctuation-Dissipation Theorem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujikura, Kyota; Shimizu, Akira

    2016-07-01

    For macroscopic quantum systems, we study what is measured when equilibrium fluctuations of macrovariables are measured in an ideal way that mimics classical ideal measurements as closely as possible. We find that the symmetrized time correlation is always obtained for such measurements. As an important consequence, we show that the fluctuation-dissipation theorem is partially violated as a relation between observed quantities in macroscopic quantum systems even if measurements are made in such an ideal way.

  9. Universal Property of Quantum Measurements of Equilibrium Fluctuations and Violation of the Fluctuation-Dissipation Theorem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujikura, Kyota; Shimizu, Akira

    2016-07-01

    For macroscopic quantum systems, we study what is measured when equilibrium fluctuations of macrovariables are measured in an ideal way that mimics classical ideal measurements as closely as possible. We find that the symmetrized time correlation is always obtained for such measurements. As an important consequence, we show that the fluctuation-dissipation theorem is partially violated as a relation between observed quantities in macroscopic quantum systems even if measurements are made in such an ideal way.

  10. Effect of thermal fluctuations on a charged dilatonic black Saturn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behnam Pourhassan

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we will analyze the effect of thermal fluctuations on the thermodynamics of a charged dilatonic black Saturn. These thermal fluctuations will correct the thermodynamics of the charged dilatonic black Saturn. We will analyze the corrections to the thermodynamics of this system by first relating the fluctuations in the entropy to the fluctuations in the energy. Then, we will use the relation between entropy and a conformal field theory to analyze the fluctuations in the entropy. We will demonstrate that similar physical results are obtained from both these approaches. We will also study the effect of thermal fluctuations on the phase transition in this charged dilatonic black Saturn.

  11. Effect of thermal fluctuations on a charged dilatonic black Saturn

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pourhassan, Behnam, E-mail: b.pourhassan@du.ac.ir [School of Physics, Damghan University, Damghan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Faizal, Mir, E-mail: f2mir@uwaterloo.ca [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Lethbridge, Lethbridge, AB T1K 3M4 (Canada)

    2016-04-10

    In this paper, we will analyze the effect of thermal fluctuations on the thermodynamics of a charged dilatonic black Saturn. These thermal fluctuations will correct the thermodynamics of the charged dilatonic black Saturn. We will analyze the corrections to the thermodynamics of this system by first relating the fluctuations in the entropy to the fluctuations in the energy. Then, we will use the relation between entropy and a conformal field theory to analyze the fluctuations in the entropy. We will demonstrate that similar physical results are obtained from both these approaches. We will also study the effect of thermal fluctuations on the phase transition in this charged dilatonic black Saturn.

  12. Effect of Thermal Fluctuations on a Charged Dilatonic Black Saturn

    CERN Document Server

    Pourhassan, Behnam

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we will analyze the effect of thermal fluctuations on the thermodynamics of a charged dilatonic black Saturn. These thermal fluctuations will correct the thermodynamics of the charged dilatonic black Saturn. We will analyze the corrections to the thermodynamics of this system by first relating the fluctuations in the entropy to the fluctuations in the energy. Then, we will use the relation between entropy and a conformal field theory to analyze the fluctuations in the entropy. We will demonstrate that similar physical results are obtained from both these approaches. We will also study the effect of thermal fluctuations on the phase transition in this charged dilatonic black Saturn.

  13. Importance of Fluctuations in Light on Plant Photosynthetic Acclimation1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    The acclimation of plants to light has been studied extensively, yet little is known about the effect of dynamic fluctuations in light on plant phenotype and acclimatory responses. We mimicked natural fluctuations in light over a diurnal period to examine the effect on the photosynthetic processes and growth of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). High and low light intensities, delivered via a realistic dynamic fluctuating or square wave pattern, were used to grow and assess plants. Plants subjected to square wave light had thicker leaves and greater photosynthetic capacity compared with fluctuating light-grown plants. This, together with elevated levels of proteins associated with electron transport, indicates greater investment in leaf structural components and photosynthetic processes. In contrast, plants grown under fluctuating light had thinner leaves, lower leaf light absorption, but maintained similar photosynthetic rates per unit leaf area to square wave-grown plants. Despite high light use efficiency, plants grown under fluctuating light had a slow growth rate early in development, likely due to the fact that plants grown under fluctuating conditions were not able to fully utilize the light energy absorbed for carbon fixation. Diurnal leaf-level measurements revealed a negative feedback control of photosynthesis, resulting in a decrease in total diurnal carbon assimilated of at least 20%. These findings highlight that growing plants under square wave growth conditions ultimately fails to predict plant performance under realistic light regimes and stress the importance of considering fluctuations in incident light in future experiments that aim to infer plant productivity under natural conditions in the field. PMID:28184008

  14. The correlation between the Nernst effect and fluctuation diamagnetism in strongly fluctuating superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Kingshuk; Banerjee, Sumilan; Mukerjee, Subroto; Ramakrishnan, T. V.

    2017-07-01

    We study the Nernst effect in fluctuating superconductors by calculating the transport coefficient {α }{xy} in a phenomenological model where the relative importance of phase and amplitude fluctuations of the order parameter is tuned continuously to smoothly evolve from an effective XY model to the more conventional Ginzburg-Landau description. To connect with a concrete experimental realization we choose the model parameters appropriate for cuprate superconductors and calculate {α }{xy} and the magnetization {M} over the entire range of experimentally accessible values of field, temperature and doping. We argue that {α }{xy} and {M} are both determined by the equilibrium properties of the superconducting fluctuations (and not their dynamics) despite the former being a transport quantity. Thus, the experimentally observed correlation between the Nernst signal and the magnetization arises primarily from the correlation between {α }{xy} and {M}. Further, there exists a dimensionless ratio {M}/(T{α }{xy}) that quantifies this correlation. We calculate, for the first time, this ratio over the entire phase diagram of the cuprates and find it agrees with previous results obtained in specific parts of the phase diagram. We conclude that there appears to be no sharp distinction between the regimes dominated by phase fluctuations and Gaussian fluctuations for this ratio in contrast to {α }{xy} and {M} individually. The utility of this ratio is that it can be used to determine the extent to which superconducting fluctuations contribute to the Nernst effect in different parts of the phase diagram given the measured values of magnetization.

  15. 2D image of local density and magnetic fluctuations from line-integrated interferometry-polarimetry measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, L; Ding, W X; Brower, D L

    2014-11-01

    Combined polarimetry-interferometry capability permits simultaneous measurement of line-integrated density and Faraday effect with fast time response (∼1 μs) and high sensitivity. Faraday effect fluctuations with phase shift of order 0.05° associated with global tearing modes are resolved with an uncertainty ∼0.01°. For physics investigations, local density fluctuations are obtained by inverting the line-integrated interferometry data. The local magnetic and current density fluctuations are then reconstructed using a parameterized fit of the polarimetry data. Reconstructed 2D images of density and magnetic field fluctuations in a poloidal cross section exhibit significantly different spatial structure. Combined with their relative phase, the magnetic-fluctuation-induced particle transport flux and its spatial distribution are resolved.

  16. Exotic weeds and fluctuating microclimate can constrain native plant regeneration in urban forest restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, K J; Laughlin, Daniel C; Clarkson, Bruce D

    2017-06-01

    Restoring forest structure and composition is an important component of urban land management, but we lack clear understanding of the mechanisms driving restoration success. Here we studied two indicators of restoration success in temperate rainforests: native tree regeneration and epiphyte colonization. We hypothesized that ecosystem properties such as forest canopy openness, abundance of exotic herbaceous weeds, and the microclimate directly affect the density and diversity of native tree seedlings and epiphytes. Relationships between environmental conditions and the plant community were investigated in 27 restored urban forests spanning 3-70 years in age and in unrestored and remnant urban forests. We used structural equation modelling to determine the direct and indirect drivers of native tree regeneration and epiphyte colonization in the restored forests. Compared to remnant forest, unrestored forest had fewer native canopy tree species, significantly more light reaching the forest floor annually, and higher exotic weed cover. Additionally, epiphyte density was lower and native tree regeneration density was marginally lower in the unrestored forests. In restored forests, light availability was reduced to levels found in remnant forests within 20 years of restoration planting, followed shortly thereafter by declines in herbaceous exotic weeds and reduced fluctuation of relative humidity and soil temperatures. Contrary to expectations, canopy openness was only an indirect driver of tree regeneration and epiphyte colonization, but it directly regulated weed cover and microclimatic fluctuations, both of which directly drove the density and richness of regeneration and epiphyte colonization. Epiphyte density and diversity were also positively related to forest basal area, as large trees provide physical habitat for colonization. These results imply that ecosystem properties change predictably after initial restoration plantings, and that reaching critical

  17. Signal fluctuations in crystal-APD systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kocak, F., E-mail: fkocak@uludag.edu.tr [Uludag University, Department of Physics, 16059 Bursa (Turkey); Tapan, I.; Pilicer, E. [Uludag University, Department of Physics, 16059 Bursa (Turkey)

    2011-08-21

    PbWO{sub 4} and CsI(Tl) crystals are widely used in high energy physics experiments. The photons generated from incident particles in the crystal material are detected by the Avalanche photodiodes (APD) placed at the end of the crystals. In this work, the light generated by 0.1-5 GeV electrons in the crystals has been obtained using with the GEANT4 simulation code. The Single Particle Monte Carlo technique has been used to calculate APD output signals and their fluctuations at a constant avalanche gain value of 50 for both the CsI(Tl) and PbWO{sub 4} crystals emission spectrum. The simulation results are agreed well with the experimental results. CsI(Tl) crystal-APD system has provided a good material-device combination. The high signal values and the low signal fluctuations make this combination an excellent choice for scintillating light detection.

  18. Fluctuation theorem in quantum heat conduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Keiji; Dhar, Abhishek

    2007-11-02

    We consider steady-state heat conduction across a quantum harmonic chain connected to reservoirs modeled by infinite collection of oscillators. The heat, Q, flowing across the oscillator in a time interval tau is a stochastic variable and we study the probability distribution function P(Q). We compute the exact generating function of Q at large tau and the large deviation function. The generating function has a symmetry satisfying the steady-state fluctuation theorem without any quantum corrections. The distribution P(Q) is non-Gaussian with clear exponential tails. The effect of finite tau and nonlinearity is considered in the classical limit through Langevin simulations. We also obtain the prediction of quantum heat current fluctuations at low temperatures in clean wires.

  19. Trapped Electron Precession Shear Induced Fluctuation Decorrelation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T.S. Hahm; P.H. Diamond; E.-J. Kim

    2002-07-29

    We consider the effects of trapped electron precession shear on the microturbulence. In a similar way the strong E x B shear reduces the radial correlation length of ambient fluctuations, the radial variation of the trapped electron precession frequency can reduce the radial correlation length of fluctuations associated with trapped electrons. In reversed shear plasmas, with the explicit dependence of the trapped electron precession shearing rate on B(subscript)theta, the sharp radial gradient of T(subscript)e due to local electron heating inside qmin can make the precession shearing mechanism more effective, and reduce the electron thermal transport constructing a positive feedback loop for the T(subscript)e barrier formation.

  20. Prevention of Employees Fluctuation in IT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Libor Mesicek

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to present results of implementation fluctuation preventing counter-measures among other positions in IT department. In 2017 there is still one of the lowest unemployment rates in the history of the Czech Republic (especially in IT and companies are trying to preserve and prevent their key employees from moving to another employer. One of the tools, which could help reduce this risk, is providing additional education, certification and qualification with laying great emphasis on most valuable and essential personnel. The paper present updated results after 6 months since the company started with selection of high risks employees. It has been found that group of employees with high risk of leaving the company has shrunk and overall fluctuation index has also plunged.

  1. Energy utilization in fluctuating biological energy converters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abraham Szőke

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We have argued previously [Szoke et al., FEBS Lett. 553, 18–20 (2003; Curr. Chem. Biol. 1, 53–57 (2007] that energy utilization and evolution are emergent properties based on a small number of established laws of physics and chemistry. The relevant laws constitute a framework for biology on a level intermediate between quantum chemistry and cell biology. There are legitimate questions whether these concepts are valid at the mesoscopic level. Such systems fluctuate appreciably, so it is not clear what their efficiency is. Advances in fluctuation theorems allow the description of such systems on a molecular level. We attempt to clarify this topic and bridge the biochemical and physical descriptions of mesoscopic systems.

  2. Quantum Fluctuations of a Superconductor Order Parameter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arutyunov, K Yu; Lehtinen, J S

    2016-12-01

    Tunneling I-V characteristics between very narrow titanium nanowires and "massive" superconducting aluminum were measured. The clear trend was observed: the thinner the titanium electrode, the broader the singularity at eV = Δ1(Al) + Δ2(Ti). The phenomenon can be explained by broadening of the gap edge of the quasi-one-dimensional titanium channels due to quantum fluctuations of the order parameter modulus |Δ2|. The range of the nanowire diameters, where the effect is pronounced, correlates with dimensions where the phase fluctuations of the complex superconducting order parameter Δ = |Δ|e(iφ), the quantum phase slips, broadening the R(T) dependencies, have been observed.

  3. Balancing Aggradation and Progradation on a Vegetated Delta: The Importance of Fluctuating Discharge in Depositional Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piliouras, Anastasia; Kim, Wonsuck; Carlson, Brandee

    2017-10-01

    Vegetation is an important component of constructional landscapes, as plants enhance deposition and provide organic sediment that can increase aggradation rates to combat land loss. We conducted two sets of laboratory experiments using alfalfa (Medicago sativa) to determine the effects of plants on channel organization and large-scale delta dynamics. In the first set, we found that rapid vegetation colonization enhanced deposition but inhibited channelization via increased form drag that reduced the shear stress available for sediment entrainment and transport. A second set of experiments used discharge fluctuations between flood and base flow (or interflood). Interfloods were critical for reworking the topset via channel incision and lateral migration to create channel relief and prevent rapid plant colonization. These low-flow periods also greatly reduced the topset slope in the absence of vegetation by removing topset sediment and delivering it to the shoreline. Floods decreased relief by filling channels with sediment, resulting in periods of rapid progradation and enhanced aggradation over the topset surface, which was amplified by vegetation. The combination of discharge fluctuations and vegetation thus provided a balance of vertical aggradation and lateral progradation. We conclude that plants can inhibit channelization in depositional systems and that discharge fluctuations encourage channel network organization to naturally balance against aggradation. Thus, variations in discharge are an important aspect of understanding the ecomorphodynamics of aggrading surfaces and modeling vegetated deltaic systems, and the combined influences of plants and discharge variations can act to balance vertical and lateral delta growth.

  4. Single molecule detection, thermal fluctuation and life

    Science.gov (United States)

    YANAGIDA, Toshio; ISHII, Yoshiharu

    2017-01-01

    Single molecule detection has contributed to our understanding of the unique mechanisms of life. Unlike artificial man-made machines, biological molecular machines integrate thermal noises rather than avoid them. For example, single molecule detection has demonstrated that myosin motors undergo biased Brownian motion for stepwise movement and that single protein molecules spontaneously change their conformation, for switching to interactions with other proteins, in response to thermal fluctuation. Thus, molecular machines have flexibility and efficiency not seen in artificial machines. PMID:28190869

  5. Climatically driven fluctuations in Southern Ocean ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Eugene J; Trathan, Philip N; Watkins, Jon L; Reid, Keith; Meredith, Michael P; Forcada, Jaume; Thorpe, Sally E; Johnston, Nadine M; Rothery, Peter

    2007-12-22

    Determining how climate fluctuations affect ocean ecosystems requires an understanding of how biological and physical processes interact across a wide range of scales. Here we examine the role of physical and biological processes in generating fluctuations in the ecosystem around South Georgia in the South Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean. Anomalies in sea surface temperature (SST) in the South Pacific sector of the Southern Ocean have previously been shown to be generated through atmospheric teleconnections with El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO)-related processes. These SST anomalies are propagated via the Antarctic Circumpolar Current into the South Atlantic (on time scales of more than 1 year), where ENSO and Southern Annular Mode-related atmospheric processes have a direct influence on short (less than six months) time scales. We find that across the South Atlantic sector, these changes in SST, and related fluctuations in winter sea ice extent, affect the recruitment and dispersal of Antarctic krill. This oceanographically driven variation in krill population dynamics and abundance in turn affects the breeding success of seabird and marine mammal predators that depend on krill as food. Such propagating anomalies, mediated through physical and trophic interactions, are likely to be an important component of variation in ocean ecosystems and affect responses to longer term change. Population models derived on the basis of these oceanic fluctuations indicate that plausible rates of regional warming of 1oC over the next 100 years could lead to more than a 95% reduction in the biomass and abundance of krill across the Scotia Sea by the end of the century.

  6. Fluctuation sensitivity of a transcriptional signaling cascade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilkiewicz, Kevin R.; Mayo, Michael L.

    2016-09-01

    The internal biochemical state of a cell is regulated by a vast transcriptional network that kinetically correlates the concentrations of numerous proteins. Fluctuations in protein concentration that encode crucial information about this changing state must compete with fluctuations caused by the noisy cellular environment in order to successfully transmit information across the network. Oftentimes, one protein must regulate another through a sequence of intermediaries, and conventional wisdom, derived from the data processing inequality of information theory, leads us to expect that longer sequences should lose more information to noise. Using the metric of mutual information to characterize the fluctuation sensitivity of transcriptional signaling cascades, we find, counter to this expectation, that longer chains of regulatory interactions can instead lead to enhanced informational efficiency. We derive an analytic expression for the mutual information from a generalized chemical kinetics model that we reduce to simple, mass-action kinetics by linearizing for small fluctuations about the basal biological steady state, and we find that at long times this expression depends only on a simple ratio of protein production to destruction rates and the length of the cascade. We place bounds on the values of these parameters by requiring that the mutual information be at least one bit—otherwise, any received signal would be indistinguishable from noise—and we find not only that nature has devised a way to circumvent the data processing inequality, but that it must be circumvented to attain this one-bit threshold. We demonstrate how this result places informational and biochemical efficiency at odds with one another by correlating high transcription factor binding affinities with low informational output, and we conclude with an analysis of the validity of our assumptions and propose how they might be tested experimentally.

  7. Financial Factors, Rare Disasters and Macroeconomic Fluctuations.

    OpenAIRE

    Gruss, Bertrand

    2010-01-01

    Defense date: 25/10/2010 Examining Board: Prof. Giancarlo Corsetti, EUI, Supervisor Prof. Ramon Marimon, EUI Prof. Enrique Mendoza, University of Maryland Prof. Vincenzo Quadrini, University of Southern California This thesis attempts to shed light on the role of financial factors and vulnerabilities in shaping macroeconomic fluctuations. It contributes to the literature that integrates financial factors into the real business cycle paradigm by introducing asymmetries and di...

  8. Thermodynamics and fluctuations far from equilibrium

    CERN Document Server

    Ross, John

    2008-01-01

    This book deals with the formulation of the thermodynamics of chemical and other systems far from equilibrium, including connections to fluctuations. It contains applications to non-equilibrium stationary states and approaches to such states, systems with multiple stationary states, stability and equi-stability conditions, reaction diffusion systems, transport properties, and electrochemical systems. The theoretical treatment is complemented by experimental results to substantiate the formulation. Dissipation and efficiency are analyzed in autonomous and externally forced reactions, including several biochemical systems.

  9. Fluctuations along supersymmetric flat directions during Inflation

    OpenAIRE

    Enqvist, Kari; Figueroa, Daniel G.; Rigopoulos, Gerasimos

    2011-01-01

    We consider a set of scalar fields, consisting of a single flat direction and one or several non-flat directions. We take our cue from the MSSM, considering separately D-flat and F-flat directions, but our results apply to any supersymmetric scenario containing flat directions. We study the field fluctuations during pure de Sitter Inflation, following the evolution of the infrared modes by numerically solving the appropriate Langevin equations. We demonstrate that for the Standard Model U(1),...

  10. Demographic Fluctuation and Institutional Response in Sparta

    OpenAIRE

    DORAN, TIMOTHY DONALD

    2011-01-01

    AbstractDemographic Fluctuation and Institutional Response in SpartabyTimothy Donald DoranDoctor of Philosophy in Ancient History and Mediterranean ArchaeologyUniversity of California, BerkeleyProfessor Emily Mackil, ChairThe Spartiate population declined from 8000 in the early fifth century to less than 1000 in the mid-fourth, and caused Sparta's political fortunes to drop dramatically from being the unofficial hegemon of the Greek-speaking peoples to a strictly local power in the Hellenisti...

  11. Freeze-out conditions from net-proton and net-charge fluctuations at RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alba, Paolo; Alberico, Wanda [Department of Physics, Torino University and INFN, Sezione di Torino, via P. Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Bellwied, Rene [Department of Physics, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204 (United States); Bluhm, Marcus [Department of Physics, Torino University and INFN, Sezione di Torino, via P. Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Mantovani Sarti, Valentina [Department of Physics, Torino University and INFN, Sezione di Torino, via P. Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Nahrgang, Marlene [Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708-0305 (United States); Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies (FIAS), Ruth-Moufang-Str. 1, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Ratti, Claudia [Department of Physics, Torino University and INFN, Sezione di Torino, via P. Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy)

    2014-11-10

    We calculate ratios of higher-order susceptibilities quantifying fluctuations in the number of net-protons and in the net-electric charge using the Hadron Resonance Gas (HRG) model. We take into account the effect of resonance decays, the kinematic acceptance cuts in rapidity, pseudo-rapidity and transverse momentum used in the experimental analysis, as well as a randomization of the isospin of nucleons in the hadronic phase. By comparing these results to the latest experimental data from the STAR Collaboration, we determine the freeze-out conditions from net-electric charge and net-proton distributions and discuss their consistency.

  12. Non-Gaussian probability distributions of solar wind fluctuations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Marsch

    Full Text Available The probability distributions of field differences ∆x(τ=x(t+τ-x(t, where the variable x(t may denote any solar wind scalar field or vector field component at time t, have been calculated from time series of Helios data obtained in 1976 at heliocentric distances near 0.3 AU. It is found that for comparatively long time lag τ, ranging from a few hours to 1 day, the differences are normally distributed according to a Gaussian. For shorter time lags, of less than ten minutes, significant changes in shape are observed. The distributions are often spikier and narrower than the equivalent Gaussian distribution with the same standard deviation, and they are enhanced for large, reduced for intermediate and enhanced for very small values of ∆x. This result is in accordance with fluid observations and numerical simulations. Hence statistical properties are dominated at small scale τ by large fluctuation amplitudes that are sparsely distributed, which is direct evidence for spatial intermittency of the fluctuations. This is in agreement with results from earlier analyses of the structure functions of ∆x. The non-Gaussian features are differently developed for the various types of fluctuations. The relevance of these observations to the interpretation and understanding of the nature of solar wind magnetohydrodynamic (MHD turbulence is pointed out, and contact is made with existing theoretical concepts of intermittency in fluid turbulence.

  13. Stress fluctuations in sheared Stokesian suspensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasan, J; Ramamohan, T R; Singh, Anugrah; Nott, Prabhu R

    2002-08-01

    We report an analysis, using the tools of nonlinear dynamics and chaos theory, of the fluctuations in the stress determined from simulations of shear flow of Stokesian suspensions. The simulations are for shear between plane parallel walls of a suspension of rigid identical spheres in a Newtonian fluid, over a range of particle concentration. By analyzing the time series of the stress, we find that the dynamics underlying these fluctuations is deterministic, low-dimensional, and chaotic. We use the dynamic and metric invariants of the underlying dynamics as a means of characterizing suspension behavior. The dimension of the chaotic attractor increases with particle concentration, indicating the increasing influence of multiple-body interactions on the rheology of the suspension with rise in particle concentration. We use our analysis to make accurate predictions of the short-term evolution of a stress component from its preceding time series, and predict the evolution of one component of the stress using the time series of another. We comment on the physical origin of the chaotic stress fluctuations, and on the implications of our results on the relation between the microstructure and the stress.

  14. Water-level fluctuations influence sediment porewater ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reservoirs typically have elevated fish mercury (Hg) levels compared to natural lakes and rivers. A unique feature of reservoirs is water-level management which can result in sediment exposure to the air. The objective of this study is to identify how reservoir water-level fluctuations impact Hg cycling, particularly the formation of the more toxic and bioaccumulative methylmercury (MeHg). Total-Hg (THg), MeHg, stable isotope methylation rates and several ancillary parameters were measured in reservoir sediments (including some in porewater and overlying water) that are seasonally and permanently inundated. The results showed that sediment and porewater MeHg concentrations were over 3-times higher in areas experiencing water-level fluctuations compared to permanently inundated sediments. Analysis of the data suggest that the enhanced breakdown of organic matter in sediments experiencing water-level fluctuations has a two-fold effect on stimulating Hg methylation: 1) it increases the partitioning of inorganic Hg from the solid phase into the porewater phase (lower log Kd values) where it is more bioavailable for methylation; and 2) it increases dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in the porewater which can stimulate the microbial community that can methylate Hg. Sulfate concentrations and cycling were enhanced in the seasonally inundated sediments and may have also contributed to increased MeHg production. Overall, our results suggest that reservoir management a

  15. Behavior of axisymmetric density fluctuations in TCV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlo, Gabriele; Jenko, Frank; Brunner, Stephan; Coda, Stefano; Huang, Zhouji; Villard, Laurent; Goerler, Tobias; Navarro, Alejandro B.; Told, Daniel

    2017-10-01

    Axisymmetric density fluctuations, either with a radially coherent or dispersive nature, are routinely observed in the TCV tokamak and experimentally interpreted as Geodesic Acoustic Modes (GAMs). We use local and global GENE simulations to investigate their behavior. With a simplified physical model, neglecting impurities and using heavy electrons, simulations reproduce the observed behavior. Simulations allow to conclude that the modification of the safety factor q alone cannot explain the transition between these two different fluctuation regimes, which thus appear as a consequence of variations of other parameters, including collisionality and finite machine size effects. The behavior of the radially coherent GAM is further investigated with high-realism GENE simulations. With this set-up, local simulations reproduce the experimental transport level at different radii while matching the observed GAM frequency at the location where the mode peaks. Global high-realism runs, aiming at reproducing the radial extent of the fluctuations, will be discussed as well. This work has been carried out within the framework of the EUROfusion Consortium and has received funding from the Euratom research and training programme 2014-2018 under Grant Agreement No 633053.

  16. Fluctuation-Noise Model for PEM Fuel Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denisov, E. S.; Salakhova, A. Sh.; Adiutantov, N. A.; Evdokimov, Yu. K.

    2017-08-01

    The fluctuation-noise model is presented. This model allows to describe the power spectral density of PEM fuel cell electrical fluctuation. The proposed model can be used for diagnostics of PEM fuel cell state of health.

  17. Experimental setup for rapid crystallization using favoured chemical ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    tors (3005 type), the output of which drives the d.c. motor. M3. The solution of ... to motor M1 prevents rapid temperature fluctuations and hence ensures very good temperature control. The thermostatic bath is heated with an infrared lamp I at the base of the unit and ... through chains of hydrogen bonds and these polymers.

  18. Coherent structures in presence of dust charge fluctuations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Our double layers analysis is based on a fluid model as described by Levine and Craw- ford [10]. In the uniform region on the high potential side of our dust acoustic double layers, the plasma consists of cold negatively charged dusts drifting away from the dou- ble layers, ions drifting toward the double layers and electrons ...

  19. Common Origin of Quantum Regression and Quantum Fluctuation Dissipation Theorems

    OpenAIRE

    Shiktorov, P.; Starikov, E.; Gruzinskis, V.; Reggiani, L.; L. Varani; Vaissiere, J. C.

    2000-01-01

    It is shown that the quantum fluctuation dissipation theorem can be considered as a mathematical formulation in the spectral representation of Onsager hypothesis on the regression of fluctuations in physical systems. It is shown that the quantum fluctuation dissipation theorem can be generalized to an arbitrary stationary state.

  20. Correlations and Fluctuations, A Summary of Quark Matter 2002

    OpenAIRE

    Pratt, Scott

    2003-01-01

    Results for correlations and fluctuations presented at Quark Matter 2002 are summarized. These results include Hanbury-Brown Twiss interferometry of a wide variety of species, large scale fluctuations and correlations in $p_t$ and multiplicity, and charge fluctuations and charge balance functions.