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Sample records for rapamycin complex mtorc1

  1. Dynamin-dependent amino acid endocytosis activates mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1).

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    Shibutani, Shusaku; Okazaki, Hana; Iwata, Hiroyuki

    2017-11-03

    The mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is a master regulator of protein synthesis and potential target for modifying cellular metabolism in various conditions, including cancer and aging. mTORC1 activity is tightly regulated by the availability of extracellular amino acids, and previous studies have revealed that amino acids in the extracellular fluid are transported to the lysosomal lumen. There, amino acids induce recruitment of cytoplasmic mTORC1 to the lysosome by the Rag GTPases, followed by mTORC1 activation by the small GTPase Ras homolog enriched in brain (Rheb). However, how the extracellular amino acids reach the lysosomal lumen and activate mTORC1 remains unclear. Here, we show that amino acid uptake by dynamin-dependent endocytosis plays a critical role in mTORC1 activation. We found that mTORC1 is inactivated when endocytosis is inhibited by overexpression of a dominant-negative form of dynamin 2 or by pharmacological inhibition of dynamin or clathrin. Consistently, the recruitment of mTORC1 to the lysosome was suppressed by the dynamin inhibition. The activity and lysosomal recruitment of mTORC1 were rescued by increasing intracellular amino acids via cycloheximide exposure or by Rag overexpression, indicating that amino acid deprivation is the main cause of mTORC1 inactivation via the dynamin inhibition. We further show that endocytosis inhibition does not induce autophagy even though mTORC1 inactivation is known to strongly induce autophagy. These findings open new perspectives for the use of endocytosis inhibitors as potential agents that can effectively inhibit nutrient utilization and shut down the upstream signals that activate mTORC1. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  2. Current Models of Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Complex 1 (mTORC1) Activation by Growth Factors and Amino Acids

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    Zheng, Xu; Liang, Yan; He, Qiburi; Yao, Ruiyuan; Bao, Wenlei; Bao, Lili; Wang, Yanfeng; Wang, Zhigang

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), which is now referred to as mechanistic target of rapamycin, integrates many signals, including those from growth factors, energy status, stress, and amino acids, to regulate cell growth and proliferation, protein synthesis, protein degradation, and other physiological and biochemical processes. The mTOR-Rheb-TSC-TBC complex co-localizes to the lysosome and the phosphorylation of TSC-TBC effects the dissociation of the complex from the lysosome and activates Rheb. GTP-bound Rheb potentiates the catalytic activity of mTORC1. Under conditions with growth factors and amino acids, v-ATPase, Ragulator, Rag GTPase, Rheb, hVps34, PLD1, and PA have important but disparate effects on mTORC1 activation. In this review, we introduce five models of mTORC1 activation by growth factors and amino acids to provide a comprehensive theoretical foundation for future research. PMID:25402640

  3. Current Models of Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Complex 1 (mTORC1 Activation by Growth Factors and Amino Acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Zheng

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR, which is now referred to as mechanistic target of rapamycin, integrates many signals, including those from growth factors, energy status, stress, and amino acids, to regulate cell growth and proliferation, protein synthesis, protein degradation, and other physiological and biochemical processes. The mTOR-Rheb-TSC-TBC complex co-localizes to the lysosome and the phosphorylation of TSC-TBC effects the dissociation of the complex from the lysosome and activates Rheb. GTP-bound Rheb potentiates the catalytic activity of mTORC1. Under conditions with growth factors and amino acids, v-ATPase, Ragulator, Rag GTPase, Rheb, hVps34, PLD1, and PA have important but disparate effects on mTORC1 activation. In this review, we introduce five models of mTORC1 activation by growth factors and amino acids to provide a comprehensive theoretical foundation for future research.

  4. Phosphoproteomic profiling of in vivo signaling in liver by the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1.

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    Gokhan Demirkan

    Full Text Available Our understanding of signal transduction networks in the physiological context of an organism remains limited, partly due to the technical challenge of identifying serine/threonine phosphorylated peptides from complex tissue samples. In the present study, we focused on signaling through the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1, which is at the center of a nutrient- and growth factor-responsive cell signaling network. Though studied extensively, the mechanisms involved in many mTORC1 biological functions remain poorly understood.We developed a phosphoproteomic strategy to purify, enrich and identify phosphopeptides from rat liver homogenates. Using the anticancer drug rapamycin, the only known target of which is mTORC1, we characterized signaling in liver from rats in which the complex was maximally activated by refeeding following 48 hr of starvation. Using protein and peptide fractionation methods, TiO(2 affinity purification of phosphopeptides and mass spectrometry, we reproducibly identified and quantified over four thousand phosphopeptides. Along with 5 known rapamycin-sensitive phosphorylation events, we identified 62 new rapamycin-responsive candidate phosphorylation sites. Among these were PRAS40, gephyrin, and AMP kinase 2. We observed similar proportions of increased and reduced phosphorylation in response to rapamycin. Gene ontology analysis revealed over-representation of mTOR pathway components among rapamycin-sensitive phosphopeptide candidates.In addition to identifying potential new mTORC1-mediated phosphorylation events, and providing information relevant to the biology of this signaling network, our experimental and analytical approaches indicate the feasibility of large-scale phosphoproteomic profiling of tissue samples to study physiological signaling events in vivo.

  5. Inhibition of Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Complex 1 (mTORC1 Downregulates ELOVL1 Gene Expression and Fatty Acid Synthesis in Goat Fetal Fibroblasts

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    Weipeng Wang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Elongation of very-long-chain fatty acids 1 (ELOVL1 is a ubiquitously expressed gene that belongs to the ELOVL family and regulates the synthesis of very-long-chain fatty acids (VLCFAs and sphingolipids, from yeast to mammals. Mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1 is a central regulator of cell metabolism and is associated with fatty acids synthesis. In this study, we cloned the cDNA that encodes Cashmere goat (Capra hircus ELOVL1 (GenBank Accession number KF549985 and investigated its expression in 10 tissues. ELOVL1 cDNA was 840 bp, encoding a deduced protein of 279 amino acids, and ELOVL1 mRNA was expressed in a wide range of tissues. Inhibition of mTORC1 by rapamycin decreased ELOVL1 expression and fatty acids synthesis in Cashmere goat fetal fibroblasts. These data show that ELOVL1 expression is regulated by mTORC1 and that mTORC1 has significant function in fatty acids synthesis in Cashmere goat.

  6. Analysis of Proteins That Rapidly Change Upon Mechanistic/Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Complex 1 (mTORC1) Repression Identifies Parkinson Protein 7 (PARK7) as a Novel Protein Aberrantly Expressed in Tuberous Sclerosis Complex (TSC).

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    Niere, Farr; Namjoshi, Sanjeev; Song, Ehwang; Dilly, Geoffrey A; Schoenhard, Grant; Zemelman, Boris V; Mechref, Yehia; Raab-Graham, Kimberly F

    2016-02-01

    Many biological processes involve the mechanistic/mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1). Thus, the challenge of deciphering mTORC1-mediated functions during normal and pathological states in the central nervous system is challenging. Because mTORC1 is at the core of translation, we have investigated mTORC1 function in global and regional protein expression. Activation of mTORC1 has been generally regarded to promote translation. Few but recent works have shown that suppression of mTORC1 can also promote local protein synthesis. Moreover, excessive mTORC1 activation during diseased states represses basal and activity-induced protein synthesis. To determine the role of mTORC1 activation in protein expression, we have used an unbiased, large-scale proteomic approach. We provide evidence that a brief repression of mTORC1 activity in vivo by rapamycin has little effect globally, yet leads to a significant remodeling of synaptic proteins, in particular those proteins that reside in the postsynaptic density. We have also found that curtailing the activity of mTORC1 bidirectionally alters the expression of proteins associated with epilepsy, Alzheimer's disease, and autism spectrum disorder-neurological disorders that exhibit elevated mTORC1 activity. Through a protein-protein interaction network analysis, we have identified common proteins shared among these mTORC1-related diseases. One such protein is Parkinson protein 7, which has been implicated in Parkinson's disease, yet not associated with epilepsy, Alzheimers disease, or autism spectrum disorder. To verify our finding, we provide evidence that the protein expression of Parkinson protein 7, including new protein synthesis, is sensitive to mTORC1 inhibition. Using a mouse model of tuberous sclerosis complex, a disease that displays both epilepsy and autism spectrum disorder phenotypes and has overactive mTORC1 signaling, we show that Parkinson protein 7 protein is elevated in the dendrites and colocalizes

  7. Analysis of Proteins That Rapidly Change Upon Mechanistic/Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Complex 1 (mTORC1) Repression Identifies Parkinson Protein 7 (PARK7) as a Novel Protein Aberrantly Expressed in Tuberous Sclerosis Complex (TSC)*

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    Niere, Farr; Namjoshi, Sanjeev; Song, Ehwang; Dilly, Geoffrey A.; Schoenhard, Grant; Zemelman, Boris V.; Mechref, Yehia; Raab-Graham, Kimberly F.

    2016-01-01

    Many biological processes involve the mechanistic/mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1). Thus, the challenge of deciphering mTORC1-mediated functions during normal and pathological states in the central nervous system is challenging. Because mTORC1 is at the core of translation, we have investigated mTORC1 function in global and regional protein expression. Activation of mTORC1 has been generally regarded to promote translation. Few but recent works have shown that suppression of mTORC1 can also promote local protein synthesis. Moreover, excessive mTORC1 activation during diseased states represses basal and activity-induced protein synthesis. To determine the role of mTORC1 activation in protein expression, we have used an unbiased, large-scale proteomic approach. We provide evidence that a brief repression of mTORC1 activity in vivo by rapamycin has little effect globally, yet leads to a significant remodeling of synaptic proteins, in particular those proteins that reside in the postsynaptic density. We have also found that curtailing the activity of mTORC1 bidirectionally alters the expression of proteins associated with epilepsy, Alzheimer's disease, and autism spectrum disorder—neurological disorders that exhibit elevated mTORC1 activity. Through a protein–protein interaction network analysis, we have identified common proteins shared among these mTORC1-related diseases. One such protein is Parkinson protein 7, which has been implicated in Parkinson's disease, yet not associated with epilepsy, Alzheimers disease, or autism spectrum disorder. To verify our finding, we provide evidence that the protein expression of Parkinson protein 7, including new protein synthesis, is sensitive to mTORC1 inhibition. Using a mouse model of tuberous sclerosis complex, a disease that displays both epilepsy and autism spectrum disorder phenotypes and has overactive mTORC1 signaling, we show that Parkinson protein 7 protein is elevated in the dendrites and

  8. mTORC1 inhibitors rapamycin and metformin affect cardiovascular markers differentially in ZDF rats.

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    Nistala, Ravi; Raja, Ahmad; Pulakat, Lakshmi

    2017-03-01

    Mammalian target for rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is a common target for the action of immunosuppressant macrolide rapamycin and glucose-lowering metformin. Inhibition of mTORC1 can exert both beneficial and detrimental effects in different pathologies. Here, we investigated the differential effects of rapamycin (1.2 mg/kg per day delivered subcutaneously for 6 weeks) and metformin (300 mg/kg per day delivered orally for 11 weeks) treatments on male Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rats that mimic the cardiorenal pathology of type 2 diabetic patients and progress to insulin insufficiency. Rapamycin and metformin improved proteinuria, and rapamycin also reduced urinary gamma glutamyl transferase (GGT) indicating improvement of tubular health. Metformin reduced food and water intake, and urinary sodium and potassium, whereas rapamycin increased urinary sodium. Metformin reduced plasma alkaline phosphatase, but induced transaminitis as evidenced by significant increases in plasma AST and ALT. Metformin also induced hyperinsulinemia, but did not suppress fasting plasma glucose after ZDF rats reached 17 weeks of age, and worsened lipid profile. Rapamycin also induced mild transaminitis. Additionally, both rapamycin and metformin increased plasma uric acid and creatinine, biomarkers for cardiovascular and renal disease. These observations define how rapamycin and metformin differentially modulate metabolic profiles that regulate cardiorenal pathology in conditions of severe type 2 diabetes.

  9. Sestrins Inhibit mTORC1 Kinase Activation through the GATOR Complex

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    Anita Parmigiani

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1 kinase is a sensor of different environmental conditions and regulator of cell growth, metabolism, and autophagy. mTORC1 is activated by Rag GTPases, working as RagA:RagB and RagC:RagD heterodimers. Rags control mTORC1 activity by tethering mTORC1 to the lysosomes where it is activated by Rheb GTPase. RagA:RagB, active in its GTP-bound form, is inhibited by GATOR1 complex, a GTPase-activating protein, and GATOR1 is in turn negatively regulated by GATOR2 complex. Sestrins are stress-responsive proteins that inhibit mTORC1 via activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK and tuberous sclerosis complex. Here we report an AMPK-independent mechanism of mTORC1 inhibition by Sestrins mediated by their interaction with GATOR2. As a result of this interaction, the Sestrins suppress mTOR lysosomal localization in a Rag-dependent manner. This mechanism is potentially involved in mTORC1 regulation by amino acids, rotenone, and tunicamycin, connecting stress response with mTORC1 inhibition.

  10. Rapamycin has a biphasic effect on insulin sensitivity in C2C12 myotubes due to sequential disruption of mTORC1 and mTORC2

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    Lan eYe

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Rapamycin, an inhibitor of mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1, improves insulin sensitivity in acute studies in vitro and in vivo by disrupting a negative feedback loop mediated by S6 kinase. We find that rapamycin has a clear biphasic effect on insulin sensitivity in C2C12 myotubes, with enhanced responsiveness during the first hour that declines to almost complete insulin resistance by 24-48 hours. We and others have recently observed that chronic rapamycin treatment induces insulin resistance in rodents, at least in part due to disruption of mTORC2, an mTOR-containing complex that is not acutely sensitive to the drug. Chronic rapamycin treatment may also impair insulin action via the inhibition of mTORC1-dependent mitochondrial biogenesis and activity, which could result in a buildup of lipid intermediates that are known to trigger insulin resistance. We confirmed that rapamycin inhibits expression of PGC-1α, a key mitochondrial transcription factor, and acutely reduces respiration rate in myotubes. However, rapamycin did not stimulate phosphorylation of PKCθ, a central mediator of lipid-induced insulin resistance. Instead, we found dramatic disruption of mTORC2, which coincided with the onset of insulin resistance. Selective inhibition of mTORC1 or mTORC2 by shRNA-mediated knockdown of specific components (Raptor and Rictor, respectively confirmed that mitochondrial effects of rapamycin are mTORC1-dependent, whereas insulin resistance was recapitulated only by knockdown of mTORC2. Thus, mTORC2 disruption, rather than inhibition of mitochondria, causes insulin resistance in rapamycin-treated myotubes, and this system may serve as a useful model to understand the effects of rapamycin on mTOR signaling in vivo.

  11. Inhibition of mTORC1 by Astrin and Stress Granules Prevents Apoptosis in Cancer Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thedieck, Kathrin; Holzwarth, Birgit; Prentzell, Mirja Tamara; Boehlke, Christopher; Klaesener, Kathrin; Ruf, Stefanie; Sonntag, Annika Gwendolin; Maerz, Lars; Grellscheid, Sushma-Nagaraja; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Nitschke, Roland; Kuehn, E. Wolfgang; Jonker, Johan W.; Groen, Albert K.; Reth, Michael; Hall, Michael N.; Baumeister, Ralf

    2013-01-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) controls growth and survival in response to metabolic cues. Oxidative stress affects mTORC1 via inhibitory and stimulatory inputs. Whereas downregulation of TSC1-TSC2 activates mTORC1 upon oxidative stress, the molecular mechanism of mTORC1 inhibition

  12. Rapamycin and mTORC1 Inhibition in the Mouse: Skin Cancer Prevention

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    Athar, Mohammad; Kopelovich, Levy

    2011-01-01

    Therapeutic and preventive effects of rapamycin include reduced risk of non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC). In this issue of the journal (beginning on page XXX), Checkley et al. report that rapamycin inhibits mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) complex 1 in murine epidermis, thereby inhibiting tumor promotion mediated by tetradecanoyl phorbol-13 acetate (TPA) in association with a strong anti-inflammatory effect. Rapamycin is an immunosuppressive drug for preventing graft rejection in organ transplant recipients and reduces the risk of NMSC and Kaposi’s sarcoma in this population, albeit by mechanisms distinct from immunosuppression. Important future directions include identifying molecular predictors of rapamycin/rapalog sensitivity or resistance (potentially, for example, PI3K pathway alterations and KRAS mutations) and combined non-rapalog, mTOR-targeting approaches, all of which should increase efficacy and minimize toxicity. PMID:21733819

  13. Disruption of the vacuolar-type H(+)-ATPase complex in liver causes MTORC1-independent accumulation of autophagic vacuoles and lysosomes.

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    Kissing, Sandra; Rudnik, Sönke; Damme, Markus; Lüllmann-Rauch, Renate; Ichihara, Atsuhiro; Kornak, Uwe; Eskelinen, Eeva-Liisa; Jabs, Sabrina; Heeren, Jörg; De Brabander, Jef K; Haas, Albert; Saftig, Paul

    2017-04-03

    The vacuolar-type H(+)-translocating ATPase (v-H(+)-ATPase) has been implicated in the amino acid-dependent activation of the mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (MTORC1), an important regulator of macroautophagy. To reveal the mechanistic links between the v-H(+)-ATPase and MTORC1, we destablilized v-H(+)-ATPase complexes in mouse liver cells by induced deletion of the essential chaperone ATP6AP2. ATP6AP2-mutants are characterized by massive accumulation of endocytic and autophagic vacuoles in hepatocytes. This cellular phenotype was not caused by a block in endocytic maturation or an impaired acidification. However, the degradation of LC3-II in the knockout hepatocytes appeared to be reduced. When v-H(+)-ATPase levels were decreased, we observed lysosome association of MTOR and normal signaling of MTORC1 despite an increase in autophagic marker proteins. To better understand why MTORC1 can be active when v-H(+)-ATPase is depleted, the activation of MTORC1 was analyzed in ATP6AP2-deficient fibroblasts. In these cells, very little amino acid-elicited activation of MTORC1 was observed. In contrast, insulin did induce MTORC1 activation, which still required intracellular amino acid stores. These results suggest that in vivo the regulation of macroautophagy depends not only on v-H(+)-ATPase-mediated regulation of MTORC1.

  14. La-related protein 1 (LARP1) represses terminal oligopyrimidine (TOP) mRNA translation downstream of mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fonseca, Bruno; Zakaria, Chadi; Jia, J J

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is a critical regulator of protein synthesis. The best studied targets of mTORC1 in translation are the eukaryotic initiation factor-binding protein 1 (4E-BP1) and ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1 (S6K1). In this study, we identify the La......-related protein 1 (LARP1) as a key novel target of mTORC1 with a fundamental role in terminal oligopyrimidine (TOP) mRNA translation. Recent genome-wide studies indicate that TOP and TOP-like mRNAs compose a large portion of the mTORC1 translatome, but the mechanism by which mTORC1 controls TOP mRNA translation...... is incompletely understood. Here, we report that LARP1 functions as a key repressor of TOP mRNA translation downstream of mTORC1. Our data show the following: (i) LARP1 associates with mTORC1 via RAPTOR; (ii) LARP1 interacts with TOP mRNAs in an mTORC1-dependent manner; (iii) LARP1 binds the 5′TOP motif...

  15. La-related Protein 1 (LARP1) Represses Terminal Oligopyrimidine (TOP) mRNA Translation Downstream of mTOR Complex 1 (mTORC1)*

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    Fonseca, Bruno D.; Zakaria, Chadi; Jia, Jian-Jun; Graber, Tyson E.; Svitkin, Yuri; Tahmasebi, Soroush; Healy, Danielle; Hoang, Huy-Dung; Jensen, Jacob M.; Diao, Ilo T.; Lussier, Alexandre; Dajadian, Christopher; Padmanabhan, Niranjan; Wang, Walter; Matta-Camacho, Edna; Hearnden, Jaclyn; Smith, Ewan M.; Tsukumo, Yoshinori; Yanagiya, Akiko; Morita, Masahiro; Petroulakis, Emmanuel; González, Jose L.; Hernández, Greco; Alain, Tommy; Damgaard, Christian K.

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is a critical regulator of protein synthesis. The best studied targets of mTORC1 in translation are the eukaryotic initiation factor-binding protein 1 (4E-BP1) and ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1 (S6K1). In this study, we identify the La-related protein 1 (LARP1) as a key novel target of mTORC1 with a fundamental role in terminal oligopyrimidine (TOP) mRNA translation. Recent genome-wide studies indicate that TOP and TOP-like mRNAs compose a large portion of the mTORC1 translatome, but the mechanism by which mTORC1 controls TOP mRNA translation is incompletely understood. Here, we report that LARP1 functions as a key repressor of TOP mRNA translation downstream of mTORC1. Our data show the following: (i) LARP1 associates with mTORC1 via RAPTOR; (ii) LARP1 interacts with TOP mRNAs in an mTORC1-dependent manner; (iii) LARP1 binds the 5′TOP motif to repress TOP mRNA translation; and (iv) LARP1 competes with the eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF) 4G for TOP mRNA binding. Importantly, from a drug resistance standpoint, our data also show that reducing LARP1 protein levels by RNA interference attenuates the inhibitory effect of rapamycin, Torin1, and amino acid deprivation on TOP mRNA translation. Collectively, our findings demonstrate that LARP1 functions as an important repressor of TOP mRNA translation downstream of mTORC1. PMID:25940091

  16. La-related Protein 1 (LARP1) Represses Terminal Oligopyrimidine (TOP) mRNA Translation Downstream of mTOR Complex 1 (mTORC1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Bruno D; Zakaria, Chadi; Jia, Jian-Jun; Graber, Tyson E; Svitkin, Yuri; Tahmasebi, Soroush; Healy, Danielle; Hoang, Huy-Dung; Jensen, Jacob M; Diao, Ilo T; Lussier, Alexandre; Dajadian, Christopher; Padmanabhan, Niranjan; Wang, Walter; Matta-Camacho, Edna; Hearnden, Jaclyn; Smith, Ewan M; Tsukumo, Yoshinori; Yanagiya, Akiko; Morita, Masahiro; Petroulakis, Emmanuel; González, Jose L; Hernández, Greco; Alain, Tommy; Damgaard, Christian K

    2015-06-26

    The mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is a critical regulator of protein synthesis. The best studied targets of mTORC1 in translation are the eukaryotic initiation factor-binding protein 1 (4E-BP1) and ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1 (S6K1). In this study, we identify the La-related protein 1 (LARP1) as a key novel target of mTORC1 with a fundamental role in terminal oligopyrimidine (TOP) mRNA translation. Recent genome-wide studies indicate that TOP and TOP-like mRNAs compose a large portion of the mTORC1 translatome, but the mechanism by which mTORC1 controls TOP mRNA translation is incompletely understood. Here, we report that LARP1 functions as a key repressor of TOP mRNA translation downstream of mTORC1. Our data show the following: (i) LARP1 associates with mTORC1 via RAPTOR; (ii) LARP1 interacts with TOP mRNAs in an mTORC1-dependent manner; (iii) LARP1 binds the 5'TOP motif to repress TOP mRNA translation; and (iv) LARP1 competes with the eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF) 4G for TOP mRNA binding. Importantly, from a drug resistance standpoint, our data also show that reducing LARP1 protein levels by RNA interference attenuates the inhibitory effect of rapamycin, Torin1, and amino acid deprivation on TOP mRNA translation. Collectively, our findings demonstrate that LARP1 functions as an important repressor of TOP mRNA translation downstream of mTORC1. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  17. Metformin Inhibits Hepatic mTORC1 Signaling via Dose-Dependent Mechanisms Involving AMPK and the TSC Complex.

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    Howell, Jessica J; Hellberg, Kristina; Turner, Marc; Talbott, George; Kolar, Matthew J; Ross, Debbie S; Hoxhaj, Gerta; Saghatelian, Alan; Shaw, Reuben J; Manning, Brendan D

    2017-02-07

    Metformin is the most widely prescribed drug for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. However, knowledge of the full effects of metformin on biochemical pathways and processes in its primary target tissue, the liver, is limited. One established effect of metformin is to decrease cellular energy levels. The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) complex 1 (mTORC1) are key regulators of metabolism that are respectively activated and inhibited in acute response to cellular energy depletion. Here we show that metformin robustly inhibits mTORC1 in mouse liver tissue and primary hepatocytes. Using mouse genetics, we find that at the lowest concentrations of metformin that inhibit hepatic mTORC1 signaling, this inhibition is dependent on AMPK and the tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) protein complex (TSC complex). Finally, we show that metformin profoundly inhibits hepatocyte protein synthesis in a manner that is largely dependent on its ability to suppress mTORC1 signaling. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Sestrin2 inhibits mTORC1 through modulation of GATOR complexes

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    Kim, Jeong Sig; Ro, Seung-Hyun; Kim, Myungjin; Park, Hwan-Woo; Semple, Ian A.; Park, Haeli; Cho, Uhn-Soo; Wang, Wei; Guan, Kun-Liang; Karin, Michael; Lee, Jun Hee (Michigan); (UCSD)

    2015-03-30

    Sestrins are stress-inducible metabolic regulators that suppress a wide range of age- and obesity-associated pathologies, many of which are due to mTORC1 overactivation. Upon various stresses, the Sestrins inhibit mTORC1 activity through an indirect mechanism that is still unclear. GATORs are recently identified protein complexes that regulate the activity of RagB, a small GTPase essential for mTORC1 activation. GATOR1 is a GTPase activating protein (GAP) for RagB whereas GATOR2 functions as an inhibitor of GATOR1. However, how the GATORs are physiologically regulated is unknown. Here we show that Sestrin2 binds to GATOR2, and liberates GATOR1 from GATOR2-mediated inhibition. Released GATOR1 subsequently binds to and inactivates RagB, ultimately resulting in mTORC1 suppression. Consistent with this biochemical mechanism, genetic ablation of GATOR1 nullifies the mTORC1-inhibiting effect of Sestrin2 in both cell culture and Drosophila models. Collectively, we elucidate a new signaling cascade composed of Sestrin2-GATOR2-GATOR1-RagB that mediates stress-dependent suppression of mTORC1 activity.

  19. Rapamycin-insensitive mTORC1 activity controls eIF4E:4E-BP1 binding [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/NM6hpo

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    Mark Livingstone

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The recent development of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR kinase domain inhibitors and genetic dissection of rapamycin-sensitive and -insensitive mTOR protein complexes (mTORC1 and mTORC2 have revealed that phosphorylation of the mTOR substrate 4E-BP1 on amino acids Thr37 and/or Thr46 represents a rapamycin-insensitive activity of mTORC1. Despite numerous previous reports utilizing serine (Ser-to-alanine (Ala and threonine (Thr-to-Ala phosphorylation site mutants of 4E-BP1 to assess which post-translational modification(s directly regulate binding to eIF4E, an ambiguous understanding persists. This manuscript demonstrates that the initial, rapamycin-insensitive phosphorylation event at Thr46 is sufficient to prevent eIF4E:4E-BP1 binding. This finding is relevant, particularly as mTOR kinase domain inhibitors continue to be assessed for clinical efficacy, since it clarifies a difference between the action of these second-generation mTOR inhibitors and those of rapamycin analogues.

  20. Rapamycin attenuates BAFF-extended proliferation and survival via disruption of mTORC1/2 signaling in normal and neoplastic B-lymphoid cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Qingyu; Qin, Shanshan; Zhang, Hai; Liu, Beibei; Qin, Jiamin; Wang, Xiaoxue; Zhang, Ruijie; Liu, Chunxiao; Dong, Xiaoqing; Zhang, Shuangquan; Huang, Shile; Chen, Long

    2018-01-01

    B cell activating factor from the TNF family (BAFF) stimulates B-cell proliferation and survival, but excessive BAFF promotes the development of aggressive B cells leading to malignant and autoimmune diseases. Recently, we have reported that rapamycin, a macrocyclic lactone, attenuates human soluble BAFF (hsBAFF)-stimulated B-cell proliferation/survival by suppressing mTOR-mediated PP2A-Erk1/2 signaling pathway. Here, we show that the inhibitory effect of rapamycin on hsBAFF-promoted B cell proliferation/survival is also related to blocking hsBAFF-stimulated phosphorylation of Akt, S6K1, and 4E-BP1, as well as expression of survivin in normal and B-lymphoid (Raji and Daudi) cells. It appeared that both mTORC1 and mTORC2 were involved in the inhibitory activity of rapamycin, as silencing raptor or rictor enhanced rapamycin's suppression of hsBAFF-induced survivin expression and proliferation/viability in B cells. Also, PP242, an mTORC1/2 kinase inhibitor, repressed survivin expression, and cell proliferation/viability more potently than rapamycin (mTORC1 inhibitor) in B cells in response to hsBAFF. Of interest, ectopic expression of constitutively active Akt (myr-Akt) or constitutively active S6K1 (S6K1-ca), or downregulation of 4E-BP1 conferred resistance to rapamycin's attenuation of hsBAFF-induced survivin expression and B-cell proliferation/viability, whereas overexpression of dominant negative Akt (dn-Akt) or constitutively hypophosphorylated 4E-BP1 (4EBP1-5A), or downregulation of S6K1, or co-treatment with Akt inhibitor potentiated the inhibitory effects of rapamycin. The findings indicate that rapamycin attenuates excessive hsBAFF-induced cell proliferation/survival via blocking mTORC1/2 signaling in normal and neoplastic B-lymphoid cells. Our data underscore that rapamycin may be a potential agent for preventing excessive BAFF-evoked aggressive B-cell malignancies and autoimmune diseases. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Intrahippocampal Glutamine Administration Inhibits mTORC1 Signaling and Impairs Long-Term Memory

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    Rozas, Natalia S.; Redell, John B.; Pita-Almenar, Juan D.; McKenna, James, III.; Moore, Anthony N.; Gambello, Michael J.; Dash, Pramod K.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanistic Target of Rapamycin Complex 1 (mTORC1), a key regulator of protein synthesis and cellular growth, is also required for long-term memory formation. Stimulation of mTORC1 signaling is known to be dependent on the availability of energy and growth factors, as well as the presence of amino acids. In vitro studies using serum- and amino…

  2. mTORC1 Prevents Preosteoblast Differentiation through the Notch Signaling Pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Huang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR integrates both intracellular and extracellular signals to regulate cell growth and metabolism. However, the role of mTOR signaling in osteoblast differentiation and bone formation is undefined, and the underlying mechanisms have not been elucidated. Here, we report that activation of mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1 is required for preosteoblast proliferation; however, inactivation of mTORC1 is essential for their differentiation and maturation. Inhibition of mTORC1 prevented preosteoblast proliferation, but enhanced their differentiation in vitro and in mice. Activation of mTORC1 by deletion of tuberous sclerosis 1 (Tsc1 in preosteoblasts produced immature woven bone in mice due to excess proliferation but impaired differentiation and maturation of the cells. The mTORC1-specific inhibitor, rapamycin, restored these in vitro and in vivo phenotypic changes. Mechanistically, mTORC1 prevented osteoblast maturation through activation of the STAT3/p63/Jagged/Notch pathway and downregulation of Runx2. Preosteoblasts with hyperactive mTORC1 reacquired the capacity to fully differentiate and maturate when subjected to inhibition of the Notch pathway. Together, these findings identified the role of mTORC1 in osteoblast formation and established that mTORC1 prevents preosteoblast differentiation and maturation through activation of the Notch pathway.

  3. Deficiency in mTORC1-controlled C/EBP beta-mRNA translation improves metabolic health in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zidek, Laura M.; Ackermann, Tobias; Hartleben, Goetz; Eichwald, Sabrina; Kortman, Gertrud; Kiehntopf, Michael; Leutz, Achim; Sonenberg, Nahum; Wang, Zhao-Qi; von Maltzahn, Julia; Mueller, Christine; Calkhoven, Cornelis F.

    The mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is a central regulator of physiological adaptations in response to changes in nutrient supply. Major downstream targets of mTORC1 signalling are the mRNA translation regulators p70 ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1 (S6K1p70) and the 4E-binding

  4. Ragulator-Rag complex targets mTORC1 to the lysosomal surface and is necessary for its activation by amino acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sancak, Yasemin; Bar-Peled, Liron; Zoncu, Roberto; Markhard, Andrew L.; Nada, Shigeyuki; Sabatini, David M.

    2010-01-01

    The mTORC1 kinase promotes growth in response to growth factors, energy levels, and amino acids and its activity is often deregulated in disease. The Rag GTPases interact with mTORC1 and are proposed to activate it in response to amino acids by promoting mTORC1 translocation to a membrane-bound compartment that contains the mTORC1 activator Rheb. We show that amino acids induce the movement of mTORC1 to lysosomal membranes, where the Rag proteins reside. A complex encoded by the MAPKSP1, ROBLD3, and c11orf59 genes, which we term Ragulator, interacts with the Rag GTPases, recruits them to lysosomes, and is essential for mTORC1 activation. Constitutive targeting of mTORC1 to the lysosomal surface is sufficient to render the mTORC1 pathway amino acid insensitive and independent of Rag and Ragulator, but not Rheb, function. Thus, Rag-Ragulator mediated translocation of mTORC1 to lysosomal membranes is the key event in amino acid signaling to mTORC1. PMID:20381137

  5. Screen for chemical modulators of autophagy reveals novel therapeutic inhibitors of mTORC1 signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aruna D Balgi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1 is a protein kinase that relays nutrient availability signals to control numerous cellular functions including autophagy, a process of cellular self-eating activated by nutrient depletion. Addressing the therapeutic potential of modulating mTORC1 signaling and autophagy in human disease requires active chemicals with pharmacologically desirable properties. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using an automated cell-based assay, we screened a collection of >3,500 chemicals and identified three approved drugs (perhexiline, niclosamide, amiodarone and one pharmacological reagent (rottlerin capable of rapidly increasing autophagosome content. Biochemical assays showed that the four compounds stimulate autophagy and inhibit mTORC1 signaling in cells maintained in nutrient-rich conditions. The compounds did not inhibit mTORC2, which also contains mTOR as a catalytic subunit, suggesting that they do not inhibit mTOR catalytic activity but rather inhibit signaling to mTORC1. mTORC1 inhibition and autophagosome accumulation induced by perhexiline, niclosamide or rottlerin were rapidly reversed upon drug withdrawal whereas amiodarone inhibited mTORC1 essentially irreversibly. TSC2, a negative regulator of mTORC1, was required for inhibition of mTORC1 signaling by rottlerin but not for mTORC1 inhibition by perhexiline, niclosamide and amiodarone. Transient exposure of immortalized mouse embryo fibroblasts to these drugs was not toxic in nutrient-rich conditions but led to rapid cell death by apoptosis in starvation conditions, by a mechanism determined in large part by the tuberous sclerosis complex protein TSC2, an upstream regulator of mTORC1. By contrast, transient exposure to the mTORC1 inhibitor rapamycin caused essentially irreversible mTORC1 inhibition, sustained inhibition of cell growth and no selective cell killing in starvation. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The observation that drugs already

  6. Recent Advances in Understanding Amino Acid Sensing Mechanisms that Regulate mTORC1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liufeng Zheng

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR is the central regulator of mammalian cell growth, and is essential for the formation of two structurally and functionally distinct complexes: mTORC1 and mTORC2. mTORC1 can sense multiple cues such as nutrients, energy status, growth factors and hormones to control cell growth and proliferation, angiogenesis, autophagy, and metabolism. As one of the key environmental stimuli, amino acids (AAs, especially leucine, glutamine and arginine, play a crucial role in mTORC1 activation, but where and how AAs are sensed and signal to mTORC1 are not fully understood. Classically, AAs activate mTORC1 by Rag GTPases which recruit mTORC1 to lysosomes, where AA signaling initiates. Plasma membrane transceptor L amino acid transporter 1 (LAT1-4F2hc has dual transporter-receptor function that can sense extracellular AA availability upstream of mTORC1. The lysosomal AA sensors (PAT1 and SLC38A9 and cytoplasmic AA sensors (LRS, Sestrin2 and CASTOR1 also participate in regulating mTORC1 activation. Importantly, AAs can be sensed by plasma membrane receptors, like G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR T1R1/T1R3, and regulate mTORC1 without being transported into the cells. Furthermore, AA-dependent mTORC1 activation also initiates within Golgi, which is regulated by Golgi-localized AA transporter PAT4. This review provides an overview of the research progress of the AA sensing mechanisms that regulate mTORC1 activity.

  7. Dietary intervention in acne: Attenuation of increased mTORC1 signaling promoted by Western diet.

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    Melnik, Bodo

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to highlight the endocrine signaling of Western diet, a fundamental environmental factor involved in the pathogenesis of epidemic acne. Western nutrition is characterized by high calorie uptake, high glycemic load, high fat and meat intake, as well as increased consumption of insulin- and IGF-1-level elevating dairy proteins. Metabolic signals of Western diet are sensed by the nutrient-sensitive kinase, mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), which integrates signals of cellular energy, growth factors (insulin, IGF-1) and protein-derived signals, predominantly leucine, provided in high amounts by milk proteins and meat. mTORC1 activates SREBP, the master transcription factor of lipogenesis. Leucine stimulates mTORC1-SREBP signaling and leucine is directly converted by sebocytes into fatty acids and sterols for sebaceous lipid synthesis. Over-activated mTORC1 increases androgen hormone secretion and most likely amplifies androgen-driven mTORC1 signaling of sebaceous follicles. Testosterone directly activates mTORC1. Future research should investigate the effects of isotretinoin on sebocyte mTORC1 activity. It is conceivable that isotretinoin may downregulate mTORC1 in sebocytes by upregulation of nuclear levels of FoxO1. The role of Western diet in acne can only be fully appreciated when all stimulatory inputs for maximal mTORC1 activation, i.e., glucose, insulin, IGF-1 and leucine, are adequately considered. Epidemic acne has to be recognized as an mTORC1-driven disease of civilization like obesity, type 2 diabetes, cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. These new insights into Western diet-mediated mTORC1-hyperactivity provide a rational basis for dietary intervention in acne by attenuating mTORC1 signaling by reducing (1) total energy intake, (2) hyperglycemic carbohydrates, (3) insulinotropic dairy proteins and (4) leucine-rich meat and dairy proteins. The necessary dietary changes are opposed to the evolution of

  8. IL-2- and IL-15-induced activation of the rapamycin-sensitive mTORC1 pathway in malignant CD4+ T lymphocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marzec, Michal; Liu, Xiaobin; Kasprzycka, Monika

    2008-01-01

    as the PI3K/Akt and MEK/ERK pathways, the IL-2-dependent cell lines activated the pathways in response to IL-2 and IL-15 but not IL-21. Activation of mTORC1 and MEK/ERK was nutrient dependent. The mTORC1, PI3K/Akt, and MEK/ERK pathways could also be activated by IL-2 in the primary leukemic, mitogen...

  9. Simultaneous inhibition of mTOR-containing complex 1 (mTORC1) and MNK induces apoptosis of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marzec, Michal Tomasz; Liu, Xiaobin; Wysocka, Maria

    2011-01-01

    mTOR kinase forms the mTORC1 complex by associating with raptor and other proteins and affects a number of key cell functions. mTORC1 activates p70S6kinase 1 (p70S6K1) and inhibits 4E-binding protein 1 (4E-BP1). In turn, p70S6K1 phosphorylates a S6 protein of the 40S ribosomal subunit (S6rp) and 4E...

  10. mTORC1 is a target of nordihydroguaiaretic acid to prevent breast tumor growth in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yue; Xu, Song; Lin, Jun; Yao, Guangyu; Han, Zelong; Liang, Bo; Zou, Zhenhong; Chen, Zhenguo; Song, Qiancheng; Dai, Yifan; Gao, Tianming; Liu, Anling; Bai, Xiaochun

    2012-11-01

    Nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA) is a natural phenolic compound isolated from the creosote bush Larrea divaricata, which has anti-tumor activities both in vitro and in vivo. Its analogs are in clinical development for use in refractory solid tumors. But the mechanisms underlying the anti-cancer effect of NDGA are not fully understood. In this study, we identified mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) as a target of NDGA both in cultured breast cancer cells and in xenograft models. NDGA effectively inhibited basal level of mTORC1 but not mTORC2 activity in breast cancer cell lines. NDGA also suppressed mTORC1 downstream signaling such as expression of cyclin D1, hypoxia-inducible factor-α and VEGF, and prevented proliferation in breast cancer cells. Although NDGA stimulated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)/tuberous sclerosis complex 2 (TSC2) signaling, which negatively regulates mTORC1, AMPK and TSC2 deletion could not diminish the inhibition of mTORC1 by NDGA. Subsequent studies revealed that NDGA may also direct target mTORC1 complex because NDGA suppressed amino acids- and insulin-stimulated mTORC1 and acted like rapamycin to disrupt mTOR-Raptor interaction. Most importantly, NDGA repressed breast tumor growth and targeted mTORC1 and its downstream signaling in xenograft models. Together our data provide a novel mechanism for NDGA activity which could help explain its anti-cancer activity. Disruption of mTOR-Raptor complex and activation of AMPK/TSC signaling may contribute to inhibitory effects of NDGA against mTORC1. Our data also raise the possibility that NDGA, as an mTORC1 inhibitor, may have a broad spectrum of action on breast cancers.

  11. Platelet-derived growth factor regulates vascular smooth muscle phenotype via mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, Jung Min; Yun, Sung Ji; Kim, Young Whan; Jin, Seo Yeon; Lee, Hye Sun [Medical Research Institute, Department of Pharmacology, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Yangsan (Korea, Republic of); Song, Sang Heon [Department of Internal Medicine, Pusan National University Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Hwa Kyoung [Department of Anatomy, Pusan National University School of Korean Medicine, Yangsan (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Sun Sik, E-mail: sunsik@pusan.ac.kr [Medical Research Institute, Department of Pharmacology, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Yangsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-14

    Mammalian target of rapamycin complex (mTORC) regulates various cellular processes including proliferation, growth, migration and differentiation. In this study, we showed that mTORC1 regulates platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-induced phenotypic conversion of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Stimulation of contractile VSMCs with PDGF significantly reduced the expression of contractile marker proteins in a time- and dose-dependent manner. In addition, angiotensin II (AngII)-induced contraction of VSMCs was completely blocked by the stimulation of VSMCs with PDGF. PDGF-dependent suppression of VSMC marker gene expression was significantly blocked by inhibition of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and mTOR whereas inhibition of p38 MAPK had no effect. In particular, inhibition of mTORC1 by rapamycin or by silencing of Raptor significantly blocked the PDGF-dependent phenotypic change of VSMCs whereas silencing of Rictor had no effect. In addition, loss of AngII-dependent contraction by PDGF was significantly retained by silencing of Raptor. Inhibition of mTORC1 by rapamycin or by silencing of Raptor significantly blocked PDGF-induced proliferation of VSMCs. Taken together, we suggest that mTORC1 plays an essential role in PDGF-dependent phenotypic changes of VSMCs. - Graphical abstract: Regulation of VSMC phenotype by PDGF-dependent activation of mTORC1. - Highlights: • The expression of contractile marker proteins was reduced by PDGF stimulation. • PDGF-dependent phenotypic conversion of VSMCs was blocked by inhibition of mTOR. • PDGF-induced proliferation of VSMCs was attenuated by inhibition of mTORC1. • mTORC1 plays a critical role in PDGF-dependent phenotypic conversion of VSMCs.

  12. Perspectives of targeting mTORC1-S6K1 in cardiovascular aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiu-Fen eMing

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The global population aging is accelerating and age-associated diseases including cardiovascular diseases become more challenging. The underlying mechanisms of aging and age-associated cardiovascular dysfunction remain elusive. There are substantial evidences demonstrating a pivotal role of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1 and its downstream effector S6K1 signalling in mammalian lifespan regulation and age-related diseases such as type II diabetes mellitus and cancer. The role of mTORC1-S6K1 in age-related cardiovascular diseases is, however, largely unknown and the available experimental results are controversial. This review article primarily summarizes the most recent advances towards understanding the role of mTORC1-S6K1 in cardiovascular aging and discusses the future perspectives of targeting mTORC1-S6K1 signalling as a healthy lifespan extension modality in anti-aging and anti-cardiovascular aging.

  13. mTORC1-Induced HK1-Dependent Glycolysis Regulates NLRP3 Inflammasome Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Jong-Seok; Hisata, Shu; Park, Mi-Ae; DeNicola, Gina M; Ryter, Stefan W; Nakahira, Kiichi; Choi, Augustine M K

    2015-07-07

    The mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) regulates activation of immune cells and cellular energy metabolism. Although glycolysis has been linked to immune functions, the mechanisms by which glycolysis regulates NLRP3 inflammasome activation remain unclear. Here, we demonstrate that mTORC1-induced glycolysis provides an essential mechanism for NLRP3 inflammasome activation. Moreover, we demonstrate that hexokinase 1 (HK1)-dependent glycolysis, under the regulation of mTORC1, represents a critical metabolic pathway for NLRP3 inflammasome activation. Downregulation of glycolysis by inhibition of Raptor/mTORC1 or HK1 suppressed both pro-IL-1β maturation and caspase-1 activation in macrophages in response to LPS and ATP. These results suggest that upregulation of HK1-dependent glycolysis by mTORC1 regulates NLRP3 inflammasome activation. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Scopolamine rapidly increases mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 signaling, synaptogenesis, and antidepressant behavioral responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voleti, Bhavya; Navarria, Andrea; Liu, Rong-Jian; Banasr, Mounira; Li, Nanxin; Terwilliger, Rose; Sanacora, Gerard; Eid, Tore; Aghajanian, George; Duman, Ronald S

    2013-11-15

    Clinical studies report that scopolamine, an acetylcholine muscarinic receptor antagonist, produces rapid antidepressant effects in depressed patients, but the mechanisms underlying the therapeutic response have not been determined. The present study examines the role of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) and synaptogenesis, which have been implicated in the rapid actions of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonists. The influence of scopolamine on mTORC1 signaling was determined by analysis of the phosphorylated and activated forms of mTORC1 signaling proteins in the prefrontal cortex (PFC). The numbers and function of spine synapses were analyzed by whole cell patch clamp recording and two-photon image analysis of PFC neurons. The actions of scopolamine were examined in the forced swim test in the absence or presence of selective mTORC1 and glutamate receptor inhibitors. The results demonstrate that a single, low dose of scopolamine rapidly increases mTORC1 signaling and the number and function of spine synapses in layer V pyramidal neurons in the PFC. Scopolamine administration also produces an antidepressant response in the forced swim test that is blocked by pretreatment with the mTORC1 inhibitor or by a glutamate alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid receptor antagonist. Taken together, the results demonstrate that the antidepressant actions of scopolamine require mTORC1 signaling and are associated with increased glutamate transmission, and synaptogenesis, similar to N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonists. These findings provide novel targets for safer and more efficacious rapid-acting antidepressant agents. © 2013 Society of Biological Psychiatry.

  15. Milk—A Nutrient System of Mammalian Evolution Promoting mTORC1-Dependent Translation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnik, Bodo C.

    2015-01-01

    Based on own translational research of the biochemical and hormonal effects of cow’s milk consumption in humans, this review presents milk as a signaling system of mammalian evolution that activates the nutrient-sensitive kinase mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), the pivotal regulator of translation. Milk, a mammary gland-derived secretory product, is required for species-specific gene-nutrient interactions that promote appropriate growth and development of the newborn mammal. This signaling system is highly conserved and tightly controlled by the lactation genome. Milk is sufficient to activate mTORC1, the crucial regulator of protein, lipid, and nucleotide synthesis orchestrating anabolism, cell growth and proliferation. To fulfill its mTORC1-activating function, milk delivers four key metabolic messengers: (1) essential branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs); (2) glutamine; (3) palmitic acid; and (4) bioactive exosomal microRNAs, which in a synergistical fashion promote mTORC1-dependent translation. In all mammals except Neolithic humans, postnatal activation of mTORC1 by milk intake is restricted to the postnatal lactation period. It is of critical concern that persistent hyperactivation of mTORC1 is associated with aging and the development of age-related disorders such as obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus, cancer, and neurodegenerative diseases. Persistent mTORC1 activation promotes endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and drives an aimless quasi-program, which promotes aging and age-related diseases. PMID:26225961

  16. Key mediators of intracellular amino acids signaling to mTORC1 activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Yehui; Li, Fengna; Tan, Kunrong; Liu, Hongnan; Li, Yinghui; Liu, Yingying; Kong, Xiangfeng; Tang, Yulong; Wu, Guoyao; Yin, Yulong

    2015-05-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is activated by amino acids to promote cell growth via protein synthesis. Specifically, Ras-related guanosine triphosphatases (Rag GTPases) are activated by amino acids, and then translocate mTORC1 to the surface of late endosomes and lysosomes. Ras homolog enriched in brain (Rheb) resides on this surface and directly activates mTORC1. Apart from the presence of intracellular amino acids, Rag GTPases and Rheb, other mediators involved in intracellular amino acid signaling to mTORC1 activation include human vacuolar sorting protein-34 (hVps34) and mitogen-activating protein kinase kinase kinase kinase-3 (MAP4K3). Those molecular links between mTORC1 and its mediators form a complicate signaling network that controls cellular growth, proliferation, and metabolism. Moreover, it is speculated that amino acid signaling to mTORC1 may start from the lysosomal lumen. In this review, we discussed the function of these mediators in mTORC1 pathway and how these mediators are regulated by amino acids in details.

  17. Milk—A Nutrient System of Mammalian Evolution Promoting mTORC1-Dependent Translation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bodo C. Melnik

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Based on own translational research of the biochemical and hormonal effects of cow’s milk consumption in humans, this review presents milk as a signaling system of mammalian evolution that activates the nutrient-sensitive kinase mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1, the pivotal regulator of translation. Milk, a mammary gland-derived secretory product, is required for species-specific gene-nutrient interactions that promote appropriate growth and development of the newborn mammal. This signaling system is highly conserved and tightly controlled by the lactation genome. Milk is sufficient to activate mTORC1, the crucial regulator of protein, lipid, and nucleotide synthesis orchestrating anabolism, cell growth and proliferation. To fulfill its mTORC1-activating function, milk delivers four key metabolic messengers: (1 essential branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs; (2 glutamine; (3 palmitic acid; and (4 bioactive exosomal microRNAs, which in a synergistical fashion promote mTORC1-dependent translation. In all mammals except Neolithic humans, postnatal activation of mTORC1 by milk intake is restricted to the postnatal lactation period. It is of critical concern that persistent hyperactivation of mTORC1 is associated with aging and the development of age-related disorders such as obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus, cancer, and neurodegenerative diseases. Persistent mTORC1 activation promotes endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress and drives an aimless quasi-program, which promotes aging and age-related diseases.

  18. Macrophage mTORC1 disruption reduces inflammation and insulin resistance in obese mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jiang, Hongfeng; Westerterp, Marit; Wang, Chunjiong; Zhu, Yi; Ai, Ding

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory factors secreted by macrophages play an important role in obesity-related insulin resistance. Being at the crossroads of a nutrient-hormonal signalling network, the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) controls important functions in the regulation of energy balance and

  19. Amino Acids Regulate mTORC1 by an Obligate Two-step Mechanism*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyachok, Julia; Earnest, Svetlana; Iturraran, Erica N.; Cobb, Melanie H.

    2016-01-01

    The mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) coordinates cell growth with its nutritional, hormonal, energy, and stress status. Amino acids are critical regulators of mTORC1 that permit other inputs to mTORC1 activity. However, the roles of individual amino acids and their interactions in mTORC1 activation are not well understood. Here we demonstrate that activation of mTORC1 by amino acids includes two discrete and separable steps: priming and activation. Sensitizing mTORC1 activation by priming amino acids is a prerequisite for subsequent stimulation of mTORC1 by activating amino acids. Priming is achieved by a group of amino acids that includes l-asparagine, l-glutamine, l-threonine, l-arginine, l-glycine, l-proline, l-serine, l-alanine, and l-glutamic acid. The group of activating amino acids is dominated by l-leucine but also includes l-methionine, l-isoleucine, and l-valine. l-Cysteine predominantly inhibits priming but not the activating step. Priming and activating steps differ in their requirements for amino acid concentration and duration of treatment. Priming and activating amino acids use mechanisms that are distinct both from each other and from growth factor signaling. Neither step requires intact tuberous sclerosis complex of proteins to activate mTORC1. Concerted action of priming and activating amino acids is required to localize mTORC1 to lysosomes and achieve its activation. PMID:27587390

  20. The mTORC1 inhibitor everolimus prevents and treats Eμ-Myc lymphoma by restoring oncogene-induced senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Meaghan; Poortinga, Gretchen; Stanley, Kym L; Lindemann, Ralph K; Bots, Michael; Chan, Christopher J; Bywater, Megan J; Kinross, Kathryn M; Astle, Megan V; Waldeck, Kelly; Hannan, Katherine M; Shortt, Jake; Smyth, Mark J; Lowe, Scott W; Hannan, Ross D; Pearson, Richard B; Johnstone, Ricky W; McArthur, Grant A

    2013-01-01

    MYC deregulation is common in human cancer. IG-MYC translocations that are modeled in Eμ-Myc mice occur in almost all cases of Burkitt lymphoma as well as in other B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders. Deregulated expression of MYC results in increased mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling. As tumors with mTORC1 activation are sensitive to mTORC1 inhibition, we used everolimus, a potent and specific mTORC1 inhibitor, to test the requirement for mTORC1 in the initiation and maintenance of Eμ-Myc lymphoma. Everolimus selectively cleared premalignant B cells from the bone marrow and spleen, restored a normal pattern of B-cell differentiation, and strongly protected against lymphoma development. Established Eμ-Myc lymphoma also regressed after everolimus therapy. Therapeutic response correlated with a cellular senescence phenotype and induction of p53 activity. Therefore, mTORC1-dependent evasion of senescence is critical for cellular transformation and tumor maintenance by MYC in B lymphocytes. This work provides novel insights into the requirements for MYC-induced oncogenesis by showing that mTORC1 activity is necessary to bypass senescence during transformation of B lymphocytes. Furthermore, tumor eradication through senescence elicited by targeted inhibition of mTORC1 identifies a previously uncharacterized mechanism responsible for significant anticancer activity of rapamycin analogues and serves as proof-of-concept that senescence can be harnessed for therapeutic benefit

  1. mTORC1 promotes proliferation of immature Schwann cells and myelin growth of differentiated Schwann cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milbrandt, Jeffrey

    2017-01-01

    The myelination of axons in peripheral nerves requires precisely coordinated proliferation and differentiation of Schwann cells (SCs). We found that the activity of the mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), a key signaling hub for the regulation of cellular growth and proliferation, is progressively extinguished as SCs differentiate during nerve development. To study the effects of different levels of sustained mTORC1 hyperactivity in the SC lineage, we disrupted negative regulators of mTORC1, including TSC2 or TSC1, in developing SCs of mutant mice. Surprisingly, the phenotypes ranged from arrested myelination in nerve development to focal hypermyelination in adulthood, depending on the level and timing of mTORC1 hyperactivity. For example, mice lacking TSC2 in developing SCs displayed hyperproliferation of undifferentiated SCs incompatible with normal myelination. However, these defects and myelination could be rescued by pharmacological mTORC1 inhibition. The subsequent reconstitution of SC mTORC1 hyperactivity in adult animals resulted in focal hypermyelination. Together our data suggest a model in which high mTORC1 activity promotes proliferation of immature SCs and antagonizes SC differentiation during nerve development. Down-regulation of mTORC1 activity is required for terminal SC differentiation and subsequent initiation of myelination. In distinction to this developmental role, excessive SC mTORC1 activity stimulates myelin growth, even overgrowth, in adulthood. Thus, our work delineates two distinct functions of mTORC1 in the SC lineage essential for proper nerve development and myelination. Moreover, our studies show that SCs retain their plasticity to myelinate and remodel myelin via mTORC1 throughout life. PMID:28484008

  2. Macropinocytosis, mTORC1 and cellular growth control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Sei; Pacitto, Regina; Inoki, Ken; Swanson, Joel

    2017-11-08

    The growth and proliferation of metazoan cells are driven by cellular nutrient status and by extracellular growth factors. Growth factor receptors on cell surfaces initiate biochemical signals that increase anabolic metabolism and macropinocytosis, an actin-dependent endocytic process in which relatively large volumes of extracellular solutes and nutrients are internalized and delivered efficiently into lysosomes. Macropinocytosis is prominent in many kinds of cancer cells, and supports the growth of cells transformed by oncogenic K-Ras. Growth factor receptor signaling and the overall metabolic status of the cell are coordinated in the cytoplasm by the mechanistic target-of-rapamycin complex-1 (mTORC1), which positively regulates protein synthesis and negatively regulates molecular salvage pathways such as autophagy. mTORC1 is activated by two distinct Ras-related small GTPases, Rag and Rheb, which associate with lysosomal membranes inside the cell. Rag recruits mTORC1 to the lysosomal surface where Rheb directly binds to and activates mTORC1. Rag is activated by both lysosomal luminal and cytosolic amino acids; Rheb activation requires phosphoinositide 3-kinase, Akt, and the tuberous sclerosis complex-1/2. Signals for activation of Rag and Rheb converge at the lysosomal membrane, and several lines of evidence support the idea that growth factor-dependent endocytosis facilitates amino acid transfer into the lysosome leading to the activation of Rag. This review summarizes evidence that growth factor-stimulated macropinocytosis is essential for amino acid-dependent activation of mTORC1, and that increased solute accumulation by macropinocytosis in transformed cells supports unchecked cell growth.

  3. Lysosomal Regulation of mTORC1 by Amino Acids in Mammalian Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yao; Jones, Edith; Inoki, Ken

    2017-07-07

    The mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is a master regulator of cell growth in eukaryotic cells. The active mTORC1 promotes cellular anabolic processes including protein, pyrimidine, and lipid biosynthesis, and inhibits catabolic processes such as autophagy. Consistent with its growth-promoting functions, hyper-activation of mTORC1 signaling is one of the important pathomechanisms underlying major human health problems including diabetes, neurodegenerative disorders, and cancer. The mTORC1 receives multiple upstream signals such as an abundance of amino acids and growth factors, thus it regulates a wide range of downstream events relevant to cell growth and proliferation control. The regulation of mTORC1 by amino acids is a fast-evolving field with its detailed mechanisms currently being revealed as the precise picture emerges. In this review, we summarize recent progress with respect to biochemical and biological findings in the regulation of mTORC1 signaling on the lysosomal membrane by amino acids.

  4. STRADalpha deficiency results in aberrant mTORC1 signaling during corticogenesis in humans and mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlova, Ksenia A; Parker, Whitney E; Heuer, Gregory G; Tsai, Victoria; Yoon, Jason; Baybis, Marianna; Fenning, Robert S; Strauss, Kevin; Crino, Peter B

    2010-05-01

    Polyhydramnios, megalencephaly, and symptomatic epilepsy syndrome (PMSE) is a rare human autosomal-recessive disorder characterized by abnormal brain development, cognitive disability, and intractable epilepsy. It is caused by homozygous deletions of STE20-related kinase adaptor alpha (STRADA). The underlying pathogenic mechanisms of PMSE and the role of STRADA in cortical development remain unknown. Here, we found that a human PMSE brain exhibits cytomegaly, neuronal heterotopia, and aberrant activation of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling. STRADalpha normally binds and exports the protein kinase LKB1 out of the nucleus, leading to suppression of the mTORC1 pathway. We found that neurons in human PMSE cortex exhibited abnormal nuclear localization of LKB1. To investigate this further, we modeled PMSE in mouse neural progenitor cells (mNPCs) in vitro and in developing mouse cortex in vivo by knocking down STRADalpha expression. STRADalpha-deficient mNPCs were cytomegalic and showed aberrant rapamycin-dependent activation of mTORC1 in association with abnormal nuclear localization of LKB1. Consistent with the observations in human PMSE brain, knockdown of STRADalpha in vivo resulted in cortical malformation, enhanced mTORC1 activation, and abnormal nuclear localization of LKB1. Thus, we suggest that the aberrant nuclear accumulation of LKB1 caused by STRADalpha deficiency contributes to hyperactivation of mTORC1 signaling and disruption of neuronal lamination during corticogenesis, and thereby the neurological features associated with PMSE.

  5. STRADα deficiency results in aberrant mTORC1 signaling during corticogenesis in humans and mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlova, Ksenia A.; Parker, Whitney E.; Heuer, Gregory G.; Tsai, Victoria; Yoon, Jason; Baybis, Marianna; Fenning, Robert S.; Strauss, Kevin; Crino, Peter B.

    2010-01-01

    Polyhydramnios, megalencephaly, and symptomatic epilepsy syndrome (PMSE) is a rare human autosomal-recessive disorder characterized by abnormal brain development, cognitive disability, and intractable epilepsy. It is caused by homozygous deletions of STE20-related kinase adaptor α (STRADA). The underlying pathogenic mechanisms of PMSE and the role of STRADA in cortical development remain unknown. Here, we found that a human PMSE brain exhibits cytomegaly, neuronal heterotopia, and aberrant activation of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling. STRADα normally binds and exports the protein kinase LKB1 out of the nucleus, leading to suppression of the mTORC1 pathway. We found that neurons in human PMSE cortex exhibited abnormal nuclear localization of LKB1. To investigate this further, we modeled PMSE in mouse neural progenitor cells (mNPCs) in vitro and in developing mouse cortex in vivo by knocking down STRADα expression. STRADα-deficient mNPCs were cytomegalic and showed aberrant rapamycin-dependent activation of mTORC1 in association with abnormal nuclear localization of LKB1. Consistent with the observations in human PMSE brain, knockdown of STRADα in vivo resulted in cortical malformation, enhanced mTORC1 activation, and abnormal nuclear localization of LKB1. Thus, we suggest that the aberrant nuclear accumulation of LKB1 caused by STRADα deficiency contributes to hyperactivation of mTORC1 signaling and disruption of neuronal lamination during corticogenesis, and thereby the neurological features associated with PMSE. PMID:20424326

  6. mTORC1 is a critical mediator of oncogenic Semaphorin3A signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, Daisuke; Kawahara, Kohichi; Maeda, Takehiko, E-mail: maeda@nupals.ac.jp

    2016-08-05

    Aberration of signaling pathways by genetic mutations or alterations in the surrounding tissue environments can result in tumor development or metastasis. However, signaling molecules responsible for these processes have not been completely elucidated. Here, we used mouse Lewis lung carcinoma cells (LLC) to explore the mechanism by which the oncogenic activity of Semaphorin3A (Sema3A) signaling is regulated. Sema3A knockdown by shRNA did not affect apoptosis, but decreased cell proliferation in LLCs; both the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) level and glycolytic activity were also decreased. In addition, Sema3A knockdown sensitized cells to inhibition of oxidative phosphorylation by oligomycin, but conferred resistance to decreased cell viability induced by glucose starvation. Furthermore, recombinant SEMA3A rescued the attenuation of cell proliferation and glycolytic activity in LLCs after Sema3A knockdown, whereas mTORC1 inhibition by rapamycin completely counteracted this effect. These results demonstrate that Sema3A signaling exerts its oncogenic effect by promoting an mTORC1-mediated metabolic shift from oxidative phosphorylation to aerobic glycolysis. -- Highlights: •Sema3A knockdown decreased proliferation of Lewis lung carcinoma cells (LLCs). •Sema3A knockdown decreased mTORC1 levels and glycolytic activity in LLCs. •Sema3A knockdown sensitized cells to inhibition of oxidative phosphorylation. •Sema3A promotes shift from oxidative phosphorylation to aerobic glycolysis via mTORC1.

  7. mTORC1 inhibition delays growth of neurofibromatosis type 2 schwannoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovannini, Marco; Bonne, Nicolas-Xavier; Vitte, Jeremie; Chareyre, Fabrice; Tanaka, Karo; Adams, Rocky; Fisher, Laurel M.; Valeyrie-Allanore, Laurence; Wolkenstein, Pierre; Goutagny, Stephane; Kalamarides, Michel

    2014-01-01

    Background Neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) is a rare autosomal dominant genetic disorder, resulting in a variety of neural tumors, with bilateral vestibular schwannomas as the most frequent manifestation. Recently, merlin, the NF2 tumor suppressor, has been identified as a novel negative regulator of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1); functional loss of merlin was shown to result in elevated mTORC1 signaling in NF2-related tumors. Thus, mTORC1 pathway inhibition may be a useful targeted therapeutic approach. Methods We studied in vitro cell models, cohorts of mice allografted with Nf2−/− Schwann cells, and a genetically modified mouse model of NF2 schwannoma in order to evaluate the efficacy of the proposed targeted therapy for NF2. Results We found that treatment with the mTORC1 inhibitor rapamycin reduced the severity of NF2-related Schwann cell tumorigenesis without significant toxicity. Consistent with these results, in an NF2 patient with growing vestibular schwannomas, the rapalog sirolimus induced tumor growth arrest. Conclusions Taken together, these results constitute definitive evidence that justifies proceeding with clinical trials using mTORC1-targeted agents in selected patients with NF2 and in patients with NF2-related sporadic tumors. PMID:24414536

  8. mTORC1 inhibition delays growth of neurofibromatosis type 2 schwannoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovannini, Marco; Bonne, Nicolas-Xavier; Vitte, Jeremie; Chareyre, Fabrice; Tanaka, Karo; Adams, Rocky; Fisher, Laurel M; Valeyrie-Allanore, Laurence; Wolkenstein, Pierre; Goutagny, Stephane; Kalamarides, Michel

    2014-04-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) is a rare autosomal dominant genetic disorder, resulting in a variety of neural tumors, with bilateral vestibular schwannomas as the most frequent manifestation. Recently, merlin, the NF2 tumor suppressor, has been identified as a novel negative regulator of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1); functional loss of merlin was shown to result in elevated mTORC1 signaling in NF2-related tumors. Thus, mTORC1 pathway inhibition may be a useful targeted therapeutic approach. We studied in vitro cell models, cohorts of mice allografted with Nf2(-/-) Schwann cells, and a genetically modified mouse model of NF2 schwannoma in order to evaluate the efficacy of the proposed targeted therapy for NF2. We found that treatment with the mTORC1 inhibitor rapamycin reduced the severity of NF2-related Schwann cell tumorigenesis without significant toxicity. Consistent with these results, in an NF2 patient with growing vestibular schwannomas, the rapalog sirolimus induced tumor growth arrest. Taken together, these results constitute definitive evidence that justifies proceeding with clinical trials using mTORC1-targeted agents in selected patients with NF2 and in patients with NF2-related sporadic tumors.

  9. CXCL12-induced macropinocytosis modulates two distinct pathways to activate mTORC1 in macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacitto, Regina; Gaeta, Isabella; Swanson, Joel A; Yoshida, Sei

    2017-03-01

    Although growth factors and chemokines elicit different overall effects on cells-growth and chemotaxis, respectively-and activate distinct classes of cell-surface receptors, nonetheless, they trigger similar cellular activities and signaling pathways. The growth factor M-CSF and the chemokine CXCL12 both stimulate the endocytic process of macropinocytosis, and both activate the mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), a protein complex that regulates cell metabolism. Recent studies of signaling by M-CSF in macrophages identified a role for macropinocytosis in the activation of mTORC1, in which delivery of extracellular amino acids into lysosomes via macropinocytosis was required for activation of mTORC1. Here, we analyzed the regulation of macropinosome (MP) formation in response to CXCL12 and identified 2 roles for macropinocytosis in the activation of mTORC1. Within 5 min of adding CXCL12, murine macrophages increased ruffling, macropinocytosis and amino acid-dependent activation of mTORC1. Inhibitors of macropinocytosis blocked activation of mTORC1, and various isoform-specific inhibitors of type 1 PI3K and protein kinase C (PKC) showed similar patterns of inhibition of macropinocytosis and mTORC1 activity. However, unlike the response to M-CSF, Akt phosphorylation (pAkt) in response to CXCL12 required the actin cytoskeleton and the formation of macropinocytic cups. Quantitative fluorescence microscopy showed that phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-trisphosphate (PIP 3 ), a product of PI3K and an upstream activator of Akt, localized to macropinocytic cups and that pAkt occurred primarily in cups. These results indicate that CXCL12 activates mTORC1 via 2 mechanisms: 1) that the macropinocytic cup localizes Akt signaling and 2) that MPs convey extracellular nutrients to lysosomes. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  10. PDMP, a ceramide analogue, acts as an inhibitor of mTORC1 by inducing its translocation from lysosome to endoplasmic reticulum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ode, Takashi [Department of Periodontology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU), 1-5-45 Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8510 (Japan); Research Fellow of the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS), 5-3-1 Kojimachi, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-0083 (Japan); Podyma-Inoue, Katarzyna A.; Terasawa, Kazue [Department of Biochemistry, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU), 1-5-45 Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8510 (Japan); Inokuchi, Jin-ichi [Division of Glycopathology, Institute of Molecular Biomembrane and Glycobiology, Tohoku Medical and Pharmaceutical University, 4-4-1, Komatsushima, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 981-8558 (Japan); Kobayashi, Toshihide [Lipid Biology Laboratory, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); CNRS, UMR 7213, University of Strasbourg, 67401 Illkirch (France); Watabe, Tetsuro [Department of Biochemistry, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU), 1-5-45 Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8510 (Japan); Izumi, Yuichi [Department of Periodontology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU), 1-5-45 Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8510 (Japan); Hara-Yokoyama, Miki, E-mail: m.yokoyama.bch@tmd.ac.jp [Department of Biochemistry, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU), 1-5-45 Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8510 (Japan)

    2017-01-01

    Mammalian or mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is a master regulator of cell growth, metabolism, and cell differentiation. Recent studies have revealed that the recruitment of mTORC1 to lysosomes is essential for its activation. The ceramide analogue 1-phenyl-2-decanoylamino-3-morpholino-1-propanol (PDMP), a well known glycosphingolipid synthesis inhibitor, also affects the structures and functions of various organelles, including lysosomes and endoplasmic reticulum (ER). We investigated whether PDMP regulates the mTORC1 activity through its effects on organellar behavior. PDMP induced the translocation of mTORC1 from late endosomes/lysosomes, leading to the dissociation of mTORC1 from its activator Rheb in MC3T3-E1 cells. Surprisingly, we found mTORC1 translocation to the ER upon PDMP treatment. This effect of PDMP was independent of its action as the inhibitor, since two stereoisomers of PDMP, with and without the inhibitor activity, showed essentially the same effect. We confirmed that PDMP inhibits the mTORC1 activity based on the decrease in the phosphorylation of ribosomal S6 kinase, a downstream target of mTORC1, and the increase in LC3 puncta, reflecting autophagosome formation. Furthermore, PDMP inhibited the mTORC1-dependent osteoblastic cell proliferation and differentiation of MC3T3-E1 cells. Accordingly, the present results reveal a novel mechanism of PDMP, which inhibits the mTORC1 activity by inducing the translocation of mTOR from lysosomes to the ER. - Highlights: • The ceramide analogue, PDMP, suppressed the activation of mTORC1. • PDMP induced the translocation of mTOR from lysosomes to ER. • PDMP led to the dissociation of mTOR from its activator Rheb. • PDMP inhibited the mTORC1-dependent osteoblastic cell proliferation.

  11. Fertilization-induced autophagy in mouse embryos is independent of mTORC1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Atsushi; Mizushima, Noboru; Tsukamoto, Satoshi

    2014-07-01

    Autophagy is a dynamically regulated intracellular degradation system that is important for cellular processes such as amino acid production during starvation and intracellular quality control. Previously, we reported that autophagy is suppressed in oocytes but is rapidly up-regulated after fertilization. During this period, autophagy is thought to be important for the generation of amino acids from the bulk degradation of maternal proteins that have accumulated during oogenesis. However, the mechanism of autophagy induction after fertilization is presently unknown. In most cell types, autophagy is negatively controlled by mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), which is typically regulated by amino acids and insulin or related growth factors. In this study, we determined the role of mTORC1 in fertilization-induced autophagy. On the basis of the phosphorylation status of mTORC1 substrates, we found that mTORC1 activity was relatively high in metaphase II (MII) oocytes but was rapidly decreased within 3 h of fertilization. However, chemical inhibition of mTORC1 by Torin1 or PP242 in MII oocytes or fertilized embryos did not induce autophagy. In addition, activation of mTORC1 by cycloheximide did not inhibit fertilization-induced autophagy in fertilized embryos. By contrast, the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitors wortmannin and LY294002 effectively suppressed autophagy in these embryos. These data suggest that, even though autophagy induction and postfertilization mTORC1 activity are inversely correlated with each other, as observed in other cell types, mTORC1 suppression is neither essential nor sufficient for fertilization-induced autophagy, highlighting a unique feature of the regulation mechanism of autophagy-mediated intracellular turnover in early embryos. © 2014 by the Society for the Study of Reproduction, Inc.

  12. Mesangial Cell Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Complex 1 Activation Results in Mesangial Expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Kojiro; Tominaga, Tatsuya; Ueda, Sayo; Shibata, Eriko; Tamaki, Masanori; Matsuura, Motokazu; Kishi, Seiji; Murakami, Taichi; Moriya, Tatsumi; Abe, Hideharu; Doi, Toshio

    2017-10-01

    Human glomerular diseases can be caused by several different diseases, many of which include mesangial expansion and/or proliferation followed by glomerulosclerosis. However, molecular mechanisms underlying the pathologic mesangial changes remain poorly understood. Here, we investigated the role of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1)-S6 kinase pathway in mesangial expansion and/or proliferation by ablating an upstream negative regulator, tuberous sclerosis complex 1 (TSC1), using tamoxifen-induced Foxd1-Cre mice [Foxd1ER(+) TSC1 mice]. Foxd1ER(+) TSC1 mice showed mesangial expansion with increased production of collagen IV, collagen I, and α-smooth muscle actin in glomeruli, but did not exhibit significant mesangial proliferation or albuminuria. Furthermore, rapamycin treatment of Foxd1ER(+) TSC1 mice suppressed mesangial expansion. Among biopsy specimens from patients with glomerular diseases, analysis of phosphorylated ribosomal protein S6 revealed mesangial cell mTORC1 activation in IgA nephropathy and in lupus mesangial proliferative nephritis but not in the early phase of diabetic nephropathy. In summary, mesangial cell mTORC1 activation can cause mesangial expansion and has clinical relevance for human glomerular diseases. This report also confirms that the tamoxifen-induced mesangium-specific Cre-loxP system is useful for studies designed to clarify the role of the mesangium in glomerular diseases in adults. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  13. mTORC1 inhibition induces pain via IRS-1-dependent feedback activation of ERK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melemedjian, Ohannes K; Khoutorsky, Arkady; Sorge, Robert E; Yan, Jin; Asiedu, Marina N; Valdez, Arely; Ghosh, Sourav; Dussor, Gregory; Mogil, Jeffrey S; Sonenberg, Nahum; Price, Theodore J

    2013-07-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) inhibitors are extensively used as immunosuppressants to prevent transplant rejection and in treatment of certain cancers. In patients, chronic treatment with rapamycin or its analogues (rapalogues) has been reported to lead to sensory hypersensitivity and pain conditions via an unknown mechanism. Here, we show that pharmacological or genetic inhibition of mTORC1 activates the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway in sensory neurons via suppression of S6K1 to insulin receptor substrate 1 negative feedback loop. As a result, increased ERK activity induces sensory neuron sensitization, mechanical hypersensitivity, and spontaneous pain. The clinically available adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase activator, metformin, which is an antidiabetic drug, prevents rapamycin-induced ERK activation and the development of mechanical hypersensitivity and spontaneous pain. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that activation of the ERK pathway in sensory neurons as a consequence of mTORC1 inhibition leads to the development of pain. Importantly, this effect is abolished by co-treatment with metformin, thus providing a potential treatment option for rapalogue-evoked pain. Our findings highlight the physiological relevance of feedback signaling through mTORC1 inhibition and have important implications for development of pain therapeutics that target the mTOR pathway. Copyright © 2013 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Genetic and pharmacologic evidence that mTOR targeting outweighs mTORC1 inhibition as an antimyeloma strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xi; Díaz-Rodríguez, Elena; Ocio, Enrique M; Paiva, Bruno; Mortensen, Deborah S; Lopez-Girona, Antonia; Chopra, Rajesh; Miguel, Jesús San; Pandiella, Atanasio

    2014-02-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a serine/threonine kinase that regulates cell growth, proliferation, metabolism, and cell survival, and plays those roles by forming two functionally distinct multiprotein complexes: mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) and mTOR complex 2 (mTORC2). Deregulation of the mTOR pathway has been found in different cancers, including multiple myeloma. Agents acting on mTORC1, such as rapamycin and derivatives, are being explored as antitumoral strategies. However, whether targeting mTOR would be a more effective antimyeloma strategy than exclusively acting on the mTORC1 branch remains to be established. In this report, we explored the activation status of mTOR routes in malignant plasma cells, and analyzed the contribution of mTOR and its two signaling branches to the proliferation of myeloma cells. Gene expression profiling demonstrated deregulation of mTOR pathway-related genes in myeloma plasma cells from patients. Activation of the mTOR pathway in myelomatous plasma cells was corroborated by flow cytometric analyses. RNA interference (RNAi) experiments indicated that mTORC1 predominated over mTORC2 in the control of myeloma cell proliferation. However, mTOR knockdown had a superior antiproliferative effect than acting only on mTORC1 or mTORC2. Pharmacologic studies corroborated that the neutralization of mTOR has a stronger antimyeloma effect than the individual inhibition of mTORC1 or mTORC2. Together, our data support the clinical development of agents that widely target mTOR, instead of agents, such as rapamycin or its derivatives, that solely act on mTORC1.

  15. mTORC1-Induced HK1-Dependent Glycolysis Regulates NLRP3 Inflammasome Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong-Seok Moon

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1 regulates activation of immune cells and cellular energy metabolism. Although glycolysis has been linked to immune functions, the mechanisms by which glycolysis regulates NLRP3 inflammasome activation remain unclear. Here, we demonstrate that mTORC1-induced glycolysis provides an essential mechanism for NLRP3 inflammasome activation. Moreover, we demonstrate that hexokinase 1 (HK1-dependent glycolysis, under the regulation of mTORC1, represents a critical metabolic pathway for NLRP3 inflammasome activation. Downregulation of glycolysis by inhibition of Raptor/mTORC1 or HK1 suppressed both pro-IL-1β maturation and caspase-1 activation in macrophages in response to LPS and ATP. These results suggest that upregulation of HK1-dependent glycolysis by mTORC1 regulates NLRP3 inflammasome activation.

  16. mTORC1 and the regulation of skeletal muscle anabolism and mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adegoke, Olasunkanmi A J; Abdullahi, Abdikarim; Tavajohi-Fini, Pegah

    2012-06-01

    The mass and integrity of skeletal muscle is vital to whole-body substrate metabolism and health. Indeed, defects in muscle metabolism and functions underlie or exacerbate diseases like diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, and cancer. Physical activity and nutrition are the 2 most important environmental factors that can affect muscle health. At the molecular level, the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is a critical signalling complex that regulates muscle mass. In response to nutrition and resistance exercise, increased muscle mass and activation of mTORC1 occur in parallel. In this review, we summarize recent findings on mTORC1 and its regulation in skeletal muscle in response to resistance exercise, alone or in combination with intake of protein or amino acids. Because increased activity of the complex is implicated in the development of muscle insulin resistance, obesity, and some cancers (e.g., ovarian, breast), drugs that target mTORC1 are being developed or are in clinical trials. However, various cancers are associated with extensive muscle wasting, due in part to tumour burden and malnutrition. This muscle wasting may also be a side effect of anticancer drugs. Because loss of muscle mass is associated not only with metabolic abnormalities but also dose limiting toxicity, we review the possible implications for skeletal muscle of long-term inhibition of mTORC1, especially in muscle wasting conditions.

  17. Testosterone induces cardiomyocyte hypertrophy through mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altamirano, Francisco; Oyarce, César; Silva, Patricio; Toyos, Marcela; Wilson, Carlos; Lavandero, Sergio; Uhlén, Per; Estrada, Manuel

    2009-08-01

    Elevated testosterone concentrations induce cardiac hypertrophy but the molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. Anabolic properties of testosterone involve an increase in protein synthesis. The mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) pathway is a major regulator of cell growth, but the relationship between testosterone action and mTORC1 in cardiac cells remains unknown. Here, we investigated whether the hypertrophic effects of testosterone are mediated by mTORC1 signaling in cultured cardiomyocytes. Testosterone increases the phosphorylation of mTOR and its downstream targets 40S ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1 (S6K1; also known as RPS6KB1) and eukaryotic initiation factor 4E-binding protein 1 (4E-BP1). The S6K1 phosphorylation induced by testosterone was blocked by rapamycin and small interfering RNA to mTOR. Moreover, the hormone increased both extracellular-regulated kinase (ERK1/2) and protein kinase B (Akt) phosphorylation. ERK1/2 inhibitor PD98059 blocked the testosterone-induced S6K1 phosphorylation, whereas Akt inhibition (Akt-inhibitor-X) had no effect. Testosterone-induced ERK1/2 and S6K1 phosphorylation increases were blocked by either 1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N,N-tetraacetic acid-acetoxymethylester or by inhibitors of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP(3)) pathway: U-73122 and 2-aminoethyl diphenylborate. Finally, cardiomyocyte hypertrophy was evaluated by, the expression of beta-myosin heavy chain, alpha-skeletal actin, cell size, and amino acid incorporation. Testosterone increased all four parameters and the increase being blocked by mTOR inhibition. Our findings suggest that testosterone activates the mTORC1/S6K1 axis through IP(3)/Ca(2+) and MEK/ERK1/2 to induce cardiomyocyte hypertrophy.

  18. mTORC1 Signaling: A Double-Edged Sword in Diabetic β Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardestani, Amin; Lupse, Blaz; Kido, Yoshiaki; Leibowitz, Gil; Maedler, Kathrin

    2017-12-20

    The mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is a central regulator of metabolic and nutrient cues that integrates environmental inputs into downstream signaling pathways to control cellular metabolism, growth, and survival. While numerous in vitro and in vivo studies reported the positive functions of mTORC1 in the regulation of β cell survival and proliferation under physiological conditions, more recent work demonstrates the opposite in the long term; this is exemplified by the constitutive inappropriate hyper-activation of mTORC1 in diabetic islets or β cells under conditions of increased β cell stress and metabolic demands. These recent findings uncover mTORC1's importance as an emerging significant player in the development and progression of β cell failure in type 2 diabetes and suggest that mTORC1 may act as a "double edge sword" in the regulation of β cell mass and function in response to metabolic stress such as nutrient overload and insulin resistance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Growth factor signaling to mTORC1 by amino acid–laden macropinosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Sei; Pacitto, Regina; Yao, Yao; Inoki, Ken

    2015-01-01

    The rapid activation of the mechanistic target of rapamycin complex-1 (mTORC1) by growth factors is increased by extracellular amino acids through yet-undefined mechanisms of amino acid transfer into endolysosomes. Because the endocytic process of macropinocytosis concentrates extracellular solutes into endolysosomes and is increased in cells stimulated by growth factors or tumor-promoting phorbol esters, we analyzed its role in amino acid–dependent activation of mTORC1. Here, we show that growth factor-dependent activation of mTORC1 by amino acids, but not glucose, requires macropinocytosis. In murine bone marrow–derived macrophages and murine embryonic fibroblasts stimulated with their cognate growth factors or with phorbol myristate acetate, activation of mTORC1 required an Akt-independent vesicular pathway of amino acid delivery into endolysosomes, mediated by the actin cytoskeleton. Macropinocytosis delivered small, fluorescent fluid-phase solutes into endolysosomes sufficiently fast to explain growth factor–mediated signaling by amino acids. Therefore, the amino acid–laden macropinosome is an essential and discrete unit of growth factor receptor signaling to mTORC1. PMID:26438830

  20. Nutritional and contractile regulation of human skeletal muscle protein synthesis and mTORC1 signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Drummond, Micah J.; Dreyer, Hans C.; Fry, Christopher S.; Glynn, Erin L.; Rasmussen, Blake B

    2009-01-01

    In this review we discuss current findings in the human skeletal muscle literature describing the acute influence of nutrients (leucine-enriched essential amino acids in particular) and resistance exercise on muscle protein synthesis and mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling. We show that essential amino acids and an acute bout of resistance exercise independently stimulate human skeletal muscle protein synthesis. It also appears that ingestion of essential amino acids fo...

  1. Inhibition of Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Complex 1 Attenuates Salt-Induced Hypertension and Kidney Injury in Dahl Salt-Sensitive Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Vikash; Wollner, Clayton; Kurth, Theresa; Bukowy, John D; Cowley, Allen W

    2017-10-01

    The goal of the present study was to explore the protective effects of mTORC1 (mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1) inhibition by rapamycin on salt-induced hypertension and kidney injury in Dahl salt-sensitive (SS) rats. We have previously demonstrated that H 2 O 2 is elevated in the kidneys of SS rats. The present study showed a significant upregulation of renal mTORC1 activity in the SS rats fed a 4.0% NaCl for 3 days. In addition, renal interstitial infusion of H 2 O 2 into salt-resistant Sprague Dawley rats for 3 days was also found to stimulate mTORC1 activity independent of a rise of arterial blood pressure. Together, these data indicate that the salt-induced increases of renal H 2 O 2 in SS rats activated the mTORC1 pathway. Daily administration of rapamycin (IP, 1.5 mg/kg per day) for 21 days reduced salt-induced hypertension from 176.0±9.0 to 153.0±12.0 mm Hg in SS rats but had no effect on blood pressure salt sensitivity in Sprague Dawley treated rats. Compared with vehicle, rapamycin reduced albumin excretion rate in SS rats from 190.0±35.0 to 37.0±5.0 mg/d and reduced the renal infiltration of T lymphocytes (CD3 + ) and macrophages (ED1 + ) in the cortex and medulla. Renal hypertrophy and cell proliferation were also reduced in rapamycin-treated SS rats. We conclude that enhancement of intrarenal H 2 O 2 with a 4.0% NaCl diet stimulates the mTORC1 pathway that is necessary for the full development of the salt-induced hypertension and kidney injury in the SS rat. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  2. mTORC1-mediated cell proliferation, but not cell growth, controlled by the 4E-BPs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowling, Ryan J O; Topisirovic, Ivan; Alain, Tommy; Bidinosti, Michael; Fonseca, Bruno D; Petroulakis, Emmanuel; Wang, Xiaoshan; Larsson, Ola; Selvaraj, Anand; Liu, Yi; Kozma, Sara C; Thomas, George; Sonenberg, Nahum

    2010-05-28

    The mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) integrates mitogen and nutrient signals to control cell proliferation and cell size. Hence, mTORC1 is implicated in a large number of human diseases--including diabetes, obesity, heart disease, and cancer--that are characterized by aberrant cell growth and proliferation. Although eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E-binding proteins (4E-BPs) are critical mediators of mTORC1 function, their precise contribution to mTORC1 signaling and the mechanisms by which they mediate mTORC1 function have remained unclear. We inhibited the mTORC1 pathway in cells lacking 4E-BPs and analyzed the effects on cell size, cell proliferation, and cell cycle progression. Although the 4E-BPs had no effect on cell size, they inhibited cell proliferation by selectively inhibiting the translation of messenger RNAs that encode proliferation-promoting proteins and proteins involved in cell cycle progression. Thus, control of cell size and cell cycle progression appear to be independent in mammalian cells, whereas in lower eukaryotes, 4E-BPs influence both cell growth and proliferation.

  3. Regulation of mTORC1 by growth factors, energy status, amino acids and mechanical stimuli at a glance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The mechanistic/mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) plays a pivotal role in the regulation of skeletal muscle protein synthesis. Activation of the complex leads to phosphorylation of two important sets of substrates, namely eIF4E binding proteins and ribosomal S6 kinases. Phosphorylation of these substrates then leads to an increase in protein synthesis, mainly by enhancing translation initiation. mTORC1 activity is regulated by several inputs, such as growth factors, energy status, amino acids and mechanical stimuli. Research in this field is rapidly evolving and unraveling how these inputs regulate the complex. Therefore this review attempts to provide a brief and up-to-date narrative on the regulation of this marvelous protein complex. Additionally, some sports supplements which have been shown to regulate mTORC1 activity are discussed.

  4. mTORC1-S6K1 inhibition or mTORC2 activation improves hippocampal synaptic plasticity and learning in Angelman syndrome mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jiandong; Liu, Yan; Tran, Jennifer; O'Neal, Patrick; Baudry, Michel; Bi, Xiaoning

    2016-11-01

    Emerging evidence is implicating abnormal activation of the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway in several monogenetic neuropsychiatric disorders, including Angelman syndrome (AS), which is caused by deficiency in maternally inherited UBE3A. Using an AS mouse model, we show that semi-chronic rapamycin treatment improves long-term potentiation (LTP) and actin polymerization in hippocampal slices, spine morphology, and fear-conditioning learning. Activity of mTORC1 and of its downstream substrate, S6K1, was increased in hippocampus of AS mice. However, mTORC2 activity, as reflected by PKCα levels, was decreased. Both increased mTORC1 and decreased mTORC2 activities were reversed by semi-chronic rapamycin treatment. Acute treatment of hippocampal slices from AS mice with rapamycin or an S6K1 inhibitor, PF4708671, improved LTP, restored actin polymerization, and normalized mTORC1 and mTORC2 activity. These treatments also reduced Arc levels in AS mice. Treatment with Torin 1, an inhibitor of both mTORC1 and mTORC2, partially rescued LTP and actin polymerization in hippocampal slices from AS mice, while partially impairing them in wild-type (WT) mice. Torin 1 decreased mTORC1 and increased mTORC2 activity in slices from AS mice but inhibited both mTORC1 and mTORC2 in WT mice. Finally, an mTORC2 activator, A-443654, increased hippocampal LTP in AS mice and actin polymerization in both WT and AS mice. Collectively, these results indicate that events set in motion by increased mTORC1 and decreased mTORC2 activities, including increased Arc translation and impaired actin remodeling, are crucial in AS pathogenesis. Therefore, selectively targeting these two master kinase complexes may provide new therapeutic approaches for AS treatment.

  5. Mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 signalling is essential for germinal centre reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bingshou; Li, Zhirong; Wang, Pengcheng; Huang, Qizhao; Xu, Lifan; He, Ran; Ye, Lilin; Bai, Qiang

    2017-10-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a serine-threonine kinase that has been shown to be essential for the differentiation and function of various immune cells. Earlier in vitro studies showed that mTOR signalling regulates B-cell biology by supporting their activation and proliferation. However, how mTOR signalling temporally regulates in vivo germinal centre B (GCB) cell development and differentiation into short-lived plasma cells, long-lived plasma cells and memory cells is still not well understood. In this study, we used a combined conditional/inducible knock-out system to investigate the temporal regulation of mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) in the GCB cell response to acute lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infection by deleting Raptor, a main component of mTORC1, specifically in B cells in pre- and late GC phase. Early Raptor deficiency strongly inhibited GCB cell proliferation and differentiation and plasma cell differentiation. Nevertheless, late GC Raptor deficiency caused only decreases in the size of memory B cells and long-lived plasma cells through poor maintenance of GCB cells, but it did not change their differentiation. Collectively, our data revealed that mTORC1 signalling supports GCB cell responses at both early and late GC phases during viral infection but does not regulate GCB cell differentiation into memory B cells and plasma cells at the late GC stage. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. mTORC1 in the Paneth cell niche couples intestinal stem-cell function to calorie intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Ömer H; Katajisto, Pekka; Lamming, Dudley W; Gültekin, Yetis; Bauer-Rowe, Khristian E; Sengupta, Shomit; Birsoy, Kivanc; Dursun, Abdulmetin; Yilmaz, V Onur; Selig, Martin; Nielsen, G Petur; Mino-Kenudson, Mari; Zukerberg, Lawrence R; Bhan, Atul K; Deshpande, Vikram; Sabatini, David M

    2012-06-28

    How adult tissue stem and niche cells respond to the nutritional state of an organism is not well understood. Here we find that Paneth cells, a key constituent of the mammalian intestinal stem-cell (ISC) niche, augment stem-cell function in response to calorie restriction. Calorie restriction acts by reducing mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signalling in Paneth cells, and the ISC-enhancing effects of calorie restriction can be mimicked by rapamycin. Calorie intake regulates mTORC1 in Paneth cells, but not ISCs, and forced activation of mTORC1 in Paneth cells during calorie restriction abolishes the ISC-augmenting effects of the niche. Finally, increased expression of bone stromal antigen 1 (Bst1) in Paneth cells—an ectoenzyme that produces the paracrine factor cyclic ADP ribose—mediates the effects of calorie restriction and rapamycin on ISC function. Our findings establish that mTORC1 non-cell-autonomously regulates stem-cell self-renewal, and highlight a significant role of the mammalian intestinal niche in coupling stem-cell function to organismal physiology.

  7. Methionine Regulates mTORC1 via the T1R1/T1R3-PLC?-Ca2+-ERK1/2 Signal Transduction Process in C2C12 Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Yuanfei Zhou; Jiao Ren; Tongxing Song; Jian Peng; Hongkui Wei

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) integrates amino acid (AA) availability to support protein synthesis and cell growth. Taste receptor type 1 member (T1R) is a G protein-coupled receptor that functions as a direct sensor of extracellular AA availability to regulate mTORC1 through Ca2+ stimulation and extracellular signal–regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) activation. However, the roles of specific AAs in T1R1/T1R3-regulated mTORC1 are poorly defined. In this study, T1R1 and...

  8. Mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 and FoxO1 in the transcriptional control of lipolysis and de novo lipogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandror, Konstantin V

    2017-10-01

    Postprandial suppression of lipolysis in adipose tissue and stimulation of de novo lipogenesis (DNL) in the liver by insulin are essential for the metabolic homeostasis in the mammalian organism. The mechanism of coregulation of lipolysis and DNL is not clear. Insulin controls both lipolysis and DNL at the level of transcription via the same mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) and FoxO1-mediated signaling pathways. mTORC1 suppresses lipolysis in adipose tissue and activates DNL in the liver, whereas FoxO1 has the opposite effect. Individual inputs of either mTORC1 or FoxO1 in the regulation of lipid metabolism may be difficult to evaluate because of the cross talk between these pathways.

  9. mTOR Ser-2481 autophosphorylation monitors mTORC-specific catalytic activity and clarifies rapamycin mechanism of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soliman, Ghada A; Acosta-Jaquez, Hugo A; Dunlop, Elaine A; Ekim, Bilgen; Maj, Nicole E; Tee, Andrew R; Fingar, Diane C

    2010-03-12

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) Ser/Thr kinase signals in at least two multiprotein complexes distinguished by their different partners and sensitivities to rapamycin. Acute rapamycin inhibits signaling by mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) but not mTOR complex 2 (mTORC2), which both promote cell growth, proliferation, and survival. Although mTORC2 regulation remains poorly defined, diverse cellular mitogens activate mTORC1 signaling in a manner that requires sufficient levels of amino acids and cellular energy. Before the identification of distinct mTOR complexes, mTOR was reported to autophosphorylate on Ser-2481 in vivo in a rapamycin- and amino acid-insensitive manner. These results suggested that modulation of mTOR intrinsic catalytic activity does not universally underlie mTOR regulation. Here we re-examine the regulation of mTOR Ser-2481 autophosphorylation (Ser(P)-2481) in vivo by studying mTORC-specific Ser(P)-2481 in mTORC1 and mTORC2, with a primary focus on mTORC1. In contrast to previous work, we find that acute rapamycin and amino acid withdrawal markedly attenuate mTORC1-associated mTOR Ser(P)-2481 in cycling cells. Although insulin stimulates both mTORC1- and mTORC2-associated mTOR Ser(P)-2481 in a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-dependent manner, rapamycin acutely inhibits insulin-stimulated mTOR Ser(P)-2481 in mTORC1 but not mTORC2. By interrogating diverse mTORC1 regulatory input, we find that without exception mTORC1-activating signals promote, whereas mTORC1-inhibitory signals decrease mTORC1-associated mTOR Ser(P)-2481. These data suggest that mTORC1- and likely mTORC2-associated mTOR Ser-2481 autophosphorylation directly monitors intrinsic mTORC-specific catalytic activity and reveal that rapamycin inhibits mTORC1 signaling in vivo by reducing mTORC1 catalytic activity.

  10. GSK3-mediated raptor phosphorylation supports amino-acid-dependent mTORC1-directed signalling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stretton, Clare; Hoffmann, Thorsten M.; Munson, Michael J.; Prescott, Alan; Taylor, Peter M.; Ganley, Ian G.; Hundal, Harinder S.

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian or mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) complex 1 (mTORC1) is a ubiquitously expressed multimeric protein kinase complex that integrates nutrient and growth factor signals for the co-ordinated regulation of cellular metabolism and cell growth. Herein, we demonstrate that suppressing the cellular activity of glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3), by use of pharmacological inhibitors or shRNA-mediated gene silencing, results in substantial reduction in amino acid (AA)-regulated mTORC1-directed signalling, as assessed by phosphorylation of multiple downstream mTORC1 targets. We show that GSK3 regulates mTORC1 activity through its ability to phosphorylate the mTOR-associated scaffold protein raptor (regulatory-associated protein of mTOR) on Ser859. We further demonstrate that either GSK3 inhibition or expression of a S859A mutated raptor leads to reduced interaction between mTOR and raptor and under these circumstances, irrespective of AA availability, there is a consequential loss in phosphorylation of mTOR substrates, such as p70S6K1 (ribosomal S6 kinase 1) and uncoordinated-51-like kinase (ULK1), which results in increased autophagic flux and reduced cellular proliferation. PMID:26348909

  11. The lysosomal v-ATPase-Ragulator complex is a common activator for AMPK and mTORC1, acting as a switch between catabolism and anabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chen-Song; Jiang, Bin; Li, Mengqi; Zhu, Mingjiang; Peng, Yongying; Zhang, Ya-Lin; Wu, Yu-Qing; Li, Terytty Yang; Liang, Yu; Lu, Zailian; Lian, Guili; Liu, Qing; Guo, Huiling; Yin, Zhenyu; Ye, Zhiyun; Han, Jiahuai; Wu, Jia-Wei; Yin, Huiyong; Lin, Shu-Yong; Lin, Sheng-Cai

    2014-09-02

    AMPK and mTOR play principal roles in governing metabolic programs; however, mechanisms underlying the coordination of the two inversely regulated kinases remain unclear. In this study we found, most surprisingly, that the late endosomal/lysosomal protein complex v-ATPase-Ragulator, essential for activation of mTORC1, is also required for AMPK activation. We also uncovered that AMPK is a residential protein of late endosome/lysosome. Under glucose starvation, the v-ATPase-Ragulator complex is accessible to AXIN/LKB1 for AMPK activation. Concurrently, the guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) activity of Ragulator toward RAG is inhibited by AXIN, causing dissociation from endosome and inactivation of mTORC1. We have thus revealed that the v-ATPase-Ragulator complex is also an initiating sensor for energy stress and meanwhile serves as an endosomal docking site for LKB1-mediated AMPK activation by forming the v-ATPase-Ragulator-AXIN/LKB1-AMPK complex, thereby providing a switch between catabolism and anabolism. Our current study also emphasizes a general role of late endosome/lysosome in controlling metabolic programs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Germinal Center Selection and Affinity Maturation Require Dynamic Regulation of mTORC1 Kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ersching, Jonatan; Efeyan, Alejo; Mesin, Luka; Jacobsen, Johanne T; Pasqual, Giulia; Grabiner, Brian C; Dominguez-Sola, David; Sabatini, David M; Victora, Gabriel D

    2017-06-20

    During antibody affinity maturation, germinal center (GC) B cells cycle between affinity-driven selection in the light zone (LZ) and proliferation and somatic hypermutation in the dark zone (DZ). Although selection of GC B cells is triggered by antigen-dependent signals delivered in the LZ, DZ proliferation occurs in the absence of such signals. We show that positive selection triggered by T cell help activates the mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), which promotes the anabolic program that supports DZ proliferation. Blocking mTORC1 prior to growth prevented clonal expansion, whereas blockade after cells reached peak size had little to no effect. Conversely, constitutively active mTORC1 led to DZ enrichment but loss of competitiveness and impaired affinity maturation. Thus, mTORC1 activation is required for fueling B cells prior to DZ proliferation rather than for allowing cell-cycle progression itself and must be regulated dynamically during cyclic re-entry to ensure efficient affinity-based selection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Selective Activation of mTORC1 Signaling Recapitulates Microcephaly, Tuberous Sclerosis, and Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidetoshi Kassai

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR has been implicated in human neurological diseases such as tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC, neurodegeneration, and autism. However, little is known about when and how mTOR is involved in the pathogenesis of these diseases, due to a lack of animal models that directly increase mTOR activity. Here, we generated transgenic mice expressing a gain-of-function mutant of mTOR in the forebrain in a temporally controlled manner. Selective activation of mTORC1 in embryonic stages induced cortical atrophy caused by prominent apoptosis of neuronal progenitors, associated with upregulation of HIF-1α. In striking contrast, activation of the mTORC1 pathway in adulthood resulted in cortical hypertrophy with fatal epileptic seizures, recapitulating human TSC. Activated mTORC1 in the adult cortex also promoted rapid accumulation of cytoplasmic inclusions and activation of microglial cells, indicative of progressive neurodegeneration. Our findings demonstrate that mTORC1 plays different roles in developmental and adult stages and contributes to human neurological diseases.

  14. Computational analysis of an autophagy/translation switch based on mutual inhibition of MTORC1 and ULK1.

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    Paulina Szymańska

    Full Text Available We constructed a mechanistic, computational model for regulation of (macroautophagy and protein synthesis (at the level of translation. The model was formulated to study the system-level consequences of interactions among the following proteins: two key components of MTOR complex 1 (MTORC1, namely the protein kinase MTOR (mechanistic target of rapamycin and the scaffold protein RPTOR; the autophagy-initiating protein kinase ULK1; and the multimeric energy-sensing AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK. Inputs of the model include intrinsic AMPK kinase activity, which is taken as an adjustable surrogate parameter for cellular energy level or AMP:ATP ratio, and rapamycin dose, which controls MTORC1 activity. Outputs of the model include the phosphorylation level of the translational repressor EIF4EBP1, a substrate of MTORC1, and the phosphorylation level of AMBRA1 (activating molecule in BECN1-regulated autophagy, a substrate of ULK1 critical for autophagosome formation. The model incorporates reciprocal regulation of mTORC1 and ULK1 by AMPK, mutual inhibition of MTORC1 and ULK1, and ULK1-mediated negative feedback regulation of AMPK. Through analysis of the model, we find that these processes may be responsible, depending on conditions, for graded responses to stress inputs, for bistable switching between autophagy and protein synthesis, or relaxation oscillations, comprising alternating periods of autophagy and protein synthesis. A sensitivity analysis indicates that the prediction of oscillatory behavior is robust to changes of the parameter values of the model. The model provides testable predictions about the behavior of the AMPK-MTORC1-ULK1 network, which plays a central role in maintaining cellular energy and nutrient homeostasis.

  15. Dysfunctional mTORC1 Signaling: A Convergent Mechanism between Syndromic and Nonsyndromic Forms of Autism Spectrum Disorder?

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    Juliana Magdalon

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Whereas autism spectrum disorder (ASD exhibits striking heterogeneity in genetics and clinical presentation, dysfunction of mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1 signaling pathway has been identified as a molecular feature common to several well-characterized syndromes with high prevalence of ASD. Additionally, recent findings have also implicated mTORC1 signaling abnormalities in a subset of nonsyndromic ASD, suggesting that defective mTORC1 pathway may be a potential converging mechanism in ASD pathology across different etiologies. However, the mechanistic evidence for a causal link between aberrant mTORC1 pathway activity and ASD neurobehavioral features varies depending on the ASD form involved. In this review, we first discuss six monogenic ASD-related syndromes, including both classical and potentially novel mTORopathies, highlighting their contribution to our understanding of the neurobiological mechanisms underlying ASD, and then we discuss existing evidence suggesting that aberrant mTORC1 signaling may also play a role in nonsyndromic ASD.

  16. Targeting mTOR with rapamycin: One dose does not fit all

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, David A.; Toschi, Alfredo

    2009-01-01

    A puzzling aspect of rapamycin-based therapeutic strategies is the wide disparity in the doses needed to suppress mTOR under different circumstances. A recent study revealing mechanistically how rapamycin suppresses mTOR provides two explanations for the differential sensitivities to rapamycin. First, mTOR exists as two functionally distinct complexes (mTORC1 and mTORC2), and while rapamycin suppresses both, it does so at very different concentrations. Whereas mTORC1 is suppressed by concentrations of rapamycin in the low nM range, mTORC2 generally requires low μM concentrations. Second, the efficacy of rapamycin is dependent on the level of phosphatidic acid (PA), which is required for the assembly of both mTORC1 and mTORC2 complexes. Rapamycin interacts with mTOR in a manner that is competitive with PA. Therefore, elevated levels of PA, which is common in cancer cells, increases the level of rapamycin needed to suppress both mTORC1 and mTORC2. A practical outcome of the recent study is that if PA levels are suppressed, mTORC2 becomes sensitive to concentrations of rapamycin that can be achieved clinically. Since mTORC2 is likely more critical for survival signals in cancer cells, the recent findings suggest new strategies for enhancing the efficacy of rapamycin-based therapeutic approaches in cancer cells. PMID:19270529

  17. The First Alcohol Drink Triggers mTORC1-Dependent Synaptic Plasticity in Nucleus Accumbens Dopamine D1 Receptor Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckley, Jacob T; Laguesse, Sophie; Phamluong, Khanhky; Morisot, Nadege; Wegner, Scott A; Ron, Dorit

    2016-01-20

    Early binge-like alcohol drinking may promote the development of hazardous intake. However, the enduring cellular alterations following the first experience with alcohol consumption are not fully understood. We found that the first binge-drinking alcohol session produced enduring enhancement of excitatory synaptic transmission onto dopamine D1 receptor-expressing neurons (D1+ neurons) in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) shell but not the core in mice, which required D1 receptors (D1Rs) and mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1). Furthermore, inhibition of mTORC1 activity during the first alcohol drinking session reduced alcohol consumption and preference of a subsequent drinking session. mTORC1 is critically involved in RNA-to-protein translation, and we found that the first alcohol session rapidly activated mTORC1 in NAc shell D1+ neurons and increased synaptic expression of the AMPAR subunit GluA1 and the scaffolding protein Homer. Finally, D1R stimulation alone was sufficient to activate mTORC1 in the NAc to promote mTORC1-dependent translation of the synaptic proteins GluA1 and Homer. Together, our results indicate that the first alcohol drinking session induces synaptic plasticity in NAc D1+ neurons via enhanced mTORC1-dependent translation of proteins involved in excitatory synaptic transmission that in turn drives the reinforcement learning associated with the first alcohol experience. Thus, the alcohol-dependent D1R/mTORC1-mediated increase in synaptic function in the NAc may reflect a neural imprint of alcohol's reinforcing properties, which could promote subsequent alcohol intake. Significance statement: Consuming alcohol for the first time is a learning event that drives further drinking. Here, we identified a mechanism that may underlie the reinforcing learning associated with the initial alcohol experience. We show that the first alcohol experience induces a persistent enhancement of excitatory synaptic transmission on NAc shell D1+ neurons

  18. Ablation of TSC2 enhances insulin secretion by increasing the number of mitochondria through activation of mTORC1.

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    Maki Koyanagi

    Full Text Available AIM: We previously found that chronic tuberous sclerosis protein 2 (TSC2 deletion induces activation of mammalian target of rapamycin Complex 1 (mTORC1 and leads to hypertrophy of pancreatic beta cells from pancreatic beta cell-specific TSC2 knockout (βTSC2(-/- mice. The present study examines the effects of TSC2 ablation on insulin secretion from pancreatic beta cells. METHODS: Isolated islets from βTSC2(-/- mice and TSC2 knockdown insulin 1 (INS-1 insulinoma cells treated with small interfering ribonucleic acid were used to investigate insulin secretion, ATP content and the expression of mitochondrial genes. RESULTS: Activation of mTORC1 increased mitochondrial DNA expression, mitochondrial density and ATP production in pancreatic beta cells of βTSC2(-/- mice. In TSC2 knockdown INS-1 cells, mitochondrial DNA expression, mitochondrial density and ATP production were increased compared with those in control INS-1 cells, consistent with the phenotype of βTSC2(-/- mice. TSC2 knockdown INS-1 cells also exhibited augmented insulin secretory response to glucose. Rapamycin inhibited mitochondrial DNA expression and ATP production as well as insulin secretion in response to glucose. Thus, βTSC2(-/- mice exhibit hyperinsulinemia due to an increase in the number of mitochondria as well as enlargement of individual beta cells via activation of mTORC1. CONCLUSION: Activation of mTORC1 by TSC2 ablation increases mitochondrial biogenesis and enhances insulin secretion from pancreatic beta cells.

  19. The cannabinoid CB1 receptor and mTORC1 signalling pathways interact to modulate glucose homeostasis in mice

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    Francisco J. Bermudez-Silva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The endocannabinoid system (ECS is an intercellular signalling mechanism that is present in the islets of Langerhans and plays a role in the modulation of insulin secretion and expansion of the β-cell mass. The downstream signalling pathways mediating these effects are poorly understood. Mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1 signalling is a key intracellular pathway involved in energy homeostasis and is known to importantly affect the physiology of pancreatic islets. We investigated the possible relationship between cannabinoid type 1 (CB1 receptor signalling and the mTORC1 pathway in the endocrine pancreas of mice by using pharmacological analysis as well as mice genetically lacking the CB1 receptor or the downstream target of mTORC1, the kinase p70S6K1. In vitro static secretion experiments on islets, western blotting, and in vivo glucose and insulin tolerance tests were performed. The CB1 receptor antagonist rimonabant decreased glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS at 0.1 µM while increasing phosphorylation of p70S6K1 and ribosomal protein S6 (rpS6 within the islets. Specific pharmacological blockade of mTORC1 by 3 nM rapamycin, as well as genetic deletion of p70S6K1, impaired the CB1-antagonist-mediated decrease in GSIS. In vivo experiments showed that 3 mg/kg body weight rimonabant decreased insulin levels and induced glucose intolerance in lean mice without altering peripheral insulin sensitivity; this effect was prevented by peripheral administration of low doses of rapamycin (0.1 mg/kg body weight, which increased insulin sensitivity. These findings suggest a functional interaction between the ECS and the mTORC1 pathway within the endocrine pancreas and at the whole-organism level, which could have implications for the development of new therapeutic approaches for pancreatic β-cell diseases.

  20. The cannabinoid CB1 receptor and mTORC1 signalling pathways interact to modulate glucose homeostasis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermudez-Silva, Francisco J; Romero-Zerbo, Silvana Y; Haissaguerre, Magalie; Ruz-Maldonado, Inmaculada; Lhamyani, Said; El Bekay, Rajaa; Tabarin, Antoine; Marsicano, Giovanni; Cota, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    The endocannabinoid system (ECS) is an intercellular signalling mechanism that is present in the islets of Langerhans and plays a role in the modulation of insulin secretion and expansion of the β-cell mass. The downstream signalling pathways mediating these effects are poorly understood. Mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signalling is a key intracellular pathway involved in energy homeostasis and is known to importantly affect the physiology of pancreatic islets. We investigated the possible relationship between cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptor signalling and the mTORC1 pathway in the endocrine pancreas of mice by using pharmacological analysis as well as mice genetically lacking the CB1 receptor or the downstream target of mTORC1, the kinase p70S6K1. In vitro static secretion experiments on islets, western blotting, and in vivo glucose and insulin tolerance tests were performed. The CB1 receptor antagonist rimonabant decreased glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) at 0.1 µM while increasing phosphorylation of p70S6K1 and ribosomal protein S6 (rpS6) within the islets. Specific pharmacological blockade of mTORC1 by 3 nM rapamycin, as well as genetic deletion of p70S6K1, impaired the CB1-antagonist-mediated decrease in GSIS. In vivo experiments showed that 3 mg/kg body weight rimonabant decreased insulin levels and induced glucose intolerance in lean mice without altering peripheral insulin sensitivity; this effect was prevented by peripheral administration of low doses of rapamycin (0.1 mg/kg body weight), which increased insulin sensitivity. These findings suggest a functional interaction between the ECS and the mTORC1 pathway within the endocrine pancreas and at the whole-organism level, which could have implications for the development of new therapeutic approaches for pancreatic β-cell diseases. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  1. Mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 activation sensitizes human glioma cells to hypoxia-induced cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiepold, Anna-Luisa; Lorenz, Nadja I; Foltyn, Martha; Engel, Anna L; Divé, Iris; Urban, Hans; Heller, Sonja; Bruns, Ines; Hofmann, Ute; Dröse, Stefan; Harter, Patrick N; Mittelbronn, Michel; Steinbach, Joachim P; Ronellenfitsch, Michael W

    2017-10-01

    Glioblastomas are characterized by fast uncontrolled growth leading to hypoxic areas and necrosis. Signalling from EGFR via mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is a major driver of cell growth and proliferation and one of the most commonly altered signalling pathways in glioblastomas. Therefore, epidermal growth factor receptor and mTORC1 signalling are plausible therapeutic targets and clinical trials with inhibitors are in progress. However, we have previously shown that epidermal growth factor receptor and mTORC1 inhibition triggers metabolic changes leading to adverse effects under the conditions of the tumour microenvironment by protecting from hypoxia-induced cell death. We hypothesized that conversely mTORC1 activation sensitizes glioma cells to hypoxia-induced cell death. As a model for mTORC1 activation we used gene suppression of its physiological inhibitor TSC2 (TSC2sh). TSC2sh glioma cells showed increased sensitivity to hypoxia-induced cell death that was accompanied by an earlier ATP depletion and an increase in reactive oxygen species. There was no difference in extracellular glucose consumption but an altered intracellular metabolic profile with an increase of intermediates of the pentose phosphate pathway. Mechanistically, mTORC1 upregulated the first and rate limiting enzyme of the pentose phosphate pathway, G6PD. Furthermore, an increase in oxygen consumption in TSC2sh cells was detected. This appeared to be due to higher transcription rates of genes involved in mitochondrial respiratory function including PPARGC1A and PPARGC1B (also known as PGC-1α and -β). The finding that mTORC1 activation causes an increase in oxygen consumption and renders malignant glioma cells susceptible to hypoxia and nutrient deprivation could help identify glioblastoma patient cohorts more likely to benefit from hypoxia-inducing therapies such as the VEGFA-targeting antibody bevacizumab in future clinical evaluations. © The Author (2017). Published by

  2. Stromal liver kinase B1 [STK11] signaling loss induces oviductal adenomas and endometrial cancer by activating mammalian Target of Rapamycin Complex 1.

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    Pradeep S Tanwar

    Full Text Available Germline mutations of the Liver Kinase b1 (LKB1/STK11 tumor suppressor gene have been linked to Peutz-Jeghers Syndrome (PJS, an autosomal-dominant, cancer-prone disorder in which patients develop neoplasms in several organs, including the oviduct, ovary, and cervix. We have conditionally deleted Lkb1 in Müllerian duct mesenchyme-derived cells of the female reproductive tract and observed expansion of the stromal compartment and hyperplasia and/or neoplasia of adjacent epithelial cells throughout the reproductive tract with paratubal cysts and adenomyomas in oviducts and, eventually, endometrial cancer. Examination of the proliferation marker phospho-histone H3 and mammalian Target Of Rapamycin Complex 1 (mTORC1 pathway members revealed increased proliferation and mTORC1 activation in stromal cells of both the oviduct and uterus. Treatment with rapamycin, an inhibitor of mTORC1 activity, decreased tumor burden in adult Lkb1 mutant mice. Deletion of the genes for Tuberous Sclerosis 1 (Tsc1 or Tsc2, regulators of mTORC1 that are downstream of LKB1 signaling, in the oviductal and uterine stroma phenocopies some of the defects observed in Lkb1 mutant mice, confirming that dysregulated mTORC1 activation in the Lkb1-deleted stroma contributes to the phenotype. Loss of PTEN, an upstream regulator of mTORC1 signaling, along with Lkb1 deletion significantly increased tumor burden in uteri and induced tumorigenesis in the cervix and vagina. These studies show that LKB1/TSC1/TSC2/mTORC1 signaling in mesenchymal cells is important for the maintenance of epithelial integrity and suppression of carcinogenesis in adjacent epithelial cells. Because similar changes in the stromal population are also observed in human oviductal/ovarian adenoma and endometrial adenocarcinoma patients, we predict that dysregulated mTORC1 activity by upstream mechanisms similar to those described in these model systems contributes to the pathogenesis of these human diseases.

  3. Arctigenin functions as a selective agonist of estrogen receptor ? to restrict mTORC1 activation and consequent Th17 differentiation

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Xin; Tong, Bei; Yang, Yan; Luo, Jinque; Yuan, Xusheng; Wei, Zhifeng; Yue, Mengfan; Xia, Yufeng; Dai, Yue

    2016-01-01

    Arctigenin was previously proven to inhibit Th17 cell differentiation and thereby attenuate colitis in mice by down-regulating the activation of mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1). The present study was performed to address its underlying mechanism in view of estrogen receptor (ER). The specific antagonist PHTPP or siRNA of ER? largely diminished the inhibitory effect of arctigenin on the mTORC1 activation in T cell lines and primary CD4+ T cells under Th17-polarization condit...

  4. Food restriction increase the expression of mTORC1 complex genes in the skeletal muscle of juvenile pacu (Piaractus mesopotamicus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paula, Tassiana Gutierrez de; Zanella, Bruna Tereza Thomazini; Fantinatti, Bruno Evaristo de Almeida; Moraes, Leonardo Nazário de; Duran, Bruno Oliveira da Silva; Oliveira, Caroline Bredariol de; Salomão, Rondinelle Artur Simões; Silva, Rafaela Nunes da; Padovani, Carlos Roberto; Santos, Vander Bruno Dos; Mareco, Edson Assunção; Carvalho, Robson Francisco; Dal-Pai-Silva, Maeli

    2017-01-01

    Skeletal muscle is capable of phenotypic adaptation to environmental factors, such as nutrient availability, by altering the balance between muscle catabolism and anabolism that in turn coordinates muscle growth. Small noncoding RNAs, known as microRNAs (miRNAs), repress the expression of target mRNAs, and many studies have demonstrated that miRNAs regulate the mRNAs of catabolic and anabolic genes. We evaluated muscle morphology, gene expression of components involved in catabolism, anabolism and energetic metabolism and miRNAs expression in both the fast and slow muscle of juvenile pacu (Piaractus mesopotamicus) during food restriction and refeeding. Our analysis revealed that short periods of food restriction followed by refeeding predominantly affected fast muscle, with changes in muscle fiber diameter and miRNAs expression. There was an increase in the mRNA levels of catabolic pathways components (FBXO25, ATG12, BCL2) and energetic metabolism-related genes (PGC1α and SDHA), together with a decrease in PPARβ/δ mRNA levels. Interestingly, an increase in mRNA levels of anabolic genes (PI3K and mTORC1 complex: mTOR, mLST8 and RAPTOR) was also observed during food restriction. After refeeding, muscle morphology showed similar patterns of the control group; the majority of genes were slightly up- or down-regulated in fast and slow muscle, respectively; the levels of all miRNAs increased in fast muscle and some of them decreased in slow muscle. Our findings demonstrated that a short period of food restriction in juvenile pacu had a considerable impact on fast muscle, increasing the expression of anabolic (PI3K and mTORC1 complex: mTOR, mLST8 and RAPTOR) and energetic metabolism genes. The miRNAs (miR-1, miR-206, miR-199 and miR-23a) were more expressed during refeeding and while their target genes (IGF-1, mTOR, PGC1α and MAFbx), presented a decreased expression. The alterations in mTORC1 complex observed during fasting may have influenced the rates of protein

  5. Food restriction increase the expression of mTORC1 complex genes in the skeletal muscle of juvenile pacu (Piaractus mesopotamicus.

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    Tassiana Gutierrez de Paula

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle is capable of phenotypic adaptation to environmental factors, such as nutrient availability, by altering the balance between muscle catabolism and anabolism that in turn coordinates muscle growth. Small noncoding RNAs, known as microRNAs (miRNAs, repress the expression of target mRNAs, and many studies have demonstrated that miRNAs regulate the mRNAs of catabolic and anabolic genes. We evaluated muscle morphology, gene expression of components involved in catabolism, anabolism and energetic metabolism and miRNAs expression in both the fast and slow muscle of juvenile pacu (Piaractus mesopotamicus during food restriction and refeeding. Our analysis revealed that short periods of food restriction followed by refeeding predominantly affected fast muscle, with changes in muscle fiber diameter and miRNAs expression. There was an increase in the mRNA levels of catabolic pathways components (FBXO25, ATG12, BCL2 and energetic metabolism-related genes (PGC1α and SDHA, together with a decrease in PPARβ/δ mRNA levels. Interestingly, an increase in mRNA levels of anabolic genes (PI3K and mTORC1 complex: mTOR, mLST8 and RAPTOR was also observed during food restriction. After refeeding, muscle morphology showed similar patterns of the control group; the majority of genes were slightly up- or down-regulated in fast and slow muscle, respectively; the levels of all miRNAs increased in fast muscle and some of them decreased in slow muscle. Our findings demonstrated that a short period of food restriction in juvenile pacu had a considerable impact on fast muscle, increasing the expression of anabolic (PI3K and mTORC1 complex: mTOR, mLST8 and RAPTOR and energetic metabolism genes. The miRNAs (miR-1, miR-206, miR-199 and miR-23a were more expressed during refeeding and while their target genes (IGF-1, mTOR, PGC1α and MAFbx, presented a decreased expression. The alterations in mTORC1 complex observed during fasting may have influenced the rates of

  6. The cochaperone BAG3 coordinates protein synthesis and autophagy under mechanical strain through spatial regulation of mTORC1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathage, Barbara; Gehlert, Sebastian; Ulbricht, Anna; Lüdecke, Laura; Tapia, Victor E; Orfanos, Zacharias; Wenzel, Daniela; Bloch, Wilhelm; Volkmer, Rudolf; Fleischmann, Bernd K; Fürst, Dieter O; Höhfeld, Jörg

    2017-01-01

    The cochaperone BAG3 is a central protein homeostasis factor in mechanically strained mammalian cells. It mediates the degradation of unfolded and damaged forms of the actin-crosslinker filamin through chaperone-assisted selective autophagy (CASA). In addition, BAG3 stimulates filamin transcription in order to compensate autophagic disposal and to maintain the actin cytoskeleton under strain. Here we demonstrate that BAG3 coordinates protein synthesis and autophagy through spatial regulation of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1). The cochaperone utilizes its WW domain to contact a proline-rich motif in the tuberous sclerosis protein TSC1 that functions as an mTORC1 inhibitor in association with TSC2. Interaction with BAG3 results in a recruitment of TSC complexes to actin stress fibers, where the complexes act on a subpopulation of mTOR-positive vesicles associated with the cytoskeleton. Local inhibition of mTORC1 is essential to initiate autophagy at sites of filamin unfolding and damage. At the same time, BAG3-mediated sequestration of TSC1/TSC2 relieves mTORC1 inhibition in the remaining cytoplasm, which stimulates protein translation. In human muscle, an exercise-induced association of TSC1 with the cytoskeleton coincides with mTORC1 activation in the cytoplasm. The spatial regulation of mTORC1 exerted by BAG3 apparently provides the basis for a simultaneous induction of autophagy and protein synthesis to maintain the proteome under mechanical strain. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Constitutive activation of CaMKKα signaling is sufficient but not necessary for mTORC1 activation and growth in mouse skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferey, Jeremie L A; Brault, Jeffrey J; Smith, Cheryl A S; Witczak, Carol A

    2014-10-15

    Skeletal muscle loading/overload stimulates the Ca²⁺-activated, serine/threonine kinase Ca²⁺/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase-α (CaMKKα); yet to date, no studies have examined whether CaMKKα regulates muscle growth. The purpose of this study was to determine if constitutive activation of CaMKKα signaling could stimulate muscle growth and if so whether CaMKKα is essential for this process. CaMKKα signaling was selectively activated in mouse muscle via expression of a constitutively active form of CaMKKα using in vivo electroporation. After 2 wk, constitutively active CaMKKα expression increased muscle weight (~10%) and protein content (~10%), demonstrating that activation of CaMKKα signaling can stimulate muscle growth. To determine if active CaMKKα expression stimulated muscle growth via increased mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling and protein synthesis, [³H]phenylalanine incorporation into proteins was assessed with or without the mTORC1 inhibitor rapamycin. Constitutively active CaMKKα increased protein synthesis ~60%, and this increase was prevented by rapamycin, demonstrating a critical role for mTORC1 in this process. To determine if CaMKKα is essential for growth, muscles from CaMKKα knockout mice were stimulated to hypertrophy via unilateral ablation of synergist muscles (overload). Surprisingly, compared with wild-type mice, muscles from CaMKKα knockout mice exhibited greater growth (~15%) and phosphorylation of the mTORC1 substrate 70-kDa ribosomal protein S6 kinase (Thr³⁸⁹; ~50%), demonstrating that CaMKKα is not essential for overload-induced mTORC1 activation or muscle growth. Collectively, these results demonstrate that activation of CaMKKα signaling is sufficient but not necessary for activation of mTORC1 signaling and growth in mouse skeletal muscle. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  8. Dual mTORC1/C2 inhibitors: gerosuppressors with potential anti-aging effect.

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    Sousa-Victor, Pedro; García-Prat, Laura; Muñoz-Cánoves, Pura

    2015-09-15

    Over the past decade, our understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms presiding over cellular and tissue decline with aging has greatly advanced. Classical hallmarks of aging cell include increasing levels of reactive oxygen species, DNA damage and senescence entry, which disrupt tissue architecture and function. Tissue dysfunction with aging has been shown to correlate with a cellular switch from a G0 reversible quiescence state into a G0 irreversible senescence state (geroconversion), causing a permanent proliferative block. The TOR (target of rapamycin) kinase has been shown to promote geroconversion. Rapamycin and other rapalogs specifically suppress activity of the mammalian TOR (mTOR) complex 1 (mTORC1) -but not mTOR complex 2 (mTORC2)- and decrease senescence entry, thus preserving proliferative potential. In this perspective, we briefly comment recent progress of Leontieva and colleagues showing a new class of non-rapalog drugs that target simultaneously mTORC1 and mTORC2 and prevent geroconversion in a more efficient way than rapamycin. Its potential future use as rejuvenating, anti-aging therapeutics is therefore proposed.

  9. Rapamycin prevents seizures after depletion of STRADA in a rare neurodevelopmental disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Whitney E; Orlova, Ksenia A; Parker, William H; Birnbaum, Jacqueline F; Krymskaya, Vera P; Goncharov, Dmitry A; Baybis, Marianna; Helfferich, Jelte; Okochi, Kei; Strauss, Kevin A; Crino, Peter B

    2013-04-24

    A rare neurodevelopmental disorder in the Old Order Mennonite population called PMSE (polyhydramnios, megalencephaly, and symptomatic epilepsy syndrome; also called Pretzel syndrome) is characterized by infantile-onset epilepsy, neurocognitive delay, craniofacial dysmorphism, and histopathological evidence of heterotopic neurons in subcortical white matter and subependymal regions. PMSE is caused by a homozygous deletion of exons 9 to 13 of the LYK5/STRADA gene, which encodes the pseudokinase STRADA, an upstream inhibitor of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1). We show that disrupted pathfinding in migrating mouse neural progenitor cells in vitro caused by STRADA depletion is prevented by mTORC1 inhibition with rapamycin or inhibition of its downstream effector p70 S6 kinase (p70S6K) with the drug PF-4708671 (p70S6Ki). We demonstrate that rapamycin can rescue aberrant cortical lamination and heterotopia associated with STRADA depletion in the mouse cerebral cortex. Constitutive mTORC1 signaling and a migration defect observed in fibroblasts from patients with PMSE were also prevented by mTORC1 inhibition. On the basis of these preclinical findings, we treated five PMSE patients with sirolimus (rapamycin) without complication and observed a reduction in seizure frequency and an improvement in receptive language. Our findings demonstrate a mechanistic link between STRADA loss and mTORC1 hyperactivity in PMSE, and suggest that mTORC1 inhibition may be a potential treatment for PMSE as well as other mTOR-associated neurodevelopmental disorders.

  10. Arctigenin functions as a selective agonist of estrogen receptor β to restrict mTORC1 activation and consequent Th17 differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xin; Tong, Bei; Yang, Yan; Luo, Jinque; Yuan, Xusheng; Wei, Zhifeng; Yue, Mengfan; Xia, Yufeng; Dai, Yue

    2016-12-20

    Arctigenin was previously proven to inhibit Th17 cell differentiation and thereby attenuate colitis in mice by down-regulating the activation of mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1). The present study was performed to address its underlying mechanism in view of estrogen receptor (ER). The specific antagonist PHTPP or siRNA of ERβ largely diminished the inhibitory effect of arctigenin on the mTORC1 activation in T cell lines and primary CD4+ T cells under Th17-polarization condition, suggesting that arctigenin functioned in an ERβ-dependent manner. Moreover, arctigenin was recognized to be an agonist of ERβ, which could bind to ERβ with a moderate affinity, promote dissociation of ERβ/HSP90 complex and nuclear translocation and phosphorylation of ERβ, and increase the transcription activity. Following activation of ERβ, arctigenin inhibited the activity of mTORC1 by disruption of ERβ-raptor-mTOR complex assembly. Deficiency of ERβ markedly abolished arctigenin-mediated inhibition of Th17 cell differentiation. In colitis mice, the activation of ERβ, inhibition of mTORC1 activation and Th17 response by arctigenin were abolished by PHTPP treatment. In conclusion, ERβ might be the target protein of arctigenin responsible for inhibition of mTORC1 activation and resultant prevention of Th17 cell differentiation and colitis development.

  11. Sleep deprivation impairs memory by attenuating mTORC1-dependent protein synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tudor, Jennifer C; Davis, Emily J; Peixoto, Lucia; Wimmer, Mathieu E; van Tilborg, Erik; Park, Alan J; Poplawski, Shane G; Chung, Caroline W; Havekes, Robbert; Huang, Jiayan; Gatti, Evelina; Pierre, Philippe; Abel, Ted

    2016-04-26

    Sleep deprivation is a public health epidemic that causes wide-ranging deleterious consequences, including impaired memory and cognition. Protein synthesis in hippocampal neurons promotes memory and cognition. The kinase complex mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) stimulates protein synthesis by phosphorylating and inhibiting the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E-binding protein 2 (4EBP2). We investigated the involvement of the mTORC1-4EBP2 axis in the molecular mechanisms mediating the cognitive deficits caused by sleep deprivation in mice. Using an in vivo protein translation assay, we found that loss of sleep impaired protein synthesis in the hippocampus. Five hours of sleep loss attenuated both mTORC1-mediated phosphorylation of 4EBP2 and the interaction between eukaryotic initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) and eIF4G in the hippocampi of sleep-deprived mice. Increasing the abundance of 4EBP2 in hippocampal excitatory neurons before sleep deprivation increased the abundance of phosphorylated 4EBP2, restored the amount of eIF4E-eIF4G interaction and hippocampal protein synthesis to that seen in mice that were not sleep-deprived, and prevented the hippocampus-dependent memory deficits associated with sleep loss. These findings collectively demonstrate that 4EBP2-regulated protein synthesis is a critical mediator of the memory deficits caused by sleep deprivation. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  12. Aging impairs contraction-induced human skeletal muscle mTORC1 signaling and protein synthesis

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    Fry Christopher S

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sarcopenia, the loss of skeletal muscle mass during aging, increases the risk for falls and dependency. Resistance exercise (RE training is an effective treatment to improve muscle mass and strength in older adults, but aging is associated with a smaller amount of training-induced hypertrophy. This may be due in part to an inability to stimulate muscle-protein synthesis (MPS after an acute bout of RE. We hypothesized that older adults would have impaired mammalian target of rapamycin complex (mTORC1 signaling and MPS response compared with young adults after acute RE. Methods We measured intracellular signaling and MPS in 16 older (mean 70 ± 2 years and 16 younger (27 ± 2 years subjects. Muscle biopsies were sampled at baseline and at 3, 6 and 24 hr after exercise. Phosphorylation of regulatory signaling proteins and MPS were determined on successive muscle biopsies by immunoblotting and stable isotopic tracer techniques, respectively. Results Increased phosphorylation was seen only in the younger group (PP >0.05. After exercise, MPS increased from baseline only in the younger group (PP 0.05. Conclusions We conclude that aging impairs contraction-induced human skeletal muscle mTORC1 signaling and protein synthesis. These age-related differences may contribute to the blunted hypertrophic response seen after resistance-exercise training in older adults, and highlight the mTORC1 pathway as a key therapeutic target to prevent sarcopenia.

  13. Pharmacological inhibition of mTORC1 prevents over-activation of the primordial follicle pool in response to elevated PI3K signaling.

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    Deepak Adhikari

    Full Text Available The majority of ovarian primordial follicles must be preserved in a quiescent state to allow for the regular production of gametes over the female reproductive lifespan. However, the molecular mechanism that maintains the long quiescence of primordial follicles is poorly understood. Under certain pathological conditions, the entire pool of primordial follicles matures simultaneously leading to an accelerated loss of primordial follicles and to premature ovarian failure (POF. We have previously shown that loss of Pten (phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome ten in mouse oocytes leads to premature activation of the entire pool of primordial follicles, subsequent follicular depletion in early adulthood, and the onset of POF. Lack of PTEN leads to increased phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K-Akt and mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1 signaling in the oocytes. To study the functional and pathological roles of elevated mTORC1 signaling in the oocytes, we treated the Pten-mutant mice with the specific mTORC1 inhibitor rapamycin. When administered to Pten-deficient mice prior to the activation of the primordial follicles, rapamycin effectively prevented global follicular activation and preserved the ovarian reserve. These results provide a rationale for exploring the possible use of rapamycin as a drug for the preservation of the primordial follicle pool, and the possible prevention of POF.

  14. mTORC1 is essential for early steps during Schwann cell differentiation of amniotic fluid stem cells and regulates lipogenic gene expression.

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    Andrea Preitschopf

    Full Text Available Schwann cell development is hallmarked by the induction of a lipogenic profile. Here we used amniotic fluid stem (AFS cells and focused on the mechanisms occurring during early steps of differentiation along the Schwann cell lineage. Therefore, we initiated Schwann cell differentiation in AFS cells and monitored as well as modulated the activity of the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR pathway, the major regulator of anabolic processes. Our results show that mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1 activity is essential for glial marker expression and expression of Sterol Regulatory Element-Binding Protein (SREBP target genes. Moreover, SREBP target gene activation by statin treatment promoted lipogenic gene expression, induced mTORC1 activation and stimulated Schwann cell differentiation. To investigate mTORC1 downstream signaling we expressed a mutant S6K1, which subsequently induced the expression of the Schwann cell marker S100b, but did not affect lipogenic gene expression. This suggests that S6K1 dependent and independent pathways downstream of mTORC1 drive AFS cells to early Schwann cell differentiation and lipogenic gene expression. In conclusion our results propose that future strategies for peripheral nervous system regeneration will depend on ways to efficiently induce the mTORC1 pathway.

  15. Milk is not just food but most likely a genetic transfection system activating mTORC1 signaling for postnatal growth.

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    Melnik, Bodo C; John, Swen Malte; Schmitz, Gerd

    2013-07-25

    Milk has been recognized to represent a functionally active nutrient system promoting neonatal growth of mammals. Cell growth is regulated by the nutrient-sensitive kinase mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1). There is still a lack of information on the mechanisms of mTORC1 up-regulation by milk consumption. This review presents milk as a materno-neonatal relay system functioning by transfer of preferential amino acids, which increase plasma levels of glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), insulin, growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) for mTORC1 activation. Importantly, milk exosomes, which regularly contain microRNA-21, most likely represent a genetic transfection system enhancing mTORC1-driven metabolic processes. Whereas human breast milk is the ideal food for infants allowing appropriate postnatal growth and species-specific metabolic programming, persistent high milk signaling during adolescence and adulthood by continued cow´s milk consumption may promote mTORC1-driven diseases of civilization.

  16. Noncanonical Pathway for Regulation of CCL2 Expression by an mTORC1-FOXK1 Axis Promotes Recruitment of Tumor-Associated Macrophages

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    Hirokazu Nakatsumi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available C-C chemokine ligand 2 (CCL2 plays pivotal roles in tumor formation, progression, and metastasis. Although CCL2 expression has been found to be dependent on the nuclear factor (NF-κB signaling pathway, the regulation of CCL2 production in tumor cells has remained unclear. We have identified a noncanonical pathway for regulation of CCL2 production that is mediated by mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1 but independent of NF-κB. Multiple phosphoproteomics approaches identified the transcription factor forkhead box K1 (FOXK1 as a downstream target of mTORC1. Activation of mTORC1 induces dephosphorylation of FOXK1, resulting in transactivation of the CCL2 gene. Inhibition of the mTORC1-FOXK1 axis attenuated insulin-induced CCL2 production as well as the accumulation of tumor-associated monocytes-macrophages and tumor progression in mice. Our results suggest that FOXK1 directly links mTORC1 signaling and CCL2 expression in a manner independent of NF-κB and that CCL2 produced by this pathway contributes to tumor progression.

  17. Methionine Induces LAT1 Expression in Dairy Cow Mammary Gland by Activating the mTORC1 Signaling Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Xiaoyu; Lin, Ye; Lv, He; Yang, Yang; Jiao, Hongtao; Hou, Xiaoming

    2017-12-01

    Methionine is the limiting amino acid for milk protein synthesis in dairy cows. The effect of methionine availability on milk protein synthesis is dependent on its active transport into cells through amino acid transporters. L-type amino acid transporter 1 (LAT1), which induces the transport of neutral amino acids, is highly expressed in lactating mammary gland. However, the effect of methionine on LAT1 expression and the mechanism governing this process in dairy cow mammary gland are poorly understood. In this study, we show that treatment of dairy cow mammary epithelial cells with increasing concentrations of methionine for 24 h resulted in increased expression of LAT1 and its associated protein 4F2 heavy chain (4F2hc). Maximal expression levels occurred after treatment with 0.6 mM methionine. Methionine treatment also increased cell viability and β-casein synthesis. Western blots showed that methionine induced LAT1 and 4F2hc expression by activating mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling. Inhibition of mTORC1 signaling by rapamycin or raptor siRNA prevented the upregulation of LAT1 and 4F2hc. These results indicate that methionine may activate the mTORC1 signaling pathway and further increase LAT1 and 4F2hc expression in dairy cow mammary gland, thus affecting milk protein synthesis.

  18. PLK1 (polo like kinase 1) inhibits MTOR complex 1 and promotes autophagy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruf, Stefanie; Heberle, Alexander Martin; Langelaar-Makkinje, Miriam; Gelino, Sara; Wilkinson, Deepti; Gerbeth, Carolin; Schwarz, Jennifer Jasmin; Holzwarth, Birgit; Warscheid, Bettina; Meisinger, Chris; van Vugt, Marcel A. T. M.; Baumeister, Ralf; Hansen, Malene; Thedieck, Kathrin

    2017-01-01

    Mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (MTORC1) and polo like kinase 1 (PLK1) are major drivers of cancer cell growth and proliferation, and inhibitors of both protein kinases are currently being investigated in clinical studies. To date, MTORC1's and PLK1's functions are mostly studied

  19. Akt inhibition promotes ABCA1-mediated cholesterol efflux to ApoA-I through suppressing mTORC1.

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    Fumin Dong

    Full Text Available ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1 plays an essential role in mediating cholesterol efflux to apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I, a major housekeeping mechanism for cellular cholesterol homeostasis. After initial engagement with ABCA1, apoA-I directly interacts with the plasma membrane to acquire cholesterol. This apoA-I lipidation process is also known to require cellular signaling processes, presumably to support cholesterol trafficking to the plasma membrane. We report here that one of major signaling pathways in mammalian cells, Akt, is also involved. In several cell models that express ABCA1 including macrophages, pancreatic beta cells and hepatocytes, inhibition of Akt increases cholesterol efflux to apoA-I. Importantly, Akt inhibition has little effect on cells expressing non-functional mutant of ABCA1, implicating a specific role of Akt in ABCA1 function. Furthermore, we provide evidence that mTORC1, a major downstream target of Akt, is also a negative regulator of cholesterol efflux. In cells where mTORC1 is constitutively activated due to tuberous sclerosis complex 2 deletion, cholesterol efflux to apoA-I is no longer sensitive to Akt activity. This suggests that Akt suppresses cholesterol efflux through mTORC1 activation. Indeed, inhibition of mTORC1 by rapamycin or Torin-1 promotes cholesterol efflux. On the other hand, autophagy, one of the major pathways of cholesterol trafficking, is increased upon Akt inhibition. Furthermore, Akt inhibition disrupts lipid rafts, which is known to promote cholesterol efflux to apoA-I. We therefore conclude that Akt, through its downstream targets, mTORC1 and hence autophagy, negatively regulates cholesterol efflux to apoA-I.

  20. Loss of the tumor suppressor gene NF2, encoding merlin, constitutively activates integrin-dependent mTORC1 signaling.

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    López-Lago, Miguel A; Okada, Tomoyo; Murillo, Miguel M; Socci, Nick; Giancotti, Filippo G

    2009-08-01

    Integrin signaling promotes, through p21-activated kinase, phosphorylation and inactivation of the tumor suppressor merlin, thus removing a block to mitogenesis in normal cells. However, the biochemical function of merlin and the effector pathways critical for the pathogenesis of malignant mesothelioma and other NF2-related malignancies are not known. We report that integrin-specific signaling promotes activation of mTORC1 and cap-dependent mRNA translation. Depletion of merlin rescues mTORC1 signaling in cells deprived of anchorage to a permissive extracellular matrix, suggesting that integrin signaling controls mTORC1 through inactivation of merlin. This signaling pathway controls translation of the cyclin D1 mRNA and, thereby, cell cycle progression. In addition, it promotes cell survival. Analysis of a panel of malignant mesothelioma cell lines reveals a strong correlation between loss of merlin and activation of mTORC1. Merlin-negative lines are sensitive to the growth-inhibitory effect of rapamycin, and the expression of recombinant merlin renders them partially resistant to rapamycin. Conversely, depletion of merlin restores rapamycin sensitivity in merlin-positive lines. These results indicate that integrin-mediated adhesion promotes mTORC1 signaling through the inactivation of merlin. Furthermore, they reveal that merlin-negative mesotheliomas display unregulated mTORC1 signaling and are sensitive to rapamycin, thus providing a preclinical rationale for prospective, biomarker-driven clinical studies of mTORC1 inhibitors in these tumors.

  1. Basement Membrane Laminin α2 Regulation of BTB Dynamics via Its Effects on F-Actin and Microtubule Cytoskeletons Is Mediated Through mTORC1 Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ying; Chen, Haiqi; Lui, Wing-Yee; Lee, Will M; Cheng, C Yan

    2017-04-01

    A local axis connects the apical ectoplasmic specialization (ES) at the Sertoli-spermatid interface, the basal ES at the blood-testis barrier (BTB), and the basement membrane across the seminiferous epithelium functionally in rat testes. As such, cellular events that take place simultaneously across the epithelium such as spermiation and BTB remodeling that occur at the apical ES and the basal ES, respectively, at stage VIII of the cycle are coordinated. Herein, laminin α2, a structural component of the basement membrane, was found to regulate BTB dynamics. Sertoli cells were cultured in vitro to allow the establishment of a tight junction (TJ) barrier that mimicked the BTB in vivo. Knockdown of laminin α2 by transfecting Sertoli cells with laminin α2-specific short hairpin RNA vs the nontargeting negative control was shown to perturb the Sertoli cell TJ barrier, illustrating laminin α2 was involved in regulating BTB dynamics. This regulatory effect was mediated through mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling because the two mTORC1 downstream signaling molecules ribosomal protein S6 and Akt1/2 were activated and inactivated, respectively, consistent with earlier findings that mTORC1 is involved in promoting BTB remodeling. Also, laminin α2 knockdown induced F-actin and microtubule (MT) disorganization through changes in the spatial expression of F-actin regulators actin-related protein 3 and epidermal growth factor receptor pathway substrate 8 vs end-binding protein 1 (a MT plus-end tracking protein, +TIP). These laminin α2 knockdown-mediated effects on F-actin and MT organization was blocked by exposing Sertoli cells to rapamycin, an inhibitor of mTORC1 signaling, and also SC79, an activator of Akt. In summary, laminin α2-mediated regulation on Sertoli cell BTB dynamics is through mTORC1 signaling. Copyright © 2017 Endocrine Society.

  2. Aspirin disrupts the mTOR-Raptor complex and potentiates the anti-cancer activities of sorafenib via mTORC1 inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Danni; Liu, Hongchun; Dai, Xiaoyang; Zheng, Xingling; Yan, Juan; Wei, Rongrui; Fu, Xuhong; Huang, Min; Shen, Aijun; Huang, Xun; Ding, Jian; Geng, Meiyu

    2017-10-10

    Aspirin is associated with a reduced risk of cancer and delayed progression of malignant disease. Adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP)-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-mTOR signaling is believed to partially contribute to these anticancer effects, although the mechanism is unclear. In this study, we revealed the mechanism underlying the effects of aspirin on AMPK-mTOR signaling, and described a mechanism-based rationale for the use of aspirin in cancer therapy. We found that aspirin inhibited mTORC1 signaling through AMPK-dependent and -independent manners. Aspirin inhibited the AMPK-TSC pathway, thus resulting in the suppression of mTORC1 activity. In parallel, it directly disrupted the mTOR-raptor interaction. Additionally, the combination of aspirin and sorafenib showed synergetic effects via inhibiting mTORC1 signaling and the PI3K/AKT, MAPK/ERK pathways. Aspirin and sorafenib showed synergetic anticancer efficacy in the SMMC-7721 model. Our study provides mechanistic insights and a mechanism-based rationale for the roles of aspirin in cancer treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Rapamycin

    OpenAIRE

    Srivastava, Rupesh K.; Utley, Adam; Shrikant, Protul A.

    2012-01-01

    Vaccines that generate Ag-specific CD8+ T-cell responses of appropriate quality, magnitude and duration are highly desirable. The ability of mTOR to regulate CD8+ T-cell functional differentiation must be exploited for clinical benefit. In a recent paper, we report that varying the regimen of rapamycin administration regulates viral vaccine-induced CD8+ T-cell responses for tumor immunity. These observations validate the use of rapamycin in vaccination strategies and demonstrate the efficacy ...

  4. Rapamycin Maintains the Chondrocytic Phenotype and Interferes with Inflammatory Cytokine Induced Processes

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    Andrea De Luna-Preitschopf

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis (OA is hallmarked by a progressive degradation of articular cartilage. Besides risk factors including trauma, obesity or genetic predisposition, inflammation has a major impact on the development of this chronic disease. During the course of inflammation, cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha(TNF-α and interleukin (IL-1β are secreted by activated chondrocytes as well as synovial cells and stimulate the production of other inflammatory cytokines and matrix degrading enzymes. The mTORC1 inhibitor rapamycin is a clinical approved immunosuppressant and several studies also verified its chondroprotective effects in OA. However, the effect of blocking the mechanistic target of rapamycin complex (mTORC1 on the inflammatory status within OA is not well studied. Therefore, we aimed to investigate if inhibition of mTORC1 by rapamycin can preserve and sustain chondrocytes in an inflammatory environment. Patient-derived chondrocytes were cultured in media supplemented with or without the mTORC1 inhibitor rapamycin. To establish an inflammatory environment, either TNF-α or IL-1β was added to the media (=OA-model. The chondroprotective and anti-inflammatory effects of rapamycin were evaluated using sulfated glycosaminoglycan (sGAG release assay, Caspase 3/7 activity assay, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH assay and quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Blocking mTORC1 by rapamycin reduced the release and therefore degradation of sGAGs, which are components of the extracellular matrix secreted by chondrocytes. Furthermore, blocking mTORC1 in OA chondrocytes resulted in an enhanced expression of the main chondrogenic markers. Rapamycin was able to protect chondrocytes from cell death in an OA-model shown by reduced Caspase 3/7 activity and diminished LDH release. Furthermore, inhibition of mTORC1 preserved the chondrogenic phenotype of OA chondrocytes, but also reduced inflammatory processes within the OA-model. This study

  5. Human stem cells alter the invasive properties of somatic cells via paracrine activation of mTORC1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosner, Margit; Pham, Ha Thi Thanh; Moriggl, Richard; Hengstschläger, Markus

    2017-09-19

    Controlled invasion is essential during many physiological processes, whereas its deregulation is a hallmark of cancer. Here we demonstrate that embryonic, induced pluripotent and amniotic fluid stem cells share the property to induce the invasion of primary somatic cells of various origins through insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I)- or II (IGF-II)-mediated paracrine activation of mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1). We propose a model in which downstream of mTORC1 this stem cell-induced invasion is mediated by hypoxia-inducible factor 1-alpha (HIF-1α)-regulated matrix metalloproteinases. Manipulating the IGF signalling pathway in the context of teratoma formation experiments demonstrates that human stem cells use this mechanism to induce invasion and thereby attract cells from the microenvironment in vivo. In this study we have identified a so far unknown feature of human stem cells, which might play a role for the development of stem cell-derived tumours.Cell invasion is required for several physiological processes but it is unknown if stem cells induce invasiveness in other cells. Here, the authors show that human stem cells secrete insulin-like growth factor, which in turn activates the mTORC1 pathway, initiating invasive behaviour and attracting other cells.

  6. mTORC1 signalling mediates PI3K-dependent large lipid droplet accumulation in Drosophila ovarian nurse cells

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    Lawrence B. Mensah

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Insulin and insulin-like growth factor signalling (IIS, which is primarily mediated by the PI3-kinase (PI3K/PTEN/Akt kinase signalling cassette, is a highly evolutionarily conserved pathway involved in co-ordinating growth, development, ageing and nutrient homeostasis with dietary intake. It controls transcriptional regulators, in addition to promoting signalling by mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1, which stimulates biosynthesis of proteins and other macromolecules, and drives organismal growth. Previous studies in nutrient-storing germline nurse cells of the Drosophila ovary showed that a cytoplasmic pool of activated phosphorylated Akt (pAkt controlled by Pten, an antagonist of IIS, cell-autonomously regulates accumulation of large lipid droplets in these cells at late stages of oogenesis. Here, we show that the large lipid droplet phenotype induced by Pten mutation is strongly suppressed when mTor function is removed. Furthermore, nurse cells lacking either Tsc1 or Tsc2, which negatively regulate mTORC1 activity, also accumulate large lipid droplets via a mechanism involving Rheb, the downstream G-protein target of TSC2, which positively regulates mTORC1. We conclude that elevated IIS/mTORC1 signalling is both necessary and sufficient to induce large lipid droplet formation in late-stage nurse cells, suggesting roles for this pathway in aspects of lipid droplet biogenesis, in addition to control of lipid metabolism.

  7. Rapamycin Reduces Seizure Frequency in Tuberous Sclerosis Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muncy, Jennifer; Butler, Ian J.; Koenig, Mary Kay

    2011-01-01

    The authors present a 10-year-old girl with tuberous sclerosis complex who has been receiving rapamycin for 10 months for seizure control. She was started at 0.05 mg/kg/d and titrated to an effective dose of 0.15 mg/kg/d. There was a dramatic reduction in seizure frequency with rapamycin therapy. Further studies are needed to objectively investigate the benefits of rapamycin in tuberous sclerosis complex and to clarify its mechanism of seizure control. PMID:19151365

  8. Electric field-induced suppression of PTEN drives epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition via mTORC1 activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Tiantian; Jiang, Xupin; Guo, Xiaowei; Chen, Wen; Tang, Di; Zhang, Junhui; Zhang, Xingyue; Zhang, Dongxia; Zhang, Qiong; Jia, Jiezhi; Huang, Yuesheng

    2017-02-01

    Naturally occurring electric fields (EFs) are an intrinsic property of wounds. Endogenous EFs in skin wounds play critical roles in the dynamic and well-ordered biological process of wound healing. The epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) allows keratinocytes to transition from sedentary cells to motile cells, facilitating wound healing. However, EMT-related studies have been performed without considering endogenous EFs. Thus, the relationship between electrical signals and the EMT remain elusive. Phosphatase and tension homolog (PTEN) and mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) are key molecules in sensing electrical cues, and they play significant roles in cellular responses to EFs. In addition, these molecules are closely related to the occurrence of the EMT in other cells. We used primary human keratinocytes to investigate the influence of EFs on the EMT as well as the roles of PTEN and mTORC1 in this process. The effects of EFs on the EMT were investigated by analyzing the levels of specific proteins and transcription factors. The roles of mTORC1 and PTEN and their relationship with each other were studied via pharmacological inhibition or genetic knockdown. A Zeiss imaging system and scratch assays were used to study single-cell motility and monolayer cell migration. EFs induced a range of both biochemical changes (e.g., increased Snail, Slug, vimentin, and N-cadherin expression, decreased E-cadherin expression) and functional changes (e.g., enhanced migratory capacity) that are characteristic of the EMT. EF-stimulated cells exhibited suppressed PTEN expression, and further PTEN downregulation led to the acquisition of more mesenchymal features and the loss of epithelial characteristics, which was accompanied by increased migratory capacity. PTEN overexpression reversed the EF-induced EMT and inhibited the migratory capacity of keratinocytes. EF-induced mTORC1 activation was a required component of the causal relationship between PTEN

  9. Divergent Metabolic Regulation of Autophagy and mTORC1—Early Events in Alzheimer’s Disease?

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    Mai A. Shafei

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD is a progressive disease associated with the production and deposition of amyloid β-peptide (Aβ aggregates and neurofibrillary tangles, which lead to synaptic and neuronal damage. Reduced autophagic flux has been widely associated with the accumulation of autophagic vacuoles (AV, which has been proposed to contribute to aggregate build-up observed in AD. As such, targeting autophagy regulation has received wide review, where an understanding as to how this mechanism can be controlled will be important to neuronal health. The mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1, which was found to be hyperactive in AD brain, regulates autophagy and is considered to be mechanistically important to aberrant autophagy in AD. Hormones and nutrients such as insulin and leucine, respectively, positively regulate mTORC1 activation and are largely considered to inhibit autophagy. However, in AD brain there is a dysregulation of nutrient metabolism, linked to insulin resistance, where a role for insulin treatment to improve cognition has been proposed. Recent studies have highlighted that mitochondrial proteins such as glutamate dehydrogenase and the human branched chain aminotransferase protein, through metabolism of leucine and glutamate, differentially regulate mTORC1 and autophagy. As the levels of the hBCAT proteins are significantly increased in AD brain relative to aged-matched controls, we discuss how these metabolic pathways offer new potential therapeutic targets. In this review article, we highlight the core regulation of autophagy through mTORC1, focusing on how insulin and leucine will be important to consider in particular with respect to our understanding of nutrient load and AD pathogenesis.

  10. Arctigenin exerts anti-colitis efficacy through inhibiting the differentiation of Th1 and Th17 cells via an mTORC1-dependent pathway.

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    Wu, Xin; Dou, Yannong; Yang, Yan; Bian, Difei; Luo, Jinque; Tong, Bei; Xia, Yufeng; Dai, Yue

    2015-08-15

    Arctigenin, the main effective constituent of Arctium lappa L. fruit, has previously been proven to dramatically attenuate dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis in mice, a frequently used animal model of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). As Th1 and Th17 cells play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of IBD, the present study addressed whether and how arctigenin exerted anti-colitis efficacy by interfering with the differentiation and activation of Th1/Th17 cells. In vitro, arctigenin was shown to markedly inhibit the differentiation of Th17 cells from naïve T cells, and moderately inhibit the differentiation of Th1 cells, which was accompanied by lowered phosphorylation of STAT3 and STAT4, respectively. In contrast, arctigenin was lack of marked effect on the differentiation of either Th2 or regulatory T cells. Furthermore, arctigenin was shown to suppress the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) pathway in T cells as demonstrated by down-regulated phosphorylation of the downstream target genes p70S6K and RPS6, and it functioned independent of two well-known upstream kinases PI3K/AKT and ERK. Arctigenin was also able to inhibit the activity of mTORC1 by dissociating raptor from mTOR. Interestingly, the inhibitory effect of arctigenin on T cell differentiation disappeared under a status of mTORC1 overactivation via knockdown of tuberous sclerosis complex 2 (TSC2, a negative regulator of mTORC1) or pretreatment of leucine (an agonist of mTOR). In DSS-induced mice, the inhibition of Th1/Th17 responses and anti-colitis effect of arctigenin were abrogated by leucine treatment. In conclusion, arctigenin ameliorates colitis through down-regulating the differentiation of Th1 and Th17 cells via mTORC1 pathway. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Rapamycin Inhibits Expression of Elongation of Very-long-chain Fatty Acids 1 and Synthesis of Docosahexaenoic Acid in Bovine Mammary Epithelial Cells

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    Zhixin Guo

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1 is a central regulator of cell growth and metabolism and is sufficient to induce specific metabolic processes, including de novo lipid biosynthesis. Elongation of very-long-chain fatty acids 1 (ELOVL1 is a ubiquitously expressed gene and the product of which was thought to be associated with elongation of carbon (C chain in fatty acids. In the present study, we examined the effects of rapamycin, a specific inhibitor of mTORC1, on ELOVL1 expression and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, C22:6 n-3 synthesis in bovine mammary epithelial cells (BMECs. We found that rapamycin decreased the relative abundance of ELOVL1 mRNA, ELOVL1 expression and the level of DHA in a time-dependent manner. These data indicate that ELOVL1 expression and DHA synthesis are regulated by mTORC1 in BMECs.

  12. Hypoxia Regulates mTORC1-Mediated Keratinocyte Motility and Migration via the AMPK Pathway.

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    Tiantian Yan

    Full Text Available Keratinocyte migration, the initial event and rate-limiting step in wound healing, plays a vital role in restoration of the intact skin barrier, also known as re-epithelialization. After acute tissue injury, hypoxic microenvironment gradually develops and acts as an early stimulus to initiate the healing process. Although we have previously found that hypoxia induces keratinocyte migration, the underlying mechanism remains unknown. Here, we first observed that hypoxia increased mTORC1 activity. Recombinant lentivirus vector and Rapamycin were used for silencing mTORC1 in HaCaT cells and primary mouse keratinocytes (MKs. Using cell migration assay and a Zeiss chamber equipped with imaging system, we also demonstrated that mTORC1 downregulation reversed hypoxia-induced keratinocyte motility and lateral migration. Importantly, hypoxia-activated mTORC1 was accompanied by the AMPK downregulation, and we found that the AMPK pathway activators Metformin (Met and 5-Aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide 1-β-D-ribofuranoside (AICAR decreased the mTORC1 activity, cell motility and lateral migration. Thus, our results suggest that hypoxia regulates mTORC1-mediated keratinocyte motility and migration via the AMPK pathway.

  13. Striatal Transcriptome and Interactome Analysis of Shank3-overexpressing Mice Reveals the Connectivity between Shank3 and mTORC1 Signaling

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    Yeunkum Lee

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Mania causes symptoms of hyperactivity, impulsivity, elevated mood, reduced anxiety and decreased need for sleep, which suggests that the dysfunction of the striatum, a critical component of the brain motor and reward system, can be causally associated with mania. However, detailed molecular pathophysiology underlying the striatal dysfunction in mania remains largely unknown. In this study, we aimed to identify the molecular pathways showing alterations in the striatum of SH3 and multiple ankyrin repeat domains 3 (Shank3-overexpressing transgenic (TG mice that display manic-like behaviors. The results of transcriptome analysis suggested that mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1 signaling may be the primary molecular signature altered in the Shank3 TG striatum. Indeed, we found that striatal mTORC1 activity, as measured by mTOR S2448 phosphorylation, was significantly decreased in the Shank3 TG mice compared to wild-type (WT mice. To elucidate the potential underlying mechanism, we re-analyzed previously reported protein interactomes, and detected a high connectivity between Shank3 and several upstream regulators of mTORC1, such as tuberous sclerosis 1 (TSC1, TSC2 and Ras homolog enriched in striatum (Rhes, via 94 common interactors that we denominated “Shank3-mTORC1 interactome”. We noticed that, among the 94 common interactors, 11 proteins were related to actin filaments, the level of which was increased in the dorsal striatum of Shank3 TG mice. Furthermore, we could co-immunoprecipitate Shank3, Rhes and Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein family verprolin-homologous protein 1 (WAVE1 proteins from the striatal lysate of Shank3 TG mice. By comparing with the gene sets of psychiatric disorders, we also observed that the 94 proteins of Shank3-mTORC1 interactome were significantly associated with bipolar disorder (BD. Altogether, our results suggest a protein interaction-mediated connectivity between Shank3 and certain upstream

  14. Activation of mTORC1 by leucine is potentiated by branched-chain amino acids and even more so by essential amino acids following resistance exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moberg, Marcus; Apró, William; Ekblom, Björn

    2016-01-01

    Protein synthesis is stimulated by resistance exercise and intake of amino acids, in particular leucine. Moreover, activation of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling by leucine is potentiated by the presence of other essential amino acids (EAA). However, the contribution...... of the branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) to this effect is yet unknown. Here we compare the stimulatory role of leucine, BCAA, and EAA ingestion on anabolic signaling following exercise. Accordingly, eight trained volunteers completed four sessions of resistance exercise during which they ingested either placebo...

  15. Rapamycin reverses status epilepticus-induced memory deficits and dendritic damage.

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    Amy L Brewster

    Full Text Available Cognitive impairments are prominent sequelae of prolonged continuous seizures (status epilepticus; SE in humans and animal models. While often associated with dendritic injury, the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. The mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1 pathway is hyperactivated following SE. This pathway modulates learning and memory and is associated with regulation of neuronal, dendritic, and glial properties. Thus, in the present study we tested the hypothesis that SE-induced mTORC1 hyperactivation is a candidate mechanism underlying cognitive deficits and dendritic pathology seen following SE. We examined the effects of rapamycin, an mTORC1 inhibitor, on the early hippocampal-dependent spatial learning and memory deficits associated with an episode of pilocarpine-induced SE. Rapamycin-treated SE rats performed significantly better than the vehicle-treated rats in two spatial memory tasks, the Morris water maze and the novel object recognition test. At the molecular level, we found that the SE-induced increase in mTORC1 signaling was localized in neurons and microglia. Rapamycin decreased the SE-induced mTOR activation and attenuated microgliosis which was mostly localized within the CA1 area. These findings paralleled a reversal of the SE-induced decreases in dendritic Map2 and ion channels levels as well as improved dendritic branching and spine density in area CA1 following rapamycin treatment. Taken together, these findings suggest that mTORC1 hyperactivity contributes to early hippocampal-dependent spatial learning and memory deficits and dendritic dysregulation associated with SE.

  16. The dual mTORC1 and mTORC2 inhibitor AZD8055 inhibits head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cell growth in vivo and in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Qiang; Song, Xin-mao; Ji, Yang-yang; Jiang, Hui; Xu, Lin-gen, E-mail: drlingenxu@126.com

    2013-11-01

    Highlights: •AZD8055 induces significant cytotoxic effects in cultured HNSCC cells. •AZD8055 blocks mTORC1 and mTORC2 activation in cultured HNSCC cells. •JNK activation is required for AZD8055-induced HNSCC cell death. •AZD8055 inhibits Hep-2 cell growth in vivo, and was more efficient than rapamycin. -- Abstract: The serine/threonine kinase mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) promotes cell survival and proliferation, and is constitutively activated in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Thus mTOR is an important target for drug development in this disease. Here we tested the anti-tumor ability of AZD8055, the novel mTOR inhibitor, in HNSCC cells. AZD8055 induced dramatic cell death of HNSCC lines (Hep-2 and SCC-9) through autophagy. AZD8055 blocked both mTOR complex (mTORC) 1 and mTORC2 activation without affecting Erk in cultured HNSCC cells. Meanwhile, AZD8055 induced significant c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation, which was also required for cancer cell death. JNK inhibition by its inhibitors (SP 600125 and JNK-IN-8), or by RNA interference (RNAi) alleviated AZD8055-induced cell death. Finally, AZD8055 markedly increased the survival of Hep-2 transplanted mice through a significant reduction of tumor growth, without apparent toxicity, and its anti-tumor ability was more potent than rapamycin. Meanwhile, AZD8055 administration activated JNK while blocking mTORC1/2 in Hep-2 tumor engrafts. Our current results strongly suggest that AZD8055 may be further investigated for HNSCC treatment in clinical trials.

  17. Ketamine accelerates fear extinction via mTORC1 signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girgenti, Matthew J; Ghosal, Sriparna; LoPresto, Dora; Taylor, Jane R; Duman, Ronald S

    2017-04-01

    Impaired fear extinction contributes to the persistence of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and can be utilized for the study of novel therapeutic agents. Glutamate plays an important role in the formation of traumatic memories, and in the pathophysiology and treatment of PTSD, highlighting several possible drug targets. Recent clinical studies demonstrate that infusion of ketamine, a glutamate NMDA receptor antagonist, rapidly and significantly reduces symptom severity in PTSD patients. In the present study, we examine the mechanisms underlying the actions of ketamine in a rodent model of fear conditioning, extinction, and renewal. Rats received ketamine or saline 24h after fear conditioning and were then subjected to extinction-training on each of the following three days. Ketamine administration enhanced extinction on the second day of training (i.e., reduced freezing behavior to cue) and produced a long-lasting reduction in freezing on exposure to cue plus context 8days later. Additionally, ketamine and extinction exposure increased levels of mTORC1 in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), a region involved in the acquisition and retrieval of extinction, and infusion of the selective mTORC1 inhibitor rapamycin into the mPFC blocked the effects of ketamine on extinction. Ketamine plus extinction also increased cFos in the mPFC and administration of a glutamate-AMPA receptor antagonist blocked the effects of ketamine. These results support the hypothesis that ketamine produces long-lasting mTORC1/protein synthesis and activity dependent effects on neuronal circuits that enhance the expression of extinction and could represent a novel approach for the treatment of PTSD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Mammalian target of rapamycin and the kidney. II. Pathophysiology and therapeutic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberthal, Wilfred; Levine, Jerrold S

    2012-07-15

    The mTOR pathway plays an important role in a number of common renal diseases, including acute kidney injury (AKI), diabetic nephropathy (DN), and polycystic kidney diseases (PKD). The activity of mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) is necessary for renal regeneration and repair after AKI, and inhibition of mTORC1 by rapamycin has been shown to delay recovery from ischemic AKI in animal studies, and to prolong delayed graft function in humans who have received a kidney transplant. For this reason, administration of rapamycin should be delayed or discontinued in patients with AKI until full recovery of renal function has occurred. On the other hand, inappropriately high mTORC1 activity contributes to the progression of the metabolic syndrome, the development of type 2 diabetes, and the pathogenesis of DN. In addition, chronic hyperactivity of mTORC1, and possibly also mTORC2, contributes to cyst formation and enlargement in a number of forms of PKD. Inhibition of mTOR, using either rapamycin (which inhibits predominantly mTORC1) or "catalytic" inhibitors (which effectively inhibit both mTORC1 and mTORC2), provide exciting possibilities for novel forms of treatment of DN and PKD. In this second part of the review, we will examine the role of mTOR in the pathophysiology of DN and PKD, as well as the potential utility of currently available and newly developed inhibitors of mTOR to slow the progression of DN and/or PKD.

  19. Anorexigenic and Orexigenic Hormone Modulation of Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Complex 1 Activity and the Regulation of Hypothalamic Agouti-Related Protein mRNA Expression

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    Kenneth R. Watterson

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Activation of mammalian target of rapamycin 1 (mTORC1 by nutrients, insulin and leptin leads to appetite suppression (anorexia. Contrastingly, increased AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK activity by ghrelin promotes appetite (orexia. However, the interplay between these mechanisms remains poorly defined. The relationship between the anorexigenic hormones, insulin and leptin, and the orexigenic hormone, ghrelin, on mTORC1 signalling was examined using S6 kinase phosphorylation as a marker for changes in mTORC1 activity in mouse hypothalamic GT1-7 cells. Additionally, the contribution of AMPK and mTORC1 signalling in relation to insulin-, leptin- and ghrelin-driven alterations to mouse hypothalamic agouti-related protein (AgRP mRNA levels was examined. Insulin and leptin increase mTORC1 activity in a phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K- and protein kinase B (PKB-dependent manner, compared to vehicle controls, whereas increasing AMPK activity inhibits mTORC1 activity and blocks the actions of the anorexigenic hormones. Ghrelin mediates an AMPK-dependent decrease in mTORC1 activity and increases hypothalamic AgRP mRNA levels, the latter effect being prevented by insulin in an mTORC1-dependent manner. In conclusion, mTORC1 acts as an integration node in hypothalamic neurons for hormone-derived PI3K and AMPK signalling and mediates at least part of the assimilated output of anorexigenic and orexigenic hormone actions in the hypothalamus.

  20. Restriction of dietary protein decreases mTORC1 in tumors and somatic tissues of a tumor-bearing mouse xenograft model.

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    Lamming, Dudley W; Cummings, Nicole E; Rastelli, Antonella L; Gao, Feng; Cava, Edda; Bertozzi, Beatrice; Spelta, Francesco; Pili, Roberto; Fontana, Luigi

    2015-10-13

    Reduced dietary protein intake and intermittent fasting (IF) are both linked to healthy longevity in rodents, and are effective in inhibiting cancer growth. The molecular mechanisms underlying the beneficial effects of chronic protein restriction (PR) and IF are unclear, but may be mediated in part by a down-regulation of the IGF/mTOR pathway. In this study we compared the effects of PR and IF on tumor growth in a xenograft mouse model of breast cancer. We also investigated the effects of PR and IF on the mechanistic Target Of Rapamycin (mTOR) pathway, inhibition of which extends lifespan in model organisms including mice. The mTOR protein kinase is found in two distinct complexes, of which mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) is responsive to acute treatment with amino acids in cell culture and in vivo. We found that both PR and IF inhibit tumor growth and mTORC1 phosphorylation in tumor xenografts. In somatic tissues, we found that PR, but not IF, selectively inhibits the activity of the amino acid sensitive mTORC1, while the activity of the second mTOR complex, mTORC2, was relatively unaffected by PR. In contrast, IF resulted in increased S6 phosphorylation in multiple metabolic tissues. Our work represents the first finding that PR may reduce mTORC1 activity in tumors and multiple somatic tissues, and suggest that PR may represent a highly translatable option for the treatment not only of cancer, but also other age-related diseases.

  1. The anti-diabetic drug metformin inhibits vascular endothelial growth factor expression via the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1/hypoxia-inducible factor-1α signaling pathway in ELT-3 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadakawa, Mari; Takeda, Takashi; Li, Bin; Tsuiji, Kenji; Yaegashi, Nobuo

    2015-01-05

    The aim of this study was to elucidate whether metformin can regulate the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in rat-derived uterine leiomyoma cells (ELT-3 cells). In vitro studies were conducted using ELT-3 cells. Under normoxic conditions, metformin suppressed VEGF protein levels in the supernatant and cells in a dose-dependent manner. In hypoxia-mimicking conditions, VEGF and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) proteins were both highly expressed and were suppressed by the metformin treatment. Metformin did not affect HIF-1α mRNA levels, which indicated that its effects occurred at the post-translational level. Metformin inhibited mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) activity by phosphorylating the mTORC1 component raptor. This study revealed the anti-angiogenic activity of metformin in ELT-3 cells by suppressing the expression of VEGF via the mTORC1/HIF-1α pathway. These results indicate that metformin may represent an effective alternative in the future treatment of uterine leiomyomas. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. mTOR complex 1: a key player in neuroadaptations induced by drugs of abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neasta, Jeremie; Barak, Segev; Hamida, Sami Ben; Ron, Dorit

    2014-07-01

    The mammalian (or mechanistic) target of rapamycin (mTOR) complex 1 (mTORC1) is a serine and threonine kinase that regulates cell growth, survival, and proliferation. mTORC1 is a master controller of the translation of a subset of mRNAs. In the central nervous system mTORC1 plays a crucial role in mechanisms underlying learning and memory by controlling synaptic protein synthesis. Here, we review recent evidence suggesting that the mTORC1 signaling pathway promotes neuroadaptations following exposure to a diverse group of drugs of abuse including stimulants, cannabinoids, opiates, and alcohol. We further describe potential molecular mechanisms by which drug-induced mTORC1 activation may alter brain functions. Finally, we propose that mTORC1 is a focal point shared by drugs of abuse to mediate drug-related behaviors such as reward seeking and excessive drug intake, and offer future directions to decipher the contribution of the kinase to mechanisms underlying addiction. Recent studies suggesting that exposure to diverse classes of drugs of abuse as well as exposure to drug-associated memories lead to mTORC1 kinase activation in the limbic system. In turn, mTORC1 controls the onset and the maintenance of pathological neuroadaptions that underlie several features of drug addiction such as drug seeking and relapse. Therefore, we propose that targeting mTORC1 and its effectors is a promising strategy to treat drug disorders. © 2014 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  3. Disruption of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 in macrophages decreases chemokine gene expression and atherosclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ai, Ding; Jiang, Hongfeng; Westerterp, Marit; Murphy, Andrew J.; Wang, Mi; Ganda, Anjali; Abramowicz, Sandra; Welch, Carrie; Almazan, Felicidad; Zhu, Yi; Miller, Yury I.; Tall, Alan R.

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 inhibitor, rapamycin, has been shown to decrease atherosclerosis, even while increasing plasma low-density lipoprotein levels. This suggests an antiatherogenic effect possibly mediated by the modulation of inflammatory responses in atherosclerotic plaques.

  4. REDD2 expression in rat skeletal muscle correlates with nutrient-induced activation of mTORC1: responses to aging, immobilization, and remobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelleher, Andrew R; Pereira, Suzette L; Jefferson, Leonard S; Kimball, Scot R

    2015-01-15

    In a previous study (Kelleher AR, Kimball SR, Dennis MD, Schilder RJ, and Jefferson LS. Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab 304: E229-236, 2013.), we observed a rapid (i.e., 1-3 days) immobilization-induced repression of mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling in hindlimb skeletal muscle of young (2-mo-old) rats that was associated with elevated expression of regulated in development and DNA-damage response (REDD) 1 and REDD2. The present study extends that observation to include an assessment of those parameters in soleus muscle of the immobilized hindlimb of various-aged rats as well as in response to remobilization. Male Sprague-Dawley rats aged 2, 9, and 18 mo were subjected to unilateral hindlimb immobilization for 7 days, whereas one group of the 9-mo-old animals underwent 7 days of remobilization. Soleus muscle mass-to-body mass ratio declined with age, with the loss of muscle mass following hindlimb immobilization being inversely proportional to age. Compared with 2-mo-old rats, the older rats exhibited reduced mTORC1 signaling in the nonimmobilized limb in association with elevated REDD2, but not REDD1, mRNA expression. In the 2-mo-old rats, 7 days of hindlimb immobilization attenuated mTORC1 signaling and induced REDD2, but not REDD1, mRNA expression. In contrast, hindlimb immobilization did not further attenuate the age-related reduction in mTORC1 signaling nor further enhance the age-related induction of REDD2 mRNA expression in 9- and 18-mo-old rats. Across ages, REDD1 mRNA was not impacted by immobilization. Finally, remobilization elevated mTORC1 signaling and lowered REDD2 mRNA expression, with no impact on REDD1 gene expression. In conclusion, changes in mTORC1 signaling associated with aging, immobilization, and remobilization were inversely proportional to alterations in REDD2 mRNA expression. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  5. Prolonged calorie restriction downregulates skeletal muscle mTORC1 signaling independent of dietary protein intake and associated microRNA expression

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    Lee M Margolis

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Short-term (5-10 days calorie restriction (CR downregulates muscle protein synthesis, with consumption of a high protein-based diet attenuating this decline. Benefit of increase protein intake is believed to be due to maintenance of amino acid-mediated anabolic signaling through the mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1, however, there is limited evidence to support this contention. The purpose of this investigation was to determine the effects of prolonged CR and high protein diets on skeletal muscle mTORC1 signaling and expression of associated microRNA (miR. 12-wk old male Sprague Dawley rats consumed ad libitum (AL or calorie restricted (CR; 40% adequate (10%, AIN-93M or high (32% protein milk-based diets for 16 weeks. Body composition was determined using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry and muscle protein content was calculated from muscle homogenate protein concentrations expressed relative to fat-free mass to estimate protein content. Western blot and RT-qPCR were used to determine mTORC1 signaling and mRNA and miR expression in fasted mixed gastrocnemius. Independent of dietary protein intake, muscle protein content was 38% lower (P < 0.05 in CR compared to AL. Phosphorylation and total Akt, mTOR, rpS6 and p70S6K were lower (P < 0.05 in CR versus AL, and total rpS6 was associated with muscle protein content (r = 0.64, r2 = 0.36. Skeletal muscle miR expression was not altered by either energy or protein intake. This study provides evidence that chronic CR attenuates muscle protein content by downregulating mTORC1 signaling. This response is independent of skeletal muscle miR and dietary protein.

  6. Leptin accelerates the pathogenesis of heterotopic ossification in rat tendon tissues via mTORC1 signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Huaji; Chen, Yuhui; Chen, Guorong; Tian, Xinggui; Tang, Jiajun; Luo, Lei; Huang, Minjun; Yan, Bin; Ao, Xiang; Zhou, Wen; Wang, Liping; Bai, Xiaochun; Zhang, Zhongmin; Wang, Liang; Xian, Cory J

    2018-02-01

    Leptin, an adipocyte-derived cytokine associated with bone metabolism, is believed to play a critical role in the pathogenesis of heterotopic ossification (HO). The effect and underlying action mechanism of leptin were investigated on osteogenic differentiation of tendon-derived stem cells (TDSCs) in vitro and the HO formation in rat tendons. Isolated rat TDSCs were treated with various concentrations of leptin in the presence or absence of mTORC1 signaling specific inhibitor rapamycin in vitro. A rat model with Achilles tenotomy was employed to evaluate the effect of leptin on HO formation together with or without rapamycin treatment. In vitro studies with TDSCs showed that leptin increased the expression of osteogenic biomarkers (alkaline phosphatase, runt-related transcription factor 2, osterix, osteocalcin) and enhanced mineralization of TDSCs via activating the mTORC1 signal pathway (as indicated by phosphorylation of p70 ribosomal S6 kinase 1 and p70 ribosomal S6). However, mTORC1 signaling blockade with rapamycin treatment suppressed leptin-induced osteogenic differentiation and mineralization. In vivo studies showed that leptin promoted HO formation in the Achilles tendon after tenotomy, and rapamycin treatment blocked leptin-induced HO formation. In conclusion, leptin can promote TDSC osteogenic differentiation and heterotopic bone formation via mTORC1 signaling in both vitro and vivo model, which provides a new potential therapeutic target for HO prevention. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Inhibition of p70S6K does not mimic the enhancement of Akt phosphorylation by rapamycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuerong; Yue, Ping; Tao, Hui; Sun, Shi-Yong

    2017-08-01

    It has been suggested that the mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1)/p70S6K axis represses upstream PI3K/Akt signaling through phosphorylation of IRS-1 and its subsequent degradation. One potential and current model that explains Akt activation induced by the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin is the relief of mTORC1/p70S6K-mediated feedback inhibition of IRS-1/PI3K/Akt signaling, although this has not been experimentally proven. In this study, we found that chemical inhibition of p70S6K did not increase Akt phosphorylation. Surprisingly, knockdown of p70S6K even substantially inhibited Akt phosphorylation. Hence, p70S6K inhibition clearly does not mimic the activation of Akt by rapamycin. Inhibition or enforced activation of p70S6K did not affect the ability of rapamycin to increase Akt phosphorylation. Moreover, inhibition of mTORC1 with either rapamycin or raptor knockdown did not elevate IRS-1 levels, despite potently increasing Akt phosphorylation. Critically, knockdown or knockout of IRS-1 or IRS-2 failed to abolish the ability of rapamycin to increase Akt phosphorylation. Therefore, IRS-1 and IRS-2 are not essential for mediating rapamycin-induced Akt activation. Collectively, our findings suggest that Akt activation by rapamycin or mTORC1 inhibition is unlikely due to relief of p70S6K-mediated feedback inhibition of IRS-1/PI3K/Akt signaling.

  8. mTORC1 stimulates phosphatidylcholine synthesis to promote triglyceride secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, William J; Wan, Min; Shewale, Swapnil V; Gelfer, Rebecca; Rader, Daniel J; Birnbaum, Morris J; Titchenell, Paul M

    2017-11-01

    Liver triacylglycerol (TAG) synthesis and secretion are closely linked to nutrient availability. After a meal, hepatic TAG formation from fatty acids is decreased, largely due to a reduction in circulating free fatty acids (FFA). Despite the postprandial decrease in FFA-driven esterification and oxidation, VLDL-TAG secretion is maintained to support peripheral lipid delivery and metabolism. The regulatory mechanisms underlying the postprandial control of VLDL-TAG secretion remain unclear. Here, we demonstrated that the mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) is essential for this sustained VLDL-TAG secretion and lipid homeostasis. In murine models, the absence of hepatic mTORC1 reduced circulating TAG, despite hepatosteatosis, while activation of mTORC1 depleted liver TAG stores. Additionally, mTORC1 promoted TAG secretion by regulating phosphocholine cytidylyltransferase α (CCTα), the rate-limiting enzyme involved in the synthesis of phosphatidylcholine (PC). Increasing PC synthesis in mice lacking mTORC1 rescued hepatosteatosis and restored TAG secretion. These data identify mTORC1 as a major regulator of phospholipid biosynthesis and subsequent VLDL-TAG secretion, leading to increased postprandial TAG secretion.

  9. Dynamics of mTORC1 activation in response to amino acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manifava, Maria; Smith, Matthew; Rotondo, Sergio; Walker, Simon; Niewczas, Izabella; Zoncu, Roberto; Clark, Jonathan; Ktistakis, Nicholas T

    2016-01-01

    Amino acids are essential activators of mTORC1 via a complex containing RAG GTPases, RAGULATOR and the vacuolar ATPase. Sensing of amino acids causes translocation of mTORC1 to lysosomes, an obligate step for activation. To examine the spatial and temporal dynamics of this translocation, we used live imaging of the mTORC1 component RAPTOR and a cell permeant fluorescent analogue of di-leucine methyl ester. Translocation to lysosomes is a transient event, occurring within 2 min of aa addition and peaking within 5 min. It is temporally coupled with fluorescent leucine appearance in lysosomes and is sustained in comparison to aa stimulation. Sestrin2 and the vacuolar ATPase are negative and positive regulators of mTORC1 activity in our experimental system. Of note, phosphorylation of canonical mTORC1 targets is delayed compared to lysosomal translocation suggesting a dynamic and transient passage of mTORC1 from the lysosomal surface before targetting its substrates elsewhere. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19960.001 PMID:27725083

  10. Phosphorylation of Ribosomal Protein S6 Mediates Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Complex 1-Induced Parathyroid Cell Proliferation in Secondary Hyperparathyroidism.

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    Volovelsky, Oded; Cohen, Gili; Kenig, Ariel; Wasserman, Gilad; Dreazen, Avigail; Meyuhas, Oded; Silver, Justin; Naveh-Many, Tally

    2016-04-01

    Secondary hyperparathyroidism is characterized by increased serum parathyroid hormone (PTH) level and parathyroid cell proliferation. However, the molecular pathways mediating the increased parathyroid cell proliferation remain undefined. Here, we found that the mTOR pathway was activated in the parathyroid of rats with secondary hyperparathyroidism induced by either chronic hypocalcemia or uremia, which was measured by increased phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6 (rpS6), a downstream target of the mTOR pathway. This activation correlated with increased parathyroid cell proliferation. Inhibition of mTOR complex 1 by rapamycin decreased or prevented parathyroid cell proliferation in secondary hyperparathyroidism rats and in vitro in uremic rat parathyroid glands in organ culture. Knockin rpS6(p-/-) mice, in which rpS6 cannot be phosphorylated because of substitution of all five phosphorylatable serines with alanines, had impaired PTH secretion after experimental uremia- or folic acid-induced AKI. Uremic rpS6(p-/-) mice had no increase in parathyroid cell proliferation compared with a marked increase in uremic wild-type mice. These results underscore the importance of mTOR activation and rpS6 phosphorylation for the pathogenesis of secondary hyperparathyroidism and indicate that mTORC1 is a significant regulator of parathyroid cell proliferation through rpS6. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  11. Perspective: The potential role of essential amino acids and the mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) pathway in the pathogenesis of child stunting

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    Stunting is the best summary measure of chronic malnutrition in children. Approximately one-quarter of children under age 5 worldwide are stunted. Lipid-based or micronutrient supplementation has little to no impact in reducing stunting, which suggests that other critical dietary nutrients are missi...

  12. The splicing-factor oncoprotein SF2/ASF activates mTORC1.

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    Karni, Rotem; Hippo, Yoshitaka; Lowe, Scott W; Krainer, Adrian R

    2008-10-07

    The splicing factor SF2/ASF is an oncoprotein that is up-regulated in many cancers and can transform immortal rodent fibroblasts when slightly overexpressed. The mTOR signaling pathway is activated in many cancers, and pharmacological blockers of this pathway are in clinical trials as anticancer drugs. We examined the activity of the mTOR pathway in cells transformed by SF2/ASF and found that this splicing factor activates the mTORC1 branch of the pathway, as measured by S6K and eIF4EBP1 phosphorylation. This activation is specific to mTORC1 because no activation of Akt, an mTORC2 substrate, was detected. mTORC1 activation by SF2/ASF bypasses upstream PI3K/Akt signaling and is essential for SF2/ASF-mediated transformation, as inhibition of mTOR by rapamycin blocked transformation by SF2/ASF in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, shRNA-mediated knockdown of mTOR, or of the specific mTORC1 and mTORC2 components Raptor and Rictor, abolished the tumorigenic potential of cells overexpressing SF2/ASF. These results suggest that clinical tumors with SF2/ASF up-regulation could be especially sensitive to mTOR inhibitors.

  13. Glucose adsorption to chitosan membranes increases proliferation of human chondrocyte via mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 and sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1 signaling.

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    Chang, Shun-Fu; Huang, Kuo-Chin; Cheng, Chin-Chang; Su, Yu-Ping; Lee, Ko-Chao; Chen, Cheng-Nan; Chang, Hsin-I

    2017-10-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is currently still an irreversible degenerative disease of the articular cartilage. Recent, dextrose (d-glucose) intraarticular injection prolotherapy for OA patients has been reported to benefit the chondrogenic stimulation of damaged cartilage. However, the detailed mechanism of glucose's effect on cartilage repair remains unclear. Chitosan, a naturally derived polysaccharide, has recently been investigated as a surgical or dental dressing to control breeding. Therefore, in this study, glucose was adsorbed to chitosan membranes (CTS-Glc), and the study aimed to investigate whether CTS-Glc complex membranes could regulate the proliferation of human OA chondrocytes and to explore the underlying mechanism. Human OA and SW1353 chondrocytes were used in this study. The experiments involving the transfection of cells used SW1353 chondrocytes. A specific inhibitor and siRNAs were used to investigate the mechanism underlying the CTS-Glc-regulated proliferation of human chondrocytes. We found that CTS-Glc significantly increased the proliferation of both human OA and SW1353 chondrocytes comparable to glucose- or chitosan-only stimulation. The role of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling, including mTOR, raptor, and S6k proteins, has been demonstrated in the regulation of CTS-Glc-increased human chondrocyte proliferation. mTORC1 signaling increased the expression levels of maturated SREBP-1 and FASN and then induced the expressions of cell cycle regulators, that is, cyclin D, cyclin-dependent kinase-4 and -6 in human chondrocytes. This study elucidates the detailed mechanism behind the effect of CTS-Glc complex membranes in promoting chondrocyte proliferation and proposes a possible clinical application of the CTS-Glc complex in the dextrose intraarticular injection of OA prolotherapy in the future to attenuate the pain and discomfort of OA patients. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Both mTORC1 and mTORC2 are involved in the regulation of cell adhesion

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    Chen, Long; Xu, Baoshan; Liu, Lei; Liu, Chunxiao; Luo, Yan; Chen, Xin; Barzegar, Mansoureh; Chung, Jun; Huang, Shile

    2015-01-01

    mTOR is a central controller for cell growth/proliferation and survival. Recent studies have shown that mTOR also regulates cell adhesion, yet the underlying mechanism is not known. Here we found that inhibition of mTOR by rapamycin reduced the basal or type I insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1)-stimulated adhesion of cancer cells. Further research revealed that both mTORC1 and mTORC2 were involved in the regulation of cell adhesion, as silencing expression of raptor or rictor inhibited cell adhesion. Also, PP242, an mTORC1/2 kinase inhibitor, inhibited cell adhesion more potently than rapamycin (mTORC1 inhibitor). Of interest, ectopic expression of constitutively active and rapamycin-resistant mutant of p70 kinase 1 (S6K1) or downregulation of eukaryotic initiation factor 4E (eIF4E)-binding protein 1 (4E-BP1) conferred resistance to rapamycin inhibition of cell adhesion, whereas expression of constitutively hypophosphorylated 4E-BP1 (4EBP1-5A) or downregulation of S6K1 suppressed cell adhesion. In contrast, neither genetic manipulation of Akt activity nor pharmacological inhibition of Akt affected cell adhesion. The results suggest that both mTORC1 and mTORC2 are involved in the regulation of cell adhesion; and mTORC1 regulates cell adhesion through S6K1 and 4E-BP1 pathways, but mTORC2 regulates cell adhesion via Akt-independent mechanism. PMID:25762619

  15. Reperfusion Therapy with Rapamycin Attenuates Myocardial Infarction through Activation of AKT and ERK

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    Scott M. Filippone

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Prompt coronary reperfusion is the gold standard for minimizing injury following acute myocardial infarction. Rapamycin, mammalian target of Rapamycin (mTOR inhibitor, exerts preconditioning-like cardioprotective effects against ischemia/reperfusion (I/R injury. We hypothesized that Rapamycin, given at the onset of reperfusion, reduces myocardial infarct size through modulation of mTOR complexes. Adult C57 male mice were subjected to 30 min of myocardial ischemia followed by reperfusion for 1 hour/24 hours. Rapamycin (0.25 mg/kg or DMSO (7.5% was injected intracardially at the onset of reperfusion. Post-I/R survival (87% and cardiac function (fractional shortening, FS: 28.63±3.01% were improved in Rapamycin-treated mice compared to DMSO (survival: 63%, FS: 17.4±2.6%. Rapamycin caused significant reduction in myocardial infarct size (IS: 26.2±2.2% and apoptosis (2.87±0.64% as compared to DMSO-treated mice (IS: 47.0±2.3%; apoptosis: 7.39±0.81%. Rapamycin induced phosphorylation of AKT S473 (target of mTORC2 but abolished ribosomal protein S6 phosphorylation (target of mTORC1 after I/R. Rapamycin induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2 but inhibited p38 phosphorylation. Infarct-limiting effect of Rapamycin was abolished with ERK inhibitor, PD98059. Rapamycin also attenuated Bax and increased Bcl-2/Bax ratio. These results suggest that reperfusion therapy with Rapamycin protects the heart against I/R injury by selective activation of mTORC2 and ERK with concurrent inhibition of mTORC1 and p38.

  16. Adrenoceptors promote glucose uptake into adipocytes and muscle by an insulin-independent signaling pathway involving mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 2.

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    Mukaida, Saori; Evans, Bronwyn A; Bengtsson, Tore; Hutchinson, Dana S; Sato, Masaaki

    2017-02-01

    Uptake of glucose into skeletal muscle and adipose tissue plays a vital role in metabolism and energy balance. Insulin released from β-islet cells of the pancreas promotes glucose uptake in these target tissues by stimulating translocation of GLUT4 transporters to the cell surface. This process is complex, involving signaling proteins including the mechanistic (or mammalian) target of rapamycin (mTOR) and Akt that intersect with multiple pathways controlling cell survival, growth and proliferation. mTOR exists in two forms, mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1), and mTOR complex 2 (mTORC2). mTORC1 has been intensively studied, acting as a key regulator of protein and lipid synthesis that integrates cellular nutrient availability and energy balance. Studies on mTORC2 have focused largely on its capacity to activate Akt by phosphorylation at Ser473, however recent findings demonstrate a novel role for mTORC2 in cellular glucose uptake. For example, agonists acting at β2-adrenoceptors (ARs) in skeletal muscle or β3-ARs in brown adipose tissue increase glucose uptake in vitro and in vivo via mechanisms dependent on mTORC2 but not Akt. In this review, we will focus on the signaling pathways downstream of β-ARs that promote glucose uptake in skeletal muscle and brown adipocytes, and will highlight how the insulin and adrenergic pathways converge and interact in these cells. The identification of insulin-independent mechanisms that promote glucose uptake should facilitate novel treatment strategies for metabolic disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Regulation of Autophagy through TORC1 and mTORC1

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    Takeshi Noda

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is an intracellular protein-degradation process that is conserved across eukaryotes including yeast and humans. Under nutrient starvation conditions, intracellular proteins are transported to lysosomes and vacuoles via membranous structures known as autophagosomes, and are degraded. The various steps of autophagy are regulated by the target of rapamycin complex 1 (TORC1/mTORC1. In this review, a history of this regulation and recent advances in such regulation both in yeast and mammals will be discussed. Recently, the mechanism of autophagy initiation in yeast has been deduced. The autophagy-related gene 13 (Atg13 and the unc-51 like autophagy activating kinase 1 (Ulk1 are the most crucial substrates of TORC1 in autophagy, and by its dephosphorylation, autophagosome formation is initiated. Phosphorylation/dephosphorylation of Atg13 is regulated spatially inside the cell. Another TORC1-dependent regulation lies in the expression of autophagy genes and vacuolar/lysosomal hydrolases. Several transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulations are controlled by TORC1, which affects autophagy activity in yeast and mammals.

  18. Regulation of mTORC1 signaling by pH.

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    Aruna D Balgi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Acidification of the cytoplasm and the extracellular environment is associated with many physiological and pathological conditions, such as intense exercise, hypoxia and tumourigenesis. Acidification affects important cellular functions including protein synthesis, growth, and proliferation. Many of these vital functions are controlled by mTORC1, a master regulator protein kinase that is activated by various growth-stimulating signals and inactivated by starvation conditions. Whether mTORC1 can also respond to changes in extracellular or cytoplasmic pH and play a role in limiting anabolic processes in acidic conditions is not known. METHODOLOGY/FINDINGS: We examined the effects of acidifying the extracellular medium from pH 7.4 to 6.4 on human breast carcinoma MCF-7 cells and immortalized mouse embryo fibroblasts. Decreasing the extracellular pH caused intracellular acidification and rapid, graded and reversible inhibition of mTORC1, assessed by measuring the phosphorylation of the mTORC1 substrate S6K. Fibroblasts deleted of the tuberous sclerosis complex TSC2 gene, a major negative regulator of mTORC1, were unable to inhibit mTORC1 in acidic extracellular conditions, showing that the TSC1-TSC2 complex is required for this response. Examination of the major upstream pathways converging on the TSC1-TSC2 complex showed that Akt signaling was unaffected by pH but that the Raf/MEK/ERK pathway was inhibited. Inhibition of MEK with drugs caused only modest mTORC1 inhibition, implying that other unidentified pathways also play major roles. CONCLUSIONS: This study reveals a novel role for the TSC1/TSC2 complex and mTORC1 in sensing variations in ambient pH. As a common feature of low tissue perfusion, low glucose availability and high energy expenditure, acidic pH may serve as a signal for mTORC1 to downregulate energy-consuming anabolic processes such as protein synthesis as an adaptive response to metabolically stressful conditions.

  19. Folliculin (Flcn) inactivation leads to murine cardiac hypertrophy through mTORC1 deregulation

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    Hasumi, Yukiko; Baba, Masaya; Hasumi, Hisashi; Huang, Ying; Lang, Martin; Reindorf, Rachel; Oh, Hyoung-bin; Sciarretta, Sebastiano; Nagashima, Kunio; Haines, Diana C.; Schneider, Michael D.; Adelstein, Robert S.; Schmidt, Laura S.; Sadoshima, Junichi; Marston Linehan, W.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy, an adaptive process that responds to increased wall stress, is characterized by the enlargement of cardiomyocytes and structural remodeling. It is stimulated by various growth signals, of which the mTORC1 pathway is a well-recognized source. Here, we show that loss of Flcn, a novel AMPK–mTOR interacting molecule, causes severe cardiac hypertrophy with deregulated energy homeostasis leading to dilated cardiomyopathy in mice. We found that mTORC1 activity was upregulated in Flcn-deficient hearts, and that rapamycin treatment significantly reduced heart mass and ameliorated cardiac dysfunction. Phospho-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-alpha (T172) was reduced in Flcn-deficient hearts and nonresponsive to various stimulations including metformin and AICAR (5-amino-1-β-D-ribofuranosyl-imidazole-4-carboxamide). ATP levels were elevated and mitochondrial function was increased in Flcn-deficient hearts, suggesting that excess energy resulting from up-regulated mitochondrial metabolism under Flcn deficiency might attenuate AMPK activation. Expression of Ppargc1a, a central molecule for mitochondrial metabolism, was increased in Flcn-deficient hearts and indeed, inactivation of Ppargc1a in Flcn-deficient hearts significantly reduced heart mass and prolonged survival. Ppargc1a inactivation restored phospho-AMPK-alpha levels and suppressed mTORC1 activity in Flcn-deficient hearts, suggesting that up-regulated Ppargc1a confers increased mitochondrial metabolism and excess energy, leading to inactivation of AMPK and activation of mTORC1. Rapamycin treatment did not affect the heart size of Flcn/Ppargc1a doubly inactivated hearts, further supporting the idea that Ppargc1a is the critical element leading to deregulation of the AMPK–mTOR-axis and resulting in cardiac hypertrophy under Flcn deficiency. These data support an important role for Flcn in cardiac homeostasis in the murine model. PMID:24908670

  20. Acute and chronic rapamycin use in patients with Fibrodysplasia Ossificans Progressiva: A report of two cases.

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    Kaplan, Frederick S; Zeitlin, Leonid; Dunn, Stephen P; Benor, Shira; Hagin, David; Al Mukaddam, Mona; Pignolo, Robert J

    2017-12-11

    Fibrodysplasia Ossificans Progressiva (FOP) is an ultrarare genetic disorder of progressive, disabling heterotopic ossification for which there is presently no definitive treatment. Several recent studies in genetic mouse models of FOP support involvement of the mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) pathway in the pathophysiology of FOP and propose the repurposed use of rapamycin, an inhibitor of mTORC1 signaling in clinical trials for the management of FOP. Here we report two patients with the classic FOP mutation who received rapamycin-one for four months on a compassionate basis for treatment of acute flare-ups of the neck and back that were refractory to corticosteroid therapy-and the other for 18years for chronic immunosuppression following liver transplantation for intercurrent cytomegalovirus infection. In both patients, FOP progressed despite the use of rapamycin. This report highlights the real-world use of rapamycin in two FOP patients and provides insight into the use of rapamycin in clinical trials for the management of FOP. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. SMG-1 and mTORC1 Act Antagonistically to Regulate Response to Injury and Growth in Planarians

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    González-Estévez, Cristina; Felix, Daniel A.; Smith, Matthew D.; Paps, Jordi; Morley, Simon J.; James, Victoria; Sharp, Tyson V.; Aboobaker, A. Aziz

    2012-01-01

    Planarian flatworms are able to both regenerate their whole bodies and continuously adapt their size to nutrient status. Tight control of stem cell proliferation and differentiation during these processes is the key feature of planarian biology. Here we show that the planarian homolog of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase-related kinase (PIKK) family member SMG-1 and mTOR complex 1 components are required for this tight control. Loss of smg-1 results in a hyper-responsiveness to injury and growth and the formation of regenerative blastemas that remain undifferentiated and that lead to lethal ectopic outgrowths. Invasive stem cell hyper-proliferation, hyperplasia, hypertrophy, and differentiation defects are hallmarks of this uncontrolled growth. These data imply a previously unappreciated and novel physiological function for this PIKK family member. In contrast we found that planarian members of the mTOR complex 1, tor and raptor, are required for the initial response to injury and blastema formation. Double smg-1 RNAi experiments with tor or raptor show that abnormal growth requires mTOR signalling. We also found that the macrolide rapamycin, a natural compound inhibitor of mTORC1, is able to increase the survival rate of smg-1 RNAi animals by decreasing cell proliferation. Our findings support a model where Smg-1 acts as a novel regulator of both the response to injury and growth control mechanisms. Our data suggest the possibility that this may be by suppressing mTOR signalling. Characterisation of both the planarian mTORC1 signalling components and another PIKK family member as key regulators of regeneration and growth will influence future work on regeneration, growth control, and the development of anti-cancer therapies that target mTOR signalling. PMID:22479207

  2. SMG-1 and mTORC1 act antagonistically to regulate response to injury and growth in planarians.

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    Cristina González-Estévez

    Full Text Available Planarian flatworms are able to both regenerate their whole bodies and continuously adapt their size to nutrient status. Tight control of stem cell proliferation and differentiation during these processes is the key feature of planarian biology. Here we show that the planarian homolog of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase-related kinase (PIKK family member SMG-1 and mTOR complex 1 components are required for this tight control. Loss of smg-1 results in a hyper-responsiveness to injury and growth and the formation of regenerative blastemas that remain undifferentiated and that lead to lethal ectopic outgrowths. Invasive stem cell hyper-proliferation, hyperplasia, hypertrophy, and differentiation defects are hallmarks of this uncontrolled growth. These data imply a previously unappreciated and novel physiological function for this PIKK family member. In contrast we found that planarian members of the mTOR complex 1, tor and raptor, are required for the initial response to injury and blastema formation. Double smg-1 RNAi experiments with tor or raptor show that abnormal growth requires mTOR signalling. We also found that the macrolide rapamycin, a natural compound inhibitor of mTORC1, is able to increase the survival rate of smg-1 RNAi animals by decreasing cell proliferation. Our findings support a model where Smg-1 acts as a novel regulator of both the response to injury and growth control mechanisms. Our data suggest the possibility that this may be by suppressing mTOR signalling. Characterisation of both the planarian mTORC1 signalling components and another PIKK family member as key regulators of regeneration and growth will influence future work on regeneration, growth control, and the development of anti-cancer therapies that target mTOR signalling.

  3. Regulation of bone formation by baicalein via the mTORC1 pathway

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    Li SF

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Sheng-fa Li,1,2,* Jia-jun Tang,1,2,* Jian Chen,1–3,* Pei Zhang,4,* Ting Wang,5 Tian-yu Chen,1,2 Bo Yan,1,2 Bin Huang,1,2 Liang Wang,1,2 Min-jun Huang,1,2 Zhong-min Zhang,1,2 Da-di Jin1,21Academy of Orthopedics of Guangdong Province, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Orthopedics, The Third Affiliated Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong, People’s Republic of China; 3Three Gorges Central Hospital of Chongqing, Chongqing, People’s Republic of China; 4School of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong, People’s Republic of China; 5Department of Cell Biology, School of Basic Medical Science, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong, People’s Republic of China*These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Osteoporosis is a systemic skeletal disease that is characterized by low bone density and microarchitectural deterioration of bone tissue. The increasing prevalence of osteoporosis has attracted much attention. In this study, MC3T3-E1 pre-osteoblasts were treated with the natural compound, baicalein (0.1 µmol/L, 1 µmol/L, 10 µmol/L, to stimulate differentiation over a 14-day period. In addition, a canonical ovariectomized (OVX mouse model was used to investigate the effect of 3-month baicalein treatment (10 mg/kg per day in preventing postmenopausal osteoporosis. In vitro, we found that baicalein induced activation of alkaline phosphatase, stimulated the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1 signaling pathway, and induced expression of osteoblast differentiation markers, ie, osteocalcin, osterix, collagen Iα1, and runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2, in osteoblasts. In vivo, several bone parameters, including trabecular thickness, trabecular bone mineral density, and trabecular number, in the distal femoral metaphysis were significantly increased in OVX mice treated intragastrically with baicalein for 3 months

  4. mTORC1 signaling and primary cilia are required for brain ventricle morphogenesis.

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    Foerster, Philippe; Daclin, Marie; Asm, Shihavuddin; Faucourt, Marion; Boletta, Alessandra; Genovesio, Auguste; Spassky, Nathalie

    2017-01-15

    Radial glial cells (RCGs) are self-renewing progenitor cells that give rise to neurons and glia during embryonic development. Throughout neurogenesis, these cells contact the cerebral ventricles and bear a primary cilium. Although the role of the primary cilium in embryonic patterning has been studied, its role in brain ventricular morphogenesis is poorly characterized. Using conditional mutants, we show that the primary cilia of radial glia determine the size of the surface of their ventricular apical domain through regulation of the mTORC1 pathway. In cilium-less mutants, the orientation of the mitotic spindle in radial glia is also significantly perturbed and associated with an increased number of basal progenitors. The enlarged apical domain of RGCs leads to dilatation of the brain ventricles during late embryonic stages (ventriculomegaly), which initiates hydrocephalus during postnatal stages. These phenotypes can all be significantly rescued by treatment with the mTORC1 inhibitor rapamycin. These results suggest that primary cilia regulate ventricle morphogenesis by acting as a brake on the mTORC1 pathway. This opens new avenues for the diagnosis and treatment of hydrocephalus. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  5. The Role of Mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR) in Insulin Signaling.

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    Yoon, Mee-Sup

    2017-10-27

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a serine/threonine kinase that controls a wide spectrum of cellular processes, including cell growth, differentiation, and metabolism. mTOR forms two distinct multiprotein complexes known as mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) and mTOR complex 2 (mTORC2), which are characterized by the presence of raptor and rictor, respectively. mTOR controls insulin signaling by regulating several downstream components such as growth factor receptor-bound protein 10 (Grb10), insulin receptor substrate (IRS-1), F-box/WD repeat-containing protein 8 (Fbw8), and insulin like growth factor 1 receptor/insulin receptor (IGF-IR/IR). In addition, mTORC1 and mTORC2 regulate each other through a feedback loop to control cell growth. This review outlines the current understanding of mTOR regulation in insulin signaling in the context of whole body metabolism.

  6. Amino Acids Attenuate Insulin Action on Gluconeogenesis and Promote Fatty Acid Biosynthesis via mTORC1 Signaling Pathway in trout Hepatocytes

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    Weiwei Dai

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Carnivores exhibit poor utilization of dietary carbohydrates and glucose intolerant phenotypes, yet it remains unclear what are the causal factors and underlying mechanisms. We aimed to evaluate excessive amino acids (AAs-induced effects on insulin signaling, fatty acid biosynthesis and glucose metabolism in rainbow trout and determine the potential involvement of mTORC1 and p38 MAPK pathway. Methods: We stimulated trout primary hepatocytes with different AA levels and employed acute administration of rapamycin to inhibit mTORC1 activation. Results: Increased AA levels enhanced the phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6 kinase (S6K1, S6, and insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS-1 on Ser302 but suppressed Akt and p38 phosphorylation; up-regulated the expression of genes related to gluconeogenesis and fatty acid biosynthesis. mTORC1 inhibition not only inhibited the phosphorylation of mTORC1 downstream targets, but also blunted IRS-1 Ser302 phosphorylation and restored excessive AAs-suppressed Akt phosphorylation. Rapamycin also inhibited fatty acid biosynthetic and gluconeogenic gene expression. Conclusion: High levels of AAs up-regulate hepatic fatty acid biosynthetic gene expression through an mTORC1-dependent manner, while attenuate insulin-mediated repression of gluconeogenesis through elevating IRS-1 Ser302 phosphorylation, which in turn impairs Akt activation and thereby weakening insulin action. We propose that p38 MAPK probably also involves in these AAs-induced metabolic changes.

  7. AKT (v-akt murine thymoma viral oncogene homolog 1) and N-Ras (neuroblastoma ras viral oncogene homolog) coactivation in the mouse liver promotes rapid carcinogenesis by way of mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1), FOXM1 (forkhead box M1)/SKP2, and c-Myc pathways.

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    Ho, Coral; Wang, Chunmei; Mattu, Sandra; Destefanis, Giulia; Ladu, Sara; Delogu, Salvatore; Armbruster, Julia; Fan, Lingling; Lee, Susie A; Jiang, Lijie; Dombrowski, Frank; Evert, Matthias; Chen, Xin; Calvisi, Diego F

    2012-03-01

    Activation of v-akt murine thymoma viral oncogene homolog (AKT) and Ras pathways is often implicated in carcinogenesis. However, the oncogenic cooperation between these two cascades in relationship to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) development remains undetermined. To investigate this issue, we generated a mouse model characterized by combined overexpression of activated forms of AKT and neuroblastoma Ras viral oncogene homolog (N-Ras) protooncogenes in the liver by way of hydrodynamic gene transfer. The molecular mechanisms underlying crosstalk between AKT and N-Ras were assessed in the mouse model and further evaluated in human and murine HCC cell lines. We found that coexpression of AKT and N-Ras resulted in a dramatic acceleration of liver tumor development when compared with mice overexpressing AKT alone, whereas N-Ras alone did not lead to tumor formation. At the cellular level, concomitant up-regulation of AKT and N-Ras resulted in increased proliferation and microvascularization when compared with AKT-injected mice. Mechanistic studies suggested that accelerated hepatocarcinogenesis driven by AKT and N-Ras resulted from a strong activation of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1). Furthermore, elevated expression of FOXM1/SKP2 and c-Myc also contributed to rapid tumor growth in AKT/Ras mice, yet by way of mTORC1-independent mechanisms. The biological effects of coactivation of AKT and N-Ras were then recapitulated in vitro using HCC cell lines, which supports the functional significance of mTORC1, FOXM1/SKP2, and c-Myc signaling cascades in mediating AKT and N-Ras-induced liver tumor development. Our data demonstrate the in vivo crosstalk between the AKT and Ras pathways in promoting liver tumor development, and the pivotal role of mTORC1-dependent and independent pathways in mediating AKT and Ras induced hepatocarcinogenesis. Copyright © 2011 American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  8. Inhibition of mTOR by Rapamycin Results in Auditory Hair Cell Damage and Decreased Spiral Ganglion Neuron Outgrowth and Neurite Formation In Vitro

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    Katharina Leitmeyer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Rapamycin is an antifungal agent with immunosuppressive properties. Rapamycin inhibits the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR by blocking the mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1. mTOR is an atypical serine/threonine protein kinase, which controls cell growth, cell proliferation, and cell metabolism. However, less is known about the mTOR pathway in the inner ear. First, we evaluated whether or not the two mTOR complexes (mTORC1 and mTORC2, resp. are present in the mammalian cochlea. Next, tissue explants of 5-day-old rats were treated with increasing concentrations of rapamycin to explore the effects of rapamycin on auditory hair cells and spiral ganglion neurons. Auditory hair cell survival, spiral ganglion neuron number, length of neurites, and neuronal survival were analyzed in vitro. Our data indicates that both mTOR complexes are expressed in the mammalian cochlea. We observed that inhibition of mTOR by rapamycin results in a dose dependent damage of auditory hair cells. Moreover, spiral ganglion neurite number and length of neurites were significantly decreased in all concentrations used compared to control in a dose dependent manner. Our data indicate that the mTOR may play a role in the survival of hair cells and modulates spiral ganglion neuronal outgrowth and neurite formation.

  9. Glucose amplifies fatty acid-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress in pancreatic beta-cells via activation of mTORC1.

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    Etti Bachar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Palmitate is a potent inducer of endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress in beta-cells. In type 2 diabetes, glucose amplifies fatty-acid toxicity for pancreatic beta-cells, leading to beta-cell dysfunction and death. Why glucose exacerbates beta-cell lipotoxicity is largely unknown. Glucose stimulates mTORC1, an important nutrient sensor involved in the regulation of cellular stress. Our study tested the hypothesis that glucose augments lipotoxicity by stimulating mTORC1 leading to increased beta-cell ER stress. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We found that glucose amplifies palmitate-induced ER stress by increasing IRE1alpha protein levels and activating the JNK pathway, leading to increased beta-cell apoptosis. Moreover, glucose increased mTORC1 activity and its inhibition by rapamycin decreased beta-cell apoptosis under conditions of glucolipotoxicity. Inhibition of mTORC1 by rapamycin did not affect proinsulin and total protein synthesis in beta-cells incubated at high glucose with palmitate. However, it decreased IRE1alpha expression and signaling and inhibited JNK pathway activation. In TSC2-deficient mouse embryonic fibroblasts, in which mTORC1 is constitutively active, mTORC1 regulated the stimulation of JNK by ER stressors, but not in response to anisomycin, which activates JNK independent of ER stress. Finally, we found that JNK inhibition decreased beta-cell apoptosis under conditions of glucolipotoxicity. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Collectively, our findings suggest that mTORC1 mediates glucose amplification of lipotoxicity, acting through activation of ER stress and JNK. Thus, mTORC1 is an important transducer of ER stress in beta-cell glucolipotoxicity. Moreover, in stressed beta-cells mTORC1 inhibition decreases IRE1alpha protein expression and JNK activity without affecting ER protein load, suggesting that mTORC1 regulates the beta-cell stress response to glucose and fatty acids by modulating the synthesis and activity of specific

  10. Up-regulation of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 subunit Raptor by aldosterone induces abnormal pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell survival patterns to promote pulmonary arterial hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghamohammadzadeh, Reza; Zhang, Ying-Yi; Stephens, Thomas E.; Arons, Elena; Zaman, Paula; Polach, Kevin J.; Matar, Majed; Yung, Lai-Ming; Yu, Paul B.; Bowman, Frederick P.; Opotowsky, Alexander R.; Waxman, Aaron B.; Loscalzo, Joseph; Leopold, Jane A.; Maron, Bradley A.

    2016-01-01

    Activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) subunit Raptor induces cell growth and is a downstream target of Akt. Elevated levels of aldosterone activate Akt, and, in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), correlate with pulmonary arteriole thickening, which suggests that mTORC1 regulation by aldosterone may mediate adverse pulmonary vascular remodeling. We hypothesized that aldosterone-Raptor signaling induces abnormal pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell (PASMC) survival patterns to promote PAH. Remodeled pulmonary arterioles from SU-5416/hypoxia-PAH rats and monocrotaline-PAH rats with hyperaldosteronism expressed increased levels of the Raptor target, p70S6K, which provided a basis for investigating aldosterone-Raptor signaling in human PASMCs. Aldosterone (10−9 to 10−7 M) increased Akt/mTOR/Raptor to activate p70S6K and increase proliferation, viability, and apoptosis resistance in PASMCs. In PASMCs transfected with Raptor–small interfering RNA or treated with spironolactone/eplerenone, aldosterone or pulmonary arterial plasma from patients with PAH failed to increase p70S6K activation or to induce cell survival in vitro. Optimal inhibition of pulmonary arteriole Raptor was achieved by treatment with Staramine-monomethoxy polyethylene glycol that was formulated with Raptor-small interfering RNA plus spironolactone in vivo, which decreased arteriole muscularization and pulmonary hypertension in 2 experimental animal models of PAH in vivo. Up-regulation of mTORC1 by aldosterone is a critical pathobiologic mechanism that controls PASMC survival to promote hypertrophic vascular remodeling and PAH.—Aghamohammadzadeh, R., Zhang, Y.-Y., Stephens, T. E., Arons, E., Zaman, P., Polach, K. J., Matar, M., Yung, L.-M., Yu, P. B., Bowman, F. P., Opotowsky, A. R., Waxman, A. B., Loscalzo, J., Leopold, J. A., Maron, B. A. Up-regulation of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 subunit Raptor by aldosterone induces abnormal pulmonary artery

  11. Phosphorylation of Ribosomal Protein S6 Mediates Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Complex 1–Induced Parathyroid Cell Proliferation in Secondary Hyperparathyroidism

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    Volovelsky, Oded; Cohen, Gili; Kenig, Ariel; Wasserman, Gilad; Dreazen, Avigail; Meyuhas, Oded; Silver, Justin

    2016-01-01

    Secondary hyperparathyroidism is characterized by increased serum parathyroid hormone (PTH) level and parathyroid cell proliferation. However, the molecular pathways mediating the increased parathyroid cell proliferation remain undefined. Here, we found that the mTOR pathway was activated in the parathyroid of rats with secondary hyperparathyroidism induced by either chronic hypocalcemia or uremia, which was measured by increased phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6 (rpS6), a downstream target of the mTOR pathway. This activation correlated with increased parathyroid cell proliferation. Inhibition of mTOR complex 1 by rapamycin decreased or prevented parathyroid cell proliferation in secondary hyperparathyroidism rats and in vitro in uremic rat parathyroid glands in organ culture. Knockin rpS6p−/− mice, in which rpS6 cannot be phosphorylated because of substitution of all five phosphorylatable serines with alanines, had impaired PTH secretion after experimental uremia- or folic acid–induced AKI. Uremic rpS6p−/− mice had no increase in parathyroid cell proliferation compared with a marked increase in uremic wild–type mice. These results underscore the importance of mTOR activation and rpS6 phosphorylation for the pathogenesis of secondary hyperparathyroidism and indicate that mTORC1 is a significant regulator of parathyroid cell proliferation through rpS6. PMID:26283674

  12. Imbalanced mechanistic target of rapamycin C1 and C2 activity in the cerebellum of Angelman syndrome mice impairs motor function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jiandong; Liu, Yan; Moreno, Stephanie; Baudry, Michel; Bi, Xiaoning

    2015-03-18

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a neurogenetic disorder caused by deficiency of maternally expressed ubiquitin-protein ligase E3A (UBE3A), an E3 ligase that targets specific proteins for proteasomal degradation. Although motor function impairment occurs in all patients with AS, very little research has been done to understand and treat it. The present study focuses on Ube3A deficiency-induced alterations in signaling through the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway in the cerebellum of the AS mouse model and on potential therapeutic applications of rapamycin. Levels of tuberous sclerosis complex 2 (TSC2), a negative regulator of mTOR, were increased in AS mice compared with wild-type mice; however, TSC2 inhibitory phosphorylation was also increased. Correspondingly, levels of phosphorylated/active mTOR were increased. Phosphorylation of the mTORC1 substrates S6 kinase 1 (S6K1) and S6 was elevated, whereas that of the mTORC2 substrates AKT and N-myc downstream regulated 1 was decreased, suggesting enhanced mTORC1 but inhibited mTORC2 signaling. Semi-chronic treatment of AS mice with rapamycin not only improved their motor performance but also normalized mTORC1 and mTORC2 signaling. Furthermore, inhibitory phosphorylation of rictor, a key regulatory/structural subunit of the mTORC2 complex, was increased in AS mice and decreased after rapamycin treatment. These results indicate that Ube3A deficiency leads to overactivation of the mTORC1-S6K1 pathway, which in turn inhibits rictor, resulting in decreased mTORC2 signaling in Purkinje neurons of AS mice. Finally, rapamycin treatment also improved dendritic spine morphology in AS mice, through inhibiting mTORC1 and possibly enhancing mTORC2-mediated regulation of synaptic cytoskeletal elements. Collectively, our results indicate that the imbalance between mTORC1 and mTORC2 activity may contribute to synaptic pathology and motor impairment in AS. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/354706-13$15.00/0.

  13. Livers with constitutive mTORC1 activity resist steatosis independent of feedback suppression of Akt.

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    Heidi L Kenerson

    Full Text Available Insulin resistance is an important contributing factor in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. AKT and mTORC1 are key components of the insulin pathway, and play a role in promoting de novo lipogenesis. However, mTORC1 hyperactivity per se does not induce steatosis in mouse livers, but instead, protects against high-fat diet induced steatosis. Here, we investigate the in vivo mechanism of steatosis-resistance secondary to mTORC1 activation, with emphasis on the role of S6K1-mediated feedback inhibition of AKT. Mice with single or double deletion of Tsc1 and/or S6k1 in a liver-specific or whole-body manner were generated to study glucose and hepatic lipid metabolism between the ages of 6-14 weeks. Following 8 weeks of high-fat diet, the Tsc1-/-;S6k1-/- mice had lower body weights but higher liver TG levels compared to that of the Tsc1-/- mice. However, the loss of S6k1 did not relieve feedback inhibition of Akt activity in the Tsc1-/- livers. To overcome Akt suppression, Pten was deleted in Tsc1-/- livers, and the resultant mice showed improved glucose tolerance compared with the Tsc1-/- mice. However, liver TG levels were significantly reduced in the Tsc1-/-;Pten-/- mice compared to the Pten-/- mice, which was restored with rapamycin. We found no correlation between liver TG and serum NEFA levels. Expression of lipogenic genes (Srebp1c, Fasn were elevated in the Tsc1-/-;Pten-/- livers, but this was counter-balanced by an up-regulation of Cpt1a involved in fatty acid oxidation and the anti-oxidant protein, Nrf2. In summary, our in vivo models showed that mTORC1-induced resistance to steatosis was dependent on S6K1 activity, but not secondary to AKT suppression. These findings confirm that AKT and mTORC1 have opposing effects on hepatic lipid metabolism in vivo.

  14. Rapamycin-induced inhibition of HTLV-I LTR activity is rescued by c-Myb

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    Lever Andrew ML

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rapamycin is an immunosuppressive which represses translation of transcripts harbouring a polypyrimidine motif downstream of the mRNA cap site through the mammalian target of rapamycin complex. It inhibits the abnormal autologous proliferation of T-cell clones containing a transcriptionally active human T-lymphotropic virus, type I (HTLV-I provirus, generated from infected subjects. We showed previously that this effect is independent of the polypyrimidine motifs in the viral long terminal repeat (LTR R region suggesting that HTLV-I transcription, and not translation, is being affected. Here we studied whether rapamycin is having an effect on a specific transcription factor pathway. Further, we investigated whether mRNAs encoding transcription factors involved in HTLV-I transcriptional activation, specifically CREB, Ets and c-Myb, are implicated in the rapamycin-sensitivity of the HTLV-I LTR. Results An in vitro analysis of the role of SRE- and NF-κB-mediated transcription highlighted the latter as rapamycin sensitive. Over-expression of c-Myb reversed the rapamycin effect. Conclusion The sensitivity of HTLV-I transcription to rapamycin may be effected through an NF-κB-pathway associated with the rapamycin-sensitive mTORC1 cellular signalling network.

  15. mTORC1-independent TFEB activation via Akt inhibition promotes cellular clearance in neurodegenerative storage diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmieri, Michela; Pal, Rituraj; Nelvagal, Hemanth R.; Lotfi, Parisa; Stinnett, Gary R.; Seymour, Michelle L.; Chaudhury, Arindam; Bajaj, Lakshya; Bondar, Vitaliy V.; Bremner, Laura; Saleem, Usama; Tse, Dennis Y.; Sanagasetti, Deepthi; Wu, Samuel M.; Neilson, Joel R.; Pereira, Fred A.; Pautler, Robia G.; Rodney, George G.; Cooper, Jonathan D.; Sardiello, Marco

    2017-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases characterized by aberrant accumulation of undigested cellular components represent unmet medical conditions for which the identification of actionable targets is urgently needed. Here we identify a pharmacologically actionable pathway that controls cellular clearance via Akt modulation of transcription factor EB (TFEB), a master regulator of lysosomal pathways. We show that Akt phosphorylates TFEB at Ser467 and represses TFEB nuclear translocation independently of mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), a known TFEB inhibitor. The autophagy enhancer trehalose activates TFEB by diminishing Akt activity. Administration of trehalose to a mouse model of Batten disease, a prototypical neurodegenerative disease presenting with intralysosomal storage, enhances clearance of proteolipid aggregates, reduces neuropathology and prolongs survival of diseased mice. Pharmacological inhibition of Akt promotes cellular clearance in cells from patients with a variety of lysosomal diseases, thus suggesting broad applicability of this approach. These findings open new perspectives for the clinical translation of TFEB-mediated enhancement of cellular clearance in neurodegenerative storage diseases. PMID:28165011

  16. The interaction between early life epilepsy and autistic-like behavioral consequences: a role for the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delia M Talos

    Full Text Available Early life seizures can result in chronic epilepsy, cognitive deficits and behavioral changes such as autism, and conversely epilepsy is common in autistic children. We hypothesized that during early brain development, seizures could alter regulators of synaptic development and underlie the interaction between epilepsy and autism. The mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR modulates protein translation and is dysregulated in Tuberous Sclerosis Complex, a disorder characterized by epilepsy and autism. We used a rodent model of acute hypoxia-induced neonatal seizures that results in long term increases in neuronal excitability, seizure susceptibility, and spontaneous seizures, to determine how seizures alter mTOR Complex 1 (mTORC1 signaling. We hypothesized that seizures occurring at a developmental stage coinciding with a critical period of synaptogenesis will activate mTORC1, contributing to epileptic networks and autistic-like behavior in later life. Here we show that in the rat, baseline mTORC1 activation peaks during the first three postnatal weeks, and induction of seizures at postnatal day 10 results in further transient activation of its downstream targets phospho-4E-BP1 (Thr37/46, phospho-p70S6K (Thr389 and phospho-S6 (Ser235/236, as well as rapid induction of activity-dependent upstream signaling molecules, including BDNF, phospho-Akt (Thr308 and phospho-ERK (Thr202/Tyr204. Furthermore, treatment with the mTORC1 inhibitor rapamycin immediately before and after seizures reversed early increases in glutamatergic neurotransmission and seizure susceptibility and attenuated later life epilepsy and autistic-like behavior. Together, these findings suggest that in the developing brain the mTORC1 signaling pathway is involved in epileptogenesis and altered social behavior, and that it may be a target for development of novel therapies that eliminate the progressive effects of neonatal seizures.

  17. mTORC1 and mTORC2 selectively regulate CD8⁺ T cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollizzi, Kristen N; Patel, Chirag H; Sun, Im-Hong; Oh, Min-Hee; Waickman, Adam T; Wen, Jiayu; Delgoffe, Greg M; Powell, Jonathan D

    2015-05-01

    Activation of mTOR-dependent pathways regulates the specification and differentiation of CD4+ T effector cell subsets. Herein, we show that mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) and mTORC2 have distinct roles in the generation of CD8+ T cell effector and memory populations. Evaluation of mice with a T cell-specific deletion of the gene encoding the negative regulator of mTORC1, tuberous sclerosis complex 2 (TSC2), resulted in the generation of highly glycolytic and potent effector CD8+ T cells; however, due to constitutive mTORC1 activation, these cells retained a terminally differentiated effector phenotype and were incapable of transitioning into a memory state. In contrast, CD8+ T cells deficient in mTORC1 activity due to loss of RAS homolog enriched in brain (RHEB) failed to differentiate into effector cells but retained memory characteristics, such as surface marker expression, a lower metabolic rate, and increased longevity. However, these RHEB-deficient memory-like T cells failed to generate recall responses as the result of metabolic defects. While mTORC1 influenced CD8+ T cell effector responses, mTORC2 activity regulated CD8+ T cell memory. mTORC2 inhibition resulted in metabolic reprogramming, which enhanced the generation of CD8+ memory cells. Overall, these results define specific roles for mTORC1 and mTORC2 that link metabolism and CD8+ T cell effector and memory generation and suggest that these functions have the potential to be targeted for enhancing vaccine efficacy and antitumor immunity.

  18. The novel mTORC1/2 dual inhibitor INK-128 suppresses survival and proliferation of primary and transformed human pancreatic cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lou, Hai-zhou [Department of Medical Oncology, Sir Run Run Shaw Hospital, College of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310016 (China); Weng, Xiao-chuan [Department of Anesthesiology, Hangzhou Xia-sha Hospital, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Pan, Hong-ming; Pan, Qin [Department of Medical Oncology, Sir Run Run Shaw Hospital, College of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310016 (China); Sun, Peng [Department of Medical Oncology, Sun Yat-Sen University Cancer Center, Guangzhou 510060 (China); Liu, Li-li [Department of Medical Oncology, Sir Run Run Shaw Hospital, College of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310016 (China); Chen, Bin, E-mail: chenbinhangzhou126@126.com [Department of Hepatopancreatobiliary Surgery, First People’s Hospital of Hangzhou, Hangzhou 310006 (China)

    2014-07-25

    Highlights: • INK-128 inhibits the survival and growth of human pancreatic cancer cells. • INK-128 induced pancreatic cancer cell apoptosis and necrosis simultaneously. • INK-128 blocks mTORC1/2 activation simultaneously in pancreatic cancer cells. • INK-128 down-regulates cyclin D1 and causes pancreatic cancer cell cycle arrest. • INK-128 significantly increases sensitivity of pancreatic cancer cells to gemcitabine. - Abstract: Pancreatic cancer has one of worst prognosis among all human malignancies around the world, the development of novel and more efficient anti-cancer agents against this disease is urgent. In the current study, we tested the potential effect of INK-128, a novel mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) complex 1 and 2 (mTORC1/2) dual inhibitor, against pancreatic cancer cells in vitro. Our results demonstrated that INK-128 concentration- and time-dependently inhibited the survival and growth of pancreatic cancer cells (both primary cells and transformed cells). INK-128 induced pancreatic cancer cell apoptosis and necrosis simultaneously. Further, INK-128 dramatically inhibited phosphorylation of 4E-binding protein 1 (4E-BP1), ribosomal S6 kinase 1 (S6K1) and Akt at Ser 473 in pancreatic cancer cells. Meanwhile, it downregulated cyclin D1 expression and caused cell cycle arrest. Finally, we found that a low concentration of INK-128 significantly increased the sensitivity of pancreatic cancer cells to gemcitabine. Together, our in vitro results suggest that INK-128 might be further investigated as a novel anti-cancer agent or chemo-adjuvant for pancreatic cancer treatment.

  19. USP9X deubiquitylating enzyme maintains RAPTOR protein levels, mTORC1 signalling and proliferation in neural progenitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, Caitlin R; Tan, Men-Chee; Premarathne, Susitha; Nanayakkara, Devathri; Bellette, Bernadette; Zencak, Dusan; Domingo, Deepti; Gecz, Jozef; Murtaza, Mariyam; Jolly, Lachlan A; Wood, Stephen A

    2017-03-24

    USP9X, is highly expressed in neural progenitors and, essential for neural development in mice. In humans, mutations in USP9X are associated with neurodevelopmental disorders. To understand USP9X's role in neural progenitors, we studied the effects of altering its expression in both the human neural progenitor cell line, ReNcell VM, as well as neural stem and progenitor cells derived from Nestin-cre conditionally deleted Usp9x mice. Decreasing USP9X resulted in ReNcell VM cells arresting in G0 cell cycle phase, with a concomitant decrease in mTORC1 signalling, a major regulator of G0/G1 cell cycle progression. Decreased mTORC1 signalling was also observed in Usp9x-null neurospheres and embryonic mouse brains. Further analyses revealed, (i) the canonical mTORC1 protein, RAPTOR, physically associates with Usp9x in embryonic brains, (ii) RAPTOR protein level is directly proportional to USP9X, in both loss- and gain-of-function experiments in cultured cells and, (iii) USP9X deubiquitlyating activity opposes the proteasomal degradation of RAPTOR. EdU incorporation assays confirmed Usp9x maintains the proliferation of neural progenitors similar to Raptor-null and rapamycin-treated neurospheres. Interestingly, loss of Usp9x increased the number of sphere-forming cells consistent with enhanced neural stem cell self-renewal. To our knowledge, USP9X is the first deubiquitylating enzyme shown to stabilize RAPTOR.

  20. Mammalian target of rapamycin complex 2 (mTORC2) controls glycolytic gene expression by regulating Histone H3 Lysine 56 acetylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadla, Raghavendra; Haldar, Devyani

    2017-11-16

    Metabolic reprogramming is a hallmark of cancer cells, but the mechanisms are not well understood. The mammalian target of rapamycin complex 2 (mTORC2) controls cell growth and proliferation and plays a critical role in metabolic reprogramming in glioma. mTORC2 regulates cellular processes such as cell survival, metabolism, and proliferation by phosphorylation of AGC kinases. Components of mTORC2 are shown to localize to the nucleus, but whether mTORC2 modulates epigenetic modifications to regulate gene expression is not known. Here, we identified histone H3 lysine 56 acetylation (H3K56Ac) is regulated by mTORC2 and show that global H3K56Ac levels were downregulated on mTORC2 knockdown but not on mTORC1 knockdown. mTORC2 promotes H3K56Ac in a tuberous sclerosis complex 1/2 (TSC1/2) mediated signaling pathway. We show that knockdown of sirtuin6 (SIRT6) prevented H3K56 deacetylation in mTORC2 depleted cells. Using glioma model consisting of U87EGFRvIII cells, we established that mTORC2 promotes H3K56Ac in glioma. Finally, we show that mTORC2 regulates the expression of glycolytic genes by regulating H3K56Ac levels at the promoters of these genes in glioma cells and depletion of mTOR leads to increased recruitment of SIRT6 to these promoters. Collectively, these results identify mTORC2 signaling pathway positively promotes H3K56Ac through which it may mediate metabolic reprogramming in glioma.

  1. Cryo-EM structure of Saccharomyces cerevisiae target of rapamycin complex 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karuppasamy, Manikandan; Kusmider, Beata; Oliveira, Taiana M; Gaubitz, Christl; Prouteau, Manoel; Loewith, Robbie; Schaffitzel, Christiane

    2017-11-23

    The target of rapamycin (TOR) kinase assembles into two distinct multiprotein complexes, conserved across eukaryote evolution. In contrast to TOR complex 1 (TORC1), TORC2 kinase activity is not inhibited by the macrolide rapamycin. Here, we present the structure of Saccharomyces cerevisiae TORC2 determined by electron cryo-microscopy. TORC2 contains six subunits assembling into a 1.4 MDa rhombohedron. Tor2 and Lst8 form the common core of both TOR complexes. Avo3/Rictor is unique to TORC2, but interacts with the same HEAT repeats of Tor2 that are engaged by Kog1/Raptor in mammalian TORC1, explaining the mutual exclusivity of these two proteins. Density, which we conclude is Avo3, occludes the FKBP12-rapamycin-binding site of Tor2's FRB domain rendering TORC2 rapamycin insensitive and recessing the kinase active site. Although mobile, Avo1/hSin1 further restricts access to the active site as its conserved-region-in-the-middle (CRIM) domain is positioned along an edge of the TORC2 active-site-cleft, consistent with a role for CRIM in substrate recruitment.

  2. The Kinase mTORC1 Promotes the Generation and Suppressive Function of Follicular Regulatory T Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lifan; Huang, Qizhao; Wang, Haoqiang; Hao, Yaxing; Bai, Qiang; Hu, Jianjun; Li, Yiding; Wang, Pengcheng; Chen, Xiangyu; He, Ran; Li, Bingshou; Yang, Xia; Zhao, Tingting; Zhang, Yanyan; Wang, Yifei; Ou, Juanjuan; Liang, Houjie; Wu, Yuzhang; Zhou, Xinyuan; Ye, Lilin

    2017-09-19

    Follicular regulatory T (Tfr) cells differentiate from conventional regulatory T (Treg) cells and suppress excessive germinal center (GC) responses by acting on both GC B cells and T follicular helper (Tfh) cells. Here, we examined the impact of mTOR, a serine/threonine protein kinase that senses and integrates diverse environmental cues, on the differentiation and functional competency of Tfr cells in response to protein immunization or viral infection. By genetically deleting Rptor or Rictor, essential components for mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) and mTOR complex 2 (mTORC2), respectively, we found that mTORC1 but not mTORC2 is essential for Tfr differentiation. Mechanistically, mTORC1-mediated phosphorylation of the transcription factor STAT3 induced the expression of the transcription factor TCF-1 by promoting STAT3 binding to the Tcf7 5'-regulatory region. Subsequently, TCF-1 bound to the Bcl6 promoter to induce Bcl6 expression, which launched the Tfr cell differentiation program. Thus, mTORC1 initiates Tfr cell differentiation by activating the TCF-1-Bcl-6 axis during immunization or infection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Effects of escitalopram and paroxetine on mTORC1 signaling in the rat hippocampus under chronic restraint stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Mi Kyoung; Choi, Cheol Min; McIntyre, Roger S; Cho, Hye Yeon; Lee, Chan Hong; Mansur, Rodrigo B; Lee, Yena; Lee, Jae-Hon; Kim, Young Hoon; Park, Sung Woo; Lee, Jung Goo

    2017-04-26

    Recent studies have suggested that the activation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling may be related to antidepressant action. Therefore, the present study evaluated whether antidepressant drugs would exert differential effects on mTOR signaling in the rat hippocampus under conditions of chronic restraint stress. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to restraint stress for 6 h/days for 21 days with either escitalopram (10 mg/kg) or paroxetine (10 mg/kg) administered after the chronic stress procedure. Western blot analyses were used to assess changes in the levels of phospho-Ser2448-mTOR, phospho-Thr37/46-4E-BP-1, phospho-Thr389-p70S6 K, phospho-Ser422-eIF4B, phospho-Ser240/244-S6, phospho-Ser473-Akt, and phospho-Thr202/Tyr204-ERK in the hippocampus. Chronic restraint stress significantly decreased the levels of phospho-mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1), phospho-4E-BP-1, phospho-p70S6 K, phospho-eIF4B, phospho-S6, phospho-Akt, and phospho-ERK (p stress reduced phospho-mTORC1 signaling activities in general, while escitalopram and paroxetine prevented these changes in phospho-mTORC1 signaling activities. These findings provide further data that contribute to understanding the possible relationships among mTOR activity, stress, and antidepressant drugs.

  4. Phase II study of mTORC1 inhibition by everolimus in neurofibromatosis type 2 patients with growing vestibular schwannomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goutagny, Stéphane; Raymond, Eric; Esposito-Farese, Marina; Trunet, Stéphanie; Mawrin, Christian; Bernardeschi, Daniele; Larroque, Béatrice; Sterkers, Olivier; Giovannini, Marco; Kalamarides, Michel

    2015-04-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) is a genetic disorder with bilateral vestibular schwannomas (VS) as the most frequent manifestation. Merlin, the NF2 tumor suppressor, was identified as a negative regulator of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1. Pre-clinical data in mice showed that mTORC1 inhibition delayed growth of NF2-schwannomas. We conducted a prospective single-institution open-label phase II study to evaluate the effects of everolimus in ten NF2 patients with progressive VS. Drug activity was monitored every 3 months. Everolimus was administered orally for 12 months and, if the decrease in tumor volume was >20 % from baseline, treatment was continued for 12 additional months. Other patients stopped when completed 12 months of everolimus but were allowed to resume treatment when VS volume was >20 % during 1 year follow-up. Nine patients were evaluable. Safety was evaluated using CTCAE 3.0 criteria. After 12 months of everolimus, no reduction in volume ≥20 % was observed. Four patients had progressive disease, and five patients had stable disease with a median annual growth rate decreasing from 67 %/year before treatment to 0.5 %/year during treatment. In these patients, tumor growth resumed within 3-6 months after treatment discontinuation. Everolimus was then reintroduced and VS decreased by a median 6.8 % at 24 months. Time to tumor progression increased threefold from 4.2 months before treatment to > 12 months. Hearing was stable under treatment. The safety of everolimus was manageable. Although the primary endpoint was not reached, further studies are required to confirm the potential for stabilization of everolimus.

  5. Next-generation mTOR inhibitors in clinical oncology: how pathway complexity informs therapeutic strategy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Wander, Seth A

    2011-04-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a PI3K-related kinase that regulates cell growth, proliferation, and survival via mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) and mTORC2. The mTOR pathway is often aberrantly activated in cancers. While hypoxia, nutrient deprivation, and DNA damage restrain mTORC1 activity, multiple genetic events constitutively activate mTOR in cancers. Here we provide a brief overview of the signaling pathways up- and downstream of mTORC1 and -2, and discuss the insights into therapeutic anticancer targets - both those that have been tried in the clinic with limited success and those currently under clinical development - that knowledge of these pathways gives us.

  6. Aspirin suppresses growth in PI3K-mutant breast cancer by activating AMPK and inhibiting mTORC1 signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Whitney S.; Laszewski, Tyler; Tsang, Tiffany; Beca, Francisco; Beck, Andrew H.; McAllister, Sandra S.; Toker, Alex

    2016-01-01

    Despite the high incidence of oncogenic mutations in PIK3CA, the gene encoding the catalytic subunit of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K), PI3K inhibitors have yielded little clinical benefit for breast cancer patients. Recent epidemiological studies have suggested a therapeutic benefit from aspirin intake in cancers harboring oncogenic PIK3CA. Here we show that mutant PIK3CA-expressing breast cancer cells have greater sensitivity to aspirin-mediated growth suppression than their wild-type counterparts. Aspirin decreased viability and anchorage-independent growth of mutant PIK3CA breast cancer cells independently of its effects on cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB). We ascribed the effects of aspirin to AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation, mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) inhibition, and autophagy induction. In vivo, oncogenic PIK3CA-driven mouse mammary tumors treated daily with aspirin resulted in decreased tumor growth kinetics, while combination therapy of aspirin and a PI3K inhibitor further attenuated tumor growth. Our study supports evaluation of aspirin and PI3K pathway inhibitors as combination therapy for targeting breast cancer. PMID:27940576

  7. Activation of mTORC1 by leucine is potentiated by branched-chain amino acids and even more so by essential amino acids following resistance exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moberg, Marcus; Apró, William; Ekblom, Björn; van Hall, Gerrit; Holmberg, Hans-Christer; Blomstrand, Eva

    2016-06-01

    Protein synthesis is stimulated by resistance exercise and intake of amino acids, in particular leucine. Moreover, activation of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling by leucine is potentiated by the presence of other essential amino acids (EAA). However, the contribution of the branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) to this effect is yet unknown. Here we compare the stimulatory role of leucine, BCAA, and EAA ingestion on anabolic signaling following exercise. Accordingly, eight trained volunteers completed four sessions of resistance exercise during which they ingested either placebo, leucine, BCAA, or EAA (including the BCAA) in random order. Muscle biopsies were taken at rest, immediately after exercise, and following 90 and 180 min of recovery. Following 90 min of recovery the activity of S6 kinase 1 (S6K1) was greater than at rest in all four trials (PlaceboBCAABCAA. However, after 180 min of recovery this difference between EAA and BCAA had disappeared, although with both these supplements the increases were still higher than with leucine (40%, P BCAA. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  8. Rapamycin improves sociability in the BTBR T(+)Itpr3(tf)/J mouse model of autism spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burket, Jessica A; Benson, Andrew D; Tang, Amy H; Deutsch, Stephen I

    2014-01-01

    Overactivation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of syndromic forms of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs), such as tuberous sclerosis complex, neurofibromatosis 1, and fragile X syndrome. Administration of mTORC1 (mTOR complex 1) inhibitors (e.g. rapamycin) in syndromic mouse models of ASDs improved behavior, cognition, and neuropathology. However, since only a minority of ASDs are due to the effects of single genes (∼10%), there is a need to explore inhibition of mTOR activity in mouse models that may be more relevant to the majority of nonsyndromic presentations, such as the genetically inbred BTBR T(+)Itpr3(tf)/J (BTBR) mouse model of ASDs. BTBR mice have social impairment and exhibit increased stereotypic behavior. In prior work, d-cycloserine, a partial glycineB site agonist that targets the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor, was shown to improve sociability in both Balb/c and BTBR mouse models of ASDs. Importantly, NMDA receptor activation regulates mTOR signaling activity. The current study investigated the ability of rapamycin (10mg/kg, i.p.×four days), an mTORC1 inhibitor, to improve sociability and stereotypic behavior in BTBR mice. Using a standard paradigm to assess mouse social behavior, rapamycin improved several measures of sociability in the BTBR mouse, suggesting that mTOR overactivation represents a therapeutic target that mediates or contributes to impaired sociability in the BTBR mouse model of ASDs. Interestingly, there was no effect of rapamycin on stereotypic behaviors in this mouse model. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Moderate Autophagy Inhibits Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Senescence to Stabilize Progressed Atherosclerotic Plaque via the mTORC1/ULK1/ATG13 Signal Pathway

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    Zhenli Luo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to investigate the effects of autophagy induced by rapamycin in the development of atherosclerosis plaque we established murine atherosclerosis model which was induced in ApoE−/− mice by high fat and cholesterol diet (HFD for 16 weeks. Rapamycin and 3-Methyladenine (MA were used as autophagy inducer and inhibitor respectively. The plaque areas in aortic artery were detected with HE and Oil Red O staining. Immunohistochemical staining were applied to investigate content of plaque respectively. In contrast to control and 3-MA groups, rapamycin could inhibit atherosclerosis progression. Rapamycin was able to increase collagen content and a-SMA distribution relatively, as well as decrease necrotic core area. Then we used MOVAS and culture with ox-LDL for 72 h to induce smooth muscle-derived foam cell model in vitro. Rapamycin and 3-MA were cultured together respectively. Flow cytometry assay and SA-β-Gal staining experiments were performed to detect survival and senescence of VSMCs. Western blot analysis were utilized to analyze the levels of protein expression. We found that rapamycin could promote ox-LDL-induced VSMCs autophagy survival and alleviate cellular senescence, in comparison to control and 3-MA groups. Western blot analysis showed that rapamycin could upregulate ULK1, ATG13 and downregulate mTORC1 and p53 protein expression.

  10. Branched-chain amino acids enhance premature senescence through mammalian target of rapamycin complex I-mediated upregulation of p21 protein.

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    Masayuki Nakano

    Full Text Available Branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs have been applied as an oral supplementation to patients with liver cirrhosis. BCAAs not only improve nutritional status of patients but also decrease the incidence of liver cancer. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR links cellular metabolism with growth and proliferation in response to nutrients, energy, and growth factors. BCAAs, especially leucine, have been shown to regulate protein synthesis through mTOR activities. On the other hand, cellular senescence is suggested to function as tumor suppressor mechanisms, and induced by a variety of stimuli including DNA damage-inducing drugs. However, it is not clear how BCAA supplementation prevents the incidence of liver cancer in patients with cirrhosis. Here we showed that human cancer cells, HepG2 and U2OS, cultured in medium containing BCAAs with Fischer's ratio about 3, which was shown to have highest activities to synthesize and secrete of albumin, had higher activities to induce premature senescence and elevate mTORC1 activities. Furthermore, BCAAs themselves enhanced the execution of premature senescence induced by DNA damage-inducing drugs, which was effectively prevented by rapamycin. These results strongly suggested the contribution of the mTORC1 pathway to the regulation of premature senescence. Interestingly, the protein levels of p21, a p53 target and well-known gene essential for the execution of cellular senescence, were upregulated in the presence of BCAAs. These results suggested that BCAAs possibly contribute to tumor suppression by enhancing cellular senescence mediated through the mTOR signalling pathway.

  11. Synergistic Effects between mTOR Complex 1/2 and Glycolysis Inhibitors in Non-Small-Cell Lung Carcinoma Cells.

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    Suhua Jiang

    Full Text Available Cancer metabolism has greatly interested researchers. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR is dysregulated in a variety of cancers and considered to be an appealing therapeutic target. It has been proven that growth factor signal, mediated by mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1, drives cancer metabolism by regulating key enzymes in metabolic pathways. However, the role of mTORC2 in cancer metabolism has not been thoroughly investigated. In this study, by employing automated spectrophotometry, we found the level of glucose uptake was decreased in non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC A549, PC-9 and SK-MES-1 cells treated with rapamycin or siRNA against Raptor, indicating that the inhibition of mTORC1 attenuated glycolytic metabolism in NSCLC cells. Moreover, the inhibition of AKT reduced glucose uptake in the cells as well, suggesting the involvement of AKT pathway in mTORC1 mediated glycolytic metabolism. Furthermore, our results showed a significant decrease in glucose uptake in rictor down-regulated NSCLC cells, implying a critical role of mTORC2 in NSCLC cell glycolysis. In addition, the experiments for MTT, ATP, and clonogenic assays demonstrated a reduction in cell proliferation, cell viability, and colony forming ability in mTOR inhibiting NSCLC cells. Interestingly, the combined application of mTORC1/2 inhibitors and glycolysis inhibitor not only suppressed the cell proliferation and colony formation, but also induced cell apoptosis, and such an effect of the combined application was stronger than that caused by mTORC1/2 inhibitors alone. In conclusion, this study reports a novel effect of mTORC2 on NSCLC cell metabolism, and reveals the synergistic effects between mTOR complex 1/2 and glycolysis inhibitors, suggesting that the combined application of mTORC1/2 and glycolysis inhibitors may be a new promising approach to treat NSCLC.

  12. Concurrent exercise incorporating high-intensity interval or continuous training modulates mTORC1 signaling and microRNA expression in human skeletal muscle.

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    Fyfe, Jackson J; Bishop, David J; Zacharewicz, Evelyn; Russell, Aaron P; Stepto, Nigel K

    2016-06-01

    We compared the effects of concurrent exercise, incorporating either high-intensity interval training (HIT) or moderate-intensity continuous training (MICT), on mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling and microRNA expression in skeletal muscle, relative to resistance exercise (RE) alone. Eight males (mean ± SD: age, 27 ± 4 yr; V̇o2 peak , 45.7 ± 9 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1)) performed three experimental trials in a randomized order: 1) RE (8 × 5 leg press repetitions at 80% 1-repetition maximum) performed alone and RE preceded by either 2) HIT cycling [10 × 2 min at 120% lactate threshold (LT); HIT + RE] or 3) work-matched MICT cycling (30 min at 80% LT; MICT + RE). Vastus lateralis muscle biopsies were obtained immediately before RE, either without (REST) or with (POST) preceding endurance exercise and +1 h (RE + 1 h) and +3 h (RE + 3 h) after RE. Prior HIT and MICT similarly reduced muscle glycogen content and increased ACC(Ser79) and p70S6K(Thr389) phosphorylation before subsequent RE (i.e., at POST). Compared with MICT, HIT induced greater mTOR(Ser2448) and rps6(Ser235/236) phosphorylation at POST. RE-induced increases in p70S6K and rps6 phosphorylation were not influenced by prior HIT or MICT; however, mTOR phosphorylation was reduced at RE + 1 h for MICT + RE vs. both HIT + RE and RE. Expression of miR-133a, miR-378, and miR-486 was reduced at RE + 1 h for HIT + RE vs. both MICT + RE and RE. Postexercise mTORC1 signaling following RE is therefore not compromised by prior HIT or MICT, and concurrent exercise incorporating HIT, but not MICT, reduces postexercise expression of miRNAs implicated in skeletal muscle adaptation to RE. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  13. Cargo and Carrier Effects of Rapamycin-Loaded Perfluorocarbon Nanoparticles

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    Bibee, Kristin Page

    Nanoparticle-based drug delivery has been championed as a means to increase local delivery of therapeutics while decreasing systemic drug exposure. By targeting the particles, and therefore the drugs, to diseased cells of interest, healthy cells will be spared and side effects avoided. This delivery mechanism would be particularly useful for drugs that interfere with cell growth and proliferation pathways, as blocking proliferation in normal cells leads to significant patient morbidity. Rapamycin is a macrolide and a known inhibitor of mTORC1, a protein complex that plays a crucial role in protein translation and cell growth. This work demonstrates the effects of rapamycin complexed with a nanoparticle carrier on two distinct pathologies: a new triple negative breast cancer cell line and a conventional mouse model of muscular dystrophy (mdx). Rapamycin is able to alter mitochondrial function and thus metabolism in both free and nanoparticle-delivered form without killing the cells. Although nanoparticles are considered to be a benign carrier, this work shows that perfluorocarbon nanoparticles are able to induce autophagy in vitro. The benefits of autophagy induction in cancer cells is cell and stage specific, but has been reported to be useful for radiosensitization of triple negative breast cancers. Additionally, the particles are shown to induce autophagy in the mdx model of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy and, when loaded with rapamycin, dramatically improve strength even in older animals with muscular dystrophy. Overall, this work enhances our understanding of the cellular effects of perfluorocarbon nanoparticles in two different disease models and enhances prospects for clinical translation of nanoparticle-based drug delivery.

  14. The Role of Mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR in Insulin Signaling

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    Mee-Sup Yoon

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR is a serine/threonine kinase that controls a wide spectrum of cellular processes, including cell growth, differentiation, and metabolism. mTOR forms two distinct multiprotein complexes known as mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1 and mTOR complex 2 (mTORC2, which are characterized by the presence of raptor and rictor, respectively. mTOR controls insulin signaling by regulating several downstream components such as growth factor receptor-bound protein 10 (Grb10, insulin receptor substrate (IRS-1, F-box/WD repeat-containing protein 8 (Fbw8, and insulin like growth factor 1 receptor/insulin receptor (IGF-IR/IR. In addition, mTORC1 and mTORC2 regulate each other through a feedback loop to control cell growth. This review outlines the current understanding of mTOR regulation in insulin signaling in the context of whole body metabolism.

  15. Methylglyoxal activates the target of rapamycin complex 2-protein kinase C signaling pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

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    Nomura, Wataru; Inoue, Yoshiharu

    2015-04-01

    Methylglyoxal is a typical 2-oxoaldehyde derived from glycolysis. We show here that methylglyoxal activates the Pkc1-Mpk1 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase cascade in a target of rapamycin complex 2 (TORC2)-dependent manner in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We demonstrate that TORC2 phosphorylates Pkc1 at Thr(1125) and Ser(1143). Methylglyoxal enhanced the phosphorylation of Pkc1 at Ser(1143), which transmitted the signal to the downstream Mpk1 MAP kinase cascade. We found that the phosphorylation status of Pkc1(T1125) affected the phosphorylation of Pkc1 at Ser(1143), in addition to its protein levels. Methylglyoxal activated mammalian TORC2 signaling, which, in turn, phosphorylated Akt at Ser(473). Our results suggest that methylglyoxal is a conserved initiator of TORC2 signaling among eukaryotes. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  16. A high-throughput, cell-based screening method for siRNA and small molecule inhibitors of mTORC1 signaling using the In Cell Western technique.

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    Hoffman, Gregory R; Moerke, Nathan J; Hsia, Max; Shamu, Caroline E; Blenis, John

    2010-04-01

    The mTORC1 pathway is a central regulator of cell growth, and defective mTORC1 regulation plays a causative role in a variety of human diseases, including cancer, tumor syndromes such as the tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) and lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM), and metabolic diseases such as diabetes and obesity. Given the importance of mTORC1 signaling in these diseases, there has been significant interest in developing screening methods suitable for identifying inhibitors of mTORC1 activation. To this end, we have developed a high-throughput, cell-based assay for the detection of rpS6-phosphorylation as a measure of mTORC1 signaling. This assay takes advantage of the "In Cell Western" (ICW) technique using the Aerius infrared imaging system (LI-COR Biosciences). The ICW procedure involves fixation and immunostaining of cells in a manner similar to standard immunofluorescence methods but takes advantage of secondary antibodies conjugated to infrared-excitable fluorophores for quantitative detection by the Aerius scanner. In addition, the cells are stained with an infrared-excitable succinimidyl ester dye, which covalently modifies free amine groups in fixed cells and provides a quantitative measure of cell number. We present validation data and pilot screens in a 384-well format demonstrating that this assay provides a statistically robust method for both small molecule and siRNA screening approaches designed to identify inhibitors of mTORC1 signaling.

  17. Dual mTORC1/2 inhibition induces anti-proliferative effect in NF1-associated plexiform neurofibroma and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor cells

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    Hivelin, Mikael; Nusbaum, Patrick; Hubas, Arnaud; Laurendeau, Ingrid; Lantieri, Laurent; Wolkenstein, Pierre; Vidaud, Michel; Pasmant, Eric; Chapuis, Nicolas; Parfait, Béatrice

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 30-50% of individuals with Neurofibromatosis type 1 develop benign peripheral nerve sheath tumors, called plexiform neurofibromas (PNFs). PNFs can undergo malignant transformation to highly metastatic malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) in 5-10% of NF1 patients, with poor prognosis. No effective systemic therapy is currently available for unresectable tumors. In tumors, the NF1 gene deficiency leads to Ras hyperactivation causing the subsequent activation of the AKT/mTOR and Raf/MEK/ERK pathways and inducing multiple cellular responses including cell proliferation. In this study, three NF1-null MPNST-derived cell lines (90-8, 88-14 and 96-2), STS26T sporadic MPNST cell line and PNF-derived primary Schwann cells were used to test responses to AZD8055, an ATP-competitive “active-site” mTOR inhibitor. In contrast to rapamycin treatment which only partially affected mTORC1 signaling, AZD8055 induced a strong inhibition of mTORC1 and mTORC2 signaling in MPNST-derived cell lines and PNF-derived Schwann cells. AZD8055 induced full blockade of mTORC1 leading to an efficient decrease of global protein synthesis. A higher cytotoxic effect was observed with AZD8055 compared to rapamycin in the NF1-null MPNST-derived cell lines with IC50 ranging from 70 to 140 nM and antiproliferative effect was confirmed in PNF-derived Schwann cells. Cell migration was impaired by AZD8055 treatment and cell cycle analysis showed a G0/G1 arrest. Combined effects of AZD8055 and PD0325901 MEK inhibitor as well as BRD4 (BromoDomain-containing protein 4) inhibitors showed a synergistic antiproliferative effect. These data suggest that NF1-associated peripheral nerve sheath tumors are an ideal target for AZD8055 as a single molecule or in combined therapies. PMID:26840085

  18. Regression of Subependymal Giant Cell Astrocytoma With Rapamycin in Tuberous Sclerosis Complex

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    Koenig, Mary Kay; Butler, Ian J.; Northrup, Hope

    2011-01-01

    The authors present a 21-year-old woman who has been receiving rapamycin for 5 months for bilateral subependymal giant cell astrocytomas. The patient was started at a dose of 0.2 mg/kg/day. Levels were maintained between 11 and 13 ng/mL. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain 2½ months after initiating rapamycin demonstrated a decrease in size of both astrocytomas (11 to 7.5 mm on the right and 8 to 5 mm on the left). Further studies are needed with prolonged observation to confirm these findings, determine the length of necessary treatment, and evaluate recurrence risk after discontinuation of rapamycin. PMID:18952591

  19. Rapamycin doses sufficient to extend lifespan do not compromise muscle mitochondrial content or endurance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Widlund, Anne Lykkegaard; Vang, Ole; Ye, Lan

    2013-01-01

    and compromise the function of mitochondria in cultured muscle cells, implying that defects in bioenergetics might be an unavoidable consequence of targeting mTORC1 in vivo. Therefore, we tested whether rapamycin, at the same doses used to extend lifespan, affects mitochondrial function in skeletal muscle. While...

  20. Metformin, Independent of AMPK, Inhibits mTORC1 In a Rag GTPase-Dependent Manner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalender, Adem; Selvaraj, Anand; Kim, So Young; Gulati, Pawan; lé, Sophie Br; Viollet, Benoit; Kemp, Bruce; Bardeesy, Nabeel; Dennis, Patrick; Schlager, John J.; Marette, André; Kozma, Sara C.; Thomas, George

    2010-01-01

    Dysfunctional mTORC1 signaling is associated with a number of human pathologies owing to its central role in controlling cell growth, proliferation, and metabolism. Regulation of mTORC1 is achieved by the integration of multiple inputs, including those of mitogens, nutrients, and energy. It is thought that agents that increase the cellular AMP/ATP ratio, such as the anti-diabetic biguanides metformin and phenformin, inhibit mTORC1 through AMPK activation of TSC1/2-dependent or -independent mechanisms. Unexpectedly, we found that biguanides inhibit mTORC1 signaling, not only in the absence of TSC1/2, but also in the absence of AMPK. Consistent with these observations, in two distinct pre-clinical models of cancer and diabetes, metformin acts to suppress mTORC1 signaling in an AMPK-independent manner. We found that the ability of biguanides to inhibit mTORC1 activation and signaling is, instead, dependent on the Rag GTPases. PMID:20444419

  1. Rictor/mammalian target of rapamycin complex 2 promotes macrophage activation and kidney fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Jiafa; Li, Jianzhong; Feng, Ye; Shu, Bingyan; Gui, Yuan; Wei, Wei; He, Weichun; Yang, Junwei; Dai, Chunsun

    2017-08-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signalling controls many essential cellular functions. However, the role of Rictor/mTOR complex 2 (mTORC2) in regulating macrophage activation and kidney fibrosis remains largely unknown. We report here that Rictor/mTORC2 was activated in macrophages from the fibrotic kidneys of mice. Ablation of Rictor in macrophages reduced kidney fibrosis, inflammatory cell accumulation, macrophage proliferation and polarization after unilateral ureter obstruction or ischaemia/reperfusion injury. In bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMMs), deletion of Rictor or blockade of protein kinase Cα inhibited cell migration. Additionally, deletion of Rictor or blockade of Akt abolished interleukin-4-stimulated or transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1-stimulated macrophage M2 polarization. Furthermore, deletion of Rictor downregulated TGF-β1-stimulated upregulation of multiple profibrotic cytokines, including platelet-derived growth factor, vascular endothelial growth factor and connective tissue growth factor, in BMMs. Conditioned medium from TGF-β1-pretreated Rictor-/- macrophages stimulated fibroblast activation less efficiently than that from TGF-β1-pretreated Rictor+/+ macrophages. These results demonstrate that Rictor/mTORC2 signalling can promote macrophage activation and kidney fibrosis. Targeting this signalling pathway in macrophages may shine light on ways to protect against kidney fibrosis in patients with chronic kidney diseases. Copyright © 2017 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. mTOR Hyperactivation by Ablation of Tuberous Sclerosis Complex 2 in the Mouse Heart Induces Cardiac Dysfunction with the Increased Number of Small Mitochondria Mediated through the Down-Regulation of Autophagy.

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    Manabu Taneike

    Full Text Available Mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1 is a key regulator of cell growth, proliferation and metabolism. mTORC1 regulates protein synthesis positively and autophagy negatively. Autophagy is a major system to manage bulk degradation and recycling of cytoplasmic components and organelles. Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC 1 and 2 form a heterodimeric complex and inactivate Ras homolog enriched in brain, resulting in inhibition of mTORC1. Here, we investigated the effects of hyperactivation of mTORC1 on cardiac function and structure using cardiac-specific TSC2-deficient (TSC2-/- mice. TSC2-/- mice were born normally at the expected Mendelian ratio. However, the median life span of TSC2-/- mice was approximately 10 months and significantly shorter than that of control mice. TSC2-/- mice showed cardiac dysfunction and cardiomyocyte hypertrophy without considerable fibrosis, cell infiltration or apoptotic cardiomyocyte death. Ultrastructural analysis of TSC2-/- hearts revealed misalignment, aggregation and a decrease in the size and an increase in the number of mitochondria, but the mitochondrial function was maintained. Autophagic flux was inhibited, while the phosphorylation level of S6 or eukaryotic initiation factor 4E -binding protein 1, downstream of mTORC1, was increased. The upregulation of autophagic flux by trehalose treatment attenuated the cardiac phenotypes such as cardiac dysfunction and structural abnormalities of mitochondria in TSC2-/- hearts. The results suggest that autophagy via the TSC2-mTORC1 signaling pathway plays an important role in maintenance of cardiac function and mitochondrial quantity and size in the heart and could be a therapeutic target to maintain mitochondrial homeostasis in failing hearts.

  3. Rapamycin Loaded Solid Lipid Nanoparticles as a New Tool to Deliver mTOR Inhibitors: Formulation and in Vitro Characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polchi, Alice; Magini, Alessandro; Mazuryk, Jarosław; Tancini, Brunella; Gapiński, Jacek; Patkowski, Adam; Giovagnoli, Stefano; Emiliani, Carla

    2016-05-09

    Recently, the use of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors, in particular rapamycin (Rp), has been suggested to improve the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. However, as Rp is a strong immunosuppressant, specific delivery to the brain has been postulated to avoid systemic exposure. In this work, we fabricated new Rp loaded solid lipid nanoparticles (Rp-SLN) stabilized with polysorbate 80 (PS80), comparing two different methods and lipids. The formulations were characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), wide angle X-ray scattering (WAXS), cryo-transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS) and particle tracking. In vitro release and short-term stability were assessed. Biological behavior of Rp-SLN was tested in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. The inhibition of mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) was evaluated over time by a pulse-chase study compared to free Rp and Rp nanocrystals. Compritol Rp-SLN resulted more stable and possessing proper size and surface properties with respect to cetyl palmitate Rp-SLN. Rapamycin was entrapped in an amorphous form in the solid lipid matrix that showed partial crystallinity with stable Lβ, sub-Lα and Lβ' arrangements. PS80 was stably anchored on particle surface. No drug release was observed over 24 h and Rp-SLN had a higher cell uptake and a more sustained effect over a week. The mTORC1 inhibition was higher with Rp-SLN. Overall, compritol Rp-SLN show suitable characteristics and stability to be considered for further investigation as Rp brain delivery system.

  4. Rapamycin Loaded Solid Lipid Nanoparticles as a New Tool to Deliver mTOR Inhibitors: Formulation and in Vitro Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Polchi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the use of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR inhibitors, in particular rapamycin (Rp, has been suggested to improve the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. However, as Rp is a strong immunosuppressant, specific delivery to the brain has been postulated to avoid systemic exposure. In this work, we fabricated new Rp loaded solid lipid nanoparticles (Rp-SLN stabilized with polysorbate 80 (PS80, comparing two different methods and lipids. The formulations were characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR, wide angle X-ray scattering (WAXS, cryo-transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM, dynamic light scattering (DLS and particle tracking. In vitro release and short-term stability were assessed. Biological behavior of Rp-SLN was tested in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. The inhibition of mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1 was evaluated over time by a pulse-chase study compared to free Rp and Rp nanocrystals. Compritol Rp-SLN resulted more stable and possessing proper size and surface properties with respect to cetyl palmitate Rp-SLN. Rapamycin was entrapped in an amorphous form in the solid lipid matrix that showed partial crystallinity with stable Lβ, sub-Lα and Lβ′ arrangements. PS80 was stably anchored on particle surface. No drug release was observed over 24 h and Rp-SLN had a higher cell uptake and a more sustained effect over a week. The mTORC1 inhibition was higher with Rp-SLN. Overall, compritol Rp-SLN show suitable characteristics and stability to be considered for further investigation as Rp brain delivery system.

  5. Branched Chain Amino Acid Suppresses Hepatocellular Cancer Stem Cells through the Activation of Mammalian Target of Rapamycin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishitani, Shinobu; Horie, Mayumi; Ishizaki, Sonoko; Yano, Hirohisa

    2013-01-01

    Differentiation of cancer stem cells (CSCs) into cancer cells causes increased sensitivity to chemotherapeutic agents. Although inhibition of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) leads to CSC survival, the effect of branched chain amino acids (BCAAs), an mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) activator remains unknown. In this study, we examined the effects of BCAA on hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells expressing a hepatic CSC marker, EpCAM. We examined the effects of BCAA and/or 5-fluorouracil (FU) on expression of EpCAM and other CSC-related markers, as well as cell proliferation in HCC cells and in a xenograft mouse model. We also characterized CSC-related and mTOR signal-related molecule expression and tumorigenicity in HCC cells with knockdown of Rictor or Raptor, or overexpression of constitutively active rheb (caRheb). mTOR signal-related molecule expression was also examined in BCAA-treated HCC cells. In-vitro BCAA reduced the frequency of EpCAM-positive cells and improved sensitivity to the anti-proliferative effect of 5-FU. Combined 5-FU and BCAA provided better antitumor efficacy than 5-FU alone in the xenograft model. Stimulation with high doses of BCAA activated mTORC1. Knockdown and overexpression experiments revealed that inhibition of mTOR complex 2 (mTORC2) or activation of mTORC1 led to decreased EpCAM expression and little or no tumorigenicity. BCAA may enhance the sensitivity to chemotherapy by reducing the population of cscs via the mTOR pathway. This result suggests the utility of BCAA in liver cancer therapy. PMID:24312415

  6. Branched chain amino acid suppresses hepatocellular cancer stem cells through the activation of mammalian target of rapamycin.

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    Shinobu Nishitani

    Full Text Available Differentiation of cancer stem cells (CSCs into cancer cells causes increased sensitivity to chemotherapeutic agents. Although inhibition of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR leads to CSC survival, the effect of branched chain amino acids (BCAAs, an mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1 activator remains unknown. In this study, we examined the effects of BCAA on hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC cells expressing a hepatic CSC marker, EpCAM. We examined the effects of BCAA and/or 5-fluorouracil (FU on expression of EpCAM and other CSC-related markers, as well as cell proliferation in HCC cells and in a xenograft mouse model. We also characterized CSC-related and mTOR signal-related molecule expression and tumorigenicity in HCC cells with knockdown of Rictor or Raptor, or overexpression of constitutively active rheb (caRheb. mTOR signal-related molecule expression was also examined in BCAA-treated HCC cells. In-vitro BCAA reduced the frequency of EpCAM-positive cells and improved sensitivity to the anti-proliferative effect of 5-FU. Combined 5-FU and BCAA provided better antitumor efficacy than 5-FU alone in the xenograft model. Stimulation with high doses of BCAA activated mTORC1. Knockdown and overexpression experiments revealed that inhibition of mTOR complex 2 (mTORC2 or activation of mTORC1 led to decreased EpCAM expression and little or no tumorigenicity. BCAA may enhance the sensitivity to chemotherapy by reducing the population of cscs via the mTOR pathway. This result suggests the utility of BCAA in liver cancer therapy.

  7. Beneficial metabolic effects of rapamycin are associated with enhanced regulatory cells in diet-induced obese mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makki, Kassem; Taront, Solenne; Molendi-Coste, Olivier; Bouchaert, Emmanuel; Neve, Bernadette; Eury, Elodie; Lobbens, Stéphane; Labalette, Myriam; Duez, Hélène; Staels, Bart; Dombrowicz, David; Froguel, Philippe; Wolowczuk, Isabelle

    2014-01-01

    The "mechanistic target of rapamycin" (mTOR) is a central controller of growth, proliferation and/or motility of various cell-types ranging from adipocytes to immune cells, thereby linking metabolism and immunity. mTOR signaling is overactivated in obesity, promoting inflammation and insulin resistance. Therefore, great interest exists in the development of mTOR inhibitors as therapeutic drugs for obesity or diabetes. However, despite a plethora of studies characterizing the metabolic consequences of mTOR inhibition in rodent models, its impact on immune changes associated with the obese condition has never been questioned so far. To address this, we used a mouse model of high-fat diet (HFD)-fed mice with and without pharmacologic mTOR inhibition by rapamycin. Rapamycin was weekly administrated to HFD-fed C57BL/6 mice for 22 weeks. Metabolic effects were determined by glucose and insulin tolerance tests and by indirect calorimetry measures of energy expenditure. Inflammatory response and immune cell populations were characterized in blood, adipose tissue and liver. In parallel, the activities of both mTOR complexes (e. g. mTORC1 and mTORC2) were determined in adipose tissue, muscle and liver. We show that rapamycin-treated mice are leaner, have enhanced energy expenditure and are protected against insulin resistance. These beneficial metabolic effects of rapamycin were associated to significant changes of the inflammatory profiles of both adipose tissue and liver. Importantly, immune cells with regulatory functions such as regulatory T-cells (Tregs) and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) were increased in adipose tissue. These rapamycin-triggered metabolic and immune effects resulted from mTORC1 inhibition whilst mTORC2 activity was intact. Taken together, our results reinforce the notion that controlling immune regulatory cells in metabolic tissues is crucial to maintain a proper metabolic status and, more generally, comfort the need to search for novel

  8. TGFβ-induced deptor suppression recruits mTORC1 and not mTORC2 to enhance collagen I (α2 gene expression.

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    Falguni Das

    Full Text Available Enhanced TGFβ activity contributes to the accumulation of matrix proteins including collagen I (α2 by proximal tubular epithelial cells in progressive kidney disease. Although TGFβ rapidly activates its canonical Smad signaling pathway, it also recruits noncanonical pathway involving mTOR kinase to regulate renal matrix expansion. The mechanism by which chronic TGFβ treatment maintains increased mTOR activity to induce the matrix protein collagen I (α2 expression is not known. Deptor is an mTOR interacting protein that suppresses mTOR activity in both mTORC1 and mTORC2. In proximal tubular epithelial cells, TGFβ reduced deptor levels in a time-dependent manner with concomitant increase in both mTORC1 and mTORC2 activities. Expression of deptor abrogated activity of mTORC1 and mTORC2, resulting in inhibition of collagen I (α2 mRNA and protein expression via transcriptional mechanism. In contrast, neutralization of endogenous deptor by shRNAs increased activity of both mTOR complexes and expression of collagen I (α2 similar to TGFβ treatment. Importantly, downregulation of deptor by TGFβ increased the expression of Hif1α by increasing translation of its mRNA. TGFβ-induced deptor downregulation promotes Hif1α binding to its cognate hypoxia responsive element in the collagen I (α2 gene to control its protein expression via direct transcriptional mechanism. Interestingly, knockdown of raptor to specifically block mTORC1 activity significantly inhibited expression of collagen I (α2 and Hif1α while inhibition of rictor to prevent selectively mTORC2 activation did not have any effect. Critically, our data provide evidence for the requirement of TGFβ-activated mTORC1 only by deptor downregulation, which dominates upon the bystander mTORC2 activity for enhanced expression of collagen I (α2. Our results also suggest the presence of a safeguard mechanism involving deptor-mediated suppression of mTORC1 activity against developing TGF

  9. Low-dose rapamycin reduces kidney volume angiomyolipomas and prevents the loss of renal function in a patient with tuberous sclerosis complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peces, Ramón; Peces, Carlos; Cuesta-López, Emilio; Pérez-Dueñas, Virginia; Vega-Cabrera, Cristina; Azorín, Sebastián; Selgas, Rafael

    2010-11-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is caused by constitutively activated mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) resulting in non-malignant tumours of several organs including renal angiomyolipomas (AMLs). AMLs may originate renal failure, hypertension and spontaneous life-threatening bleeding. Recent reports suggest a possible beneficial role of the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin for TSC. However, safety and efficiency of rapamycin in TSC patients as an anti-proliferative agent are still undefined. A 40-year-old man with sporadic TSC and a history of spontaneous bleeding from his left kidney AMLs received low-dose rapamycin for 12 months, and this was associated with a reduction in bilateral kidney AML volume, stabilization and even improvement of renal function. There was also a reduction of facial angiofibromas, improvement of blood pressure control and absence of AML bleeding over this time period. Brain lesion images remained stable, and no significant rapamycin-associated side effects were noted. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a case of reduction in renal AML volume together with preservation of renal function in a patient with TSC receiving low-dose rapamycin. These data suggest that it could be the result of the anti-angiogenic, anti-fibrotic and anti-proliferative effects of rapamycin.

  10. mTORC1-Dependent Metabolic Reprogramming Underlies Escape from Glycolysis Addiction in Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusapati, Raju V; Daemen, Anneleen; Wilson, Catherine; Sandoval, Wendy; Gao, Min; Haley, Benjamin; Baudy, Andreas R; Hatzivassiliou, Georgia; Evangelista, Marie; Settleman, Jeff

    2016-04-11

    Although glycolysis is substantially elevated in many tumors, therapeutic targeting of glycolysis in cancer patients has not yet been successful, potentially reflecting the metabolic plasticity of tumor cells. In various cancer cells exposed to a continuous glycolytic block, we identified a recurrent reprogramming mechanism involving sustained mTORC1 signaling that underlies escape from glycolytic addiction. Active mTORC1 directs increased glucose flux via the pentose phosphate pathway back into glycolysis, thereby circumventing a glycolysis block and ensuring adequate ATP and biomass production. Combined inhibition of glycolysis and mTORC1 signaling disrupted metabolic reprogramming in tumor cells and inhibited their growth in vitro and in vivo. These findings reveal novel combinatorial therapeutic strategies to realize the potential benefit from targeting the Warburg effect. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. mTORC1 Dependent Regulation of REDD1 Protein Stability

    OpenAIRE

    Chia Yee Tan; Thilo Hagen

    2013-01-01

    REDD1 is known to be transcriptionally upregulated in hypoxia. During hypoxic stress, REDD1 plays an important role as a mediator of mTORC1 inhibition. REDD1 is also subject to highly dynamic transcriptional regulation in response to a variety of other stress signals. In addition, the REDD1 protein is highly unstable. However, it is currently not well understood how REDD1 protein stability is regulated. In this study, we discovered that mTORC1 regulates REDD1 protein stability in a 26S protea...

  12. Crosstalk between mTORC1 and cAMP Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae (25). We identified the Arf1 GTPase to be involved in a signaling pathway that connects Gln to mTORC1 activation at the lysosome in...Empty vector,NLKwild type, orNLK-KNwas transfected togetherwith S6K into HEK293 cells. Cells were starved with amino acid-free medium for 1 h and...normal culture or starved with amino acid-free medium for 1 h. The activity of mTORC1was examined by S6K phosphorylation. (F ) NLK induces Raptor

  13. The mTORC1-Signaling Pathway and Hepatic Polyribosome Profile Are Enhanced after the Recovery of a Protein Restricted Diet by a Combination of Soy or Black Bean with Corn Protein

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    Claudia C. Márquez-Mota

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Between 6% and 11% of the world’s population suffers from malnutrition or undernutrition associated with poverty, aging or long-term hospitalization. The present work examined the effect of different types of proteins on the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTORC1-signaling pathway in: (1 healthy; and (2 protein restricted rats. (1 In total, 200 rats were divided into eight groups and fed one of the following diets: 20% casein (C, soy (S, black bean (B, B + Corn (BCr, Pea (P, spirulina (Sp, sesame (Se or Corn (Cr. Rats fed C or BCr had the highest body weight gain; rats fed BCr had the highest pS6K1/S6K1 ratio; rats fed B, BCr or P had the highest eIF4G expression; (2 In total, 84 rats were fed 0.5% C for 21 day and protein rehabilitated with different proteins. The S, soy + Corn (SCr and BCr groups had the highest body weight gain. Rats fed SCr and BCr had the highest eIF4G expression and liver polysome formation. These findings suggest that the quality of the dietary proteins modulate the mTORC1-signaling pathway. In conclusion, the combination of BCr or SCr are the best proteins for dietary protein rehabilitation due to the significant increase in body weight, activation of the mTORC1-signaling pathway in liver and muscle, and liver polysome formation.

  14. Target-of-rapamycin complex 1 (Torc1) signaling modulates cilia size and function through protein synthesis regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Shiaulou; Li, Jade; Diener, Dennis R.; Choma, Michael A.; Rosenbaum, Joel L.; Sun, Zhaoxia

    2012-01-01

    The cilium serves as a cellular antenna by coordinating upstream environmental cues with numerous downstream signaling processes that are indispensable for the function of the cell. This role is supported by the revelation that defects of the cilium underlie an emerging class of human disorders, termed “ciliopathies.” Although mounting interest in the cilium has demonstrated the essential role that the organelle plays in vertebrate development, homeostasis, and disease pathogenesis, the mechanisms regulating cilia morphology and function remain unclear. Here, we show that the target-of-rapamycin (TOR) growth pathway modulates cilia size and function during zebrafish development. Knockdown of tuberous sclerosis complex 1a (tsc1a), which encodes an upstream inhibitor of TOR complex 1 (Torc1), increases cilia length. In contrast, treatment of embryos with rapamycin, an inhibitor of Torc1, shortens cilia length. Overexpression of ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1 (S6k1), which encodes a downstream substrate of Torc1, lengthens cilia. Furthermore, we provide evidence that TOR-mediated cilia assembly is evolutionarily conserved and that protein synthesis is essential for this regulation. Finally, we demonstrate that TOR signaling and cilia length are pivotal for a variety of downstream ciliary functions, such as cilia motility, fluid flow generation, and the establishment of left-right body asymmetry. Our findings reveal a unique role for the TOR pathway in regulating cilia size through protein synthesis and suggest that appropriate and defined lengths are necessary for proper function of the cilium. PMID:22308353

  15. mTORC1 and muscle regeneration are regulated by the LINC00961-encoded SPAR polypeptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Akinobu; Pasut, Alessandra; Matsumoto, Masaki; Yamashita, Riu; Fung, Jacqueline; Monteleone, Emanuele; Saghatelian, Alan; Nakayama, Keiichi I; Clohessy, John G; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo

    2017-01-12

    Although long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are non-protein-coding transcripts by definition, recent studies have shown that a fraction of putative small open reading frames within lncRNAs are translated. However, the biological significance of these hidden polypeptides is still unclear. Here we identify and functionally characterize a novel polypeptide encoded by the lncRNA LINC00961. This polypeptide is conserved between human and mouse, is localized to the late endosome/lysosome and interacts with the lysosomal v-ATPase to negatively regulate mTORC1 activation. This regulation of mTORC1 is specific to activation of mTORC1 by amino acid stimulation, rather than by growth factors. Hence, we termed this polypeptide 'small regulatory polypeptide of amino acid response' (SPAR). We show that the SPAR-encoding lncRNA is highly expressed in a subset of tissues and use CRISPR/Cas9 engineering to develop a SPAR-polypeptide-specific knockout mouse while maintaining expression of the host lncRNA. We find that the SPAR-encoding lncRNA is downregulated in skeletal muscle upon acute injury, and using this in vivo model we establish that SPAR downregulation enables efficient activation of mTORC1 and promotes muscle regeneration. Our data provide a mechanism by which mTORC1 activation may be finely regulated in a tissue-specific manner in response to injury, and a paradigm by which lncRNAs encoding small polypeptides can modulate general biological pathways and processes to facilitate tissue-specific requirements, consistent with their restricted and highly regulated expression profile.

  16. The impact of cow's milk-mediated mTORC1-signaling in the initiation and progression of prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is dependent on androgen receptor signaling and aberrations of the PI3K-Akt-mTORC1 pathway mediating excessive and sustained growth signaling. The nutrient-sensitive kinase mTORC1 is upregulated in nearly 100% of advanced human PCas. Oncogenic mTORC1 signaling activates key subsets of mRNAs that cooperate in distinct steps of PCa initiation and progression. Epidemiological evidence points to increased dairy protein consumption as a major dietary risk factor for the development of PCa. mTORC1 is a master regulator of protein synthesis, lipid synthesis and autophagy pathways that couple nutrient sensing to cell growth and cancer. This review provides evidence that PCa initiation and progression are promoted by cow´s milk, but not human milk, stimulation of mTORC1 signaling. Mammalian milk is presented as an endocrine signaling system, which activates mTORC1, promotes cell growth and proliferation and suppresses autophagy. Naturally, milk-mediated mTORC1 signaling is restricted only to the postnatal growth phase of mammals. However, persistent consumption of cow´s milk proteins in humans provide highly insulinotropic branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) provided by milk´s fast hydrolysable whey proteins, which elevate postprandial plasma insulin levels, and increase hepatic IGF-1 plasma concentrations by casein-derived amino acids. BCAAs, insulin and IGF-1 are pivotal activating signals of mTORC1. Increased cow´s milk protein-mediated mTORC1 signaling along with constant exposure to commercial cow´s milk estrogens derived from pregnant cows may explain the observed association between high dairy consumption and increased risk of PCa in Westernized societies. As well-balanced mTORC1-signaling plays an important role in appropriate prostate morphogenesis and differentiation, exaggerated mTORC1-signaling by high cow´s milk consumption predominantly during critical growth phases of prostate development and differentiation may exert long-term adverse effects on prostate health. Attenuation of mTORC1 signaling by contemporary Paleolithic diets and restriction of dairy protein intake, especially during mTORC1-dependent phases of prostate development and differentiation, may offer protection from the most common dairy-promoted cancer in men of Western societies. PMID:22891897

  17. The impact of cow's milk-mediated mTORC1-signaling in the initiation and progression of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnik, Bodo C; John, Swen Malte; Carrera-Bastos, Pedro; Cordain, Loren

    2012-08-14

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is dependent on androgen receptor signaling and aberrations of the PI3K-Akt-mTORC1 pathway mediating excessive and sustained growth signaling. The nutrient-sensitive kinase mTORC1 is upregulated in nearly 100% of advanced human PCas. Oncogenic mTORC1 signaling activates key subsets of mRNAs that cooperate in distinct steps of PCa initiation and progression. Epidemiological evidence points to increased dairy protein consumption as a major dietary risk factor for the development of PCa. mTORC1 is a master regulator of protein synthesis, lipid synthesis and autophagy pathways that couple nutrient sensing to cell growth and cancer. This review provides evidence that PCa initiation and progression are promoted by cow´s milk, but not human milk, stimulation of mTORC1 signaling. Mammalian milk is presented as an endocrine signaling system, which activates mTORC1, promotes cell growth and proliferation and suppresses autophagy. Naturally, milk-mediated mTORC1 signaling is restricted only to the postnatal growth phase of mammals. However, persistent consumption of cow´s milk proteins in humans provide highly insulinotropic branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) provided by milk´s fast hydrolysable whey proteins, which elevate postprandial plasma insulin levels, and increase hepatic IGF-1 plasma concentrations by casein-derived amino acids. BCAAs, insulin and IGF-1 are pivotal activating signals of mTORC1. Increased cow´s milk protein-mediated mTORC1 signaling along with constant exposure to commercial cow´s milk estrogens derived from pregnant cows may explain the observed association between high dairy consumption and increased risk of PCa in Westernized societies. As well-balanced mTORC1-signaling plays an important role in appropriate prostate morphogenesis and differentiation, exaggerated mTORC1-signaling by high cow´s milk consumption predominantly during critical growth phases of prostate development and differentiation may exert long-term adverse effects on prostate health. Attenuation of mTORC1 signaling by contemporary Paleolithic diets and restriction of dairy protein intake, especially during mTORC1-dependent phases of prostate development and differentiation, may offer protection from the most common dairy-promoted cancer in men of Western societies.

  18. The impact of cow's milk-mediated mTORC1-signaling in the initiation and progression of prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melnik Bodo C

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Prostate cancer (PCa is dependent on androgen receptor signaling and aberrations of the PI3K-Akt-mTORC1 pathway mediating excessive and sustained growth signaling. The nutrient-sensitive kinase mTORC1 is upregulated in nearly 100% of advanced human PCas. Oncogenic mTORC1 signaling activates key subsets of mRNAs that cooperate in distinct steps of PCa initiation and progression. Epidemiological evidence points to increased dairy protein consumption as a major dietary risk factor for the development of PCa. mTORC1 is a master regulator of protein synthesis, lipid synthesis and autophagy pathways that couple nutrient sensing to cell growth and cancer. This review provides evidence that PCa initiation and progression are promoted by cow´s milk, but not human milk, stimulation of mTORC1 signaling. Mammalian milk is presented as an endocrine signaling system, which activates mTORC1, promotes cell growth and proliferation and suppresses autophagy. Naturally, milk-mediated mTORC1 signaling is restricted only to the postnatal growth phase of mammals. However, persistent consumption of cow´s milk proteins in humans provide highly insulinotropic branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs provided by milk´s fast hydrolysable whey proteins, which elevate postprandial plasma insulin levels, and increase hepatic IGF-1 plasma concentrations by casein-derived amino acids. BCAAs, insulin and IGF-1 are pivotal activating signals of mTORC1. Increased cow´s milk protein-mediated mTORC1 signaling along with constant exposure to commercial cow´s milk estrogens derived from pregnant cows may explain the observed association between high dairy consumption and increased risk of PCa in Westernized societies. As well-balanced mTORC1-signaling plays an important role in appropriate prostate morphogenesis and differentiation, exaggerated mTORC1-signaling by high cow´s milk consumption predominantly during critical growth phases of prostate development and differentiation may exert long-term adverse effects on prostate health. Attenuation of mTORC1 signaling by contemporary Paleolithic diets and restriction of dairy protein intake, especially during mTORC1-dependent phases of prostate development and differentiation, may offer protection from the most common dairy-promoted cancer in men of Western societies.

  19. Mammalian Target of Rapamycin: Hitting the Bull's-Eye for Neurological Disorders

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    Zhao Zhong Chong

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR and its associated cell signaling pathways have garnered significant attention for their roles in cell biology and oncology. Interestingly,the explosion of information in this field has linked mTOR to neurological diseases with promising initial studies. mTOR, a 289 kDa serine/threonine protein kinase, plays an important role in cell growth and proliferation and is activated through phosphorylation in response to growth factors, mitogens and hormones. Growth factors, amino acids, cellular nutrients and oxygen deficiency can downregulate mTOR activity. The function of mTOR signaling is mediated primarily through two mTOR complexes: mTORC1 and mTORC2. mTORC1 initiates cap-dependent protein translation, a rate-limiting step of protein synthesis, through the phosphorylation of the targets eukaryotic initiation factor 4E-binding protein 1 (4EBP1 and p70 ribosomal S6 kinase (p70S6K. In contrast, mTORC2 regulates development of the cytoskeleton and also controls cell survival. Although closely tied to tumorigenesis, mTOR and the downstream signaling pathways are significantly involved in the central nervous system (CNS with synaptic plasticity, memory retention, neuroendocrine regulation associated with food intake and puberty and modulation of neuronal repair following injury. The signaling pathways of mTOR also are believed to be a significant component in a number of neurological diseases, such as Alzheimer disease, Parkinson disease and Huntington disease, tuberous sclerosis, neurofibromatosis, fragile X syndrome, epilepsy, traumatic brain injury and ischemic stroke. Here we describe the role of mTOR in the CNS and illustrate the potential for new strategies directed against neurological disorders.

  20. Induction of biogenic magnetization and redox control by a component of the target of rapamycin complex 1 signaling pathway.

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    Keiji Nishida

    Full Text Available Most organisms are simply diamagnetic, while magnetotactic bacteria and migratory animals are among organisms that exploit magnetism. Biogenic magnetization not only is of fundamental interest, but also has industrial potential. However, the key factor(s that enable biogenic magnetization in coordination with other cellular functions and metabolism remain unknown. To address the requirements for induction and the application of synthetic bio-magnetism, we explored the creation of magnetism in a simple model organism. Cell magnetization was first observed by attraction towards a magnet when normally diamagnetic yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae were grown with ferric citrate. The magnetization was further enhanced by genetic modification of iron homeostasis and introduction of ferritin. The acquired magnetizable properties enabled the cells to be attracted to a magnet, and be trapped by a magnetic column. Superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID magnetometry confirmed and quantitatively characterized the acquired paramagnetism. Electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy showed electron-dense iron-containing aggregates within the magnetized cells. Magnetization-based screening of gene knockouts identified Tco89p, a component of TORC1 (Target of rapamycin complex 1, as important for magnetization; loss of TCO89 and treatment with rapamycin reduced magnetization in a TCO89-dependent manner. The TCO89 expression level positively correlated with magnetization, enabling inducible magnetization. Several carbon metabolism genes were also shown to affect magnetization. Redox mediators indicated that TCO89 alters the intracellular redox to an oxidized state in a dose-dependent manner. Taken together, we demonstrated that synthetic induction of magnetization is possible and that the key factors are local redox control through carbon metabolism and iron supply.

  1. Repletion of branched chain amino acids reverses mTORC1 signaling but not improved metabolism during dietary protein dilution

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    Adriano Maida

    2017-08-01

    Conclusions: Repletion of BCAAs in dietary PD is sufficient to oppose changes in somatic mTORC1 signaling but does not reverse the hepatic ISR nor induce insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes during dietary PD.

  2. Post-transcriptional Regulation of De Novo Lipogenesis by mTORC1-S6K1-SRPK2 Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Gina; Zheng, Yuxiang; Cho, Sungyun; Jang, Cholsoon; England, Christina; Dempsey, Jamie M; Yu, Yonghao; Liu, Xiaolei; He, Long; Cavaliere, Paola M; Chavez, Andre; Zhang, Erik; Isik, Meltem; Couvillon, Anthony; Dephoure, Noah E; Blackwell, T Keith; Yu, Jane J; Rabinowitz, Joshua D; Cantley, Lewis C; Blenis, John

    2017-12-14

    mTORC1 is a signal integrator and master regulator of cellular anabolic processes linked to cell growth and survival. Here, we demonstrate that mTORC1 promotes lipid biogenesis via SRPK2, a key regulator of RNA-binding SR proteins. mTORC1-activated S6K1 phosphorylates SRPK2 at Ser494, which primes Ser497 phosphorylation by CK1. These phosphorylation events promote SRPK2 nuclear translocation and phosphorylation of SR proteins. Genome-wide transcriptome analysis reveals that lipid biosynthetic enzymes are among the downstream targets of mTORC1-SRPK2 signaling. Mechanistically, SRPK2 promotes SR protein binding to U1-70K to induce splicing of lipogenic pre-mRNAs. Inhibition of this signaling pathway leads to intron retention of lipogenic genes, which triggers nonsense-mediated mRNA decay. Genetic or pharmacological inhibition of SRPK2 blunts de novo lipid synthesis, thereby suppressing cell growth. These results thus reveal a novel role of mTORC1-SRPK2 signaling in post-transcriptional regulation of lipid metabolism and demonstrate that SRPK2 is a potential therapeutic target for mTORC1-driven metabolic disorders. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Chronic signaling via the metabolic checkpoint kinase mTORC1 induces macrophage granuloma formation and marks sarcoidosis progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linke, Monika; Pham, Ha Thi Thanh; Katholnig, Karl; Schnöller, Thomas; Miller, Anne; Demel, Florian; Schütz, Birgit; Rosner, Margit; Kovacic, Boris; Sukhbaatar, Nyamdelger; Niederreiter, Birgit; Blüml, Stephan; Kuess, Peter; Sexl, Veronika; Müller, Mathias; Mikula, Mario; Weckwerth, Wolfram; Haschemi, Arvand; Susani, Martin; Hengstschläger, Markus; Gambello, Michael J; Weichhart, Thomas

    2017-03-01

    The aggregation of hypertrophic macrophages constitutes the basis of all granulomatous diseases, such as tuberculosis or sarcoidosis, and is decisive for disease pathogenesis. However, macrophage-intrinsic pathways driving granuloma initiation and maintenance remain elusive. We found that activation of the metabolic checkpoint kinase mTORC1 in macrophages by deletion of the gene encoding tuberous sclerosis 2 (Tsc2) was sufficient to induce hypertrophy and proliferation, resulting in excessive granuloma formation in vivo. TSC2-deficient macrophages formed mTORC1-dependent granulomatous structures in vitro and showed constitutive proliferation that was mediated by the neo-expression of cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4). Moreover, mTORC1 promoted metabolic reprogramming via CDK4 toward increased glycolysis while simultaneously inhibiting NF-κB signaling and apoptosis. Inhibition of mTORC1 induced apoptosis and completely resolved granulomas in myeloid TSC2-deficient mice. In human sarcoidosis patients, mTORC1 activation, macrophage proliferation and glycolysis were identified as hallmarks that correlated with clinical disease progression. Collectively, TSC2 maintains macrophage quiescence and prevents mTORC1-dependent granulomatous disease with clinical implications for sarcoidosis.

  4. Negative Effects of Chronic Rapamycin Treatment on Behavior in a Mouse Model of Fragile X Syndrome

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    Rachel M. Saré

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Fragile X syndrome (FXS, the most common form of inherited intellectual disability, is also highly associated with autism spectrum disorders (ASD. It is caused by expansion of a CGG repeat sequence on the X chromosome resulting in silencing of the FMR1 gene. This is modeled in the mouse by deletion of Fmr1 (Fmr1 KO. Fmr1 KO mice recapitulate many of the behavioral features of the disorder including seizure susceptibility, hyperactivity, impaired social behavior, sleep problems, and learning and memory deficits. The mammalian target of rapamycin pathway (mTORC1 is upregulated in Fmr1 KO mice and is thought to be important for the pathogenesis of this disorder. We treated Fmr1 KO mice chronically with an mTORC1 inhibitor, rapamycin, to determine if rapamycin treatment could reverse behavioral phenotypes. We performed open field, zero maze, social behavior, sleep, passive avoidance, and audiogenic seizure testing. We found that pS6 was upregulated in Fmr1 KO mice and normalized by rapamycin treatment, but, except for an anxiogenic effect, it did not reverse any of the behavioral phenotypes examined. In fact, rapamycin treatment had an adverse effect on sleep and social behavior in both control and Fmr1 KO mice. These results suggest that targeting the mTOR pathway in FXS is not a good treatment strategy and that other pathways should be considered.

  5. Stoichiometry and assembly of mTOR complexes revealed by single-molecule pulldown.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Ankur; Arauz, Edwin; Aggarwal, Vasudha; Ikon, Nikita; Chen, Jie; Ha, Taekjip

    2014-12-16

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) kinase is a master regulator of cellular, developmental, and metabolic processes. Deregulation of mTOR signaling is implicated in numerous human diseases including cancer and diabetes. mTOR functions as part of either of the two multisubunit complexes, mTORC1 and mTORC2, but molecular details about the assembly and oligomerization of mTORCs are currently lacking. We use the single-molecule pulldown (SiMPull) assay that combines principles of conventional pulldown assays with single-molecule fluorescence microscopy to investigate the stoichiometry and assembly of mTORCs. After validating our approach with mTORC1, confirming a dimeric assembly as previously reported, we show that all major components of mTORC2 exist in two copies per complex, indicating that mTORC2 assembles as a homodimer. Interestingly, each mTORC component, when free from the complexes, is present as a monomer and no single subunit serves as the dimerizing component. Instead, our data suggest that dimerization of mTORCs is the result of multiple subunits forming a composite surface. SiMPull also allowed us to distinguish complex disassembly from stoichiometry changes. Physiological conditions that abrogate mTOR signaling such as nutrient deprivation or energy stress did not alter the stoichiometry of mTORCs. On the other hand, rapamycin treatment leads to transient appearance of monomeric mTORC1 before complete disruption of the mTOR-raptor interaction, whereas mTORC2 stoichiometry is unaffected. These insights into assembly of mTORCs may guide future mechanistic studies and exploration of therapeutic potential.

  6. Mammalian target of rapamycin complex 2 (mTORC2 is a critical determinant of bladder cancer invasion.

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    Sounak Gupta

    Full Text Available Bladder cancer is the fourth most common cause of cancer in males in the United States. Invasive behavior is a major determinant of prognosis. In this study, we identified mammalian target of rapamycin complex 2 (mTORC2 as a central regulator of bladder cancer cell migration and invasion. mTORC2 activity was assessed by the extent of phosphorylation of Ser473 in AKT and determined to be approximately 5-fold higher in specimens of invasive human bladder cancer as opposed to non-invasive human bladder cancer. The immortalized malignant bladder cell lines, UMUC-3, J82 and T24 demonstrated higher baseline mTORC2 activity relative to the benign bladder papilloma-derived cell line RT4 and the normal urothelial cell line HU1. The malignant bladder cancer cells also demonstrated increased migration in transwell and denudation assays, increased invasion of matrigel, and increased capacity to invade human bladder specimens. Gene silencing of rictor, a critical component of mTORC2, substantially inhibited bladder cancer cell migration and invasion. This was accompanied by a significant decrease in Rac1 activation and paxillin phosphorylation. These studies identify mTORC2 as a major target for neutralizing bladder cancer invasion.

  7. mTORC1 Is a Major Regulatory Node in the FGF21 Signaling Network in Adipocytes

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    Annabel Y. Minard

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available FGF21 improves the metabolic profile of obese animals through its actions on adipocytes. To elucidate the signaling network responsible for mediating these effects, we quantified dynamic changes in the adipocyte phosphoproteome following acute exposure to FGF21. FGF21 regulated a network of 821 phosphosites on 542 proteins. A major FGF21-regulated signaling node was mTORC1/S6K. In contrast to insulin, FGF21 activated mTORC1 via MAPK rather than through the canonical PI3K/AKT pathway. Activation of mTORC1/S6K by FGF21 was surprising because this is thought to contribute to deleterious metabolic effects such as obesity and insulin resistance. Rather, mTORC1 mediated many of the beneficial actions of FGF21 in vitro, including UCP1 and FGF21 induction, increased adiponectin secretion, and enhanced glucose uptake without any adverse effects on insulin action. This study provides a global view of FGF21 signaling and suggests that mTORC1 may act to facilitate FGF21-mediated health benefits in vivo.

  8. ULK1 regulates melanin levels in MNT-1 cells independently of mTORC1.

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    Eyal Kalie

    Full Text Available Melanosomes are lysosome-related organelles that serve as specialized sites of melanin synthesis and storage in melanocytes. The progression of melanosomes through the different stages of their formation requires trafficking of specific proteins and membrane constituents in a sequential manner, which is likely to deploy ubiquitous cellular machinery along with melanocyte-specific proteins. Recent evidence revealed a connection between melanogenesis and the autophagy machinery, suggesting a novel role for members of the latter in melanocytes. Here we focused on ULK1, a key autophagy protein which is negatively regulated by mTORC1, to assess its potential role in melanogenesis in MNT-1 cells. We found that ULK1 depletion causes an increase in melanin levels, suggesting an inhibitory function for this protein in melanogenesis. Furthermore, this increase was accompanied by increased transcription of MITF (microphthalmia-associated transcription factor and tyrosinase and by elevated protein levels of tyrosinase, the rate-limiting factor in melanin biogenesis. We also provide evidence to show that ULK1 function in this context is independent of the canonical ULK1 autophagy partners, ATG13 and FIP200. Furthermore we show that regulation of melanogenesis by ULK1 is independent of mTORC1 inhibition. Our data thus provide intriguing insights regarding the involvement of the key regulatory autophagy machinery in melanogenesis.

  9. Regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis in erythropoiesis by mTORC1-mediated protein translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xin; Zhang, Yuannyu; Ni, Min; Cao, Hui; Signer, Robert A J; Li, Dan; Li, Mushan; Gu, Zhimin; Hu, Zeping; Dickerson, Kathryn E; Weinberg, Samuel E; Chandel, Navdeep S; DeBerardinis, Ralph J; Zhou, Feng; Shao, Zhen; Xu, Jian

    2017-06-01

    Advances in genomic profiling present new challenges of explaining how changes in DNA and RNA are translated into proteins linking genotype to phenotype. Here we compare the genome-scale proteomic and transcriptomic changes in human primary haematopoietic stem/progenitor cells and erythroid progenitors, and uncover pathways related to mitochondrial biogenesis enhanced through post-transcriptional regulation. Mitochondrial factors including TFAM and PHB2 are selectively regulated through protein translation during erythroid specification. Depletion of TFAM in erythroid cells alters intracellular metabolism, leading to elevated histone acetylation, deregulated gene expression, and defective mitochondria and erythropoiesis. Mechanistically, mTORC1 signalling is enhanced to promote translation of mitochondria-associated transcripts through TOP-like motifs. Genetic and pharmacological perturbation of mitochondria or mTORC1 specifically impairs erythropoiesis in vitro and in vivo. Our studies support a mechanism for post-transcriptional control of erythroid mitochondria and may have direct relevance to haematologic defects associated with mitochondrial diseases and ageing.

  10. Therapeutic trial of metformin and bortezomib in a mouse model of tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC.

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    Neil Auricchio

    Full Text Available Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC is a human genetic disorder in which loss of either TSC1 or TSC2 leads to development of hamartoma lesions, which can progress and be life-threatening or fatal. The TSC1/TSC2 protein complex regulates the state of activation of mTORC1. Tsc2(+/- mice develop renal cystadenoma lesions which grow progressively. Both bortezomib and metformin have been proposed as potential therapeutics in TSC. We examined the potential benefit of 1 month treatment with bortezomib, and 4 month treatment with metformin in Tsc2(+/- mice. Results were compared to vehicle treatment and treatment with the mTORC1 inhibitor rapamycin for 1 month. We used a quantitative tumor volume measurement on stained paraffin sections to assess the effect of these drugs. The median tumor volume per kidney was decreased by 99% in mice treated with rapamycin (p = 0.0004. In contrast, the median tumor volume per kidney was not significantly reduced for either the bortezomib cohort or the metformin cohort. Biochemical studies confirmed that bortezomib and metformin had their expected pharmacodynamic effects. We conclude that neither bortezomib nor metformin has significant benefit in this native Tsc2(+/- mouse model, which suggests limited benefit of these compounds in the treatment of TSC hamartomas and related lesions.

  11. Paradigmenwechsel in der Anti-Aging-Medizin: Hormesis, Target-of-Rapamycin-Komplex und erste Anti-Aging-Pillen // Paradigm Shift in Anti-Aging Medicine: Hormesis, Target of Rapamycin Complex and First Human Anti-Aging-Pills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Römmler A

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies in model organisms have shown that some drugs and lifestyle practices (calorie-restricted diets, regular exercise, e.g. can extend life and health span and protect against the onset of age-related chronic diseases by targeting physiological pathways.brA common mode of action was found via mTOR (mechanistic Target Of Rapamycin pathway signalling. This intracellular protein kinase complex plays a key role in stimulating anabolic and cell growth promoting processes, while inhibiting autophagy. On the other hand, downregulation results in antiproliferative, anticancer and intensive cell-repairing effects leading to life and health span extension and stress resistance. The mTOR complex regulates such basic cell activities and integrates signals from nutrition sensing, energy metabolism, insulin and growth factors, stress and hypoxia.brImportantly, mTOR can be inhibited by some molecules and their analogs (rapamycin, resveratrol, metformin, e.g., which are released naturally from plants, yeast or bacteria to protect against natural enemies. Its dosage resembles an adaptive hormetic response relationship, as high concentrations are toxic and mild doses are associated with anticancer and antiaging effects. This opens up new avenues for their use as „anti-aging pills“ in humans.brRecent human data suggest that metformin, rapamycin and other mTOR-inhibitors could delay heart disease, cancer, cognitive decline and improve survival time in people with diabetes mellitus. In addition, response to influenca vaccine was enhanced by rapamycin in adults with immunosenescence, indicating beneficial anti-aging effects in the elderly.br“Treat aging” is an actual call to recognize aging as an indication appropriate for clinical trials and treatments, as it was recently approved by the Federal Drug Administration (FDA USA. p bKurzfassung/b: Die ansteigende Morbidität und Invalidität in alternden Industrienationen stößt an die Grenzen der Ressourcen

  12. The impact of cow's milk-mediated mTORC1-signaling in the initiation and progression of prostate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Melnik Bodo C; John Swen; Carrera-Bastos Pedro; Cordain Loren

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Prostate cancer (PCa) is dependent on androgen receptor signaling and aberrations of the PI3K-Akt-mTORC1 pathway mediating excessive and sustained growth signaling. The nutrient-sensitive kinase mTORC1 is upregulated in nearly 100% of advanced human PCas. Oncogenic mTORC1 signaling activates key subsets of mRNAs that cooperate in distinct steps of PCa initiation and progression. Epidemiological evidence points to increased dairy protein consumption as a major dietary risk factor for ...

  13. Rapamycin promotes osteogenesis under inflammatory conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xing; Chang, Bei; Wang, Banchao; Bu, Wenhuan; Zhao, Liang; Liu, Jie; Meng, Lin; Wang, Lu; Xin, Ying; Wang, Dandan; Tang, Qi; Zheng, Changyu; Sun, Hongchen

    2017-12-01

    Chronic periodontitis, a common oral disease, usually results in irreversible bone resorption. Bone regeneration is a complex process between bone‑forming activity of osteoblasts and bone‑resorbing activity of osteoclasts, and still remains a challenge for physicians clinically. A previous study demonstrated that the mechanistic target of rapamycin signaling pathway is involved in osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stromal cells. Herein, whether rapamycin could be used to induce osteogenic differentiation of primary bone marrow‑derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) in vitro and promote new bone formation in vivo were evaluated. The results demonstrated that rapamycin alone was not enough to fully induce osteoblast differentiation in vitro and enhanced bone regeneration in vivo. Interestingly, rapamycin in rapamycin plus lipopolysaccharide (LPS)‑treated BMSCs significantly increased the gene expression levels of Sp7 transcription factor, runt related transcription factor 2, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and collagen I (Col I), ALP activity, and calcium nodule at different time points in vitro, indicating that osteoblast differentiation occurs by rapamycin when BMSCs are exposed to LPS simultaneously. It was also demonstrated that rapamycin in rapamycin plus LPS‑treated rats promoted bone regeneration in vivo. These results suggest that rapamycin may influence osteoblast differentiation and new bone formation after LPS induces an inflammatory environment. Rapamycin may be used to treat periodontitis associated with bone loss in future clinical practice.

  14. Rapamycin drives selection against a pathogenic heteroplasmic mitochondrial DNA mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Ying; Zheng, Kangni; Clark, Joanne; Swerdlow, Russell H; Pulst, Stefan M; Sutton, James P; Shinobu, Leslie A; Simon, David K

    2014-02-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations cause a variety of mitochondrial disorders for which effective treatments are lacking. Emerging data indicate that selective mitochondrial degradation through autophagy (mitophagy) plays a critical role in mitochondrial quality control. Inhibition of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) kinase activity can activate mitophagy. To test the hypothesis that enhancing mitophagy would drive selection against dysfunctional mitochondria harboring higher levels of mutations, thereby decreasing mutation levels over time, we examined the impact of rapamycin on mutation levels in a human cytoplasmic hybrid (cybrid) cell line expressing a heteroplasmic mtDNA G11778A mutation, the most common cause of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy. Inhibition of mTORC1/S6 kinase signaling by rapamycin induced colocalization of mitochondria with autophagosomes, and resulted in a striking progressive decrease in levels of the G11778A mutation and partial restoration of ATP levels. Rapamycin-induced upregulation of mitophagy was confirmed by electron microscopic evidence of increased autophagic vacuoles containing mitochondria-like organelles. The decreased mutational burden was not due to rapamycin-induced cell death or mtDNA depletion, as there was no significant difference in cytotoxicity/apoptosis or mtDNA copy number between rapamycin and vehicle-treated cells. These data demonstrate the potential for pharmacological inhibition of mTOR kinase activity to activate mitophagy as a strategy to drive selection against a heteroplasmic mtDNA G11778A mutation and raise the exciting possibility that rapamycin may have therapeutic potential for the treatment of mitochondrial disorders associated with heteroplasmic mtDNA mutations, although further studies are needed to determine if a similar strategy will be effective for other mutations and other cell types.

  15. Loss of cardiac carnitine palmitoyltransferase 2 results in rapamycin-resistant, acetylation-independent hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereyra, Andrea S; Hasek, Like Y; Harris, Kate L; Berman, Alycia G; Damen, Frederick W; Goergen, Craig J; Ellis, Jessica M

    2017-11-10

    Cardiac hypertrophy is closely linked to impaired fatty acid oxidation, but the molecular basis of this link is unclear. Here, we investigated the loss of an obligate enzyme in mitochondrial long-chain fatty acid oxidation, carnitine palmitoyltransferase 2 (CPT2), on muscle and heart structure, function, and molecular signatures in a muscle- and heart-specific CPT2-deficient mouse (Cpt2 M-/- ) model. CPT2 loss in heart and muscle reduced complete oxidation of long-chain fatty acids by 87 and 69%, respectively, without altering body weight, energy expenditure, respiratory quotient, or adiposity. Cpt2M -/- mice developed cardiac hypertrophy and systolic dysfunction, evidenced by a 5-fold greater heart mass, 60-90% reduction in blood ejection fraction relative to control mice, and eventual lethality in the absence of cardiac fibrosis. The hypertrophy-inducing mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) pathway was activated in Cpt2M -/- hearts; however, daily rapamycin exposure failed to attenuate hypertrophy in Cpt2M -/- mice. Lysine acetylation was reduced by ∼50% in Cpt2M -/- hearts, but trichostatin A, a histone deacetylase inhibitor that improves cardiac remodeling, failed to attenuate Cpt2M -/- hypertrophy. Strikingly, a ketogenic diet increased lysine acetylation in Cpt2M -/- hearts 2.3-fold compared with littermate control mice fed a ketogenic diet, yet it did not improve cardiac hypertrophy. Together, these results suggest that a shift away from mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation initiates deleterious hypertrophic cardiac remodeling independent of fibrosis. The data also indicate that CPT2-deficient hearts are impervious to hypertrophy attenuators, that mitochondrial metabolism regulates cardiac acetylation, and that signals derived from alterations in mitochondrial metabolism are the key mediators of cardiac hypertrophic growth. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. mTORC1 Inhibition Corrects Neurodevelopmental and Synaptic Alterations in a Human Stem Cell Model of Tuberous Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica Costa

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Hyperfunction of the mTORC1 pathway has been associated with idiopathic and syndromic forms of autism spectrum disorder (ASD, including tuberous sclerosis, caused by loss of either TSC1 or TSC2. It remains largely unknown how developmental processes and biochemical signaling affected by mTORC1 dysregulation contribute to human neuronal dysfunction. Here, we have characterized multiple stages of neurogenesis and synapse formation in human neurons derived from TSC2-deleted pluripotent stem cells. Homozygous TSC2 deletion causes severe developmental abnormalities that recapitulate pathological hallmarks of cortical malformations in patients. Both TSC2+/− and TSC2−/− neurons display altered synaptic transmission paralleled by molecular changes in pathways associated with autism, suggesting the convergence of pathological mechanisms in ASD. Pharmacological inhibition of mTORC1 corrects developmental abnormalities and synaptic dysfunction during independent developmental stages. Our results uncouple stage-specific roles of mTORC1 in human neuronal development and contribute to a better understanding of the onset of neuronal pathophysiology in tuberous sclerosis.

  17. HDAC5-mTORC1 Interaction in Differential Regulation of Ghrelin and Nucleobindin 2 (NUCB2)/Nesfatin-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Liangxiao; Tang, Hong; Yin, Yue; Yu, Ruili; Zhao, Jing; Li, Yin; Mulholland, Michael W; Zhang, Weizhen

    2015-11-01

    Sodium valporate (VPA), a broad-spectrum inhibitor of histone deacetylases (HDACs), increased ghrelin whereas decreased nesfatin-1 in mice fed normal chow diet or high-fat diet. Alterations in ghrelin and nucleobindin 2/nesfatin-1 were mediated by HDAC5 but not HDAC4. Activation of mTORC1 significantly attenuated the effect of VPA on ghrelin and nesfatin-1 levels. HDAC5 coimmunoprecipitated with raptor. Inhibition of HDAC5 by VPA, trichostatin A, or siHDAC5 markedly increased acetylation of raptor Lys840 and subsequent phosphorylation of raptor Ser792, resulting in suppression of mTORC1 signaling. A raptor mutant lacking the Lys840 acetylation site showed a decrement in phosphorylation of raptor Ser792 and subsequent increase in mTORC1 signaling. These alterations were associated with reciprocal changes in ghrelin and nucleobindin 2/nesfatin-1 expression. These findings reveal HDAC5-mTORC1 signaling as a novel mechanism in the differential regulation of gastric ghrelin and nesfatin-1.

  18. p53 Nongenotoxic Activation and mTORC1 Inhibition Lead to Effective Combination for Neuroblastoma Therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moreno-Smith, Myrthala; Lakoma, Anna; Chen, Zaowen; Tao, Ling; Scorsone, Kathleen A.; Schild, Linda; Aviles-Padilla, Kevin; Nikzad, Rana; Zhang, Yankai; Chakraborty, Rikhia; Molenaar, Jan J.; Vasudevan, Sanjeev A.; Sheehan, Vivien; Kim, Eugene S.; Paust, Silke; Shohet, Jason M.; Barbieri, Eveline

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: mTORC1 inhibitors are promising agents for neuroblastoma therapy; however, they have shown limited clinical activity as monotherapy, thus rational drug combinations need to be explored to improve efficacy. Importantly, neuroblastoma maintains both an active p53 and an aberrant mTOR

  19. Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Inhibitor Induced Complete Remission of a Recurrent Subependymal Giant Cell Astrocytoma in a Patient Without Features of Tuberous Sclerosis Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appalla, Deepika; Depalma, Andres; Calderwood, Stanley

    2016-07-01

    The majority of patients with subependymal giant cell astrocytoma (SEGA) have tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC). In such patients, the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor everolimus has been shown to induce responses. Isolated SEGA have been reported in patients without clinical or genetic features of TSC. The treatment of these patients with everolimus has not previously been reported. We treated a patient with a recurrent isolated SEGA with an mTOR inhibitor. The patient tolerated therapy well and had a sustained complete remission. MTOR inhibitors may be useful for the treatment of isolated SEGA. Further study is warranted. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. West nile virus-induced activation of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 supports viral growth and viral protein expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shives, Katherine D; Beatman, Erica L; Chamanian, Mastooreh; O'Brien, Caitlin; Hobson-Peters, Jody; Beckham, J David

    2014-08-01

    Since its introduction in New York City, NY, in 1999, West Nile virus (WNV) has spread to all 48 contiguous states of the United States and is now the leading cause of epidemic encephalitis in North America. As a member of the family Flaviviridae, WNV is part of a group of clinically important human pathogens, including dengue virus and Japanese encephalitis virus. The members of this family of positive-sense, single-stranded RNA viruses have limited coding capacity and are therefore obligated to co-opt a significant amount of cellular factors to translate their genomes effectively. Our previous work has shown that WNV growth was independent of macroautophagy activation, but the role of the evolutionarily conserved mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway during WNV infection was not well understood. mTOR is a serine/threonine kinase that acts as a central cellular censor of nutrient status and exercises control of vital anabolic and catabolic cellular responses such as protein synthesis and autophagy, respectively. We now show that WNV activates mTOR and cognate downstream activators of cap-dependent protein synthesis at early time points postinfection and that pharmacologic inhibition of mTOR (KU0063794) significantly reduced WNV growth. We used an inducible Raptor and Rictor knockout mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) system to further define the role of mTOR complexes 1 and 2 in WNV growth and viral protein synthesis. Following inducible genetic knockout of the major mTOR cofactors raptor (TOR complex 1 [TORC1]) and rictor (TORC2), we now show that TORC1 supports flavivirus protein synthesis via cap-dependent protein synthesis pathways and supports subsequent WNV growth. Since its introduction in New York City, NY, in 1999, West Nile virus (WNV) has spread to all 48 contiguous states in the United States and is now the leading cause of epidemic encephalitis in North America. Currently, the mechanism by which flaviviruses such as WNV translate their genomes in

  1. Mechanistic target of rapamycin is necessary for changes in dendritic spine morphology associated with long-term potentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Fredrick E; Hockeimer, William; Chen, Alex; Mysore, Shreesh P; Sutton, Michael A

    2017-10-30

    Alterations in the strength of excitatory synapses in the hippocampus is believed to serve a vital function in the storage and recall of new information in the mammalian brain. These alterations involve the regulation of both functional and morphological features of dendritic spines, the principal sites of excitatory synaptic contact. New protein synthesis has been implicated extensively in the functional changes observed following long-term potentiation (LTP), and changes to spine morphology have similarly been documented extensively following synaptic potentiation. However, mechanistic links between de novo translation and the structural changes of potentiated spines are less clear. Here, we assess explicitly the potential contribution of new protein translation under control of the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) to LTP-associated changes in spine morphology. Utilizing genetic and pharmacological manipulations of mTORC1 function in combination with confocal microscopy in live dissociated hippocampal cultures, we demonstrate that chemically-induced LTP (cLTP) requires do novo protein synthesis and intact mTORC1 signaling. We observed a striking diversity in response properties across morphological classes, with mushroom spines displaying a particular sensitivity to altered mTORC1 signaling across varied levels of synaptic activity. Notably, while pharmacological inhibition of mTORC1 signaling significantly diminished glycine-induced changes in spine morphology, transient genetic upregulation of mTORC1 signaling was insufficient to produce spine enlargements on its own. In contrast, genetic upregulation of mTORC1 signaling promoted rapid expansion in spine head diameter when combined with otherwise sub-threshold synaptic stimulation. These results suggest that synaptic activity-derived signaling pathways act in combination with mTORC1-dependent translational control mechanisms to ultimately regulate changes in spine morphology. As several monogenic

  2. mTOR complex-2 stimulates acetyl-CoA and de novo lipogenesis through ATP citrate lyase in HER2/PIK3CA-hyperactive breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yaqing; Qian, Jianchang; He, Qun; Zhao, Hui; Toral-Barza, Lourdes; Shi, Celine; Zhang, Xuesai; Wu, Jiang; Yu, Ker

    2016-05-03

    The mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a major regulator of cell growth and is frequently dysregulated in cancer. While mTOR complex-1 (mTORC1) is a validated cancer target, the role of mTOR complex-2 (mTORC2) remains less defined. Here, we reveal mTORC2 as a critical regulator of breast cancer metabolism. We showed that hyperphosphorylation in ATP citrate lyase (ACL) occurs frequently in human breast tumors and correlates well with HER2+ and/or PIK3CA-mutant (HER2+/PIK3CAmut) status in breast tumor cell lines. In HER2+/PIK3CAmut cells, mTORC2 controls Ser-455 phosphorylation of ACL thereby promoting acetyl-CoA production, de novo lipogenesis and mitochondrial physiology, all of which were inhibited by an mTORC1/mTORC2 kinase inhibitor (mTOR-KI) or cellular depletion of mTORC2 or ACL. mTOR-KI but not rapamycin blocked the IGF-1-induced ACL phosphorylation and glucose to lipid conversion. Depletion of mTORC2 but not mTORC1 specifically inhibited the ACL-dependent acetyl-CoA production. In the HER2+/PIK3CAmut MDA361, MDA453, BT-474 and T47D cells, depletion of mTORC2 or ACL led to growth inhibition and mitochondrial hyperpolarization, which were partially rescued by an alternate source of acetyl-CoA. These same changes were not apparent in mTORC2- or ACL-depleted HER2-/PIK3CAwt MDA231 and HCC1806 cells, highlighting a differential dependence of mTORC2-ACL for survival in these two cell types. Moreover, ACL Ser-455 mutants S455E (phosphomimetic) and S455A (non-phosphorylatable) each increased or decreased, respectively, the acetyl-CoA production, mitochondrial homeostasis and survival in ACL-depleted MDA453 cells. These studies define a new and rapamycin-resistant mechanism of mTORC2-ACL in lipogenesis and acetyl-CoA biology and provide a rationale for targeting of mTORC1 and mTORC2 in HER2+/PIK3CAmut breast cancer.

  3. Targeting of mTORC1/2 by the mTOR kinase inhibitor PP242 induces apoptosis in AML cells under conditions mimicking the bone marrow microenvironment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Zhihong; Shi, Yue Xi; Tsao, Twee; Qiu, YiHua; Kornblau, Steven M.; Baggerly, Keith A.; Liu, Wenbin; Jessen, Katti; Liu, Yi; Kantarjian, Hagop; Rommel, Christian; Fruman, David A.; Andreeff, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The interactions between the bone marrow (BM) microenvironment and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is known to promote survival of AML cells. In this study, we used reverse phase-protein array (RPPA) technology to measure changes in multiple proteins induced by stroma in leukemic cells. We then investigated the potential of an mTOR kinase inhibitor, PP242, to disrupt leukemia/stroma interactions, and examined the effects of PP242 in vivo using a mouse model. Using RPPA, we confirmed that multiple survival signaling pathways, including the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (AKT)/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), were up-regulated in primary AML cells cocultured with stroma. PP242 effectively induced apoptosis in primary samples cultured with or without stroma. Mechanistically, PP242 attenuated the activities of mTORC1 and mTORC2, sequentially inhibited phosphorylated AKT, S6K, and 4EBP1, and concurrently suppressed chemokine receptor CXCR4 expression in primary leukemic cells and in stromal cells cultured alone or cocultured with leukemic cells. In the in vivo leukemia mouse model, PP242 inhibited mTOR signaling in leukemic cells and demonstrated a greater antileukemia effect than rapamycin. Our findings indicate that disrupting mTOR/AKT signaling with a selective mTOR kinase inhibitor can effectively target leukemic cells within the BM microenvironment. PMID:22826565

  4. Isoimperatorin ameliorates osteoarthritis by downregulating the mammalian target of rapamycin C1 signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Jiayao; Jiang, Huaji; Fang, Hang; Cui, Wenbo; Cai, Daozhang

    2017-12-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common disease of the joints, and is characterized by the breakdown of cartilage and degradation of the extracellular matrix. OA causes a high level of patient suffering and incurs large societal costs; however, the current strategies for treating OA are restricted due to limited understanding of the underlying molecular and cellular mechanisms. In the present study, the beneficial effects of isoimperatorin (Iso) were investigated using an experimental mouse model of OA, and its mechanism of action on primary chondrocytes was elucidated. Destabilization of the medial meniscus was performed on 8‑week‑old male mice to induce OA in the knees. Iso (500 mg/g/day) was intragastrically administered for 4 weeks. Degeneration of articular cartilage was assessed by histology using the Osteoarthritis Research Society International scoring system. The expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)13, Runt‑related transcription factor (Runx)2, type X collagen (Col X) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in the knee joints was examined by immunohistochemistry. In vitro, murine primary chondrocytes were treated with various concentrations of Iso, followed by 10 ng/ml interleukin‑1. The mRNA expression levels of MMP13, Runx2, Col X and VEGF were determined by reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The levels of autophagy and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling were determined by western blotting. Iso significantly ameliorated the severity of articular cartilage degradation in mice with experimental OA. The expression levels of MMP13, Runx2, Col X and VEGF were reduced in Iso‑treated mice. In murine primary chondrocytes, Iso also reduced MMP13, Runx2, Col X and VEGF expression, and activated autophagy by downregulating the mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling pathway. Therefore, the results of the present study demonstrated that Iso ameliorates OA‑induced pathological alterations by delaying

  5. Pten deletion causes mTorc1-dependent ectopic neuroblast differentiation without causing uniform migration defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Guo; Chow, Lionel M L; Bayazitov, Ildar T; Tong, Yiai; Gilbertson, Richard J; Zakharenko, Stanislav S; Solecki, David J; Baker, Suzanne J

    2012-09-01

    Neuronal precursors, generated throughout life in the subventricular zone, migrate through the rostral migratory stream to the olfactory bulb where they differentiate into interneurons. We found that the PI3K-Akt-mTorc1 pathway is selectively inactivated in migrating neuroblasts in the subventricular zone and rostral migratory stream, and activated when these cells reach the olfactory bulb. Postnatal deletion of Pten caused aberrant activation of the PI3K-Akt-mTorc1 pathway and an enlarged subventricular zone and rostral migratory stream. This expansion was caused by premature termination of migration and differentiation of neuroblasts and was rescued by inhibition of mTorc1. This phenotype is reminiscent of lamination defects caused by Pten deletion in developing brain that were previously described as defective migration. However, live imaging in acute slices showed that Pten deletion did not cause a uniform defect in the mechanics of directional neuroblast migration. Instead, a subpopulation of Pten-null neuroblasts showed minimal movement and altered morphology associated with differentiation, whereas the remainder showed unimpeded directional migration towards the olfactory bulb. Therefore, migration defects of Pten-null neurons might be secondary to ectopic differentiation.

  6. Key Markers of mTORC1-Dependent and mTORC1-Independent Signaling Pathways Regulating Protein Synthesis in Rat Soleus Muscle During Early Stages of Hindlimb Unloading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timur Mirzoev

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The purpose of the study was to assess the amount of rRNA and phosphorylation status of the key markers of mTORC1-dependent (70s6k, 4E-BP1 and mTORC1-independent (GSK-3β, AMPK signaling pathways controlling protein synthesis in rat soleus during early stages of mechanical unloading (hindlimb suspension (HS for 1-, 3- and 7 days. Methods: The content of the key signaling molecules of various anabolic signaling pathways was determined by Western-blotting. The amount of 28S rRNA was evaluated by RT-PCR. The rate of protein synthesis was assessed using in-vivo SUnSET technique. Results: HS for 3 and 7 days induced a significant (pConclusion: Taken together, the results of our study suggest that a decline in the global rate of protein synthesis in rat soleus during early stages of simulated microgravity is associated with impaired ribosome biogenesis as well as reduced activity of mTORC1-independent signaling pathways.

  7. Let-7 coordinately suppresses components of the amino acid sensing pathway to repress mTORC1 and induce autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubinsky, Amy N; Dastidar, Somasish Ghosh; Hsu, Cynthia L; Zahra, Rabaab; Djakovic, Stevan N; Duarte, Sonia; Esau, Christine C; Spencer, Brian; Ashe, Travis D; Fischer, Kimberlee M; MacKenna, Deidre A; Sopher, Bryce L; Masliah, Eliezer; Gaasterland, Terry; Chau, B Nelson; Pereira de Almeida, Luis; Morrison, Bradley E; La Spada, Albert R

    2014-10-07

    Macroautophagy (hereafter autophagy) is the major pathway by which macromolecules and organelles are degraded. Autophagy is regulated by the mTOR signaling pathway-the focal point for integration of metabolic information, with mTORC1 playing a central role in balancing biosynthesis and catabolism. Of the various inputs to mTORC1, the amino acid sensing pathway is among the most potent. Based upon transcriptome analysis of neurons subjected to nutrient deprivation, we identified let-7 microRNA as capable of promoting neuronal autophagy. We found that let-7 activates autophagy by coordinately downregulating the amino acid sensing pathway to prevent mTORC1 activation. Let-7 induced autophagy in the brain to eliminate protein aggregates, establishing its physiological relevance for in vivo autophagy modulation. Moreover, peripheral delivery of let-7 anti-miR repressed autophagy in muscle and white fat, suggesting that let-7 autophagy regulation extends beyond CNS. Hence, let-7 plays a central role in nutrient homeostasis and proteostasis regulation in higher organisms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. High mTORC1 activity drives glycolysis addiction and sensitivity to G6PD inhibition in acute myeloid leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulain, L; Sujobert, P; Zylbersztejn, F; Barreau, S; Stuani, L; Lambert, M; Palama, T L; Chesnais, V; Birsen, R; Vergez, F; Farge, T; Chenevier-Gobeaux, C; Fraisse, M; Bouillaud, F; Debeissat, C; Herault, O; Récher, C; Lacombe, C; Fontenay, M; Mayeux, P; Maciel, T T; Portais, J-C; Sarry, J-E; Tamburini, J; Bouscary, D; Chapuis, N

    2017-11-01

    Alterations in metabolic activities are cancer hallmarks that offer a wide range of new therapeutic opportunities. Here we decipher the interplay between mTORC1 activity and glucose metabolism in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We show that mTORC1 signaling that is constantly overactivated in AML cells promotes glycolysis and leads to glucose addiction. The level of mTORC1 activity determines the sensitivity of AML cells to glycolysis inhibition as switch-off mTORC1 activity leads to glucose-independent cell survival that is sustained by an increase in mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. Metabolic analysis identified the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) as an important pro-survival pathway for glucose metabolism in AML cells with high mTORC1 activity and provided a clear rational for targeting glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) in AML. Indeed, our analysis of the cancer genome atlas AML database pinpointed G6PD as a new biomarker in AML, as its overexpression correlated with an adverse prognosis in this cohort. Targeting the PPP using the G6PD inhibitor 6-aminonicotinamide induces in vitro and in vivo cytotoxicity against AML cells and synergistically sensitizes leukemic cells to chemotherapy. Our results demonstrate that high mTORC1 activity creates a specific vulnerability to G6PD inhibition that may work as a new AML therapy.

  9. Tumor growth in patients with tuberous sclerosis complex on the ketogenic diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu-Shore, Catherine J; Thiele, Elizabeth A

    2010-04-01

    New evidence is emerging that the availability of nutrients plays a key role in regulating the mammalian target of rapamycin complex-1 (mTORC1) signaling pathway in human cancers. Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is a genetic disorder which results in the growth of hamartomatous lesions in multiple organs due to insufficient suppression of the mTORC1 pathway. A minority of patients with TSC who develop epilepsy which is intractable to standard anticonvulsant medical and/or surgical treatments are treated with the ketogenic diet. To provide insight into the effects of nutrient manipulation on tumor growth in this condition, we describe our experience in a unique group of patients with known tuberous sclerosis complex who are on the ketogenic diet for seizure control. A retrospective chart review was performed of patients with TSC treated with the ketogenic diet between January 2002 and May 2007 at Massachusetts General Hospital. Five patients with definite TSC underwent serial imaging for tumor growth while on the ketogenic diet or had unchanged imaging prior to the onset of the diet and after termination. Three out of five patients, all children, had progression of a known tumor or tumors or the development of a new tumor while on the ketogenic diet. In this limited case series of five TSC patients, the ketogenic diet did not induce tumor regression or suppress the growth of TSC-related tumors. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Different patterns of Akt and ERK feedback activation in response to rapamycin, active-site mTOR inhibitors and metformin in pancreatic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Heloisa P; Ni, Yang; Kisfalvi, Krisztina; Sinnett-Smith, James; Rozengurt, Enrique

    2013-01-01

    The mTOR pathway is aberrantly stimulated in many cancer cells, including pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), and thus it is a potential target for therapy. However, the mTORC1/S6K axis also mediates negative feedback loops that attenuate signaling via insulin/IGF receptor and other tyrosine kinase receptors. Suppression of these feed-back loops unleashes over-activation of upstream pathways that potentially counterbalance the antiproliferative effects of mTOR inhibitors. Here, we demonstrate that treatment of PANC-1 or MiaPaCa-2 pancreatic cancer cells with either rapamycin or active-site mTOR inhibitors suppressed S6K and S6 phosphorylation induced by insulin and the GPCR agonist neurotensin. Rapamycin caused a striking increase in Akt phosphorylation at Ser(473) while the active-site inhibitors of mTOR (KU63794 and PP242) completely abrogated Akt phosphorylation at this site. Conversely, active-site inhibitors of mTOR cause a marked increase in ERK activation whereas rapamycin did not have any stimulatory effect on ERK activation. The results imply that first and second generation of mTOR inhibitors promote over-activation of different pro-oncogenic pathways in PDAC cells, suggesting that suppression of feed-back loops should be a major consideration in the use of these inhibitors for PDAC therapy. In contrast, metformin abolished mTORC1 activation without over-stimulating Akt phosphorylation on Ser(473) and prevented mitogen-stimulated ERK activation in PDAC cells. Metformin induced a more pronounced inhibition of proliferation than either KU63794 or rapamycin while, the active-site mTOR inhibitor was more effective than rapamycin. Thus, the effects of metformin on Akt and ERK activation are strikingly different from allosteric or active-site mTOR inhibitors in PDAC cells, though all these agents potently inhibited the mTORC1/S6K axis.

  11. Signaling by FGF Receptor 2, Not FGF Receptor 1, Regulates Myelin Thickness through Activation of ERK1/2-MAPK, Which Promotes mTORC1 Activity in an Akt-Independent Manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furusho, Miki; Ishii, Akihiro; Bansal, Rashmi

    2017-03-15

    FGF signaling has emerged as a significant "late-stage" regulator of myelin thickness in the CNS, independent of oligodendrocyte differentiation. Therefore, it is critically important to identify the specific FGF receptor type and its downstream signaling molecules in oligodendrocytes to obtain better insights into the regulatory mechanisms of myelin growth. Here, we show that FGF receptor type 2 (FGFR2) is highly enriched at the paranodal loops of myelin. Conditional ablation of this receptor-type, but not FGF receptor type 1 (FGFR1), resulted in attenuation of myelin growth, expression of major myelin genes, key transcription factor Myrf and extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) activity. This was rescued by upregulating ERK1/2 activity in these mice, strongly suggesting that ERK1/2 are key transducers of FGFR2 signals for myelin growth. However, given that the PI3K/Akt/mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway is also known to regulate myelin thickness, we examined FGFR2-deficient mice for the expression of key signaling molecules in this pathway. A significant downregulation of p-mTOR, p-Raptor, and p-S6RP was observed, which was restored to normal by elevating ERK1/2 activity in these mice. Similar downregulation of these molecules was observed in ERK1/2 knock-out mice. Interestingly, since p-Akt levels remained largely unchanged in these mice, it suggests a mechanism of mTORC1 activation by ERK1/2 in an Akt-independent manner in oligodendrocytes. Taken together, these data support a model in which FGFs, possibly from axons, activate FGFR2 in the oligodendrocyte/myelin compartment to increase ERK1/2 activation, which ultimately targets Myrf, as well as converges with the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway at the level of mTORC1, working together to drive the growth of the myelin sheath, thus increasing myelin thickness. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT It is well accepted that myelin is a biologically active membrane in active communication with the

  12. Novel Pathway for Hypoxia-Induced Proliferation and Migration in Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells: Involvement of HIF-1α, FASN, and mTORC1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyun Jik; Ryu, Jung Min; Jung, Young Hyun; Oh, Sang Yub; Lee, Sei-Jung; Han, Ho Jae

    2015-07-01

    The control of stem cells by oxygen signaling is an important way to improve various stem cell physiological functions and metabolic nutrient alteration. Lipid metabolism alteration via hypoxia is thought to be a key factor in controlling stem cell fate and function. However, the interaction between hypoxia and the metabolic and functional changes to stem cells is incompletely described. This study aimed to identify hypoxia-inducible lipid metabolic enzymes that can regulate umbilical cord blood (UCB)-derived human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) proliferation and migration and to demonstrate the signaling pathway that controls functional change in UCB-hMSCs. Our results indicate that hypoxia treatment stimulates UCB-hMSC proliferation, and expression of two lipogenic enzymes: fatty acid synthase (FASN) and stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1 (SCD1). FASN but not SCD1 is a key enzyme for regulation of UCB-hMSC proliferation and migration. Hypoxia-induced FASN expression was controlled by the hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α)/SCAP/SREBP1 pathway. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) was phosphorylated by hypoxia, whereas inhibition of FASN by cerulenin suppressed hypoxia-induced mTOR phosphorylation as well as UCB-hMSC proliferation and migration. RAPTOR small interfering RNA transfection significantly inhibited hypoxia-induced proliferation and migration. Hypoxia-induced mTOR also regulated CDK2, CDK4, cyclin D1, cyclin E, and F-actin expression as well as that of c-myc, p-cofilin, profilin, and Rho GTPase. Taken together, the results suggest that mTORC1 mainly regulates UCB-hMSC proliferation and migration under hypoxia conditions via control of cell cycle and F-actin organization modulating factors. In conclusion, the HIF-1α/FASN/mTORC1 axis is a key pathway linking hypoxia-induced lipid metabolism with proliferation and migration in UCB-hMSCs. Stem Cells 2015;33:2182-2195. © 2015 AlphaMed Press.

  13. Dual mTORC1/mTORC2 blocker as a possible therapy for tauopathy in cellular model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salama, Mohamed; Elhussiny, Mahmoud; Magdy, Alshimaa; Omran, Ahmed G; Alsayed, Aziza; Ashry, Ramy; Mohamed, Wael

    2017-10-27

    Tauopathy comprises a group of disorders caused by abnormal aggregates of tau protein. In these disorders phosphorylated tau protein tends to accumulate inside neuronal cells (soma) instead of the normal axonal distribution of tau. A suggested therapeutic strategy for tauopathy is to induce autophagy to increase the ability to get rid of the unwanted tau aggregates. One of the key controllers of autophagy is mTOR. Blocking mTOR leads to stimulation of autophagy. Recently, unravelling molecular structure of mTOR showed that it is formed of two subunits: mTORC1/C2. So, blocking both subunits of mTOR seems more attractive as it will explore all abilities of mTOR molecule. In the present study, we report using pp242 which is a dual mTORC1/C2 blocker in cellular model of tauopathy using LUHMES cell line. Adding fenazaquin to LUHMES cells induced tauopathy in the form of increased phospho tau aggregates. Moreover, fenazaquin treated cells showed the characteristic somatic redistribution of tau. PP242 use in the present tauopathy model reversed the pathology significantly without observable cellular toxicity for the used dosage of 1000 nM. The present study suggests the possible use of pp242 as a dual mTOR blocker to treat tauopathy.

  14. Impaired Reelin-Dab1 Signaling Contributes to Neuronal Migration Deficits of Tuberous Sclerosis Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uk Yeol Moon

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC is associated with neurodevelopmental abnormalities, including defects in neuronal migration. However, the alterations in cell signaling mechanisms critical for migration and final positioning of neurons in TSC remain unclear. Our detailed cellular analyses reveal that reduced Tsc2 in newborn neurons causes abnormalities in leading processes of migrating neurons, accompanied by significantly delayed migration. Importantly, we demonstrate that Reelin-Dab1 signaling is aberrantly regulated in TSC mouse models and in cortical tubers from TSC patients owing to enhanced expression of the E3 ubiquitin ligase Cul5, a known mediator of pDab1 ubiquitination. Likewise, mTORC1 activation by Rheb overexpression generates similar neuronal and Reelin-Dab1 signaling defects, and directly upregulates Cul5 expression. Inhibition of mTORC1 by rapamycin treatment or by reducing Cul5 largely restores normal leading processes and positioning of migrating neurons. Thus, disrupted Reelin-Dab1 signaling is critically involved in the neuronal migration defects of TSC.

  15. Longevity, aging and rapamycin

    OpenAIRE

    Ehninger, Dan; Neff, Frauke; Xie, Kan

    2014-01-01

    The federal drug administration (FDA)-approved compound rapamycin was the first pharmacological agent shown to extend maximal lifespan in both genders in a mammalian species. A major question then is whether the drug slows mammalian aging or if it has isolated effects on longevity by suppressing cancers, the main cause of death in many mouse strains. Here, we review what is currently known about the effects that pharmacological or genetic mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibition have o...

  16. Target of rapamycin complex 1 and Tap42-associated phosphatases are required for sensing changes in nitrogen conditions in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinmei; Yan, Gonghong; Liu, Sichi; Jiang, Tong; Zhong, Mingming; Yuan, Wenjie; Chen, Shaoxian; Zheng, Yin; Jiang, Yong; Jiang, Yu

    2017-12-01

    In yeast target of rapamycin complex 1 (TORC1) and Tap42-associated phosphatases regulate expression of genes involved in nitrogen limitation response and the nitrogen discrimination pathway. However, it remains unclear whether TORC1 and the phosphatases are required for sensing nitrogen conditions. Utilizing temperature sensitive mutants of tor2 and tap42, we examined the role of TORC1 and Tap42 in nuclear entry of Gln3, a key transcription factor in yeast nitrogen metabolism, in response to changes in nitrogen conditions. Our data show that TORC1 is essential for Gln3 nuclear entry upon nitrogen limitation and downshift in nitrogen quality. However, Tap42-associated phosphatases are required only under nitrogen limitation condition. In cells grown in poor nitrogen medium, the nitrogen permease reactivator kinase (Npr1) inhibits TORC1 activity and alters its association with Tap42, rendering Tap42-associated phosphatases unresponsive to nitrogen limitation. These findings demonstrate a direct role for TORC1 and Tap42-associated phosphatases in sensing nitrogen conditions and unveil an Npr1-dependent mechanism that controls TORC1 and the phosphatases in response to changes in nitrogen quality. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Complex 2 Controls CD8 T Cell Memory Differentiation in a Foxo1-Dependent Manner

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    Lianjun Zhang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Upon infection, antigen-specific naive CD8 T cells are activated and differentiate into short-lived effector cells (SLECs and memory precursor cells (MPECs. The underlying signaling pathways remain largely unresolved. We show that Rictor, the core component of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 2 (mTORC2, regulates SLEC and MPEC commitment. Rictor deficiency favors memory formation and increases IL-2 secretion capacity without dampening effector functions. Moreover, mTORC2-deficient memory T cells mount more potent recall responses. Enhanced memory formation in the absence of mTORC2 was associated with Eomes and Tcf-1 upregulation, repression of T-bet, enhanced mitochondrial spare respiratory capacity, and fatty acid oxidation. This transcriptional and metabolic reprogramming is mainly driven by nuclear stabilization of Foxo1. Silencing of Foxo1 reversed the increased MPEC differentiation and IL-2 production and led to an impaired recall response of Rictor KO memory T cells. Therefore, mTORC2 is a critical regulator of CD8 T cell differentiation and may be an important target for immunotherapy interventions.

  18. A Multi-Lineage Screen Reveals mTORC1 Inhibition Enhances Human Pluripotent Stem Cell Mesendoderm and Blood Progenitor Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuel Joseph Paul Nazareth

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs exist in heterogeneous micro-environments with multiple subpopulations, convoluting fate-regulation analysis. We patterned hPSCs into engineered micro-environments and screened responses to 400 small-molecule kinase inhibitors, measuring yield and purity outputs of undifferentiated, neuroectoderm, mesendoderm, and extra-embryonic populations. Enrichment analysis revealed mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR inhibition as a strong inducer of mesendoderm. Dose responses of mTOR inhibitors such as rapamycin synergized with Bone Morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4 and activin A to enhance the yield and purity of BRACHYURY-expressing cells. Mechanistically, small interfering RNA knockdown of RAPTOR, a component of mTOR complex 1, phenocopied the mesendoderm-enhancing effects of rapamycin. Functional analysis during mesoderm and endoderm differentiation revealed that mTOR inhibition increased the output of hemogenic endothelial cells 3-fold, with a concomitant enhancement of blood colony-forming cells. These data demonstrate the power of our multi-lineage screening approach and identify mTOR signaling as a node in hPSC differentiation to mesendoderm and its derivatives.

  19. Intake of a Ketone Ester Drink during Recovery from Exercise Promotes mTORC1 Signaling but Not Glycogen Resynthesis in Human Muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandoorne, Tijs; De Smet, Stefan; Ramaekers, Monique; Van Thienen, Ruud; De Bock, Katrien; Clarke, Kieran; Hespel, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Ketone bodies are energy substrates produced by the liver during prolonged fasting or low-carbohydrate diet. The ingestion of a ketone ester (KE) rapidly increases blood ketone levels independent of nutritional status. KE has recently been shown to improve exercise performance, but whether it can also promote post-exercise muscle protein or glycogen synthesis is unknown. Methods: Eight healthy trained males participated in a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled crossover study. In each session, subjects undertook a bout of intense one-leg glycogen-depleting exercise followed by a 5-h recovery period during which they ingested a protein/carbohydrate mixture. Additionally, subjects ingested a ketone ester (KE) or an isocaloric placebo (PL). Results: KE intake did not affect muscle glycogen resynthesis, but more rapidly lowered post-exercise AMPK phosphorylation and resulted in higher mTORC1 activation, as evidenced by the higher phosphorylation of its main downstream targets S6K1 and 4E-BP1. As enhanced mTORC1 activation following KE suggests higher protein synthesis rates, we used myogenic C2C12 cells to further confirm that ketone bodies increase both leucine-mediated mTORC1 activation and protein synthesis in muscle cells. Conclusion: Our results indicate that adding KE to a standard post-exercise recovery beverage enhances the post-exercise activation of mTORC1 but does not affect muscle glycogen resynthesis in young healthy volunteers. In vitro, we confirmed that ketone bodies potentiate the increase in mTORC1 activation and protein synthesis in leucine-stimulated myotubes. Whether, chronic oral KE intake during recovery from exercise can facilitate training-induced muscular adaptation and remodeling need to be further investigated.

  20. Rapamycin carbonate esters

    OpenAIRE

    Rhodes, A; Sandhu, S S; Onis, J. E; McKendrick, John

    2009-01-01

    Certain embodiments include carbonate esters of rapamycin at position 42 that are synthesized by a lipase catalyzed regio-specific process. These compounds or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof are useful in the treatment of organ and tissue transplant rejection, autoimmune disease, proliferative disorder, restenosis, cancer, or microbial infection.

  1. Rapamycin inhibits poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation in intact cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fahrer, Joerg, E-mail: joerg.fahrer@uni-ulm.de [Molecular Toxicology Group, Department of Biology, University of Konstanz (Germany); Wagner, Silvia [Clinic of General, Visceral- and Transplantation Surgery, ZMF, University Hospital Tuebingen (Germany); Buerkle, Alexander [Molecular Toxicology Group, Department of Biology, University of Konstanz (Germany); Koenigsrainer, Alfred [Clinic of General, Visceral- and Transplantation Surgery, ZMF, University Hospital Tuebingen (Germany)

    2009-08-14

    Rapamycin is an immunosuppressive drug, which inhibits the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) kinase activity inducing changes in cell proliferation. Synthesis of poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) is an immediate cellular response to genotoxic stress catalyzed mostly by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1), which is also controlled by signaling pathways. Therefore, we investigated whether rapamycin affects PAR production. Strikingly, rapamycin inhibited PAR synthesis in living fibroblasts in a dose-dependent manner as monitored by immunofluorescence. PARP-1 activity was then assayed in vitro, revealing that down-regulation of cellular PAR production by rapamycin was apparently not due to competitive PARP-1 inhibition. Further studies showed that rapamycin did not influence the cellular NAD pool and the activation of PARP-1 in extracts of pretreated fibroblasts. Collectively, our data suggest that inhibition of cellular PAR synthesis by rapamycin is mediated by formation of a detergent-sensitive complex in living cells, and that rapamycin may have a potential as therapeutic PARP inhibitor.

  2. Resolvin D1 and D2 Reverse Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Depression-Like Behaviors Through the mTORC1 Signaling Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deyama, Satoshi; Ishikawa, Yuka; Yoshikawa, Kotomi; Shimoda, Kento; Ide, Soichiro; Satoh, Masamichi; Minami, Masabumi

    2017-07-01

    Resolvin D1 and D2 are bioactive lipid mediators that are generated from docosahexaenoic acid. Although recent preclinical studies suggest that these compounds have antidepressant effects, their mechanisms of action remain unclear. We investigated mechanisms underlying the antidepressant effects of resolvin D1 and resolvin D2 in lipopolysaccharide (0.8 mg/kg, i.p.)-induced depression model mice using a tail suspension test. I.c.v. infusion of resolvin D1 (10 ng) and resolvin D2 (10 ng) produced antidepressant effects; these effects were significantly blocked by a resolvin D1 receptor antagonist WRW4 (10 µg, i.c.v.) and a resolvin D2 receptor antagonist O-1918 (10 µg, i.c.v.), respectively. The mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 inhibitor rapamycin (10 mg/kg, i.p.) and a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase inhibitor U0126 (5 µg, i.c.v.) significantly blocked the antidepressant effects of resolvin D1 and resolvin D2. An AMPA receptor antagonist NBQX (10 mg/kg, i.p.) and a phosphoinositide 3-kinase inhibitor LY294002 (3 µg, i.c.v.) blocked the antidepressant effects of resolvin D1 significantly, but not of resolvin D2. Bilateral infusions of resolvin D1 (0.3 ng/side) or resolvin D2 (0.3 ng/side) into the medial prefrontal cortex or dentate gyrus of the hippocampus produced antidepressant effects. These findings demonstrate that resolvin D1 and resolvin D2 produce antidepressant effects via the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 signaling pathway, and that the medial prefrontal cortex and dentate gyrus are important brain regions for these antidepressant effects. These compounds and their receptors may be promising targets for the development of novel rapid-acting antidepressants, like ketamine and scopolamine.

  3. Astragaloside IV Ameliorates Airway Inflammation in an Established Murine Model of Asthma by Inhibiting the mTORC1 Signaling Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hualiang Jin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Astragaloside IV (AS-IV, a main active constituent of Astragalus membranaceus, has been confirmed to have antiasthmatic effects. However, it remained unclear whether the beneficial effects of AS-IV on asthma were attributed to the mTOR inhibition; this issue was the focus of the present work. BALB/c mice were sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin followed with 3 weeks of rest/recovery and then reexposure to ovalbumin. AS-IV was administrated during the time of rest and reexposure. The characteristic features of allergic asthma, including airway hyperreactivity, histopathology, cytokines (IL-4, IL-5, IL-13, IL-17, and INF-γ, and CD4+CD25+Foxp3+Treg cells in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF, and downstream proteins of mTORC1/2 signaling were examined. AS-IV markedly suppressed airway hyperresponsiveness and reduced IL-4, IL-5, and IL-17 levels and increased INF-γ levels in the BALF. Histological studies showed that AS-IV markedly decreased inflammatory infiltration in the lung tissues. Notably, AS-IV inhibited mTORC1 activity, whereas it had limited effects on mTORC2, as assessed by phosphorylation of mTORC1 and mTORC2 substrates S6 ribosomal protein, p70 S6 Kinase, and Akt, respectively. CD4+CD25+Foxp3+Treg cells in BALF were not significantly changed by AS-IV. Together, these results suggest that the antiasthmatic effects of AS-IV were at least partially from inhibiting the mTORC1 signaling pathway.

  4. Long-lived Snell dwarf mice display increased proteostatic mechanisms that are not dependent on decreased mTORC1 activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Joshua C; Bruns, Danielle R; Peelor, Frederick F; Biela, Laurie M; Miller, Richard A; Miller, Benjamin F; Hamilton, Karyn L

    2015-06-01

    Maintaining proteostasis is thought to be a key factor in slowed aging. In several growth-restricted models of long-life, we have shown evidence of increased proteostatic mechanisms, suggesting that proteostasis may be a shared characteristic of slowed aging. The Snell dwarf mouse is generated through the mutation of the Pit-1 locus causing reductions in multiple hormonal growth factors and mTORC1 signaling. Snell dwarfs are one of the longest lived rodent models of slowed aging. We hypothesized that proteostatic mechanisms would be increased in Snell compared to control (Con) as in other models of slowed aging. Using D2O, we simultaneously assessed protein synthesis in multiple subcellular fractions along with DNA synthesis in skeletal muscle, heart, and liver over 2 weeks in both sexes. We also assessed mTORC1-substrate phosphorylation. Skeletal muscle protein synthesis was decreased in all protein fractions of Snell compared to Con, varied by fraction in heart, and was not different between groups in liver. DNA synthesis was lower in Snell skeletal muscle and heart but not in liver when compared to Con. The new protein to new DNA synthesis ratio was increased threefold in Snell skeletal muscle and heart compared to Con. Snell mTORC1-substrate phosphorylation was decreased only in heart and liver. No effect of sex was seen in this study. Together with our previous investigations in long-lived models, we provide evidence further supporting proteostasis as a shared characteristic of slowed aging and show that increased proteostatic mechanisms may not necessarily require a decrease in mTORC1. © 2015 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Rapamycin: one drug, many effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Kim, Sang Gyun; Blenis, John

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway is a master regulator of cell growth and metabolism. Deregulation of the mTOR pathway has been implicated in a number of human diseases such as cancer, diabetes, obesity, neurological diseases and genetic disorders. Rapamycin, a specific inhibitor of mTOR, has been shown to be useful in the treatment of certain diseases. Here we discuss its mechanism of action and highlight recent findings regarding the effects and limitations of rapamycin monotherapy and the potential utility of combination therapy with rapamycin. PMID:24508508

  6. mTORC1 activation blocks BrafV600E-induced growth-arrest, but is insufficient for melanoma formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damsky, William; Micevic, Goran; Meeth, Katrina; Muthusamy, Viswanathan; Curley, David P.; Santhankrishnan, Manjula; Erdelyi, Ildiko; Platt, James T.; Huang, Laura; Theodosakis, Nicholas; Zaidi, M. Raza; Tighe, Scott; Davies, Michael A.; Dankort, David; McMahon, Martin; Merlino, Glenn; Bardeesy, Nabeel; Bosenberg, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY BrafV600E induces benign, growth-arrested melanocytic nevus development, but also drives melanoma formation. Cdkn2a loss in BrafV600E melanocytes in mice results in rare progression to melanoma, but only after stable growth arrest as nevi. Immediate progression to melanoma is prevented by upregulation of miR-99/100 which downregulates mTOR and IGF1R signaling. mTORC1 activation through Stk11 (Lkb1) loss abrogates growth-arrest of BrafV600E melanocytic nevi, but is insufficient for complete progression to melanoma. Cdkn2a loss is associated with mTORC2 and Akt activation in human and murine melanocytic neoplasms. Simultaneous Cdkn2a and Lkb1 inactivation in BrafV600E melanocytes results in activation of both mTORC1 and mTORC2/Akt, inducing rapid melanoma formation in mice. In this model, activation of both mTORC1/2 is required for Braf-induced melanomagenesis. PMID:25584893

  7. Rapamycin regulates biochemical metabolites

    OpenAIRE

    Tucci, Paola; Porta, Giovanni; Agostini, Massimiliano; Antonov, Alexey; Garabadgiu, Alexander Vasilievich; Melino, Gerry; Willis, Anne E

    2013-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) kinase is a master regulator of protein synthesis that couples nutrient sensing to cell growth, and deregulation of this pathway is associated with tumorigenesis. p53, and its less investigated family member p73, have been shown to interact closely with mTOR pathways through the transcriptional regulation of different target genes. To investigate the metabolic changes that occur upon inhibition of the mTOR pathway and the role of p73 in this response p...

  8. Immunohistochemical Analysis of the Mechanistic Target of Rapamycin and Hypoxia Signalling Pathways in Basal Cell Carcinoma and Trichoepithelioma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkhuizen, Tjinta; Weijzen, Chantal A. H.; Eben, Jonathan; Thissen, Monique R.; van Marion, Ariënne M.; Lohman, Björn G.; Winnepenninckx, Véronique J. L.; Nelemans, Patty J.; van Steensel, Maurice A. M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common cancer in Caucasians. Trichoepithelioma (TE) is a benign neoplasm that strongly resembles BCC. Both are hair follicle (HF) tumours. HFs are hypoxic microenvironments, therefore we hypothesized that hypoxia-induced signalling pathways could be involved in BCC and TE as they are in other human malignancies. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF1) and mechanistic/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) are key players in these pathways. Objectives To determine whether HIF1/mTOR signalling is involved in BCC and TE. Methods We used immunohistochemical staining of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded BCC (n = 45) and TE (n = 35) samples to assess activity of HIF1, mTORC1 and their most important target genes. The percentage positive tumour cells was assessed manually in a semi-quantitative manner and categorized (0%, 80%). Results Among 45 BCC and 35 TE examined, expression levels were respectively 81% and 57% (BNIP3), 73% and 75% (CAIX), 79% and 86% (GLUT1), 50% and 19% (HIF1α), 89% and 88% (pAKT), 55% and 61% (pS6), 15% and 25% (pMTOR), 44% and 63% (PHD2) and 44% and 49% (VEGF-A). CAIX, Glut1 and PHD2 expression levels were significantly higher in TE when only samples with at least 80% expression were included. Conclusions HIF and mTORC1 signalling seems active in both BCC and TE. There are no appreciable differences between the two with respect to pathway activity. At this moment immunohistochemical analyses of HIF, mTORC1 and their target genes does not provide a reliable diagnostic tool for the discrimination of BCC and TE. PMID:25181405

  9. Immunohistochemical analysis of the mechanistic target of rapamycin and hypoxia signalling pathways in basal cell carcinoma and trichoepithelioma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tjinta Brinkhuizen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Basal cell carcinoma (BCC is the most common cancer in Caucasians. Trichoepithelioma (TE is a benign neoplasm that strongly resembles BCC. Both are hair follicle (HF tumours. HFs are hypoxic microenvironments, therefore we hypothesized that hypoxia-induced signalling pathways could be involved in BCC and TE as they are in other human malignancies. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF1 and mechanistic/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR are key players in these pathways. OBJECTIVES: To determine whether HIF1/mTOR signalling is involved in BCC and TE. METHODS: We used immunohistochemical staining of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded BCC (n = 45 and TE (n = 35 samples to assess activity of HIF1, mTORC1 and their most important target genes. The percentage positive tumour cells was assessed manually in a semi-quantitative manner and categorized (0%, 80%. RESULTS: Among 45 BCC and 35 TE examined, expression levels were respectively 81% and 57% (BNIP3, 73% and 75% (CAIX, 79% and 86% (GLUT1, 50% and 19% (HIF1α, 89% and 88% (pAKT, 55% and 61% (pS6, 15% and 25% (pMTOR, 44% and 63% (PHD2 and 44% and 49% (VEGF-A. CAIX, Glut1 and PHD2 expression levels were significantly higher in TE when only samples with at least 80% expression were included. CONCLUSIONS: HIF and mTORC1 signalling seems active in both BCC and TE. There are no appreciable differences between the two with respect to pathway activity. At this moment immunohistochemical analyses of HIF, mTORC1 and their target genes does not provide a reliable diagnostic tool for the discrimination of BCC and TE.

  10. Development of hypomelanotic macules is associated with constitutive activated mTORC1 in tuberous sclerosis complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Lisbeth Birk; Schönewolf-Greulich, Bitten; Rosengren, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    leads to the formation of an active donor splice site, resulting in three shorter alternatively spliced transcripts with premature stop codons. However a small amount of normal spliced transcript is apparently produced from the mutated allele, which might explain the milder phenotype. The gene products...

  11. Rapamycin inhibits ox-LDL-induced inflammation in human endothelial cells in vitro by inhibiting the mTORC2/PKC/c-Fos pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Juan-Juan; Yin, Xiao-Wei; Liu, Hui-Hui; Du, Wen-Xiu; Shi, Lu-Yao; Huang, Ya-Bo; Wang, Fen; Liu, Chun-Feng; Cao, Yong-Jun; Zhang, Yan-Lin

    2017-10-26

    Rapamycin and its derivative possess anti-atherosclerosis activity, but its effects on adhesion molecule expression and macrophage adhesion to endothelial cells during atherosclerosis remain unclear. In this study we explored the effects of rapamycin on ox-LDL-induced adhesion molecule expression and macrophage adhesion to endothelial cells in vitro and the underlying mechanisms. Ox-LDL (6-48 μg/mL) dose-dependently increased the protein levels of two adhesion molecules, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and E-selectin, in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), whereas pretreatment with rapamycin (1-10 μmol/L) dose-dependently inhibited ox-LDL-induced increase in the adhesion molecule expression and macrophage adhesion to endothelial cells. Knockdown of mTOR or rictor, rather than raptor, mimicked the effects of rapamycin. Ox-LDL (100 μg/mL) time-dependently increased PKC phosphorylation in HUVECs, which was abolished by rapamycin or rictor siRNA. Pretreatment with PKC inhibitor staurospo¬rine significantly reduced ox-LDL-stimulated adhesion molecule expression and macrophage adhesion to endothelial cells, whereas pretreatment with PKC activator PMA/TPA attenuated the inhibitory effect of rapamycin on adhesion molecule expression. Ox-LDL (100 μg/mL) time-dependently increased c-Fos levels in HUVECs, and pretreatment with rapamycin or rictor siRNA significantly decreased expression of c-Fos. Knockdown of c-Fos antagonized ox-LDL-induced adhesion molecule expression and macrophage adhesion to endothelial cells. Our results demonstrate that rapamycin reduces ox-LDL-stimulated adhesion molecule expression and macrophage adhesion to endothelial cells by inhibiting mTORC2, but not mTORC1, and mTORC2 acts through the PKC/c-Fos signaling pathway.

  12. Rapamycin: One Drug, Many Effects

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Jing; Kim, Sang Gyun; Blenis, John

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway is a master regulator of cell growth and metabolism. Deregulation of the mTOR pathway has been implicated in a number of human diseases such as cancer, diabetes, obesity, neurological diseases and genetic disorders. Rapamycin, a specific inhibitor of mTOR, has been shown to be useful in the treatment of certain diseases. Here we discuss its mechanism of action and highlight recent findings regarding the effects and limitations of rapa...

  13. Biphasic Rapamycin Effects in Lymphoma and Carcinoma Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Pandeswara, Srilakshmi; Dao, Vinh; Padrón, Álvaro; Drerup, Justin M; Lao, Shunhua; Liu, Aijie; Hurez, Vincent; Curiel, Tyler J

    2017-01-15

    mTOR drives tumor growth but also supports T-cell function, rendering the applications of mTOR inhibitors complex especially in T-cell malignancies. Here, we studied the effects of the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin in mouse EL4 T-cell lymphoma. Typical pharmacologic rapamycin (1-8 mg/kg) significantly reduced tumor burden via direct suppression of tumor cell proliferation and improved survival in EL4 challenge independent of antitumor immunity. Denileukin diftitox (DD)-mediated depletion of regulatory T cells significantly slowed EL4 growth in vivo in a T-cell-dependent fashion. However, typical rapamycin inhibited T-cell activation and tumor infiltration in vivo and failed to boost DD treatment effects. Low-dose (LD) rapamycin (75 μg/kg) increased potentially beneficial CD44hiCD62L(+) CD8(+) central memory T cells in EL4 challenge, but without clinical benefit. LD rapamycin significantly enhanced DD treatment efficacy, but DD plus LD rapamycin treatment effects were independent of antitumor immunity. Instead, rapamycin upregulated EL4 IL2 receptor in vitro and in vivo, facilitating direct DD tumor cell killing. LD rapamycin augmented DD efficacy against B16 melanoma and a human B-cell lymphoma, but not against human Jurkat T-cell lymphoma or ID8agg ovarian cancer cells. Treatment effects correlated with IL2R expression, but mechanisms in some tumors were not fully defined. Overall, our data define a distinct, biphasic mechanisms of action of mTOR inhibition at doses that are clinically exploitable, including in T-cell lymphomas. Cancer Res; 77(2); 520-31. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  14. Regulation of cardiac miR-208a, an inducer of obesity, by rapamycin and nebivolol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gul, Rukhsana; Mahmood, Abuzar; Luck, Christian; Lum-Naihe, Kelly; Alfadda, Assim A; Speth, Robert C; Pulakat, Lakshmi

    2015-11-01

    Resistance to obesity is observed in rodents and humans treated with rapamycin (Rap) or nebivolol (Neb). Because cardiac miR-208a promotes obesity, this study tested whether the modes of actions of Rap and Neb involve inhibition of miR-208a. Mouse cardiomyocyte HL-1 cells and Zucker obese (ZO) rats were used to investigate regulation of cardiac miR-208a. Angiotensin II (Ang II) increased miR-208a expression in HL-1 cells. Pretreatment with an AT1 receptor (AT1R) antagonist, losartan (1 μM), antagonized this effect, whereas a phospholipase C inhibitor, U73122 (10 μM), and an NADPH oxidase inhibitor, apocynin (0.5 mM), did not. Ang II-induced increase in miR-208a was suppressed by Rap (10 nM), an inhibitor of nutrient sensor kinase mTORC1, and Neb (1 μM), a 3rd generation β-blocker that suppressed bioavailable AT1R binding of (125) I-Ang II. Thus, suppression of AT1R expression by Neb, inhibition of AT1R activation by losartan, and inhibition of AT1R-induced activation of mTORC1 by Rap attenuated the Ang II-induced increase in miR-208a. In ZO rats, Rap treatment (750 μg kg(-1)  day(-1) ; 12 weeks) reduced obesity despite similar food intake, suppressed cardiac miR-208a, and increased cardiac MED13, a suppresser of obesity. Rap and Neb suppressed cardiac miR-208a. Suppression of miR-208a and increase in MED13 correlated with attenuated weight gain despite leptin resistance. © 2015 The Obesity Society.

  15. Opposing regulation of the late phase TNF response by mTORC1-IL-10 signaling and hypoxia in human macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Linda; Kusnadi, Anthony; Park, Sung Ho; Murata, Koichi; Park-Min, Kyung-Hyun; Ivashkiv, Lionel B.

    2016-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is best known for inducing a rapid but transient NF-κB-mediated inflammatory response. We investigated later phases of TNF signaling, after the initial transient induction of inflammatory genes has subsided, in primary human macrophages. TNF signaling induced expression of late response genes, including inhibitors of NF-κB and TLR signaling, with delayed and sustained kinetics 6–24 hr after TNF stimulation. A subset of late phase genes was expressed in rheumatoid arthritis synovial macrophages, confirming their expression under chronic inflammatory conditions in vivo. Expression of a subset of late phase genes was mediated by autocrine IL-10, which activated STAT3 with delayed kinetics. Hypoxia, which occurs at sites of infection or inflammation where TNF is expressed, suppressed this IL-10-STAT3 autocrine loop and expression of late phase genes. TNF-induced expression of IL-10 and downstream genes was also dependent on signaling by mTORC1, which senses the metabolic state of cells and is modulated by hypoxia. These results reveal an mTORC1-dependent IL-10-mediated late phase response to TNF by primary human macrophages, and identify suppression of IL-10 responses as a new mechanism by which hypoxia can promote inflammation. Thus, hypoxic and metabolic pathways may modulate TNF responses during chronic inflammation. PMID:27558590

  16. Metformin potentiates the effect of arsenic trioxide suppressing intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma: roles of p38 MAPK, ERK3, and mTORC1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Sunbin; Xie, Haiyang; Yang, Fan; Shan, Qiaonan; Dai, Haojiang; Zhuo, Jianyong; Wei, Xuyong; Song, Penghong; Zhou, Lin; Xu, Xiao; Zheng, Shusen

    2017-02-28

    Arsenic trioxide (ATO) is commonly used in the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL), but does not benefit patients with solid tumors. When combined with other agents or radiation, ATO showed treatment benefits with manageable toxicity. Previously, we reported that metformin amplified the inhibitory effect of ATO on intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC) cells more significantly than other agents. Here, we investigated the chemotherapeutic sensitization effect of metformin in ATO-based treatment in ICC in vitro and in vivo and explored the underlying mechanisms. ICC cell lines (CCLP-1, RBE, and HCCC-9810) were treated with metformin and/or ATO; the anti-proliferation effect was evaluated by cell viability, cell apoptosis, cell cycle, and intracellular-reactive oxygen species (ROS) assays. The in vivo efficacy was determined in nude mice with CCLP-1 xenografts. The active status of AMPK/p38 MAPK and mTORC1 pathways was detected by western blot. In addition, an antibody array was used screening more than 200 molecules clustered in 12 cancer-related pathways in CCLP-1 cells treated with metformin and/or ATO. Methods of genetic modulation and pharmacology were further used to demonstrate the relationship of the molecule. Seventy-three tumor samples from ICC patients were used to detect the expression of ERK3 by immunohistochemistry. The correlation between ERK3 and the clinical information of ICC patients were further analyzed. Metformin and ATO synergistically inhibited proliferation of ICC cells by promoting cell apoptosis, inducing G0/G1 cell cycle arrest, and increasing intracellular ROS. Combined treatment with metformin and ATO efficiently reduced ICC growth in an ICC xenograft model. Mechanistically, the antibody array revealed that ERK3 exhibited the highest variation in CCLP-1 cells after treatment with metformin and ATO. Results of western blot confirm that metformin and ATO cooperated to inhibit mTORC1, activate AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), and upregulate ERK3. Metformin abrogated the activation of p38 MAPK induced by ATO, and this activity was partially dependent on AMPK activation. Inactivation of p38 MAPK by SB203580 or specific short interfering RNA (siRNA) promoted the inactivation of mTORC1 in ICC cells treated with metformin and ATO. Activation of p38 MAPK may be responsible for resistance to ATO in ICC. The relationship between p38 MAPK and ERK3 was not defined by our findings. Finally, AMPK is a newfound positive regulator of ERK3. Overexpression of EKR3 in ICC cells inhibited cell proliferation through inactivation of mTORC1. ERK3 expression is associated with a better prognosis in ICC patients. Metformin sensitizes arsenic trioxide to suppress intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma via the regulation of AMPK/p38 MAPK-ERK3/mTORC1 pathways. ERK3 is a newfound potential prognostic predictor and a tumor suppressor in ICC.

  17. Differential Role of Rapamycin in Epidermis-Induced IL-15-IGF-1 Secretion via Activation of Akt/mTORC2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Bai

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Backgroud/Aims: The effects of rapamycin (RPM on wound healing have been previously studied. However, reciprocal contradictory data have been reported, and the underlying mechanism remains unclear. This study aims to uncover differential role of RPM in regulation of wound healing and explore the possible mechanism. Methods: C57BL/6J mice and epidermal cells were treated with different doses of RPM. The wound re-epithelialization was observed by hematoxylin and eosin (HE staining. The expression of IL-15 and IGF-1 were detected by immunohistochemistry and quantitative real-time PCR. Epidermal cell survival was determined by CCK-8 assays. Moreover, the mTORC1 and mTORC2 pathway were examined by western blot analysis. Results: This study showed that differential doses of RPM could lead to separate consequences in epidermis. Histological analyses showed that low-dose RPM promoted wound healing, and enhanced the expression of IL-15 and IGF-1. Furthermore, western blot analysis showed that the effect of low-dose RPM in epidermis were not through mTORC1 pathway. Instead, activation of the Akt/mTORC2 pathway was involved in low-dose RPM-induced IL-15 and IGF-1 production in epidermis, while high-dose RPM inhibited the expression of IL-15 and IGF-1 and the activity of mTORC1 and mTORC2 pathway. Conclusion: This study for the first time demonstrated that RPM-mediated wound healing was dose-dependent.

  18. Differential Role of Rapamycin in Epidermis-Induced IL-15-IGF-1 Secretion via Activation of Akt/mTORC2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yang; Xu, Rui; Zhang, Xueyuan; Zhang, Xiaorong; Hu, Xiaohong; Li, Yashu; Li, Haisheng; Liu, Meixi; Huang, Zhenggen; Yan, Rongshuai; He, Weifeng; Luo, Gaoxing; Wu, Jun

    2017-01-01

    Backgroud/Aims: The effects of rapamycin (RPM) on wound healing have been previously studied. However, reciprocal contradictory data have been reported, and the underlying mechanism remains unclear. This study aims to uncover differential role of RPM in regulation of wound healing and explore the possible mechanism. C57BL/6J mice and epidermal cells were treated with different doses of RPM. The wound re-epithelialization was observed by hematoxylin and eosin (HE) staining. The expression of IL-15 and IGF-1 were detected by immunohistochemistry and quantitative real-time PCR. Epidermal cell survival was determined by CCK-8 assays. Moreover, the mTORC1 and mTORC2 pathway were examined by western blot analysis. This study showed that differential doses of RPM could lead to separate consequences in epidermis. Histological analyses showed that low-dose RPM promoted wound healing, and enhanced the expression of IL-15 and IGF-1. Furthermore, western blot analysis showed that the effect of low-dose RPM in epidermis were not through mTORC1 pathway. Instead, activation of the Akt/mTORC2 pathway was involved in low-dose RPM-induced IL-15 and IGF-1 production in epidermis, while high-dose RPM inhibited the expression of IL-15 and IGF-1 and the activity of mTORC1 and mTORC2 pathway. This study for the first time demonstrated that RPM-mediated wound healing was dose-dependent. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. A systems study reveals concurrent activation of AMPK and mTOR by amino acids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pezze, Piero Dalle; Ruf, Stefanie; Sonntag, Annika G; Langelaar-Makkinje, Miriam; Hall, Philip; Heberle, Alexander M; Navas, Patricia Razquin; van Eunen, Karen; Tölle, Regine C; Schwarz, Jennifer J; Wiese, Heike; Warscheid, Bettina; Deitersen, Jana; Stork, Björn; Fäßler, Erik; Schäuble, Sascha; Hahn, Udo; Horvatovich, Peter; Shanley, Daryl P; Thedieck, Kathrin

    2016-01-01

    Amino acids (aa) are not only building blocks for proteins, but also signalling molecules, with the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) acting as a key mediator. However, little is known about whether aa, independently of mTORC1, activate other kinases of the mTOR signalling network. To

  20. Down regulation of Peroxiredoxin-3 in 3T3-L1 adipocytes leads to oxidation of Rictor in the mammalian-target of rapamycin complex 2 (mTORC2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Dalay H; Burrill, Joel S; Kuzmicic, Jovan; Hahn, Wendy S; Park, Ji-Man; Kim, Do-Hyung; Bernlohr, David A

    2017-11-25

    Mitochondrially-derived oxidative stress has been implicated in the development of obesity-induced insulin resistance and is correlated with down regulation of Peroxiredoxin-3 (Prdx3). Prdx3 knockout mice exhibit whole-body insulin resistance, while Prdx3 transgenic animals remain insulin sensitive when placed on a high fat diet. To define the molecular events linking mitochondrial oxidative stress to insulin action, Prdx3 was silenced in 3T3-L1 adipocytes (Prdx3 KD) and the resultant cells evaluated for mitochondrial function, endoplasmic reticulum stress (ER stress), mitochondrial unfolded protein response (mtUPR) and insulin signaling. Prdx3 KD cells exhibit a two-fold increase in H2O2, reduced insulin-stimulated glucose transport and attenuated S473 phosphorylation of the mTORC2 substrate, Akt. Importantly, the decrease in glucose uptake can be rescued by pre-treatment with the antioxidant N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC). The changes in insulin sensitivity occur independently from activation of the ER stress or mtUPR pathways. Analysis of mTORC2, the complex responsible for phosphorylating Akt at S473, reveals increased cysteine oxidation of Rictor in Prdx3 KD cells that can be rescued with NAC. Taken together, these data suggest mitochondrial dysfunction in adipocytes may attenuate insulin signaling via oxidation of the mammalian-target of rapamycin complex 2 (mTORC2). Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Regulation of mTORC1 Signaling by Src Kinase Activity Is Akt1-Independent in RSV-Transformed Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Vojtěchová

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Increased activity of the Src tyrosine protein kinase that has been observed in a large number of human malignancies appears to be a promising target for drug therapy. In the present study, a critical role of the Src activity in the deregulation of mTOR signaling pathway in Rous sarcoma virus (RSV-transformed hamster fibroblasts, H19 cells, was shown using these cells treated with the Src-specific inhibitor, SU6656, and clones of fibroblasts expressing either the active Src or the dominant-negative Src kinase-dead mutant. Disruption of the Src kinase activity results in substantial reduction of the phosphorylation and activity of the Akt/protein kinase B (PKB, phosphorylation of tuberin (TSC2, mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR, S6K1, ribosomal protein S6, and eukaryotic initiation factor 4E-binding protein 4E-BP1. The ectopic, active Akt1 that was expressed in Src-deficient cells significantly enhanced phosphorylation of TSC2 in these cells, but it failed to activate the inhibited components of the mTOR pathway that are downstream of TSC2. The data indicate that the Src kinase activity is essential for the activity of mTOR-dependent signaling pathway and suggest that mTOR targets may be controlled by Src independently of Akt1/TSC2 cascade in cells expressing hyperactive Src protein. These observations might have an implication in drug resistance to mTOR inhibitor-based cancer therapy in certain cell types.

  2. Alternative rapamycin treatment regimens mitigate the impact of rapamycin on glucose homeostasis and the immune system

    OpenAIRE

    Arriola Apelo, Sebastian I.; Neuman, Joshua C.; Baar, Emma L.; Syed, Faizan A.; Cummings, Nicole E.; Brar, Harpreet K.; Pumper, Cassidy P.; Kimple, Michelle E.; Lamming, Dudley W.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Inhibition of the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway by the FDA?approved drug rapamycin has been shown to promote lifespan and delay age?related diseases in model organisms including mice. Unfortunately, rapamycin has potentially serious side effects in humans, including glucose intolerance and immunosuppression, which may preclude the long?term prophylactic use of rapamycin as a therapy for age?related diseases. While the beneficial effects of rapamycin are larg...

  3. Enhanced skeletal muscle ribosome biogenesis, yet attenuated mTORC1 and ribosome biogenesis-related signalling, following short-term concurrent versus single-mode resistance training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fyfe, Jackson J; Bishop, David J; Bartlett, Jonathan D; Hanson, Erik D; Anderson, Mitchell J; Garnham, Andrew P; Stepto, Nigel K

    2018-01-12

    Combining endurance training with resistance training (RT) may attenuate skeletal muscle hypertrophic adaptation versus RT alone; however, the underlying mechanisms are unclear. We investigated changes in markers of ribosome biogenesis, a process linked with skeletal muscle hypertrophy, following concurrent training versus RT alone. Twenty-three males underwent eight weeks of RT, either performed alone (RT group, n = 8), or combined with either high-intensity interval training (HIT+RT group, n = 8), or moderate-intensity continuous training (MICT+RT group, n = 7). Muscle samples (vastus lateralis) were obtained before training, and immediately before, 1 h and 3 h after the final training session. Training-induced changes in basal expression of the 45S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) precursor (45S pre-rRNA), and 5.8S and 28S mature rRNAs, were greater with concurrent training versus RT. However, during the final training session, RT further increased both mTORC1 (p70S6K1 and rps6 phosphorylation) and 45S pre-rRNA transcription-related signalling (TIF-1A and UBF phosphorylation) versus concurrent training. These data suggest that when performed in a training-accustomed state, RT induces further increases mTORC1 and ribosome biogenesis-related signalling in human skeletal muscle versus concurrent training; however, changes in ribosome biogenesis markers were more favourable following a period of short-term concurrent training versus RT performed alone.

  4. Metformin inhibition of mTORC1 activation, DNA synthesis and proliferation in pancreatic cancer cells: Dependence on glucose concentration and role of AMPK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinnett-Smith, James; Kisfalvi, Krisztina; Kui, Robert [Division of Digestive Diseases, Department of Medicine, CURE: Digestive Diseases Research Center, David Geffen School of Medicine and Molecular Biology Institute, University of California at Los Angeles, CA (United States); Rozengurt, Enrique, E-mail: erozengurt@mednet.ucla.edu [Division of Digestive Diseases, Department of Medicine, CURE: Digestive Diseases Research Center, David Geffen School of Medicine and Molecular Biology Institute, University of California at Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2013-01-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Metformin inhibits cancer cell growth but the mechanism(s) are not understood. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We show that the potency of metformin is sharply dependent on glucose in the medium. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer AMPK activation was enhanced in cancer cells incubated in physiological glucose. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Reciprocally, metformin potently inhibited mTORC1, DNA synthesis and proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Metformin, at low concentrations, inhibited DNA synthesis through AMPK. -- Abstract: Metformin, a widely used anti-diabetic drug, is emerging as a potential anticancer agent but the mechanisms involved remain incompletely understood. Here, we demonstrate that the potency of metformin induced AMPK activation, as shown by the phosphorylation of its substrates acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) at Ser{sup 79} and Raptor at Ser{sup 792}, was dramatically enhanced in human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) cells PANC-1 and MiaPaCa-2 cultured in medium containing physiological concentrations of glucose (5 mM), as compared with parallel cultures in medium with glucose at 25 mM. In physiological glucose, metformin inhibited mTORC1 activation, DNA synthesis and proliferation of PDAC cells stimulated by crosstalk between G protein-coupled receptors and insulin/IGF signaling systems, at concentrations (0.05-0.1 mM) that were 10-100-fold lower than those used in most previous reports. Using siRNA-mediated knockdown of the {alpha}{sub 1} and {alpha}{sub 2} catalytic subunits of AMPK, we demonstrated that metformin, at low concentrations, inhibited DNA synthesis through an AMPK-dependent mechanism. Our results emphasize the importance of using medium containing physiological concentrations of glucose to elucidate the anticancer mechanism of action of metformin in pancreatic cancer cells and other cancer cell types.

  5. C. elegans DAF-16/FOXO interacts with TGF-ß/BMP signaling to induce germline tumor formation via mTORC1 activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjing Qi

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Activation of the FOXO transcription factor DAF-16 by reduced insulin/IGF signaling (IIS is considered to be beneficial in C. elegans due to its ability to extend lifespan and to enhance stress resistance. In the germline, cell-autonomous DAF-16 activity prevents stem cell proliferation, thus acting tumor-suppressive. In contrast, hypodermal DAF-16 causes a tumorous germline phenotype characterized by hyperproliferation of the germline stem cells and rupture of the adjacent basement membrane. Here we show that cross-talk between DAF-16 and the transforming growth factor ß (TGFß/bone morphogenic protein (BMP signaling pathway causes germline hyperplasia and results in disruption of the basement membrane. In addition to activating MADM/NRBP/hpo-11 gene alone, DAF-16 also directly interacts with both R-SMAD proteins SMA-2 and SMA-3 in the nucleus to regulate the expression of mTORC1 pathway. Knocking-down of BMP genes or each of the four target genes in the hypodermis was sufficient to inhibit germline proliferation, indicating a cell-non-autonomously controlled regulation of stem cell proliferation by somatic tissues. We propose the existence of two antagonistic DAF-16/FOXO functions, a cell-proliferative somatic and an anti-proliferative germline activity. Whereas germline hyperplasia under reduced IIS is inhibited by DAF-16 cell-autonomously, activation of somatic DAF-16 in the presence of active IIS promotes germline proliferation and eventually induces tumor-like germline growth. In summary, our results suggest a novel pathway crosstalk of DAF-16 and TGF-ß/BMP that can modulate mTORC1 at the transcriptional level to cause stem-cell hyperproliferation. Such cell-type specific differences may help explaining why human FOXO activity is considered to be tumor-suppressive in most contexts, but may become oncogenic, e.g. in chronic and acute myeloid leukemia.

  6. PIK3CA-mutated melanoma cells rely on cooperative signaling through mTORC1/2 for sustained proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Jillian M; Deuker, Marian M; Baguley, Bruce C; McMahon, Martin

    2017-05-01

    Malignant conversion of BRAF- or NRAS-mutated melanocytes into melanoma cells can be promoted by PI3'-lipid signaling. However, the mechanism by which PI3'-lipid signaling cooperates with mutationally activated BRAF or NRAS has not been adequately explored. Using human NRAS- or BRAF-mutated melanoma cells that co-express mutationally activated PIK3CA, we explored the contribution of PI3'-lipid signaling to cell proliferation. Despite mutational activation of PIK3CA, melanoma cells were more sensitive to the biochemical and antiproliferative effects of broader spectrum PI3K inhibitors than to an α-selective PI3K inhibitor. Combined pharmacological inhibition of MEK1/2 and PI3K signaling elicited more potent antiproliferative effects and greater inhibition of the cell division cycle compared to single-agent inhibition of either pathway alone. Analysis of signaling downstream of MEK1/2 or PI3K revealed that these pathways cooperate to regulate cell proliferation through mTORC1-mediated effects on ribosomal protein S6 and 4E-BP1 phosphorylation in an AKT-dependent manner. Although PI3K inhibition resulted in cytostatic effects on xenografted NRASQ61H /PIK3CAH1047R melanoma, combined inhibition of MEK1/2 plus PI3K elicited significant melanoma regression. This study provides insights as to how mutationally activated PIK3CA acts in concert with MEK1/2 signaling to cooperatively regulate mTORC1/2 to sustain PIK3CA-mutated melanoma proliferation. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Enhanced genetic modification of adult growth factor mobilized peripheral blood hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells with rapamycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lijing; Torres-Coronado, Mónica; Gu, Angel; Rao, Anitha; Gardner, Agnes M; Epps, Elizabeth W; Gonzalez, Nancy; Tran, Chy-Anh; Wu, Xiwei; Wang, Jin-Hui; DiGiusto, David L

    2014-10-01

    Genetic modification of adult human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) with lentiviral vectors leads to long-term gene expression in the progeny of the HSPCs and has been used to successfully treat several monogenic diseases. In some cases, the gene-modified cells have a selective growth advantage over nonmodified cells and eventually are the dominant engrafted population. However, in disease indications for which the gene-modified cells do not have a selective advantage, optimizing transduction of HSPC is paramount to successful stem cell-based gene therapy. We demonstrate here that transduction of adult CD34+ HSPCs with lentiviral vectors in the presence of rapamycin, a widely used mTORC1 inhibitor, results in an approximately threefold increase in stable gene marking with minimal effects on HSPC growth and differentiation. Using this approach, we have demonstrated that we can enhance the frequency of gene-modified HSPCs that give rise to clonogenic progeny in vitro without excessive increases in the number of vector copies per cell or changes in integration pattern. The genetic marking of HSPCs and expression of transgenes is durable, and transplantation of gene-modified HSPCs into immunodeficient mice results in high levels of gene marking of the lymphoid and myeloid progeny in vivo. The prior safe clinical history of rapamycin in other applications supports the use of this compound to generate gene-modified autologous HSPCs for our HIV gene therapy clinical trials. ©AlphaMed Press.

  8. Novel Histopathological Patterns in Cortical Tubers of Epilepsy Surgery Patients with Tuberous Sclerosis Complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelika Mühlebner

    Full Text Available Tuberous Sclerosis Complex (TSC is a genetic hamartoma syndrome frequently associated with severe intractable epilepsy. In some TSC patients epilepsy surgery is a promising treatment option provided that the epileptogenic zone can be precisely delineated. TSC brain lesions (cortical tubers contain dysmorphic neurons, brightly eosinophilic giant cells and white matter alterations in various proportions. However, a histological classification system has not been established for tubers. Therefore, the aim of this study was to define distinct histological patterns within tubers based on semi-automated histological quantification and to find clinically significant correlations. In total, we studied 28 cortical tubers and seven samples of perituberal cortex from 28 TSC patients who had undergone epilepsy surgery. We assessed mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1 activation, the numbers of giant cells, dysmorphic neurons, neurons, and oligodendrocytes, and calcification, gliosis, angiogenesis, inflammation, and myelin content. Three distinct histological profiles emerged based on the proportion of calcifications, dysmorphic neurons and giant cells designated types A, B, and C. In the latter two types we were able to subsequently associate them with specific features on presurgical MRI. Therefore, these histopathological patterns provide consistent criteria for improved definition of the clinico-pathological features of cortical tubers identified by MRI and provide a basis for further exploration of the functional and molecular features of cortical tubers in TSC.

  9. CD40 agonist converting CTL exhaustion via the activation of the mTORC1 pathway enhances PD-1 antagonist action in rescuing exhausted CTLs in chronic infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Aizhang; Wang, Rong; Freywald, Andrew; Stewart, Kristoffor; Tikoo, Suresh; Xu, Jianqing; Zheng, Changyu; Xiang, Jim

    2017-03-11

    Expansion of PD-1-expressing CD8 + cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) and associated CTL exhaustion are chief issues for ineffective virus-elimination in chronic infectious diseases. PD-1 blockade using antagonistic anti-PD-L1 antibodies results in a moderate conversion of CTL exhaustion. We previously demonstrated that CD40L signaling of ovalbumin (OVA)-specific vaccine, OVA-Texo, converts CTL exhaustion via the activation of the mTORC1 pathway in OVA-expressing adenovirus (AdVova)-infected B6 mice showing CTL inflation and exhaustion. Here, we developed AdVova-infected B6 and transgenic CD11c-DTR (termed AdVova-B6 and AdVova-CD11c-DTR) mice with chronic infection, and assessed a potential effect of CD40 agonist on the conversion of CTL exhaustion and on a potential enhancement of PD-1 antagonist action in rescuing exhausted CTLs in our chronic infection models. We demonstrate that a single dose of anti-CD40 alone can effectively convert CTL exhaustion by activating the mTORC1 pathway, leading to CTL proliferation, up-regulation of an effector-cytokine IFN-γ and the cytolytic effect in AdVova-B6 mice. Using anti-CD4 antibody and diphtheria toxin (DT) to deplete CD4 + T-cells and dendritic cells (DCs), we discovered that the CD40 agonist-induced conversion in AdVova-B6 and AdVova-CD11c-DTR mice is dependent upon host CD4 + T-cell and DC involvements. Moreover, CD40 agonist significantly enhances PD-1 antagonist effectiveness in rescuing exhausted CTLs in chronic infection. Taken together, our data demonstrate the importance of CD40 signaling in the conversion of CTL exhaustion and its ability to enhance PD-1 antagonist action in rescuing exhausted CTLs in chronic infection. Therefore, our findings may positively impact the design of new therapeutic strategies for chronic infectious diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Potential use of rapamycin in HIV infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Donia, Marco; McCubrey, James A; Bendtzen, Klaus

    2010-01-01

    The strong need for the development of alternative anti-HIV agents is primarily due to the emergence of strain-resistant viruses, the need for sustained adherence to complex treatment regimens and the toxicity of currently used antiviral drugs. This review analyzes proof of concept studies...... indicating that the immunomodulatory drug rapamycin (RAPA) possesses anti-HIV properties both in vitro and in vivo that qualifies it as a potential new anti-HIV drug. It represents a literature review of published studies that evaluated the in vitro and in vivo activity of RAPA in HIV. RAPA represses HIV-1...... replication in vitro through different mechanisms including, but not limited, to down regulation of CCR5. In addition RAPA synergistically enhances the anti-HIV activity of entry inhibitors such as vicriviroc, aplaviroc and enfuvirtide in vitro. RAPA also inhibits HIV-1 infection in human peripheral blood...

  11. Enteral leucine supplementation increases protein synthesis in skeletal and cardiac muscles and visceral tissues of neonatal pigs through mTORC1-dependent pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leucine activates mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) to upregulate protein synthesis (PS). To examine enteral Leu effects on PS and signaling activation, 5-d-old piglets were fed for 24 h diets containing: (i) LP, (ii) LP+L, or (iii) HP. PS in skeletal muscles, heart, liver, pancreas, and jejunum...

  12. Chronic treatment with novel nanoformulated micelles of rapamycin, Rapatar, protects diabetic heart against ischaemia/reperfusion injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samidurai, Arun; Salloum, Fadi N; Durrant, David; Chernova, Olga B; Kukreja, Rakesh C; Das, Anindita

    2017-10-01

    Enhanced mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signalling contributes to the pathogenesis of diabetes and plays a critical role in myocardial ischaemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. Rapatar is a novel nanoformulated micellar of rapamycin, a putative inhibitor of mTOR that has been rationally designed to increase water solubility of rapamycin to facilitate p.o. administration and enhance bioavailability. We examined the effect of Rapatar on the metabolic status and protection against myocardial I/R injury in type 2 diabetic mice. Adult male db/db mice were treated daily for 10 weeks with Rapatar (0.75 mg·kg-1 ·day-1 , p.o.) or vehicle. Isolated hearts were connected to a Langendorff perfusion system and subjected to global ischaemia (30 min) and reperfusion (1 h). Rapatar reduced fasting plasma glucose and triglyceride levels, prevented the gain in body weight and also improved glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity in db/db mice compared with control. Cardiac function was improved following Rapatar treatment in db/db mice. Myocardial infarct size was reduced in Rapatar-treated mice with improved post-ischaemic rate-force product. Western blot analyses demonstrated a significant inhibition of phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6 (downstream target of mTORC1), but not Akt (Ser473 , target of mTORC2) following chronic treatment with Rapatar. Rapatar also induced phosphorylation of AMPK, STAT3, ERK1/2 and glycogen synthase kinase 3β, without interfering with phosphorylation of p38. Our studies indicate that chronic treatment with Rapatar improves metabolic status and cardiac function with a reduction of infarct size following myocardial I/R injury in diabetic mice. © 2017 The British Pharmacological Society.

  13. Microcystic Lymphatic Malformation Successfully Treated With Topical Rapamycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Montero, Pablo; Del Boz, Javier; Sanchez-Martínez, Miguel; Escudero Santos, Isabel María; Baselga, Eulalia

    2017-05-01

    Microcystic lymphatic malformations (MLM) are low-flow vascular malformations composed of multiple small cysts. MLM usually affect deep-lying structures, which makes their treatment even more difficult and complex. A novel and interesting treatment is rapamycin, a mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor that when orally administrated has offered favorable results. However, until recently, topical rapamycin had not been used in the treatment of MLM. Case 1 is a girl aged 13 years with extensive MLM affecting the muscles in the right buttock. The patient had received frequent cycles of cryotherapy, but they had failed to control the associated symptoms. In the previous 12 months, the patient had reported greater discomfort, swelling, exudate, and superinfection of the affected region. Because no specific treatment has yet been approved for MLM, and as a step before the use of aggressive systemic or intralesional treatments, it was decided to initiate treatment with 1% rapamycin ointment. After 4 months of treatment, the patient presented a marked improvement, with a significant reduction of associated complications and no major side effects. Case 2 is a boy aged 5 years who underwent surgery for an intergluteal lipoblastoma at 3 weeks of life and developed a MLM on the scar 6 months afterward. The lesion showed slow growth and continuous exudation with frequent episodes of superinfection. Treatments with laser multiplex and intralesional bleomycin were performed unsuccessfully. In the previous 4 months, the patient had been treated with 1% rapamycin ointment with significant improvement and no side effects. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  14. Combination testing (Stage 2) of the Anti-IGF-1 receptor antibody IMC-A12 with rapamycin by the pediatric preclinical testing program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolb, E Anders; Gorlick, Richard; Maris, John M; Keir, Stephen T; Morton, Christopher L; Wu, Jianrong; Wozniak, Amy W; Smith, Malcolm A; Houghton, Peter J

    2012-05-01

    IMC-A12, a fully human antibody that blocks ligand binding to the Type 1 insulin-like growth factor receptor, and rapamycin, a selective inhibitor of mTORC1 signaling, have both demonstrated significant antitumor activity against PPTP solid tumor models. Here we have evaluated antitumor activity of each agent individually and in combination against nine tumor models. IMC-A12 was administered twice weekly and rapamycin was administered daily for 5 days per week for a planned 4 weeks. The impact of combining IMC-A12 with rapamycin was evaluated using two measures: (1) the "therapeutic enhancement" measure, and (2) a linear regression model for time-to-event to formally evaluate for sub- and supra-additivity for the combination compared to the agents used alone. Two osteosarcomas, and one Ewing sarcoma of the nine xenografts tested showed therapeutic enhancement. The combination effect was most dramatic for EW-5 for which PD2 responses of short duration were observed for both single agents and a prolonged PR response was observed for the combination. Both OS-2 and OS-9 showed significantly longer times to progression with the combination compared to either of the single agents, although objective response criteria were not met. The combination of IMC-A12 with rapamycin was well tolerated, and induced tumor responses that were superior to either single agent alone in several models. These studies confirm reports using other antibodies that inhibit IGF-1 receptor-mediated signaling that indicate enhanced therapeutic effect for this combination, and extend the range of histotypes to encompass additional tumors expressing IGF-1R where this approach may be effective. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Rapamycin bypasses vesicle-mediated signaling events to activate Gln3 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puria, Rekha

    2008-01-01

    Growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in poor nitrogen sources or exposure to the Tor inhibitor rapamycin results in expression of the nitrogen catabolite repressed (NCR) genes whose products are involved in scavenging and metabolizing nitrogen. The NCR genes are regulated by the GATA-like transactivators Gln3 and Gat1, which are thought to be under control of the rapamycin-sensitive Tor complex 1 (TORC1). We have recently shown that Gln3 nuclear translocation in response to nitrogen source quality but not in response to rapamycin requires Golgi to endosome trafficking. These and previous findings that several TORC1 components localize to low density endomembranes are discussed in a model that underscores a prominent role for the vesicular trafficking system in facilitating molecular interactions in response to nitrogen source. In addition, these findings have important implications for Tor signaling and rapamycin mechanism of action, both in yeast and in metazoans. PMID:19430540

  16. TORC1 signaling inhibition by rapamycin and caffeine affect lifespan, global gene expression, and cell proliferation of fission yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rallis, Charalampos; Codlin, Sandra; Bähler, Jürg

    2013-01-01

    Target of rapamycin complex 1 (TORC1) is implicated in growth control and aging from yeast to humans. Fission yeast is emerging as a popular model organism to study TOR signaling, although rapamycin has been thought to not affect cell growth in this organism. Here, we analyzed the effects of rapamycin and caffeine, singly and combined, on multiple cellular processes in fission yeast. The two drugs led to diverse and specific phenotypes that depended on TORC1 inhibition, including prolonged chronological lifespan, inhibition of global translation, inhibition of cell growth and division, and reprograming of global gene expression mimicking nitrogen starvation. Rapamycin and caffeine differentially affected these various TORC1-dependent processes. Combined drug treatment augmented most phenotypes and effectively blocked cell growth. Rapamycin showed a much more subtle effect on global translation than did caffeine, while both drugs were effective in prolonging chronological lifespan. Rapamycin and caffeine did not affect the lifespan via the pH of the growth media. Rapamycin prolonged the lifespan of nongrowing cells only when applied during the growth phase but not when applied after cells had stopped proliferation. The doses of rapamycin and caffeine strongly correlated with growth inhibition and with lifespan extension. This comprehensive analysis will inform future studies into TORC1 function and cellular aging in fission yeast and beyond. PMID:23551936

  17. Towards natural mimetics of metformin and rapamycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliper, Alexander; Jellen, Leslie; Cortese, Franco; Artemov, Artem; Karpinsky-Semper, Darla; Moskalev, Alexey; Swick, Andrew G; Zhavoronkov, Alex

    2017-11-15

    Aging is now at the forefront of major challenges faced globally, creating an immediate need for safe, widescale interventions to reduce the burden of chronic disease and extend human healthspan. Metformin and rapamycin are two FDA-approved mTOR inhibitors proposed for this purpose, exhibiting significant anti-cancer and anti-aging properties beyond their current clinical applications. However, each faces issues with approval for off-label, prophylactic use due to adverse effects. Here, we initiate an effort to identify nutraceuticals-safer, naturally-occurring compounds-that mimic the anti-aging effects of metformin and rapamycin without adverse effects. We applied several bioinformatic approaches and deep learning methods to the Library of Integrated Network-based Cellular Signatures (LINCS) dataset to map the gene- and pathway-level signatures of metformin and rapamycin and screen for matches among over 800 natural compounds. We then predicted the safety of each compound with an ensemble of deep neural network classifiers. The analysis revealed many novel candidate metformin and rapamycin mimetics, including allantoin and ginsenoside (metformin), epigallocatechin gallate and isoliquiritigenin (rapamycin), and withaferin A (both). Four relatively unexplored compounds also scored well with rapamycin. This work revealed promising candidates for future experimental validation while demonstrating the applications of powerful screening methods for this and similar endeavors.

  18. Rapamycin pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic relationships in osteosarcoma: a comparative oncology study in dogs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa C Paoloni

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Signaling through the mTOR pathway contributes to growth, progression and chemoresistance of several cancers. Accordingly, inhibitors have been developed as potentially valuable therapeutics. Their optimal development requires consideration of dose, regimen, biomarkers and a rationale for their use in combination with other agents. Using the infrastructure of the Comparative Oncology Trials Consortium many of these complex questions were asked within a relevant population of dogs with osteosarcoma to inform the development of mTOR inhibitors for future use in pediatric osteosarcoma patients.This prospective dose escalation study of a parenteral formulation of rapamycin sought to define a safe, pharmacokinetically relevant, and pharmacodynamically active dose of rapamycin in dogs with appendicular osteosarcoma. Dogs entered into dose cohorts consisting of 3 dogs/cohort. Dogs underwent a pre-treatment tumor biopsy and collection of baseline PBMC. Dogs received a single intramuscular dose of rapamycin and underwent 48-hour whole blood pharmacokinetic sampling. Additionally, daily intramuscular doses of rapamycin were administered for 7 days with blood rapamycin trough levels collected on Day 8, 9 and 15. At Day 8 post-treatment collection of tumor and PBMC were obtained. No maximally tolerated dose of rapamycin was attained through escalation to the maximal planned dose of 0.08 mg/kg (2.5 mg/30 kg dog. Pharmacokinetic analysis revealed a dose-dependent exposure. In all cohorts modulation of the mTOR pathway in tumor and PBMC (pS6RP/S6RP was demonstrated. No change in pAKT/AKT was seen in tumor samples following rapamycin therapy.Rapamycin may be safely administered to dogs and can yield therapeutic exposures. Modulation pS6RP/S6RP in tumor tissue and PBMCs was not dependent on dose. Results from this study confirm that the dog may be included in the translational development of rapamycin and potentially other mTOR inhibitors. Ongoing studies of

  19. Rapamycin inhibits mTOR/p70S6K activation in CA3 region of the hippocampus of the rat and impairs long term memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lana, D; Di Russo, J; Mello, T; Wenk, G L; Giovannini, M G

    2017-01-01

    The present study was aimed at establishing whether the mTOR pathway and its downstream effector p70S6K in CA3 pyramidal neurons are under the modulation of the cholinergic input to trigger the formation of long term memories, similar to what we demonstrated in CA1 hippocampus. We performed in vivo behavioral experiments using the step down inhibitory avoidance test in adult Wistar rats to evaluate memory formation under different conditions. We examined the effects of rapamycin, an inhibitor of mTORC1 formation, scopolamine, a muscarinic receptor antagonist or mecamylamine, a nicotinic receptor antagonist, on short and long term memory formation and on the functionality of the mTOR pathway. Acquisition was conducted 30min after i.c.v. injection of rapamycin. Recall testing was performed 1h, 4h or 24h after acquisition. We found that (1) mTOR and p70S6K activation in CA3 pyramidal neurons were involved in long term memory formation; (2) rapamycin significantly inhibited mTOR and of p70S6K activation at 4h, and long term memory impairment 24h after acquisition; (3) scopolamine impaired short but not long term memory, with an early increase of mTOR/p70S6K activation at 1h followed by stabilization at longer times; (4) mecamylamine and scopolamine co-administration impaired short term memory at 1h and 4h and reduced the scopolamine-induced increase of mTOR/p70S6K activation at 1h and 4h; (5) mecamylamine and scopolamine treatment did not impair long term memory formation; (6) unexpectedly, rapamycin increased mTORC2 activation in microglial cells. Our results demonstrate that in CA3 pyramidal neurons the mTOR/p70S6K pathway is under the modulation of the cholinergic system and is involved in long-term memory encoding, and are consistent with the hypothesis that the CA3 region of the hippocampus is involved in memory mechanisms based on rapid, one-trial object-place learning and recall. Furthermore, our results are in accordance with previous reports that selective

  20. Glucose deprivation in tuberous sclerosis complex-related tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Xiuyun

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cancer cells possess unique metabolic phenotypes that are determined by their underlying oncogenic pathways. Activation of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling cascade promotes glycolysis and leads to glucose-dependence in tumors. In particular, cells with constitutive mTORC1 activity secondary to the loss of TSC1/TSC2 function are prone to undergo apoptosis upon glucose withdrawal in vitro, but this concept has not been tested in vivo. This study examines the effects of restricting glucose metabolism by pharmacologic and dietary means in a tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC tumor xenograft model. Results Tumor-bearing mice were randomly assigned to receive unrestricted carbohydrate-free ("Carb-free" or Western-style diet in the absence or presence of 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG in one of four treatment groups. After 14 weeks, tumor sizes were significantly different among the four treatment groups with those receiving 2-DG having the smallest tumors. Unexpectedly, the "Carb-free" diet was associated with the largest tumors but they remained responsive to 2-DG. PET imaging showed significant treatment-related changes in tumor 18fluorodeoxyglucose-uptake but the standard uptake values did not correlate with tumor size. Alternative energy substrates such as ketone bodies and monounsaturated oleic acid supported the growth of the Tsc2-/- cells in vitro, whereas saturated palmitic acid was toxic. Correspondingly, tumors in the high-fat, "Carb-free" group showed greater necrosis and liquefaction that contributed to their larger sizes. In contrast, 2-DG treatment significantly reduced tumor cell proliferation, increased metabolic stress (i.e., ketonemia and AMPK activity, whereas rapamycin primarily reduced cell size. Conclusions Our data support the concept of glycolytic inhibition as a therapeutic approach in TSC whereas dietary withdrawal of carbohydrates was not effective.

  1. Molecular insights into the stabilization of protein-protein interactions with small molecule: The FKBP12-rapamycin-FRB case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaurasia, Shilpi; Pieraccini, Stefano; De Gonda, Riccardo; Conti, Simone; Sironi, Maurizio

    2013-11-01

    Targetting protein-protein interactions is a challenging task in drug discovery process. Despite the challenges, several studies provided evidences for the development of small molecules modulating protein-protein interactions. Here we consider a typical case of protein-protein interaction stabilization: the complex between FKBP12 and FRB with rapamycin. We have analyzed the stability of the complex and characterized its interactions at the atomic level by performing free energy calculations and computational alanine scanning. It is shown that rapamycin stabilizes the complex by acting as a bridge between the two proteins; and the complex is stable only in the presence of rapamycin.

  2. ATP-Competitive Inhibitors of the Mammalian Target of Rapamycin: Design and Synthesis of Highly Potent and Selective Pyrazolopyrimidines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zask, Arie; Verheijen, Jeroen C.; Curran, Kevin; Kaplan, Joshua; Richard, David J.; Nowak, Pawel; Malwitz, David J.; Brooijmans, Natasja; Bard, Joel; Svenson, Kristine; Lucas, Judy; Toral-Barza, Lourdes; Zhang, Wei-Guo; Hollander, Irwin; Gibbons, James J.; Abraham, Robert T.; Ayral-Kaloustian, Semiramis; Mansour, Tarek S.; Yu, Ker; (Wyeth)

    2009-09-18

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), a central regulator of growth, survival, and metabolism, is a validated target for cancer therapy. Rapamycin and its analogues, allosteric inhibitors of mTOR, only partially inhibit one mTOR protein complex. ATP-competitive, global inhibitors of mTOR that have the potential for enhanced anticancer efficacy are described. Structural features leading to potency and selectivity were identified and refined leading to compounds with in vivo efficacy in tumor xenograft models.

  3. Mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors for treatment in tuberous sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Won Seop Kim

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC is a genetic multisystem disorder that results from mutations in the TSC1 or TSC2 genes, and is associated with hamartomas in several organs, including subependymal giant cell tumors. The neurological manifestations of TSC are particularly challenging and include infantile spasms, intractable epilepsy, cognitive disabilities, and autism. The TSC1- and TSC2-encoded proteins modulate cell function via the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR signaling cascade, and are key factors in the regulation of cell growth and proliferation. The mTOR pathway provides an intersection for an intricate network of protein cascades that respond to cellular nutrition, energy levels, and growth factor stimulation. In the brain, TSC1 and TSC2 have been implicated in cell body size, dendritic arborization, axonal outgrowth and targeting, neuronal migration, cortical lamination, and spine formation. The mTOR pathway represents a logical candidate for drug targeting, because mTOR regulates multiple cellular functions that may contribute to epileptogenesis, including protein synthesis, cell growth and proliferation, and synaptic plasticity. Antagonism of the mTOR pathway with rapamycin and related compounds may provide new therapeutic options for TSC patients.

  4. Inhibition of Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Signaling with Rapamycin Prevents Trauma-Induced Heterotopic Ossification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Ammar T; Dey, Devaveena; Sanders, Erin M; Seavey, Jonathan G; Tomasino, Allison M; Moss, Kaitlyn; Wheatley, Benjamin; Cholok, David; Loder, Shawn; Li, John; Levi, Benjamin; Davis, Thomas A

    2017-11-01

    A pressing clinical need exists for 63% to 65% of combat-wounded service members and 11% to 20% of civilians who develop heterotopic ossification (HO) after blast-related extremity injury and traumatic injuries, respectively. The mammalian target of rapamycin pathway is a central cellular sensor of injury. We evaluated the prophylactic effects of rapamycin, a selective inhibitor of mammalian target of rapamycin signaling, on HO formation in a rat model of blast-related, polytraumatic extremity injury. Rapamycin was administered intraperitoneally daily for 14 days at 0.5 mg/kg or 2.5 mg/kg. Ectopic bone formation was monitored by micro-computed tomography and confirmed by histologic examination. Connective tissue progenitor cells, platelet-derived growth factor receptor-α-positive cells, and α-smooth muscle actin-positive blood vessels were assayed at postoperative day 7 by colony formation and immunofluorescence. Early gene expression changes were determined by low-density microarray. There was significant attenuation of 1) total new bone and soft tissue ectopic bone with 0.5 mg/kg (38.5% and 14.7%) and 2.5 mg/kg rapamycin (90.3% and 82.9%), respectively, 2) connective tissue progenitor cells, 3) platelet-derived growth factor receptor-α-positive cells, 4) α-smooth muscle actin-positive blood vessels, and 5) of key extracellular matrix remodeling (CD44, Col1a1, integrins), osteogenesis (Sp7, Runx2, Bmp2), inflammation (Cxcl5, 10, IL6, Ccl2), and angiogenesis (Angpt2) genes. No wound healing complications were noted. Our data demonstrate the efficacy of rapamycin in inhibiting blast trauma-induced HO by a multipronged mechanism. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Mammalian target of rapamycin is essential for cardiomyocyte survival and heart development in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Pengpeng [Key Laboratory of Swine Genetics and Breeding, Ministry of Agriculture, College of Animal Science and Technology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Key Laboratory of Agricultural Animal Genetics, Breeding and Reproduction, Ministry of Education, College of Animal Science and Technology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Department of Animal Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Shan, Tizhong; Liang, Xinrong [Department of Animal Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Deng, Changyan [Key Laboratory of Swine Genetics and Breeding, Ministry of Agriculture, College of Animal Science and Technology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Key Laboratory of Agricultural Animal Genetics, Breeding and Reproduction, Ministry of Education, College of Animal Science and Technology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Kuang, Shihuan, E-mail: skuang@purdue.edu [Department of Animal Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States)

    2014-09-12

    Highlights: • mTOR is a critical regulator of many biological processes yet its function in heart is not well understood. • MCK-Cre/Mtor{sup flox/flox} mice were established to delete Mtor in cardiomyocytes. • The mTOR-mKO mice developed normally but die prematurely within 5 weeks after birth due to heart disease. • The mTOR-mKO mice had dilated myocardium and increased cell death. • mTOR-mKO hearts had reduced expression of metabolic genes and activation of mTOR target proteins. - Abstract: Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a critical regulator of protein synthesis, cell proliferation and energy metabolism. As constitutive knockout of Mtor leads to embryonic lethality, the in vivo function of mTOR in perinatal development and postnatal growth of heart is not well defined. In this study, we established a muscle-specific mTOR conditional knockout mouse model (mTOR-mKO) by crossing MCK-Cre and Mtor{sup flox/flox} mice. Although the mTOR-mKO mice survived embryonic and perinatal development, they exhibited severe postnatal growth retardation, cardiac muscle pathology and premature death. At the cellular level, the cardiac muscle of mTOR-mKO mice had fewer cardiomyocytes due to apoptosis and necrosis, leading to dilated cardiomyopathy. At the molecular level, the cardiac muscle of mTOR-mKO mice expressed lower levels of fatty acid oxidation and glycolysis related genes compared to the WT littermates. In addition, the mTOR-mKO cardiac muscle had reduced Myh6 but elevated Myh7 expression, indicating cardiac muscle degeneration. Furthermore, deletion of Mtor dramatically decreased the phosphorylation of S6 and AKT, two key targets downstream of mTORC1 and mTORC2 mediating the normal function of mTOR. These results demonstrate that mTOR is essential for cardiomyocyte survival and cardiac muscle function.

  6. Synthesis of I-125 labeled photoaffinity rapamycin analogs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shu, A.Y.L.; Yamashita, D.S.; Holt, D.A.; Heys, J.R. [SmithKline Beecham Pharmaceuticals, King of Prussia, PA (United States)

    1996-03-01

    Two no-carrier-added {sup 125}I-labelled photoaffinity rapamycin analogs were prepared: 7-demethoxy-7-(4-azido-3-{sup 125}I-benzyloxy) rapamycin and its C{sub 28}-C{sub 29} seco analog. The key reactions of the synthesis were substitution of the C{sub 7} methoxyl of rapamycin with 4-azido-3-tributylstannylbenzyloxy group, exchange of tributyltin with {sup 125}I using Na{sup 125}I and Chloramine-T, and a ZnCl{sub 2} mediated retro-Aldol cleavage of the C{sub 28}-C{sub 29} bond of rapamycin. (author).

  7. Chronic rapamycin treatment causes diabetes in male mice

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schindler, Christine E; Partap, Uttara; Patchen, Bonnie K; Swoap, Steven J

    2014-01-01

    .... We observed that treatment with rapamycin for 52 wk induced diabetes in male mice, characterized by hyperglycemia, significant urine glucose levels, and severe glucose and pyruvate intolerance...

  8. Therapeutic effects of rapamycin on alcoholic cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Xilin; Wang, Chao; Ru, Xiaoxue; Jing, Lili; Zhou, Lijun; Jing, Ling

    2017-10-01

    The present study aimed to investigate whether rapamycin has therapeutic potential as a treatment for alcoholic cardiomyopathy. Rats were divided into eight groups (n=7 in each group): The control group; the alcohol group; abstinence in the first week; abstinence in the third week; abstinence in the fourth week; abstinent+rapamycin (AB-RAP) until the first week (AB-RAP 1); AB-RAP until the third week (AB-RAP 3); and AB-RAP until the fourth week (AB-RAP 4). Subsequently, echocardiography, and hematoxylin-eosin and Masson's staining were performed, followed by electron microscopy and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling assay. Finally, expression levels of B cell lymphoma-2, Beclin-1 and microtubule-associated protein 1A/1B-light chain 3 were detected by immunohistochemistry and western blot analysis. The levels of left ventricular end-diastolic dimension in AB-RAP 3 (7.00±0.41) and AB-RAP 4 (6.33±0.68) groups were significantly lower when compared with the alcohol group (8.01±0.30; P<0.05). Compared with the alcohol group, the apoptosis rate of left ventricular myocardial tissue in the AB+RAP 3 (37.68±2.15) and AB+RAP 4 (26.97±2.11) groups was significantly reduced (P<0.05). To conclude, rapamycin may be considered as a therapeutic tool to attenuate alcoholic cardiomyopathy and improve cardiac function through increasing autophagy and reducing apoptosis.

  9. Dietary intervention in acne

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnik, Bodo

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to highlight the endocrine signaling of Western diet, a fundamental environmental factor involved in the pathogenesis of epidemic acne. Western nutrition is characterized by high calorie uptake, high glycemic load, high fat and meat intake, as well as increased consumption of insulin- and IGF-1-level elevating dairy proteins. Metabolic signals of Western diet are sensed by the nutrient-sensitive kinase, mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), which integrates signals of cellular energy, growth factors (insulin, IGF-1) and protein-derived signals, predominantly leucine, provided in high amounts by milk proteins and meat. mTORC1 activates SREBP, the master transcription factor of lipogenesis. Leucine stimulates mTORC1-SREBP signaling and leucine is directly converted by sebocytes into fatty acids and sterols for sebaceous lipid synthesis. Over-activated mTORC1 increases androgen hormone secretion and most likely amplifies androgen-driven mTORC1 signaling of sebaceous follicles. Testosterone directly activates mTORC1. Future research should investigate the effects of isotretinoin on sebocyte mTORC1 activity. It is conceivable that isotretinoin may downregulate mTORC1 in sebocytes by upregulation of nuclear levels of FoxO1. The role of Western diet in acne can only be fully appreciated when all stimulatory inputs for maximal mTORC1 activation, i.e., glucose, insulin, IGF-1 and leucine, are adequately considered. Epidemic acne has to be recognized as an mTORC1-driven disease of civilization like obesity, type 2 diabetes, cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. These new insights into Western diet-mediated mTORC1-hyperactivity provide a rational basis for dietary intervention in acne by attenuating mTORC1 signaling by reducing (1) total energy intake, (2) hyperglycemic carbohydrates, (3) insulinotropic dairy proteins and (4) leucine-rich meat and dairy proteins. The necessary dietary changes are opposed to the evolution of

  10. Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Inhibition With Rapamycin Mitigates Radiation-Induced Pulmonary Fibrosis in a Murine Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Eun Joo [Radiation Oncology Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Sowers, Anastasia; Thetford, Angela [Radiation Biology Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); McKay-Corkum, Grace; Chung, Su I. [Radiation Oncology Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Mitchell, James B. [Radiation Biology Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Citrin, Deborah E., E-mail: citrind@mail.nih.gov [Radiation Oncology Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States)

    2016-11-15

    Purpose: Radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis (RIPF) is a late toxicity of therapeutic radiation. Signaling of the mammalian target of rapamycin drives several processes implicated in RIPF, including inflammatory cytokine production, fibroblast proliferation, and epithelial senescence. We sought to determine if mammalian target of rapamycin inhibition with rapamycin would mitigate RIPF. Methods and Materials: C57BL/6NCr mice received a diet formulated with rapamycin (14 mg/kg food) or a control diet 2 days before and continuing for 16 weeks after exposure to 5 daily fractions of 6 Gy of thoracic irradiation. Fibrosis was assessed with Masson trichrome staining and hydroxyproline assay. Cytokine expression was evaluated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Senescence was assessed by staining for β-galactosidase activity. Results: Administration of rapamycin extended the median survival of irradiated mice compared with the control diet from 116 days to 156 days (P=.006, log-rank test). Treatment with rapamycin reduced hydroxyproline content compared with the control diet (irradiation plus vehicle, 45.9 ± 11.8 μg per lung; irradiation plus rapamycin, 21.4 ± 6.0 μg per lung; P=.001) and reduced visible fibrotic foci. Rapamycin treatment attenuated interleukin 1β and transforming growth factor β induction in irradiated lungs compared with the control diet. Type II pneumocyte senescence after irradiation was reduced with rapamycin treatment at 16 weeks (3-fold reduction at 16 weeks, P<.001). Conclusions: Rapamycin protected against RIPF in a murine model. Rapamycin treatment reduced inflammatory cytokine expression, extracellular matrix production, and senescence in type II pneumocytes.

  11. Rapamycin extends murine lifespan but has limited effects on aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neff, Frauke; Flores-Dominguez, Diana; Ryan, Devon P; Horsch, Marion; Schröder, Susanne; Adler, Thure; Afonso, Luciana Caminha; Aguilar-Pimentel, Juan Antonio; Becker, Lore; Garrett, Lillian; Hans, Wolfgang; Hettich, Moritz M; Holtmeier, Richard; Hölter, Sabine M; Moreth, Kristin; Prehn, Cornelia; Puk, Oliver; Rácz, Ildikó; Rathkolb, Birgit; Rozman, Jan; Naton, Beatrix; Ordemann, Rainer; Adamski, Jerzy; Beckers, Johannes; Bekeredjian, Raffi; Busch, Dirk H; Ehninger, Gerhard; Graw, Jochen; Höfler, Heinz; Klingenspor, Martin; Klopstock, Thomas; Ollert, Markus; Stypmann, Jörg; Wolf, Eckhard; Wurst, Wolfgang; Zimmer, Andreas; Fuchs, Helmut; Gailus-Durner, Valérie; Hrabe de Angelis, Martin; Ehninger, Dan

    2013-08-01

    Aging is a major risk factor for a large number of disorders and functional impairments. Therapeutic targeting of the aging process may therefore represent an innovative strategy in the quest for novel and broadly effective treatments against age-related diseases. The recent report of lifespan extension in mice treated with the FDA-approved mTOR inhibitor rapamycin represented the first demonstration of pharmacological extension of maximal lifespan in mammals. Longevity effects of rapamycin may, however, be due to rapamycin's effects on specific life-limiting pathologies, such as cancers, and it remains unclear if this compound actually slows the rate of aging in mammals. Here, we present results from a comprehensive, large-scale assessment of a wide range of structural and functional aging phenotypes, which we performed to determine whether rapamycin slows the rate of aging in male C57BL/6J mice. While rapamycin did extend lifespan, it ameliorated few studied aging phenotypes. A subset of aging traits appeared to be rescued by rapamycin. Rapamycin, however, had similar effects on many of these traits in young animals, indicating that these effects were not due to a modulation of aging, but rather related to aging-independent drug effects. Therefore, our data largely dissociate rapamycin's longevity effects from effects on aging itself.

  12. Rapamycin is neuroprotective in a rat chronic hypertensive glaucoma model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenru Su

    Full Text Available Glaucoma is a leading cause of irreversible blindness. Injury of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs accounts for visual impairment of glaucoma. Here, we report rapamycin protects RGCs from death in experimental glaucoma model and the underlying mechanisms. Our results showed that treatment with rapamycin dramatically promote RGCs survival in a rat chronic ocular hypertension model. This protective action appears to be attributable to inhibition of neurotoxic mediators release and/or direct suppression of RGC apoptosis. In support of this mechanism, in vitro, rapamycin significantly inhibits the production of NO, TNF-α in BV2 microglials by modulating NF-κB signaling. In experimental animals, treatment with rapamycin also dramatically inhibited the activation of microglials. In primary RGCs, rapamycin was capable of direct suppression the apoptosis of primary RGCs induced by glutamate. Mechanistically, rapamycin-mediated suppression of RGCs apoptosis is by sparing phosphorylation of Akt at a site critical for maintenance of its survival-promoting activity in cell and animal model. These results demonstrate that rapamycin is neuroprotective in experimental glaucoma, possibly via decreasing neurotoxic releasing and suppressing directly apoptosis of RGCs.

  13. Rapamycin suppresses brain aging in senescence-accelerated OXYS rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolosova, Nataliya G; Vitovtov, Anton O; Muraleva, Natalia A; Akulov, Andrey E; Stefanova, Natalia A; Blagosklonny, Mikhail V

    2013-06-01

    Cellular and organismal aging are driven in part by the MTOR (mechanistic target of rapamycin) pathway and rapamycin extends life span inC elegans, Drosophila and mice. Herein, we investigated effects of rapamycin on brain aging in OXYS rats. Previously we found, in OXYS rats, an early development of age-associated pathological phenotypes similar to several geriatric disorders in humans, including cerebral dysfunctions. Behavioral alterations as well as learning and memory deficits develop by 3 months. Here we show that rapamycin treatment (0.1 or 0.5 mg/kg as a food mixture daily from the age of 1.5 to 3.5 months) decreased anxiety and improved locomotor and exploratory behavior in OXYS rats. In untreated OXYS rats, MRI revealed an increase of the area of hippocampus, substantial hydrocephalus and 2-fold increased area of the lateral ventricles. Rapamycin treatment prevented these abnormalities, erasing the difference between OXYS and Wister rats (used as control). All untreated OXYS rats showed signs of neurodegeneration, manifested by loci of demyelination. Rapamycin decreased the percentage of animals with demyelination and the number of loci. Levels of Tau and phospho-Tau (T181) were increased in OXYS rats (compared with Wistar). Rapamycin significantly decreased Tau and inhibited its phosphorylation in the hippocampus of OXYS and Wistar rats. Importantly, rapamycin treatment caused a compensatory increase in levels of S6 and correspondingly levels of phospo-S6 in the frontal cortex, indicating that some downstream events were compensatory preserved, explaining the lack of toxicity. We conclude that rapamycin in low chronic doses can suppress brain aging.

  14. Rapamycin extends life- and health span because it slows aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blagosklonny, Mikhail V

    2013-08-01

    Making headlines, a thought-provocative paper by Neff, Ehninger and coworkers claims that rapamycin extends life span but has limited effects on aging. How is that possibly possible? And what is aging if not an increase of the probability of death with age. I discuss that the JCI paper actually shows that rapamycin slows aging and also extends lifespan regardless of its direct anti-cancer activities. Aging is, in part, MTOR-driven: a purposeless continuation of developmental growth. Rapamycin affects the same processes in young and old animals: young animals' traits and phenotypes, which continuations become hyperfunctional, harmful and lethal later in life.

  15. Aging Reduces the Activation of the mTORC1 Pathway after Resistance Exercise and Protein Intake in Human Skeletal Muscle: Potential Role of REDD1 and Impaired Anabolic Sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Francaux

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to better understand the molecular mechanisms involved in the anabolic resistance observed in elderly people. Nine young (22 ± 0.1 years and 10 older (69 ± 1.7 years volunteers performed a one-leg extension exercise consisting of 10 × 10 repetitions at 70% of their 3-RM, immediately after which they ingested 30 g of whey protein. Muscle biopsies were taken from the vastus lateralis at rest in the fasted state and 30 min after protein ingestion in the non-exercised (Pro and exercised (Pro+ex legs. Plasma insulin levels were determined at the same time points. No age difference was measured in fasting insulin levels but the older subjects had a 50% higher concentration than the young subjects in the fed state (p < 0.05. While no difference was observed in the fasted state, in response to exercise and protein ingestion, the phosphorylation state of PKB (p < 0.05 in Pro and Pro+ex and S6K1 (p = 0.059 in Pro; p = 0.066 in Pro+ex was lower in the older subjects compared with the young subjects. After Pro+ex, REDD1 expression tended to be higher (p = 0.087 in the older group while AMPK phosphorylation was not modified by any condition. In conclusion, we show that the activation of the mTORC1 pathway is reduced in skeletal muscle of older subjects after resistance exercise and protein ingestion compared with young subjects, which could be partially due to an increased expression of REDD1 and an impaired anabolic sensitivity.

  16. Rapamycin Prolongs the Survival of Corneal Epithelial Cells in Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Sanaz Gidfar; Farnoud Y. Milani; Milani, Behrad Y.; Xiang Shen; Medi Eslani; Ilham Putra; Michael J. Huvard; Hossein Sagha; Djalilian, Ali R.

    2017-01-01

    Rapamycin has previously been shown to have anti-aging effects in cells and organisms. These studies were undertaken to investigate the effects of rapamycin on primary human corneal epithelial cells in vitro. Cell growth and viability were evaluated by bright field microscopy. Cell proliferation and cycle were evaluated by flow cytometry. The expression of differentiation markers was evaluated by quantitative PCR and Western blot. Senescence was evaluated by senescence-associated ?-Galactosid...

  17. Rapamycin promotes β-amyloid production via ADAM-10 inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Sheqing; Salemi, Jon; Hou, Huayan; Zhu, Yuyan; Mori, Takashi; Giunta, Brian; Obregon, Demian; Tan, Jun

    2010-01-01

    Rapamycin is a well known immunosuppressant drug for rejection prevention in organ transplantation. Numerous clinical trials using rapamycin analogs, involving both children and adults with various disorders are currently ongoing worldwide. Most recently, rapamycin gained much attention for what appears to be life-span extending properties when administered to mice. The risk for Alzheimer disease (AD) is strongly and positively correlated with advancing age and is characterized by deposition of β-amyloid peptides (Aβ) as senile plaques in the brain. We report that rapamycin (2.5 μM), significantly increases Aβ generation in murine neuron-like cells (N2a) transfected with the human “Swedish” mutant amyloid precursor protein (APP). In concert with these observations, we found rapamycin significantly decreases the neuroprotective amino-terminal APP (amyloid precursor protein) cleavage product, soluble APP-α (sAPP-α) while increasing production of the β-carboxyl-terminal fragment of APP (β-CTF). These cleavage events are associated with decreased activation of a disintegrin and metallopeptidase domain-10 (ADAM-10), an important candidate α-secretase which opposes Aβ generation. To validate these findings in vivo, we intraperitoneal (i.p.) injected Tg2576 Aβ-overproducing transgenic mice with rapamycin (3 mg/kg/day) for 2 weeks. We found increased Aβ levels associated with decreased sAPP-α at an average rapamycin plasma concentration of 169.7 ± 23.5 ng/mL by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). These data suggest that although rapamycin may increase the lifespan in some mouse models, it may not decrease the risk for age-associated neurodegenerative disorders such as AD. PMID:20542014

  18. Topical rapamycin as a treatment for fibrofolliculomas in Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome: a double-blind placebo-controlled randomized split-face trial.

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    Lieke M C Gijezen

    Full Text Available Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome (BHD is a rare autosomal dominant disorder characterised by the occurrence of benign, mostly facial, skin tumours called fibrofolliculomas, multiple lung cysts, spontaneous pneumothorax and an increased renal cancer risk. Current treatments for fibrofolliculomas have high rates of recurrence and carry a risk of complications. It would be desirable to have a treatment that could prevent fibrofolliculomas from growing. Animal models of BHD have previously shown deregulation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR. Topical use of the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin is an effective treatment for the skin tumours (angiofibromas in tuberous sclerosis complex, which is also characterised by mTOR deregulation. In this study we aimed to determine if topical rapamycin is also an effective treatment for fibrofolliculomas in BHD.We performed a double blinded, randomised, facial left-right controlled trial of topical rapamycin 0.1% versus placebo in 19 BHD patients. Trial duration was 6 months. The primary outcome was cosmetic improvement as measured by doctors and patients. Changes in fibrofolliculoma number and size were also measured, as was occurrence of side effects.No change in cosmetic status of fibrofolliculomas was reported in the majority of cases for the rapamycin treated (79% by doctors, 53% by patients as well as the placebo treated facial sides (both 74%. No significant differences between rapamycin and placebo treated facial halves were observed (p = 1.000 for doctors opinion, p = 0.344 for patients opinion. No significant difference in fibrofolliculoma number or change in size of the fibrofolliculomas was seen after 6 months. Side effects occurred more often after rapamycin treatment (68% of patients than after placebo (58% of patients; p = 0.625. A burning sensation, erythema, itching and dryness were most frequently reported.This study provides no evidence that treatment of fibrofolliculomas with topical

  19. Rapamycin extends murine lifespan but has limited effects on aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neff, Frauke; Flores-Dominguez, Diana; Ryan, Devon P.; Horsch, Marion; Schröder, Susanne; Adler, Thure; Afonso, Luciana Caminha; Aguilar-Pimentel, Juan Antonio; Becker, Lore; Garrett, Lillian; Hans, Wolfgang; Hettich, Moritz M.; Holtmeier, Richard; Hölter, Sabine M.; Moreth, Kristin; Prehn, Cornelia; Puk, Oliver; Rácz, Ildikó; Rathkolb, Birgit; Rozman, Jan; Naton, Beatrix; Ordemann, Rainer; Adamski, Jerzy; Beckers, Johannes; Bekeredjian, Raffi; Busch, Dirk H.; Ehninger, Gerhard; Graw, Jochen; Höfler, Heinz; Klingenspor, Martin; Klopstock, Thomas; Ollert, Markus; Stypmann, Jörg; Wolf, Eckhard; Wurst, Wolfgang; Zimmer, Andreas; Fuchs, Helmut; Gailus-Durner, Valérie; Hrabe de Angelis, Martin; Ehninger, Dan

    2013-01-01

    Aging is a major risk factor for a large number of disorders and functional impairments. Therapeutic targeting of the aging process may therefore represent an innovative strategy in the quest for novel and broadly effective treatments against age-related diseases. The recent report of lifespan extension in mice treated with the FDA-approved mTOR inhibitor rapamycin represented the first demonstration of pharmacological extension of maximal lifespan in mammals. Longevity effects of rapamycin may, however, be due to rapamycin’s effects on specific life-limiting pathologies, such as cancers, and it remains unclear if this compound actually slows the rate of aging in mammals. Here, we present results from a comprehensive, large-scale assessment of a wide range of structural and functional aging phenotypes, which we performed to determine whether rapamycin slows the rate of aging in male C57BL/6J mice. While rapamycin did extend lifespan, it ameliorated few studied aging phenotypes. A subset of aging traits appeared to be rescued by rapamycin. Rapamycin, however, had similar effects on many of these traits in young animals, indicating that these effects were not due to a modulation of aging, but rather related to aging-independent drug effects. Therefore, our data largely dissociate rapamycin’s longevity effects from effects on aging itself. PMID:23863708

  20. Detection of Human Papillomavirus in Human Focal Cortical Dysplasia Type IIB

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Julie; Tsai, Victoria; Parker, Whitney E.; Aronica, Eleonora; Baybis, Marianna; Crino, Peter B.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Focal cortical dysplasia type IIB (FCDIIB) is a sporadic developmental malformation of the cerebral cortex highly associated with pediatric epilepsy. Balloon cells (BCs) in FCDIIB exhibit constitutive activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling pathway.

  1. Metabolic effects of acute thiamine depletion are reversed by rapamycin in breast and leukemia cells.

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    Shuqian Liu

    Full Text Available Thiamine-dependent enzymes (TDEs control metabolic pathways that are frequently altered in cancer and therefore present cancer-relevant targets. We have previously shown that the recombinant enzyme thiaminase cleaves and depletes intracellular thiamine, has growth inhibitory activity against leukemia and breast cancer cell lines, and that its growth inhibitory effects were reversed in leukemia cell lines by rapamycin. Now, we first show further evidence of thiaminase therapeutic potential by demonstrating its activity against breast and leukemia xenografts, and against a primary leukemia xenograft. We therefore further explored the metabolic effects of thiaminase in combination with rapamycin in leukemia and breast cell lines. Thiaminase decreased oxygen consumption rate and increased extracellular acidification rate, consistent with the inhibitory effect of acute thiamine depletion on the activity of the TDEs pyruvate dehydrogenase and 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complexes; these effects were reversed by rapamycin. Metabolomic studies demonstrated intracellular thiamine depletion and the presence of the thiazole cleavage product in thiaminase-treated cells, providing validation of the experimental procedures. Accumulation of ribose and ribulose in both cell lines support the thiaminase-mediated suppression of the TDE transketolase. Interestingly, thiaminase suppression of another TDE, branched chain amino ketoacid dehydrogenase (BCKDH, showed very different patterns in the two cell lines: in RS4 leukemia cells it led to an increase in BCKDH substrates, and in MCF-7 breast cancer cells it led to a decrease in BCKDH products. Immunoblot analyses showed corresponding differences in expression of BCKDH pathway enzymes, and partial protection of thiaminase growth inhibition by gabapentin indicated that BCKDH inhibition may be a mechanism of thiaminase-mediated toxicity. Surprisingly, most of thiaminase-mediated metabolomic effects were also

  2. Tomato FK506 Binding Protein 12KD (FKBP12 mediates the interaction between rapamycin and Target of Rapamycin (TOR

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    Fangjie Xiong

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Target of Rapamycin (TOR signaling is an important regulator in multiple organisms including yeast, plants and animals. However, the TOR signaling in plants is much less understood as compared to that in yeast and animals. TOR kinase can be efficiently suppressed by rapamycin in the presence of functional FK506 Binding Protein 12KD (FKBP12 in yeast and animals. In most examined higher plants rapamycin fails to inhibit TOR kinase due to the non-functional FKBP12. Here we find that tomato plants showed obvious growth inhibition when treated with rapamycin and the inhibitory phenotype is similar to suppression of TOR causing by active-site TOR inhibitors (asTORis such as KU63794, AZD8055 and Torin1. The chemical genetic assays using TOR inhibitors and heterologous expressing SlFKBP12 in Arabidopsis indicated that the TOR signaling is functional in tomato. The protein gel shifting and TOR inhibitors combination assays showed that SlFKBP12 can mediate the interaction between rapamycin and TOR. Furthermore, comparative expression profiling analysis between treatments with rapamycin and KU63794 identified highly overlapped Differentially Expressed Genes (DEGs which are involved in many anabolic and catabolic processes, such as photosynthesis, cell wall restructuring, and senescence in tomato. These observations suggest that SlFFBP12 is functional in tomato. The results provided basic information of TOR signaling in tomato, and also some new insights into how TOR controls plant growth and development through reprogramming the transcription profiles

  3. A brain proteomic investigation of rapamycin effects in the Tsc1+/- mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesseling, Hendrik; Elgersma, Ype; Bahn, Sabine

    2017-01-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is a rare monogenic disorder characterized by benign tumors in multiple organs as well as a high prevalence of epilepsy, intellectual disability and autism. TSC is caused by inactivating mutations in the TSC1 or TSC2 genes. Heterozygocity induces hyperactivation of mTOR which can be inhibited by mTOR inhibitors, such as rapamycin, which have proven efficacy in the treatment of TSC-associated symptoms. The aim of the present study was (1) to identify molecular changes associated with social and cognitive deficits in the brain tissue of Tsc1+/- mice and (2) to investigate the molecular effects of rapamycin treatment, which has been shown to ameliorate genotype-related behavioural deficits. Molecular alterations in the frontal cortex and hippocampus of Tsc1+/- and control mice, with or without rapamycin treatment, were investigated. A quantitative mass spectrometry-based shotgun proteomic approach (LC-MSE) was employed as an unbiased method to detect changes in protein levels. Changes identified in the initial profiling stage were validated using selected reaction monitoring (SRM). Protein Set Enrichment Analysis was employed to identify dysregulated pathways. LC-MSE analysis of Tsc1+/- mice and controls (n = 30) identified 51 proteins changed in frontal cortex and 108 in the hippocampus. Bioinformatic analysis combined with targeted proteomic validation revealed several dysregulated molecular pathways. Using targeted assays, proteomic alterations in the hippocampus validated the pathways "myelination", "dendrite," and "oxidative stress", an upregulation of ribosomal proteins and the mTOR kinase. LC-MSE analysis was also employed on Tsc1+/- and wildtype mice (n = 34) treated with rapamycin or vehicle. Rapamycin treatment exerted a stronger proteomic effect in Tsc1+/- mice with significant changes (mainly decreased expression) in 231 and 106 proteins, respectively. The cellular pathways "oxidative stress" and "apoptosis" were found

  4. BMAL1-dependent regulation of the mTOR signaling pathway delays aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khapre, Rohini V; Kondratova, Anna A; Patel, Sonal; Dubrovsky, Yuliya; Wrobel, Michelle; Antoch, Marina P; Kondratov, Roman V

    2014-01-01

    The circadian clock, an internal time-keeping system, has been linked with control of aging, but molecular mechanisms of regulation are not known. BMAL1 is a transcriptional factor and core component of the circadian clock; BMAL1 deficiency is associated with premature aging and reduced lifespan. Here we report that activity of mammalian Target of Rapamycin Complex 1 (mTORC1) is increased upon BMAL1 deficiency both in vivo and in cell culture. Increased mTOR signaling is associated with accelerated aging; in accordance with that, treatment with the mTORC1 inhibitor rapamycin increased lifespan of Bmal1-/- mice by 50%. Our data suggest that BMAL1 is a negative regulator of mTORC1 signaling. We propose that the circadian clock controls the activity of the mTOR pathway through BMAL1-dependent mechanisms and this regulation is important for control of aging and metabolism.

  5. Beneficial role of rapamycin in experimental autoimmune myositis.

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    Nicolas Prevel

    Full Text Available We developed an experimental autoimmune myositis (EAM mouse model of polymyositis where we outlined the role of regulatory T (Treg cells. Rapamycin, this immunosuppressant drug used to prevent rejection in organ transplantation, is known to spare Treg. Our aim was to test the efficacy of rapamycin in vivo in this EAM model and to investigate the effects of the drug on different immune cell sub-populations.EAM is induced by 3 injections of myosin emulsified in CFA. Mice received rapamycin during 25 days starting one day before myosin immunization (preventive treatment, or during 10 days following the last myosin immunization (curative treatment.Under preventive or curative treatment, an increase of muscle strength was observed with a parallel decrease of muscle inflammation, both being well correlated (R(2 = -0.645, p<0.0001. Rapamycin induced a general decrease in muscle of CD4 and CD8 T cells in lymphoid tissues, but spared B cells. Among T cells, the frequency of Treg was increased in rapamycin treated mice in draining lymph nodes (16.9 ± 2.2% vs. 9.3 ± 1.4%, p<0.001, which were mostly activated regulatory T cells (CD62L(lowCD44(high: 58.1 ± 5.78% vs. 33.1 ± 7%, treated vs. untreated, p<0.001. In rapamycin treated mice, inhibition of proliferation (Ki-67(+ is more important in effector T cells compared to Tregs cells (p<0.05. Furthermore, during preventive treatment, rapamycin increased the levels of KLF2 transcript in CD44(low CD62L(high naive T cell and in CD62L(low CD44(high activated T cell.Rapamycin showed efficacy both as curative and preventive treatment in our murine model of experimental myositis, in which it induced an increase of muscle strength with a parallel decrease in muscle inflammation. Rapamycin administration was also associated with a decrease in the frequency of effector T cells, an increase in Tregs, and, when administered as preventive treatment, an upregulation of KFL2 in naive and activated T cells.

  6. Rapamycin Rescues the Poor Developmental Capacity of Aged Porcine Oocytes

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    Seung Eun Lee

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Unfertilized oocytes age inevitably after ovulation, which limits their fertilizable life span and embryonic development. Rapamycin affects mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR expression and cytoskeleton reorganization during oocyte meiotic maturation. The goal of this study was to examine the effects of rapamycin treatment on aged porcine oocytes and their in vitro development. Rapamycin treatment of aged oocytes for 24 h (68 h in vitro maturation [IVM]; 44 h+10 μM rapamycin/24 h, 47.52±5.68 or control oocytes (44 h IVM; 42.14±4.40 significantly increased the development rate and total cell number compared with untreated aged oocytes (68 h IVM, 22.04±5.68 (p<0.05. Rapamycin treatment of aged IVM oocytes for 24 h also rescued aberrant spindle organization and chromosomal misalignment, blocked the decrease in the level of phosphorylated-p44/42 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK, and increased the mRNA expression of cytoplasmic maturation factor genes (MOS, BMP15, GDF9, and CCNB1 compared with untreated, 24 h-aged IVM oocytes (p<0.05. Furthermore, rapamycin treatment of aged oocytes decreased reactive oxygen species (ROS activity and DNA fragmentation (p<0.05, and downregulated the mRNA expression of mTOR compared with control or untreated aged oocytes. By contrast, rapamycin treatment of aged oocytes increased mitochondrial localization (p<0.05 and upregulated the mRNA expression of autophagy (BECN1, ATG7, MAP1LC3B, ATG12, GABARAP, and GABARAPL1, anti-apoptosis (BCL2L1 and BIRC5; p<0.05, and development (NANOG and SOX2; p<0.05 genes, but it did not affect the mRNA expression of pro-apoptosis genes (FAS and CASP3 compared with the control. This study demonstrates that rapamycin treatment can rescue the poor developmental capacity of aged porcine oocytes.

  7. Hepatic S6K1 Partially Regulates Lifespan of Mice with Mitochondrial Complex I Deficiency

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    Takashi K. Ito

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The inactivation of ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1 (S6K1 recapitulates aspects of caloric restriction and mTORC1 inhibition to achieve prolonged longevity in invertebrate and mouse models. In addition to delaying normative aging, inhibition of mTORC1 extends the shortened lifespan of yeast, fly, and mouse models with severe mitochondrial disease. Here we tested whether disruption of S6K1 can recapitulate the beneficial effects of mTORC1 inhibition in the Ndufs4 knockout (NKO mouse model of Leigh Syndrome caused by Complex I deficiency. These NKO mice develop profound neurodegeneration resulting in brain lesions and death around 50–60 days of age. Our results show that liver-specific, as well as whole body, S6K1 deletion modestly prolongs survival and delays onset of neurological symptoms in NKO mice. In contrast, we observed no survival benefit in NKO mice specifically disrupted for S6K1 in neurons or adipocytes. Body weight was reduced in WT mice upon disruption of S6K1 in adipocytes or whole body, but not altered when S6K1 was disrupted only in neurons or liver. Taken together, these data indicate that decreased S6K1 activity in liver is sufficient to delay the neurological and survival defects caused by deficiency of Complex I and suggest that mTOR signaling can modulate mitochondrial disease and metabolism via cell non-autonomous mechanisms.

  8. The mTOR inhibitor rapamycin has limited acute anticonvulsant effects in mice.

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    Adam L Hartman

    Full Text Available The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR pathway integrates signals from different nutrient sources, including amino acids and glucose. Compounds that inhibit mTOR kinase activity such as rapamycin and everolimus can suppress seizures in some chronic animal models and in patients with tuberous sclerosis. However, it is not known whether mTOR inhibitors exert acute anticonvulsant effects in addition to their longer term antiepileptogenic effects. To gain insights into how rapamycin suppresses seizures, we investigated the anticonvulsant activity of rapamycin using acute seizure tests in mice.Following intraperitoneal injection of rapamycin, normal four-week-old male NIH Swiss mice were evaluated for susceptibility to a battery of acute seizure tests similar to those currently used to screen potential therapeutics by the US NIH Anticonvulsant Screening Program. To assess the short term effects of rapamycin, mice were seizure tested in ≤ 6 hours of a single dose of rapamycin, and for longer term effects of rapamycin, mice were tested after 3 or more daily doses of rapamycin.The only seizure test where short-term rapamycin treatment protected mice was against tonic hindlimb extension in the MES threshold test, though this protection waned with longer rapamycin treatment. Longer term rapamycin treatment protected against kainic acid-induced seizure activity, but only at late times after seizure onset. Rapamycin was not protective in the 6 Hz or PTZ seizure tests after short or longer rapamycin treatment times. In contrast to other metabolism-based therapies that protect in acute seizure tests, rapamycin has limited acute anticonvulsant effects in normal mice.The efficacy of rapamycin as an acute anticonvulsant agent may be limited. Furthermore, the combined pattern of acute seizure test results places rapamycin in a third category distinct from both fasting and the ketogenic diet, and which is more similar to drugs acting on sodium channels.

  9. Arsenic trioxide overcomes rapamycin-induced feedback activation of AKT and ERK signaling to enhance the anti-tumor effects in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilbert, Cynthia; Annis, Matthew G; Dong, Zhifeng; Siegel, Peter M; Miller, Wilson H; Mann, Koren K

    2013-01-01

    Inhibitors of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTORi) have clinical activity; however, the benefits of mTOR inhibition by rapamycin and rapamycin-derivatives (rapalogs) may be limited by a feedback mechanism that results in AKT activation. Increased AKT activity resulting from mTOR inhibition can be a result of increased signaling via the mTOR complex, TORC2. Previously, we published that arsenic trioxide (ATO) inhibits AKT activity and in some cases, decreases AKT protein expression. Therefore, we propose that combining ATO and rapamycin may circumvent the AKT feedback loop and increase the anti-tumor effects. Using a panel of breast cancer cell lines, we find that ATO, at clinically-achievable doses, can enhance the inhibitory activity of the mTORi temsirolimus. In all cell lines, temsirolimus treatment resulted in AKT activation, which was decreased by concomitant ATO treatment only in those cell lines where ATO enhanced growth inhibition. Treatment with rapalog also results in activated ERK signaling, which is decreased with ATO co-treatment in all cell lines tested. We next tested the toxicity and efficacy of rapamycin plus ATO combination therapy in a MDA-MB-468 breast cancer xenograft model. The drug combination was well-tolerated, and rapamycin did not increase ATO-induced liver enzyme levels. In addition, combination of these drugs was significantly more effective at inhibiting tumor growth compared to individual drug treatments, which corresponded with diminished phospho-Akt and phospho-ERK levels when compared with rapamycin-treated tumors. Therefore, we propose that combining ATO and mTORi may overcome the feedback loop by decreasing activation of the MAPK and AKT signaling pathways.

  10. Arsenic trioxide overcomes rapamycin-induced feedback activation of AKT and ERK signaling to enhance the anti-tumor effects in breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia Guilbert

    Full Text Available Inhibitors of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTORi have clinical activity; however, the benefits of mTOR inhibition by rapamycin and rapamycin-derivatives (rapalogs may be limited by a feedback mechanism that results in AKT activation. Increased AKT activity resulting from mTOR inhibition can be a result of increased signaling via the mTOR complex, TORC2. Previously, we published that arsenic trioxide (ATO inhibits AKT activity and in some cases, decreases AKT protein expression. Therefore, we propose that combining ATO and rapamycin may circumvent the AKT feedback loop and increase the anti-tumor effects. Using a panel of breast cancer cell lines, we find that ATO, at clinically-achievable doses, can enhance the inhibitory activity of the mTORi temsirolimus. In all cell lines, temsirolimus treatment resulted in AKT activation, which was decreased by concomitant ATO treatment only in those cell lines where ATO enhanced growth inhibition. Treatment with rapalog also results in activated ERK signaling, which is decreased with ATO co-treatment in all cell lines tested. We next tested the toxicity and efficacy of rapamycin plus ATO combination therapy in a MDA-MB-468 breast cancer xenograft model. The drug combination was well-tolerated, and rapamycin did not increase ATO-induced liver enzyme levels. In addition, combination of these drugs was significantly more effective at inhibiting tumor growth compared to individual drug treatments, which corresponded with diminished phospho-Akt and phospho-ERK levels when compared with rapamycin-treated tumors. Therefore, we propose that combining ATO and mTORi may overcome the feedback loop by decreasing activation of the MAPK and AKT signaling pathways.

  11. Bone growth during rapamycin therapy in young rats

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    He Yu-Zhu

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rapamycin is an effective immunosuppressant widely used to maintain the renal allograft in pediatric patients. Linear growth may be adversely affected in young children since rapamycin has potent anti-proliferative and anti-angiogenic properties. Methods Weanling three week old rats were given rapamycin at 2.5 mg/kg daily by gavage for 2 or 4 weeks and compared to a Control group given equivalent amount of saline. Morphometric measurements and biochemical determinations for serum calcium, phosphate, iPTH, urea nitrogen, creatinine and insulin-growth factor I (IGF-I were obtained. Histomorphometric analysis of the growth plate cartilage, in-situ hybridization experiments and immunohistochemical studies for various proteins were performed to evaluate for chondrocyte proliferation, chondrocyte differentiation and chondro/osteoclastic resorption. Results At the end of the 2 weeks, body and tibia length measurements were shorter after rapamycin therapy associated with an enlargement of the hypertrophic zone in the growth plate cartilage. There was a decrease in chondrocyte proliferation assessed by histone-4 and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR expression. A reduction in parathyroid hormone/parathyroid hormone related peptide (PTH/PTHrP and an increase in Indian hedgehog (Ihh expression may explain in part, the increase number of hypertrophic chondrocytes. The number of TRAP positive multinucleated chondro/osteoclasts declined in the chondro-osseous junction with a decrease in the receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa β ligand (RANKL and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF expression. Although body and tibial length remained short after 4 weeks of rapamycin, changes in the expression of chondrocyte proliferation, chondrocyte differentiation and chondro/osteoclastic resorption which were significant after 2 weeks of rapamycin improved at the end of 4 weeks. Conclusion When given to young rats, 2 weeks of rapamycin

  12. Mammalian target of rapamycin activity is required for expansion of CD34(+) hematopoietic progenitor cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geest, Christian R.; Zwartkruis, Fried J.; Vellenga, Edo; Coffer, Paul J.; Buitenhuis, Miranda

    Background The mammalian target of rapamycin is a conserved protein kinase known to regulate protein synthesis, cell size and proliferation. Aberrant regulation of mammalian target of rapamycin activity has been observed in hematopoietic malignancies, including acute leukemias and myelodysplastic

  13. Mammalian target of rapamycin activity is required for expansion of CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geest, C.R.; Zwartkruis, G.J.T.; Vellenga, E.; Coffer, P.J.; Buitenhuis, M.

    2009-01-01

    Background The mammalian target of rapamycin is a conserved protein kinase known to regulate protein synthesis, cell size and proliferation. Aberrant regulation of mammalian target of rapamycin activity has been observed in hematopoietic malignancies, including acute leukemias and

  14. The effect of rapamycin on biodiesel-producing protist Euglena gracilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukaida, Shiho; Ogawa, Takumi; Ohishi, Kazuko; Tanizawa, Yasuhiro; Ohta, Daisaku; Arita, Masanori

    2016-06-01

    Rapamycin induces autophagy with lipid remodeling in yeast and mammalian cells. To investigate the lipid biosynthesis of Euglena gracilis, rapamycin was supplemented in comparison with two model algae, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Cyanidioschyzon merolae. In Euglena, rapamycin induced the reduction of chlorophylls and the accumulation of neutral lipids without deterring its cell proliferation. Its lipidomic profile revealed that the fatty acid composition did not alter by supplementing rapamycin. In Chlamydomonas, however, rapamycin induced serious growth inhibition as reported elsewhere. With a lower concentration of rapamycin, the alga accumulated neutral lipids without reducing chlorophylls. In Cyanidioschyzon, rapamycin did not increase neutral lipids but reduced its chlorophyll content. We also tested fatty acid elongase inhibitors such as pyroxasulfone or flufenacet in Euglena with no significant change in its neutral lipid contents. In summary, controlled supplementation of rapamycin can increase the yield of neutral lipids while the scheme is not always applicable for other algal species.

  15. Rapamycin inhibits spermatogenesis by changing the autophagy status through suppressing mechanistic target of rapamycin-p70S6 kinase in male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shangjing; Huang, Longxian; Geng, Yanqing; He, Junlin; Chen, Xuemei; Xu, Hao; Li, Rong; Wang, Yingxiong; Ding, Yubin; Liu, Xueqing

    2017-10-01

    Rapamycin (sirolimus) is an antiproliferative drug that has been widely used in the clinic as an immunosuppressant and a potential anticancer agent. Certain reports have indicated that rapamycin may induce male infertility through impairing sperm quality. The present study investigated the mechanism of male infertility caused by rapamycin and examined whether withdrawal of rapamycin could recover the number of sperm in rats. Male Sprague‑Dawley rats (n=100) were divided randomly into 5 groups: 3 rapamycin‑treated groups (2, 4 and 6 mg/kg) and 2 control groups [Blank and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO)]. Organ coefficients of the testes, number of sperm and hematoxylin‑eosin staining analyses demonstrated that rapamycin treatment markedly damaged the structure of the seminiferous tubule and reduced the number of sperm. Immunohistochemistry of mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) and Ki67 in testes tissue, and western blotting of phosphorylated‑p70S6K and p70S6K, supported the hypothesis that rapamycin causes sperm reduction through inhibiting proliferation of spermatogonia. Unfortunately, 24 weeks after cessation of rapamycin treatment, only the number of sperm in 2 mg/kg group was restored back to the normal level. In addition, to the best of our knowledge, the present study was the first to demonstrate that low doses rapamycin leads to activation of autophagy in rat testes. This may be a self‑protective mechanism of the cell in response to external stress. Thus, spermatogenesis can be recovered in the testes from rats in the low dose group. High doses of rapamycin resulted in excessive consumption of autophagy proteins, and the damage could not be compensated. In addition, it was revealed that cell apoptosis increased after treatment with rapamycin. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that rapamycin inhibits spermatogenesis through suppressing phosphorylation of p70S6K and changing the autophagy status, ultimately reducing the number of sperm

  16. Inhibition of mammalian target of rapamycin by rapamycin increases the radiosensitivity of esophageal carcinoma Eca109 cells

    OpenAIRE

    ZHANG, DEJUN; XIANG, JIE; GU, YUMING; XU, WEI; XU, HAO; ZU, MAOHENG; PEI, DONGSHENG; ZHENG, JUNNIAN

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate whether radiation induces the mammalian target of rapamycin (Rap) (mTOR) signaling pathway in esophageal carcinoma Eca109 cells, and whether mTOR inhibition by rapamycin increases Eca109 cell radiosensitivity. Changes in the levels of mTOR signaling pathway and DNA damage-repair proteins in Eca109 cells prior to and following radiation were determined. The Eca109 cells were treated with Rap (0, 100, 200 and 400 nmol/l) in combination with radiat...

  17. Differing Effects of Systemically Administered Rapamycin on Consolidation and Reconsolidation of Context vs. Cued Fear Memories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glover, Ebony M.; Ressler, Kerry J.; Davis, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Rapamycin, an inhibitor of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) kinase, has attracted interest as a possible prophylactic for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)-associated fear memories. We report here that although rapamycin (40 mg/kg, i.p.) disrupted the consolidation and reconsolidation of fear-potentiated startle paradigm to a…

  18. Inhibition of hemangioma growth using polymer-lipid hybrid nanoparticles for delivery of rapamycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haitao; Teng, Yunfei; Sun, Jin; Liu, Jianyong

    2017-11-01

    Although infantile hemangiomas is benign, its rapid growth may induce serious complications. However, only one drug Hemangeol™ has been approved by US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to treat infantile hemangiomas. Thus it is necessary to develop novel alternative drugs to treat infantile hemangiomas. Rapamycin is a well-know potent antiangiogenic agent, whereas the daily oral administration of rapamycin exerts undesired metabolic effects due to its inhibition of mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) which is critical in cell metabolism. We hereby developed rapamycin-loaded polymer-lipid hybrid nanoparticles (Rapamycin-PLNPs) as a local controlled release system to realize local and sustained release of rapamycin, aiming to reduce the side effects and frequency of administration of rapamycin. Rapamycin-PLNPs are of a small size (129.1nm), desired drug encapsulation efficiency (63.7%), and sustained drug release for 5 days. Rapamycin-PLNPs were shown to be able to effectively bind to hemangioma endothelia cells (HemECs), induce significant proliferation inhibition and reduce expression of angiogenesis factors in HemECs. The therapeutic effect of Rapamycin-PLNPs against infantile hemangioma in vivo was superior to rapamycin, as reflected by reduced hemangioma volume, weight and microvessel density. Taken together, Rapamycin-PLNPs represent a very promising local approach in the treatment of infantile hemangiomas. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Rapamycin treatment causes developmental delay, pigmentation defects, and gastrointestinal malformation on Xenopus embryogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moriyama, Yuki [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Shizuoka University, 836 Ohya, Suruga-ku, Shizuoka 422-8529 (Japan); Ohata, Yoshihisa [Department of Education (Sciences), Shizuoka University, 836 Ohya, Suruga-ku, Shizuoka 422-8529 (Japan); Mori, Shoko [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Shizuoka University, 836 Ohya, Suruga-ku, Shizuoka 422-8529 (Japan); Matsukawa, Shinya [Department of Education (Sciences), Shizuoka University, 836 Ohya, Suruga-ku, Shizuoka 422-8529 (Japan); Michiue, Tatsuo [Department of Life Sciences, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 3-8-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan); Asashima, Makoto [Department of Life Sciences, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 3-8-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan); Research Center for Stem Cell Engineering, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Baien, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8562 (Japan); Kuroda, Hiroki, E-mail: ehkurod@ipc.shizuoka.ac.jp [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Shizuoka University, 836 Ohya, Suruga-ku, Shizuoka 422-8529 (Japan); Department of Education (Sciences), Shizuoka University, 836 Ohya, Suruga-ku, Shizuoka 422-8529 (Japan)

    2011-01-28

    Research highlights: {yields} Does famous anti-aging drug rapamycin work from the beginning of life? The answer is yes. {yields} This study shows that developmental speed of frog embryo was dose-dependently decreased by rapamycin treatment. {yields} In additions, morphogenetic effects such as less pigmentations and gut malformation are occurred by rapamycin. -- Abstract: Rapamycin is a drug working as an inhibitor of the TOR (target of rapamycin) signaling pathway and influences various life phenomena such as cell growth, proliferation, and life span extension in eukaryote. However, the extent to which rapamycin controls early developmental events of amphibians remains to be understood. Here we report an examination of rapamycin effects during Xenopus early development, followed by a confirmation of suppression of TOR downstream kinase S6K by rapamycin treatment. First, we found that developmental speed was declined in dose-dependent manner of rapamycin. Second, black pigment spots located at dorsal and lateral skin in tadpoles were reduced by rapamycin treatment. Moreover, in tadpole stages severe gastrointestinal malformations were observed in rapamycin-treated embryos. Taken together with these results, we conclude that treatment of the drug rapamycin causes enormous influences on early developmental period.

  20. Impairment of object recognition memory by rapamycin inhibition of mTOR in the amygdala or hippocampus around the time of learning or reactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jobim, Paulo F C; Pedroso, Thiago R; Werenicz, Aline; Christoff, Raissa R; Maurmann, Natasha; Reolon, Gustavo K; Schröder, Nadja; Roesler, Rafael

    2012-03-01

    The role of the basolateral complex of the amygdala (BLA) in recognition memory remains poorly understood. The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in the BLA and other brain areas has been implicated in synaptic plasticity and memory. We have recently shown that mTOR signaling in both the BLA and the dorsal hippocampus (DH) is required for formation and reconsolidation of inhibitory avoidance, a fear-motivated memory task. Here we examined the effects of infusions of the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin into the BLA before or after either training or reactivation on retention of novel object recognition (NOR) memory in rats, and compared the effects with those obtained using intra-DH infusions. Male Wistar rats received bilateral infusions of vehicle or rapamycin into the BLA or DH before or after NOR training or reactivation. Rapamycin impaired NOR retention tested 24h after training when given either before or immediately after training into the BLA or DH. Rapamycin also impaired retention measured 24h after reactivation when infused before reactivation into the BLA or DH, or immediately after reactivation into the BLA, but not when given 6h after reactivation into either the BLA or DH. The results suggest that mTOR signaling in the BLA and DH is involved in NOR memory formation and stabilization. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Tuberous sclerosis complex 1 (Tsc1) enforces quiescence of naive T cells to promote immune homeostasis and function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kai; Neale, Geoffrey; Green, Douglas R.; He, Weifeng; Chi, Hongbo

    2011-01-01

    The mechanisms that regulate T cell quiescence are poorly understood. We report that tuberous sclerosis complex 1 (Tsc1) establishes a quiescence program in naive T cells by controlling cell size, cell cycle entry, and responses to T cell receptor stimulation. Loss of quiescence predisposed Tsc1-deficient T cells to apoptosis that resulted in loss of conventional T cells and invariant natural killer T cells. Loss of Tsc1 function dampened in vivo immune responses to bacterial infection. Tsc1-deficient T cells exhibited increased mTORC1 but diminished mTORC2 activities, with mTORC1 activation essential for the disruption of immune homeostasis. Therefore, Tsc1-dependent control of mTOR is crucial in establishing naive T cell quiescence to facilitate adaptive immune function. PMID:21765414

  2. Mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor-associated stomatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boers-Doets, Christine B.; Raber-Durlacher, Judith E.; Treister, Nathaniel S.; Epstein, Joel B.; Arends, Anniek B. P.; Wiersma, Diede R.; Lalla, Rajesh V.; Logan, Richard M.; van Erp, Nielka P.; Gelderblom, Hans

    2013-01-01

    With the recent introduction of inhibitors of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in oncology, distinct cutaneous and oral adverse events have been identified. In fact, stomatitis and rash are documented as the most frequent and potentially dose-limiting side effects. Clinically, mTOR

  3. Suppression of Th17-polarized airway inflammation by rapamycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joean, Oana; Hueber, Anja; Feller, Felix; Jirmo, Adan Chari; Lochner, Matthias; Dittrich, Anna-Maria; Albrecht, Melanie

    2017-11-10

    Because Th17-polarized airway inflammation correlates with poor control in bronchial asthma and is a feature of numerous other difficult-to-treat inflammatory lung diseases, new therapeutic approaches for this type of airway inflammation are necessary. We assessed different licensed anti-inflammatory agents with known or expected efficacy against Th17-polarization in mouse models of Th17-dependent airway inflammation. Upon intravenous transfer of in vitro derived Th17 cells and intranasal challenge with the corresponding antigen, we established acute and chronic murine models of Th17-polarised airway inflammation. Consecutively, we assessed the efficacy of methylprednisolone, roflumilast, azithromycin, AM80 and rapamycin against acute or chronic Th17-dependent airway inflammation. Quantifiers for Th17-associated inflammation comprised: bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) differential cell counts, allergen-specific cytokine and immunoglobulin secretion, as well as flow cytometric phenotyping of pulmonary inflammatory cells. Only rapamycin proved effective against acute Th17-dependent airway inflammation, accompanied by increased plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) and reduced neutrophils as well as reduced CXCL-1 levels in BAL. Chronic Th17-dependent airway inflammation was unaltered by rapamycin treatment. None of the other agents showed efficacy in our models. Our results demonstrate that Th17-dependent airway inflammation is difficult to treat with known agents. However, we identify rapamycin as an agent with inhibitory potential against acute Th17-polarized airway inflammation.

  4. Rapamycin alleviates oxidative stress-induced damage in rat erythrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Abhishek Kumar; Singh, Sandeep; Garg, Geetika; Rizvi, Syed Ibrahim

    2016-10-01

    An imbalanced cellular redox system promotes the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that may lead to oxidative stress-mediated cell death. Erythrocytes are the best-studied model of antioxidant defense mechanism. The present study was undertaken to investigate the effect of the immunosuppressant drug rapamycin, an inducer of autophagy, on redox balance of erythrocytes and blood plasma of oxidatively challenged rats. Male Wistar rats were oxidatively challenged with HgCl2 (5 mg/kg body mass (b.m.)). A significant (p membrane redox system (PMRS), intracellular Ca2+ influx, lipid peroxidation (LPO), osmotic fragility, plasma protein carbonyl (PCO) content, and plasma advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP) and simultaneously significant reduction in glutathione (GSH) level and ferric reducing ability of plasma (FRAP) were observed in rats exposed to HgCl2. Furthermore, rapamycin (0.5 mg/kg b.m.) provided significant protection against HgCl2-induced alterations in rat erythrocytes and plasma by reducing ROS production, PMRS activity, intracellular Ca2+ influx, LPO, osmotic fragility, PCO content, and AOPP and also restored the level of antioxidant GSH and FRAP. Our observations provide evidence that rapamycin improves redox status and attenuates oxidative stress in oxidatively challenged rats. Our data also demonstrate that rapamycin is a comparatively safe immunosuppressant drug.

  5. Chemical Genetics of Rapamycin-Insensitive TORC2 in S. cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph I. Kliegman

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Current approaches for identifying synergistic targets use cell culture models to see if the combined effect of clinically available drugs is better than predicted by their individual efficacy. New techniques are needed to systematically and rationally identify targets and pathways that may be synergistic targets. Here, we created a tool to screen and identify molecular targets that may synergize with new inhibitors of target of rapamycin (TOR, a conserved protein that is a major integrator of cell proliferation signals in the nutrient-signaling pathway. Although clinical results from TOR complex 1 (TORC1-specific inhibition using rapamycin analogs have been disappointing, trials using inhibitors that also target TORC2 have been promising. To understand this increased therapeutic efficacy and to discover secondary targets for combination therapy, we engineered Tor2 in S. cerevisiae to accept an orthogonal inhibitor. We used this tool to create a chemical epistasis miniarray profile (ChE-MAP by measuring interactions between the chemically inhibited Tor2 kinase and a diverse library of deletion mutants. The ChE-MAP identified known TOR components and distinguished between TORC1- and TORC2-dependent functions. The results showed a TORC2-specific interaction with the pentose phosphate pathway, a previously unappreciated TORC2 function that suggests a role for the complex in balancing the high energy demand required for ribosome biogenesis.

  6. The pleiotropic regulation of cyclin D1 by newly identified sesaminol-binding protein ANT2

    OpenAIRE

    Watanabe, M.; Iizumi, Y; Sukeno, M; Iizuka-Ohashi, M; Sowa, Y; Sakai, T

    2017-01-01

    The expression of cyclin D1 is upregulated in various cancer cells by diverse mechanisms, such as increases in mRNA levels, the promotion of the translation by mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling and the protein stabilization. We here show that sesaminol, a sesame lignan, reduces the expression of cyclin D1 with decreasing mRNA expression levels, inhibiting mTORC1 signaling and promoting proteasomal degradation. We subsequently generated sesaminol-immobilized FG beads t...

  7. THE EFFECT OF RAPAMYCIN ON SECRETORY ACTIVITY OF THE RABBIT OVARIAN FRAGMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushmita Nath

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of our study was to examine the effect of rapamycin on secretory activity of the rabbit ovarian fragments. The secretion of steroid (progesterone, testosterone, estradiol and peptide (prolactine hormones by ovarian fragments after rapamycin addition at the doses 0, 1, 10, 100 μg.ml-1 was determined. Fragments were incubated with rapamycin for 48 hours. Hormones were determinated by RIA. The experimental data showed that, addition of rapamycin did not affect progesterone and prolactine release (at all doses. Estradiol secretion was inhibited by rapamycin at the doses of 1, 10 and 100 μg.ml-1. Testosterone was inhibited by the rapamycin at the doses of 1 and 10 μg.ml-1 but not at 100 μg.ml-1. In conclusion, our results suggest a direct effect of rapamycin on ovarian functionsand a possible involvement in the regulation of steroidogenesis.

  8. Inhibition of MDM2 Re-Sensitizes Rapamycin Resistant Renal Cancer Cells via the Activation of p53.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Xin; Dai, Shundong; Sun, Jing; Jiang, Shenyi; Sui, Chengguang; Meng, Fandong; Li, Yan; Fu, Liye; Jiang, Tao; Wang, Yang; Su, Jia; Jiang, Youhong

    2016-01-01

    Rapamycin is a potential anti-cancer agent, which modulates the activity of mTOR, a key regulator of cell growth and proliferation. However, several types of cancer cells are resistant to the anti-proliferative effects of rapamycin. In this study, we report a MDM2/p53-mediated rapamycin resistance in human renal cancer cells. Trypan blue exclusion tests were used to determine the cell viability. Changes in mRNA and protein expression were measured using real-time PCR and western blot, respectively. Xenograft models were established to evaluate the in vivo effects of rapamycin combined with a MDM2 inhibitor. Rapamycin treatment suppresses the expression of MDM2 and exogenous overexpression of MDM2 in A498 cells contributes to rapamycin resistance. By establishing a rapamycin resistant cell line, we observed that MDM2 was significantly upregulated in rapamycin resistant cells than that in rapamycin sensitive cells. Importantly, the rapamycin resistant cells demonstrated attenuated accumulation of p53 in the nucleus in response to rapamycin treatment. Moreover, the inhibition of MDM2 by siMDM2 sensitizes A498 cells to rapamycin through the activation of p53. In both in vitro and in vivo models, the combination of rapamycin with the MDM2 inhibitor, MI-319, demonstrated a synergistic inhibitory effect on rapamycin resistant cells. Our study reports a novel mechanism for rapamycin resistance in human renal cancer and provides a new perspective for the development of anti-cancer drugs. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Rapamycin causes growth arrest and inhibition of invasion in human chondrosarcoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jian; Wang, Xiaobo; Zhu, Jiaxue; Liu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Chondrosarcoma is a highly malignant tumor that is characterized by a potent capacity to invade locally and cause distant metastasis and notable for its lack of response to conventional chemotherapy or radiotherapy. Rapamycin, the inhibitor of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), is a valuable drug with diverse clinical applications and regulates many cellular processes. However, the effects of rapamycin on cell growth and invasion of human chondrosarcoma cells are not well known. We determined the effect of rapamycin on cell proliferation, cell cycle arrest and invasion by using MTS, flow cytometry and invasion assays in two human chondrosarcoma cell lines, SW1353 and JJ012. Cell cycle regulatory and invasion-related genes' expression analysis was performed by quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR). We also evaluated the effect of rapamycin on tumor growth by using mice xenograph models. Rapamycin significantly inhibited the cell proliferation, induced cell cycle arrest and decreased the invasion ability of human chondrosarcoma cells. Meanwhile, rapamycin modulated the cell cycle regulatory and invasion-related genes' expression. Furthermore, the tumor growth of mice xenograph models with human chondrosarcoma cells was significantly inhibited by rapamycin. These results provided further insight into the role of rapamycin in chondrosarcoma. Therefore, rapamycin targeted therapy may be a potential treatment strategy for chondrosarcoma.

  10. Disruption of TBC1D7, a subunit of the TSC1-TSC2 protein complex, in intellectual disability and megalencephaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capo-Chichi, José-Mario; Tcherkezian, Joseph; Hamdan, Fadi F; Décarie, Jean Claude; Dobrzeniecka, Sylvia; Patry, Lysanne; Nadon, Marc-Antoine; Mucha, Bettina E; Major, Philippe; Shevell, Michael; Bencheikh, Bouchra Ouled Amar; Joober, Ridha; Samuels, Mark E; Rouleau, Guy A; Roux, Philippe P; Michaud, Jacques L

    2013-11-01

    Mutations in TSC1 or TSC2 cause the tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC), a disorder characterised by the development of hamartomas or benign tumours in various organs as well as the variable presence of epilepsy, intellectual disability (ID) and autism. TSC1, TSC2 and the recently described protein TBC1D7 form a complex that inhibits mTORC1 signalling and limits cell growth. Although it has been proposed that mutations in TBC1D7 might also cause TSC, loss of its function has not yet been documented in humans. We used homozygosity mapping and exome sequencing to study a consanguineous family with ID and megalencephaly but without any specific features of TSC. We identified only one rare coding variant, c.538delT:p.Y180fsX1 in TBC1D7, in the regions of homozygosity shared by the affected siblings. We show that this mutation abolishes TBC1D7 expression and is associated with increased mTORC1 signalling in cells of the affected individuals. Our study suggests that disruption of TBC1D7 causes ID but without the other typical features found in TSC. Although megalencephaly is not commonly observed in TSC, it has been associated with mTORC1 activation. Our observation thus reinforces the relationship between this pathway and the development of megalencephaly.

  11. Rapamycin-binding FKBP25 associates with diverse proteins that form large intracellular entities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galat, Andrzej, E-mail: galat@dsvidf.cea.fr; Thai, Robert

    2014-08-08

    Highlights: • The hFKBP25 interacts with diverse components of macromolecular entities. • We show that the endogenous human FKBP25 is bound to polyribosomes. • The endogenous hFKBP25 co-immunoprecipitated with nucleosomal proteins. • FKBP25 could induce conformational switch in macromolecular complexes. - Abstract: In this paper, we show some evidence that a member of the FK506-binding proteins, FKBP25 is associated to diverse components that are part of several different intracellular large-molecular mass entities. The FKBP25 is a high-affinity rapamycin-binding immunophilin, which has nuclear translocation signals present in its PPIase domain but it was detected both in the cytoplasm compartment and in the nuclear proteome. Analyses of antiFKBP25-immunoprecipitated proteins have revealed that the endogenous FKBP25 is associated to the core histones of the nucleosome, and with several proteins forming spliceosomal complexes and ribosomal subunits. Using polyclonal antiFKBP25 we have detected FKBP25 associated with polyribosomes. Added RNAs or 0.5 M NaCl release FKBP25 that was associated with the polyribosomes indicating that the immunophilin has an intrinsic capacity to form complexes with polyribonucleotides via its charged surface patches. Rapamycin or FK506 treatments of the polyribosomes isolated from porcine brain, HeLa and K568 cells caused a residual release of the endogenous FKBP25, which suggests that the immunophilin also binds to some proteins via its PPIase cavity. Our proteomics study indicates that the nuclear pool of the FKBP25 targets various nuclear proteins that are crucial for packaging of DNA, chromatin remodeling and pre-mRNA splicing whereas the cytosolic pool of this immunophilin is bound to some components of the ribosome.

  12. Potential use of rapamycin in HIV infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Donia, Marco; McCubrey, James A; Bendtzen, Klaus

    2010-01-01

    replication in vitro through different mechanisms including, but not limited, to down regulation of CCR5. In addition RAPA synergistically enhances the anti-HIV activity of entry inhibitors such as vicriviroc, aplaviroc and enfuvirtide in vitro. RAPA also inhibits HIV-1 infection in human peripheral blood......, the evidence presented in this review suggests that RAPA may be a useful drug that should be evaluated for the prevention and treatment of HIV-1 infection.......The strong need for the development of alternative anti-HIV agents is primarily due to the emergence of strain-resistant viruses, the need for sustained adherence to complex treatment regimens and the toxicity of currently used antiviral drugs. This review analyzes proof of concept studies...

  13. Tumor growth effects of rapamycin on human biliary tract cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heuer Matthias

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Liver transplantation is an important treatment option for patients with liver-originated tumors including biliary tract carcinomas (BTCs. Post-transplant tumor recurrence remains a limiting factor for long-term survival. The mammalian target of rapamycin-targeting immunosuppressive drug rapamycin could be helpful in lowering BTC recurrence rates. Therein, we investigated the antiproliferative effect of rapamycin on BTC cells and compared it with standard immunosuppressants. Methods We investigated two human BTC cell lines. We performed cell cycle and proliferation analyses after treatment with different doses of rapamycin and the standard immunosuppressants, cyclosporine A and tacrolimus. Results Rapamycin inhibited the growth of two BTC cell lines in vitro. By contrast, an increase in cell growth was observed among the cells treated with the standard immunosuppressants. Conclusions These results support the hypothesis that rapamycin inhibits BTC cell proliferation and thus might be the preferred immunosuppressant for patients after a liver transplantation because of BTC.

  14. NVP-BEZ235 and NVP-BGT226, dual phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors, enhance tumor and endothelial cell radiosensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fokas Emmanouil

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K/Akt pathway is activated in tumor cells and promotes tumor cell survival after radiation-induced DNA damage. Because the pathway may not be completely inhibited after blockade of PI3K itself, due to feedback through mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR, more effective inhibition might be expected by targeting both PI3K and mTOR inhibition. Materials and methods We investigated the effect of two dual PI3K/mTOR (both mTORC1 and mTORC2 inhibitors, NVP-BEZ235 and NVP-BGT226, on SQ20B laryngeal and FaDu hypopharyngeal cancer cells characterised by EGFR overexpression, on T24 bladder tumor cell lines with H-Ras mutation and on endothelial cells. Analysis of target protein phosphorylation, clonogenic survival, number of residual γH2AX foci, cell cycle and apoptosis after radiation was performed in both tumor and endothelial cells. In vitro angiogenesis assays were conducted as well. Results Both compounds effectively inhibited phosphorylation of Akt, mTOR and S6 target proteins and reduced clonogenic survival in irradiated tumor cells. Persistence of DNA damage, as evidenced by increased number of γH2AX foci, was detected after irradiation in the presence of PI3K/mTOR inhibition, together with enhanced G2 cell cycle delay. Treatment with one of the inhibitors, NVP-BEZ235, also resulted in decreased clonogenicity after irradiation of tumor cells under hypoxic conditions. In addition, NVP-BEZ235 blocked VEGF- and IR-induced Akt phosphorylation and increased radiation killing in human umbilical venous endothelial cells (HUVEC and human dermal microvascular dermal cells (HDMVC. NVP-BEZ235 inhibited VEGF-induced cell migration and capillary tube formation in vitro and enhanced the antivascular effect of irradiation. Treatment with NVP-BEZ235 moderately increased apoptosis in SQ20B and HUVEC cells but not in FaDu cells, and increased necrosis in both tumor and endothelial all cells tumor

  15. Autophagy is required for extension of yeast chronological life span by rapamycin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvers, Ashley L.; Wood, Michael S.; Hu, Doreen; Kaywell, Amelia C.; Dunn, William A.; Aris, Jhon P.

    2013-01-01

    Rapamycin is an antibiotic that stimulates autophagy in a wide variety of eukaryotes, including the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Low concentrations of rapamycin extend yeast chronological life span (CLS). We have recently shown that autophagy is required for chronological longevity in yeast, which is attributable in part to a role for autophagy in amino acid homeostasis. We report herein that low concentrations of rapamycin stimulate macroautophagy during chronological aging and extend CLS. PMID:19458476

  16. Longitudinal imaging studies of tumor microenvironment in mice treated with the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keita Saito

    Full Text Available Rapamycin is an allosteric inhibitor of mammalian target of rapamycin, and inhibits tumor growth and angiogenesis. Recent studies suggested a possibility that rapamycin renormalizes aberrant tumor vasculature and improves tumor oxygenation. The longitudinal effects of rapamycin on angiogenesis and tumor oxygenation were evaluated in murine squamous cell carcinoma (SCCVII by electron paramagnetic resonance imaging (EPRI and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI to identify an optimal time after rapamycin treatment for enhanced tumor radioresponse. Rapamycin treatment was initiated on SCCVII solid tumors 8 days after implantation (500-750 mm(3 and measurements of tumor pO(2 and blood volume were conducted from day 8 to 14 by EPRI/MRI. Microvessel density was evaluated over the same time period by immunohistochemical analysis. Tumor blood volume as measured by MRI significantly decreased 2 days after rapamycin treatment. Tumor pO(2 levels modestly but significantly increased 2 days after rapamycin treatment; whereas, it decreased in non-treated control tumors. Furthermore, the fraction of hypoxic area (pixels with pO(2<10 mm Hg in the tumor region decreased 2 days after rapamycin treatments. Immunohistochemical analysis of tumor microvessel density and pericyte coverage revealed that microvessel density decreased 2 days after rapamycin treatment, but pericyte coverage did not change, similar to what was seen with anti-angiogenic agents such as sunitinib which cause vascular renormalization. Collectively, EPRI/MRI co-imaging can provide non-invasive evidence of rapamycin-induced vascular renormalization and resultant transient increase in tumor oxygenation. Improved oxygenation by rapamycin treatment provides a temporal window for anti-cancer therapies to realize enhanced response to radiotherapy.

  17. The mammalian target of rapamycin at the crossroad between cognitive aging and Alzheimer’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talboom, Joshua S; Velazquez, Ramon; Oddo, Salvatore

    2015-01-01

    Age-dependent cognitive decline is a major debilitating event affecting even individuals who are otherwise healthy. Understanding the molecular basis underlying these changes may increase the healthspan of the elderly population. It may also reveal insights into the pathogenesis of numerous neurodegenerative disorders characterized by cognitive deficits, as aging is the major risk factor for most of these disorders. Alzheimer’s disease (AD), the most common neurodegenerative disorder, first manifests itself as deficits in encoding new memories. As AD progresses, these deficits spread to other cognitive domains that further debilitate the person before contributing to their demise. Suppression of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) increases healthspan and lifespan in several organisms. Numerous reports have linked alterations in mTOR signaling to age-dependent cognitive decline and the pathogenesis of AD. This review will discuss recent work highlighting the complex role of mTOR in cognitive aging and in the pathogenesis of AD. PMID:28721257

  18. The mammalian target of rapamycin at the crossroad between cognitive aging and Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talboom, Joshua S; Velazquez, Ramon; Oddo, Salvatore

    2015-01-01

    Age-dependent cognitive decline is a major debilitating event affecting even individuals who are otherwise healthy. Understanding the molecular basis underlying these changes may increase the healthspan of the elderly population. It may also reveal insights into the pathogenesis of numerous neurodegenerative disorders characterized by cognitive deficits, as aging is the major risk factor for most of these disorders. Alzheimer's disease (AD), the most common neurodegenerative disorder, first manifests itself as deficits in encoding new memories. As AD progresses, these deficits spread to other cognitive domains that further debilitate the person before contributing to their demise. Suppression of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) increases healthspan and lifespan in several organisms. Numerous reports have linked alterations in mTOR signaling to age-dependent cognitive decline and the pathogenesis of AD. This review will discuss recent work highlighting the complex role of mTOR in cognitive aging and in the pathogenesis of AD.

  19. Health Effects of Long-Term Rapamycin Treatment: The Impact on Mouse Health of Enteric Rapamycin Treatment from Four Months of Age throughout Life.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen E Fischer

    Full Text Available Rapamycin, an mTOR inhibitor, has been shown to extend lifespan in a range of model organisms. It has been reported to extend lifespan in multiple strains of mice, administered chronically or acutely early or late in life. The ability of rapamycin to extend health (healthspan as opposed to life is less well documented. To assess the effects chronic rapamycin treatment on healthspan, enteric rapamycin was given to male and female C57BL/6J mice starting at 4 months of age and continued throughout life. Repeated, longitudinal assessments of health in individual animals were made starting at 16 months of age (=12 months of treatment until death. A number of health parameters were improved (female grip strength, female body mass and reduced sleep fragmentation in both sexes, others showed no significant difference, while at least one (male rotarod performance was negatively affected. Rapamycin treatment affected many measures of health in a highly sex-specific manner. While sex-specific phenotypic effects of rapamycin treatment have been widely reported, in this study we document sex differences in the direction of phenotypic change. Rapamycin-fed males and females were both significantly different from controls; however the differences were in the opposite direction in measures of body mass, percent fat and resting metabolic rate, a pattern not previously reported.

  20. Divergent tissue and sex effects of rapamycin on the proteasome-chaperone network of old mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl Andrew Rodriguez

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Rapamycin, an allosteric inhibitor of the mTOR kinase, increases longevity in mice in a sex-specific manner. In contrast to the widely accepted theory that a loss of proteasome activity is detrimental to both life- and healthspan, biochemical studies in vitro reveal that rapamycin inhibits 20S proteasome peptidase activity. We tested if this unexpected finding is also evident after chronic rapamycin treatment in vivo by measuring peptidase activities for both the 26S and 20S proteasome in liver, fat, and brain tissues of old, male and female mice fed encapsulated chow containing 2.24mg/kg (14 ppm rapamycin for 6 months. Further we assessed if rapamycin altered expression of the chaperone proteins known to interact with the proteasome-mediated degradation system (PMDS, heat shock factor 1 (HSF1, and the levels of key mTOR pathway proteins. Rapamycin had little effect on liver proteasome activity in either gender, but increased proteasome activity in female brain lysates and lowered its activity in female fat tissue. Rapamycin-induced changes in molecular chaperone levels were also more substantial in tissues from female animals. Furthermore, mTOR pathway proteins showed more significant changes in female tissues compared to those from males. These data show collectively that there are divergent tissue and sex effects of rapamycin on the proteasome-chaperone network and that these may be linked to the disparate effects of rapamycin on males and females. Further our findings suggest that rapamycin induces indirect regulation of the PMDS/heat-shock response through its modulation of the mTOR pathway rather than via direct interactions between rapamycin and the proteasome.

  1. Surface Engineering of Porous Silicon Microparticles for Intravitreal Sustained Delivery of Rapamycin

    OpenAIRE

    Nieto, Alejandra; Hou, Huiyuan; Moon, Sang Woong; Sailor, Michael J.; Freeman, William R.; Cheng, Lingyun

    2015-01-01

    Mild oxidation and subsequent silanization of the porous silicon (pSi) rendered the resultant pSi particles optimized for rapamycin loading/release as an intravitreal injectable delivery system. The system slowly released rapamycin and safely resided in rabbit vitreous more than 8 weeks.

  2. Blood-brain barrier leakage after status epilepticus in rapamycin-treated rats II : Potential mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Vliet, Erwin A; Otte, Wim M; Wadman, Wytse J; Aronica, Eleonora; Kooij, Gijs; de Vries, Helga E; Dijkhuizen, Rick M; Gorter, Jan A

    OBJECTIVE: Blood-brain barrier (BBB) leakage may play a pro-epileptogenic role after status epilepticus. In the accompanying contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (CE-MRI) study we showed that the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor rapamycin reduced BBB leakage and seizure

  3. Assessment of Response of Kidney Tumors to Rapamycin and Atorvastatin in Tsc1+/- Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Ming Hong; Samsel, Paulina; Shen, Louise L; Narov, Kalin; Yang, Jian; Sampson, Julian R

    2017-10-01

    Atorvastatin is widely used to lower blood cholesterol and to reduce risk of cardiovascular disease-associated complications. Epidemiological investigations and preclinical studies suggest that statins such as atorvastatin have antitumor activity for various types of cancer. Tuberous sclerosis (TSC) is a tumor syndrome caused by TSC1 or TSC2 mutations that lead to aberrant activation of mTOR and tumor formation in multiple organs. Previous studies have demonstrated that atorvastatin selectively suppressed growth and proliferation of mouse Tsc2 null embryonic fibroblasts through inhibition of mTOR. However, atorvastatin alone did not reduce tumor burden in the liver and kidneys of Tsc2+/- mice as assessed by histological analysis, and no combination therapy of rapamycin and atorvastatin has been tried. In this study, we used T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging to track changes in tumor number and size in the kidneys of a Tsc1+/- mouse model and to assess the efficacy of rapamycin and atorvastatin alone and as a combination therapy. We found that rapamycin alone or rapamycin combined with atorvastatin significantly reduced tumor burden, while atorvastatin alone did not. Combined therapy with rapamycin and atorvastatin appeared to be more effective for treating renal tumors than rapamycin alone, but the difference was not statistically significant. We conclude that combined therapy with rapamycin and atorvastatin is unlikely to provide additional benefit over rapamycin as a single agent in the treatment of Tsc-associated renal tumors. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The incidence, management, and evolution of rapamycin-related side effects in kidney transplant recipients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhave, J.C.; Boucher, A.; Dandavino, R.; Collette, S.; Senecal, L.; Hebert, M.J.; Girardin, C.; Cardinal, H.

    2014-01-01

    Conversion from a calcineurin-inhibitor-based immunosuppression to a rapamycin-based immunosuppression may preserve kidney graft function. The side effects of rapamycin can limit its usefulness, but their management and evolution are rarely reported in clinical trials. We performed a retrospective

  5. Rapamycin Induces Heme Oxygenase-1 in Liver but Inhibits Bile Flow Recovery after Ischemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kist, Alwine; Wakkie, Joris; Madu, Max; Versteeg, Ruth; ten Berge, Judith; Nikolic, Andrej; Nieuwenhuijs, Vincent B.; Porte, Robert J.; Padbury, Robert T. A.; Barritt, Greg J.

    Background/Aims. Rapamycin, which is employed in the management of patients undergoing liver surgery, induces the synthesis of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in some non-liver cell types. The aim was to investigate whether rapamycin can induce HO-1 expression in the liver, and to test the effects of

  6. Positive-feedback regulation of subchondral H-type vessel formation by chondrocyte promotes osteoarthritis development in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jiansen; Zhang, Haiyan; Cai, Daozhang; Zeng, Chun; Lai, Pinglin; Shao, Yan; Fang, Hang; Li, Delong; Ouyang, Jiayao; Zhao, Chang; Xie, Denghui; Huang, Bin; Yang, Jian; Jiang, Yu; Bai, Xiaochun

    2018-01-12

    Vascular-invasion-mediated interactions between activated articular chondrocytes and subchondral bone are essential for osteoarthritis (OA) development. Here, we determined the role of nutrient sensing mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling in the crosstalk across the bone cartilage interface and its regulatory mechanisms. Then mice with chondrocyte-specific mTORC1 activation (Tsc1 CKO and Tsc1 CKOER ) or inhibition (Raptor CKOER ) and their littermate controls were subjected to OA induced by destabilization of the medial meniscus (DMM) or not. DMM or Tsc1 CKO mice were treated with bevacizumab, a vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A antibody that blocks angiogenesis. Articular cartilage degeneration was evaluated using the Osteoarthritis Research Society International score. Immunostaining and western blotting were conducted to detect H-type vessels and protein levels in mice. Primary chondrocytes from mutant mice and ADTC5 cells were treated with interleukin-1β to investigate the role of chondrocyte mTORC1 in VEGF-A secretion and in vitro vascular formation. Clearly, H-type vessels were increased in subchondral bone in DMM-induced OA and aged mice. Cartilage mTORC1 activation stimulated VEGF-A production in articular chondrocyte and H-type vessel formation in subchondral bone. Chondrocyte mTORC1 promoted OA partially through formation of VEGF-A-stimulated subchondral H-type vessels. In particular, vascular-derived nutrients activated chondrocyte mTORC1, and stimulated chondrocyte activation and production of VEGF, resulting in further angiogenesis in subchondral bone. Thus a positive-feedback regulation of H-type vessel formation in subchondral bone by articular chondrocyte nutrient-sensing mTORC1 signaling is essential for the pathogenesis and progression of OA. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  7. Rapamycin attenuates mitochondrial dysfunction via activation of mitophagy in experimental ischemic stroke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Qiang [Department of Neurology, Shanghai Sixth People’s Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200233 (China); Department of Neurology, Shanghai Ninth People’s Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200011 (China); Zhang, Ting [Department of Neurology, Shanghai Sixth People’s Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200233 (China); Wang, Jixian [Department of Neurology, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200025 (China); Med-X Research Institute and School of Biomedical Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200030 (China); Zhang, Zhijun [Med-X Research Institute and School of Biomedical Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200030 (China); Zhai, Yu [Department of Neurology, Shanghai Ninth People’s Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200011 (China); Yang, Guo-Yuan, E-mail: gyyang0626@gmail.com [Department of Neurology, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200025 (China); Med-X Research Institute and School of Biomedical Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200030 (China); Sun, Xiaojiang, E-mail: sunxj19@gmail.com [Department of Neurology, Shanghai Sixth People’s Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200233 (China)

    2014-02-07

    Highlights: • Rapamycin enhances mitophagy via increasing p62 translocation to the mitochondria. • Rapamycin attenuates brain ischemic damage and improves mitochondrial function. • The protection of rapamycin to mitochondrial is linked to enhanced mitophagy. - Abstract: Rapamycin has been demonstrated to exhibit neuroprotective functions via the activation of autophagy in a cerebral ischemia model. However, the involvement of mitophagy in this process and its contribution to the protection of mitochondrial function remains unknown. The present study explored the characteristics of mitophagy after cerebral ischemia and the effect of rapamycin on mitochondrial function. Male Sprague–Dawley rats underwent transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO). Neurological deficits scores; infarct volumes; mitophagy morphology; and the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and mitochondrial membrane potentials (Δψm) were examined. The expression of LC3, Beclin-1 and p62 in the mitochondrial fraction combined with transmission electronic microscopy were used to explore mitophagic activity after ischemia. We also blocked autophagosome formation using 3-methyladenine (3-MA) to check the linkage between the mitochondrial protective effect of rapamycin and enhanced mitophagy. We observed that rapamycin significantly enhanced mitophagy, as evidenced by the increase in LC3-II and Beclin-1 expression in the mitochondria and p62 translocation to the mitochondria. Rapamycin reduced infarct volume, improved neurological outcomes and inhibited mitochondrial dysfunction compared with the control animals (p < 0.05). However, these protective effects were reversed by 3-methyladenine treatment after rapamycin. The present study indicates that rapamycin treatment attenuates mitochondrial dysfunction following cerebral ischemia, which is linked to enhanced mitophagy.

  8. Lung function response and side effects to rapamycin for lymphangioleiomyomatosis: a prospective national cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bee, Janet; Fuller, Sharon; Miller, Suzanne; Johnson, Simon R

    2017-10-09

    Mechanistic target of rapamycin inhibitors reduce loss of lung function in lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM), although their benefit varies between individuals. We examined lung function response and side effects to rapamycin in a national cohort. Subjects were receiving rapamycin for progressive lung disease. Clinical evaluation, detailed phenotyping, serial lung function, rapamycin and safety monitoring were performed according to a clinical protocol. Lung function change, measured as FEV1 slope (ΔFEV1), was reported for those treated for 1 year or longer. Rapamycin was associated with improved ΔFEV1 in 21 individuals where pretreatment data were available (p<0.0001). In 47 treated for a mean duration of 35.8 months, mean ΔFEV1 was +11 (SD 75) mL/year, although it varied from +254 to -148 mL/year. The quartile with the highest positive ΔFEV1 had greater pretreatment FEV1 (p=0.02) and shorter disease durations (p=0.02) than the lowest quartile. Serum rapamycin level was positively associated with side effects (p=0.02) but not ΔFEV1 over 1 year. Within the first month of therapy, apthous ulcers, nausea and diarrhoea were associated with higher rapamycin levels. Acne, oedema and menstrual irregularities tended to increase over the first year of therapy. At the end of observation, the prevalence of side effects was 5% or less. Rapamycin reduces lung function loss in LAM, although in some, ΔFEV1 continues to fall at an accelerated rate. Poor response to rapamycin was associated with lower pretreatment lung function and longer disease duration but not serum level. Early intervention with low-dose rapamycin may preserve lung function and reduce side effects. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  9. Rapamycin prevents drug seeking via disrupting reconsolidation of reward memory in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jue; Liu, Lingqi; Wen, Quan; Zheng, Chunming; Gao, Yang; Peng, Shuxian; Tan, Yalun; Li, Yanqin

    2014-01-01

    The maladaptive drug memory developed between the drug-rewarding effect and environmental cues contributes to difficulty in preventing drug relapse. Established reward memories can be disrupted by pharmacologic interventions following their reactivation. Rapamycin, an inhibitor of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) kinase, has been proved to be involved in various memory consolidation. However, it is less well characterized in drug memory reconsolidation. Using a conditioned place preference (CPP) procedure, we examined the effects of systemically administered rapamycin on reconsolidation of drug memory in rats. We found that systemically administered rapamycin (0.1 or 10 mg/kg, i.p.) after re-exposure to drug-paired environment, dose dependently decreased the expression of CPP 1 d later, and the effect lasted for up to 14 d and could not be reversed by a priming injection of morphine. The effect of rapamycin on morphine-associated memory was specific to drug-paired context, and rapamycin had no effect on subsequent CPP expression when rats were exposed to saline-paired context or homecage. These results indicated that systemic administration of rapamycin after memory reactivation can persistently inhibit the drug seeking behaviour via disruption of morphine memory reconsolidation in rats. Additionally, the effect of rapamycin on memory reconsolidation was reproduced in cocaine CPP and alcohol CPP. Furthermore, rapamycin did not induce conditioned place aversion and had no effect on locomotor activity and anxiety behaviour. These findings suggest that rapamycin could erase the acquired drug CPP in rats, and that mTOR activity plays an important role in drug reconsolidation and is required for drug relapse.

  10. Rapamycin up-regulates triglycerides in hepatocytes by down-regulating Prox1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Sora; Jeon, Ji-Sook; Kim, Su Bin; Hong, Young-Kwon; Ahn, Curie; Sung, Jung-Suk; Choi, Inho

    2016-02-27

    Although the prolonged use of rapamycin may cause unwanted side effects such as hyperlipidemia, the underlying mechanism remains unknown. Prox1 is a transcription factor responsible for the development of several tissues including lymphatics and liver. There is growing evidences that Prox1 participates in metabolism in addition to embryogenesis. However, whether Prox1 is directly related to lipid metabolism is currently unknown. HepG2 human hepatoma cells were treated with rapamycin and total lipids were analyzed by thin layer chromatography. The effect of rapamycin on the expression of Prox1 was determined by western blotting. To investigate the role of Prox1 in triglycerides regulation, siRNA and overexpression system were employed. Rapamycin was injected into mice for 2 weeks and total lipids and proteins in liver were measured by thin layer chromatography and western blot analysis, respectively. Rapamycin up-regulated the amount of triglyceride and down-regulated the expression of Prox1 in HepG2 cells by reducing protein half-life but did not affect its transcript. The loss-of-function of Prox1 was coincident with the increase of triglycerides in HepG2 cells treated with rapamycin. The up-regulation of triglycerides by rapamycin in HepG2 cells reverted to normal levels by the compensation of Prox1 using the overexpression system. Rapamycin also down-regulated Prox1 expression but increased triglycerides in mouse liver. This study suggests that rapamycin can increase the amount of triglycerides by down-regulating Prox1 expression in hepatocytes, which means that the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling is important for the regulation of triglycerides by maintaining Prox1 expression.

  11. Excessive Leucine-mTORC1-Signalling of Cow Milk-Based Infant Formula: The Missing Link to Understand Early Childhood Obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bodo C. Melnik

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Increased protein supply by feeding cow-milk-based infant formula in comparison to lower protein content of human milk is a well-recognized major risk factor of childhood obesity. However, there is yet no conclusive biochemical concept explaining the mechanisms of formula-induced childhood obesity. It is the intention of this article to provide the biochemical link between leucine-mediated signalling of mammalian milk proteins and adipogenesis as well as early adipogenic programming. Leucine has been identified as the predominant signal transducer of mammalian milk, which stimulates the nutrient-sensitive kinase mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1. Leucine thus functions as a maternal-neonatal relay for mTORC1-dependent neonatal β-cell proliferation and insulin secretion. The mTORC1 target S6K1 plays a pivotal role in stimulation of mesenchymal stem cells to differentiate into adipocytes and to induce insulin resistance. It is of most critical concern that infant formulas provide higher amounts of leucine in comparison to human milk. Exaggerated leucine-mediated mTORC1-S6K1 signalling induced by infant formulas may thus explain increased adipogenesis and generation of lifelong elevated adipocyte numbers. Attenuation of mTORC1 signalling of infant formula by leucine restriction to physiologic lower levels of human milk offers a great chance for the prevention of childhood obesity and obesity-related metabolic diseases.

  12. Normalizing translation through 4E-BP prevents mTOR-driven cortical mislamination and ameliorates aberrant neuron integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tiffany V; Hsieh, Lawrence; Kimura, Tomoki; Malone, Taylor J; Bordey, Angélique

    2016-10-04

    Hyperactive mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is a shared molecular hallmark in several neurodevelopmental disorders characterized by abnormal brain cytoarchitecture. The mechanisms downstream of mTORC1 that are responsible for these defects remain unclear. We show that focally increasing mTORC1 activity during late corticogenesis leads to ectopic placement of upper-layer cortical neurons that does not require altered signaling in radial glia and is accompanied by changes in layer-specific molecular identity. Importantly, we found that decreasing cap-dependent translation by expressing a constitutively active mutant of the translational repressor eukaryotic initiation factor 4E-binding protein 1 (4E-BP1) prevents neuronal misplacement and soma enlargement, while partially rescuing dendritic hypertrophy induced by hyperactive mTORC1. Furthermore, overactivation of translation alone through knockdown of 4E-BP2 was sufficient to induce neuronal misplacement. These data show that many aspects of abnormal brain cytoarchitecture can be prevented by manipulating a single intracellular process downstream of mTORC1, cap-dependent translation.

  13. Autophagy response: manipulating the mTOR-controlled machinery by amino acids and pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fader, Claudio Marcelo; Aguilera, Milton Osmar; Colombo, María Isabel

    2015-10-01

    Macroautophagy is a self-degradative process that normally maintains cellular homeostasis via a lysosomal pathway. It is induced by different stress signals, including nutrients and growth factors' restriction as well as pathogen invasions. These stimuli are modulated by the serine/threonine protein kinase mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) which control not only autophagy but also protein translation and gene expression. This review focuses on the important role of mTOR as a master regulator of cell growth and the autophagy pathway. Here, we have discussed the role of intracellular amino acid availability and intracellular pH in the redistribution of autophagic structures, which may contribute to mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) activity regulation. We have also discussed that mTORC1 complex and components of the autophagy machinery are localized at the lysosomal surface, representing a fascinating mechanism to control the metabolism, cellular clearance and also to restrain invading intracellular pathogens.

  14. Inhibition of mammalian target of rapamycin reduces epileptogenesis and blood-brain barrier leakage but not microglia activation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Vliet, E.A.; Forte, G.; Holtman, L.; den Burger, J.C.G.; Sinjewel, A.; de Vries, H.E.; Aronica, E.; Gorter, J.A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Previous studies have shown that inhibition of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway with rapamycin prevents epileptogenesis after pharmacologically induced status epilepticus (SE) in rat models of temporal lobe epilepsy. Because rapamycin is also known for its immunosuppressant

  15. Blood-brain barrier leakage after status epilepticus in rapamycin-treated rats I : Magnetic resonance imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Vliet, Erwin A; Otte, Wim M; Wadman, Wytse J; Aronica, Eleonora; Kooij, Gijs; de Vries, Helga E; Dijkhuizen, Rick M; Gorter, Jan A

    OBJECTIVE: The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway has received increasing attention as a potential antiepileptogenic target. Treatment with the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin after status epilepticus reduces the development of epilepsy in a rat model. To study whether rapamycin mediates this

  16. γ-Oryzanol Enhances Adipocyte Differentiation and Glucose Uptake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Hwa Jung

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies show that brown rice improves glucose intolerance and potentially the risk of diabetes, although the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear. One of the phytochemicals found in high concentration in brown rice is γ-oryzanol (Orz, a group of ferulic acid esters of phytosterols and triterpene alcohols. Here, we found that Orz stimulated differentiation of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes and increased the protein expression of adipogenic marker genes such as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR-γ and CCAAT/enhanced binding protein alpha (C/EBPα. Moreover, Orz significantly increased the glucose uptake in insulin-resistant cells and translocation of glucose transporter type 4 (GLUT4 from the cytosol to the cell surface. To investigate the mechanism by which Orz stimulated cell differentiation, we examined its effects on cellular signaling of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1, a central mediator of cellular growth and proliferation. The Orz treatment increased mTORC1 kinase activity based on phosphorylation of 70-kDa ribosomal S6 kinase 1 (S6K1. The effect of Orz on adipocyte differentiation was dependent on mTORC1 activity because rapamycin blocks cell differentiation in Orz-treated cells. Collectively, our results indicate that Orz stimulates adipocyte differentiation, enhances glucose uptake, and may be associated with cellular signaling mediated by PPAR-γ and mTORC1.

  17. Chondrocyte-Specific Knockout of TSC-1 Leads to Congenital Spinal Deformity in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Cheng; Chen, Yuhui; Li, Zhen; Cao, He; Chen, Keming; Lai, Pinglin; Yan, Bo; Huang, Bin; Tang, Jiajun; Fan, Shicai; Cai, Daozhang; Jin, Dadi; Bai, Xiaochun; Zhou, Rongping

    2017-01-01

    Congenital spinal deformity is the most severe clinical orthopedic issue worldwide. Among all the pathological processes of congenital spinal deformity, the imbalance of endochondral ossification is considered to be the most important developmental cause of spinal dysplasia. We established chondrocyte-specific TSC-1 knockout (KO) mice to overactivate the energy metabolic component, mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), and measured the spinal development by general, imaging, histo...

  18. Dietary intervention in acne

    OpenAIRE

    Melnik, Bodo

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to highlight the endocrine signaling of Western diet, a fundamental environmental factor involved in the pathogenesis of epidemic acne. Western nutrition is characterized by high calorie uptake, high glycemic load, high fat and meat intake, as well as increased consumption of insulin- and IGF-1-level elevating dairy proteins. Metabolic signals of Western diet are sensed by the nutrient-sensitive kinase, mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), which integ...

  19. Persistent effect of mTOR inhibition on preneoplastic foci progression and gene expression in a rat model of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francois-Vaughan, Heather; Adebayo, Adeola O; Brilliant, Kate E; Parry, Nicola M A; Gruppuso, Philip A; Sanders, Jennifer A

    2016-04-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a heterogeneous disease in which tumor subtypes can be identified based on the presence of adult liver progenitor cells. Having previously identified the mTOR pathway as critical to progenitor cell proliferation in a model of liver injury, we investigated the temporal activation of mTOR signaling in a rat model of hepatic carcinogenesis. The model employed chemical carcinogens and partial hepatectomy to induce progenitor marker-positive HCC. Immunohistochemical staining for phosphorylated ribosomal protein S6 indicated robust mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) activity in early preneoplastic lesions that peaked during the first week and waned over the subsequent 10 days. Continuous administration of rapamycin by subcutaneous pellet for 70 days markedly reduced the development of focal lesions, but resulted in activation of the PI3K signaling pathway. To test the hypothesis that early mTORC1 activation was critical to the development and progression of preneoplastic foci, we limited rapamycin administration to the 3-week period at the start of the protocol. Focal lesion burden was reduced to a degree indistinguishable from that seen with continuous administration. Short-term rapamycin did not result in the activation of PI3K or mTORC2 pathways. Microarray analysis revealed a persistent effect of short-term mTORC1 inhibition on gene expression that resulted in a genetic signature reminiscent of normal liver. We conclude that mTORC1 activation during the early stages of hepatic carcinogenesis may be critical due to the development of preneoplastic focal lesions in progenitor marker-positive HCC. mTORC1 inhibition may represent an effective chemopreventive strategy for this form of liver cancer. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors for treatment in tuberous sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Won Seop Kim

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Korean J Pediatr 2011;54:241-5. &lt;a href='http://dx.doi.org/10.3345/kjp.2011.54.6.241'&gt;http://dx.doi.org/10.3345/kjp.2011.54.6.241&lt;/a&gt;. PMID: 21949518 [PubMed] &lt;div style="border-top:1px solid #0092C8"&gt;&lt;/div&gt; The following article&lt;sup&gt;1&lt;/sup&gt; is being retracted as a part of the manuscript was plagiarized. Yeong-Ho Rha, MD, PhD Editor-in-Chief, Korean J Pediatr 1.Kim WS. Mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors for treatment in tuberous sclerosis. Korean J Pediatr 2011;54:241-5.

  1. Rapamycin Ameliorates Proteinuria and Restores Nephrin and Podocin Expression in Experimental Membranous Nephropathy

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    Stavros Stratakis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Recent studies have shown a beneficial effect of rapamycin in passive and active Heymann Nephritis (HN. However, the mechanisms underlying this beneficial effect have not been elucidated. Methods. Passive Heymann Nephritis (PHN was induced by a single intravenous infusion of anti-Fx1 in 12 Sprague-Dawley male rats. One week later, six of these rats were commenced on daily treatment with subcutaneous rapamycin 0.5 mgr/kg (PHN-Rapa. The remaining six rats were used as the proteinuric control group (PHN while six more rats without PHN were given the rapamycin solvent and served as the healthy control group (HC. All rats were sacrificed at the end of the 7th week. Results. Rapamycin significantly reduced proteinuria during the autologous phase of PHN. Histological lesions were markedly improved by rapamycin. Immunofluorescence revealed attenuated deposits of autologous alloantibodies in treated rats. Untreated rats showed decreased glomerular content of both nephrin and podocin whereas rapamycin restored their expression. Conclusions. Rapamycin monotherapy significantly improves proteinuria and histological lesions in experimental membranous nephropathy. This beneficial effect may be mediated by inhibition of the alloimmune response during the autologous phase of PHN and by restoration of the normal expression of the podocyte proteins nephrin and podocin.

  2. Modulation of the immune response in rheumatoid arthritis with strategically released rapamycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Ping; Ma, Linxiao; Ren, Yile; Liu, Huijie

    2017-10-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease, which is associated with symptoms, including synovial membrane inflammatory pain, joint synovitis and stiffness. However, there are no effective methods available to cure this disease. In the present study, rapamycin was used to modulate immunity in RA. To limit the cytotoxicity of rapamycin, rapamycin was loaded into well‑characterized biocompatible nanoparticles. In vitro, rapamycin particles downregulated the activation of dendritic cell surface markers, including CD80+ and CD40+, upon interacting with macrophages. The rapamycin particles reduced the secretion of inflammatory cytokines, including interleukin (IL)‑6, tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and IL‑1β, which are characteristic of RA. In vivo, the rapamycin particles decreased the symptoms of RA in mice, and the production of inflammatory cytokines was associated with the occurrence of RA. The present study partially revealed the interactions between rapamycin and two types of immune cell in RA disease, and may potentially offer a solution to improve the treatment of RA.

  3. Rapamycin regulates autophagy and cell adhesion in induced pluripotent stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Areechun Sotthibundhu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cellular reprogramming is a stressful process, which requires cells to engulf somatic features and produce and maintain stemness machineries. Autophagy is a process to degrade unwanted proteins and is required for the derivation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs. However, the role of autophagy during iPSC maintenance remains undefined. Methods Human iPSCs were investigated by microscopy, immunofluorescence, and immunoblotting to detect autophagy machinery. Cells were treated with rapamycin to activate autophagy and with bafilomycin to block autophagy during iPSC maintenance. High concentrations of rapamycin treatment unexpectedly resulted in spontaneous formation of round floating spheres of uniform size, which were analyzed for differentiation into three germ layers. Mass spectrometry was deployed to reveal altered protein expression and pathways associated with rapamycin treatment. Results We demonstrate that human iPSCs express high basal levels of autophagy, including key components of APMKα, ULK1/2, BECLIN-1, ATG13, ATG101, ATG12, ATG3, ATG5, and LC3B. Block of autophagy by bafilomycin induces iPSC death and rapamycin attenuates the bafilomycin effect. Rapamycin treatment upregulates autophagy in iPSCs in a dose/time-dependent manner. High concentration of rapamycin reduces NANOG expression and induces spontaneous formation of round and uniformly sized embryoid bodies (EBs with accelerated differentiation into three germ layers. Mass spectrometry analysis identifies actin cytoskeleton and adherens junctions as the major targets of rapamycin in mediating iPSC detachment and differentiation. Conclusions High levels of basal autophagy activity are present during iPSC derivation and maintenance. Rapamycin alters expression of actin cytoskeleton and adherens junctions, induces uniform EB formation, and accelerates differentiation. IPSCs are sensitive to enzyme dissociation and require a lengthy differentiation time

  4. Inhibition of akt enhances the chemopreventive effects of topical rapamycin in mouse skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, Sally E; Janda, Jaroslav; Criswell, Jane; Blohm-Mangone, Karen; Olson, Erik R.; Liu, Zhonglin; Barber, Christie; Rusche, Jadrian J.; Petricoin, Emmanuel; Calvert, Valerie; Einspahr, Janine G.; Dickinson, Jesse; Stratton, Steven P.; Curiel-Lewandrowski, Clara; Saboda, Kathylynn; Hu, Chengcheng; Bode, Ann M.; Dong, Zigang; Alberts, David S.; Bowden, G. Timothy

    2016-01-01

    The PI3Kinase/Akt/mTOR pathway has important roles in cancer development for multiple tumor types, including UV-induced non-melanoma skin cancer. Immunosuppressed populations are at increased risk of aggressive cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Individuals who are treated with rapamycin, (sirolimus, a classical mTOR inhibitor) have significantly decreased rates of developing new cutaneous SCCs compared to those that receive traditional immunosuppression. However, systemic rapamycin use can lead to significant adverse events. Here we explored the use of topical rapamycin as a chemopreventive agent in the context of solar simulated light (SSL)-induced skin carcinogenesis. In SKH-1 mice, topical rapamycin treatment decreased tumor yields when applied after completion of 15 weeks of SSL exposure compared to controls. However, applying rapamycin during SSL exposure for 15 weeks, and continuing for 10 weeks after UV treatment, increased tumor yields. We also examined whether a combinatorial approach might result in more significant tumor suppression by rapamycin. We validated that rapamycin causes increased Akt (S473) phosphorylation in the epidermis after SSL, and show for the first time that this dysregulation can be inhibited in vivo by a selective PDK1/Akt inhibitor, PHT-427. Combining rapamycin with PHT-427 on tumor prone skin additively caused a significant reduction of tumor multiplicity compared to vehicle controls. Our findings indicate that patients taking rapamycin should avoid sun exposure, and that combining topical mTOR inhibitors and Akt inhibitors may be a viable chemoprevention option for individuals at high risk for cutaneous SCC.

  5. Comparison of rapamycin schedules in mice on high-fat diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leontieva, Olga V; Paszkiewicz, Geraldine M; Blagosklonny, Mikhail V

    2014-01-01

    At a wide range of doses, rapamycin extends life span in mice. It was shown that intraperitoneal injections (i.p.) of rapamycin prevent weight gain in mice on high-fat diet (HFD). We further investigated the effect of rapamycin on weight gain in female C57BL/6 mice on HFD started at the age of 7.5 months. By the age of 16 and 23 months, mice on HFD weighed significantly more (52 vs 33 g; p = 0.0001 and 70 vs 38 g; p applications are discussed.

  6. Influence of mTOR in energy and metabolic homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haissaguerre, Magalie; Saucisse, Nicolas; Cota, Daniela

    2014-11-01

    The mechanistic (or mammalian) target of rapamycin couples a variety of different environmental signals, including nutrients and hormones, with the regulation of several energy-demanding cellular functions, spanning from protein and lipid synthesis to mitochondrial activity and cytoskeleton dynamics. mTOR forms two distinct protein complexes in cells, mTORC1 and mTORC2. This review focuses on recent advances made in understanding the roles played by these two complexes in the regulation of whole body metabolic homeostasis. Studies carried out in the past few years have shown that mTORC1 activity in the hypothalamus varies by cell and stimulus type, and that this complex is critically implicated in the regulation of food intake and body weight and in the central actions of both nutrients and hormones, such as leptin, ghrelin and triiodothyronine. As a regulator of cellular anabolic processes, mTORC1 activity in the periphery favors adipogenesis, lipogenesis, glucose uptake and beta-cell mass expansion. Much less is known about the function of mTORC2 in the hypothalamus, while in peripheral organs this second complex exerts roles strikingly similar to those described for mTORC1. Deregulation of mTORC1 and mTORC2 is associated with obesity, type 2 diabetes, cancer and neurodegenerative disorders. Insights on the exact relationship between mTORC1 and mTORC2 in the context of the regulation of metabolic homeostasis and on the specific molecular mechanisms engaged by these two complexes in such regulation may provide new avenues for therapy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Inhibition in Trypanosoma cruzi-Infected Macrophages Leads to an Intracellular Profile That Is Detrimental for Infection

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    Jorge David Rojas Márquez

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The causative agent of Chagas’ disease, Trypanosoma cruzi, affects approximately 10 million people living mainly in Latin America, with macrophages being one of the first cellular actors confronting the invasion during T. cruzi infection and their function depending on their proper activation and polarization into distinct M1 and M2 subtypes. Macrophage polarization is thought to be regulated not only by cytokines and growth factors but also by environmental signals. The metabolic checkpoint kinase mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR-mediated sensing of environmental and metabolic cues influences macrophage polarization in a complex and as of yet incompletely understood manner. Here, we studied the role of the mTOR pathway in macrophages during T. cruzi infection. We demonstrated that the parasite activated mTOR, which was beneficial for its replication since inhibition of mTOR in macrophages by different inhibitors decreased parasite replication. Moreover, in rapamycin pretreated and infected macrophages, we observed a decreased arginase activity and expression, reduced IL-10 and increased interleukin-12 production, compared to control infected macrophages treated with DMSO. Surprisingly, we also found a reduced iNOS activity and expression in these macrophages. Therefore, we investigated possible alternative mechanisms involved in controlling parasite replication in rapamycin pretreated and infected macrophages. Although, cytoplasmic ROS and the enzyme indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase (IDO were not involved, we observed a significant increase in IL-6, TNF-α, and IL-1β production. Taking into account that IL-1β is produced by activation of the cytoplasmic receptor NLRP3, which is one of the main components of the inflammasome, we evaluated NLRP3 expression during mTOR inhibition and T. cruzi infection. We observed that rapamycin-pretreated and infected macrophages showed a significant increase in NLRP3 expression and produced higher levels of

  8. Rapamycin sensitizes T-ALL cells to dexamethasone-induced apoptosis

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    Mu Dezhi

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glucocorticoid (GC resistance is frequently seen in acute lymphoblastic leukemia of T-cell lineage (T-ALL. In this study we investigate the potential and mechanism of using rapamycin to restore the sensitivity of GC-resistant T-ALL cells to dexamethasone (Dex treatment. Methods Cell proliferation was detected by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl- 2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT assay. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS analysis was used to analyze apoptosis and cell cycles. Western blot analysis was performed to test the expression of the downstream effector proteins of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR, the cell cycle regulatory proteins, and apoptosis associated proteins. Results 10 nM rapamycin markedly increased GC sensitivity in GC-resistant T-ALL cells and this effect was mediated, at least in part, by inhibition of mTOR signaling pathway. Cell cycle arrest was associated with modulation of G1-S phase regulators. Both rapamycin and Dex can induce up-regulation of cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK inhibitors of p21 and p27 and co-treatment of rapamycin with Dex resulted in a synergistic induction of their expressions. Rapamycin did not obviously affect the expression of cyclin A, whereas Dex induced cyclin A expression. Rapamycin prevented Dex-induced expression of cyclin A. Rapamycin had a stronger inhibition of cyclin D1 expression than Dex. Rapamycin enhanced GC-induced apoptosis and this was not achieved by modulation of glucocorticoid receptor (GR expression, but synergistically up-regulation of pro-apoptotic proteins like caspase-3, Bax, and Bim, and down-regulation of anti-apoptotic protein of Mcl-1. Conclusion Our data suggests that rapamycin can effectively reverse GC resistance in T-ALL and this effect is achieved by inducing cell cycles arrested at G0/G1 phase and activating the intrinsic apoptotic program. Therefore, combination of mTOR inhibitor rapamycin with GC containing protocol might be an attracting

  9. The effect of Bortezomib and Rapamycin on Telomerase Activity in Mantle Cell Lymphoma

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    Orit Uziel

    2014-12-01

    In the light of the crucial role of telomerase in cancer cells, it was important to characterize the possible relations between telomerase and bortezomib and to distinguish the biochemical mechanisms of its regulation and its interactions with other signal transduction inhibitors such as rapamycin. The results of this work encourage the in vivo examination of the therapeutic potential of the combination of bortezomib and rapamycin in Mantle Cell Lymphoma patients.

  10. Brain Injury-Induced Synaptic Reorganization in Hilar Inhibitory Neurons Is Differentially Suppressed by Rapamycin.

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    Butler, Corwin R; Boychuk, Jeffery A; Smith, Bret N

    2017-01-01

    Following traumatic brain injury (TBI), treatment with rapamycin suppresses mammalian (mechanistic) target of rapamycin (mTOR) activity and specific components of hippocampal synaptic reorganization associated with altered cortical excitability and seizure susceptibility. Reemergence of seizures after cessation of rapamycin treatment suggests, however, an incomplete suppression of epileptogenesis. Hilar inhibitory interneurons regulate dentate granule cell (DGC) activity, and de novo synaptic input from both DGCs and CA3 pyramidal cells after TBI increases their excitability but effects of rapamycin treatment on the injury-induced plasticity of interneurons is only partially described. Using transgenic mice in which enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) is expressed in the somatostatinergic subset of hilar inhibitory interneurons, we tested the effect of daily systemic rapamycin treatment (3 mg/kg) on the excitability of hilar inhibitory interneurons after controlled cortical impact (CCI)-induced focal brain injury. Rapamycin treatment reduced, but did not normalize, the injury-induced increase in excitability of surviving eGFP+ hilar interneurons. The injury-induced increase in response to selective glutamate photostimulation of DGCs was reduced to normal levels after mTOR inhibition, but the postinjury increase in synaptic excitation arising from CA3 pyramidal cell activity was unaffected by rapamycin treatment. The incomplete suppression of synaptic reorganization in inhibitory circuits after brain injury could contribute to hippocampal hyperexcitability and the eventual reemergence of the epileptogenic process upon cessation of mTOR inhibition. Further, the cell-selective effect of mTOR inhibition on synaptic reorganization after CCI suggests possible mechanisms by which rapamycin treatment modifies epileptogenesis in some models but not others.

  11. Low-dose rapamycin extends lifespan in a mouse model of mtDNA depletion syndrome.

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    Siegmund, Stephanie E; Yang, Hua; Sharma, Rohit; Javors, Martin; Skinner, Owen; Mootha, Vamsi; Hirano, Michio; Schon, Eric A

    2017-12-01

    Mitochondrial disorders affecting oxidative phosphorylation (OxPhos) are caused by mutations in both the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes. One promising candidate for treatment is the drug rapamycin, which has been shown to extend lifespan in multiple animal models, and which was previously shown to ameliorate mitochondrial disease in a knock-out mouse model lacking a nuclear-encoded gene specifying an OxPhos structural subunit (Ndufs4). In that model, relatively high-dose intraperitoneal rapamycin extended lifespan and improved markers of neurological disease, via an unknown mechanism. Here, we administered low-dose oral rapamycin to a knock-in (KI) mouse model of authentic mtDNA disease, specifically, progressive mtDNA depletion syndrome, resulting from a mutation in the mitochondrial nucleotide salvage enzyme thymidine kinase 2 (TK2). Importantly, low-dose oral rapamycin was sufficient to extend Tk2KI/KI mouse lifespan significantly, and did so in the absence of detectable improvements in mitochondrial dysfunction. We found no evidence that rapamycin increased survival by acting through canonical pathways, including mitochondrial autophagy. However, transcriptomics and metabolomics analyses uncovered systemic metabolic changes pointing to a potential 'rapamycin metabolic signature.' These changes also implied that rapamycin may have enabled the Tk2KI/KI mice to utilize alternative energy reserves, and possibly triggered indirect signaling events that modified mortality through developmental reprogramming. From a therapeutic standpoint, our results support the possibility that low-dose rapamycin, while not targeting the underlying mtDNA defect, could represent a crucial therapy for the treatment of mtDNA-driven, and some nuclear DNA-driven, mitochondrial diseases. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  12. Rapamycin increases fetal hemoglobin and ameliorates the nociception phenotype in sickle cell mice.

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    Khaibullina, Alfia; Almeida, Luis E F; Wang, Li; Kamimura, Sayuri; Wong, Edward C C; Nouraie, Mehdi; Maric, Irina; Albani, Sarah; Finkel, Julia; Quezado, Zenaide M N

    2015-12-01

    Fetal hemoglobin-inducing therapies are disease-modifying and ameliorate the pain phenotype in sickle cell disease (SCD). Rapamycin, a mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor, increases HbF in erythroid precursor cells in vitro. We hypothesized that rapamycin would increase HbF levels and improve nociception phenotype in SCD mice. We used sine-wave electrical stimulation to examine nocifensive phenotype and evaluate myelinated [2000Hz (Aβ-fiber) and 250Hz (Aδ-fiber)] and unmyelinated (5Hz C-fibers)] sensory fiber function. Rapamycin significantly increased γ-globin mRNA and HbF levels [+2.3% (0.7, 3.9), mean increase (95% confidence interval, CI), p=0.006]. In homozygous (sickling) mice, long- (16 weeks), but not short-term (6 weeks), rapamycin treatment increased 2000Hz and 250Hz current thresholds in a pattern that varied according to sex. In male, but not female mice, rapamycin (compared with vehicle) was associated with increases in 2000Hz [21Units (7, 35), mean difference (95% CI), p=0.009 for sex∗treatment interaction] and 250Hz [9Units (1, 16), p=0.01] current thresholds. In rapamycin-treated homozygotes, HbF levels directly correlated with myelinated [2000Hz(Aβ-fiber, r=0.58, p=0.01) and 250Hz(Aδ-fiber, r=0.6, p=0.01)] but not unmyelinated sensory fiber current thresholds. These findings suggest that in SCD mice, rapamycin increases HbF and modulates current thresholds of myelinated fibers. Therefore, mTOR signaling might be implicated in the pathobiology of SCD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Differential Effects of Rapamycin and Dexamethasone in Mouse Models of Established Allergic Asthma

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    Mushaben, Elizabeth M.; Brandt, Eric B.; Hershey, Gurjit K. Khurana; Le Cras, Timothy D.

    2013-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) plays an important role in cell growth/differentiation, integrating environmental cues, and regulating immune responses. Our lab previously demonstrated that inhibition of mTOR with rapamycin prevented house dust mite (HDM)-induced allergic asthma in mice. Here, we utilized two treatment protocols to investigate whether rapamycin, compared to the steroid, dexamethasone, could inhibit allergic responses during the later stages of the disease process, namely allergen re-exposure and/or during progression of chronic allergic disease. In protocol 1, BALB/c mice were sensitized to HDM (three i.p. injections) and administered two intranasal HDM exposures. After 6 weeks of rest/recovery, mice were re-exposed to HDM while being treated with rapamycin or dexamethasone. In protocol 2, mice were exposed to HDM for 3 or 6 weeks and treated with rapamycin or dexamethasone during weeks 4–6. Characteristic features of allergic asthma, including IgE, goblet cells, airway hyperreactivity (AHR), inflammatory cells, cytokines/chemokines, and T cell responses were assessed. In protocol 1, both rapamycin and dexamethasone suppressed goblet cells and total CD4+ T cells including activated, effector, and regulatory T cells in the lung tissue, with no effect on AHR or total inflammatory cell numbers in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Rapamycin also suppressed IgE, although IL-4 and eotaxin 1 levels were augmented. In protocol 2, both drugs suppressed total CD4+ T cells, including activated, effector, and regulatory T cells and IgE levels. IL-4, eotaxin, and inflammatory cell numbers were increased after rapamycin and no effect on AHR was observed. Dexamethasone suppressed inflammatory cell numbers, especially eosinophils, but had limited effects on AHR. We conclude that while mTOR signaling is critical during the early phases of allergic asthma, its role is much more limited once disease is established. PMID:23349887

  14. Blocking mTOR Signalling with Rapamycin Ameliorates Imiquimod-induced Psoriasis in Mice.

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    Bürger, Claudia; Shirsath, Nitesh; Lang, Victoria; Diehl, Sandra; Kaufmann, Roland; Weigert, Andreas; Han, Ying-Ying; Ringel, Christian; Wolf, Peter

    2017-10-02

    The mTOR (mechanistic target of rapamycin) inhibitor rapamycin has long been known for its immune suppressive properties, but it has shown limited therapeutic success when given systemically to patients with psoriasis. Recent data have shown that the mTOR pathway is hyperactivated in lesional psoriatic skin, which probably contributes to the disease by interfering with maturation of keratinocytes. This study investigated the effect of topical rapamycin treatment in an imiquimod-induced psoriatic mouse model. The disease was less severe if the mice had received rapamycin treatment. Immunohistological analysis revealed that rapamycin not only prevented the activation of mTOR signalling (P-mTOR and P-S6 levels), but almost normalized the expression of epidermal differentiation markers. In addition, the influx of innate immune cells into the draining lymph nodes was partially reduced by rapamycin treatment. These data emphasize the role of mTOR signalling in the pathogenesis of psoriasis, and support the investigation of topical mTOR inhibition as a novel anti-psoriatic strategy.

  15. Intranasal Rapamycin Rescues Mice from Staphylococcal Enterotoxin B-Induced Shock

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    Teresa Krakauer

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB and related exotoxins produced by Staphylococcus aureus are potent activators of the immune system and cause toxic shock in humans. Currently there is no effective treatment except for the use of intravenous immunoglobulins administered shortly after SEB exposure. Intranasal SEB induces long-lasting lung injury which requires prolonged drug treatment. We investigated the effects of rapamycin, an immunosuppressive drug used to prevent graft rejection, by intranasal administration in a lethal mouse model of SEB-induced shock. The results show that intranasal rapamycin alone delivered as late as 17 h after SEB protected 100% of mice from lethal shock. Additionally, rapamycin diminished the weight loss and temperature fluctuations elicited by SEB. Intranasal rapamycin attenuated lung MCP-1, IL-2, IL-6, and IFNγ by 70%, 30%, 64%, and 68% respectively. Furthermore, short courses (three doses of rapamycin were sufficient to block SEB-induced shock. Intranasal rapamycin represents a novel use of an immunosuppressant targeting directly to site of toxin exposure, reducing dosages needed and allowing a wider therapeutic window.

  16. Combinatorial Antitumor Effect of Rapamycin and β-Elemene in Follicular Thyroid Cancer Cells

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    Jun Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. mTOR signaling would be a promising target for thyroid cancer therapy. However, in clinical trials, objective response rate with mTOR inhibitor monotherapy in most cancer types was modest. A new focus on development of combinatorial strategies with rapalogs is increasing. Objective. Investigating the combinatorial antitumor effect of rapamycin and β-elemene in follicular thyroid cancer cells. Methods. MTT assay was used to determine the FTC-133 cell proliferation after culturing with rapamycin and/or β-elemene. To analyze their combinatorial effect, immunoblotting was performed to analyze the activation status of AKT. Moreover, β-elemene attenuated rapamycin-induced immunosuppression was tested in mice. Results. Combination of rapamycin and β-elemene exerted significant synergistic antiproliferative effects in FTC-133 cell lines in vitro, based on inhibiting the AKT feedback activation induced by rapamycin. In vivo, the β-elemene could attenuate rapamycin-induced immunosuppression via reversing imbalance of Treg/Th17, with the underlying mechanism needed to be declared. Conclusions. We demonstrate that the novel combination of mTOR inhibitor with β-elemene synergistically attenuates tumor cell growth in follicular thyroid cancer, which requires additional preclinical validation.

  17. Rapamycin reversal of VEGF-C-driven lymphatic anomalies in the respiratory tract.

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    Baluk, Peter; Yao, Li-Chin; Flores, Julio C; Choi, Dongwon; Hong, Young-Kwon; McDonald, Donald M

    2017-08-17

    Lymphatic malformations are serious but poorly understood conditions that present therapeutic challenges. The goal of this study was to compare strategies for inducing regression of abnormal lymphatics and explore underlying mechanisms. CCSP-rtTA/tetO-VEGF-C mice, in which doxycycline regulates VEGF-C expression in the airway epithelium, were used as a model of pulmonary lymphangiectasia. After doxycycline was stopped, VEGF-C expression returned to normal, but lymphangiectasia persisted for at least 9 months. Inhibition of VEGFR-2/VEGFR-3 signaling, Notch, β-adrenergic receptors, or autophagy and antiinflammatory steroids had no noticeable effect on the amount or severity of lymphangiectasia. However, rapamycin inhibition of mTOR reduced lymphangiectasia by 76% within 7 days without affecting normal lymphatics. Efficacy of rapamycin was not increased by coadministration with the other agents. In prevention trials, rapamycin suppressed VEGF-C-driven mTOR phosphorylation and lymphatic endothelial cell sprouting and proliferation. However, in reversal trials, no lymphatic endothelial cell proliferation was present to block in established lymphangiectasia, and rapamycin did not increase caspase-dependent apoptosis. However, rapamycin potently suppressed Prox1 and VEGFR-3. These experiments revealed that lymphangiectasia is remarkably resistant to regression but is responsive to rapamycin, which rapidly reduces and normalizes the abnormal lymphatics without affecting normal lymphatics.

  18. Rapamycin Influences the Efficiency of Fertilization and Development in the Mouse: A Role for Autophagic Activation

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    Geun-Kyung Lee

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR regulates cellular processes such as cell growth, metabolism, transcription, translation, and autophagy. Rapamycin is a selective inhibitor of mTOR, and induces autophagy in various systems. Autophagy contributes to clearance and recycling of macromolecules and organelles in response to stress. We previously reported that vitrified-warmed mouse oocytes show acute increases in autophagy during warming, and suggested that it is a natural response to cold stress. In this follow-up study, we examined whether the modulation of autophagy influences survival, fertilization, and developmental rates of vitrified-warmed mouse oocytes. We used rapamycin to enhance autophagy in metaphase II (MII oocytes before and after vitrification. The oocytes were then subjected to in vitro fertilization (IVF. The fertilization and developmental rates of vitrified-warmed oocytes after rapamycin treatment were significantly lower than those for control groups. Modulation of autophagy with rapamycin treatment shows that rapamycin-induced autophagy exerts a negative influence on fertilization and development of vitrified-warmed oocytes.

  19. Rapamycin Regulates Bleomycin-Induced Lung Damage in SP-C-Deficient Mice

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    Satish K. Madala

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Injury to the distal respiratory epithelium has been implicated as an underlying cause of idiopathic lung diseases. Mutations that result in SP-C deficiencies are linked to a small subset of spontaneous and familial cases of interstitial lung disease (ILD and interstitial pulmonary fibrosis (IPF. Gene-targeted mice that lack SP-C (−/− develop an irregular ILD-like disease with age and are a model of the human SP-C related disease. In the current study, we investigated whether rapamycin could ameliorate bleomycin-induced fibrosis in the lungs of −/− mice. +/+ and −/− mice were exposed to bleomycin with either preventative administration of rapamycin or therapeutic administration beginning eight days after the bleomycin injury. Rapamycin-treatment increased weight loss and decreased survival of bleomycin-treated +/+ and −/− mice. Rapamycin did not reduce the fibrotic disease in the prophylactic or rescue experiments of either genotype of mice. Further, rapamycin treatment augmented airway resistance and reduced lung compliance of bleomycin-treated −/− mice. Rapamycin treatment was associated with an increased expression of profibrotic Th2 cytokines and reduced expression of INF-γ. These findings indicate that novel therapeutics will be required to treat individuals with SP-C deficient ILD/IPF.

  20. Targeting human medulloblastoma: oncolytic virotherapy with myxoma virus is enhanced by rapamycin.

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    Lun, Xue Qing; Zhou, Hongyuan; Alain, Tommy; Sun, Beichen; Wang, Limei; Barrett, John W; Stanford, Marianne M; McFadden, Grant; Bell, John; Senger, Donna L; Forsyth, Peter A

    2007-09-15

    We have shown previously the oncolytic potential of myxoma virus in a murine xenograft model of human glioma. Here, we show that myxoma virus used alone or in combination with rapamycin is effective and safe when used in experimental models of medulloblastoma in vitro and in vivo. Nine of 10 medulloblastoma cell lines tested were susceptible to lethal myxoma virus infection, and pretreatment of cells with rapamycin increased the extent of in vitro oncolysis. Intratumoral injection of live myxoma virus when compared with control inactivated virus prolonged survival in D341 and Daoy orthotopic human medulloblastoma xenograft mouse models [D341 median survival: 21 versus 12.5 days; P = 0.0008; Daoy median survival: not reached (three of five mice apparently "cured" after 223 days) versus 75 days; P = 0.0021]. Rapamycin increased the extent of viral oncolysis, "curing" most Daoy tumor-bearing mice and reducing or eliminating spinal cord and ventricle metastases. Rapamycin enhanced tumor-specific myxoma virus replication in vivo and prolonged survival of D341 tumor-bearing mice (median survival of mice treated with live virus (LV) and rapamycin, versus LV alone, versus rapamycin alone, versus inactivated virus: 25 days versus 19, 13, and 11 days, respectively; P myxoma virus oncolysis. These observations suggest that myxoma virus may be an effective oncolytic agent against medulloblastoma and that combination therapy with signaling inhibitors that modulate activity of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt pathway will further enhance the oncolytic potential of myxoma virus.

  1. Comparison of three rapamycin dosing schedules in A/J Tsc2+/- mice and improved survival with angiogenesis inhibitor or asparaginase treatment in mice with subcutaneous tuberous sclerosis related tumors

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    Dabora Sandra L

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tuberous Sclerosis Complex (TSC is an autosomal dominant tumor disorder characterized by the growth of hamartomas in various organs including the kidney, brain, skin, lungs, and heart. Rapamycin has been shown to reduce the size of kidney angiomyolipomas associated with TSC; however, tumor regression is incomplete and kidney angiomyolipomas regrow after cessation of treatment. Mouse models of TSC2 related tumors are useful for evaluating new approaches to drug therapy for TSC. Methods In cohorts of Tsc2+/- mice, we compared kidney cystadenoma severity in A/J and C57BL/6 mouse strains at both 9 and 12 months of age. We also investigated age related kidney tumor progression and compared three different rapamycin treatment schedules in cohorts of A/J Tsc2+/- mice. In addition, we used nude mice bearing Tsc2-/- subcutaneous tumors to evaluate the therapeutic utility of sunitinib, bevacizumab, vincristine, and asparaginase. Results TSC related kidney disease severity is 5-10 fold higher in A/J Tsc2+/- mice compared with C57BL/6 Tsc2+/- mice. Similar to kidney angiomyolipomas associated with TSC, the severity of kidney cystadenomas increases with age in A/J Tsc2+/- mice. When rapamycin dosing schedules were compared in A/J Tsc2+/- cohorts, we observed a 66% reduction in kidney tumor burden in mice treated daily for 4 weeks, an 82% reduction in mice treated daily for 4 weeks followed by weekly for 8 weeks, and an 81% reduction in mice treated weekly for 12 weeks. In the Tsc2-/- subcutaneous tumor mouse model, vincristine is not effective, but angiogenesis inhibitors (sunitinib and bevacizumab and asparaginase are effective as single agents. However, these drugs are not as effective as rapamycin in that they increased median survival only by 24-27%, while rapamycin increased median survival by 173%. Conclusions Our results indicate that the A/J Tsc2+/- mouse model is an improved, higher through-put mouse model for future TSC

  2. Target of rapamycin activation predicts lifespan in fruit flies.

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    Scialò, Filippo; Sriram, Ashwin; Naudí, Alba; Ayala, Victoria; Jové, Mariona; Pamplona, Reinald; Sanz, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Aging and age-related diseases are one of the most important health issues that the world will confront during the 21(st) century. Only by understanding the proximal causes will we be able to find treatments to reduce or delay the onset of degenerative diseases associated with aging. Currently, the prevalent paradigm in the field is the accumulation of damage. However, a new theory that proposes an alternative explanation is gaining momentum. The hyperfunction theory proposes that aging is not a consequence of a wear and tear process, but a result of the continuation of developmental programs during adulthood. Here we use Drosophila melanogaster, where evidence supporting both paradigms has been reported, to identify which parameters that have been previously related with lifespan best predict the rate of aging in wild type flies cultured at different temperatures. We find that mitochondrial function and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mtROS) generation correlates with metabolic rate, but not with the rate of aging. Importantly, we find that activation of nutrient sensing pathways (i.e. insulin-PI3K/Target of rapamycin (Tor) pathway) correlates with lifespan, but not with metabolic rate. Our results, dissociate metabolic rate and lifespan in wild type flies and instead link nutrient sensing signaling with longevity as predicted by the hyperfunction theory.

  3. Dysregulation of Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Signaling in Mouse Models of Autism.

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    Huber, Kimberly M; Klann, Eric; Costa-Mattioli, Mauro; Zukin, R Suzanne

    2015-10-14

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a central regulator of a diverse array of cellular processes, including cell growth, proliferation, autophagy, translation, and actin polymerization. Components of the mTOR cascade are present at synapses and influence synaptic plasticity and spine morphogenesis. A prevailing view is that the study of mTOR and its role in autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) will elucidate the molecular mechanisms by which mTOR regulates neuronal function under physiological and pathological conditions. Although many ASDs arise as a result of mutations in genes with multiple molecular functions, they appear to converge on common biological pathways that give rise to autism-relevant behaviors. Dysregulation of mTOR signaling has been identified as a phenotypic feature common to fragile X syndrome, tuberous sclerosis complex 1 and 2, neurofibromatosis 1, phosphatase and tensin homolog, and potentially Rett syndrome. Below are a summary of topics covered in a symposium that presents dysregulation of mTOR as a unifying theme in a subset of ASDs. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/3513836-07$15.00/0.

  4. [Effects of mTOR Inhibitor Rapamycin on Burkitt's Lymphoma Cells].

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    Zhou, Lun-Huan; Zhu, Xiong-Peng; Xiao, Hui-Fang; Xin, Peng-Liang; Li, Chun-Tuan

    2017-10-01

    To explore the effects of mTOR inhibitor rapamycin on proliferation, cell cycle and apoptosis of Burkitt's lymphoma cell line Raji and CA46 cells and its mechanism, so as to provide the experimental evidence for a therapeutic target of Burkitt's lymphoma. 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide(MTT) assay was performed to assess the inhibitory effect of rapamycin on proliferation of Burkitt's lymphoma cell line Raji and CA46 cells. The cell cycle distribution of Raji and CA46 cells was analyzed by flow cytometry with propidium iodide(PI) single staining. The cell apoptosis of Raji and CA46 cells was analyzed by flow cytometry with FITC Annexin V+PI double staining. The expressions of RPS6, p-RPS6, survivin and caspase-3 proteins were detected by Western blot after treating with rapamycin. Rapamycin markedly inhibited the proliferation of both Raji and CA46 cells in a time- and concentration-dependent manners, showing good biological activity, the cell proliferation inhibition rate reached about 20% after treatment with 1 nmol/L rapamycin. After treatment with different concentrations of rapamycin for 24 and 48 hours, the proportion of both cells in G1/G0 phase in the treated groups was significantly increased in a time- and concentration-dependent manners in comparison with the solvent control group. With regard to the cells in S and G2/M phase, the decreased population was accompanied by the increase of G1/G0 phase cells. After treatment with 100 nmol/L rapamycin for 48 hours, both Raji and CA46 cells demonstrated an apparent apoptosis,especially late apoptosis by flow cytometry with Annexin V+PI staining. After treatment with rapamycin, the expression of p-RPS6 and survivin of Raji and CA46 cells was obviously down-regulated, the expression of caspase-3 was obviously up-regulated in a time- and dose-dependent manners. However, rapamycin did not obviously affect the expression of RPS6. The rapamycin can effectively inhibit cell proliferation

  5. 4EBP-Dependent Signaling Supports West Nile Virus Growth and Protein Expression

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    Shives, Katherine D.; Massey, Aaron R.; May, Nicholas A.; Morrison, Thomas E.; Beckham, J. David

    2016-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) is a (+) sense, single-stranded RNA virus in the Flavivirus genus. WNV RNA possesses an m7GpppNm 5′ cap with 2′-O-methylation that mimics host mRNAs preventing innate immune detection and allowing the virus to translate its RNA genome through the utilization of cap-dependent translation initiation effectors in a wide variety of host species. Our prior work established the requirement of the host mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) for optimal WNV growth and protein expression; yet, the roles of the downstream effectors of mTORC1 in WNV translation are unknown. In this study, we utilize gene deletion mutants in the ribosomal protein kinase called S6 kinase (S6K) and eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E-binding protein (4EBP) pathways downstream of mTORC1 to define the role of mTOR-dependent translation initiation signals in WNV gene expression and growth. We now show that WNV growth and protein expression are dependent on mTORC1 mediated-regulation of the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E-binding protein/eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E-binding protein (4EBP/eIF4E) interaction and eukaryotic initiation factor 4F (eIF4F) complex formation to support viral growth and viral protein expression. We also show that the canonical signals of mTORC1 activation including ribosomal protein s6 (rpS6) and S6K phosphorylation are not required for WNV growth in these same conditions. Our data suggest that the mTORC1/4EBP/eIF4E signaling axis is activated to support the translation of the WNV genome. PMID:27763553

  6. 4EBP-Dependent Signaling Supports West Nile Virus Growth and Protein Expression

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    Katherine D. Shives

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available West Nile virus (WNV is a (+ sense, single-stranded RNA virus in the Flavivirus genus. WNV RNA possesses an m7GpppNm 5′ cap with 2′-O-methylation that mimics host mRNAs preventing innate immune detection and allowing the virus to translate its RNA genome through the utilization of cap-dependent translation initiation effectors in a wide variety of host species. Our prior work established the requirement of the host mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1 for optimal WNV growth and protein expression; yet, the roles of the downstream effectors of mTORC1 in WNV translation are unknown. In this study, we utilize gene deletion mutants in the ribosomal protein kinase called S6 kinase (S6K and eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E-binding protein (4EBP pathways downstream of mTORC1 to define the role of mTOR-dependent translation initiation signals in WNV gene expression and growth. We now show that WNV growth and protein expression are dependent on mTORC1 mediated-regulation of the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E-binding protein/eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E-binding protein (4EBP/eIF4E interaction and eukaryotic initiation factor 4F (eIF4F complex formation to support viral growth and viral protein expression. We also show that the canonical signals of mTORC1 activation including ribosomal protein s6 (rpS6 and S6K phosphorylation are not required for WNV growth in these same conditions. Our data suggest that the mTORC1/4EBP/eIF4E signaling axis is activated to support the translation of the WNV genome.

  7. 4EBP-Dependent Signaling Supports West Nile Virus Growth and Protein Expression.

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    Shives, Katherine D; Massey, Aaron R; May, Nicholas A; Morrison, Thomas E; Beckham, J David

    2016-10-18

    West Nile virus (WNV) is a (+) sense, single-stranded RNA virus in the Flavivirus genus. WNV RNA possesses an m7GpppNm 5' cap with 2'-O-methylation that mimics host mRNAs preventing innate immune detection and allowing the virus to translate its RNA genome through the utilization of cap-dependent translation initiation effectors in a wide variety of host species. Our prior work established the requirement of the host mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) for optimal WNV growth and protein expression; yet, the roles of the downstream effectors of mTORC1 in WNV translation are unknown. In this study, we utilize gene deletion mutants in the ribosomal protein kinase called S6 kinase (S6K) and eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E-binding protein (4EBP) pathways downstream of mTORC1 to define the role of mTOR-dependent translation initiation signals in WNV gene expression and growth. We now show that WNV growth and protein expression are dependent on mTORC1 mediated-regulation of the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E-binding protein/eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E-binding protein (4EBP/eIF4E) interaction and eukaryotic initiation factor 4F (eIF4F) complex formation to support viral growth and viral protein expression. We also show that the canonical signals of mTORC1 activation including ribosomal protein s6 (rpS6) and S6K phosphorylation are not required for WNV growth in these same conditions. Our data suggest that the mTORC1/4EBP/eIF4E signaling axis is activated to support the translation of the WNV genome.

  8. mTOR activation is a biomarker and a central pathway to autoimmune disorders, cancer, obesity, and aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perl, Andras

    2015-06-01

    The mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a ubiquitous serine/threonine kinase, which plays pivotal roles in integrating growth signals on a cellular level. To support proliferation and survival under stress, two interacting complexes that harbor mTOR, mTORC1 and mTORC2, promote the transcription of genes involved in carbohydrate metabolism and lipogenesis, enhance protein translation, and inhibit autophagy. Although rapamycin was originally developed as an inhibitor of T cell proliferation for preventing organ transplant rejection, its molecular target, mTOR, has been subsequently identified as a central regulator of metabolic cues that drive lineage specification in the immune system. Owing to oxidative stress, the activation of mTORC1 has emerged as a central pathway for the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus and other autoimmune diseases. Paradoxically, mTORC1 has also been identified as a mediator of the Warburg effect that allows cell survival under hypoxia. Rapamycin and new classes of mTOR inhibitors are being developed to block not only transplant rejection and autoimmunity but also to treat obesity and various forms of cancer. Through preventing these diseases, personalized mTOR blockade holds promise to extend life span. © 2015 New York Academy of Sciences.

  9. Conditional ablation of Raptor in the male germline causes infertility due to meiotic arrest and impaired inactivation of sex chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Mengneng; Zhu, Zhiping; Tian, Suwen; Zhu, Ruping; Bai, Shun; Fu, Kaiqiang; Davis, James G; Sun, Zheng; Baur, Joseph A; Zheng, Ke; Ye, Lan

    2017-09-01

    Rapamycin is a clinically important drug that is used in transplantation and cancer therapy but which causes a number of side effects, including male infertility. Its canonical target, mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), plays a key role in metabolism and binds chromatin; however, its precise role in the male germline has not been elucidated. Here, we inactivate the core component, Raptor, to show that mTORC1 function is critical for male meiosis and the inactivation of sex chromosomes. Disruption of the Raptor gene impairs chromosomal synapsis and prevents the efficient spreading of silencing factors into the XY chromatin. Accordingly, mRNA for XY-linked genes remains inappropriately expressed in Raptor-deficient mice. Molecularly, the failure to suppress gene expression corresponded with deficiencies in 2 repressive chromatin markers, H3K9 dimethylation and H3K9 trimethylation, in the XY body. Together, these results demonstrate that mTORC1 has an essential role in the meiotic progression and silencing of sex chromosomes in the male germline, which may explain the infertility that has been associated with such inhibitors as rapamycin.-Xiong, M., Zhu, Z., Tian, S., Zhu, R., Bai, S., Fu, K., Davis, J. G., Sun, Z., Baur, J. A., Zheng, K., Ye, L. Conditional ablation of Raptor in the male germline causes infertility due to meiotic arrest and impaired inactivation of sex chromosomes. © FASEB.

  10. Delayed and short course of rapamycin prevents organ rejection after allogeneic liver transplantation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdani, Salim; Thiolat, Allan; Naserian, Sina; Grondin, Cynthia; Moutereau, Stéphane; Hulin, Anne; Calderaro, Julien; Grimbert, Philippe; Cohen, José Laurent; Azoulay, Daniel; Pilon, Caroline

    2017-10-14

    To test whether a delayed and short course of rapamycin would induce immunosuppressive effects following allogeneic orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) in rats. Allogeneic OLTs were performed using Dark Agouti livers transplanted into Lewis recipients, and syngeneic OLTs were performed using the Lewis rat strain. Rapamycin (1 mg/kg per day) was administered by gavage from day 4 to day 11 post-transplantation. Lymphocyte cellular compartments were analyzed by flow cytometry in draining lymph nodes, non-draining lymph nodes and the spleen at days 11 and 42 in rapamycin-treated rats, untreated control rats and syngeneic grafted rats. Skin grafts from Dark agouti or from F344 RT were performed at day 30 on liver grafted rats treated with rapamycin. An 8-d course of rapamycin treatment initiated 4 d following transplantation resulted in the survival of grafted rats for more than 100 d. In contrast, untreated rats died of liver failure within 13 to 21 d. The analysis of the cellular compartment revealed an increase in two cellular subpopulations, specifically myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) and CD8+CD45RClow T cells, without major modifications in the regulatory T cell (Treg) compartment in treated rats in the early stages after grafting. We evaluated the ability of treated rats to reject third-party allogeneic skin grafts to confirm their immune competence. In contrast, when skin was collected from rats syngeneic to the grafted liver, it was not rejected. Our results demonstrate that short and delayed rapamycin treatment allows for tolerance in allogeneic OLT. The results also allowed for the identification of the mechanisms of tolerance induced by rapamycin by identifying MDSCs and CD8+CD45RClow T cells as associated with the state of tolerance.

  11. Rapamycin is highly effective in murine models of immune-mediated bone marrow failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xingmin; Lin, Zenghua; Sun, Wanling; Hollinger, Maile K; Desierto, Marie J; Keyvanfar, Keyvan; Malide, Daniela; Muranski, Pawel; Chen, Jichun; Young, Neal S

    2017-10-01

    Acquired aplastic anemia, the prototypical bone marrow failure disease, is characterized by pancytopenia and marrow hypoplasia. Most aplastic anemia patients respond to immunosuppressive therapy, usually with anti-thymocyte globulin and cyclosporine, but some relapse on cyclosporine withdrawal or require long-term administration of cyclosporine to maintain blood counts. In this study, we tested efficacy of rapamycin as a new or alternative treatment in mouse models of immune-mediated bone marrow failure. Rapamycin ameliorated pancytopenia, improved bone marrow cellularity, and extended animal survival in a manner comparable to the standard dose of cyclosporine. Rapamycin effectively reduced Th1 inflammatory cytokines interferon-γ and tumor necrosis factor-α, increased the Th2 cytokine interleukin-10, stimulated expansion of functional regulatory T cells, eliminated effector CD8+ T cells (notably T cells specific to target cells bearing minor histocompatibility antigen H60), and preserved hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Rapamycin, but not cyclosporine, reduced the proportion of memory and effector T cells and maintained a pool of naïve T cells. Cyclosporine increased cytoplasmic nuclear factor of activated T-cells-1 following T-cell receptor stimulation, whereas rapamycin suppressed phosphorylation of two key signaling molecules in the mammalian target of rapamycin pathway, S6 kinase and protein kinase B. In summary, rapamycin was an effective therapy in mouse models of immune-mediated bone marrow failure, acting through different mechanisms to cyclosporine. Its specific expansion of regulatory T cells and elimination of clonogenic CD8+ effectors support its potential clinical utility in the treatment of aplastic anemia. Copyright© 2017 Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  12. Complexity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rahul Pandit

    2008-10-31

    Oct 31, 2008 ... ”The more complex a thing is, the more you can talk about it.” - attributed to Giorgio Parisi. ▻ ”C'est magnifique, mais ce n'est pas de la science.” (It is magnificent, but not all of it is science.) - attributed ... Earliest examples: theoretical computer science, algorithmic complexity, etc. ▻ Rapid progress after the ...

  13. Effects of Cyclosporine, Tacrolimus, and Rapamycin on Osteoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Fernández, M; Rubert, M; Montero, M; de la Piedra, C

    2017-11-01

    One factor that can contribute to severe bone loss after transplantation is the direct action of immunosuppressants on bone cells. The aim of this work was to study the effects of cyclosporine (CsA), tacrolimus (FK-506), and rapamycin (RAPA) on the release of three local factors directly implicated in bone-remodeling regulation and apoptosis of human osteoblasts: interleukin (IL)-6, osteoprotegerin, and receptor activator of nuclear factor κβ (RANKL). Human osteoblasts were obtained from five different patients who underwent orthopedic surgery. These cells were treated with what are considered to be a clinically high dose and an acceptable dose of each immunosuppressant-RAPA 50 ng/mL and 12 ng/mL, FK-506 20 ng/mL and 5 ng/mL, CsA 1000 ng/mL and 250 ng/mL-or vehicle. Apoptotic cell death was quantified using flow cytometry of DNA content in permeabilized, propidium iodide-stained cells. IL-6 was measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA; Quantikine Human IL6, R&D Systems, Minneapolis, Minn, United States). Messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of osteoprotegerin, RANKL, and IL-6 was measured using quantitative RT-PCR. A significant increase in IL-6 (mRNA and released protein) was observed in the presence of FK-506 and RAPA. Addition of RAPA to the cultures of osteoblasts produced a significant increase in the OPG/RANKL ratio. A significant increase in osteoblast apoptosis was observed in the cells treated with FK-506 and RAPA 24 hours after the addition of immunosuppressants. CsA did not produce any significant changes in osteoblasts. These results suggest that an increase in osteoblast apoptosis by osteoblasts may be one of the mechanisms by which bone loss occurs after RAPA and FK-506 treatments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Exercise, Amino Acids and Aging in the Control of Human Muscle Protein Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Dillon K.; Dickinson, Jared M.; Timmerman, Kyle L.; Drummond, Micah J.; Reidy, Paul T.; Fry, Christopher S.; Gundermann, David M.; Rasmussen, Blake B.

    2012-01-01

    In this review we discuss recent research in the field of human skeletal muscle protein metabolism characterizing the acute regulation of mammalian target of rapamycin complex (mTORC) 1 signaling and muscle protein synthesis (MPS) by exercise, amino acid nutrition and aging. Resistance exercise performed in the fasted state stimulates mixed MPS within 1 h post-exercise, which can remain elevated for 48 h. We demonstrate that the activation of mTORC1 signaling (and subsequently enhanced translation initiation) is required for the contraction-induced increase in MPS. In comparison, low-intensity blood flow restriction (BFR) exercise stimulates MPS and mTORC1 signaling to an extent similar to traditional, high-intensity resistance exercise. We also show that mTORC1 signaling is required for the essential amino acid (EAA) induced increase in MPS. Ingestion of EAAs (or protein) shortly following resistance exercise enhances MPS and mTORC1 signaling as compared to resistance exercise or EAAs alone. In older adults, the ability of skeletal muscle to respond to anabolic stimuli is impaired. For example, in response to an acute bout of resistance exercise, older adults are less able to activate mTORC1 or increase MPS during the first 24h of post-exercise recovery. However, BFR exercise can overcome this impairment. Aging is not associated with a reduced response to EAAs provided the EAA content is sufficient. Therefore, we propose that exercise combined with EAA should be effective not only in improving muscle repair and growth in response to training in athletes, but that strategies such as EAA combined with resistance exercise (or BFR exercise) may be very useful as a countermeasure for sarcopenia and other clinical conditions associated with muscle wasting. PMID:21606874

  15. Serine 302 Phosphorylation of Mouse Insulin Receptor Substrate 1 (IRS1) Is Dispensable for Normal Insulin Signaling and Feedback Regulation by Hepatic S6 Kinase*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copps, Kyle D.; Hançer, Nancy J.; Qiu, Wei; White, Morris F.

    2016-01-01

    Constitutive activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 and S6 kinase (mTORC1→ S6K) attenuates insulin-stimulated Akt activity in certain tumors in part through “feedback” phosphorylation of the upstream insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1). However, the significance of this mechanism for regulating insulin sensitivity in normal tissue remains unclear. We investigated the function of Ser-302 in mouse IRS1, the major site of its phosphorylation by S6K in vitro, through genetic knock-in of a serine-to-alanine mutation (A302). Although insulin rapidly stimulated feedback phosphorylation of Ser-302 in mouse liver and muscle, homozygous A302 mice (A/A) and their knock-in controls (S/S) exhibited similar glucose homeostasis and muscle insulin signaling. Furthermore, both A302 and control primary hepatocytes from which Irs2 was deleted showed marked inhibition of insulin-stimulated IRS1 tyrosine phosphorylation and PI3K binding after emetine treatment to raise intracellular amino acids and activate mTORC1 → S6K signaling. To specifically activate mTORC1 in mouse tissue, we deleted hepatic Tsc1 using Cre adenovirus. Although it moderately decreased IRS1/PI3K association and Akt phosphorylation in liver, Tsc1 deletion failed to cause glucose intolerance or promote hyperinsulinemia in mixed background A/A or S/S mice. Moreover, Tsc1 deletion failed to stimulate phospho-Ser-302 or other putative S6K sites within IRS1, whereas ribosomal S6 protein was constitutively phosphorylated. Following acute Tsc1 deletion from hepatocytes, Akt phosphorylation, but not IRS1/PI3K association, was rapidly restored by treatment with the mTORC1 inhibitor rapamycin. Thus, within the hepatic compartment, mTORC1 → S6K signaling regulates Akt largely through IRS-independent means with little effect upon physiologic insulin sensitivity. PMID:26846849

  16. Rapamycin-induced autophagy restricts porcine epidemic diarrhea virus infectivity in porcine intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Seongyeol; Gu, Min Jeong; Kim, Cheol Gyun; Kye, Yoon Chul; Lim, Younggap; Lee, Ji Eun; Park, Byung-Chul; Chu, Hyuk; Han, Seung Hyun; Yun, Cheol-Heui

    2017-10-01

    Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) invades porcine intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) and causes diarrhea and dehydration in pigs. In the present study, we showed a suppression of PEDV infection in porcine jejunum intestinal epithelial cells (IPEC-J2) by an increase in autophagy. Autophagy was activated by rapamycin at a dose that does not affect cell viability and tight junction permeability. The induction of autophagy was examined by LC3I/LC3II conversion. To confirm the autophagic-flux (entire autophagy pathway), autophagolysosomes were examined by an immunofluorescence assay. Pre-treatment with rapamycin significantly restricted not only a 1 h infection but also a longer infection (24 h) with PEDV, while this effect disappeared when autophagy was blocked. Co-localization of PEDV and autophagosomes suggests that PEDV could be a target of autophagy. Moreover, alleviation of PEDV-induced cell death in IPEC-J2 cells pretreated with rapamycin demonstrates a protective effect of rapamycin against PEDV-induced epithelial cell death. Collectively, the present study suggests an early prevention against PEDV infection in IPEC-J2 cells via autophagy that might be an effective strategy for the restriction of PEDV, and opens up the possibility of the use of rapamycin in vivo as an effective prophylactic and prevention treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Covalent modification of pericardial patches for sustained rapamycin delivery inhibits venous neointimal hyperplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Hualong; Lee, Jung Seok; Chen, Elizabeth; Wang, Mo; Xing, Ying; Fahmy, Tarek M.; Dardik, Alan

    2017-01-01

    Prosthetic grafts and patches are commonly used in cardiovascular surgery, however neointimal hyperplasia remains a significant concern, especially under low flow conditions. We hypothesized that delivery of rapamycin from nanoparticles (NP) covalently attached to patches allows sustained site-specific delivery of therapeutic agents targeted to inhibit localized neointimal hyperplasia. NP were covalently linked to pericardial patches using EDC/NHS chemistry and could deliver at least 360 ng rapamycin per patch without detectable rapamycin in serum; nanoparticles were detectable in the liver, kidney and spleen but no other sites within 24 hours. In a rat venous patch angioplasty model, control patches developed robust neointimal hyperplasia on the patch luminal surface characterized by Eph-B4-positive endothelium and underlying SMC and infiltrating cells such as macrophages and leukocytes. Patches delivering rapamycin developed less neointimal hyperplasia, less smooth muscle cell proliferation, and had fewer infiltrating cells but retained endothelialization. NP covalently linked to pericardial patches are a novel composite delivery system that allows sustained site-specific delivery of therapeutics; NP delivering rapamycin inhibit patch neointimal hyperplasia. NP linked to patches may represent a next generation of tissue engineered cardiovascular implants.

  18. E-selectin targeted immunoliposomes for rapamycin delivery to activated endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholizadeh, Shima; Visweswaran, Ganesh Ram R; Storm, Gert; Hennink, Wim E; Kamps, Jan A A M; Kok, Robbert J

    2017-10-13

    Activated endothelial cells play a pivotal role in the pathology of inflammatory disorders and thus present a target for therapeutic intervention by drugs that intervene in inflammatory signaling cascades, such as rapamycin (mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor). In this study we developed anti-E-selectin immunoliposomes for targeted delivery to E-selectin over-expressing tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) activated endothelial cells. Liposomes composed of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3.;hosphocholine (DPPC), Cholesterol, and 1,2-Distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-N-[methoxy(polyethyleneglycol)-2000]-maleimide (DSPE-PEG-Mal) were loaded with rapamycin via lipid film hydration, after which they were further functionalized by coupling N-succinimidyl-S-acetylthioacetate (SATA)-modified mouse anti human E-selectin antibodies to the distal ends of the maleimidyl (Mal)-PEG groups. In cell binding assays, these immunoliposomes bound specifically to TNF-α activated endothelial cells. Upon internalization, rapamycin loaded immunoliposomes inhibited proliferation and migration of endothelial cells, as well as expression of inflammatory mediators. Our findings demonstrate that rapamycin-loaded immunoliposomes can specifically inhibit inflammatory responses in inflamed endothelial cells. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Rapamycin increases oxidative stress response gene expression in adult stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kofman, Amber E.; McGraw, Margeaux R.; Payne, Christopher J.

    2012-01-01

    Balancing quiescence with proliferation is of paramount importance for adult stem cells in order to avoid hyperproliferation and cell depletion. In some models, stem cell exhaustion may be reversed with the drug rapamycin, which was shown can suppress cellular senescence in vitro and extend lifespan in animals. We hypothesized that rapamycin increases the expression of oxidative stress response genes in adult stem cells, and that these gene activities diminish with age. To test our hypothesis, we exposed mice to rapamycin and then examined the transcriptome of their spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs). Gene expression microarray analysis revealed that numerous oxidative stress response genes were upregulated upon rapamycin treatment, including superoxide dismutase 1, glutathione reductase, and delta-aminolevulinate dehydratase. When we examined the expression of these genes in 55-week-old wild type SSCs, their levels were significantly reduced compared to 3-week-old SSCs, suggesting that their downregulation is coincident with the aging process in adult stem cells. We conclude that rapamycin-induced stimulation of oxidative stress response genes may promote cellular longevity in SSCs, while a decline in gene expression in aged stem cells could reflect the SSCs' diminished potential to alleviate oxidative stress, a hallmark of aging. PMID:22529334

  20. Mechanisms of neurocognitive dysfunction and therapeutic considerations in tuberous sclerosis complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Peter; Sahin, Mustafa

    2011-04-01

    Mendelian disorders that affect cognition provide a unique opportunity to study the mechanisms of neurodevelopmental disorders through the examination of genetic defects in animals and development of hypotheses that can be tested in human beings. Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is a genetic disease that presents with epilepsy, autism, and intellectual disability. Here we review recent advances in our understanding of TSC pathogenesis and signaling pathways that may be modulated to treat the neurological symptoms. Accumulating evidence suggests that TSC patients have nontuber abnormalities that contribute to the development of the neurological phenotype- in particular, disorganization of axon tracts and deficient myelination. TSC mouse models have failed to replicate the human neuropathology entirely, but have shed light on the cellular abnormalities and the neurobehavioral phenotypes. Most importantly, cell culture and animal models have identified the mTORC1 pathway as a therapeutic target in this disease. Preclinical data strongly suggest that TSC is a disease of abnormal neuronal connectivity. The high incidence of neurodevelopmental deficits, early detection of the disease in very young ages, and availability of mTORC1 inhibitors make TSC a model for other Mendelian disorders of neurocognition and an avenue for the mechanism-based treatment trials of neurodevelopmental disorders.

  1. Transcriptional Profiling of Rapamycin-Treated Fibroblasts From Hypertrophic and Keloid Scars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Victor W.; You, Fanglei; Januszyk, Michael; Gurtner, Geoffrey C.; Kuang, Anna A.

    2016-01-01

    Excess scar formation after cutaneous injury can result in hypertrophic scar (HTS) or keloid formation. Modern strategies to treat pathologic scarring represent nontargeted approaches that produce suboptimal results. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), a central mediator of inflammation, has been proposed as a novel target to block fibroproliferation. To examine its mechanism of action, we performed genomewide microarray on human fibroblasts (from normal skin, HTS, and keloid scars) treated with the mTOR inhibitor, rapamycin. Hypertrophic scar and keloid fibroblasts demonstrated overexpression of collagen I and III that was effectively abrogated with rapamycin. Blockade of mTOR specifically impaired fibroblast expression of the collagen biosynthesis genes PLOD, PCOLCE, and P4HA, targets significantly overexpressed in HTS and keloid scars. These data suggest that pathologic scarring can be abrogated via modulation of mTOR pathways in procollagen and collagen processing. PMID:24835866

  2. Mood-stabilizing effects of rapamycin and its analog temsirolimus: relevance to autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kara, Nirit Z; Flaisher-Grinberg, Shlomit; Anderson, Grant W; Agam, Galila; Einat, Haim

    2017-08-02

    Accumulated data support a relationship between mood disorders and cellular plasticity and resilience, some suggesting relevance to autophagy. Our previous data show that pharmacological enhancement of autophagy results in antidepressant-like effects in mice. The current study was designed to further examine the effects of autophagy enhancement on mood by testing the effects of subchronic treatment with the mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors and autophagy enhancers rapamycin and temsirolimus in a model for mania and in a model for antidepressant action, respectively. The results show that rapamycin reduced mania-like aggression and reward-seeking behaviors, with no effects on locomotion. Temsirolimus reduced depression-related immobility in the forced-swim test without effects on locomotion in the open field or on anxiety-related measures in the elevated plus maze. Taken together with our previous findings, these data support the notion that enhancing autophagy may have mood-stabilizing effects.

  3. Positively charged amphiphilic chitosan derivative for the transscleral delivery of rapamycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsaid, Naba; Jackson, Timothy L; Gunic, Mirza; Somavarapu, Satyanarayana

    2012-12-13

    We explored the potential of an amphiphilic chitosan derivative to facilitate the transscleral delivery of rapamycin, a potential multitherapeutic agent with poor water solubility. The amphiphilic chitosan derivative, O-octanoyl-chitosan-polyethylene glycol (OChiPEG) graft copolymer, was analyzed using Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). OChiPEG micelles were prepared via the thin film method and characterized for their size using dynamic light scattering (DLS), zeta potential using laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV), morphology using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), drug entrapment efficiency (EE), and drug loading (DL) efficiency using reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC), critical micelle concentration (CMC) using spectrofluorometry, and thermal properties using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and x-ray powder diffraction (XRPD). Scleral permeation and retention of rapamycin from the drug-loaded micelles were determined in porcine sclera clamped in Ussing chambers, using RP-HPLC. Conjugation of hydrophilic and hydrophobic groups to chitosan was confirmed using FT-IR. Rapamycin-loaded micelles of particle size 40.6 nm and zeta potential + 6.84 mV were prepared successfully. These carriers exhibited a high EE and DL of 85.6 and 16.3%, respectively, and a CMC of 16.6 μM. OChiPEG micelles showed a high rapamycin scleral retention (14.8 ± 0.81 μg/g) with successful transscleral permeation (5.57 ± 1.04 × 10(-8) cm(2) · s(-1)). Positively charged OChiPEG micelles loaded with rapamycin were prepared successfully. These showed a high scleral retention and successful permeation of rapamycin, and therefore may be useful for the topical delivery of other hydrophobic agents.

  4. Rapamycin inhibits IGF-1 stimulated cell motility through PP2A pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Liu

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Serine/threonine (Ser/Thr protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A has been implicated as a novel component of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR signaling pathway. Recently we have demonstrated that mTOR regulates cell motility in part through p70 S6 kinase 1 (S6K1 and eukaryotic initiation factor 4E (eIF4E binding protein 1 (4E-BP1 pathways. Little is known about the role of PP2A in the mTOR-mediated cell motility. Here we show that rapamycin inhibited the basal or insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1-induced motility of human Ewing sarcoma (Rh1 and rhabdomyosarcoma (Rh30 cells. Treatment of the cells with rapamycin activated PP2A activity, and concurrently inhibited IGF-1 stimulated phosphorylation of Erk1/2. Inhibition of Erk1/2 with PD98059 did not significantly affect the basal mobility of the cells, but dramatically inhibited IGF-1-induced cell motility. Furthermore, inhibition of PP2A with okadaic acid significantly attenuated the inhibitory effect of rapamycin on IGF-1-stimulated phosphorylation of Erk1/2 as well as cell motility. Consistently, expression of dominant negative PP2A conferred resistance to IGF-1-stimulated phosphorylation of Erk1/2 and cell motility. Expression of constitutively active MKK1 also attenuated rapamycin inhibition of IGF-1-stimulated phosphorylation of Erk1/2 and cell motility. The results suggest that rapamycin inhibits cell motility, in part by targeting PP2A-Erk1/2 pathway.

  5. Rapamycin facilitates fracture healing through inducing cell autophagy and suppressing cell apoptosis in bone tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Z-Y; Yin, J; Huo, Y-F; Yu, J; Sheng, L-X; Dong, Y-F

    2017-11-01

    To investigate the changes in cell autophagy and the molecular mechanism of rapamycin affecting the fracture healing. Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were used to establish the right femoral shaft fracture models, and then underwent immunofluorescence assay to detect the autophagy level in bone tissues. After model establishment, SD rats were divided into two groups, the control group and the rapamycin group (1 mg/kg/d). Respectively, at the 2nd, 4th, and 6th week, rats were randomly selected from each group for X-ray and Micro-computed tomography (Micro-CT) examinations to determine callus growth, immunofluorescence assay to detect the protein expression of light chain 3 II (LC3 II), immunohistochemistry to evaluate the autophagy level through detecting the expression of Beclin1 in rats, Western blotting assay to detect cell apoptosis in tissues, hematoxylin and eosin staining (HE staining) to evaluate the osteoblastic activity through count of osteoblast in bone tissue at the end of fracture, and measure the expression of vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGF). Significant increases were seen in protein expression of cells in bone tissues at the end of fracture. In rapamycin group, callus formation and calcification level in rats were all higher than those in control group; compared with control group, for rats in rapamycin group, cell autophagy was significantly elevated in bone tissues, while cell apoptosis at the end of fracture was reduced with a significant increase in osteoblastic activity. The expression of VEGF in rapamycin group was higher than that in control group. Rapamycin can facilitate fracture healing through inducing cell apoptosis and suppressing cell apoptosis in bone tissues.

  6. The rapamycin-regulated gene expression signature determines prognosis for breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsavachidis Spiridon

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR is a serine/threonine kinase involved in multiple intracellular signaling pathways promoting tumor growth. mTOR is aberrantly activated in a significant portion of breast cancers and is a promising target for treatment. Rapamycin and its analogues are in clinical trials for breast cancer treatment. Patterns of gene expression (metagenes may also be used to simulate a biologic process or effects of a drug treatment. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that the gene-expression signature regulated by rapamycin could predict disease outcome for patients with breast cancer. Results Colony formation and sulforhodamine B (IC50 in vitro and in vivo gene expression data identified a signature, termed rapamycin metagene index (RMI, of 31 genes upregulated by rapamycin treatment in vitro as well as in vivo (false discovery rate of 10%. In the Miller dataset, RMI did not correlate with tumor size or lymph node status. High (>75th percentile RMI was significantly associated with longer survival (P = 0.015. On multivariate analysis, RMI (P = 0.029, tumor size (P = 0.015 and lymph node status (P = 0.001 were prognostic. In van 't Veer study, RMI was not associated with the time to develop distant metastasis (P = 0.41. In the Wang dataset, RMI predicted time to disease relapse (P = 0.009. Conclusion Rapamycin-regulated gene expression signature predicts clinical outcome in breast cancer. This supports the central role of mTOR signaling in breast cancer biology and provides further impetus to pursue mTOR-targeted therapies for breast cancer treatment.

  7. Nuclear PIM1 confers resistance to rapamycin-impaired endothelial proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walpen, Thomas; Kalus, Ina [Research Unit, Division Internal Medicine, University Hospital Zuerich, 8091 Zuerich (Switzerland); Schwaller, Juerg [Department of Biomedicine, University of Basel, 4031 Basel (Switzerland); Peier, Martin A. [Research Unit, Division Internal Medicine, University Hospital Zuerich, 8091 Zuerich (Switzerland); Battegay, Edouard J. [Research Unit, Division Internal Medicine, University Hospital Zuerich, 8091 Zuerich (Switzerland); Zurich Center for Integrative Human Physiology (ZIHP), 8057 Zuerich (Switzerland); Humar, Rok, E-mail: Rok.Humar@usz.ch [Research Unit, Division Internal Medicine, University Hospital Zuerich, 8091 Zuerich (Switzerland); Zurich Center for Integrative Human Physiology (ZIHP), 8057 Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2012-12-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pim1{sup -/-} endothelial cell proliferation displays increased sensitivity to rapamycin. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer mTOR inhibition by rapamycin enhances PIM1 cytosolic and nuclear protein levels. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Truncation of Pim1 beyond serine 276 results in nuclear localization of the kinase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nuclear PIM1 increases endothelial proliferation independent of rapamycin. -- Abstract: The PIM serine/threonine kinases and the mTOR/AKT pathway integrate growth factor signaling and promote cell proliferation and survival. They both share phosphorylation targets and have overlapping functions, which can partially substitute for each other. In cancer cells PIM kinases have been reported to produce resistance to mTOR inhibition by rapamycin. Tumor growth depends highly on blood vessel infiltration into the malignant tissue and therefore on endothelial cell proliferation. We therefore investigated how the PIM1 kinase modulates growth inhibitory effects of rapamycin in mouse aortic endothelial cells (MAEC). We found that proliferation of MAEC lacking Pim1 was significantly more sensitive to rapamycin inhibition, compared to wildtype cells. Inhibition of mTOR and AKT in normal MAEC resulted in significantly elevated PIM1 protein levels in the cytosol and in the nucleus. We observed that truncation of the C-terminal part of Pim1 beyond Ser 276 resulted in almost exclusive nuclear localization of the protein. Re-expression of this Pim1 deletion mutant significantly increased the proliferation of Pim1{sup -/-} cells when compared to expression of the wildtype Pim1 cDNA. Finally, overexpression of the nuclear localization mutant and the wildtype Pim1 resulted in complete resistance to growth inhibition by rapamycin. Thus, mTOR inhibition-induced nuclear accumulation of PIM1 or expression of a nuclear C-terminal PIM1 truncation mutant is sufficient to increase endothelial cell proliferation

  8. Convergence of Ubiquitylation and Phosphorylation Signaling in Rapamycin-Treated Yeast Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iesmantavicius, Vytautas; Weinert, Brian Tate; Choudhary, Chuna Ram

    2014-01-01

    for reduced ubiquitylation and reduced protein abundance. The convergence of multiple proteome-level changes on the Rsp5 system indicates a key role of this pathway in the response to rapamycin treatment. Collectively, these data reveal new insights into the global proteome dynamics in response to rapamycin...... treatment and provide a first detailed view of the co-regulation of phosphorylation and ubiquitylation-dependent signaling networks by this compound......., and vesicle trafficking. TOR regulates cellular physiology by modulating phosphorylation and ubiquitylation signaling networks, however, the global scope of such regulation is not fully known. Here, we used mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics approach for the parallel quantification of ubiquitylation...

  9. Synergistic antitumor activity of rapamycin and EF24 via increasing ROS for the treatment of gastric cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiqian Chen

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Mechanistic/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR has emerged as a new potential therapeutic target for gastric cancer. Rapamycin and rapamycin analogs are undergoing clinical trials and have produced clinical responses in a subgroup of cancer patients. However, monotherapy with rapamycin at safe dosage fails to induce cell apoptosis and tumor regression which has hampered its clinical application. This has led to the exploration of more effective combinatorial regimens to enhance the effectiveness of rapamycin. In our present study, we have investigated the combination of rapamycin and a reactive oxygen species (ROS inducer EF24 in gastric cancer. We show that rapamycin increases intracellular ROS levels and displays selective synergistic antitumor activity with EF24 in gastric cancer cells. This activity was mediated through the activation of c-Jun N terminal kinase and endoplasmic reticulum stress (ER pathways in cancer cells. We also show that inhibiting ROS accumulation reverses ER stress and prevents apoptosis induced by the combination of rapamycin and EF24. These mechanisms were confirmed using human gastric cancer xenografts in immunodeficient mice. Taken together, our work provides a novel therapeutic strategy for the treatment of gastric cancer. The work reveals that ROS generation could be an important target for the development of new combination therapies for cancer treatment.

  10. Acne: risk indicator for increased body mass index and insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnik, Bodo C; John, Swen Malte; Plewig, Gerd

    2013-11-01

    Acne appears to represent a visible indicator disease of over-activated mTORC1 signalling, an unfavour-able metabolic deviation on the road to serious common Western diseases of civilisation associated with increased body mass index and insulin resistance. Exaggerated mTORC1 signalling by Western diet explains the association of acne with increased body mass index, insulin resistance, and early onset of menarche. Both, a high glycaemic load and increased consumption of milk and milk products, staples of Western diet, aggravate mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 signalling. This review of the literature summarises present evidence for an association between acne, increased body mass index, insulin resistance and Western diet. By dietary intervention with a Palaeolithic-type diet, the dermatologist has the chance to attenuate patients' increased mTORC1 signalling by reducing glycaemic load and milk consumption, which may not only improve acne but may delay the march to more serious mTORC1-driven diseases of civilisation.

  11. Molecular mechanisms of mTOR regulation by stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heberle, Alexander Martin; Prentzell, Mirja Tamara; van Eunen, Karen; Bakker, Barbara Marleen; Grellscheid, Sushma Nagaraja; Thedieck, Kathrin

    2015-01-01

    Tumors are prime examples of cell growth in unfavorable environments that elicit cellular stress. The high metabolic demand and insufficient vascularization of tumors cause a deficiency of oxygen and nutrients. Oncogenic mutations map to signaling events via mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), metabolic pathways, and mitochondrial function. These alterations have been linked with cellular stresses, in particular endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, hypoxia, and oxidative stress. Yet tumors survive these challenges and acquire highly energy-demanding traits, such as overgrowth and invasiveness. In this review we focus on stresses that occur in cancer cells and discuss them in the context of mTOR signaling. Of note, many tumor traits require mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) activity, but mTORC1 hyperactivation eventually sensitizes cells to apoptosis. Thus, mTORC1 activity needs to be balanced in cancer cells. We provide an overview of the mechanisms contributing to mTOR regulation by stress and suggest a model wherein stress granules function as guardians of mTORC1 signaling, allowing cancer cells to escape stress-induced cell death.

  12. Genetic Deletion of Rheb1 in the Brain Reduces Food Intake and Causes Hypoglycemia with Altered Peripheral Metabolism

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    Wanchun Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Excessive food/energy intake is linked to obesity and metabolic disorders, such as diabetes. The hypothalamus in the brain plays a critical role in the control of food intake and peripheral metabolism. The signaling pathways in hypothalamic neurons that regulate food intake and peripheral metabolism need to be better understood for developing pharmacological interventions to manage eating behavior and obesity. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR, a serine/threonine kinase, is a master regulator of cellular metabolism in different cell types. Pharmacological manipulations of mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1 activity in hypothalamic neurons alter food intake and body weight. Our previous study identified Rheb1 (Ras homolog enriched in brain 1 as an essential activator of mTORC1 activity in the brain. Here we examine whether central Rheb1 regulates food intake and peripheral metabolism through mTORC1 signaling. We find that genetic deletion of Rheb1 in the brain causes a reduction in mTORC1 activity and impairs normal food intake. As a result, Rheb1 knockout mice exhibit hypoglycemia and increased lipid mobilization in adipose tissue and ketogenesis in the liver. Our work highlights the importance of central Rheb1 signaling in euglycemia and energy homeostasis in animals.

  13. Phosphatidic acid: biosynthesis, pharmacokinetics, mechanisms of action and effect on strength and body composition in resistance-trained individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Peter

    2017-01-01

    The mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) has received much attention in the field of exercise physiology as a master regulator of skeletal muscle hypertrophy. The multiprotein complex is regulated by various signals such as growth factors, energy status, amino acids and mechanical stimuli. Importantly, the glycerophospholipid phosphatidic acid (PA) appears to play an important role in mTORC1 activation by mechanical stimulation. PA has been shown to modulate mTOR activity by direct binding to its FKBP12-rapamycin binding domain. Additionally, it has been suggested that exogenous PA activates mTORC1 via extracellular conversion to lysophosphatidic acid and subsequent binding to endothelial differentiation gene receptors on the cell surface. Recent trials have therefore evaluated the effects of PA supplementation in resistance-trained individuals on strength and body composition. As research in this field is rapidly evolving, this review attempts to provide a comprehensive overview of its biosynthesis, pharmacokinetics, mechanisms of action and effect on strength and body composition in resistance-trained individuals.

  14. Synergistic Effect of Rapamycin and Metformin Against Age-Dependent Oxidative Stress in Rat Erythrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Abhishek Kumar; Garg, Geetika; Singh, Sandeep; Rizvi, Syed Ibrahim

    2017-10-01

    Erythrocytes are particularly vulnerable toward age-dependent oxidative stress-mediated damage. Caloric restriction mimetics (CRMs) may provide a novel strategy for the maintenance of redox balance as well as effective treatment of age-associated diseases. Herein, we have investigated the beneficial effect of cotreatment with CRM-candidate drugs, rapamycin (an immunosuppressant drug and inhibitor of mammalian target of rapamycin) and metformin (an antidiabetic biguanide and activator of adenosine monophosphate kinase), against aging-induced oxidative stress in erythrocytes and plasma of aging rats. Male Wistar rats of age 4 (young) and 24 months (old) were coexposed to rapamycin (0.5 mg/kg body weight [b.w.]) and metformin (300 mg/kg b.w.), and data were compared with the response of rats receiving an independent exposure to these chemicals at similar doses. The exposure of individual candidate drugs significantly reversed the age-dependent alterations in the endpoints associated with oxidative stress such as reactive oxygen species, ferric reducing ability of plasma, malondialdehyde, reduced glutathione, plasma membrane redox system, plasma protein carbonyl, and acetyl cholinesterase in erythrocytes and plasma of aging rats. However, the cotreatment with rapamycin and metformin showed a significant augmented effect compared with individual drug interventions on reversal of these age-dependent biomarkers of oxidative stress, suggesting a synergistic response. Thus, the findings open up further possibilities for the design of new combinatorial therapies to prevent oxidative stress- and age-associated health problems.

  15. Local therapeutic efficacy with reduced systemic side effects by rapamycin-loaded subcapsular microspheres

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Falke, Lucas L.; van Vuuren, Stefan H.; Kazazi-Hyseni, Filis; Ramazani, Farshad; Nguyan, Tri Q.; Veldhuis, Gert J.; Maarseveen, Erik M.; Zandstra, Jurjen; Zuidema, Johan; Duque, Luisa F.; Steendam, Rob; Popa, Eliane R.; Kok, Robbert Jan; Goldschmeding, Roe

    Kidney injury triggers fibrosis, the final common pathway of chronic kidney disease (CKD). The increase of CKD prevalence worldwide urgently calls for new therapies. Available systemic treatment such as rapamycin are associated with serious side effects. To study the potential of local antifibrotic

  16. GSK-3/Rb12 Pathway as a Novel Target of Rapamycin in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-11-01

    that also have a potent tumor suppressor effect. These drugs are currently being evaluated in clinical trials to treat human cancers including...tumors to inhibition of FRAP /mTOR." Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 98(18): 10314-9. Noh, W. C., W. H. Mondesire, et al. (2004). "Determinants of rapamycin

  17. Myxoma virus virotherapy for glioma in immunocompetent animal models: optimizing administration routes and synergy with rapamycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lun, XueQing; Alain, Tommy; Zemp, Franz J; Zhou, Hongyuan; Rahman, Masmudur M; Hamilton, Mark G; McFadden, Grant; Bell, John; Senger, Donna L; Forsyth, Peter A

    2010-01-15

    Oncolytic myxoma virus (MYXV) is being developed as a novel virotherapeutic against human brain cancer and has promising activity against human brain tumor models in immunocompromised hosts. Because an intact immune system could reduce its efficacy, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the oncolytic potential of MYXV in immunocompetent racine glioma models. Here, we report that MYXV infects and kills all racine cell glioma lines and that its effects are enhanced by rapamycin. Intratumoral administration of MYXV with rapamycin improved viral replication in the tumor and significantly prolonged host survival. Similarly, coadministration via a method of convection-enhanced delivery (CED) enhanced viral replication and efficacy in vivo. Mechanisms by which rapamycin improved MYXV oncolysis included an inhibition of type I IFN production in vitro and a reduction of intratumoral infiltration of CD68(+) microglia/macrophages and CD163(+) macrophages in vivo. Our findings define a method to improve MYXV efficacy against gliomas by rapamycin coadministration, which acts to promote immune responses engaged by viral delivery.

  18. How longevity research can lead to therapies for Alzheimer's disease: The rapamycin story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Arlan; Galvan, Veronica; Lin, Ai-Ling; Oddo, Salvatore

    2015-08-01

    The discovery that rapamycin increases lifespan in mice and restores/delays many aging phenotypes has led to the speculation that rapamycin has 'anti-aging' properties. The major question discussed in this review is whether a manipulation that has anti-aging properties can alter the onset and/or progression of Alzheimer's disease, a disease in which age is the major risk factor. Rapamycin has been shown to prevent (and possibly restore in some cases) the deficit in memory observed in the mouse model of Alzheimer's disease (AD-Tg) as well as reduce Aβ and tau aggregation, restore cerebral blood flow and vascularization, and reduce microglia activation. All of these parameters are widely recognized as symptoms central to the development of AD. Furthermore, rapamycin has also been shown to improve memory and reduce anxiety and depression in several other mouse models that show cognitive deficits as well as in 'normal' mice. The current research shows the feasibility of using pharmacological agents that increase lifespan, such as those identified by the National Institute on Aging Intervention Testing Program, to treat Alzheimer's disease. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. New approach for local delivery of rapamycin by bioadhesive PLGA-carbopol nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Weiwei; Cao, Guangqing; Xi, Yanwei; Zhang, Na

    2009-01-01

    Local delivery of antiproliferative drugs encapsulated in biodegradable nanoparticles has shown promise as an experimental strategy for preventing vascular restenosis development. The general aim of this work was to develop polymeric nanoparticle carriers with bioadhesive properties, and to evaluate its adjuvant potential for local, intramural delivery of rapamycin for inhibition of restenosis. The bioadhesive rapamycin-loaded PLGA nanoparticles were obtained by applying carbopol 940 of different concentrations as stabilizer and bioadhesive agent. The resultant nanoparticles were characterized concerning physicochemical properties such as morphology, particle size, zeta potential, entrapment efficiency, drug loading, drug release in vitro, stability in vitro as well as the arterial uptake and retention ability in an ex-vivo model. The results revealed that carbopol could serve as a better stabilizer in the preparation of rapamycin-loaded PLGA nanoparticles compared with PVA, and the physicochemical characteristics of the obtained PLGA nanoparticles were affected by the concentration of carbopol. Furthermore, it was found that carbopol could impart the nanoparticles with bioadhesive properties, improving the rentention and uptake of nanoparticles in the arterial wall, benefiting the nanoparticles for efficient localization of therapeutic agents in restenosis site. Cell viability assay results showed that blank PLGA-carbopol nanoparticles exhibited low toxicity and excellent biocompatibility and rapamycin-loaded nanoparticles with a smaller particle size (carbopol stabilized bioadhesive nanoparticles against restenosis in vivo.

  20. Rapamycin Conditioning of Dendritic Cells Differentiated from Human ES Cells Promotes a Tolerogenic Phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn M. Silk

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available While human embryonic stem cells (hESCs may one day facilitate the treatment of degenerative diseases requiring cell replacement therapy, the success of regenerative medicine is predicated on overcoming the rejection of replacement tissues. Given the role played by dendritic cells (DCs in the establishment of immunological tolerance, we have proposed that DC, rendered tolerogenic during their differentiation from hESC, might predispose recipients to accept replacement tissues. As a first step towards this goal, we demonstrate that DC differentiated from H1 hESCs (H1-DCs are particularly responsive to the immunosuppressive agent rapamycin compared to monocyte-derived DC (moDC. While rapamycin had only modest impact on the phenotype and function of moDC, H1-DC failed to upregulate CD40 upon maturation and displayed reduced immunostimulatory capacity. Furthermore, coculture of naïve allogeneic T cells with rapamycin-treated H1-DC promoted an increased appearance of CD25hi Foxp3+ regulatory T cells, compared to moDC. Our findings suggest that conditioning of hESC-derived DC with rapamycin favours a tolerogenic phenotype.

  1. Treating brain tumor-initiating cells using a combination of myxoma virus and rapamycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemp, Franz J; Lun, Xueqing; McKenzie, Brienne A; Zhou, Hongyuan; Maxwell, Lori; Sun, Beichen; Kelly, John J P; Stechishin, Owen; Luchman, Artee; Weiss, Samuel; Cairncross, J Gregory; Hamilton, Mark G; Rabinovich, Brian A; Rahman, Masmudur M; Mohamed, Mohamed R; Smallwood, Sherin; Senger, Donna L; Bell, John; McFadden, Grant; Forsyth, Peter A

    2013-07-01

    Intratumoral heterogeneity in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) poses a significant barrier to therapy in certain subpopulation such as the tumor-initiating cell population, being shown to be refractory to conventional therapies. Oncolytic virotherapy has the potential to target multiple compartments within the tumor and thus circumvent some of the barriers facing conventional therapies. In this study, we investigate the oncolytic potential of myxoma virus (MYXV) alone and in combination with rapamycin in vitro and in vivo using human brain tumor-initiating cells (BTICs). We cultured fresh GBM specimens as neurospheres and assayed their growth characteristics in vivo. We then tested the susceptibility of BTICs to MYXV infection with or without rapamycin in vitro and assessed viral biodistribution/survival in vivo in orthotopic xenografts. The cultured neurospheres were found to retain stem cell markers in vivo, and they closely resembled human infiltrative GBM. In this study we determined that (i) all patient-derived BTICs tested, including those resistant to temozolomide, were susceptible to MYXV replication and killing in vitro; (ii) MYXV replicated within BTICs in vivo, and intratumoral administration of MYXV significantly prolonged survival of BTIC-bearing mice; (iii) combination therapy with MYXV and rapamycin improved antitumor activity, even in mice bearing "advanced" BTIC tumors; (iv) MYXV treatment decreased expression of stem cell markers in vitro and in vivo. Our study suggests that MYXV in combination with rapamycin infects and kills both the BTICs and the differentiated compartments of GBM and may be an effective treatment even in TMZ-resistant patients.

  2. Oncolytic virotherapy synergism with signaling inhibitors: Rapamycin increases myxoma virus tropism for human tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanford, Marianne M; Barrett, John W; Nazarian, Steven H; Werden, Steven; McFadden, Grant

    2007-02-01

    Myxoma virus is a rabbit-specific poxvirus pathogen that also exhibits a unique tropism for human tumor cells and is dramatically oncolytic for human cancer xenografts. Most tumor cell lines tested are permissive for myxoma infection in a fashion intimately tied to the activation state of Akt kinase. A host range factor of myxoma virus, M-T5, directly interacts with Akt and mediates myxoma virus tumor cell tropism. mTOR is a regulator of cell growth and metabolism downstream of Akt and is specifically inhibited by rapamycin. We report that treatment of nonpermissive human tumor cell lines, which normally restrict myxoma virus replication, with rapamycin dramatically increased virus tropism and spread in vitro. This increased myxoma replication is concomitant with global effects on mTOR signaling, specifically, an increase in Akt kinase. In contrast to the effects on human cancer cells, rapamycin does not increase myxoma virus replication in rabbit cell lines or permissive human tumor cell lines with constitutively active Akt. This indicates that rapamycin increases the oncolytic capacity of myxoma virus for human cancer cells by reconfiguring the internal cell signaling environment to one that is optimal for productive virus replication and suggests the possibility of a potentially therapeutic synergism between kinase signaling inhibitors and oncolytic poxviruses for cancer treatment.

  3. Rapamycin potentiates cytotoxicity by docetaxel possibly through downregulation of Survivin in lung cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Hui

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To elucidate whether rapamycin, the inhibitor of mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin, can potentiate the cytotoxic effect of docetaxel in lung cancer cells and to probe the mechanism underlying such enhancement. Methods Lung cancer cells were treated with docetaxel and rapamycin. The effect on the proliferation of lung cancer cells was evaluated using the MTT method, and cell apoptosis was measured by flow cytometry. Protein expression and level of phosphorylation were assayed using Western Blot method. Results Co-treatment of rapamycin and docetaxel was found to favorably enhance the cytotoxic effect of docetaxel in four lung cancer cell lines. This tumoricidal boost is associated with a reduction in the expression and phosphorylation levels of Survivin and ERK1/2, respectively. Conclusion The combined application of mTOR inhibitor and docetaxel led to a greater degree of cancer cell killing than that by either compound used alone. Therefore, this combination warrants further investigation in its suitability of serving as a novel therapeutic scheme for treating advanced and recurrent lung cancer patients.

  4. Multi-scale optical imaging of the delayed type hypersensitivity reaction attenuated by rapamycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Meijie; Zhang, Zhihong; Li, Hui; Qiao, Sha; Liu, Zheng; Fu, Ling; Shen, Guanxin; Luo, Qingming

    2014-01-01

    Neutrophils and monocytes/macrophages (MMs) play important roles in the development of cell-mediated delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH). However, the dynamics of neutrophils and MMs during the DTH reaction and how the immunosuppressant rapamycin modulates their behavior in vivo are rarely reported. Here, we take advantage of multi-scale optical imaging techniques and a footpad DTH reaction model to non-invasively investigate the dynamic behavior and properties of immune cells from the whole field of the footpad to the cellular level. During the classic elicitation phase of the DTH reaction, both neutrophils and MMs obviously accumulated at inflammatory foci at 24 h post-challenge. Rapamycin treatment resulted in advanced neutrophil recruitment and vascular hyperpermeability at an early stage (4 h), the reduced accumulation of neutrophils (> 50% inhibition ratio) at 48 h, and the delayed involvement of MMs in inflammatory foci. The motility parameters of immune cells in the rapamycin-treated reaction at 4 h post-challenge displayed similar mean velocities, arrest durations, mean displacements, and confinements as the classic DTH reaction at 24 h. These results indicate that rapamycin treatment shortened the initial preparation stage of the DTH reaction and attenuated its intensity, which may be due to the involvement of T helper type 2 cells or regulatory T cells.

  5. Surface engineering of porous silicon microparticles for intravitreal sustained delivery of rapamycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto, Alejandra; Hou, Huiyuan; Moon, Sang Woong; Sailor, Michael J; Freeman, William R; Cheng, Lingyun

    2015-01-22

    To understand the relationship between rapamycin loading/release and surface chemistries of porous silicon (pSi) to optimize pSi-based intravitreal delivery system. Three types of surface chemical modifications were studied: (1) pSi-COOH, containing 10-carbon aliphatic chains with terminal carboxyl groups grafted via hydrosilylation of undecylenic acid; (2) pSi-C12, containing 12-carbon aliphatic chains grafted via hydrosilylation of 1-dodecene; and (3) pSiO2-C8, prepared by mild oxidation of the pSi particles followed by grafting of 8-hydrocarbon chains to the resulting porous silica surface via a silanization. The efficiency of rapamycin loading follows the order (micrograms of drug/milligrams of carrier): pSiO2-C8 (105 ± 18) > pSi-COOH (68 ± 8) > pSi-C12 (36 ± 6). Powder X-ray diffraction data showed that loaded rapamycin was amorphous and dynamic drug-release study showed that the availability of the free drug was increased by 6-fold (compared with crystalline rapamycin) by using pSiO2-C8 formulation (P = 0.0039). Of the three formulations in this study, pSiO2-C8-RAP showed optimal performance in terms of simultaneous release of the active drug and carrier degradation, and drug-loading capacity. Released rapamycin was confirmed with the fingerprints of the mass spectrometry and biologically functional as the control of commercial crystalline rapamycin. Single intravitreal injections of 2.9 ± 0.37 mg pSiO2-C8-RAP into rabbit eyes resulted in more than 8 weeks of residence in the vitreous while maintaining clear optical media and normal histology of the retina in comparison to the controls. Porous silicon-based rapamycin delivery system using the pSiO2-C8 formulation demonstrated good ocular compatibility and may provide sustained drug release for retina. Copyright 2015 The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Inc.

  6. Advances in Autophagy Regulatory Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura E. Gallagher

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy plays a critical role in cell metabolism by degrading and recycling internal components when challenged with limited nutrients. This fundamental and conserved mechanism is based on a membrane trafficking pathway in which nascent autophagosomes engulf cytoplasmic cargo to form vesicles that transport their content to the lysosome for degradation. Based on this simple scheme, autophagy modulates cellular metabolism and cytoplasmic quality control to influence an unexpectedly wide range of normal mammalian physiology and pathophysiology. In this review, we summarise recent advancements in three broad areas of autophagy regulation. We discuss current models on how autophagosomes are initiated from endogenous membranes. We detail how the uncoordinated 51-like kinase (ULK complex becomes activated downstream of mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (MTORC1. Finally, we summarise the upstream signalling mechanisms that can sense amino acid availability leading to activation of MTORC1.

  7. Rapamycin protects testes against germ cell apoptosis and oxidative stress induced by testicular ischemia-reperfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasemnejad-Berenji, Morteza; Ghazi-Khansari, Mahmoud; Yazdani, Iraj; Saravi, Seyed Soheil Saeedi; Nobakht, Maliheh; Abdollahi, Alireza; Ansari, Javad Mohajer; Ghasemnejad-Berenji, Hojjat; Pashapour, Sarvin; Dehpour, Ahmad Reza

    2017-08-01

    Rapamycin is an immunosuppressant compound with a broad spectrum of pharmaco-logical activities. In recent years, it has been used successfully to decrease ischemia-reperfusion injury in several organ systems. The purpose of the present study was to examine the effect of rapamycin on testicular ischemia-reperfusion injury. Seventy-two adult male Wistar rats were divided into six groups: control (group1), sham-operated (Group2), T/D + DMSO as vehicle group (group3), and groups 4-6; respectively received 0.5, 1, and 1.5 mgkg-1 of rapamycin, IP 30 min before detorsion. Ischemia was achieved by twisting the right testis 720° clockwise for 1 hr. The right testis of 6 animals from each group were excised 4 hr after detorsion for the measurement of lipid peroxidation, caspase-3, and antioxidant enzyme activities. Histopathological changes and germ cell apoptosis were determined by measuring mean of seminiferous tubules diameters (MSTD) and TUNEL test in right testis of 6 animals per group, 24 hr after detorsion. Testicular T/D caused increases in the apoptosis, malondialdehyde (MDA), and caspase-3 levels and decreases in the superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities in ipsilateral testis (P<0.001). The rats treated with rapamycin had significant decreases in the MDA and caspase-3 levels and significant increases in the SOD, CAT and GPx activities in ipsilateral testis compared with the T/D group (P<0.001); germ cell apoptosis was decreased, and MSTD was improved. Rapamycin administration during testicular torsion decreased ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) cellular damage.

  8. The TSC Complex Is Required for the Benefits of Dietary Protein Restriction on Stress Resistance In Vivo

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    Eylul Harputlugil

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Protein restriction (PR is important for the benefits of dietary restriction on longevity and stress resistance, but relevant nutrient sensors and downstream effectors in mammals remain poorly defined. We used PR-mediated protection from hepatic ischemia reperfusion injury to probe genetic requirements for the evolutionarily conserved nutrient sensors GCN2 and mTORC1 in stress resistance. One week of PR reduced free amino acids and circulating growth factors, activating GCN2 and mTORC1 repressor tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC. However, although GCN2 was dispensable for PR-induced protection, hepatic TSC1 was required. PR improved hepatic insulin sensitivity in a TSC1-dependent manner prior to ischemia, facilitating increased prosurvival signaling and reduced apoptosis after reperfusion. These benefits were partially abrogated by pharmacological PI3K inhibition or genetic deletion of the insulin receptor in hepatocytes. In conclusion, improved insulin sensitivity upon short-term PR required TSC1, facilitated increased prosurvival signaling after injury, and contributed partially to PR-mediated resistance to clinically relevant ischemia reperfusion injury.

  9. A Signal-On Fluorosensor Based on Quench-Release Principle for Sensitive Detection of Antibiotic Rapamycin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hee-Jin Jeong

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available An antibiotic rapamycin is one of the most commonly used immunosuppressive drugs, and also implicated for its anti-cancer activity. Hence, the determination of its blood level after organ transplantation or tumor treatment is of great concern in medicine. Although there are several rapamycin detection methods, many of them have limited sensitivity, and/or need complicated procedures and long assay time. As a novel fluorescent biosensor for rapamycin, here we propose “Q’-body”, which works on the fluorescence quench-release principle inspired by the antibody-based quenchbody (Q-body technology. We constructed rapamycin Q’-bodies by linking the two interacting domains FKBP12 and FRB, whose association is triggered by rapamycin. The fusion proteins were each incorporated position-specifically with one of fluorescence dyes ATTO520, tetramethylrhodamine, or ATTO590 using a cell-free translation system. As a result, rapid rapamycin dose-dependent fluorescence increase derived of Q’-bodies was observed, especially for those with ATTO520 with a lowest detection limit of 0.65 nM, which indicates its utility as a novel fluorescent biosensor for rapamycin.

  10. Evaluation of an AAV2-based rapamycin-regulated glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF expression vector system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Hadaczek

    Full Text Available Effective regulation of transgene product in anatomically circumscribed brain tissue is dependent on the pharmacokinetics of the regulating agent, the kinetics of transcriptional activation and degradation of the transgene product. We evaluated rapamycin-regulated AAV2-GDNF expression in the rat brain (striatum. Regulated (a dual-component system: AAV2-FBZhGDNF + AAV2-TF1Nc and constitutive (CMV-driven expression vectors were compared. Constitutively active AAV2-GDNF directed stable GDNF expression in a dose-dependent manner and it increased for the first month, thereafter reaching a plateau that was maintained over a further 3 months. For the AAV2-regGDNF, rapamycin was administered in a 3-days on/4-days off cycle. Intraperitoneal, oral, and direct brain delivery (CED of rapamycin were evaluated. Two cycles of rapamycin at an intraperitoneal dose of 10 mg/kg gave the highest GDNF level (2.75±0.01 ng/mg protein. Six cycles at 3 mg/kg resulted in lower GDNF values (1.36±0.3 ng/mg protein. Interestingly, CED of rapamycin into the brain at a very low dose (50 ng induced GDNF levels comparable to a 6-week intraperitoneal rapamycin cycle. This study demonstrates the effectiveness of rapamycin regulation in the CNS. However, the kinetics of the transgene in brain tissue, the regulator dosing amount and schedule are critical parameters that influence the kinetics of accumulation and zenith of the encoded transgene product.

  11. Antitumor activity of rapamycin in a Phase I trial for patients with recurrent PTEN-deficient glioblastoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim F Cloughesy

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available There is much discussion in the cancer drug development community about how to incorporate molecular tools into early-stage clinical trials to assess target modulation, measure anti-tumor activity, and enrich the clinical trial population for patients who are more likely to benefit. Small, molecularly focused clinical studies offer the promise of the early definition of optimal biologic dose and patient population.Based on preclinical evidence that phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on Chromosome 10 (PTEN loss sensitizes tumors to the inhibition of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR, we conducted a proof-of-concept Phase I neoadjuvant trial of rapamycin in patients with recurrent glioblastoma, whose tumors lacked expression of the tumor suppressor PTEN. We aimed to assess the safety profile of daily rapamycin in patients with glioma, define the dose of rapamycin required for mTOR inhibition in tumor tissue, and evaluate the antiproliferative activity of rapamycin in PTEN-deficient glioblastoma. Although intratumoral rapamycin concentrations that were sufficient to inhibit mTOR in vitro were achieved in all patients, the magnitude of mTOR inhibition in tumor cells (measured by reduced ribosomal S6 protein phosphorylation varied substantially. Tumor cell proliferation (measured by Ki-67 staining was dramatically reduced in seven of 14 patients after 1 wk of rapamycin treatment and was associated with the magnitude of mTOR inhibition (p = 0.0047, Fisher exact test but not the intratumoral rapamycin concentration. Tumor cells harvested from the Ki-67 nonresponders retained sensitivity to rapamycin ex vivo, indicating that clinical resistance to biochemical mTOR inhibition was not cell-intrinsic. Rapamycin treatment led to Akt activation in seven patients, presumably due to loss of negative feedback, and this activation was associated with shorter time-to-progression during post-surgical maintenance rapamycin therapy (p < 0.05, Logrank test.Rapamycin

  12. Distinct amino acid-sensing mTOR pathways regulate skeletal myogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Mee-Sup; Chen, Jie

    2013-12-01

    Signaling through the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in response to amino acid availability controls many cellular and developmental processes. mTOR is a master regulator of myogenic differentiation, but the pathways mediating amino acid signals in this process are not known. Here we examine the Rag GTPases and the class III phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) Vps34, two mediators of amino acid signals upstream of mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) in cell growth regulation, for their potential involvement in myogenesis. We find that, although both Rag and Vps34 mediate amino acid activation of mTORC1 in C2C12 myoblasts, they have opposing functions in myogenic differentiation. Knockdown of RagA/B enhances, whereas overexpression of active RagB/C mutants impairs, differentiation, and this inhibitory function of Rag is mediated by mTORC1 suppression of the IRS1-PI3K-Akt pathway. On the other hand, Vps34 is required for myogenic differentiation. Amino acids activate a Vps34-phospholipase D1 (PLD1) pathway that controls the production of insulin-like growth factor II, an autocrine inducer of differentiation, through the Igf2 muscle enhancer. The product of PLD, phosphatidic acid, activates the enhancer in a rapamycin-sensitive but mTOR kinase-independent manner. Our results uncover amino acid-sensing mechanisms controlling the homeostasis of myogenesis and underline the versatility and context dependence of mTOR signaling.

  13. Role of mTOR Inhibitors in Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moto Kajiwara

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The first compound that inhibited the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR, sirolimus (rapamycin was discovered in the 1970s as a soil bacterium metabolite collected on Easter Island (Rapa Nui. Because sirolimus showed antiproliferative activity, researchers investigated its molecular target and identified the TOR1 and TOR2. The mTOR consists of mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1 and mTORC2. Rapalogues including sirolimus, everolimus, and temsirolimus exert their effect mainly on mTORC1, whereas their inhibitory effect on mTORC2 is mild. To obtain compounds with more potent antiproliferative effects, ATP-competitive inhibitors of mTOR targeting both mTORC1 and mTORC2 have been developed and tested in clinical trials as anticancer drugs. Currently, mTOR inhibitors are used as anticancer drugs against several solid tumors, and immunosuppressive agents for transplantation of various organs. This review discusses the role of mTOR inhibitors in renal disease with a particular focus on renal cancer, diabetic nephropathy, and kidney transplantation.

  14. Mammalian target of rapamycin complex 2 regulates muscle glucose uptake during exercise in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kleinert, Maximilian; Parker, Benjamin L; Fritzen, Andreas Mæchel

    2017-01-01

    Exercise increases glucose uptake into insulin-resistant muscle. Thus, elucidating the exercise signalling network in muscle may uncover new therapeutic targets. mTORC2, a regulator of insulin-controlled glucose uptake, has been reported to interact with Rac1, which plays a role in exercise......-induced glucose uptake in muscle. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that mTORC2 activity is necessary for muscle glucose uptake during treadmill exercise. We used mice that specifically lack mTORC2 signalling in muscle, by deletion of the obligatory mTORC2 component, Rictor (Ric mKO). Running capacity...... potential exercise-dependent mTORC2 substrates, including contractile proteins, kinases, transcriptional regulators, actin cytoskeleton regulators and ion-transport proteins. Our study suggests that mTORC2 is a component of the exercise signalling network that regulates muscle glucose uptake and we provide...

  15. Topical Rapamycin Therapy to Alleviate Cutaneous Manifestations of Tuberous Sclerosis Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    present in up to 80% of TSC patients. Facial angiofibromas create considerable cosmetic morbidity for patients with TSC and currently there is no...cheeks, and chin. Lesions appear in early childhood and are present in up to 80% of TSC patients. These facial lesions create considerable cosmetic ...formulation, chemistry , manufacturing and control of the drug product. 1. The study drug and controls have been successfully formulated and optimized with

  16. Inhibiting the Mammalian target of rapamycin blocks the development of experimental cerebral malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Emile B; Hart, Geoffrey T; Tran, Tuan M; Waisberg, Michael; Akkaya, Munir; Skinner, Jeff; Zinöcker, Severin; Pena, Mirna; Yazew, Takele; Qi, Chen-Feng; Miller, Louis H; Pierce, Susan K

    2015-06-02

    Malaria is an infectious disease caused by parasites of several Plasmodium spp. Cerebral malaria (CM) is a common form of severe malaria resulting in nearly 700,000 deaths each year in Africa alone. At present, there is no adjunctive therapy for CM. Although the mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of CM are incompletely understood, it is likely that both intrinsic features of the parasite and the human host's immune response contribute to disease. The kinase mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a central regulator of immune responses, and drugs that inhibit the mTOR pathway have been shown to be antiparasitic. In a mouse model of CM, experimental CM (ECM), we show that the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin protects against ECM when administered within the first 4 days of infection. Treatment with rapamycin increased survival, blocked breakdown of the blood-brain barrier and brain hemorrhaging, decreased the influx of both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells into the brain and the accumulation of parasitized red blood cells in the brain. Rapamycin induced marked transcriptional changes in the brains of infected mice, and analysis of transcription profiles predicted that rapamycin blocked leukocyte trafficking to and proliferation in the brain. Remarkably, animals were protected against ECM even though rapamycin treatment significantly increased the inflammatory response induced by infection in both the brain and spleen. These results open a new avenue for the development of highly selective adjunctive therapies for CM by targeting pathways that regulate host and parasite metabolism. Malaria is a highly prevalent infectious disease caused by parasites of several Plasmodium spp. Malaria is usually uncomplicated and resolves with time; however, in about 1% of cases, almost exclusively among young children, malaria becomes severe and life threatening, resulting in nearly 700,000 deaths each year in Africa alone. Among the most severe complications of Plasmodium falciparum infection

  17. Chondrocyte-Specific Knockout of TSC-1 Leads to Congenital Spinal Deformity in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Cheng; Chen, Yuhui; Li, Zhen; Cao, He; Chen, Keming; Lai, Pinglin; Yan, Bo; Huang, Bin; Tang, Jiajun; Fan, Shicai; Cai, Daozhang; Jin, Dadi; Bai, Xiaochun; Zhou, Rongping

    2017-01-01

    Congenital spinal deformity is the most severe clinical orthopedic issue worldwide. Among all the pathological processes of congenital spinal deformity, the imbalance of endochondral ossification is considered to be the most important developmental cause of spinal dysplasia. We established chondrocyte-specific TSC-1 knockout (KO) mice to overactivate the energy metabolic component, mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), and measured the spinal development by general, imaging, histological, and Western-blot assessments. In addition to skeletal dysplasia, the KO mice displayed severe congenital spinal deformity and significant intervertebral disc changes. This study suggests that, in the process of endochondral ossification, excessive activation of mTORC1 signaling in chondrocytes induces obvious spinal deformity, and the chondrocytes may be the cell type responsible for congenital spinal deformity.

  18. Chondrocyte-Specific Knockout of TSC-1 Leads to Congenital Spinal Deformity in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Yang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital spinal deformity is the most severe clinical orthopedic issue worldwide. Among all the pathological processes of congenital spinal deformity, the imbalance of endochondral ossification is considered to be the most important developmental cause of spinal dysplasia. We established chondrocyte-specific TSC-1 knockout (KO mice to overactivate the energy metabolic component, mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1, and measured the spinal development by general, imaging, histological, and Western-blot assessments. In addition to skeletal dysplasia, the KO mice displayed severe congenital spinal deformity and significant intervertebral disc changes. This study suggests that, in the process of endochondral ossification, excessive activation of mTORC1 signaling in chondrocytes induces obvious spinal deformity, and the chondrocytes may be the cell type responsible for congenital spinal deformity.

  19. mTOR regulates phagosome and entotic vacuole fission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krajcovic, Matej; Krishna, Shefali; Akkari, Leila; Joyce, Johanna A; Overholtzer, Michael

    2013-12-01

    Macroendocytic vacuoles formed by phagocytosis, or the live-cell engulfment program entosis, undergo sequential steps of maturation, leading to the fusion of lysosomes that digest internalized cargo. After cargo digestion, nutrients must be exported to the cytosol, and vacuole membranes must be processed by mechanisms that remain poorly defined. Here we find that phagosomes and entotic vacuoles undergo a late maturation step characterized by fission, which redistributes vacuolar contents into lysosomal networks. Vacuole fission is regulated by the serine/threonine protein kinase mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), which localizes to vacuole membranes surrounding engulfed cells. Degrading engulfed cells supply engulfing cells with amino acids that are used in translation, and rescue cell survival and mTORC1 activity in starved macrophages and tumor cells. These data identify a late stage of phagocytosis and entosis that involves processing of large vacuoles by mTOR-regulated membrane fission.

  20. PF-4708671 activates AMPK independently of p70S6K1 inhibition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilad W Vainer

    Full Text Available The P70 ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1 (P70S6K1 is activated by the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTORC1 and regulates proliferation, growth, and metabolism. PF-4708671 is a novel, cell-permeable, has been proposed to be a highly specific inhibitor of p70S6K1. It is used in micromolar concentration range to dissect signaling pathways downstream of mTORC1 and to study the function of p70S6K1. Here we show that PF-4708671 induces AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK phosphorylation and activation in immortalized mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEF independently of p70S6K1, due to specific inhibition of mitochondrial respiratory chain Complex I.

  1. Resistance exercise, but not endurance exercise, induces IKKβ phosphorylation in human skeletal muscle of training-accustomed individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Andreas Buch; Vendelbo, Mikkel Holm; Rahbek, Stine Klejs

    2013-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is considered an important role in the muscular adaptations to exercise. It has been proposed that exercise-induced signaling to mTORC1 do not require classic growth factor PI3K/Akt signaling. Activation of IKKβ and the mitogen-activated protein......), TSC1, MAPK, and upstream Akt activators, along with gene expression of selected cytokines, in skeletal muscles from these subjects. Biopsies were sampled prior to, immediately after, and in the recovery period following resistance exercise, endurance exercise, and control interventions. The major...... other groups immediately after the intervention. Resistance and endurance exercise increased IL6, IL8, and TNFα gene expression immediately after exercise. The non-exercise control group demonstrated that cytokine gene expression is also sensitive to repeated biopsy sampling, whereas no effect...

  2. Rapamycin enhances docetaxel-induced cytotoxicity in a androgen-independent prostate cancer xenograft model by survivin downregulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morikawa, Yasuyuki, E-mail: yasu-m@med.gunma-u.ac.jp [Department of Urology, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, 3-39-22 Showa-machi, Maeabshi, Gunma 3718511 (Japan); Koike, Hidekazu; Sekine, Yoshitaka; Matsui, Hiroshi; Shibata, Yasuhiro; Ito, Kazuto; Suzuki, Kazuhiro [Department of Urology, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, 3-39-22 Showa-machi, Maeabshi, Gunma 3718511 (Japan)

    2012-03-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rapamycin (RPM) enhances the susceptibility of PC3 cells to docetaxel. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Low-dosage of docetaxel (DTX) did not reduce survivin expression levels in PC3 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Combination treatment of RPM with DTX suppressed the expression of surviving. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SiRNA against survivin enhanced the susceptibility of PC3 cells to DTX. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RPM and DTX cotreatment inhibited PC3 cell growth and decreased surviving in vivo. -- Abstract: Background: Docetaxel is a first-line treatment choice in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). However, the management of CRPC remains an important challenge in oncology. There have been many reports on the effects of rapamycin, which is an inhibitor of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), in the treatment of carcinogenesis. We assessed the cytotoxic effects of the combination treatment of docetaxel and rapamycin in prostate cancer cells. Furthermore, we examined the relationship between these treatments and survivin, which is a member of the inhibitory apoptosis family. Methods: Prostate cancer cells were cultured and treated with docetaxel and rapamycin. The effects on proliferation were evaluated with the MTS assay. In addition, we evaluated the effect on proliferation of the combination treatment induced knockdown of survivin expression by small interfering RNA transfection and docetaxel. Protein expression levels were assayed using western blotting. PC3 cells and xenograft growth in nude mice were used to evaluate the in vivo efficacy of docetaxel and its combination with rapamycin. Results: In vitro and in vivo, the combination of rapamycin with docetaxel resulted in a greater inhibition of proliferation than treatment with rapamycin or docetaxel alone. In addition, in vitro and in vivo, rapamycin decreased basal surviving levels, and cotreatment with docetaxel further decreased these levels

  3. Beneficial effects of rapamycin in a Drosophila model for hereditary spastic paraplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shiyu; Stern, Michael; McNew, James A

    2017-01-15

    The locomotor deficits in the group of diseases referred to as hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) reflect degeneration of upper motor neurons, but the mechanisms underlying this neurodegeneration are unknown. We established a Drosophila model for HSP, atlastin (atl), which encodes an ER fusion protein. Here, we show that neuronal atl loss causes degeneration of specific thoracic muscles that is preceded by other pathologies, including accumulation of aggregates containing polyubiquitin, increased generation of reactive oxygen species and activation of the JNK-Foxo stress response pathway. We show that inhibiting the Tor kinase, either genetically or by administering rapamycin, at least partially reversed many of these pathologies. atl loss from muscle also triggered muscle degeneration and rapamycin-sensitive locomotor deficits, as well as polyubiquitin aggregate accumulation. These results indicate that atl loss triggers muscle degeneration both cell autonomously and nonautonomously. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  4. PTEN and rapamycin inhibiting the growth of K562 cells through regulating mTOR signaling pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Hao

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To investigate, in vitro, the regulatory effects of tumor-suppressing gene PTEN on mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin signaling pathway, the effects of transfected PTEN and rapamycin on the growth inhibition, and apoptosis induction for human leukemia cell line K562 cells. Methods K562 cells were transfected with recombined adenovirus-PTEN vector containing green fluorescent protein (Ad-PTEN-GFP, followed by the treatment of the cells with or without rapamycin. The proliferation inhibition rate and apoptotic rate of these transfected and/or rapamycin treated K562 cells were measured by MTT assay and flow cytometry (FCM, the expression levels of PTEN-, mTOR-, cyclinD1- and P27kip1- mRNA were measured by real-time fluorescent relative-quantification reverse transcriptional PCR (FQ-PCR, the protein expression levels of PTEN, Akt, p-Akt were detected by western blotting. Results The proliferation of K562 cells was inhibited by PTEN gene transfection with/without the treatment of rapamycin. The expression levels of PTEN- and P27kip1- mRNA were up-regulated, and the mTOR- and cyclinD1- mRNA were down-regulated in K562 cells after the cells transfected with wild type PTEN gene and treated with rapamycin. Conclusion PTEN and rapamycin inhibited mTOR expression by acting as an upstream regulator of mTOR. Low dose rapamycin in combination with over-expressed PTEN might have synergistic effects on inhibiting the proliferation and promoting apoptosis of K562 cells.

  5. Effects of rapamycin treatment after controlled cortical impact injury on neurogenesis and synaptic reorganization in the mouse dentate gyrus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corwin R Butler

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Post-traumatic epilepsy (PTE is one consequence of traumatic brain injury (TBI. A prominent cell signaling pathway activated in animal models of both TBI and epilepsy is the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR. Inhibition of mTOR with rapamycin has shown promise as a potential modulator of epileptogenesis in several animal models of epilepsy, but cellular mechanisms linking mTOR expression and epileptogenesis are unclear. In this study, the role of mTOR in modifying functional hippocampal circuit reorganization after focal TBI induced by controlled cortical impact was investigated. Rapamycin (3 or 10 mg/kg, an inhibitor of mTOR signaling, was administered by intraperitoneal injection beginning on the day of injury and continued daily until tissue collection. Relative to controls, rapamycin treatment reduced dentate granule cell area in the hemisphere ipsilateral to the injury two weeks post-injury. Brain injury resulted in a significant increase in doublecortin immunolabeling in the dentate gyrus ipsilateral to the injury, indicating increased neurogenesis shortly after TBI. Rapamycin treatment prevented the increase in doublecortin labeling, with no overall effect on Fluoro-Jade B staining in the ipsilateral hemisphere, suggesting that rapamycin treatment reduced posttraumatic neurogenesis but did not prevent cell loss after injury. At later times post-injury (8-13 weeks, evidence of mossy fiber sprouting and increased recurrent excitation of dentate granule cells was detected, which were attenuated by rapamycin treatment. Rapamycin treatment also diminished seizure prevalence relative to vehicle-treated controls after TBI. Collectively, these results support a role for adult neurogenesis in PTE development and suggest that suppression of epileptogenesis by mTOR inhibition includes effects on post-injury neurogenesis.

  6. Campylobacter jejuni induces colitis through activation of mammalian target of rapamycin signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaolun; Threadgill, Deborah; Jobin, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is the worldwide leading cause of bacterial-induced enteritis. The molecular and cellular events that lead to campylobacteriosis are poorly understood. We identify mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) as a signaling pathway that leads to C jejuni-induced intestinal inflammation. Germ-free (control) or conventionally derived Il10(-/-) mice that express enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) under the control of nuclear factor κB (Il10(-/-); NF-κB(EGFP) mice) were infected with C jejuni (10(9) colony-forming units/mouse) for 12 days; their responses were determined using histologic, semiquantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction, fluorescence in situ hybridization, transmission electron microscopy, and tissue culture analyses. mTOR signaling was blocked by daily intraperitoneal injections of the pharmacologic inhibitor rapamycin (1.5 mg/kg). CD4(+) T cells were depleted by intraperitoneal injections of antibodies against CD4 (0.5 mg/mouse every 3 days). Bacterial survival in splenocytes was measured using a gentamycin killing assay. C jejuni induced intestinal inflammation, which correlated with activation of mTOR signaling and neutrophil infiltration. The inflamed intestines of these mice had increased levels of interleukin-1β, Cxcl2, interleukin-17a, and EGFP; C jejuni localized to colons and extraintestinal tissues of infected Il10(-/-); NF-κB(EGFP) mice compared with controls. Rapamycin, administered before or after introduction of C jejuni, blocked C jejuni-induced intestinal inflammation and bacterial accumulation. LC3II processing and killing of C jejuni were increased in splenocytes incubated with rapamycin compared with controls. mTOR signaling mediates C jejuni-induced colitis in Il10(-/-) mice, independently of T-cell activation. Factors involved in mTOR signaling might be therapeutic targets for campylobacteriosis. Copyright © 2012 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Rapamycin inhibits the growth and muscle-sparing effects of clenbuterol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kline, William O; Panaro, Frank J; Yang, Hayung; Bodine, Sue C

    2007-02-01

    Clenbuterol and other beta2-adrenergic agonists are effective at inducing muscle growth and attenuating muscle atrophy through unknown mechanisms. This study tested the hypothesis that clenbuterol-induced growth and muscle sparing is mediated through the activation of Akt and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathways. Clenbuterol was administered to normal weight-bearing adult rats to examine the growth-inducing effects and to adult rats undergoing muscle atrophy as the result of hindlimb suspension or denervation to examine the muscle-sparing effects. The pharmacological inhibitor rapamycin was administered in combination with clenbuterol in vivo to determine whether activation of mTOR was involved in mediating the effects of clenbuterol. Clenbuterol administration increased the phosphorylation status of PKB/Akt, S6 kinase 1/p70(s6k), and eukaryotic initiation factor 4E binding protein 1/PHAS-1. Clenbuterol treatment induced growth by 27-41% in normal rats and attenuated muscle loss during hindlimb suspension by 10-20%. Rapamycin treatment resulted in a 37-97% suppression of clenbuterol-induced growth and a 100% reduction of the muscle-sparing effect. In contrast, rapamycin was unable to block the muscle-sparing effects of clenbuterol after denervation. Clenbuterol was also shown to suppress the expression of the MuRF1 and MAFbx transcripts in muscles from normal, denervated, and hindlimb-suspended rats. These results demonstrate that the effects of clenbuterol are mediated, in part, through the activation of Akt and mTOR signaling pathways.

  8. Balloon Coating with Rapamycin Using an On-site Coating Device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmehl, Joerg, E-mail: joerg.schmehl@med.uni-tuebingen.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital of Tuebingen (Germany); Ruhr, Juergen von der [Institute of Anatomy, University of Tuebingen (Germany); Dobratz, Markus; Kehlbach, Rainer [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital of Tuebingen (Germany); Braun, Isabelle [Translumina GmbH (Germany); Greiner, Tim-Oliver [Clinic of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, University Hospital of Tuebingen (Germany); Claussen, Claus D. [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital of Tuebingen (Germany); Behnisch, Boris [Translumina GmbH (Germany)

    2013-06-15

    Purpose. The efficacy of drug-eluting balloons has been demonstrated in clinical trials. The drug predominantly used is paclitaxel because of its lipophilic properties and the rapid onset of action. The aim of the investigation was to evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of an alternative balloon coating with rapamycin that can be applied on site.MethodsThe balloon coating (3.0/18 and 3.0/12 mm, Cathy No. 4, Translumina GmbH) with rapamycin was conducted with a coating machine (Translumina GmbH). Concentrations were 2, 2 Multiplication-Sign 2, 3, and 4 %. Measurements regarding the amount of substance released to the vessel wall were carried out on explanted porcine coronaries by means of ultraviolet and visible-light spectroscopy. Inflation time varied between 30 and 120 s. The biological effect of the coating was evaluated in a porcine peripheral overstretch and stent implantation model. Results. The amount of rapamycin on the balloon surface ranged from 558 {+-} 108 {mu}g for the 2 % solution to 1,441 {+-} 228 {mu}g in the 4 % solution. An amount of 95 {+-} 63-193 {+-} 113 {mu}g was released into the vessel wall. The quantitative measurements of the angiographic examinations 4 weeks after treatment revealed a reduction of diameter stenosis from 20.6 {+-} 17.4 % in the control group to 11.6 {+-} 5.5 % in the drug-eluting balloon group. Conclusion. A balloon coating with rapamycin omitting an excipient is possible with a dose-adjustable coating machine. However, the biological effects are moderate, which make further optimization of the coating process and evaluation of appropriate excipients necessary.

  9. Combination therapy for inhibitor reversal in haemophilia A using monoclonal anti-CD20 and rapamycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Moanaro; Rogers, Geoffrey L; Sherman, Alexandra; Byrne, Barry J; Markusic, David M; Jiang, Haiyan; Herzog, Roland W

    2017-01-05

    Development of antibodies (inhibitors) against coagulation factor VIII (FVIII) is a major complication of intravenous replacement therapy in haemophilia A (HA). Current immune tolerance induction (ITI) regimens are not universally effective. Rituximab, a B cell-depleting antibody against CD20, has shown mixed results for inhibitor reversal in patients. This study aims to develop a combinatorial therapy for inhibitor reversal in HA, using anti-murine CD20 (anti-mCD20) antibody and rapamycin, which targets both B and T cell responses. Additionally, it extensively characterises the role of the IgG backbone in B cell depletion by anti-CD20 antibodies. For this, inhibitors were generated in BALB/c-HA mice by weekly IV injection of FVIII. Subsequently, anti-mCD20 (18B12) with IgG2a or IgG1 backbone was injected IV in two doses three weeks apart and B cell depletion and recovery was characterised. Rapamycin was administered orally 3x/week (for 1 month) while continuing FVIII injections. Altering the IgG backbone of anti-mCD20 from IgG2a to IgG1 reduced overall depletion of B cells (including memory B cells), and marginal zone, B-10, and B-1b cells were specifically unaffected. While neither antibody was effective alone, in combination with rapamycin, anti-mCD20 IgG2a but not IgG1 was able to reverse inhibitors in HA mice. This regimen was particularly effective for starting titres of ~10 BU. Although IgG1 anti-mCD20 spared potentially tolerogenic B cell subsets, IgG2a directed sustained hyporesponsiveness when administered in conjunction with rapamycin. This regimen represents a promising treatment for inhibitor reversal in HA, as both of these compounds have been extensively used in human patients.

  10. Dysregulation of Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Signaling in Mouse Models of Autism

    OpenAIRE

    Huber, Kimberly M.; Klann, Eric; Costa-Mattioli, Mauro; Zukin, R. Suzanne

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a central regulator of a diverse array of cellular processes, including cell growth, proliferation, autophagy, translation, and actin polymerization. Components of the mTOR cascade are present at synapses and influence synaptic plasticity and spine morphogenesis. A prevailing view is that the study of mTOR and its role in autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) will elucidate the molecular mechanisms by which mTOR regulates neuronal function under physiolo...

  11. Specific disruption of Tsc1 in ovarian granulosa cells promotes ovulation and causes progressive accumulation of corpora lutea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Huang

    Full Text Available Tuberous sclerosis complex 1 (Tsc1 is a tumor suppressor negatively regulating mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1. It is reported that mice lacking Tsc1 gene in oocytes show depletion of primordial follicles, resulting in premature ovarian failure and subsequent infertility. A recent study indicated that deletion of Tsc1 in somatic cells of the reproductive tract caused infertility of female mice. However, it is not known whether specific disruption of Tsc1 in granulosa cells influences the reproductive activity of female mice. To clarify this problem, we mated Tsc1(flox/flox mice with transgenic mice strain expressing cyp19-cre which exclusively expresses in granulosa cells of the ovary. Our results demonstrated that Tsc1(flox/flox; cyp19-cre mutant mice were fertile, ovulating more oocytes and giving birth to more pups than control Tsc1(flox/flox mice. Progressive accumulation of corpora lutea occurred in the Tsc1(flox/flox; cyp19-cre mutant mice with advanced age. These phenotypes could be explained by the elevated activity of mTORC1, as indicated by increased phosphorylation of rpS6, a substrate of S6 in the Tsc1(flox/flox; cyp19-cre mutant granulosa cells. In addition, rapamycin, a specific mTORC1 inhibitor, effectively rescued the phenotype caused by increased mTORC1 activity in the Tsc1(cko ovaries. Our data suggest that conditional knockout of Tsc1 in granulosa cells promotes reproductive activity in mice.

  12. Regulation of mTOR activity in Snell dwarf and GH receptor gene-disrupted mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominick, Graham; Berryman, Darlene E; List, Edward O; Kopchick, John J; Li, Xinna; Miller, Richard A; Garcia, Gonzalo G

    2015-02-01

    The involvement of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in lifespan control in invertebrates, calorie-restricted rodents, and extension of mouse lifespan by rapamycin have prompted speculation that diminished mTOR function may contribute to mammalian longevity in several settings. We show here that mTOR complex-1 (mTORC1) activity is indeed lower in liver, muscle, heart, and kidney tissue of Snell dwarf and global GH receptor (GHR) gene-disrupted mice (GHR-/-), consistent with previous studies. Surprisingly, activity of mTORC2 is higher in fasted Snell and GHR-/- than in littermate controls in all 4 tissues tested. Resupply of food enhanced mTORC1 activity in both controls and long-lived mutant mice but diminished mTORC2 activity only in the long-lived mice. Mice in which GHR has been disrupted only in the liver do not show extended lifespan and also fail to show the decline in mTORC1 and increase in mTORC2 seen in mice with global loss of GHR. The data suggest that the antiaging effects in the Snell dwarf and GHR-/- mice are accompanied by both a decline in mTORC1 in multiple organs and an increase in fasting levels of mTORC2. Neither the lifespan nor mTOR effects appear to be mediated by direct GH effects on liver or by the decline in plasma IGF-I, a shared trait in both global and liver-specific GHR-/- mice. Our data suggest that a more complex pattern of hormonal effects and intertissue interactions may be responsible for regulating both lifespan and mTORC2 function in these mouse models of delayed aging.

  13. Topical application of rapamycin ointment ameliorates Dermatophagoides farina body extract-induced atopic dermatitis in NC/Nga mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fei; Tanaka, Mari; Wataya-Kaneda, Mari; Yang, Lingli; Nakamura, Ayumi; Matsumoto, Shoji; Attia, Mostafa; Murota, Hiroyuki; Katayama, Ichiro

    2014-08-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD), a chronic inflammatory skin disease characterized by relapsing eczema and intense prurigo, requires effective and safe pharmacological therapy. Recently, rapamycin, an mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) inhibitor, has been reported to play a critical role in immune responses and has emerged as an effective immunosuppressive drug. In this study, we assessed whether inhibition of mTOR signalling could suppress dermatitis in mice. Rapamycin was topically applied to inflamed skin in a murine AD model that was developed by repeated topical application of Dermatophagoides farina body (Dfb) extract antigen twice weekly for 7 weeks in NC/Nga mice. The efficacy of topical rapamycin treatment was evaluated immunologically and serologically. Topical application of rapamycin reduced inflammatory cell infiltration in the dermis, alleviated the increase of serum IgE levels and resulted in a significant reduction in clinical skin condition score and marked improvement of histological findings. In addition, increased mTOR phosphorylation in the lesional skin was observed in our murine AD model. Topical application of rapamycin ointment inhibited Dfb antigen-induced dermatitis in NC/Nga mice, promising a new therapy for atopic dermatitis. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Rapamycin Eye Drops Suppress Lacrimal Gland Inflammation In a Murine Model of Sjögren's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Mihir; Edman, Maria C.; Reddy Janga, Srikanth; Yarber, Frances; Meng, Zhen; Klinngam, Wannita; Bushman, Jonathan; Ma, Tao; Liu, Siyu; Louie, Stan; Mehta, Arjun; Ding, Chuanqing; MacKay, J. Andrew; Hamm-Alvarez, Sarah F.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the efficacy of topical rapamycin in treating autoimmune dacryoadenitis in a mouse model of Sjögren's syndrome. Methods We developed rapamycin in a poly(ethylene glycol)-distearoyl phosphatidylethanolamine (PEG-DSPE) micelle formulation to maintain solubility. Rapamycin or PEG-DSPE eye drops (vehicle) were administered in a well-established Sjögren's syndrome disease model, the male nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice, twice daily for 12 weeks starting at 8 weeks of age. Mouse tear fluid was collected and tear Cathepsin S, a putative tear biomarker for Sjögren's syndrome, was measured. Lacrimal glands were retrieved for histological evaluation, and quantitative real-time PCR of genes associated with Sjögren's syndrome pathogenesis. Tear secretion was measured using phenol red threads, and corneal fluorescein staining was used to assess corneal integrity. Results Lymphocytic infiltration of lacrimal glands from rapamycin-treated mice was significantly (P = 0.0001) reduced by 3.8-fold relative to vehicle-treated mice after 12 weeks of treatment. Rapamycin, but not vehicle, treatment increased tear secretion and decreased corneal fluorescein staining after 12 weeks. In rapamycin-treated mice, Cathepsin S activity was significantly reduced by 3.75-fold in tears (P eye. PMID:28122086

  15. Low-Dose Rapamycin Treatment Increases the Ability of Human Regulatory T Cells to Inhibit Transplant Arteriosclerosis In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hester, J; Schiopu, A; Nadig, S N; Wood, K J

    2012-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Treg) are currently being tested in clinical trials as a potential therapy in cell and solid organ transplantation. The immunosuppressive drug rapamycin has been shown to preferentially promote Treg expansion. Here, we hypothesized that adjunctive rapamycin therapy might potentiate the ability of ex vivo expanded human Treg to inhibit vascular allograft rejection in a humanized mouse model of arterial transplantation. We studied the influence of combined treatment with low-dose rapamycin and subtherapeutic Treg numbers on the development of transplant arteriosclerosis (TA) in human arterial grafts transplanted into immunodeficient BALB/cRag2−/−Il2rg−/− mice reconstituted with allogeneic human peripheral blood mononuclear cell. In addition, we assessed the effects of the treatment on the proliferation and apoptosis of naïve/effector T cells. The combined therapy efficiently suppressed T-cell proliferation in vivo and in vitro. Neointima formation in the human arterial allografts was potently inhibited compared with each treatment alone. Interestingly, CD4+ but not CD8+ T lymphocytes were sensitive to Treg and rapamycin-induced apoptosis in vitro. Our data support the concept that rapamycin can be used as an adjunctive therapy to improve efficacy of Treg-based immunosuppressive protocols in clinical practice. By inhibiting TA, Treg and rapamycin may prevent chronic transplant dysfunction and improve long-term allograft survival PMID:22500984

  16. Addition of rapamycin to anti-CD3 antibody improves long-term glycaemia control in diabetic NOD mice.

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    Shira Perl

    Full Text Available Non-Fc-binding Anti CD3 antibody has proven successful in reverting diabetes in the non-obese diabetes mouse model of type 1 diabetes and limited efficacy has been observed in human clinical trials. We hypothesized that addition of rapamycin, an mTOR inhibitor capable of inducing operational tolerance in allogeneic bone marrow transplantation, would result in improved diabetes reversal rates and overall glycemia.Seventy hyperglycemic non-obese diabetic mice were randomized to either a single injection of anti CD3 alone or a single injection of anti CD3 followed by 14 days of intra-peritoneal rapamycin. Mice were monitored for hyperglycemia and metabolic control.Mice treated with the combination of anti CD3 and rapamycin had similar rates of diabetes reversal compared to anti CD3 alone (25/35 vs. 22/35. Mice treated with anti CD3 plus rapamycin had a significant improvement in glycemia control as exhibited by lower blood glucose levels in response to an intra-peritoneal glucose challenge; average peak blood glucose levels 30 min post intra-peritoneal injection of 2 gr/kg glucose were 6.9 mmol/L in the anti CD3 plus rapamycin group vs. 10 mmo/L in the anti CD3 alone (P<0.05.The addition of rapamycin to anti CD3 results in significant improvement in glycaemia control in diabetic NOD mice.

  17. Progeroid syndrome patients with ZMPSTE24 deficiency could benefit when treated with rapamycin and dimethylsulfoxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinci, Baris; Sankella, Shireesha; Gilpin, Christopher; Ozono, Keiichi; Garg, Abhimanyu; Agarwal, Anil K.

    2017-01-01

    Patients with progeroid syndromes such as mandibuloacral dysplasia, type B (MADB) and restrictive dermopathy (RD) harbor mutations in zinc metalloproteinase (ZMPSTE24), an enzyme essential for posttranslational proteolysis of prelamin A to form mature lamin A. Dermal fibroblasts from these patients show increased nuclear dysmorphology and reduced proliferation; however, the efficacy of various pharmacological agents in reversing these cellular phenotypes remains unknown. In this study, fibroblasts from MADB patients exhibited marked nuclear abnormalities and reduced proliferation that improved upon treatment with rapamycin and dimethylsulfoxide but not with other agents, including farnesyl transferase inhibitors. Surprisingly, fibroblasts from an RD patient with a homozygous null mutation in ZMPSTE24, resulting in exclusive accumulation of prelamin A with no lamin A on immunoblotting of cellular lysate, exhibited few nuclear abnormalities and near-normal cellular proliferation. An unbiased proteomic analysis of the cellular lysate from RD fibroblasts revealed a lack of processing of vimentin, a cytoskeletal protein. Interestingly, the assembly of the vimentin microfibrils in MADB fibroblasts improved with rapamycin and dimethylsulfoxide. We conclude that rapamycin and dimethylsulfoxide are beneficial for improving nuclear morphology and cell proliferation of MADB fibroblasts. Data from a single RD patient's fibroblasts also suggest that prelamin A accumulation by itself might not be detrimental and requires additional alterations at the cellular level to manifest the phenotype. PMID:28050601

  18. Rapamycin Inhibits ALDH Activity, Resistance to Oxidative Stress, and Metastatic Potential in Murine Osteosarcoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaodong Mu