WorldWideScience

Sample records for rapid eye mount

  1. Rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schenck, C H; Montplaisir, J Y; Frauscher, B

    2013-01-01

    We aimed to provide a consensus statement by the International Rapid Eye Movement Sleep Behavior Disorder Study Group (IRBD-SG) on devising controlled active treatment studies in rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (RBD) and devising studies of neuroprotection against Parkinson disease (PD...

  2. Rapid eye-fixation training without eyetracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzman-Martinez, Emmanuel; Leung, Parkson; Franconeri, Steve; Grabowecky, Marcia; Suzuki, Satoru

    2009-06-01

    Maintenance of stable central eye fixation is crucial for a variety of behavioral, electrophysiological, and neuroimaging experiments. Naive observers in these experiments are not typically accustomed to fixating, either requiring the use of cumbersome and costly eyetracking or producing confounds in results. We devised a flicker display that produced an easily detectable visual phenomenon whenever the eyes moved. A few minutes of training using this display dramatically improved the accuracy of eye fixation while observers performed a demanding spatial attention cuing task. The same amount of training using control displays did not produce significant fixation improvements, and some observers consistently made eye movements to the peripheral attention cue, contaminating the cuing effect. Our results indicate that (1) eye fixation can be rapidly improved in naive observers by providing real-time feedback about eye movements, and (2) our simple flicker technique provides an easy and effective method for providing this feedback.

  3. The RapidEye mission design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyc, George; Tulip, John; Schulten, Daniel; Krischke, Manfred; Oxfort, Michael

    2005-01-01

    The RapidEye mission is a commercial remote sensing mission by the German Company RapidEye AG. The RapidEye mission will deliver information products for various customers in the agricultural insurance market, large producers, international institutions and cartography. The mission consists of a constellation of five identical small satellites and a sophisticated ground infrastructure based on proven systems. The five satellites will be placed in a single sun-synchronous orbit of approximately 620 km, with the satellites equally spaced over the orbit. The RapidEye system has the unique ability to image any area on earth once per day and can also provide large area coverage within 5 days. The satellites will each carry a 5 band multi-spectral optical imager with a ground sampling distance of 6.5 m at nadir and a swath width of 80 km. These capabilities along with the processing throughput of the ground segment allows the system to deliver the information products needed by the customers reliably and in a time frame that meets their specific needs.

  4. Do the eyes scan dream images during rapid eye movement sleep? Evidence from the rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclair-Visonneau, Laurène; Oudiette, Delphine; Gaymard, Bertrand; Leu-Semenescu, Smaranda; Arnulf, Isabelle

    2010-06-01

    Rapid eye movements and complex visual dreams are salient features of human rapid eye movement sleep. However, it remains to be elucidated whether the eyes scan dream images, despite studies that have retrospectively compared the direction of rapid eye movements to the dream recall recorded after having awakened the sleeper. We used the model of rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder (when patients enact their dreams by persistence of muscle tone) to determine directly whether the eyes move in the same directions as the head and limbs. In 56 patients with rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder and 17 healthy matched controls, the eye movements were monitored by electrooculography in four (right, left, up and down) directions, calibrated with a target and synchronized with video and sleep monitoring. The rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder-associated behaviours occurred 2.1 times more frequently during rapid eye movement sleep with than without rapid eye movements, and more often during or after rapid eye movements than before. Rapid eye movement density, index and complexity were similar in patients with rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder and controls. When rapid eye movements accompanied goal-oriented motor behaviour during rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder (e.g. grabbing a fictive object, hand greetings, climbing a ladder), which happened in 19 sequences, 82% were directed towards the action of the patient (same plane and direction). When restricted to the determinant rapid eye movements, the concordance increased to 90%. Rapid eye movements were absent in 38-42% of behaviours. This directional coherence between limbs, head and eye movements during rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder suggests that, when present, rapid eye movements imitate the scanning of the dream scene. Since the rapid eye movements are similar in subjects with and without rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder, this concordance can be extended

  5. A new mapping function in table-mounted eye tracker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Qinqin; Hua, Xiao; Qiu, Jian; Luo, Kaiqing; Peng, Li; Han, Peng

    2018-01-01

    Eye tracker is a new apparatus of human-computer interaction, which has caught much attention in recent years. Eye tracking technology is to obtain the current subject's "visual attention (gaze)" direction by using mechanical, electronic, optical, image processing and other means of detection. While the mapping function is one of the key technology of the image processing, and is also the determination of the accuracy of the whole eye tracker system. In this paper, we present a new mapping model based on the relationship among the eyes, the camera and the screen that the eye gazed. Firstly, according to the geometrical relationship among the eyes, the camera and the screen, the framework of mapping function between the pupil center and the screen coordinate is constructed. Secondly, in order to simplify the vectors inversion of the mapping function, the coordinate of the eyes, the camera and screen was modeled by the coaxial model systems. In order to verify the mapping function, corresponding experiment was implemented. It is also compared with the traditional quadratic polynomial function. And the results show that our approach can improve the accuracy of the determination of the gazing point. Comparing with other methods, this mapping function is simple and valid.

  6. An Analysis of Eye Movements with Helmet Mounted Displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-27

    Kalich, M., Lang, G., King , R., and Noback, R., 2009, “Perceptual and Cognitive Effects Due to Operational Factors”, appears in Helmet-Mounted...Robert Wildsunas, J. Lynn Caldwell, Melvyn Kalich, Gregory Lang, Ronal King , and Robert Noback. “Perceptual and Cognitive Effects Due to Operational...2005. Smith, Suzanne D. (2005) Super Cobra (AH-1Z) Human Vibration Evaluation. AFRL-HE-WP- TR-2005-0114, Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright

  7. Rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zoetmulder, Marielle; Jennum, Poul

    2009-01-01

    and neurological disease. RBD is related to brainstem pathology. Furthermore, it is increasingly recognized that RBD is frequently related to Parkinsonian disorders and narcolepsy. This article reviews recent knowledge about RBD with focus on the diagnostic process and management. Udgivelsesdato: 2009-May......Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behaviour disorder (RBD) is characterized by loss of REM sleep and related electromyographic atonia with marked muscular activity and dream enactment behaviour. RBD is seen in 0.5% of the population. It occurs in an idiopathic form and secondarily to medical...

  8. Parallax error in the monocular head-mounted eye trackers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mardanbeigi, Diako; Witzner Hansen, Dan

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigates the parallax error, which is a common problem of many video-based monocular mobile gaze trackers. The parallax error is defined and described using the epipolar geometry in a stereo camera setup. The main parameters that change the error are introduced and it is shown how...... each parameter affects the error. The optimum distribution of the error (magnitude and direction) in the field of view varies for different applications. However, the results can be used for finding the optimum parameters that are needed for designing a head-mounted gaze tracker. It has been shown...

  9. Rapid eye movement sleep in breath holders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohyama, J; Hasegawa, T; Shimohira, M; Fukumizu, M; Iwakawa, Y

    2000-07-01

    One-night polysomnography was performed on seven subjects suffering from breath-holding spells, including one whose death was suggested to be a consequence of a breath-holding spell. The fatal case showed no rapid eye movements (REMs) during REM sleep, although he exhibited REMs during wakefulness. The average numbers of both REMs and bursts of REMs in REM sleep in the other six breath holders were significantly lower than those in age-matched controls. The breath holders showed no airway obstruction, desaturation, or sleep fragmentation. Since the rapid ocular activity in REM sleep is generated in the brain stem, we hypothesized that a functional brainstem disturbance is involved in the occurrence of breath-holding spells.

  10. Application of head-mounted devices with eye-tracking in virtual reality therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lutz Otto Hans-Martin

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Using eye-tracking to assess visual attention in head-mounted devices (HMD opens up many possibilities for virtual reality (VR-based therapy. Existing therapy concepts where attention plays a major role can be transferred to VR. Furthermore, they can be expanded to a precise real-time attention assessment, which can serve as a foundation for new therapy approaches. Utilizing HMDs and eye-tracking in a clinical environment is challenging because of hygiene issues and requirements of patients with heterogeneous cognitive and motor impairments. In this paper, we provide an overview of those challenges, discuss possible solutions and present preliminary results of a study with patients.

  11. Rapid Nonconjugate Adaptation of Vertical Voluntary Pursuit Eye Movements

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    applied to the post-adaptation data from the left eye magnification condition: YRpost(Transformed) = (2 * YRpre) - YRPost (6) For example, if the pie ...nonconjugate adaptation with spectacle- mounted plano -cylindrical lenses, Lemij (1990) demonstrated that nonconjugate pursuit adaptation was

  12. Blunt eye trauma: empirical histopathologic paintball impact thresholds in fresh mounted porcine eyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sponsel, William E; Gray, Walt; Scribbick, Frank W; Stern, Amber R; Weiss, Carl E; Groth, Sylvia L; Walker, James D

    2011-07-15

    Ballistic studies were conducted using gelatin-embedded abattoir-fresh porcine eyes suspended within clear acrylic orbits to discern the energy required to produce specific ocular injuries. Paintball impact provides a robust ballistic model for isolating and quantifying the role of direct blunt force in ocular trauma. Fifty-nine porcine orbital preparations received direct blows from 0.68 caliber (16-18 mm diameter/3.8 g) paintballs fired at impact velocities ranging from 26 to 97 meters per second (2-13.5 J). Five additional eyes not subjected to ballistic impact were also evaluated as controls. Impact energies were correlated with histopathologic damage. Minimum impact energies consistently producing damage in experimental eyes unobserved in control specimens were: 2 joules--posterior lens dislocation, zonulysis, capsular rupture, and choroidal detachment; 3.5 joules--moderate angle recession; 4 joules--anterior lens dislocation; 4.8 joules--peripapillary retinal detachment; 7 joules--severe angle recession, iridodialysis, and cyclodialysis; 7.5 joules--corneal stromal distraction; 9.3 joules--choroidal segmentation; and 10 joules--globe rupture. Impact thresholds correlating traumatic ocular pathology with impact energy followed a positive stepwise progression in severity with impact energies between 2 and 10 joules. Moderate angle recession commensurate with typical clinical traumatic glaucoma was not observed among control eyes, but occurred at relatively low impact energy of 3.5 joules among test eyes. Extensive disruption in and around the angle (iridodialysis/cyclodialysis) consistently occurred at energies >7 joules. Globe rupture required a minimum energy of 10 joules.

  13. KOH mount as an aid in the management of infectious keratitis at secondary eye care centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathi, Varsha M; Thakur, Monica; Sharma, Savitri; Khanna, Rohit; Garg, Prashant

    2017-11-01

    To report the clinical outcome of infectious keratitis managed after doing 10% KOH mount of corneal smears and reporting done by an ophthalmologist in the secondary eye care centre in South India. 103 consecutive cases of microbial keratitis were studied. Inclusion criteria were presence of corneal infiltrate on slit lamp biomicroscopy. An ophthalmologist carried out microbiological evaluation of 10% KOH mount of corneal scrapings. No cultures were done at secondary centres. Antifungal therapy with 5% Natamycin was initiated when 10% KOH mount was positive for fungal filaments. Else, the patients were started on combined topical ciprofloxacin (0.3%) and fortified cefazolin (5%). 41/103 (39.8%) smears were positive for fungus and 62 (60.2%) were negative. 89 out of 103 patients (86.40%) healed with scarring at an average of 2.95±1.58 weeks. Healing was noted in 39/41 (95.12%) of patients at an average of 3.06±1.19 weeks in patients with KOH smear positive keratitis. 80.64% (50/62) healed with scarring at an average period of 2.86±1.86 weeks in KOH mount negative keratitis. Initial smear examination of KOH mount by an ophthalmologist helped in diagnosis of infectious keratitis caused by fungi and its management and 95.12% of KOH positive patients healed with scarring. Reading of KOH mount by an ophthalmologist helped in initiation of specific therapy with improved clinical outcome. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  14. Rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder and rapid eye movement sleep without atonia in narcolepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dauvilliers, Yves; Jennum, Poul; Plazzi, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    Narcolepsy is a rare disabling hypersomnia disorder that may include cataplexy, sleep paralysis, hypnagogic hallucinations, and sleep-onset rapid eye movement (REM) periods, but also disrupted nighttime sleep by nocturnal awakenings, and REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD). RBD is characterized...... by dream-enacting behavior and impaired motor inhibition during REM sleep (REM sleep without atonia, RSWA). RBD is commonly associated with neurodegenerative disorders including Parkinsonisms, but is also reported in narcolepsy in up to 60% of patients. RBD in patients with narcolepsy is, however......, a distinct phenotype with respect to other RBD patients and characterized also by absence of gender predominance, elementary rather than complex movements, less violent behavior and earlier age at onset of motor events, and strong association to narcolepsy with cataplexy/hypocretin deficiency. Patients...

  15. A Statistical Approach to Continuous Self-Calibrating Eye Gaze Tracking for Head-Mounted Virtual Reality Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Tripathi, Subarna; Guenter, Brian

    2016-01-01

    We present a novel, automatic eye gaze tracking scheme inspired by smooth pursuit eye motion while playing mobile games or watching virtual reality contents. Our algorithm continuously calibrates an eye tracking system for a head mounted display. This eliminates the need for an explicit calibration step and automatically compensates for small movements of the headset with respect to the head. The algorithm finds correspondences between corneal motion and screen space motion, and uses these to...

  16. Use of infrared TV cameras built into head-mounted display to measure torsional eye movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ukai, K; Saida, S; Ishikawa, N

    2001-01-01

    The head-mounted display (HMD) has produced conflict between visual and vestibular stimuli because the HMD image does not move with the head motion of the wearer. The HMD can show binocular parallax three-dimensional (3D) images, in which vergence and accommodation conflict. Thus, the HMD may affect the normal visual/vestibular functions. We attempted to develop a system that makes possible the measurement of torsional eye movements, vergence eye movements, and pupillary responses of the HMD wearer. Our apparatus is composed of two infrared CCD cameras installed in the HMD. Iris images produced by these cameras are analyzed by a personal computer using free software. Further, a third camera fixed on the HMD projects an image of the view as the subject sees it, via video tape recorder or frame memory to the HMD. Images can be stored, replayed, or frozen. Our system can measure torsional eye movement with 0.20 degrees resolution every 1/30 (or 1/60) seconds even though the pupil size alternates during measurement. Binocular eye movement and pupillary response are also measured. A system was developed which can be used for assessment of the effect of 3D HMD on the visual system. A third camera coupled with HMD can control visual stimulus independently of head motion (vestibular stimulus).

  17. Rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder and rapid eye movement sleep without atonia in narcolepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauvilliers, Yves; Jennum, Poul; Plazzi, Giuseppe

    2013-08-01

    Narcolepsy is a rare disabling hypersomnia disorder that may include cataplexy, sleep paralysis, hypnagogic hallucinations, and sleep-onset rapid eye movement (REM) periods, but also disrupted nighttime sleep by nocturnal awakenings, and REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD). RBD is characterized by dream-enacting behavior and impaired motor inhibition during REM sleep (REM sleep without atonia, RSWA). RBD is commonly associated with neurodegenerative disorders including Parkinsonisms, but is also reported in narcolepsy in up to 60% of patients. RBD in patients with narcolepsy is, however, a distinct phenotype with respect to other RBD patients and characterized also by absence of gender predominance, elementary rather than complex movements, less violent behavior and earlier age at onset of motor events, and strong association to narcolepsy with cataplexy/hypocretin deficiency. Patients with narcolepsy often present dissociated sleep features including RSWA, increased density of phasic chin EMG and frequent shift from REM to NREM sleep, with or without associated clinical RBD. Most patients with narcolepsy with cataplexy lack the hypocretin neurons in the lateral hypothalamus. Tonic and phasic motor activities in REM sleep and dream-enacting behavior are mostly reported in presence of cataplexy. Narcolepsy without cataplexy is a condition rarely associated with hypocretin deficiency. We proposed that hypocretin neurons are centrally involved in motor control during wakefulness and sleep in humans, and that hypocretin deficiency causes a functional defect in the motor control involved in the development of cataplexy during wakefulness and RBD/RSWA/phasic motor activity during REM sleep. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Characteristics of rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder in narcolepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jennum, Poul Jørgen; Frandsen, Rune Asger Vestergaard; Knudsen, Stine

    2013-01-01

    Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD) is characterized by dream-enacting behavior and impaired motor inhibition during REM sleep (REM sleep without atonia, RSWA). RBD is commonly associated with Parkinsonian disorders, but is also reported in narcolepsy. Most patients with narcol...

  19. Neurophysiological basis of rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jennum, Poul; Christensen, Julie Anja Engelhard; Zoetmulder, Marielle

    2016-01-01

    Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD) is a parasomnia characterized by a history of recurrent nocturnal dream enactment behavior and loss of skeletal muscle atonia and increased phasic muscle activity during REM sleep: REM sleep without atonia. RBD and associated comorbidities ha...

  20. A novel contrast stain for the rapid diagnosis of pityriasis versicolor: A comparison of Chicago Sky Blue 6B stain, potassium hydroxide mount and culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikita Lodha

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The mycological study of pityriasis versicolor is usually done by potassium hydroxide (KOH mount and culture. However, KOH mount lacks a color contrast and requires a trained eye to interpret, while culture is difficult to perform, time consuming and has low sensitivity. Chicago Sky Blue 6B (CSB is a new contrast stain that highlights the fungal hyphae and spores, blue against a purplish background. Aims and Objectives: This study was done to compare the utility of a novel contrast stain (CSB stain with KOH mount and culture. Materials and Methods: Skin scrapings from the lesions of 100 clinically diagnosed cases of P. versicolor were subjected to (1 KOH mount and CSB stain for direct microscopic examination and (2 culture using Sabouraud′s dextrose agar. The statistical analysis of CSB stain and culture was done using KOH mount as the reference method, as it is the most commonly performed and practical diagnostic test available for P. versicolor. An interrater reliability analysis using the Cohen′s Kappa statistic was performed to determine consistency (agreement among the different modalities. Observations and Results: Direct microscopy with CSB stain, KOH mount and mycological culture showed positive results in 98 (98%, 92 (92% and 56 (56% patients, respectively. Using KOH mount as the reference method, CSB stain had a sensitivity of 100% which was significantly higher than culture (60.9%. Statistically significant fair agreement was found between CSB stain and KOH mount (94% with κ=0.38, P < 0.001. Negligible agreement was found between CSB stain and culture (66%, κ=0.199, P = 0.001 as well as between KOH mount and culture (64%, κ=0.051, P = 0.107. Conclusion: CSB staining of skin scrapings is the most sensitive method for the diagnosis of pityriasis versicolor. Due to the distinct contrast provided by CSB, it is easy to perform, rapid and qualitatively superior to KOH mount.

  1. Rapid Eye Movement Sleep Behavior Disorder and Neurodegenerative Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Michael Joseph; Schenck, Carlos Hugh

    2015-06-01

    The dream enactment of rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (RBD) is often the first indication of an impending α-synuclein disorder, such as Parkinson disease, multiple-system atrophy, or dementia with Lewy bodies. To provide an overview of RBD from the onset of dream enactment through the emergence of a parkinsonian disorder. Peer-reviewed articles, including case reports, case series, retrospective reviews, prospective randomized trials, and basic science investigations, were identified in a PubMed search of articles on RBD from January 1, 1986, through July 31, 2014. Under normal conditions, vivid dream mentation combined with skeletal muscle paralysis characterizes rapid eye movement sleep. In RBD, α-synuclein abnormalities in the brainstem disinhibit rapid eye movement sleep motor activity, leading to dream enactment. The behaviors of RBD are often theatrical, with complexity, aggression, and violence; fighting and fleeing actions can be injurious to patients as well as bed partners. Rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder is distinguished from other parasomnias by clinical features and the demonstration of rapid eye movement sleep without atonia on polysomnography. Consistent with early neurodegeneration, patients with RBD demonstrate subtle motor, cognitive, and autonomic impairments. Approximately 50% of patients with spontaneous RBD will convert to a parkinsonian disorder within a decade. Ultimately, nearly all (81%-90%) patients with RBD develop a neurodegenerative disorder. Among patients with Parkinson disease, RBD predicts a non-tremor-predominant subtype, gait freezing, and an aggressive clinical course. The most commonly cited RBD treatments include low-dose clonazepam or high-dose melatonin taken orally at bedtime. Treatment of RBD can prevent injury to patients and bed partners. Because RBD is a prodromal syndrome of Parkinson disease (or related disorder), it represents a unique opportunity for developing and testing disease

  2. Genetics of rapid eye movement sleep in humans

    OpenAIRE

    Adamczyk, M.; Ambrosius, U; Lietzenmaier, S; Wichniak, A; Holsboer, F.; Friess, E

    2015-01-01

    The trait-like nature of electroencephalogram (EEG) is well established. Furthermore, EEG of wake and non-rapid eye movement (non-REM) sleep has been shown to be highly heritable. However, the genetic effects on REM sleep EEG microstructure are as yet unknown. REM sleep is of special interest since animal and human data suggest a connection between REM sleep abnormalities and the pathophysiology of psychiatric and neurological diseases. Here we report the results of a study in monozygotic (MZ...

  3. Morbidities in rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jennum, Poul; Mayer, Geert; Ju, Yo-El

    2013-01-01

    Idiopathic rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (iRBD, RBD without any obvious comorbid major neurological disease), is strongly associated with numerous comorbid conditions. The most prominent is that with neurodegenerative disorders, especially synuclein-mediated disorders, above all...... of dementia with Lewy bodies. These findings underline the progressive disease process, suggesting involvement of more brain regions in patients with a more advanced disease stage. RBD is also associated with narcolepsy, and it is likely that RBD associated with narcolepsy is a distinct subtype associated...

  4. Rapid assessment methods in eye care: An overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivas Marmamula

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Reliable information is required for the planning and management of eye care services. While classical research methods provide reliable estimates, they are prohibitively expensive and resource intensive. Rapid assessment (RA methods are indispensable tools in situations where data are needed quickly and where time- or cost-related factors prohibit the use of classical epidemiological surveys. These methods have been developed and field tested, and can be applied across almost the entire gamut of health care. The 1990s witnessed the emergence of RA methods in eye care for cataract, onchocerciasis, and trachoma and, more recently, the main causes of avoidable blindness and visual impairment. The important features of RA methods include the use of local resources, simplified sampling methodology, and a simple examination protocol/data collection method that can be performed by locally available personnel. The analysis is quick and easy to interpret. The entire process is inexpensive, so the survey may be repeated once every 5-10 years to assess the changing trends in disease burden. RA survey methods are typically linked with an intervention. This article provides an overview of the RA methods commonly used in eye care, and emphasizes the selection of appropriate methods based on the local need and context.

  5. Rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder in patients with narcolepsy is associated with hypocretin-1 deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Stine; Gammeltoft, Steen; Jennum, Poul J

    2010-01-01

    that rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder coexists with cataplexy in narcolepsy due to hypocretin deficiency. In our study, rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder was diagnosed by the International Classification of Sleep Disorders (2nd edition) criteria in 63 narcolepsy patients with or without......Rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder is characterized by dream-enacting behaviour and impaired motor inhibition during rapid eye movement sleep. Rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder is commonly associated with neurodegenerative disorders, but also reported in narcolepsy with cataplexy....... Most narcolepsy with cataplexy patients lack the sleep-wake, and rapid eye movement sleep, motor-regulating hypocretin neurons in the lateral hypothalamus. In contrast, rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder and hypocretin deficiency are rare in narcolepsy without cataplexy. We hypothesized...

  6. [Parkinson Disease With Rapid Eye Movement Sleep Behavior Disorder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yang; Zhang, Wei

    2015-06-01

    Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD) is characterized by lack of muscle atonia during REM sleep and enactment of dream content. RBD is associated with Parkinson disease (PD) and has high incidence in PD patients. PD patient with RBD mainly presents rigid type, has longer disease duration, more severe motor and non-motor symptoms and poorer activity of daily living and life quality. The pathophysiological mechanisms of RBD may be related to dysfunctions of pontine tegmentum, locus coeruleus/sub-locus coeruleus complex and related projections. The diagnosis of RBD depends on clinical histories and video-polysomnography (v-PSG). Besides treatment for PD, protective measures have to be taken for patients and their sleep partners. If abnormal behaviors during sleep cause distress and danger,patients should be given drug therapy.

  7. Cognition in rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-François eGagnon

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Rapid eye movement (REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD is a parasomnia characterized by excessive muscle activity and undesirable motor events during REM sleep. RBD occurs in approximately 0.5% of the general population, with a higher prevalence in older men. RBD is a frequent feature of dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB, but is only rarely reported in Alzheimer’s disease. RBD is also a risk factor for α-synuclein-related diseases, such as DLB, Parkinson’s disease (PD, and multiple system atrophy. Therefore, RBD has major implications for the diagnosis and treatment of neurodegenerative disorders and for understanding neurodegeneration mechanisms. Several markers of neurodegeneration have been identified in RBD, including cognitive impairments such as deficits in attention, executive functions, learning capacities, and visuospatial abilities. Approximately 50% of RBD patients present mild cognitive impairment (MCI. Moreover, RBD is also associated with cognitive decline in PD.

  8. Ictal SPECT in patients with rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Geert; Bitterlich, Marion; Kuwert, Torsten; Ritt, Philipp; Stefan, Hermann

    2015-05-01

    Rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder is a rapid eye movement parasomnia clinically characterized by acting out dreams due to disinhibition of muscle tone in rapid eye movement sleep. Up to 80-90% of the patients with rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder develop neurodegenerative disorders within 10-15 years after symptom onset. The disorder is reported in 45-60% of all narcoleptic patients. Whether rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder is also a predictor for neurodegeneration in narcolepsy is not known. Although the pathophysiology causing the disinhibition of muscle tone in rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder has been studied extensively in animals, little is known about the mechanisms in humans. Most of the human data are from imaging or post-mortem studies. Recent studies show altered functional connectivity between substantia nigra and striatum in patients with rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder. We were interested to study which regions are activated in rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder during actual episodes by performing ictal single photon emission tomography. We studied one patient with idiopathic rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder, one with Parkinson's disease and rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder, and two patients with narcolepsy and rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder. All patients underwent extended video polysomnography. The tracer was injected after at least 10 s of consecutive rapid eye movement sleep and 10 s of disinhibited muscle tone accompanied by movements registered by an experienced sleep technician. Ictal single photon emission tomography displayed the same activation in the bilateral premotor areas, the interhemispheric cleft, the periaqueductal area, the dorsal and ventral pons and the anterior lobe of the cerebellum in all patients. Our study shows that in patients with Parkinson's disease and rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder-in contrast to wakefulness

  9. Detection of rapid-eye movements in sleep studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Rajeev; Takeuchi, Tomoka; Laroche, Suzie; Gotman, Jean

    2005-08-01

    One of the key features of rapid-eye movement (REM) sleep is the presence of bursts of REMs. Sleep studies routinely use REMs to classify sleep stages. Moreover, REM count or density has been used in studies involving learning and various psychiatric disorders. Most of these studies have been based on the visual identification of REMs, which is generally a very time-consuming task. This and the varying definitions of REMs across scorers have warranted the development of automatic REM detection methodologies. In this paper, we present a new detection scheme that combines many of the intrinsic properties of REMs and requires minimal parameter adjustments. In the proposed method, a single parameter can be used to control the REM detection sensitivity and specificity tradeoff. Manually scored training data are used to develop the method. We assess the performance of the method against manual scoring of individual REM events and present validation results using a separate data set. The ability of the method to discriminate fast horizontal ocular movement in REM sleep from other types of events is highlighted. A key advantage of the presented method is the minimal a priori information requirement. The results of training data (recordings from five subjects) show an overall sensitivity of 78.8% and specificity of 81.6%. The performance on the testing data (recording from five subjects different from the training data) showed overall sensitivity of 67.2% and specificity of 77.5%.

  10. Using Priors to Compensate Geometrical Problems in Head-Mounted Eye Trackers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Batista Narcizo, Fabricio; Ahmed, Zaheer; Hansen, Dan Witzner

    to distance, location, luminance, movement, speed; information extracted directly from the scene camera; calibration of video capture devices and other components of the eye tracker; information collected from a totally controlled environment; among others. Thus, priors are used to improve the robustness...... of eye tracking in real applications, for example, (1) If the distance between the subject and the viewed target is known, it is possible to estimate subject’s current point of regard even when target moves in depth and suffers influence of parallax error; and (2) if the tridimensional angular rotation...

  11. Investigating rapid eye movement sleep without atonia in Parkinson's disease using the rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder screening questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolitho, Samuel J; Naismith, Sharon L; Terpening, Zoe; Grunstein, Ron R; Melehan, Kerri; Yee, Brendon J; Coeytaux, Alessandra; Gilat, Moran; Lewis, Simon J G

    2014-05-01

    Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD) is frequently observed in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Accurate diagnosis is essential for managing this condition. Furthermore, the emergence of idiopathic RBD in later life can represent a premotor feature, heralding the development of PD. Reliable, accurate methods for identifying RBD may offer a window for early intervention. This study sought to identify whether the RBD screening questionnaire (RBDSQ) and three questionnaires focused on dream enactment were able to correctly identify patients with REM without atonia (RWA), the neurophysiological hallmark of RBD. Forty-six patients with PD underwent neurological and sleep assessment in addition to completing the RBDSQ, the RBD single question (RBD1Q), and the Mayo Sleep Questionnaire (MSQ). The REM atonia index was derived for all participants as an objective measure of RWA. Patients identified to be RBD positive on the RBDSQ did not show increased RWA on polysomnography (80% sensitivity and 55% specificity). However, patients positive for RBD on questionnaires specific to dream enactment correctly identified higher degrees of RWA and improved the diagnostic accuracy of these questionnaires. This study suggests that the RBDSQ does not accurately identify RWA, essential for diagnosing RBD in PD. Furthermore, the results suggest that self-report measures of RBD need to focus questions on dream enactment behavior to better identify RWA and RBD. Further studies are needed to develop accurate determination and quantification of RWA in RBD to improve management of patients with PD in the future. © 2014 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  12. [Electromyography Analysis of Rapid Eye Movement Sleep Behavior Disorder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Natsuko; Kinoshita, Fumiya; Takada, Hiroki; Nakayama, Meiho

    2018-01-01

    Polysomnography (PSG), which records physiological phenomena including brain waves, breathing status, and muscle tonus, is useful for the diagnosis of sleep disorders as a gold standard. However, measurement and analysis are complex for several specific sleep disorders, such as rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD). Usually, brain waves during REM sleep indicate an awakening pattern under relaxed conditions of skeletal and antigravity muscles. However, these muscles are activated during REM sleep when patients suffer from RBD. These activated muscle movements during REM, so-called REM without atonia (RWA) recorded by PSG, may be related to a neurodegenerative disease such as Parkinson's disease. Thus, careful analysis of RWA is significant not only physically, but also clinically. Commonly, manual viewing measurement analysis of RWA is time-consuming. Therefore, quantitative studies on RWA are rarely reported. A software program, developed from Microsoft Office Excel ® , was used to semiautomatically analyze the RWA ratio extracted from PSG to compare with manual viewing measurement analysis. In addition, a quantitative muscle tonus study was carried out to evaluate the effect of medication on RBD patients. Using this new software program, we were able to analyze RWA on the same cases in approximately 15 min as compared with 60 min in the manual viewing measurement analysis. This software program can not only quantify RWA easily but also identify RWA waves for either phasic or tonic bursts. We consider that this software program will support physicians and scientists in their future research on RBD. We are planning to offer this software program for free to physicians and scientists.

  13. Mapping soil heterogeneity using RapidEye satellite images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccard, Isabelle; Eerens, Herman; Dong, Qinghan; Gobin, Anne; Goffart, Jean-Pierre; Curnel, Yannick; Planchon, Viviane

    2016-04-01

    In the frame of BELCAM, a project funded by the Belgian Science Policy Office (BELSPO), researchers from UCL, ULg, CRA-W and VITO aim to set up a collaborative system to develop and deliver relevant information for agricultural monitoring in Belgium. The main objective is to develop remote sensing methods and processing chains able to ingest crowd sourcing data, provided by farmers or associated partners, and to deliver in return relevant and up-to-date information for crop monitoring at the field and district level based on Sentinel-1 and -2 satellite imagery. One of the developments within BELCAM concerns an automatic procedure to detect soil heterogeneity within a parcel using optical high resolution images. Such heterogeneity maps can be used to adjust farming practices according to the detected heterogeneity. This heterogeneity may for instance be caused by differences in mineral composition of the soil, organic matter content, soil moisture or soil texture. Local differences in plant growth may be indicative for differences in soil characteristics. As such remote sensing derived vegetation indices may be used to reveal soil heterogeneity. VITO started to delineate homogeneous zones within parcels by analyzing a series of RapidEye images acquired in 2015 (as a precursor for Sentinel-2). Both unsupervised classification (ISODATA, K-means) and segmentation techniques were tested. Heterogeneity maps were generated from images acquired at different moments during the season (13 May, 30 June, 17 July, 31 August, 11 September and 1 November 2015). Tests were performed using blue, green, red, red edge and NIR reflectances separately and using derived indices such as NDVI, fAPAR, CIrededge, NDRE2. The results for selected winter wheat, maize and potato fields were evaluated together with experts from the collaborating agricultural research centers. For a few fields UAV images and/or yield measurements were available for comparison.

  14. Dopamine transporter imaging in rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yu Kyeong; Yoon, In Young; Kim, Jong Min; Jeong, Seok Hoon; Kim, Ji Sun; Lee, Byung Chul; Lee, Won Woo; Kim, Sang Eun [Seoul National Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-01

    The pathogenesis of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD) is still unknown. However, involvement of dopaminergic system in RBD has been hypothesized because of frequent association with degenerative movement disorders such as Parkinson's disease. The purpose of this study was to examine the extent and pattern of loss of dopamine transporter in RBD using FP-CIT SPECT. Fourteen patient with idiopathic RBD (mean age:665 yrs, M:F=10:3) participated in this study. Polysonmography confirmed loss of REM atonia and determined RBD severities by amount of tonic/phasic muscle activity during REM sleep in all cases. To compare with RBD, 14 early idiopathic Parkinson's disease rated as Hoehn and Yahr stage 1 (IPD) and 12 healthy controls were also selected. All participants performed single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging 3 hours after injection of [123I]FP-CIT. Regions of interest were drawn on bilateral caudate and putamen, whole striatum and occipital cortex. Specific binding for dopamine transporters (DAT) were calculated using region to occipital uptake ratio based on the transient equilibrium method. Overall mean of DAT density in the striatum was lower in RBD group than controls, and higher than IPD group, However, DAT density in most individual RBD was still within normal range, and total striatal DAT density was not correlated with severity of RBD. Meanwhile, the caudate to putamen uptake ratio (C/P ratio) in RBD group was insignificantly higher than those in healthy controls. Nevertheless, C/P ratio within RBD group was reversely correlated with the RBD severity. Our study suggested that nigrostriatal dopaminergic degeneration could be a part of the pathogenesis of RBD, but not essential for the development of RBD. Further longitudinal evaluation of presynaptic dopaminergic system in idiopathic RBD may guarantee the more understanding for RBD and associated neurodegenerative disease.

  15. Rapid P300 brain-computer interface communication with a head-mounted display

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivo eKäthner

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Visual ERP (P300 based brain-computer interfaces (BCIs allow for fast and reliable spelling and are intended as a muscle-independent communication channel for people with severe paralysis. However, they require the presentation of visual stimuli in the field of view of the user. A head mounted display could allow convenient presentation of visual stimuli in situations, where mounting a conventional monitor might be difficult or not feasible (e.g. at a patient’s bedside. To explore if similar accuracies can be achieved with a virtual reality (VR headset compared to a conventional flat screen monitor, we conducted an experiment with 18 healthy participants. We also evaluated it with a person in the locked-in state (LIS to verify that usage of the headset is possible for a severely paralyzed person. Healthy participants performed online spelling with three different display methods. In one condition a 5x5 letter matrix was presented on a conventional 22 inch TFT monitor. Two configurations of the VR headset were tested. In the first (glasses A, the same 5x5 matrix filled the field of view of the user. In the second (glasses B, single letters of the matrix filled the field of view of the user. The participant in the LIS tested the VR headset on 3 different occasions (glasses A condition only. For healthy participants, average online spelling accuracies were 94% (15.5 bits/min using three flash sequences for spelling with the monitor and glasses A and 96% (16.2 bits/min with glasses B. In one session, the participant in the LIS reached an online spelling accuracy of 100% (10 bits/min using the glasses A condition. We also demonstrated that spelling with one flash sequence is possible with the VR headset for healthy users (mean: 32.1 bits/min, maximum reached by one user: 71.89 bits/min at 100% accuracy. We conclude that the VR headset allows for rapid P300 BCI communication in healthy users and may be a suitable display option for severely

  16. Rapid Eye Movement and Non-Rapid Eye Movement Sleep Contributions in Memory Consolidation and Resistance to Retroactive Interference for Verbal Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deliens, Gaétane; Leproult, Rachel; Neu, Daniel; Peigneux, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: To test the hypothesis that rapid eye movement (REM) sleep contributes to the consolidation of new memories, whereas non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep contributes to the prevention of retroactive interference. Design: Randomized, crossover study. Setting: Two sessions of either a morning nap or wakefulness. Participants: Twenty-five healthy young adults. Interventions: Declarative learning of word pairs followed by a nap or a wake interval, then learning of interfering word pairs and delayed recall of list A. Measurements and Results: After a restricted night (24:00-06:00), participants learned a list of word pairs (list A). They were then required to either take a nap or stay awake during 45 min, after which they learned a second list of word pairs (list B) and then had to recall list A. Fifty percent of word pairs in list B shared the first word with list A, resulting in interference. Ten subjects exhibited REM sleep whereas 13 subjects exhibited NREM stage 3 (N3) sleep. An interference effect was observed in the nap but not in the wake condition. In post-learning naps, N3 sleep was associated with a reduced interference effect, which was not the case for REM sleep. Moreover, participants exhibiting N3 sleep in the post-learning nap condition also showed a reduced interference effect in the wake condition, suggesting a higher protection ability against interference. Conclusion: Our results partly support the hypothesis that non-rapid eye movement sleep contributes in protecting novel memories against interference. However, rapid eye movement sleep-related consolidation is not evidenced. Citation: Deliens G; Leproult R; Neu D; Peigneux P. Rapid eye movement and non-rapid eye movement sleep contributions in memory consolidation and resistance to retroactive interference for verbal material. SLEEP 2013;36(12):1875-1883. PMID:24293762

  17. Rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder in Parkinson's disease: magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Andrew H; Duncan, Gordon W; Firbank, Michael J; Yarnall, Alison J; Khoo, Tien K; Burn, David J; O'Brien, John T

    2013-06-01

    Rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder has poor prognostic implications for Parkinson's disease. The authors recruited 124 patients with early Parkinson's disease to compare clinical and neuroimaging findings based on the presence of this sleep disorder. The presence of rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder was assessed with the Mayo Sleep Questionnaire. Magnetic resonance imaging sequences were obtained for voxel-based morphometry and diffusion tensor imaging. Patients with sleep disorder had more advanced disease, but groups had similar clinical characteristics and cognitive performance. Those with sleep disorder had areas of reduced cortical grey matter volume and white matter changes compared with those who did not have sleep disorder. However, differences were slight and were not significant when the analyses were adjusted for multiple comparisons. Rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder was associated with subtle changes in white matter integrity and grey matter volume in patients with early Parkinson's disease. Copyright © 2013 Movement Disorder Society.

  18. The nasal and gut microbiome in Parkinson's disease and idiopathic rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heintz-Buschart, Anna; Pandey, Urvashi; Wicke, Tamara; Sixel-Döring, Friederike; Janzen, Annette; Sittig-Wiegand, Elisabeth; Trenkwalder, Claudia; Oertel, Wolfgang H; Mollenhauer, Brit; Wilmes, Paul

    2017-08-26

    Increasing evidence connects the gut microbiota and the onset and/or phenotype of Parkinson's disease (PD). Differences in the abundances of specific bacterial taxa have been reported in PD patients. It is, however, unknown whether these differences can be observed in individuals at high risk, for example, with idiopathic rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder, a prodromal condition of α-synuclein aggregation disorders including PD. To compare microbiota in carefully preserved nasal wash and stool samples of subjects with idiopathic rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder, manifest PD, and healthy individuals. Microbiota of flash-frozen stool and nasal wash samples from 76 PD patients, 21 idiopathic rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder patients, and 78 healthy controls were assessed by 16S and 18S ribosomal RNA amplicon sequencing. Seventy variables, related to demographics, clinical parameters including nonmotor symptoms, and sample processing, were analyzed in relation to microbiome variability and controlled differential analyses were performed. Differentially abundant gut microbes, such as Akkermansia, were observed in PD, but no strong differences in nasal microbiota. Eighty percent of the differential gut microbes in PD versus healthy controls showed similar trends in idiopathic rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder, for example, Anaerotruncus and several Bacteroides spp., and correlated with nonmotor symptoms. Metagenomic sequencing of select samples enabled the reconstruction of genomes of so far uncharacterized differentially abundant organisms. Our study reveals differential abundances of gut microbial taxa in PD and its prodrome idiopathic rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder in comparison to the healthy controls, and highlights the potential of metagenomics to identify and characterize microbial taxa, which are enriched or depleted in PD and/or idiopathic rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder. © 2017 The Authors. Movement

  19. Quality of life in patients with an idiopathic rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Keun Tae; Motamedi, Gholam K; Cho, Yong Won

    2017-08-01

    There have been few quality of life studies in patients with idiopathic rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder. We compared the quality of life in idiopathic rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder patients to healthy controls, patients with hypertension, type 2 diabetes mellitus without complication and idiopathic restless legs syndrome. Sixty patients with idiopathic rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder (24 female; mean age: 61.43 ± 8.99) were enrolled retrospectively. The diagnosis was established based on sleep history, overnight polysomnography, neurological examination and Mini-Mental State Examination to exclude secondary rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder. All subjects completed questionnaires, including the Short Form 36-item Health Survey for quality of life. The total quality of life score in idiopathic rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder (70.63 ± 20.83) was lower than in the healthy control group (83.38 ± 7.96) but higher than in the hypertension (60.55 ± 24.82), diabetes mellitus (62.42 ± 19.37) and restless legs syndrome (61.77 ± 19.25) groups. The total score of idiopathic rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder patients had a negative correlation with the Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index (r = -0.498, P Health Survey score and the Insomnia Severity Index (β = -1.100, P = 0.001) and Beck Depression Inventory-2 (β = -1.038, P sleep behaviour disorder had a significant negative impact on quality of life, although this effect was less than that of other chronic disorders. This negative effect might be related to a depressive mood associated with the disease. © 2016 European Sleep Research Society.

  20. The role of rapid eye movement sleep for amygdala-related memory processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Genzel, L.K.E.; Spoormaker, V.I.; Konrad, B.N.; Dresler, M.

    2015-01-01

    Over the years, rapid eye movement (REM) sleep has been associated with general memory consolidation, specific consolidation of perceptual, procedural, emotional and fear memories, brain maturation and preparation of waking consciousness. More recently, some of these associations (e.g., general and

  1. Rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder--diagnostik, årsager og behandling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zoetmulder, Marielle; Jennum, Poul Jørgen

    2009-01-01

    Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behaviour disorder (RBD) is characterized by loss of REM sleep and related electromyographic atonia with marked muscular activity and dream enactment behaviour. RBD is seen in 0.5% of the population. It occurs in an idiopathic form and secondarily to medical...

  2. Rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder in patients with narcolepsy is associated with hypocretin-1 deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Stine; Gammeltoft, Steen; Jennum, Poul J

    2010-01-01

    variables were analysed in relation to cataplexy and hypocretin deficiency with uni- and multivariate logistic/linear regression models, controlling for possible rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder biasing factors (age, gender, disease duration, previous anti-cataplexy medication). Only hypocretin...

  3. Rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder--diagnostik, årsager og behandling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zoetmulder, Marielle; Jennum, Poul Jørgen

    2009-01-01

    Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behaviour disorder (RBD) is characterized by loss of REM sleep and related electromyographic atonia with marked muscular activity and dream enactment behaviour. RBD is seen in 0.5% of the population. It occurs in an idiopathic form and secondarily to medical and neu...

  4. Disrupted rapid eye movement sleep predicts poor declarative memory performance in post-traumatic stress disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipinska, Malgorzata; Timol, Ridwana; Kaminer, Debra; Thomas, Kevin G F

    2014-06-01

    Successful memory consolidation during sleep depends on healthy slow-wave and rapid eye movement sleep, and on successful transition across sleep stages. In post-traumatic stress disorder, sleep is disrupted and memory is impaired, but relations between these two variables in the psychiatric condition remain unexplored. We examined whether disrupted sleep, and consequent disrupted memory consolidation, is a mechanism underlying declarative memory deficits in post-traumatic stress disorder. We recruited three matched groups of participants: post-traumatic stress disorder (n = 16); trauma-exposed non-post-traumatic stress disorder (n = 15); and healthy control (n = 14). They completed memory tasks before and after 8 h of sleep. We measured sleep variables using sleep-adapted electroencephalography. Post-traumatic stress disorder-diagnosed participants experienced significantly less sleep efficiency and rapid eye movement sleep percentage, and experienced more awakenings and wake percentage in the second half of the night than did participants in the other two groups. After sleep, post-traumatic stress disorder-diagnosed participants retained significantly less information on a declarative memory task than controls. Rapid eye movement percentage, wake percentage and sleep efficiency correlated with retention of information over the night. Furthermore, lower rapid eye movement percentage predicted poorer retention in post-traumatic stress disorder-diagnosed individuals. Our results suggest that declarative memory consolidation is disrupted during sleep in post-traumatic stress disorder. These data are consistent with theories suggesting that sleep benefits memory consolidation via predictable neurobiological mechanisms, and that rapid eye movement disruption is more than a symptom of post-traumatic stress disorder. © 2014 European Sleep Research Society.

  5. Rapid eye movements during sleep in mice: high trait-like stability qualifies rapid eye movement density for characterization of phenotypic variation in sleep patterns of rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulda, Stephany; Romanowski, Christoph P N; Becker, Andreas; Wetter, Thomas C; Kimura, Mayumi; Fenzel, Thomas

    2011-11-02

    In humans, rapid eye movements (REM) density during REM sleep plays a prominent role in psychiatric diseases. Especially in depression, an increased REM density is a vulnerability marker for depression. In clinical practice and research measurement of REM density is highly standardized. In basic animal research, almost no tools are available to obtain and systematically evaluate eye movement data, although, this would create increased comparability between human and animal sleep studies. We obtained standardized electroencephalographic (EEG), electromyographic (EMG) and electrooculographic (EOG) signals from freely behaving mice. EOG electrodes were bilaterally and chronically implanted with placement of the electrodes directly between the musculus rectus superior and musculus rectus lateralis. After recovery, EEG, EMG and EOG signals were obtained for four days. Subsequent to the implantation process, we developed and validated an Eye Movement scoring in Mice Algorithm (EMMA) to detect REM as singularities of the EOG signal, based on wavelet methodology. The distribution of wakefulness, non-REM (NREM) sleep and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep was typical of nocturnal rodents with small amounts of wakefulness and large amounts of NREM sleep during the light period and reversed proportions during the dark period. REM sleep was distributed correspondingly. REM density was significantly higher during REM sleep than NREM sleep. REM bursts were detected more often at the end of the dark period than the beginning of the light period. During REM sleep REM density showed an ultradian course, and during NREM sleep REM density peaked at the beginning of the dark period. Concerning individual eye movements, REM duration was longer and amplitude was lower during REM sleep than NREM sleep. The majority of single REM and REM bursts were associated with micro-arousals during NREM sleep, but not during REM sleep. Sleep-stage specific distributions of REM in mice correspond to human

  6. Rapid eye movements during sleep in mice: High trait-like stability qualifies rapid eye movement density for characterization of phenotypic variation in sleep patterns of rodents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fulda Stephany

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In humans, rapid eye movements (REM density during REM sleep plays a prominent role in psychiatric diseases. Especially in depression, an increased REM density is a vulnerability marker for depression. In clinical practice and research measurement of REM density is highly standardized. In basic animal research, almost no tools are available to obtain and systematically evaluate eye movement data, although, this would create increased comparability between human and animal sleep studies. Methods We obtained standardized electroencephalographic (EEG, electromyographic (EMG and electrooculographic (EOG signals from freely behaving mice. EOG electrodes were bilaterally and chronically implanted with placement of the electrodes directly between the musculus rectus superior and musculus rectus lateralis. After recovery, EEG, EMG and EOG signals were obtained for four days. Subsequent to the implantation process, we developed and validated an Eye Movement scoring in Mice Algorithm (EMMA to detect REM as singularities of the EOG signal, based on wavelet methodology. Results The distribution of wakefulness, non-REM (NREM sleep and rapid eye movement (REM sleep was typical of nocturnal rodents with small amounts of wakefulness and large amounts of NREM sleep during the light period and reversed proportions during the dark period. REM sleep was distributed correspondingly. REM density was significantly higher during REM sleep than NREM sleep. REM bursts were detected more often at the end of the dark period than the beginning of the light period. During REM sleep REM density showed an ultradian course, and during NREM sleep REM density peaked at the beginning of the dark period. Concerning individual eye movements, REM duration was longer and amplitude was lower during REM sleep than NREM sleep. The majority of single REM and REM bursts were associated with micro-arousals during NREM sleep, but not during REM sleep. Conclusions Sleep

  7. Phenological Metrics Extraction for Agricultural Land-use Types Using RapidEye and MODIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xingmei; Doktor, Daniel; Conrad, Christopher

    2016-04-01

    Crop phenology involves the various agricultural events, such as planting, emergence, flowering, development of fruit and harvest. These phenological stages of a crop contain essential information for practical agricultural management, crop productivity estimation, investigations of crop-weather relationships, and also play an important role in improving agricultural land-use classification. In this study, we used MODIS and RapidEye images to extract phenological metrics in central Germany between 2010 and 2014. The Best Index Slope Extraction algorithm was used to remove undesirable data noise from Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) time series of both satellite data before fast Fourier transformation was applied. Metrics optimization for phenology of major crops in the study area (winter wheat, winter barley, winter oilseed rape and sugar beet) and validation were performed with intensive ground observations from the German Weather Service (2010-2014) and our own measurements of BBCH code (Biologische Bundesanstalt für Land- und Forstwirtschaft, Bundessortenamt und CHemische Industrie) (in 2014). We found that the dates with maximum NDVI have a close link to the heading stage of cereals (RMSE = 9.48 days for MODIS and RMSE = 13.55 days for RapidEye), and the dates of local half maximum during senescence period of winter crops was strongly related to ripeness stage (BBCH: 87) (RMSE = 8.87 days for MODIS and RMSE = 9.62 days for RapidEye). The root-mean-square errors (RMSE) of derived green up dates for both winter and summer crops were larger than 2 weeks, which was caused by limited number of good quality images during the winter season. Comparison between RapidEye and homogeneous MODIS pixels indicated that phenological metrics derived from both satellites were similar to the crop calendar in this region. We also investigated the influence of spatial aggregation of RapidEye-scale phenology to MODIS scale as well as the effect of decreasing the

  8. Research progress on the pathogenesis of rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder and neurodegenerative diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-yang JIANG

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (RBD is a sleep disorder characterized by the disappearance of muscle relaxation and enacting one's dreams during rapid eye movement (REM, with most of the dreams being violent or aggressive. Prevalence of RBD, based on population, is 0.38%-2.01%, but it becomes much higher in patients with neurodegenerative diseases, especially α - synucleinopathies. RBD may herald the emergence of α-synucleinopathies by decades, thus it may be used as an effective early marker of neurodegenerative diseases. In this review, we summarized the progress on the pathogenesis of RBD and its relationship with neurodegenerative diseases. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2017.10.003

  9. A single-question screen for rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Postuma, Ronald B; Arnulf, Isabelle; Hogl, Birgit

    2012-01-01

    Idiopathic rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD) is a parasomnia that is an important risk factor for Parkinson's disease (PD) and Lewy body dementia. Its prevalence is unknown. One barrier to determining prevalence is that current screening tools are too long for large-scale epi......Idiopathic rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD) is a parasomnia that is an important risk factor for Parkinson's disease (PD) and Lewy body dementia. Its prevalence is unknown. One barrier to determining prevalence is that current screening tools are too long for large......-scale epidemiologic surveys. Therefore, we designed the REM Sleep Behavior Disorder Single-Question Screen (RBD1Q), a screening question for dream enactment with a simple yes/no response....

  10. Importance of Rapid Eye Movement Sleep Behavior Disorder to the Primary Care Physician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarter, Stuart J; Howell, Michael J

    2016-10-01

    Sleep disorders and neurodegenerative diseases are commonly encountered in primary care. A common, but underdiagnosed sleep disorder, rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (RBD), is highly associated with Parkinson disease and related disorders. Rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder is common. It is estimated to affect 0.5% of the general population and more than 7% of individuals older than 60 years; however, most cases go unrecognized. Rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder presents as dream enactment, often with patients thrashing, punching, and kicking while they are sleeping. Physicians can quickly assess for the presence of RBD with high sensitivity and specificity by asking patients the question "Have you ever been told that you act out your dreams, for example by punching or flailing your arms in the air or screaming and shouting in your sleep?" Patients with RBD exhibit subtle signs of neurodegenerative disease, such as mild motor slowing, constipation, or changes in sense of smell. These signs and symptoms may predict development of a neurodegenerative disease within 3 years. Ultimately, most patients with RBD develop a neurodegenerative disease, highlighting the importance of serial neurological examinations to assess for the presence of parkinsonism and/or cognitive impairment and prognostic counseling for these patients. Rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder is treatable with melatonin (3-6 mg before bed) or clonazepam (0.5-1 mg before bed) and may be the most common, reversible cause of sleep-related injury. Thus, it is important to identify patients at risk of RBD in a primary care setting so that bedroom safety can be addressed and treatment may be initiated. Copyright © 2016 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Dream Anxiety in Patients with Rapid Eye Movement Dependent Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Ece Yazla; Mustafa Bilici; Zerrin Pelin

    2017-01-01

    Aims: The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of the breathing disorders that arise during sleep and are predominantly observed in Rapid Eye Movement (REM) phase onto the dreams which have negative effects on daily life. While doing this, we also investigated differences between the REM dependent and non REM dependent obstructive sleep apnea syndrome groups in terms of some sociodemographic and clinical characteristics. Methods: Seventy patients who had got the diagnosis of obs...

  12. Apnea-Induced Rapid Eye Movement Sleep Disruption Impairs Human Spatial Navigational Memory

    OpenAIRE

    Varga, Andrew W.; Kishi, Akifumi; Mantua, Janna; Lim, Jason; Koushyk, Viachaslau; Leibert, David P.; Osorio, Ricardo S.; Rapoport, David M.; Ayappa, Indu

    2014-01-01

    Hippocampal electrophysiology and behavioral evidence support a role for sleep in spatial navigational memory, but the role of particular sleep stages is less clear. Although rodent models suggest the importance of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep in spatial navigational memory, a similar role for REM sleep has never been examined in humans. We recruited subjects with severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) who were well treated and adherent with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). Restric...

  13. Crop Type Classification Using Vegetation Indices of RapidEye Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ustuner, M.; Sanli, F. B.; Abdikan, S.; Esetlili, M. T.; Kurucu, Y.

    2014-09-01

    Cutting-edge remote sensing technology has a significant role for managing the natural resources as well as the any other applications about the earth observation. Crop monitoring is the one of these applications since remote sensing provides us accurate, up-to-date and cost-effective information about the crop types at the different temporal and spatial resolution. In this study, the potential use of three different vegetation indices of RapidEye imagery on crop type classification as well as the effect of each indices on classification accuracy were investigated. The Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), the Green Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (GNDVI), and the Normalized Difference Red Edge Index (NDRE) are the three vegetation indices used in this study since all of these incorporated the near-infrared (NIR) band. RapidEye imagery is highly demanded and preferred for agricultural and forestry applications since it has red-edge and NIR bands. The study area is located in Aegean region of Turkey. Radial Basis Function (RBF) kernel was used here for the Support Vector Machines (SVMs) classification. Original bands of RapidEye imagery were excluded and classification was performed with only three vegetation indices. The contribution of each indices on image classification accuracy was also tested with single band classification. Highest classification accuracy of 87, 46 % was obtained using three vegetation indices. This obtained classification accuracy is higher than the classification accuracy of any dual-combination of these vegetation indices. Results demonstrate that NDRE has the highest contribution on classification accuracy compared to the other vegetation indices and the RapidEye imagery can get satisfactory results of classification accuracy without original bands.

  14. Slow wave and rapid eye movement sleep deprivation: differing impacts on memory consolidation?

    OpenAIRE

    Solomons, Luke

    2016-01-01

    It has been debated whether different stages in the human sleep cycle preferentially mediate the consolidation of explicit and implicit memories, or whether all of the stages in succession are necessary for optimal consolidation. We investigated whether the selective deprivation of slow wave sleep (SWS) or rapid eye movement (REM) sleep over an entire night would have a specific effect on consolidation in explicit and implicit memory tasks. Participants had one control night of undisturbed sl...

  15. Predicting stem borer density in maize using RapidEye data and generalized linear models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Rahman, Elfatih M.; Landmann, Tobias; Kyalo, Richard; Ong'amo, George; Mwalusepo, Sizah; Sulieman, Saad; Ru, Bruno Le

    2017-05-01

    Average maize yield in eastern Africa is 2.03 t ha-1 as compared to global average of 6.06 t ha-1 due to biotic and abiotic constraints. Amongst the biotic production constraints in Africa, stem borers are the most injurious. In eastern Africa, maize yield losses due to stem borers are currently estimated between 12% and 21% of the total production. The objective of the present study was to explore the possibility of RapidEye spectral data to assess stem borer larva densities in maize fields in two study sites in Kenya. RapidEye images were acquired for the Bomet (western Kenya) test site on the 9th of December 2014 and on 27th of January 2015, and for Machakos (eastern Kenya) a RapidEye image was acquired on the 3rd of January 2015. Five RapidEye spectral bands as well as 30 spectral vegetation indices (SVIs) were utilized to predict per field maize stem borer larva densities using generalized linear models (GLMs), assuming Poisson ('Po') and negative binomial ('NB') distributions. Root mean square error (RMSE) and ratio prediction to deviation (RPD) statistics were used to assess the models performance using a leave-one-out cross-validation approach. The Zero-inflated NB ('ZINB') models outperformed the 'NB' models and stem borer larva densities could only be predicted during the mid growing season in December and early January in both study sites, respectively (RMSE = 0.69-1.06 and RPD = 8.25-19.57). Overall, all models performed similar when all the 30 SVIs (non-nested) and only the significant (nested) SVIs were used. The models developed could improve decision making regarding controlling maize stem borers within integrated pest management (IPM) interventions.

  16. Rapid eye movement sleep behavioral events: a new marker for neurodegeneration in early Parkinson disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sixel-Döring, Friederike; Trautmann, Ellen; Mollenhauer, Brit; Trenkwalder, Claudia

    2014-03-01

    To analyze potential markers in sleep for early recognition of neurodegenerative disease in newly diagnosed, unmedicated patients with Parkinson disease (PD) compared to controls. Videopolysomnography (vPSG) was available in 158 newly diagnosed, unmedicated patients with PD and 110 age-, sex-, and education-matched healthy controls (HC). Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep was analyzed for REM without atonia (RWA) and studied by review of time-synchronized video. Motor behaviors and/or vocalizations in REM sleep with a purposeful component other than comfort moves were identified as REM sleep behavioral events (RBE). Two or more events had to be present to be classified as "RBE positive." RBE subjects included rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (RBD) and non-RBD subjects based on the presence or absence of RWA > 18.2%. RBE were detected in 81 of 158 patients with de novo PD (51%) and 17 of 110 HC (15%) (P sleep (P = 0.002) and a higher periodic leg movements in sleep index (P = 0.022) compared to subjects without RBE. This first description of REM sleep behavioral events (RBE) shows it occurs more frequently in patients with de novo Parkinson disease (PD) than in healthy controls and may be an early sign of neurodegeneration and precede rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (RBD). There is no specific phenotype of PD associated with newly defined RBE or RBD at this early stage.

  17. Rapid, low-cost photogrammetry to monitor volcanic eruptions: an example from Mount St. Helens, Washington, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diefenbach, Angela K.; Crider, Juliet G.; Schilling, Steve P.; Dzurisin, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    We describe a low-cost application of digital photogrammetry using commercially available photogrammetric software and oblique photographs taken with an off-the-shelf digital camera to create sequential digital elevation models (DEMs) of a lava dome that grew during the 2004–2008 eruption of Mount St. Helens (MSH) volcano. Renewed activity at MSH provided an opportunity to devise and test this method, because it could be validated against other observations of this well-monitored volcano. The datasets consist of oblique aerial photographs (snapshots) taken from a helicopter using a digital single-lens reflex camera. Twelve sets of overlapping digital images of the dome taken during 2004–2007 were used to produce DEMs and to calculate lava dome volumes and extrusion rates. Analyses of the digital images were carried out using photogrammetric software to produce three-dimensional coordinates of points identified in multiple photos. The evolving morphology of the dome was modeled by comparing successive DEMs. Results were validated by comparison to volume measurements derived from traditional vertical photogrammetric surveys by the US Geological Survey Cascades Volcano Observatory. Our technique was significantly less expensive and required less time than traditional vertical photogrammetric techniques; yet, it consistently yielded volume estimates within 5% of the traditional method. This technique provides an inexpensive, rapid assessment tool for tracking lava dome growth or other topographic changes at restless volcanoes.

  18. Rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder as an outlier detection problem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kempfner, Jacob; Sørensen, Gertrud Laura; Nikolic, M.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Idiopathic rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder is a strong early marker of Parkinson's disease and is characterized by REM sleep without atonia and/or dream enactment. Because these measures are subject to individual interpretation, there is consequently need...... for quantitative methods to establish objective criteria. This study proposes a semiautomatic algorithm for the early detection of Parkinson's disease. This is achieved by distinguishing between normal REM sleep and REM sleep without atonia by considering muscle activity as an outlier detection problem. METHODS...... limb movements did only have a minor influence on the quantification of the muscle activity. Analysis of muscle activity during nonrapid eye movement sleep may improve the separation even further. Copyright © 2014 by the American Clinical Neurophysiology Society....

  19. Mapping Submerged Aquatic Vegetation Using RapidEye Satellite Data: The Example of Lake Kummerow (Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Fritz

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Submersed aquatic vegetation (SAV is sensitive to changes in environmental conditions and plays an important role as a long-term indictor for the trophic state of freshwater lakes. Variations in water level height, nutrient condition, light availability and water temperature affect the growth and species composition of SAV. Detailed information about seasonal variations in littoral bottom coverage are still unknown, although these effects are expected to mask climate change-related long-term changes, as derived by snapshots of standard monitoring methods included in the European Water Framework Directive. Remote sensing offers concepts to map SAV quickly, within large areas, and at short intervals. This study analyses the potential of a semi-empirical method to map littoral bottom coverage by a multi-seasonal approach. Depth-invariant indices were calculated for four Atmospheric & Topographic Correction (ATCOR2 atmospheric corrected RapidEye data sets acquired at Lake Kummerow, Germany, between June and August 2015. RapidEye data evaluation was supported by in situ measurements of the diffuse attenuation coefficient of the water column and bottom reflectance. The processing chain was able to differentiate between SAV and sandy sediment. The successive increase of SAV coverage from June to August was correctly monitored. Comparisons with in situ and Google Earth imagery revealed medium accuracies (kappa coefficient = 0.61, overall accuracy = 72.2%. The analysed time series further revealed how water constituents and temporary surface phenomena such as sun glint or algal blooms influence the identification success of lake bottom substrates. An abundant algal bloom biased the interpretability of shallow water substrate such that a differentiation of sediments and SAV patches failed completely. Despite the documented limitations, mapping of SAV using RapidEye seems possible, even in eutrophic lakes.

  20. Rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder--diagnostik, årsager og behandling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zoetmulder, Marielle; Jennum, Poul Jørgen

    2009-01-01

    and neurological disease. RBD is related to brainstem pathology. Furthermore, it is increasingly recognized that RBD is frequently related to Parkinsonian disorders and narcolepsy. This article reviews recent knowledge about RBD with focus on the diagnostic process and management.......Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behaviour disorder (RBD) is characterized by loss of REM sleep and related electromyographic atonia with marked muscular activity and dream enactment behaviour. RBD is seen in 0.5% of the population. It occurs in an idiopathic form and secondarily to medical...

  1. Rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder--diagnostik, årsager og behandling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zoetmulder, Marielle; Jennum, Poul Jørgen

    2009-01-01

    Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behaviour disorder (RBD) is characterized by loss of REM sleep and related electromyographic atonia with marked muscular activity and dream enactment behaviour. RBD is seen in 0.5% of the population. It occurs in an idiopathic form and secondarily to medical...... and neurological disease. RBD is related to brainstem pathology. Furthermore, it is increasingly recognized that RBD is frequently related to Parkinsonian disorders and narcolepsy. This article reviews recent knowledge about RBD with focus on the diagnostic process and management....

  2. Rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder--diagnostik, årsager og behandling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zoetmulder, Marielle; Jennum, Poul Jørgen

    2009-01-01

    Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behaviour disorder (RBD) is characterized by loss of REM sleep and related electromyographic atonia with marked muscular activity and dream enactment behaviour. RBD is seen in 0.5% of the population. It occurs in an idiopathic form and secondarily to medical and neu...... and neurological disease. RBD is related to brainstem pathology. Furthermore, it is increasingly recognized that RBD is frequently related to Parkinsonian disorders and narcolepsy. This article reviews recent knowledge about RBD with focus on the diagnostic process and management....

  3. Rapid Eye Movements (REMs) and visual dream recall in both congenitally blind and sighted subjects

    OpenAIRE

    Bértolo, Helder; Mestre, Tiago; Barrio de Santos, Ana Rosa; Antona Peñalba, Beatriz

    2017-01-01

    Our objective was to evaluate rapid eye movements (REMs) associated with visual dream recall in sighted subjects and congenital blind. During two consecutive nights polysomnographic recordings were performed at subjects home. REMs were detected by visual inspection on both EOG channels (EOG-H, EOG-V) and further classified as occurring isolated or in bursts. Dream recall was defined by the existence of a dream report. The two groups were compared using t-test and also the two-way ANOVA and...

  4. The 'scanning hypothesis' of rapid eye movements during REM sleep: a review of the evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnulf, I

    2011-12-01

    Rapid eye movements (REMs) and visual dreams are salient features of REM sleep. However, it is unclear whether the eyes scan dream images. Several lines of evidence oppose the scanning hypothesis: REMs persist in animals and humans without sight (pontine cats, foetus, neonates, born-blinds), some binocular REMs are not conjugated (no focus point), REMs occur in parallel (not in series) with the stimulation of the visual cortex by ponto-geniculo-occipital spikes, and visual dreams can be obtained in non REM sleep. Studies that retrospectively compared the direction of REMs to dream recall recorded after having awakened the sleeper yielded inconsistent results, with a concordance varying from 9 to 80%. However, this method was subject to methodological flaws, including the bias of retrospection and neck atonia that does not allow the determination of the exact direction of gaze. Using the model of RBD (in which patients are able to enact their dreams due to the absence of muscle atonia) in 56 patients, we directly determined if the eyes moved in the same directions as the head and limbs. When REMs accompanied goal-oriented motor behaviour during RBD (e.g., framing something, greeting with the hand, climbing a ladder), 90% were directed towards the action of the patient (same plane and direction). REMs were however absent in 38% of goal-oriented behaviours. This directional coherence between limbs, head and eye movements during RBD suggests that, when present, REMs imitate the scanning of the dream scene. Because REMs index and complexity were similar in patients with RBD and controls, this concordance can be extended to normal REM sleep. These results are consistent with the model of a brainstem generator activating simultaneously images, sounds, limbs movements and REMs in a coordinated parallel manner, as in a virtual reality.

  5. Validation of the Turkish Version of the Rapid Eye Movement Sleep Behavior Disorder Questionnaire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarı Cömert, Itır; Pelin, Zerrin; Arıcak, Tolga; Yapan, Saadet

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the validity and reliability of a Turkish version of the rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder questionnaire (the RBDSQ-T) for identifying patients with rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (RBD) and to ensure that this tool can be applied in Turkish language. Three groups were enrolled to validate the RBDSQ-T: 78 healthy controls, 17 patients previously diagnosed with RBD, and 28 patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). Based on a cut-off score of five, the RBDSQ-T was able to discriminate RBD patients from healthy controls with sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 87%. Accordingly, 63% of patients were correctly diagnosed using the RBDSQ-T. Similarly, with a cut-off score of five, the RBDSQ-T was able to discriminate RBD from OSAS with sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 64%. Assessment of test-retest reliability and internal consistency reliability using Kuder-Richardson 20 analysis revealed a test-retest correlation coefficient of 0.95 and a Kuder-Richardson 20 value of 0.82. The findings demonstrate that the RBDSQ-T is a valid and reliable tool. PMID:27340339

  6. Validation of the Turkish Version of the Rapid Eye Movement Sleep Behavior Disorder Questionnaire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Itır Tarı Cömert

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the validity and reliability of a Turkish version of the rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder questionnaire (the RBDSQ-T for identifying patients with rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (RBD and to ensure that this tool can be applied in Turkish language. Three groups were enrolled to validate the RBDSQ-T: 78 healthy controls, 17 patients previously diagnosed with RBD, and 28 patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS. Based on a cut-off score of five, the RBDSQ-T was able to discriminate RBD patients from healthy controls with sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 87%. Accordingly, 63% of patients were correctly diagnosed using the RBDSQ-T. Similarly, with a cut-off score of five, the RBDSQ-T was able to discriminate RBD from OSAS with sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 64%. Assessment of test-retest reliability and internal consistency reliability using Kuder-Richardson 20 analysis revealed a test-retest correlation coefficient of 0.95 and a Kuder-Richardson 20 value of 0.82. The findings demonstrate that the RBDSQ-T is a valid and reliable tool.

  7. Using a slit lamp-mounted digital high-speed camera for dynamic observation of phakic lenses during eye movements: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leitritz MA

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Martin Alexander Leitritz, Focke Ziemssen, Karl Ulrich Bartz-Schmidt, Bogomil Voykov Centre for Ophthalmology, University Eye Hospital, Eberhard Karls University of Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany Purpose: To evaluate a digital high-speed camera combined with digital morphometry software for dynamic measurements of phakic intraocular lens movements to observe kinetic influences, particularly in fast direction changes and at lateral end points. Materials and methods: A high-speed camera taking 300 frames per second observed movements of eight iris-claw intraocular lenses and two angle-supported intraocular lenses. Standardized saccades were performed by the patients to trigger mass inertia with lens position changes. Freeze images with maximum deviation were used for digital software-based morphometry analysis with ImageJ.Results: Two eyes from each of five patients (median age 32 years, range 28–45 years without findings other than refractive errors were included. The high-speed images showed sufficient usability for further morphometric processing. In the primary eye position, the median decentrations downward and in a lateral direction were -0.32 mm (range -0.69 to 0.024 and 0.175 mm (range -0.37 to 0.45, respectively. Despite the small sample size of asymptomatic patients, we found a considerable amount of lens dislocation. The median distance amplitude during eye movements was 0.158 mm (range 0.02–0.84. There was a slight positive corrlation (r=0.39, P<0.001 between the grade of deviation in the primary position and the distance increase triggered by movements.Conclusion: With the use of a slit lamp-mounted high-speed camera system and morphometry software, observation and objective measurements of iris-claw intraocular lenses and angle-supported intraocular lenses movements seem to be possible. Slight decentration in the primary position might be an indicator of increased lens mobility during kinetic stress during eye movements

  8. Relevance of new multispectral imagery for assessing tropical forest disturbance: RapidEye and WorldView-2

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Cho, Moses A

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this study were to assess utility of RapidEye imagery for predicting leaf nitrogen concentration and evaluate the effects of forest fragmentation on leaf nitrogen distribution in the Dukuduku forest, KwaZulu Natal, South Africa. Rapid...

  9. Long-Term Follow-up Investigation of Isolated Rapid Eye Movement Sleep Without Atonia Without Rapid Eye Movement Sleep Behavior Disorder: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefani, Ambra; Gabelia, David; Högl, Birgit; Mitterling, Thomas; Mahlknecht, Philipp; Stockner, Heike; Poewe, Werner; Frauscher, Birgit

    2015-11-15

    Idiopathic rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD) is a harbinger of synuclein-mediated neurodegenerative diseases. It is unknown if this also applies to isolated REM sleep without atonia (RWA). We performed a long-term follow-up investigation of subjects with isolated RWA. Participants were recruited from 50 subjects with isolated RWA who were identified at the sleep laboratory of the Department of Neurology at the Medical University of Innsbruck between 2003 and 2005. Eligible subjects underwent follow-up clinical examination, polysomnography, and assessment of neurodegenerative biomarkers (cognitive impairment, finger speed deficit, impaired color vision, olfactory dysfunction, orthostatic hypotension, and substantia nigra hyperechogenicity). After a mean of 8.6 ± 0.9 y, 1 of 14 participating subjects (7.3%) progressed to RBD. Ten of 14 RWA subjects (71.4%) were positive for at least one neurodegenerative biomarker. Substantia nigra hyperechogenicity and presence of mild cognitive impairment were both present in 4 of 14 subjects with isolated RWA. Electromyographic activity measures increased significantly from baseline to follow-up polysomnography ("any" mentalis and both anterior tibialis muscles: 32.5 ± 9.4 versus 52.2 ± 16.6%; p = 0.004). This study provides first evidence that isolated RWA is an early biomarker of synuclein-mediated neurodegeneration. These results will have to be replicated in larger studies with longer observational periods. If confirmed, these disease findings have implications for defining at-risk cohorts for Parkinson disease. © 2015 American Academy of Sleep Medicine.

  10. The improvement of movement and speech during rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder in multiple system atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Cock, Valérie Cochen; Debs, Rachel; Oudiette, Delphine; Leu, Smaranda; Radji, Fatai; Tiberge, Michel; Yu, Huan; Bayard, Sophie; Roze, Emmanuel; Vidailhet, Marie; Dauvilliers, Yves; Rascol, Olivier; Arnulf, Isabelle

    2011-03-01

    Multiple system atrophy is an atypical parkinsonism characterized by severe motor disabilities that are poorly levodopa responsive. Most patients develop rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder. Because parkinsonism is absent during rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder in patients with Parkinson's disease, we studied the movements of patients with multiple system atrophy during rapid eye movement sleep. Forty-nine non-demented patients with multiple system atrophy and 49 patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease were interviewed along with their 98 bed partners using a structured questionnaire. They rated the quality of movements, vocal and facial expressions during rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder as better than, equal to or worse than the same activities in an awake state. Sleep and movements were monitored using video-polysomnography in 22/49 patients with multiple system atrophy and in 19/49 patients with Parkinson's disease. These recordings were analysed for the presence of parkinsonism and cerebellar syndrome during rapid eye movement sleep movements. Clinical rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder was observed in 43/49 (88%) patients with multiple system atrophy. Reports from the 31/43 bed partners who were able to evaluate movements during sleep indicate that 81% of the patients showed some form of improvement during rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder. These included improved movement (73% of patients: faster, 67%; stronger, 52%; and smoother, 26%), improved speech (59% of patients: louder, 55%; more intelligible, 17%; and better articulated, 36%) and normalized facial expression (50% of patients). The rate of improvement was higher in Parkinson's disease than in multiple system atrophy, but no further difference was observed between the two forms of multiple system atrophy (predominant parkinsonism versus cerebellar syndrome). Video-monitored movements during rapid eye movement sleep in patients with multiple system

  11. Clinical characteristics, management and long-term outcome of suspected rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder in 14 dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, T A; Chidester, R M; Chrisman, C L

    2011-02-01

    To describe the clinical characteristics, management and long-term outcome in dogs with suspected rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder. Medical records and video recordings of 14 dogs with suspected rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder were reviewed and the owners were contacted via telephone or email for further information. Clinical signs included episodes of violent limb movements, howling, barking, growling, chewing, or biting during sleep. Episodes occurred at night and during daytime naps. The age at onset ranged from 8 weeks to 7·5 years with a median of 6 years but 64% of dogs were one year or less. There was no apparent sex or breed predisposition. Rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder events were reduced in severity and frequency in 78% of the dogs treated with 40 mg/kg/day oral potassium bromide. One dog was euthanized within 3 months of the onset of signs because of their severity. The duration of the disorder in the 13 surviving dogs ranged from 1·5 to 9 years. None of the dogs spontaneously recovered. Rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder is suspected to occur in dogs, as it does in human beings. It causes concern to the owners and disrupts the home environment. Unlike human beings, rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder of dogs often has a juvenile onset. © 2011 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  12. Rapid Eye Movements (REMs) and visual dream recall in both congenitally blind and sighted subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bértolo, Helder; Mestre, Tiago; Barrio, Ana; Antona, Beatriz

    2017-08-01

    Our objective was to evaluate rapid eye movements (REMs) associated with visual dream recall in sighted subjects and congenital blind. During two consecutive nights polysomnographic recordings were performed at subjects home. REMs were detected by visual inspection on both EOG channels (EOG-H, EOG-V) and further classified as occurring isolated or in bursts. Dream recall was defined by the existence of a dream report. The two groups were compared using t-test and also the two-way ANOVA and a post-hoc Fisher test (for the features diagnosis (blind vs. sighted) and dream recall (yes or no) as a function of time). The average of REM awakenings per subject and the recall ability were identical in both groups. CB had a lower REM density than CS; the same applied to REM bursts and isolated eye movements. In the two-way ANOVA, REM bursts and REM density were significantly different for positive dream recall, mainly for the CB group and for diagnosis; furthermore for both features significant results were obtained for the interaction of time, recall and diagnosis; the interaction of recall and time was however, stronger. In line with previous findings the data show that blind have lower REMs density. However the ability of dream recall in congenitally blind and sighted controls is identical. In both groups visual dream recall is associated with an increase in REM bursts and density. REM bursts also show differences in the temporal profile. REM visual dream recall is associated with increased REMs activity.

  13. Integrating RapidEye and ancillary data to map alpine habitats in South Tyrol, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polychronaki, Anastasia; Spindler, Nadine; Schmidt, Alexander; Stoinschek, Barbara; Zebisch, Marc; Renner, Kathrin; Sonnenschein, Ruth; Notarnicola, Claudia

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, we present a two-stage method for mapping habitats using Earth observation (EO) data in three Alpine sites in South Tyrol, Italy. The first stage of the method was the classification of land cover types using multi-temporal RapidEye images and support vector machines (SVMs). The second stage involved reclassification of the land cover types to habitat types following a rule-based spatial kernel. The highest accuracies in land cover classification were 95.1% overall accuracy, 0.94 kappa coefficient and 4.9% overall disagreement. These accuracies were obtained when the combination of images with topographic parameters and homogeneity texture was used. The habitat classification accuracies were rather moderate due to the broadly defined rules and possible inaccuracies in the reference map. Overall, our proposed methodology could be implemented to map cost-effectively alpine habitats over large areas and could be easily adapted to map other types of habitats.

  14. Neuropeptide S mitigates spatial memory impairment induced by rapid eye movement sleep deprivation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhengqing; Huang, Liuqing; Wu, Huijuan; Li, Yanpeng; Zhang, Lin; Yin, You; Xiang, Zhenghua; Zhao, Zhongxin

    2010-06-23

    Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep deprivation causes learning and memory deficits. Neuropeptide S, a newly discovered neuropeptide, has been shown to regulate arousal, anxiety, and may enhance long-term memory formation and spatial memory. However, it is unknown whether neuropeptide S could improve the REM sleep deprivation-induced memory impairment. Here, we report that 72-h REM sleep deprivation in rats resulted in spatial memory impairment and reduced phosphorylation level of cAMP-response element binding protein in the hippocampus, both of which were reversed by central administration of neuropeptide S. The results suggest that neuropeptide S mitigates spatial memory impairment in rats induced by 72-h REM sleep deprivation, possibly through activating cAMP-response element binding protein phosphorylation in the hippocampus.

  15. Memory Reactivation during Rapid Eye Movement Sleep Promotes Its Generalization and Integration in Cortical Stores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterpenich, Virginie; Schmidt, Christina; Albouy, Geneviève; Matarazzo, Luca; Vanhaudenhuyse, Audrey; Boveroux, Pierre; Degueldre, Christian; Leclercq, Yves; Balteau, Evelyne; Collette, Fabienne; Luxen, André; Phillips, Christophe; Maquet, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: Memory reactivation appears to be a fundamental process in memory consolidation. In this study we tested the influence of memory reactivation during rapid eye movement (REM) sleep on memory performance and brain responses at retrieval in healthy human participants. Participants: Fifty-six healthy subjects (28 women and 28 men, age [mean ± standard deviation]: 21.6 ± 2.2 y) participated in this functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study. Methods and Results: Auditory cues were associated with pictures of faces during their encoding. These memory cues delivered during REM sleep enhanced subsequent accurate recollections but also false recognitions. These results suggest that reactivated memories interacted with semantically related representations, and induced new creative associations, which subsequently reduced the distinction between new and previously encoded exemplars. Cues had no effect if presented during stage 2 sleep, or if they were not associated with faces during encoding. Functional magnetic resonance imaging revealed that following exposure to conditioned cues during REM sleep, responses to faces during retrieval were enhanced both in a visual area and in a cortical region of multisensory (auditory-visual) convergence. Conclusions: These results show that reactivating memories during REM sleep enhances cortical responses during retrieval, suggesting the integration of recent memories within cortical circuits, favoring the generalization and schematization of the information. Citation: Sterpenich V, Schmidt C, Albouy G, Matarazzo L, Vanhaudenhuyse A, Boveroux P, Degueldre C, Leclercq Y, Balteau E, Collette F, Luxen A, Phillips C, Maquet P. Memory reactivation during rapid eye movement sleep promotes its generalization and integration in cortical stores. SLEEP 2014;37(6):1061-1075. PMID:24882901

  16. Interannual Change Detection of Mediterranean Seagrasses Using RapidEye Image Time Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimosthenis Traganos

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Recent research studies have highlighted the decrease in the coverage of Mediterranean seagrasses due to mainly anthropogenic activities. The lack of data on the distribution of these significant aquatic plants complicates the quantification of their decreasing tendency. While Mediterranean seagrasses are declining, satellite remote sensing technology is growing at an unprecedented pace, resulting in a wealth of spaceborne image time series. Here, we exploit recent advances in high spatial resolution sensors and machine learning to study Mediterranean seagrasses. We process a multispectral RapidEye time series between 2011 and 2016 to detect interannual seagrass dynamics in 888 submerged hectares of the Thermaikos Gulf, NW Aegean Sea, Greece (eastern Mediterranean Sea. We assess the extent change of two Mediterranean seagrass species, the dominant Posidonia oceanica and Cymodocea nodosa, following atmospheric and analytical water column correction, as well as machine learning classification, using Random Forests, of the RapidEye time series. Prior corrections are necessary to untangle the initially weak signal of the submerged seagrass habitats from satellite imagery. The central results of this study show that P. oceanica seagrass area has declined by 4.1%, with a trend of −11.2 ha/yr, while C. nodosa seagrass area has increased by 17.7% with a trend of +18 ha/yr throughout the 5-year study period. Trends of change in spatial distribution of seagrasses in the Thermaikos Gulf site are in line with reported trends in the Mediterranean. Our presented methodology could be a time- and cost-effective method toward the quantitative ecological assessment of seagrass dynamics elsewhere in the future. From small meadows to whole coastlines, knowledge of aquatic plant dynamics could resolve decline or growth trends and accurately highlight key units for future restoration, management, and conservation.

  17. Maize Cropping Systems Mapping Using RapidEye Observations in Agro-Ecological Landscapes in Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyalo Richard

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Cropping systems information on explicit scales is an important but rarely available variable in many crops modeling routines and of utmost importance for understanding pests and disease propagation mechanisms in agro-ecological landscapes. In this study, high spatial and temporal resolution RapidEye bio-temporal data were utilized within a novel 2-step hierarchical random forest (RF classification approach to map areas of mono- and mixed maize cropping systems. A small-scale maize farming site in Machakos County, Kenya was used as a study site. Within the study site, field data was collected during the satellite acquisition period on general land use/land cover (LULC and the two cropping systems. Firstly, non-cropland areas were masked out from other land use/land cover using the LULC mapping result. Subsequently an optimized RF model was applied to the cropland layer to map the two cropping systems (2nd classification step. An overall accuracy of 93% was attained for the LULC classification, while the class accuracies (PA: producer’s accuracy and UA: user’s accuracy for the two cropping systems were consistently above 85%. We concluded that explicit mapping of different cropping systems is feasible in complex and highly fragmented agro-ecological landscapes if high resolution and multi-temporal satellite data such as 5 m RapidEye data is employed. Further research is needed on the feasibility of using freely available 10–20 m Sentinel-2 data for wide-area assessment of cropping systems as an important variable in numerous crop productivity models.

  18. Maize Cropping Systems Mapping Using RapidEye Observations in Agro-Ecological Landscapes in Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Kyalo; Abdel-Rahman, Elfatih M.; Subramanian, Sevgan; Nyasani, Johnson O.; Thiel, Michael; Jozani, Hosein; Borgemeister, Christian; Landmann, Tobias

    2017-01-01

    Cropping systems information on explicit scales is an important but rarely available variable in many crops modeling routines and of utmost importance for understanding pests and disease propagation mechanisms in agro-ecological landscapes. In this study, high spatial and temporal resolution RapidEye bio-temporal data were utilized within a novel 2-step hierarchical random forest (RF) classification approach to map areas of mono- and mixed maize cropping systems. A small-scale maize farming site in Machakos County, Kenya was used as a study site. Within the study site, field data was collected during the satellite acquisition period on general land use/land cover (LULC) and the two cropping systems. Firstly, non-cropland areas were masked out from other land use/land cover using the LULC mapping result. Subsequently an optimized RF model was applied to the cropland layer to map the two cropping systems (2nd classification step). An overall accuracy of 93% was attained for the LULC classification, while the class accuracies (PA: producer’s accuracy and UA: user’s accuracy) for the two cropping systems were consistently above 85%. We concluded that explicit mapping of different cropping systems is feasible in complex and highly fragmented agro-ecological landscapes if high resolution and multi-temporal satellite data such as 5 m RapidEye data is employed. Further research is needed on the feasibility of using freely available 10–20 m Sentinel-2 data for wide-area assessment of cropping systems as an important variable in numerous crop productivity models. PMID:29099780

  19. Maize Cropping Systems Mapping Using RapidEye Observations in Agro-Ecological Landscapes in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Kyalo; Abdel-Rahman, Elfatih M; Subramanian, Sevgan; Nyasani, Johnson O; Thiel, Michael; Jozani, Hosein; Borgemeister, Christian; Landmann, Tobias

    2017-11-03

    Cropping systems information on explicit scales is an important but rarely available variable in many crops modeling routines and of utmost importance for understanding pests and disease propagation mechanisms in agro-ecological landscapes. In this study, high spatial and temporal resolution RapidEye bio-temporal data were utilized within a novel 2-step hierarchical random forest (RF) classification approach to map areas of mono- and mixed maize cropping systems. A small-scale maize farming site in Machakos County, Kenya was used as a study site. Within the study site, field data was collected during the satellite acquisition period on general land use/land cover (LULC) and the two cropping systems. Firstly, non-cropland areas were masked out from other land use/land cover using the LULC mapping result. Subsequently an optimized RF model was applied to the cropland layer to map the two cropping systems (2nd classification step). An overall accuracy of 93% was attained for the LULC classification, while the class accuracies (PA: producer's accuracy and UA: user's accuracy) for the two cropping systems were consistently above 85%. We concluded that explicit mapping of different cropping systems is feasible in complex and highly fragmented agro-ecological landscapes if high resolution and multi-temporal satellite data such as 5 m RapidEye data is employed. Further research is needed on the feasibility of using freely available 10-20 m Sentinel-2 data for wide-area assessment of cropping systems as an important variable in numerous crop productivity models.

  20. Electroencephalographic findings related with mild cognitive impairment in idiopathic rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasai, Taeko; Matsuura, Masato; Inoue, Yuichi

    2013-12-01

    Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and electroencephalographic (EEG) slowing have been reported as common findings of idiopathic rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (iRBD) and α-synucleinopathies. The objective of this study is to clarify the relation between MCI and physiological markers in iRBD. Cross-sectional study. Yoyogi Sleep Disorder Center. Thirty-one patients with iRBD including 17 younger patients with iRBD (younger than 70 y) and 17 control patients for the younger patients with iRBD. N/A. Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) and n-polysomnogram (PSG) were conducted of all participants. In patients with iRBD, the factors associated with MCI were explored among parameters of REM sleep without atonia (RWA), score of Sniffin' Sticks Test (threshold-discrimination-identification [TDI] score), RBD morbidity, and RBD severity evaluated with the Japanese version of the RBD questionnaire (RBDQ-JP). The younger iRBD group showed significantly lower alpha power during wake and lower MoCA score than the age-matched control group. MCI was detected in 13 of 17 patients (76.5%) on MoCA in this group. Among patients wtih iRBD, the MoCA score negatively correlated with age, proportion of slow wave sleep, TDI score, and EEG spectral power. Multiple regression analysis provided the following equation: MoCA score = 50.871-0.116*age -5.307*log (δ power during REM sleep) + 0.086*TDI score (R² = 0.598, P sleep), and 0.357 for TDI score (F = 9.900, P sleep and olfactory dysfunction, was revealed to be associated with cognitive decline in idiopathic rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder.

  1. Measuring dwell time percentage from head-mounted eye-tracking data--comparison of a frame-by-frame and a fixation-by-fixation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vansteenkiste, Pieter; Cardon, Greet; Philippaerts, Renaat; Lenoir, Matthieu

    2015-01-01

    Although analysing software for eye-tracking data has significantly improved in the past decades, the analysis of gaze behaviour recorded with head-mounted devices is still challenging and time-consuming. Therefore, new methods have to be tested to reduce the analysis workload while maintaining accuracy and reliability. In this article, dwell time percentages to six areas of interest (AOIs), of six participants cycling on four different roads, were analysed both frame-by-frame and in a 'fixation-by-fixation' manner. The fixation-based method is similar to the classic frame-by-frame method but instead of assigning frames, fixations are assigned to one of the AOIs. Although some considerable differences were found between the two methods, a Pearson correlation of 0.930 points out a good validity of the fixation-by-fixation method. For the analysis of gaze behaviour over an extended period of time, the fixation-based approach is a valuable and time-saving alternative for the classic frame-by-frame analysis.

  2. Morning rapid eye movement sleep naps facilitate broad access to emotional semantic networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Michelle; Nielsen, Tore

    2015-03-01

    The goal of the study was to assess semantic priming to emotion and nonemotion cue words using a novel measure of associational breadth for participants who either took rapid eye movement (REM) or nonrapid eye movement (NREM) naps or who remained awake; assess relation of priming to REM sleep consolidation and REM sleep inertia effects. The associational breadth task was applied in both a priming condition, where cue-words were signaled to be memorized prior to sleep (primed), and a nonpriming condition, where cue words were not memorized (nonprimed). Cue words were either emotional (positive, negative) or nonemotional. Participants were randomly assigned to either an awake (WAKE) or a sleep condition, which was subsequently split into NREM or REM groups depending on stage at awakening. Hospital-based sleep laboratory. Fifty-eight healthy participants (22 male) ages 18 to 35 y (Mage = 23.3 ± 4.08 y). The REM group scored higher than the NREM or WAKE groups on primed, but not nonprimed emotional cue words; the effect was stronger for positive than for negative cue words. However, REM time and percent correlated negatively with degree of emotional priming. Priming occurred for REM awakenings but not for NREM awakenings, even when the latter sleep episodes contained some REM sleep. Associational breadth may be selectively consolidated during REM sleep for stimuli that have been tagged as important for future memory retrieval. That priming decreased with REM time and was higher only for REM sleep awakenings is consistent with two explanatory REM sleep processes: REM sleep consolidation serving emotional downregulation and REM sleep inertia. © 2015 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  3. Rapid eye movement-sleep is reduced in patients with acute uncomplicated diverticulitis—an observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenxi Huang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Sleep disturbances are commonly found in patients in the postoperative period. Sleep disturbances may give rise to several complications including cardiopulmonary instability, transient cognitive dysfunction and prolonged convalescence. Many factors including host inflammatory responses are believed to cause postoperative sleep disturbances, as inflammatory responses can alter sleep architecture through cytokine-brain interactions. Our aim was to investigate alteration of sleep architecture during acute infection and its relationships to inflammation and clinical symptoms.Materials & Methods. In this observational study, we included patients with acute uncomplicated diverticulitis as a model to investigate the isolated effects of inflammatory responses on sleep. Eleven patients completed the study. Patients were admitted and treated with antibiotics for two nights, during which study endpoints were measured by polysomnography recordings, self-reported discomfort scores and blood samples of cytokines. One month later, the patients, who now were in complete remission, were readmitted and the endpoints were re-measured (the baseline values.Results. Total sleep time was reduced 4% and 7% the first (p = 0.006 and second (p = 0.014 nights of diverticulitis, compared to baseline, respectively. The rapid eye movement sleep was reduced 33% the first night (p = 0.016, compared to baseline. Moreover, plasma IL-6 levels were correlated to non-rapid eye movement sleep, rapid eye movement sleep and fatigue.Conclusion. Total sleep time and rapid eye movement sleep were reduced during nights with active diverticulitis and correlated with markers of inflammation.

  4. Study on rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder in patients with Parkinson's disease at early stage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-li ZOU

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the incidence, occurrence time and electrophysiological characteristics of rapid eye movement behavior disorder (RBD in patients with early Parkinson's disease (PD, and the characteristics of motor symptoms and non . motor symtoms (NMS. Methods Sixty PD patients were divided into PD + RBD group (N = 42 and control group (N = 18 according to whether they were complicated with RBD or not. Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRSⅡ andⅢ, Hoehn-Yahr Stage, Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA, Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HAMA, Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD, RBD Screening Questionnaire (RBDSQ, Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS and polysomnography (PSG were used in 60 patients. Results Among 60 patients, 42 (70% were accompanied by RBD. PSG showed that PD + RBD patients mainly presented upper limb stretching and gripping, body twitching, laughing, shouting, cursing and other non.violent actions, except 2 cases presented violent actions, such as hitting, kicking, etc. In PD + RBD group, the age was older (P = 0.024, duration was longer (P = 0.000, and UPDRSⅡ (P = 0.005,UPDRSⅢ(P = 0.001, the scale values of Hoehn-Yahr Sotage 2 (P = 0.007, anxiety (P = 0.044 and depression (P = 0.001 ratio were all higher than control group. There were significant differences in density of mandible myoelectric activity (P = 0.000 and ratio of rapid eye movement (REM without atonia (P = 0.000 between 2 groups. In PD + RBD group, 16 patients (38.10% had symptoms of RBD, earlier than PD occurred 5.20 (3.91, 6.51 years. Conclusions PD patients with older age, longer duration, more severe motor symptoms and non?motor symptoms were more likely to be accompanied by RBD. The severity of RBD in PD patients accompanied with RBD is higher than that in PD without RBD. RBD may be the early manifestation of PD. PSG has important value in the diagnosis of PD with RBD. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2017.10.006

  5. Radiometric and geometric assessment of data from the RapidEye constellation of satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chander, Gyanesh; Haque, Md. Obaidul; Sampath, Aparajithan; Brunn, A.; Trosset, G.; Hoffmann, D.; Roloff, S.; Thiele, M.; Anderson, C.

    2013-01-01

    To monitor land surface processes over a wide range of temporal and spatial scales, it is critical to have coordinated observations of the Earth's surface using imagery acquired from multiple spaceborne imaging sensors. The RapidEye (RE) satellite constellation acquires high-resolution satellite images covering the entire globe within a very short period of time by sensors identical in construction and cross-calibrated to each other. To evaluate the RE high-resolution Multi-spectral Imager (MSI) sensor capabilities, a cross-comparison between the RE constellation of sensors was performed first using image statistics based on large common areas observed over pseudo-invariant calibration sites (PICS) by the sensors and, second, by comparing the on-orbit radiometric calibration temporal trending over a large number of calibration sites. For any spectral band, the individual responses measured by the five satellites of the RE constellation were found to differ B2B) alignment of the image data sets. The position accuracy was assessed by comparing the RE imagery against high-resolution aerial imagery, while the B2B characterization was performed by registering each band against every other band to ensure that the proper band alignment is provided for an image product. The B2B results indicate that the internal alignments of these five RE bands are in agreement, with bands typically registered to within 0.25 pixels of each other or better.

  6. Suppression of interictal spikes during phasic rapid eye movement sleep: a quantitative stereo-electroencephalography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campana, C; Zubler, F; Gibbs, S; de Carli, F; Proserpio, P; Rubino, A; Cossu, M; Tassi, L; Schindler, K; Nobili, L

    2017-10-01

    Tonic and phasic rapid eye movement (REM) sleep seem to represent two different brain states exerting different effects on epileptic activity. In particular, interictal spikes are suppressed strongly during phasic REM sleep. The reason for this effect is not understood completely. A different level of synchronization in phasic and tonic REM sleep has been postulated, yet never measured directly. Here we assessed the interictal spike rate across non-REM (NREM) sleep, phasic and tonic REM sleep in nine patients affected by drug resistant focal epilepsy: five with type II focal cortical dysplasia and four with hippocampal sclerosis. Moreover, we applied different quantitative measures to evaluate the level of synchronization at the local and global scale during phasic and tonic REM sleep. We found a lower spike rate in phasic REM sleep, both within and outside the seizure onset zone. This effect seems to be independent from the histopathological substrate and from the brain region, where epileptic activity is produced (temporal versus extra-temporal). A higher level of synchronization was observed during tonic REM sleep both on a large (global) and small (local) spatial scale. Phasic REM sleep appears to be an interesting model for understanding the mechanisms of suppression of epileptic activity. © 2017 European Sleep Research Society.

  7. Rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder in patients with probable Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pan; Wing, Yun Kwok; Xing, Jianli; Liu, Yong; Zhou, Bo; Zhang, Zengqiang; Yao, Hongxiang; Guo, Yan'e; Shang, Yanchang; Zhang, Xi

    2016-10-01

    Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD) is commonly associated with neurodegenerative disorders characterized by α-synuclein deposition, including Parkinson's disease, multiple system atrophy, and Lewy body dementia. However, this tendency in tauopathy-mediated diseases is rare and only sporadically reported. We systematically illustrate the occurrence of RBD and sleep features among a cohort of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD), a non-synucleinopathy. We recruited 105 clinically probable AD patients. Fifteen clinically probable AD patients with suspected RBD underwent a video-polysomnography (vPSG) examination. Five patients with probable AD exhibited RBD. One of the patients performed repeated touching of the head and the face with his hands and flailed his arms. Three patients exhibited hand twisting, exploring, prominent limb kicking, and jerking. The fifth patient exhibited all of the characteristics of RBD (he recalled a dream about fighting animals), and his wife was awakened by his screaming. Of these five patients, one patient took the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor drug donepezil. The patients with AD + RBD demonstrated increases in both tonic and phasic electromyography activity during REM sleep, but sleep architecture did not differ between the AD + RBD and AD-alone groups. RBD can occur in patients with AD. The occurrence of RBD does not change the sleep architecture of AD patients.

  8. Rapid Eye Movement Sleep Behavior Disorder: A Review of the Literature and Update on Current Concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Carlos L; Jaimchariyatam, Nattapong; Budur, Kumar

    2017-09-01

    Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD) is characterized by abnormal behaviors emerging during REM sleep that may cause injury or sleep disruption. The diagnosis requires polysomnography (PSG) demonstrating a loss of normal skeletal muscle atonia during REM sleep. RBD results from dysfunction of the brain stem circuits responsible for maintaining normal REM sleep atonia and suppressing behaviors during REM sleep. The diagnosis of idiopathic RBD (IRBD), that is, RBD without an identifiable cause, is frequently followed years later by the development of a neurodegenerative disorder, most commonly one of the synucleinopathies. As such, RBD is often a step in the progression of a neurodegenerative disorder. In this circumstance, it is a manifestation of neurodegeneration occurring in the brain stem before spreading to adjacent and other CNS regions, resulting in the development of symptoms and signs that permit recognition of a specific neurodegenerative disorder. RBD has been linked with narcolepsy and has been associated with a variety of other disorders. The management of RBD focuses on preventive/safety measures, counseling, monitoring for the development of a neurodegenerative disorder, and pharmacotherapy, which is typically effective but not well understood. The purpose of this article is to review and update our current understanding of the clinical features, epidemiology, demographics, pathophysiology, evaluation, diagnosis, differential diagnosis, causes, associations, and the clinical management of RBD. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Impulse control disorder and rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayard, Sophie; Dauvilliers, Yves; Yu, Huan; Croisier-Langenier, Muriel; Rossignol, Alexia; Charif, Mahmoud; Geny, Christian; Carlander, Bertrand; Cochen De Cock, Valérie

    2014-12-01

    The relationship between ICD and RBD is still not yet understood and the results from the current literature are contradictory in PD. We aimed to explore the association between rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD) and impulse control disorder in Parkinson's disease. Ninety-eight non-demented patients with Parkinson's disease underwent one night of video-polysomnography recording. The diagnosis of RBD was established according to clinical and polysomnographic criteria. Impulse control disorders were determined by a gold standard, semi-structured diagnostic interview. Half of the patients (n = 49) reported clinical history of RBD while polysomnographic diagnosis of RBD was confirmed in 31.6% of the patients (n = 31). At least one impulse control disorder was identified in 21.4% of patients, 22.6% with RBD and 20.9% without. Logistic regression controlling for potential confounders indicated that both clinical RBD (OR = 0.34, 95% CI = 0.07-1.48, P = 0.15) and polysomnographic confirmed RBD diagnoses (OR = 0.1.28, 95% CI = 0.31-5.33, P = 0.34) were not associated with impulse control disorder. In Parkinson's disease, REM Sleep Behavior Disorder is not associated with impulse control disorder. The results of our study do not support the notion that PSG-confirmed RBD and ICD share a common pathophysiology. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Longitudinal assessment of probable rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjørnarå, K A; Dietrichs, E; Toft, M

    2015-08-01

    Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behaviour disorder (RBD) is frequently present in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and may have prognostic implications. There are few longitudinal studies of RBD in patients with PD. Our aim was to investigate whether RBD was a persistent feature in a follow-up study of 107 patients with PD. After a mean follow-up time of 3 years, 96 patients were available for reassessment. Probable RBD (pRBD) was diagnosed by the REM sleep behaviour disorder screening questionnaire. At follow-up, pRBD was found in 49% of the patients, versus 38% at baseline. The pRBD status remained unchanged in three-quarters of the patients, whilst 17% had new pRBD symptoms. Disease duration was longer in the pRBD group, 9.4 vs. 7.6 years (P = 0.02). Probable RBD is a persistent feature in PD and probably increases over time. © 2015 EAN.

  11. Laughing as a manifestation of rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siclari, F; Wienecke, M; Poryazova, R; Bassetti, C L; Baumann, C R

    2011-06-01

    Among the range of sleep-related behavior displayed by patients with rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD), aggressive acts are particularly common, while pleasant behaviors have rarely been reported. We aimed at identifying the frequency and characteristics of patients who displayed laughing as a pleasant, nonviolent manifestation of RBD. We reviewed 67 consecutive polysomnographic recordings of patients with RBD, obtained in our sleep laboratory between July 2004 and July 2009. We identified 14 patients (21% of our RBD patients with degenerative parkinsonism: 10 males, mean age 63 ± 11 years) who repeatedly laughed during REM sleep. Ten patients had idiopathic Parkinson's disease, 3 suffered from multisystem atrophy and 1 patient was diagnosed with dementia with Lewy bodies. Other RBD-associated behaviors included smiling, crying, aggressive behavior, screaming, and somniloquia. Nine of the 14 patients were depressed during daytime. Laughing belongs to the spectrum of behavioral manifestations of RBD. Many of our patients with RBD-associated laughter were depressed, suggesting a dissociation between emotional expression during daytime and REM sleep. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Memory reactivation during rapid eye movement sleep promotes its generalization and integration in cortical stores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterpenich, Virginie; Schmidt, Christina; Albouy, Geneviève; Matarazzo, Luca; Vanhaudenhuyse, Audrey; Boveroux, Pierre; Degueldre, Christian; Leclercq, Yves; Balteau, Evelyne; Collette, Fabienne; Luxen, André; Phillips, Christophe; Maquet, Pierre

    2014-06-01

    Memory reactivation appears to be a fundamental process in memory consolidation. In this study we tested the influence of memory reactivation during rapid eye movement (REM) sleep on memory performance and brain responses at retrieval in healthy human participants. Fifty-six healthy subjects (28 women and 28 men, age [mean ± standard deviation]: 21.6 ± 2.2 y) participated in this functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study. Auditory cues were associated with pictures of faces during their encoding. These memory cues delivered during REM sleep enhanced subsequent accurate recollections but also false recognitions. These results suggest that reactivated memories interacted with semantically related representations, and induced new creative associations, which subsequently reduced the distinction between new and previously encoded exemplars. Cues had no effect if presented during stage 2 sleep, or if they were not associated with faces during encoding. Functional magnetic resonance imaging revealed that following exposure to conditioned cues during REM sleep, responses to faces during retrieval were enhanced both in a visual area and in a cortical region of multisensory (auditory-visual) convergence. These results show that reactivating memories during REM sleep enhances cortical responses during retrieval, suggesting the integration of recent memories within cortical circuits, favoring the generalization and schematization of the information.

  13. A new function of rapid eye movement sleep: improvement of muscular efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Zi-Jian

    2015-05-15

    Previously I demonstrated that the slow wave sleep (SWS) functioned to adjust the emotional balance disrupted by emotional memories randomly accumulated during waking, while the rapid eye movement (REM) sleep played the opposite role. Many experimental results have unambiguously shown that various emotional memories are processed during REM sleep. In this article, it is attempted to combine this confirmed function of REM sleep with the atonic state unique to REM sleep, and to integrate a new theory suggesting that improvement of muscular efficiency be a new function of REM sleep. This new function of REM sleep is more advantageous than the function of REM sleep in emotional memories and disinhibited drives to account for the phylogenetic variations of REM sleep, especially the absence of REM sleep in dolphins and short duration of REM sleep in birds in contrary to that in humans and rodents, the absence of penile erections in REM sleep in armadillo, as well as the higher voltage in EEG during REM sleep in platypus and ostrich. Besides, this new function of REM sleep is also advantageous to explain the association of REM sleep with the atonic episodes in SWS, the absence of drastic menopausal change in duration of REM sleep, and the effects of ambient temperature on the duration of REM sleep. These comparative and experimental evidences support the improvement of muscular efficiency as a new and major function of REM sleep. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Neurophysiological basis of rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder: informing future drug development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennum P

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Poul Jennum, Julie AE Christensen, Marielle Zoetmulder Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Danish Center for Sleep Medicine, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark Abstract: Rapid eye movement (REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD is a parasomnia characterized by a history of recurrent nocturnal dream enactment behavior and loss of skeletal muscle atonia and increased phasic muscle activity during REM sleep: REM sleep without atonia. RBD and associated comorbidities have recently been identified as one of the most specific and potentially sensitive risk factors for later development of any of the alpha-synucleinopathies: Parkinson’s disease, dementia with Lewy bodies, and other atypical parkinsonian syndromes. Several other sleep-related abnormalities have recently been identified in patients with RBD/Parkinson’s disease who experience abnormalities in sleep electroencephalographic frequencies, sleep–wake transitions, wake and sleep stability, occurrence and morphology of sleep spindles, and electrooculography measures. These findings suggest a gradual involvement of the brainstem and other structures, which is in line with the gradual involvement known in these disorders. We propose that these findings may help identify biomarkers of individuals at high risk of subsequent conversion to parkinsonism. Keywords: motor control, brain stem, hypothalamus, hypocretin

  15. Rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder in treatment-naïve Parkinson disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plomhause, Lucie; Dujardin, Kathy; Duhamel, Alain; Delliaux, Marie; Derambure, Philippe; Defebvre, Luc; Monaca Charley, Christelle

    2013-10-01

    Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD) is a risk factor for dementia in Parkinson disease (PD) patients. The objectives of our study were to prospectively evaluate the frequency of RBD in a sample of treatment-naïve, newly diagnosed PD patients and compare sleep characteristics and cognition in RBD and non-RBD groups. Fifty-seven newly diagnosed PD patients were consecutively recruited in a university medical center. All patients underwent two overnight polysomnography (PSG) sessions and were diagnosed with RBD according to the International Classification of Sleep Disorders, Second Revision criteria. Daytime sleepiness was measured in a multiple sleep latency test (MSLT). Cognition was assessed in a standard neuropsychologic examination. Seventeen PD patients (30%) met the criteria for RBD. The RBD patients and non-RBD patients did not significantly differ in mean age, gender ratio, disease duration, motor symptom subtype and severity, total sleep time, percentage of REM sleep, apnea-hypopnea index, mean oxygen saturation, and importantly cognitive performance. However, non-RBD patients had a significantly shorter mean daytime sleep latency than RBD patients (15 vs. 18 min, respectively; P=.014). A high frequency of RBD was found in our sample of 57 newly diagnosed PD patients. At this stage in the disease, RBD was not found to be associated with other sleep disorders or cognitive decline. Follow-up is needed to assess the risk for developing dementia in early-stage PD patients with RBD. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Perception of experimental pain is reduced after provoked waking from rapid eye movement sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daya, Vivek G; Bentley, Alison J

    2010-06-01

    Patients with chronic pain often complain of pain when they wake at night, but the accuracy of their perception of the pain after waking at night is unknown. While cognitive functions are reduced for a short time after waking from sleep, a situation known as sleep inertia, it is unclear how sleep inertia may affect the perception of pain. We investigated the effects of sleep inertia on the perception of experimentally induced pain. Fourteen male volunteers were exposed to a randomized thermal heat stimulus of 43.1 degrees C 'hot' and 46.5 degrees C 'hurting' during provoked waking from Stage 2 sleep, slow wave sleep and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. Subjects rated their pain on awakening on a Visual Analogue Scale at 30 s after awakening and each minute thereafter for 5 min. We found no change in pain perception over the 5-min period irrespective of temperature used or sleep stage. However, perceived pain when awoken abruptly from REM sleep was significantly lower than the awake score for both the hot (P = 0.0069) and hurting (P = 0.0025) temperatures. Pain perception when woken from Stage 2 sleep or slow wave sleep was not significantly different from perception when awake. Our findings indicate that sleep inertia reduces pain perception when awoken abruptly from REM. This suggests that patients who wake up in pain either perceive accurately the pain they are experiencing, or at worst underestimate the level of pain if woken from REM sleep.

  17. Sleep alterations in mammals: did aquatic conditions inhibit rapid eye movement sleep?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madan, Vibha; Jha, Sushil K

    2012-12-01

    Sleep has been studied widely in mammals and to some extent in other vertebrates. Higher vertebrates such as birds and mammals have evolved an inimitable rapid eye movement (REM) sleep state. During REM sleep, postural muscles become atonic and the temperature regulating machinery remains suspended. Although REM sleep is present in almost all the terrestrial mammals, the aquatic mammals have either radically reduced or completely eliminated REM sleep. Further, we found a significant negative correlation between REM sleep and the adaptation of the organism to live on land or in water. The amount of REM sleep is highest in terrestrial mammals, significantly reduced in semi-aquatic mammals and completely absent or negligible in aquatic mammals. The aquatic mammals are obligate swimmers and have to surface at regular intervals for air. Also, these animals live in thermally challenging environments, where the conductive heat loss is approximately ~90 times greater than air. Therefore, they have to be moving most of the time. As an adaptation, they have evolved unihemispheric sleep, during which they can rove as well as rest. A condition that immobilizes muscle activity and suspends the thermoregulatory machinery, as happens during REM sleep, is not suitable for these animals. It is possible that, in accord with Darwin's theory, aquatic mammals might have abolished REM sleep with time. In this review, we discuss the possibility of the intrinsic role of aquatic conditions in the elimination of REM sleep in the aquatic mammals.

  18. Rapid eye movement-sleep is reduced in patients with acute uncomplicated diverticulitis—an observational study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Chenxi; Alamili, Mahdi; Nielsen, Claus Henrik

    2015-01-01

    responses are believed to cause postoperative sleep disturbances, as inflammatory responses can alter sleep architecture through cytokine-brain interactions. Our aim was to investigate alteration of sleep architecture during acute infection and its relationships to inflammation and clinical symptoms....... Materials & Methods. In this observational study, we included patients with acute uncomplicated diverticulitis as a model to investigate the isolated effects of inflammatory responses on sleep. Eleven patients completed the study. Patients were admitted and treated with antibiotics for two nights, during...... was reduced 4% and 7% the first (p = 0.006) and second (p = 0.014) nights of diverticulitis, compared to baseline, respectively. The rapid eye movement sleep was reduced 33% the first night (p = 0.016), compared to baseline. Moreover, plasma IL-6 levels were correlated to non-rapid eye movement sleep, rapid...

  19. Monitoring of the Spatial Distribution and Temporal Dynamics of the Green Vegetation Fraction of Croplands in Southwest Germany Using High-Resolution RapidEye Satellite Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imukova, Kristina; Ingwersen, Joachim; Streck, Thilo

    2014-05-01

    The green vegetation fraction (GVF) is a key input variable to the evapotranspiration scheme applied in the widely used NOAH land surface model (LSM). In standard applications of the NOAH LSM, the GVF is taken from a global map with a 15 km×15 km resolution. The central objective of the present study was (a) to derive gridded GVF data in a high spatial and temporal resolution from RapidEye images for a region in Southwest Germany, and (b) to improve the representation of the GVF dynamics of croplands in the NOAH LSM for a better simulation of water and energy exchange between land surface and atmosphere. For the region under study we obtained monthly RapidEye satellite images with a resolution 5 m×5 m by the German Aerospace Center (DLR). The images hold five spectral bands: blue, green, red, red-edge and near infrared (NIR). The GVF dynamics were determined based on the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) calculated from the red and near-infrared bands of the satellite images. The satellite GVF data were calibrated and validated against ground truth measurements. Digital colour photographs above the canopy were taken with a boom-mounted digital camera at fifteen permanently marked plots (1 m×1 m). Crops under study were winter wheat, winter rape and silage maize. The GVF was computed based on the red and the green band of the photographs according to Rundquist's method (2002). Based on the obtained calibration scheme GVF maps were derived in a monthly resolution for the region. Our results confirm a linear relationship between GVF and NDVI and demonstrate that it is possible to determine the GVF of croplands from RapidEye images based on a simple two end-member mixing model. Our data highlight the high variability of the GVF in time and space. At the field scale, the GVF was normally distributed with a coefficient of variation of about 32%. Variability was mainly caused by soil heterogeneities and management differences. At the regional scale the GVF

  20. Quantitative EEG of Rapid-Eye-Movement Sleep: A Marker of Amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brayet, Pauline; Petit, Dominique; Frauscher, Birgit; Gagnon, Jean-François; Gosselin, Nadia; Gagnon, Katia; Rouleau, Isabelle; Montplaisir, Jacques

    2016-04-01

    The basal forebrain cholinergic system, which is impaired in early Alzheimer's disease, is more crucial for the activation of rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep electroencephalogram (EEG) than it is for wakefulness. Quantitative EEG from REM sleep might thus provide an earlier and more accurate marker of the development of Alzheimer's disease in subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) subjects than that from wakefulness. To assess the superiority of the REM sleep EEG as a screening tool for preclinical Alzheimer's disease, 22 subjects with amnestic MCI (a-MCI; 63.9±7.7 years), 10 subjects with nonamnestic MCI (na-MCI; 64.1±4.5 years) and 32 controls (63.7±6.6 years) participated in the study. Spectral analyses of the waking EEG and REM sleep EEG were performed and the [(delta+theta)/(alpha+beta)] ratio was used to assess between-group differences in EEG slowing. The a-MCI subgroup showed EEG slowing in frontal lateral regions compared to both na-MCI and control groups. This EEG slowing was present in wakefulness (compared to controls) but was much more prominent in REM sleep. Moreover, the comparison between amnestic and nonamnestic subjects was found significant only for the REM sleep EEG. There was no difference in EEG power ratio between na-MCI and controls for any of the 7 cortical regions studied. These findings demonstrate the superiority of the REM sleep EEG in the discrimination between a-MCI and both na-MCI and control subjects. © EEG and Clinical Neuroscience Society (ECNS) 2015.

  1. Rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder after bilateral subthalamic stimulation in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Eun; Jeon, Beom S; Paek, Sun-Ha; Yun, Ji Young; Yang, Hui-Jun; Kim, Han-Joon; Ehm, Gwanhee; Kim, Hee Jin; Lee, Jee-Young; Kim, Ji-Young

    2015-02-01

    The effect of subthalamic nucleus (STN) deep brain stimulation (DBS) on rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (RBD) in Parkinson's disease (PD) is not well known. We evaluated the change in the incidence of probable RBD after bilateral STN DBS in PD patients. Ninety patients with PD treated with bilateral STN DBS underwent retrospective assessment of RBD by interview before and after DBS. Forty-seven (52.2%) of the 90 patients had RBD preoperatively. RBD was resolved only in one patient and persisted in 46 patients at 1 year after DBS. RBD developed de novo in 16 patients (de novo RBD group) within 1 year after DBS, resulting in 62 (68.9%) of the 90 patients having RBD 1 year after DBS. Patients with RBD at any time within 1 year after DBS (RBD group, n = 63) were older than the patients without RBD (non-RBD group, n = 27). The sum of the Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) axial score for the "on" state was lower in the RBD group than in the non-RBD group after DBS (p = 0.029). Comparing the de novo RBD group and non-RBD group, the UPDRS Part III and total score and the levodopa equivalent daily doses for the "on" states decreased more in the de novo RBD group than in the non-RBD group (p < 0.05). The incidence of clinical RBD increased after bilateral STN DBS because de novo RBD developed and pre-existing RBD persisted after DBS. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Apnea-induced rapid eye movement sleep disruption impairs human spatial navigational memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varga, Andrew W; Kishi, Akifumi; Mantua, Janna; Lim, Jason; Koushyk, Viachaslau; Leibert, David P; Osorio, Ricardo S; Rapoport, David M; Ayappa, Indu

    2014-10-29

    Hippocampal electrophysiology and behavioral evidence support a role for sleep in spatial navigational memory, but the role of particular sleep stages is less clear. Although rodent models suggest the importance of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep in spatial navigational memory, a similar role for REM sleep has never been examined in humans. We recruited subjects with severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) who were well treated and adherent with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). Restricting CPAP withdrawal to REM through real-time monitoring of the polysomnogram provides a novel way of addressing the role of REM sleep in spatial navigational memory with a physiologically relevant stimulus. Individuals spent two different nights in the laboratory, during which subjects performed timed trials before and after sleep on one of two unique 3D spatial mazes. One night of sleep was normally consolidated with use of therapeutic CPAP throughout, whereas on the other night, CPAP was reduced only in REM sleep, allowing REM OSA to recur. REM disruption via this method caused REM sleep reduction and significantly fragmented any remaining REM sleep without affecting total sleep time, sleep efficiency, or slow-wave sleep. We observed improvements in maze performance after a night of normal sleep that were significantly attenuated after a night of REM disruption without changes in psychomotor vigilance. Furthermore, the improvement in maze completion time significantly positively correlated with the mean REM run duration across both sleep conditions. In conclusion, we demonstrate a novel role for REM sleep in human memory formation and highlight a significant cognitive consequence of OSA. Copyright © 2014 the authors 0270-6474/14/3414571-07$15.00/0.

  3. Phenomapping of rangelands in South Africa using time series of RapidEye data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parplies, André; Dubovyk, Olena; Tewes, Andreas; Mund, Jan-Peter; Schellberg, Jürgen

    2016-12-01

    Phenomapping is an approach which allows the derivation of spatial patterns of vegetation phenology and rangeland productivity based on time series of vegetation indices. In our study, we propose a new spatial mapping approach which combines phenometrics derived from high resolution (HR) satellite time series with spatial logistic regression modeling to discriminate land management systems in rangelands. From the RapidEye time series for selected rangelands in South Africa, we calculated bi-weekly noise reduced Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) images. For the growing season of 2011⿿2012, we further derived principal phenology metrics such as start, end and length of growing season and related phenological variables such as amplitude, left derivative and small integral of the NDVI curve. We then mapped these phenometrics across two different tenure systems, communal and commercial, at the very detailed spatial resolution of 5 m. The result of a binary logistic regression (BLR) has shown that the amplitude and the left derivative of the NDVI curve were statistically significant. These indicators are useful to discriminate commercial from communal rangeland systems. We conclude that phenomapping combined with spatial modeling is a powerful tool that allows efficient aggregation of phenology and productivity metrics for spatially explicit analysis of the relationships of crop phenology with site conditions and management. This approach has particular potential for disaggregated and patchy environments such as in farming systems in semi-arid South Africa, where phenology varies considerably among and within years. Further, we see a strong perspective for phenomapping to support spatially explicit modelling of vegetation.

  4. Rapid-Eye-Movement-Sleep (REM Associated Enhancement of Working Memory Performance after a Daytime Nap.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Yuet Ying Lau

    Full Text Available The main objective was to study the impact of a daytime sleep opportunity on working memory and the mechanism behind such impact. This study adopted an experimental design in a sleep research laboratory. Eighty healthy college students (Age:17-23, 36 males were randomized to either have a polysomnography-monitored daytime sleep opportunity (Nap-group, n=40 or stay awake (Wake-group, n=40 between the two assessment sessions. All participants completed a sleep diary and wore an actigraph-watch for 5 days before and one day after the assessment sessions. They completed the state-measurement of sleepiness and affect, in addition to a psychomotor vigilance test and a working memory task before and after the nap/wake sessions. The two groups did not differ in their sleep characteristics prior to and after the lab visit. The Nap-group had higher accuracy on the working memory task, fewer lapses on the psychomotor vigilance test and lower state-sleepiness than the Wake-group. Within the Nap-group, working memory accuracy was positively correlated with duration of rapid eye movement sleep (REM and total sleep time during the nap. Our findings suggested that "sleep gain" during a daytime sleep opportunity had significant positive impact on working memory performance, without affecting subsequent nighttime sleep in young adult, and such impact was associated with the duration of REM. While REM abnormality has long been noted in pathological conditions (e.g. depression, which are also presented with cognitive dysfunctions (e.g. working memory deficits, this was the first evidence showing working memory enhancement associated with REM in daytime napping in college students, who likely had habitual short sleep duration but were otherwise generally healthy.

  5. Quantitative assessment of motor speech abnormalities in idiopathic rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusz, Jan; Hlavnička, Jan; Tykalová, Tereza; Bušková, Jitka; Ulmanová, Olga; Růžička, Evžen; Šonka, Karel

    2016-03-01

    Patients with idiopathic rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder (RBD) are at substantial risk for developing Parkinson's disease (PD) or related neurodegenerative disorders. Speech is an important indicator of motor function and movement coordination, and therefore may be an extremely sensitive early marker of changes due to prodromal neurodegeneration. Speech data were acquired from 16 RBD subjects and 16 age- and sex-matched healthy control subjects. Objective acoustic assessment of 15 speech dimensions representing various phonatory, articulatory, and prosodic deviations was performed. Statistical models were applied to characterise speech disorders in RBD and to estimate sensitivity and specificity in differentiating between RBD and control subjects. Some form of speech impairment was revealed in 88% of RBD subjects. Articulatory deficits were the most prominent findings in RBD. In comparison to controls, the RBD group showed significant alterations in irregular alternating motion rates (p = 0.009) and articulatory decay (p = 0.01). The combination of four distinctive speech dimensions, including aperiodicity, irregular alternating motion rates, articulatory decay, and dysfluency, led to 96% sensitivity and 79% specificity in discriminating between RBD and control subjects. Speech impairment was significantly more pronounced in RBD subjects with the motor score of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale greater than 4 points when compared to other RBD individuals. Simple quantitative speech motor measures may be suitable for the reliable detection of prodromal neurodegeneration in subjects with RBD, and therefore may provide important outcomes for future therapy trials. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Rapid eye movement sleep in relation to overweight in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xianchen; Forbes, Erika E; Ryan, Neal D; Rofey, Dana; Hannon, Tamara S; Dahl, Ronald E

    2008-08-01

    Short sleep duration is associated with obesity, but few studies have examined the relationship between obesity and specific physiological stages of sleep. To examine specific sleep stages, including rapid eye movement (REM) sleep and stages 1 through 4 of non-REM sleep, in relation to overweight in children and adolescents. A total of 335 children and adolescents (55.2% male; aged 7-17 years) underwent 3 consecutive nights of standard polysomnography and weight and height assessments as part of a study on the development of internalizing disorders (depression and anxiety). Body mass index (calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared) z score and weight status (normal, at risk for overweight, overweight) according to the body mass index percentile for age and sex. The body mass index z score was significantly related to total sleep time (beta = -0.174), sleep efficiency (beta = -0.027), and REM density (beta = -0.256). Compared with normal-weight children, overweight children slept about 22 minutes less and had lower sleep efficiency, shorter REM sleep, lower REM activity and density, and longer latency to the first REM period. After adjustment for demographics, pubertal status, and psychiatric diagnosis, 1 hour less of total sleep was associated with approximately 2-fold increased odds of overweight (odds ratio = 1.85), 1 hour less of REM sleep was associated with about 3-fold increased odds (odds ratio = 2.91), and REM density and activity below the median increased the odds of overweight by 2-fold (odds ratio = 2.18) and 3-fold (odds ratio = 3.32), respectively. Our results confirm previous epidemiological observations that short sleep time is associated with overweight in children and adolescents. A core aspect of the association between short sleep duration and overweight may be attributed to reduced REM sleep. Further studies are needed to investigate possible mechanisms underpinning the association between diminished REM sleep and

  7. Selective Rapid Eye Movement Sleep Deprivation Affects Cell Size and Number in Kitten Locus Coeruleus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James P Shaffery

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Cells in the locus coeruleus (LC constitute the sole source of norepinephrine (NE in the brain, and change their discharge rates according to vigilance state. In addition to its well established role in vigilance, NE affects synaptic plasticity in the postnatal critical period (CP of development. One form of CP synaptic plasticity affected by NE results from monocular occlusion, which leads to physiological and cytoarchitectural alterations in central visual areas. Selective suppression of rapid eye movement sleep (REMS in the CP kitten enhances the central effects of monocular occlusion. The mechanisms responsible for heightened cortical plasticity following REMS deprivation (REMSD remain undetermined. One possible mediator of an increase in plasticity is continuous NE outflow, which presumably persists during extended periods of REMSD. Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH is the rate-limiting enzyme in the synthesis of NE and serves as a marker for NE-producing cells. We selectively suppressed REMS in kittens for one week during the CP. The number and size of LC cells expressing immunoreactivity to tyrosine hydroxylase (TH-ir was assessed in age-matched REMS-deprived (RD-, treatment-control (TXC-, and home cage-reared (HCC animals. Sleep amounts and slow wave activity (SWA were also examined relative to baseline. Time spent in REMS during the study was lower in RD compared to TXC animals, and RD kittens increased SWA delta power in the latter half of the REMSD period. The estimated total number of TH-ir cells in LC was significantly lower in the RD- than in the TXC kittens and numerically lower than in HCC animals. The size of LC cells expressing TH-ir was greatest in the HCC group. They were significantly larger than the cells in the RD kittens. These data are consistent with a possible reduction in NE in forebrain areas, including visual cortex, caused by one week of REMSD.

  8. Rapid-Eye-Movement-Sleep (REM) Associated Enhancement of Working Memory Performance after a Daytime Nap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Esther Yuet Ying; Wong, Mark Lawrence; Lau, Kristy Nga Ting; Hui, Florence Wai Ying; Tseng, Chia-huei

    2015-01-01

    The main objective was to study the impact of a daytime sleep opportunity on working memory and the mechanism behind such impact. This study adopted an experimental design in a sleep research laboratory. Eighty healthy college students (Age:17-23, 36 males) were randomized to either have a polysomnography-monitored daytime sleep opportunity (Nap-group, n=40) or stay awake (Wake-group, n=40) between the two assessment sessions. All participants completed a sleep diary and wore an actigraph-watch for 5 days before and one day after the assessment sessions. They completed the state-measurement of sleepiness and affect, in addition to a psychomotor vigilance test and a working memory task before and after the nap/wake sessions. The two groups did not differ in their sleep characteristics prior to and after the lab visit. The Nap-group had higher accuracy on the working memory task, fewer lapses on the psychomotor vigilance test and lower state-sleepiness than the Wake-group. Within the Nap-group, working memory accuracy was positively correlated with duration of rapid eye movement sleep (REM) and total sleep time during the nap. Our findings suggested that "sleep gain" during a daytime sleep opportunity had significant positive impact on working memory performance, without affecting subsequent nighttime sleep in young adult, and such impact was associated with the duration of REM. While REM abnormality has long been noted in pathological conditions (e.g. depression), which are also presented with cognitive dysfunctions (e.g. working memory deficits), this was the first evidence showing working memory enhancement associated with REM in daytime napping in college students, who likely had habitual short sleep duration but were otherwise generally healthy.

  9. Rapid Eye Movement Sleep Behavior Disorder: A Window on the Emotional World of Parkinson Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariotti, Paolo; Quaranta, Davide; Di Giacopo, Raffaella; Bentivoglio, Anna Rita; Mazza, Marianna; Martini, Annalisa; Canestri, Jorge; Della Marca, Giacomo

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD) is a parasomnia characterized by motor activity during sleep with dream mentation. Aggressiveness has been considered a peculiar feature of dreams associated with RBD, despite normal score in aggressiveness scales during wakefulness. We aimed to measure daytime aggressiveness and analyze dream contents in a population of patients with Parkinson disease (PD) with and without RBD. Design: This is a single-center prospective observational study; it concerns the description of the clinical features of a medical disorder in a case series. Setting: The study was performed in the Department of Neurosciences of the Catholic University in Rome, Italy. Patients: Three groups of subjects were enrolled: patients with PD plus RBD, patients with PD without RBD, and healthy controls. Interventions: The diagnosis of RBD was determined clinically and confirmed by means of overnight, laboratory-based video-polysomnography. For the evaluation of diurnal aggressiveness, the Buss-Perry Aggression Questionnaire (BPAQ) was used. The content of dreams was evaluated by means of the methods of Hall and Van De Castle. Measurements and Results: Patients with PD without RBD displayed higher levels of anger, and verbal and physical aggressiveness than patients with PD and RBD and controls. Patients with PD and RBD and controls did not differ in hostility. Conclusions: It can be hypothesized that a noradrenergic impairment at the level of the locus coeruleus could, at the same time, explain the presence of REM sleep behavior disorder, as well as the reduction of diurnal aggressiveness. This finding also suggests a role for REM sleep in regulating homeostasis of emotional brain function. Citation: Mariotti P, Quaranta D, Di Giacopo R, Bentivoglio AR, Mazza M, Martini A, Canestri J, Della Marca G. Rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder: a window on the emotional world of Parkinson disease. SLEEP 2015;38(2):287–294. PMID:25325501

  10. Validation of an integrated software for the detection of rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frauscher, Birgit; Gabelia, David; Biermayr, Marlene; Stefani, Ambra; Hackner, Heinz; Mitterling, Thomas; Poewe, Werner; Högl, Birgit

    2014-10-01

    Rapid eye movement sleep without atonia (RWA) is the polysomnographic hallmark of REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD). To partially overcome the disadvantages of manual RWA scoring, which is time consuming but essential for the accurate diagnosis of RBD, we aimed to validate software specifically developed and integrated with polysomnography for RWA detection against the gold standard of manual RWA quantification. Academic referral center sleep laboratory. Polysomnographic recordings of 20 patients with RBD and 60 healthy volunteers were analyzed. N/A. Motor activity during REM sleep was quantified manually and computer assisted (with and without artifact detection) according to Sleep Innsbruck Barcelona (SINBAR) criteria for the mentalis ("any," phasic, tonic electromyographic [EMG] activity) and the flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS) muscle (phasic EMG activity). Computer-derived indices (with and without artifact correction) for "any," phasic, tonic mentalis EMG activity, phasic FDS EMG activity, and the SINBAR index ("any" mentalis + phasic FDS) correlated well with the manually derived indices (all Spearman rhos 0.66-0.98). In contrast with computerized scoring alone, computerized scoring plus manual artifact correction (median duration 5.4 min) led to a significant reduction of false positives for "any" mentalis (40%), phasic mentalis (40.6%), and the SINBAR index (41.2%). Quantification of tonic mentalis and phasic FDS EMG activity was not influenced by artifact correction. The computer algorithm used here appears to be a promising tool for REM sleep behavior disorder detection in both research and clinical routine. A short check for plausibility of automatic detection should be a basic prerequisite for this and all other available computer algorithms. © 2014 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  11. Study on transcranial sonography in patients with idiopathic rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder

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    Xu-dong LI

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the changes of transcranial sonography (TCS in patients with rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (RBD.  Methods Fifteen patients fulfilled the diagnostic criteria of RBD according to International Classification of Sleep Disorders (ICSD, 2nd edition. Under the monitor of polysomnography (PSG, the sleep architectures of all RBD cases were evaluated by Polysmith software and visual analysis. Furthermore, all RBD patients and 15 normal controls underwent TCS. Cases with substantia nigra echo intensity over Ⅲ grade and substantia nigra area over 0.20 cm2 were supposed to be hyperechogenicity. Additionally, the width of the third ventricle was measured and whether there was hyperechogenicity in basal ganglia was evaluated. The cognitive functions were evaluated by Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE and Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA.  Results RBD patients presented typical clinical manifestations and electrophysiologic changes. No significant difference (P = 0.080, 0.109 was found in the comparison of hyperechogenicity rate on substantia nigra (6/15 and basal ganglia (7/15 in RBD patients and normal controls (1/15, 2/15. No significant difference in the comparison of MoCA was found in RBD patients with or without substantia nigra hyperechogenicity (P = 0.075. The RBD patients with hyperechogenicity on basal ganglia had higher MMSE scores than those without hyperechogenicity on basal ganglia, and the difference was significant (P = 0.021.  Conclusions RBD which is suggested as the prodromal period of synucleinopathy may present hyperechogenicity in substantia nigra and basal ganglia on TCS. TCS could detect subclinical changes of brain and evaluate the risk of synucleinopathy. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2016.04.010

  12. Consolidation of strictly episodic memories mainly requires rapid eye movement sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauchs, Géraldine; Bertran, Françoise; Guillery-Girard, Bérengère; Desgranges, Béatrice; Kerrouche, Nacer; Denise, Pierre; Foret, Jean; Eustache, Francis

    2004-05-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the effects of sleep deprivation during the first or second half of the night on episodic memory consolidation. Episodic memory is defined as memory for events located in time and space. It is also characterized by autonoetic consciousness, which gives a subject the conscious sensation of traveling back in time to relive the original event and forward into the future. Consolidation of episodic information was tested after 4-hour retention intervals, which followed learning and occurred during either the early or late half night, respectively dominated by slow wave sleep (SWS) or rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, or corresponding periods of wakefulness. Data collection occurred in the sleep laboratory. Forty-three young healthy subjects: 9 men and 34 women, age ranging from 18 to 26 years (mean 20.18 +/- 1.94 years) were included in this study. Waking after a 4-hour retention interval filled with early or late sleep, or 4-hour sleep deprivation, during early or late period of night. The cognitive task, named the What-Where-When test, was specially designed to assess factual, spatial, and temporal components of episodic memory. This task was associated with the Remember/Know paradigm to assess autonoetic consciousness. We measured performance on immediate free recall, delayed free recall (after a 4-hour interval of wakefulness or sleep), and delayed recognition. We also calculated a forgetting rate for each feature (factual, spatial, and temporal) and, for the recognition task, scores of autonoetic consciousness (R responses). REM-sleep deprivation was associated with significantly lower recall of spatial information compared to SWS deprivation (P sleep (P sleep deprivation was also associated with a higher forgetting rate of temporal information as compared to the early sleep condition (Psleep deprivation led subjects to give significantly fewer R responses, indicative of true memories, as compared to SWS deprivation (P sleep.

  13. Rapid Detection Methods for Asphalt Pavement Thicknesses and Defects by a Vehicle-Mounted Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zehua Dong

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The thickness estimation of the top surface layer and surface layer, as well as the detection of road defects, are of great importance to the quality conditions of asphalt pavement. Although ground penetrating radar (GPR methods have been widely used in non-destructive detection of pavements, the thickness estimation of the thin top surface layer is still a difficult problem due to the limitations of GPR resolution and the similar permittivity of asphalt sub-layers. Besides, the detection of some road defects, including inadequate compaction and delamination at interfaces, require further practical study. In this paper, a newly-developed vehicle-mounted GPR detection system is introduced. We used a horizontal high-pass filter and a modified layer localization method to extract the underground layers. Besides, according to lab experiments and simulation analysis, we proposed theoretical methods for detecting the degree of compaction and delamination at the interface, respectively. Moreover, a field test was carried out and the estimated results showed a satisfactory accuracy of the system and methods.

  14. Rapid Detection Methods for Asphalt Pavement Thicknesses and Defects by a Vehicle-Mounted Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Zehua; Ye, Shengbo; Gao, Yunze; Fang, Guangyou; Zhang, Xiaojuan; Xue, Zhongjun; Zhang, Tao

    2016-12-06

    The thickness estimation of the top surface layer and surface layer, as well as the detection of road defects, are of great importance to the quality conditions of asphalt pavement. Although ground penetrating radar (GPR) methods have been widely used in non-destructive detection of pavements, the thickness estimation of the thin top surface layer is still a difficult problem due to the limitations of GPR resolution and the similar permittivity of asphalt sub-layers. Besides, the detection of some road defects, including inadequate compaction and delamination at interfaces, require further practical study. In this paper, a newly-developed vehicle-mounted GPR detection system is introduced. We used a horizontal high-pass filter and a modified layer localization method to extract the underground layers. Besides, according to lab experiments and simulation analysis, we proposed theoretical methods for detecting the degree of compaction and delamination at the interface, respectively. Moreover, a field test was carried out and the estimated results showed a satisfactory accuracy of the system and methods.

  15. The link between Parkinson's disease and rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder with dream enactment: Possible implications for early rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Brian P; Westlake, Kelly P

    2017-09-07

    The purpose of this paper is twofold. First, to inform readers of the link between the loss of motor inhibition during rapid eye movement (REM) sleep dreaming, diagnosed as REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD), and the future onset of neurodegenerative disorders, such as Parkinson's Disease and dementia with lewy bodies. It has been reported that motor disinhibition during rapid eye movement sleep often precedes onset of these disorders by years or even decades. Second, to consider that identification of RBD and the early involvement of rehabilitation and/or development of home exercise plans may aid in prolonging and even increasing function, independence, and quality of life should such neurodegenerative disorders develop later in life. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Exploiting machine learning algorithms for tree species classification in a semiarid woodland using RapidEye image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adelabu, Samuel; Mutanga, Onisimo; Adam, Elhadi; Cho, Moses Azong

    2013-01-01

    Classification of different tree species in semiarid areas can be challenging as a result of the change in leaf structure and orientation due to soil moisture constraints. Tree species mapping is, however, a key parameter for forest management in semiarid environments. In this study, we examined the suitability of 5-band RapidEye satellite data for the classification of five tree species in mopane woodland of Botswana using machine leaning algorithms with limited training samples.We performed classification using random forest (RF) and support vector machines (SVM) based on EnMap box. The overall accuracies for classifying the five tree species was 88.75 and 85% for both SVM and RF, respectively. We also demonstrated that the new red-edge band in the RapidEye sensor has the potential for classifying tree species in semiarid environments when integrated with other standard bands. Similarly, we observed that where there are limited training samples, SVM is preferred over RF. Finally, we demonstrated that the two accuracy measures of quantity and allocation disagreement are simpler and more helpful for the vast majority of remote sensing classification process than the kappa coefficient. Overall, high species classification can be achieved using strategically located RapidEye bands integrated with advanced processing algorithms.

  17. Mortality and Its Risk Factors in Patients with Rapid Eye Movement Sleep Behavior Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Junying; Zhang, Jihui; Lam, Siu Ping; Mok, Vincent; Chan, Anne; Li, Shirley Xin; Liu, Yaping; Tang, Xiangdong; Yung, Wing Ho; Wing, Yun Kwok

    2016-08-01

    To determine the mortality and its risk factors in patients with rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD). A total of 205 consecutive patients with video-polysomnography confirmed RBD (mean age = 66.4 ± 10.0 y, 78.5% males) were recruited. Medical records and death status were systematically reviewed in the computerized records of the health care system. Standardized mortality ratio (SMR) was used to calculate the risk ratio of mortality in RBD with reference to the general population. Forty-three patients (21.0%) died over a mean follow-up period of 7.1 ± 4.5 y. The SMR was not increased in the overall sample, SMR (95% confidence interval [CI]) = 1.00 (0.73-1.33). However, SMR (95% CI) increased to 1.80 (1.21-2.58) and 1.75 (1.11-2.63) for RBD patients in whom neurodegenerative diseases and dementia, respectively, eventually developed. In the Cox regression model, mortality risk was significantly associated with age (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.05; 95% CI, 1.01-1.10), living alone (HR = 2.04; 95% CI, 1.39-2.99), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (HR = 3.38; 95% CI, 1.21-9.46), cancer (HR = 10.09; 95% CI, 2.65-38.42), periodic limb movements during sleep (HR = 3.06; 95% CI, 1.50-6.24), and development of neurodegenerative diseases (HR = 2.84; 95% CI, 1.47-5.45) and dementia (HR = 2.66; 95% CI, 1.39-5.08). Patients with RBD have a higher mortality rate than the general population only if neurodegenerative diseases develop. Several risk factors on clinical and sleep aspects are associated with mortality in RBD patients. Our findings underscore the necessity of timely neuroprotective interventions in the early phase of RBD before the development of neurodegenerative diseases. © 2016 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  18. The Circadian Clock Gene Csnk1e Regulates Rapid Eye Movement Sleep Amount, and Nonrapid Eye Movement Sleep Architecture in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Lili; Bryant, Camron D.; Loudon, Andrew; Palmer, Abraham A.; Vitaterna, Martha Hotz; Turek, Fred W.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: Efforts to identify the genetic basis of mammalian sleep have included quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping and gene targeting of known core circadian clock genes. We combined three different genetic approaches to identify and test a positional candidate sleep gene — the circadian gene casein kinase 1 epsilon (Csnk1e), which is located in a QTL we identified for rapid eye movement (REM) sleep on chromosome 15. Measurements and Results: Using electroencephalographic (EEG) and electromyographic (EMG) recordings, baseline sleep was examined in a 12-h light:12-h dark (LD 12:12) cycle in mice of seven genotypes, including Csnk1etau/tau and Csnk1e-/- mutant mice, Csnk1eB6.D2 and Csnk1eD2.B6 congenic mice, and their respective wild-type littermate control mice. Additionally, Csnk1etau/tau and wild-type mice were examined in constant darkness (DD). Csnk1etau/tau mutant mice and both Csnk1eB6.D2 and Csnk1eD2.B6 congenic mice showed significantly higher proportion of sleep time spent in REM sleep during the dark period than wild-type controls — the original phenotype for which the QTL on chromosome 15 was identified. This phenotype persisted in Csnk1etau/tau mice while under free-running DD conditions. Other sleep phenotypes observed in Csnk1etau/tau mice and congenics included a decreased number of bouts of nonrapid eye movement (NREM) sleep and an increased average NREM sleep bout duration. Conclusions: These results demonstrate a role for Csnk1e in regulating not only the timing of sleep, but also the REM sleep amount and NREM sleep architecture, and support Csnk1e as a causal gene in the sleep QTL on chromosome 15. Citation: Zhou L; Bryant CD; Loudon A; Palmer AA; Vitaterna MH; Turek FW. The circadian clock gene Csnk1e regulates rapid eye movement sleep amount, and nonrapid eye movement sleep architecture in mice. SLEEP 2014;37(4):785-793. PMID:24744456

  19. The Use of Surveillance Cameras for the Rapid Mapping of Lava Flows: An Application to Mount Etna Volcano

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Coltelli

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve the observation capability in one of the most active volcanic areas in the world, Mt. Etna, we developed a processing method to use the surveillance cameras for a quasi real-time mapping of syn-eruptive processes. Following an evaluation of the current performance of the Etna permanent ground NEtwork of Thermal and Visible Sensors (Etna_NETVIS, its possible implementation and optimization was investigated to determine the locations of additional observation sites to be rapidly set up during emergencies. A tool was then devised to process time series of ground-acquired images and extract a coherent multi-temporal dataset of georeferenced map. The processed datasets can be used to extract 2D features such as evolution maps of active lava flows. The tool was validated on ad-hoc test fields and then adopted to map the evolution of two recent lava flows. The achievable accuracy (about three times the original pixel size and the short processing time makes the tool suitable for rapidly assessing lava flow evolutions, especially in the case of recurrent eruptions, such as those of the 2011–2015 Etna activity. The tool can be used both in standard monitoring activities and during emergency phases (eventually improving the present network with additional mobile stations when it is mandatory to carry out a quasi-real-time mapping to support civil protection actions. The developed tool could be integrated in the control room of the Osservatorio Etneo, thus enabling the Etna_NETVIS for mapping purposes and not only for video surveillance.

  20. Rapid mapping of compound eye visual sampling parameters with FACETS, a highly automated wide-field goniometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglass, John K; Wehling, Martin F

    2016-12-01

    A highly automated goniometer instrument (called FACETS) has been developed to facilitate rapid mapping of compound eye parameters for investigating regional visual field specializations. The instrument demonstrates the feasibility of analyzing the complete field of view of an insect eye in a fraction of the time required if using non-motorized, non-computerized methods. Faster eye mapping makes it practical for the first time to employ sample sizes appropriate for testing hypotheses about the visual significance of interspecific differences in regional specializations. Example maps of facet sizes are presented from four dipteran insects representing the Asilidae, Calliphoridae, and Stratiomyidae. These maps provide the first quantitative documentation of the frontal enlarged-facet zones (EFZs) that typify asilid eyes, which, together with the EFZs in male Calliphoridae, are likely to be correlated with high-spatial-resolution acute zones. The presence of EFZs contrasts sharply with the almost homogeneous distribution of facet sizes in the stratiomyid. Moreover, the shapes of EFZs differ among species, suggesting functional specializations that may reflect differences in visual ecology. Surveys of this nature can help identify species that should be targeted for additional studies, which will elucidate fundamental principles and constraints that govern visual field specializations and their evolution.

  1. Nocturnal Rapid Eye Movement Sleep Latency for Identifying Patients With Narcolepsy/Hypocretin Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andlauer, Olivier; Moore, Hyatt; Jouhier, Laura; Drake, Christopher; Peppard, Paul E.; Han, Fang; Hong, Seung-Chul; Poli, Francesca; Plazzi, Giuseppe; O’Hara, Ruth; Haffen, Emmanuel; Roth, Thomas; Young, Terry; Mignot, Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Narcolepsy, a disorder associated with HLA-DQB1*06:02 and caused by hypocretin (orexin) deficiency, is diagnosed using the Multiple Sleep Latency Test (MSLT) following nocturnal polysomnography (NPSG). In many patients, a short rapid eye movement sleep latency (REML) during the NPSG is also observed but not used diagnostically. OBJECTIVE To determine diagnostic accuracy and clinical utility of nocturnal REML measures in narcolepsy/hypocretin deficiency. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Observational study using receiver operating characteristic curves for NPSG REML and MSLT findings (sleep studies performed between May 1976 and September 2011 at university medical centers in the United States, China, Korea, and Europe) to determine optimal diagnostic cutoffs for narcolepsy/hypocretin deficiency compared with different samples: controls, patients with other sleep disorders, patients with other hypersomnias, and patients with narcolepsy with normal hypocretin levels. Increasingly stringent comparisons were made. In a first comparison, 516 age- and sex-matched patients with narcolepsy/hypocretin deficiency were selected from 1749 patients and compared with 516 controls. In a second comparison, 749 successive patients undergoing sleep evaluation for any sleep disorders (low pretest probability for narcolepsy) were compared within groups by final diagnosis of narcolepsy/hypocretin deficiency. In the third comparison, 254 patients with a high pretest probability of having narcolepsy were compared within group by their final diagnosis. Finally, 118 patients with narcolepsy/hypocretin deficiency were compared with 118 age- and sex-matched patients with a diagnosis of narcolepsy but with normal hypocretin levels. MAIN OUTCOME AND MEASURES Sensitivity and specificity of NPSG REML and MSLT as diagnostic tests for narcolepsy/hypocretin deficiency. This diagnosis was defined as narcolepsy associated with cataplexy plus HLA-DQB1*06:02 positivity (no cerebrospinal

  2. Early Detection of Bark Beetle Green Attack Using TerraSAR-X and RapidEye Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerald Kändler

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Bark beetles cause widespread damages in the coniferous-dominated forests of central Europe and North America. In the future, areas affected by bark beetles may further increase due to climate change. However, the early detection of the bark beetle green attack can guide management decisions to prevent larger damages. For this reason, a field-based bark beetle monitoring program is currently implemented in Germany. The combination of remote sensing and field data may help minimizing the reaction time and reducing costs of monitoring programs covering large forested areas. In this case study, RapidEye and TerraSAR-X data were analyzed separately and in combination to detect bark beetle green attack. The remote sensing data were acquired in May 2009 for a study site in south-west Germany. In order to distinguish healthy areas and areas affected by bark beetle green attack, three statistical approaches were compared: generalized linear models (GLM, maximum entropy (ME and random forest (RF. The spatial scale (minimum mapping unit was 78.5 m2. TerraSAR-X data resulted in fair classification accuracy with a cross-validated Cohen’s Kappa Coefficient (kappa of 0.23. RapidEye data resulted in moderate classification accuracy with a kappa of 0.51. The highest classification accuracy was obtained by combining the TerraSAR-X and RapidEye data, resulting in a kappa of 0.74. The accuracy of ME models was considerably higher than the accuracy of GLM and RF models.

  3. Cerebral O2 metabolism and cerebral blood flow in humans during deep and rapid-eye-movement sleep

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, P L; Schmidt, J F; Wildschiødtz, Gordon

    1991-01-01

    It could be expected that the various stages of sleep were reflected in variation of the overall level of cerebral activity and thereby in the magnitude of cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) and cerebral blood flow (CBF). The elusive nature of sleep imposes major methodological restrictions...... on examination of this question. We have now measured CBF and CMRO2 in young healthy volunteers using the Kety-Schmidt technique with 133Xe as the inert gas. Measurements were performed during wakefulness, deep sleep (stage 3/4), and rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep as verified by standard polysomnography...

  4. Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide excites medial pontine reticular formation neurons in the brainstem rapid eye movement sleep-induction zone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kohlmeier, Kristi Anne; Reiner, P B

    1999-01-01

    Although it has long been known that microinjection of the cholinergic agonist carbachol into the medial pontine reticular formation (mPRF) induces a state that resembles rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, it is likely that other transmitters contribute to mPRF regulation of behavioral states. A key...... conclude that VIP excites mPRF neurons by activation of a sodium current. This effect is mediated at least in part by G-protein stimulation of adenylyl cyclase, cAMP, and protein kinase A. These data suggest that VIP may play a physiological role in REM induction by its actions on mPRF neurons....

  5. Lobster-eye x-ray optics: a rapid evaluation of the image distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peele, A G; Nugent, K A

    1998-02-01

    A method for calculating the image distribution for one-dimensional lobster-eye optics is presented. This method gives the image distribution exactly for certain cases and offers improved speed over the method of ray tracing. Examples of the use of the algorithm are given. We show that the algorithm gives the same results as detailed ray-tracing codes. Extension of the method to the two-dimensional case is discussed.

  6. Visual Working Memory Modulates Rapid Eye Movements to Simple Onset Targets

    OpenAIRE

    Hollingworth, Andrew; Matsukura, Michi; Luck, Steven J.

    2013-01-01

    Visual working memory (VWM) representations influence attention and gaze control in complex tasks, such as visual search, that require top-down selection to resolve stimulus competition. VWM and visual attention clearly interact, but the mechanism of that interaction is not well understood. Here we demonstrate that VWM representations of object features influence the spatiotemporal dynamics of extremely simple eye movements, in the absence of stimulus competition or goal-level biases. The rea...

  7. Fragmentation of Rapid Eye Movement and Nonrapid Eye Movement Sleep without Total Sleep Loss Impairs Hippocampus-Dependent Fear Memory Consolidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Michael L; Katsuyama, Ângela M; Duge, Leanne S; Sriram, Chaitra; Krushelnytskyy, Mykhaylo; Kim, Jeansok J; de la Iglesia, Horacio O

    2016-11-01

    Sleep is important for consolidation of hippocampus-dependent memories. It is hypothesized that the temporal sequence of nonrapid eye movement (NREM) sleep and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep is critical for the weakening of nonadaptive memories and the subsequent transfer of memories temporarily stored in the hippocampus to more permanent memories in the neocortex. A great body of evidence supporting this hypothesis relies on behavioral, pharmacological, neural, and/or genetic manipulations that induce sleep deprivation or stage-specific sleep deprivation. We exploit an experimental model of circadian desynchrony in which intact animals are not deprived of any sleep stage but show fragmentation of REM and NREM sleep within nonfragmented sleep bouts. We test the hypothesis that the shortening of NREM and REM sleep durations post-training will impair memory consolidation irrespective of total sleep duration. When circadian-desynchronized animals are trained in a hippocampus-dependent contextual fear-conditioning task they show normal short-term memory but impaired long-term memory consolidation. This impairment in memory consolidation is positively associated with the post-training fragmentation of REM and NREM sleep but is not significantly associated with the fragmentation of total sleep or the total amount of delta activity. We also show that the sleep stage fragmentation resulting from circadian desynchrony has no effect on hippocampus-dependent spatial memory and no effect on hippocampus-independent cued fear-conditioning memory. Our findings in an intact animal model, in which sleep deprivation is not a confounding factor, support the hypothesis that the stereotypic sequence and duration of sleep stages play a specific role in long-term hippocampus-dependent fear memory consolidation.

  8. Shorter duration of non-rapid eye movement sleep slow waves in EphA4 knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freyburger, Marlène; Poirier, Gaétan; Carrier, Julie; Mongrain, Valérie

    2017-10-01

    Slow waves occurring during non-rapid eye movement sleep have been associated with neurobehavioural performance and memory. In addition, the duration of previous wakefulness and sleep impacts characteristics of these slow waves. However, molecular mechanisms regulating the dynamics of slow-wave characteristics remain poorly understood. The EphA4 receptor regulates glutamatergic transmission and synaptic plasticity, which have both been linked to sleep slow waves. To investigate if EphA4 regulates slow-wave characteristics during non-rapid eye movement sleep, we compared individual parameters of slow waves between EphA4 knockout mice and wild-type littermates under baseline conditions and after a 6-h sleep deprivation. We observed that, compared with wild-type mice, knockout mice display a shorter duration of positive and negative phases of slow waves under baseline conditions and after sleep deprivation. However, the mutation did not change slow-wave density, amplitude and slope, and did not affect the sleep deprivation-dependent changes in slow-wave characteristics, suggesting that EphA4 is not involved in the response to elevated sleep pressure. Our present findings suggest a role for EphA4 in shaping cortical oscillations during sleep that is independent from sleep need. © 2017 European Sleep Research Society.

  9. Fight or flight? Dream content during sleepwalking/sleep terrors vs. rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uguccioni, Ginevra; Golmard, Jean-Louis; de Fontréaux, Alix Noël; Leu-Semenescu, Smaranda; Brion, Agnès; Arnulf, Isabelle

    2013-05-01

    Dreams enacted during sleepwalking or sleep terrors (SW/ST) may differ from those enacted during rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (RBD). Subjects completed aggression, depression, and anxiety questionnaires. The mentations associated with SW/ST and RBD behaviors were collected over their lifetime and on the morning after video polysomnography (PSG). The reports were analyzed for complexity, length, content, setting, bizarreness, and threat. Ninety-one percent of 32 subjects with SW/ST and 87.5% of 24 subjects with RBD remembered an enacted dream (121 dreams in a lifetime and 41 dreams recalled on the morning). These dreams were more complex and less bizarre, with a higher level of aggression in the RBD than in SW/ST subjects. In contrast, we found low aggression, anxiety, and depression scores during the daytime in both groups. As many as 70% of enacted dreams in SW/ST and 60% in RBD involved a threat, but there were more misfortunes and disasters in the SW/ST dreams and more human and animal aggressions in the RBD dreams. The response to these threats differed, as the sleepwalkers mostly fled from a disaster (and 25% fought back when attacked), while 75% of RBD subjects counterattacked when assaulted. The dreams setting included their bedrooms in 42% SW/ST dreams, though this finding was exceptional in the RBD dreams. Different threat simulations and modes of defense seem to play a role during dream-enacted behaviors (e.g., fleeing a disaster during SW/ST, counterattacking a human or animal assault during RBD), paralleling and exacerbating the differences observed between normal dreaming in nonrapid eye movement (NREM) vs rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Visual working memory modulates rapid eye movements to simple onset targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollingworth, Andrew; Matsukura, Michi; Luck, Steven J

    2013-05-01

    Representations in visual working memory (VWM) influence attention and gaze control in complex tasks, such as visual search, that require top-down selection to resolve stimulus competition. VWM and visual attention clearly interact, but the mechanism of that interaction is not well understood. In the research reported here, we demonstrated that in the absence of stimulus competition or goal-level biases, VWM representations of object features influence the spatiotemporal dynamics of extremely simple eye movements. The influence of VWM therefore extends into the most basic operations of the oculomotor system.

  11. Normal Morning Melanin-Concentrating Hormone Levels and No Association with Rapid Eye Movement or Non-Rapid Eye Movement Sleep Parameters in Narcolepsy Type 1 and Type 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrölkamp, Maren; Jennum, Poul J; Gammeltoft, Steen; Holm, Anja; Kornum, Birgitte R; Knudsen, Stine

    2017-02-15

    Other than hypocretin-1 (HCRT-1) deficiency in narcolepsy type 1 (NT1), the neurochemical imbalance of NT1 and narcolepsy type 2 (NT2) with normal HCRT-1 levels is largely unknown. The neuropeptide melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) is mainly secreted during sleep and is involved in rapid eye movement (REM) and non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep regulation. Hypocretin neurons reciprocally interact with MCH neurons. We hypothesized that altered MCH secretion contributes to the symptoms and sleep abnormalities of narcolepsy and that this is reflected in morning cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) MCH levels, in contrast to previously reported normal evening/afternoon levels. Lumbar CSF and plasma were collected from 07:00 to 10:00 from 57 patients with narcolepsy (subtypes: 47 NT1; 10 NT2) diagnosed according to International Classification of Sleep Disorders, Third Edition (ICSD-3) and 20 healthy controls. HCRT-1 and MCH levels were quantified by radioimmunoassay and correlated with clinical symptoms, polysomnography (PSG), and Multiple Sleep Latency Test (MSLT) parameters. CSF and plasma MCH levels were not significantly different between narcolepsy patients regardless of ICSD-3 subtype, HCRT-1 levels, or compared to controls. CSF MCH and HCRT-1 levels were not significantly correlated. Multivariate regression models of CSF MCH levels, age, sex, and body mass index predicting clinical, PSG, and MSLT parameters did not reveal any significant associations to CSF MCH levels. Our study shows that MCH levels in CSF collected in the morning are normal in narcolepsy and not associated with the clinical symptoms, REM sleep abnormalities, nor number of muscle movements during REM or NREM sleep of the patients. We conclude that morning lumbar CSF MCH measurement is not an informative diagnostic marker for narcolepsy.

  12. Using a slit lamp-mounted digital high-speed camera for dynamic observation of phakic lenses during eye movements: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitritz, Martin Alexander; Ziemssen, Focke; Bartz-Schmidt, Karl Ulrich; Voykov, Bogomil

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate a digital high-speed camera combined with digital morphometry software for dynamic measurements of phakic intraocular lens movements to observe kinetic influences, particularly in fast direction changes and at lateral end points. A high-speed camera taking 300 frames per second observed movements of eight iris-claw intraocular lenses and two angle-supported intraocular lenses. Standardized saccades were performed by the patients to trigger mass inertia with lens position changes. Freeze images with maximum deviation were used for digital software-based morphometry analysis with ImageJ. Two eyes from each of five patients (median age 32 years, range 28-45 years) without findings other than refractive errors were included. The high-speed images showed sufficient usability for further morphometric processing. In the primary eye position, the median decentrations downward and in a lateral direction were -0.32 mm (range -0.69 to 0.024) and 0.175 mm (range -0.37 to 0.45), respectively. Despite the small sample size of asymptomatic patients, we found a considerable amount of lens dislocation. The median distance amplitude during eye movements was 0.158 mm (range 0.02-0.84). There was a slight positive correlation (r=0.39, Pcamera system and morphometry software, observation and objective measurements of iris-claw intraocular lenses and angle-supported intraocular lenses movements seem to be possible. Slight decentration in the primary position might be an indicator of increased lens mobility during kinetic stress during eye movements. Long-term assessment by high-speed analysis with higher case numbers has to clarify the relationship between progressing motility and endothelial cell damage.

  13. A comparative study of methods for automatic detection of rapid eye movement abnormal muscular activity in narcolepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Alexander Neergaard; Cesari, Matteo; Christensen, Julie Anja Engelhard

    2018-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate rapid eye movement (REM) muscular activity in narcolepsy by applying five algorithms to electromyogram (EMG) recordings, and to investigate its value for narcolepsy diagnosis. Patients/methods: A modified version of phasic EMG metric (mPEM), muscle activity index (MAI), REM...... atonia index (RAI), supra-threshold REM EMG activit ymetric (STREAM), and Frandsen method (FR) were calculated from polysomnography recordings of 20 healthy controls, 18 clinic controls (subjects suspected with narcolepsy but finally diagnosed without any sleep abnormality), 16 narcolepsy type 1 without...... REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD), 9 narcolepsy type 1 with RBD, and 18 narcolepsy type 2. Diagnostic value of metrics in differentiating between groups was quantified by area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). Correlations among the metrics and cerebrospinal fluid hypocretin-1...

  14. Rapid evolution of asymmetric reproductive incompatibilities in stalk-eyed flies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Emily G; Brand, Cara L; Wilkinson, Gerald S

    2014-02-01

    The steps by which isolated populations acquire reproductive incompatibilities remain poorly understood. One potentially important process is postcopulatory sexual selection because it can generate divergence between populations in traits that influence fertilization success after copulation. Here we present a comprehensive analysis of this form of reproductive isolation by conducting reciprocal crosses between variably diverged populations of stalk-eyed flies (Teleopsis dalmanni). First, we measure seven types of reproductive incompatibility between copulation and fertilization. We then compare fertilization success to hatching success to quantify hybrid inviability. Finally, we determine if sperm competition acts to reinforce or counteract any incompatibilities. We find evidence for multiple incompatibilities in most crosses, including failure to store sperm after mating, failure of sperm to reach the site of fertilization, failure of sperm to fertilize eggs, and failure of embryos to develop. Local sperm have precedence over foreign sperm, but this effect is due mainly to differences in sperm transfer and reduced hatching success. Crosses between recently diverged populations are asymmetrical with regard to the degree and type of incompatibility. Because sexual conflict in these flies is low, postcopulatory sexual selection, rather than antagonistic coevolution, likely causes incompatibilities due to mismatches between male and female reproductive traits. © 2013 The Author(s). Evolution © 2013 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  15. An easy, rapid method to isolate RPE cell protein from the mouse eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Hong; Xun, Zixian; Granado, Herta; Wu, Angela; Handa, James T

    2016-04-01

    The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is essential for maintaining the health of the neural retina. RPE cell dysfunction plays a critical role in many common blinding diseases including age-related macular degeneration (AMD), diabetic retinopathy, retinal dystrophies. Mouse models of ocular disease are commonly used to study these blinding diseases. Since isolating the RPE from the choroid has been challenging, most techniques separate the RPE from the retina, but not the choroid. As a result, the protein signature actually represents a heterogeneous population of cells that may not accurately represent the RPE response. Herein, we describe a method for separating proteins from the RPE that is free from retinal and choroidal contamination. After removing the anterior segment and retina from enucleated mouse eyes, protein from the RPE was extracted separately from the choroid by incubating the posterior eyecup with a protein lysis buffer for 10 min. Western blot analysis identified RPE65, an RPE specific protein in the RPE lysates, but not in choroidal lysates. The RPE lysates were devoid of rhodopsin and collagen VI, which are abundant in the retina and choroid, respectively. This technique will be very helpful for measuring the protein signal from the RPE without retinal or choroidal contamination. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Dopamine agonist suppression of rapid-eye-movement sleep is secondary to sleep suppression mediated via limbic structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miletich, R.S.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of pergolide, a direct dopamine receptor agonist, on sleep and wakefulness, motor behavior and /sup 3/H-spiperone specific binding in limbic structures and striatum in rats was studied. The results show that pergolide induced a biphasic dose effect, with high doses increasing wakefulness and suppressing sleep while low dose decreased wakefulness, but increased sleep. It was shown that pergolide-induced sleep suppression was blocked by ..cap alpha..-glupenthixol and pimozide, two dopamine receptor antagonists. It was further shown that pergolide merely delayed the rebound resulting from rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep deprivation, that dopamine receptors stimulation had no direct effect on the period, phase or amplitude of the circadian rhythm of REM sleep propensity and that there was no alteration in the coupling of REM sleep episodes with S/sub 2/ episodes. Rapid-eye-movement sleep deprivation resulted in increased sensitivity to the pergolide-induced wakefulness stimulation and sleep suppression and pergolide-induced motor behaviors of locomotion and head bobbing. /sup 3/H-spiperone specific binding to dopamine receptors was shown to be altered by REM sleep deprivation in the subcortical limbic structures. It is concluded that the REM sleep suppressing action of dopamine receptor stimulation is secondary to sleep suppression per se and not secondary to a unique effect on the REM sleep. Further, it is suggested that the wakefulness stimulating action of dopamine receptor agonists is mediated by activation of the dopamine receptors in the terminal areas of the mesolimbocortical dopamine projection system.

  17. Alterations in regional cerebral glucose metabolism across waking and non-rapid eye movement sleep in depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nofzinger, Eric A; Buysse, Daniel J; Germain, Anne; Price, Julie C; Meltzer, Carolyn C; Miewald, Jean M; Kupfer, David J

    2005-04-01

    Depression is associated with sleep disturbances, including alterations in non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep. Non-rapid eye movement sleep is associated with decreases in frontal, parietal, and temporal cortex metabolic activity compared with wakefulness. To show that depressed patients would have less of a decrease than controls in frontal metabolism between waking and NREM sleep and to show that during NREM sleep, they would have increased activity in structures that promote arousal. Subjects completed electroencephalographic sleep and regional cerebral glucose metabolism assessments during both waking and NREM sleep using [(18)F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography. General clinical research center. The study included 29 unmedicated patients who met the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV criteria for current major depression and who had a score of 15 or greater on a 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression and 28 medically healthy subjects of comparable age and sex who were free of mental disorders. Electroencephalographic sleep and regional cerebral metabolism during waking and NREM sleep. Depressed patients showed smaller decreases than healthy subjects in relative metabolism in broad regions of the frontal, parietal, and temporal cortex from waking to NREM sleep. Depressed patients showed larger decreases than healthy subjects in relative metabolism in the left amygdala, anterior cingulate cortex, cerebellum, parahippocampal cortex, fusiform gyrus, and occipital cortex. However, in post hoc analyses, depressed patients showed hypermetabolism in these areas during both waking and NREM sleep. The smaller decrease in frontal metabolism from waking to NREM sleep in depressed patients is further evidence for a dynamic sleep-wake alteration in prefrontal cortex function in depression. Hypermetabolism in a ventral emotional neural system during waking in depressed patients persists into NREM sleep.

  18. Decision fusion and non-parametric classifiers for land use mapping using multi-temporal RapidEye data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löw, Fabian; Conrad, Christopher; Michel, Ulrich

    2015-10-01

    This study addressed the classification of multi-temporal satellite data from RapidEye by considering different classifier algorithms and decision fusion. Four non-parametric classifier algorithms, decision tree (DT), random forest (RF), support vector machine (SVM), and multilayer perceptron (MLP), were applied to map crop types in various irrigated landscapes in Central Asia. A novel decision fusion strategy to combine the outputs of the classifiers was proposed. This approach is based on randomly selecting subsets of the input dataset and aggregating the probabilistic outputs of the base classifiers with another meta-classifier. During the decision fusion, the reliability of each base classifier algorithm was considered to exclude less reliable inputs at the class-basis. The spatial and temporal transferability of the classifiers was evaluated using data sets from four different agricultural landscapes with different spatial extents and from different years. A detailed accuracy assessment showed that none of the stand-alone classifiers was the single best performing. Despite the very good performance of the base classifiers, there was still up to 50% disagreement in the maps produced by the two single best classifiers, RF and SVM. The proposed fusion strategy, however, increased overall accuracies up to 6%. In addition, it was less sensitive to reduced training set sizes and produced more realistic land use maps with less speckle. The proposed fusion approach was better transferable to data sets from other years, i.e. resulted in higher accuracies for the investigated classes. The fusion approach is computationally efficient and appears well suited for mapping diverse crop categories based on sensors with a similar high repetition rate and spatial resolution like RapidEye, for instance the upcoming Sentinel-2 mission.

  19. Repeated Administration of Korea Red Ginseng Extract Increases Non-Rapid Eye Movement Sleep via GABAAergic Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chung-Il; Kim, Chung-Soo; Han, Jin-Yi; Oh, Eun-Hye; Oh, Ki-Wan; Eun, Jae Soon

    2012-10-01

    The current inquiry was conducted to assess the change in sleep architecture after long periods of administration to determine whether ginseng can be used in the therapy of sleeplessness. Following post-surgical recovery, red ginseng extract (RGE, 200 mg/ kg) was orally administrated to rats for 9 d. Data were gathered on the 1st, 5th, and 9th day, and an electroencephalogram was recorded 24 h after RGE administration. Polygraphic signs of unobstructed sleep-wake activities were simultaneously recorded with sleep-wake recording electrodes from 11:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. for 6 h. Rodents were generally tamed to freely moving polygraphic recording conditions. Although the 1st and 5th day of RGE treatment showed no effect on power densities in non-rapid eye movement (NREM) and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, the 9th day of RGE administration showed augmented α-wave (8.0 to 13.0 Hz) power densities in NREM and REM sleep. RGE increased total sleep and NREM sleep. The total percentage of wakefulness was only decreased on the 9th day, and the number of sleep-wake cycles was reduced after the repeated administration of RGE. Thus, the repeated administration of RGE increased NREM sleep in rats. The α-wave activities in the cortical electroencephalograms were increased in sleep architecture by RGE. Moreover, the levels of both α- and β-subunits of the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)A receptor were reduced in the hypothalamus of the RGE-treated groups. The level of glutamic acid decarboxylase was over-expressed in the hypothalamus. These results demonstrate that RGE increases NREM sleep via GABAAergic systems.

  20. Reduction in ultrasonic vocalizations in pups born to rapid eye movement sleep restricted mothers in rat model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamalesh K Gulia

    Full Text Available The effects of rapid eye movement sleep restriction (REMSR in rats during late pregnancy were studied on the ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs made by the pups. USVs are distress calls inaudible to human ears. Rapid eye movement (REM sleep was restricted in one group of pregnant rats for 22 hours, starting from gestational day 14 to 20, using standard single platform method. The USVs of male pups were recorded after a brief isolation from their mother for two minutes on alternate post-natal days, from day one till weaning. The USVs were recorded using microphones and were analysed qualitatively and quantitatively using SASPro software. Control pups produced maximum vocalization on post-natal days 9 to 11. In comparison, the pups born to REMSR mothers showed not only a reduction in vocalization but also a delay in peak call making days. The experimental group showed variations in the types and characteristics of call types, and alteration in temporal profile. The blunting of distress call making response in these pups indicates that maternal sleep plays a role in regulating the neural development involved in vocalizations and possibly in shaping the emotional behaviour in neonates. It is suggested that the reduced ultrasonic vocalizations can be utilized as a reliable early marker for affective state in rat pups. Such impaired vocalization responses could provide an important lead in understanding mother-child bonding for an optimal cognitive development during post-partum life. This is the first report showing a potential link between maternal REM sleep deprivation and the vocalization in neonates and infants.

  1. Reduction in ultrasonic vocalizations in pups born to rapid eye movement sleep restricted mothers in rat model.

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    Gulia, Kamalesh K; Patel, Niraj; Radhakrishnan, Arathi; Kumar, Velayudhan Mohan

    2014-01-01

    The effects of rapid eye movement sleep restriction (REMSR) in rats during late pregnancy were studied on the ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs) made by the pups. USVs are distress calls inaudible to human ears. Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep was restricted in one group of pregnant rats for 22 hours, starting from gestational day 14 to 20, using standard single platform method. The USVs of male pups were recorded after a brief isolation from their mother for two minutes on alternate post-natal days, from day one till weaning. The USVs were recorded using microphones and were analysed qualitatively and quantitatively using SASPro software. Control pups produced maximum vocalization on post-natal days 9 to 11. In comparison, the pups born to REMSR mothers showed not only a reduction in vocalization but also a delay in peak call making days. The experimental group showed variations in the types and characteristics of call types, and alteration in temporal profile. The blunting of distress call making response in these pups indicates that maternal sleep plays a role in regulating the neural development involved in vocalizations and possibly in shaping the emotional behaviour in neonates. It is suggested that the reduced ultrasonic vocalizations can be utilized as a reliable early marker for affective state in rat pups. Such impaired vocalization responses could provide an important lead in understanding mother-child bonding for an optimal cognitive development during post-partum life. This is the first report showing a potential link between maternal REM sleep deprivation and the vocalization in neonates and infants.

  2. Auditory inhibition of rapid eye movements and dream recall from REM sleep.

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    Stuart, Katrina; Conduit, Russell

    2009-03-01

    There is debate in dream research as to whether ponto-geniculo-occipital (PGO) waves or cortical arousal during sleep underlie the biological mechanisms of dreaming. This study comprised 2 experiments. As eye movements (EMs) are currently considered the best noninvasive indicator of PGO burst activity in humans, the aim of the first experiment was to investigate the effect of low-intensity repeated auditory stimulation on EMs (and inferred PGO burst activity) during REM sleep. It was predicted that such auditory stimuli during REM sleep would have a suppressive effect on EMs. The aim of the second experiment was to examine the effects of this auditory stimulation on subsequent dream reporting on awakening. Repeated measures design with counterbalanced order of experimental and control conditions across participants. Sleep laboratory based polysomnography (PSG) PARTICIPANTS: Experiment 1 : 5 males and 10 females aged 18-35 years (M = 20.8, SD = 5.4). Experiment 2 : 7 males and 13 females aged 18-35 years (M = 23.3, SD = 5.5). Below-waking threshold tone presentations during REM sleep compared to control REM sleep conditions without tone presentations. PSG records were manually scored for sleep stages, EEG arousals, and EMs. Auditory stimulation during REM sleep was related to: (a) an increase in EEG arousal, (b) a decrease in the amplitude and frequency of EMs, and (c) a decrease in the frequency of visual imagery reports on awakening. The results of this study provide phenomenological support for PGO-based theories of dream reporting on awakening from sleep in humans.

  3. Impacts of dust aerosol and adjacency effects on the accuracy of Landsat 8 and RapidEye surface reflectances

    KAUST Repository

    Houborg, Rasmus

    2017-03-29

    The atmospheric correction of satellite data is challenging over desert agricultural systems, due to the relatively high aerosol optical thicknesses (τ550), bright soils, and a heterogeneous surface reflectance field. Indeed, the contribution of reflected radiation from adjacent pixels scattered into the field of view of a target pixel is considerable and can significantly affect the fidelity of retrieved reflectances. In this study, uncertainties and quantitative errors associated with the atmospheric correction of multi-spectral Landsat 8 and RapidEye data were characterized over a desert agricultural landscape in Saudi Arabia. Surface reflectances were retrieved using an implementation of the 6SV atmospheric correction code, and validated against field collected spectroradiometer measurements over desert, cultivated soil, and vegetated surface targets. A combination of satellite and Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) data were used to parameterize aerosol properties and atmospheric state parameters. With optimal specification of τ550 and aerosol optical properties and correction for adjacency effects, the relative Mean Absolute Deviation (MAD) for all bands combined was 5.4% for RapidEye and 6.8% for Landsat 8. However uncertainties associated with satellite-based τ550 retrievals were shown to introduce significant error into the reflectance estimates. With respect to deriving common vegetation indices from corrected reflectance data, the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) was associated with the smallest errors (3–8% MAD). Surface reflectance errors were highest for bands in the visible part of the spectrum, particularly the blue band (5–16%), while there was more consistency within the red-edge (~ 5%) and near-infrared (5–7%). Results were generally better constrained when a τ550-dependent aerosol model for desert dust particles, parameterized on the basis of nearby AERONET site data, was used in place of a generic rural or background

  4. Baseline Levels of Rapid Eye Movement Sleep May Protect Against Excessive Activity in Fear-Related Neural Circuitry.

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    Lerner, Itamar; Lupkin, Shira M; Sinha, Neha; Tsai, Alan; Gluck, Mark A

    2017-11-15

    Sleep, and particularly rapid eye movement sleep (REM), has been implicated in the modulation of neural activity following fear conditioning and extinction in both human and animal studies. It has long been presumed that such effects play a role in the formation and persistence of posttraumatic stress disorder, of which sleep impairments are a core feature. However, to date, few studies have thoroughly examined the potential effects of sleep prior to conditioning on subsequent acquisition of fear learning in humans. Furthermore, these studies have been restricted to analyzing the effects of a single night of sleep-thus assuming a state-like relationship between the two. In the current study, we used long-term mobile sleep monitoring and functional neuroimaging (fMRI) to explore whether trait-like variations in sleep patterns, measured in advance in both male and female participants, predict subsequent patterns of neural activity during fear learning. Our results indicate that higher baseline levels of REM sleep predict reduced fear-related activity in, and connectivity between, the hippocampus, amygdala and ventromedial PFC during conditioning. Additionally, skin conductance responses (SCRs) were weakly correlated to the activity in the amygdala. Conversely, there was no direct correlation between REM sleep and SCRs, indicating that REM may only modulate fear acquisition indirectly. In a follow-up experiment, we show that these results are replicable, though to a lesser extent, when measuring sleep over a single night just before conditioning. As such, baseline sleep parameters may be able to serve as biomarkers for resilience, or lack thereof, to trauma. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Numerous studies over the past two decades have established a clear role of sleep in fear-learning processes. However, previous work has focused on the effects of sleep following fear acquisition, thus neglecting the potential effects of baseline sleep levels on the acquisition itself. The

  5. Sleep spindles and rapid eye movement sleep as predictors of next morning cognitive performance in healthy middle-aged and older participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafortune, Marjolaine; Gagnon, Jean-François; Martin, Nicolas; Latreille, Véronique; Dubé, Jonathan; Bouchard, Maude; Bastien, Célyne; Carrier, Julie

    2014-04-01

    Spindles and slow waves are hallmarks of non-rapid eye movement sleep. Both these oscillations are markers of neuronal plasticity, and play a role in memory and cognition. Normal ageing is associated with spindle and slow wave decline and cognitive changes. The present study aimed to assess whether spindle and slow wave characteristics during a baseline night predict cognitive performance in healthy older adults the next morning. Specifically, we examined performance on tasks measuring selective and sustained visual attention, declarative verbal memory, working memory and verbal fluency. Fifty-eight healthy middle-aged and older adults (aged 50-91 years) without sleep disorders underwent baseline polysomnographic sleep recording followed by neuropsychological assessment the next morning. Spindles and slow waves were detected automatically on artefact-free non-rapid eye movement sleep electroencephalogram. All-night stage N2 spindle density (no./min) and mean frequency (Hz) and all-night non-rapid eye movement sleep slow wave density (no./min) and mean slope (μV/s) were analysed. Pearson's correlations were performed between spindles, slow waves, polysomnography and cognitive performance. Higher spindle density predicted better performance on verbal learning, visual attention and verbal fluency, whereas spindle frequency and slow wave density or slope predicted fewer cognitive performance variables. In addition, rapid eye movement sleep duration was associated with better verbal learning potential. These results suggest that spindle density is a marker of cognitive functioning in older adults and may reflect neuroanatomic integrity. Rapid eye movement sleep may be a marker of age-related changes in acetylcholine transmission, which plays a role in new information encoding. © 2013 European Sleep Research Society.

  6. Acute administration of fluoxetine normalizes rapid eye movement sleep abnormality, but not depressive behaviors in olfactory bulbectomized rats.

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    Wang, Yi-Qun; Tu, Zhi-Cai; Xu, Xing-Yuan; Li, Rui; Qu, Wei-Min; Urade, Yoshihiro; Huang, Zhi-Li

    2012-01-01

    In humans, depression is associated with altered rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. However, the exact nature of the relationship between depressive behaviors and sleep abnormalities is debated. In this study, bilateral olfactory bulbectomy (OBX) was carried out to create a model of depression in rats. The sleep-wake profiles were assayed using a cutting-edge sleep bioassay system, and depressive behaviors were evaluated by open field and forced swimming tests. The monoamine content and monoamine metabolite levels in the brain were determined by a HPLC-electrochemical detection system. OBX rats exhibited a significant increase in REM sleep, especially between 15:00 and 18:00 hours during the light period. Acute treatment with fluoxetine (10 mg/kg, i.p.) immediately abolished the OBX-induced increase in REM sleep, but hyperactivity in the open field test and the time spent immobile in the forced swimming test remained unchanged. Neurochemistry studies revealed that acute administration of fluoxetine increased serotonin (5-HT) levels in the hippocampus, thalamus, and midbrain and decreased levels of the 5-HT metabolite 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA). The ratio of 5-HIAA to 5-HT decreased in almost all regions of the brain. These results indicate that acute administration of fluoxetine can reduce the increase in REM sleep but does not change the depressive behaviors in OBX rats, suggesting that there was no causality between REM sleep abnormalities and depressive behaviors in OBX rats. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Neurochemistry © 2011 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  7. Just a scary dream? A brief review of sleep terrors, nightmares, and rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder.

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    Haupt, Mark; Sheldon, Stephen H; Loghmanee, Darius

    2013-10-01

    The clinical spectrum of sleep disorders in children is broad, ranging from primary snoring and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) syndrome to complex sleep-related behaviors and movement disorders. Although snoring and OSA typically receive significant attention and discussion, other biologically based sleep disorders are as common, if not more common, in children. A general pediatrician is frequently presented with the complaint of sleep talking, sleep walking, or abnormal movements during sleep. Even more alarming is the presentation of the child suddenly and explosively screaming during sleep. Such complaints fall under the category of parasomnias. Exclusive to sleep and wake-to-sleep transitions, these parasomnias include arousals with abnormal motor, behavioral, autonomic, or sensory symptoms. Parasomnias can be noticeably dissimilar in clinical manifestations, but most share biologic characteristics. Three parasomnias associated with loud vocalizations associated with sleep that can present to general practitioners include sleep terrors, nightmares, and rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (RBD). Although usually benign, these sleep disorders can be disruptive and even potentially dangerous to the patient and can often be threatening to quality of life. In this article, we describe the clinical features of some of these disorders and how to differentiate between their alarming presentations. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  8. Why Are Seizures Rare in Rapid Eye Movement Sleep? Review of the Frequency of Seizures in Different Sleep Stages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Ng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the formal characterization of sleep stages, there have been reports that seizures may preferentially occur in certain phases of sleep. Through ascending cholinergic connections from the brainstem, rapid eye movement (REM sleep is physiologically characterized by low voltage fast activity on the electroencephalogram, REMs, and muscle atonia. Multiple independent studies confirm that, in REM sleep, there is a strikingly low proportion of seizures (~1% or less. We review a total of 42 distinct conventional and intracranial studies in the literature which comprised a net of 1458 patients. Indexed to duration, we found that REM sleep was the most protective stage of sleep against focal seizures, generalized seizures, focal interictal discharges, and two particular epilepsy syndromes. REM sleep had an additional protective effect compared to wakefulness with an average 7.83 times fewer focal seizures, 3.25 times fewer generalized seizures, and 1.11 times fewer focal interictal discharges. In further studies REM sleep has also demonstrated utility in localizing epileptogenic foci with potential translation into postsurgical seizure freedom. Based on emerging connectivity data in sleep, we hypothesize that the influence of REM sleep on seizures is due to a desynchronized EEG pattern which reflects important connectivity differences unique to this sleep stage.

  9. Degenerative Encephalopathy in Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retrievers Presenting with a Rapid Eye Movement Sleep Behavior Disorder.

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    Barker, E N; Dawson, L J; Rose, J H; Van Meervenne, S; Frykman, O; Rohdin, C; Leijon, A; Soerensen, K E; Järnegren, J; Johnson, G C; O'Brien, D P; Granger, N

    2016-09-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by loss of neurons and are commonly associated with a genetic mutation. To characterize the clinical and histopathological features of a novel degenerative neurological disease affecting the brain of young adult Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retrievers (NSDTRs). Nine, young adult, related NSDTRs were evaluated for neurological dysfunction and rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder. Case series review. Clinical signs of neurological dysfunction began between 2 months and 5 years of age and were progressive in nature. They were characterized by episodes of marked movements during sleep, increased anxiety, noise phobia, and gait abnormalities. Magnetic resonance imaging documented symmetrical, progressively increasing, T2-weighted image intensity, predominantly within the caudate nuclei, consistent with necrosis secondary to gray matter degeneration. Abnormalities were not detected on clinicopathological analysis of blood and cerebrospinal fluid, infectious disease screening or urine metabolite screening in most cases. Postmortem examination of brain tissue identified symmetrical malacia of the caudate nuclei and axonal dystrophy within the brainstem and spinal cord. Genealogical analysis supports an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. A degenerative encephalopathy was identified in young adult NSDTRs consistent with a hereditary disease. The prognosis is guarded due to the progressive nature of the disease, which is minimally responsive to empirical treatment. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  10. Effects of partial sleep deprivation on slow waves during non-rapid eye movement sleep: A high density EEG investigation.

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    Plante, David T; Goldstein, Michael R; Cook, Jesse D; Smith, Richard; Riedner, Brady A; Rumble, Meredith E; Jelenchick, Lauren; Roth, Andrea; Tononi, Giulio; Benca, Ruth M; Peterson, Michael J

    2016-02-01

    Changes in slow waves during non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep in response to acute total sleep deprivation are well-established measures of sleep homeostasis. This investigation utilized high-density electroencephalography (hdEEG) to examine topographic changes in slow waves during repeated partial sleep deprivation. Twenty-four participants underwent a 6-day sleep restriction protocol. Spectral and period-amplitude analyses of sleep hdEEG data were used to examine changes in slow wave energy, count, amplitude, and slope relative to baseline. Changes in slow wave energy were dependent on the quantity of NREM sleep utilized for analysis, with widespread increases during sleep restriction and recovery when comparing data from the first portion of the sleep period, but restricted to recovery sleep if the entire sleep episode was considered. Period-amplitude analysis was less dependent on the quantity of NREM sleep utilized, and demonstrated topographic changes in the count, amplitude, and distribution of slow waves, with frontal increases in slow wave amplitude, numbers of high-amplitude waves, and amplitude/slopes of low amplitude waves resulting from partial sleep deprivation. Topographic changes in slow waves occur across the course of partial sleep restriction and recovery. These results demonstrate a homeostatic response to partial sleep loss in humans. Copyright © 2015 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Abnormal response of melanin-concentrating hormone deficient mice to fasting: hyperactivity and rapid eye movement sleep suppression.

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    Willie, J T; Sinton, C M; Maratos-Flier, E; Yanagisawa, M

    2008-10-28

    Melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) is a hypothalamic neuropeptide that has been implicated in energy homeostasis. Pharmacological studies with MCH and its receptor antagonists have suggested additional behavioral roles for the neuropeptide in the control of mood and vigilance states. These suggestions have been supported by a report of modified sleep in the MCH-1 receptor knockout mouse. Here we found that MCH knockout (MCH(-)(/)(-)) mice slept less during both the light and dark phases under baseline conditions. In response to fasting, MCH(-)(/)(-) mice exhibited marked hyperactivity, accelerated weight loss and an exaggerated decrease in rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. Following a 6-h period of sleep deprivation, however, the sleep rebound in MCH(-)(/)(-) mice was normal. Thus MCH(-)(/)(-) mice adapt poorly to fasting, and their loss of bodyweight under this condition is associated with behavioral hyperactivity and abnormal expression of REM sleep. These results support a role for MCH in vigilance state regulation in response to changes in energy homeostasis and may relate to a recent report of initial clinical trials with a novel MCH-1 receptor antagonist. When combined with caloric restriction, the treatment of healthy, obese subjects with this compound resulted in some subjects experiencing vivid dreams and sleep disturbances.

  12. Retinal nerve fiber layer thinning: a window into rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorders in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zi-Jiao; Wei, Jing; Mao, Cheng-Jie; Zhang, Jin-Ru; Chen, Jing; Ji, Xiao-Yan; Liu, Jun-Yi; Shen, Yun; Xiong, Kang-Ping; Huang, Jun-Ying; Yang, Ya-Ping; Liu, Chun-Feng

    2016-12-01

    Retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thinning occurs in Parkinson's disease (PD) and other neurodegenerative diseases. Idiopathic RBD (iRBD) is a well-established prodromal hallmark of synucleinopathies and occurs secondary to many neurodegenerative diseases, including PD. The aim of this study is to determine whether or not retinal structures are altered with the onset of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorders (RBD). In all, a total of 63 patients with PD, 14 patients with idiopathic RBD, and 26 sex- and age-matched healthy controls were enrolled and underwent optical coherence tomography measurements (HD-OCT (Zeiss) ) for the average and every quadrant of RNFL thickness. The REM Sleep Behavior Disorder Screening Questionnaire (RBDSQ) was used to classify PD patients with clinically probable RBD (PD + pRBD) or without probable RBD (PD - pRBD). Patients with iRBD were identified by polysomnography. For patients with RBD (idiopathic or secondary to PD), we found a significant decrease in RNFL thickness compared with groups without RBD (PD - pRBD and healthy controls) (all p treatment. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that RBDSQ score was negatively associated with average and inferior RNFL variation in PD (all p < 0.005). The findings show that RNFL was slightly but significantly thinner in idiopathic RBD. In PD, RNFL thickness may vary depending on the presence of RBD.

  13. Effects of partial sleep deprivation on slow waves during non-rapid eye movement sleep: a high density EEG investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plante, David T.; Goldstein, Michael R.; Cook, Jesse D.; Smith, Richard; Riedner, Brady A.; Rumble, Meredith E.; Jelenchick, Lauren; Roth, Andrea; Tononi, Giulio; Benca, Ruth M.; Peterson, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Changes in slow waves during non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep in response to acute total sleep deprivation are well-established measures of sleep homeostasis. This investigation utilized high-density electroencephalography (hdEEG) to examine topographic changes in slow waves during repeated partial sleep deprivation. Methods Twenty-four participants underwent a 6-day sleep restriction protocol. Spectral and period-amplitude analyses of sleep hdEEG data were used to examine changes in slow wave energy, count, amplitude, and slope relative to baseline. Results Changes in slow wave energy were dependent on the quantity of NREM sleep utilized for analysis, with widespread increases during sleep restriction and recovery when comparing data from the first portion of the sleep period, but restricted to recovery sleep if the entire sleep episode was considered. Period-amplitude analysis was less dependent on the quantity of NREM sleep utilized, and demonstrated topographic changes in the count, amplitude, and distribution of slow waves, with frontal increases in slow wave amplitude, numbers of high-amplitude waves, and amplitude/slopes of low amplitude waves resulting from partial sleep deprivation. Conclusions Topographic changes in slow waves occur across the course of partial sleep restriction and recovery. Significance These results demonstrate a homeostatic response to partial sleep loss in humans. PMID:26596212

  14. The effects of social housing on extinction of fear conditioning in rapid eye movement sleep-deprived rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Amy Silvestri

    2014-05-01

    Both human and animal research indicate that rapid eye movement sleep (REM) plays an important role in the processing of emotional information. REM is altered after fear conditioning in rats, but this alteration can be mitigated by exposure to a naïve conspecific. In addition, both the housing condition (isolated vs paired) and the experiences of rats' cagemates can influence the response to aversive events. Based on this prior work, the present study sought to determine the effects of social housing on the previously demonstrated impairment in the extinction of conditioned fear responses produced by REM deprivation. Rats were assigned to one of three housing conditions: housed with a naïve rat, housed with another fear-conditioned rat, or housed alone. The results demonstrated that rats housed with either a naïve or a fear-conditioned conspecific exhibited an impairment in the acquisition of extinction as a consequence of REM deprivation, as observed in previous studies. However, rats in the isolated condition demonstrated a trend toward an impairment only after continued extinction training. These results indicate that the effects of social housing on REM deprivation-induced impairments in learning and memory are subtle, but may explain some conflicting findings in the literature.

  15. Rapid eye movement sleep deprivation disrupts consolidation but not reconsolidation of novel object recognition memory in rats.

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    Chen, Lin; Tian, Shaowen; Ke, Jie

    2014-03-20

    There is increasing evidence that sleep plays a critical role in memory consolidation. However, there are comparatively few studies that have assessed the relationship between sleep and memory reconsolidation. In the present study, we explored the effects of rapid eye movement sleep deprivation (RSD) on the consolidation (experiment 1) and reconsolidation (experiment 2) of novel object recognition memory in rats. In experiment 1 behavioral procedure involved two training phases: sample and test. Rats were subjected to 6h RSD starting either immediately after sample (exposed to 2 objects) or 6h later. In experiment 2 behavioral procedure involved three training phases: sample, reactivation and test. Rats were subjected to 6h RSD starting either immediately after reactivation (exposed to the same 2 sample objects to reactivate the memory trace) or 6h later. Results from experiment 1 showed that post-sample RSD from 0 to 6h but not 6 to 12h disrupted novel object recognition memory consolidation. However, we found that post-reactivation RSD whether from 0 to 6h or 6 to 12h had no effect on novel object recognition memory reconsolidation in experiment 2. The results indicated that RSD selectively disrupted consolidation of novel object recognition memory, suggesting a dissociation effect of RSD on consolidation and reconsolidation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder: devising controlled active treatment studies for symptomatic and neuroprotective therapy--a consensus statement from the International Rapid Eye Movement Sleep Behavior Disorder Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenck, C H; Montplaisir, J Y; Frauscher, B; Hogl, B; Gagnon, J-F; Postuma, R; Sonka, K; Jennum, P; Partinen, M; Arnulf, I; Cochen de Cock, V; Dauvilliers, Y; Luppi, P-H; Heidbreder, A; Mayer, G; Sixel-Döring, F; Trenkwalder, C; Unger, M; Young, P; Wing, Y K; Ferini-Strambi, L; Ferri, R; Plazzi, G; Zucconi, M; Inoue, Y; Iranzo, A; Santamaria, J; Bassetti, C; Möller, J C; Boeve, B F; Lai, Y Y; Pavlova, M; Saper, C; Schmidt, P; Siegel, J M; Singer, C; St Louis, E; Videnovic, A; Oertel, W

    2013-08-01

    We aimed to provide a consensus statement by the International Rapid Eye Movement Sleep Behavior Disorder Study Group (IRBD-SG) on devising controlled active treatment studies in rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (RBD) and devising studies of neuroprotection against Parkinson disease (PD) and related neurodegeneration in RBD. The consensus statement was generated during the fourth IRBD-SG symposium in Marburg, Germany in 2011. The IRBD-SG identified essential methodologic components for a randomized trial in RBD, including potential screening and diagnostic criteria, inclusion and exclusion criteria, primary and secondary outcomes for symptomatic therapy trials (particularly for melatonin and clonazepam), and potential primary and secondary outcomes for eventual trials with disease-modifying and neuroprotective agents. The latter trials are considered urgent, given the high conversion rate from idiopathic RBD (iRBD) to Parkinsonian disorders (i.e., PD, dementia with Lewy bodies [DLB], multiple system atrophy [MSA]). Six inclusion criteria were identified for symptomatic therapy and neuroprotective trials: (1) diagnosis of RBD needs to satisfy the International Classification of Sleep Disorders, second edition, (ICSD-2) criteria; (2) minimum frequency of RBD episodes should preferably be ⩾2 times weekly to allow for assessment of change; (3) if the PD-RBD target population is included, it should be in the early stages of PD defined as Hoehn and Yahr stages 1-3 in Off (untreated); (4) iRBD patients with soft neurologic dysfunction and with operational criteria established by the consensus of study investigators; (5) patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI); and (6) optimally treated comorbid OSA. Twenty-four exclusion criteria were identified. The primary outcome measure for RBD treatment trials was determined to be the Clinical Global Impression (CGI) efficacy index, consisting of a four-point scale with a four-point side-effect scale. Assessment of

  17. Application of a regularized model inversion system (REGFLEC) to multi-temporal RapidEye imagery for retrieving vegetation characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houborg, Rasmus; McCabe, Matthew F.

    2015-10-01

    Accurate retrieval of canopy biophysical and leaf biochemical constituents from space observations is critical to diagnosing the functioning and condition of vegetation canopies across spatio-temporal scales. Retrieved vegetation characteristics may serve as important inputs to precision farming applications and as constraints in spatially and temporally distributed model simulations of water and carbon exchange processes. However significant challenges remain in the translation of composite remote sensing signals into useful biochemical, physiological or structural quantities and treatment of confounding factors in spectrum-trait relations. Bands in the red-edge spectrum have particular potential for improving the robustness of retrieved vegetation properties. The development of observationally based vegetation retrieval capacities, effectively constrained by the enhanced information content afforded by bands in the red-edge, is a needed investment towards optimizing the benefit of current and future satellite sensor systems. In this study, a REGularized canopy reFLECtance model (REGFLEC) for joint leaf chlorophyll (Chll) and leaf area index (LAI) retrieval is extended to sensor systems with a band in the red-edge region for the first time. Application to time-series of 5 m resolution multi-spectral RapidEye data is demonstrated over an irrigated agricultural region in central Saudi Arabia, showcasing the value of satellite-derived crop information at this fine scale for precision management. Validation against in-situ measurements in fields of alfalfa, Rhodes grass, carrot and maize indicate improved accuracy of retrieved vegetation properties when exploiting red-edge information in the model inversion process.

  18. Rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder in young- and older-onset Parkinson disease: a questionnaire-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahale, R; Yadav, R; Pal, P K

    2014-06-01

    Rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (RBD) is common in Parkinson disease (PD). To determine the frequency of clinically probable RBD (cpRBD) in young-onset (21 to 40 years; OOPD) and characterize its pattern. A total of 156 patients with PD (YOPD-51, OOPD-105) were clinically examined and the presence of RBD was diagnosed using the minimal criteria for diagnosis of RBD (International Classification of Sleep Disorders, ICSD-1). RBD screening questionnaire based on the minimal criteria was used. The bed-partners were also interviewed with Mayo sleep questionnaire. Other scales included Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale part III (UPDRS III), Hoehn & Yahr stage, Mini Mental Status Examination, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, Parkinson Disease Sleep Scale, Epworth Sleep Scale, Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale and Hamilton Depression Rating Scale. cpRBD was diagnosed in 30 (19.2%) patients, majority being OOPD rather than YOPD (86.7% vs. 13.3%; P=0.01). The frequency of RBD was significantly higher (P=0.016) in OOPD (24.8%) compared to those with YOPD (7.8%). Most often (72.4%) RBD occurred after the onset of parkinsonian symptoms. RBD was independently associated with higher global PSQI scores, total ESS scores and total PDSS scores after adjusting for the effects of age, gender, Hoehn & Yahr stage and duration of illness. Patients with RBD were older with later-onset motor symptoms, a more advanced stage, poorer sleep quality, and more frequent daytime sleepiness. Older-onset PD had a higher frequency of RBD than young-onset PD. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Application of a regularized model inversion system (REGFLEC) to multi-temporal RapidEye imagery for retrieving vegetation characteristics

    KAUST Repository

    Houborg, Rasmus

    2015-10-14

    Accurate retrieval of canopy biophysical and leaf biochemical constituents from space observations is critical to diagnosing the functioning and condition of vegetation canopies across spatio-temporal scales. Retrieved vegetation characteristics may serve as important inputs to precision farming applications and as constraints in spatially and temporally distributed model simulations of water and carbon exchange processes. However significant challenges remain in the translation of composite remote sensing signals into useful biochemical, physiological or structural quantities and treatment of confounding factors in spectrum-trait relations. Bands in the red-edge spectrum have particular potential for improving the robustness of retrieved vegetation properties. The development of observationally based vegetation retrieval capacities, effectively constrained by the enhanced information content afforded by bands in the red-edge, is a needed investment towards optimizing the benefit of current and future satellite sensor systems. In this study, a REGularized canopy reFLECtance model (REGFLEC) for joint leaf chlorophyll (Chll) and leaf area index (LAI) retrieval is extended to sensor systems with a band in the red-edge region for the first time. Application to time-series of 5 m resolution multi-spectral RapidEye data is demonstrated over an irrigated agricultural region in central Saudi Arabia, showcasing the value of satellite-derived crop information at this fine scale for precision management. Validation against in-situ measurements in fields of alfalfa, Rhodes grass, carrot and maize indicate improved accuracy of retrieved vegetation properties when exploiting red-edge information in the model inversion process. © (2015) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE).

  20. Noradrenergic modulation of masseter muscle activity during natural rapid eye movement sleep requires glutamatergic signalling at the trigeminal motor nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Peter B; Mir, Saba; Peever, John H

    2014-01-01

    Noradrenergic neurotransmission in the brainstem is closely coupled to changes in muscle activity across the sleep–wake cycle, and noradrenaline is considered to be a key excitatory neuromodulator that reinforces the arousal-related stimulus on motoneurons to drive movement. However, it is unknown if α-1 noradrenoceptor activation increases motoneuron responsiveness to excitatory glutamate (AMPA) receptor-mediated inputs during natural behaviour. We studied the effects of noradrenaline on AMPA receptor-mediated motor activity at the motoneuron level in freely behaving rats, particularly during rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, a period during which both AMPA receptor-triggered muscle twitches and periods of muscle quiescence in which AMPA drive is silent are exhibited. Male rats were subjected to electromyography and electroencephalography recording to monitor sleep and waking behaviour. The implantation of a cannula into the trigeminal motor nucleus of the brainstem allowed us to perfuse noradrenergic and glutamatergic drugs by reverse microdialysis, and thus to use masseter muscle activity as an index of motoneuronal output. We found that endogenous excitation of both α-1 noradrenoceptor and AMPA receptors during waking are coupled to motor activity; however, REM sleep exhibits an absence of endogenous α-1 noradrenoceptor activity. Importantly, exogenous α-1 noradrenoceptor stimulation cannot reverse the muscle twitch suppression induced by AMPA receptor blockade and nor can it elevate muscle activity during quiet REM, a phase when endogenous AMPA receptor activity is subthreshold. We conclude that the presence of an endogenous glutamatergic drive is necessary for noradrenaline to trigger muscle activity at the level of the motoneuron in an animal behaving naturally. PMID:24860176

  1. Allergic rhinitis affects the duration of rapid eye movement sleep in children with sleep-disordered breathing without sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Francesco, Renata C; Alvarez, Jessica

    2016-05-01

    Our goals were to assess whether allergic rhinitis (AR) is an aggravating factor that affects the severity of sleep apnea in children with tonsils/adenoid hypertrophy (T&A) and to compare polysomnographic data from children with and without AR. This prospective study included 135 children (age range, 3 to 14 years) with sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) resulting from T&A. Children with lung, neurological, or craniofacial problems; septal deviations; previous pharyngeal surgeries; or orthodontic treatments were excluded. All children underwent a clinical evaluation, nasopharyngoscopy or lateral X-ray imaging, sleep study, and hypersensitivity skin-prick test. The mean patient age was 6.44 ± 2.55 years (83 males). AR was present in 42.2% of the children; 40% presented with sleep apnea; and 17.04% had sleep apnea and AR. The percentage of time spent in the rapid eye movement (REM) sleep stage was lower among children with AR without sleep apnea (p = 0.028); however, the percentage of REM sleep was not significantly different among children with apnea (p = 0.2922). No difference in the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) was observed between the children with (AHI = 2.79 events/hour) and without AR (3.75 events/hour, p = 0.4427). A multivariate analysis showed that nasal congestion was an important factor that can affect the duration of the REM sleep stage. AR affects REM sleep in children with SDB without sleep apnea, and AR is not an aggravating factor regarding the severity of AHI. © 2016 ARS-AAOA, LLC.

  2. Vegetation cover mapping at multiple scales using MODIS, Landsat, RapidEye, and Aircraft imageries in the Texas High Plains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajan, N.; Gowda, P. H.; Maas, S. J.; Basu, S.; Nair, S. S.

    2009-12-01

    Vegetation cover is an important input variable in many earth and environmental studies. In many of these studies, vegetation cover information is needed at different spatial scales. Hence, remote sensing is a popular tool to estimate vegetation cover. Numerous spectral-based models are available in the literature for mapping vegetation cover. However, very limited information is available on their ability to perform well at spatial scales different from the scale at which the model was developed. In this study, we used a procedure based on the Perpendicular Vegetation Index (PVI) to estimate vegetation cover. Using this procedure, vegetation cover is estimated from the ratio of the PVI of an image pixel to the PVI of full vegetation canopy (100% ground cover). The major advantages of this procedure compared to several other methods are that this method does not rely on empirical relationships, and can use raw remote sensing data without converting it into surface reflectance or normalization to account scene-to scene difference in vegetation. Previous studies conducted during the summer growing seasons of 2006, 2007 and 2008 in the Texas High Plains (THP) show that the method could estimate vegetation cover from Landsat imagery with an average error of less than 6%, and from high-resolution aerial images (obtained using TTAMRSS, the Texas Tech Airborne Multispectral Remote Sensing System) with an average error of less than 3%. In this study, we used this procedure to estimate vegetation cover of 10 large agricultural fields in the THP with Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS, 250 m resolution) and with the RapidEye (5 m resolution) imageries. The results were compared with ground-based observations and vegetation cover derived from Landsat and high resolution aircraft imageries.

  3. Time-of-night variations in the story-like organization of dream experience developed during rapid eye movement sleep.

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    Cipolli, Carlo; Guazzelli, Mario; Bellucci, Claudia; Mazzetti, Michela; Palagini, Laura; Rosenlicht, Nicholas; Feinberg, Irwin

    2015-04-01

    This study aimed to investigate the cycles (2nd/4th) and duration-related (5/10 min) variations in the story-like organization of dream experience elaborated during rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. Dream reports were analysed using story grammar rules. Reports were provided by those subjects (14 of 22) capable of reporting a dream after each of the four awakenings provoked in 2 consecutive nights during REM sleep of the 2nd and 4th cycles, after periods of either 5 or 10 min, counterbalanced across the nights. Two researchers who were blind as to the sleep condition scored the dream reports independently. The values of the indicators of report length (measured as value of total word count) and of story-like organization of dream reports were matched taking time-of-night (2nd and 4th cycles) and REM duration (5 versus 10 min) as factors. Two-way analyses of variance showed that report length increased significantly in 4th-cycle REM sleep and nearly significantly for longer REM duration, whereas the number of dream-stories per report did not vary. The indices of sequential (number of statements describing the event structure developed in the story) and hierarchical (number of episodes per story) organization increased significantly only in dream-stories reported after 10 min of 4th-cycle REM sleep. These findings indicate that the characteristics of structural organization of dream-stories vary along with time of night, and suggest that the elaboration of a long and complex dream-story requires a fairly long time and the availability of a great amount of cognitive resources to maintain its continuity and coherence. © 2014 European Sleep Research Society.

  4. Prevalence of rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (RBD) in Parkinson's disease: a meta and meta-regression analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaona; Sun, Xiaoxuan; Wang, Junhong; Tang, Liou; Xie, Anmu

    2017-01-01

    Rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (RBD) is thought to be one of the most frequent preceding symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD). However, the prevalence of RBD in PD stated in the published studies is still inconsistent. We conducted a meta and meta-regression analysis in this paper to estimate the pooled prevalence. We searched the electronic databases of PubMed, ScienceDirect, EMBASE and EBSCO up to June 2016 for related articles. STATA 12.0 statistics software was used to calculate the available data from each research. The prevalence of RBD in PD patients in each study was combined to a pooled prevalence with a 95 % confidence interval (CI). Subgroup analysis and meta-regression analysis were performed to search for the causes of the heterogeneity. A total of 28 studies with 6869 PD cases were deemed eligible and included in our meta-analysis based on the inclusion and exclusion criteria. The pooled prevalence of RBD in PD was 42.3 % (95 % CI 37.4-47.1 %). In subgroup analysis and meta-regression analysis, we found that the important causes of heterogeneity were the diagnosis criteria of RBD and age of PD patients (P = 0.016, P = 0.019, respectively). The results indicate that nearly half of the PD patients are suffering from RBD. Older age and longer duration are risk factors for RBD in PD. We can use the minimal diagnosis criteria for RBD according to the International Classification of Sleep Disorders to diagnose RBD patients in our daily work if polysomnography is not necessary.

  5. Ventricular orexin-A (hypocretin-1 levels correlate with rapid-eye-movement sleep without atonia in Parkinson's disease

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    Bridoux A

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Agathe Bridoux,1,2 Stephane Moutereau,3 Ala Covali-Noroc,1 Laurent Margarit,1 Stephane Palfi,4 Jean-Paul Nguyen,5 Jean-Pascal Lefaucheur,1,2 Pierre Césaro,6 Marie-Pia d'Ortho,7 Xavier Drouot1,21Service de Physiologie, Groupe Henri Mondor, 2Faculté de Médecine, Université Paris Est Créteil, 3Service de Biochimie, Groupe Henri Mondor, 4UF Neurochirurgie Fonctionnelle, Groupe Henri Mondor, Créteil, France; 5Service de Neurochirurgie, Hôpital Nord Laënnec, Nantes, France; 6Service de Neurologie, Groupe Henri Mondor, Créteil, France; 7Service de Physiologie, Groupe Bichat – Claude Bernard, Paris, FranceObjective: Patients with Parkinson's disease frequently complain of sleep disturbances and loss of muscle atonia during rapid-eye-movement (REM sleep is not rare. The orexin-A (hypocretin-1 hypothalamic system plays a central role in controlling REM sleep. Loss of orexin neurons results in narcolepsy-cataplexy, a condition characterized by diurnal sleepiness and REM sleep without atonia. Alterations in the orexin-A system have been also documented in Parkinson's disease, but whether these alterations have clinical consequences remains unknown.Methods: Here, we measured orexin-A levels in ventricular cerebrospinal fluid from eight patients with Parkinson's disease (four males and four females who underwent ventriculography during deep brain-stimulation surgery and performed full-night polysomnography before surgery.Results: Our results showed a positive correlation between orexin-A levels and REM sleep without muscle atonia.Conclusion: Our results suggest that high levels of orexin-A in Parkinson's disease may be associated with loss of REM muscle atonia.Keywords: Parkinson, orexin-A, ventricular CSF, REM atonia

  6. Prognostic and symptomatic aspects of rapid eye movement sleep in a mouse model of posttraumatic stress disorder

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    Stephanie A. Polta

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Not every individual develops Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD after the exposure to a potentially traumatic event. Therefore, the identification of pre-existing risk factors and early diagnostic biomarkers is of high medical relevance. However, no objective biomarker has yet progressed into clinical practice. Sleep disturbances represent commonly reported complaints in PTSD patients. In particular, changes in rapid eye movement sleep (REMS properties are frequently observed in PTSD patients. Here, we examined in a mouse model of PTSD whether (1 mice developed REMS alterations after trauma and (2 whether REMS architecture before and/or shortly after trauma predicted the development of PTSD-like symptoms. We monitored sleep-wake behavior via combined EEG/EMG recordings immediately before (24 h pre, immediately after (0-48 h post and two months after exposure to an electric foot shock in male C57BL/6N mice (n=15. PTSD-like symptoms, including hyperarousal, contextual and generalized fear, were assessed one month post-trauma.Shocked mice showed early-onset and sustained elevation of REMS compared to non-shocked controls. In addition, REMS architecture before trauma was correlated with the intensity of acoustic startle responses, but not contextual fear, one month after trauma.Our data suggest REMS as prognostic (pre-trauma and symptomatic (post-trauma marker of PTSD-like symptoms in mice. Translated to the situation in humans, REMS may constitute a viable, objective and non-invasive biomarker in PTSD and other trauma-related psychiatric disorders, which could guide pharmacological interventions in humans at high risk.

  7. Study on microstructure of corpus striatum in patients with idiopathic rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder using magnetic resonance imaging

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    Ya-meng ZHANG

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the structure of corpus striatum and the integrity of white matter fiber in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD and idiopathic rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (iRBD.  Methods Twelve patients with iRBD, 12 patients with PD and 10 healthy subjects that were well matched in gender, age and education were enrolled in this study. Head MRI examination was performed to all subjects to observe the changes of corpus striatum structure (the gray matter volume and the integrity of white matter fiber [fractional anisotropy (FA] by combining voxel?based morphometry (VBM and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI.  Results Compared with healthy subjects, the gray matter volume of left caudate nucleus was significantly decreased (P < 0.005, and FA values of left caudate nucleus (P < 0.005, right caudate nucleus (P < 0.001 and right putamen (P < 0.05 were all significantly reduced in iRBD patients; FA value of right putamen was significantly decreased in PD patients (P < 0.05. Compared with PD patients, the gray matter volume of left caudate nucleus of iRBD patients was significantly reduced (P < 0.001, FA values of left caudate nucleus (P < 0.01 and right caudate nucleus (P < 0.005 of iRBD patients were significantly reduced.  Conclusions There is atrophy of gray matter volume and extensive white matter fiber impairment in corpus striatum of patients with iRBD, and the white matter fiber impairment was similar to PD, which provides an anatomical evidence for iRBD being presymptom of PD. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2017.05.008

  8. Cytomorphometric changes in the dorsal raphe neurons after rapid eye movement sleep deprivation are mediated by noradrenalin in rats

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    Biswas Sudipta

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives This study was carried out to investigate the effect of rapid eye movement sleep (REMS deprivation (REMSD on the cytomorphology of the dorsal raphe (DR neurons and to evaluate the possible role of REMSD-induced increased noradrenalin (NA in mediating such effects. Methods Rats were REMS deprived by the flowerpot method; free moving normal home cage rats, large platform and post REMS-deprived recovered rats were used as controls. Further, to evaluate if the effects were induced by NA, separate sets of experimental rats were treated (i.p. with α1-adrenoceptor antagonist, prazosin (PRZ. Histomorphometric analysis of DR neurons in stained brain sections were performed in experimental and control rats; neurons in inferior colliculus (IC served as anatomical control. Results The mean size of DR neurons was larger in REMSD group compared to controls, whereas, neurons in the recovered group of rats did not significantly differ than those in the control animals. Further, mean cell size in the post-REMSD PRZ-treated animals was comparable to those in the control groups. IC neurons were not affected by REMSD. Conclusions REMS loss has been reported to impair several physiological, behavioral and cellular processes. The mean size of the DR neurons was larger in the REMS deprived group of rats than those in the control groups; however, in the REMS deprived and prazosin treated rats the size was comparable to the normal rats. These results showed that REMSD induced increase in DR neuronal size was mediated by NA acting on α1-adrenoceptor. The findings suggest that the sizes of DR neurons are sensitive to REMSD, which if not compensated could lead to neurodegeneration and associated disorders including memory loss and Alzheimer's disease.

  9. Determination of rice canopy growth based on high resolution satellite images: a case study using RapidEye imagery in Korea

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    Mijeong Kim

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Processing to correct atmospheric effects and classify all constituent pixels in a remote sensing image is required before the image is used to monitor plant growth. The raw image contains artifacts due to atmospheric conditions at the time of acquisition. This study sought to distinguish the canopy growth of paddy rice using RapidEye (BlackBridge, Berlin, Germany satellite data and investigate practical image correction and classification methods. The RapidEye images were taken over experimental fields of paddy rice at Chonnam National University (CNU, Gwangju, and at TaeAn, Choongcheongnam-do, Korea. The CNU RapidEye images were used to evaluate the atmospheric correction methods. Atmospheric correction of the RapidEye images was performed using three different methods, QUick Atmospheric Correction (QUAC, Fast Line-of-sight Atmospheric Analysis of Spectral Hypercubes (FLAASH, and Atmospheric and Topographic Correction (ATCOR. To minimize errors in utilizing observed growth and yield estimation of paddy rice, the paddy fields were classified using a supervised classification method and normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI thresholds, using the NDVI time-series features of the paddy fields. The results of the atmospheric correction using ATCOR on the satellite images were favorable, which correspond to those from reference UAV images. Meanwhile, the classification method using the NDVI threshold accurately classified the same pixels from each of the time-series images. We have demonstrated that the image correction and classification methods investigated here should be applicable to high resolution satellite images used in monitoring other crop growth conditions.

  10. The Role of Non-Rapid Eye Movement Slow-Wave Activity in Prefrontal Metabolism across Young and Middle Age Adults

    OpenAIRE

    Wilckens, K.A.; Aizenstein, H J; Nofzinger, E.A.; James, J. A.; Hasler, B.P.; Rosario-Rivera, B.L.; Franzen, P; Germain, A.; Hall, M. H.; Kupfer, D.J.; Price, J C.; Siegle, G.J.; Buysse, D. J.

    2016-01-01

    Electroencephalographic slow-wave activity (0.5���4 Hz) during non rapid-eye-movement (NREM) sleep is a marker for cortical reorganization, particularly within the prefrontal cortex. Greater slow-wave activity during sleep may promote greater waking prefrontal metabolic rate, and in turn, executive function. However, this process may be affected by age. Here we examined whether greater NREM slow-wave activity was associated with higher prefrontal metabolism during wakefulness and whether this...

  11. Probable rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder, nocturnal disturbances and quality of life in patients with Parkinson’s disease: a case-controlled study using the rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder screening questionnaire

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    Suzuki Keisuke

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increasing evidence provides a clear association between rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorders (RBD and Parkinson’s disease (PD, but the clinical features that determine the co-morbidity of RBD and PD are not yet fully understood. Methods We evaluated the characteristics of nocturnal disturbances and other motor and non-motor features related to RBD in patients with PD and the impact of RBD on their quality of life. Probable RBD (pRBD was evaluated using the Japanese version of the RBD screening questionnaire (RBDSQ-J. Results A significantly higher frequency of pRBD was observed in PD patients than in the controls (RBDSQ-J ≥ 5 or ≥ 6: 29.0% vs. 8.6%; 17.2% vs. 2.2%, respectively. After excluding restless legs syndrome and snorers in the PD patients, the pRBD group (RBDSQ-J≥5 showed higher scores compared with the non-pRBD group on the Parkinson’s disease sleep scale-2 (PDSS-2 total and three-domain scores. Early morning dystonia was more frequent in the pRBD group. The Parkinson’s Disease Questionnaire (PDQ-39 domain scores for cognition and emotional well-being were higher in the patients with pRBD than in the patients without pRBD. There were no differences between these two groups with respect to the clinical subtype, disease severity or motor function. When using a cut-off of RBDSQ-J = 6, a similar trend was observed for the PDSS-2 and PDQ-39 scores. Patients with PD and pRBD had frequent sleep onset insomnia, distressing dreams and hallucinations. The stepwise linear regression analysis showed that the PDSS-2 domain “motor symptoms at night”, particularly the PDSS sub-item 6 “distressing dreams”, was the only predictor of RBDSQ-J in PD. Conclusion Our results indicate a significant impact of RBD co-morbidity on night-time disturbances and quality of life in PD, particularly on cognition and emotional well-being. RBDSQ may be a useful tool for not only screening RBD in PD patients

  12. A novel non-rapid-eye movement and rapid-eye-movement parasomnia with sleep breathing disorder associated with antibodies to IgLON5: a case series, characterisation of the antigen, and post-mortem study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabater, Lidia; Gaig, Carles; Gelpi, Ellen; Bataller, Luis; Lewerenz, Jan; Torres-Vega, Estefanía; Contreras, Angeles; Giometto, Bruno; Compta, Yaroslau; Embid, Cristina; Vilaseca, Isabel; Iranzo, Alex; Santamaría, Joan; Dalmau, Josep; Graus, Francesc

    2014-06-01

    Autoimmunity might be associated with or implicated in sleep and neurodegenerative disorders. We aimed to describe the features of a novel neurological syndrome associated with prominent sleep dysfunction and antibodies to a neuronal antigen. In this observational study, we used clinical and video polysomnography to identify a novel sleep disorder in three patients referred to the Sleep Unit of Hospital Clinic, University of Barcelona, Spain, for abnormal sleep behaviours and obstructive sleep apnoea. These patients had antibodies against a neuronal surface antigen, which were also present in five additional patients referred to our laboratory for antibody studies. These five patients had been assessed with polysomnography, which was done in our sleep unit in one patient and the recording reviewed in a second patient. Two patients underwent post-mortem brain examination. Immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry were used to characterise the antigen and develop an assay for antibody testing. Serum or CSF from 298 patients with neurodegenerative, sleep, or autoimmune disorders served as control samples. All eight patients (five women; median age at disease onset 59 years [range 52-76]) had abnormal sleep movements and behaviours and obstructive sleep apnoea, as confirmed by polysomnography. Six patients had chronic progression with a median duration from symptom onset to death or last visit of 5 years (range 2-12); in four the sleep disorder was the initial and most prominent feature, and in two it was preceded by gait instability followed by dysarthria, dysphagia, ataxia, or chorea. Two patients had a rapid progression with disequilibrium, dysarthria, dysphagia, and central hypoventilation, and died 2 months and 6 months, respectively, after symptom onset. In five of five patients, video polysomnography showed features of obstructive sleep apnoea, stridor, and abnormal sleep architecture (undifferentiated non-rapid-eye-movement [non-REM] sleep or poorly structured

  13. Vaginitis test - wet mount

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wet prep - vaginitis; Vaginosis - wet mount; Trichomoniasis - wet mount; Vaginal candida - wet mount ... a rash, painful intercourse, or odor after intercourse. Trichomoniasis , a sexually transmitted disease. Vaginal yeast infection .

  14. The Clinical Phenotype of Idiopathic Rapid Eye Movement Sleep Behavior Disorder at Presentation: A Study in 203 Consecutive Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Arcos, Ana; Iranzo, Alex; Serradell, Mónica; Gaig, Carles; Santamaria, Joan

    2016-01-01

    To describe the clinical phenotype of idiopathic rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (IRBD) at presentation in a sleep center. Clinical history review of 203 consecutive patients with IRBD identified between 1990 and 2014. IRBD was diagnosed by clinical history plus video-polysomnographic demonstration of REM sleep with increased electromyographic activity linked to abnormal behaviors. Patients were 80% men with median age at IRBD diagnosis of 68 y (range, 50-85 y). In addition to the already known clinical picture of IRBD, other important features were apparent: 44% of the patients were not aware of their dream-enactment behaviors and 70% reported good sleep quality. In most of these cases bed partners were essential to convince patients to seek medical help. In 11% IRBD was elicited only after specific questioning when patients consulted for other reasons. Seven percent did not recall unpleasant dreams. Leaving the bed occurred occasionally in 24% of subjects in whom dementia with Lewy bodies often developed eventually. For the correct diagnosis of IRBD, video-polysomnography had to be repeated in 16% because of insufficient REM sleep or electromyographic artifacts from coexistent apneas. Some subjects with comorbid obstructive sleep apnea reported partial improvement of RBD symptoms following continuous positive airway pressure therapy. Lack of therapy with clonazepam resulted in an increased risk of sleep related injuries. Synucleinopathy was frequently diagnosed, even in patients with mild severity or uncommon IRBD presentations (e.g., patients who reported sleeping well, onset triggered by a life event, nocturnal ambulation) indicating that the development of a neurodegenerative disease is independent of the clinical presentation of IRBD. We report the largest IRBD cohort observed in a single center to date and highlight frequent features that were not reported or not sufficiently emphasized in previous publications. Physicians should be aware of

  15. Distinct associations between energy balance and the sleep characteristics slow wave sleep and rapid eye movement sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutters, F; Gonnissen, H K; Hursel, R; Lemmens, S G; Martens, E A; Westerterp-Plantenga, M S

    2012-10-01

    Epidemiologically, an inverse relationship between body mass index (BMI) and sleep duration is observed. Intra-individual variance in the amount of slow wave sleep (SWS) or rapid eye movement (REM) sleep has been related to variance of metabolic and endocrine parameters, which are risk factors for the disturbance of energy balance (EB). To investigate inter-individual relationships between EB (EB= energy intake-energy expenditure∣, MJ/24 h), SWS or REM sleep, and relevant parameters in normal-weight men during two 48 h stays in the controlled environment of a respiration chamber. A total of 16 men (age 23±3.7 years, BMI 23.9±1.9 kg m(-2)) stayed in the respiration chamber twice for 48 h to assure EB. Electroencephalography was used to monitor sleep (2330-0730 hrs). Hunger and fullness were scored by visual analog scales; mood was determined by State Trait Anxiety Index-state and food reward by liking and wanting. Baseline blood and salivary samples were collected before breakfast. Subjects were fed in EB, except for the last dinner, when energy intake was ad libitum. The subjects slept on average 441.8±49 min per night, and showed high within-subject reliability for the amount of SWS and REM sleep. Linear regression analyses showed that EB was inversely related to the amount of SWS (r=-0.43, Phunger, reward, stress and orexigenic hormone concentrations were related to overeating, as well as to the amount of SWS and REM sleep, however, after inclusion of these parameters in a multiple regression, the amount of SWS and REM sleep did not add to the explained variance of EB, which suggests that due to their individual associations, these EB parameters are mediator variables. A positive EB due to overeating, was explained by a smaller amount of SWS and higher amount of REM sleep, mediated by hunger, fullness, State Trait Anxiety Index-state scores, glucose/insulin ratio, and ghrelin and cortisol concentrations.

  16. Characteristics of early- and late-onset rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder in China: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Junying; Zhang, Jihui; Du, Lina; Li, Zhe; Li, Yun; Lei, Fei; Wing, Yun-Kwok; Kushida, Clete A; Zhou, Dong; Tang, Xiangdong

    2014-06-01

    To investigate demography and clinic and polysomnographic characteristics in Chinese rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD) patients across onset ages. Ninety consecutive patients fulfilling the criteria for RBD were recruited for study in our sleep center. Patients were separated into early- and late-onset groups according to age when symptoms began (50 years, respectively). Ninety age- and gender-matched healthy subjects served as controls. All subjects were interviewed for their clinical history, completed an RBD questionnaire, and underwent an overnight video polysomnography assessment. Demographics, comorbidities, scores on the RBD questionnaire, sleep architecture, and EMG activity were compared between the patients and controls and between the early- and late-onset groups. Of all RBD patients, 63 were male, and mean age of RBD onset was 54.3±15.7 years. In 25 patients (28%), RBD was secondary and associated with neurodegenerative disease, narcolepsy or antidepressant use. Twenty-three patients (26%) had early-onset RBD and 67 (74%) were in the late-onset group. RBD patients had significantly more comorbidities, dreams and dream-enacting behaviors, and poorer sleep quality than did controls. The early-onset group had a high proportion of females (48%) and an increased proportion of cases associated with narcolepsy. The early-onset group also had fewer movements, lower EMG activity during REM sleep, and better sleep quality when compared to the late-onset group. EMG activity was positively correlated with age of onset. The mean follow-up time was 1.57±0.82 years, and four patients in the late-onset group were subsequently diagnosed with neurodegenerative diseases. Stratifying patients into early and late-onset RBD revealed different characteristics from those previously described as typical for RBD. EMG activity during REM sleep was positively correlated with age of onset. We suggest that it will be valuable to explore the relationship

  17. Rapid eye movement (REM sleep deprivation reduces rat frontal cortex acetylcholinesterase (EC 3.1.1.7 activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camarini R.

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Rapid eye movement (REM sleep deprivation induces several behavioral changes. Among these, a decrease in yawning behavior produced by low doses of cholinergic agonists is observed which indicates a change in brain cholinergic neurotransmission after REM sleep deprivation. Acetylcholinesterase (Achase controls acetylcholine (Ach availability in the synaptic cleft. Therefore, altered Achase activity may lead to a change in Ach availability at the receptor level which, in turn, may result in modification of cholinergic neurotransmission. To determine if REM sleep deprivation would change the activity of Achase, male Wistar rats, 3 months old, weighing 250-300 g, were deprived of REM sleep for 96 h by the flower-pot technique (N = 12. Two additional groups, a home-cage control (N = 6 and a large platform control (N = 6, were also used. Achase was measured in the frontal cortex using two different methods to obtain the enzyme activity. One method consisted of the obtention of total (900 g supernatant, membrane-bound (100,000 g pellet and soluble (100,000 g supernatant Achase, and the other method consisted of the obtention of a fraction (40,000 g pellet enriched in synaptic membrane-bound enzyme. In both preparations, REM sleep deprivation induced a significant decrease in rat frontal cortex Achase activity when compared to both home-cage and large platform controls. REM sleep deprivation induced a significant decrease of 16% in the membrane-bound Achase activity (nmol thiocholine formed min-1 mg protein-1 in the 100,000 g pellet enzyme preparation (home-cage group 152.1 ± 5.7, large platform group 152.7 ± 24.9 and REM sleep-deprived group 127.9 ± 13.8. There was no difference in the soluble enzyme activity. REM sleep deprivation also induced a significant decrease of 20% in the enriched synaptic membrane-bound Achase activity (home-cage group 126.4 ± 21.5, large platform group 127.8 ± 20.4, REM sleep-deprived group 102.8 ± 14.2. Our results

  18. Dissociating the contributions of slow-wave sleep and rapid eye movement sleep to emotional item and source memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groch, S; Zinke, K; Wilhelm, I; Born, J

    2015-07-01

    Sleep benefits the consolidation of emotional memories, and this influence is commonly attributed to the rapid eye movement (REM) stage of sleep. However, the contributions of sleep stages to memory for an emotional episode may differ for the event per se (i.e., item memory), and the context in which it occurred (source memory). Here, we examined the effects of slow wave sleep (SWS) and REM sleep on the consolidation of emotionally negative and neutral item (picture recognition) and source memory (recall of picture-location and picture-frame color association) in humans. In Study 1, the participants (n=18) learned 48 negative and 48 neutral pictures which were presented at specific locations and preceded by colored frames that had to be associated with the picture. In a within-subject design, learning was either followed by a 3-h early-night SWS-rich or by a late-night REM sleep-rich retention interval, then retrieval was tested. Only after REM-rich sleep, and not after SWS-rich sleep, was there a significant emotional enhancement, i.e., a significantly superior retention of emotional over neutral pictures. On the other hand, after SWS-rich sleep the retention of picture-frame color associations was better than after REM-rich sleep. However, this benefit was observed only for neutral pictures; and it was completely absent for the emotional pictures. To examine whether this absent benefit reflected a suppressive effect of emotionality on associations of minor task relevance, in Study 2 we manipulated the relevance of the picture-frame color association by combining it with information about monetary reward, following otherwise comparable procedures. Here, rewarded picture-frame color associations were equally well retained over SWS-rich early sleep no matter if the frames were associated with emotional or neutral pictures. Results are consistent with the view that REM sleep favors the emotional enhancement of item memory whereas SWS appears to contribute primarily

  19. A prospective, naturalistic follow-up study of treatment outcomes with clonazepam in rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shirley Xin; Lam, Siu Ping; Zhang, Jihui; Yu, Mandy Wai Man; Chan, Joey Wing Yin; Liu, Yaping; Lam, Venny Kwai Ho; Ho, Crover Kwok Wah; Zhou, Junying; Wing, Yun Kwok

    2016-05-01

    Rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (RBD) is characterized by prominent dream-enacting behaviors, often resulting in sleep-related injuries. This study aimed to prospectively examine the treatment response of people with RBD treated with clonazepam, by quantitatively delineating the characteristic changes in the clinical and polysomnographic features, and to explore the factors associated with this response. Patients diagnosed with idiopathic RBD (iRBD) were consecutively recruited and invited to complete clinical and polysomnographic (PSG) assessments and self-administered questionnaires (including the modified REM Sleep Behavior Questionnaire, RBDQ-3M) before and after the initiation of treatment with clonazepam. Thirty-nine iRBD patients (male: 74.4%, mean age at diagnosis: 68.3 ± 7.8 years) were recruited with a follow-up duration of 28.8 ± 13.3 months. Clonazepam was offered as the first-line treatment (starting dose: 0.43 ± 0.16 mg, range: 0.125-1.00; dose at follow-up: 0.98 ± 0.63 mg, range: 0.125-3). Treatment response, as defined by a complete elimination of sleep-related injuries and potentially injurious behaviors to self and/or to bed partner, at follow-up was reported in 66.7% of the overall study subjects. Frequency of disturbing dreams with violent and frightening content and vigorous behavioral RBD symptoms was significantly reduced, while residual nocturnal symptoms and an increase in REM-related EMG activities were observed at follow-up. Less optimal treatment outcomes were found to be associated with the presence of comorbid obstructive sleep apnea and earlier onset of RBD. Clonazepam differentially changes dream affect and content, as well as reduces vigorous verbal and motor behaviors. Residual RBD symptoms are common, despite treatment. Other more effective alternative or adjunctive interventions are needed for better clinical management of RBD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. A population-based cross-sectional study of barriers to uptake of eye care services in South India: the Rapid Assessment of Visual Impairment (RAVI) project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmamula, Srinivas; Khanna, Rohit C; Shekhar, Konegari; Rao, Gullapalli N

    2014-06-12

    To assess the barriers to uptake of eye care services among those with avoidable impairment in the population aged ≥40 years in the South Indian state of Andhra Pradesh. Cross-sectional study. Community setting. Of 7800 participants recruited from one urban and two rural locations using a two-stage cluster random sampling methodology, 7378 (95%) were examined. Eye examinations were conducted using a rapid assessment protocol. Visual impairment (VI) was defined as presenting visual acuity attitude and 'felt need' to improve vision, newer and much intensive awareness campaigns are needed to bring about an attitudinal/behavioural change among individuals to improve the uptake of services. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  1. Avoidance of a moving threat in the common chameleon (Chamaeleo chamaeleon): rapid tracking by body motion and eye use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lev-Ari, Tidhar; Lustig, Avichai; Ketter-Katz, Hadas; Baydach, Yossi; Katzir, Gadi

    2016-08-01

    A chameleon (Chamaeleo chamaeleon) on a perch responds to a nearby threat by moving to the side of the perch opposite the threat, while bilaterally compressing its abdomen, thus minimizing its exposure to the threat. If the threat moves, the chameleon pivots around the perch to maintain its hidden position. How precise is the body rotation and what are the patterns of eye movement during avoidance? Just-hatched chameleons, placed on a vertical perch, on the side roughly opposite to a visual threat, adjusted their position to precisely opposite the threat. If the threat were moved on a horizontal arc at angular velocities of up to 85°/s, the chameleons co-rotated smoothly so that (1) the angle of the sagittal plane of the head relative to the threat and (2) the direction of monocular gaze, were positively and significantly correlated with threat angular position. Eye movements were role-dependent: the eye toward which the threat moved maintained a stable gaze on it, while the contralateral eye scanned the surroundings. This is the first description, to our knowledge, of such a response in a non-flying terrestrial vertebrate, and it is discussed in terms of possible underlying control systems.

  2. Control of the strength of visual-motor transmission as the mechanism of rapid adaptation of priors for Bayesian inference in smooth pursuit eye movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darlington, Timothy R; Tokiyama, Stefanie; Lisberger, Stephen G

    2017-08-01

    Bayesian inference provides a cogent account of how the brain combines sensory information with "priors" based on past experience to guide many behaviors, including smooth pursuit eye movements. We now demonstrate very rapid adaptation of the pursuit system's priors for target direction and speed. We go on to leverage that adaptation to outline possible neural mechanisms that could cause pursuit to show features consistent with Bayesian inference. Adaptation of the prior causes changes in the eye speed and direction at the initiation of pursuit. The adaptation appears after a single trial and accumulates over repeated exposure to a given history of target speeds and directions. The influence of the priors depends on the reliability of visual motion signals: priors are more effective against the visual motion signals provided by low-contrast vs. high-contrast targets. Adaptation of the direction prior generalizes to eye speed and vice versa, suggesting that both priors could be controlled by a single neural mechanism. We conclude that the pursuit system can learn the statistics of visual motion rapidly and use those statistics to guide future behavior. Furthermore, a model that adjusts the gain of visual-motor transmission predicts the effects of recent experience on pursuit direction and speed, as well as the specifics of the generalization between the priors for speed and direction. We suggest that Bayesian inference in pursuit behavior is implemented by distinctly non-Bayesian internal mechanisms that use the smooth eye movement region of the frontal eye fields to control of the gain of visual-motor transmission.NEW & NOTEWORTHY Bayesian inference can account for the interaction between sensory data and past experience in many behaviors. Here, we show, using smooth pursuit eye movements, that the priors based on past experience can be adapted over a very short time frame. We also show that a single model based on direction-specific adaptation of the strength of

  3. Estimation and Validation of RapidEye-Based Time-Series of Leaf Area Index for Winter Wheat in the Rur Catchment (Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Ali

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Leaf Area Index (LAI is an important variable for numerous processes in various disciplines of bio- and geosciences. In situ measurements are the most accurate source of LAI among the LAI measuring methods, but the in situ measurements have the limitation of being labor intensive and site specific. For spatial-explicit applications (from regional to continental scales, satellite remote sensing is a promising source for obtaining LAI with different spatial resolutions. However, satellite-derived LAI measurements using empirical models require calibration and validation with the in situ measurements. In this study, we attempted to validate a direct LAI retrieval method from remotely sensed images (RapidEye with in situ LAI (LAIdestr. Remote sensing LAI (LAIrapideye were derived using different vegetation indices, namely SAVI (Soil Adjusted Vegetation Index and NDVI (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index. Additionally, applicability of the newly available red-edge band (RE was also analyzed through Normalized Difference Red-Edge index (NDRE and Soil Adjusted Red-Edge index (SARE. The LAIrapideye obtained from vegetation indices with red-edge band showed better correlation with LAIdestr (r = 0.88 and Root Mean Square Devation, RMSD = 1.01 & 0.92. This study also investigated the need to apply radiometric/atmospheric correction methods to the time-series of RapidEye Level 3A data prior to LAI estimation. Analysis of the the RapidEye Level 3A data set showed that application of the radiometric/atmospheric correction did not improve correlation of the estimated LAI with in situ LAI.

  4. A microstructural study of sleep instability in drug-naive patients with schizophrenia and healthy controls: sleep spindles, rapid eye movements, and muscle atonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guénolé, Fabian; Chevrier, Elyse; Stip, Emmanuel; Godbout, Roger

    2014-05-01

    This study aimed at characterizing the functional stability of sleep in schizophrenia by quantifying dissociated stages of sleep (DSS), and to explore their correlation with psychopathology. The sleep of 10 first-break, drug-naive young adults with schizophrenia and 10 controls was recorded. Four basic DSS patterns were scored: 1) the transitional EEG-mixed intermediate stage (EMIS); 2) Rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep without rapid eye movement (RSWR); 3) REM sleep without atonia (RSWA); and 4) non-REM sleep with rapid eye movements. An intermediate sleep (IS) score was calculated by summing EMIS and RSWR scores, and the durations of intra-REM sleep periods IS (IRSPIS) and IS scored "at the expense" of REM sleep (ISERS) were determined. Patients were administered the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS) at the time of recording. Proportions of each DSS variables over total sleep time and proportions of IRSPIS and ISERS over REM sleep duration were compared between patients and controls. Correlation coefficients between DSS variables and BPRS total scores were calculated. The proportion of total DSS did not differ between patients and controls. Among DSS subtypes, RSWA was significantly increased in patients while other comparisons showed no significant differences. Significant positive correlations were found between BPRS scores and proportions of DSS, IS, RSWR, IRSPIS and ISERS over total sleep and REM sleep durations. These results demonstrate the functional instability of REM sleep in first-break, drug naive young adults with schizophrenia and unveil a pattern reminiscent of REM sleep behavior disorder. The significant correlation suggests that schizophrenia and REM sleep share common neuronal control mechanisms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Cognitive performances and mild cognitive impairment in idiopathic rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder: results of a longitudinal follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzaghi, Michele; Zucchella, Chiara; Rustioni, Valter; Sinforiani, Elena; Manni, Raffaele

    2013-10-01

    To investigate the capacity of neuropsychological deficits in idiopathic rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (iRBD) to predict the development of dementia and/or parkinsonism. Prospective longitudinal follow-up study. Tertiary sleep center. Twenty patients with initial iRBD (19 males, mean age 66.1 ± 7.1) underwent a clinical and neuropsychological follow-up within a mean of 43 ± 19 months. Neuropsychological performances at baseline were compared with those of healthy controls matched for sex, age, and education. Discontinuation of clonazepam at least 7 days before the follow-up evaluation. At follow-up, the Wilcoxon test showed a significant worsening of scores on Raven Colored Matrices 47 (P = 0.01), Attentive matrices (P = 0.002), phonemic (P = 0.04) and sematic (P = 0.04) fluency. Thirteen patients (65%) showed cognitive deterioration involving multiple domains. Of these, four patients (20%) maintained a stable cognitive dysfunction and nine (45%) showed a progression of cognitive dysfunction: six (30%) in constructional abilities (P = 0.03), four (20%) in short-term memory (P = NS), three (15%) in executive functions and non-verbal logic (P = NS), one (5%) in verbal fluency (P = NS), and one (5%) in long-term memory (P = NS) (McNemar test). Seven patients (35%) retained a normal cognitive profile. Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) was diagnosed at baseline in seven patients (35%). At follow-up, three of these patients showed overt dementia that was accompanied by parkinsonism in all cases; one had worsened from non-amnesic single-domain to nonamnesic multiple-domain MCI, two were stable, and one patient no longer met the criteria for MCI. Four patients (20%) without MCI at baseline had MCI at follow-up. Patients who developed MCI/dementia had an older age at disease onset (65.8 ± 5.4 versus 56.8 ± 9.3; P = 0.01) compared with those who did not. Our findings corroborate evidence that visuospatial abilities constitute the area most affected in

  6. C-H oxidation and chelation of a dipyrromethane mediated rapid colorimetric naked-eye Cu(ii) chemosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajmohan, Rajamani; Ayaz Ahmed, Khan Behlol; Sangeetha, Sampathkumar; Anbazhagan, Veerappan; Vairaprakash, Pothiappan

    2017-09-08

    Copper(ii) ion mediated C-H oxidation of dipyrromethanes (DPMs) to the corresponding dipyrrins followed by complexation invoked the selective sensing of copper(ii) ions in aqueous solutions. On the addition of copper, the colour of the DPM solution instantaneously changes from yellow to pink with the detection limit of 0.104 μM measured by absorption spectroscopy, whereas visible colour changes could be observed by the naked eye for concentrations as low as 3 μM.

  7. Potential of RapidEye and WorldView-2 Satellite Data for Improving Rice Nitrogen Status Monitoring at Different Growth Stages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanyu Huang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available For in-season site-specific nitrogen (N management of rice to be successful, it is crucially important to diagnose rice N status efficiently across large areas within a short time frame. In recent studies, the FORMOSAT-2 satellite images with traditional blue (B, green (G, red (R, and near-infrared (NIR wavebands have been used to estimate rice N status due to its high spatial resolution, daily revisit capability, and relatively lower cost. This study aimed to evaluate the potential improvements of RapidEye and WorldView-2 data over FORMOSAT-2 for rice N status monitoring, as the former two sensors provide additional wavelengths besides the traditional four wavebands. Ten site-year N rate experiments were conducted in Jiansanjiang, Heilongjiang Province of Northeast China from 2008 to 2011. Plant samples and field hyperspectral data were collected at three growth stages: panicle initiation (PI, stem elongation (SE, and heading (HE. The canopy-scale hyperspectral data were upscaled to simulate the satellite bands. Vegetation index (VI analysis, stepwise multiple linear regression (SMLR, and partial least squares regression (PLSR were performed to derive plant N status indicators. The results indicated that the best-performed VIs calculated from the simulated RapidEye and WorldView-2 bands, especially those based on the red edge (RE bands, explained significantly more variability for above ground biomass (AGB, plant N uptake (PNU, and nitrogen nutrition index (NNI estimations than their FORMOSAT-2-based counterparts did, especially at the PI and SE stages. The SMLR and PLSR models based on the WorldView-2 bands generally had the best performance, followed by the ones based on the RapidEye bands. The SMLR results revealed that both the NIR and RE bands were important for N status estimation. In particular, the NIR1 band (760–900 nm from RapidEye or 770–895 nm from WorldView-2 was most important for estimating all the N status indicators. The RE

  8. An efficient probe for rapid detection of cyanide in water at parts per billion levels and naked-eye detection of endogenous cyanide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Namita; Jha, Satadru; Bhattacharya, Santanu

    2014-03-01

    A new molecular probe based on an oxidized bis-indolyl skeleton has been developed for rapid and sensitive visual detection of cyanide ions in water and also for the detection of endogenously bound cyanide. The probe allows the "naked-eye" detection of cyanide ions in water with a visual color change from red to yellow (Δλmax =80 nm) with the immediate addition of the probe. It shows high selectivity towards the cyanide ion without any interference from other anions. The detection of cyanide by the probe is ratiometric, thus making the detection quantitative. A Michael-type addition reaction of the probe with the cyanide ion takes place during this chemodosimetric process. In water, the detection limit was found to be at the parts per million level, which improved drastically when a neutral micellar medium was employed, and it showed a parts-per-billion-level detection, which is even 25-fold lower than the permitted limits of cyanide in water. The probe could also efficiently detect the endogenously bound cyanide in cassava (a staple food) with a clear visual color change without requiring any sample pretreatment and/or any special reaction conditions such as pH or temperature. Thus the probe could serve as a practical naked-eye probe for "in-field" experiments without requiring any sophisticated instruments. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. A rapid, naked-eye detection of hypochlorite and bisulfite using a robust and highly-photostable indicator dye Quinaldine Red in aqueous medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Tanoy; Chandra, Falguni; Koner, Apurba L.

    2018-02-01

    A ;naked-eye; detection of health hazardous bisulfite (HSO3-) and hypochlorite (ClO-) using an indicator dye (Quinaldine Red, QR) in a wide range of pH is demonstrated. The molecule contains a quinoline moiety linked to an N,N-dimethylaniline moiety with a conjugated double bond. Treatment of QR with HSO3- and ClO-, in aqueous solution at near-neutral pH, resulted in a colorless product with high selectivity and sensitivity. The detection limit was 47.8 μM and 0.2 μM for HSO3- and ClO- respectively. However, ClO- was 50 times more sensitive and with 2 times faster response compared to HSO3-. The detail characterization and related analysis demonstrate the potential of QR for a rapid, robust and highly efficient colorimetric sensor for the practical applications to detect hypochlorite in water samples.

  10. Aboveground biomass estimation using SAR-optical (Lidar, RapidEye) and field inventory datasets in Skukuza, Kruger National Park in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onyango Odipo, Victor; Hüttich, Christian; Luck, Wolfgang; Schmullius, Christiane

    2015-04-01

    African savanna covers approximately two-thirds of sub-saharan Africa, playing important roles as a carbon pool, habitat for mankind and wildlife, source of livelihood, an important tropical climate modifier, among other ecological roles. Sub-saharan Africa alone accounts for 25% of the tropical aboveground carbon stock (193 Gt C). Global and national level AGB estimates rely on extrapolations with regression models from few field inventories, leading in some cases, up to 100% uncertainty. Remote sensing has proven to provide reliable vegetation structural mapping, given the high spatial and temporal resolution allowing datasets to be availed in areas where ground based inventories are infeasible due to time and financial constraints. The availability of freely accessible optical remotely-sensed datasets has made this feat attainable. However, the heterogeneity of tropical savannas (co-existence of trees and grasses), coupled with erratic rainfall events and atmospheric clouds and aerosol in the tropics has made it difficult to extract biophysical properties of the savannas by solely using optical datasets. This has necessitated an assessment of synergies between active and passive remotely sensed datasets to benefit from the complementarities. In this study we assess the extent to which multi-level sub-centimeter Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) Lidar, high resolution RapidEye and microwave (ALOS PALSAR L-band and Sentinel-1 C-band) remotely sensed datasets can be used together with tree census datasets to estimate AGB within the complex southern Africa savanna ecosystem. A random forest (RF) regression model is produced which relates the Lidar canopy-height metrics (CHM) with both synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and high resolution RapidEye datasets. As a validation, we compare our results with both national and global level ABG estimates.

  11. Comparing the Dry Season In-Situ Leaf Area Index (LAI Derived from High-Resolution RapidEye Imagery with MODIS LAI in a Namibian Savanna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel J. Mayr

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The Leaf Area Index (LAI is one of the most frequently applied measures to characterize vegetation and its dynamics and functions with remote sensing. Satellite missions, such as NASA’s Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS operationally produce global datasets of LAI. Due to their role as an input to large-scale modeling activities, evaluation and verification of such datasets are of high importance. In this context, savannas appear to be underrepresented with regards to their heterogeneous appearance (e.g., tree/grass-ratio, seasonality. Here, we aim to examine the LAI in a heterogeneous savanna ecosystem located in Namibia’s Owamboland during the dry season. Ground measurements of LAI are used to derive a high-resolution LAI model with RapidEye satellite data. This model is related to the corresponding MODIS LAI/FPAR (Fraction of Absorbed Photosynthetically Active Radiation scene (MOD15A2 in order to evaluate its performance at the intended annual minimum during the dry season. Based on a field survey we first assessed vegetation patterns from species composition and elevation for 109 sites. Secondly, we measured in situ LAI to quantitatively estimate the available vegetation (mean = 0.28. Green LAI samples were then empirically modeled (LAImodel with high resolution RapidEye imagery derived Difference Vegetation Index (DVI using a linear regression (R2 = 0.71. As indicated by several measures of model performance, the comparison with MOD15A2 revealed moderate consistency mostly due to overestimation by the aggregated LAImodel. Model constraints aside, this study may point to important issues for MOD15A2 in savannas concerning the underlying MODIS Land Cover product (MCD12Q1 and a potential adjustment by means of the MODIS Burned Area product (MCD45A1.

  12. The Benefit of Directed Forgetting Persists After a Daytime Nap: The Role of Spindles and Rapid Eye Movement Sleep in the Consolidation of Relevant Memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaskovich, Borbála; Szollosi, Ágnes; Gombos, Ferenc; Racsmány, Mihály; Simor, Péter

    2017-03-01

    We aimed to investigate the effect of directed forgetting instruction on memory retention after a 2-hour delay involving a daytime nap or an equivalent amount of time spent awake. We examined the associations between sleep-specific oscillations and the retention of relevant and irrelevant study materials. We applied a list-method directed forgetting paradigm manipulating the perceived relevance of previously encoded lists of words. Participants were randomly assigned to either a nap or an awake group, and to a remember or a forget subgroup. The remember and the forget subgroups were both instructed to study two consecutive lists of words, although, the forget subgroup was manipulated to forget the first list and memorize only the second one. Participants were 112 healthy individuals (44 men; Mage = 21.4 years, SD = 2.4). A significant directed forgetting effect emerged after a 2-hour delay both in the awake and sleep conditions; however, the effect was more pronounced within the sleep group. The benefit of directed forgetting, that is, relatively enhanced recall of relevant words in the forget group, was evidenced only in those participants that reached rapid eye movement (REM) phase. Non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sigma power was correlated with memory performance for the relevant (second) list, and sleep spindle amplitude was associated with the retention of both lists. These associations, however, were detected only within the forget subgroup. REM duration correlated with recall performance for the relevant (second) list within the forget subgroup, and with recall performance for the first list within the remember subgroup. A directed forgetting effect persists after a 2-hour delay spent awake or asleep. Spindle-related activity and subsequent REM sleep might selectively facilitate the processing of memories that are considered to be relevant for the future.

  13. Integration of TerraSAR-X, RapidEye and airborne lidar for remote sensing of intertidal bedforms on the upper flats of Norderney (German Wadden Sea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adolph, Winny; Jung, Richard; Schmidt, Alena; Ehlers, Manfred; Heipke, Christian; Bartholomä, Alexander; Farke, Hubert

    2017-04-01

    The Wadden Sea is a large coastal transition area adjoining the southern North Sea uniting ecological key functions with an important role in coastal protection. The region is strictly protected by EU directives and national law and is a UNESCO World Heritage Site, requiring frequent quality assessments and regular monitoring. In 2014 an intertidal bedform area characterised by alternating crests and water-covered troughs on the tidal flats of the island of Norderney (German Wadden Sea sector) was chosen to test different remote sensing methods for habitat mapping: airborne lidar, satellite-based radar (TerraSAR-X) and electro-optical sensors (RapidEye). The results revealed that, although sensitive to different surface qualities, all sensors were able to image the bedforms. A digital terrain model generated from the lidar data shows crests and slopes of the bedforms with high geometric accuracy in the centimetre range, but high costs limit the operation area. TerraSAR-X data enabled identifying the positions of the bedforms reflecting the residual water in the troughs also with a high resolution of up to 1.1 m, but with larger footprints and much higher temporal availability. RapidEye data are sensitive to differences in sediment moisture employed to identify crest areas, slopes and troughs, with high spatial coverage but the lowest resolution (6.5 m). Monitoring concepts may differ in their remote sensing requirements regarding areal coverage, spatial and temporal resolution, sensitivity and geometric accuracy. Also financial budgets limit the selection of sensors. Thus, combining differing assets into an integrated concept of remote sensing contributes to solving these issues.

  14. A compact fiber optic eye diagnostic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Rafat R.; Suh, Kwang I.; Dubin, Stephen; Della Vecchia, Michael A.

    1996-03-01

    A new fiber optic probe developed for determining transport properties of sub-micron particles in fluids experiments in a microgravity environment has been applied to study different parts of an eye. The probe positioned in front of an eye, delivers a low power (˜few μW) light from a laser diode into the eye and guides the light which is back scattered by different components (aqueous humor, lens, and vitreous humor) of the eye through a receiving optical fiber to a photo detector. The probe provides rapid determination of macromolecular diffusivities and their respective size distributions in the eye lens and the gel-like material in the vitreous humor. In a clinical setting, the probe can be mounted on a standard slit-lamp apparatus simply using a Hruby lens holder. The capability of detecting cataracts, both nuclear and cortical, in their early stages of formation, in a non invasive and quantitative fashion, has the potential in patient monitoring and in developing and testing new drugs or diet therapies to ``dissolve'' or slow down the cataract formation before the surgery becomes necessary. The ability to detect biochemical and macromolecular changes in the vitreous structure can be very useful in identifying certain diseases of the posterior chamber and their complications, e.g., posterior vitreous detachment and diabetic retinopathy.

  15. A rapid method of ferromanganese nodule mounting

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mukhopadhyay, S.; Banerjee, R.

    stirred vigorously. The mixture is then transferred to the cast (s) within which the air-dried ferromanganese nodules and crusts are kept. Plastic container,. even simple hard paper box may be used as casts depending upon the size and shape of the sample...

  16. Eye Allergies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stories Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Eye Allergies Sections What Are Eye Allergies? Eye Allergy ... Eye allergy diagnosis Eye allergy treatment What Are Eye Allergies? Leer en Español: ¿Qué Son las Alergias ...

  17. Eye redness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloodshot eyes; Red eyes; Scleral injection; Conjunctival injection ... There are many causes of a red eye or eyes. Some are medical emergencies. Others are a cause for concern, but not an emergency. Many are nothing to worry about. Eye ...

  18. The King-Devick (K-D) test of rapid eye movements: a bedside correlate of disability and quality of life in MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moster, Stephen; Wilson, James A; Galetta, Steven L; Balcer, Laura J

    2014-08-15

    We investigated the King-Devick (K-D) test of rapid number naming as a visual performance measure in a cohort of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). In this cross-sectional study, 81 patients with MS and 20 disease-free controls from an ongoing study of visual outcomes underwent K-D testing. A test of rapid number naming, K-D requires saccadic eye movements as well as intact vision, attention and concentration. To perform the K-D test, participants are asked to read numbers aloud as quickly as possible from three test cards; the sum of the three test card times in seconds constitutes the summary score. High-contrast visual acuity (VA), low-contrast letter acuity (1.25% and 2.5% levels), retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness by optical coherence tomography (OCT), MS Functional Composite (MSFC) and vision-specific quality of life (QOL) measures (25-Item NEI Visual Functioning Questionnaire [NEI-VFQ-25] and 10-Item Neuro-Ophthalmic Supplement) were also assessed. K-D time scores in the MS cohort (total time to read the three test cards) were significantly higher (worse) compared to those for disease-free controls (P=0.003, linear regression, accounting for age). Within the MS cohort, higher K-D scores were associated with worse scores for the NEI-VFQ-25 composite (Pdisability status as disabled (receiving disability pension) did worse on K-D testing compared to those working full-time (P=0.001, accounting for age). The K-D test, a impairment, and reduced vision-specific QOL in patients with MS. Scores reflect work disability as well as structural changes as measured by OCT imaging. History of ON and abnormal binocular acuities were associated with worse K-D scores, suggesting that abnormalities detected by K-D may go along with afferent dysfunction in MS patients. A brief test that requires saccadic eye movements, K-D should be considered for future MS trials as a rapid visual performance measure. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Correlation between regular mouthing movements and heart rate patterns during non-rapid eye movement periods in normal human fetuses between 32 and 40 weeks of gestation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otera, Yuka; Morokuma, Seiichi; Fukushima, Kotaro; Wake, Norio; Kato, Kiyoko

    2013-06-01

    Regular mouthing movements (RMMs) are observed during fetal non-rapid eye movement (NREM) periods. To determine the correlation between RMM and fetal heart rate (FHR) patterns during NREM periods. Fetal eye and mouth movements and FHR patterns were observed and recorded. 50 normal singleton pregnancies between 32 and 40 weeks of gestation. Changes in the power spectrum ratio of 3-minute blocks of RMM clusters, FHR with RMM clusters (HR+), and FHR without RMM clusters (HR-) were calculated at a frequency band of 0.02 Hz among 3 gestational age groups: group 1, 32-34 weeks gestation; group 2, 35-37 weeks gestation; group 3, 38-40 weeks gestation. We calculated the percentage of cases showing dominant peak ratios of RMM and HR+ in the same frequency band, the maximum correlation coefficient, and its lag time. In group 3, the dominant peaks of both RM and HR+ were present at the same frequency band, 0.06-0.08 Hz; this was not seen in the other groups' relative power spectral patterns. The percentage of cases showing dominant peaks of RMM and HR+ in the same frequency band increased with advancing gestational age. The maximum correlation coefficient in groups 1 (0.28 ± 0.11) and 3 (0.45 ± 0.14) differed significantly (p<0.05). The correlation between RMM and FHR patterns became stronger, and their rhythmicity was similar, from 38 to 40 gestational weeks, suggesting that a common center starts to govern both patterns at approximately 38 weeks gestation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Eye cosmetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draelos, Z K

    1991-01-01

    Eye cosmetics are useful to highlight and emphasize the eyes. Currently available eye cosmetics include eye shadows, eye shadow setting creams, under-eye concealers, eye-liners, mascaras, artificial eyelashes, and eyebrow pencils. Special care must be taken when patients with sensitive skin or contact lens wearers select eye cosmetics. Eye cosmetics may also be the cause of either irritant or allergic contact dermatitis, which are two causes of the upper-eyelid dermatitis syndrome.

  1. Uncertainty of soil reflectance retrieval from SPOT and RapidEye multispectral satellite images using a per-pixel bootstrapped empirical line atmospheric correction over an agricultural region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaudour, E.; Gilliot, J. M.; Bel, L.; Bréchet, L.; Hamiache, J.; Hadjar, D.; Lemonnier, Y.

    2014-02-01

    Many authors have reported the use of empirical line regression between field target sites and image pixels in order to perform atmospheric correction of multispectral images. However few studies were dedicated to the specific reflectance retrieval for cultivated bare soils from multispectral satellite images, from a large number (≥15) of bare field targets spread over a region. Even fewer were oriented towards additional field targets for validation and uncertainty assessment of reflectance error. This study aimed at assessing ELM validation accuracy and uncertainty for predicting topsoil reflectance over a wide area (221 km2) with contrasting soils and tillage practices using a set of six multispectral images at very high (supermode SPOT5, 2.5 m), high (RapidEye, 6.5 m) and medium (SPOT4, 20 m) spatial resolutions. For each image and each spectral band, linear regression (LR) models were constructed through a series of 1000 bootstrap datasets of training/validation samples generated amongst a total of about 30 field sites used as targets, the reflectance measurements of which were made between -6 days/+7 days around acquisition date. The achieved models had an average coefficient of variation of validation errors of ∼14%, which indicates that the composition of training field sites does influence performance results of ELM. However, according to median LR-models, our approach mostly resulted in accurate predictions with low standard errors of estimation around 1-2% reflectance, validation errors of 2-3% reflectance, low validation bias (March: in agricultural areas, images programmed during periods when most field tillage operations have resulted in smooth seedbed conditions (April in this study) are in favour of better performances of soil reflectance prediction. Nevertheless, directional effects appear to mainly and moderately affect the global performance of near-infrared and SWIR bands-models except for oblique viewing images (viewing angle > |20°|). The

  2. Quantitative assessment of isolated rapid eye movement (REM) sleep without atonia without clinical REM sleep behavior disorder: clinical and research implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasai-Sakuma, Taeko; Frauscher, Birgit; Mitterling, Thomas; Ehrmann, Laura; Gabelia, David; Brandauer, Elisabeth; Inoue, Yuichi; Poewe, Werner; Högl, Birgit

    2014-09-01

    Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep without atonia (RWA) is observed in some patients without a clinical history of REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD). It remains unknown whether these patients meet the refined quantitative electromyographic (EMG) criteria supporting a clinical RBD diagnosis. We quantitatively evaluated EMG activity and investigated its overnight distribution in patients with isolated qualitative RWA. Fifty participants with an incidental polysomnographic finding of RWA (isolated qualitative RWA) were included. Tonic, phasic, and 'any' EMG activity during REM sleep on PSG were quantified retrospectively. Referring to the quantitative cut-off values for a polysomnographic diagnosis of RBD, 7/50 (14%) and 6/50 (12%) of the patients showed phasic and 'any' EMG activity in the mentalis muscle above the respective cut-off values. No patient was above the cut-off value for tonic EMG activity or phasic EMG activity in the anterior tibialis muscles. Patients with RWA above the cut-off value showed higher amounts of RWA during later REM sleep periods. This is the first study showing that some subjects with incidental RWA meet the refined quantitative EMG criteria for a diagnosis of RBD. Future longitudinal studies must investigate whether this subgroup with isolated qualitative RWA is at an increased risk of developing fully expressed RBD and/or neurodegenerative disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Essential roles of GABA transporter-1 in controlling rapid eye movement sleep and in increased slow wave activity after sleep deprivation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin-Hong Xu

    Full Text Available GABA is the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the mammalian central nervous system that has been strongly implicated in the regulation of sleep. GABA transporter subtype 1 (GAT1 constructs high affinity reuptake sites for GABA and regulates GABAergic transmission in the brain. However, the role of GAT1 in sleep-wake regulation remains elusive. In the current study, we characterized the spontaneous sleep-wake cycle and responses to sleep deprivation in GAT1 knock-out (KO mice. GAT1 KO mice exhibited dominant theta-activity and a remarkable reduction of EEG power in low frequencies across all vigilance stages. Under baseline conditions, spontaneous rapid eye movement (REM sleep of KO mice was elevated both during the light and dark periods, and non-REM (NREM sleep was reduced during the light period only. KO mice also showed more state transitions from NREM to REM sleep and from REM sleep to wakefulness, as well as more number of REM and NREM sleep bouts than WT mice. During the dark period, KO mice exhibited more REM sleep bouts only. Six hours of sleep deprivation induced rebound increases in NREM and REM sleep in both genotypes. However, slow wave activity, the intensity component of NREM sleep was briefly elevated in WT mice but remained completely unchanged in KO mice, compared with their respective baselines. These results indicate that GAT1 plays a critical role in the regulation of REM sleep and homeostasis of NREM sleep.

  4. Effects of oral temazepam on slow waves during non-rapid eye movement sleep in healthy young adults: A high-density EEG investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plante, D T; Goldstein, M R; Cook, J D; Smith, R; Riedner, B A; Rumble, M E; Jelenchick, L; Roth, A; Tononi, G; Benca, R M; Peterson, M J

    2016-03-01

    Slow waves are characteristic waveforms that occur during non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep that play an integral role in sleep quality and brain plasticity. Benzodiazepines are commonly used medications that alter slow waves, however, their effects may depend on the time of night and measure used to characterize slow waves. Prior investigations have utilized minimal scalp derivations to evaluate the effects of benzodiazepines on slow waves, and thus the topography of changes to slow waves induced by benzodiazepines has yet to be fully elucidated. This study used high-density electroencephalography (hdEEG) to evaluate the effects of oral temazepam on slow wave activity, incidence, and morphology during NREM sleep in 18 healthy adults relative to placebo. Temazepam was associated with significant decreases in slow wave activity and incidence, which were most prominent in the latter portions of the sleep period. However, temazepam was also associated with a decrease in the magnitude of high-amplitude slow waves and their slopes in the first NREM sleep episode, which was most prominent in frontal derivations. These findings suggest that benzodiazepines produce changes in slow waves throughout the night that vary depending on cortical topography and measures used to characterize slow waves. Further research that explores the relationships between benzodiazepine-induced changes to slow waves and the functional effects of these waveforms is indicated. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. β oscillation during slow wave sleep and rapid eye movement sleep in the electroencephalogram of a transgenic mouse model of Huntington's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yannick Jeantet

    Full Text Available STUDY OBJECTIVES: To search for early abnormalities in electroencephalogram (EEG during sleep which may precede motor symptoms in a transgenic mouse model of hereditary neurodegenerative Huntington's disease (HD. DESIGN: In the R6/1 transgenic mouse model of HD, rhythmic brain activity in EEG recordings was monitored longitudinally and across vigilance states through the onset and progression of disease. MEASUREMENTS AND RESULTS: Mice with chronic electrode implants were recorded monthly over wake-sleep cycles (4 hours, beginning at 9-11 weeks (presymptomatic period through 6-7 months (symptomatic period. Recording data revealed a unique β rhythm (20-35 Hz, present only in R6/1 transgenic mice, which evolves in close parallel with the disease. In addition, there was an unusual relationship between this β oscillation and vigilance states: while nearly absent during the active waking state, the β oscillation appeared with drowsiness and during slow wave sleep (SWS and, interestingly, strengthened rather than dissipating when the brain returned to an activated state during rapid eye movement (REM sleep. CONCLUSIONS: In addition to providing a new in vivo biomarker and insight into Huntington's disease pathophysiology, this serendipitous observation opens a window onto the rarely explored neurophysiology of the cortico-basal ganglia circuit during SWS and REM sleep.

  6. β oscillation during slow wave sleep and rapid eye movement sleep in the electroencephalogram of a transgenic mouse model of Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeantet, Yannick; Cayzac, Sebastien; Cho, Yoon H

    2013-01-01

    To search for early abnormalities in electroencephalogram (EEG) during sleep which may precede motor symptoms in a transgenic mouse model of hereditary neurodegenerative Huntington's disease (HD). In the R6/1 transgenic mouse model of HD, rhythmic brain activity in EEG recordings was monitored longitudinally and across vigilance states through the onset and progression of disease. Mice with chronic electrode implants were recorded monthly over wake-sleep cycles (4 hours), beginning at 9-11 weeks (presymptomatic period) through 6-7 months (symptomatic period). Recording data revealed a unique β rhythm (20-35 Hz), present only in R6/1 transgenic mice, which evolves in close parallel with the disease. In addition, there was an unusual relationship between this β oscillation and vigilance states: while nearly absent during the active waking state, the β oscillation appeared with drowsiness and during slow wave sleep (SWS) and, interestingly, strengthened rather than dissipating when the brain returned to an activated state during rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. In addition to providing a new in vivo biomarker and insight into Huntington's disease pathophysiology, this serendipitous observation opens a window onto the rarely explored neurophysiology of the cortico-basal ganglia circuit during SWS and REM sleep.

  7. Expression of prion protein in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with Parkinson's disease complicated with rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, W J; Shang, X L; Peng, J; Zhou, M H; Sun, W J

    2017-01-23

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is one of the most common neurodegenerative diseases and mainly manifests with decreasing numbers of dopaminergic neurons. Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD) has an incidence of 15-47% in all PD patients. Prion proteins (PrPs), which are expressed in both neurons and glial cells of the brain, are believed to be correlated with abnormal neurological functions, although their role in PD-related sleeping disorders remains unclear. We therefore investigated the expressional profiles of PrP in PD patients with RBD. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and western blotting were used to detect the mRNA and protein levels of PrP, respectively, in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of PD patients with RBD, PD patients without sleeping disorder, and healthy people (N = 23 each). We investigated the correlation between the CSF PrP level and sleeping behavior in PD patients. Patients with PD complicated with RBD had significantly elevated CSF PrP expression levels (both mRNA and protein) compared with either PD patients without sleeping disorder or healthy individuals (P < 0.05 in both cases). There is elevated expression of PrP in the CSF of PD patients with RBD. This may benefit the diagnosis of PD-related RBD.

  8. Evaluating the influence of the Red Edge band from RapidEye sensor in quantifying leaf area index for hydrological applications specifically focussing on plant canopy interception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dube, Timothy; Mutanga, Onisimo; Sibanda, Mbulisi; Shoko, Cletah; Chemura, Abel

    2017-08-01

    Reliable and accurate quantification of plant Leaf Area Index (LAI) is critical in understanding its role in reducing runoff. The main aim of the present study was to evaluate the ability of the Red Edge (RE) band derived from RapidEye in estimating LAI for applications in quantifying canopy interception at landscape scale. To achieve this objective, the study also compares the predictive power of two machine learning algorithms (Random Forest-RF and Stochastic Gradient Boosting-SGB) in estimating LAI. Comparatively, the results of the study have demonstrated that the inclusion of spectral information derived from the Red Edge band yields high accurate LAI estimates, when compared to the use of traditional traditional Red, Green, Blue and Near Infra-Red (traditional RGBNIR) spectral information. The results indicate that the use of the four traditional RGBNIR bands yielded comparatively lower R2 values and high Root Mean Squares, Mean Absolute Error (Pinus taeda: R2 of 0.60; the lowest RMSE (0.35 m2/m2) and MAE of 28); whereas the use of integration of traditional RGBNIR + RE in more accurate LAI estimates (Pinus taeda: R2 = 0.65; RMSE = 0.30 m2/m2) and the lowest MAE of 0.23). These findings therefore underscores the importance of new generation multispectral sensors with strategically-position bands and machine learning algorithms in estimating LAI for quantifying canopy interception, especially in resource-poor areas.

  9. [Effect of rapid eye movement sleep deprivation on anxiety behavior and hippocampus NO level: different responses of adolescent and adult C57BL/6J mice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xin-Yan; Chen, Tian-Bin; Hao, Yan-Li; Zhang, Bin

    2015-10-01

    To explore the difference between adolescent and adult C57BL/6J mice in response to rapid eye movement sleep (REMS) deprivation in terms of anxiety behavior and hippocampal NO level. Both adolescent and adult C57BL/6J mice were divided into normal control (NC) group, wide platform (WP) group, and 24-hour REMS deprivation group, each group consisting of 15 mice. REMS deprivation models were established using a small platform in water tank, and the elevated plus maze test was used to examine anxiety behavior of the mice. After behavioral tests, the mice were sacrificed to examine hippocampal NO levels using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and hippocampal nNOS protein expression was detected with Western blotting. The adolescent C57BL/6J mice showed no obvious differences in anxiety behaviors between the 3 groups, but NO level and nNOS expression in the hippocampus was significantly higher in REMSD group than in NC and WP groups (Pdeprivation produces different effects on anxiety-related behaviors between adolescent and adult mice possibly in relation to their different responses in terms of NO levels and nNOS expression in the hippocampus.

  10. State-specific effects of sevoflurane anesthesia on sleep homeostasis: selective recovery of slow wave but not rapid eye movement sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Dinesh; Lipinski, William J; Walker, Amanda J; Turner, Ashley M; Mashour, George A

    2011-02-01

    Prolonged propofol administration does not result in signs of sleep deprivation, and propofol anesthesia appears to satisfy the homeostatic need for both rapid eye movement (REM) and non-REM (NREM) sleep. In the current study, the effects of sevoflurane on recovery from total sleep deprivation were investigated. Ten male rats were instrumented for electrophysiologic recordings under three conditions: (1) 36-h ad libitum sleep; (2) 12-h sleep deprivation followed by 24-h ad libitum sleep; and (3) 12-h sleep deprivation, followed by 6-h sevoflurane exposure, followed by 18-h ad libitum sleep. The percentage of waking, NREM sleep, and REM sleep, as well as NREM sleep δ power, were calculated and compared for all three conditions. Total sleep deprivation resulted in significantly increased NREM and REM sleep for 12-h postdeprivation. Sevoflurane exposure after deprivation eliminated the homeostatic increase in NREM sleep and produced a significant decrease in the NREM sleep δ power during the postanesthetic period, indicating a complete recovery from the effects of deprivation. However, sevoflurane did not affect the time course of REM sleep recovery, which required 12 h after deprivation and anesthetic exposure. Unlike propofol, sevoflurane anesthesia has differential effects on NREM and REM sleep homeostasis. These data confirm the previous hypothesis that inhalational agents do not satisfy the homeostatic need for REM sleep, and that the relationship between sleep and anesthesia is likely to be agent and state specific.

  11. Can observers link dream content to behaviours in rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder? A cross-sectional experimental pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valli, Katja; Frauscher, Birgit; Gschliesser, Viola; Wolf, Elisabeth; Falkenstetter, Tina; Schönwald, Suzana V; Ehrmann, Laura; Zangerl, Anja; Marti, Isabelle; Boesch, Sylvia M; Revonsuo, Antti; Poewe, Werner; Högl, Birgit

    2012-02-01

    Motor activity in rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behaviour disorder (RBD) has been linked to dream content. Systematic and controlled sleep laboratory studies directly assessing the relation between RBD behaviours and experienced dream content are, however, largely lacking. We aimed to investigate whether a link can be established between RBD behaviours and dream content when both are systematically sampled in a controlled setting. We investigated six patients with Parkinson syndrome and RBD who underwent 2-3 nights of video-polysomnographic recording during which they were awakened from REM sleep (10 min after the onset of the second and successive REM periods). Spontaneous free-worded dream reports and a structured dream questionnaire were obtained. Video recordings of motor manifestations were each combined with four dream reports, and seven judges had to match the video clip with the correctly reported dream content from a choice of four possibilities. Of the 35 REM sleep awakenings performed, a total of 17 (48.6%) motor-behavioural episodes with recalled dream content were obtained. The mean of correctly identified video-dream pairs was 39.5% (range 0-100%). Our data showed that reported dream content can be linked to motor behaviours above chance level. Matching accuracy was affected mainly by the clarity of dream reports and the specific nature of movements manifest in video recordings. © 2011 European Sleep Research Society.

  12. Decreased phasic EMG activity during rapid eye movement sleep in treatment-naïve Parkinson's disease: effects of treatment with levodopa and progression of illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Borreguero, Diego; Caminero, Ana B; De La Llave, Yolanda; Larrosa, Oscar; Barrio, Soledad; Granizo, Juan J; Pareja, Juan A

    2002-09-01

    Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD) is frequently associated with Parkinson's disease (PD) and may anticipate its diagnosis by several years. We assessed the presence of motor dyscontrol during REM sleep in treatment-naïve PD patients and investigated the putative effect of levodopa (L-dopa) treatment on motor activity. Overnight sleep studies were performed on 15 previously untreated PD patients and 14 controls at baseline, again after a 3- to 9-month treatment period with a low dose of L-dopa, and 2 to 5 days after treatment discontinuation (in 8 patients). No differences in sleep parameters were observed across groups or treatment conditions. None of the patients met criteria for RBD at baseline, whereas 5 patients were symptomatic at the time of the second sleep study. A quantitative analysis of electromyographic (EMG) activity during REM sleep showed a lower phasic twitching activity in untreated PD than in controls. However, an increase in both phasic twitching and tonic activity was found after treatment with L-dopa. Discontinuation of treatment resulted in a return to pretreatment values of phasic but not of tonic EMG activity. Thus, the increase in phasic activity seems to depend on the effects of L-dopa, whereas the increase in tonic EMG activity during REM sleep might be caused by other factors such as the progression of disease. Potential implications for the understanding of the relationship between RBD and PD are discussed. Copyright 2002 Movement Disorder Society

  13. Benefits of Red-Edge Spectral Band and Texture Features for the Object-based Classification using RapidEye sSatellite Image data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, H. O.; Yeom, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    Space-based remote sensing in agriculture is particularly relevant to issues such as global climate change, food security, and precision agriculture. Recent satellite missions have opened up new perspectives by offering high spatial resolution, various spectral properties, and fast revisit rates to the same regions. Here, we examine the utility of broadband red-edge spectral information in multispectral satellite image data for classifying paddy rice crops in South Korea. Additionally, we examine how object-based spectral features affect the classification of paddy rice growth stages. For the analysis, two seasons of RapidEye satellite image data were used. The results showed that the broadband red-edge information slightly improved the classification accuracy of the crop condition in heterogeneous paddy rice crop environments, particularly when single-season image data were used. This positive effect appeared to be offset by the multi-temporal image data. Additional texture information brought only a minor improvement or a slight decline, although it is well known to be advantageous for object-based classification in general. We conclude that broadband red-edge information derived from conventional multispectral satellite data has the potential to improve space-based crop monitoring. Because the positive or negative effects of texture features for object-based crop classification could barely be interpreted, the relationships between the textual properties and paddy rice crop parameters at the field scale should be further examined in depth.

  14. The role of non-rapid eye movement slow-wave activity in prefrontal metabolism across young and middle-aged adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilckens, Kristine A; Aizenstein, Howard J; Nofzinger, Eric A; James, Jeffrey A; Hasler, Brant P; Rosario-Rivera, Bedda L; Franzen, Peter L; Germain, Anne; Hall, Martica H; Kupfer, David J; Price, Julie C; Siegle, Greg J; Buysse, Daniel J

    2016-06-01

    Electroencephalographic slow-wave activity (0.5-4 Hz) during non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep is a marker for cortical reorganization, particularly within the prefrontal cortex. Greater slow wave activity during sleep may promote greater waking prefrontal metabolic rate and, in turn, executive function. However, this process may be affected by age. Here we examined whether greater NREM slow wave activity was associated with higher prefrontal metabolism during wakefulness and whether this relationship interacted with age. Fifty-two participants aged 25-61 years were enrolled into studies that included polysomnography and a (18) [F]-fluoro-deoxy-glucose positron emission tomography scan during wakefulness. Absolute and relative measures of NREM slow wave activity were assessed. Semiquantitative and relative measures of cerebral metabolism were collected to assess whole brain and regional metabolism, focusing on two regions of interest: the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and the orbitofrontal cortex. Greater relative slow wave activity was associated with greater dorsolateral prefrontal metabolism. Age and slow wave activity interacted significantly in predicting semiquantitative whole brain metabolism and outside regions of interest in the posterior cingulate, middle temporal gyrus and the medial frontal gyrus, such that greater slow-wave activity was associated with lower metabolism in the younger participants and greater metabolism in the older participants. These results suggest that slow-wave activity is associated with cerebral metabolism during wakefulness across the adult lifespan within regions important for executive function. © 2016 European Sleep Research Society.

  15. Promotion of non-rapid eye movement sleep and activation of reticular thalamic neurons by a novel MT2 melatonin receptor ligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa-Sanchez, Rafael; Comai, Stefano; Lacoste, Baptiste; Bambico, Francis Rodriguez; Dominguez-Lopez, Sergio; Spadoni, Gilberto; Rivara, Silvia; Bedini, Annalida; Angeloni, Debora; Fraschini, Franco; Mor, Marco; Tarzia, Giorgio; Descarries, Laurent; Gobbi, Gabriella

    2011-12-14

    Melatonin activates two brain G-protein coupled receptors, MT(1) and MT(2), whose differential roles in the sleep-wake cycle remain to be defined. The novel MT(2) receptor partial agonist, N-{2-[(3-methoxyphenyl) phenylamino] ethyl} acetamide (UCM765), is here shown to selectively promote non-rapid eye movement sleep (NREMS) in rats and mice. The enhancement of NREMS by UCM765 is nullified by the pharmacological blockade or genetic deletion of MT(2) receptors. MT(2), but not MT(1), knock-out mice show a decrease in NREMS compared to the wild strain. Immunohistochemical labeling reveals that MT(2) receptors are localized in sleep-related brain regions, and notably the reticular thalamic nucleus (Rt). Microinfusion of UCM765 in the Rt promotes NREMS, and its systemic administration induces an increase in firing and rhythmic burst activity of Rt neurons, which is blocked by the MT(2) antagonist 4-phenyl-2-propionamidotetralin. Since developing hypnotics that increase NREMS without altering sleep architecture remains a medical challenge, MT(2) receptors may represent a novel target for the treatment of sleep disorders.

  16. A rapid, naked-eye detection of hypochlorite and bisulfite using a robust and highly-photostable indicator dye Quinaldine Red in aqueous medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Tanoy; Chandra, Falguni; Koner, Apurba L

    2017-10-12

    A "naked-eye" detection of health hazardous bisulfite (HSO3(-)) and hypochlorite (ClO(-)) using an indicator dye (Quinaldine Red, QR) in a wide range of pH is demonstrated. The molecule contains a quinoline moiety linked to an N,N-dimethylaniline moiety with a conjugated double bond. Treatment of QR with HSO3(-) and ClO(-), in aqueous solution at near-neutral pH, resulted in a colorless product with high selectivity and sensitivity. The detection limit was 47.8μM and 0.2μM for HSO3(-) and ClO(-) respectively. However, ClO(-) was 50 times more sensitive and with 2 times faster response compared to HSO3(-). The detail characterization and related analysis demonstrate the potential of QR for a rapid, robust and highly efficient colorimetric sensor for the practical applications to detect hypochlorite in water samples. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Rational design of a novel azoimine appended maleonitrile-based Salen chemosensor for rapid naked-eye detection of copper(II) ion in aqueous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaeian, Khatereh; Khanmohammadi, Hamid; Arab, Vajihe

    2015-12-05

    Achieving specific selectivity and high sensitivity for the colorimetric recognition of copper(II) ions in aqueous media over a complex background of potentially competing metal ions is inherently challenging in sensor development. Thus, a novel azo-azomethine receptor (L) based on the combination of 2-amino-3-(5-bromo-2-hydroxybenzylamino)maleonitrile and azo-coupled salicylaldehyde scaffold has been designed and synthesized for the naked-eye and rapid detection of Cu(2+) ion at trace level in a wide pH range. Accordingly, the devised chemosensor distinguished Cu(2+) from other metal ions by distinct color change from light yellow to light brown without any expensive equipment. The binding stoichiometry between Cu(2+) and L has been investigated using Job's plot and MALDI-TOF mass analysis. Remarkably, the current sensor can detect Cu(2+) ions even at 1.07 μM level, which is lower than the World Health Organization (WHO) permissible level (30 μM) in drinking water. Furthermore, sensor L was successfully utilized in the preparation of test strips for the detection of copper(II) ions from aqueous environment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Recent data on rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder in patients with Parkinson disease: analysis of behaviors, movements, and periodic limb movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochen De Cock, Valérie

    2013-08-01

    Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD) is a fascinating parasomnia in which patients are able to enact their dreams because of a lack of muscle atonia during REM sleep. RBD represents a unique window into the dream world. Frequently associated with Parkinson's disease (PD), RBD raises various issues about dream modifications in this pathology and about aggressiveness during RBD episodes in placid patients during wakefulness. Studies on these behaviors have underlined their non-stereotyped, action-filled and violent characteristics but also their isomorphism with dream content. Complex, learnt behaviors may reflect the cortical involvement in this parasomnia but the more frequent elementary movements and the associated periodic limb movements during sleep also implicate the brainstem. Surprisingly, patients with PD have an improvement of their movements during their RBD as if they were disease-free. Also not yet understood, this improvement of movement during REM sleep raises issues about the pathways involved in RBD and about the possibility of using this pathway to improve movement in PD during the day. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Google Glass Glare: disability glare produced by a head-mounted visual display.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longley, Chris; Whitaker, David

    2016-03-01

    Head mounted displays are a type of wearable technology - a market that is projected to expand rapidly over the coming years. Probably the most well known example is the device Google Glass (or 'Glass'). Here we investigate the extent to which the device display can interfere with normal visual function by producing monocular disability glare. Contrast sensitivity was measured in two normally sighted participants, 32 and 52 years of age. Data were recorded for the right eye, the left eye and then again in a binocular condition. Measurements were taken both with and without the Glass in place, across a range of stimulus luminance levels using a two-alternative forced-choice methodology. The device produced a significant reduction in contrast sensitivity in the right eye (>0.5 log units). The level of disability glare increased as stimulus luminance was reduced in a manner consistent with intraocular light scatter, resulting in a veiling retinal illuminance. Sensitivity in the left eye was unaffected. A significant reduction in binocular contrast sensitivity occurred at lower luminance levels due to a loss of binocular summation, although binocular sensitivity was not found to fall below the sensitivity of the better monocular level (binocular inhibition). Head mounted displays such as Google Glass have the potential to cause significant disability glare in the eye exposed to the visual display, particularly under conditions of low luminance. They can also cause a more modest binocular reduction in sensitivity by eliminating the benefits of binocular summation. © 2015 The Authors Ophthalmic & Physiological Optics © 2015 The College of Optometrists.

  20. Photovoltaic mounting/demounting unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    The present invention relates to a photovoltaic arrangement comprising a photovoltaic assembly comprising a support structure defining a mounting surface onto which a photovoltaic module is detachably mounted; and a mounting/demounting unit comprising at least one mounting/demounting apparatus...... which when the mounting/demounting unit is moved along the mounting surface, causes the photovoltaic module to be mounted or demounted to the support structure; wherein the photovoltaic module comprises a carrier foil and wherein a total thickness of the photo voltaic module is below 500 muiotaeta....... The present invention further relates to an associated method for mounting/demounting photovoltaic modules....

  1. Quantification of forest carbon degradation in Nicaragua using RapidEye remote sensing data: El Cuá and Wiwili case studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argoty, F. N.; Cifuentes, M.; Imbach, P. A.; Vilchez, S.; Casanoves, F.; Ibrahim, M.; Vierling, L. A.

    2012-12-01

    Forest degradation and deforestation affect ecosystem function and climate regulation services such as carbon storage. Historically, Central America has been a deforestation and forest degradation hotspot. Wiwili and El Cuá municipalities in northern Nicaragua are no exception, where subsistence agriculture and cattle ranch expansion have driven deforestation and other wood extraction activities, leading to various levels of forest degradation. Reduction of Emissions from forest Degradation and Deforestation (REDD) projects are proposed as a tool to slow the degradation and loss of carbon stocks by restoring carbon to its natural levels in order to mitigate carbon dioxide emissions that cause global warming. REDD projects require baseline estimations of current carbon stocks and forest degradation status. We estimated carbon stocks across a forest degradation gradient based on common biophysical variables and commercially available (RapidEye) remote sensing data. We measured 80 temporary forest plots (50x20m) for aboveground biomass to sample a gradient of forest degradation at two municipalities (El Cuá and Wiwili) in northern Nicaragua. We measured biomass in trees (≥10 cm DBH), saplings (5-9.9 cm DBH), other growth forms (ferns, palms and woody vines), and large detritus (snags and downed wood). Biomass was estimated by a range of allometric models and a constant conversion factor (0.47) was applied to calculate aboveground carbon stocks. Remote sensing data from a RapidEye scene for 02/2010 provided data for 5 spectral bands and 19 vegetation indexes at 6 m spatial resolution. Precipitation, temperature, altitude, slope, canopy cover, and aspect were also used as input variables for carbon modeling. We tested linear mixed models, generalized additive mixed models and regression tree approaches to explain carbon stocks based on vegetation indexes and biophysical variables. Additionally, we grouped plots into low (17-168 Mg C ha-1), medium (168-302 Mg C ha-1

  2. Development of Methods for the Real-Time and Rapid Identification and Detection of TSE in Living Animals Using Fluorescence Spectroscopy of the Eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-07-01

    the eye, especially in the diseased eye. An increase in lipofuscin accumulation is known to occur in human Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease victims and in...retina is homogeneously weakly emmissive or whether it is heterogeneous, containing very bright regions of highly fluorescent material resulting from

  3. A Biphasic Change of Regional Blood Volume in the Frontal Cortex during Non-Rapid Eye Movement Sleep: A Near-Infrared Spectroscopy Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhongxing; Khatami, Ramin

    2015-08-01

    Current knowledge on hemodynamics in sleep is limited because available techniques do not allow continuous recordings and mainly focus on cerebral blood flow while neglecting other important parameters, such as blood volume (BV) and vasomotor activity. Observational study. Continuous measures of hemodynamics over the left forehead and biceps were performed using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) during nocturnal polysomnography in 16 healthy participants in sleep laboratory. Temporal dynamics and mean values of cerebral and muscular oxygenated hemoglobin (HbO2), deoxygenated hemoglobin (HHb), and BV during different sleep stages were compared. A biphasic change of cerebral BV was observed which contrasted a monotonic increase of muscular BV during non-rapid eye movement sleep. A significant decrement in cerebral HbO2 and BV accompanied by an increase of HHb was recorded at sleep onset (Phase I). Prior to slow wave sleep (SWS) HbO2 and BV turned to increase whereas HHb began to decrease in subsequent Phase II suggested increased brain perfusion during SWS. The cerebral HbO2 slope correlated to BV slope in Phase I and II, but it only correlated to HHb slope in Phase II. The occurrence time of inflection points correlated to SWS latencies. Initial decrease of brain perfusion with decreased blood volume (BV) and oxygenated hemoglobin (HbO2) together with increasing muscular BV fit thermoregulation process at sleep onset. The uncorrelated and correlated slopes of HbO2 and deoxygenated hemoglobin indicate different mechanisms underlying the biphasic hemodynamic process in light sleep and slow wave sleep (SWS). In SWS, changes in vasomotor activity (i.e., increased vasodilatation) may mediate increasing cerebral and muscular BV. © 2015 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  4. Blood RNA biomarkers in prodromal PARK4 and rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder show role of complexin 1 loss for risk of Parkinson's disease

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    Suna Lahut

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease (PD is a frequent neurodegenerative process in old age. Accumulation and aggregation of the lipid-binding SNARE complex component α-synuclein (SNCA underlies this vulnerability and defines stages of disease progression. Determinants of SNCA levels and mechanisms of SNCA neurotoxicity have been intensely investigated. In view of the physiological roles of SNCA in blood to modulate vesicle release, we studied blood samples from a new large pedigree with SNCA gene duplication (PARK4 mutation to identify effects of SNCA gain of function as potential disease biomarkers. Downregulation of complexin 1 (CPLX1 mRNA was correlated with genotype, but the expression of other Parkinson's disease genes was not. In global RNA-seq profiling of blood from presymptomatic PARK4 indviduals, bioinformatics detected significant upregulations for platelet activation, hemostasis, lipoproteins, endocytosis, lysosome, cytokine, Toll-like receptor signaling and extracellular pathways. In PARK4 platelets, stimulus-triggered degranulation was impaired. Strong SPP1, GZMH and PLTP mRNA upregulations were validated in PARK4. When analysing individuals with rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder, the most specific known prodromal stage of general PD, only blood CPLX1 levels were altered. Validation experiments confirmed an inverse mutual regulation of SNCA and CPLX1 mRNA levels. In the 3′-UTR of the CPLX1 gene we identified a single nucleotide polymorphism that is significantly associated with PD risk. In summary, our data define CPLX1 as a PD risk factor and provide functional insights into the role and regulation of blood SNCA levels. The new blood biomarkers of PARK4 in this Turkish family might become useful for PD prediction.

  5. Dreaming furiously? A sleep laboratory study on the dream content of people with Parkinson's disease and with or without rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valli, Katja; Frauscher, Birgit; Peltomaa, Taina; Gschliesser, Viola; Revonsuo, Antti; Högl, Birgit

    2015-03-01

    Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD) has been related to altered, action-filled, vivid, and aggressive dream content, but research comparing the possible differences in dreams of Parkinson's disease (PD) patients with and without RBD is scarce. The dream content of PD patients with and without RBD was analyzed with specific focus on action-filledness, vividness, emotional valence, and threats. A total of 69 REM and NREM dream reports were collected in the sleep laboratory, 37 from nine PD patients with RBD and 32 from six PD patients without RBD. A content analysis of (1) action-filledness (actions and environmental events); (2) vividness (emotions and cognitive activity); (3) intensity of actions, events and emotions; (4) emotional valence, and (5) threatening events was performed on the transcripts. Altogether 563 dream elements expressing action-filledness and vividness were found. There were no significant between-group differences in the number or distribution of elements reflecting action-filledness or vividness, emotional valence or threats. In within-group analyses, PD patients with RBD had significantly more negative compared to positive dreams (p = 0.012) and compared to PD patients without RBD, a tendency to have more intense actions in their dreams (p = 0.066). Based on the results of this study, there are no major between-group differences in the action-filledness, vividness, or threat content of dreams of PD patients with and without RBD. However, within-group analyses revealed that dreams were more often negatively than positively toned in PD patients with RBD. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Comparing cortical auditory processing in children with typical and atypical benign epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes: Electrophysiologic evidence of the role of non-rapid eye movement sleep abnormalities.

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    Filippini, Melissa; Boni, Antonella; Giannotta, Melania; Pini, Antonella; Russo, Angelo; Musti, Muriel Assunta; Guerra, Angelo; Lassonde, Maryse; Gobbi, Giuseppe

    2015-05-01

    The mismatch negativity (MMN) is an objective measure of central auditory discrimination. MMN alterations have been shown in children with language and/or developmental disorders. In benign focal epilepsies, neuropsychological disorders are often reported and linked to interictal epileptic discharges (IEDs) during non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep. There are few studies reporting MMN in children with benign epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes (BECTS) and sleep IEDs. Moreover, no MMN recording has yet been reported in atypical BECTS children with continuous spike-and-wave during sleep (CSWS). We retrospectively compared MMN in typical and atypical BECTS children, particularly addressing the impact of NREM sleep IEDs on auditory discrimination. Moreover, we attempted a neuropsychological characterization of patients. The MMN was recorded in 9 normal controls and 23 patients (14 typical BECTS and 9 atypical BECTS) in an oddball paradigm with syllable stimuli. MMN, sleep electroencephalography (EEG) and neuropsychological evaluation were realized in the same testing session. Measurable MMN responses to speech stimuli were identified in both the control and patient groups. A significant difference between control and atypical BECTS children was found with respect to amplitude (p = 0.0061). Atypical BECTS also showed a lower MMN amplitude with respect to typical BECTS, but this difference did not reach statistical significance (p = 0.0545). Statistical comparisons between groups revealed no differences in latency. Among the neuropsychological variables, academic difficulties were significantly more prominent in the patients with atypical BECTS (p = 0.04). CSWS EEG pattern affects auditory discrimination and may have a long-lasting impact on academic skills acquisition, whereas in typical BECTS children with a lower degree of IED NREM sleep, plastic brain reorganization or the preservation of participating networks may prevent such difficulty. Early

  7. Slow oscillating transcranial direct current stimulation during non-rapid eye movement sleep improves behavioral inhibition in attention-deficit/ hyperactivity disorder

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    Manuel Tobias Munz

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Behavioral inhibition, which is a later-developing executive function (EF and anatomically located in prefrontal areas, is impaired in attention-deficit and hyperactivity disorder (ADHD. While optimal EFs have been shown to depend on efficient sleep in healthy subjects, the impact of sleep problems, frequently reported in ADHD, remains elusive. Findings of macroscopic sleep changes in ADHD are inconsistent, but there is emerging evidence for distinct microscopic changes with a focus on prefrontal cortical regions and non-rapid eye movement (non-REM slow-wave sleep. Recently, slow oscillations (SO during non-REM sleep were found to be less functional and, as such, may be involved in sleep-dependent memory impairments in ADHD. Objective: By augmenting slow-wave power through bilateral, slow oscillating transcranial direct current stimulation (so-tDCS, frequency = 0.75 Hz during non-REM sleep, we aimed to improve daytime behavioral inhibition in children with ADHD. Methods: 14 boys (10-14 yrs diagnosed with ADHD were included. In a randomized, double-blind, cross-over design, patients received so-tDCS either in the first or in the second experimental sleep night. Inhibition control was assessed with a visuomotor go/no-go task. Intrinsic alertness was assessed with a simple stimulus response task. To control for visuomotor performance, motor memory was assessed with a finger sequence tapping task. Results: SO-power was enhanced during early non-REM sleep, accompanied by slowed reaction times and decreased standard deviations of reaction times, in the go/no-go task after so-tDCS. In contrast, intrinsic alertness and motor memory performance were not improved by so-tDCS. Conclusion: Since behavioral inhibition but not intrinsic alertness or motor memory was improved by so-tDCS, our results suggest that lateral prefrontal slow oscillations during sleep might play a specific role for executive functioning in ADHD.

  8. Translational evaluation of JNJ-18038683, a 5-hydroxytryptamine type 7 receptor antagonist, on rapid eye movement sleep and in major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonaventure, Pascal; Dugovic, Christine; Kramer, Michelle; De Boer, Peter; Singh, Jaskaran; Wilson, Sue; Bertelsen, Kirk; Di, Jianing; Shelton, Jonathan; Aluisio, Leah; Dvorak, Lisa; Fraser, Ian; Lord, Brian; Nepomuceno, Diane; Ahnaou, Abdellah; Drinkenburg, Wilhelmus; Chai, Wenying; Dvorak, Curt; Sands, Steve; Carruthers, Nicholas; Lovenberg, Timothy W

    2012-08-01

    In rodents 5-hydroxytryptamine type 7 (5-HT(7)) receptor blockade has been shown to be effective in models of depression and to increase the latency to rapid eye movement (REM) sleep and decrease REM duration. In the clinic, the REM sleep reduction observed with many antidepressants may serve as a biomarker. We report here the preclinical and clinical evaluation of a 5-HT(7) receptor antagonist, (3-(4-chlorophenyl)-1,4,5,6,7,8-hexahydro-1-(phenylmethyl)pyrazolo[3,4-d]azepine 2-hydroxy-1,2,3-propanetricarboxylate) (JNJ-18038683). In rodents, JNJ-18038683 increased the latency to REM sleep and decreased REM duration, and this effect was maintained after repeated administration for 7 days. The compound was effective in the mouse tail suspension test. JNJ-18038683 enhanced serotonin transmission, antidepressant-like behavior, and REM sleep suppression induced by citalopram in rodents. In healthy human volunteers JNJ-18038683 prolonged REM latency and reduced REM sleep duration, demonstrating that the effect of 5-HT(7) blockade on REM sleep translated from rodents to humans. Like in rats, JNJ-18038683 enhanced REM sleep suppression induced by citalopram in humans, although a drug-drug interaction could not be ruled out. In a double-blind, active, and placebo-controlled clinical trial in 225 patients suffering from major depressive disorder, neither treatment with pharmacologically active doses of JNJ-18038683 or escitalopram separated from placebo, indicating a failed study lacking assay sensitivity. Post hoc analyses using an enrichment window strategy, where all the efficacy data from sites with an implausible high placebo response [placebo group Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) = 28) are removed, there was a clinically meaningful difference between JNJ-18038683 and placebo. Further clinical studies are required to characterize the potential antidepressant efficacy of JNJ-18038683.

  9. The dream-lag effect: Selective processing of personally significant events during Rapid Eye Movement sleep, but not during Slow Wave Sleep.

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    van Rijn, E; Eichenlaub, J-B; Lewis, P A; Walker, M P; Gaskell, M G; Malinowski, J E; Blagrove, M

    2015-07-01

    Incorporation of details from waking life events into Rapid Eye Movement (REM) sleep dreams has been found to be highest on the night after, and then 5-7 nights after events (termed, respectively, the day-residue and dream-lag effects). In experiment 1, 44 participants kept a daily log for 10 days, reporting major daily activities (MDAs), personally significant events (PSEs), and major concerns (MCs). Dream reports were collected from REM and Slow Wave Sleep (SWS) in the laboratory, or from REM sleep at home. The dream-lag effect was found for the incorporation of PSEs into REM dreams collected at home, but not for MDAs or MCs. No dream-lag effect was found for SWS dreams, or for REM dreams collected in the lab after SWS awakenings earlier in the night. In experiment 2, the 44 participants recorded reports of their spontaneously recalled home dreams over the 10 nights following the instrumental awakenings night, which thus acted as a controlled stimulus with two salience levels, high (sleep lab) and low (home awakenings). The dream-lag effect was found for the incorporation into home dreams of references to the experience of being in the sleep laboratory, but only for participants who had reported concerns beforehand about being in the sleep laboratory. The delayed incorporation of events from daily life into dreams has been proposed to reflect REM sleep-dependent memory consolidation. However, an alternative emotion processing or emotional impact of events account, distinct from memory consolidation, is supported by the finding that SWS dreams do not evidence the dream-lag effect. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Study on the relation of brain functional connectivity to movement disorders and cognitive impairment in patients with rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder

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    Hong-ju ZHANG

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective To explore the relation between abnormal functional connectivity of substantia nigra and impairment of movement and cognition in patients with rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (RBD. Methods A total of 22 subjects, including 14 patients with RBD and 8 sex, age, education-matched healthy controls, were enrolled in this study according to international diagnostic criteria. Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale Ⅲ (UPDRS Ⅲ and Hoehn-Yahr Stage were used to evaluate motor function. Digit Ordering Test - Attention (DOT - A, Symbol Digit Modalities Test (SDMT, Stroop Color-Word Test (SCWT, Trail Making Test (TMT, Rey-Osterrieth Complex Figure Test (ROCFT, Clock Drawing Test (CDT, Boston Naming Test (BNT and Auditory Verbal Learning Test (AVLT were used to evaluate cognitive function. The functional connectivity from left and right substantia nigra to brain region were examined. Results There were no statistical differences of UPDRSⅢ and Hoehn?Yahr Stage between 2 groups (P > 0.05, for all. In comparison with control group, SDMT (P = 0.001, ROCFT-copy (P = 0.013 and AVLT-N2 (P = 0.032 were significantly lower, while TMT-B test was significantly higher (P =0.005 in RBD group. Compared with control group, the functional connectivity of right substantia nigra to left precentral gyrus (P < 0.005 and right angular gyrus (P < 0.005 were all decreased in RBD group. Conclusions The results suggest that cognitive impairment occurs earlier than movement disorders in RBD, and there are abnormal functional connectivity from right substantia nigra to left precentral gyrus and right angular gyrus, proving that abnormal functional connectivity is the base of behavior disorders in RBD. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2017.09.005

  11. Activation of phasic pontine-wave generator prevents rapid eye movement sleep deprivation-induced learning impairment in the rat: a mechanism for sleep-dependent plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Subimal; Mavanji, Vijayakumar; Ulloor, Jagadish; Patterson, Elissa H

    2004-02-11

    Animal and human studies of sleep and learning have demonstrated that training on various tasks increases subsequent rapid eye movement (REM) sleep and phasic pontine-wave (P-wave) activity, followed by improvement in performance on the learned task. It is well documented that REM sleep deprivation after learning trials blocks the expected improvement in performance on subsequent retesting. Our aim was to test whether experimentally induced P-wave generator activation could eliminate the learning impairment produced by post-training REM sleep deprivation. Rats were trained on a two-way active avoidance-learning task. Immediately thereafter, two groups of those rats received a control vehicle (100 nl saline) microinjection and one group received a carbachol (50 ng in 100 nl saline) microinjection into the P-wave generator. The carbachol-injected group and one of the two control saline microinjected groups were selectively deprived of REM sleep during a 6 hr polygraphic recording session. All rats were then tested on the avoidance-learning task. The rats that received both the control saline injection and REM sleep deprivation showed learning deficits compared with the control saline-injected rats that were allowed to sleep normally. In contrast, the rats that received the carbachol microinjection and REM sleep deprivation demonstrated normal learning. These results demonstrate, for the first time, that carbachol-induced activation of the P-wave generator prevents the memory-impairing effects of post-training REM sleep deprivation. This evidence supports our hypothesis that the activation of the P-wave generator during REM sleep deprivation enhances a physiological process of memory, which occurs naturally during post-training REM sleep.

  12. Eye Wear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eye wear protects or corrects your vision. Examples are Sunglasses Safety goggles Glasses (also called eyeglasses) Contact ... jobs and some sports carry a risk of eye injury. Thousands of children and adults get eye ...

  13. Eye Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer of the eye is uncommon. It can affect the outer parts of the eye, such as the eyelid, which are made up ... adults are melanoma and lymphoma. The most common eye cancer in children is retinoblastoma, which starts in ...

  14. Eye Injuries

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    ... of your face helps protect your eyes from injury. Still, injuries can damage your eye, sometimes severely enough that you could lose your vision. Most eye injuries are preventable. If you play sports or work ...

  15. Eye emergencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Keep flushing the eye with clean water or saline for at least 15 minutes. Seek medical help right away. Do not delay. EYE CUT, SCRATCH, OR BLOW Gently apply a clean cold compress to the eye to reduce swelling and ...

  16. A history of helmet mounted displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foote, Bob; Melzer, James

    2015-05-01

    In more than 40 years of development, the Helmet-Mounted Display (HMD) has become a key part of the equipment for fixed and rotary wing pilots and ground soldiers, proving to be a force multiplier and reducing user workload. Rockwell Collins has been a key player in the development of modern HMD technology and is currently fielding major HMDs supporting pilots around the world including the Joint Hemet Mounted Cueing System (JHMCS) and Strike Eye. This paper will outline the history of HMDs over the last 40 years for fixed wing, rotorcraft and soldiers and discuss Rockwell Collins' role. We will discuss the development and testing required for introduction of HMDs into the modern pilot environment. Within the paper we will point out some of the misconceptions, facts and legends of HMDS.

  17. Rapid eye movement sleep loss induces neuronal apoptosis in the rat brain by noradrenaline acting on alpha 1-adrenoceptor and by triggering mitochondrial intrinsic pathway

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    Bindu I Somarajan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Many neurodegenerative disorders are associated with rapid eye movement sleep (REMS-loss, however the mechanism was unknown. As REMS-loss elevates noradrenaline (NA level in the brain as well as induces neuronal apoptosis and degeneration, in this study we have delineated the intracellular molecular pathway involved in REMS deprivation (REMSD associated NA-induced neuronal apoptosis. Rats were REMS deprived for 6 days by the classical flower-pot method, suitable controls were conducted and the effects on apoptosis markers evaluated. Further, the role of NA was studied by one, intraperitoneal (i.p. injection of NA-ergic alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonist prazosin (PRZ and two, by down-regulation of NA synthesis in locus coeruleus (LC neurons by local microinjection of tyrosine hydroxylase siRNA (TH-siRNA. Immunoblot estimates showed that the expressions of pro-apoptotic proteins viz. Bcl2-associated death promoter (BAD protein, apoptotic protease activating factor-1 (Apaf-1, cytochrome c, caspase9, caspase3 were elevated in the REMS-deprived rat brains, while caspase8 level remained unaffected; PRZ treatment did not allow elevation of these pro-apoptotic factors. Further, REMSD increased cytochrome c expression, which was prevented if the NA synthesis from the LC neurons was blocked by microinjection of TH-siRNA in vivo into the LC during REMSD in freely moving normal rats. Mitochondrial damage was re-confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM, which showed distinctly swollen mitochondria with disintegrated cristae, chromosomal condensation and clumping along the nuclear membrane and all these changes were prevented in PRZ treated rats. Combining findings of this study along with earlier reports we propose that upon REMSD NA level increases in the brain as the LC NA-ergic REM-OFF neurons do not cease firing and TH is up-regulated in those neurons. This elevated NA acting on alpha1-adrenoceptors damages mitochondria causing release of

  18. Rapid eye movement sleep without atonia may help diagnose Lewy body disease in middle-aged and older patients with somatic symptom disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munechika, Takayuki; Fujishiro, Hiroshige; Okuda, Masato; Iwamoto, Kunihiro; Torii, Youta; Iritani, Shuji; Ozaki, Norio

    2017-01-01

    Lewy body disease (LBD), including Parkinson's disease (PD) and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), is defined pathologically as degeneration in the central and peripheral nervous system associated with Lewy bodies. Somatic symptom disorder often predates the clinical diagnosis of PD and DLB. It is crucial to make an initial diagnosis of LBD in patients with psychiatric symptoms because administering psychotropic drugs often causes or exacerbates extrapyramidal signs. Given the close association between rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behaviour disorder and LBD, REM sleep without atonia on polysomnography may help to diagnose LBD in middle-aged and older patients with somatic symptom disorder. We reviewed the clinical profiles of five patients with an initial diagnosis of somatic symptom disorder who exhibited REM sleep without atonia on polysomnography. There were three men and two women, with a mean age of 68.4 years (range: 55.0-78.0 years). The mean Mini-Mental State Examination score was 26 (range: 22-30). Only two patients had a clinical history of dream-enacting behaviour and fulfilled the clinical criteria for REM sleep behaviour disorder, but clinical conditions in the other three patients corresponded to subclinical REM sleep behaviour disorder. Final clinical diagnoses were made as probable DLB in three patients; two patients did not meet the clinical criteria for PD or DLB. Neurological examinations revealed mild extrapyramidal signs in these two patients, and their scores on the motor component of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale were 8 and 5 points, and their Mini-Mental State Examination scores were 30 points. Neither patient exhibited dream-enacting behaviour, but both had constipation. Cardiac 123 I-metaiodobenzylguanidine scintigraphy revealed mild increased washout rates. REM sleep without atonia may provide an opportunity to identify LBD in patients with somatic symptom disorder, even before they fulfil the clinical criteria for PD or

  19. An Object-Based Image Analysis Method for Monitoring Land Conversion by Artificial Sprawl Use of RapidEye and IRS Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maud Balestrat

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available In France, in the peri-urban context, urban sprawl dynamics are particularly strong with huge population growth as well as a land crisis. The increase and spreading of built-up areas from the city centre towards the periphery takes place to the detriment of natural and agricultural spaces. The conversion of land with agricultural potential is all the more worrying as it is usually irreversible. The French Ministry of Agriculture therefore needs reliable and repeatable spatial-temporal methods to locate and quantify loss of land at both local and national scales. The main objective of this study was to design a repeatable method to monitor land conversion characterized by artificial sprawl: (i We used an object-based image analysis to extract artificial areas from satellite images; (ii We built an artificial patch that consists of aggregating all the peripheral areas that characterize artificial areas. The “artificialized” patch concept is an innovative extension of the urban patch concept, but differs in the nature of its components and in the continuity distance applied; (iii The diachronic analysis of artificial patch maps enables characterization of artificial sprawl. The method was applied at the scale of four departments (similar to provinces along the coast of Languedoc-Roussillon, in the South of France, based on two satellite datasets, one acquired in 1996–1997 (Indian Remote Sensing and the other in 2009 (RapidEye. In the four departments, we measured an increase in artificial areas of from 113,000 ha in 1997 to 133,000 ha in 2009, i.e., an 18% increase in 12 years. The package comes in the form of a 1/15,000 valid cartography, usable at the scale of a commune (the smallest territorial division used for administrative purposes in France that can be adapted to departmental and regional scales. The method is reproducible in homogenous spatial-temporal terms, so that it could be used periodically to assess changes in land conversion

  20. A pilot study of serotonin-1A receptor genotypes and rapid eye movement sleep sensitivity to serotonergic/cholinergic imbalance in humans: a pharmacological model of depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biard K

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Kathleen Biard,1,2 Alan B Douglass,2,3 Rébecca Robillard,2 Joseph De Koninck1,2 1School of Psychology, University of Ottawa, 2University of Ottawa Institute for Mental Health Research, 3Royal Ottawa Mental Health Center, University of Ottawa Institute for Mental Health Research, Ottawa, ON, Canada Rationale: The serotonergic and cholinergic systems are jointly involved in regulating sleep but this system is theorized to be disturbed in depressed individuals. We previously reported that cholinergic and serotonergic agents induce sleep changes partially consistent with monoamine models of sleep disturbances in depression. One potential cause of disturbed neurotransmission is genetic predisposition. The G(-1019 allele of the serotonin-1A (5-HT1A receptor promoter region predicts an increased risk for depression compared to the wild-type C(-1019 allele. Objective: The goal of this study was to investigate how serotonin-1A receptor genotypes mediate sleep sensitivity to pharmacological probes modeling the serotonergic/cholinergic imbalance of depression. Methods: Seventeen healthy female participants homozygous for either C (n=11 or G (n=6 alleles aged 18–27 years were tested on four nonconsecutive nights. Participants were given galantamine (an anti-acetylcholinesterase, buspirone (a serotonergic agonist, both drugs together, or placebos before sleeping. Results: As reported previously, buspirone significantly increased rapid eye movement (REM latency (P<0.001, as well as awakenings, percentage of time spent awake, and percentage of time asleep spent in stage N1 (P<0.019. Galantamine increased awakenings, percentage of time spent awake, percentage of time asleep spent in stage N1, and percentage of time asleep spent in REM, and decreased REM latency and percentage of time asleep spent in stage N3 (P<0.019. Galantamine plus buspirone given together disrupted sleep more than either drug alone, lowering sleep efficiency and percentage of time asleep

  1. Neurodegenerative disease status and post-mortem pathology in idiopathic rapid-eye-movement sleep behaviour disorder: an observational cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iranzo, Alex; Tolosa, Eduard; Gelpi, Ellen; Molinuevo, José Luis; Valldeoriola, Francesc; Serradell, Mónica; Sanchez-Valle, Raquel; Vilaseca, Isabel; Lomeña, Francisco; Vilas, Dolores; Lladó, Albert; Gaig, Carles; Santamaria, Joan

    2013-05-01

    We postulated that idiopathic rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep behaviour disorder (IRBD) represents the prodromal phase of a Lewy body disorder and that, with sufficient follow-up, most cases would eventually be diagnosed with a clinical defined Lewy body disorder, such as Parkinson's disease (PD) or dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB). Patients from an IRBD cohort recruited between 1991 and 2003, and previously assessed in 2005, were followed up during an additional period of 7 years. In this original cohort, we sought to identify the nature and frequency of emerging defined neurodegenerative syndromes diagnosed by standard clinical criteria. We estimated rates of survival free from defined neurodegenerative disease by means of the Kaplan-Meier method. We further characterised individuals who remained diagnosed as having only IRBD, through dopamine transporter (DAT) imaging, transcranial sonography (TCS), and olfactory testing. We did a neuropathological assessment in three patients who died during follow-up and who had the antemortem diagnosis of PD or DLB. Of the 44 participants from the original cohort, 36 (82%) had developed a defined neurodegenerative syndrome by the 2012 assessment (16 patients were diagnosed with PD, 14 with DLB, one with multiple system atrophy, and five with mild cognitive impairment). The rates of neurological-disease-free survival from time of IRBD diagnosis were 65·2% (95% CI 50·9 to 79·5) at 5 years, 26·6% (12·7 to 40·5) at 10 years, and 7·5% (-1·9 to 16·9) at 14 years. Of the four remaining neurological-disease-free individuals who underwent neuroimaging and olfactory tests, all four had decreased striatal DAT uptake, one had substantia nigra hyperechogenicity on TCS, and two had impaired olfaction. In three patients, the antemortem diagnoses of PD and DLB were confirmed by neuropathological examination showing widespread Lewy bodies in the brain, and α-synuclein aggregates in the peripheral autonomic nervous system in one case

  2. Rebuilding Mount St. Helens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilling, Steve P.; Ramsey, David W.; Messerich, James A.; Thompson, Ren A.

    2006-01-01

    On May 18, 1980, Mount St. Helens, Washington exploded in a spectacular and devastating eruption that shocked the world. The eruption, one of the most powerful in the history of the United States, removed 2.7 cubic kilometers of rock from the volcano's edifice, the bulk of which had been constructed by nearly 4,000 years of lava-dome-building eruptions. In seconds, the mountain's summit elevation was lowered from 2,950 meters to 2,549 meters, leaving a north-facing, horseshoe-shaped crater over 2 kilometers wide. Following the 1980 eruption, Mount St. Helens remained active. A large lava dome began episodically extruding in the center of the volcano's empty crater. This dome-building eruption lasted until 1986 and added about 80 million cubic meters of rock to the volcano. During the two decades following the May 18, 1980 eruption, Crater Glacier formed tongues of ice around the east and west sides of the lava dome in the deeply shaded niche between the lava dome and the south crater wall. Long the most active volcano in the Cascade Range with a complex 300,000-year history, Mount St. Helens erupted again in the fall of 2004 as a new period of dome building began within the 1980 crater. Between October 2004 and February 2006, about 80 million cubic meters of dacite lava erupted immediately south of the 1980-86 lava dome. The erupting lava separated the glacier into two parts, first squeezing the east arm of the glacier against the east crater wall and then causing equally spectacular crevassing and broad uplift of the glacier's west arm. Vertical aerial photographs document dome growth and glacier deformation. These photographs enabled photogrammetric construction of a series of high-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) showing changes from October 4, 2004 to February 9, 2006. From the DEMs, Geographic Information Systems (GIS) applications were used to estimate extruded volumes and growth rates of the new lava dome. The DEMs were also used to quantify dome

  3. Eye movement monitoring of memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Jennifer D; Riggs, Lily; McQuiggan, Douglas A; McQuiggan, Doug

    2010-08-15

    Explicit (often verbal) reports are typically used to investigate memory (e.g. "Tell me what you remember about the person you saw at the bank yesterday."), however such reports can often be unreliable or sensitive to response bias, and may be unobtainable in some participant populations. Furthermore, explicit reports only reveal when information has reached consciousness and cannot comment on when memories were accessed during processing, regardless of whether the information is subsequently accessed in a conscious manner. Eye movement monitoring (eye tracking) provides a tool by which memory can be probed without asking participants to comment on the contents of their memories, and access of such memories can be revealed on-line. Video-based eye trackers (either head-mounted or remote) use a system of cameras and infrared markers to examine the pupil and corneal reflection in each eye as the participant views a display monitor. For head-mounted eye trackers, infrared markers are also used to determine head position to allow for head movement and more precise localization of eye position. Here, we demonstrate the use of a head-mounted eye tracking system to investigate memory performance in neurologically-intact and neurologically-impaired adults. Eye movement monitoring procedures begin with the placement of the eye tracker on the participant, and setup of the head and eye cameras. Calibration and validation procedures are conducted to ensure accuracy of eye position recording. Real-time recordings of X,Y-coordinate positions on the display monitor are then converted and used to describe periods of time in which the eye is static (i.e. fixations) versus in motion (i.e., saccades). Fixations and saccades are time-locked with respect to the onset/offset of a visual display or another external event (e.g. button press). Experimental manipulations are constructed to examine how and when patterns of fixations and saccades are altered through different types of prior

  4. Clamp-mount device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, K. H. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A clamp-mount device is disclosed for mounting equipment to an associated I-beam and the like structural member of the type having oppositely extending flanges wherein the device comprises a base and a pair of oppositely facing clamping members carried diagonally on the base clamping flanges therebetween and having flange receiving openings facing one another. Lock means are carried diagonally by the base opposite the clamping members locking the flanges in the clamping members. A resilient hub is carried centrally of the base engaging and biasing a back side of the flanges maintaining tightly clamped and facilitating use on vertical as well as horizontal members. The base turns about the hub to receive the flanges within the clamping members. Equipment may be secured to the base by any suitable means such as bolts in openings. Slidable gate latches secure the hinged locks in an upright locking position. The resilient hub includes a recess opening formed in the base and a rubber-like pad carried in this opening being depressably and rotatably carried therein.

  5. Design of a head phantom produced on a 3D rapid prototyping printer and comparison with a RANDO and 3M lucite head phantom in eye dosimetry applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homolka, Peter; Figl, Michael; Wartak, Andreas; Glanzer, Mathias; Dünkelmeyer, Martina; Hojreh, Azadeh; Hummel, Johann

    2017-04-01

    An anthropomorphic head phantom including eye inserts allowing placement of TLDs 3 mm below the cornea has been produced on a 3D printer using a photo-cured acrylic resin to best allow tissue equivalence. Thus Hp(3) can be determined in radiological and interventional photon radiation fields. Eye doses and doses to the forehead have been compared to an Alderson RANDO head and a 3M Lucite skull phantom in terms of surface dose per incident air kerma for frontal irradiation since the commercial phantoms do not allow placement of TLDs 3 mm below the corneal surface. A comparison of dose reduction factors (DRFs) of a common lead glasses model has also been performed. Eye dose per incident air kerma were comparable between all three phantoms (printed phantom: 1.40, standard error (SE) 0.04; RANDO: 1.36, SE 0.03; 3M: 1.37, SE 0.03). Doses to the forehead were identical to eye surface doses for the printed phantom and the RANDO head (ratio 1.00 SE 0.04, and 0.99 SE 0.03, respectively). In the 3M Lucite skull phantom dose on the forehead was 15% lower than dose to the eyes attributable to phantom properties. DRF of a sport frame style leaded glasses model with 0.75 mm lead equivalence measured were 6.8 SE 0.5, 9.3 SE 0.4 and 10.5 SE 0.5 for the RANDO head, the printed phantom, and the 3M Lucite head phantom, respectively, for frontal irradiation. A comparison of doses measured in 3 mm depth and on the surface of the eyes in the printed phantom revealed no difference larger than standard errors from TLD dosimetry. 3D printing offers an interesting opportunity for phantom design with increasing potential as printers allowing combinations of tissue substitutes will become available. Variations between phantoms may provide a useful indication of uncertainty budgets when using phantom measurements to estimate individual personnel doses.

  6. Design of a head phantom produced on a 3D rapid prototyping printer and comparison with a RANDO and 3M lucite head phantom in eye dosimetry applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homolka, Peter; Figl, Michael; Wartak, Andreas; Glanzer, Mathias; Dünkelmeyer, Martina; Hojreh, Azadeh; Hummel, Johann

    2017-04-21

    An anthropomorphic head phantom including eye inserts allowing placement of TLDs 3 mm below the cornea has been produced on a 3D printer using a photo-cured acrylic resin to best allow tissue equivalence. Thus H p (3) can be determined in radiological and interventional photon radiation fields. Eye doses and doses to the forehead have been compared to an Alderson RANDO head and a 3M Lucite skull phantom in terms of surface dose per incident air kerma for frontal irradiation since the commercial phantoms do not allow placement of TLDs 3 mm below the corneal surface. A comparison of dose reduction factors (DRFs) of a common lead glasses model has also been performed. Eye dose per incident air kerma were comparable between all three phantoms (printed phantom: 1.40, standard error (SE) 0.04; RANDO: 1.36, SE 0.03; 3M: 1.37, SE 0.03). Doses to the forehead were identical to eye surface doses for the printed phantom and the RANDO head (ratio 1.00 SE 0.04, and 0.99 SE 0.03, respectively). In the 3M Lucite skull phantom dose on the forehead was 15% lower than dose to the eyes attributable to phantom properties. DRF of a sport frame style leaded glasses model with 0.75 mm lead equivalence measured were 6.8 SE 0.5, 9.3 SE 0.4 and 10.5 SE 0.5 for the RANDO head, the printed phantom, and the 3M Lucite head phantom, respectively, for frontal irradiation. A comparison of doses measured in 3 mm depth and on the surface of the eyes in the printed phantom revealed no difference larger than standard errors from TLD dosimetry. 3D printing offers an interesting opportunity for phantom design with increasing potential as printers allowing combinations of tissue substitutes will become available. Variations between phantoms may provide a useful indication of uncertainty budgets when using phantom measurements to estimate individual personnel doses.

  7. Eye Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... form of childhood eye cancer. Hemangioma is a benign tumor of the choroid and retina that starts in the blood vessels. Other, rare cancers of the eye include: Conjunctival melanoma is a tumor of the conjunctiva, which is ...

  8. Eye Anatomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News About Us Donate In This Section Eye Anatomy en Español email Send this article to a ... You at Risk For Glaucoma? Childhood Glaucoma Eye Anatomy Five Common Glaucoma Tests Glaucoma Facts and Stats ...

  9. Helmet-Mounted Displays (HMD)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Helmet-Mounted Display labis responsible for monocular HMD day display evaluations; monocular HMD night vision performance processes; binocular HMD day display...

  10. Eye-based head gestures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mardanbegi, Diako; Witzner Hansen, Dan; Pederson, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    A novel method for video-based head gesture recognition using eye information by an eye tracker has been proposed. The method uses a combination of gaze and eye movement to infer head gestures. Compared to other gesture-based methods a major advantage of the method is that the user keeps the gaze...... on the interaction object while interacting. This method has been implemented on a head-mounted eye tracker for detecting a set of predefined head gestures. The accuracy of the gesture classifier is evaluated and verified for gaze-based interaction in applications intended for both large public displays and small...... mobile phone screens. The user study shows that the method detects a set of defined gestures reliably....

  11. Validation of mobile eye-tracking as novel and efficient means for differentiating progressive supranuclear palsy from Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marx, Svenja; Respondek, Gesine; Stamelou, Maria; Dowiasch, Stefan; Stoll, Josef; Bremmer, Frank; Oertel, Wolfgang H; Höglinger, Günter U; Einhäuser, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    The decreased ability to carry out vertical saccades is a key symptom of Progressive Supranuclear Palsy (PSP). Objective measurement devices can help to reliably detect subtle eye movement disturbances to improve sensitivity and specificity of the clinical diagnosis. The present study aims at transferring findings from restricted stationary video-oculography (VOG) to a wearable head-mounted device, which can be readily applied in clinical practice. We investigated the eye movements in 10 possible or probable PSP patients, 11 Parkinson's disease (PD) patients, and 10 age-matched healthy controls (HCs) using a mobile, gaze-driven video camera setup (EyeSeeCam). Ocular movements were analyzed during a standardized fixation protocol and in an unrestricted real-life scenario while walking along a corridor. The EyeSeeCam detected prominent impairment of both saccade velocity and amplitude in PSP patients, differentiating them from PD and HCs. Differences were particularly evident for saccades in the vertical plane, and stronger for saccades than for other eye movements. Differences were more pronounced during the standardized protocol than in the real-life scenario. Combined analysis of saccade velocity and saccade amplitude during the fixation protocol with the EyeSeeCam provides a simple, rapid (<20 s), and reliable tool to differentiate clinically established PSP patients from PD and HCs. As such, our findings prepare the ground for using wearable eye-tracking in patients with uncertain diagnoses.

  12. Validation of mobile eye tracking as novel and efficient means for differentiating progressive supranuclear palsy from Parkinson’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svenja eMarx

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The decreased ability to carry out vertical saccades is a key symptom of Progressive Supranuclear Palsy (PSP. Objective measurement devices can help to reliably detect subtle eye-movement disturbances to improve sensitivity and specificity of the clinical diagnosis. The present study aims at transferring findings from restricted stationary video-oculography to a wearable head-mounted device, which can be readily applied in clinical practice.Methods: We investigated the eye movements in 10 possible or probable PSP patients, 11 Parkinson’s disease (PD patients and 10 age-matched healthy controls (HC using a mobile, gaze-driven video camera setup (EyeSeeCam. Ocular movements were analyzed during a standardized fixation protocol and in an unrestricted real-life scenario while walking along a corridor.Results: The EyeSeeCam detected prominent impairment of both saccade velocity and amplitude in PSP patients, differentiating them from PD and HCs. Differences were particularly evident for saccades in the vertical plane, and stronger for saccades than for other eye movements. Differences were more pronounced during the standardized protocol than in the real-life scenario. Conclusions: Combined analysis of saccade velocity and saccade amplitude during the fixation protocol with the EyeSeeCam provides a simple, rapid (< 20s and reliable tool to differentiate clinically established PSP patients from PD and HCs. As such, our findings prepare the ground for using wearable eye-tracking in patients with uncertain diagnoses.

  13. Detector Mount Design for IGRINS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Sok Oh

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The Immersion Grating Infrared Spectrometer (IGRINS is a near-infrared wide-band high-resolution spectrograph jointly developed by the Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute and the University of Texas at Austin. IGRINS employs three HAWAII-2RG Focal Plane Array (H2RG FPA detectors. We present the design and fabrication of the detector mount for the H2RG detector. The detector mount consists of a detector housing, an ASIC housing, a Field Flattener Lens (FFL mount, and a support base frame. The detector and the ASIC housing should be kept at 65 K and the support base frame at 130 K. Therefore they are thermally isolated by the support made of GFRP material. The detector mount is designed so that it has features of fine adjusting the position of the detector surface in the optical axis and of fine adjusting yaw and pitch angles in order to utilize as an optical system alignment compensator. We optimized the structural stability and thermal characteristics of the mount design using computer-aided 3D modeling and finite element analysis. Based on the structural and thermal analysis, the designed detector mount meets an optical stability tolerance and system thermal requirements. Actual detector mount fabricated based on the design has been installed into the IGRINS cryostat and successfully passed a vacuum test and a cold test.

  14. Diabetes eye exams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabetic retinopathy - eye exams; Diabetes - eye exams; Glaucoma - diabetic eye exam; Macular edema - diabetic eye exam ... if the doctor who takes care of your diabetes checks your eyes, you need an eye exam ...

  15. SXI prototype mirror mount

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-04-01

    The purpose of this contract was to provide optomechanical engineering and fabrication support to the Solar X-ray Imager (SXI) program in the areas of mirror, optical bench and camera assemblies of the telescope. The Center for Applied Optics (CAO) worked closely with the Optics and S&E technical staff of MSFC to develop and investigate the most viable and economical options for the design and fabrication of a number of parts for the various telescope assemblies. All the tasks under this delivery order have been successfully completed within budget and schedule. A number of development hardware parts have been designed and fabricated jointly by MSFC and UAH for the engineering model of SXI. The major parts include a nickel electroformed mirror and a mirror mount, plating and coating of the ceramic spacers, and gold plating of the contact rings and fingers for the camera assembly. An aluminum model of the high accuracy sun sensor (HASS) was also designed and fabricated. A number of fiber optic tapers for the camera assembly were also coated with indium tin oxide and phosphor for testing and evaluation by MSFC. A large number of the SXI optical bench parts were also redesigned and simplified for a prototype telescope. These parts include the forward and rear support flanges, front aperture plate, the graphite epoxy optical bench and a test fixture for the prototype telescope. More than fifty (50) drawings were generated for various components of the prototype telescope. Some of these parts were subsequently fabricated at UAH machine shop or at MSFC or by the outside contractors. UAH also provide technical support to MSFC staff for a number of preliminary and critical design reviews. These design reviews included PDR and CDR for the mirror assembly by United Technologies Optical Systems (UTOS), and the program quarterly reviews, and SXI PDR and CDR. UAH staff also regularly attended the monthly status reviews, and made a significant number of suggestions to improve

  16. SXI prototype mirror mount

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this contract was to provide optomechanical engineering and fabrication support to the Solar X-ray Imager (SXI) program in the areas of mirror, optical bench and camera assemblies of the telescope. The Center for Applied Optics (CAO) worked closely with the Optics and S&E technical staff of MSFC to develop and investigate the most viable and economical options for the design and fabrication of a number of parts for the various telescope assemblies. All the tasks under this delivery order have been successfully completed within budget and schedule. A number of development hardware parts have been designed and fabricated jointly by MSFC and UAH for the engineering model of SXI. The major parts include a nickel electroformed mirror and a mirror mount, plating and coating of the ceramic spacers, and gold plating of the contact rings and fingers for the camera assembly. An aluminum model of the high accuracy sun sensor (HASS) was also designed and fabricated. A number of fiber optic tapers for the camera assembly were also coated with indium tin oxide and phosphor for testing and evaluation by MSFC. A large number of the SXI optical bench parts were also redesigned and simplified for a prototype telescope. These parts include the forward and rear support flanges, front aperture plate, the graphite epoxy optical bench and a test fixture for the prototype telescope. More than fifty (50) drawings were generated for various components of the prototype telescope. Some of these parts were subsequently fabricated at UAH machine shop or at MSFC or by the outside contractors. UAH also provide technical support to MSFC staff for a number of preliminary and critical design reviews. These design reviews included PDR and CDR for the mirror assembly by United Technologies Optical Systems (UTOS), and the program quarterly reviews, and SXI PDR and CDR. UAH staff also regularly attended the monthly status reviews, and made a significant number of suggestions to improve

  17. Tuberculosis; Eye

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    muscle could present as a painful swelling over the corresponding part of the eye with associated restriction of ocular motility involving the muscle. TUBERCULOSIS OF THE EYE. CORNEA: Primary infection of the cornea is very rare. Corneal involvement is usually due to a hypersentitivity or cross-reaction whereby the.

  18. Eye cosmetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donoghue, M N

    2000-10-01

    There are many eye cosmetics available to enhance the beauty or improve the appearance of the face. To prevent infection, most eye cosmetics contain preservatives. Fragrance is usually absent to keep the products as safe as possible. Hypoallergenic products contain fewer ingredients and may be more appropriate for patients with sensitive skin.

  19. Intra-and-Inter Species Biomass Prediction in a Plantation Forest: Testing the Utility of High Spatial Resolution Spaceborne Multispectral RapidEye Sensor and Advanced Machine Learning Algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy Dube

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The quantification of aboveground biomass using remote sensing is critical for better understanding the role of forests in carbon sequestration and for informed sustainable management. Although remote sensing techniques have been proven useful in assessing forest biomass in general, more is required to investigate their capabilities in predicting intra-and-inter species biomass which are mainly characterised by non-linear relationships. In this study, we tested two machine learning algorithms, Stochastic Gradient Boosting (SGB and Random Forest (RF regression trees to predict intra-and-inter species biomass using high resolution RapidEye reflectance bands as well as the derived vegetation indices in a commercial plantation. The results showed that the SGB algorithm yielded the best performance for intra-and-inter species biomass prediction; using all the predictor variables as well as based on the most important selected variables. For example using the most important variables the algorithm produced an R2 of 0.80 and RMSE of 16.93 t·ha−1 for E. grandis; R2 of 0.79, RMSE of 17.27 t·ha−1 for P. taeda and R2 of 0.61, RMSE of 43.39 t·ha−1 for the combined species data sets. Comparatively, RF yielded plausible results only for E. dunii (R2 of 0.79; RMSE of 7.18 t·ha−1. We demonstrated that although the two statistical methods were able to predict biomass accurately, RF produced weaker results as compared to SGB when applied to combined species dataset. The result underscores the relevance of stochastic models in predicting biomass drawn from different species and genera using the new generation high resolution RapidEye sensor with strategically positioned bands.

  20. Solar panel parallel mounting configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutschler, Jr., Edward Charles (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A spacecraft includes a plurality of solar panels interconnected with a power coupler and an electrically operated device to provide power to the device when the solar cells are insolated. The solar panels are subject to bending distortion when entering or leaving eclipse. Spacecraft attitude disturbances are reduced by mounting each of the solar panels to an elongated boom made from a material with a low coefficient of thermal expansion, so that the bending of one panel is not communicated to the next. The boom may be insulated to reduce its bending during changes in insolation. A particularly advantageous embodiment mounts each panel to the boom with a single mounting, which may be a hinge. The single mounting prevents transfer of bending moments from the panel to the boom.

  1. Fast Picometer Mirror Mount Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed innovation is a 6DOF controllable mirror mount with high dynamic range and fast tip/tilt capability for space based applications. It will enable the...

  2. Mounting clips for panel installation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavieres, Andres; Al-Haddad, Tristan; Goodman, Joseph

    2017-07-11

    A photovoltaic panel mounting clip comprising a base, central indexing tabs, flanges, lateral indexing tabs, and vertical indexing tabs. The mounting clip removably attaches one or more panels to a beam or the like structure, both mechanically and electrically. It provides secure locking of the panels in all directions, while providing guidance in all directions for accurate installation of the panels to the beam or the like structure.

  3. The head-mounted microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ting; Dailey, Seth H; Naze, Sawyer A; Jiang, Jack J

    2012-04-01

    Microsurgical equipment has greatly advanced since the inception of the microscope into the operating room. These advancements have allowed for superior surgical precision and better post-operative results. This study focuses on the use of the Leica HM500 head-mounted microscope for the operating phonosurgeon. The head-mounted microscope has an optical zoom from 2× to 9× and provides a working distance from 300 mm to 700 mm. The headpiece, with its articulated eyepieces, adjusts easily to head shape and circumference, and offers a focus function, which is either automatic or manually controlled. We performed five microlaryngoscopic operations utilizing the head-mounted microscope with successful results. By creating a more ergonomically favorable operating posture, a surgeon may be able to obtain greater precision and success in phonomicrosurgery. Phonomicrosurgery requires the precise manipulation of long-handled cantilevered instruments through the narrow bore of a laryngoscope. The head-mounted microscope shortens the working distance compared with a stand microscope, thereby increasing arm stability, which may improve surgical precision. Also, the head-mounted design permits flexibility in head position, enabling operator comfort, and delaying musculoskeletal fatigue. A head-mounted microscope decreases the working distance and provides better ergonomics in laryngoscopic microsurgery. These advances provide the potential to promote precision in phonomicrosurgery. Copyright © 2011 The American Laryngological, Rhinological, and Otological Society, Inc.

  4. Assessment of a head-mounted miniature monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, J. P., II

    1992-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted to assess the capabilities and limitations of the Private Eye, a miniature, head-mounted monitor. The first experiment compared the Private Eye with a cathode ray tube (CRT) and hard copy in both a constrained and unconstrained work envelope. The task was a simulated maintenance and assembly task that required frequent reference to the displayed information. A main effect of presentation media indicated faster placement times using the CRT as compared with hard copy. There were no significant differences between the Private Eye and either the CRT or hard copy for identification, placement, or total task times. The goal of the second experiment was to determine the effects of various local visual parameters on the ability of the user to accurately perceive the information of the Private Eye. The task was an interactive video game. No significant performance differences were found under either bright or dark ambient illumination environments nor with either visually simple or complex task backgrounds. Glare reflected off of the bezel surrounding the monitor did degrade performance. It was concluded that this head-mounted, miniature monitor could serve a useful role for in situ operations, especially in microgravity environments.

  5. Practical low-cost stereo head-mounted display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pausch, Randy; Dwivedi, Pramod; Long, Allan C., Jr.

    1991-08-01

    A high-resolution head-mounted display has been developed from substantially cheaper components than previous systems. Monochrome displays provide 720 by 280 monochrome pixels to each eye in a one-inch-square region positioned approximately one inch from each eye. The display hardware is the Private Eye, manufactured by Reflection Technologies, Inc. The tracking system uses the Polhemus Isotrak, providing (x,y,z, azimuth, elevation and roll) information on the user''s head position and orientation 60 times per second. In combination with a modified Nintendo Power Glove, this system provides a full-functionality virtual reality/simulation system. Using two host 80386 computers, real-time wire frame images can be produced. Other virtual reality systems require roughly 250,000 in hardware, while this one requires only 5,000. Stereo is particularly useful for this system because shading or occlusion cannot be used as depth cues.

  6. Moving Ahead With Eye Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory's collaborated with LC Technologies, Inc., to improve LCT's Eyegaze Communication System, an eye tracker that enables people with severe cerebral palsy, muscular dystrophy, multiple sclerosis, strokes, brain injuries, spinal cord injuries, and ALS (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis) to communicate and control their environment using their eye movements. To operate the system, the user sits in front of the computer monitor while the camera focuses on one eye. By looking at control keys on the monitor for a fraction of a second, the user can 'talk' with speech synthesis, type, operate a telephone, access the Internet and e-mail, and run computer software. Nothing is attached to the user's head or body, and the improved size and portability allow the system to be mounted on a wheelchair. LCT and JPL are working on several other areas of improvement that have commercial add-on potential.

  7. Solar panel truss mounting systems and methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Haddad, Tristan Farris; Cavieres, Andres; Gentry, Russell; Goodman, Joseph; Nolan, Wade; Pitelka, Taylor; Rahimzadeh, Keyan; Brooks, Bradley; Lohr, Joshua; Crooks, Ryan; Porges, Jamie; Rubin, Daniel

    2015-10-20

    An exemplary embodiment of the present invention provides a solar panel truss mounting system comprising a base and a truss assembly coupled to the base. The truss assembly comprises a first panel rail mount, second panel rail mount parallel to the first panel rail mount, base rail mount parallel to the first and second panel rail mounts, and a plurality of support members. A first portion of the plurality of support members extends between the first and second panel rail mounts. A second portion of the plurality of support members extends between the first panel rail mount and the base rail mount. A third portion of the plurality of support members extends between the second panel rail mount and the base rail mount. The system can further comprise a plurality of connectors for coupling a plurality of photovoltaic solar panels to the truss assembly.

  8. Solar panel truss mounting systems and methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Haddad, Tristan Farris; Cavieres, Andres; Gentry, Russell; Goodman, Joseph; Nolan, Wade; Pitelka, Taylor; Rahimzadeh, Keyan; Brooks, Bradley; Lohr, Joshua; Crooks, Ryan; Porges, Jamie; Rubin, Daniel

    2016-06-28

    An exemplary embodiment of the present invention provides a solar panel truss mounting system comprising a base and a truss assembly coupled to the base. The truss assembly comprises a first panel rail mount, second panel rail mount parallel to the first panel rail mount, base rail mount parallel to the first and second panel rail mounts, and a plurality of support members. A first portion of the plurality of support members extends between the first and second panel rail mounts. A second portion of the plurality of support members extends between the first panel rail mount and the base rail mount. A third portion of the plurality of support members extends between the second panel rail mount and the base rail mount. The system can further comprise a plurality of connectors for coupling a plurality of photovoltaic solar panels to the truss assembly.

  9. Solar panel truss mounting systems and methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Haddad, Tristan Farris; Cavieres, Andres; Gentry, Russell; Goodman, Joseph; Nolan, Wade; Pitelka, Taylor; Rahimzadeh, Keyan; Brooks, Bradley; Lohr, Joshua; Crooks, Ryan; Porges, Jamie; Rubin, Daniel

    2018-01-30

    An exemplary embodiment of the present invention provides a solar panel truss mounting system comprising a base and a truss assembly coupled to the base. The truss assembly comprises a first panel rail mount, second panel rail mount parallel to the first panel rail mount, base rail mount parallel to the first and second panel rail mounts, and a plurality of support members. A first portion of the plurality of support members extends between the first and second panel rail mounts. A second portion of the plurality of support members extends between the first panel rail mount and the base rail mount. A third portion of the plurality of support members extends between the second panel rail mount and the base rail mount. The system can further comprise a plurality of connectors for coupling a plurality of photovoltaic solar panels to the truss assembly.

  10. Red Eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... AskMayoExpert. Conjunctivitis. Rochester, Minn.: Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research; 2014. Jan. 11, 2018 Original article: http://www.mayoclinic.org/symptoms/red-eye/basics/definition/SYM-20050748 . Mayo Clinic Footer Legal Conditions and ...

  11. What Is Dry Eye?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Dry Eye Sections What Is Dry Eye? Dry Eye Symptoms ... Dry Eye Dry Eye Treatment What Is Dry Eye? Leer en Español: ¿Qué Es el Ojo Seco? ...

  12. A depth-based head-mounted visual display to aid navigation in partially sighted individuals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen L Hicks

    Full Text Available Independent navigation for blind individuals can be extremely difficult due to the inability to recognise and avoid obstacles. Assistive techniques such as white canes, guide dogs, and sensory substitution provide a degree of situational awareness by relying on touch or hearing but as yet there are no techniques that attempt to make use of any residual vision that the individual is likely to retain. Residual vision can restricted to the awareness of the orientation of a light source, and hence any information presented on a wearable display would have to limited and unambiguous. For improved situational awareness, i.e. for the detection of obstacles, displaying the size and position of nearby objects, rather than including finer surface details may be sufficient. To test whether a depth-based display could be used to navigate a small obstacle course, we built a real-time head-mounted display with a depth camera and software to detect the distance to nearby objects. Distance was represented as brightness on a low-resolution display positioned close to the eyes without the benefit focussing optics. A set of sighted participants were monitored as they learned to use this display to navigate the course. All were able to do so, and time and velocity rapidly improved with practise with no increase in the number of collisions. In a second experiment a cohort of severely sight-impaired individuals of varying aetiologies performed a search task using a similar low-resolution head-mounted display. The majority of participants were able to use the display to respond to objects in their central and peripheral fields at a similar rate to sighted controls. We conclude that the skill to use a depth-based display for obstacle avoidance can be rapidly acquired and the simplified nature of the display may appropriate for the development of an aid for sight-impaired individuals.

  13. Mounting clips for panel installation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavieres, Andres; Al-Haddad, Tristan; Goodman, Joseph; Valdes, Francisco

    2017-02-14

    An exemplary mounting clip for removably attaching panels to a supporting structure comprises a base, spring locking clips, a lateral flange, a lever flange, and a spring bonding pad. The spring locking clips extend upwardly from the base. The lateral flange extends upwardly from a first side of the base. The lateral flange comprises a slot having an opening configured to receive at least a portion of one of the one or more panels. The lever flange extends outwardly from the lateral flange. The spring bonding flange extends downwardly from the lever flange. At least a portion of the first spring bonding flange comprises a serrated edge for gouging at least a portion of the one or more panels when the one or more panels are attached to the mounting clip to electrically and mechanically couple the one or more panels to the mounting clip.

  14. Head and eye movements in unrestrained pigeons (Columba livia)

    OpenAIRE

    Wohlschläger, Andreas; Jäger, Ralf; Delius, Juan

    1993-01-01

    Head and eye movements were simultaneously recorded during locomotory and pecking behavior of 4 pigeons, which were trained to traverse a conditioning chamber, with a pecking key and a food dispenser at each end. Each trial involved key pecking, walking, and feeding. Head movements were registered with a skull-mounted miniature accelerometer, and eye movements were recorded with implanted electrooculogram (EOG) electrodes. An almost perfect temporal coordination between head and eye movements...

  15. Infant Eye-Tracking in the Context of Goal-Directed Actions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbetta, Daniela; Guan, Yu; Williams, Joshua L.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents two methods that we applied to our research to record infant gaze in the context of goal-oriented actions using different eye-tracking devices: head-mounted and remote eye-tracking. For each type of eye-tracking system, we discuss their advantages and disadvantages, describe the particular experimental setups we used to study…

  16. Control of Wall Mounting Robot

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sloth, Christoffer; Pedersen, Rasmus

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a method for designing controllers for trajectory tracking with actuator constraints. In particular, we consider a joystick-controlled wall mounting robot called WallMo. In contrast to previous works, a model-free approach is taken to the control problem, where the path...

  17. Mount Rainier active cascade volcano

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    Mount Rainier is one of about two dozen active or recently active volcanoes in the Cascade Range, an arc of volcanoes in the northwestern United States and Canada. The volcano is located about 35 kilometers southeast of the Seattle-Tacoma metropolitan area, which has a population of more than 2.5 million. This metropolitan area is the high technology industrial center of the Pacific Northwest and one of the commercial aircraft manufacturing centers of the United States. The rivers draining the volcano empty into Puget Sound, which has two major shipping ports, and into the Columbia River, a major shipping lane and home to approximately a million people in southwestern Washington and northwestern Oregon. Mount Rainier is an active volcano. It last erupted approximately 150 years ago, and numerous large floods and debris flows have been generated on its slopes during this century. More than 100,000 people live on the extensive mudflow deposits that have filled the rivers and valleys draining the volcano during the past 10,000 years. A major volcanic eruption or debris flow could kill thousands of residents and cripple the economy of the Pacific Northwest. Despite the potential for such danger, Mount Rainier has received little study. Most of the geologic work on Mount Rainier was done more than two decades ago. Fundamental topics such as the development, history, and stability of the volcano are poorly understood.

  18. Mounting power cables on SOLEIL

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    1999-01-01

    The power couplers are mounted on the SOLEIL cryomodule in a clean room. The cryomodule will allow superconducting technology to be used at SOLEIL, the French national synchrotron facility. This work is carried out as part of a collaboration between CERN and CEA Saclay, the French National Atomic Energy Commission.

  19. Design, Sensing and Control of a Robotic Prosthetic Eye for Natural Eye Movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. J. Gu

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Loss of an eye is a tragedy for a person, who may suffer psychologically and physically. This paper is concerned with the design, sensing and control of a robotic prosthetic eye that moves horizontally in synchronization with the movement of the natural eye. Two generations of robotic prosthetic eye models have been developed. The first generation model uses an external infrared sensor array mounted on the frame of a pair of eyeglasses to detect the natural eye movement and to feed the control system to drive the artificial eye to move with the natural eye. The second generation model removes the impractical usage of the eye glass frame and uses the human brain EOG (electro-ocular-graph signal picked up by electrodes placed on the sides of a person's temple to carry out the same eye movement detection and control tasks as mentioned above. Theoretical issues on sensor failure detection and recovery, and signal processing techniques used in sensor data fusion, are studied using statistical methods and artificial neural network based techniques. In addition, practical control system design and implementation using micro-controllers are studied and implemented to carry out the natural eye movement detection and artificial robotic eye control tasks. Simulation and experimental studies are performed, and the results are included to demonstrate the effectiveness of the research project reported in this paper.

  20. Eye trauma

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-02-02

    Feb 2, 2011 ... Industrial workers should be protected by safety glasses but injuries occur nonetheless. Eye trauma is frequent in homes, farms and backyards where safety glasses are not available. Angle-grinders, metal beating, hammering, fence mending, herding animals, forestry, fire fighting and cutting sugar cane ...

  1. Your Eyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... OK if you ask to see their liver! Big as a Ping Pong Ball The eye is about as big as a ping-pong ball and sits in ... of sight! Reviewed by: Jonathan H. Salvin, MD Date reviewed: February 2015 More on this topic for: ...

  2. Eye trauma

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-02-02

    Feb 2, 2011 ... Stain cornea with fluorescein. It is advisable to examine the eye as soon as possible since a delay will invariably lead to lid swelling, making the examination far more difficult. This can be overcome using cotton tips to retract the eyelids, or lid retractors can be made from bent paper clips (Illustration 1).

  3. Tension pneumocephalus: Mount Fuji sign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pulastya Sanyal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A 13-year-old male was operated for a space occupying lesion in the brain. A noncontrast computed tomography scan done in the late postoperative period showed massive subdural air collection causing compression of bilateral frontal lobes with widening of interhemispheric fissure and the frontal lobes acquiring a peak like configuration - causing tension pneumocephalus-"Mount Fuji sign." Tension pneumocephalus occurs when air enters the extradural or intradural spaces in sufficient volume to exert a mass or pressure effect on the brain, leading to brain herniation. Tension pneumocephalus is a surgical emergency, which needs immediate intervention in the form of decompression of the cranial cavity by a burr hole or needle aspiration. The Mount Fuji sign differentiates tension pneumocephalus from pneumocephalus.

  4. Head-mounted display system for virtual reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ding; Xu, Tong; Wang, Yongtian; Hua, Hong; Hu, Ying

    1996-09-01

    A head-mounted-display system for virtual reality is developed, which is mainly comprised of a pair of viewing lenses together with LCDs to provide the stereoscopic image, and a tracking device to detect the motion of the head. Each viewing lens contains 4 optical elements, and can give a 120 degree(s) field of view for each eye when used with a 2.2' LCD. The tracking device consists of a 3-axis fluxgate magnetometer and a pendulum, which determines the orientation angles of the helmet. Another version of the tracking device capable of measuring 6 degrees of freedom movement of the helmet is currently under development.

  5. Head Mounted Display with a Roof Mirror Array Fold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olczak, Eugene (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    The present invention includes a head mounted display (HMD) worn by a user. The HMD includes a display projecting an image through an optical lens. The HMD also includes a one-dimensional retro reflective array receiving the image through the optical lens at a first angle with respect to the display and deflecting the image at a second angle different than the first angle with respect to the display. The one-dimensional retro reflective array reflects the image in order to project the image onto an eye of the user.

  6. MOUNT HENRY ROADLESS AREA, MONTANA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Loenen, Richard E.; Conyac, Martin D.

    1984-01-01

    A mineral survey of the Mount Henry Roadless Area, Lincoln County, Montana, was conducted. A small area located along the southwest boundary was determined to have a probable mineral-resource potential for low-grade deposits of stratabound copper and silver. There is little possibility for locatable mineral, coal, oil, gas, and geothermal resources in the remainder of the area. There are no mines, prospects, or records of mineral production within the roadless area.

  7. Conjunctivitis (Pink Eye)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... can put on your web pages. Conjunctivitis (Pink Eye) One-Page Overview Pink, itchy eyes? Conjunctivitis – or ... yourself from getting and spreading pink eye . Pink Eye: What To Do Discusses causes and treatment, when ...

  8. About the Eye

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... NEI for Kids > About the Eye All About Vision About the Eye Ask a Scientist Video Series ... Eye Health and Safety First Aid Tips Healthy Vision Tips Protective Eyewear Sports and Your Eyes Fun ...

  9. Eye Disease Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... USAJobs Home > Eye Health Information > Eye Disease Simulations Eye Disease Simulations Age-Related Macular Degeneration Cataract Diabetic ... information page Back to top Diabetic Retinopathy Diabetic Eye Disease information page Back to top Glaucoma Glaucoma ...

  10. About the Eye

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... USAJobs Home > NEI for Kids > About the Eye All About Vision About the Eye Ask a Scientist Video ... Vision Tips Protective Eyewear Sports and Your Eyes Fun Stuff Cool Eye Tricks Links to More Information ...

  11. About the Eye

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... USAJobs Home > NEI for Kids > About the Eye All About Vision About the Eye Ask a Scientist ... Links to More Information Optical Illusions Printables About the Eye Your eyes are made up of many ...

  12. Eye muscle repair - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Lazy eye repair - discharge; Strabismus repair - discharge; Extraocular muscle surgery - discharge ... You or your child had eye muscle repair surgery to correct eye muscle ... term for crossed eyes is strabismus. Children most often ...

  13. Diabetic Eye Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease, & Other Dental Problems Diabetes & Sexual & Urologic Problems Diabetic Eye Disease What is diabetic eye disease? Diabetic eye disease is a group ... eye diseases that can threaten your sight are Diabetic retinopathy The retina is the inner lining at ...

  14. About the Eye

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... eye behind the iris that helps to focus light on the retina. It allows the eye to ... of the eye. It regulates the amount of light entering the eye through the pupil. Pupil (PYOO- ...

  15. Why Do Eyes Water?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Educators Search English Español Why Do Eyes Water? KidsHealth / For Kids / Why Do Eyes Water? What's ... coming out of your nose. Why Do Eyes Water? Eyes water for lots of different reasons besides ...

  16. Eye Movement Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... t work properly. There are many kinds of eye movement disorders. Two common ones are Strabismus - a disorder ... of the eyes, sometimes called "dancing eyes" Some eye movement disorders are present at birth. Others develop over ...

  17. Mounting support for a photovoltaic module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Gregory Michael; Barsun, Stephan K.; Coleman, Nathaniel T.; Zhou, Yin

    2013-03-26

    A mounting support for a photovoltaic module is described. The mounting support includes a foundation having an integrated wire-way ledge portion. A photovoltaic module support mechanism is coupled with the foundation.

  18. Eye Contricks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas J Wade

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Pictorial images are icons as well as eye-cons: they provide distillations of objects or ideas into simpler shapes. They create the impression of representing that which cannot be presented. Even at the level of the photograph, the links between icon and object are tenuous. The dimensions of depth and motion are missing from icons, and these alone introduce all manner of potential ambiguities. The history of art can be considered as exploring the missing link between icon and object. Eye-cons can also be illusions—tricks of vision so that what is seen does not necessarily correspond to what is physically presented. Pictorial images can be spatialised or stylised; spatialised images generally share some of the projective characteristics of the object represented. Written words are also icons, but they do not resemble the objects they represent—they are stylised or conventional. Icons as stylised words and spatialised images were set in delightful opposition by René Magritte in a series of pipe paintings, and this theme is here alluded to. Most of visual science is now concerned with icons—two-dimensional displays on computer monitors. Is vision now the science of eye-cons?

  19. Preventing Eye Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Eye Injuries Sections Preventing Eye Injuries Recognizing and Treating Eye ... Five Steps to Safer Champagne Celebrations Preventing Eye Injuries Leer en Español: Lesiones de los Ojos Reviewed ...

  20. Magnetic tracking of eye position in freely behaving chickens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Jason S.; Sridharan, Devarajan; Knudsen, Eric I.

    2013-01-01

    Research on the visual system of non-primates, such as birds and rodents, is increasing. Evidence that neural responses can differ dramatically between head-immobilized and freely behaving animals underlines the importance of studying visual processing in ethologically relevant contexts. In order to systematically study visual responses in freely behaving animals, an unobtrusive system for monitoring eye-in-orbit position in real time is essential. We describe a novel system for monitoring eye position that utilizes a head-mounted magnetic displacement sensor coupled with an eye-implanted magnet. This system is small, lightweight, and offers high temporal and spatial resolution in real time. We use the system to demonstrate the stability of the eye and the stereotypy of eye position during two different behavioral tasks in chickens. This approach offers a viable alternative to search coil and optical eye tracking techniques for high resolution tracking of eye-in-orbit position in behaving animals. PMID:24312023

  1. MOUNT MORIAH ROADLESS AREA, NEVADA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Robert R.; Wood, Robert H.

    1984-01-01

    A mineral survey identified the northeastern part of the Mount Moriah Roadless Area in extreme east-central Nevada as an area of probable potential for the occurrence of small, isolated deposits containing lead and zinc. Many active quarries in a unique high-quality decorative building stone occur in the area and have substantiated mineral-resource potential. Further studies in the roadless area might include detailed mapping of exposed Prospect Mountain Quartzite building stone units and notation of their suitability for quarrying. More detailed geochemical studies in the area of probable base-metal resource potential might include additional stream-sediment sampling and sampling along fault zones.

  2. Helmet-mounted pilot night vision systems: Human factors issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Sandra G.; Brickner, Michael S.

    1989-01-01

    Helmet-mounted displays of infrared imagery (forward-looking infrared (FLIR)) allow helicopter pilots to perform low level missions at night and in low visibility. However, pilots experience high visual and cognitive workload during these missions, and their performance capabilities may be reduced. Human factors problems inherent in existing systems stem from three primary sources: the nature of thermal imagery; the characteristics of specific FLIR systems; and the difficulty of using FLIR system for flying and/or visually acquiring and tracking objects in the environment. The pilot night vision system (PNVS) in the Apache AH-64 provides a monochrome, 30 by 40 deg helmet-mounted display of infrared imagery. Thermal imagery is inferior to television imagery in both resolution and contrast ratio. Gray shades represent temperatures differences rather than brightness variability, and images undergo significant changes over time. The limited field of view, displacement of the sensor from the pilot's eye position, and monocular presentation of a bright FLIR image (while the other eye remains dark-adapted) are all potential sources of disorientation, limitations in depth and distance estimation, sensations of apparent motion, and difficulties in target and obstacle detection. Insufficient information about human perceptual and performance limitations restrains the ability of human factors specialists to provide significantly improved specifications, training programs, or alternative designs. Additional research is required to determine the most critical problem areas and to propose solutions that consider the human as well as the development of technology.

  3. Passive method of eliminating accommodation/convergence disparity in stereoscopic head-mounted displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichenlaub, Jesse B.

    2005-03-01

    The difference in accommodation and convergence distance experienced when viewing stereoscopic displays has long been recognized as a source of visual discomfort. It is especially problematic in head mounted virtual reality and enhanced reality displays, where images must often be displayed across a large depth range or superimposed on real objects. DTI has demonstrated a novel method of creating stereoscopic images in which the focus and fixation distances are closely matched for all parts of the scene from close distances to infinity. The method is passive in the sense that it does not rely on eye tracking, moving parts, variable focus optics, vibrating optics, or feedback loops. The method uses a rapidly changing illumination pattern in combination with a high speed microdisplay to create cones of light that converge at different distances to form the voxels of a high resolution space filling image. A bench model display was built and a series of visual tests were performed in order to demonstrate the concept and investigate both its capabilities and limitations. Results proved conclusively that real optical images were being formed and that observers had to change their focus to read text or see objects at different distances

  4. Gaze and eye-tracking solutions for psychological research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mele, Maria Laura; Federici, Stefano

    2012-08-01

    Eye-tracking technology is a growing field used to detect eye movements and analyze human processing of visual information for interactive and diagnostic applications. Different domains in scientific research such as neuroscience, experimental psychology, computer science and human factors can benefit from eye-tracking methods and techniques to unobtrusively investigate the quantitative evidence underlying visual processes. In order to meet the experimental requirements concerning the variety of application fields, different gaze- and eye-tracking solutions using high-speed cameras are being developed (e.g., eye-tracking glasses, head-mounted or desk-mounted systems), which are also compatible with other analysis devices such as magnetic resonance imaging. This work presents an overview of the main application fields of eye-tracking methodology in psychological research. In particular, two innovative solutions will be shown: (1) the SMI RED-M eye-tracker, a high performance portable remote eye-tracker suitable for different settings, that requires maximum mobility and flexibility; (2) a wearable mobile gaze-tracking device--the SMI eye-tracking glasses--which is suitable for real-world and virtual environment research. For each kind of technology, the functions and different possibilities of application in experimental psychology will be described by focusing on some examples of experimental tasks (i.e., visual search, reading, natural tasks, scene viewing and other information processing) and theoretical approaches (e.g., embodied cognition).

  5. Eye casualty services in London

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, H B; Daniel, C S; Verma, S

    2013-01-01

    The combined pressures of the European Working Time Directive, 4 h waiting time target, and growing rates of unplanned hospital attendances have forced a major consolidation of eye casualty departments across the country, with the remaining units seeing a rapid increase in demand. We examine the effect of these changes on the provision of emergency eye care in Central London, and see what wider lessons can be learned. We surveyed the managers responsible for each of London's 8 out-of-hours eye casualty services, analysed data on attendance numbers, and conducted detailed interviews with lead clinicians. At London's two largest units, Moorfields Eye Hospital and the Western Eye Hospital, annual attendance numbers have been rising at 7.9% per year (to 76 034 patients in 2010/11) and 9.6% per year (to 31 128 patients in 2010/11), respectively. Using Moorfields as a case study, we discuss methods to increase capacity and efficiency in response to this demand, and also examine some of the unintended consequences of service consolidation including patients travelling long distances to geographically inappropriate units, and confusion over responsibility for out-of-hours inpatient cover. We describe a novel ‘referral pathway' developed to minimise unnecessary travelling and delay for patients, and propose a forum for the strategic planning of London's eye casualty services in the future. PMID:23370420

  6. Evaluation of a remote webcam-based eye tracker

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovsgaard, Henrik; Agustin, Javier San; Johansen, Sune Alstrup

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we assess the performance of an open-source gaze tracker in a remote (i.e. table-mounted) setup, and compare it with two other commercial eye trackers. An experiment with 5 subjects showed the open-source eye tracker to have a significantly higher level of accuracy than one of the c......In this paper we assess the performance of an open-source gaze tracker in a remote (i.e. table-mounted) setup, and compare it with two other commercial eye trackers. An experiment with 5 subjects showed the open-source eye tracker to have a significantly higher level of accuracy than one...

  7. Computer Analysis of Eye Blood-Vessel Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, R. J.; White, B. S.

    1984-01-01

    Technique rapidly diagnoses diabetes mellitus. Photographs of "whites" of patients' eyes scanned by computerized image analyzer programmed to quantify density of small blood vessels in conjuctiva. Comparison with data base of known normal and diabetic patients facilitates rapid diagnosis.

  8. What Is Dry Eye?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Eye Symptoms Causes of Dry Eye Dry Eye Treatment What Is Dry Eye? Leer en Español: ¿Qué ... Your Eyelid Nov 29, 2017 New Dry Eye Treatment is a Tear-Jerker Jul 21, 2017 Three ...

  9. What Is Dry Eye?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Tips & Prevention News Ask an Ophthalmologist Patient Stories Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Dry Eye ... Eye Treatment What Is Dry Eye? Leer en Español: ¿Qué Es el Ojo Seco? Written By: Kierstan ...

  10. About the Eye

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Ask a Scientist Video Series Glossary The Visual System Your Eyes’ Natural Defenses Eye Health and Safety First Aid Tips Healthy Vision Tips Protective Eyewear Sports and Your Eyes Fun Stuff Cool Eye Tricks Links to More Information Optical Illusions Printables About the Eye Your eyes ...

  11. What Is Dry Eye?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Center Laser Surgery Education Center Redmond Ethics Center Global Ophthalmology Guide Eye Health Find an Ophthalmologist Academy Store Eye Health A- ... Get ophthalmologist-reviewed tips and information about eye health and preserving your vision. Privacy ... Choosing Wisely When It Comes to Eye Care, Part 5 Mar 19, 2013 Eye Makeup Safety ...

  12. What Is Dry Eye?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Health Find an Ophthalmologist Academy Store Eye Health A-Z Symptoms Glasses & Contacts Tips & Prevention News Ask ... Ophthalmologist Patient Stories Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Dry Eye Sections What Is Dry Eye? ...

  13. Development of novel adjustable focus head mount display for concurrent image-guided treatment applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hojong; Ryu, Jaemyung; Yoon, Changhan

    2017-12-01

    A conventional see-through head mount display contains many optical lenses, which can be problematic in image-guided treatment applications due to its size, weight, structure, and focus limitation. Therefore, we have designed a new type of see-through head mount display with a reduced number of optical lenses and an adequate optical resolution that can be utilized for image-guided treatment applications. A new type of adjustable focus head mount display with expanded virtual images and an external treatment space that can be provided to the eyes of a user by enlarging the images of a small display is designed and investigated in this study. This type of head mount display can be used in image-guided treatment applications because of the dual paths of imaging and treatment from the optical systems. Therefore, this system with an adjustable focus function can aid doctors in obtaining images for the treatment of the eyes of patients because every patient has a unique pupil size. The results of the adjustable focus see-through head mount display showed distortion values of +0.36% in the +1 diopter location and -0.55% in the -4 diopter location, and there are less significant modulation transfer function differences within the ±5 diopter locations. Low optical distortions within ±0.5 diopters can help doctors image the eye conditions of patients through fewer image processing techniques. Therefore, the designed adjustable focus head mount display can provide low optical aberrations and high optical modulation transfer function resolutions for image-guided treatment applications.

  14. Advanced centering of mounted optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenzel, Christian; Winkelmann, Ralf; Klar, Rainer; Philippen, Peter; Garden, Ron; Pearlman, Sasha; Pearlman, Guy

    2016-03-01

    Camera objectives or laser focusing units consist of complex lens systems with multiple lenses. The optical performance of such complex lens systems is dependent on the correct positioning of lenses in the system. Deviations in location or angle within the system directly affect the achievable image quality. To optimize the achievable performance of lens systems, these errors can be corrected by machining the mount of the lens with respect to the optical axis. The Innolite GmbH and Opto Alignment Technology have developed a novel machine for such center turning operation. A confocal laser reflection measurement sensor determines the absolute position of the optical axis with reference to the spindle axis. As a strong advantage compared to autocollimator measurements the utilized Opto Alignment sensor is capable of performing centration and tilt measurements without changing objectives on any radius surface from 2 mm to infinity and lens diameters from 0.5 mm to 300 mm, including cylinder, aspheric, and parabolic surfaces. In addition, it performs significantly better on coated lenses. The optical axis is skewed and offset in reference to the spindle axis as determined by the measurement. Using the information about the mount and all reference surfaces, a machine program for an untrue turning process is calculated from this data in a fully automated manner. Since the optical axis is not collinear with the spindle axis, the diamond tool compensates for these linear and tilt deviations with small correction movements. This results in a simple machine setup where the control system works as an electronic alignment chuck. Remaining eccentricity of <1 μm and angular errors of < 10 sec are typical alignment results.

  15. EyeAR: Refocusable Augmented Reality Content through Eye Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damien Constantine Rompapas

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Augmented Reality (AR superimposes computer graphics (CG onto a user’s view of the real world. A key quality problem in this field is to achieve coherence between reality and CG when the user’s eyes refocus or change pupil size. We designed and evaluated a display that improves coherence by measuring the user’s eye state and continuously adapting CG accordingly. Our tabletop prototype emulates an Optical See-Through Head-Mounted Display, a common AR display device. In our evaluation, participants observed three pillars at different depths. We then challenged them to identify a virtual pillar among the three while freely refocusing their eyes. Results show that our design significantly improved realism. Compared to Light Field Displays, our design aims to simplify display-optics while providing similar quality. We could only partially achieve this goal. We discuss the lessons we learned and how we plan to overcome the remaining challenges. The experimental protocol from our evaluation is useful for display developers as it can be used to measure the coherence of a display.

  16. Ocean floor mounting of wave energy converters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Stefan G

    2015-01-20

    A system for mounting a set of wave energy converters in the ocean includes a pole attached to a floor of an ocean and a slider mounted on the pole in a manner that permits the slider to move vertically along the pole and rotate about the pole. The wave energy converters can then be mounted on the slider to allow adjustment of the depth and orientation of the wave energy converters.

  17. Mounting and Alignment of IXO Mirror Segments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kai-Wing; Zhang, William; Evans, Tyler; McClelland, Ryan; Hong, Melinda; Mazzarella, James; Saha, Timo; Jalota, Lalit; Olsen, Lawrence; Byron, Glenn

    2010-01-01

    A suspension-mounting scheme is developed for the IXO (International X-ray Observatory) mirror segments in which the figure of the mirror segment is preserved in each stage of mounting. The mirror, first fixed on a thermally compatible strongback, is subsequently transported, aligned and transferred onto its mirror housing. In this paper, we shall outline the requirement, approaches, and recent progress of the suspension mount processes.

  18. Recent advances in head-mounted light field displays for virtual and augmented reality (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Hong

    2017-02-01

    Head-mounted light field displays render a true 3D scene by sampling either the projections of the 3D scene at different depths or the directions of the light rays apparently emitted by the 3D scene and viewed from different eye positions. They are capable of rendering correct or nearly correct focus cues and addressing the very well-known vergence-accommodation mismatch problem in conventional virtual and augmented reality displays. In this talk, I will focus on reviewing recent advancements of head-mounted light field displays for VR and AR applications. I will demonstrate examples of HMD systems developed in my group.

  19. Surface mount technology terms and concepts

    CERN Document Server

    Zarrow, Phil

    1997-01-01

    In today's fast-paced world of technology, keeping up with new terms and concepts can be quite a challenge. Surface Mount Technology Terms and Concepts is an invaluable reference containing over 1000 terms and definitions used in the SMT field. Each term is followed by a paragraph or two explaining the meaning and how it fits into the surface mount industry. The easy lookup and concise explanations make it ideal for those starting out in the field as well as professionals already involved in surface mount design and assembly.Glossary of over 1000 surface mount technology terms

  20. About the Eye

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Cool Eye Tricks Links to More Information Optical Illusions Printables About the Eye Your eyes are made ... of the macula, where your vision is sharpest. Optic nerve (OP-tic nurv) is the bundle of ...

  1. About the Eye

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and other programs with respect to blinding eye diseases, visual disorders, mechanisms of visual function, preservation of sight, and ... National Eye Health Education Program (NEHEP) Diabetic Eye Disease Education Program Glaucoma Education Program Low Vision Education ...

  2. About the Eye

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Glossary The Visual System Your Eyes’ Natural Defenses Eye Health and Safety First Aid Tips Healthy Vision ... to More Information Optical Illusions Printables About the Eye Your eyes are made up of many different ...

  3. Dilating Eye Drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Frequently Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Dilating Eye Drops En Español Read in Chinese What are dilating eye drops? Dilating eye drops contain medication to enlarge ( ...

  4. About the Eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Glossary The Visual System Your Eyes’ Natural Defenses Eye Health and Safety First Aid Tips Healthy Vision ... to More Information Optical Illusions Printables About the Eye Your eyes are made up of many different ...

  5. Eyes, Bulging (Proptosis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Therapy for Kids With Rare Eye Disease (Video) Ocular Implant (Video) Glaucoma Additional Content Medical News Eyes, ... has other eye symptoms, such as dryness, increased tear formation, double vision, loss of vision, irritation, or ...

  6. What Is Dry Eye?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... vision? May 27, 2017 Is stopping Restasis dangerous? Mar 06, 2017 Why are my eyes bloodshot when ... When It Comes to Eye Care, Part 5 Mar 19, 2013 Eye Makeup Safety Tips Sep 25, ...

  7. LASIK eye surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to correct a very nearsighted eye may prevent amblyopia (lazy eye). Your eyes must be healthy and ... any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed physician should ...

  8. About the Eye

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and other programs with respect to blinding eye diseases, visual disorders, mechanisms of visual function, preservation of ... National Eye Health Education Program (NEHEP) Diabetic Eye Disease Education Program Glaucoma Education Program Low Vision Education ...

  9. Eye muscle repair - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100062.htm Eye muscle repair - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... the eyeball to the eye socket. The external muscles of the eye are found behind the conjunctiva. ...

  10. EyeGENE

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The eyeGENE® Biorepository and corresponding Database contain family history and clinical eye exam data from subjects enrolled in eyeGENE® Program coupled to...

  11. What Is Dry Eye?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... also when your eyes do not make the right type of tears or tear film. How do ... information about eye health and preserving your vision. Privacy Policy Related New Dry Eye Treatment is a ...

  12. What Is Dry Eye?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Member Services Advocacy Foundation About Subspecialties & More Eye Health Home Annual Meeting Clinical Education Practice Management Member ... Center Redmond Ethics Center Global Ophthalmology Guide Eye Health Find an Ophthalmologist Academy Store Eye Health A- ...

  13. What Is Dry Eye?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Get ophthalmologist-reviewed tips and information about eye health and preserving your vision. Privacy ... Choosing Wisely When It Comes to Eye Care, Part 5 Mar 19, 2013 Eye Makeup Safety ...

  14. Laser photocoagulation - eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laser coagulation; Laser eye surgery; Photocoagulation; Laser photocoagulation - diabetic eye disease; Laser photocoagulation - diabetic retinopathy; Focal photocoagulation; Scatter (or pan retinal) photocoagulation; Proliferative ...

  15. Experimental techniques for measuring the biomechanical response of the eye during impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Eric A; McNally, Craig; Duma, Stefan M

    2007-01-01

    Over 2 million eye injuries occur each year in the United States as a result of trauma. In order to show the injury potential of objects such as BB guns, paintball guns, automotive airbag systems, and other consumer products, researchers have frequently tested enucleated eyes which have been placed in simulated orbits and held in place with a 10% gelatin solution. The purpose of this study is to perform biomechanical impact tests using both in-situ human eyes and human eyes mounted in simulated orbits, to compare the responses of both. A total of 12 dynamic eye impact tests were performed to develop force-deflection characteristics of the human eye in-situ, determine the effects that the extraocular muscles have on the response of the eye to dynamic impacts, and to characterize the force-deflection response of eyes supported with a gelatin solution within a simulated orbit. It was found that force-deflection corridors are similar with the extraocular muscles left intact or transected. Impact tests performed on eyes mounted in simulated orbits made of polycarbonate and filled with a 10% gelatin solution showed force-deflection responses that matched those of the in-situ eye impact tests. It is concluded that the use of simulated orbits to perform eye impact tests offers the appropriate boundary conditions to represent the in-situ human eye under dynamic eye impact events.

  16. Sustained eye closure slows saccades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikh, Aasef G.; Wong, Aaron L.; Optican, Lance M.; Miura, Kenichiro; Solomon, David; Zee, David S.

    2010-01-01

    Saccadic eye movements rapidly orient the line of sight towards the object of interest. Pre-motor burst neurons (BNs) controlling saccades receive excitation from superior colliculus and cerebellum, but inhibition by omnipause neurons (OPNs) prevents saccades. When the OPNs pause, BNs begin to fire. It has been presumed that part of the BN burst comes from post-inhibitory rebound (PIR). We hypothesized that in the absence of prior inhibition from OPNs there would be no PIR, and thus the increase in initial firing rate of BNs would be reduced. Consequently, saccade acceleration would be reduced. We measured eye movements and showed that sustained eye closure, which inhibits the activity of OPNs and thus hypothetically should weaken PIR, reduced the peak velocity, acceleration, and deceleration of saccades in healthy human subjects. Saccades under closed eyelids also had irregular trajectories; the frequency of the oscillations underlying this irregularity was similar to that of high-frequency ocular flutter (back-to-back saccades) often seen in normal subjects during attempted fixation at straight ahead while eyes are closed. Saccades and quick phases of nystagmus are generated by the same pre-motor neurons, and we found that the quick-phase velocity of nystagmus was also reduced by lid closure. These changes were not due to a mechanical hindrance to the eyes, because lid closure did not affect the peak velocities or accelerations of the eyes in the “slow-phase” response to rapid head movements of comparable speeds to those of saccades. These results indicate a role for OPNs in generating the abrupt onset and high velocities of saccades. We hypothesize that the mechanism involved is PIR in pre-motor burst neurons. PMID:20573593

  17. Geologic Map of Mount Mazama and Crater Lake Caldera, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacon, Charles R.

    2008-01-01

    Crater Lake partly fills one of the most spectacular calderas of the world, an 8-by-10-km basin more than 1 km deep formed by collapse of the volcano known as Mount Mazama (fig. 1) during a rapid series of explosive eruptions about 7,700 years ago. Having a maximum depth of 594 m, Crater Lake is the deepest lake in the United States. Crater Lake National Park, dedicated in 1902, encompasses 645 km2 of pristine forested and alpine terrain, including the lake itself, virtually all of Mount Mazama, and most of the area of the geologic map. The geology of the area was first described in detail by Diller and Patton (1902) and later by Williams (1942), whose vivid account led to international recognition of Crater Lake as the classic collapse caldera. Because of excellent preservation and access, Mount Mazama, Crater Lake caldera, and the deposits formed by the climactic eruption constitute a natural laboratory for study of volcanic and magmatic processes. For example, the climactic ejecta are renowned among volcanologists as evidence for systematic compositional zonation within a subterranean magma chamber. Mount Mazama's climactic eruption also is important as the source of the widespread Mazama ash, a useful Holocene stratigraphic marker throughout the Pacific Northwest, adjacent Canada, and offshore. A detailed bathymetric survey of the floor of Crater Lake in 2000 (Bacon and others, 2002) provides a unique record of postcaldera eruptions, the interplay between volcanism and filling of the lake, and sediment transport within this closed basin. Knowledge of the geology and eruptive history of the Mount Mazama edifice, greatly enhanced by the caldera wall exposures, gives exceptional insight into how large volcanoes of magmatic arcs grow and evolve. Lastly, the many smaller volcanoes of the High Cascades beyond the limits of Mount Mazama are a source of information on the flux of mantle-derived magma through the region. General principles of magmatic and eruptive

  18. Head-Mounted Display Technology for Low-Vision Rehabilitation and Vision Enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrlich, Joshua R; Ojeda, Lauro V; Wicker, Donna; Day, Sherry; Howson, Ashley; Lakshminarayanan, Vasudevan; Moroi, Sayoko E

    2017-04-01

    To describe the various types of head-mounted display technology, their optical and human-factors considerations, and their potential for use in low-vision rehabilitation and vision enhancement. Expert perspective. An overview of head-mounted display technology by an interdisciplinary team of experts drawing on key literature in the field. Head-mounted display technologies can be classified based on their display type and optical design. See-through displays such as retinal projection devices have the greatest potential for use as low-vision aids. Devices vary by their relationship to the user's eyes, field of view, illumination, resolution, color, stereopsis, effect on head motion, and user interface. These optical and human-factors considerations are important when selecting head-mounted displays for specific applications and patient groups. Head-mounted display technologies may offer advantages over conventional low-vision aids. Future research should compare head-mounted displays with commonly prescribed low-vision aids to compare their effectiveness in addressing the impairments and rehabilitation goals of diverse patient populations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Implementasi Rangkaian Elektronika Menggunakan Teknologi Surface Mount

    OpenAIRE

    Suherman

    2009-01-01

    Salahsatu perkembangan perangkat elektronika adalah miniaturisasi, yakni pengurangan pada volume perangkat. Dan teknologi yang berperan penting dalam proses miniaturisasi adalah teknologi Surface Mount. Teknologi Surface Mount adalah teknologi komponen yang berusaha nengurangi ukuran komponen dan diletakkan secara langsung pada permukaan PCB. Teknologi ini menggantikan teknologi sebelumnya, yakni teknologi thru hole, dimana dalam pemasangannya dilakukan pelubangan pada PCB. Pemakaian kompo...

  20. Mount Athos: Between autonomy and statehood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avramović Dragutin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Legal status of the Mount Athos is characterized by many special features that make it internationally unique legal regime. The author analyzes peculiarities of Mount Athos territorial status, legal position of residents and visitors, as well as organization of Mount Athos authorities. The author concludes that the Mount Athos is characterized by a kind of para-sovereignty. Its autonomy involves not only the internal organization, autonomous governance and religious autonomy, but it also includes many elements of secular life of their visitors. Mount Athos has its own, separate legislative, administrative and judicial powers, while the Statute of the Mount Athos has greater legal force than all the other laws of the Greek state, because the state can not unilaterally change its provisions. Having in mind that the wide self-government is vested in church authorities and that the monks have very specific way of living, the author takes a position that the Mount Athos represent 'monastic state', but without statehood. The author also states that the Mount Athos will be faced with many challenges in the context of spreading of an assimilating, universal conception of human rights.

  1. Development of Magnetorheological Engine Mount Test Rig

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Yunos Mohd Razali

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Ride comfort is an important factor in any road vehicle performance. Nonetheless, passenger ride comfort is sometimes affected by the vibrations resulting from the road irregularities. Vehicle ride comfort is also often compromised by engine vibration. Engine mount is one of the devices which act as vibration isolator from unwanted vibration from engine to the driver and passengers. This paper explains the development of the test rig used for laboratory testing of Magnetorheological (MR engine mount characterization. MR engine mount was developed to investigate the vibration isolation process. An engine mount test machine was designed to measure the displacement, relative velocity and damper force with respect to current supply to characterize the hysteresis behavior of the damper and as force tracking control of the MR engine mount.

  2. The use of head-mounted display eyeglasses for teaching surgical skills: A prospective randomised study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peden, Robert G; Mercer, Rachel; Tatham, Andrew J

    2016-10-01

    To investigate whether 'surgeon's eye view' videos provided via head-mounted displays can improve skill acquisition and satisfaction in basic surgical training compared with conventional wet-lab teaching. A prospective randomised study of 14 medical students with no prior suturing experience, randomised to 3 groups: 1) conventional teaching; 2) head-mounted display-assisted teaching and 3) head-mounted display self-learning. All were instructed in interrupted suturing followed by 15 minutes' practice. Head-mounted displays provided a 'surgeon's eye view' video demonstrating the technique, available during practice. Subsequently students undertook a practical assessment, where suturing was videoed and graded by masked assessors using a 10-point surgical skill score (1 = very poor technique, 10 = very good technique). Students completed a questionnaire assessing confidence and satisfaction. Suturing ability after teaching was similar between groups (P = 0.229, Kruskal-Wallis test). Median surgical skill scores were 7.5 (range 6-10), 6 (range 3-8) and 7 (range 1-7) following head-mounted display-assisted teaching, conventional teaching, and head-mounted display self-learning respectively. There was good agreement between graders regarding surgical skill scores (rho.c = 0.599, r = 0.603), and no difference in number of sutures placed between groups (P = 0.120). The head-mounted display-assisted teaching group reported greater enjoyment than those attending conventional teaching (P = 0.033). Head-mounted display self-learning was regarded as least useful (7.4 vs 9.0 for conventional teaching, P = 0.021), but more enjoyable than conventional teaching (9.6 vs 8.0, P = 0.050). Teaching augmented with head-mounted displays was significantly more enjoyable than conventional teaching. Students undertaking self-directed learning using head-mounted displays with pre-recorded videos had comparable skill acquisition to those attending traditional wet

  3. Computer-Assisted Eye Examination: Background and Prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-05-01

    neurology . A general eye-examination case history is different only in that the questions refer to problems of vision. Also, it may be wise to assume that...the principle of the astronomical tele- ...1C [he foal length of the objective was 40.5 mon that of the eyepiece, 27 mm. The lenses ,,rc mounted it

  4. About the Eye

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the eye behind the iris that helps to focus light on the retina. It allows the eye to focus on both far and near objects. Iris is ... front of your eye. It helps your eye focus light so things look sharp and clear. Sclera ( ...

  5. About the Eye

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... All About Vision About the Eye Ask a Scientist Video Series Glossary The Visual System Your Eyes’ Natural Defenses Eye Health and Safety First Aid Tips Healthy Vision Tips Protective Eyewear Sports and Your Eyes Fun Stuff Cool Eye Tricks ...

  6. Eye Injuries in Sports

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... very high risk. This includes boxing, wrestling, and martial arts.There are several types of common eye injuries in sports.Blunt trauma injuries. These occur when something or someone hits you in or around your eye. A black eye is bruising of your eye, eyelid, or ...

  7. Maxwellian Eye Fixation during Natural Scene Perception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Duchesne

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available When we explore a visual scene, our eyes make saccades to jump rapidly from one area to another and fixate regions of interest to extract useful information. While the role of fixation eye movements in vision has been widely studied, their random nature has been a hitherto neglected issue. Here we conducted two experiments to examine the Maxwellian nature of eye movements during fixation. In Experiment 1, eight participants were asked to perform free viewing of natural scenes displayed on a computer screen while their eye movements were recorded. For each participant, the probability density function (PDF of eye movement amplitude during fixation obeyed the law established by Maxwell for describing molecule velocity in gas. Only the mean amplitude of eye movements varied with expertise, which was lower in experts than novice participants. In Experiment 2, two participants underwent fixed time, free viewing of natural scenes and of their scrambled version while their eye movements were recorded. Again, the PDF of eye movement amplitude during fixation obeyed Maxwell’s law for each participant and for each scene condition (normal or scrambled. The results suggest that eye fixation during natural scene perception describes a random motion regardless of top-down or of bottom-up processes.

  8. Drill cuttings mount formation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teh, Su Yean; Koh, Hock Lye

    2014-07-01

    Oil, Gas and Energy sector has been identified as an essential driving force in the Malaysian Economic Transformation Programs (ETP). Recently confirmed discovery of many offshore oil and gas deposits in Malaysian waters has ignited new confidence in this sector. However, this has also spurred intense interest on safeguarding the health and environment of coastal waters in Malaysia from adverse impact resulting from offshore oil and gas production operation. Offshore discharge of spent drilling mud and rock cuttings is the least expensive and simplest option to dispose of large volumes of drilling wastes. But this onsite offshore disposal may have adverse environmental impacts on the water column and the seabed. It may also pose occupational health hazards to the workers living in the offshore platforms. It is therefore important to model the transport and deposition of drilling mud and rock cuttings in the sea to enable proper assessment of their adverse impacts on the environment and the workers. Further, accumulation of drill particles on the seabed may impede proper operation of pipelines on the seabed. In this paper, we present an in-house application model TUNA-PT developed to cater to local oil and gas industry needs to simulate the dispersion and mount formation of drill cuttings by offshore oil and gas exploration and production platforms. Using available data on Malaysian coastal waters, simulation analyses project a pile formation on the seabed with a maximum height of about 1 m and pile radius of around 30 to 50 m. Simulated pile heights are not sensitive to the heights of release of the cuttings as the sensitivity has been mitigated by the depth of water.

  9. Recognizing and Treating Eye Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Patient Stories Español Eye Health / Tips & Prevention Eye Injuries Sections Preventing Eye Injuries Recognizing and Treating Eye ... to Safer Champagne Celebrations Recognizing and Treating Eye Injuries Leer en Español: Reconociendo las Lesiones de los ...

  10. A Novel Approach to Surgical Instructions for Scrub Nurses by Using See-Through-Type Head-Mounted Display.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Soichiro; Sasaki, Asami; Sato, Chikage; Yamazaki, Mutsuko; Takayasu, Junya; Tanaka, Naofumi; Okabayashi, Norie; Hirano, Hiromi; Saito, Kazutaka; Fujii, Yasuhisa; Kihara, Kazunori

    2015-08-01

    In order to facilitate assists in surgical procedure, it is important for scrub nurses to understand the operation procedure and to share the operation status with attending surgeons. The potential utility of head-mounted display as a new imaging monitor has been proposed in the medical field. This study prospectively evaluated the usefulness of see-through-type head-mounted display as a novel intraoperative instructional tool for scrub nurses. From January to March 2014, scrub nurses who attended gasless laparoendoscopic single-port radical nephrectomy and radical prostatectomy wore the monocular see-through-type head-mounted display (AiRScouter; Brother Industries Ltd, Nagoya, Japan) displaying the instruction of the operation procedure through a crystal panel in front of the eye. Following the operation, the participants completed an anonymous questionnaire, which evaluated the image quality of the head-mounted display, the helpfulness of the head-mounted display to understand the operation procedure, and adverse effects caused by the head-mounted display. Fifteen nurses were eligible for the analysis. The intraoperative use of the head-mounted display could help scrub nurses to understand the surgical procedure and to hand out the instruments for the operation with no major head-mounted-display wear-related adverse event. This novel approach to support scrub nurses will help facilitate technical and nontechnical skills during surgery.

  11. Accuracy of rendered depth in head-mounted displays: role of eyepoint location

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaissie, Laurent; Rolland, Jannick P.

    2000-06-01

    Eyetracking is typically not available in head-mounted displays, and eye motions are thus simply ignored when 2D virtual images are displayed, giving rise to rendered depth errors in generating stereoscopic image pairs in head- mounted displays. We present an investigation and quantification of rendered depth errors linked to natural eye movements in binocular head-mounted displays, or Albertian errors, for three possible eyepoint locations: the center of the entrance pupil, the nodal point, and the center of rotation. Theoretical computations based on the intersection of chief rays concluded that, while the center of rotation yields minimal depth errors if no eyetracking is used, rendered angular errors may in some cases be significant (i.e. up to six degrees). Based on the analysis presented in this paper, we suggest that the center of entrance pupil be chosen for far field applications. The center of rotation of the eye should be chosen for near field applications under the assumption that they emphasize position accuracy versus angular accuracy. Preventing or minimizing rendered depth errors may be required for some high accuracy tasks related, for example, to medical or military visualization.

  12. Modeling of Wind Turbine Gearbox Mounting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morten K. Ebbesen

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper three bushing models are evaluated to find a best practice in modeling the mounting of wind turbine gearboxes. Parameter identification on measurements has been used to determine the bushing parameters for dynamic simulation of a gearbox including main shaft. The stiffness of the main components of the gearbox has been calculated. The torsional stiffness of the main shaft, gearbox and the mounting of the gearbox are of same order of magnitude, and eigenfrequency analysis clearly reveals that the stiffness of the gearbox mounting is of importance when modeling full wind turbine drivetrains.

  13. 1980 Mount Saint Helens, USA Images

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — An earthquake occurred at 15 32 UT, only seconds before the explosion that began the eruption of Mount St. Helens volcano. This eruption and blast blew off the top...

  14. Mount Pinatubo, Philippines: June 1991 Eruptions

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Mount Pinatubo is an andesitic island arc volcano, located on the southern Luzon Island, Philippines. Prior to 1991 it had been dormant for more than 635 years. On...

  15. Analysis of adjusting effects of mounting force on frequency conversion of mounted nonlinear optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Ruifeng; Liu, Haitao; Liang, Yingchun; Lu, Lihua

    2014-01-10

    Motivated by the need to increase the second harmonic generation (SHG) efficiency of nonlinear optics with large apertures, a novel mounting configuration with active adjusting function on the SHG efficiency is proposed and mechanically and optically studied. The adjusting effects of the mounting force on the distortion and stress are analyzed by the finite element methods (FEM), as well as the contribution of the distortion and stress to the change in phase mismatch, and the SHG efficiency are theoretically stated. Further on, the SHG efficiency is calculated as a function of the mounting force. The changing trends of the distortion, stress, and the SHG efficiency with the varying mounting force are obtained, and the optimal ones are figured out. Moreover, the mechanism of the occurrence of the optimal values is studied and the adjusting strategy is put forward. Numerical results show the robust adjustment of the mounting force, as well as the effectiveness of the mounting configuration, in increasing the SHG efficiency.

  16. Eyes Wide Open

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoi Manesi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Research from evolutionary psychology suggests that the mere presence of eye images can promote prosocial behavior. However, the “eye images effect” is a source of considerable debate, and findings across studies have yielded somewhat inconsistent support. We suggest that one critical factor may be whether the eyes really need to be watching to effectively enhance prosocial behavior. In three experiments, we investigated the impact of eye images on prosocial behavior, assessed in a laboratory setting. Participants were randomly assigned to view an image of watching eyes (eyes with direct gaze, an image of nonwatching eyes (i.e., eyes closed for Study 1 and averted eyes for Studies 2 and 3, or an image of flowers (control condition. Upon exposure to the stimuli, participants decided whether or not to help another participant by completing a dull cognitive task. Three independent studies produced somewhat mixed results. However, combined analysis of all three studies, with a total of 612 participants, showed that the watching component of the eyes is important for decision-making in this context. Images of watching eyes led to significantly greater inclination to offer help as compared to images of nonwatching eyes (i.e., eyes closed and averted eyes or images of flowers. These findings suggest that eyes gazing at an individual, rather than any proxy to social presence (e.g., just the eyes, serve as a reminder of reputation. Taken together, we conclude that it is “eyes that pay attention” that can lift the veil of anonymity and potentially facilitate prosocial behavior.

  17. An inertia-type hybrid mount combining a rubber mount and a piezostack actuator for naval shipboard equipment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seok-Jun Moon

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper has been focused on developing a new hybrid mount for shipboard equipment used in naval surface ships and submarines. While the hybrid mount studied in our previous research was 100 kg-class series-type mount, the new hybrid mount has been designed as an inertia-type mount capable of supporting a static of 500 kg. The proposed mount consists of a commercial rubber resilient mount, a piezostack actuator and an inertial mass. The piezostack actuator connected with the inertial mass generates actively the control force. The performances of the proposed mount with a newly designed specific controller have been evaluated in accordance with US military specifications and compared with the passive mount. An isolation system consisting of four proposed mounts and auxiliary devices has been also tested. Through a series of experimental tests, it has been confirmed that the proposed mount provides better performance than the US Navy's standard passive mounts.

  18. About the Eye

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... First Aid Tips Healthy Vision Tips Protective Eyewear Sports and Your Eyes Fun Stuff Cool Eye Tricks ... NEI Office of Science Communications, Public Liaison, and Education. Technical questions about this website can be addressed ...

  19. About the Eye

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... you see. Check out the diagrams below to learn about each part of your eye and what ... the optic nerve to the brain. Watch now! Learn how the different parts of your eye work ...

  20. What Is Dry Eye?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 12, 2017 Can lupus affect my vision? May 27, 2017 Is stopping Restasis dangerous? Mar 06, 2017 ... link between seasonal allergens and dry eye Apr 27, 2015 Choosing Wisely When It Comes to Eye ...

  1. Eye muscle repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... child may go home. You should have a follow-up visit with the eye surgeon 1 to 2 weeks after the surgery. To prevent infection, you will probably need to put drops or ointment in your child's eyes.

  2. National Eye Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... testing new therapies. Learn more Learn about the Eye and Vision Our web pages for kids make ... illusions, and more. View the site Video: New Eye Imaging Tools The NEI Audacious Goals Initiative is ...

  3. About the Eye

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Education Programs National Eye Health Education Program (NEHEP) Diabetic Eye Disease Education Program Glaucoma Education Program Low ... iris adjusts the size of the pupil and controls the amount of light that can enter the ...

  4. What Is Dry Eye?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... vision? May 27, 2017 Is stopping Restasis dangerous? Mar 06, 2017 Why are my eyes bloodshot when ... When It Comes to Eye Care, Part 5 Mar 19, 2013 Follow The Academy Professionals: Education Guidelines ...

  5. Eye Drop Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Involved News About Us Donate In This Section Eye Drop Tips en Español email Send this article ... the reach of children. Steps For Putting In Eye Drops: Start by tilting your head backward while ...

  6. Lasik eye surgery - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000525.htm Lasik eye surgery - discharge To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Lasik eye surgery permanently changes the shape of the cornea ( ...

  7. About the Eye

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Links to More Information Optical Illusions Printables About the Eye Your eyes are made up of many ... make sense of the world around you. Did You Know? Vision depends on your brain as much ...

  8. What Is Dry Eye?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Eye Health Home Annual Meeting Clinical Education Practice Management Member Services Advocacy Foundation About Subspecialties & More Academy Publications EyeNet Ophthalmology Ophthalmology Retina Information for: International Ophthalmologists Media Medical Students Patients and ...

  9. Eye Cosmetic Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... eye (scratching your cornea, for example) with a mascara wand or other applicator. Even a slight scratch ... containers of eye cosmetics. Manufacturers usually recommend discarding mascara two to four months after purchase. Discard dried- ...

  10. What Is Dry Eye?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Services Advocacy Foundation About Subspecialties & More Eye Health Home Annual Meeting Clinical Education Practice Management Member Services ... 2015 Choosing Wisely When It Comes to Eye Care, Part 5 Mar 19, 2013 Follow The Academy ...

  11. What Is Dry Eye?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Eye Health Home Annual Meeting Clinical Education Practice Management Member Services Advocacy Foundation About Subspecialties & More Academy Publications EyeNet Ophthalmology Ophthalmology Retina Information for: International Ophthalmologists Media Medical Students Patients and Public Technicians ...

  12. About the Eye

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Clinical Studies Publications Catalog Photos and Images Spanish Language Information Grants and Funding Extramural Research Division of ... National Eye Health Education Program (NEHEP) Diabetic Eye Disease Education Program Glaucoma Education Program Low Vision Education ...

  13. Cultivating the Third Eye

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Holden, Constance

    2005-01-01

    Zoologist Om Prakash Jangir and his colleagues found that if the removed tadpoles' eyes and raised the animals in a medium enriched with vitamin A, a new eye developed within ten days over the site of the pineal gland...

  14. Eye Injuries at Home

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Steps to Safer Champagne Celebrations Eye Injuries at Home Leer en Español: Lesiones de los Ojos en ... chore is being done. Preventing Eye Injuries at Home Wearing protective eyewear will prevent 90 percent of ...

  15. About the Eye

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... System Your Eyes’ Natural Defenses Eye Health and Safety First Aid Tips Healthy ... Your eyes are made up of many different parts that work together to help you see. Check out the ...

  16. Bags Under Eyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... can include: Mild swelling Saggy or loose skin Dark circles When to see a doctor You may not ... Rochester, Minn., July 22, 2014. Related Chemical peel Dark circles under eyes Bags under eyes Symptoms & causes Diagnosis & ...

  17. Eyes Wide Open

    OpenAIRE

    Zoi Manesi; Van Lange, Paul A. M.; Pollet, Thomas V.

    2016-01-01

    Research from evolutionary psychology suggests that the mere presence of eye images can promote prosocial behavior. However, the “eye images effect” is a source of considerable debate, and findings across studies have yielded somewhat inconsistent support. We suggest that one critical factor may be whether the eyes really need to be watching to effectively enhance prosocial behavior. In three experiments, we investigated the impact of eye images on prosocial behavior, assessed in a laboratory...

  18. Fish eye optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudec, R.; Michalova, S.

    2017-07-01

    We report on small student (high—school) project of the Czech Academy of Sciences dealing with animal (fish) eyes and possible application in science and technology. Albeit most fishes have refractive eyes, the recent discoveries confirm that some fishes have reflective eyes with strange arrangements as well.

  19. About the Eye

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... other programs with respect to blinding eye diseases, visual disorders, mechanisms of visual function, preservation of sight, and the special health ... Eye Ask a Scientist Video Series Glossary The Visual System Your Eyes’ Natural Defenses Eye Health and ...

  20. Common eye emergencies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2007-10-11

    Oct 11, 2007 ... Common eye emergencies may present as an acute red eye, sudden visual loss or acute ocular trauma. Most eye emergencies will require referral to an ophthalmologist after initial basic examination and primary management. A relevant history of onset and symptoms of the current problem must be ...

  1. What Is Dry Eye?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Global Ophthalmology Guide Eye Health Find an Ophthalmologist Academy Store Eye Health A-Z Symptoms Glasses & Contacts Tips & Prevention News ... For Advertisers For Media Ophthalmology Job Center © American Academy of Ophthalmology 2017 Our Sites EyeWiki International Society of Refractive Surgery ... Enter code: * Message: Thank you Your feedback has been sent.

  2. The all seeing eye?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koenderink, Jan J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/070864543

    2014-01-01

    The All Seeing Eye? Did you know that you are probably a believer in the All Seeing Eye? The odds are that I’m right—why? Well, the bulk of mainstream vision literature blindly relies on the All Seeing Eye. It is written all over papers, albeit between the lines. Understandably so, for scientists

  3. Anomaly detection: eye movement patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, W; Fodor, J D; Crain, S; Shankweiler, D

    1998-09-01

    The symptom of a garden path in sentence processing is an important anomaly in the input string. This anomaly signals to the parser that an error has occurred, and provides cues for how to repair it. Anomaly detection is thus an important aspect of sentence processing. In the present study, we investigated how the parser responds to unambiguous sentences that contain syntactic anomalies and pragmatic anomalies, examining records of eye movement during reading. While sensitivity to the two kinds of anomaly was very rapid and essentially simultaneous, qualitative differences existed in the patterns of first-pass reading times and eye regressions. The results are compatible with the proposal that syntactic information and pragmatic information are used differently in garden-path recovery.

  4. Eye Care: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Institute) Sports and Your Eyes (National Eye Institute) Topic Image MedlinePlus Email Updates Get Eye Care updates by email What's this? GO Related Health Topics Eye Diseases Eye Infections Eye Injuries Eye Wear ...

  5. School eye health appraisal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desai Sanjiv

    1989-01-01

    Full Text Available School children form an important large target group which must be screened adequately for early detection of eye diseases and prevention of blindness. A total approach in a school eye health programme must include teacher orientation and health education of children in addition to screening for eye diseases. The ocular morbidity pattern in 5135 school children of Jodhpur is discussed in this paper and it is hoped that it will be an indicator to all eye care agencies to help plan their priorities in the delivery of school based eye care.

  6. New academic partnerships in global health: innovations at Mount Sinai School of Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landrigan, Philip J; Ripp, Jonathan; Murphy, Ramon J C; Claudio, Luz; Jao, Jennifer; Hexom, Braden; Bloom, Harrison G; Shirazian, Taraneh; Elahi, Ebby; Koplan, Jeffrey P

    2011-01-01

    Global health has become an increasingly important focus of education, research, and clinical service in North American universities and academic health centers. Today there are at least 49 academically based global health programs in the United States and Canada, as compared with only one in 1999. A new academic society, the Consortium of Universities for Global Health, was established in 2008 and has grown significantly. This sharp expansion reflects convergence of 3 factors: (1) rapidly growing student and faculty interest in global health; (2) growing realization-powerfully catalyzed by the acquired immune deficiency syndrome epidemic, the emergence of other new infections, climate change, and globalization-that health problems are interconnected, cross national borders, and are global in nature; and (3) rapid expansion in resources for global health. This article examines the evolution of the concept of global health and describes the driving forces that have accelerated interest in the field. It traces the development of global health programs in academic health centers in the United States. It presents a blueprint for a new school-wide global health program at Mount Sinai School of Medicine. The mission of that program, Mount Sinai Global Health, is to enhance global health as an academic field of study within the Mount Sinai community and to improve the health of people around the world. Mount Sinai Global Health is uniting and building synergies among strong, existing global health programs within Mount Sinai; it is training the next generation of physicians and health scientists to be leaders in global health; it is making novel discoveries that translate into blueprints for improving health worldwide; and it builds on Mount Sinai's long and proud tradition of providing medical and surgical care in places where need is great and resources few. © 2011 Mount Sinai School of Medicine.

  7. Flow distortion on boom mounted cup anemometers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindelöw, Per Jonas Petter; Friis Pedersen, Troels; Gottschall, Julia

    in the measurement of wind turbine power performance, wind resource assessment and for providing purposeful in-field comparisons between different sensors, e.g. lidar anemometers. With the proposed method, direction dependent errors can be extracted and the mast flow distortion effect on the wind measurements......In this report we investigate on wind direction dependent errors in the measurement of the horizontal wind speed by boom mounted cup anemometers. The boom mounting on the studied lattice tower is performed according to IEC standard design rules, yet, larger deviations than predicted by flow models...... are observed. The errors on the measurements are likely caused by an underestimation of the flow distortions around the tower. In this paper an experimental method for deriving a correction formula and an in-field calibration is suggested. The method is based on measurements with two cup anemometers mounted...

  8. The CUREA Program at Mount Wilson

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Paula C.; LoPresto, J. C.; Simmons, M.

    2006-12-01

    For fifteen years, Mount Wilson Observatory has been host to a unique educational program designed to introduce undergraduate students of physics and astronomy to elements of observational solar and stellar astrophysics. Founded by faculty members from four-year colleges who dubbed themselves the Consortium for Undergraduate Research and Education in Astronomy (CUREA), the CUREA program is an intensive two-week course in observational astronomy. It includes lectures by astronomers and physicists, observational exercises in both solar and stellar astrophysics, tours of various research facilities on the mountain and in the Los Angeles area, and an observational mini-project designed and executed by each student during the second week of the program. This paper will present the program’s curriculum and goals, a brief history, and examples of observational projects undertaken by recent participants. CUREA is administered by the Mount Wilson Observatory Association, using facilities provided by the Mount Wilson Institute.

  9. EYE GAZE TRACKING

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2011-01-01

    This invention relates to a method of performing eye gaze tracking of at least one eye of a user, by determining the position of the center of the eye, said method comprising the steps of: detecting the position of at least three reflections on said eye, transforming said positions to spanning...... a normalized coordinate system spanning a frame of reference, wherein said transformation is performed based on a bilinear transformation or a non linear transformation e.g. a möbius transformation or a homographic transformation, detecting the position of said center of the eye relative to the position...... of said reflections and transforming this position to said normalized coordinate system, tracking the eye gaze by tracking the movement of said eye in said normalized coordinate system. Thereby calibration of a camera, such as knowledge of the exact position and zoom level of the camera, is avoided...

  10. Pain ameliorating effect of eye movement desensitization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hekmat, H; Groth, S; Rogers, D

    1994-06-01

    This study explores the efficacy of eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMD/R) in the management of acute pain induced by hand exposures to ice water. Thirty participants were randomly assigned to one of the following interventions: (a) eye movement desensitization and reprocessing, (b) eye movement desensitization with music (EMD/M), and (c) control. The EMD/R participants focused on negative experiences associated with exposure to ice water, generated positive self-talk, and diverted their attention away from pain by focusing on a rapidly moving light on a monitor. The EMD with music group received eye movement desensitization coupled with preferred music. Repeated measures univariate and multivariate analysis of covariance was used to analyze the data. Results indicated that both procedures alleviated participants' pain to a similar degree and significantly more than the control, P < 0.05.

  11. Sensor mount assemblies and sensor assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, David H [Redondo Beach, CA

    2012-04-10

    Sensor mount assemblies and sensor assemblies are provided. In an embodiment, by way of example only, a sensor mount assembly includes a busbar, a main body, a backing surface, and a first finger. The busbar has a first end and a second end. The main body is overmolded onto the busbar. The backing surface extends radially outwardly relative to the main body. The first finger extends axially from the backing surface, and the first finger has a first end, a second end, and a tooth. The first end of the first finger is disposed on the backing surface, and the tooth is formed on the second end of the first finger.

  12. Eye blinking-based method for detecting driver drowsiness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma'touq, Jumana; Al-Nabulsi, Jamal; Al-Kazwini, Akeel; Baniyassien, Ahmed; Al-Haj Issa, Ghassan; Mohammad, Haitham

    2014-11-01

    Drowsy driving is a major cause of traffic accidents. Eye blinking is considered as important evidence of driver drowsiness. In this paper, a portable and low cost device for monitoring a driver's drowsiness is proposed. The proposed system consists of two main parts that detect eye blinking based on IR sensors mounted on eyewear. Depending on the reflected and absorbed IR radiation, this system detects and classifies the eye blinking into normal blinking (NB) or prolonged blinking (PB). The detected prolonged blinking is used to trigger an audio/visual alarm system which draws the driver's attention back. The system was simulated initially by LabVIEW® software. Moreover, the system was bench tested on 15 adult volunteers; eye blinking were detected and classified successfully for all subjects. The results of this research are promising and additional investigation is required to further improve the method.

  13. Method for Compensation of Eye Movements in Adaptive Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karitans, V.; Ozolinsh, M.

    2010-03-01

    The benefit of correction of aberrations in the human eye with adaptive optics is strongly reduced by eye movements. Although devices for compensation of eye movements have already been developed, these are very advanced and expensive. We are working on the development of a novel method for eye movement compensation based on the detection of a corneal reflex by a linear profile sensor. Electronic circuits for controlling the profile sensor and stepper motors have already been designed. Next, a circuit must be designed so that the profile sensor controls the stepper motor. One of the shortcomings of this method is that a stepper motor runs at low speed. Another shortcoming is that the profile sensor operates in only one dimension. However, these problems can be solved by using a two-dimensional profile sensor and piezo-mounts working at much higher frequencies.

  14. Reflow Soldering of Surface Mount Electronic Components in a Laboratory

    OpenAIRE

    Erickson, Christopher J.; Durfee, Dallin S.

    2008-01-01

    We present a basic tutorial for implementing surface mount technology in lab-built scientific instruments. We discuss the advantages and disadvantages of using surface mount chips. We also describe methods for the development and prototyping of surface mount circuitry in home-built electronics. The method of soldering surface mount components in a common toaster oven is described. We provide advice from our own experience in developing this technology, and argue that surface mount technology ...

  15. Mount Sinai and Mount Zion: Discontinuity and continuity in the book of Hebrews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hulisani Ramantswana

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The author of Hebrews draws significant contrasts between Mount Sinai and Mount Zion which both played a major role in the old covenant. For the author of Hebrews the former mountain, Mount Sinai, only had limited significance with respect to the new covenant, whereas the latter mountain, Mount Zion, continued to have significance in the new covenant. Mount Zion was viewed as a shadow of the heavenly reality, which is the true destination for the pilgrimage community. Mount Sinai as the locus of encounter or meeting between God and Israel only played a transitory role, whereas Mount Zion had perpetual significance as the destination, the dwelling place of God and his people.Berg Sinai en Berg Sion: Diskontinuïteit en kontinuïteit in die brief aan die Hebreërs. Die skrywer van Hebreërs wys op betekenisvolle teenstellings tussen Berg Sinai en Berg Sion, wat elkeen ’n beduidende rol in die ou verbond gespeel het. Vir die Hebreërskrywer het Berg Sinai egter beperkte betekenis vir die nuwe verbond, terwyl Sion nog steeds betekenis het. Berg Sion word as skaduwee van die hemelse werklikheid beskou, wat die uiteindelike bestemming van die pelgrimsgemeenskap is. Berg Sinai, as die lokus van ontmoeting tussen God en Israel, speel slegs ‘n oorgangsrol, terwyl Berg Sion steeds beduidende betekenis het as bestemming en woonplek van God en sy volk.

  16. MANUS: a wheelchair-mounted rehabilitation robot

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driessen, B.J.F.; Evers, H.G.; Woerden, J.A. van

    2001-01-01

    Rehabilitation robots are assistive devices designed for use by people with severe disability in order to gain independence in tasks of daily living. MANUS is a wheelchair-mounted general-purpose manipulator now in use with over 100 people in their homes in the Netherlands, in France and in other

  17. Photovoltaic module mounting clip with integral grounding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenox, Carl J.

    2010-08-24

    An electrically conductive mounting/grounding clip, usable with a photovoltaic (PV) assembly of the type having an electrically conductive frame, comprises an electrically conductive body. The body has a central portion and first and second spaced-apart arms extending from the central portion. Each arm has first and second outer portions with frame surface-disrupting element at the outer portions.

  18. PC board mount corrosion sensitive sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, Alex L.; Casias, Adrian L.; Pfeifer, Kent B.; Laguna, George R.

    2016-03-22

    The present invention relates to surface mount structures including a capacitive element or a resistive element, where the element has a property that is responsive to an environmental condition. In particular examples, the structure can be optionally coupled to a printed circuit board. Other apparatuses, surface mountable structures, and methods of use are described herein.

  19. June 1992 Mount Spurr, USA Images

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Following 39 years of inactivity, Crater Peak vent on the south flank of Mount Spurr volcano burst into eruption at 7:04 a.m. Alaska daylight time (ADT) on June 27,...

  20. Solidly Mounted Resonator with Optimized Acoustic Reflector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jose, Sumy; Jansman, Andreas; Hueting, Raymond Josephus Engelbart

    2009-01-01

    The quality factor (Q) of the Solidly Mounted Resonator is limited by acoustic losses caused by waves leaking through the mirror stack. Traditionally employed acoustic mirror reflects only longitudinal waves and not shear waves. Starting with the stop-band theory and the principle of spacer layers

  1. Reliability Analysis of Surface Mount Technology (SMT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-03-01

    380, 1981. 7. J. DeVore; "The Mechanisms of Solderability and Solderability Related Failures," General Electric, WCIII-43, Printed Circuit World Convention...34Thermal Cycles and Surface Mounting Attachment Reliability," Circuit World , Vol. Il, 1985 76. J. Collett; "SMT Solder Joint Reliability," IPC-TP-708

  2. Eye tracking young children with autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasson, Noah J; Elison, Jed T

    2012-03-27

    The rise of accessible commercial eye-tracking systems has fueled a rapid increase in their use in psychological and psychiatric research. By providing a direct, detailed and objective measure of gaze behavior, eye-tracking has become a valuable tool for examining abnormal perceptual strategies in clinical populations and has been used to identify disorder-specific characteristics, promote early identification, and inform treatment. In particular, investigators of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) have benefited from integrating eye-tracking into their research paradigms. Eye-tracking has largely been used in these studies to reveal mechanisms underlying impaired task performance and abnormal brain functioning, particularly during the processing of social information. While older children and adults with ASD comprise the preponderance of research in this area, eye-tracking may be especially useful for studying young children with the disorder as it offers a non-invasive tool for assessing and quantifying early-emerging developmental abnormalities. Implementing eye-tracking with young children with ASD, however, is associated with a number of unique challenges, including issues with compliant behavior resulting from specific task demands and disorder-related psychosocial considerations. In this protocol, we detail methodological considerations for optimizing research design, data acquisition and psychometric analysis while eye-tracking young children with ASD. The provided recommendations are also designed to be more broadly applicable for eye-tracking children with other developmental disabilities. By offering guidelines for best practices in these areas based upon lessons derived from our own work, we hope to help other investigators make sound research design and analysis choices while avoiding common pitfalls that can compromise data acquisition while eye-tracking young children with ASD or other developmental difficulties.

  3. Diagnosis of pulmonary pneumocystosis by microscopy on wet mount preparations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BAVA Amadeo Javier

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available We have compared the searching of the presence of "honeycomb" structures by direct microscopy on wet mount preparations with the direct immunofluorescence (DIF for the diagnosis of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (PCP in 115 bronchoalveolar (BAL fluids. The samples belonged to 115 AIDS patients; 87 with presumptive diagnosis of PCP and 28 with presumptive diagnosis other than PCP. The obtained results were coincident in 114 out of 115 studied samples (27 were positive and 87 negative with both techniques. A higher percentage of positive results (32.18% among patients with presumptive diagnosis of PCP with respect to those with presumptive diagnosis other than PCP (3.57% was observed. One BAL fluid was positive only with DIF, showed scarce and isolated P. carinii elements and absence of typical "honeycomb" structures. The searching for "honeycomb" structures by direct microscopy on wet mount preparations could be considered as a cheap and rapid alternative for diagnosis of PCP when other techniques are not available or as screening test for DIF. This method showed a sensitivity close to DIF when it was applied to BAL fluids of AIDS patients with poor clinical condition and it was performed by an experienced microscopist.

  4. Light-Field Correction for Spatial Calibration of Optical See-Through Head-Mounted Displays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Yuta; Klinker, Gudrun

    2015-04-01

    A critical requirement for AR applications with Optical See-Through Head-Mounted Displays (OST-HMD) is to project 3D information correctly into the current viewpoint of the user - more particularly, according to the user's eye position. Recently-proposed interaction-free calibration methods [16], [17] automatically estimate this projection by tracking the user's eye position, thereby freeing users from tedious manual calibrations. However, the method is still prone to contain systematic calibration errors. Such errors stem from eye-/HMD-related factors and are not represented in the conventional eye-HMD model used for HMD calibration. This paper investigates one of these factors - the fact that optical elements of OST-HMDs distort incoming world-light rays before they reach the eye, just as corrective glasses do. Any OST-HMD requires an optical element to display a virtual screen. Each such optical element has different distortions. Since users see a distorted world through the element, ignoring this distortion degenerates the projection quality. We propose a light-field correction method, based on a machine learning technique, which compensates the world-scene distortion caused by OST-HMD optics. We demonstrate that our method reduces the systematic error and significantly increases the calibration accuracy of the interaction-free calibration.

  5. Video-based eyetracking methods and algorithms in head-mounted displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Hong; Krishnaswamy, Prasanna; Rolland, Jannick P.

    2006-05-01

    Head pose is utilized to approximate a user’s line-of-sight for real-time image rendering and interaction in most of the 3D visualization applications using head-mounted displays (HMD). The eye often reaches an object of interest before the completion of most head movements. It is highly desirable to integrate eye-tracking capability into HMDs in various applications. While the added complexity of an eyetracked-HMD (ET-HMD) imposes challenges on designing a compact, portable, and robust system, the integration offers opportunities to improve eye tracking accuracy and robustness. In this paper, based on the modeling of an eye imaging and tracking system, we examine the challenges and identify parametric requirements for video-based pupil-glint tracking methods in an ET-HMD design, and predict how these parameters may affect the tracking accuracy, resolution, and robustness. We further present novel methods and associated algorithms that effectively improve eye-tracking accuracy and extend the tracking range.

  6. Modern sports eye injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capão Filipe, J A; Rocha-Sousa, A; Falcão-Reis, F; Castro-Correia, J

    2003-11-01

    To determine the severity and long term sequelae of eye injuries caused by modern sports that could be responsible for significant ocular trauma in the future. Prospective observational study of 24 (25 eyes) athletes with sports related ocular injuries from health clubs, war games, adventure, radical and new types of soccer, presenting to an eye emergency department between 1992 and 2002 (10 years). Modern sports were responsible for 8.3% of the 288 total sports eye injuries reported. Squash (29.2%) was the most common cause, followed by paintball (20.8%) and motocross (16.6%). The most common diagnosis during the follow up period was retinal breaks (20%). 18 (75%) patients sustained a severe injury. The final visual acuity remained paintball players. Ocular injuries resulting from modern sports are often severe. Adequate instruction of the participants in the games, proper use of eye protectors, and a routine complete ophthalmological examination after an eye trauma should be mandatory.

  7. Screening of myopic photorefractive keratectomy in eye bank eyes by computerized videokeratography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim-Bon-Siong, R; Williams, J M; Samapunphong, S; Chuck, R S; Pepose, J S

    1998-05-01

    In contrast to incisional keratotomy, corneas that have undergone photorefractive keratectomy may be difficult to detect by inspection with slitlamp biomicroscopy alone. Eye bank corneas that have undergone high myopic refractive surgical correction could potentially result in substantial postoperative hyperopic correction if used as donor tissue for corneal transplantation. Surface irregularities or displacement of the treated optical zone within the graft in relation to the entrance pupil of the recipient could result in significant induced astigmatism and distortion. This study examines computerized videokeratographic screening of eye bank globes as a strategy for detecting myopic photorefractive keratectomy. Preoperative and postoperative corneal topographic maps of freshly enucleated human and rabbit eyes that have undergone myopic photorefractive keratectomy with an excimer laser were placed in a globe-fixating device and analyzed using a vertically oriented videokeratoscope. The same system was applied in an actual eye bank setting, and potentially transplantable globes from donors without a history of corneal surgery were analyzed. Computerized videokeratography using a vertically mounted system reliably detected photorefractive keratectomy in 12 of 12 human eye bank corneas treated by excimer photorefractive keratectomy in a range between -1.5 to -6.0 diopters. This method also detected similar changes on lased rabbit corneas enucleated 6 weeks after excimer surgery. Data processed with the tangential mode yielded a "bull's-eye" topography pattern reflecting central corneal flattening that was more sensitive in detecting myopic corrections than the conventional axial formula-based color maps. False-positive results were not detected in 96 cadaver globes sequentially screened in the eye bank. Computerized videokeratography represents a feasible method to screen donor globes for myopic photorefractive keratectomy as shown by the in vitro and rabbit models

  8. What Is Dry Eye?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Services Advocacy Foundation About Subspecialties & More Eye Health Home Annual Meeting Clinical Education Practice Management Member Services Advocacy Foundation About Subspecialties & ...

  9. What Is Dry Eye?

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    Full Text Available ... Member Services Advocacy Foundation About Subspecialties & More Eye Health Home Annual Meeting Clinical Education Practice Management Member Services Advocacy Foundation About Subspecialties & ...

  10. Ocular Emergencies: Red Eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarff, Andreina; Behrens, Ashley

    2017-05-01

    "Red eye" is used as a general term to describe irritated or bloodshot eyes. It is a recognizable sign of an acute/chronic, localized/systemic underlying inflammatory condition. Conjunctival injection is most commonly caused by dryness, allergy, visual fatigue, contact lens overwear, and local infections. In some instances, red eye can represent a true ocular emergency that should be treated by an ophthalmologist. A comprehensive assessment of red eye conditions is required to preserve the patients visual function. Severe ocular pain, significant photophobia, decreased vision, and history of ocular trauma are warning signs demanding immediate ophthalmological consultation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. What Is Dry Eye?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Ophthalmology Education Center Oculofacial Plastic Surgery Center Laser Surgery Education Center Redmond Ethics ... Services Advocacy Foundation About Subspecialties & More Eye ...

  12. What Is Dry Eye?

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    Full Text Available ... Academy Publications EyeNet Ophthalmology Ophthalmology Retina Information for: International Ophthalmologists Media Medical Students Patients and Public Technicians and Nurses Senior Ophthalmologists ...

  13. Right-Rapid-Rough

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Craig

    2003-01-01

    IDEO (pronounced 'eye-dee-oh') is an international design, engineering, and innovation firm that has developed thousands of products and services for clients across a wide range of industries. Its process and culture attracted the attention of academics, businesses, and journalists around the world, and are the subject of a bestselling book, The Art of Innovation by Tom Kelley. One of the keys to IDEO's success is its use of prototyping as a tool for rapid innovation. This story covers some of IDEO's projects, and gives reasons for why they were successful.

  14. Looking at vision : Eye/face/head tracking of consumers for improved marketing decisions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wedel, M.; Pieters, R.; Moutinho, L.; Bigné, E.; Manrai (eds.), A.K.

    Against the backdrop of the rapid growth of the use eye tracking and facial recognition methodology, this chapter discusses the measurement of eye movements, facial expression of emotions, pupil dilation, eye blinks and head movements. After discussing some of the main research findings in the

  15. Bilateral Saccadic Eye Movements and Tactile Stimulation, but Not Auditory Stimulation, Enhance Memory Retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieuwenhuis, Sander; Elzinga, Bernet M.; Ras, Priscilla H.; Berends, Floris; Duijs, Peter; Samara, Zoe; Slagter, Heleen A.

    2013-01-01

    Recent research has shown superior memory retrieval when participants make a series of horizontal saccadic eye movements between the memory encoding phase and the retrieval phase compared to participants who do not move their eyes or move their eyes vertically. It has been hypothesized that the rapidly alternating activation of the two hemispheres…

  16. New Academic Partnerships in Global Health: Innovations at Mount Sinai School of Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landrigan, Philip J.; Ripp, Jonathan; Murphy, Ramon J. C.; Claudio, Luz; Jao, Jennifer; Hexom, Braden; Bloom, Harrison G.; Shirazian, Taraneh; Elahi, Ebby; Koplan, Jeffrey P.

    2011-01-01

    Global health has become an increasingly important focus of education, research, and clinical service in North American universities and academic health centers. Today there are at least 49 academically based global health programs in the United States and Canada, as compared with only one in 1999. A new academic society, the Consortium of Universities for Global Health, was established in 2008 and has grown significantly. This sharp expansion reflects convergence of 3 factors: (1) rapidly growing student and faculty interest in global health; (2) growing realization–powerfully catalyzed by the acquired immune deficiency syndrome epidemic, the emergence of other new infections, climate change, and globalization–that health problems are interconnected, cross national borders, and are global in nature; and (3) rapid expansion in resources for global health. This article examines the evolution of the concept of global health and describes the driving forces that have accelerated interest in the field. It traces the development of global health programs in academic health centers in the United States. It presents a blueprint for a new school-wide global health program at Mount Sinai School of Medicine. The mission of that program, Mount Sinai Global Health, is to enhance global health as an academic field of study within the Mount Sinai community and to improve the health of people around the world. Mount Sinai Global Health is uniting and building synergies among strong, existing global health programs within Mount Sinai; it is training the next generation of physicians and health scientists to be leaders in global health; it is making novel discoveries that translate into blueprints for improving health worldwide; and it builds on Mount Sinai’s long and proud tradition of providing medical and surgical care in places where need is great and resources few. PMID:21598272

  17. Solutions to helmet-mounted display visual correction compatibility issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rash, Clarence E.; Kalich, Melvyn E.; van de Pol, Corina

    2002-08-01

    To meet the goal of 24-hour, all-weather operation, U.S. Army aviation uses a number of imaging sensor systems on its aircraft. Imagery provided by these systems is presented on helmet-mounted displays (HMDs). Fielded systems include the Integrated Helmet Display Sighting System (IHADSS) used on the AH-64 Apache. Proposed future HMD systems such as the Helmet Integrated Display Sighting System (HIDSS) and the Microvision, Inc., Aircrew Integrated Helmet System (AIHS) scanning laser system are possible choices for the Army's RAH-66 Comanche helicopter. Ever present in current and future HMD systems is the incompatibility problem between the design-limited physical eye relief of the HMD and the need to provide for the integration of laser and nuclear, biological and chemical (NBC) protection, as well as the need to address the changing optical and vision requirements of the aging aviator. This paper defines the compatibility issue, reviews past efforts to solve this problem (e.g., contact lenses, NBC masks, optical inserts, etc.), and identifies emerging techniques (e.g., refractive surgery, adaptive optics, etc.) that require investigation.

  18. Eye tracking social preferences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jiang, Ting; Potters, Jan; Funaki, Yukihiko

    We hypothesize that if people are motivated by a particular social preference, then choosing in accordance with this preference will lead to an identifiable pattern of eye movements. We track eye movements while subjects make choices in simple three-person distribution experiments. We characterize

  19. Photorefraction of the Eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colicchia, Giuseppe; Wiesner, Hartmut; Zollman, Dean

    2015-01-01

    Photorefraction is a method to easily estimate the refractive state of the eye. The principle of photorefraction involves projecting light into the eye during flash photography and then examining the paths of light that emerge from the pupil after scattering on the back portion of the interior of the eyeball (fundus). We will explain the optical…

  20. What Is Dry Eye?

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    Full Text Available ... and Deadlines Museum of Vision Ophthalmology Job Center Our Sites EyeWiki International Society of Refractive Surgery Subspecialties ... and Deadlines Museum of Vision Ophthalmology Job Center Our Sites EyeWiki International Society of Refractive Surgery Subspecialties ...

  1. What Is Dry Eye?

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    Full Text Available ... Medicare Physician Payment Meetings and Deadlines Museum of Vision Ophthalmology Job Center Our Sites EyeWiki International Society ... Medicare Physician Payment Meetings and Deadlines Museum of Vision Ophthalmology Job Center Our Sites EyeWiki International Society ...

  2. About the Eye

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    Full Text Available ... Vision Research & Ophthalmology (DIVRO) Student Training Programs To search for current job openings visit HHS USAJobs Home > NEI for Kids > About the Eye All About Vision About the Eye Ask a Scientist Video Series Glossary The Visual System Your Eyes’ ...

  3. Smoking and Eye Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Patient Stories Español Eye Health / Tips & Prevention Sections Smoking and Eye Disease Leer en Español: El Cigarrillo ... By: Brenda Pagan-Duran MD Apr. 27, 2017 Smoking contributes to a number of major health problems, ...

  4. Chemotherapy in eye cancer

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chemotherapy in eye cancer. Chemotherapy is one of several treatment strategies used to halt the uncontrolled division, proliferation and unpredictable growth patterns of malignant cells. R Dolland, BSc, MB BCh, FC Ophth (SA). Consultant, St John Eye Hospital, Division of Ophthalmology, Department of Neurosciences, ...

  5. About the Eye

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    Full Text Available ... D., Deputy Clinical Director Education Programs National Eye Health Education Program (NEHEP) Diabetic Eye Disease Education Program Glaucoma ... NEI Office of Science Communications, Public Liaison, and Education. Technical questions ... of Health and Human Services | The National Institutes of Health | ...

  6. What Is Dry Eye?

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    Full Text Available ... Media Medical Students Patients and Public Technicians and Nurses Senior Ophthalmologists Young Ophthalmologists Tools and Services EyeCare ... Media Medical Students Patients and Public Technicians and Nurses Senior Ophthalmologists Young Ophthalmologists Tools and Services EyeCare ...

  7. What Is Dry Eye?

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  8. Understanding pink eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pink eye (PE) is a physiological tuber disorder that can result in serious processing complications and storage losses. The earliest external symptoms consist of an ephemeral pinkish discoloration around tuber eyes, predominately at the bud end of the tuber. These pinkish areas can then develop into...

  9. Perception of eye positions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lorteije, J.A.M.; Wezel, R.J.A. van; Lankheet, M.J.M.

    2002-01-01

    In a two-alternative forced-choice psychophysical test human subjects were tested for their ability to perceive their own viewing direction. A small red flash was presented at different horizontal positions left or right from the subjects' eye position on the screen. Eye positions were recorded with

  10. LASIK Eye Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Persistent dry eyes Unstable vision due to medications, hormonal changes, pregnancy, breast-feeding or age Keratitis, uveitis, herpes simplex ... to certain conditions, such as abnormal wound healing, hormonal imbalances or pregnancy. Sometimes this change in vision is due to another eye problem, ...

  11. Eye-Tracking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela GROSSECK

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Eye-tracking: one of the newest and most efficient methods of improving on-line marketing communication is called eye-tracking. Marketers have borrowed this technique, usually used in psychological and medical research, in order to study web users with the help of a video camera incorporated in the monitor.

  12. What Is Dry Eye?

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  13. What Is Dry Eye?

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  14. What Is Dry Eye?

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  15. What Is Dry Eye?

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  16. What Is Dry Eye?

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  17. About the Eye

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    Full Text Available ... National Eye Institute’s mission is to “conduct and support research, training, health information dissemination, and other programs ... search for current job openings visit HHS USAJobs Home > NEI for Kids > About the Eye All About ...

  18. Micro-inverter solar panel mounting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, John; Gilchrist, Phillip Charles

    2016-02-02

    Processes, systems, devices, and articles of manufacture are provided. Each may include adapting micro-inverters initially configured for frame-mounting to mounting on a frameless solar panel. This securement may include using an adaptive clamp or several adaptive clamps secured to a micro-inverter or its components, and using compressive forces applied directly to the solar panel to secure the adaptive clamp and the components to the solar panel. The clamps can also include compressive spacers and safeties for managing the compressive forces exerted on the solar panels. Friction zones may also be used for managing slipping between the clamp and the solar panel during or after installation. Adjustments to the clamps may be carried out through various means and by changing the physical size of the clamps themselves.

  19. The spontaneous eye movements in the awake kitten.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bon, L; Lucchetti, C

    1985-07-01

    The spontaneous eye movements were analysed comparatively in the kitten and in the cat. The eye movements were recorded in the dark by a magnetic search coil technique. The spatio-temporal organization of eye movements in the kitten has a prevailing vertical orientation and differs completely from that of the cat. In the kitten the amplitude of eye movements is smaller than in the cat and only a few movements are followed by fixation. It results, by correlating amplitude-peak velocity, that rapid eye movements in the awake kitten are saccades. From our results we conclude that the eye movements in the kitten and in the cat differ in many aspects and that the visual system is responsible for the development of the correct oculomotor behaviour.

  20. Towards Gaze Interaction in Immersive Virtual Reality: Evaluation of a Monocular Eye Tracking Set-Up

    OpenAIRE

    Pfeiffer, Thies; Schumann, Marco; Kuhlen, Torsten

    2008-01-01

    Of all senses, it is visual perception that is predominantly deluded in Virtual Realities. Yet, the eyes of the observer, despite the fact that they are the fastest perceivable moving body part, have gotten relatively little attention as an interaction modality. A solid integration of gaze, however, provides great opportunities for implicit and explicit human-computer interaction. We present our work on integrating a lightweight head-mounted eye tracking system in a CAVE-like Virtual Reality ...

  1. Indexing Mount For Rotation Of Optical Component

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichle, Donald J., Jr.; Barnes, Norman P.

    1993-01-01

    Indexing mount for polarizer, wave plate, birefringent plate, or other optical component facilitates rotation of component to one or more preset angles. Includes hexagonal nut holding polarizer or other optical component. Ball bearing loaded by screw engages notch on cylindrical extension of nut engaging bracket. Time-consuming and tedious angular adjustment unnecessary: component turned quickly and easily, by hand or by use of wrench, to preset angular positions maintained by simple ball-detent mechanism.

  2. Conceptual design for PSP mounting bracket

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ransom, G.; Stein, R. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Piketon, OH (United States)

    1991-12-31

    Protective structural packages (PSP`s or overpacks) used to ship 2 1/2-ton UF{sub 6} product cylinders are bolted to truck trailers. All bolts penetrate two longitudinal rows of wooden planks. Removal and replacement is required at various intervals for maintenance and routine testing. A conceptual design is presented for mounting brackets which would securely attach PSP`s to trailer frames, reduce removal and replacement time, and minimize risk of personnel injury.

  3. Mounting ground sections of teeth: Cyanoacrylate adhesive versus Canada balsam

    OpenAIRE

    Manogna R.L. Vangala; Amrutha Rudraraju; Subramanyam, R. V.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Hard tissues can be studied by either decalcification or by preparing ground sections. Various mounting media have been tried and used for ground sections of teeth. However, there are very few studies on the use of cyanoacrylate adhesive as a mounting medium. Aims: The aim of our study was to evaluate the efficacy of cyanoacrylate adhesive (Fevikwik™) as a mounting medium for ground sections of teeth and to compare these ground sections with those mounted with Canada balsam. Mat...

  4. 46 CFR 61.05-15 - Boiler mountings and attachments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Boiler mountings and attachments. 61.05-15 Section 61.05... TESTS AND INSPECTIONS Tests and Inspections of Boilers § 61.05-15 Boiler mountings and attachments. (a....05-10. (b) Each stud or bolt for each boiler mounting that paragraph (c) of this section requires to...

  5. [The controversy of routine articulator mounting in orthodontics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Han, Xianglong; Bai, Ding

    2013-06-01

    Articulators have been widely used by clinicians of dentistry. But routine articulator mounting is still controversial in orthodontics. Orthodontists oriented by gnathology approve routine articulator mounting while nongnathologic orthodontists disapprove it. This article reviews the thoughts of orthodontist that they agree or disagree with routine articulator mounting based on the considerations of biting, temporomandibular disorder (TMD), periodontitis, and so on.

  6. Advocacy for eye care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thulasiraj D Ravilla

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The effectiveness of eye care service delivery is often dependant on how the different stakeholders are aligned. These stakeholders range from the ministries of health who have the capacity to grant government subsidies for eye care, down to the primary healthcare workers who can be enrolled to screen for basic eye diseases. Advocacy is a tool that can help service providers draw the attention of key stakeholders to a particular area of concern. By enlisting the support, endorsement and participation of a wider circle of players, advocacy can help to improve the penetration and effectiveness of the services provided. There are several factors in the external environmental that influence the eye care services - such as the availability of trained manpower, supply of eye care consumables, government rules and regulations. There are several instances where successful advocacy has helped to create an enabling environment for eye care service delivery. Providing eye care services in developing countries requires the support - either for direct patient care or for support services such as producing trained manpower or for research and dissemination. Such support, in the form of financial or other resources, can be garnered through advocacy.

  7. Monitoring voluntary blink magnitude through a wearable eye-tracking system: A preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanata, Antonio; Guidi, Andrea; Greco, Alberto; Valenza, Gaetano; Scilingo, Enzo Pasquale

    2017-07-01

    This study proposes a novel approach to measure the contractile force of eye blink that is generally obtained from the orbicularis oculi activity through Ocular ElectroMyo-Graphy (O-EMG). Here, O-EMG is compared with the eye information acquired through a wearable head-mounted eye-tracking system in order to investigate the possibility of using the eye-tracking in place of the O-EMG. Eight subjects were simultaneously monitored through an O-EMG and the eye-tracker while they were performing a structured protocol implying a variation in the blink contractile strength. Results showed that eye-tracking features were able to statistically discriminate three kinds of contractile forces similarly to EMG features. The consequent correlation analysis revealed that all the EMG-related features were significantly correlated with the eye-tracking ones with a p-value eye-tracking features, i.e. Integrated Gaze Path (IGP) and Eye-closed Duration (ECD), IGP reported a higher Spearman's correlation values with eye-blink reflex magnitude (EBM) than ECD. These encouraging results suggest that the ocular information extracted from the eye-tracking could be profitably used in non-invasive ecological environments where wearability and comfortability play a crucial role in detecting spontaneous response.

  8. [How I treat...a red eye].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huvelle, H; Duchesne, B; Rakic, J M

    2013-12-01

    Before any initiation of treatment for a red eye, an accurate differential diagnosis must absolutely be done, as considered in a previous article. Red eye can result from benign diseases, but also from serious pathologies which shouldn't be neglected, as they require a rapid ophtalmologist management. This is the case for keratitis, uveitis, acute glaucoma attack, or endophtalmitis. Treatment of red eye will just be symptomatic in benign diseases but, in contrast, will absolutely need an etiological diagnosis and therapeutic approach in more serious cases. Generally speaking, topical steroids should never be prescribed in doubt of infectious keratitis. Moreover, local anaesthetics, because of their toxicity for the cornea, should not be prescribed under any circumstances.

  9. Aquaporins in the Eye

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tran, Thuy Linh; Hamann, Steffen; Heegaard, Steffen

    2017-01-01

    The major part of the eye consists of water . Continuous movement of water and ions between the ocular compartments and to the systemic circulation is pivotal for many physiological functions in the eye. The movement of water facilitates removal of the many metabolic products of corneal-, ciliary...... pressure. In the retina, water is transported into the vitreous body and across the retinal pigment epithelium to regulate the extracellular environment and the hydration of the retina. Aquaporins (AQPs ) take part in the water transport throughout the eye....

  10. Secondary eyes mediate the response to looming objects in jumping spiders (Phidippus audax, Salticidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spano, Lauren; Long, Skye M; Jakob, Elizabeth M

    2012-12-23

    Some species have sensory systems divided into subsystems with morphologically different sense organs that acquire different types of information within the same modality. Jumping spiders (family Salticidae) have eight eyes. Four eyes are directed anteriorly to view objects in front of the spider: a pair of principal eyes track targets with their movable retinae, while the immobile anterior lateral (AL) eyes have a larger field of view and lower resolution. To test whether the principal eyes, the AL eyes, or both together mediate the response to looming stimuli, we presented spiders with a video of a solid black circle that rapidly expanded (loomed) or contracted (receded). Control spiders and spiders with their principal eyes masked were significantly more likely to back away from the looming stimulus than were spiders with their AL eyes masked. Almost no individuals backed away from the receding stimulus. Our results show that the AL eyes alone mediate the loom response to objects anterior to the spider.

  11. Magnetic eye tracking in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Hannah L; Raymond, Jennifer L

    2017-09-05

    Eye movements provide insights about a wide range of brain functions, from sensorimotor integration to cognition; hence, the measurement of eye movements is an important tool in neuroscience research. We describe a method, based on magnetic sensing, for measuring eye movements in head-fixed and freely moving mice. A small magnet was surgically implanted on the eye, and changes in the magnet angle as the eye rotated were detected by a magnetic field sensor. Systematic testing demonstrated high resolution measurements of eye position of eye tracking offers several advantages over the well-established eye coil and video-oculography methods. Most notably, it provides the first method for reliable, high-resolution measurement of eye movements in freely moving mice, revealing increased eye movements and altered binocular coordination compared to head-fixed mice. Overall, magnetic eye tracking provides a lightweight, inexpensive, easily implemented, and high-resolution method suitable for a wide range of applications.

  12. ATST telescope mount: telescope of machine tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffers, Paul; Stolz, Günter; Bonomi, Giovanni; Dreyer, Oliver; Kärcher, Hans

    2012-09-01

    The Advanced Technology Solar Telescope (ATST) will be the largest solar telescope in the world, and will be able to provide the sharpest views ever taken of the solar surface. The telescope has a 4m aperture primary mirror, however due to the off axis nature of the optical layout, the telescope mount has proportions similar to an 8 meter class telescope. The technology normally used in this class of telescope is well understood in the telescope community and has been successfully implemented in numerous projects. The world of large machine tools has developed in a separate realm with similar levels of performance requirement but different boundary conditions. In addition the competitive nature of private industry has encouraged development and usage of more cost effective solutions both in initial capital cost and thru-life operating cost. Telescope mounts move relatively slowly with requirements for high stability under external environmental influences such as wind buffeting. Large machine tools operate under high speed requirements coupled with high application of force through the machine but with little or no external environmental influences. The benefits of these parallel development paths and the ATST system requirements are being combined in the ATST Telescope Mount Assembly (TMA). The process of balancing the system requirements with new technologies is based on the experience of the ATST project team, Ingersoll Machine Tools who are the main contractor for the TMA and MT Mechatronics who are their design subcontractors. This paper highlights a number of these proven technologies from the commercially driven machine tool world that are being introduced to the TMA design. Also the challenges of integrating and ensuring that the differences in application requirements are accounted for in the design are discussed.

  13. Cotton phenotyping with lidar from a track-mounted platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Andrew N.; Gore, Michael A.; Thompson, Alison

    2016-05-01

    High-Throughput Phenotyping (HTP) is a discipline for rapidly identifying plant architectural and physiological responses to environmental factors such as heat and water stress. Experiments conducted since 2010 at Maricopa, Arizona with a three-fold sensor group, including thermal infrared radiometers, active visible/near infrared reflectance sensors, and acoustic plant height sensors, have shown the validity of HTP with a tractor-based system. However, results from these experiments also show that accuracy of plant phenotyping is limited by the system's inability to discriminate plant components and their local environmental conditions. This limitation may be overcome with plant imaging and laser scanning which can help map details in plant architecture and sunlit/shaded leaves. To test the capability for mapping cotton plants with a laser system, a track-mounted platform was deployed in 2015 over a full canopy and defoliated cotton crop consisting of a scanning LIDAR driven by Arduinocontrolled stepper motors. Using custom Python and Tkinter code, the platform moved autonomously along a pipe-track at 0.1 m/s while collecting LIDAR scans at 25 Hz (0.1667 deg. beam). These tests showed that an autonomous LIDAR platform can reduce HTP logistical problems and provide the capability to accurately map cotton plants and cotton bolls. A prototype track-mounted platform was developed to test the use of LIDAR scanning for High- Throughput Phenotyping (HTP). The platform was deployed in 2015 at Maricopa, Arizona over a senescent cotton crop. Using custom Python and Tkinter code, the platform moved autonomously along a pipe-track at LIDAR scans at 25 Hz (0.1667 deg. beam). Scanning data mapped the canopy heights and widths, and detected cotton bolls.

  14. What Is Dry Eye?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Guide Find an Ophthalmologist Advanced Search Annual Meeting Clinical Education Practice Management Member Services Advocacy Foundation About Subspecialties & More Eye Health Home Annual Meeting Clinical Education Practice Management Member Services Advocacy Foundation About ...

  15. Eye Injuries (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of your child's routine activities, such as a sport , follow up by investing in an ounce of prevention — protective goggles or unbreakable glasses ... Your Child's Medical History First Aid: Eye Injuries Your Child's Vision What ...

  16. What Is Dry Eye?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Dry Eye Symptoms Related Ask an Ophthalmologist Answers Can a six-month dissolvable punctal plug be removed ... insert a permanent punctal plug? Sep 12, 2017 Can you explain why I have halos and blurry ...

  17. What Is Dry Eye?

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    Full Text Available ... Advanced Search Annual Meeting Clinical Education Practice Management Member Services Advocacy Foundation About Subspecialties & More Eye Health Home Annual Meeting Clinical Education Practice Management Member Services Advocacy Foundation About Subspecialties & More Academy Publications ...

  18. Applied eye tracking research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jarodzka, Halszka

    2011-01-01

    Jarodzka, H. (2010, 12 November). Applied eye tracking research. Presentation and Labtour for Vereniging Gewone Leden in oprichting (VGL i.o.), Heerlen, The Netherlands: Open University of the Netherlands.

  19. Multimodal eye recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhi; Du, Yingzi; Thomas, N. L.; Delp, Edward J., III

    2010-04-01

    Multimodal biometrics use more than one means of biometric identification to achieve higher recognition accuracy, since sometimes a unimodal biometric is not good enough used to do identification and classification. In this paper, we proposed a multimodal eye recognition system, which can obtain both iris and sclera patterns from one color eye image. Gabor filter and 1-D Log-Gabor filter algorithms have been applied as the iris recognition algorithms. In sclera recognition, we introduced automatic sclera segmentation, sclera pattern enhancement, sclera pattern template generation, and sclera pattern matching. We applied kernelbased matching score fusion to improve the performance of the eye recognition system. The experimental results show that the proposed eye recognition method can achieve better performance compared to unimodal biometric identification, and the accuracy of our proposed kernel-based matching score fusion method is higher than two classic linear matching score fusion methods: Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA).

  20. What Is Dry Eye?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Dry Eye Symptoms Related Ask an Ophthalmologist Answers Can a six-month dissolvable punctal plug be removed ... insert a permanent punctal plug? Sep 12, 2017 Can lupus affect my vision? May 27, 2017 Is ...

  1. What Is Dry Eye?

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    Full Text Available ... plug? Sep 12, 2017 Can you explain why I have halos and blurry vision in the morning? ... 06, 2017 Why are my eyes bloodshot when I wake up? Jun 26, 2016 Find an Ophthalmologist ...

  2. About the Eye

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    Full Text Available ... support research, training, health information dissemination, and other programs with respect to blinding eye diseases, visual disorders, ... and Funding Extramural Research Division of Extramural Science Programs Division of Extramural Activities Extramural Contacts NEI Division ...

  3. What Is Dry Eye?

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    Full Text Available ... for: International Ophthalmologists Media Medical Students Patients and Public Technicians and Nurses Senior Ophthalmologists Young Ophthalmologists Tools and Services Emergency Relief EyeCare America Help IRIS Registry Medicare ...

  4. About the Eye

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    Full Text Available ... Extramural Science Programs Division of Extramural Activities Extramural ... is the small, sensitive area of the retina needed for central vision. It contains the fovea. Lens is the clear part of the eye behind ...

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    Full Text Available ... part of your eye and what it does. Macula (MACK-yoo-luh) is the small, sensitive area ... FOH-vee-uh) is the center of the macula, where your vision is sharpest. Optic nerve (OP- ...

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    Full Text Available ... Accomplishments Budget and Congress About the NEI Director History of the NEI NEI 50th Anniversary NEI Women ... Emily Y. Chew, M.D., Deputy Clinical Director Education Programs National Eye Health Education Program (NEHEP) Diabetic ...

  10. What Is Dry Eye?

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    Full Text Available ... eyes don’t make enough tears or something affects one or more layers of the tear film. ... in the morning? Jun 12, 2017 Can lupus affect my vision? May 27, 2017 Is stopping Restasis ...

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    Full Text Available ... about each part of your eye and what it does. Macula (MACK-yoo-luh) is the small, ... area of the retina needed for central vision. It contains the fovea. Lens is the clear part ...

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    Full Text Available ... information about eye health and preserving your vision. Privacy Policy Related Please Don’t Shave the Inside ... the Academy Financial Relationships with Industry Medical Disclaimer Privacy Policy Terms of Service For Advertisers For Media ...

  17. Eye Complications in IBD

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... necessary. Another possible consequence may be night blindness. Artificial tears provide relief of symptoms. Vitamin A supplements, ... of the lens of the eye that impairs vision). SUMMARY Although not everyone with Crohn’s disease or ...

  18. About the Eye

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    Full Text Available ... is to “conduct and support research, training, health information dissemination, and other programs with respect to blinding eye ... Media Policies and Other Important Links NEI Employee Emergency Information NEI Intranet (Employees Only) *PDF files require ...

  19. What Is Dry Eye?

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    Full Text Available ... Privacy Policy Terms of Service For Advertisers For Media Ophthalmology Job Center © American Academy of Ophthalmology 2017 Our Sites EyeWiki International Society of Refractive Surgery * Required * First Name: * Last Name: ...

  20. What Is Dry Eye?

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    Full Text Available ... the Inside of Your Eyelid Nov 29, 2017 New Dry Eye Treatment is a Tear-Jerker Jul ... Privacy Policy Terms of Service For Advertisers For Media Ophthalmology Job Center © American Academy of Ophthalmology 2017 ...

  1. About the Eye

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  2. Using Eye Makeup

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in a moving vehicle. Do not separate your mascara-clumped lashes with sharp items. If you tend ... all eye makeup at night before sleeping, especially mascara that can stick to the lashes. Brush a ...

  3. Standard eye exam

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the eye ( glaucoma ) using a method called tonometry Color blindness is tested using cards with colored dots that ... Astigmatism (abnormally curved cornea) Blocked tear duct Cataracts Color blindness Corneal abrasion (or dystrophy) Corneal ulcers and infections ...

  4. Sports and Your Eyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... at high risk for eye injuries. Baseball Basketball Water Sports Boxing ... Protective Eyewear Fast Facts Everyone should wear protective eyewear. Ordinary prescription glasses, contact lenses, and sunglasses won’t protect you from injuries. ...

  5. About the Eye

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    Full Text Available ... Search Search the NEI Website search NEI on Social Media | Search A-Z | en español | Text size S M L ... Board of Scientific Counselors National Advisory Eye Council (NAEC) Donating to ...

  6. Diabetic Eye Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... damage your eyes. The most common problem is diabetic retinopathy. It is a leading cause of blindness ... You need a healthy retina to see clearly. Diabetic retinopathy damages the tiny blood vessels inside your ...

  7. What Is Dry Eye?

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    Full Text Available ... of tears or tear film. How do tears work? When you blink, a film of tears spreads ... Care, Part 5 Mar 19, 2013 Eye Makeup Safety Tips Sep 25, 2012 Follow The Academy Professionals: ...

  8. About the Eye

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  10. Get Your Eyes Tested

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    ... blurry or distorted at all distances Presbyopia (“prez-bee-OH-pee-uh”) – a condition that older adults ... sections Take Action! Take Action: Schedule Your Exam Protect your vision. Get regular eye exams so you ...

  11. What Is Dry Eye?

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  12. Eye Injuries at Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... work. Use machine guarding, work screens or other engineering controls. Use proper eye protection. Wear protective eyewear ... Us About the Academy Jobs at the Academy Financial Relationships with Industry Medical Disclaimer Privacy Policy Terms ...

  13. Lasik eye surgery - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... presentations/100206.htm Lasik eye surgery - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing features on this page, ... Bethesda, MD 20894 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health Page last updated: ...

  14. What Is Dry Eye?

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    Full Text Available ... Kierstan Boyd Reviewed By: Brenda Pagan-Duran MD Sep. 01, 2017 Our eyes need tears to stay ... tear duct to insert a permanent punctal plug? Sep 12, 2017 Can lupus affect my vision? May ...

  15. What Is Dry Eye?

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    Full Text Available ... of what we see as tears. This layer cleans the eye, washing away particles that do not ... Last Name: Member ID: * Phone Number: * Email: * Enter code: * Message: Thank you Your feedback has been sent.

  16. Eye Disease and Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Thomas Barnebeck; Dalgaard, Carl-Johan Lars; Selaya, Pablo

    This research advances the hypothesis that cross-country variation in the historical incidence of eye disease has influenced the current global distribution of per capita income. The theory is that pervasive eye disease diminished the incentive to accumulate skills, thereby delaying the fertility...... transition and the take-off to sustained economic growth. In order to estimate the influence from eye disease incidence empirically, we draw on an important fact from the field of epidemiology: Exposure to solar ultraviolet B radiation (UVB-R) is an underlying determinant of several forms of eye disease...... are robust to the inclusion of an extensive set of climate and geography controls. Moreover, using a global data set on economic activity for all terrestrial grid cells we show that the link between UVB-R and economic development survives the inclusion of country fixed effect....

  17. Diagram of the Eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... eye diseases, visual disorders, mechanisms of visual function, preservation of sight, and the special health problems and ... Clinical Studies Publications Catalog Photos and Images Spanish Language Information Grants and Funding Extramural Research Division of ...

  18. About the Eye

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    Full Text Available ... eye diseases, visual disorders, mechanisms of visual function, preservation of sight, and the special health problems and ... Clinical Studies Publications Catalog Photos and Images Spanish Language Information Grants and Funding Extramural Research Division of ...

  19. The Aging Eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... eye diseases, visual disorders, mechanisms of visual function, preservation of sight, and the special health problems and ... Clinical Studies Publications Catalog Photos and Images Spanish Language Information Grants and Funding Extramural Research Division of ...

  20. About the Eye

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    Full Text Available ... of visual function, preservation of sight, and the special health problems and requirements of the blind.” News & ... Emily Y. Chew, M.D., Deputy Clinical Director Education Programs National Eye Health Education Program (NEHEP) Diabetic ...