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Sample records for rapid abdominal aortic

  1. Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Andrusaitis

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: A 69-year-old male with poorly controlled hypertension presented with 1 hour of severe low back pain that radiated to his abdomen. The patient was tachycardic and had an initial blood pressure of 70/40. He had a rigid and severely tender abdomen. The patient’s history of hypertension, abnormal vital signs, severity and location of his pain were suspicious for a ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA. Therefore, a computed tomography angiogram (CTA was ordered. Significant findings: CTA demonstrated a ruptured 7.4 cm infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm with a large left retroperitoneal hematoma. Discussion: True abdominal aortic aneurysm is defined as at least a 3cm dilatation of all three layers of the arterial wall of the abdominal aorta.1 An estimated 15,000 people die per year in the US of this condition.2 Risk factors for AAA include males older than 65, tobacco use, and hypertension.1,3,4 There are also congenital, mechanical, traumatic, inflammatory, and infectious causes of AAA.3 Rupture is often the first manifestation of the disease. The classic triad of abdominal pain, pulsatile mass, and hypotension is seen in only 50% of ruptured AAAs.5 Pain (abdominal, groin, or back is the most common symptom. The most common misdiagnoses of ruptured AAAs are renal colic, diverticulitis, and gastrointestinal hemorrhage.6 Bedside ultrasonography is the fastest way to detect this condition and is nearly 100% sensitive.1 One study showed that bedside ultrasounds performed by emergency physicians had a sensitivity of .94 [95% CI = .86-1.0] and specificity of 1 [95% CI = .98-1.0] for detecting AAAs.7 CTA has excellent sensitivity (approximately 100% and yields the added benefit of facilitating surgical planning and management.1 Without surgical treatment, a ruptured AAA is almost uniformly fatal, and 50% of those who undergo surgery do not survive.1 Early resuscitation and coordination with vascular surgery should be

  2. Abdominal Aortic Emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lech, Christie; Swaminathan, Anand

    2017-11-01

    This article discusses abdominal aortic emergencies. There is a common thread of risk factors and causes of these diseases, including age, male gender, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and connective tissue disorders. The most common presenting symptom of these disorders is pain, usually in the chest, flank, abdomen, or back. Computed tomography scan is the gold standard for diagnosis of pathologic conditions of the aorta in the hemodynamically stable patient. Treatment consists of a combination of blood pressure and heart rate control and, in many cases, emergent surgical intervention. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Abdominal aortic aneurysm surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gefke, K; Schroeder, T V; Thisted, B

    1994-01-01

    The goal of this study was to identify patients who need longer care in the ICU (more than 48 hours) following abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) surgery and to evaluate the influence of perioperative complications on short- and long-term survival and quality of life. AAA surgery was performed in 553......, 78% stated that their quality of life had improved or was unchanged after surgery and had resumed working. These data justify a therapeutically aggressive approach, including ICU therapy following AAA surgery, despite failure of one or more organ systems....

  4. Abdominal aortic aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholt, Jes Sanddal

    2010-01-01

    Although the number of elective operations for abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) is increasing, the sex- and age-standardised mortality rate of AAAs continues to rise, especially among men aged 65 years or more. The lethality of ruptured AAA continues to be 80-95%, compared with 5-7% by elective...... surgery of symptomfree AAA. In order to fulfil all WHO, European, and Danish criteria for screening, a randomised hospitalbased screening trial of 12,639 65-73 year old men in Viborg County (Denmark) was initiated in 1994. It seemed that US screening is a valid, suitable and acceptable method of screening...... intervals. Two large RCTs have given clear indications of operation. Survivors of surgery enjoy the same quality of life as the background population, and only 2-5% of patients refuse an offer of surgery. Early detection seems relevant since the cardiovascular mortality is more than 4 times higher in AAA...

  5. Abdominal aortic feminism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortimer, Alice Emily

    2014-11-14

    A 79-year-old woman presented to a private medical practice 2 years previously for an elective ultrasound screening scan. This imaging provided the evidence for a diagnosis of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) to be made. Despite having a number of recognised risk factors for an AAA, her general practitioner at the time did not follow the guidance set out by the private medical professional, that is, to refer the patient to a vascular specialist to be entered into a surveillance programme and surgically evaluated. The patient became symptomatic with her AAA, was admitted to hospital and found to have a tender, symptomatic, 6 cm leaking AAA. She consented for an emergency open AAA repair within a few hours of being admitted to hospital, despite the 50% perioperative mortality risk. The patient spent 4 days in intensive care where she recovered well. She was discharged after a 12 day hospital stay but unfortunately passed away shortly after her discharge from a previously undiagnosed gastric cancer. 2014 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  6. Abdominal aortic aneurysm

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... area of the aorta becomes very large or balloons out. Causes The exact cause of an aneurysm ... Symptoms may come on quickly if the aneurysm expands rapidly, tears open or leaks blood within the ...

  7. Abdominal aortic aneurysm and diastasis recti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPhail, Ian

    Midline abdominal incisional hernias are common following open repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms. These may be caused by the weakness of connective tissue. This study sought to determine the prevalence of diastasis recti among unoperated Caucasian males with abdominal aortic aneurysm compared to a control group with atherosclerotic lower extremity peripheral arterial disease. Forty-two consecutive white males referred for evaluation of abdominal aortic aneurysm (n = 18) or peripheral arterial disease (n = 24) were examined by a single examiner at the Mayo Clinic. Both groups were similar in terms of age and smoking history, 2 major risk factors for both abdominal aortic aneurysm and peripheral arterial disease. Abdominal aortic aneurysm patients ranged in age from 59 to 89 (mean, 73.2) years. Seventeen of 18 (94.4%) had a history of smoking. Peripheral arterial disease patients ranged in age from 52 to 93 (mean, 70.8) years. Twenty-one of 24 (87.5%) had a history of smoking. Diastasis recti were present in 12 of 18 (66.7%) subjects with abdominal aortic aneurysm versus 4 of 24 (16.7%) subjects with peripheral arterial disease (P = .001, 2-tailed Fisher exact test). Diastasis recti are significantly more common in males with abdominal aortic aneurysm than peripheral arterial disease and may provide an important clue to screen for abdominal aortic aneurysm in those at risk.

  8. General Considerations of Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm: Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Chung Won; Bae, Miju; Chung, Sung Woon

    2015-01-01

    Although development of surgical technique and critical care, ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm still carries a high mortality. In order to obtain good results, various efforts have been attempted. This paper reviews initial management of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm and discuss the key point open surgical repair and endovascular aneurysm repair.

  9. Vitamins and abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Hisato; Umemoto, Takuya

    2017-02-01

    To summarize the association of vitamins (B6, B12, C, D, and E) and abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), we reviewed clinical studies with a comprehensive literature research and meta-analytic estimates. To identify all clinical studies evaluating the association of vitamins B6/B12/C/D/E and AAA, databases including MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were searched through April 2015, using Web-based search engines (PubMed and OVID). For each case-control study, data regarding vitamin levels in both the AAA and control groups were used to generate standardized mean differences (SMDs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Pooled analyses of the 4 case-control studies demonstrated significantly lower circulating vitamin B6 levels (SMD, -0.33; 95% CI, -0.55 to -0.11; P=0.003) but non-significantly lower vitamin B12 levels (SMD, -0.42; 95% CI, -1.09 to 0.25; P=0.22) in patients with AAA than subjects without AAA. Pooled analyses of the 2 case-control studies demonstrated significantly lower levels of circulating vitamins C (SMD, -0.71; 95% CI, -1.23 to -0.19; P=0.007) and E (SMD, -1.76; 95% CI, -2.93 to 0.60; P=0.003) in patients with AAA than subjects without AAA. Another pooled analysis of the 3 case-control studies demonstrated significantly lower circulating vitamin D (25-hydroxyvitamin D) levels (SMD, -0.25; 95% CI, -0.50 to -0.01; P=0.04) in patients with AAA than subjects without AAA. In a double-blind controlled trial, 4.0-year treatment with a high-dose folic acid and vitamin B6/B12 multivitamin in kidney transplant recipients did not reduce a rate of AAA repair despite significant reduction in homocysteine level. In another randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, 5.8-year supplementation with α-tocopherol (vitamin E) had no preventive effect on large AAA among male smokers. In clinical setting, although low circulating vitamins B6/C/D/E (not B12) levels are associated with AAA presence, vitamins B6/B12/E

  10. [Albert Einstein and his abdominal aortic aneurysm].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervantes Castro, Jorge

    2011-01-01

    The interesting case of Albert Einstein's abdominal aortic aneurysm is presented. He was operated on at age 69 and, finding that the large aneurysm could not be removed, the surgeon elected to wrap it with cellophane to prevent its growth. However, seven years later the aneurysm ruptured and caused the death of the famous scientist.

  11. Natural history of abdominal aortic aneurysm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perko, M J; Schroeder, T V; Olsen, P S

    1993-01-01

    During a 10-year period in which 735 patients presented with abdominal aortic aneurysms to our clinic, 63 were not offered operative treatment. The primary reason for choosing conservative treatment was concomitant diseases that increased the risk of operation. After 2 years of followup, half...

  12. Suprarenal Abdominal Aortic Coarctation Diagnosed During Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sh Hajsadeghi

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Coarctation of the abdominal aorta is an extremely rare vascular defect inwhich congenital or acquired etiologies have been described. This case concernsa 30-year-old pregnant woman with 15-years history of uncontrolled hypertensionand lower limb claudication presented with worsened hypertension during herfirst pregnancy. Magnetic resonance angiography study of aorta revealed astenosis in abdominal aorta about 12mm from the origin of celiac axisaccompanied by left sided aortic arch and right aberrant subclavian artery. Thiscase highlights the importance of a throughout physical examination in patientspresented with hypertension and it emphasizes considering the coarctation of theabdominal aorta during the diagnostic workup of hypertension, especially inyoung patients. In such cases magnetic resonance angiography of the aorta is auseful tool to reach a definitive diagnosis especially in pregnant women.Also to our knowledge, this patient is the first one found to have aortic archmalformation combined with an abdominal coarctation.

  13. Abdominal aortic aneurysms: an autoimmune disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagadesham, Vamshi P; Scott, D Julian A; Carding, Simon R

    2008-12-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) are a multifactorial degenerative vascular disorder. One of the defining features of the pathophysiology of aneurysmal disease is inflammation. Recent developments in vascular and molecular cell biology have increased our knowledge on the role of the adaptive and innate immune systems in the initiation and propagation of the inflammatory response in aortic tissue. AAAs share many features of autoimmune disease, including genetic predisposition, organ specificity and chronic inflammation. Here, this evidence is used to propose that the chronic inflammation observed in AAAs is a consequence of a dysregulated autoimmune response against autologous components of the aortic wall that persists inappropriately. Identification of the molecular and cellular targets involved in AAA formation will allow the development of therapeutic agents for the treatment of AAA.

  14. Abdominal compartment syndrome caused by ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm in vena cava

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipović Aleksandar

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS is a rapid increase in intra-abdominal pressure associated with multi-organs dysfunction. It is caused mostly by abdominal bleeding und massive volume compensation. Case report. We reported a 76-year-old patient admitted to the hospital with aortic abdominal aneurysm, 13.7 cm in diameter, ruptured in vena cava, which caused intraabdominal hypertension, the liver and kidney dysfunction, as well as circulation, respiration and metabolic disorders. Intraabdominal pressure was measured by bladder manometry. Central venous pressure and systemic arterial pressure were monitored continuously. Clinical signs were thrill and typical abdominal bruit. Aorto-caval fistula was diagnosed by the use of contrast computerized tomography. Caval endoaneurysmatic suture and aortobiiliac bypass with 18 × 9 mm Dacron prothesis were performed. Haemodynamic changes were mostly corrected during the surgery. The complete correction of haemodynamics, liver, kidney, respiration and metabolic changes was established in the next few weeks. Conclusion. The ACS was caused by rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysm in vena cava followed by edema of the abdominal organs, retroperitoneum, abdominal wall and ascites. Caval endoaneurysmatic suture and aortobiiliac bypass with 18 × 9 mm Dacron prothesis solved aortocaval fistula as well as all the organs and metabolic dysfunctions caused by ACS.

  15. Combined coronary artery bypass surgery and abdominal aortic aneurysm repair.

    OpenAIRE

    Black, J J; Desai, J B

    1995-01-01

    The proper management of patients with asymptomatic abdominal aortic aneurysms and significant coexistent coronary artery disease is still debatable. The most common approach has been to perform the coronary artery bypass surgery some weeks before the abdominal aortic aneurysm repair in the hope of reducing the cardiac morbidity and mortality. We report our initial experience of three consecutive elective cases where the coronary artery bypass surgery and the abdominal aortic aneurysm repair ...

  16. Abdominal Aortic Diameter Is Increased in Males with a Family History of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mejnert Jørgensen, Trine; Houlind, K; Green, A

    2014-01-01

    measurement of maximum antero-posterior aortic diameter. Family history obtained by questionnaire. Multivariate regression analysis was used to test for confounders: age, sex, smoking, comorbidity and medication. RESULTS: From the screened cohort, 569 participants had at least one first degree relative......OBJECTIVE: To investigate, at a population level, whether a family history of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is independently related to increased aortic diameter and prevalence of AAA in men, and to elucidate whether the mean aortic diameter and the prevalence of AAA are different between...... participants with male and female relatives with AAA. DESIGN: Observational population-based cross-sectional study. MATERIALS: 18,614 male participants screened for AAA in the VIVA-trial 2008-2011 with information on both family history of AAA and maximal aortic diameter. METHODS: Standardized ultrasound scan...

  17. Optimising stroke volume and oxygen delivery in abdominal aortic surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, J; Gilsaa, T; Rønholm, E

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Post-operative complications after open elective abdominal aortic surgery are common, and individualised goal-directed therapy may improve outcome in high-risk surgery. We hypothesised that individualised goal-directed therapy, targeting stroke volume and oxygen delivery, can reduce...... complications and minimise length of stay in intensive care unit and hospital following open elective abdominal aortic surgery. METHODS: Seventy patients scheduled for open elective abdominal aortic surgery were randomised to individualised goal-directed therapy or conventional therapy. In the intervention......-operative complications, intensive care unit or hospital length of stay in open elective abdominal aortic surgery....

  18. Risk Factor Analysis in Operated Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Sunar

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Background : Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA is a common disease of the elderly, with a complex etiology. The known risk factors for abdominal aortic aneurysm is age, male gender, presence of family history of AAA, presence of aneurysms elsewhere (especially at the femoral and popliteal artery, smoking, diabetes mellitus, atherosclerosis and hypertension. The aim of this study was to evaluate risk factors associated with operated abdominal aortic aneurysm in our center. Patients and Method : Our study population consisted of 210 patients who had been performed abdominal aortic aneurysm surgery between January 1998 and January 2010 in our clinic. The study was designed in a retrospective manner and all data were collected from hospital records. The patients were searched for diabetes mellitus, hypertension, age, gender, hyperlipidemia, atherosclerosis and smoking. Results : 187 of 210 patients male and 23 of 210 patients female. The mean age was 64,4±8,9. The most common risk factors were diabetes mellitus (10.1%, hypertension (67.6%, hyperlipidemia (30.9%, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (35.7% and smoking (76.7% for abdominal aortic aneurysm. Conclusion: Smoking was found be as the most important risk factor for abdominal aortic aneurysm. To our knowledge, high rate of smoking in our society has a direct link with abdominal aortic aneurysm. The effective implementation of social campaigns to prevent smoking may be promising for reducing the incidence of abdominal aortic aneurysm in our society.

  19. Statin use and rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wemmelund, H; Høgh, A; Hundborg, H H

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (rAAA) is associated with high mortality. Research suggests that statins may reduce abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) growth and improve rAAA outcomes. However, the clinical impact of statins remains uncertain in relation to both the risk and prognosis...

  20. Rapid prototyping in aortic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bangeas, Petros; Voulalas, Grigorios; Ktenidis, Kiriakos

    2016-04-01

    3D printing provides the sequential addition of material layers and, thus, the opportunity to print parts and components made of different materials with variable mechanical and physical properties. It helps us create 3D anatomical models for the better planning of surgical procedures when needed, since it can reveal any complex anatomical feature. Images of abdominal aortic aneurysms received by computed tomographic angiography were converted into 3D images using a Google SketchUp free software and saved in stereolithography format. Using a 3D printer (Makerbot), a model made of polylactic acid material (thermoplastic filament) was printed. A 3D model of an abdominal aorta aneurysm was created in 138 min, while the model was a precise copy of the aorta visualized in the computed tomographic images. The total cost (including the initial cost of the printer) reached 1303.00 euros. 3D imaging and modelling using different materials can be very useful in cases when anatomical difficulties are recognized through the computed tomographic images and a tactile approach is demanded preoperatively. In this way, major complications during abdominal aorta aneurysm management can be predicted and prevented. Furthermore, the model can be used as a mould; the development of new, more biocompatible, less antigenic and individualized can become a challenge in the future. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  1. An 18-cm unruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan M. Droz, MD

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA is a significant source of morbidity and ranked by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention as the 15th leading cause of death among adults aged 60 to 64 years. Size confers the largest risk factor for aneurysm rupture, with aneurysms >6 cm having an annual rupture risk of 14.1%. We present the case of a 60-year-old man found on ultrasound imaging at a health fair screening to have a 15-cm AAA. Follow-up computed tomography angiography revealed an 18-cm × 10-cm unruptured, infrarenal, fusiform AAA. Giant AAAs, defined as >11 cm, are rarely described in the literature. Our patient underwent successful transperitoneal AAA repair with inferior mesenteric artery reimplantation and was discharged home on operative day 6. We believe this case represents one of the largest unruptured AAAs in the literature and demonstrates the feasible approach for successful repair.

  2. Mast Cells in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shi, Guo-Ping; Lindholt, Jes Sanddal

    2013-01-01

    Mast cells (MCs) are proinflammatory cells that play important roles in allergic responses, tumor growth, obesity, diabetes, atherosclerosis, and abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Although the presence and function of MCs in atherosclerotic lesions have been thoroughly studied in human specimens......, in primary cultured vascular cells, and in atherosclerosis in animals, their role in AAA was recognized only recently. Via multiple activation pathways, MCs release a spectrum of mediators � including histamine, inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, growth factors, proteoglycans, and proteases � to activate...... neighboring cells, degrade extracellular matrix proteins, process latent bioactive molecules, promote angiogenesis, recruit additional inflammatory cells, and stimulate vascular cell apoptosis. These activities associate closely with medial elastica breakdown, medial smooth-muscle cell loss and thinning...

  3. Diastasis recti and abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moesbergen, Todd; Law, Alice; Roake, Justin; Lewis, David R

    2009-01-01

    An association between abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) and abdominal wall hernia has been suggested, possibly reflecting a common collagen disorder. The same mechanism may also cause a greater frequency of diastasis recti among patients at risk of developing AAA. Diastasis recti could be used to identify patients at risk of AAA, with implications for AAA screening. The aim of this study was to determine whether an association between diastasis recti and AAA could be demonstrated.The preoperative computed tomographic (CT) scans of 75 male patients undergoing elective AAA repair were retrospectively examined and linea alba width recorded at supraumbilical and subumbilical levels. Measurements were compared with controls frequency matched for age.Fifty patients with AAA were observed to have supraumbilical diastasis recti on preoperative CT compared with 47 controls. Mean linea alba width was not significantly different between the two groups at either the supraumbilical (19.3 mm vs 20.7 mm, p = .45) or subumbilical (3.6 mm vs 4.3 mm, p = .43) level.The findings do not support the hypothesis that the presence of diastasis recti can serve as an indication to select male patients for screening for AAA.

  4. Rupture of an Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm in a Young Man with Marfan Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Maria Weinkouff; Huynh, Khiem Dinh; Baandrup, Ulrik Thorngren; Nielsen, Dorte Guldbrand; Andersen, Niels Holmark

    2018-02-05

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) are very rare in Marfan syndrome. We present a case with a young nonsmoking and normotensive male with Marfan syndrome, who developed an infrarenal AAA that presented with rupture to the retroperitoneal cavity causing life-threatening bleeding shock. The patient had acute aortic surgery and survived. Five months before this incident, the patient had uneventful elective aortic root replacement (ad modum David) due to an enlarged aortic root. At that time, his abdominal aorta was assessed with a routine ultrasound scan that showed a normal-sized abdominal aorta. This documents that the aneurysm had evolved very rapidly despite young age and absence of risk factors. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Association Between Diverticular Disease and Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mark-Christensen, Anders; Lindholt, Jes Sanddal; Diederichsen, Axel

    2017-01-01

    Background The aetiology of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) is multifactorial, and many risk factors are shared with diverticular disease. It is unknown whether an independent association exists between these conditions. Methods Individuals enrolled in two Danish population based randomised AAA ...

  6. Is screening for abdominal aortic aneurysm acceptable to the population?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholt, Jes Sanddal; Juul, Søren; Henneberg, E W

    1998-01-01

    The aim of the study was to analyse whether the selection and recruitment for hospital-based mass screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) is acceptable for the population according to the criteria from the Council of Europe.......The aim of the study was to analyse whether the selection and recruitment for hospital-based mass screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) is acceptable for the population according to the criteria from the Council of Europe....

  7. Osteoprotegerin Prevents Development of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Batmunkh Bumdelger

    Full Text Available Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs, which commonly occur among elderly individuals, are accompanied by a risk of rupture and subsequent high mortality. Establishment of medical therapies for the prevention of AAAs requires further understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of this condition. This report details the possible involvement of Osteoprotegerin (OPG in the prevention of AAAs through inhibition of Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL. In CaCl2-induced AAA models, both internal and external diameters were significantly increased with destruction of elastic fibers in the media in Opg knockout (KO mice, as compared to wild-type mice. Moreover, up-regulation of TRAIL expression was observed in the media by immunohistochemical analyses. Using a culture system, both the TRAIL-induced expression of matrix metalloproteinase-9 in smooth muscle cells (SMCs and the chemoattractive effect of TRAIL on SMCs were inhibited by OPG. These data suggest that Opg may play a preventive role in the development of AAA through its antagonistic effect on Trail.

  8. Marfan's syndrome presenting with abdominal aortic aneurysm: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We present the case of a 16-year old student with Marfan's syndrome and abdominal aortic aneurysm who presented with a diagnostic conundrum. He presented with a three months history of progressive painful left upper abdominal mass and back pain. It became severe in the last two weeks before presentation and was ...

  9. Mesenteric ischemia after abdominal aortic aneurysm repair : a systemic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruggink, J. L. M.; Tielliu, I. F. J.; Zeebregts, C. J.; Pol, R. A.

    2014-01-01

    Mesenteric ischemia after abdominal aneurysm repair is a devastating complication with mortality rates up to 70%. Incidence however is relatively low. The aim of this review was to provide an overview on current insights, diagnostic modalities and on mesenteric ischemia after abdominal aortic

  10. Mycotic Saccular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm in an Infant after Cardiac Catheterization: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benrashid, Ehsan; McCoy, Christopher C; Rice, Henry E; Shortell, Cynthia K; Cox, Mitchell W

    2015-10-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) are a rare entity in the pediatric population. Children with mycotic (infectious) AAA in particular are at risk of life-threatening rupture due to their rapid expansion coupled with aortic wall thinning and deterioration. Here, we present the case of a 10-month-old infant with prior 2-staged repair for hypoplastic left heart syndrome that was incidentally discovered to have a mycotic AAA on abdominal ultrasound (US) for evaluation of renovascular hypertension. Before the time of evaluation with US, the infant had developed methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia 3 days after cardiac catheterization with percutaneous thoracic aortic balloon angioplasty. She had normal aortic contours on contrasted computed tomography scan of the abdomen approximately 2 weeks before the aforementioned US evaluation. This infant subsequently underwent open aneurysmorrhaphy with cryopreserved vein patch angioplasty with resolution of her aneurysmal segment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Aortic stentgrafts and en dovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2007-07-19

    Jul 19, 2007 ... 4). Calibrating angiography, transoesophageal echo and intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) are useful adjuncts only for thoracic aortic pathology. The stentgraft should generally be oversized by 15 - 20% (10 -. 15% for connective tissue disorders, aortic dissections, etc.). EVAR is performed with local, regional.

  12. Abdominal aortic calcifications predict survival in peritoneal dialysis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mäkelä, Satu M; Asola, Markku; Hadimeri, Henrik

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Peripheral arterial disease and vascular calcifications contribute significantly to the outcome of dialysis patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prognostic role of severity of abdominal aortic calcifications and peripheral arterial disease on outcome of peritoneal...... dialysis (PD) patients using methods easily available in everyday clinical practice. METHODS: We enrolled 249 PD patients (mean age 61 years, 67% male) in this prospective, observational, multicenter study from 2009 to 2013. The abdominal aortic calcification score (AACS) was assessed using lateral lumbar...... [CI] 1.94 - 24.46) for aortic calcification (AACS ≥ 7), 2.14 for diabetes (yes/no), 0.93 for albumin (per 1 g/L), and 1.04 for age (per year). A low or high ABI were not independently associated with mortality. CONCLUSIONS: Severe aortic calcification was a strong predictor of all-cause mortality...

  13. Influence of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Shape on Hemodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-19

    An incompressible fluid with Newtonian properties is assumed. The governing equations for the conserva- tion of mass and momentum, in a Cartesian... equations . To ensure the Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy (CFL) num- ber < 1, the time step is fixed at ∆t = 0.5 × 10−4 s during a pulse. The simulation is...Supraceliac and infrarenal aortic flow in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms: mean flows, waveforms, and allometric scaling relation- ships, Card. Eng

  14. Failure to demonstrate Chlamydia pneumoniae in symptomatic abdominal aortic aneurysms by a nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholt, Jes Sanddal; Ostergård, L; Henneberg, E W

    1998-01-01

    To investigate whether Chlamydia pneumoniae is present in symptomatic abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA).......To investigate whether Chlamydia pneumoniae is present in symptomatic abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA)....

  15. Treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysm in nine countries 2005-2009: a vascunet report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mani, K; Lees, T; Beiles, B

    2011-01-01

    To study contemporary treatment and outcome of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair in nine countries.......To study contemporary treatment and outcome of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair in nine countries....

  16. Features of manifestation and progression for critical lower limb ischemia in subjects with abdominal aortic calcification: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Zelinskiy

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The study was designed to assess the specific features of manifestation and progression for critical low limb ischemia in patients with abdominal aortic calcification. Methods. The total of 151 patients with low limb critical ischemia due to peripheral arterial disease were enrolled to the study cohort: 79 patients (study group with abdominal aortic calcification and 72 patients (control group without any signs of abdominal aortic wall calcification. Abdominal aortic calcification was detected by CT-imaging. The patients with diabetes mellitus and with chronic renal insufficiency were excluded from the study cohort. Results. Critical lower limb ischemia in subjects with abdominal aortic calcification manifested itself in the following features: predominant localization of lesions in the aorto-iliac position (68.4% vs. 33.3% in patients without abdominal aortic calcification; р<0.05, rapid progression of lower limb ischemia (its prevalence in the study group was 77.7% vs. 37.3% in the control group; р<0.01, expressed hypercoagulation combined with a decrease in the level of natural anticoagulants concentration (mean activity of antithrombin III in individuals with abdominal aortic calcification was 56.5±10.4% vs. 98.7±16.4% in patients without abdominal aortic calcification; р<0.001. Conclusion. The study findings have shown that critical lower limb ischemia in subjects with abdominal aortic calcification has specific futures of manifestation and clinical course that need to be considered when choosing the best treatment strategy.Received 24 April 2017. Revised 7 June 2017. Accepted 19 June 2017.Funding: The study did not have sponsorship.Conflict of interest: The authors declare no conflict of interest.

  17. Induction of autoimmune abdominal aortic aneurysm in pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riber, Sara Schødt; Ali, Mulham; Bergseth, Sara Hveding

    2017-01-01

    Background Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a common disease with a high mortality. Many animal models have been developed to further understand the pathogenesis of the disease, but no large animal model has been developed to investigate the autoimmune aspect of AAA formation. The aim...... of this study was to develop a large animal model for abdominal aortic aneurysm induction through autoimmunity by performing sheep-to-pig xenotransplantation. Methods Six pigs underwent a xenotransplantation procedure where the infrarenal porcine aorta was replaced by a decellularized sheep aorta...

  18. Adventitial vasa vasorum arteriosclerosis in abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroki Tanaka

    Full Text Available Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA is a common disease among elderly individuals. However, the precise pathophysiology of AAA remains unknown. In AAA, an intraluminal thrombus prevents luminal perfusion of oxygen, allowing only the adventitial vaso vasorum (VV to deliver oxygen and nutrients to the aortic wall. In this study, we examined changes in the adventitial VV wall in AAA to clarify the histopathological mechanisms underlying AAA. We found marked intimal hyperplasia of the adventitial VV in the AAA sac; further, immunohistological studies revealed proliferation of smooth muscle cells, which caused luminal stenosis of the VV. We also found decreased HemeB signals in the aortic wall of the sac as compared with those in the aortic wall of the neck region in AAA. The stenosis of adventitial VV in the AAA sac and the malperfusion of the aortic wall observed in the present study are new aspects of AAA pathology that are expected to enhance our understanding of this disease.

  19. Endovascular treatment of spontaneous isolated abdominal aortic dissection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Maria Giribono

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Isolated abdominal aortic dissection is a rare clinical disease representing only 1.3% of all dissections. There are a few case series reported in the literature. The causes of this pathology can be spontaneous, iatrogenic, or traumatic. Most patients are asymptomatic and symptoms are usually abdominal or back pain, while claudication and lower limb ischemia are rare. Surgical and endovascular treatment are two valid options with acceptable results. We herein describe nine cases of symptomatic spontaneous isolated abdominal aortic dissection, out of which four successfully were treated with an endovascular approach between July 2003 and July 2013. All patients were men, smokers, symptomatic (either abdominal or back pain or lower limb ischemia, with a history of high blood pressure, with a medical history negative for concomitant aneurysmatic dilatation or previous endovascular intervention. Diagnosis of isolated abdominal aortic dissection were established by contrast-enhanced computed tomography angiography (CTA of the thoracic and abdominal aorta. All nine patients initially underwent medical treatment. In four symptomatic cases, non-responsive to medical therapy, bare-metal stents or stent grafts were successfully positioned. All patients completed a CTA follow-up of at least 12 months, during which they remained symptom-free. Endovascular management of this condition is associated with a high rate of technical success and a low mortality; therefore, it can be considered the treatment of choice when it is feasible.

  20. MRI-based Assessment of Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laan, M.J. van der

    2007-01-01

    Imaging techniques play a key role in the Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair (EVAR) follow-up. The most important parameters monitored after EVAR are the aneurysm size and the presence of endoleaks. Currently, computed tomographic angiography (CTA) is the most commonly used imaging

  1. Deep gluteal grounding pad burn after abdominal aortic aneurysm repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapienza, Paolo; Venturini, Luigi; Cigna, Emanuele; Sterpetti, Antonio V; Biacchi, Daniele; di Marzo, Luca

    2015-06-24

    Although skin burns at the site of grounding pad are a known risk of surgery, their exact incidence is unknown. We first report the case of a patient who presented a deep gluteal burn at the site of the grounding pad after an abdominal aortic aneurism repair, the etiology and the challenging treatment required to overcome this complication.

  2. [Pseudomembranous colitis after surgery for a ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano Sánchez, F; Sánchez Fernández, J; Palacios, E; Fernández, M; Ingelmo Morin, A; Gómez Alonso, A

    1993-01-01

    We present a rare postoperative complication after surgical procedures for rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysms. The disease, a pseudomembranous colitis, was early recognized (by evidence of clostridium difficile after a coprocultive) and satisfactorily treated with vancomycin. From the literature review we found only a similar case but results were absolutely different from our case.

  3. Mass or high-risk screening for abdominal aortic aneurysm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholt, Jes Sanddal; Henneberg, E W; Fasting, H

    1997-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is known to be associated with various diseases, especially hypertension, acute myocardial infarction (AMI), chronic obstructive airway disease (COAD), and intermittent claudication. These associations have led to a debate about whether screening of older men for AAA...

  4. High heritability of liability to abdominal aortic aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mejnert Jørgensen, Trine; Christensen, Kaare; Lindholt, Jes Sanddal

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: First degree relatives of patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) have an increased risk of developing AAA; however, despite intensive investigation, the specific genetic factors involved in the development of the disease are still largely unknown. In twin studies the influence...

  5. ORIGINAL ARTICLES Screening for abdominal aortic aneurysm - a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A pilot study to assess the feasibility and affordability of a targeted screening programme for abdominal aortic ... fracture risk in premenopausal women who had suffered minor fractures2 and also in long-term users of ... was requested in cases that required specialist opinion or follow-up, or in which surgery appeared to be ...

  6. Animal Models Used to Explore Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lysgaard Poulsen, J; Stubbe, J; Lindholt, J S

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Experimental animal models have been used to investigate the formation, development, and progression of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) for decades. New models are constantly being developed to imitate the mechanisms of human AAAs and to identify treatments that are less risky than t...

  7. Asthma Associates With Human Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm and Rupture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Cong-Lin; Wemmelund, Holger; Wang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Both asthma and abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) involve inflammation. It remains unknown whether these diseases interact. APPROACH AND RESULTS: Databases analyzed included Danish National Registry of Patients, a population-based nationwide case-control study included all patients with...

  8. Antimicrobial Treatment to Impair Expansion of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergqvist, David; Lindeman, Johannes H N; Lindholt, Jes Sanddal

    2013-01-01

    Antimicrobial treatment to attenuate expansion of abdominal aortic aneurysm has been suggested, especially with the focus on Chlamydophila. In this systematic literature review only four randomized trials were identified. In two small studies there is an indication of an effect of roxithromycin. ...

  9. A variant in LDLR is associated with abdominal aortic aneurysm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bradley, Declan T; Hughes, Anne E; Badger, Stephen A

    2013-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a common cardiovascular disease among older people and demonstrates significant heritability. In contrast to similar complex diseases, relatively few genetic associations with AAA have been confirmed. We reanalyzed our genome-wide study and carried through...

  10. Familial Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm : Clinical Features and Genetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.M. van de Luijtgaarden (Koen)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstractAbstract Cardiovascular disease is the most important cause of death in the world and encompasses occlusive as well as aneurysmal disease. The most common aneurysm in humans is the abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). The question is why the aorta dilates in aneurysmal disease and

  11. Estimating overdiagnosis in Screening for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Minna; Hansson, Anders; Brodersen, J.

    2015-01-01

    Clinical context: Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) are often asymptomatic until they rupture, when the death rate is greater than 80%. If diagnosed before rupture, AAA can be treated with surgery, which has a mortality of 4-5% Diagnostic change: Sweden, the UK, and the US have initiated screenin...

  12. Minilaparotomy for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair: Preliminary Results

    OpenAIRE

    Klokocovnik, Tomislav

    2001-01-01

    A median laparotomy is the standard approach for endoaneurysmorrhaphy of abdominal aortic aneurysms. The so-called minilaparotomy, which has come into use in recent years to reduce surgical trauma, provides good exposure of the operating field, similar to that afforded by the conventional procedure.

  13. Surgery for small asymptomatic abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filardo, Giovanni; Powell, Janet T; Martinez, Melissa Ashley-Marie; Ballard, David J

    2015-02-08

    An abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is an abnormal ballooning of the major abdominal artery. Some AAAs present as emergencies and require surgery; others remain asymptomatic. Treatment of asymptomatic AAAs depends on many factors, but an important one is the size of the aneurysm, as risk of rupture increases with aneurysm size. Large asymptomatic AAAs (greater than 5.5 cm in diameter) are usually repaired surgically; very small AAAs (less than 4.0 cm diameter) are monitored with ultrasonography. Debate continues over the appropriate roles of immediate repair and surveillance with repair on subsequent enlargement in people presenting with asymptomatic AAAs of 4.0 cm to 5.5 cm diameter. This is the third update of the review first published in 1999. To compare mortality, quality of life, and cost effectiveness of immediate surgical repair versus routine ultrasound surveillance in people with asymptomatic AAAs between 4.0 cm and 5.5 cm in diameter. For this update, the Cochrane Peripheral Vascular Diseases Group Trials Search Co-ordinator searched the Specialised Register (February 2014) and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2014, Issue 1). We checked reference lists of relevant articles for additional studies. Randomised controlled trials in which men and women with asymptomatic AAAs of diameter 4.0 cm to 5.5 cm were randomly allocated to immediate repair or imaging-based surveillance at least every six months. Outcomes had to include mortality or survival. Three members of the review team independently extracted the data, which were cross-checked by other team members. Risk ratios (RR) (endovascular aneurysm repair only), hazard ratios (HR) (open repair only), and 95% confidence intervals based on Mantel-Haenszel Chi(2) statistic were estimated at one and six years (open repair only) following randomisation. We included all relevant published studies in this review. For this update, four trials with a combined total of 3314 participants

  14. Fenestrated endografts for complex abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastracci, Tara M

    2010-12-01

    The treatment of aortic aneurysm disease using endovascular stent grafts has evolved over the past 20 years. Extending this approach to aneurysms involving the visceral aorta has required development of fenestrated endografts. By creating branches to accommodate visceral vessels, the proximal landing zone can be chosen based on the adequacy of the aortic wall, rather than the constraints of visceral vessels. This allows for a more stable repair, and permits a minimally invasive approach in even very complex aneurysms. As the technology becomes more widespread, the use of these grafts has emerged from an experimental form to standard of care in some jurisdictions. Thus, many patients who might have previously been considered high risk for aneurysm repair are now candidates for surgery. This article outlines the basic concepts behind the development of fenestrated endografts, their current use, and the future of the technology.

  15. Blunt abdominal aortic injury: a Western Trauma Association multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalhub, Sherene; Starnes, Benjamin W; Brenner, Megan L; Biffl, Walter L; Azizzadeh, Ali; Inaba, Kenji; Skiada, Dimitra; Zarzaur, Ben; Nawaf, Cayce; Eriksson, Evert A; Fakhry, Samir M; Paul, Jasmeet S; Kaups, Krista L; Ciesla, David J; Todd, S Rob; Seamon, Mark J; Capano-Wehrle, Lisa M; Jurkovich, Gregory J; Kozar, Rosemary A

    2014-12-01

    Blunt abdominal aortic injury (BAAI) is a rare injury. The objective of the current study was to examine the presentation and management of BAAI at a multi-institutional level. The Western Trauma Association Multi-Center Trials conducted a study of BAAI from 1996 to 2011. Data collected included demographics, injury mechanism, associated injuries, interventions, and complications. Of 392,315 blunt trauma patients, 113 (0.03%) presented with BAAI at 12 major trauma centers (67% male; median age, 38 years; range, 6-88; median Injury Severity Score [ISS], 34; range, 16-75). The leading cause of injury was motor vehicle collisions (60%). Hypotension was documented in 47% of the cases. The most commonly associated injuries were spine fractures (44%) and pneumothorax/hemothorax (42%). Solid organ, small bowel, and large bowel injuries occurred in 38%, 35%, and 28% respectively. BAAI presented as free aortic rupture (32%), pseudoaneurysm (16%), and injuries without aortic external contour abnormality on computed tomography such as large intimal flaps (34%) or intimal tears (18%). Open and endovascular repairs were undertaken as first-choice therapy in 43% and 15% of cases, respectively. Choice of management varied by type of BAAI: 89% of intimal tears were managed nonoperatively, and 96% of aortic ruptures were treated with open repair. Overall mortality was 39%, the majority (68%) occurring in the first 24 hours because of hemorrhage or cardiac arrest. The highest mortality was associated with Zone II aortic ruptures (92%). Follow-up was documented in 38% of live discharges. This is the largest BAAI series reported to date. BAAI presents as a spectrum of injury ranging from minimal aortic injury to aortic rupture. Nonoperative management is successful in uncomplicated cases without external aortic contour abnormality on computed tomography. Highest mortality occurred in free aortic ruptures, suggesting that alternative measures of early noncompressible torso hemorrhage

  16. The effect of flow recirculation on abdominal aortic aneurysm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taib, Ishkrizat; Amirnordin, Shahrin Hisham; Madon, Rais Hanizam; Mustafa, Norrizal; Osman, Kahar

    2012-06-01

    The presences of flow recirculation at the abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) region yield the unpredictable failure of aneurismal wall. The failure of the aneurismal wall is closely related to the hemodynamic factor. Hemodynamic factor such as pressure and velocity distribution play a significance role of aneurysm growth and rupture. By using the computational approach, the influence of hemodynamic factor is investigated using computational fluid dynamic (CFD) method on the virtual AAA model. The virtual 3D AAAs model was reconstructed from Spiral Computed Tomography scan (CT-scan). The blood flow is assumed as being transient, laminar and Newtonian within a rigid section of the vessel. The blood flow also driven by an imposed of pressure gradient in the form of physiological waveform. The pulsating blood flow is also considered in this simulation. The results on pressure distribution and velocity profile are analyzed to interpret the behaviour of flow recirculation. The results show the forming of vortices is seen at the aneurysm bulge. This vortices is form at the aneurysm region then destroyed rapidly by flow recirculation. Flow recirculation is point out much higher at distal end of aneurysm closed to iliac bifurcation. This phenomenon is managed to increase the possibility of aneurysm growth and rupture.

  17. Quantitative Aortic Distensibility Measurement Using CT in Patients with Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm: Reproducibility and Clinical Relevance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunfei Zha

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To investigate the reproducibility of aortic distensibility (D measurement using CT and assess its clinical relevance in patients with infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA. Methods. 54 patients with infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm were studied to determine their distensibility by using 64-MDCT. Aortic cross-sectional area changes were determined at two positions of the aorta, immediately below the lowest renal artery (level 1. and at the level of its maximal diameter (level 2. by semiautomatic segmentation. Measurement reproducibility was assessed using intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC and Bland-Altman analyses. Stepwise multiple regression analysis was performed to assess linear associations between aortic D and anthropometric and biochemical parameters. Results. A mean distensibility of Dlevel  1.=(1.05±0.22×10-5  Pa-1 and Dlevel  2.=(0.49±0.18×10-5  Pa-1 was found. ICC proved excellent consistency between readers over two locations: 0.92 for intraobserver and 0.89 for interobserver difference in level 1. and 0.85 and 0.79 in level 2. Multivariate analysis of all these variables showed sac distensibility to be independently related (R2=0.68 to BMI, diastolic blood pressure, and AAA diameter. Conclusions. Aortic distensibility measurement in patients with AAA demonstrated high inter- and intraobserver agreement and may be valuable when choosing the optimal dimensions graft for AAA before endovascular aneurysm repair.

  18. Proteomic identification of differentially expressed proteins in aortic wall of patients with ruptured and nonruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Urbonavicius, Sigitas; Lindholt, Jes S.; Vorum, Henrik

    2009-01-01

    To compare the basic proteomic composition of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) wall tissue in patients with nonruptured and ruptured aneurysms.......To compare the basic proteomic composition of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) wall tissue in patients with nonruptured and ruptured aneurysms....

  19. Vascular disease patient information page: Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moennich, Laurie Ann; Mastracci, Tara M

    2014-10-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm is a silent but often fatal disease. AAA is most common in older people, with both modifiable (such as smoking) and hereditary (family history of AAA) risk factors influencing disease development. Screening for AAA can aid in the early diagnosis and treatment of the disease, reducing complications and death amongst those affected. Advancements in screening techniques, surgical innovations, and graft development strive to further improve patient outcomes and disease management.

  20. Renal failure after operation for abdominal aortic aneurysm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, P S; Schroeder, T; Perko, M

    1990-01-01

    Among 656 patients undergoing surgery for abdominal aortic aneurysm, 81 patients (12%) developed postoperative renal failure. Before operation hypotension and shock occurred in 88% of the patients with ruptured aneurysm, whereas none of the patients operated electively were hypotensive. Dialysis...... cases the death was caused by renal failure only or in combination with failure of other organs. Analysis of the cumulative survival shows that, if the patients survive the postoperative period, their life expectancy is comparable to that of patients without renal complications....

  1. 3D image analysis of abdominal aortic aneurysm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subasic, Marko; Loncaric, Sven; Sorantin, Erich

    2001-07-01

    In this paper we propose a technique for 3-D segmentation of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) from computed tomography angiography (CTA) images. Output data (3-D model) form the proposed method can be used for measurement of aortic shape and dimensions. Knowledge of aortic shape and size is very important in planning of minimally invasive procedure that is for selection of appropriate stent graft device for treatment of AAA. The technique is based on a 3-D deformable model and utilizes the level-set algorithm for implementation of the method. The method performs 3-D segmentation of CTA images and extracts a 3-D model of aortic wall. Once the 3-D model of aortic wall is available it is easy to perform all required measurements for appropriate stent graft selection. The method proposed in this paper uses the level-set algorithm for deformable models, instead of the classical snake algorithm. The main advantage of the level set algorithm is that it enables easy segmentation of complex structures, surpassing most of the drawbacks of the classical approach. We have extended the deformable model to incorporate the a priori knowledge about the shape of the AAA. This helps direct the evolution of the deformable model to correctly segment the aorta. The algorithm has been implemented in IDL and C languages. Experiments have been performed using real patient CTA images and have shown good results.

  2. Abdominal Aortic Dissection with Acute Mesenteric Ischemia in a Patient with Marfan Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chii-Shyan Lay

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Marfan syndrome is an autosomal dominant inherited disorder of connective tissue, with various complications manifested primarily in the cardiovascular system. It potentially leads to aortic dissection and rupture, these being the major causes of death. We report a patient who complained of acute abdominal pain, which presented as acute mesenteric ischemia combined with abdominal aortic dissection. Echocardiography showed enlargement of the aortic root and mitral valve prolapse. Abdominal computed tomography scan revealed acute mesenteric ischemia due to abdominal aortic dissection. Finally, the patient underwent surgery of aortic root replacement and had a successful outcome. Therefore, we suggest that for optimal risk assessment and monitoring of patients with Marfan syndrome, both aortic stiffness and the diameter of the superior mesenteric vein compared with that of the superior mesenteric artery are useful screening methods to detect acute mesenteric ischemia secondary to abdominal aortic dissection. Early diagnosis and early treatment can decrease the high mortality rate of patients with Marfan syndrome.

  3. Primary congenital abdominal aortic aneurysm: a case report with perinatal serial follow-up imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jung Im; Lee, Whal; Chung, Jin Wook; Park, Jae Hyung [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea); Kim, Sang Joon [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Surgery, Seoul (Korea); Seo, Jeong-Wook [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Pathology, Seoul (Korea)

    2008-11-15

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms in neonates and infants are rare and are usually associated with infection, vasculitis, connective tissue disorder, or iatrogenic trauma such as umbilical catheterization. An idiopathic congenital abdominal aortic aneurysm is the least common category and there are few descriptions of the imaging features. We present the antenatal and postnatal imaging findings of an idiopathic congenital abdominal aortic aneurysm including the findings on US, MRI and CT. (orig.)

  4. Combined transdiaphragmatic off-pump and minimally invasive coronary artery bypass with right gastroepiploic artery and abdominal aortic aneurysm repair

    OpenAIRE

    G?rer, Onur; Haberal, Ismail; Ozsoy, Deniz

    2013-01-01

    Patient: Male, 74 Final Diagnosis: Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) Symptoms: Palpable abdominal mass Medication: ? Clinical Procedure: Abdominal aortic aneurysm repair Specialty: Surgery Objective: Rare disease Background: Coronary artery disease is common in elderly patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms. Here we report a case of the combination of surgical repair for abdominal aortic aneurysm and off-pump and minimally invasive coronary artery bypass surgery. Case Report: A 74-year-old ma...

  5. [Chronic low back pain and abdominal aortic aneurysm].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zúñiga Cedó, E; Vico Besó, L

    2013-10-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm has a population prevalence of 2-5% and mortality in case of rupture of 80%. Up to 91% of cases is accompanied with low back pain, so it is important to include aortic aneurysm in the differential diagnosis of chronic low back pain. Low back pain is one of the most frequent reasons for consultions in Services Emergency Hospital Emergency and Primary Care Services, with an estimated 80% of population having spinal pain at some point in their lives, with 90% of them having a benign course. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  6. Open Versus Endovascular Stent Graft Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Firwana, Belal; Ferwana, Mazen; Hasan, Rim

    2014-01-01

    We performed an analysis to assess the need for conducting additional randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing open and endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Trial sequential analysis (TSA) is a statistical methodology that can calculate the required...... evidence that there would be no extra benefit in conducting more RCTs to detect the effectiveness of EVAR versus open repair. For long-term mortality, TSA revealed either inconclusive evidence to support or refute endovascular or open repair; so, further RCTs should be performed to investigate long...

  7. Systemic levels of cotinine and elastase, but not pulmonary function, are associated with the progression of small abdominal aortic aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholt, Jes Sanddal; Jørgensen, B; Klitgaard, N A

    2003-01-01

    to study whether smoking and impaired pulmonary function are associated with the expansion of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA).......to study whether smoking and impaired pulmonary function are associated with the expansion of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA)....

  8. Women with abdominal aortic aneurysms have more extensive aortic neck pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hultgren, Rebecka; Vishnevskaya, Liya; Wahlgren, Carl Magnus

    2013-07-01

    The proportion of women with abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) treated with endovascular aortic repair (EVAR) is lower than for open repair (OR). Unfavorable morphologic features for EVAR in women with AAA may explain this disproportion. The objective of this study was to identify morphologic features in AAA patients undergoing elective repair with special emphasis on gender differences. Patients undergoing elective repair from January 1, 2006 to December 31, 2008 at our university's vascular unit were included in this study. Computed tomography (CT) angiograms were analyzed. Morphologic features considered unfavorable for EVAR rather than open repair (OR) included: infrarenal aortic neck 60°; circumferential neck thrombus; neck width >32 mm; iliac arteries more of the other aortic neck exclusion criteria. One hundred seventy-two patients, including 140 men and 32 women, were treated during the study period, which included 99 with OR (21 women, 78 men) and 73 with EVAR (11 women, 62 men). Morphologic unsuitability for EVAR was 44% (75 of 172) and was not statistically different between women and men [47% (15 of 32) vs. 43% (60 of 140), P = 0.70]. Aortic neck pathology was the dominating feature for unsuitability for EVAR (69 of 75, 92%), and 85 of 172 patients had an unsuitable aortic neck. This rate was not different between women and men [19 of 32 (59%) vs. 66 of 140 (47%), P = 0.24]. Iliac unsuitability rates were 11% (19 of 172) and were not different between women and men [4 of 32 (12%) vs. 15 of 140 (11%), P = 0.76]. In patients unsuitable for EVAR, the proximal aortic necks showed more extensive aortic neck pathology in women than in men [8 of 15 (53%) vs. 13 of 60 (22%), P = 0.02]. More men had only short neck pathology [22 of 60 (37%) vs. 1 of 15 (7%), P = 0.03]. Aortic neck pathology is the dominating cause of EVAR exclusion in both genders. A higher proportion of women have more pathologic neck anatomy. Future development of EVAR devices should focus on

  9. Can colonoscopy diagnose transmural ischaemic colitis after abdominal aortic surgery? An evidence-based approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houe, T; Thorböll, J E; Sigild, U

    2000-01-01

    to assess the diagnostic value of colonoscopy in ischaemic colitis following abdominal aortic surgery, based on a literature review, and to introduce the concept of evidence-based medicine.......to assess the diagnostic value of colonoscopy in ischaemic colitis following abdominal aortic surgery, based on a literature review, and to introduce the concept of evidence-based medicine....

  10. Critical role of mast cell chymase in mouse abdominal aortic aneurysm formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, J; Zhang, J; Lindholt, Jes S.

    2009-01-01

    Mast cell chymase may participate in the pathogenesis of human abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), yet a direct contribution of this serine protease to AAA formation remains unknown.......Mast cell chymase may participate in the pathogenesis of human abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), yet a direct contribution of this serine protease to AAA formation remains unknown....

  11. Insulin-like growth factor I - a novel biomarker of abdominal aortic aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholt, J S; Martin-Ventura, J L; Urbonavicius, S

    2011-01-01

    The study aimed to test the potential role of insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) and IGF-II as biomarkers for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA).......The study aimed to test the potential role of insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) and IGF-II as biomarkers for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA)....

  12. Serum-elastin-peptides as a predictor of expansion of small abdominal aortic aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholt, Jes Sanddal; Heickendorff, Lene; Henneberg, E W

    1997-01-01

    To optimise the indication and time for operation for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), we analysed whether or not serum-elastin-peptides (SEP) could be a potential predictor for expansion.......To optimise the indication and time for operation for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), we analysed whether or not serum-elastin-peptides (SEP) could be a potential predictor for expansion....

  13. Natural history of abdominal aortic aneurysm with and without coexisting chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholt, Jes Sanddal; Heickendorff, Lene; Antonsen, Sebastian

    1998-01-01

    To study the relation between abdominal aortic aneurysms and chronical obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), in particular the suggested common elastin degradation caused by elastase and smoking.......To study the relation between abdominal aortic aneurysms and chronical obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), in particular the suggested common elastin degradation caused by elastase and smoking....

  14. Proteomic Analysis of Intraluminal Thrombus Highlights Complement Activation in Human Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinez-Pinna, Roxana; Madrigal-Matute, Julio; Tarin, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    To identify proteins related to intraluminal thrombus biological activities that could help to find novel pathological mechanisms and therapeutic targets for human abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA).......To identify proteins related to intraluminal thrombus biological activities that could help to find novel pathological mechanisms and therapeutic targets for human abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA)....

  15. Cost effectiveness of abdominal aortic aneurysm screening and rescreening in men in a modern context

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard, Rikke; Laustsen, Jesper; Lindholt, Jes Sanddal

    2012-01-01

    To assess the cost effectiveness of different screening strategies for abdominal aortic aneurysm in men, from the perspective of a national health service.......To assess the cost effectiveness of different screening strategies for abdominal aortic aneurysm in men, from the perspective of a national health service....

  16. Simultaneous repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm and resection of unexpected, associated abdominal malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illuminati, Giulio; Calio', Francesco G; D'Urso, Antonio; Lorusso, Riccardo; Ceccanei, Gianluca; Vietri, Francesco

    2004-12-15

    The management of unexpected intra-abdominal malignancy, discovered at laparotomy for elective treatment of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), is controversial. It is still unclear whether both conditions should be treated simultaneously or a staged approach is to be preferred. To contribute in improving treatment guidelines, we retrospectively reviewed the records of patients undergoing laparotomy for elective AAA repair. From January 1994 to March 2003, 253 patients underwent elective, trans-peritoneal repair of an AAA. In four patients (1.6%), an associated, unexpected neoplasm was detected at abdominal exploration, consisting of one renal, one gastric, one ileal carcinoid, and one ascending colon tumor. All of them were treated at the same operation, after aortic repair and careful isolation of the prosthetic graft. The whole series' operative mortality was 3.6%. None of the patients simultaneously treated for AAA and tumor resection died in the postoperative period. No graft-related infections were observed. Simultaneous treatment of AAA and tumor did not prolong significantly the mean length of stay in the hospital, compared to standard treatment of AAA alone. Except for malignancies of organs requiring major surgical resections, simultaneous AAA repair and resection of an associated, unexpected abdominal neoplasm can be safely performed, in most of the patients, sparing the need for a second procedure. Endovascular grafting of the AAA can be a valuable tool in simplifying simultaneous treatment, or in staging the procedures with a very short delay.

  17. Aorfix™ device for abdominal aortic aneurysm with challenging anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sbarzaglia, P; Grattoni, C; Oshoala, K; Castriota, F; D'Alessandro, G; Cremonesi, A

    2014-02-01

    Anatomical characteristics of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) are the most critical factors for successful endovascular aortic repair (EVAR). Of these, severe proximal aortic neck angulation and iliac axis tortuosity increase the complexity of EVAR. Neck angulation seems to have a pivotal potential for fixation failure, a situation that may lead to complications, including endoleak and late rupture. Bench-test studies identified that the relative stiffness of a stent-graft was responsible for its inability to conform to neck angulation, therefore creating leaks through gaps between the stent graft and the neck. Aorfix™ stent graft (Lombard Medical, Didcot, UK) is a flexible stent-graft designed and manufactured with the purpose of overcoming the issue of stent-graft stiffness. Many studies have shown good results in term of procedural success and mid-term type-I endoleak. PYTHAGORAS trial evaluated mainly patients with highly angulated infrarenal neck and showed that high performance of Aorfix™ stent graft did not present any significant difference between neck >60° and <60°. In the series of 27 patients treated at our Institution we had a primary technical success of 96.3% and an assisted primary technical success of 100%. In this review we will analyze the available data in literature regarding Aorfix™ stent graft and will discuss the outcome of the patients treated with Aorfix™ stent graft at our centre.

  18. Ruptured cryptogenic mycotic abdominal aortic aneurysm by Salmonella enteritidis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordzadeh, Ali; Rhodes, Karen May; Hanif, Muhammad Asad; Scott, Harriet; Panayiotopoulos, Yiannis

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study is to describe a case of ruptured cryptogenic mycotic abdominal aortic aneurysm by Salmonella enteritidis (SE) and present a comprehensive review of the literature. A 66-year-old man with a past medical history of coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) and polymylagia rheumatica (PMR) presented with a 2-day history of right-flank-to-groin pain and fever. He was found to have tenderness on the right of the umbilical region and laboratory data showed leukocytosis, raised C-reactive protein, and a significant drop in hemoglobin level as compared with his first visit 17 days earlier, with no hemodynamic instability. An immediate computed tomography angiogram (CTA) was performed, which showed a 4-cm, fusiform, ruptured infrarenal aortic aneurysm. Exploratory laparatomy was performed and the aorta was isolated and excised from the infrarenal level to the common iliac bificuration. A straight silver Dacron graft soaked in rifampicin was placed with an end-to-end anastomosis. The excised aorta and the lymph nodes were sent for histologic and microbiologic assessment. Blood culture and specimen microbiology grew Salmonella enteritidis (SE). The histology exhibited atherosclerosis at the rupture point with decreasing neutrophil deposition from the intima to the adventitia layer, respectively. Infrarenal abdominal mycotic aneurysm (MA) by SE was observed and showed vague, nonspecific signs and symptoms. We recommend a high index of suspicion and low threshold for use of CT imaging in any infected patient of age >60 years with fever and abdominal pain on a background of diabetes and connective tissue disease. A comprehensive review of the literature was performed due to a lack of consensus on the best surgical treatment and limited information on the path of SE-induced aortitis or MA from presentation to final outcome. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Patterns and management of blunt abdominal aortic injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Donald G; Drucker, Charles B; Brenner, Megan L; Sarkar, Rajabrata; Narayan, Mayur; Crawford, Robert S

    2013-11-01

    Blunt abdominal aortic injury (BAAI) is historically associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Our institutional experience was analyzed to define current patterns of injury and to help guide management. Adult patients with BAAI between January 2000 and July 2011 were identified from our trauma registry. Medical, radiographic, and autopsy records were reviewed for relevant clinical data. Management and outcomes were compared between patients with minimal aortic injury limited to the intima (MAI) compared to more significant aortic injury (SAI). Nine patients had MAI and 8 had SAI, including 2 dissections, 2 pseudoaneurysms, 2 branch avulsions, 1 thrombosis, and 1 transection. The MAI and SAI groups had similar demographics and patterns of injury, and all patients had significant polytrauma, with a mean injury severity score of 42. More MAI than SAI patients were managed nonoperatively (100% vs. 38%; P=0.01). All observed patients underwent repeat imaging during the index admission, 85% within 72 hours, and no observed lesions led to malperfusion, death, or progression during the index admission. One MAI progressed to a pseudoaneurysm within 8 months. Five SAI patients underwent aortic-related repairs, including 2 endovascular stent grafts, 2 open primary repairs, and 1 axillobifemoral bypass. Overall, 15 (88%) patients underwent procedures for any injury-9 required laparotomy (53%) and 2 underwent thoracotomy. There were 6 (35%) deaths, 2 attributable to aortic injury-1 from hemorrhage and 1 from hyperkalemic cardiac arrest after prolonged ischemia from infrarenal aortic occlusion. Among patients who survived the initial resuscitation, SAI was associated with a significantly higher mortality rate compared to MAI (50% vs. 0%; P=0.03). Patients with MAI are at low risk of complications and may be considered for observation. Patients with SAI requiring intervention manifest clinically and/or radiographically at presentation. Those not associated with

  20. Endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm sizing and case planning using the TeraRecon Aquarius workstation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, W Anthony

    2007-01-01

    The gold standard for preoperative evaluation of an aortic aneurysm is a computed tomography angiogram (CTA). Three-dimensional reconstruction and analysis of the computed tomography data set is enormously helpful, and even sometimes essential, in proper sizing and planning for endovascular stent graft repair. To a large extent, it has obviated the need for conventional angiography for morphologic evaluation. The TeraRecon Aquarius workstation (San Mateo, Calif) represents a highly sophisticated but user-friendly platform utilizing a combination of task-specific hardware and software specifically designed to rapidly manipulate large Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) data sets and provide surface-shaded and multiplanar renderings in real-time. This article discusses the basics of sizing and planning for endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair and the role of 3-dimensional analysis using the TeraRecon workstation.

  1. Daily diurnal variation in admissions for ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Killeen, Shane

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Many vascular events, such as myocardial infarction and cerebrovascular accident, demonstrate a circadian pattern of presentation. Blood pressure is intimately related to these pathologies and is the one physiological variable consistently associated with abdominal aortic aneurysm rupture. It also demonstrates a diurnal variation. The purpose of this study was to determine if rupture of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (RAAA) exhibits a diurnal variation. METHODS: A retrospective cohort-based study was performed to determine the timing of presentation of RAAA to the vascular unit of Cork University Hospital over a 15-year period. Time of admission, symptom onset, and co-morbidities such as hypertension were noted. Fournier\\'s analysis and chi-squared analysis were performed. To ameliorate possible confounding factors, patients admitted with perforated peptic ulcers were examined in the same manner. RESULTS: A total of 148 cases of RAAA were identified, with a male preponderance (71.7% [124] male versus 29.3% [44] female patients) and a mean age of 74.4 +\\/- 7.2 years at presentation. 70.9% (105) were known to have hypertension, 52.2% (77) were current smokers, and 46.8% (69) were being treated for chronic obstructive airway disease (COAD). Time of symptom onset was recorded in 88.5% (131) of patients. There was a marked early morning peak in RAAA admissions, with the highest number of RAAA being admitted between 08.00 and 09.59. A second, smaller peak was observed at 14.00-15.59. These findings were suggestive of diurnal variation. [chi(2) =16.75, p < 0.003]. Some 40% (59) of patients were admitted between 00.00 and 06.00, an incidence significantly higher than for other time periods (06.00-12.00, 12.00-18.00, and 18.00-24.00) [chi(2) = 18.72; df = 3; p < 0.0003]. A significantly higher number of patients admitted between 00.00 and 06.00 were known hypertensives (chi(2) = 7.94; p < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: The findings of this study suggest a distinct

  2. Screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms Rastreamento de aneurismas da aorta abdominal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Telmo Pedro Bonamigo

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE AND METHODS: Screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms may be useful to decrease mortality related to rupture. We conducted a study to assess the prevalence of abdominal aortic aneurysms in southern Brazil and to define risk factors associated with high prevalence of this disorder. The screening was conducted using abdominal ultrasound. Three groups were studied: Group 1 - cardiology clinic patients; Group 2 - individuals with severe ischemic disease and previous coronary surgery, or important lesions on cardiac catheterism; Group 3 - individuals without cardiac disease selected from the general population. All individuals were male and older than 54 years of age. The ultrasonographic diagnosis of aneurysm was based on an anteroposterior abdominal aorta diameter of 3 cm, or on an abdominal aorta diameter 0.5 cm greater than that of the supra-renal aorta. RESULTS: A total of 2.281 people were screened for abdominal aortic aneurysms in all groups: Group 1 - 768 individuals, Group 2 - 501 individuals, and Group 3 - 1012 individuals. The prevalence of aneurysms was 4.3%, 6.8% and 1.7%, respectively. Age and cigarette smoking were significantly associated with increased prevalence of aneurysms, as was the diagnosis of peripheral artery disease. DISCUSSION: We concluded that screening may be an important tool to prevent the mortality associated with abdominal aortic aneurysms surgery. Additionally, the cost of screening can be decreased if only individuals presenting significant risk factors, such as coronary and peripheral artery disease, smokers and relatives of aneurysm patients, are examined.OBJETIVO E MÉTODOS: O rastreamento de aneurisma da aorta abdominal infra-renal é importante pois pode diminuir a mortalidade relacionada à ruptura. Realizamos um estudo para definir a prevalência desses aneurismas em diversos segmentos da população em nossa região do Brasil. O rastreamento foi realizado utilizando-se a ecografia de abdômen. Tr

  3. Atmospheric pressure variations and abdominal aortic aneurysm rupture.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Killeen, S D

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (RAAA) presents with increased frequency in the winter and spring months. Seasonal changes in atmospheric pressure mirrors this pattern. AIM: To establish if there was a seasonal variation in the occurrence of RAAA and to determine if there was any association with atmospheric pressure changes. METHODS: A retrospective cohort-based study was performed. Daily atmospheric pressure readings for the region were obtained. RESULTS: There was a statistically significant monthly variation in RAAA presentation with 107 cases (52.5%) occurring from November to March. The monthly number of RAAA and the mean atmospheric pressure in the previous month were inversely related (r = -0.752, r (2) = 0.566, P = 0.03), and there was significantly greater daily atmospheric pressure variability on days when patients with RAAA were admitted. CONCLUSION: These findings suggest a relationship between atmospheric pressure and RAAA.

  4. HAS-1 genetic polymorphism in sporadic abdominal aortic aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Balbarini

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The hyaluronan synthase 1 (HAS-1 gene encodes a plasma membrane protein that synthesizes hyaluronan (HA, an extracellular matrix molecule. Accumulating evidence emphasizes the relevance of HA metabolism in an increasing number of processes of clinical interest, including abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA. The existence of aberrant splicing variants of the HAS-1 gene could partly explain the altered extracellular matrix architecture and influence various biological functions, resulting in progressive arterial wall failure in the development of AAA. In the present study, we assessed the hypothesis that HAS-1 genetic 833A/G polymorphism could be associated with the risk of AAA by performing a case-control association study, involving AAA patients and healthy matched donors.

  5. Hybrid Treatment of Acute Abdominal Aortic Thrombosis Presenting with Paraplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzarone, Matteo; De Troia, Alessandro; Iazzolino, Luigi; Nabulsi, Bilal; Tecchio, Tiziano

    2016-05-01

    Acute thrombotic or embolic occlusion of the abdominal aorta is a rare vascular emergency associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. Classically, the clinical presentation is a severe peripheral ischemia with bilateral leg pain as the predominant feature. Aortic occlusion presenting as an isolated acute onset of paraplegia due to spinal cord ischemia is very rare and requires improved awareness to prevent adverse outcomes associated with delayed diagnosis. We report the case of a 54-year-old man who presented with sudden paraplegia due to the thrombotic occlusion of the infrarenal aorta involving the first segment of the common iliac arteries on both sides; emergent transperitoneal aorto iliac thrombectomy combined with the endovascular iliac kissing-stent technique were performed achieving perioperative complete regression of the symptoms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. In vitro assessment of mouse fetal abdominal aortic vascular function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renshall, Lewis J; Dilworth, Mark R; Greenwood, Susan L; Sibley, Colin P; Wareing, Mark

    2014-09-15

    Fetal growth restriction (FGR) affects 3-8% of human pregnancies. Mouse models have provided important etiological data on FGR; they permit the assessment of treatment strategies on the physiological function of both mother and her developing offspring. Our study aimed to 1) develop a method to assess vascular function in fetal mice and 2) as a proof of principle ascertain whether a high dose of sildenafil citrate (SC; Viagra) administered to the pregnant dam affected fetal vascular reactivity. We developed a wire myography methodology for evaluation of fetal vascular function in vitro using the placenta-specific insulin-like growth factor II (Igf2) knockout mouse (P0; a model of FGR). Vascular function was determined in abdominal aortas isolated from P0 and wild-type (WT) fetuses at embryonic day (E) 18.5 of gestation. A subset of dams received SC 0.8 mg/ml via drinking water from E12.5; data were compared with water-only controls. Using wire myography, we found that fetal aortic rings exhibited significant agonist-induced contraction, and endothelium-dependent and endothelium-independent relaxation. Sex-specific alterations in reactivity were noted in both strains. Maternal treatment with SC significantly attenuated endothelium-dependent and endothelium-independent relaxation of fetal aortic rings. Mouse fetal abdominal aortas reproducibly respond to vasoactive agents. Study of these vessels in mouse genetic models of pregnancy complications may 1) help to delineate early signs of abnormal vascular reactivity and 2) inform whether treatments given to the mother during pregnancy may impact upon fetal vascular function. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  7. Duplex Ultrasound Surveillance After Uncomplicated Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaeffer, Jacob S; Shakhnovich, Irina; Sieck, Kyle N; Kallies, Kara J; Davis, Clark A; Cogbill, Thomas H

    2017-07-01

    Health-care costs and risks of radiation and intravenous contrast exposure challenge computed tomography angiography (CTA) as the standard surveillance method after endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR). We reviewed our experience using Duplex ultrasound scan (DUS) as an initial and subsequent surveillance technique after uncomplicated EVAR. The medical records of patients who underwent EVAR from 2004 to 2014 with at least 1 postoperative imaging study were retrospectively reviewed. Duplex ultrasound scan was the primary modality, with CTA reserved for patients with suspicious findings. Mean follow-up was 3.2 years for 266 patients. Fifty-seven endoleaks (7 type I, 50 type II) were detected in 51 patients (19%). Nineteen (33%) endoleaks were identified and monitored by DUS alone. Nine (16%) endoleaks were identified on CTA without prior DUS. Twenty-two (39%) endoleaks were identified on DUS and confirmed by CTA; 6 of these patients had a secondary intervention. When compared to subsequent CTA, there were 7 discordant results: 4 false-negative and 3 false-positive endoleaks on DUS. Two of these patients with discordant results required intervention. Follow-up CTA was not obtained for the other 2 patients due to severe comorbidities including renal disease. One of these patients eventually developed abdominal aortic aneurysm rupture and death. Among 88 patients with both DUS and CTA, positive predictive value and negative predictive value for DUS were 0.88 and 0.94, respectively. Sac size on DUS compared to CTA resulted in an interclass correlation coefficient of r = .84. In our experience, DUS was safe and effective for initial and follow-up surveillance after uncomplicated EVAR.

  8. Alcohol consumption, specific alcoholic beverages, and abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stackelberg, Otto; Björck, Martin; Larsson, Susanna C; Orsini, Nicola; Wolk, Alicja

    2014-08-19

    Studies investigating the role of alcohol consumption in the development of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) are scarce. We aimed to examine associations between total alcohol consumption and specific alcoholic beverages and the hazard of AAA. The study population was made up of 44 715 men from the Cohort of Swedish Men and 35 569 women from the Swedish Mammography Cohort who were 46 to 84 years of age at baseline in 1998. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate hazard ratios with 95% confidence intervals for the associations between alcohol consumption, assessed through a food frequency questionnaire, and AAA, identified by means of linkage to the Swedish Inpatient Register and the Swedish Vascular Registry (Swedvasc). Over the 14-year follow-up until December 2011 (1 019 954 person-years), AAAs occurred in 1020 men and 194 women. Compared with the consumption of 1 glass of alcohol per week (12 g of ethanol), the hazard ratio of AAA among men who consumed 10 glasses per week was 0.80 (95% confidence interval, 0.68-0.94). The corresponding hazard ratio among women who consumed 5 glasses per week was 0.57 (95% confidence interval, 0.40-0.82). Among participants free from cardiovascular disease, total alcohol consumption did not seem to be associated with hazard of the disease. The most commonly consumed alcoholic beverages, beer among men and wine among women, were inversely associated, whereas no association was observed for liquor. Moderate alcohol consumption, specifically wine and beer, was associated with a lower hazard of abdominal aortic aneurysm. The associations between higher doses of alcohol and risk of the disease remain unknown. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  9. Possible dual role of decorin in abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koshiro Ueda

    Full Text Available Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA is characterized by chronic inflammation, which leads to pathological remodeling of the extracellular matrix. Decorin, a small leucine-rich repeat proteoglycan, has been suggested to regulate inflammation and stabilize the extracellular matrix. Therefore, the present study investigated the role of decorin in the pathogenesis of AAA. Decorin was localized in the aortic adventitia under normal conditions in both mice and humans. AAA was induced in mice using CaCl2 treatment. Initially, decorin protein levels decreased, but as AAA progressed decorin levels increased in all layers. Local administration of exogenous decorin prevented the development of CaCl2-induced AAA. However, decorin was highly expressed in the degenerative lesions of human AAA walls, and this expression positively correlated with matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-9 expression. In cell culture experiments, the addition of decorin inhibited secretion of MMP-9 in vascular smooth muscle cells, but had the opposite effect in macrophages. The results suggest that decorin plays a dual role in AAA. Adventitial decorin in normal aorta may protect against the development of AAA, but macrophages expressing decorin in AAA walls may facilitate the progression of AAA by up-regulating MMP-9 secretion.

  10. Periostin links mechanical strain to inflammation in abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osamu Yamashita

    Full Text Available AIMS: Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs are characterized by chronic inflammation, which contributes to the pathological remodeling of the extracellular matrix. Although mechanical stress has been suggested to promote inflammation in AAA, the molecular mechanism remains uncertain. Periostin is a matricellular protein known to respond to mechanical strain. The aim of this study was to elucidate the role of periostin in mechanotransduction in the pathogenesis of AAA. METHODS AND RESULTS: We found significant increases in periostin protein levels in the walls of human AAA specimens. Tissue localization of periostin was associated with inflammatory cell infiltration and destruction of elastic fibers. We examined whether mechanical strain could stimulate periostin expression in cultured rat vascular smooth muscle cells. Cells subjected to 20% uniaxial cyclic strains showed significant increases in periostin protein expression, focal adhesion kinase (FAK activation, and secretions of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1 and the active form of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-2. These changes were largely abolished by a periostin-neutralizing antibody and by the FAK inhibitor, PF573228. Interestingly, inhibition of either periostin or FAK caused suppression of the other, indicating a positive feedback loop. In human AAA tissues in ex vivo culture, MCP-1 secretion was dramatically suppressed by PF573228. Moreover, in vivo, periaortic application of recombinant periostin in mice led to FAK activation and MCP-1 upregulation in the aortic walls, which resulted in marked cellular infiltration. CONCLUSION: Our findings indicated that periostin plays an important role in mechanotransduction that maintains inflammation via FAK activation in AAA.

  11. MicroRNA expression signature in human abdominal aortic aneurysms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pahl Matthew C

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA is a dilatation of the aorta affecting most frequently elderly men. Histologically AAAs are characterized by inflammation, vascular smooth muscle cell apoptosis, and extracellular matrix degradation. The mechanisms of AAA formation, progression, and rupture are currently poorly understood. A previous mRNA expression study revealed a large number of differentially expressed genes between AAA and non-aneurysmal control aortas. MicroRNAs (miRNAs, small non-coding RNAs that are post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression, could provide a mechanism for the differential expression of genes in AAA. Methods To determine differences in miRNA levels between AAA (n = 5 and control (n = 5 infrarenal aortic tissues, a microarray study was carried out. Results were adjusted using Benjamini-Hochberg correction (adjusted p  Results A microarray study identified eight miRNAs with significantly different expression levels between AAA and controls (adjusted p  Conclusions Our genome-wide approach revealed several differentially expressed miRNAs in human AAA tissue suggesting that miRNAs play a role in AAA pathogenesis.

  12. Controlled hypotension versus normotensive resuscitation strategy for people with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Daniel H; Cacione, Daniel G; Baptista-Silva, Jose C C

    2016-05-13

    An abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is the pathological enlargement of the aorta and can develop in both men and women. Progressive aneurysm enlargement can lead to rupture. The rupture of an AAA is frequently fatal and accounts for the death from haemorrhagic shock of at least 45 people per 100,000 population. The outcome of people with ruptured AAA varies among countries and healthcare systems, with mortality ranging from 53% to 90%. Definitive treatment for ruptured AAA includes open surgery or endovascular repair. The management of haemorrhagic shock is crucial for the person's outcome and aims to restore organ perfusion and systolic blood pressure above 100 mm Hg through immediate and aggressive fluid replacement. This rapid fluid replacement is known as the normotensive resuscitation strategy. However, evidence suggests that infusing large volumes of cold fluid causes dilutional and hypothermic coagulopathy. The association of these factors may exacerbate bleeding, resulting in a 'lethal triad' of hypothermia, acidaemia, and coagulopathy. An alternative to the normotensive resuscitation strategy is the controlled (permissive) hypotension resuscitation strategy, with a target systolic blood pressure of 50 to 100 mm Hg. The principle of controlled or hypotensive resuscitation has been used in some management protocols for endovascular repair of ruptured AAA. It may be beneficial in preventing blood loss by avoiding the clot disruption caused by the rapid increase in systolic blood pressure; avoiding dilution of clotting factors, platelets and fibrinogen; and by avoiding the temperature decrease that inhibits enzyme activity involved in platelet and clotting factor function. To compare the effects of controlled (permissive) hypotension resuscitation and normotensive resuscitation strategies for people with ruptured AAA. The Cochrane Vascular Information Specialist searched the Specialised Register (April 2016) and the Cochrane Register of Studies (CENTRAL (2016

  13. Endovascular Aortic Aneurysm Repair for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm: Single Center Experience in 122 Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yun Young; Song, Jang Hyeon; Kim, Yong Tae; Yim, Nam Yeol; Kim, Jae Kyu; Lee, Ho Kyun; Choi, Soo Jin Na; Chung, Sang Young [Dept. of Radiology, Chonnam National University Hospital, Chonnam National University School of Medicine, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Soo Hyun; Chang, Nam Kyu [Dept. of Radiology, Chonnam National University Hwasun Hospital, Chonnam National University School of Medicine, Hwasun (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-02-15

    To analyze a single center experience of endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) for abdominal aortic aneurysms. Results of 122 patients who underwent EVAR were analyzed, retrospectively. Sex, age, aneurysmal morphology, hostile neck anatomy, preprocedural and postprocedural sac-diameter, technical and clinical success, postprocedural complication and need of additional procedure were analyzed. A total of 111 male and 11 female patients were included. Morphology of the aneurysms was as follows: fusiform (n = 108), saccular (n = 3) and ruptured type (n = 11). Sixty-four patients had hostile neck anatomy. The preprocedural mean sac-diameter was 52.4 mm. Postprocedural sac-diameter was decreased or stable in 110 patients (90.2%) and increased in 8 patients (6.6%). Technical success rate was 100% and clinical success rate was 86.1%. Fifty-one patients showed endoleak (41.8%) and 15 patients (12.3%) underwent secondary intervention due to type I endoleak (n = 4), type II endoleak (n = 4) and stent-graft thrombosis (n = 7). EVAR is a safe and effective therapy for abdominal aortic aneurysm, and it has high technical success and clinical success rate, and low complication rate.

  14. A review of macrolide treatment of atherosclerosis and abdominal aortic aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholt, Jes Sanddal; Stovring, Jette; Andersen, Paul Lehm

    2003-01-01

    Seroepidemiological studies have shown an association between Chlamydia pneumoniae and atherosclerosis, the risk of acute myocardial infarction and abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA). Several studies have detected C. pneumoniae in atherosclerotic lesions from coronary and carotid arteries, in AAA, ...

  15. Soluble TWEAK plasma levels predict expansion of human abdominal aortic aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martín-Ventura, J L; Lindholt, Jes S.; Pavón Moreno, Miguel Ángel

    2010-01-01

    Diminished soluble tumor necrosis factor-like weak inducer of apoptosis (sTWEAK) concentrations are associated with cardiovascular diseases. We have analyzed sTWEAK levels and its relation with expansion rate in subjects with abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA)....

  16. Controlled release of ascorbic acid from gelatin hydrogel attenuates abdominal aortic aneurysm formation in rat experimental abdominal aortic aneurysm model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Akiko; Hasegawa, Tomomi; Morimoto, Keisuke; Bao, Wulan; Yu, Jie; Okita, Yutaka; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Okada, Kenji

    2014-09-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) are associated with oxidative stress and inflammatory response. We investigated the hypothesis that the known antioxidant ascorbic acid, which can also promote elastin and collagen production by smooth muscle cells, would prevent AAA formation in a rat model. An intraluminal elastase and extraluminal calcium chloride-induced rat AAA model was used, and the animals were divided into three groups: control (group C, n = 18), the aorta wrapped with a saline-impregnated gelatin hydrogel sheet (group G, n = 18), and the aorta wrapped with a gelatin hydrogel sheet incorporating ascorbic acid (group A, n = 18). Wrapping of the sheet was completed at the end of treatment for AAA creation. The aortic dilatation ratio was measured, and aortic tissues were further examined for oxidative stress and oxidative DNA damage using biochemical and histologic techniques. Aortic dilatation at both 4 and 8 weeks was inhibited in group A (dilatation ratio [%] at 4 weeks: 186.2 ± 21.8 in group C, 152.3 ± 10.2 in group G, 126.8 ± 11.6 in group A; P < .0001; dilatation ratio [%] at 8 weeks: 219.3 ± 37.5 in group C, 194.0 ± 11.6 in group G, 145.7 ± 8.3 in group A; P = .0002). Elastin and collagen content were significantly preserved in group A (elastin, P = .0015; collagen, P < .0001). The messenger RNA expressions of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9, monocyte chemotactic protein-1, interleukin-1β, and tissue necrosis factor-α (P = .0024, P < .0001, P < .0001, and P < .0001, respectively) were downregulated in group A (P = .0024), whereas tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinase (TIMP)-1 and TIMP-2 were both upregulated in group A (TIMP-1, P = .0014; TIMP-2, P < .0001). Gelatin zymography showed activities of pro-MMP-2, MMP-2, and MMP-9 were significantly suppressed in group C (P < .0001 for each). Reactive oxygen species expression and 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine and cluster of differentiation 68 staining were significantly suppressed in group A (reactive

  17. Posterior ''Nutcracker'' phenomenon in a patient with abdominal aortic aneurysm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puig, Stefan [Department of Radiology, University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Stuehlinger, Hermann Georg; Domanovits, Hans [Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Staudenherz, Anton [Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Zebenholzer, Karin [Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Department of Neurology, University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Rebhandl, Winfried [Department of Surgery, University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Prokop, Mathias [Department of Radiology, University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2002-07-01

    We report on a posterior ''nutcracker'' phenomenon due to an abdominal aortic aneurysm in a patient with a retro-aortic left renal vein. A 71-year-old man with a known abdominal aortic aneurysm presented in the emergency room with mild hematuria and flank pain. Computed tomography angiography revealed an aortic aneurysm, which compressed the left renal vein between the aorta and the vertebral column. Compression of the left renal vein, due to the aorta with consecutive congestion and hematuria as well as flank pain, was previously described as nutcracker phenomenon. In case of a retro-aortic left renal vein, increase of the aortic diameter can lead to compression of the renal vein and furthermore to the classical signs and symptoms of the ''nutcracker'' phenomenon, even though the aneurysm is not ruptured or there are no aorto-caval or aorto-left renal vein fistulas. (orig.)

  18. Plasma cathepsin S and cystatin C levels and risk of abdominal aortic aneurysm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lv, Bing-Jie; Lindholt, Jes Sanddal; Cheng, Xiang

    2012-01-01

    Human abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) lesions contain high levels of cathepsin S (CatS), but are deficient in its inhibitor, cystatin C. Whether plasma CatS and cystatin C levels are also altered in AAA patients remains unknown.......Human abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) lesions contain high levels of cathepsin S (CatS), but are deficient in its inhibitor, cystatin C. Whether plasma CatS and cystatin C levels are also altered in AAA patients remains unknown....

  19. Modification of an endovascular stent graft for abdominal aortic aneurysm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moloye, Olajompo Busola

    Endovascular surgery is currently used to treat abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA). A stent graft is deployed to exclude blood flow from the aneurysm sac. It is an effective procedure used in preventing aneurysm rupture, with reduced patient morbidity and mortality compared to open surgical repair. Migration and leakage around the device ("endoleak") due to poor sealing of the stent graft to the aorta have raised concerns about the long-term durability of endovascular repair. A preliminary study of cell migration and proliferation is presented as a prelude to a more extensive in vivo testing. A method to enhance the biological seal between the stent graft and the aorta is proposed to eliminate this problem. This can be achieved by impregnating the stent graft with 50/50 poly (DL-lactide co glycolic acid) (PLGA) and growth factors such as basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) or connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), at the proximal and distal ends. It is hypothesized that as PLGA degrades it will release the growth factors that will promote proliferation and migration of aortic smooth muscle cells to the coated site, leading to a natural seal between the aorta and the stent graft. In addition, growth factor release should promote smooth muscle cell (SMC) contraction that will help keep the stent graft in place at the proximal and distal ends. It is shown that a statistically significant effect of increased cell proliferation and migration is observed for CTGF release. Less of an effect is noted for bFGF or just the PLGA. The effect is estimated to be large enough to be clinically significant in a future animal study. The long term goal of this study is to reduce migration encounter after graft deployment and to reduce secondary interventions of EVAR especially for older patients who are unfit for open surgical treatment.

  20. Hemodynamic Study of Flow Remodeling Stent Graft for the Treatment of Highly Angulated Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    OpenAIRE

    Siang Lin Yeow; Hwa Liang Leo

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the effect of a novel flow remodeling stent graft (FRSG) on the hemodynamic characteristics in highly angulated abdominal aortic aneurysm based on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) approach. An idealized aortic aneurysm with varying aortic neck angulations was constructed and CFD simulations were performed on nonstented models and stented models with FRSG. The influence of FRSG intervention on the hemodynamic performance is analyzed and compared in terms of flow patte...

  1. Allergic Lung Inflammation Aggravates Angiotensin II-Induced Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms in Mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Cong-Lin; Wang, Yi; Liao, Mengyang

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Asthma and abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) both involve inflammation. Patients with asthma have an increased risk of developing AAA or experiencing aortic rupture. This study tests the development of one disease on the progression of the other. APPROACH AND RESULTS: Ovalbumin sensitiz...

  2. Screening of COPD patients for abdominal aortic aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flessenkaemper IH

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Ingo H Flessenkaemper,1 Robert Loddenkemper,2 Stephanie Roll,3 Kathrin Enke-Melzer,1 Henrik Wurps,2 Torsten T Bauer21Department for Vascular Medicine, 2Department of Pneumology, Helios Klinikum Emil von Behring, Berlin, Germany; 3Institute for Social Medicine, Epidemiology and Health Economics, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, GermanyPurpose: Screening for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA in “men aged over 65 years who have ever smoked” is a recommended policy. To reduce the number of screenings, it may be of value to define subgroups with a higher prevalence of AAA. Since chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and AAA are associated with several common risk factors, this study investigates the prevalence of AAA in COPD patients.Patients and methods: Patients with COPD were identified via the hospital information system. Inclusion criteria were: COPD stage I–IV, ability to give full consent, and age >18 years; exclusion criteria were: patient too obese for an ultrasound check, previously diagnosed AAA, prior surgery for AAA, or ethical grounds such as concomitant advanced malignant or end-stage disease. The primary endpoint of the study was an aortic diameter measured by ultrasound of ≥30 mm. Defined secondary endpoints were evaluated on the basis of medical records and interviews.Results: Of the 1,180 identified COPD patients, 589 were included in this prospective study. In 22 patients (3.70%, the aortic diameter was ≥30 mm, representing an AAA prevalence of 6.72% among males aged >65 years. The risk of AAA increased with the following comorbidities/risk factors: male sex (odds ratio [OR] 2.98, coronary heart disease (OR 2.81, peripheral arterial occlusive disease (OR 2.47, hyperlipoproteinemia (OR 2.77, AAA in the family history (OR 3.95, and COPD stage I/II versus IV (OR 1.81.Conclusion: The overall AAA prevalence of 3.7% in our group of COPD patients is similar to that of the general population aged >65

  3. Natural history of abdominal aortic aneurysm with and without coexisting chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindholt, J S; Heickendorff, L; Antonsen, S; Fasting, H; Henneberg, E W

    1998-08-01

    To study the relation between abdominal aortic aneurysms and chronical obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), in particular the suggested common elastin degradation caused by elastase and smoking. A cross-sectional population study and a prospective cohort study of small abdominal aortic aneurysms was performed in a community setting. All previous diagnoses recorded in a hospital computer database were received for 4404 men 65 to 73 years of age who had been invited to a population screening for abdominal aortic aneurysm. One hundred forty-one men had AAA (4.2%). They were asked to participate in an interview, a clinical examination, and collection of blood sample. Men with an abdominal aortic aneurysm 3 to 5 cm in diameter were offered annual ultrasound scans to check for expansion. Among patients with COPD 7.7% had abdominal aortic aneurysms (crude odds ratio=2.05). The adjusted odds ratio, however, was only 1.59 after adjustment for coexisting diseases associated with abdominal aortic aneurysm (P=.13). The mean annual expansion was 2.74 mm per year among patients with COPD, 2.72 among patients without COPD, and 4.7 mm among patients who used oral steroids compared with 2.6 among patients who did not use steroids (P diseases rather than a common pathway of pathogenesis.

  4. Multimodality Imaging Approach towards Primary Aortic Sarcomas Arising after Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair: Case Series Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamran, Mudassar, E-mail: kamranm@mir.wustl.edu; Fowler, Kathryn J., E-mail: fowlerk@mir.wustl.edu; Mellnick, Vincent M., E-mail: mellnickv@mir.wustl.edu [Washington University School of Medicine, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology (United States); Sicard, Gregorio A., E-mail: sicard@wudosis.wustl.edu [Washington University School of Medicine, Department of Surgery (United States); Narra, Vamsi R., E-mail: narrav@mir.wustl.edu [Washington University School of Medicine, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Primary aortic neoplasms are rare. Aortic sarcoma arising after endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) is a scarce subset of primary aortic malignancies, reports of which are infrequent in the published literature. The diagnosis of aortic sarcoma is challenging due to its non-specific clinical presentation, and the prognosis is poor due to delayed diagnosis, rapid proliferation, and propensity for metastasis. Post-EVAR, aortic sarcomas may mimic other more common aortic processes on surveillance imaging. Radiologists are rarely knowledgeable about this rare entity for which multimodality imaging and awareness are invaluable in early diagnosis. A series of three pathologically confirmed cases are presented to display the multimodality imaging features and clinical presentations of aortic sarcoma arising after EVAR.

  5. The potential role of DNA methylation in abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryer, Evan J; Ronning, Kaitryn E; Erdman, Robert; Schworer, Charles M; Elmore, James R; Peeler, Thomas C; Nevius, Christopher D; Lillvis, John H; Garvin, Robert P; Franklin, David P; Kuivaniemi, Helena; Tromp, Gerard

    2015-05-18

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a complex disorder that has a significant impact on the aging population. While both genetic and environmental risk factors have been implicated in AAA formation, the precise genetic markers involved and the factors influencing their expression remain an area of ongoing investigation. DNA methylation has been previously used to study gene silencing in other inflammatory disorders and since AAA has an extensive inflammatory component, we sought to examine the genome-wide DNA methylation profiles in mononuclear blood cells of AAA cases and matched non-AAA controls. To this end, we collected blood samples and isolated mononuclear cells for DNA and RNA extraction from four all male groups: AAA smokers (n = 11), AAA non-smokers (n = 9), control smokers (n = 10) and control non-smokers (n = 11). Methylation data were obtained using the Illumina 450k Human Methylation Bead Chip and analyzed using the R language and multiple Bioconductor packages. Principal component analysis and linear analysis of CpG island subsets identified four regions with significant differences in methylation with respect to AAA: kelch-like family member 35 (KLHL35), calponin 2 (CNN2), serpin peptidase inhibitor clade B (ovalbumin) member 9 (SERPINB9), and adenylate cyclase 10 pseudogene 1 (ADCY10P1). Follow-up studies included RT-PCR and immunostaining for CNN2 and SERPINB9. These findings are novel and suggest DNA methylation may play a role in AAA pathobiology.

  6. [Patient volume and quality in surgery for abdominal aortic aneurysm].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austvoll-Dahlgren, Astrid; Underland, Vigdis; Straumann, Gyri Hval; Forsetlund, Louise

    2017-04-01

    BACKGROUND Patient volume is assumed to affect quality, whereby complex procedures are best performed by those who perform them frequently. We have conducted a systematic review of the research on the association between patient volume and quality of vascular surgery. In this article we describe the outcomes for abdominal aortic aneurysm surgery.MATERIAL AND METHOD We undertook systematic searches in relevant databases. We searched for systematic reviews, and randomised and observational studies. The search was concluded in December 2015. We have summarised the results descriptively and assessed the overall quality of the evidence.RESULTS Forty-six observational studies fulfilled our inclusion criteria. We found a possible association for both hospital and surgeon volume. Higher patient volume may possibly be associated with lower 30-day mortality and lower hospital mortality for both open and endovascular surgery. Although the association appears to apply to both elective and acute hospitalisations, there is greater uncertainty with regard to the most ill patients. For hospital volume there may also be fewer complications for open and endovascular surgery, as well as for all surgery assessed as a whole. We considered the evidence base to be medium to very low quality.INTERPRETATION We found a possible correlation between patient volume and quality indicators such as mortality and complications. It may be advantageous to allocate planned procedures to institutions and surgeons with high volume, while this is less certain with regard to acute hospitalisations.

  7. Therapeutic Prospect of Adipose-Derived Stromal Cells for the Treatment of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Parvizi, Mojtaba; Harmsen, Martin C.

    2015-01-01

    Aneurysm refers to the dilation of the vessel wall for more than 50%. Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) refers to the dilation and weakening of all three layers of the abdominal aorta, which mostly occur infrarenally. The population aged above 50 years is at risk of AAA development, while a familiar

  8. Combined transdiaphragmatic off-pump and minimally invasive coronary artery bypass with right gastroepiploic artery and abdominal aortic aneurysm repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürer, Onur; Haberal, Ismail; Ozsoy, Deniz

    2013-01-01

    Male, 74 FINAL DIAGNOSIS: Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) Symptoms: Palpable abdominal mass Medication: - Clinical Procedure: Abdominal aortic aneurysm repair Specialty: Surgery. Rare disease. Coronary artery disease is common in elderly patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms. Here we report a case of the combination of surgical repair for abdominal aortic aneurysm and off-pump and minimally invasive coronary artery bypass surgery. A 74-year-old man who presented at our clinic with chest pain was diagnosed with an abdominal aortic aneurysm. His medical history included right coronary artery stenting. Physical examination revealed a pulsatile abdominal mass on the left side and palpable peripheral pulses. Computed tomography scans showed an infrarenal abdominal aneurysm with a 61-mm enlargement. Coronary angiography revealed 80% stenosis in the stent within the right coronary artery and 20% stenosis in the left main coronary artery. The patient underwent elective coronary artery bypass grafting and abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. Abdominal aortic aneurysm repair and transdiaphragmatic off-pump and minimal invasive coronary artery bypass grafting with right gastroepiploic artery were performed simultaneously in a single surgery. We report this case to emphasize the safety and effectiveness of transdiaphragmatic off-pump and minimally invasive coronary artery bypass surgery with abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. This combined approach shortens hospital stay and decreases cost.

  9. Interleukin-6 receptor pathways in abdominal aortic aneurysm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Seamus C.; Smith, Andrew J.P.; Jones, Gregory T.; Swerdlow, Daniel I.; Rampuri, Riaz; Bown, Matthew J.; Folkersen, Lasse; Baas, Annette F.; de Borst, Gert Jan; Blankensteijn, Jan D.; Price, Jacqueline F.; van der Graaf, Yolanda; McLachlan, Stela; Agu, Obi; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Franco-Cereceda, Anders; Ruigrok, Ynte M.; van't Hof, F.N.; Powell, Janet T.; van Rij, Andre M.; Casas, Juan P.; Eriksson, Per; Holmes, Michael V.; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Humphries, Steve E.

    2013-01-01

    Methods We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of studies reporting circulating IL-6 in AAA, and new investigations of the association between a common non-synonymous functional variant (Asp358Ala) in the IL-6R gene (IL6R) and AAA, followed the analysis of the variant both in vitro and in vivo. Inflammation may play a role in the development of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA). Interleukin-6 (IL-6) signalling through its receptor (IL-6R) is one pathway that could be exploited pharmacologically. We investigated this using a Mendelian randomization approach. Results Up to October 2011, we identified seven studies (869 cases, 851 controls). Meta-analysis demonstrated that AAA cases had higher levels of IL-6 than controls [standardized mean difference (SMD) = 0.46 SD, 95% CI = 0.25–0.66, I2 = 70%, P = 1.1 × 10–5 random effects]. Meta-analysis of five studies (4524 cases/15 710 controls) demonstrated that rs7529229 (which tags the non-synonymous variant Asp358Ala, rs2228145) was associated with a lower risk of AAA, per Ala358 allele odds ratio 0.84, 95% CI: 0.80–0.89, I2 = 0%, P = 2.7 × 10–11). In vitro analyses in lymphoblastoid cell lines demonstrated a reduction in the expression of downstream targets (STAT3, MYC and ICAM1) in response to IL-6 stimulation in Ala358 carriers. Conclusions A Mendelian randomization approach provides robust evidence that signalling via the IL-6R is likely to be a causal pathway in AAA. Drugs that inhibit IL-6R may play a role in AAA management. PMID:23111417

  10. Antiphospholipid antibodies predict progression of abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Duftner

    Full Text Available Antiphospholipid antibodies (aPLs frequently occur in autoimmune and cardiovascular diseases and correlate with a worse clinical outcome. In the present study, we evaluated the association between antiphospholipid antibodies (aPLs, markers of inflammation, disease progression and the presence of an intra-aneurysmal thrombus in abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA patients. APLs ELISAs were performed in frozen serum samples of 96 consecutive AAA patients and 48 healthy controls yielding positive test results in 13 patients (13.5% and 3 controls (6.3%; n.s.. Nine of the 13 aPL-positive AAA patients underwent a second antibody testing >12 weeks apart revealing a positive result in 6 cases. APL-positive patients had increased levels of inflammatory markers compared to aPL-negative patients. Disease progression was defined as an increase of the AAA diameter >0.5 cm/year measured by sonography. Follow-up was performed in 69 patients identifying 41 (59.4% patients with progressive disease. Performing multipredictor logistic regression analysis adjusting for classical AAA risk factors as confounders, the presence of aPLs at baseline revealed an odds ratio of 9.4 (95% CI 1.0-86.8, p = 0.049 to predict AAA progression. Fifty-five patients underwent a computed tomography in addition to ultrasound assessment indicating intra-aneurysmal thrombus formation in 82.3%. Median thrombus volume was 46.7 cm3 (1.9-377.5. AAA diameter correlated with the size of the intra-aneurysmal thrombus (corrcoeff = 0.721, p<0.001, however neither the presence nor the size of the intra-aneurysmal thrombus were related to the presence of aPLs. In conclusion, the presence of aPLs is associated with elevated levels of inflammatory markers and is an independent predictor of progressive disease in AAA patients.

  11. Logistic considerations for a successful institutional approach to the endovascular repair of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Dieter; Rancic, Zoran; Pfammatter, Thomas; Hechelhammer, Lukas; Veith, Frank J; Donas, Konstantin; Lachat, Mario

    2010-01-01

    The value of emergency endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) in the setting of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm remains controversial owing to differing results. However, interpretation of published results remains difficult as there is a lack of generally accepted protocols or standard operating procedures. Furthermore, such protocols and standard operating procedures often are reported incompletely or not at all, thereby making interpretation of results difficult. We herein report our integrated logistic system for the endovascular treatment of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms. Important components of this system are prehospital logistics, in-hospital treatment logistics, and aftercare. Further studies should include details about all of these components, and a description of these logistic components must be included in all future studies of emergency EVAR for ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms.

  12. Idealized Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) Geometry as Predictor of Hemodynamics Stresses

    OpenAIRE

    Soudah, E.; Vilalta, G.; Vilalta, J. A.; Bordone, M.; Nieto, F.; Pérez, M. A.; Vaquero Puerta, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Producción Científica Introduction: Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is defined as a localized, progressive and permanent dilation of the aortic wall. Usually are thought to be the end results of irreversible pathological remodelling of the arterial connective tissue, which causes changes, over time, in AAA geometry, in the constitutive formulation an in the failure criterion. Simple geometric parameters, those obtained directly from the computed tomography CT, can define the AA...

  13. Targeting vascular remodeling in abdominal aortic aneurysm : To identify novel treatment strategies and drug candidates

    OpenAIRE

    Vorkapić, Emina

    2016-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a degenerative weakening of the aortic wall, mainly affecting elderly men with a prevalence of 4.4-7.7 %. AAA is characterized by medial and adventitial inflammatory cell infiltration associated with vascular remodeling of the extracellular matrix proteins such as collagen and elastin and with phenotypic modulation and loss of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Although much research has been performed, the precise cellular and molecular pathways behind t...

  14. Upper gastrointestinal obstruction secondary to aortoduodenal syndrome owing to a noninflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cahill, Kevin

    2012-01-31

    Aortoduodenal syndrome is a rare complication of an abdominal aortic aneurysm wherein the aneurysm sac obstructs the patient\\'s duodenum. It presents with the symptoms of an upper gastrointestinal tract obstruction and requires surgical intervention to relieve it. Previously, gastric bypass surgery was advocated, but now aortic replacement is the mainstay of treatment. We report a case of a 67-year-old woman whose aortoduodenal syndrome was successfully managed and review the literature on this topic.

  15. Long-term benefit and cost-effectiveness analysis of screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms from a randomized controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholt, Jes S.; Sørensen, J; Søgaard, R

    2010-01-01

    The aim was to estimate long-term mortality benefits and cost-effectiveness of screening for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) in men aged 64-73 years.......The aim was to estimate long-term mortality benefits and cost-effectiveness of screening for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) in men aged 64-73 years....

  16. The cardiac cycle is a major contributor to variability in size measurements of abdominal aortic aneurysms by ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grøndal, Nikolaj Fibiger; Bramsen, Morten; Thomsen, Marie Dahl

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the impact of the cardiac cycle on ultrasound measurements of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) diameters.......The objective of the study was to evaluate the impact of the cardiac cycle on ultrasound measurements of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) diameters....

  17. Endovascular treatment of huge saccular abdominal aortic aneurysm in a young Behcet patient: mid-term result

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turkoz Riza

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Abdominal aortic aneurysm formation is among the arterial complications of Behcet's disease. Weakness and fragility of aortic walls leads to the development of arterial complications like pseudoaneurysms. Case Presentation A case of huge saccular abdominal aortic aneurysm in a young Behcet patient who was successfully treated with endovascular stent graft placement is reported, diagnostic and interventional procedures are discussed, and mid-term follow-up results are presented. Conclusions Endovascular treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysm complications of young Behcet patients who are not suitable for open surgery and need intervention could be an alternative treatment modality even without performing preprocedural angiography.

  18. Plasma levels of cathepsins L, K, and V and risks of abdominal aortic aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lv, Bing-Jie; Lindholt, Jes S; Wang, Jing

    2013-01-01

    Cathepsin L (CatL), cathepsin K (CatK), and cathepsin V (CatV) are potent elastases implicated in human arterial wall remodeling. Whether plasma levels of these cathepsins are altered in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) remains unknown.......Cathepsin L (CatL), cathepsin K (CatK), and cathepsin V (CatV) are potent elastases implicated in human arterial wall remodeling. Whether plasma levels of these cathepsins are altered in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) remains unknown....

  19. ApoA-I/HDL-C levels are inversely associated with abdominal aortic aneurysm progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burillo, Elena; Lindholt, Jes S.; Molina-Sánchez, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) evolution is unpredictable, and there is no therapy except surgery for patients with an aortic size> 5 cm (large AAA). We aimed to identify new potential biomarkers that could facilitate prognosis and treatment of patients with AAA. A differential quantitative...... proteomic analysis of plasma proteins was performed in AAA patients at different stages of evolution [small AAA (aortic size=3-5 cm) vs large AAA] using iTRAQ labelling, high-throughput nano-LC-MS/MS and a novel multi-layered statistical model. Among the proteins identified, ApoA-I was decreased in patients...

  20. Ultrasonography for endoleak detection after endoluminal abdominal aortic aneurysm repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraha, Iosief; Luchetta, Maria Laura; De Florio, Rita; Cozzolino, Francesco; Casazza, Giovanni; Duca, Piergiorgio; Parente, Basso; Orso, Massimiliano; Germani, Antonella; Eusebi, Paolo; Montedori, Alessandro

    2017-06-09

    People with abdominal aortic aneurysm who receive endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) need lifetime surveillance to detect potential endoleaks. Endoleak is defined as persistent blood flow within the aneurysm sac following EVAR. Computed tomography (CT) angiography is considered the reference standard for endoleak surveillance. Colour duplex ultrasound (CDUS) and contrast-enhanced CDUS (CE-CDUS) are less invasive but considered less accurate than CT. To determine the diagnostic accuracy of colour duplex ultrasound (CDUS) and contrast-enhanced-colour duplex ultrasound (CE-CDUS) in terms of sensitivity and specificity for endoleak detection after endoluminal abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR). We searched MEDLINE, Embase, LILACS, ISI Conference Proceedings, Zetoc, and trial registries in June 2016 without language restrictions and without use of filters to maximize sensitivity. Any cross-sectional diagnostic study evaluating participants who received EVAR by both ultrasound (with or without contrast) and CT scan assessed at regular intervals. Two pairs of review authors independently extracted data and assessed quality of included studies using the QUADAS 1 tool. A third review author resolved discrepancies. The unit of analysis was number of participants for the primary analysis and number of scans performed for the secondary analysis. We carried out a meta-analysis to estimate sensitivity and specificity of CDUS or CE-CDUS using a bivariate model. We analysed each index test separately. As potential sources of heterogeneity, we explored year of publication, characteristics of included participants (age and gender), direction of the study (retrospective, prospective), country of origin, number of CDUS operators, and ultrasound manufacturer. We identified 42 primary studies with 4220 participants. Twenty studies provided accuracy data based on the number of individual participants (seven of which provided data with and without the use of contrast). Sixteen of

  1. Risk Stratification of Patients with Peripheral Arterial Disease and Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Using Aortic Augmentation Index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckmann, Marianne; Jacomella, Vincenzo; Kohler, Malcom; Lachat, Mario; Salem, Amr; Amann-Vesti, Beatrice; Husmann, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Central augmentation index (cAIx) is an indicator for vascular stiffness. Obstructive and aneurysmatic vascular disease can affect pulse wave propagation and reflection, causing changes in central aortic pressures. To assess and compare cAIx in patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and / or abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). cAIx was assessed by radial applanation tonometry (Sphygmocor) in a total of 184 patients at a tertiary referral centre. Patients were grouped as having PAD only, AAA only, or both AAA and PAD. Differences in cAIx measurements between the three patient groups were tested by non-parametric tests and stepwise multivariate linear regression analysis to investigate associations with obstructive or aneurysmatic patterns of vascular disease. In the study sample of 184 patients, 130 had PAD only, 20 had AAA only, and 34 patients had both AAA and PAD. Mean cAIx (%) was 30.5 ± 8.2 across all patients. It was significantly higher in females (35.2 ± 6.1, n = 55) than males (28.4 ± 8.2, n = 129), and significantly higher in patients over 80 years of age (34.4 ± 6.9, n = 22) than in those under 80 years (30.0 ± 8.2, n = 162). Intergroup comparison revealed a significant difference in cAIx between the three patient groups (AAA: 27.3 ± 9.5; PAD: 31.4 ± 7.8; AAA & PAD: 28.8 ± 8.5). cAIx was significantly lower in patients with AAA, higher in patients with both AAA and PAD, and highest in patients with PAD only (beta = 0.21, p = 0.006). Non-invasive assessment of arterial stiffness in high-risk patients indicates that cAIx differs according to the pattern of vascular disease. Measurements revealed significantly higher cAIx values for patients with obstructive peripheral arterial disease than for patients with aneurysmatic disease.

  2. Risk Stratification of Patients with Peripheral Arterial Disease and Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Using Aortic Augmentation Index.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianne Beckmann

    Full Text Available Central augmentation index (cAIx is an indicator for vascular stiffness. Obstructive and aneurysmatic vascular disease can affect pulse wave propagation and reflection, causing changes in central aortic pressures.To assess and compare cAIx in patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD and / or abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA.cAIx was assessed by radial applanation tonometry (Sphygmocor in a total of 184 patients at a tertiary referral centre. Patients were grouped as having PAD only, AAA only, or both AAA and PAD. Differences in cAIx measurements between the three patient groups were tested by non-parametric tests and stepwise multivariate linear regression analysis to investigate associations with obstructive or aneurysmatic patterns of vascular disease.In the study sample of 184 patients, 130 had PAD only, 20 had AAA only, and 34 patients had both AAA and PAD. Mean cAIx (% was 30.5 ± 8.2 across all patients. It was significantly higher in females (35.2 ± 6.1, n = 55 than males (28.4 ± 8.2, n = 129, and significantly higher in patients over 80 years of age (34.4 ± 6.9, n = 22 than in those under 80 years (30.0 ± 8.2, n = 162. Intergroup comparison revealed a significant difference in cAIx between the three patient groups (AAA: 27.3 ± 9.5; PAD: 31.4 ± 7.8; AAA & PAD: 28.8 ± 8.5. cAIx was significantly lower in patients with AAA, higher in patients with both AAA and PAD, and highest in patients with PAD only (beta = 0.21, p = 0.006.Non-invasive assessment of arterial stiffness in high-risk patients indicates that cAIx differs according to the pattern of vascular disease. Measurements revealed significantly higher cAIx values for patients with obstructive peripheral arterial disease than for patients with aneurysmatic disease.

  3. Abdominal ultrasound-scanning versus non-contrast computed tomography as screening method for abdominal aortic aneurysm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liisberg, Mads; Diederichsen, Axel C.; Lindholt, Jes S.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Validating non-contrast-enhanced computed tomography (nCT) compared to ultrasound sonography (US) as screening method for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) screening. Methods: Consecutively attending men (n = 566) from the pilot study of the randomized Danish CardioVascular Screening......CT seems superior to US concerning sensitivity, and is able to detect aneurysmal lesions not detectable with US. Finally, the prevalence of AAA in Denmark seems to remain relatively high, in this small pilot study group....

  4. A proposal for standardizing computed tomography reports on abdominal aortic aneurysms; Proposta para padronizacao do relatorio de tomografia computadorizada nos aneurismas da aorta abdominal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torlai, Fabiola Goda; Meirelles, Gustavo S. Portes [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), SP (Brazil); Miranda Junior, Fausto; Fonseca, Jose Honorio A.P. da [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Cirurgia; Ajzen, Sergio; D' Ippolito, Giuseppe [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Diagnostico por Imagem]. E-mail: giuseppe_dr@uol.com.br

    2006-07-15

    Objective: to propose a model to standardize computed tomography reports on abdominal aortic aneurysms. Materials and methods: interviews were carried out with members of the Vascular Surgery Division of our institution, in the period between April and October 2004, aiming at developing a standardized model of computed tomography reports on abdominal aortic aneurysms. Based on this model, a questionnaire was elaborated and sent to other nine surgeons, all of them experienced in the field of abdominal aortic surgery. The questionnaires response rate was 55.5% (5/9). Results: the most frequently mentioned parameters of interest for evaluation of abdominal aortic aneurysms were: maximum diameter of proximal aortic neck, proximal aortic neck length to lower renal arteries, shape of proximal aortic neck, maximum diameter of the aneurysm and diameter of the common iliac arteries. These data allowed the development of a proposal for a model to standardize computed tomography reports. Conclusion: a model for standardized tomographic analysis of abdominal aortic aneurysms has met vascular surgeons' needs for following-up patients and planning their treatment. (author)

  5. Abdominal aortic injury in a child: intravenous digital subtraction angiogram (IVDSA) for the diagnosis of pediatric vascular trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soares, Gregory [Division of Interventional Radiology, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Rhode Island Hospital, Brown Medical School, RI 02903, Providence (United States); Ibarra, Rodolfo; Ferral, Hector [Department of Radiology, University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX (United States)

    2003-08-01

    Abdominal aortic injury due to trauma is a rare entity, especially in the pediatric population. We report a 6-year-old girl with partial transection of the abdominal aorta as a result of a motor vehicle accident. The diagnosis was made with IVDSA. The patient survived the injury. We discuss the imaging findings, mechanisms, and associated injuries of abdominal aortic trauma in children. (orig.)

  6. Tissue Doppler Imaging in the evaluation of abdominal aortic pulsatility: a useful tool for the neonatologist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valerio, Enrico; Grison, Alessandra; Capretta, Anna; Golin, Rosanna; Ferrarese, Paola; Bellettato, Massimo

    2017-03-01

    Sonographic cardiac evaluation of newborns with suspected aortic coarctation (AoC) should tend to demonstrate a good phasic and pulsatile flow and the absence of pressure gradient along a normally conformed aortic arch from the modified left parasternal and suprasternal echocardiographic views; these findings, however, may not necessarily rule out a more distal coarctation in the descending aorta. For this reason, the sonographic exam of newborns with suspected AoC should always include a Doppler evaluation of abdominal aortic blood flow from the subcostal view. Occasionally, however, a clearly pulsatile Doppler flow trace in abdominal aorta may be difficult to obtain due to the bad insonation angle existing between the probe and the vessel. In such suboptimal ultrasonic alignment situation, the use of Tissue Doppler Imaging instead of classic Doppler flow imaging may reveal a preserved aortic pulsatility by sampling the aortic wall motion induced by normal flow. We propose to take advantage of the TDI pattern as a surrogate of a normal pulsatile Doppler flow trace in abdominal aorta when the latter is difficult to obtain due to malalignment with the insonated vessel.

  7. MRI follow-up of abdominal aortic aneurysms after endovascular repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cornelissen, S.A.P.

    2012-01-01

    Aneurysm size changes form the basis of the follow-up after endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair, because aneurysm growth increases rupture risk. Aneurysm growth can be caused by endoleak (leakage of blood in the aneurysm sac). Therefore, accurate endoleak detection is important in growing

  8. Validation of endovascular aneurysm sealing for treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boersen, Johannes Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is dilation of the infrarenal aorta of more than twice the normal diameter. The risk of AAA rupture increases with size. The standard treatment of infrarenal AAA is endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR), in which the diseased part of the aorta is supported by

  9. Endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair complicated by spondylodiscitis and iliaco-enteral fistula.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koning, H.D. de; Sterkenburg, S.M. van; Pierie, M.E.; Reijnen, M.M.P.J.

    2008-01-01

    Infections of abdominal aortic endografts are rare. There are no reports on the association with spondylodiscitis. We report a case of a 74-year-old man who underwent endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) and subsequently femorofemoral bypass placement due to occlusion of the right limb of the

  10. Low-dose aspirin and rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wemmelund, Holger; Jørgensen, Trine M M; Høgh, Annette

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The use of low-dose aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid [ASA]) has been suggested to attenuate growth of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs), yet solid clinical evidence of this hypothesis is still missing. This study aimed to investigate whether preadmission ASA use influenced the risk...

  11. Statin use is associated with reduced all-cause mortality after endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leurs, L.J.; Visser, P.; Laheij, R.J.F.; Buth, J.; Harris, P.L.; Blankensteijn, J.D.

    2006-01-01

    It has been shown that preoperative statin therapy reduces all-cause and cardiovascular mortality in patients undergoing major noncardiac vascular surgery. In this report, we investigated the influence of statin use on early and late outcome following endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair

  12. Collected World and Single Center Experience With Endovascular Treatment of Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veith, Frank J.; Lachat, Mario; Mayer, Dieter; Malina, Martin; Holst, Jan; Mehta, Manish; Verhoeven, Eric L. G.; Larzon, Thomas; Gennai, Stefano; Coppi, Gioacchino; Lipsitz, Evan C.; Gargiulo, Nicholas J.; van der Vliet, J. Adam; Blankensteijn, Jan; Buth, Jacob; Lee, W. Anthony; Biasi, Giorgio; Deleo, Gaetano; Kasirajan, Karthikeshwar; Moore, Randy; Soong, Chee V.; Cayne, Neal S.; Farber, Mark A.; Raithel, Dieter; Greenberg, Roy K.; van Sambeek, Marc R. H. M.; Brunkwall, Jan S.; Rockman, Caron B.; Hinchliffe, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Case and single center reports have documented the feasibility and suggested the effectiveness of endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms (RAAAs), but the role and value of such treatment remain controversial. Objective: To clarify these we examined a

  13. Collected world and single center experience with endovascular treatment of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veith, F.J.; Lachat, M.; Mayer, D.; Malina, M.; Holst, J.; Mehta, M.; Verhoeven, E.L.; Larzon, T.; Gennai, S.; Coppi, G.; Lipsitz, E.C.; Gargiulo, N.J.; Vliet, J.A. van der; Blankensteijn, J.D.; Buth, J.; Lee, W.A.; Biasiol, G.; Deleo, G.; Kasirajan, K.; Moore, R.; Soong, C.V.; Cayne, N.S.; Farber, M.A.; Raithel, D.; Greenberg, R.K.; Sambeek, M.R. van; Brunkwall, J.S.; Rockman, C.B.; Hinchliffe, R.J.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Case and single center reports have documented the feasibility and suggested the effectiveness of endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms (RAAAs), but the role and value of such treatment remain controversial. OBJECTIVE: To clarify these we examined a

  14. von Willebrand Factor and Prekallikrein in Plasma Are Associated With Thrombus Volume in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghulam, Qasam M; Bredahl, Kim; Gram, Jørgen Brodersen

    2016-01-01

    was consecutively obtained from 38 patients with asymptomatic infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm. von Willebrand factor activity, thrombin generation time, factor XII, and prekallikrein concentration were measured in plasma on automated and in-house platforms. In total, 8 patients were excluded due to ongoing...

  15. Relation between hospital volume and outcome of elective surgery for abdominal aortic aneurysm: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Henebiens, M.; van den Broek, Th A. A.; Vahl, A. C.; Koelemay, M. J. W.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Our aim was to analyse the relation between hospital volume and peri-operative mortality in abdominal aortic aneurysm surgery. DESIGN: Systematic review. METHOD: The Medline, Embase and Cochrane databases were searched to identify all population based studies reporting on the volume

  16. An emergency visceral hybrid procedure for ruptured thoraco-abdominal aortic aneurysms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    von Meyenfeldt, E. M.; Schnater, J. M.; Reekers, J. A.; Balm, R.

    2009-01-01

    Rupture of a thoraco-abdominal aortic aneurysm (TAAA) is usually lethal. Patients with contained ruptures, who reach the hospital, have traditionally been subjected to open reconstructive surgery. However, especially in older patients, open surgery has a high mortality and morbidity rate. Visceral

  17. Near-infrared spectroscopy assessed cerebral oxygenation during open abdominal aortic aneurysm repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, H.; Nielsen, Henning Morris Bay; Secher, N H

    2016-01-01

    During open abdominal aortic aneurism (AAA) repair cerebral blood flow is challenged. Clamping of the aorta may lead to unintended hyperventilation as metabolism is reduced by perfusion of a smaller part of the body and reperfusion of the aorta releases vasodilatory substances including CO2. We...

  18. Abdominal aortic aneurysm in a premature neonate with disseminated candidiasis: Ultrasound and angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khoss, A.E.; Ponhold, W.; Pollak, A.; Schlemmer, M.; Weninger, M.

    1985-09-01

    When using ultrasound for detection of kidney enlargement, we found an acute abdominal aortic aneurysm secondary to aortitis arising from umbilical artery catheterisation in a premature neonate with systemic candidiasis. Aortography was performed to provide vascular details such as involvement of celiac, renal, iliac and femoral arteries.

  19. Segmentation and motion estimation of stent grafts in abdominal aortic aneurysms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klein, Almar

    2011-01-01

    Patients with an Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm have a high risk of dying due to the rupture of a dilated aorta. Endovascular aneurysm repair is a technique to threat AAA, by which a stent graft prosthesis is implanted in the aorta of the patient. Due to its minimal invasive character, this intervention

  20. Nationwide Study on the Risk of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms in Patients With Psoriasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khalid, Usman; Egeberg, Alexander; Ahlehoff, Ole

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a complex multifactorial disease associated with a high morbidity and mortality. Increased inflammation including T-helper 17 cell-mediated effects has been implicated in AAA pathogenesis. Psoriasis is considered to be a T-helper 17-driven chronic inf...

  1. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Karl Emil; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Gislason, Gunnar Hilmar

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The renin-angiotensin system is thought to play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs). However, effects of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) and angiotensin II type 1 receptor blockers (ARBs) on human AAAs remain unclear. We therefore ex...

  2. Melatonin reduces cardiac morbidity and markers of myocardial ischemia after elective abdominal aortic aneurism repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gögenür, Ismail; Kücükakin, Bülent; Panduro Jensen, Leif

    2014-01-01

    The aim was to examine the effect of perioperative melatonin treatment on clinical cardiac morbidity and markers of myocardial ischemia in patients undergoing elective surgery for abdominal aortic aneurism. Reperfusion injury results in increased cardiac morbidity in patients undergoing surgery f...

  3. Outcome after endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair: a meta-analysis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walschot, L.H.B.; Laheij, R.J.F.; Verbeek, A.L.M.

    2002-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine the frequencies of complications and risk factors for complications following endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair (EVAR). METHODS: Thirty-nine articles published between October 1995 and October 1999 in English, German, French, or Dutch were identified in

  4. Outcome and quality of life after endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair in octogenarians

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pol, Robert A.; Zeebregts, Clark J.; van Sterkenburg, Steven M. M.; Ferreira, Luis M.; Goktay, Yigit; Reijnen, Michel M. P. J.

    Objective: This study determined outcome and quality of life (QOL) in octogenarians, compared with patients aged Methods: From March 2009 until April 2011, 1263 patients in the Endurant Stent Graft Natural Selection Global Postmarket Registry (ENGAGE) registry with an abdominal aortic aneurysm were

  5. Biomechanical Imaging Markers as Predictors of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Growth or Rupture: A Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Indrakusuma, R.; Jalalzadeh, H.; Planken, R. N.; Marquering, H. A.; Legemate, D. A.; Koelemay, M. J. W.; Balm, R.

    2016-01-01

    Biomechanical characteristics, such as wall stress, are important in the pathogenesis of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) and can be visualised and quantified using imaging techniques. This systematic review aims to present an overview of all biomechanical imaging markers that have been studied in

  6. Endograft treatment of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms using the talent aortouniiliac system : An international multicenter study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peppelenbosch, N.; Geelkerken, R.H.; Soong, C.; Cao, P.; Steinmetz, O.K.; Teijink, J.A.W.; Lepantalo, M.; de Letter, J.; Vermassen, F.E.G.; DeRose, G.; Buskens, E.; Buth, J.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To understand the potential of endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) in patients presenting with a ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (rAAA), the proportion in whom this procedure was applicable was assessed. Mortality and morbidity was also determined in patients treated with emergency

  7. Simultaneous aortic and coronary assessment in abdominal aortic aneurysm patients by thoraco-abdominal 64-detector-row CT angiography: estimate of the impact on preoperative management: a pilot study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Budde, R.P.; Huo, F.; Cramer, M.J.; Doevendans, P.A.; Bots, M.L.; Moll, F.L.; Prokop, M.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To estimate the influence of information on the coronary arteries obtained from routine thoraco-abdominal CT angiography (CTA) on pre-operative clinical management in abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) patients. METHODS: Twenty-eight AAA patients underwent pre-operative thoraco-abdominal

  8. Aortocaval fistula – rare complication of ruptured abdominal aortic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aortocaval fistula (ACF) formation is a rare condition occurring in 0.2 - 1.3% of patients with degenerative aortic aneurysms. 1 This paper describes the presentation and successful management of a patient with such an ACF. We wish to highlight the need to maintain a high index of suspicion for this condition in patients with ...

  9. Matrix metalloproteinase-9 genotype as a potential genetic marker for abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duellman, Tyler; Warren, Christopher L; Peissig, Peggy; Wynn, Martha; Yang, Jay

    2012-10-01

    Degradation of extracellular matrix support in the large abdominal arteries contribute to abnormal dilation of aorta, leading to abdominal aortic aneurysms, and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) is the predominant enzyme targeting elastin and collagen present in the walls of the abdominal aorta. Previous studies have suggested a potential association between MMP-9 genotype and abdominal aortic aneurysm, but these studies have been limited only to the p-1562 and (CA) dinucleotide repeat microsatellite polymorphisms in the promoter region of the MMP-9 gene. We determined the functional alterations caused by 15 MMP-9 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) reported to be relatively abundant in the human genome through Western blots, gelatinase, and promoter-reporter assays and incorporated this information to perform a logistic-regression analysis of MMP-9 SNPs in 336 human abdominal aortic aneurysm cases and controls. Significant functional alterations were observed for 6 exon SNPs and 4 promoter SNPs. Genotype analysis of frequency-matched (age, sex, history of hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, and smoking) cases and controls revealed significant genetic heterogeneity exceeding 20% observed for 6 SNPs in our population of mostly white subjects from Northern Wisconsin. A step-wise logistic-regression analysis with 6 functional SNPs, where weakly contributing confounds were eliminated using Akaike information criteria, gave a final 2 SNP (D165N and p-2502) model with an overall odds ratio of 2.45 (95% confidence interval, 1.06-5.70). The combined approach of direct experimental confirmation of the functional alterations of MMP-9 SNPs and logistic-regression analysis revealed significant association between MMP-9 genotype and abdominal aortic aneurysm.

  10. Evaluation of normal abdominal aortic diameters in the Indian population using computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasper, A; Harshe, G; Keshava, S N; Kulkarni, G; Stephen, E; Agarwal, S

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to establish normal diameters for the suprarenal and infrarenal abdominal aorta measured at T12 and L3 vertebral levels in the Indian population and to study the variation in aortic diameters with age, sex, height, weight, body mass index (BMI), and body surface area (BSA). One hundred and forty-two patients who underwent helical contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) scans of the abdomen for non-cardiovascular reasons were recruited.. The mean internal diameters of the suprarenal and infrarenal abdominal aorta (maximum anteroposterior and transverse diameter) were measured at T12 and L3 vertebral levels and tabulated according to various age groups for both men and women. Pearson correlation coefficient was used to evaluate the correlation between aortic diameters, height, weight, BSA, and BMI. The mean diameters of the suprarenal and infrarenal abdominal aorta measured at T12 and L3 vertebral levels, in men were 19.0 ± 2.3 and 13.8 ± 1.9 mm and in women 17.1 ± 2.3 and 12.0 ± 1.6 mm, respectively. The aortic diameter progressively increased in caliber with increasing age of the patients and was smaller in women than men. A significant positive correlation was found in men between the suprarenal and infrarenal aortic diameters and weight, BSA, and BMI. In women, this correlation was significant in the infrarenal aorta but not in the suprarenal aorta. We obtained a set of normal values for the abdominal aorta in the Indian population. The aortic diameters correlated with age, gender, and body size of the patients as seen with previously published data in the Western population. A brief comparison of data between Indian and Western population showed that the values obtained were less than published elsewhere and hence, this should be considered while formulating intervention protocols.

  11. Evaluation of normal abdominal aortic diameters in the Indian population using computed tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Jasper

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this study was to establish normal diameters for the suprarenal and infrarenal abdominal aorta measured at T12 and L3 vertebral levels in the Indian population and to study the variation in aortic diameters with age, sex, height, weight, body mass index (BMI, and body surface area (BSA. Materials and Methods: One hundred and forty-two patients who underwent helical contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT scans of the abdomen for non-cardiovascular reasons were recruited.. The mean internal diameters of the suprarenal and infrarenal abdominal aorta (maximum anteroposterior and transverse diameter were measured at T12 and L3 vertebral levels and tabulated according to various age groups for both men and women. Pearson correlation coefficient was used to evaluate the correlation between aortic diameters, height, weight, BSA, and BMI. Results: The mean diameters of the suprarenal and infrarenal abdominal aorta measured at T12 and L3 vertebral levels, in men were 19.0 ± 2.3 and 13.8 ± 1.9 mm and in women 17.1 ± 2.3 and 12.0 ± 1.6 mm, respectively. The aortic diameter progressively increased in caliber with increasing age of the patients and was smaller in women than men. A significant positive correlation was found in men between the suprarenal and infrarenal aortic diameters and weight, BSA, and BMI. In women, this correlation was significant in the infrarenal aorta but not in the suprarenal aorta. Conclusion: We obtained a set of normal values for the abdominal aorta in the Indian population. The aortic diameters correlated with age, gender, and body size of the patients as seen with previously published data in the Western population. A brief comparison of data between Indian and Western population showed that the values obtained were less than published elsewhere and hence, this should be considered while formulating intervention protocols.

  12. Endovascular treatment of Brucella-infected abdominal aortic aneurysm: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tao; Ji, Donghua; Wang, Feng

    2017-10-01

    In very rare cases, a primary infected abdominal aortic aneurysm (IAAA) is caused by a species of Brucella. In this report, we report such a case that was successfully treated with a novel approach. To the best of our knowledge, this was the first case occurring in China, in which an infection of the abdominal aortic aneurysm was caused by a Brucella species. The clinical findings included high fever, fatigue, and abdominal pain. The diagnosis was confirmed by computed tomography angiography and by bacteriologic isolation from the patient's blood culture. The patient was given endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) and Brucella-sensitive antibiotics for 6 weeks. During the 10-month follow-up, the patient's clinical course remained uneventful. Our case study supports the premise that endovascular aneurysm repair is an appropriate alternative strategy to treat an infected abdominal aortic aneurysm. Compared with conventional surgical treatment, EVAR with long-term oral antibiotics is a simpler, less traumatic, and more efficient procedure. However, this needs to be further evaluated through long-term follow-up.

  13. Endovascular repair of inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm: serial changes of periaortic fibrosis demonstrated by CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sueyoshi, Eijun; Sakamoto, Ichiro; Uetani, Masataka

    2009-07-01

    Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm (IAAA) is characterized by inflammatory and/or fibrotic changes in the periaortic regions of the retroperitoneum. Surgical repair is usually selected for this disease. However, the perioperative mortality associated with open surgical repair of IAAs is three times higher than that with noninflammatory aortic aneurysms due to inflammation and periaortic fibrosis (PAF). Endovascular aneurysm repair of IAAs excludes the aneurysm and seems to reduce the size of the aneurysmal sac and the extent of PAF with acceptable peri-interventional and long-term morbidity. We describe the successful endovascular repair of an IAAA and the serial CT findings after repair.

  14. Thrombosed abdominal aortic aneurysm associated with an extensively "shaggy" aorta repaired anatomically via a thoracoabdominal approach with supraceliac aortic clamping: report of a case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Satofumi; Tanaka, Kuniyoshi; Morioka, Koichi; Yamada, Narihisa; Takamori, Atsushi; Handa, Mitsuteru; Ihaya, Akio; Sasaki, Masato; Ikeda, Takeshi

    2010-09-01

    A 76-year-old man with a history of multiple laparotomies and severe coronary artery disease was referred to our hospital after the sudden development of pain and numbness in the lower extremities. Computed tomography showed a thrombosed abdominal aortic aneurysm and diffuse aortic atherosclerosis; compatible with a "shaggy aorta." A good response to thrombolytic therapy permitted elective scheduling of abdominal aortic surgery after coronary artery bypass grafting. We operated via an extended left retroperitoneal approach through a thoracoabdominal incision. Epiaortic ultrasonography revealed that only the supraceliac aorta was free of mobile thrombi and had minimal plaque; we therefore placed a proximal aortic cross-clamp there. Anatomic aortic reconstruction was then performed successfully using an aorto-biiliac graft to restore adequate distal blood flow. There were no vital-organ ischemic complications, and the postoperative course was satisfactory.

  15. Spontaneous aortic thrombosis in a neonate with multiple thrombi in the main branches of the abdominal aorta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawahira, Y; Kishimoto, H; Lio, M; Ikawa, S; Kume, Y; Inamura, N; Matushita, T; Maeno, T; Nakada, T

    1995-04-01

    Spontaneous aortic thrombosis in the neonate is a rare entity with a high mortality rate. The present patient, who was diagnosed after showing haematuria and cyanosis, underwent aortic thrombectomy with a Fogarty catheter through a left thoracotomy, but died of sepsis, disseminated intravascular coagulation and multiple organ failure. Autopsy revealed multiple residual thrombi in the main branches of the abdominal aorta and necrosis of the abdominal organs despite a patent thoracoabdominal aorta. In patients with no blood flow in the main branches of the abdominal aorta on preoperative examination, removal of thrombi, including those in the main branches of the abdominal aorta, might be performed in a single, early and aggressive procedure.

  16. Lower limb myalgias in a man who used to "climb the stairs": an atypical abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dognini, Giuseppina Patrizia; Cadeo, Gianluca; Dolcino, Luigi; Gilardoni, Lodovico; Stringhi, Enrico; Forloni, Franco

    2012-07-01

    Atypical presentation of emergency abdominal aortic aneurysm comprises a wide spectrum of symptoms. Lower limbs' involvement is infrequent, usually monolateral and with clear vascular features. We report the case of a 58-year-old patient who complained exclusively about symmetric lower limb myalgias without vascular features, after having repeatedly climbed the stairs of the school he worked in. The surprising final diagnosis was of rupturing abdominal aortic aneurysm; the patient was sent to emergency surgery and survived.

  17. Characterization of the transport topology in patient-specific abdominal aortic aneurysm models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arzani, Amirhossein; Shadden, Shawn C.

    2012-08-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is characterized by disturbed blood flow patterns that are hypothesized to contribute to disease progression. The transport topology in six patient-specific abdominal aortic aneurysms was studied. Velocity data were obtained by image-based computational fluid dynamics modeling, with magnetic resonance imaging providing the necessary simulation parameters. Finite-time Lyapunov exponent (FTLE) fields were computed from the velocity data, and used to identify Lagrangian coherent structures (LCS). The combination of FTLE fields and LCS was used to characterize topological flow features such as separation zones, vortex transport, mixing regions, and flow impingement. These measures offer a novel perspective into AAA flow. It was observed that all aneurysms exhibited coherent vortex formation at the proximal segment of the aneurysm. The evolution of the systolic vortex strongly influences the flow topology in the aneurysm. It was difficult to predict the vortex dynamics from the aneurysm morphology, motivating the application of image-based flow modeling.

  18. Hypoperfusion of the Adventitial Vasa Vasorum Develops an Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroki Tanaka

    Full Text Available The aortic wall is perfused by the adventitial vasa vasorum (VV. Tissue hypoxia has previously been observed as a manifestation of enlarged abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs. We sought to determine whether hypoperfusion of the adventitial VV could develop AAAs. We created a novel animal model of adventitial VV hypoperfusion with a combination of a polyurethane catheter insertion and a suture ligation of the infrarenal abdominal aorta in rats. VV hypoperfusion caused tissue hypoxia and developed infrarenal AAA, which had similar morphological and pathological characteristics to human AAA. In human AAA tissue, the adventitial VV were stenotic in both small AAAs (30-49 mm in diameter and in large AAAs (> 50 mm in diameter, with the sac tissue in these AAAs being ischemic and hypoxic. These results indicate that hypoperfusion of adventitial VV has critical effects on the development of infrarenal AAA.

  19. A successful case of ascending aorta--abdominal aorta bypass for middle aortic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuno, Yukihiro; Mori, Yoshio; Umeda, Yukio; Imaizumi, Matsuhisa; Takiya, Hiroshi

    2009-01-01

    The middle aortic syndrome (MAS) is a rare disease affecting children and young adults, and it occurs in about 0.5% to 2.0% of all aortic coarctation cases. Congenital, acquired, inflammatory, and infectious etiologies have been described. In the majority of cases, there is a short, isolated or diffuse tubular narrowing of the descending thoracic and abdominal aorta, often accompanied by ostial stenosis or occlusion of the renal and visceral branches, which leads to renovascular hypertension and visceral ischemia. Surgical treatment should be considered in cases of uncontrollable hypertension, evidence of end-organ damage such as cardiac failure, progressive renal insufficiency, or severe intermittent claudication. Several surgical treatments for this condition have been reported, including bypass grafting, graft replacement, or patch angioplasty. We report a successful case of ascending aorta-abdominal aorta bypass for MAS in a 11-year-old boy.

  20. Glycated Hemoglobin Is Associated With the Growth Rate of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Katrine Lawaetz; Dahl, Marie; Rasmussen, Lars Melholt

    2017-01-01

    were observed in subgroup analysis of individuals without self-reported diabetes mellitus. CONCLUSIONS—: We found an inverse association between the growth rate of abdominal aortic aneurysms and the level of HbA1c, indicating that long-lasting elevated blood sugar impairs aneurysmal progression......OBJECTIVE—: An inverse association between abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) and diabetes mellitus exists; however, the cause remains unknown. This study aimed to evaluate whether the degree of glycemia is associated with aneurysm growth. APPROACH AND RESULTS—: The study was based on VIVA trial...... missing blood samples, we were left with 319 individuals. Sixty-one individuals (19.1%) had diabetes mellitus. The median growth rate was 1.7 versus 2.7 mm/y in individuals with and without diabetes mellitus, respectively (P

  1. Outcomes after open repair for ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms in patients with friendly versus hostile aortoiliac anatomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Beek, S. C.; Reimerink, J. J.; Vahl, A. C.; Wisselink, W.; Reekers, J. A.; Legemate, D. A.; Balm, R.

    2014-01-01

    In patients with a ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (RAAA), anatomic suitability for endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) depends on aortic neck and iliac artery characteristics. If the aortoiliac anatomy is unsuitable for EVAR ("hostile anatomy"), open repair (OR) is the next option. We

  2. Risk attitude and Patients experience with treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysm and severe claudication

    OpenAIRE

    Letterstål, Anna

    2010-01-01

    The overall aim of this thesis was to investigate the effect of information on well-being after open surgical repair (OR) of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) and to explore the experience of the care pathway of OR from the patients perspective as well as to describe risk attitude and preference for treatment of AAA and severe intermittent claudication (IC). The effect of information was assessed during the first week after returning to the surgical ward using a study-specific...

  3. Perioperative prognostic factors in patients with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms treated in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gierek, Danuta; Cyzowski, Tomasz; Kaczmarska, Adrianna; Janowska-Rodak, Anna; Budziarz, Barbara; Koczur, Tomasz

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of abdominal aortic aneurysm has been estimated at 20-40 cases per 100,000 per annum. The disease is often asymptomatic; in many cases, its first symptom is shock caused by a ruptured aneurysm. The aim of the present study was to assess retrospectively the selected perioperative factors in patients hospitalised in the intensive care unit (ICU) after repair of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm. Analysis involved medical records of patients after repair of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm treated in ICU in the years 2009-2010. Patients were divided into two groups: group I - survivors who were discharged from ICU and group II - non-survivors. Demographic factors, intraoperative data, vital parameters, laboratory results and severity of patient's state on admission to ICU were analysed. Analysis of laboratory results on admission to ICU showed lower values of pH and HCO(3)(-) concentrations as well as higher international normalised ratio (INR) and activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) in group II. Mean intraoperative diuresis differed between the groups; in group I - 303 mL and in group II - 155 mL. Mean diuresis on ICU day 1 was higher in group I compared to group II, i.e. 20.87 and 11.27 mL kg b.w.-1, respectively. APACHE II, SAPS II, MODS and SOFA point values were higher in group I than in group II. Markers of impaired homeostasis, such as pH, HCO(3)(-) concentration, INR and APTT assessed on admission to ICU can be relevant prognostic factors in patients after repair of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm. Monitoring of diuresis during surgery and on day 1 of ICU treatment was a sensitive risk marker for acute kidney injury. Multiple organ failure scales such as APACHE II, MODS, SOFA and SAPS II were reliable prognostic tools to be used in the early period of ICU treatment.

  4. Traumatic abdominal aortic dissection in a 16-month-old child

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heck, Josh M. [Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Nashville, TN (United States); Bittles, Mark A. [Monroe Carell Jr. Children' s Hospital at Vanderbilt, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Nashville, TN (United States)

    2009-07-15

    Abdominal aortic injury after blunt trauma is rare in the pediatric population. There have been fewer than 20 reported cases in the literature since 1960, and most were the result of motor vehicle collisions. We report the case of a 16-month-old boy who is the youngest reported patient to sustain this type of injury. We discuss the radiologic findings in multiple imaging modalities, mechanisms, associated injuries and management options. (orig.)

  5. Three-dimensional finite volume modelling of blood flow in simulated angular neck abdominal aortic aneurysm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algabri, Y. A.; Rookkapan, S.; Chatpun, S.

    2017-09-01

    An abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is considered a deadly cardiovascular disease that defined as a focal dilation of blood artery. The healthy aorta size is between 15 and 24 mm based on gender, bodyweight, and age. When the diameter increased to 30 mm or more, the rupture can occur if it is kept growing or untreated. Moreover, the proximal angular neck of aneurysm is categorized as a significant morphological feature with prime harmful effects on endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR). Flow pattern in pathological vessel can influence the vascular intervention. The aim of this study is to investigate the blood flow behaviours in angular neck abdominal aortic aneurysm with simulated geometry based on patient’s information using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). The 3D angular neck AAA models have been designed by using SolidWorks Software. Consequently, CFD tools are used for simulating these 3D models of angular neck AAA in ANSYS FLUENT Software. Eventually, based on the results, we summarized that the CFD techniques have shown high performance in explaining and investigating the flow patterns for angular neck abdominal aortic aneurysm.

  6. Metformin treatment does not affect the risk of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Katrine L.; Pottegård, Anton; Hallas, Jesper

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Diabetes counteracts formation and rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysms, possibly through arterial matrix accumulation. Use of metformin, on the other hand, reduces arterial accumulation of matrix molecules. Consequently, we hypothesized that metformin treatment may reverse the protec......Objective: Diabetes counteracts formation and rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysms, possibly through arterial matrix accumulation. Use of metformin, on the other hand, reduces arterial accumulation of matrix molecules. Consequently, we hypothesized that metformin treatment may reverse...... of metformin and ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (RAAA). The source population was defined as all individuals in Denmark with diabetes. Cases were all individuals within the source population who were hospitalized with a primary diagnosis of RAAA. For each case, 10 controls matched by age and sex were....... In total, 22.4% of the case population were long-term metformin users compared with 28.8% of the controls. We found a statistically nonsignificant protective effect of long-term metformin use toward RAAA with crude odds ratio (OR) of 0.74 (confidence interval, 0.54-1.00). When adjusted for covariates...

  7. Value of volume measurements in evaluating abdominal aortic aneurysms growth rate and need for surgical treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kontopodis, Nikolaos, E-mail: kontopodisn@yahoo.gr [Department of Vascular Surgery, University of Crete Medical School, Heraklion (Greece); Metaxa, Eleni, E-mail: emmetaxa@gmail.com [Institute of Applied and Computational Mathematics, Foundation for Research and Technology-Hellas, Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Papaharilaou, Yannis, E-mail: yannisp@iacm.forth.gr [Institute of Applied and Computational Mathematics, Foundation for Research and Technology-Hellas, Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Georgakarakos, Efstratios, E-mail: efstratiosgeorg@gmail.com [Vascular Surgery Department, “Demokritus” University of Thrace Medical School, Alexandroupolis (Greece); Tsetis, Dimitris, E-mail: tsetis@med.uoc.gr [Interventional Radiology Unit, Department of Radiology, University of Crete Medical School, Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Ioannou, Christos V., E-mail: ioannou@med.uoc.gr [Department of Vascular Surgery, University of Crete Medical School, Heraklion (Greece)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: To examine whether indices other than the traditionally used abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) maximum diameter, such as AAA volume, intraluminal thrombus (ILT) thickness and ILT volume, may be superior to evaluate aneurismal enlargement. Materials and methods: Thirty-four small AAAs (initially presenting a maximum diameter <5.5 cm which is the threshold for surgical repair) with an initial and a follow-up CT were examined. Median increase and percentile annual change of these variables was calculated. Correlation between growth rates as determined by the new indices under evaluation and those of maximum diameter were assessed. AAAs were divided according to outcome (surveillance vs. elective repair after follow-up which is based on the maximum diameter criterion) and according to growth rate (high vs. low) based on four indices. Contingency between groups of high/low growth rate regarding each of the four indices on one hand and those regarding need for surgical repair on the other was assessed. Results: A strong correlation between growth rates of maximum diameter and those of AAA and ILT volumes could be established. Evaluation of contingency between groups of outcome and those of growth rate revealed significant associations only for AAA and ILT volumes. Subsequently AAAs with a rapid volumetric increase over time had a likelihood ratio of 10 to be operated compared to those with a slower enlargement. Regarding increase of maximum diameter, likelihood ratio between AAAs with rapid and those with slow expansion was only 3. Conclusion: Growth rate of aneurysms regarding 3Dimensional indices of AAA and ILT volumes is significantly associated with the need for surgical intervention while the same does not hold for growth rates determined by 2Dimensional indices of maximum diameter and ILT thickness.

  8. Hemodynamic Study of Flow Remodeling Stent Graft for the Treatment of Highly Angulated Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siang Lin Yeow

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the effect of a novel flow remodeling stent graft (FRSG on the hemodynamic characteristics in highly angulated abdominal aortic aneurysm based on computational fluid dynamics (CFD approach. An idealized aortic aneurysm with varying aortic neck angulations was constructed and CFD simulations were performed on nonstented models and stented models with FRSG. The influence of FRSG intervention on the hemodynamic performance is analyzed and compared in terms of flow patterns, wall shear stress (WSS, and pressure distribution in the aneurysm. The findings showed that aortic neck angulations significantly influence the velocity flow field in nonstented models, with larger angulations shifting the mainstream blood flow towards the center of the aorta. By introducing FRSG treatment into the aneurysm, erratic flow recirculation pattern in the aneurysm sac diminishes while the average velocity magnitude in the aneurysm sac was reduced in the range of 39% to 53%. FRSG intervention protects the aneurysm against the impacts of high velocity concentrated flow and decreases wall shear stress by more than 50%. The simulation results highlighted that FRSG may effectively treat aneurysm with high aortic neck angulations via the mechanism of promoting thrombus formation and subsequently led to the resorption of the aneurysm.

  9. Chronic contained rupture of an abdominal aortic aneurysm presenting as a Grynfeltt lumbar hernia. A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobbeleir, J; Fourneau, I; Maleux, G; Daenens, K; Vandekerkhof, J; Nevelsteen, A

    2007-06-01

    We report a unique case of chronic contained thoraco-abdominal aneurysm rupture presenting as a Grynfeltt lumbar hernia. A 79-year-old man presented with backpain and a bluish swelling in the left lumbar region in the presence of a non tender aortic aneurysm. CT scan confirmed contained rupture of a type IV thoraco-abdominal aortic aneurysm. The peri-aortic haematoma protruded through the lumbar wall causing a Grynfeltt lumbar hernia. The aneurysm was replaced through a thoraco-phreno-lumbotomy. The patient survived and is doing well six months postoperatively.

  10. A case study involving a blunt abdominal trauma leading to disruption of the aortic bifurcation in an infant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seleno Glauber de Jesus-Silva

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of aortic disruption secondary to blunt abdominal trauma is rarely reported in the pediatric population. In general, most of the cases described are the result of motor vehicle accidents. We report on the treatment and outcomes of a 5-year-old child with aortic bifurcation disruption secondary to an unusual case of blunt abdominal trauma who was admitted to the emergency room in hypovolemic shock and subjected to immediate exploratory laparotomy and vascular repair. The mechanical forces involved in aortic disruption and the management options for repair and treatment of this injury will be discussed.

  11. An analysis of variables affecting aortic neck length with implications for fenestrated endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Madeline; Suresh, Adithya; Alexander, Jason; Cragg, Andrew

    2014-05-01

    A major factor in the selection of patients for endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) is the character of the aortic neck, and studies suggest that many patients are treated outside of the instructions for use (IFU) criteria. By analyzing aortic neck morphology, we hope to identify factors that may influence decision making about the use of fenestrated endografts as an alternative to extending the neck limitations of traditional endografts. A retrospective analysis was completed on 111 patients who underwent computed tomography angiography (CTA) scans between May 1, 2009 and January 3, 2011 for the evaluation of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Individual characteristics of neck and aneurysm morphology were analyzed to establish whether certain factors determined suitability for EVAR with traditional nonfenestrated endografts. In considering augmented neck lengths (ANL), anatomic measurements of distance from the start of aortic dilatation to the lowest renal artery (LRA) and highest renal artery (HRA) were analyzed. Measurements were analyzed using Stata software (version 11.2; StataCorp, College Station, TX). There were 86 men and 25 women in the patient population, with an average age of 72.9 years. In 46 patients, the proximal neck length was relationship between AAA maximum diameter and proximal neck length (rs = -0.2237; P = 0.018), indicating that as aneurysm size increases, proximal neck length decreases. There was a significant correlation between proximal neck length and proximal neck diameter (rs = -0.2585; P = 0.006) and between proximal neck length and angle (rs = -0.2355; P = 0.013), and between proximal neck diameter and right iliac maximum diameter (rs = 0.2329; P = 0.014). Using fenestration to place an endograft above the LRA would create an ANL of >15 mm in 20 of 40 patients with aortic necks deemed too short to be eligible for EVAR using conventional infrarenal graft positioning. Extending the graft above the HRA would create an ANL of >15 mm in

  12. Plasma cytokine levels and risks of abdominal aortic aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liao, Mengyang; Liu, Cong-Lin; Lv, Bing-Jie

    2015-01-01

    ), IL10, IL17A, IFN-γ, and C-reactive protein (CRP) from 476 AAA patients and 200 controls. AAA patients had lower IL6, IFN-γ, IL10, IL17A, and higher CRP than controls. IL10 correlated positively with IFN-γ, IL17A, or IL6, but not CRP in control or AAA populations. IL10 associated negatively...... with systolic blood pressure, whereas CRP associated positively with diastolic blood pressure and body mass index. CRP was an independent AAA risk factor and correlated positively with aortic diameters before and after adjustments for other risk factors. IFN-γ, IL17A, and CRP correlated positively with cross......-sectional AAA area after adjustment. IL10 correlated positively with AAA growth rate before and after adjustment. The risk of death doubled in AAA patients with CRP levels above the median. CONCLUSIONS: Reduced IFN-γ, IL10, and IL17A in AAA patients, positive correlations of IFN-γ and IL17A with cross...

  13. Cyclooxygenase-2 inhibition attenuates abdominal aortic aneurysm progression in hyperlipidemic mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarbani Ghoshal

    Full Text Available Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs are a chronic inflammatory disease that increase the risk of life-threatening aortic rupture. In humans, AAAs have been characterized by increased expression of cyclooxygenase-2 and the inactivation of COX-2 prior to disease initiation reduces AAA incidence in a mouse model of the disease. The current study examined the effectiveness of selective cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 inhibition on reducing AAA progression when administered after the initiation of AAA formation. AAAs were induced in hyperlipidemic apolipoprotein E-deficient mice by chronic angiotensin II (AngII infusion and the effect of treatment with the COX-2 inhibitor celecoxib was examined when initiated at different stages of the disease. Celecoxib treatment that was started 1 week after initiating AngII infusion reduced AAA incidence by 61% and significantly decreased AAA severity. Mice treated with celecoxib also showed significantly reduced aortic rupture and mortality. Treatment with celecoxib that was started at a late stage of AAA development also significantly reduced AAA incidence and severity. Celecoxib treatment significantly increased smooth muscle alpha-actin expression in the abdominal aorta and did not reduce expression of markers of macrophage-dependent inflammation. These findings indicate that COX-2 inhibitor treatment initiated after formation of AngII-induced AAAs effectively reduces progression of the disease in hyperlipidemic mice.

  14. Overexpression of Catalase in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells Prevents the Formation of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parastatidis, Ioannis; Weiss, Daiana; Joseph, Giji; Taylor, W Robert

    2013-01-01

    Objective Elevated levels of oxidative stress have been reported in abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA), but which reactive oxygen species (ROS) promotes the development of AAA remains unclear. Here we investigate the effect of the hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) degrading enzyme catalase on the formation of AAA. Approach and Results AAA were induced with the application of calcium chloride (CaCl2) on mouse infrarenal aortas. The administration of PEG-catalase, but not saline, attenuated the loss of tunica media and protected against AAA formation (0.91±0.1 mm vs. 0.76±0.09 mm). Similarly, in a transgenic mouse model, catalase over-expression in the vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) preserved the thickness of tunica media and inhibited aortic dilatation by 50% (0.85±0.14 mm vs. 0.57±0.08 mm). Further studies showed that injury with CaCl2 decreased catalase expression and activity in the aortic wall. Pharmacologic administration or genetic over-expression of catalase restored catalase activity and subsequently decreased matrix metalloproteinase activity. In addition, a profound reduction in inflammatory markers and VSMC apoptosis was evident in aortas of catalase over-expressing mice. Interestingly, as opposed to infusion of PEG-catalase, chronic over-expression of catalase in VSMC did not alter the total aortic H2O2 levels. Conclusions The data suggest that a reduction in aortic wall catalase activity can predispose to AAA formation. Restoration of catalase activity in the vascular wall enhances aortic VSMC survival and prevents AAA formation primarily through modulation of matrix metalloproteinase activity. PMID:23950141

  15. Reported high salt intake is associated with increased prevalence of abdominal aortic aneurysm and larger aortic diameter in older men.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Golledge

    Full Text Available Salt intake has been implicated in the pathogenesis of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA through studies in rodent models but not previously studied in humans. The aim of this study was to examine the association between reported addition of salt to food and the prevalence of AAA.A risk factor questionnaire which contained a question about salt intake was included as part of a population screening study for AAA in 11742 older men. AAA presence was assessed by abdominal ultrasound imaging using a reproducible protocol.The prevalence of AAA was 6.9, 8.5 and 8.6% in men who reported adding salt to food never, sometimes and always, respectively, p = 0.005. Addition of salt to food sometimes (odds ratio [OR]: 1.22, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.03-1.44 or always (OR: 1.23, 95% CI 1.04-1.47 was independently associated with AAA after adjustment for other risk factors including age, waist-hip ratio, blood pressure, history of hypertension, high cholesterol, angina, diabetes, myocardial infarction and stroke. Salt intake was also independently associated with aortic diameter (beta 0.023, p = 0.012. In men with no prior history of hypertension, high cholesterol, angina, myocardial infarction or stroke (n = 4185, the association between addition of salt to food sometimes (OR: 1.41, 95% CI 0.96-2.08 or always (OR: 1.52, 95% CI 1.04-2.22 and AAA remained evident.Reported salt intake is associated with AAA in older men. Additional studies are needed to determine whether reducing salt intake would protect against AAA.

  16. Management of patients with acute aortic syndrome through a regional rapid transport system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzur, Miguel; Han, Sukgu M; Dunn, Joie; Elsayed, Ramsey S; Fleischman, Fernando; Casagrande, Yolee; Weaver, Fred A

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to describe the outcomes of patients with acute aortic syndrome (AAS) during and after transfer to a regional aortic center by a rapid transport system. Review of patients with AAS who were transferred by a rapid transport system to a regional aortic center was performed. Data regarding demographics, diagnosis, comorbidities, transportation, and hospital course were acquired. Severity of existing comorbidities was determined by the Society for Vascular Surgery Comorbidity Severity Score (SVSCSS). The Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) score assessed physiologic instability on admission. Risk factors associated with system-related (transfer and hospital) mortality were identified by univariate and multivariate linear regression analysis. During a recent 18-month period (December 2013-July 2015), 183 patients were transferred by a rapid transport system; 148 (81%) patients were transported by ground and 35 (19%) by air. Median distance traveled was 24 miles (range, 3.6-316 miles); median transport time was 42 minutes (range, 10-144 minutes). Two patients died during transport, one with a type A dissection, the other of a ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm. There were 118 (66%) patients who received operative intervention. Median time to operation was 6 hours. Type B dissections had the longest median time to operation, 45 hours, with system-related mortality of 1.9%; type A dissections had the shortest median time, 3 hours, and a system-related mortality of 16%. Overall, system-related mortality was 15%. On univariate analysis, factors associated with system-related mortality were age ≥65 years (P = .026), coronary artery disease (P = .030), prior myocardial infarction (P = .049), prior coronary revascularization (P = .002), SVSCSS of >8 (P 10 (P = .004). Distance traveled and transport mode and duration were not associated with increased risk of system-related mortality. Only SVSCSS of >8 (odds

  17. Endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms: vascular anatomy, device selection, procedure, and procedure-specific complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryce, Yolanda; Rogoff, Philip; Romanelli, Donald; Reichle, Ralph

    2015-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is abnormal dilatation of the aorta, carrying a substantial risk of rupture and thereby marked risk of death. Open repair of AAA involves lengthy surgery time, anesthesia, and substantial recovery time. Endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) provides a safer option for patients with advanced age and pulmonary, cardiac, and renal dysfunction. Successful endovascular repair of AAA depends on correct selection of patients (on the basis of their vascular anatomy), choice of the correct endoprosthesis, and familiarity with the technique and procedure-specific complications. The type of aneurysm is defined by its location with respect to the renal arteries, whether it is a true or false aneurysm, and whether the common iliac arteries are involved. Vascular anatomy can be divided more technically into aortic neck, aortic aneurysm, pelvic perfusion, and iliac morphology, with grades of difficulty with respect to EVAR, aortic neck morphology being the most common factor to affect EVAR appropriateness. When choosing among the devices available on the market, one must consider the patient's vascular anatomy and choose between devices that provide suprarenal fixation versus those that provide infrarenal fixation. A successful technique can be divided into preprocedural imaging, ancillary procedures before AAA stent-graft placement, the procedure itself, postprocedural medical therapy, and postprocedural imaging surveillance. Imaging surveillance is important in assessing complications such as limb thrombosis, endoleaks, graft migration, enlargement of the aneurysm sac, and rupture. Last, one must consider the issue of radiation safety with regard to EVAR. (©)RSNA, 2015.

  18. Endovascular Treatment of Infrarenal Abdominal Aortic Lesions With or Without Common Iliac Artery Involvement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oender, Hakan, E-mail: drhakanonder@hotmail.com [Dicle University Medical Faculty, Department of Radiology (Turkey); Oguzkurt, Levent [Baskent University Medical Faculty, Department of Radiology (Turkey); Guer, Serkan [Sifa University Medical Faculty, Department of Radiology (Turkey); Tekbas, Gueven [Dicle University Medical Faculty, Department of Radiology (Turkey); Guerel, Kamil [Abant Izzet Baysal University Medical Faculty, Department of Radiology (Turkey); Coskun, Isa [Baskent University Medical Faculty, Department of Cardiovascular Surgery (Turkey); Oezkan, Ugur [Baskent University Medical Faculty, Department of Radiology (Turkey)

    2013-02-15

    To evaluate the results of stent placement for obstructive atherosclerotic aortic disease with or without involvement of the common iliac artery. Forty patients had self-expanding stents primarily or after balloon dilatation in the abdominal aorta between January 2005 and May 2011. All patients had trouble walking. Follow-up examinations were performed with clinical visits; these included color Doppler ultrasonography and computed tomographic angiography. Technical, clinical, and hemodynamic success was achieved in all patients. None of the patients underwent reintervention during the follow-up period, which ranged from 3 months to 6 years (median 24 months). Nine complications occurred in six patients. Of the nine complications, four were distal thromboembolisms, which were successfully treated with catheter-directed thrombolysis or anticoagulation therapy. Endovascular treatment of the obstructive aortic disease using self-expanding stents was safe and effective, with high technical success and long-term patency. Thromboembolic complications were high even though direct stenting was considered protective for thromboembolism formation. Particularly for infrarenal aortic stenosis, it can be recommended as the first-line treatment option for patients with obstructive atherosclerotic aortic disease.

  19. Feasibility of Laser Doppler Vibrometry as potential diagnostic tool for patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuurman, T; Rixen, D J; Swenne, C A; Hinnen, J-W

    2013-04-05

    The application of laser measurements in medical applications makes it possible to measure even very small vibrations without contacting the skin surface. In the present work we investigate the use of a scanning vibrometer to measure the mechanical wave of the abdominal wall caused by the heart beat and blood pressure pulse. A Laser Doppler Vibrometer, triggered by cardiac signals, is used to scan points on a grid positioned on the abdomen of human subjects. The proposed procedure is intended for detecting anomalies in the abdominal cavity such as aortic aneurysms. Here, we outline the technical setup used in our preliminary in vivo experiments and present some preliminary results. This feasibility study shows that the proposed measurement procedure allows for measuring the skin motion, that the skin motion measured is related to the heart activity, and that there are indication that the presence of an abdominal aortic aneurysm significantly modifies the relation between blood pressure pulsations and skin motion on the abdomen. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The validity of ultrasonographic scanning as screening method for abdominal aortic aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholt, J.S; Vammen, S; Juul, Svend

    1999-01-01

    Objective:the sensitivity and specificity of screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) with ultrasonographic scanning (US) is unknown. The aim of the study was to validate US as screening test for AAAs.Methods and material:4176 (76.3%) of 5470 men aged 65–73 attended hospital-based US...... screening for an AAA at their local hospital. Two observers and one scanner were used. The maximal anterior–posterior (AP) of the dilated aorta, or 2 cm above the bifurcation, and at the crossing of left renal vein was recorded. In 50 cases, blinded measurements were carried out by two observers. An AAA...... for AAA. Screening for proximal infrarenal aorta aneurysm remains acceptable because the majority of aortic diameters in this segment are so much smaller than the diameters that define an AAA....

  1. Comparison of arterial stiffness and microcirculatory changes following abdominal aortic aneurysm grafting.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Moloney, M A

    2012-02-01

    BACKGOUND: Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) surgery provides a unique opportunity to study the impact of arterial stiffness on central haemodynamics, reflected in augmentation index (AI). The aneurysmal aorta is significantly stiffer than undilated age-matched aorta. AIM: We investigated whether replacement of an aneurysmal aorta with a compliant graft would result in a decrease in AI, which would thus decrease myocardial workload parameters. METHODS: Patients undergoing elective open or endovascular AAA repair were assessed with applanation tonometry and laser fluximetry pre-operatively, immediately and long-term post-operatively. RESULTS: Replacement of a small segment of abnormal conduit vessel resulted in improvements in AI, demonstrating that arterial stiffness can be surgically manipulated. CONCLUSIONS: These results reflect a decreased myocardial workload post-aortic grafting. This decrease in AI is important from a risk factor management perspective, and arterial stiffness should become a further recognised and screened for risk factor in patients with known aneurysmal disease.

  2. How to manage a case of aymptomatic thoraco-abdominal aortic aneurysm with occluded mesenteric arteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhisekh Mohanty

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We report a unique case of a 57-year-old male having a suprarenal thoraco-abdominal aortic aneurysm which is extending till the origin of superior mesenteric artery (SMA. The origins of celiac artery and SMA were totally occluded and filled retrogradely through dense collateral vessels arising from the inferior mesenteric artery. Surprisingly, the patient was not having any symptoms related to mesenteric ischemia. We decided to use a conventional aortic aneurysm stent graft to repair it without revascularizing the occluded mesenteric arteries. After 1 month, CT aortogram was repeated which revealed a well-apposed stent graft with no endoleaks. He did not have any clinical signs and symptoms attributable to mesenteric ischemia.

  3. Comparison of arterial stiffness and microcirculatory changes following abdominal aortic aneurysm grafting.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Moloney, M A

    2010-11-11

    BACKGOUND: Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) surgery provides a unique opportunity to study the impact of arterial stiffness on central haemodynamics, reflected in augmentation index (AI). The aneurysmal aorta is significantly stiffer than undilated age-matched aorta. AIM: We investigated whether replacement of an aneurysmal aorta with a compliant graft would result in a decrease in AI, which would thus decrease myocardial workload parameters. METHODS: Patients undergoing elective open or endovascular AAA repair were assessed with applanation tonometry and laser fluximetry pre-operatively, immediately and long-term post-operatively. RESULTS: Replacement of a small segment of abnormal conduit vessel resulted in improvements in AI, demonstrating that arterial stiffness can be surgically manipulated. CONCLUSIONS: These results reflect a decreased myocardial workload post-aortic grafting. This decrease in AI is important from a risk factor management perspective, and arterial stiffness should become a further recognised and screened for risk factor in patients with known aneurysmal disease.

  4. Follow-up of aortic dissection: contribution of MR angiography for evaluation of the abdominal aorta and its branches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogaert, J. [Department of Radiology, Catholic University Hospitals, Herestraat 49, B-3000 Leuven (Belgium); Meyns, B. [Department of Cardiac Surgery, Catholic University Hospitals, Herestraat 49, B-3000 Leuven (Belgium); Rademakers, F.E. [Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Catholic University Hospitals, Herestraat 49, B-3000 Leuven (Belgium); Bosmans, H. [Department of Radiology, Catholic University Hospitals, Herestraat 49, B-3000 Leuven (Belgium); Verschakelen, J. [Department of Radiology, Catholic University Hospitals, Herestraat 49, B-3000 Leuven (Belgium); Flameng, W. [Department of Cardiac Surgery, Catholic University Hospitals, Herestraat 49, B-3000 Leuven (Belgium); Marchal, G. [Department of Radiology, Catholic University Hospitals, Herestraat 49, B-3000 Leuven (Belgium); Baert, A.L. [Department of Radiology, Catholic University Hospitals, Herestraat 49, B-3000 Leuven (Belgium)

    1997-06-01

    Spin-echo MR is an established method to evaluate thoracic aortic dissections, but is not well suited to study the abdominal aorta. In this study we evaluated whether MR angiography could provide a complete examination of the abdominal aorta. In 28 patients (40 MR studies) with suspected (n = 6) or known (n = 34) aortic dissection, MR studies were performed. Thoracic aorta was evaluated with spin-echo and gradient-recalled-echo MR imaging. Axial two-dimensional time-of-flight MR angiography with thin overlapping slices was used to study the abdominal aorta. Intermediate and high signal intensity on MR angiography was interpreted as patent flow, and low signal was interpreted as thrombus. The presence of an intima flap and the re-entry site could be depicted in all MR studies. Thrombus in the false channel was seen in 8 studies. The origin of the abdominal visceral branches and their relation to the false-true channel could be depicted, except in 4 of 80 renal arteries studied. Extension of the dissection into the coeliac trunk was seen in 2 and in the superior mesenteric artery in 10 studies. Dilatation of the suprarenal abdominal aorta was seen in 20 studies, and of the infrarenal aorta in 9 studies. MR angiography provides valuable information about the abdominal aorta and its branches in patients with aortic dissection. This makes MR imaging appealing as the preferred imaging modality for the diagnosis and follow-up of aortic dissection. (orig.). With 6 figs., 6 tabs.

  5. Acute Testicular Ischemia following Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair Identified in the Emergency Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan Finnerty

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR is perhaps the most widely utilized surgical procedure for patients with large abdominal aortic aneurysms. This procedure is minimally invasive and reduces inpatient hospitalization requirements. The case involves a 72-year-old male who presented to the emergency department with right testicular ischemia two days following EVAR. Given the minimal inpatient hospitalization associated with this procedure, emergency physicians are likely to encounter associated complications. Ischemic and thromboembolic events following EVAR are extremely rare but require prompt vascular surgery intervention to minimize morbidity and mortality.

  6. A staged repair of crossed fused renal ectopia with complex abdominal aortic and iliac aneurysms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Teresa O'Donnell, MD

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Crossed fused renal ectopia in the presence of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs is a rare challenge to therapy. A 68-year-old man had a 6.9-cm AAA, a 6.6-cm left common iliac aneurysm, and a 3.2-cm right internal iliac aneurysm. He had multiple comorbidities and a right-sided crossed fused kidney supplied by two small renal arteries arising from the AAA. Aortorenal bypass with staged endovascular aneurysm repair was used to treat the aneurysmal disease. Two-stage open aortorenal bypass followed by endovascular repair for complex aneurysms is feasible in the rare patient with such a congenital anomaly.

  7. Colorectal cancer associated with abdominal aortic aneurysm: results of EVAR followed by colectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illuminati, Giulio; Ceccanei, Gianluca; Pacilè, Maria A; Pizzardi, Giulia; Palumbo, Piergaspare; Vietri, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    The association of colorectal cancer and abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is infrequent but poses special problems of priority of treatment under elective circumstances. The purpose of this study was to retrospectively evaluate the outcome of 16 consecutive patients undergoing endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) followed by colectomy. Operative mortality was nil. Operative morbidity included two transient rise of serum creatinine level and one extraperitoneal anastomotic leakage which evolved favourably with conservative treatment. EVAR allowed a very short delay of treatment of colorectal cancer after aneurysm repair, minimizing operative complications.

  8. Immunoglobulin A antibodies against Chlamydia pneumoniae are associated with expansion of abdominal aortic aneurysm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholt, J.S; Juul, Svend; Vammen, S

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to examine the possible association between the progression of small abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) and chronic infection with Chlamydia pneumoniae. METHODS: Patients from a hospital-based mass screening programme for AAA with annual follow-up (mean 2.7 years...... or more was a significant independent predictor of increased AAA expansion, adjusted for known risk factors of expansion. Initial AAA size and serum total cholesterol level were also predictors of expansion. CONCLUSION: A high proportion of men with a small AAA had signs of chronic infection with C...

  9. Immunoblotting analysis of abdominal aortic aneurysms using antibodies against Chlamydia pneumoniae recombinant MOMP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vammen, Sten; Vorum, Henrik; Ostergaard, L

    2002-01-01

    antibodies against Chlamydia pneumoniae have been associated with atherosclerosis and with expansion of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA). C. pneumoniae has been demonstrated in coronary arteries, AAA and the carotid arteries by use of polymerase chain reactions (PCR), immunohistochemical procedures...... and electron microscopy. However, the correlation between demonstrating C. pneumoniae DNA or antigen in tissue from plaque material or aneurysms and the antibody titres in serum is controversial. The specificity of immunohistochemical procedures is unknown. The aim of this study was to assess the possibility...

  10. Coronary artery bypass grafting following simultaneous treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysm and peripheral arterial disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temizkan, Veysel; Ugur, Murat; Alp, Ibrahim; Ucak, Alper; Yedekci, Erturk; Yilmaz, Ahmet Turan

    2014-01-01

    Atherosclerosis might affect all arterial segments of the vascular system, thus peripheral arterial disease (PAD) accompanying coronary artery disease (CAD) is not uncommon. In addition to this coexistence, abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is frequently associated with CAD. Although treatment strategies of CAD and PAD or CAD and AAA has been reported previously, treatment of these three pathologies has not been reported. The management of a therapeutic strategy is important for avoiding perioperative mortality and morbidity in CAD associated with AAA and PAD. We are reporting our simultaneous treatment strategy of three pathologies with endovascular AAA repair, stent implantation into the superficial femoral artery (SFA) and coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG).

  11. Endovascular Treatment of Blunt Traumatic Abdominal Aortic Occlusion With Kissing Stent Placement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Idoguchi, Koji, E-mail: idoguchi@ares.eonet.ne.jp; Yamaguchi, Masato; Okada, Takuya [Kobe University Hospital, Department of Radiology and Center for Endovascular Therapy (Japan); Nomura, Yoshikatsu [Kobe University Hospital, Department of Cardiovascular Surgery (Japan); Sugimura, Kazuro [Kobe University Hospital, Department of Radiology and Center for Endovascular Therapy (Japan); Okita, Yutaka [Kobe University Hospital, Department of Cardiovascular Surgery (Japan); Sugimoto, Koji [Kobe University Hospital, Department of Radiology and Center for Endovascular Therapy (Japan)

    2012-10-15

    Blunt traumatic abdominal aortic dissection is extremely rare and potentially deadly. We present the case of a 62-year-old man involved in a frontal car crash. After emergency undergoing laparotomy for bowel injuries, he was referred to our hospital due to acute ischemia of bilateral lower extremities on day 3 after the trauma. Computed tomography and aortography showed an aortobiiliac dissection with complete occlusion. This injury was successfully treated by endovascular treatment with 'kissing'-technique stent placement, which appears to be a safe, effective, and minimally invasive treatment.

  12. Efficacy and mechanism of angiotensin II receptor blocker treatment in experimental abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasunori Iida

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Despite the importance of the renin-angiotensin (Ang system in abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA pathogenesis, strategies targeting this system to prevent clinical aneurysm progression remain controversial and unproven. We compared the relative efficacy of two Ang II type 1 receptor blockers, telmisartan and irbesartan, in limiting experimental AAAs in distinct mouse models of aneurysm disease. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: AAAs were induced using either 1 Ang II subcutaneous infusion (1000 ng/kg/min for 28 days in male ApoE(-/- mice, or 2 transient intra-aortic porcine pancreatic elastase infusion in male C57BL/6 mice. One week prior to AAA creation, mice started to daily receive irbesartan (50 mg/kg, telmisartan (10 mg/kg, fluvastatin (40 mg/kg, bosentan (100 mg/kg, doxycycline (100 mg/kg or vehicle alone. Efficacy was determined via serial in vivo aortic diameter measurements, histopathology and gene expression analysis at sacrifice. Aortic aneurysms developed in 67% of Ang II-infused ApoE(-/- mice fed with standard chow and water alone (n = 15, and 40% died of rupture. Strikingly, no telmisartan-treated mouse developed an AAA (n = 14. Both telmisartan and irbesartan limited aneurysm enlargement, medial elastolysis, smooth muscle attenuation, macrophage infiltration, adventitial neocapillary formation, and the expression of proteinases and proinflammatory mediators. Doxycycline, fluvastatin and bosentan did not influence aneurysm progression. Telmisartan was also highly effective in intra-aortic porcine pancreatic elastase infusion-induced AAAs, a second AAA model that did not require exogenous Ang II infusion. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Telmisartan suppresses experimental aneurysms in a model-independent manner and may prove valuable in limiting clinical disease progression.

  13. Acute Symptomatic Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Secondary to Endovascular Stent Graft Associated Type II Endoleak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Ka Leung Chan

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Endovascular abdominal aneurysm repair (EVAR is popular because of its low invasiveness and feasibility for high-risk patients. Endoleak is common after EVAR and is characterized by blood flow within the aneurysm sac but outside the stent graft. Type II or collateral endoleak commonly results from retrograde filling of the aneurysm from collateral visceral vessels, lumbar, inferior mesenteric, accessory renal or sacral arteries. Collateral leaks are generally thought to be benign and over half of the early leaks will seal spontaneously. Sporadically, collateral endoleak could lead to aneurysm sac pressurization and place the patient at ongoing risk of rupture. Herein, we report an uncommon case of early post-stent graft placement symptomatic abdominal aortic aneurysm associated with type II endoleak.

  14. Mycotic abdominal aortic aneurysm caused by bacteroides thetaiotaomicron and acinetobacter lwoffii: the first case in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min Gyu; Jeon, Jae Woong; Ryu, Il Hwan; Lee, Jae Joon; Kim, Joo Seok; Choi, Ji Wook; Cho, Byung-Sun; Yoon, Hee Jung

    2014-03-01

    Mycotic aneurysms are uncommon, but are fatal without appropriate management. Previous reports have shown that anaerobes and gram-negative organisms are less common but more dangerous than other causative agents of mycotic aneurysm. We report the case of a 60-year-old man with poorly controlled diabetes mellitus and atherosclerosis in the aorta, and a 10-day of history of lower abdominal pain and fever. This man was diagnosed with an uncommon abdominal aorta mycotic aneurysm caused by Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron and Acinetobacter lwoffii. The aneurysm was successfully treated with antibiotics therapy and aorto-bi-external iliac artery bypass with debridement of the infected aortic wall. We present this case together with a review of the relevant literature.

  15. Aortobifemoral reconstruction and renal transplantation in a patient with abdominal aortic aneurysm and occlusion of iliac arteries: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomić Aleksandar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Aortoiliac occlusive disease and abdominal aortic aneurysm in patients with renal insufficiency on hemodialysis can significantly influence the success of renal transplantation. In the recent past, advanced atherosclerosis was considered as contraindication for renal transplantation. Complicated creation of vascular anastomoses and progression of occlusive or aneurysmal disease were the main reasons. Case report. We presented a 52-year-old man with a 5-year history of end-stage renal disease on haemodialysis. The patient was previously excluded from renal transplantation program because of severe aortoiliac atherosclerosis and abdominal aortic aneurysm. Resection of abdominal aortic aneurysm with occlusion of the iliac arteries and reconstruction with aortobifemoral synthetic grafts was performed and followed by cadaveric renal transplantation. Conclusion. Advanced atherosclerotic disease in aortoiliac segment requires elective vascular surgical reconstruction, as part of preparation for renal transplantation in patients with end-stage renal disease.

  16. Impaired results of a randomised double blinded clinical trial of propranolol versus placebo on the expansion rate of small abdominal aortic aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholt, Jes Sanddal; Henneberg, E W; Juul, Søren

    1999-01-01

    To study the propranolol treatment of small abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) concerning intention to treat, side effects, and inhibition of expansion.......To study the propranolol treatment of small abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) concerning intention to treat, side effects, and inhibition of expansion....

  17. Abdominal aortic aneurysms do not develop more aggressively among patients with a positive family history of the disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mejnert Jørgensen, Trine; Wemmelund, Holger; Green, Anders

    Title: Abdominal aortic aneurysms no not develop more aggressively among patients with a positive family history of the disease Authors: Trine M. M. Joergensen, Holger Wemmelund, Anders Green, Jes Lindholt, Kim Houlind. Introduction: It is well known, that a family history of abdominal aortic...... among patients with a positive family history of the disease....... with information on family history of AAA, diameter of AAA throughout follow-up, surgery, ruptures, comorbidity, smoking, and use of medication. Methods: Patients with and without a family history of AAA were compared regarding mean age at diagnosis and surgery, diameter of AAA at diagnosis, risk of surgery...

  18. Randomized clinical trial of mast cell inhibition in patients with a medium-sized abdominal aortic aneurysm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sillesen, H; Eldrup, N; Hultgren, R

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is thought to develop as a result of inflammatory processes in the aortic wall. In particular, mast cells are believed to play a central role. The AORTA trial was undertaken to investigate whether the mast cell inhibitor, pemirolast, could retard...... surgery, diabetes mellitus, and severe concomitant disease with a life expectancy of less than 2 years. Included patients were treated with 10, 25 or 40 mg pemirolast, or matching placebo for 52 weeks. The primary endpoint was change in aortic diameter as measured from leading edge adventitia...

  19. The effects of preoperative cardiology consultation prior to elective abdominal aortic aneurysm repair on patient morbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boniakowski, Anna E; Davis, Frank M; Phillips, Amanda R; Robinson, Adina B; Coleman, Dawn M; Henke, Peter K

    2017-08-01

    Objectives The relationship between preoperative medical consultations and postoperative complications has not been extensively studied. Thus, we investigated the impact of preoperative consultation on postoperative morbidity following elective abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. Methods A retrospective review was conducted on 469 patients (mean age 72 years, 20% female) who underwent elective abdominal aortic aneurysm repair from June 2007 to July 2014. Data elements included detailed medical history, preoperative cardiology consultation, and postoperative complications. Primary outcomes included 30-day morbidity, consult-specific morbidity, and mortality. A bivariate probit regression model accounting for the endogeneity of binary preoperative medical consult and patient variability was estimated with a maximum likelihood function. Results Eighty patients had preoperative medical consults (85% cardiology); thus, our analysis focuses on the effect of cardiac-related preoperative consults. Hyperlipidemia, increased aneurysm size, and increased revised cardiac risk index increased likelihood of referral to cardiology preoperatively. Surgery type (endovascular versus open repair) was not significant in development of postoperative complications when controlling for revised cardiac risk index ( p = 0.295). After controlling for patient comorbidities, there was no difference in postoperative cardiac-related complications between patients who did and did not undergo cardiology consultation preoperatively ( p = 0.386). Conclusions When controlling for patient disease severity using revised cardiac risk index risk stratification, preoperative cardiology consultation is not associated with postoperative cardiac morbidity.

  20. Primary stenting in the treatment of focal atherosclerotic abdominal aortic stenoses

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    Poncyljusz, W.; Falkowski, A.; Garncarek, J.; Karasek, M.; England, S.; Zawierucha, D

    2006-08-15

    Aim: To evaluate the results of primary stent placement in focal atherosclerotic aortic stenoses using balloon expandable stents. Materials and methods: Twenty-six primary balloon expandable stent placements in the abdominal aorta were performed and reviewed. All the aortic stenoses were atherosclerotic. Patients were followed up by ankle/brachial pressure indices (ABPI) and Doppler ultrasound (US) at 24 h after procedure and at 12 and 24 months. Follow-up angiograms were performed at 12 months. Results: Twenty-six stents in 26 patients were placed in the infrarenal aorta. All procedures were technically successful and immediate clinical success was obtained. The mean ABPI significantly improved from 0.52 {+-} 0.10 to 0.94 {+-} 0.09 within 24 h after procedure, and remained at 0.90 {+-} 0.12 between 12 and 24 months follow-up (mean 18 months). There was full haemodynamic success at hospital discharge and at 12 and 24 months after the procedure. Clinical success at 12 and 24 months (mean 18 months) was defined as an improvement in the Fontaine classification by at least one class compared with the pre-procedure class and was shown to be 100%. Conclusion: In summary, we report that primary stenting is a safe and effective alternative to surgery in cases of symptomatic stenosis of the infrarenal abdominal aorta. The excellent intermediate term results suggested that we would recommend primary stenting as the treatment of choice for focal atherosclerotic stenoses of the infrarenal aorta in selected patients.

  1. Primary stenting in the treatment of focal atherosclerotic abdominal aortic stenoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poncyljusz, W; Falkowski, A; Garncarek, J; Karasek, M; England, S; Zawierucha, D

    2006-08-01

    To evaluate the results of primary stent placement in focal atherosclerotic aortic stenoses using balloon expandable stents. Twenty-six primary balloon expandable stent placements in the abdominal aorta were performed and reviewed. All the aortic stenoses were atherosclerotic. Patients were followed up by ankle/brachial pressure indices (ABPI) and Doppler ultrasound (US) at 24h after procedure and at 12 and 24 months. Follow-up angiograms were performed at 12 months. Twenty-six stents in 26 patients were placed in the infrarenal aorta. All procedures were technically successful and immediate clinical success was obtained. The mean ABPI significantly improved from 0.52+/-0.10 to 0.94+/-0.09 within 24h after procedure, and remained at 0.90+/-0.12 between 12 and 24 months follow-up (mean 18 months). There was full haemodynamic success at hospital discharge and at 12 and 24 months after the procedure. Clinical success at 12 and 24 months (mean 18 months) was defined as an improvement in the Fontaine classification by at least one class compared with the pre-procedure class and was shown to be 100%. In summary, we report that primary stenting is a safe and effective alternative to surgery in cases of symptomatic stenosis of the infrarenal abdominal aorta. The excellent intermediate term results suggested that we would recommend primary stenting as the treatment of choice for focal atherosclerotic stenoses of the infrarenal aorta in selected patients.

  2. Endovascular Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms in the Presence of a Transplanted Kidney

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    Silverberg, Daniel, E-mail: silverberg-d@msn.com; Yalon, Tal; Halak, Moshe [The Chaim Sheba Medical Center, The Department of Vascular Surgery (Israel)

    2015-08-15

    PurposeTo present our experience performing endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms in kidney transplanted patients.MethodsA retrospective review of all patients who underwent endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) for abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) performed at our institution from 2007 to 2014. We identified all patients who had previously undergone a kidney transplant. Data collected included: comorbidities, preoperative imaging modalities, indication for surgery, stent graft configurations, pre- and postoperative renal function, perioperative complications, and survival rates.ResultsA total of 267 EVARs were performed. Six (2 %) had a transplanted kidney. Mean age was 74 (range, 64–82) years; five were males. Mean time from transplantation to EVAR was 7.5 (range, 2–12) years. Five underwent preoperative planning with noncontrast modalities only. Devices used included bifurcated (n = 3), aortouniiliac (n = 2), and tube (n = 1) stent grafts. Technical success was achieved in all patients. None experienced deterioration in renal function. Median follow-up was 39 (range, 6–51) months. Four patients were alive at the time of the study. Two patients expired during the period of follow-up from unrelated causes.ConclusionsEVAR is an effective modality for the management of AAAs in the coexistence of a transplanted kidney. It can be performed with minimal morbidity and mortality without harming the transplanted kidney. Special consideration should be given to device configuration to minimize damage to the renal graft.

  3. Data for the Oxford Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Study international survey of vascular surgery professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Regent; Jones, Amy; Woodgate, Felicity; Killough, Nicholas; Bellamkonda, Kirthi; Williams, Matthew; Hurst, Katherine; Fulford-Smith, Lucy; Cassimjee, Ismail; Handa, Ashok

    2017-10-01

    As part of the Oxford Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (OxAAA) Study, we conducted an international survey of vascular surgery professionals. One aspect of the survey is as published in the International Journal of Cardiology: "International Opinion on Priorities in Research for Small Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms and the Potential Path for Research to Impact Clinical Management". This Data-in-Brief article contains a detailed method for the conduct of this survey and additional original data. In this survey, we also provided vascular surgery colleagues with contemporary epidemiologic and surgical outcome data. This was followed by a hypothetical scenario whereby a patient had just been diagnosed with a small (40 mm) AAA and a novel biomarker predicted it to be fast growing in the coming years. We assessed the vascular professionals' perception of the patient's preference for management in this scenario, and their willingness to refer patients for a surgical trial that investigates the outcome of early versus late surgery in this setting. The survey then asked the vascular professionals to assume the role of the patient, and provided their own preferences in such a scenario.

  4. Bioluminescence and Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Macrophage Homing to Experimental Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noriyuki Miyama

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Macrophage infiltration is a prominent feature of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA progression. We used a combined imaging approach with bioluminescence (BLI and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI to study macrophage homing and accumulation in experimental AAA disease. Murine AAAs were created via intra-aortic infusion of porcine pancreatic elastase. Mice were imaged over 14 days after injection of prepared peritoneal macrophages. For BLI, macrophages were from transgenic mice expressing luciferase. For MRI, macrophages were labeled with iron oxide particles. Macrophage accumulation during aneurysm progression was observed by in situ BLI and by in vivo 7T MRI. Mice were sacrificed after imaging for histologic analysis. In situ BLI (n = 32 demonstrated high signal in the AAA by days 7 and 14, which correlated significantly with macrophage number and aortic diameter. In vivo 7T MRI (n = 13 at day 14 demonstrated T2* signal loss in the AAA and not in sham mice. Immunohistochemistry and Prussian blue staining confirmed the presence of injected macrophages in the AAA. BLI and MRI provide complementary approaches to track macrophage homing and accumulation in experimental AAAs. Similar dual imaging strategies may aid the study of AAA biology and the evaluation of novel therapies.

  5. Metabolic and hemodynamic effects of saline infusion to maintain volemia on temporary abdominal aortic occlusion

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    Fábio Ferreira Amorim

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To analyze hemodynamic and metabolic effects of saline solution infusion in the maintenance of blood volume in ischemia-reperfusion syndrome during temporary abdominal aortic occlusion in dogs. METHODS: We studied 20 dogs divided into 2 groups: the ischemia-reperfusion group (IRG, n=10 and the ischemia-reperfusion group with saline solution infusion aiming at maintaining mean pulmonary arterial wedge pressure between 10 and 20 mmHg (IRG-SS, n=10. All animals were anesthetized with sodium thiopental and maintained on spontaneous ventilation. Occlusion of the supraceliac aorta was obtained with inflation of a Fogarty catheter inserted through the femoral artery. After 60 minutes of ischemia, the balloon was deflated, and the animals were observed for another 60 minutes of reperfusion. RESULTS: IRG-SS dogs did not have hemodynamic instability after aortic unclamping, and the mean systemic blood pressure and heart rate were maintained. However, acidosis worsened, which was documented by a greater reduction of arterial pH that occurred especially due to the absence of a respiratory response to metabolic acidosis that was greater with the adoption of this procedure. CONCLUSION: Saline solution infusion to maintain blood volume avoided hemodynamic instability after aortic unclamping. This procedure, however, caused worsening in metabolic acidosis in this experimental model.

  6. Sex differences in abdominal aortic aneurysm: the role of sex hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makrygiannis, Georgios; Courtois, Audrey; Drion, Pierre; Defraigne, Jean-Olivier; Kuivaniemi, Helena; Sakalihasan, Natzi

    2014-11-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a complex multifactorial disease with genetic and environmental components. AAA is more common in men, whereas women have a greater risk of rupture and more frequently have concomitant thoracic aortic aneurysms. Moreover, women are diagnosed with AAA about 10 years later and seem to be protected by female sex hormones. In this MEDLINE-based review of literature, we examined human and animal in vivo and in vitro studies to further deepen our understanding of the sexual dimorphism of AAA. We focus on the role of sex hormones during the formation and growth of AAA. Endogenous estrogens and exogenous 17β-estradiol were found to exert favorable actions protecting from AAA in animal models, whereas exogenous hormone replacement therapy in humans had inconclusive results. Androgens, known to have detrimental effects in the vasculature, in sufficient levels maintain the integrity of the aortic wall through their anabolic actions and act differentially in men and women, whereas lower levels of testosterone have been associated with AAA in humans. In conclusion, sex differences remain an important area of AAA research, but further studies especially in humans are needed. Furthermore, differential molecular mechanisms of sex hormones constitute a potential therapeutic target for AAA. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Supraceliac and Infrarenal Aortic Flow in Patients with Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms: Mean Flows, Waveforms, and Allometric Scaling Relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Les, Andrea S; Yeung, Janice J; Schultz, Geoffrey M; Herfkens, Robert J; Dalman, Ronald L; Taylor, Charles A

    2010-03-01

    Hemodynamic forces are thought to play a critical role in abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) growth. In silico and in vitro simulations can be used to study these forces, but require accurate aortic geometries and boundary conditions. Many AAA simulations use patient-specific geometries, but utilize inlet boundary conditions taken from a single, unrelated, healthy young adult. In this study, we imaged 43 AAA patients using a 1.5 T MR scanner. A 24-frame cardiac-gated one-component phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging sequence was used to measure volumetric flow at the supraceliac (SC) and infrarenal (IR) aorta, where flow information is typically needed for simulation. For the first 36 patients, individual waveforms were interpolated to a 12-mode Fourier curve, peak-aligned, and averaged. Allometric scaling equations were derived from log-log plots of mean SC and IR flow vs. body mass, height, body surface area (BSA), and fat-free body mass. The data from the last seven patients were used to validate our model. Both the SC and IR averaged waveforms had the biphasic shapes characteristic of older adults, and mean SC and IR flows over the cardiac cycle were 51.2 ± 10.3 and 17.5 ± 5.44 mL/s, respectively. Linear regression of the log-log plots revealed that BSA was most strongly predictive of mean SC ( R 2 = 0.29) and IR flow ( R 2 = 0.19), with the highest combined R 2 . When averaged, the measured and predicted waveforms for the last seven patients agreed well. We present a method to estimate SC and IR mean flows and waveforms for AAA simulation.

  8. Reproducibility of thoracic and abdominal aortic wall measurements with three-dimensional, variable flip angle (SPACE) MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihai, Georgeta; Varghese, Juliet; Lu, Bo; Zhu, Hong; Simonetti, Orlando P; Rajagopalan, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the reproducibility and repeatability of high-resolution, isotropic thoracic and abdominal aortic wall measurements, and determine the implications they have on the number of subjects necessary for future clinical trials. Using a T1-weighted three-dimensional MRI SPACE sequence, we evaluated the interobserver, intraobserver, and scan-rescan variability of isotropic thoracic and abdominal aortic wall measurements in 15 cardiovascular diseased patients and 6 normal volunteers. Main outcome analyses were intracorrelation coefficient (ICC), mean relative error (mRE), and sample size calculation at 80% power to be used to compare placebo group and treatment group means in future two-arm randomized clinical trials. Excellent reliability, ICC > 0.8 (P measures: lumen area (LA), outer wall area (OWA), wall area (VWA), total wall volume (TWV), and percentage wall volume (%WV). Sample size calculation revealed slightly different sample size per treatment arm for thoracic and abdominal aorta segments (maximum number of subjects: 352 subjects for thoracic segment versus 421 subjects for abdominal segment for LA at 5% difference, and minimum of 3 thoracic versus 4 abdominal subjects needed for %WV evaluation at 25% difference). Our study demonstrates the reproducibility and repeatability of SPACE aortic plaque measurements, and gives insight into the number of subjects needed for the design of therapeutic studies in aortic atherosclerosis. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Doxycycline does not influence established abdominal aortic aneurysms in angiotensin II-infused mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaojie Xie

    Full Text Available There is no proven medical approach to attenuating expansion and rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs. One approach that is currently being investigated is the use of doxycycline. Despite being primarily used as an antimicrobial drug, doxycycline has been proposed to function in reducing AAA expansion. Doxycycline is effective in reducing the formation in the most commonly used mouse models of AAAs when administered prior to the initiation of the disease. The purpose of the current study was to determine the effects of doxycycline on established AAAs when it was administered at a dose that produces therapeutic serum concentrations.LDL receptor -/- male mice fed a saturated-fat supplemented diet were infused with AngII (1,000 ng/kg/min via mini-osmotic pumps for 28 days. Upon verification of AAA formation by noninvasive high frequency ultrasonography, mice were stratified based on aortic lumen diameters, and continuously infused with AngII while also administered either vehicle or doxycycline (100 mg/kg/day in drinking water for 56 days. Administration of doxycycline led to serum drug concentrations of 2.3 ± 0.6 µg/ml. Doxycycline administration had no effect on serum cholesterol concentrations and systolic blood pressures. Doxycycline administration did not prevent progressive aortic dilation as determined by temporal measurements of lumen dimensions using high frequency ultrasound. This lack of effect on AAA regression and progression was confirmed at the termination of the study by ex vivo measurements of maximal width of suprarenal aortas and AAA volumes. Also, doxycycline did not reduce AAA rupture. Medial and adventitial remodeling was not overtly changed by doxycycline as determined by immunostaining and histological staining.Doxycycline administration did not influence AngII-induced AAA progression and aortic rupture when administered to mice with established AAAs.

  10. Doxycycline Does Not Influence Established Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms in Angiotensin II-Infused Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xiaojie; Lu, Hong; Moorleghen, Jessica J.; Howatt, Deborah A.; Rateri, Debra L.; Cassis, Lisa A.; Daugherty, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Background There is no proven medical approach to attenuating expansion and rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs). One approach that is currently being investigated is the use of doxycycline. Despite being primarily used as an antimicrobial drug, doxycycline has been proposed to function in reducing AAA expansion. Doxycycline is effective in reducing the formation in the most commonly used mouse models of AAAs when administered prior to the initiation of the disease. The purpose of the current study was to determine the effects of doxycycline on established AAAs when it was administered at a dose that produces therapeutic serum concentrations. Methods and Results LDL receptor −/− male mice fed a saturated-fat supplemented diet were infused with AngII (1,000 ng/kg/min) via mini-osmotic pumps for 28 days. Upon verification of AAA formation by noninvasive high frequency ultrasonography, mice were stratified based on aortic lumen diameters, and continuously infused with AngII while also administered either vehicle or doxycycline (100 mg/kg/day) in drinking water for 56 days. Administration of doxycycline led to serum drug concentrations of 2.3±0.6 µg/ml. Doxycycline administration had no effect on serum cholesterol concentrations and systolic blood pressures. Doxycycline administration did not prevent progressive aortic dilation as determined by temporal measurements of lumen dimensions using high frequency ultrasound. This lack of effect on AAA regression and progression was confirmed at the termination of the study by ex vivo measurements of maximal width of suprarenal aortas and AAA volumes. Also, doxycycline did not reduce AAA rupture. Medial and adventitial remodeling was not overtly changed by doxycycline as determined by immunostaining and histological staining. Conclusions Doxycycline administration did not influence AngII-induced AAA progression and aortic rupture when administered to mice with established AAAs. PMID:23029514

  11. Local wall thickness in finite element models improves prediction of abdominal aortic aneurysm growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Eric K; Nathan, Derek P; Woo, Edward Y; Fairman, Ronald M; Wang, Grace J; Gorman, Robert C; Gorman, Joseph H; Jackson, Benjamin M

    2015-01-01

    Growing evidence suggests that peak wall stress (PWS) derived from finite element analysis (FEA) of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) predicts clinical outcomes better than diameter alone. Prior models assume uniform wall thickness (UWT). We hypothesize that the inclusion of locally variable wall thickness (VWT) into FEA of AAAs will improve its ability to predict clinical outcomes. Patients with AAAs (n = 26) undergoing radiologic surveillance were identified. Custom MATLAB algorithms generated UWT and VWT aortic geometries from computed tomography angiography images, which were subsequently loaded with systolic blood pressure using FEA. PWS and aneurysm expansion (as a proxy for rupture risk and the need for repair) were examined. The average radiologic follow-up time was 22.0 ± 13.6 months and the average aneurysm expansion rate was 2.8 ± 1.7 mm/y. PWS in VWT models significantly differed from PWS in UWT models (238 ± 68 vs 212 ± 73 kPa; P = .025). In our sample, initial aortic diameter was not found to be correlated with aneurysm expansion (r = 0.26; P = .19). A stronger correlation was found between aneurysm expansion and PWS derived from VWT models compared with PWS from UWT models (r = 0.86 vs r = 0.58; P = .032 by Fisher r to Z transformation). The inclusion of locally VWT significantly improved the correlation between PWS and aneurysm expansion. Aortic wall thickness should be incorporated into future FEA models to accurately predict clinical outcomes. Copyright © 2015 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Radiation exposure in endovascular repair of abdominal and thoracic aortic aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monastiriotis, Spyridon; Comito, Matthew; Labropoulos, Nicos

    2015-09-01

    Endovascular aortic repair has become increasingly popular the last years for the treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms (EVAR) and thoracic aortic aneurysms. EVAR is less invasive compared with the classic open approach, related to a decreased immediate postoperative morbidity and mortality. Those beneficial characteristics of EVAR do not come without a cost, since EVAR requires that the patient will be exposed to a significant amount of radiation during preoperative planning, graft placement, and consecutive follow-up. This systematic review examines the periprocedural radiation exposure to patients and staff as well as ways to ameliorate it. A systematic literature search was conducted using the MEDLINE electronic database. All articles reporting radiation exposure to alive humans during EVAR were eligible for review. Only studies publishing numerical data regarding radiation exposure were included in the Results section. Other relevant articles were used for further discussion. Twenty-four studies, both prospective and retrospective in nature, were included. These studies revealed that the radiation exposure depends on the specific type of procedure, with more complex procedures carrying greater radiation burden. Variations in the positioning and operating of the fluoroscopic unit may significantly alter radiation dose to both patients and staff. There was an apparent lack of education among vascular specialists and trainees in terms of radiation safety awareness. At follow-up, a significant number of patients needed additional procedures, and all required radiographic imaging, further increasing the radiation exposure to alarming levels. Every effort should be made to decrease radiation exposure related to endovascular aortic procedures. Attempts must be directed towards maximizing the operator's awareness, welcoming new imaging technology emitting less radiation, and shifting to follow-up strategies that require minimal or no radiation. Copyright © 2015

  13. High prevalence of unsuspected abdominal aortic aneurysms in patients hospitalised for surgical coronary revascularisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monney, Pierre; Hayoz, Daniel; Tinguely, Francine; Cornuz, Jacques; Haesler, Erik; Mueller, Xavier M; von Segesser, Ludwig K; Tevaearai, Hendrik T

    2004-01-01

    Prevalence of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) is not exactly known among patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) who are considered for surgical revascularisation. We evaluated the value of screening AAA among coronary patients admitted in our cardiovascular surgery unit. Over a 24-month period, an abdominal echography was proposed to male patients aged 60 or more while hospitalised for surgical coronary revascularisation. Patients with previous investigation of the aorta were excluded. The aorta was considered aneurysmal when the anterior-posterior diameter was of 30 mm or more. Three hundred and ninety-five consecutive patients all accepted a proposed abdominal echographic screening for AAA. Forty unsuspected AAA were detected (10.1%). The mean diameter was 38.9 +/- 1.3 mm. Four AAA were larger than 50 mm and considered for surgery after the CABG procedure. Surveillance was proposed to the other 36, especially the 10 patients with an AAA larger than 40 mm. Patients with AAA were significantly older than those without AAA (71.3 +/- 0.8 vs. 69.4 +/- 0.3 years, P<0.05). Smoking history (P<0.05) and hypertension (P<0.05) were also associated more frequently with AAA. More than 16% of the patients being smokers and suffering hypertension presented with unsuspected AAA. In-hospital screening of AAA is very efficient among patients with coronary artery disease. Therefore, patients with CAD may be considered for routine AAA screening.

  14. Long-term results after repair of ruptured and non-ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuzmanović Ilija B.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Abdominal aortic aneurysm can be repaired by elective procedure while asymptomatic, or immediately when it is complicated - mostly due to rupture. Treating abdominal aneurysm electively, before it becomes urgent, has medical and economical reason. Today, the first month mortality after elective operations of the abdominal aorta aneurysm is less than 3%; on the other hand, significant mortality (25%-70% has been recorded in patients operated immediately because of rupture of the abdominal aneurysm. In addition, the costs of elective surgical treatment are significantly lower. OBJECTIVE The objective of this study is to compare long-term survival of patients that underwent elective or immediate repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm (due to rupture, and to find out the factors influencing the long-term survival of these patients. MATERIAL AND METHODS Through retrospective review of prospectively collected data of the Institute for Cardiovascular Diseases of Clinical Center of Serbia, Belgrade, 56 patients that had elective surgery and 35 patients that underwent urgent operation due to rupture of abdominal aneurysm were followed up. Only the patients that survived 30 postoperative days were included in this review, and were followed up (ranging from 2 to 126 months. Electively operated patients were followed during 58.82 months on the average (range 7 to 122, and urgently operated were followed over 52.26 months (range 2 to 126. There was no significant difference of the length of postoperative follow-up between these two groups. RESULTS During this period, out of electively operated and immediately operated patients, 27 and 22 cases died, respectively. There was no significant difference (p>0,05a of long-term survival between these two groups. Obesity and early postoperative complications significantly decreased long-term survival of both electively and immediately operated patients. Graft infection, ventral hernia, aneurysm of

  15. Increased levels of thioredoxin in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs). A potential link of oxidative stress with AAA evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinez-Pinna, R; Lindholt, Jes S.; Blanco-Colio, L M

    2010-01-01

    Oxidative stress is a main mechanism involved in vascular pathologies. Increased thioredoxin (TRX) levels have been observed in several oxidative stress-associated cardiovascular diseases. We aim to test the potential role of TRX as a biomarker of oxidative stress in abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA)....

  16. From tissue iron retention to low systemic haemoglobin levels, new pathophysiological biomarkers of human abdominal aortic aneurysm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinez-Pinna, Roxanna; Lindholt, Jes Sanddal; Madrigal-Matute, Julio

    2014-01-01

    Iron deposits are observed in tissue of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) patients, although the underlying mechanisms are not completely elucidated. Therefore we explored circulating markers of iron metabolism in AAA patients, and tested if they could serve as biomarkers of AAA. Increased red bloo...

  17. Finite Element Implementation of a Structurally-Motivated Constitutive Relation for the Human Abdominal Aortic Wall with and without Aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enevoldsen, Marie Sand; Henneberg, Kaj-Åge; Lönn, L

    2011-01-01

    -ly-motivated anisotropic constitutive relation for the “four fiber family” arterial model. First a 2D implementation is used for benchmarking the FEM implementation to fitted biaxial stress-strain data obtained experimentally from four different groups of persons; 19-29 years, 30-60 years, 61-79 years and abdominal aortic...

  18. Lack of association between inguinal hernia and abdominal aortic aneurysm in a population-based male cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, N A; Sorensen, L T; Jørgensen, Lars Nannestad

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have reported a higher prevalence of inguinal hernia in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). The aim of this study was to explore the association between inguinal hernia and AAA in a large population-based cohort of men who had screening for AAA....

  19. Risk factors in abdominal aortic aneurysm and in Polish population aortoiliac occlusive disease and differences between them

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikołajczyk-Stecyna, Joanna; Korcz, Aleksandra; Gabriel, Marcin; Pawlaczyk, Katarzyna; Oszkinis, Grzegorz; Słomski, Ryszard

    2013-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) and aortoiliac occlusive disease (AIOD) are multifactorial vascular disorders caused by complex genetic and environmental factors. The purpose of this study was to define risk factors of AAA and AIOD in the Polish population and indicate differences between diseases. PMID:24346221

  20. Genetic variants associated with type 2 diabetes and adiposity and risk of intracranial and abdominal aortic aneurysms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hof, F.N. van 't; Vaucher, J.; Holmes, M.V.; Wilde, A. de; Baas, A.F.; Blankensteijn, J.D.; Hofman, A.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Rivadeneira, F.; Uitterlinden, A.G.; Vermeulen, S.H.; Rinkel, G.J.; Bakker, P.I. de; Ruigrok, Y.M.

    2017-01-01

    Epidemiological studies show that type 2 diabetes (T2D) is inversely associated with intracranial aneurysms (IA) and abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA). Although adiposity has not been considered a risk factor for IA, there have been inconsistent reports relating adiposity to AAA risk. We assessed

  1. Proteins associated with the size and expansion rate of the abdominal aortic aneurysm wall as identified by proteomic analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Urbonavicius, Sigitas; Lindholt, Jes S.; Delbosc, Sandrine

    2010-01-01

    Identification of biomarkers for the natural history of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) holds the key to non-surgical intervention and improved selection for AAA repair. We aimed to associate the basic proteomic composition of AAA wall tissue with the expansion rate and size in patients with AAA....

  2. Surgical treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysm in combination with obliterating atherosclerosis of the lower extremities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Gubka

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms in combination with obliterating atherosclerosis of the lower extremities is a very difficult problem in the definition of surgical approach. Its caused by increased frequency of atherosclerosis as the basis of this disease, old age and the presence of comorbidities, especially coronary heart disease (CHD, which determines the capabilities of this treatment and its prognosis. The aim of this research was to analyze the results of diagnostics and treatment of the patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm in combination with obliterating atherosclerosis of the lower extremities. Materials and methods: The research was conducted during the past 20 years in the Department of Vascular Surgery in Zaporizhzhya Regional Clinical Hospital in the age group of 40 to 80 years. 92 patients had aneurysm of the abdominal aorta in combination with obliterating atherosclerosis of the lower extremities. In this study were analyzed the results of treatment of the patients who underwent surgery only in a planned manner. All of them had manifestations of the lower limbs ischemia and severe comorbidities. Herewith, 8 patients had occlusion of the iliac arteries on both sides and 15 patients had occlusion of the iliac arteries on one side. 87 patients had iliac artery stenosis of varying severity. 53 patients from the same group had occlusion of the superficial femoral artery with the deep femoral artery stenosis. Choice of the surgical method was determined by the data of aneurysm’s state in the dynamics received by instrumental methods, the presence of comorbidities, patient’s age, the state of vital functions and the risk of bleeding and restore of the lower limbs circulation. The basic way of surgical interventions for abdominal aortic aneurysm in combination with obliterating atherosclerosis of the lower extremities was a resection of the aneurysm with opening of the aneurysmal bag and prosthetics of the aorta. Aorto-aortic

  3. Regional expression of HOXA4 along the aorta and its potential role in human abdominal aortic aneurysms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elmore James R

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The infrarenal abdominal aorta exhibits increased disease susceptibility relative to other aortic regions. Allograft studies exchanging thoracic and abdominal segments showed that regional susceptibility is maintained regardless of location, suggesting substantial roles for embryological origin, tissue composition and site-specific gene expression. Results We analyzed gene expression with microarrays in baboon aortas, and found that members of the HOX gene family exhibited spatial expression differences. HOXA4 was chosen for further study, since it had decreased expression in the abdominal compared to the thoracic aorta. Western blot analysis from 24 human aortas demonstrated significantly higher HOXA4 protein levels in thoracic compared to abdominal tissues (P HOXA4 transcript levels were significantly decreased in human abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs compared to age-matched non-aneurysmal controls (P P Conclusions Our results demonstrated spatial variation in expression of HOXA4 in human aortas that persisted into adulthood and that downregulation of HOXA4 expression was associated with AAAs, an important aortic disease of the ageing population.

  4. Three-dimensional ultrasound evaluation of small asymptomatic abdominal aortic aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bredahl, K; Sandholt, B; Lönn, L

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Non-invasive and reproducible size measurements that correlate well with computed tomography (CT) are desirable in the management of small abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA). Three dimensional ultrasound (3D-US) technology may reduce inaccuracy because of variations in orientation...... physicians. METHODS: In the period from 1 March 2013 to 27 February 2014, consecutive patients with a small AAA, AAA size measures were obtained: dual plane diameter, diameter perpendicular to the residual sac's centreline...... and a partial volume. RESULT: In all, 122 consecutive US examinations were performed. Patients were excluded because of inadequate AAA size (n = 11) and for technical reasons (n = 11). Thus, 100 patients (F/M; 20/80) with a median maximum AAA diameter of 46 (range 31-55) mm were analysed. The mean US dual plane...

  5. [Review of pre- and post-treatment multidetector computed tomography findings in abdominal aortic aneurysms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casula, E; Lonjedo, E; Cerverón, M J; Ruiz, A; Gómez, J

    2014-01-01

    The increase in the frequency of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) and the widely accepted use of endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) as a first-line treatment or as an alternative to conventional surgery make it necessary for radiologists to have thorough knowledge of the pre- and post-treatment findings. The high image quality provided by multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) enables CT angiography to play a fundamental role in the study of AAA and in planning treatment. The objective of this article is to review the cases of AAA in which CT angiography was the main imaging technique, so that radiologists will be able to detect the signs related to this disease, to diagnose it, to plan treatment, and to detect complications in the postoperative period. Copyright © 2012 SERAM. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  6. Novel Biomarkers of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Disease: Identifying Gaps and Dispelling Misperceptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demetrios Moris

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA is a prevalent and potentially life-threatening disease. Early detection by screening programs and subsequent surveillance has been shown to be effective at reducing the risk of mortality due to aneurysm rupture. The aim of this review is to summarize the developments in the literature concerning the latest biomarkers (from 2008 to date and their potential screening and therapeutic values. Our search included human studies in English and found numerous novel biomarkers under research, which were categorized in 6 groups. Most of these studies are either experimental or hampered by their low numbers of patients. We concluded that currently no specific laboratory markers allow screeing for the disease and monitoring its progression or the results of treatment. Further studies and studies in larger patient groups are required in order to validate biomarkers as cost-effective tools in the AAA disease.

  7. Activity of thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor in the plasma of patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubis, Joanna; Zuk, Natalia; Grendziak, Ryszard; Zapotoczny, Norbert; Pfanhauser, Monika; Witkiewicz, Wojciech

    2014-04-01

    Patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) experience impaired balance between fibrinolysis and coagulation, manifested by increased prothrombotic tendency and intensified inflammatory processes. The aim of this study was to evaluate the TAFI activity level (thrombin activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor) in the plasma of AAA patients. Plasma levels of PAI-1 (plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1), urokinase-type plasminogen activator and uPAR (urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor) were measured as markers of fibrinolytic activity. The study showed that the activity of the thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor in the plasma of AAA patients was significantly lower than in the plasma of the control individuals (64.6 ± 10.1 vs. 54.2 ± 10.9%, P fibrinolysis inhibitor TAFI may heighten the blood fibrinolytic potential in AAA patients and contribute to the development of comorbidities. Therefore, TAFI participation in AAA pathogenesis cannot be excluded.

  8. Health-related quality-of-life in patients after elective surgery for abdominal aortic aneurysm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ehlers, Lars; Laursen, Kathrine Bang; Jensen, Morten Berg

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to describe the health-related quality-of-life (QoL) in patients after elective surgery for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) compared to a normal population and to study the association between QoL and number of years since surgery. Methods: All Danish men who....... Limitations: The main limitation of the study was the cross-sectional design. Males with a higher risk of death were under-represented in the sample. Conclusion: A poorer quality-of-life was found in patients having had elective AAA surgery compared to the normal population....... underwent elective surgery for AAA at the age of 65 or more in the period from 1989–2007 in Denmark were invited to participate in the survey. Of 722 patients, 375 were alive and 328 (87%) responded. The nstruments EQ-5D (European Quality of life), EQ-VAS and SF-12 (Short Form Health Survey) were applied...

  9. The anechoic crescent in abdominal aortic aneurysms: not a sign of dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, P S; Cooperberg, P L; Madigan, S M

    1986-02-01

    In six cases, abdominal aortic aneurysms simulated dissections because an anechoic crescent was seen peripheral to the echogenic intraluminal thrombus. Thrombus can easily be identified by sonography, but the layered echogenic and anechoic appearance has not been described. Three of these cases are presented to illustrate this sonographic pattern of thrombus so that it will not be misinterpreted as a dissection. CT scans were performed on all three patients and an arteriogram and surgery in one, all of which confirmed that these were not dissections but two layers of thrombus with the intima peripheral to the anechoic layer. At surgery, the anechoic layer medial to the intima in one case proved to be serosanguinous fluid and, therefore, likely liquefaction of the clot.

  10. External validation of a 5-year survival prediction model after elective abdominal aortic aneurysm repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMartino, Randall R; Huang, Ying; Mandrekar, Jay; Goodney, Philip P; Oderich, Gustavo S; Kalra, Manju; Bower, Thomas C; Cronenwett, Jack L; Gloviczki, Peter

    2017-08-11

    The benefit of prophylactic repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) is based on the risk of rupture exceeding the risk of death from other comorbidities. The purpose of this study was to validate a 5-year survival prediction model for patients undergoing elective repair of asymptomatic AAA .05 indicating goodness of fit). Across different populations of patients, assessment of age and level of cardiac, pulmonary, and renal disease can accurately predict 5-year survival in patients with AAA <6.5 cm undergoing repair. This risk prediction model is a valid method to assess mortality risk in determining potential overall survival benefit from elective AAA repair. Copyright © 2017 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. An update on the etiology of abdominal aortic aneurysms: implications for future diagnostic testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miner, Grace H; Faries, Peter L; Costa, Kevin D; Hanss, Basil G; Marin, Michael L

    2015-10-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) disease is multifactorial with both environmental and genetic risk factors. The current research in AAA revolves around genetic profiles and expression studies in both human and animal models. Variants in genes involved in extracellular matrix degradation, inflammation, the renin-angiotensin system, cell growth and proliferation and lipid metabolism have been associated with AAA using a variety of study designs. However, the results have been inconsistent and without a standard animal model for validation. Thus, despite the growing body of knowledge, the specific variants responsible for AAA development, progression and rupture have yet to be determined. This review explores some of the more significant genetic studies to provide an overview of past studies that have influenced the current understanding of AAA etiology. Expanding our understanding of disease pathogenesis will inform research into novel diagnostics and therapeutics and ultimately to improve outcomes for patients with AAA.

  12. Associations of Diabetes and Obesity with Risk of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm in Men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The associations of diabetes and obesity with the risk of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA are inconclusive in previous studies. Subjects/Methods. We conducted prospective analysis in the Physicians’ Health Study. Among 25,554 male physicians aged ≥ 50 years who reported no AAA at baseline, 471 reported a newly diagnosed AAA during a mean of 10.4 years’ follow-up. Results. Compared with men who had baseline body mass index (BMI 2 years’ follow-up, resp.. Conclusion. In a large cohort of middle-aged and older men, obesity was associated with a higher risk, while history of diabetes tended to associate with a lower risk of diagnosed AAA, particularly over longer follow-up.

  13. [Thoraco-abdominal aortic replacement in chronic phase in a patient with temporary paraplegia after Stanford B acute dissection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Goro; Hata, Masaki; Tabayashi, Koichi

    2013-07-01

    A 42-year-old man underwent was performed with thoraco-abdominal aneurysm replacement accompaniedy with reconstruction of abdominal branches and intercostal arteries. Eighteen months before, he had suffered from Stanford already been cured with paraplegia on being type B acute aortic dissection combined with paraplegia. When paraplegia had been occurred, cerebrospinal fluid drainage was had been performed promptly, and 4 days later, neurologic deficit was disappeared in 1 day. During the thoraco-abdominal aortic operation, cerebrospinal fluid drainage was performed done again. After the operation, paraplegia did was not occurred and he did not feel somewhat wrong with his legs. He was discharged from hospital on foot by himself. This case showed the efficacy of cerebral spinal fluid drainage for not only both with the prevention but also and treatment of paraplegia.

  14. Cost-Effectiveness Evaluation of EHR: Simulation of an Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm in the Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Assuli, Ofir; Ziv, Amitai; Sagi, Doron; Ironi, Avinoah; Leshno, Moshe

    2016-06-01

    Health care organizations have installed electronic systems to increase efficiency in health care. Empirically assessing the cost-effectiveness of technologies to the health care system is a challenging and complex task. This study examined cost-effectiveness of additional clinical information supplied via an EHR system by simulating a case of abdominal aortic aneurysm devised and acted professionally by the Israel Center of Medical Simulation. We conducted a simulation-based study on physicians who were asked to treat a simulated patient for the prevalent medical scenario of hip and leg pain that actually corresponded to an abdominal aortic aneurysm. Half of the participating physicians from the Department of Emergency Medicine at Tel-Hashomer Hospital - Israel's largest - had access to an EHR system that integrates medical data from multiple health providers (community and hospitals) in addition to the local health record, and half did not. To model medical decision making, the results of the simulation were combined with a Markov Model within a decision tree. Cost-effectiveness was analyzed by comparing the effects of the admission/discharge decision in units of quality adjusted life years (QALYs) to the estimated costs. The results showed that using EHR in the ED increases the QALY of the patient and improves medical decision-making. The expenditure per patient for one QALY unit as a result of using the EHR was $1229, which is very cost-effective according to many accepted threshold values (less than all these values). Thus, using the EHR contributes to making a cost-effective decision in this specific but prevalent case.

  15. Endovascular repair of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastracci, Tara M; Garrido-Olivares, Luis; Cinà, Claudio S; Clase, Catherine M

    2008-01-01

    The perioperative mortality for people with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms (RAAA) has not changed for two decades. Of patients who survive long enough to undergo open repair for ruptured aneurysms, half die (48%; 95% confidence interval [CI] 46 to 50). Randomized trials have shown that endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) for nonruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms decreases perioperative mortality compared with open repair. EVAR may similarly benefit patients with RAAA. We aimed to summarize studies of patients undergoing EVAR for ruptured aneurysms. Two reviewers searched Medline and EMBASE databases from 1994 to July 2006, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, the Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effectiveness, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Best Evidence 1994 to 2006, reference lists, clinical trial registries, and conference proceedings; we also contacted authors. All published and unpublished studies in which a group of people with ruptured aneurysms, assessed objectively by imaging, was treated with EVAR (REVAR) were eligible. We used the generic inverse variance function of the REVMAN software to pool results for death in hospital. Sensitivity analyses, using prespecified subgroups, explored heterogeneity between studies. Pooled mortality in 18 observational studies describing 436 people who underwent REVAR was 21% (95% CI 13 to 29); however, 90% of the heterogeneity between studies was not explained by chance alone. Surgical volume explained substantial heterogeneity. According to study-specific criteria, 47% (95% CI 39 to 55) of people with ruptured aneurysms were potentially eligible for REVAR. Mortality in people who underwent REVAR is lower than that in historical reports of unselected people undergoing open repair. Further investigation is needed to determine whether the difference in mortality is attributable to patient selection alone or to this new approach to treatment.

  16. Provider volume and outcomes for abdominal aortic aneurysm repair, carotid endarterectomy, and lower extremity revascularization procedures.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Killeen, Shane D

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Intuitively, vascular procedures performed by high-volume vascular subspecialists working at high-volume institutions should be associated with improved patient outcome. Although a large number of studies assess the relationship between volume and outcome, a single contemporary compilation of such studies is lacking. METHODS: A review of the English language literature was performed incorporating searches of the Medline, EMBASE, and Cochrane collaboration databases for abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (elective and emergent), carotid endarterectomy, and arterial lower limb procedures for any volume outcome relationship. Studies were included if they involved a patient cohort from 1980 onwards, were community or population based, and assessed health outcomes (mortality and morbidity) as a dependent variable and volume as an independent variable. RESULTS: We identified 74 relevant studies, and 54 were included. All showed either an inverse relationship of variable magnitude between provider volume and mortality, or no volume-outcome effect. The reduction in the risk-adjusted mortality rate (RAMR) for high-volume providers was 3% to 11% for elective abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair, 2.5 to 5% for emergent AAA repair, 0.7% to 4.7% carotid endarterectomy, and 0.3% to 0.9% for lower limb arterial bypass procedures. Subspeciality training also conferred a considerable morbidity and mortality benefit for emergent AAA repair, carotid endarterectomy, and lower limb arterial procedures. CONCLUSION: High-volume providers have significantly better outcomes for vascular procedures both in the elective and emergent setting. Subspeciality training also has a considerable impact. These data provide further evidence for the specialization of vascular services, whereby vascular procedures should generally be preformed by high-volume, speciality trained providers.

  17. Adjusted Hospital Outcomes of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Surgery Reported in the Dutch Surgical Aneurysm Audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lijftogt, N; Vahl, A C; Wilschut, E D; Elsman, B H P; Amodio, S; van Zwet, E W; Leijdekkers, V J; Wouters, M W J M; Hamming, J F

    2017-04-01

    The Dutch Surgical Aneurysm Audit (DSAA) is mandatory for all patients with primary abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) in the Netherlands. The aims are to present the observed outcomes of AAA surgery against the predicted outcomes by means of V-POSSUM (Vascular-Physiological and Operative Severity Score for the enUmeration of Mortality and Morbidity). Adjusted mortality was calculated by the original and re-estimated V(physiology)-POSSUM for hospital comparisons. All patients operated on from January 2013 to December 2014 were included for analysis. Calibration and discrimination of V-POSSUM and V(p)-POSSUM was analysed. Mortality was benchmarked by means of the original V(p)-POSSUM formula and risk-adjusted by the re-estimated V(p)-POSSUM on the DSAA. In total, 5898 patients were included for analysis: 4579 with elective AAA (EAAA) and 1319 with acute abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAAA), acute symptomatic (SAAA; n = 371) or ruptured (RAAA; n = 948). The percentage of endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) varied between hospitals but showed no relation to hospital volume (EAAA: p = .12; AAAA: p = .07). EAAA, SAAA, and RAAA mortality was, respectively, 1.9%, 7.5%, and 28.7%. Elective mortality was 0.9% after EVAR and 5.0% after open surgical repair versus 15.6% and 27.4%, respectively, after AAAA. V-POSSUM overestimated mortality in most EAAA risk groups (p high risk groups, and underestimated in low risk groups (p Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Induction of histone deacetylases (HDACs in human abdominal aortic aneurysm: therapeutic potential of HDAC inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Galán

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Clinical management of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA is currently limited to elective surgical repair because an effective pharmacotherapy is still awaited. Inhibition of histone deacetylase (HDAC activity could be a promising therapeutic option in cardiovascular diseases. We aimed to characterise HDAC expression in human AAA and to evaluate the therapeutic potential of class I and IIa HDAC inhibitors in the AAA model of angiotensin II (Ang II-infused apolipoprotein-E-deficient (ApoE−/− mice. Real-time PCR, western blot and immunohistochemistry evidenced an increased expression of HDACs 1, 2 (both class I, 4 and 7 (both class IIa in abdominal aorta samples from patients undergoing AAA open repair (n=22 compared with those from donors (n=14. Aortic aneurysms from Ang-II-infused ApoE−/− mice exhibited a similar HDAC expression profile. In these animals, treatment with a class I HDAC inhibitor (MS-275 or a class IIa inhibitor (MC-1568 improved survival, reduced the incidence and severity of AAA and limited aneurysmal expansion evaluated by Doppler ultrasonography. These beneficial effects were more potent in MC-1568-treated mice. The disorganisation of elastin and collagen fibres and lymphocyte and macrophage infiltration were effectively reduced by both inhibitors. Additionally, HDAC inhibition attenuated the exacerbated expression of pro-inflammatory markers and the increase in metalloproteinase-2 and -9 activity induced by Ang II in this model. Therefore, our data evidence that HDAC expression is deregulated in human AAA and that class-selective HDAC inhibitors limit aneurysm expansion in an AAA mouse model. New-generation HDAC inhibitors represent a promising therapeutic approach to overcome human aneurysm progression.

  19. Expression and Cellular Localization of 15-Hydroxy-Prostaglandin-Dehydrogenase in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Solà-Villà

    Full Text Available PGE2 has been implicated in abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA associated hypervascularization. PGE2-metabolism involves 15-hydroxyprostaglandin-dehydrogenase (15-PGDH the expression of which in AAA is unknown. The aim of this study was to examine the expression and cell distribution of 15-PGDH in AAA. Here, we show that 15-PGDH mRNA levels were significantly higher in aorta samples from patients undergoing AAA repair than in those from healthy multiorgan donors. Consequently, the ratio of metabolized PGE2 secreted by aortic samples was significantly higher in AAA. AAA production of total PGE2 and PGE2 metabolites correlated positively with PGI2 production, while the percentage of metabolized PGE2 correlated negatively with the total amount of PGE2 and with PGI2. Transcript levels of 15-PGDH were statistically associated with leukocyte markers but did not correlate with microvascular endothelial cell markers. Immunohistochemistry revealed 15-PGDH in the areas of leukocyte infiltration in AAA samples, mainly associated with CD45-positive cells, but not in normal aorta samples. We provide new data concerning 15-PGDH expression in human AAA, showing that 15-PGDH is upregulated in AAA and mainly expressed in infiltrating leukocytes. Our data suggest that microvasculature was not involved in PGE2 catabolism, reinforcing the potential role of microvasculature derived PGE2 in AAA-associated hypervascularization.

  20. A Literature Review of the Numerical Analysis of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms Treated with Endovascular Stent Grafts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Roy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to present the basic principles and relevant advances in the computational modeling of abdominal aortic aneurysms and endovascular aneurysm repair, providing the community with up-to-date state of the art in terms of numerical analysis and biomechanics. Frameworks describing the mechanical behavior of the aortic wall already exist. However, intraluminal thrombus nonhomogeneous structure and porosity still need to be well characterized. Also, although the morphology and mechanical properties of calcifications have been investigated, their effects on wall stresses remain controversial. Computational fluid dynamics usually assumes a rigid artery wall, whereas fluid-structure interaction accounts for artery compliance but is still challenging since arteries and blood have similar densities. We discuss alternatives to fluid-structure interaction based on dynamic medical images that address patient-specific hemodynamics and geometries. We describe initial stresses, elastic boundary conditions, and statistical strength for rupture risk assessment. Special emphasis is accorded to workflow development, from the conversion of medical images into finite element models, to the simulation of catheter-aorta interactions and stent-graft deployment. Our purpose is also to elaborate the key ingredients leading to virtual stenting and endovascular repair planning that could improve the procedure and stent-grafts.

  1. Abdominal aortic endograft infection: report of two cases and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veraldi, Gian Franco; Genco, Bruno; Minicozzi, Annamaria; Zecchinelli, Marco Paolo; Segattini, Christian; Momo, Rostand Emmanuel; Pacca, Rosario

    2009-01-01

    Endovascular prosthesis infection after exclusion of an abdominal aortic aneurysm is a rare, dramatic event and its diagnosis and treatment are extremely complex. This particular complication has been less well explored in the literature than others such as endoleaks, migration or stent rupture. The incidence of aorto-iliac stent-graft infection is almost 0.7%, while the infection rate in open surgery varies from 0.6% to 3%. Moreover, the infection can be early when it arises within 4 months of the implant or late when it arises after 4 months. Since 1991 only 94 cases of endograft infections have been reported in the world literature, to which our two cases need to be added, making a total of 96 cases. The first of our patients was diagnosed with an early infection that was successfully treated by explanting the infected graft followed by aortic reconstruction with a homograft. Six months after the operation the patient died of cardiac failure. The second case was a late infection which developed 8 years after the first intervention in a patient with chronic renal failure treated with dialytic therapy. After aneurysmectomy and stent-graft removal, a bifurcated dacron silver graft was implanted. The patient died of cardiogenic shock 40 days after surgery. The surgical treatment of this serious complication is associated with high perioperative morbidity and mortality rates and requires very careful planning of the operation.

  2. Parametric study of effects of collagen turnover on the natural history of abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, J S; Baek, S; Humphrey, J D

    2013-02-08

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) are characterized by significant changes in the architecture of the aortic wall, notably, loss of functional elastin and smooth muscle. Because collagen is the principal remaining load-bearing constituent of the aneurysmal wall, its turnover must play a fundamental role in the natural history of the lesion. Nevertheless, detailed investigations of the effects of different aspects of collagen turnover on AAA development are lacking. A finite-element membrane model of the growth and remodelling of idealized AAAs was thus used to investigate parametrically four of the primary aspects of collagen turnover: rates of production, half-life, deposition stretch (prestretch) and material stiffness. The predicted rates of aneurysmal expansion and spatio-temporal changes in wall thickness, biaxial stresses and maximum collagen fibre stretch at the apex of the lesion depended strongly on all four factors, as did the predicted clinical endpoints (i.e. arrest, progressive expansion or rupture). Collagen turnover also affected the axial expansion, largely due to mechanical changes within the shoulder region of the lesion. We submit, therefore, that assessment of rupture risk could be improved by future experiments that delineate and quantify different aspects of patient-specific collagen turnover and that such understanding could lead to new targeted therapeutics.

  3. Fluid Characteristics in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms (AAAs) and Its Correlation to Thrombus Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Rubing; Bar-Yoseph, Pinhas Z.; Lasheras, Juan

    2008-11-01

    It has been observed that most large Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms (AAAs) develop an intraluminal thrombus as they progressively enlarge. Previous studies have suggested that the build up of the thrombus may be associated with the altered hemodynamic patterns that arise inside the AAA. We have performed a parametrical computational study of the flow patterns inside enlarging AAA to investigate the possible mechanism controlling the thrombus formation. Pulsatile blood flows were simulated in idealized models of fusiform aneurysms with different dilatation ratios and the effects of shear-activated platelet accumulation and platelet/wall interaction were evaluated based on the calculated flow fields. The platelet activation level (PAL) was determined by computing the integral over time of flow shear stresses exerted over the platelets as they are transported throughout the aneurysm. Our results have shown that the values of PAL in AAAs are in fact smaller than the maximum value obtained in a healthy abdominal aorta. However, we show that the transportation of blood cells towards the wall and the formation of stagnation points on the aneurysm's wall play more significant roles in thrombus formation than PAL.

  4. Update on Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Research: From Clinical to Genetic Studies

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    Helena Kuivaniemi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA is a dilatation of the abdominal aorta with a diameter of at least 3.0 cm. AAAs are often asymptomatic and are discovered as incidental findings in imaging studies or when the AAA ruptures leading to a medical emergency. AAAs are more common in males than females, in individuals of European ancestry, and in those over 65 years of age. Smoking is the most important environmental risk factor. In addition, a positive family history of AAA increases the person’s risk for AAA. Interestingly, diabetes has been shown to be a protective factor for AAA in many large studies. Hallmarks of AAA pathogenesis include inflammation, vascular smooth muscle cell apoptosis, extracellular matrix degradation, and oxidative stress. Autoimmunity may also play a role in AAA development and progression. In this Outlook paper, we summarize our recent studies on AAA including clinical studies related to surgical repair of AAA and genetic risk factor and large-scale gene expression studies. We conclude with a discussion on our research projects using large data sets available through electronic medical records and biobanks.

  5. CFD Modelling of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm on Hemodynamic Loads Using a Realistic Geometry with CT

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    Eduardo Soudah

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to find a correlation between the abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA geometric parameters, wall stress shear (WSS, abdominal flow patterns, intraluminal thrombus (ILT, and AAA arterial wall rupture using computational fluid dynamics (CFD. Real AAA 3D models were created by three-dimensional (3D reconstruction of in vivo acquired computed tomography (CT images from 5 patients. Based on 3D AAA models, high quality volume meshes were created using an optimal tetrahedral aspect ratio for the whole domain. In order to quantify the WSS and the recirculation inside the AAA, a 3D CFD using finite elements analysis was used. The CFD computation was performed assuming that the arterial wall is rigid and the blood is considered a homogeneous Newtonian fluid with a density of 1050 kg/m3 and a kinematic viscosity of 4×10-3 Pa·s. Parallelization procedures were used in order to increase the performance of the CFD calculations. A relation between AAA geometric parameters (asymmetry index (β, saccular index (γ, deformation diameter ratio (χ, and tortuosity index (ε and hemodynamic loads was observed, and it could be used as a potential predictor of AAA arterial wall rupture and potential ILT formation.

  6. Reliability of radiologic evaluation of abdominal aortic calcification using the 24-point scale.

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    Pariente-Rodrigo, E; Sgaramella, G Alessia; García-Velasco, P; Hernández-Hernández, J L; Landeras-Alvaro, R; Olmos-Martínez, J Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Calcification of the abdominal aorta is associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity, so a reliable method to quantify it is clinically transcendent. The 24-point scale (AAC-24) is the standard method for assessing abdominal aortic calcification on lateral plain films of the lumbar spine. The aim of this study was to determine the intraobserver and interobserver agreements for the AAC-24, taking into account the heterogeneity of the distribution of the calcifications in the design of the statistical analysis. We analyzed the intraobserver agreement (in plain films from 81 patients, with a four-year separation between observations) and the interobserver agreement (in plain films from 100 patients, with three observers), using both intraclass correlation and Bland-Altman plots. The intraobserver intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.93 (95% confidence interval [CI95%]: 0.6-0.9), and the interobserver intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.91 (CI95%: 0.8-0.9) with an increase in the coefficient in the tercile with the greatest discrepancy. The difference in means ranged from 0.3 to 1.2 points, and the distance between the limits of agreement ranged from 4.7 to 9.4 points. These differences increased significantly as the calcification progressed. Using the AAC-24 on lateral plain films of the lumbar spine is a reliable and reproducible method of assessing calcification of the abdominal aorta; both intraobserver and interobserver agreement are higher during the initial phases of calcification. Copyright © 2014 SERAM. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Tissue Responses to Stent Grafts with Endo-Exo-Skeleton for Saccular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms in a Canine Model

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    Kim, Il Young; Chung, Jin Wook; Kim, Hyo Cheol [Dept. of Radiology and Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Clinical Research Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Young Ho; So Young Ho [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University Boramae Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyun Beom [Dept. of Radiology, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Min, Seung Kee [Dept. of Surgery, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jae Hyung [Dept. of Radiology, Gachon University Gil Medical Center, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    We evaluated the effect of close contact between the stent and the graft on the induction of endothelial covering on the stent graft placed over an aneurysm. Saccular abdominal aortic aneurysms were made with Dacron patch in eight dogs. The stent graft consisted of an inner stent, a expanded polytetrafluoroethylene graft, and an outer stent. After sacrificing the animals, the aortas with an embedded stent graft were excised. The aortas were inspected grossly and evaluated microscopically. The animals were sacrificed at two (n = 3), six (n = 3), and eight months (n = 2) after endovascular repair. In two dogs, the aortic lumen was occluded at two months after the placement. On gross inspection of specimens from the other six dogs with a patent aortic lumen, stent grafts placed over the normal aortic wall were covered by glossy white neointima, whereas, stent grafts placed over the aneurysmal aortic wall were covered by brownish neointima. On microscopic inspection, stent grafts placed over the normal aortic wall were covered by thin neointima (0.27 ± 0.05 mm, mean ± standard deviation) with an endothelial layer, and stent grafts placed over the aneurysmal aortic wall were covered by thick neointima (0.62 ± 0.17 mm) without any endothelial lining. Transgraft cell migration at the normal aortic wall was more active than that at the aneurysmal aortic wall. Close contact between the stent and the graft, which was achieved with stent grafts with endo-exo-skeleton, could not enhance endothelial covering on the stent graft placed over the aneurysms.

  8. Tissue responses to stent grafts with endo-exo-skeleton for saccular abdominal aortic aneurysms in a canine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Il; Choi, Young Ho; Chung, Jin Wook; Kim, Hyo-Cheol; So, Young Ho; Kim, Hyun Beom; Min, Seung-Kee; Park, Jae Hyung

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the effect of close contact between the stent and the graft on the induction of endothelial covering on the stent graft placed over an aneurysm. Saccular abdominal aortic aneurysms were made with Dacron patch in eight dogs. The stent graft consisted of an inner stent, a expanded polytetrafluoroethylene graft, and an outer stent. After sacrificing the animals, the aortas with an embedded stent graft were excised. The aortas were inspected grossly and evaluated microscopically. The animals were sacrificed at two (n = 3), six (n = 3), and eight months (n = 2) after endovascular repair. In two dogs, the aortic lumen was occluded at two months after the placement. On gross inspection of specimens from the other six dogs with a patent aortic lumen, stent grafts placed over the normal aortic wall were covered by glossy white neointima, whereas, stent grafts placed over the aneurysmal aortic wall were covered by brownish neointima. On microscopic inspection, stent grafts placed over the normal aortic wall were covered by thin neointima (0.27 ± 0.05 mm, mean ± standard deviation) with an endothelial layer, and stent grafts placed over the aneurysmal aortic wall were covered by thick neointima (0.62 ± 0.17 mm) without any endothelial lining. Transgraft cell migration at the normal aortic wall was more active than that at the aneurysmal aortic wall. Close contact between the stent and the graft, which was achieved with stent grafts with endo-exo-skeleton, could not enhance endothelial covering on the stent graft placed over the aneurysms.

  9. Screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms during a basic medical checkup in residents of a Japanese rural community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, K; Iwasawa, T; Ono, T

    2000-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) and the size distribution of the abdominal aortic diameter in the Japanese population, 1,591 residents of a farming community were screened by ultrasonography during the annual basic medical checkup arranged by the town. The mean diameter of the abdominal aorta was 17.2 +/- 2.2mm and four AAAs were found (0.3%), all in men aged 60 years or older, three of whom were hypertensive. The mean diameter of the common iliac artery was 10.2 +/- 5.1mm and five iliac arterial aneurysms were found (0.3%). One man had both aortic and iliac arterial aneurysms. The iliac arterial aneurysms were also found in men, four of whom were aged 60 years or older and had a smoking habit. We were able to keep the cost of screening low by combining the program with an annual basic medical checkup. These findings indicate that it is important to examine the iliac artery as well as the abdominal aorta because the incidence of aneurysm is similar in both. Screening for AAAs using ultrasonography is accurate enough to detect them before rupture, and can be effectively performed in men aged 60 years or older during their annual basic medical checkup.

  10. Endovascular management of lap belt-related abdominal aortic injury in a 9-year-old child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papazoglou, Konstantinos O; Karkos, Christos D; Kalogirou, Thomas E; Giagtzidis, Ioakeim T

    2015-02-01

    Blunt abdominal aortic trauma is a rare occurrence in children with only a few patients having been reported in the literature. Most such cases have been described in the context of lap belt injuries. We report a 9-year-old boy who suffered lap belt trauma to the abdomen during a high-speed road traffic accident resulting to the well-recognized pattern of blunt abdominal injury, that is, the triad of intestinal perforation, fractures of the lumbar spine, and abdominal aortic injury. The latter presented with lower limb ischemia due to dissection of the infrarenal aorta and right common iliac artery. Revascularization was achieved by endovascular means using 2 self-expanding stents in the infrarenal aorta and the right common iliac artery. This case is one of the few reports of lap belt-related acute traumatic abdominal aortic dissection in a young child and highlights the feasibility of endovascular management in the pediatric population. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Intraoperative blood salvage reduces the requirements for allogenic blood transfusion and transfusion related inflammatory response in abdominal aortic aneurysm surgery: Blood transfusion and abdominal aortic aneurysm surgery

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    Vuković Anita

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Intraoperative blood salvage (IBS is a procedure involving recovering blood looses during surgery and reinfusing it into the patient with a purpose to reduce the perioperative morbidity and mortality associated with complications after administration of allogenic transfusion (AT. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the IBS reduces the need for allogenic transfusion requirements and for non-invasive ventilation (NIV and/or oxygen supplementation and whether it was associated with decreased levels of inflammatory markers following abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA surgery. Methods. Throughout the period from February to October 2010, 51 patients underwent both elective and emergency AAA surgery. During the study period, IBS using 'Haemonetics cell saver 5+' was applied in 24 (46.2% patients (CS group, while it wasn't used in 27 (51.9% cases (NCS group. Values of certain inflammatory biomarkers included: white blood cell count (WBCC, C-reactive protein (CRP, procalcitonin (PCT and fibrinogen were monitored during the first 48 hours postoperatively. Secondary outcome measures icluded: the need for allogenic transfusion and for non-invasive ventilation (NIV and/or oxygen supplementation. Results. The requirements for intra and postoperative alogenic red blood cells transfusions was significantly higher in patients from NCS group compared to patients in CS group (3.63 vs. 0.58 units per patient; p< 0.001. Non-invasive respiratory support was more frequently used in patient from NCS group (4/27 compared to those in CS (1/24 group but difference was not statistically significant (p=0.17. The postoperatively average WBCC was significantly higher among patients in NCS group compared to those from CS group (12.89 x 109 vs. 10.44 x109; p=0.014. Also CRP plasma levels postoperatively were significantly higher in NCS group compared to CS group (67.18 mg.L-1 vs. 47.54 mg.L-1; p=0.015. Conclusion(s. The usage of intraoperative blood

  12. A multimodality vascular imaging phantom of an abdominal aortic aneurysm with a visible thrombus

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    Allard, Louise; Chayer, Boris; Qin Zhao [Laboratory of Biorheology and Medical Ultrasonics, Research Center, University of Montreal Hospital (CRCHUM), Quebec H2L 2W5 (Canada); Soulez, Gilles [Department of Radiology, University of Montreal Hospital (CHUM), Quebec H2L 2M1 (Canada); Department of Radiology, Radio-Oncology and Nuclear Medicine, University of Montreal, Quebec H3T 1J4 (Canada); Institute of Biomedical Engineering, University of Montreal, Quebec H3T 1J4 (Canada); Roy, David [Institute of Biomedical Engineering, University of Montreal, Quebec H3T 1J4 (Canada); Cloutier, Guy [Laboratory of Biorheology and Medical Ultrasonics, Research Center, University of Montreal Hospital (CRCHUM), Quebec H2L 2W5 (Canada); Department of Radiology, Radio-Oncology and Nuclear Medicine, University of Montreal, Quebec H3T 1J4 (Canada); Institute of Biomedical Engineering, University of Montreal, Quebec H3T 1J4 (Canada)

    2013-06-15

    Purpose: With the continuous development of new stent grafts and implantation techniques, it has now become technically feasible to treat abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) with challenging anatomy using endovascular repair with standard, fenestrated, or branched stent-grafts. In vitro experimentations are very useful to improve stent-graft design and conformability or imaging guidance for stent-graft delivery or follow-up. Vascular replicas also help to better understand the limitation of endovascular approaches in challenging anatomy and possibly improve surgical planning or training by practicing high risk clinical procedures in the laboratory to improve outcomes in the operating room. Most AAA phantoms available have a very basic anatomy, which is not representative of the clinical reality. This paper presents a method of fabrication of a realistic AAA phantom with a visible thrombus, as well as some mechanical properties characterizing such phantom. Methods: A realistic AAA geometry replica of a real patient anatomy taken from a multidetector computed tomography (CT) scan was manufactured. To demonstrate the multimodality imaging capability of this new phantom with a thrombus visible in magnetic resonance (MR) angiography, CT angiography (CTA), digital subtraction angiography (DSA), and ultrasound, image acquisitions with all these modalities were performed by using standard clinical protocols. Potential use of this phantom for stent deployment was also tested. A rheometer allowed defining hyperelastic and viscoelastic properties of phantom materials. Results: MR imaging measurements of SNR and CNR values on T1 and T2-weighted sequences and MR angiography indicated reasonable agreement with published values of AAA thrombus and abdominal components in vivo. X-ray absorption also lay within normal ranges of AAA patients and was representative of findings observed on CTA, fluoroscopy, and DSA. Ultrasound propagation speeds for developed materials were also in

  13. EPA Prevents the Development of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms through Gpr-120/Ffar-4.

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    Ryo Kamata

    Full Text Available Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs, which commonly occur among elderly individuals, are accompanied by a risk of rupture with a high mortality rate. Although eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA has been reported to prevent AAA formation, the mechanism by which EPA works on vascular smooth muscle cells is unknown. This study aimed to investigate the mechanism by which orally-administered EPA prevents the formation of severe AAAs that develop in Osteoprotegerin (Opg knockout (KO mice. In the CaCl2-induced AAA model, EPA attenuated the enhanced progression of AAAs in Opg-KO mice, including the increase in aortic diameter with destruction of elastic fibers in the media. Immunohistochemical analyses showed that EPA reduced the phosphorylation of transforming growth factor beta-activated kinase-1/Map3k7 (Tak-1 and c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK, as well as the expression of Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (Mmp-9 in the media of the aorta. In smooth muscle cell cultures, rh-TRAIL-induced activation of the Tak-1-JNK pathway and increase in Mmp-9 expression were inhibited by EPA. Moreover, GW9508, a specific ligand for G-protein coupled receptor (Gpr-120/Free fatty acid receptor (Ffar-4, mimicked the effects of EPA. The effects of EPA were abrogated by knockdown of the Gpr-120/Ffar-4 receptor gene. Our data demonstrate that the Trail-Tak-1-JNK-Mmp-9 pathway is responsible for the enhancement of AAAs in Opg-KO mice, and that EPA inhibits the Tak-1-JNK pathway by activating Gpr-120/Ffar-4, which results in the attenuation of AAA development.

  14. Endothelial and smooth muscle cells from abdominal aortic aneurysm have increased oxidative stress and telomere attrition.

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    Giuseppe Cafueri

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA is a complex multi-factorial disease with life-threatening complications. AAA is typically asymptomatic and its rupture is associated with high mortality rate. Both environmental and genetic risk factors are involved in AAA pathogenesis. Aim of this study was to investigate telomere length (TL and oxidative DNA damage in paired blood lymphocytes, aortic endothelial cells (EC, vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC, and epidermal cells from patients with AAA in comparison with matched controls. METHODS: TL was assessed using a modification of quantitative (Q-FISH in combination with immunofluorescence for CD31 or α-smooth muscle actin to detect EC and VSMC, respectively. Oxidative DNA damage was investigated by immunofluorescence staining for 7, 8-dihydro-8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxo-dG. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: Telomeres were found to be significantly shortened in EC, VSMC, keratinocytes and blood lymphocytes from AAA patients compared to matched controls. 8-oxo-dG immunoreactivity, indicative of oxidative DNA damage, was detected at higher levels in all of the above cell types from AAA patients compared to matched controls. Increased DNA double strand breaks were detected in AAA patients vs controls by nuclear staining for γ-H2AX histone. There was statistically significant inverse correlation between TL and accumulation of oxidative DNA damage in blood lymphocytes from AAA patients. This study shows for the first time that EC and VSMC from AAA have shortened telomeres and oxidative DNA damage. Similar findings were obtained with circulating lymphocytes and keratinocytes, indicating the systemic nature of the disease. Potential translational implications of these findings are discussed.

  15. Interference of doxycycline pretreatment in a model of abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata, Karina M; Tefé-Silva, Cristiane; Floriano, Elaine M; Fernandes, Cleverson R; Rizzi, Elen; Gerlach, Raquel F; Mazzuca, Marc Q; Ramos, Simone G

    2015-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is characterized by chronic inflammation and degradation of the extracellular matrix, mediated by matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Doxycycline has been reported to control the progression of AAA by regulation of MMP. We hypothesized that doxycycline pretreatment in a rat model of AAA would cause reduction in gelatinolytic activity of MMP-2 and -9 and the inflammatory response in the wall of an aneurysm, consequently decreasing the formation and development of AAAs. Male Wistar rats were divided into the following four groups: aneurysm (A); control (C); aneurysm+doxycycline (A+D) and control+doxycycline (C+D), with 24 animals per group subdivided into n=6 animals at different time points [1, 3, 7, and 15 days postsurgery (dps)]. The (A) and (A+D) groups simultaneously received the injury and extrinsic stenosis of the aortic wall. The (C) and (C+D) groups received sham operation. The treated animals received doxycycline via gavage (30 mg/kg/day) from 48 h before surgery until the end of experiment. At 1, 3, 7, and 15 dps, the animals were euthanized, and the aortas were collected for morphological analyses, immunohistochemistry, and zymography. The animals from the (A) group developed AAAs. However, the animals treated with doxycycline showed a 85% decrease in AAA development, which was associated with a large reduction in gelatinolytic activity of MMP-2 and -9, and decreased inflammatory response (Pdoxycycline before surgery inhibited the activity of MMP-2 and -9, as well as the inflammatory response, and may play an important role in the prevention of the development of AAAs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1 regulates macrophage cytotoxicity in abdominal aortic aneurysm.

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    Qiwei Wang

    Full Text Available AIMS: In abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA, macrophages are detected in the proximity of aortic smooth muscle cells (SMCs. We have previously demonstrated in a murine model of AAA that apoptotic SMCs attract monocytes and other leukocytes by producing MCP-1. Here we tested whether infiltrating macrophages also directly contribute to SMC apoptosis. METHODS AND RESULTS: Using a SMC/RAW264.7 macrophage co-culture system, we demonstrated that MCP-1-primed RAWs caused a significantly higher level of apoptosis in SMCs as compared to control macrophages. Next, we detected an enhanced Fas ligand (FasL mRNA level and membrane FasL protein expression in MCP-1-primed RAWs. Neutralizing FasL blocked SMC apoptosis in the co-culture. In situ proximity ligation assay showed that SMCs exposed to primed macrophages contained higher levels of receptor interacting protein-1 (RIP1/Caspase 8 containing cell death complexes. Silencing RIP1 conferred apoptosis resistance to SMCs. In the mouse elastase injury model of aneurysm, aneurysm induction increased the level of RIP1/Caspase 8 containing complexes in medial SMCs. Moreover, TUNEL-positive SMCs in aneurysmal tissues were frequently surrounded by CD68(+/FasL(+ macrophages. Conversely, elastase-treated arteries from MCP-1 knockout mice display a reduction of both macrophage infiltration and FasL expression, which was accompanied by diminished apoptosis of SMCs. CONCLUSION: Our data suggest that MCP-1-primed macrophages are more cytotoxic. MCP-1 appears to modulate macrophage cytotoxicity by increasing the level of membrane bound FasL. Thus, we showed that MCP-1-primed macrophages kill SMCs through a FasL/Fas-Caspase8-RIP1 mediated mechanism.

  17. Fluid structure interaction of patient specific abdominal aortic aneurysms: a comparison with solid stress models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, James H; Wright, Andrew R; Cheshire, Nick; Crane, Jeremy; Thom, Simon A; Hughes, Alun D; Xu, Yun

    2006-05-19

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a dilatation of the aortic wall, which can rupture, if left untreated. Previous work has shown that, maximum diameter is not a reliable determinant of AAA rupture. However, it is currently the most widely accepted indicator. Wall stress may be a better indicator and promising patient specific results from structural models using static pressure, have been published. Since flow and pressure inside AAA are non-uniform, the dynamic interaction between the pulsatile flow and wall may influence the predicted wall stress. The purpose of the present study was to compare static and dynamic wall stress analysis of patient specific AAAs. Patient-specific AAA models were created from CT scans of three patients. Two simulations were performed on each lumen model, fluid structure interaction (FSI) model and static structural (SS) model. The AAA wall was created by dilating the lumen with a uniform 1.5 mm thickness, and was modeled as a non-linear hyperelastic material. Commercial finite element code Adina 8.2 was used for all simulations. The results were compared between the FSI and SS simulations. Results are presented for the wall stress patterns, wall shear stress patterns, pressure, and velocity fields within the lumen. It is demonstrated that including fluid flow can change local wall stresses slightly. However, as far as the peak wall stress is concerned, this effect is negligible as the difference between SS and FSI models is less than 1%. The results suggest that fully coupled FSI simulation, which requires considerable computational power to run, adds little to rupture risk prediction. This justifies the use of SS models in previous studies.

  18. Fluid structure interaction of patient specific abdominal aortic aneurysms: a comparison with solid stress models

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    Thom Simon A

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA is a dilatation of the aortic wall, which can rupture, if left untreated. Previous work has shown that, maximum diameter is not a reliable determinant of AAA rupture. However, it is currently the most widely accepted indicator. Wall stress may be a better indicator and promising patient specific results from structural models using static pressure, have been published. Since flow and pressure inside AAA are non-uniform, the dynamic interaction between the pulsatile flow and wall may influence the predicted wall stress. The purpose of the present study was to compare static and dynamic wall stress analysis of patient specific AAAs. Method Patient-specific AAA models were created from CT scans of three patients. Two simulations were performed on each lumen model, fluid structure interaction (FSI model and static structural (SS model. The AAA wall was created by dilating the lumen with a uniform 1.5 mm thickness, and was modeled as a non-linear hyperelastic material. Commercial finite element code Adina 8.2 was used for all simulations. The results were compared between the FSI and SS simulations. Results Results are presented for the wall stress patterns, wall shear stress patterns, pressure, and velocity fields within the lumen. It is demonstrated that including fluid flow can change local wall stresses slightly. However, as far as the peak wall stress is concerned, this effect is negligible as the difference between SS and FSI models is less than 1%. Conclusion The results suggest that fully coupled FSI simulation, which requires considerable computational power to run, adds little to rupture risk prediction. This justifies the use of SS models in previous studies.

  19. Clinical trial of doxycycline for matrix metalloproteinase-9 inhibition in patients with an abdominal aneurysm doxycycline selectively depletes aortic wall neutrophils and cytotoxic t cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lindeman, J.H.N.; Abdul-Hussien, H.; Bockel, J.H. van; Wolterbeek, R.; Kleemann, R.

    2009-01-01

    Background-Doxycycline has been shown to effectively inhibit aneurysm formation in animal models of abdominal aortic aneurysm. Although this effect is ascribed to matrix metalloproteinase-9 inhibition, such an effect is unclear in human studies. We reevaluated the effect of doxycycline on aortic

  20. Percutaneous implantation of thoracic and abdominal aortic prostheses in patients at high surgical risk

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    Juan C Ortiz

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: el aneurisma aórtico es frecuente; su ruptura depende del diámetro. La cirugía es el manejo de elección; como alternativa está el implante intraluminal de stents. Objetivo: analizar el impacto del implante percutáneo de los stents aórticos en pacientes de alto riesgo quirúrgico con seguimiento mínimo de un año. Método: estudio descriptivo llevado a cabo desde diciembre de 2005 hasta marzo de 2010, en el que se incluyeron 125 pacientes con aneurisma de aorta torácica o abdominal, criterio quirúrgico por su diámetro y que además fueron rechazados por cirugía dado su alto riesgo. Los desenlaces fueron: muerte intraoperatoria, por cualquier causa y relacionada con el aneurisma a uno, seis y doce meses. Las complicaciones se definieron como las vasculares ocurridas durante los primeros treinta días. Resultados: el aneurisma abdominal fue más frecuente (70,4%. La mortalidad total a un seguimiento de 25,7 meses fue 14,8%; de este porcentaje 5,2% fallecieron por causas relacionadas con el aneurisma. Un paciente falleció durante la intervención. Se reintervinieron 4,3% por fugas. Hubo mayor mortalidad relacionada con el aneurisma en los torácicos (14,7 vs. 1,2% p=0,003 y tendencia en los de mayor diámetro (6,9 vs. 5,7 cm p=0,210. No hubo relación entre mortalidad y diabetes mellitus, tabaquismo, enfermedad coronaria, hipertensión arterial o dislipidemia. Conclusiones: la mortalidad relacionada con el aneurisma en pacientes intervenidos con stent graft aórtico es baja. Ésta se asoció a la torácica y al mayor diámetro aneurismático. Las complicaciones no significaron un aumento en mortalidad. En conclusión, en pacientes con aneurisma aórtico y alto riesgo quirúrgico rechazados para cirugía abierta, el abordaje percutáneo es un tratamiento seguro y eficaz a un seguimiento a mediano plazo.Introduction: aortic aneurysm is common; its rupture depends on the diameter. Surgery is the treatment of choice, and

  1. Prevalence and predictors of abdominal aortic calcification in healthy living kidney donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leckstroem, D C T; Bhuvanakrishna, T; McGrath, A; Goldsmith, D J A

    2014-01-01

    Vascular calcification (VC) is common and is both a marker and a cause of increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, especially so in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. Renal transplantation is the cornerstone of the successful long-term management of CKD, and in order to satisfy transplantation needs, more use is made now of living kidney donors (LKD). Prior to selection for transplantation, much screening of potential LKD takes place, including for cardiovascular issues. It is not known; however, how much these potentially healthy LKD may be prone to clinically silent VC. We identified 103 living kidney donors from 2011 renal transplant records. Abdominal aortic calcification (AAC) was assessed using existing abdominal CT imaging using multi-channel CT aortograms (used primarily to assess renal vascular anatomy). Using these CT scans, manual calcium scoring was undertaken to calculate total aortic calcium load (AAC severity score). The prevalence, severity and associations of AAC between calcified and non-calcified donors were then compared. A total of 103 donors were identified from records. Ninety three of these had detailed clinical records to complement their CT scans. Fifty of ninety-three donors were male, and the mean age was 45.9 ± 1.8 years. Mean MDRD eGFR was 88.73 ± 2.97 ml/min/1.73 m(2). 7.14 ± 3.07 % of the aorta in these donors was calcified with a mean AAC severity score of 0.98 ± 0.56. In kidney donors >50 years of age, there was significantly more AAC than in those donor GFR, systolic blood pressure, pulse pressure, calcium-phosphate product or smoking. AAC prevalence, patterns and severity in this important donor population have not previously been described in the literature. There was relatively little VC in what would be regarded as a "healthy" donor population. VC was more common with age, but the other possible risk factors for the presence or severity of VC did not impact on overall AAC scores. VC did not influence vascular

  2. Outcomes after Open Surgery for Inflammatory Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm: A 10-Year Single-Center Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floros, Nikolaos; Papadakis, Marios; Wagenhäuser, Markus Udo; Duran, Mansur; Simon, Florian; Schelzig, Hubert; Oberhuber, Alexander

    2017-08-01

    Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysms (IAAAs) are rare clinical entities with an exaggerated inflammatory component. The aim of this study is to report outcomes of a single-center 10-year experience in open surgical management of IAAA and to compare the results with noninflammatory, atherosclerotic abdominal aortic aneurysms (non-IAAAs). We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 18 patients with IAAA selected out of patients with AAA who underwent open surgery in the Department of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery at the University Hospital Dusseldorf from January 2006 to December 2015. These patients were matched with controls, selected from a prospectively retained database of patients with AAA undergoing open surgery during the study period. A 1:2 case-control match regarding age, gender, and year of treatment was performed. We analyzed both groups for preoperative parameters, intraoperative findings, and early postoperative outcomes. The 2 groups showed considerable similarities with no significant differences in the clinical features. Both groups outlined comparable aneurysm size (62 vs. 56 mm); however, the mean preoperative C-reactive protein was found to be significantly elevated in the study group (mean value: 2.6 vs. 0.9 mg/dL, P < 0.05). Most patients were operated using a standard transperitoneal median laparotomy approach; only 1 patient of each group was operated using a left retroperitoneal approach. There was no significant difference in operation time (190 vs. 194 min) and 30-day mortality 0%. The in-hospital mortality was 11% in the study group and 0% in the control group. We found a significant higher complication rate in the study group 10 (56%) vs. 12 (33%). The major complications were also more frequent in the study group 4 (22%) vs. 6 (16.7%). IAAA showed a statistically significant longer length of intensive care unit and hospital stay when compared with non-IAAA (7 and 20 days vs. 2 and 14 days, P < 0.05). IAAAs

  3. Coarctation-induced degenerative abdominal aortic aneurysm in a porcine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Pao-Yen; Wu, Yeng-Ting; Lin, Guan-Cheng; Shih, Yao Hsiang; Sampilvanjil, Ariunaa; Chen, Lih-Ren; Yang, Yu-Jen; Wu, Hua-Lin; Jiang, Meei Jyh

    2013-03-01

    Hemodynamic stress participates in the initiation and progression of aneurysmal degeneration. Coarctation increases flow-mediated stress on the aortic wall. We tested the hypothesis that prolonged coarctation of an infrarenal abdominal aorta (AA) segment leads to abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) formation in mini pigs. An asymmetric, funnel-shaped flow path was created by constricting the infrarenal AA segment of Taiwanese Lanyu mini pigs (age, 7-10 months; male and female) wrapped with an 8-mm-wide expanded polytetrafluoroethylene Teflon strip for 4 weeks (4w), 8 weeks (8w), and 12 weeks (12w) (seven pigs per group). This mimics the tortuous aneurysm neck in human AAA, which increases downstream flow-mediated stress. Significant flow disturbance resulting from moderate coarctation was indicated by a pulsatility index reduced to one third the inherent levels. Sham control pigs received Teflon wrapping without coarctation. Aneurysm characterized by progressive medial degeneration occurred at the terminal AA after 12w coarctation. The outer dimension enlargement of the distal AA exceeded 50% compared with that of the proximal AA at 4w, 8w, and 12w postcoarctation (sham, 1.0; 4w, 1.7 ± 0.08; 8w, 1.5 ± 0.09; 12w, 1.7 ± 0.01). Lumen ratio of the distal-to-suprarenal AA increased time dependently, with 12w postcoarctation exhibiting significant increase (sham, 1.0 ± 0.05; 4w, 1.1 ± 0.11; 8w, 1.4 ± 0.20; 12w, 1.5 ± 0.09). In the distal AA, elastic lamellae exhibited fragmentation at 4w and more pronounced fragmentation with decreased density at 8w and 12w postcoarctation. Medial collagen density exhibited the trend to increase at 4w and 8w but was reversed at 12w postcoarctation. Smooth muscle exhibited disarray and nuclear density decrease at 8w and 12w postcoarctation (sham, 6966 ± 888/mm; 4w, 5747 ± 1340/mm; 8w, 4153 ± 323/mm; 12w, 4083 ± 465/mm). Gelatin zymography revealed that matrix metalloproteinase-9 activity markedly increased at 4w postcoarctation

  4. Thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor in human abdominal aortic aneurysm disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridge, K I; Bollen, L; Zhong, J; Hesketh, M; Macrae, F L; Johnson, A; Philippou, H; Scott, D J; Gils, A; Ariёns, R A S

    2017-08-21

    Essentials Patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) develop dense clots that are resistant to lysis. This study explores the role of thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFI) in human AAA. There is evidence of chronically increased TAFI activation in patients with AAA. TAFI may represent a pharmacological target for cardiovascular risk reduction in AAA. Background Intra-luminal thrombosis is a key factor in growth of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs). Patients with AAA form dense clots that are resistant to fibrinolysis. Thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFI) has been shown to influence AAA development in murine models. Objective The aim of this study is to characterize the role of TAFI in human AAA. Methods Plasma levels of TAFI, TAFI activation peptide (TAFI-AP), activated/inactivated TAFI (TAFIa/ai) and plasmin-α2-antiplasmin complex were measured by ELISAs in patients with AAA (n = 202) and controls (n = 188). Results TAFIa/ai and TAFI-AP levels were higher in patients than controls (median [IQR], 20.3 [14.6-32.8] ng mL(-1) vs. 14.2 [11.2-19.3] ng mL(-1) and 355.0 [232.4-528.1] ng mL(-1) vs. 248.6 [197.1-328.1] ng mL(-1) ). TAFIa/ai was positively correlated with TAFI-AP (r = 0.164). Intact TAFI levels were not different between patients and controls (13.4 [11.2-16.1] μg mL(-1) vs. 12.8 [10.6-15.4] μg mL(-1) ). Plasmin-α2-antiplasmin was higher in AAA patients than controls (690.0 [489.1-924.3] ng mL(-1) vs. 480.7 [392.6-555.3] ng mL(-1) ). Conclusions The increase in TAFIa/ai and TAFI-AP suggests an increased TAFI activation in patients with AAA. Prospective studies are required to further elucidate the role of TAFI and fibrinolysis in AAA pathogenesis. © 2017 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  5. Zenith p-branch standard fenestrated endovascular graft for juxtarenal abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitagawa, Atsushi; Greenberg, Roy K; Eagleton, Matthew J; Mastracci, Tara M

    2013-08-01

    This article reports the early clinical outcomes and experiences of Zenith pivot branch device (p-branch) standard fenestrated endovascular graft (Cook, Bloomington, Ind) for treating juxtarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) originating below the superior mesenteric artery (SMA). A physician-sponsored investigational device exemption study was used to assess enrolled elective and emergency patients from August 2011 to September 2012 for treatment with an off-the-shelf Zenith p-branch device. Patients were included provided an anatomic seal could be established 4 mm below the SMA and the renal geometry fit the protocol based on reconstructed computed tomography data. The celiac artery was addressed with a scallop and the SMA with an 8-mm fenestration. The renal fenestrations were constructed as a modified design to allow a range of renal locations (7.5 mm radially from the center of the fenestration) to be acceptably treated with a single configuration. Two anatomic configurations were created for renal arteries (origins at the same level, or disparate renal arteries with left lower than right). Outcomes are reported in coherence with endovascular reporting standards documents. The study enrolled 16 patients (94% men; median age, 75 years [range, 59-87 years]) with a mean aneurysm size of 61 mm (range, 52-82 mm). Two were treated for aneurysm rupture. Technical success was achieved in all patients. The median fluoroscopy time was 62 minutes (range, 38-105 minutes), and the amount of contrast media was 69 mL (range, 31-121 mL). There were no aortic-related deaths, aneurysm ruptures, open surgical conversion, or type I/III endoleaks. One right renal artery occluded during follow-up in the setting of a conically shaped visceral aortic segment and was successfully treated with endovascular recanalization. The use of the p-branch device for aneurysms originating infra-SMA is associated with a high rate of technical success and minimal problems during the short follow

  6. Tissue Responses to Stent Grafts with Endo-Exo-Skeleton for Saccular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms in a Canine Model

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Young Il; Choi, Young Ho; Chung, Jin Wook; Kim, Hyo-Cheol; So, Young Ho; Kim, Hyun Beom; Min, Seung-Kee; Park, Jae Hyung

    2014-01-01

    Objective We evaluated the effect of close contact between the stent and the graft on the induction of endothelial covering on the stent graft placed over an aneurysm. Materials and Methods Saccular abdominal aortic aneurysms were made with Dacron patch in eight dogs. The stent graft consisted of an inner stent, a expanded polytetrafluoroethylene graft, and an outer stent. After sacrificing the animals, the aortas with an embedded stent graft were excised. The aortas were inspected grossly an...

  7. Infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm repair in presence of coronary artery disease: Optimization of myocardial stress by controlled phlebotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neema Praveen

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA in the presence of significant coronary artery disease (CAD carries a high-risk of adverse peri-operative cardiac event. The options to reduce cardiac risk include perioperative β-blockade, preoperative optimization by myocardial revascularization and simultaneous (combined coronary artery bypass grafting and aneurysm repair. We describe intra-operative controlled phlebotomy to optimize myocardial stress during repair of infrarenal AAA in a patient with significant stable CAD.

  8. Infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm repair in presence of coronary artery disease: optimization of myocardial stress by controlled phlebotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neema, Praveen Kumar; Vijayakumar, Arun; Manikandan, S; Rathod, Ramesh Chandra

    2009-01-01

    The repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) in the presence of significant coronary artery disease (CAD) carries a high-risk of adverse peri-operative cardiac event. The options to reduce cardiac risk include perioperative beta-blockade, preoperative optimization by myocardial revascularization and simultaneous (combined) coronary artery bypass grafting and aneurysm repair. We describe intra-operative controlled phlebotomy to optimize myocardial stress during repair of infrarenal AAA in a patient with significant stable CAD.

  9. Histology and Biaxial Mechanical Behavior of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Tissue Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pancheri, Francesco Q; Peattie, Robert A; Reddy, Nithin D; Ahamed, Touhid; Lin, Wenjian; Ouellette, Timothy D; Iafrati, Mark D; Luis Dorfmann, A

    2017-03-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) represent permanent, localized dilations of the abdominal aorta that can be life-threatening if progressing to rupture. Evaluation of risk of rupture depends on understanding the mechanical behavior of patient AAA walls. In this project, a series of patient AAA wall tissue samples have been evaluated through a combined anamnestic, mechanical, and histopathologic approach. Mechanical properties of the samples have been characterized using a novel, strain-controlled, planar biaxial testing protocol emulating the in vivo deformation of the aorta. Histologically, the tissue ultrastructure was highly disrupted. All samples showed pronounced mechanical stiffening with stretch and were notably anisotropic, with greater stiffness in the circumferential than the axial direction. However, there were significant intrapatient variations in wall stiffness and stress. In biaxial tests in which the longitudinal stretch was held constant at 1.1 as the circumferential stretch was extended to 1.1, the maximum average circumferential stress was 330 ± 70 kPa, while the maximum average axial stress was 190 ± 30 kPa. A constitutive model considering the wall as anisotropic with two preferred directions fit the measured data well. No statistically significant differences in tissue mechanical properties were found based on patient gender, age, maximum bulge diameter, height, weight, body mass index, or smoking history. Although a larger patient cohort is merited to confirm these conclusions, the project provides new insight into the relationships between patient natural history, histopathology, and mechanical behavior that may be useful in the development of accurate methods for rupture risk evaluation.

  10. Embolization by micro navigation for treatment of persistent type 2 Endoleaks after endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Lorenção de Almeida

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background:Endovascular repair has become established as a safe and effective method for treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms. One major complication of this treatment is leakage, or endoleaks, of which type 2 leaks are the most common.Objective:To conduct a brief review of the literature and evaluate the safety and effectiveness of embolization by micronavigation for treatment of type 2 endoleaks.Method:A review of medical records from patients who underwent endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms identified 5 patients with persistent type 2 endoleaks. These patients were submitted to embolization by micronavigation.Results:In all cases, angiographic success was achieved and control CT scans showed absence of type 2 leaks and aneurysm sacs that had reduced in size after the procedure.Conclusion:Treatment of type 2 endoleaks using embolization by micronavigation is an effective and safe method and should be considered as a treatment option for this complication after endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms.

  11. Serum myoglobin and renal morbidity and mortality following thoracic and thoraco-abdominal aortic repair: does rhabdomyolysis play a role?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, C C; Villa, M A; Sutton, J; Lau, D; Keyhani, K; Estrera, A L; Azizzadeh, A; Coogan, S M; Safi, H J

    2009-04-01

    The intractability of renal dysfunction following thoracic and thoraco-abdominal aortic repair leads us to believe that the accepted mechanisms of renal injury - ischaemia and embolism - are incompletely explanatory. We studied postoperative myoglobinaemia and renal dysfunction following aortic surgery. Between September 2006 and February 2008, we studied serum myoglobin in 109 patients requiring thoracic/thoraco-abdominal repair for three postoperative days. Forty-two of the 109 (38%) patients were female. The median age was 67 years (range 23-84 years). As we have focussed more attention on renal function, our independent renal consultants have dialysed more aggressively. We divided dialysis into: (1) creatinine indication, (2) non-creatinine indication and (3) no dialysis. Thirteen of the 109 (12%) patients met creatinine indication for dialysis (>4 mg dl(-1)) and an additional 28 (26%) were dialysed for other reasons. Overall mortality was 12 out of 109 (11%) cases: 11 out of 41 (27%) in dialysed patients and one out of 68 (1.5%) in non-dialysed patients. Mortality did not differ between the indications for dialysis. Predictors of mortality were baseline glomerular filtration rate (GFR), postoperative myoglobin and dialysis. The only predictor of dialysis was postoperative myoglobin. A strong relationship between postoperative serum myoglobin and renal failure suggests a rhabdomyolysis-like contributing aetiology following thoraco-abdominal aortic repair. We postulate a novel mechanism of renal injury for which mitigation strategies should be developed.

  12. Trace elements in the wall of abdominal aortic aneurysms with and without coexisting iliac artery aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziaja, Damian; Chudek, Jerzy; Sznapka, Mariola; Kita, Andrzej; Biolik, Grzegorz; Sieroń-Stołtny, Karolina; Pawlicki, Krzysztof; Domalik, Jolanta; Ziaja, Krzysztof

    2015-06-01

    Iliac artery aneurysms (IAA) and abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) frequently coexist. It remains unknown whether the content of trace elements in AAA walls depends on the coexistence of IAAs. The aim of this study was to compare the content of selected trace elements in AAA walls depending on the coexistence of IAAs. The content of trace elements was assessed in samples of AAA walls harvested intraoperatively in 19 consecutive patients. In the studied group, coexisting IAAs were diagnosed in 11 out of the 19 patients with AAA. The coexistence of IAAs was associated with a slightly lower content of nickel (0.28 (0.15-0.40) vs. 0.32 (0-0.85) mg/g; p = 0.09) and a significantly higher content of cadmium (0.71 (0.26-1.17) vs. 0.25 (0.20-0.31) mg/g; p = 0.04) in AAA walls. The levels of the remaining studied elements, copper, zinc, manganese, magnesium and calcium, were comparable. The elevated levels of cadmium in the walls of AAA coexisting with IAAs may suggest an impact of the accumulation of this trace element on the greater damage of the iliac artery wall.

  13. Dynamic simulation and Doppler Ultrasonography validation of blood flow behavior in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botar, Cristian C; Tóth, Árpád Á; Klisurić, Olivera R; Nićiforović, Dijana D; Vučaj Ćirilović, Viktorija A; Till, Viktor E

    2017-05-01

    Criteria for rupture prediction of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) are based only on the diameter of AAA. This method does not consider complex hemodynamic forces exerted on AAA wall. The methodology used in our study combines Computer-Aided Design (CAD) with Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). Three-dimensional vascular structures reconstructions were based on Computed Tomography (CT) images and CAD. CFD theory was used for mathematical modeling and simulations. In this way, dynamic behavior of blood flow in bounded three-dimensional space was described. Doppler Ultrasonography (US) was used for model results validation. All simulations were based on medical investigation of 4 patients (male older than 65years) with diagnosed AAA. Good correspondence between computed velocities in AAA and measured values with Doppler US (Patient 1 0.60m·s(-1) versus 0.61m·s(-1), Patient 2 0.80m·s(-1) versus 0.80m·s(-1), Patient 3 0.75m·s(-1) versus 0.78m·s(-1), Patient 4 0.50m·s(-1) versus 0.49m·s(-1)) was noticed. The good agreement between measured and simulated velocities validates our methodology and the other data available from simulations (eg. von Misses stress) could be used to provide useful information about the possibility of AAA rupture. Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Flow of a blood analogue fluid in a compliant abdominal aortic aneurysm model: experimental modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deplano, Valérie; Knapp, Yannick; Bailly, Lucie; Bertrand, Eric

    2014-04-11

    The aim of this work is to develop a unique in vitro set-up in order to analyse the influence of the shear thinning fluid-properties on the flow dynamics within the bulge of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). From an experimental point of view, the goals are to elaborate an analogue shear thinning fluid mimicking the macroscopic blood behaviour, to characterise its rheology at low shear rates and to propose an experimental device able to manage such an analogue fluid without altering its feature while reproducing physiological flow rate and pressure, through compliant AAA. Once these experimental prerequisites achieved, the results obtained in the present work show that the flow dynamics is highly dependent on the fluid rheology. The main results point out that the propagation of the vortex ring, generated in the AAA bulge, is slower for shear thinning fluids inducing a smaller travelled distance by the vortex ring so that it never impacts the anterior wall in the distal region, in opposition to Newtonian fluids. Moreover, scalar shear rate values are globally lower for shear thinning fluids inducing higher maximum stress values than those for the Newtonian fluids. Consequently, this work highlights that a Newtonian fluid model is finally inadequate to obtain a reliable prediction of the flow dynamics within AAA. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Machine Learning Approach for Predicting Wall Shear Distribution for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm and Carotid Bifurcation Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordanski, Milos; Radovic, Milos; Milosevic, Zarko; Filipovic, Nenad; Obradovic, Zoran

    2016-12-14

    Computer simulations based on the finite element method (FEM) represent powerful tools for modeling blood flow through arteries. However, due to its computational complexity, this approach may be inappropriate when results are needed quickly. In order to reduce computational time, in this paper we proposed an alternative machine learning based approach for calculation of wall shear stress (WSS) distribution, which may play an important role in mechanisms related to initiation and development of atherosclerosis. In order to capture relationships between geometric parameters, blood density, dynamic viscosity and velocity and WSS distribution of geometrically parameterized abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) and carotid bifurcation models, we proposed multivariate linear regression (MLR), multilayer perceptron neural network (MLP) and gaussian conditional random fields (GCRF). Results obtained in this paper show that machine learning approaches can successfully predict WSS distribution at different cardiac cycle time points. Even though all proposed methods showed high potential for WSS prediction, GCRF achieved the highest coefficient of determination (0.930 to 0.948 for AAA model and 0.946 to 0.954 for carotid bifurcation model) demonstrating benefits of accounting for spatial correlation. The proposed approach can be used as an alternative method for real time calculation of wall shear stress distribution.

  16. Fruit Intake and Abdominal Aortic Calcification in Elderly Women: A Prospective Cohort Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola P. Bondonno

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease (CVD is the leading cause of death worldwide. There is a consistent inverse relationship between fruit intake with CVD events and mortality in cross-sectional and prospective observational studies, but the relationship of fruit intake with measurements of atherosclerosis in humans is less clear. Nutritional effects on abdominal aortic calcification (AAC, a marker for subclinical intimal and medial atherosclerotic vascular disease, have not been studied previously. The aim of this study was to examine the cross-sectional relationship of total and individual fruit (apple, pear, orange and other citrus, and banana intake with AAC, scored between 0 and 24. The current study assessed baseline data for a cohort of 1052 women over 70 years of age who completed both a food frequency questionnaire assessing fruit intake, and underwent AAC measurement using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. AAC scores were significantly negatively correlated with total fruit and apple intakes (p < 0.05, but not with pear, orange or banana intakes (p > 0.25. In multivariable-adjusted logistic regression, each standard deviation (SD; 50 g/day increase in apple intake was associated with a 24% lower odds of having severe AAC (AAC score >5 (odd ratio OR: 0.76 (0.62, 0.93, p = 0.009. Total and other individual fruit intake were not associated with increased odds of having severe AAC. Apple but not total or other fruit intake is independently negatively associated with AAC in older women.

  17. Effect of exercise on patient specific abdominal aortic aneurysm flow topology and mixing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arzani, Amirhossein; Les, Andrea S; Dalman, Ronald L; Shadden, Shawn C

    2014-02-01

    Computational fluid dynamics modeling was used to investigate changes in blood transport topology between rest and exercise conditions in five patient-specific abdominal aortic aneurysm models. MRI was used to provide the vascular anatomy and necessary boundary conditions for simulating blood velocity and pressure fields inside each model. Finite-time Lyapunov exponent fields and associated Lagrangian coherent structures were computed from blood velocity data and were used to compare features of the transport topology between rest and exercise both mechanistically and qualitatively. A mix-norm and mix-variance measure based on fresh blood distribution throughout the aneurysm over time were implemented to quantitatively compare mixing between rest and exercise. Exercise conditions resulted in higher and more uniform mixing and reduced the overall residence time in all aneurysms. Separated regions of recirculating flow were commonly observed in rest, and these regions were either reduced or removed by attached and unidirectional flow during exercise, or replaced with regional chaotic and transiently turbulent mixing, or persisted and even extended during exercise. The main factor that dictated the change in flow topology from rest to exercise was the behavior of the jet of blood penetrating into the aneurysm during systole. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Antagonism of toll-like receptor 2 attenuates the formation and progression of abdominal aortic aneurysm

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    Huimin Yan

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA is an inflammatory vascular disorder with high mortality. Accumulating evidence shows that toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2 plays a critical role in the regulation of wound-repairing process after tissue injury. We wondered if TLR2 signaling contributed to the pathogenesis of AAA and that targeting TLR2 would attenuate AAA development and progression. In this study, enhanced expression of TLR2 and its ligands were observed in human AAA tissue. Neutralization of TLR2 protected against AAA development and caused established AAA to regress in mouse models of AAA. In addition, TLR2-deficient mice also failed to develop AAA. The prophylactic and therapeutic effects of blocking TLR2 were accompanied by a significant resolution of inflammation and vascular remodeling, as indicated by the decreased expression or activity of MMP-2/9, α-SMA, inflammatory cytokines, and transcription factors NF-κB, AP-1 and STAT1/3 in AAA tissue. Mechanistically, blocking TLR2 decreased the expression and interaction of TLR2 and several endogenous ligands, which diminished chronic inflammation and vascular remodeling in the vascular tissue of AAA. Our studies indicate that the interactions between TLR2 and its endogenous ligands contribute to the pathogenesis of AAA and that targeting TLR2 offers great potential toward the development of therapeutic agents against AAA.

  19. Gastric emptying after elective abdominal aortic aneurysm surgery: the case for early postoperative enteral feeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avrahami, R; Cohen, J D; Haddad, M; Singer, P; Zelikovski, A

    1999-03-01

    To assess gastric emptying with a view to early postoperative enteral nutrition after elective abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) surgery. The paracetamol absorption test was used to assess gastric emptying in 13 consecutive patients at 6, 18 and 32 h following elective AAA surgery. All patients received postoperative analgesia with marcaine given via an epidural catheter during the first 48 postoperative hours. Normal emptying was defined as an area under the plasma paracetamol concentration curve at 60 min (AUC-60) of > 600 mg/min/l. The median time to normal gastric emptying was 18 +/- 7.7 h. One patient (7.6%) had normal emptying at 6 h, nine (69%) at 18 h and 12 (92%) at 32 h. The nasogastric tubes were removed at a median of 3.2 days after surgery, and enteral feeding was commenced on day 4. Gastric emptying was normal 18 h post-AAA surgery as assessed by the paracetamol absorption test. In view of the importance of maintaining an intact gastrointestinal mucosa, enteral nutrition may be commenced on the second postoperative day.

  20. [Natural history of abdominal aortic aneurysm with and without concomitant chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindholt, J S; Heickendorff, L; Antonsen, S; Vammen, S; Fasting, H; Henneberg, E W

    1999-08-16

    The relationship between abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) and chronical obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and in particular the suggested common elastin degradation caused by elastase and smoking was analysed by a cross sectional population mass screening study for AAA, and a prospective cohort study of small AAA. All previous computer-hospital-recorded diagnoses were received concerning 4,404 men invited to screening for AAA. One hundred and forty-one had AAA (4.2%). They were asked for an interview, a clinical examination, and a blood sample. Men with an AAA of 3-5 cm were offered annual control-scans to check for expansion. Of COPD-patients, 7.7% had AAA (crude OR = 2.05), however the adjusted OR was only 1.53 after adjusting for other co-existing diseases (p = 0.13). The mean annual expansion was 2.74 mm per year in COPD patients and 2.72 in non-COPD patients, and 4.7 mm in oral steroid-users compared to 2.6 in non-steroid-users (p diseases rather than a common pathway of pathogenesis.

  1. The use of tonometry to predict mortality in patients undergoing abdominal aortic aneurysm repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soong, C V; Halliday, M I; Hood, J M; Rowlands, B J; Barros D'Sa, A A

    1998-01-01

    To assess the reliability of intramucosal pH (pHi) of the sigmoid colon, IL-6 concentration and the APACHE II score in predicting outcome in patients undergoing elective abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. Prospective study. In 42 patients, measurements were made of the sigmoid pHi with the silicone tonometer and plasma IL-6 by enzyme linked immuno-sorbent assay (ELISA). The daily postoperative APACHE II scores were also calculated. In 29 patients a preoperative left ventricular ejection fraction was determined by gated radionuclide angiography. Four out of 42 patients who were studied died. The lowest perioperative pHi, the peak postoperative IL-6 concentration and APACHE II scores were significantly different in the survivors in comparison to the non-survivors. In the non-survivors, the fall in pHi preceded the time of patient's demise by at least 4 days. Significant correlations were observed between changes in pHi, IL-6 and APACHE II. Using receiver operating characteristic curves, pHi was shown to be the most predictive of mortality compared to the other variables. The simplicity, speed and practicality of using the tonometer adds to its superiority over the latter measurements. No relationship was found between ventricular ejection fraction, pHi and outcome. Although the number of patients is small, these results support pHi as a valuable predictor of outcome and also suggest a role for the gut in initiating the IL-6 and physiological responses.

  2. Fruit Intake and Abdominal Aortic Calcification in Elderly Women: A Prospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondonno, Nicola P; Lewis, Joshua R; Prince, Richard L; Lim, Wai H; Wong, Germaine; Schousboe, John T; Woodman, Richard J; Kiel, Douglas P; Bondonno, Catherine P; Ward, Natalie C; Croft, Kevin D; Hodgson, Jonathan M

    2016-03-10

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death worldwide. There is a consistent inverse relationship between fruit intake with CVD events and mortality in cross-sectional and prospective observational studies, but the relationship of fruit intake with measurements of atherosclerosis in humans is less clear. Nutritional effects on abdominal aortic calcification (AAC), a marker for subclinical intimal and medial atherosclerotic vascular disease, have not been studied previously. The aim of this study was to examine the cross-sectional relationship of total and individual fruit (apple, pear, orange and other citrus, and banana) intake with AAC, scored between 0 and 24. The current study assessed baseline data for a cohort of 1052 women over 70 years of age who completed both a food frequency questionnaire assessing fruit intake, and underwent AAC measurement using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. AAC scores were significantly negatively correlated with total fruit and apple intakes (p 0.25). In multivariable-adjusted logistic regression, each standard deviation (SD; 50 g/day) increase in apple intake was associated with a 24% lower odds of having severe AAC (AAC score >5) (odd ratio OR): 0.76 (0.62, 0.93), p = 0.009). Total and other individual fruit intake were not associated with increased odds of having severe AAC. Apple but not total or other fruit intake is independently negatively associated with AAC in older women.

  3. Fluid-Structure Interaction in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm: Effect of Modeling Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengmao Lin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the impact of modeling techniques on predicting the mechanical behaviors of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA is systematically investigated. The fluid-structure interaction (FSI model for simultaneously capturing the transient interaction between blood flow dynamics and wall mechanics was compared with its simplified techniques, that is, computational fluid dynamics (CFD or computational solid stress (CSS model. Results demonstrated that CFD exhibited relatively smaller vortexes and tends to overestimate the fluid wall shear stress, compared to FSI. On the contrary, the minimal differences in wall stresses and deformation were observed between FSI and CSS models. Furthermore, it was found that the accuracy of CSS prediction depends on the applied pressure profile for the aneurysm sac. A large pressure drop across AAA usually led to the underestimation of wall stresses and thus the AAA rupture. Moreover, the assumed isotropic AAA wall properties, compared to the anisotropic one, will aggravate the difference between the simplified models with the FSI approach. The present work demonstrated the importance of modeling techniques on predicting the blood flow dynamics and wall mechanics of the AAA, which could guide the selection of appropriate modeling technique for significant clinical implications.

  4. Chlamydia pneumoniae Antibodies and C-Reactive Protein Levels in Patients with Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Sharif

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The study aim was to assess the relationship between the presence of antibodies to Chlamydia pneumoniae and abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA incidence. Patients and Methods. Consecutive AAA patients and AAA-free controls were recruited prospectively. Serum samples from both groups were examined to determine Immunoglobulin (Ig A and IgG titres against Chlamydia pneumoniae by ELISA and C-reactive protein (CRP concentrations. Results were expressed as mean (SD or median (IQR and compared using χ2 and Mann-Whitney U tests. A P value of <0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results. Each study group (AAA/nAAA comprised 250 patients. 196 (78.7% AAA patients had positive IgA antichlamydial antibody titres, compared to 181 (72.4% in the control group (P=0.008, OR 2.0, 95% CI 1.2–3.5. However, positive IgG antibody titres were similar (191 versus 203; P=0.222, OR 0.7, 95% CI 0.4–1.3. Average CRP concentrations were higher in AAA individuals. IgA or IgG antibody titres were not related to CRP concentrations. Conclusions. These results demonstrated that the frequent incidence of Chlamydia pneumoniae antibodies within the general population makes it difficult to relate its presence to AAA development, despite the high IgA antibody titres. In addition, raised CRP concentrations in AAA patients are not related to the presence of antichlamydial antibodies.

  5. 3D analysis of vortical structures in an abdominal aortic aneurysm by stereoscopic PIV

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    Deplano, Valérie; Guivier-Curien, Carine; Bertrand, Eric

    2016-11-01

    The present work presents an experimental in vitro three-dimensional analysis of the flow dynamics in an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) through stereoscopic particle image velocimetry (SPIV) measurements. The experimental set-up mimics the pathophysiological context involving a shear thinning blood analogue fluid, compliant AAA and aorto-iliac bifurcation walls and controlled inlet and outlet flow rate and pressure waveforms as well as working fluid temperature. SPIV was carefully calibrated and conducted to assess the three velocity components in the AAA volume. For the first time in the literature, the 3D vortex ring genesis, propagation, and vanishing in the AAA bulge are experimentally described and quantified. In comparison with classical 2-component PIV measurements (2C PIV), the third component of the velocity vector was shown to be of importance in such a geometry, especially, during the deceleration phase of the flow rate. The 3D velocity magnitude reached up more than 20 % of the 2D one showing that 2C PIV are definitively not accurate enough to provide a complete description of flow behaviour in an AAA. In addition to potential clinical implications of a full 3D vortex ring description in AAA evolution, the 3D in vitro experimental quantification of the flow dynamics carried out in the present study offers an interesting tool for the validation of fluid-structure interaction numerical studies dealing with AAA.

  6. Sac Angiography and Glue Embolization in Emergency Endovascular Aneurysm Repair for Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

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    Koike, Yuya, E-mail: r06118@hotmail.co.jp; Nishimura, Jun-ichi, E-mail: jun-ichi-n@nifty.com; Hase, Soichiro, E-mail: haseman@hotmail.co.jp; Yamasaki, Motoshige, E-mail: genyamasaki@gmail.com [Kawasaki Saiwai Hospital, Department of Interventional Radiology (Japan)

    2015-04-15

    PurposeThe purpose of this study was to demonstrate a sac angiography technique and evaluate the feasibility of N-butyl cyanoacrylate (NBCA) embolization of the ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) sac in emergency endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) in hemodynamically unstable patients.MethodsA retrospective case series of three patients in whom sac angiography was performed during emergency EVAR for ruptured AAA was reviewed. After stent graft deployment, angiography within the sac of aneurysm (sac angiography) was performed by manually injecting 10 ml of contrast material through a catheter to identify the presence and site of active bleeding. In two patients, sac angiography revealed active extravasation of the contrast material, and NBCA embolization with a coaxial catheter system was performed to achieve prompt sealing.ResultsSac angiography was successful in all three patients. In the two patients who underwent NBCA embolization for aneurysm sac bleeding, follow-up computed tomography (CT) images demonstrated the accumulation of NBCA consistent with the bleeding site in preprocedural CT images.ConclusionsEVAR is associated with a potential risk of ongoing bleeding from type II or IV endoleaks into the disrupted aneurysm sac in patients with severe coagulopathy. Therefore, sac angiography and NBCA embolization during emergency EVAR may represent a possible technical improvement in the treatment of ruptured AAA in hemodynamically unstable patients.

  7. The role of lysyl oxidase family members in the stabilization of abdominal aortic aneurysms.

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    Remus, Ebony Washington; O'Donnell, Robert E; Rafferty, Kathryn; Weiss, Daiana; Joseph, Giji; Csiszar, Katalin; Fong, Sheri F T; Taylor, W Robert

    2012-10-15

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States today. We employed a model for AAA development using apolipoprotein E knock out mice fed a high-fat diet and treated with ANG II and β-aminopropionitrile (β-APN) for 4 wk. ANG II induces hypertension and atherosclerotic disease, whereas β-APN inhibits the activity of the lysyl oxidase/ lysyl oxidase-like protein (LOX/LOXL) family members. LOX/LOXL family members crosslink collagen and elastin in the extracellular matrix and therefore contribute to the integrity and stabilization of a healthy vessel wall. In this model, cotreatment with ANG II and β-APN caused a 90% AAA incidence and increased atherosclerotic lesion formation from less than 5% to greater than 25% after 4 wk. In more atheroprotected mouse strains (C57BL/6 and BalbC), cotreatment with ANG II and β-APN caused 50% and 40% AAA incidence, respectively. These data demonstrate the importance of LOX/LOXL to the stability of the vessel wall. Therapeutic strategies to overexpress LOX/LOXL enzymes or to support the crosslinking of soluble matrix proteins in a polymeric scaffold are a promising opportunity to achieve stabilization of AAAs.

  8. Screened individuals' preferences in the delivery of abdominal aortic aneurysm repair.

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    Holt, P J E; Gogalniceanu, P; Murray, S; Poloniecki, J D; Loftus, I M; Thompson, M M

    2010-04-01

    This study aimed to determine preferences for service attributes in a population screened for abdominal aortic aneurysm. A questionnaire was designed to encompass various aspects of service provision. Questions were calibrated against the time an individual was willing to travel to access specific attributes. Subjects attending an aneurysm screening programme were asked to complete a questionnaire before their screening ultrasound scan. Statistical analysis was through pairwise analysis of the median travel times with the signed rank test. The Wilcoxon rank sum, analysed by the Kruskal-Wallis test, was used to compare preference ratings. A total of 262 individuals were asked to complete the questionnaire; the response rate was 98.5 per cent. Approximately 92 per cent of individuals stated a willingness to travel for at least 1 h beyond their nearest hospital in order to access services with a 5 per cent lower perioperative mortality rate, a 2 per cent lower amputation or stroke rate, a high annual caseload of aneurysm repairs, and routine availability of endovascular repair. Patients attending aneurysm screening were willing to travel beyond their nearest hospital to access a service with better outcomes, higher surgical volumes and endovascular surgery. Copyright (c) 2010 British Journal of Surgery Society Ltd. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Coronary risk in candidates for abdominal aortic aneurysm repair: a word of caution.

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    Borioni, Raoul; Tomai, Fabrizio; Pederzoli, Alessio; Fratticci, Laura; Barberi, Filippo; De Luca, Leonardo; Albano, Marzia; Garofalo, Mariano

    2014-11-01

    Current guidelines do not recommend routine coronary evaluation preceding abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) repair in low-risk patients. The purpose of the present study is to report the incidence of coronary lesions in candidates for AAA repair with a Revised Cardiac Risk (Lee) Index (RCRI) coronary angiography and myocardial revascularization (percutaneous coronary intervention, PCI; coronary artery bypass grafting, CABG) before elective open or endovascular AAA repair (January 2005-December 2012). Severe coronary artery disease (CAD) was revealed in 43 patients (28.9%), who underwent successful myocardial revascularization by means of PCI (n.35) or off-pump CABG (n.8). The incidence of severe CAD in patients resulted at low risk on the basis of risk models was approximately 25%. The incidence of severe CAD in asymptomatic patients was 29.8%. Endovascular (n.52, 35.1%) and open (n.96, 64.9%) AAA repair was performed with low morbidity (0.6%) and mortality (0.6%) in 148 patients. The long-term estimated survival (freedom from fatal cardiovascular events) was 97% at 60 months and 82% at 90 months. The incidence of severe correctable CAD is not negligible in low-risk patients scheduled for AAA repair. Waiting for further recommendations based on large population studies of vascular patients, a more extensive indication to coronary angiography and revascularization should be considered in many candidates for AAA repair.

  10. Role of preoperative radionuclide ejection fraction in direct abdominal aortic aneurysm repair

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    Kazmers, A.; Cerqueira, M.D.; Zierler, R.E.

    1988-08-01

    Preoperative radionuclide ventriculography was performed in 60 patients to assess whether such testing could define those at increased risk after direct abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair. None of the patients had prophylactic coronary artery reconstruction to reduce the risk of AAA repair despite angina in 27% and previous myocardial infarction (MI) in 42%. The mean ejection fraction (EF) was 52% +/- 15% (range 14% to 78%). Low EF (normal greater than 50%) was present in 40%, whereas ventricular wall motion abnormalities were present in 39% of patients. The overall perioperative (30-day) mortality rate was 5%. MI occurred in 7% within 30 postoperative days; none was fatal. Life-table analysis revealed that overall survival after AAA repair was significantly lower in patients with an EF of 50% or less (p less than 0.025, Mantel-Cox) during a follow-up of 20.1 +/- 11.9 months. Overall survival differences were even more striking for those with an EF of 35% or less (p = 0.003, Mantel-Cox). There was a marked difference in the cumulative mortality rate during follow-up, being 50% in those patients with an EF of 35% or less (n = 10) compared with 14% in those with an EF greater than 35% (n = 50, p = 0.036, Fisher exact test). There was no statistical difference in the incidence of perioperative MI or perioperative death for those with an EF of 35% or less vs EF greater than 35%. 50 references.

  11. A Review of Computational Methods to Predict the Risk of Rupture of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

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    Tejas Canchi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Computational methods have played an important role in health care in recent years, as determining parameters that affect a certain medical condition is not possible in experimental conditions in many cases. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD methods have been used to accurately determine the nature of blood flow in the cardiovascular and nervous systems and air flow in the respiratory system, thereby giving the surgeon a diagnostic tool to plan treatment accordingly. Machine learning or data mining (MLD methods are currently used to develop models that learn from retrospective data to make a prediction regarding factors affecting the progression of a disease. These models have also been successful in incorporating factors such as patient history and occupation. MLD models can be used as a predictive tool to determine rupture potential in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA along with CFD-based prediction of parameters like wall shear stress and pressure distributions. A combination of these computer methods can be pivotal in bridging the gap between translational and outcomes research in medicine. This paper reviews the use of computational methods in the diagnosis and treatment of AAA.

  12. The role of IL-6 in pathogenesis of abdominal aortic aneurysm in mice.

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    Michihide Nishihara

    Full Text Available Although the pathogenesis of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA remains unclear, evidence is accumulating to support a central role for inflammation. Inflammatory responses are coordinated by various soluble cytokines of which IL-6 is one of the major proinflammatory cytokines. In this study we examined the role of IL-6 in the pathogenesis of experimental AAA induced by a periaortic exposure to CaCl2 in mice. We now report that the administration of MR16-1, a neutralizing monoclonal antibody specific for the mouse IL-6 receptor, mildly suppressed the development of AAA. The inhibition of IL-6 signaling provoked by MR16-1 also resulted in a suppression of Stat3 activity. Conversely, no significant changes in either NFκB activity, Jnk activity or the expression of matrix metalloproteinases (Mmp -2 and -9 were identified. Transcriptome analyses revealed that MR16-1-sensitive genes encode chemokines and their receptors, as well as factors that regulate vascular permeability and cell migration. Imaging cytometric analyses then consistently demonstrated reduced cellular infiltration for MR16-1-treated AAA. These results suggest that IL-6 plays an important but limited role in AAA pathogenesis, and primarily regulates cell migration and infiltration. These data would also suggest that IL-6 activity may play an important role in scenarios of continuous cellular infiltration, possibly including human AAA.

  13. Open repair management of a patient with aortic arch saccular aneurysm, penetrating atherosclerotic ulcer, one vessel coronary artery disease and an isolated dissection of the abdominal aorta.

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    Romolo, Harvey; Wartono, Dicky A; Suyuti, Sugisman; Herlambang, Bagus; Caesario, Michael; Sunu, Ismoyo

    2017-01-01

    Isolated saccular compared to fusiform aneurysm is considered to be a rare entity with challenges of its own. A 62-year-old female was diagnosed with a case of saccular aneurysm and penetrating atherosclerotic ulcer of the aortic arch. Additionally, she also had one vessel coronary artery disease and type B abdominal aortic dissection. She was then managed with open aortic arch repair and coronary artery bypass grafting. If required, elective endovascular repair will be done for the abdominal aorta on a later date.

  14. Rapidly Progrediating Aortic Valve Infective Endocarditis in an Intravenous Drug User Treated by Antibiotics and Surgery

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    Malkia S. Swedi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a 22-year old male, a self-confessed recreational drug user who developed cardiogenic shock because of severe destruction of the aortic valve by rapidly progressive aortic valve endocarditis. The disease progression was acute; in a matter of days, the clinical manifestations were life-threatening necessitating urgent aortic valve replacement surgery. Cultivation revealed Streptococcus viridans as the microbial agent. Subsequent recovery with antibiotic treatment was without complication. This case report shows that immediately performed transoesophageal echocardiography and early consultation with a cardiac surgeon has fundamental importance in diagnosis and management of acute infective endocarditis in haemodynamically instable patients.

  15. Long-term effect of cinacalcet hydrochloride on abdominal aortic calcification in patients on hemodialysis with secondary hyperparathyroidism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Kazunori; Nakao, Kazushi; Takatori, Yuji; Inoue, Junko; Kojo, Shoichirou; Akagi, Shigeru; Fukushima, Masaki; Wada, Jun; Makino, Hirofumi

    2014-01-01

    Background Secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT) is one of the common complications in dialysis patients, and is associated with increased risk of vascular calcification. The effects of cinacalcet hydrochloride treatment on bone and mineral metabolism have been previously reported, but the benefit of cinacalcet on vascular calcification remains uncertain. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of cinacalcet on abdominal aortic calcification in dialysis patients. Subjects and methods Patients were on maintenance hemodialysis with insufficiently controlled SHPT (intact parathyroid hormone [PTH] >180 pg/mL) by conventional therapies. All subjects were initially administered 25 mg cinacalcet daily, with concomitant use of calcitriol analogs. Abdominal aortic calcification was annually evaluated by calculating aortic calcification area index (ACAI) using multidetector computed tomography (MDCT), from 12 months before to 36 months after the initiation of cinacalcet therapy. Results Twenty-three patients were analyzed in this study. The mean age was 59.0±8.7 years, 34.8% were women, and the mean dialysis duration was 163.0±76.0 months. After administration of cinacalcet, serum levels of intact PTH, phosphorus, and calcium significantly decreased, and mean Ca × P values significantly decreased from 67.4±7.9 mg2/dL2 to 52±7.7 mg2/dL2. Although the ACAI value did not decrease during the observation period, the increase in ACAI between 24 months and 36 months after cinacalcet administration was significantly suppressed. Conclusion Long-term administration of cinacalcet was associated with reduced progression of abdominal aortic calcification, and achieving appropriate calcium and phosphorus levels may reduce the rates of cardiovascular events and mortality in patients on hemodialysis. PMID:24379691

  16. Comparison of the strain field of abdominal aortic aneurysm measured by magnetic resonance imaging and stereovision: a feasibility study for prediction of the risk of rupture of aortic abdominal aneurysm.

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    Wang, Yufei; Joannic, David; Delassus, Patrick; Lalande, Alain; Juillion, Patrick; Fontaine, Jean-François

    2015-04-13

    The prediction of the risk of rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a complex problem. Currently the criteria to predict rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysms are aneurysm diameter and growth rates. It is generally believed that study of the wall strain distribution could be helpful to find a better decision criterion for surgery of aortic aneurysms before their rupture. The wall strain distribution depends on many biological and biomechanical factors such as elastic properties of the aorta, turbulent blood flow, anatomy of the aorta, presence of thrombus or not and so on. Recently, numerical simulations to estimate rupture-potential have received many attentions. However, none of the medical imaging tools for screening and monitoring of AAAs were studied in terms of mechanical behavior and experimentally to demonstrate their capability to measure relevant variables. The aim of this study was to develop a metrological approach for deployment testing of the ability of techniques for measuring local in-vitro deformations based on comparison of stereovision and MRI. In this paper, we present the implementation approach and results of the study based on cylindrical phantoms with or without AAA representing, respectively, healthy and unhealthy artery. Through this study, an experimental device was developed for the behavior study of AAA during a cardiac cycle. The results show that the stereovision techniques used in laboratory is well suited and is qualitatively and quantitatively equivalent with MRI measurements. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Late diagnosis of Takayasu's arteritis with repeated attacks of heart failure and uncontrolled hypertension due to abdominal aortic thrombosis: case report and review of the literature.

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    Wang, Huan; Lai, Baochun; Wu, Xiaoying; Han, Tao; Chen, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Takayasu's arteritis (TA) is a chronic, idiopathic, inflammatory disease affecting the aorta and its branches. To date, only one case involving abdominal aortic thrombosis due to TA has been reported. After bilateral artificial subclavian-iliac bypass, a case of abdominal aortic thrombosis due to TA received a delayed diagnosis in a 44-year-old Chinese male who experienced recurrent episodes of heart failure and uncontrolled hypertension with claudication of two extremities. Abdominal color Doppler sonography and computed tomography aortography (CTA) showed occlusion of the abdominal aorta and bilateral renal artery stenosis. After vascular bypass and during 1 year follow-up, his cardiac function improved and blood pressure was well controlled, with reduced serum creatinine. Postoperative CTA still showed abdominal aortic thrombosis resulting in arterial occlusion extending from the left renal artery initial segment level to the bilateral common iliac artery and the bifurcation of the renal artery, except for the vascular bypass. Abdominal aortic thrombosis due to TA is very rare and potentially life threatening, probably becoming an atherosclerosis risk factor. Doppler sonography and CTA results are important for diagnosis. Artificial vascular bypass can be used for TA in debilitated patients with diffuse aortic disease.

  18. Open versus endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm: a survey of Canadian vascular surgeons.

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    Mastracci, Tara M; Clase, Catherine M; Devereaux, Philip J; Cinà, Claudio S

    2008-04-01

    The aim of this survey was to determine Canadian vascular surgeons' experience with elective endovascular aortic repair (EVAR) and traditional open repair and their interest in participating in an expertise- based randomized controlled trial (RCT) as opposed to a conventional RCT comparing these 2 procedures. A single-page questionnaire was developed and sent by fax, email or post to all vascular surgeons in Canada. Nonresponders were recontacted on 2 additional occasions to improve the response rate. The questionnaire had 2 sections. The first inquired about current and past practice patterns, including experience in both open and endovascular techniques. The second investigated the surgeons' belief in the value of open as opposed to endovascular repair and the value of expertise-based RCT methodology; it also canvassed their interest in participating in a future trial. Definitions of expertise in open and endovascular repair were drawn from the published literature. Criteria to determine the feasibility of conducting an expertise-based RCT were established a priori. The questionnaire was sent to 259 surgeons who appeared in multiple vascular surgery databases, and the overall response rate was 56% (95% confidence interval [CI] 50%-62%). The mean career experience was 406 cases (standard deviation [SD] 359) for conventional open abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair and 24 cases (SD 48) for endovascular repair. Of the responding surgeons, 51% (95% CI 41%-60%) ranked conventional open repair as "probably superior." Respondents were equally interested in participating in an RCT using either expertise-based methodology (54%, 95% CI 44%-63%) or conventional design (51%, 95% CI 41%-60%). Uncertainty exists among vascular surgeons in Canada as to the role of endovascular surgery in the repair of AAA. A national RCT comparing open with endovascular repair in the elective setting is potentially feasible with either expertise-based or conventional design. Increases in the

  19. Leukotriene B4 levels in human atherosclerotic plaques and abdominal aortic aneurysms.

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    Pleunie van den Borne

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Leukotriene B4 (LTB4 has been associated with the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis and abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA formation. However, associations of LTB4 levels with tissue characteristics and adverse clinical outcome of advanced atherosclerosis and AAA are scarcely studied. We hypothesized that LTB4 levels are associated with a vulnerable plaque phenotype and adverse clinical outcome. Furthermore, that LTB4 levels are associated with inflammatory AAA and adverse clinical outcome. METHODS: Atherosclerotic plaques and AAA specimens were selected from two independent databases for LTB4 measurements. Plaques were isolated during carotid endarterectomy from asymptomatic (n = 58 or symptomatic (n = 317 patients, classified prior to surgery. LTB4 levels were measured without prior lipid extraction and levels were corrected for protein content. LTB4 levels were related to plaque phenotype, baseline patient characteristics and clinical outcome within three years following surgery. Seven non-diseased mammary artery specimens served as controls. AAA specimens were isolated during open repair, classified as elective (n = 189, symptomatic (n = 29 or ruptured (n = 23. LTB4 levels were measured similar to the plaque measurements and were related to tissue characteristics, baseline patient characteristics and clinical outcome. Twenty-six non-diseased aortic specimens served as controls. RESULTS: LTB4 levels corrected for protein content were not significantly associated with histological characteristics specific for vulnerable plaques or inflammatory AAA as well as clinical presentation. Moreover, it could not predict secondary manifestations independently investigated in both databases. However, LTB4 levels were significantly lower in controls compared to plaque (p = 0.025 or AAA (p = 0.017. CONCLUSIONS: LTB4 levels were not associated with a vulnerable plaque phenotype or inflammatory AAA or clinical

  20. Analysis of multiple genetic polymorphisms in aggressive-growing and slow-growing abdominal aortic aneurysms.

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    Duellman, Tyler; Warren, Christopher L; Matsumura, Jon; Yang, Jay

    2014-09-01

    The natural history of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) suggests that some remain slow in growth rate whereas many develop a more accelerated growth rate and reach a threshold for intervention. We hypothesized that different mechanisms are responsible for AAAs that remain slow growing and never become actionable vs the aggressive AAAs that require intervention and may be reflected by distinct associations with genetic polymorphisms. AAA growth rate was determined from serial imaging data in 168 control and 141 AAA patients with ultrasound or computed tomography imaging studies covering ∼5 years. Genetic polymorphisms all previously reported as showing a significant correlation with AAA with functional effects on the expression or function were determined by analysis of the genomic DNA, including angiotensin 1 receptor (rs5186), interleukin-10 (IL-10; rs1800896), methyl-tetrahydrofolate reductase (rs1801133), low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1; rs1466535), angiotensin-converting enzyme (rs1799752), and several matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) single nucleotide polymorphisms. Of the AAA patients, 81 were classified as slow AAA growth rate (3.25 mm/y, those presenting with a rupture, or those with maximal aortic diameter >5.5 cm [male] or >5.0 cm [female]). Discriminating confounds between the groups were identified by logistic regression. Analyses identified MMP-9 p-2502 single nucleotide polymorphism (odds ratio [OR], 0.54; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.31-0.94; P = .029) as a significant confound discriminating between control vs slow-growth AAA, MMP-9 D165N (OR, 0.49; 95% CI, 0.26-0.95; P = .035) and LRP1 (OR, 4.99; 95% CI, 1.13-22.1; P = .034) between control vs aggressive-growth AAAs, and methyltetrahydrofolate reductase (OR, 2.99; 95% CI, 1.01-8.86; P = .048), MMP-9 p-2502 (OR, 2.19; 95% CI, 1.05-4.58; P = .037), and LRP1 (OR, 4.96; 95% CI, 1.03-23.9; P = .046) as the statistically significant confounds distinguishing slow

  1. Analysis of multiple genetic polymorphisms in aggressive- and slow-growing abdominal aortic aneurysms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duellman, Tyler; Warren, Christopher L.; Matsumura, Jon; Yang, Jay

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The natural history of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) suggests that some remain slow in growth rate while many develop a more accelerated growth rate reaching a threshold for intervention. We hypothesized that different mechanisms are responsible for AAA that remain slow-growth and never become actionable versus the aggressive-AAA that require intervention may be reflected by distinct associations with genetic polymorphisms. Methods 168 control and 141 AAA subjects all with ultrasound or CT imaging studies covering about 5 years were identified and the AAA growth rate determined from the serial imaging data. Genetic polymorphisms all previously reported as showing significant correlation with AAA: angiotensin 1 receptor (AT1R) (rs5186), interleukin-10 (IL-10) (rs1800896), methyl-tetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) (rs1801133), low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) (rs1466535), angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) (rs1799752) and several MMP9 SNPs with functional effects on the expression or function were determined by analysis of the genomic DNA. Results AAA subjects were classified as slow-growth rate- (3.25 mm /yr, those presenting with a rupture, or those with maximal aortic diameter >5.5 cm (male) or >5.0 cm (female); n=60) and discriminating confounds between the groups identified by logistic regression. Analyses identified MMP9 p-2502 SNP (P=0.029, OR=0.54 (0.31-0.94)) as a significant confound discriminating between control- vs. slow-growth AAA, MMP-9 D165N (P=0.035) and LRP1 (P=0.034) between control vs. aggressive-AAA, and MTHFR (P=0.048, OR=2.99 (1.01-8.86)), MMP9 p-2502 (P=0.037, OR=2.19 (1.05-4.58), and LRP1 (P=0.046, OR= 4.96 (1.03-23.9)) as the statistically significant confounds distinguishing slow- vs. aggressive-AAA. Conclusion Logistic regression identified different genetic confounds for the slow-growth rate-and aggressive-AAA indicating a potential for different genetic influences on AAA of distinct aggressiveness

  2. Appearance of femoropopliteal segment aneurysms in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm

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    Maksić Milanko

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. To promote better treatment outcome, as well as economic benefit it is very important to find out patients with simultaneous occurrence of both aortic and arterial aneurysms. The aim of this prospective study was to determine the frequency and factors affecting femoropopliteal (F-P segment aneurysms appearance in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA. Methods. This study included 70 patients who had underwent elective or urgent surgery of AAA from January 1, 2006 to December 31, 2007. After ultrasonographic examination of F-P segment, all the patients were divided into two groups - those with adjunctive F-P segment aneurysm (n = 20 and the group of 50 patients with no adjunctive F-P segment aneurysm. In both groups demographic characteristics (gender, age, risk factors (diabetes mellitus, elevated serum levels of cholesterol and triglycerides, arterial hypertension, smoking, obesity and cardiovascular comorbidity (cerebrovascular desease, ischemic heart desease were investigated. Results. Twenty (28.57% patients who had been operated on because of AAA, had adjunctive aneurysmal desease of F-P segment. Diabetes was no statistically significantly more present among the patients who, beside AAA, had adjunctive aneurismal desease of F-P segment (χ2 = 0.04; DF = 1; p > 0.05. Also, in both groups there was no statistically significant difference in gender structure (χ2 = 2. 05; DF = 2; p > 0.05, age (χ2 = 5. 46; DF = 1; p > 0.05, total cholesterol level (χ2 = 0.89; DF = 1; p > 0.05 and triglyceride (χ2 = 0.89; DF = 1; p > 0.05 levels, the presence of arterial hypertension (χ2 = 1.38; DF = 2; p > 0.05, smoking (χ2 = 1.74; DF = 1; p > 0.05, obesity (χ2 = 1.76; DF = 1; p > 0.05 and presence of cerebrovascular desease (χ2 = 2.34; DF = 1; p > 0.05. Conversly, ischemic heart desease was statistically significantly more present among the patients who, beside AAA, had adjunctive aneurismal desease of F-P segment (χ2 = 5

  3. Aneurisma de la aorta abdominal: Tratamiento endovascular con una endoprótesis fenestrada Abdominal aortic aneurysm: Endovascular treatment with fenestrated endoprothesis

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    Román Rostagno

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available El tratamiento endovascular de los aneurismas de aorta abdominal es una alternativa a la cirugía abierta para pacientes de alto riesgo. Consiste en la exclusión del saco aneurismático mediante la interposición de una endoprótesis colocada por vía femoral. El tratamiento endovascular no puede ser utilizado en todos los pacientes. Una limitación frecuente la constituye el nacimiento de una arteria visceral desde el saco aneurismático. Para contrarrestar esta limitación recientemente se han desarrollado endoprótesis fenestradas que presentan orificios que se corresponden con el nacimiento de las arterias involucradas en el aneurisma evitando su oclusión, permitiendo de esta manera el tratamiento endovascular. En esta comunicación se presenta un caso de tratamiento endovascular de un aneurisma de aorta abdominal mediante la colocación de una endoprótesis fenestrada en un paciente cuya arteria renal izquierda nacía directamente del saco aneurismático.Endovascular treatment of the abdominal aortic aneurysm is consider an alternative to open surgery for high risk patients. Its goal is to exclude the aneurysm from the circulation by using an endoprothesis introduced from a femoral approach. Patients must be strictly selected to avoid possible complications. The most frequent limitation is related to anatomic contraindications such as visceral arteries involved in the aneurysm. Fenestrated endograft have been recently developed to allow endovascular treatment when anatomic features contraindicate classic endovascular procedures. Fenestrated endograft have holes that match with the origin of the visceral arteries maintaining its potency. In this paper we report the endovascular treatment of an abdominal aortic aneurysm by using a fenestrated endoprothesis in a patient whose left renal artery is originated from the aneurysm.

  4. Female Mice With an XY Sex Chromosome Complement Develop Severe Angiotensin II-Induced Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms.

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    Alsiraj, Yasir; Thatcher, Sean E; Charnigo, Richard; Chen, Kuey; Blalock, Eric; Daugherty, Alan; Cassis, Lisa A

    2017-01-24

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) are a deadly pathology with strong sexual dimorphism. Similar to humans, female mice exhibit far lower incidences of angiotensin II-induced AAAs than males. In addition to sex hormones, the X and Y sex chromosomes, and their unique complements of genes, may contribute to sexually dimorphic AAA pathology. Here, we defined the effect of female (XX) versus male (XY) sex chromosome complement on angiotensin II-induced AAA formation and rupture in phenotypically female mice. Female low-density lipoprotein receptor (Ldlr) deficient mice with an XX or XY sex chromosome complement were infused with angiotensin II for 28 days to induce AAAs. Abdominal aortic lumen diameters were quantified by ultrasound, whereas AAA diameters were quantified at study end point. DNA microarrays were performed on abdominal aortas. To mimic males, female mice were administered a single dose of testosterone as neonates or as adults before angiotensin II infusions. Female Ldlr-/- deficient mice with an XX and XY sex chromosome complement had similar sex organ weights and low serum testosterone concentrations. Abdominal aortas from female XY mice selectively expressed Y chromosome genes, whereas genes known to escape X inactivation were higher in XX females. The majority of aortic gene differences in XY versus XX females fell within inflammatory pathways. AAA incidences doubled and aneurysms ruptured in XY females. AAAs from XY females exhibited inflammation, and plasma interleukin-1β concentrations were increased in XY females. Moreover, aortas from XY females had augmented matrix metalloproteinase activity and increased oxidative stress. Last, testosterone exposure applied chronically, or as a single bolus at postnatal day 1, markedly worsened AAA outcomes in XY in comparison with XX adult females. An XY sex chromosome complement in phenotypic females profoundly influenced aortic gene expression profiles and promoted AAA severity. When XY females were exposed

  5. The pathophysiology of abdominal aortic aneurysm growth: Corresponding and discordant inflammatory and proteolytic processes in abdominal aortic and popliteal artery aneurysms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abdul-Hussien, H.; Hanemaaijer, R.; Kleemann, R.; Verhaaren, B.F.J.; Bockel, J.H. van; Lindeman, J.H.N.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: There is remarkable controversy over the processes driving abdominal aneurysm growth. The inherent limitations of animal and human studies hamper elucidation of the key inflammatory and proteolytic processes. Human data are largely derived from surgical specimens that typically reflect

  6. Monitoring and Staging Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) Disease with Pulse Wave Imaging (PWI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandlall, Sacha D.; GoldKlang, Monica P.; Kalashian, Aubrey; Dangra, Nida A.; D’Armiento, Jeanine M.; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2014-01-01

    The Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) is a silent and often deadly vascular disease caused by the localized weakening of the arterial wall. Previous work has shown that local changes in wall stiffness can be detected with Pulse Wave Imaging (PWI), which is a noninvasive technique for tracking the propagation of pulse waves along the aorta at high spatial and temporal resolutions. This study aims at assessing the capability of PWI to monitor and stage AAA progression in a murine model of the disease. ApoE/TIMP-1 knockout mice (N = 18) were given angiotensin II for 30 days via subcutaneously implanted osmotic pumps. The suprarenal sections of the abdominal aortas were imaged every 2-3 days after implantation using a 30 MHz Visualsonics Vevo 770 with 115 μm lateral resolution. Pulse wave propagation was monitored at an effective frame rate of 8 kHz by using retrospective electrocardiogram (ECG) gating and by performing 1-D cross-correlation on the radio-frequency (RF) signals to obtain the displacements induced by the waves. In normal aortas, the pulse waves propagated at constant velocities (2.8±0. 9 m/s, r2 = 0.89±0.11), indicating that the composition of these vessels was relatively homogeneous. In the mice that developed AAAs (N = 10), the wave speeds in the aneurysm sac were 45% lower (1.6±0.6 m/s) and were more variable (r2 = 0.66±0.23). Moreover, the wave-induced wall displacements were at least 80% lower within the sacs compared to the surrounding vessel. Finally, in mice that developed fissures (N = 5) or ruptures (N = 3) at the sites of their AAA, higher displacements directed out of the lumen and with no discernible wave pattern (r2 PWI can be used to distinguish normal murine aortas from aneurysmal, fissured, and ruptured ones. Hence, PWI could potentially be used to monitor and stage human aneurysms by providing information complementary to standard B-modes. PMID:25130446

  7. Characterization of the mechanical behavior and pathophysiological state of abdominal aortic aneurysms based on 4D ultrasound strain imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittek, Andreas; Blase, Christopher; Derwich, Wojciech; Schmitz-Rixen, Thomas; Fritzen, Claus-Peter

    2017-06-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) are a degenerative disease of the human aortic wall that may lead to weakening and eventually rupture of the wall with high mortality rates. Since the currently established criterion for surgical or endovascular treatment of the disease is imprecise in the individual case and treatment is not free of complications, the need for additional patient-individual biomarkers for short-term AAA rupture risk as basis for improved clinical decision making. Time resolved 3D ultrasound combined with speckle tracking algorithms is a novel non-invasive medical imaging technique that provides full-field displacement and strain measurements of aortic and aneurysmal wall motion. This is patient-individual information that has not been used so far to assess wall strength and rupture risk. The current study uses simple statistical indices of the heterogeneous spatial distribution of in-plane strain components as biomarkers for the pathological state of the aortic and aneurysmal wall. The pathophysiological rationale behind this approach are the known changes in microstructural composition of the aortic wall with progression of AAA development that results in increased stiffening and heterogeneity of the walls mechanical properties and in decreased wall strength. In a comparative analysis of the aortic wall motion of young volunteers without known cardiovascular diseases, aged arteriosclerotic patients without AAA, and AAA patients, mean values of all in-plane strain components were significantly reduced, and the heterogeneity of circumferential strain was significantly increased in the AAA group compared to both other groups. The capacity of the proposed method to differentiate between wall motion of aged, arteriosclerotic patients and AAA patients is a promising step towards a new method for in vivo assessment of AAA wall strength or stratification of AAA rupture risk as basis for improved clinical decision making on surgical or endovascular

  8. Perfusion computed tomography imaging of abdominal aortic aneurysms may be of value for patient specific rupture risk estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontopodis, Nikolaos; Galanakis, Nikolaos; Tsetis, Dimitrios; Ioannou, Christos V

    2017-04-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) continues to pose a significant cause of unexpected mortality in the developed countries with its incidence constantly rising. The indication of elective surgical repair is currently based on the maximum diameter and growth rate criteria which represent an oversimplification of the Law of Laplace stating that the stress exerted in a cylinder or sphere is proportional to its radius. These criteria fail to capture the complex pathophysiology of the aneurismal disease thus often leading to therapeutic inaccuracies (treating large AAAs with a very low actual rupture risk while observing smaller ones with a much greater risk). Aneurysmal disease is mainly a degenerative process leading to loss of structural integrity of the diseased aortic wall which cannot withhold the stresses due to systemic pressurization. Moreover aortic wall degeneration has been shown to be a localized phenomenon and rupture depends on the pointwise comparison of strength and stress rather than a global aortic wall weakening. Ex-vivo mechanical studies have related vessel wall hypoxia to loss of structural endurance and reduced wall strength. Therefore a module to capture in vivo variation of aortic wall blood supply and oxygenation would be of value for the evaluation of AAA rupture risk. Perfusion computed tomography (PCT) imaging represents a novel technique which has been already used to estimate tissue vascularity in several clinical conditions but not aneurismal disease. We hypothesize that PCT could be used as an adjunct tool during AAA diagnostics in order to evaluate aortic wall oxygenation in vivo, therefore providing a possible means to identify weak spots making the lesion amenable to rupture. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. A comparison of modelling techniques for computing wall stress in abdominal aortic aneurysms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McGloughlin Timothy M

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aneurysms, in particular abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA, form a significant portion of cardiovascular related deaths. There is much debate as to the most suitable tool for rupture prediction and interventional surgery of AAAs, and currently maximum diameter is used clinically as the determining factor for surgical intervention. Stress analysis techniques, such as finite element analysis (FEA to compute the wall stress in patient-specific AAAs, have been regarded by some authors to be more clinically important than the use of a "one-size-fits-all" maximum diameter criterion, since some small AAAs have been shown to have higher wall stress than larger AAAs and have been known to rupture. Methods A patient-specific AAA was selected from our AAA database and 3D reconstruction was performed. The AAA was then modelled in this study using three different approaches, namely, AAA(SIMP, AAA(MOD and AAA(COMP, with each model examined using linear and non-linear material properties. All models were analysed using the finite element method for wall stress distributions. Results Wall stress results show marked differences in peak wall stress results between the three methods. Peak wall stress was shown to reduce when more realistic parameters were utilised. It was also noted that wall stress was shown to reduce by 59% when modelled using the most accurate non-linear complex approach, compared to the same model without intraluminal thrombus. Conclusion The results here show that using more realistic parameters affect resulting wall stress. The use of simplified computational modelling methods can lead to inaccurate stress distributions. Care should be taken when examining stress results found using simplified techniques, in particular, if the wall stress results are to have clinical importance.

  10. Inhibition of rho-kinase by fasudil suppresses formation and progression of experimental abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Peng

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Accumulating evidence suggests that inflammatory cell infiltration is crucial pathogenesis during the initiation and progression of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA. Given Rho-kinase (ROCK, an important kinase control the actin cytoskeleton, regulates the inflammatory cell infiltration, thus, we investigate the possibility and mechanism of preventing experimental AAA progression via targeting ROCK in mice porcine pancreatic elastase (PPE model. METHODS AND RESULTS: AAA was created in 10-week-old male C57BL/6 mice by transient intraluminal porcine pancreatic elastase infusion into the infrarenal aorta. The mRNA level of RhoA, RhoC, ROCK1 and ROCK2 were elevated in aneurismal aorta. Next, PPE infusion mice were orally administrated with vehicle or ROCK inhibitor (Fasudil at dose of 200 mg/kg/day during the period of day 1 prior to PPE infusion to day 14 after PPE infusion. PPE infusion mice treated with Fasudil produced significantly smaller aneurysms as compare to PPE infusion mice treated with vehicle. AAAs developed in all vehicle-treated groups within 14 days, whereas AAAs developed in six mice (66%, 6/9 treated with Fasudil within 14 days. Furthermore, our semi-quantitative histological analysis revealed that blood vessels and macrophages were significantly reduced in Fasudil treated mice during the AAA progression. Finally, when mice with existing AAAs were treated with Fasudil, the enlargement was nearly completely suppressed. CONCLUSION: Fasudil inhibits experimental AAA progression and stabilize existing aneurysms, through mechanisms likely related to impaired mural macrophage infiltration and angiogenesis. These findings suggest that ROCK inhibitor may hold substantial translational value for AAA diseases.

  11. Cardiopulmonary exercise testing in small abdominal aortic aneurysm: profile, safety, and mortality estimates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Jonathan; Powell, Alyssa; Smith, Kimberly; Fonda, Holly; Dalman, Ronald L

    2011-06-01

    Few data are available regarding exercise testing in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) disease. The purpose of this study was to evaluate safety and to characterize the hemodynamic and cardiopulmonary (CPX) response to exercise in a large group of patients with AAA. Three hundred and six patients with AAA ≥3.0 to ≤5.0 cm (mean 72 ± 8 years) underwent CPX as part of a randomized trial of exercise training. CPX and hemodynamic responses, ischemic events, rhythm disturbances, and risk estimates based on treadmill scores were quantified and compared to an age-matched group of 2155 veterans referred for exercise testing for clinical reasons. Peak VO(2) was similar between patients with AAA and the referral group (20.0 ± 6 ml/kg/min; 77 percent of age-predicted and 20.3 ± 7 ml/kg/min; 80 percent of age-predicted, respectively). The incidence of exercise-induced hypotension and hypertension was higher in AAA patients versus the referral group (2.9 and 3.6 percent vs mortality, respectively, were similar between groups. Patients with AAA have a slightly higher incidence of hyper- and hypotensive responses to exercise than age-matched referrals, but no serious events related to CPX occurred. AAA patients can undergo maximal CPX safely and have risk scores based on treadmill test results that are similar to age-matched referral subjects. These findings extend recent studies using sub-maximal evaluations to stratify risk in patients considered for surgery, and support the routine use of exercise testing for risk evaluation and the functional assessment of patients with AAA.

  12. Screening of siblings to patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linné, Anneli; Forsberg, Johan; Leander, Karin; Hultgren, Rebecka

    2017-06-01

    The prevalence of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) is higher for First Degree Relatives to AAA-patients compared to the general population, regardless of sex. The prevalence of AAA is also higher in the North of Sweden compared to the Mid and South. A regional strong hereditary trait has been suggested as an explanation to this. The aim of this study was to investigate if siblings to AAA-patients in the North have a higher prevalence of AAA compared to siblings in the Mid-region. Cohort study. All patients treated for AAA in a northern region (Norrbotten county, North) were screened for siblings. Consenting siblings, age 40-80, were examined (n = 379) with ultrasound. The results were compared to the previously published results of 150 ultrasound-screened siblings in the Mid-region (Stockholm county). The male/female ratio in the sibling cohort was 48% vs 52%. The prevalence of AAA in siblings in the North was 37/379 (brothers 14%, sisters 6%). This was not different from the prevalence among the Mid-region siblings 16/150 (brothers 17%, sisters 6% (p = 0.75). The distribution of risk factors was similar in the two regions. The results reinforce the importance of a more systematic approach towards selective screening of all siblings to AAA patients. Ultrasound should be performed in all eligible siblings, since the distribution of AAA is similar over regions. A correlation between the familial distribution and the reported high prevalence of AAA in general population in the North could not be shown.

  13. The impact of weather factors, moon phases, and seasons on abdominal aortic aneurysm rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kózka, Mateusz Andrzej; Bijak, Piotr; Chwala, Maciej; Mrowiecki, Tomasz; Kotynia, Maksymilian; Kaczmarek, Bogusz; Szczeklik, Michał; Lall, Kulvinder S; Szczeklik, Wojciech

    2014-04-01

    Several studies have documented that weather factors, seasons of the year, time of the day, and even changes in moon phases have an impact on the occurrence of rupture of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (RAAA); however, the available data are confounding. The objective of this study was to determine the impact of these factors on the prevalence and mortality rate of RAAA. This is a retrospective analysis of medical records of patients treated for RAAA over a 10-year period. Weather data (i.e., atmospheric pressure, air temperature, humidity, visibility, and wind speed) and weather events (i.e., rain, snow, and storms, etc) were obtained from the local meteorologic weather station and analyzed for a correlation with RAAA. Five hundred thirty patients with RAAA were identified, and these patients presented on 478 days during the 10-year study period (3,652 days), with the overall in-hospital mortality rate of 48.7%. The RAAA mortality was higher during weekends and national holidays, when compared to weekdays (59% vs 45%; P = 0.006) and in patients admitted between 3-7 am when compared to work day hours (65.5% vs 44.1%; P = 0.035). Season changes had no influence on the frequency of RAAA; however, summer seemed to be associated with an increase in mortality as opposed to autumn (54.4% vs 42.5%; P = 0.047). Mean atmospheric pressure (and fluctuations thereof) and other weather factors, including phases and parts of the moon, did not correlate with RAAA occurrence or its mortality. Patients with RAAA who were admitted on weekends, national holidays and in late night hours had lower survival rates. Weather factors (including atmospheric pressure) do not influence the prevalence and mortality of RAAA. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Toll-Like Receptor 4 Is Essential in the Development of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao-Han Lai

    Full Text Available Toll-like receptor (TLR family plays a key role in innate immunity and various inflammatory responses. TLR4, one of the well-characterized pattern-recognition receptors, can be activated by endogenous damage-associated molecular pattern molecules such as high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1 to sustain sterile inflammation. Evidence suggested that blockade of TLR4 signaling may confer protection against abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA. Herein we aimed to obtain further insight into the mechanism by which TLR4 might promote aneurysm formation. Characterization of the CaCl2-induced AAA model in mice revealed that upregulation of TLR4 expression, localized predominantly to vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs, was followed by a late decline during a 28-day period of AAA development. In vitro, TLR4 expression was increased in VSMCs treated with HMGB1. Knockdown of TLR4 by siRNA attenuated HMGB1-enhanced production of proinflammatory cytokines, specifically interleukin-6 and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1, and matrix-degrading matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-2 from VSMCs. In vivo, two different strains of TLR4-deficient (C57BL/10ScNJ and C3H/HeJ mice were resistant to CaCl2-induced AAA formation compared to their respective controls (C57BL/10ScSnJ and C3H/HeN. Knockout of TLR4 reduced interleukin-6 and MCP-1 levels and HMGB1 expression, attenuated macrophage accumulation, and eventually suppressed MMP production, elastin destruction and VSMC loss. Finally, human AAA exhibited higher TLR4 expression that was localized to VSMCs. These data suggest that TLR4 signaling contributes to AAA formation by promoting a proinflammatory status of VSMCs and by inducing proteinase release from VSMCs during aneurysm initiation and development.

  15. Biomechanical Imaging Markers as Predictors of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Growth or Rupture: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indrakusuma, R; Jalalzadeh, H; Planken, R N; Marquering, H A; Legemate, D A; Koelemay, M J W; Balm, R

    2016-10-01

    Biomechanical characteristics, such as wall stress, are important in the pathogenesis of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) and can be visualised and quantified using imaging techniques. This systematic review aims to present an overview of all biomechanical imaging markers that have been studied in relation to AAA growth and rupture. This systematic review followed the PRISMA guidelines. A search in Medline, Embase, and the Cochrane Library identified 1503 potentially relevant articles. Studies were included if they assessed biomechanical imaging markers and their potential association with growth or rupture. Twenty-seven articles comprising 1730 patients met the inclusion criteria. Eighteen studies performed wall stress analysis using finite element analysis (FEA), 13 of which used peak wall stress (PWS) to quantify wall stress. Ten of 13 case control FEA studies reported a significantly higher PWS for symptomatic or ruptured AAAs than for intact AAAs. However, in some studies there was confounding bias because of baseline differences in aneurysm diameter between groups. Clinical heterogeneity in methodology obstructed a meaningful meta-analysis of PWS. Three of five FEA studies reported a significant positive association between several wall stress markers, such as PWS and 99th percentile stress, and growth. One study reported a significant negative association and one other study reported no significant association. Studies assessing wall compliance, the augmentation index and wall stress analysis using Laplace's law, computational fluid dynamics and fluid structure interaction were also included in this systematic review. Although PWS is significantly higher in symptomatic or ruptured AAAs in most FEA studies, confounding bias, clinical heterogeneity, and lack of standardisation limit the interpretation and generalisability of the results. Also, there is conflicting evidence on whether increased wall stress is associated with growth. Copyright © 2016 European

  16. Measurements and detection of abdominal aortic aneurysm growth: Accuracy and reproducibility of a segmentation software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kauffmann, Claude, E-mail: claude.kauffmann@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Montreal (CHUM) and CHUM Research Center (CRCHUM), University of Montreal, 1560 Sherbrooke Est, H2L 4M1 Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Tang, An, E-mail: duotango@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Montreal (CHUM) and CHUM Research Center (CRCHUM), University of Montreal, 1560 Sherbrooke Est, H2L 4M1 Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Therasse, Eric, E-mail: eric.therasse.chum@ssss.gouv.qc.ca [Department of Radiology, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Montreal (CHUM) and CHUM Research Center (CRCHUM), University of Montreal, 1560 Sherbrooke Est, H2L 4M1 Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Giroux, Marie-France, E-mail: m_fgiroux@videotron.ca [Department of Radiology, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Montreal (CHUM) and CHUM Research Center (CRCHUM), University of Montreal, 1560 Sherbrooke Est, H2L 4M1 Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Elkouri, Stephane, E-mail: stephane.elkouri.chum@ssss.gouv.qc.ca [Department of Surgery, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Montreal (CHUM) and CHUM Research Center (CRCHUM), University of Montreal, 1560 Sherbrooke Est, H2L 4M1 Montreal, Quebec (Canada); and others

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: To validate the reproducibility and accuracy of a software dedicated to measure abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) diameter, volume and growth over time. Materials and methods: A software enabling AAA segmentation, diameter and volume measurement on computed tomography angiography (CTA) was tested. Validation was conducted in 28 patients with an AAA having 2 consecutive CTA examinations. The segmentation was performed twice by a senior radiologist and once by 3 medical students on all 56 CTAs. Intra and inter-observer reproducibility of D-max and volumes values were calculated by intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Systematic errors were evaluated by Bland-Altman analysis. Differences in D-max and volume growth were compared with paired Student's t-tests. Results: Mean D-max and volume were 49.6 {+-} 6.2 mm and 117.2 {+-} 36.2 ml for baseline and 53.6 {+-} 7.9 mm and 139.6 {+-} 56.3 ml for follow-up studies. Volume growth (17.3%) was higher than D-max progression (8.0%) between baseline and follow-up examinations (p < .0001). For the senior radiologist, intra-observer ICC of D-max and volume measurements were respectively estimated at 0.997 ({>=}0.991) and 1.000 ({>=}0.999). Overall inter-observer ICC of D-max and volume measurements were respectively estimated at 0.995 (0.990-0.997) and 0.999 (>0.999). Bland-Altman analysis showed excellent inter-reader agreement with a repeatability coefficient <3 mm for D-max, <7% for relative D-max growth, <6 ml for volume and <6% for relative volume growth. Conclusion: Software AAA volume measurements were more sensitive than AAA D-max to detect AAA growth while providing an equivalent and high reproducibility.

  17. Three-dimensional workstation is useful for measuring the correct size of abdominal aortic aneurysm diameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihara, Tsutomu; Komori, Kimihiro; Yamamoto, Kiyohito; Kobayashi, Masayoshi; Banno, Hiroshi; Kodama, Akio

    2013-02-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm diameter is usually measured by the maximum minor-axis diameter on axial computed tomography (CT). However, this "traditional" diameter may underestimate the real size, as the aorta is not always straight and the aneurysm shape is sometimes in the form of an ellipse along the cross section. Therefore, we measured maximum major-axis diameters using a three-dimensional (3D) workstation and compared them with the traditional maximum minor-axis diameters measured using thin-slice axial CT. CT data of 141 AAA patients (with fusiform aneurysms) were stored in a 3D workstation. These thin-slice CT images were reviewed on the 3D workstation to obtain curved multiplanar reconstruction images (CPR images). Using the CPR images, we measured the maximum major-axis and minor-axis diameters on CPR and the angle of the aneurysms to the body axis. The mean traditional maximum minor-axis diameter was 51.2 ± 8.2 mm, whereas the mean maximum major-axis diameter on CPR was 54.7 ± 10.1 mm. Sixty eight patients had a mean aneurysm size of 55 mm on CPR. The measurement of the traditional maximum minor-axis diameter of aneurysms is useful in the case of most patients. However, the traditional maximum minor-axis diameter may underestimate the real aneurysmal diameter, particularly in patients with an ellipse-shaped aneurysm. The maximum major-axis diameter as measured using CPR images is effective for representing the real aneurysmal size. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Vessel asymmetry as an additional diagnostic tool in the assessment of abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Doyle, Barry J

    2009-02-01

    OBJECTIVE: Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) rupture is believed to occur when the local mechanical stress exceeds the local mechanical strength of the wall tissue. On the basis of this hypothesis, the knowledge of the stress acting on the wall of an unruptured aneurysm could be useful in determining the risk of rupture. The role of asymmetry has previously been identified in idealized AAA models and is now studied using realistic AAAs in the current work. METHODS: Fifteen patient-specific AAAs were studied to estimate the relationship between wall stress and geometrical parameters. Three-dimensional AAA models were reconstructed from computed tomography scan data. The stress distribution on the AAA wall was evaluated by the finite element method, and peak wall stress was compared with both diameter and centerline asymmetry. A simple method of determining asymmetry was adapted and developed. Statistical analyses were performed to determine potential significance of results. RESULTS: Mean von Mises peak wall stress +\\/- standard deviation was 0.4505 +\\/- 0.14 MPa (range, 0.3157-0.9048 MPa). Posterior wall stress increases with anterior centerline asymmetry. Peak stress increased by 48% and posterior wall stress by 38% when asymmetry was introduced into a realistic AAA model. CONCLUSION: The relationship between posterior wall stress and AAA asymmetry showed that excessive bulging of one surface results in elevated wall stress on the opposite surface. Assessing the degree of bulging and asymmetry that is experienced in an individual AAA may be of benefit to surgeons in the decision-making process and may provide a useful adjunct to diameter as a surgical intervention guide.

  19. Regional distribution of wall thickness and failure properties of human abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghavan, Madhavan L; Kratzberg, Jarin; Castro de Tolosa, Erasmo Magalhães; Hanaoka, Mauro M; Walker, Patricia; da Silva, Erasmo Simão

    2006-01-01

    The regional distribution of wall thickness and failure properties in human abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) was explored. Three unruptured and one ruptured AAA were harvested as a whole during necropsy. Thickness was measured at about every 1.5 cm(2) wall surface area for an average of 100 measurement sites per AAA. Multiple longitudinally oriented rectangular specimen strips were cut at various locations from each AAA for a total of 48 strips. The strips were subjected to uniaxial extension until failure. Wall thickness varied regionally and between AAA from as low as 0.23 mm at a rupture site to 4.26 mm at a calcified site (median=1.48 mm). Wall thickness was slightly lower in the posterior and right regions. The failure tension (ultimate) of specimen strips varied regionally and between AAA from 5.5 N/cm close to a blister site in the ruptured AAA to 42.3N/cm at the undilated neck of a 4 cm diameter unruptured AAA (median=14.8 N/cm). Failure stress (ultimate) varied from 33.6 to 235.1N/cm(2) (median=126.6N/cm(2)). There was no perceptible pattern in failure properties along the circumference. Failure tension of specimen strips at or close to blisters was mostly low. The rupture site in the ruptured aneurysm had the lowest recorded wall thickness of 0.23 mm with only slightly higher readings within a 1cm radius. The failure tension of the specimen strip close to the rupture site was low (11.1 N/cm) compared to its neighborhood in the ruptured aneurysm.

  20. DPP4 deficiency preserved cardiac function in abdominal aortic banding rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Chun Ku

    Full Text Available Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP4 enzyme inhibition has been reported to increase plasma glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1 level for controlling postprandial glucose concentration. A prominent GLP-1 level in DPP4-deficient rats contributed to the resistance of endotoxemia and myocardial infarction. DPP4 deficiency also increased the capability against H₂O₂-induced stress in cardiomyocyte. However, long term effect of loss DPP4 activity on cardiac performance remained unclear. We used abdominal aortic banding (AAB to induce pressure overload in wild-type and DPP4-deficient rats, and investigated the progression of heart failure. Cardiac histology and function were determined. Blood sample was collected for the plasma biochemical marker measurement. Heart weight to body weight ratio increased 1.2-fold after 6 weeks of AAB surgery. Cardiac function was compensated against pressure overload after 6 weeks of AAB surgery, but progressed to deterioration after 10 weeks of AAB surgery. AAB induced cardiac dysfunction was alleviated in DPP4-deficient rats. DPP4 activity increased significantly in wild-type rats after 10 weeks of AAB surgery, but remained unchanged in DPP4-deficient rats. In contrast, GLP-1 concentration was elevated by AAB after 6 weeks of surgery in DPP4-deficient rats, and remained high after 10 weeks of surgery. Ang II level markedly increased after 6 weeks of AAB surgery, but were less in DPP4-deficient rats. Massive collagen deposits in wild-type rat hearts appeared after 10 weeks of AAB surgery, which were alleviated in DPP4-deficient rats. Long term deficiency of DPP4 activity improved cardiac performance against pressure overload in rat, which may be attributed to a great quantity of GLP-1 accumulation during AAB.

  1. In-situ laser fenestration of endovascular stent-graft in abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micheletti, Filippo; Pini, Roberto; Piazza, Roberta; Ferrari, Vincenzo; Condino, Sara; Rossi, Francesca

    2017-02-01

    Endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysms repair (EVAR) involves the minimally invasive implantation of a stent-graft within the aorta to exclude the aneurysm from the circulation thus preventing its rupture. The feasibility of such operation is highly dependent on the aorta morphology and in general the presence of one/both renal arteries emerging from the aneurysm is the absolute limit for the implantation of a standard stent-graft. Consequently, classical intervention methods involve the implantation of a custom-made graft with fenestrations, leading to extremely complicated surgeries with high risks for the patient and high costs. Recent techniques introduced the use of standard grafts (i.e. without fenestrations) in association with mechanical in-situ fenestration, but this procedure is limited principally by the brittleness and low stability of the environment, in addition to the difficulty of controlling the guidance of the endovascular tools due to the temporarily block of the blood flow. In this work we propose an innovative EVAR strategy, which involves in-situ fenestration with a fiber guided laser tool, controlled via an electromagnetic navigation system. The fiber is sensorized to be tracked by means of the driving system and, using a 3D model of the patient anatomy, the surgeon can drive the fiber to the aneurysm, where the stent has been previously released, to realize the proper fenestration(s). The design and construction of the catheter laser tool will be presented, togheter with preliminary fenestration tests on graft-materials, including the effects due to the presence of blood and tissues.

  2. Preoperative Supervised Exercise Improves Outcomes After Elective Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barakat, Hashem M; Shahin, Yousef; Khan, Junaid A; McCollum, Peter T; Chetter, Ian C

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the impact of a preoperative medically supervised exercise program on outcomes after elective abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair. Functional capacity is an important predictor of postoperative outcomes after elective AAA repair. Improving patients' preoperative fitness with exercise has the potential to positively influence recovery. A randomized controlled trial was performed at a tertiary vascular unit. Patients scheduled for open or endovascular AAA repair were randomized to either 6 weeks of preoperative supervised exercise or standard treatment using sealed envelopes. The primary outcome measure was a composite endpoint of cardiac, pulmonary, and renal complications. Secondary outcome measures were 30-day mortality, lengths of hospital and critical care stay, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) scores, reoperation, and postoperative bleeding. One hundred twenty-four patients were randomized (111 men, mean [SD] age 73 [7] y). Fourteen patients sustained postoperative complications in the exercise group (22.6%), compared with 26 in the nonexercise group (41.9%; P = 0.021). Four patients (2 in each group) died within the first 30 postoperative days. Duration of hospital stay was significantly shorter in the exercise group (median 7 [interquartile range 5-9] vs 8 [interquartile range 6-12.3] d; P = 0.025). There were no significant differences between the groups in the length of critical care stay (P = 0.845), APACHE II scores (P = 0.256), incidence of reoperations (P = 1.000), or postoperative bleeding (P = 0.343). A period of preoperative supervised exercise training reduces postoperative cardiac, respiratory, renal complications, and length of hospital stay in patients undergoing elective AAA repair.

  3. Influence of Gender on Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair in the Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevidomskyte, Daiva; Shalhub, Sherene; Singh, Niten; Farokhi, Ellen; Meissner, Mark H

    2017-02-01

    Women have been shown to experience inferior outcomes following intact and ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) treatment in endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) and open surgical repair (OSR) groups. The goal of our study was to compare gender-specific presentation, management, and early outcomes after AAA repair using a statewide registry. We utilized the Washington State's Vascular Interventional Surgical Care and Outcomes Assessment Program registry data collected in 19 hospitals from July 2010 to September 2013. Demographics, presentation, procedural data, and outcomes in elective and emergent AAA repair groups were analyzed. We identified 1,231 patients (19.6% women) who underwent intact (86.4%) or ruptured AAA (13.6%) repairs. Nine thousand seventy-two (79.0%) patients had EVAR and 259 (21.0%) had OSR. Men and women were of equivalent age and had similar comorbidities, except that women had less coronary artery disease (P aneurysm diameters (5.8 ± 1.1 vs. 6.2 ± 1.8 cm, P aneurysm size. Men were more likely to undergo EVAR, with significant differences in elective (82.1% vs. 74.1%, P = 0.01), but not ruptured repair. Women had significantly higher mortality rates following elective EVAR (3.1% vs. 0.6%, P = 0.01), but not after ruptured or elective open repair. Following elective EVAR, women were less likely to be discharged to home after longer hospital stays (3 vs. 2 days, P aneurysm diameter, and similar medical comorbidities, women experience substantially worse hospital outcomes primarily driven by elective endovascular procedures. Utilization of endovascular techniques in women still remains lower compared with men. Improvement of elective outcomes in women will likely depend on technical advancements in repair techniques and management strategies that may differ between genders. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Management of coronary artery disease in patients undergoing elective abdominal aortic aneurysm open repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosokawa, Yusuke; Takano, Hitoshi; Aoki, Asako; Inami, Toru; Ogano, Michio; Kobayashi, Nobuaki; Tanabe, Jun; Yokoyama, Hiroyuki; Kato, Takayoshi; Takagi, Hisato; Umemoto, Takuya; Takayama, Morimasa; Mizuno, Kyoichi

    2008-12-01

    The efficacy of prophylactic coronary revascularization with percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) or coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) scheduled for open repair surgery remains controversial. Concomitant coronary artery disease (CAD) with no inducible ischemia can be medically treated in AAA patients undergoing open repair as long as the existence of CAD is recognized. A retrospective analysis of acute and long-term outcomes was performed for 122 patients with AAA who underwent coronary arteriography (CAG) for preoperative evaluation followed by elective open repair. Preoperative CAG revealed no CAD in 54 patients (non-CAD group) and the existence of CAD in 68 patients. Prophylactic PCI or CABG surgery was performed in 16 patients (CAD-PCI/CABG group) with symptomatic angina, ischemia proven by pharmacological stress scintigraphy, or coexistence of reduced cardiac contraction and coronary stenosis in multiple vessels. Medical treatment was administered to 52 patients who had no signs of ischemia (CAD-medical group). During the perioperative period, no cardiac event occurred irrespective of the existence of CAD. The long-term outcomes in the CAD-medical group were equivalent to those in the non-CAD group. In the CAD-PCI/CABG group, the cardiac event-free rate was comparable with that of other groups, although mortality was higher. In patients undergoing AAA open repair, medical treatment for concomitant CAD with no obvious inducible ischemia does not confer unfavorable outcomes. Although prophylactic coronary revascularization possibly prevents future cardiac events, it appears to be necessary in a very limited number of cases. (c) 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Quality of life before and after endovascular and retroperitoneal abdominal aortic aneurysm repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballard, Jeffrey L; Abou-Zamzam, Ahmed M; Teruya, Theodore H; Bianchi, Christian; Petersen, Floyd F

    2004-04-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate changes in quality of life and to compare conventional outcomes in patients undergoing endovascular and open retroperitoneal abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair. Between October 2000 and May 2003, 129 patients underwent elective AAA repair, endovascular repair in 22 patients and open retroperitoneal repair in 107 patients. The Short-Form Health Survey, 12 items (SF-12) was administered preoperatively and at 3 weeks, 4 months, and 1 year after discharge. Quality of life, hospital and intensive care unit stay, perioperative complications, discharge disposition, readmission, and hospital cost were statistically evaluated. For the total group, significant differences were observed for both Physical Component Summary scores (Pscores (P=.001) between time points. There were no significant differences for either Component Summary score between open and endovascular procedures for any time period. Number of weeks required to return to baseline functional status was similar after either open or endovascular repair (7.22 vs 5.47 weeks, respectively; P=.09). Mean hospital and intensive care unit stay was 4.4 and 1 days, respectively, for open repair versus 1.9 and 0 days, respectively, for endovascular repair (P or =.54). Mean total hospital cost for endovascular repair was 1.60 times that for open repair (mean difference, $11,662; P<.0001; 95% confidence interval, $17,799-$5525). Hospital stay is significantly shorter after endovascular AAA repair. However, hospital cost is almost twice that for open retroperitoneal repair. Perioperative complications, discharge disposition, and hospital readmission are not statistically different between the two groups. Effect on health-related quality of life is similar after either open retroperitoneal or endovascular AAA repair.

  6. Endovascular Treatment of Infrarenal Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm with Short and Angulated Neck in High-Risk Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stylianos Koutsias

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Endovascular treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA is an established alternative to open repair. However lifelong surveillance is still required to monitor endograft function and signal the need for secondary interventions (Hobo and Buth 2006. Aortic morphology, especially related to the proximal neck, often complicates the procedure or increases the risk for late device-related complications (Hobo et al. 2007 and Chisci et al. 2009. The definition of a short and angulated neck is based on length (60° (Hobo et al. 2007 and Chisci et al. 2009. A challenging neck also offers difficulties during open repairs (OR, necessitating extensive dissection with juxta- or suprarenal aortic cross-clamping. Patients with extensive aneurysmal disease typically have more comorbidities and may not tolerate extensive surgical trauma (Sarac et al. 2002. It is, therefore, unclear whether aneurysms with a challenging proximal neck should be offered EVAR or OR (Cox et al. 2006, Choke et al. 2006, Robbins et al. 2005, Sternbergh III et al. 2002, Dillavou et al. 2003, and Greenberg et al. 2003. In our case the insertion of a thoracic endograft followed by the placement of a bifurcated aortic endograft for the treatment of a very short and severely angulated neck proved to be feasible offering acceptable duration of aneurysm exclusion. This adds up to our armamentarium in the treatment of high-risk patients, and it should be considered in emergency cases when the fenestrated and branched endografts are not available.

  7. Alterations of blood flow pattern after triple stent endovascular treatment of saccular abdominal aortic aneurysm: a porcine model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JAHIR RICHARD DE OLIVEIRA

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: to determine the blood flow pattern changes after endovascular treatment of saccular abdominal aortic aneurysm with triple stent. Methods: we conducted a hemodynamic study of seven Landrace and Large White pigs with saccular aneurysms of the infrarenal abdominal aorta artificially produced according to the technique described. The animals were subjected to triple stenting for endovascular aneurysm. We evaluated the pattern of blood flow by duplex scan before and after stent implantation. We used the non-paired Mann-Whitney test for statistical analysis. Results: there was a significant decrease in the average systolic velocity, from 127.4cm/s in the pre-stent period to 69.81cm/s in the post-stent phase. There was also change in the flow pattern from turbulent in the aneurysmal sac to laminate intra-stent. Conclusion: there were changes in the blood flow pattern of saccular abdominal aortic aneurysm after endovascular treatment with triple stent.

  8. Application of a novel particle tracking algorithm in the flow visualization of an artificial abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yang; Wang, Yuan; He, Wenbo; Yang, Bin

    2014-01-01

    A novel Particle Tracking Velocimetry (PTV) algorithm based on Voronoi Diagram (VD) is proposed and briefed as VD-PTV. The robustness of VD-PTV for pulsatile flow is verified through a test that includes a widely used artificial flow and a classic reference algorithm. The proposed algorithm is then applied to visualize the flow in an artificial abdominal aortic aneurysm included in a pulsatile circulation system that simulates the aortic blood flow in human body. Results show that, large particles tend to gather at the upstream boundary because of the backflow eddies that follow the pulsation. This qualitative description, together with VD-PTV, has laid a foundation for future works that demand high-level quantification.

  9. Open Repair for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm in a Young Boy with Tuberous Sclerosis and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dueppers, Philip; Duran, Mansur; Grabitz, Klaus; Schelzig, Hubert

    2017-02-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) are very rare in pediatric patients and can rarely be associated with tuberous sclerosis (TS). Open surgery is the first-line therapy. We report our experience added by a review on current literature. A 9-year-old boy with TS and history of 2 earlier open repairs for AAA presented to our department with a recurrent juxtarenal aortic aneurysm. We performed a polytetraflourethylene patch plasty. Postoperative course was uneventful. After 8 months, reconstruction was stable, and no recurrent aneurysm developed. Recurrent aneurysms may develop after open surgery for TS-associated AAA. However, open surgery is the recommended therapy but requires special techniques and experience in pediatric patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Variations in complication rates and opportunities for improvement in quality of care for patients having abdominal aortic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pronovost, P; Garrett, E; Dorman, T; Jenckes, M; Webb III, T H; Breslow, M; Rosenfeld, B; Bass, E

    2001-07-01

    The purpose was to assess the current variation in complication rates and evaluate the association between specific types of complications and in-hospital mortality and total hospital charges for patients having abdominal aortic surgery. We studied 2987 patients for abdominal aortic surgery in Maryland from 1994 to 1996 and used discharge diagnoses and procedure codes to identify diagnoses that most likely represent major surgery complications. We evaluated how in-hospital mortality and total hospital charges related to specific complications, adjusting for patient demographics, severity of illness, comorbidity, and hospital and surgeon volumes. Discharge data was obtained from the hospital marketing departments. Complication rates varied widely among hospitals. Complications independently associated with increased risk of in-hospital death include cardiac arrest with an odds ratio (OR) of 90 and a 95% confidence interval (CI) of 32-251, septicemia (OR 6.1, CI 3.3-11.3), acute myocardial infarction (OR 5.7, CI 2.3-14.3), acute renal failure (OR 5.0, CI 2.3-11.0), surgical complications after a procedure (OR 3.1, CI 2.0-4.9), and reoperation for bleeding (OR 2.2, CI 1.1-4.8). The population-attributable risk for in-hospital mortality was 47% for cardiac arrest and 27% for acute renal failure. In abdominal aortic surgery on patients in Maryland, the rates of some complications vary widely and are independently associated with increased in-hospital mortality and hospital charges (charges differ from costs). Efforts to reduce these complications should help to decrease both levels.

  11. Mural thrombus and the progression of abdominal aortic aneurysms: a large population-based prospective cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Behr-Rasmussen, Carsten; Grøndal, Nikolaj Fibiger; Thomsen, Marie Dahl

    2014-01-01

    Abstract OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether the relative size of intraluminal thrombus (ILT) in abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) is associated with AAA growth. METHODS: This large observational study was based on a randomised population-based screening trial. Six hundred and fifteen AAAs were......, and diastolic blood pressure were significantly positively associated with growth rate, while the presence of diabetes mellitus was significantly negatively associated with growth rate. The relative ILT size remained significantly positively associated with the growth rate after a multivariate linear regression...

  12. Combined abdominal aortic aneurysm repair and coronary artery bypass: presentation of 13 cases and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Thomas; Baykut, Doan; Zerkowski, Hans-Reinhand; Stierli, Peter; Gürke, Lorenz

    2006-01-01

    Coronary artery disease remains the major cause of perioperative mortality after abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair. The beneficial effect of coronary artery bypass (CAB) before AAA repair in patients with severe coronary artery disease has been proven. The coexistence of a very large or symptomatic AAA and coronary artery disease remains a therapeutic challenge since there is the risk of AAA rupture in the interval between CAB and AAA repair. Combined CAB and aortic aneurysm repair has been suggested for these cases, and results on several series of patients have been published. However, the exact indication for the combined operation remains to be clarified. We present a series of 13 patients who underwent CAB on cardiopulmonary bypass and aortic aneurysm repair as a one-stage procedure. The indication was a large AAA in seven patients and a symptomatic AAA in six patients. In four patients, the aortic reconstruction was performed without the use of cardiopulmonary bypass; in nine patients, the aortic reconstruction was performed under partial cardiopulmonary bypass. Thirty-day mortality was 15%. Major morbidity was 31%. All major complications were due to excessive bleeding and occurred in patients who had AAA repair performed with partial cardiopulmonary bypass, suggesting that prolonged bypass time represents a major source of morbidity. A detailed review of the literature is presented. From the evidence available we suggest that the combined procedure can be recommended only for patients with very high rupture risk, such as in symptomatic AAA. In all other cases, the staged approach--CAB followed by AAA repair 2-4 weeks later--is preferable. During the combined procedure, cardiopulmonary bypass support during AAA repair should be used only in patients with clear evidence of hemodynamic instability.

  13. Numerical study of purely viscous non-Newtonian flow in an abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrero, Victor L; Tichy, John A; Sahni, Onkar; Jansen, Kenneth E

    2014-10-01

    It is well known that blood has non-Newtonian properties, but it is generally accepted that blood behaves as a Newtonian fluid at shear rates above 100 s-1. However, in transient conditions, there are times and locations where the shear rate is well below 100 s-1, and it is reasonable to infer that non-Newtonian effects could become important. In this study, purely viscous non-Newtonian (generalized Newtonian) properties of blood are incorporated into the simulation-based framework for cardiovascular surgery planning developed by Taylor et al. (1999, "Predictive Medicine: Computational Techniques in Therapeutic Decision Making," Comput. Aided Surg., 4, pp. 231-247; 1998, "Finite Element Modeling of Blood Flow in Arteries," Comput. Methods Appl. Mech. Eng., 158, pp. 155-196). Equations describing blood flow are solved in a patient-based abdominal aortic aneurysm model under steady and physiological flow conditions. Direct numerical simulation (DNS) is used, and the complex flow is found to be constantly transitioning between laminar and turbulent in both the spatial and temporal sense. It is found for the case simulated that using the non-Newtonian viscosity modifies the solution in subtle ways that yield a mesh-independent solution with fewer degrees of freedom than the Newtonian counterpart. It appears that in regions of separated flow, the lower shear rate produces higher viscosity with the non-Newtonian model, which reduces the associated resolution needs. When considering the real case of pulsatile flow, high shear layers lead to greater unsteadiness in the Newtonian case relative to the non-Newtonian case. This, in turn, results in a tendency for the non-Newtonian model to need fewer computational resources even though it has to perform additional calculations for the viscosity. It is also shown that both viscosity models predict comparable wall shear stress distribution. This work suggests that the use of a non-Newtonian viscosity models may be attractive

  14. Preoperative cardiopulmonary exercise testing and risk of early mortality following abdominal aortic aneurysm repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartley, R A; Pichel, A C; Grant, S W; Hickey, G L; Lancaster, P S; Wisely, N A; McCollum, C N; Atkinson, D

    2012-11-01

    Cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) provides an objective assessment of functional capacity. The aim of this study was to assess whether preoperative CPET identifies patients at risk of early death following elective open and endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair. Prospective data were collected from a pilot study between September 2005 and February 2007, and from all patients who underwent CPET before elective AAA repair at two vascular centres between February 2007 and November 2011. Symptom-limited, maximal CPET was performed on each patient. Univariable and multivariable analyses were used to identify risk factors for 30- and 90-day mortality. Some 415 patients underwent CPET before elective AAA repair. Anaerobic threshold (AT), peak oxygen consumption (peak V.O(2) ) and ventilatory equivalents for carbon dioxide were associated with 30- and 90-day mortality on univariable analysis. On multivariable analysis, open repair (odds ratio (OR) 4·92, 95 per cent confidence interval 1·55 to 17·00; P = 0·008), AT below 10·2 ml per kg per min (OR 6·35, 1·84 to 29·80; P = 0·007), anaemia (OR 3·27, 1·04 to 10·50; P = 0·041) and inducible cardiac ischaemia (OR 6·16, 1·48 to 23·07; P = 0·008) were associated with 30-day mortality. Anaemia, inducible cardiac ischaemia and peak V.O(2) less than 15 ml per kg per min (OR 8·59, 2·33 to 55·75; P = 0·005) were associated with 90-day mortality on multivariable analysis. Patients with two or more subthreshold CPET values were at increased risk of both 30- and 90-day mortality. An AT below 10·2 ml per kg per min, peak V.O(2) less than 15 ml per kg per min and at least two subthreshold CPET values identify patients at increased risk of early death following AAA repair. Copyright © 2012 British Journal of Surgery Society Ltd. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. The effect of surgeon specialization on outcomes after ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Alexander T; Smith, Ann D; Schaumeier, Maria J; de Vos, Marit S; Hevelone, Nathanael D; Nguyen, Louis L

    2014-09-01

    Although mortality after elective abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair has steadily declined, operative mortality for a ruptured AAA (rAAA) remains high. Repair of rAAA at hospitals with a higher elective aneurysm workload has been associated with lower mortality rates irrespective of the mode of treatment. This study sought to determine the association between surgeon specialization and outcomes after rAAA repair. The American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Project database from 2005 to 2010 was used to examine the 30-day mortality and morbidity outcomes of patients undergoing rAAA repair by vascular and general surgeons. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was performed for each death and morbidity, adjusting for all independently predictive preoperative risk factors. Survival curves were compared using the log-rank test. We identified 1893 repairs of rAAAs, of which 1767 (96.1%) were performed by vascular surgeons and 72 (3.9%) were performed by general surgeons. There were no significant differences between patients operated on by general vs vascular surgeons in preoperative risk factors or method of repair. Overall 30-day mortality was 34.3% (649 of 1893). After risk adjustment, mortality was significantly lower in the vascular surgery group compared with the general surgery group (odds ratio [OR], 0.51; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.30-0.86; P = .011). The risk of returning to the operating room (OR, 0.58; 95% CI, 0.35-0.97; P = .038), renal failure (OR, 0.54; 95% CI, 0.31-0.95; P = .034), and a cardiac complication (OR, 0.53; 95% CI, 0.28-0.99; P = .047) were all significantly less in the vascular surgery group. Despite similar preoperative risk factors profiles, patients who were operated on by vascular surgeons had lower mortality, less frequent returns to the operating room, and decreased incidences of postoperative renal failure and cardiac events. These data add weight to the case for further centralization of

  16. [Simultaneous endovascular aortic aneurysm repair and coronary artery bypass grafting in a patient with abdominal aortic aneurysm and left main trunk lesion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakao, Yoshihisa; Mitsuoka, Hiroshi; Masuda, Mikio; Shintani, Tsunehiro; Higashi, Shigeki

    2010-10-01

    To patients with severe coronary artery disease (CAD) and expanding large abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), simultaneous coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) and AAA repair has been recommended. A 68-year-old woman had a CAD and an AAA 71 mm in diameter which was enlarging. Coronary angiography showed severe stenoses in the left main trunk (LMT), the left anterior descending artery and the circumflex artery. On-pump beating CABG and AAA repair with endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) were performed simultaneously, because intraaortic balloon pumping (IABP) might be needed due to severe stenoses of LMT. Just after EAVR, on-pump beating CABG was performed. The patient was discharged 15 days after the operation. It was suggested that a simultaneous operation of CABG and EVAR might be safe and effective for high risk patients with CAD and AAA.

  17. NON-INVASIVE PULSE WAVE ANALYSIS IN A THROMBUS-FREE ABDOMINAL AORTIC ANEURYSM AFTER IMPLANTATION OF A NITINOL AORTIC ENDOGRAFT.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efstratios eGeorgakarakos

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Endovascular Aneurysm Repair has been associated with changes in arterial stiffness, as estimated by pulse wave velocity (PWV. This marker is influenced by the medical status of the patient, the elastic characteristics of the aneurysm wall and the intraluminal thrombus. Therefore, in order to delineate the influence of the endograft implantation in the early postoperative period, we conducted non-invasively pulse wave analysis in a male patient with an abdominal aortic aneurysm of no intraluminal thrombus, no medical history and absence of peripheral arterial disease. Central systolic and diastolic pressure decreased postoperatively. PWV showed subtle changes from 11.6m/sec to 10.6 and 10.9 at 1-week and 1-month, respectively. Accordingly, the augmentation index decreased from 28% to 14% and continued to drop to 25%. The augmentation pressure decreased gradually from 15- to 6- and 4mmHg. The wave reflection magnitude dropped from 68% to 52% at 1-month. Finally, the peripheral resistance dropped from 1.41 to 0.99 and 0.85 dyn×sec×cm−5. Our example shows that the implantation of an aortic endograft can modify the wave reflection in aorta without causing significant alterations in PWV.

  18. Correlation between intrasac pressure measurements of a pressure sensor and an angiographic catheter during endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Galvagni Silveira

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To establish a correlation between intrasac pressure measurements of a pressure sensor and an angiographic catheter placed in the same aneurysm sac before and after its exclusion by an endoprosthesis. METHODS: Patients who underwent endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair and received an EndoSureTM wireless pressure sensor implant between March 19 and December 11, 2004 were enrolled in the study. Simultaneous readings of systolic, diastolic, mean, and pulse pressure within the aneurysm sac were obtained from the catheter and the sensor, both before and after sac exclusion by the endoprosthesis (Readings 1 and 2, respectively. Intrasac pressure measurements were compared using Pearson's correlation and Student's t test. Statistical significance was set at p0.05, mean (p>0.05, and pulse (p0.05 by the sensor. CONCLUSION: The excellent agreement between intrasac pressure readings recorded by the catheter and the sensor justifies use of the latter for detection of post-exclusion abdominal aortic aneurysm pressurization.

  19. The ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid, eicosapentaenoic acid, attenuates abdominal aortic aneurysm development via suppression of tissue remodeling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jack H Wang

    Full Text Available Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA is a prevalent vascular disease that can progressively enlarge and rupture with a high rate of mortality. Inflammation and active remodeling of the aortic wall have been suggested to be critical in its pathogenesis. Meanwhile, ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids such as eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA are known to reduce cardiovascular events, but its role in AAA management remains unclear. Here, we show that EPA can attenuate murine CaCl2-induced AAA formation. Aortas from BALB/c mice fed an EPA-diet appeared less inflamed, were significantly smaller in diameter compared to those from control-diet-fed mice, and had relative preservation of aortic elastic lamina. Interestingly, CT imaging also revealed markedly reduced calcification of the aortas after EPA treatment. Mechanistically, MMP2, MMP9, and TNFSF11 levels in the aortas were reduced after EPA treatment. Consistent with this finding, RAW264.7 macrophages treated with EPA showed attenuated Mmp9 levels after TNF-α simulation. These results demonstrate a novel role of EPA in attenuating AAA formation via the suppression of critical remodeling pathways in the pathogenesis of AAAs, and raise the possibility of using EPA for AAA prevention in the clinical setting.

  20. Thoracic and abdominal aortic diameters in a general population: MRI-based reference values and association with age and cardiovascular risk factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mensel, Birger; Hesselbarth, Lydia; Wenzel, Michael; Kuehn, Jens-Peter; Hegenscheid, Katrin [University Medicine Greifswald, Institute of Diagnostic Radiology and Neuroradiology, Greifswald (Germany); Doerr, Marcus [University Medicine Greifswald, Department of Internal Medicine, Greifswald (Germany); DZHK (German Center for Cardiovascular Research), partner site Greifswald, Greifswald (Germany); Voelzke, Henry [University Medicine Greifswald, Institute for Community Medicine, Greifswald (Germany); DZHK (German Center for Cardiovascular Research), partner site Greifswald, Greifswald (Germany); Lieb, Wolfgang [Christian Albrechts University, Institute of Epidemiology, Kiel (Germany); Lorbeer, Roberto [Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital, Institute of Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany)

    2016-04-15

    To generate reference values for thoracic and abdominal aortic diameters determined by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and analyse their association with cardiovascular risk factors in the general population. Data from participants (n = 1759) of the Study of Health in Pomerania were used for analysis in this study. MRI measurement of thoracic and abdominal aortic diameters was performed. Parameters for calculation of reference values according to age and sex analysis were provided. Multivariable linear regression models were used for determination of aortic diameter-related risk factors, including smoking, blood pressure (BP), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C). For the ascending aorta (β = -0.049, p < 0.001), the aortic arch (β = -0.061, p < 0.001) and the subphrenic aorta (β = -0.018, p = 0.004), the body surface area (BSA)-adjusted diameters were lower in men. Multivariable-adjusted models revealed significant increases in BSA-adjusted diameters with age for all six aortic segments (p < 0.001). Consistent results for all segments were observed for the positive associations of diastolic BP (β = 0.001; 0.004) and HDL (β = 0.035; 0.087) with BSA-adjusted aortic diameters and for an inverse association of systolic BP (β = -0.001). Some BSA-adjusted median aortic diameters are smaller in men than in women. All diameters increase with age, diastolic blood pressure and HDL-C and decrease as systolic BP increases. (orig.)

  1. Alterations of blood flow pattern after triple stent endovascular treatment of saccular abdominal aortic aneurysm: a porcine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Jahir Richard DE; Aquino, Maurício DE Amorim; Barros, Svetlana; Pitta, Guilherme Benjamin Brandão; Pereira, Adamastor Humberto

    2016-01-01

    to determine the blood flow pattern changes after endovascular treatment of saccular abdominal aortic aneurysm with triple stent. we conducted a hemodynamic study of seven Landrace and Large White pigs with saccular aneurysms of the infrarenal abdominal aorta artificially produced according to the technique described. The animals were subjected to triple stenting for endovascular aneurysm. We evaluated the pattern of blood flow by duplex scan before and after stent implantation. We used the non-paired Mann-Whitney test for statistical analysis. there was a significant decrease in the average systolic velocity, from 127.4cm/s in the pre-stent period to 69.81cm/s in the post-stent phase. There was also change in the flow pattern from turbulent in the aneurysmal sac to laminate intra-stent. there were changes in the blood flow pattern of saccular abdominal aortic aneurysm after endovascular treatment with triple stent. determinar as alterações do padrão do fluxo sanguíneo após tratamento endovascular do aneurisma sacular de aorta abdominal com triplo stent. estudo hemodinâmico de sete suínos das raças Landrace e Large White portadores de aneurismas saculares de aorta abdominal infrarrenal artificialmente produzidos segundo técnica descrita. Os animais foram submetidos a implante de triplo stent para correção endovascular do aneurisma e reavaliados por duplex scan quanto ao padrão do fluxo sanguíneo antes e após o implante dos stents. A análise estatística foi realizada com o teste Mann-Whitney não pareado. verificou-se uma queda significativa da velocidade sistólica média de 127,4cm/s na fase pré-stent para 69,81cm/s na fase pós-stent. Houve ainda mudança no padrão do fluxo de turbilhonar no saco aneurismático para laminar intrastent. o estudo demonstrou alterações do padrão do fluxo sanguíneo do aneurisma sacular de aorta abdominal após tratamento endovascular com triplo stent.

  2. The Role of Extra-Anatomic Bypass in the Surgical Treatment of Acute Abdominal Aortic Occlusion

    OpenAIRE

    Gokhan Ilhan; Şahin Bozok; Şaban Ergene; Sedat Ozan Karakisi; Nebiye Tufekci; Hızır Kazdal; Sabri Ogullar; Seref Alp Kucuker

    2015-01-01

    Background: Aortic occlusion is rare catastophic pathology with high rates of mortality and severe morbidity. In this study, we aimed to share our experience in the management of aortic occlusion and to assess the outcomes of extra-anatomic bypass procedures. Methods: Eighteen patients who had undergone extra-anatomic bypass interventions in the cardiovascular surgery department of our tertiary care center between July 2009 and May 2013 were retrospectively evaluated. All patients...

  3. CT angiography versus intraarterial DSA in abdominal aortic aneurysms; CT-Angiographie versus intraarterielle DSA bei Bauchaortenaneurysmen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rieker, O. [Klinik fuer Radiologie, Johannes-Gutenberg-Universitaet, Mainz (Germany); Dueber, C. [Klinik fuer Radiologie, Johannes-Gutenberg-Universitaet, Mainz (Germany); Schmiedt, W. [Klinik fuer Herz-, Thorax- und Gefaesschirurgie, Johannes-Gutenberg-Universitaet, Mainz (Germany); Neufang, A. [Klinik fuer Herz-, Thorax- und Gefaesschirurgie, Johannes-Gutenberg-Universitaet, Mainz (Germany); Pittow, M. [Klinik fuer Radiologie, Johannes-Gutenberg-Universitaet, Mainz (Germany); Schweden, F. [Klinik fuer Radiologie, Johannes-Gutenberg-Universitaet, Mainz (Germany)

    1996-07-01

    To evaluate if CT angiography is able to image all features necessary for the preoperative planning of abdominal aortic aneurysms (accessory renal arteries, stenoses or occlusions of renal and iliac arteries, patency of inferior mesentric artery). CT angiography and DSA were performed on 27 patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms. CT angiography was performed using a protocol that covered the abdominal aorta and the pelvic arteries with a single spiral acquisition (contrast dose: 150 ml, collimation: 5 mm, table feed: 7.5 mm/s, increment of reconstruction: 2 mm). Maximum intensity projections (MIP) and axial scans were compared with the results of intraarterial DSA. Using axial scans and subvolume MIP, CTA accurately defined 7/8 accessory renal arteries, 13/13 occlusions and 9/12 high grade stenoses of renal and pelvic arteries. High-grade stenoses of the iliac arteries were underestimated in two cases and overlooked in one case. CT angiography was superior to DSA in imaging the inferior mesenteric artery. CT angiography precisely diagnosed 33 aneurysms of the iliac, renal and coeliac arteries. CT angiography using a single administration of intravenous contrast may replace preoperative DSA in most cases of abdominal aortic aneurysm. (orig.) [Deutsch] Ziel dieser Studie war es zu pruefen, ob mit der CT-Angiographie die fuer die praeoperative Planung von Bauchaortenaneurysmen relevanten Gefaessveraenderungen darstelbar sind (Akzessorische Nierenarterien, Nierenarterienstenosen, A. mesenterica inferior, Beckenarterien). Die CT-Angiographien wurden mit einem Protokoll durchgefuehrt, das die Bauchaorta und die Beckenarterien bis zur Leiste mit einer einzigen Spiralakquisition erfasst (150 ml Kontrastmittel, Kollimation: 5 mm, Tischvorschub: 7,5 mm/s, Rekonstruktionsintervall: 2 mm). Die Befunde aus Maximum-Intensitaets-Projektionen (MIP) und den axialen Schnittbildern wurden mit den Befunden der intraarteriellen DSA bei 27 Patienten verglichen. Bei Hinzuziehung von

  4. PD123319 augments angiotensin II-induced abdominal aortic aneurysms through an AT2 receptor-independent mechanism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan Daugherty

    Full Text Available AT2 receptors have an unclear function on development of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs, although a pharmacological approach using the AT2 receptor antagonist PD123319 has implicated a role. The purpose of the present study was to determine the role of AT2 receptors in AngII-induced AAAs using a combination of genetic and pharmacological approaches. We also defined effects of AT2 receptors in AngII-induced atherosclerosis and thoracic aortic aneurysms.Male AT2 receptor wild type (AT2 +/y and deficient (AT2 -/y mice in an LDL receptor -/- background were fed a saturated-fat enriched diet, and infused with either saline or AngII (500 ng/kg/min. AT2 receptor deficiency had no significant effect on systolic blood pressure during AngII-infusion. While AngII infusion induced AAAs, AT2 receptor deficiency did not significantly affect either maximal width of the suprarenal aorta or incidence of AAAs. The AT2 receptor antagonist PD123319 (3 mg/kg/day and AngII were co-infused into male LDL receptor -/- mice that were either AT2 +/y or -/y. PD123319 had no significant effect on systolic blood pressure in either wild type or AT2 receptor deficient mice. Consistent with our previous findings, PD123319 increased AngII-induced AAAs. However, this effect of PD123319 occurred irrespective of AT2 receptor genotype. Neither AT2 receptor deficiency nor PD123319 had any significant effect on AngII-induced thoracic aortic aneurysms or atherosclerosis.AT2 receptor deficiency does not affect AngII-induced AAAs, thoracic aortic aneurysms and atherosclerosis. PD123319 augments AngII-induced AAAs through an AT2 receptor-independent mechanism.

  5. Endovascular repair of an abdominal aortic aneurysm in a patient with stenosis of bilateral common iliac artery stents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daab, Leo J; Aidinian, Gilbert; Weber, Michael A; Kembro, Ronald J; Cook, Patrick R

    2011-01-01

    The explosion in endovascular interventions for peripheral vascular disease has resulted in procedures being used by a multitude of specialties. Nonvascular surgeons performing these interventions can create scenarios that may make future vascular interventions difficult. In this article, we present a case report illustrating this point. A 68-year-old man with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, coronary artery disease with prior myocardial infarction, and multiple abdominal operations presented with an abdominal aortic aneurysm. In our opinion, this patient was at a prohibitive operative risk for open repair. Review of his imaging results revealed a 6.7-cm infrarenal aneurysm with bilateral common iliac artery (CIA) stents (right: 8 mm; left: 6 mm) and 6-mm self-expanding stents extending from the right external iliac artery through the common femoral artery. A Cook Zenith Renu (30 × 108 mm) graft (Cook Medical Inc., Bloomington, IN) was advanced after serial dilation and balloon angioplasty of the stenotic right CIA stent. Left brachial access was used for arteriographic imaging. The left common femoral artery was accessed and the left CIA was coil-embolized to prevent backbleeding. A femoro-femoral artery crossover bypass was then performed after segmental resection of the right common femoral artery stent. The patient tolerated the procedure well and was discharged home on postoperative day 3. Subsequent postoperative computed tomography arteriogram after 1 month showed palpable pulses and no evidence of endoleak with flow in the femoro-femoral graft on clinical exam. This case demonstrates an endovascular intervention which limited the potential options available for aneurysm repair. Similar problems may become increasingly common as more providers offer endovascular interventions, thus emphasizing the importance of a collaborative approach to the patient with complex aorto-iliac occlusive disease and abdominal aortic aneurysm. It is the duty of the

  6. Early Outcomes of Open Abdominal Repair Versus Endovascular Repair for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm: Report from National Hospital Organization Network Study in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onohara, Toshihiro; Okamoto, Minoru; Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi; Shimoe, Yasushi; Okada, Masahiro; Ishibashi, Yoshimitsu; Yamashita, Masafumi; Takahashi, Toshiki; Kasashima, Fuminori; Kishimoto, Jyunji; Mizuno, Akihiro; Kei, Jyunichi; Nakai, Mikizou; Suhara, Hitoshi; Endo, Masamitsu; Nishina, Takeshi; Furuyama, Tadashi; Kawasaki, Masakazu; Mikasa, Keita; Ueno, Yoichirou

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Early outcomes of open abdominal repair (OS) versus endovascular repair (EVAR) for abdominal aortic aneurysm were retrospectively analyzed, after commercialized devices for EVAR had become available in Japan. Patients and Methods: A total of 781 consecutive patients (OS, n = 522; EVAR, n = 259) were treated at ten medical centers between January 2008 and September 2010. The OS group comprised patients with preoperative shock (SOS, n = 34) and without shock (NOS, n = 488). Results: Patients in the EVAR group were 3 years older than those in the NOS group. There was greater prevalence of hostile abdomen, on dialysis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease on inhaled drug, and cerebrovascular disease in the EVAR group than in the NOS group. Surgical mortality was 16 cases (2.0% in all patients, EVAR: 0.8%, NOS: 1.4%, SOS: 21%). Hospital stay >30 days was documented in 52 (11%) with NOS, 11 (33%) with SOS, and 8 (3%) with EVAR. Thirty late deaths included 6 aneurysm related death and 14 cardiovascular causes at a mean follow up of 1.0 year. The survival rates freedom from all cause death at one year, were 95 ± 1% in NOS and 94 ± 2% in EVAR respectively. Conclusion: Though significant differences in patient characteristics among three groups were noted, early results were satisfactory. PMID:23555507

  7. Resultados da cirurgia do aneurisma da aorta abdominal em pacientes jovens Outcomes after surgical repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms in young patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Telmo P. Bonamigo

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXTO: A presença de aneurisma da aorta abdominal (AAA é rara em pacientes jovens. OBJETIVO: Avaliar os resultados da cirurgia do AAA em pacientes com idade BACKGROUND: Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA are rare in young patients. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate outcomes after AAA repair in patients aged < 50 years. METHODS: Between June 1979 and January 2008, 946 patients underwent elective repair for an infrarenal AAA performed by the first author. Of these, 13 patients (1.4% were < 50 years old at surgery. Demographic characteristics and surgical data were analyzed, as well as early and late outcomes after surgical intervention. RESULTS: Mean age was 46±3.4 years (ranging from 43 to 50 years. Most patients were men (76.9%, hypertensive (76.9% and smokers (61.5%. Perioperative morbidity and mortality rates were low (15.4% and 0%, respectively; one patient had respiratory infection and another patient had unstable angina. Median follow-up was 85.5 months, and two patients died due to ischemic cardiopathy and cerebrovascular accident during the follow-up period. CONCLUSION: AAA repair in young patients is a safe procedure, with good long-term results. In our study, there were no perioperative deaths, and a good long-term survival was observed.

  8. Pasteurella multocida infection, a rare cause of mycotic abdominal aortic aneurysm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koelemay, Mark J. W.

    2009-01-01

    A 64-year-old man was admitted with abdominal pain 6 weeks after treatment with intravenous flucloxacillin for cellulitis of his right leg. Urgent operation was necessary for a mycotic aneurysm of the abdominal aorta due to infection with Pasteurella multocida, a microorganism residing in the oral

  9. Genome-wide association study identifies a sequence variant within the DAB2IP gene conferring susceptibility to abdominal aortic aneurysm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gretarsdottir, Solveig; Baas, Annette F.; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Holm, Hilma; den Heijer, Martin; de Vries, Jean-Paul P. M.; Kranendonk, Steef E.; Zeebregts, Clark J. A. M.; van Sterkenburg, Steven M.; Geelkerken, Robert H.; van Rij, Andre M.; Williams, Michael J. A.; Boll, Albert P. M.; Kostic, Jelena P.; Jonasdottir, Adalbjorg; Jonasdottir, Aslaug; Walters, G. Bragi; Masson, Gisli; Sulem, Patrick; Saemundsdottir, Jona; Mouy, Magali; Magnusson, Kristinn P.; Tromp, Gerard; Elmore, James R.; Sakalihasan, Natzi; Limet, Raymond; Defraigne, Jean-Olivier; Ferrell, Robert E.; Ronkainen, Antti; Ruigrok, Ynte M.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Grobbee, Diederick E.; Shah, Svati H.; Granger, Christopher B.; Quyyumi, Arshed A.; Vaccarino, Viola; Patel, Riyaz S.; Zafari, A. Maziar; Levey, Allan I.; Austin, Harland; Girelli, Domenico; Pignatti, Pier Franco; Olivieri, Oliviero; Martinelli, Nicola; Malerba, Giovanni; Trabetti, Elisabetta; Becker, Lewis C.; Becker, Diane M.; Reilly, Muredach P.; Rader, Daniel J.; Mueller, Thomas; Dieplinger, Benjamin; Haltmayer, Meinhard; Urbonavicius, Sigitas; Lindblad, Bengt; Gottsater, Anders; Gaetani, Eleonora; Pola, Roberto; Wells, Philip; Rodger, Marc; Forgie, Melissa; Langlois, Nicole; Corral, Javier; Vicente, Vicente; Fontcuberta, Jordi; Espana, Francisco; Grarup, Niels; Jorgensen, Torben; Witte, Daniel R.; Hansen, Torben; Pedersen, Oluf; Aben, Katja K.; de Graaf, Jacqueline; Holewijn, Suzanne; Folkersen, Lasse; Franco-Cereceda, Anders; Eriksson, Per; Collier, David A.; Stefansson, Hreinn; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Rafnar, Thorunn; Valdimarsson, Einar M.; Magnadottir, Hulda B.; Sveinbjornsdottir, Sigurlaug; Olafsson, Isleifur; Magnusson, Magnus Karl; Palmason, Robert; Haraldsdottir, Vilhelmina; Andersen, Karl; Onundarson, Pall T.; Thorgeirsson, Gudmundur; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Powell, Janet T.; Carey, David J.; Kuivaniemi, Helena; Lindholt, Jes S.; Jones, Gregory T.; Kong, Augustine; Blankensteijn, Jan D.; Matthiasson, Stefan E.; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Stefansson, Kari

    We performed a genome-wide association study on 1,292 individuals with abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) and 30,503 controls from Iceland and The Netherlands, with a follow-up of top markers in up to 3,267 individuals with AAAs and 7,451 controls. The A allele of rs7025486 on 9q33 was found to

  10. Genome-wide association study identifies a sequence variant within the DAB2IP gene conferring susceptibility to abdominal aortic aneurysm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gretarsdottir, Solveig; Baas, Annette F; Thorleifsson, Gudmar

    2010-01-01

    We performed a genome-wide association study on 1,292 individuals with abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) and 30,503 controls from Iceland and The Netherlands, with a follow-up of top markers in up to 3,267 individuals with AAAs and 7,451 controls. The A allele of rs7025486 on 9q33 was found to as...

  11. A double shunt technique for the prevention of ischaemia of a congenital, solitary, pelvic kidney during abdominal aortic aneurysm repair: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vrachliotis Thomas G

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Congenital solitary pelvic kidney is a rare condition, and its association with an abdominal aortic aneurysm is even more unusual. To the best of our knowledge, only two such cases have been reported in the literature to date. Case presentation We report the case of a 59-year-old Caucasian man with a congenital solitary pelvic kidney, who was found to have an abdominal aortic aneurysm 83 mm in diameter. Abdominal computed tomography angiography clearly identified two renal arteries, one originating from the aortic bifurcation. and the other from the proximal portion of the right common iliac artery. At surgery, renal ischaemia was prevented by introduction of an axillofemoral shunt (consisting of two femoral cannulas and a vent tube of extracorporeal circulation from the right axillary to the right femoral artery, and a second Argyle shunt from the right common iliac artery to the origin of the left renal artery. A 20 mm Dacron tube graft was then implanted. Our patient's postoperative renal function was normal. Conclusion The renal preservation double shunt technique used in this case seems to be effective during abdominal aortic aneurysm repair.

  12. Experiences of the screening process and the diagnosis abdominal aortic aneurysm among 65-year-old men from invitation to a 1-year surveillance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pettersson, Monica; Hansson, Anders; Brodersen, John

    2017-01-01

    in a University Hospital in Sweden. These were qualitatively analyzed using manifest and latent content analysis. The experience of the screening process and having an abdominal aortic aneurysm in a long-term perspective revealed three categories: "trusting the health care system," emphasizing the need...

  13. Meta-Analysis of Genome-Wide Association Studies for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Identifies Four New Disease-Specific Risk Loci

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jones, Gregory T; Tromp, Gerard; Kuivaniemi, Helena; Gretarsdottir, Solveig; Baas, Annette F|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/26922517X; Giusti, Betti; Strauss, Ewa; Van't Hof, Femke N G; Webb, Thomas R; Erdman, Robert; Ritchie, Marylyn D; Elmore, James R; Verma, Anurag; Pendergrass, Sarah; Kullo, Iftikhar J; Ye, Zi; Peissig, Peggy L; Gottesman, Omri; Verma, Shefali S; Malinowski, Jennifer; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J; Borthwick, Kenneth M; Smelser, Diane T; Crosslin, David R; de Andrade, Mariza; Ryer, Evan J; McCarty, Catherine A; Böttinger, Erwin P; Pacheco, Jennifer A; Crawford, Dana C; Carrell, David S; Gerhard, Glenn S; Franklin, David P; Carey, David J; Phillips, Victoria L; Williams, Michael J A; Wei, Wenhua; Blair, Ross; Hill, Andrew A; Vasudevan, Thodor M; Lewis, David R; Thomson, Ian A; Krysa, Jo; Hill, Geraldine B; Roake, Justin; Merriman, Tony R; Oszkinis, Grzegorz; Galora, Silvia; Saracini, Claudia; Abbate, Rosanna; Pulli, Raffaele; Pratesi, Carlo; Saratzis, Athanasios; Verissimo, Ana R; Bumpstead, Suzannah; Badger, Stephen A; Clough, Rachel E; Cockerill, Gillian; Hafez, Hany; Scott, D Julian A; Futers, T Simon; Romaine, Simon P R; Bridge, Katherine; Griffin, Kathryn J; Bailey, Marc A; Smith, Alberto; Thompson, Matthew M; van Bockxmeer, Frank M; Matthiasson, Stefan E; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Blankensteijn, Jan D; Teijink, Joep A W; Wijmenga, Cisca; de Graaf, Jacqueline; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Lindholt, Jes S; Hughes, Anne; Bradley, Declan T; Stirrups, Kathleen; Golledge, Jonathan; Norman, Paul E; Powell, Janet T; Humphries, Steve E; Hamby, Stephen E; Goodall, Alison H; Nelson, Christopher P; Sakalihasan, Natzi; Courtois, Audrey; Ferrell, Robert E; Eriksson, Per; Folkersen, Lasse; Franco-Cereceda, Anders; Eicher, John D; Johnson, Andrew D; Betsholtz, Christer; Ruusalepp, Arno; Franzén, Oscar; Schadt, Eric E; Björkegren, Johan L M; Lipovich, Leonard; Drolet, Anne M; Verhoeven, Eric L; Zeebregts, Clark J; Geelkerken, Robert H; van Sambeek, Marc R; van Sterkenburg, Steven M; de Vries, Jean-Paul; Stefansson, Kari; Thompson, John R; de Bakker, Paul I W|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/342957082; Deloukas, Panos; Sayers, Robert D; Harrison, Seamus C; van Rij, Andre M; Samani, Nilesh J; Bown, Matthew J

    2017-01-01

    RATIONALE: Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a complex disease with both genetic and environmental risk factors. Together, 6 previously identified risk loci only explain a small proportion of the heritability of AAA. OBJECTIVE: To identify additional AAA risk loci using data from all available

  14. Meta-Analysis of Genome-Wide Association Studies for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Identifies Four New Disease-Specific Risk Loci

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jones, Gregory T.; Tromp, Gerard; Kuivaniemi, Helena; Gretarsdottir, Solveig; Baas, Annette F.; Giusti, Betti; Strauss, Ewa; van't Hof, Femke N. G.; Webb, Thomas R.; Erdman, Robert; Ritchie, Marylyn D.; Elmore, James R.; Verma, Anurag; Pendergrass, Sarah A; Kullo, Iftikhar J.; Zy, Zi Ye; Peissig, Peggy L.; Gottesman, Omri; Verma, Shefali S.; Malinowski, Jennifer; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J.; Borthwick, Kenneth M.; Smelser, Diane T.; Crosslin, David R; de Andrade, Mariza; Ryer, Evan J.; McCarty, Catherine A.; Bottinger, Erwin P.; Pacheco, Jennifer A.; Crawford, Dana C.; Carrell, David S; Gerhard, Glenn S.; Franklin, David P.; Carey, David J.; Phillips, Victoria L.; Williams, Michael J. A.; Wei, Wenhua; Blair, Ross; Hill, Andrew A.; Vasudevan, Thodor M.; Lewis, David R.; Thomson, Ian A.; Krysa, Jo; Hill, Geraldine B.; Roake, Justin; Merriman, Tony R.; Oszkinis, Grzegorz; Galora, Silvia; Saracini, Claudia; Abbate, Rosanna; Pulli, Raffaele; Pratesi, Carlo; Saratzis, Athanasios; Verissimo, Ana R.; Bumpstead, Suzannah; Badger, Stephen A.; Clough, Rachel E.; Cockerill, Gillian; Hafez, Hany; Scott, D. Julian A.; Futers, T. Simon; Romaine, Simon P. R.; Bridge, Katherine; Griffin, Kathryn J.; Bailey, Marc A.; Smith, Alberto; Thompson, Matthew; van Bockxmeer, Frank M.; Matthiasson, Stefan E.; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Blankensteijn, Jan D.; Teijink, Joep A. W.; Wijmenga, Cisca; de Graaf, Jacqueline; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Lindholt, Jes S.; Hughes, Anne E.; Bradley, Declan T.; Stirrups, Kathleen; Golledge, Jonathan; Norman, Paul E.; Powell, Janet T.; Humphries, Steve E.; Hamby, Stephen E.; Goodall, Alison H.; Nelson, Christopher P.; Sakalihasan, Natzi; Courtois, Audrey; Ferrell, Robert E.; Eriksson, Per; Folkersen, Lasse; Franco-Cereceda, Anders; Eicher, John D.; Johnson, Andrew D.; Betsholtz, Christer; Ruusalepp, Arno; Franzen, Oscar; Schadt, Eric; Bjorkegren, Johan L. M.; Lipovich, Leonard; Drolet, Anne M.; Verhoeven, Eric L.; Zeebregts, Clark J.; Geelkerken, Robert H.; Sambeek, Marc R.; van Sterkenburg, Steven M.; De Vries, Jean-Paul; Stefansson, Kari; Thompson, John R.; de Bakker, Paul I. W.; Deloukas, Panos; Sayers, Robert D.; Harrison, Seamus C.; van Rij, Andre M.; Samani, Nilesh J.; Bown, Matthew J.

    2017-01-01

    Rationale: Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a complex disease with both genetic and environmental risk factors. Together, 6 previously identified risk loci only explain a small proportion of the heritability of AAA. Objective: To identify additional AAA risk loci using data from all available

  15. A Radiographic Study on the Associations of Age and Prevalence of Vertebral Fractures with Abdominal Aortic Calcification in Japanese Postmenopausal Women and Men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Iwamoto

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study was to determine the associations of age and history of non- and low-traumatic fractures with the severity of abdominal aortic calcification in Japanese postmenopausal women and men. Four hundred and one Japanese persons (24 men and 377 postmenopausal women, mean age: 73.8 years for whom thoracic and lumbar spine radiographs had been obtained to evaluate their posture prior to patient participation in a fall-prevention exercise program were enrolled. The associations of sex, age, history of hip fracture, prevalence of vertebral fracture, and spondylosis grade (the Nathan degree with the severity of abdominal aortic calcification (length of calcification, as evaluated according to the number of vertebral bodies were analyzed. Nine subjects (2.2% had a history of hip fracture, and 221 (55.1% had at least one prevalent vertebral fracture. Two hundred and sixty-seven subjects (66.6% had first-degree spondylosis. Age and the number of prevalent vertebral fractures, but not sex, history of hip fracture, or spondylosis grade, were significantly associated with the severity of abdominal aortic calcification. The present study confirmed that age and the number of vertebral fractures were associated with the severity of abdominal aortic calcification in Japanese postmenopausal women and men.

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging of the intraluminal thrombus in abdominal aortic aneurysms. A quantitative and qualitative evaluation and correlation with growth rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Behr-Rasmussen, Carsten; Gammelgaard, Lise; Fründ, Ernst T

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The role of the intraluminal thrombus (ILT) in abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) growth remains incompletely understood. MRI is superior to other methods in depicting the morphology of the ILT. This study brings preliminary, but novel information on the presence and morphological charac...

  17. Noninvasive intrasac pressure measurement and the influence of type 2 and type 3 endoleaks in an animal model of abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Milner, R.; Verhagen, H.J.; Prinssen, M.; Blankensteijn, J.D.

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this study was to noninvasively detect pressure changes within an excluded aneurysm sac in an animal model of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) and to study the influence of type 2 and 3 endoleaks. A porcine model of AAA that allows for the creation of type 2 and 3 endoleaks was used.

  18. Acute kidney injury defined according to the 'Risk,' 'Injury,' 'Failure,' 'Loss,' and 'End-stage' (RIFLE) criteria after repair for a ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Beek, Sytse C.; Legemate, Dink A.; Vahl, Anco; Bouman, Catherine S. C.; Vogt, Liffert; Wisselink, Willem; Balm, Ron

    2014-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a serious complication after repair of a ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (RAAA). In the present Society for Vascular Surgery (SVS)/International Society for CardioVascular Surgery (ISCVS) reporting standards patients are classified as no dialysis (grade I), as

  19. Emergency Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair in a Patient with Failing Heart: Axillofemoral Bypass Using a Centrifugal Pump Combined with Levosimendan for Inotropic Support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Michalek

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe the case of an 83-year-old patient requiring repair of a large symptomatic abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA. The patient was known to have coronary artery disease (CAD with symptoms and signs of significant myocardial dysfunction, left-heart failure, and severe aortic insufficiency. The procedure was performed with the help of both mechanical and pharmacological circulatory support. Distal perfusion was provided by an axillofemoral bypass with a centrifugal pump, with dobutamine and levosimendan administered as pharmacological inotropic support. The patient's hemodynamic status was monitored with continuous cardiac output monitoring and transesophageal echocardiography. No serious circulatory complications were recorded during the perioperative and postoperative periods. This paper suggests a potential novel approach to combined circulatory support in patients with heart failure, scheduled for open abdominal aortic aneurysm repair.

  20. Two incidental cases of abdominal aortic aneurysm and gallbladder cancer. Further data influencing the management of patients affected by aneurysm and gallbladder disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Monti, M; Ghilardi, G; Bianchi, E; Kunkl, E; Scorza, R

    2000-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm and cholelithiasis are two common diseases in the elderly population. The prevalence of abdominal aortic aneurysms ranges between 1.8 and 6.6% in autoptic series and it's estimated that 2.5% of the over sixty year old population is affected. Carcinoma of the gallbladder is the most common malignant tumor of the biliary tract and in the United States is the fifth most frequent digestive tract malignancy; it's incidence ranges between 2 to 10 cases of 100,000 persons/year. No adequate guidelines are now available to assist the surgeon, in the case of concomitant gallbladder disease and abdominal aortic aneurysm. In this paper the management of abdominal aortic aneurysm in a patient with gallbladder disease is discussed in order to assist the surgeon deciding whether to perform concomitant aneurysm resection and cholecystectomy. In 162 aneurysmectomies (1987-1997) 18 (11.11%) patients underwent combined aneurysmectomy and cholecystectomy operation. The patients ranged in age from 49 to 88 years (average 69 years). In two cases the anatomo-histological specimen examinations (twelve sections) demonstrated a gallbladder carcinoma. The overall mortality rate was 5.56% either for aneurysmectomy alone or for combined therapy. In case of abdominal aortic aneurysm and concomitant gallbladder disease, in choosing simple endoaneurysmectomy, the surgeon has to consider the risk of early and late complications of leaving a diseased gallbladder in place. In case of concomitant performance of both operations, the risks of a possible septic graft contamination must be considered. We believe that the patient may be best served by performing the vascular and nonvascular procedures in the same operation. In this paper a new proof, till now never considered in the international literature, is presented to support our opinion: the possibility of concomitant unknown cancer or precancerous lesions in a lithiasic gallbladder. Diagnosis of these lesions is, indeed

  1. Association of Ficolin-3 with abdominal aortic aneurysm presence and progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandez-García, Carlos-Ernesto; Burillo, Elena; Lindholt, Jes S

    2017-01-01

    from healthy tissue. Moreover, ficolin-3 mRNA levels in AAA wall were greatly increased compared with healthy aortic walls. Immunohistochemistry of AAA tissue demonstrated increased ficolin-3, while little staining was present in healthy walls. Finally, increased ficolin-3 levels were observed in AAA...

  2. To see or not to see -- ambiguous findings on post-mortem cross-sectional imaging in a case of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluschke, Franziska; Ross, Steffen; Flach, Patricia M; Schweitzer, Wolf; Ampanozi, Garyfalia; Gascho, Dominic; Vonlanthen, Bruno; Thali, Michael J; Ruder, Thomas D

    2013-09-01

    We present a case of a ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) with ambiguous accessory findings on post-mortem computed-tomography (PMCT), post-mortem magnetic resonance (PMMR) imaging, and PMCT-angiography (PMCTA) suggestive of thoracic aortic dissection. The diagnosis of ruptured AAA was confirmed by autopsy; however, there was no aortic dissection. The imaging findings that mimicked the presence of aortic dissection might have been an atypical presentation of post-mortem clotting or sedimentation. This case is an ideal example to illustrate benefits, limitations, and challenges of post-mortem cross-sectional imaging. It serves as a reminder that both, training as well as correlation of imaging findings with autopsy are fundamental to improve our understanding of radiologic findings on post-mortem cross-sectional imaging. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Abdominal aortic aneurysm is associated with a variant in low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bown, Matthew J; Jones, Gregory T; Harrison, Seamus C

    2011-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a common cause of morbidity and mortality and has a significant heritability. We carried out a genome-wide association discovery study of 1866 patients with AAA and 5435 controls and replication of promising signals (lead SNP with a p value ... additional cases and 32,687 controls and performed further follow-up in 1491 AAA and 11,060 controls. In the discovery study, nine loci demonstrated association with AAA (p ...-density-lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) demonstrated significant association (p = 0.0042). We confirmed the association of rs1466535 and AAA in our follow-up study (p = 0.035). In a combined analysis (6228 AAA and 49182 controls), rs1466535 had a consistent effect size and direction in all sample sets (combined...

  4. Scientific second-order 'nudging' or lobbying by interest groups: the battle over abdominal aortic aneurysm screening programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploug, Thomas; Holm, Søren; Brodersen, John

    2014-11-01

    The idea that it is acceptable to 'nudge' people to opt for the 'healthy choice' is gaining currency in health care policy circles. This article investigates whether researchers evaluating Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Screening Programmes (AAASP) attempt to influence decision makers in ways that are similar to popular 'nudging' techniques. Comparing two papers on the health economics of AAASP both published in the BMJ within the last 3 years, it is shown that the values chosen for the health economics modelling are not representative of the literature and consistently favour the conclusions of the articles. It is argued (1) that this and other features of these articles may be justified within a Libertarian Paternalist framework as 'nudging' like ways of influencing decision makers, but also (2) that these ways of influencing decision makers raise significant ethical issues in the context of democratic decision making.

  5. Chimney-Graft as a Bail-Out Procedure for Endovascular Treatment of an Inflammatory Juxtarenal Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Fratesi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory and juxtarenal Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (j-iAAA represents a technical challenge for open repair (OR due to the peculiar anatomy, extensive perianeurysmal fibrosis, and dense adhesion to the surrounding tissues. A 68-year-old man with an 11 cm asymptomatic j-iAAA was successfully treated with elective EVAR and chimney-graft (ch-EVAR without postprocedural complications. Target vessel patency and normal renal function are present at 24-month follow-up. The treatment of j-iAAA can be technically challenging. ch-EVAR is a feasible and safe bail-out method for elective j-iAAA with challenging anatomy.

  6. Chinese red yeast rice attenuates the development of angiotensin II-induced abdominal aortic aneurysm and atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xiaojie; Wang, Yifan; Zhang, Songzhao; Zhang, Guidi; Xu, Yinchuan; Bi, Honghao; Daugherty, Alan; Wang, Jian-an

    2012-06-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a chronic vascular disease characterized by medial degradation and inflammation. No medical approaches have been validated for treating AAA, and therapeutic options are limited to regular surveillance leading to surgical intervention. This study aimed to investigate whether administration of Chinese red yeast rice (Monascus purpureus; RYR) suppressed angiotensin II (AngII)-induced AAA and atherosclerosis. Apolipoprotein E-deficient male mice fed a normal diet were administered either RYR extract (200 mg/kg/day) or vehicle by gavage for 1 week before initiating AngII infusion (1000 ng/kg/min) via subcutaneous osmotic pumps for 28 days. Red yeast rice extract administration significantly suppressed AngII-induced expansion of suprarenal diameter and area (PRed yeast rice may have preventive potential for patients with AAA. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Seventeen Years’ Experience of Late Open Surgical Conversion after Failed Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair with 13 Variant Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Ziheng, E-mail: wuziheng303@hotmail.com [Zhejiang University, Department of Vascular Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine (China); Xu, Liang, E-mail: maxalive@163.com [Zhejiang University, Department of Neurosurgery, The Second Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine (China); Qu, Lefeng, E-mail: qulefeng@gmail.com [The Second Military Medical University, Department of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, Changzheng Hospital (China); Raithel, Dieter, E-mail: dieter.raithel@rzmail.uni-erlangen.de [Nuremberg Southern Hospital, Department of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery (Germany)

    2015-02-15

    PurposeTo investigate the causes and results of late open surgical conversion (LOSC) after failed abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) and to summarize our 17 years’ experience with 13 various endografts.MethodsRetrospective data from August 1994 to January 2011 were analyzed at our center. The various devices’ implant time, the types of devices, the rates and causes of LOSC, and the procedures and results of LOSC were analyzed and evaluated.ResultsA total of 1729 endovascular aneurysm repairs were performed in our single center (Nuremberg South Hospital) with 13 various devices within 17 years. The median follow-up period was 51 months (range 9–119 months). Among them, 77 patients with infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysms received LOSC. The LOSC rate was 4.5 % (77 of 1729). The LOSC rates were significantly different before and after January 2002 (p < 0.001). The reasons of LOSC were mainly large type I endoleaks (n = 51) that were hard to repair by endovascular techniques. For the LOSC procedure, 71 cases were elective and 6 were emergent. The perioperative mortality was 5.2 % (4 of 77): 1 was elective (due to septic shock) and 3 were urgent (due to hemorrhagic shock).ConclusionLarge type I endoleaks were the main reasons for LOSC. The improvement of devices and operators’ experience may decrease the LOSC rate. Urgent LOSC resulted in a high mortality rate, while selective LOSC was relatively safe with significantly lower mortality rate. Early intervention, full preparation, and timely LOSC are important for patients who require LOSC.

  8. Circulating S100A12 Levels Are Associated with Progression of Abdominal Aortic Calcification in Hemodialysis Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byoung Ho Choi

    Full Text Available Vascular calcification is an important factor associated with mortality in dialysis patients. Recently, soluble receptor for advanced glycation end product (sRAGE and extracellular RAGE binding protein S100A12 (EN-RAGE have been reported to be involved in the process of vascular calcification. Therefore, we investigated whether sRAGE and S100A12 are useful indicators of progression of abdominal aortic calcification in hemodialysis (HD patients. We analyzed annual changes in vascular calcification score (VCS for up to 4 years, compared to clinical and biological parameters in 149 HD patients. VCS was assessed annually using plain X-ray images of the lateral lumbar spine. The progression group was defined as patients with an increase in VCS more than 1 point each year on average during the observation period. Time-averaged concentrations were also evaluated to examine the association between biological parameters and changes in VCS. The patients had a mean age of 58.59 ± 12.93 years; 53.7% were male, and 45% were diabetic. The VCS increased in 55 patients; the mean increase was 1.60 ± 2.91 points. In a stepwise multivariate logistic analysis, we found that higher levels of S100A12 were significantly associated with progression of VCS (odds ratio [OR], 2.622; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.371-5.016; P = 0.004. The relationship between sRAGE and VCS was not statistically significant (OR, 0.644; 95% CI, 0.302-1.374; P = 0.255. Our findings suggest that serum levels of S100A12 are associated with progression of abdominal aortic calcification in HD patients, independent of sRAGE level.

  9. Combined Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting and Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair: Presentation of 3 Cases and a Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Andrew M; Watson, Jennifer; Mansour, M Ashraf; Sugiyama, George T

    2016-01-01

    Coronary artery disease and abdominal aortic aneurysmal disease can occur in a single patient, and a therapeutic conundrum presents when open surgical repair is indicated for both conditions. The traditional standard of care is to conduct coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) followed by abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair 2-6 months later, but there is significant risk with staging these 2 major surgeries. An alternative method is to surgically repair both diseases in 1 combined operation. The aim of our study is to review our own experience with the combined procedure and to review the published literature to assess morbidity and mortality of combined CABG and AAA repair. A systematic search for relevant studies was performed in the PubMed/Medline database. Short-term mortality (repair. The mean age was 71 years, the average AAA size was 8.9 cm, and average operative time was 328 min. None experienced any postoperative complications. Two are still alive at 9 and 10 years after surgery, and 1 died of unrelated causes 8 years postoperatively. The results of this systematic review suggest that combined CABG and AAA repair is a viable procedure with low operative mortality. Patients with preserved ejection fractions, large AAA, and limited comorbidities appear to receive the most benefit from a combined approach based on reported data from the literature. We have experienced promising results in our highly selected patient population. More research is warranted to devise criteria to determine which patients would be good surgical candidates for this combined procedure. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Transcatheter embolization of abdominal aortic endograft endoleaks using onyx and coils: mid-term imaging follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ford CA

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Christopher A Ford, Benjamin B Lange, Christopher S Morris Department of Radiology, University of Vermont Health Network, University of Vermont Medical Center, Burlington, VT, USA Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of ethylene vinyl alcohol copolymer (Onyx with or without coils in treatment of type II endoleaks associated with abdominal aortic endografts. Materials and methods: The medical records of 14 patients (12 men and 2 women, mean age 73 years with type II endoleaks associated with abdominal aortic endografts, and treated with Onyx, with or without coils, were reviewed. These patients underwent 19 type II endoleak embolization procedures. Time to follow up computed tomography angiogram (CTA, initial and follow-up aneurysm sac characteristics, embolization access technique, use of coils, volume and type of Onyx used, and complications were recorded. Results: Mean procedure time was 124 minutes (range, 51–237 minutes, and mean volume of Onyx used per procedure was 2.1 cc (range, 1.5–3. Mean follow-up time between initial and final CTA was 19.9 months (range, 0.5–64.4. After one or more treatments, follow-up imaging documented complete occlusion of the endoleaks in 10 of 14 patients. Mean sac size decreased by an average of 0.3 cm in those with successful embolization and increased by an average of 0.4 cm in those with failed embolization. One major complication (infection, 5.2% occurred before adding prophylactic antibiotics to our protocol. No significant inadvertent embolization occurred. Conclusion: This study contributes to the growing body of data regarding safety and efficacy of treating type II endoleaks using Onyx. Potential benefits are both technical and economic. As we found advantages with the use of Onyx, additional studies are warranted. Keywords: endoleak, onyx, embolization

  11. Fenestrated Stent Graft Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm: Hemodynamic Analysis of the Effect of Fenestrated Stents on the Renal Arteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Zhonghua; Chaichana, Thanapong [Curtin University of Technology, Perth (Australia)

    2010-02-15

    We wanted to investigate the hemodynamic effect of fenestrated stents on the renal arteries with using a fluid structure interaction method. Two representative patients who each had abdominal aortic aneurysm that was treated with fenestrated stent grafts were selected for the study. 3D realistic aorta models for the main artery branches and aneurysm were generated based on the multislice CT scans from two patients with different aortic geometries. The simulated fenestrated stents were designed and modelled based on the 3D intraluminal appearance, and these were placed inside the renal artery with an intra-aortic protrusion of 5.0-7.0 mm to reflect the actual patients' treatment. The stent wire thickness was simulated with a diameter of 0.4 mm and hemodynamic analysis was performed at different cardiac cycles. Our results showed that the effect of the fenestrated stent wires on the renal blood flow was minimal because the flow velocity was not significantly affected when compared to that calculated at pre-stent graft implantation, and this was despite the presence of recirculation patterns at the proximal part of the renal arteries. The wall pressure was found to be significantly decreased after fenestration, yet no significant change of the wall shear stress was noticed at post-fenestration, although the wall shear stress was shown to decrease slightly at the proximal aneurysm necks. Our analysis demonstrates that the hemodynamic effect of fenestrated renal stents on the renal arteries is insignificant. Further studies are needed to investigate the effect of different lengths of stent protrusion with variable stent thicknesses on the renal blood flow, and this is valuable for understanding the long-term outcomes of fenestrated repair.

  12. Resveratrol Inhibits Growth of Experimental Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Associated With Upregulation of Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Corey S; Biros, Erik; Krishna, Smriti M; Wang, Yutang; Tikellis, Chris; Morton, Susan K; Moxon, Joseph V; Cooper, Mark E; Norman, Paul E; Burrell, Louise M; Thomas, Merlin C; Golledge, Jonathan

    2017-11-01

    Recent evidence suggests an important role for angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) in limiting abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). This study examined the effect of ACE2 deficiency on AAA development and the efficacy of resveratrol to upregulate ACE2 in experimental AAA. APPROACH AND RESULTS: Ace2 deletion in apolipoprotein-deficient mice (ApoE(-/-)Ace2(-/y) ) resulted in increased aortic diameter and spontaneous aneurysm of the suprarenal aorta associated with increased expression of inflammation and proteolytic enzyme markers. In humans, serum ACE2 activity was negatively associated with AAA diagnosis. ACE2 expression was lower in infrarenal biopsies of patients with AAA than organ donors. AAA was more severe in ApoE(-/-)Ace2(-/y) mice compared with controls in 2 experimental models. Resveratrol (0.05/100-g chow) inhibited growth of pre-established AAAs in ApoE(-/-) mice fed high-fat chow and infused with angiotensin II continuously for 56 days. Reduced suprarenal aorta dilatation in mice receiving resveratrol was associated with elevated serum ACE2 and increased suprarenal aorta tissue levels of ACE2 and sirtuin 1 activity. In addition, the relative phosphorylation of Akt and ERK (extracellular signal-regulated kinase) 1/2 within suprarenal aorta tissue and gene expression for nuclear factor of kappa light polypeptide gene enhancer in B cells 1, angiotensin type-1 receptor, and metallopeptidase 2 and 9 were significantly reduced. Upregulation of ACE2 in human aortic smooth muscle cells by resveratrol in vitro was sirtuin 1-dependent. This study provides experimental evidence of an important role for ACE2 in limiting AAA development and growth. Resveratrol upregulated ACE2 and inhibited AAA growth in a mouse model. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  13. Early results from a Canadian multicenter prospective registry of the Endurant stent graft for endovascular treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvinlaug, Kylie E; Lawlor, D Kirk; Forbes, Thomas L; Willoughby, Rod; MacKenzie, Kent S; DeRose, Guy; Corriveau, Marc M; Steinmetz, Oren K

    2012-02-01

    To report the early results of a multicenter registry of endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) using the Endurant stent-graft. Patients having elective treatment of infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) with the Endurant stent-graft at 3 Canadian centers were enrolled in a prospective registry between September 2008 and January 2010. In the 16-month period, 111 patients (90 men; mean age 75 years, range 53-93) were registered. Thirty-seven (33.3%) patients had challenging anatomy: short proximal aortic necks (n=17), large diameter (>28 mm) aortic necks (n=4), angulated (>60°) necks (n=3), and small (5 mm, secondary intervention, stent-graft migration, and graft thrombosis. The overall technical success rate was 100%. Nineteen (17.1%) patients experienced perioperative complications. After a mean follow-up of 6 months (range 0.1-16), mortality in the series was 4.5%: 1 perioperative death (multisystem organ failure) and 4 (3.6%) late deaths (3 cardiac, 1 cancer). Clinical and imaging follow-up past the perioperative period were available in 107 (96.4%) and 99 (89.2%) patients, respectively. Among the latter, 9 (9.1%) had a type II endoleak on the first scan; 4 resolved spontaneously. Three (3.0%) patients developed graft limb thrombosis in follow-up; one required an intervention. There was no graft migration, aneurysm expansion, secondary intervention for endoleak, aneurysm rupture, or conversion. Early results from this prospective multicenter registry indicate that the Endurant stent-graft is a safe option for elective EVAR in selected AAA patients. Longer follow-up is required to determine the durability of these outcomes.

  14. 3D printed abdominal aortic aneurysm phantom for image guided surgical planning with a patient specific fenestrated endovascular graft system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meess, Karen M.; Izzo, Richard L.; Dryjski, Maciej L.; Curl, Richard E.; Harris, Linda M.; Springer, Michael; Siddiqui, Adnan H.; Rudin, Stephen; Ionita, Ciprian N.

    2017-03-01

    Following new trends in precision medicine, Juxatarenal Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (JAAA) treatment has been enabled by using patient-specific fenestrated endovascular grafts. The X-ray guided procedure requires precise orientation of multiple modular endografts within the arteries confirmed via radiopaque markers. Patient-specific 3D printed phantoms could familiarize physicians with complex procedures and new devices in a risk-free simulation environment to avoid periprocedural complications and improve training. Using the Vascular Modeling Toolkit (VMTK), 3D Data from a CTA imaging of a patient scheduled for Fenestrated EndoVascular Aortic Repair (FEVAR) was segmented to isolate the aortic lumen, thrombus, and calcifications. A stereolithographic mesh (STL) was generated and then modified in Autodesk MeshMixer for fabrication via a Stratasys Eden 260 printer in a flexible photopolymer to simulate arterial compliance. Fluoroscopic guided simulation of the patient-specific FEVAR procedure was performed by interventionists using all demonstration endografts and accessory devices. Analysis compared treatment strategy between the planned procedure, the simulation procedure, and the patient procedure using a derived scoring scheme. Results: With training on the patient-specific 3D printed AAA phantom, the clinical team optimized their procedural strategy. Anatomical landmarks and all devices were visible under x-ray during the simulation mimicking the clinical environment. The actual patient procedure went without complications. Conclusions: With advances in 3D printing, fabrication of patient specific AAA phantoms is possible. Simulation with 3D printed phantoms shows potential to inform clinical interventional procedures in addition to CTA diagnostic imaging.

  15. Tryptophan-Derived 3-Hydroxyanthranilic Acid Contributes to Angiotensin II-Induced Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Formation in Mice In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiongxin; Ding, Ye; Song, Ping; Zhu, Huaiping; Okon, Imoh; Ding, Yang-Nan; Chen, Hou-Zao; Liu, De-Pei; Zou, Ming-Hui

    2017-12-05

    Abnormal amino acid metabolism is associated with vascular disease. However, the causative link between dysregulated tryptophan metabolism and abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is unknown. Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) is the first and rate-limiting enzyme in the kynurenine pathway of tryptophan metabolism. Mice with deficiencies in both apolipoprotein e (Apoe) and IDO (Apoe-/-/IDO-/-) were generated by cross-breeding IDO-/- mice with Apoe-/- mice. The acute infusion of angiotensin II markedly increased the incidence of AAA in Apoe-/- mice, but not in Apoe-/-/IDO-/- mice, which presented decreased elastic lamina degradation and aortic expansion. These features were not altered by the reconstitution of bone marrow cells from IDO+/+ mice. Moreover, angiotensin II infusion instigated interferon-γ, which induced the expression of IDO and kynureninase and increased 3-hydroxyanthranilic acid (3-HAA) levels in the plasma and aortas of Apoe-/- mice, but not in IDO-/- mice. Both IDO and kynureninase controlled the production of 3-HAA in vascular smooth muscle cells. 3-HAA upregulated matrix metallopeptidase 2 via transcription factor nuclear factor-κB. Furthermore, kynureninase knockdown in mice restrained 3-HAA, matrix metallopeptidase 2, and resultant AAA formation by angiotensin II infusion. Intraperitoneal injections of 3-HAA into Apoe-/- and Apoe-/-/IDO-/- mice for 6 weeks increased the expression and activity of matrix metallopeptidase 2 in aortas without affecting metabolic parameters. Finally, human AAA samples had stronger staining with the antibodies against 3-HAA, IDO, and kynureninase than those in adjacent nonaneurysmal aortic sections of human AAA samples. These data define a previously undescribed causative role for 3-HAA, which is a product of tryptophan metabolism, in AAA formation. Furthermore, these findings suggest that 3-HAA reduction may be a new target for treating cardiovascular diseases. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  16. Regulatory T cells in human and angiotensin II-induced mouse abdominal aortic aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Yi; Wu, Wenxue; Lindholt, Jes S

    2015-01-01

    transfer of Tregs from wild-type (WT) and IL10-deficient (Il10(-/-)) mice increased AAA lesion Treg content, but only WT mice Tregs reduced AAA size, AAA incidence, blood pressure, lesion macrophage and CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell accumulation, and angiogenesis with concurrent increase of lesion collagen...... content. Both AAA lesion immunostaining and plasma ELISA demonstrated that adoptive transfer of WT Tregs, but not Il10(-/-) Tregs, reduced the expression of MCP-1. In vitro cell culture and aortic ring assay demonstrated that only Tregs from WT mice, but not those from Il10(-/-) mice, reduced macrophage...... MCP-1 secretion, macrophage and vascular cell protease expression and activity, and aortic ring microvessel formation. CONCLUSION: This study supports a protective role of Tregs in human and experimental AAA by releasing IL10 to suppress inflammatory cell chemotaxis, arterial wall remodelling...

  17. Quantification of Particle Residence Time in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Ga-Young; Les, Andrea S.; Tenforde, Adam S.; Shadden, Shawn C.; Spilker, Ryan L.; Yeung, Janice J.; Cheng, Christopher P.; Herfkens, Robert J.; Dalman, Ronald L.; Taylor, Charles A.

    2011-01-01

    Hemodynamic conditions are hypothesized to affect the initiation, growth, and rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs), a vascular disease characterized by progressive wall degradation and enlargement of the abdominal aorta. This study aims to use magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to quantify flow stagnation and recirculation in eight AAAs by computing particle residence time (PRT). Specifically, we used gadolinium-enhanced MR angiography to obtain images of the vessel lumens, which were used to generate subject-specific models. We also used phase-contrast MRI to measure blood flow at supraceliac and infrarenal locations to prescribe physiologic boundary conditions. CFD was used to simulate pulsatile flow, and PRT, particle residence index, and particle half-life of PRT in the aneurysms were computed. We observed significant regional differences of PRT in the aneurysms with localized patterns that differed depending on aneurysm geometry and infrarenal flow. A bulbous aneurysm with the lowest mean infrarenal flow demonstrated the slowest particle clearance. In addition, improvements in particle clearance were observed with increase of mean infrarenal flow. We postulate that augmentation of mean infrarenal flow during exercise may reduce chronic flow stasis that may influence mural thrombus burden, degradation of the vessel wall, and aneurysm growth. PMID:21103933

  18. Outer Wall Segmentation of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm by Variable Neighborhood Search Through Intensity and Gradient Spaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siriapisith, Thanongchai; Kusakunniran, Worapan; Haddawy, Peter

    2018-01-19

    Aortic aneurysm segmentation remains a challenge. Manual segmentation is a time-consuming process which is not practical for routine use. To address this limitation, several automated segmentation techniques for aortic aneurysm have been developed, such as edge detection-based methods, partial differential equation methods, and graph partitioning methods. However, automatic segmentation of aortic aneurysm is difficult due to high pixel similarity to adjacent tissue and a lack of color information in the medical image, preventing previous work from being applicable to difficult cases. This paper uses uses a variable neighborhood search that alternates between intensity-based and gradient-based segmentation techniques. By alternating between intensity and gradient spaces, the search can escape from local optima of each space. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method outperforms the other existing segmentation methods in the literature, based on measurements of dice similarity coefficient and jaccard similarity coefficient at the pixel level. In addition, it is shown to perform well for cases that are difficult to segment.

  19. The Role of Extra-Anatomic Bypass in the Surgical Treatment of Acute Abdominal Aortic Occlusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilhan, Gokhan; Bozok, Şahin; Ergene, Şaban; Karakisi, Sedat Ozan; Tufekci, Nebiye; Kazdal, Hızır; Ogullar, Sabri; Kucuker, Seref Alp

    2015-06-01

    Aortic occlusion is rare catastophic pathology with high rates of mortality and severe morbidity. In this study, we aimed to share our experience in the management of aortic occlusion and to assess the outcomes of extra-anatomic bypass procedures. Eighteen patients who had undergone extra-anatomic bypass interventions in the cardiovascular surgery department of our tertiary care center between July 2009 and May 2013 were retrospectively evaluated. All patients were preoperatively assessed with angiograms (conventional, computed tomography, or magnetic resonance angiography) and Doppler ultrasonography. Operations consisted of bilateral femoral thromboembolectomy, axillobifemoral extra-anatomic bypass and femoropopliteal bypass and were performed on an emergency basis. In all patients during early postoperative period successful revascularization outcomes were obtained; however, one of these operated patients died on the 10th postoperative due to multiorgan failure. The patients were followed up for a mean duration of 21.2±9.4 months (range, 6 to 36 months). Amputation was not warranted for any patient during postoperative follow-up. To conclude, acute aortic occlusion is a rare but devastating event and is linked with substantial morbidity and mortality in spite of the recent advances in critical care and vascular surgery. Our results have shown that these hazardous outcomes may be minimized and better rates of graft patency may be achieved with extra-anatomic bypass techniques tailored according to the patient.

  20. The Role of Extra-Anatomic Bypass in the Surgical Treatment of Acute Abdominal Aortic Occlusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gokhan Ilhan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Aortic occlusion is rare catastophic pathology with high rates of mortality and severe morbidity. In this study, we aimed to share our experience in the management of aortic occlusion and to assess the outcomes of extra-anatomic bypass procedures. Methods: Eighteen patients who had undergone extra-anatomic bypass interventions in the cardiovascular surgery department of our tertiary care center between July 2009 and May 2013 were retrospectively evaluated. All patients were preoperatively assessed with angiograms (conventional, computed tomography, or magnetic resonance angiography and Doppler ultrasonography. Operations consisted of bilateral femoral thromboembolectomy, axillo-bifemoral extra-anatomic bypass and femoropopliteal bypass and were performed on an emergency basis. Results: In all patients during early postoperative period successful revascularization outcomes were obtained; however, one of these operated patients died on the 10th postoperative due to multiorgan failure. The patients were followed up for a mean duration of 21.2±9.4 months (range, 6 to 36 months. Amputation was not warranted for any patient during postoperative follow-up.. Conclusion: To conclude, acute aortic occlusion is a rare but devastating event and is linked with substantial morbidity and mortality in spite of the recent advances in critical care and vascular surgery. Our results have shown that these hazardous outcomes may be minimized and better rates of graft patency may be achieved with extra-anatomic bypass techniques tailored according to the patient.

  1. Experimental Model of Saccular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm in Swines with Pericardium Sac

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    Maurício de Amorim Aquino

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To consider modifications in an experimental model of saccular aortic aneurysm, aiming at better reproducibility, to be used in the development of vascular prostheses. Methods: Experimental study in two phases, developed in the Center of Experimental Surgery and Bioterium (CCEB of the University of Health Sciences of Alagoas (UNCISAL, with 11 hybrid swine, female, mean weight of 20 ± 5 kg, according to modifications in the Perini technique was performed. In the first phase, the aneurysm was confectioned with bovine pericardial patch. In the second phase, fifteen days later, the patency of the aneurysms was confirmed by Doppler ultrasonography. The described variables were aortic and aneurysm sac patency, incidence of rupture, morbidity and mortality. The statistical analysis program used was STATA v.8. Results: All animals survived to the procedures. Surgical mean time was 73 minutes. Aneurysm rupture, proximal or distal aortic thrombosis, visceral or legs ischemia weren't observed. Parietal thrombus formation was observed in all of the aneurysms, two of which (18%; IC 95% = 3.98 - 48.84 were occluded and nine (82%; IC 95% = 51.15 - 96.01 were patent. Conclusion: In this series, the modifications carried out in the technique related to the surgical approach, race, anesthesia, and imaging exams reproduced the experimental model, reducing its costs, without hindering the analysis of the variables. The satisfactory patency ratio allows the method to be used in experimental models for the development of vascular prostheses.

  2. Proposta para padronização do relatório de tomografia computadorizada nos aneurismas da aorta abdominal A proposal for standardizing computed tomography reports on abdominal aortic aneurysms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiola Goda Torlai

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Propor um modelo de padronização de relatório para aneurisma da aorta abdominal na tomografia computadorizada. MATERIAIS E MÉTODOS: Foram realizadas, no período de abril a outubro de 2004, entrevistas com integrantes da Disciplina de Cirurgia Vascular da nossa instituição, para elaboração de um modelo de padronização de relatório de tomografia computadorizada para o estudo do aneurisma da aorta abdominal. A partir deste modelo foi elaborado um questionário, enviado a nove outros cirurgiões, todos com experiência em cirurgia da aorta abdominal. O índice de resposta aos questionários foi de 55,5% (5/9. RESULTADOS: Os parâmetros de interesse citados mais freqüentemente para a avaliação dos aneurismas de aorta abdominal foram: diâmetro máximo do colo proximal, extensão do colo proximal até a artéria renal mais baixa, forma do colo proximal, diâmetro máximo do aneurisma e diâmetro das artérias ilíacas comuns. Estes dados permitiram elaborar uma proposta de modelo para padronização de relatório na tomografia computadorizada. CONCLUSÃO: Um modelo para a análise tomográfica padronizada do aneurisma de aorta abdominal permite atender às necessidades dos cirurgiões vasculares para acompanhar a evolução e planejar o tratamento destes pacientes.OBJECTIVE: To propose a model to standardize computed tomography reports on abdominal aortic aneurysms. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Interviews were carried out with members of Vascular Surgery Division of our institution, in the period between April and October 2004, aiming at developing a standardized model of computed tomography reports on abdominal aortic aneurysms. Based on this model, a questionnaire was elaborated and sent to other nine surgeons, all of them experienced in the field of abdominal aortic surgery. The questionnaires response rate was 55.5% (5/9. RESULTS: The most frequently mentioned parameters of interest for evaluation of abdominal aortic aneurysms

  3. IL-1β (Interleukin-1β) and TNF-α (Tumor Necrosis Factor-α) Impact Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Formation by Differential Effects on Macrophage Polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batra, Rishi; Suh, Melissa K; Carson, Jeffrey S; Dale, Matthew A; Meisinger, Trevor M; Fitzgerald, Matthew; Opperman, Patrick J; Luo, Jiangtao; Pipinos, Iraklis I; Xiong, Wanfen; Baxter, B Timothy

    2018-02-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms are inflammatory in nature and are associated with some risk factors that also lead to atherosclerotic occlusive disease, most notably smoking. The purpose of our study was to identify differential cytokine expression in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm and those with atherosclerotic occlusive disease. Based on this analysis, we further explored and compared the mechanism of action of IL (interleukin)-1β versus TNF-α (tumor necrosis factor-α) in abdominal aortic aneurysm formation. IL-1β was differentially expressed in human plasma with lower levels detected in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm compared with matched atherosclerotic controls. We further explored its mechanism of action using a murine model and cell culture. Genetic deletion of IL-1β and IL-1R did not inhibit aneurysm formation or decrease MMP (matrix metalloproteinase) expression. The effects of IL-1β deletion on M1 macrophage polarization were compared with another proinflammatory cytokine, TNF-α. Bone marrow-derived macrophages from IL-1β -/- and TNF-α -/- mice were polarized to an M1 phenotype. TNF-α deletion, but not IL-1β deletion, inhibited M1 macrophage polarization. Infusion of M1 polarized TNF-α -/- macrophages inhibited aortic diameter growth; no inhibitory effect was seen in mice infused with M1 polarized IL-1β -/- macrophages. Although IL-1β is a proinflammatory cytokine, its effects on aneurysm formation and macrophage polarization differ from TNF-α. The differential effects of IL-1β and TNF-α inhibition are related to M1/M2 macrophage polarization and this may account for the differences in clinical efficacy of IL-1β and TNF-α antibody therapies in management of inflammatory diseases. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  4. Ruptura de aneurismas de aorta abdominal. Herramienta informática para su predicción // Rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysm. Software for its prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Villalta‐Alonso

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available La ruptura de los aneurismas de aorta abdominal representa un evento clínico muy importantedebido a su alta tasa de mortalidad. Los indicadores empleados actualmente para decidir eltratamiento a pacientes con aneurismas son el diámetro máximo transversal y la tasa de crecimiento,los que pueden ser considerados insuficientes, pues no tienen una base teórica físicamentefundamentada. En el presente artículo se definen los fundamentos para el diseño de una herramientainformática para PC que permita predecir, con suficiente precisión para ser clínicamente relevante, elriesgo de ruptura de aneurismas de aorta abdominal sobre bases personalizadas del paciente. Laherramienta consta de 3 módulos, que están diseñados para procesar toda la información delpaciente e integrarla mediante un modelo que incorpora la interrelación de los factores biomecánicosde diferentes naturalezas (biológicos, estructurales y geométrico y escalas (temporal y dimensional,con el objetivo de calcular un indicador numérico y personalizado del riesgo de ruptura. Estaherramienta debe constituir un elemento auxiliar del facultativo médico en la toma de decisionesrespecto del tratamiento adecuado a pacientes con aneurisma.Palabras claves: AAA, riesgo de ruptura, modelo multiescala, predicción, herramienta informática.___________________________________________________________________AbstractThe rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA represents an important clinical event due to its highmortality rate. Currently the criteria to decide on the treatment of AAA patients are the peaktransverse diameter and the growth rate which can be considered insufficient because they have nota reasonable physical base. The foundations for the design of PC software to predict, with sufficientaccuracy to be clinically relevant, the risk of AAA rupture on patient-specific basis are defined in thispaper. The software consists of 3 modules which are designed for processing all

  5. Evaluation of the CritiView in pig model of abdominal aortic occlusion and graded hemorrhage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayevsky, A.; Preisman, S.; Willenz, P. E.; Castel, D.; Perel, A.; Givony, D.; Dekel, N.; Oren, L.; Pewzner, E.

    2009-02-01

    We hypothesize that in the presence of reduced oxygen delivery and extraction, blood flow will be redistributed in order to protect the most vital organs (e.g., brain and heart) by increasing their regional blood flow, while O2 delivery to the less vital organs (e.g., GI tract or urethral wall) will diminish. Evaluation of mitochondrial function in vivo could be done by monitoring the oxidation reduction state of the respiratory chain. Thus, the NADH redox state of less vital organs could serve as an indicator of overall O2 imbalance as well as an endpoint of resuscitation. We have therefore tested, in a pig model, a new medical device providing real time data on NADH redox state and tissue blood flow- TBF This device contains a modified three way Foley catheter with a fiber optic probe which connects the measurement unit to the tested tissue. Female pigs underwent graded hemorrhage (GH) or Aortic clamping (AC). The main effects of GH started when blood volume decreased by 30%. At 40% blood loss, minimal levels of TBF were correlated to the maximal NADH levels. The values of the 2 parameters returned to baseline after retransfusion of the shed blood. Aortic clamping led to significant decrease in TBF while NADH levels increased. After aortic declamping the parameters recovered to normal values. Due to the short length of the urethra in female pigs and the instable contact between the probe and the tissue, inconsistency of the responses was observed. Our preliminary results show that the CritiView may be a useful tool for the detection of body O2 imbalance.

  6. Lower extremity compartment syndrome after elective percutaneous fenestrated endovascular repair of an abdominal aortic aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John F. Charitable, MD

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Ischemic complications after fenestrated endovascular aortic aneurysm repair (FEVAR can result in significant morbidity and mortality. We present a case of a 65-year-old man who underwent a FEVAR complicated by bilateral lower extremity compartment syndrome requiring four-compartment fasciotomies. This ischemic complication was likely caused by sheath occlusion because the patient had no evidence of arterial injury or distal plaque embolization. This case highlights the importance of careful postoperative monitoring after FEVAR, because the larger sheaths required can be occlusive and result in lower extremity ischemia, even for relatively short cases.

  7. A prospective clinical, economic, and quality-of-life analysis comparing endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR), open repair, and best medical treatment in high-risk patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms suitable for EVAR: the Irish patient trial.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hynes, Niamh

    2007-12-01

    To report the results of a trial comparing endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) to open repair (OR) and best medical therapy (BMT) involving high-risk patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) suitable for EVAR.

  8. Prevention of abdominal aortic aneurysm progression by oral administration of green tea polyphenol in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setozaki, Shuji; Minakata, Kenji; Masumoto, Hidetoshi; Hirao, Shingo; Yamazaki, Kazuhiro; Kuwahara, Koichiro; Ikeda, Tadashi; Sakata, Ryuzo

    2017-06-01

    Inflammation-mediated elastin destruction in the aortic medial layer is related to progression of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), a major component of green tea polyphenols, reportedly increases elastin synthesis in vitro and may possess anti-inflammatory effects. We used a rat model to investigate whether EGCG could prevent AAA progression. AAA was induced with administration of intraluminal elastase and extraluminal CaCl2 in male rats. Rats were randomly divided into a control group (n = 30) and an EGCG group (n = 30). In the EGCG group, an EGCG solution (20 mg/d) was administered orally to each rat from 2 weeks before AAA induction and continued 4 weeks beyond induction. The abdominal aortic diameter was significantly smaller in the EGCG group than in the control group on day 28 (2.9 ± 0.2 vs 2.3 ± 0.1 mm; P oxidase were significantly higher in the EGCG group immediately before AAA induction, indicating promoted elastoregeneration by EGCG administration (tropoelastin: 0.59 ± 0.36 control vs 1.24 ± 0.36 EGCG [P oxidase: 0.77 ± 0.45 control vs 1.34 ± 0.4 EGCG [P < .05]) (fold increase). Gene expression levels of inflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β, were significantly downregulated in the EGCG group (1.82 ± 0.71 vs 0.97 ± 0.59 [P < .05] and 3.91 ± 3.24 vs 0.89 ± 0.59 [P < .05], respectively). On day 7, gene expression levels and gelatinolytic activity of matrix metalloproteinase 9 were significantly lower in the EGCG group (1.41 ± 0.86 vs 0.51 ± 0.42 [P < .05] and 1.00 ± 0.17 vs 0.29 ± 0.12 [P < .0001], respectively), whereas gene expression levels of tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinase-1 were significantly higher in the EGCG group (0.96 ± 0.11 vs 1.14 ± 0.09; P < .05). EGCG attenuated AAA progression in a rat model by preserving the aortic thickness and elastin content of the medial layer through regeneration of elastin, as mediated by

  9. APACHE III score on ICU admission predicts hospital mortality after open thoracoabdominal and open abdominal aortic aneurysm repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabbani, Loay S; Escobar, Guillermo A; Knipp, Brian; Deatrick, Christopher B; Duran, Ahmet; Upchurch, Gilbert R; Napolitano, Lena M

    2010-11-01

    No prior studies, to our knowledge, have examined the performance of the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) III score in predicting mortality of patients undergoing open thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm (TAAA) or open abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair. We sought to evaluate APACHE III scores in the prediction of postoperative mortality in elective TAAA and AAA repairs. Over a 9-year period (July 1998 through June 2007), prospective data (demographics, admitting diagnosis, APACHE III score, intensive care unit [ICU] and hospital length of stay, ICU and hospital mortality) were collected by a dedicated APACHE III coordinator for all patients admitted to a tertiary academic surgical ICU (20 beds). Observational and comparative analyses were performed. Emergent repairs for ruptured aneurysms were excluded from the study. Forty-one patients underwent open elective repair of TAAA and 404 underwent open elective repair of AAA. Mean age of the TAAA group was 63.4 ± 9.8 years and the AAA group was 70.3 ± 8.3 years. Mean APACHE III score was 54 (range: 10-103) for the TAAA group and 45 (range: 11-103) for the AAA group. The in-hospital mortality rate for TAAA patients was 4.9% (n = 2) and for AAA patients was 2.0% (n = 8). Mean APACHE III scores on ICU admission were significantly greater in nonsurvivors versus survivors (79 vs. 45, p APACHE III score on ICU admission was an excellent discriminator of hospital mortality (receiver operating characteristic and area under the curve 0.92 [standard error of 0.05, 95% CI: 0.83-1.0]). APACHE III is an accurate predictor of survival to hospital discharge in both open elective TAAA and AAA repairs. Copyright © 2010 Annals of Vascular Surgery Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Polychlorinated biphenyl 77 augments angiotensin II-induced atherosclerosis and abdominal aortic aneurysms in male apolipoprotein E deficient mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arsenescu, Violeta [Graduate Center for Nutritional Sciences, University of Kentucky, 800 Rose Street, Lexington, KY 40536-0200 (United States); Arsenescu, Razvan [Digestive Diseases and Nutrition, University of Kentucky, 800 Rose Street, Lexington, KY 40536-0200 (United States); Parulkar, Madhura; Karounos, Michael [Graduate Center for Nutritional Sciences, University of Kentucky, 800 Rose Street, Lexington, KY 40536-0200 (United States); Zhang, Xuan [Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky, 800 Rose Street, Lexington, KY 40536-0200 (United States); Baker, Nicki [Graduate Center for Nutritional Sciences, University of Kentucky, 800 Rose Street, Lexington, KY 40536-0200 (United States); Cassis, Lisa A., E-mail: lcassis@uky.edu [Graduate Center for Nutritional Sciences, University of Kentucky, 800 Rose Street, Lexington, KY 40536-0200 (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Infusion of angiotensin II (AngII) to hyperlipidemic mice augments atherosclerosis and causes formation of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs). Each of these AngII-induced vascular pathologies exhibit pronounced inflammation. Previous studies demonstrated that coplanar polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) promote inflammation in endothelial cells and adipocytes, two cell types implicated in AngII-induced vascular pathologies. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that administration of PCB77 to male apolipoprotein E (ApoE) -/- mice promotes AngII-induced atherosclerosis and AAA formation. Male ApoE-/- mice were administered vehicle or PCB77 (49 mg/kg, i.p.) during week 1 and 4 (2 divided doses/week) of AngII infusion. Body weights and total serum cholesterol concentrations were not influenced by administration of PCB77. Systolic blood pressure was increased in AngII-infused mice administered PCB77 compared to vehicle (156 {+-} 6 vs 137 {+-} 5 mmHg, respectively). The percentage of aortic arch covered by atherosclerotic lesions was increased in AngII-infused mice administered PCB77 compared to vehicle (2.0 {+-} 0.4 vs 0.9 {+-} 0.1%, respectively). Lumen diameters of abdominal aortas determined by in vivo ultrasound and external diameters of excised suprarenal aortas were increased in AngII-infused mice administered PCB77 compared to vehicle. In addition, AAA incidence increased from 47 to 85% in AngII-infused mice administered PCB77. Adipose tissue in close proximity to AAAs from mice administered PCB77 exhibited increased mRNA abundance of proinflammatory cytokines and elevated expression of components of the renin-angiotensin system (angiotensinogen, angiotensin type 1a receptor (AT1aR)). These results demonstrate that PCB77 augments AngII-induced atherosclerosis and AAA formation. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Polychlorinated biphenyl 77 (PCB77) promotes AngII-induced hypertension. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PCB77 augments Ang

  11. Analysis of positional candidate genes in the AAA1 susceptibility locus for abdominal aortic aneurysms on chromosome 19

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferrell Robert E

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA is a complex disorder with multiple genetic risk factors. Using affected relative pair linkage analysis, we previously identified an AAA susceptibility locus on chromosome 19q13. This locus has been designated as the AAA1 susceptibility locus in the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM database. Methods Nine candidate genes were selected from the AAA1 locus based on their function, as well as mRNA expression levels in the aorta. A sample of 394 cases and 419 controls was genotyped for 41 SNPs located in or around the selected nine candidate genes using the Illumina GoldenGate platform. Single marker and haplotype analyses were performed. Three genes (CEBPG, PEPD and CD22 were selected for DNA sequencing based on the association study results, and exonic regions were analyzed. Immunohistochemical staining of aortic tissue sections from AAA and control individuals was carried out for the CD22 and PEPD proteins with specific antibodies. Results Several SNPs were nominally associated with AAA (p CEBPG, peptidase D (PEPD, and CD22. Haplotype analysis found a nominally associated 5-SNP haplotype in the CEBPG/PEPD locus, as well as a nominally associated 2-SNP haplotype in the CD22 locus. DNA sequencing of the coding regions revealed no variation in CEBPG. Seven sequence variants were identified in PEPD, including three not present in the NCBI SNP (dbSNP database. Sequencing of all 14 exons of CD22 identified 20 sequence variants, five of which were in the coding region and six were in the 3'-untranslated region. Five variants were not present in dbSNP. Immunohistochemical staining for CD22 revealed protein expression in lymphocytes present in the aneurysmal aortic wall only and no detectable expression in control aorta. PEPD protein was expressed in fibroblasts and myofibroblasts in the media-adventitia border in both aneurysmal and non-aneurysmal tissue samples. Conclusions Association testing

  12. Non-Activated Autologous Platelet-Rich Plasma for the Prevention of Inguinal Wound-Related Complications After Endovascular Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    OpenAIRE

    Saratzis, Nikolaos; Saratzis, Athanasios; Melas, Nikolaos; Kiskinis, Dimitrios

    2008-01-01

    The endovascular repair (EVAR) of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) usually involves the surgical exposure and catheterization of the femoral arteries. Several inguinal surgical wound-related complications have been reported postoperatively. The aim of this report was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of intraoperative application of autologous platelet-rich plasma (PRP) for the prevention of wound-related complications in AAA EVAR. The authors conducted a patient- and assessor-blinded cont...

  13. Vascular surgical society of great britain and ireland: immunoglobulin A antibodies against chlamydia pneumoniae are associated with expansion of small abdominal aortic aneurysms and declining ankle blood pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholt, Jes S.; Vammen; Henneberg

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The potential correlation between chronic infection with Chlamydia pneumoniae and the progression of small abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) and lower limb atherosclerosis was studied. METHODS: Mass screening for AAA was carried out in outdoor clinics at all hospitals in the county....... CONCLUSION: A high proportion of men with a small AAA have signs of chronic C. pneumoniae infection. The progression of AAAs and lower limb atherosclerosis seems to be correlated to chronic infection with C. pneumoniae....

  14. Hybrid treatment of bullet embolism at the abdominal aortic bifurcation, complicated with thoracoabdominal aorta pseudoaneurysm and common iliac artery occlusion: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Bastos Metzger

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Embolization due to a firearm projectile entering the bloodstream is a rare event that is unlikely to be suspected during initial treatment of trauma patients. We describe and discuss a case of bullet embolism of the abdominal aortic bifurcation, complicated by a pseudoaneurysm of the thoracoabdominal aorta and occlusion of the right common iliac artery, but successfully treated using a combination of endovascular methods and conventional surgery.

  15. Abdominal aortic aneurysm, arterial stiffening and the role of the intraluminal thrombus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyck Hansen, Maria; Dahl Thomsen, Marie; Melholt Rasmussen, Lars

    2015-01-01

    PATIENTS AND METHODS: PWV and PWA were measured in male patients with AAA from an ongoing Danish AAA screening trial. Information on blood pressure, medications, BMI and smoking status was obtained at inclusion. RESULTS: In total, 157 patients were included. Mean age was 73 years. Mean AAA size...... was 42.2 mm. Fifty-six of the patients had an intraluminal thrombus, and patients with AAA and ILT had a significantly higher Aix75 than patients with AAA but without ILT (Mean = 28.3 ± 1.4 SEM vs. 24.9 ± 0.81, p=0.027), a difference that was also significant when adjusting for AAA size, blood pressure...... and age. There was no difference in PWV between the groups. CONCLUSIONS: Haemodynamic properties of the aorta are affected by the presence of ILT in patients with AAA that is not explained by aortic size. Alternatively, these findings could be explained by associations between ILT and properties...

  16. Automatic pose initialization for accurate 2D/3D registration applied to abdominal aortic aneurysm endovascular repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Shun; Lucas, Joseph; Liao, Rui

    2012-02-01

    Minimally invasive abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) stenting can be greatly facilitated by overlaying the preoperative 3-D model of the abdominal aorta onto the intra-operative 2-D X-ray images. Accurate 2-D/3-D registration in 3-D space makes the 2-D/3-D overlay robust to the change of C-Arm angulations. By far, the 2-D/3-D registration methods based on simulated X-ray projection images using multiple image planes have been shown to be able to provide satisfactory 3-D registration accuracy. However, one drawback of the intensity-based 2-D/3-D registration methods is that the similarity measure is usually highly non-convex and hence the optimizer can easily be trapped into local minima. User interaction therefore is often needed in the initialization of the position of the 3-D model in order to get a successful 2-D/3-D registration. In this paper, a novel 3-D pose initialization technique is proposed, as an extension of our previously proposed bi-plane 2-D/3-D registration method for AAA intervention [4]. The proposed method detects vessel bifurcation points and spine centerline in both 2-D and 3-D images, and utilizes landmark information to bring the 3-D volume into a 15mm capture range. The proposed landmark detection method was validated on real dataset, and is shown to be able to provide a good initialization for 2-D/3-D registration in [4], thus making the workflow fully automatic.

  17. Association between the synthetic vascular stent used for abdominal aortic aneurysm and generalized granuloma annulare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han-Chi Tseng

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The etiology of granuloma annulare (GA remains unknown, although several eliciting factors have been proposed. We herein present the case of an 81-year-old man who developed generalized erythematous annular plaques 6 months after engraftment of a vascular stent for abdominal aneurysm repair. Based on the diagnosis of generalized GA and the patient's age, we treated him with psoralens plus ultraviolet A therapy. The treatment response was good. This is the first report showing the association between vascular stent and generalized GA.

  18. Does lower limb exercise worsen renal artery hemodynamics in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anqiang Sun

    Full Text Available Renal artery stenosis (RAS and renal complications emerge in some patients after endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR to treat abdominal aorta aneurysm (AAA. The mechanisms for the causes of these problems are not clear. We hypothesized that for EVAR patients, lower limb exercise could negatively influence the physiology of the renal artery and the renal function, by decreasing the blood flow velocity and changing the hemodynamics in the renal arteries. To evaluate this hypothesis, pre- and post-operative models of the abdominal aorta were reconstructed based on CT images. The hemodynamic environment was numerically simulated under rest and lower limb exercise conditions. The results revealed that in the renal arteries, lower limb exercise decreased the wall shear stress (WSS, increased the oscillatory shear index (OSI and increased the relative residence time (RRT. EVAR further enhanced these effects. Because these parameters are related to artery stenosis and atherosclerosis, this preliminary study concluded that lower limb exercise may increase the potential risk of inducing renal artery stenosis and renal complications for AAA patients. This finding could help elucidate the mechanism of renal artery stenosis and renal complications after EVAR and warn us to reconsider the management and nursing care of AAA patients.

  19. Rapid Two-stage Versus One-stage Surgical Repair of Interrupted Aortic Arch with Ventricular Septal Defect in Neonates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng-Lin Lee

    2008-11-01

    Conclusion: The outcome of rapid two-stage repair is comparable to that of one-stage repair. Rapid two-stage repair has the advantages of significantly shorter cardiopulmonary bypass duration and AXC time, and avoids deep hypothermic circulatory arrest. LVOTO remains an unresolved issue, and postoperative aortic arch restenosis can be dilated effectively by percutaneous balloon angioplasty.

  20. Comparison of patient-specific inlet boundary conditions in the numerical modelling of blood flow in abdominal aortic aneurysm disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardman, David; Semple, Scott I; Richards, Jennifer M J; Hoskins, Peter R

    2013-02-01

    Three inlet boundary condition datasets were derived from phase-contrast MRI: (i) centre line velocity data converted to two-dimensional (2D) velocity profile using Womersley equations (Womersley), (ii) 2D velocity profile with one axial component of velocity (1CV), (iii) 2D velocity profile with three components of velocity (3CV). Computational fluid dynamics was performed using a rigid wall approach with geometry data extracted from the computed tomography dataset. Helical flow was present in the 1CV and 3CV simulations, with more complex patterns for the 3CV case. The Womersley method produced simplified flow patterns with an absence of helical flow. Mean values of quantitative indices (helical flow index, mean wall shear stress, oscillatory index) were compared with the 3CV inlet data. These were lower for both the Womersley inlet data (28%, 71%, 56%) and the 1CV inlet data (9%, 24%, 69%). It was concluded that inlet methods based on centre line velocity, such as might be obtained from Doppler ultrasound, lead to significantly simplified abdominal aortic aneurysm haemodynamics and thus are not recommended. Single velocity component (axial) data from MRI might suffice when general flow characteristics and spatial wall shear stress are required. Ideally 2D MRI velocity profiles with 3-velocity component data are preferred to fully account for helical flow. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Evaluation with Doppler vascular ultrasound in postoperative endovascular treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysm: a prospective comparative study with angiotomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graciliano Jose Franca

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Diagnosis of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA is usually incidental, and surgical treatment, when indicated, may be open or endovascular. The drawbacks of computed angiotomography (CTA and the advantages of Doppler ultrasonography have led to the development of alternative follow-up protocols, comparing the two methods. OBJECTIVE: To determine validity indices for Doppler ultrasonography and to correlate them with CTA results in a group of patients who had undergone elective endovascular treatment of AAAs. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Thirty-three patients were selected. The following three items were evaluated: 1 presence or absence of endoleak; 2 presence of blood flow in the aortoiliac segment; and 3 maximum AAA diameter. RESULTS: For the detection of endoleak, Doppler ultrasonography showed a sensitivity of 54.5%, a specificity of 92.8%, a positive predictive value of 85.7%, a negative predictive value of 92.8%, and an overall accuracy of 76%. For the evaluation of blood flow in the aortoiliac segment, values were 100, 97.8, 80, 97.8, and 98%, respectively. Maximum AAA diameter was similarly measured by both methods, with statistically significant differences (mean difference: 1.98 mm. Pearson's correlation coefficient was 0.97, showing that Doppler ultrasonography and CTA yielded similar results. CONCLUSION: Doppler ultrasonography showed good validity indices and a moderate correlation with CTA in the postoperative evaluation of patients undergoing endovascular treatment of AAAs.

  2. Non-Newtonian Study of Blood Flow in an Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm with a Stabilized Finite Element Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrero, Victor; Sahni, Onkar; Jansen, Kenneth; Tichy, John; Taylor, Charles

    2008-11-01

    In recent years the methods of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) have been applied to the human cardiovascular system to better understand the relationship between arterial blood flow and the disease process, for example in an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Obviously, the technical challenges associated with such modeling are formidable. Among the many problems to be addressed, in this paper we add yet another complication -- the known non-Newtonian nature of blood. In this preliminary study, we used a patient-based AAA model with rigid walls. The pulsatile nature of the flow and the RCR outflow boundary condition are considered. We use the Carreau-Yasuda model to describe the non-Newtonian viscosity variation. Preliminary results for 200K, 2M, and 8M elements mesh are presented for the Newtonian and non-Newtonian cases. The broad fundamental issue we wish to eventually resolve is whether or not non-Newtonian effects in blood flow are sufficiently strong in unhealthy vessels that they must be addressed in meaningful simulations. Interesting differences during the flow cycle shed light on the problem, but further research is needed.

  3. An integrated fluid-chemical model towards modeling the formation of intra-luminal thrombus in abdominal aortic aneurysms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacopo eBiasetti

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms (AAAs are frequently characterized by the presenceof an Intra-Luminal Thrombus (ILT known to influence biochemically and biomechanicallytheir evolution. ILT progression mechanism is still unclear and little is known regardingthe impact on this mechanism of the chemical species transported by blood flow.Chemical agonists and antagonists of platelets activation, aggregation, and adhesion andthe proteins involved in the coagulation cascade (CC may play an important role in ILTdevelopment. Starting from this assumption, the evolution of chemical species involvedin the CC, their relation to coherent vortical structures (VSs and their possible effect onILT evolution have been studied. To this end a fluido-chemical model that simulates theCC through a series of convection-diffusion-reaction (CDR equations has been developed.The model involves plasma-phase and surface bound enzymes and zymogens, and includesboth plasma-phase and membrane-phase reactions. Blood is modeled as a non-Newtonianincompressible fluid. VSs convect thrombin in the domain and lead to the high concentration observed in the distal portion of the AAA. This finding is in line with the clinicalobservations showing that the thickest ILT is usually seen in the distal AAA region. Theproposed model, due to its ability to couple the fluid and chemical domains, provides anintegrated mechanochemical picture that potentially could help unveil mechanisms of ILTformation and development.

  4. Porphyromonas gingivalis participates in pathogenesis of human abdominal aortic aneurysm by neutrophil activation. Proof of concept in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandrine Delbosc

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms (AAAs represent a particular form of atherothrombosis where neutrophil proteolytic activity plays a major role. We postulated that neutrophil recruitment and activation participating in AAA growth may originate in part from repeated episodes of periodontal bacteremia. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Our results show that neutrophil activation in human AAA was associated with Neutrophil Extracellular Trap (NET formation in the IntraLuminal Thrombus, leading to the release of cell-free DNA. Human AAA samples were shown to contain bacterial DNA with high frequency (11/16, and in particular that of Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg, the most prevalent pathogen involved in chronic periodontitis, a common form of periodontal disease. Both DNA reflecting the presence of NETs and antibodies to Pg were found to be increased in plasma of patients with AAA. Using a rat model of AAA, we demonstrated that repeated injection of Pg fostered aneurysm development, associated with pathological characteristics similar to those observed in humans, such as the persistence of a neutrophil-rich luminal thrombus, not observed in saline-injected rats in which a healing process was observed. CONCLUSIONS: Thus, the control of periodontal disease may represent a therapeutic target to limit human AAA progression.

  5. Melatonin attenuates angiotensin II-induced abdominal aortic aneurysm through the down-regulation of matrix metalloproteinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Jing; Zhang, Ya; Liu, Shanshan; Li, Hongxuan; Liu, Shangming; Wang, Jingjing; Qin, Xiaoteng; Jiang, Xiuxin; Yang, Jianmin; Zhang, Cheng; Zhang, Wencheng

    2017-02-28

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) affects more than 5% of the population in developed countries and the pharmacotherapies for AAA are limited. Here, we explored whether melatonin regulates the development of AAA. In smooth muscle cells, melatonin treatment decreases angiotensin II-induced matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2) and MMP9 expression. Human antigen R (HuR) could bind with the adenylateuridylate-rich elements of MMP2 and MMP9 mRNAs 3' untranslated region, resulting in the increased stability of MMP2 and MMP9 mRNAs. HuR is required for angiotensin II-induced MMP2 and MMP9 expression. Moreover, melatonin suppresses angiotensin II-induced HuR expression through inhibiting NF-κB signaling, leading to decreased MMP2 and MMP9 levels. Finally, melatonin attenuates the development of AAA in ApoE-/- mice infused with angiotensin II in vivo. These data support a role of HuR in the development of AAA and possible therapeutic roles for melatonin and/or HuR inhibition in AAA.

  6. Duplex ultrasound and computed tomography angiography in the follow-up of endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair: a comparative study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantador, Alex Aparecido; Siqueira, Daniel Emilio Dalledone; Jacobsen, Octavio Barcellos; Baracat, Jamal; Pereira, Ines Minniti Rodrigues; Menezes, Fabio Hüsemann; Guillaumon, Ana Terezinha, E-mail: alex_cantador@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (FCM/UNICAMP), Campinas, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Ciencias Medicas

    2016-07-15

    Objective: To compare duplex ultrasound and computed tomography (CT) angiography in terms of their performance in detecting endoleaks, as well as in determining the diameter of the aneurysm sac, in the postoperative follow-up of endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. Materials and Methods: This was a prospective study involving 30 patients who had undergone endovascular repair of infrarenal aortoiliac aneurysms. Duplex ultrasound and CT angiography were performed simultaneously by independent radiologists. Measurements of the aneurysm sac diameter were assessed, and the presence or absence of endoleaks was determined. Results: The average diameter of the aneurysm sac, as determined by duplex ultrasound and CT angiography was 6.09 ± 1.95 and 6.27 ± 2.16 cm, respectively. Pearson's correlation coefficient showing a statistically significant correlation (R = 0.88; p < 0.01). Comparing the duplex ultrasound and CT angiography results regarding the detection of endoleaks, we found that the former had a negative predictive value of 92.59% and a specificity of 96.15%. Conclusion: Our results show that there is little variation between the two methods evaluated, and that the choice between the two would have no significant effect on clinical management. Duplex ultrasound could replace CT angiography in the postoperative follow-up of endovascular aneurysm repair of the infrarenal aorta, because it is a low-cost procedure without the potential clinical complications related to the use of iodinated contrast and exposure to radiation. (author)

  7. Time trends in hospital admissions and mortality due to abdominal aortic aneurysms in France, 2002-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, M; Juillière, Y; Gabet, A; Kownator, S; Olié, V

    2017-05-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) are serious disease with a high fatality rate but recent epidemiologic data showed a decrease of AAA mortality. Our objective was to estimate, in France, the hospitalization, inhospital mortality and mortality rates due to AAA and to analyze their trends over time. Hospitalization data were extracted from the hospital discharge summaries in the national database between 2002 and 2013. The analysis covered all patients hospitalized for AAA as a principal diagnosis. During the same period, all death certificates mentioning AAA as an initial cause of death were included in the study. Crude and standardized rates were calculated according to age and sex. Poisson regression was used to analyze the average annual percent change. In 2013, there were 8853 patients hospitalized for AAA in France (7986 unruptured and 867 ruptured). Between 2002 and 2013, the rate of patients hospitalized for unruptured AAA decreased slightly in men (-5.0%) but increased in women (+5.2%). By contrast, the rate of patients hospitalized for ruptured AAA has decreased by >20% in men and women. The proportion of endovascular treatment of unruptured AAA rose from <10% in 2005 to 35% in women and 40% in men in 2013. In 2013, 939 deaths from AAA were recorded. Mortality for this disease declined significantly from 2002 to 2013 in men and women. The unfavorable epidemiological trends in women and important evolution of the management of AAA call for an epidemiological surveillance of this disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Growth Description for Vessel Wall Adaptation: A Thick-Walled Mixture Model of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grytsan, Andrii; Eriksson, Thomas S E; Watton, Paul N; Gasser, T Christian

    2017-08-25

    (1) Background: Vascular tissue seems to adapt towards stable homeostatic mechanical conditions, however, failure of reaching homeostasis may result in pathologies. Current vascular tissue adaptation models use many ad hoc assumptions, the implications of which are far from being fully understood; (2) Methods: The present study investigates the plausibility of different growth kinematics in modeling Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) evolution in time. A structurally motivated constitutive description for the vessel wall is coupled to multi-constituent tissue growth descriptions; Constituent deposition preserved either the constituent's density or its volume, and Isotropic Volume Growth (IVG), in-Plane Volume Growth (PVG), in-Thickness Volume Growth (TVG) and No Volume Growth (NVG) describe the kinematics of the growing vessel wall. The sensitivity of key modeling parameters is explored, and predictions are assessed for their plausibility; (3) Results: AAA development based on TVG and NVG kinematics provided not only quantitatively, but also qualitatively different results compared to IVG and PVG kinematics. Specifically, for IVG and PVG kinematics, increasing collagen mass production accelerated AAA expansion which seems counterintuitive. In addition, TVG and NVG kinematics showed less sensitivity to the initial constituent volume fractions, than predictions based on IVG and PVG; (4) Conclusions: The choice of tissue growth kinematics is of crucial importance when modeling AAA growth. Much more interdisciplinary experimental work is required to develop and validate vascular tissue adaption models, before such models can be of any practical use.

  9. Non-contrast 3D black blood MRI for abdominal aortic aneurysm surveillance: comparison with CT angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Chengcheng; Leach, Joseph R.; Hope, Michael D. [University of California San Francisco, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, San Francisco, CA (United States); Tian, Bing; Liu, Qi; Lu, Jianping; Chen, Luguang [Changhai Hospital, Department of Radiology, Shanghai (China); Saloner, David [University of California San Francisco, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, San Francisco, CA (United States); Radiology Service, VA Medical Center, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2017-05-15

    Management of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) is based on diameter. CT angiography (CTA) is commonly used, but requires radiation and iodinated contrast. Non-contrast MRI is an appealing alternative that may allow better characterization of intraluminal thrombus (ILT). This study aims to 1) validate non-contrast MRI for measuring AAA diameter, and 2) to assess ILT with CTA and MRI. 28 patients with AAAs (diameter 50.7 ± 12.3 mm) underwent CTA and non-contrast MRI. MRI was acquired at 3 T using 1) a conventional 3D gradient echo (GRE) sequence and 2) a 3D T{sub 1}-weighted black blood fast-spin-echo sequence. Two radiologists independently measured the AAA diameter. The ratio of signal of ILT and adjacent psoas muscle (ILT{sub r} = signal{sub ILT}/signal{sub Muscle}) was quantified. Strong agreement between CTA and non-contrast MRI was shown for AAA diameter (intra-class coefficient > 0.99). Both approaches had excellent inter-observer reproducibility (ICC > 0.99). ILT appeared homogenous on CTA, whereas MRI revealed compositional variations. Patients with AAAs ≥5.5 cm and <5.5 cm had a variety of distributions of old/fresh ILT types. Non-contrast 3D black blood MRI provides accurate and reproducible AAA diameter measurements as validated by CTA. It also provides unique information about ILT composition, which may be linked with elevated risk for disease progression. (orig.)

  10. A Systematic Review of Protocols for the Three-Dimensional Morphologic Assessment of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms Using Computed Tomographic Angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghatwary, Tamer M. H.; Patterson, Benjamin O.; Karthikesalingam, Alan; Hinchliffe, Robert J.; Loftus, Ian M. [St. George' s Vascular Institute, St. George' s Hospital, Department of Outcomes Research (United Kingdom); Morgan, Robert [St. George' s Hospital, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom); Thompson, Matt M.; Holt, Peter J. E., E-mail: pholt@sgul.ac.uk [St. George' s Vascular Institute, St. George' s Hospital, Department of Outcomes Research (United Kingdom)

    2013-02-15

    The morphology of infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) directly influences the perioperative outcome and long-term durability of endovascular aneurysm repair. A variety of methods have been proposed for the characterization of AAA morphology using reconstructed three-dimensional (3D) computed tomography (CT) images. At present, there is lack of consensus as to which of these methods is most applicable to clinical practice or research. The purpose of this review was to evaluate existing protocols that used 3D CT images in the assessment of various aspects of AAA morphology. An electronic search was performed, from January 1996 to the end of October 2010, using the Embase and Medline databases. The literature review conformed to PRISMA statement standards. The literature search identified 604 articles, of which 31 studies met inclusion criteria. Only 15 of 31 studies objectively assessed reproducibility. Existing published protocols were insufficient to define a single evidence-based methodology for preoperative assessment of AAA morphology. Further development and expert consensus are required to establish a standardized and validated protocol to determine precisely how morphology relates to outcomes after endovascular aneurysm repair.

  11. Beneficial Effects of Pre-operative Exercise Therapy in Patients with an Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouwels, S; Willigendael, E M; van Sambeek, M R H M; Nienhuijs, S W; Cuypers, P W M; Teijink, J A W

    2015-01-01

    The impact of post-operative complications in abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) surgery is substantial, and increases with age and concomitant co-morbidities. This systematic review focuses on the possible effects of pre-operative exercise therapy (PET) in patients with AAA on post-operative complications,aerobic capacity, physical fitness, and recovery. A systematic search on PET prior to AAA surgery was conducted. The methodological quality of the included studies was rated using the Physiotherapy Evidence Database scale. The agreement between the reviewers was assessed with Cohen's kappa. Five studies were included, with a methodological quality ranging from moderate to good. Cohen's kappa was 0.79. Three studies focused on patients with an AAA (without indication for surgical repair) with physical fitness as the outcome measure. One study focused on PET in patients awaiting AAA surgery and one study focused on the effects of PET on post-operative complications, length of stay, and recovery. PET has beneficial effects on various physical fitness variables of patients with an AAA. Whether this leads to less complications or faster recovery remains unclear. In view of the large impact of post-operative complications, it is valuable to explore the possible benefits of a PET program in AAA surgery.

  12. Platelet accumulation in abdominal aortic aneurysm and the effect of antiplatelet drugs; Assessment by indium platelet scintigraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Etami, Hideki (Osaka-Minami National Hospital, Kawachi-nagano (Japan)); Kimura, Kazufumi; Isaka, Yoshinari (and others)

    1992-06-01

    A dual tracer technique using {sup 111}In labeled platelets and {sup 99m}Tc labeled human serum albumin was applied to evaluate the in vivo thrombogenicity in 12 cases with abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) and the effect of antiplatelet drug on the thrombogenicity. The magnitude of platelet accumulation at AAA was expressed as the ratio of radioactivity of {sup 111}In platelets on the vascular wall to those in the blood pool (PAI; platelet accumulation index). Of the 12 patients with AAA, 11 had positive studies on baseline imaging and 1 had equivocally positive image. The PAI value (Mean{+-}SD) over the AAA was 53.8{+-}34.1% as compared to -8.6{+-}4.4% in the control group (p<0.01). Seven patients with an AAA and positive baseline images were restudied during platelet active drug with 325 mg of aspirin. During treatment with aspirin, of 7 patients, 5 had positive images, of which 3 were decreased and others unchanged compared to baseline studies, 1 equivocally positive one and one negative one. The PAI value during treatment (21.9{+-}18.6%) was significantly decreased compared to those in baseline study (52.1{+-}23.9%). Our results suggest that the method used for platelet imaging in the present study may be useful for studying the in vivo thrombogenicity and the effect of platelet active drugs in AAA. (author).

  13. Combined coronary artery bypass grafting and open abdominal aortic aneurysm repair is a reasonable treatment approach: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanos, Konstantinos; Saleptsis, Vasileios; Karathanos, Christos; Rousas, Nikolaos; Athanasoulas, Athanasios; Giannoukas, Athanasios D

    2014-08-01

    We reviewed the literature for studies investigating the outcomes of combined 1-stage coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) and abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) open repair (OR) procedures. An electronic search of the English literature was conducted using the PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane databases. Age, coronary heart disease severity, AAA size, mean duration from CABG to AAA OR procedures, details of each procedure, mortality, and morbidity rates were analyzed. Between 1994 and 2012, 12 studies (256 patients) with 1-stage treatment fulfilled the inclusion criteria and were analyzed. There were 20 early (30 days) deaths, accounting for a 30-day mortality rate of 7.8%. The early morbidity was 53% (136 of 256). One-stage treatment when necessary can be undertaken with acceptable mortality and reasonable morbidity rates considering the complexity of both the operations. Nowadays, endovascular AAA repair is preferred over OR. The outcomes of combined cardiac surgery and endovascular AAA repair have not been extensively evaluated. © The Author(s) 2013.

  14. Usefulness of one-stage coronary artery bypass grafting on the beating heart and abdominal aortic aneurysm repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimoto, Keisuke; Taniguchi, Iwao; Miyasaka, Shigeto; Aoki, Tetsuya; Kato, Ippei; Yamaga, Takeshi

    2004-02-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is commonly associated with coronary artery disease (CAD). Simultaneous coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) under cardiac arrest and AAA repair may be considerably invasive. Recently CABG under the beating heart without CPB has been reported as a less invasive method. We report the combined operation of CABG on a beating heart and AAA repair for AAA patients with CAD, and compare it with a separate operation. A retrospective review of the records of consecutive patients who underwent elective combined procedure or single operation for CABG on a beating heart and/or repair of the AAA between May 1999 and October 2001 was carried out. Ten patients underwent combined procedures. A single operation, CABG on a beating heart or repair of AAA, were performed in 27 or 19 patients. There were no significant differences with regard to intraoperative blood loss, transfusion and postoperative intubation time among the three groups. There was no operative mortality for any of the three groups. All cases were discharged without severe complications and with patent coronary bypass grafts. There was a decrease in mean total hospital costs for the combined operation group compared with the CABG group plus AAA repair group (3.34 million versus 5.87 million yen). Combined CABG on a beating heart and AAA repair on a one-step approach appears to be a safe and useful therapeutic strategy for AAA patients with CAD.

  15. Existen ventajas en el abordaje extraperitoneal para el tratamiento del aneurisma de aorta abdominal? Are there advantages in the extraperitoneal approach for the treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysm?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heinz Hiller

    2010-02-01

    . Debido al tamaño de la muestra no puede concluirse que hubo una diferencia estadísticamente significativa en cuanto a la mortalidad; sin embargo se observó una tendencia a la reducción de la misma con el abordaje extraperitoneal.There are current controversies over the benefits of the extraperitoneal vs the transperitoneal approach for repairing an infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm. Several studies report a reduction in morbidity and mortality with the former approach. This study reports the short term results using both approaches at one reference center. This is a 12 year, retrospective descriptive study of 299 patients who underwent an elective open repair of an abdominal aortic aneurysm, distributed in two groups: transperitoneal approach group=1, extraperitoneal approach group=2. A total of 93 patients in group 1 and 206 in group 2 were intervened, mainly male patients with an median age of 68 years. The frequencies of co-morbidities were similar in both groups. There was a reduced tendency of reoperations in group 2 (12.9%vs 5.8%, and a greater tendency of postoperative complications in group 1 (30.1% vs 12.6%. However, the types complications were similar. The results show a median hospital stay of 13.3 days (SD+- 10,4 vs. 7.19 days (SD+- 4.20 p=0.00001, median post-operative stay of 9.16 days (SD-+ 8,1 vs. 5.62 days (SD+- 3,46 p= 0.001 and median intensive unit stay of 2.76 days (SD+-4.19 vs 1.56 days (SD+-1.86 p=0.00001 in group 1 y 2 respectively. Early global mortality was 3.3% with a distribution frequency of 6.5% (n=6 in group 1 and 1.9% (n=4 in group 2. In our experience, the extraperitoneal approach offers better results regarding hospital, postoperative and intensive care unit stay, as well as post-operative re-operation rates and complications. Because of the small sample size, the mortality difference was not statistically significant; however, we found an important tendency towards improved mortality rates with this approach.

  16. Abdominal aortic occlusion and vascular compromise secondary to acute gastric dilatation in a patient with bulimia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsharif, M; Doulias, T; Aljundi, W; Balchandra, S

    2014-11-01

    Acute gastric dilation is a rare but recognised complication in patients with bulimia and anorexia following binge episodes owing to decreased bowel motility. We present a rare case of acute gastric dilation secondary to bulimia in an otherwise healthy 18-year-old female patient that resulted in compression and complete occlusion of the abdominal aorta, leading to acute mesenteric and bilateral lower limb ischaemia. This resolved immediately following a laparotomy and gastric decompression. Management of these patients is very challenging owing to the lack of a successful precedent. To our knowledge, such a catastrophic complication has only ever been reported once in the literature and the outcome was fatal. Our case is of additional importance as it offers a successful management strategy for these patients.

  17. Tratamento endovascular do aneurisma da aorta abdominal em paciente com insuficiência renal crônica Endovascular treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysm in a patient with chronic renal failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cleoni Pedron

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available A insuficiência renal crônica não-dialítica é uma contra-indicação relativa ao tratamento endovascular dos aneurismas da aorta abdominal. O uso de contrastes alternativos, como o gadolínio, além de fornecer imagens de baixa qualidade, está relacionado à nefrotoxicidade. Relatamos um caso de tratamento endovascular de aneurisma da aorta abdominal guiado por eco-Doppler colorido. Um paciente masculino de 82 anos, com aneurisma da aorta abdominal de 55 mm de diâmetro e clearance de creatinina de 17 ml/min, recebeu implante de endoprótese aórtica modular bifurcada, utilizando este método de imagem associado à radioscopia. Não foi empregado contraste iodado. O resultado imediato e os controles de 1 e 6 meses revelam completa exclusão do aneurisma. A função renal permanece inalterada. Concluímos que o implante de endoprótese guiado por eco-Doppler colorido em pacientes com insuficiência renal crônica não terminal e com anatomia favorável é um método factível e seguro.Non-dialytic chronic renal failure is a contraindication related to the endovascular treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms. The use of alternative contrast agents, such as gadolinium, provides good-quality images and is associated with nephrotoxicity. We report a case of endovascular treatment of an abdominal aortic aneurysm guided by color-flow Doppler ultrasonography. An 82-year-old male patient, with abdominal aortic aneurysm (55 mm in diameter and creatinine clearance of 17 ml/min, underwent implantation of modular bifurcated aortic stent-graft, using that imaging method associated with radioscopy. Iodinated contrast was not used. The immediate result and 1- and 6-month controls showed complete aneurysm exclusion. Renal function is still unaltered. We conclude that the stent-graft implantation guided by color-flow Doppler ultrasonography in patients with nonterminal chronic renal failure and with favorable anatomy is a feasible and safe method.

  18. A Systematic Review of Proximal Neck Dilatation After Endovascular Repair for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouvelos, George N; Oikonomou, Kyriakos; Antoniou, George A; Verhoeven, Eric L G; Katsargyris, Athanasios

    2017-02-01

    To provide an updated systematic literature review and summarize current evidence on proximal aortic neck dilatation (AND) after endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR). A review of the English-language medical literature from 1991 to 2015 was conducted using MEDLINE and EMBASE to identify studies reporting AND after EVAR. Studies considered for inclusion and full-text review fulfilled the following criteria: (1) reported AND after EVAR, (2) included at least 5 patients, and (3) provided data on AND quantification. The search identified 26 articles published between 1998 and 2015 that encompassed 9721 patients (median age 71.8 years; 9439 men). AND occurred in 24.6% of patients (95% CI 18.6% to 31.8%) over a period ranging from 15 months to 9 years after EVAR. No significant dilatation of the suprarenal part of the aorta was reported by most studies. The incidence of combined clinical events (endoleak type I, migration, reintervention during follow-up) was higher in the AND group (26%) when compared with 2% in the group without AND (OR 28.7, 95% CI 5.43 to 151.67, p<0.001). AND affects a considerable proportion of EVAR patients and was related to worse clinical outcome, as indicated by increased rates of type I endoleak, migration, and reinterventions. Future studies should focus on a better understanding of the pathophysiology, predictors, and risk factors of AND, which could identify patients who may warrant a different EVAR strategy and/or a closer post-EVAR surveillance strategy.

  19. Medium-Term Outcomes Following Endovascular Repair of Infrarenal Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms with an Unfavourable Proximal Neck

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saha, Prakash, E-mail: prakash.2.saha@kcl.ac.uk; Hughes, John, E-mail: johnhughes387@rocketmail.com; Patel, Ashish S., E-mail: ashish.s.patel@kcl.ac.uk; Donati, Tommaso, E-mail: tommaso.donati@gstt.nhs.uk; Sallam, Morad, E-mail: morad.sallam@gstt.nhs.uk; Patel, Sanjay D., E-mail: sanjay.patel@gstt.nhs.uk; Bell, Rachel E. [King’s Health Partners, Department of Vascular Surgery, Guy’s and St. Thomas’ Hospitals, NHS Foundation Trust (United Kingdom); Katsanos, Konstantinos, E-mail: katsanos@med.upatras.gr [King’s Health Partners, Department of Interventional Radiology, Guy’s and St. Thomas’ Hospitals, NHS Foundation Trust (United Kingdom); Modarai, Bijan, E-mail: bijan.modarai@kcl.ac.uk; Zayed, Hany A., E-mail: hany.zayed@gstt.nhs.uk [King’s Health Partners, Department of Vascular Surgery, Guy’s and St. Thomas’ Hospitals, NHS Foundation Trust (United Kingdom)

    2015-08-15

    PurposeThe purpose of this study was to evaluate medium-term outcomes following endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms (EVAR) with unfavourable neck anatomy using stent grafts with a 36 mm or larger proximal diameter.Materials and MethodsA retrospective review of 27 patients who underwent elective EVAR between 2006 and 2008 using a stent graft with a 36 mm or larger proximal diameter was carried out. All patients had computed tomography angiography (CTA) for procedure planning, and detailed assessment of the aneurysm neck was performed using a three-dimensional CTA workstation. Patients were followed up with CTA at 3 and 12 months and annual duplex thereafter.ResultsThe median aneurysm diameter was 7 cm, and the median aneurysm neck diameter was 31 mm. Cook Zenith stent grafts were used in all patients, with a proximal diameter of 36 mm (n = 25) and 40 mm (n = 2). Primary and assisted primary technical success rates were 74 and 93 %, respectively. The follow-up period ranged from 62 to 84 months, with a median of 72 months. 15 patients died during follow-up. Two patients died from aortic rupture, and the remaining patients died from cardiac disease (n = 4), chest sepsis (n = 6), cancer (n = 2) and renal failure (n = 1). Complications included type I endoleak (n = 5), limb occlusion (n = 2), limb stenosis (n = 2), limb kinking (n = 1), dissection of an artery (n = 1), occlusion of a femorofemoral cross-over graft (n = 1) and poor attachment of a distal limb (n = 1).ConclusionsEVAR using stent grafts in the presence of an unfavourable neck has a high risk of complications. Medium-term survival in this group is low but mainly due to patient co-morbidities.

  20. Aortic Valve Stenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... rapid, fluttering heartbeat Not eating enough (mainly in children with aortic valve stenosis) Not gaining enough weight (mainly in children with aortic valve stenosis) The heart-weakening effects of aortic valve stenosis ...

  1. Aneurysm-Specific miR-221 and miR-146a Participates in Human Thoracic and Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Premakumari Venkatesh

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Altered microRNA expression is implicated in cardiovascular diseases. Our objective was to determine microRNA signatures in thoracic aortic aneurysms (TAAs and abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs compared with control non-aneurysmal aortic specimens. We evaluated the expression of fifteen selected microRNA in human TAA and AAA operative specimens compared to controls. We observed significant upregulation of miR-221 and downregulation of miR-1 and -133 in TAA specimens. In contrast, upregulation of miR-146a and downregulation of miR-145 and -331-3p were found only for AAA specimens. Upregulation of miR-126 and -486-5p and downregulation of miR-30c-2*, -155, and -204 were observed in specimens of TAAs and AAAs. The data reveal microRNA expression signatures unique to aneurysm location and common to both thoracic and abdominal pathologies. Thus, changes in miR-1, -29a, -133a, and -221 are involved in TAAs and miR-145, -146, and -331-3p impact AAAs. This work validates prior studies on microRNA expression in aneurysmal diseases.

  2. Hemodynamic Effects of the Abdominal Aortic and Junctional Tourniquet in a Hemorrhagic Swine Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-30

    acepromazine, and buprenex. After induction of general anesthesia with isoflurane and mechanical ventilation, lactated Ringer’s solution was administered as...mL of warmed Hextend (6% Hetastarch in Lactated Elec- trolyte Injection) was administered via the left jugular vein using a Belmont Rapid Infuser...central venous pressure (CVP), mean pulmonary arterial pressure (MPAP), PaO2/FiO2 ratio, and lactate . All these indices, with the exception of PaO2

  3. Meteorology in ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm: an institutional study and a meta-analysis of published studies reporting atmospheric pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, H; Watanabe, T; Mizuno, Y; Kawai, N; Umemoto, T

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this paper was to determine whether weather factors including atmospheric pressure are associated with the occurrence of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (RAAA). We investigated our institutional experiences of RAAA in more than 150 patients during 8 years. Further, we performed a meta-analysis of published studies reporting the influence of atmospheric pressure on RAAA. We retrospectively evaluated 152 patients who underwent surgery for RAAA (including ruptured iliac arterial aneurysm) at our institute between 1 January 2006 and 31 December 2013. Daily regional meteorological data (in the nearest weather station located 3.5 km from the hospital) were obtained online from Japan Meteorological Agency. To identify comparative studies of mean atmospheric pressure on the day with RAAA versus that on the day without RAAA, MEDLINE and EMBASE were searched through January 2014 using Web-based search engines (PubMed and OVID). Mean sea level atmospheric pressure, delta mean atmospheric pressure (difference between mean sea level atmospheric pressure on the day and that on the previous day), and sunshine duration on the day with RAAA were significantly lower than those on the day without RAAA: 1012.43±7.44 versus 1013.71±6.49 hPa, P=0.039, -1.18±5.15 versus 0.05±5.62 hPa, P=0.005; and 4.76±3.76 versus 5.47±3.88 h, P=0.026; respectively. A pooled analysis of 8 studies (including our institutional study) demonstrated that mean atmospheric pressure on the day with RAAA was significantly lower than that on the day without RAAA: standardized mean difference, -0.09; 95% confidence interval, -0.14 to -0.04; P=0.0009. Atmospheric pressure on the day with RAAA appears lower than that on the day without RAAA. Atmospheric pressure may be associated with the occurrence of RAAA.

  4. Suitability of pharmacokinetic models for dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI of abdominal aortic aneurysm vessel wall: a comparison.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V Lai Nguyen

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Increased microvascularization of the abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA vessel wall has been related to AAA progression and rupture. The aim of this study was to compare the suitability of three pharmacokinetic models to describe AAA vessel wall enhancement using dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Patients with AAA underwent DCE-MRI at 1.5 Tesla. The volume transfer constant (K(trans , which reflects microvascular flow, permeability and surface area, was calculated by fitting the blood and aneurysm vessel wall gadolinium concentration curves. The relative fit errors, parameter uncertainties and parameter reproducibilities for the Patlak, Tofts and Extended Tofts model were compared to find the most suitable model. Scan-rescan reproducibility was assessed using the interclass correlation coefficient and coefficient of variation (CV. Further, the relationship between K(trans and AAA size was investigated. RESULTS: DCE-MRI examinations from thirty-nine patients (mean age±SD: 72±6 years; M/F: 35/4 with an mean AAA maximal diameter of 49±6 mm could be included for pharmacokinetic analysis. Relative fit uncertainties for K(trans based on the Patlak model (17% were significantly lower compared to the Tofts (37% and Extended Tofts model (42% (p<0.001. K(trans scan-rescan reproducibility for the Patlak model (ICC = 0.61 and CV = 22% was comparable with the Tofts (ICC = 0.61, CV = 23% and Extended Tofts model (ICC = 0.76, CV = 22%. K(trans was positively correlated with maximal AAA diameter (Spearman's ρ = 0.38, p = 0.02 using the Patlak model. CONCLUSION: Using the presented imaging protocol, the Patlak model is most suited to describe DCE-MRI data of the AAA vessel wall with good K(trans scan-rescan reproducibility.

  5. Hospitalization rates and post-operative mortality for abdominal aortic aneurysm in Italy over the period 2000-2011.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi Sensi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recent studies have reported declines in incidence, prevalence and mortality for abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs in various countries, but evidence from Mediterranean countries is lacking. The aim of this study is to examine the trend of hospitalization and post-operative mortality rates for AAAs in Italy during the period 2000-2011, taking into account the introduction of endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR in 1990s. METHODS: This retrospective cohort study was carried out in Emilia-Romagna, an Italian region with 4.5 million inhabitants. A total of 19,673 patients hospitalized for AAAs between 2000 and 2011, were identified from the hospital discharge records (HDR database. Hospitalization rates, percentage of OSR and EVAR and 30-day mortality rates were calculated for unruptured (uAAAs and ruptured AAAs (rAAAs. RESULTS: Adjusted hospitalization rates decreased on average by 2.9% per year for uAAAs and 3.2% for rAAAs (p<0.001. The temporal trend of 30-day mortality rates remained stable for both groups. The percentage of EVAR for uAAAs increased significantly from 2006 to 2011 (42.7 versus 60.9% respectively, mean change of 3.9% per year, p<0.001. No significant difference in mortality was found between OSR and EVAR for uAAAs and rAAAs. CONCLUSIONS: The incidence and trend of hospitalization rates for rAAAs and uAAAs decreased significantly in the last decade, while 30-day mortality rates in operated patients remained stable. OSR continued to be the most common surgery in rAAAs, although the gap between OSR and EVAR recently declined. The EVAR technique became the preferred surgery for uAAAs since 2008.

  6. The efficacy of pharmacotherapy for decreasing the expansion rate of abdominal aortic aneurysms: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Idris Guessous

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pharmacotherapy may represent a potential means to limit the expansion rate of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs. Studies evaluating the efficacy of different pharmacological agents to slow down human AAA-expansion rates have been performed, but they have never been systematically reviewed or summarized. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Two independent reviewers identified studies and selected randomized trials and prospective cohort studies comparing the growth rate of AAA in patients with pharmacotherapy vs. no pharmacotherapy. We extracted information on study interventions, baseline characteristics, methodological quality, and AAA growth rate differences (in mm/year. Fourteen prospective studies met eligibility criteria. Five cohort studies raised the possibility of benefit of beta-blockers [pooled growth rate difference: -0.62 mm/year, (95%CI, -1.00 to -0.24], but this was not confirmed in three beta-blocker RCTs [pooled RCT growth rate difference: -0.05 mm/year (-0.16 to 0.05]. Statins have been evaluated in two cohort studies that yield a pooled growth rate difference of -2.97 (-5.83 to -0.11. Doxycycline and roxithromycin have been evaluated in two RCTs that suggest possible benefit [pooled RCT growth rate difference: -1.32 mm/year (-2.89 to 0.25]. Studies assessing NSAIDs, diuretics, calcium channel blockers and ACE inhibitors, meanwhile, did not find statistically significant differences. CONCLUSIONS: Beta-blockers do not appear to significantly reduce the growth rate of AAAs. Statins and other anti-inflammatory agents appear to hold promise for decreasing the expansion rate of AAA, but need further evaluation before definitive recommendations can be made.

  7. Description of a risk predictive model of 30-day postoperative mortality after elective abdominal aortic aneurysm repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eslami, Mohammad H; Rybin, Denis V; Doros, Gheorghe; Farber, Alik

    2017-01-01

    Despite vast improvement in the field of vascular surgery, elective abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair still leads to perioperative death. Patients with asymptomatic AAAs, therefore, would benefit from an individual risk assessment to help with decisions regarding operative intervention. The purpose of this study was to describe such a 30-day postoperative (POD) risk prediction model using American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Project (NSQIP) data. The NSQIP database (2005-2011) was queried for patients undergoing elective AAA repair using open or endovascular techniques. Clinical variables and known predictors of mortality were included in a full prediction model. These variables included procedure type, patient's age, functional dependence and comorbidities, and surgeon's specialty. Backward elimination with alpha-level of 0.2 was used to construct a parsimonious model. Model discrimination was evaluated in equally sized risk quintiles. The overall mortality rate for 18,917 elective AAA patients was 1.7%. In this model, surgeon's specialty was not predictive of POD. The most significant factors affecting POD included open repair (odds ratio [OR], 2.712; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.119-3.469; P 70 (OR, 2.243; 95% CI, 1.695-3.033; P model was reasonable (C-statistic = 0.751) and corrected to 0.736 after internal validation. The NSQIP model performed well predicting mortality among risk-group quintiles. The NSQIP risk prediction model is a robust vehicle to predict POD among patient undergoing elective AAA repair. This model can be used for risk stratification of patients undergoing elective AAA repair. Copyright © 2016 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Outcomes After Use of Aortouniiliac Endoprosthesis Versus Modular or Unibody Bifurcated Endoprostheses for Endovascular Repair of Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Prateek K; Kempe, Kelly; Brahmbhatt, Reshma; Gupta, Himani; Montes, Jorge; Forse, R Armour; Stickley, Shaun M; Rohrer, Michael J

    2017-08-01

    Outcomes after endovascular repair (EVAR) of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms (rAAAs) have been widely published. There is, however, controversy on the role of the use of aortouniiliac endoprosthesis (AUI) versus modular or unibody bifurcated endoprosthesis (MUB) for repair of rAAAs. We study and compare 30-day outcomes after use of AUI and MUB for all rAAAs focusing specifically on patients with instability. Patients who underwent EVAR for rAAA (n = 425) using AUI (n = 55; 12.9%) and MUB (n = 370; 87.1%) were identified from the American College of Surgeons' National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (2005-2010) database. Univariable and multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed. No significant difference ( P > .5) was seen in comorbidities between patients who underwent EVAR with AUI or MUB; there was also no change in endoprosthesis use from 2005 to 2010 ( P = .7). Patients who underwent EVAR with AUI more commonly had a history of peripheral arterial procedure (10.9% vs 4.6%; P = .053) and preoperative transfusion of >4 U packed red blood cells (18.2% vs 6.8%; P = .004). Use of AUI versus MUB was associated with more 30-day wound complications (16.4% vs 6.2%; P = .01), return to operating room (38.2% vs 20.0%; P = .003), and mortality (34.5% vs 21.4%; P = .03). On multivariable analysis, use of AUI was associated with an increased risk of 30-day mortality (odds ratio: 2.4; 95% confidence interval: 1.1-5.3). On subanalysis of the cohort for only the patients with unstable rAAA (n = 159; AUI = 29 and MUB = 130), 30-day mortality for AUI versus MUB was still higher but not statistically significant (44.8% vs 32.3%; P = .2). Endovascular repair for ruptured AAA using aortouniliac endoprosthesis is associated with higher 30-day mortality than using modular or unibody bifurcated endoprosthesis.

  9. Reproducibility of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Diameter Measurement and Growth Evaluation on Axial and Multiplanar Computed Tomography Reformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dugas, Alexandre; Therasse, Eric; Kauffmann, Claude; Tang, An [University of Montreal, Department of Radiology, Centre Hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal (CHUM) and CHUM Research Center (CRCHUM) (Canada); Elkouri, Stephane [University of Montreal, Department of Surgery, Centre Hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal (CHUM) (Canada); Nozza, Anna [Institut de Cardiologie de Montreal, Montreal Heart Institute Coordinating Centre (Canada); Giroux, Marie-France; Oliva, Vincent L.; Soulez, Gilles, E-mail: gilles.soulez.chum@ssss.gouv.qc.ca [University of Montreal, Department of Radiology, Centre Hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal (CHUM) and CHUM Research Center (CRCHUM) (Canada)

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: To compare different methods measuring abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) maximal diameter (Dmax) and its progression on multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) scan. Materials and Methods: Forty AAA patients with two MDCT scans acquired at different times (baseline and follow-up) were included. Three observers measured AAA diameters by seven different methods: on axial images (anteroposterior, transverse, maximal, and short-axis views) and on multiplanar reformation (MPR) images (coronal, sagittal, and orthogonal views). Diameter measurement and progression were compared over time for the seven methods. Reproducibility of measurement methods was assessed by intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and Bland-Altman analysis. Results: Dmax, as measured on axial slices at baseline and follow-up (FU) MDCTs, was greater than that measured using the orthogonal method (p = 0.046 for baseline and 0.028 for FU), whereas Dmax measured with the orthogonal method was greater those using all other measurement methods (p-value range: <0.0001-0.03) but anteroposterior diameter (p = 0.18 baseline and 0.10 FU). The greatest interobserver ICCs were obtained for the orthogonal and transverse methods (0.972) at baseline and for the orthogonal and sagittal MPR images at FU (0.973 and 0.977). Interobserver ICC of the orthogonal method to document AAA progression was greater (ICC = 0.833) than measurements taken on axial images (ICC = 0.662-0.780) and single-plane MPR images (0.772-0.817). Conclusion: AAA Dmax measured on MDCT axial slices overestimates aneurysm size. Diameter as measured by the orthogonal method is more reproducible, especially to document AAA progression.

  10. Clonal expansion of T cells in abdominal aortic aneurysm: a role for doxycycline as drug of choice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroon, Albert M; Taanman, Jan-Willem

    2015-05-18

    Most reported studies with animal models of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) and several studies with patients have suggested that doxycycline favourably modifies AAA; however, a recent large long-term clinical trial found that doxycycline did not limit aneurysm growth. Thus, there is currently no convincing evidence that doxycycline reduces AAA expansion. Here, we critically review the available experimental and clinical information about the effects of doxycycline when used as a pharmacological treatment for AAA. The view that AAA can be considered an autoimmune disease and the observation that AAA tissue shows clonal expansion of T cells is placed in the light of the well-known inhibition of mitochondrial protein synthesis by doxycycline. In T cell leukaemia animal models, this inhibitory effect of the antibiotic has been shown to impede T cell proliferation, resulting in complete tumour eradication. We suggest that the available evidence of doxycycline action on AAA is erroneously ascribed to its inhibition of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) by competitive binding of the zinc ion co-factor. Although competitive binding may explain the inhibition of proteolytic activity, it does not explain the observed decreases of MMP mRNA levels. We propose that the observed effects of doxycycline are secondary to inhibition of mitochondrial protein synthesis. Provided that serum doxycycline levels are kept at adequate levels, the inhibition will result in a proliferation arrest, especially of clonally expanding T cells. This, in turn, leads to the decrease of proinflammatory cytokines that are normally generated by these cells. The drastic change in cell type composition may explain the changes in MMP mRNA and protein levels in the tissue samples.

  11. Endovascular Versus Open Repair as Primary Strategy for Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm: A National Population-based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunnarsson, K; Wanhainen, A; Djavani Gidlund, K; Björck, M; Mani, K

    2016-01-01

    In randomized trials, no peri-operative survival benefit has been shown for endovascular (EVAR) repair of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (rAAA) when compared with open repair. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of primary repair strategy on early and midterm survival in a non-selected population based study. The Swedish Vascular Registry was consulted to identify all rAAA repairs performed in Sweden in the period 2008-12. Centers with a primary EVAR strategy (treating > 50% of rAAA with EVAR) were compared with centers with a primary open repair strategy. Peri-operative outcome, midterm survival, and incidence of rAAA repair/100,000 inhabitants aged > 50 years were assessed. In total, 1,304 patients were identified. Three primary EVAR centers (pEVARc) operated on 236 patients (74.6% EVAR). Twenty-six primary open repair centers (pORc) operated 1,068 patients (15.6% EVAR). Patients treated at pEVARc were more often referrals (28.0% vs. 5.3%; p strategy at 30 days (pEVARc 28.0%, n = 66; pORc 27.4%, n = 296 [p = .87]), 1 year (pEVARc 39.9%, n = 93; pORc 34.7%, n = 366 [p = .19]), or 2 years (42.1%, n = 94; 38.3%, n = 394 [p = .28]), either overall or in subgroups based on age or referral status. Overall, patients treated with EVAR were older (mean age 76.4 vs. 74.0 years; p strategy, either peri-operatively or in the midterm. The study supports the early findings of the randomized controlled trials in a national population based setting. Copyright © 2015 European Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Fluid-structure interaction of a patient-specific abdominal aortic aneurysm treated with an endovascular stent-graft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McGloughlin Tim M

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA are local dilatations of the infrarenal aorta. If left untreated they may rupture and lead to death. One form of treatment is the minimally invasive insertion of a stent-graft into the aneurysm. Despite this effective treatment aneurysms may occasionally continue to expand and this may eventually result in post-operative rupture of the aneurysm. Fluid-structure interaction (FSI is a particularly useful tool for investigating aneurysm biomechanics as both the wall stresses and fluid forces can be examined. Methods Pre-op, Post-op and Follow-up models were reconstructed from CT scans of a single patient and FSI simulations were performed on each model. The FSI approach involved coupling Abaqus and Fluent via a third-party software - MpCCI. Aneurysm wall stress and compliance were investigated as well as the drag force acting on the stent-graft. Results Aneurysm wall stress was reduced from 0.38 MPa before surgery to a value of 0.03 MPa after insertion of the stent-graft. Higher stresses were seen in the aneurysm neck and iliac legs post-operatively. The compliance of the aneurysm was also reduced post-operatively. The peak Post-op axial drag force was found to be 4.85 N. This increased to 6.37 N in the Follow-up model. Conclusion In a patient-specific case peak aneurysm wall stress was reduced by 92%. Such a reduction in aneurysm wall stress may lead to shrinkage of the aneurysm over time. Hence, post-operative stress patterns may help in determining the likelihood of aneurysm shrinkage post EVAR. Post-operative remodelling of the aneurysm may lead to increased drag forces.

  13. Effect of aorto-iliac bifurcation and iliac stenosis on flow dynamics in an abdominal aortic aneurysm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Shivam; Usmani, Abdullah Y.; Muralidhar, K.

    2017-06-01

    Physiological flows in rigid diseased arterial flow phantoms emulating an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) under rest conditions with aorto-iliac bifurcation and iliac stenosis are examined in vitro through 2D PIV measurements. Flow characteristics are first established in the model resembling a symmetric AAA with a straight outlet tube. The influence of aorto-iliac bifurcation and iliac stenosis on AAA flow dynamics is then explored through a comparison of the nature of flow patterns, vorticity evolution, vortex core trajectory and hemodynamic factors against the reference configuration. Specifically, wall shear stress and oscillatory shear index in the bulge portion of the models are of interest. The results of this investigation indicate overall phenomenological similarity in AAA flow patterns across the models. The pattern is characterized by a central jet and wall-bounded vortices whose strength increases during the deceleration phase as it moves forward. The central jet impacts the wall of AAA at its distal end. In the presence of an aorto-iliac bifurcation as well as iliac stenosis, the flow patterns show diminished strength, expanse and speed of propagation of the primary vortices. The positions of the instantaneous vortex cores, determined using the Q-function, correlate with flow separation in the bulge, flow resistance due to a bifurcation, and the break in symmetry introduced by a stenosis in one of the legs of the model. Time-averaged WSS in a healthy aorta is around 0.70 N m-2 and is lowered to the range ±0.2 N m-2 in the presence of the downstream bifurcation with a stenosed common iliac artery. The consequence of changes in the flow pattern within the aneurysm on disease progression is discussed.

  14. Fluid-structure interaction of a patient-specific abdominal aortic aneurysm treated with an endovascular stent-graft.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Molony, David S

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) are local dilatations of the infrarenal aorta. If left untreated they may rupture and lead to death. One form of treatment is the minimally invasive insertion of a stent-graft into the aneurysm. Despite this effective treatment aneurysms may occasionally continue to expand and this may eventually result in post-operative rupture of the aneurysm. Fluid-structure interaction (FSI) is a particularly useful tool for investigating aneurysm biomechanics as both the wall stresses and fluid forces can be examined. METHODS: Pre-op, Post-op and Follow-up models were reconstructed from CT scans of a single patient and FSI simulations were performed on each model. The FSI approach involved coupling Abaqus and Fluent via a third-party software - MpCCI. Aneurysm wall stress and compliance were investigated as well as the drag force acting on the stent-graft. RESULTS: Aneurysm wall stress was reduced from 0.38 MPa before surgery to a value of 0.03 MPa after insertion of the stent-graft. Higher stresses were seen in the aneurysm neck and iliac legs post-operatively. The compliance of the aneurysm was also reduced post-operatively. The peak Post-op axial drag force was found to be 4.85 N. This increased to 6.37 N in the Follow-up model. CONCLUSION: In a patient-specific case peak aneurysm wall stress was reduced by 92%. Such a reduction in aneurysm wall stress may lead to shrinkage of the aneurysm over time. Hence, post-operative stress patterns may help in determining the likelihood of aneurysm shrinkage post EVAR. Post-operative remodelling of the aneurysm may lead to increased drag forces.

  15. Abdominal aortic calcium, coronary artery calcium, and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criqui, Michael H; Denenberg, Julie O; McClelland, Robyn L; Allison, Matthew A; Ix, Joachim H; Guerci, Alan; Cohoon, Kevin P; Srikanthan, Preethi; Watson, Karol E; Wong, Nathan D

    2014-07-01

    To evaluate the predictive value of abdominal aortic calcium (AAC) for incident cardiovascular disease (CVD) independent of coronary artery calcium (CAC). We evaluated the association of AAC with CVD in 1974 men and women aged 45 to 84 years randomly selected from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis participants who had complete AAC and CAC data from computed tomographic scans. AAC and CAC were each divided into following 3 percentile categories: 0 to 50th, 51st to 75th, and 76th to 100th. During a mean of 5.5 years of follow-up, there were 50 hard coronary heart disease events, 83 hard CVD events, 30 fatal CVD events, and 105 total deaths. In multivariable-adjusted Cox models including both AAC and CAC, comparing the fourth quartile with the ≤ 50th percentile, AAC and CAC were each significantly and independently predictive of hard coronary heart disease and hard CVD, with hazard ratios ranging from 2.4 to 4.4. For CVD mortality, the hazard ratio was highly significant for the fourth quartile of AAC, 5.9 (P=0.01), whereas the association for the fourth quartile of CAC (hazard ratio, 2.1) was not significant. For total mortality, the fourth quartile hazard ratio for AAC was 2.7 (P=0.001), and for CAC, it was 1.9, P=0.04. Area under the receiver operating characteristic curve analyses showed improvement for both AAC and CAC separately, although improvement was greater with CAC for hard coronary heart disease and hard CVD, and greater with AAC for CVD mortality and total mortality. Sensitivity analyses defining AAC and CAC as continuous variables mirrored these results. AAC and CAC predicted hard coronary heart disease and hard CVD events independent of one another. Only AAC was independently related to CVD mortality, and AAC showed a stronger association than CAC with total mortality. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  16. Mortality from ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms: clinical lessons from a comparison of outcomes in England and the USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthikesalingam, Alan; Holt, Peter J; Vidal-Diez, Alberto; Ozdemir, Baris A; Poloniecki, Jan D; Hinchliffe, Robert J; Thompson, Matthew M

    2014-03-15

    The outcome of patients with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (rAAA) varies by country. Study of practice differences might allow the formulation of pathways to improve care. We compared data from the Hospital Episode Statistics for England and the Nationwide Inpatient Sample for the USA for patients admitted to hospital with rAAA from 2005 to 2010. Primary outcomes were in-hospital mortality, mortality after intervention, and decision to follow non-corrective treatment. In-hospital mortality and the rate of non-corrective treatment were analysed by binary logistic regression for each health-care system, after adjustment for age, sex, year, and Charlson comorbidity index. The study included 11,799 patients with rAAA in England and 23,838 patients with rAAA in the USA. In-hospital mortality was lower in the USA than in England (53·05% [95% CI 51·26-54·85] vs 65·90%; pUSA than in England (19,174 [80·43%] vs 6897 [58·45%]; pUSA than in England (4003 [20·88%] vs 589 [8·54%]; pUSA). These observations persisted in age-matched and sex-matched comparisons. In both countries, reduced mortality was associated with increased use of endovascular repair, increased hospital caseload (volume) for rAAA, high hospital bed capacity, hospitals with teaching status, and admission on a weekday. In-hospital survival from rAAA, intervention rates, and uptake of endovascular repair are lower in England than in the USA. In England and the USA, the lowest mortality for rAAA was seen in teaching hospitals with larger bed capacities and doing a greater proportion of cases with endovascular repair. These common factors suggest strategies for improving outcomes for patients with rAAA. None. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Correlation Between ABCA1 Gene Polymorphism and aopA-I and HDL-C in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lingfeng; Jin, Hui; Yang, Bin; Zhang, Shichao; Han, Shengbin; Yin, Fang; Feng, Yaoyu

    2016-01-17

    As the most common type of aneurysm, abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) has an unfavorable prognosis due to the high frequency of rupture. Studies have indicated a close relationship between the pathogenesis and progression of AAA and abnormal serum lipid levels. ATP-binding cassette transport protein A1 (ABCA1) is a cell-surface protein facilitating cellular efflux of cholesterol. The single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) of ABCA1 gene has been suggested to be correlated with abnormal metabolism of lipids. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the relationship between ABCA1 polymorphism and apoA-I and HDL-C in an attempt to elucidate its correlation with AAA occurrence. We included 126 AAA patients and 119 healthy controls in this study. PCR and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) were used to detect the SNP pattern of ABCA1 gene at locus rs2230806 from both AAA patients and healthy controls. The distribution pattern and correlation with apoA-I and HDL-C was analyzed. The distribution of KK/RR genotype of ABCA1 gene had significant difference between disease and control group, with lower rates of RR genotype and R allele in the disease group (p<0.05). Levels of apoA-I and HDL-C, but not triglyceride and LDL-C levels, in AAA patients who carried R allele in ABCA1 gene (including RR and RK genotypes) were higher than in non-carriers (p<0.05). The R allele of ABCA1 gene was shown to be related with the occurrence of AAA (p<0.05). Polymorphism of ABCA1 gene is correlated with AAA occurrence, possibly via the regulation of serum lipid metabolism by R allele.

  18. In vivo optical molecular imaging of matrix metalloproteinase activity in abdominal aortic aneurysms correlates with treatment effects on growth rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheth, Rahul A; Maricevich, Marco; Mahmood, Umar

    2010-09-01

    We present a method to quantify the inflammatory processes that drive abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) development that may help predict the rate of growth and thus guide medical and surgical management. We use an in vivo optical molecular imaging approach to quantify protease activity within the walls of AAAs in a rodent model. AAAs were generated in mice by topical application of calcium chloride, followed by the administration of the MMP inhibitor doxycycline for 3 months. After this time period, an enzyme-activatable optical molecular imaging agent sensitive to MMP activity was administered, and MMP proteolytic activity was measured in vivo. Histology and in situ zymography were performed for validation. AAAs were also generated in rats, and MMP activity within the walls of the AAAs was also quantified endovascularly. A dose-dependent response of AAA growth rate to doxycycline administration was demonstrated, with high doses of the drug resulting in nearly complete suppression of aneurysm formation. There was a direct relationship between the rate of aneurysmal growth and measured MMP activity, with a linear best-fit well approximating the relationship. We additionally performed endovascular imaging of AAAs in rats and demonstrated a similar suppression of intramural MMP activity following doxycycline administration. We present an in vivo evaluation of MMP activity within the walls of AAAs in rodents and show a direct, linear relationship between proteolytic activity and aneurysmal growth. We also illustrate that this functional imaging method can be performed endovascularly, demonstrating potential pre-clinical and clinical applications. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Acute kidney injury after infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm surgery: a comparison of AKIN and RIFLE criteria for risk prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, J-Y; Lee, J B; Yoon, Y; Seo, H-S; Song, J-G; Hwang, G S

    2014-12-01

    Although both Acute Kidney Injury Network (AKIN) and risk, injury, failure, loss, and end-stage (RIFLE) kidney disease criteria are frequently used to diagnose acute kidney injury (AKI), they have rarely been compared in the diagnosis of AKI in patients undergoing surgery for infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). This study investigated the incidence of, and risk factors for, AKI, defined by AKIN and RIFLE criteria, and compared their ability to predict mortality after infrarenal AAA surgery. This study examined 444 patients who underwent infrarenal AAA surgery between January 1999 and December 2011. Risk factors for AKI were assessed by multivariable analyses, and the impact of AKI on overall mortality was assessed by a Cox's proportional hazard model with inverse probability of treatment weighting (IPTW). Net reclassification improvement (NRI) was used to assess the performance of AKIN and RIFLE criteria in predicting overall mortality. AKI based on AKIN and RIFLE criteria occurred in 82 (18.5%) and 55 (12.4%) patients, respectively. The independent risk factors for AKI were intraoperative red blood cell (RBC) transfusion and chronic kidney disease (CKD) by AKIN criteria, and age, intraoperative RBC transfusion, preoperative atrial fibrillation, and CKD by RIFLE criteria. After IPTW adjustment, AKI was related to 30 day mortality and overall mortality. NRI was 15.2% greater (P=0.04) for AKIN than for RIFLE criteria in assessing the risk of overall mortality. Although AKI defined by either AKIN or RIFLE criteria was associated with overall mortality, AKIN criteria showed better prediction of mortality in patients undergoing infrarenal AAA surgery. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Journal of Anaesthesia. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Free-breathing black-blood CINE fast-spin echo imaging for measuring abdominal aortic wall distensibility: a feasibility study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jyh-Miin; Patterson, Andrew J.; Chao, Tzu-Cheng; Zhu, Chengcheng; Chang, Hing-Chiu; Mendes, Jason; Chung, Hsiao-Wen; Gillard, Jonathan H.; Graves, Martin J.

    2017-05-01

    The paper reports a free-breathing black-blood CINE fast-spin echo (FSE) technique for measuring abdominal aortic wall motion. The free-breathing CINE FSE includes the following MR techniques: (1) variable-density sampling with fast iterative reconstruction; (2) inner-volume imaging; and (3) a blood-suppression preparation pulse. The proposed technique was evaluated in eight healthy subjects. The inner-volume imaging significantly reduced the intraluminal artifacts of respiratory motion (p  =  0.015). The quantitative measurements were a diameter of 16.3  ±  2.8 mm and wall distensibility of 2.0  ±  0.4 mm (12.5  ±  3.4%) and 0.7  ±  0.3 mm (4.1  ±  1.0%) for the anterior and posterior walls, respectively. The cyclic cross-sectional distensibility was 35  ±  15% greater in the systolic phase than in the diastolic phase. In conclusion, we developed a feasible CINE FSE method to measure the motion of the abdominal aortic wall, which will enable clinical scientists to study the elasticity of the abdominal aorta.

  1. Evaluación del riesgo de ruptura de aneurismas de aorta abdominal personalizados mediante factores biomecánicos/Patient-specific abdominal aortic aneurysms rupture risk assessment by means of biomechanical factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariel Zúñiga‐Reyes

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available El Aneurisma de Aorta Abdominal es la dilatación localizada, irreversible y progresiva que experimenta la pared aortica. Esta patología ha sido reconocida como un importante problema de salud, puesto que su ruptura está asociada mayormente a consecuencias fatales. La falta de criterios fiables, respecto a los actualmente utilizados, para la evaluación del riesgo de ruptura, constituye un inconveniente en la gestión clínica de la enfermedad. El presente trabajo tiene como objetivo evaluar el riesgo de ruptura de Aneurismas de Aorta Abdominal, mediante indicadores numéricos, como es previsto por el enfoque biomecánico. Fueron utilizadas técnicas de modelación por elementos finitos para determinar el comportamiento del flujo sanguíneo y el estado tensional de la pared arterial. Los resultados mostraron que ninguno de los aneurismas analizados presenta riesgo de ruptura elevado y que la evaluación del riesgo de ruptura mediante índices numéricos, es un camino viable para prever la ruptura de un aneurisma específico.Palabras claves: aneurisma de aorta abdominal, factores biomecánicos, interacción fluido-sólido, riesgo de ruptura.______________________________________________________________________________AbstractAbdominal Aortic Aneurysm is a localized, progressive and permanent dilation of the infra-renal aorta.AAA has increasingly been recognized as an important health problem in the last decades. The AAA rupture is mostly associated with fatal consequences. The lack of more reliable criteria for rupture riskassessing, results in a problem in the clinical management of the disease. This paper aims to assess the rupture risk of abdominal aortic aneurysms by means of numerical indexes, as envisaged by the biomechanical approach. Finite Volume Techniques were used to determine the blood flow behavior within aneurysmatic sac and the structural state of the arterial wall. The results showed that none of the assessed aneurysms is at

  2. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... accurate. In emergency cases, it can reveal internal injuries and bleeding quickly enough to help save lives. ... kidney and bladder stones. abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA), injuries to abdominal organs such as the spleen, liver, ...

  3. Cine phase-contrast MR to assess portal blood flow in a 10-year-old girl with abdominal aortic coarctation: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, T.W.I.; Culham, J.A.G. [Department of Radiology, British Columbia Children`s Hospital, Vancouver, BC (Canada)

    1998-08-01

    We report the case of a 10-year-old girl with repaired abdominal aortic coarctation in whom chronic mesenteric ischemia was clinically suspected. Cine phase-contrast magnetic resonance (MR) was used to determine the difference between fasting and postprandial portal blood flow. Fasting flow rates in the portal vein were normal. After a meal, blood flow in the portal vein increased 226 % over the fasting state, showing normal augmentation. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first application of this technique to a pediatric setting. (orig.) With 2 figs., 10 refs.

  4. Successful endovascular aneurysm repair for abdominal aortic aneurysm in a patient with severe coronary artery disease undergoing off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sun Min; Cho, Jae Yeong; Kim, Ju Han; Park, Keun-Ho; Sim, Doo Sun; Hong, Young Joon; Ahn, Youngkeun; Jeong, Myung Ho

    2014-04-01

    It is well known that patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) often have concomitant coronary artery disease (CAD). In cases of AAA with severe CAD requiring coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), two therapeutic strategies regarding the timing of CABG can be considered: staged or simultaneous operations. However, the ideal treatment of patients with large AAA and critical CAD remains controversial. We experienced a case of successful endovascular aneurysm repair after off-pump CABG in a 70-year-old patient who had a huge AAA and critical CAD.

  5. Hérnias incisionais no pós-operatório de correção de aneurisma de aorta abdominal Postoperative incisional hernias after open abdominal aortic aneurysm repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Hüsemann Menezes

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXTO: A incidência de hérnia incisional no pós-operatório da correção aberta de aneurisma de aorta abdominal é alta, variando de 10 a 37% e mais de três vezes mais comum do que em pacientes submetidos à correção para doença obstrutiva aorto-ilíaca. OBJETIVO: Apresentar a incidência de hérnia incisional em um grupo de pacientes acompanhados no pós-operatório da correção aberta de aneurisma de aorta abdominal. MÉTODOS: Série de casos em uma população de 144 pacientes operados por aneurisma de aorta abdominal, entre junho de 1989 e junho de 2010, e que estão em acompanhamento regular no Ambulatório de Moléstias Vasculares. RESULTADOS: O seguimento médio dos pacientes foi de 63 meses (1 a 238. A idade média foi de 67 anos (45 a 91 e o tamanho médio dos aneurismas foi de 6,54 cm. Foram realizadas 130 laparotomias medianas xifo-púbicas e 13 acessos extraperitoniais pelo flanco esquerdo. Nestes pacientes, a incidência de hérnia incisional foi de 18,5 e 7,7%, respectivamente, para incisões na linha média ou no flanco (p=0,315. Um paciente apresentou abaulamento da musculatura oblíqua por denervação. Foi realizada uma laparotomia transversa, que não apresentou hérnia no pós-operatório tardio. CONCLUSÕES: A incidência de hérnia incisional na cirurgia aberta para correção de aneurisma de aorta abdominal é alta, ocorre com maior frequência em incisões da linha média e tem relação direta com a técnica empregada para o fechamento da aponeurose, exigindo do cirurgião atenção especial para este tempo cirúrgico para evitar a causa mais comum de reoperação em tal grupo de pacientes.BACKGROUND: The incidence of incisional hernia in the post operatory of patients submitted to open abdominal aortic aneurysm repair is high, ranging from 10 to 37%, and is more than three times higher than the incidence of hernias in patients operated for aorto-iliac occlusion. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the incidence of

  6. Sutureless, rapid deployment valves and stented bioprosthesis in aortic valve replacement: recommendations of an International Expert Consensus Panel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gersak, Borut; Fischlein, Theodor; Folliguet, Thierry A; Meuris, Bart; Teoh, Kevin H T; Moten, Simon C; Solinas, Marco; Miceli, Antonio; Oberwalder, Peter J; Rambaldini, Manfredo; Bhatnagar, Gopal; Borger, Michael A; Bouchard, Denis; Bouchot, Olivier; Clark, Stephen C; Dapunt, Otto E; Ferrarini, Matteo; Laufer, Guenther; Mignosa, Carmelo; Millner, Russell; Noirhomme, Philippe; Pfeiffer, Steffen; Ruyra-Baliarda, Xavier; Shrestha, Malakh; Suri, Rakesh M; Troise, Giovanni; Diegeler, Anno; Laborde, Francois; Laskar, Marc; Najm, Hani K; Glauber, Mattia

    2016-03-01

    After a panel process, recommendations on the use of sutureless and rapid deployment valves in aortic valve replacement were given with special respect as an alternative to stented valves. Thirty-one international experts in both sutureless, rapid deployment valves and stented bioprostheses constituted the panel. After a thorough literature review, evidence-based recommendations were rated in a three-step modified Delphi approach by the experts. Literature research could identify 67 clinical trials, 4 guidelines and 10 systematic reviews for detailed text analysis to obtain a total of 28 recommendations. After rating by the experts, 12 recommendations were identified and degree of consensus for each was determined. Proctoring and education are necessary for the introduction of sutureless valves on an institutional basis as well as for the individual training of surgeons. Sutureless and rapid deployment should be considered as the valve prosthesis of first choice for isolated procedures in patients with comorbidities, old age, delicate aortic wall conditions such as calcified root, porcelain aorta or prior implantation of aortic homograft and stentless valves as well as for concomitant procedures and small aortic roots to reduce cross-clamp time. Intraoperative transoesophageal echocardiography is highly recommended, and in case of right anterior thoracotomy, preoperative computer tomography is strongly recommended. Suitable annular sizes are 19-27 mm. There is a contraindication for bicuspid valves only for Type 0 and for annular abscess or destruction due to infective endocarditis. Careful but complete decalcification of the aortic root is recommended to avoid paravalvular leakage; extensive decalcification should be avoided not to create annular defects. Proximal anastomoses of concomitant coronary artery bypass grafting should be placed during a single aortic cross-clamp period or alternatively with careful side clamping. Available evidence suggests that the use

  7. Cost-effectiveness analysis of screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms based on five year results from a randomised hospital based mass screening trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholt, Jes S.; Juul, Svend; Fasting, Helge

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to estimate the cost effectiveness of screening for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). MATERIAL AND METHODS: All 12,639 men born in the years 1921-1933 (aged 64-73) living in Viborg County, Denmark, were randomly allocated either to receive an invitation...... to abdominal ultrasound scanning for AAA or to be controls. Costs for screening and surveillance were assessed prospectively. Diagnosis Related Group (DRG) costs from 1999 were used concerning admissions with uncomplicated and complicated operations. Admissions for AAA surgery were retrospectively classified...... according to complications in patient records. RESULTS: Mean follow-up time was 52 months. 76.6% of invited men attended screening, and 191 (4.0%) had an AAA. As previously reported, the cumulative 5-year AAA-specific mortality in the invited group was significantly reduced by 67% compared to the control...

  8. Prevalence of abdominal aortic aneurysm and large infrarenal aorta in patients with acute coronary syndrome and proven coronary stenosis: a prospective monocenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Anne; Bui, Huu Tri; Barbe, Coralie; Henni, Amine Hadj; Journet, Julien; Metz, Damien; Nazeyrollas, Pierre

    2010-07-01

    Little is known about the prevalence of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) in patients with coronary heart disease. The aims of this prospective study were to evaluate the prevalence of AAA and of large abdominal aorta in patients hospitalized for acute coronary syndrome and coronary stenosis of 50% or greater. AAA ultrasound screening was prospectively performed in 306 patients after they gave informed consent. AAA and large abdominal aorta were defined by maximum anteroposterior diameter of 30 mm or greater and of 20 to 29 mm, respectively. Patient characteristics were prospectively collected. Univariate and multivariate analyses were used to identify risk factors for AAA and large abdominal aorta. A p value Prevalence reached 7.7% in patients older than 50 years. Using stepwise logistic regression analysis, age (odds ratio [OR] 1.04. 95% confidence [CI] 1.00-1.09 per year of age, p = 0.06) and previous coronary events (OR 2.44, 95% CI 0.96-6.25, p = 0.06) showed a borderline significant association with AAA. Large infrarenal aortic diameter was observed in 32% of patients. Age (OR 1.03, 95% CI 1.02-1.05 per year of age, p prevalence seems high in patients with acute coronary syndrome and proven coronary stenosis of 50% or greater. Previous coronary events and older age might be associated with higher risk of AAA, and age, male gender, and obesity are significantly associated with large infrarenal aorta. If these results are confirmed in larger studies, further guidelines concerning AAA screening in this well-defined population should be considered. Copyright (c) 2010 Annals of Vascular Surgery Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Relationship between diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis, abdominal aortic calcification and associated metabolic disorders: Data from the Camargo Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pariente-Rodrigo, Emilio; Sgaramella, Giusi Alessia; Olmos-Martínez, José Manuel; Pini-Valdivieso, Stefanie Francesca; Landeras-Alvaro, Rosa; Hernández-Hernández, José Luis

    2017-09-08

    Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) and abdominal aortic calcification (AAC) are related to an increased cardiovascular risk. The aim of this study was to analyse a possible relationship between both entities and also the association between metabolic disorders and DISH. Analytic cross-sectional study in a population-based cohort. DISH (with Resnick-Niwayama criteria) and AAC (with AAC-24 scale) were assessed on plain x-ray images. Interaction terms between DISH and forty clinical covariates were also investigated, through correlation analysis and multivariate regression. Nine hundred eighty-seven males aged≥50 years, with a mean age=65,5±9 years, were evaluated. Prevalence rates of DISH and AAC were 21.6% and 58.7%, respectively. DISH+ subjects were older (68.1±9 vs. 63.8±9 years; P=.0001) and more likely to be affected by metabolic syndrome (MS) (55.6% vs. 36.6%; P=.0001). In DISH+ subjects, the AAC was 3.7±5 points, whereas in DISH- subjects it was 3.3±5 (P=.25). AAC was associated with an increased risk of prevalent DISH (unadjusted OR=1.4 [CI95%: 1.01-1.9]; P=.04), that disappeared when it was adjusted for age (adjusted OR=1.1 [CI95%: 0.8-1.5];P=.47]. No association was found between DISH and hypertension, diabetes or dyslipidaemia; however, age (OR=2.2 [CI95%: 1.6-3]; P=.0001), BMI (OR=1.5 [CI95%: 1.1-2]; P=.007), waist circumference (OR=1.5 [CI95%: 1.04-2,3]; P=.03) and MS (OR=1.7 [CI95%: 1.1-2.4]; P=.005) showed a significant relationship with DISH after adjusting for confounders. The study was not able to demonstrate a consistent association between DISH and AAC, proving only a weak and age-dependent relationship between them. DISH proved to be significantly associated with age, BMI, waist circumference and MS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Preoperative White Blood Cell Count in Patients with Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms and Its Relation to Survival following Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berge, Camilla; Hagen, Anne I; Myhre, Hans O; Dahl, Torbjørn

    2017-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to explore whether preoperative white blood cell (WBC) count may predict 30-day mortality and long-term survival following surgery for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Secondarily, we wanted to assess the potential sex differences in WBC in these patients. The study was carried out as a retrospective cohort study. Patients undergoing surgery for intact and ruptured AAA (rAAA) at our institution consecutively in the time period 1994-2007 were included. Patients were either treated with open aneurysm repair or with endovascular aneurysm repair. Data were collected from the patients' medical records, including laboratory reports for WBC count prior to surgery. Mortality and long-term survival were extracted from The Patient Administrative System. A total of 988 patients were included, 712 (72%) patients were treated for intact AAA and 276 (28%) underwent surgery for rAAA. Patients with WBC ≥11 ×109/L had a 8.7-fold higher risk of 30-day mortality undergoing surgery for intact AAA compared to patients with WBC <11 ×109/L (95% confidence interval [CI]: 3.2-23.3, P < 0.001). Patients with a high WBC tended to have inferior long-term survival. However, when excluding 30-day mortality, no statistically significant difference was found (hazard ratio, 1.4; 95% CI: 0.9-2.0, P = 0.121). No association between WBC count and 30-day mortality or long-term survival was observed among patients treated for rAAA. We could not identify any sex differences in WBC, neither in intact AAA nor in rAAA. We were not able identify any association between WBC and specific causes of death. This study suggests that patients with WBC count ≥11 ×109/L prior to surgery for intact AAA have a higher 30-day mortality compared to patients with WBC <11 ×109/L. We could not identify any substantial difference in long-term survival when excluding 30-day mortality. We did not observe any association between preoperative WBC count and case fatality or long

  11. Evidence for the credibility of health economic models for health policy decision-making: a systematic literature review of screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Søgaard, Rikke; Lindholt, Jes

    2012-01-01

    To investigate whether the credibility of health economic models of screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms for health policy decision-making has improved since 2005 when a systematic review by Campbell et al. concluded that reporting standards were poor and there was divergence between the findings of studies that was hard to explain. A systematic literature review was carried out following PRISMA reporting principles. Health economic models of the cost-effectiveness of screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms published between 2005-2010 were included. Key characteristics were extracted and the models were assessed for quality against guidelines for best practice by a multidisciplinary team. Seven models were identified and found to provide divergent guidance. Only three reports met 10 of the 15 quality criteria. Researchers in the field seem to have benefited from general advances in health economic modelling and some improvements in reporting were noted. However, the low level of agreement between studies in model structures and assumptions, and difficulty in justifying these (convergent validity), remain a threat to the credibility of health economic models. Decision-makers should not accept the results of a modelling study if the methods are not fully transparent and justified. Modellers should, whenever relevant, supplement a primary report of results with a technical report detailing and discussing the methodological choices made.

  12. Morphological and Biomechanical Differences in the Elastase and AngII apoE−/− Rodent Models of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evan H. Phillips

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA is a potentially fatal cardiovascular disease with multifactorial development and progression. Two preclinical models of the disease (elastase perfusion and angiotensin II infusion in apolipoprotein-E-deficient animals have been developed to study the disease during its initiation and progression. To date, most studies have used ex vivo methods to examine disease characteristics such as expanded aortic diameter or analytic methods to look at circulating biomarkers. Herein, we provide evidence from in vivo ultrasound studies of the temporal changes occurring in biomechanical parameters and macromolecules of the aortic wall in each model. We present findings from 28-day studies in elastase-perfused rats and AngII apoE−/− mice. While each model develops AAAs specific to their induction method, they both share characteristics with human aneurysms, such as marked changes in vessel strain and blood flow velocity. Histology and nonlinear microscopy confirmed that both elastin and collagen, both important extracellular matrix molecules, are similarly affected in their levels and spatial distribution. Future studies could make use of the differences between these models in order to investigate mechanisms of disease progression or evaluate potential AAA treatments.

  13. Preliminary intraobserver and interobserver variability in wall stress and rupture risk assessment of abdominal aortic aneurysms using a semiautomatic finite element model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teutelink, Arno; Cancrinus, Ernst; van de Heuvel, Danyel; Moll, Frans; de Vries, Jean-Paul

    2012-02-01

    We investigated the intraobserver and interobserver variability of using semiautomatic finite element analysis to calculate the von Mises stress and peak wall rupture risk (PWRR) in patients with an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) in longitudinal studies. Four independent observers made 3-dimensional (3D) reconstructions, with minimal manual adjustments, of small AAAs (method was used to calculate von Mises stress and PWRR, which are indicators for wall stress. The differences of each pair of measurements of von Mises stress and PWRR were plotted against their mean and the difference of the mean, according to Bland-Altman analysis. The intraobserver variability had an overall mean percentage difference of 6.86% ± 6.46% for the von Mises stress and 7.70% ± 6.26% for PWRR. The interobserver variability for the four observers showed an overall mean percentage difference of 7.09% ± 6.16% for the von Mises stress and 9.47% ± 8.18% for the PWRR measurement. No significant differences were found (P calculated in this semiautomatic finite element analysis program show good interobserver and intraobserver variability. It is suitable for clinical use to evaluate mechanical aortic wall characteristics and to compare it with other current methods such as maximum aortic diameter measurements. Copyright © 2012 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for SeniorsGallstonesRead Article >>GallstonesBladder Training for Urinary IncontinenceRead Article >>Bladder Training for Urinary Incontinence Visit our interactive symptom checker Visit our interactive ...

  15. Case Report: Rapid staged abdominal closure using Gore-Tex® mesh as a bridge to primary omphalocele sac closure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William C. Kethman

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Omphaloceles present an ongoing challenge due to significant variations in presentation and associated co-morbidities. Diverse management strategies have been described to tackle many of the fundamental challenges of closure and reconstruction of the abdominal wall – this fact demonstrates a need for increasingly individualized management options for this complex disease. We describe a novel method of rapid staged abdominal wall closure using Gore-Tex® mesh as a bridge to primary omphalocele closure in an infant with partial Pentalogy of Cantrell and giant ruptured omphalocele. This strategy can be used in management of some of the most complex abdominal wall defects.

  16. Meta-analysis of individual-patient data from EVAR-1, DREAM, OVER and ACE trials comparing outcomes of endovascular or open repair for abdominal aortic aneurysm over 5 years

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Powell, J. T.; Sweeting, M. J.; Ulug, P.; Blankensteijn, J. D.; Lederle, F. A.; Becquemin, J.-P.; Greenhalgh, R. M.; Beard, J. D.; Buxton, M. J.; Brown, L. C.; Harris, P. L.; Rose, J. D. G.; Russell, I. T.; Sculpher, M. J.; Thompson, S. G.; Lilford, R. J.; Bell, P. R. F.; Whitaker, S. C.; Poole-Wilson, The Late P. A.; Ruckley, C. V.; Campbell, W. B.; Dean, M. R. E.; Ruttley, M. S. T.; Coles, E. C.; Halliday, A.; Gibbs, S. J.; Epstein, D.; Hannon, R. J.; Johnston, L.; Bradbury, A. W.; Henderson, M. J.; Parvin, S. D.; Shepherd, D. F. C.; Mitchell, A. W.; Edwards, P. R.; Abbott, G. T.; Higman, D. J.; Vohra, A.; Ashley, S.; Robottom, C.; Wyatt, M. G.; Byrne, D.; Edwards, R.; Leiberman, D. P.; McCarter, D. H.; Taylor, P. R.; Reidy, J. F.; Wilkinson, A. R.; Ettles, D. F.; Clason, A. E.; Leen, G. L. S.; Wilson, N. V.; Downes, M.; Walker, S. R.; Lavelle, J. M.; Gough, M. J.; McPherson, S.; Scott, D. J. A.; Kessell, D. O.; Naylor, R.; Sayers, R.; Fishwick, N. G.; Gould, D. A.; Walker, M. G.; Chalmers, N. C.; Garnham, A.; Collins, M. A.; Gaines, P. A.; Ashour, M. Y.; Uberoi, R.; Braithwaite, B.; Davies, J. N.; Travis, S.; Hamilton, G.; Platts, A.; Shandall, A.; Sullivan, B. A.; Sobeh, M.; Matson, M.; Fox, A. D.; Orme, R.; Yusef, W.; Doyle, T.; Horrocks, M.; Hardman, J.; Blair, P. H. B.; Ellis, P. K.; Morris, G.; Odurny, A.; Vohra, R.; Duddy, M.; Thompson, M.; Loosemore, T. M. L.; Belli, A. M.; Morgan, R.; Adiseshiah, M.; Brookes, J. A. S.; McCollum, C. N.; Ashleigh, R.; Aukett, M.; Baker, S.; Barbe, E.; Batson, N.; Bell, J.; Blundell, J.; Boardley, D.; Boyes, S.; Brown, O.; Bryce, J.; Carmichael, M.; Chance, T.; Coleman, J.; Cosgrove, C.; Curran, G.; Dennison, T.; Devine, C.; Dewhirst, N.; Errington, B.; Farrell, H.; Fisher, C.; Fulford, P.; Gough, M.; Graham, C.; Hooper, R.; Horne, G.; Horrocks, L.; Hughes, B.; Hutchings, T.; Ireland, M.; Judge, C.; Kelly, L.; Kemp, J.; Kite, A.; Kivela, M.; Lapworth, M.; Lee, C.; Linekar, L.; Mahmood, A.; March, L.; Martin, J.; Matharu, N.; McGuigen, K.; Morris-Vincent, P.; Murray, S.; Murtagh, A.; Owen, G.; Ramoutar, V.; Rippin, C.; Rowley, J.; Sinclair, J.; Spencer, S.; Taylor, V.; Tomlinson, C.; Ward, S.; Wealleans, V.; West, J.; White, K.; Williams, J.; Wilson, L.; Grobbee, D. E.; Bak, A. A. A.; Buth, J.; Pattynama, P. M.; Verhoeven, E. L. G.; van Voorthuisen, A. E.; Balm, R.; Cuypers, P. W. M.; Prinssen, M.; van Sambeek, M. R. H. M.; Baas, A. F.; Hunink, M. G.; van Engelshoven, J. M.; Jacobs, M. J. H. M.; de Mol, B. A. J. M.; van Bockel, J. H.; Reekers, J.; Tielbeek, X.; Wisselink, W.; Boekema, N.; Heuveling, L. M.; Sikking, I.; de Bruin, J. L.; Tielbeek, A. V.; Pattynama, P.; Prins, T.; van der Ham, A. C.; van der Velden, J. J. I. M.; van Sterkenburg, S. M. M.; ten Haken, G. B.; Bruijninckx, C. M. A.; van Overhagen, H.; Tutein Nolthenius, R. P.; Hendriksz, T. R.; Teijink, J. A. W.; Odink, H. F.; de Smet, A. A. E. A.; Vroegindeweij, D.; van Loenhout, R. M. M.; Rutten, M. J.; Hamming, J. F.; Lampmann, L. E. H.; Bender, M. H. M.; Pasmans, H.; Vahl, A. C.; de Vries, C.; Mackaay, A. J. C.; van Dortmont, L. M. C.; van der Vliet, A. J.; Schultze Kool, L. J.; Boomsma, J. H. B.; van Dop, H. R.; de Mol van Otterloo, J. C. A.; de Rooij, T. P. W.; Smits, T. M.; Yilmaz, E. N.; van den Berg, F. G.; Visser, M. J. T.; van der Linden, E.; Schurink, G. W. H.; de Haan, M.; Smeets, H. J.; Stabel, P.; van Elst, F.; Poniewierski, J.; Vermassen, F. E. G.; Freischlag, J. A.; Kohler, T. R.; Latts, E.; Matsumura, J.; Padberg, F. T.; Kyriakides, T. C.; Swanson, K. M.; Guarino, P.; Peduzzi, P.; Antonelli, M.; Cushing, C.; Davis, E.; Durant, L.; Joyner, S.; Kossack, The Late A.; LeGwin, Mary; McBride, V.; O'Connor, T.; Poulton, J.; Stratton, The Late S.; Zellner, S.; Snodgrass, A. J.; Thornton, J.; Haakenson, C. M.; Stroupe, K. T.; Jonk, Y.; Hallett, J. W.; Hertzer, N.; Towne, J.; Katz, D. A.; Karrison, T.; Matts, J. P.; Marottoli, R.; Kasl, S.; Mehta, R.; Feldman, R.; Farrell, W.; Allore, H.; Perry, E.; Niederman, J.; Randall, F.; Zeman, M.; Beckwith, The Late D.; O'Leary, T. J.; Huang, G. D.; Bader, M.; Ketteler, E. R.; Kingsley, D. D.; Marek, J. M.; Massen, R. J.; Matteson, B. D.; Pitcher, J. D.; Langsfeld, M.; Corson, J. D.; Goff, J. M.; Kasirajan, K.; Paap, C.; Robertson, D. C.; Salam, A.; Veeraswamy, R.; Milner, R.; Guidot, J.; Lal, B. K.; Busuttil, S. J.; Lilly, M. P.; Braganza, M.; Ellis, K.; Patterson, M. A.; Jordan, W. D.; Whitley, D.; Taylor, S.; Passman, M.; Kerns, D.; Inman, C.; Poirier, J.; Ebaugh, J.; Raffetto, J.; Chew, D.; Lathi, S.; Owens, C.; Hickson, K.; Dosluoglu, H. H.; Eschberger, K.; Kibbe, M. R.; Baraniewski, H. M.; Endo, M.; Busman, A.; Meadows, W.; Evans, M.; Giglia, J. S.; El Sayed, H.; Reed, A. B.; Ruf, M.; Ross, S.; Jean-Claude, J. M.; Pinault, G.; Kang, P.; White, N.; Eiseman, M.; Jones, The Late R.; Timaran, C. H.; Modrall, J. G.; Welborn, M. B.; Lopez, J.; Nguyen, T.; Chacko, J. K. Y.; Granke, K.; Vouyouka, A. G.; Olgren, E.; Chand, P.; Allende, B.; Ranella, M.; Yales, C.; Whitehill, T. A.; Krupski, The Late W. C.; Nehler, M. R.; Johnson, S. P.; Jones, D. N.; Strecker, P.; Bhola, M. A.; Shortell, C. K.; Gray, J. L.; Lawson, J. H.; McCann, R.; Sebastian, M. W.; Kistler Tetterton, J.; Blackwell, C.; Prinzo, P. A.; Lee, N.; Cerveira, J. J.; Zickler, R. W.; Hauck, K. A.; Berceli, S. A.; Lee, W. A.; Ozaki, C. K.; Nelson, P. R.; Irwin, A. S.; Baum, R.; Aulivola, B.; Rodriguez, H.; Littooy, F. N.; Greisler, H.; O'Sullivan, M. T.; Kougias, P.; Lin, P. H.; Bush, R. L.; Guinn, G.; Bechara, C.; Cagiannos, C.; Pisimisis, G.; Barshes, N.; Pillack, S.; Guillory, B.; Cikrit, D.; Lalka, S. G.; Lemmon, G.; Nachreiner, R.; Rusomaroff, M.; O'Brien, E.; Cullen, J. J.; Hoballah, J.; Sharp, W. J.; McCandless, J. L.; Beach, V.; Minion, D.; Schwarcz, T. H.; Kimbrough, J.; Ashe, L.; Rockich, A.; Warner-Carpenter, J.; Moursi, M.; Eidt, J. F.; Brock, S.; Bianchi, C.; Bishop, V.; Gordon, I. L.; Fujitani, R.; Kubaska, S. M.; Behdad, M.; Azadegan, R.; Ma Agas, C.; Zalecki, K.; Hoch, J. R.; Carr, S. C.; Acher, C.; Schwarze, M.; Tefera, G.; Mell, M.; Dunlap, B.; Rieder, J.; Stuart, J. M.; Weiman, D. S.; Abul-Khoudoud, O.; Garrett, H. E.; Walsh, S. M.; Wilson, K. L.; Seabrook, G. R.; Cambria, R. A.; Brown, K. R.; Lewis, B. D.; Framberg, S.; Kallio, C.; Barke, R. A.; Santilli, S. M.; d'Audiffret, A. C.; Oberle, N.; Proebstle, C.; Johnson, L. L.; Jacobowitz, G. R.; Cayne, N.; Rockman, C.; Adelman, M.; Gagne, P.; Nalbandian, M.; Caropolo, L. J.; Pipinos, I. I.; Johanning, J.; Lynch, T.; DeSpiegelaere, H.; Purviance, G.; Zhou, W.; Dalman, R.; Lee, J. T.; Safadi, B.; Coogan, S. M.; Wren, S. M.; Bahmani, D. D.; Maples, D.; Thunen, S.; Golden, M. A.; Mitchell, M. E.; Fairman, R.; Reinhardt, S.; Wilson, M. A.; Tzeng, E.; Muluk, S.; Peterson, N. M.; Foster, M.; Edwards, J.; Moneta, G. L.; Landry, G.; Taylor, L.; Yeager, R.; Cannady, E.; Treiman, G.; Hatton-Ward, S.; Salabsky, The Late B.; Kansal, N.; Owens, E.; Estes, M.; Forbes, B. A.; Sobotta, C.; Rapp, J. H.; Reilly, L. M.; Perez, S. L.; Yan, K.; Sarkar, R.; Dwyer, S. S.; Perez, S.; Chong, K.; Hatsukami, T. S.; Glickerman, D. G.; Sobel, M.; Burdick, T. S.; Pedersen, K.; Cleary, P.; Back, M.; Bandyk, D.; Johnson, B.; Shames, M.; Reinhard, R. L.; Thomas, S. C.; Hunter, G. C.; Leon, L. R.; Westerband, A.; Guerra, R. J.; Riveros, M.; Mills, J. L.; Hughes, J. D.; Escalante, A. M.; Psalms, S. B.; Day, N. N.; Macsata, R.; Sidawy, A.; Weiswasser, J.; Arora, S.; Jasper, B. J.; Dardik, A.; Gahtan, V.; Muhs, B. E.; Sumpio, B. E.; Gusberg, R. J.; Spector, M.; Pollak, J.; Aruny, J.; Kelly, E. L.; Wong, J.; Vasilas, P.; Joncas, C.; Gelabert, H. A.; DeVirgillio, C.; Rigberg, D. A.; Cole, L.; Marzelle, J.; Sapoval, M.; Favre, J.-P.; Watelet, J.; Lermusiaux, P.; Lepage, E.; Hemery, F.; Dolbeau, G.; Hawajry, N.; Cunin, P.; Harris, P.; Stockx, L.; Chatellier, G.; Mialhe, C.; Fiessinger, J.-N.; Pagny, L.; Kobeiter, H.; Boissier, C.; Lacroix, P.; Ledru, F.; Pinot, J.-J.; Deux, J.-F.; Tzvetkov, B.; Duvaldestin, P.; Jourdain, C.; DAVID, V.; Enouf, D.; Ady, N.; Krimi, A.; Boudjema, N.; Jousset, Y.; Enon, B.; Blin, V.; Picquet, J.; L'Hoste, P.; Thouveny, F.; Borie, H.; Kowarski, S.; Pernes, J.-M.; Auguste, M.; Desgranges, P.; Allaire, E.; Meaulle, P.-Y.; Chaix, D.; Juliae, P.; Fabiani, J. N.; Chevalier, P.; Combes, M.; Seguin, A.; Belhomme, D.; Baque, J.; Pellerin, O.; Favre, J. P.; Barral, X.; Veyret, C.; Peillon, C.; Plissonier, D.; Thomas, P.; Clavier, E.; Martinez, R.; Bleuet, F.; C, Dupreix; Verhoye, J. P.; Langanay, T.; Heautot, J. F.; Koussa, M.; Haulon, S.; Halna, P.; Destrieux, L.; Lions, C.; Wiloteaux, S.; Beregi, J. P.; Bergeron, P.; Patra, P.; Costargent, A.; Chaillou, P.; D'Alicourt, A.; Goueffic, Y.; Cheysson, E.; Parrot, A.; Garance, P.; Demon, A.; Tyazi, A.; Pillet, J.-C.; Lescalie, F.; Tilly, G.; Steinmetz, E.; Favier, C.; Brenot, R.; Krause, D.; Cercueil, J. P.; Vahdat, O.; Sauer, M.; Soula, P.; Querian, A.; Garcia, O.; Levade, M.; Colombier, D.; Cardon, J.-M.; Joyeux, A.; Borrelly, P.; Dogas, G.; Magnan, P.-É; Branchereau, A.; Bartoli, J.-M.; Hassen-Khodja, R.; Batt, M.; Planchard, P.-F.; Bouillanne, P.-J.; Haudebourg, P.; Bayne, J.; Gouny, P.; Badra, A.; Braesco, J.; Nonent, M.; Lucas, A.; Cardon, A.; Kerdiles, Y.; Rolland, Y.; Kassab, M.; Brillu, C.; Goubault, F.; Tailboux, L.; Darrieux, H.; Briand, O.; Maillard, J.-C.; Varty, K.; Cousins, C.

    2017-01-01

    The erosion of the early mortality advantage of elective endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) compared with open repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm remains without a satisfactory explanation. An individual-patient data meta-analysis of four multicentre randomized trials of EVAR versus open repair

  17. Meta-analysis of individual-patient data from EVAR-1, DREAM, OVER and ACE trials comparing outcomes of endovascular or open repair for abdominal aortic aneurysm over 5 years

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Powell, Janet T; Sweeting, Michael J; Ulug, P; Blankensteijn, Jan D.; Lederle, F A; Becquemin, J.P.; Greenhalgh, R.M.; Grobbee, DE|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/071889256

    BACKGROUND: The erosion of the early mortality advantage of elective endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) compared with open repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm remains without a satisfactory explanation. METHODS: An individual-patient data meta-analysis of four multicentre randomized trials of EVAR

  18. Meta-analysis of individual-patient data from EVAR-1, DREAM, OVER and ACE trials comparing outcomes of endovascular or open repair for abdominal aortic aneurysm over 5 years

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.T. Powell (Janet); Sweeting, M.J.; Ulug, P.; Blankensteijn, J.D.; F.A. Lederle (Frank); Becquemin, J.-P.; Greenhalgh, R.M.

    2017-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The erosion of the early mortality advantage of elective endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) compared with open repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm remains without a satisfactory explanation. Methods: An individual-patient data meta-analysis of four multicentre randomized

  19. Meta-analysis of individual-patient data from EVAR-1, DREAM, OVER and ACE trials comparing outcomes of endovascular or open repair for abdominal aortic aneurysm over 5 years

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Powell, J.T.; Sweeting, M.J.; Ulug, P.; Blankensteijn, J.D.; Lederle, F.A.; Becquemin, J.P.; Greenhalgh, R.M.; Evar, D.O.; Schultze Kool, L.J.; et al.,

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The erosion of the early mortality advantage of elective endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) compared with open repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm remains without a satisfactory explanation. METHODS: An individual-patient data meta-analysis of four multicentre randomized trials of EVAR

  20. Surgical treatment of chronic multivascular mesenteric ischemia in a patient with antiphospholipid syndrome, abdominal aortic aneurism, and renal cancer: when planning overwhelms complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paliogiannis, Panagiotis; Ginesu, Giorgio Carlo; Feo, Claudio Francesco; Cossu, Maria Laura; Pinna, Antonio; Farina, Giulia; Vidili, Gianpaolo; Porcu, Alberto

    2016-12-20

    Chronic mesenteric ischemia is a clinical condition caused by obstructive or occlusive disease of the mesenteric vessels, with potentially lethal consequences. We describe a case of open multiple revascularization in a patient affected by antiphospholipid syndrome and diffuse atherosclerosis, with an abdominal aortic aneurism, a contracted kidney, a renal cancer affecting the contralateral kidney, and as a consequence, a chronic renal failure and hypertension. We revascularized the celiac trunk, the superior and inferior mesenteric arteries, and the right renal artery using saphenous grafts; the aneurism was corrected, and the renal tumor was treated by radiofrequency ablation. Despite the invasiveness and complexity, the surgical strategy adopted allowed to save the patient's life, to treat the chronic mesenteric ischemia and the renal cancer, and to improve the chronic renal insufficiency and hypertension. Graft, Mesenteric ischemia, Occlusion, Revascularization.

  1. Transretroperitoneal CT-guided Embolization of Growing Internal Iliac Artery Aneurysm after Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm: A Transretroperitoneal Approach with Intramuscular Lidocaine Injection Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Joon Young, E-mail: pjy1331@hanmail.net; Kim, Shin Jung, E-mail: witdd2@hanmail.net; Kim, Hyoung Ook, E-mail: chaos821209@hanmail.net [Chonnam National University Hospital, Department of Radiology (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yong Tae, E-mail: mono-111@hanmail.net [Chonnam National University Hwasun Hospital, Department of Radiology (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Nam Yeol, E-mail: apleseed@hanmail.net; Kim, Jae Kyu, E-mail: kjkrad@jnu.ac.kr [Chonnam National University Hospital, Department of Radiology (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Sang Young, E-mail: sycpvts@jnu.ac.kr; Choi, Soo Jin Na, E-mail: choisjn@jnu.ac.kr; Lee, Ho Kyun, E-mail: mhaha@hanmail.net [Chonnam National University Hospital, Department of Surgery (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    This study was designed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of CT-guided embolization of internal iliac artery aneurysm (IIAA) after repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm by transretroperitoneal approach using the lidocaine injection technique to iliacus muscle, making window for safe needle path for three patients for whom CT-guided embolization of IIAA was performed by transretroperitoneal approach with intramuscular lidocaine injection technique. Transretroperitoneal access to the IIAA was successful in all three patients. In all three patients, the IIAA was first embolized using microcoils. The aneurysmal sac was then embolized with glue and coils without complication. With a mean follow-up of 7 months, the volume of the IIAAs remained stable without residual endoleaks. Transretroperitoneal CT-guided embolization of IIAA using intramuscular lidocaine injection technique is effective, safe, and results in good outcome.

  2. Arachidonic Acid, but Not Omega-3 Index, Relates to the Prevalence and Progression of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm in a Population-Based Study of Danish Men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholt, Jes S; Kristensen, Katrine L; Burillo, Elena

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Animal models support dietary omega-3 fatty acids protection against abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), but clinical data are scarce. The sum of red blood cell proportions of the omega-3 eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids, known as omega-3 index, is a valid surrogate for long...... patients reached criteria for vascular surgical repair. Participants were high consumers of omega-3 (average omega-3 index: 7.6%). No significant associations were found for omega-3 index. In contrast, arachidonic acid in AAA patients was higher than in controls (P...% confidence interval, 1.127-2.114; P=0.007). CONCLUSIONS: Omega-3 index is unrelated to men with AAA from a country in which fish consumption is customarily high. Arachidonic acid is associated with AAA presence and progression. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION: URL: https://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique...

  3. Associations of cardiovascular disease risk factors with abdominal aortic calcium volume and density: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbang, Nketi I; McClelland, Robyn L; Remigio-Baker, Rosemay A; Allison, Matthew A; Sandfort, Veit; Michos, Erin D; Thomas, Isac; Rifkin, Dena E; Criqui, Michael H

    2016-12-01

    Abdominal aortic calcium (AAC) predicts future cardiovascular disease (CVD) events and all-cause mortality independent of CVD risk factors. The standard AAC score, the Agatston, up-weights for greater calcium density, and thus models higher calcium density as associated with increased CVD risk. We determined associations of CVD risk factors with AAC volume and density (separately). In a multi-ethnic cohort of community living adults, we used abdominal computed tomography scans to measure AAC volume and density. Multivariable linear regression was used to determine the period cross-sectional independent associations of CVD risk factors with AAC volume and AAC density in participants with prevalent AAC. Among 1413 participants with non-zero AAC scores, the mean age was 65 ± 9 years, 52% were men, 44% were European-, 24% were Hispanic-, 18% were African-, and 14% were Chinese Americans (EA, HA, AA, and CA respectively). Median (interquartile range, IQR) for AAC volume was 628 mm3 (157-1939 mm3), and mean AAC density was 3.0 ± 0.6. Compared to EA, each of HA, AA, and CA had lower natural log (ln) AAC volume, but higher AAC density. After adjustments for AAC density, older age, ever smoking history, higher systolic blood pressure, elevated total cholesterol, reduced HDL cholesterol, statin and anti-hypertensive medication use, family history of myocardial infarction, and alcohol consumption were significantly associated with higher ln(AAC volume). In contrast, after adjustments for ln(AAC volume), older age, ever smoking history, higher BMI, and lower HDL cholesterol were significantly associated with lower AAC density. Several CVD risk factors were associated with higher AAC volume, but lower AAC density. Future studies should investigate the impact of calcium density of aortic plaques in CVD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. In vivo imaging of macrophages during the early-stages of abdominal aortic aneurysm using high resolution MRI in ApoE mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuyu Yao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Angiotensin II (ANG II promotes vascular inflammation and induces abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA in hyperlipidemic apolipoprotein E knock-out (apoE(-/- mice. The aim of the present study was to detect macrophage activities in an ANG II-induced early-stage AAA model using superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO as a marker. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Twenty-six male apoE(-/- mice received saline or ANG II (1000 or 500 ng/kg/min infusion for 14 days. All animals underwent MRI scanning following administration of SPIO with the exception of three mice in the 1000 ng ANG II group, which were scanned without SPIO administration. MR imaging was performed using black-blood T2 to proton density -weighted multi-spin multi-echo sequence. In vivo MRI measurement of SPIO uptake and abdominal aortic diameter were obtained. Prussian blue, CD68,α-SMC and MAC3 immunohistological stains were used for the detection of SPIO, macrophages and smooth muscle cells. ANG II infusion with 1000 ng/kg/min induced AAA in all of the apoE(-/- mice. ANG II infusion exhibited significantly higher degrees of SPIO uptake, which was detected using MRI as a distinct loss of signal intensity. The contrast-to-noise ratio value decreased in proportion to an increase in the number of iron-laden macrophages in the aneurysm. The aneurysmal vessel wall in both groups of ANG II treated mice contained more iron-positive macrophages than saline-treated mice. However, the presence of cells capable of phagocytosing haemosiderin in mural thrombi also induced low-signal-intensities via MRI imaging. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: SPIO is taken up by macrophages in the shoulder and the outer layer of AAA. This alters the MRI signaling properties and can be used in imaging inflammation associated with AAA. It is important to compare images of the aorta before and after SPIO injection.

  5. Testing the generalizability of national reimbursement rates with respect to local setting: the costs of abdominal aortic aneurysm surgery in Denmark

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren Løvstad Christensen

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Søren Løvstad Christensen1, Mette Kjoelby1,2, Lars Ehlers31Health Technology Assessment and Health Services Research, Centre for Public Health, Central Denmark Region, Denmark; 2School of Public Health, Aarhus University, Denmark; 3Health Economics and Management, Aalborg University, DenmarkObjective: The purpose of this study is to investigate if the Danish national diagnosis-related group (DRG tariffs for surgery for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA were good estimates of the actual costs in two local hospitals in the Central Region of Denmark.Methods: We collected clinical data for 178 AAA patients operated at Skejby Hospital and Viborg Hospital in the period 2005–2006 from the Danish National Vascular Registry and economic data from the administrative systems in the hospitals. We used bootstrap methods to calculate 95% confidence intervals (CIs for the mean costs of surgery for ruptured AAA, nonruptured AAA and AAA where the patient died within 30 days by applying a cost-trimming rule that the Danish National Board of Health uses in calculating national DRG tariffs.Results: The national DRG tariff lies within the calculated Danish Krone (DKK CIs (CI ruptured AAA, 98,178–195,327 [€13,196–€26,254]; CI nonruptured AAA, 79,039–98,178 [€10,624–€13,196]; CI dead, 42,023–111,685 [€5,648–€15,011], and thus national DRG tariffs could be a good estimate for the actual costs in the local hospitals.Conclusion: The bootstrap method is useful for testing the generalizability of national DRG tariffs as estimates of local surgical costs.Keywords: bootstrap method, costs, DRG, abdominal aortic aneurysm

  6. Tratamento cirúrgico dos aneurismas da aorta abdominal: existe diferença dos resultados entre homens e mulheres? Surgical treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms: is there difference in the results obtained in men and women?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Telmo Pedro Bonamigo

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar os resultados cirúrgicos após o tratamento convencional e eletivo do aneurisma da aorta abdominal, verificando se existe diferença entre homens e mulheres na mortalidade e morbidade cirúrgicas, bem como nos resultados a longo prazo. PACIENTES E MÉTODOS: Entre dezembro de 1983 e dezembro de 2003, 675 pacientes foram submetidos ao tratamento cirúrgico do aneurisma da aorta abdominal infra-renal, sendo divididos em dois grupos: homens (n = 575 e mulheres (n = 100. Os dados demográficos e aqueles relacionados ao procedimento cirúrgico, bem como os resultados perioperatórios, foram coletados pela revisão dos prontuários. Os pacientes com alta hospitalar formaram uma coorte retrospectiva, onde foram avaliadas as causas tardias de óbito e a sobrevida. RESULTADOS: A média das idades foi similar, sem diferença estatística entre mulheres e homens (68,9 ± 9,1 versus 67,4 ± 7,1 anos; P = 0,089. A presença de hipertensão arterial foi significativamente superior nas mulheres (73 versus 62,4%; P = 0,042, e a cardiopatia isquêmica e história de tabagismo foram mais freqüentes nos homens (P OBJECTIVE: To evaluate perioperative results in patients submitted to elective conventional open repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm, comparing the results between women and men in relation to perioperative mortality and morbidity, as well as long term outcomes. PATIENTES AND METHODS: Between December 1983 and December 2003, 675 patients were submitted to infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. We divided these patients into two groups: men (n = 575 and women (n = 100. Demographic and operative data, as well as perioperative outcomes were obtained from chart review. Discharged patients formed a retrospective cohort, in which the late causes of death and survival were evaluated. RESULTS: The mean age was similar, but no statistical difference was observed between men and women (68.9 ± 9.1 versus. 67.4 ± 7.1 years; P = 0.089. The

  7. Evaluation of a mobile screening service for abdominal aortic aneurysm in Broken Hill, a remote regional centre in far western NSW.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesjak, Margaret S; Flecknoe-Brown, Stephen C; Sidford, Jan R; Payne, Kerryn; Fletcher, John P; Lyle, David M

    2010-04-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of a mobile screening service model for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) in a remote population centre in Australia. Screening test evaluation. A remote regional centre (population: 20 000) in far western NSW. Men aged 65-74 years, identified from the Australian Electoral roll. A mobile screening service using directed ultrasonography, a basic health check and post-screening consultation. Attendance at the screening program, occurrence of AAA in the target population and effectiveness of screening processes. A total of 516 men without a previous diagnosis of AAA were screened, an estimated response rate of 60%. Of these, 463 (89.7%) had a normal aortic diameter, 28 (5.4%) ectatic and 25 (4.9%) a small, moderate or significant aneurysm. Two men with AAA were recommended for surgery. Feedback from participants indicated that the use of a personalised letter of invitation helped with recruitment, that the screening process was acceptable and the service valued. It is feasible to organise and operate a mobile AAA screening service from moderate sized rural and remote population centres. This model could be scaled up to provide national coverage for rural and remote residents.

  8. Clopidogrel, a platelet P2Y12 receptor inhibitor, reduces vascular inflammation and angiotensin II induced-abdominal aortic aneurysm progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ou Liu

    Full Text Available Medial degeneration and inflammation are features of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs. However, the early inflammatory event initiating aneurysm formation remains to be identified. Activated platelets release abundant proinflammatory cytokines and are involved in initial inflammation in various vascular diseases. We investigated the role of platelets in progression of AAA in vivo and in vitro. Histological studies of tissues of patients with AAA revealed that the number of platelets was increased in aneurysm sites along with the increased infiltration of T lymphocytes and augmented angiogenesis. In a murine model of AAA, apolipoprotein E-knockout mice infused with 1,000 ng/kg/min angiotensin II, treatment with clopidogrel, an inhibitor of platelets, significantly suppressed aneurysm formation (47% decrease, P<0.05. The clopidogrel also suppressed changes in aortic expansion, elastic lamina degradation and inflammatory cytokine expression. Moreover, the infiltration of macrophages and production of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs were also significantly reduced by clopidogrel treatment. In vitro incubation of macrophages with isolated platelets stimulated MMP activity by 45%. These results demonstrate a critical role for platelets in vascular inflammation and AAA progression.

  9. One hundred percent of ruptured aortic abdominal aneurysms can be treated endovascularly if adjunct techniques are used such as chimneys, periscopes and embolization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larzon, T; Skoog, P

    2014-04-01

    Observational studies comparing endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) with open repair (OR) in ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) have suggested a benefit for EVAR but have been questioned recently by randomized controlled trials (RCT). A low eligibility for endovascular repair is a main limitation of these RCTs. In contrast, data from 473 patients from 1998 to 2011 in the Örebro/Zurich series show that nearly all AAA patients presenting with rupture can in fact be treated with EVAR with a low 30-day mortality rate (24%) and a minimal exclusion rate (4%). By using different adjunct techniques, such as chimneys and periscopes, also juxtarenal aneurysms can be treated even if simultaneous aortic balloon occlusion is necessary. OnyxTM embolization of the internal iliac artery in patients with aortoiliac aneurysms prevents back flow, thus avoiding an endoleak type. From May 2009 until December 2013, 70 patients arrived at Örebro University Hospital with a ruptured AAA diagnose. Nine percent were considered unfit for any intervention (including OR) and were treated medically. All of the 64 patients that underwent surgery were treated with EVAR and 30-day mortality in this group was 17 of 64 patients (27%). The mortality for patients treated with adjunct techniques was not significantly increased compared with patients treated with standard EVAR. In conclusion, our data support that open repair of ruptured AAA can be replaced by EVAR with appropriate management of existing adjunct techniques.

  10. Rapid non-contrast magnetic resonance imaging for post appendectomy intra-abdominal abscess in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Megan H. [Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, St. Louis, MO (United States); Eutsler, Eric P.; Khanna, Geetika [Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, Pediatric Radiology, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, St. Louis, MO (United States); Sheybani, Elizabeth F. [Mercy Hospital St. Louis, Department of Radiology, St. Louis, MO (United States)

    2017-07-15

    Acute appendicitis, especially if perforated at presentation, is often complicated by postoperative abscess formation. The detection of a postoperative abscess relies primarily on imaging. This has traditionally been done with contrast-enhanced computed tomography. Non-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has the potential to accurately detect intra-abdominal abscesses, especially with the use of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI). To evaluate our single-center experience with a rapid non-contrast MRI protocol evaluating post-appendectomy abscesses in children with persistent postsurgical symptoms. In this retrospective, institutional review board-approved study, all patients underwent a clinically indicated non-contrast 1.5- or 3-Tesla abdomen/pelvis MRI consisting of single-shot fast spin echo, inversion recovery and DWI sequences. All MRI studies were reviewed by two blinded pediatric radiologists to identify the presence of a drainable fluid collection. Each fluid collection was further characterized as accessible or not accessible for percutaneous or transrectal drainage. Imaging findings were compared to clinical outcome. Seven of the 15 patients had a clinically significant fluid collection, and 5 of these patients were treated with percutaneous drain placement or exploratory laparotomy. The other patients had a phlegmon or a clinically insignificant fluid collection and were discharged home within 48 h. Rapid non-contrast MRI utilizing fluid-sensitive and DWI sequences can be used to identify drainable fluid collections in post-appendectomy patients. This protocol can be used to triage patients between conservative management vs. abscess drainage without oral/intravenous contrast or exposure to ionizing radiation. (orig.)

  11. Controlled Hypotension in Patients Suspected of a Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm: Feasibility during Transport by Ambulance Services and Possible Harm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reimerink, J. J.; Hoornweg, L. L.; Vahl, A. C.; Wisselink, W.; Balm, R.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate a controlled hypotension protocol for patients suspected of a ruptured aneurysm of the abdominal aorta (RAAA) and to identify possible harm to patients with a final diagnosis other than RAAA. Design: Retrospective analysis of patients suspected of RAAA and transported by

  12. Personalized design and virtual evaluation of physician-modified stent grafts for juxta-renal abdominal aortic aneurysms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanathkhani, Soroosh; Shroff, Sanjeev G.; Menon, Prahlad G.

    2017-02-01

    Endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) of juxtarenal aortic aneurysms (JAA) is particularly challenging owing to the requirement of suprarenal EVAR graft fixation, which has been associated with significant declines in long term renal function. Therefore, the ability to design fenestrated EVAR grafts on a personalized basis in order to ensure visceral and renal perfusion, is highly desirable. The objectives of this study are: a) To demonstrate novel 3D geometric methods to virtually design and deploy EVAR grafts into a virtually designed JAA, by applying a custom surface mesh deformation tool to a patient-specific descending aortic model reconstructed from computed tomographic (CT) images; and b) To virtually evaluate patient-specific renal flow and wall stresses in these patient-specific virtually EVAR geometries, using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). The presented framework may provide the modern cardiovascular surgeon the ability to leverage non-invasive, pre-operative imaging equipment to personalize and guide EVAR therapeutic strategy. Our CFD studies revealed that virtual EVAR grafting of a patient-specific JAA, with optimal fenestration sites and renal stenting, led to a 179.67±15.95% and 1051.43±18.34% improvement in right and left renal flow rates, respectively, when compared with the baseline patient-specific aortic geometry with renal stenoses, whereas a right and left renal flow improved by 36.44±2.24% and 885.93±12.41%, respectively, relative to the equivalently modeled JAA with renal stenoses, considering averages across the three simulated inflow rate cases. The proposed framework have utility to iteratively optimize suprarenal EVAR fixation length and achieve normal renal wall shear stresses and streamlined juxtarenal hemodynamics.

  13. Notch γ-secretase inhibitor dibenzazepine attenuates angiotensin II-induced abdominal aortic aneurysm in ApoE knockout mice by multiple mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue-Hong Zheng

    Full Text Available Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA is a life-threatening aortic disease in the elderly. Activation of Notch1 pathway plays a critical role in the development of AAA, but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. In the present study, we explored the mechanisms by which Notch1 activation regulates angiotensin II (Ang II-induced AAA formation and evaluated the therapeutic potential of a new Notch γ-secretase inhibitor, dibenzazepine (DBZ, for the treatment of AAA. Apolipoprotein E knockout (Apo E(-/- mice infused for 4 weeks with Ang II (1000 ng/kg/min, IP using osmotic mini-pumps were received an intraperitoneal injection of either vehicle or 1 mg/kg/d DBZ. Notch1 signaling was activated in AAA tissue from both Ang II-infused Apo E(-/- mice and human undergoing AAA repair in vivo, with increased expression of Notch intracellular domain (NICD and its target gene Hes1, and this effect was effectively blocked by DBZ. Moreover, infusion of Ang II markedly increased the incidence and severity of AAA in Apo E(-/- mice. In contrast, inhibition of Notch activation by DBZ prevented AAA formation in vivo. Furthermore, DBZ markedly prevented Ang II-stimulated accumulation of macrophages and CD4(+ T cells, and ERK-mediated angiogenesis, simultaneously reversed Th2 response, in vivo. In conclusion, these findings provide new insight into the multiple mechanisms of Notch signaling involved in AAA formation and suggest that γ-secretase inhibitor DBZ might be a novel therapeutic drug for treating AAAS.

  14. Systolic Sac Pressure Index for the Prediction of Persistent Type II Endoleak for 12 Months After Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikoma, Akira, E-mail: yfb04322@nifty.com; Nakai, Motoki, E-mail: momonga@wakayama-med.ac.jp; Sato, Morio, E-mail: morisato@wakayama-med.ac.jp; Sato, Hirotatsu, E-mail: kuppa1220@yahoo.co.jp; Minamiguchi, Hiroki, E-mail: hiromina4@hotmail.com; Sonomura, Tetsuo, E-mail: sonomura@wakayama-med.ac.jp [Wakayama Medical University, Departments of Radiology (Japan); Nishimura, Yoshiharu, E-mail: nishim-y@wakayama-med.ac.jp; Okamura, Yoshitaka, E-mail: y-ok@wakayama-med.ac.jp [Wakayama Medical University, Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery (Japan)

    2016-04-15

    PurposeTo assess the relationship between the systolic sac pressure index (SPI) and the presence of endoleaks 12 months after endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR).Materials and MethodsWe performed a single-center prospective trial of consecutively treated patients. SPI (calculated as systolic sac pressure/systolic aortic pressure) was measured by catheterization immediately after EVAR. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography was scheduled 12 months after EVAR to detect possible endoleaks.ResultsData were available for 34 patients who underwent EVAR for an AAA. Persisting type II endoleak was found in 8 patients (endoleak-positive group) but not in the other 26 patients (endoleak-negative group). The mean ± standard deviation SPI was significantly greater in the endoleak-positive group than in the endoleak-negative group (0.692 ± 0.048 vs. 0.505 ± 0.081, respectively; P = .001). Receiver-operating characteristic curve analysis revealed that an SPI of 0.638 was the optimum cutoff value for predicting a persistent endoleak at 12 months with high accuracy (0.971; 33/34), sensitivity (1.00), and specificity (0.962) values. The mean change in AAA diameter was −4.28 ± 5.03 mm and 2.22 ± 4.54 mm in patients with SPI of <0.638 or ≥0.638, respectively (P = .002).ConclusionPatients with an SPI of ≥0.638 immediately after EVAR were more likely to have a persistent type II endoleak at 12 months with an accuracy of 0.971, and showed increases in aneurysm sac diameter compared with patients with an SPI of <0.638.

  15. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... pancreatitis or liver cirrhosis. cancers of the liver, kidneys, pancreas, ovaries and bladder as well as lymphoma. kidney and bladder stones. abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA), injuries ...

  16. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the liver, kidneys, pancreas, ovaries and bladder as well as lymphoma. kidney and bladder stones. abdominal aortic ... and properly administer radiation treatments for tumors as well as monitor response to chemotherapy. top of page ...

  17. Quantitative assessment of lower limb ischemia of arterial occlusive disease utilizing leg scintigraphy by abdominal aortic infusion of {sup 201}Tl chloride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirooka, Noriyuki [Wakayama Medical Univ. (Japan)

    2001-06-01

    We developed leg scintigraphy by abdominal aortic infusion of {sup 201}Tl (111 Mbq, which is equivalent dose in leg scintigraphy by intravenous injection) for diagnosis of ischemic leg. An evaluation of the image by this scintigraphy and a quantitative assessment of ischemic leg by time radioactivity curve (TAC) on calf was preformed among 36 limbs in 18 patients with intermittent claudication. These limbs were divided into 4 groups based on walking distance without calf pain as follows; Group 1 (5 limbs): asymptomatic, Group 2 (13 limbs); over 500 m and less than 1000 m, Group 3 (12 limbs); over 100 m and less than 500 m, Group 4 (6 limbs); less than 100 m. The image of supreme quality for diagnosis of leg ischemia was obtained in all subjects due to a lack of interference from background radioactivity. The relationship between each group and following 3 indicators; peak value, peak time and k value as washout rate obtained from TAC was evaluated. The peak value was 792.6{+-}78.6, 419.4{+-}42.3, 252.6{+-}32.7 and 77.0{+-}21.6 in G1, G2, G3 and G4, respectively (significant difference among each group). The peak time was 11.6{+-}0.6, 14.3{+-}1.2, 16.5{+-}0.85 and 18.6{+-}2.2 in G1, G2, G3 and G4, respectively (G1 vs G2 and G2 vs G3: significant difference, G3 vs G4: not significant). The k value was 1.89{+-}0.32, 1.35{+-}0.33, 0.91{+-}0.12 and 0.56{+-}0.11 in G1, G2, G3 and G4, respectively (significant difference among each group). The peak value is affected by the infused dose of Tl, but the k value is not affected by the dose and is constant indicator in a given leg. These results suggest that lower limb muscle scintigraphy using abdominal aortic infusion of {sup 201}Tl produces a clear image for diagnosis of ischemic leg and k value is one of useful indicators to evaluate the clinical grading of arterial occlusive disease of leg. (author)

  18. Performance of the Endurant stent graft in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms independent of their morphologic suitability for endovascular aneurysm repair based on instructions for use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donas, Konstantinos P; Torsello, Giovanni; Weiss, Kristin; Bisdas, Theodosios; Eisenack, Markus; Austermann, Martin

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to prospectively evaluate the early and late 7-year experience with the Endurant bifurcated stent graft system (Medtronic, Santa Rosa, Calif) in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms. Between November 14, 2007, and December 2013, 712 consecutive high-risk patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms underwent elective or urgent placement of an Endurant bifurcated endograft in our institution. The included patients were consecutive (all comers) and treated independently from their morphologic eligibility for use of the Endurant device based on the instructions for use. The primary study outcome was freedom from all-cause reintervention. The median follow-up was 19.2 months (interquartile range, 6.3-35.9 months). Overall, 517 patients (72.6%) were treated on the basis of instructions for use conditions. On the other hand, 195 patients (27.4%) had morphologic data not consistent with the recommendations for the use of the Endurant system. The 30-day mortality was 1.4% (10 of 712). Nine patients (1.2%) were lost to follow-up because of relocation abroad. The overall mortality rate was 14.74% (101 of 703). Overall survival rate was 92.3% at 1 year, 86.4% at 2 years, and 65% at 5 years. Overall freedom from reintervention rate was 93.3%, 86.4%, and 65% at 1 year, 2 years, and 5 years, respectively. Five patients (0.7%) underwent a surgical conversion and explantation of the Endurant device. The reasons were endograft infection (n = 1), endoleak type Ia (n = 1), endoleak type II (n = 1), endograft and limb thrombotic occlusion (n = 1), and endotension (n = 1). The overall iliac limb occlusion rate was 2.1% (15 of 712). The performance of the Endurant stent graft during a period of 7 years under real-life conditions was good, with low incidence of reinterventions and endoleaks. Copyright © 2015 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. TRATAMIENTO PERCUTÁNEO CON PRÓTESIS ENDOVASCULAR DE COARTACIÓN DE AORTA ABDOMINAL EN UN ADULTO / Percutaneous treatment with endovascular prosthesis of abdominal aortic coarctation in an adult

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Felipe Vega Fleites

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Resumen: La coartación de la aorta abdominal es una afección vascular no hereditaria poco frecuente, que afecta a hombres y mujeres por igual. Recientemente ha sido nombrada como “Síndrome aórtico medio”, y los hallazgos clínicos son similares a los de la CoAo típica. Para el diagnóstico, se debe recurrir a la resonancia magnética o a la arteriografía, y las opciones terapéuticas incluyen la dilatación percutánea con catéter-globo, el tratamiento quirúrgico y, por último, como opción más novedosa, la implantación de prótesis endovasculares. En este artículo presentamos el caso de una mujer de 45 años de edad, exfumadora, con antecedentes de artritis reumatoidea e hipertensión arterial que presentaba claudicación de miembros inferiores durante la marcha. Existía una disminución bilateral marcada de los pulsos femorales y el Doppler, y mostró un componente amortiguado en ambas arterias femorales y poplíteas. La AngioTAC encontró una estenosis significativa del tercio distal de la aorta abdominal infrarrenal, con hipoplasia marcada de la ilíaca derecha. La aortografía corroboró el diagnóstico (gradiente de 80 mmHg. A través de dos introductores arteriales por las arterias femorales se avanzaron dos catéteres-globo MATCH-35 de 5.0x80 mm que se inflaron simultáneamente y posteriormente, se implantó un stent MEDTRONIC “Bridge Assurant” de 10 x 30 mm en el segmento estenótico, sin complicaciones. El gradiente residual fue de 10 mmHg. La paciente evolucionó favorablemente y fue egresada a las 24 horas del procedimiento. / Abstract: Coarctation of the abdominal aorta is an uncommon, non-inherited vascular condition that affects men and women alike. It has been recently named as "middle aortic syndrome", and the clinical findings are similar to those of typical aortic coarctation. For diagnosis, one must make use of magnetic resonance imaging or arteriography, and therapeutic options include percutaneous

  20. Superinfecção e rotura de aneurisma da aorta abdominal por Salmonella dublin: relato de caso Superinfection and rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysm after Salmonella dublin septicemia: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anibal Basile Filho

    1988-12-01

    Full Text Available Os autores relatam o caso de paciente de 66 anos, que apresentou superinfecção e rotura de aneurisma da aorta abdominal, após septicemia por Salmonella dublin. As infecções endovasculares associadas à rotura de aneurisma pré-existentes são um rico potencial nos pacientes com mais de 50 anos de idade, que apresentam bacteremia ou septicemia por Salmonella sp. A alta mortalidade da aortite por salmonelose é devida à septicemia grave ou à rotura desses aneurismas. Qualquer tecido orgânico pode ser a sede de infecções metastáticas, porém os locais mais susceptíveis são os tecidos necróticos e as lesões crônicas degenerativas. Os autores discutem a importância do diagnóstico precoce para reduzir a mortalidade dessa entidade.The authors present a case of a 66 year-old woman with a dissection and rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysm after Salmonella dublin septicemia. Endovascular infection and rupture of atherosclerotic aneurysm is a substantial risk in patients older than 50 years of age who have bacteremia or sepsis due to Salmonella sp. The high mortality is the resultant of Salmonella aortitis due either to septicemia or rupture. Tissue anywhere may be seeded, but damage tissues appear to be particularly susceptible to abscess and chronic destructive lesions. The significance of early diagnosis to decrease the fatal outcome is discussed.

  1. Distribution, size, shape, growth potential and extent of abdominal aortic calcified deposits predict mortality in postmenopausal women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mads; Ganz, Melanie; Lauze, Francois Bernard

    2010-01-01

    Background Aortic calcification is a major risk factor for death from cardiovascular disease. We investigated the relationship between mortality and the composite markers of number, size, morphology and distribution of calcified plaques in the lumbar aorta. Methods 308 postmenopausal women aged 48...... from the Framingham Heart Study cohorts. Results All four scoring systems showed increasing age, smoking, and raised triglyceride levels were the main predictors of mortality after adjustment for all other metabolic and physical parameters. The SCORE card and the Framingham score resulted...... the best predictive power for identification of patients at risk of mortality, with a hazard ratio of 15.6 (p predicts risk of mortality, but also the distribution, shape...

  2. Preservation of hypogastric artery blood flow during endovascular aneurysm repair of an abdominal aortic aneurysm with bilateral common and internal iliac artery involvement: utilization of off-the-shelf stent-graft components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riesenman, Paul J; Ricotta, Joseph J; Veeraswamy, Ravi K

    2012-01-01

    A 72-year-old male presented with a 7.4-cm abdominal aortic aneurysm with bilateral common and internal iliac involvement. To maintain pelvic perfusion, preservation of the patient's left hypogastric artery (HA) was pursued. Two weeks after right HA embolization, endovascular repair of the patient's aneurysms was performed using a branched endograft approach. A 22-mm main body bifurcated endograft was unsheathed and the proximal covered stent was removed. The contralateral gate was preloaded with a wire and catheter. The device was resheathed and placed in the left common iliac artery. The preloaded wire in the contralateral gate was snared from the right side, establishing through-and-through femoral access. A contralateral femoral sheath was advanced up and over the aortic bifurcation from the right side into the contralateral gate of the bifurcated endograft. The repair was bridged to the left HA using a balloon-expandable stent-graft, followed by standard endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. Completion angiography demonstrated exclusion of patient's aneurysms, without evidence of endoleak, and maintenance of pelvic blood flow through the left HA. The patient recovered without complication and was discharged home on postoperative day 4. This technique illustrates the technical feasibility of using a preloaded commercially available endograft to preserve HA blood flow and maintain pelvic perfusion during endovascular aortic aneurysm repair. Copyright © 2012 Annals of Vascular Surgery Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Endovascular repair of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm: technical and team training in an immersive virtual reality environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudarakanchana, Nung; Van Herzeele, Isabelle; Bicknell, Colin D; Riga, Celia V; Rolls, Alexander; Cheshire, Nicholas J W; Hamady, Mohamad S

    2014-08-01

    This study evaluates a fully immersive simulated angiosuite for training and assessment of technical endovascular and human factor skills during a crisis scenario. Virtual reality (VIST-C, Mentice) simulators were integrated into a simulated angiosuite (ORCAMP, Orzone). Teams, lead by experienced (N = 5) or trainee (N = 5) endovascular specialists, performed simulated endovascular ruptured aortic aneurysm repair (rEVAR). Timed performance metrics were recorded as surrogate measures of performance. Participants (N = 22) completed postprocedure questionnaires evaluating face validity, as well as technical and human factor aspects, of the simulation on a Likert scale from 1 (not at all) to 5 (very much). Experienced team leaders were significantly faster than trainees in obtaining proximal control with an intra-aortic occlusion balloon (352 vs. 501 s, p = 0.047) and all completed the procedure within the allotted time, whilst no trainee was able to do so. Total fluoroscopy times were significantly lower in the experienced group (782 vs. 1,086 s, p = 0.016). Realism of the simulated angiosuite was scored highly by experienced team leaders (median 4/5, IQR 4-5). Participants found the simulation useful for acquiring technical (4/5, IQR 4-5) and communication skills (4/5, IQR 4-5) and particularly valuable for enhancing teamwork (5/5, IQR 4-5) and patient safety (5/5, IQR 4-5). This study shows feasibility of creation of a crisis scenario in a fully immersive angiosuite simulation and team performance of a simulated rEVAR. Performance metrics differentiated between experienced specialists and trainees, and the realism of the simulation exercise and environment were rated highly by experienced endovascular specialists. This simulation has potential as a powerful training and assessment tool with opportunities to improve team performance in rEVAR through both technical and human factor skills training.

  4. Carbon dioxide (CO2) angiography as an option for endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Angelis, Chiara; Sardanelli, Francesco; Perego, Matteo; Alì, Marco; Casilli, Francesco; Inglese, Luigi; Mauri, Giovanni

    2017-11-01

    To assess feasibility, efficacy and safety of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) digital subtraction angiography (DSA) to guide endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) in a cohort of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). After Ethical Committee approval, the records of 13 patients (all male, mean age 74.6 ± 8.0 years) with CKD, who underwent EVAR to exclude an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) under CO 2 angiography guidance, were reviewed. The AAA to be excluded had a mean diameter of 52.0 ± 8.0 mm. CO 2 angiography was performed by automatic (n = 7) or hand (n = 6) injection. The endograft was correctly placed and the AAA was excluded in all cases, without any surgical conversions. Two patients (15.4%) had an endoleak: one type-Ia, detected by CO 2 -DSA and effectively treated with prosthesis dilatation; one type-III, detected by CO 2 -DSA, confirmed using 10 ml of ICM, and conservatively managed. In one patient, CO 2 angiograms were considered of too low quality for guiding the procedure and 200 ml of ICM were administered. Overall, 11 patients (84.6%) underwent a successful EVAR under the guidance of the sole CO 2 angiography. No patients suffered from major complications, including those typically CO 2 -related. Two patients suffered from abdominal pain during the procedure secondary to a transient splanchnic perfusion's reduction due to CO 2 , and one patient had a worsening of renal function probably caused by a cholesterol embolization during the procedure. In patients with CKD, EVAR under CO 2 angiography guidance is feasible, effective, and safe.

  5. Greater Volume but not Higher Density of Abdominal Aortic Calcium Is Associated With Increased Cardiovascular Disease Risk: MESA (Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbang, Nketi I; Michos, Erin D; McClelland, Robyn L; Remigio-Baker, Rosemay A; Allison, Matthew A; Sandfort, Veit; Ix, Joachim H; Thomas, Isac; Rifkin, Dena E; Criqui, Michael H

    2016-11-01

    Abdominal aortic calcium (AAC) and coronary artery calcium (CAC) independently and similarly predict cardiovascular disease (CVD) events. The standard AAC and CAC score, the Agatston method, upweights for greater calcium density, thereby modeling higher calcium density as a CVD hazard. Computed tomography scans were used to measure AAC and CAC volume and density in a multiethnic cohort of community-dwelling individuals, and Cox proportional hazard was used to determine their independent association with incident coronary heart disease (CHD, defined as myocardial infarction, resuscitated cardiac arrest, or CHD death), cardiovascular disease (CVD, defined as CHD plus stroke and stroke death), and all-cause mortality. In 997 participants with Agatston AAC and CAC scores >0, the mean age was 66±9 years, and 58% were men. During an average follow-up of 9 years, there were 77 CHD, 118 CVD, and 169 all-cause mortality events. In mutually adjusted models, additionally adjusted for CVD risk factors, an increase in ln(AAC volume) per standard deviation was significantly associated with increased all-cause mortality (hazard ratio=1.20; 95% confidence interval, 1.08-1.33; P<0.01) and an increased ln(CAC volume) per standard deviation was significantly associated with CHD (hazard ratio=1.17; 95% confidence interval, 1.04-1.59; P=0.02) and CVD (hazard ratio=1.20; 95% confidence interval, 1.05-1.36; P<0.01). In contrast, both AAC and CAC density were not significantly associated with CVD events. The Agatston method of upweighting calcium scores for greater density may be inappropriate for CVD risk prediction in both the abdominal aorta and coronary arteries. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  6. Fatores de morbimortalidade na cirurgia eletiva do aneurisma da aorta abdominal infra-renal: experiência de 134 casos Morbidity and mortality factors in the elective surgery of infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm: a case study with 134 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aquiles Tadashi Ywata de Carvalho

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXTO: O tratamento cir